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Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1891bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1891 




BOSTON: 
ROCKWELL AND ClIUECHILL, CITY PRINTEllS. 

1892. 







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CONTENTS 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



PAGE 

Area of Pavement in Boston. 53 

Barney Dumping-Scow 88 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Division 47 

Brick Sidewalks (ten years), 68 

Brick Tests 60-62 

Bridge Division 46, 47 

Bridge Division Specials 16 

Brighton (Sewers) 103-106 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge ... 48 

Central Office Division 3 

Charlestown (Sewers) 93 

City Proper and Back Bay 

(Sewers) 93-98 

Civil Service Tables 35-42 

Classification of Expenses... 49 

Complaints 45 

Conclusion . 135 

Condition of Appropriation . . 49 

Contracts 19-33 

Contract Work (Summary, 

Street-Watering) 73 

Cost of Street-Cleaning 131-133 

Culverts ... 109, 110 

Day-Work (Street-Watering), 72 
Difficulties encountered 

(Street-Cleaning) 128-130 

Distribution of Carts (Street- 
Watering) ... 74 

Distribution of Pavements . 54-56 
Districts (Street-Cleaning) . . 121, 122 

Dorchester (Sewers) 100 

Draw-Openings 50 

East Boston (Sewers) 92 

Employment of Labor 34 

Engineering Work. 115, 116 

Estimated Cost of Work in 

Boston (Street-Watering) . 84 



PAGE 

Expenses of Central Office. . .45, 46 

Finance 4 

Future Needs of the Division 

(Street-Cleaning) 130 

Future Work of the Division 

(Sewers) 106-109 

General Statement of Appro- 
priations 6, 7 

Grade and Number of Em- 
ployees.. 43, 44 

High Level Intercepting Sew- 
ers 112 

High Level Relief Sewers 112 

Hired Teams (Sanitary) 90 

Introduction 1 

Lengths of Streets 52 

Macadamized Streets ....... 56 

Main Drainage Works 112, 115 

Money Expended 1891 (Street- 
Watering) 75 

Monthly Exhibit Sheet(Street- 

Watering) 77 

New Edgestones (ten years) . . 67 
Night-Work (Street-Clean- 
ing) 124 

Ordinance for Street- Water- 
ing 81, 82 

Organization 136 

Paved Areas by Districts 

(Street-Cleaning) 122, 123 

Paving Division 52 

Paving Division Specials 8-14 

Prison-Point Bridge 48 

Property Schedule (Bridges), 50, 51- 

Push-Cart Patrol 125-128 

Recapitulation (Street-Water- 
ing) 76 

Recapitulation of Expenditures 17 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Refuse Materials (Sanitary 

Division) 91 

Removal of Ashes 8'.), 90 

Removal of Offal 85-88 

Roxbury (Sewers) 99 

Sanitary Division 85 

Sewer Diagram 117, 119 

Sewer Division 91 

Sewer Division Specials 15, 16 

South Boston (Sewers) 98 

Special Features in this Year's 

AV^ork in Paving 62, 65 

Statement of Income 17 

Statement of TrafBc over 

Bridges 51 

St. Louis (Street- Watering) . . 82-84 
Stony Brook 110, 111 



PAGE 

Street-Cleaning Division 119 

Street-Watering 69 

Transportation of Prisoners . . 90 
Violation of the City Ordi- 
nance 134 

Water-Posts 85 

Watering in front of Engine- 
houses 79 

Watering in front of Police- 

Stations 80 

Watering in front of School- 
houses 78, 79 

West Boston Bridge 47, 48 

West Roxbury (Sewers) 102 

Work done on Edgestone 
and Sidewalks, etc. (three 
years) &6, 67 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGE 

DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Appropriations and Expendi- 
tures 139, 140 

Bridges of which Boston pays 
a Part of the Cost of Main- 
tenance 163 

Bridges of which Boston sup- 
ports the Part within its 
Limits 162 

Bridges supported by Railroad 

Corporations 163 

Bridges wholly supported by 

Boston 161 

Income 140 

Inland Bridges 152, 156 

Recapitulation (Tide-Water 

Bridges) 151 

Recapitulation (Inland 

Bridges) 157 

Recapitulation 164 

Regular Maintenance Ex- 
penses, North and South 
Yards 158, 159 



PAGE 

Reportof the Deputy Superin- 
tendent of Bridge Division, 137 

Special Appropriations 159-161 

Special Works 138 

Tide-Water Bridges 140, 150 

Appendix Al (Drawtenders' 

Reports) 166, 167 

Appendix A2 (Widths of 

Openings) 168, 169 

Appendix A3 (Width of Tide- 
Water Bridges) 170 

Appendix A4 (Culver'ts) 171-175 

Appendix A4 Supplement (Cul- 
verts built in 1891) 176 

Appendix A5 (Traffic, 6.30 

A.M. to 8 A.M.) 177 

Appendix A6 (Traffic, 12 M. 

to 1 P.M.) 177 

Appendix A7 (Traffic, 5.30 
P.M. to 7 P.M.) 178 

Appendix AlO (Vessels pass- 
thro ugh drawbridges).. 178 



CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
PAVING DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Detail of Work and Expenses, 

238-293 

Executions of Court 194 

Expenditures 194 

Expenditures under Special 

Appropriations . 234-237 

Financial Statement 191 

Grade Damages 195 

Income 192 

New Brick Sidewalks 296 

New Edgestone 293-296 

Official Duties 181 

Permits 184 



Property 298 

Removal of Snow 233 

Schedule of Maintenance Ex- 
penses 196-226 

Sprinkling Streets 227-233 

Streets Discontinued 189 

Streets Laid Out 186 

Streets Relocated 189 

Streets Widened 189 

Table of Expenses Classified . . 193 
Tools, Horses, Carts, etc. ..300, 301 
Yearly Expenditures 179 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Cost of Blacksmithing, Carts, 

etc 307 

Conveyance of Prisoners .... 309 
Distribution of Hay and Grain, 

310-312 

Dumping-Boats 308 

Hired Teams 308 

Horse Account 313 



House-Dirt and Ashes 

House-Offal 

Material collected, and Dispo- 
sition of same 

Material collected in 10 Years, 

Schedule of City Property. . . 

Total Cost for Removal of 
House-Dirt, etc 



PAGE 

318 
312 

806 
309 
314 

305 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWER 

DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Decision of Supreme Court . . 316 

Fall of Rain and Snow 351 

Financial Statement 320-325 

General Matter 315-319 

Property 354 

Pumping-Station Record..... 353 
Schedule of Sewers built to Date, 350 



PAGE 

Schedule of Tools and Stock. 352 
Sewers and Culverts built 

(Classified by Districts) . .326-349 

Sludge removed 354 

Specials 355-368 

Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion 350 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET- 
CLEANING . DIVISION. 



Cleaning Gutters, Crossings, 
and Sidewalks (Cost by Dis- 
tricts) 370, 871 

Cleaning Streets (Cost by Dis- 
tricts) 370 

Complaints 375 

Cost of maintaining Dumps . . 371 
Cost of Removal of Snow. ... 371 
Financial Statement 369-374 



PAGE 

Force employed . 375 

General Recapitulation 373, 374 

Income 375 

Inventory of Property 376 

Patrol System 372 

Recapitulation of Expenses . . 372 
Stable and Yard Expenses. .372, 373 

Stock Account 373 

Table of Cost per Mile . ...374,375 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



PAGE 

Bennington-St. Culvert 386 

Berkeley-St. Bridge over the 

B. & A. R.R 382 

Chelsea Bridge, North, Fender- 
Guard 383 

Chelsea Bridge, North, Steam- 
Power 383 

Contract Work 377 

Cornwall- St. Bridge over 

Stony Brook Channel 383 

Details by Streets 378-381 



PAGE 

384 

384 



Hill-St. Retaining- Wall 

Irvington-St. Footbridge. . . 

Irvington and Yarmouth Sts. 

Retaining-Walls 384 

L-St. Abutment and Bulk- 
head * 385 

Roxbury Canal and Sea-Wall . 385 

Report of Engineering Depart- 
ment 377-386 

Stony Brook Improvement . . . 385 



APPENDIX G. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 

1891 387 

Commissioners of Cambridge 

Bridges before 1891 391 

Health Department before 

1891 390 



Paving Department before 

1891 387, 388 

Sewer Department before 

1891 389 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Fort Hill Dumping- Wharf 84 

Dumping-Scow Loaded, going to Sea , . 86 

Dumping-Scow Unloading 88 

Chart of Dumping-Stations , 90 

Dorchester Brook Sewer 98 

Roslindale Main Sewer — Excavating-Machine 102 

Oakland-Street Culvert (as rebuilt) , Brighton 108 

Faneuil-Street Sewer Culvert (to be built) , Brighton 108 

Stony Brook Gate-House (exterior) 110 

" " " (interior) 110 

Sewer Diagram 118 

Push-Cart Patrol Service 126 

Stony Brook Improvement (Roslindale) 384 



Street Department, City Hall, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 1892. 

Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
first annual report of the operations and expenses of the 
Street Department for the year 1891 is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

In accordance with a recommendation made by you in 
your inaugural address, Jan. 5, 1891, in regard to the con- 
solidation of certain of the departments having to do with 
work directly connected with the streets of the city, an 
ordinance to amend Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1890 was passed by the Board of Aldermen on March 2, 
1891. The ordinance provided that " the Street Department 
shall be under the charge of the Superintendent of Streets, 
who shall construct all highways and sewers ; shall have 
charge of and keep the highways, the pumping-station, and 
reservoirs of the improved sewerage system, all sewers under 
the control of the city, and the catch-basins in the streets 
connected with the sewers, clean and in good condition and 
repair ; shall remove all ashes accumulated from the burning 
of materials for heating buildings and for domestic purposes, 
all house dirt, house otfal, and all noxious and refuse sub- 
stances from the yards and areas, where so placed as to be 
easily removed ; shall have the care of the city teams and city 
stables, and of all property acquired for carrying out said 
purposes, and shall keep the same in good condition and 
repair ; shall purchase all fuel and other supplies required 
for said purposes, and shall within the appropriation for 
officers and subordinates appoint all necessary deputy super- 
intendents, chiefs of divisions, and other subordinates, said 
deputies and chiefs to be approved by the Mayor ; shall have 
the care and management of all bridges which are used as 
highways and are in whole or in part under the charge of the 
city, and of so much of Harvard bridge and of Prison-point 
bridge as are under the charge of the Board of Aldermen ; 
shall be the commissioner to act with another couunissioner 
for the city of Cambridge, and shall have and exercise all the 
powers in relation to West Boston and Craigie's bridges con- 
ferred by Chapter 302 of the Acts of the year 1870; shall 



2 City Docu:ment No. 3 (5. 

ninke all repairs aHectins the strength of bridires, and keep 
the rails and planks in good order, and all dirt, snow, and 
ice removed from the sidewalk, and keep all bridges, draws, 
and wharves thereof clean and in good condition and rei)air, 
and shall appoint all draw-tenders ; shall place and maintain 
all street signs and number all buildings ; shall issue all 
permits to open, occupy, or obstruct streets for various pur- 
])oses ; permits to licensed drain-la3^ers to enter particular 
drains into the i)ub!ic sewers ; permits to open, occupy, and 
use portions of the street for coal-holes and vaults ; permits 
to raise and lower goods and safes ; permits to building- 
movers ; permits to open and occupy portions of the street 
for the purpose of laying wires, railway tracks, pipes or 
conduits ; and permits to place and maintain poles for the 
snpi)ort of wires." 

In general, the Superintendent of Streets is charged with 
seeino; that all statutes, ordinances, and res^ulations relating: 
to the care and use of streets, bridges, and sewers are fully 
observed, and with carrying out all lawful orders of the 
Board of Aldermen relating to streets, bridges, and sewers. 
The ordinance relating to the duties of the Superintendent 
of Streets was still further amended on Dec. 15, 1891, by a 
clause obliging him to keep the streets properly watered. 

The before-mentioned duties were, previous to the pas- 
sage of this ordinance, performed by the Superintendent of 
Streets, the Superintendent of Sewers, the Superintendent 
of Sanitary Police, the Superintendent of Bridges, and the 
Commissioner of Cambridge Bridges, all of which offices 
were abolished in the ordinance, and the departments under 
their control consolidated into the Street Department. 

In order to systematize the work of the Street Depart- 
ment, the following divisions have been made : 

Central Office. 
Paving Division. 
Sewer Division. 
Sanitary Division. 
Street-cleanino^ Division. 
Bridge Division. 
Cambrid2:e Bridc^es Division. 

Each of these divisions, with the exception of the Central 
Office and the Cambridge Bridges Divisions, is in charge of 
a deputy superintendent. 



Street Department, 



Central Office Division. 

The Central Office Division takes charge of all work of 
a general nature, such as correspondence, purchasing of 
supplies, attending to complaints, execution of contracts, 
keeping the records returned from the various divisions, and 
all financial accounts, monthly returns of force accounts, 
monthly statements of accumulated expenses for reports to 
the Mayor, and all legal transactions affecting the depart- 
ment, giving due notice of the same to parties affected 
thereby ; and, in general, acts as headquarters from which 
the operations of the various divisions can be directed. 

To this office the various deputies in charge of the 
divisions report daily, so that the work in all divisions shall 
move along harmoniously, and without duplication of labor 
and expense. 

The supplies of the department are all obtained through a 
purchasing agent, instead of through the head clerks of the 
different divisions, as was formerly the case before the de- 
partments were consolidated. 

Uniformity in quality of materials and the lowest market 
rates are thus obtained. 

Blank forms are furnished to the foremen in the different 
yards, on which are entered by them memoranda of 
materials needed and the object thereof, and this form is 
returned to the chief clerk of the division, who enters the 
same in a warrant book, the stubs of which are numbered 
consecutively. 

This warrant, approved by the deputy superintendent of 
the division, is then sent direct to the purchasing agent, 
who issues in return the requisition on the parties with 
whom he holds contracts for furnishing materials. 

The numbers of Avarrants and requisitions are made to 
correspond, so that upon the return of the bills, certified as 
to quantity and quality (delivered by the foreman receiving 
the same), they are easily identified and vouched for by the 
purchasing agent before being entered upon the schedule for 
payment. 

This complete system of warrants and requisitions for 
supplies allows the purchasing agent to have a check on 
their price and delivery, and also on the purchase of an ex- 
cessive amount of stock at a given time. 

Specifications have been prepared for the purchasing of 
all large supplies which are bought by contract after public 
advertisement. 

During the year the Corporation Counsel has rendered 77 



4 City Document No. 36. 

legal opinions, of which number 37 relate to matters per- 
taining to the Paving Division, 32 to the Sewer Division, 
3 to the Bridge Division, and 5 to miscellaneous matters. 

Finance. 

Books are kept at the Central Office which show the 
objects and amounts of the various appropriations and 
balances from month to month. The following detailed 
statement shows the various appropriations and amount ex- 
pended for maintenance for four months ending May 1, 1891, 
and for the nine months ending Jan. 31, 1892. 

This division of the financial accounts is made necessary 
by the change in the financial year. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



STREET DEPARTMEIN^T APPROPRIATION 



JANUARY 1, 1891, TO JANUARY 31, 1892, 
INCLUSIVE. 



CiTv Docujnient No. 36. 



Appkopriations. 



Street Department, now Pacing 
Division 



Sewer Department, now Sewer 
Division 



Sanitary Police Department, now 
Sanitary Division 



Bridge Department, now Bridge 
Division 



Cambridge Bridge Department, 
now Cambridge Bridges Di- 
vision 



Balance on 

hand 
Jan. 1, 1892. 



$45,211 81 

S4,748 24 

151,562 44 

23,572 99 

E 1,543 48 



Revenue 

and 
Loans. 



1 $179,124 27 

2 40,892 05 

s 27,212 16 

< 1,201 10 



Total 
Credits. 



$224,336 08 

75,640 29 

178,774 60 

24,774 

1,543 48 



Expendi- 
tures for the 
four months 
ending 
April 30, 
1891. 



$224,336 08 
75,397 41 

178,774 60 
24,774 09 

1,543 48 



$242 88 



Total $256,638 96 $248,429 58 $505,068 54 $504,825 66 $242 88 



1 Transferred from Causeway street $3,000 00 

Loan 183,000 00 

Transferred from Cambridge Bridges 5,494 30 



Transferred to Commonwealth avenue 

" " Sewer Division 

" " Sanitary " 

" *' Bridge " 



$44 93 
8,411 84 
2,712 16 
1,201 10 



* Loan 

Revenue 

Transferred from Street De- 
partment 



$191,494 30 

12,370 03 

$179,124 27 

32,000 00 * Transferred from Street De- 

480 21 partment $1,20110 

8,411 84 



$40,892 05 

SLoan $24,500 00 

Transferred from Street De- 
partment 2,712 16 

$27,212 16 



' Original balance 

Transferred to Street Depart- 
ment ' 



$7,037 78 

5,494 30 

$1,543 48 



Street Department. 











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City Document No. 3(3. 



Paving Division Specials. 



Object op Appropriation. 



A St., Broadway to First st 

Albany st 

Aldie 8t 

Allandale st 

Ashfiild st 

Ashmont st., Dorchester ave. to Washington st. 

Atlantic ave 

Austin st... 

Atl.intic St., Thomas Park to Fourth st 

Baker st 

Baldwin St., Ward 4 

Ballard st , . 

Battery march st 

Bi-acon St., -west from Charles st 

Beacon St., West Chester Tark to Arlington st 

Bedford St., Chauncy to Columbia st 

Board alley 

Boat-landing, Commercial wharf 

Bolton street. Second to D st 

Boylston St., Church to Arlington st 

Bristol st 

Brookline St., Shawmut ave. to Treraont st,. . . . 

Bunker Hill St., Elm to Sackville st. 

Bushnell st 

Button wood st 

Cabot st 

Caldwell si 

Cambridge st.. Wards 9 and 10 

Camden st., Tremont st. to O. C. R.R 

Canton st., Shawmut ave. to Tremont st 

Centre St., Pynchon to New Heath st 

Centre St., Ward 23 

Chambers St., Charlestown 

Charles st 

Chestnut ave.. Ward 9, paving 

Carried forward 



Appropri- 
ations. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31,1892. 



$12,000 00 

21,107 49 
1,000 00 
6,000 00 
1,000 00 
5,400 00 
3,492 76 
8,700 00 
1,543 02 
2,500 00 
3,307 26 
1,000 00 
3,200 00 

35,350 00 
6,000 00 
4,100 00 
469 50 
1,000 00 
1,767 00 
8,000 00 
2,579 71 
531 10 
4,C00 00 
2,917 00 
3,500 00 

16,000 00 
1,568 52 

23,775 29 
7,500 00 
1,000 00 
3,000 00 
1,261 14 
634 35 

28,224 71 
660 00 



$12,000 00 
21,107 49 
1,000 00 
4,729 41 
1,000 00 
5,400 00 
3,492 76 
8,700 00 
1,543 02 
2,500 00 



1,000 00 
3,200 00 
35,350 00 
4,825 38 
4,100 00 
469 50 



64 50 

49 00 

531 10 

4,000 00 

2,917 00 

2,013 30 

16,000 00 

1,568 52 

23,775 29 

7,500 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 



634 35 

16,578 66 



$224,078 85 $190,049 28 $34,029 57 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1892. 



$1,270 59 



3,307 26 



1,174 62 



,<X)0 00 
,767 00 
,935 50 
,530 71 



1,261 14 



,646 05 
650 00 



Street Department. 



Paving" Division Specials. — Continved. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1892. 



Brought forward. 

Childs 8t 

Cleveland pi 

Cliff St 

Columbus ave 



Commonwealth ave., "West Chester park to 
Arlington st 



Concord sq 

Cool: St. 

Cornell st 

Cornwall St., laying out and constructing 

Call St., laying out and constructing 

D St., First to Third st 

Dartmouth st., Tremont st. to Columbus ave. 

Dearborn st., Eustis to Dudley st 

Dorchester st., Eighth st. to Dorchester ave.. . 

Dorset St., Dorchester ave. to Boston st 

Dover St., Harrison ave. to Albany st 

Dudley St., to Norfolk House 

Dudley St., "Washington to "Vine st 

Dudley st.. Blue Hill ave. to Shirley st 

Dupont st 

Eagle sq 

East Fifth st., L to N st 

East First St., H to K st 

E St., Third to Bolton st. and Third St., 160 ft. 

Ellery St., "Ward 15 

East Concord St., Harrison ave. to Albany st. . 
East Newton St., Harrison ave. to Albany st.. 

Edgeworth st 

EUwood st 

Emerson St., U to I st 

Emerald st 

Exeter st 

First St., "West 

First St., "Ward 14 



Carried forward $410,229 56 $345,793 27 $64,436 29 



$224,078 85 

2,500 00 

1,000 00 

2,169 72 

39,000 00 

2,000 00 

72 40 

700 00 

4,300 00 

6,405 86 

3,096 45 

5,000 00 

568 10 

2,066 91 

22,000 00 
5,000 no 
6,715 00 
5,000 00 

33,899 36 
7,600 64 
524 00 
1,000 00 
3,244 91 
1,C00 00 
3,000 00 
1,780 39 
4,500 00 
3,554 36 
400 00 
1,251 06 
5,000 00 
1,574 98 
316 50 
5,200 00 
4,710 07 



$190,049 28 



1,000 00 

2,169 72 

39,000 00 

603 90 
72 40 

700 00 
4,300 00 
5,405 86 
3,096^45 



568 10 



21,613 91 
5,000 00 
6,715 00 
5,000 00 

33,177 75 



...524 00 
1,000 00 



1,000 00 
3,000 00 



4,500 00 
3,554 36 

400 00 
1,251 06 
5,000 00 
1,574 98 

316 50 
5,200 00 



$34,029 57 
2,500 00 



1,396 10 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

2,066 91 
386 09 



721 61 
7,600 64 



3,244 91 



1,780 39 



4,710 07 



10 



City Docuiment No. 36. 



Paving' Division Specials. — Continued. 



Object or Appropriation. 



Brought forward 

First St., E toF St ... 

First St., D to F St 

First St.. N. Y. & N. E. R.R. to F st 

Falcon st 

Fourtli St., G to H st 

Forbes st 

Fulda st 

Fulton St., Richmond to Lewis st 

Genesee st 

Geneva ave 

Goldsmith st 

Granite ave 

Green St., Charlestown 

Gustin st 

Hampshire st 

Harrison ave., Canton to Sharon st 

Harrison ave., E. Concord to E. Chester park 
Harrison ave., E. Lenox to Northami^ton st. .. 

Harrison ave., Kneeland to Bennett st 

Han'ard St., Washington to Albany st 

Harvest st., Boston st. to Dorchester ave 

Haskins st 

Haviland st 

Heath St., widening, etc 

Henley st 

High St., Winthrop to Walker st. 

Hill st 

Hobart st 

Hollis st 

Howland st 

Hudson st _ 

Humboldt ave., grading 

Hunneman st 

Horace and Homer sts 

Humboldt ave., grade damages 



Appropria- 
tions. 



E.xpended 
Jan. 1,1891,10 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Carried forward 



$410,229 56 

4,000 00 

2,289 93 

25,000 00 

5,667 00 

1,104 35 

2,020 75 

830 28 

7,230 42 

3,500 00 

13,000 00 

1,000 00 

10,000 00 

460 46 

1,700 00 

1,000 00 

4,000 00 

- 1,500 00 

3,000 00 

3,900 00 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 

2,809 79 

541 98 

17,167 00 

3,847 52 

2,125 13 

4,138 07 

2,000 00 

3,087 02 

4,000 00 

21,000 00 

16,025 27 

14,000 00 

1,169 26 

1,815 00 



$345,793 27 
4,000 00 
2,289 93 

25,000 00 
3,380 40 
1,104 35 
2,020 75 
324 75 
7,230 42 
3,500 00 
6,249 79 
1,000 00 

10,000 00 
460 46 
1,700 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
1,500 00 
3,000 00 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1892. 



$64,436 29 



2,286 60 



77 78 
4,000 00 
2,809 79 



2,768 33 
3,847 52 
2,125 13 
4,138 07 
2,000 00 
3,087 02 
4,000 00 
20,113 68 
16,025 27 
82 SO 



,158 79 $488,629 61 $120,529 28 



6,750 21 



3,900 00 
9,922 22 



541 98 
14,398 67 



13,917 20 
1,169 26 
1,815 00 



Street Department. 



n 



Paving- Division Specials. — Continued. 



Object of Appeopbiation. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891. to 
Jan. 31, 1892 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1892. 



Carried forward 

Island St 

Jeffries and Marginal sts 

K St., Broadway to First st 

K St., Fourth to Eighth sts 

Kingston st.. Summer to Essex sts 

Lake st 

L st 

Lenox st 

Lincoln st 

Longwood ave., Parker to Huntington ave. . . 

Lucas st 

Lynde st 

Magazine St., E. Chester park to Norfolk ave. 

Magnolia st 

Maiden st 

Matthews st 

Maynard st .-. . . 

Medford St., Lexington to Chelsea st 

Mercer St., Dorchester to Eighth st 

Minot st 

Monument court , 

Monument st 

Moon st 

Moreland st., from Fairland st , 

Mt. Vernon St., Ward 25 

Murdock st. 

National st 

Neponset ave 

Newman st., Mercer to Dorchester st 

Ninth St., Old Harbor to N st 

Oakst 

Ocean st 

Oneida st 

Oswego st 

Park st 



Carried forward 



$609,158 79 

25 tJO 

5,000 00 

2,000 00 

678 34 

7,715 00 

12,000 00 

30,440 00 
5,474 41 
2,300 00 

23,000 00 
308 22 
2,000 00 
2,500 00 
4,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,560 25 
2,000 00 

28,200 00 
2,000 00 

10,000 00 
497 48 
1,866 87 
3,519 34 
2,000 00 
2,125 00 
2,000 00 
1,500 00 

12,000 00 
1,198 26 

12,654 37 
1,000 00 

10,100 00 
3,300 00 
3,668 67 
2,115 43 



$488,629 51 

25 60 

5,000 00 

678 34 
7,715 00 

12,000 00 

21,098 97 
5,474 41 
2,300 00 

22,592 12 
308 22 
1,603 79 
925 80 
4,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,560 25 
2,000 00 

21,505 36 
1,054 98 
8,440 37 
497 48 
1,866 87 
3,519 34 
2,000 00 
2,125 00 
1,006 06 
1,500 00 

12,000 00 
1,198 26 
6,117 66 
1,000 00 

10,100 00 
3,300 00 
3,668 67 
2,115 43 



$818,906 03 $667,927 49 $150,978 54 



$120,529 28 



2,000 00 



9,341 03 



396 21 
1,574 20 



6,694 64 

945 02 

1,559 63 



6,536 71 



12 



City Document No. 36. 



Paving Division Specials. 



Continued. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Appropria- 
tione. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
.31, 1892. 



Brought fomcard 

Parker st 

Parker st., Huntington ave. to Westland ave 

Parkman st., Ward 9 

Pan 1 st 

Pemberton sq 

Preble st., Dorchester ave. to Vinton st 

Prentiss st 

Prospect ave 

Q st 

Randolph st 

Resurfacing streets, Wards 17 and 18 , 

Richmond st 

Rochester st 

Rogers st., Dorchester st. to Preble st 

Rutherford ave., macadamizing 

Rutherford ave., paving 

Rutland square 

Salem st., Charlestown 

Savin Hill ave 

Scotia, Cambria, and Bothnia sts 

Second at., K to M st 

Second st., E to Dorchester st 

Second at.. Granite St., easterly 

Second St., grading, etc 

Seneca st 

Seventh st., D to B st 

Sheds, Medford-st. Tard 

Shirley st 

Short St., Charlestown 

Short St., West Roxbury 

Silver St., A to D st 

Sixth St., B to Cat 

Sixth St., H to I st 

Soley st 

Stillman st 

Carried forward 



$818,906 03 

35,000 00 

1,000 00 

453 80 

844 38 
1,584 57 
5,800 00 
4,000 00 

500 00 

399 85 
6,000 00 
5,777 31 
1,400 00 
4,360 64 
1,000 00 

100 00 
13,538 23 

114 10 

1,000 00 

3,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,422 21 

20,000 00 

15,000 00 

1,034 36 

3,241 33 

9,000 00 

2,000 00 

6,750 00 

700 00 
3,500 00 
1,500 00 
3,200 00 
1,621 54 

810 35 
1,500 00 



$667,927 49 

35,000 00 

420 00 

453 80 

844 38 

1,584 57 

5,800 00 

4,000 00 

500 00 

399 85 



$150,978 54 



580 00 



5,777 31 

1,400 00 

4,360 64 

1,000 00 

100 00 

7,841 50 

114 10 

1,000 00 

3,500 00' 

10,000 00 

1,422 21 

20,000 00 

15,000 00 

1,034 36 

3,241 33 

9.000 00 



4,042 66 

700 00 

96 60 

1,090 66 

3,200 00 

1,621 64 

810 35 



6,000 eo 



2,000 00 
2,707 34 



3,403 40 
409 34 



1,500 00 



,203 78 $815,230 13 $173,973 65 



Street Department. 



13 



Paving- Division Specials. — Coniinued. 



Object of Appropriations. 



Brought forward 

Story at 

Stoughton St., Harrison ave. to Albany et 

Bun-court Bt 

Sycamore and Kidge sts 

Symmes st 

Stanhope st.. 

Smith Bt 

Terrace pi 

Terrace st.. 

Texas st 

Third st . 

Tremont st., Roxbury crossing to Parker st.. . . 
Tremont st., Roxbury crossing to Huntington ave. . 

Tremont St., Scollay sq. to Boylston st 

Troy st 

Village St. 

Vinton st 

Waltham et 

Ward st 

"Warebam st. 

Warren ave 

Warren st., granite blocks. 

Warren st. and Blue Hill ave 

Warrenton st. 

Washburn st. 

Washington St., Charlesto wn 

Washington et., Hawes ave. to N. Y. & N. E. R.R 

Washington st., etc., Ward 23 

Water at., Charlestown 

Watson st 

Waumbeck st , 

Way st 

Wellst 

Wendell st 

West Chester park 



Appropria- 
tions. 



$989,203 78 

2,645 08 

3,000 00 

1,388 32 

3,700 00 

1,000 00 

1,683 50 

639 60 

850 00 

25,695 54 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

10 50 

2,304 46 

52,000 00 

8,100 00 

2,200 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

675 72 

13,024 62 

254 40 

20,000 00 

5,000 00 

6,871 64 

3,043 89 

2,000 00 

500 00 

11,953 19 

540 70 

1,498 65 

2,000 00 

8,179 80 

1,800 00 

2,520 06 

15,647 63 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



$815,230 13 
1,946 78 
3,000 00 
1,388 32 
3,700 00 
1,000 00 



Balance ou 

hand Jan. 

1, 1892. 



639 60 

850 00 

25,218 34 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

10 50 




6,621 08 

3,043 89 

2,000 00 

600 00 

11,953 19 

540 70 

1,498 65 

2,000 00 

1,800 00 
2.520 06 



$173,973 65 
698 30 



1,683 50 



477 20 



2,304 46 



1,000 00 



2,918 25 

6,000 00 

250 66 



8,179 80 



15,647 63 



Carried forward $1,195,354 02 



$983,918 97 $211,436 05 



14 



City Document No. 36. 



Paving Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Ob.tect of ApPROPI!IATI0N. 



Brought forward 

West Chester park and square 

■^Vest Dedham st 

West Newton et., Tremont st. to Columbus ave.. . 
West ]S"ewton st., Tremont st. to Shawmut ave. . . 

West Second st 

Wharf st 

Total 



Appropria- 
tions. 



$1,195,354 02 
2,563 02 
4,500 00 
12,000 00 
6,000 00 
135 49 
1,861 03 



$1,219,850 54 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



$983,918 97 
2,568 02 
4,500 00 
12,000 00 
6,000 00 
135 49 
1,861 03 



$1,008,415 40 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

1, 1892. 



$211,435 05 



$211,435 05 



Stueet Departmknt. 



15 



Sewer Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Arlington st 

Border st 

Burnett et 

Beacon st. and Commonwealth ave 

Brighton 

Byron st 

" " outlet 

Brookline ave., improved sewerage connection 

Cambridge st 

Catch-basins, Huntington ave 

" " Wards 19 and 22 

" " Stanhope st 

Charlestown sewers, repairing 

Cleveland pi • 

Crawford st., Humboldt ave. to Walnut ave. . . 

Culverts, Ward 24 

Commonwealth ave 

Cottage St., outlet extension 

D St., outlet 

Dike, Winthrop Junction 

Dunstable st • . • ■ 

Dustin st 

Dorchester brook, rebuilding 

East Boston 

Eleventh aldermanic district 

Falcon st. 

Florence st 

Harcourt st 

Hillside st 

Harvard and Kilton sts 

Homer st 

Lawrence ave., Quincy and Magnolia eta 

Milton st 

New st 

Oak st 

Orient Heights 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Carried forward. 



$2,107 69 
1,108 91 
715 55 
18,800 00 
10,400 00 
934 19 
1,211 83 
4,665 50 
1,500 00 
472 95 
190 21 
227 05 
11,000 00 
157 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
160 50 
10,000 00 
2,350 00 
373 55 
6,000 00 
20,366 02 
5,200 00 
1,046 97 
1,000 00 
1,306 60 
432.00 
579 19 
12,000 00 
1,250 00 
6,000 00 
865 31 
450 00 
3,600 00 
29,650 00 



$1,970 06 
1,108 91 

715 55 

10,387 82 

3,673 30 

934 19 
1,208 19 

131 55 
1,500 00 

454 34 

190 21 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1892. 



8,968 71 
157 00 
2,030 80 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
160 50 
3,976 17 



373 55 

6,000 00 

20,366 02 

2,925 70 



1,000 00 

1,306 60 

432 00 

679 19 

12,000 00 

1,250 00 

4,143 12 

865 31 

15 29 

3,500 00 

29,585 04 



$167,021 02 $127,909 12 $39,111 90 



$137 63 



8,412 18 
6,726 70 

3 64 
4,633 95 



227 05 
2,031 29 



2,969 20 



6,023 83 
2,350 00 



2,274 30 
1.046 97 



434 71 



64 96 



16 



City Docuivient No. 36. 



Sewer Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1S92. 



Brought forward 

Peter Parley road 

Parker Hill st 

Porter st 

Rockwell and Armandine sts 

Russell st 

Roxbury 

Roslindale and West Roxbury 

Savin Hill district 

South Boston 

Stable and sheds, Brighton 

Summer and Orleans sts 

Stony-brook improvement 

Tyler st 

Walkhill st ■ 

Welles ave 

Washington St., etc., Ward 23 '. 

Westville, Freeman, and Charles sts 
Whitmore st 

Total 



$167,021 02 

395 19 

1,024 00 

12,000 00 

15,000 00 

324 13 

10,220 81 

55,321 26 

21,962 26 

4,000 00 

4,500 00 

13,000 00 

23,082 44 

7,000 00 

1,500 00 

750 00 

2,000 00 

8,000 00 

700 00 



$127,909 12 

370 92 

1,024 00 

12,000 00 

8,800 93 

324 13 

361 38 

47,184 96 

21,678 70 

231 11 



13,000 00 
22,997 30 
7,000 00 
1,500 00 
750 00 
2,000 00 
4,003 36 



$39,111 90 

24 27 



6,199 07 

9,859 43 
8,136 30 
283 56 
3,768 89 
4,500 00 



3,996 6-t 
700 00 



$347,801 11 



$271,135 91 



$76,665 20 



Bridgre Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Berkeley-st. bridge, rebuilding. 
Chelsea bridge, steam apparatus 

Ferdinand-st. bridge 

Irvington-et. bridge 

Milton bridge, repairs 

Savin-Hill ave. bridge, -widening 

Total 



Appropria- 
tions. 



$18,000 00 

12,000 00 

17,427 87 

7,000 00 

2,500 00 

5,000 00 



$61,927 87 



Expended 
Jan. 1,1 891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



$8,496 18 
7,768 45 

15,552 90 
7,000 00 
2,500 00 



$41,317 53 



Balance 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1892. 



$9,503 82 
4,231 55 
1,874 97 



5,000 00 



$20,610 34 



Street Department. 



17 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES 



FOR THE 



Thirteen Months ending Jan. 31, 1892. 





Current Expenses. 


Special Ap- 
propriations. 




Object of Appropriation. 


For the 
four months 
ending April 

30, 1891. 


For the 
nine months 
ending Jan. 

31, 1892. 


Total. 


Street Department : 
Central Office 




$16,050 00 
752,863 94 
370,825 28 
330,567 64 
215,464 92 
98,236 54 
10,322 94 
464 41 




$16,050 00 
1,985,615 51 




$22i,336 08 

75,397 41 

178,774 60 


$1,008,415 49 
271,135 91 






509,342 24 






215 464 92 




24,774 09 
1,543 48 


41,317 53 


164,3-:8 16 

11,866 42 

464 41 


Cambridge Bridges Division . . 
Street Police 












Total 


$504,825 66 


$1,794,795 67 


$1,320,868 93 


$3,620,490 26 





Statement showing the Income of the Department for 
the Year ending January 31, 1892. 

Paving Division 
Sewer Division . 



Sanitary Division 
Bridge Division 
Street-cleaninof Division 



133,777 85 

^24,197 53 

43,148 51 

1,183 40 

941 00 

$103,248 29 



iln addition to the sum of $24,197.53 (the amount of the bills for sewer assessments and 
entrance fees deposited with the City Collector) there remains on the books of the Sewer 
Division the sum of $57,415.46, assessed for the construction of sewers, but not yet deposited 
with the City Collector or collected under the new law, which sum will be drawing interest 
at ofo until paid. 



LIST OF CONTEACTS 



APEIL 1, 1891, TO FEBRUAEY 1, 1892, 



MADE BY THE 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



20 



City Document No. 36. 



Paving- Blocks. 



Size. 



Where Delivered. 



Contractor. 



Date of 
Bid. 



Price per M. 



200,000 Large, Boston wharves . 



300,000 
500.000 

300,000 
200,000 

100,000 
300,000 

300,000 



Small, 



S. &R. J. Lomhard, April 7,1891, 



" " ..Cape Ann Granite 
Co 

Dorchester or So. 

Boston wharves,! S. &R. J. Lombard, 



Large, j Charlestown.. .. 
Boston whai-ves 



Boston , B iirnham's 
wharf 



Boston wharves . . . 



H. Gore& Co 

Cape Ann Granite 
Co 



ilay 8, " 

May 18, " 

May 18, " 

May 26, " 

May 21, " 



Cape Ann Granite 
Co ! June 27, " 



Rockport Granite 
Co 



Rockport Granite 
Co 



July 27, " 



S60.00 ISr.End. 
72.00 S. End. 



$72 95 


48 GO 


78 00 


72 95 


72 95 


72 95 


73 65 



Paving" Brick. 



Amoukt. Where Delivered. 



200,000 
200,000 



Contractor. 



Boston streets Oliver S. Foster 

Boston streets 



New England Steam Brick 
Co 



Date of 
Bid. 



June 15, 1891, 
July 17, " 



Price per M. 



$11 50 
12 50 



North-River Flag-ging-. 



AVhere Delivered. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price per Sq. Ft. 


(Jity 


J.J Cuddihy 


April 6,1891 .. 


$0 52i $0 571 
on wharf, on street. 







Eflg^estone. 



Amount. 


Where Delivered. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price 
per Lin. Ft. 


10,000 lin. ft. 


Boston wharves 


Perkins & White . . 


Julys, 1891 ... 


$0 73 



Street Departjient. 



21 



Spruce Lumber. 



Where Delivered. 



Contractor. 



Date of Bid. 



Price 
per M. 



Price 

for 

Planing. 



Paving District 1, South Boston.. 

" 2, East Boston... 

" 3, Charleatown . . 

" 4, Brighton 

" 5, WestRoxbury. 

" 6, Dorchester... . 

" 7, Roxbnry 

•• 8,9, and 10, City.. 



A.M. Stetson &Co. 

John W. Letherbee. 

*< (( 

G. Fuller & Son .... 

Curtis & Pope 

Otis Eddy 

Curtis & Pope 

A. M. Stetson & Co. 



April 7, 1891 



$15 38 
18 00 
17 75 
17 00 
17 50 
16 90 
16 40 
15 38 



$1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 25 
1 75 
1 50 
1 75 
1 00 



Bank Gravel and Sand. 



"Wheke Delivered. 



Paving District 1, South Boston.. 

" 2, East Boston .. . 

" 3, Charlestown... 

" 4, Brighton 

" 5, West Roxbury 

" 6, Dorchester ... 

" 7, Roxbury 

" 8,9, and 10, City. 



Contractor. 



Frank Hannon 

No bid 

P. O'Riordan. 
Wm. Scollans 
Thos. Minton. 
Owen Nawn.. 



Date of Bid. 



Gravel. 



Sand. 



April 6,1891. 



$1 58 



1 87 
1 39 
1 40 
1 50 
1 40 
1 60 



Loads. 



1 87 
1 96 
1 35 
1 80 
1 60 
1 70 



Beach Gravel. 



Where Delivered. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price per Ton. 


City 


Perkins & White 


April 6, 1891 . 


$0.71 





Coal. 



Where Delivered. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price per 
2,240 Lbs. 


Pumping-station, Dorchester. 


H. G.Jordan & Co 

J. A. Bradford &Co.... 


April 6, 1891 . . 
Sept. 25, 1891.. 


$3 71 
3 73 



22 



City Document No. 36. 



Eng-lne and Boiler, 6 Inch x 12 Inch. 



Where Delivered. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price. 




Miller & Shaw 




$745 00 








660 00 










Wire Rope, Angle, Sliieve, etc. 



Where Delivered. 



Chelsea, South Draw 
" North " 



Contractor. 



Miller & Shaw 



Date of Bid. 



Price. 



$689 00 
1,192 00 



Furnishing Stone to City Crushers. 



Where Deliv'd. 


Crusher. 


Contractor. 


Date of Bid. 


Price. 


Paving District 5, 
West Roxbury .. 

Paving District 7, 
Roxbury 

Paving District 6, 


Washington st... 

Dimock st 

Bird Bt 


James Doonan 

H. P. Nawn 


April 22, 1891.. 

" 22, " .. 
May 7, " .. 

" 9, " .. 


$0.80 double 
load. 

.87 per ton. 
.90 " 


James P. Davern .... 
Wm. L. O'Connell . . 


Paving District 6, 
Dorchester. 


Codman st 


.68 " 



Street Department. 



23 



Excavating and Removing' Material from Roadway. 



Locality. 



Lenox st 

Harrlsou aye 

West Dedham si 

Wareham st 

Emerson st 

Sixth St., B St. to C st 

Kochester st 

Magazine st 

Seventh st 

Cambridge st 

West Newton St., Shawmutave. 
to Tremont st 

Wigglesworth and Worthing- 
tou sts 

Parker st 

Maiden st 

Warren st. 

Rutherford ave 

Prentiss st 

West Newton St., Tremont st. 
to Columbus ave 



Contractor. 



John McCarthy 



J. J. Sullivan . 
M. Donnellan . 

John McCarthy 
Wm. T. Davis. 
M. Donnellan.. 
8. & R. J. Lombard 



J. J.Sullivan. 



Wm. T. Davis 

Edward A. Janse.. 

J. J. Sullivan 

John McCarthy. . . . 
S.&R. J. Lombard 
Edward A. Janse. . 



John Casey 



Date of Bid. 



May 6, ISM 

" 23, " 

June 10, " 

" 20, " 

" 4, " 

" 23, " 

" 23, " 

" 30, " 

July 7, " 

" 15, " 

" 18, " 

Aug. 1, " 

" 8, " 

" 15, " 

Sept. 1, •' 

" 14, " 

Oct. 23, " 



Price. 



Per cu. yds. 
Earth. 



Per sq. yds. 
Paving 
removed. 



$0 STJ 
231 

Cioj 

55 
26 
19| 
23^ 

151 
49 



25 
55 
23i 
19 

15 



27 



24 



City Documkxt No. 30. 



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32 



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34 City Docuiment No. 36. 



Employment of Labor. 

AVith but few exceptions till grades of labor employed in 
the Street Department come under the regulations of the 
civil service, and the names of men employed by the depart- 
ment must be certitied by the Commissioners before employ- 
ment can be given. On the organization of the central office, 
the hiring of labor formerly employed by the several depart- 
ments was taken charge of by the central office, and the duty 
of applying to the Civil Service Commission for men was 
assigned to the correspondence and complaint clerk. Books 
are kept at the central office by means of which the record 
of any one of the 2,200 employees of the department can be 
looked up, and his standing in the civil service and his char- 
acter for industry be investigated. 

The annexed table shows that 142 applications have been 
made on the Civil Service Commission for 419 men for 
various kinds of work. Of the 712 names submitted by the 
Civil Service Commission, 501 men were given employment 
and assigned to the different divisions. Of this number, 61 
were veterans. 

The following table shows in detail the applications made 
to the Civil Service Commission for labor : 



Street Department. 



35 









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36 



City Docu3Ient No. 36. 



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37 



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38 



City Document No. 3(3. 






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39 



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City Document No. 36. 



Number Employed. 
Divisions. 






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Sept. 1,1891.... 
Aug. 24, " 

'• 24, " .... 

" 21. '< 


Sept. 3, " 

Aug. 25, " 

28, " .... 

Sept. 1, " .... 

18, " .... 

" S, " .... 

3, " .... 

12, " .... 

18, " .... 

" 18, " .... 

28, " .... 

26, " .... 


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Street Department. 



41 



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42 



City Document Xo. 36. 



Number Employed. 
Divisions. 


»1 . 


to 




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to 


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— 53 


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p 


Nov. 17,1891.... 

" 16, " .... 
" 24, " .... 
" 25, " .... 
" 27, " .... 
" 24, " .... 
" 23, " .... 
" 25, " .... 
" 28, "... 
" 28, " .... 
" 30, " .... 

Dec. 9, " 

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Street Department. 



43 



Grade and Xumber of Employees in the Street 
Department. 

(^Showing the average force employed during the summer.') 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Central 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street- 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 




1 

1 

2 
2 












1 


Deputy superinteadents 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 
1 


Purchasing agent and assistant, 
Clerks 












2 


5 
11 
23 

6 


6 

8 

13 

22 

3 

5 

3 

5 

17 


4 
4 
10 


1 
11 
12 


1 
3 

4 


19 




37 






62 






28 












3 




1 










6 










3 














5 














17 


Aid 






1 

5 






1 






15 


1 
17 


21 






17 












2 
2 


2 






1 


23 






25 






1 




1 


Carpenters and assistants 




21 


6 
4 




22 


49 






4 












20 
32 


20 














32 








1 






1 








12 


5 


11 


17 






14 


15 


40 






4 




4 








5 
3 






5 














3 






2 


2 






4 












Carried forward 


7 


1 99 


158 


44 


30 


98 


436 



44 City Document No. 36. 

Grade and Number of Employees, etc.— Concluded. 





Divisions. 


Total. 


Title. 


Central 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street- 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 




7 


99 


158 


44 

190 

4 


SO 
54 


98 
1 


436 




244 











4 








2 
2 
361 
4 
1 

34 
6 


3 












2 






447 




157 


2 


967 






4 














1 














34 














6 






3 
5 








3 




2 


2 

7 


2 


2 


4 


17 




7 






93 








93 








2 




10 


12 








1 
2 


1 














2 






3 








3 






2 
1 






^ 


2 














1 






10 

12 


9 






19 










12 






1 ■ 

3 

1 
16 

1 
12 








1 






15 








18 












1 






63 


159 


57 


2 


297 






1 






8 
4 
5 
2 

8 


5 




4 


29 






4 






1 
2 








6 






2 

7 






4 






1 




18 










, 9 


777 


620 


424 


301 


121 


2,252 







Street Department. 45 



Complaints. 

Complaints received by telephone, or by mail, are put in 
the hands of a complaint-clerk, who gives to them his per- 
sonal attention, in the following manner: 

A record of each comphiint is made in a book kept for 
such purposes, the system of keeping the same and rectify- 
ing complaints, as far as practicable, being as follows : 

First, on the receipt of letter or notice, an abstract is 
made of the same in the complaint book, and a copy on a 
form adopted for such purposes is sent to either of the 
divisions for investigation. The district foreman to whom 
the complaint was referred investigates the cause and recom- 
mends the adoption of certain improvements or immediately 
rectifies the cause. He then makes an endorsement on the 
back of notice and returns it to the central office. The 
recommendations or improvements are also recorded in the 
complaint book, and if of enough importance the complainant 
is notified of the recommendations and intentions of the de- 
partment. 

The number of such complaints received at this office 
since May 1, 1891, to January 1, 1892, was 251, of which 

145 related to the Paving Division. 
25 " " Sewer " 

45 " " Sanitary " 

27 *' " Street-cleaninof Division. 

9 " *' Street-watering " 

Complaints, to receive proper attention, should be sent to 
the central office and not to some local foreman. 

All complaints should be signed with full name and ad- 
dress, as anonymous communications receive no attention. 

Expenses of Central Office. 

For the current expenses of the central office the City 
Council appropriated the sum of fifteen thousand dollars 
($15,000), to which was added by transfer the sum of one 
thousand and fifty dollars ($1,050), making a total of six- 
teen thousand and fifty dollars ($16,050) for the nine (9) 
months ending Jan. 1, 1892. The same was expended as 
follows : 

Salaries $13,155 10 

Stationery, printing, postage, etc. . . 1,144 09 

Atlases, books, etc 343 10 



46 City Docuinient No. 3o. 

Rubber stamps, etc. ..... $48 80 

Board of horse, shoeing, clothing, etc. . . 536 00 

Telephones ....... 165 48 

Travelling exj^enses, etc. .... 601 10 

Miscellaneous office-supplies, etc. . . . 56 33 



$16,050 00 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 

Previous to May 1, 1891, the entire force of mechanics 
employed in the Bridge Division, consisting of carpenters, 
painters, laborers, etc, were under the charge of one fore- 
man, with headquarters at the Foundry-street yard. The 
territory covered by this force reached from Winthrop to 
Charlestown on one side of the Charles river, and from the 
City Proper to Milton on the other side. Bridge repairs, 
especially such as are required on the tide-water bridges, re- 
quire immediate attention, and as all tools, gearing, block- 
ins:, :in<l stock were stored at one yard, and as much time 
was lost by the transfer of the men from one remote district 
to another when any exigency for their services arose, it was 
deemed better to divide the territory into two di^^tricts. 

The Northern District, with headquarters on Charles-river 
bridge, includes all bridges north and west of th§ Charles 
river. 

The Southern District, with headquarters at Foundry 
street, includes all bridges south of the Charles river. 

This division of territory equalizes, as nearly as possible, 
the care of the most important tide-water bridges, and places 
within easy access all necessary ap[)lianees for doing such 
w^ork as may be required in each district. The headquarters 
of both of these districts have telephone connections, and, 
if necessary, the whole repair-force of the division can be 
concentrated at any point, in case of immediate repairs being 
required on any important bridge. 

The al)Ove system of dividing the work into two districts 
has worked satiisfactorily, and has resulted in economy and 
efficiency. 

Previous to May 1, 1891, all draw-tenders reported 
directly to the Superintendent's office, and on the most 
trivial matters left their Juidges without the services of a 
draw-tender. In order to allow the draw-tenders to put in 
their whole time on their bridges, the office of Chief Draw- 



Street Department. 47 

tender was creiited, and an old employee of the dcpiirtment 
selected for the position. All daily bridge-reports of draw- 
tenders arc now made to the Chief Draw-tender, who also 
makes provision for all needed supplies, and, in general, 
under the direction of the Deputy Superintendent, super- 
vises the entire force employed on the drawbridges. 

The report of the Deputy Superintendent, Appendix A, 
gives the detailed report of expenditures, and amount of 
work done on each bridije, together with much other in- 
formation of a useful nature. 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES DIVISION. 



By the provisions of the acts of the Legislature of 1870, 
the care of the West Boston, Canal, and Prison-point 
bridges is placed in the hands of two Commissioners, one of 
whom is appointed by the City of Cambridge, the other by 
the City of Boston. By the terms of the ordinances, the 
Superintendent of Streets is Commissioner for the City of 
Boston. 

The following report shows the present condition of the 
bridges, the work that has been done during the year, and 
the work proposed to be done during the coming year. 

West Boston Bridge. 

The repairs of the westerly bulkhead, sidewalk, and adja- 
cent roadway, alluded to as necessary in the last report, 
have been made. 

Substantially the same plan has been adopted as the one 
used in rebuilding the down-stream side in 1886. 

The bridge has been relieved of a large amount of gravel 
and mud, all decayed timber has been removed, and a new 
sidewalk of hard-pine timber and kyanized spruce-plank has 
been built, and upon it a brick sidewalk has been laid. 

The old edgestoues have been reset. The roadway plank 
wherever uncovered has been protected by a layer of salt 
mud, and the entire space between the curbstone and nearest 
railroad track has beeu repaved, using the old paving-blocks. 
A new hard-pine fence has been built for the entire length 
of bridge repaired. The part of the bridge repaired as above 
described includes all the up-stream sidewalk between the 
draw and the Cambridge abutment, and about one hundred 
feet in length on the same side of the bridge next the Boston 
abutment. 



48 City Document No. 36. 

The rei)airs luive been made by eontract by Josiah Shaw, 
who was the lowest bidder. Total cost, 15,250.25. 

A new boiler for the engine has been provided, and the 
turning-apparatus put in good order. 

The up-stream end of the draw-pier is in bad condition, 
and will require repairs and strengthening next season. The 
plank sides of the waterway are in bad condition and re- 
quire attention. The paving of the roadway and sidewalk 
from the draw to Boston end will require attention next 
year, and the bulkheads next the Charles-river embankment 
should be repaired. 

With the exceptions above noted, the bridge is in as good 
condition as it is practicable to put so old and narrow a struct- 
ure, and the need of a new, wider, and more commodious 
bridge becomes more urgent year by year. 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

The foundation to the engine-house on the draw-pier has 
been put in good condition. The roadway paving laid last 
year has done good service, and the remaining surface should 
be repaved.' The fender on the up-stream side is in bad 
condition. The hard bottom prevents the driving of piles in 
the usual manner, and a different plan nmst be adopted to 
protect the bridge from vessels. The sides of the waterway 
need new planking. The wooden draw shows signs of age, 
and piling under the Boston end will soon require attention. 

The bridge as a whole is in fairly good and safe condition. 

Prison-point Bridge. 

The draw-pier has been replanked, and ordinary repairs 
made to the roadway and machinery for moving the draw. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended, of the number of draw- 
openings and the number of vessels passed through. 

The amount of revenue receivpd for dockage, sale of old 
material, etc., during the year has been $633.40, one-half of 
Avhich has been paid over to City of Cambridge ; also the 
sum of $1,515.27 paid by Park Department for building 
taken on West Boston bridge for the Charles-river embank- 
ment, and a like sum paid to City of Cambridge. 

The following is a statement of the payments made by the 
City of Boston on account of the West Boston, Canal, and 
Prison-point bridges from Januar}^ 1, 1891, to January 1, 
1892 : 



Street Department. 



49 



Amount expended from appropriation for 

1890-91 $1,543 48 

Amount expended from appropriation for 

1891-92 10,322 94 

Total amount expended . . . . $11,866 42 



Condition of Appropriation. 

Amount of appropriation for financial year 

1891-92 

Amount expended to Feb. 1,1892. 

Unexpended balance .... 



$12,000 00 

10,322 94 
f 



$1,677 06 



Classification nf Expense's. 



1891. 


General 
Account. 


Canal 
Bridge. 


Prison- 

poiut 

Bridge. 


West Bos- 
ton Bridge. 


Total. 




$395 00 
43 28 
26 72 








$395 no 
43 28 










Travelling expenses ... 








26 72 


$1,095 00 

308 11 

354 05 

61 15 

390 00 

108 40 

53 56 

98 80 

41 96 

11 77 

77 50 

200 00 

14 40 


$215 94 

211 25 

221 68 

77 60 


$900 09 

213 76 

46 50 

158 16 

585 00 

86 70 

32 07 

92 95 

3 82 

1 57 

200 00 

200 00 

9 00 

22 56 

5,250 25 


2 211 03 






733 12 






622 23 
296 91 










975 00 


Fuel 












4 15 

50 
9 82 


89 78 






192 ''5 






55 60 






13 34 






37 50 


315 00 






400 00 






4 95 


''9 ''S 






oo 5g 










5 '■'50 25 












Totals 


$465 00 


$2,814 70 


$783 39 


$7,803 33 


$11,866 42 





50 



City Document No. 3G. 



Nninber of Times the DraAvs in West Boston, Canal, an. I 
Prison-l*oint Briilji'os have been opened, aiul tlie Num- 
ber of Vessels Avhich have passed dnrinj? tlie Y'ear 
ending- Jan. 31, 1892. 



Date. 


West Boston. 


Canal or 

Craigie's. 


Prison 


-piiiiu. 


Jan.l, 1891, to Feb. 1,1892. 


1.1 

^ 'a 

a s 


"3 . 
*^ P 

P So 

1- 


Q 
3.5 

1^ 


> p 

|i 


52 

i5^ 


"3 

^ -.J 




9 , 

26 

36 
148 
222 
246 
229 
2.32 
207 
122 
166 
107 

40 


14 

46 
57 
222 
378 
383 
371 
332 
334 
201 
279 
193 
60 


96 
97 
147 
383 
456 
352 
431 
427 
384 
297. 
377 
298 
131 


82 
121 
185 
392 
482 
371 
561 
452 
512 
369 
284 
315 
111 


21 
14 
11 
18 
29 
61 
26 
29 
21 
26 
27 
64 
57 


35 


February 


19 
U 




;>i 


May 


35 




100 


July 


35 




42 




25 


October • ... 


34 
38 




297 




2-18 






Totals 


1,790 


2,870 


3,876 


4,237 


404 


933 







Canal Bridge Property-schedule. 

* Three street-hoes, * 3 snow-scrapers, 1 coal-scoop, 2 long 
pokers, 3 corn-brooms, 2 cold-chisels, 1 crowbar, 1 hammer, 

1 sledge, * 1 snow-plough, 1 saw, 6 wrenches, 4 oil-cans, 

2 ice-chisels, 4 hand-lanterns, * 16 street-lanterns, 2 earth - 
picks, 1 United States flag, 30 fathoms rope, 1 lamp, 1 iron 
block, 1 wheelbarrow. 

Prisox-point Bridge Property-schedule. 

One hundred feet woven hose, 1 iron shovel, 1 pickaxe, 
* 1 adze, 1 axe, 1 brace with 3 bits, * 2 chisels, 1 hammer, 2 
Yale padlocks, 1 snow-shovel, 1 broom, 1 street- hoe. 



* In poor condition. 



Street Department. 



51 



West Boston Bridge Property-schedule. 

Two wheelbarrows, 1 United States flag, 200 feet rojie, 
2 snatch-blocks, 1 ladder, 3 lanterns, 2 bushel baskets, <'^ 
oil-cans, 1 long poker, 1 tube-cleaner, 2 brooms, 1 table, 1 
monkey-wrench, 1 auger, 1 vice, 1 Stillson wrench, 2 ham- 
mers, 1 saw, 1 mallet, 1 ice-saw, 2 pails, 1 adze, 1 top- 
maul, 1 iron bar, 5 hoes, 3 ice-chisels, 1 axe, 2 files, * 10 
iron shovels, *3 wooden shovels, * 175 feet hose. 

Statement of Traffic over Bridg-es. 





6S 


ii 


«2 

us 




•c2 


lz;a. 


?2 




«<i 


a 2 


«<i 


1891. 


a to 
o 

"no -*" 




^ to 

a „ 




^§^ 


a _r 


n > . 




r- 






Teams to Boston 


1,322 


2,940 


1,9041 2. 




647 
2,657 


235 
3,990 


C3 


Foot-passengers to Boston 


r 

2,276J 1 




1,297 


3,555 
225 






626 






1,939 


3,550 









* In poor condition. 



52 



City Document No. 36. 



PAVING DIVISION. 



The following tables show the length of accepted streets 
and the character and areas of pavements Feb. 1, 1892 : 

Leng"th in Miles. 





J3 
< 


o 
o 

5 




,a 
o 
O 


52 


6 


"3 

-a 
2 

O 


"a 
O 


1890 Report. 


3.2 


64.9 




6.5 


174.6 


160.9 


. . . . 


409.7 


1892. 


















City Proper, Feb. 1 . 


*4.07 


39.67 


0.36 


4 41 


31.33 


0.78 


0.07 


80.69 


Charlestown 


0.03 


7.68 




0.29 


14.46 


0.03 


0.05 


22.54 


East Boston 




. 3.50 


.... 


0.48 


2.09 


20.30 


0.18 


26.55 


South Boston .... 


0.33 


10.24 




0.75 


23.33 


1.82 


5.71 


42.18 


Roxbury 


0.23 


6.3S 




0.01 


52.24 


16.06 


0.70 


75.02 






0.09 






24.67 


47.29 


67 


72.72 






1.73 






40.01 
16.43 


36.59 
16.61 


1.47 

1.45 


79 80 










34.49 














Total 


4.66 


69.29 


0.36 


5.94 


204.56 


139.48 


10.30 


4-34.59 



* Of this amount 0.48 miles = asphalt blocks. 



There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year 7.87 linear miles, .12 miles have 
been discontinued, making a total increase of mileage of 
7.75 miles. The discrepancy between 434.59 miles and 
417.45 miles (obtained by adding the increased mileage to 
the 1890 report) is owing to a rcmeasurement having been 
made this year of the street mileage, and an error of seven^ 
teen miles having been discovered in the previous reports. 

The rapid increase in this mileage, from year to year, is 
shown by the following table : 



Street Department. 



53 



1859. 
1871. 

1872. 
1873. 
1874. 

1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 



.111.50 Miles. 
.201.32 
.207.4 
.209.24 
.313.90 
.318.58 
327.50 
.333.2 
.340.39 
.345.19 
.350 54 
.355.5 



1882. 
1883 . 
1884. 
1885, 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892 



.359.85 Miles. 

.307.99 

.374.10 

.379.60 

.383.55 

.390.30 

.392.72 

.397.84 

.404.6 

.409.6 

.434.59 



The following table .shows tlie area of pavement in the city 
of Boston, in square yards : 





Asphalt 


Block. 


Brick. 


Cobble. 


Telford 

and 

Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Feb.l, 1891. 


.54,070 


1,429,620 




109,890 










Feb. 1, 1892. 
City Proper, 
Chailest'n . 
E. Bo.ston . 
S. Boston . 
Roxbury . 
W. Roxb'v, 


*65,6do 
421 

4,271 
3,559 


860,853 
178,060 

83,286 

218,076 

139,776 

2,067 

39,444 


3,638 


52,156 
2,936 
9,621 

14,959 

717 


606,675 
219,471 
39,536 
405,661 
932,270 
433,826 
718,302 
399 365 


13,207 

161 

389,142 

38,173 
263,319 
739,700 
613,177 
254,749 


1,204 

762 
3,555 
118,371 
9,530 
10,492 
31,050 
26,977 


1,603,388 

401,811 

525,140 

799,511 

1,349,171 

1,186,085 

1,401,973 

681,091 


Dorchester. 
























Total . . 


73,906 


1,521,562 


3,638 


80,389 


3,755,106 


2,311,628 


201,941 


7,948,170 



* Of this amount. 8,501 gq yds. =: asphalt blocks. 

Total public htreets, 434.59 miles. 

Note. — The city is subdivided on former boundary lines. 



In order to compare the character of the pavements in the 
city of Boston with the other cities of the country, the follow- 
ing table is presented : 



54 



City Document No. 36. 



Disti'ibiitioii of Kinds of Pavements. Public and Im- 
proved Streets. 





a 
3 

1^1 


S o a 


O 111 


-too 

pa c-i 




_C3 
S 

2 53 
C Pi 


o^ S 


Sheet asphalt . . 
Coal-tar .... 
Asphalt block . 
Block etoue . . 

AVood 

Cobble 


26.07 
23.06 
5.19 
14.18 
0.18 
6.94 


0.94 

29.07 
1.25 


0.76 

0.62 

3.45 

61.27 


30.49 


3.44 


3.23 

2.47 
15.69 

49.21 

2.60 

15.16 


0.96 
11 


40.45 


67.61 
00.70 


15.94 
1.37 


Vitrified brick . 






0.02 


00 08 


liubble 










*Telfoid .... 




4.34 
64.40 


33.90 


0.29 

28.75 




10.00 


♦Macadam. . . . 


4.83 
19.55 


5.10 
23.15 


11.64 


37.07 
34.47 














100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


1 00.00 


Mileage .... 


165.70 


421.97 


669.64 


34T.75 


475.16 


762.20 


434.59 



* Not usually separated in the reports of the various cities. 

An inspection of the foregoing tables shows that >n Boston 
only 15.9^ of the total mileage is paved with granite blocks ; 
1.07% paved with asphalt; .08% paved with brick ; 1.4% 
]iaved with cobble; the remainder, 81%, being either 
macadamized or gravelled. 

This percentage of macadam and gravelled streets is larger 
than most of the other cities in the country, St. Louis, 
which compares the nearest with Boston, having 64%, while 
Buffalo has but 30% macadamized, and over 70% of its 
streets well paved. This large percentage of macadamized 
streets accounts largely for the expense of maintaining the 
department, compared with other cities. 

The inferior condition of most of the paved streets of 
Boston is apparent to ever^'^ one. Several causes have oper- 
ated to bring this condition al)out. 

In the first place, the quality of the stone blocks with 
M'hich the pavement Avas originally laid was poor ; these 
blocks, in most instances, were roughl}' cut, of irregular 
<limensions, and laid without proper care, so that, in some 
cases, even where the original pavement has never been dis- 



Street Department. 55 

turl)ecl, it has worn unequally and has settled in such a 
manner as to pre'^ent a very uneven surface. 

The numerous structures under the pavement, consisting 
of gas-pipes, vvater-pi[)es, tele[)hone conduits, steam- heating 
jiipes, electric-wire conduits, and sewers with their connec- 
tions, necessitate a constant tearing up of the pavements to 
make connections and remedy breaks and defects. 

There is also the tearing up and replacing of railroad 
tracks which is continually going on. 

This continual disturbance of the pavement and the im- 
possibility of replacing it over an excavation in such a 
manner as to leave the pavement in its original condition 
has resulted in the present uneven appearance of many of 
our stiTets, making them uncomfortable to travel over and 
difficult to clean. 

It will be impossible to construct and maintain first-class 
pavements in our commercial and business thoroughfares, 
as long as private corporations are allowed legislative fran- 
chises to not only cover the greater part of the surface with 
lailroads, drip-boxes, manholes, gate-boxes, and covers of all 
sizes and kinds, but also to undermine the same with a per- 
fect network of contrivances, some seething with steam, 
some flowing the most volatile, gas-producing and inflamma- 
ble hydrocarbons, and some conducting the electric current — 
all being liable to get out of repair and requiring excavations 
and disturbanceof the street-surface to keep them in condition. 

The spirit of self-interest and the desire to realize large 
dividends tend toward the greatest economy on the part of 
corporations in replacing the disturbed portions of street and 
pavement ; thus leaving to the city a great deal of work to 
finally adjust and regulate at the expense of the [)ublic 
funds. 

The only complete remedy for these evils is to build a 
large brick subway beneath the sidewalk or roadwaj capable 
of containing every wire or pipe needed for all purposes, 
with only its manholes appearing at the surface. 

Until such time as an underground conduit of a size 
sufiicient to contain all gas, water, and other pipes and wires 
is laid, it will be impossible to prevent the tearing up of the 
])avements, and dependence must be placed on the power of 
the dei)artment to grant or refuse permits and to have all 
openings repaved in as good a manner as possible under the 
circumstances. The amendment to the ordinance made this 
year, whereby the parties who make openings are obliged to 
keep the pavements in repair for six months, and, on their 
failure to do so, to be ol)liged to pay the cost of the city's 
doing the work, will tend to lessen these evils. • 



5(5 City Document Xo. 30. 

The following list shows the fom[)anies and corporntions 
in the city which, from the nature of their business, have 
occasion to disturh the street-surface most frequently : 

Albany Street Freight Railroad Company. 

Boston Electric Light Company. 

Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 

Boston & jSIaine Railroad Comi)any. 

Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad Company. 

Boston Gaslight Company. 

Brookline Gaslight Company. 

Charlestown Gaslight Company. 

Dorchester Gaslight Company. 

East Boston Gaslight Company. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company. 

Fitchburg Railroad Company. 

Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Company. 

Jamaica Plain Gaslight Company. 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Company. 

New York & New England Railroad Company. 

Old Colony Railroad Company. 

Roxbury Gaslight Company. 

South Boston Gaslight Company. 

West End Railroad Company, 

Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Eleven thousand three hundred and twenty permits were 
granted during the past year to open streets. The excava- 
tions made under these permits aggregate 110.7' miles in 
length, and show the proportions to which this nuisance has 
grown. 

One thousand nine hundred and sixteen openings were 
made under "emergenc}^ permits " for breaks in water and 
gas pipes requiring immediate attention. 

Macadamized Streets. 

Boston has a larger proportion of macadamized streets 
than any large city in this country. 

While streets of this description can be constructed 
cheaply, the rapid deterioration of the surface requires an 
immense outlay to keep thera in repair. 

With constant attention in the way of resurfacing and 
watering, these streets are convenient for travel, l)ut with- 
out this care, holes are soon w(n-n in the surface. Macadam- 
ized streets are always muddy in wet weather, and are not 
suited to stand the travel of our thoroughfares leading to the 
suburbs. • 



Street Depaktment. 57 

All the macadamized streets of the City Proper, exce[)t 
those whose grade is more than G per 100, and all tlie main 
macadamized avenues which radiate to the suburbs, should 
be paved with granite blocks or asphalt, as rapid I3' as the 
finances of the city will permit. 

In determining the chtiracter of the pavement to be used on a 
street, regard must be paid to several considerations, among 
which are its life, first cost, cost of maintenance, conven- 
ience, appearance, and adaptability to the traffic it may be 
exi)ected to undergo during its life. 

The pavement laid this year has been laid in accordance 
with the best modern practice, and in accordance with what 
seemed for the best interests of the community. 

The business streets in exclusively commercial sections 
subjected to the heaviest travel have been paved with granite 
blocks. 

Where all water, gas, sewer, telephone, and other pipes 
are already laid, and where there is reasonable cause to 
believe that the pavement will not be constantly torn up, the 
blocks have been laid on a concrete base of hydraulic 
cement, and the joints filled with pebbles and road-pitch. 

A concrete base is especially applicable in loose soil where 
there is liable to be trouble from sub-soil water. 

The streets subjected to heavy travel in which the various 
pipes have not as yet been laid, have been paved with granite 
blocks on a gravel base in the ordinary manner; more atten- 
tion, however, has been paid to rolling and preparing the 
foundation- bed than was the practice in fin-mer years, with the 
result of securing a more even pavement. 

The residence streets, where sufficient appropriation ex- 
isted, have been paved with sheet asphalt, asphalt blocks, 
or brick, as seemed most suited to the case in hand. 

Brick paving has only obtained on a few cross-streets, wnth 
a view of putting it to a thorough test. It can be used to 
advantage on streets of comparatively light traffic, where a 
less expensive form is desired than asphalt. 

It is believed that the above kinds of pavement include all 
the varieties necessary to pave our streets in a first-class 
manner. Wood pavements, which are extensively used in 
Western cities and in cities abroad, are not adapted to this 
city. The difficulty of keeping them clean, owing to the 
tenacity with which filthy matter of all kinds adheres to 
them, and the exhalations which arise from their absorption 
of fluids, render them an unsanitary pavement. They are 
short-lived and require frequent repairs. 

The granite-block pavement laid on a face of hydraulic- 
cement concrete is believed to be the pavement best adapted 



58 City Document No. 36. 

to our business streets, especiiilh'^ where all water, gns, tele- 
jihone, and electric pipes have been Liid and connections 
made. This pavement possesses the advantao'e of the longest 
life, is easily cleaned, gives a good foothold for horses, and 
requires but little expenditure for repairs. Its chief dis- 
advantage is its noise. The average cost of this pavement, 
including all labor and materials, is $4.70 per square 
yard. This pavement has been laid on Tremont street, 
between Cornhill and Boylston street, and a comparison 
of the paving between the railroad tracks with the rest 
of the street shows what can be done with first-class granite 
l)locks properly laid. 

A number of streets have been paved with granite blocks 
laid on the ordinary gravel foundation. This st3de of paving 
has obtained on such streets as were not entirely built up 
with business blocks, and where a subsequent change in the 
character of the buildings will involve numerous excava- 
tions to connect with water, gas, electric, and other pipes. 
'I'he quality of the stone blocks used has been first-class, 
however, and when the street has arrived at its ultimate 
development (provided it does so during the life of the stone 
bl(jcks), the street can be repaved with the same blocks set 
on a concrete base. 

A large amount of asphalt pavement has been laid this 
year on different streets, among which may be mentioned : 
Beacon street from Charles street to Arlington, Cabot street, 
Columbus avenue, Hudson street, Austin street, Kilby 
street. Court street, etc. This pavement is particularly 
suited to residence streets, and such business streets as are 
free from horse-car tracks and are lined with buildings 
occupied mostly by ofiices, where the noise of a granite- 
block pavement could not be borne. This pavement, when 
made of genuine asphalt and prepared and laid in the best 
manner, gives a very satisfactory result. Such of these 
l)avements in Boston as have given out have done so by 
neglect to prom[)tly repair them, or else by the opening of 
trenches through the street for the various gas, water, or 
other pipes. The life of the pavement is not so long as that 
of a granite-block pavement, but with reasonable care the 
])avement is good for many years. All the asphalt pave- 
ments laid are kept in repair at the expense of the con- 
tractors for five years. The asphalt pavement is easily 
cleaned, and presents a pleasing appearance to the eye. 
Much has been said and written about the slipperiness of this 
pavement. If the pavement is kept clean and free from the 
thin coating of mud which is apt to accumulate, and is sanded 
in case of sleet fallimr on the surface, it ijives a better foot- 



Street Department. 59 

ing than a stone pavement. Statistics prove that more 
horses fall on a mile of stone pavement than on a mile of 
asphalt pavement. The cost of the asphalt pavement laid 
this 3'ear has averaged about $3.50 per square yard. 

Several streets have been paved during the year with an 
asphalt-block pavement. This pavement, while not so dur- 
able as the sheet asphalt, has the advantage of being easily 
replaced in case of excavation being made through its 
surface for gas or water pijoes. It presents a very hand- 
some appearance when well laid, and is well suited for light 
travel. The city of Baltimore has miles of streets paved with 
this material, which have been in good repair for eight years. 

The use of brick for a street pavement has been attracting 
the attention of municipal authorities for the last few years. 

It is extensively used in several Western and Southern 
cities, and has lately been tried in some of the large cities, 
among which are Cleveland, Columbus, Chicago, Philadel- 
phia, Indianapolis, Omaha, Peoria, Baltimore, AVashington, 
Harrisburg, Wheeling, Johnstown, Clinton. The claims 
made for this pavement are its low cost, combined with its 
durability and appearance. 

There are now four streets paved in this city. 

Hamilton place (a private way) was paved in 1888 by the 
abutters, and is now in good condition. It is subjected to 
light travel only, so that conclusions cannot be drawn from 
this street alone concerning the durability of the pavement. 
Genesee, Seneca, and Oswego streets have been paved 
with brick this year ; the first two streets with a Keramite 
brick, at a cost of $2.75 per square yard; the last-named 
street with a brick manufactured in Rhode Island, at a cost 
of $2.40 per square yard. 

The following method was observed in paving these 
streets. The macadam was excavated to the depth of seven 
inches and the road-bed then rolled with a horse-roller. A 
two-inch layer of gravel was then spread and rolled and the 
bricks laid on a thin sand bed. After being rammed 
in place, the surface was flooded with water and the bricks 
again rammed to a true surface, after which the joints were 
grouted with Portland cement mortar, mixed 1 to 1. 

These streets have only been paved six months, so that no 
judgment can be passed upon them. 

There are various methods of laying a brick pavement, 
and it is proposed during the coming ^ear to lay the bricks 
on a concrete base as well as by other methods, so that a 
comparison may be obtained. Great care has to be taken in 
the selection of the brick to be used, and before trying 



GO City Document No. 36. 

this style of pavement, the department made a series of 
tests of different bricks submitted. 

The bricks should have toughness, elasticity, homogeneity, 
and impermeal)ility, and this condition should obtain in each 
and every layer throughout the kiln. 

The common tests that are applied are : 

1. Absorption test by volume or by weight. 

2. Test for compressive strength. 

3. Test for transverse strength. 

4. Test for abrasion. 

Under the first test, measurements by weight usually show 
a less power of absorption than by volume, but, as the 
specific gravity of a brick or paving stone has no bearing on 
its wearing qualities, the volume test seems more proper. 

Likewise, the transverse strength is of ftir greater value 
than the compressive strength. The test for abrasion, or 
the "rattler test," is made by placing the bricks to be tested 
in a revolving cylinder together with one or two hundred 
weight of "foundry shot," or nuggets broken off of iron 
castings. The per cent, of abrasion is obtained from the 
lo6S by weight at the end of stated periods of time. 

The following table shows the results obtained by the 
tests made by the department : 



Street Department. 



61 



Resistance of Paving- Bricic, Stone, and Asphalt to 
Abrasion and Impact. Mechanical Tests made with a 
Foundry " Rattler." 



d 

0) 


Loss in per cents of the original 
weight during 


Total 
loss. 


Absorptive power in per cents 
of the volume of the 












1st half 
hour. 


2d half 
hour. 


3d half 
hour. 




dry brick. 




Granite and Asphalt. 




1. . . 


0.88 


0.46 


0..37 


1.71 


0.8 


2. . . 


3.63 


2.57 


2.42 


8.62 






Paving Brick. 




3. . . 


1.43 


0.96 


0.48 


2.87 


• 


4. . . 


2.83 


1.15 


0.99 


4.97 




5 . . . 


1.51 


0.71 


0.55 


2.77 


2.2 


6. . . 


0.84 


0.30 


0.30 


1.44 




7 . . . 


0.68 


0.49 


0.37 


1.54 


1.5 


8. . . 


0.62 


0.49 


0.37 


1.48 


2.0 


9. . . 


0.62 


0.56 


0.49 


1.67 


1.0 


10 . . . 


2.81 


1.76 


1.22 


5.79 


3.0 


U . . . 


1.98 


1.86 


1.68 


5.52 


6.0 


12 . . . 


1.03 


0.54 


0.36 


1.93 




13. . . 


0.90 


0.41 


0.25 


1.56 


6.0 


14. . . 


4.32 


3.66 


4.24 


12.22 


23.3 


15. . . 


1.60 


0.97 


0.62 


3.19 


10.0 


16. . . 


2.19 


1.83 


1.60 


5.62 


14.0 


17. . . 


1.72 


1.00 


0.55 


3.27 




18. . . 


1.66 


0.90 


0.67 


3.23 







Addenda. 



Absorptive power in per cents 

of the weight of the 

dry brick. 



0.17 
0.19 



Three samples of the brick, numbered 7, 8, [), were tested 
at the VVaterlown Arsenal, as to their transverse strength, 
with the followino; results : 



()2 



City Document Xo. 3i). 







Modulus of rupture in lbs. 






per square inch. 


A. . . 




1925 


B . . . 
C . . . 




2072 
1700 



The foregoing tests show conclusively that there is a great 
variation in the toughness of the so-called paving bricks, and 
that the variation exists in bricks from the same yard. 

A range from 1.44% to 12.22% loss by abrasion is cer- 
tainly very great, and in absorption a range from 1.5% to 
23.3% is enough to put the materials into a doubtful class ; 
all of which goes to show that in the selection of brick for 
pavement great care must be taken to secure a uniformity as 
to vitrification and composition, if we expect to find "life" 
in this comparatively new form of pavement. 

The special features of the year's work in paving are the 
increase in asphalt roadway-paving, — both the sheet paving 
and the asphalt blocks, — the use of brick paving, and the 
use of a concrete base for the ordinary well-known and 
thoroughly tried granite blocks. 

Asphalt paving is used in large cities in almost all parts 
of the civilized world, and when used in streets which are 
suited for it, and not taking the question of cost into account, 
is undoubtedly the most desirable pavement which has come 
into common use. The streets upon which it can be used 
are limited. It is unsuitable for steep grades, for streets 
subjected to unusually heavy traffic, or for narrow streets 
with railway tracks. It is costly to put down in the first in- 
stance, and costly to maintain, but for city streets used for 
residences it is unsurpassed, both for the comfort of the oc- 
cupants of the houses, and also for those who use the streets. 
From a sanitary point of view it stands at the head of the 
list of varieties of paving, as it is perfectly smooth and ab- 
solutely impervious to moisture. 

Its first cost is about ten per cent, greater than that of a 
first-class granite-block paving on gravel, and the cost of 
maintenance for a term of years is much greater, but just 
how much greater the limited experience of this city does not 
satisfiictorily answer. 

The addition of a concrete base to the ordinary granite- 
block paving is no new experiment, but it has been em- 
ployed to only a limited extent heretofore in Boston. Its 
advantages are marked, and its use for streets with the 



Street Department. HS 

heaviest traffic is to be commended. It consists of a solid 
foundation-layer or sheet of cement concrete, from six to 
eijiht inches in thickness, and covering the entire area to be 
[)aved ; upon this the blocks are set in the usual manner, on 
a layer of sand about two inches in thickness. The paving 
may then be finished in the usual manner, by filling the inter- 
stices between the blocks with coarse sand or fine screened 
gravel, or they may be filled with heated pebbles and mehed 
pitch, as Avas done on Tremont street. The pitch-joints have 
no necessary connection with the concrete base, and either 
one is used without the other. 

The advantages of the concrete base are those of a good 
foundation, which is indispensable for all good work. The 
concrete foundation is superior to gravel, however well com- 
pacted ; and it serves the same good purpose in block paving 
that it does in asphalt paving. 

As a preliminary to all paving, the various pipes and 
structures in the street must be put in order, and more or 
less trenches or other excavations made. The concrete base 
practically overcomes uneven settling, by bridging over the 
trenches and distributing the weight of travel over larger 
areas. Again, the paving-blocks are set in two inches of 
sand on a concrete base, and on six inches of gravel in or- 
dinary paving. The settlement in the two inches, due to un- 
even depths of stone, is much less than in the paving on 
gravel, giving a smoother surface, and additional settling of 
each block independently of others is entirely prevented. 

The disadvantages of the method are, first, the extra cost. 
This will not exceed one dollar per square yard for ordinary 
street-paving ; second, difficulty of excavation for repairs, 
etc., of pipes in the street, and extra cost of replacing the 
pavement properly. It must be conceded by all that the 
primary and principal use of streets is for highways, and 
their use for pipes and structures is secondary and incidental. 
This is fully recognized in the authority over the streets 
given to the Superintendent, who controls their opening, 
— under the proper legal limitations, — for any [)urpose 
whatever ; moreover, the difficulty of making excavations 
will obviously lead to the moie careful construction of 
buried structures, and to the invention of methods of using 
them without removing the paving. As an instance, note 
that until within a very few years it was necessary to make 
an excavation in the street every time the city water was 
turned on or ofi'a customer's premises. 

The thii-d objection to the concrete foundation is that it 
makes a water-tight layer, covering the street, and graded 
so as to turn all the water that penetrates the layer of paving- 



64 City Document Xo. 36. 

block to the gutters. In streets luiving areas under the 
sidewalks, this is liable to make trouble from the water leak- 
ing through the wall and showing itself in the area. Care 
has been taken to make a water-tight joint in such cases. 

The filling of the joints of the paving-stones with heated 
pebbles and pitch has been successful, and has done away 
with leaving a layer of gravel on the stones to be ground 
up by teams, and to become a nuisance to the public. The 
method of filling the joints promptly and effectually with 
pebbles and pitch avoids the long and dirty process of 
grinding up gravel by teams, and allows the street to be 
cleaned at once. Paving has been injured by the removal of 
gravel before the joints were filled, and also by water-carts 
sprinkling the layer of gravel. The sprinkling seems to pre- 
vent the gromid-up gravel from penetrating the joints by 
caking in the upper part of the joint. All gravel used for 
covering off paving, as it is termed, should be thoroughly dry 
when applied, either naturally or artificially. 

Better work can be dt)ne in the hot, dry weather of sum- 
mer than in the shorter and cooler days of the fall. This is 
especially true of all pitch joint- work. It cannot be properly 
done when the stones are wet, or so cold as to chill the pitch 
at once to so low a temperature that it loses its waxy con- 
sistency. It would probably be an improvement to use more 
fiuid pitch than has been done heretofore. 

About two-thirds of the cost of paving is in the granite 
blocks, and the aggregate cost for the year is very large. 
In cases where it is practicable, say for Quincy stone deliv- 
ered on the ground, stone might be bought by the square 
yard of finished paving, instead of by the tedious and un- 
satisfactory method of counting. Paving-stones bought by 
contract vary in size so that the cost to the city for two con- 
secutive areas of paving will frequently vary from six to 
twelve per cent. This has been showai by actual count of 
sections laid from day to day. 

The asphalt pavement which has been laid has all been 
done by the Barber As[)halt Paving Company. 

The i)ractice of rolling the road-bed before placing gravel 
on streets to be paved gives satisfactory results. 

The printed specifications for paving, while more rigid in 
many points than the former practice of the Paving Division, 
on the whole are very satisfactory, and l)ut few changes in 
the subject-matter will be necessitated. 

In commencing the work of street-paving, a force of engi- 
neers was organized, consisting of two field-parties and an 
office assistant — twelve men in all during the busy season. 

Plans and profiles of streets to I)e i)aved were made, quan- 



Street Department. 65 

titles estimated, general specifications previously prepared 
were tilled out for letting the work by public competition. 
The large amount of work to be done, together with its 
character, necessitated the letting of the paving of a number 
of streets by contract. 

The city furnished all raatei-ials except paving-gravel, 
which was furnished by the contractor, and the price included 
in the bid. In most cases material furnished by the city 
was delivered to the contractor on wharves or at city yards. 
In some cases, paving-blocks were delivered on or in the 
vicinity of the work under existing contracts, old material 
removed was delivered by the contractor at some convenient 
point where the city had use for it ; if of no use to the city, 
it was given to the contractor. 

Seventeen contracts were let, covering 4.35 miles of street, 
and costino;, exclusive of material furnished by the city, 
$169,161.02. 

Fifty-three thousand four hundred and forty-four square 
yards block paving on gravel were laid ; average cost, |1.155. 

Nine thousand two hundred and ninety-four square yards 
block paving on concrete base with pitched joints were laid; 
average cost, $2,727. 

Fifteen thousand one hundred and eighty-nine square 
3^ards of asphalt paving were laid ; average cost, with con- 
crete base, $3,635 (when old base was used, $2.25). 

Thirty-one thousand six hundred and forty-six linear feet 
of edgestone set; cost on average, $0,329. 

Twenty-two thousand four hundred and seventeen square 
yards of sidewalk relaid ; average cost, $0,836. 

Three thousand and seventy-eight square yards flagging 
cross-walk; average cost, $1,184. 

The number of blocks used cannot be exactly given, as 
they were taken from stock in most cases. Counts of small 
areas proved very unsatisfactory ; averaging the largest quan- 
tities where exact figures are obtainable gives about twenty- 
five large and about thirty-eight small blocks to the square 
yard. The cost of blocks, including culling and wharfage, 
is about five cents for small blocks and seven and one-half cents 
for a large one, making the cost per yard $1.90 in each case. 
The small blocks come from Quincy, and are used on inland 
work, and are delivered on the work. The large blocks 
come mostly from Cape Ann, and are delivered on wharves. 

The average cost of block paving on gravel, per yard, is 
$3.05 ; this, under somewhat severe specifications, requiring 
the removal of thirteen inches of old material, grading and 
rolling the road-bed, and furnishing six inches of new gravel. 

Details of the work done are to be found in the appendix. 



{j6 



City Document No. 36. 



The ptist year has been one of the busiest ever known in 
the history of the Street Department. 

The following table shows the amount of work done on 
paving, edgestones, sidewalks, etc., in 1889, 1890, and 1891 ; 



Granite blocks laid and relaid : 

Regular appropriation . . . 

Special appropriation . . . 
Edgestone set and reset : 

Regular appropriation . . . 

Special appropriation . . . 
Brick walks laid and relaid ; 

Regular appropriation ... 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Flagging set and reset : 

Regular appropriation . . . , 

Siiecial apjoropriation . . . , 
Asphalt: 

Regular appropriation . . . , 

Special appropriation . . . , 
Hill gravel : 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Hill sand : 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Filling : 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Stone : 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Beach gravel : 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Special appropriation . . . . 

Grade damage, etc 

Watering streets 

General repairs 



18SO. 



55,922 sq. yds. 
43,673 sq. yds. 

60,275 lin. ft. 
38,077 lin. ft. 

19,368 sq. yds. 
16,512 sq. yds. 

10,879 ft. 
2,716 ft. 

3,806 sq. yds. 
2,892 sq. yds. 

$46,866 01 
18,197 78 

3,572 83 
3,516 09 

8,623 55 
6,176 67 

29,139 20 
5,157 53 

7,168 95 

1,208 95 

19,065 21 

47,586 58 

234,585 91 



49,630.8 sq. yds 
21,332.8 8q.yd». 

42,437 lin. ft. 
8,567 lin. ft. 

15,448 sq. yds. 
6,758 sq. yds. 

15,640 ft. 
2,759 ft. 

1,369 sq. yds. 
2,317.6 sq. yds. 

$32,205 34 
9,727 95 

6,024 85 
475 46 

2,110 36 
27,926 03 

21,097 34 
2,747 44 

5,160 87 

1,133 01 

23,383 11 

57,967 34 

200,079 07 



43,951 sq. yds. 
153,639 sq. yds. 

46,237 lin.lt. 
147,215 lin ft. 

29,239 sq. yds. 
73,336 sq. yds. 

21,134 ft. 
16,940 ft. 

1,731 sq. jds. 
39,955 sq. yds. 

$53,443 87 
39,707 51 

8,875 1 
2,528 28 

2,333 60 
9,231 25 

72,938 04 
35,926 87 

9,460 61 

7,134 20 

25,633 65 

104,203 62 

249,845 70 



SxiiEET DePxVRTMEXT. 



1889. 



1890. 



Expended from Jan. 1,1889. to Dec. .31, 
1889 and 1890, and expended from Jan. 
1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892: 

Regular appropriation 

Special appropriation 

Pay-rolls Jan. 1, 1889, to Dec. 31, 1889 and 
1890; Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892: 

Regular appropriation 

Special appropriation 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1889-1890; Feb. 1,1892: 

Regular appropriation 

Special appropriation 



$760,388 61 
291,071 57 



330,.'i99 97 
97,634 30 



8,265 11 
3,118 98 



$806,995 21 
254,727 19 

349,789 36 
123,554 96 

36,291 97 
205,105 73 



$977,2(0 02 
1,014,321 26 



396,282 98 
171,769 05 



483 71 
206,622 18 



As a matter of interest to the residents in the different 
sections of the city, the foHowing tables are presented, show- 
ing the amount of work done on edgestones and sidewalks 
in the different districts, one-half the cost of which is a.s- 
sessable on the abutters : 



New Edgestone. (Lin. ft. set.) 



Year. 


o 
o 

U 


O 


O 
O 

p 
o 

02 


a 

o 

o 
« 

H 


o 

<D 

.a 
o 

o 

O 


.a 

o 

K 


a 
o 

a 


a 
& 
o 

S 
a 
.a 
O 


o 


1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 


6,294 
3,-398 
2,763 
4,691 
5,291 
5,790 
3,222 
4,359 
2,946 
2,781 
8,236 


8,328 

10,930 

7,306 

9,733 

4,644 

8,978 

10,192 

5,191 

13,224 

11,475 

22,693 


6,304 
4,190 
4,660 
6,189 
2,538 
2,463 
4,269 
4,531 
2,139 
4,946 
11,724 


443 

2,119 

98 

2,450 

1,333 

349 

436 

971 

1,419 

981 

4,131 


13,112 
8,235 
2,467 

18,310 
4,976 

11,051 
5,229 
5,051 
6,794 
9,882 

18,1.38 


1,314 

5,454 
4,381 
4,610 
1,952 
2,451 
2,726 
580 
10,404 
3,288 
4,617 


263 

5,543 

1,895 

106 

303 

737 

2,055 

867 

1,845 

3,042 

2,032 


794 
1,595 

696 
546 
174 
223 

573 

988 
2,227 


36,852 
41,464 
23,570 
46,785 
21,583 
31,993 
28,352 
21,550 
39,344 
37,383 
73,798 


Total . . . 


49,771 


112,694 


53,953 


14,730 


103,245 


41,777 


18,688 


7,816 


402,674 



08 



City Document No. 3G. 



Brick Sidewalks. (Sq. yds. set.) 



Yeab. 


a 
c< 
o 

0-1 

G 


O 


n 

O 

o 

ca 

3 
O 
OQ 


a 
o 

o 

PQ 

OS 


1 
O 




O 


a 
o 

(2 


a 
o 
a 
a 
O 


"a 
1 ■ 


1881 

1882 

1883 

1881 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 ..... 

1890 

1891 


5,207 
5,905 
4,392 
4,870 
4,756 
5,273 
5,970 
2,540 
4,835 
4,913 
3,881 


11,491 
7,510 
7,675 
7,279 
3,896 
5,285 
7,693 
6,910 

10,489 
7,651 
9,098 


3,961 
4,984 
4,794 
4,437 
1,473 
2,112 
3,768 
3,164 
1,942 
1,915 
3,628 


893 
1,658 
1,095 
1,616 

722 
1,002 
1,500 
1,110 
1,362 
1,9-17 
2,176 


337 

179 
2,795 
4,902 

892 
2,843 
1,348 

614 

638 
1,155 
1,478 


1,096 

1,834 

3,354 

954 

479 

643 
346 
124 
274 
967 


381 
117 

46 

58 

188 
900 

377 


159 

887 
177 
739 
342 
527 
56 
75 

791 
120 


23,525 
23,074 
24,282 
24,797 
12,606 
17.100 
20,978 
14,759 
19,528 
19,546 
21,725 


Total . . . 


52,543 


84,977 


36,178 


15,081 


17,181 


10,071 


2,017 


3,873 


221,920 



The cost to the city of Boston of laying the edgestones and 
l)iMck sidewalks, shown in the foregoing table, has been 
$581,230.21. 

Of this amount the sum of $269,677.56 has been'assessed 
on the abutters when the edgestone and sidewalk have been 
laid. 

Of this sum of $269,677.56, the sum of $10,810.48 was 
abated by order of the Board of Aldermen, $218,942.62 has 
been collected, and $39,924.46 is still uncollected. 



StEEET-W ATERING . 

The most unsatisfactory work which the Street Depai-t- 
ment had to do during the year was that of street- watering. 
This arises from the fact that there has never been any 
system in regard to this work. Until Dec. 13, 1891, the 
duty of watering was not a part of the w^ork of the Street 
Department, as the subject was not mentioned in the ordi- 
nances. Eecognizing, however, the importance of watering 
streets, both for the preservation of their surface and the 
preservation of the pulilic health, it has been the practice of 
every superintendent of the department to devote as much 
money to this work as possible. As this money was not 



Street Depaktmext. 



C9 



especially appropriated by the City Government for this 
purpose, but was taken out of the regular maintenance ap- 
propriation of the department, the sum expended and the 
amount of work done varied largely from year to year. 
The following table shows the amount expended in street- 
watering by the city for the last fifteen years : 



1877 . • 


. $17,593 Q2 


1885 . 


. $43,854 68 


1878 . 


23,595 02 


1886 . 


. 44,940 35 


1879 . 


26,747 18 


1887 . 


. 51,365 73 


1880 . 


33,306 95 


1888 . 


. 40,586 58 


1881 . 


36,178 24 


1889 . 


. 47,837 46 


1882 . 


45,797 00 


1890 . 


. 57,967 34 


1883 . 


53,502 29 


1891 . 


. 104,263 62 


1884 . 


34,518 47 







As the cost of watering all the streets of the city was 
largely in excess of the amount which the Street Depart- 
ment was able to devote to the purpose, and of necessity 
a large number of streets were entirely neglected, the 
custom arose of the department's expending the money for 
street-watering on important macadamized thoroughfares 
and a few other streets which it was deemed of special im- 
portance to water, leaving it to private parties who were 
willing to pay, to obtain from contractors the watering of 
the streets in front of their residences. 

This method has caused a great deal of complaint from 
residents who were obliged to pay for street- watering, as 
frequently an adjacent street was watered at the city's ex- 
pense. 

Another source of complaint was the exorbitant rate 
charged by the contractors where the work was done at the 
expense of the abutters. As it was impossible to ascertain 
what proportion of people subscribed for watering on a 
given street, the contractor set a price which would allow 
for the expense being borne by such people as were liberally 
inclined. This price, in some instances, is known to be 
about seven times the actual cost of watering ; yet the con- 
tractor claimed that the sum he demanded was made neces- 
sary by the fact that a great many people would not 
subscribe for the work ; that frequently those who sub- 
scribed failed to pay, and that the total amount collected 
by him barely returned a fair profit on the capital and plant 
employed. 

The growing discontent concerning this system made 
itself manifest in the press in the spring of 1891, and several 
articles were published concerning the exorbitant rates 



70 City Document No. 36. 

■svliich people were obliged to pay to street- watering- con- 
tractors. This agitation resulted in bringing the matter to 
the attention of the authorities, and led to an examination 
of the subject. 

It is found that in all the large cities outside of Boston, 
the idea of local benefit as to street-watering largel}'- i)re- 
vails, and in most cases the abutters are expected to pay 
the expense thereof in front of their several estates. Sev- 
eral considerations have gradually taken the subject from 
the category of private enterprise and established it under 
municipal control. 

1st. The importance of keeping the street-surface in 
good sanitary condition. 

2d. The importance of having the amount of water used 
on the street, under control. 

3d. The question of general accommodation to public 
traffic as far as ease and comfort are concerned. 

4th. The impossibility of contractors procuring complete 
and uniform subscriptions on a given route where the water- 
ing is done at the expense of the abutters. 

These, together with numerous other considerations, have 
led to the enactment by the Legislature of a State law 
whereby any city is authorized to water its streets, and to 
levy a tax or assessment for the expense thereof against the 
abutters, in the same manner as for building sewers or laying 
edgestones and sidewalks ; or to do the whole of the work 
at its own expense, including it in the tax rate. 

Chapter 179 of the Acts and Resolves of 1891,- which was 
passed late in the spring, reads as follows : 

"Section 1. Any city, the population of which exceeds 
thirty thousand, . . . may annually appropriate money 
to water all or any of the pul:)lic streets within its limits, or 
it may determine that such streets shall be watered in whole 
or in part at the expense of the abutters thereon. 

" Sect. 2. If a city shall determine that the streets within 
its limits, or certain streets or portions of streets therein, 
shall be watered in whole or in part at the expense of the 
al)utters, the expense of such watering shall be assessed upon 
the estates abutting on such street or poition of such street 
in proportion to the number of linear feet of each estate 
upon such street or portion thereof so watered." 

No advantage was taken of this law last year, for the fol- 
lowing reasons : 

1st. Under the |9 tax limit, it was impossible to devote 
from the amount raised by the tax levy the large sum re- 
(juired to water the streets. 

2d. The lateness of the season prevented any plan l)eing 



Street Department. 71 

formed whereby the cost of waterinij should be assessed on 
the abutters. The delays that would have occurred in form- 
ing such a plan would have postponed street- watering for 
some time, and brought great inconvenience upon the resi- 
dents of the city. 

The City Government recognizing the importance of the 
subject, appropriated the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of 
street- watering ; which, taken in connection with the sum of 
$54,000 which could be spared from the regular maintenance 
appropriation of the department, gave a much larger sum 
than ever was before devoted to this purpose. 

This sum, although a large amount for the city to appro- 
priate, was entirely inadequate to do all the street- watering 
required, and the practice of former years had to be contin- 
ued, of the city's refusing to water paved streets and those 
streets which were thickly settled and on which the residents 
were amply able to pay for the work themselves. The sum 
of $104,000 was therefore largely expended in the suburbs 
and on the main thoroughfares leading to them. 

As no systematic method had ever been followed out in 
doing this work, and no data existed to show on what l^asis 
the work had previously been paid, for, the labor of looking 
into the numerous watering contracts, with a view of equal- 
izing the prices, was very great. All prices paid for new 
work and former prices paid for old work were adjusted on 
the basis that a water-cart should cover from 27,000 to 
30,000 linear feet of single spread per day. In laying out 
new street- watering routes and adjusting old ones, the leng-th 
and width of streets to be covered were carefully determined, 
and the number of spreads necessary to cover from curb to 
curb were taken into account in regulating the price to be 
paid. 



72 



CiiY Document No. 36. 



The following table gives a summary of the work done by- 
teams hired by the day and teams owned by the city, classi- 
fied by districts, with the number of miles covered in each 
district : 

1891. 

Summary of Day Work. 



Districts. 


Number of teams 
hired by the day. 


K umber of teams 
owned by the city. 


Number miles 
covered. 


1. South Boston 


6 
3 
3 

10 
8 

10 
7 
3 
4 
1 




20.42 


2. East Boston 

3. Charlestown 





6.74 
5.99 


4. Brighton 


2 
2 

2 


''1 74 


5. AVest Roxbury 

6. Dorchester 

7. Eoxbury 


30.7/ 
34.38 
17.47 


8. South yard 

9. Back Bay 

10. North End 




G.16 




5.57 
2.62 








Totals 


55 


6 


151.86 







The summary shows that fifty-five carts hired by the day 
and six carts ow^ned by the city have watered 151.86 miles 
of streets during the year. 

The following table, classified by districts, shows the 
length in miles, and the square j^ards of surface, watered by 
the various street-watering contractors during the year. 

The expense of this work was borne entirely by the city 
in some districts, in others entirely by the abutters, and in 
the remainder partly by the city and partly by the abutters. 



Street Department. 



73 



1891. 
Summary of Contract Wor^ . 




District. 


Contractor. 


Miles. 


Square yards. 


City Proper 


Daniel Clark ... 


4.55 

19.34 

12.70 

4.73 

10.83 

8.04 

3.00 

3.20 

3.32 

3.14 

1.54 

21.47 
5.64 
.80 
3.36 
3.70 
1.48 
3.80 
3.29 
2.27 

10.87 


87,268 


(< 


0. Nute & Son 


495,910 


(1 


Proctor Bros. & Billings, 

A. J. Tuttle & Co 

J. L. & H. K. Potter .... 

Philip Sowden, Jr 

Wm. H. Quigley 

E. Devine. 

P. J. Calnan. 


263,641 


West End 


91,272 


South End 


235,254 


East Boston 


160,811 




68,325 


(( 


60,834 


ti 


55,644 


Dorchester 

(C 


William Hannon 

Ashmont Improvement Co. 

A. A. Hall 

M. E. Nawn 


60,229 
26,575 


Dorchester, South Bos- 
ton, and Roxbury . . . 

Roxbury 


418,7;)5 
101,769 


<c 


Bancroft 


26,633 


(( 


T. W. Manning 


69,700 


(( 


William Finneran 

E. A. Janse 


87,487 


<( 


31,700 


West Roxbury 


Patrick Ward ...... 

Thomas Minton ........ 

John S. Kelly 


58,383 
66,699 


(( 


34,762 


<( 


Thomas O'Leary . . . . 


189,408 






Totals 




131.07 


2,691,099 









City Document No. 36. 



Distribution of Carts. 



No. 


Districts. 


City carts. 


Hired carts. 


Contractors' 
carts. 


Total. 


Miles. 


1 


Soiitli Boston. . 




6 
3 
3 

10 
9 

10 
7' 
7 


3 
5 
6 


9 

8 
9 

12 
18 
17 
21 
58 


24.92 


2 


Eiist Boston .... 




14.78 


3 


Charlestown . . . 




15.51 


4 


Brighton 

West Eoxbury.. 

Dorchester 

Roxbury . . .... 

City Proper .... 


2 
2 

2 


21.74 


5 
6 

7 
8 


* • • • ■ 

7 

5 
14 
51 


51.00 
43.33 
45.15 
66.50 












6 


55 


91 


152 


282.93 



Street Department. 



75 



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76 



City Docuiment No. 36. 



1891. 



No. 


Districts. 


1 

Miles, day work. 


Miles, contract woik. 


Totiil. 


1 


South Boston. . . 


20.42 


4.5 


24.9-' 


2 


East Boston 


6.74 


8.04 


14.78 


3 


Charlestown 


.5.99 


9.52 


15.51 


4 


Brighton 

"West Roxbury. . 


21 74 




21.74 


5 


30.77 


20.23 


51.00 


6 


Dorchester 


34.38 


8.95 


43.33 


7 


Roxbury 


17.47 


27.68 


45.15 


8 


South yard 


6.161 

1 






9 


Back Bay 


5.57 i- 

1 


52.15 


66.50 


10 


North yard 


2.62 J 








151.86 


131.07 


282.93 






or 


or 








2,000,000 sq. yds. 


2,692,000 sq. yds. 





Cost of city and day work, exclusive of 

supervision $332 00 per mile 

Cost of contract work, exclusive of super- 
vision 312 44 " 



Entire cost of city and day work per 1,000 sq. yds. ^ 
$23.17 per season, exclusive of water. 

Cost to city of contract work, which was paid for also by 
the abutters, per 1,000 sq. yds. = $16.38 per season, exclu- 
sive of water. 

In comparing the cost of the " contract work " with the 
cost of the day work done by the city, it must be borne in 
mind that the cost of the contract work as stated is the 
amount which the city has paid the contractors, and that an 
unknown amount has been paid several contractors by the 
abutters on the streets. Of the 91 contract carts, the city 
pays for only about 48 carts, while the other 43 collect 
entirely from the abutters. 



Street Department. 



77 



Monthly Exhibit Sheet. (Averajje larg-e month.) 





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South Boston, 


3 


$197 33 


6 


$900 00 


$1,097 33 


1,753 


$140 24 


$1,237 57 


East Boston . 


5 


550 00 


3 


450 00 






1,000 00 


7931 


63 46 


1,063 46 


Charlestown . 


6 


700 00 


3 


450 00 






1,150 00 


8671 


69 41 


1,219 41 


Brighton . . . 






10 

8 


1,500 00 
1 200 00 


2 

2 


$300 00 
300 00 


1,800 00 
2,575 89 


4,051 
3,088 


324 08 
247 04 


2,124 08 


M'est Roxbury, 


7 


1,075 89 


2,822 93 


l^orchester . . 


5 


1,082 50 


10 


1,500 00 


2 


300 00 


2,882 50 


3,234 


258 76 


3,141 26 


Roxbury . . 


14 


1,901 67 


7 


1,030 00 






2,951 67 


2,133 


170 69 


3,122 36 


City Proper . 


51 


1,786 44 


7 


1,050 00 


6 




2,836 44 


3,247 


259 77 


3,096 21 


Total . . . 


91 


$7,293 83 


54 


$8,100 00 


$900 00 


$16,293 83 


19,168 


$1,533 45 


$17,827 28 



The summary of the method pursued this year shows the 
following classes of work : 

1st. Work done by city carts. 

2d. Work done by hired carts at city's expense. 

3d. Work done by contractors' carts, under contract, at 
city's expense. 

4th. Work done by contractors' carts with partial com- 
pensation from the city. 

5th. Work done by contractors at the expense of the 
abutters. 

The work in City Proper was almost entirely of the fifth 
class. 

The summary of the results for this year shows that 6 
city carts and 55 carts hired by the day were used, and 
that contracts were held with 22 different parties, who re- 
quired 91 watering-carts for the routes which they covered. 
This makes a total number of carts 152, and as some of 
these carts held from 1,000 to 1,500 gallons, they were 
equivalent to 165 carts of 600 gallons each. 

The number of miles watered by city and day work is 
151.86. 

The number of miles watered by contract is 131.07. 

With this plant the total numl^er of miles watered has 
been 282.93. The total expenditure for this work has been 



78 



City Document No. oC^. 



$104, 203. 02, jind the streets have been Avatercd in dry 
weather from two to four times per day; of this sum, the 
amount of the AA^ater bill for two years has been included, 
as the bill for 18U0 was paid out of the appro})riation for 
18i)l. 

As the Street Department was at the expense of watering 
in front of a large number of public buildings, it seemed 
just that the department having control of them should pay 
for the watering of the streets in front of this property. 

An arrangement was therefore made with the Superinten- 
dent of Public Buildings, whereby the streets in front of 
several school-houses were watered, at the foUoAving rates : 



Name. Rate per month. 


Name. Rate 


per month. 


Allston 


$3 


35 


Gaston . 


$10 00 


Adams . 


5 


15 


George street 


3 60 


Atherton 


1 


85 


George Putnam 


2 15 


Adams street 


3 


00 


Green street . 


1 10 


Andrews 


1 


25 


Haverhill street 


3 85 


Austin . 


1 


15 


Howard Grammar . 


3 65 


Agassiz 


4 


25 


Howe . 


1 75 


Bowdoin 


3 


10 


High and Latin 


22 00 


Bennett 


3 


75 


Hyde . 


3 75 


Benjamin Pope 


- 5 


50 


High (Charles- 




Bunker Hill Gram- 






. town) 


3 45 


mar . 


4 


60 


Harvard hill . 


2 20 


Bunker Hill Pri- 






Hancock 


50 


mary 


1 


60 


Hillside 


4 50 


Cyrus Alger . 


4 


10 


High (Elm street, 




Chapman 


3 


10 


W. K.) 


4 25 


Charles Sumner 


2 


90 


High (Dorchester 




Canterbury street 


4 


40 


avenue) 


8 15 


Common street 




65 


Harris . 


i) 60 


Cushman 


2 


25 


Howard avenue 


1 65 


Chestnut avenue 


1 


20 


Harvard 


2 50 


Clinch . 


6 


10 


Hugh O'Brien 


7 90 


Capen . 


4 


25 


Heath street . 


3 CO 


Dudley . 


7 


40 


Joshua Bates 


3 25 


Dorchester-Everett 


, 1 


50 


Lawrence 


5 00 


D wight Primary 


1 


60 


Lyman . 


6 25 


Drake . 


4 


10 


Lewis . 


5 00 


Everett . 


6 


10 


Lowell . 


7 10 


Eustis . 


3 


20 


Lucretia Crocker . 


5 00 


Florence 


5 


15 


M i n 1 Grammar 




Francis street 


1 


50 


(new) 


2 75 


Frothingham . 


4 


00 


Maitin . 


y 35 


Glen road 


2 


75 


Moulton street 


85 



Street Department. 



Name. Rate 

Mead street . 

Mt. Pleasant ave- 
nue . 

Mt. Vernon 

Norcross 

Noble . 

Oak square 

Old High (Dor 
Chester avenue) 

Old Minot . 

Prescott 

Phillips street 

Polk street 

Poplar street 

Quincy street 

Rice Grammar 

Roxbury street 

Shurtl eff Grammar 

Sherwin 

Stoughton 

Smith street . 



per month. 

$90 

75 

2 00 

4 00 

7 00 

18 35 

9 75 
1 90 
15 
40 
20 
90 
05 
35 
25 
90 



6 55 
3 00 
3 50 



Name. Rate 

Savin Hill avenue . 

Thos. N. Hart 

Tileston 

Ticknor 

Thomas street 

Vernon street 

Wells 

Warren 

Webster street 

Winchell 

Washington street 

(near Glen road) . 
Washington street 

(near Forest Hills 

station) 
Way street . 
W ashington street 

(Germantown) . 
Yeoman street 



per month. 

$2 (>5 

2 25 
5 15 

3 00 

1 25 
75 

3 15 

4 50 
75 

2 90 



1 80 



3 50 
60 



90 
15 



Total 



. $362 10 



An arrangement was also made with the Fire Department 
to water in front of the various eno-ine and hook-and-ladder 
houses, at the following rates : 



Number. 

13 
16 
18 
19 
20 
28 
29 
30 
33 



6 
10 
15 
16 



Engine-Houses . 



Hook and Ladder. 



Rate per month. 


. $3 75 




3 00 




1 00 




1 25 




1 25 




2 50 




3 50 




2 25 




4 10 


. 3 00 


. 2 50 


4 25 




3 25 



Total 



15 P-^ 



80 



City Document No. 36. 



An arrangement was made with the Police Department to 
water in front of the various police stations, at the following 
rates ; 



Police Stations. 



Xiimbcr. 



8 



10 

11 

12 

13 

U 

15 

16 

Walnut-street Police Station, Neponset . 

Centre-street Police Station, West Roxbury 

Mattapan Police Station, River street 

Washington street, Ward 24 

Total 



Rate per month. 


. $1 00 


. 3 


50 


. 4 


75 


. 2 


75 


. 3 


25 


. 1 


50 


1 


75 


1 


75 


. 3 


50 


. 2 


00 




75 




75 


. 2 


00 


. 5 


00 



. $34 25 



An ordinance relating to the duties of the Superintendent 
of Streets became a law on December 13, 1891, and reads 
as follows : 



'^Be it_ ordained, etc. : 

" Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordinances of the year 1890, 
as amended by chapter 1 of the ordinances of the year 
1891, is hereby amended in the first section by inserting be- 
tween the words 'repair ' and 'shall' in the seventh line the 
words 'shall keep the streets properly watered.' " 

The Superintendent was accordingly requested to include 
in his annual estimates a sum necessary for this purpose, and 
the sum of $250,000 has been reported as meeting the sub- 
stantial requirements for street-watering for the coming 
year. 

The cost of watering the streets comes strictly under the 
head of the current expenses of the Street Department, and 
it is therefore impracticable to l)orrow money outside of the 
del)t limit for this purpose. Taking into account the great 
demands for money to be expended on new works of per- 
manent improvement and importance, it is also inadvisable 
to pay for street-watering by means of a special loan. 



Street Department. 81 

The demands of the various city departments always ex- 
ceed by several million dollars the amount Avhich can be 
raised under the $9 tax limit, and there is therefore no hope 
of obtaining the large additional sum necessary for the ex- 
pense of street-watering from the money raised in the tax 
levy. 

The question then becomes, How to do away with the 
present unjust method of paying for street- watering, and at 
the same time, in view of the financial condition of the city, 
take the matter entirely under municipal control. 

The only solution of this problem is believed to be by a 
method of local assessment, an ordinance for the authoriza- 
tion of which has been submitted by the department to the 
City Council, and is now under consideration. 

The ordinance as submitted reads as follows : 

" An Ordinance to provide for Watering the Public 
Streets of the City of Boston, made under Au- 
thority OF THE Legislature, Chapter 179 of the 
Acts of 1891. 

" Be it ordained hy the City Council of Boston, as follows: 

"Article 1. Chapter 18 of the revised ordinances 
of 1890, as amended March 2, 1891, is hereby still further 
amended and extended to read as follows : 

" Section 23. The superintendent of streets is hereby 
authorized to keep the public streets properly watered, and 
is directed to do, by contract or otherwise, the work of said 
watering, in accordance with the following plan : The city 
is to be divided into such sprinkling districts as the said 
superintendent shall determine, in each of which shall be 
specified the streets and parts thereof to be watered, together 
with the estimated total lengths of streets sprinkled, ex- 
pressed in miles, and the approximate area between curbs 
in square yards. 

" k5ECT. 24. To enable the superintendent to carry out 
the provisions of this ordinance, he is hereb}^ authorized to 
organize a new division to be known as the Street- Watering 
Division, and to appoint a deputy superintendent thereof, 
subject to the approval of the mayor, and to employ the in- 
spectors and extra clerical force necessary to carry out the 
work of the division. 

"Sect. 25. The cost of the foregoing work shall be paid 
as follows : The cost of administration shall be wholly 
borne by the city ; all other expenses for watering, actually 
incurred in a given district, shall be assessed as a special tax 
in favor of the city by the superintendent of streets on the 



82 City Document Xo. 3(3. 

adjoinino; property fronlinir on the streets, ])nl)lic ])l:ice.s, 
jiiul purtts thereof so watered in said district, in the ])r()j)or- 
tion that the a})i)roximate frontage of each lot watered in 
said district (borderino- on the street or public ])lace) hears 
to the total numl)er of linear feet of all property so Avatered 
in the district under consideration. Said special tax-hills 
shall be made out and certified to the auditor by the super- 
intendent of streets, and by the auditor delivered to the 
collector of the city of Boston on or before the first day of 
Oetober in each year, or as soon thereafter as practicable ; 
said special tax shall be and become a lien on the propeity 
charged therewith from the said first day of October of the 
year in which they are issued, and may be collected of the 
owner of the land in the name of and by the city of Boston 
like any other claim, in any court of competent jurisdiction, 
with interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum from the 
first day of November in each 3"ear, and seven per cent. Der 
annum from the first day of November in each year, if unpaid 
on the first day of Januar}^ of the following year. If not 
paid by the first day of April, they shall be transmitted to 
the corporation counsel for collection by suit or otherwise. 

"Sect. 26. All money received by the city from the 
proceeds of the special tax-bills aforesaid shall be placed to 
the credit of the street department, for the purpose of de- 
fraying the expense of street watering. 

"Article 2. Any other ordinance relating to street 
watering in conflict herewith is hereby repealed." 

This system would return to the city treasury a consider- 
able portion of the sum expended. 

In support of the ordinance assessing the cost of street- 
watering on abutters, the following data is submitted : 

Street-watering in most of the large cities of this country 
is paid for entirely by the abutters, and is treated as a 
private enterprise. 

In others, there is a system of local assessment, the work 
being done by the city. In order to show the practical 
working of this system, the following city is cited : 

St. Louis. 

The sj^stem of street-watering now in vogue in the city 
of St. Louis is on the local-assessment plan under municipal 
control, the water being furnished for this purpose free of 
expense, and each abutter paying a fixed rate per front foot 
of estate. 

There are within th<? city limits about 272 miles of 
macadamized streets and 70 miles of paved streets, distrib- 



Street Depart^ient. 83 

uted as follows : Of Telford, 18.32 miles ; wooden block 
on concrete base, 5. 26 miles; granite block, 41.35 miles; 
asphalt, 3.95 miles; limestone block and old Nicholson wocd 
block, 1.11 miles. 

There are also 80 miles of paved alleys. Total, 422 miles 
of streets and alleys. 

Of this total mileage 364 miles are properly sprinkled for 
the season, for a period of 8| months. 

The city is divided into 43 sprinkling districts of from 
7 to miles each, and the work is let out by contract. 

The average length of each district is a little over 8 
miles. Average amount paid for each district is $3,224. 

The street-sprinkling superintendent has charge of the 
work at a salary of $2,500 per annum, and is assisted by 16 
inspectors at a salary of $1,000 per annum each, with $20 
per month allowance for a horse and buggy. 

The total amount of the contracts for 

1890 $138,621.20 

The average cost per mile for the season . 336.93 

The average cost per front foot . . .0353 

The city recovered by assessment . . 122,546.62 

The paved streets are sprinkled four times daily, and the 
unimproved and macadamized streets three times daily, 
Sundays included. 

The rate of special tax per front foot for sprinkling has 
been decreasino; each year, it having been as hioh as $.0589 
in 1888, and $.0482 iii 1889, while for 1890 it is only $.0353. 
This reduction may be attributed to more careful supe i - 
tendence and systematic laying out of work. 

The assessment plan involves a large amount of clerical 
work, covering a space of about three months, during which 
time it is found necessary to employ temporary clerks, 
involving an expenditure of about $2,500, whose duty it i-^ 
to perform the computations and to issue about 61,000 
assessment bills. 

All expense of administration is paid by the city, but the 
actual amount of each sprinkling contract is assessed 
on the abutting property in proportion that its linear 
feet front bears to the total linear feet of assessable frontage 
of the whole district in which the contract is made. The 
rates in the different sprinkling districts only varied in 1889 
from $0.0371 to $0.0630 per linear foot, averaging $0.0482. 

Paved streets are sprinkled twice a day during the 
months of March, April, and November, and three times a 
day during the months of May and October, and four times 
a day during June, July, August, and September. 



84 City DoctraiENT No. 36. 

TJie unjjaved streets are sprinkled twice a day during 
March, April, May, October, and November, and three times 
a day during June, July, August, and September. 

One sprinkling only is required on Sunday, except the 
Lindell avenue, the principal driveway to the park. 

The street commissioner determines whether rain has ob- 
viatied the necessity of sprinkling, also whether the con- 
tractor has given the requisite number of sprinklings and the 
proper quantity of water, and he can change and regulate 
the time, if found necessary. 

The work in this city has proved more satisfactory and 
more economical year by year as the system has been per- 
fected. 

Estimated Cost qf Work in Boston. 

In calculating the cost of street- watering in this city, it is 
necessary to figure on a watering season of eight months, as 
it is well known that in previous years the watering has 
been delayed until long after the time when it was needed. 

Of our 434 miles of streets, it is estimated that — 

1. 47^% are 40 feet wide or less. 

2. 47 J % are more than 40 and less than QQ> feet wide. 

3. 5% are more than (^Q feet wide. 
Thus making 206 miles of 1. 

206 " " 2.- 
22 " " 3. 

Of the first class it is thought that there are about Q^ 
miles that will not need watering in any event, on account of 
their isolation, shade, and other considerations, leaving — 

1. 140 miles requiring a single spread. 

2. 206 " " a double spread. 

3. 22 " " three or more spreads. 

65 carts will provide for street requiring a single spread. 
130 carts will provide for street requiring a double spread. 
25 carts will provide for street requiring three spreads. 
220 carts will provide all that is necessary, which, at 
$1,050 each year, will cost $231,000, and if we add for 
supervision and assessment expense . . $12,000 

Water 7,000 

The total cost will be 250,000 

Tills is the least sum with which the work should be un- 
dertaken the first year. In subsequent years the expense 
per mile would undoubtedly be reduced, owing to more per- 
fect orgaiiizjition and the lower prices to be obtained by 
competition junong contractors. 



Street Department. 85 

Water-posts. 

As the amount of work that a water-cart can cover in a 
day is largely influenced l)y the distribution of water-posts, 
the sul>ject was investig-ated early in the spring and a map 
made showing the location of all water-posts in existence at 
that time, and a requisition made on the Water Department 
to establish new ones at selected points, which was complied 
with, to the better accomplishment of street-sprinkling. 

The whole number in existence May 19, 1891 . . 228 

The number abandoned during 1891 .... 2 

The number changed in location during 1891 . . 2 

The number established during 1891 .... 45 
The whole number now in use . . . . .271 

A large number of new posts will have to be established 
during the coming season in order to economically cover the 
territory desired. 



SANITAEY DIVISION. 



In order to obtain more efiioiency in the work of cleaning 
the streets, the Sanitary Police Department, when the con- 
solidation of the departments took place, was divided into 
the Street-Cleaning Division and the Sanitary Division. 
The Sanitary Division attends to the removal of house-oft'al 
and the removal of house and store dirt. 

Removal of Offal. 

The oflal of the city is collected by 81 offal-carts (66 of 
which are owned by the city) and 179 men. Such of the 
offal as is fresh is taken by the teams to the different yards 
of the department, and disposed of to farmers, who remove it 
daily. The offal of Charlestown is taken to the yard at 
Maiden bridge ; the offal of East Boston is collected and dis- 
posed of by contract ; the offal of the City Proper, South 
Boston, and Dorchester is conveyed to the yard at the South 
End ; the offal of Roxbury and West Roxbury is conveyed 
to the yard on Highland street ; and the offal of Brighton is 
disposed of by contract. Such of the offal as is decayed is 
removed to the dump-scow and is towed to sea ; the decayed 
oflal thus removed amounts to about three per cent, of the 
total amount collected. 

The subject of the disposal of offal has been considerably 
discussed during the last year. Complaint was made both 



8() City Documeis't Xo. 36. 

of the method of disposal, bv towing the decayed offal to 
sea, and also of the method of sellino: the fresh ofl'al to 
farmers. Complaint concerning the method of dumping it 
at sea came from neighboring towns on the seashore, wdiere 
it was alleged that it was deposited on the beaches, to the 
great inconvenience of the residents. On investigation, it 
was proved that these complaints were well-founded, as the 
refuse picked up on the beaches in Swampscott and vicinity 
undoubtedly came from the city of Boston's dumping-scow. 
Tlie location of the dumping-place w^as therefore changed ; 
and instead of using a single dump, as had been the custom 
in former years, a number of dumps were arranged so that 
advantage might be taken of the wind to keep the refuse 
from floating ashore. The accompanying chart shows the 
(lifierent dumping-stations and the manner of using them. 
Since this change has been made, no complaint from any 
source has been received, as it is possible to choose a sta- 
tion from which the garbage cannot be blown ashore. 

The practice of selling offal to farmers has been criticised 
during the year on the ground that the swine fed on this 
material became unhealthy, and that the meat produced and 
sold in this city must have a bad effect on the health of the 
c(mmiunity. The city now derives the sum of $30,000 per 
year from the sale of this offal ; and as there seems to be no 
other cheap method of disposing of it, and as it is not yet 
satisfactorily demonstrated that this offal wdien fresh is unfit 
to be fed to swine, no other method of disposaj has been 
seriously considered. 

The cremation of offal, w-hich has been adopted by some 
cities, has in almost every case proved a failure. Not only 
is the method very expensive, costing, as it does, from 
thirty to sixty cents per ton, but a very serious nuisance is 
created. This nuisance arises from the fact that it is almost 
impossible to entirely consume the offjil, even at the most 
intense heat ; the foul odors given off during the process of 
combustion also create an intolerable nuisance in the vicinity 
of the crematory. Should the time come when the country 
towns around Boston prohibit the bringing in of offal into 
their Ihnits, and the city's market for it is thus cut off, re- 
course can be had to one of two methods, either of wdiich 
would be entirely satisfactory. 

First. Towing all offal out to sea and dumping it. The 
expense of this method of disposal would be about ten cents 
[)er ton ; and provided that care is taken in selecting proper 
dumping-stations, so that by no possibility could the offal 
float ashore, this method would be as satisfactory and eco- 
nomical as any. 



ti; J » 



C Mm 






3 ^\'vif;i'fri''i^*'i'' 









i * 







Street Department. 



87 



Second. By treatins: the oftal chemically. The city of 
Providence has adopted a chemical method of treating- offal, 
by which the material, after being collected and removed to 
the works, is subjected to the action of naphtha. The 
grease is extracted and sold, and the residue, which comes 
out of the extractors perfectly drj^ and odorless, is ground up 
for a fertilizer. This process is patented, and the inventor 
offered to erect a plant at the expense of his company in 
Boston, and treat the offal for the sum of two and one-half 
cents per head of population, provided he could be assured 
of a contract for a long term of years. The process, as 
carried on at Providence, creates no nuisance, and is well 
adapted to all cities situated where it is impossible to dis- 
pose of the garbage at sea. 

The abandonment of our present method, and the adop- 
tion of either of the above-described methods, means a 
difference of $42,000 to the city, as a revenue of $30,000 
per year vv^ould be given up, and an increased expenditure of 
$12,000 would be necessitated. 

Complaints are frequently received concerning the failure 
of this division promptly to remove ashes or offal. On in- 
vestigation, it is usually shown that the parties making the 
complaint are at fault. The regulations of the division 
require that the ashes and offal must be kept separate, put 
in suitable receptacles, and so placed as to be convenient of 
access to the employees of the division. If any of these 
conditions are violated, the employees have orders to refuse 
to remove the ashes or offal, until the city regulations are 
complied with. 

The rapid growth of the city has resulted in a greatly in- 
creased amount of work done Iby this division. The follow- 
ing table shows the amount of offal removed for the last ten 
years : 

Year. 

1882 . 

1883 . 

1884 . 

1885 . 

1886 . 

1887 . 

1888 . 

1889 . 

1890 . 
1891^ . 

Each load of offal is equivalent to fifty-seven cubic feet. 







Number of loads 


28,385 






. 27,408 






. 28,520 






. 31,206 






. 33,170 






. 36,724 






. 37,709 






. 40,183 






. 40,525 






. 46,742 



1 From Jan. ], 189 1, to Feb. 1 1892. 



88 City Document No. 36. 

The steady increase of the amount of work to be done 
will require ceitain additions to the plant of the division, 
some of which are extremely important, and should be done 
at once. A new wharf (estimated expense |()0,000) must 
soon be purchased at the North End, where another dumpino- 
stiition can be located. A new depot for the disposal of ofial 
must be established in Dorchester, in order to do away with 
the present long haul to the South End depot. 

If any further argument were needed for the establishment 
of a new dumping-wharf at the North End, the report of the 
Deputy Superintendent, wherein it is shown that the expense 
of teaming the ashes and house-dirt to the various dumps on 
waste land in the vicinity of the city is 60 cents per load, 
whereas the expense of disposing of the material by towing 
to sea is only 30 cents per load, should be conclusive. 
Fifteen thousand loads of ashes and house and store dirt now 
hauled to Cambridge could be disposed of in this way at an 
annual saving of $4,500. 

Baeney Dumping— Scow. 

The offal and refuse now towed to sea is removed in the 
patent Barney dumping-scows. These scows dump their 
load in a compact mass, and are the best scows yet devised 
for the purpose. The load is discharged into the water six 
feet below the sea level instead of being scattered on the 
surface, and being thoroughly saturated through absorption, 
is prepared to sink at once. The city now owns one scow, 
for which the sum of $12,000 and a yearly royalty pf $1,500 
was paid, and rents another scow at a yearly rental of 
$5,475. It would be much more economical to buy the 
scow we now rent. Two new scows should be purchased, to 
use in connection with the new dumping-wharf at the North 
End, the establishment of which was previously recom- 
mended. 

By obtaining competition this year on the towing of the 
dumping-scows to sea, a much more favorable rate has l)een 
detained. The former price for towing to the dumping- 
station was $29, with an additional allowance of $6 for night 
and Sunday work. The rate obtained by the division this 
year is $23, with no allowance for night or Sunday work. 

In this connection it is recommended that the new tow- 
boat required for use by the Sewer Division be Imilt at 
once. This boat, the estimated cost of which is $20,000, 
would, in addition to doing the regular work for the Sewer 
Division, be able to do all towing for the Sanitarj^ Division, 
and save an annual expenditure of about $7,500, now })aid 
to the various tow-boat companies. 



V twk0 



iffi 



'm. 





1 



Street Department. 



8d 



Eemoval of Ashes. 

The following table shows the amount of ashes and house 
and store dirt collected during the last ten years : 



Year. 

1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
18911 



Number of loads. 

. 159,197 

. 169,610 

. 182,642 

. 193,734 

. 209,129 

. 220,186 

. 233,514 

. 227,325 

. 245,730 

. 313,464 



Each load of ashes is equivalent to 43 cubic feet. 

Comparative statement of number of loads of ashes col- 
lected clurino- 16 weeks in winter and 16 weeks in summer : 



1889. Nov. 29 to Dec. 27, inclusive . 
Dec. 28 to Jan. 24, 1890 . 

Jan. 25 to Feb. 21, 1890, inclusive . 
Feb. 22 to March 22, 1^90, inclusive 

Total number of loads . . . . 

1890. May 3 to May 30, inclusive 
May 31 to June 27, inclusive . 
June 28 to July 25, inclusive . 
July 26 to Aug. 22, inclusive . 



Total number of loads 



Winter 
Summer 

Difference for winter 



/Summavi/. 



19,975 
20,685 
21,193 
21,013 

82,866 

19,741 
16,765 
15,083 
13,650 

65,239 



82,866 
65,239 

17,627 



The above table shows that a steady increase of the num- 
ber of loads of ashes removed has taken place, owing to the 
growth of the city. The cost of the removal of ashes is con- 
stantly increasing, owing to the filling up of convenient 



1 From Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892. 



90 City DocmiEXT No. 36. 

dumpina-oTouncls, and the extra expense of teamino; tlie 
ashes to the remote location of those now in use. The pro- 
posed new dnmjiing-wharf at the North End, from whence 
the ashes of that part of the city could be towed to sea, 
would reduce the cost of disposing of this material very 
considerably. The nine-hour hnv passed in 1891 has largely 
increased the cost of running the Sanitary Division, as each 
team loses one trip per day from the number of trips made 
under the ten-hour law. When the number of trips that a 
team can make is only five or six, it is seen that the per- 
centage of work lost is a large one. 

Suggestions have l)een made that the ashes and garbage 
be removed during the night. Considering the fact that the 
receptacles for both ashes and garbage are kept by house- 
holders in locations not accessible to the employees of the 
division at night, and also taking into account the inadvisa- 
bility of ol:)liging householders to put the receptacles on the 
sidewalk, it is difficult to arrange a plan whereby removal at 
night can be adopted. 

Transport ATiox of Prisoners. 

As the Sanitary Division was yearly put to a large ex- 
pense in the transportation of prisoners from the various 
city lock-ups to the Court-House, and was obliged to main- 
tain prison vans and horses for this purpose, the matter was 
looked into, as this duty seemed to be somewhat foreign to 
the collection of ashes and offal. The practice dated back to 
the time when the only city department that OAvned teams 
was the Health Department, and for that reason the trans- 
portation of prisoners had been saddled on to it. A com- 
munication from the Corporation Counsel, in answer to an 
inquiry from this department, showed that this expense 
should be borne by the County of Suffolk, and arrangements 
have now been made, whereby the expense of this work is 
borne by the county. 



price paid by the Sanitary Police Department in for- 
?ars to contractors for single teams was $5.50 per day, 



Hired Teams. 

The 
mer ye: 

which price included an extra man. The department fur- 
nished an ash or swill cart, as the case might be, and the 
contractor furnished two men and a horse to run the cart. 
As the rate in the other divisions was $;).00 per day for a 
teamster, horse, and cart (cart being furnished by the con- 
tractor), and as extra labor could be hired for $2.00 per day, 
the price of $5.50 was reduced to $5.00, to correspond with 



pp^;^^«;^?i•l^i»Mi;ffl|^^ 



'!l'-'iii. 







42 ^s 






^ ? 5 



- J I i t i §■ 
%% if 1 

"' ?i. I ill 

:i 




Street Depart:\ient. 91 

the other divisions. A saving of several thousand dollars 
has resulted from this operation. 

Eefuse Material . 

■ The value of the refuse collected by the Sanitary Division 
and deposited at the different dumps is very considerable. 
In New York, the privilege of "trimming the scows," or 
sorting over this refuse, is let by contract for the sum of 
about $1,600 per week, thus affording the city a consider- 
able revenue. The city of Boston has never derived any 
revenue from this source. The explanation that has always 
l)een made to account for this fact is, that the residents of 
New York are more wasteful, and that material which is 
there thrown into ash-barrels is here saved by the house- 
holders and sold by them. 

The department this year has investigated this matter 
more closely, with the result of obtaining an offer of $200 
per week for the privilege of sorting over the dumps. This 
would not only result in an income of $10,400 per year 
(which would probably largely increase as soon as the 
system was established and competition could be obtained) , 
but would also effect a saving of about $10,000 on the wages 
of men now employed by the department on the dumps. 
The only argument to be advanced against the letting of 
such a contract is that a number of poor people who now 
make a living by sorting over this refuse, would be deprived 
of this method of getting a livelihood. This matter has been 
referred to the City Council for settlement. 

The report of the Deputy Superintendent gives tables 
showing the cost of the removal of ashes, house and store 
dirt, and offal, together with the amount of work done. 
Tables showing the cost of horse-shoeing, cost of feedino; 
horses, and other matters of interest, are also annexed. 



SEWER DIVISION. 



The Sewer Division has charge of the following work : 

1. The maintenance and construction of all common 
sewers and catch-basins. 

2. The maintenance of the Main Drainage Works. 

3. The maintenance of Stony brook. 

4. The maintenance and construction of all street cul- 
"erts. 



92 City Document No. 3(). 

5. The preparation of plans, and the eng-ineering and 
supervision required on the construction and maintenance of 
all work connected with the division. 

6. The granting of permits for all connections to l)e m;\de 
with the common sewers, and the custody of bonds tiled by 
drain-layers authorized to make such connections. 

7. The levying of assessments on estates benelited by the 
construction of sewers. 

The present condition of the common sewers, together 
with a brief statement of the work done this year and the 
work to be done in the near future, in order that the effi- 
ciency of the sewers may be improved, is shown in the fol- 
lowing statement : 

East Boston. 

Most of the old wooden sewers by which this section was 
formerly sewered have been replaced by good brick sewers, 
on a gravel foundation, the mud which formed the foundation 
of the old sewers having been removed to hardpan and re- 
placed with gravel. The remainder of the defective sewers 
should be rebuilt as rapidly as appropriations will permit. 
A number of outlets need to be enlarged and extended, and 
steps to that end have been taken. The portion of the 
Orient Heights system, for which an appropriation was made 
last year, has been more than half completed ; the remainder, 
which should be built the coming season, consists of 850 
feet of brick and 2,000 feet of pipe sewer in Saratoga, Ford, 
Breed, Gladstone, and Leyden streets. 

Work done during 1891. 

Thirteen thousand one hundred and twenty-two linear feet 
of sewers were built in East Boston during the past year. 
The amount is about equally divided between brick and pipe 
sewers. In Bremen, Orleans, Sumner, and Porter streets, 
3,369 linear feet of brick sewer were built to replace de- 
fective sewers that had been built on a poor foundation. In 
order to secure a suitable foundation, it was necessary to 
excavate a considerable depth of mud, and replace the exca- 
vation with gravel; 3,329 linear feet of brick and pipe 
scM'er were built in Bennington, AYalley, Leyden, and Glad- 
stone streets. These sewers form a part of the Orient 
Heights S3\stem, and will l)e connected with the jNIetropoli- 
tan system when the latter is completed. The other sewers 
built in this district were mostly small branch sewers, and 
require no special mention. 



Street Department. 93 

ClIARLESTOWN. 

The Bunker Hill and Vine-street sewer, begun in 1887, 
has been completed, and a lai-ge territory which formerly 
drained through Polk and Monument streets into Medford 
street has been diverted down Bunker Hill street so as to 
relieve the Medford-street sewer. In the vicinity of Ar- 
lington avenue and Beacham street, the sewerage is unsatis- 
factory. Here a separate system of house sewers may be 
built to connect with the Metropolitan sewer which will be 
located probably in Alford street. The old sewer can then be 
connected with surface drains. The sewers in Charlestown, 
generally, are very defective. A large proportion of the 
old sewers are the old-fashioned square affairs, with earth 
])ottom, brick sides, laid without mortar, and tops com- 
posed of flat stones. They are liable to hold together for 
years or to break down at any moment ; so that it is difii- 
cult to say what may or may not be required ; but it would 
be good policy to rebuild them as fast as the money is 
available. It is next to impossible to clean or flush them, 
and when they become obstructed, the streets have to be 
o[)ened to clear them. 

Work done during 1891. 

Two thousand and seventy linear feet of sewers were built 
in Charlestown during the past year. They consist mostly 
of small branch sewers, and require no special mention. 

City Proper and Back Bay. 

Many of the old wooden sewers in the city proper are in very 
bad condition, and are nearly ready to fall in ; notably those 
in Beverly, Billerica, and Commercial streets. The sewer in 
Fayette street is badly broken, and should be rebuilt imme- 
diately. The district drained by Canal street, and bounded 
approximately by Causeway, Beverly, Endicott, Hanover, 
Portland, and Merrimac streets, is in as bad condition, from 
a sanitary point of view, as can be imagined. Before the 
intercepting sewers were built there was a continuous low- 
grade sewer across the city, running through Canal street, 
Haymarket square, Blackstone, Clinton, Commercial, and 
Central streets, with a summit near Hanover street, from 
which the sewage flowed both ways, east and west. The 
east-side intercepting sewer was low enough to pass under 
the outlet sewer and intercept the sewage without obstruct- 
ing it, but the west-side intercepting sewer was so much 
higher that it dammed up the Canal-street sewer about 



94 City Document Xo. 3G. 

three and one-half feet. A\] that portion of tlie system 
west of Hanover street, extendino- to the boundaries named, 
has been partly or wholly filled with water and accunmlated 
sewaii'c since 1883. Near the boundaries named, the sewers 
rise high enough to be partly above the level of the dam 
formed by the intercepting sewer, but in the centre and at 
the outlet of the system the sewers are entirely full at all 
times, so that they cannot be entered, nor can any appliance 
be used to clean them short of pumping out the entire 
system. To remedy this trouble, either of two schemes 
may be followed in dealing with the districts. The first is 
to rebuild all the sewers at a higher grade, high enough to 
drain into the intercepting sewer. Each branch sewer 
would then have to be followed back and rebuilt until a 
point was reached where the old sewer was higher than the 
intercepting sewer. It would be of no use to rebuild the 
main sewer at the higher level, leaving the branch sewers down 
at the old grade ; they would be dammed up just as badly as 
before. The sewers would all be raised varying amounts, 
from a few inches to three and one-half feet ; therefore 
most of the house connections would have to be raised also. 
The whole system would have to be rebuilt at once ; if any 
portion were left, its condition would be just as bad as ever. 
The surface of the streets would be dug up lengthways by 
the main sewer, and crossways by the house connections. 
It would be difficult to estimate the cost of such a jol), and 
the result would be that the whole sewer system would be 
left several feet higher than it is now, which mighty prove 
a poor policy in a business district where cellars are con- 
tinually l)eing carried deeper. The other scheme is to build 
a new main sewer across the city from the east-side inter- 
cepting sewer, which is about four feet lower than the west- 
side sewer at opposite points. One advantage of this plan 
is, that as soon as the proposed new intercepting sewer was 
built, the branch sewers would immediately drain out into 
it, and would not have to be rebuilt. Although the branch 
sewers are built of wood, they have been completely sub- 
merged, and are probably sound. They could be relniilt as 
the need became apparent, and the money became available. 
By this latter plan the new sewers would be at about the 
same grade as the old ones, and the house connections 
would, therefore, not have to be disturl)ed. 

The total cost of the latter scheme, including rebuilding 
all the branch sewers, is greater than the former, but the first 
cost of the latter scheme, inasmuch as it is only necessary to 
rebuild the main at present, is aliout $10,000 less than the 
former scheme. The line selected for the intercepting sewer 



Stkekt Department. 95 

in the latter scheme is lonoer than is absolutely necessary, 
but has been selected on account of the bad condition of the 
sewers in Custom-House square, Central and Comnieicial 
streets. These are old wooden sewers, running up and 
down hill without regular pitch , and holding continually fio u 
one to three feet of sewage and mud. The solids of the 
sewage lodge in the depressions, and remain until a sewer 
storm moves them along. These sewers should be replaced 
by smooth, self-cleaning brick sewers. This is all the more 
necessary for the reason that these sewers receive the sewage 
of the markets, containing large quantities of animal refuse. 
A branch could be extended to Dock square, from the main 
sewer of this scheme, to relieve that locality from floods; 
450 feet built in North street, from Blackstone street, would 
accomplish this. The drainage of the Faneuil Hall markets is, 
and has always been, in an unsatisfactory and unsanitary 
condition. The stalls, sinks, refrigerators, etc., drain down 
into cesspools, where the refuse of meat, fish, and poultry 
accumulates until the tank is full, when a plug is withdrawn 
and the whole mass flushed out into the sewers, which are 
the old wooden ones just described, where it remains decom- 
posing for an indefinite time, until swept away by a heavy 
rain-storm. The tanks not being large enough for the pres- 
ent requirements of the markets, overflow, tilling the space 
beneath the floor of the basement, and giving notice of the 
state of things by coming up through the floor. Inasmuch 
as these basements are much below the level of high tide, 
they cannot be drained when the sewer system is ill led by 
a rain occurring simultaneously with a high tide. Therefore 
space must be provided to stow the sewage during a few 
hours of high tide, until the level of the water in the sewers 
falls below that of the basement and allows of discharge. 
An ample storage-chamber, well ventilated and easily acces- 
sible, should be built in South Market street, and both 
markets drained into it by means of a pipe running down the 
centre of the basement. The present tanks could then be 
done away with. The storage-chamber should be drained 
into a self-cleansing sewer in which there is a constant flow, 
so that the animal refuse may be quickly carried to the Moon 
Island outlet. If the intercepting sewer across the city be 
built, as recommended above, it would aflTord a satisfactory 
outlet ; if not, a pipe sewer should be extended through South 
Market street to the intercepting sewer in Atlantic avenue. 
This class of refuse material should not be thrown into such 
a defective sewer as now exists in Commercial street. 

The description of the wooden sewers in the foregoing 
paragraphs applies to most of the old wooden sewers of the 



Of) City DoctnviENT No. 3G. 

North End and South Cove districts : they are practicall}' 
elongated cesspools. A properly constructed sewer carries 
sewage out of the inhabited portion of a city before decom- 
iiosition has time to take place. These old sewers fail to 
do this, but retain the sewage indefinitely. In addition to 
their defects as carriers of sewage, they have settled and 
their joints have opened, letting in the water from the tide, 
whicli still follows up old stone and pile wharves, which 
abound all through the tilled land of these localities. This 
water all goes to the intercepting sewers, increasing the 
burden upon the pumps. The time has come when these 
sewers should be replaced by tight self-cleansing sewers. 
In 1888-9 a large sewer was built in Essex and Federal 
streets and Mt. Washington avenue. The object was to 
intercept the great amount of sewage and drainage which 
flowed through Kingston and Beach streets ; carry it to tide- 
water by a new route, so as to isolate the Beach street 
district from the rest of the sewer system and connect it 
directly with the intercepting sewer. By this method the 
district would receive the benefit of the pumps of the 
Main Drainage Works in the same manner as do the Dover 
and Dedham street districts. This scheme involved shifting 
the district regulator from Dover street to a point near 
Beach street, and building small regulatcn's at the Oswego 
street and Harvard street connections. The scheme was 
completed except the building of these three I'egulators. 
In order to have the scheme work as designed, these regu- 
lators should be built. 

Attention has been called in a former report of this 
department to a sewer in Falmouth and Caledonia streets 
that is in a dangerous condition. It is a brick sewer built 
in 1881. Proper precautions were not taken to procure a 
foundation, and subsequent filling, to raise the grade of the 
street, caused a settlement of two feet or more in the sewer. 
Quite a large territory is dependent upon it for drainage, 
and about 360 feet of it should be rebuilt immediately, before 
it falls to pieces and causes trouble in the vicinity. 

The tract of land just laid out by the Board of Survey 
bounded by the Back Bay Fens and the B. & A. Iv.K., 
also that lying between Charlesgate West and Brookline 
avenue, the B. & A. K.Il. and Charles river, and also the 
new Commonwealth avenue and vicinity, from the "fork in 
the roads" to the l)ridge at Cottage Farm sttition, are ptirtic- 
ularly adapted to a separate system of sewerage. The prox- 
imity of the Charles Kiver, together >vith the watercourses 
through the Fens and the covered channel of Muddy Kiver, 
afford chances for short, cheap lines of surface drainage, and 



Street Department. 97 

the probability that these districts will be covered with the 
finest buildings in the city, renders it necessary that they 
should be ensured as far as is possible against the flooding 
of their cellars. This can be done by a system of house 
sewers (separate from the surfiice drains) , taking nothing 
but the house sewage and as much of the roof water as can- 
not be otherwise disposed of, and large enough to afford 
storage room for an hour or two. This system should be 
connected with the Metropolitan sewer, and guarded against 
the engorgement of that sewer by having regulators at every 
connection. 

The unusual width of these avenues has led to the pro- 
posed adoption of the plan of building a sewer on each 
side of the street instead of one in the middle. Two sewers, 
while increasing the first cost, will not double it, and will be 
a saving to the citj' in preserving a good paved or macad- 
amized surface for a number of years, as well as benefit the 
abutters by reducing the length of their drain connections. 

In the area bounded by St. Mary's street and two branches 
of the B. & A. R.R. the same system is desirable. A be- 
ginning of a sewer system has been built here on the old 
plan of the sewer in the middle of the street ; but it would 
not cost much to change to the other system, if the change 
were determined upon now. The Villa street district, so 
called, bounded by Huntington and Brookline avenues, 
Francis street and the park, can be served in the same way, 
with a double system of separate sewers. This plan of 
double sewers, one on each side of the street, will have to be 
followed extensively in the future on the new, wide main 
avenue, if there are to be any restrictions made as to open- 
ing the streets. 

Work done during 1891. 

Six thousand eight hundred and twenty-two linear feet of 
sewers were built in City Proper and Back Bay during the 
past year. Sewers were built in portions of Oak, Tyler, 
and Kingston streets to replace old and defective ones. 
On account of an insufiicient appropriation the rebuilding 
in Oak street could not be carried beyond Hudson street. 
That poii^ion of the old sewer between Hudson and Curve 
streets is in very bad condition, and should be rebuilt the 
coming season. There has been a long-felt need of improve- 
ment in the surface drainage of the lower part of Tremont 
.street. The fact of there being no sewer in that portion of 
the street opposite the Common, explains why the trouble 
was not sooner lemedied. Prior to laying the new pave- 
ment in Tremont street last fall, the necessary catch-basins. 



98 City Document No. 36. 

with 625 linear feet of surface drain for outlets, were bviilt. 
The improvement in the condition of the street during a 
heavy rain is very marked. Six hundred and fifty-two 
linear feet of surface drain has been laid in State street, be- 
tween Atlantic avenue and Commercial street, aftbrding 
great relief from surface water in this locality. 

The sewers built in Commonwealth avenue, Beacon and 
Eawley streets, the past season, are a part of a separate 
system for this vicinity. They connect with the sewer in 
Brookline avenue, which, at the present time, is being con- 
nected with the Charles River Yalley Metropolitan Sewer. 

The other sewers built in these districts require no special 
mention. 

South Bostox. 

There are many wooden sewers in South Boston, some of 
which are on the point of caving in. These sewers have 
rotted rapidly since tide-water was excluded from them by 
the building of tide-gates, etc., necessitated by their con- 
nection with the Main Drainage Works, and should be reliuilt 
without further delay. The districts about First and D 
streets which suffered from floods due to insufficient outlets 
for storm water will be provided for by the large storm 
overflow now building on the extension of D street. The 
outlets for the sewer system at B and Seventh streets, and 
also at D street and Dorchester avenue, on the west side 
of the peninsula, are in a bad condition, being of insufiicient 
size, and choked up by the filling constantly going on around 
the South Bay. The D street sewer from Dorchester avenue 
to Ninth street, though built only a few years ago, is badly 
settled and should be rebuilt. A comprehensive plan has 
been prepared for uniting the two outlets named above, 
into one at B and Seventh streets, through the O. C. E..K. 
freight yard. This sewer is to be built on the same line 
as the old one, which is too small and is badly broken and 
settled. This plan also includes rebuilding the D street 
sewer, and provides for sewering the depressed portion of D 
street under the O. C. R.R., where there has been so much 
trouble in past years. If this plan were carried out it 
would put the sewer system of that part of South Boston in 
very good condition. Much of the complaint from that 
section is due, not to any defect in the sewer where the 
trouble manifests itself, but to the sewage being dammed up 
by insufficient outlets. 

The South Boston system of intercepting sewers is now 
completed, but is not as yet provided with a suitable over- 
flow. One has been projected on the side of the old Kemp 



DORCHESTER BROOK SEWER. 

FEBRUARY 1892. 

5 s 

SCALE OF FEELT. 




SECTION OF 8-6"" 8'-o" SEWER. 




SECTION OF 13 - 0"x 9-o" SEWER. 



Street Department. 99 

street sewer, which is now not in use. This should be 
rebuilt large enough at the same time to afford an outlet for 
the storm water from the district bounded by Preble and 
Mt. Vernon streets, Dorchester avenue and the water-front. 
This district could then be sewered with a separate 
system. 

Work done during 1891. 

Two thousand six hundred and forty-eight linear feet of 
sewers were built in South Boston during the past year. 
They consist of small branch sewers, with the exception of 
the D and Anchor streets overflow, which is an extension of 
the D and First streets overflow, necessitated by the fill- 
ing in of the " flats." 

EOXBURY. 

Most of the sewer building in Roxbury will consist of 
simple extensions of the old system, where new streets are 
laid out, and the rebuilding of some defective sewers. The 
exceptions to the above are in a few localities where peculiar 
systems are called for. One of these is the section adjacent 
to the Back Bay, which will be considered under that head. 
The sewers in Hallock and Ward streets are in very bad 
condition and should be rebuilt. The Harrison avenue 
sewer, from Northampton street to Eustis street, is so much 
settled that it cannot be cleaned ; it also should be rebuilt. 
There are other districts in which, although the sewers are 
in a fair condition, they are not low enough to afford 
proper drainage to the cellars. The best plan in these 
oases, where an intercepting sewer is within reach, is to 
devote the old system of sewers to surface drainage, and 
build a new system of separate sewers at a lower grade to 
drain the cellars, and connect with the interceptor. Such 
a scheme has been devised for the district between Ham- 
mond and Lenox streets, and the money for it has been pro- 
vided in the last loan. Another district where a similar 
scheme should be carried out, is that bounded by Camden, 
Tremont, and Culvert streets and the Providence E.R. 
Provision has been made in the Loan Order for this object, 
but the scheme can best be worked up in connection with 
the extension of Columbus avenue. 

Provision has been made in the Loan Order for continu- 
ing the work on Dorchester Brook sewer. This will be 
pushed during the coming year, as the sewerage of the 
district around Shirley street and Norfolk avenue, for which 
there is a great demand, depends upon its completion. The 
area bounded by Gerard, Swett, and Magazine streets and 



100 City Document No. 36. 

Norfolk avenue is also in a bad sanitary condition, and 
ATould be a favorable location for a separate system of 
sewerage. If a sum could be obtained sufficient to sewer 
the whole of the territory at once, some such scheme could 
be carried out ; otherwise the sewers will probably be an ex- 
tension of the ordinary combined system. 

Work done during 1891, 

Six thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven linear feet of 
sewers were built in Roxbury during the past year. They 
were simple extensions or small branches. Work on the 
laro-e Dorchester Brook sewer, near East Chester Park, was 
stopped during the summer on account of .the exhaustion of 
the loan made for that purpose. The sewer was built far 
enough, however, to intercept the Clapp street sewer, so 
that even in its present condition it affords more relief to 
that district than it has ever before received. Work will be 
started here as early as possible in the spring. There is a 
large section needing sewers in this vicinity that is dependent 
on this sewer for an outlet. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester, like West Eoxbury, may be divided into two 
sections, — the northern half, in which the sewer building- 
consists merely of small extensions of a system already well 
developed, and the southern half, in which mains are to be 
extended into new territory or entire new systems are to 
be built. The division line would run about through Har- 
vard station. The first district in importance requiring 
sewerage south of this line would be, no doubt, the village of 
Lower Mills. The drainage of this place should be divided, 
part going into the Dorchester Lower Mills Intercepting 
sewer, and part into the Neponset Valley Intercepting sewer. 
In the first part the system of combined sewers and storm 
overflows can be followed, but in the second part the condi- 
tions are different. 

Here there is already quite a system of surface drains 
built, running into the Neponset, and this system can be 
easily extended. A separate system of house sewers can be 
built connecting with the Neponset Valley Intercepting 
sewer. 

There is another district in Dorchester, building up rapidly 
and demandino- drainao'e. It is in the neighborhood of 
Dorchester and Forest avenue stations, including such 
streets as Lauriat, Jones, Ballon, and Chapman avenues, 
Nelson, Corbett, Evans, Maxwell, Selden, and Capen 



Street Department. 101 

streets. The existino- 8e\yer in Norfolk street is built 
at such a high grade that it cannot be extended to reach 
any more territory. A little more can be done by a 
new sewer to Talbot avenue, near Bernard street, by 
way of Lyons street. But a scheme to provide for the 
whole district will require a new outlet either to Dorchester 
Bay or the Neponset River, including in either case a tunnel 
through the ridge which forms the divide line of the Stony 
Brook basin, within which a large part of this territory lies. 
Many schemes could be proposed ; the problem is intimately 
connected with that of deepening the Canterbury branch of 
Stony Brook and draining the meadows west of Dorchester 
station, and might be solved at the same time (by the pro- 
posed Stony Brook tunnel to the Neponset, for instance, 
recommended in 1886 by the Stony Brook Commission as a 
remedy for the floods on Stony Brook), but the demand for 
sewers will probably be so many years in advance of that 
for the brook improvements, that it will have to be solved 
separately. 

A careful study of the territory will have to be made, and 
plans of difterent lines prepared, before the subject can be 
properly discussed. 

Work done during 1891. 

Twenty-eight thousand five hundred and seventy-six linear 
feet of sewers, and four hundred and forty-two linear feet of 
culverts, have been built in Dorchester during the past year. 
This represents the largest amount built in any one district, 
also the greatest variety of work. Special mention of some 
of these sewers should be made. Work on the system at 
Savin Hill, which was commenced in 1890 under special 
loan, has progressed rapidly the past season. The separate 
system was adopted here, as the location was particularly 
adapted to it. The house sewage goes to the Dorchester 
Intercepting sewer, while the storm water empties into 
Savin Hill Bay, This work was shut down only when the 
appropriation was exhausted, late in the fall. A new appro- 
priation is now at hand, and the work will be started as soon 
as the weather is suitable. 

The sewer in Westville street is in process of construc- 
tion the present time. It is one of several sewers that are 
"to be constructed in this and adjacent streets the coming 
season to aflbrd much-needed relief to that locality, which is 
building up very rapidly. These sewers will empty into 
the sewer in Geneva avenue extension. The territory is 
low and has needed drainage very much for some time. In 
oonnection with this sewer a surface drain is being built in 



102 City Document No. 3(5, 

Westville street and Geneva avenue extension to relieve the 
territory between Westville and Bowdoin streets. The build- 
ing of Geneva avenue extension at this point has obliterated 
a brook that took the drainage of quite a large area. The 
sewer in Kilton street, from Talbot avenue to Harvard street, 
is about completed. It affords an outlet to a large territory 
between Kilton and Washington streets. An extension of 
it has also been built through Harvard and School streets to 
Washington street. Construction on the Dorchester Lower 
Mills Trunk sewer was started in the spring, without a 
special appropiiation, and continued until a lack of funds 
necessitated a shut-down in the fall. An appropriation is 
now at hand with which to continue construction the coming 
season. 

In Dorchester we have a forcible illustration of the value 
attached to sewers by the people, even in a suburban dis-^ 
trict. There were 10,729 linear feet of sewers built by 
private parties, and released to the city, in this district the 
past year. It shows that the people of this vicinity require 
sewers, and if the city cannot build them, owing to lack of 
appropriation, they take the expense upon themselves. 

West Roxbury. 

This part of the city may be divided into tAvo parts, as far 
as future sewer buildins: is concerned. In and near Jamaica 
Plain there will be nothing but ordinary extensions of the 
existing system. In the remaining part of the district, main 
sewers are now beino- built, and the buildino; of tTie laterals 
for each street will soon follow. These mains are only 
large enough to carry the house sewage and a small amount 
of rain water from the street surfaces when the district shall 
have become well settled. The extensions will have to be 
on the same scale, and the means of relief in time of rain, 
that of overflowing the storm water into the brooks. 

Near Forest Hills station, the Anson and Mark streets dis- 
trict will have to be provided with an outlet to Washington 
street very soon. 

In the district near Sycamore, Florence, Brooks, and Ash- 
land streets there are many houses being built which cannot 
be sewered by extending the existing sewers in those streets. 
An outlet from the extreme north-westerly point of Florence 
street to the northerly of the two intersections of South and 
Washington streets will meet this want for the present. 

In regard to the Roslindale main sewer, it would seem to 
be the best policy to extend it to Highland station before 
many laterals are built ; for although there is a considerable 



Street Depaetment. 103 

l)opu]ation, and apparent need for sewers, in the neighborhood 
of Bellevue and Central avenues, there is not such an urgent 
demand for them as there is on such streets as Mount 
Vernon, Bellevue, Corey, Park, and Centre streets and other 
streets near Highland station. The whole appropriation for 
this district should therefore be devoted to extending the 
main sewer. 

Work done during 1891. 

Eight thousand five hundred and seventy linear feet of 
sewers, and one hundred and ninety linear feet of culverts, 
were l^uilt in West Roxbury during the past year. 

The Roslindale and West Roxbury trunk sewer was the 
only work of any magnitude in the district. This sewer, as- 
projected, is to extend from Washington street, Roslindale,. 
to Highland station, following as near as practicable, 
through streets and private land, the course of a tributary of 
Stony Brook ; 4,346 linear feet had been completed the past 
season, when the appropriation was exhausted and the work 
stopped. A new appropriation is now available, and the 
work has been started. It is advisable to reach Highland 
station with the sewer as soon as practicable, for the reasons 
above stated. 

BrIGHTOjS^ 

In this section of the city, which is developing rapidly , 
and in which there were no sewers prior to 1878, there will 
be a continually increasing demand for sewers for some time 
to come. 

Immediate steps should be taken to straighten out the 
question of natural watercourses, and to relieve some of the 
exitsing sewers that are overburdened with surface water 
which ought to have been excluded from the sewers and 
allowed to flow in the old watercourses. In that portion of 
the district lying between North Harvard and Franklin 
streets, the B. & A. R.R. , and the river, there will probably be 
considerable demand for sewer building, now that the Metro- 
politan sewer is completed. This is a favorable locality for 
building a separate system of surface drains to run to the 
river, and to the brook, which is the natural drain of that 
part of Brighton. Two large tracts of land in this local- 
ity have been subdivided during the past year, streets 
laid out, and sewers liuilt by private parties, under the 
city's directions, and released to the city when completed. 
This shows that the locality will probably build up rapidly ; 
and, as the land has but a slight elevation above tide- 
water, the building of sewers nuist keep up with its growth. 



104 City Document No. 36. 

The separate system of sewers in this part of Brighton 
coukl be very easily and cheaply carried out, if it were not 
for the fact that the brook in the vicinity presents one of the 
worst cases of the abuse of natural watercourses in the city. 
The brook has been taken into the sewers at Union street, 
Washington street near Caml)ridge street, Noi-tli Beacon 
street near Arthur street, and at Everett street, thus over- 
charo-inir the sewers, and causing floodino- of cellars. 
Land-owners have taken prompt advantage of this fact, 
and have filled in and obliterated the channel of the brook 
in many places. At the corner of Everett and Braintree 
streets houses have been built over the old watercourse, 
and the remnant of the brook is carried in a pipe through 
the cellars. This connection of the brook into the sewer 
s^'^stem should be stopped at once, the sewer restricted to the 
service for which it was built, and the great flood of surface 
water returned to the channel of the brook. Unless these 
brook channels are restored, the city must build a large 
surface drain in Everett and Braintree streets to con- 
nect with the old channel through the railroad yards, which 
has been preserved. It is hardlj^ necessary to say that 
this would cost a large sum of mone,y. It is earnestly 
recommended that the brook be restored at once, and pri- 
vate parties who have filled it in be notified to remove the 
obstructions, and to define its course by takings, as in a few 
years it will be practically impossible. 

In building sewers in this region draining directly in the 
Metropolitan sewer, particular care should be paid to mak- 
ing them water-tight. Water-tight sewers should 'be built 
everywhere ; but it is more important in the lowland, because 
all this water will always have to be pumped, whereas, in the 
highlands, after the high-level intercepting sewers are built, 
it will run to the outfall by gravity. 

There is another brook, sometimes called Smelt Brook, re- 
duiring attention. It follows approximately the course of 
Commonwealth avenue. In building this fine avenue, little or 
no attention seems to have been paid to the question of pro- 
viding channels for the surface water across the location of the 
avenue. No culverts were built where it crossed hollows, 
which has resulted in the formation of marshy ponds. In one 
place, an existing culvert was stopped up by filling over one 
«nd of it. This last piece of negligence blocked off a consid- 
erable branch of the brook and resulted in having to turn it 
into the Redesdale street sewer, rather than disturb the newly 
surfaced avenue by rebuilding the culvert. The Redesdale 
street sewer is now gorged with this brook water at every 
storm. Near Allston street the same thing has been done. 



Street Department. 105 

and a larii'e area which formerly drained down into the 
brook channel in the vicinity of Holmes avenne is now forced 
to drain along the north-western side of Commonwealth 
avenue, and goes to aggravate the trouble atRedesdale street. 
This last culvert should be rebuilt at present, even at the 
sacriiice of the surface of the avenue. The others might wait 
until the teaming, sewer building, etc., incident to the com- 
pletion of the avenue destroys the surface. 

West of Foster and Parsons streets there are no sewers in 
Brighton, Avith the exception of a short pipe sewer near 
Faneuil. The existing system of sewers has been extended 
westward from Parsons street as far as possible, and no more 
sewers can be built until a new outlet is provided. There 
are not many houses now in this part of Brighton, but there 
are quite a number of petitions for sewers several years old, 
and the subdivision of the land into house-lots is in progress. 
With an outlet provided to accommodate lateral sewers, this 
territory undoubtedly would build up rapidly. In this 
valley flows a large brook. If the city had the right to use 
this brook for sewer overflows, a system of sewers could be 
built at a comparatively small expense for this section , as the 
sewers required to take the house sewage and the flrst wash 
of the streets would not be large. If the city does not ac- 
quire this right, it will be many years before money enough 
oan be raised to build sewers on the ' ordinary combined 
principle . 

Work done during 1891. 

Eleven thousand six hundred and ninety-seven linear feet 
of sewers, and two hundred and eis^ht linear feet of culverts, 
were built in Brighton during the past year. 

While there were no sewers of special magnitude built in 
this district during the season, there is one noticeable fact 
regarding the amount constructed, namely, the number of 
linear feet built by private parties under the city's direction 
is nearly double that built by the city. The cause in this 
<}ase is the development for building purposes of two 
tracts of land in Allston. 

It is getting to be a custom in some of the suburban 
districts for parties having land they wish to put on the 
market, to subdivide it, lay out and construct the streets 
and build the sewers, under the direction of the proper 
authorities, before building the houses. It has been demon- 
strated that this method gives the quickest returns for the 
money expended, and that land which would otherwise lay 
idle for years can be readily disposed of. 



10») City Document No. 36. 



FUTUKE WOKK or THE DIVISION. 

'I'he })ulk of the work of the department in the future will 
consist of sewering the suburlian districts, and the most im- 
portant question for this department to settle is that of the 
best policy to be })ursued, in view of what has already been 
done, and of what will be required. 

Large areas are already paitially sewered, upon the com- 
bined system, with sewers which are rapidly l)econiing inad- 
equate to })erform the double duty imposed upon them, that 
of carrying both sewage and surface water ; and the problem 
which confronts the division is twofokl, — to devise a remedy 
for these inadequate servers, and to settle upon a policy ta 
be pursued in building the extensions into new territory,, 
which must necessarily be connected Avith the present system. 
Before proceeding further, it may be well to call attention to 
the great variations in the amount of surfoce water which the 
same district will yield under different conditions of surface. 
Thus, with a certain rainfall, 100 acres of land, with few 
roads and scattered houses, might yield a flow of 188 gallons^ 
per second; the same land, well developed, cut up inta 
small house-lots occupied by dwellings, and with good mac- 
adamized roads, would give twice that flow, — 37.") gallons per 
second. With the streets paved and dwellings replaced by 
business blocks, the yield would be 4.50 gallons per second ^ 
240 per cent, of the flrst. In view of this fact, it is not diffi- 
cult to see how the present inadequate sj^stem came to be 
built ; indeed, it is difficult to see how it could well have 
been otherwise, considering the manner in whicvli a city 
grows. All land when flrst developed into house-lots (where 
sewers are now usually called for) is in the condition flrst 
described, gradually changing into the second condition, and 
perhaps into the third. The engineer called upon to design 
the sewers does not feel justifled in designing them large 
enough to meet the requirements of a fully developed dis- 
trict, unless he can he assured, not only that such develop- 
ment will take place, but that it will take place within a 
reasonable period of time. If such development were cer- 
tain to take place flnally, but not likely to occur within, say, 
twenty-flve years, it would still be better flnancial policy ta 
build a sewer of small size, fully understanding that, having- 
served its purpose, it would be abandoned, and rebuilt larger 
at a later date, than to sink the capital required to build 
the large-size sewer in the flrst place. 

Then the very fact of the existence of a large system of 
small sewers ensures the extension of the same system ort 
the same scale, for it is folly to build a new sewer larger 



Street Department. 107 

than the one through which it discharges, unless there is a 
probability of being able to rebuild the outlet sewer in the 
near future. There is also another cause operating power- 
fully and often, to bring about the liuilding of sewers known 
at the time of building to be inadequate, and that is the 
necessity, under our methods of raising money, of reaching 
districts imperatively needing sewers with a limited amount 
of money. Under these circumstances, the public health 
being threatened, the division does not feel that it has the 
right to refuse relief, because it does not have money enough 
to build the proper theoretical size. All these causes con- 
spire to produce the same effect, namely, the building of 
sewers which subsequently prove inadequate. 

It is not necessary to allege incompetence in our predeces- 
sors to account for the existing inadequate system ; natural 
causes are sufficient to account for it, and the same causes 
will continue to operate and to produce the same results. 

We have then on our hands this large system of suburban 
sewers, which is now proving insufficient in size to carry all 
the sewage and surface water now admitted to it, and the 
first part of our double problem is to provide relief. Any 
plan for relief should include utilizing the present system to 
the greatest extent practicable. To rebuild the whole of it 
is out of the question. There are left only two alternative 
courses : first, to build a system of large intercepting relief 
sewers, of sufficient capacity to carry all sewage as well as 
storm water ; second, to utilize the natural watercourses for the 
conveyance of storm water. The first course, although not 
out of the question, is excessively costly ; the second is not, 
and, although presenting some difficulties, is entirely prac- 
ticable, and is the one which is recommended. The project 
of utilizing the watercourses is, for surface drainage, not 
only cheaper in first cost, but the burden of the cost is in- 
comparably easier to be borne by the city, from the manner 
in which it will be imposed. The cost of a relief sewer 
must be borne all at once. When built, it must be built as 
large as will ever be required, because its capacity cannot 
be expanded to meet the constantly increasing requirements 
of the district. The watercourse or brook channel, on the 
other hand, does admit of such expansion. The development 
of the brook into a relief sewer could be made to keep pace 
with the development of the district, first by a deepening and 
widening, then a further deepening and walling, next pav- 
ing, and last the covering in. The conversion of the brook 
into a storm sewer is then complete, without any large sum 
of money having been expended years in advance of the 
needs of the district. 



108 City Document No. 36. 

Money for drainage of an^- kind is always granted unwill- 
ingly, never until absolutely necessary ; the difficulty of 
obtaining it increases with the amount asked for ; hence it fol- 
lows that a district needing an expensive relief sewer would 
sutler long and severely, before the large lump-sum required 
could be obtained, whereas the comparatively small sums 
needed at any one time for increasing the efficiency of the 
brook channel could be much more readily obtained. The 
application of this method of relief in districts already 
sewered will present but few difficulties. In many cases an 
overflow can be constructed direct from the sewer into the 
brook where the two cross ; but in many other cases the 
sewer crosses under the brook, and in such cases either one 
of two methods may be adopted. If there is considerable 
pitch to the brook, a few hundred feet of its length may be 
lowered ; that is, a part of the ultimate deepening may be 
<ione at present ; or, if that is not feasible, a short length of 
storm sewer can be constructed from the brook to a point 
where the common sewer is higher than the brook, and the 
overflow efiected there. The last plan can be followed 
wherever desired, as the brook is always in the lowest thread 
of the valley. All catch-basins near natural watercourses 
or storm sewers should be turned into them, instead of into 
the common sewers, and it is hardly necessary to say that 
where brooks have been taken into sewers, they should be 
restored to their old channels, and that, too, before the terri- 
tory adjacent becomes any further developed. In regard to 
the second part of our problem, that which relates to the 
policy to be pursued in sewering new territory, the circum- 
stances in each case should be taken into account. In some 
favorable localities an entirely separate system of house 
sewers and storm sewers may and should be built. In such 
<?.ases both sewers should be built at the same time, for the 
average citizen will not take the pains to understand the dis- 
tinctions between them, and is exasperated if he cannot have 
a catch-basin to drain any water which may accumulate on 
the street, into the sewer as soon as it is built. 

But in those places where new sewers must be an exten- 
sion of the old system, there would be no advantage in a 
separate system. The most practical system, generally, will 
be a combined system, consisting largely of 12-in. pipes, 
nnitino; into mains laro;e enoui2:h to carry the combined 
sewage and storm water from each little district, to where it 
crosses the first watercourse where a relief overflow would 
"be established, and the size of the sewer reduced to one just 
large enough to carry the sewage and a small amount of 
surface water from the streets, the first and foulest washings. 







^ 







■^.^ J- 




e . 






3 "»"■<-,*' 



5 *f" 



^ > 




Street Department. 109^ 

The main would then be gradually increased in size as it 
passed though the next small district, until it reached the 
next watercourse, when it would be reduced as before, and 
so on. The first cost of this system, since the brooks would 
not have to be deepened for some time, would be less than 
that of the separate system, if in the latter both kinds of 
sewers were constructed at once, and would be little greater 
than the cost of the house sewers alone of that system ; 
because the only economy in laying a small pipe rather than 
a large one is in the extra cost of the pipe itself, the trench 
costing practically the same, and the latter item in all cases 
comprises the largest part of the whole cost of the sewer. 
The system recommended above would be practically an 
extension of the old system, and requiring and admitting of 
the same means of relief in the future, by means of the 
natural watercourses. The old sewers are, in the main, 
large enough to carry the house sewage and a small rainfall 
upon the street surfaces, and that is all that it is desirable that 
they should do, provided the city is assured oi the right to con- 
trol and use the natural watercourses. It is this assurance 
that is lacking now, and which, if obtained, would render it 
possible to economize largely on future designs. The brooks 
should be seized at once by the city and the damages, if any, 
settled. The takinos should be defined, and in doing this 
the wishes of the land-owners should be considered, and 
such divisions made as will leave the land in good shape for 
cutting up into house-lots. 

The engineer would then know certainly at what points he 
could economize safely on designs for sewers. The depart- 
ment could then adopt and adhere to the policy as outlined 
above. It is the best adapted to the existing sewer system ; 
it requires no wholesale destruction and reconstruction of 
sewers ; it is the most convenient for the people ; it is the 
cheapest in first cost, and superior, from a financial point of 
view, in the manner and times of requiring the investment 
of capital ; it is the natural method of evolving, out of an 
old and ill-adapted system, the new system well adapted to 
the present and future requirements. 

Culverts. 

More attention has been paid to the natural watercourses 
this year than ever before. The constantly increasing- 
floods (due to the development and change in the nature of 
the surface of the ground) have called the attention of every 
one to the inadequate size of the old culverts across the 
streets. These, up to the present time, seem to have been 



110 City Document No. 36. 

built as they arc in countn' towns, without the least regard 
to the size of the territory to be drained through them. In 
other countries, building a road is considered an engineering- 
enterprise, and one of the problems connected with it is the 
determination of the location and size of the culverts for 
draining the vallej^s which are crossed. But in this city it 
bas been left to the judgment of a street foreman, who, of 
course, had no means of calculating the proper size. These 
culverts have been inadequate for years, creating nuisances 
during every storm. Man}'" of the worst have been rebuilt 
this year, and many more remain to be rebuilt. The re- 
building of one culvert of the proper size simply shifts the 
nuisance to the next culvert down stream, and calls for its 
rebuilding, and the process of enlargement will have to be 
followed down to tide-water. In all the culverts which have 
been built this year, ample provision has been made for the 
largest rainfalls likely to occur, and the culvert has been so 
designed as to accommodate itself to future deepening of the 
watercourse. In some cases the culvert under the street 
joins on to a culvert or some form of covered channel 
through private land. In these cases, the department has 
confined itself to rebuilding the culvert between the street 
lines only, leaving the channel through private land as 
before. This course cle-ars the city from the legal respon- 
sibility of maintaining a nuisance , but does not remedy the 
liability of damage by floods, as the water is still held back 
by the small channel through the private land. 

In this connection, it would be well to call attention to the 
lack of supervision in the matter of building private 
streets, which the city is afterward asked to accept. The 
location of such streets is now supervised by the city. There 
should be some engineering supervision over the size of 
culverts under them. The builder of a private street can- 
not be expected to know what size of culvert is required ; 
be should not be required to rebuild it at greatly increased 
expense before the city is willing to accept the street ; nor 
should the city be expected to repair the result of his 
ignorant action. He should be notified in the beginning 
what sized culvert will be required, and compelled to build 
it in a manner satisfactory to the city. 

Stony Brook. 

Stony Brook, the largest of the city's watercourses, is 
now provided with an ample outlet, and gives little trouble. 
The effect of the development of its water-shed can be seen, 
however, in the increasing rapidity and height to which it 



Street Department. Ill 

rises now at every rain, compared to what it did eight years 
ago, although now its outlet is ample in size, and then it was 
not. There has been a movement already to have the new 
channel, recommended by the commission of 1886, extended 
from the inlet chamber on Pynchon street to Green street. 
When this is done, provision must be made for continuing 
the supply of brook-water to the Boston Belting Company. 

There are considerable areas of land near the brook which 
are too low to be drained by the existing Stony Brook 
Valley sewer system. Since the brook improvement of 
1880-84, this land has been available for building. When the 
new channel is extended above the inlet chamber, it would 
be comparatively easy to design its sections, so as to carry 
upon its haunch a sewer for these districts ; it would not be 
large, being for house sewerage only. From the inlet 
chamber down to the Roxbury crossing, there is a twenty- 
foot channel occupied only by the stream, ^\hich flows through 
a six-ibot opening; a sewer could be built cheaply here. 
From the Roxbury crossing to the intercepting sewer in 
Hampshire street, corner of Linden Park street, there is a 
channel already built — the overflow channel — which would 
do with very slight alteration. If the new channel is built 
without providing this low-grade sewer, it will be clifiicult to 
ever properly sewer the low districts along the brook. The 
Grade Crossing Commission and the Rapid Transit Com- 
mission both have under consideration the project of raising 
the Providence Railroad. If the extension of the large con- 
duit above the inlet chamber be made on the lines of the 
Commission of 1886, it will be directly alongside the rail- 
road for a distance of 2,000 feet to Old Heath street, then 
again from near Amory street to a point 400 feet above 
Boylston street, 2,400 feet more ; a total of 4,400 feet. The 
brook is from ten to fifteen feet below the railroad. The plan 
is to raise the railroad about fifteen or sixteen feet ; the 
commissioners' plan would lower the brook twelve feet. If 
the railroad were raised before the brook was lowered, it 
would require a retaining- wall of 26 to 30 feet high. It 
would be very difiicult and expensive to go down a depth of 
twelve feet alongside such a wall, carrying a four-track rail- 
road, and build the covered channel recommended. If an 
open channel instead were built, the retaining-wall on that 
side would be 38 to 42 feet high. If the railroad is to be 
raised, the proposed extension of the brook channel must be 
built first, at least as far as Boylston Station. 



112 City Document No. 36. 



High-Level Intercepting Sewers. 

An essential part of the scheme of intercepting sewers for 
Boston is to carry the sewage from the highlands above grade 
40, directly to the outlet by gravity, and thus avoid pumping. 
To do this, a system of intercepting sewers was projected in 
Dorchester, Roxbury, and Brighton, to intercept the sew^age 
from all land above grade 40. It is time that this system 
was begun, now that the State is about to pour into our 
system the sewage from the Charles River valley. 

High-Level Relief Sewers. 

There are some districts of the City Proper, consisting 
partl}^ of high and partly of low land, in which the water 
from the highland fills up the sewers in the lowland at 
every rain. A system of relief sewers has been proposed 
for these districts, to tap the common sewers at a point 
above the level of the tide, and run the storm water from the 
highlands directly overboard, without connection with the 
sewers in the lowland portion of the district. The volume 
of the wdiole sewer system in the lowland district would 
then be available to store the storm water falling on the 
lowland alone until the ebb tide should allow it to escape, 
thus to a great extent preventing the flooding of cellars. 
Incidentally it would afford another means of relieving the 
pumps of the intercepting sewer system, and should be 
begun for the same reasons mentioned in the previous 
paragraph. 

Main Drainage Works. 

Special attention is called to this important branch of the 
Sewer Division. 

During the eight years that it has been in operation the 
general working of this system has been very satisfactory. 
Many points have been developed that furnish valuable in- 
formation for the construction of such a plant as this. One 
of the most impoi-tant of these is the action of sewage and 
its gases on metals. It was expected that the sewage would 
have a decided action on the ironwork, but without definite 
knowledge of its extent, it was not deemed expedient to 
substitute other metals at a greatly increased cost. The 
sequel has proved that on certain parts of the pumps and 
gates, especially where sul)jected to friction, the substi- 
tution of other metals Avould have been expedient. The 
iron valve-seats on the pumps are worn away to such an 
extent that all of them Avill have to be renewed ; this work 
is in progress now. The gate-seats in the sewers at Moon 



Street Department. 113 

Island are in the same condition, and are being treated in the 
same way. The method adopted to prevent a recurrence- 
of the trouble, is to face the seats where the wear comes- 
with a hard composition. Before commencing these renew- 
als, tests were made with the metals combined and placed 
under similar conditions, to see if any galvanic action would 
result from the combination. None, however, has taken 
place. The boiler-feed and flue-heaters will have to be re- 
newed, the old ones having burned out. 

A certain style of heater is under consideration at present 
which will be much more efficient and lasting than the origi- 
nal one, at about one-half the cost. 

Repeated mention has previously been made of the urgent 
necessity of keeping storm and soil water out of the sewers 
as far as practicable. The force of those recommendations 
is nowhere more apparent than at the pumping-station. 
The continual addition to the sewer system of new sewers, 
with catch-basins connected with them, brings a rapidly in- 
creasing amount of the storm water to the pumps. To this 
is added the leakage of soil water into the system, through 
the old and defective sewers that should have been rebuilt 
long ago. The result is that the pumps are often taxed to 
their uttermost capacity, and with water alone, not sewage. 

The following figures will give an idea of the amount of 
this excess of water. The average daily consumption of 
water in this section drained by the Main Drainage Works, 
for 1891, was 35,686,900 gallons. The daily average amount 
pumped at the pumping-station (pump measurement), for 
1891, was 62,582,683 gallons, allowing a liberal percentage 
for " slip " in the pump measurement due to the worn con- 
dition of the valve-seats. There still remains an amount in 
excess of the water consumption, or sewage proper, that 
shows conclusively the value of the above recommendation. 

The building of the Charles River branch of the Metro- 
politan Sewer system the past season is going to further 
tax the pumps by the immediate addition of the sewage of 
Brookline and Brighton. In view of these facts it is evident 
that immediate steps must be taken to increase the capacity 
of the pumping plant by the addition of one or more pumps. 
It will take two years, at least, before this work can be fin- 
ished, if action is taken immediately. On account of the 
increase in the amount of sewage, and the necessity of the 
occasional shutting down of the high-duty pumps for repairs, 
it has been and will be necessary to run the low-duty pumps 
much more than heretofore. As it takes more coal to do 
the same work with the latter pumps, it is recommended 
that a high-duty attachment be added to these pumps im- 



114 City Document No. 36. 

mediately, as ])y so doing a savino- of twenty per cent, in 
fuel can he made whenever these pumps are in use. This 
saving would pay the interest on the mone}^ invested twice 
•over, even Avith the amount that these pumps are run at 
present. 

The need of completing certain portions of this system, 
and the risk attending the delay of such action, has been 
pointed out to the City Government each successive year 
since the starting of the works. The need is more urgent at 
the present time than ever before, and unless the machinery 
designed for pumping out the Dorchester Bay tunnel, which 
was purchased in 1884, is placed in position at the east 
shaft, and the permanent conduit in the embankment 
between Squantum and Moon Island is pushed to complete- 
tion, a stoppage of the present system of discharging may 
be looked for in the near future. The trouble feared in the 
former case is that the iron guides on the sides of the shaft 
are in danger of dropping into the tunnel, in which case the 
sewage would have to discharge into Dorchester Bay at 
the pumping-station. Should this occur, the delay and ex- 
pense involved in pumping out the tunnel, with the means 
at hand, would l)e very great. The guides are held in posi- 
tion by being liolted to iron beams built into the masonry. 
The condition of the bolts is not known except at the sur- 
face, where it is shown that they are badly eaten away by 
the action of the sewage. They have been submerged for 
over eight years, and from the indications at the surface, and 
the knowledo-e of the action of the sewao-e on the iron on 
other portions of the works, it would indicate that there was 
danger of their dropping down the shaft at any time, even 
if some of them have not already. AVhile there is some un- 
certainty in the above case, there is no uncertainty in the 
trouble to be expected in case the conduit betw^een Squan- 
tum and Moon Island is not completed as quickly as possi- 
ble. The w^ooden flume, which at the present time carries 
the sewage from the tunnel to the reservoir at Moon Island, 
is in very bad condition, despite the repairs that have been 
made upon it for the last four years. It was built for a 
temporary structure to be used until such time as the per- 
manent conduit could be built. It has been in use longer 
than it was expected would be necessary, and is now in 
such condition that it is sure to go to pieces if any 
unusual strain is put upon it either internally or ex- 
ternally. Quite extensive repairs are at present being 
made upon it, which are only in view of keeping it in 
position. Many of the piles that support it are so eaten 
away that they are not five inches in diameter. It is not 



Street Department. 115 

only a menace in itself, but its condition is so weak that 
no proper test can be made of the tunnel, to discover its con- 
dition as regards deposits. If the flume should give way, the 
sewage would have to l:>e discharged continually on the flats 
off Squantum, or in Dorchester Bay at the pum ping-station, 
and not at Moon Island outlet, on the ebb tide alone. 

Engineering Work. 

During the past year the engineering force of the Sewer 
Division has been busily engaged on the routine work of the 
division. 

This work comprises the preparation of plans for new 
work on sewers, surface drains, and culverts, the making of 
record plans of work accomplished during the year, and the 
engineering supervision of the construction of sewers, drains, 
and culverts. 

In addition to the above work, the force has been eno;ao;ed 
in preparing topographical plans of the various sewerage 
districts, and in carrying out a S3^stem of accurate levels 
through the whole city. 

In 1887 the department experienced much difficulty in 
carrying on its work on account of the lack of an accurate 
system of levels. 

No attempt had ever been made to establish such a system, 
the elevation of different points having been borrowed from 
other departments, and long lines of levels run from them. 
These were necessarily inconsistent one with another, and 
errors had crept in which could not be located, owing to 
the absence of any thorough system of checking from one 
line of levels to another. 

Discrepancies of over a foot were found, and the depart- 
ment possessed no reliable system of its own. 

The Superintendent of Sewers at that time set about 
remedying this state of afiairs ; the engineering force was 
increased, and a portion of it employed exclusively in level- 
ling, establishing benches all over the city, and levelling to 
the manholes, the elevations of hundreds of which were un- 
known and could not be indicated on the sectional plans of 
the office. 

An accurate, consistent system of levels was carried all 
over the City Proper, Charlestown, South Boston, Roxbury, 
East Boston as far as Eagle square, Brighton to Oak square, 
Dorchester to Neponset and Dorchester station, and a single 
line of levels carried through West Roxbury to within one- 
half mile of the Dedhani line. 

A total of 374 benches and 2,262 manholes were levelled 
to. 



116 City Document No. 36. 

It was also found that there was much inaccuracy in the 
plans of the city, which, although veiy accurate in places, 
were not geodeticaUy correct, not having been based upon. 
any comprehensive survey. 

The topographical plans (the very basis of all sewer calcu- 
lations) were very incomplete. 

It was determined to supply both these deficiencies at 
once. A party was organized, and for the first time the 
city was triangulated, and upon this triangulation a stadia 
topographical survey was based. 

This triangulation was developed from three difierent 
base lines of the United States Survey on the northerly side 
of the city, and a check obtained by connection with United 
States stations and State points on the southerly side of the 
city. 

The most difficult part of such an undertaking is to select 
the points and make the observations for the first system of 
large triangles, which required sights sometimes ten miles 
long. 

This system of triangles was established and developed 
into smaller triangles, whose sides varied from 3,000 to 
6,000 feet in leng-th, and the latitude and longitude of all 
observed points, some sixty in number, calculated. 

This whole system of triangulation made by the engineers 
of the Sewer Division has been adopted and further used by 
the Board of Survey in its work of mapping out the city. 

The stadia survey was completed in Brighton, and a fine 
map, accurate geodetically and topographically, was plotted. 

This map has been traced in six sectional sheets during 
the year past, and blue-printed in a new style, the streets 
being rendered in white, so that the sj^stem of sewers may 
be drawn upon them, and the constant additions that are 
being built can be plotted, and the plans thus kept up to 
date. 

These blue-prints are equally available for showing water- 
pipes, gas-pipes, etc. 

The sketched topographical plans of the other parts of the 
city, which, although not stiictly accurate, are valuable as 
showing the general features of the ground, have also been 
traced and blue-printed in the same manner, and can be re- 
produced to any extent desired. They are especially valua- 
ble, on account of their age, in preserving a record of the 
natural watercourses. 

There is much work of this same sort remaining to be 
done. The stadia topographical survey should be carried over 
the remainder of the city, particularly Dorchester, West 
Eoxbury, and Roxbury. 



Street Department. 117 

The bench-levelling should be extended into new districts 
where sewers will soon be built, and there are about 1,000 
manholes now to be levelled to. 

Two parties are devoted to this work now, while a third 
is employed in preparing alternative plans for sewering the 
region to the west of Dorchester and Forest avenue stations, 
where some comprehensive plan must be adopted to provide 
a new outlet to tide-water. 



Sewer Diagram. 

A " sewer diagram " is appended which shows the method 
by which the sizes of sewers are calculated in this city. 

The object of this diagram is to enable the person using 
it to arrive at a tolerably correct idea of the size of sewer 
required in any particular case as soon as he knows the prin- 
<3ipal facts concerning it, viz. : 

First, the size and character of the district to be drained ; 
and, second, the fall which is available for the sewer. To 
accomplish this, two sets of curves are plotted with the same 
vertical and horizontal scales. 

The first set, those springing from the lower left-hand 
corner and going toward the right upper corner, are designed 
to give the flow that ma}^ be expected from any given area. 

The ordinates of these curves are cubic feet per second ; 
the abscissas written along the top are the number of acres 
drained. 

There are five of these curves corresponding to that number 
of degrees of steepness of surface, namely : 

One for flat districts, the general inclination of which is 5 
feet per 7,000, and others for steeper slopes, up to 100 per 
1,000. 

The curves are plotted according to the interpretation of 
the Biirkli-Zeigler formula found in Gray's Providence 
Report of 1884, using the table of coefiicients which he gives 
there, and giving the value 1 to the factor r, the rate in 
inches of rainfall per hour ; or, in short, the curves give the 
ilow which may be expected from any given area, from a 
rainfall of one inch per hour, falling at a uniform rate. 

For example : 100 acres, the general pitch of the surface 
of which is 5 feet per 1,000, yield 30 cubic feet per second ; 
if its slope is 20 per 1,000, 42 cubic feet; if 100 per 1,000, 
^2 cubic feet. 

The second set of curves, those going from the left down- 
ward toward the right, represent the capacities of sewers of 
"varying sizes at various inclinations. 

They refer to the same vertical scale of cubic feet per 



118 City Document No. 36. 

second ; and the horizontal scale is in terms of the horizontal 
component of the angle of inclination, or the number of feet 
horizontally in which the sewer falls one foot vertically, or 
the ordinary terms in which the pitch of a sewer is described 
as 1: 500, 1 : 1,000, etc. 

For example : A 4-foot circular sewer, running 3 feet 
deep, at a pitch of 1 : 150 carries 105 cubic feet per second. 

If the sewer is running under a head, the slope of the- 
hydraulic gradient, of course, must be taken, not the actual 
pitch at which the sewer is built. 

The whole operation, then, is as follows : Suppose we have 
to drain 200 acres lying at a general slope of 20 feet per 1 ,000,. 
and our outlet sewer can be given a fall of 1 : 500 ; then we- 
find that 200 acres, at a slope of 20 per 1 ,000, yields 70 cubic 
feet per second ; and looking on the sewer curves, we find 
that at 1 : 500, a 4-foot 6-inch circular sewer running 3.25 
feet deep carries 74 cubic feet per second. This, then, is the 
size indicated by the diagram. 

The angles in the curves are due to changes in scale, both 
horizontal and vertical. It is not practicable to plot them on 
any one scale without making them either illegible at one 
end, or stretching them out to an unmanageable length at the 
other end. 

If plotted on any one scale, the curves would, of course, be 
smooth sweeps. It will be noticed that the scale of acres 
drained at the top, and the scale at the bottom showing the 
pitch of the sewers, are made to correspond, as, for example, 
the same vertical line indicates 500 acres on the drainage- 
area curves, and a fall of 1 : 500 on the curves of capacities 
of sewers. This is done to avoid mistakes in the use of the 
diagram. Although the scales at the top and bottom indi- 
cate difierent things, and refer to different sets of curves, it 
does not make any difference which is used. The note in the 
corner states that these drainage-area curves are calculated 
for suburban districts ; if the district is closely built upon 
and paved, an allowance of 20 per cent, should be added ; 
if in a rural state, 30 to 50 per cent, should be subtracted. 

The diagram is particularly convenient in discussing- 
schemes of sewerage ; the sizes of sewers required b}^ differ- 
ent plans can be compared, and the results of proposed 
changes or modifications can be seen in a moment without 
going through tiresome calculations. 

Another application is to show about what a sewer carried 
under some unusual conditions when completely sul)merged, 
for instance, and discharging under a very small head. 

The sewer curves are plotted from Clark's tables. The 
quantities agree very closely with the Kutter formula (taking- 




L B/c r z i 



O J' 



s \ % 



r-^ ^f-Jc^C^ '^f'y?£ IC^i^A^S 



^Lf^ :->LCOND vDISCHAR&ED. 

SEW£'^ CLfAS/ES '^/taMctARKEilAsui. 

Z'ECLEFi FOHMUl A GRAY & cOEmarNT!: 

cnr-tPf^Eol ni^Tk r~ ''' 7ri'l 0/ 









'^■e- 







5tfc:-. . 



FEET PER\ 5E:Qp\DD/ScHAliCLL' 




^ 



^ 






JJS O.JJQ0Q51' 







Street Department. 119 

7? as .013) for medium-size sewers; for the smallest sewers 
they are 10 or 12 per cent, larger, and for the largest sewers 
they are 10 or 12 per cent, smaller, than Kutter's formula 
would give. A line is also plotted following the general 
direction of the set of curves first described, and representing 
a discharge of one-half cubic foot per second per acre. This 
line is given for reference, as it represents the allowance 
which was formerly made for the quantity of water a dis- 
trict might be expected to yield. A few approximate 
velocity curves are also plotted. 



STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 



Several years ago Boston was noted for the appearance of 
its streets, which were referred to throughout the country as 
models of cleanliness. A o-radual change for the worse in 
their condition has been taking place, until in the fall of 
1890 their condition was such as to call out a protest 
addressed to the Mayor, setting forth the " outrageous and 
unwarrantable dirty condition of the principal streets of our 
great city," and stating that " if our streets were kept clean, 
as are the principal streets of New York City, — Broadway 
and Fifth avenue, — the amount of dirt now brought into our 
stores would be avoided, and property saved from great loss 
by the damage done our merchandise by dust and dirt, and 
the general health of our people would be protected." 

This protest, signed as it was by a large number of influ- 
ential citizens, carried great weight, and a public hearing 
was held. At this hearing the official in charge of the 
street-cleanino; stated that the streets were as clean as it was 
possible to keep them, and that no change for the better 
could be made, even if $1,000,000 was spent in their care. 
The matter was then dropped until the beginning of the next 
municipal administration, when, on January 17, 1891, the 
duty of cleaning the streets was taken from the hands of the 
Superintendent of Sanitary Police, where it had always 
rested, and placed in the hands of the Acting Superintendent 
of Streets. Pending the organization of a se[)arate division 
of street-cleaning, which could only be elaborated after care- 
ful study, steps were at once taken to clean up the city, and 
the combined forces of the Paving Department and such force 
as (!Ould be spared from the Department of Sanitary Police 
were set to work. Patrol wagons, to collect the litter which 
had been allowed to lie in the gutters undisturbed for months. 



120 City Document No. 3(5. 

were sent round ; and in genenii an effort was made to clean 
up the city. The hibors of this force soon produced an effect, 
as indicated by the change in tone of the press and the com- 
ment made by the public on the improved condition of the 
streets. Meanwhile a study was being made of the reason 
why the condition of the streets had been so unsatisfactory 
in the past, and a plan was elaborated for their better care in 
the future. 

The reason why the streets had grown more filthy from 
year to year was easily discovered. The system of cleaning 
in vogue, while it answered for twenty years ago, had been 
entirely outgrown. Notwithstanding the enormous growth 
of the city, the system had never been changed to keep pace 
with this growth. The organization of the street-sweeping 
force was divided up into two large double gangs and one 
small single gang. One large double gang, with headquar- 
ters at the West End stable, attended to the streets in the 
North End, East Bdston, Charlestown, and the Back Bay. 
The other large double gang covered the streets from State 
street to Washington park at the Highlands and the streets 
of South Boston and Dorchester. A small gang, with head- 
quarters at the Highlands, attended to streets in that vicinity. 

The double gangs mentioned above worked in two divis- 
ions without any well-defined limits of area, and in such a 
manner that a s^reat deal of time was wasted in o-oino; to and 
from their work. The failure to distinctly separate the work 
of the divisions resulted in one division travelling over the same 
ground just covered by another division, in order^ to reach 
the territory in which it was to work. The transportation of 
sweeping-machines and men to remote localities, such as 
Charlestown, East Boston, or South Boston, in itself wasted 
a valuable amount of time which should have been expended 
in actual sweeping-work. The areas laid out for these gangs 
were entirely too large. Nothing but a printed list of 
streets to be swept on certain days of the week was in exist- 
ence as a guide to the foreman in his work. This list had 
grown obsolete, owing to the impossibility of covering the 
entire area laid out, and the work was largely done by gen- 
eral orders to work where the dirt was the greatest. 

But little attention was paid to Brighton, West Roxbury, 
or the other remote suburbs. Two or three times a year, 
when the streets in the main portion of the city were sup- 
posed to be in fairly respectable condition, the entire force 
was transferred to the suburbs, and a spasmodic attempt 
made to clean the gutters. 

In winter, the larger part of the force was transferred to 
the work of collecting ashes, and the work of cleaning the 



Street Department. 121 

streets almost entirely neglected. The dirt which accumu- 
lated by this method was frequently an inch deep over the 
surface of the street. During; the time that snow remained 
on the street, or while the temperature was below freezing, 
this neglect did not involve much discomfort to pedestrians ; 
but on the occurrence of a thaw, the streets became almost 
impassable. 

Immediately on the consolidation of the departments being 
effected, a new division was formed, known as the Street- 
Cleaning Division, whose duty was to devote its attention 
solely to the cleaning of the streets, independent of the re- 
moval of ashes and oarbaoe. Inasmuch as the cleanliness of 
the streets holds such a close and vital relation to the health 
and comfort of all citizens, it was thought important enough 
to demand continuous work of a force assigned for that im- 
portant purpose throughout the year. 

A tabulated list of the streets of the city having been 
prepared, classified according to districts and according to 
the style of paving, showing the length, width, and area of 
each street, enabled the total amount of paving to be swept 
to be determined. A table was also prepared showing the 
miles of macadamized roads the gutters of which were to be 
scraped and cleaned at proper intervals. These paved streets 
were marked on a city map, and then by successive approx- 
imations the division lines of the proposed sweeping-districts 
were so determined that each foreman of a district would 
liave a stipulated number of square yards of paved area to 
take care of; this amount was determined by the number of 
square yards known to be covered by the average work of 
sweeping-machines. 

A study of this map, together with the data concerning the 
number of square yards to be swept, showed that it was 
advisable to divide the city into nine sweeping-districts. 
These districts being much smaller in extent than the sweep- 
ing districts into which the city had formerly been divided, 
enabled a better supervision to be exercised over the clean- 
liness of the city in general. 

The following districts have been established : 

jSTo. 1. West End. 
This district is bounded by Washington, School, and Beacon 
streets and Charles River to Charles River bridge. 

iVb. 2. North End. 
This district is bounded by Charles River from Charles 
River bridge to Central wharf, and by Central, Milk, Wash- 
ington, and Causeway streets. 



122 City Document No. 36. 

JSfo. 3. South End, 

This district is bounded by Central, Milk, Washington^ 
Kneeland, Lincohi, Harvard, and Utica streets and Fort 
Point channel to Central wharf. 

No. 4. South End. 

This district is bounded by Utica, Kneeland, Washington^ 
School, Beacon, and Dartmouth streets, Columbus avenue, 
Berkeley and Dover streets, and Fort Point channel to 
Federal street bridge. 

JSTo. 5. Boston Neck and. Back Bay. 

This district is bounded by Dover and Berkeley streets,. 
Columbus avenue, Dartmouth street, Charles River, West 
Chester park, Falmouth, Gainsborough, Hammond, Ball, 
Hunneman, Fellows, Northampton, and Albany streets, and 
Roxbury Canal, South Bay, to Dover street bridge. 

Note. — Harvard bridge is swept in this district. 

No. 6. South Boston and Dorchester. 

No. 7. Roxbury and West Roxlmry. 

No. 8. Brighton. 

No. 9. East Boston and Charlestoivn.^ 

In laying out the sweeping-districts, the amount of pave- 
ment was carefully measured, and the boundary lines of 
each district were so fixed that each foreman would have an 
equal amount of work to superintend. 

The first five districts are made up as follows : 

District No. 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



1 . Paving cleaned 3 times per week 
Gutter " once ' 

Total " " " . . 584, 08^ 



Paving, sq. yds. 


Gutter, sq. yds. 


183,094 


34,800 


194,710 


1,800 


195,330 


1,900 


193,186 


16,200 


227,630 


129,140 




Sq. yds. 


reek . 


549, 28^ 


(( 


34,800 



Street Department. 



123 



District No. 

2. Paving cleaned 3 times per week 
Gutter " 2 

Total 



3. Paving 
Gutter 

Total 

4. Paving 
Gutter 

Total 

5. Paving 
Gutter 

Total 



3 " 
once 



2 " 
once 



Sq. yds. 

584,130 
3,600 

587,730 

585,990 
3,800 

589,790 

579,558 
16,200 



595,758 

455,260 
129,140 



584,400 



In districts 6, 7, 8, and 9 the amount of work to be done 
was not computed, as it was not possible to assign men 
enough to these districts so that they could be cleaned as 
often as the business section. 

The amount of pavement in each of those districts is aa 
follows : 



District Xo. 

6 . 

7 



9 



Sq. yds. 

238,635 
123,680 
125,000 + 
269,645 



In the above arrangement of work, two sweeping-ma- 
chines are assigned to each of the first five districts, which 
allows for 100,000 square yards per day, or 600,000 square 
yards per week, as a double sweeping-machine can cover, 
on an average, 50,000 square yards in a day in actual 
practice. 

As will be seen by the above table, the first four districts 
are covered every two days. In these districts the follow- 
ing streets are covered every day : 

Green street, Bowdoin street. Court street. Court square, 
Tremont street, Hanover street (from Court street to Black- 
stone street), Adams square, New Washington street, Port- 
land street, Friend street (west of Washington street). Hay- 



124 City Document No. 36. 

market square, Haverhill street, Travers street, Causeway 
street, Union street, Dock square, Washington street (from 
Cornhill street to Dover street). School street, New Devon- 
shire street, Kilby street. Liberty square, Exchange place, 
Central street, India street, Doane street, Faneuil Hall square, 
North and South Market streets, Clinton street, Blackstone 
street. North street (Union street to Blackstone street) , Knee- 
land street, Bedford street, Chauncy street, Avon place. Sum- 
mer street. Federal street (from Summer street to Beach 
street) , Bromfield street. Winter street, Temple place, West 
street) . 

In South Boston, there are a large number of paved 
streets. The force assigned to this district cleans the streets 
on which there is heavy traffic twice a week ; it also spends 
two days per week in Dorchester. 

East Boston and Charlestown are taken care of by one 
gang, whose headquarters are located in Charlestown. 
Eventually, a separate gang will have to be allotted to each 
of these districts ; but such an arrangement will not inter- 
fere, in a general way, with the organization of the rest of 
the force. A separate gang was not provided in East Boston 
this year, owing to the lack of stable accommodations. 

In Brighton, a small gang is organized under the super- 
vision of the district foreman of the Paving Division. 
There are no paved streets in this district, and the force is 
employed in cleaning gutters and crossings, and scraping 
macadamized streets. 

Each swee[)ing-gang consists of a foreman, two »sub-fore- 
men, six helpers, sixteen sweepers, one dumper, one water- 
cart driver, six teamsters, and two sweeping-machine drivers. 
Each gang takes care of 200,000 square yards of paved 
:area ; and the amount of gutter work that is added to the 
labor of sweeping is so adjusted that the total amount of 
work under each foreman is equalized as nearly as possible. 

The assignment of work for each day is so made that the 
a,rea covered each week amounts to about 590,000 square 
yards. 

Night Work. 

Owing to the early hour at which traffic commences in 
Sweeping District No. 2 (which includes the principal mar- 
kets), and the consequent hindrance to the working of the 
sweeping-machines on account of the blockading of the 
streets with market-wagons, caravans, etc., the experiment 
was tried of sweeping this district at night. This system 
was inaugurated on June 10 and continued until November 
14. A decided improvement of the appearance of this dis- 



Street Department. 



125 



trict was immediately noticed ; and it is intended to introduce 
night-sweeping in District No. 3 during the coming year. 

It is impracticable to carry on night-sweeping after cold 
weather sets in, for the reason that the force must be availa- 
ble in the daytime for the work of keeping crossings and 
sidewalks clean if a fall of snow occurs. It is practicable, 
however, to employ this method from April 1 to November 
1 , and such will be the practice of the division in Districts^ 
No. 2 and No. 3 during the coming year. 

The maximum force of the division is shown in the fol- 
lowing table : 















Average No. of 


District. Men employed. 


Office 4 


1 . 














37 


2 . 














39 


3 . 














32 


4 . 














34 


5 . 














35 


6 . 














36 


7 . 










, 




3a 


8 . 














10 


9 . 














27 


Yard and stable 












11 


Push-cart patr 


ol 












37 



Total 



332 



The above-mentioned force use in carrying out the work 
of the division the following plant : 

16 double sweeping-machines. 

15 single sweeping-machines. 

12 water-carts. 

70 street-carts. 

72 horses (owned by the department). 

The push-cart patrol use : 

37 push-carts. 

74 barrels. 

5 street-carts (steel). 

5 horses. 

Push-cart Patrol. 

The fact that the hourly accumulation in a business 
thoroughfare is due to street traffic, and to the large number 
of pedestrians throwing away fruit-skins, paper-bags, news- 
papers, and odds and ends of all kinds, led to the introduc- 
tion of the push-cai't jpatrol. 



12(3 City Document No. 36. 

The push-cart consists of a two-wheeled truck, on which is 
siispended an oak barrel. The iron framework, including 
the axle, is made of curved iron to conform to the contour 
of the barrel, by means of a couple of hooks on each side, 
which tit into I'ings on the truck. 

Each truck is furnished with two barrels, one of which, 
when full, is left at a stated point to be emptied by the 
patrol-cart, which makes a periodical trip through the dis- 
trict. 

By this arrangement, the sweeper always has a compara- 
tively empty barrel at his disposal, and can therefore con- 
tinuously gather up the piles of refuse as fast as they appear, 
instead of sweeping them into piles, as in the old-style 
method, only to be blown about by the wind, and scattered 
about by passing teams before the dump-cart arrives. These 
push-carts are provided with proper supports for broom and 
shovel, and, if Avanted, a sprinkling-pot. 

In every case where they have been properly tried, tliey 
liave proved a valuable acquisition to the service, and have 
occasioned favorable comment from all who desire a cleanly 
thoroughfare. 

The introduction of the push-cart patrol as a necessary 
adjunct of the work of the division was made contempo- 
raneously with its adoption in New York City, where it was a 
matter of experiment. The advisory committee appointed 
in New York to make a report on street-cleaning recom- 
mended that the entire city be swept by hand, and that 1,700 
of these carts should be used. This method, however, is 
very expensive, as it costs two and one-half times as much as 
machine-sweeping ; and it has been introduced into this cit}'" 
merely to supplement the regular work of the sweeping- 
machines. 

The territory covered by this service includes the follow- 
ing streets : 

Arch street, Avon place, Beach street (Washington street to 
South street). Beacon street (Arlington street to Charles 
street), Bedford street, Blackstone street (Hanover street to 
Cross street), Boylston street (Washington street to Park 
square) , Bowdoin square, Brattle street, Brattle square, Brom- 
field street, Bulfinch street (Howard street to Bowdoin 
square) , Causeway street (Merrimac street to Beverly street) , 
Central street, Chardon street, Chauncy street, Columbus 
avenue (Park square to West Chester park), Congress 
street (Milk street to State street). Congress square. Corn- 
hill, Court street, Devonshire street, Doane street, Eliot 
street. Elm street, Essex street (Washington street to South 
street). Exchange place, Federal street (Summer street to 



Street Department. 127 

Milk street), Franklin street (Washington street to Federal 
street), Friend street, Hanover street (Scollay square to 
Blackstone street) , Harrison avenue (Bedford street to 
Kneeland street), Hawkins street, Hawley street, Hayniarket 
square. Harvard street, Kilby street, Kingston street. Knee- 
land street. La Grange street, Lincoln street. Mason street, 
Merrimac street. Milk street (Washington street to Broad 
street), Otis street. Park square, Portland street, Post-ofBce 
square, School street. South street, State street (Washington 
street to Broad street) , Sudbury street. Summer street, Temple 
place, Travers street (Merrimac street to Beverly street), 
Tremont street (Eliot street to Court street), Tremont row. 
Union street (Hanover street to Haymarket square), Wash- 
ington street (Kneeland street to Haymarket square), Water 
street. West street, Winter street, Winthrop square. 

That this service is an important adjunct to the general 
work in the depot and trading districts cannot be denied. 
Even if these streets are swept perfectly clean in the early 
part of the day or during the night, the hourly accumulations 
are so great that the gutters and crossings soon become lit- 
tered and an eyesore to pedestrians. 

The contents of the barrels collected by the push-cart 
patrol are removed at regular intervals by an odorless iron 
dumping-cart. This cart does not leak, is easily dumped, 
and has proved a valuable adjunct of the work of collecting 
the contents of the barrels. 

The refuse collected by the patrol is taken to the dumping- 
scow and towed to sea. The refuse has considerable value 
as manure, but the extra cost of teaming it to the railroad 
stations, where it could be sold to farmers, prevents the 
division from disposing of it in this manner. 

The following table shows the number of loads of street- 
sweepings removed each year during the last ten years : 

Year. No. of Cart-loads. 

1882 52,381 



1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1891 



58,272 
62,222 
61,455 
59,875 
68,990 
68,010 
70,476 
70,449 
187,113 
2 91,425 



1 Jan. 1, 1890, to Jan. 1, 1891. 

2 Jan. 1, 1890, to Feb. 1, 1892 (date made necessary by the change in the financial year). 
•Of this amount 4,290 loads were collected by the push-cart patrol. 



128 City Document No. 36. 



Difficulties encountered by the Division in keeping 
THE Streets clean. 

The following quotations, taken from the report of the 
Committee on Street-Cleaning, appointed to investigate the 
subject in New York, apply to the city of Boston, and show 
that the inhabitants of a city are largely responsible for its 
condition as regards cleanliness ; 

If the existing laws and ordinances regulating the conduct of house- 
holders and citizens with respect to cleanliness were faithfully observed 
and duly enforced, the task of the Street-Cleaning Department would be 
greatly lightened. 

The law against throwing litter and rubbish of any kind into the 
gutters and streets is daily and hourly violated in the best sections of the 
city, and that by people who have not the excuse of ignorance of the 
law. 

We have seen prominent business-houses on Fifth avenue engaged in 
unpacking large cases upon the sidewalk, the operation involving the 
throwing into the streets of paper, straw, and litter of all descriptions. 

We have seen well-dressed men, on their way down town, deliber- 
ately toss into the public highway the eight-page newspaper which they 
had just finished reading. We have seen the same class of people dis- 
embarrass themselves of handfuls of paper and scraps by the same easy 
process. 

We have seen men engaged in repairing the Sidewalks, where the 
material taken up was decayed wood, throw the debris into the public 
streets, and leave it there in piles. 

We have seen in front of a Avell-known and reputable establishment 
on Union square the remains of a large awning partially desti'oyed by 
fire cast deliberately into the gutter. 

It is a matter of daily habit with many storekeepers upon the lines of 
the great lateral avenues to commence the day by sweeping out all the 
refuse litter of their stores into the streets. 

It is useless to multiply these instances ; every one will recognize the 
fact of their daily and hourly occurrence. It is a hopeless task to keep 
the streets of this citj' clean so long as the j^eople themselves are de- 
termined to keep them dirty. 

So thoroughly convinced are we of the absolute necessity of the en- 
forcement of these laws and ordinances, if it is really desired to keep 
the city clean, that, as a most essential part of the remedy we have been 
called upon to suggest, we urge upon the Mayor, as the chief executive 
officer of New York, to exercise all the authority he can command to 
bring all the depai-tments charged with the execution of these laws and 
ordinances into cordial harmony and cooperation for their vigorous 
enforcement. 

Realizing that the enforcement of such ordinances as were 
in force in this city would have a marked effect upon the 
appearance of the streets, the department issued the follow- 
ing circular, and distributed it throughout the retail district 
of the city : 



Street Department. 129 



Office of Scjperintexdent of Streets, 

City Hall, Boston, April 4, 1891. 
Notice to Occupants. 
Your attention is hereby called to the following section of the Revised 
Ordinances in relation to throwing or sweeping dirt of any kind into 
the public streets : 

Chapter 49. 

" Sect. 39. No person shall throw or sweep into, or place, or drop 
and suffer to remain, in any street, any hoops, boards, or other wood 
with nails, or nails of any kind which may be dangerous to horses' feet, 
any earth, dirt, gravel, sand, sweejjings, sawdust, soot, ashes, cinders, 
shavings, hair, manui-e, oyster, claiu, or lobster shells, rubbish or filth 
of any kind, or any noxious or refuse liquid or solid matter, or 
substance." 

Sweeping store-dirt to the sidewalks, and thence to the gutters, is in 
violation of the above ordinance. You are therefore notified to provide 
other measures for the removal of all such sweej^ings and litter, as the 
above ordinance will be enforced. 

(Signed) H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

Following the issue of this circular, several parties were 
arrested and fined from $10 to $20. 

There is no doubt that storekeepers still take advantage 
of the distinction between sweeping off the sidewalk and 
sweeping store-dirt across the sidewalk, as it is often 
noticed that they manage to get rid of the trouble of taking 
up a good deal of their refuse and putting it into barrels, by 
sweeping it into the gutters. The gutters in front of large 
wholesale and retail stores are frequently defaced with litter 
due to its being set out for the ashmen in broken boxes and 
barrels after the street itself has been swept up clean. A 
little painstaking on the part of store employees would help 
the matter considerably. 

The ordinance Avill be even more rigidly enforced the com- 
ing year. 

One of the greatest nuisances is caused by the distribu- 
tion of handbills, which in most instances are thrown directly 
into the street- without being read. An attempt was made 
by the department to get an ordinance passed by the gov- 
ernment this year, to i)revent this distribution ; but, owing 
to the opposition of printers, the ordinance was not passed. 
Boston is now the only large city in the country which tol- 
erates this nuisance.^ 

The constant tearing up of our streets also causes a large 
amount of dirt to accumulate. In replacing the pavements, 
it is necessary to cover them Avith a layer of gravel, which 
eventually works into the joints. As this gravel is not 

' Since the dale of the publication of this report, the City Council has passed an 
ordinance prohibiting the distribution of handbills. 



130 CiTv Document No. 36. 

permitted to be swept up, it becomes ground to powder, 
forming ti mud which is distributed over the surface of the 
streets in the vicinity. This nuisance is obviated by hiving 
the pavement with gravel and tar joints, such as were used 
this year on Tremont street ; but the employment of this 
metliod where ordinary repairs have been made is impracti- 
cable. 

The following circular was sent to the different corpora- 
tions that have frequent occasion to open the streets, in 
order that this nuisance should be remedied as far as pos- 
sible : 

Street Department, 
City Hall, Boston, Oct. 2, 1891. 

You are hereby notified that in future all new paving done by your 
company is to be covered off with beach gravel instead of the dirty hill- 
gravul that you have been accustomed to use. This hill-gravel works 
into mud immediately, and I find it impossible to keep streets clean 
where it is used. Youi's truly, 

(Signed) H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

In addition to the above-mentioned causes for an unclean 
appearance of the streets, we have in this city to contend 
with bad and uneven pavements of long standing that are 
extremely hard to keep clean. 

The duties of the Street-Cleaning Division are not entirely 
confined to the actual work of keeping the streets clean. In 
winter, the sidewalks around the Common and all pul)lic 
squares and burying- grounds, and around many of the public 
buildings, are kept free from snow by the employees of this 
division. The snow is also removed from Harvard bridge, 
and the street-crossings kept free from snow and ice, and the 
gutters are opened up, so that on the occurrence of a thaw 
the water may find its way to the catch-basins and thence to 
the sewers. 

Future Needs of the Division. 

The growth of the city will soon demand the organization 
of separate gangs for the care of East Boston, Dorchester, and 
West Roxbury. In order that time may not be wasted in the 
transfer of men and machines to the location of their work, 
it will be necessary to provide suitable stables and offices in 
each of these districts. 

A new dumping- wharf (which can also be used by the 
Sanitary Division) must be provided at the North End. 

All the ashes and street-sweei)ings now teauied over to 
Caml)ridge from the City Proper should be dumped aboard a 
scow at the North End and towed to sea, as the saving of 
expense on teaming would be very great. 



Street Department. 131 

Cost of Street-cleaning. 

In the report of the Citizens' Association for 1890, reference 
is made to the cost of street-cleaning and the removal of ashes 
and garbage in Boston, and a comparison is made with the 
cost in other cities, much to the disadvantage of tiie city of 
Boston. 

The conditions which govern the expense of street-cleaning 
in diiferent cities vary so much that it is almost impossible 
to make an intelligent comparison. The mere fact that a city 
has more miles of streets than the city of Boston, and spends 
less money on street-cleaning and the removal of ashes and 
garbage, does not necessarily show that the work is conducted 
more economically, as the question as to the thoroughness 
and method of carrying out the work is entirely omitted in 
such a comparison. 

A comparison showing that it costs one city a certain num- 
ber of dollars per mile to sweep the streets, and a certain 
number of cents per load to dispose of its street-dirt and 
ashes and garbage, does not necessarily show that the street- 
cleaning department in that city is either better organized or 
more economically managed than that of another city where 
the cost is shown to be greater. Certain local conditions and 
customs have a great bearing on the subject. 

A city having well -paved streets, with a large number of 
accessible places suited for dumping refuse (so that the cost 
of teaming is reduced to a minimum), with no law established 
by the State Legislature limiting the hours of work to nine per 
day, and with a rate of wages for day-labor from fifty to seventy- 
five cents per day less than the rate established by the City 
Council of Boston, can undoubtedly show that it costs less to 
clean streets and remove ashes and garbage than it does the 
city of Boston. 

In New York, ashes and garbage are not separated, but are 
put together in one receptacle, and are put in the space be- 
tween the stoop and the house line, wdiere they are easily 
accessible to the employees of the department. This method 
of obliging householders to put out their ashes and garbage, 
if adopted in Boston, would alone effect a saving of several 
thousand dollars per year, which the Sanitary Division ex- 
pends for extra helpers who go into the houses and yards and 
carry out the ashes and garbage. 

The report of the Citizens' Association cites Philadelphia 
and New York, and gives figures showing the amount of 
work done in comparison with the amount of money ex- 
pended. The following table is taken from the reports of 
the Bureau of Street-cleaning in Philadelphia, where the 
work is all done by contract : 



132 



City Document No. 36. 



Year. 



18S8. 
1SS9. 
1890. 
1891. 



No. Miles 
cleaned. 



30,340 
44,870 
53,600 



No. Loads No. Loads 
Street-dirt Ashes 
removed, removed. 



306,722 
256,572 
266,831 



499,479 
413,631 
458,000 



No. Loads 
Garbage 
removed. 



88,660 
59,593 
64,934 



Total No. 

Loads 
removed. 



894,861 
729,796 
789,765 



Amount 
expended, 



$460,000 
425,042 
432,037 

1551,998 



Com- 
plaints 
rec'd of 
inefficient 
Service. 



2,501 
1,381 
1,592 



1 Amount recommended. Supervision not included. 



If these figures are correct, it cannot be denied that the 
work of cleanins; streets and colkctins: ashes and garbage in 

c ceo 

Boston costs much more than the same work in Philadelphia. 
The work in Philadelphia is done by contract, and the total 
force employed on the supervision is one chief of bureau, 
five inspectors, one clerk, and one messenger, at an annual 
expense of $9,176. It might be asked how this force is 
enabled to keep the correct accounts of 900,000 loads of 
material collected and disposed of at difl^'erent dumps. An 
inspection of the table reveals the remarkable fact that the 
offal of the city, which in 1^88 amounted to 88,660 loads, 
fell oif in 1890 to 64,934 loads. As the population increased 
during this time, and as the amount of offal should be a 
constant ratio to the population, this is a very iemarkal)le 
showing, and tends to discredit the figures given in the report. 
In 1890, although 23,260 more miles of street weVe swept 
than in 1888, the amount of sweepings removed fell oft' 39,891 
loads. As the average amount of dirt collected is generally 
about 6 loads per mile, there should have been a correspond- 
ing increase of 120,000 loads. 

In view of the above facts, the generalizations by the 
Citizens' Association on the cost per load of dirt removed, 
which are based on these returns, must be accepted with 
caution. The sudden increase recommended for 1891, to- 
gether with the fact that several hundreil complaints are re- 
ceived during the year, leads to the conclusion that the work 
is not entirely satisfactory to the citizens, notwithstanding the 
extreme economy which is shown by the return. 

New York is cited by the Citizens' Association to show the 
economical way in which street-cleaning is conducted, and 
also to show the advantages of the contract system. Since 
the rei)ort of the Citizens' Association, a report has been made 
by a committee appointed to examine the subject of street- 
cleaning in New York. This committee was api)ointed 



Street Department. 133 

by the Mayor to inquire into the tilthy condition of the city, 
and has recommended the entire abolishment of" the contract 
system, and that the sum of $1,259,000 appropriated for street- 
cleaning in 1888 (which was cited in the report of the 
Citizens' Association) be increased to $1,797,870 for tlie 
year 1892. 

The cost of street-cleaning and the remov^al of ashes and 
garbage must necessarily vary in each city. A degree of 
cleanliness wdiich would be entirely satisfactory to the resi- 
dents of one city would be unsatisfactory to the residents of 
another. It is believed that the residents of Boston are more 
particular in this respect than the residents of most of the 
other large cities in the country, and that a degree of clean- 
liness is demanded here which is not deemed necessary in 
other cities. 

The detailed report of the Deputy Superintendent of the 
Street-Cleaning Division gives tables showing the numl)er of 
miles swept, cost of cleaning per mile, number of loads of 
street-dirt removed, and cost of same, together with othen" 
data relating to the division. 

From the personal observations of officials connected with 
the department and from the comments made l)y visiting offi- 
cials from other cities, it may be safely said that during the 
past year the condition of the streets of Boston as I'egards 
cleanliness has not been surpassed by those of any other city 
in this country. 

A comparison of the condition of the streets of this city 
with those of European cities is frequently made by people 
who have returned from abroad. The following o|)ini()n, 
quoted from the ex-Commissioner of Street-cleaning of New 
York, fully explains the reason why European cities are 
cleaner than the cities in this country : 

" When superior cleanliness is observed in the princi[)!d 
cities of Western and Central Europe as compared with the 
condition of the streets in this city, it is not due to better 
methods of work or to the use of better apparatus, but is to be 
attributed to the existence of better pavement, the rigid en- 
forcement of the municipal and sanitary ordinances relating to 
street-cleaning, the employment of at least double the amount 
of labor on the same mileage of streets, and the cooperation 
of the citizens with the officials in their task of securing and 
maintaining order and cleanliness." 

To this it might be added that European cities noted for 
cleanliness spend enormous sums of money on this work ; 
that men, women, and children are employed, who work 
twelve hours per day for a fraction of the sum paid laborers 
in this country who work only nine hours per day. 



134 City Document No. 36. 

Violation of City Ordinances. 

A laro-e amount of correspondence has taken place between 
this department and the Board of Police during the year con- 
cerning the enforcement of the ordinances. In general, the 
Board has been willing to prosecute parties when specially 
requested, and when the evidence of the violation of the 
ordinance was to be furnished by the department, but in 
some instances have assumed that it was the duty of this 
department to make the prosecutions. 

The department has taken the ground, conformably to an 
opinion of Mr. J. B. Richardson, formerly corporation coun- 
sel, that it is the duty of the police to prosecute violations 
of the ordinances, and has contented itself with notifying the 
Board of Police of such violations as were brought to its 
attention. 

The following correspondence shows tlie attitude of the 
police authorities in the matter of prosecuting violations of 
the city ordinances : 
* Form No. 66. 

Police Department of the City of Boston, 

Nov. 4, 1891. 
To Capt. Cyrus Smale, Superintendent of Police: 

I hereby report that Conrad Zeigler, No. 50 George street, has a steam- 
pipe entering the eateh-basin in front of his dye-house, and the steam 
frightens liorses as they pass. 

(Signed) Geo. A. Walker, 

Commanding Div. No. 9. 
Eeferred to the Superintendent of Streets. ^ 

Respectfully forwarded, 
(Signed) Cyrus Small, 

Superintendent of Police. 
Office Superintendent of Police, Boston, Nov. 5, 1891. 

Street Department, City Hall, 

Boston, Nov. 6, 1891. 

Board of Police, No. 7 Pemberton square : 

Gentlemen: I have received j'our "Form No. 66," addressed to 
Capt. Cyrus Small, and signed by Geo. A. Walker, commanding Div. 
No. 9, to the effect that Conrad Zeigler, 50 George street, has a steam- 
pipe entering tlie catch-basin in front of his dye-house, and that the 
steam frightens horses as they pass. 

For some reason, this report has been referred to the Superintend- 
ent of Streets. As a catch-basin can be held to be part of the sewer, 
and as the emptying of steam into the sewer violates a city ordinance, it 
would seem that you have the remedy in your own hands ; unless j'ou 
consider it a part of the duty of the Superintendent of Streets to prose- 
cute people who are violating the city ordinances. 

Yours respectfully, 
(Signed) II. II. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Street Department. 135 

The following letter was addressed to the Board of Police, 
in the hope that some cooperation could be ol)tained from 
the police officers in the task of keeping the streets clean : 

Street Department, 
City Hall, Boston, Aug. 6, 1891. 
Board of Police, 7 Pemberton square : 

Gentlemen : It is continually brought to my attention that the ordi- 
nance in rehxtion to sweeping store-dirt into the streets is being violated. 
In fact, it is the regular pi'actice of storekeepers to sweep out their 
dirt into the street at any time of day they see fit; and your policemen 
witness these violations and pay no attention whatever to them. These 
storekeepers should be compelled to sweep up their dirt and put it into 
barrels. 

There is no reason, at least in the retail business section of the city, 
why this ordinance should not be strictly enforced ; and I should like to 
have your officers warn the storekeepers whom they find violating this 
ordinance that on the repetition of the ofi^ence they will be prosecuted. 
Yours very truly, 
(Signed) H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

Conclusion. 

In carr3nng out the work of the department, the several 
divisions have worked in entire harmony throughout 
the year. The advantage is manifest of being able to 
carry on all work pertaining to the streets in such a manner 
that the work of the different divisions should be directed by 
one official, and therefore proceed with a system. There 
has been no useless duplication of work during the past 
year, and the work on sewers and paving has been carried 
along jointly, at a great saving of expense. 

Appendices are submitted giving the reports of the differ- 
ent deputy superintendents, and, in accordance with the 
recommendation of the Citizens' Association, more attention 
has been given this year to introducing a new system of 
book-keeping ascertaining the cost of the various classes 
of work. Owino; to the o-reat number of streets on which 
improvements have been made, it is impossible to state, 
without taking up a great deal of space, the exact amount of 
work done on each street, although the expenditures are 
shown in all cases. When the cost of a sewer has ex- 
ceeded $2,000, and when the cost of the paving or construc- 
tion of a street has exceeded $3,000, the amount of work 
done is shown in detail. The several deputies have attended 
faithfully to their duties, and have endeavored to harmoni- 
ously work for the benefit of the whole department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION, 1891. 



Central Office .... Room 47, City Hall. 



HENRY H. CARTER, Supermtendent of Streets. 

JOHN W. McDonald, Purchasing Agent. 
HENRY B. WOOD, Secretary and Executive Engineer. 
M. J. MURRAY, Clerh. 

PAVI^^G DIVISION. 

Room 41, City Hall. 

CHARLES R. CUTTER, Deputy Superintendent. 

BENJAMIN B. TREMERE, Chief Clerk. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

Room 44, City Hall. 

HENRY W. SANBORN, Deputy Superintendent {ex officio, Enghieer 

Improved Sewerage^. 

FRANK H. RICE, Chief Cleric. 

Engineer's Office, 12 Beacon Street. 

E. S. DORR, Engineer in Charge. 

SANITARY DIVISION. 

12 Beacon Street. 

GEO. W. EORRISTALL, Deputy Superintendent. 

WILLIAM G. DAVIES, Chief Cleric. 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

PHILIP A. JACKSON, Deputy Superintendent. 

THOMAS Mclaughlin, chief Clerlc. 

BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

JOHN A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent. 

FREDERICK H. SPRING, Chief Clerlc. 

CAMBRIDGE AND BOSTON BRIDGES. 

HENRY II. CARTER, Commissioner for Boston {ex officio). 

WILLIAM J. MARVIN, Commissioner for Cambridge. 

136 



Stkekt Department. 137 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 
OF THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : In conipliaiice with your desires I herewith 
respectfully submit the following report of the acts and 
doings of the Bridge Department and Division from January 
1, 1891, to January 31, 1892, inclusive. 

There was on hand to the credit of the Bridge Department, 
January 1, 1891, a balance of $23,572.99 to complete the 
year ending April 30, 1891. This sum was found to be 
insufficient to the amount of $1,201.10. 

On May 1, 1891, the sum of $100,000 was allotted to 
the Bridge Division, for care, maintenance, etc., of the 
bridges to February 1, 1892, and of this sum there were 
expended by this division $98,236.54. 

The report contains a tabulated statement of the expendi- 
tures, and a description of the work performed on each 
bridge, together with tables conveying necessary and useful 
information, such as bridges supported wholly or in part by 
the city of Boston, etc. ; widths of draw-openings; widths 
of bridges, roadways, and sidewalks ; kind of pavement 
used ; number of draw-openings made for navigation ; census 
of traffic taken on some of the most important bridges ; and 
an inventory of tools, veliicles, and horses on hand. 

The total number of bridges in Boston, not including cul- 
verts, is one hundred and four ; of this number, sixty-nine 
are supported wholly or in part by Boston, and include 
twenty-one tide-water bridges provided with draws. These, 
of all others, require constant care, and cover a territory 
from one extreme end of the city to the other. Previous to 
May 1, 1891, all the mechanics, etc., employed in the de- 
partment were grouped in one body, having their only head- 
quarters at Foundry street. South Boston, where tools, rig- 
ging, stock, and everything necessary for the work was kept. 
After careful consideration, it was decided that the efficiency 
of the mechanics employed could be increased by dividing 
the care and work on the most important bridges and estab- 



138 City Document No. 36. 

lishing" two districts, allotting to each district a certain num- 
ber of men. On May 1, 1891, the reorganization went 
into effect, and was as follows : " North district," head- 
quarters, Charles-river bridge, eml)racing all bridges from 
"Winthrop to Brighton. " South district," headquarters at 
Foundry street, embracing all bridges from South Boston to 
Milton. The results obtained have been entirely satisfac- 
tory, and much more work has been accomplished than it 
was possible to do under the old system. Both forces can 
be concentrated in a very short time wherever their services 
are demanded. 

^Yith the exception of Charles-river, Chelsea-street, and 
Maiden, the general condition of the bridges is good. 

The lumber furnished during the year by the several 
firms having the contracts has been of excellent quality, 
and I take pleasure in saying that in no single case were we 
delayed because of a failure to promptly deliver the mate- 
rial ordered. At all times care was taken in ordering lum- 
ber to specify such lengths as would admit of the least 
waste. 

The operatives of the tide- water bridges have performed 
their duties in a faithful and careful manner. All these 
bridges are furnished with a duplicate set of gearing, so that 
in case of a break the public will suffer but little delay and 
inconvenience. All patterns owned by the city, and known 
to be in the possession of outside concerns, have been re- 
claimed and placed in the care of the draw-tender of the 
bridge to which they belonged. 

The inland bridges have been kept in a clean and safe con- 
dition, were thoroughly swept each week, chords cleaned 
and scuppers kept open. 

Special Work. 

The report contains also the expenditures up to date on 
bridges built, or in process of construction, where special 
appropriations were provided. On all these Imdges, since 
May 1, 1891, the woodwork, where any was called for, — viz., 
Cornwall street, over Stony brook, Milton; Berkeley street, 
over Boston & Albany liailroad ; and Chelsea steam-appa- 
ratus, — has been performed by the men employed in this 
division, under the supervision of the City Engineer, and by 
plans furnished by him. This work was formei-ly done by 
contract, but I firmly believe the best results can be obtained 
by allowing those men to build who are to keep it in repair. 
The difference in the cost, if any, under such conditions, 
would be trifling, comi)ared with the advantages derived 
from a thorough knowledge of the work. 



Street Department. 139 

We have endeavored to perform all work of this kind to 
the satisfaction of the City Engineer. 

During the past year, Federal-street bridge has been com- 
pleted, and an electric motor placed there to furnish the 
power necessary for opening and closing the draws. It has 
now been in operation for several months, and, so far, has 
proven satisfactory. The work of substituting steam for 
horse power at both the Chelsea draws is about complete, 
and the new method will be operated in a short time. 
Very respectfully yours, 

John A. McLaughlin, 

DejDuty Superintendent. 



Appropriations and Expenditures for the Four Months 
ENDING April 30, 1891. 

Balance of appropriatiou, 1890-1, on 

hand, Jan. 1, 1891 . . . $23,572 99 

By transfer, April 30, 1891 (to make 

up deficit) 1,201 10 



Total ...... $24,774 09 

This amount was expended as follows : 
By Bridge Department . . . $13,982 52 
" " Division .... 10,791 57 



Total $24,774 09 

Appropriations and Expenditdres for the Nine Months 
ENDING Jan. 31, 1892. 



Appropriation available. May 1 . 
Transferred to Sanitary Division 


$100,000 00 
600 00 




Total 






$99,400 00 


Expended to Jan. 31, 1892 


• 


• 


98,236 54 


Balance ..... 


$1,163 46 


Expenditures, 








Administration 
Office expenses : 

Advertising .... 
Printing . . . . . 


$10 
224 


12 
00 





Carried forward^ $234 12 



140 City Document No. 36. 



Brought forivard. 
Stationery and postage 
Office books 
Telephone 
Sundries . 



Superintendent of Bridges 
Salary to April 1, 1891 
Board of horse . 
Telephone at house . 



$234 12 


152 


94 


24 


50 


121 


15 


43 


95 


$625 


00 


93 


78 


24 


00 



$576 66 



742 78 



Salaries of Deputy Superintendent, clerk, and mes- 
senger 4,838 34 

Salaries of general foreman and two district fore- 
men, 9 months 3,381 00 

Board of Deputy Superintendent's horse . . 261 00 

Paid to widow of John T. Kilt}', a former employee, 

by order of City Council 1,000 00 

Paid to Walter Friend & Co., agents for schr. " S. C. 
Tr^'on," damages caused by insufficient width of 
draws on Charles-river bridges, as award of Com- 
mittee on Claims ...... 338 30 



Amount expended. Administration . . . . $11,138 08 



Expenditures on tide-water bridges . . . $92,892 53 

" " inland " ... 8,351 75 

" North yard and stable . . . 4,357 90 

" South ^' " " ... 6,270 37 

" Administration '11,138 08 



Total amount expended for the year, including draw- 
tenders' and mechanics' rolls for January, 1892 . $123,010 63 



Income. 

The amount of bills for repairing damage done to 
bridges by vessels, work done by the department, 
and sale of old iron, etc., deposited with the 
City Collector during the year, was . . . $1,183 40 



TIDE-WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort-Point channel). 
Sheathed draw and roadway- general re[)airs on machinery, new 
centre put in under draw, boat repaire 1 ami painted, and on 
Lehigh-street span put in new deck and painted ironwork un- 
derneath two coats. 



Steeet Department. 



141 



Carpenters 


$987 72 


Painters 


121 25 


Lumber 


1,380 33 


Nails and spikes 


30 88 


Ironwork 


99 87 


Paint-stock 


34 60 


Calking 


64 35 


Hardware 


3 05 


Boat-stock 


12 54 


Cement and sand . 


12 40 


Regular expenses : 




Draw- tenders . 


$6,370 17 


Coal 


230 40 


Watering 


250 00 


Gas . . . 


28 35 


Bedding . 


41 50 


Water ^ . 


22 50 


Small supplies 


78 99 



$2,746 99 



7,021 91 

Cambridge-street bridge (from Brighton to 

Cambridge). 

Rebuilt end of pier, new top laid, hard-pine cap- 
ing and new iron bands, waterway repaired, ex- 
tra gears attached to hoisting-machinery of draw. 



Carpenters 


$511 01 


Lumber . 


444 87 


Nails and spikes 


7 00 


Ironwork 


242 46 


Car-fares 


8 90 


Teaming 


24 00 


Driving piles . 


75 00 


Regulfir expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


$400 71 


Coal 


7 52 


Small supplies 


17 80 



$1,313 24 



426 03 

Charles-river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town) : 

Built shed on pier for storage, put new trucks in 
place twice, repaired machinery, put new water- 
pipes in stable, and placed the same in box 
covering, painted boat, general lepairs on engine, 
new smoke-stack, and sheathed draw twice. 
Carpenters . . . $1,579 58 
Painters ... 22 50 

Lumber .... 521 86 



1,768 90 



1,739 27 



Carried forward, 



;,123 94 



.1,508 17 



142 



City Docibient No. 36. 



Brought fonvard, 


$2,123 94 


Nails and spikes 


7 98 


Ironwork 


299 02 


Paint-stock 


3 45 


Phuubing 


2o0 00 


Hardware 


12 85 


8moke-stack . 


14 50 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


$5,387 50 


Cual 


464 40 


Watering 


250 00 


Gas 


30 55 


Fnrniture and bedding . 


62 35 


Cordage . 


234 79 


Water . 


23 50 


Oil ... 


22 02 


Salt 


11 00 


Small supplies 


42 66 



.1,508 17 



!,711 74 



6,528 77 

Chelsea bridge [North] (over North channel, 

M^'stic river) . 

Sheathed draw, repaired waterway, painted top 
and underside of bridge one coat, house painted 
inside and out, boat repaired and painted, new 
sidewalk on draw, new steps from draw to pier, 
and reset buoy. 



Carpenters 


1546 00 


Painters 


326 00 


Lumber . 


189 93 


Nails and spikes 


3 75 


Ironwork 


69 39 


Paint-stock 


86 87 


Boat-stock 


4 60 


Setting buoy . 


56 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


. $3,059 76 


Feed 


107 36 


Coal . . 


24 15 


Horse-shoeing 


19 25 


Gas 


34 51 


Woollen carpet 


20 93 


Water . 


4 50 


Veterinar}^ service . 


5 00 


Repairing harness . 


7 90 


Small supplies 


49 08 



,282 54 



3,332 44 



9,240 51 



4,614 98 



Carried fonuard, 



$25,363 66 



Street Department. 

Brovghtforivanl, 

Chelsea bridge [South] (over South channel, 

Mystic I iver) . 

Sheatlied draw, new oak headers, reslated draw- 
tenders' house, painted top of bridge one coat, 
underside two coats, draw-tenders' house, out- 



143 

$25,363 66 



side, one coat, inside p 

Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber . 
Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 
Paint-stock 
Plumbing 
Slatina: . 



Regular expenses 
Draw-tenders . 
Feed 
Coal 

Horse-shoeing 
Gas 

Bedding 
Water . 
Repairing harness 
Small supplies 



ainted and varnished. 

$478 07 

492 60 

245 74 

11 25 

85 

101 

5 



64 
79 
00 
41 25 



. $3,059 


76 


119 


97 


19 


20 


37 


50 


38 


52 


15 


00 


11125 


17 


40 


60 


98 



.,461 24 



3,379 58 



4,840 82 



Chelsea-street bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 

Replanked draw, repaired sheathing on roadway, 
and painted top of bridge two coats. 



Carpenters 


$114 33 


Painters 


59 00 


Lumber . 


170 12 


Nails and spikes 


6 75 


Ironwork 


6 85 


Paint-stock 


49 90 


Car-fares 


10 32 


Teaming 


2 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


$327 75 


Small supplies 


5 55 



$419 27 



333 30 



752 57 



Carried forioard, 



),957 05 



144 



City Docuiment No. 36. 



Brotight foriuarrl , 
Commercial Point, or Tenean bridge (Dor- 
chester) . 

Made new flaps for draw, and extensive repairs 
made on hoistiuo;-o;ear. 



),957 05 



Carpenters 


. 


$46 00 




Lumber . 


, , 


9 02 




Ironwork 


. • . 


249 69 




Car- fares 


. 


2 50 


$307 21 






Regular ex 


penses : 






Draw-tender 


• 


• 


50 00 



Congress-street bridge (over Fort-Point chan- 
nel) . 

Sheathed draw twice, repaired stringers under 
draw, repaired machinery, painted buildings and 
bridge, general repairs on engine and boilers, 
and repaired concrete sidewalk. 



Carpenters 


$961 


90 




Painters 


595 


75 




Lum.ber . 


575 


27 




Nails and spikes 


9 


00 




Ironwork 


721 


85 




Paint-stock 


119 


82 




Hardware 


11 


90 




Teaming 


18 


00 




Repairing concrete walk 


21 


66 




Two new pier signs 


12 


00 


$3,047 15 


Regular expenses : 






Draw- tenders . 


. $6,042 


16 




Coal . . . . 


307 


80 




Watering 


125 


00 




P\irniture and bedding . 


27 


40 




AV^ater . . . . 


100 


44 




Small supplies 


87 


19 


6.689 99 









Dover-street bridge (over Fort-Point channel). 

Repaired deck, sidewalks, fender-guards, and water- 
way, sheathed draws twice, put in tliree new sets 
of trucks, repaired road-gates, and put in oak 
sleepers under track rails, built new chimney on 
house, new plumbing in house and stable. 

Carpenters . . . $1,409 01 

Painters . . . . 10 00 

Lumber .... 269 90 

Nails and spikes . . 6 00 

Ironwork ... 813 38 



357 21 



9,737 14 



Carried forward, 



«2,508 89 



$41,051 40 



Steeet Department. 



Brought forivard, 


$2,508 89 


Paint-stock 


3 44 


Plumbing 


438 00 


Hardware 


10 30 


iSevv chimney = 


31 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw- tenders . 


$4,917 96 


Feed 


229 73 


Coal 


22 45 


Horse-shoeing 


26 00 


Watering 


125 00 


Gas 


32 68 


Water . 


13 50 


Repairing harness . 


6 35 


Small supplies 


103 72 



145 
.,051 40 



^2,991 63 



5,477 39 

Essex-street bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 
bridge). 
Sheathed roadway, laid new sidewalk, and repaired 

latches^ 



8,469 02 



Carpenters 


$283 50 




Lumber . 


246 37 




Nails and spikes . 


7 00 




Ironwork 


12 53 




Car-fares 


20 40 


$569 80 






Regular expenses : 






Draw-tender . 


$721 62 




Coal 


7 27 




Repairs on stove 


6 60 




Small supplies 


1 31 


736 80 







1,306 60 



Federal-street bridge (over Fort-Point chan- 
nel). 

Adjusted draws and made small repairs. 



Carpenters 


$234 37 


Ironwork 


6 46 


Hardware 


5 98 


New signs for road-gates, 


10 50 


Teaming old iron . 


24 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


$5,757 07 


Feed 


17 43 


Coal 


126 44 


Horse-shoeing . 


4 00 


Watering 


125 00 



$281 31 



Carried forward, 



;,029 94 $281 31 



),827 02 



146 



City Document No. 36. 



BrovgJit forward. 


$6,029 94 


Gas ... 


9 30 


Furniture and bedding 


64 12 


Cordage . 


21 36 


Water 


44 76 


Small supplies 


125 10 



;l 31 $50,827 02 



6,294 58 



Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Eepaired sheathing and latches on the draw. 
Carpenters ... $6 25 

Lumber .... 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 
Small supplies 



4 43 



$262 20 
2 77 



$10 68 



264 97 



Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett) . 
Sheathed draw, put in new oak headers, repaired 
machiner}-, adjusted draw, located buoy-stone, 
and repaired and painted boat. 



Carpenters 


$322 36 


Painters . 


7 50 


Lumber . 


22 75 


Ironwork 


69 75 


Faint-stock 


2 00 


Car-fares 


12 85 


Finding buoy-stone . 


25 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


. $2,336 87 


Coal 


9 95 


Watering 


165 00 


Gas 


7 36 


Water . 


9 00 


Repairs on stove 


5 60 


Small supplies 


20 53 



$462 21 



2,554 31 

Meridian-street bridge (from East Boston to 

Chelsea). 

Sheathed draw, put in new oak headers, new rack, 
and new pinion gear, repaired stable and water- 
wa}^ painted top and underside of bridge, also 
painted buildings two coats, water-pipes repaired, 
duplicate parts of machinery placed on bridge, 
and reset buoy. 

Carpenters . . . $544 63 

Painters . . . . 501 75 



Carried forward, 



$1,046 38 



6,575 89 



275 65 



3,016 52 



),695 08 



Street Department. 



liro II gJtt forward, 


$1,046 


38 




Lumber . . . . 


159 


50 




Nails and spikes 


4 


50 




Ironwork 


•230 


04 




Paint stock 


182 


95 




Car-fares 


56 


04 




Plumbing 


295 


86 




Resetting buoy 


54 


65 


$2,029 92 








Regular expenses : 








Draw-tenders . 


$2,994 


01 




Feed 


131 


00 




Coal 


30 


10 




Horse-shoeing 


25 


75 




Gas 


27 


00 




Bedding . . . 


11 


45 




Cordage . 


3 


48 




Water 


9 


00 




New horse for turninc 


r 






draw . . . 


I 250 


00 




New stove 


23 


90 




Small supplies 


55 


88 


3,561 57 









147 
$60,695 08 



5,591 49 



Mt. Washington-avenue bridge (over Fort- 
Point channel) . 

All woodwork on draw rebuilt, new stringers, 
deck, guards, oak centre, sidewalks, fences ; 
also deck calked. Added a stor}^ on draw- 
tender's house, containing three rooms, put in 
new water-closet and new plumbing, repaired 
sidewalk on bridge, also waterway, painted under- 
side and top of bridge two coats, buildings inside 



and out two coats, rep 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber . 
Nails and spikes 
Lonwork 
Paint stock 
Plumbing 
Calking . 
Hardware 
Plastering 
New chimney 
Roofers' bill 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 
Coal 



lired and painted boat. 
$1,997 69 
480 75 
60 

77 
07 
16 



1,459 

58 

368 

98 

198 

123 

23 

80 

38 

56 



io 
80 
16 
00 
85 
20 



$4,983 80 



$5,393 49 
38 00 



Carried forward, 



$5,431 49 $4,983 80 



),286 57 



148 



City Document No. 36. 



Brought forioard., 
Watering 
Gas 

Furniture and bedding 
Water . 

Rent of land two years 
New stove 
Small supplies 



$5,431 49 

125 00 

24 15 

70 12 

4 50 

120 00 

21 35 

49 18 



t,983 80 



i,286 57 



5,845 79 



Nepoiiset Ibridge (from Dorchester to Quincy). 
Laid new top on easterly pier, repaired waterway 
and hoisting machinery, and rebuilt new side- 
walk. 



Carpenters 
Lumber . 


$404 91 
307 54 




Nails and spikes 


18 50 




Ironwoi'k 


329 60 




Car-fares 


22 36 




Hardware 


1 20 


$1,084 11 
437 19 


Regular expenses : 
Draw- tender . 





North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton to 

Watertown), 

Sheathed roadway and draw. 
Carpenters . . . $60 50 

Lumber . . . . 153 60 

Nails and spikes . . 3 20 

$217 30 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender ... 82 08 



North Harvard-street bridge (from Brighton 
to Cambridge). 

Repaired waterway and built new house on pier for 
draw-tender. 



Carpenters 


$181 00 


Painters 


7 50 


Lumber . 


114 11 


Nails and spikes 


1 87 


Ironwork 


77 08 


Paint-stock 


2 00 


Car-fares 


3 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


$400 71 


Small supplies 


1 75 



$386 56 



402 46 



10,829 59 



1,521 30 



299 38 



Carried fonva.' d, 



789 02 
$79,725 86 



Street Department. 

Brought fonvard, 
Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 
Sheathed draws three times, placed new iron ladder 
in engine-house, repaired machinery and engines, 
repaired fender-gnards, road-gates, and fence, 
painted nnderside and top of bridge, and all 
buildings two coats, and put in new cables. 



Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 

Put in new deck and sheathed roadway and draw. 

Carpenters . . . $156 52 

Lumber . 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 

Car- fares 



193 45 




11 80 




4 00 




11 60 






$377 37 





149 

;79,725 86 



Carpenters 


$929 46 








Painters 


675 


00 








Lumber . 


340 


01 








Nails and spikes 


6 


75 








Lonwork 


260 


18 








Paint- stock 


18 


46 








Plumbing 


2 


15 








Wire rope 


38 


77 


$2,270 


78 












Regular expenses : 












Draw-tenders . 


. $5,792 


34 








Coal 


577 


80 








Watering 


375 


00 








Gas 


68 


81 








Bedding 


7 


50 








Water . 


45 


00 








Small supplies 


82 


21 


6,948 


66 






















9,219 44 


Western-ayenue 


bridge (from B 


righton 


to 


Cambridge). 












Repaired sheathing on roadway and draw. 






Carpenters 


$93 46 








].umber . 


105 


57 








Nails and spikes 


4 


60 








Ironwork 


8 


78 








Car-fares 


1 


40 


$213 


81 












Regular expenses : 












Draw-tender . 


$400 


71 








Coal 


4 


85 








Small supplies 


1 


75 


407 


31 










fi-->1 19 



Carried forward, 



177 37 



,566 42 



150 City Document No. 36. 



Brought forward^ 
Regular expenses : 
Driiw-tender . 
Small supplies 


$82 08 
1 25 


$377 37 
83 33 







Willtlirop bridge (from Breed's Island to Win- 
throp) . 
Repaired wheel-guards. 

Carpenters . . . $35 00 

Ironwork ... 4 80 

$39 80 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . $100 00 
Small supplies . « 2 50 



102 50 



Sundry expenditures on tide-water bridges 
Building sanitary boxes . $182 10 



Sundr}' car-fares 


. 


202 86 


Repairinsf boats 


. 


60 00 


Citv Engineer, horse-hire 




for . 


. 


17 50 


City Engineer, use 


of 




steam-launch 




48 00 


Regular expenses : 




Chief draw-tender 


(9 




months') 




$1,350 00 


Messenger (9 months) 


. 


598 26 


Counting traffic 


, 


62 50 


Sundry bridge supplies 


• 


201 89 



$510 46 



2,212 65 



1,566 42 



460 70 



142 30 



2,723 11 



Total expended on tide-water bridges . . $92,892 53 



Street Department. 



151 



Recapitulation. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Tide-water Bridges for the Year ending 

Feb. 1, 1892. 



Namk of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge-street 

Charles-river 

Chelsea (North) 

Chelsea (South) 

Chelsea-street 

Commercial-point 

Congress-street 

Dover-street 

Essex-street 

Federal-street 

Granite ....... 

Maiden 

Meridian-street 

Mt. Washington-avenue 

Neponset 

North Beacon-street , 

North Harvard-street . 

Warren 

Western-avenue (to Cambridge) . 

Western-avenue (to Watertown) . 

Winthrop 

Chief draw-tender, and sundry ex- 
penditures , 

Totals 



Repairs, labor, 

lumber, 

ironwork, and 

painting. 



|2,746 99 

1,313 24 

2,711 74 

1,282 54 

1,461 24 

419 27 

307 21 

3,047 15 

2,991 63 

569 80 

281 31 

10 68 

462 21 

2,029 92 

4,983 80 

1,084 11 

217 30 

386 56 

2,270 78 

213 81 

377 37 

39 80 

510 46 



629,718 92 



Regular ex- 
penses, salaries, 
fuel, and 
supplies. 



57,021 91 

426 03 
6,528 77 
3,332 44 
3,379 58 

333 30 

50 00 

6,689 99 

5,477 39 

736 80 
6,294 58 

264 97 
2,554 31 
3,561 57 
5,845 79 

437 19 

82 08 
402 46 

6,918 QQ 
407 31 

83 33 
102 50 

2,212 65 



5,173 61 



Total. 



$9,768 90 

1,739 27 

9,240 51 

4,614 98 

4,840 83 

752 57 

357 21 

9,737 14 

8,469 02 

1,306 60 

6,575 89 

275 65 

3,016 52 

5,591 49 

10,829 59 

1,521 30 

299 38 

789 02 

9,219 44 

621 12 

460 70 

142 30 

2,723 11 



>,892 53 



152 



City Document No. 36. 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

AlbJiny-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Eaiiroad). 
Sheatlied roadway and painted top of bridge. 

Carpenters $128 75 

Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 
Paiut-stocli: 

Ashland-stl-eet bridge (over Old Colony Rail- 
road, Providence Division). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters . . . . . S43 12 

Lumber 97 92 

Nails 2 35 



320 


50 


132 


28 


3 


00 


29 


70 



Baker-street bridge (over brook, near Cow 
Island, West Roxbury), 
Repaired sheathing on roadway. 

Carpenters $16 00 

Lumber 21 26 

Nails 2 25 



Beacon-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 
Sheathed roadwa}'. 

Carpenters $97 01 

Lumber ...... 159 35 

Nails 3 90 

Car-fares 10 65 



Berkeley-street bridge (over Old Colony Rail- 
road, Providence Division). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters . . ... . $196 50 

Lumber 493 15 

Nails 9 00 



Boylston-stl'eet bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Sheathed westerly roadway in 1890, paid for stock 

this year. 

Carpenters $4 69 

Lumber ...... 136 96 

Sand 1 75 



$614 23 



143 39 



39 51 



270 91 



698 65 



143 40 



Carried fonuard, 



$1,910 09 



Street Department. 153 

Brovght fnrionrd^ $1,910 09 

Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road) . 

Slieathed roadway, and repaired deck where 
defective. 

Carpenters $58 oO 

Lumber ...... 75 69 

Nails 2 40 



Canterbury- street bridge (over Stony Brook). 
Repaired sheathing where defective : 

Carpenters $22 50 

Lumber ...... 39 83 

Nails (from stock). 



Central-avenue bridge (from Dorchester to 
Milton). 

Repaired sheathing, and painted fences on the 
bridge. 

Carpenters . . . . . $13 75 

Painters 28 75 

Lumber . . . . . . 9 10 

Paint 71 10 

"Nails (from stock). 

Teaniino; ...... 4 00 



Columbus-ayenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Kailroad). 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $46 62 

Lumber ...... 85 64 

Nails 2 15 



Commonwealtli-avenue bridge (over outlet to 
Back Bay). 

Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $82 62 

Lumber 143 43 

Nails 4 60 

Car-fares ...... 7 50 



Cottage-street (foot) bridge (from Jeffries 
Point to Wood Island). 

Painted part of bridge fence. 

Painters $264 25 

Paint-stock . . . . . 44 20 

Watchman (permanently employed) . 798 00 



136 59 



62 33 



126 70 



133 41 



238 15 



Carried forivard, $1,106 45 $2,607 27 



154 



City Document No. 36. 



Broug Jit forward, 
Coal . . . . 
Stove 



$1,106 4.0 
10 
7 54 



$85 


25 


398 


75 


176 


.37 


6 


60 


79 


63 



Dartmouth-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany, and Providence Division of Old Colony 
Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway and painted top of bridge one 

coat. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 
Paint-stock 

Dorchester-street bridge (over Old Colony 

Railroad, Central Division). 

Roadway sheathed by Old Colony Railroad Com- 
pany, the City paying for its share, one-fifth 

Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & 

Albany Railroad). 

Services of watchman to guard the bridge after it 
was condemned by the City Kngineer, and before 
the rebuilding of the same was commenced 

Gardner-street bridge (over brook, near Cow 
Island, West Roxbury). 
New structure built. 

(^arpenters 
Lumber 

Nails 



Gravel 
Car-fares 



50 88 

70 43 

2 25 

9 50 

21 40 



Huntington-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Repaired sheathing on roadway. 

Carpenters $59 50 

Lumber 97 10 

Nails 3 15 



Hyde Park-avenue bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Repaired shealhing on roadway. 

Carpenters $11 50 

Lumber 31 01 

Nails 1 20 



;2,607 27 
1,119 09 



746 60 



11 93 



255 00 



254 46 



159 75 



43 71 



Carried fonvard, 



5,197 81 



Street Department. 



155 



Brought forward^ 
Matt.ipail bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Repaired slieatliing. 

Carpenters $22 25 

Lumber ...... 13 91 

Kails (from stock). 



^5,197 81 



Sliawmut 


-avenue bridge (over 


Boston 


& Al- 


bany Railroa 


d). 






Sheatiied roa 


dway and repaired sidei 


rt'alk. 




Carpenters 


. 




$76 13 


Lumber 


. 




116 52 


Nails 


. . . . 




3 50 


Cement 


. 




2 75 



Smimier-street bridge (near Spring- street sta- 
tion, West Roxbury). 

New deck laid, sheathed roadwa}', built new side- 
walk and fence. 
Carpenters ..... $8 75 

Lumber 18 41 

Nails (from stock). 



Swett-street bridge (east of New York & New 
England Railroad) . 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters .^ . . . . $188 52 

Lumber . . . . . . 140 95 

Nails 4 60 



Swett-street bridge (west of New York & New 

England Railroad). 

Strengthened the entire structure underneath, ac- 
cording to plans of City Engineer, and sheathed 
roadway. 



Carpenters 


$550 81 


Lumber .... 


282 35 


Nails and spikes 


10 92 


Ironwork .... 


6 60 


Car-fares .... 


4 50 


Rnbber boots 


16 00 


Repairs on portable tool-house 


7 45 



Texas-street bridge (over Stony Brook). 
New deck, new stringers where defective, and new 

sidewalks. 
Carpenters ..... $26 50 

Lumber 26 24 

Nails 1 25 



36 16 



198 90 



27 16 



334 07 



878 63 



53 99 



Carried forward, 



),726 72 



153 City Docuiment No. 36. 

Brought forward^ $6,72G 72 

West Chester-park bridge (over Old Colony 
railroad, Providence Division). 
Sheathed roadwaj'. 

Carpenters $38 88 

Lumber . . . . . . 76 1)7 

Nails 2 60 

118 45 



West Newton-street bridge (over Old Colony 
Railroad, Providence Division). 
Sheathed roadway and repaired sidewalks. 

Carpenters ..... 

Lumber ...... 

Nails 

Sundry expenditures on inland bridges : 
Labor, removing snow 

" bridge cleaner 
Sand for slippery- walks 

1,394 87 

Total 18,351 75 



$34 


50 


75 


01 


2 


20 


;979 


75 


388 


49 


26 


63 



111 71 



Street Department. 



157 



Recapitulation. 

Table sJiowing Expendihires on the Inland Bridges during the 
Year ending Feb. i, 1892. 



Name of Bridge. 

Albau3--street .... 
Ashlaud-street .... 
Baker-slreet .... 

Beacon-street (over B. & A. R.R.) 
Berkeley-street (over Providence Division, O. C 

R.R.) 
Bo3'lston-street (over B. & A. R.R.) 
Broadway (over B. & A. R.R.) . 
Canterbury-street 
Central-avenne 
Columbus-avenue 

Common wealth-avenue (over Outlet) 
Cottage-street 
Dartmouth-street 
Dorchester-street 
Ferdinand-street 
Gardner-street 
Huniington-avenue 
Hyde Park-avenue 
INlattapan 
Shawmut-avenue . 
Summer-street 
Swett-street (East) 
Swett-slreet (West) 
l^exas-street 
West Chester-park (over Providence Div 

O. C. RR.) 
West Newton-street 
Sundry expenditures 



Repairs, 
labor, lumber, iron- 
■work, and painting. 


$614 


23 


143 


39 


39 


51 


270 


91 


698 


65 


143 


40 


136 


59 


62 


33 


126 


70 


133 


41 


238 


15 


1,119 


09 


746 


60 


11 


93 


255 


00 


254 


46 


159 


75 


43 


71 


36 


16 


198 


90 


27 


16 


334 


07 


878 


63 


53 


99 


118 


45 


111 


71 


1,394 


87 



Total 



i,351 75 



158 



City Docujment No. 36. 



Stable, District No. 1. 



Teamster 
Hostler 
Feed 

Re[)airs on buggy 
" " wagons 
Horse-shoeing 
Harness and repair 
Supplies 
New buggy . 
Bay horse 

Veterinary services 
Horse-clipping 



Amount expended North Yard and. Stable, 



REGULAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH 
AND SOUTH YARDS. 

North Yard, District No. 1. 

Charles- River Bridge. 

Messenger 

Watchman 

Repairing buildings 

Painting signs 

Tools for carpenters 

Tools for painters 

Bridge flags . 

Supplies 

Telephone 

Stock, lumber, nails, and paint 



28 

545 00 

283 39 

9 52 

162 28 

81 32 

96 00 

70 04 

116 33 

80 70 



. 1. 




. $587 


50 


296 


50 


231 


43 


3 


95 


]31 


70 


34 


75 


91 


80 


142 


41 


200 


00 


325 


00 


200 


00 


21 


00 


3 


00 



S2,088 86 



2,269 04 
$4,357 90 



South Yard, District No. 2. 



Messenger 
Yardman 
Watchman 
Repairing buildings 
Making street-horses 
Painting signs 
Tools for carpenters 
Tools for pointers 
Bridge flags . 

Carried foncard, 



Foundry Street. 



$644 28 


515 


75 


562 


50 


97 


19 


64 


97 


33 


25 


268 


45 


72 


49 


93 


80 



$2,352 68 



Steeet Department. 



lot) 



Broiight furivard, 








$2,352 


68 




Supplies ...... 75 


97 




Telephone 120 


00 




Stock, lumber, nails, and paint . . 136 


94 


$2,685 59 


Stable, District No. 2. 




Teamster ...... 


$873 


12 




Hostler 








590 


00 




Feed . 








321 


50 




llepairs on buggy 








96 


15 




" " wagons 








144 


20 




Horse-shoeing 








119 


25 




Harness and repairs 








187 


50 




Supplies 








62 


23 




New buggy . 








275 


00 




" wagon 








200 


00 




Brown horse 








325 


00 




Gray horse . 








250 


00 




Veterinary services 








30 


00 




Horse-clipping 








5 


00 




Use of horse 








85 


83 




" " buggy 








20 


00 










3,584 78 






Amount expended South Yard and Stable, 


$6,270 37 


Total amount expends 


'd at 


North 


and 


South Yards, 


$10,628 27 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Berkeley-sti-eet bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 




Building new iron bridge, parapets and bridge seals. 




(work in progress). 




Bridge seats and parapets ..... 

Iron bridge structure ...... 

Carpenters ........ 

Painters ........ 


$2,084 86 

4,898 00 

998 34 

224 00 


Inspector ........ 

Iron bolts ........ 


170 00 
11 88 


Advertising and specifications .... 


106 10 


Hand-siamp ........ 


3 00 


Expended .Tan. 31, 1892 

Balance 


$8,496 18 
9,503 82 


Appropriation 


$18,000 00 



160 



City Document No. 36. 



Chelsea bridge, steam apparatus. New engines, 
boilers, etc., new motive power for the North and 
South draws of Chelsea bridge. 
(Worli in progress.) 

Carpenters ..... 
Painters ..... 
Lumber ..... 

Nails 

Paint 

Bolts, washers, straps, etc. . 

Six iron tanks .... 

Hose ...... 

One double engine and boiler. North draw . 
One double engine and boiler. South draw 
Angle-irons, wire rope, sheave, etc.. North draw 
Groove, steel chain, brackets, etc.. South draw 
P^ouudation to engine-house, North draw 
Kngineers' rolls ...... 

Advertising ...... 

Sand and cement ...... 

Expended Jan. 31, 1892 .... 
Balance ....... 

Appropriation ...... 



$1,855 


95 


187 


CO 


1,056 


53 


19 


93 


19 


75 


170 


89 


60 


00 


14 


60 


660 


00 


745 


00 


589 


00 


1,192 


00 


919 


70 


270 


84 


4 


26 


3 


00 


$7,768 


45 


4,231 


55 


$12,000 


00 



Cornwall street, laving out and constructing. 
Cornwall-street bridge (over Stony Brook, Ward 
23). Building new wooden bridge (completed). 

Carpenters . 

Lumber 

Nails . 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Car-fares 

Amount expended as per books of this division 



$657 


50 


654 


63 


5 


35 


312 


99 


6 


99 


10 


70 


$1,548 


16 



Irvington-street (foot) bridge (over Provi- 
dence Division, Old Colony Kailroad). 
Building new iron foot-bridge, new abutment and 

painting old one (completed). 

Advertising and specifications 
Inspector .... 
Building new relaiuing-wall . 
Paintii]g oM retaining-wall . 
Iron foot-bridge complete 

Amount expended as per books of this division 



$101 34 

145 00 

3,472 00 

50 00 

1,773 00 

^5,54] 34 



Street Department. 



IGl 



Milton bridge, repairing. Milton bridge (over 
Neponset river, from Dorchester to Milton). 
Making general repairs (completed). 



Carpenters . 








$631 35 


Painters 








87 50 


Lumber 








1,175 52 


Nails . 








3 86 


Ironwork 








20 50 


Paint . 








4 85 


Graving, etc. 








75 26 


Car-fares 






isiou 


62 50 


Amount expended as per books of this div 


$2,061 34 



I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

In the list, those marked with an asterisk are over naviga- 
ble waters, and are each provided with a draw. 

Agassiz, in Back-Bay Fens. 

Ashland street, Ward 23, over Old Colony Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

Athens street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Beacon entrance, Back-Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back-Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence Divi- 
sion. 

Blakemore street, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 
Division, Ward 23. 

Bolton street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Boylston street, over outlet to Back-Bay Fens. 

* Broadway, over Fort-Point Channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

* Charles River, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea (South), over South Channel, Mystic River. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Commercial Point, or Tenean, Ward 24. 
Commonwealth avenue, over outlet to Back-Bay Fens. 

* Congress street, over Fort-Point Channel. 
Cornwall street, over Stony Brook, Ward 23. 



1(32 City Document No. 3G. 

Cottage-street foot-bridge, from eTeffries Point to Wood 

Island. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany, and Providence 

Division of Old Colony Railroad. 

* Dover street, over Fort- Point Channel. 

* Federal street, over Fort-Point Channel. 
Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Franklin-street foot-bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Gold-street foot-bridge, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Irvington-street foot-bridge, over Old Colony Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Leydeu street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & L\ain Railroad. 
Linden Park street, over Stony Brook. 

* Maiden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

* Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort-Point Channel. 
Neptune, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lj'^nn Railroad. 
Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Swett street, east of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Swett street, west of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Chester park, over Boston, & Albany Railroad. 

West Chester park, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
West Newton street, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
West Rutland square foot-bridge, over Old Colony Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 



II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 
WITHIN its Limits. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Ward 24 to Milton. 

* Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 

* Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Granite, froaii Dorchester, Ward 24, to Milton. 
Longwood avenue, from Ward 22 to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Ward 24 to Milton. 

Milton, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Ward 24 to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



STREr<]T Department. 163 

Spring street, from West Roxbury to Declham. 

* Western avenue 3 from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Dorchester street, over Old Colony Railroad, Central Divi- 
sion. 

* Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

* West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

The last three bridges are in the care of two Commis- 
sioners, who make an annual report to the City Council. 
Harvard bridge is in the care of three Commissioners. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st. — Boston (& Albany Railroad. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston <& Ataine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, S Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — JSTeiv York & JSfeiv England Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue. 
Harvard street, Ward 24. 
Morton " " 

Norfolk " " 

Norfolk " " 



164 City Document No. 36. 

Silver street. 

"Washington street, Ward 24. 

West Broadway. 

West Fifth street. 

West Fourth street. 

West Second street. 

West Sixth street. 

West Third street. 

6th. — Old Colony Railroad, Central Division. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Commercial street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — Old Colony Railroad, Providence Division. 

Beach street, Ward 23. 

Bellevue street, Ward 23. 

Canterbury street. Ward 23. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, Ward 23. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, Ward 23. 

Dudley avenue. Ward 23. 

Park street, Ward 23. 

Eecapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . .49 

II. Number of which Boston supports the part with- 
in its limits ....... 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ...... 6 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 5 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Div 2 

3. " " Western Div. ... 2 

4. Boston, Kevere Beach, & Lynn ... I 

5. New York & New England . . . .13 

6. Old Colony, Central Div 5 

7. " " Providence Div 7 

Total number 104 

The existing regulations for the passage of vessels through 
drawbridges have been })osted on the several bridges, as re- 
quired by law. 



Street Department. 165 

The records of the number of" draw-openings, vessels pa;>s- 
ing through the bridges, time of passage, kind of vessels, 
number laden with cargo, etc., as kept by the draw-tenders 
of the several bridges, have been tabulated, and the totals 
are given in the summary, which will be found in Appendices 
Al and AlO. 

A list of widths of openings for vessels in all bridges pro- 
vided with draws in the city, measurements being furnished 
by the City Engineer, will be found in Appendix A2. 

Appendix A3 is a table, also made by the City Engineer, 
showing widths of bridges, kind of roadways, sidewalks, etc. 

A list of culverts and small bridges will be found in Ap- 
pendix A4. 

Appendices A5, A6, and A7 contain tabulated statements 
of traffic. 

Appendix A8 is a list of tools, etc., at North Yard. 

Appendix A9 contains a list of tools, etc., at South Yard. 



1(1 () 



City Document No. 3(3. 



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Street Department. 



167 



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168 



City Document No. 36. 



APPENDIX A2. 



Table shoAving the Widths of Openings for Vessels in all Bridges 
provided Avith Draws in the City of Boston, February, 1892. 



Name of Beidge. 




Location. 


«1H 
O ^ 

(D a 

11 

1 

1 




Width. 


Boston & Maine R.E.., Eastern Divi- 


Boston to Charlestown . 
Over Miller's river . . . 


35 f 
35 




Boston& Maine R.R., Eastern Divi- 
sion 


II 10 " 


Boston & Maine R.R. (freig 
Southern Division .... 


•ht), 


Boston to East Cambridge 
II It II II 

Boston to Charlestown . 


1 
1 
1 


35 
35 
35 


II 8 11 


Boston & Maine R.R. (passeng 
Southern Division .... 


er), 


II 10 " 


Boston & Maine E.R., Western 
vision 


Di- 


« 5 II 


Boston & Maine R.E., Western 


Di- 


Over Miller's river . . . 
Over Fort-Point channel, 


1 
1 


35 
43 


" 9 " 


Broadway 




" 3 " 


Cambridge st 




Ward 25 to Cambridge . 


1 


36 


II 3 II 


Canal (or Craigie's) 




Boston to East Cambridge 


1 


35 


II 10 " 


Charles River 




Boston to Charlestown . 
Charlestown to Chelsea, 


1 
1 


36 

38 


" " 


Chelsea (south channel) 


II 10 11 


Chelsea (north channel) . . . 






1 


44 


11 10 II 


Chelsea st. (East Boston side) 




East Boston to Chelsea . 


2 


33 


II 1 II 


" " (Chelsea side) . . 




II II 




34 


" 3 " 


Commercial Point (or Teneau) 




Ward 24 


1 


24 


11 " 


Congress st. (Boston side) . 




Over Fort-Point channel. 


2 


43 


II 3 11 


" " (South Boston sic 


e) . 


" " 




43 


II 11 II 






Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Over Fort-Point channel, 
Boston to Charlestown . 
II II II 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


36 
36 
41 
36 
35 


II " 


Essex st 


II " 




.1 10 « 


Fitchburi,'' R.R 


" " 


" " (for teaming freights) 


" 11 " 



Street Department. 



169 



Table showing Width of Openings, etc. — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 


S a 


Width. 






3 ^ 
1 






Grand Junction R.R 


"Ward 25 to Cambridge . 


35 feet 7 inches. 




East Boston to Chelsea . 


1 


34 ' 


8 " 


Granite 


"Ward 24 to Milton . . . 
Boston to Cambridge . 


1 
2 


36 ' 
36 ' 


" 


Harvard (Boston side) 


8 " 


" (Cambridge side) .... 


" 




36 ' 


8 " 


Maiden 


Charlestown to Everett . 


1 


43 ' 


4 " 


Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 


East Boston to Chelsea , 


2 


59 ' 


2 " 


" " (Chelsea side) .... 


u _ 




59 ' 


" 


Mt. Washington ave. (Boston side) 


Over Fort-Point channel 


2 


42 ' 


1 " 


" '' " (South Boston 
side) .... 


» » .< « 




42 ' 


4 " 


Neponset 


"Ward 24 to Quincy . . 


1 


36 ' 


" 


New York & New England R.R. 
(Boston side) 


Over Fort-Point channel 


2 


40 ' 


4 " 


New York & New England R.R. 


u .< u 




40 ' 


2 " 


New York & New England R.R. . . 


Over South Bay .... 


1 


28 ' 


4 " 


North Beacon st 


Ward 25 to "Watertown . 
"Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Over Fort Point channel, 


1 
1 
1 


30 ' 
36 ' 
36 ' 


2 " 




" 


Old Colony R.R 


" 




Ward 24 to Quincy . . 

Charlestown to Cam- 
bridge 


1 


36 ' 


" 


Prison Point 


1 


36 ' 


" 


Warren 


Boston to Charlestown . 
Boston to Cambridge . 


1 

2 


36 ' 
35 ' 


3 « 


West Boston (Boston side) .... 


8 " 


" " (Cambridge side) . . 


" 




36 ' 


" 


Western ave 


Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Ward 25 to "Watertown . 


1 
1 


36 ' 
30 ' 


" 




" 



170 



City Document No. 36. 



APPENDIX A3. 



Table showing Width of Bridges, Kind of Roadways, Sidewalks, 
etc., on Tide-water Bridges, Jan. 28, 1893. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street .... 

Canal 

Charles River 

Chelsea, North 

" South 

" Street 

Commercial Point .... 

Cono;ress street 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

Hai-vard 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington avenue . 

Neponset 

North Beacon street . . . 
North Harvard street . . 

Prison Point 

Warren 

W. avenue to Cambridge 
" " " Watertown 

Winthrop 

West Boston 



BOADWAY. 



Ft. In. 
60 
40 
64 
50 

49 

50 

30 2 
about 

34 

60 
59 

31 
69 
30 2 
69 4 
40 
50 

61 

30 

31 
28 2 
50 
80 
33 2 
26 10 
24 2 
50 



Kind of 
Roadway. 



Ft. In. 
40 

33 2 

48 

34 

40 

37 

24 
about 
32 

44 

43 

22 8 

49 

24 4 
51 
32 
36 
39 6 

23 10 

25 2 

26 7 
36 
60 
26 3 
26 10 
19 10 
36 



Plank 



Paved 



Plank 

Paved 

Plank 
Paved 
Plank 

Paved 
(< 

Plank 



" par 
Paved par 



Plank . 



Paved 



Sidewalks. 



d 


% 




Ft. In. 


2 


10 


1 


6 


2 


8 


2 


<S 


1 


8 


2 


6 6 


1 


5 6 







2 


8 


2 


8 


1 


7 6 


2 


10 


1 


5 


2 


9 2 


1 


7 


2 


70 


2 


10 9 


1 


5 5 


1 


5 







2 


7 


2 


10 


1 


6 







1 


3 7 


2 


7 



Kind of walks. 



Coal-tar conci'ete. 

Plank. 

Brick. 

Coal-tar concrete . 

Plank 

Coal-tar concrete. 



j Part 
I Part 



plank. 



Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal- tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Coal-tarconcretc. 



Plank. 



Plank. 
Brick. 



Street Department. 



171 



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5-^9^ 



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<J<|pqpqeqpqpqpqfri 



172 



City Document No. 3fi. 






O fee 



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Street Department. 



173 



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1^ 125 |Zi 



174 



City Document No. 36. 



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175 



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176 



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Street Departjuent. 



177 



APPENDIX A5. 



statement of Traffic between the Hours of 6.30 A.M. and 8 A.M. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Broadway ....... 

Congress street .... 
Congress street .... 

Dover street 

Dover street ...... 

Federal street ..... 

Federal street .... 

Mt. Washington avenue 
Mt. Washington avenue 



Q 



April 8, 
April 10, 
April 6. 
April 9, 
April 7. 
April 10. 
April 7. 
April 9. 
April 6. 
April 8. 



289 
192 
315 
240 
149 
158 
392 
330 
203 
220 



o o 



1,844 

1,390 

445 

505 

1,179 

1,281 

3,600 

3,450 

564 

498 



a o 



65 

72 

141 

165 

112 

105 

82 

63 

105 

63 



C O 



137 
258 
709 
765 
368 
351 
245 
92 
350 
276 



24 

25 

348 

126 



Ph ^ 
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1,360^ 
"445 



538 

628 

2,686 

2,681 



1 Excess caused by blockade previous to count. 



APPENDIX A6. 



statement of Traffic between the Hours of 12 M. and 1 P.M. 



Name of Bridge. 


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April 8. 
April 10. 
April 6. 
April 9. 
.\pril 7. 


39 

72 

189 

174 

62 

59 

107 

90 

76 

52 


412 
383 
333 
223 
451 
442 
750 
750 
148 
185 


59 

77 

178 

209 

62 

82 

108 

123 

76 

90 


514 
451 
316 
251 
394 
472 
355 
442 
180 
203 


14 
12 


351 
298 














12 
12 
63 

70 


202 




April 10. 
April 7. 
April 9. 
April 6. 
April 8. 


239 




1,043 




1,272 

















178 



City Document No. 3(i. 
APPENDIX A7. 



statement of Traffic between the Hours of 5.30 P.M. and 7.00 P.M. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Broadway 

Congress street .... 
Congress street .... 

Dover street 

Dover street 

Federal street .... 
Federal street .... 
Mt. Washington avenue 
Mt. Washington avenue 



April 8. 
April 10. 
April 6. 
April 9. 
April 7. 
April 10. 
April 7. 
April 9. 
April 6. 
April 8. 



32 
92 
110 
100 
57 
oO 
57 
73 
56 
58 



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499 
427 
1,080 
630 
650 
569 
287 
213 
363 
313 



03 pq 



275 
338 
302 
270 
122 
109 
339 
294 
372 
235 



a; O 



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2,504 

442 

473 

1,164 

1,298 

3,700 

3,525 

623 

447 



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504 



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1,031 
3,250 
3,604 

































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y tin- Cfty ol' sti 1, diirlnp the Years 1881. lH8a, I 










































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Street Department. 



179 



APPE]SrDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PAVING DIVISION. 



H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir: In compliance with the order conveyed in 
your letter of Dec. 14, 1891, requesting a statement of the 
work of the Paving Division, for the year 1891, the follow- 
ing report is submitted, showing the expenditures of this 
division from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892, the nature of 
its work under the new organization, the number and variety 
of permits issued, and the details of expenditures involved 
in paving, macadamizing, and regulating the various streets. 

The following list shows the total yearly expenditures of 
the Paving Division, according to the report of the Superin- 
tendent of Streets, for the last thirty-four years, the expen- 
ditures being from January 1 to December 31, inclusive, of 
each year, except for 1891, that year extending to elan, 31, 
1892, making a period of thirteen months : 



1856 


. . $192,458 


48 


1875 


. 11,062,408 55 


1857 


201,528 


49 


1876 


980,741 42 


1858 


187,160 


92 


1877 


1,077,475 81 


1859 . 


186,295 


77 


1878 


. . 644,821 76 


1860 . 


197,170 


63 


1879 


727,340 05 


1861 


176,978 


76 


1880 


1,015,063 06 


1862 


175,981 


68 


1881 


966,366 49 


1863 . 


151,130 


27 


1882 


1,088,551 14 


1864 . 


156,959 


65 


1883 


. . 934,656 58 


1865 


173,258 


13 


1884 


1,310,172 16 


1866 


244,953 


55 


1885 


1,018,693 39 


1867 


283,641 


56 


1886 


1,170,863 01 


1868 . 


407,053 


89 


1887 


1,260,530 03 


1869 . 


667,817 


90 


1888 . 


1,043,475 52 


1K70 . 


804,384 


89 


1.S89 


1,051,460 18 


1871 . 


923,312 


37 


1890 


1,061,722 40 


1872 


1,010.508 


48 


1891 


1,991,524 28 


1873 


931,019 

1,683,848 


01 






1874 


67 


Total 


. $27,161,328 93 



180 City Document No. 36. 

We see by this schedule that the city expended in 1850, 
$1S>2,458.48 on a street mileage of one hundred miles (iorly 
of which were paved, and sixty unpaved), covering that ])art 
of our cit}^ which is now known as the City Proper, East and 
South Boston. 

The street mileage was increased by the annexation of 
Roxbury, ^Tan. 6, 18G8 ; Dorchester, Jan. 3, 1870; Charles- 
town, Brighton, and West Roxbury, Jan. 5, 1874; and also 
by converting the private ways into public streets, and lay- 
ing out new streets, so that by Jan. 1, 1891, the total mile- 
age of streets that was under the care of the Superintendent 
of Streets was 40i^'.37 miles, with an expenditure of 
$1,061,722.40. It can readily be seen by this, that as the 
government has increased the mileage of streets, it has not 
increased the amount of money to maintain them in propor- 
tion, as the Superintendent of to-day has only about the 
same average amount of money per mile, with which to 
niaintain the streets, as his predecessor did thirty-five years 
ago, when our citizens were satisfied with the cobble-stone 
pavement, at $1.70 per square yard, against the granite block 
paving, on a concrete base, with tar joints, at an expense of 
$4.75 per square yard. 

Labor at that time was worth only $1.00 per day for ten 
hours' work, against $2.00 for nine hours at the present 
time, and the cost of teams and materials to do the work 
has increased in the same proportion ; also at that time there 
was no expense for street-watering, which shows at the 
present time an expenditure of $104,263 a year. » 

Also, our streets at that time were not continually being 
torn up for the purpose of constructing street lailways, and 
for laying sewer, water, and gas pipes, and making the neces- 
sary connections ; also for laying underground wires. 

To what an extent this is done yearly, it may be stated 
that last year there were over thirteen thousand permits 
granted, covering more than one hundred and ten miles 
of trenches ; and every year this business of openmg our 
streets increases. 

In 1856 th(^ average number of men employed in onr 
division was sixty ; at the present time we furnish employ- 
ment for seven hundred and fifty men. 

By the above statement it can be seen that the Superin- 
tendent of to-day has not the means financially for the care of 
our public streets, in proportion to the increase of work that 
comes under his supervision. 

It may also be stated that twenty years ago (1872) the 
city of Boston ai)propriated and expended $1,000,000 for 
the maintenance of its streets, with a mileaije of 207 miles, 



Street Department. 181 

and since then has expended on an average $1,000,000 a 
year for the same purpose, and at the same time the mileage 
has increased from 207 in 1872 to 434.59 miles in 1892 ; so 
it can be seen that as the city appropriated about the same 
amount for its maintenance, its mileage has doubled. 

As the money for the maintenance of this department is 
provided for out of the tax levy, it makes it impossible to 
increase the amount sufficiently for the maintenance of this 
department, and therefore it would seem advisable that some 
way be found to build our streets by assessment on the 
abutting property, so that large and needed improvements 
can be made yearly. 

This would enable our citizens, especially in our outlying 
wards, to have their streets built and improvements made 
without having to wait for some indefinite period to enable 
the government to furnish the money from some loan. 

Official Duties. 

The duties of the ofiSce are defined in the following letter, 
which was received on the appointment of the present 
deputy : 

Boston, March 23, 1891. 
C. R. Cutter, Esq., Deputy Siqoerintendent of Paving Division: 

Dear Sir : The duties of your division are defined in the ordinance 
to amend Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordinances of 1890, relating to the 
Street Department, as passed by the Board of Aldermen March 2, 1891, 
and approved by the Mayor March 9, 1891, and as more particularly 
specified as follows : 

1. To take charge of the construction and maintenance of all high- 
ways, as provided in Section 1 of said ordinance. 

2. To attend to the placing of street-signs and numbering of build- 
ings, as provided in Section 4 of said ordinance. 

3. To notify all departments, and persons authorized to place struc- 
tures in streets, when your division contemplates the construction or re- 
surfacing of streets, as provided in Section 7 of said ordinance 

4. To issue permits to open, occupy, and obstruct portions of streets 
to persons having authority in the premises, and to see that such 
permits are carried out in accordance with the jorovisions of Sections 8 
to 19, inclusive, of said ordinance. 

5. To see that all statutes, ordinances, and regulations relating to the 
care and use of streets are fully observed, and to carry out all lawful 
orders of the Board of Aldermen relating to streets, as provided in 
Section 21. 

6. To organize your division with a suitable force of clerks and 
assistants, for the purpose of keeping the necessary books and records. 

7. To divide construction work of your division into ten districts, 
and to employ the necessary force of foremen, sub-foremen, mechanics, 
laborers, etc., to properly do the work of your division, and to take 
charge of all property formerly belonging to the Street Department. 

8. "J'o take chai'ge of all street-sprinkUng that is done by the city. 

9. To remove snow and ice from the streets and gutters, and to 
shovel snow from all plank sidewalks where the city is liable for any 
damages from accidents thereon. 

(Signed) H. H. Carter, 

Siiperijiiendcnt of Sireeis. 



182 City DocumexNt No. 30. 

Section 1. Construction and Maintenance. — The greater 
pait of (3ur work has been done by the department, but 
owino- to the unusually larsje amount of work called for and 
the lack t)f proper plant, some of the more important streets 
were let out by contract, the supervision of which was 
assigned to the City Engineer, Mr. William eTackson. 

Section 2. — As to the placing of street-signs and 
numbering of buildings, as provided for in Section 4 of the 
ordinance, I would state that numerous signs designating the 
names of different streets have been placed in the various 
distiicts of the city, and the work is being continued as fast 
as possible, in the hope that by another year our streets shall 
be well defined, for the convenience of visitors from sister 
cities, as well as our own. 

The signs in use are painted wood, and are not as durable 
as could be desired. 

Several different patent signs are being tried, but have not 
been in use long enough to pass judgment on them. 

What is needed is a sign that can be placed at the inter- 
section of streets, that can be read at night as well as in the 
daytime. 

In regard to the numbering of streets, a special clerk 
takes charge of this work, whose duty it is to attend to all 
applications for estate numbers, drafting a plan of the street, 
and numbering each lot consecutively until the proper num- 
ber is found. 

Numbers have been assigned to estates in the different dis- 
tricts as follows : 

City proper 
Koxbury . 
Dorchester 
Charlestown 
West lloxbur}'- . 
East Boston 
South Boston 
Brighton . 

Total .... 170 " ♦' 

Section 3. Notification to Abutters. — When the division 
contemplates the construction or resurfacing of streets, notice 
has been sent to all city departments and persons authorized 
to place structures in the streets, and to all the owners of 
abutting property that were on record according to the 
Assessors' plan of the previous May. 

This notice stated that the city was about to commence 



40 streets 


, and 


parts 


thereof. 


44 








25 








9 








20 








9 








13 








17 









Street Department. 183 

work thereon, and that no permits would be granted for open- 
ings in the street, until one year had elapsed from the time 
of the completion of the work. 

These notifications were sent by mail, and as it involved 
looking up the addresses of owners of estates of some 250 
diflerent streets, it can readily be seen that a large amount 
of clerical labor was required. 

A more satisfactory method, if the ordinance so admitted, 
would be to place all such notices in public print at a speci- 
fied time, as it would accomplish the desired results in the 
end. 

This is a matter of courtesy, and not required by law. If 
the closino; of the street were extended to a limit of two 
years, instead of one, it would be much better for the street. 

Where the city has been compelled to grant permits for 
openings for the repairs of leaks on streets that were closed, 
the parties doing the work have been obliged to fill the 
trenches with concrete, to prevent any settling of the street. 

Section 4. Issuing Permits. — All persons and corpo- 
rations applying for permits to open, occupy, and obstruct 
portions of the street, are required to file satisfactory bonds 
with the permit clerk, before any permit is issued. Two 
inspectors are employed to follow up the permits issued, 
to see that all work is properly done. This number of in- 
spectors is not considered sufficient to proi)erly look after all 
the work that is S'oino; on at anv one o-iven time, as it is im- 
portant to be on the ground while the refill is taking place. 

By the present method a man applies for and obtains a 
permit to make an opening in the street ; he shows it to the 
police, to prove that he has authority to make the opening ; 
he makes the opening, does the work, fills the trench, 
smooths the top of, and returns his permit to the police, 
who sends it to the office properly indorsed. 

All this work has been done without any supervision or 
inspection by the city of the way or manner that the 
trench was filled. 

After the permit has been returned to the office, the sur- 
face of the opening is inspected, which looks smooth and 
proper as a general thing. In four or five weeks after the 
city has accepted the opening, there comes a heavy rain, and 
the trench settles. 

The city then has to look up the parties who made the 
opening, and to require them to put it into a satisfactory 
condition, it being sometimes necessary to send the parties 
back four or five times. 

No party ought to be allowed to fill a trench except under 
supervision. 



184 



City Document No. 36. 



Permits to open the streets for underground work, be- 
tween January 1, 1891, and January 31, 1892, have been 
issued as follows : 



Company. 

Barber Asphalt Co. 
Boston Electric Light Co. 
Boston Gas Light Co. 
Boston Water Dept. (E. D.) 
Boston Water Dept. (Mystic) 
Brookline Gas Light Co. 
Charlestown Gas Light Co. 
City Engineer Dept. . 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. 
East Boston Gas Light Co. 
Edison Electric 111. Co. 
Fire-Alarm Dept. 
Improved Sewerage 
Jamaica Plain Gas Co. 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co 
National Construction Co. 
N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co. 
Postal Tel. Cable Co. . 
Quincy Market Cold Storage Co. 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. 
Sewer Division . 
South Boston Gas Light Co 
AVest End St. Ry. Co. 
Western Union Telegraph Co. 
Miscellaneous 



11,320 584,365 
Or 110.7 miles of trench opened. 

The average length of trench opened on a permit is 51.6 
feet. 

There have been in addition to the above, 1,916 openings 
mude on emergency permits, with which the various corpora- 
tions and departments are furnished. The average lengths 
of openings on these permits are about six feet each. A 
record of these is ke[)t in this office. 

Oilier permits have been granted as follows : 

Moving buildings ...... 94 

Coal-holes . ....... 16 

Occupying portions of the streets, to repair and 

construct buildings ..... 4,808 



Permits. 


Feet. 


24 


14,876 


166 


1,576 


963 


46,233 


3,580 


135,378 


133 


7,738 


121 


10,972 


57 


976 


1 


1,280 


414 


15,460 


108 


3,394 


595 


27,960 


20 


359 


1 


1,456 


243 


23,052 


22 


1,856 


4 


105 


185 


41,437 


10 


1,336 


2 


735 


391 


15,137 


302 


46,332 


175 


15,921 


279 


88,142 


26 * 


996 


3,487 


87,175 



Carried forward, 



4,918 



Street Department. 185 

Broiight forward, 4,1' 18 

Erectino- awnino;s ...... 479 

Driving cuttle ....... 34 

liaising and lowering safes, machinery, etc. . . 827 

Distributing sand ...... 24 

Special permits fou various purposes . . . 125 



6,407 
Total number of permits of all kinds issued . . 17,727 

There have been 10,881 notices sent to the various di- 
vision foremen to repair in the streets defects reported by 
the police. 

Also 2,020 to various parties to repair defects in coal- 
holes, Hyatt lights, and work that has been done imper- 
fectly. 

There have also been 5,465 notices sent to abutters on 
various streets, to notify them of contemplated improve- 
ments. 

There have been 526 bonds filed in this office this year, 
in accordance with Chap. 18, Rev. Ord., 1891. 

Section 5. — Care has been taken to see that all statutes, 
ordinances, and regulations relating to the care and use of 
streets are fully observed, and to carry out all lawful orders 
of the Board of Aldermen relating to streets, as provided for 
in Section 21 of the ordinances. 

Section 6. Office Fotce. — The force of clerks and 
assistants for the purpose of keeping the necessary books 
and records is the same as it was uncler the previous Super- 
intendent, although the work is more than doubled. 

The clerks are faithful and hard working, and a judicious 
increase of their salaries would be a recognition of their 
work. 

Section 7. — The construction work of the division is 
divided into ten districts, and necessitates the employment 
of a force of foremen, sub-foremen, mechanics, laborers, etc., 
in all about 750 men, to properly do the work and to take 
care of all the property formerly belonging to the Street 
Superintendent. 

The men in this division have done excellent work during; 
the past year, and the press and the citizens have much to 
say in praise of many changes inaugurated. 

Section 8. Street-watering . — The street-watering has 
been very costly and unsatisfactory, on account of the way 
and manner in which it has been done. 

The total expense has been $104,263; $50,000 of whic h 
was appropriated directly for the purpose from the reserved 



186 



City Document No. 36. 



fund, and the balance of $54,263 was paid out of the regular 
maintenance appropriation of the division. 

More satisfactory means should be devised for watering 
the city and dividing the cost thereof, and the whole work 
systematically mapped out at the very beginning of the year. 

Section 9. Removal of Snoio and Ice. — The cit}^ has 
been divided up into snow districts, and all the sidewalks 
that belong to the city to be kept clear have been thor- 
oughly covered, and the snow has been shovelled otf and 
carted away as soon as practicable. It has been the custom 
to shovel the snow from all plank-walks in order to free them 
from danger of accidents, and to remove the snow and ice 
from the streets and gutters only where edgestones are set. 
The work is so arranged in conjunction with the Street- 
Cleaning Division, that a large snow-storm can be easily 
handled in a comparatively short space of time. 



Streets Laid Out or Extended in 1891. 

Date. Street. Length in ft. 

Mar. 3. Sewall street, Tremont street to Dell 

avenue . . . . . . 314 

Mar. 11. Mountford street. Beacon street to Ivy 

street ., . . ... . 636 

Mar. 26. Gold street, B street to New England 

K.R. ...... 150 

Mar. 30. Eldora street. Hillside street to Sunset 

street . . . . . • 427 

Mar. 14. Smith street, Bumstead lane to Hunt- 
ington avenue .... 504 

April 22. Mt. Vernon street to Foster street . 713 

May 7. Call street, Keyes street to Hall street, 505 

May 18. Westford street, from Raymond street, 762 

May 18. Burke street, Tremont street to Berlin 

street 28 L 

June 12. Harold street, Crawford street to Har- 

rishoff street ..... 1,031 

June 18. Granger street, Clayton street to 

Duncan street .... 521 

June 18. Maxwell street, Milton avenue to Nel- 
son street . . . . . 1,610 

June 19. Lonormeadow street, Clifton to Batch- 
elder street . . . . 287 

June 23. Reading street, Kemble street to Svvett 

street 1,033 



Carried fonvard. 



8,774 



Street Department. 187 

Date. Street. Length in ft. 

Brotiglit forivard 8,774 

June 23. Homer street, Moore street to Byron 

street 600 

July 2. Sunset street, Parker Hill avenue to 

Hillside street .... 399 

July 2. Horace street, Moore street to Byron 

street 600 

July 14. Hano street, Braintree street to private 

way 486 

July 14. Blaine street, Braintree street to private 

way ...... 404 

July 16. Mansur street, Day street to Schiller 

street . . . . . . 374 

July 16. Schiller street, Heath street to Minden 

street 302 

July 17. Sylvia street, Washington street to 

Forest Hills street . . . 231 

July 24. Kenneth street, Farrington street to 

Beech street 302 

Aug. 12. Cornwall street, Brookside avenue to 

Boylston avenue . . . . 317 

Aug. 14. Arlington street, Parsons street, west . 399 

Aug. 14. Bradbury street, Franklin to Mansfield 

street 371 

Aug. 14. Buttonwood street, Mt. Vernon to 

Locust street . . . . 601 

Aug. 17. South wood street. Edge wood to Blue 

Hill avenue ..... 546 

Aug. 25. Harvest street, Dorchester avenue to 

Boston street ..... 950 

Aug. 25. Falcon street. Meridian to Putnam 

street 1,483 

Aug. 28. Moreland street, Blue Hill avenue to 

Dennis street .... 342 

Aug. 28. Sycamore street, Ashland to Florence 

street ...... 1,375 

Aug. 28. Peter Parley street. Forest Hills street 

to Walnut street .... 1,122 
Sept. 11. Goldsmith street. Centre to Custer 

street 650 

Sept. 10. German street, Washington to Grove 

street . . . " . . . 1,060 

Sept. 21. No. Margin street, from angle in 

street to Still man . . . . 83 

Carried forward^ 21,771 



188 City Document No. 36. 

Date. Street. Length in ft. 

Brought for loard, 21,771 

Sept. 28. Boyle street, Cordis to Pleasant street, 132 

Oct. 3. Ballard street. Centre to Custer street, 557 

Oct. 3. Ridge street, Sherwood to Sycamore 

street 421 

Oct. 3. Toplift' street, Bowdoiu streetto Geneva 

avenue ...... 1,353 

Oct. 7. Peter Parley street. Forest Hills street 

to Washington street . . . 159 

Oct. 9. Baldwin street, Main street to Ruther- 
ford avenue ..... 247 

Oct. 13. Lucas street, Middlesex street to Shaw- 

mut avenue . . . . . 98 

Oct. 13 Prospect street, Sheldon to Sycamore 

street ...... 168 

Oct. 13. Gustin street, W. Ninth street to Old 

Colony R.R 354 

Oct. 16. Church street, AA' inter to High street . 320 

Nov. 2. Auckland street, Belfort to Bay street, 1,410 
Nov. 2. Bigelow street, Webster to Brooks 

street 2,284 

Nov. 2. Dundee street, W. Chester park to 

Dalton street ..... 723 

Nov. 6. Henshaw street. Market to Cambridge 

street . ... . . . 979- 

Nov. 10. Dacia street, Dalmatia street to Dewey 

street ...... 235 

Nov. 10. Cherry street to Dalmatia street . *. 112 

Nov. 13. Wirt street, Washington to Henshaw 

street ...... 258 

Nov. 13. Menlo street, Henshaw to Sparhawk 

street . . . . . . 443 

Nov. 13. Shelton street to Wrenthan street . 353 

Nov. 16. Tuttle street, Savin Hill avenue to Hart- 
land street . . . . .1,157 

Nov. 27. Houghton street. Mill to Pope's Hill 

street ...... 1,415 

Nov. 30. Wenhani street. Walk Hill to Weldon 

street 1,285 

Nov. 30. Beale street, Dorchester avenue to Old 

Colony R.R 536 

Dec. 1. Byron street, Saratoga to Pope street, 931 

Dec. 1. Hunneman street, Harrison avenue to 

Washington street .... 493 

Carried forward, 38,194 



Street Department. 181) 

Date. Street. Length in ft. 

Brought foricar'd, 88,194 

Dec. 8. Dalmatia street, Blue Hill Jivenue to 

Howard avenue . . . . 724 

Dec. 16. Stanho})e street, Berkeley street to 

near Columbus avenue . . . 895 

Dec. 16. Malcolm street, Mt. Vernon to Chestnut 

street 240 

Dec. 22. Ley land street. Cottage to Burgess 

street ...... 695 

Dec. 23. Norway street, Huntington avenue to 

Falmouth street .... 225 

Dec. 31. Dacia street, Dewey to Brookford 

street ...... 610 



41,583 



or 7.87 miles. 

Streets Relocated in 1891. 

Date. Street. Sq. feet. 

Aug. 17. Harvard street, between Harvard 

avenue and Trescott street . . 4,925 

Nov. 13. Howard avenue, relocated and grade 

changed . . . ." . 2,801 

Nov. 27. North square, near and at North street, 92 

Dec. 10. Westernavenue, opposite Market street, 1,242 



9,060 



Streets Discontinued in 1891. 

Date. Street. Bq. feot. 

Mar. 18. High street, between Hartford and 

Oliver streets .... 23 

July 11. E. Springfield street, Harrison avenue 

to Albany street .... 31,561 

Nov. 16. Bigelow street, W. side, near Webster 

street 147 

Dec. 1(). Walnut avenue, near and north of Cob- 
den street ..... 93 

31,824 



Streets W^idened in 1891. 

Date, Street. Sq. feet. 

Mar. 18. High street, north-west side, between 

Hartford and Olivia ... 13 

April 29. Dudley street, Vine to Hampden street, 1,846 

Carried forward^ 1,859 



190 



City Document No. 36. 



Bate. Street. 

Brought forivai'd, 

June 29. Nai'th square, on north-east and south- 
west side, near North street 

Jul}' 21. Charlestovvn street, on west side, be- 
tween Causeway and Medford 

Oct. 2. Whitney street, north-west side, near 

Smith street ..... 

Oct. 12. Bhie Hill avenue, west side, near Tiles- 
ton avenue ..... 

Dec. 22. Blue Hill avenue, at Morton street 

Dec. 31. Kennard avenue, south-east side, near 
Allen street . . 



Sq. feet. 

1,859 

110 

926 

322 

676 
950 




The record of the Street Commissioners for the year 1891 
shows the following results : 

Streets laid out or extended 
Streets relocated . 
Streets discontinued 
Streets widened 
Increase in niileao:e 



41,583 lin. ft. 

9,060 sq. ft. 
631 lin. ft. 

6,289 sq. ft. 
41,124 lin. ft. 



7.87 miles. 



0.12 mile. 



7.75 miles. 



Table showino- the number of miles in len2:th of streets 
laid out bv the Board of Stieet Commissioners : 



n 1871 


' . 5.72 miles. 


In 1883 . 


. 6.11 mil 


1872 


. 2.20 




1884 . 


. 5.50 " 


1873 


. 4.66 




1885 . 


. 3.95 " 


1874 


. 4.68 




1886 . 


. 6.75 " 


1875 


. 8.92 




1887 . 


. 5.34 " 


1876 


. 5.52 




1888 . 


. 5.12 " 


1877 


. 7.37 




1889 . 


. 6.22 - 


1878 


. 4.80 




1890 . 


. 5.69 " 


1879 


. 5.35 




1891 . 


. 7.75 " 


1880 


. 4.51 








1881 


. 4.80 




Total in 21 yrs. 


119.10 " 


1882 


. 8.14 









les. 



Street Department. 191 



Financial Statement. 

Balance on hand elan. 1, 1891 . . . $45,21181 
Transferred from Causeway street Jan. 3, 

1891 3,000 00 

Loan Feb. 2, 1891 183,000 00 



$231,211 81 
Amount of expenditures charged 

to Pavino; Division from Jan. 

1, 1891, "to April 30, 1891 . $224,336 08 
Used by other divisions . . 6,875 73 



,211 81 

Appropriation for Pavins; Divi- 
sion, 1891-1892 . ". . $700,000 00 

From Reserve Fund for Street- 
watering, July . . . 50,000 00 

Transferred from Cambridge 

Bridge. .... 1,677 06 

Transferred from Police Division, 3,485 59 



Amount of expenditures charged 

to Paving Division from May 

1, 1891, 'to Jan. 31, 1892 . $752,863 94 
Transferred to Humboldt-avenue 

grade damages . . . 1,815 00 

Kemaining in treasury Feb. 1, 

1892 483 71 



$755,162 65 



$755,162 65 



986,374 46 $986,374 46 

Total expenditures from rea'ular appropria- 
tion ...."... $977,200 02 

Total expenditures from special appropria- 
tions 1,014,324 26 



Grand total (regular and special) . $1,991,524 28 



192 City Document No. 36. 



IjsCOME. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the 
City Collector from' Jan. 1, l«Ol, to Feb. 1, 1892, on ac- 
count of the Paving Division : 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . $31,037 30 

Sale of stone, etc. ..... 985 55 

Fort Hill Wharf (rent) .... 625 00 

West End R.E,. Co., settlement of accident 

claim 1,130 00 



,777 85 



The amount paid into the city treasury during the same 
period on account of the Paving Division : 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . $17,299 01 

Sale of stone, etc. 482 15 

Fort Hill Wharf (rent) .... 625 00 

West End R.R., settlement of accident claim, 1,130 00 

$19,536 16 



Street Department. 



193 






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194 



City Document No. 36. 



Expenditures. 

Advertising in and subscribing for daily papers, 

Dorchester ledge, construction of . 

Horses, carts, and harnesses (new) 

Harrisburg Foundry and Machine Co., steam 
roller .... 

Aveling & Porter, steam-roller 

Plans for office 

Printing and stationery 

Repairing stables, sheds, etc. 

Sundries .... 

Street sio;ns and numberino; 

Salary of J. Edwin Jones, as Superintendent 
of Streets, Jan. 1 to Jan. 17, 1891 

Salary of Michael Meehan, as Deputy Super- 
intendent of Streets, Jan. 1 to Jan. 17, 
1891 

Salary of H. H. Carter, as Acting Superinten- 
dent cf Streets, Jan. 19 to March 8, 1891 . 

Salary of H. H. Carter, as Acting Superinten- 
dent of Streets, March 9 to March 31, 
1891 . . . . . . . 

Salary of C. R. Cutter, as Deputy Superinten- 
dent of Streets, March 23, 1891, to Jan 
28, 1892 

Salary of office clerks .... 

Telephone, expenses of . . . 

Tools, cost of keeping same in repair, etc. 



Executions of Court, etc. 

Brown, Mary L., personal injuries 

Brackett, J. Albert, injurios to horse . 

Bean, B. F., damage to house 

Coffey, John J., jaersonal injuries 

Clark, Thos. H., damage to carriage . 

Carroll, Patrick, personal injuries 

CunnifF, Ellen, " 

Driscoll, Louisa M., damage to estate 

Deegan, Catherine E., Admx., injury to husband (Com 

mittee on Claims .... 
Fitzpatrick, John B., personal injuries 
Finn, Ellen T., " 

Gordan, Charles K., " 

Grose, Mercy D., " 



i, $647 


78 


2,084 


26 


10,993 


14 


4,000^ 


00 


4,000 


00 


1,067 


70 


4,458 


34 


1,327 


94 


8,445 


69 


3,112 


83 



188 89 

141 67 
566 66 

458 33 



2,578 55 

' 9,089 27 

992 47 

14,919 11 

569,072 63 



1,033 


S6 


200 


00 


40 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


55 


50 


100 


00 


75 


00 


400 00 


200 


00 


325 


12 


175 


00 


200 


00 



Carried fo7-ward, 



>,894 48 



Street Department. 



195 



Brought forward, 
Gates, Mary A., personal injuries 
Holmes, John S., " 

Hutchinson, Margaret A. C, personal injuries 
Imre, T. J., 

Kelrey, Chas. E., " 

Luehterhand, Sophie K., " 

Luchterhand, Fred. W., " 

Lynch, William, damage to house 
Lannon, Jane C, grade damages 
McNamara, Bridget, personal injuries 
Madden, Bridget F., et als., grade damages 
Mooney, J., grade damages 
McCorkle, Sarah J., personal injuries 
McLellan, Albert, 

Mahern, Esther J., damage to house . 
McGonagle, Charles, stone taken from his land 
Peters, Richard and Mary, grade damages . 
Ruggles, Daniel, personal injuries 
Robbins, Elliot D., injuries to horse . 
Ryan, Mary E., personal injuries 
Sampson, Thomas A., damage to herdic 
Thompson, Emma A., personal injuries 
Vaughan, Kate, " 

Warren, J. Frank, " 

Whitcomb, A. F., injuries to horse 



12,894 48 

1,325 45 

400 00 

2,099 73 

150 OO 

131 60 

122 37 

100 00 

50 00 

625 32 

686 68 

675 32 

400 00 

100 00 

64 00 

28 00 

40 00 

125 32 

250 00 

350 00 

450 00 

50 00 

1,650 45 

937 49 

400 00 

150 00 

















$14,250 


21 


Grade Damages, Humboldt Avenue. 




Brown, Agnes $471 


24 


Carpenter, Samuel L. and Lucinda W 










200 


00 


Draper, Charles E. . . . 










2,121 


24 


D'Arcy, Frank P. 














421 


24 


Folsom, Mary F. 














1,521 


24 


Gerry, Samuel L. 














400 


00 


Hunt, Sylvia W. 














471 


24 


Knowles, J. M. , 














900 


00 


Kittredge, C. F. . 














300 


00 


Leonard, George 














400 


00 


Maguire, Patrick 














900 


00 


Rand, Carrie B. . 














571 


24 


Sawyer, Nellie 0. 














300 


00 


Svdlivan, Michael 














1,200 


00 


Taggard, John H. 














500 


00 


Vail, Emma L. R. 














100 


00 


Woodbury, Louisa 














600 


00 




$11,377 


44 



11)() City Document No. 36, 

The following schedule shows the expenditures from the 
maintenance appropriation of this division devoted to the 
various streets in the several districts : 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

A street/ B roadway to First street. In ex- 
cess of special appropriation . . . $102 47 

Dorchester street/ Eighth street to Dor- 
chester avenue. In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 68 90 

E street/ Third street to Bolton street. In 

excess of special appropriation . . . 470 47 

First street/ N. Y. & N. E. li.R. to F street. 

In excess of special appropriation . . 1,291 23 

Fourth street/ G street to H street. In ex- 
cess of special appropriation ... 28 00 

Gustin street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . . 597 14 

Harvest street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 830 74 

Newman street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . . . . . ... 142 88 

Kogers street.^ In ex:cess of special appro- 
priation ....... 264 88 

Seventh street/ D street towards B street. 

In excess of special appropriation . . 244 36 

Second street/ E street to Dorchester street. 

In excess of special appropriation . . 1,243 99 

Sixth street,^ O street to Q street; 
repaved between O and P streets — paved 
between P and Q streets : 

Labor $228 14 

Teaming . . . . 75 00 

Material . . . . 1,246 75 

1,549 89 

Sixth street,^ H street to I street. In excess 

of special appropriation . . . . 108 07 

Second street,^ Granite street to A street. 

In excess of special appropriation . . 55 74 

Ward street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion _ . . 122 00 

Washburn street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 1,044 92 



A:mount carried forward^ $8,165 68 

' For detail of tliis work sec special appropriations. 



Street Department. 197 

Amount brought forioard, $8,165 68 

Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor $2,302 98 

Teaminjr . . . . 787 50 



Crossings, repairs : 
Labor . 
Material 

Crossings, new : 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Material 



Edgestone and sidewalks, repairs : 

Labor $3,250 18 

Teaming .... 2,292 00 

Material . . . . 1,281 14 



$94 07 


613 


44 


$146 


02 


24 


00 


640 


25 



Edo;estone, sidewalks, and gutters, new : 

"Labor . . . . . $1,298 80 

Pavers' bills . . . 492 58 

Material . . . . 615 27 



Fences and plank-walks : 

Labor $831 49 

Material . . . . 703 17 



Repairs : 

Labor $3,113 76 

Teaming .... 4,054 50 

Pavers' bills . . . . 251 59 

Material .... 5,810 35 



Total 
Credit on account of city crusher 



3,090 48 



707 51 



810 27 



6,823 32 



2,406 65 



1,534 QQ 



13,230 


20 


$36,768 
787 


77 
96 


$35,980 81 



198 



City Document No. 36. 



EAST BOSTON. 

Bennington street, Prescott street to Words- 
worth street : Reo-ulatino- and o'radins' : 

C ~ C3 O 

1,218 ft. edofestone set. 
432 sq. yds. gutter paving. 
776 sq. yds. brick sidewalks relaid. 
3,690 sq. 3^ds. of 3-inch macadam. 
3,495 cu. yds. filling (taken from sewer 
trenches). 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Stone and screenings 

Roller .... 

Edgestone (622 ft., new) 

Pavers' bills . 

Sand .... 

IBeachmont avenue. Ley den street to Revere : 
Filling (taken from sewer trenches) : 

Labor $868 15 

Teamino .... 757 50 



. $1,987 58 




526 50 




737 90 




201 00 




446 20 




158 49 




32 00 






$4,089 67 



Belmont square : Gravelled — Edgestones set 
— Gutter paved — Crossings laid : 

Labor . . . .. $155 67 
Teaming . . . . 72 00 

Street-roller . . . 18 00 

Material . . . . 485 55 



Eagle square, at Chelsea street.^ In excess of 
special appropriation .... 

Jeffries and Marginal streets. In excess of 
special appropriation .... 

Lamson street, Sumner street to Webster 
street : Gravelled — Edgestone set — Brick 
walks laid : 

Labor $186 75 

Teaming . . . . 66 00 

Pavers' ^bills . . . . 106 05 

Material . . . . 433 20 



1,625 65 



731 22 

558 40 
516 61 



792 00 



Amouiit carried forward. 



!,313 55 



' For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



Street Department. 



199 



5501 


32 


115 


50 


519 


95 


516 


40 



Amount brought fornmrd, 
Lewis street : Entire length repaved : 
Labor .... 

Teaming .... 
Pavers' bills 
Material .... 



Morris street, Marion street to Brooks street : 
Gravelled — Edgestone set — Gutters paved 
— Brick sidewalk paved : 

Labor .... $549 51 

Teaming .... 367 50 

Street- roller . . . 51 00 

Material . . . . 424 65 



1,313 55 



Porter street, Bremen street to Central square : 
Resurfaced : 

Labor .... $390 84 

Teaming . . . . 108 00 

Street-roller ... 33 00 

Material . . . . 578 24 

Putnam street, Chelsea street to Bennington 
street : Resurfaced : 

Labor .... $242 77 

Teaming . . . . 40 50 

Street-roller ... 9 00 

Material . . . . 337 03 



Sumner street, at Belmont square : Cross- 
walks laid : 

Labor . . . . $57 60 

Teaming .... 24 00 

Pavers' bills . * . 42 00 

Material . . . . 569 30 



Terrace place : Repaved 
Sidewalks laid : 
Labor 
Teaming 
Pavers' bills 



Edo-estone set — 

$571 69 

96 00 

166 92 



Walley street 
Labor 
Team in si- 



Resurfaced 



$325 16 
217 50 



1,653 17 



1,392 QQ 



1,110 08 



629 30 



692 90 



834 61 



542 66 



Amount carried forioard. 



$15,168 93 



200 



CiTT Document No. 36. 



Amount brought forward, 






$15,168 


93 


Webster street, Cottage str 


eet 


to Jeffries 






street : Resurfaced : 










Labor 




$597 41 






Teaming 




151 50 






Pavers' bills 




134 85 






Street- roller 




78 00 






Material 




387 79 


1,349 


55 






Webster street, at Belmont 


sqi 


lare : Cross- 






walks laid : 










Labor 




$57 60 






Teaming 




33 00 






Pavers' bills 




32 25 






Material 




558 20 


681 


05 


Maintenance of macadamized r 


oad^ 


^vays : 


Labor 




$1,634 88 






Teaming 




462 00 


2,096 


88 


Edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 


, repairs : 


Labor . . . 




$1,769 58 






Teaming . ^ . 




856 50 






Pavers' bills 




21 63 






Material 




638 26 


3,285 


97 






%J 1 


Edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 


, new : 






Labor .... 




$229 67 


^ 




Teaming 




12 00 






Pavers' 'bills 




71 39 






Material 




1,220 73 


1,533 


79 






Fences and plank-walks : 










Labor .... 


4 


$477 72 






Teaming 




135 00 






Carpenter 




378 00 






Material 




784 73 


1,775 


45 






ttrt/ 


Repairing streets : 










Labor .... 




$9,917 45 






Teaming 




2,326 50 






Roller . . . . 




145 00 






Pavers' bills . 




57 35 






Material 




2,873 06 


15,319 


36 




. • 


fj \j 


Total .... 


$41,210 


98 



Street Department. 



201 



CHARLES TOWN. 

Austin street.-^ In excess of special appropri- 
ation ....... 

Charles-river avenue : Repavecl roadway : 

Labor $279 36 

Teaming . . . . 102 00 

Pavers'1)ills . . . 419 42 

Material . . . . 243 63 



Dupont street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Edge worth street.^ In excess of speciaJ ap- 
propriation ...... 

Parker street : Reset edgestones — Relaid 



gutters and sidewalks 
hahor . 
Teaming 
Material 



$368 70 

84 00 

114 17 



Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor $1,729 97 

Teaming .... 1,485 00 



Edgestones, sidewalk, and gutter, repairs : 

Labor . . . . . $2,288 91 

Teamino- . . . . 997 50 

Material .... 1,429 18 



Fences and plank-walks 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Carpenter 
Material 



Repairing streets 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Roller . 
Material 



$415 


49 


54 


00 


210 


47 


167 


08 


16,230 


82 


3,618 


00 


71 


02 


102 


00 


2,602 


80 



$140 43 



1,044 41 

121 21 

37 25 



566 87 



3,214 97 



4,715 59 



847 04 



12,624 64 



Total 



,312 41 



' For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



202 



City Document No. 36. 



BBIGETON. 

Cambridge street, near Gas-house : Eesurfacino; 
2,860 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor . . . . $573 29 

Teaming 

Pavers' bills 

Edgestone 

Gravel and sand 

Roller 

Stone . 

Westford street : Regulating and Gravelling 

244 ft. edgestone. 
88 sq. yds. gutter paving. 
1,820 sq. yds. gravel roadway. 

950 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 



442 18 




65 06 




28 42 




155 96 




84 00 




771 40 






$2,120 31 



Labor .... 


$743 30 


Teaming 


297 00 


Gravel 


. 1,163 43 


Pavers' bills 


41 56 


Edgestones . 


209 26 


Stone .... 


43 70 


Western avenue : Regulating an( 


\ Resurfacing : 


366 ft. edgestone. 




123 sq. yds. gutter paving. 




5,130 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 




Labor .... 


. $565 07 


Teaming 


600 50 


Edgestone . 


104 39 


Pavers' bills 


30 77 


Stone .... 


. 1,420 10 


Gravel 


403 76 


Roller .... 


145 00 


Aldie street.^ In excess of spec 


ial appropria- 


tion. .... 


. 


Commonwealth avenue. Enti 


re length re- 


paired where needed : 




Labor . . . . 


. $86 40 


Teaming . . . . 


. 348 00 


Material . . . . 


1,250 20 



2,498 25 



3,269 59 
247 05 



A.mou)U carried forward, 



1,684 60 
59,819 80 



1 For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



Street Department. 203 

A.mount brought forward ^ $9,819 80 

Dunboy street : Grading and Gravelling from 
Biglow street, 800 feet south : 

Labor |840 96 

Teaming .... 463 50 

Material . . • . 547 95 

1,852 41 



Dustin street.^ In excess of special appropri- 
ation 1,069 79 

Mansfield street : Gradino- — Settins; Edoe- 
stones — Gutters : 

Labor ..... $453 23 



Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Street-roller 
Material 



192 00 

239 83 

63 00 

826 51 



1,774 57 

Mount Vernon street.' In excess of special 

appropriation . . . . . . 568 10 

Hobart street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 2,213 37 

Lake street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 3,642 91 

Oakland street : Grading : 

Labor . . ." . . $189 11 
Teaming . . . . 79 50 

Materiat- . . . . 535 15 

803 76 



Rockland street. Macadamized ; Chestnut Hill 
avenue, south : 

Labor $91 39 

Teaming .... 60 00 

Steam-roller . . . 96 00 

Material . . . . 422 80 



Washington street : Repairs entire length : 

Labor $103 09 

Teaming .... 87 00 

Street-roller . . . 66 00 

Material . . . . 353 27 



Winship street : New crossings, new edge- 
stones, new sidewalk — Repairs entire length : 
Labor $48 00 



670 19 



609 36 



Amounts carried forward, $48 00 $23,024 26 

For detail of this work see special appropriation , 



204 



City Document No. 36. 



A.mo/( n ts hvouyh t forivard, 
Teaniinir 
Pavers' bills . 
Materinl . . . 



$48 00 
81 86 
56 95 

702 43 



$23,024 26 



889 24 



Maintenance of macadamized roadwavs : 

Labor . . . . . $2,119 35 

Teaming . . . . 634 50 



Crossings, new : 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Material 



$209 82 

60 00 

2,100 07 



Edgestone — Sidewalk and gutters, repaired : 

Labor $27 75 

Material . . . . 847 05 



Edgestone — Sidewalks and gutters, new : 

Labor $284 33 

Teaming . . . . 148 50 

Pavers' bills ... 180 29 

Material . . . . 1,835 33 



Fences and plank-walks 
Labor . 
Material 



Repairing streets 
Labor 
Teaming 
Material 
Pavers' bills 
Roller 



$673 04 
1,409 64 



^8,997 50 

5,652 00 

5,852 45 

134 22 

84 00 



Total .... 

Credit on account of city crusher, 



2,753 85 



2,369 89 



874 80 



2,448 45 



2,082 Q^ 



20,720 17 

$55,163 34 
1,181 93 



$53.9»1 41 



Street Department. 



205 



WEST EOXBUBY. 

Canterbury street, Bine Hill avenue to Aus- 
tin street : Resurfacing : 

3,300 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .... $188 30 

Teaming .... 636 00 

Graver .' . . . 165 20 

Roller . . . . 192 00 

Stone .... 1,309 10 



Centre street. Green to Amory : Resurfac- 
ing: 

5,500 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor . . . . $393 88 

Teaming .... 667 50 

Stone .... 1,507 13 

Gravel . ... 531 10 

Roller .... 237 00 

Hyde Park avenue, Mt. Hope to Hyde Park 
line : Resurfacing : 
5,3()0 lin. ft. i)lank-walk. 

15,500 sq. yds. 6-m. macadam. 

Labor .... $464 78 

Teaming .... 870 00 

Gravel .... 1,466 90 

Roller . . . . 320 00 

Stone . . . . 7,690 90 

Lumber .... 569 04 



Mozart street : Reo;ulating and resurfacing : 

2,600 lin. ft. edgestone. 
880 sq. yds. block-stone gutter. 
257 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 

2,500 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor .... $804 50 

Teaming .... 316 50 

Blocks . . . . 990 22 

Gravel . . . . 746 10 

Pavers' bills ... 474 34 

Edgestone . . . . 1,572 68 

Stone .... 498 45 

Roller . . . . 175 00 



!,490 60 



3,336 61 



11,381 62 



5,577 79 



Amount carried forward , 



,786 62 



206 



City Document No. 3(5. 



A.mount brought forward, 

Mt. Hope street, Hyde park avenue to Can- 
terbury : Resurfacing with gravel : 

5,200 sq. yds. gravel roadway. 

2,700 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 
300 sq. yds. gutter relaid. 



2,786 62 



Labor 




$397 QQ 


Teaming 




225 00 


Pavers' bills 




77 18 


Roller 




321 00 


Gravel 


shington to Wal 


1,453 90 


School street, Wa 


lut avenue : 


Regulating and 


macadamizing : 




2,400 sq. yds. Telford macadam. 




Labor 


. • ■ 


1380 25 


Teaming 


. • • 


587 00 


Gravel 


. . • 


261 80 


Roller 


• . • 


130 00 



Stone 



1,774 60 



South street, near Centre : Resurfacing 
6,100 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 



Teaming 






102 00 


Gravel 




, , 


383 60 


Stone . 




. 


. 2,922 20 


Roller 


t, Paine to Back st 


167 00 


Walkhill stree 


reet : Resur- 


facing and regulating : 




432 sq. yds. 


gutter 


paving. 




2,500 sq. yds. 


4-in. macadam. 




Labor 






$505 81 


Teaming 


^ 




704 50 


Roller 


^ 




200 00 


Stone 


^ 




671 20 


Gravel 


• 




751 80 



Washington street, south of Forest Hills : Re- 
surfacing : 

4,500 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .... $833 31 

Teaming .... 583 50 



2,474 74 



3,133 65 



3,714 60 



2,833 31 



Amounts carried forivard, $1,416 81 $34,942 92 



Steeet Department. 207 

Amounts brought forward, $1,416 81 $34,942 92 

Stone .... 1,786 00 

EoUer . . . . 224 00 

3,426 81 



Arnold street, from Weld street to Newton 
line : Repaired : 

Labor $9 00 

Teaming . . . . 118 50 

Material .... 549 50 



Baker street.^ In excess of special appro- 


677 


00 


priation ....... 


366 


00 


Ballard street.^ In excess of special appro- 






priation ....... 


136 


80 


Berry street, from Canterbury street to 






Calvary Cemetery : Resurfaced : 






Labor $416 31 






Teaming .... 90 00 






Roller 145 00 






Material . . . . 854 00 


1 ^f\f^ 


qi 



Boynton street. South street to Call street : 

Labor $34 44 

Material . . . . 467 75 



502 19 

Call-street extension.^ In excess of special 

appropriation . . . . . . 599 71 

Centre street, near Spring street : Repairs : 

Labor $56 25 

Teaming . . . . 163 50 
Material . • . . 373 10 

592 85 



Danforth street, Boylston street to Paul Gore 
street : Resurfaced : 

Labor . . . . . $549 85 

Teamino- . . . . 372 00 

Paver's^Bills . . . 206 33 

Material . . . . 347 10 

1,475 28 

Forbes street : ^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 2,095 45 

German street : Whole length, construction : 
Labor $923 85 



Teaming . , . . 505 50 



1,429 35 



Jimount carried forward, $47,749 67 

^ For detail of this woi'k see special appropriation. 



208 City Document No. 36. 

Amount brought forivard, $47,749 67 

Goldsmith street.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation ...... 22 88 

Hyde Park avenue, near Forest Hills : Re- 
surfaced : 

Labor $487 55 

Teaming . . . . 142 50 

Material . . . . 504 00 

1,134 05 



La Grange street, 


Pai 


trido-e 


street to Martin 


street : Resurfaced 






Labor . 




. 


. $228 86 


Teaming 




, 


367 50 


Roller . 




, . 


55 00 


Material 




• 


. 1,041 60 



1,692 96 

Maynard street.' In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 444 93 

Oak street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 28 16 

Paul Gore street,^ Chestnut avenue to Lamar- 
tine street : Resurfaced — New edgestone, 
sidewalks, and gutters : 

Labor $311, 71 

Teaming 
Street-roller 
Material 
Pavers' bills 

Peter Parley road.^ In excess of special ap 

propriation 
Poplar street, Canterbury street to Metropoli- 
tan avenue : Repairs : 

Labor $335 21 

Teaming .... 358 50 

PaversMjills . . 232 65 

Material . . . 218 40 



127 50 




146 00 




1,191 79 




92 07 







' 1,869 07 


)ecial ap- 




. 


46 10 



Prospect avenue. In excess of special appro- 
priation . . .... 

Sylvia street.^ In excess of special appropri- 
ation ....... 

Symmes street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Amount carried- forward^ 

1 For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



1,144 


76 


33 


00 


436 


25 


390 


50 


$54,992 


33 



Street Department. 209 

Amou7it brought forward^ $54,992 33 

Walter street : Kepairs : 

Labor $440 83 



Teaming . . . . 334 50 



Weld street, Baker street to Corey street : 

Labor . . . . $123 08 

Teaming .... 63 00 

Material . . . . 697 90 



Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor .... $6,014 95 

Teaming .... 3,474 00 

Crossings, repairs : 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Material 

Edgestone — Sidewalks and gutter repairs : 
Teaming . . . . $96 00 
Pavers' bills . . . 687 27 

Material . . . . 881 61 



$161 89 


48 


00 


909 


92 



775 33 



883 98 



Washington, South, and Centre streets.^ In 

excess of special appropriation . . . 9,381 79 

Wise street : New edgestones, gutters, and 
walks : 

Labor ...... $52 80 

Teaming . . . . 123 00 

Pavers'l)ills . . . 94 14 

Material . . . . 506 16 



776 10 



9,488 95 



1,119 81 



Edgestone — Sidewalk and gutters (new) : 
Labor .... $347 45 
Teaming .... 115 50 
Pavers' bills . . . 544 34 
Material . . . . 355 86 


1,363 

3,026 


15 
96 


Fences and plank-walks : 
Labor 

Carpenter . 
Material 


. $1,390 93 

45 50 

. 1,590 53 






Amounl carried forward. 


$83,473 


28 



' For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



210 



City Document No. 3(j. 



Amount brought foriuard, 






$83,473 


28 


Repairing streets : 










Labor . . . 


. $9,444 77 






Teaming 


. 17,161 


00 






Pavers' bills . 


200 


72 






Holler .... 


147 


00 






Material 


. 14,577 


90 












41,531 


30 








fj \J 


Total 


$125,004 


67 


Credit on account of city cru 


>hers 


• 


1,575 


91 




$123,428 


76 


DORCHESTER. 








Adams street, Dorchester avenue to Park 






street : Paving gutters and 


macadamizing : 






360 sq. yds. block-stone gutt 


ers. 








3,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam : 










Labor .... 


. $1,099 


72 






Teaming 


181 


50 






Gravel 


159 


00 






Stone .... 


. 1,235 


00 






Roller .... 


49 


00 


<ll!9 791 


99 



Blue Hill avenue, Wales to Harvard street : 
333 feet edgestone reset. 
112 sq. yds. gutter paving. 

6-in. macadam. : 



6,000 sq. yds 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel 
Stone . 
Roller . 



$863 75 

568 74 

430 50 

2,363 40 

196 00 



Codman street, Adams to Shawmut Branch 

R.R. : Reaulatinor and macadamizino; : 

608 feet edgestone. 

203 sq. yds. gutters. 

163 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 
2,350 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

720 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $558 87 

Teaming . . . . 165 00 

Pavinff-blocks ... 223 08 



4,422 39 



Amounts carried forward, 



$946 95 $7,146 61 



Street Department. 



211 



mouyits brought fortoard.. 


$946 95 


Kdo:estone . 


364 80 


Pavers' bills 


125 98 


Gravel 


112 50 


Roller .... 


84 00 


Stone .... 


959 00 



',146 61 



Dracut street : Reo^ulatino; and macadamizino- : 
2,332 lin. ft. edgestone. 
323 sq. yds. block-stone gutters. 
450 sq. yds. round stone gutters. 
2,450 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 
1,600 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Stone . 

Blocks 

Pavers' bills 

Gravel 

Roller . 

Washington street, Norfolk to Columbia : 

Resurfacing and regulatins : 
7,000 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam — Edgestones 





$1,983 


64 




742 


67 




1,225 


00 




367 


96 




386 


25 




388 


50 




112 


00 



reset — Gutters rela 
Labor . 
Teaming 
'Roller . 
Stone . 
Gravel 
Pavers' bills 



d: 



$338 55 
504 50 
154 00 

1,388 90 
331 80 
229 37 



Abbot street. Blue Hill avenue to Harvard 
street : Resurfaced : 

Labor . . . . $236 08 

Teaming . . . . 174 00 

Roller .... 81 00 

Material . . . . 405 60 



Adams street. King 
street : Resurfaced : 
Labor 
Teaminof 



street to Beaumont 

$247 08 
126 00 



2,593 23 



5,206 02 



2,947 12 



896 68 



jA-mounts carried forward^ 



$373 08 $18,789 ^^ 



212 City Document No. 36. 

Amounts brought forward^ $373 08 $18,789 66 

Roller . . . . 134 00 

Material .... 1,114 60 

1,621 68 



Asbmont street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . 679 00 

Blue Hill avenue, Quincy street to Grove 
Hall : Resurfaced : 

Labor . . . . $67 50 

Teaming . . . . 258 00 

Material . . . . 273 60 

599 10 



Boston street, Stoughton street to Eastman 
street : Resurfaced : 

Material . . . . . . 660 80 

Bushnell street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 1,619 51 

Carruth street, Beaumont street to New Minot 
street: Macadamizing — Resetting edge- 
stones — New gutters : 

Labor .... $517 27 

Teaming .... 90 00 

Roller . . . . 21 00 

Material . . . . 584 90 

1,213 17 



Codman street, Dorchester avenue to Wash- 
ington street : Macadamizing : 

Labor .... $142 98 

Teaming . . . . 127 50 

Roller .... 98 00 

Material . . . . 718 00 



Gleason street, Harvard street to White 
street : Macadamized : 

Labor .... $170 28 

Teaming .... 100 92 

Material .... 384 56 

Roller . . . . 105 00 



1,086 48 



760 76 

Gi-anite avenue.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 3,204 21 

Amount carried forward ^ $30,234 37 

' For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



Street DeparTxMent. 



213 



A^nount brotight forward^ 
Hancock street : Widening at Upham's Corner 



$30,234 37 



Labor 

Teaming 

Excavating 

Pavers' bills 

Roller 

Material 



$512 28 

165 00 

57 50 

^b 90 

42 00 

360 50 



In excess of special appro- 
In excess of special appro- 



Magnolia street.^ 

priation 
Neponset avenue.^ 

priation ....... 

Pleasant street, Stoughton street to Victoria 

street : Resurfaced : 
Labor 



Teaming 
Material 



$61 80 
120 00 
358 86 



Sturbridore 
street 
Labor 
Materia 



street, River street to Sanford 



Filling 



$108 37 
453 85 



Victoria street, from Pleasant street, east, 

towards Dorchester avenue : Repairing 

concrete sidewalk — Resetting edsestone 
and gutters : 

Labor . . . . $87 29 

Teaming .... 27 00 

Pavers' bills ... ^^'o 64 

Material . . . . 469 38 



Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor .... $3,218 38 

Teaming . . . . 1,209 00 



Edgestone — Sidewalk and gutter, repairs : 
Labor . . . . $1,044 64 

Teaming .... 675 00 

Pavers' bills . . . 45 97 

Material . . . . 822 49 



A.mount carried forward , 



1,223 18 



304 08 



5,161 26 



540 66 



562 22 



650 31 



4,427 38 



2,588 10 
$45,691 56 



^ For detail of this work sec special appropriation. 



214 



City Document No. 36. 



Amotint hrouglit forward. 



Sidewalks and o'utters 



Edgostone 
Labor 
Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Material 



Fences and plank-walks : 
Labor 
Teaming 
Carpenter 
Material 



Repairs : 
Labor 
Teaming 
Roller 
Pavers' bills 
Material 
Excavating 



Total 
Credit on account of city crushers 



(new) : 
$137 50 
451 61 
669 84 

3,797 26 



$1,667 50 

6 00 

42 00 

2,049 10 



$8,578 81 

8,707 50 

350 13 

95 63 

13,978 87 

325 00 



$45,691 56 



5,056 21 



3,764 60 



32,035 


94 


$86,548 31 
2,363 87 


$84,184 


44 



BOXBTJRY. 

Blue Hill avenue, Quincy to Warr 
ulating and resurfacing : 
386 ft. edgestone. 
127 sq. yds. block-stone gutters. 
353 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 
1,900 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Edojestone . 

Pavers' bills 

Sand . 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Rollers 

Blocks 



Amount carried forward, 



en : Reg- 



$568 61 




259 84 




325 68 




118 01 




107 20 




302 40 




758 80 




90 00 




86 71 






$2,617 25 



!,617 25 



Stkeet Department. 



Eegulating — Grading and mac- 



jionount brought forward. 
Bower street 
adaniizing 
1,280 ft. edgestone reset. 
467 sq. yds. block-stone gutters. 
264 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 
1,700 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
Labor . 
Teaminsc 
Sand . 
Gravel 
Stone . 
Brick . 
Edgestone . 
Pavers' bills 
Roller 



461 


41 


166 


14 


94 


40 


327 


60 


672 


70 


19 


50 


82 


56 


271 


57 


98 


00 



Harold street : Re^ulatino; and macadam izinsf .- 

662 ft. edgestone. 

208 sq. yds. block-stone gutters. 

217 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 
1,400 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $179 49 

Teaming . . . . 161 37 

Edgestone . . . . 585 70 

Pavers' bills . . . 143 87 

Gravel . . . . 291 20 

Roller . . . . 140 00 

Stone 569 62 

Flagging . . . . 124 80 



Kendall street : Regulatinoj and resurfacino- 
2, .164 tt. edgestone reset. 

772 sq. yds. gutter repaved. 
1,324 sq. yds. brick sidewalk relaid. 
2,300 sq, yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Sand . 

Gravel 

Rollers 

Stone . 

Pavers' bills 

Brick . 



Amount carried forward. 



215 

!,617 25 



2,193 88 



2,196 05 



$916 47 




500 14 




90 10 




247 09 




174 50 




1,035 34 




616 18 




232 06 






3,811 88 






$10,819 06 



216 



City Docu3Ient No. 36. 



jimount brought forward , 
Eoxhury fctreet, Hisfhlnnd to Tremont : Reg- 
ulating and resurfiicing : 
5,900 sq. yds. 3-iu. macadam. 

Labor . 

Team ins: 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Roller 

Block 



$10,819 06 



Fl a edging 



Calumet street 
Labor 
Teaming: 



Gradino- 





$88 77 






106 00 






253 40 






1,141 27 






144 00 






100 38 






182 40 


2,016 22 








$560 22 




• 


225 00 


785 22 


special 


appropri- 


1,792 94 



at] on 
Cheney street, Blue Hill avenue to Hartvvell 



street : itesuriaced — Jiidgestone 


— (jrutters 






— Sidewalks : 








Labor .... 


$109 77 






Teaming . . • . 


66 36 






Pavers' Ijills 


29 26 






Roller .... 


35 00 






Material . . . 


498 58 










, 738 


97 


Cliff street.^ In excess of special 


appropria- 


tion ...... 


. 


314 


61 


Centre street. In excess of special 


appropria- 






tion ...... 


, 


1,639 


77 


Dunmore street: Macadamized — ' 


S"ew edge- 






stone — Sidewalk and gutters : 








Labor .... 


$539 09 






Teaming .... 


255 00 






Pavers' bills 


123 28 






Roller .... 


46 00 






Material .... 


538 QQ 










1,502 


03 






\_/t/ 


Dudley street, at Norfolk House. I 


n excess of 






special appropriation . 




1,258 


74 


Amomit carried forward. 


$20,867 


56 



1 For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



Street Department. 217 

jimourd brought forward , $20,867 56 

East Lenox street, Washington street to 
Fellows street : Edgestones and sidewalks 
(new) : 

Labor . . . . $124 41 

Teaming . . . . 15 00 

Pavers' bills ... 246 43 

Material .... 120 96 

506 80 



Elmore street, Mayfair street to Washington 
street ; Edgestones — Gutters — Sidewalks 
— Resurfaced : 

Labor .... $405 63 

Teamino- .... 165 02 

Pavers'bills ... 136 19 

Material .... 698 80 



Elmwood street, Roxbury street to King 
street : Macadamized — Edgestone — Side- 
walks — Gutters : 

Pavers' bills ... $59 58 

Street-roller ... 54 00 

Material .... 388 08 



Guild row : Widened — Repaved — Edgestone 
reset : 

Labor .... $644 13 

Material .... 818 24 



1,405 64 



501 m 



1,462 37 



Hampshire street.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation ..... . 694 80 

Rowland street.* In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 1,827 78 

Humboldt avenue. Li excess of special appro- 
priation 15,999 61 

Humboldt avenue, Walnut avenue to Craw- 
ford street : Resurfaced — Edgestone — Side- 
walk — Gutter : 

Labor . . . . $161 34 

Teaming 1 . . . 90 00 

Pavers'bills . . , 166 10 

Material . . . . 632 34 

1,049 78 



Amount carried forward , $44,316 00 

^ For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



218 City Document No. 3(5. 

Ajnount hrougJit forward, $44,316 00 

Kensington street: Eclgestone — Sidewalk — 
Gutters : 

Labor .... $145 71 

Teaming . . . . 72 00 

PaversM)ills . . . 91 11 

Material . . . . 328 98 

637 80 



Laurel street, at Humboldt avenue : Resur- 
faced — Edgestone — Sidewalks — Gutters : 

Labor $183 16 

Teaming . . . . 91 35 

Pavers'^bills . . . . 73 32 

Eoller . . . . . 14 00 

Material . . . . 375 75 



Parker street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion ...... 

Ruggles street, Washington street to Tre- 
mont street : Resurfaced : 

Labor $81 48 

Teaming . . . . 44 74 

Roller 120 00 

Material 398 00 



737 58 



Lenox street. ^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 3,097 69 

Moreland street. ^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . . . . . . . 40 21 

Monroe street : Hazelwood street to 500 feet 
west, Humboldt avenue: Resurfaced — 
Edffestone : 

Labor . . . . . $670 64 

Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Roller . 
Material 



312 00 
41 11 
7 00 
92 40 ' 


1,123 15 

4,483 48 


)ropria- 



644 22 



Shirley street. ^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 254 86 



Amount carried forward, $55,334 99 

' For detail oi this work see special appropriation. 



Street Depaktment. 219 

Amount brought forward, $55,334 99 

Sterling street, VA'iishlngton street to Shaw- 
iiiut avenue : Macadamized — Edgestone — 
Sidewalks : 

Labor $70 12 



Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Koller . 
Material 



29 88 
265 22 

22 50 
288 91 



Townsend street, Walnut avenue to Hum- 
boldt avenue : Macadamized — Edgestone 
— Sidewalks and gutters : 



Labor . 


$44 05 


Teaming 


31 35 


Pavers' bills 


130 52 


Roller 


28 00 


Material 


414 80 



Tremont street, Huntington avenue to Brook- 
line line : Resurfaced : 

Labor $122 23 

Teaming . . . . 156 00 

Roller 266 00 

Material . . . . 720 17 



Washington street, Cedar street to Circuit 
street : Repaved : 

Pavers' bills . . . $495 11 

Material . . . . 217 00 



Westminster street : Resurfaced — New edge- 
stone and gutters — Reset edgestones : 

Labor $65 89 

Teaming .... 15 00 

Pavers' bills ... 185 42 



676 63 



648 72 



1,264 40 



712 11 



Waumbeck street.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation . . . . . . 3,91921 

Walden street : Macadamized — Edgestone — 
Sidewalk : 

Pavers' bills . . . $12 50 

Material . . . . 747 87 

— 760 37 



Amounts carried forward, $266 31 $63,316 43 

^ For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



220 



City Document No. 36. 



Amounts broil ght forward , $260 31 

Roller 37 50 

Material . . . . 738 00 

Williams street : Resurfaced from Westminster 
to Washington — Edgestone and gutters : 
Labor . 



Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Roller 
Material 



$311 QQ 

217 50 

33 52 

90 00 

688 99 



Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor ... . ... $4,544 20 

Teaming .... 2,923 50 



Crossings (new) : 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Material 



Edgestone, sidewalks, gutters, repaired : 

Labor $3,116 29 

Teamins: . • . . 3,066 00 

Pavers'' bills . . . 115 34 

Material . . . . 2,559 43 



$52 


78 


13 


50 


743 


16 



Edgestone, sidewalks, gutters (new) : 

Labor .... $1,050 02 

Teaming . . . .1,107 00 

Pavers' bills . . . 4,357 13 

Material . . . . 5,550 43 



Fences and plank-walks : 

Labor .... $1,129 05 

Material . . . . 1,471 12 

Repairs on streets : 

Labor .... $7,453 03 

Teaming .... 14,857 17 

Pavers' bills . . . 362 65 

Roller . . . . 168 00 

Material .... 24,762 49 



Total .... 

Credit on account of city crushers 

Total .... 



$63,316 43 
1,041 81 



1,341 67 



7,467 70 



809 44 



8,857 06 



12,064 58 



2,600 17 



47,603 34 

$145,102 20 

2,757 85 

$142,344 35 



Street Department. 



221 



CITY PROPER. 

Commonwealth avenue, W. Chester park to 
Cross-roads : Eeo;uIatino; and resurfacino- ; 
640 ft. edgestone. 
236 sq. yds. block-stone gutter. 
2,200 sq. yds. Telford macadam : 
Labor 
Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Screenings 
Gravel 
Flao-o-ino; 

Stone . 

Roller 

Blocks 

Exeter street : Resfulatins^ and resurfacing : 
640 ft. edgestone. 
369 sq. yds. stone gutter. 
113 sq. yds. brick sidewalk. 
1,800 sq. 3^ds. Telford macadam : 

Labor .... $218 25 

Teaming . . . . 312 00 

Pavers'' bills ... 292 64 

Gravel . . . . 254 40 

Stone .... 1,490 60 

Roller . . . . 170 00 



$391 


84 


273 


00 


107 


00 


220 


50 


44 


80 


58 


56 


. 1,725 


12 


214 


00 


425 


55 



Albany street. In excess of special appropria- 
tion ..... . . 

Atlantic avenue, Clinton street to Central 
wharf: Repaving : 

Teaming . " . . . $24 00 

Pavers'^bills ... 534 18 



Atlantic avenue.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Batterymarch street.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation ...... 

Bedford street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Beacon street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion ........ 

Amount carried forward , 



,460 37 



2,737 89 
165 90 



558 18 

97 36 

136 00 

1,139 bQ 

4,727 87 

$13,023 13 



^ For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



222 City Document No. 36. 

Amount brought forward, $13,023 13 

Blno-den street : Eesurfaced : 

"Labor . . . . $77 37 

Teaming .... 108 00 
Material . . . . 634 60 

819 97 



Camden street,^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ..... . . 1,871 41 

Columbia street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 942 84 

Charles-river avenue : Repaving : 

Labor .... 187 08 

Teaming .... 40 50 

Pavers' bills . . . 132 55 

Material . . . . 256 34 

516 47 



Cleveland place. ^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . . . . . . • 86 77 

Court street, Washington street to Court 
square : Asphalting : 

Labor $258 77 

Teaming 

Asphalting . 

Pavers' bills 

Removino stone 

Material 

Dalton and Dundee streets : Macadamizing 
— New edgestones — Sidewalk — Gutters : 

Labor $303 57 

Teaming . . . . 240 00 

Pavers' l)ills . . . 43 40 

Material . . . . 170 30 



84 


00 


,052 


50 


93 


72 


135 


50 


44 


21 



1,668 70 



757 27 

East Concord street.^ In excess of special 

appropriation ...... 1,339 19 

Emerald street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation _ • 126 81 

East Newton street.^ In excess of special 

appropriation ...... 224 00 

Friend street, Washington to Sudbury st. : 
Repaving : 

Labor $396 76 



Amounts carried forioard, $396 76 $21,376 56 



^ For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



Street Department. 223 

Amounts brought fortoard , $396 76 $21,376 56 

Teaming . ' . . . 96 00 

Material . . . . 160 35 

653 11 



Hanover street, Cross to Clark : Repaying por- 
tions : 

Labor $374 80 

Teaming .... 366 00 

Material .... 905 74 

1,646 54 

Hollis street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 103 57 

Hudson street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 665 34 

Huntington avenue, E.R. to Dartmouth street : 
Resurfaced — New edgestones and sidewalks : 
Labor . ." . . $220 50 

Teamino; . . . . 118 50 

PaversMoills . . . 202 17 

Material . . . . 591 14 

1,132 31 



Kilby street, State to Milk street: Asphalting, 1,835 60 
Kingston street. ^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 1,548 64 

Knapp street : Regulating and repairing : 

Labor . . . . $^272 40 

Teaming . . . . 283 50 

Pavers' bills ... 225 02 

Material . . . . 243 54 

1,024 46 

Maiden street/ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 503 99 

Matthews street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 280 41 

Moon street/ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 239 03 

Newbury street. West Chester park to 
Charlesgate East : Resurfaced ; 

Labor $116 16 

Teaming . . . . 287 28 

Roller . . . . 189 00 

Material .... 1,348 31 

1,940 75 



Amount carried forward, 1^32,950 31 

^ For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



224 



City Docuiment No. 3(3. 



Amount brought forward, $32,950 31 
Oneida street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 201 11 

Parkmtui street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation 144 00 

Parnell street : New edgestones : — Sidewalks 
and gutters : 

Labor $368 81 

Teaming .... 150 00 

Material . . . . 334 11 

852 92 

605 20 

956 97 

715 73 
176 60 
369 Q>Q 
254 60 



Peniberton square.^ In excess of 


special ap- 


propriation 


. 


Pincknev street : Resurfaced : 




Labor . . . . . 


$253 65 


Teaming . . . . 


283 50 


Material .... 


419 82 



Kichmond street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Rochester street/ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 

Scotia, Cambria, and Bothnia streets. In ex- 
cess of special appropriation 
Seneca street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation . . . . . 

Somerset street, at new Court House : Mac- 
adamized — Edgestones set — Sidewalks laid 
— Gutters paved — Edgestones and brick 
furnished by Court House Commissioners : 
Labor . . . . $175 13 

Teaming 
Roller 
Pavers' bills 
Material 

St. Botolph street, at College of Pharmacy. 
Owner furnished brick : 

Labor $231 86 

Teaming 
Pavers' bills 
Material 
Roller . 



Amount carried forward, 

'For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



338 


00 


14 


00 


81 


18 


339 


16 



947 47 



51 00 




277 65 




952 53 




30 00 






1 "il^ 04 








$39,717 61 



Street Department. 225 

Amount brought forioard, $39,717 61 

Stanifoi'd street, Causeway street to Green 
street : 

Labor $177 92 

Teaming . . . . 117 00 

Material . . . . 251 00 

545 92 



Stoughton street.^ In excess of special appro- 

prtation 1,274 24 

Treraoiit street.^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 1,725 34 

Troy street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 429 37 

Warrenton street.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation ...... 184 60 

Waltham street,^ In excess of special appro- 
priation ....... 1,025 97 

West Chester park.^ In excess of special ap- 
propriation ...... 593 60 

West Chester park, Huntington avenue to 
Beacon street : Repaired : 

Labor $17 20 

Teaming . . . . 12 00 

Material .... 1,539 38 



1,568 58 

West Newton street.^ In excess of special 

appropriation ...... 673 30 

Well street.^ In excess of special appropria- 
tion 312 75 

Repairing asphalt- paved streets : 

Labor $20 37 

Teaming .... 1 50 

Material > i n^ a nc\ 

.,,,.> . . . I,bl4 79 

Asphaltmg 3 

Maintenance of macadamized roadways : 

Labor $7,191 19 

Teaming .... 4,836 50 



Crossino; repairs : 

Labor $3,076 28 

Teaming .... 388 50 

Material .... 5,853 20 



1,636 66 



12,027 69 



9,317 98 



Amount cari'iecl forward , $71,033 61 

' For detail of this work see special appropriation. 



226 



City Document No. 36. 



A.monnt brought forivard, 






$71,033 61 


Crossings (new) : 








Labor .... 


. $173 


18 




Teaming 


82 


50 




Material 


. 1,145 


61 










1,401 29 


Edgestone, sidewalk, and gutter repaired : 




Labor .... 


. $8,894 39 




Teaming 


. 6,109 


50 




Pavers' bills 


. 2,008 


50 




Material 


. 8,435 


69 


25,448 08 


Edgestone, sidewalks, gutters 


(new) : 




Labor .... 


$753 


60 




Teaming 


405 


00 




Pavers' bills 


. 1,355 


83 




Material 


. 2,842 


^Q, 


5,357 09 








Fences and plank-walks : 








Labor .... 


. $1,796 82 




Teaming 


37 


50 




Material 


. 2,672 


87 


4,507 19 








Repairs on streets : - 








Labor .... 


. $25,445 


89 




Teaming 


. 12,524 


76 




Pavers' bills 


. 2,992 


68 




Material 


. 26,730 


33 




Roller .... 


87 


00 


66,780 QQ 








'Total 


$174,527 92 


Credit on account material . 




• 


3,151 82 




$171,376 10 



Street Department. 



227 



S PEINE LING STB SETS. 

South Boston. 
Labor ..... 
Water-carts 

Cochitiiate Water-Works 
Boston street (by contract) . 
Dorchester avenue (by contract) 
Dorchester street (by contract) 
Svvett street (by contract) 
First street (by contract) 



East Boston. 
Labor ....... 

Water-carts ..... 

Cochituate Water- Works 

Sumner street ; Orleans street ; Cottage 
street ; Maverick street ; Everett street 
Saratoga street ; Bennington street ; Mar 
ion street ; Paris street ; Havre street 
London street; Falcon street; White 
street ; Eutaw street ; Monmouth street 
Brook street ; Prescott street ; Border 
street ; Marion street ; Decatur street 



Bremen 
tract) 



street; Chelsea street (by coo- 



Charlestown. 

Labor ........ 

Water-carts ...... 

Mystic Water-Works 

Rutherford avenue and Alfred street (macad- 
amized portion ) — by contract . 

Lincoln street; Walker street; High street; 
Russell street; Middlesex street; Lyncle- 
boro street (by contractor) 

Main street (Walker to Baldwin) ; Mystic av- 
enue ; Dorrance street ; Arlington avenue ; 
Cambridge street ; Haverhill street ; Kings- 
ton street ; Sever street ; Gardiner street 
(by contract) ...... 



$899 58 

3,5()7 75 

309 28 

443 74 

173 34 

416 00 

277 34 

75 00 

^6,162 03 



$5 06 

2,115 00 

553 88 



3,379 33 

^6,053 27 

$325 48 

2,143 50 

485 24 

928 67 



197 16 



801 00 



A.mount carried fortoard, 



.,881 05 



228 City Document No. 36. 

Amount brought forward, $4,881 05 

Winthrop street; Sullivan street; Russell 
street; Pearl street ; Bartlett street ; Jenner 
street ; Rutherford avenue (Devens to Chap- 
man) ; Rutherford avenue (Devens to 
Union) — by contract .... 477 50 

Bartlett street ; Monument square ; Elm 
street (High to Bunker Hill street) ; Green 
street (High to Bunker Hill street) ; Chest- 
nut street (Monument square to Chelsea 
street) ; Cordis street (Warren street to 
High street) ; Sunmier street (Elm street 
to Pearl street) — by contract . . . 462 50 

Main street (Miller street to City square); 
Rutherford avenue (So. Eden to Chapman 
street) ; Chapman street (Main street to 
Austin street) ; Washington street (Bow 
street to Austin street) ; Union street ; 
Austin street ; Cordis street (by con- 
tract) 410 50 

Essex street ; Mill street ; Harvard street ; 
Prescott street ; Lawrence street ; Miller 
street; Henley street (Harvard square to 
Main street) ; Winthrop street (Warren 
streets to Common street) ; Lynde street ; 
Harvard square ; Devens street ; Bow 
street ; Charles River and Warren avenues : 
Mason street ; Benedict street ; Soley 
street ; Arrow street ; Short street ; ' 
Washington street ; Stacy street ; Park 
street (City square to Warren street) — by 
contract 752 68 



Brighton. 

Labor $311 84 

Water-carts .... 10,167 50 

Cochituate Water- Works . . 3,416 03 



1,984 23 



,895 37 



West Roxbury. 

Labor $434 36 

W^ater-carts 7,497 00 

Cochituate W^ater-Works . . . . 2,591 69 



Amount carried forward, $10,523 05 



Street Department. 



229 



Amount brought forward, 

Walk Hill street, Hyde Park avenue (Forest 
Hills to \^'alk Hill street) — by contract . 

Mount Hope street ; Berry street ; Hyde Park 
avenue ; (Walk Hill street to Hyde Park 
line) — by contract . . . . . 

Mozart street ; Burr street ; Clive street ; Roys 
street ; Hoffman street ; Laniartine street ; St. 
John street ; Spring park avenue ; Paul Gore 
street; Sheridan street; Wyman street; 
Day street ; Chestnut avenue ; Wise street ; 
Rockview street; Bell street; Oakdale 
street; Armstrong street; Ashley street; 
Danforth street ; Custer street ; Centre 
street (Pond street to the bridge) ; Boylston 
street (Centre street to the R.R,.) — by con- 
tract ....... 

Weld avenue ; Cornwall street ; Robeson 
street ; Sigourney street ; Glen road ; 
Brookside avenue ; Woodside avenue ; For- 
est Hills street ; Williams street ; Egleston 
street ; Copley street ; Green street (R.R. 
to Forest Hills) — by contract . 

Washington street (Green street to 
Hills depot) ; Forest Hills depot 
(by contract) ...... 

Morton street (Washington street to Forest 
Hills Cemetery) — by contract . 

Boylston avenue ; Armory street 

street ; Boylston street ; Jess street ; Por- 
ter street (by contract) .... 

Beethoven street ; Atherton street ; Walnut 
avenue ; Arcadia street ; Seaver street (by 
contract) ....... 

Prince street ; Perkins street ; Carolina avenue ; 
Pond street (Centre street to Brookline 
line) ; Centre street (May street to Arbore- 
tum) ; Chestnut street, near Perkins street 
(by contract) *..... 



Forest 
square 



School 



$10,523 05 

784 S8 

1,021 68 



1,549 16 



563 34 

29 06 
574 07 

531 90 

577 87 

963 00 



Dorchester. 



Labor . 
Water-carts 



$17,118 01 



1674 54 
7,162 25 



Amount carried forward, 



',^36 79 



230 City Document No. 36. 

Amount bt'ought foi'irard, $7,836 79 

Cochituate Water- Works .... 2,756 U9 

Bowdoin avenue; Trenilett street; Mather 
street; Nixon street; Allston street; Mel- 
ville avenue ; Washington street (Bowdoin 
to Centre) ; Hooper street ; Wheatland ave- 
nue ; Dorchester avenue (Field's Corner to 
Mather street) — by contract . . . 1,172 50 

Hancock street (Columbia to Eaton square) ; 
Eaton square ; Bowdoin street ; Columbia 
street (Bridge to Quincy street) ; Wash- 
ington street (Grove Hall to Bowdoin 
street) — by contract . . . . 2,249 07 

Dorchester avenue (Field's Corner to Mount 

Vernon street) — by contract . . . 370 50 

Pleasant street ; Commercial street (Hancock 
street to Dorchester avenue) ; Commercial 
street (R.R. to Mill street) ; Park street 
(R.R. to Adams street) ; Savin Hill avenue 
(R.R. to Pleasant street) ; Dudley street 
(Dorchester avenue to Upham's Corner) ; 
Stoughton street ; Thornley street ; Han- 
cock street (Upham's Corner to Columbia 
street) ; Boston street (Upham's Corner 
to Mount Vernon street) ; Cottage street ; 
Humphreys street ; Sumner street ; Adams 
street (Field's Corner to Meeting-House 
Hill)— by contract ^1,118 00 

$15,503 85 



ROXBURY. 

Labor . $1,058 73 

Water-carts 5,112 80 

Cochituate Water- Works .... 1,720 63 

Tremont street (Parker street to Brookline 

line) ; Huntington avenue (West Chester 

Park to Tremont street) ; Longwood avenue 

(Brookline avenue to Parker street) — by 

contract 1,987 44 

Francis street and Brookline avenue (b}' con- 
tract) 1,056 90 

Crawford street ; Elm Hill avenue ; Maple 

street; Waumbeck street (by contract) . 603 80 

A.mou7it cat'ried Joj'ivard, $11,540 30 



Street Department. 231 

Amount brought forward, $11,540 30 

Bellevue street ; Wigglesworth street ; Worth- 

ington street (by coiitmct) . . . 213 17 

Albany street (Northampton street to Eustis 
street) ; Warren street (Dudley street to 
Blue Hill avenue) ; Dudley street (Eliot 
square to Brook avenue) ; Blue Hill avenue 
(Dudley to Columbia street) — by contract, 2,007 99 

Centre street (Cedar street to Highland street) ; 
Cedar street ( Centre street to Washington 
street) ; Dudley street (Highland street to 
Warren street) ; Dale street ( Walnut avenue 
to Warren street); Hammond street; Ball 
street ; Highland street (Cedar to Eliot 
square) ; Ruggles street (Warwick street to 
VVashington street) ; Roxbury street (Eliot 
square to Washington street) ; Shawmut ave- 
nue (Roxbury street to Ball street) ; Sterling 
street; Townsend street (Walnut avenue to 
Warren street) ; Vernon street (Cabot street 
to Washington street) ; Walnut avenue 
( Warren street to Seaver street) ; Warwick 
street; Williams street; Circuit street 
(Walnut avenue to Regent street) ; Rock- 
land street (Walnut avenue to Warren 
street) — by contract .... 1,248 33 



$15,009 79 



City Proper. 

Labor .... $1,729 82 

Water-carts . . . 6,388 00 

Cochituate Water- Works . 1,917 30 

Sundries . . . . 661 38 



$10,696 50 

Swett street (bridge to Albany street) ; East 

Chester Park 2,209 99 

Charles street (Cambridge street to Leverett 
street) ; Allen street (Charles street to Cam- 
bridge street) ; Cambridge street (North 
Russell street to Harbor) ; Poplar street ; 
Lowell street (Brighton street to Causeway) ; 
Chambers street (Cambridge street to Green 
street) ; Derne street (Blossom street 
to Nashua street) ; Somerset street ; Allston 



Amount carried forward, $12,906 49 



232 City Docu:\ient No. 36. 

Amoitnt brought forward, $12,906 49 

street ; Green street (Charles street to Bovv- 
doin street) ; Bowdoin street (Allston street 
to Ashburton place) ; Bulfinch street (How- 
ard street to Myrtle street) ; Atlantic ave- 
nue (Foster's wharf to Hanover street) ; 
Hanover street (Battery street to Eastern 
avenue) ; Pa rmenter street ; Hancock street ; 
Temple street ; Bowdoin street ; Staniford 
street 2,400 29 

Rochester street ; Genesee street ; Oneida 
street ; Seneca street ; Oswego street ; Troy 
street; Waltham street (Washington street 
to Union park) ; Maiden street (Albany 
street to Washington street) ; Broadway ex- 
tension (bridge to Harrison avenue) ; 
East Dedham street (Washington street to 
Harrison avenue) ; Union park (Washing- 
ton street to Harrison avenue) ; Berkeley 
street (Chandler street to St. James ave- 
nue) — by contract ..... 1,095 84 

East Concord street (Harrison avenue to 
Albany street) ; West Chester park 
(Huntington avenue to Beacon street) ; 
Dartmouth street (Boylston street to rail- 
road) ; Harrison avenue (Union Park street 
to Northampton street) ; Shawmut avenue 
(Dedham street to Arnold street) ; Wash- 
ington street (Union Park street to Arnold » 
street) ; Tremont street (Waltham street to 
Hammond street) ; Warren avenue (Dart- 
mouth street to Columbus square) ; West 
Canton street ; Wellington street ; West Rut- 
land scjuare (Columbus avenue to railroad) ; 
Yarmouth street ; Harwich street ; Canton 
street (Albany street to Appleton street) ; 
West Brookline street (Tremont street to 
Albany street) ; Pembroke street (Tremont 
street to Shawmut avenue) ; Newton street 
(James street to All^any street) ; Concord 
street (Shawmut avenue to Harrison ave- 
nue) ; Worcester street (Shawmut avenue to 
Washington street) ; Worcester street (Co- 
lumbus avenue to Tremont street) ; West 
Springfield street (Harrison avenue to Wash- 

.Amount carried forivard, $16,402 62 



StKEET DEPAr^TMENT. 233 

Amount hr ought forward, $10,402 62 

ington street) ; VYest Springfield street (Tre- 
niont street to Columbus avenue) ; North- 
am})ton street (Albany street to railroad) ; 
Sawyer street ; Kendall street; Buckingham 
street; Pelham street; Union park (Har- 
rison avenue to Albany street) ; Columbus 
avenue (by contract) . . . . 6,861 45 

Albany street (Dover street to Beach street) ; 

Tyler street (by contract) . . . . 273 00 

23,537 07 

Street Watering. 

Recapitulation. 

South Boston $6,162 03 

East Boston 6,053 27 

Charlestown 6,984 23 

Brighton 13,895 37 

We^t Roxbury 17,118 01 

Dorchester ....... 15,503 85 

Eoxbury . 15,009 79 

City Proper 23,537 07 

Total . , . .... $104,263 62 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . 
Roxbury 
City Proper 



REMOVAL OF SNOW.- 






$9,378 43 




5,446 59 




6,121 26 




4,986 63 




7,093 74 




6,261 19 




10,035 33 


• « « • • 


53,087 69 




$102,410 86 



234 



City Document No. 36. 



EXPENDITURES UNDER SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Total amount expended : 

A street, Broadway to First street 

Albany street, Hampden to Eustis street 

Aldie street . 

Allandale street 

Ash fie Id street 

Ashmont street 

Atlantic avenue 

Atlantic street 

Austin street . 

Baker street . 

Ballard street 

Batterj'mai'ch street 

Beacon street. West from Charles street, and 

Beacon street, W. Chester park to Ai'lington 

street 

Bedford street, Chamiey to Columbia street, and 

Kingston street, Sumner to Essex street . 
Board alley ....... 

Boylston street, Church to Arlington . 

Bristol street . 

Brookline street, Shawmut avenue to Tremont 

street ....... 

Bunker Hill street, Elm to Sackville street 
Bushnell street ...... 

Buttonwood street ...... 

Cabot street ....... 

Caldwell street . . . . . 

Call-street extension 

Cambridge street . . . . 
Camden street, Tremont street to R-R. 
Canton street, Shawmut avenue to Tremont street 
Centre street, Pynchon to New Heath street 
Chamber street, Charlestown 

Charles street 

Cleveland place 

Cliff street 

Columbus avenue ...... 

Commonwealth avenue. West Chester park 

Arlington street 

Concord square ...... 

Cook street 

Cornell street 

Cornwall street 

Dartmouth street, Tremont street to Columbu 

avenue 

Dorchester street. Eighth sti-eet to Dorchester 

avenue 

Dorset street ....... 

Dover street, Harrison avenue to Albany street 
Dudley street, Washington street to jSTorfoll 

House . 

Dudley street, Washington to Hampden street 
Dupont street ...... 

Eagle square 

Amount carried forward, 



to 



$12,102 47 
21,273 39 
1,247 05 
4,729 41 
1,000 00 
6,079 00 
3,590 12 
1,543 02 
8,840 43 
2,866 00 
1,136 80 
3,336 00 

44,903 25 

14,503 20 

469 60 
64 50 
49 00 

531 10 
4,000 00 
4,536 51 
2,013 SO 

17,792 94 
1,568 52 
3,696 16 

23.775 29 

9,371 41 

1,435 65 

4,639 77 

634 35 

16,578 66 
1,086 77 
2,484 33 

39,034 20 

603 90 
72 40 

700 00 
4,300 00 
5,405 86 

1,056 40 

21,682 89 
5,000 00 
6,715 00 

6,258 74 

33,177 75 

645 21 

1,000 00 

$347,530 25 



Street Department. 



235 



F sti-eet 



street 



Amount brought forward. 
East First street, H to K street 
E street, Third to Bolton street, and 

Third street, from E street,westerly 
East Concord street 
East Newton street 
Edgevvorth street 
Ellwood street 
Emerson street 
Emerald street 
Exeter street . 
Falcon street . 
> Ferdinand-street bridge 
First street, N.Y. & N.E. R.K. to 
Forbes street . 

Fom'th street, G to H street . 
Fulda street ..... 
Fulton street, Richmond to Lewis 
Genesee street 
Geneva avenue 
Goldsmith street . 
Granite avenue 
Green street, Charlestown 
Gustin street .... 
Hampshire street . 

Harrison avenue, Canton to Sharon street 
Harrison avenue, E. Concord street to E. Chester 

park . 
Harrison avenue. East Lenox to Northampton 

street . 
Harvard street, Washington to Albany 
Harvest street 
Haskins street 

Heath street .... 
Henley street 

High street .... 
Hill street .... 
Hobart street 

Hollis street .... 
Howland street 
Hudson street 

Humboldt avenue (grading) 
Hunneman street . 
Island street 

Jeffries and Marginal streets 
K street. Fourth to Eighth street 
Lake street . 
L street 
Lenox street 

Lincoln street, Charlestown 
Longwood avenue, Parker street 

avenue 
Lucas street . 
Lynde street 
Magazine street 
Magnolia street 

Amount carried forward. 



street 



to Huntin 



ofton 



$347,530 25 
1,000 00 

8,470 47 

5,839 14 
3;554 36 

437 25 
1,251 06 
5,000 00 
1,701 79 

316 50 
3,380 40 
5,908 77 
37,781 16 
3,976 33 
1,132 35 

324 75 
7,230 42 
3,865 m 
6,249 79 
1,022 88 
13,204 21 

460 46 
2,297 14 
1,694 80 
4,000 00 

1,500 00 

3,000 00 

77 78 

4,830 74 

2,809 79 

2,768 33 

3,847 52 

2,125 13 

4,138 07 

4,213 37 

3,190 59 

5,827 78 

20,779 02 

32,024 88 

82 80 

25 60 

5,516 61 

678 34 

15,642 91 

21,098 97 

8,572 10 

2,300 00 

22,592 12 

308 22 

1,603 79 

925 80 

4,222 74 

$637,332 94 



^ The amount of $5,908.77 was paid oat of the appropriatiou for Ferdinand-street 
bridge, for work done on approaches to said bridge. 



236 



City Document No. 36. 



Amojinf broiight forward, $637,332 94 

Maldon street and Wareham street . . . 19,528 61 

JNIatthews street and Leather square . . . 4,911 85 

Mavnard street 2,444 93 

INIedford street 21,505 36 

Mercer street 1,054 98 

Minot street . . . . . . . 8,440 37 

Monument court 497 48 

Monument street 1,866 87 

Moon street 3,758 37 

Moreland street 2,040 21 

Mount Vernon street 2,693 10 

Murdock street 1,006 06 

National street 1,500 00 

Nejionset avenue 17,161 26 

Newman street ....... 1,311 14 

Ninth street 6,117 66 

Oak street 1,000 00 

Ocean street 10,100 00 

Oneida street 3,501 11 

Oswego street 3,668 67 

Park street 2,115 43 

Parker street 39,483 48 

Parker street, Huntington avenue to Westland 

avenue 420 00 

Parkman street 597 80 

Paul street 844 38 

Pemberton square 2,189 77 

Preble street 5,800 00 

Prentiss street 4,000 00 

Prospect avenue . . . . . . . 533 00 

Q street 399 85 

Resurfacing streets, Wards 17 and 18 . . . 5,777 31 

Richmond street . . . . . . . 2,115 73 

Rochester street 4,537 24 

Rogers street 1,264 88 

Rutherford avenue (macadamizing) . . *. 100 00 

Rutherford avenue (paving) .... 7,841 50 

Rutland square 1 14 10 

Salem street 1,000 00 

Savin Hill avenue 3,826 68 

Scotia, Cambria, and Bothnia streets . . . 10,369 66 

Second street (grading, etc.) .... 1,034 36 

Second street, K to M 1,422 21 

Second street, E to Dorchester street . . . 21,243 99 

Second street, easterly from Granite, and ) ^j q.- -, 

Third street, A to Second ) * ' 

Seneca street 3,495 93 

Seventh street, D to B . . . . . . 9,244 36 

Shirley street 4,042 66 

Short street, Charlestown 700 00 

Short street, AVest lloxbury .... 96 60 

Silver street, A to D 1,090 66 

Sixth street, B to C 3.200 00 

Sixth street, H to I 1,729 61 

Smith-street extension ....... 639 60 

Soley street 810 35 

Story street 1,946 78 



Amount carried forward, 



) 12,554 63 



Street Department. 



237 



Amotmt brought forward , 
Stoiighton street . 
Sun-Court street . 
Sycamcn-e and Ridge streets 
Symmes street 
Terrace place, East Boston 
Terrace street 
Texas street . 

Tremont street, from Roxbur}' Crossing 
Tremont street, Scollay square to Boylston 
Troy street , 
Village street 
Waltham street 
Ward street . 
Warren avenue 
Warren street 
Warrenton street 
Washburn street 

Washington street, Charlestown . 
Washington street, Dorchester 
Washington, South and Centi'e streets 
Water street, Charlestown 
Watson street .... 
Waumbeck street .... 

Well street 

Wendell street .... 

West Chester park and square 

West Dedham street 

West Newton street, Tremont street to Columbus 

avenue 
West Newton street, Tremont street to Shawmut 

avenue 
West Second street 
Wharf street 

Total 

Less amount paid out of Appropriation for 
Paving 

Total 



$912,554 63 

4,274 24 

1,888 32 

3,700 00 

1,390 50 

1,684 61 

25,218 34 

2,000 00 

10 50 

53,725 34 

8,529 37 

2,200 00 

1,525 97 

797 72 

254 40 

17,081 75 

6,805 68 

4,088 81 

2,000 00 

500 00 

21,334 98 

540 70 

l,4f8 65 

5,919 21 

2,112 75 

2,520 06 

3,161 62 

4,500 00 

12,000 00 

6,673 30 

135 49 

1,861 03 

$1,111,987 97 

97,663 71 

$1,014,324 26 



'2S8 



City Document No. 36. 



DETAILED SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER 
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS, TOGETHER WITH STATE- 
MENTS OF THE AMOUNT OF WORK DONE THE COST 
OF WHICH EXCEEDED $3,000. 



A street, Broadwaj' to First street, repaying. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming ...... 

64,806 granite paving-blocks 

AViiarfage on paving-blocks 

1 1 U feet of edgestone 

29,450 paving-brick .... 

823 lin. feet of flagging 

Sundries 



$689 67 
153 75 

4,743 20 
240 80 
62 35 
338 67 
883 05 
231 00 



Amount paid to Collins & Ham, for leaving, as 
per contract : 
2,542 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $] .05 
1,362 lin. feet edgestone set, at 55 cts. 
1,124 sq. 3'ds. brick paving laid, at 91 cts 
175 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.15 
6 days' labor stone-cutting, at $4.60 . 

Amount jDaid for the construction 2 new catch-basins and 
2 new manholes by the Sewer Division 



ing' 


as 










$2,669 


10 






749 


10 






1,022 


84 






201 


25 






27 


60 



r,342 49 



Amount charged to L street, filling . 
Amount I'etained from Collins & Ham 



$251 50 
25 00 



4,669 89 
366 59 

$12,378 97 



276 50 

$12,102 47 
Amount of special appropriation . . . . . 12,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $102 47 

Albany street, Hampden to Enstis street, paving. 

Labor . . . .' . . . . $3,881 70 

Teaming . 2,938 50 

145,979 granite paving-blocks .... 10,569 64 
176 It. of edgestone, 5 corners . . . " . 117 31 

1.444.73 ft. flagging 1,516 97 

Hill gravel • . . 1,534 40 

Beach gravel . . . . . . . 383 40 

11,200 paving-brick 134 40 

Sand 31 50 

$21,107 82 

Amount paid for building 1 new catch-basin by the 

Sewer Division 165 57 



Amount of special apjDi'opriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropi-iation 

2,604 ft. of edgestone reset. 
5.320 sq. yds. block paving laid. 
1.117 sq. yds. brick paving laid. 
160 cu. vds. earth-cutting. 



$21,273 39 
21,107 49 

$165 90 



Street Department. 239 

Aldie street, gravelled. 

Ltibor " . . . $201 70 

Teaming 190 50 

Gravel 854 85 

$1,247 05 

Amount of special appropriation 1,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $217 05 

AUandale street, grading. """""" 

Labor $2,129 80 

Teaming 1,851 00 

$3,980 80 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

culvert (80 ft. stone pipe culvert) and 159 ft. 18-in. i^ipe, 748 61 

$4,729 41 

Aslifleld street, grading. " 

Labor $691 00 

Teaming . . 309 00 

$1.000 00 

Aslimont street, Dorchester avenue to Washington street, 
regulating and macadamizing. 

Labor $2,376 22 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 216 00 

Edgestone, 1,810 ft. and 5 corners . . . . . 1,338 80 

Gravel . . 543 75 

Stone 890 14 

2,471 granite paving-blocks 177 54 

1,810 ft. edgestone set, 8 cts $144 80 

727 sq. yds. block paving laid, 25 cts. . . 181 75 

326 55 

Roller 210 00 

$6,079 00 

Amount of special appropi'iation . . . . . 5,400 00 

Amount paid from Paving Division appropriation . . $679 00 

2,500 sq. 3^ds. 6-in. macadam. ' 
1,300 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Atlantic avenue, paving. 

Labor $685 14 

Teaming 759 00 

323 ft. of flagging 372 45 

Beach gravel ......... 716 11 

400.4 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $32 03 
3,797.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 949 40 
245.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 44 24 

1,025 67 

1,000 paving- brick 12 50 

Beach sand 18 00 

Crossing-blocks 1 25 

$3,590 12 

Amount of special appropriation 3,492 76 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $97 36 



240 



City Document No. 36. 



Atlantic street, regulating and macadamizing. 

814 sq. yds. 3-iu. macadam. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming 

Stone 

Roller 

Gravel 

Sand 

7,000 paving-brick 

076 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $54 08 
16.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 4 08 

308.4 sq. yds. romid paving laid, at 25 cts, . . 77 10 
558.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 100 46 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new manhole . . . ' 



Amount of special appropriation 

Austin street, paving. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teatning ..... 
22 li feet of edgestone and 2 corners 
115i feet of flagging . 
11,000 paving-brick . 
36,175 granite paving-blocks 
400 sq. yds. asphalt, including bed 
Sundries ..... 
Amount paid for paving, as per 
Turner & Co. : 
1,318 sq. yds. block paving, at $1.30 
1,115 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 35 cents 
700 sq. yds. block paving, at $1 
76 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.50 
7|- days' labor stone-cutting, at $4.60 



contract with John 



$1,713 40 

390 25 

700 00 

114 00 

34 25 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Baker street, widening and grading. 

Labor 
Teaming . 
Gravel 
Sundries 



Amount of special appropri 



ation 



$557 32 

100 50 

162 80 

70 00 

204 62 

64 75 

84 00 



235 72 

$1,479 71 

63 31 

$1,543 02 
1.543 02 



$605 91 

39 00 

179 77 

96 81 

126 50 

2,740 89 

2,026 05 

73 60 



2,951 90 

^8,840 43 
8,700 00 



$140 43 



$892 20 




1,203 00 




725 20 




45 60 







$2,866 00 


. 


2,500 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appi'opriation 



$366 00 



Street Department. 



241 



Ballard street, grading. 

Labor ...... 

Teamino- 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Amount of special a]3proprlation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Batterymarcli street, paving. 

Labor, including engineering and insiDCCtion 

Teaming 

Gravel ...... 

114.6 feet of flagging 

Sundries ...... 



$405 60 
252 00 
456 40 

22 80 



$1,136 80 
1,000 00 

$136 80 



24,232 granite paving-blocks 

281 liu. feet edgestone set, at 8 

cents ...... 

1,003 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 

25 cents ...... 

137.4 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 

cents ...... 



1, 



91 
466 50 
228 80 
131 79 
32 04 
672 00 



12 48 



250 75 



24 73 



297 96 



^3,336 00 
3.200 00 

$136 00 



Amount of special aj^propriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appi'opriation 

Beacon street, west from Charles street, and between W. Chester 
park and Arlington street, asphalting and macadamizing. 

9,000 yds. Telford macadam. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming .... 

Hill g-ravel .... 



Sand 

Beach gravel 

Crushed stone 

1073^\ feet of edgestone 

29,247 paving-brick 

10,601 granite paving-blocks 

Rolling .... 

Sundries .... 
Amount paid for paving, as per contract with Barber 
Asphalt Paving Co. : 

115^ sq. yds. gutters paved on a concrete founda- 
tion, at $2.00 $231 00 

3,633 sq. yds. paving with Trinidad asphalt 

on concrete foundation, at $3.60 . . . 13,078 80 

237^ sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.05 . . 249 38 

Amount paid for paving to J. Dohei'ty & Co. : 
468 lin. feet edgestones set, at 8 cts. 
2,023 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
5,59.5 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 
1371 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. 
1,045 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 40 cts. 
38,007 lin. feet edgestone set, at 18 cts. 

Amounts carried forward, $1,311 46 



2,044 61 
2,973 00 
225 60 
210 80 
107 21 
7,187 24 
601 11 
442 29 
909 62 
336 53 
476 78 



$37 44 


50 


58 


100 


71 


20 


60 


418 


00 


684 


13 



13,559 18 



),073 97 



242 City Document No. 36. 

Amounts brought foricard, $1,31146 $39,073 97 

1,655.8 sq. yds. block jjaving laid, at 35 cts. . 579 54 
5,280.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 1,478 48 
306 sq. yds. patch paving, at 35 cts. . . . 107 10 
6961 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 

$1.37 817 55 

lOJ.J sq. yds. block paving laid (grave joint) , at 

65 cts 67 92 

4,362 05 



Amount j^aid for leaving to E. McLaughlin : 

120.3 lin. leet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $9 62 

51.2 sq. yds. I'ound paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 12 80 

105.5 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 18 99 

Amount paid for leaving to H. Gore & Co. : 

663.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $99 53 

295 sq. yds. brick leaving laid, at 43 cts. . . 126 85 

Teaming 96 00 

Sand 32 00 

Gravel 36 00 

15 days' labor stone-cutting . . . . 67 50 

Sundries 37 25 



41 41 



495 13 



$43,972 56 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Re- 

IDairing 7 catch-basins and 2 manholes ..... 930 69 



$44,903 25 
Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . 4,727 87 



$40,175 38 
Amount of special appropriation 41,350 00 

Balance unexpended $1,174 62 

Bedford Stl'eet, Chauncy to Columbia street, and Kingston 
street, Summer street to Essex street, paving. 

Labor, including insjjection and engineering . . . $1,011 92 
63,322 granite paving-blocks ....... 4,742 39 

AVharfage on paving-blocks 214 19 

9,056 paving-brick 114 21 

674.7 It. flagging 804 64 

333.7 ft. of edgestone 187 36 

Sundries 65 94 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with H. Gore 
& Co. : 
2,1861 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $2.66 . $5,816 53 

629 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 30 cts. ... 188 70 
462i sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 91 cts. . . 420 88 
134 i sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $2,34 . . 314 73 

Exti'a work, as ordered 231 21 

6,972 05 

$14,112 70 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 3 

new catch-basins ........ 390 50 



Amount carried forward, $14,503 20 



Street Department. 243 



$14,503 
4,100 


20 
00 


$10,403 20 
7,715 00 


$2,688 20 


$135 
42 
17 


95 
00 
04 



Amount brouglit forivard. 
Amount of special appropriation for Bedford street 



Amount of special appropriation for Kingston street 
Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation , 

Board alley, paving. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Beach gravel ........ 

Amount paid for paving by H. Gore & Co. : 
20.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . $3 73 

2.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. ... 18 

i)8.4 sq. 3^ds. brick jDaving on edge, grouted 

with cement, at $2.75 270 60 

274 51 

$469 50 

Boylston street, Church street to Arlington street, paving. 
Labor $64 50 

Bristol street. 

Labor $49 00 

Brookline street, Washington to Tremont, resurfacing. 

Labor $153 60 

Teaming 195 00 

Stone 107 50 

Roller 75 00 

$531 10 

Bunker Hill street, Elm street to Sackville street, paving. 

Labor $826 94 

Teaming 268 50 

Hill gravel 87 89 

Beach gravel 64 61 

35,513 granite paving-blocks . . . , . . 2,71731 

2,500 paving-brick 28 75 

Sundries 6 00' 



193.3 ft. of edgestone I'eset. 
1,271 sq. yds. block paving. 
130.3 sq. yds. brick paving. 



$4,000 00 



Bushnell street, regulating and macadamizing. 

1,550 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
900 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $601 88 

Teaming . 1.53 00 

(iravel 332 25 

Sand 32 40 

Amount carried forward, $1,119 53 



244 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount brought forward. 

Stone 

2;i,643 granite paving-blocks 
Edgestone — 1,494 ft. and carting 
6 large and 2 small corners 

Roller 

1,839 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts 

642 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 

191 sq. yds. brick paving laitl, at 18 cts. 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division 
4 new catch-basins and repairing 4 manholes 



$147 12 

160 60 

34 38 

Buildino- 



n.no 53 

626 89 

656 08 

1,202 94 

41 10 

63 00 



342 00 

484 97 

$4,536 51 
2,917 00 

$1,619 51 



Amount of special appropriation .... 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

ButtoilWOOd street, Mt. Vernon street to Locust street, grading. 

Labor $268 50 

Filling 1,992 cu. yds., at 65 cts 1,294 80 

Grade damages 450 00 



Ciibot street, paving. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming ........ 

178.3 ft. of edgestone and 5 corners . 
529.8 ft. of flagging ... . . . 

60,000 paving- brick 

Sundries , . 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. for paving : 
74 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
23 cu. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
37.6 cu. yds. block paving laid, at $1.05 . 

Amount paid for asphalting, as jter conti'act with 

Barber Asphalt Co. : 
3,567 sq. yds. asphalt paving, at $3.60 
2,385 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 40 cts. 
1,724 sq. yds. brick paving, at 85 cts. 
227 yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.05 
36 days' labor stone-cutting 



>,013 30 



$472 01 

18 00 

139 43 

573 19 

580 00 

31 70 



61 15 



$12,841 20 

954 00 

1,465 40 

238 35 

176 94 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new catch-basin and repairing 10 catch-basins 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Caldwell street, macadamiziug. 

]./abor ......... 

Teamins: 



15,675 89 

$17,641 37 

251 67 

$17,792 94 
16,000 00 

$1,792 94 



$196 60 
232 60 



Amount carried forward, 



$429 10 



Street Department. 



245 



Amount brought forward, 
Crushed stone ..... 

Gravel ...... 

618.6 feet of edgestone atid two coi'ners 
643.25 liii. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 



Cainlbridge street, Wards 9 and 19, paving 

935 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Beach gravel 

Beach sand 

Hill sand 

8-1:5^ feet of edgestone 

45,140 paving-brick 

240 feet flagging . 

115,730 granite paving-blocks 

Wharfage on paving-blocks 

2,744 sq. yds. paving removed 

Sundries .... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co 
2,900.8 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts 
4,216.5 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints) 

at 97 cts. ...... 

2,299 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



$429 10 

424 09 

223 65 

440 22 

61 46 



1,568 52 



and regulating. 



for 



paving ; 



$232 06 

4,083 22 
413 82 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 22 catch- 
basins repaired . ....... 



Call-street extension, grading. 

1,250 sq. yds. 6-in macadam. 
Labor ..... 

Filling ..... 

Crushed stone .... 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
56,948 feet 15 and 18 in. sewer . . . . 



Balance from Street Commissioners . 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



Camden street, Tremout street to O.C. R.R., macadamizing. 

3,000 sq. yds. Telford macadam. : 

Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

Crushed stone 

Hill gravel . . . . . . . . . 

Beach ofravel ........ 



^3,443 27 

2,379 00 

1,039 50 

70 20 

57 00 

481 67 

551 90 

263 20 

8,514 51 

300 00 

1,344 56 

80 36 



4,729 10 

$23,254 27 

521 02 

$23,775 29 



$1,468 99 
675 25 
503 21 

$2,647 45 

1,048 71 

$3,696 16 
3,096 45 

71 



$2,167 


53 


1,063 


50 


2,717 


22 


896 


00 


51 


83 



Amount carried forward. 



$6,896 08 



24 G City Document No. 36. 

Amotmt brought forward, $6,896 08 

111.8 feet of flagging 117 39 

l,3o5 feet of edgestone (new) 934 .50 

16 corners 60 00 

Steam-roller 300 00 

Sundries 22 60 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co. for paving : 
1,568 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $125 44 
701 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 175 25 
83.4 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 15 01 

848.8 lin. feet of edgestone set, at IS cts. . . 152 78 
605.1 sq. yds. block'paving laid, at 35 cts. . 211 79 

680 27 

$9,010 74 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch-basins 360 67 



$9,371 41 

Amount of special apiDropriation , . . . . 7,500 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $1,871 41 

Canton street, Shawmut avenue toTremont street, macadamizing. 
1,090 sq. yds. 6-in macadam. 

Labor . . . . $875 00 

Stone 435 65 

Steam-roller 125 00 

$1,435 65 

Amount of special appropriation 1,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $435 65 

Centre street, Pynchon to New Heath street, macadamizing. 

2,040 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. * 

Labor $359 54 

Teaming 217 50 

Gravel 730 80 

Sand 136 00 

Crushed stone • . . . 809 19 

2,000 granite paving-blocks 94 00 

27,950 paving-brick 335 40 

1,190 feet of edgestone . 868 70 

5 corners .......... 28 75 

117.8 feet of flagging 123 69 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
1,187.8 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 20 cts. . $237 56 

917.5 sq. yds. of block paving laid, at 50 cts. . 458 75 

660.6 sq. yds. of brick paving laid, at 35 cts. . 231 39 

927 70 



$4,631 27 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

2 manholes 8 50 

$4,6;i9 77 
Amount of special approj^riation 3000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $1,639 77 



Street Department. 



247 



Chambers street, Cliarlestown, resurfacing. 

700 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand 

Cruslied stone ......... 

4,5U0 paving-brick ........ 

Amount paid for paving to P. Brennan & Co. : 
390.1 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $31 21 
143.4 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 

cts 35 85 

163.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 29 46 



;182 03 

120 00 

40 00 

13 09 

130 90 

51 75 



96 52 



Charles street, paving 

Labor . 
Teaming 
Beach gravel 
Beach sand . 
Hill sand 

71 feet of edgeslone 
125 feet of flagging 
35,000 paving- brick 
Wharfage . 
Sund ries 

Amount paid for paving to Payson & Co. : 
1,354 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . 
1,946 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 
3,640 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints) 

at $1.12 



83 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
Labor, trimming stone .... 

Amount paid for paving to James Grant & Co, 
3,080 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 

$1.12 

1,370 lin. feet edgestone set, at 16 cts. 
2,472 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. 
59.6 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
678 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 
33 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 
Labor, trimming stone .... 



$203 10 
544 88 

4,076 80 
21 25 
62 00 



?3,449 60 
205 50 
692 16 

4 77 
160 50 

5 94 
69 00 



$634 35 



12,611 52 

2,455 .50 

651 84 

91 20 

137 75 

39 76 

143 75 

420 00 

■ 200 00 

24 58 



4,908 03 



4,-596 47 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins and repairing 1 catch-basin 



$16,280 40 
298 26 



5,578 66 



248 City Document No. 36. 

Cleyeland place, asphalting. 

Labor $110 25 

Teaming 54 00 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
11.7 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . $2 11 

4.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 ets. . . 1 61 

314.8 sq. 3^ds. asplialt briclv paving laid, at $2.25 775 80 

779 52 



$943 77 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

28.12 ft. 12-in. pipe sewer 143 00 

$1,086 77 
Amount of special appropriation 1,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . 86 77 

Cliff street, resurfacing. 
1,500 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. : 

Labor $938 00 

Teaming 229 50 

Koller 140 00 

Gravel 277 20 

Sand 38 40 

Crushed stone 574 26 

215 feet edgestone 150 50 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co. 

231.8 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $46 36 

114.9 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 50 cts. . 57 45 
93.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 35 cts. . .32 66 

136 47 



$2,484 33 
Amount of special appropriation 2,169 72 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . *. $314 61 

Columbus avenue, resurfacing. 

Labor $3,088 63 

Teaming 592 50 

Gravel ' . . . 71 00 

50,121 granite paving-blocks 3,697 46 

28.5 feet of flagging 34 20 

Sundries 91 05 

Amount paid for asphalting, as per contract with Barber 

Asplialt Paving Co. : 

10,468 sq. yds. surface relaid, at $2.25 . $23,553 00 

1,088^ sq. yds. concrete surface relaid, at $3.75, 4,081 25 

475.7 cu. yds. concrete base relaid, at $8.50 . 4,038 71 

$31,672 96 
Deduct 30 loads old asphalt, at $2.00 . . 60 00 

31,612 96 

$39,187 80 
Amovint paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

8 catch-basins 33 17 

Amount carried forward, $39,220 97 



Street Department. 



241) 



Amount brought forward. 
Amount of special appropriation 



Amount paid out of appropriation for resurfacing streets 
Amount paid out of Paving Division a]3i3ropriation 



^39,220 97 
39,000 00 

$220 97 
J86 77 



$34 20 



Commonwealth avenue, West Chester park to Arlington street, 
resurfacing. 

500 sc]. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming ......... 

Eoller 

Stone 



Concord square, resurfacing. 

Labor ...... 

TeaminD- . . . 



Cook street, macadamizing, 600 sq. yds. 3-m. macadam 
Labor , 



Teaming 
Roller . 
Gravel 
Crushed stone 



Cornell street, grading and gravelling. 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel ....... 

Sundries 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
41 feet stone culvert ....... 



Cornwall street, grading and gravelling and erecting bridge 
across Stony Brook. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming 

Gravel ......... 

Filling 

Grade damag^es 



Amount paid for work done by Bridge Division 



$156 00 


140 


80 


106 


00 


201 


10 


$603 90 


$52 


90 


19 


50 


$72 


40 


$276 


55 


192 


00 


42 


00 


54 


96 


134 


49 


$700 00 


$2,046 


18 


876 


00 


783 


30 


87 


71 


$3,793 19 


506 


81 


$4,300 00 


g brid 


ge 


$232 10 


147 


00 


250 


60 


628 


00 


2,600 


00 


$3,857 


70 


1,548 


16 


$5,405 86 



250 



City Document No. 36. 



Dartmouth street, Tremoiit street to Columbus avenue, macad- 
amizing. 

1,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $383 60 

Teaming 184 50 

Stone 488 30 



Amount of si^ecial appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division approijriation 

Dorchester street, Eighth street to Dorchester 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
14.5.8 ft. edgestone and 4 corners 
492 ft. flagging . 
6,000 paving-bricks . 
118,394 granite paving-blocks 
"Wharfage on paving-blocks 
Sundries .... 

Amount paid for paving, as per co 
Ham : 
4,75"2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.35 
3,157 lin. feet edgestone set, at 24 cts. 
2,639 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 83 cts. 
207 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.35 
Extra work, as ordered 



$1,056 40 
568 10 

$488 30 



avenue, 



paving. 

;1,461 94 
102 62 
522 75 
547 50 

8,619 71 

481 65 

75 26 



Qtract with Collins & 



6,415 20 

757 68 

2,190 37 

279 45 

294 63 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
5 new catch-basins . . . ... 



9,937 33 
^21,748 76 



837 50 



$22,586 26 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropri- 
ation $68 98. 

Amount charged to Washburn street, filling . 374 25 
Amount charged to Preble street, filling . . 32 25 

475 48 

$22,110 78 
Amount of special appropriation 22,000 00 

$110 78 
Amount retained from Collins & Ham, $196.87; of this 

amount $110.78 will be paid from Paving Division. 
Dorset street, Dorchester avenue to Boston, regulating and mac- 
adamizing. 

2,100 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $1,769 35 

'J'eaming 420 00 

Stone 820 80 

Roller 112 00 

Gravel 112 67 

Sand 30 63 

Edgestone, 1,618 feet 1,127 07 

Sundries 37 00 

Amou7it carried forivarcL $1,429 52 



Street Department. 



251 



$4,429 52 



315 90 




181 68 




72 90 







570 48 




$5,000 00 


• 


5,000 00 



Amount brought forward, 
1,620 ft. edgestone set, at 19 cts. 
559 sq. yds. gutters paved, at 32 cts. 
405 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



Amount for special appropriation 



Dover street, Harrison avenue to Albany street, regulating and 
paving. 

1,017 lin. ft. edgestone reset. 
1,816 sq. yds. block stone paving. 

828 sq. yds. brick sidewalk relaid. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 

56,175 granite paving-blocks 

Gravel ...... 

Sundries 

Work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 2 catch- basins 



Amount of siDccial appropriation 



$2,003 01 

538 50 

3,972 09 

125 59 

50 05 

25 76 

$6,715 00 

6,715 00 



Dudley street, Washington street to Norfolk House, regulating 
and macadamizing. 

2,700 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $1,105 50 

Teaming 867 00 

Crushed stone 1,175 26 

Gravel 981 40 

Sand . 72 00 

Paving-brick, 18,000 212 00 

Edgestone, 302 ft 180 78 

Sundiies .......... 31 50 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repair- 
ing 9 manholes ........ 45 41 

Amount paid to Payson & Co., for paving : 

2,140.2 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 18 cts. . . $385 24 

1,185.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . 414 96 

1,512.9 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 423 61 

25.7 sq. yds. concrete paving laid, at 75 cts. . 19 27 

58 sq. j'ds. brick paving laid, at 46 cts. . 26 68 

781.7 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . 62 54 

620 sq. yds. bldck paving laid, at 2o cts. . 155 00 

439.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 79 14 

59.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 36 cts. . 21 45 



Amount of special appropriation .... 
Amount paid out of Paving Department ajapropriation 



1,587 89 

^6,258 74 
5,000 00 



.258 74 



252 



City Document No. 36. 



Dudley street, Washingtou to Vine street, etc., paving. 

l^abor, inchuling inspection and engineering 

1,815.8 ft. of flagging . 

260,019 granite paving-blocks 

329.2 ft. of edgestone and 2 corners 

65,633 paving-bricks . . 

Sand 



Gravel 

Sundries ..... 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with James 
Grant & Co. : 
9,106 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 95 cts. 
5,600 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 28 cts. 
4,124 sq. yds. brick paving, at 79 cts. 
542 sq. yds. ci'oss-walks laid, at $1.42 
Extra work, as ordered 



8,650 70 

1,568 00 

3,257 96 

769 64 

635 98 



$2,059 94 

1,921 70 

13,662 06 

191 84 

776 00 

5 00 

15 00 

121 10 



Amount paid for work done by Sevver Division : Repairing 
10 catcii-basins and buildino; 1 new catch-basin 



14,882 28 

^33,634 98 

264 38 



Amount of special appropriation 

$721.61 of this amount retained from Grant & Co. 

Dupont street, edgestone. 

230 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . . . . 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . 

Gravel 

Stone . . 

232^^2 ft. of edgestone and 4 corners . . . , • 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. for paving: 
266 ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . , ." $21 28 
137.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 34 33 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Eagle square, cross-walks, etc. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand 

4,062 granite paving-blocks .... 

253 5 ft. of flao;ging 

Amount jmid to Roger Devlin for i)aving : 
110.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



g3S,899 36. 
33,899 36 



$113 00 

142 50 

54 23 

102 60 

177 27 



55 61 



$645 21 


524 


00 


$121 


21 


$284 


55 


99 


00 


199 


75 


12 


00 


93 


43 


291 


43 


19 


84 


$1,000 00 



Street Department. 253 

E street, Third to Bolton street, etc., asphalling. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $238 GO 

Teaming J8 00 

Sundries 10 00 

Amount paid for asphalting, as per contract with New 
England Paving Co. : 
1,020.4 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.75 
45G.4 sq. yds. brick leaving laid, at 45 cts. 
172.5 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 60 cts. . 
630.1 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 18 cts. 
Extra work, as ordered .... 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

1 new catch-basin and repairing 1 manhole . . . 182 43 



205 38 




103 50 




113 42 




74 46 






3,302 86 






$3, .569 46 



Amount charged for filling to L street . . $120 00 
Amount retained from New England Paving' Co. 161 42 



5,751 



281 42 



$3,470 47 
Amount of special appropriation 3,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $170 47 

East. First street, H to K, edgestones aiKl glitters. 

600 ft. edgestone $360 00 

200 sq. yds. gutter paving, at 25 cts 50 00 

600 ft. edgestone setting, at 8 cts 48 00 

Labor 240 00 

Teaming 170 00 

Gravel 132 Oo 

$1,000 00 

Amount of special appi'opriation 1,000 00 

East Concord street, Harrison avenue to Albany, regulating 

and macadamizing. 
1,890 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $1,383 64 

Teaming 1,047 75 

Stone 742 95 

Roller 140 00 

Flagging 147 00 

Gravel 444 37 

Sand 178 20 

Edgestone, 644 ft 360 78 

Amount paid for work done by Sew^er Division : Repairing 

2 catch-basins and 2 manholes 55 31 

Amount paid for paving to Daniel Sullivan : 
2,097.1 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . . $167 76 

3.208.1 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 802 02 

1.286.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 227 91 
1,415 sq. yds. digging, at 10 cts. . . . 14150 

1,339 14 

Amount carried forivard, $5,839 14 



254 City Docibient No. 36. 

Amonnt bi^ought foricard, $5,839 14 

Amount of sjjecial appropriation 4,500 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $1,339 14 

East Newtou street, Harrison avenue to Albany, regulating and 

macadamizing. 
2,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . ^ $1,306 91 

Teamino; 144 00 

(travel 216 10 

Stone 898 70 

Roller 140 00 

Edgestone, 691 ft 386 96 

Sundries _ • 164 50 

Amount paid for worli done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

2 manlioles ......... 9 79 

Amount paid to Roger Devlin for paving : 
1,068.7 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . . $85 50 
451.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 112 89 

494.5 sq. yds. brick pavino; laid, at 18 cts. . . 89 01 

~ 287 40 

$3,554 36 

Amount of special appropi'iation 3,554 36 

Edgeworth street, repaying. 

Labor $137 35 

Teaming ...:...... 141 00 

Gravel 70 00 

Crushed stone 88 90 

$437 25 

Amount of special appropriation 400 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $37 25 

EUwOOd street, regulating and macadamizing. 

186 sq yds., 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $607 67 

Teaming 173 98 

Roller 50 00 

Stone . . . . 74 40 

Gravel 76 67 

Edgestone, 375 ft 262 34 

Sundries • • 6 00 

$1.251 06 

Emerald street, paving. 

Laljor $374 60 

Teaming 181 50 

Gravel ^1 69 

Sand 11 70 

Sundries 135 36 

Amount carried forioard^ $794 85 



Street Department. 



255 



Amount brought forward. 

Amount jmid to J. Dohertj^ & Co. for paving: 
405.6 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. 
374.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. 
100 lin. ft. edgestones set, at IS cts. . 
760 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 97 

cts. ........ 

144 sq. yds. digging, at 10 cts 



$32 


45 


104 89 


18 


00 


737 


20 


14 


40 



$794 85 



906 94 



$1,701 79 

Amount of special appropriation 1,574 98 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appro J) riation , . $126 81 

Emerson street, H to I, paving. 

Labor . $429 60 

Teaming 782 34 

32,720 granite paving-blocks 2,386 92 

Wharfage on paving-blocks ...... 45 00 

5,800 paving-bricks 66 70 

Gravel 331 80 

Sand . . . 31 50 

Sundries 3 72 

Amount i^aid for excavating to M. Donnellan . . . 412 70 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. for paAdng: 
791.3 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . . $63 30 

1,176.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . i94 12 
497.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 89 51 

446 93 

$4,937 21 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

1 new manhole 62 79 

$5,000 00 

Exeter street, repairing. 

Teaming , . $140 00 

Labor 176 50 



Falcon street, grading and gravelling. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming 

Gravel 



^316 50 



1,693 90 

727 50 

959 00 

5,380 40 



First street, N. Y. & N. E. R.R. to F street, paving. 
Labor, including engineering and insijection 
Teaminof ...... 



1,5993^2 it- edgestone and 22 corners 
1,465.4 ft. flagging 
50,247 paving-bricks . 
235,047 granite paving-blocks 

Amount carried forward. 



$1,553 74 

106 50 

1,076 58 

1,538 67 

615 63 

17,085 42 

$21,976 54 



250 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount brought forward, $21,976 54 

"Wharfage on 2:)aviiig-blocks ...... 621 88 

Sundries .......... 71 Ql 

Amount paid for paving as per contract with Collins & 
Ham : 
9,400 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.18 . $11,092 00 
4,434 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 55 cts. . . 2,438 70 
1,897 sq. yds. bricls paving laid, at 91 cts. . 1,726 27 
337 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.15 . . 387 55 
Extra work, as ordered. 491 72 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
6 new catch-basins ........ 



Amount charged to L street, filling 

Amount of special appropriation 

Amount retained from Collins & Ham to be 

paid out of the appropriation for First street, $806 81 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropria- 
tion 1,291 23 

Forbes street, grading and macadamizing, 
3,500 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 
2,000 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor ... 

Teaming .......... 

Stone 

Gravel 

Roller 

Sundries 

Paid from special appropriation . * . . . 

Amount paid from Paving Division appropriation 

Fourth street, G street to H street, resurfacing. 

Labor 

Teaming . 

Gravel 

Rolling 

Sundries 

Work done by Sewer Division : Building 1 neW manhole . 

Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



16,136 24 

$38,811 73 

652 49 

$39,464 22 
876 25 

$38,587 97 
36,489 93 

$2,098 04 



$2,098 04 



$595 


37 


694 


50 


794 


20 


1,607 


55 


140 


00 


144 


71 


^3,976 


33 


2,020 


75 



,955 58 



$440 70 

432 00 

75 05 

78 00 
1 80 

n,027 55 
104 80 

n,132 35 
1,104 35 

$28 00 



Street Department. 



257 



Fulda street, repairs. 

Teaming . . . 

Labor ........... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catcli-basins 



$9 00 
7 69 

$16 69 

308 06 

B32-t 75 



Nay 



Fulton street, Richmond street to Lewis street, paving. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

47,677 granite paving-blocks 

15,500 paving-brick 

28^*2 ^t. of edgestone . 

45^85 It. of flagging 

Sundries .... 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with B. F. 
& Co. : 
1,829 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.03 . . $1,883 87 
955 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 21 cts. . 
621 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 63 cts. 
141 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 55 cts. 
Extra work, as ordered 



Amount paid for woi'k done by Sewer Division 
new catch-basins ..... 



200 


55 


391 


23 


7 


98 


.846 


15 


Buildin 


g2 



Genesee street, paving. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming .- 

7,000 paving-brick 

36 ft. of edgestone ........ 

350 granite paving-blocks . . . . . . 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with H. Gore & 
Co.: 
1,091 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at $2.75 . . $3,000 25 
1,005 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . 150 75 

479 sq. yds. brick paving iaid, at 43 cts. . . 205 97 
28 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 55 cts. . . 15 40 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Geneva avenue, grading. 

Labor ......... 

Rubble and filling . . . 

Gravel 

Sundries 

Amount carried forward, 



$400 09 

3,483 88 

178 25 

16 10 

48 20 

29 89 



2,829 


78 


$6,986 19 
244 23 


$7,230 


42 



356 40 

3 00 

87 50 

20 84 

25 55 



^3,372 37 



$3,865 


66 


3,500 


00 


$365 66 


$923 55 


1,160 


10 


420 


00 


5 


00 


$2,508 65 



258 



City Document No. 36. 



Amoimt b r ought fo nva rd , 
Amount paid to A. A. Hall, for excavating: 
680 en. yds. earth excavated, at 60 cts. 
92 cu. yds. rock excavated, at $1.00 . 



$108 00 
92 00 



Amount paid to Wm. T, Davis, for excavating: 
334 cu. yds. earth cutting, at 40 cts. . . . $133 60 
189 cu. yds. borrowed filling at 85 cts. . . 160 65 
12 cu. yds. bowlders blasted, at $2.50 . . 30 00 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
517.5 ft. 4 ft. 6 in.X3 ft. 6 in. circular sewer . 



Goldsmith street, grading and gravelling. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sundries . . . . . 

Amount of special ajjpropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



$2,508 65 



500 00 



324 


25 


$3,332 
2,916 


90 

89 


$6,249 


79 


$335 

1.50 

494 

42 


80 
00 
20 

88 


$1,022 88 
1,000 00 


$22 88 



Granite arenue, macadamizing. 

6,500 sq. yds. 15-in. Telford macadam. 

1 ,800 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor ..... 

Teaming .... 

Roller ..... 

Stone ..... 

Gravel .... 

93 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
6 new catch-basins and 44 feet 12-in. pipe sewer 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Green street, Charlestown, macadamizing. 

400 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming . 

Gravel ........ 

Roller 

Crushed stone ....... 



$3,602 39 

1,443 00 

287 00 

6,600 49 

452 25 

23 25 

B12,408 38 

795 83 

$13,204 21 
J 0,000 00 

$3,204 21 



$103 05 


100 


60 


52 


50 


24 


00 


180 


41 


$460 46 



Street Department. 259 

Glistin street, sewer and macadamizing. 

280 sq. yds. Telford macadam. 

Labor $394 22 

Teaming 336 00 

Gravel 29 20 

Filling 86 6o 

Stone 240 68 

640 feet edgestone and 13 coi'ners 458 74 

950 granite paving-blocks , 69 35 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
646.5 lin. It. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $51 72 
218.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 54 68 



106 40 



L,721 24 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

347.13 ft. 12-in. pipe sewer 575 90 

$2,297 14 
Amount of special appropriation 1,700 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $597 14 



Hampshire street, regulating. 

Labor . $208 67 

Teaming 414 00 

Sand 354 20 

Crushed stone 22 88 

Gravel 49 60 

38 feet of edgestone and 6 corners 49 10 

Amount paid for paving to Jas. Dohertj' & Co. : 
1,451 6 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . $261 29 
683.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . 239 16 

342.5 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 95 90 



596 35 



$1,694 80 
Amount of siiecial appropriation 1,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $694 80 

Harrison avenue, Canton street to Sharon street. 

Labor $2,232 65 

Teaming 121 50 

Gravel .......... 312 00 

Sand 39 10 

512.6 feet of flagging 516 75 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
910.1 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $72 81 
1,750.9 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 437 72 
910.4 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 163 87 

674 40 

$3,926 40 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

8 catch- basins 73 60 

$4,000 00 



2(30 



City Document No. 36. 



Harrisou ayeuiie, E. Coucord to E. Chester park. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Beach gravel 

Hill gravel . 

Sand . 

81.5 ft. flagging 

596.8 sq. yds. of block paving 



$1,019 53 
97 50 
29 82 
40 00 
18 70 
85 57 
208 88 

$1,500 00 



Harrison avenue, E. Lenox street to Northampton street. 

Labor $1,464 11 

Teaming 265 50 

Gravel - 305 60 

Sand 10 20 

38 ft. circular edgestone 42 90 

81.5 ft. flagging 85 58 

Amount paid to J. McCarthy for excavating : 
469 sq. yds. old paving carted away, at 23i cts., $110 22 
317 cu. yds. earth and gravel excavated, at 

69i cts 220 32 



Amount paid for paving to Payson & Co. : 

944.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $75 54 

1,367.9 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 341 97 

249.9 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 44 98 



Amount paid for work done by ScAver Division : Repairing 
2 manholes . . . . . . 



330 54 



462 49 

$2,966 92 

33 08 

.$3,000 00 



Haryartl street, Washington to Albany street, sewer' and paving. 

Paving . ......... $77 78 

Harvest street, Boston street to Dorchester avenue, regulating 

and macadamizing. 
200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam, 900 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $971 75 

Teaming 537 00 

Sand 7 20 

Stone 742 26 

1,915 feet edgestone and 18 corners 1,457 98 

7,365 granite paving-blocks . . . . . . 204 38 

Sundries 88 48 

Amount paid lor paving to J. Grant & Co. : 
2,122 feet of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $318 30 

679 so. yds. block paving laid, at 40 cts. . . 27160 

•^ 589 90 

$4,598 95 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch-basins . . 231 79 

Amount carried forward, $4,830 74 



Street Depaktment. 



261 



Amount brought forward. 
Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



$4,830 74 
4,000 00 

$830 74 



Haskins street, edgestones and macadamizing. 

900 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam, 700 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 
Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel .......... 

Crushed stone 

1,211 feet edgestone and 4 corners . . . . . 

Amount paid for paving to Payson & Co. : 
1,189.3 lin feet edgestone set, at 27 cts. . $321 11 

416.9 sq. yds. block paving laid, at Qb cts. . 270 98 

2.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . . 64 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
2 catch-basins and 4 manholes ..... 



Heath street, widening, etc 

Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Sand ..... 
3,700 paving-brick 
16 corners .... 
Sundries .... 

Amount paid for paving to J. Doherty & 
592.5 sq. j-ds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 
412. 3 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
1,419.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts 



Co. 



$106 65 
103 08 
113 b% 



Henley street, paving. 

Labor 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 

Gravel .......... 

29,650 granite paving-blocks ...... 

7,500 paving-brick ........ 

56 =[^2 ^^"^t edgestone 

Amount paid for paving to J. Tui"ner & Co. : 
668 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $100 20 
1,351.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 48 cts. . 648 82 
347.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 43 cts. . 149 25 



74 
231 00 
]90 40 
257 57 
802 15 



592 



$2,763 


59 


46 


20 


$2,809 


79 


$1,065 80 


879 


50 


710 


60 


158 


40 


44 


40 


60 


00 


26 


32 



323 31 

$2,768 33 



$184 00 

39 00 

287 98 

2.312 70 
86 25 
39 32 



898 27 



^3,847 52 



262 City Document No. 36. 

High street, Winthrop street to Walker street, resurfacing. 
1,900 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $.o58 90 

Teaming , . . . 435 00 

Gravel 350 00 

Stone , . . . 781 23 

$2,125 13 

Hill street, construction. 

Labor $800 40 

Teaming Ill 00 

Hill gravel 30 00 

Beach gravel 56 80 

Stone 306 17 

489.1 feet edgestone and 2 corners . . . . . 349 57 

Sundries . , 6 50 

Amount paid to Donovan & Brock, as per contract : 

Building retaining-wall $1,475 00 

Extra work, as ordered 22 44 

1,497 44 

Amount paid for paving to P. Brennan & Co. : 
489.4 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $39 15 
178.8 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 44 70 

83 85 

$3,241 73 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 239 ft. 

12-in. pipe sewer built 896 34 

$4.1 38 07 

Hobart Stl'eet, grading and gravelling roadway and sidewalks, 
building culvert and fencing. 

950 feet fence. 

4,120 sq. yds. gravel roadway. 

2,060 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $1,180 94 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 415 50 

Gravel 2,017 48 

Edgestone, 25i feet ' . . . 15 30 

Constructing culvert 475 81 

Sundries 78 34 

$4,213 37 

Paid by special aiDpropriation 2,000 00 

Paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . . $2,213 37 

Hollis street, asphalting and repaviug. 

Labor $1,611 88 

Teaming 67 50 

85 feet flagging 97 75 

1,419 granite paving-blocks ...... 103 57 

Gravel 29 11 

Sundries 14 00 

477.7 sq. yds. asphalt 955 40 

Amount carried foriv(ird, $2. ■'^79 21 



Street Department. 

Amotmt brought forward. 

Amount paid for paving to Payson & Co. : 
270 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
268.2 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 

97 cts 

164.6 sq. yds. brick pav^ing laid, at 18 cts. 



$21 60 

260 15 
29 63 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Howland street, resurfacing and regulating. 

4,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel . 

Sand 

Stone . 

4,000 paving-brick 

159 feet flagging 

62 feet circular edgestone ....... 

Sundries .......... 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
971 lin. feet edgestone set. at 15 cts. . . . $145 65 

587 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . . 187 95 
942 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . . 263 76 
438 lin. feet edgestone set, at 20 cts. . . . 87-60 

tl43 sq. yds. block paving, at 50 cts. . . . 71 50 

3,043 sq. yds. brick paving, at 35 cts. . . . 106 51 



Amount paid for work done by the Sewer Division : Build- 
ino- 3 new catch-basins ....... 



Amount of special ap^jropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



263 

$2,879 21 

311 .38 

$3,190 59 
3,087 02 

$103 57 



SI, 176 40 

417 00 

596 40 

257 60 

1,736 47 

50 00 

166 95 

81 38 

18 00 



862 97 

$5,363 17 

464-61 

$5,827 78 
4,000 00 

$1,827 78 



Hudson street, asphalting and regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $1,029 00 

Teaming 60 00 

liaising sidewalk ........ 150 00 

Mason-work , . . 406 00 

Gravel 26 98 

620.7 ft. edgestone and 2 corners 454 57 

3,859 granite paving-blocks 281 70 

47,600 paving-brick 571 20 

Sundries .......... 31 47 

Amount paid for asphalting, as per contract with Bar- 
ber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
3,961 sq yds. asphalt laid, at $3.50 . . $13,863 50 
3,300.5 lin. feet edgestone set. at 42 cts. . . 1,386 21 
2,533 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 90 cts. . . 2,279 70 

Amounts carriedforward, $17,529 41 $3,010 92 



2(U 



City Document No. 36. 



Amounts brotight forward, 
187.6 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.05 
Extra work, as ordered 



$17,529 41 
196 98 
629 12 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
13 catch-basins and 7 manholes 



Amount of special appropriation . . • . 

Amount j)aid out of Paving Division appropriation 

$886.32 retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. under the 
terms of the contract. 

Humboldt avenue, grading, regulating, and macadamizing 

15,000 sq. yds. 15-in. Telford macadam. 
Labor . 



5,010 92 



18,355 51 

$21,366 43 

298 91 

$21,665 34 
21,000 00 

$665 M 



Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand . 

Crushed stone 

Steam-roller 

1,630 leet of edgestone and 4 corners 

3,300 paving-brick (face) 

Sundries ..... 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co 
1,034.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $82 78 
365.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 91 38 
1,807.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 20 cts. . . 361 50 
742 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 50 cts. . . 371 00 
211 sq. 3'ds. brick paving laid, at 35 cts. . . 73 89 
59.5 feet fence curbing, at $2.00 . . . . 119 00 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Hunneman street, grading and constructing. 
Labor 



$7,338 00 


2.760 00 


2,737 


00 


57 


60 


15,790 


18 


84 00 


1,690 45 


56 


10 


412 


00 



Island street. 

Labor . 



1,099 


55 


$32,024 
16,025 


88 
27 


$15,999 


61 


$82 80 


$25 


60 



Jeffries aud Marginal streets, regulating and macadamizing 

2.200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam 

Labor . 

Teamins: 



Gravel . 

Sand . 

Crushed stone 

1,580 ft. edgestone and 18 corner 

Amount carried forward. 



$1,260 30 
613 50 
1,056 14 
16 00 

899 36 
1,181 60 

$5,026 90 



Street Department. 265 

Amount brotcght forward, $5,026 90 

Amount paid for paving to Roger Devlin : 
1,956.4 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . , $156 51 
1,090.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 272 67 
134.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 24 13 

453 31 



$5,480 21 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

2 catch-basins and 1 manhole 36 40 



$5,516 61 
Amount of special appropriation 6,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $516 61 

K street, Fourth street to Eighth street, resurfacing. 

Labor ........... $465 00 

Teaming 177 00 

Gravel 36 34 



$678 34 

Kingston street, Summer street to Essex street, paving (see 
Bedford and Kingston streets). 

Lake street, grading and macadamizing, building culvert, fences, 
plank-walks and cross-walks aud retainiug-wall. 

1,300 lin. ft. plank- walk. 

1,400 ft. fence. 

450 ft. board fence. 

130 perches retaining-wall. 

5,600 sq. yds. Telford macadam road. 

1,500 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $4,349 18 

Teaming 1,936 82 

Gravel . 1,644 40 

Stone . 4,423 86 

Flagging, 402 ft., at 80 cts 322 00 

Sundries 261 11 

Constructing culverts by Sewer Division ; 4 new catch- 
basins and 83.85 ft. stone culvert (double) . . . 2,705 54 

$15,642 91 
Paid by special appropriation 12,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division ajopropriation . . $3,642 91 

L street, grading, constructing, and filling bulkhead. 

Labor $2,204 89 

Teaming 130 00 

Stone ballast 5,296 15 

Pilling 3,307 20 

Sundries 144 03 

Amount paid for building bulkhead, as per contract with 

F. G. Whiteorab 7,210 00 

Amount paid for abutment for bridge .... 2,806 70 

$21,098 97 



2G6 



City Document No. 36. 



Lenox street, paving and regulating 

Labor 

Teaming .... 

Gravel 

Sand 

462.4 ft. flagging 

7,600 paving-brick 

37,087 granite paving-blocks 

Amonnt paid to J. McCarthy & Co. 
1,878 sq. yds stone paving carted, at 37 cts 
660 en. yds. earth excavated, at 59 cts 



for excavatino-: 

. $'704 % 
. 389 40 



771 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 

4,348.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 

471.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



$61 68 

1,087 15 

84 91 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



$892 72 

628 50 

1,249 60 

42 50 

554 88 

94 99 

2,781 52 



1,093 65 



1,233 74 

^8,572 10 
5,474 41 

13,097 69 



Lincoln street, Charlestown, regulating and macadamizing. 

900 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Sand .... 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

1,000 paving-brick 

Amount i^aid for paving to J. Turner & ( 
1.127.7 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
394.4 sq. yds. block ^^aving laid, at 25 cts. 
737.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



$90 22 

98 60 

132 67 



27 25 
390 00 

69 19 
211 31 
360 76 
120 00 



321 49 
$2,300 00 



LongWOOd avenue, Parker street to Huntington avenue, 

Labcn-, including inspection and engineering 

I'eaming .... 

200,777 granite paving-blocks 

62,755 paving-bi'ick 

39.1 feet edo:estone 

819.2 fee 

Sundries 

Amount i:>aid for paving, as per contract with J. Doherty 
&Co. : 
5,313 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.22 . . $6,481 86 
2.796 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . 419 40 
1,774 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 66 cts. . 1,170 84 
206 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 27 cts. . . 55 62 

Extra work, as ordered 29 90 



paving. 

3,149 34 
294 00 

9,637 29 

730 14 

28 95 

871 24 

117 33 



8,157 62 



Aniounl carried forward. 



^22,985 91 



Strket Department. 267 

Amount brought forward, $22,985 91 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

1 catcli-basin . . . . . . . . . 14 09 



$23,000 00 
Amount of special appropriation $2;:5,000 00 

$407 88 of this amount retained from J. Doherty & Co. 

Lucas street, paving with asphalt blocks. 

Teaming $72 00 

76.2 sq. yds. asphalt block paving laid, at $3.10 . . 236 22 

22 



Lynde street, macadamizing. 

Labor . $653 20 

Teaming 240 00 

Gravel 127 50 

Crushed stone 583 09 

$1,603 79 

Magazine street, grading. 

Labor $117 30 

Stone screenings 808 50 



Magnolia street, regulating. 

Labor $642 46 

Teaming 742 50 

Gravel 732 20 

Crushed stone 81 34 

Sand 41 60 

1,565.7 feet edgestone 1,103 47 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
721 7 lin. feet edgestone set, at 20 cts. . . $144 34 
289 4 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 50 cts. . 144 70 

426.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 35 cts. . 149 38 

438 42 

Amount paid for paving to J. Doherty & Co. : 

1.585 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $237 75 
580 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . . 203 00 

440 75 

$4,222 74 
Amount of special appropriation 4,000 00 



Amount paid out of Paving Division ajipropriation . . $222 74 

Maiden street, and junction of Wareham street, and Wareham 
street, Harrison avenue to Albany street, paving and regu- 
lating. 

Labor $4,254 98 

Teaming . 1,551 00 



A)iiount carried forward, $5,805 98 



268 City Document No. 36. 

Amount brought forward, $5,805 98 

Gravel . . ". 1,368 58 

95,6^0 granite uaving-blocks 7,083 63 

43.8 feet edgestone 24 74 

142 feet flagging 150 03 

Sundries io »/ 

Amount paid for excavating to J. J. Sullivan : 
4,469 sq. j'ds. round stone removed, at 55 cts. . §2,457 95 
300 sq. yds. round stone removed, at 35 cts. . 105 00 

2,562 95 

Amoun paid for paving to J. Turner & Co. : 

2,617 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $209 36 

4,517.1 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 1,129 27 
740.5 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), 

at97cts 718 29 

732.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 131 81 

2,188 73 

$19,201 51 
Amount paid for Avork done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch-basins and repairing 2 others . . . 327 10 

$19,528 61 
Amount of appropriation for ]\Ialden street . $6,000 00 
Amount of appropriation for Wareham street . 13,024 62 

19,024 62 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $.503 99 

Matthews street, including Leather square, paving. 

Labor • . . . . $1,271 90 

Teaming „ 279 00 

41,072 o-ranite paving-blocks 3,009 35 

Gravel 316 18 

8 feet edgestone » 4 80 

2,450 paving-brick . 30 62 

$4,911 85 

Amount of special appropiiation 4,560 25 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $351 60 

Maynard street, grading. 

Labor $832 90 

Teaming 1,059 00 

Gravel ■ . • 407 40 

36.6 feet edgestone 47 65 

Sundries . . . 9 H 

$2,356 06 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

65 feet 15-in. pipe culvert 88 87 

$2,444 93 

Amount of special appropriation 2,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $144 93 



Street Department. 269 

Medfortl street, Lexington street to Chelsea street, paving and 

regulating. 

Labor $3,050 05 

Teaming 1,162 50 

Hill gravel 519 86 

Beach gravel 941 46 

145,582 granite paving-blocks 11,355 40 

150 feet flagging 172 60 

31,500 paving-brick 376 25 

87^*2 feet edgestone 65 88 

Sundries 127 26 

Amount paid for paving to P. Brennan & Co. : 

2.013.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $161 08 

3.910.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 975 15 
1,429 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 257 22 

1,393 45 

Amount paid for paving to J. Turner & Co. : 
2,260.2 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $212 82 
5,043.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 1,260 80 
2,405.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 432 94 

1,906 56 

$21 ,071 17 
Amount paid for woi'k done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch- basins and repairing 6 others . . . 434 19 

$21,505 36 

Mercer street, Dorchester street to Eighth street, resurfacing and 
regulating. 

Labor $434 70 

Teaming 348 00 

Gravel 78 21 

800 paving-brick 9 60 

61 feet flagging 64 05 

Sundries . . 10 17 

$944 73 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

1 new catch-basin . 110 25 



Minot street, grading, edgestones, and gutters. 
Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

4,081.3 feet edgestone, and carting .... 

Gravel 

Sundries 

64,774 granite paving-blocks 

Amount paid for paving to C. J. Coates : 
3,829 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $306 32 

1,277 sq. yds. block jDaving laid, at 25 cts. . 319 25 

625 57 

$8,116 53 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

3 new catch-basins and repairing 1 manhole . . . 323 84 

$8,440 37 



$1,054 


98 


$2,102 


80 


391 


50 


2,995 


36 


740 


25 


1 


25 


1,259 


80 



$161 62 


87 


00 


140 


02 


30 


61 


42 


00 


7 


48 


28 


75 


$497 48 


$303 30 


195 


50 


803 


72 


70 


00 


232 


50 


$1,605 02 


261 


85 


$1,866 87 



270 City Document No. 36. 

Monument court, regulatiug and macadamizing. 

350 sq. yds. 6-in. iiiaeadam. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

Crushed stone " 

Gravel ......... 

Roller 

Sand 

2,500 paving-brick 



Monument street, regulating and macadamizing. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming 

Crushed stone 

Roller 

Gravel ......... 



Amovint paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins and repairing 1 manhole . 



Moon street, paving. 

Labor $666 27 

Teaming 114 00 

Gravel 239 03 

34.3 ft. edgestone ........ . 19 18 

41,780 granite paving-blocks 1,963 64 

1,000 paving- brick . . . . ■ . . . . 11 50 

331 sq. yds. Barber asphalt, at $2.25 744 75 

$3,758 37 

Amount of special appropriation .,..». 3,519 34 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $239 03 

Moreland street, Fairland street to Blue Hill avenue, resurfacing. 
1,800 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor $845 50 

Teaming 363 00 

Gravel 278 60 

Crushed stone . 363 12 

180.4 ft. flagging 189 39 

$2,040 21 

Amount of special appropriation . . . . . 2,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $40 21 
Mount Ternon street. Ward 25, grading and regulating. 
1,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
800 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor $1,371 60 

Teaming 250 50 

Gravel 436 46 

Amount carried forward, $2,058 56 



Street DeparTxMext. 



271 



Amount brought forward, 

Sand 

Stone 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



^2,058 56 

1 96 

632 58 

B2,693 10 
2,125 UO 

$568 10 



Murdock street, grading and gravelling. 




Labor 


$221 50 


Teaming ......... 


45 00 


Gi"avel 


412 83 


Sand 


49 00 


Sundries ......... 


29 23 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins ........ 



National street, macadamizing, gutters, etc. 

750 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 

Stone ........... 

Gravel 

Sand 

Roller 

10,000 paving-brick ........ 

Sundries 

Amount jDaid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,120.6 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $89 65 
466.4 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 116 61 

607.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 91 39 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new manhole ........ 



5757 56 
248 50 
,006 06 



H70 26 

168 00 

152 80 

106 40 

66 51 

60 00 

115 00 

1 74 



297 Qa 

$1,438 36 

61 64 

$1,.500 00 



Neponset avenue, Tileston place to Minot street, regulating and 
macadamizing. 

9,600 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 

4,500 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

2,955 ft. edgestone 

412 ft. flagging . 

3,130 paving-brick 

Building retaining-wall 

Sundries 

Amount carried forward, 



$4,773 


57 


1,675 


50 


1,614 


00 


4,790 


03 


2,349 


03 


432 


60 


71 


99 


659 


75 


75 


93 


$16,442 40 



272 City Document No. 36. 

Amonnl brought forward, $16,442 40 
Amount paid fov paving to C. J. Coates : 
8.257 lin. ft. edgestoue set, at 8 cts. . . $260 56 
1,801 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 458 30 

$718 86 

$17,161 26 

Amount of special appropriation 12,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $5,161 26 

Newman street, Mercer street to Dorchester street, resurfacing. 
1,700 sq. yds. o-in. macadam. 

Labor $634 00 

Roller 70 00 

Teaming 232 60 

Hill gi-avel 36 34 

Beach gravel • • • • 21 30 

Crushed stone 340 00 

Sundries 7 00 

$1,341 14 

Amount of special appropriation 1,198 26 

Amount paid out of Paving Division approj)riation . . $142 88 

Mlltll street, Old Harbor street to N street, regulating and 

grading. 

Labor $2,140 25 

Teaming 1,449 00 

Hill gravel . . . ' . . . . ■ . . 439 24 

Beach gravel 40 47 

Sand . . . 49 00 

1,608 ft. edgestone and 17 corners 979 42 

4,000 paving-brick 48 00 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 

94.5 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . . $17 01* 

40.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . 14 21 
68.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 19 26 



Amount paid for paving to P. AV. Hernan : 

2,600.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $208 02 

1,095.1 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 273 77 

473.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 85 27 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
3 new catch-basins and repairing 1 catch-basin and 1 man- 
hole 



Oak street, grading and gravelling. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel ...... 

Sundries 



50 48 

567 06 
^5,762 92 



354 74 
$6,117 66 


$315 50 

240 00 

363 84 

80 66 



$1,000 00 



Street Department. 



273 



Ocean street, regulating and macadamizing. 

3,000 sq. yils. 'i'elford macadam. 
1,800 sq. yds. o-ravel sidewalk. 

Labor $2,069 .59 

Teaming 282 00 

Gravel 391 50 

Stone 2,680 00 

Roller . • 210 00 

34,864 granite paving-blocks 967 47 

Edgestone, 2,448 ft 1,438 12 

Sundries 31 25 

Amount paid for woi'k done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new cateli-basins ....... 218 26 

Amount paid for paving to C. J. Coates : 
988 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 72 cts. . . $654 49 
2,704 It. edgestone set, at 33 cts. . . . 892 32 

630 cu. yds. earth, excavated, at 50 cts. . . 265 00 

1,811 81 



$10,100 00 



Oneida street, paving and regulating. 

Labor $1,035 04 

Teaming 207 00 

Gravel 235 91 

113.1 lin. feet edgestone 67 86 

21,070 paving-brick 263 37 

300 paving-blocks . 12 90 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,020 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $153 00 

1,070 sq. yds. block-paving laid (tar joints), at 

$1.22 1,305 40 

29 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 55 cts. . . 15 96 
476 sq. yds. brick pavino^ laid, at 43 cts. . . 204 68 



Amount of special appropriation ..... 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . 

O.^wegO street, paving and regulating with brick. 
Labor .......... 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 

172 feet edgestone 

Sundries .......... 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore «& Co. : 
1,021.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 16 cts. . . $153 27 
22.1 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 55 cts. . . 12 16 

1,025.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid on edge, at 

$2.40 2,461 68 

618.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 43 cts. . . 223 08 



$3,501 


11 


3,300 00 


$201 


11 


$1,117 


53 


6 


00 


96 


32 


26 


16 



2,850 19 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. under the terms of 
the contract ......... 



$4,096 20 
3,668 67 



$427 53 



274 



City Docibient No. 36. 



Park street, macadainiziug. 
9oO sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Ltiboi- $1,371 7-t 

Teaming 9G 00 

Roller 112 UO 

Stone 443 12 

Sundries 11 35 

Amount paid for paving to Wm. McEleney : 
89.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $7 18 
233.7 sq. yds. blocli paving laid, at 25 cts. . 68 43 

86.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 16 61 



81 22 



Parker street, paving, edgestones, aud macadamizing. 

4,200 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 
Labor ...... 



T. Davis 



Teaming ..... 
Gravel . . . . . 

Roller 

Sand 

Stone 

186,453 granite paving-blocks 

2,000 paving-brick 

«b3.4 feet flagging 

3,442 feet edgestone and 24 corners 

Sundries ..... 

Amount paid for excavating to Wm. 
780 cu. yds. earth excavated, at 85 cts, 

Amount paid for excavating to E. A. Janse : 
2,060 cu. yds. eai'th excavated, at 72 cts. . 
458 sq. yds. paving removed, at 25 cts. 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby & Co 
4,046 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
654 lin. feet edgestone set, at 18 cts. 

208.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 20 cts. 
6,634.5 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
395.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. 
64.9 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 50 cts. ' 

122.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 
609 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . 
226 sq. yds. brick 23aving laid, at 35 cts. • 
20 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 50 cts. 



1,483 20 
114 60 



$323-68 

117 72 

41 70 

1,658 63 

138 50 

32 45 

22 07 

159 72 

79 10 

10 00 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
18 new catcli-basins and 170 feet retainino;-wall . 



Amount of special apjiropriation .... 
Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



^2,115 43 



$3,718 70 

2,619 00 

4,386 20 

210 00 

176 00 

3,405 82 

13,999 73 

24 00 

928 63 

2,284 19 

66 51 

663 00 



1,597 70 



2,583 57 

$36,663 05 

2,820 43 

$39,483 48 
35,000 00 



1,483 48 



Parker street, Huntington avenue to Westland avenue. 

Building iron fence . $120 00 



Street Department. 



275 



Parkman street, Ward 9, paving. 

Labor 

1'eaming , . . . . . 
Stone ....... 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appx'opriation 



$210 03 
144 00 

243 77 

$597 80 
453 80 

$144 00 



Paul street, paving. 

Labor . . . . 



Teaming .......... 

Amount paid for paving to E. McLaughlin : 
249.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 15 cts. .... 

Amount jmid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
249.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . $44 87 

216.6 sq. yds. brick paving, laid on edge, at 

$2.75 '. . . 

95.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid .... 



Pemberton square, macadamizing and regulating 

850 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Labor ........ 

Gravel 

363 granite paving-blocks .... 
Stone ........ 

100 ft. iiagging 

Rolling 

Sundries ....... 

Amount paid for paving to Wm. McEleney : 
218 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $17 44 

561 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 140 25 
57 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 10 26 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



$119 27 
6 00 

37 40 



595 65 
41 19 


681 71 

$844 38 




ting. 






$696 22 
28 40 
256 70 
680 00 
120 00 
229 50 
12 00 



167 95 

^2,189 77 
1,584 57 

$605 20 



Preble street, Dorchester avenue to Vinton street, macadamizing, 
sewers, etc. 

Labor $699 53 

Teaming 

Hill gravel . 

Stone . 

Beach gravel 

Holier . 

Sand . 

Filling 

1,183 ft. edgestone and 13 corners 



372 


00 


230 68 


600 


00 


9 


94 


72 


00 


14 00 


32 


25 


859 


41 



Amount carried fonvard, 



81 



276 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount of special appropriatian , ► . , . 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Q street, flagging crossing. 

Labor ........... 

Gravel 

180 feet flagging 

Resurfacing street*;. Wards 17 aud 18. 

l^abor 

Teaming ,...,..... 

Crushed stone ......... 

Amount paid for paving done on W.Newton street, to Metro- 

])()litaii Consti"uction Company ..... 

Amount paid f<jr asphalting on Columbus avenue, to Barber 

Asphalt Paving Company ...... 



Amormt brought fonrard. 




$2,8S9 81 


Amount paid for paving to Roger Devlin : 






1,244 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. 


$223 92 




97.7 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 


7 82 




407.9 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. 


142 76 




65.3 sq. vds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. , 


16 32 




197.4 sq. yds. brick leaving laid, at 28 cts. 


55 27 




63.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 


9 68 


455 77 
$3,345 58 






Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division 


: Building 




5 new eatch-basins and 840.36 ft. 10-in. sewei 


•-pipe 


2,454 42 


Amount of special appropriation 


. 


$5,800 00 


Prentiss street, paving. 




Labor ........ 




$328 84 


Teaming 




366 00 


Gravel ....... 




445 2) 


62 feet flagging 




65 10 


80,702 granite paving-blocks 




2,252 74 


Amount paid for excavating to E. A. Janse : 






812 sq. yds. gutters removed, at 15 cts. 


$46 80 




279 cu. yds. material excavated, at 60 cts. 


167 40 






. . 


214 20 


Amount paid for paving to J. Doherty & Co. : 






713 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 


$57 04 




1,020 sq. vds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 


255 00 




116 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 


, 20 88 


332 92 








$4,000 00 


Prospect avenne, grading and gravelling. 






Labor ........ 


, , 


$283 20 


Teaming 


. . • 


72 00 


Gravel 


. 


177 80 



$583 00 
600 00 

$33 00 



$191 
18 

189 


89 
96 
00 


$399 85 


$751 
304 
317 


19 
50 
21 


4,217 


64 


186 


77 


$5,777 


31 



Street Department. 277 

Bichmond street, paving. 

Labor $437 76 

Teaming 498 00 

Gravel 85 41 

Sand 45 00 

79 feet flagging . 94 aO 

8,550 granite paving-bloelvS 619 52 

Amount paid for paving to J. Grant & Co. : 

400 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 ets. . . . $32 00 
1,038 sq. 3-ds. block paving laid, at 25 ets. . 259 50 

243 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 ets. . . 43 74 

■^ 335 24 



Amount of special appropriation. 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . 

Rochester street, paving. 

Labor 

22^ ft. edgestone 

38 ft. flagging ..*....... 

Sundries .......... 

Amount paid for paving to J. McCarthy : 
436 sq. yds. block paving excavated, at 23-^ ets., $102 46 
3(i3 cu. yds. earth excavated, at 95^ ets. . . 289 37 
3 days' teaming 18 00 



^2,115 73 
1,400 00 


$715 


73 


$526 30 

12 64 
39 90 

13 75 



409 83 



Amount paid for paving to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
996.1 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 ets. . . $149 42 
20.2 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 55 ets. . . 1111 

462.9 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 43 ets. . 199 05 

1,095.4 sq. yds. asphalt block paving laid, at 

$2.85 3,121 89 

Extra work done, as ordered .... 50 60 

3,532 07 




Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
2 catch-basins 

l:,537 24 
Amount of special appropriation 4,360 64 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $176 60 

Rogers street, Dorchester street to Preble street, asphalting. 

Gravel $14 22 

900 paving brick 10 80 

Sundries 8 67 

Amount jjaid for paving to Payson & Co. : 
650 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 15 ets. ... $97 50 
112.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 ets. . 39 26 

175.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 ets. . 49 22 

185 98 



Amount carried forward, $219 67 



278 City Document No. 3(3. 

Amount brought f on vard, $219 67 

Amount paid for asphalting to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
464.3 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.25 . . . $l,04i 68 
2.1 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 53 

1,045 21 

$1,264 88 
Amount of special appropriation 1,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $264 88 

Rutherford avenue, macadamizing. 

Labor $100 00 

Rutherford avenue, paving. 

Labor . $906 20 

Teaming 294 00 

Gravel 600 27 

110.5 feet edgestone ........ 77 35 

67,423 granite paving-blocks 4,478 99 

Amount paid for excavating to S. & R. J. Lombard : 
121 sq. yds. gutters removed, at 19 cts. . . $22 99 
350 eu. yds. earth excavated, at 98 cts. . . 343 00 

365 99 

Amount paid for paving to P. Brennan & Co. : 
461 1 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $36 89 
1,243.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 310 80 

347 69 

Amount paid for paving to J. Turner & Co. : 
295 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $23 60 
627.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 156 83 

180 43 

$7,250 92 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division: BuiMing 

3 new catch-basins and repairing 1 catch-basin . . 590 58 

$7,841 50 

Rutland square, repairs. 

Labor $73 60 

Teaming 40 50 

$114 10 

Salem street, Charlestowa, regulating and macadamizing. 

730 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $388 34 

Teaming 184 50 

Gravel 51 12 

Roller 60 00 

Crushed stone 298 79 

1,500 paving-brick 17 25 

Amount of special appropriation $1,000 00 



Street Department. 279 



Sayin Hill ayenue, paving. 

Labor $593 47 

Teaming 289 60 

Gravel 526 50 

Sand 25 20 

38,155 granite paving-blocks 1,980 34 

2,500 paving-brick 30 00 

Sundries 3 20 

Amount paid for paving to C. J. Coates : 
697 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $55 76 
1,041 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 260 25 

347 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 62 46 

378 47 

$3,826 68 
Amount of special appropriation ..... 3,500 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropiiation . . $326 68 

Scotia, Cambria, and Bothnia streets, macadamizing. 

3,000 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Labor $3,903 88 

Teaming 874 60 

Gravel 254 40 

Sand 146 20 

Stone 2,400 00 

Roller 210 00 

1,271 ft. edgestone . . 740 72 

16,500 paving-brick 272 25 

Sundries 31 23 

Amount paid for paving to J. Doherty & Co. : 

1.967.4 lin ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $157 40 
508 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. ... 91 44 

1.069.5 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 267 39 
175.6 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . 61 46 
717.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 129 12 
684 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . . 191 52 

898 33 



$9,731 51 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 3 
new catch-basins, repairing 2 manholes, and building 85 
ft. 12-in. sewer 







Amount of special appropriation .... 


$10,369 66 
10,000 00 


Amount paid out of Paving Division apj)ropriation . 

Second street, grading, etc. 

1,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .......'... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Roller 

Crushed stone 


$369 66 

$399 65 

130 50 

33 21 

60 00 

411 00 




$1,034 36 



280 



City Document No. 86. 



Second street, K to M, macadamizing. 

1,000 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming 

Rollev 

Gravel 

Crushed stone . 

41U ft- edgestone 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
498.3 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 ets. . . . $39 86 
168.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 42 08 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division: Building 
1 new catch-basin 



Second street, E street to Dorchester street, repaying 

Labor ..... 
784.8 ft. flagging 
62,039 paving-brick 
125,025 granite jjaving-bloeks 
Wharfage on paving-blocks 
Sundries .... 
Amount paid for paving as per contract with J. Dohei'ty 
&Co.: 
5,022 sq. yds. block pavinglaid, at $1.25 . . $6,277 50 
2,651 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 23 cts. . . 609 73 
2,128 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 78 cts. . 1,659 84 
172 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.00 . . 172 00 
Extra work, as ordered 850 20 



$310 90 
124 50 
60 00 
187 73 
234 25 
287 94 



81 94 

»1,287 26 

134 95 

;l,422 21 



$952 20 
824 04 
775 49 

9,083 78 

317 24 

66 91 



9,069 


27 


$21,088 93 
249 50 


$20,839 43 
404 56 


$21,243 99 
20,000 00 


$1,243 


99 



Amount charged to L street for filling 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



Second street, easterly from Granite street, repaying, and Third 
street, A street to Second street, repaying. 

Labor ..... 

78,791 granite paving-blocks 

Wharfage on paving-blocks 

38,104 paving-brick 

516 feet flagging . 

134 feet edgestone and 12 corners 

Sundries ..... 

Amount carried forward. 



$867 


53 


7,6.54 


59 


390 


00 


476 


31 


541 


88 


127 


74 


40 


60 


$10,098 65 



Street Department. 



28L 



Amount brought fonvard, 
Amount jjaid for isaving, as per contract with Collins & 
Ham : 
3,899 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.17 . . $4,561 83 



$10,098 Qb 



1,906 lin. feet edgestone set, at 33 cts. 
1,518 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 91 cts. 
122 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.35 
Extra work, as ordered 



628 98 

1,381 38 

164 70 

245 20 



Amount retained from Collins & Ham 

Amount of sj^ecial appropriation for Second street 

Amount of special appropriation for Third street 
Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



6,982 09 

$17,080 74 
25 00 

$17,055 74 
15,000 00 

$2,055 74 
2,000 00 

$55 74 



Seneca street, paving (brick) . 

Labor i^514 79 

Teaming 37 50 

21 feet of edgestone 11 81 

29.4 feet flagging 30 87 

9,800 paving-brick 122 50 

Sundries 57 95 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with H. Gore & 
Co.: 
816.4 sq. yds. keramite paving laid, at $2.75 . $2,245 10 
1,008.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . 151 28 
19.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 55 cts. . . 10 56 

14.6 sq. yds. round paving laid, at 55 cts. . . 8 03 

459 9 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 43 cts. . 197 75 
Extra woi'k, as ordered 29 32 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
2 catch-basins and buildino; 1 manhole .... 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



2,642 04 
^3,417 46 

78 47 

53,495 93 
3,241 33 

$254 60 



Seventh street, D street towards B street, paving. 
Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

Hill gravel ......... 

Beach gravel ........ 

Sand .......... 

50,563 granite paving-blocks . . . . . 

Wharfage on paving-blocks ..... 

9,000 paving-brick 

Amount carried forward. 



$921 


45 


858 


00 


184 


03 


838 


51 


119 


01 


3,663 


97 


119 


50 


109 


00 



6,813 47 



282 



City Docuivient No. 3i3. 



Amount brought forward. 
Amount jjaid for excavating to M. Donnellan : 

967.3 sq. yds. block paving removed, at 15i 
cts. ......... 

841 cu. yds. earth removed, at 94i cts. 

Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,724.2 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
2,541.8 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 

439.4 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 
97 cts 

1,592.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Shirley street, grading. 

Labor ........ 

Crushed stone 

Filling . . . . 

Sundries 

Amount paid for excavating to W. T. Davis : 
2,615 cu. yds., and labor excavating earth and delivering 

on Shirley street . 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division: Building 
40 ft. stone culvert 



5,813 47 



$149 94 
794 75 


944 69 


$137 94 
635 45 




426 22 
286 59 


1,486 20 


. 


$9,244 36 
9,000 00 


n . 


$244 36 


. • 


$113 78 

601 60 

1,127 00 

41 98 



Short street, Charlestown. 

400 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. : 



Labor 
Teaming 
Crushed stone 
Roller 
Gravel 



1,810 95 



$3,695 


21 


347 


45 


$4,042 66 


$270 86 

159 00 

162 14 

48 00 

60 00 



Short street, West Roxbury, grading. 
Labor 



Silver street, A to D street, macadamizing 

Labor . 
Teamino; 



Gravel . 

4,300 paving-brick 

Sundries 

Amount paid for paving, to D. Sullivan : 
1,352.6 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
442 7 sq yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 
514.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



$108 21 

110 67 

92 57 



$700 00 



$96 60 





"~ 


$331 


20 


279 


00 


109 


34 


51 


60 


8 


07 



311 45 

$1,090 66 



Street DeparTxMent. 



283 



Sixth street, B and C street, 


paving. 










Labor 






$442 46 


Teaming .... 












337 50 


Gravel ..... 












341 51 


Sand 












50 75 


45 ft edgestone . 












28 70 


4,500 paving-brick 












51 75 


18,000 granite paving-blocks 












1,313 10 


Wharfage on paving-blocks 












35 00 


Amount paid for excavating to M. Donnellan : 








233.4 cu. yds. stone removed, at 19^ cts. . 


$45 51 






229 


5'i 












275 03 


Amount paid for paving to H. Gore & Co. : 








547.7 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . 


$43 82 




815 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 


203 


It 




425.7 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 


76 


6£ 


324 20 

$3,200 00 








Sixth street, H to I street, macadamizing. 








1,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 








Labor 






$643 04 


Teaming 






358 50 


Roller 






70 00 


Gravel 






146 10 


167 ft. edgestone and 2 corners .... 






102 47 


Crushed stone ....... 






400 00 


Sundries 






9 50 




$1,729 61 


Amount of special appropriation 






1,621 54 


Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 






$108 07 


Smith street, extension and grading. 




Labor . . 


, 




$357 60 


Teaming 


• 




282 00 




$639 60 


Soley street, macadamizing. 








800 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 








Labor ......... 






$237 20 


Teaming 






195 00 


Hill gravel 






82 50 


Roller 






48 00 


Beach gravel 






52 54 


Crushed stone 






164 61 


30^ ft. flagging 






30 50 




$810 35 


Story street, grading. 










. 


nellan, at $2.45 ...... 


, 




. $1,939 18 


Teaming ........ 


J 




7 60 




$1,946 78 



284 



City Docuivient No. 36. 



Stougllton street, Harrison avenue to Albany street. 

2,000 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. : 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gi'avel .... 

Roller .... 

Sand .... 

Crushed stone 

405 granite paving-blocks 

812.8 ft. edgestone and 2 corners 

Amount paid for paving to Daniel SuUiv 
1,3-44.6 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . . $107 56 
637.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 159 42 

244.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 43 97 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
290 ft. 15-in. pipe sewer ....... 



Amount of siiecial appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . 

Sun-Court street, asphalt. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel 

2,000 paving-brick . . . . . . 

225.3 sq. yds. Barber asphalt pavement laid, at $2.25 

Amount jiaid for paving to P. Bi'ennan : 
809 lin. ft. edgestones set, at 8 cts. . . . $64 72 

1,462.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at -25 cts. . 365 67 
387.3 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 69 71 



$962 94 

216 00 

173 76 

84 00 

8 10 

1,007 00 

29 58 

470 14 



310 95 

^3,262 47 

1,011 77 

M,274 24 
3,000 00 

a, 274 24 



$266 90 

63 00 

28 40 

23 00 

506 92 



$500 10 
$1,388 32 



Sycamore and Ridge streets, grading and coustructiug culverts. 

Labor $942 82 

Teaming 516 00 

Gravel 312 90 

Filling . 213 55 

$1,985 27 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

73 tt. stone culvert 1,714 73 

$3,700 00 
Amount of special appi'opriation 3,700 00 

Symmes street, grading and gravelling. 

Labor $664 00 

Teaming 376 50 

Gravel 350 00 

Amount carried forward, $1,390 50 



Street Department. 



285 



Amount broiiglit forward. 
Amount of special appvopdation . . 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Terrace place, East Boston, regulating. 

Labor 

Teaming ........ 

Gravel . 

Amount paid for paving to Roger Devlin . 
529.9 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
357.9 sq. jAs,. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
194.8 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



$42 39 
89 47 
35 06 



Amount paid for woi^k done by Sewer Division : Building 
45.2 ft. 12-in. pipe sewer 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division aj)propriation 

Terrace street, paving. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

227,007 granite i3aving-blocks 

53,376 paving-brick 

238 ft. flagging .... 

2,501 ft. edgestone and 17 corners 
Sundries ..... 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with A. A. Libby 
& Co. : 
5,995 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.05 . . $6,294 75 
3,778 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 32| cts. . . 1,227 85 
1,720 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 75 cts. . 1,290 00 

113 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $L30 . . 146 90 
844 sq. yds. block paving (tar joints) . . 607 68 
Extra work as ordered ..... 584 48 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new catch-basin ........ 



Amount retained from A. A. Libby & Co. . 

Amount of special appropriation .... 

Texas street, regulating and constructing sewers. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

Sand .......... 

Gravel . . . . . . . . . 

314^ ft. edgestone and 7 corners .... 

3,934 granite paving-blocks 

Amount carried forward, 



^,390 ,50 
1,000 00 

$390 50 



,085 44 
128 00 
203 43 



166 92 
>1,.583 79 

100 82 

!1,684 61 
850 00 

$834 61 



$1,660 11 

30 00 

10,896 33 

651 38 

249 90 

1,706 91 

92 98 



10,151 QQ 

$25,439 27 

256 27 

$25,695 54 
477 20 

$25,218 34 



$142 60 

81 00 

22 40 

112 00 

250 28 

282 68 

$890 96 



286 



City Document No. 36. 



Amniinl hroKghi forward, 
Amount paid for paving to Jas. Doherty & Co. : 
o4G lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $27 68 
loO.o sq. }'ds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 32 63 

87.5 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 15 75 



$890 96 



76 06 



$967 02 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
201.8 ft. 10-in. jDipe sewer, including rebuilding of 
Stonj-'brook culvert $1,032 98 



Amount of special appi'opriation . . . . , 

Tremont street, Roxbury crossing to Parker street. 
Labor .......... 



$2,000 00 
2,000 00 



$10 50 



Third street, A to Second street. (See Second and Third 
streets.) 

Tremout street, Scollay square to Boylston street, paving. 



Labor, including engineering and superintendence 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ..... 

55, 100 paving-brick 

3,108.5 ft. flagging . . . 

1,079 ft. edgestone and 4 coi-ners 

210,925 granite paving-blocks . 

AVharfage on paving-blocks 

Sundries ..... 

Amount i^aid for paving, as per contract with H. Gore 
& Co. : 
6,992 sq. yds. block paving on concrete, at 

$2.76 $19,297 92 

1,616 sq. yds. block paving on gravel, at $1.19 . 1,923 04 
2,117 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 39 cts. 
2,ii37 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 90 cts. 
670 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $2.74 
Extra work, as ordered 



$3,350 13 

824 85 

8 76 

661 20 

3,313 01 

703 29 

15,490 80 

800 00 

148 12 



825 63 
1,833 30 
1,835 80 

946 11 



— 26,661 80 



Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
7 new catch-basins and reijairing 1 catch-basin 



Amount of special appropriation .... 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Paving Division 

Troy street, paving and regulating. 

Labor ......... 

202.5 ft. flagging 

143.8 ft. edgestone 



$51,961 96 
150 00 

$51,811 96 

1,913 38 



$53,725 


34 


62,0U0 


00 


$1,725 


34 


$365 


79 


212 


63 


80 


45 



Amount carried forward, 



$658 87 



Strf:et Department. 287 

Amount brought fonoard, $658 87 

17,2JU paving-brick 210 40 

43,064 granite paving-blocks 3,141 51 

Sundries 72 29 

Amount paid for paving as per contract witli Jas. Grant 
&Co. : 
1,952 sq. yds. block paving laid, at $1.52 . . $2,967 04 
1,009 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 35 cts. . . 353 15 

627.5 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at $1.32 . . 828 30 
72.5 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.98 . . 143 65 
Extra work as ordered ..... 87 40 



4,379 44 

$8,462 51 
Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 

8 catch-basins and 2 manholes ..... 66 86 

$8,529 37 
Amount of special appropriation 8,100 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $429 37 

Village street, paviug. 

Labor $665 12 

Teaming 222 00 

Gravel 193 01 

Amount paid for paving to D. Sullivan : 
642 lin. ft. edgestone set,' at 18 cts. . . . $115 56 
320 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. . . 89 60 

943 sq. yds. block paving laid (tar joints), at 97 

cts 914 71 



1,119 87 



$2,200 00 
Amount of special appropriation 2,200 00 

Waltham street, Shawmut avenue to Tremont street. 
1,300 sq. 3'ds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor $243 60 

Teaming - 259 50 

Roller 60 00 

Gravel 125 56 

Sand 18 00 

Stone 361 00 

255 granite paving-blocks 18 62 

5,100 paving-brick 63 75 

Amount paid for paving to D. Sullivan : 
1,121 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $89 68 

551.5 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 138 12 

823 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 148 14 



375 94 



$1,625 97 
Amount of special appropriation . . . , . 600 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appi-opriation . . $1,025 97 



288 



City Docuivient No. 36. 



Ward street, Dorchester avenue to Preble street, resurfacing. 

700 sq. yds. o-iu. imacadaiii. 

Labor $249 20 

Teaming 217 50 

Roller . 30 00 

Gravel 64 12 

Stone 132 02 

1(30.8 ft. edgestone 93 23 

950 paving-briek . . . . . . . . . 11 65 

$797 72 
Amount of spedal ai^propriation 675 72 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $122 00 



Warren ayeuue, repairs. 

Labor 

Teaming: .... 



$179 40 
75 00 

$254 40 



Warren street, paving. 

1,500 sq. yds. block-stone paving done bytlie city; balance 

laid, as per contract, with A. A. Libby & Co. 
Labor ..... 



Teaming . . . 
Gravel .... 

Sand 

4,000 paving-brick 
134,948 granite paving-blocks 
319 ft. edgestone and 2 corners 
Sundries .... 

Amount joaid for excavating to J. McCarthy : 
1,076 sq. yds. paving carted away, at 23^ cts. . $252 86 
801 cu. yds. material excavated, at 69J cts. . 476 60 
7 cu. yds. stone carted away, at $1.00 . . 7 00 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby : 

595.4 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 20 cts. . . $119 08 

462.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 75 cts. . 346 73 

199.7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 50 cts. . 100 10 

465.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 35 cts. . 162 80 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new catch-basin . . . . . . . 



^2,444 95 

1,066 50 

1,864 80 

99 20 

50 00 

9,696 60 

230 80 

33 71 



736 46 



728 71 

516,951 73 

130 02 



$17,081 75 



Warrenton street, asphalting from Wasliington street. 

Labor 

Teaming ..... 
Gravel ..... 

11,525 paving-brick 
115.1 ft. edgestone and 4 corners 

Amount carried forward, 



$712 


43 


96 


00 


4 


38 


156 


66 


78 


54 


$1,047 


91 



Street Depaetment. 



289 



Amount brought forward. 
Amount paid for paving to J. Turner & Co. : 
1,613 lin. it. edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $2-4195 

432.2 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 60 cts. . 259 32 
830.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 40 cts. . . 332 07 

Amount paid for asphalting to Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co.: 
969.6 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $3.25 . . . $3,151 20 
916 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2 . . . . 1,832 00 
65.5 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.50 . ... 16375 
26.7 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.05 . . 28 04 



L,047 91 



833 34 



5,174 99 



$7,056 24 

Amount of special appropriation ..... 6,871 64 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $184 60 
$250.56 retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 

Washburn street, Dorchester avenue to Boston street, regulating 
and macadamizing. 

1,000 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Labor $1,017 12 

Teaming . . . . . . . . . . 369 00 

Stone 805 60 

Filling . 442 25 

Gravel 204 26 

Sand 6 00 

Rolling 49 00 

1,055 ft. edgestone 770 15 

Sundries 15 90 

Amount paid for paving to D. Sullivan : 
1,055 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $84 40 
407.9 sq. yds. block paving laid . . . 101 97 

186 37 

22.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. .... 6 33 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins ....... 



Amount of special appropriations 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 



$3,871 98 

216 83 

$4,088 81 
3,043 89 

$1,044 92 



Washington street, Charlestown, regulating and macadamizing. 
2,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 



Labor . 




$399 79 


Teaming 




34.-) 00 


Roller . 




120 00 


Gravel 




297 34 


Stone . 




823 87 


Sundries 




. . . 14 00 

$2,000 00 


Amount of 


special appropriation 


2,000 00 



290 City Document No. 36. 

Washington street, Dorchester, Hawes avenue to N. Y. & N, E. 
R.R., regulating. 

Labor $128 80 

12,729 granite gutter paving-blocks 292 77 

Sundries 78 43 

$500 00 

Amount of special appropriation ..... 500 00 

Washington street, South and Centre Streets, Ward 23, 

14,000 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Labor $6,183 28 

Teaming 1,897 50 

Roller 200 00 

Gravel 1,392 10 

Stone 11,037 00 

Rolling 448 00 

Sundries 177 10 

$21,334 98 

Amount of special appropriation 11,953 19 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $9,381 79 

Water street, Charlestown, repaving. 

Labor $370 30 

Teaming 108 00 

Gravel . 36 92 

531 granite paving-blocks -. . . . . , . . 25 48 

Amount of special appropriation . . . . . $540 70 

Watson street, regulating and macadamizing. 

925 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor '. $495 50 

Teaming 30 00 

Roller 49 00 

Crushed stone . . 361 50 

Gravel 76 6.8 

444 feet edgestone and 2 corners . . . . . 322 30 

Amount paid for paving to J. Doherty & Co. : 
872 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . $69 76 
266.9 sq. yds. block j)aving laid, at 25 cts. . . 66 73 
151 sq. vds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 27 18 

163 67 

Amount of special appropriation . . . . . $1,498 65 

Waunibeck street, resurfacing. 

2,800 sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Lalwr $542 25 

Teaming 650 90 

Gravel 609 00 

Roller 140 00 

Sand 208 00 

Crushed stone 2,172 40 

Amount carried forward, $4,322 65 



Street IXepartment. 



201 



Amount brought forivard, 
1.216 feet edgestone and 4 corners 
5,U0() paving-brick . . . . . 

56 feet flagging 

Sundries ....... 

Amount paid for paving to A. A. Libby : 
93.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 20 cts . 
31.2 sq. yds. block paving laidd at 50 cts. . 

Amount paid for paving to Payson &, Co. 
2, .582. 2 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
1,014.1 sq. 3'ds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
1,221.9 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



$18 76 
15 60 



57 
253 52 
219 94 



$4,322 ,55 

748 47 

61 50 

58 80 

13 50 



34 36 



680 03 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation . 

Well street, paving. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming . . . 

(iravel. .......... 

Sand ■ . 

185 feet edgestone 

98 feet flagging 

7,500 granite paving-blocks 

4,800 paving-brick ........ 

Sundries .......... 

Amount paid for paving to J. Uolierty & Co. : 
534.7 lin. feet edgestone 'set, at 8 cts. . . $42 78 
571.3 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 142 83 

199.1 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 35 84 



?5,919 21 
2,000 00 

!3,919 21 



$523 42 

387 00 

108 00 

18 00 

111 00 

117 60 

538 88 

58 00 

29 40 



221 45 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

Wendell street, paving. 

Labor ..... 



Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

100 feet edgestone 
7,900 granite paving-blocks 
2,500 jDaving-brick 

Amount paid for paving to Jas. Grant & Co. 
352 lin. ft edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
683 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 
162 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



$28 16 

170 75 

29 16 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
1 new catch-basin . ....... 



^2,112 75 
1,800 00 

$312 75 



$786 67 

613 50 

56 80 

56 00 

576 31 

28 75 



228 07 

$2,376 10 

143 96 



Amount of special appropriation 



$2,520 06 
2,520 06 



292 City Document No. 36. 



West Chester park and square, Columbus avenue to bridge. 
2,o50 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

J.abor $1,181 60 

Teaming . 858 00 

Stone 976 89 

Roller 70 00 

Sundries ' . j, . . . . 75 13 

$3,161 62 
Amount of special approiniation ..... 2,568 02 

Amount jiaid out of Paving Division appropriation . . $593 60 

West Dedliam street, Shawmut avenue to Washington street, 
paving (tar joints). 

Labor ' $565 27 

Teaming 117 00 

Gravel 260 80 

Sand 74 80 

27.977 o:ranite paving-blocks ...... 2,040 92 

160.6 feet ed^estone 89 88 

Amount paid for excavating to J. McCarthy : 
301 cu. yds. earth excavated and carted away, 

at 95 cts $285 95 

284 sq. yds. round stone gutters removed, at 33 

cts 95 14 

381 09 

Amount paid for paving, to A. A. Libby »fe Co. : 

564.8 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $45 18 
1,124.5 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 75 cts. . 843 81 
454.2 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 81 75 

970 24 



$4,500 00 
Amount of special appropriation 4,500 00 

West Newton street, Tremont street to Columbus avenue, 
asphalt blocks. 

Labor $677 38 

Teaming 178 50 

Amount paid for excavating to John Casey : 
831 sq. yds. paving carted away, at 27 cts. . $224 37 

785 cu. yds. material removed, at 65 cts. . . 510 25 



Amount paid for paving, as per conti'aet with Metropolitan 

Construction Co. : 
3,118 sq. yds. Hastings asphalt block, at $3.10 $9,665 80 
1,521 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . 228 15 
7 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 55 cts. . . 3 85 

1,190 sq. yds. brick jjaving laid, at 43 cts, . 511 70 



734 62 



10,409 50 



$12,000 00 
Amount of special appropriation 12,000 00 



Street Department. 



293 



West Newton street, Tremoni street to Sliawmnt avenue, asphalt 

blocks. 

Labor 

Teaming .......... 

Gvavel .......... 

Stone 

Amount paid fov excavating to J. J. Sullivan : 
763 sq. yds. round stone gutters removed, at 29 

cts $221 27 

709 cu. yds. macadam removed, at 75 cts. . 531 75 

Amount paid for paving, as per contract with Metropoli- 
tan Construction Co. : 

1.442.6 lin. feet edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $216 39 
41.9 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at 55 cts. . . 28 04 

1.119.7 sq. yds. biick paving laid, at 43 cts. . 481 47 
2,738.5 sq. yds. asphalt paving laid, at $3.10 . 8,489 85 

9,210 25 



$634 20 

75 00 

5 68 

212 79 



753 02 



Amount paid out of resurfacing streets appropriation 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Paving Division appropriation 

West Second street, repairs. 

Labor . . . . . . . . . 

Wharf street, paving. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

100 feet edgestone 

4,000 paving-brick 

11,010 granite paving-blocks 

Amount paid for paving to D. N. Payson : 
425 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
478 sq. yds. block paving hiid, at 25 cts. . 
194 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 



$10,890 94 
4,217 64 

$6,673 30 
6,L00 00 

$673 30 



$135 49 



$34 00 

119 50 

34 92 



H95 63 

250 50 

21 30 

56 00 

46 00 

803 18 



188 42 



Amount of special appropriation 



$1,861 03 
1,861 03 



NEW EDGESTONE. 

The following tables show the amount of new edgestone set during 
the past year : 

City Proper. 

(Districts 8, 9, 10, including a portion of Roxbury.) 

Lin. ft. 

Bay State road 102 

Beividere street 440 

Beacon street . . . . . . . . . . Ill 

Boylston street 167 

Cambria street . . . . . . . . . . 612 

Camden street . . . . . . . .' . . 1,403 

Commonwealth avenue . . . . . . . . 151 



294 



City Document No. 36. 



Dalton and Dundee streets 

East Concord street 

East Newton street 

Exeter street 

Garrison street . 

Huntington avenue 

Harcourt street . 

Scotia street 

Stoughton street 

Watson street 

AVest Chester pai'k 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



7, 



{District No 
Albany street 
Bird street 
Blue Hill avenue 
Crawford street 
Centre street 
Cheney street 
Dunreath street 
Dunmore street 
Ellis and Fulda streets 
Elmore street 
Gaston street 
Hampshire street 
Harold street 
Highland street 
Haskins street 
Humboldt avenue 
Holborn street 
Homestead street 
Howland street 
Kensington street 
Kingsbury street 
Longwood avenue 
Magazine street 
Magnolia street . 
Monroe street 
Parker street 
Band street 
Ruthven street . 
Shirley street 
Sterling street . 
Terrace street 
Texas street 
Town send street 
Tremont street . 
Wigglesworth street 
Westminster avenue 
Walden sti-eet 
Waumbeck street 
Wabeno street . 
Wayland street . 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



ROXBURY. 

including a portion of Dorchester.') 



Lin. ft. 

153 
657 
832 
426 
177 
485 
169 
538 
1,049 
430 
139 
195 

8,236 



291 
182 
688 
302 
878 
356 
126 
392 
240 
472 
173 
224 

1,058 
169 

1,380 

2,100 
188 
247 
426 
3«9 
199 
192 
113 

1,487 
362 

2,476 
179 
183 
511 
149 

1,713 
350 
655 
160 
225 
104 

1,210 

1.009 
118 
303 
714 



22.693 



Street Department. 



295 



South Boston. 
(^District No. 1, including a portion of Dorchester.) 



Boston street 

Dorset street 

East First street . 

East Second street 

East Third street 

East Sixth street 

East Nintli street 

Gustin street 

Harvest street 

Monks street 

Preble street 

Washburn street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. ft. 

260 
1,GU 
2,109 

31.5 

205 

243 
1,797 

oM 
1,806 

171 
1,290 
1,027 

351 

11,724 



East Boston. — ^^ 

{District No. 2.) 

Bennington street ......... 1,216 

Jeffries street 1,297 

Lamson street .......... 169 

Marginal street 535 

Morris street .......... 565 

Paris street 100 

Sundry streets 249 

4 ,131 

Charlestown. -hb* 

(District No. 3.) 

Caldwell street 1,161 

Dupont street 236 

Elhvood street .......... 351 

Hill street 479 

2,227 

Brighton. ^^ 

(District No. 4.) 

Ashford street 211 

Franklin street .......... 234 

Mansfield street 1,272 

Pratt street 315 

2,032 

West Roxbury. -— 

(District No. 5.) 

Childs street 145 

Centre street . . . 304 

Danforth street .......... 857 

Grove street .......... 123 

Harris avenue .......... 105 

Mozart street 2,129 

Paul Gore street . . . . . . . . . . 468 

Koys and Wise sti'eets 486 



4.617 



29(3 



City Document No. 36. 



Dorchester. 
{District No. 6.) 

Lin. ft. 

Ashmont street 1,682 

Buslinell street 1,514 

Blue Hill avenue . . . . . . . . . 333 

Belfort street 118 

Codman and Carruth streets 480 

Draeut street 1,255 

Hancock street and Gushing avenue 313 

]\Iill street . 114 

Mount Everett street 311 

Minot street 4,065 

Neponset avenue 2,891 

Ocean street 2,649 

Roslin and Harlej'- streets 298 

Stanley street 152 

Victoria street 362 

Washington street 1,187 

Sundry streets in small quantities 414 

18.138 

Eecapitulation. 

City Proper 8,236 

Roxbury 22,693 

South Boston 11,724 

East Boston 4,131 

Charlestown 2,227 

West Roxbury .......... 4,617 

Brighton 2,032 

Dorchester ' 18,138 

73,798 



NEW BBICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of new brick 
sidewalks laid during the past year : 

City Proper. 



{Districts Nos. 8, 9, and 10, including a portion of Roxbury.') 



Bay State road 

Beacon street 

Belvidere, Scotia, and Bothnia streets 
Boylston street ..... 
Dalton and Dundee streets 
East Concord and East Newton streets 
Harcourt street ..... 
Huntington avenue .... 
St. Botolph street .... 
Tro}' street ..... 

^V'est Chester park .... 
Sundry sti'cets in small quantities 



Sq. yds. 

130 
331 
428 
187 
109 
841 
133 
973 
193 
157 
285 
114 



3,881 



Street DKrAiiTMENT. 



297 



ROXHURY. 

(^District No. 7, including a portion of Dorchester.') 



Bower street and Walnut avenue 

Blue Hill avenue 

Centre and Highland streets 

Crawford street . 

Cottage street 

Dudley street 

Edgewood street 

Elmore street 

Gaston street 

Hoi born street . 

Humboldt avenue, Homestead and Plarold streets 

Hampshire street 

Howard avenue and Hartford street 

Huntington avenue . 

Kingsbury street 

Kensington street 

Mill street .... 

Munroe street 

Magnolia and Wayland streets 

Rand street 

Rockland avenue 

Ruthven street . 

Shii'ley street 

Texas street 

Townsend street 

Tremont street . 

Vernon street 

Warren street 

Waumbeck street 

Walden and Minden streets 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



South Boston. 

{District No. 1, including a portion of Dot^chester.) 
Boston street 
Congress street . 
Dorset street 
Dorchester avenue 
East Second street 
East Third street 
East Fourth street 
Harvest street 
M street 
Ninth street 
Preble street 
West Second street 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



East Boston. 

(District No. 2.) 
Bennington street ..... 

C(^ttage street ...... 

Jeffries street 



Sq. yds. 

3C2 
574 
435 
312 
179 
226 
185 
354 
145 
127 
1,031 
144 
192 
125 
143 
219 
176 
121 
850 
280 
260 
109 
258 
572 
123 
308 
167 
158 
351 
672 
540 

9,098 



365 
125 
404 
332 
467 
354 
171 
191 
100 
200 
130 
118 
671 

3,628 



518 
189 
125 



298 



City Document No. 36. 



Lam son street 

^lorris street 

Marion sli'eet 

Moore street 

Paris street 

Putnam street 

West Eag-le street 

Sundiy streets in small quantities 



Charlestown". 
{District No. 3.) 
Sundry streets in small quantities 

Brighton. 

{District No. 4.) 
Western avenue ..... 

Sundry streets ...... 



West Roxbury. 

{District No. o.) 



Burroughs street 

Centi'e street .... 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Dorchester. 

{District No. 6.) 
Codman and Carrutli streets 
Gushing avenue and Hancock street . 
Dorchester avenue and Thornley street 
Stanley street ..... 
Washington sti'eet .... 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



Sq. yds. 

152 
190 
258 
164 
150 
167 
108 
155 

2,176 



120 



186 
191 

377 



625 
176 
266 

967 



818 
404 
148 
250 
258 
100 

1,478 



Recapitulation. 

City Proper 3,881 

Roxbury 9,098 

South Boston 3,628 

East Boston 2,176 

Charlestown . . . . ; 120 

Brighton 377 

West Roxbury 967 

Dorchester 1,478 



21,725 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTEN- 
DENT OF PAVING DIVISION. 

Buildings and wharf on Albany sti'eet, opposite Sharon street. The 
building is of brick and wood and covers some 8,000 square feet of 
land, and is divided into a shed for breaking stone for macadamizing. 



Street Department. 299 

blacksmith's and carpenter's shops, tool-room, and stable. The total 
contents of the lot. including wharf and building, are 63.180 square feet. 

Fort Hill Wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of the 
Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for the landing and storage 
of paving-blocks and gravel until such time as said wharf shall be wanted 
for the extension of Oliver street. A part of this wharf is occupied by 
a tenant-at-will, at $500 per annum, part by Sanitary Division. 

Lot on Chelsea, Marion, and Paris streets East Boston, containing 
4S,550 square feet. Part of this lot used by the Sewer Division. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Roxbury, con- 
taining 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are buildings containing a 
steam-engine and stone-crusher. 

Highland-street Stable lot. Upon this lot is a large bri(;k stable 
erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Paving Divisions; ali^o 
a brick building used as a blacksmith's shoj), and a shed for the stoi'age 
of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot, on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 square 
feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed containing a steam- 
engine and stone-crusher, also a stable and tool-house. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are two 
stables, also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot, on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, containing 
81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by the town of Dorchester 
in 1867. Upon this lot are a blacksmith's shop and large shed. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,800 square feet. 

West Roxbury. — On Child street, a lot of land containing 14,457 
square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, blacksmith's shop and 
tool-house. 

Gravel lots. — On the corner of Forest Hills avenue and Norfolk street, 
a lot containing 47,798 square feet, purchased by the town of Dorchester, 
in town of Milton, on Brush Hill road, containing- 64,523 square feet, 
hired by the town of Dorchester for nine hundred and ninety-nine 
years. Morton street. Ward 23, containing about one-third of an acre, 
purchased by town of West Roxbury in 1890, used for storage purposes. 
Tenean street, purchased for $21,360 in 1874. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 37,000 
square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This lot is at present 
leased. 

Gravel and stones on lot on Market street, Ward 25, purchased by 
town of Brighton. 

On Rockland street. Ward 25, adjacent to engine-house, a brick 
building, containing a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot, on Chestnut-hill avenue, Brighton, containing about 13 
acres, upon which is an office, engine-house, stable, and crusher plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm street, con- 
taining 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, stable, etc. 

Property belonging to the Paving Division, consisting of 90 horses, 
65 carts, 16 water-carts, 13 wagons, 6 steam-rollers, 8 stone-crushers, 
and 6 engines. 

In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets, a lot of land contain- 
ing about 12,000 square feet, upon which have been erected a stable, 
carriage-house, shed, tool-house, and office. Rent of same, including 
use of wharf and flats opposite, $650 per annum, with taxes. 

On Hereford street, a yard with shed, tool-house, and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkins' Wharf, 521 Commercial street, purchased 
in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square feet, having on it an office 
and stable. 



300 



City Document No. 36. 



Tools, Horses, Carts, etc. 



District. 


1 


3 


3 


4 

7 
1 
2 
23 
15 


5 


6 


T 


8 


9 


10 


Total. 


Axes 

Blocks and ropes, sets 


2 
1 

1 

6 

55 


3 

1 

1 

2 

15 


1 

'l2 
35 


7 

1 

3 

28 

26 

5 

6 

1 

5 

3 

2 

11 

6 

1 
133 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

'76 
8 
13 
12 
84 
75 
2 

2 

50 

11 

7 

4 

30 

14 

1 

1 

44 

2 

109 

119 

5 

2 

13 

20 

15 

■ 12 

11 

10 

'2 
2 
1 
4 
1 

1 
6 
8 

59 
100 

25 

4 
1 


4 
2 
1 
23 
20 
1 

"2 
12 

3 

2 
10 

4 

1 

233 

3 

2 

2 

1 

'25 

18 

9 

46 

195 

75 

1 

1 

250 
12 
13 

4 

"18 
1 
1 

105 

' 97 

100 

3 

1 

11 

12 

5 

17 

5 

3 

2 
3 

'5 
2 

2 
8 
8 
126 
125 
5 

8 

1 

4 

10 

' 11 
3 

4 


3 

2 

1 

11 

43 
1 
8 
4 
8 

2 

'20 

2 

430 

9 

1 

"2 
1 

'50 
16 

6 
46 
90 
45 

1 

7 

8 

2 

33 

11 

3 

1 

120 

11 

201 

130 

2 

1 

6 

4 

8 

6 

9 

2 
2 
1 

3 

2 

1 
3 
5 
216 
190 
8 

'4 
1 

'22 

2 

1 


7 
2 

11 

60 

1 

13 

' 10 

16 

'12 

2 

"1 
1 

1 

1 

20 

8 

' '3 

25 
125 
1 
2 
1 
1 

80 
S 
8 
2 

82 

11 
2 
1 

90 

3 

22(7 

111 

13 
1 

14 

7 

12 
5 

"13 

11 

1 

1 

3 

2 

114 

150 

5 

1 

10 

1 

'32 
1 


2 

'3 

22 

4 
2 
1 

' 23 

1 
1 

43 
3 

'20 

300 

50 

1 
1 

100 
3 

"3 

25 

2 

'50 

2 

98 

100 

1 
6 

1 
1 
3 
6 

'3 

4 

1 

'3 

1 

2 
1 
50 
86 
2 
2 
2 
1 

' 26 

'2 
6 


2 
2 

'10 
75 

1 

4 
1 

6 
12 

'2 
100 

'3 
15 
50 
50 

1 
1 
110 
4 
4 
1 
12 
5 
1 

' 60 

2 

180 

210 

1 

6 

2 

'2 

8 

12 

1 

"1 

1 

'36 
110 

1 
1 

' 30 
1 


37 
13 
11 




129 


Crowbars . . 


366 
9 






2 


2 


1 
5 
4 
3 

4 


35 






g 


Carts, single 


3 




6 


55 
10 




3 
1 


1 


1 


16 




37 




34 




2 




6 


49 




6 


Drills 


11 


7 




150 
2 
1 


976 




16 




1 


1 


1 


g 




3 










1 
2 

'20 

4 

6 

20 

20 

50 

1 

1 

9 

2 

30 

16 

1 

1 

50 

250 

50 

1 

1 

4 

9 

20 

6 

15 


6 
















1 
36 

3 
9 

72 
50 

1 

1 
50 
3 

1 

58 


"35 

2 
75 
25 

1 

50 
3 
5 
2 

21 
7 


5 




50 

14 

6 

11 

18 

100 

1 

1 

2 
216 
3 
3 
3 
39 
6 


455 


" fade and hand 

" striking 


71 

46 

181- 




929 




645 




7 


" stone ........ 


3 
6 




16 


Hose, feet of 


896 




56 






" wagon and buggy . . . 
Hoes, street and grub 


24 

330 

90 




9 






1 

24 

2 

131 

94 


'39 

140 
90 


6 




70 

2 

225 

95 


(^'ri 




24 




1,658 

1,099 

25 


















6 
2 
4 
6 
6 


3 
1 

2 
5 


5 

2 
3 
4 


74 




61 




62 




73 




70 




10 


Rammers, iron ... 

" wooden 

Robes, sleigh, and buggy 

Btreet-rollers, stone 


3 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 


4 
2 
1 
1 
2 


4 
3 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 


1 
2 
1 

"4 

'] 
6 
6 
94 
60 
10 

4 

] 


41 
44 
14 
5 
31 




G 




1 


Snow-levellers 

Scythes 


1 




H 
25 










28 


Shovels, gravel 

" snow 

" long-handled 

Street-sweeping machines 

Screens, gravel 

Sleigbs 


75 
8 
5 

4 
1 


50 
56 

2 


70 
85 

1 
1 


890 

970 

60 

3 

40 

9 


Sleds 


4 


Street horses, wood 


15 
3 

15 
1 

4 


5 
2 

1 
1 


15 
1 


12 

6 
1 
2 


21 
4 

8 
2 

3 


188 
11 


Spoons, drilling 


40 
14 




20 







Street DeparTxVient. 

Tools, Horses, Carts, etc. — Concluded. 



301 



BiSTUICT. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


T 


8 


9 


lO 


Total. 


Tools for stone-cutters, sets .... 

•* carpenters, sets 

** pavers, sets 


2 
1 
3 


1 
2 


2 
1 
2 


2 
3 

5 

8 

40 

2 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

' n 

IT 

2 
2 
2 


1 

'] 

1 
2 

5 

8 

2 
2 
1 


1 

2 
6 
3 

1 
10 
12 
26 

1 

2 


5 
2 
8 
2 
7 
3 

11 
27 

2 

1 
] 


11 
1 
2 

*3 

1 
3 
8 

1 
1 


4 
1 
6 
1 
6 
2 
4 
12 

1 


28 

9 

30 

10 




6 


2 


3 
1 
3 
10 

1 

2 


34 


Trucks 


8 




4 

20 
5 
2 
1 
1 


4 

11 

4 

5 


60 




118 




92 


Wrenches, hydrant 


15 

10 




13 







Respectfully submitted, 

C. R. Cutter, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



302 



City Document No. 36. 



APPEIS^DIX C. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT OF THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Street Department, Sanitary Division, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 181)2. 
H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir : I herewith submit my Report of Acts and Expen- 
ditures of the Sanitary Division from Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 
1892 : 



ITEMS OF EXPENDITURES. 



For labor in sweeping streets and crossings, and 

removal of snow from public walks, yards, and 

squares , 

For labor in collection and removal of house-dirt 

and ashes 

For labor in collection of house- olf'al 

For labor of mechanics, foremen, watchmen, 

feeder, and prison-carriage drivers 

For labor of men employed in the stables and 

yards 

Official pay-roll salary of deputy superintendent 

and clerks in office 

Grain used at city stables 

Hay and straw at city stables 

For collection of aslies in East Boston 

For the purchase of new horses 

For stock and tools purchased for blacksmitli 

shop 

For stock and tools purchased for wheelwright's 

shop 

For stock and tools in harness shop 

For stock and tools in jjaint shop 

Extra team-work in collecting ashes 

Repairs on stables and sheds 

Fui'l, gas, and electric lights 

]\ledical attendance on horses, medicine 

ISIujeing horses (outside shops) 

Prmting, stationery, and advertising 

Broom stock for sweeping streets 

Contracts for the collection and removal of house- 

oflPal in East Boston and Brighton 

Water-rates 

Oflal stock, consisting of buckets, etc 

A.-l) stock, consisting of cart-covers, baskets, etc. 
Street stock, consisting of shovels, hoes, etc 



Expended 

from Jan. 1, 

1891, to May 1, 

1891. 



A ru ounis car ried fo r wa rd . 



$28,163 18 

5.3,010 72 
30,198 37 

9,815 55 



1,906 00 
8.920 56 
2,989 19 
2,563 40 



783 41 

943 Qb 

A'>1 88 

131 3 

16,043 99 

259 06 

."iO-l 17 

118 97 

176 73 

240 22 

70 35 

1,750 00 
1,025 23 

155 50 
95 26 

606 51 



Expended 

from May 1, 

1891, to Feb. 1, 

1892. 



^102,433 62 
76,027 22 

21,301 27 

8,870 06 

6,792 70 
17,952 21 
8,971 18 
7,635 86 
5,785 00 

2,682 57 

1,334 06 

1,166 72 

414 31 

45,505 50 

.o46 44 

1,305 06 

364 44 

393 57 

355 84 



5,250 00 
102 20 
162 42 
565 91 



$161,059 27' $315,918 16 



Street Department. 



303 



ITEMS OF EXPENDITURES. 



Amovnts hrovght forv>ard 

Stable stock, consisting of curry-combs, brushes, 

sponge, soap, blankets, manure-forks, etc 

Dumping-boat, rental, royalty, towage, rent of 

wharf, repairs, labor, etc 

Amount expended on account of Street-Cleaning 

Division 



Incidental expenses as follows 



Telephone rental and repairs . . 

Stabling horses, East Boston, 
Dorchester, and West Kox- 
bury 

Claims for personal injuries, 
damages to fences and car- 
riages 

Travelling expenses 

Boston directories 

Newspapers for office use , . . . 

Repairing safe in office 

Watering front, No. 12 Beacon 
street 



^40 50 
148 24 



655 20 
3 05 



7 50 



)54 49 



$424 10 
277 47 



17 87 
22 45 
22 00 

6 00 

7 50 

5 00 

$782 39 



Expended 

from Jau, 1, 

1891, to May 1, 

1891. 



161,059 27 

118 12 

5,092 73 

11,549 99 



954 49 



$178,774 60 



Expended 

from May 1, 

1891, to Feb. 1, 

1892. 



515,918 16 

664 38 

16,405 71 



r82 39 



$333,770 64 



Income. 

Amount paid inco the city treasury and credited the Sanitary Division for 
material sold during the year 1891 : 

Sale of ashes 

" " manure 

" " offal 

" " old material 

" " street dirt 
Removal of ashes 
Conveying prisoners 
Use of driveway, Snow's Wharf 

$45,485 29 




304 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount JExpended for the Collection of Iloiise-dirt, House-offal, 
and Cleaning Streets. Labor and Contracts. 



Districts. 



City Proper. . . 
Soutli Boston . 
Enst Boston . . 
Charlestown . . 

Koxbury 

West Koxbury 
Dorchester . . . 
Briuhton 



Totals 



Labor. 
Expended for 
Sweeping the 

Streets from 
Jan. 1, 1891, to 

May 1, 1891. 



f 26. 060 81 
597 60 
360 40 
428 56 
701 SI 



8 50 



i,I63 18 



Labor. 

Expended for 

UoUectiou of 

Ashes from 

Jan. 1, 1891, to 

May 1,1891. 



54,834 69 

l,it94 08 

2,623 37' 

3.432 70 

8,262 41 

1,844 10 

2,144 11 

1,038 66 



B56,174 12 



Labor. 
Expended for 
Ki-moval of 
Hou.seoffal 
from Jan. 1, 
1891, to May 
1, 1891. 



,175 50 
338 00 
,375 00- 
,298 00 
997 87 
,200 00 
,189 00 
375 003 



,948 37 



1 East Boston contract included. 



2 East Boston contract. 



' Brighton contract. 



Districts. 



City Proper. . . 
South Boston 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . 

Roxbury 

West Koxbury. 
Dorchester . . . 
Briffhton. .. . . 



Totals 



From May 1, 

1891, to Feb. 

1, 1892. 



From May 1, 

1891, to Feb. 

1, 1892. 



^63,009 41 
4,156 06 
7,635 86> 
7,852 16 
15,656 76 
4,132 44 
5,575 35 
2,051 44 



.$110,069 48 



From May 1, 

1891, to Feb. 

1, 1892. 



.$39,5S5 23 
5.878 80 
4,125 00» 
5,445 29 
11,763 05 
3,782 80 
9,572 05 
1,125 00' 



!1,277 22 



^ Contract work. 



Street DepXrtment. 



305 



fe 



o 



CO 

o 



<M O 


CD 


CO o 


CO 


CO lO 


>o 


CO CO 


CO 


'^i o 


CD 






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t^ 


O Oi 





<N l^ O 

C<> CO o 

1^- CO o 
•M CD 'O 
O l^ CM 



O O OD 

L^ CO — < 

(M ■>! O 

o GO -r 

l^ L^ lO 



O 



OS 



CO ">! 
CD l^ 

— O 



-M 


-* 


o 


t- 


>o 


^ 


O ^ 


CO 


*-H 


o 


CD 


CD 


(>) 


lO 








CO 


r-H 


CM 


>o 


CO 





t^ kO o 

CO CM O 

CO C5 O 
CjJ Ci uO 
T— CD L^ 



O Ci O 

o ^ t- 

CD -^ — I 

O "O 'Cj 

<Ji Oi iO 



H 

P 
O 
O 

u 

<1 






K ^ © .5> 



*-> 


, 


o 


o 


e>- 




o 


Pi 


;s 


* 


r1 


^ 


o 

CJ 


(» 




->-> 


^1 


p 


o; 


O 


^ 


bJJ 


o 



7 -' /3 

tlj i. <1> O 



bH -s 



|2| 



s 
CJ 7? 



'^ 
a 

cS 

o 2 

" O 
MS 






s 
^' o 

si 



s.^§ 



f^ 



I o 
CO bC 



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w 



y, 
W 






« c =- 
cc i-i P^ 



306 



City Document No. 36. 



Material Collected by Districts. 

From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 





South 
Teams. 

45,388 

5,886 

10,301 


West 
Teams. 

26,388 
4,678 

31,066 


Roxbury 
Teams. 

20,455 
2,925 

23,380 


Chs'n 
Teams. 


E.Bost. 
Teams. 


Brigh'n 
Teams. 


Total 
Loads. 


Ashes 


5,936 
995 


4,157 
" " *960 


1,722 
"'l23 


104,046 


Street-dirt 

House-ofFal . . 


10,564 
15,304 




61,575 


6,931 


5,117 


1,845 


129,914 



From Mat 1, 1891, to Jan. 28, 1892. 



Ashes 


84,958 
23,974 


57,139 



42,399 
7,346 


12,704 
1,201 


9,176 
2,160 


3,042 

277 


209,418 


House-offal 


34,958 


From Jan. 1, 1891, 
to Feb. 1, 1892. . 


108,932 


57,139 


49,745 


13,905 


9,176 
3,120 


3,042 
400 


241,939 
3,520 















Disposition of Blaterial Collected. 



Where Dumped. 


From Jan. 1, 1891,, to 
May 1, 1891. 


From Mat 1, 1891, to Jan. 28, 
1892. 




Loads 
Ashes. 


Loads 
Offal. 

275 
2 


Total 
Loads. 

17,193 

11,116 

46,260 

2,732 

13,917 

2,920 

8,994 

1,191 

104,323 


Loads 

Ashes. 


Loads 
Rot. 


Loads 
Offal. 


Total 
Loads. 


At sea by scows .... 


16,918 

11,116 

46,260 

2,732 

13,917 

2,918 

8,994 

1,191 


50,449 
19,805 
78,115 

1,106 
27,908 

8,128 
17,846 

6,061 


1,383 


1,371 


53,203 
19,805 


Vacant lots 

N Y. & N. E. R.R. . 






78,115 
1,106 








27,908 


Mill Pond (Chs'n;... 
Ward street (Rox.) . 




481 


8,609 

17,846 

6,061 










104,046 


277 


209,418 


1,383 


1,852 


212,653 



Street Department. 



307 



Cost for Carting Material to Dumps. 





From Jan. 1, 1891, to Mat 1, 
1891. 


From Mat 1, 1891, to Jan. 28, 
1892. 




Loads. 


Cost 

per 

Load. 


Total Cost. 


Loads. 


Cost 
pel- 
Load. 


Total Cost. 


Sent to sea . . . 

To all other 

dumps 


17,193 
87,130 


$0 29 
60 


$5,092 73 
53,610 72 


53,203 
159,450 


$ 030 
64 


$16,405 91 
102,433 62 




104,323 




S58,703 45 


212,653 




$118,839 53 



Cost of Blacksmithing and Horse-shoeing. 



HORSE-SHOEING. 
Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891, stock and labor . $1,453 90 
May 1, 1891, to Fub. 1, 1892, " " " . 3,717 74 

Total amount expended thirteen months . $5,171 64 

BLACKSMITHS. 
Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891, stock and labor . $2,732 51 

May 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892, " " " . 4,890 33 

Total amount expended, thirteen months . $7,622 84 

Number of shoes put on. Sanitary Division, Jan. 1 to May 1 
" " " " " May 1 to Feb. 1 
" " " Street-Cleaning Division, May 1 to 
Feb. 1 

Total number of shoes, thirteen months . . 
Cost per shoe, about thirty-eight cents. 

Number of Carts. 

Offal-wagons owned by Sanitary Division .... 
Ash-carts " " " 

" employed by hired horses ..... 

Contracts, carts owned by P. Morrison, East Boston 
Offal-wagons in use by Thomas Mulligan, East Boston 
" " " Allen Clark, Brighton . 



Outside Shops. 

$176 73 

393 57 



$570 30 



44 



Total 



4,533 
6,501 

2,511 
13,545 



79 
162 

5 
5 

2 

253 



Year. 

1884. Ash-carts 

1886. " 

1888. 

1891. 



Cost of Carts. 



$148 00 
142 00 

'107 00 
133 00 



1 Light carts, for Roxbury. 



308 



City Document No. 36. 



Hired Teams. 

From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 





South 
Yard. 


West 
Yard. 


Roxbury 
Yard. 

667 


Charles- 
town 
Yard. 


Total. 


Day's work 


2,799 


584 


641 


4,050 


No. loads collected by 
teams 


22,989 


3,894 


3,397 


30,921 




Amount expended 








$16,043 99 











From Mat 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 1892. 



Day's work 


5,352 
33,730 


1,135^ 

7,882i 


1,672^ 
11,174 


2,882 




No. loads 


55,668 




Amount expended 








$45,505 50 

















Dumping-boats. 





Jan. 1, 1891, 

to 
May 1, 1891. 


May 1, 1891, 

to 
Jan. 1, 1892. 


Total 
Amount. 


Amount expende 


d for royalty ... 

rental 

towing 

wharfage .... 

repairs 

labor 

dredging. . . . 


$1,665 '6o 

1,922 50 

531 25 

698 98 

375 00 


$1,500 00 

3,540 00 

4,379 50 

1,500 00 

1,819 59 

3,068 60 

240 00 

150 00 

208 22 


$1,500 00 
5,205 00 
6,302 00 
2,031 25 
2,418 57 
3,443 60 
240 00 
150 00 




insurance . . . 






incidentals . . 




'>08 "^2 




to sea 








$5,092 73 


$16,405 91 


$21,498 64 


Number of trips 


65 


153 


218 





Street Department. 



309 



Account of the Number of Loads of Material Collected from 1882 to 

Feb. 1, 1892. 



Year. 


Ashes. 


Offal. 


Street- 
sweepiugs. 


Cesspool 
Matter. 


Total Loads. 


1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
188^ 


159,197 
169,610 
182.642 
193,734 
209,129 
220,186 
233,514 
227,325 
245,730 
313,4642 


28,385 
27,408 
28,520 
31,206 
33,170 
36,724 
37,709 
40,183 
40,525 
46,742 


52,381 
68,272 
62,222 
G 1,455 
59,875 
68,990 
68,019 
70,476 
70,449 
10,5643 


10,051 
8,801 
12,578 
13,151 
11,392 
14,333 
5,644i 


250,014 
264,091 
285,962 
299,546 
313,566 
340,233 
344,886 
337,984 


1890 




356,704 


1891 




370,164 










2,154,531 


350,572 


582,703 


75,950 


3,163,150 



• July 1, 1888, the Sewer Department commenced cleaning cesspools. 

2 Ashes from Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1,1891. 104,046 

Ashea from May 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892 209,418 



3 Street-cleaning transferred May 1, 1891, to Street-Cleaning Division. 



■ 313,464 



During the past year there have been conveyed from the several police- 
stations to the city prison, under tlse court house, 8,514 prisoners, for which 
the Board of Police have paid 25 cents per head. 

There have been conveyed during the past year, without charge, county 
prisoners as follows : 



From court house to jail .... 

" jail to court house .... 

" court house to liouse of correction . 
" " to steamer " J. P. Bradlee " 

" Bast Boston to " " 

" " to jail .... 

" jail to East Boston .... 

" East Boston to house of correction . 

" court house to Boston & Albany R.R. 

" South Boston to boat 
" " to jail .... 

*' jail to South Boston 

" South Boston to house of correction 



Total 



2,055 

894 

420 

5,652 

8 

5 

5 

3 

80 

617 

198 

5» 

17 

10,012 



Since Nov. 1, 1891, the work of conveying prisoners from the several 
station-liouses to court house has been done by the Board of Police. One 
horse and one van have been sold to said Board. Two horses and two vans 
have been transferred to the County of Suffolk for conveying county pris- 
oners. 



310 



City Document No. 36. 



Distribution of Hay and Grain. 

Account of Bay, Straw, and Grain fed out and ttsed for Norses of the Street 
Dept., Sanitary Div., from Jan. 1, 1S91. 

South Yard. — Erom Jan. 1, 1891, to Mat 1, 1891. 

Sanitary Horses, 14,760. 



Hay .. 

Meal . . 
Oats . . 
Shorts 
Corn . . 
Carrots 
Straw . 



Bales, 



720 



112 



Bushels. 



1,610 
4,142^^ 



668 



Lbs. 



136,653 
80,700 

132,560 

12,600 

37,408 

2,500 

29,106 



431,527 



Amount. 



$1,048 22 

1,142 50 

2,368 75 

158 88 

504 48 

20 00 

276 56 



),519 39 



Cost 
per Horse 
per Day. 



•^'147 6 

07x 092 .0 

.163^1^ 

.01-U-iJa 

.036iJLa 

.00^^^ 



Lbs. 
per Horse 
per Day. 



09-25-13- 

•"^1 47(i0 

.Oo-aa-QA 

.OS-LAAAH 
.001-2£J1 

_Q0 78a8 

.00^^^ 

,0lJ-434S 



0Q_b4_al_ 
•'^''I476t) 



From May 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 1892. 
Sanitary Horses, 18,228; Street-cleaning Horses, 6,543. 



Hay 


1,205 


"' 1,524 
10,240 


293,113 

76,463 

327,680 

18,000 

70,655 

86,912 

6,215 

200 


$2,458 66 

1,125 16 

5,261 38 

205 50 

646 99 

1,201 62 

40 93 

15 00 


002^422 

•'^•'24827 
_04J.iJ2im 

.00^^^^^ 

09ii'>0 4S 
.0420££A 

".00^^-^ 
.OOa'Wr 


iijUL&xe. 




.03iii-a2 


Oats 




.131i2i 


Shorts 




00 1 fi " f 


Straw 


277 


"1,452 


09-^flO' 

.03JJ-A^i 






.00^15. 


Eno". ^Q<T. Food . 


Ibbl. 




.OO^iJ^ 
















879,238 


$10,955 24 


•*^24827 


q4JLL43X 
•0*24827 



West Yard. — From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 
120 Days, 9,912 Horses. 



Hay 


1,011 


992 
3 098 


187,677 
49,600 
99,136 
12,S00 
27,030 
1,680 


$1,283 04 

684 20 

1,787 53 

160 90 

244 59 

25 80 


190360 
••'-no"i 2 

_0fi8!UH 

.18'''" 

_0lfil7S 

_02AJ^''^ 


1 QPJlSlI 


Meal 


.05''" 


Oats 




10'" 


Shorts 




012888 


Straw 


105 


'36 


09liilS 


Corn 


.OOiSf^ 


Carrots 






Peat iTioss 


23 





1.800 
379,723 


11 25 


•ooiiff 

49:! 4 27, 


.OO^S-an 




$4,197 31 


•38b-^J 



Street Department. 



311 



From May 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 1892. 
Sanitary Jlorses, 12,221; Street- cleaning Horses, 7,077. 





Bales. 


Bushels. 


Lbs. 


Amount. 


Cost per 

Horse 

per Day. 


Lbs. per 

Horse 
per D.ay. 


Hay 


1,356 


520 
7,375 

286 


242,712 

26,241 

235,900 

11,950 

58,409 

15,976 

6,085 

1,200 


f2,169 73 

465 14 

3,816 33 

141 06 

541 76 

228 30 

40 07 

90 00 


1 i-4jia5_ 

•^'19298 

.02^-Li' 

'Oo-Li^l-^ 

Qoi .'j.Tsn 

.013532 

.00^^ 

.oo^^*^ 

•38lf-|9^ 


1 911-1.3 & 


Meal 


010943 


Oats 




\2*?i3J. 


Shorts 


242 


00 1 4 1 6 


Straw 

Corn 


Q9) fi.'JSil 
01^5.1^ 


Carrots 




00* "°7 


Eng. Veg. Food. . . . 


6 bbls. 




001200 
















598,473 


$7,492 39 


■oo-Mi-h 



Highland Yard. — From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 
Sanitary Horses, 5,928. 



Hay 


337 


296 
2,430 


87,766 
14,800 
77,768 
4,900 
8,070 
10,080 


$685 20 

204 88 

1,448 73 

58 75 

73 64 

134 00 


1 1 3 312 
•^'.'5928 
.032704 

. 24.?-^-5-i.. 

.OOi^ii 

.OlLiajl 

091 544 


■mm 

092 944 


Meal 


Oats 




13704 


Shorts 




00^-^" 


Straw 


35 


180 


012142 


Corn ... 


014153. 














203,384 


$2,605 20 


•43|iM 


•^*5928 



From May 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 1892. 
Sanitary Horses, 10,769 ; Street-cleaning Horses, 980. 



Hay .. 
Meal . . 
Oats . 
Shorts 
Straw . 
Corn . . 
Carrots 



867 



78 



420 
3,984 



355 



172,433 

21,044 

127,488 

9,700 

21,070 

19,880 

5,720 



377,335 




• '*1 1 749 

.Oiiuia.5 
.lO^'i-S-^ 

.OOAMU 
.012.3.21 
.Ol&liii 
.00^1^ 

59_13ii.7_ 
•^-1 1749 



Charlestown Yard. — From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 
Horses, 2,135. 



Hay 

Meal 


149 


210 
720 


30,136 

10,500 

24,040 

2,910 

4,939 


$201 .30 

147 93 

401 80 

35 25 

44 44 


oq ii> Ai 

•"•^ 2 13 5 

.06 ^-aa 

.18^^^ 
OiiSflU 

.021^* 


•H-A¥5- 
.041-aia. 


Oats 




.]]5.aA 


Shorts 




.01^-5^ 


Straw 


19 




.02^^^ 








72,525 


$830 72 


0,Q 2 (La 2. 
•^02135 


a'-i2ivrj) 

■^•'2135 



312 



City Document No. 36. 



From Mat 1, 1891, to Jan. 1, 1892. 
Sanitary Horses, 3,702; Street-cleaning Horses, 1,057 ; Total, 4,762. 





Bales. 


Bushels. 


Lbs. 


Amount. 


Cost per 

UorFe 
per Day. 


Lbs. per 

Horse 
per Day. 


Hay 


390 


220 
1,906 


78.148 

11,000 

60,992 

4,028 

10,76] 

4,760 

1,820 


$642 42 
158 30 
984 81 
45 58 
96 74 
64 8D 
11 38 


•'04782 

.20^^-^^ 

•' '^'4 7(12 

02 ^^^ 

;oiii2x 

.00JLi3£ 

4 9-iilS- 


164 #55 


Meal 


.02-1-iii 


Oats 




]23848 


Shorts 




.OO'ID^S 


Straw 


49 


85 


021337 


Corn 


.004l#9 


Carrots 




.001S2.0 
















171,509 


$2,004 12 


■36tH2 



Brighton Yard. 



•From Jan. 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891. 
Horses, 240. 



Hav 


17 


117 


3,427 
3.744 

787 

7,958 


$27 42 

68 6(» 

7 24 

$103 26 


• ' ' 2 4 (1 

,9fji4_e. 
!03A 


14-,^/^ 


Oats 


•■■^24(1 


Straw 


3 


03^^ 












■^Hh 


.33-23,^ 



From Mat 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892. 
- 1 

Hay I 

Oats [- Included in the account of the South Yard. 

Straw I 

J 



HoUSE-OFFAL. 

There are employed in removing house-offal 150 men and 79 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses tln'ee times 
a week during the summer months, and twice a week during the 
winter; from hotels, markets, and restaurants it is removed 
daily. There are 62 routes. The men are required to enter the 
yards, coUcct the offal, and empty the same into wagons ; then to 
drive to one of the depots owned by the city. There are three 
offal depots, loc.nted as follows: one on Albany- street, one on 
Highland street, Roxbury, and one at the Almsliouse, Cliarles- 
town. The offal is sold to farmers of adjoining towns, who pur- 
chase a ticket of the offal clerk for the quantity tliey want; the 
ticket is tlien taken to the clerk in charge of tiie dump, and he 
measures out the quantity the ticket calls for; the ticket is 
punched and returned at night to the clerk it was purchased of, 
who makes out his daily account from the tickets sold. 



Street Department. 



313 



House-dirt and Ashes. 

There are employed in the collection and removal of house- 
dirt and ashes 195 men and 162 carts, with two men to each 
team. This material is removed from hotels, tenement-honses, 
and stores daily ; from dwelling-houses once a week. There are 
82 regular routes. The ordinance requires that house-dirt and 
ashes shall be kept in an easy place for removal. The men are 
required to enter the yards and remove the vessels of ashes, 
place them upon the sidewalks ; the teams follow and are loaded ; 
the empty vessels are returned to their original position in the 
yard. There are employed 8 sub- foremen and 12 dumpers. 

The ashes are sold and used for filling purposes. 

Foremen, Mechanics, Watchmen, etc. 

There are 4 district foremen ; 15 mechanics who are employed in 
painting and manufacturing and repairing carts, wagons, sleds, 
and harnesses, and shoeing horses ; 5 watchmen and 4 feeders. 



Horse Account. 



1891. 






Dr. 


1891. 




Cr. 


Jan. ]. 


On 


hand 


274 


Feb. 


Killed 


1 


Apr. 3. 


Pu 


rchased 


2 


Mar. 12. 


Died 


1 


Apr. 7. 






4 


Mar. 25. 


" 


1 


Nov. 27. 






2 


Mar. 25. 


Killed 


4 


Dec. 3. 






2 


Mar. 31. 


" 


1 


Dec. 10. 






2 


May 1. 


Transferred to Street- 




Dec. U. 






2 




Cleanina: Division 


67 


Dec. 21. 






2 


May 11. 
May 16. 
July 15. 
Aug. 19. 
Aug. 28. 
Dec. 23. 
1892. 


Exch'd W. K. Porter 
Killed 

Died 

Exch'd W. K. Porter 


6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
5 








290 


Jan. 1. 


On hand 


199 


Total 


Total 


290 



314 City Document No. 36. 



Schedule of City Property at the South, West, Rox- 

BURY, AND ChARLESTOWN StABLES. 

199 Horses. 

196 Harnesses, double and single. 
196 Woollen blankets. 
32 Car',)et blankets. 
6 Buffalo robes. 

Stock and tools in harness shop .S270 00 worth. 

Tools in blacksmith shop 400 00 

Blacksmith stock, iron and steel 3,000 00 

Tools in wheelwright shop 115 00 

Stock in wheelwright shop 5,175 00 

Stock and tools in paint shop 261 75 

Hay, straw, corn, oats, etc 2,083 00 

162 Carts for collecting ashes. 
79 One-horse wagons for collecting house-offal. 

4 One-horse cesspool wagons. 

5 Express wagons. 
8 Old open wagons. 

6 Top biaggies. 

2 Two-seated wagons (new). 

3 Vehicles for conveying prisoners. 
1 Hay-rigging. 
5 Market wagons. 

215 Sleds for conveying ashes and offal. 
8 Sleighs. 

4 Pungs. 
122 Snow-drags. 

1 Demerritt cart. 
1 Dumping-barge. 
219 Cart-covers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George W. Forristall, 

Deputy /SupeKi7itendent. 



Street Department. 315 



APPENDIX D. 



EEPOET OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SEWER DIVISION. 



Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets of the City 
of Boston : 

Sir : The following report of the expenses, income, and 
business of the Street Department, Sewer Division, from 
Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892, together with a few sugges- 
tions on subjects which should receive attention, is respect- 
fully submitted : 

A large amount of work was done, in sewer construction, 
in this division the past year ; but it comprises but a small 
part of the present needs of the city in this direction. 
These needs can only be satisfied by liberal appropriations, 
which would unquestionably be sanctioned by the citizens 
generally, if they could be made thoroughly conversant with 
the subject. No subject is of greater importance to a large 
and densely populated city than that of sewerage. The old 
and imperfect sewers, mostly in the older and more thickly 
settled districts, are in many cases nothing more than 
elongated cesspools, and are such a menace to the health of 
the public that they should be rebuilt without delay. In 
the rapidly growing districts there is a great demand for 
new sewers, which should be heeded, as it is shown re- 
peatedly that the failure to build sewers petitioned for 
has greatly delayed the development of these localities, and 
consequently prevented the great increase in valuation 
which would have resulted. The policy advocated by this 
department, to be pursued in sewering the suburban dis- 
tricts, differs from that of our predecessors in respect to the 
right and policy of using the natural watercourses for pur- 
pose of sewer overflows instead of for surface drainage only 
as a part of a separate system. The reason for the present 
policy is as follows : By the method now advocated the 
brooks would escape the worst of the street-washings, which 
would be carried off by the sewers before they would beo^in 
to overflow, but would receive a slight contamination from 
sewage ; slight, because the volume of sewage is ex- 



316 City Document No. 3ij. 

tremcl y sm:ill compared to the volume of storm-water. The 
brooks are hound to carry dirty water in either case, as soon 
as the district is built up ; there does not seem to be much 
choice, certainly not enough to warrant the expense and 
inconvenience of a double system of sewers. 

Though a choice of evils, the evil in either case is small, 
for this reason, that, whether it be foul street-wash or dilute 
sewage which the brook receives, it is received at the 
beginning of the storm and followed by a flood of clear 
water which will sweep it away. 

Whatever may be the result of such method, I firml}- 
believe that it is the only thing for the city to adopt, and so 
far as the city may be liable for damage, it seems to me that 
the case of Merrifield v. Worcester, 110 Mass. Reports, 
page 216, shows that the city would not necessarily be so 
liable. In that case, the plaintiff sued for an alleged viola- 
tion of his rights as riparian proprietor, upon a small natural 
stream running through the city of Worcester, near its 
centre. The injury complained of was that of polluting its 
waters so as to render it unfit for mechanical and other pur- 
poses, to which the plaintiff' had been accustomed to apply it. 
He alleged generally that "the defendant in 1861, and on 
divers days and times after that time, had cast, and caused to 
be cast, carried, and deposited into said brook above the 
plaintiff's works, great quantities of filth, dirt, gravel, refuse 
and material matters discharged from sewers, privies, water- 
closets, stables, sinks, and streets, and divers other noxious 
materials and ingredients." 

The Court in this case say : 

"The case, then, presents the question upon what grounds 
and to what extent a city is responsible in damages for such 
effects produced by its system of drainage, or by the man- 
ner in which its drains are used and managed. The right, 
of which the plaintiff alleges a violation, is not that of ac- 
quired property in possession. It is not an absolute right, 
but a natural one, qualified and limited, like all natural 
rights, by the existence of like rights in others. It is inci- 
dent merely to his ownership of land through which the 
stream has its course. As such owner, he has the right to 
enjoy the continued flow of the stream, to use its force, and 
to make limited and temporary appropriation of its waters. 
These rights are held in common with all others having land 
bordering upon the same stream ; but his enjoyment nmst 
necessarily be according to his opportunity, prior to those 
below him, subsequent to those above. It follows that all 
such rights are liable to be modified and abridged in the en- 
joyment, by the exercise by others of their own rights ; and, 



Street Department. 317 

so far as they are thus abridged, the loss is damnum absque 
injuria. The only limit that can be set to this abridgment 
through the exercise by others of their natural rights, is in 
the standard or measure of reasonable use. 

" So the natural right of the plaintiff to have the water 
descend to him in its pure state, fit to be used for the various 
purposes to which he may have occasion to apply to it, 
must yield to the equal right in those who happen to be 
above him. Their use of the stream for mill purposes, for 
irrigation, watering cattle, and the manifold purposes for 
which they may lawfully use it, will tend to render the 
water more or less impure. Cultivating and fertilizing tlie 
lands bordering on the stream, and in which are its sources, 
their occupation by farm-houses and other erections, will 
unavoidably cause impurities to be carried into the stream. 
As the lands are subdivided and their occupation and use 
become multifarious, these causes will be rendered more 
operative, and their effects more perceptible. The water 
may thus be rendered unfit for many uses for which it had 
been before suitable ; but so far as that condition results 
only from reasonable use of the stream in accordance with 
the common right, the lower riparian proprietor has no 
remedy. 

"When the population becomes dense, and towns or villages 
gather along its banks, the stream naturally and necessarily 
suffers still greater deterioration. Roads and streets cross- 
ing it, or running by its side, with their gutters and sluices 
discharging into it their surface-water collected from large 
spaces, and carrying with it in suspension the loose and 
light material that is thus swept off, are abundant sources 
of impurity, against which the law affords no redress by 
action." 

The foregoing is the language of the Supreme Court of 
this State. I claim that such use of the brooks as is now 
recommended could be shown to be only " reasonable use " 
within the meaning of the Court, and that altogether too 
much weight has been given to the fact that a smaTl quantity 
of sewage would be unavoidably carried into the brooks by 
the first overflow. It is not necessary to be able to assert 
that there is absolutely no sewage in the overflow from the 
sewer ; it will be sufficient to show that the brooks are not 
unreasonably defiled, more than they would be by the 
naturally dirty water from a settled district ; that there is no 
permanent sewage contamination. Certainly this technical 
point about a mere trifle of sewage ought not to be held to 
be of sufficient importance to force the city into buildino- a 
complete separate system. 



318 City Document No. 36. 

Parties continue to violate the ordinance whicli proliibits 
the exhausting of steam into the sewers. To secure com- 
pliance with the ordinance it is necessary first to identify 
the offenders, usually the most difficult part of the under- 
taking. In many cases the steam has been traced to its 
source, notice served upon the parties offending, and the 
nuisance abated ; many more cases will follow. 

Another vexed question is that of proper disposal of roof- 
water. 

Section 101 of Chapter 374 of the Acts of 1885 requires 
that " all water shall be conducted from a building or from 
land to the street, gutter, or sewer, in such a manner as not 
to flow upon the sidewalk." It is impracticable to convey 
this water to the street or gutter without its flowing over 
the sidewalk on account of its freezing in winter and filling 
up its channel with ice, whether that channel is open or 
covered. When the law is enforced, the usual and only 
practicable expedient, where there is a sewer, is to connect 
the leaders with the house-drain. Unless a trap is inter- 
posed between this point of connection and the sewer, this 
method is objectionable, for the reason that the leaders will 
conduct the gases from the sewer to the upper windows of 
the houses. It is also objectionable in those low districts 
where separate systems of sewers have to be built large 
enough to store the sewage during periods when the height 
of tide prevents discharge, as the volume of roof-water is 
about twelve times that of the sewage proper. Whenever 
there is a catch-basin near by, the leaders can be connected 
with it, and this is a very satisfactory arrangement. But 
catch-basins are several hundred feet apart, and can serve 
but few houses in this way. These considerations naturally 
lead to the suggestion that a pipe might be laid under the 
gutter to connect the catch-basin and furnish a continuous 
channel into which the leaders from the roofs could dis- 
charge, and if this pipe were laid deep enough to prevent 
freezing no further trouble ^vould ensue. In districts where 
the sewers are built on the combined principle, taking storm- 
water from the streets as well as sewage, these pipes could 
be small ; in those districts where a separate system of sewers 
is built to take house sewage only, these pipes could be larger, 
and could be developed into the system of surface-drains, 
which is the necessary complement of a separate system. 
The only objection to this proposition is on account of the 
cost ; but the city cannot wholly escape expense in dealing 
with this roof-water problem, — it is sued every year for 
large sums for personal injuries from icy sidewalks. 

Sewer assessments, covering the period from»Ian. 1, 1891, 



Street Department. 319 

to Feb. 1, 1892, to the amount of $59,104.06, have been 
made and determined by the Deputy Superintendent of the 
Sewer Division, in accordance with the Acts and Resolves of 
the Legishiture. 

Bills for sewer assessments amounting to $21,025.53 have 
been sent to the City Collector for collection. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $3,072.00 have been col- 
lected (from estates upon which no assessment was ever 
levied) in accordance with the ordinances of the city of 
Boston. Twenty-four hundred and eighty-six permits have 
been granted to drain-layers to connect house-drains with 
the sewers, or to repair old drains; and the work done under 
these permits has been duly inspected. 

Following are tables showing the financial exhibit of the 
division, the detailed record of sewers built, the rainfall as 
gauged at the Albany-street yard, schedule of property, 
report of pumping done during the year, etc. 



320 



City Document No. 36. 



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322 



City Document No. 36. 



Balanoea 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 

1892. 


(35 <0 

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Expenditures 

during 
the 9 mouths 

ending 
Jun. 31, 1892. 


$490,832 54 
1,208 19 
1,000 00 
2,925 70 


1,000 00 
432 00 
579 19 

1,250 00 

4.143 12 

865 31 

15 29 

3,976 17 

160 50 

29,585 04 

1,024 00 


Amounts at 
tlie disposal 
of the Sewer 
Div'n during 
the 9 months 

ending 
J^n. 31, 1892, 


$534,870 52 
1,211 83 
1,000 00 
5,200 00 
1,046 97 
1,000 00 
432 00 
679 19 
1,250 00 

6,000 00 

S65 31 

450 00 

10,000 00 

160 50 

89,650 CO 

1,024 00 


Approprfa. 

tions and 

Revenue 

added during 

the 9 months 

ending 
Jan. 31, 1892, 


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Balanoea 

on hand 

Apr. 30, 

1891, 


































Expenditures 

during 
the 4 months 

ending 
Apr. 30, 1891, 


€6' 
































Amounts at 
the disposal 
of the Sewer 
Dept. during 
the 4 months 

ending 
Apr. 30, 1891. 


•a 
































Appropria- 
tions ^nd 
Revenue 
added during 
the 4 months 

endipg 
Apr, 30, 1891. 


o 

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Balances 

on hand 

Jan. 1, 

1891, 


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324 



City Document No. 36. 



Improved Sewerage Maintenance. 



Office expenses 
Pumping-station, inside 

" outside 

Engines and boilers 
Main and intercepting sewers 
Moon Island 
Tow-boat . . . . 



11,067 96 
43,0.58 86 
16,583 50 

6,813 82 
10.575 59 
10,611 61 

4,719 00 



,430 34 



Stony-brook Improvement. 



Damages and claims 
Koslindale channels 



$3,082 44 
20,347 30 

$23,429 74 



Miscellaneous. 

Office expenses, including salaries of deputy 
superintendent, clerks, and draughtsmen 
stationery, drawing materials, etc. 

Engineering expenses, including salaries of 
engineers, instruments, etc. 

Current expenses of eight yards and lockers 

Current expenses of seven stables, including 
cost of horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc. 

Repairing sewers ..... 

Cleaning and flushing sewers 

Cleaning catch-basins .... 

Repairing streets ..... 

Building and repairing culverts and surftice 
drains ...... 

Examining and locating 

Dredging ...... 

Maintenance Stony brook 

AVork for departments and others . 

House fonnections .... 

Water-rates ...... 

Drainage privileges .... 

Damages and claims .... 

Holidays ...... 

Travelling and incidental expenses 

Aiiioicnt carried forward. 



$19,588 69 

21,282 11 
22,110 72 

27,656 16 

7,268 53 

16,884 42 

39,593 28 

463 16 

19,733 07 
6,826 05 
1,080 00 

13,071 65 
7,064 51 
4,986 74 
8,724 83 
900 00 
5,757 80 

18,846 73 
3.031 95 

$244,870 40 



Street Department. 



325 



A.7)iount hroiight forward^ 
Balances on old contracts 
Repairs of department buildings, stables, and 

yards ..... 
Hardware, blacksmithing, and tools 
Rubber goods .... 
Engines and boilers 
Stock and supplies not included elsewhere 



$244,870 40 
163 31 

2,527 22 

12,001 77 

1,380 70 

826 36 

4,444 49 

$266,214 25 



Recapitulation. 



City Proper . 
Charlestown . 
Brighton 
East Boston . 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 



Sewers. 



$17,035 97 

9,946 22 

13,873 32 

78,188 41 
5,465 00 
68,197 
67,245 
50,472 



36 
91 

38 



Catch- Basins. 


City Proper . . 


$5,010 79 


Charlestown . 


1,181 85 


Brio;hton 


1,239 86 


East Boston . 


4,508 iiS 


South Boston 


1,794 35 


Dorchester 


2,358 05 


Roxbury 


6,113 03 


West Roxbury 


1,653 09 



Improved Sewerage Maintenance 
Stony- brook Improvement 
Miscellaneous 



$310,424 57 



23,859 70 

93,430 34 

23,429 74 

266,214 25 



$717,358 60 



326 



City Document No. 36. 






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328 



City Document No. 36. 



City Proper. 

Surface Drains built between Jan. 1, 1891, and Feb. 1, 1892, by the City. 



Locality. 


Length in 
feet. 


Dimensions 


Built in. 


Between. 


and material. 


Huntiiiiiton ave. 

State stT 

Tremont st 

Tremont st 


Garrison st. and VV. Newton st. . . 
Atlantic ave. and Commercial st. 
Mason st. and West st 

West St. and Temple pi 


179.00 
652.62 
289.00 
88.90 
247.95 


12-in., pipe. 
18-in., pipe. 
r2-in., pipe. 
10-iu., pipe. 
10-in., pipe. 




Total , . . 


1,457.47 





The cost of this work is included in the -expenditure on account of building catch- 
basins, etc. 



Work Done for an 


d Paid by Paving? Division, 


City. 




Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewees. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length 
in Feet. 


Size. 


Cleveland place . 










28.12 
290. 

85.90 


12-in. pipe 
15-in. pipe 


Bedford street .... 
Wendell street 


3 

1 








Wareliam street. . . 


2 


2 
2 
8 
2 




2 
2 
2 

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2 

7 
2 


Columbus avenue. 
East Con cord street 
East Newton street 










8 
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Scotia street 


3 


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22 

7 
1 

1 

13 

2 

1 

8 


1 








Tremont street. . . . 
Camden street.... 
Charles street 


7 
2 
2 




Seneca street 

Lono'wood avenue. 






Troy street ...... 






Fulton street 


2 





Work done for Paving Division, 

Summary. 
22 catch-basins built. 
79 " repaired. 

1 manhole built. 
19 manholes repaired. 
409.02 feet of sewers built. 



City. 



Street Department. 



329 






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330 City Document No. 36. 

Work done for and Paid by Paving Division, Charlestown. 





Catce-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewebs. 


Street. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length in 
Feet. 


Size. 


Medford street. . . . 


2 
2 


6 




1 


239 




Hill street 






12-in. pipe 


Rutherford avenue 


3 


1 







Summary. 



7 catch-basins built. 
7 " repaired. 

1 manhole " 

239 feet of sewers built. 



Street Department. 



331 



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332 



City Document No. 36. 









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Street Department. 



333 



Work clone for and Paid by Paving- Division, East Boston. 





Catch-Basin. 


Manholes. 


Seweks. 


Street. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length in 
Feet. 


Size. 


Jeffries street .... 




2 




1 






Terrace place . . . ■ 




42.5 


12-in. 















Summary 



2 catch-busins repaired. 
1 manhole " 

42.5 feet of sewers built. 






City Document Xo. 36. 









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336 



City DocUxMent No. 3(5. 



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XX 









Street Department. 



337 



Brighton. 

Ctdverts built between Jan. 1, 1891, and Feb. i, 1892, by the City, either 
by Contract or by Day Labor 



Locality. 










Length in 


Dimensions and 






Feet. 


Material. 


Built in 


Between 






Dustin street . . . 


Near N. Beacon street . 


40.56 


5 ft. X 5 ft., stone. 


Hobart street . . . 


Near Fane nil street . , 


44.25 


6 ft. wide X 7 ft. 6 in. 
high, stone with brick 
arch. 


Lake street .... 


Near Washington street. 


40.00 


5 ft. wide X 5 ft. 11 in. 
high, stone, double 
culvert. 


Lake street .... 


Near Chandler's pond , 


43.85 


4 ft. 6 in. wide X 4 ft. 
11 in. high, stone, 
double culvert. 


Oakland street . . 


Near Faneuil street . . 


39.50 


6 ft. wide X 5 ft. 6 in. 
high, stone with 20 ft. 
of brick arch, double 




Total 




culvert. 




208.16 





The cost of this work is included in the amount expended for building culverts, etc. 

Work done for and Paid by Paving Division, Brighton. 



street. 


Oatch-Basins. 


Culverts. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Lake street 


4 
2 




40 ft. 5 ft. X 5 ft. 11 in., stone. 


Murdock street 


43.85 ft. 4 ft. 6 in. X 4 ft. 11 in., 
stone. 



Summary. 

6 catch-basins built. 

83.85 feet of culverts built. 



338 



City Document No. 36. 



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Street Department. 339 

Work done for and Paid by Paving- Division, South Boston. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewers. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length 
in feet. 


Size. 


Preble street 


5 
6 
2 








840.36 
347.13 


10-in. pipe. 


First street 

A street 




2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


4 


Mercer street 

Fourth street 


1 
























1 
3 
5 
3 
2 


1 




Second street .... 
Dorchester street. 

Ninth street 

Washburn street. . 
Gustin street 


12-in. pipe. 













Summary. 

28 catch- basins built. 

1 catch-basin repaired. 

7 manholes built. 

4 " repaired. 

1,187.49 feet of sewers built. 



340 



City Document No. 36. 



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342 



City Document No. 36. 



Dorchester. 

Sewers built between Jan. 1, 1S91, and Feb. 1, 1S92, by Private Parties. 



L0CAI.ITY. 



Built in 



Alo^onqnin and ) 
J3radlce sts. . . J 

Bourneside ave. . . 

Colonial ave 

Hall St 

Intei'vale park . . . 

Julian ave 

Morse st 

Moultrie st 

Newport St. and ) 

IIarl)or View st. J 

Nightingale st. . . . 

Northern ave. . . . 

Private land and 
Baker pi. ... 

Private street, estate 

of Ford . 
Rill St. . . 
Saco St. . . 

School st. . 

Seaborn st. 
Kenwood st. 

Shenandoah st. . 
Southern ave. 



Between 



School and Washington f 
sts 1 

Park St. and Melville ave. ] 

Talbot and New England | 
aves I 

Dorchester ave. and Ad- 
ams st 

Bourneside and Melville 
aves 

Dorchester-brook sewer 
and Howard ave. . . . 

Washington st. and Mt. 
Bowdoin ave 

Seaborn st. and Church pi. 

Existing sewer and exist- 
ing sewer 

Tall)ot ave. and Bernard f 
st I 

Whitfield and Washing- | 
ton sts j 

Dorchester-brook sewer 
at N.Y. & N.E. ii.R. 
and Bird st 

Bird st. and end of street. 
Present sewer and VVare st 
Dorchester intercepting 

sewer and Neponsct ave. 
Harvard and Washing- f 

ton sts. . .' I 

Centre and Kenwood sts. 
Allstou a-.id Washington 

sts 

Carruth st. and Shawmut 

Branch LMl 

Talbot ave. and Washin: 

ton st 

Total .... 



Length 
in feet. 



244.85 
1,454.42 
469.00 
232.22 
750 51 
220.17 

833.97 

738.88 

275.65 

200.45 
275.00 

76.00 
520.20 
574.45 
224.00 
444.78 

108.15 
5.50 



155.00 
54.00 

188.30 
513.75 
463.60 
954.27 

18.00 

362.50 

371.95 



10,729.57 



Dimensions 

and 

Material. 



1.5-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
15-in., pipe. 
r2-in., pipe. 
15-in., pipe. 
12-iu., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 

10-in.,pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 
12 in., pipe. 
15-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
10- in., pipe. 

15-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 
15-in., piiie. 
r2-in., pipe. 
r2-in., pipe. 

8-in., pipe. 

10-in., pipe. 

12-in., pipe. 



Remarks. 



Rock. 



Rock. 



Rock. 



Rock. 



Rock. 
Rock. 



Rock. 



Rock. 



Street Department. 



343 



Dorchester. 

Surface Drains and Culverts built betiveen Jan. I, 1891, a?id Feb. 1, 1892, 
by the City, either by Contract or Day Labor. 



Locality. 



Built in 



Between 



r.eno'th 
in Feet. 



Dimensions and 
M aterial. 



Bailey st., near Hill- 
side terrace . . . 

Bay St., private land ] 

Spi inodale st. and > 
Bath ave. ... J 

Blue Hill ave. anil 
Norfolk st 

Blue Hill ave., near 
Harvard st. ... 

Carrutli st., near Cod- 
man st 

Centre st., near Sea- 
born st 

Dorchester ave., near 
Van Winkle st. 

Dorchester ave., near 
Kinjr st 

Fuller St., near Hill- 
side terrace .... 



Midland st. and Savin Hill 
ave 



40.00 



128. or 
614.33 



4 ft. X 3 ft. 5 in., stone. 

30-in. .circular iron pipe. 
30-in., circular, brick. 



25.00ll0-in., pipe. 



Geneva ave. and 
Westville st. . . . 

Harvard St., near Blue 
Hill ave 

Private land .... 



Bowdoin and Ditson sts. 



Private land. 



Crusher yard and Rossetter 
st 

River st. and Neponset ave. 



85.00 

72.00 

40.00 

60.00 

60.00 

40.00 

f 325 00 
I 530.00 

45.00 

162.80 
J 195.00 
I 12.00 

2,434.13 



5 ft. X 4 ft. 5 in., stone. 

5 ft. X 5 ft., stone. 

3 ft, X 3 ft. 5 in., stone. 

4 ft. X 3 ft. 5 in., stone. 

4 ft. 6 in. X 4 ft. 11 in., 
stone. 

40 ft. or4 ft. X 3 ft. 5 in., 

stone. 
24-in., pipe. 
18-in., pipe. 

5 ft. X 4 ft. 5 in., stone. 

12-in., pipe. 
18-in , pipe. 
20-in., iron pipe. 



The cost of this work is included in the amount expended for building culverts, etc 

Work done for and Paid by Paving^ Division, Dorchester. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Surface Drains and 
oulvkbts. 




Basin. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length 
in feet. 


Size. 


Ocean street 


2 
6 
3 
4 

2 




44.00 
517.5 


12 in., pipe. 


Minot street . ... 




- 


1 
4 


Buslinell street. 








Boston and Har- 
vest streets 






f4ft. 6in. 
1 3 ft. 6 in. 
\ 3 ft. 
[^Circular. 













Summary. 
17 catch-basins built. 
5 manholes repaired. 
561.5 feet of sewers, surface drains, etc., built. 



344 



City Document No. 36. 






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34(3 



City Document No. 36. 



Roxlmry. 

Sewers built between Jan. 1, 1891, and Feb. 1, 1892, by Private Parties, 



Locality. 


Leng^th 
in feet. 


Dimensions and 


Built in 


Between 


Material. 


Avon place . . 
Caleilouia st. . . 
Dimock st. . . . 

Galena st. ... 

Gayland ave. . . 
Howland st. . . . 


Extension of old sewer .... 
Parker st. and W. Chester park . 
Amory st. and Brunswick ave. . 

Gaston st. and Holborn st. . . . 

Judson st. and W. Cottage st. . 
Extension 


70.00 

245.05 

277.45 

f 699 20 

33.20 
100.00 
195.20 
293.00 
210.35 

50 00 
413.00 


12-in., pipe. 
15-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
15-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
10-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 
12-in., pipe. 


Julian ave. . . . 
Jiidsou St. ... 
Mt. Pleasant ave. 
Private st. ... 


Dor. Brook sewer and Rand sq., 
Julian ave. and Gayland ave. . . 
End oi old sewer and Vine st. . 
Blue Hill ave. and Gaston st. . . 




2,586.45 





Work Done for and Paid by Paving Division, Roxbury. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Retaining 
Wall. 


Manholes 
Repaired. 


Sewers. 


Built. 


Repaired . 


Length 
in Feet. 


Size. 


Dudley st 

Cabot St. . 

Haskins st 


10 

10 

2 




9 
4 

2 


201.80 




Fulda st 


2 
3 

1 




Terrace st 

Warren st 

Shirley st 

Howland st 

Albany st 

Centre st 




Texas st 








10-in., pipe 


Parker st 


18 




170 ft. 









Summary. 



30 calch-basins built. 
22 " repaired. 

170 feet retaining-wall. 
15 manholes repaii-ed. 
201.80 feet of sewers built. 



Street Department. 



347 






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348 



City Document No. 36. 



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349 



West Roxbury. 

Surface Drains and Culverts built between Jan. 1, 1891, and Feb. 1, 
1892, by the City, either by Contract or Day Labor. 



L OCALITT. 


Length in 
leet. 


Dimensions and 


Built in 


Between 


Material. 


Allandale street near 
ihe Sprin"' .... 




40 00 

194.00 
40,00 
65.00 

41.00 

40.00 

436.00 

350.00 

73.00 


3 ft 6 in. X 3 ft 11 in 


Allandale st., lower 
brook 




stone. 
18-in., pipe. 

3 ft. 6 in, X 3 ft., stone. 
15-in., pipe. 

4 ft X 3 ft. 5 in. stone 


Dale street .... 




Maj'nard street . . . 




Cornell street, near 
Wash in "'ton . . . 




Linnet street .... 




4 ft. X 3 ft 6 in stone 


South street .... 
Sprinf^ street .... 


Hall St., southwesterly 


15-in-, pipe. 
12 in., pipe. 

4 It. X 3 ft 11 in stone 


Sycamore and Flor- 
ence streets . . . 












1,279.00 





The cost of this work is included in the amount expended for building culverts, etc. 

Work done for and Paid by Paving Division, West 
Roxbury. 



Street. 


Culverts. 


Sewbk. 


Length in 

Feet. 


Size. 


Cornell street 

S3'camore & Eidge \ 
streets J 

Allandale street. . -j 

Shirley street 

Maynard street 

Call street 


41 ft. 3 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft. 11 in., stone. 

73 ft., 4 ft. X 3 ft. 11 in., stone. 

199ft., 18 in., pipe. 
40ft.,3ft. 6in.X3ft. 11 in., stone. 
40 ft., 2 ft. 6 in. X 2 ft. Bin., stone. 
65 ft., 15 in., pipe. 

/ 


306.95 
262.53 

• 


18-in., pipe. 




I 


15-in., pipe. 



Summary. 
299 feet of culverts built. 
569.48 feet of sewers built. 



350 



City Document No. 36. 



Suitiniary of Sewer Construction for the Thirteen Months 
endinjf Jan. 31, 1892. 



District. 



City 

Charlestown . . 
East Bositon . . 
Briijliton .... 
South Boston . 
Dorcliester . . 

Koxburj' 

West Roxbury 

Total 



Built by the 
Cily by Con- 
tract or 
Day Labor. 

Feet. 



4,166.07 
2,070.38 
13,028.01 
4,393.04 
2.648.39 
17,956.87 
.6,352.33 
8,635.09 



69,250.18 



Built by 
Private Parties. 



Feet. 



9390 
7,304.32 

10,729.57 
2,586.45 



20,714.24 



Total 
Length Built 
during the 13 
Months ending 
Jan. 31, 18i:2. 

Peet. 



4,166.07 

2,070.38 

13,121.91 

11,697.36 

2,648.39 

28,686.44 

8,938.78 

8,635.09 

79,964.42 



9,698 catch-basins cleansed. 

1,078.16 feet of culverts built. 

710 feet of culverts repaired. 

There are now 330 miles of sewers in charo^e of the Sewer 
Division. 

The amount expended by this division during the thirteen 
months ending Jan. 31, 1892, including the amount spent 
under special appropriations, was $717,358.60. 

The items of expenditure are shown in the financial state- 
ment. 



Schedule of Sewers huilt to Date in the City of Boston. 



Wards. 


Feet. 


Wards. 


Feet. 


Wards. 


Feet. 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 


74,431 
40,937 
30.510 
40,523 
38,850 
45,254 
36,779 
18,532 
27,119 


BroH 
for'd, 

10 

11.... 
12.... 
13.... 
14.... 
15.... 
16.... 
17.... 


352.935 
38,382 
74.399 
41,817 
51,353 
75,097 
46,329 
31,626 
41,428 

753,366 


BroH 

for^d, 

18.... 

19.... 

20.... 

21.... 

22 

23 ! ! ! . 
24.... 
25 ... . 


753,366 
59,573 
45,850 
97,606 

124,409 
86,152 

137,777 

244,748 
87,932 




1,637,413 


or 310.1 miles. 




352,935 



Intercopting sewers 
Total 



21.5 miles. 



331.6 



Street Department. 



351 



Fall of Rain and Siioiv in Inches at South Yard, Albany 
Street, in thirteen months, ending Jan. 31, 1892. 



Day. 


c 

1.44 

. ■ 

'.96 
.17 

1.36 

1.12 

".80 
.22 

'.36 
.20 


p 
(^ 

.26 
'.7'2 

'.24 
'.56 
'.80 

".23 
.34 

".68 

1.25 

'.16 


'.48 

".56 

".81 
.02 

2.16 


, . 

".30 
'.5'5 
'.18 

'.08 


.16 

'.08 
l".2'3 

".02 
".52 


6 

^^ 

".43 

".97 
1.72 

'.09 


".34 
".66 

'.04 
".26 

'.59 

.49 

'.82 


W 

C 
be 

< 
.11 

".58 

".27 
'.43 

'.51 
.11 

1.14 
".36 


g 
S 

w 
.81 

2.08 
'.07 

'.03 


O 

o 
O 


o 


g 

o 

0) 

o 


d 


1 . . . 

2 . . . 

3 . . . 

4 . . . 

5 . . . 

6 . . . 

7 . . . 

8 . . . 

9 . . . 

10 . . . 

11 . . . 

12 . . . 

13 . . . 

14 . . . 

15 . . . 

16 . . . 

17 . . . 

18 . . . 

19 . . . 

20 . . . 

21 . . . 

22 . . . 

23 . . . 

24 . . . 

25 . . . 

26 . . . 

27 . . . 

28 . . . 

29 . . . 

30 . . . 

31 . . . 


.35 

2.27 
.01 

2.29 

'.90 

'.64 

".03 
.18 


'.61 

'.24 
1.29 


".39 
'.43 

.47 

'.28 

'.6'o 
.23 

1.38 


l'.6'7 
1.29 

1.77 

■ ■ 

1.56 
.29 


Totals. 


6.63 


5.24 


4.03 


2.65 


2.01 


3.21 


3.20 


3.51 


2.99 


6.67 


2.14 


3.78 


6.58 



Total for thirteen months 52.64 inches. 



352 City Document No. 36. 



Schedule of Tools, etc., owned by Sewer Division. 

9 boats, 3 boring-tools, 3 boring-machines, 8 buggies, 1 brick-furnace, 

1 cement testing-machine, 13 cleaning-wagons, 129 catch-buckets, 1 
Cornish engine, 7 Concord wagons, 21 cesspool wagons, 1,685 ft. cleaning- 
rods, 1 caravan, 1 drill-pump, 25 derricks, 1 diagram-machine, 2 demo- 
crat wagons, 1 elevator engine, 1 electric engine, 12 express wagons, 
6 engineer's levels, 5 engineer's transits, 1 furnace, 1 liather planer, 

2 flushing wagons, 3,550 feet fire-hose, 7 farmers kettles, 11 flushing- 
machines, 18 fire-hose nozzles, 17 hydrant goosenecks, 20 hydrant- 
chucks, 9 hand-carts, 2,800 feet hand-hose, 12 hand-hose nozzles, 3 horse 
scrapei's, 1 iron planer and set tools, 2 lathes, complete, 1 marine glass, 
18 measuring-rods, 1 Paine engine, 9 regulator floats, 622 feet suc- 
tion-hose, 2 sewer-boats, 4 sewer-trucks, 4 self-reading rods, 1 sludge- 
machine engine, 1 steam-drill, 2 pontoon and 2 jumbo scrapers, 8 
sleighs, 1 steam-launch, 32 shanties, 1 two-wheel truck, 11 tiiD-carts, 
1 tow-boat, 5 Knowles pumps. No. 11 ; 1 Knowlespump, 1^-in. ; 1 Blake 
pump. No. 9 ; 1 Blake pump, 10- in., suspension ; 5 Andrews pumps, 6-in. ; 
1 Andrews j^ump, 4-in. ; 1 rotary pump, 6-in., submerged ; 1 Granger 
pump, 2i-in. ; 1 Granger pump, 8-in. ; 1 Granger pump, 4-in. ; 1 Granger 
pump, 6-in. ; 1 Weber pump, 6-in. ; 1 Douglass jDump, IJ-in. ; 22 Edson 
pumps, 8-in. ; 3 siphon pumps, 4-in. ; 2 siphon pumps, 3-in. ; 2 tin hand- 
pumps, 1 common pump, 3 Hoadley engines on wheels, 1 Hoadley en- 
gine on platform, 2 hoisting-engines, and other miscellaneous tools 
necessary to do the work of the division. 

Catch-Basin, Manhole, and Pipe Stock. 

37 stone frames, 147 catch-basin covers, iron; 111 catch-basin grates, 
82 catch-basin traps, 152 catch-basin hooks, 57 catch-basin heads, 99 
catch-basin gutters, 1 gutter mouth, 3 stone curbs, 170 catch-basin 
covers, wooden ; 5,000 feet oak stock for wooden covers, 116 manhole 
frames, 411 manhole covers, 550 manhole steps, 14 lamp-hole frames, 
16 lamp-hole covers, 14 lamp-hole grates, 12 sump-chains, 11 bridle- 
chains, 3 inlet pipes, 80 inlet-pipe connections, 6 inlet-pipe nozzles, 
14 feet of 24-inch pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc. 24 feet 
of 20-inch pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc. ;, 666.5 feet of 
18-inch pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 4,781.5 feet of 
15-inch pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 7,190 feet of 
12-inch pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 3,645 feet of 
10-inch pipe, in'^luding branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 2 feet of 9-inch 
pipe, including branches, curves, bends, etc, ; 1 ,820 feet of 8-inch pipe, 
including branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 2,669 feet of 6-inch pipe, in- 
cluding branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 12 feet of 5-inch pipe, including 
branches, curves, bends, etc. ; 271 feet of 4-inch pipe, including 
branches, curves, iDends, etc. ; 11 feet of 2-inch pipe, including branches, 
curves, bends, etc. 



Street DepaRtjment. 



353 



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354 



City Document No. 36. 



The following 


is 


a record of sli 


ndge 1 


•eceived in 


and re- 


moved from deposit- 


-sewers for IS 


months ending 


Jan. 31, 


1892: 


















Received. 




Removed. 


January, 1891 


. 


. 331 cubic 


yards. 


388 


cubic yards. 


February, " 


, 


. 245 


( 


237 






March, 


, 


. 888 


( 


237 






April, 


. 


. 206 


( 


318 






May, " 




. 661 




628 






June, *' 




. 650 




629 






July, 




, 212 




545 






August, " . 




. 833 




624 






Se})temher, " 




. 59 




550 






October, " . 




. 457 




476 






November, " 




. 584 




476 






December, " 




. 382 




397 






January, 1892 . 




. 342 




558 







5,850 



6,063 



Propeety in Charge of the Sewer Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street. 

Sewer yard, with building, on North Grove st. 

Sewer yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. 
This is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were 
erected by the Sew^er Department. 

Sewer yard, with shed, on Boylston street, Jamaica Plain, 

Small lot of land on Stony brook, corner of Centre street. 
Ward 21. 

Gate-house on Stonv brook, Pynchoa street, built in 
1889. 

Lot of land on Chestnot-Hill avenue, transferred from 
the Street Department and not yet in use by the Sewer De- 
partment. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Rutherford avenue, Charles- 
town. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, cor. Paris and Marion streets. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on East Chester park, near 
Albany street. 

A small shed on Cypress street, Ward 9, on land hired 
by the city. 



Street Department. 



355 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years. 





1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 




Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Built by City by Contract or Day 

Labor . . ." 

Built by Private Parties 


63,062.79 
8,932.23 


34,633.81 
44,368.47 

49,002 28 


30,003.03 
13,191.45 


24,200.25 
17,218.10 


59,250.18 
20,714.24 


Total number of feet built . . • 


71,995.02 


43,194.48 


41,418.3£ 


79,964.42 



Oak and Tyler Streets. 



Labor .... 
144 double loads gravel 
26 tons coal . 
Teaminor 

Boring 

4 manhole frames and covers 

Trench-mach i ne 

96,400 brick 

Engine-hire . 

189 double loads screenings 

68^ double loads sand 

3 tons sand 

500^ barrels cement 

17,503 feet lumber 

767 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. . 

Sundry supplies and repairs 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

868.98 ft., 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 

Special appropriation . . . . 
Furnished from current expenses. Sewer Divi- 
sion ....... 



Vine Street. 



Labor ..... 
120 barrels cement 
49,500 brick 

Atnount carried forward., 



6,348 


92 


281 


50 


120 


90 


1,975 


50 


l47 


88 


47 


00 


331 


67 


964 


00 


162 


50 


378 


00 


140 


60 


575 


39 


264 


26 


153 


88 


42 


17 


121 


62 



$12,055 79 

$10,500 00 
1,555 79 

112,055 79 

$4,399 31 
141 60 
383 ^=1 



t,924 53 



356 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount brought forward. 






$4,924 53 


Teaming ....... 275 


50 


3,347 feet lumber 








43 


12 


31^ double loads gravel 








58 


95 


21 1 doable loads sand . 








40 


50 


1 manhole frame and cover 








11 


75 


20s feet pipe 








53 


03 


Branches and bends 








21 


92 


Fuel and sundries 








13 


88 




$5,443 


18 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

U7.75 ft., 3 ft. 3 in. X 3 ft. 5 in., brick. 
Special appropriation. 

Sewer Outlet, D and Anchor Streets. 

Built by Contract. 

1,950 cu. yds. earth excavation and refilling, 
at 90 cents ...... 

350 lin. ft., 4 ft. X 5 ft., wooden box sewer, 
at $7.78 

Less amount retained 



Inspecting . 
Miscellaneous 



Special appropriation. 

Orient-Heights Sewer. Section 1. 

J3uilt by Contract. 

357.20 lin. ft. earth excavation and refilling, 
at $3.30 

1,580.63 lin. ft. earth excavation and refillinof, 
at $2.97 

1.82 cu. yds. rock excavation, at $5 

630 cu. yds. brick masonry, American cement, 
at $4.75 

586.06 cu. yds. concrete in place, at $3.50 



$1,755 00 

2,723 00 

$4,478 00 

800 00 

$3,678 00 

240 00 

58 17 

$3,976 17 



n,178 76 

4,694 47 

9 10 

2,992 50 

2,051 21 



Amount carried forward. 



$10,926 04 



Street Department. 



357 



Amo2i7it brought forward, 
343.42 cu. yds. earth excavation below grade, 

at 80 cents ...... 

343.42 cu. yds. gravel refilling, at 50 cents . 
2.956 M ft. B.M. spruce lumber left in place, 

at $12 

1,319 lin. ft. 8-in. under-drain laid, at 15 cents, 
154 house-connections, at 10 cents 



Less amount retained 



406,025 brick 

1,499 bbls. cement 

1,200 ft. pipe 

8 manhole frames, covers, etc. 

Bends, slants, etc. 

Inspecting, etc. . 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer 

357.21 ft., 4 ft. 6 in. X 4 ft. 9 in., brick. 
1,580.63 ft., 4 ft. X 4 ft. 3 in., brick. 
Special appropriation. 



$10,926 04 


274 


74 


171 


71 


35 


47 


197 


85 


15 


40 







$11,621 


21 


• ■ " 


800 


00 


$10,821 


21 


4,060 


50 




. 


1,873 


70 






243 


00 






165 


84 






40 


69 






1,115 


00 






246 


16 




$18,566 


10 



Orient-Heights Sewer. Section 2. 

Built by Contract. 

558.17 lin. ft. earth excavation and refilling, 
at $2.50 

498.40 lin. ft. 15-in. pipe laid, at $1.30 . 

2,244.65 lin. ft. 12-in. pipe laid, at $1.60 

99.71 cu. yds. rock excavation, at $5.00 

191.21 cu. yds. brick masonry, American 
cement, at $5.25 

48 lin. ft. 8-in. under-drain, at 20 cents 

43 house-connections, at 10 cents . 

260 lin. ft. pipe laid as chimneys, at 10 cents, 



Less 5% retained . 
Amount carried forward. 



1,395 


42 


647 


92 


3,591 


44 


498 


55 


1,003 


85 


9 


60 


4 


30 


26 


00 



,177 08 

358 85 



1,818 23 



358 



City Document No. 36. 



A.mount brought forwar 


d. 






$6,818 23 


128,500 brick 


1,285 00 


260 bbls. cement . 










325 00 


2,558 ft. pipe 










969 61 


Branches 










427 89 


Inspecting . 










395 50 


Manhole frames, etc. 










211 10 


Bends, etc. . 










49 44 


Miscellaneous 










74 10 




$10,555 87 



8ize and Length of Sewer. 

558.17 ft., 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
498.40 ft., 15 in., pipe. 
2,244.65 ft., 12 in., pipe. 
Special appropriation. 



Bennington Street (at Saratoga Street). 



Labor ..... 






$3,066 73 


60,000 bricks . . . 






600 00 


355 barrels cement 






436 40 


58 double loads sand 






99 00 


609.5 double loads gravel 






1,219 00 


11,830 feet lumber 






250 26 


2 manhole frames and covers 






' 23 50 


16 manhole steps . 






8 80 


Engine and pump hire . 






57 00 


Coal 






24 25 


Teaming ..... 






165 00 


Miscellaneous .... 






97 77 




$6,047 71 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

241 ft., 4 ft. 6 in. X 4 ft. 9 in., brick. 
12 ft., 24 in., pipe. 

Furnished from current expenses. Sewer 
Division .... . . . 

Special appropriation ..... 



$4,413 95 

1,603 76 

$6,047 71 



Street Department. 



359 



Sumner and Orleans Streets 



Labor ..... 

203,100 brick . . . 

939 barrels cement 

172.5 tons sand 

1,188 doable loads gravel 

1,364 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. . 

12,874 feet lumber 

33 tons coal .... 

5 iron manhole frames and covers 

18 iron manhole steps . 

Trench machine and engine-hire 

Teaming .... 

Miscellaneous 



$5,520 86 

2,031 00 

1,108 02 

301 87 

2,376 00 

225 92 

26 88 

232 78 

138 93 

58 75 

9 90 

600 00 

919 50 

61 23 



Size and Length of Sewer. 


$13,611 64 




484 ft., 4 ft. X 4 ft. 3 in., brick. 




713.90 ft., 2 ft. 2 in. X 3 ft. 3 in., brick. 




Special appropriation ..... $13,000 00 
Furnished from current expenses, Sewer 


Division ...... 


611 64 




$13,611 64 


Bremen Street. 


' 


Labor ....... 


$2,794 99 


117,250 brick 
622 barrels cement 






1,172 50 
733 96 


85 tons sand 






148 75 


1,759 loads gravel 

3 manhole frames and covers 






1,759 00 
35 25 


Teaming .... 






623 25 


11,313 feet lumber 

702 feet pipe .... 

Branches, bends, etc. . 






210 32 
95 99 
11 61 


21 tons coal .... 






98 -22 


Carson machine .... 






164 50 


Engine-hire ..... 






92 00 


Miscellaneous .... 






13 05 




$7,953 39 



Size and Length of Sewer 
687.02 ft., 3 ft. 8 in. X 5 ft. 4 in., brick. 
Paid from current expenses, Sewer Division. 



360 



City Document No. 36. 



Porter Street. 






Labor $5,171 19 


210,425 brick 








2,104 25 


1,067 bbls. cement 








1,259. 06 


2,591 loads gravel 








2,591 00 


1861 tons sand 








a25 94 


Teaming 








915 00 


9,459 ft. lumber . 








172 86 


1,524 ft. pipe 








285 76 


Branches, slants, etc. . 








17 71 


Coal .... 








196 97 


Trench machine . 








296 00 


Engine and pump 








420 00 


Manhole rings, etc. 








29 00 


Miscellaneous 








74 31 




$13,859 05 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

560.17 feet, 3 ft. 8 in. x 5 ft. 4 in., brick. 
756.35 feet, 2 ft. 10 in. X 4 ft. 3 in., brick. 
168.00 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 



Special appropriation ..... $12,000 00 
Furnished from current expenses Sewer Di- 
vision 1,859 05 











-$13,859 05 


Rockwell and Armandine Streets. 


Labor ........ 


$5,488 09 


122,350 brick 








1,284 66 


1,009 ft. pipe 








135 02 


Branches, bends, etc. . 








26 68 


Carpentry .... 








13 75 


250 bbls. cement . 








304 00 


54|- double loads sand . 








98 10 


2 double loads screenings 








3 00 


Powder 








72 69 


Blacksmithing 








206 90 


«,652 ft. lumber . 








193 09 


14 double loads gravel . 








21 00 


3 manhole frames and covers 






35 25 


Teaming .... 






222 00 




$8,104 23 



Street Department. 



361 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

300 ft., 2 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
850 ft., 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
Special appropriation. 

Mas:nolia Street. 



Labor ....... 


$3,714 16 


Teaming ....... 


218 25 


2| tons sand . . . . 


4 51 


3,520 brick ...... 


36 96 


11 bbls. cement ..... 


13 46 


150 lbs. powder ..... 


54 00 


2,033 ft. spruce ..... 


34 36 


2 manhole frames and covers 


23 50 


18 manhole steps . . . . 


9 90 


681 feet pipe ..... 


225 80 


Branches, bends, etc. .... 


46 84 


Blacksmithing ..... 


57 58 




$4,439 32 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

408 ft., 12 in., pipe. 
Special appropriation. 



Adams, Codman, and Hutchinson Streets. 



Labor . 








$4,771 36 


198,980 brick 








2,089 28 


388 bbls. cement 








457 84 


49 double loads sand 








93 20 


795 feet drain-pipe 








160 21 


Branches, bends, etc. 








12 49 


412 feet lumber . 








6 96 


Coal . 








95 69 


3 manhole frames and covers 






35 25 


Trench machine and engine-hire 






489 05 


Teaming .... 






349 50 


Miscellaneous 






45 




18,561 28 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

987 feet, 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft., brick. 

Paid from current expenses, Sewer Division. 



3G2 



City Document No. 36. 



Labor . 
361,650 brick 
832 bbls. cement . 
43 double loads sand 
536 " " gravel 

5,791 feet drain-pipe 
Branches, bends, etc. 
31,750 feet lumber 
35 manhole frames and 
Coal . 
Teaminsj 
Piling 
Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

721.88 ft., 2 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
452.72 ft., 1 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 6 in., brick. 
2,699.30 ft., 15 in., pipe. 
1,495.15 ft., 12 in., pipe. 
Special appropriation. 



OXjli, X 


LXTittC 


XiUll 


LI, \D\)\J 


m 


• • . • 


$8,913 03 










3,794 82 










983 86 










83 60 










971 75 










2,395 04 










448 18 










559 56 


cover. 








411 25 

14 92 

407 12 

533 00 

361 52 




$19,877 65 



Harvard and Kilton Streets. 



Labor ....... 


$6,806 26 


Coal 


97 65 


13,480 feet lumber .... 


257 00 


Carson trench machine and engine-hire . 


705 94 


Carpentry . . . . ... 


57 50 


Powder, etc. 


70 12 


9 manhole rings and covers . 


105 75 


Blacksmithing ...... 


262 15 


147,300 brick 


1,546 QQ 


2,416 pipe ....... 


1,007 47 


Branches, bends, etc. .... 


208 22 


55 double loads and 23 tons sand . 


122 00 


287 bbls. cement .... 


345 16 


10 double loads gravel . . . . 


15 00 


Supplies, repairs, etc. .... 


3 75 


Teaming ...... 


289 50 


Inspector ...... 


150 50 




$12,050 63 



Street Department. 



363 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

995 ft., 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 

900 ft., 18 in., pipe. 

478 ft., 15 in., pipe. 
Special appropriation .... 

lurnished from current expenses. Sewer 

Division ....... 



$12,000 00 

50 63 

$12,050 63 



Sewer in Adams, Beaumont, and Burgoyne Streets. 

Built hy Contract. 
231.03 linear feet 18-incli pipe sewer, at 



$1.50 _ . 

798.83 linear feet excavating and refilling 
above grade of 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick sewer, at 
$2.20 

211.41 cubic yards brick masonry, at $5.40 . 

35 feet 6-inch slants, at 10 cents . 

724 linear feet 6-inch under-drain, at 20 cents, 

6.39 cubic yards rock excavation, at $5.00 



Less 5% retained 



Inspecting . 

121,100 brick 

320 barrels cement 

911 feet pipe 

Branches, etc. 

Manhole rings and covers 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

798.16 feet, 2 feet X 3 feet, brick. 
Paid from current expenses, Sewer Division. 



Westville Street. 



Labor . 
Teamino- 



$346 55 



1,757 


43 


1,141 


61 


3 


50 


144 


80 


31 


95 



$3,425 84 


171 


29 


$3,254 55 


410 


00 


1,271 


55 


380 


33 


257 


20 


. •. 30 


71 


58 


75 


. . . 60 


69 


$5,723 


78 



,975 77 
172 50 



jimount carried forward, 



$3,148 27 



364 



City Document No. 36. 



Amount brought forward, 
1,354 feet pipe 
Branches, bends, etc. . 








$3,148 27 

321 20 

77 36 


4,406 feet lumber 
22 double loads sand 








74 46 
39 60 


Black smithing 








65 00 


56,500 brick 

131 barrels cement 








593 25 

154 58 


4 manhole rings and covers 








47 00 


2 pieces C. B. curving . 








7 50 




14,528 22 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
700 feet of 12-inch pipe. 
211 " "4 feet 6 inch, circular. 
158 *' " 3 " 6 " 
248 " «« 3 " t' 

Special appropriation . . . . . 

Furnished from current expenses, Sewer Divi- 
sion ........ 



Size and Length of Seiver 
1,290.48 feet, 2 feet X 3 feet, brick. 
4«.B1 " 2 " X 3 " " 

72.03 " 18 '^ pipe. 
Special appropriation . 



:,003 36 
524 86 









$4,528 22 


Commonwealth Avenue. 


Labor $7,349 19 


52,050 brick .... 






535 05 


208 barrels cement 






242 22 


46j double loads sand . 






93 OU 


36^ " " gravel 






63 00 


28 " " screenings . 






55 50 


12,621 feet lumber 






206 22 


5 manhole frames and covers 






58 75 


690 feet pipe 






75 60 


Branches, etc. ... 






10 06 


Teaming . . . . 






729 00 


Trench machine 






96 80 


Engine-hire .... 






65 00 


Salt hay .... 






75 00 


Fuel 






63 90 


Miscellaneous supplies . 






131 93 




$9,850 22 



Street Department. 



365 



Calumet Street. 

Built by Contract. 

145.47 cubic yards brick masonry, at $13.00 
174.31 " " concrete, " 4.65 

1,440.50" " rock excavated, " 4.00 
155.1 linear feet 12-in. pipe laid, " .50 

Previous payments . . . 



Inspecting 

Branches, bends, etc. . 
Coal .... 
Manhole frames and covers 



$1,891 11 

810 54 

5,762 00 

77 55 



$8,541 


20 


3,687 


60 


$4,853 


60 


758 


50 


17 


37 


2 


55 


35 


25 


$5,667 


27 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

472.62 feet, 2 ft. x 3 ft., brick. 

Paid from current expenses. Sewer Division. 



Bacon and Raleigh Streets. 



Labor .... 

26,433 feet of lumber 

Teaming 

Coal .... 

Boring .... 

439^ bbls. cement . 

84 double loads sand 

787 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Engine-hire . 

Trench machine 

88,000 brick . 

144 double loads screenings 

101 " " gravel . 

5 manhole frames and covers 

Iron pipe 

Supplies, blacksmithing, etc. 





$4,751 82 


430 85 


1,148 50 


65 10 


90 50 


524 30 


154 80 


189 36 


40 49 




132 50 




207 36 




886 80 




243 75 




169 65 




58 75 




40 54 




66 45 



1,201 52 



363 



City Document No. 36. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
562.12 feet, 2 ft. x 3 ft., brick. 
193.30 " 15 in., pipe. 
36.33 " 12 in., " 
Paid from current expenses. Sewer Division. 



Holland Streets. 



Crawford and 
Labor .... 
46,400 brick . 
231 bbls. cement . 
42 double loads sand . 
42.5 " " gravel . 
74 feet drain-pipe . 
Branches, bends, etc. 
21,750 feet lumber 
Manhole frames and covers 

" steps 
Teaming 

Piling .... 
Miscellaneous 



Size and- Length of Sewer, 
570.07 feet, 1 ft. 8 in. X 2 ft. 6 in., brick. 
Paid from current expenses, Sewer Division. 

Rebuilding Dorchester 
Labor ..... 
Coal ..... 
Derrick, engine, etc., hire of 



),257 18 

467 50 

273 00 

74 80 

60 00 

20 84 

11 91 

358 99 

51 72 

22 00 

308 25 

205 80 

37 22 

',149 21 



Miscellaneous supplies, rep 

Iron pipe, bolts, etc. 

1,521 barrels cement 

84 feet drain-pipe 

342,225 brick 

67,988 feet lumber 

332 double loads screenings 

458^ " " sand . 

4( 2I " " gravel 

Teaming 

• • • 1 

Furnishing and driving piles 
7 manhole steps . 
Carpentry . 
175 perches stone 



au^mo; 



Brook Sewer. 


, 


. $n,079 36 






351 15 






917 11 


tools 


, etc. 


485 83 

964 49 

1,920 02 

18 93 

3,422 25 

1,203 36 

498 00 

806 20 

603 75 

802 00 

1,572 78 

3 85 

7 50 

437 46 



$25,094 04 



Str 


EET I 


)epar 


TMEN 


r. 




367 


Special appropriation 


.... 


. $20,366 02 


Furnished from current expenses, Sewer 




Division . 




4,728 


02 




$25,094 04 


Dustin Street. 






Labor . 


• • . . 


$4,156 


65 


84,675 brick 










846 


75 


240 barrels cement 










296 


50 


17 loads sand 










16 


66 


1,213 feet pipe 










517 


91 


Branches, slants, etc. 










130 


50 


2,000 feet lumber 










34 


00 


Teaming 










27 


00 


Manhole frames, etc. 










94 


00 


Miscellaneous 










33 


36 












$6,153 


33 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

429.60 ft., 24 in. x 36 in., brick. 
359.80 ft., 20 in. x 26 in., brick. 
641.66 ft., 18-in. pipe. 

Special appropriation . . . . , 

Furnished from current expenses. Sewer Di- 
vision ....... 



;,ooo 00 

153 33 



Labor .... 
711,150 brick 
2,129 barrels cement 
502.5 double loads sand 
545 " " gravel 

3,377 feet drain-pipe 
Branches, bends, etc. 
44,912 feet lumber 
20 manhole frames and covers 
Coal .... 
Teaming . 
Miscellaneous 



^ohasset Streets, 


$6,153 


33 


etc. 




. $25,834 


46 








8,243 


80 








2,596 


37 








773 


40 








702 


80 








456 


20 








70 


49 








793 


04 








239 


50 








101 


57 








622 


40 








3,111 


03 




$43,545 


06 



368 City Docibient No. 36. 

Size and Length of Sewer. 

1,988.80 ft., 2 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
750.25 ft., 2 ft. 2 in. X 3 ft. 3 in., brick. 
1,607.65 ft., 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
Special appropriation. 



Respectfully submitted, 

H. W. Sanborn, 
Deputy Superintendent. 



Street Department. 369 



APPENDIX E. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT OF THE STREET-CLEANING DI- 
VISION OF THE STREET DEPARTMENT. 



Boston, Feb. 1, 1892. 
H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir: In reply to your circular of Dec. 14, 1891, in 
regard to the annual report, I beg leave to ofl'er the follow- 
ing statement of the expenditures, income, and business of 
this division, together with a schedule of the appreciable 
property on hand, for the nine months ending Jan, 31, 1892. 

When I assumed charge of the Street-Cleanino- Division, I 
found the work being prosecuted under the direction of 
G. W. Forristall, of the Sanitary Division, and it was 
mutually understood that he was to continue keeping the 
record of the work done, and an account of the manner in 
which the money was expended, until the close of the fiscal 
year ending April 30, 1891. 

My report, consequently, which is herein submitted, covers 
the period of nine (9) months ending Jan. 31, 1892. 

Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation .... $250,000 00 
Total expenditures . . $215,464 92 

Transferred to Sewer Division, 20,000 00 

235,464 92 



Unexpended $14,535 08 

Street Police Division. 

Amount of appropriation .... $5,000 00 
Total expenditures . . $464 41 

Transferred to Central Office, 1,050 00 

Transferred to Paving Division, 3,485 59 

$5,000 00 



370 



City Document No. 36. 



Objects of Expenditure. 

Superintendence. 
Salary of Deputy Superintendent 



Office pay-rolls, including pay 
drauohtsraan, and messengers 
Advertising, etc. 
Board of horse 
Use of carriages 
Maps, plans, etc. 
Printing 
Stationery . 
Telephone service, etc, 

Total cost of superintendence 



of 



lerks, 



52,333 34 

3,516 62 

51 00 

230 81 

21 00 

258 35 

398 07 

462 05 

79 73 

;7,350 97 



Cleaning Streets, 

Including the Cost of Sweeping, Loading, and Removal of 

Street-dirt. 



District 1. 


West End 


. $15,101 67 


District 2. 


North End ... 


17,412 22 


District 3. 


South End 


16,502 09 


District 4. 


South End 


15,943 24 


District 5. 


Back Bay 


15,205 72 


District 6. 


South Boston and Dorchester 


17,239 87 


District 7. 


Roxbury and West Roxbury 


,11,995 63 


District 8. 


Briohton .... 


* 


District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
il cost of cleaning streets 


12,008 52 


Tots 


$121,408 96 



Cleaning Gutters, Crossings, and Sidewalks, 

Including Oost of Scraping, Loading, and Removal of Street- 
dirt. 



District 1. 
District 2. 
District 3. 



West End 
North End 
South End 



$2,015 56 
102 88 
126 17 



Amount carried forward, 



!,244 61 



*InBriahton, there was no sweeping except of crossinsjs, and the street-cleaning was 
confined wholly to scraping macadamized roads and gutters. The expense is given under 
Guitur Work. 



Street Department. 



371 



Amount brought forward, 

District 4. South End 

District 5. Back Bay .... 

District 6. South Boston and Dorchester 

District 7. Roxbury and West Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton .... 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Total cost of cleaning gutters, etc. 



$2,244 61 
782 23 
2,048 19 
2.(108 12 
1,713 61 
3,738 25 
1,944 75 

$14,479 76 



Cost of Maintaining Dumps. 



District 1. 


West End 


$445 03 


District 2. 


North End 


388 15 


District 3. 


South End 1 


5 20 


District 4. 


South End ^ . . . 


95 17 


District 5. 


Back Bay .... 


378 36 


District 6. 


South Boston and Dorchester 


405 12 


District 7. 


Roxbury and West Roxbury 


. 


District 8. 


Brighton .... 




District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
il cost of dumps . . . . 


331 00 


Tot^ 


$2,048 03 



Cost or Removal of Snow, 



District 1. 


West End .... 


$976 96 


District 2. 


North End 


854 QH 


District 3. 


South End 


741 39 


District 4. 


South End 


880 10 


District 5. 


Back Bay . . ... 


995 30 


District 6. 


South Boston and Dorchester 


930 82 


District 7. 


Roxbury and West Roxbury 


890 85 


District 8. 


Briohton . 


246 00 


District 9. 


East Boston and Charlestown 
il cost of removing snow 


645 98 


Toti 


$7,162 08 







1 District 3 used Districts 1 and 2 dumps rejjularly. 
^ District 4 used Districts 1, 2, and 5 dumps regularly. 



372 



City Document No. 36. 



Patrol System. 

Push-carts, including labor, teaming, etc. 

Paper patrol, labor and teaming 

Snow ....... 

Superintendence ..... 

Total 



$14,582 29 

3,696 50 

679 89 

943 41 



.9,902 09 



Recapitulation or Expenses, exclusive or Superin- 
tendence, Stable and Yard Expenses, Stock Ac- 
count, AND Miscellaneous. 



District. 


Cost of Clean- 
ing Streets. 


Cost of Cloan- 
ing Gutters, 

Crossings, and 
Sidewalks. 


Cost of 
Dumps. 


Cost of 

Removing 

Snow. 


Cost of 
Patrol 
System. 


Total. 


No. 1 . . 
No.2 . . 
No. 3 . . 

No.4 . . 
No. 5 . . 
No. 6 . . 
No. 7 . . 
No. S . . 


$15,101 67 
17,412 22 
16,502 09 
15,943 24 
15,205 72 
17,239 87 
11,995 63 


$2,015 66 

102 88 

126 17 

782 23 

2,048 19 

2,008 12 

1,713 61 

3,738 25 

1,944 75 


$445 03 
388 15 
5 201 
95 172, 
378 36 
405 12 

331 00 


$976 96 
854 68 
741 39 
880 10 
995 30 
930 82 
890 85 
246 00 
645 98 




$18,539 22 
18,757 93 
17,374 85 
17,700 74 
18,627 5T 
20,583 93 
14,600 09 
3,984 25 


No.9 . . 


12,008 52 


14,930 25 


Patrol S 










$19,902 09 


$19,902 09 












Total . . $121,408 96 


$14,479 76 


$2,048 03 


$'7,162 08 


$19,902 09 


$165,000 92 



1 District 3 used the Districts 1 and 2 dumps regularly. 

2 District 4 used Districts 1, 2, and 5 dumps regularly. 



Stable and Yard Expenses, 

Including the Cost of the South End, West End, Roxhury, 
and Ohmiestoivn Stables, as folloivs : 

Superintendence ...... $1,357 59 

Lal)or, including cost of feeders, hostlers, 

l)r()om-maker8, blacksmiths, carpenters, 

watchmen, etc. ..... 3,964 93 



Aonount carried forward. 



.,322 hi 



Street Department. 



873 



Amount broughi forward, 
Cart and carriage repairs 
Carts, use of . . . 

Coal 

Harness repairs 

Horse- shoeing 

Repairs on lockers 

Repairs on sweeping-machines 

Ferry-passes, car-tickets 

Tool repairs 

Veterinary services and medicines 



Total stable and yard expenses 



$5,322 52 

1,918 71 

120 00 

14 55 

214 Oi) 

1,675 53 

292 46 

940 77 

219 18 

16 41 

156 U 

$10,890 30 



Stock Account. 

Broom-stock purchased 

Carts, carriages, etc., purchased 

Harnesses, horse furnishings, purchased 

Horses purchased . . . . 

Push-carts purchased . . . . 

Sleigh purchased . . . , 

Sweeping-machines purchased 

Tools 

Total ...... 



^5,870 16 
6,323 50 
3,376 78 
3,200 00 
1,117 50 
95 00 
1,125 00 
781 58 

}1,889 52 



Miscellaneous. 



Holidays 
Sand . 
Sundries 

Total 



$9,543 00 

76 50 

963 71 



$10,583 21 



General Recapitulation of Expenses. 
For Nine Months ending Jan. 31, 1892. 



Superintendence ... 
Cleaning of streets .... 

Cleaning gutters, crossings, and sidewalks 
Maintaining dumps .... 

Removal of snow and ice 



Amount carried forward , 



$7,350 


97 


. 121,408 


96 


14,479 


76 


2,048 


03 


7,162 


08 


$152,449 


80 



374 



City Documknt No. 8(). 



Amov.Dt hrouglit forward , 
Cost of patrol system 
Stsil)le and yard expenses 
Stock account 
Miscellaneous 

Total .... 



$152,449 80 
19,902 09 
10,890 30 
21,889 52' 
10,583 21 

^$215,714 92 



Table slioAving the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, exclusive of Supervision and other Expenses. 



District. 


No. of 

Miles 

Cleaned. 


Cost of 
Cleaning. 


Cost of 
Dump. 


Total Cost. 


Cost per 
Mile. 


No. 1 


1,136.34 

1,541.20 

1,218.41 

1,281.51 

539.86 

679.25 

307.15 


$15,101 67 
17,412 22 
16,502 09 
15,943 24 
15,205 72 
17,239 87 
11,995 63 


$396 07 

345 45 

4 63 

84 70 

386 74 

360 56 


$15,497 74 
17,757 67 
16,606 72 
16,027 94 
15,542 46 
17,600 -^3 
11,995 63 


$13 63+ 

11 52+ 
13 54+ 

12 50+ 
28 78+ 
25 91+ 
39 05+ 


No. 2 


No. 3 

No. 4 


No. 5 


No. 6 

No. 7 

No. 8 


No. 9 


569.52 


12,008 52 


294 59 


12,303 11 


21 60+ 




Total 


7,273.24 


$121,408 96 


$1,822 74 


$123,231 70 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight (8) 
districts, exclusive of supervision, etc., $16.94. 

Districts 5, 6, 7, and 9 are made up partly of paved 
streets and partly of macadamized streets, and as the cost of 
scraping a macadamized street and gutter is largely in ex- 
cess of cleaning a paved street, the rates per mile in these 
districts exceed those of Districts 1, 2, 3, and 4, which are 
within the paved area. 



* One liuiidred twenty dollnvs of this ainoiint offset by sale of three horses, in exchange. 
One hundred thirty doHars of thi.-f amount offset hy sweepiniis dumped al L street, maliing^ 
the net e.\pen8es of this division, as shown in financial statement, $:ild,464.92. 



Street Department. 



175 



Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, including Supervision, Labor, Yard, and Stable Expenses. 



5 


1,136.34 


^ 02 


o a 
•gn 

^3 


CO ^ 


6 

'a a 
-X » 
£. =^ 


Total 
per Mile. 


No. 1 . . 


$684 


11 


$15,497 


74 


$1,150 44 


$17,332 


29 


$15 25 


No. 2 .. 


I,n41.f0 


783 


87 


17,757 


67 


1,318 21 


19,859 


75 


12 88 


No. 3 . . 


1,218.41 


728 


65 


16,506 


72 


1,225 34 


18,460 


71 


15 15 


No. 4 .. 


1,281.51 


707 


50 


16,027 


94 


1,189 80 


17,925 


24 


13 98 


No. 5*.. 


539.86 


686 


08 


15,542 


46 


1,153 76 


17,382 


30 


32 19 


No. 6* . . 


679.25 


776 


92 


17,600 


43 


1,306 53 


19,683 


88 


28 97 


No. 7*.. 


307.15 


529 


51 


11,995 


63 


890 47 


13.415 


61 


43 67 


No. 8 .. 




















No. 9* . . 


569.52 


543 


08 


12,303 


11 


913 30 


13,759 


49 


24 15 


Total . . . 


7,273.24 


$5>439 


72 


$123,231 


70 


$9,147 85 


$137,819 


27 





*Includes the cost of cleaning the macadamized streets in these districts. 

Average cost per mile of cleanino; the streets in eight (8) 
districts, including supervision, etc., $18.94. 

Income. 

Bills deposited with the City Collector from May 
5, 1891, to Jan. 30, 1892, on which payment is 
expected $941 00 

Amount credited to this division by City Collector 

up to date, on account of above bills • . 497 00 







Complaints. 




Made by police ...... 


1 


Made by Paving Division .... 


1 


In form of a petition ..... 


1 


By telephone ....... 


2 


Anonymous ....... 


4 


Individuals, personally and by letter 


26 


Through Central Office 


36 



Total number of complaints 

Force Employed. 

Deputy Superintendent . 

Chief Clerk 

Messengers ..... 
Employees ..... 

Entire force .... 



71 



1 
1 

2 

328 

332 



376 



CiTr Document No. 36. 



Charge of this Division. 



horses, driving. 

hydrants. 

machine, boring. 

machine brooms. 

machine for cutting bass. 

market wagons. 

oil horse-covers. 

scrapers, asphalt. 

shovels, scoops, etc. 

sleigh. 

squeegees. 

steam- box and boiler. 

surcingles. 

sweeping-machines, double. 

sweeping-machines, single. 



In addition to the above, there is an amount of stock 
whose quantity is constantly varying, such as broom-stock, 
rattan, bass, machine-oil, cart-oil, soap, medicine, flax, 
broom-cord, pitch, broom-handles, coal, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip A. Jackson, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Inventory of Property 


IN 


Cl 


74 barrels for push-carts. 






3 


76 blankets, stable. 






7 


34 blankets, street. 






1 


191 brushes, horse. 






15 


2 buggies, Concord. 






1 


1 buggy, Goddard. 






2 


37 carts, push. 






74 


9 carts, iron. 






8 


5 carts, McDonald, Pate 


it steel. 




589 


12 carts, water. 






1 


61 carts, wooden. 






12 


67 harnesses, cart. 






1 


5 harnesses, driving. 






72 


9 harnesses, double. 






IH 


1 harness, express. 






15 


70 horses, cart. 









Street Department. 377 



APPENDIX F. 



City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, Feb. 1, 1892. 

Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir : I herewith submit the followino^ report of the work 
done under my direction for your department. 

Plans and profiles of streets to be paved were made, quan- 
tities estimated, and specifications prepared. 

The work done is shown in the accompany in^^ tables ; the 
city furnished all material except paving-gravel, and gener- 
ally the materials were delivered to the contractor from 
wharves or from city yards. In some cases the paving- 
blocks were delivered by the city on or in the vicinity of the 
work. Such of the old materials as the city could use were 
delivered by the contractor. 

It will thus be seen that the prices contained in the tables 
have no comparative value, since the conditions differed on 
each street, some being paved, others macadamized or grav- 
elled ; also the length of haul for new supplies and for dis- 
posing of old material, and the relative quantity of each, was 
far from uniform. 

Under seventeen contracts, 4.35 miles of street were 
paved at a cost, exclusive of material furnished by the city, 
of $169,161.02. 

The following is a brief summary of the items : 

52,744 sq. yds. block paving on gravel furnished were 
laid at an average cost of $1,155 per sq. yd. 

9,294 sq. yds. block paving on a cement concrete base, 
with pitched joints, were laid at an average cost of $2,727 
per sq. yd. 

15,189 sq. yds. of asphalt paving were laid ; average cost, 
with cement concrete base, $3,635 per sq. yd. ; when the 
old base was used, the cost was $2,025 per sq. yd. 

31,509 linear feet of edgestones were set at an average 
cost of $0,329 per linear ft^ 

21,372 sq. yds. sidewalk were relaid at an average cost 
of $0,836 per sq. yd. 

3,079 sq. yds. of flagging cross-walks were laid at an av- 
erage cost of $1,184 per sq. yd. 

The specifications of one contract provided that the city 



378 City Document No. 3(). 

should furnish the gravel and remove the old materials. The 
quantities of work done under that contract have been in- 
cluded in the totals of work done in the above statements, 
but they have not l)een used in determining the average 
costs. Counts of paving-blocks used in small areas actually 
laid are found to be variable. The average of the largest 
areas where exact number of blocks used is obtainable is 
about 25 large and about 38 small blocks to the square 
yard. The cost of blocks, including culling and wharfage, is 
about five cents per small block, and seven and one-half 
cents per large block, making the cost for blocks per yard 
$1.90 in each case. The small blocks came from Quincy, 
Mass., and were used for suburban streets; they were de- 
livered on the work. The large blocks came mostly from 
Ca])e Ann, and were delivered on wharves. 

The average cost of block paving on a gravel foundation 
was $1.1 5 X $1.90 = $3.05 per sq. yd. 

The work was done under somewhat severe specifications, 
requiring the removal of 13 inches of old material, the grad- 
ing and rolling the road-bed, and the furnishing of 6 inches 
of new gravel. The cost of supervision and inspection is 
not included in the above. Details of the wc-rk done are as 
follows : 

A Street, South Boston, from Broadway to First 
street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel founda- 
tion, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was of cobble 
paving. The old cobbles were hauled to the crusher at 
Broadway bridge, the surplus earth to L- street extension ; 
the new paving-blocks were hauled from the New York 
& New Enoland R.R. wharf, and the edo-estones and flao-oino- 
from the Albany-street paving yard. 

First Street, from New York & New England R.R. to 
F street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was gen- 
erally of gravel, with concrete patches, and one block from 
E street to F street was paved with cobbles. The 
old cobbles were hauled to the Broadway-bridge crusher, 
the surplus earth to the L-street dump. The new granite 
blocks were hauled from the New York & New England 
R.R. wharf and from the Bay State wharf, the edgestones 
and the flagging from the South End yard ; the edgestones 
were delivered to the contractor on the street. 

Troy street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street, was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by James 
Grant & Co. The old surface was of macadam, and was 
very hard. The cobble-stones in the gutter were hauled to 
the Broadwav-bridii'e crusher, the earth and macadam to 



Street Department. 379 

East Chester park, between Swett street and New York & 
New England R.R. ; the new granite blocks, and all other 
new materials furnished by the city, were delivered from the 
Albany-street yard. 

Longiuood avenue^ from Huntington avenue to Parker 
street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, 
by James Doherty & Co. The old surface was of macadam ; 
the surplus earth was hauled to Parker street, near Hunting- 
ton avenue ; the cobble-stones from the gutters to the 
Tremont-street crusher ; the Quincy paving-blocks were 
delivered on the street, and all other materials furnished by 
the city were hauled from the Albany-street yard. 

Austin street, Charlestoivn, from Main street to Ruther- 
ford avenue, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by John Turner & Co. The old surface was of 
macadam. The surplus material was the property of the 
contractor, and the cobble gutter-stones were purchased by 
him from the city ; the granite paving-blocks and the cross- 
walks were delivered to the contractor on the street, and the 
other materials came from the Charlestown paving yard, on 
Medford street. 

A short section of the street in front of a church 
was paved wdth asphalt by the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Company. 

Fulton street, from Richmond street to Lewis street, was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by B. F. 
Nay & Co. The old surface was paved with cobble-stones, 
which were hauled to the Broadway-bridge crusher; the 
surplus earth was disposed of by the contractor; the granite 
paving-blocks and all paving materials were delivered from 
the North End paving yard, on Commercial street. 

Columbus avenue, from the railioad bridge to West 
Chester park, w^as nearly all resurfaced l)y the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The concrete base where de- 
fective was patched, and if not found at proper grade was 
brought to grade, the new concrete furnished being paid for 
by the cubic yard. A portion of the street was patched by 
the company at its own expense, under a five-year guarantee 
given in 1887 ; a small portion of the old surface was 
patched. A plan has been jirepared and filed with the con- 
tract showino; the areas under o-uarantee, and the time of 
expiration of the saine. The old material was wasted and 
used for filling on Parker street. The new work is to be 
kept in order by the company for five years under the 
contract. 

Bedford street, from Chauncy to Columbia street, and 
Kingston street, from Summer to Bedford street, were 



380 City Document No. 36. 

paved with granite blocks, with pitched joints on a Rosen- 
dale cement base, by H. Gore & Co. 

The surface was paved, and a portion of the old blocks 
were used in the new work ; the culls were hauled to Scotia 
street on the Back Bay ; the surplus earth was hauled to 
Parker street ; the new granite blocks were hauled from Wales 
wharf; and the other new material from the Albany-street 
yard. 

Dudley street, from Washington street to Blue Hill 
avenue, was repaved by James Grant & Co. The old sur- 
face was partly of macadam and partly paved with granite 
block paving. The old blocks of suitable quality were used 
in repaving, and the culls were delivered to the Bird-street 
yard ; the surplus filling was delivered on Marshlield and 
Shirley streets ; the new Quincy granite blocks and the side- 
walk bricks were delivered to the contractor on the street, 
and the other new material was hauled from the Albany- 
street yard. 

Terrace street, from Tremont to New Heath street, was 
paved by A. A. Libby & Co. The old surface was of 
macadam, and the old material was used for surfacing 
several streets within a radius of one mile from Terrace 
street. The new Quincy blocks, the edgestones, and the 
sidewalk bricks were delivered on the street. The new 
flagging was hauled from the Albany-street yard. The 
joints of the paving opposite the school- house, next Tremont 
street, were pitched at an extra expense of seventy-three 
cents per square yard. 

Second street, from B street to Granite street, and 
Third street, from A street to Second street. South 
Boston, were paved with granite blocks on a gravel founda- 
tion, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was cobble-stone 
paving, the old stones were hauled to the Broadway crusher, 
and the surplus excavation was hauled to the L-street 
extension. The new granite blocks were hauled from the 
New York & New England wharf, the sidewalk bricks were 
delivered on the street, and the flaaoino- vvas hauled from 
the Albany-street yard. 

Tremont street, from Scollay square to Boylston street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a Rosendale cement con- 
crete base, by H. Gore & Co. The work was let in two 
sections, with Temple place as the point of division. The 
old granite blocks were delivered by the contractor on 
sundry streets, within one and a half miles' haul, and the 
surplus earth was the property of the contractor. The new 
granite blocks were hauled from Burnham's wharf, the 
paving-bricks were delivered on the street, and the flagging 



.Street Department. 381 

in part was delivered from the Albany-street yard, and in 
part delivered on the street. The joints of the new paving 
were filled with hot screened pebl)les and hot paving-pitch. 

Second street, from Dorchester to E street, South Boston, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by J. 
Doherty & Co. The old surface was of cobble paving. The 
old cobbles were delivered on Ninth street, opposite H street ; 
the surplus excavation was delivered on the L-street exten- 
sion. The new granite blocks were hauled from the Bay 
Stale wharf, Hie paving-bricks were delivered on the street, 
and the flagging hauled from the Albany-street yard. 

Dorchester street, from Dorchester avenue to Ninth street. 
South Boston, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was partly 
paved with granite blocks and partly macadamized. The 
old granite blocks in good condition were used in the new 
work, and the culls and surplus earth were delivered by the 
contractor on sundry streets within half a mile, mostly on 
Washburn street ; the old cobble gutter-stones were hauled to 
the Broadway crusher ; the new paving-blocks were hauled 
from the Thompson & Baker coal wharf on Ninth street ; the 
paving-bricks were delivered on the street, and the flagging 
was hauled from the Albany-street yard. The paving in 
front of the school-house was laid with pitched joints. 

Beacon street, from Arlington street to Charles street, was 
paved from the street-railroad track to the northerly edge- 
stone with asphalt on a Portland cement concrete base, by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The gutters and 
toothing strip next the railroad track were paved with granite 
blocks, partly delivered from Burnham's wharf and partly 
delivered on the street ; the surplus excavation was hauled to 
Scotia street. The remainder of the street between the 
same points was repaved with the old granite blocks, b}'^ J. 
Doherty & Co. This portion was the narrow strip under 
the trees, adjoining the Public Garden. The joints in the 
paving were tilled with hot pebbles and pitch. 

Tables showing the length of accepted streets in Boston, 
the area of roadway in each, and the area of each kind of pav- 
ing or roadway construction, have been prepared for the use of 
the Street Department, and will be found on pp. 52, 53, and 
54 of this report. These tables are an entirely new computa- 
tion from the best obtainable original sources. The meas- 
urements have been principallj^ made from careful surveys 
of the Surveying Department, and when information could 
not be obtained from original surveys, the streets have been 
measured. They have also been examined to determine the 
character of the paving, and as it is impossible to determine 



382 City Document Xo. 36. 

at this season of the 3'eau whether a street is macad- 
amized or simply gravelled, the tables have been checked by 
the district foreman and by the Deputy Superintendent of 
Streets. In giving lengths and areas, care has been taken to 
include intersections of streets but once, and the detail tables 
show the streets from which the intersections have been 
deducted. The general rule has been to include intersec- 
tions as part of the principal street. 

^The engineering force has done considerable work of a 
miscellaneous character, and numerous estimates for new 
work have also been made. 

A summary of the detailed tables, showing total lengths 
and areas of paving, is appended. 

Berkeley-Street Bridge, over the B. & A. R.R. 

A contract was made with John Cavanagh & Co., dated 
October 9, 1891, for taking down the parapets and bridge 
seats of Berkeley-street bridge and rebuilding the same 
with granite masonry laid solid in cement mortar, of the 
dimensions required to receive the new bridge. This work 
is now complete, with the exception of one parapet stone 
which cannot be placed until the truss used for a temporary 
support of the telephone wires is removed. 
The contract price for the work is $2,290. 
An agreement was made with the Boston Brido;e Works, 
October 7, 1891, for removing the old bridge, for the sum of 
$350. The work called for under this agreement has been 
completed, with the exception of the sidewalk truss'carrying 
the telephone wires, which was moved sufficiently to allow 
the new bridge to be placed. As soon as the wires are in 
place on the bridge, this truss will be removed. 

The new superstructure is a through plate girder bridge, 
consisting of six lines of plate girders, dividing the street into 
two roadways ; two sidewalks and a centre walk is also used 
for two lines of water-pipes. The bridge is seventy-one feet 
long and seventy-eight feet six inches wide between centres 
of sidewalk girders. The four roadway girders have curved 
upper flanges five feet six inches deep at centres, and four 
feet six inches deep at ends. The two sidewalk girders are 
four feet six inches deep, with straight upper flanges, and are 
to have hand-rails on top. The floor-beams for the roadway 
are built beams, and for the walks are 9-inch steel I beams. 
The roadway and sidewalk stringers are of hard-pine, the 
roadway flooring-plank is of spruce, the under course being 
four inches thick and the upper course two inches thick. The 
sidewalk is planked with 2-inch hard-pine. 



Street Department. 383 

The contractor for the ironwork was the Boston Brido;e 
Works, and the contract price was $4,898. 

The wooden floorino- and the paintino- of the bridge have 
been done by the Bridge Division. 

Chelsea Bridge, North, Steam-power. 

Machinery for moving both the north and south draws of 
Chelsea bridge by steam-power has been erected and is now 
ready for use. On the pier of the south draw, there is an en- 
gine-house 15X20 feet, in which is placed a double 6X12 
inch engine and boiler. An endless chain passes around 
the turntable drum of the draw, and the power is transmitted 
from the engine by bevel gearing, a horizontal shaft, and 
sprocket wheel. 

At the north draw an addition 26 X 32 feet has been 
made to the draw-pier on which the engine-house is placed. 
This draw^ is to be moved by means of wire ropes attached to 
the draw and to a 36-inch drum in the engine-house. A re- 
versing-engine with two 6 X 12 inch cylinders will fur- 
nish the power. 

At each draw a winch-head has been placed for working 
vessels through the draw by steam-power. 

The machinery has been furnished and set up by Miller 
& Shaw, and the engine-houses and other woodwork was 
done by the Bridge Division. 

Chelsea Bridge, North, Fender-guard. 

Plans and specifications for building a fender-guard 173 
et Ic 
made. 



feet long at the north draw of Chelsea brids^e have been 



Cornwall-Street Bridge, over Stony-Brook Channel. 

A plan and bill of material for a new bridge on Cornwall 
street were furnished, and the structure has been built by 
the Bridge Division. 

The bridge has a single span, 32 feet long over all, 
and a total width of 40 feet, divided into a roadway of 
26 feet and two sidewalks of 7 feet each. The span con- 
sists of 12 lines of trussed beams, each made of two 6 X 12 
inch hard-pine sticks, trussed by a l-|-inch diameter rod. 
The roadway planking is of spruce, the under course being 
4 inches thick and the upper, or sheathing course, being 2 
inches thick. The sidewalk is planked with 3-inch planed 
hard-pine. 



384 City Document No. 3o. 

The end supports of the bridge are timber bulkheads, 
each having nine 10 inch X 10 inch hard-pine posts, with a 6 
inch X 10 inch hard-pine sill, sunk about 9 feet into the 
ground, and capped with a 12 inch x 12 inch hard-pine stick. 

Hill-Street Retaining-wall. 

A contract was made with Donovan & Brock, Boston, 
dated October 6, 1891, for building a retaining- wall at the 
easterly end of Hill street, on the line of Sackville street. 

The wall is of granite, laid solid in cement mortar, and 
rests on a concrete foundation. The wall is capped with a 
granite coping, and has on top a close board fence 5 feet 
high. 

Total amount paid contractor, $1,485. 

Irvington-Street and Yarmouth-Street Retaining- 

WALLS. 

These walls are located one on each side of the Prov- 
idence Division of the Old Colony Railroad, at the ends of 
Irvington and Yarmouth streets, the streets being in line 
with each other. 

A contract was made with R. D. Shanahan, dated June 
15, 1891, for building a retaining-vvaU at the end of 
Irvington street, and for adding buttresses to the retaining- 
wall at the end of Yarmouth street. 

The wall is of granite laid solid in cement mortar, and 
rests upon a pile foundation with concrete cap. Granite 
buttresses Avere built at the back of the wall to afford a suf- 
ficient foundation for the piers of an iron foot-bridge. At 
the back of the wall on Yarmouth street, similar buttresses 
were built of concrete, with granite coping-stones. 

The total cost of the work, including the repointing of 
the wall on Yarmouth street, was $3,537, 

Irvington-Street Foot-bridge, over Providence 
Division, Old Colony Railroad. 

An iron foot-bridge has been built over the tracks of the 
Providence Division of the Old Colony Railroad, on the line 
of Irvington and Yarmouth streets. The bridge is a through 
bridge of the riveted bowstring type, resting upon wrought- 
iron piers. The tops of the piers are on a level with the 
floor of the bridge, and are reached by stairways from the 
sidewalks of ea'ch street. The stairways are of wrought 
iron with hard-pine treads. The bridge was built by the 
R. F. Hawkins Iron Works, of Si)ringtield, Mass., under 
contract dated Sept. 16, 1891, at a total cost of $1,773. 



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Street Department. 385 

L-Street Abutment. 

The contract for building tlie south abutment of L-street 
bridf!:e was let to Perkins & White, of Boston, under date 
of Oct. 28, 1891, for |5,925, and calls for the completion of 
the work on or before June 15, 1892. At this date the i)iles 
have been driven and capped for the foundation, and the 
larger portion of the ballast and riprap placed. 

L-Street Bulkhead, South Boston. 

Plans and specifications were made in 1890 for extending 
L-street bulkhead northerly from the bulkhead built in 
1889 ; the length of bulkhead to be built being 727 feet, en- 
closing 328^ feet of street extension. 

The contract for building the bulkhead was awarded to F. 
G. Whitcomb for $7,200 ; the work was begun April 23 and 
completed July 27, 1891, at a total cost of $7,210. 

Roxbury-Canal Sea-wall. 

Plans and specifications were made for building a sea-wall 
on Roxbury canal and adjacent dock at the Paving wharf of 
the Street Department. 

No work has yet been done on the wall. 



Stony-Brook Improvement. 
Roslinddle Branches. 

This improvement contemplates a channel sufficiently large 
to carry the rainfall from a tributary water-shed of about 
1,000 acres, and will, when this improvement is completed, 
prevent the flooding in this vicinity during heavy rains ; but 
until the channel has been farther extended up-stream about 
300 feet, there will still be danger of occasional floods. 

The work done during the past season embraced both the 
main branch of Stony brook at Roslindale and also a small 
brook flowino; into it. The larg-er channel extends from a 
point on the old brook channel about 160 feet below Poplar 
street, through private land, and in Poplar and Washington 
streets, a distance of 665 feet. It is partly open and partly 
covered. The open portion below Poplar street is 12 feet 
wide, with side- walls of rubble masonry nowhere less than 
6.8 feet high. It is laid on a grade of 1 foot in 100; 
the covered channel varies in size from 11 feet 6 inches wide 
X 6 feet 6 inches high to 9 feet wide X 8 feet 6 inches high. 
Both side-walls and the arch are of rubble masonry ; the 



386 City Document No. 36. 

inclinations are 1 foot in 100 feet and 1 foot in 56 feet; 22 
feet of open channel, 9 feet wide, was built at the up-stream 
end ; the bottom is paved throughout with stone or brick, and 
a concrete foundation extends under both walls and under 
the paved bottom. The smaller brook channel extends from 
Birch street through private lands, across Cohasset street, 
and again through private lands to its junction with the 
larger channel on the north-west side of Washington street ; 
a total distance of 507 feet This channel is a stone culvert 
4 feet 6 inches high and 5 feet wide ; it is laid on an inclina- 
tion of 1 foot in 125 feet ; the side-walls are of rubble with 
granite coverino-stones ; the paving is of stone ; a concrete 
foundation extends under the side-walls and under the 
paved bottom. 

Bids for the construction of the work were received July 
20, and the contract was awarded to H. P. Nawn, the 
loAvest bidder. 

In connection with the brook channels, and during their 
construction, 340 feet of pipe sewer was built, with the 
necessary branches, manholes, etc. This sewer was neces- 
sary in order to aflbrd drainage to houses on the westerly 
side of Washington street, which were cut off from the 
common sewer in that street by the low grade of the new 
channel ; this work was done to much better advantage 
during the construction of the brook channel than would 
have been possible after the completion of the work. The 
sewer is of 10-inch Akron pipe, surrounded by concrete ; 
it is located for a distance of 185 feet immediately outside of 
the walls of the brook channel, and for the remaining 155 
feet, until it enters the common sewer on Washington street, 
is laid under the new channel, immediately beneath the 
concrete foundation. 

Bennington-Street Culvert. 

Plans and estimates were made for a wooden culvert 
across Bennington street, between Saratoga street and Wads- 
worth street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer, 



City of Boston, Engineering Department. — TaUt; showing Details of Contract Street Paving, SeaKon of 1891. 





Granite lilocks on concrete. 
Item A. 


Granite blocks on gravel. 
Item B. 


Trinidad aepbalt on concrete. 
Item C. 


For set 


ing edgestone. 
Item E. 


For laying 


brick sidewalk. 
Item F. 


For laying crosswalk. 
Item G. 


Extra work. 
ItemH. 






Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Pinal estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Final estimate 


estimate. 








$1 06 


2,542 sq. yds. 






§0 55 


1,362 lin. ft. 

§74!) 10 

4,434 lin. ft. 

.§2,438 70 

1,009 lin. ft. 

.§353 15 
2,796 lin. ft. 

§419 40 
1,115 lin. ft. 

§390 25 
955 lin. ft. 

§200 65 


§0 91 
91 
i'32' 


1,124 sq. yds. 

§1,022 84 

1,897 sq. yds. 

§1,726 27 

627.5 sq. yds. 

§828 .30 

1,774 sq. yds. 

■91,170 84 

700 sq. yds. 

§760 00 

621 sq. yds. 

§391 23 


§1 15 


175 sq. yds. 

§201 25 
337 sq. yds. 

§387 55 

72.5 sq. yds. 

§143 55 

206 sq. yds. 

§55 62 

76 sq. yds. 

§114 dO 

14.5 sq. yds. 

§7 98 




■ 


Collins & Ham 




§2,669 10 

9,400 sq. yds. 

§11,092 00 

1,952 sq. yds. 

§2,967 04 
5,313 sq. yds. 

§6,481 86 
1,318 sq. yds. 

§1,713 40 
1,829 sq. yds. 

§1.883 87 






827 60 




First street 






1 18 
1 52 






55 
35 


1 15 
""i'98 




Collins & Ham 


491 72 


16,136 24 


Grant & Co 










87 40 


4,379 44 








1 22 






15 


6 66 


27 


.T DohertT & Co 










29 90 


8, 157 62 








1 30 






35 


1 00 


1 60 












34 25 


2,951 90 








1 03 






6 21 


63 


65 


B. F.Nay&Co 










346 13 


2,829 78 










§3 75 


1,088J sq. yds. 
§4,081 25 






























4,081 25 




§2 66 


2, 1861 sq. yds. 
§5,816 53 








30 


629 lin. ft. 

§188 70 

3,600 lin. ft. 

§1,368 (10 

3,778 lin. ft. 

§1,227 85 


91 


4624 sq. yds. 

§420 88 

4,124 sq. yds 

§3,257 96 

1,720 sq. yds. 

§1,290 00 


2 34 


134,5, sq. yds. 
'§314 73 




H. Gore & Co 










231 21 


6,972 05 






6 95 
1 05 


9,106 sq. yds. 

§8,650 70 
5,995 sq. yds. 

§6,294 75 






6 28 


79 
75 


i 42 












§769 64 
113 sq. yds. 

§146 90 
237.5 sq. yds. 

§249 38 
122sq. yds. 

S164 70 
276 sq. yds. 

§717 24 

394 sq. yds. 

§1,079 56 

172 sq. yds. 

§172 00 
207 sq. yds. 

§279 45 


185 97 


14,432 27 








.324 


1 30 


Albert A. Libby & Co 








584 48 


9,343 98 




2 00 


115.5 sq. yds. 
$231 00 




3 00 






1 05 








§13,078 80 








13,559 18 






1 17 


3,899 sq. yds. 

§4,561 83 

574 sq. yds. 

§683 06 

1,042 sq. yds. 

§1,23!) 98 

5,022 sq. yds. 

§6,277 50 




33 


1,906 lin. ft. 

§628 98 
791 lin. ft. 

§308 49 
1,326 lin. ft. 

§517 14 
2,651 lin. ft. 

§609 73 
3,157 lin. ft. 

§757 68 


91 


1,318 sq. Yds. 

§1,381 38 

937 sq. yds. 

§843 30 

1,100 sq. yds. 

.§990 00 

2,128 sq. yds. 

§1,659 84 

2,639 sq. yds. 

§2,190 37 


1 35 
""2'74' 
"2 74' 




Collins & Ham 










245 20 


6,982 09 


H. Gore & Co 


2 76 


3,592 sq. yds. 

§9,913 92 
3,400 sq. yds. 

§9,384 00 


1 19 






39 


90 
90 






393 29 


1' 859 30 


Tremont street — Temple place to ScoUay square. 
H. Gore & Co 


2 76 


1 19 






39 








591 82 


13.802 50 






1 25 




23 


78 


1 00 




J. Doherty & Co 








291 35 
294 63 


9,010 42 








1 35 






24 


83 


1 35 




Collins & Ham 






§6,415 20 






9,937 3S 




§2. .54 5 




















9,294.2 sq. yds. 


81.188 


52,744 sq. yds. 


§3.675 


4,721 sq. yds. 


0.332 


31,509 sq. yds. 


§0.871 


21,372 sq. yds. 


§1.173 


3,079 sq. yds. 






Average by final estimate. Total costs 


§2.727 


§25,345 45 


§1.155 


§60,930 29 


§3.635 


§17,160 06 


0.329 


§10,357 72 


§0.836 


§17,873 21 


§1.184 


§4,803 55 


§3,834 97 


§140.305 24 
28,855 78 




8169,161 02 



Note. — The averages for cross-walks do not include those in Bedford and Kingston streets and Tremont street. 

Thirty;nine dollars was deducted from Item " G " on Tremont street (Boylston to Temjile place), as per liual estimate. 

Also the following quantities were not included in the above table, on account of their not coming under the regular items; but they I 



eluded in total i 



of all work.jis per labl 



Beacon street, J. Doherty : 



5963 sq. yds granite blocks on gravel, at «1.37 *^il j5 

104i " " ■ " " $0.65 61 9*J 

137! lin. ft. setting edgestone, at $0.15 20 60 

I,(l45sq. yds. laying brick sidewalk, at *0.40 "° '"' 

10,468 sq. yds asphalt on old concrete, at $2.25 *^S? 1',° 

47,i 1-7 cu. yds. Portland concrete, at $8.50 ^'0^ '^ 

$27,591 71 

30 loads olil asphalt bought from city °° °° 



Steket Department. 



387 



APPEN^DIX G. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 1SS6 under Charge of City Engineer. 



Name. 



Bartholomew M. Young 
James H. Nugent 



Year. 



1886 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report. 



For 


Pub. 


Year. 


Year. 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



29 
26 
29 

22 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Vol. 1. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Enoch Patterson, Supt. Streets and Drains 
Zephaniah Sampson, " " " " 

Thomas Hunting, Superintendent 

Alfred T. Turner, " 

Charles Harris, " 

Nehemiah T. Merritt, " 

James J. Flynn, " 

Charles Harris, " 

Michael Meehan, " 

John W McDonald, " ........ 

J. Edwin Jones, " 



1827 to 1831 


1831 to 1846 


1846 to 1853 


1853 to 1864 


1864 to 1883 


1883 


1883 


1884 


1884 to 1886 


1886 to 1889 


1889 to 1891 



388 



City Document No. 36. 

Paving Department before 1891. 



N"amb of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 






1851 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
188i 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


6 




1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


29 
2 




6 


11 a 


6 


<( a 


5 


i( <i 


3 


(( tt 


3 
3 


a a 


6 


u << 


6 


(1 u 


5 


<( ic 


4 


.! 11 


3 


11 t< 


3 


l< l< 


70 


11 <C 


3 


11 <1 


6 


<1 11 


9 




14 


1 ( 11 


13 




12 


I( 11 


16 


11 11 


21 


It 11 


25 


11 11 


27 


11 11 


30 




38 


U (1 


29 




24 


(1 11 


24 




48 


11 11 


51 


It 11 


47 


11 11 


46 


11 u 


97 


.1 11 


30 


u 1, 


16 


It i; 


23 


(( 11 


30 


11 11 


19 


11 11 


* 







* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Vol. 1. 



Street Department. 



389 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 

Zephaniah Sampson, " 
Charles B. Wells, 

Simeon B. Smith, " 

William H. Bradley, " 

Horace H. Moses, " 

Thomas J. Young, " 

Seth Perkins, " 

Charles Morton, " 



Tear. 



1827 to 1831 


1831 to 1837 


1837 to 1856 


1856 to 1863 


1863 to 1883 


1883 to 1885 


1885 to 1887 


1887 to 1889 


1889 to 1891 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report 



For Tear. 


Pub. 
Tear. 


1859 


1860 


1860 


1861 


1861 


1862 


1862 


1863 


1863 


1864 


1864 


1865 


1865 


1866 


1866 


1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884) 
1885 5 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



11 
12 
12 
13 
11 
5 
6 
8 
13 
11 
3 
11 
10 
13 
12 
17 
11 
13 
15 
11 
16 
19 
18 
16 

43 

58 
69 
81 
129 
14 



Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Vol. 1. 



390 



City Document No. 36. 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name. 



Tear. 



Ezra Forristall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 

Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall, " 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
1869 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name of Docxtment. 



Annual Report. 



Annual report from 1873 to 1884 inclusive; the 
Superintendent's report was embodied in the 
report of the Board of Health 

Annual Report 



Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


1858 


1854 


1854 


1855 


1855 


1856 


1856 


1857 


1857 


1858 


1858 


1859 


1859 


I860 


1860 


1861 


1861 


1862 


1862 


1863 


1863 


1884 


1864 


1865 


1865 


1866 


1866 


1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



12 
4 
10 
17 
40 



45 
22 
16 
23 
21 



* Published in.Vol. 1, Executive Report, 1891. 



Street Department. 



391 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison-Point.) 



Name. 



Frederic W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston. 



{ 



Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge. . 



••\ 



William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge . , . . ? 



Year. 



May 22, 1871, to 
March, 1891. 

June 14, 1871, to 
Jan. 31, 1883. 

March 28, 1883, to 
present time. 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison-Point.) 



Name or Document. 



Annual Report. 



For Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



Ko. of 
Doc. 



19 
12 
16 
23 
20 
12 
10 

8 
12 

8 

15 
15 
19 

8 
12 
19 
25 
22 
20 



* Published in Vol. 1, Executive Report, 1891. 



'K/ 



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