(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

• ilLC Q2U. 






<CCT 












■ MTV c 



Accessions 



Shelf No 



X 




8C_«C«g 















<<:'oc. .«C'<r 









rgcC 



<«M ^ci. <2c cr< 









<:<ac 





















V S3 cot 
^ S3 --<*£* 















V<e3cc<c?fe 






~<L 


v^_ * 


^jQ 


^<: 


' 1 ~- ^^-^ 


^ Sr ^&± 


<r°" 


*+<£$ 


<Z 


rcr 


<7 


c: 


<T 


^^ 


sS 


<:"~'~< 


«? -'-. 


<fe 


<c 


<gi > 


cr 


~<3& CL 



<L<T 



CC/Clc<CCL 



ct c. < 



QC^IZ^ 






jR jCiSat 



<z< <r <r c<: .-"<? 






Or < <£ cc <<r " 



i c C 

co.-c 



<& cr? 



« <( 



:« <<• ct c « 



ci cr 



<r s 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1892bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



(>:> rfri, 



1 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1892 







BOSTON : 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

18 9 3. 



f\^ 









CONTENTS 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



CENTRAL OFFICE. 

PAGE 

Central Office Division 2 

Complaints 29 

Expenses Central Office 2 

Employment' of Labor 26 

Financial Statement (General), 4 
Grade and Number of Em- 
ployees 27 

Income 11 

List of Contracts 12-25 

Organization 1 

Recapitulation of Expenditures, 1 1 

Special Appropriations 5-10 

Bridge Division 29 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Division 33 

Classification of Expenditures, 35 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge 33 

Closing of Drawbridges 31 

Draw Openings 36 

Federal-st. Draw 29 

Harbor and Land Com., Letter, 31 

Harvard Bridge 34 

In General 34 

Prison-Point Bridge 34 

Statement of Traffic over 

Bridges 36 

West Boston Bridge 34 

Paving Division 37 

Areas of Pavements 38 

Brick Sidewalks 44 

Comments on Assessments . . 45 

Chap. 401 of the Acts of 1892, 46 

Contract Work 42 

Distribution of Kinds of Pave- 
ment :;:i 



PAGE 

Edgestones and Sidewalks 44 

Length of Accepted Streets 

and Character of Pavements, 37 
Paving done in 1892 (Com- 
ments) , 40 

Permits, Class 1-5 50-53 

Permit to Feed and Bait 

Horses 54 

Report of City Engineer on 

Special Work 55-65 

Special Permits 54 

Street Openings 49 

Street Hawkers and Pedlers. . 50 

Streets Laid Out 37 

Table of Work done 43 

Table of Money Expended . . 43 

Street-Watering 66 

Contracts for Street-sprinkling, 71 

Comments on Street-watering, 78 

Distribution of Carts. ........ 75 

Income 78 

Money Expended, 1892 76 

Money Expended for Last Six- 
teen Years 77 

Permits for Street-watering . . 70 
Report of Committee on Ordi- 
nances 67 

Style of Water Carts . . 69 

Summary of Day Work 72 

Summary of Contract Work.. 73 

Summary of Work done 74 

Water-posts 77 

Work done at Expense of 

Abutters 73 

Sanitary Division 79 

Amount of House Offal Re- 
moved (10 years) 79 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Amount Ashes Removed (11 

years) 90 

Brown Developing Process. . . 86 
Comparative Statement, Six- 
teen Weeks in Winter and 

Summer.. 91 

Comments on Tow-boat and 

Dumping-wharf 92 

Collection and Disposal of 

Offal 80 

Capacity of Offal Wagons ... 89 

Disposition of Material 91 

Engle Process 83 

Engle Co., Letter 84 

Force Employed 90 

General Discussion 86 

Merz Process 85 

Removal of Ashes 90 

Simonin Proposition 81 

Tow-boat 92 

Sewer Division 93 

Brighton District 104 

Charlestown District 101 

City Proper and Back Bay 

District 96 

Dorchester District 110 

Diagrams 116 

East Boston District 99 

Laws and Ordinances concern- 
ing Sewer Assessment 120 

Metropolitan Sewer (Contract), 94 

Main Drainage Works 113 



PAGE 

Roxbury District 102 

Sewer Assessments (Discus- 
sion) 132 

Sewer Assessments, 1882-1891, 135 
Sewer Assessments (Com- 
ments) 136 

Sewer Assessments during 

1892, under Acts of 1889-90, 137 
Sewer Assessments Levied dur- 
ing 1892 141 

Sewer Release 93 

South Boston District 98 

Stony Brook 109 

Tests of Sewer Covers 95 

West Roxbury District 107 

Street-Cleaning Division, 142 

Average No. Men Employed. . 142 

Difficulties Encountered 145 

Emptying Eilth into Catch- 
basins 147 

Future Needs of the Division, 157 
Ordinances and their Enforce- 
ment 145 

Plant 142 

Push-cart Patrol 143 

Street Sweepings Removed (11 

years) 144 

Conclusion 148 

Street Department — Organi- 
zation. ...... . 149 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGE 

DIVISION. 



Appendix Al (Drawtenders' 

Report) ....... 182 

Appendix A2 (Width of Open- 
ings) 184 

Appendix A3 (Width of 

Bridges) 186 

Appendix A4 (List of Cul- 
verts and Small Bridges) . . 187 

Appendix A4, List of Culverts 



and Small Bridges ( Supple- 
ment; 192 

Appendix A5 (Statement of 

Traffic) 194 

Appendix A6 (Drawtenders' 

Report) broadside facing 194 

Appropriations and Expendi- 
tures 152 

Superintendent's Statement. . 151 



CONTENTS . 



PAGE 

Bridges wholly Supported by 

Boston 178 

Bridges of which Boston Sup- 
ports the Part within its 
Limits 179 

Bridges of which Boston Pays 
a Part of the Cost of Main- 
tenance 180 

Bridges Supported by Railroad 

Corporations 179-80 

Financial Statement — Regular 

Appropriations 152 

Inland Bridges . 167-1 70 

List of Boston Bridges ...... 178 



PAGE 

Public Landings 152 

Recapitulation 181 

Recapitulation Expenses on 

Inland Bridges 172 

Regular Maintenance Ex- 
penses at the North and 

South Yards 173 

Recapitulation Expenses on 

Tide-water Bridges 166 

Special Work 152 

Special Appropriations 175 

Street Improvements, Ward 13, 176 

Total Regular Expenditures, 153 

Tide-water Bridges 154-165 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF PAVING 

DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Paving Division 195 

Detail of Expenditures under 

Special Appropriations .... 2 1 7-240 
Driveways, Block-stone, As- 

pbalt, and Gravel 270 

Expenditures (Details) . . 204 

Execution of Courts, etc 204 

Financial- Statement 201 

Income 202 

New Edgestones 264 

New Brick Sidewalks 267 

Permits Issued 196 

Removal of Snow (Table) .. 217 

Recapitulation (Table) 273 

Street Improvements (Alder- 
manic Districts) 240-261 

Summary of Expenditures 

(Specials) 261-263 



PAGE 

Street-watering Expenditures, 217 

Schedule of Property 273 

Street Numbers Assigned .... 196 

Streets Laid Out or Extended. 198 

Streets Widened or Relocated. 200 
Schedule of Regular Expenditures : 

South Boston 205 

East Boston 205 

Charlestown 206 

Brighton 207 

West Roxbury 208 

Dorchester. 210 

Roxbury 211 

City Proper 214 

Table of Expenditures (17 

years) 195 

Table of Expenses, Regular 

Appropriation 203 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Amount Expended for Collec- 
tion and Removal of House 

Offal 277 

Contracts... 282 

Contract for Refuse Cans 283 

Cost of Carts 280 

Comparative Table, Collection 

Garbage 278 

Disposition of Material Col- 
lected .... 278 

Dumping-boats , Expenses of, 280 

Horse Account 288 

House Offal........ 287 

House Dirt and Ashes 287 

Hay and Grain 284 



Horse-shoeing and Blacksmith- 

ing (cost) 281 

Items of Expenditure 275 

Material Collected and Cost of 

Teams 279 

Material Collected by Districts, 277 

Number of Carts 280 

Organization 288 

Recapitulation (Hay and Grain) 286 

Revenue 276 

Report of Deputy Superin- 
tendent Sanitary Division. . 275 

Total Cost, do 277 

Table of Loads (11 years) ... 281 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY 
SEWER 

Brighton. 

PAGE 

Financial Statement 290 

Eall of Rain and Snow...... 329 

Improved Sewerage (Expen- 
ditures) 292 

Miscellaneous Expenses 292 

New Tow-boat . 292 

Pumping-station Record. ... 330 
Property in Charge of Sewer 

Division. 331 

Recapitulation 326 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 303 

By Private Parties 305 

Surface Drains 305 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 307 

Building Stables and Sheds, 

Brighton 292 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 
DIVISION. 

City Proper. 

PAGE 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 294 

By Private Parties 295 

Surface Drains 295 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 296 

Charlestown. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 297 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision : . 299 

Dorchester. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 310 

By Private Parties 312 

Surface Drains 314 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 317 

East Boston. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 300 

Surface Drains 301 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision . 302 

Building Dike, Winthrop Junc- 
tion 292 

RoXBURY. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 
Day Labor 318 

By Private Parties 320 

Surface Drains 

Work done for Paving Divi- 
sion 322 

West Roxbury. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 323 



PAGE 

By Private Parties 325 

Surface Drains 325 

Work done for Paving Division, 326 
Stony Brook Improvement 

(Expenditures) . 292 

South Boston. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 308 

By Private Parties 308 

Work done for Paving Division 309 



Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion 327 

Sludge Record 331 

Specials, etc 333-344 

Summary of Construction (6 
years) 332 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Average Force Employed 351 

Cost per Mile, exclusive of 

Supervision 350 

Complaints 351 

Cost per Mile, inclusive Su- 
pervision ,. 350 

Cleaning Streets, Cost by Dis- 
tricts 346 

Cleaning Gutters by Districts, 346 

Cleaning Crossings 346 

Cost of Maintaining Dumps. . . 346 

Cost of Removal of Snow.... 347 

Cost of Scraping Mac. Streets, 347 

Cost of Collecting Leaves. .. . 347 



PAGE 

Cost of Cleaning Private Ways, 347 

Financial Statement 345 

General Recapitulation of Ex- 
penses 349 

Income 351 

Miscellaneous 349 

Objects of Expenditure 345 

Patrol System 347 

Recapitulation of Expenses . . . 348 

Stable and Yard Expenses .... 349 

Stock Account 349 

Total Number of Loads Street- 
dirt Removed 351 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



PAGE 

Allston Bridge 28 

Bell-mouth, Dorchester-brook Sewer 110 

Bell-mouth, Dorchester-brook Sewer 112 

Brick Paving, Oswego street 40 

Chestnut-hill Stone-crusher, Brighton 200 

Diagram of Rainfall 120 

Drainage-area Curves 116 

Granite-block Paving, Washington street 54 

Granite-block Paving — Pitching Joints — Washington street 62 

L-street Bridge 32 

Morton-street Culvert, Stony Brook 108 

Rolling and Tamping Rock Asphalt, Broadway, South Boston 42 

Rosseter-street Stone-crusher, Mt. Bowdoin 196 

Sewer Diagram 118 

Tests of Sewer Covers — Diagram 94 

Track Construction, Washington street 36 



Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sm : In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
second annual report of the operations and expenses of the 
Street Department for the year 1892 is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

Organization. 

The work of the department during the past year has been 
carried on under the same organization that was effected when 
the consolidated department was created in 1891, the several 
divisions of the department being as follows : 

The Central Office. 

Bridge Division. 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges Division. 

Paving Division. 

Sewer Division. 

Sanitary Division. 

Street-Cleaning Division. 

Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office and the Boston and Cambridge Bridges Divis- 
ion, is in charge of a deputy superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge Bridges Division is managed by 
two commissioners, the Superintendent of Streets being the 
commissioner for the city of Boston, the other commissioner 
being appointed by the Mayor of the city of Cambridge. 

The work of street-watering, the duty of which devolves 
on the Street Department, is carried on under the supervision 
of the Paving Division, with a foreman of street-watering in 
charge. 






City Document No. 34. 



CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 






The work of the Central Office Division has consisted of 
general supervision over the work of the several divisions of 
the department, correspondence, purchasing supplies, at- 
tending to complaints, drawing and executing contracts, 
keeping of all records, financial, civil service, and legal, 
preparing estimates for public improvements, and other mis- 
cellaneous work. 



Expenses of the Central Office. 

For the current expenses of the Central Office the City- 
Council appropriated the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000), from which the sum of one thousand two hun- 
dred and six dollars and forty cents ($1,206.40) was trans- 
ferred to the Bridge Division, leaving a balance of eighteen 
thousand seven hundred ninety-three dollars and sixty cents 
($18,793.60), which was expended as follows: 



Salaries . . . 

Stationery, printing, postage, etc. 

Travelling expenses, carriages, etc. 

Board, shoeing, clothing, etc., of horses 

Telephone and telegraph 

Copying and compiling 

Miscellaneous expenses, office 

Typewriter and supplies 

Atlases .... 

Messengers 

Newspapers, periodicals, etc. 

Rubber stamps, pads, etc. 

Transferred to Bridge Division 



$15,419 


33 


948 


60 


750 


44 


742 


96 


362 


49 


161 


39 


102 


44 


81 


50 


70 


00 


63 


35 


60 


00 


31 


10 


$18,793 


60 


1,206 


40 


$20,000 


00 



Street Department. 3 

The following condensed statement shows the various ap- 
propriations and amounts expended for the maintenance of 
the department for the year ending January 31, 1893 ; also, 
in separate tables, the special appropriations and amounts ex- 
pended for specific objects designated by the City Council : 



City Document No. 34. 



_S CO 





.<a .... 

.0 . . . . 

CM_ 

.•* . . . 






& 5 






N CD O Oi •* Ol IN O 
CO l- CD OS I- 1— I ** CO 

-*oseo©©ao©r— 

iC N G CD N ^ CN O 
OS © t-^-i^CC^CO re O 
cc"t-Tco iO o> © CO -^H 

IM H H r- CO CD CO Cfl 
rH OS -<* O <N 



r-CDO-f^OiNO 
CO t- CD CO t- H ** OO 

•^OSCO-fOOOOt- 
»C I- OS *N t~ © CM © 
OS © t- t— CO^CC^CO^O 

GO* »■* ocT co* oT ©"co" **" 

CNi— I p- iO CD CD CO © 
rH OS"^ iO CN 











.«o 












" en 


' ' 
















•* 






•«■ 





h(00©-*OflO 

n [- to fj [-■*■* 00 

co <-T go — ' aT aT aT rJH 
I i!3 O 10 n ffl 
OS 1*1 lO CM ... 



CM rHi-l ' 



■fj ' 



J -2 2 3 
fc 5 iJ 5 .. S Ja (2 

cx,'^3 ~ a -) <u q) t» 

H^cscDcJricDSS 

W P5 ^ Q n GO X' 03 X> 



00m 


OS O 


OS 




•* O IT- 


i-H O 




1 -* O 


CD CO iO 


GO O 


GO 








o 




CO CM CM 




CO 












-ti CM 




. 
















'.: 


J CO l( 



r-1 rH CM 



> O CO -+ 
: -* ira i— 
= ■* CO CM 



^s| 

•si O xi 
J>£ a 

s^ o 

OS o 
5^ CD , 

JS > 

ffltE 



co°; 
J. «■ 



J 2- 

C3 tj 



•< S- 
00 H 










<= 


1 








°- lf ^ 


• tin a 


CO 
CD 


£ § 


t-T 1 


•~ | 




3 -* 




"r^ ^ 


Ph 




a" 


m p. 


"S 


> g • 


> „ 

S" 

K to 


1892-3 
Public 
Fire D 
Board 


Cc3 • 


CD co 

«3p-< 
0- 


* ■ 
o 0: 


- 


I 33 * 

32a 










•a 


cs-a 




■O'C'E 
































cd cup 










p,co 




S a if 


CO" 




a cs a 



HH 















- 




* On a CO 




. p a 
. E m.2 


* tin 




^ a c8 


a S . 


is g a 


.5 * & 


°c-3| 


8- P. ° 






£ a 2S 

CD cci - M 
03 03 02 


^2-5? 


O - . 






•*T3 -^ J; 


T3 


ta? 9 cj 




S E-S a< 






cd 35 CD 


CO » » 


£g ■-■§ 




«S2 


C3 
















cowo»a 










CO 


01-00 







^ CO CO cc 


-9" 


.1 




-~ 










-* CO O *-i CO 


CO 

















« "M O CD CO 


























CO 








OS 




HMO 


■* 






















,. 
















€& ~ 


€& • 




€» ■» 




m 


6^ 


. . . 








































» 


• • . 




••d 


• -OcD^ 






CD 


. a 




" c3 


•SspgcS 






H 






























> " 






•>{)s? 






5 



T3 


0.2 s 


CO 

-r 


• tm 

CO c 


Paving Di 
Street-Ule 
New-stret 
Crawford 


•« 


2 


a 


^ - 


ts 










ana 




a 

CS 


a ; 


« 


a 

.2<S 


So:;: 


^ 




CST3 




CJT3 


°-d 


"W 














CD 


&~ 






.2 1 


^ 








cu 






















J3 


a- x 






a.* 




c 


) 



<5 s * s 



000 00 
047 22 

500 75 
206 40 


-r 
.c 

l- CO 


954 37 

000 00 
580 51 


•- in ico 
uot- 1- 

!os 

IO|>- 
iC .o 


OOIO 

O -* CO 

O CD CO 
O O OS 

O CM it— 


000 00 
30 00 

46% 34 
500 00 
500 00 


CO 

10 




•O CM 1-11-1 


OS 
CM 




CNt— Uh 


O r- OcT 
CM i-i 
« l«& 


O CO t— tP 

m co 

CO 1-1 




O 



§a 



CD 



- -a 
cms 

a c< 



,( ~ sn 
■ tsna 



•it ="gO •£ 

CO - s .2 ^ Q 

o =-2 >i £■ 

2> 55 S 3 

^ Qrt C5 w CD ^s 

«° ° i 

lb s % 



C3S 5 t*a J *k CD 



* S 
S 3 



a « 



a 23 
o o 






5- - J=03- 

"^ S 6 .2f S 
EPPflo: 



HH h 



Street Department. 



Paving Division Specials. 



Object or Appropriation. 



Allandale st 

Austin st 

Baldwin St., Ward 4 
Beacon st 



Beacon St., Dartmouth st. to West Chester park, 
asphalt 



Beacon st., West Chester park to Arlington st. . 

Boat-landing, Commercial wharf 

Bolton st., Second st. to D st 

Boston st., Andrew sq. to Mt. Vernon st 

Boylston St., Church st. to Arlington St., paving . 

Brent st 

Bristol st 

Bunker Hill St., between Pearl and Sackville sts., 
Buttonwood St., Mt. Vernon st. to Locust st. . . . 

Centre St., Ward 23 

Chardon st 

Charles st 

Cherry st 

Chester sq., Washington st. to Tremont st. . . . 

Chestnut ave., Ward 9, paving 

Childs st 

City Wood-yard, Commercial St., paving . . . . 
Commonwealth ave., construction ........ 



Commonwealth ave., W. Chester park to Arling- 
ton st 



Conant st., macadamizing 

Cooper st., between N. Margin and 8alem sts. . 
Cornwall st., laying out and constructing . . . 

Davis St., asphalt 

Dearborn St., between Eustis and Dudley sts. . 

Decatur St., Ward 10, asphalt 

Dorchester ave., paving, Wards 15 and 24 . . . 



Dorchester st., between Eighth st. aDd Dorches- 
ter ave., paving 



Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 



$3,770 59 
4,000 00 
4,807 26 

10,000 00 

40,000 00 

1,174 62 

970 00 

1,767 00 

5,000 00 

7,511 33 

5,000 00 

2,530 71 

5,500 00 

1,486 70 

1,261 14 

13,020 99 

11,040 71 

1,966 96 

14,000 08 

650 00 

2,500 00 

121 25 

241,233 01 

1,396 10 
7,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
2,860 71 
2,066 91 
3,133 82 
120,000 00 

386 09 



Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1892, to Jan. 

31, 1893. 



$3,770 59 
4,000 00 
4,807 26 
5,151 15 

40,000 00 

1,174 62 

970 00 

1,767 00 

5,000 00 

7,511 33 

3,473 72 

809 72 

5,500 00 

1,486 70 

1,261 14 

12,671 54 

11,040 71 

1,901 86 

14,000 08 

650 00 

2,500 00 

121 25 

123,170 81 

1,396 10 
5,151 06 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1893. 



1,000 00 
2,860 71 
2,066 91 
3,133 82 
117,299 63 



Carried forward $519,155 08 I $385,647 71 $133,608 27 



$4,848 85 



1,526 28 
1,720 99 



349 45 



65 10 



118,062 20 

2,348 94 
1,500 00 



2,700 37 



;;sti mi 



City Document No. 34. 



Paving Division Specials. — Continued. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Brought forward 

Dorchester st., Ninth st. to Broadway, paving . . 
Dudley at., between Blue Hill ave. and Shirley st. 
Dudley st., Washington st. to Vine St., etc. . . . 

Dudley st., Dennis st. to Brook ave 

East Fifth st., between L and N sts 

Edgestones, Ward 21 

Eighth st., L st. to O St., edgestones, etc 

Eliot st., Tremont st. to Park sq. . . . 

Ellery st 

Falcon St., macadamizing 

First St., Ward 14 

Florence st., asphalt 

Freeport st 

Fulda St., macadamizing 

Geneva ave., grading 

Harbor View st 

Harrison ave., Kneeland st. to Benuet St., asphalt- 



Harvard st., construction 

Harvard st., Washington st. to Albany st., sewer 
and paving 



Haviland st., macadamizing 

Hawes st 

Heath St., widening, etc 

Henshaw St., construction 

Horace and Homer sts 

Houghton st., macadamizing 

Howell St., construction 

Hudson St., asphalting . . . 

Humboldt-ave. extension, grade damages 
Hunneman st., grading and constructing . 

India St., paving . . . 

Jackson St., construction 



K st., between Broadway and First St., macadam- 
izing 



L St., grading, etc. 



Carried forward $669,377 68 



Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 



$519,155 98 

12,000 00 

7,600 64 

721 61 
2,557 34 
3,244 91 
1,000 00 
5,000 00 
9,000 00 
1,780 39 
2,286 60 
3,010 07 
3,281 20 
10,849 55 

505 53 
6,750 21 

562 96 

3,900 00 
5,000 00 

9,922 22 

541 98 

1,100 00 

14,398 67 

1,000 00 

1,169 26 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

886 32 

1,815 00 

13,917 20 

979 01 

1,500 00 

2,000 00 
19,341 03 



Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1892, to Jan. 

31,1893. 



85,647 71 
9,064 65 
7,600 64 
721 61 
2,557 34 
3,244 91 
1,000 00 
3,750 31 
9,000 00 
1,780 39 
2,286 60 
2,564 81 
3,281 20 



505 53 
6,750 21 



239 80 

541 98 

1,100 00 

14,398 67 

1,000 00 

1,169 26 

449 60 



886 32 

1,650 00 

13,053 75 

979 01 



2,000 00 
16,994 53 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1893. 



$133,508 27 
2,935 35 



1,249 69 



445 26 



10,849 55 



562 96 

3,900 00 
5,000 00 

9,682 42 



1,550 40 
1,500 00 



165 00 
863 45 



2,346 50 



$494,218 83 I $175,158 85 



Street Department. 



Paving Division Specials. — Continued. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Brought forward 

La Grange st 

Landing, East Boston 

Landing, Federal-street bridge 

Lehigh St., paving 

Lexington ave 



Longwood ave., Parker si. to Huntington ave., 
paving 

Lynde st 



Magazine st., between East Chester park and 
Norfolk ave 



Medford St., Lexington st. to Chelsea st 

Medford st., between Main and Quincy sts. . . . 

Mercer st., Dorchester st. to Eighth st., resurfac- 
ing 



Minot st 

Motte st., asphalt 

Murdock st 

Ninth st., Old Harbor st. to N St., macadamizing, 

North Margin st., construction '. 

Parker St., Huntington ave. to YVestland ave. . . 

Randolph st 

Regulating Poplar st 

River st 

Rutherford ave., paving 

Sawyer ave 

School st 



Seattle, Hopedale, Windom, and Sorrento sts., 
macadamizing 



Second st., B st. to D St., paving 

Second st., Dorchester st. to I St., paving .... 

Seventh st., D st. to E st 

Shirley st 

Short st., West Roxbury 

Silver St., A st. to D st., macadamizing 

Smith st., construction 

South Margin st., between Pitts and Prospect sts., 



Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 



Curried forward $786,138 31 ! $573,040 26 $213,090 05 



Expended Balance on 

°™ F „ e " hand Jan. 
1*92, to Jan. 1 ... lcnQ 

31, 1893. 61 ' lb9d ' 



69,377 68 

5,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 

2,831 78 

2,500 00 

407 88 
396 21 

1,574 20 
1,031 87 
2,162 77 

945 02 
1,559 63 
1,500 00 

993 94 
6,536 71 
7,214 75 

580 00 
6,000 00 
3,000 00 

4,noo on 

6,696 73 
4,000 00 
4,600 00 

9,000 00 

6,000 00 

16,000 00 

6,000 00 

150 00 

3,403 40 

409 34 

7,364 40 

6,000 00 



4,218 83 I $175,158 85 



1,730 70 



500 00 



407 SS 
396 21 

1,574 20 
1,031 87 
2,162 77 

945 02 
1,659 63 
1,500 00 

993 94 
3,078 87 
1,546 21 

580 00 
4,851 71 
3,000 00 



5,696 73 
2,286 56 
4,500 00 

9,000 00 

6,000 00 

12,630 70 

6,000 00 

150 00 

3,403 40 

409 34 

3,094 60 



3,269 30 
500 00 



2,831 78 
1,702 90 



3,457 84 
6,668 54 

1,148 29 



1,713 44 



3,360 30 



4,269 81 
6,000 00 



City Document No. 34. 



Paving" Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Brought forward 

Stanhope st 

Stanton st 

Stillman st., paving . 

Story st 

Terrace st., paving . , 



Thacher st., Charlestown st. to Endicott St., as- 
phalt 



Tremont st., bet. Roxbury crossing and Hunting- 
ton ave 



Tuttle st. . . 

Vinton St., macadamizing 

Walnut ave 

Warren st. and Blue Hill ave. 

Warren st., granite blocks 

Warrenton St., from Washington St., etc 

Washington st., Boylston st. to Adams square . . 
Washington st., between Florence and Davis sts., 

Way St., paving 

Wenham st., construction 

West Chester park 



West Newton St., between Washington st. and 
Shawmut ave., asphalt blocks 



Worcester square, Washington st. to Harrison ave. 

Worthington St., edgestones, etc 

Allston Bridge, paving 1 



Appropri- 
ations and 
Balances. 



Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1892, to Jan. 

31, 1893. 



$786,136 31 $573,046 26 



1,683 50 

6,000 00 

837 05 

698 30 

477 20 

1,578 69 

2,304 46 
2,918 41 
1,000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

2,918 25 

250 56 

48,000 00 
1,000 00 
5,605 33 
6,000 00 

14,196 47 

4,300 00 

1,600 00 

4,000 00 

252 90 



1,683 50 

4,000 00 

837 05 

698 30 

477 20 

1,578 69 

2,304 46 
2,918 41 
1,000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

2,918 25 

250 56 

48,000 00 
1,000 00 
5,605 33 
6,000 00 

14,196 47 

4,138 74 

1,600 00 

4,000 00 

252 90 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1893. 



$213,090 05 
2,000 00 



161 26 



Totals 



,757 43 $691,506 12 $215,251 31 



1 Money furnished by the City Engineer's Department. 



Street Department. 



Sewer Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Catch-basins, etc., Huntington ave 

Catch-basins, Stanhope st 

Cbarlestown sewers, repairing 

Dike, Winthrop Junction 

Improved sewer, Brookline ave. connection . . . 

Rebuilding Dorchester-brook sewer 

Sewer, Arlington st 

Sewers, Beacon st. and Commonwealth ave. . . . 

Sewer, between Roslindale and West Roxbury . 

Sewers, Brighton 

Sewer, Crawford st., Humboldt ave. to "Walnut 
ave 

Sewer, Dorchester ave., Crescent ave. to Grafton 
st 

Sewers, East Boston 

Sewer, Lawrence ave., Quincyand Magnolia sts., 

Sewer, New st 

Sewer, Orient Heights 

Sewer outlet, Byron St., East Boston 

Sewer outlets, D st 

Sewer outlets, East Boston 

Sewer, Peter Parley Road 

Sewer, Rockwell and Armandine sts 

Sewers, Roxbury 

Sewers, Savin Hill District 

Sewers, South Boston 

Sewers, Ward 23, Washington st, etc 

Sewers, Westville, Freeman, and Charles sts. . . 

Stables and sheds, Brighton 

Tug-boat 

Stony-brook Improvement 

Totals 



Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 



$18 61 

227 05 

2,031 29 

2,333 33 

4,533 95 

30,000 00 

137 63 

3,379 17 

26,336 30 

12,326 70 

2,682 51 

1,437 04 

6,625 14 

1,856 88 

273 33 

64 96 

3 64 

16,023 83 

12,000 00 

24 27 

6,199 07 

7,859 43 

683 56 

4,768 89 

3,000 00 

9,996 64 

14,500 00 

25,000 00 

85 14 



Expended 

from Feb.l, 

1892, to Jan. 

31, 1893. 



$194,408 36 



$18 61 

227 05 

2,031 29 

2,333 33 

4,533 95 

30,000 00 

137 63 

3,379 17 

19,429 57 

9,840 23 

2,682 51 

1,437 04 

6,625 14 

1,856 88 

273 33 

64 96 

3 64 

10,297 48 

10,237 05 

24 27 

6,199 07 

7,859 43 

683 56 

1,293 75 

2,283 59 

8,755 12 

8,542 08 

12,567 50 

85 14 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1893. 



$6,906 73 
2,486 47 



5,726 35 
1,762 95 



3,475 14 

716 41 

1,241 52 

5,957 92 

12,432 50 



$153,702 37 



$40,705 99 



10 



City Document No. 34. 



Bridge Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Berkeley-st. bridge , 

Boylston-st. bridge 

Chelsea bridge, steam apparatus 
Congress-st. bridge, guard . . . 
Maiden bridge, repairs .... 
Savin Hill-ave. bridge, widening 

Totals 



Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 



$6,503 82 
1,200 00 
4,231 55 
534 31 
4,000 00 
5,000 00 



Expended 

from Feb.l, 

1892, to Jan. 

31, 1893. 



$5,837 25 



4,231 55 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1893. 



$666 57 
1,200 00 



$7,400 88 



Aldermanic District Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 


Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 


Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1892, to Jan. 

31, 1893. 


Balance ou 
hand Jan. 
31, 1893. 


Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 1, 


$35,465 83 


$35,465 83 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 2, 


11,800 00 


11,800 00 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 3, 


21,984 26 


21,984 26 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 4, 


605 34 


605 34 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 5, 


2,224 17 


1,758 87 


$465 30 


Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6, 


20,700 00 


14,528 59 


6,171 41 


Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 7, 


20,000 00 


18,718 50 


1,281 50 


Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 8, 


2,551 08 


2,551 08 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 9, 


21,000 00 


21,000 00 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 10, 


41,000 00 


41,000 00 




Street Improvements, AldermanicDistrictNo.il, 


22,046 97 


22,046 97 




Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 12, 


33,232 04 


33,232 04 






24,250 00 


17,966 27 


6,283 73 




24,250 00 


24,250 00 






1,800 00 


1,800 00 










$282,909 69 


$268,707 75 


$14,201 94 







Street Department. 



11 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months 
ending January 31, 1893. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Street Department : 

Central Office 

Bridge Division 

Cambridge Bridges Division 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Sanitary Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Street-Watering 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic Districts 



Totals 



Current 
Expenses for 
the twelve 
months end- 
ing Jan. 31, 
1S93. 



$18,793 60 
128,954 37 

11,079 76 
915,460 99 
560,608 19 
469,370 74 
288,320 42 

94,507 80 



$2,487,095 87 



Special Ap- 
propriations. 



$14,068 80 



691,506 12 
153,702 37 



268,707 75 



1,127,985 04 



Totals. 



$18,793 60 

143,023 17 

11,079 76 

1,606,967 11 

714,310 56 

469,370 74 

288,320 42 

94,507 80 

268,707 75 



$3,615,080 91 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the 
City Collector for the year ending January 31, 1893, by the 
several divisions of the Street Department : 



Paving Division . 
Sewer Division 
Sanitary Division 
Bridge Division . 
Street-Cleaning -Division 



$266,826 22 

120,134 20 

36,426 16 

516 61 

8,256 37 

$432,159 56 



Statement showing the amount paid into the city treasury 
during the same period on account of the several divisions 
of the Street Department : 



Paving Division . 
Sewer Division 
Sanitary Division 
Bridge Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 



$67,792 37 

60,043 09 

35,856 70 

1,481 04 

1,585 02 



$166,758 22 



12 



City Document No. 34. 



List of Contracts from February 1, 1892, to February 1, 
1893, made by the Street Department. 



Paving- Blocks. 



CONTRACT. 


Awarded to 


Proposals 
Received. 


Price per M. 


Large paving blocks, 300,000, city . 
Small paving blocks, Texas st. . . 


Rockport Granite Co., 
S. & R. J. Lombard . 


March 10, 1892. 
Aug. 2, " 


$73 90 
56 00 



North-River Flagging-. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposals 
Received. 


Price per Sq. Ft. 


North-River flagging, city . 


J. J. Cuddihy . . . 


March 19, 1892, 


$0 40 
on wharf. 


$0 45 
on street. 



Edgestones. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposals 
Received. 


Price 
per Lin. Ft. 


Furnishing 10,000 lin. feet edge- 


James E. Lambert . . 

No bids received. 
Thomas Lahey ... 


Aug. 3, 1892. 

Aug. 22, " 
Aug. 29, " 


$0 79 


Furnishing 10,000 lin. feet edge- 




79 



Spruce Lumber. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposals 
Received. 


Price 
per M. 


Price 

for 

Planing. 


Spruce lumber, Dist. 1 


A. M. Stetson & Co. . 


March 5, 1892. 


$15 73 

2 
16 75 

3 
16 45 

5 
16 75 


$1 00 


" " Dist. 2, 3, and 5, 


J. W. Leatherbee . . 


« 


















1 00 


" " Dist. 6 and 7 . . 


J. Lodge Eddy .... 


" 


16 40 


1 50 


" " Dist. 8, 9, and 10, 


A. M. Stetson & Co. . 


.. 


15 73 


1 00 


Furnishing spruce lumber, Har- 


The Geo. W. Gale 


Sept. 30, " 


16 00 





Street Department. 



13 



Bank Gravel and Sand. 





Awarded to 


Proposals 
Received. 


G-ravel. Sand. 




Loads. 


Contract. 


"3d 

a ■ 

m 


6 

3 

3 
O 
P 


so 
£ 
33 


2 

3 
O 
ft 


Bank gravel and sand, Dist. 4 . . 


Wm.Scollans. 


Mar. 19, 1892. 


$0.70 


$1.75 


$0.80 


$1.95 


" Dist. 5 . . 


James Doonan, 


" 


.54 


1.08 


.54 


1.08 


" " Dist. 6 . . 


J. J. Nawn . . 


" 


.80 


1.65 


.90 


1.80 


" " Dists. 7, 8, 
and 9 . . 


Owen Nawn . 


" 


7 
$0.80 
8&9 
$0.80 


7 
$1.70 
8&9 
$1.60 


7 
$0.85 
8&9 
$0.80 


7 
$1.80 
8&9 
$1.75 



Beach Gravel. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
Received. 


Price 
per Ton. 




James F. Mcintosh . . 


March 10, 1892. 


$0.75 





Coal. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposals • 
Received. 


Price. 


Coal. (1,500 tons) Pumping 
Station (Dorchester) . . . 


H. G. Jordan & Co. . 
C Thomas & Co. ,1,000] 

1 J. A. Bradford, f 


April 30, 1892. 
Sept. 19, " 


$3.40 per ton. 

$3.64 per ton of 2,240 
lbs. 



Furnishing Stone to City Crushers. 



Contract. 



Awarded to 



Proposals 
Received. 



Price. 



Furnishing stone to crusher, 
Codman st 

Furnishing stone to city 
crasher, Washington St., 
West Roxbury 

Furnishing stone to Rosseter- 
et. crusher 

Furnishing stone to Dimock- 
st. crusher 



James F. Davern . 

James Doonan . . 
James A. King . . 
H. P. Nawn . . . 



July 22,1 S92. 

Aug. 2, " 

" 13, " 

July 30, " 



$0.70 per ton of 2,000 lbs. 

$0.97 perd. l.of 40 cu. ft. 
$0.78 per ton of 2,000 lbs. 
$0.90 per ton. 



14 



City Document No. 34. 



Excavating- and Removing- Material from Roadway. 



Contract. 



Awarded to 



Excavating and removing, 
Dorchester ave. (Washburn 
to Belfort st., South Boston) 

Excavating and removing, 
Dorchester ave. (Adams to 
Park St., South Boston) . . 

Excavating and removing, 
Dorchester ave. (Wells ave. 
to Ashmont st.) 



Excavating and removing, 
Moreland st. (Dennis st. to 
Blue Hill ave.) 



Excavating 

Texas st. 



and removing 



Excavating and removing, 
Seventh st. (D st. to E st.) . 

Excavating and removing, 
Bennington st. (Porter to 
Marion st.) 



Excavating and removing, 
Nelson st., at Evans st. . . 

Excavating and removing, 
East Sixth st 



Excavating and removing, 
Oak st 

Excavating and removing, 
Cherry st 



Howard avenue, excavating 



J. J. Sullivan 



M. Donnellan 



James McGovern 



J. J. Nawn . . . 
E. A. Janse . . 
J. J. Sullivan . 



P. J. Attridge . 

Thomas Minton . 

M. Donnellan . , 

E. A. Janse . . , 

John A. Casey . , 
Martin F. Kelly , 



Proposals 
Received. 



Apr. 22, 1892 

May 2, 1892 

July 22, 1892 

July 20, 1892 
July 30, 1892 
Sept. 26, 1892 

Sept. 26, 1892 

Sept. 26, 1892 

Oct. 13, 1892 

Oct. 13, 1892 

Oct. 20, 1892 
Mar. 24, 1892 



Price. 



( Earth, $0.80 per cu. yd. 
] Paving, $0.35 per sq. 

( yd. 

C Earth, $0.62 per cu. yd. 
< Paving, $0.18£ per sq. 
( yd. 



$0.62| cu. yd. 



.40 cu. yd. 



(A) $0.65 cu. yd.; (B) 
$0.20 sq. yd. 

(A) $0.60 cu. yd. earth; 
(B)$0.20sq. yd.paving. 



(A) $0.44 cu. yd. earth ; 
(B)$0.19 sq. yd.paving. 

(A) $0.55 cu. yd. earth; 
(C) $2.25 cu. yd. rock. 

(A) $0.64| cu.yd.; (B) 
$0.19| sq. yd. 

(A) $0.78; (B) $0.20. 



(A) $0.89; (B) 0.35. 

Earth, $0.75 eu. yd. 
rock, $2.00. 



Street Department. 



15 





•d 
s 

eg 

5 
■— 
f* 

- 



O fe 










CO 


- 


— 




«r 


l-i 






CD 




^ 


a 










!0 


u 


c 


<u 



*~ rt=> 









15" 



553 . 
d ... a 
«o:a 
w - 
,_ . »« 

mm"? 



>CS «o 



I-H « <M 



«1~ 









H >> 



>>"? 
.O 



>«C5 



is •»„ 



a J? .£" 



<1 <1 



a 


(3 


<4S 


# 


0) 


a 




S 


o 


■« 


a 















« 








1-5 


1-5 


U 



S w 
5 S 



— fl H 



<) « 



ft eg 

* ■ a 

a pB 

'P "P 2 

(2 £ 



SOT' O 
"g,5 5 . 



Sd'S« 

S mag 3 



..I I I I 



o 

o . 

g o a 

** t3 « a 

ft pB-g 

« n S - ■ 

H 



o c8 

a — 

O M 

° c3 



S 2 * 
2p-b 

P 60 

5.2 



£°a 



M 



i o a a 

5^ O O 

■-.■b os * .■ 

c a -a "5 - 

£ c3 ftff-S 

m & S « 3 
& '1 "1 & | 

B9E.S.S 

ftS-ft^-r^ 
ooo" § 

"g'S'a'2 3 

c3 cs 5 ? a 

**> >>>i "■*> r 

a a a a ... 

ftfta,^ 

ffi o <u « 
H « u .« 
u •£ "E u 

I I I I 



16 



City Document No. 34. 



o 

0> 

et 

K 

be 

= 

•H 













•a 
















>, 














o 1 






fe 








00 

o 












13 














>. 














cr 






fl 








o 

00 

o 






i 




13 


-d 








>> 


>> 


>. 




o 


o 


o< 


O" 


6< 




£ 




o 




CO 

o 


o 








۩ 










t 




-c 


•a 








r-5 


>4 


>s 








o< 


cj 1 


6- 






M 


cr 

o 




o 

CO 

o 


© 

CO 

o 








« 














• 


J 








<4- 




*+H 


*+-. 








c 




a 


p 




















<4 














a 




o 


00 






















c 




o 


o 








€& 








T3 














o 


CM 


oi 


cn 






.0- 


CT 


ce 


en 




03 




oc 


00 


oo 




O 












Q> 












w 


ec 


cc 


<M 
CM 


IN 
















"5 


E 


c: 


3 


3 




o 


5d SO bo 


bO 




ft 




p 


3 


3 




o 


< 


< 


<1 


«J 




£ 














C 




6 


d 




o 


O 


O 


a 




t3 


* 


■c 


a 


cSJ 




V 

s 





C 
C 

hj 


a 




OJ 






1 
£ 


Q 


o 







C 


£ 


►a 


hs 






« 


13 




h - 








OJ 














OJ 


ce 


01 










E* 


> 














03 


u 


,a 








oj 


EC 


2 


cj 

O 








~3 




2 


fl 








M 


2 


o 


.2 








j« 


& 


,3 


M 








"3 


oj 


03 


2 








^ 


'd 


* 


I* 






E4 


oj 






OJ 






cj 


T3 




13 


2 






-0. 














K 


„ 


H 


„ 


™ 






£-. 




OJ 










Z 


1- 
cj 


3 


CD 








o 












O 


3 


bo 


"3 


3 








SB 


. 


SB 


bo 










lUC 

3? 


OJ 


OJ 








a 


o 


a 


a 








o 




o 


o 










®1 

bo" 












IS 


» 


OJ " 






13 5 


01 "^ 


cm 


,5?-* 






oj^ 




OJ 


0J^ 






6bT 


wit 


bo 


DO'S 






s « 


a o 


a 


3 03 






OS'* 




>> 

03 










1-1 


Hi 


P 


Hi 







•a «j 

C3 >5 



Ph 34 
OJ OJ 



c-a, 



OJ 


- 


■a 


a 


SI 




o 


OJ 


4d 














cr 




-= 




M 


bn 




2 


a 


a 


> 


>i 


>> 




s 



fe 



03 

~ O O 
o "*" 

O S 5 

O >>>» 

"[^ OJ OJ 

Si * 3 



I I I 











JM 




J4 










a 


3 




CJ 




C3 


03 




OJ 




■Q 


^2 




<w 
















3 


3 
















J= 




■d 


13 




3 


m B 


OJ 


Gl 




o 










o 


sg 


3 


3 




-* 


CJ ^ 


C3 


03 


oj 


e*H 


>>>4 


OJ 


OJ 




O 


ifl 


a 


a 


£ 


•a 

C3 


T3T3~ 


■a 


i?" 




o 


s- F- 






13 






03 oS 


3 


C3 *3 




OJ 


>>>> 


>» 


^ s. 




3 

3 


22 


2 




3 *^ 




o 


3 3 


3 


s ^ 




13 


CJ CJ 


CJ 


§ ^ 




u 


t- bl 


u 


° 






OJ OJ 


OJ 


m >- 




ft 


ftft 


ft 


» ft 




o 


CE H- 


,_ 


«ld 




ex 


Tt CO 


CO 


,- 


CO 




l-H 


o o 


o 


° 




€& 


— 








T3 












CJ 












> 


CN 


ci 


-ri 


CJ ' 




o> 


CB 


— . 




CE 




CO 


CO 


00 


co ; 


0J 








ca 


o" 


co" 


in" 


»r 


ce* 




CM 


CM 




CM 














03 


s 


« 








C 
ft 
O 


ft 

< 


^ 


OJ 

o 




O O 


Si 












CL, 


































DQ 
















*o 
















^3 
































O 










6 


d 


H 






o 




o 


a 


r. 






T3 




bo 


bo 


0? 






OJ 




□ 


a 








■a 








^3 




















C3 

< 




03 
U 

a 
o 


03 

o 


5 


l 




o 

a 


O 


O 


S \ 


fi 




a 


3 


03 - 






w 


o 


a 


a^ 

OJ 

m 


Eh 




Q 


o 

pa 


o 

pa 


^ 




























o 


















s^ 




































a 


















o 


















CJ 
















CM 


£» 














O 










1 






P 


CJ 












p 



























>> 










o 




03 

pa 


o 


OJ 






«3 

P3 

o 
O 


'c? 
o 


M 

CJ 
03 
« 


5 

o 


bo 
bo 

3 

2 






2 

bo 


bo 


bi 










a 


3 


a 




























3 








P3 


ca 


« 






















bo 

.9 


oj 
> 

03 


- > 
03 


> 

03 


bo 

3 




£3. 


XI 


X) 


J3 


33 




t3 


^ 




^3 


CO 






03 




03 








OJ 




CJ 






CO 


fc* 


fe 


fc 


CO 




a 

o 

-a 





3 


3 


3 




o 


O 


O 


O 




s 


s 


a 


3 




3 


g 


£ 


a 


§ 




% 


o 


o 









C 




O 


c 




32 





Street Department. 



17 



:i 



< ^ 



E- O 























^ 






























>> 


































































































■3 


13 


3 




3 T3 






•3 T3 
















- 


C3 >i — 












cS s 






2 C3 






>i^3 r 3 


? 




3 c3 ci 






i-i «*> 




>> >> 


>> !>» 


O "^ 




>S >> ^1 






O O 


o 


O O 


o o 


su y 


o 


O O O 
































ai 


3 -O 


,Q 


■2 -2 


lb ^= 


5-a-a 


a 


/= a! .a 




o 


3 3 


3 




3 3 


c-i 3 




3 3 3 






O O 


O 


o o 


o o 


"«* 


o 




i c o 




Ph 




. ^ 


















tn 






b 0> 


OJ 


b <a 


b a) 


S 3 O 




b 






ft a 


ft 


ft ». 


a< a 


ft«^ ft 


ft 


ft ft ft 






o o 


lO 


o o 


o o 


a> ^.o 


o 


o o o 






o o 


c* 


o © 


o o 


o -^ o 


o 


o o o 








5 O 


>o 


lO »ra 


lO "O 


O UiO 


to 




D to UD 






<t» 












a ** 




























b 




























O 












t3 




























V 




















































































a? 


C-l <M 


N 




1 <M 


M <M 


Ol tM 


CM 


CM C-l <M 






OS C7> 


Ol 


© 


Oi Oi 


O OS 




OS C75 CT. 








> OO 






3 GO 








00 










Ph 


i-H t-h 


»H 


r-l rH 


T-( I-H 


r-H t-* 


1-1 


r-l pH r-l 




_ 


»o O 


~. 










IM O 
















cti 






<M CO 












S 




























O 














^a 












© 


a. 
o 


>> 6o 

1 3 


60 
«1 


60 fee 

<1 «! 


60 

3 cj 


0> O 

a a 

3 3 
1-5 l-S 


^ 


3 *3 ° 
1-6 l-S O 




























te 
































«3 
































- 
































® 
































-— 




c 


) 




C 


> d 


O O 


O O 


d 


O O O 


0> 




C 


) 




C 


) O 


O O 


o a 


O 


O O O 


Srt 




c 


■ 






: a 




: a 


a a 


a 


a c 


a 




o 


c 


. 




c 


> o 


2 .2 


o o 


O 


o o o 


T3 


t 


• 






o 


o o 




o 


o z> o 





CJ 




m 






p 


3 3 


3 3 


3 






a 


T) 


























w 












m 


■g -g 


to K 


"to 


to to to 




1 












a a 


a a 


a 


a a a 


— 


c 


. 




e. 


o 


o o 


o O 


O 


o o o 


<5 


C 


. 




C 


O 


o o 


O O 


O 


O O O 


H 




e 








a 


a a 


a a 


a 


c 


a a 








a 


a 




c3 


« 03 


C3 C3 


C3 


c? 


»»i 






'•£ 


* 
















cS 






=3 


£ 






















"c 


c 


O 


"o o 


o o 


o 


"o 


- 




c 


e 


-, & 


a ft 


ft ft 


ft 


ft ft ft 




c 


. 






O 


o o 


o o 




o o o 


"w 






P- 


cm 






J-t fc. 


ij is 


i^ 


is +2 +2 




t 


. 




a 


O 


o> o 


0) 0) 


CV 


0) a 


CJ 


— 




? 


M 


W 


P 


!^ 


? 


S 


3 K5 


3 


2 3 ; 


3 




























































^ • 






o • 


Cl 




+i 














&f 






03 . 






_J . 


> 




2 

o 














•p«h 






o . 


























,j3 












2 ' 


a 




J 














cc 






* ! 






td • 


o 




3 














H 






a . 
o 






•c • 


■s 




O 




&^ 










s 






to " 






El. ■ 


s 


^5 


C3 

C3 




o 










Eh 






5 • 








"60 


s 




























60 


ft 




















0. 


r- ' 






n • 

o 


(§ 


3 

0) 
.3 


m 


D 1 

















c 


m 






i) * 




o 






a 












O 


c 


O * 


.2 




c 




2 


o 

OS 

o 


0) 


5 


o 


o 
o> 

pa 














a 


o . 


qT 




■ 3 


oT 


oT 


i= 


oT 


<u 


c 










Jz; 






c; 






C3 








rt 












© 


j= 


M • 


.a 


x 




-= 


3 


o> 


.a 


^2 


X 


,£ 








O 


a 


CJ * 




a 


3 . 

a - 


o 


o 


p 


o> 


s 


a 


a 










t 












a 
























-_ 


o . 




o 


















c 


a . 


- 






a 


a 




a 


a 


a 


c 










a 


o 


O 


£ 


— 


o 


o 
o 


60 


o 


o 


o 
a 


c 


) J 






61 


J bo . 


tn 


6l 


60 


60 




bo 


60 


bj 


) 61 






C 




a 


C 


-T" " 




a 




a 


a 


a 


a 
















ci 
















0) 
























>» 












a 


rs • 










rt 




CS 






a 


p 






























a 

a 






T3 


•d • 


— 


— 




T3 


'd 


"g 


-3 


73 


3 


— 






p 


a 






a ? 








a 


p 


- 


£ 


o 






S 




r: 


c 






ci 


*j n 


C5 


a 




o 






6l 


o SB aJ 


60 


6 


I ;r 2 


60 




bf ■ 60 


bo 


61 


) 61 


> 






c 


a > 






a g 




a 


a a S 


a 


3 


p 




































'£ 


■? a 


_; 


- 


Y. 3 


ja S 


■g 


13 g 3 


"5 


^ 


j: 


>-* 














'55 




















e 


a i, 






a c 


a 


r ,° ? 


a 


- 


e 


u 






t- 


u -~ 


5 




to 


3 - 


3 


a'' a 


g 


E 


A 






1 


£ 


£ 


1 


P-* 


ft, 


PB| 


fe 


Pk 


pc, 


tt 


(t 


U 





18 



City Document No. 34. 



( w r> a? <u 



s ft 



*p ■- 



M M 



<m .a .a 



' « CO OS 



0» N rH 






www 



o o 



&0 












N 


** 




(N 


<N 




<N 


<M 












a . . ! 




OS 








CS 




CO 


CO 




CO 




CO 




CO 






"* ""i 




rH 


T ™ 1 


ri 




""1 


rH 


rH 


1-1 


1-1 


1-1 



oo os as ci os to 
ti n n m cq 



bo -fi bo so bo -g 

3 §* 5 2 3 « 
■q 02 <! <! *P t» 



o o 



o o 






<i <, ►? is a a i? 



BQ — 



c « £ - £ 



, s .5 






6 I s J W H 



S fe 



.2 3 •=> E 
> 13 J5 ° 
t> < *h u 



S »J 72 



02 02 72 02 73 73 



02 02 03 72 73 72 



£ [S £ (S £ £■ 
o a) o 0) o o) 

73 73 72 02 Oi 73 



Street Department. 



19 



oca 

--23 



»a 



IIS 






- o 



I* « 



.2 u 5 -S ; 






. o . 



r_o 



4» » 4» 



M M M W M< 



55 s = 






-^ a .2 • - o 5 o 



0.0 ,"v Be©. 



• DZ : 



-» 



1> 



«"= Po.„ 
■ —So 

.5 .2 us 3 ' 



e * -a ^ « © 









C O O Q O 



^ o. ,, *^ - - ^ ^ ^ - .— ( <« -■* • 

„"* = ^'° ►> ,-.© « © _ >IT J 



OO OD CO 00 



fc a Q 



«i < 



60 bB 



1 




"a 

c 


1 





C fi 



ss a 



is a 



*t .s a 



w c 



oo oa i/j x '/i 



3 S 



S 
.3 



So 
*a 


_, • 5 e so 

p a *. a -a 


a — 


« 


* s 5.2 










a 


n a -9 




o 




.nas 


s* 


. A c 5; £ g 




p- 










a u e> o o o 


















Ph PhShCh 
1 1 1 1 


1 | 


B 


P >^X 


r-'N 



S 2 >9 



B 

al. 
.2 >. 

« 5 



3 *! 



a a 



OS i 



60 



a to v a a » ja 






! « .2 -a -g . -3 

I = -o » .2 2 

~ — o C £ 

' -~£ = <- n 

! — -a o u u 

i 5 g 3 3 5 

i £ a o § o 

S ^ o oj m a 

CS Q> Q) o — U 

I I I I I 



° = -a a _ 
» --a a 3 

tH ^ ._ -"" ?■ 



O O « OD O 

'■2 '•§ 3 g 3 

^ S 3 3 S o 
^ o » a o b 



I I 1 I I 



« a S a. gift 3 
Sg S'E'aa-g 
» (d a» a a - 









= 3000 
<2 ° £ <2 £ 



5 o 



a ss a S a « « a o 

y i a y y y y o i* 
.2 S .2 .2 a a a ^ a ,; a 



yyyyyyyj<-^yi 



I I II I I I I I 



20 



City Document No. 34. 




Street Department. 



21 







•6 


■d 


■6 
















a 


ta 


c3 






>> 


>» 


>> 






p 




cd 








^ 


h 






5 


03 


cS 




o 


3 


3 


=1 






cr< 


& 














Ph 












0) 


cd 


cd 








Pc 


& 






a 


Ci 


o 






OO 










cm 


CM 


CO 






» 








•a 












o 












> 
























<d 












o 










PS 


CM 

OS 


CM 

Ci 


CM 






CO 


CO 


CO 


























lO 


"» 






o 










a 






o 

a 

3 
>-3 




p 


ti 


bo 




£ 


p 
<! 


S3 






d 


d 


6 






O 


O 


o 






a 


H 









o 


o 


o 












If. 


o 


o 


o 

a 


o 










c 


•a 

0) 

■a 


a 
o 


a 
o 


a 
o 


"T 


3 


O 


O 


O 


- 


£ 


a 


a 


a 




*! 


C3 


CJ 


CS 










X 










c/. 




o 


o 
p. 


o 


c 




o 


o 


5" 






















— 




CD 


o 


CD 


03 




S 


§ 


S 


Z 

— 






> 












CS 






? 




^ 


= 






ex 




•S 


i* 






B 




o 
io 


03 
— 
CO 






> 












08 




o 

O 
© 


o 

a 
o 

M 

n 








e! 


^ 










D 












■< 


a* 










« 


£ 














o 


"S 




O 










O 


rt 


£ 


O 






o 


cd 


a 








Y A 


V 






eg 










cd 

M 


i 


o 
















,m 


M 


^ 










o 






o 


O 


o 
















,o 


ft 


IS 






eo 


S) 


:J 














































ej 


td 


C3 






PC 


W 


a 




' 


^a 


•S 


^ 
















is 


* 


^ 






60 


-.Ii 


so 






a 


a 


a 




















> 










a 






Pi 


£ 


P- 









in co 








■p 




■c 


■B 




5 
>> 


CO o 


— ^ 
C3 C3 




3 


«a 




p 

5 


o 


a 






3 




& 


•"OO itt 


CT 1 W 


£ 




Or-O 






a 
a, 




(D CD 

P. P. 




CM 










^oa 


C 


tO 




CM 


<j— - - 


c? 


CO 




«■ 




1» «■ 


-d 













<D 












> 
























CD 












O 




CM 








cd 




O 






« 




CO 


c>] 


C-5 


CJ 




a 


cn 








X 


00 












c3 






















OJ 






00 


o 
p, 
o 


CM 


CM (M 






si 


tjj-^ 


^» ci 


£ 


3 
< 




^ 


3 




d 


d 










O 


D 








o 


a 


a 










o 


_o 








t3 












cd 


o 










■a 




3 


































a 
o 


a 
o 


c 
C 


d 
D 


O 


O 


<k 


eg 














C3 


a 




p 




a 
o 


a 
o 


c 
- 


o 






ca 








& 


!z! 


H 


td 

















i> 










p- 




"So 






i^ 




a 
















4-< 










o 




3 






-* 




CO 






CO 




p 
















ts 




T3 

a 






i 




a 










60 






>> 




a 






73 




03 
P. 






co 










p 














c7j 






» 




^^ 






cm 




t5 






a 






H 




'■£> 




O 1 


CJ 




c3 




o 1 


■«1 










E-c 


"to 


5 




P3 


S3 


o 


' — 




r . 


O 

a 


o 


T3 

a 




ts l 




s 


a 


= 


a 








: 


4) 








t 


-a 








a 


-^ 




■a 


43 

a, 

C3 


C 


1. 










a 




-^ 


M 


-= 


— 




p 


p 


c 




t, p. 
a 




2 


a 


c; 


a 










C3 




































o 


















0Q 


CB 


v 


aj 




.q 


£ 


^ 


4J 
























* 


& 


s 


* 




bo 


tlj 


t> 


D 60 




a 


a 




a 
























■a 


CC 


s 


53 






&4 


P. 


P- 





-= 

-i- 
•— 

._ 
> 

C8 





x 


•C 














2 3 


d 


& • 3 


o 


? - co a ' 










Ph 


t- p *■< 




a°a 








H CJ1- 








O ^O 




•» ^ 


•d 








> 
















CD 








o 








0) 




« 


CM CM 

Ci Ci 




CO OO 






C3 




o 


>0 LO 

CM CM 


p. 




o 


a -^ 




Ph 






|-3 ►: 




d 
















13 




d 


13 


d o 


3 


O ij 


^ 


c5J h 


«J 














cd .r 5 




J3 H • 








O ' 




t-5 1-5 














> 






C3 












3 

£ 


< 




[S 


K 




c3 


H 




ja 


Z 




ai 


O 

O 


^5 O 




CD % 








l S 




O so 




. ' a 




3 :; 2 




§ « 








■^ C 








CD ~^ 








'a " 




71 — 




ti i a 




at , s 




ja ' S 




jj c 




^ Ph 




bo 60 




a a 








> > 




r- ■ C3 




P- 


p. 





22 



City Document No. 34. 



u 

> 
ft 



I 






















j- 

























e-» 








i 








«■ 








i 








aT 








I 








a 
























!■ 








.a 

























| 








cS 
















a 
















T3 
















a 
















ce 
































>» 
















W 








I <d 

















































II 


i 






"ft 


C-> 
'«■ 

ID 
O 

3 










Q O $ 


ai «' 






















■ a "5. o. S 


ft p, 




I 


o 3 3 2 


3 3 






ft ft ft 03 


ft ft 






5§ O O £ 











"p. o «n 


°. >» 




! 


• * * « 


S " 




! "O 
















a> 
















> 
































o> 


















O? (M <T3 OJ 


CT C* 


IN 




C3i OS C31 OS 


Ol C* 


O 


tf 


QC 






CO 


cr 


00 


00 




























"a 




-1 







• ** 




CN 




CO rH 






p-t 


or 

ft 


•4 












p 


£ 


c a ™ 


0- > 


°C 


£ 


5 = = 3 

3 i-s 1-3 o] 


O) 

ft fc 


ft 

< 


o 








J5 








na 








a 


D 






CD 











s. 




T3 


*a 


















CD- CD CD P* 
O CJ 


II 

£ 


1 

<So* 


3 




c3 


r 


cb 




>> 


^ 




C 


c 


C 




i 


ca 


O 




W Er 


H 


ft 


fc 


fe 










c 























































a 


















m 


















H 


















r 




a 














1c 













c 






SB 
d 






M 






fi 


e 






Jj 










o 




' a 


a 


O 




E4 






< 


c 
c 


> 


> 


O 












* 




1 




CD 






O 


(£ 


« 


"5 




« 


<a 


a> 


O 




a 


s 




£ 










c 


c 


.9 


a 


4 


03 

C7* 




0. 


c 


c 












£ 


£ 


E 


■c 




ft 


3) 




!■ 


£ 


£ 




et 




"si 






c 


c 


13 







cj 







C 


C 


n 


> 


O 


ft 




61 


) Sj 


1 6 


tj 


si 


si 




a 


c 


C 


p 


a 


a 






► 




3 


> 


> 


_t> 


































■a 


•a 


V 


"a 


73 


V 


T3 






a 


<v 


0! 


_a> 






r^ 


~ 


™ 


3 






3; 





Ph Ph fL, fL, PL, fL, PL, I 



03 

C 

a; 



o 



c 
111 

G 

5 s 















1 




CD 








































O 










. Eh • 








"g 








e3 ° ™ «- 






C 


>» t,S2 






CS 




> CDP3 g 


















1 






A 








p 


a 


er c 

deli 

Son 
Dor 




£ 


a rad 






p< 


O et •- — 1 






CD 

ft 


°. £T3T3 






^H CD O 






O 


■6» ? 










O O CD 






66' 


^ 






13 




*3 "3 






O 

CCS 










a! C = a 






n 


>> c a 





































*Q CD CD D 






ft 


3 ftftft 

O iO 






« 


ot-r-o 
^i _. __. 









°. « 






■S& 






"O- 


. 








> 




















0) 





















a 










Pi 




03 o? 




ca 


C3S CT3 




CO 




00 00 








T-H 




eft 
















i-T rt 




ft 










a 


sc 


6B BO 




£ 


3 


S 3 




<} 


<J < 







a 




a 




•a 

CD 
13 
s*- 
e3? 




CD 

a 




'J 


a 
a 






H 


5 


a 




ha 


h; 


a 










-a 






l> 


b 









P-, 


.'- 


1-3 
















ej « 










>■ 




CD 






ca • 




> 






. 




03 






S ' 




^ 










A 






ID 




.9 






SB • 










-c . 




> 

e3 










OQ 






c 








1 


• 




CD 

a 




























8 


a 


SO 

a 






§ ! 


tB 


"§ 




En 


. 


a 


> 




S5 




c 






O 




c 


"3 




O 


^a . 




n3 
T3 






a 


Bl 


J a 






t4 ^~N 

° CD 

■a > 


1= 


si 






O (3 


c 


a 






« Sh 


h 


1 
5 






So 


-3 






a 
ec 
Si 









. 


_c 


.9 






*J CD 


> 


i>a 
















-c 1 




b 






.5? 


6 


§ ! 






Ph 


O 


C? ' 





Street Department. 



23 



u 

— 

ft 



pq 







6Jo 














c 


























> 












as 












ft 












■a 












>> 












o< 


























£ 












ft 












o 












t^ 












o 












«©• 


■p 












t*> 




d 




5 


DO 








o 


F- 






Cm 




£ 




ft 








< 




C 






















e 




C 










a 




■» 








6B 












s 




? 




S 

3 






f. 














a 















a 


ft 


ft 

a 






c 




e 








c 




c 




a 




c 
c 


S o 


-t 


o 


o 




c 


■» "? 


«■ < 


© 








_■« 


" 2 


ira 




€©■ v. 


- «» 




y ■» 


•» 


■o 
















» 














£ 




























'8 














o 




IN 


<M 


es 


(M 


IN 


0) 


a 


C 


O 







OS 


M 


s 




OO 




00 




■« 


a 


c 


o 


s 


■* 


CM 




Cv 


c^ 


Cn 






o 




a 


© 


a 






ft 


£■ 


E 


a 


c 


M 


,a 


o 


a 


C 


a 




9 


q) 


Cm 


ft 


!"S h> 


►=> o 


fe 


O 










































u 


,3 


•a 

3 




_c 


• 


c 


s 


a 

o 


£ 


% 


'g 


h 


1 




^ 


<5 


a 


J 

* 


<1 


c 

C 


i 


3 




e 


a 


Pm 




Zh 


d 




c 


1 




c 


i 


fe 






































p 


I 












a 














c 


. 


. 










6 















c 


a> 












£ 


on 

2 


13 










> 




S 












63 


3 




a 






'C 




60 


5 


6 

T 




a 


D S> 


a 


t 


U 


K 


c 


X 

I 


SB 


— 
'Z 

pc 


- 

w 




u 


O 


X 




n 




<*-! 


o 


O 


"c 


1 


o 

1 


c 

c 

c 
PC 


O 

4 


m 

ft 




c 


< 


00 


< 


C3 

2 


OS 




T 




O 


* 


bo 






t 


» t 


f 


6 


o .2 


« 




t 


c 


> 5f 




J4 










• a 




a 














C3 










L .2 


a 










i. e 


C 


i. "el 






a 


> i 


1 "rt 


a 


V 


.3 




P 


i » 


; Cm 


ft 


! « 


c 


) 



bo 



s 
eS 



S 



6 








u 












s 






Ch 








c 


O 




c 


o 




c 


d 




o 






ir 


o> 




«»• 4& 


•d 






» 






.fc 












'53 






V 


1892 
1892 


P3 


"S 


(O f( 


DQ 


Cv 




O 






ft 




a 


o 




C3 


Cm 


O H5 


o 
















■a 








"g 








c 


a 


5 


cj 


« 




> 


_> 






s 




DC 


02 




& 


li 






> 


^ 








^_^ 








a! 
















o 








t-t 








a> 








a 








a 








o 








O 
















cs 






bl 


> 60 






Z 


P 






— 


'd 








a 

88 




< 

a 


c 

2 


V 




K 


a 


3 




o 


p 


< 3 




U 


9 


ft 






s 


J t3 






■c 


a 








eg 






CC 










C3 






G 


o 






f- 


«p( 














■2 


If* 




g 


2^ 




a 


3^ 




PE 


W 





24 



City Document No. 34. 

















T3T3 








>s >a 








g*i 








o ° ■ 








£3 CO *J 
















c'" 1 ". 








^«> a 
























£.*"''« 








.„■,"« 








\ -^ ^ 








q-t t^'-N 
















i = ~ 
























o s 








m "73 o 








M^^ 




P-i 




■a >».. 

^4.3 
• go 
a 1 -■ 
a coo 

CD 3^ 






c 








c 


o'^S 






c 


«I--N_ 






3 . 






O 


PQ W ^ 












«■ , , , 




•o 








01 








> 
















'5 








ca 


CJ 




ca 
C3 


a 


s 




"3 


c 






o 

ft 


s jj 




o 


o •< 












o 




















TJ 


a 








3 


6 

c 


£ 






-4 


< 


c2 








u 








o 






c 


O 






£■ 


• 








w 








« 










a) 










M 










3 


















































3 










,3 










-a 








'a 


g 

c3 








P 










« 






e5 

o 


C 


^■s 




<! 




i ^C ca 




E-> 

o 
O 


V 

c 

PC 


Ah 
<u ca 






"5 


. 3 

6I.CQ 

.9 

■5 £ 






cS 


«T3 









3 C3 






rt 


g'Sb 






ill 








s 


n« 












'3 


S* 






pq 


PU 







— ~ o 

•? « a 
wo 
s ca * 

o> ° a 
I I I 



as 



s.3 



>S>J 



►, m" C 3 

5 %%. a 

Z « a> o 

< ! = a 

J JOO 

fc O a; ^ 



fJiJj 



OK" 



S =2 



« a cj 
P-iJ J 



KHPd 







a'> S 



.5 

® 
o 



» «■ «■ 



<1 <1 ft 



■a a 



oj O ^ 



ix 





CD 


















! i 




tu t, 




ft <u 




<= 


» 




c 






c 


° 


ca 
o 


CO CO 






- m 


Ph 


/: 








"a 










c 


o 




c 


o 




c 






IT 


CO 












" » 




«§■ 






a> 










t 


oj 




C 


^ 




& 


J3 






ca 




- 


- 




a 


lit 


■6 






ca 






_> 






"5 


e- 


<M 




a 


CS 


ca 




CO 


C3 


*r. 


~ co" 








cs 


,= 


^3 


c 


c. 










p 1 
(5 


ffi 


a 


^ 


a 


o 




6 
o 


*3 






ca 




6X) 


•a 




3 


3 


C 


l 


<1 




^ 




!z 


a 




p£ 


1 
o 




!b 


P3 














O 




C 








"C 








e* 

o 

« 


c 


ft 

13 


Eh 


> 


> 3 


O 


PP 


H 


O 


A( 


^ 




c 


3 




ca 


O 




PC 


GQ 










t> 


M 




c 


















ca 












c«. 


ca 




^ 


is 




•g 


ca 




cc 


ca 
















OQ 


OQ 





Street Department. 



25 




S 


ea 


<? 






o 




a 




a 




o 




O 




O 




£ S3 











~~ 


























o 






















«& 










































6 












































T3 












































=3 ,-. 




















<L 


o 


■ £" 




































3 




X 


















g.' ^ 5 

is m 






a 
o 














C3 


— 




















cc 




















e 


iH 


"o 










o 








o 




& 




^ 




o 








• 


X 






a" 




Ph 








s 


»* S 

>» § 






o 














a 









o a 




























■d 

J-t O 


o 

: 

c 
a 
c 


o >> 

• §> g :S 

3 -* * o 


•6 So 
■^ cc » 

1 ^1 


M 

a 






a 


o 


in 


>. ? 




. a 




S -p 


C3 






= 

-T 


3 




<° « 







3 


GO 






p. 

<M 
O 


d tl C? 

■4 m 2 


" £ 1 


d CO 


CO 
CM 






€& ■«©■ 






re 


<* 


«& 


m 


T3 






















> 




1 


CM 


CM 


cn 




C-l 


CN 


IM 


<M 


"3 




r 


OS 


CT 






O 


CT 


O 


cn 


o 




r 


GO 










X 




00 


0) 






















Ph 
























— 


CO 


c 


CC 




•* 


CT 


CD 


CO 








CN 


:~ 








(M 




CM 
























C3 






















O 
p 




c 
a 


bi> 

3 


1-5 <1 


Ml 


SB bi) 

a 3 


,o 




- 


«3 





< 


< 




fn 












a 






















o 






















O 












o 










SB 








d 


0) 










QJ 








CO 


to 


T3 






a 




£ 




o 




5 


a 


73 








o 
















3 


O °Q 




"3 




CO 


-. 


5 




> 


1 1 


■8 H v 




o 




a 


J4 


<j 




1 


E 


>> ~ 2 




O 


c 
c 
c 


M 

o 


5 
a 






1 


1 


3 o : 

o si 




g 


5 


pq 


'3 
3 






< 


fe 


-; a 




►s 


I s 


1 


rCi 




a5 




£ 


























ki 






















c3 




M 






















.a 




M 


























o 




Sri 


















c! 








CD 




■a 












£ 




c 




0> 




3 








a 
o 

.s? 




a 
o 

a 

a 




p 


c 
c 


" £> 




,a 
a 

T3 


CI 

Si 








5 

o 




o 


c 


O 

.s 


a 


t 

i 
c 








Eh 
O 


a 






c 


a 


ft 


a 


c 
E 






_0J 


Eh 


o 




,a 




a 




[o 


c 






cd 


o 


b£ 






c. 


£ 






c 






■a 


P 

> 




S 


c 


p 

S 


< 

c 


° l 


c 
c 






a 

M 
T3 




'a 




o 


c 


"3 

o 


i 

c 




c 






OQ 








D 


( 


is 


c 


> £ 


e 








5 


1 


a 
. 3 

05 


6 
a 


.2 




> a 


E 

b 


cu 

a 

o o 


CU 




bf 

c 

c 


1 


SB 


( 




o 


o 


s 


>-< 




fj 


1 


< 
a 


*Cy 
O 


J 

2 


I 5? 




c 


o 


o 
o 






"" <B 


< 


0) 


c 


t <U 


k 


>- 






5 




H 


pe 


Ph 




) 1-1 


& 


ff 




r/ 





2t> City Document No. 34. 

Employment of Labor. 

Owing to the large number of laborers hired in 1891, but 
few requests were made on the Civil Service Commission 
during the past year. There are now about 2,500 names of 
men on the books of the department eligible for employment. 

The department records show that 80 applications have 
been made on the Civil Service Commission for 261 men for 
various kinds of work. Of the names submitted, 297 men 
were given employment. 

The following table shows the grade and number of em- 
ployees in the Street Department : 



Street Department. 



27 



Grade and Number of Employees in the Street 
Department. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Centra] 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 




1 












1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 




1 

2 
1 


1 














2 


Clerks 


7 
10 
27 

3 


5 
9 
11 
26 
3 
8 
3 
5 
17 


5 
4 
6 

2 


1 
11 
13 


1 
3 
3 


20 




37 






60 






31 










3 




1 










9 










3 














5 














17 


Aid 






3 
5 












18 


1 
20 


2 




6 






20 












4 
2 


4 








26 






2$ 








1 




1 






21 


8 

6 

t 


2 


25 


56 






6 












20 
34 


20 














34 








1 






1 








15 


7 


15 


22 


Engineers and assistants .... 




14 


17 


46 


4 




4 








6 






6 














3 






2 


3 






5 














6 


108 


170 


49 


37 


108 


479 



28 



City Document No. 34. 



Grade and Number of Employees, etc. — Concluded,. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Central 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 




6 


103 


176 


49 

195 

4 


37 
61 


108 


479 
256 










4 








2 

1 

479 

4 

1 

37 
5 




1 


3 












1 






498 




170 


2 


1,149 






4 


H 












1 














37 








5 






2 
4 








2 




1 


3 
5 


3 


2 


4 


17 




5 






38 
1 


38 






1 

2 


2 




9 


12 






1 














2 






4 








4 






3 
1 
2 








3 














1 






11 

8 


7 


4 




24 


Steam drillers 




8 


1 
3 

2 
16 








1 






14 








17 












2 






57 


158 


65 


2 


298 












10 
3 
4 
1 

8 


12 


5 


1 


4 


32 






3 






1 
2 








5 






2 
11 






3 






1 


1 


23 










7 


766 


759 


436 


341 


131 


2,440 










hn 


-=t 


"a 


o3 


_Q 




F 


m 


ctf 




U 


rr 










ns 


> 




o 


hn 




c 




o> 




w 


o 


O 


(U 





cr 


<D 


UJ 


■a 




nS 






2: 


bfl 



Street Department. 29 

Complaints. 

The number of complaints received from January 1, 1892, 
to February 1, 1893, is 254, distributed as follows: 

75 related to the Paving Division. 

23 related to the Sewer Division. 

53 related to the Sanitary Division. 

20 related to the Street-Cleaning Division. 

83 related to Street-watering. 

The complaints concerning street- watering were made 
in the part of the season when the weather was too cold 
for the work of street-sprinkling. There is annually, in 
March and December, a period of more or less suffering on 
account of dust, as it is impossible to keep water turned on 
in the post hydrants in freezing weather, or to water streets 
when the temperature is low. 

Other complaints were made before the work of street- 
watering was fairly organized, but it is satisfactory to note 
that after the organization was effected the complaints ceased 
almost entirely, and during the latter part of the summer 
scarcely any were received. 

It is also gratifying to note that but twenty complaints 
were received -as to the matter of cleanliness of the streets, 
showing that the extra efforts which have been put forth in 
this direction have been fully appreciated by the public. 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 



The establishment of two districts in the Bridge Division, 
one known as the Northern District, including all bridges 
north and west of the Charles river, and the other known 
as the Southern District, with headquarters at Foundry \/' 
street, including all bridges south of the Charles river, has 
continued to work satisfactorily. 

The headquarters of the Northern District has been 
removed from Charles-river bridge and transferred to War- 
ren bridge, and a suitable building for office, stable, and car- 
penter shop has been erected, the work being done by the 
regular division force. 

Federal-street Draw. 

The draw of Federal-street bridge is now operated by an 
electric motor, which was substituted for the steam power 
employed two years ago. There are two draws on this 



30 City Document No. 34. 

bridge, each of which is 32 feet 9 inches wide, and carrying 
a roadway of 21 feet in width, and a sidewalk of 10 feet 
3 inches in width. 

Each draw is moved by a 20-horse-power electric motor 
connected by shafting to a horizontal drum under the draw ; 
from this drum motion is transmitted to the draw by wire 
ropes. The draws are operated and controlled by one man 
from a small house situated between the draws, and near the 
channel on the Boston side. 

Gearing is provided for operating the draws by hand or 
horse power in case of accident to the electric plant, but up 
to the present date no accident has occurred to demand its 
use. The substitution of electricity for steam power in the 
operation of drawbridges is of very recent date, and the 
result of this innovation has been carefully watched through- 
out the year. 

The person controlling the movements of the draws can 
regulate the speed with which they can be opened or closed 
more easily by means of an electric motor than by any other 
power in use on bridges. 

No repairs have been made or needed on the motors since 
they were adopted on the bridges, and the introduction of 
electricity to operate drawbridges is regarded as a success. 

Among other changes that have taken place during the 
year may be mentioned the erection of a new drawbridge 
house at Federal-street bridge, in a location convenient to 
the street; the old house, which was situated on the main 
pier, has been removed to Maiden bridge, for use there as a 
drawtender's house. The removal of the house from Federal 
street is of great advantage to the drawtenders, as they now 
have an unobstructed view of the channel from any part of 
the draw. 

New asphalt sidewalks have been laid on Broadway, 
Washington-avenue, and Dover-street bridges, to replace the 
old sidewalks, which were in a dangerous condition. 

Essex-street bridge underwent extensive rebuilding, as an 
examination showed that the bridge was in a dangerous con- 
dition. No adequate appropriation being available for the 
work, the money ($1,804.82) was taken from the mainten- 
ance appropriation of the division. 

The only bridge which has inconvenienced the public to 
any extent has been the Charles-river bridge, which during 
the present year has been closed to public travel twelve 
times, from one to three days at a time. This structure has 
been reported as unsafe for some years. 

An order was introduced into the Board of Aldermen on 
October 3, 1892, requesting His Honor the Mayor to petition 



Street Department. 31 

the General Court, at its next session, for the passage of an 
act authorizing the city of Boston to borrow outside of the 
debt limit the sum of five hundred thousand dollars, said sum 
to constitute a special appropriation for a new bridge to 
Charlestown. It is to be hoped that an appropriation will 
be made in the near future to rebuild this bridge, as the fre- 
quent closings to public travel occasion great inconvenience. 
Care has been taken to provide a duplicate set of trucks, 
gearings, and machinery for all the drawbridges, and several 
times daring the year when breakdowns have occurred, the 
delay has been trifling, owing to the rapidity with which new 
apparatus could be procured. 

Closing of Drawbridges. 

The following ordinance has been passed by the city gov- 
ernment : 

Section 1. Chapter 1 of the Ordinances of 1891 is 
hereby amended in Section 3, by inserting the following 
words after the word " closed " in the last line but one of 
said section, namely: 

" But he shall not allow any vessel to pass through the 
draws of Congress-street bridge, Mount Washington-avenue 
bridge, Federal-street bridge, Broadway bridge, or Dover- 
street bridge, on any day, except Sundays or holidays, from 
6.15 o'clock A.M. to 8 o'clock A.M., or from 12 o'clock M. 
to 1 o'clock P.M., or from 6 o'clock P.M. to 7 o'clock P.M." 

Application was made to the Corporation Counsel to ascer- 
tain whether or not this department would come into conflict 
with the Constitution or statutes of the United States by 
carrying out the provisions of this ordinance. 

A reply having been received that, while the city ordi- 
nance referred to was in harmony with the Constitution and 
statute law, it would be necessary to submit the same to the 
Harbor and Lund Commission for approval before carrying 
the order into effect, a hearing before the said Commissioners 
was held, occupying two days, in the month of July, 1892. 
The following letter was received by this department as to 
the decision of the said Commissioners, and consequently no 
further steps have been taken towards closing the draws. 

Harbor and Land Commissioners' Office, 
Commonwealth Building, 65 Bowdoin Street, 

Boston, August 25, 1892. 
Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir: The Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners have had 
submitted to them for their approval Seetion 3 of Chapter 36 of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1892 of the City of Boston, and Chapter 2 of 



/ 



V 



32 City Document No. 34. 

the Ordinances of 1892 (second series) of the City of Boston, under the 
provisions of Section 28 of Chapter 53 of the Public Statutes. 

The above-named sections submitted to us provide for the closing of 
the draws of Congress-street bridge, Mt. Washington-avenue bridge, 
Federal-street bridge, Broadway bridge, and Dover-street bridge, on 
all days except Sundays and holidays, from 6.15 o'clock A.M. to 8 A.M., 
and from 12 o'clock M. to 1 o'clock P.M., and from 6 o'clock P.M. to 
7 o'clock P.M., and the di'aw of the Chelsea bridge, south, from 
11.55 o'clock A.M. to 12.10 o'clock P.M., and from 12.50 o'clock P.M. 
to 1 o'clock P.M. 

We have given this matter very careful consideration, and have also 
given a public hearing upon the subject, Avhich was largely attended, 
and at which the city of Boston was represented by its corporation 
counsel. The evidence at the hearing made it clear to us that the pro- 
posed closing of the draws could not be enforced without serious injury 
to the commerce of Boston, and we do not feel justified in giving our 
approval to the above-named sections of the Revised Ordinances. 

We therefore hereby respectfully notify the city of our non-concur- 
rence in its action. 

For the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, 
(Signed) Henry W. Swift, 

Chairman. 

The following report, giving the reasons for this action of 
the Harbor and Land Commissioners, is taken from their 
annual report for 1892 : 

" The Board gave a hearing upon the matter, at which 
the city and also the various shipping and commercial inter- 
ests affected by the proposed closing of the draws were 
represented. It appeared that the largest vessels using the 
Fort Point channel, which are naturally the most important 
commercially, cannot pass through the draws of the bridges 
except at high tide, and that the proposed closing of the 
draws when high tide occurred within the hours of closing 
might, in some cases, cause a delay of twenty -four hours, or 
even longer. 

" After a very thorough investigation of the facts of the 
case, the Board declined to concur in the action of the city, 
and the proposed ordinance failed to become a law. 

"The ordinance also covered a proposed closing of the 
draw of the Chelsea bridge over the south channel of 
Mystic river, and the same decision was arrived at in that 
case. 

"In view of the exceeding difficulty of making any reason- 
able regulations to compel the absolute closing of the draws 
within certain hours, the Board deem the matter to be well 
provided for by the existing provisions of the Public 
Statutes, which leave the question of the closing and opening 
of the draws to the reasonable discretion of the drawtender, 
the statute providing that the drawtender shall furnish all 
facilities for the passing of vessels, and 'shall allow no 
detention, having due regard for the public travel." 5 



Street Department. 33 

The report of the Deputy Superintendent (Appendix A) 
gives a detailed statement of expenditures, and contains 
much useful information concerning the repairs made on the 
various bridges and other matters. 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES DIVISION. 



By the provisions of the Acts of Legislature of 1870 and 
1882, the care of the bridges uniting the city of Boston with 
the city of Cambridge is placed in the hands of two commis- 
sioners, one of whom is appointed by the city of Cambridge, ' 
the other by the city of Boston. 

The Boston commissioner, according to the Revised Ordi- 
nances, is the Superintendent of Streets, and the present 
commissioner for Cambridge is Mr. William J. Marvin. The 
bridges thus provided for are four in number, namely : 

Canal or Craigie's bridge. 

Harvard bridge. 

Prison Point bridge. 

West Boston bridge. 

One of these bridges, Harvard bridge, was finished in the 
latter part of 1891, and was turned over by the Construction 
Commission on August 1, 1892. The following report will \y 
show, briefly, the general condition of the various bridges, 
the repairs made, the work needed to be done, together 
with a detailed statement of expenditures : 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

The paving of the roadway on both sides of the draw, as 
recommended in last year's report, has been repaired, 
and the draw has been painted. The engine-house roof has 
been tinned and painted, and the chain for moving the draw 
repaired, and the machinery in the engine-house where neces- 
sary has been made good. The fender on the up-stream side f 
is in bad condition, and will have to be replaced with a new 
one. The sides of the waterway need new planking. New 
tracks have been laid in anticipation of running electric cars 
over this bridge ; but before they are allowed to run over the 
draw it should be carefully examined and repaired. It has 
been in use for eighteen years, and is very old for a wooden 
draw ; the upper chords of the trusses, the angle blocks, and 
the samson posts should receive special attention. 



34 City Document No. 34. 

Harvard Bridge. 

This bridge was opened to the public September 1, 1891, 
and has been in constant use since that date. The plank 
upper flooring was laid in 1889, and consequently was in 
poor condition when the bridge was opened ; it was kept in 
repair until October, 1892, when a new upper floor was laid 
at an expense of $3,533.51. 

The electric cars of the West End Street Railway Com- 
pany commenced running on the bridge August 15, 1892. 

The centre of the pier of the draw has been stayed to the 
track circle by rods. 

The bridge is in good condition, except that it should be 
thoroughly painted. 

Prison Point Bridge. 

The draw has been planked, the machinery to raise the 
draw repaired, and the draw arms and fences painted. 

West Boston Bridge. 

The repaying of the roadway of West Boston Bridge from 
the draw to the Boston abutment alluded to as necessary in 
the last report has been done, and the bulkhead next to the 
Charles-river embankment has been rebuilt and a new brick 
sidewalk laid. 

The up-stream end of the draw-pier has been strengthened 
by driving new piles, the surface of the pier has been newly 
planked, and four thousand three hundred and twenty-nine 
feet in length offence, and the draw, have been painted with 
two coats of white-lead and linseed-oil paint. 

The plank sides of the waterway and the surface of the 
draw-pier are in bad condition, and will have to be repaired 
next year. This bridge is in fairly good condition, and will 
not require any more than the ordinary repairs for 1893, 
with the exceptions noted above. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended of the number of draw- 
openings and the number of vessels which passed through. 

The amount of revenue received for dockage, sale of old 
material, etc., during the year has been $940.88, one-half of 
which has been paid over to the city of Cambridge. 

The following is a statement of the payments made by the 
city of Boston on account of West Boston, Canal, and Prison 
Point bridges from February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893, 
also for Harvard bridge from September 1, 1892, to January 
31, 1893: 



Street Department. 



35 



Amount of appropriation for financial years 
1892-3 / 

Amount transferred from Harvard-bridge ap- 
propriation, September 17, 1892 

Total appropriation .... 

Amount expended to January 31, 1893 . 

1 Unexpended balance . . . . 

Classification of Expenditures. 



$9,000 00 
3,580 51 



$12,580 51 
11,079 76 

$1,500 75 



1892. 



Salaries 



Printing and eta- 
tionery 



Tra veil ing ex- 
penses 



Messengers 
Claims . . 



Drawtenders 

assistants . 



and 



Ordinary repairs . 

Replanking and 
labor 



General 
Account. 



$275 00 

37 93 

40 15 
10 30 
22 50 



Paving . . . . , 
Lumber .... 
Ironwork ... 
Electric lights . , 
Electric current , 



Electric cable re- 
pairs 



Fuel 

Sundries . . . , 
Repairs to gas-lamp, 
Cleaning bridge . . 
PaiDt and painting, 
Inspecting .... 
Watering roadway. 
Water-rates .... 

Insurance 

Tools and hardware, 



Totals . 



Canal 
Bridge. 



$1,140 00 
311 41 



34 66 
274 89 

80 97 
360 00 



135 99 

28 52 



177 43 
54 45 

125 00 

12 00 

16 00 

6 00 

25 46 



Harvard 
Bridge. 



$425 55 
9 50 

1,731 29 



14 17 
134 26 
380 55 

50 00 

35 44 

13 00 

13 53 

93 12 



Prison 
Point 
Bridge. 



$149 23 | 
200 00 ' 



18 62 
132 05 
32 11 



West Bos 
ton Bridge. 



1,045 88 
520 71 



15 47 
82 50 



2 75 



60 00 



5 50 

2 50 

12 53 



637 79 

391 78 

28 18 

540 00 



89 10 
52 20 



88 $2,782 78 $3,067 62 $777 18 $4,066 30 $11,079 76 



195 24 
225 83 
235 00 
12 00 
11 00 
3 75 
77 84 



Total. 



$275 00 ; 
37 93 ' 

40 15 

10 30 
22 50 ' 

2,960 66 
1,003 51 

1,731 29 

691 07 

812 89 

275 52 

1,280 55 

50 00 



35 44 




238 09 




97 00 




93 12 


>< 


372 67 




295 75 


<y 


502 50 


V 


24 00 


V 


32 50 


) ' 


12 25 




185 07 





1 The above balance was transferred to the Street Department, Bridge Division. 



36 



City Document No. 34. 



Number of Times the Draws in Canal, Harvard, Prison 
Point, and West Boston Bridges have been opened, and 
the number of Vessels which have passed through dur- 
ing the year ending January 31, 1893. 



Date. 


Canal or 
Craigie's. 


Harvard. 


Prison Point. 


West Boston. 


February 1, 1892, 


|S 

03 

ft 




|S 
03 

A . 


m so 

S 3 
>2 


is 

03 

u 


o ~ 
CD bo 
§ 3 

>2 


IS 
« . 


S so 
II 




<4H 05 

o so 


«H,q 


= 5? 


o ** 


O S) 


S3 


o 5? 






>-.5 


HT3 




n-TJ 


n5 


hT3 




t.'O 




£ 3 








o p 




a> a 




January 31, 1893. 


8 ft 


3 ea 


42 <p 
S ft 


S 03 


42 a) 

a» ' 


- s 
a a 


42 0) 


a t« 




5° 


3 ft 


sO 


3 ft 


Uo 


3 ft 


go 


3 ft 




& 


5 


fc 


£ 


K 


fc 


fc 


fei • 


February, 1892 






99 


104 


26 


30 


24 


42 


33 


44 5 


March . . . 










154 


163 


30 


35 


16 


19 


39 


51 v 


April . . 












348 


370 


120 


160 


19 


24 


145 


235 V 


May . . . 












372 


411 


131 


196 


3S 


53 


178 


313 |/ 


June . . 












490 


505 


135 


206 


44 


64 


235 


635 ^ 


July . . . 












523 


556 


215 


323 


23 


26 


251 


421 i' 


August . 












347 


360 


266 


357 


79 


89 


223 


418 u' : 
319 -' 


September 












373 


375 


196 


288 


124 


130 


194 


October . 












346 


352 


106 


161 


79 


94 


179 


259 "' 


November 












259 


263 


117 


175 


31 


36 


155 


226 U 


December 












244 


285 


117 


179 


39 


59 


122 


210 ; 


January, 1893 








95 


123 


8 


8 


16 


24 


20 


. , J 
36 


Totals .. . 








3,406 


3,582 


1,350 


1,939 


493 


601 


1,652 


2,957 



Statement showing Traffic over Bridges. 



Date. 
1892. 


Bridge. 


Foot 
Passengers. 


Teams. 


Cars. 


Car 
Passengers. 


September 17, 

6 A.M. 

to 7 P.M. 




6,927 
1,487 

1,735 
3,584 


4,552 
1,576 
2,104 
2,953 


493 
146 

1,059 


11,221 
5,355 

2S.592 






13,733 


11,185 


1,698 


45,168 




TRACK CONSTRUCTION, WASHINGTON STREET. 



(Showing new design of grooved rail, with ties imbedded 
in concrete ) 



Street Department. 



37 



PAYING DIVISION. 



The following table shows the length of accepted streets 
and the character of pavements, February 1, 1893 : 



Length in Miles, 





C3 

,4 
< 


o 
o 

s 


o 

"C 

pq 


o 
O 


Is 

Is 

E-i 


Gravel. 


T3 

•n 

50 
O 
6 


3 

o 


1891 Report. 


4.66 


69.29 


0.36 


5.94 


204.56 


139.48 


10.30 


434.59 


Feb. 1, 1893. 




















*5.10 


+40.61 


0.36 


3.87 


29.99 


0.77 




80.70 




0.03 


8.06 




0.29 


14.11 


0.09 




22.58 






3.80 
11.19 




0.27 
0.15 


2.33 
23.12 


20.40 
2.10 


0.1S 
5.57 


26.98 


South Boston .... 


0.50 


42.63 




0.37 


7.77 


.... 


0.01 


52.82 


15.07 


0.89 


76.93 






0.09 
3.26 






26.16 
43.41 

16.80 


46.74 
34.21 
17.83' 


1.40 
1.50 
2.12 


74.39 










82.38 










36.75 
















6.00 


74.78 


0.36 


4.59 


208.74 


137.21 


11.66 


443.34 



Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 

* Of this amount 0.69 miles = asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount 2.07 miles = granite-block paving on concrete with pitched joints. 



Total public streets, 443.34 miles. 



There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year 7.715 linear miles ; 221.4 square 
feet have been discontinued without changing the mileage ; 
corrections to previous measurements show an increase of 
1.035 miles, making a total net increase of 8.75 miles. 



38 



City Document No. 34. 



The rate of this increase from year to year is shown in the 
following; table : 



1859 1 11 .50 miles. 


1882 

1883 


359.85 miles. 




201.32 " 


367.99 " 




207.4 


1884 


. 374.10 " 


1873 


209.24 " 


1885 


379.60 " 


1874 


313.90 " 


1886 


383.55 " 


1875 


318.58 " 


1887 

1888 ........ 


390.30 " 


1876 


. 327.50 " 


392.72 " 


1877 


333.2 " 


1889 


397.84 " 


1878 


340.39 " 

345.19 " 


1890 


404.6 


1879 


1891 


409.6 " 


1880 ........ 


350.54 " 


1892 


434.59 " 


1881 


355.5 " 


1893 


443.34 " 



The following table shows the areas of pavements in square 
yards, arranged by districts : 





Asphalt 


Block. 


Brick. 


Cobble. 


Telford 

and 

Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Feb. 1, 1892. 


73,906 


1,521,562 


3,638 


80,389 


3,755,106 


2,311.628 


201,941 


7,948,170 


Feb. 1, 1893. 
City proper, 
Charlest'n . 


*86,931 
421 


872,292 
1S6.108 

88,633 

237,172 

158,994 

2,067 

70,659 


3,638 


45,609 
2,936 
5,311 
3,057 

408 


587,780 
211,853 
46,132 
402,646 
940,405 
454,181 
773,166 
404,667 


13,811 

1,105 
387,693 
43,503 
248,627 
732,259 
564,750 
273,217 


3,555 
114,983 
11,920 
20,896 
32,970 
35,893 


1,610,061 
402,423 
531,324 


S. Boston . 
Roxbury . 
W. RoxVy 


6,901 
6,559 


808,262 
1,366,913 
1,209,403 






1,441,545 










713,777 














Total . 


100,812 


1,615,925 


3,638 


57,321 


3,820,830 


2,264,965 


220,217 


8,083,708 



* Of this amount, 8,501 sq. yds. = asphalt blocks. 

Total public streets, 443.34 miles. 

Note. — The city is subdivided on original boundary lines. 



For the sake of comparing the character of the pavements 
in the city of Boston with that of other large cities, consid- 
erable care has been taken to collect and arrange the follow- 
ing table, which is supposed to give the results up to the 
present date, information having been received direct from 
the cities named : 



Street Department. 



39 



Distribution of Kinds of Pavements, 
proved Streets. 



Public and Ini- 





a 

o 
1 « 


o5 

CO — 


Chicago. 
Per cent. 


Buffalo. 
Per cent. 


a 

* ? 

a> 33 

fe Ph 


Philadelphia. 
Per cent. 


-3 § 

O 0) 


Sheet asphalt . . 
Coal-tar .... 
Asphalt block . 
Block stone . . 


43.90 

15.74 

7.56 

15.82 


1.17 


1.40 


33.12 


8.52 


5.00 


1.20 


29.85 
1.86 


0.40 
2.79 
63.13 


34.60 


0.05 

75.27 


2.00 
20.00 


0.16 
16.87 


Cobble .... 


8.98 




0.20 
0.01 


42.00 

5.00 
14.00 


1.03 






0.07 


0.40 


00.08 










* Telford .... 




7.48 
59.64 


32.19 


0.26 
31.62 




9.92 


* Macadam . . . 


8.00 


15.95 


12.00 


37.16 
33.58 








0.02 


























100.00' 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


Mileage .... 


165.00 


450.00 


878.70 


379.5 


441.54 


819.8 


443.34 



*Not usually separated in the reports of the various cities. 

An inspection of the foregoing tables shows that in Boston 
only 17 per cent, of the total mileage is paved with granite 
blocks, 1.36 per cent, paved with asphalt, 0.08 per cent, 
paved with brick, 1.03 per cent, paved with cobble, the re- 
mainder, or nearly 81 per cent., being either macadamized 
or gravelled. 

It is noticeable that our percentage of macadam and gravel 
streets is much larger than that of most other cities, and 
specially prominent is the fact that Buffalo has nearly thirty 
times as much sheet asphalt as Boston. It is not to be 
wondered at, in view of the show made by the table, that 
the expense of maintaining our streets calls for a much 
larger outlay of money every year than in cities provided 
with more permanent forms of paving. 

Considering the cost and the temporary results obtained 
by repairing our macadam roads with a veneer of crushed 
stone, it would seem to be in the direct line of economy to 
adopt a more permanent form of roadway surface, suited to 
our peculiar conditions of business traffic. 



40 City Document No. 34. 



Paving laid in 1892. 



A considerable area has been paved with granite blocks 
laid with pitch joints on a cement concrete base. The ex- 
perience with the paving laid in this manner in 1891 is very 
favorable, and in comparing streets laid in this manner with 
those laid in the usual manner on a gravel base, the conclu- 
sion is irresistible that the new method is worth all it costs, 
and that all block paving in old and solidly built-up business 
streets should be laid in this manner. The value of the con- 
crete base is unquestionable, while the great practical value 
of the pitch joint over the gravel joint is that it gives 
immediate use of the pavement in a clean condition, and saves 
the weeks and months of mud and dust required to fill the 
joints by the tedious and unscientific process of grinding up 
gravel under the wheels of teams, and sifting the powder 
into the joints by jarring the blocks with the same vehicles. 
Experiments in a small way have been made by using 
cement in place of pitch, without decisive results as yet. 
Such a compound would have several advantages over pitch, 
as it would be possible to solidly fill the joints between the 
stones, and the nuisance arising from heating pitch on the 
public streets would also be done away with. The difficulty 
of taking up and replacing pavements laid on a concrete 
base has not proved so serious in practice as was anticipated, 
and with suitable and proper precautions should not be a 
serious objection. From its cost this method is not likely to 
be adopted in streets not yet built upon, and before any 
pavement is laid it is only fair play to the pavement that all 
digging up of the street that can be foreseen should be done, 
and the trenches thoroughly consolidated. Sufficient atten- 
tion has not been given to this subject, and notwithstanding 
the fact that all persons and corporations having interests in 
the street are notified weeks and months in advance, no 
sooner does the work begin on a street than numerous appli- 
cations are at once made for new T excavations. Manholes and 
all covers showing on the surface should be easily adjustable 
to grade, and should be made of non-perishable material, cer- 
tainly not of wood, and their form and dimensions and 
location should be controlled by the Superintendent of 
Streets. There is great room for improvement in the design 
and use of these structures. 

A large area of sheet asphalt has been laid, and experi- 
ence continues to show that in the localities for which it is 
adapted, it is a most admirable pavement. Asphalt blocks 
have been laid to a small extent this year ; they make an ex- 




I ': H o 



1 vrWvf 



1 






Street Department. 41 

cellent surface, but results shown are not favorable for their 
continued use, due principally to our cold climate. 

No brick pavement has been laid. It is probable that 
brick pavements are better adapted to districts destitute of 
suitable stone than to Massachusetts, where granite is an 
important article of commerce. 

Two of the three streets paved with brick on a gravel 
base in 1891 seem to withstand the comparatively light 
travel to which they are subjected fairly well, but the third 
street shows a marked tendency to chip at the joints. 

In supervising the work of paving, care has been taken to 
show a smoother and more carefully graded surface than has 
heretofore obtained. In building a new street with a fall of 
one or two feet in a hundred, without a street-railroad track 
and with a p reestablished grade, the work of so laying out 
the surface as to secure smooth curves, with good surface- 
drainage, is an easy matter. With an old street, with only 
an approximation to an established grade, with adjoining 
buildings at different grades, and with all sorts of sidewalk 
openings into cellars and areas ; with a street warped in 
every conceivable manner, and to crown all a street railroad 
running through the centre that must have a good cross 
section and suitable' lines and grades, — the task becomes an 
engineering puzzle. It is precisely this state of affairs that 
obtains in the old part of Boston ; the grades of the streets 
within the small limits that apply to surfacing the paving are 
varied, and as incapable of being reduced to a system as is 
the ground plan of the same part of the city. The methods 
pursued previous to the year 1891 have been : first, the 
street railroad was laid in accordance with the best skill of 
the railroad engineer, who naturally had the best interests 
of the road in view. The edgestones and catch-basins were 
then placed where necessity compelled ; the various manholes 
and other covers were set about right, and finally the paver 
proceeded to set his paving within the limits remaining for 
his work. 

In reversing the process above outlined, and in laying out 
the work to be done on paper in the first place, as had been 
done during the years 1891 and 1892, and in insisting that 
every successive workman should bring his work up to the 
line and grade given, the task of the engineer has been the 
usual one of the reformer. Many parts of the work have to 
be done over and over, from the reason that the workmen 
have not sufficient skill or inclination to work to line and 
grade, and that it has not been required of them in the past. 
Particularly in laying sheet asphalt on a concrete base has 
a higher standard of workmanship been called for than ever 



42 City Document No. 34. 

before, and this year the sub-grade has been made to templet 
in all cases in which templets could be used, and in this way 
almost perfect results have been obtained. On the perfectly 
level streets of the Back Bay, the central half of the road- 
way has been made in the shape of a section of a cylinder, 
with the centre line parallel to the curbstone grade, and the 
quarters have been made with sets of templets cut to circular 
curves of different radii, all tangent to the central half, and 
arranged to fit the gutters, which vary in depth about six 
inches from catch-basin to summit. 

In all contract work, the city furnished all materials ex- 
cept paving- gravel, which was furnished by the contractor, 
and the price included in the bid. In most cases material 
furnished by the city was delivered to the contractor on 
wharves or at city yards. In some cases, paving-blocks 

were delivered on or in the vicinity of the work under exist- 
ing contracts ; old material removed Avas delivered by the 
contractor at some convenient point where the city had use 
for it ; if of no use to the city, it was given to the con- 
tractor. 

Under the charge of the City Engineer, fifty-six contracts 

were executed, covering 5.97 miles of street, and costing, 

inclusive of material and labor furnished by the city, 

$435,160.20. 

Forty-five thousand one hundred and seventy square 

yards block paving on gravel base with gravel joints were 

laid; average cost, $3.10 per square yard. 

Seventeen thousand and eighty-nine square yards block 

paving on concrete base with pitched joints were laid ; aver- 
age cost, $4.75 per square yard. 

Three thousand three hundred and twenty-nine square 

yards Sicilian rock asphalt, on Portland concrete base, at a 

cost of $3.60 per square yard. 

Twenty thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine square 

yards of Trinidad asphalt paving were laid on concrete base 

and on old cobble; average cost, with concrete base, $3.60 

(when old base was used, $2.25). 

Thirty-six thousand four hundred and forty-three linear 

feet of edffestone set : average cost of small amount of new 

work, including supervision, culling, etc., $1.30. 

Twenty-four thousand three hundred and ten square yards 

of sidewalk relaid ; average cost, new work, $1.40 per square 

yard. 

Three thousand two hundred and twelve square yards 

flagging cross-walk ; average cost, new work, $5 per square 

yard. 




o 



Street Department. 



43 



Block asphalt paving on a sand base, 4,232 square yards 
were laid; average cost, $3.60 per square yard. 

The following table shows the work done on paving, edge- 
stones, sidewalks, etc., for the years 1889 and 1890, com- 
pared with the years 1891 and 1892 ; also the work for the 
year 1892 separately, and paid for out of both regular and 
special appropriations : 



1889 and 
1890. 



1891 and 
1892. 



Granite blocks laid and relaid 
Edgestones set and reset . . 
Brick walks laid and relaid . 
Flagging set and reset .... 

Asphalt 

Hill gravel 

Hill sand 

Filling 

Stone 

Beach gravel 

Executions of Court, ( 
Grade damages, etc., ( ' " 

Watering streets 

General repairs 



170,557 sq. yds. 
149,356 lin. ft. 
5S.0S6 sq. yds. 
31,994 sq. yds. 
10,384 sq. yds. 
$106,997 08 
13,589 23 
44,836 61 
58,141 51 
14,671 78 
42,448 32 
105,553 92 
434,665 5S 



340,356 sq. yds. 
374,598 lin. ft. 
203,087 sq. yds. 
66,699 sq. yds. 
80,243 sq. yds. 
$213,644 20 
27,570 49 
73,150 15 
203,838 89 
32,086 56 
49,071 16 
198,771 42 
560,954 S6 



142,766 sq. yds. 
181,146 lin. ft. 
100,512 sq. yds. 
28,625 sq. yds. 
38,557 sq. yds. 
$120,492 83 
16,166 70 
61,585 30 
94,973 98 
15,491 75 
23,437 51 
94,507 80 
311,109 16 



Money Expended. 




1889 and 
189U. 


1891 and 
1892. 


1892. 


Total amount expended 


$2,113,182 58 


$3,866,943 52 


$1,875,419 24 



44 City Document No. 34. 

Edgestones and Sidewalks — New Edg-estone. (Lin. ft. set.) 



Yeae 




ft 
o 

>> 
6 


3 

M 

o 


a 
o 

o 

,a 

"5 
o 

02 


a 
o 

o 
M 


3 
P 


3 
1 


a 

O 

I 
pq 


a 

is 

o 
o 
es 
O 


"3 
o 


1881 . 




6,294 


8,328 


6,304 


443 


13,112 


1,314 


263 


794 


36,852 


18S2 . 




3,398 


10,930 


4,190 


2,119 


8,235 


5,454 


5,543 


1,595 


41,464 


1883 . 




2,763 


7,306 


4,660 


98 


2,467 


4,381 


1,895 




23,570 


1884 . 




4,691 


9,733 


6,189 


2,450 


18,310 


4,610 


106 


696 


46,785 


1885 . 




5,291 


4,644 


2,538 


1,333 


4,976 


1,952 


303 


546 


21,583 


1886 . 




5,790 


8,978 


2,463 


349 


11,051 


2,451 


737 


174 


31,993 


1887 . 




3,222 


10,192 


4,269 


436 


5,229 


2,726 


2,055 


223 


28,352 


188S . 




4,359 


5,191 


4,531 


971 


5,051 


580 


867 




21,550 


1889 . 




2,946 


13,224 


2,139 


1,419 


6,794 


10,404 


1,845 


573 


39,344 


1890 . 




2,781 


11,475 


4,946 


9S1 


9,882 


3,288 


3,042 


988 


37,383 


1S91 . 




8,236 


22,693 


11,724 


4,131 


18,138 


4,617 


2,032 


2,227 


73,798 


1892 . 




9,222 


25,506 


9,631 


11,238 


36,859 


9,970 


9,001 


2,804 


114,231 


Total 




58,993 


138,200 


63,584 


25,968 


140,104 


51,747 


27,689 


10,620 


516,905 



Brick Sidewalks. (Sq. yds. set.) 















>, 














o 


a 




£ ■ 




a 




Year. 


ft 




o 


■£ 




o 


a 


o 










ffl 






Ph 


o 








P4 




-a 


w 


a 

u 




60 


e3 


"3 




5 


o 


o 

02 


C3 


Q 


£ 


M 


O 


H 


1881 . . . 


5,207 


11,491 


3,961 


893 


337 


1,096 


381 


159 


23,525 


1882 . . 


5,905 


7,510 


4,984 


1,658 


179 


1,834 


117 


887 


23,074 


1883 . . 


4,392 


7,675 


4,794 


1,095 


2,795 


3,354 




177 


24,282 


1884. . 


4,870 


7,279 


4,437 


1,616 


4,902 


954 


.... 


739 


24,797 


1885 . . 


4,756 


3,896 


1,473 


722 


892 


479 


46 


342 


12,606 


1886 . . 


5,273 


5,285 


2,112 


1,002 


2,843 




58 


527 


17,100 


1887 . . 


5,970 


7,693 


3,768 


1,500 


1,348 


643 


.... 


56 


20,978 


1888 . . 


2,540 


6,910 


3,164 


1,110 


614 


346 




75 


14,759 


18S9 . . 


4,835 


10,489 


1,942 


1,362 


638 


124 


138 




19,528 


1890 . . 


4,913 


7,651 


1,915 


1,947 


1,155 


274 


900 


791 


19,546 


1891 . . 


3,881 


9,098 


3,628 


2,176 


1,478 


967 


377 


120 


21,725 


1892 . . 


10,423 


20,231 


4,484 


12,847 


10,462 


2,905 


1,068 


3,451 


65,871 


Total 


• 62,965 


105,208 


40,662 


27,928 


27,643 


12,976 


3,085 


7,324 


287,791 



Street Department. 45 

The cost to the city of Boston of laying the edgestones 
and brick sidewalks, shown in the foregoing table, from 
1881 to 1891, was $581,230.21. 

Of this amount the sum of $277,698.88 was assessed on 
the abutters. 

Of this sum of $277,698.88 the sum of $10,810.48 was 
abated by order of the Board of Aldermen, $218,942.62 has 
been collected, and $47,945.78 is still uncollected. 

The laying of edgestones and sidewalks from 1882 to 1891 
was done under the laws of 1882. 

Chapter 50 of the Acts and Resolves of that year provided 
that "... the Mayor and Aldermen or Selectmen or 
Road Commissioners may establish and grade sidewalks in 
such streets as, in their judgment, the public convenience 
may require, and may assess the abutter on such side- 
walks one-half of the expense of the same. All assessments 
so made shall be a lien upon the abutting lands, and be col- 
lected in the same manner as taxes on real estate." 

The Mayor and Aldermen or the Selectmen, 
or Eoad Commissioners, mav grade and construct sidewalks 
and complete partially constructed sidewalks in any street as 
the public convenience may require, with or without edge- 
stone, and may cover the same with brick, flat stones, con- 
crete, gravel, or other appropriate material, and may assess 
not exceeding one-half of the expense proportionally upon 
the abutters on such sidewalks. ..." 

This law, while it had the effect of obliging the abutter on 
the sidewalk to pay only one-half the cost of the work, and 
was therefore favorable to him in that respect, provided no 
special appropriation from which could be defrayed the pro- 
portion of the expense which the city of Boston was obliged 
to assume. 

The cost of this work came out of the so-called regular 
maintenance appropriation of the Street Department, or else 
out of such special loans for street improvements as were 
made from time to time by the city government. 

On account of the limited amount of money which could 
be spared for the purpose of constructing edgestones and 
sidewalks from the maintenance appropriation of the Street 
Department, the practical effect of the old law was that 
hundreds of unsatisfied petitions for the construction of side- 
walks were on file in the office of the Superintendent of 
Streets, and these petitions remained on file sometimes for 
several years before they were granted. 

To provide a remedy for this state of affairs and enable all 
applications to be promptly attended to, the present admin- 



46 City Document No. 34. 

istration interested itself in the Massachusetts Legislature 
to obtain the passage of the following Act. 

[CHAP. 401 OF THE ACTS OF 1892.] 
An Act relating to Sidewalks in the City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston may 
pass an order that the superintendent of streets of said city may make 
a sidewalk along any highway or part thereof in said city, specifying in 
the order the locations, heights, widths, and materials for the sidewalks, 
and said superintendent shall carry out such order. 

Sect. 2. Any expenses incurred for any work so ordered and 
performed shall be paid out of the moneys appropriated under the pro- 
visions of section one of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and shall be repaid to 
said city as the assessable cost of the work by the owners of the several 
parcels of land bordering on the part of the highway along which the 
sidewalk is made ; provided, however, that if any such parcel is devoted 
to public use, said city may assume and pay the whole or part of the 
amount assessed thereto, if said city shall deem proper so to do. 

Sect. 3. Said superintendent shall so apportion the said assess- 
able cost to the parcels of land aforesaid that the amount apportioned to 
each parcel shall bear to the total assessable cost the proportion which 
the number of lineal feet of each parcel on said highway bears to the 
number of such lineal feet of all such parcels, and a lien shall attach to 
the parcel and to any buildings Avhich may be thereon for such amount, 
as a part of the tax on such parcel. Said superintendent shall give 
notice of the amount of every such assessment to the owner of the 
estate assessed therefor, forthwith after the amount has been deter- 
mined. 

Sect. 4. The provisions of sections sixteen, seventeen, and 
eighteen of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-one and acts in amendment thereof 
shall, so far as applicable, apply to all assessments made under this 
act. 

Sect. 5. Sidewalks in said city shall hereafter be made and paid 
for only in accordance with the provisions of this act, the provisions of 
chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-one, and acts in amendment thereof. 

Sect. 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 16, 1892. 

Section 2 of the foregoing act provides that the expense 
shall be defrayed out of money appropriated under the pro- 
vision of Section 1 of Chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, as 
amended by Chapter 418 of the Acts of 1892, commonly 
known as the " Laying out and Constructing of Highways " 
act. 

Under this act an annual appropriation of not more than 
one million dollars ($1,000,000) can be made by the city of 
Boston for the purpose of laying out and constructing of 
highways, the constructing of sidewalks, and the construct- 
ing of sewers. 



Street Department. 47 

This appropriation is not considered in the determination 
of the authorized limit of indebtedness of the city, and can 
therefore be made annually by ordinary vote. The practical 
effect of this law is to provide a large sum of money avail- 
able for the purposes of sidewalk construction, so that all 
petitions for this Avork in the future can be promptly 
satisfied. 

The change in the law by which the abutters, instead of 
defraying one-half of the cost of the work, are now obliged 
to defray the whole cost has naturally created some dissatis- 
faction. This dissatisfaction arises largely from the fact 
that the citizens of Boston up to the present year have 
obtained street, sidewalk, and sewer improvements largely 
at the expense of the general tax-levy. 

In no other city in this country is such a method pursued. 
In many cities the whole expense of the paving of a street, 
the expense of building the sidewalk, and the expense of the 
sewer is charged directly on the abutting property. In other 
cities a proportion varying from one-half to three-quarters 
of the entire expense is charged to the abutters. This 
method permits these cities to do enormous amounts of 
paving, sewer, and sidewalk work, the expense of which is 
not defrayed from money raised by general tax, but is 
assessed directly on the abutters. In some cases, where all 
the work is done by contract, the contractor is paid by cer- 
tificates issued as a bill against the abutting property, and he 
is obliged to collect his money directly from the owners. 

It is in this way that the financial exhibits of most of the 
large cities in this country show such a large amount of work 
done on such a small amount of money raised by taxation, 
and has led to the frequent criticism, made by persons who 
know nothing about the subject, that Boston gets less in 
public works in proportion to the amount raised by general 
tax than any other city in the United States. 

Comparisons purporting to show the amount of work done 
in the various cities in this country, and citing the amount 
raised by taxation in the several cities, from which deduc- 
tions are drawn as to the economical conduct of affairs, are 
absolutely of no value, as they do not take into account the 
different methods of doing the work or the financial methods 
adopted for paying for them. 

The previous law concerning the payment Ivy the city of a 
large proportion of the expense of sewers and sidewalks has 
had the effect of retarding public improvements of this char- 
acter, and it is only under the laws of 1892 that improve- 
ments of this character can be carried out as fast as they are 
demanded. 



48 City Document No. 34. 

The work done by the department under the sidewalk 
law during the past year has caused dissatisfaction in some 
instances. In addition to the general dissatisfaction with a 
law obliging abutters to pay the whole cost instead of a 
portion of it, complaints have been made that the assess- 
ments charged by the city are excessive ; complaint is also 
made that interest on the cost of the work is added to the 
assessment from the time of the passage of the " order to 
build " the sidewalk, instead of from the time of the comple- 
tion of the work. 

In regard to the prices charged by the city for the laying 
of edgestones and sidewalks, it may be said that the cost of 
such work depends on the kind and quality of the material 
used, and the thoroughness demanded in putting it in place. 
Edgestones can be bought at prices ranging from forty-five 
cents per lineal foot up to two dollars and a half per 
lineal foot. For the sum of forty-five cents per foot a 
poor quality of granite, roughly split out in short lengths 
and of shallow depth, can be obtained. Edgestone of this 
description is frequently laid in some of the small country 
towns. It is unsightly, and, owing to its shallow depth, 
it is soon thrown out of line by the frost. 

For the sum of two dollars and one-half per lineal foot the 
best quality of granite edgestone, quarried in long lengths, 
of extra depth, and finely dressed with six-cut work on all 
exposed surfaces, can be obtained. 

The department has adopted specifications for edgestone 
which call for a kind of edgestone superior to the first 
quality described above and inferior to the last. This stone 
is cut at the City Institutions at Deer Island, at a cost 
delivered on the wharf of $0.75 per lineal foot: the same 
kind of stone is bought by contract for $0.79 per foot. To 
this cost must be added the charges made for wharfage, 
teaming to site of work, laying, and incidental expenses. 

The cost at which edgestone is furnished and laid is 
believed to be reasonable, and it is probable that dissatisfac- 
tion concernino- charges is due more to the increased amount 
paid under a law assessing the whole cost on abutters than 
to the feeling that the department does work at an excessive 

£OSt. 

The same remarks apply to sidewalks, as brick can be 
purchased from $8 to $13 per thousand, and, depending on 
the quality used, a great difference would be made in the 
cost of the work. The so-called concrete sidewalks also 
differ in price. By using a worthless coal-tar in the mixture 
instead of pitch and asphalt, a cheap sidewalk can be made, 
which, however, will crack and need repairing inside of two 



Street Department. 49 

years. The department has aimed to do the best possible 
work consistent with charging abutters a fair price. 

Concerning the dissatisfaction in regard to the payment of 
interest on the cost of the work from the time of the passage 
of the order to build, it would seem that the act does an in- 
justice in this instance. Interest should be computed from 
the date that the owner is notified of the completion of the 
work and of the amount of the assessment. 

Street Openings. 

Ten thousand six hundred and ninety-six permits were 
granted during the past year to open streets. The excava- 
tions made under these permits aggregate 101.9 miles in 
length, and show the extent of this work. 

The Street Department has been accustomed to grant to 
the various gas and other companies whose work would in 
certain cases admit of no delay a so-called " emergency per- 
mit," which allowed excavations to be made without special 
permission being obtained, the only requirement being that 
a daily return of openings made under this form of permit 
should be forwarded to the office of the Superintendent. 

Two thousand two hundred and thirty-seven openings of 
an average length of six feet each were made under " emer- 
gency permits," for breaks in water and gas pipes which 
were alleged to require immediate attention. These open- 
ings were made under 79 permits. 

Numerous cases of misuse of these " emergency permits " 
have occurred, during such times as it was difficult to ob- 
tain the usual permit. After the cold weather had set in, 
and the fact had been publicly advertised that no permits 
would be issued except in case of obvious necessity, open- 
ings became frequent under the emergency claim, until the 
Superintendent was compelled to revoke even this form of 
permit, which was issued originally in the interest of public 
safety. This action, placing the companies involved at 
great risk of sudden loss, brought about immediate changes 
in the course pursued by them, and led to the guarantee on 
their part that no such violations should occur in the future. 

It may here properly be mentioned that real-estate owners 
are extremely careless in providing sewer and water connec- 
tions for their several buildings, both old and new. in streets 
that are advertised to be improved and regulated, and fre- 
quently call for a permit to open for gas, water, or sewer 
connections soon after the department has put down a per- 
manent pavement. It is believed that this trouble will 
remedy itself in time, as the public is gradually finding out 



50 City Document No. 34. 

the difficulty of obtaining permits where the department has 
recently done work. 

Street Hawkers and Pedlers. 

Section 35 of Chapter 43 of the Revised Ordinances of 
1892 provides "that no person shall, except in accordance 
with the permit of the Superintendent of Streets, in any streets 
or from any building, sell any goods or article, to any per- 
son on the street, or in any street place or permit to remain 
for more than ten minutes any goods or article of which he 
is the owner or in charge, or while on foot carry and display 
in any street any show-card, placard, or sign." 

On March 29, 1892, the police force began to strictly en- 
force this ordinance by ordering all pedlers off the city 
streets, with the immediate result of causing to appear at the 
office of the Superintendent of Streets throngs of street- 
pedlers, including newsboys, bootblacks, and juvenile ped- 
lers of all kinds, to make application for the necessary 
permit. It having been decided by the City Solicitor that 
newsboys, bootblacks, and juvenile pedlers were clearly 
exempted from this ordinance, and were subject to special 
license from the Board of Aldermen, this class was pro- 
vided for in the usual way and dropped out of consideration 
of the Street Department altogether. 

As it was impossible for the department to issue permits 
at once to this throng of applicants, a temporary suspension 
of the sweeping order of the police was conveniently 
arranged by the acting Mayor, in order to give time for the 
classification and arrangement of the various permits. 

After consultation with the Corporation Counsel and City 
Solicitor, it was decided to issue the following permits : 

Class No. 1. — Hawkers' and pedlers' permit to sell from 
vehicles. 

Class No. 2. — Hawkers' and pedlers' permit to sell from 
receptacles. 

Class No. 3. — Permit to sell from a building. 

Class No. 4. — Permit to sell from an area. 

Class No. 5. — Permit to occupy a portion of sidewalk. 

Class No. 1. — To Sell from Vehicles. 

Permits in Class No. 1 clo not applj r between the hours of 6.80 A.M. 
and 8 P.M. to the following streets : Haymarket square, Sudbury street 
Court street from Sudbury street to Seollay square, Seollay square, 
Tremont street from Seollay square to Eliot street, Eliot street from 
Tremont street to Washington street, Washington street from Eliot 
street to Franklin street, Franklin street from Washington street to 
Devonshire street, Devonshire street from Franklin street to Milk street, 



Street Department. 51 

Milk street from Devonshire street to Pearl street, Post-Office square, 
Water street from Congress street to Devonshire street, Devonshire 
street from "Water street to Washington street, State street from Mer- 
chants row to Devonshire street, Washington street from Adams square 
to Haymarket square, or any of the streets or squares included within 
the territory bounded as above described. 

This permit is granted upon the condition that the said person to 
whom it is granted shall not sell goods or articles within twenty-five 
feet of a shop or store where like goods are sold, and shall comply with 
all the laws of the Commonwealth, the ordinances of the city of Boston, 
the regulations of the Board of Aldermen, and the regulations of the 
Street Department ; and any infraction thereof shall be deemed a suffi- 
cient cause for the revocation of this permit. 

This permit may be revoked by the Siq^erintendent of Streets for 
cause at any time, and will not be renewed for six months after 
revocation. 

Street Dejmrtment Regulations. 

The Superintendent of Streets will issue permits to sell goods and 
merchandise in the streets of Boston, other than the streets mentioned 
in this permit, to all persons who (unless they are exempt from the 
payment of a license fee under sections 7,8, and 9 of chapter 68 of the 
Public Statutes) present satisfactory evidence that they have paid 
the City Treasurer of Boston the license fee prescribed by section 6 of 
chapter 68 of the Public Statutes. 

Each permit is to be numbered, and the holder thereof is required to 
post the number of his State license upon the vehicle from which he 
sells, as required in section 13 of chapter 68 of the Public Statutes, which 
reads as follows: "Every pei'son licensed to peddle as hereinbefore 
provided shall post his name, residence, and the number of his license 
in a conspicuous manner upon his parcels or vehicle ; and when his li- 
cense is demanded of him by a mayor, alderman, selectman, town or 
city treasurer or clerk, constable, police officer, or justice of the peace, 
he shall forthwith exhibit it, and, if he neglects so to do, shall be sub- 
ject to the same penalty as if he had no license." And also to post in 
the same manner the number of his city permit; and he shall at all 
times have his permit with him, and shall produce the same when de- 
manded by any authorized person for inspection. 

This permit is granted on the condition that the person to whom it is 
issued shall gather up and dispose of all refuse matter or litter created 
by the selling of his wares ; failure to observe which regulation will be 
sufficient cause for the revocation of this permit. 

Class No. 2. — To Sell from Receptacles. 

Permits to sell from receptacles do not apply between the hours of 
6-30 A.M. and 8 P.M. on the following streets : 

West street. Temple place, Winter sti'eet, Bromfield street, Bosworth 
street, School street, Court street from Tremont street to Washington 
street, State street from Washington street to Merchants Row, Tremont 
street from ( lourt street to Boylston street, and Washington street from 
Court street to Boylston street. 

This permit is granted upon the condition that the said person to 
whom it is granted shall not sell goods or articles within twenty-five feel 
of ,-i shop or store where like goods are sold, and shall comply with all 
iIm' laws of the Commonwealth, the ordinances of the city of Boston, 
the regulations of the Board of Aldermen, and the regulations of tin; 
Street Department ; and any infraction thereof will be deemed a suffi- 
cienl cause for revocation of this permit. This permit may be revoked 
by the Superintendent of Streets for cause ;ii any time, and will nol lie 
renewed for six months after revocation. 



52 City Document No. 34. 



Street Department Regulations. 

The Superintendent of Streets will issue permits to sell goods and 
merchandise in the streets of Boston, other than the streets mentioned 
in this permit, to all persons who (unless they are exempt from the pay- 
ment of a license fee under sections 7, 8, and 9 of chapter 68 of the 
Public Statutes) present satisfactory evidence that they have paid the 
City Treasurer of Boston the license fee prescribed by section 6 of chap- 
ter 68 of the Public Statutes. 

Each permit is to be numbered, and the holder thereof is required to 
post the number of his State license upon the receptacle from which he 
sells, as required by section 13 of chapter 68 of the Public Statutes, 
which reads as follows : " Every person licensed to peddle as hereinbe- 
fore provided shall post his name, residence, and the number of his 
license in a conspicuous manner upon his parcels or vehicles ; and when 
his license is demanded of him by a mayor, alderman, selectman, town 
or city treasurer or clerk, constable, police officer, or justice of the 
peace, he shall forthwith exhibit it, and, if he neglects or refuses so to 
do, shall be subject to the same penalty as it he had no license." And 
also to post in the same manner the number of his city permit ; and he 
shall at all times have his permit with him, and produce the same when 
demanded by any authorized person for inspection. 

This permit is granted on the condition that the person holding it shall 
gather up and dispose of all refuse matter or litter created by the selling 
of his wares ; failure to observe which regulation will be sufficient cause 
for the revocation of this permit. 

This permit is issued on the express condition that all goods are to be 
carried on the person, or on receptacles attached to the person, and that 
said receptacles shall in no case be deposited on the street while selling 
goods. 

Class No. 3. — To Sell from a Building. 

This permit allows to sell from the first story or basement of pre- 
scribed premises to persons on the street. . 

It is granted upon condition that the said person to whom this permit 
is granted is the lessee of the premises, and in conducting said business 
shall comply with all the laws of the Commonwealth, the regulations of 
the Board of Aldermen, and the regulations of the Street Department; 
and any infraction thereof will be deemed a sufficient cause for the rev- 
ocation of this permit. This permit may be revoked by the Superin- 
tendent of Streets for cause at any time, and it will not be renewed for 
six months after revocation. 

Street Department Regulations. 

This permit will be granted only to persons who are tenants of the 
first story or basement of the buildings from which they sell, and who 
are taxpayers of the city of Boston, and upon the express condition that 
the person to whom it is issued shall keep the street within fifty feet of 
his premises free from all refuse paper and litter created by the sale or 
handling of his wares. 

This permit must be shown to j>olice officers, or any authorized person 
on application. 

Failure to observe these regulations will be a sufficient cause for the 
revocation of this permit. 

Class No. 4. — To Sell from an Area. 

This permit allows the holder to sell from the area between the high- 
way and the building to persons on the street. 



Street Department. 53 

It is granted upon the condition that the said person to whom this 
permit is granted is the lessee of the premises, and in conducting said 
business shall comply with all the laws of the Commonwealth, the 
regulations of the Board of Aldermen, and the regulations of the Street 
Department; and any infraction thereof will be deemed a sufficient cause 
for the revocation of this permit. This permit may be revoked by the 
Superintendent of Streets for cause at any time, and it will not be re- 
newed for six months after revocation. 

Street Department Regulations. 

This permit will be granted only to persons who present to the 
Superintendent the written request of the owner of the area from which 
they sell that this permit be granted, and upon the express condition 
that the person to whom it is issued shall keep the street within fifty 
feet of his premises free from all refuse paper and litter created by the 
sale or handling of his wares. 

This permit will be revoked at any time on the written request of the 
owner of the area. 

This permit must be shown to police officers or any authorized person 
on application. 

Failure to observe these regulations will be a sufficient cause for the 
revocation of this permit. 

Class No. 5. — To occupy Portion of Sidewalk. 

Permission is given under this permit to occupy a portion of the side- 
walk in front of the prescribed number for more than ten minutes at a 
time, providing that the space mentioned be used for the proper receipt 
and delivery of goods, and not for storage purposes. It is also agreed 
that the said firm shall maintain an open passage between the building 
and the street, and will be responsible for any damage which may occur 
by reason of the occupancy of the sidewalk under this permit. It is also 
agreed that the said firm shall keep the street and sidewalk as above 
described in clean condition, and free from litter of any kind. 

This permit may be revoked at any time, at the discretion of the 
Superintendent of Streets. 

The prohibiting of pedlers in the down-town retail districts 
of the city caused considerable excitement among pedlers, 
who through their various organizations endeavored to have 
the restrictions removed. The department, however, stood 
firm in the matter and refused to reconsider the regulation 
which had been adopted. 

The result of issuing these permits has been to free the 
retail district of what has been considered the greatest of 
nuisances to pedestrians and the public generally, who 
formerly were besieged at every step to stop and trade on 
the street, thus blocking off travel in either direction and 
leading to much confusion and annoyance. 

In general it has served to open up the sidewalks to the 
use of the travelling public, for whom they were originally 
made, while at the same time the restrictions are such as to 
give the abutting merchants a proper use of their immediate 
sidewalk as far as necessary for the proper conduct of their 
business. Favorable comment on the improved condition 



54 City Document No. 34. 

of the streets and sidewalks on account of the present ar- 
rangement has been received from leading merchants and 
tradesmen. 

Special Permits. 

Special permits are granted to temporarily obstruct the sidewalk and 
the prescribed feet of roadway in front of premises for the purpose of 
clearing snow and ice from the roofs of buildings. This permit is issued 
and accepted upon condition that the person accepting it shall in all re- 
spects conform to the statutes and ordinances of the city of Boston and 
the specifications of this permit ; that any violation of the above shall 
work an immediate revocation of this permit; shall place sufficient bar- 
riers around the space so occupied, and, if at night, proper lights suffi- 
cient to protect travellers from injury. 

That the person to whom this permit is granted shall indemnify and 
save the city harmless from any damages it may sustain or be required 
to pay by reason of doing the work covered by this permit. 

Permitjto Feed and Bait Horses. | 

Permit to feed or bait horses on the streets of Boston is given except 
upon the following-named streets : West street, Temple place, Winter 
street, Bromfield street, Bosworth street, School street, Court street 
from Tremont street to Washington street, State street from Washing- 
ton street to Merchants Row, Tremont street from Court street to Bo} T l- 
ston street, Washington street from Court street to Boylston street, 
Beacon street from Tremont street to Park street, Park street from 
Tremont street to Beacon street, Boylston street from Tremont street to 
Charles street, Summer street from Washington street to Lincoln street, 
Bedford street, Franklin street from Washington street to Hawley 
street, Milk street from Washington street to Federal street, Water 
street, Devonshire street from State street to Dock square, provided 
said feeding and baiting does not continue longer than twenty minutes. 

This permit is granted upon the condition that the said person to 
whom this permit is granted has a wagon license from the Board of 
Police, or satisfies the Superintendent of Streets that it is impossible 
for him to bait on private land, and shall comply with all the laws of 
the Commonwealth, the regulations of the Board of Aldermen, the 
Board of Police, and the regulations of the Street Department; and any 
infraction thereof will be deemed a sufficient cause for the revocation of 
this permit. This permit may be revoked by the Superintendent of 
Streets for cause at any time, and it will not be renewed for six months 
after revocation. . 

Street Department Regulations. 

This permit will be granted upon the express- condition that the per- 
son to whom it is granted shall provide some proper person to stand by 
and care for the said animal while being fed, or shall properly secure 
the said animal, and shall in all cases lock the wheels of the vehicle to 
prevent its getting beyond said person's control. 

Also upon the condition that the person to whom it is issued shall 
keep the street free from all refuse or litter created by the said feeding 
and baiting. 

This permit may be revoked at any time, on the written request of 
the owner of the buildings or estate in front of which said feeding is 
done. 

This permit must be shown to police officers, or any authorized per- 
son, on application. 

Failure to observe these regulations will be a sufficient cause for the 
revocation of this permit. 




o 



Street Department. 55 

The number of permits to feed horses upon the streets 
issued to date is 1,430. 

The report of the Deputy Superintendent of the Paving 
Division shows the actual number of permits that have been 
issued in each of the various classes. 

The following statement of the City Engineer contains the 
main features of the special work assigned to him by this 
department for engineering supervision : 

City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, February 1, 1893. 

Mr. H. TL Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir : I herewith submit the following report of the work 
done under my direction for your department : 

A statement of the street-paving work done by contract 
has been arranged in tabular form, and two sheets accom- 
panying this report show the details of the work and the 
prices paid for doing the same. 

As was explained at greater length in the report of last 
year, the averages given have only a general value, as each 
piece of work done varies from the others in essential par- 
ticulars. 

The specifications for granite blocks vary from those of 
last year in the length of the block called for, the length this 
year being from 9 to 14 inches, to average 11 J inches, in- 
stead of — as last year — 8 to 12 inches, to average 10 inches. 

As a result of the change, about 23 blocks per square yard 
have been used, instead of about 25 as laid last year; but 
very few small blocks were used. 

•Under 56 agreements 5.97 miles of streets have been 
paved at a cost of $193,595.85 paid to the contractors, and 
at a total cost to the city, including the material and labor 
furnished by the Street Department, of $435,160.20. 

The following are the principal items of work done : 
Block-stone paving on a concrete base laid with pitch joints, 
17,089.6 square yards, at an average cost of about $4.75 per 
square yard. Block-stone paving on a gravel base laid with 
pitch joints, 2,282 square yards, at an average cost of about 
$3.70 per square yard. Block-stone paving on a gravel 
base with gravel joints, 45,170 square yards, at an average 
cost of about $3.10 per square yard. Trinidad sheet asphalt 
on a concrete base and on an old cobble-stone paving base, 
20,829 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.60 per 
square yard. Sicilian sheet asphalt on a concrete base, 
3,329 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.60 per 



56 City Document No. 34. 

square yard. Asphalt block pavement on a sand base, 
4,232 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.25 per 
square yard. 

Edgestone set, 36,443 lineal feet. 

Brick sidewalks relaid, 24,310 square yards. 

Flagging cross-walks laid, 3,212 square yards. 

The following is a description of the paving done. The 
details of cost and quantities are shown in a tabular state- 
ment. 

Athens Street. 

Athens street, from B street to C street, South Boston, 
was paved by H. Gore & Co., with Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 
Portland cement concrete base. The old macadam surface 
was utilized on neighboring streets, and the old cobble-stones 
from the gutters were hauled to the Broadway crusher ; 
edgestones, flagging, and paving-bricks were delivered on 
the street by the city. Two new catch-basins were built. 

Beacon Street. 

Beacon street, from Dartmouth street to Gloucester street, 
was paved with sheet asphalt on a concrete base, by the Bar- 
ber Asphalt Paving Co., excepting about 150 feet in length at 
Gloucester street, which was paved with Hastings asphalt 
blocks laid on a gravel base by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company. The surface removed was macadam. The road- 
bed w r as prepared by the regular force of the Street Depart- 
ment, which also disposed of the surplus material. The 
concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company. During the work the 40-inch main water-pipe 
across the old inlet sluices of the full basin of the Boston 
Water Power Company was uncovered. It was formerly 
carried in a heavy wooden box for about 150 feet in 
length, supported by the old stone piers at intervals of about 
25 .feet. It had been buried for many years, and the wooden 
trusses were in bad condition, the old wooden box was re- 
moved, and piles were driven and capped between the old 
piers to support the pipe ; the excavation was refilled with 
the old road material. Edgestones were reset by F. H. 
Cowin & Co., and the brick sidewalks were relaid by F. H. 
Cowin & Co. and James Grant. 

Border Street. 

Border street, from White street to Condor street, East 
Boston, was paved by H. Gore & Co., with granite blocks 
on a gravel base. The old surface was of macadam, which 



Street Department. 57 

was delivered with the surplus material on other streets 
within a distance of one mile. Blocks, edgestone, flagging, 
and paving-bricks were delivered on the street by the city. 

The retaining-wall on and near Condor street was par- 
tially rebuilt, and built to grade, as a part of the same con- 
tract. A. substantial iron fence was built on the line of the 
wall by George T. McLauthlin & Co. Three new catch- 
basins were built. 

Border street, from North Ferry to Sumner street, East 
Boston, w T as paved by A. A. Libby & Co., with the old 
granite blocks on a gravel base. The street-railway tracks 
were relaid, and the foot- walks rearranged to correspond to 
the relocation of the ferry entrances. The surplus earth was 
disposed of by the contractor. New blocks, edgestones, 
flagging, and bricks were furnished by the city on the 
ground. Two catch-basins were rilled up, and one new one 
was built. 

Boylston Street. 

Boylston street, from Church street to Arlington street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, with pitch 
joints, by J. Doherty & Co. The old surface was of 
macadam, wdiich was removed and delivered within one mile 
where required. The new stone blocks, edgestone, and 
flagging furnished by the city were hauled by the contractors 
from the Albany-street yard, and paving-bricks were delivered 
by the city on the work. One new catch-basin was built. 

Broadway. 

Broadway from A street towards Dorchester avenue, 
South Boston, was paved with Sicilian rock asphalt on an 
American cement concrete base, b} r the National Construction 
Co. The former surface was paved with granite blocks, 
which were hauled to 'Seventh street between D and E 
streets, and to Sixth street between M and C) streets, and 
the surplus material was taken to Vale street. Edgestones 
and bricks were delivered on the work by the city. 

Brighton Street. 

Brighton street, from Allen street to Leverett street, was 
paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co. with Trinidad 
sheet asphalt laid on the old cobble-stone pavement. The 
old pavement was partly relaid, and the remains of a former 
asphalt covering removed in part. A partial base or binder 
course of coal-tar concrete was laid over the old pavement. 
The sub-grading was done and the sidewalks put in order by 
P. W. Hernan. 



■58 City Document No. 34. 



Cabot Street. 

Cabot street, from Ruggles street to Vernon street, was 
paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., with Trinidad 
asphalt on an American cement concrete base. The old 
street surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was done 
by the Street Department. The concrete was laid by the 
Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks and edge- 
stones were relaid by T. Payson. One new catch-basin was 
built. 

Chardon Street. 

Chardon street, from Bowdoin square to Merrimac street, 
was paved with granite blocks, with pitch joints, on a con- 
crete base, by Jones & Meehan. The old surface was paved 
with cobble-stones. The surplus earth was disposed of 
by the contractors. Paving-blocks, edgestones, and flag- 
ging were furnished by the city at the West yard on Com- 
mercial street, and the paving-bricks were delivered on the 
work. This street was paved with a special stone block, 
which was about one inch less in depth than the standard 
block. One new catch-basin was built. 

Charles Street. 

Charles street, from Beacon street to Pinckney street, was 
paved by J. Doherty & Co., with granite blocks, laid with 
pitch joints on a concrete base. The old paving was of 
granite blocks, which were culled and the best used in the 
new work. The surplus blocks were removed by the Street 
Department. The sub-grading, from Beacon to Mt. Vernon 
street, was done by the Street Department. The remainder 
of the sub-grading was done by J. Doherty & Co., who 
disposed of the useless and surplus material. The concrete 
base was laid by the Metropolitan Construction Co. Edge- 
stones and sidewalks w T ere laid by J. Grant, paving-blocks, 
flagging, and paving-bricks were furnished by the city. 

Cherry Street. 

Cherry street, from Shawmut avenue to Washington 
street, was paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., with 
Trinidad sheet asphalt laid on an American cement concrete 
base. The former surface was of macadam. The sub- 
grading was done by J. Casey. The concrete base was laid 
by the Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks 
were put in order by the Street Department. 



Street Department. 59 



Davis Street. 

Davis street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
was paved with Trinidad sheet asphalt, on an American 
cement concrete base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
The former surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was 
done by the Street Department. The concrete base w T as 
laid by the Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks 
were put in order by D. Sullivan. 

Decatur Street. 

Decatur street, from Washington street to Harrison ave- 
nue, was paved by H. Gore & Co. with Sicilian rock 
asphalt, on an American cement concrete base. The former 
surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was done by the 
Street Department. The concrete base was laid by the Met- 
ropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks put in order 
by P. W. Hernan. 

Dorchester Avenue. 

Estimates were made early in the year for putting this 
avenue in order from South Boston line to Adams street, 
Dorchester, and a large amount of work has been done upon 
it. From Washburn street to Pond street both sides of the 
street between the curb and the railway track have been 
paved. From Pond street to Belfort street the westerly 
side of the street has been paved, the easterly side being 
already paved. From Belfort street to Adams street the 
avenue was already paved on both sides. From Adams 
street to Park street the avenue has been paved on both sides 
of the street-railway track. From Park street to Ashmont 
street the avenue has been graded, a new double street-rail- 
way track laid, and the roadway on the easterly side of the 
track paved. On the westerly side of the track, the old 
macadam surface was in fair condition from Park street to 
Centre street, and it was repaired and put in order ; from 
Centre street to Ashmont, street a new " Telford-Macadam " 
road has been built on the westerly side of the street. All 
the paving has been made of granite blocks on a gravel base, 
and there is now a continuous paved roadway from the 
city to Ashmont street. From Ashmont street to Rich- 
mond street a new single street-railway track, being the 
easterly section of a future double track, has been laid. The 
street was graded, a heavy rock cut was made near Rich- 
mond street, and a heavy fill made, with slopes covering the 
old retaining- walls, in the valley between Codman and Rich- 



60 City Document No. 34. 

mond streets. This section of the avenue was finished with 
a " Telford-Macadam " surface, the stone from the rock cut 
being utilized for this purpose. The improvement has been 
carried to a point about three hundred feet beyond Richmond 
street ; beyond that point, in the short distance to Adams 
street, another heavy rock cut will be required before the im- 
provements are completed. The block paving was done by 
H. Gore & Co. and C. J. Coates, and portions of the street 
were graded by M. Donnellan, J. J. Sullivan, and J. 
McGovern. The rock work, Telford road-making, and a 
large part of the grading, was done by the Street Department. 
Eleven new catch-basins were built. 

Eliot Street. 

Eliot street, from Washington street to Pleasant street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a concrete base, by C. B. 
Payson & Co. The old pavement was of granite blocks, 
which were relaid on Stanhope, Pleasant, and other streets. 
The surplus earth was delivered on Huntington avenue, be- 
yond Gainsborough street. New granite blocks, edgestones, 
and flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard, and the bricks were delivered on the work. The 
street-railway track was relaid and paved with the old granite 
blocks on a gravel base, and the space between the double 
tracks was paved with new granite blocks on a gravel base. 
Two new catch-basins were built. 

Eustis Street. 

Eustis street, from Washington street to Dearborn street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, by A. A. 
Lihby & Co. The old surface was of macadam with cobble 
gutters. The old cobble-stones were delivered at the Dimock- 
street crusher, and the surplus material was used on streets 
within one-half mile. Granite blocks, edgestones, and flag- 
ging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street yard, 
and the paving-bricks were delivered on the ground. Two 
new catch-basins were built. 

Florence Street. 

Florence street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
was paved by the Metropolitan Construction Co., with 
Hastings asphalt blocks on a 4-inch American cement con- 
crete base. The former surface was of macadam. The 
sub-grading was done by the Street Department, and the 
sidewalks were put in order by D. Sullivan. 



Street Department. 61 

India Street. 

India street, in front of the Custom-house, was paved by 
J. Doherty & Co., with granite blocks laid with pitch joints, 
on a concrete base. The old paving-, of large granite blocks 
about one foot square, was removed by J. J. Sullivan, and 
the sub-grading was done by the Street Department, and the 
concrete base was laid by H. P. Xawn. The edgestone, 
flagging, and sidewalks were relaid by J. Doherty & Co. 
The granite blocks, edgestone, flagging, and bricks were fur- 
nished on the ground by the city. 

Kemble Street. 

Kemble street, from Gerard street to Magazine street, 
was paved by Collins & Ham, with granite blocks on a 
gravel base. This was an ungraded street: it was graded 
by the contractors, and the surplus material was delivered to 
the city on East Chester Park extension, to abate a nuisance 
caused by standing water. Stone blocks, edgestones, and 
flagging were delivered to the contractors by the city at the 
Albany-street yard, and paving-bricks were delivered on 
the ground. Two new catch-basins were built. 

From Gerard street to Hampden street the street was par- 
tially paved by the same contractors, under an extension of 
their contract. Work was stopped by cold weather, and the 
time for finishing it has been extended to allow of its com- 
pletion in the spring. Four additional catch-basins were 
built. 

Motte Street. 

Motte street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
w,as paved by H. Gore & Co., with Sicilian rock sheet asphalt 
laid on an American cement base. The former street surface 
was of macadam. The sub-grading was done by the Street 
Department, the concrete base was laid by H. P. Nawn, 
and the sidewalks put in order by F. H. Cowin & Co. 

Prextiss Street. 

Prentiss street, from Tremont street through Hallock 
street, was paved by H. Gore & Co., with granite blocks on 
a gravel base. The old surface was of macadam. The sur- 
plus material was delivered where required within one-half 
mile, and the old cobble gutter-stones were delivered to the 
Tremont-street crusher. Paving-blocks, edgestones, and 
flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard ; the bricks were delivered to the contractor on the 
street. 



62 City Document No. 34. 



KUTHERFORD A VENUE. 

Rutherford avenue, from Essex street to Allen street, was 
paved with granite blocks on gravel by J. Turner & Co. 
The roadbed was prepared and all materials were furnished 
by the Street Department. Eight new catch-basins were 
built. 

School Street. 

School street, from Washington street to Tremont street, 
was paved by C. B. Payson & Co. with granite blocks, with 
pitch joints, on a concrete base. The old surface was paved 
with granite blocks, which were all removed, with the sur- 
plus material, by H. P. Nawn. The concrete base was laid 
by the Metropolitan Construction Company. Granite blocks 
were specially prepared for this work ; the granite blocks, 
edoestones, flagging, and bricks were delivered on the 
ground. 

Washington Street. 

Washington street, from Cornhill to Essex and Boylston 
streets, was paved by Jones & Meehan (excepting a small 
portion by C. B. Payson & Co.) with granite blocks, with 
pitch joints, on a concrete base. The old surface was granite 
block paving, which was hauled to Dorchester avenue, be- 
yond Field's Corner. The surplus earth was disposed of by 
the contractors ; part of it was hauled to the South Boston 
flats, and a part to the vicinity of Huntington avenue. The 
stone blocks were furnished by the city at the Boston Wharf 
Company's wharf on Fort Point channel ; edgestone and 
flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard ; the bricks were delivered on the work. 

The street railroad was entirely rebuilt b_y the West End 
Company, with an improved rail. The paving between the 
rails is of the same quality, including the concrete founda- 
tion, as the rest of the street, and the tracks were laid to a 
grade conformino; with the new street surface. Ten new 
catch-basins were built, giving much better surface drainage 
than before. 

West Chester Park. 

West Chester Park from Columbus avenue to Tremont 
street, on the northerly side of the central parkway, was 
paved with Hastings asphalt blocks, on a gravel base, by the 
Metropolitan Construction Company. The former surface 
was of macadam : the sub-grading was done and the side- 
walks put in order by the Street Department. 



Street Department. <io 



West Chester Park and Chester Square. 

West Chester Park* and Chester square, from Columbus 
avenue to Washington street, on the southerly side of the 
central parkway, was paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving- 
Company with sheet asphalt, on an American cement con- 
crete base. The sub-grading was done by the Street 
Department, the concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan 
Construction Company, and the edgestones and sidewalks 
were put in order by the Street Department. 

West Newton Street. 

West Newton street, from Shawmut avenue to Washing- 
ton street, was paved by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company with Hastings asphalt blocks, laid on a sand base. 
The former surface was of macadam. The sub- grading was 
done by the Street Department, and the sidewalks were put 
in order by P. W. Hernan. 

West Second Street. 

West Second street, from B street to E street, South Bos- 
ton, was paved by H. Gore & Co. with granite blocks, on a 
gravel base. The old surface was of cobble-stone paving. 
The cobble-stones were sold to the city of Cambridge, and 
the surplus material was used to fill streets on the South 
Boston flats. Granite blocks w T ere furnished by the city at 
the L-street extension, the edgestones and flagging at the 
Albany-street yard, and the paving-bricks were delivered on 
the street. Three new catch-basins were built. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

The plans, specifications, and form of contract for filling 
the additional width of Commonwealth avenue, between 
Pleasant street and the forks of the road at the corner of 
Beacon street, not including a section at the Cottage Farm 
bridge, were prepared early in the year, and a contract dated 
May 4, 1892, was made with the Boston Contracting Com- 
pany for furnishing and delivering about 13(3,000 cubic yards 
of clean filling, at the rate of 49^ cents per cubic yard. The 
material has been taken from a hill in Brookline near Har- 
vard avenue, a short distance from the corner of Common- 
wealth avenue and Brighton avenue. A standard gauge 
track was laid, and February 1, l<S9o, about 76,000 cubic 
yards of material, measured in the fill, had been delivered 
on the avenue. Between Cottage Farm bridge and Pleas- 



64 City Document No. 34. 

ant street, on the marsh, the mud proved to be deep and 
soft, and a very large displacement took place, probably 
amounting to 14,000 cubic yards or more. 

The contract required the material to be measured in the 
till, and owing to the large quantity of tilling required to 
make good the displacement of the mud, for which no payment 
could be made under the contract, work was discontinued by 
the contractors. The City Council, however, authorized the 
payment of the sum of $7,000 on account of the displace- 
ment, the contract was modified so that the city pays the 
contractors, for moving the material only, the sum of 37 cents 
per cubic yard measured in the fill, the owners of the gravel 
bank being paid by the city 12i cents per cubic yard for the 
filling measured in the bank, and the contractors resumed 
work. Under the original contract with the Boston Con- 
tracting Company, 46,640 cubic yards were measured and 
paid for ; under the modified contract 29,542 cubic yards had 
been delivered to February 1, 1893. 

Plans. 

The Street Department has turned over to the care of this 
department a set of sectional plans covering a large part of the 
city, and known as " Sidewalk Plans." They are intended to 
show all structures, whether covered or exposed, and whether 
belonging to private corporations or to the city, existing in 
every street. The set is imperfect,, and is so many years 
behind in its corrections as to be of little use. The 
engineering force, not otherwise occupied, has been em- 
ployed in an attempt to bring this set of plans up to date. 

As the information must be sought for largely on the 
street itself, progress is necessarily very slow, and the pres- 
ent available force will never be able to bring all the plans 
up to date at the same time. It is hoped, however, that 
a system may be arranged by which all changes shall be 
a matter of record when they are made, and the task of 
keeping up the plans thus be one of compilation only, after 
they are once brought up to date. The work can then be 
carried on in the winter, and the larger part of the force re- 
quired for summer work kept employed, and skilled men be 
available when the active season for out-of-door work opens. 
This set of plans will be of great value when completed, and 
carefully corrected once a year. 

Tables. 

The tables showing the lengths of accepted streets and the 
areas of various kinds of pavement have been corrected to 



Street Department. 65 

February 1, 1893. (See pages 37 and 38.) The streets laid 
out as highways during the year by the Street Commissioners 
have been added, those discontinued deducted, and the 
changes in the character of surfaces of the streets have been 
compiled. 

L-street Bridge. — Abutment. 

The contract for building the abutment of L-street bridge, 
which was let to Perkins & White under date of October 
28, 1891, was completed in November, 1892, at a cost of 
$6,231.71. 

L-street Bridge. — Eetaining- Walls. 

A contract for building two retaining-walls between the 
abutment and the bulkhead built in 1891, and filling the 
space enclosed, was awarded to Thomas A. Howe, of Boston. 
Work was commenced July 19, 1892, and completed in 
November, at a cost of $9,824.73. 



Malden Bridge. — Draw. 

This draw has been entirely rebuilt during the year, under 
a contract with Josiah Shaw, of Somerville. The draw is of 
the same form and general dimensions as the old one, and 
rests on a new turn-table. The foundations were also re- 
built, all the work above the piles being new, and twelve new 
piles were driven. 

Roxbury Canal. — Sea-Wall. 

Plans and specifications were made in April, 1891, for 
building a sea-wall on Roxbury Canal at the Albany-street 
paving-wharf, similar to that built at the wharf of the Water 
Department in 1888. The work was advertised October, 
1892. 

October 22 a contract was made with Thomas A. Rowe, 
of Boston, for building the wall, and it was completed Jan- 
uary 9, 1893, at a cost of $12,657. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



66 City Document No. 34. 



STREET-WATERING. 



In the last annual report, the subject of street-watering 
was treated at considerable leno-th. Anions' other matters 
considered was a proposed ordinance which would allow of 
the city's taking advantage of Chapter 179 of the Acts and 
Resolves of 1891, Section 1 of which reads : " Any city, the 
population of which exceeds 30,000, may annually appro- 
priate money to water all or any of the public streets within 
its limits, or it may determine that such streets shall be 
watered in whole or in part at the expense of the abutters 
thereon." 

As the amount of money required to water all the streets 
of Boston would involve the expenditure of about $250,000, 
and as it was impossible to devote such a large sum to this 
purpose from the limited appropriations made by the City 
Council under the $9 tax limit, it was thought desirable to 
frame an ordinance which would allow of the streets being 
watered entirely at the expense of the abutters. 

Section 25 of the proposed ordinance (which was printed 
in full in the last report) provided that " The cost of water- 
ing shall be paid as follows : The cost of administration shall 
be borne by the city ; all other expenses for watering, ac- 
tually incurred in a given district, shall be assessed as a 
special tax in favor of the city by the Superintendent of 
Streets, on the adjoining property fronting on the streets so 
watered in said district, in the proportion that the approxi- 
mate frontage of each lot bears to the total number of linear 
feet of all property so watered in the district under consid- 
eration," etc. The ordinance further provided that special 
tax-bills which were to be a lien on property were to be 
issued, and the proceeds placed to the credit of the Street 
Department to pay for the cost of watering. 

This system is the one in vogue in St. Louis, Rochester, 
and many cities and towns throughout the country. The 
proposed method for paying for this work involved such 
a radical change, however, that, before taking any action, 
it was deemed advisable by the Committee on Ordinances 
having the matter in charge to give public hearings, and 
accordingly two were held, one on February 10, the other 
on February 17, 1892, both of which were well at- 
tended, and proved highly interesting. The testimony 
taken at these hearings, which was voluminous, and in itself 



Street Department. 67 

constitutes a treatise on street-watering (City Document 44, 
1892), was carefully considered by the Committee on Or- 
dinances, and in the Board of Aldermen oh March 28, 1892, 
the following report was submitted : 

In Board of Aldermen, March 28, 1892. 

The Committee on Ordinances, to whom were refeiTed so much of 
the Mayor's inaugural address as relates to street-watering, and several 
orders relating to the same, having considered the matter, have the 
honor to report as follows : 

Realizing the importance of the subject submitted to your commit- 
tee, public hearings were had, which were well attended. His Honor the 
Mayor, the Superintendent of Streets, and many taxpayers were present. 
Several citizens represented by counsel objected strongly, not only to 
the present method of watering streets by the city and voluntary private 
subscription, but also to the plan of assessing the cost upon the abut- 
ters according to the frontage of their estates, as proposed in an ordi- 
nance submitted by the Superintendent of Streets. 

The assessment authorized by Chapter 179 of the Acts of 1891 was 
strenuously objected to, especially by the owners of estates in the sub- 
urbs, where the average frontages are great and the value compara- 
tively small. The owners of unimproved property felt that any 
assessment would be a hardship upon them. The system hitherto 
in vogue among contractors of levying assessments on the abutters 
under the subscription plan has been unsatisfactory, and is open to 
abuses. The public demand that the streets shall be properly watered, 
and your committee deem this a duty devolved upon the city as much as 
that of street repairs, street-cleaning, etc. It is as necessary and desir- 
able that the streets shall be properly sprinkled as swept, and it would 
seem to be the duty of the city to do both at the expense of the citizens 
generally. Only $100,000 has been appropriated this year for street- 
watering, and to obtain a larger sum than this, additional money must 
be transferred from some other appropriation ; and under Chapter 20(i 
of the Acts of 1891 no money can be borrowed for what is obviously a 
current expense i unless the necessity of the case will justify the Mayor 
in so certifying within the meaning of the Act. If some assessment 
plan is thought desirable for the purpose of increasing the funds availa- 
ble for current expenses, your committee is of the opinion that it might 
be applied to a greater extent to matters of street construction, as the 
laying of sewers, sidewalks, and pavements, where the benefit ac- 
crued is more peculiarly to the individual abutter, and is of a perma- 
nent nature. 

Some of the drain upon the street-watering appropriation might be 
lessened if the paved sti-eets in the business portion of the city were 
swept more frequently than they are. The value of street-sprinkling 
is not so much to have a wet surface, but to keep the dust and refuse 
upon the highways from blowing about, becoming a nuisance, and im- 
pairing the health of the citizens. 

Your committee, therefore, report that it is inexpedient to pass any 
ordinance at this time to levy an assessment in accordance with the 
authority given to the city by the Legislature in the year 1891. The 
Superintendent of Streets should be urged to attempt the task of water- 
ing the streets this year as thoroughly as possible. Legislation which 
will relieve the tax levy from a portion of the burden now borne by it 
in the construction of streets, and furnishing them with sewers, side- 
walks, edgestones, and pavements, may be desirable, and out of \\\n 
money saved a sufficient sum should be appropriated to permit the 



68 City Document No. 34. 

Superintendent of Streets to do the necessary street-sprinkling in a 
proper and satisfactory manner. The testimony taken at the hearings 
is submitted herewith as an appendix to this report. 

For the Committee, 

John H. Lee, 
[Appendix omitted.] Chairman. 

The matter was brought before the meeting of the Board 
of Aldermen on April 4, when the proposed ordinance assess- 
ing the cost on abutters was defeated, and the report of the 
committee was accepted. 

At the beginning of the year an appropriation of 
$100,000 had been made by the City Council for the pur- 
pose of street-watering. As this amount was insufficient to 
water all the streets of the city, a system was devised whereby 
this sum could be justly apportioned in different districts of 
the city, and the greatest possible benefit be derived from 
this limited appropriation. 

The principle first adopted was to exclude from considera- 
tion all paved streets. Provided a paved street is kept 
clean there is no special reason why it should be watered ; 
the water does not tend to preserve the pavement, and the 
extra comfort to abutters on the street by having the pave- 
ment watered should be paid for by them, as the benefit, if 
any, is enjoyed directly by them. 

No trouble has ever been experienced by street- watering 
contractors in Boston in raising money enough by voluntary 
subscription on paved streets in the business section to do 
the work. In New York, owing to the large sums contract- 
ors are able to collect from abutters, the privilege of water- 
ing such streets is sold by the city to contractors, and a 
revenue of several thousand dollars is derived therefrom. 
Paved streets in general are so closely built up and the 
number of occupants of buildings is so large that a volun- 
tary assessment is not felt as a hardship by the people 
benefited. 

For the above reasons, having excluded all the paved 
streets from consideration, the macadamized streets alone 
remained to be provided for. As far as these were con- 
cerned, the principle was adopted of watering all the main 
thoroughfares, and such other streets as could be undertaken 
with the limited appropriation. 

The above method involved the radical change of water- 
ing the Back Bay and South End Districts at the expense of 
the city of Boston. 

The agitation concerning street-watering in the press in 
1891 and 1892, which resulted in the public hearings at City 



Street Department. 69 

Hall, was brought about by the residents of the Back Bay, 
who objected to the way in which the watering was done, 
not so much on account of unsatisfactory work as on account 
of the exorbitant amount collected by the contractor, and as 
these streets were macadamized and largely travelled, it 
became necessary for the city to do this work and assume 
the cost. 

The watering of the Back Bay and South End Districts 
was publicly advertised to be let by contract, and the work 
was awarded to the lowest bidders. 

The work done during the past year has been fairly satis- 
factory, and but few complaints have been received. The 
greater portion of complaints came from people living on 
side streets which the department refused to water, owing to 
the limited appropriation, and the residents thereof consid- 
ered themselves as unfairly treated. 

Criticisms made on the way in which the street-watering 
is done generally are made by people not thoroughly con- 
versant with the difficulties attending the subject. The 
following remarks of Dr. H. J. Barnes before the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society are quoted as showing the difficulty of 
laying out a given amount of work for a water-cart under 
all circumstances : 

" I would like to say a few words about the condition of the streets 
the last two days. There has been a good deal of flying dust, perhaps 
as much as at any time last year or any other year. I took occasion to 
go to the Signal Service Office this morning, to ascertain something in 
regard to humidity of the atmosphere and what influence it has had, and 
from the information gained I have taken the following notes to present 
this evening : 

" Yesterday the Weather Bureau reported the humidity at 36, and to- 
day at noon it was 35. The yearly average is at about 75 at Boston. 
You will therefore observe that to-day it was at least 40 points below 
the average and 65 points from saturation. It has been an extremely 
drj r air with high winds and bright sun, most favorable conditions for 
rapid evaporation. My street has been covered five times to-day. In 
the afternoon, half an hour after sprinkling, the dust was flying, and at 
the expiration of an hour there was little evidence that it had been 
sprinkled at all. It would require five times as much water to keep 
the dust laid such a day as this as was the average requirement 
for forty-three days last year, or, in other words, it would take 
five carts to do the work ordinarily performed by one. The thirteen 
miles of Hack Bay streets are easily covered by eight two-horse water- 
carts when the humidity is from 70 to 80. To have accomplished sat- 
isfactory results to-day would have required forty carts of the same 
capacity." 

Style of Water-Carts. 

Another practical difficulty in doing satisfactory watering 
is the character of the carts owned in the city. Out of about 
150 water-carts owned in the city of Boston by private par- 



70 City Document No. 34. 

ties, only 65 or 70 are of modern make, the rest being the 
old-fashioned type of copper sprinkler. 

It might be asked, Why does not the city of Boston spe- 
cify that only carts of a certain pattern should be used? It 
would be an easy matter to do this, and contractors would 
undoubtedly be willing to buy modern carts if they could 
be assured of work for several years ; but as the administra- 
tion of the city affairs is apt to change at the end of each 
year, and as there is no certainty of employment for more 
than one year at a time, contractors naturally are not dis- 
posed to expend several hundred dollars for new water-carts 
which, after being employed for eight months, might lie idle 
for several years. 

An administration of city affairs should either last for 
more than one year, or authority should be obtained by city 
departments to make agreements with contractors that would 
hold for at least four years. 

Should the city of Boston own the necessary plant, it 
would involve an original outlay of about $96,000 to provide 
the necessary number of first-class sprinkling-wagons. In 
addition to this large expenditure, the city would be obliged 
to provide storage room in the winter for this plant, and 
would also be at a large annual expense for repairs and 
renewals. 

In view of the above facts, and taking into consideration 
the probability that there will never be an ordinance passed 
allowing the cost of street-watering to be assessed entirely 
on the abutters, and also that there will never be money 
enough appropriated by the government to do this work in 
a systematic manner entirely at the city's expense, it is be- 
lieved that the best results will be obtained by continuing 
the present method of letting out by contract the watering 
of districts such as the Back Bay and the South End, and 
by watering the rest of the macadamized streets with teams 
hired by the day ; the Superintendent of Streets to have the 
power to make a contract for at least three years with 
owners of water-carts, who could then be required to provide 
themselves with expensive modern street-sprinklers. 

Permits. 

Notice was issued to all parties engaged in street-watering 
to supply themselves with the necessary permit from the 
Superintendent of Streets as provided for in the Revised 
Ordinances, and the permits issued contained the following 
regulations : 



Street Department. 71 

Carts must be provided with sprinklers satisfactory to the Super- 
intendent of Streets, and each must have the name of the owner and 
number painted in large, legible letters on its sides. 

Carts with choked or broken sprinklers, or leaking tanks or valves, 
shall not be used. 

The sprinkling must be done with judgment and care, and street cross- 
ings must be kept dry as nearly as possible. 

The amount of water used may be prescribed by the Superintendent 
of Streets. The person holding this permit will be held responsible for 
the condition of the street surface and pavement for a distance of fifteen 
feet from water-posts where water is taken. 

If any driver of a water-cart is disobedient or disorderly, or fails 
properly to attend to his work, he must be immediately discharged on 
the requisition of the Superintendent of Streets. 

This permit may be revoked by the Superintendent of Streets for 
cause, at any time. 

Contracts. 

The specifications for work done by contract are rigidly 
drawn, and provide among other things, in addition to the 
points contained in the permit regulations, for the full con- 
trol of the work by the Superintendent of Streets, who 
should decide all questions arising relative to the execution 
of the contract, and determine absolutely the amount of work 
to be paid for under the contract. 

Lists of streets within a prescribed district designed to be 
watered are given in the contract, with power to discontinue 
any street or to add thereto any street or streets within five 
hundred feet of the district boundaries. 

The amount of water to be used is regulated by the Super- 
intendent, and the choice between using salt or fresh water 
is made by him. 

The sprinkling-wagons are subject to regulation, and may 
be ordered off the street when considered unfit for use. 
The season extends from March to December. The Super- 
intendent of Streets determines whether or not the contractor 
has kept the streets in the damp condition provided by the 
contract, and is also to determine whether or not rain has 
obviated the necessity for sprinkling. 

Complaints from any citizen or taxpayer of unsatisfactory 
work call for an examination by the Superintendent, and, if 
well founded, authority is given to supply additional service 
at the contractor's expense, and deductions from the con- 
tractor's dues are made and determined by the Superintend- 
ent of Streets. 

Proper provision is made for cancelling the contract and 
reletting the work, in case the same is neglected or abandoned. 

Payment is made monthly on estimates approximately 
proportional to the amount of work done, less deductions, 
the price stated in proposals being a fixed sum per mile for 



72 



City Document No. 34. 



the season, for watering with salt water, and another fixed 
sum per mile for watering with fresh water. 

A bond with two sureties, residents of the State of Massa- 
chusetts and satisfactory to the Superintendent of Streets, is 
required with each contract. 

The following table gives a summary of the work done by 
teams hired by the day and teams owned by the city, clas- 
sified by districts, with the number of miles covered in each 
district. 

1892. 
Summary of Day Work paid for by the City. 



Districts. 


Number of teams 
hired by the day. 


Number of teams 
owned by the city. 


Number of 
miles covered. 


1. South Boston 


8 

6 

7 

11 

15 

13 

18 

1 

2 

1 

2 




20.06 
12.78 


3. Charlestown 




15.00 
27.00 


5. West Roxbury .... 


2 
1 


5200 
40.44 
51.61 


8. South Yard ...... 

9. Back Bay 




2.30 
3.35 




1.58 


11 Beacon Hill 




4.00 








Totals 


84 


3 


230.12 







The summary shows that eighty-four carts hired by the 
day and three carts owned by the city have watered 230.12 
miles of streets during this year, as compared with 151.86 
miles of streets watered with sixty-one carts last year. The 
expense of this work was borne entirely by the city. The cost 
of day work and city work, exclusive of supervision, was 
$291 per mile, or $67,048.50. These carts averaged about 
2.645+ miles per day. The West Roxbury carts averaged 
3.06 miles per day ; Dorchester carts averaged 2.86 miles 
per day; and on the Back Bay the carts averaged 1.68 
miles per day. 



Street Department. 



73 



1892. 
Summary of Contract Work paid for by the City. 



Districts. 


Contractor. 


Carts. 
10 

& 


Miles. 


Cost. 


South End 


M. E. Nawn 


13.028 
7.959 
2.11 


$11,6<)3 41 

5,439 18 

322 50 


Ashmont Improvement Co.* . 


Totals 




15 


23.097 


$17,425 09 







* One-half the expense of a watering-cart is paid by the Ashmont Co. 

The summary shows that fifteen carts were used by the 
contractors to water 23.097 miles, of which 7.45 miles were 
watered with salt water, and 13.442 miles were watered with 
fresh water, paid for entirely by the city, and 2.11 miles in 
Dorchester, one-half the cost being paid by the city and one- 
half by the abutters. 

The contract price in Back Bay was $1,150 per mile for 
salt water and $850 per mile for fresh water. 

The contract price in South End was $767 per mile for 
salt water and $567 per mile for fresh water. 

1892. 

Work done by Contractors at the Expense of the 
Abutters. 



Districts. 


Contractor. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


City Proper 




3 

4 

h 
2 

h 
h 
1 


2 75 


City Proper 


Proctor Bros. & Billings. . . 


8 00 


City Proper 


7 10 




1.50 


Roxhury and South Boston. . 


A. A. Hall 


2.75 




0.50 






0.50 




J. V. Bancroft 


1.00 








Totals 




16 


24.10 









74 



City Document No. 34. 



The expense of this was borne entirely by the abutters. 
This table shows that with sixteen carts these contractors 
watered 24.10 miles of paved streets in the City Proper, 
South Boston, East Boston, Charlestown, and Roxbury. 
This watering was done on the streets paved with stone, ex- 
cept a small piece of asphalt on Columbus avenue. 



1892. 
Summary of Work done which was paid for hy the City. 



No. 


Districts. 


Miles, day work. 


Miles, contract work. 


Total. 


1 


South Boston. . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown .... 

West Roxbury. . 
Dorchester .... 

Soutli Yard 

Back Bay 

North Yard .... 


20.06 

12.78 

15.00 

27.00 

52.00 

40.44 

51.61 

2.30 

3.35 

5.58 




20.06 


2 




12.78 


3 




15.00 


4 




27.00 


5 
6 


2.11 


52.00 
42.55 
51.61 


8 

9 

10 


7.96 
13.03 


10.26 

16.38 

5.58 










230.12 

• 

or about 
3,037,600 sq. yds. 


23.10 
or about 
486,000 sq. yds. 


253.22 



Cost of city and day work, exclusive of 

supervision ..... $291 00 permile. 

Cost of contract work, exclusive of super- 
vision 754 00 " " 

Total cost of contract and day and city 

work $92,527 77 

(All of the above exclusive of water, water-posts, etc.) 
Water furnished by Boston Water- Works at no expense. 



Street Department. 



o 



1892. 

Distribution of Carts, showing the Entire Amount of 
Work clone. 



No. 


Districts. 


City carts. 


Hired carts. 


Contractors' 
cans. 


Total. 


Miles. 


1 


Soutli Boston. . 




8 


1 


9 


21.44 


2 


East Boston .... 




6 

7 


h 


6* 


13.28 


3 






15.50 


4 






11 
15 




n 

17 


27.00 


5 


West Roxuury . . 




2 




52.00 


6 


Dorchester .... 


1 


13 


h 


144 


42.55 


7 






18 


2 


20 


53.98 


8 






6 


264 


324 


51.57 












3 


84 


31 


118 


277.32 



76 



City Document No. 34. 



05 





c 


c 


o 


"* 


o 


c 


c 


CO 


o 








-* 


CM 


OS 


cc 


CM 


ec 


cc 




CO 




_J 


lO 


ec 


OS 


-f 


OS 


9 


OS 


CO 


r— 






OC 


>C 


lO 


t- 


Iffl 


O 


c 




o 




o 


t~ 


ec 


00 




t~ 


1« 


cc 


t- 


»© 
























H 


co 


ir: 


10 


d 


•* 




-* 


lO 








Ǥ= 












CM 


OS 






















<=©= 




















CO 


CO 




h 
















CO 


CO 


























3 
















o 


o 




i 
















CO 


CO 




o 
















CO 


cc 


















۩= 


Ǥ= 




w 






























c 








CM 


CM 












c 








C3 


CM 




'3 








ec 








<# 


f- 




o< 
















co 


Os 




u 








33= 






CO 


CO 




P3 


















m 




1 








<T. 


o 


IG 


c 


-* 


CO 










CC 


lO 


a- 




<M 






o 






















ft 








IN 


■* 




o- 


># 


CM 












C 


CO 


cc 


o 


»o 


UO 




co 








T* 


CM 








OS 




a 








3£ 








€6= 




te 






















F* 
























c 


c 


o 


IC 


o 


io O co 


CO 






•T 


CN 


as 


** 


t~ 


CO l> 


-* 






J- 
























c 


c 


>o 


o; 




>(■ 


-«* 


co 


tH 




£ 


V. 


cs 


lO 


c 


CM 


CO -* 


CO 


>o 




ea 


ur. 


IT 


lO 


ec 


CO 


CM to CO 


o^ 




1-1 


&. 


»= 






,_T 


,_7 


CM 


cxT 






















۩= 






c 


c 


o 


o o 


o o o 


o 




?4 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 


o o o 


o 




o 


IT 


er 


-H 


c 


o 


CO CO 1Q 


■-C 




if 


a" 


o 


IT 


CO 


O to CO 


00 




t» 


C\ 


a 


eo 




© 


^ O S 


■* 




P 


ce 


-a 


»o 


a- 


of 


ffi CO •* 


to 




ft 


* 






""* 








CO 

m 




j<5 












o 


CS 


OS 




3 












U5 


lO 


o 




£ 












CM 


CM 


lO 




o 












CS 




o 


CM 














CO 




-*_ 




a 












€& 


t-^ 


t-^ 




a 






















o 
O 


















<§& 














o 


o 




O 




M 










o 


«o 




lO 




3 










CO 


-* 




tr~ 














os 




co 




>> 


















m 
















































o 










m 








m 




QQ 
























EH 
























O 
















































B 










>> 














H 


c 








u 














M 


c 


c 


e 




3 














S 


"5 


c 


fe 




o 

122 


s. 



c 




<D 










(2 


a 

c 


2 


c 

c 


> 

J; 


a, 

■> o 


"3 








PC 


.2 










£ 

i 


o 








» 




J> 


) CO 




>< 


£> 


H 






c 




J2 

O 


pc 


£ 


c 

p 


c 

PS 


o 






6 




< <r 


CO 


■^ 


»o 


« 


t- 


00 






y A 

























Street Department. 



77 



The following table shows the amount expended in street- 



waten no- by 


the city tor the la 


st sixteen ye 


u's : 


1877 . 


$17,593 62 


1885 . 


$43,854 68 


1878 . 


. 23,595 02 


1886 . 


. 44,940 35 


1879 . 


. 26,747 18 


1887 . 


. 51,365 73 


1880 . 


. 33,306 95 


1888 . 


. 40,586 58 


1881 . 


. 36,178 24 


1889 . 


. 47,837 46 


1882 . 


. 45,797 00 


1890 . 


. 57,967 34 


1883 . 


. 53,502 29 


1891 . 


104,263 62 


1884 . 


. 34,518 47 


1892 . 


. 94,507 80 



Water-Posts. 

An effort has been made throughout the year to improve 
the service by a better distribution of water-posts, and old 
locations have been changed and new ones established when- 
ever it was .evident that more territory could be covered by 
a given cart by so doing. 



The whole number in existence February 1 , 1892 

The number abandoned during 1892 . 

The number changed in location during 1892 

The number established during 1892 

The whole number now in use . 



The following table shows their location by districts : 



271 
1 

6 

69 

339 



District. 


1891. 


1892. 


Increase. 




23 

16 
19 
25 
50 
61 
53 
24 


25 
23 
19 
39 
59 
72 
60 
42 


2 




7 


Charlestown 







15 


Dorchester 


9 
11 




7 


City Proper 


18 






Total 


271 


339 


69 







'One abandoned in August. 



78 City Document No. 34. 

The Water Board have promptly made these changes at 
the request of the Superintendent of Streets, and an expense 
of $952.18 therefor has been paid by the Street Depart- 
ment. 

Income. 

The Street Department during the year watered streets in 
front of 103 public schools, 14 police-stations, and 28 engine- 
houses, and received from the several departments having 
control of the same the following sums : 

Schools $2,440 50 

Police-stations . . . . 214 20 

Engine- houses .... 353 10 



Total $3,007 80 

In addition to the work done for the other city depart- 
ments and paid for by them, the department, at the request 
of the abutters, watered Louisburg square, which is a private 
way, and received the sum of $100 therefor. Correspond- 
ence was entered into with the abutters on various other 
private ways, and also with the abutters on side streets 
which were not watered owing to the smallness of the ap- 
propriation, with a view of the department undertaking the 
work on the payment of the actual cost of watering. 

No agreement (outside of the one on Louisburg square) 
was made, as it was found that the residents would not pay 
the small individual amount necessary. 

A close inspection of the results accomplished this year 
with those of last year shows that the cost of the work done 
by the city has decreased, and that the distance covered per 
day with each team employed by the city has shown an 
increase. 

This is the natural result of better organization and super- 
vision, and an increase in economy and efficiency may be 
confidently looked for during the year of 1893. The work 
let by contract (the watering of the Back Bay and the South 
End), although publicly advertised and awarded to the low- 
est bidder, in comparison with the work done by the city, 
shows that a very large price was obtained by the several 
contractors. 

This is accounted for by the fact that contractors in their 
bids were obliged to make allowance for plant, and also by 
the fact that the call for salt water in the specification added 
largely to the cost of watering. It is also invariably the expe- 
rience that the first time that bids are called for on any work, 



Street Department. 



79 



the prices obtained are generally high, but each year there- 
after a decrease takes place until there is only a reasonable 
amount of profit in the work. This statement is borne out 
by the fact that the bid recently opened for street-watering in 
the South End for the year 1893 shows a falling off in the 
prices of about 19 per cent., and in the Back Bay of about 
26 per cent. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 



The work of the Sanitary Division, which includes the re- 
moval of house offal and the removal of house and store dirt 
and ashes, shows a constant increase from year to year. 

The following; table shows the number of loads of offal 
collected and removed in the last ten (10) years: 



Amount of House Offal removed. 

Tear. No. of 

1883 27 



1884 

1885 

1886 

18o7 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 l 

1892 



28 
31 
33 
36 
37 
40 
40 
46 
46 



Loads. 

,408 
,520 
,206 
,170 
,724 
,409 
,183 
,525 
,742 
,343 



^rom January 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892, or 13 months. 

Each load of offal is equivalent to fifty-seven (57) cubic 
feet, and weighs one and one-half (1£) tons. 

The above table does not include the amount collected by 
contract in East Boston and Brighton, which amounts to 
about 5,100 loads per year. 

The collection of this material is attended to by practically 
the same force as last year, 93 offal carts and 175 men being 
employed, and on contract work 8 offal carts and 16 men, 
making a total of 101 offal carts and 191 men. 

But few complaints have been received concerning the 
failure of the division to promptly remove offal ; investiga- 
tion of complaints usually shows that either the offal has not 
been properly separated from ashes or other house refuse, 
as is insisted on in this city, or else that the receptacles 



80 



City Document No. 34. 



were deposited in some inaccessible place. If householders 
would see that the employees have easy access to the recep- 
tacles, and that the men are not unnecessarily delayed in 
this work, the service would be greatly facilitated. 

The disposal of this large amount of offal is one of the 
most serious problems with which the city is confronted. 

The disposal has been made during the year in the manner 
described in last year's report, viz. : The offal from the 
markets, and offal that is decayed, is put on board a scow 
and towed to sea ; the offal of Charlestown is taken to the 
yard at Maiden bridge and then disposed of to farmers ; the 
offal of East Boston is collected by contractors, and is re- 
moved to Revere : the offal of the City Proper, South Boston, 
and Dorchester is conveyed to the yard at the South End, 
and disposed of to farmers, who remove it daily ; the offal of 
Roxbury and West Roxbury is conveyed to the yard on 
Highland street, and disposed of to farmers ; and the offal 
of Brighton is collected by contract and disposed of outside 
of the district. 

For two years this subject has been agitated in the public 
press, but no change has been inaugurated in the method of 
disposal, although the sale of offal to farmers, who feed it to 
pigs which are afterwards brought to market in this city, 
has been severely condemned. 

The effect of the agitation that has been going on for the 
past two years is plainly visible in the receipts of the 
department for the sale of offal s which have fallen off in a 
marked degree. 

Collection and Disposal of Offal. 



Year. 


Total amount 
collected. 


Amount sold. 


Amount dumped 

on scow and 

towed to sea or 

wasted. 


Per cent, wasted 

to total 

collection. 


Amount of re- 
ceipts from 
sales. 


1891 
1892 


142,616 loads. 
46,343 " 


40,492 loads. 
30,773 " 


2,124 loads. 
15,570 " 


5 per cent. 
33 " " 


$30,672 65 
21,282 82 



1 Twelve months. Above table does not include contracts in East Boston and Brighton. 



This felling off in receipts is accounted for by the fact that 
the Boards of Health of many suburban towns have prohib- 
ited the carrying on of piggeries within the town limits. 
Many farmers have therefore been obliged to discontinue the 
raising of pigs, and the market for the city's offal is becom- 
ing more and more restricted. 

It is probable that the practice of selling offal for food 



Street Department. 81 

purposes will be entirely prohibited within two years, and 
that a radical change in the method of getting rid of this 
material must be inaugurated by the city. 

As stated in last year's report, there are several ways in 
which the disposal of offal in the future may be satisfactorily 
accomplished. 

The towing of offal to sea during the past year and dump- 
ing it has not given rise to any complaints from neighboring 
towns. This is entirely due to the care exercised in the 
selection of the dumping-grounds and the method used in 
dumping, a description and chart of which were 'published in 
last year's report. 

This method can be continued in the future, but the amount 
of offal that can be economically disposed of in this way is 
limited, as the cost of hauling it from remote sections in 
West Roxbury or Dorchester to the dumping-scow is so 
great that some other method of disposal in these districts 
is necessary. 

Two other methods of disposal remain ; viz., cremation 
and chemical treatment. Propositions concerning both these 
methods have been submitted to the City Council by parties 
interested in these processes. 

The first proposition, made by I, M. Simonin, of Philadel- 
phia, is as follows : 

Simonin Proposition. 

Philadelphia, Pa., October 12, 1892. 

To the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Boston, Mass. ; 

Gentlemen : We beg to submit the following proposal for the utili- 
zation of your kitchen garbage : 

We agree to transfer to the city of Boston, for its perpetual and 
exclusive use, all right, title, and interest in the system known as the 
"Simonin process," a scientific means for the sanitary and economic 
disposal of vegetable and kitchen garbage. This process includes the 
letters-patent and all papers pertaining to the said patented process and 
apparatus, any future improvements, and all necessary buildings (the 
city providing the ground), to make a completely equipped plant for 
the treatment of this refuse. 

For the sum of $160,000 we will construct a plant and guarantee it 
will treat 140 tons of kitchen garbage daily. 

For the sum of $175,000 we will construct a plant and guarantee it 
will treat 160 tons of kitchen garbage daily. 

For the sum of $185,000 we will construct a plant and guarantee it 
will treat 180 tons of kitchen garbage daily. 

On assignment of patent and signing of contract and bond, the city to 
pa} - $40,000, and future payments to be mutually agreed upon. This 
plant then to be managed by us, under a lease given by the city, for a 
period of 20 years, with the privilege of renewal for a similar period, 
and to be operated by us or our assigns for the purpose for which it was 
constructed; and we agree to pay to the city, in quarterly payments, an 



82 City Document No. 34. 

annual rental of $3,200 if a plant is built of 140 tons daily capacity; or 
$3,500 if a plant is built of 160 tons daily capacity ; or $3,700 if a plant is 
built of 180 tons daily capacity. 

We also agree under this proposal to dispose of daily, of crude vege- 
table and animal kitchen garbage, free of cost to the city or contractor, 
an amount equal to the guaranteed capacity of the plant. 

When, however, the city, owing to the natural growth in population 
or other causes, delivers an excess of the capacity of the plant, the city 
then to pay to the lessees the sum of 45 cents per ton on all excess of 
the said daily capacity. The additional apparatus necessary to scientifi- 
cally and sanitarily treat this excess to be paid for by the lessees, and at 
the expiration of the contract the plant to revert to the city, and all ap- 
paratus to be in good workmanlike condition, the city paying a just- 
valuation for the additional apparatus. 

We further propose that the plant can be used, in case of an epidemic, 
as a city disinfecting station. 

If given the contract, we will file a $25,000 bond for the faithful per- 
formance of the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SlMONIN & SlMONIN. 

The above-described method, which contemplates treating 
the offal by chemicals, is the one now in successful operation at 
Providence, and has lately been adopted by the city of Cin- 
cinnati. It has the merit of so treating the offal that what- 
ever valuable constituents are present are utilized. 

The offal, on arrival at the works, is placed in specially 
constructed crates, which in turn are stacked on to an iron 
truck which is then run on a track into a large iron 
"extractor." This extractor (of which there are six in 
operation at Providence) is cylindrical in shape, eighteen 
feet long and six feet in diameter. The end of the extractor 
is removable and fastens on with screw-bolts, after the 
trucks (three of which are put in each extractor) have been 
wheeled in. It is then hermetically sealed. No attempt is 
made to sort over the offal or deprive it of water before 
treatment. 

It can be immediately loaded on the crates and put in the 
extractor. This is one of the most valuable features of this 
process, for beyond the actual handling of the offal there is 
no further nuisance. After being placed in the " extractor " 
the offal is completely immersed in a chemical reagent which 
is pumped into the extractor. 

This reagent does not mix with the water, but acts as a 
solvent for the grease which is present. Hot steam is then 
passed through coils of pipe in the extractors, which has the 
effect of volatilizing the chemical reagent, which passes off* 
in vapor into storage vats. A large part of the water in the 
offal is displaced, owing to its specific gravity, and the 
balance passes off with the vapor of the reagent and is 
then condensed. 



Street Department. 83 

After being treated in this manner several times (without, 
however, removing it from the extractor, which is kept her- 
metically sealed) the offal becomes entirely dried, and is also 
freed from all grease, which has passed off with the reagent. 
The offal when removed from the crates is perfectly dry, has 
no odor, and is entirely harmless. It is ground up in a mill 
and sold as a dryer for fertilizer. It contains about 4.4 per 
cent, of ammonia and 9 per cent, of free phosphate of lime, 
and is in itself a fertilizer for some plants. 

The grease which is extracted is sold for the manufacture 
of soap, candles, etc., and there is always a market for it. 

As far as being a sanitary process for the disposal of offal, 
this process is almost perfect ; for, from the time the offal is 
put into the retort until it comes out dry and odorless, it 
has been hermetically sealed up, and there is but little odor 
either in the building or in the gases given off from the 
chimney. The plant in Providence is less than ten minutes' 
walk from the union depot. 

Engle Process. 

This is entirely a process of cremation. The offal is 
entirely burned up, and no attempt is made to cull out any 
portion of it for special sale. The only commercial product 
is the ashes, which must be rehandled and teamed off to some 
dumping-ground. 

The principal distinctive feature of the Engle furnace is 
the fact that two fires are used : one to burn the garbage, and 
the other to burn and destroy the escaping smoke and gases 
before being sent out into the open air. The furnace for a 
thirty-ton per day plant consists of a rectangular brick 
structure 42 feet long, 91 feet wide, 12^ feet high, outside 
measurements, with a stack at one end, 30 feet of which is 
of brick and 60 of iron. 

At each end of the furnace, on a line with the garbage 
grates, are fire-boxes ; the flues at the stack end leading into 
the chimney are closed by heavy fire-clay slabs. The in- 
terior walls are lined by heavy fire-clay blocks accurately 
fitted together, backed on the outside by a heavy brick wall, 
braced and bonded together with stays, rods, and angle 
irons. 

The crematory is covered by a house of galvanized corru- 
gated iron, the entrance to which is so arranged that teams 
can drive in upon the platform directly from the street, and 
dump their loads upon a chute made of steel plates, which 
slope toward a number of holes in the top of the furnace, 



84 City Document No. 34. 

one hole being large enough to admit the bodies of dead 
animals. 

These holes are covered with fire-clay plates which can be 
taken out readily. When removed, no odor escapes, as the 
draught is downward. The garbage thus dumped upon the 
grates comes in immediate contact with the strong flames, 
and is consumed ; the escaping smoke and gases pass across 
to the second fire. The flames from the second fire are by 
the action of a strong draught brought back underneath the 
garbage grates, heating the mass intensely from below. 

Stoke holes conveniently arranged admit of an occasional 
stirring of the garbage upon the grates. It is claimed that 
all the odors, gases, and products of combustion passing 
through one or both fires must be completely destroyed be- 
fore being discharged into the air. To operate such a plant 
it is claimed that only from one to one and one-half tons of 
coal per day are required, and the services of two men when 
burning 10 or 15 tons of garbage per day. 

This process is in operation in Lowell, Mass., in Chicago, 
111., Tampa and Jacksonville, Fla., Savannah, Ga., and 
several other places. The following official communication 
to His Honor the Mayor is the only statement submitted to 
this city for consideration up to date, by the company repre- 
senting the Engle System. 

The Engle Sanitary and Cremation Company. 

James C. Saveky, President. James Callahan, Treasurer. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

W. F. Mobsb, Represented in New York by 

General Agent, Geo. H. Wakner, 

30 State street, New York. 30 State street, New York. 

JS t ew York, October 29, 1892. 

To the Honorable the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, and the Common 
Council of the City of Boston : 

Gentlemen : Understanding that the city of Boston proposes to in- 
vestigate the various methods and systems for the disposal of the gar- 
bage and waste of the city, the Engle Sanitary and Cremation Company 
respectfully represent : 

That the company has constructed and put into successful operation 
thirty different cremating furnaces of the Engle pattern in twenty-two 
cities and towns of this country. 

That the company is now constructing cremating furnaces to destroy 
the garbage and waste of the World's Columbian Exjjosition, at Chicago, 
111., and are building large cremators at several other points. 

That from examination of the situation in Boston it is the belief of this 
company that the gai'bage of the city can be destroyed by cremation, 
with entii'e sanitary protection, at a moderate expense. 

That this work can be done at four different localities within the city 
limits, which will compel the garbage and waste to be brought but com- 



Street Department. 85 

paratively short distances, and ensiwe the speedy destruction of all 
offensive and worthless matters at places near to the field of production 
and collection. 

That it is the opinion of the Engle Company that the cost of handling 
and transportation of garbage and waste will be materially reduced, 
and the present expense lessened, by the adoption of the method of cre- 
mation at these several localities. 

That the employment of the Engle System of Garbage Disposal at 
other cities where it has been in continuous operation for a series of 
years, warrants the belief and opinion that the same methods will be 
found equally valuable if brought into use in the city of Boston. 

The Engle Company will, if desired, submit plans and drawings ac- 
companied b} 7 detailed statements and definite proposals showing the 
cost of proposed Engle cremating furnaces, and the expense of operation 
and maintenance of same, and respectfully petition for a hearing before 
the proper authorities having charge of this matter. 
Very respectfully, 
The Engle Sanitary and Cremation Company, 
(Signed) W. F. Morse, 

General Agent. 

Merz Process. 

This process, which is strictly a chemical reduction process, 
as actually operated in some cities in this country, requires, 
for a one-hundred ton per day plant, twelve driers and five 
extractors. The driers are made of concentric cylinders, one 
within the other, hung horizontally below the receiving-floor. 

The inner cylinder receives the garbage through a hopper, 
opening to the delivery-floor, and carries a reel made of 
riveted steel and revolving through the longitudinal axis of 
the drier. 

The outer cylinder is nothing more than a jacket, into 
which superheated steam is admitted at a temperature of 
about 300° Fahrenheit. The time required for drying one 
cylinder full of garbstge is usually from five to six hours. 

Before the garbage passes through the hopper into the 
drier, it is sorted over so that the old cans, junk, bottles, 
pieces of rags, etc., are sorted out and disposed of indepen- 
dently of the process. As the drying process goes on the 
watery vapors pass off* through 12-inch pipes to a set of con- 
densers, and thence into the sewer. 

On the bottom of each drier is a steam-tight door, through 
which the contents are withdrawn upon a belt conveyer, 
which transmits it directly to the extractors. The extractors 
are circular, upright tanks with a false bottom, in which for 
six hours the product from the driers is subjected to a ben- 
zine bath, by means of which the oily constituents are wholly 
removed. The benzine is then driven oft* and recondensed, • 
the oil withdrawn to the storage tanks, and the dry residue 
conveyed to a storehouse, where, after sifting, the fine, dry 
product is put up in bags and sent to market. 



SQ City Document No. 34. 

By this process all moisture is driven off at a high tem- 
perature, and the decomposable acids are so changed that 
the product delivered is no longer subject to decomposition, 
even upon long standing. 

Little or no gas is given off, owing to insufficient tem- 
perature for the decomposition of the vegetable fibre to take 
place, the organic vegetable matter deprived of its watery 
composition having no tendency to decomposition by expos- 
ure to the air. 

Dead animals are separately treated in special driers 
similar in every respect to those used for ordinary garbage, 
except that they have a special connecting-pipe for filling. The 
larger animals being first cut up, and the skins being saved, 
are thrown into the upright boiler, sealed from the air, and 
boiled for some hours by superheated steam, till the parts 
are reduced in size so as to slip easily through the valve 
chute into the driers. From this point on the animal matter 
is treated in exactly the same manner as ordinary garbage. 

The cost of destroying this garbage in an inoffensive man- 
ner is stated to be nine cents per 100 pounds, or $1.80 per 
ton, to the extent of 100 tons per day. 

The products of the factory are two : grease and fertilizing 
material, both of which are marketable and in demand. 

The success of this process depends largely upon the 
proper disposal of these products. 

Brown Developing Process. 

The Brown Developing Company have erected a patent 
furnace (at their own expense) on Albany street, and the 
department is now conducting experiments in the burn- 
ing of garbage, with a view of ascertaining the exact cost of 
disposal. The process is entirely one of cremation, no 
attempt being made to extract any of the valuable constit- 
uents of the garbage. 

General Discussion. 

The disposal of offal is largely a question of expense and 
whether or not a nuisance is created in the disposal, and 
conies down to the disputed question as to whether offal 
should be treated for the valuable constituents which are 
alleged to be present by parties interested in the chemical 
treatment of offal, or whether the offal should be regarded 
as a waste product of civilization which should be burned up 
and destroyed. 

If the offal can be treated chemically and valuable prod- 
ucts be produced from such treatment, it would seem the 



Steeet Department. 87 

proper system to pursue, if the method is conducted without 
producing a nuisance. 

Compared with any system of cremation, it is believed that 
the operation of treating offal chemically can be conducted 
with the least nuisance. 

In regard to the proposition made to the city of Boston 
for chemical treatment and cremation, an investigation would 
seem to show the following results : 

First. If the proposition to treat the offal chemically by 
the Simonin process was accepted, the city of Boston would 
be obliged to invest the sum of $175,000 for the purchase of 
a plant which would be run by the owners of the process, 
who would pay an annual rental for the privilege of treating 
the offal and disposing of the manufactured product. The 
interest on the invested capital of the city (at a percentage 
which would allow of the establishment of a sinking-fund to 
renew the plant) plus the miscellaneous expenses, and less the 
amount received as rental ($3,500), would represent the 
annual outlay on the part of the city, and would amount to 
about $10,000. 

The above argument assumes that the owners of the pro- 
cess are put under bonds so that the capital the city invests 
in the plant is secure, and the running of the plant for the 
specified term of years is guaranteed. 

Second. If the proposition to treat the offal by cremation 
was accepted, the city of Boston would be obliged to invest 
the sum of about $80,000 in plant, and would then be at the 
expense of running the plant and destroying the offal. The 
cost of this method of disposal is a very uncertain question. 
It has been stated in various places as ranging from thirty 
cents to one dollar a ton. 

It is safe to assume that offal in the city of Boston would 
cost, at least, seventy-five cents per ton to destroy, and even 
if mixed with all the available house and store dirt which 
could be collected in the vicinity, and which would serve as 
fuel, the cost would not be less than seventy cents per ton. 

The destruction of one hundred and sixty tons of offal 
would require a yearly expenditure, including interest on 
plant and sinking-fund, of about $i0,000. 

The future disposal of the offal will probably be effected 
in the following manner, and steps should at once be taken 
to inaugurate the method : 

First. All offal collected in the vicinity of the wharf 
where the present dumping-boat is located should be taken 
there, and then towed to sea. If new dumping-wharves are 
established, either in East Boston, Charlestown, South 



88 City Document No. 34. 

Boston, or the North End, all the offal of these districts 
should also be disposed of at sea. 

Second. A central place (such as the site of the old 
small-pox hospital at the South Bay) should be selected and 
a plant erected for the disposal of offal by chemical treat- 
ment. 

Jt would be advisable to dispose of the offal of Roxbury, 
the South End, and parts of Dorchester, City Proper, and 
South Boston at this place. The amount of offal to be 
treated at this station would amount, at the present time, to 
about 100 tons per day, and would ultimately increase 
to about 160 tons per day. 

Third. As the erection of a chemical-treatment plant 
could not be undertaken unless a considerable amount of 
offal can be treated, it would be necessary to establish sev- 
eral small cremation plants : one to be located in Brighton, 
another in West Roxbury, and another in Dorchester. 

By adopting the above-described system the greatest 
economy would be effected, as the offal would be disposed of 
in the vicinity where it is collected, and the expense of haul- 
ing the material long distances would be done away with. 

In order to show the capacities of the various offal wagons, 
the following measurements of various city carts were taken 
at random, and the average computed therefrom : 



Street Department. 



89 



No. or Wagon. 



5 cesspool wagon 

6 

7 

9 . 

10 

13 

15 

17 

19 

20 

21 

22 . 

26 

27 

30 

33 

38 

53 Roxbury 

54 " 

61 " 

64 " 

79 " 



Total 



Average 



Measurement of 
Wagons. 



iCd. ft. 
9 _9 

" 16 

9 _2 

" 16 

9 _4_ 

" 16 

" 16 

^ 16 

9 _fl . 

" 16 

9 _9 

"16 

9 _UL 

O 16 — 

9 „fl 

" 16 — 

9 .S. 

"16 — ■ 

9 in _ 

" 1 6 

9 .3 

"16 

9'^fl 

" 16 — 

9 _a 

"16 

9 m — 

" 16 — 

9 JLU 

"16 — 

9 _a 

"16 — 

9 _fl 

"16 

9 _S 

"16 

9 -k 

"16 

9 _£ 

"16 — 

9 _5 

"16 — 

9 _4 

"16 — 

9 .a 

"i6 — 



Cu. ft. 
57 

57 
52 
57 
57 
57 
57 
58 
57 
57 
58 
57 
57 
57 



57 
57 
57 
53 
53 
53 
52 
57 



84 -fr = 1,350 



Weight of Offal. 



•) 3 3 

" li I 



56.25 



Pounds. 
3,040 
3,090 
2,925 
3,120 
2,990 
2,980 
3,220 
3,3-10 
2,910 
3,360 
3,280 
3,510 
3,205 
3,510 
3,100 
3.460 
3,300 
2.910 
3,140 
2,860 
3,190 
2,770 
2,710 
2,835 



74,755 



3,115 



■A cord contain* 128 feet and weighs 7,091 lbs., and is sold at Charlestown yard for 
$4 per cord and at Highland yard for §5 per cord, and at Albany street for $4 per cord. 



90 



City Document No. 34. 



Force Employed. 



City Force. 



Sub-foreman 
Offal clerks . 
Teamsters . . 

Helptrs 

Dampers . . 

Total .... 



1 

2 

67 



157 



Hired 
Teams. 



IS 



Contract 

Teams. 

E. Boston. 



12 



Contract 

Teams. 

Brighton. 



Grand total, 191 men. 

Removal of Ashes. 

The removal of ashes and house and store dirt has been 
attended to during the year by an average force of 202 men, 
179 city carts, and 5 carts by an East Boston contractor. 
This work shows a constant increase from year to year, as 
will be seen in the following table, and is an indication of the 
actual growth of the city : 



Amount of Ashes and House and Store Dirt 

REMOVED. 

Year. 

1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 x 



1892 



Number of Loads. 

159,197 
169,610 
182,642 
193,734 
209,129 
220,186 
233,514 
227,325 
245,730 
313,464 
303,878 



Each load of ashes is equivalent to 43 cubic feet. 
This enormous amount of waste material is used largely for 
the purpose of rilling low and swampy lands. 

i Thirteen months, from January 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892. 



Street Department. 



91 



The following- table shows the disposition of this material 
for 1892, together with the amount of house offal and the 
portion of street sweepings that were disposed of by the 
Sanitary Division : 





Amount col- 
lected. 


Deposited on 
Low Land. 


Towed to 
Sea. 




Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 




303,878 
46,343 
33,370 


220,615 
7,963 


83,263 
7,607 




33,370 






Total 


383,591 


299,678 


124,240 



The filling in of low land within the city limits is progress- 
ing at such a rapid rate, that the procuring of dumps convenient 
to the locality where the material is collected is a matter of ex- 
treme difficulty. A large amount of material has to be hauled 
a long distance, which adds largely to the cost of disposal. 

The filling in of the so-called State Dump in South Boston 
has done away with one of the most accessible dumps. It 
would seem to be a wise proceeding on the part of the city of 
Boston to acquire a large area of flats in the so-called South 
Bay. The filling of these flats, which are covered with five 
or six feet of water at high tide, would take several years. 

The city would not only acquire territory which for years 
would be available for a central dumping-station, but the 
rise in valuation of this land when filled to grade twelve 
would be enormous, and would prove a most profitable in- 
vestment. The gradual filling in of this territory would do 
away with the nuisance existing when these flats are uncov- 
ered. The South Bay in its present condition is a menace 
to the health of the community, and the city should acquire 
the territory and fill it in. 

Comparative Statement of Number of Loads of Ashes collected 
during 16 Weeks of the Summer and 10 Weeks of the Winter. 



Summer. 


Loads. 


Winter. 


Loads. 


Diff.Tenco 
for Winter. 


May 4, 1889, to Aug. 23, 1889 
" 2, 1890, " " 21, 1890 
" 2. 1891, " " 21, 1891 

Apr. 30, 1892, " " 19, 1892 


60,609 
65,239 
76,625 
82,034 


Nov. 30, 1889, to Mar. 1, 1890 

" 1, 1890, " " 13, 1891 

Oct. 31, 1891, " Feb. 19, 1892 


82,866 
93,660 
100,223 


22,257 
28,421 
23,598 



92 City Document No. 34. 



Tow-Bo AT. 

The recommendation made in last year's report to the 
effect that a new tow-boat should be provided capable of 
doing the work of the sewer and sanitary division was favor- 
ably acted on by the government, and a first-class boat is 
now in course of construction. 

The work of garbage disposal at sea will be conducted 
by May 1 in dumping-boats towed by the department tug, 
thus affecting a large saving in expense. 

The boat is being built by the Atlantic Works of East 
Boston, who were the lowest bidders. The contract price is 
$23,994, and the boat will be ready in April. 

No action has been taken on the recommendation that a 
new dumping-wharf be procured at the North End. At the 
time this recommendation was made, there were several 
wharves available which have since been bought by steam- 
ship companies. 

The procuring of a suitable wharf will now be a matter of 
some difficulty, even if an appropriation is made. 

In July last an injunction was asked of the Superior Court 
by the Boston and Portsmouth Steamship Company, against 
the use of the Fort Hill wharf as a dumping-wharf, on the 
ground that it was a nuisance to the company and the pas- 
sengers using its steamships running to the Isles of Shoals 
and Portsmouth from Snow's Arch wharf. After considera- 
tion of the testimony the court refused to grant the injunc- 
tion, as it was shown that it was imperative for the city to 
maintain this wharf as a dumping-station. Grave doubts 
exist as to the court's having the same opinion when it 
comes to a final hearing of the case. 

The advisability of the department having another wharf 
is manifest, as it would be a very serious matter if, for any 
reason, the present wharf could not be used, even for a short 
time. 

The refuse material which has been towed to sea and 
dumped during the year has been conveyed in the Barney 
dumping-scows in use by the city. The contract for towing 
has been evenly divided between the Boston and the Com- 
mercial Wharf Tow-Boat Companies at the same favorable 
prices as were made last year. 

The recommendation made in last year's report, that the 
city purchase a second dumping-boat in place of leasing one, 
has not received consideration from the government. 

The plant of the department has been kept in a high state 
of efficiency throughout the year. It is doubtful if a su- 
perior lot of horses or carts employed in the collection of 



Street Department. 93 

offal can be found in any city in this country. Many of 
these horses weigh 1,550 pounds, and their appearance is the 
subject of favorable comment from visiting officials. 



SEWER DIVISION. 



The past year has been the most active in respect to sewer 
construction in the history of the division; 71,381.85 feet 
of sewers have been built by the city, and 22,503.34 feet 
designed and superintended for parties who desired to 
build their own sewers, under the form of release which is 
provided for this purpose. As the entire cost of small 
sewers now falls on the abutters under the law of 1802, it is 
probable that the building of sewers by private parties will 
increase, as a feeling exists that work done by contract can 
be done cheaper than by the regular force of the division. 
In anticipation of greater activity in this method of sewer- 
building, the following form of release has been prepared, 
under which parties are allowed to construct their own 
sewers : 

Know all men by these presents, 
That , the undersigned, owners of real estate on a street 

called 

street, Ward , in the City of Boston, County of Suffolk, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. In consideration of the granting to by 
the City of Boston of the right to construct or extend a sewer in said 
street, and connect the same with the public sewer 
in street without charge, hereby agree to furnish all the 
material necessary for the proper construction of said sewer, except the 
manhole frames and covers, which shall be furnished by the City of 
Boston, and to build said sewer at own expense, under the super- 
vision of an inspector appointed by the City of Boston (whom 
hereby agree to pay weekly for said supervision at the rate of three 
dollars and fifty cents per day), and according to a plan prepared by the 
Superintendent of Streets. And further agree that said sewer, 
when completed to the acceptance of said Superintendent of Streets, 
shall become the property of said city without any claim for compensa- 
tion on part, and do hereby release unto said city all 

ri^ht, title, and interest in and to said sewer, reserving to 
the right of drainage into said sewer for such a part of each of 
lots abutting on said sewer as shall lie within one hundred and twenty- 
five feet of the line of the aforesaid street, free of expense of any sewer 
assessment, except such as may be levied on any of aforesaid 

lots, on account of a sewer being constructed by the said city in any 
other street or strip of land on which aforesaid lots may now or 

hereafter abut. also further agree that the work on said sewer 

shall be diligently prosecuted from its commencement, and completed 
within days from the date of beginning. 



94 City Document No. 34. 

In witness whereof, have hereto set hands and seals 

this day of 189 . 

Witness to signatures, 



Suffolk, ss. Boston, 189 

Then personally appeared the above-named 



and acknowledged the foregoing instrument to be free act and deed. 

Before me, 

Justice of the Peace. 

Metropolitan Sewer. 

The whole sewage from the Charles-river Valley System 
passes through the Boston Main Drainage Works, and after 
being raised by the pumps at Dorchester is discharged at 
Moon Island. 

As compensation for the expense of pumping, repairs, etc., 
occasioned by caring for this sewage, which is furnished by 
Brookline, Newton, Watertown, and Waltham, and in accord- 
ance with the authority given by the Board of Aldermen and 
approved by His Honor the Mayor, November 21, 1891, the 
following contract between the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts and the City of Boston was entered into : 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, acting by Hosea Kingman, 
Tilly Haynes, and Harvey N. Collison, constituting the Board of Metro- 
politan Sewerage Commissioners, all duly appointed and acting under 
the authority of chapter four hundred and thirty-nine of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, and the City of Boston, acting 
by Henry H. Carter, its Superintendent of Streets, hereto duly author- 
ized, on this sixteenth clay of April, in the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-two, agree : 

1. Said city shall take into its sewers, at the corner of Huntington 
avenue and Gainsborough street, in said city', all the sewage caused by 
said commissioners to be discharged at that point from the system of 
sewers constructed by them under the authority of said act, and shall 
convey said sewage through its system of sewers and discharge the 
same at the outlet thereof at Moon Island, for the term of four years 
irom the first day of January, eighteen hundred and ninety-two. 

2. Said Commonwealth shall reimburse said city for any and all 
damages, costs, and expenses which said city may be required to pay to 
others from injuries resulting from the discharge of said sewer into its 
said sewers, or from conveying the said sewage through its own sewers, 
or from the discharge of said sewage into the waters of Boston harbor, 
and will hold the city harmless on account thereof, and shall assume the 
defence of all actions which may be brought against said city for any of 
said matters, and shall pay any judgments which may be obtained in 
said suits against said city. 

3. Said Commonwealth shall pay to said city, in each of the years 
eighteen hundred and ninety-two, eighteen hundred and ninety-three, 
and eighteen hundred and ninety-four the sum of twenty-three thousand 
dollars, and in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five the sum of 




PLAN OF COVER 

USED IN TRANSVERSE TESTS. 




A 2.00V 



B 1.93' 



18" 



H^A 1.75" 
IB 1.90" 



SECTION OF COVER 

USED IN TRANSVERSE TESTS. 




KO.75'-^ 



FORM OF SPECIMENS 

USED IN TENSION TESTS 



Street Department. 95 

twenty-four thousand dollars, the first paymeut to be made on the first 
day of July next in the sum of eleven thousand five hundred dollars, 
and thereafter on the first day of October, January, April, and July, in 
each of said years, in proportional parts of said yearly payments. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
(Signed) By Hosea Kingman, 

(Signed) Tilly Haynes, 

(Signed) Harvey N. Collison, 

Metropolitan Seiverage Commissioners. 

City of Boston. 
(Signed) By H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 
Approved April 27, 1892. 

1ST. Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor. 



Tests of Sewer Covers. 

Owing to the fact that adverse criticism was made con- 
cerning the price paid bj the department for iron sewer 
castings, a comparative test was made of the covers purchased 
and used, which cost 2\ cents per lb., and covers offered to 
the department by dealers at 2 cents per pound. 

February 24, 1892, two sewer covers and frames, one 
costing 2| cents and the other 2 cents per lb., were sent by 
the purchasing agent, Mr. J. W. McDonald, to the Water- 
town Arsenal, to be subjected to transverse tests and tests 
by tension under the United States testing-machine of 800,- 
000 pounds capacity, from which the following results were 
obtained : 

Transverse Tests. 

(See diagram ) 

The covers were supported on bars 18 in. apart, and loaded on the 
top at the centre. 

The load on top earned on the four central projecting points of the 
castings. 

No. 8,2G3. Cover marked A (purchased by department at the price 
of 2£ cents per lb. ; weight, 2K)£ lbs. ; ultimate strength, 65,800 lbs. 

Fractured along diameter of cover, through line of seven cored holes. 

Appearance of fracture, medium fine granular. 

No. 8,20-1. Cover marked B (ottered by dealer at 2 cents per lb. ; 
weight, 206«| lbs. ; ultimate strength, 41,700 lbs. 

Fractured, 3-in. eccentric, across cover through line of seven cored 
holes. 

Appearance of fracture, medium fine granular. 



96 City Document No. 34. 

Tension Tests of Specimens taken from Fractured Covers 
after Transverse Tests were made. 

form of specimens. 

(/See diagram.') 

Tensile strength. 
Test number. Marks. Diameter. Sec. area. Total lbs. Lbs. per sq. in. 

8.265 A 1.129 in. 1.00 24,570 24,570 

8.266 B 1.129 in. 1.00 19,160 19,160 
Fractures, fine granular. 

Correct. 
(Signed) J. E. Howard. 

(Signed) J. W. Reilly, 

Major Ordnance Dept. U.S.A., Commanding. 

In view of the fact that a sewer manhole cover made of 
inferior iron gave way under the weight of a heavy team, 
and the city was in consequence subjected to heavy damages, 
the policy of the department in buying only first-class cast- 
ings should be continued. 

SEWERS. 
City Proper and Back Bay Districts. 

The sewers in Fayette, Beverly, Billerica, and Commer- 
cial streets were mentioned in last year's report as being in 
a tumble-down condition. Nothing has been done upon 
them. They should be rebuilt this year. 

There are three localities in this city the condition of 
which is exceedingly bad from a sanitary point of view : the 
first of these is the Canal-street district, the second is Faneuil 
Hall Market, and the third is the Harrison avenue district. 

The condition of the first of these, Canal street, was fully 
described last year. It is not necessary to go into a full 
explanation this year ; suffice it to say that the sewers are 
filled from one to three feet deep with sewage sludge, which 
has been accumulating now about ten years. 

It is doubtful whether there could be anywhere found sew- 
ers in worse condition than some in this district. Much of 
the district drained by these sewers is occupied by crowded 
tenement -houses. 

In view of the great danger that cholera may find a 
lodgment in this city the coming year in spite of quarantine 
measures, it would be inexcusable to postpone the rebuild- 
ing of these sewers any longer. Work should be begun 
upon them at the earliest possible moment, for it would be 
perhaps even more dangerous to stir up this mass of pollu- 
tion during hot weather than to let it remain. 

The softer portions of the accumulation might be pumped 
into the West-side intercepting sewer, and flushed away, 



Street Department. 97 

down to Moon Island, but the heavier portions will ha ye to 
be shovelled up and carted off, and this cleaning work should 
be done before hot weather. 

The condition of the second locality, Faneuil Hall Market, 
was also fully described in last year's report. 

It ought not to be necessary to be obliged to argue very 
strongly in favor of having perfect sanitary arrangements for 
this market, where such a large proportion of the food supply 
of the city is handled. Not only is its condition now far from 
perfect, but in fact it is about as bad as it can be. 

Plans are now ready for sewering this market properly, 
the estimated cost being $10,000. 

If this work is done before the sewer is built across the 
city, as recommended last year, for the relief of the Canal- 
street district, it will be necessary to run a pipe from the 
market down South Market street to the intercepting sewer in 
Atlantic avenue, at an additional cost of $3,500 ; if the sewer 
across the city is built at once, this will not be necessary. 

The third locality is the Harrison-avenue district, which 
lies mostly in Roxbury, and will be treated under that head. 

Attention must be called again to the Falmouth and Cale- 
donia street sewer, which is badly settled and broken. It 
is liable to fall in and cut off the drainage of quite a large 
territory. About 360 feet of it should be rebuilt. 

Trouble was experienced last year on the Back Bay from 
the flooding of cellars during an unusually heavy rain, which 
occurred at about the time of high tide. 

Whenever an extraordinarily heavy rain occurs, there will 
be danger of flooding cellars in low districts, because the 
surface water from the streets must rill the sewer system to 
a level somewhat higher than that of the tide before it can 
force its way out. 

The tide often rises above the established grade of cellars, 
and, although it does not remain long at its extreme height, 
if a heavy rain happens to occur at the same time, the cellars 
will be in danger, unless the volume or storage capacity of 
the sewer system is large enough to store the storm- water until 
the tide has subsided. 

A calculation has been made of the storage capacity, 
or the length of time required to All each of the four Back 
Bay sewer-systems mentioned below with different amounts 
of rainfall. 

Rate of rainfall, Rate of rainfall, 

1 in. per hour. 2.70 in. per hour. 

Berkeley street . . 14 minutes. 5 minutes. 

Dartmouth street . . 14 minutes. 5 minutes. 

Fairfield street ... 15 minutes. 5 minutes. 

Hereford street . . . 12 minutes. 4 minutes. 



98 City Document No. 34. 

2.70 inches per hour is the rate at which the rain fell in 
the storm referred to, August 12 and 13, 1892. It will be 
seen that the storage capacity of these systems is very little. 

A method of giving relief to these old systems is to build 
larger storm-water outlets to Charles river. 

The sewers which have been built on the Back Bay the 
past two years have all been built large enough to afford 
more storage capacity. 

The Hull-street sewer, an old wood, stone, and brick 
affair, should be rebuilt. 

The sewer in South Margin street is in bad condition, and 
needs to be rebuilt. 

There has been more trouble from flooding of cellars on 
Essex street near Edinboro street. 

The large sewer built in Essex street in 1889 should be 
extended from Kingston to Chauncy street, and the regula- 
tors, tide-gates, etc., necessary to complete this Essex and 
Federal street system should be built as explained last year. 
There have also been cellars flooded on Harvard street. 

This sewer should be rebuilt and the regulator and en- 
larged storm-overflow, which forms a part of the last- 
mentioned system, should be built. 

The houses on the water side of Beacon street have never 
been connected with the sewer system, but have drained 
directly into Charles river. Surveys have been made, and 
two alternative plans have been prepared, one for a sewer in 
the back street and another for a sewer in Beacon street. One 
or the other of these schemes will, undoubtedly, be carried 
out the coming year. 

Work clone during 1892. 

Nine thousand nine hundred and seventy-four linear feet 
of sewers w T ere built last year in the city proper and Back 
Bay by the city, and 151 feet by private parties. 

This includes 2,492 feet of large brick storage sewer on 
Commonwealth avenue, and 409 feet on Beacon street. 

The Brookline-avenue sewer, built in 1884, and useless 
until this year, has been carried under Muddy river and 
connected with the Metropolitan sewer. 

Other sewers built last year in this district require no es- 
pecial mention. 

South Boston District. 

The sewer in Dorchester avenue, between First street 
and Broadway, should be rebuilt as soon as the frost is out 
of the ground, as it is on the point of felling in. 



Street Department. 99 

In regard to the sewers in the south-west part of the 
peninsula, having outlets at B and Seventh streets and D 
street, about the same remarks must be made as were last 
year ; the unsatisfactory service which the sewers give is 
due not to defects in the sewers where the trouble occurs, 
but is due to the defective condition of the outlets. 

If the outlet recommended last year (and for which plans 
are in readiness) should be built, these troubles would 
disappear. 

A plan has been prepared for an overflow sewer for the 
South Boston intercepting sewer, on the location of the old 
Kemp-street sewer. 

Flooding of cellars has occurred on Mercer and Vale 
streets, caused by the insufficient size of the sewer in Mercer 
street. 

It should be rebuilt, and will require about 400 feet of 
3 ft. 9 in. circular brick sewer. 

Work done during 1892. 

Seven hundred and fifty-five linear feet of sewers were 
built by the city by contract in South Boston, and 462 feet 
by private parties. 

The first item includes 529 feet of 4 ft. X 5 ft. wooden 
sewer, which completes the overflow relief sewer for the D 
and First street district. 

East Boston District. 

Several outlets should be extended to deep water. Eagle- 
square outlet should be extended 250 feet, Jeffreys-street 
outlet about 160 feet, Decatur-street outlet, near Border 
street, about 200 feet, and the outlet at Dock No. 13 about 
450 feet. 

An important work, which should be attended to this year, 
is the extension of the Orleans-street sewer to a junction 
with the Porter-street outlet. 

The old sewer in Orleans street, between Sumner and 
Maverick streets, has been rebuilt already on the proper 
grade to connect with the Porter-street outlet. 

This grade being lower, by about a foot and a half, than 
that of the Sumner-street sewer through which it finds its 
outlet temporarily, it is dammed up that much at the present 
time. 

When the sewer is built through the extension of Orleans 
^street, this damming up will cease, and the new outlet will 
convey the storm-water from about 32 acres, mostly high 
land in the vicinity of Webster, Sumner, and Cottage streets, 



100 City Document No. 34. 

directly to the Porter-street outlet, thus relieving the Bremen- 
street sewer, which is now overcharged, between Decatur 
and Porter streets. 

It will require about 650 feet of 4-ft. circular brick sewer, 
and the same amount of 4-ft. square wooden sewer. 

Wesley-street sewer is broken down and should be rebuilt 
this year, as a portion of Paris and Meridian streets drains 
through it. 

Havre street, between Marion and Porter streets, is in 
bad condition, and the same is true of London street between 
the same limits. 

At Orient Heights there are a large number of houses 
which need sewerage on Leyden street, west of Breed street. 
It will take 1,800 feet of sewer in Leyden street itself, 
equally divided between brick and pipe sewer, and as the 
street slopes away from Breed street, it will take 640 feet 
more of brick sewer for an outlet for it. Ashley avenue also 
needs sewerage, between Breed and Bennington streets; 
this will take 750 feet of brick sewer. 

The Metropolitan Drainage Commission are about to begin 
the branch sewers which are to encircle the island, and it is 
probable that the greater portion of them will be built this 
year. This department will have to make the necessary 
connections between the common sewers and the intercepting 
sewer, which will involve a large outlay. 

There are twenty-one outlets in East Boston at present. As 
soon as the siphon under Belle Isle Inlet is built, the State 
sewer will be completed from the Pumping-station in East 
Boston to Point Shirley, and it is hoped that arrangements 
may be made with the commissioners to use it with a tem- 
porary outlet at Point Shirley to take the sewage of Orient 
Heights and the adjoining part of East Boston this year, and 
do away with the nuisance at Orient Heights. 

Work done during 1892. 

Six thousand nine hundred and forty-five linear feet of 
sewers and 547 feet of surface drains were built by the city 
last year. This includes 872 feet of large brick sewer and 
658 feet of pipe sewer built at Orient Heights. 

The Cottage- street sewer has been carried out to the Por- 
ter-street outlet by building 1,181 feet of brick and wood 
sewer on piles. 

Moore street and Lamson street outlets are being carried 
out to deep water, in order to abate nuisances caused by the 
sewage lodging upon the flats at these places. 



Street Department. 101 



Charlestown District. 

The district in the vicinity of Arlington avenue and Alford 
street will require a considerable amount of sewer building. 
A system of separate house sewers should be built here to 
connect with the Metropolitan sewer. That portion of the 
district lying south-east of Dorrance street should be drained 
into the Metropolitan main sewer, which runs through the 
new park, about 40 feet south-east of and parallel with 
Alford street. 

The remainder should be connected with the Arlington 
branch of the Metropolitan sewer, near the Somerville line. 
The first-mentioned portion of the district will require about 
2,700 feet of pipe sewers, and the second portion about 3,200 
feet to sewer all the existing streets. 

A portion of these sewers should be built the coming year, 
as a temporary overboard outlet can be given them until the 
Metropolitan system goes into operation. If these sewers 
are all made 15-inch pipes, the system will afford a storage 
of 30 to 50 minutes for the house sewage and a small por- 
tion of roof water, which is probably sufficient for this 
district. 

The existing sewers will serve to carry the surface water 
from the streets, but in the streets at present unsewered, 
surface drains will have to be built. The streets will require 
in the aggregate about 2,100 feet of pipe drains at a shallow 
depth, but these will not need to be built until the streets 
are improved. 

A very large area lying between Rutherford avenue and 
the Somerville line, which formerly consisted of mill ponds 
and tidal flats, has been filled in by the railroad companies 
during the last few years. These spaces used to be available 
for storm outlets for all the sewers coming down the westerly 
side of Bunker Hill. As the filling has gone on, the sewers 
in the vicinity of Rutherford avenue have given trouble. A 
large storm sewer will have to be built through this filled 
district to carry the surface water of the district itself, and 
the storm overflow of the sewers on the west side of Bunker 
Hill ; and the city of Somerville should cooperate in build- 
ing it. 

Work done during 1802. 

Two thousand nine hundred and thirty- six linear feet of 
sewers were built by the city, all by day-labor. The work 
consisted mostly of rebuilding of old, broken-down sewers, 
and requires no further mention. 



102 City Document No. 34. 

Roxbury District. 

Hallock and Ward streets, mentioned last year, should be 
attended to and rebuilt. The Harrison-avenue sewer be- 
tween Chester park and Eustis street is settled so much as 
to be in about the same condition as the sewers in Canal- 
street district as described under City Proper. It cannot be 
cleaned properly, and the sewage lies stagnant in it. A con- 
siderable district is affected by it, extending on Harrison 
avenue between the limits named, and on the streets running 
westerly from the avenue toward Washington street. 

This sewer and such of the lateral sewers as are settled 
with it should be rebuilt at once ; and the worst of the work 
should be done before hot weather, as there are many tene- 
ment-houses on these streets. As there are beds of mud 
under Harrison avenue seventy feet or more deep, it would 
be enormously expensive to put in a pile foundation. A 
wooden sewer lined with concrete would be better adapted 
to the conditions, and very much cheaper. Such a structure 
would have elasticity enough to bend without breaking in 
case further settlement of the street takes place, and if it be- 
comes settled very badly, the arch can be raised and the in- 
vert concreted up and the grade restored in this manner. 

The sewer in Fellows street is settled and broken so 
badly as to be inoperative. It should now either be built 
upon a pile foundation, or some form of wooden sewer built 
as recommended for Harrison avenue. 

The district bounded by Hammond, Tremont, and Lenox 
streets and Shawmut avenue, and the adjacent streets, have 
been carefully studied and a plan devised for converting the 
existing sewers, which are upon the combined system, into a 
complete separate system. 

The present sewers receive the storm water from the streets 
as well as the house drainage, and the cellars, being but little 
above the level of the sewers, are flooded by this surface 
water. This difficulty will be obviated when the separate sys- 
tem is completed, because the surface water will be excluded 
from those sewers which are devoted to house drainage. 

Plans are now ready for building the new sewers which 
this scheme calls for. 

Another district in which the conditions are exactly simi- 
lar is bounded by Culvert, Tremont, and Davenport streets, 
and the Providence R.R. ; this has been studied in the same 
way and plans prepared for accomplishing the same end. 

The unsewered district bounded by Chester park, Gerard 
street, Norfolk avenue, and the New York & New England 
R.R., and that portion of the area of South Bay lying be- 



Street Department. 103 

tween Chester park, the Harbor Commissioners' line, Rox- 
bury Canal, and the New York & New England R.R., soon 
to be filled in, have been studied together and several plans 
worked out for sewering them ; as soon as a definite decision 
is made as to which plan is best, the work of sewer-building 
can proceed. 

Along the old channel of Stony brook, between Hunting- 
ton avenue and the Roxbury crossing, are situated a number 
of dwelling-houses, car-shops, stables, etc., which are too 
low to drain into the sewer system, and have been drain- 
ing into Stony brook. These have been traced out by agents 
of the Board of Health and City Engineer's Department. 

Pipe sewers will have to be built, located behind the side 
walls of the brook channel wherever practicable, and be- 
neath the channel of the brook itself, wherever the first plan 
cannot be followed. Levels have been taken to all cellars in 
the vicinity of the brook, and plans prepared showing the 
relative height of the cellars and the brook channel, and the 
room between the buildings and the walls of the brook. 

These plans show that there will be required 3,050 linear 
feet of 12-inch pipe sewer laid behind the walls of the 
channel. 

These sewers will find their outlets into the intercepting 
system at Huntington avenue, Providence R.R., Tremont 
street, and Hampshire street, and into the Vernon and 
Lamont street common sewer at the corner of these two 
streets. One of these new sewers will furnish an outlet for 
a short length of pipe sewer on Vernon street, between 
Lamont and Simmons streets, which now drains into the 
brook. 

A 12-inch pipe-sewer should be built on the north side of 
Vernon street, between Lamont and Cabot streets, to take 
the drainage which enters the Vernon-street sewer below the 
point of interception at Cabot street, and thus finds its way 
into the brook. 

This pipe should empty into the existing pipe-sewer on 
the south side of Vernon street. When these sewers are 
completed they will furnish outlets for all building-lots 
along the course of Stony brook, between Huntington ave- 
nue and Linden Park street, except on the easterly side of 
the brook on Rogers avenue, between Huntington avenue 
and the Providence R.R. 

On Sherman and Warren streets, near Bower street, there 
have been complaints of cellar-floodings. The matter has 
been investigated and found to be due to the insufficient size 
of the sewer which runs, through Ottawa, Dale, and Laurel 
streets and Walnut avenue. If an attempt is made to relieve 



104 City Document No. 34. 

this locality by rebuilding this sewer, it will be necessary to 
rebuild for a long distance, from Sherman down to Wakullah 
street, about 2,230 feet, at very great expense. 

A scheme has been investigated for effecting relief by 
tapping the Warren-street sewer at Savin street, and convey- 
ing the drainage of a large district down Savin street to the 
sewer in Blue Hill avenue. 

This w T ould require a deep-cut sewer entirely through 
ledge for about 2,100 feet, at a cost of at least $10 per linear 
foot. As the number of cellars flooded is small and the cost 
of affording relief so great, it would be better for the people 
to put back-water traps on their drains and protect them- 
selves for the present. 

Work done during 1892. 

Nine thousand three hundred and seventy-seven linear feet 
of sewers have been built by the city, and 3,868 feet by 
private parties. The most important work was the extension 
of the Dorchester-brook sewer from Clapp street to Norfolk 
avenue, and up this avenue to Clapp street again. Four 
hundred and eighty-five linear feet of brick sewer, 9 feet by 
13 feet inside, and a large and peculiar bell-mouth on a pile 
foundation, were built between the first-named limits, and 
518 feet of 8-foot 6-inch by 8-foot brick sewer were built in 
Norfolk avenue. At the point now reached, the corner of 
Norfolk avenue and Clapp streets, the department will begin 
at once the building of a sewer in Norfolk avenue to extend 
as far as Magazine street, which will afford outlets for sewers 
in Shirley and Langdon streets, and adjacent land where 
there has long been a demand for sewers. 

Another important job was the extension of the trunk 
sewer up Huntington avenue from Vancouver street to Long- 
wood avenue, and up the latter avenue to Bumstead lane. 

By this means the nuisance which has existed so long on 
Longwood avenue caused by the overcharging of the sewer 
with storm water will be abated. 

Other sewers require no especial mention. 

Brighton District. 

The most important w T ork which will be called for in 
Brighton is the new system of sewers for that portion of the 
town lying west of Parsons street. A new outlet must be 
established, as no further extensions westward of the existing 
system are possible. Plans are in readiness for main sewers 
in Parsons street, from the Metropolitan sewer to Faneuil 
street ; in Faneuil street, from Parsons street to Oak square ; 



Street Department. 105 

in Fairbanks street ; and in Washington street from Oak 
square to Foster street. A beginning should be made on 
this system the coming year. 

Plans have been prepared for connecting the Abattoir and 
Tripe-works drains with the Metropolitan sewer, and these 
connections can be made as soon as the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Commissioners decide as to whether each drain may be 
taken in separately, or whether they must be collected into 
a few inlets. 

If the latter is decided upon, three is the smallest number 
of inlets that is practicable, and it will require 1,750 linear 
feet of pipe sewer to collect these numerous drains into three 
inlets. 

Plans are now ready for building the culverts on Common- 
wealth avenue, the absence of which was commented on last 
year. Near Chestnut Hill avenue about 200 feet of 3 feet X 3 
feet stone culvert is required. From Allston street easterly, 
550 feet of 3 feet X 3 feet 4 inches stone culvert will be re- 
quired on the north side of the avenue, then 220 feet of 

3 feet X 4 feet 4 inches to convey the water across to the 
southern side of the avenue; the first length mentioned will 
also serve to drain the gutters of the north side. Between 
Allston and Warren streets there is a culvert whose condi- 
tion is fairly good as far as it is known, but whose exact 
location is uncertain. It is not quite large enough ; its 
capacity can, however, be supplemented by laying a 24-inch 
pipe under the proposed location of the gutter on the north 
side of the avenue. 

Near Reedsdale street, to restore the brook from Harvard 
Crystal spring to its old channel will require 200 feet of 

4 feet X 4 feet stone culvert. Between Essex and Malvern 
streets 4,450 feet of pipe drains will be needed to take the 
surface water of the new avenue, and about the same amount 
of pipe sewers for house drainage. It will be injudicious to 
build either of these classes of sewers until all settlement has 
ceased where new fills have been made. From Harvard 
avenue nearly down to Perkins pond the brook runs within 
the lines of the avenue on the south-easterly side ; in widen- 
ing the avenue out to its lines it will be necessary to build 
about 2,200 feet of 6 feet X 6 feet stone culvert, lowering the 
grade of the brook at present about 4 feet ; this culvert 
will be so designed as to admit of further deepening if 
greater capacity should be wanted in future. 

At Everett street, near Braintree street, it is impracticable 
to restore the channel of the brook on its old lines, its loca- 
tion having been covered with houses ; the only practicable 
solution of the question, at this point, is to build a storm 



106 City Document No. 34. 

sewer in Everett street, between Braintree street and a point 
450 feet south, thence along a property line to the old 
channel. As the brook culvert under the Boston & Albany 
R.R. is not as large as it will need to be in future, it is 
useless to build the storm sewer in Everett street as large 
as it will require to be when the district is fully developed, 
but it may be of such width that when deepened to a 
uniform grade-line it will have the requisite capacity, and 
will also have sufficient capacity, at the present time, to 
answer present requirements. A stone culvert seven feet 
wide and four feet deep between Braintree street and the 
point where the culvert has been built through the embank- 
ment of the new Everett street, and six feet wide and four feet 
deep from that point up to the property line before men- 
tioned, would answer those requirements. At Shepard street, 
near the head waters, this brook has been taken into the 
sewer, which is altogether too small to carry it. It should be 
taken out and restored to its old channel, which is still trace- 
able between Shepard and Winship streets. If this is not 
found to be advisable, then a storm sewer should be built 
down Shepard and Washington streets. One scheme or the 
other should be carried out this year, as the brook floods the 
houses on Shepard street at every storm, creating unhealthy 
conditions. The brook is again taken into the sewer on 
Cambridge street, near Washington, and if the plan of 
building storm sewers be resorted to, the one just described 
should be continued down Washington, Cambridge, Murdock, 
and Sparhawk streets to the old channel, which is well 
defined below this point for a long distance. On North 
Beacon, near Arthur street, the brook is again taken into 
the sewer system, but could easily be restored at this 
point. 

In Bayard, Weitz, and Kenneth streets, house sewers were 
built in 1892, connecting with the Rena-street system of 
separate sewers, which is connected directly with the Metro- 
politan sewer ; no catch-basins can be connected with these 
sewers. These streets are private now, but surface drains 
should be built in them the coming year, either by the city, or 
by private parties if the streets remain unaccepted. Eleven 
hundred and sixty-five feet of pipe surface drains will be 
needed, and 285 feet of 30-inch brick sewer in North Har- 
vard street, to connect them with the brook near Coolidge 
road. Weitz and Kenneth streets both pitch toward Franklin 
street, but no more surface water should be put into the 
sewer in that street, as it is overcharged now. 

There is a call for sewerage in North Harvard street from 
Spurr street to the Charles river. As this street lies between 



Street Department. 107 

the Metropolitan sewer and the river, two sets of sewers, 
entirely separate, must be put in ; house sewers pitching 
toward the Metropolitan, and storm sewers toward the river. 
There will be required 2,800 feet of house sewers and 2,230 
feet of storm sewers, all pipe sewers, from 12-inch to 24- 
inch in size. 

Work done daring 1892. 

Seven thousand six hundred and seventy-five linear feet of 
sewers were built by the city by contract or day labor, 2,442 
feet by private parties, and 2,170 feet of storm sewers by the 
city. Three of the sewer systems of Brighton have been 
connected with the Metropolitan sewer, — at Western avenue 
near Market street, at Western avenue near Everett street, 
and at Salt creek near Beacon park, — and the pollution of 
the river at these points has ceased. The fourth connection, 
on North Beacon street at the iron bridge of the Boston & 
.Albany R.R., is in process of construction. Each of these 
connections involved the building of complicated regulators 
and sump manhole chambers and the setting of automatic 
regulating machinery therein. The last two mentioned re- 
quired in the aggregate about 1,200 feet of large brick sewer 
to reach the Metropolitan sewer. There is but one sewer 
outlet remaining in Brighton to connect with the State sewer, 
— a small one near Faneuil station. Some small, cheap 
regulating device may be put in here, and an inexpensive 
connection made with the State sewer. 
Other sewers require no special mention. 

West Roxbury District. 

The outlet for south street, between Keyes and Morton 
streets, and also for Anson and St. Mark streets, will have 
to cross the Providence Division of the Old Colony R.R. 
in order to reach the main sewer in Washington street ; it 
will cost $5,000, and should be built before anything is 
done toward raising the tracks of the railroad, as is pro- 
posed. 

In the vicinity of Spring street and West Roxbury 
stations, on the Providence Division of the Old Colony R.R. 
(Dedham Branch), a populous district is growing up and 
already needs a system of sewerage. The brook which 
drains this valley is considerably polluted now. 

It is going to be a very difficult matter to provide proper 
sewerage for this and other districts which lie beyond the 
ridge which separates the Stony-brook water-shed from the 
Charles-river water-shed, and which cannot, therefore, be 



108 City Document No. 34. 

drained into the Roslindale main sewer. These districts 
drain toward Charles river, but sewers cannot be run into the 
river, because a number of towns — Brookline, Newton, Need- 
ham, Wellesley, and Waltham — draw their water supply 
from the river below this point. The sewage of these districts 
will be finally disposed of by an intercepting sewer, which will 
run either through Dedham and Hyde Park, down the valley 
of Mother brook and the Neponset river, or down the valley 
of the Charles river through Newton to Waltham, the pres- 
ent terminus of the Charles-river Valley Metropolitan 
Sewer. Either of these routes will require an act of the 
Legislature to obtain the cooperation of the towns through 
which it must run, and probably many years will elapse 
before it can be built. Investigations should be begun at 
once to determine which route is preferable. The question 
now is, What is to be done with the sewage until such a 
sewer can be built? Only two courses are open from 
which to choose, — either to filter or otherwise purify the 
sewage and then run it into the river, or to pump it back 
over the ridge into the Roslindale main sewer. 

A rough estimate has been made upon the latter scheme, 
including sewers in the principal streets, a pum ping-station, 
and a mile or more of iron force main ; the cost has been 
figured at $40,000. The sewage would be discharged into 
the head of the Roslindale main sewer at Centre street, 
corner of Mt. Vernon street. 

A petition has been received by this department to 
fix the grade of the brook which drains the Spring-street 
valley. 

Surveys have been made and levels taken and a reasonable 
grade determined, and the sizes of all culverts calculated 
where streets cross the brook. It might be advantageous to 
build some of these culverts in order to remedy cases of 
flooding, but it would not be judicious to do any great 
amount of deepening or straightening of the brook channel, 
whereby its water would be delivered more quickly into 
Charles river, until some system of sewers has been built and 
the present sources of pollution removed from the brook. 

Work will be continued steadily on the Roslindale main 
sewer, and about the same rate of progress maintained as 
heretofore . 

Demands are arising for sewers in the low districts near 
the main channel of Stony brook ; these demands cannot be 
satisfied, as the existing sewer system is too high. 

The only way such territory will ever be drained is by 
a sewer near or within the channel of Stony brook, and at a 



Street Department. 109 

lower elevation than the present Stony-brook valley sewer, 
substantially in the manner outlined in last year's report. 

Work done during 1892. 

Nine thousand eight hundred and ninety-one linear feet of 
sewers were built by the city, 4,192 feet by private parties, 
and 1,049 feet of surface drains and 350 feet of stone cul- 
verts by the city. 

Two thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven linear 
feet were built on the Roslindale main sewer, and 1,700 feet 
on a brick main in Centre and May streets. 

No other work requires special mention. 

Stony Brook. 

Stony brook gives but little trouble, but requires consid- 
erable attention. 

At the inlet chamber near Pynchon street, by means of 
various sets of stop-planks, the flow can be turned either 
into the new channel to the Back Bay park, or entirely down 
the old channel. The Boston Belting Company, whose 
factory is situated on the old channel, and who claim the 
right to the water, want all the water during the small flow 
of summer ; the old channel has to be left open and the 
openings to the new channel closed by stop-planks in order 
to accommodate them. 

At the same time, whenever a sudden rain occurs, the old 
channel must be closed by stop-planks and the flow turned 
into the new channel in order to prevent Roxbury from being 
flooded. As these floods are as liable to occur at night as in 
the daytime, constant attendance is necessary. 

On the night of August 12 and 13 a violent storm oc- 
curred (in half an hour 1.35 inches of rain fell), the brook 
rose in a very short time and ran 4 feet 9 inches deep ; it fell 
again to about half that height with equal rapidity. Such a 
sudden rise brings down great quantities of rubbish of all 
kinds, — branches and roots of trees, pieces of fences, railroad 
ties, planks, etc., — which must be caught and prevented 
from £oino- down the new channel. 

During the severe cold weather, great quantities of ice are 
formed in the brook. When a rain or thaw occurs and the 
brook rises several feet, these sheets of ice, 8 to 11 inches 
thick, are loosened and come down stream, blocking up the 
culverts and damming up the brook unless promptly broken 
up. Under these conditions the ice has piled up 8^ feet deep 
at the inlet chamber. 

Last year's report called attention to the necessity of 



110 City Document No. 34. 

carrying up the low-grade channel (according to the plan of 
the Commissioners of 1886) from the inlet chamber to 
Boylston station, before the proposed raising of the track 
of the Providence Division of the Old Colony Railroad is 
begun. 

The Grade Crossing Commission have considered this 
difficulty, but have taken no definite action ; if nothing is 
done, an unnecessarily expensive job will be entailed upon 
the city. 

Dorchester District. 

The question of draining the Corbett, Maxwell, and Capen 
street district, discussed in last year's report, has been inves- 
tigated and estimates made on seven different routes. 

The choice lies between a cheap scheme which will serve 
some of the district well and more of it poorly or not at all, 
and some expensive scheme of tunnelling to Dorchester bay 
or the Neponset river, which will give good service to this 
and all the adjacent districts lying within that part of the 
Canterbury branch of the Stony-brook valley. 

The first route is to start a sewer at Talbot avenue near 
Bernard street, pass between the Catholic cemetery and the 
Franklin Field, through Lyons street and across Ballou 
avenue to Norfolk street, corner of Capen street, whence the 
system can be carried in every direction. 

This system would serve the Corbett, Maxwell, and Capen 
street district well, but would be of little or no use in Lyons 
street, being scarcely under ground, and would be of no 
use in the district bounded roughly by Noyes and Ballou 
avenues, Lyons street, Blue Hill avenue, and Morton street. 

The second scheme is to begin at Central avenue on the 
Neponset river, thence through the "Lava Beds," so called, 
private land, Morton street, and private land, Capen street, 
to Ballou avenue. 

This would have about 4,300 feet of tunnel, and would re- 
quire the completion of the intercepting sewer as far as Cen- 
tral avenue, at a cost of $150,000 (for which the money is 
practically available, however). The principal objection to 
this route is that it lies through an uninhabited country where 
there is no necessity at present for a sewer. 

The third route investigated begins in the Neponset about 
2,000 feet above Central avenue, thence to the Mattapan 
brook about 1,200 feet south of Forest-avenue station, thence 
northerly across Morton and Norfolk streets, through Shreve 
street and Madison avenue to Ballou avenue. This route is 
a little cheaper than the preceding, but requires an extension 
of the intercepting sewer above Central avenue, the cost of 




r 



■ 



Street Department. Ill 

which, if added, would make it more expensive. Its route 
is totally uninhabited. 

The fourth route is that by way of Park street, West Park 
street, Bernard street, the Parkway and Lyons street, to 
Ballou avenue. This would cost roughly about $280,000, 
and is perhaps the best of the tunnel routes. It lies through 
a country where sewers are wanted, but where few have been 
built ; and by means of it the Talbot-avenue sewer can be 
tapped and made more effective, and the engorgement of the 
Centre-street tunnel can be relieved. 

The fifth route investigated is practically that of the 
present Centre-street tunnel. It is more costly than the 
Park-street route, and has the additional disadvantage of fol- 
lowing streets most of which are already sewered. 

The sixth route may be called the Rosemont-street route ; 
beginning on Mill street at the intercepting sewer, through 
Mill, Adams, and Kosemont streets ; thence through private 
land to Brent street ; thence through Talbot-avenue exten- 
sion, and the same route as the preceding. A variation of 
this route by going through Southern avenue was tried. 
These routes look w T ell on paper, but are more expensive 
than the preceding, more tunnelling being required. 

The seventh is by way of the valley of the Davenport 
brook. 

If the existing streets have to be followed, the length of 
this route, and especially of the tunnel, becomes so great as 
to carry its cost above all the others, as the streets run diag- 
onally to the desired direction ; but if a tunnel could be 
carried straight from a point on Van Winkle street to a point 
on Lyons street under private property, without incurring 
land damages, it would be a little cheaper than the Park- 
street route. 

Whatever tunnel scheme is adopted should provide that 
the sewer, when it reaches Lyons street, should have such a 
depth as to be capable of being extended westerly as far as 
the junction of Walk Hill and Canterbury streets, as that 
is the extreme easterly limit to which sewers can be ex- 
tended from the sewer system near Forest Hills station. 

Any plan including a tunnel will take at least a year to 
build, and much more unless many sections are started at 
the same time, whereas the district mentioned needs sewer- 
age this coming season. This can be effected by the follow- 
ing scheme : let the sewer be built as outlined in the first 
scheme ; that is, through Capen and Lyons streets to the 
Parkway ; but instead of being built at a high level, so as to 
drain into Talbot avenue by gravity, let it be built deep 
enough to drain Lyons street and Chapman and Lauriat 



112 City Document No. 34. 

avenues properly. Then let a temporary pumping-station 
be established, by which the sewage may be raised and con- 
veyed through a cheap temporary conduit of pipe or wood 
through the Parkway to Talbot avenue. When the low- 
grade sewer from the tunnel reaches the location of the 
pumping-station, the latter would be discontinued, and the 
sewers already built throughout the district would form a 
consistent part of the tunnel system. 

The healthfulness of this district for residential purposes 
could be greatly improved by improving the natural water- 
courses, — the Canterbury branch of Stony brook and the 
Mattapan brook. 

If these were deepened and graded, they would drain off 
the surface water which now makes marshes and quagmires 
in the vicinity. 

These improvements could be carried out at small expense 
compared to the benefit and enhanced valuation, if the land- 
owners would grant the city the necessary rights, and not 
seek to recover speculative damages on account of the city's 
operations. 

On Park street, near Dorchester avenue, and on Gibson 
and Adams streets, there is constantly trouble from flooding. 
Overflow connections have been made from the sewers into 
the brooks ; these have been provided with tide-gates to pre- 
vent high water in the brook channels from flowing back 
into the sewers. The explanation is that the combined 
capacity of the brook and sewer is not sufficient to carry off 
the flood water of the valley, which finds its outlet in this 
locality into Tenean creek. The sewers are capable of 
bringing down at least 95 cubic feet per second, and the two 
brook channels 250 cubic feet more, making at least 345 
cubic feet altogether, while the combined capacity of brook 
and sewer to discharge against a high tide is not over 200 
cubic feet per second. Moods must always occur here until 
a greatly enlarged outlet is provided. 

There has been a movement to build a covered channel for 
that part of the creek below Adams street, and make a park 
of the adjacent land. Plans have been prepared by the City 
Engineer's department for this covered channel, and this 
department has also prepared similar plans, but our plans 
cover the brook channel up as far as Park street near Dor- 
chester avenue. The estimated cost is $125,000. If this 
improvement of Tenean creek is carried out, it will afford 
adequate relief to the sewer system. 

The northern half of the Savin Hill peninsula needs a 
sewer system, as it is now being built upon quite rapidly. 

A new inlet will have to be made into the Dorchester In- 



Street Department. 113 

terceptor in Sidney street. A separate system of house and 
storm sewers, like that just built in the southern part, should 
be put in ; $25,000 will cover the cost of as much of it as is 
necessary at present. The Dorchester Lower Mills sewer 
will probably reach the vicinity of Morton street at the end 
of the coming working season ; the local sewers to drain all 
that portion of the village around Morton and Sanford 
streets may then be built. The remainder of the village will 
have to be drained by a system of separate house sewers con- 
nected directly with the Interceptor, which will probably be 
completed about the same time. 

Work done during 1892. 

Sixteen thousand one hundred and live linear feet of 
sewers were built by the city, and 11,450 feet by private 
parties ; 3,971 feet of surface drains and 266 feet of stone 
culverts were built by the city. None of these sewers call 
for special mention, except perhaps the completion of the 
system of storm sewers in Geneva avenue and Westville 
street, which, being at the head waters of Tenean creek, 
shows that this watercourse will - have to be improved 
throughout its whole length eventually. 

Main Drainage Works. 

The general working of this branch of the Sewer Division 
is as satisfactory as ever. There is urgent need of repairs 
to some of the machinery of the plant to bring it to its 
proper efficiency, which will be spoken of later in detail. 

That portion of the Metropolitan Sewer System constructed 
to drain Brookline, Brighton, and Newton, which was in 
the original design of this system, was connected in April, 
and the sewage of Brookline and Newton has since been 
handled under an arrangement made with the Metropolitan 
Commissioners. 

Before the coming summer, all the Brighton sewers will 
have been connected with this system, and no sewage will 
then enter the Charles river from the southerly bank, between 
the Back Bay district and Newton. 

The main and intercepting sewers throughout the city 
have been carefully inspected and cared for continually. 
Considerable flushing was necessary, during the warm 
weather, to keep them sweet and clean. All the tide-gates 
and regulators were inspected at every storm, and all iron- 
work on them kept properly painted. The headquarters of 
the force that attend to this work are on East Chester park. 



114 City Document No. 34. 

The buildings there generally are entirely inadequate for the 
purpose for which they are used. They are, in fact, noth- 
ing more than shanties that were left on the ground at the 
time the main sewer was built. Proper buildings should 
be placed on the lot without further delay, to facilitate the 
work and give some comfort to the men who attend to this 
work through the year regardless of the weather. 

At the pumping-station there has been considerable done 
in the way of repairs during the past year, but it constitutes 
but a small part of what there is yet to be done. The pumps 
have been run now continuously for nine years, and, as was 
stated in last year's report, the action of the sewage during 
that time has so worn away the valve and gate seats that all 
need renewing. 

It is very necessary that this work should be done as soon 
as possible, as there is, with the present condition of the 
valve-seats, a large percentage of slip to the pumps, which 
means an increase in the consumption of coal without an 
increase in amount of sewage pumped. The repairs are of 
such an extent that it cannot be done out of the regular 
maintenance fund, but will require a special sum for the 
purpose. It was the failure to get such an appropria- 
tion that prevented more progress in the work this last 
year. 

Pump No. 2 was thoroughly overhauled and put in first- 
class condition throughout. The valve- seats on both suction 
and delivery were renewed with composition ; the plungers 
were turned down and the old rings replaced by stuffing- 
boxes. 

A large quantity of sand was removed from the pump- 
well. This deposit was caused by the pump being able, on 
account of the slip, to do but a small part of its proper 
work. 

Pump No. 1 is in about the same condition that No. 2 was 
before repairs were made. The main shaft and wheel of No. 
3 were raised and the boxes re babbitted. The plungers were 
repacked with metallic packing. There remains to be done 
as follows : Facing with composition the valve-seats on the 
delivery of Pump No. 3 ; the delivery valve-seats on Pump 
No. 4 also need to be faced with composition, and the 
main shaft raised and the boxes rebabbitted. Nothing has 
been done in the way of repairs on the gates at the filth- 
hoist and pump-wells, but it is not safe to delay the repairs 
longer. The old feed-water heaters have been replaced 
by "Green Fuel Economizers," which have worked well 
from the start and promise to be a great improvement. 
An auxiliary flue from each pair of boilers, to connect with 



Street Department. 115 

opposite chimney flue, was put in, so that the flue-heaters 
could be inspected without shutting down the boilers. 

That portion of the ventilating-pipe that is in the coal- 
house which connects the pump-wells with the chimney 
should be replaced. It has been useless for some time. 

Repairs were made on the wharf at the pumping-station. 
The tops of the fender-piles having rotted badly, the piles 
were cut below the top of the wharf, and oak pile butts, to 
extend above the wharf, were spliced on and painted, to pro- 
tect them. The wharf should be extended about seventy 
feet, for the double purpose of serving as a support to the 
tow-boat when on the blocks, and affording a safe berth for 
the boat when other vessels are lying at the wharf. 

Some dredo-ino- has been done in front of the sludge tank, 
to enable the loading of the scow at all stages of the tide. 

The whole of the dock channel should be redredged to its 
former depth, otherwise the tow-boat will not be able to 
make or leave her berth at low water. 

November 25, 1892, the sewage was shut out of the 
tunnel while the connections were being made at Squantum 
with the new permanent brick outfall sewer, which replaced 
the old temporary wooden flume. 

While the sewage was shut off, the gates at the west shaft 
were overhauled and repaired. The cage at the top of the 
shaft was repaired also. Since the completion of the per- 
manent outfall sewer two tests of the tunnel, to ascertain the 
reduction of area, if any, from deposits, have been made, 
and show a loss of about 18 per cent, in area. It is proba- 
ble that this reduction is caused by deposit due to the re- 
duced velocity of the sewage flow through the tunnel for the 
last two years, which could not be remedied, as the weak 
condition of the flume prevented a proper flushing of the 
tunnel. If the above is the cause, the continued flushings 
that the tunnel will receive from the spring rains will move 
the deposit, and later tests will show an increase in area. If 
this result does not follow, it will indicate that there is some 
obstruction other than sludge. In that case, the only solution 
is that some of the pump-guides in the east shaft have 
become detached and fallen into the tunnel. This danger 
was spoken of in last year's report, and the recommendation 
made then, that the pumping machinery which was designed 
for pumping out the tunnel, and purchased in 1884, be put 
in position at the east shaft without delay. 

The condition of the plant at Moon Island is good, with 
the exception of the gates on the outfall and discharge 
sewers and a few other points of less importance. The 
action of the sewage here on the submerged ironwork 



116 City Document No. 34. 

is as marked as at the Pumping- station ; and it is found 
.necessary to renew all the gates and frames. The work can- 
not proceed rapidly, for outside of the machine work it is 
tide work. The discharge gates are in worse condition than 
those on the outfall sewer. Six of the former have been re- 
newed and are in perfect working order. The bearing parts 
of the gates and frames are faced with composition, and the 
frames are bolted to the masonry with composition bolts. 
The framework of three more is finished, and by next fall 
the renewal of the twelve discharge gates will probably be 
completed. Some repairs were made on the gutters and con- 
crete bottom of Division No. 1 of the reservoir. Consider- 
able pointing is still necessary on the reservoir walls. The old 
portion of the outfall sewer is in good condition, with the 
exception that some of the arch, which has always been above 
the flow line, needs pointing. The gas in the sewer, where 
the masonry is never submerged, seems to take the life out 
of the mortar. This disintegration extends to a depth of 
an inch or more, in some parts of the arch. Of that portion 
of the sewer that is in bad condition, 208 linear feet have 
been pointed, and about 280 feet more remain to be done. 
This sewer needs better ventilation, which may account partly 
for the above trouble. More open covers would be an im- 
provement ; also an extra manhole should be built about half- 
way between the connection chamber and the new work ; 
and a boat chamber near the gate-house. The turbine at 
the gate-house will have to be renewed again. The working- 
parts should be of composition, as the iron is too short-lived, 
sewage being used for power. The building of the sea-wall 
from the outlet to the point of the island, which was in the 
original design of the works, should not be delayed longer. 
The eddy formed in the cove causes a slight deposit on the 
flats. This has been accumulating for nine years, and in 
summer when the flats are exposed, or it has been stirred up 
by an easterly storm, the smell from it is quite strong. The 
conditions here are not in keeping with the other portions 
of the works. 

Diagrams. 

Diagrams for determining the sizes of sewers are inserted 
in this year's report ; they are substantially the same as the 
diagram published last year, but for the sake of greater 
clearness the sewer curves have been separated from the 
drainage area curves and plotted on a separate sheet. 

These latter curves, shown on plate 1, are intended to give 
the maximum rate of flood discharge, which it is reasonable 
to provide for, from a given area of a certain degree of 



ssoo 

5GQO 
S40O 
5ZOO 



39O0 
3600 
3400- 
3200. 



- *SO 
--700 
6C*Q 

SOQ 

.4-B0 
-460 

4SO 



mumb£r\ : ,6r\ . Acres = ^drained. : 







It- 



a: 



orainage-ar£a curves 

FROM WERKB-2iE€kEfh-F0RMULA,- 

FOR SUBURBAN^ DISTRICTS. 

: TQR^RURAL 'ISSTRJUtS^SUBlkACrTlUroSili 
\ FOR bv&fi niSTRfCTS .ADD 20%. \ ' 
S?MP/<_££> _gf-~£JSJ}QB8. £N&1ME£B. Of- iE^/ER LVV ■ ' : 

^ay*** ,,t, ^ eosr^. - FLATS/. . 



■ry&m 

i V- • — u* 



I 

U 



.mil* 1 



Q~/.Z5CRy 




r r.icrs. 



mv£i> STS. 



iji* MAX f-LQOD mSCMR6EL IN CUBIC 
fc t «>££" 0EPENDM6 ON MATURE OF 
OSO^MStNART VALUE. SUauRBA': 
' Jo- VALUE USED^JN THESE CURVES. 

C n^d-iv'U.cE j-~o« districts covered- 

OZS^.VALUE FDR^kURATETMSTRiOrS. _ — - 

R" AVZ INTENSITY OR kAihimtL.' DpRLtiS : PERIQC OF HEAVL 

ill CUBK. FT PER ACRE . PER I SEC'ljND,. .. 
" / Ct/B/C Ft PER /(CREEPER sei-JOf/D,' USED IN THESE 
5« GENERAL. ^§^fOF PRA/MASE ' AREA] PER- 1000. 
A" AREA URAJNED !H ACRES. F '. ■ - • - 



«S6PO 
44DO 



- T /00O 


11 


Q 


■so 


&--*»■ 






<£ 


ftso 


£K 


MO 


5-' nee 1 * 


< 


4S_ 


U 


Soi? 


$ 300 


so 


Q 






s« 






t-J 200 






95 






fj 




bj- «*> 


Si L_ 
45 




40 


i 








1 - /25- 




n: 


<20 
IS 


^ 


10 - 


C too 




j 


J« 




3 






K : gg. 








W 


ar 


H - 




1^ 50 





NUMBER 



OF?.- .ACRES} — DRAINED.. 



-X- 



I 5 ^nj3^in^'SH> 1 



8s»|giiigg gii8 ssgiii§§§ig§i8i j 



IHllHj 



§ 



O o o ■ 



Street Department. 117 

steepness, according to the Buerkli-Zeigler formula, using 
for the factor B, the value 1 ; i.e., one cubic foot per second 
per acre, or its equivalent, one inch of rain per hour. 

Plate 2 contains the sewer curves, showing the discharg- 
ing capacity of sewers of a given size at a given inclination. 

This diagram is much more complete and covers a greater 
range than that of last year, showing sewers ranging in size 
from 6 inches to 20 feet in diameter for all degrees of incli- 
nation likely to occur in practice. 

Each curve represents tw r o sets of values, — one for a sewer 
of a certain size running full, and another for a sewer of a 
larger size running at, approximately, three-fourths of its 
depth. 

Both diagrams have the same vertical scale of cubic feet 
per second, and in the horizontal scales the same figures 
are used, representing in plate 1 the acreage of the drainage 
area, and in plate 2 the inclination of the sewer, or the hori- 
zontal length in feet for a fall of one foot. 

It has been considered that the Buerkli-Zeigler formula, 
with a value of R equal to 1, would give as large quantities for 
maximum flood-discharge as it would be wise to provide for, 
without attempting to make provision for those unusual 
rainfalls which occur only at long intervals of time. 

There is always room for a difference of opinion as to 
wmat constitutes an unusual rainfall; e.g., if the rate 
selected were such that it was exceeded but once in twenty- 
five years, it should be regarded as sufficiently high ; but if 
it were exceeded every few years, with consequent over- 
flow of sewers designed upon it as a basis, then it should 
be considered insufficient. 

Some assumption had to be made. It was set at one inch 
per hour ; now the question is whether that is large enough. 

In our practice we have been compelled to add a liberal 
allowance in the case of steep districts, or small districts, or 
those near the level of tide-water, where cellars are flooded 
if the sewers run under much of a head, and in all well- 
paved districts. 

In studying the records of rainfalls, we are met at the 
outset by this great difficulty, that these records do not give 
us what we want to know. 

They record the total depth of rain and the total time oc- 
cupied by it in falling, including the periods of very gentle 
rain which accompany almost all falls. But it is the rate of 
rainfall during the period of heaviest constant fall which de- 
termines the maximum flood-discharge in sewers and water- 
courses. 

By dividing the total fall by the total time, the result must 



118 City Document No. 34. 

necessarily be much less than the rate during the heavy fall, 
so that these records are almost useless for our purpose. 

An automatically registering rain-gauge, which will record 
the various rates at which rain falls, as well as the total 
amount, is the only one which will give the kind of data to 
determine the proper rate of rainfall to provide for. 

There is but one such in the vicinity of Boston, that at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, where Mr. Desmond FitzGerald, 
Superintendent of Western Division of the Water Works, 
has made such observations for about fourteen years. 

Before discussing these records it is well to consider 
whether observations taken at this place are fairly applicable 
to Boston territory in general. 

To decide this point, the records of an ordinary gauge at 
Chestnut Hill, at the sewer yard on Albany street, and at the 
United States Signal Service station on the post-office, for 
the last four years have been tabulated and compared. 

The records of individual rains at Chestnut Hill and at the 
sewer yard agree very closely in some cases, and in others 
are discordant ; the monthly totals agree fairly well, and the 
totals for the year bear a very uniform relation to each other, 
the total for the sewer yard being about 92 per cent, of that 
for Chestnut Hill. 

The records of the Signal Service station are the most dis- 
cordant, and are invariably smaller, as might be expected 
from the elevated situation of this gauge ; they should be 
thrown out in making this comparison. 

The yearly totals are tabulated below, with the percentage 
of each of the others to that at Chestnut Hill in brackets. 

Tear. Signal Service. Sewer Department. Chestnut Hill. 

1889 39.81 in. [0.726] 50.31 in. [0.918] 54.79 

1890 39.20 in. [0.785] 46.58 in. [0.933] 49.91 

1891 39.70 in. [0.799] 46.06 in. [0.928] 49.63 

1892 36.92 in. [0.871] 38.33 in. [0.906] 42.27 

In the great majority of cases where the records disagree, the 
rain was accompanied by high winds, and the disagreement 
may be attributed to the local conditions in the vicinity of 
the gauges ; when there was little wind, the agreement was 
very close in almost all cases, except in summer thunder- 
showers of small extent ; this being so, and the yearly totals 
agreeing, it is fair to conclude that the records at Chestnut 
Hill furnish a fair criterion for estimating the rainfall for 
Boston territory generally. 

The records of this automatic gauge are plotted on 
plate 3. 



LENGTH —OF SEWER 



liiliiiiSfi 



of tm: 



FOOT 

i i s i i 









,4O0a- , 



iosa 



e^ra 



W ~EM& QF- SE\ 



DIAGRAM 



EBFRQM '- FLYNfJS TABLES tofo££HfflV KUTTEgS ' /FQKlMjLPi) 
DORR £!U6y -OF' SEWER -*fV -STREET DEPT- CfTY OF $O&T0fl 



-f-OOOSUi t;- -AQ(m 



o 

^0 



//5 t-s» 



>i* 



Q.OIS ■ , . ■> i 



LlDJMS 



CROS S SECTIO N Of STREAM 
WETFC& PERIMETER 
1 FGL LiOF WATER SURFACE 
,- - - EEi&iht _ :_. 



PLATEl 



-f - 406 ' 



i u> « 

Il r a 

I Si ? 

q kl I 



Ifl 



to * 



«l A o"5~ ST?! 



LENGTH OF SEWER FOR FALL OF ONE FOOT 



§08 § § 



Street Department. 119 

In the upper diagram, each point plotted indicates a 
constant rainfall of the depth in inches shown on the vertical 
scale, and of a duration equal to the corresponding time indi- 
cated on the horizontal scale of hours. 

2 50 T 
The curve, whose equation is I D = " , , encloses all 

rainfalls which it seems reasonable to provide for. The 
interpretation of the formula is as follows : to obtain the 
maximum aggregate depth in inches which it is reasonable 
to make provision for, for a storm of given duration, multi- 
ply the time in hours by 2.50 and divide by the time plus 
0.50. 

1 In the lower diagram, each plotted observation in the 
upper diagram is divided by the time in hours, so that 
each point in the diagram indicates the hourly rate in inches 
at which the rain fell during the corresponding time ; and the 

2 50 

formula for the curve of rates, L, = rTr — ^ — , means that 

E T + 0.50 

to obtain the maximum hourly rate in inches for a storm of 

given duration, for which it is reasonable to provide, 2.50 

must be divided by the time in hours plus 0.50. 

The lower diagram is simply the upper one divided by T. 

Inspection of these diagrams shows that there have been 
many rainfalls observed during the fourteen years covered 
by the record whose rate largely exceeds one inch per hour ; 
particularly in those storms in which the constant fall occu- 
pied less than one hour, the rates are frequently more than 
double that rate ; and for small fractions of an hour, very 
high rates have been observed. 

When rain falls upon the surface of the ground, it must 
first wet it, and, if porous, saturate it, before it begins to 
flow off into the sewers, an operation sometimes called 
establishing the " drainaoe-vehicle." If the rain continues at 
a constant rate, it will reach the sewers at the same rate as 
that at which it is falling, and as soon as it has filled the 
volume of the sewers and established the flow, it will reach 
the outlet or point of concentration of the system of sewers 
at the same rate at which it is falling. 

If the size and slope of a drainage area are such that the 
time required for the rain falling upon the most remote 
portions to reach the outlet, in addition to the time required 
to form the " drainage-vehicle," is an hour or less, it is clear 
that the flow from the impervious portions of the area 
will be at the rate of 1^- to 3 or more cubic feet per second 
per acre. If the area under consideration consists of from 

1 See Kuichling on Rainfall, etc., Am. Soc. C. E., Jan., 1889. 



120 City Document No. 34. 

^ to | impervious surface, as is not infrequent in suburban 
territory, the discharge may reach a cubic foot per second 
per acre of the entire surface ; which is much in excess of 
what the Buerkli-Zeigler formula will give with a value of 
the factor K. equal to 1. 

In well built-up and paved districts, where the percentage 
of impervious surface is very large, the flood discharge will 
reach correspondingly large figures. 

It is evident that a larger value than 1 should be used for 
the factor R. The diagram seems to indicate that it should 
be 1|, but the question is so complicated that it is not clear 
just what the value should be without more data. 

Automatic registering rain-gauges, similar to that at 
Chestnut Hill, will have to be established at different points 
around the city, to show the maximum constant rate of rain- 
fall attained in each storm, and other self- registering devices 
placed in the sewers to show the corresponding maximum 
flood discharge ; then with a few observations on the effect 
of storms on territory of different character, and on drainage 
areas of different sizes, some small and some large, like that 
of Stony brook, for instance, we shall be in possession of 
the data which are necessary to decide this point. 

Laws and Ordinances concerning the Building and 

Assessing of Sewers. 

The following compilation of the various laws and ordi- 
nances under which sewers have been built in the city of 
Boston has been made for convenient reference : 

Act of Legislature passed February 20,1797, for regulating Drains and 

Common Seivers. 

Section 2. Be it further enacted, That all drains and common 
sewers for the draining of cellars, which shall hereafter be made or re- 
paired in any streets or highways, shall be substantially done with brick 
and stone, or with such other materials as the selectmen of the town 
shall permit, and in such manner as the said selectmen shall direct. 
And when any one or more of the inhabitants of any town shall, by the 
consent and under the direction aforesaid, at his or their own charge, 
make and lay any common sewer or main drain, for the benefit of them- 
selves and others who may think fit to join therein, eveiy person who 
shall afterwards enter his or her particular drain into the same, or by 
any more remote means shall receive any benefit thereby, for the drain- 
ing of their cellars or lands, shall be held to pay the owner or owners of 
such common sewer or main drain a proportional part of the charge of 
making or rejjairing the same, to be ascertained and determined by the 
selectmen of the town or a major part of them, and certified under their 
hands ; saving always to the paity aggrieved at any such determination 
a right of appeal to the court of the general sessions of the peace. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That when any common sewer or 
main drain shall be stopped or gone to decay so that it shall be neces- 
sary to oj:)en the same in order to repair it or remove such stoppage, all 



Hours of Time. 

5 6 7 8 d 





*s 




I 




- *5- - a 






3P -- 




5 






. 


— g-r^-2 







Ebi_ 



wm 






fgpfjeM ; £ t; i - f trf * j ^++y 



ismH 







< £ 3 - 


-j- : 


> 


** 




-ty- - 




*• 


^ 


*i 


SI 

:0 






'*J 


1 6? 




-fc" 


-pHfc 


HJ 


r>j 


S 


^ 


m 





/L^AGfiAM: 3mw/ft/G the /^tApqd o^f RjpES Idfm^fiE^HS. I 
: i&DUR^fifQN jar RAINFA L^ M, RfcoRmp by Awmmrc \ RAMGAjki 

TmTJfiiL IN HOUMS. i 



S-r-fci i 



o 



\PLATE 



I 2 !i 3: 4 




■T^ r i ~t_-> ♦ » i | i -1-1 fc&' 

Hours at Thne^ 



*^»*f*ao : 



32 £2 3SB* n 



50 



Street Department. 121 

the persons who shall be benefited by such repairs or removal of 
obstructions shall be held to pay their proportionable parts of the ex- 
pense thereof, as well as those who do not, as those who do cause such 
repairs to be made, or obstruction removed, to be ascertained and deter- 
mined by the selectmen as aforesaid : saving an appeal as aforesaid. 

This law provided for the building of individual drains and 
sewers by the inhabitants, the only restriction being that the 
materials entering into the work, and the proportionate part 
of the cost that persons should pay for the privilege of con- 
necting with the sewer, should be determined by the select- 
men. 

City Ordinance relative to Drains and Common Sewers, passed 
July 7, 1823. 

Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common 
Council of the City of Boston, in City Council assembled, That all com- 
mon sewers which shall hereafter be considered necessary by the mayor 
and aldermen, in anj T street or highway in which there is at present no 
common sewer, shall be made and laid, and forever afterward shall be 
kept in repair, at the expense of the city and under the direction of the 
maj'or and aldermen, or of some person or persons by them appointed. 

Sect. 2. Be it further ordained, That every person who shall enter 
his or her particular drain into such common sewer, or shall otherwise 
be benefited thereby, shall be held to pay the city such sum of money 
as the maj'or and aldermen shall deem just' and reasonable, having 
reference always to the valuation of each estate connected with said 
drains, in the assessors 1 books ; and in the case of any subsequent repair 
of such common sewer the mayor and aldermen shall assess the amount 
of such repair on those whose particular drains connect therewith, or 
are otherwise benefited thereby, in such amount as they deem just 
and reasonable. 

Sect. 7. Be it further ordained, That whenever any common sewer 
shall go to decay, and the mayor and aldermen shall deem it necessary 
to rebuild or repair the same, they shall have power to cause the same 
to be done under their direction, and to assess the amount of such re- 
building or repairs upon the owner, agent, or tenant, as in the foregoing 
ordinance provided for the case of streets in which there is no common 
sewer. 

This ordinance provided that sewers should be built by 
the city instead of by the individual, and that the expense 
of the work should be defrayed by the persons who connected 
with the sewer in such sums as determined by the Mayor and 
Aldermen. 

City Ordinance relative to Servers and Drains, passed February 13, 

1834. 

This ordinance is almost identical with the ordinance of 
1823, with the exception that the superintendence of all 
sewers was put into the hands of the City Marshal. As the 
Ordinance of 1823 was very ambiguous concerning sewer 
assessments, the Ordinance of 1834 contained the following 
clauses relative to this matter: 



122 City Document No. 34. 

Section 4. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the duty of the 
auditor of accounts to keep an accurate account of the expense of con- 
structing each common sewer, and on receiving- the report of the city 
marshal relating thereto, to assess the expense upon the persons and 
estates deriving benefit therefrom, in conformit} r with the provisions of 
this ordinance and the laws of the Commonwealth ; and after having 
completed such assessment, he shall report the same to the mayor and 
aldermen, and if sanctioned by them he shall enter the same in 
books to be kept for that purpose, and proceed forthwith to collect such 
assessments. 

It would also seem that under the Ordinance of 1823 some 
difficulty had arisen concerning the levying of assessments, 
as section 5 of the Ordinance of 1834 provides for the col- 
lection of back assessments, as follows : 

Section 5. Be it further ordained, That for the purpose of making 
and collecting assessments for common sewers heretofore constructed by 
the city, the expenses of which have not already been assessed and col- 
lected, it shall be the duty of the city marshal and the auditor of accounts 
to proceed in relation to all such sewers in the same manner as they are 
by this ordinance directed to proceed in relation to those which may 
hereafter be constructed. 

An Ordinance to establish the Office of Superintendent of Seivers. 
June 6', 1837. 

Section 1. There shall be appointed annually in the month of May 
or June, by concurrent vote of the city council, a superintendent of 
common sewers. . . . 

Sect. 3. The said Superintendent, whenever any common sewer is 
ordered to be built or repaired, shall ascertain its depth, breadth, mode 
of construction, and general direction, and make a plan thereof, and insert 
the same, with all those particulars, in a book to be kept for that 
purpose, and forthwith ascertain and insert on said plan all entries 
made into such sewer, and obtain from the assessors 1 book the valuation 
of all estates which shall be benefited thereby. 

Sect. 4. The said Superintendent shall keep an account of the 
expense of constructing each common sewer, and assess the expense 
upon the persons and estates deriving benefit therefrom ; and after having 
completed said assessment he shall report the same to the mayor and 
aldermen, and if sanctioned by them, he shall enter the same in books 
to be kept for that purpose, and shall forthwith make out bills for the 
said assessments against all persons whose drains have entered the 
common sewer, or who have been otherwise benefited thereby, and 
deliver the same to the city treasurer for collection ; and the said 
treasurer shall forthwith present the same for payment ; and all bills 
or dues under this ordinance which shall remain unpaid at the expira- 
tion of sixty clays shall be handed to the city solicitor, and forthwith 
be put in suit. 

Sect. 5. The said Superintendent shall proceed forthwith to make 
all assessments for common sewers heretofore constructed by the city, 
the expenses of which have not already been assessed and collected, in 
the same manner as he is by this ordinance directed to proceed in rela- 
tion to those which may hereafter be constructed. 

The above ordinance comprises, in a condensed form, all 
the provisions of former statutes and ordinances. 



Steeet Department. 123 



An Act, in relation to Main Drains or Common Sewers. Passed 1841. 
Accepted by the City Council April 7, 1841. 

The only new feature introduced by this act is the clause 
relative to the sewer assessment, and the clause under which 
the city of Boston assumed one-quarter of the expense of 
construction, which is as follows : 

And all assessments so made shall constitute a lien on the real estate 
assessed for one year after they are laid, and may, together with all in- 
cidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale thereof if the assessment 
is not paid within three months after a written demand of payment 
made, either upon the person assessed or upon any person occupying 
the estate, such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales for the 
non-payment of taxes. 

Sect. 4. Any person who may deem himself aggrieved by any such 
assessment may, at any time within thi-ee months from receiving notice 
thereof, appeal to the county commissioners, or if the case arise in the 
city of Boston ... to the court of common pleas ; . . . pro- 
vided, however, that in all cases of appeal as aforesaid, the appellant, 
before entering it, shall give one month's notice in writing to . . . 
mayor and aldermen of his intention to appeal, and shall therein par- 
ticularly specify the points of his objection to the assessment made by 
them, to which specification he shall be confined upon the hearing of 
the appeal. 

Sect. 5. . . . and in the city of Boston not less than one-quarter 
part of such expense [of constructing, maintaining, and repairing main 
drains or common sewers] shall be paid by said city, and shall not be 
charged upon those using the said main drains or common sewers. 

Ordinance passed June 14, 1841. 

This ordinance is drawn in conformity with the act passed 
April 7, 1841, and contains no new features. 

Ordinance passed December 31, 1862. 

No owner or owners of any real estate, to whom permission has been 
or shall be given to construct private drains for such estate, shall by the 
construction of such private drains be exempted from an assessment 
lawfully imposed for constructing common sewers in the same vicing. 

Statutes and Ordinances in force 1869. 

Statutes. 

Section 4. Every person who enters his particular drain into such 
main drain or common sewer, or who, by more remote means, receives 
benefit thereby, for the draining his cellar or land, shall pay to the city 
or town a proportional part of the charge of making and repairing the 
same, to be ascertained, assessed, and certified by the mayor and alder- 
men or selectmen, and notice thereof shall be given to the party to be 
charged, or his tenant or lessee. 

Sect. h. Assessments so made shall constitute a lien on the real 
estates assessed for one year after they are laid, and may, together 
with incidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale thereof, if the 
assessment is not paid within three months after a written demand for 
payment, made either upon the person assessed, or upon any person 



124 City Document No. 34. 

occupying the estate ; such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales 
for the non-payment of taxes. 

Sect. 6. A person aggrieved by such assessment may, at any time 
within three months from receiving notice thereof, apply for a jury. 
Such application shall be made in like manner, and the proceedings 
thereon shall be the same, as in case of lands taken for laying out of 
highways : provided, that before making his application the party shall 
give one month's notice in writing to the selectmen or mayor and alder- 
men of his intention so to apply, and shall therein particularly specify 
his objections to the assessment made by them ; to which specification 
he shall be confined upon the hearing by the jury. 

Sect. 7. . . . and in the city of Boston not less than one -quarter 
part of such expense [of constructing, maintaining, and repairing main 
drains and common sewers] shall be paid by the city, and shall not be 
charged upon those using the main drains and common sewers. 

Ordinances. 

Section 5. He [superintendent of sewers] shall keep an accurate 
account of the expense of constructing and repairing each common 
sewer, and shall report the same to the board of aldermen, together 
with a list of the persons and estates deriving benefit therefrom, and 
an estimate of the value of the lands upon which said expense ought to 
be assessed, exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon. 

Sect. 6. The board of aldermen, in making assessments for defray- 
ing the expense of constructing or repairing common sewers, pursuant 
to the provisions of this ordinance, shall deduct therefrom such jjart, 
not less than one-quarter, as they may deem expedient, to be charged to 
and paid by the city ; and they shall assess the remainder thereof upon 
the persons and estates deriving benefit from such common sewer, 
either by the entry of their particular drains, or by any more remote 
means, apportioning the assessment according to the value of the lands 
thus benefited, exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon ; 
and they shall also fix the time when the proportion of the assessments 
charged upon persons benefited shall be paid. 

Sect. 7. The superintendent shall enter in books kept for that pur- 
pose all such assessments made by the board of aldermen, and shall 
forthwith make out bills for the same and deliver them to the city 
treasurer for collection ; and the city treasurer shall forthwith demand 
pajmient in writing of the said bills, in the manner prescribed by law ; 
and if any bills or dues under this ordinance remain unpaid at the 
expiration of three months after demand for payment or collection, the 
city treasurer shall cause the same to be collected by the proper legal 
process. 

Sect. 9. It shall be lawful for all persons, having the care of any 
buildings, to carry the rain water from the roofs of said buildings, at 
their own expense, into any common sewers, free of any charge from the 
city ; provided, hoivever, that the same be done by tight water spouts and 
tubes under ground, and under the direction of the board of aldermen. 

Sect. 14. No owner or owners of any real estate to whom permis- 
sion has been or shall be given to construct private drains for such 
estate shall, by the construction of such private drains, be exempted 
from an assessment lawfully imposed for constructing common sewers 
in the same vicinity. 

An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance in relation to Common Sewers 
and Drains. Passed July, 1875. 

Be it ordained by the Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Boston, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
Section 1. The ordinance in relation to common sewers and drains 



Street Department. 125 

is hereby amended by striking out, in the twelfth line of the sixth section, 
the word "value," and inserting in place thereof the word "area;" 
also by striking out, in the thirteenth and fourteenth lines of said sec- 
tion, the words " exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon." 

An Act to establish the Office of Collector of Taxes. Passed May 3, 1875. 

Section 2. Said collector shall have the powers now possessed by the 
treasurer of said city as collector of taxes, and shall also collect and re- 
ceive all assessments. 

Acts and Resolves passed by the General Court of Massachusetts, 1878. 

(Chapter 232.) 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Section 4 of chapter 48 of the Statutes of 1869 of the 
General Statutes is hereby amended by inserting before the words " to 
be ascertained" the words " and of the charge, not already assessed, of 
making and repairing other main drains or common sewers through 
which the same discharges." 

Sect. 3. The city council of any city . . . may adopt a system 
of sewerage to apply to any part or the whole of the territory of such 
city . . . and may provide that the assessment authorized by sec- 
tion four shall be made upon the owners of the estates embraced in 
such system, by a fixed uniform rate, based upon the estimated average 
cost of all the sewers therein, according to the number of feet of area 
their said estates contain within a fixed depth from such street or 
w r ay, or both, according to such frontage and area, which rate when 
adopted shall not be changed. 

Approved May 8, 1878. 

Acts and Resolves passed by the General Court of Massachusetts, 1879- 

(Chapter 55.) 
Be it enacted, etc. : 

Section 1. Section 3 of chapter 232 of the Acts of the year 1878 is 
hereby amended by adding at the end thereof the following words : 
'■'provided, hoicever, that in respect to any estate fronting upon such 
street or Way which by reason of its grade or level, or for any other 
cause, cannot be drained into such sewer, the selectmen shall not ascer- 
tain, assess, and certify the assessment thereon, or give notice of such 
assessment to the owner of such estate, until the incapacity of such es- 
tate to be drained into such sewer has been removed. 

Approved February 21, 1879. 

Section 1 above mentioned makes a radical change in the 
method of assessing the cost of sewers, inasmuch as it pre- 
scribed that not only the cost of the particular sewer should 
be assessed on the abutter, but also a proportionate part of 
the cost of all other sewers through which the same dis- 
charged. 

Public Statutes. Enacted November 19, 1881, to take effect February 1, 

1882. 

(Chapter 50.) 

Section 4. Every person who enters his particular drain into such 
main drain or common sewer, or who, by more remote means, received 



126 City Document No. 34. 

benefit thereby for draining his cellar or land, shall pay to the city or 
town a proportional part of the charge of making and repairing the 
same, and of the charge, not already assessed, of making and repairing 
other main drains and common sewers through which the same dis- 
charges, to be ascertained, assessed, and certified by the mayor and 
aldermen or selectmen ; and notice thereof shall be given to the party 
to be charged, or to his tenant or lessee. 

Sect. 5. Assessments so made shall for one year after they are laid 
constitute a lien on the real estates assessed, and may, together with 
incidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale of such real estate, if 
the assessment is not paid within three months after a written demand 
for payment, made either upon the person assessed or upon any person 
occupying the estate ; such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales 
for the payment of taxes. 

Sect. 6. A person aggrieved by such assessment may, at any time 
within three months after receiving notice thereof, apply for a jury. 
Such application shall be made in like manner and the proceedings 
thereof shall be the same as in case of lands taken for laying out high- 
ways ; provided, that before making his application the party shall give 
one month's notice in writing to the selectmen or road commissioners, 
or mayor and aldermen, of his intention so to apply, and shall therein 
particularly specify his objections to the assessment; to which specifi- 
cation he shall be confined upon the hearing by the jury. 

Sect. 7. The city council of a city or the legal voters of a town may 
adopt a system of sewerage for a part or the whole of its territory, and 
may provide that assessments under section 4 shall be made upon own- 
ers of estates within such territory by a fixed uniform rate, based upon 
the estimated average cost of all sewers therein, according to the front- 
age of such estates on any street or way where a sewer is constructed, 
or according to the area of such estates within a fixed depth from such 
street or way, or according to both such frontage or area; but no assess- 
ment in respect to any such estate which, by reason of its grade or level, 
or for any other cause, cannot be drained into such sewer, shall be 
made, certified, or notified until such incapacity is removed. 

Sect. 11. Nothing herein contained shall prevent a city or town 
from providing, by ordinance or otherwise, that a part of the expense of 
constructing, maintaining, and repairing main drains or common sew- 
ers shall be paid by such city or town. And in the city of Boston not 
less than one-quarter of such expense shall be paid by the city, and 
shall not be charged upon those using the main drains of- common 
sewers. 

Sect. 25. In a city or town which has accepted the provisions of 
this section or of chapter 249 of the Statutes of 1878, if the owner of 
real estate within sixty clays after notice of a sewer or sidewalk assess- 
ment thereon notifies in writing the board making such assessment to 
apportion the same, said board shall apportion it into three equal 
parts, and certify such apportionment to the assessors ; and the assess- 
ors shall add one of said parts, with interest from the date of appor- 
tionment, to the annual tax of said real estate for each of the three years 
next ensuing. All liens for the collection of such assessments shall 
continue until the expiration of two years from the time when the last 
instalment is committed to the collector ; and all sewer and sidewalk 
assessments remaining unpaid after the time of payment stated in the 
order making the same shall draw interest from such time until paid. 

Section 25 passed 1878. Accepted by the city Januartj, 1885. 

Chapter 145 of the Acts of 1883. 
Section five of chapter fifty of the Public Statutes, relating to sewer 
assessments constituting a lien upon real estate, is hereby amended by 
adding thereto the following clause, viz. : "And real estate so sold may 



Street Department. 127 

be redeemed the same as if sold for the non-payment of taxes, and in 
the same manner." April 24, 1883. 

Chapter 237 of the Acts of 1884. 

Section 1. All assessments on account of betterments and other 
public improvements which are a lien upon real estate shall bear inter- 
est from the thirtieth clay after assessment until paid. 

Sect. 2. In case of any suit or other proceeding calling in question 
the validity or amount of such assessment, the assessment shall continue 
to be a lien for one year after final judgment in such suit or proceed- 
ings, and may, with all costs and interest, be collected by virtue of such 
lien in the same manner as provided for the original assessment. 

Approved May 15, 1884. 

Chapter 210 of the Acts of 1886. 

Section five of chapter fifty of the Public Statutes is hereby amended 
so that assessments for main drains or common sewers hereafter made 
shall constitute a lien on the real estates assessed for two years instead 
of one year. Passed May 14, 1886. 

Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1889. 

An Act to provide for the Making and Collecting of Sewer 
Assessments in the City of Boston. 

Section 1. The owner of each estate in the city of Boston bordering 
on a street or on a strip of land through Avhich a main drain or common 
sewer shall hereafter be constructed in said city, may enter a particular 
drain into such main drain or common sewer from that part of said estate 
which is situated within one hundred feet from said street or strip of 
land ; and shall upon and after such entry pay to the said city an assess- 
ment on such estate equal to the number of square feet of land thereof, 
within one hundred feet of such street or strip of land multiplied by the 
number representing one two-hundredth part of the average cost per 
running foot of all the main drains and common sewei's of the city of 
Boston built during the five fiscal years preceding the date of the order 
to build such main drain or common sewer. 

No estate shall be assessed more than once for the construction of a 
drain or sewer except as hereinafter provided, but such estate may be 
assessed in the manner aforesaid for the cost of renewal or repair of a 
drain or sewer. 

Sect. 2. The amoimt of every such assessment shall, immediately 
upon the completion of the main drain or common sewer, be made and 
determined by the superintendent of sewers of said city, and interest 
shall be added to the amount assessed at the rate of five per cent, per 
annum, from the date of completion of the main drain or common 
sewer, as certified in writing by said superintendent in a book to be 
kept for that purpose in his office ; and notice of the date of such com- 
pletion and of the amount of such assessment shall be given by said 
superintendent to the person assessed forthwith after the amount of the 
assessment has been determined. 

Sect. 3. The owner of an estate not bordering on a street or strip of 
land through which a main drain or common sewer is constructed, or 
of an estate bordering on such street or strip of land extending more 
than one hundred feet in depth therefrom, may, after the amount of the 
assessment on such estate to be paid therefor has, on the petition of 
such owner, been fixed by the board of aldermen of said city, enter from 
such first-named estate, or from any part of such last-named estate, 
situated more than one hundred feet from the street or strip of land, a 
particular drain into the main drain or common sewer, and shall ivpon 



128 City Document No. 34. 

and after such entry pay to the said city the amount of the assessment 
.fixed as aforesaid; but such amount shall not exceed the amount he 
would have had to pay under section one of this act if his estate had 
bordered on such street or strip of land and had been only one hundred 
feet in depth therefrom. 

Sect. 4. Upon the request of an owner of an estate on which an 
assessment has been made under this act, made to the board of assessors 
of said city within ten days after any entry aforesaid, said board of 
assessors shall apportion the same into three equal parts, and shall add 
one of said parts with interest as aforesaid to the annual tax of said 
estate for each of the three years next ensuing. 

Sect. 5. Every assessment made under this act shall constitute a 
lien upon the estate assessed until it is paid, and may with all incidental 
costs and expenses be levied and collected, in the same manner as taxes 
on real estate are levied and collected ; and a person aggrieved by any 
such assessment may, at any time within ten days after any entry afore- 
said, apply for and have an abatement of his assessment in the same 
manner and under like rules of law as a person may apply for and have 
an abatement of taxes. 

Sect. 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 7, 1889. 

In Board of Aldermen, October 7, 1889. 
Ordered, That the amount of sewer assessment which any owner of 
an estate not bordering on a street or strip of land through which a main 
drain or common sewer is constructed, or of an estate bordering on such 
street or strip of land extending more than one hundred feet in dejjth 
therefrom, shall pay, upon entry into said main drain or common sewer, 
is hereby fixed and determined at the same amount per square foot 
which the estates bordering on said street or strip of land are obliged to 
pay, under the provisions of chapter 456 of the Acts and Resolves of the 
.Legislature of 1889. And the Superintendent of Sewers is hereby 
instructed to levy assessments' for such amounts on all parties applying 
for permission to enter said main drains or common sewers from estates 
coming under the provisions of section 3 of said chapter. 

Chapter 346 of the Acts of 1890. 

An Act to amend an Act relating to Sewer Assessments in the 
City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Section one of chapter four hundred and fifty-six of the 
Acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty-nine is hereby amended by 
striking out, in the ninth line, the words "the number of square feet," 
and inserting in place thereof the words "one cent for each square 
foot," and also by striking out all after the word " land" in the tenth 
line, and before the words "No estate" in the fifteenth line, and insert- 
ing in place thereof the words: "provided, however, that if the total 
amount of the assessments for said sewer exceeds the total sum of the 
cost of the sewer, plus a proportionate part of the cost of the outlet 
thereof, each of said assessments shall be proportionately reduced, so 
that the total amount thereof shall be equal to said sum," so that said 
section shall read as follows : 

Section 1. The owner of each estate in the city of Boston border- 
ing on a street or strip of land through which a main drain or common 
sewer shall hereafter be constructed in said city may enter a particular 
drain into such main drain or common sewer from that part of said 
estate which is situated within one hundred feet from said street or strip 
of land ; and shall upon and after such entry pay to said city an assess- 
ment on such estate equal to one cent for each square foot of land there- 



Street Department. 129 

of within one hundred feet of such street or strip of land ; provided, 
however, that if the total amount of the assessments for said sewer 
exceeds the total sum of the cost of the sewer, plus a proportionate part 
of the cost of the outlet thereof, each of said assessments shall be pro- 
portionately reduced, so that the total amount thereof shall be equal to 
said sum. iS'o estate shall be assessed more than once for the con- 
struction of a drain or sewer, except as hereinafter provided, but such 
estate may be assessed in the manner aforesaid for the cost of renewal 
or repair of a drain or sewer. 

Sect. 2. Section five of said chapter is hereby amended by striking 
out, in the second line, the word " assessed," and inserting in the place 
thereof the words, " on which the assessment is made ;" also by striking 
out, in the fourth and fifth lines, the words " levied and," and also by 
striking out all after the word •• collected " in the fifth line, and insert- 
ing in the place thereof the words : " The city collector of said city shall 
have power to collect, and the assessors of taxes of said city shall have 
power to abate, such assessments ; and all laws relating to the col- 
lection and abatement of taxes in said city shall, so far as applicable, 
apply to the collection and abatement of such assessments ; and when 
an assessment is made upon a person or corporation by law exempt 
from the assessment of taxes, the said assessors shall notify said col- 
lector not to enforce the collection of such assessment ; but when an 
estate, the collection of the assessment upon which has not been en- 
forced under such notice, comes into the possession of another person as 
owner, the amount of such assessment shall be paid by such new owner 
in like manner, subject to the same provisions of law as if an original 
assessment," so that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

Sect. 5. Every assessment made under this act shall constitute a 
lien upon the estate on which the assessment was made until it is paid, 
and ruay, with all incidental costs and expenses, be collected in the same 
manner as taxes on real estate are collected. 

The city collector of said city shall have power to collect, and the 
assessors of taxes of said city shall have power to abate, such assess- 
ments ; and all laws relating to the collection and abatement of taxes in 
said city shall, so far as applicable, apply to the collection and abate- 
ment of such assessments ; and when an assessment is made upon a per- 
son or corporation by law exempt from the assessment of taxes, the said 
assessors shall notify said collector not to enforce the collection of such 
assessment; but when an estate, the collection of the assessment upon 
which has not been enforced under such notice, comes into the posses- 
sion of another person as owner, the amount of such assessment shall be 
paid by such new owner in like manner, subject to the same provisions 
of law as if an original assessment. 

Sect. 3. The board of aldermen of said city shall adjust all sewer 
assessments made under this act so that the said assessments shall be as 
if made tinder the said act as hereby amended, and said city shall there- 
upon refund any excess in the amount of said assessments paid to said 
city. 

Sect. 4. The repeal or alteration by this act of any provisions of law 
shall not affect any act done, liability incurred, or right accrued and 
established, or any suit or proceedings to enforce such right or liability, 
under tin; authority of the laws hereby repealed or altered, except as 
hereinbefore provided. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 28, 1890. 



130 City Document No. 34. 



An ordinance, to amend Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordinances of 1890, 
relating to the Street Department, as approved by the Mayor, March 
9, 1891. 

Section 5. Said superintendent [of streets] shall keep a book in which 
he shall record the date of every order for constructing a sewer, the 
name of the contractor or builder constructing it, the date of commenc- 
ing and the date of completing the work, and the cost of the sewer; also 
a book in which he shall certify the names of the owners of estates 
assessed for the constructing of the sewer, the number of feet of land 
of each estate bordering on the street or strip of land in which the sewer 
was laid, the depth of each estate, the amount of each assessment, the 
date of completion of the sewer, and the dates when the notices of as- 
sessment were given. 

He shall make and deliver to the city collector all bills for assess- 
ments as they become due. 

Sect. 10. ... but before issuing a permit for entering a particular 
drain into a public sewer, from land upon which a sewer assessment has 
not been paid, he [superintendent of streets] shall be paid for the city 
an assessment of one cent per square foot, for all land in the estate from 
which the entry is made, within one hundred feet of the street or strip 
of land in which the sewer or particular drain is laid, except as other- 
wise provided in section 1 of chapter 346 of the Acts of 1890. 

Chapter 402 of the Acts of 1892. 
An Act relating to Sewers in the City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston may 
order that the superintendent of streets of said city make a sewer or 
sewers in any highway or strip of land and any other places in said city, 
specifying in the order the locations, sizes, and materials for the sewer 
or sewers, and the said superintendent shall carry out said order. 

Sect. 2. Any expenses incurred for any work so ordered and per- 
formed shall be paid out of the moneys appropriated under the pro- 
visions of section one of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and shall, to an 
amount not exceeding four dollars for each lineal foot of sewer, be re- 
paid to said city as the assessable cost of the work, by the owners of the 
several parcels of land bordering on the highway or strip of land in 
which the sewer is made. 

Sect. 3. Said superintendent shall so apportion the assessable cost to 
the parcels of land aforesaid that the amount apportioned to each parcel 
shall bear to the total assessable cost the jDroportion which the number 
of lineal feet of each parcel on said highway or strip of land bears to 
the number of such lineal feet of all such parcels, and a lien shall attach 
to the parcel and to an}' buildings which may be thereon for such 
amount, as a part of the tax of said parcel. Said superintendent shall 
give notice of the amount of every such assessment and the interest 
thereon to the owner of the parcel liable therefor, forthwith after such 
amount has been determined. 

Sect. 4. When an assessment is made for a parcel of land for 
which the owner is by law exempt from being taxed, as determined and 
certified to by the assessors of said city on application to them therefor, 
the collector of taxes of said city shall suspend the collection of such 
assessment ; but after the day on which, the parcel ceases to be owned 
by a person or corporation so exempt, the amount of such assessment, 
less any payment made for an entry under the following section, shall 
be collected as if that day were the date of the passage of the aforesaid 
order for making the sewer. 



Street Department. 131 

Sect 5. The owner of any parcel of land on which an assessment 
has been made for said cost, and the collection of which has not been 
suspended, under the provisions of the preceding section, may enter 
from any part thereof, within one hundred and twenty-five feet of said 
highway or strip of land, a particular drain into such sewer, and the 
owner of any parcel of land, the collection of the assessment upon 
which has been so suspended, or of any other parcel of land, may, 
after the amount to be paid for an entry has been fixed by the mayor 
and aldermen of said city, enter a particular drain from such parcel 
into said sewer, and there shall be due and payable to said city, upon 
any such entry, the amount of the assessment apportioned or fixed as 
hereinbefore provided. 

Sect. 6. The provisions of sections sixteen, seventeen, and eighteen 
of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and acts in amendment thereof, so far 
as applicable, apply to all assessments made under this act. 

Sect. 7. Chapter four hundred and fifty-six of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and eight3*-nine, and chapter three hundred and forty- 
six of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety, are hereby re- 
pealed, and sewers in said city shall hereafter be made and paid for only 
in accordance with the provisions of this act or the provisions of chapter 
three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-one and acts in amendment thereof. 

Sect. 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 16, 1892. 

Chapter 418 of the Acts of the Tear 1892. 

Section 16 of chapter 323 of the acts of the year 1891 amended. 

If the amount of the aforesaid assessable cost for which any parcel of 
land is liable, determined as provided in section fifteen, is not paid 
before the expiration of one year from the date of said determination, 
or if such amount as found by the court, on an appeal or other suit or 
proceeding, is not paid before the last day of May next succeeding the 
finding of the court, in each case with interest from the date of the 
passage of the aforesaid order of said street commissioners, at the rate 
of four and one-half per cent, per annum, the board of assessors of said 
city shall include a sum equal to nine per cent, of such amount in the 
next succeeding annual tax bills issued tor the tax on the said parcel, and 
in the tax bills issued the first year shall also include interest on the 
whole of said amount at the rate of four and one-half per cent, per 
annum from the date of the aforesaid order to the last day of October of 
the year of the date of such tax bill, and in the tax bills for each suc- 
ceeding year shall include one year's interest on the whole of said 
amount at the aforesaid rate, and shall so include such sums and 
interest until ten such sums with interest have been paid ; said board 
shall issue tax bills for such sums for any parcels for which no tax bill 
would otherwise be issued Every such sum in a tax bill shall be 
abated, collected, and paid into the city treasury, as if a part of and in 
the same manner as the city taxes. 

Section 17 of chapter 323 of the acts of the year 1891 amended. 

The owner of any parcel of land aforesaid may at any time pay to 
said city the balance of the amount of the said assessable cost for which 
his parcel is liable, remaining due after deducting therefrom I he several 
sums, exclusive of interest, included in tax bills as provided in section 
sixteen, with interest on the whole amount assessed al the rate of four and 
one-half per centum per annum from the last da\ of ( October preceding, 
to the date of payment, and his parcel shall then be relieved from 
further lien and liability for said cost, or he may at any time pay a part 
of said balance, and the board of street commissioners may then, at 



132 City Document No. 34. 

their discretion, with the approval of the mayor, relieve a proportional 
part of said parcel from further liability and lien for said cost. 
Approved June 16, 1892. 

(N.B. — The Board of Aldermen have taken no action in regard to 
fixing the amount to be paid for entry into sewer by the owner of a 
parcel of land, the collection of the assessment upon which has been 
suspended.) 

Sewer Assessments. (Discussion.) 

The question of assessing the cost of a sewer upon the 
people benefited by its construction is a perplexing one. 
The foregoing resume of laws and statutes relative to sewers 
shows how the method of assessment has been repeatedly 
changed. 

The earliest law (1797) provided that the inhabitants of 
the town build their own sewers and pay for them, and no 
reference in this law is therefore made to assessments. 

The law of 1823, which first provided that the city should 
build the sewers, was very indefinite concerning the method 
of assessment ; and as future laws referred to the manner in 
which the expense of all sewers built and not previously 
assessed was to be collected, it is fair to suppose that trouble 
was experienced in interpreting the law of 1823 in regard 
to assessments. 

The law of 1834 introduced a clause referring to the valu- 
ation of the estate benefited by the sewer, which was to 
have some bearing on the amount of the assessment levied. 
As the law did not specify exactly in what manner the valu- 
ation of the estate bears on the amount of the sewer assess- 
ment, it must have been impossible to determine the amount 
of sewer assessments. 

The law of 1841 provided that the city should assume one- 
quarter of the cost of construction of the main sewers. 

This clause was probably introduced on account of the 
increased cost of main sewers. The assessing of the whole 
expense of large main sewers on the abutters probably 
proved burdensome, and this method was adopted to even 
up the difference in cost of main and branch sewers. 

The amendment of the ordinance of 1875 in regard to 
sewer assessments provides that the benefit from sewers 
should be proportionate to the area instead of to the value of 
abutting property. 

The report of the Superintendent of Sewers of that year 
mentions that "the change has diminished the amount of.ar- 
bitrary judgment demanded in fixing values and reduced the 
labor of equably apportioning the cost of sewers." 

The next radical change is found in the law of 1878, in which 



Street Department. 133 

it is provided that a person who enters his drain into a com- 
mon sewer shall not only pay a proportional part of the cost 
of the common sewer, but also a proportional part of the 
cost of all other common and main sewers through which the 
particular sewer discharges. 

While this law bad the advantage that after the cost of all 
sewers in a given drainage district bad been determined, it 
would be possible to assess the cost on the abutters in such 
a manner that all assessments were in proportion to the bene- 
fit gained, and while it solved the vexed question of whether 
a drain was a main drain and the city should therefore pay 
one-quarter of the expense, or whether it was a common drain 
and the abutter should therefore pay the whole cost, it had 
the great disadvantage that it became impossible to levy 
sewer assessments until every sewer in the drainage area had 
been completed, as the cost of mains through which a branch 
sewer discharged was in some cases an unknown quantity. 

The following extract from the report of the Superintendent 
of Sewers for the year 1887 is given as bearing on this sub- 
ject, and as bearing on the general question of sewer assess- 
ment laws in force at that time : 

The question of how to equitably assess a proportion of the cost of 
sewers upon those deriving benefit therefrom is a vexing one. 

The ordinary interpretation of the statutes and the- city ordinances 
bearing upon the question allows such a large margin for the exercise 
of judgment, that there is always a chance for objections being raised 
and dissatisfaction expressed at"every schedule of assessment. 

The present method (1887) of laying assessments is based upon 
the custom of the department for the last fifteen years, and though 
having, perhaps, some points in its favor, is certainly open to objections. 

A party draining into a sewer receives the same benefit per square 
foot of land drained, or any other unit, whether entering a 10-inch, 
12-inch, or 15-inch pipe sewer, or a 4-foot sewer, whether the sewer is 
laid in easy digging or in a rock cut; and as, according to the present 
method (1887) of making up assessments, the cost of the particular 
sewer in front of the premises to be drained (except in the case of 
main sewers) is the basis on which the assessment is calculated, one 
sewer may call for an assessment of $0,005 per square foot, and another, 
where rock cutting or other obstacle is- encountered, may call for as 
high as $0 01 or $0.05 per square foot for exactly the same benefit ; i e., 
the right of entering the sewer for the purpose of drainage. There 
being this difference in the charges, parties desiring sewers generally 
assume the smallest cost when petitioning for sewers, and are dissatis- 
fied if the bills, when rendered, amount to more. 

I am satisfied that a uniform rate per square foot of land benefited, 
or a uniform cost per linear foot of sewer, can be established, based 
upon the average cost of sewers already built, which will yield an 
equal amount of revenue to the city, and be more equitable and satis- 
factory to those assessed. 

This fixed charge being known in advance, parties wanting sewers 
may determine to a certainty what they will have to pay, and therefore 
be able to decide intelligently on the advisability of petitioning the 
Board of Aldermen. It is difficult to see why an individual, in order 



134 City Document No. 34. 

to drain his house lot, should be called upon to pay a high rate because 
rock or other obstacle was encountered during the construction of a 
sewer in his immediate vicinity, or because the conditions were such as 
to render an 18-inch pipe necessary, when in other places a 10-inch 
pipe might answer. 

As the question of assessments is an important one, and involves a 
deal of study to find out, through the successive changes in statutes 
and ordinances, why the present system was adopted, I would recommend 
that a special committee, or the Committee on Sewers of the Board of 
Aldermen, together with the Corporation Counsel and the Superintend- 
ent of Sewers, take the matter under consideration, with a view to see- 
ing if the present system could not be improved upon. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Superin- 
tendent of Sewers, the passage of Chapter 450 of the Acts 
of 1889 was obtained, providing for an assessment on land 
within 100 feet of the street in which the sewer was sit- 
uated, amounting to the sum obtained by multiplying the 
number of square feet of land within 100 feet of the street by 
the number representing one two-hundredth part of the aver- 
age cost per running foot of all the main and common sewers 
of the city of Boston built during the five fiscal years 
preceding. 

Assuming that land extended back 100 feet from the 
street, and that the average cost of all sewers was $4.00 per 
linear foot, this method gave an assessment of two cents per 
square foot. , 

This act, which returned a fair percentage of the cost of 
sewers to the city treasury, was amended by Chapter 346 of 
the Acts of 1890, by making the sewer assessment one cent 
per square foot of land instead of two cents, and further pro- 
vided that if the cost of the sewer was less than the amount 
returned to the city by an assessment of one cent per square 
foot, then the assessment should be reduced proportionately. 

All sewer assessments made under the Act of 1889 were 
adjusted according to the Act of 1890, and the money col- 
lected was refunded. 

In order to show the effect of the laws of 1881 and 1889 
(as amended in Chapter 340 of the Acts of 1890) on the 
finances of the city, the following table is inserted. As 
shown by the table, the practical effect of these laws is to 
return to the city treasury only 30% of the amount ex- 
pended for sewer construction. 



Street Department. 



135 



m . 


O • O 




• 10 


• 


• O 00 


co 


« a"g 


i-H • O 




• CD 


• CD 


• 10 —1 





3 3 a 
o S o 


CM * O 




t~ 


- b- 


• CO -H 


in 


»o • O 




• co 


• ■* 


• CO CO 


CD 


g aa 32 
Coo 


«e= ; -1 




• t- 


• t~ 


' * "cl 


00 


< ! 2 






'. CO 


'. 3l" 


-** 


00 


<§ 












•jft 


g«l 


h 10 O * ■* N O 


• CO 


• -4< CM 


CO 


00 35 S3 —1 "* — 1 00 


CO 


iO CO 


t^ 


1 OTJ « 


MOfflOlOna 


CO 


t- 31 


co 




■<* a O t O M 31 




O 1- 


00 


^l^ 


rr 3 -H M >H H CO 


CO 


t~ t- 


35 










'-' — D = 

5 a ^ 


S3 00 00 S3 00 tr- CO 


1— 


iO -*• 


CM 


UO « ri IO 10 00 H 


CD 


r-c -1 


CM 

CD 


e|b 








«e= 


I «3 ® S 










a ® 










"3 ft 












X id NOO Wffl H 


■ -* 


O >-o 





2 


■* N Tt< O 3! rH CM 


— ' 


33 O 


t~ 


a 2-ci 

3 3 3 
O n ^ 


-# — 1 30 "* O t— — > 


O 


SO iO 


CO 


ION COW 00 MO 


O 


t~ 30 





CO m co t- t ■* 50 


CO 


t~ CM 


CO 


E2J 










CO CO — © CO CD — 









<! a S 


€& «HHH 






CO 


< 








<5& 


'CC- i- 


t^ m n w a 





-P 10 


CO 


« 2 ' 


CO CM CO CM CO CO CO 




31 iO 




•5 1.2 


O CM CO -C CO 00 30 


CO 


CO iO 


3-1 


3 33 t; 


iO 00 -f 30 CO 30 — 1 


CD 


UO in 


m 


P0§ 


CO -* 30 35 IO iO CO 


CO 


1-1 iO 


co 


"^^ 










CO "M 30 30 tH CO 30 


CO 


t^ S3 


co" 


a 5*3 


CO CO r-( t~ t-- O 31 


CO 




CM 








l^ 


S'og 








m= 


E >>-+* 








^1 


<=, J 










>> 












co •* >o co r— co 35 





— 1 3-1 






2 >^ 


00 00 co 00 00 00 00 


30 


S3 S3 






"sl 


CM CO T 'O CO t— 00 


30 


O — 1 






00 00 00 00 00 00 00 


00 


33 33 






L^ O 


CO 00 30 00 CO 00 00 


00 


00 00 






JH° 




i-H 














O 






C030— 1 •* s a » 1? 


30 C 


O CO 


t> 




W-iCOiOM-*1i^ 


■>* O 


IO O 


t- 


2 


050-tNNOt 


CO 3! 


t^ •* 


_ 


*i 3 . 


CO— I55NNH- < 0- 


O X 


CO CO 


m 


a -3 
3 3 3 


S3 CO CO CO CO — IOC 


00 -*■ 








* > 


O 31 -* CO CM CO — 1 t> 


— CM 


•»• S3 


of 


5^0 


!0"rt-*CO-'lO- 


CD O 


CO «o 


CO 


<2~ 


• " riH j 


H S 




(^ 

m 


<! 








^3 


73 


CM S3 t^ m CO CO 33 


Ol 


1^ 


CM 


3 3 


CO O CM t~ t- CM -*■ 


CM ■ 


-* 


■^1 


"3 O 












I— -*■ t~- t-~ t— t-~ CO 


31 • 


CO O 


CO 




CM O CM So 'C CM CO 


CM 


<ra —1 


O 


Sis s 


O OO O CO — < m CM 


O ■ 


>o 1^ 


CO 










^ « 3 


m -* O — CM CM 31 


CO . 


m -* 




HflE 


IO IO ■* 'O -H - CO CM 


31 . 


—1 


in 


3 


rt H M Ol •* CN H 




CM CO 


IN 


5^0 


«e= 




-O 


■>7 


s s 








m 


** *t-l 










3 


w s a •» 10 • 


S3 ' 


O t- 





g 


CM O O SM CO -» 10 ■ 


31 


CO CM 


t^ 


13 * 


IO t- CM CM O CM GO • 


O • 


00 — 1 


CO 


~ Z 3 


31 O -* — ■ CM IO — ■ • 


33 • 


33 iO 


CO 


i= 2 


— 10 10 CO 31 — CO • 


CO • 


33 O 


-* 1 












sv».3 


CO CM CO -f O 31 CO 


CO 


in c-i 


CO 


M O > 


■t 3 » O O S H . 




c-i m 


CM 


_2 


cm cs co -ti co -* O . 


10 . 


in r- 




£/> ^ ■ 




S 


in 








<©= 













£h 










. 








; 


e jj 3 


'.'.'. l '.:. '. 






00 


03a 


01 CO -H IO CD 1- CO 30 


31 O 


— ' 





(h 3 a 


(CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


CO 3-. 


33 33 




CO CO CO 00 A CO CO CO 


30 CO 


CO CO 


d^ 




















<J 







i* & P : 



c* --o o •* 5J 



00 00 OO CO qo 



136 City Document No. 34. 

An analysis of this table shows that of the sum of 
$5,128,488.70, the sum of $2,251,803.42 was expended for 
actual sewer construction ; of the balance, or $2,876,685.28, 
the sum of $786,518.01 was expended for Stony-brook con- 
struction, and the sum of $2,090,167.27 was expended for 
the maintenance of the Sewer Division, including the main- 
tenance of the Main Drainage Works. 

Of the amount expended for sewer construction, the sum 
of $762,551.77 has been levied against abutting estates in 
the form of assessments ; this amount being about thirty per 
cent, of the actual cost of the sewers constructed. 

The amount of assessments levied, in comparison with the 
amount expended for sewer construction, has varied largely 
from year to year, both on account of former looseness in 
making up sewer assessments, and also owing to changes 
which have been made in the laws. An inspection of this 
table shows that in 1884 the sum of $240,027.27 was ex- 
pended for sew T er construction, and only the sum of 
$14,334.81 was levied in ussessments. On the other hand, 
in 1888 the sum of $129,268.49 was expended for sewer 
construction, and the sum of $151,017.48 was levied in as- 
sessments. This is accounted for by the fact that the depart- 
ment that year made up a large number of back assessments 
which had been allowed to accumulate. 

Operation of the Law of 1889 as amended in 1890. 

In order to determine the exact amount which the city 
received in assessments for sewers constructed under the 
law of 1890, a table has been prepared showing the cost and 
amount assessed of every sewer (with one exception, which 
is not yet assessed) built under this law. The table shows 
that the cost of building 145 sewers amounted to $520,635.01 , 
of which amount the city assessed the sum of $126,685.26 
on the abutters, or about twenty-four per cent. 



Street Department. 



137 



Assessments of Sewers built under the Acts of 1889-90, 
to February 1, 1893. 



Street and Location. 



Walnut ave. and Cobden St., Rox. . . 
Blue Hill ave., Roxbury, South- 
wood to Damascus 

Essex st , Charlestown 

Mt. Vernon St., Dor., Dorchester 

ave. to Buttonwood 

Mozart St., Roxbury, Lamartine to 

Chestnut ave 

Maverick st., E. Boston, Maverick 

sq. to London st 

Childs st., West Roxbury 

Mt. Vernon st. . Dorchester, Boston 

to end of sewer 

Sackville St., Charlestown 

Lawrence ave., Dorchester 

Irvington st. , Back Bay 

Centre st.. West Roxbury, Pond to 

Lakeville pi 

Bowdoin st., Dorchester 

Morris St., East Boston, Brooks to 

Putnam 

Third st., South Boston, I to K .'. . . 

Union st., Brighton 

Centre st. , Roxbury, Highland to 

Marcella , 

Franklin st , Brighton, East from 

Raymond 

Chelsea st., Chsn., Vine to Perry . . 
Ashford St., Brighton, Chester to 

Malvern 

Day st., Rox., Minden to Mansur. . 
Myrtle st., City Proper, Ash pi. to 

end of sewer 

Edson st., Dorchester 

Allston st., Charlestown Medford 

to Bunker Hill 

West Park and Whitfield sts., Dor., 
Washington St., West Roxbury, 

Forest Hills to Cornwall 

Meridian st., East Boston, Decatur 

to Saratoga 

Ashmont st., Dorchester 

Moznrt st., Roxbury, Centre st., 

100 feet south 

Ocean St., Dor., Ashmont to Roslin, 
Alban St., Dorchester, Ashmont to 

end of sewer. ..... 

Kent st., Roxbury 

Dunreath st., Roxbury, Warren, 

200 feet east 

Bunker Hill st., Charlestown, Fer- 

rin to Green 

Everett st.. Brighton 

Magazine st., Roxbury 



Carried for ward 868,542 35 



Cost. 


Assessments. 


Collected. 


$18,594 60 


§709 75 


8364 75 


640 21 
782 33 


600 35 
322 99 


400 35 
224 89 


264 85 


192 00 


152 00 


352 52 


129 30 


115 75 


978 72 
246 46 


560 21 
52 25 


295 16 
52 25 


1,099 72 

1,597 50 

241 47 

623 78 


932 00 
542 31 
123 50 
623 78 


652 00 
501 18 
123 50 
514 82 


4,910 96 
1,299 97 


850 00 

1,288 0.) 


312 00 
1,013 00 


674 13- 

430 69 

2.610 13 


484 50 
298 70 

1,897 86 


246 10 

248 90 

1,304 27 


379 84 


163 63 


103 47 


359 10 

1,380 64 


249 00 

258 92 


64 CO 
258 92 


870 88 
1,249 60 


486 33 
257 37 


324 2> 
257 37 


298 76 
1,710 86 


. 101 83 
1,419 33 


66 94 

904 58 


880 10 
2,241 70 


352 30 
1,557 68 


328 30 

1,362 68 


1,031 10 


544 17 


305 00 


6,595 61 
1,240 32 


991 40 
1,176 99 


898 16 
821 12 


259 65 
712 69 


55 00 
619 70 


55 on 
439 70 


343 26 
2,558 97 


355 00 
370 83 


355 00 

204 98 


1,320 72 


118 33 


100 15 


3,315 71 
1,451 32 

4,993 48 


520 94 

492 87 

1,634 43 


223 92 

330 87 

1,634 43 


868,542 35 


821,333 55 


815,560 03 



138 



City Document No. 34. 



Assessments of Sewers. — Continued. 



Street and Location. 



Brought forward 

Hudson st., City Proper, Curve to 

Kneeland 

Bay State Itoad, Roxbury 

Magnolia St., Dorchester, Way land 

to Robert ave 

Reading St., Roxbury 

Bailey St., Dorchester, Dorchester 
ave. to Washington . . 

Neponset avenue, Adams to Mill . . 

Decatur, E. B., Meridian to Border, 

Exeter, Providence to Huntington 
avenue 

Sterling, Roxbury, Shawmut ave- 
nue to Washington 

Putnam, E. B., Bremen to Chelsea 

Cohasset, West Roxbury, Corinth 
to Stony brook . . " 

Condor, E. B., Brooks to Putnam. . 

Condor, E.B., Meridian to Border, 

Market, Brighton 

Border, E. B., Utah to White 

Cedar place, Dorchester 

Paulding, Roxbury, Bainbridge to 
Dale 

Kilby, City Proper 

Walden, Rox., Arklow to Centre . . 

Bellevue and Kane, Dorchester. . . 

Paul Gore, West Roxbury 

Walnut avenue, Roxbury, 'Harris- 
hof to Hohvorthy 

Symmes, West Roxbury 

Waverly, Brighton ... 

Cambridge, Brighton 

Paneuil, Brighton 

Lincoln, Brighton 

Carruth, Dor., Minot to Codman. . . 

Brent, Dorchester 

Dunstable, Charlestown 

Russell, Charlestown 

N, So. Boston, Second to Third . . 

O, So. Boston, First to Second 

Welles avenue, Dorchester, Wash- 
ington to Harley 

Horace, E. B., Moore to Byron 

Parker Hill avenue, Roxbury, Tre- 
mont to Hillside 

Liberty and Preble, Soutii Boston. . 

Border, E. B., White to Condor . . . 

Crawford and Holland, Roxbury . . . 

Humboldt avenue, Roxbury, Wal- 
nut avenue to Munroe 

Blue Hill ave., Dewey to Dalmatia, 

St. Botolph, Garrison to Hareourt . 

Dustin , Brighton 

Stoughton, City Proper 



568,542 35 

24,098 07 
1,502 01 

943 19 

676 65 

5,059 78 

817 20 

7,928 69 

705 82 

1,279 81 
322 41 

1,349 25 
625 52 
324 07 
1,440 03 
1,563 09 
1,181 84 

602 21 

1,070 51 

673 53 



Assessments. 



Carried forward $163,874 31 $52,427 99 



3,520 


50 


2,861 


47 


1.035 


56 


1,426 


86 


3,067 


64 


1,292 


78 


82 


34 


238 


18 


875 


61 


924 


35 


232 


27 


554 


20 


349 


36 


461 


21 


753 


38 


898 


36 


1,088 


66 


1.924 


93 


1.080 


22 


7,865 


41 


2,516 


26 


501 


27 


1,538 


07 


6,153 


33 


1,S96 


06 


33,874 


31 



.$21,333 55 

1,209 74 
1,052 16 

175 33 
450 14 

2,818 93 
708 93 
542 21 

31 20 

497 06 
160 00 

1.152 46 
625 52 
324 07 
343 86 

1.153 73 
202 56 



188 01 

571 14 

814 70 

1,457 51 

270 00 
1,147 50 

2,358 86 
684 40 
82 34 
238 18 
563 52 
821 54 
139 30 
188 83 
330 00 
185 00 

591 51 

898 36 

650 84 

248 54 

1,004 22 

879 49 

746 43 

303 11 

679 94 

2,360 48 

1,121 31 



Collected. 



15,560 03 

1,167 11 

848 68 

175 33 
450 14 

2,141 16 
593 40 
521 46 

34 20 

282 06 
HiO 00 

949 10 

2:>8 17 

141 13 

109 70 

789 23 

202 56 

88 48 

188 01 

439 50 

708 25 

1,457 51 

170 00 
720 00 
1,754 39 
644 40 
39 38 
169 44 

69 11 
130 00 

70 30 

151 83 
120 00 
185 00 

417 51 
745 90 

152 34 
233 84 
205 17 
108 00 

591 94 

123 27 

679 94 

795 90 



55,512 81 



Street Department. 



139 



Assessments of Sewers. — Continue 



Street axd Location. 



Brought forward 

Walk Hill,' West Roxbury 

Texas, Roxbury 

Common, Charlestown 

Summer. Charlestown 

Bainbridge, Roxbury . .- 

Howard ave., Dorchester . 

Hill, Charlestown 

McLean, City Proper 

Raleigh and Beacon, Roxbury 

Reading, Roxbury, Maiden lane to 
Farnham 

Pope's Hill and Neponset ave.. Dor., 

Cleveland pi . , City Proper 

Maverick, E. B., Short to Jeffries. . 

Gustin, South Boston 

Cambridge, Brighton, from Saun- 
ders st. , westerly 

Florence, West Roxbury 

Burnett, West Roxbury 

Porter, East Boston, Bremen to 
Bennington 

Homer, E. B., Byron to Moore 

Call, West Roxbury 

Bremen, E. B., Porter to Brooks . . 

Arlington, Brighton 

Tyler, Harvard to Oak | 

Oak, Harrison ave. to Hudson. . . { 

Byron, E.B. , Cowper to Coleridge, 
and 

Coleridge, E. B., Byron to Rice . 

Calumet and Sachem, Roxbury . . . 

Wenham, West Roxbury 

Peter Parley, West Roxbury 

Gladstone, East Boston 1 

Leyden, East Boston | 

Walley, East Boston | 

Bennington, E.ist Boston. J 

Adams, Beaumont, and Burgoyne, 
1 )orchester 

Hillside, Roxbury, Parker Hill to 
Sunset 

Adams and Codman, Dorchester, 

Bay st., private land, Springdale 
st. , etc 

Savin Hill ave. and Grampian way 

Roslindale Main Sewer, Washing- 
ton to Beech 

Private land and Ashmont street,"] 
and 

Washington and part of Arman- j 
dine J 

Falcon, E. B.. Brooks to Putnam.. 

Rockland. Brighton 

Dewey, Dacia to Blue Hill avenue. 

Dalmatia and Cherry 



Carried forward $421,940 74 $105,697 99 



Cost. 



8163,874 31 
1,428 29 
1,02(1 94 
1.247 22 

212 33 
1,321 78 
1,124 82 

886 05 
1,623 22 
9,201 52 

347 90 

2,502 78 

320 88 

616 55 

574 78 

1,521 96 

1,178 95 

569 16 

13,859 05 
1,845 65. 
1,033 37 

12,004 42 
4,203 50 

12,055 79 

1,499 77 

17,196 42 

2,268 m 

414 67 



36,865 81 



5,899 32 

678 41 
21,326 01 

24,042 92 

b 

61,776 09 

14,869 72 

1.743 82 

633 12 

438 63 

713 15 



Asseseruents. 



Collected. 



$52,427 99 
811 98 

28 92 
290 72 

20 80 
192 49 
121 8s 

85 33 
647 17 
591 64 

286 34 

1,640 90 

73 09 

578 37 

381 82 

1.014 33 

8K4 54 

a 647 26 

1,051 79 

1,000 00 

487 86 

1,255 98 

1,490 91 

/ 657 68 

1 158 29 

308 00 

900 00 
2,466 61 

802 98 
61 49 
2,583 77 
1,774 12 
1,124 93 
3,04* 



18 



1,410 83 

458 41 
4,078 54 

2,480 36 
5,214 70 

8,(124 20 
1,814 04 



738 94 
936 24 
240 41 

308 36 
120 80 



35,512 81 

760 40 

9 77 

57 85 

20 80 

81 39 

94 76 

47 23 

325 38 

591 64 

184 42 
557 98 
73 09 
224 00 
365 86 

579 06 

364 42 

m 84 

940 56 
725 00 
373 49 
433 32 
732 42 
568 43 
158 29 
308 00 

481 25 
1,208 11 

509 95 
37 85 

899 13 
1,194 85 

985 60 
1,643 51 

954 30 

348 91 
1,576 24 

694 30 
3,100 91 

2,483 17 
1,524 94 



589 94 
336 87 
76 66 
30K 36 
115 24 



soil. 227 30 



140 



City Document No. 34, 



Assessments of Sewers. — Concluded. 



Street and Location. 



Brought forward 

Commonwealth avenue, Charlesgate 
W. to Brookline avenue 

Orleans, East Boston, Maverick ~| 

to Sumner | 

and y 

Sumner, East Boston, Orleans to | 
Cottage J 

Vine, Charlestown . 

Kilton and Harvard, Dorchester . . 

Humboldt avenue, Roxbury, Home- 
stead to Seaver 

Private street, East Boston, Leyden 
to W alley 

Crawford, Roxbury, south-east, 
from Holland 

Magnolia and Lawrence avenue . . . 

Jeffries, from No. 11 to Everett, 
East Boston 

Baldwin, Charlcstown 

Creighton, Roxbury 

New, E. B., Maverick to Cross .... 

C, South Boston, Fifth to Sixth . . 

Tremont, Charlestown 

Westville, private land and Charles 
street 

Randolph, City Proper 

Parker Hill avenue, Roxbury, Hill- 
side, south 

Dorchester avenue, Crescent ave 
nue, north 

North Harvard and Rena. . . ...... 

Townsend 



Totals . 



Cost. 



$424,946 74 
12,816 11 

15,467 71 



5,862 83 
13,223 24 

1,910 33 

429 33 

5,218 94 
8,254 12 

266 68 
674 22 
1,194 28 
329 35 
794 16 
273 53 

b 13.525 44 
b 4,506 75 

1,049 09 

1.477 96 
5,270 78 
3,043 42 



$105,697 99 
1,066 80 



$520,535 01 



561 00 



L 1.105 97 

190 90 

3,374 95 

1,012 16 

77 48 

1,802 43 
1,724 92 

135 00 

7 35 

1,146 28 

321 35 

136 75 
83 52 

2,610 QG 
1,111 14 

899 56 

914 63 

2,307 97 

396 15 



$126,685 26 



Collected. 



$60,227 36 

1,066 80 

401 00 



1,083 97 
190 90 
625 46 

607 16 



927 79 
1,268 28 

35 00 

7 35 

764 41 

63 17 

85 22 

83 52 

1,203 03 
357 46 

391 38 

673 08 

681 56 
77 30 



$73,821 20 



The revision by order of the Board of Aldermen, Augtsst 1&, 18-90, made in this table. 
No abatements made. 

(a) Including proportionate cost of main sewer. 

(b) Storm sewer included. 
Assessed '24 4-10ths per cent, of cost. 

Collected 14 per cent, of cost. Collected 58 per cent, of assessments. 



The foregoing table shows that even less money is returned 
to the city treasury under the law of 1890 than under the 
laws of 1881 and 1890, as the percentage assessed falls off 
from over thirty per cent, to twenty-four per cent. In order 
that a greater proportion of the expense might be assessed 
on the abutters the law of 1892 was passed. (See Chapter 
402 of the Acts of 1892.) 

It is too early to draw definite conclusions from the new 
law of 1892. Calculations made to date show that the city will 
recover in assessments about seventy per cent, of the cost of 



Street Department. 141 

sewers instead of the thirty per cent, recovered under the 
1881 law, and the twenty-four per cent, under the 1890 law. 

Sewer Assessments levied during the Year 1892. 

Sewer assessments have been made by this division for 
the year ending January 31, 1893, to the amount of 
$105^490.37 as follows: 

In accordance with the Public Statutes en- 
acted November 19, 1881 . . . $1,394 18 

In accordance with Chap. 456 of the Acts 
of 1889, as amended by Chap. 346 of the 
Acts of 1890 27,970 55 

In accordance with Chap. 402 of the Acts 

1892 ....... 76,125 64 



$105,490 37 



Bills for sewer assessments have been deposited with the 
City Collector for collection to the amount of $113,860.27. 
This sum is made up of all assessments levied during the 
year under the acts of 1881 and acts of 1892, and the bills 
for those estates assessed under the acts of 1889-1890, from 
1889 to date, that have made connection with the city's sewers 
during the year ; the assessments for those estates not having 
made connection with the sewers remaining on the books of 
this division at 5 per cent, interest. These amount to 
$49,143.56, and will be deposited for collection as the estates 
assessed connect with the sewers. This amount represents 
39 per cent, of the total assessments made under the acts of 
1889-1890, showing a marked increase in the amount de- 
posited for collection during the current year, as there 
remained on the books February 1, 1892, a sum representing 
58 per cent, of the assessments made to that date. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $5,090.85 have been col- 
lected from estates upon which no sewer assessment was ever 
levied, in accordance with Chap. 36, Sect. 10, of the Revised 
Ordinances. This exceeds any sum previously collected by 
this department, even when the rate for entrance was double 
what it is at present. 

Two thousand six hundred and twenty-eight permits have 
been issued to drain-layers to connect house drains with the 
city's sewers, or to repair old connections, and the work done 
under these permits has been inspected and a record of same 
made on the plans in this division. 



142 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 



The work of the Street-Cleaning Division has continued to 
give satisfaction through the year. No special changes have 



that the organization 



per 



been inaugurated, for the reason 
fected in 189 L proved to be efficient. 

The details of this organization were fully set forth in last 
year's report, together with the data concerning the areas of 
the different sweeping districts, and other valuable informa- 
tion. During the year 1891, District No. 2 (which includes 
the territory in the vicinity of the markets) was swept at 
night. It was found that, owing to the complete absence of 
teams at this time, much more effective work could be 
accomplished, and night-sweeping has been inaugurated in 
Districts Nos. 3, 4, and 5 as well, which practically include 
all territory north of Dover street. 

The following table shows the average force employed 



during the year : 








Average No. men 


District. employed. 


Office ... 4 


1, \V T est End .... 






. 39 


2, North End .... 






. 35 


3, South End .... 






. 35 


4, South End .... 






. 36 


5, Back Bay .... 




. 


. 35 


6, South Boston and Dorchester . 






. 36 


7, Roxbury .... 






. 35 


8, Brighton .... 






. 10 


9, Charlestown and East Boston . 






. 29 


Yard and stable .... 






. 13 


Push-cart Patrol .... 






. 40 



Total 



347 



The above-mentioned force use in carrying out the work 
of the division the following plant: 

Eighteen double sweeping-machines, 14 single sweeping- 
machines (1 transferred to Paving Division), 13 water-carts, 
83 street-carts, 87 horses (owned by the division) , 21 asphalt- 
scrapers. 

The Push-cart Patrol use : 

Forty-seven push-carts, 37 extra barrels, 4 street-carts 
(steel), 4 horses (all hired). 



Street Department. 143 

In addition to the above-mentioned carts, the division 
hires about 25 extra teams. 

For the Paper Patrol one team is employed all the time. 

Experiments have been made at various times through the 
year with several patent sweeping-machines, constructed so 
as to sweep the dirt and elevate it into a cart. No satisfac- 
tory machine has yet been invented, all being clumsy and 
complicated in arrangement, and the work is carried on now 
as formerly, using the ordinary machine-sweeper. 

Push-Cart Patrol. 

The working of the Push-cart Patrol has been quite satis- 
factory, and the results have been so gratifying that the 
number has been increased during the year. Forty men are 
now employed in this service, and the area covered com- 
prises the following-named streets : 

Arch street, Avon place, Beach street (Washington street 
to South street), Beacon street (Arlington street to Charles 
street), Bedford street, Blackstone street (Hanover street to 
Cross street), Boylston street (Washington street to Park 
square) , Bowdoin square, Brattle street, Brattle square, Brom- 
field street, Bulfinch street (Howard street to Bowdoin 
square ) , Causeway street ( Merrimac street to Beverly street) , 
Central street, Chardon street, Chauncy street, Columbus 
avenue (Park square to West Chester park), Congress 
street (Milk street to State street), Congress square, Corn- 
hill, Court street, Devonshire street, Doane street, Eliot 
street, Elm street, Essex street (Washington street to South 
street), Exchange place, Federal street (Summer street to 
Milk street), Franklin street (Washington street to Federal 
street), Friend street, Hanover street (Scollay square to 
Blackstone street), Harrison avenue (Bedford street to 
Kneeland street), Hawkins street, Hawley street, Haymarket 
square, Harvard street, Kilby street, Kingston street, Knee- 
land street, La Grange street, Lincoln street, Mason street, 
Merrimac street, Milk street (Washington street to Broad 
street), Otis street, Park square, Portland street, Post-office 
square, School street, South street, State street (Washington 
street to Broad street), Sudbury street, Summer street, 
Temple place, Travers street (Merrimac street to Beverly 
street), Tremont street (Eliot street to Court street), Tre- 
mont row, Union street (Hanover street to Haymarket 
square), Washington street (Kneeland street to Haymarket 
square), Water street, West street, Winter street, Winthrop 
square, and the following asphalt streets: 

Beacon street from Dartmouth to Gloucester, W. Newton 



144 



City Document No. 34. 



street from Washington to Columbus avenue, Chester square, 
south side, from Washington to Columbus avenue, Chester 
square, north side, from Tremont to Columbus avenue, 
Broadway from Dorchester avenue to Dorchester street. 

That this service is an important adjunct to the general 
work in the depot and trading districts cannot be denied. 
Even if these streets are swept perfectly clean in the early 
part of the day or during the night, the hourly accumulations 
are so great that the gutters and crossings soon become lit- 
tered and an eyesore to pedestrians. 

The contents of the barrels collected by the Push-cart 
Patrol are removed at regular intervals by an odorless iron 
dumping-cart. This cart does not leak, is easily dumped, 
and has proved of good service in the work of collecting 
the contents of the barrels. 

The refuse collected by the patrol is taken to the dumping- 
scow and towed to sea. The refuse has considerable value 
as manure, but the extra cost of teaming it to the railroad 
stations, where it could be sold to farmers, and the difficulty 
of making arrangement for cars, prevent the division from 
disposing of it in this manner. 

Three thousand four hundred and fifty-six loads of street- 
sweepings were collected by the "Push-cart Patrol," and 439 
loads by the "Paper Patrol," making a total for the patrol 
system of 3,895 loads. 

The following table shows the number of loads of street- 
sweepings removed each year during the last eleven years : 



Year. 






No. of Cart-loads. 


1882 .... . 52,381 


1883 


. 


58,272 


1884 




. 


62,222 


1885 




, 


(31,455 


] 886 




, . 


59,875 


1887 




. 


68,990 


1888 




. 


68,010 


1889 




. 


70,476 


1890 




. 


70,449 


1891, 12 months 




. 


1 87,113 


1891, 13 months 




. 


2 9 1,425 


1892 




• 


106,829 



i Jan.l, 1890, to Jan. 1, 1891. 

2 Jan. 1, 1890, to Feb. 1, 1S92 (date made necessary by the change in the financial year). 
Of this amount 4,290 loads were collected by the Push-cart Patrol. 



Street Department. 145 



Difficulties encountered by the Division in keeping 
the Streets Clean. 

In the report made last year, reference was made to the 
difficulties encountered by the division in keeping streets 
clean, and a quotation from the report of the Committee on 
Street- Cleaning appointed to investigate the subject in New 
York was published. 

The quotation covers the subject so concisely, and is a 
matter of such general interest, that it has been reinserted in 
this report. 

If the existing laws and ordinances regulating the conduct of house- 
holders and citizens with respect to cleanliness were faithfully observed 
and duly enforced, the task of the Street-Cleaning Department would 
be greatly lightened. 

The law against throwing litter and rubbish of any kind into the gut- 
ters and streets is daily and hourly violated in the best sections of the 
city, and that by people who have not the excuse of ignorance of the 
law. 

We have seen prominent business houses on Fifth avenue engaged in 
unpacking large cases upon the sidewalk, the operation involving the 
throwing into the streets of paper, straw, and litter of all descriptions. 

We have seen well-dressed men, on their way down town, deliber- 
ately toss into the public highway the eight-page newspaper which they 
had just finished reading. We have seen the same class of people dis- 
embarrass themselves of handfuls of paper and scraps by the same easy 
process. 

We have seen men engaged in repairing the sidewalks, where the 
material taken up was decayed v\ ood, throw the debris into the public 
streets, and leave it there in piles. 

We have seen in front of a well-known and reputable establishment 
on Union square the remains of a hirge awning partially destroyed by 
fire cast deliberately into the gutter. 

It is a matter of daily habit with many storekeepers upon the lines of 
the great lateral avenues to commence the day by sweeping out all the 
refuse litter of their stores into the streets. 

It is useless to multiply these instances ; every one will recognize the 
fact of their daily and hourly occurrence. It is a hopeless task to keep 
the streets of this city clean so long as the people themselves are deter- 
mined to keep them dirty. 

So thoroughly convinced are we of the absolute necessity of the 
enforcement of these laws and ordinances, if it is really desired to keep 
the city clean, that, as a most essential part of the remedy we have 
been called upon to suggest, we urge upon the Mayor, as the chief 
executi e officer of New lork, to exercise all the authority he can com- 
mand to bring all the departments charged with the execution of these 
laws and ordinances into cordial harmony and cooperation for their 
vigorous enforcement. 

Ordinances and their Enforcement. 

The present ordinances of the City of Boston are sufficient 
to prohibit the throwing of refuse into the streets, and it is 
the duty of the police to enforce these ordinances. 



14(5 City Document No. 34. 

The department has, during the year, endeavored by 
correspondence to impress on the Board of Police the 
necessity of such enforcement. 

The condition of some of the business streets during the 
year in regard to cleanliness has been extremely unsatisfac- 
tory. 

This unsatisfactory condition has not been the fault of the 
Street-Cleaning Division, the streets in question being those 
that are nightly swept, and in addition are covered during 
the day by the Push-Cart Patrol, but is directly due to the 
numerous violations of Section 39 of Chapter 43 of the Re- 
vised Ordinances concerning the throwing of rubbish into the 
streets. It being the duty of the police force, to prevent 
these violations, the following letter w 7 as sent to the Board 
of Police on June 2, 1892 : 

To the Board of Police : 

I desrre to call your attention to the general appearance of the busi- 
ness part of this city, caused by violations of Section 39 of Chapter 43 
of the Revised Ordinances of 1892. It would seem to me that the police 
are as much bound to see that the violations of these ordinances do not 
occur, as they are to see that the laws and ordinances in general are 
enforced. 

In my opinion, the Board of Police are primarily responsible for the 
keeping of the streets free from such refuse matter as is mentioned .in 
Section 39 of Chapter 43 of the Revised Ordinances. 

Each scrap of paper, handbill, piece of wood, or, in general, rubbish 
of any sort that is visible in the street, is an evidence of the violation of 
the city ordinances, for which a proper penalty has been provided; and 
the presence of this material in the street shows that acts have been 
committed which it is the duty of the police to prevent. It seems to me 
that, your Board being primarily responsible tor seeing that the streets 
are kept free from refuse and debris, it would be a most simple matter 
to have each police captain responsible for his own district, and each 
patrolman responsible tor the condition of the streets on his route. 

It ought to be the duty of each captain to inspect his district daily in 
reference to the condition of the streets, and on finding on the route 
of an officer numerous violations of the ordinance above referred to, a 
reprimand should follow, and, if necessary, a suspension or discharge. 
It would be the duty of this officer to make complaints in general, con- 
cerning the violations which have occurred in the different districts, and, 
if repeated complaints were made in regard to one district, it should, in 
nry opinion, be the duty of your board to call the captain to account. 

If there were a proper cooperation between the Board of Police and 
this department, the condition of the streets could be greatly improved, 
as a large part of their present unsightly condition is due to violations 
of ordinances, which it is the duty of the police to prevent. If these 
violations never occurred, there is no doubt in my mind that my force 
is perfectly organized to do the part of the work that belongs to it, and 
to keep the streets clean. 

Yours truly, 

(Signed) H. H. Cauter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Street Department. 147 

It is to be regretted that as far as could be ascertained 
this letter had no effect in making the police force more 
active in attending to their duty. Great activity has been 
shown by the Board of Police in enforcing minor ordinances 
relative to feeding horses in the streets, peddling, occupying 
streets for the proper receipt and delivery of goods, and for 
building purposes, etc., etc. 

It is extremely gratifying to be able to record this activity 
of the police force, but it is somewhat surprising that the 
most important of the ordinances which have been the sub- 
ject of special communication to the Board of Police can be 
universally violated, while unimportant ordinances are 
strictly enforced. 

The Department has brought to the attention of the Board 
of Police specific instances of violation of ordinances, and in 
some instances has offered to furnish testimony in case of 
prosecution. 

In such cases the Board of Police has cooperated with the 
Department, and several convictions have been procured in 
the police court for such violations. 

Emptying Filth into Catch-Basins. 

During the year some trouble has arisen from store- 
keepers emptying slops and filth directly into the catch- 
basins, clogging them up and rendering them unsanitary. 
As this is in violation of the ordinances, several arrests were 
made and fines imposed, among which might be mentioned 
the following : 

William Cassidy, of the New England Telephone Com- 
pany. Prosecuted and fined $10 for dumping filth from its 
manholes into the catch-basins. 

Frank Tedman, an employee of Niles Brothers, corner 
Cross and Fulton streets, for dumping beef pickle into catch- 
basin on Cross street. Fined $10. 

Charles Kogel, an employee of Louis Bassill, for dumping 
grindstone refuse into catch-basin, 37 Pitts street. Fined 
$5 and costs. 

Future Needs of the Division. 

The picking over of ash barrels by rag-pickers should be 
prohibited by ordinance, and it is to be hoped that this year 
will see a change in this matter. 

Owing to the amount of the appropriation, no separate 
cleaning-gangs could be provided in Dorchester and West 
Roxbury, the necessity for which is greater year by year as 
the districts develop. 



148 City Document No. 34. 

Owing to the paving of Dorchester avenue during the year, 
it will be necessary to establish a small force in Dorchester to 
sweep the paved streets and attend to the scraping of the 
gutters and macadamized streets in that locality, and a small 
force will be established in West Roxbury during the coming 
year. 

Conclusion. 

Five appendices are submitted herewith, in which will be 
found the reports of the different deputy superintendents, 
showing the expenditure of each division in detail. They 
are as follows : 

Appendix A, Bridge Division. 
Appendix B, Paving Division. 
Appendix C, Sanitary Division. 
Appendix D, Sewer Division. 
Appendix E, Street-Cleaning Division. 

The Superintendent is under obligations to His Honor, 
Mayor Nathan Matthews, Jr., and to the City Council, for the 
liberal spirit shown in making appropriations for necessary 
street improvements, and for the interest taken in securing 
legislation of great value to the department. 

To all officials and employees the Superintendent desires 
to extend his thanks for the ability and fidelity displayed in 
carrying on the work of the department during the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



STREET' DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION, 1892. 



Central Office .... Room 47, City Hall. 

HENRY H. CARTER, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



JOHN W. McDONALD, Purchasing Agent. 
HENRY B. WOOD, Secretary and Executive Engineer. 

PAVING DIVISION. 

Room 41, City Hall. 

CHARLES R. CUTTER, Deputy Superintendent. 

BENJAMIN B. TREMERE, Chief Clerk. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

Room 44, City Hall. 

HENRY W. SANBORN, Deputy Superintendent {ex officio, Engineer 

Improved Sewerage'). 

FRANK H. RICE, Chief Clerk. 

Engineer's Office, 12 Beacon Street. 

E. S. DORR, Engineer in Charge. 

SANITARY DIVISION. 

12 Beacon Street. 

GEO. W. FORRISTALL, Deputy Superintendent. 

M. J. MURRAY, Chief Clerk. 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

PHILIP A. JACKSON, Deputy Superintendent. 

THOMAS MCLAUGHLIN, Chief Clerk. 

BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

JOHN A. MCLAUGHLIN. Deputy Superintendent. 

FREDERICK II. SPRING, Chief Clerk. 

CAMBRIDGE AND BOSTON BRIDGES. 

HENRY II. CARTER. Commissioner for Boston {ex of/icio). 
WILLIAM J. MARVIN, Commissioner for Cambridge. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 151 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street, 
Boston, February 1, 1893. 

H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir: In compliance with order conveyed in your letter of 
January 14, 1893, I respectfully submit herewith the following 
report of the acts and expenditures of the Bridge Division from 
February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893. For this period there was 
allotted, for the care, maintenance, etc., of the bridges, the sum of 
Si 25,000, which, by reason of necessary work on Charles-river and 
Essex-street bridges, was found to be insufficient to the amount of 
83,954.37. Thus the total sum expended by this division in the 
performance of regular work was $128,951.37. 

The total number of bridges in Boston, under supervision of 
this division, not including culverts, is (108) one hundred and 
eight; of this number seventy-three are supported wholly or in part 
by the city of Boston, and include twenty-two tidewater bridges, 
provided with draws. The increase of four bridges consists of 
two in Back Bay Park, L-street bridge at South Boston, and 
Allston bridge, over tracks of Boston and Albany Railroad at 
Cambridge street. 

Of the important tidewater bridges, all are equipped with steam 
power except Meridian and Dover streets, which continue horse- 
power ; Federal street, which is operated by electricity ; Maiden 
and Mt. Washington avenue, which ate moved by hand power. 
All other draws are operated by hand-power. The general condi- 
tion of these bridges is good, with two exceptions, notably 
Charles river and Chelsea street. 

The report contains a tabulated statement of the expenditures, 
and a description of work performed on each bridge, and the 
maintenance expenses of the two districts comprising the Bridge 
Division. 

Embodied in the report also are tables showing bridges sup- 
ported in part or wholly by the City of Boston, etc. ; widths of 
draw-openings ; widths of bridges, roadways, and sidewalks ; kind 
of pavement used ; number of draw openings made for navigation ; 
census of traffic taken in June of present year, as a comparison 
with that taken in April, 1891. 

The inland bridges have been carefully looked after, and spe- 
cial effort has been made to keep them clean and safe. They have 
been thoroughly swept each week, and scupper holes have been 
kept free and clear. 



152 City Document No. 34. 

The delivery of material in the different districts by those hav- 
ing contracts has been prompt and efficient, causing no delay for 
the proper performance of the work. 

Public Landing— Places. 

The following public landing places have been built by the city, 
and are maintained and controlled by the Street Department: 

Charles River Biidge. — Size, 40 X 60. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

Essex Street Bridge. — Size, 9 X 23. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

East Boston, Public Landing. — Dock and flats leased December 
10, 1892, from East Boston Dry Dock Company, at $200 per year. 
Size, 18 X 30. Being built. 

Commercial Wharf. — Docks and flats leased November 30, 
1891, from Commercial Wharf Corporation, at $1,000 per year. 
Float built by M. F. Sullivan; contract dated January 1, 1892. 
Size, 30 X 50. 

Federal-street Bridge, Public Landing. — Moored from city's 
property. Float built by M. F. Sullivan, October 26, 1892. 
Size, 20 X 35. 

Special Work. 

The report contains a description of work performed and ex- 
penditures on several bridges, money for which was provided by 
special appropriation. 

The total amount of money so expended and charged was 
$24,190.03. Of this sum $13,486.09 was paid to various persons, 
for work wdiich could not be performed by our own men. The 
balance, $10,703.94, was directly beneficial to our own mechanics, 
except a small portion used for the purchase of material for the 
work. 

Very respectfully yours, 

John A. McLaughlin, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Eegular Appropriation. 

Appropriation, 1892-93 $125,000 00 

Transferred from Central Office, December 22, 1892, 1,206 40 
Transferred from Cambridge bridges, December 22, 

1892 . . 1,500 75 

Transferred from Paving Division, January 28, 

1893 . . . . . . ." . 2,047 22 

Total . . ... . ... . $129,754 37 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



153 



Amount of expenditures charged to Bridge Divis- 
ion, February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893 
Transferred to Sanitary Division, January 13, 1893, 

Total 



1128,954 37 
800 00 

1129,754 37 



Expenditures. 

Administration. 



Office expenses : 
Advertising 

Printing 

Stationery and postage 

Office books 

Telephone . 

Binding reports . 

Sundries 



$19 75 
236 36 
85 83 
47 00 
120 00 
27 15 
17 00 



$553 09 

Salaries of Deputv Superintendent, Clerk, and Mes- 
senger 5,800 00 

Salary of Executive Engineer, 1-|4 months . . 317 78 
Salary of Clerk of Committee on Streets and 

Sewers, 11 weeks ...... 316 36 

Salaries of General Foreman and two District Fore- 
men 4,555 50 

Board of Deputy Superintendent's horse . . 366 00 
Travelling expenses of Deputy Superintendent and 

General Foreman ...... 60 00 

Amount expended, administration . . . $11,968 73 



Total, Regular Expenditures. 



Expenditures, administration 

"• on tide- water bridges 

" " " inland " . 

" North yard and stable 

" South " " kt " 



Total amount expended for the year, February 
1, 1892, to January 31, 1893 



511,968 73 

93,212 66 

10,012 92 

6,938 75 

6,821 31 



$128,954 37 



Income. 

The amount of bills for work done by this division, 
deposited with tlie City Collector during the year, 
was ......... 

Amount due on leases ...... 



H41 61 
375 00 



Total 



&516 61 



154 



City Document No. 34. 









TIDE-WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort Point channel) . 

Sheathed roadway and draw, repaired sidewalks, put 
in new stringers and floor, new hatch on draw, new 
oak headers, red-leaded underneath one coat, re- 
paired wheel guards, put in new lockers in draw- 
tender's quarters, painted engine-room, machinery, 
and chambers two coats, and varnished same, 
repaired engines and boat, and made repairs on 
water and waste pipes. 

Carpenters . . . . . $676 13 



Painters 
Lumber 

Nails and spikes 
Ironwork . 
Hardware . 
Paint stock 
Plumbing . 
Testing boiler, etc. 
Repairing boat . 



1,116 41 

549 71 

12 09 

1,366 96 

9 19 

222 46 

58 55 

26 72 

12 00 



Regular expenses : 




Draw- tenders 


. $5,697 50 


Substitutes 


181 75 


Coal .... 


201 20 


Gas ..... 


43 20 


AVater .... 


25 00 


Ice ..... 


6 00 


Sand .... 


2 63 


Small supplies . 


52 08 



Cambridge-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 
Sheathed bridge and repaired deck where defective, 

put in new flaps, repaired hoisting machinery, 

and painted fence. 



Carpenters 


$118 25 


Painters 


15 00 


Lumber . 


96 89 


Nails and spikes 


2 05 


Ironwork 


51 05 


Paint stock 


5 00 


Car fares 


2 90 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


$365 56 


Coal 


4 85 


Small supplies 


15 58 



• 1 14 



385 99 



1,050 22 



6,209 36 



677 13 



Car lied forward, 



.0,936 71 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



155 



Brought forward, 
Charles-river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town). 

Painted draw-tender's house inside one coat, 
sheathed draw twice, put in trucks nine times 
and repaired trucks eight times, new bunter, re- 
paired sidewalk, pier, and fence, repaired water- 
way by splicing piles and bracing, put in two 
new thirty-foot rails and repaired tracks and 
stringers, repaired engines and placed water- 
pipe under sidewalk. 



10,936 71 



Carpenters 


$1,080 


57 




Painters 


145 


00 




Lumber . 


26 1 


70 




Nails and spikes 


20 


50 




Ironwork 


1,406 


28 




Paint stock 


36 


75 




Plumbing 


54 


50 




Sand and brick 


20 


50 




Testing boiler 


13 


60 




Steel rails 


17 


95 


$3,057 35 








Regular expenses : 








Draw-tenders . 


$5,021 


25 




Substitute 


15 


00 




Coal 


469 


20 




Gas 


46 


02 




Water 


25 


00 




Cordage 


310 


97 




Ice 


6 


00 




New row-boat 


70 


00 




Small supplies 


80 


84 


6.044 28 



Chelsea bridge [North] (over North channel, 
Mystic river) . 

Sheathed draw and approaches twice, repaired deck 
where defective, put in new truck and bunter, re- 
paired tracks and engine-house, and varnished 
draw-tender's house inside. 



Carpenters 




$467 12 


Painters 




28 75 


Lumber . 




145 72 


Nails and spikes 




8 00 


Ironwork 




53 39 


Paint stock 




11 36 


Plumbing 




2 90 


Displacement of 


tide 




water . 




7 12 



V 



9,101 63 



$724 36 



Carried forward, 



$724 36 $20,038 34 



156 



City Document No. 34. 



V 



Brought forward, 
Regular expenses 
Draw -tenders 
Substitutes 
Coal 
Feed 
Gas 

Water . 
Furniture 
Ice 

New row-boat 
Horse-shoeing 
Small supplies 



$724 37 $20,038 34 



£3,358 


94 


329 


00 


159 


65 


41 


6y 


28 


36 


32 


50 


15 


50 


6 


00 


70 


00 


16 


26 


62 


06 



4,119 9Q 



4,844 32 



\ 



Chelsea bridge [South] (over South channel, 
Mystic river). 

Sheathed draw twice, rebuilt waterway and fender- 
guard on northeasterly side, repaired remaining 
portion, also piles, repaired engine-room, placed 
shop on pier taken from Warren bridge and 
painted same two coats, and made repairs on turn- 
table and machinery. 



Carpenters 


$1,165 13 


Painters 


71 25 


Lumber . 


554 84 


Nails and spikes 


28 70 


Ironwork 


329 66 


Hardware 


3 10 


Faint stock 


16 71 


Repairing fender-guard 


239 CO 


Moving shop . 


75 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


$3,926 52 


Substitutes 


72 50 


Coal 


270 05 


Feed 


20 05 


Gas 


27 71 


Water . 


60 00 


Furniture 


5 25 


Ice 


6 00 


Rubber packing- 


44 60 


New row-boat 


70 00 


Horse-shoeing 


7 00 


Small supplies 


86 23 



$2,483 39 



4,595 91 



7,079 30 



Carried forward, 



H,96l 96 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



157 



Brought forward, 

Chelsea-Street bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 
Sheathed bridge, repaired deck where defective, and 

gear under draw. 



i 1,961 ( ^G 



Carpenters 
Lumber . 
Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 
Car fares 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 
Small supplies 



$69 00 

189 91 

1 90 

4 83 

17 16 



$299 00 
2 60 



$282 80 



301 60 



Commercial Point or Tenean bridge (Dor- 
chester). 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender ....... 






584 40 



50 00 



Congress-Street bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 

Sheathed draw three times, new oak headers, re- 
paired straps on pier, also fence, repaired iron 
fence on draw, repaired boat, reset and repaired 
buoys three times, general repairs made on 
machiner} 7 , steam and service pipes, put in new 
water-closet, and painted draw-tender's house and 
fence one coat. 



Carpenters 


$466 30 


Painters 


35 00 


Lumber .... 


671 13 


Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 


14 70 
562 51 


Hardware 


27 75 


Paint stock 


15 74 


Plumbing 


204 05 


Resetting buoys 


4 55 50 


Repairing iron fence on 




draw .... 


278 00 


Repairing damage to ves- 
sel ... . 


16 50 


Repairing row-boat 
Testing boilers, etc. 


9 00 
34 85 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 


$5,661 15 


Substitutes 


65 70 



(2,791 03 






Carried forward, 



55,728 85 $2,791 03 $32,596 36 



158 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 


$5,728 85 


$2,791 03 


Coal 


847 00 




Water 


106 75 




Ice 


6 00 




Small supplies 


98 38 


6,284 98 







12,5^6 36 



DOTer-street bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 

Sheathed draws three times, repaired waterway, put 
in new oak headers, repaired trucks and placed 
the same under draws four times, general repairs 
made on water service and waste pipes. 



Carpenters 


$212 


64 




Painters . 


45 


75 




Lumber . 


55 


19 




Nails and spikes 


5 


23 




Ironwork 


1,200 


36 




Hardware 


24 


66 




Paint stock 


36 


24 




Plumbing 


54 


02 




New windows . 


11 


65 


$1,645 74 








Regular expenses : 








Draw-tenders . 


$4,486 


56 




Substitutes 


105 


00 




Coal 


20 


60 




Feed 


248 


65 




Gas 


43 


06 




Water 


15 


00 




Tan 


36 


00 




Ice 


6 


00 




Horse-shoeing 


29 


50 




Bay horse 


350 


00 




Horse-hire 


12 


00 




Repairing harness . 


18 


90 




Small supplies 


59 


60 


5 430 87 








KJ m Jt* * \J U J 



Essex-Street bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

Put in stringers and deck where defective, 
sheathed roadway and draw, put in new flaps, 
sheathed top of westerly pier, built foundation for 
draw- tender's house, which was moved here from 
Maiden bridge. 

Carpenters . . . $690 87 

Lumber .... 768 51 

Nails and spikes . . 56 55 

Ironwork . . . 17 65 



9,076 01 



7,076 61 



Carried forward, 



,533 58 



5,718 98 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



159 



Brought forward , $1,533 58 

Hardware ... 6 25 

Car fares ... 62 00 

Moving draw-tender's house, 200 00 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 
Substitute 
Coal 
Small supplies 



$,748 98 



-/■ 



5658 


32 


12 


66 


8 


18 


9 


90 



,801 83 



689 06 



2,490 89 



Federal-Street bridge (over Fort Point channel) , 
Sheathed draws twice, built division fence on 
north-easterly pier and floor to motor-house, 
repaired waterway, put in new wire cable for 
working draw, red-leaded underneath draws, 
trucks, and rails two coats. 



Carpenters 


$661 35 


Painters . 


67 50 


Lumber 


329 46 


Nails and spikes 


13 03 


Ironwork . 


563 20 


Hardware 


7 99 


Paint stock 


16 25 


Wire rope for draw . 


45 25 




$1,704 03 



Built new house for draw- 
tenders, and painted same 
inside and out two coats. 
Carpenters . $148 12 



Painters . 


200 


00 












Carpenters' bills, 


573 


75 












Lumber and 
















woodwork 


1,305 


50 












Nails 


54 


96 












Hardware . 


124 


99 










, 


Paint stock 


73 


09 










Plumbing . 


289 


27 










Y 


Sheathing-paper, 


25 


08 












Slater's bill 


253 


66 












Double iron chitn 


- 














ney-pipe 


68 


00 












New gas-service 
















pipe 


54 


05 












Sheet lead 


3 


44 












Plastering 


124 


62 


3,298 53 




















xxrd, 






$5 


002 


56 










Carried for u 


$5 


002 


56 


$51,239 87 



160 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought fonvard, 




Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


$5,754 61 


Substitutes 


705 00 


Coal 


45 85 


Gas 


3 60 


Water . 


5 00 


Furniture and bedding 


123 55 


Ice . 


6 00 


Small supplies 


99 77 



$5,002 56 $51,23'J 87 



6,743 38 

Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Sheathed roadway, put in new flaps, repaired fence, 
and painted top and underside of draw one coat. 



Carpenters 


$59 50 


Painters 


35 00 


Lumber ... 


74 57 


Kails and spikes 


1 95 


Ironwork 


3 55 


Hardware 


1 50 


Paint stock 


18 12 


Car fares 


8 10 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


$239 20 


Small supplies 


3 57 



$202 29 



242 77 

Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 
Built new pier for draw-tender's house, which 
was moved here from Federal-street bridge, and 
painted same inside and out, adjusted draw and 
repaired fence, put in new water- closet and water- 
service pipes, and repaired boat. 



Carpenters 




$343 50 


Painters . 


. 


152 50 


Lumber . 


. 


97 13 


N:dls and spikes 


. 


4 25 


Ironwork 


. 


7 45 


Hardware 


. 


2 18 


Paint stock 


. 


28 79 


Plumbing 


. 


42 77 


Car fares 




13 35 


Moving draw 


-tender's 




house . 


. 


200 00 


Repairing boat 


es : 


27 00 


Regular expens 




Draw-tenders . 




$2,591 94 



Carried forward, 



H8 92 



1,591 94 $918 92 



11,745 94 



445 06 



>:3,430 87 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



161 



Brought forward, 


$2,591 94 


$918 92 


Substitutes 


262 50 




Coal 


2G 05 




Gas 


11 86 




Water 


20 00 




Ice 


6 00 




Furniture and bedding 


58 25 




Small supplies 


31 92 


3,008 52 







§63,430 87 



Meridian-street bridge (from East Boston to 

Chelsea). 

Sheathed draw, painted draw-tender's house inside 
one coat, and put in new windows, repaired 
latches on road gates and machinery on draw, 
built new gates to pier, repaired stable and boat. 



3,927 44 



Carpenters 


$362 75 


Painters . 


74 50 


Lumber . . . . 


170 34 


Nails and spikes 


2 10 


Ironwork 


293 86 


Paint stock 


31 00 


Car fares 


20 40 


Ferry tickets . 


7 00 


Blinds and windows 


8 92 


Repairing boat 


21 75 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


$2,505 69 


Substitutes 


362 50 


Coal 


29 40 


Feed 


128 29 


Gas 


18 80 


Water . 


20 00 


Furniture 


10 50 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Horse-shoeing 


21 90 


Veterinary service . 


12 00 


Repairing harness . 


19 50 


Small supplies 


55 02 






$992 62 



3,189 60 



4,182 22 



Mt. Washington-avenue bridge (over Fort 
Point chaunel). 

Sheathed roadway twice, put in new oak headers, 
new water-closet in house, repaired waterways, 
new iron straps on pier, repaired guard, reset 
buoy twice, and painted draw-tender's house one 
coat. 

Carpenters . . . $511 27 



Carried forivard, 



$511 



•27 



$71,540 53 



162 



City Document No. 34. 



v 



Brought fomvard, 


$511 27 


Painters . 


63 75 


Lumber . 


345 22 


Nails and spikes 


8 25 


Ironwork 


145 31 


Hardware 


1 27 


Paint stock 


24 40 


Plumbing 


72 41 


Resetting buoys 


148 50 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


. $4,894 17 


Substitutes 


115 70 


Coal 


31 20 


Gas 


52 50 


Water . 


5 00 


Ice 


6 00 


Rent of land . 


60 00 


New row-boat 


70 00 


Small supplies 


59 15 



$71,540 53 



,320 38 



5,293 72 

Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy) . 
Sheathed roadway, put in new flaps, repaired water- 
way, and painted draw underneath two coats, 
upper side two coats. 



6,614 10 



Carpenters 
Painters . 
Lumber . 
Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 
Paint stock 
Car fares 

Regular expenses 
Draw-tender . 
Substitute 
Small supplies 



$105 

97 

179 

2 

43 

30 

6 



69 
50 
85 
44 
62 
33 
69 



84 
67 

87 



$466 12 



411 38 



877 50 



North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton to 

Watertown). 

Sheathed roadway and draw, put in new flaps, re- 

paired deck and fence where defective. 
Carpenters . $19 00 

Lumber . 
Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 
Car fares 



23 37 




1 48 




2 16 




3 20 






$49 21 





Carried forward, 



$49 21 $79,032 13 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



163 



Brought forward. 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 



21 $79,032 13 



74 88 



124 09 



North Harvard-street bridge (from Brighton 
to Cambridge). 

Sheathed roadway and repaired draw. 

Carpenters 

Lumber .... 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 
Small supplies . 



$47 


00 


3 


40 


2 


53 


7 


64 


$365 


56 




75 



57 



366 31 



426 88 



Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 
Sheathed both draws four times, repaired machin- 
ery, boilers, service and waste pipes, built shed 
for tools and oil tanks, also put in new wire 
cable on draw. 



Carpenters 


'$623 75 


Painters 


15 00 


Lumber 


873 37 


Nails and spik 


es . 22 50 


Ironwork 


523 57 


Paint stock 


5 01 


Plumbing 


58 70 


Wire rope for 


draw . 25 24 


Testing boiler 


13 60 


Mason work 


5 77 


Sheet lead 


18 16 


Repairing dan 


age to ves- 


sel 


96 72 


Regular exp 


enses : 


Draw-tenders . 


. $4,933 59 


Substitutes 


268 75 


Coal 


714 90 


Gas 


77 37 


Water . 


50 00 


Furniture 


5 25 


Ice 


6 00 


Two oil-tanks 


15 00 


Lubricating oi 


[ 15 75 


Small supplies 


93 36 



$2,281 39 



6,179 97 



Carried forward, 



8,461 36 
38,044 46 



164 



City Document No. 34. 









Brovght forward, 

Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 

Built shed, repaired house and work-shop, and 
shingled roofs of shed, house, and work-shop. 



1,044 46 



Carpenters 
Painters 


$121 00 

7 50 


Lumber . 


129 92 


Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 


3 15 
97 49 


Car fares 


2 40 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 


$365 56 


Coal 


. 4 85 


Repairing stove 
Small supplies 


3 30 

1 82 



II 46 



375 53 



Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown) . 

Repaired draw and flaps. 

Carpenters ... $4 00 

Ironwork . . . 12 50 

$16 50 

Regular expenses : 

Draw-tender ... $74 88 

Small supplies . . 4 81 



79 69 



Wintkrop bridge (from Breed's Island to 
Winthrop) . 

Sheathed i*oadway, repaired deck where defective, 
put in new iron wheel-guard, and painted fence 
one coat. 



Carpenters 


$124 75 


Painters . 


54 75 


Lumber . 


302 99 


Nails and spikes 


4 20 


Ironwork 


148 27 


Paint stock 


29 95 


Car fares 


9 84 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . . . 


. 



$674 75 



100 00 



736 99 



96 19 



774 75 



Carried forward, 



,652 39 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



1(35 



Brought forward, 
Sundry expenditures on tide-water bridges 
Mill work on bridges . $39 67 
Repairing row-boats . 28 53 " 
Spare trucks . . . 314 13 
Car fares, mechanics . 140 00 
Car fares, chief draw- 
tender. ... 20 00 



1,652 39 



Regular expenses : 






Chief draw-tender . 


. $1,570 


00 


Messenger 


797 


68 


Kay horse 


200 


00 


Red roan horse 


150 


00 


Concord wagon 


225 


00 


Repairing harness . 


11 


75 


Reins and weight 


5 


80 


Blanket . 


8 


50 


Clipping horse 


3 


00 


Framing rules 


28 


50 


Small supplies 


17 


71 



$542 33 



3,017 94 



Total expended on tide-water bridges 



3,560 27 
)3,212 66 



166 



City Document No. 34. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Tide-water Bridges for the Year, 
February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge-street 

Charles-river ... ..... 

Chelsea [North] ....... 

Chelsea [South] 

Chelsea-street 

Commercial-point ...... 

Congress-street 

Dover-street 

Essex-street 

Federal-street ........ 

Granite 

Maiden . . 

Meridian-street . 

Mt. Washington-avenue .... 

Neponset 

North Beacon-street 

North Harvard-street 

Warren 

Western-avenue (to Cambridge) 
Western-avenue (to Watertown) 
Winthrop 



Chief draw-tender, and sundry expendi- 
tures 



Totals 



Repairs, labor, 
lumber, iron- 
work, and 
painting. 



$4,050 22 
291 14 

3,057 35 
724 36 

2,483 39 
282 80 



2,791 03 
1,645 74 
1,801 83 
5,002 56 

202 29 

918 92 
. 992 62 
1,320 38 

466 12 

49 21 

60 57 

2,281 39 

361 46 
16 50 

674 75 

542 33 
30,016 96 



Regular ex- 
penses, sal. 
aries, fuel, and 
supplies. 


$6,209 36 


385 99 


6,044 28 


4,119 96 


4,595 91 


301 60 


50 00 


6,284 98 


5,430 87 


689 06 


6,743 38 


242 77 


3,008 52 


3,189 60 


5,293 72 


411 38 


74 88 


306 31 


6,179 97 


375 53 


79 69 


100 00 


3,017 94 


$63,195 70 



Total. 



$10,259 58 u 

677 13 ' 
9,101 63 
4,844 32 *■ 
7,079 30 

584 40 . 

50 00 

9,076 01 V 

7,076 61 V 

2,490 89 V 

11,745 94 - 

445 06]/ 
3,927 44 V 
4,182 22 
6,614 10 

877 50 

124 09 

426 88 
8,461 36 

736 99 
96 19 

774 75 

3,560 27 
$93,212 66 



■y 



J 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



167 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

Albany-street bridge (over Boston and Albany 
Railroad). 

Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $90 20 

Lumber . . . . . . Ill 62 

Nails 1 95 



Athens-street bridge (over New York and 
New England Railroad). 
Painted bridge two coats. Labor charged to 

Street Improvements, Ward 13. 
Faint stock ....... 

Beacon-street bridge (over outlet to Back Bay 
Fens). 
Red-leaded underneath two coats, and painted 

fence two coats. 

Painters $114 00 

Paint stock 18 05 



Beech-street bridge (over Stony Brook) . 
Built new structure. 

Carpenters . . . . . $13 

Lumber ...... 



00 



27 75 



Berkeley-street bridge (over Old Colony Rail- 
road, Providence Division). 

Sheathed roadway and repaired deck where defec- 
tive, and made repairs for water department as 
per plans, also painted the same. 

Carpenters . . . . . . $61 88 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails . 

Paint stock . 

Blakemore-street bridge (over Old Colony 
Railroad, Providence Division). 

Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters ....... $47 13 

Lumber 57 20 

Nails 1 90 



35 


00 


52 


03 


1 


48 


21 


99 



Boylston-avenue bridge (over Stony Brook). 
Sheathed roadway, built new sidewalk, and put in 

new stringers where defective. 

Carpenters $90 59 

Lumber . . . . . . 126 74 



$203 77 



14 48 



132 05 



40 75 



172 38 



106 23 



Carried forward, 



217 33 



$a(jd tw 



168 



City Document No. 34. 



V 



Brought forward, 
Nails 
Ironwork . 



BoyMoil-street bridge (over Boston & Albauy 
Railroad) . 

Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $76 97 

Lumber 130 51 

Nails 1 32 



5217 33 


$669 66 


2 10 




96 




_ 


220 39 



Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road ) . 

Put in new deck, calked the same, new sidewalks 
laid, roadway sheathed and ironwork red-leaded 
two coats, painted top of bridge two coats. 
Carpenters ..'... $535 87 

Painters . . . . . 830 50 

Lumber . . . . . ■ . 1,738 68 

Nails 27 45 

Paint stock 102 84 

Graving deck 102 50 



Brookline-aveiiue 

Albany Railroad). 


brie 


ge 


(over 


Boston 


& 


Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters 

Lumber 

Nails 


bridge 


(from 


Do 


$75 

104 

6 


38 
50 
30 


Central-avenue 

Milton). 
Sheathed roadway. 


rchester 


to 


Carpenters 
Lumber 

Nails 
Car fares 


• 


• 




• 


• 


$30 37 

91 71 

1 95 

3 24 



Colnmbus-avenne bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 

Sheathed roadways and painted all truss work 

and water box one coat. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 
Paint stock 



Carried forward, 



208 80 



3,337 84 



186 18 



127 27 



$40 51 

194 50 

118 25 

1 95 

37 29 


392 50 

$5,142 64 





Street Department — Bridge Division 



169 



Brought forward, 
Commonwealth-avenue bridge (over outlet 
to Back Bay Fens) . 

Bed-leaded underneath two coats, painted top work 
fence two coats. 

Carpenters $8 00 

Painters . . . . . . 150 00 

Paint stock 33 30 



55,142 64 



Cottage-Street [foot] bridge (from Jeffries 
Point to Wood Island). 

Moved watchman's house twice and repaired and 

painted house and fence. 
Carpenters 

Painters .... 
Lumber . 
Nails . 

Paint stock 
Car fares and tolls 
Watchman (permanently employ 
Substitute ... 

Furniture 

Coal .... 

New stove 

Dorchester-street bridge (over Old Colony 
Railroad, Central Division). 
Shenthed roadway and laid new sidewalk. 

Carpenters ..... $9 25 

Lumber 30 78 

Nails 1 51 



ed) 



$64 


25 


161 


75 


6 


66 


2 


10 


22 


55 


29 


28 


728 


00 


14 


00 


6 


50 


10 


10 


21 


50 



Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 

Sheathed roadway and painted fence and top of 

bridge two coats. 
Carpenters ... . $18 69 

Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 
Paint stock 

Franklin-street [foot] bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 

Built new stairs, painted underneath two coats, 

upper side one coat. 

Carpenters $128 00 

Painters ..... 84 75 

Lumber 65 31 



80 


75 


68 


50 


1 


48 


20 


41 



191 30 



1,066 69 



41 54 



189 83 



Carried forward, 



$278 06 



6,632 00 



170 City Document No. 34. 



v 



V 






Brought forward, 

Nails 

Ironwork ..... 
Paint stock .... 
Car fares .... 


er New 
(over B 

Boston, 
3 (over 


$278 06 

2 25 

9 85 

25 00 

12 48 


Gold-street [foot] bridge (ov 
New England Railroad). 
Repaired fence. 
Carpenters . 

Huntington-ayenue bridge 

Albany Railroad). 

Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters .... 
Lumber ..... 
Nails . . 


York & 

oston & 

$31 13 

73 23 

1 95 


Leyden-street bridge (over 

Beach & Lynn Railroad). 
Small repairs made. 
Carpenters .... 
Painters ..... 


Revere 

$2 50 
7 50 


Linden Park-street bridg< 

Brook) . 

Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters .... 
Lumber ..... 
Nails 


Stony 

$13 75 

48 28 

2 10 



Longwood-avenue bridge (from Roxbury to 
Brookline) . 

Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters ..... $35 55 

Lumber . . . . 82 26 

Nails 4 00 



Mattapan bridge ( from Dorchester to Milton) . 
Sheathed roadway and repaired sidewalk. 

Carpenters ..... $2 50 

Lumber 28 36 

Nails 74 



Milton bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Built new sidewalk. 

Carpenters ..... $26 07 

Lumber 78 90 

Nails 1 48 



$6,632 00 



327 64 



25 



106 31 



10 00 



64 13 



121 81 



31 60 



106 45 



Carried forward, $7,407 19 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



171 



Brought fortvard, 

Shawmut-avenne bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, painted underneath two coats, 

upper side two coats. 



$7,407 19 



Carpenters 


$58 44 


Painters 


116 25 


Lumber 


118 42 


Nails 


1 95 


Paint stock 


23 18 



Spring-street bridge (from West Roxbury 
Deduam). 

Built new fence. 

Carpenters ..... $63 

Lumber ...... 63 

Nails 3 

Ironwork ...... 5 



to 



00 
97 
75 
00 



West Chester-park 


bridge (over 


Boston & 


Albany Railroad). 






Shesthecl road 


vay. 






Carpenters 


. 


. 


$70 13 


Lumber 


. 


. 


126 94 


Nails 


. . 


. 


2 22 


Turpentine 


• 


. 


6 60 



West Chester-park bridge (over Old Colony 
Railroad, Providence Division). 

Repaired sheathing. 

Carpenters $41 59 

Lumber 86 77 

Nails 2 10 



Sundry expenditures on 
Labor, bridge-cleaners 
Labor, removing snow 
Sand for slippery walks 
Car fares, mechanics 



inland bridges : 








$1,261 


75 




. 


477 


17 




. . 


14 


00 




• 


62 


50 



V 



318 24 



135 72 



205 89 



130 46 



1,815 42 



Total expended on inland bridges 



$10,012 92 



172 



City Document No. 34. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Inland Bridges for the Year, 
February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893. 



Name of Bridge. 

Albany street 

Athens street 

Beacon street (over Outlet) 

Beech street .... 

Berkeley street (over Providence Division, Old Col 

ony Railroad) 
Blakemore street 
Boylston avenue 

Boylston street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Broadway (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Brookline avenue ..... 

Central avenue ..... 

Columbus avenue ..... 

Commonwealth avenue (over Outlet) 
Cottage street ..... 

Dorchester street ..... 

Ferdinand street ..... 

Franklin street ..... 

Gold street ...... 

Huntington avenue .... 

Leyden street ..... 

Linden Park street ..... 

Longwood avenue ..... 

Mattapan ...... 

Milton 

Shawmut avenue . . . 
Spring street . 
West Chester park 

road) . 
West Chester park 

Colony Railroad) 
Sundry expenditures 



(over Boston & Albany 
(over Providence Division 



Rail 



Old 



Repairs, Labor, 

Lumber, Ironwork, 

and Painting. 


$203 
14 


77 
48 


132 


05 


40 


75 


172 


38 


106 


23 


220 


39 


208 


80 


3,337 


84 


186 


18 


127 


27 


392 


50 


191 


30 


1,066 
41 


69 
54 


189 


83 


327 


64 


7 


25 


106 


31 


10 


00 


64 


13 


121 


81 


31 


60 


106 


45 


318 


24 


135 


72 



205 89 



v 
V 



130 

1,815 



46 
42 



Total 



$10,012 92 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



173 



REGULAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH AND 
SOUTH YARDS. 

North Yard, District No. 1. 



Warren 


Bridge. 


Messenger 079 7 68 


Watchman 






735 50 


Tools for carpenters . 






184 87 


Tools for painters 






22 00 


Telephone . 






146 85 


Coal 






\H 60 


Lanterns . 






18 00 


Shovels and ice chisels 






27 50 


Hose 






8 87 


Ice .... 






6 00 


Small supplies . 






35 68 



Built new house on the westerly pier, 
containing office, stable, and shop, 
fitted same with water, gas, and 
steam-heating apparatus, the steam 
being furnished from the draw- 
tender's house. 



$2,001 55 



Carpenters 


$753 


37 






Painters 


138 


00 






Lumber and woodwork . 


1,111 


82 






Nails and spikes 


32 


00 






Ironwork 


95 


68 






Hardware 


61 


58 






Paint stock 


62 


50 






Radiators and steam and 










gas fixtures 


275 


00 






Sheet lead 


20 


74 






Stable fixtures 


98 


69 






Sheathing-paper 


29 


13 


2,678 


51 




e, District '. 


Stabl 


So. 1. 




Teamster . 






$783 


75 


Hostler 






325 


50 


Feed 






391 


62 


Repairs on buggy 






167 


75 


Repairs on wagons 






84 


31 


Horse-shoeing . 






88 


12 


Harness and repairs . 






98 


10 


Supplies 






106 


54 


Carried forward, 


$2,045 


69 



$4,680 06 



$4,680 06 



174 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
New sleigh 
Use of vehicle . 
Clipping horses . 
Vegetable food . 



$2,045 69 

125 00 

16 00 

12 00 

60 00 



Amount expended, North Yard and Stable 



$4,680 06 



2,258 69 
56,938 75 



South Yard, District No. 2. 



Foundry Street. 



Messenger 

Yardman . 

Watchman 

Tools for carpenters 

Tools for painters 

Telephone 

Coal 

Lanterns . 

Shovels and ice-chisels 

Plumbing . 

Repairing jacks 

Ice . 

Small supplies . 

Repairing buildings 



8723 03 

490 00 

862 50 

138 47 

71 57 

120 00 

50 90 

33 65 

27 50 

52 20 

18 75 

6 00 

97 34 

60 32 



Stable, District No 



Teamster . 

Hostler 

Feed 

Repairs on wagons 

Horse-shoeing . 

Harness and repairs 

Supplies 

New sleigh 

Use of horse 

Clipping horses . 

Vegetable food . 

Heavy draught horse 

Heavy wagon 

New buggy 

Water 



. 2. 




$782 


50 


771 


00 


493 


59 


180 


34 


176 


25 


173 


15 


90 


25 


125 


00 


113 


00 


9 


00 


165 


00 


300 


00 


375 


00 


300 


00 


15 


00 



52,752 23 



4,069 08 



Amount expended, South Yard and Stable 



5,821 31 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



175 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Berkeley-street bridge (ovei 


• Boston & Albany 




Railroad). 










Building new iron biidge. 










Carpenters . 




$198 


19 




Painters .... 




96 


50 




Lumber . 




1,379 


09 




Nails and spikes 




42 


60 




Ironwork .... 




32 


57 




Paint stock 




143 


25 




Inspector .... 




220 


00 




Engineer's roll . 




292 


50 




Placing stone on bridge 




300 


00 




Removing old bridge 




350 


00 




Graving deck . 




76 


00 




Advertising (City Architect) 




22 


50 




Copying specifications 




4 


23 




Car fares 




4 


60 




Amount paid for work done b^ 


7 Pav 








ing Division 




2,675 


22 




Expended January 31, 1893 




. 


85,837 25 


Transferred to Boylston-street b 


ridge 


. . 


, 


1,200 00 


Transferred to Aldermanic Distr 


ict Nc 


>. 5 


. 


1,800 00 


Balance 








666 57 




$9,503 82 



Chelsea bridge, Steam Apparatus. 
Put in new motive-power for working the North 
and South draws, built 172 feet of fender guard 
on Chelsea [North], spliced piles and drove new 
ones as per City Engineer's plan, sheathed and 
covered machiuery, put in new truss, built new 
iron fence on Chelsea [South] draw, painted 
same two coats, and built new sidewalks. 



Carpenters 






. $1,194 00 


Painters 






59 00 


Lumber 


, 




437 15 


Ironwork . 


. 




985 08 


Engine work 






360 07 


Hardware and nails . 


, 




70 36 


Paint stock 


, 




20 26 


Plumbing 


, 




40 48 


Inspector 


. 




20 00 


Furnishing and driving 


oak 


piles 


i . 835 00 


It it t( 


ash 


1 1 


193 64 


Small sundries 


• 




16 51 



1,231 55 



176 



City Document No. 34. 



Maiden bridge, repairs. 

Rebuilt draw, drove piles and put in new founda- 
tion, new centre pinion, and necessary ironwork. 

Inspector ........ 

Contract with Josiah Shaw for work done and 
material furnished . . . . . ' . 

Cash paid by him for labor furnished . . 

Trucks and wheels ...... 

Turn-tables, suspension rods, ballast, etc., extra 
work ordered . . . . 

Advertising ........ 

Ironwork ........ 

Amount expended ..... 

Appropriation ....... 

Furnished from appropriation, Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 2 . 



>2 50 



3,650 
192 
165 


00 
60 
00 


1,374 

27 
8 


88 
95 
03 


$5,710 


96 


$4,000 00 


1,710 


96 


$5,710 


96 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 13. 

Athens-street bridge (over New York & New 
England Railroad). 
Rebuilt all woodwork, new deck, sidewalks, and 

fence, all ironwork scraped and cleaned, and 

painted bridge two coats. (Paint stock used 

taken from yard ) 

Carpenters $169 10 

Painters 43 75 

Lumber 232 97 

Nails, spikes, etc. .... 5 25 



Broadway bridge (over Fort Point channel). 
Foundry- street span. 
Put in new beams, new deck, calked the same, and 

new sheathing laid, and red-leaded ironwork 

underneath two coats, also laid new concrete 

sidewalks. 
Carpenters ..... $656 47 

Painters ....... 77 50 

Lumber ...... 1,276 21 

Nails and spikes .... 40 80 

Ironwork . . . . . . 17 89 

Paint stock 203 59 

Calking and graving . . . 222 50 

Laid new concrete sidewalks . . 1,184 95 



L51 07 



Carried forward, 



3,679 91 
54,130 98 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



177 



Brought forward, 

Dover-Street bridge (over Fort Point channel) . 
Built new fence, stringers, deck, and sidewalk, 

painted fence two coats, and laid new concrete 

sidewalks. 
Carpenters . . . . . $642 84 

Painters 109 25 

Lumber . . . 710 13 

Ironwork . . . . . . 4 15 

Paint stock 78 00 

Laid new concrete sidewalk . . 316 80 

Mt. Washingtou-avenue bridge (over Fort 

Point cbanuel). 

Put in new stringers, and laid under-deck for side- 
walks, South Boston end, rebuilt fence and 
painted same, also laid new concrete sidewalks. 



1,130 98 



Carpenters 


$653 86 


Painters .... 


25 00 


Lumber .... 


770 34 


Nails and spikes 


4 25 


Ironwork .... 


55 45 


Laid new concrete walks 


401 50 



1,861 17 



1,910 40 



Amount expended b}- Bridge Division, and charged 
to Street Improvements, Ward 13 

Essex-street bridge. 
Labor performed b} r carpenters on Essex-street 
bridge ........ 

For description of work done and material used, 
see regular appropriation. 

Above amount charged to Street Improvements, 
Aldermanic District No.- 11. 

North Ferry avenue (East Boston). 

Repairing sidewalk on North Ferry avenue, East 

Boston. 
Carpenters. ..... $30 50 

Lumber . . .... 9 20 



Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic 
District No. 1. 



',902 55 



$468 02 



!9 70 



178 City Document No. 34. 

LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 
I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

In the list those marked with an asterisk are over navigable 
waters, and are each provided with a draw. 

Agassiz road, in Back Bay Fens. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street. 

Ashland street, Ward 28, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Athens street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Beacon entrance, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence Division. 
Blakemore street, over Old Colon y Railroad, Providence Division, 

Ward 23. 
Bolton street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Boylston street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
*Broadway, over Fort Point Channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 
*Chelsea (South), over South Channel, Mystic river. 
*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Alban}' Railroad. 
*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Ward 24. 
Commonwealth avenue, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
*Congress street, over Fort Point Channel. 
Cornwall street, over Stony Brook, Ward 23. 
Cottage-street foot-bridge, from Jeffries Point to Wood Island. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany, and Providence Division 

of Old Colony Railroad. 
*Dover street, over Fort Point Channel. 
*Federal street, over Fort Point Channel. 
Fen, Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Franklin-street foot-bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Gold-street foot-bridge, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Irvingtou-street foot-bridge, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
*L street, over Reserved Channel at junction of Congress and L 

streets. 
Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Linden Park street, over Stony Brook. 
*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 
*Meridiau street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort Poiut Channel. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 179 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Shawm ut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony Brook, Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Swett street, we,st of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

*Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Chester park, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

West Chester park, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
West Newton street, over Old Colony Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
West Rutland square foot-bridge, over Old Colony Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part within its 

Limits. 

*Cambriclge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
*Granite, from Dorchester, Ward 24, to Milton. 
Longwood avenue, from Ward 22 to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
Milton, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Ward 24 to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Rosbury to Dedham. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the Cost of 

Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Dorchester street, over Old Colony Railroad, Central Division. 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

The last four bridges are in the care of two Commissioners, 
one of whom is appointed by the City of Cambridge and the other 
by the City of Boston. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st . — Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton. 
Harrison avenue. 



180 City Document No. 34. 

Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — New York & New England Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue. 
Harvard street, Ward 24. 
Morton " " 

Norfolk " " 

Norfolk " " 

Silver street. 

Washington street, Ward 24. 
West Broadway. 
West Fifth street. 
West Fourth street. 
West Second street. 
West Sixth street. 
West Third street. 

6lh. — Old Colony Railroad, Central Division. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Freeport street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — Old Colony Railroad, Providence Division. 

Beech street, Ward 23. 

Bellevue street, Ward 23. 

Canterbuiy street, Ward 23. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, Ward 23. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, Ward 23. 

Dudley avenue, Ward 23. 

Park street, Ward 23. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 181 



Recapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston ... 53 
II. Number of which Boston supports the part within its 

limits 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost of 

maintenance ....... 6 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany 5 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Div. ... 2 

3. " " Western Div. ... 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn ... 1 

5. New York & New England . . . . 13 

6. Old Colony, Central Div 5 

7. " " Providence Div. ... 7 

Total number .108 

The existing regulations for the passage of vessels through 
drawbridges have been posted on the several bridges, as required 
by law. 

The records of the number of draw-openings, vessels passing 
through the bridges, time of passage, kind of vessels, number 
laden with cargo, etc., as kept by the draw-tenders of the several 
bridges, have been tabulated, and the totals are given in the 
summary which will be found in Appendices Al and A6. 

A list of widths of openings for vessels in all bridges provided 
with draws in the city, measurements being furnished by the City 
Engineer, will be found in Appendix A2. 

Appendix A3 is a table, also made by the City Engineer, 
showing widths of bridges, kind of roadways, sidewalks, etc. 

A list of culverts and small bridges will be found in Appendix 
A4. 

Appendix A5 contains a tabulated statement of traffic. 



182 



City Document No. 34. 



XI 
i— i 

Q 

pm 

Pm 





c 

OS 

C 
c 





o> 




fl 




hj 




^ 




£ 




•d 




0> 








i— i 




2$ 




+s OS 




a cc 




O H 




« 


C/J 




H 


05 H 


« 




O 
P-i 

PS 




<JJ 


ft o 


w 


4) . 


Q 


£ <M 


fc 


^OS 


w 


A CC 


H 


6lH 


i 


S - 


£ 


O H 


«i 


£ >» 


PS 


* $ 


ft 


bo s 




C 'H 




£ <D 

e8 & 




A 



o 

0) 

= 







«»-l 


H 




CM 


OS 

o 




co 

OS 


CD 
CO 




■* 


cc 


OS 

co 


CO 


"3 ° 






t- 


i> 


CS 


co 






CN 


t^ 


CO 






bjD 






















o 6 






rjn 




»o 


CO 


CO 






CO 


co 




Eh^O 


"* 




























CM 




as 


CO 


ITS 


co 




co 


OS 


CO 


a c 






CM 


o 


t- 


CD 


TH 






tH 


o 


o 


t* 


o 


QC 


CM 


co 


co 


o 






l>; 


in 


CM 


r° 6 




o 






c4 










co' 






^1 


O 


M 






























co 


CO 


CD 




■+ 


^ 


IO 


CO 










CO 


CO 


n 


IO 


CO 


IO 




r- 




IO 


go 




C3 


-* 


<M 


■o 


CO 


o 






CD 


CC 


CM 


Hi 




























O 


IO 




t^ 


TP 


IO 








-31 






H 
















1—1 










IO 


co 


IO 


CO 


o> 






O 


■O 


C3 


i> 






o 


C2 


t~ 


^H 


co 








o 


00 




>»-ffl 


IO 




o 


"* 


CO 






CO 


CN 




6 




PQ.S 


,-h' 




cs 










CO 






fc 

j 




fc 


























CD 


o 


X 


co 


CM 


•* 


■* 


o 




CM 


<i 






"O 


-* 




o 


"* 


IO 




co 




CO 


H 




£^ 


OS 




cc 


tH 


CO 






CO 


5 




O 
EH 


























«fi 


CO 


" 


.- 


■* 


^ - 






CN 


co 










CO 


OS 


o 


m 


CD 


-» 


Tl- 


■* 


■* 


t^ 








C-5 


CD 




o 


00 






co 


m 


CO 






C3 


co 


CM 


5 


CN 


C72 






cc 


iG 


CM 


QQ 




O 

Eh 






CM 


1-1 








CN 








■* 


m 


Jl 


t^ 


CM 






03 


CD 


o 


W 






m 


co 


CO 










o 


Tj 


"* 


H 










IO 










CC 






O 




























£ 


























cn 


■** 


CI 


oc 


-* 


Tt 


"* 


IO 


"* 


t^ 


<! 




*t 


t^ 


CO 


l> 


cc 


l> 






CN 


c 


•* 




•* 


CM 


— 


o 


oc 






CN 


"* 


CN1 




































""H 








CM 












OJ 


co 


-f 


en 


CO 


CO 




1^ 


iO 


■* 








o 


CO 


1- 


Oi 


CM 


CO 




■* 


c 


o 






« 


l^ 


1>- 


cc 


00 


05 






CD 


IO 


t^ 
































O 

Eh 


7-1 




CN 


CM 


CM 






t^ 










© 


CM 


r^ 


CO 


l> 






c 


cc 


■* 


QQ 






-* 


IO 


co 


IC 


CC 






CO 


CO 


■* 


BJ 




M? n 


CM 




cc 


CM 








■* 


CN 




P 




m.l D 






















H 




|Z3 


























cr 




t^ cc 


CC 


cc 




t^ o~ 


o 








co 


co 




■* 


cc 


CO 


" 




CO CD 






rf 


co 


c - 


cc 


l> 






CN 


o 


CO 


































CN 


CN 


CM 






cc 












cc 


CD 


o 


t> 


1-^ 


Tf 




cc 


t-- 1^ 










CO 


o 




CO 






cr. 


IO 


■* 






C3 




CM 


-J~- 


» 


c 






X 


IC 


CM 


GO 
























' 




O 

Eh 


CC 




CN 










-t 


CN 






r^ 




1^ 


-* 


cc 








oc 


o 






c 




JZ 


t> 


oc 






cc 


CN 




as 

3 




«f 






-C 












OC 








IO 


c- 


co 


r— 


^ 




lO 


a- 


CM 




«i 




CM 




■*] 


■ ir; 








CN 


■* 


5 

02 




c 


CM 


c- 


cc 


o- 






!>. I 




CN 














CO 


i— 










oc 




~ 


ICC 


>n 






oc 


c 


CO 












CN 


co 


cc 






o- 




r-H 






C3 
















CN 




































O 






















DQ 




Eh 






















B 






TJ> 




cc 


-* 


Tf 






IO 


— 
























o- 








P3.2f 






















H 
DQ 




fc 
























-* 




cc 


I— 








cc 


a 


CO 












cc 


cc 






c 

CN 








W 


























as 


























n 




















































a 


























ffl 






"S 








1 


P 










Cb 






03 






£ 




'c 










o 














-£ 


P; 


4, 








H 






03 




5 


c 














- 




R 

| 

c 
C 




_> 






eS 


*0 

'Z 
a 




a 


0) 

O 








1 


c 
r 


0. 


a. 


a. 


c 

E 




a a 
> 


y. 










c3 






^= 




c 


c 


c 










(K 


Q 


c 


c 


c 


C 


C 


c 


C 


« 



Steeet Depaetment — Beidge Division. 



183 



CO <£> i-i 



Ph o 



i-i (M CO 



l-H 1Q 00 



O l-l 1-H 






— — s -S 



a v « a 



g S }zj • Jz; £ 



o 


d 










o 


>> 




£> 


"5 "S 




o 


S3 
O 


o 




a 






o 


O 


Ch 








- 


M 



to u 

§■3 



184 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A 2. 



Table showing 1 the Widths of Openings for Vessels in all 
Bridges provided with Draws, in the City of Boston, 
January* 1893. 



Name of Bridge. 



Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern Divis- 
ion 

Boston & Maine R.R.,EasternDivis- 
ion 

Boston & Maine R.R. (freight), 
Southern Division 

Boston & Maine R.R. (passenger) , 
Southern Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., Western Di- 
vision 

Boston & Maine R.R., Western Di- 
vision 

Broadway 

Cambridge st 

Canal (or Craigie's) 

Charles river 

Chelsea (south channel) 

Chelsea (north channel) 

Chelsea st. (East Boston side) . . . 

" " (Chelsea side) 

Commercial point (or Tenean) . . 

Congress st. (Boston side) .... 

" " (South Boston side) . 

Dover st 

Essex st. . . . 

Federal st 

FitchburgR.R 

" " (for teaming freights) 



Location. 



Boston to Charlestown . 
Over Miller's river . . 
Boston to East Cambridge 

<< (( (< it 

Boston to Charlestown . 

Over Miller's river . . 
Over Fort Point channel, 
Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Boston to East Cambridge 
Boston to Charlestown . 
Charlestown to Chelsea, 

East Boston to Chelsea . 



Ward 24 

Over Fort Point channel, 



Ward 25 to Cambridge 
Over Fort Point channel, 
Boston to Charlestown 



SO 



Width. 



35 feet 10 inches. 



1 36 < 



10 
8 

10 

5 

9 
3 
3 

10 


10 

10 
1 
3 

3 

11 



10 


11 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 185 

Table showing - Width of Opening's, etc. — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 


o Si 


Width. 


Grand Junction R.R. . . . . . 


Ward 25 to Cambridge . 


1 


35 feet 10 inches. 


" 


East Boston to Chelsea . 


1 


34 


« 6 « 




Ward 24 to Milton . . . 
Boston to Cambridge . 


1 
2 


36 
36 


" o " 




« 8 " 


" (Cambridge side) .... 


" " 




36 


" 8 " 




Over Reserved channel, 










South Boston . . . 


1 


40 


« « 


Maiden 


Charlestown to Everett . 
East Boston to Chelsea . 


1 
2 


43 
59 


<< 4 « 


Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 


" 2 " 


" " (Chelsea side) .... 


" " " . 




59 


» " 


Mt. Washington ave. (Boston side) . 


Over Fort Point channel, 


2 


42 


" 1 " 


" " " (South Boston 
side) . . . 


u u « «< 


. . 


42 


<< 4 << 




Ward 24 to Quincy . . 


1 


36 


« o " 


New York & New England R.R. 












Over Fort Point channel, 


2 


41 


» " 


New York & New England R.R. 












(( << it a 




40 


" 5 " 


New York & New England R.R. . . 


Over South Bay .... 


1 


28 


" 4 " 




Ward 25 to Watertown . 
Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Over Fort Point channel, 


1 
1 

1 


30 
36 
36 


" 2 " 




« « 


Old Colony R.R 


" " 


« « « 


Ward 24 to Quincy . . 
Charlestown to Cam- 


1 


36 


" " 














1 


36 


" " 


Warren 


Boston to Charlestown . 
Boston to Cambridge . . 


1 

2 


36 
35 


" 3 " 


West Boston (Boston side) .... 


" 8 " 


" " (Cambridge side) . . 


M U 




36 


« « 


Western ave 


Ward 25 to Cambridge . 
Ward 25 to Watertown . 


1 
1 


36 
36 


" " 


" 


" " 







186 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A3. 



Table showing Width of Bridges, Kind of Roadways, Sidewalks., 
etc., on Tide- water Bridges, January 28, 1893. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Canal 

Charles river , 

Chelsea, North 

" South 

" street 

Commercial Point ..... 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

Harvard 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington avenue . . 

Neponset 

North Beacon street . . . . 
North Harvard street . . . 

Prison Point 

Warren 

W. avenue to Cambridge . 
" " " Watertown . 

Winthrop 

West Boston 



Ft. In. 
60 
40 
64 
50 

49 

50 

30 2 
about 

34 

60 

59 

31 
69 
30 2 
69 4 

60 
40 
50 

61 

30 

31 
28 2 
50 
80 
33 2 
33 
24 2 
50 



BOADWAY. 



Ft. In. 
40 

33 2 

48 
30 2 
40 

43 

24 
about 
37 

44 
43 

22 8 

49 

24 4 
51 

34 
32 
36 
39 6 

23 10 

25 2 

26 7 
36 
60 
26 3 

24 2 
1910 
36 



Kind of 
Boaclwav. 



Plank 



Paved 



Plank 

Paved 

Plank 
Paved 
Plank 

Paved 



Plank . 



( " par 
I Paved 

Paved . 
Plank . 



Paved 



part 



Sidewalks. 



Ft. In. 
10 
6 
8 
8 
8 

6 6 
5 6 

8 

8 

7 6 
10 

5 

9 2 

8 
7 
7 

10 9 
5 5 

5 

7 
10 

6 

8 
3 7 

7 



Kind of walks. 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 

Brick. 

it 

Coal-tar concrete . 
Plank. 

Coal-tar concrete. 

fPart " ) 

{ Part plank. J 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal-tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



187 



w 
<0 

to 

U § 

fflB 
_ >> 

a™ 



* -a 
cp * 

73 -r 1 






o bD 


c 


: "-: 


c 




G 


o 


c 




o 




^ 


c 






a . 


lO 


ro 


CD 


CM 






ici 


































" CO J*i 






























IB O 






























QO 






























si 






























s 


























































































CO 






























> 

o 
O 


a 


co 


a. 




c 


o 


1 




CJ 




a 


03 


^c 


c 






c 


C 






c 




c 








o 


c 


o 


E 


c 


c 


3 


C 


c 


o 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 




a 


02 


DC 


£ 


5 


02 


a 


f> 02 


£ 


a 


tfl ?> 


^ 






A 






























o 




























































oi 


























GO 




03 
























































zi 
if 




o 






























c. 
























03 




o 


a 


























a 


3 


o. 


ffi 


a. 


o 


a. 


1 


03 


a 


a. 


a 


a 


CJ 


m 


c 






c 






c 


H 


c 


C 




c 


a 




c 


o 


5 


c 


c 


o 


5 


c 


O 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 






Q 








+2 




















a 


ac 


oc 


a: 


02 


6c 


a 


CO 


ac 


OC 


a 


a 


CO 






























































bc"s 


t~ 


no 


>c 


«; 


c 


o 


c 


cr 


o 


c 


c 


1C 


c 


o 


cofc 


it: 


co 


CN 


i> 


if; 


JO 


co 


co 


co 


ir: 


Tf 


CN 


cc 


CO 
























CN 






i-3 






























eight of 
pening. 
Feet. 


c 


o 


c 


it: 


c 


© 


c 


c 


CO 


c 


iC 


CO c 


ICO 


■<* 


od 
13 


Tt 


>r: 


co 


co 


-* 


iC 


oi 


Tf 


Cs 


I— 


t^ Ol 


ao 




03 












































t^ 






IC 








c 


© 


o 


CC 


c 


© 


c 


c 


CO 


c 


IG 


t-- 


o 


? ** 


IC 


Oi 


t^ » 


co 


CO 


it: 


IC 


c<i 


-* 




CN 


a- 


id 


£^ 




CJ 

55 






































K 






























s 






h 
























hO 






g 
























y, 






^ 
























o 






X 


> 






















Ph 






o 


















> 


■> > 










Pn 


_S 















































y 


► 


> 


■> ^ 




> 


1 o 

> 


c 

Pi 

















c 


c 


„E 


















^ - 

o 

o 

o 


5 

<L 

£ 

P. 
<♦- 

c 


1 
o 
Ph 

a 

o 
O 


P 

a. 

a 
a 


pi 

a. 

c 

c 


1 
« 
a 

; £ 

a 

c, 

a 

c 


- 6 

? 

CJ 
CO 


i 

j, 

c 
C 

c 


c 

p: 

a 

A! 


o" 

a 

CO 

s> 

cS 

C3 
CO 
ft 

O 

03 




a 

E 
01 
> 

C 
03 

B 


> 

C 

Ph 
a 

"3 
o 

Ph 

S 

03 

a 




c 
J 

- 


c 

c 


03 

c 
c 
< 


> 

6 
Ph 

oi 




c 

a 


o 


e 

c 


1 




c 


o 
o 


a 


c 
c 

pi 

a 


o 

ft 

ft 
o 


«1 

d 

0) 

a 


a 




a 
E 


03 

a 

03 






co 




CD 


a. 


a) 


C 










CO 


03 




a 


o 






a. 


CD 








-*j 




t> 




r3 




0. 














a 


CO 


03 


03 


CO 


a 1 
















a 


9 


CO 


03 









d 

o 

93 




V 




t; 




c 


a 


0! 




1 


1 


en 


1 


£ 




£ 


o 
















A 


^2 






3 






-2 




JW 


E 


JS 


a 


CJ 


<u 


CJ 


$~ 




ci 








,a 


c. 


it 


03 


03 






o 




"B 


.3 


< 


< 


"7 








oj 


03 


03 






CO 




< 


J 


* 


* 


< 


<j 


PC 


P 


w 


pq 


pa 


pq 


PP 


* 



188 



City Document No. 34. 



O &0 
a . 




10 
CN 


o c 


o 


lO © © O O l£0 


~ 


o 


c 


un 


o 




^ 


GO -st 


co 


oc 


co o ■* in ^* 


cc 


oi 


CN 


CM 


tP 


■S 0,« 


































srgki 


































q3 








































_-: 




























































hi 






3 

o 


































































































3 
> 


































o 


,y 03 


•"3 o 


03 0) o u o o 





03 


0. 





0) 


o 


o a 


o e 


a 


a a a a a a 








p 


3 




•- o 


o c 


o 


o o o o o o 


c 


3 


c 


c 


O 




,-£ H- 5 


^ co co 


■*J ^-1 +J -t-3 *. 












CQ CO 


CO CO CO CO CO 32 


CO CO 


co co co 


en 


"3 
3 






























^ 


r o 






























(f 


-3 

03 






"p 








^3 
p 












-a 

03 


i 






3 








cl 












3 




3 o 




' c 


a) 


a 


a) © a) © oj 


03 03 


03 03 O 


CO 


s ' c 


c 


> c 






a a a a a 


a a 


a a a 




o 




> c 


o 


c 


o o o o o 


o o 


o o o 








& 


H- 








+J +J 






Q co 


u 


! 'CO 


a 


co co co co co 


CO CO 


co co co 


tt,1§ 


t-- o 




c 


CN 


c 


o <= 


o o o 




o 


lO O o 




■* U2 


IT 


^ 


"* 


■ - 


IQ iO ITS CO 


cS 


CD CO lO 


































' 
































c<-l . 


































O bo 


© o 


c 


c 


© 


1C 


C 


c 


c 


c 


iO 


iC 


o 


c 


IC 


co 

(DO 




cc co 


« 


cc 


"ft 


c^ 


-si 


« 


rt 


cr 


c<5 


■^ 


CO 


Cv 


cr 


TjJ 


03 Q<^ 


<3 






























so 


C5 






















































t^ 








=s Sc 


© Id 


c 


c 


o 


ir: 


c 


It: 


cr 


IC 


ITS 


cr 


io 


c 


ic 


O 


t~- CO 


cc 


cn 


© 


o 


** 


CN 


Tf 




od 


CM 


ca 


CO 


co 


■* 




,a 
o 






' ' 


























cc 


































a> 








































h 








































































a 




























fc> 


-s 






y. 
o 
Ph 




























,c 


a 
o 


c 


















3 












>> 
c 


z 

o 

8 

■8 

pq 

^ o 
1 


: 


> 




> 






> 


1 > 
















o 

EH 

o 
o 


t/ 

a 



a 

e 
c 

a 

c 

rr 

« 


0. 

9- 
a 

c 

or 

a 


D X! 
. J 

c 

1 
% 

5 

03 

a 


0) 

a 
3 

03 
l> 

c« 

o 

o 

& 

& 

c3 

03 


c 
p: 

a 

5 

- 
z 
Ph 

B 

a 


Jc 
1« 

c 
p: 

cr 

a. 

b. 

.E 
cc 

e 


c 
pi 

a 

5 


c 

PB 
a 

.5 

i 
% 


1 

c 
P= 

0. 

I 
■ s 


g 

K 

03 

o 

3 

a 


c 

Pi 

a 

'o 

o 

c 


o 
, P. 

03 

.2 

bp 

s 


c 
6 
PC 

Pi 
pi 

3 

03 


c 

„ 2 
.b 

PC 

Z 
c 
p 

PC 

CH 

o 
c 




) 

a 

# b 
PC 

c 

c 

<s 

Ph 


) 




"a 


oT 


a 


0) 

co 


03 


a 


03 

a 


03 

a 


+3 


ci 


3 


fe 


cd 

0) 


P 


.a 


j o 




j. 


3 


3 




£ 


^ 










o 


■ 


a 


^J 


^j 


In 







03 


a; 

09 


> 


> h 




03 


03 
03 


03 
03 


a 

03 


03 
03 


3 

03 


03 
03 


03 

03 


03 
03 


03 




c 


d 





p 


3 


c 


"Jj 


-C 


•+j 


-2 


-^ 


a 


_5h 


OQ 


CO 


fc 






o 


c 




rp 


pC 


03 


03 


0) 


a 


03 


,£ 


m 


+; 


7Z 


ra 






2 


,£ 


a 


3 


3 














(*■. 




03 

a 


03 

a 




c 


bp 


& 


5 "3 


"3 


3 


c 


e 


c 


3 


"g 




03 


O 




PC 
* 






ni 


cS 


oj 


03 


03 


03 


0) 


s 


3 


O 


t» 


oe 


cS 




w 


pq 


a 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


O 


H 


Ph 


Ph 





Street Department — Bridge Division. 



189 



i-l i-H CO CO 



ca © © o 

h o oi ^ 






xi co m 



x> pa ^ an 



XlJlXliD.-X101XlXlXlXltAX> 



£ (S 






ui ai xi ui cc xi 



"3 a 









§ ti 



£ J « 



o ci 



"2 S3 J= <S 



> pa -? 

!> M be 



_^ O " *<H 



pa « ~ 



-a r^ te 



a ts -is 






£ ■" iS -C O 



^ hj ^ ^ ^ ^J 



.- a — o 



— s u 



*r P 



r, ~ "• B ,2 






O <u 



X, ^ 



190 



City Document No. 34. 



=4-1 ■ 

C be- 



p3 



fe £ 



CO CO CO CO 



^ to 02 M M ^ ^ 



•P-l 

ffl 



OS 

= 

-a 



= 

o 



CO CO CO 02 



43 .£ .£ >~» -2 43 l> " 43 +5 K. 

cococo!>cocoOQcoc04> 



be « 






5 « 






PH fl 



rt P3 tf 



oj ^3 /a 






fl g «" 

5 * r3 



M -o 



K 13 



fl ^r 



~ a. ft 



SzjOP-IPhPhP-iPhP-iPhPhPh 



a s a> 



co co co 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



191 



CO CO CO CO Tf CO 



co co co 



d d c 

-2 -2 ^ C 

CO CO t& 



co co co 



"5 a a 



co co t-i co co co 



I I >> 



£ b 



tf 5 



« S 



s a. a 



■S 5J *> 



"3 Pi 



W -p 



-»- ■»- <u 



rd '2 J 



o - - 



192 



City Document No. 34, 



12 "^ 



c5 CC 



pq 



^ g 



«l 


a 

GO 




F— 1 


w 


H 


1— 1 


cti 


A 


T 


^5 


•(-) 


W 


c 


Ph 


> 


Ph 


s 


^ 


u 

5H 



o bo 


ip 


c 


in 


ip 


in 


lO 


w 


C 


o 


c 


ir: 


ICt 


IC 


CN 






CM 


<M 


i- 




I— I 




c< 


c< 


c< 


CN 


<> 




I— 1 


-d'STS 




























































g-g^H 






























DO 






























&b 






























a 




























































cu 






























o 
O 




a, 


0. 


a 


<L 


a> 


a 


a. 


<L 


a. 




0. 


^ 




P 


p 


P 


p 




a 


P 


p 


P 


p 


CL 


p 


fl 












© 




c 


C 


c 








































co 


ct 


Ct 


ot 


a. 


co 


a. 


a. 


CO 


a 


P- 


0L 


PC 


co 




























































































c« 






























£ 


• 






























































a 


a 


a 


(U 


a 


a. 


a. 


a. 




a 


a: 


a> 


CO 




p 






p 


a 


P 


p 


p 


p 


a 


p 


p 


a 








c 


c 








c 


c 


c 


a 






































a: 


a 


u. 


a. 


CO CO 


0!. 


<x 


CO 


a 


P- 


c/. 


cc 


co 


■2 • 






























ia 


>ct 




c 


C 


© 


CN 


c 


K 


c 


c 




■* 


o 


3^ 


oc 


^h 


■* 


rt 


sc 


CO 


t-- -<t 


t^ Tt 


Tt- 


■* 


>* 


■* 


^ 






























O &JD 




CN 


CN 




<M 




CN 


ff 


c- 










^ 


Tj 


Tf 


■* -^ 


OS 


O Tt 






O •ri 






■<* 


-* 


co co co ■* 


113 K 


co co i- 


o: 


t^ lO 


.5, D S£ 




























































WO 






























s^ 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


»o 


C 


c 


c 


lO IP 


c 


c 


o 


IP 


IP 


T* 


Tt 


Ti 


•* 




K 


Ti 


« 


r— 


n 


<x 


lO 
















1C 
































H 
















K 








a 


■ 






« 












O 

M 

H 

o 


K £ 


a. 

P 

a 
> 


fl 




~c7 

p 


?, 


<L 




P 

pq 

XI 

o 






0. 


g 
W 

St 


0) 


O 
Hi 


> 
5 






> 


bo 

a 

S 


P 

£ 


a. 
a. 

p 


CO y 


b 

_p 

p 
a 


-1 

f5 


1 

t 

.s 

rP 


Ph ?- 


— 
p 


o 
o 

OS 
CO 

pq 




03 

a. 

P 

a 

<L 
> 


3 

R 


a 


EC 

5 
a) 
p 


a 
a 


a 
a, 

p 

a 
P 
P 
a. 
> 

a 


s 


c 
C 

5 
a 

P 

4 
J 

V 




co 

5 
p 

a 

t 


a 
c 
p 
a. 

c 

1 
a, 


t- 

B 

a. 

P 

t 

a 

a. 


^C 


e 
a 

P 

a 

4, 


p 
ee 

e 
I 

a 

a. 


■g 
o 
!zi 

5s 
cu 
a 

t 

CD 




tc 


3 
> 

3 


CO 

> 

4 

'5 


' ,1 


a. 

| 
c 






i 

p 

a. 


c 
E 


1 


" 


"a 


5 
c 


l 




ec 


PC 




£ 


(_ 




C_ 


<_ 


cc 


1 -f 




— 


cc 


Q 





Street Department — Bridge Division. 



193 



2.s°- 


© 


© 


© 


c 


© 




c 


c 


c 


lO 


c 




CN 


c- 


in 


c^ 


oi 




c^ 


cn 


CN 


cj 


o 


















































CD >*~N 
























r\ o 
























H o 
























bio 


























a 














































































> 
o 




























o. 


CD 


<L 


03 




a. 


a 


a. 


o 


0) 


O 


o 


c 


B 




a 




c 


= 




a 


a 




c 


O 


C 


o 




c 




c 


o 


o 


















-£ 










P4 


X 


02 


a 


CO 




7 


co cc 


co 


co 


X 














































































^ 


























o 


















































CO 




a 


<v 


a 


o 




c 


c 


a. 


05 


0) 


o 


C 


a 




a 


















c 


o 


c 


o 




E 


c 


c 


O 


o 




S 






-J- 










+- 








a 


Cfi 


a 


co 




a 


cc a 


CO 


co 


. 


o 


c 


o 


<= 


o 




— 


c 


c 


o 


* 


fcB $ 


© 


3 


© 


c 


© 




c 
■^ 


c 
o: 


S 


o 


CO 
T)5 


-J 


CO 


1C 


rH 


— 


■* 




Tt 


oc 


o 


CO 


o 
co 






















f-i . 
























o bp 
























t« .5 ■** 


o 


« 


© 


a- 


CO 




c 


c^ 


c 


o 


o 




o3 


cc 


CO 


V 


co 




•* 


co o: 


co 


t-^ 


BO 
























• . 


© 


c 


© 


c 


© 




— 


IT 


c 


o 


o 


co^ 


CN 


cr 


co 


o- 


ro 




cc 


ci 


"* 


CO 


t-1 




1 












































O) 


0) 








o 














05 


0) 




























o 
























03 




s 














Cfi 


CO 




-s 




> 














03 


o 


o 

D 

O 


H 1 

^ .2 

co 2 

W os 
o > 


a 
a. 

< 


sS 

03 


a 
a 


CD 
CD 


M 

S3 

8 

o 

Ph 

Eh 


a, 
a 


1 


+= 

a. 

Q. 


> 
"is 

° cw 

2 % 


C(H 
O 

03 


o a 


u- 


-a 


c 


o 
o 


CO 

H 


a 






M J 


«Jh 




Q 3' 


_^ 




cc 


a 


a. 


, c 


a 
P 


o 


O 

co 
oT 




o 

CO 


a 

■— 
c 


O 

pq 

g 


c 


a 

a 
p 




— 


5 
t 
> 
v. 


g 


IQ 

in 

»* 

a 




03 


in 




*5 

«£5 




— 
c 


a. 


c 
a 


OS 


C3 




a 


a 
5 


CD 


-- 




e 
c 


c 


a. 


"c3 


e3 






















0) 


03 




a 
a 

eS 

a 


c 


CD 

2 


a 
a 


03 




a 


c 
c 

1 


c. 
c 


a 
o 

a 
a 


s 

o 

a 

a 
















c 


,5 
II 




o 


o 




<i 


< 


On 


Z_ 


H 




C 


a 


u 


C 





194 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A5. 



Statement of Traffic on Wednesday, June 29, 1892, between the hours 
of 6 A.M. and 7 P.M. 

North Bridges. 



Name of Bridge. 


Foot 

Passengers 

from 

Boston. 


Foot 

Passengers 

to 

Boston. 


Teams 

from 

Boston. 


Teams 

to 
Boston. 


Horse and 

Electric Cars 

from 

Boston. 


Horse and 

Electric Cars 

to 

Boston. 




3,585 


3,270 


2,030 


1,535 








770 


775 


815 


728 


206 


216 




2,297 


2,367 


852 


811 


210 


222 




990 


1,050 


580 


600 


107 


110 




7,290 


7,045 


3,195 


3,355 • 


1,155 


1,165 




i 


South Brx 


dges. 








4,150 


4,895 


1,020 


1,175 






Congress street 


3 104 


3,117 
4,064 


2,701 
939 


2 869 






3,919 


913 


196 


193 




5,135 


6,061 


1,421 


1,620 


499 


505 


Mt. Washington avenue . 


1,730 


1,888 


828 


1,070 







APPENDI 
DRAW-TEND E R 











































<iiv 


ng the 


Number of 


Vessels 


passing through the Drawbridges controlled by the < it > ..I 


Bosti 


ii. . 
















Steameks. 












SMi ini. -Vessels. 


















n urn of Bridge. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


188 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


Jan., 
1893. 


1892. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


188 1. 


1885. 


I88G. 


1881. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


Jan., 

IN!12. 


1802. 


1881. 


1882. 

2,011 

1,595 
2,018 


1NS3. 

1,843 
1,187 

2,416 

1,784 

2,192 

3 


s;s 

2,065 
1,720 
2,609 


.885. 1886. 


1,864 
1,421 
2,678 


ISN 




20 
6 
46 

63 


i 3i 


34 


36 




54 


21 


14 
2 
30 

229 


22 

12 

194 
6 


22 

17 
122 

7 


4 

41 

115 

8 


9 


8 

29 
35 
85 


4,201 
411 

6,868 
910 

1,380 


3,772 
372 

5,386 
909 

1,188 


3,530 
398 

5,089 
848 

1,122 


3,905 
394 

4,851 
866 

1,225 


3,825 
431 

4,818 
730 

1,100 
3 


3,394 
476 

5,139 
770 

1,113 
1 


3,188 
461 

4,785 
786 

1,196 
12 


3,168 
534 

4,753 

1,906 

1,086 

2 


3.279 
439 

1,344 
S79 
938 


1,7 6 
271 

1,663 
805 

1,027 


: 111 

325 

3,256 

967 
998 


71 

s, 
26 

50 


3,118 
236 

■J, SI III 
717 
1,037 


2,040 
691 
2,681 
1,447 
1,912 






: 

1,510 
1,220 
1,997 

2 


sill 
1,745 

1 




Chelsea street 


81 
125 

7 


fill 
17 


:.7 
174 
18 


1 


■i; 

10 


86 

146 

4 

1 


53 

89 
2 
1 




































216 
26 
99 
20 


254 
36 
1 
34 


329 
32 
1 
34 


358 
37 

36 


si 10 

i 


356 
53 


365 
19 

20 


391 
14 
4 
14 


343 

14 

23 


348 
26 
2 
14 


306 
13 
4 
2 


12 


298 
10 
13 
10 


7,818 

3,447 
443 

4,2M 
101 
393 
928 

5,375 
136 


6,667 
3,103 

421 

3,735 

90 

350 
1,038 
4,816 

137 


6,024 
2,695 

441 

3,588 

69 

308 

886 
1,633 

130 


6,008 
3,013 

137 

3,934 

94 

424 
1,054 
1,693 

166 


6,173 
2,922 

477 
3,854 

113 

356 
1,019 
1,681 

185 


5,711 
2.5SI 

526 
3,398 

109 

300 
1,002 
4,314 

138 


2,671 
512 

3,337 
109 
2! is 

1,063 

1,044 
222 


6,337 
2,741 

592 
3,390 

141 

380 
1,005 
3,945 

233 
2 

169 


II!.-, 

34,089 


5,148 
2,786 

499 
3,464 

110 

365 
1,021 
3,958 

176 


5,470 

3,072 
300 

3,914 
120 
282 
765 

4,468 
173 


5,147 

2,685 

103 

3,54 

100 

a is 

4,108 
167 


I* 

89 
13 


1,896 
2,557 

217 

3,295 

91 

215 

861 
1,923 

193 


7.77S 

1.S71 

718 

2,203 

132 

735 

2,123 

4,879 

92 


8,769 
1,907 

570 

2,270 

95 

781 

6,197 
118 


8,626 

1,658 

1,237 

2,126 

120 

894 

1,869 

5,196 

126 


7,122 

1 ,562 
904 

1,931 
132 
853 

2 225 

134 


6,433 
1,605 

781 
1,840 

mi 

776 
2,214 
1,225 

166 


6,510 
1,352 
875 
1,678 

170 

2,109 
1,187 

171 


5,944 

I,, III 
107 
775 












Federal street 


1,8 


Maiden 


2S 
88 
26 


16 
116 
61 








9 

1 


2 

17 
79 


4 
25 
60 


75 
63 


6 
97 
32 


4 
97 
85 


2 
86 
91 


8 


3 

74 
70 


(1 


Meridian street 

Mi. Washington avenue 


29 
76 


27 
65 


1 


27 
102 


2,7 


\ B 






















1 
17 
1 


47 
2 




1 

17 
1 








39 
2 
2 


82 


61 


54 




1 

1 


82 


44 


46 
2 


25 


136 

4,877 

384 

48 


125 

4,395 

341 

64 


106 
4,186 

348 
29 


119 

4,095 
355 
61 


97 

3,924 

383 

33 


133 
4,298 

427 
2 


159 

3,933 

417 

12 

32,760 


168 

1. 

3S0 
2 


142 
3,289 
228 


138 

3,123 

236 

5 


88 


120 
2,796 
211 

12 


244 

1,685 

654 

37 


1,493 
539 
21 

33.134 


!«: 

1,201 

1,136 

35 


152 

1,111 
821 
36 

30,890 


168 
680 

653 
56 


264 
846 
769 
24 


864 
723 
25 


3 

',» 
s 


Western avenue to Watertown . 


4 




2 


















683 


814 


768 


864 






935 


703 


884 


774 


763 


726 


33 


654 


41,062 


36,923 


34,330 


35,684 


35,104 


33,832 


32,016 


31,728 


29,6 19 


:.'■ 


27,319 


31,922 


34,618 


26,747 


27,352 


27,160 





'West Boston, FriBoii Point, Canal i.ur i 'ran.-!.''*), 



1 DritlgL-B not Included Id these < 



SDIX AG. 

5 R S ' REPORTS. 1 

i, during the Tears 1SS1. 1882. 1887S, 1884, ls.s.-,, 188<>, 1887, 1888, 1889, 18!)0, 18!H, and 189:; 















All Others. 












Total No. ... \ . ... . . 












13, M, I, 




l-ss. 


[88 i. 
1,258 


1890. 

1.416 


1891. 

1,365 


189J! 


[892. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


1NN5. 


INNIi. 
194 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 

584 


1890. 


1 601. 


1892.' 

30 


1892. 


1881. 

n.lll 


IHN2. 

6,124 


inn:). 


1884. 

3,891 


1 NN7,. 

5,616 


1886. 


1887. 


INNN. 


1NN9. 

5,143 


l~ 10. 

7,,l:,7. 


1891. 

5,143 


1892! 

1S7 


1 Nil-;. 
• 3,401 


INNI In 
Feb. 1. 189.1. 


Bhidoe 




86 


1,709 


180 


277 


136 


245 


120 


194 


206 


.121 


430 


626 


.-,,-,1 : 


5,082 


1,763 


1,966 




1,578 


Broadway, 


94) 


967 


795 


765 


10 


733 


70 


33 


1,025 


4.31 


28 


35 


61 


80 


113 


33 1 


308 


6 


2i,9 


1,178 


982 


2,illii 


1.723 


1,195 


1,351 




1,560 


1,519 


1,103 


l inn 


,0 


1,238 


17,480 




2,118 




2,611 


2,947 


ISO 


2,814 


741 


712 


537 




421 


658 


889 


809 


1,420 


1,822 


2,149 


127, 


2,010 


9,336 


8,760 


8,132 


7,179 


6,825 


7,628 


7,591 


7.71.1 




8,113 




396 


7.693 








3.274 


1.53S 


1,108 


91 


J 399 


446 


385 


562 


433 


191 


_ 269 


33S 


870 


2,il in 


3,487 


2,34 : 


23 


1 ,29,-1 


2,866 


::.914 


3,289 


3,193 








6,368 






7,733 


149 








3.121 




3,954 
2 


3,193 


172 


2,923 


305 


440 


502 
6 
6 


1.H12 
6 
11 


509 
1 
10 


517 
4 
5 


532 
10 
3 


950 
10 
1 


858 
11 
1 


2,855 

23 
3 


l.i,2n 
30 
2 


B5 
2 


986 
14 
4 


9 


3,658 
5 


3,833 
9 
6 


1,864 
6 
11 


3,616 

6 

in 


3,920 


1,408 

2.3 
3 


:,.li,n 
12 
1 


[,489 
11 

1 


7 : 
27, 
3 


5,819 

;,. 
2 


1,17 


-.ml 
1 


185 
60 


Chelsea So 

l Point 




i.423 


6,909 


7.121 


461 


7,647 


1,643 


2, is; 


4,021 


2,260 


1,604 


2,243 


1,890 


1,699 


2,187 


2,360 


2,323 


170 


2,834 


17,485 


I7.S77 


[8,999 


15,748 


14,600 


14,820 


1,754 




13,10] 


15,087 


15,097 


7S2 


13.il7.-i 






1,(58 


1.11.1 


1.23U 


1,205 


60 


1,505 


._, j. i 


221 


233 


314 


230 


316 


206 


185 


613 


319 


414 


20 


544 


5,7.73 


,,2i,7 


1,618 




1,697 


1,302 


4,171 


1,308 


1,326 


4,677 


1,317 


135 


■l.i.l,, 


33,22; 






1,058 


! 


1,044 


in 


701 


12 


33 


932 


427 


211 


44 


42 


112 


106 


361 


631 


6 


287 




1,1127. 


2.1.11 


1,768 


1,281 


Mi:, 


1,383 


1,651 


1,663 


1,7,72 


1 ,982 


16 


1,231 




| 


1,808 


1,931 


1,810 


1,646 


113 


2014 


too 


190 


258 


319 


213 


344 


211 


305 


72,-i 


510 


672 


47 


646 


6,827 


.1,7,29 


6,004 


,,.72n 


.,944 


.-,,177, 


:,,! 11 


:,,,I7 


5.743 






21, 






' 




196 


228 


219 




1S4 




















4 


37 




19 


236 


193 


189 


229 


273 


279 


270 


387 





352 


:::,., 




- 






























947 








979" 


135 


1211 


145 


238 


303 


212 


165 


38 


308 


376 


437 


18 


17:; 


1.291 




1,647 


1,515 


1,417, 


1,296 


1,242 




1,929 


1,648 




74 


1 670 




Maiden. 


:.; : 1 




2,55 


2,511 




3,85 1 


707 


845 


901 


803 


662 


587 


719 


834 


1,052 


931 


1,132 


78 


1,432 


3,906 


4,329 


3,688 


1, 


3,904 


3,717) 


i,;,.. 


l; 18 


i,079 




I.lsl 


2S2 


.3.79S 


52,568 


Meridian street 


1 272 


3,5 -I 


4,514 


4,770 


109 


5,094 


1,050 


1,313 


1,939 


1,845 


1,364 


1,115 


1 ,23 1 


1,211 


1,059 


1,6110 


1..H12 


118 


2,199 


11,330 


11,377 


11,711 


11,206 


10,334 


9,997. 


9.291 


9,9,1 


'i. 2IHI 


10,667 


10,781 


533 


11,286 


126,905 


Mi. Washington 


252 


205 


23:l 


237 




198 




2 


10 




8 


18 


3 


21 


6 


7 








227 


257 


2.16 


290 


369 




::s7 


506 


387 


113 


llll 




391 


4,217 


Neponset. 


117 


352 


278 


243 




272 


21 


26 


823 


mi 


11 


26 


24 


28 


1 
35 


28 


23 




39 


1 

401 


377 


4 
1,866 


1211 


2 

279 


423 


467 


514 


1 


3 

lis 


1 
101 




131 


20 

7.173 


■ 


965 


1,192 


1,539 


1,9911 


115 


1,940 


603 


550 


322 


35 1 




527 


in:, 


591 


686 


1.171 


1,630 


2H'.I 


1,470 


7,2111 


,,,-,2u 


.-,,773 






: 


,-,.7 9. 


5,832 


6,143 


6,019 




112 


| 223 




w 


844 


833 


887 


591 




619 


■" 


32 


1,024 


467 


28 


32 


57 


39 


81 


287 


278 




128 


1.110 


■U2 


2,508 


1,643 


l.i.i.l 


1,228 


1.197 


1,350 




1,202 


l.U'7 




1,058 




Wcsti mi avenue to < .mlvidfrr 


22 


21 




35,202 


1,838 


15 

35,709 


18 


27 


22 


9 


26 


IS 


_1 

7,534 


16 
B.302 


14 


22 


11 






107. 


116 
78,699 


B6 


ins 


121 


11 


7,3 


42 


37 
75,865 


53 


:; 




28 


832 


A 










29,786 


35,224 


B 790 


7,698 


13,709 


10,140 


6,084 


7,196 


13,289 


16.3.51 


16,691 


946 


152285 


80,457 


83.425 


77..ISI 


68,873 


69,315 


68,157 


75,487 


81,069 


S2.17.S 


3,540 


78,967 






i 




JumbrldL'c 




bj these 


,„!„,.. 




J 


OTI -1 


ii" In'; 


led 1888 t 


ver tini., 




.rv 1, 188 


, lo Febru 


,rv 1, Ki 







































Street Department — Paving Division, 



195 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 
PAVING DIVISION. 



OF 



Office Paving Division, 
Room 41, City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1893. 
H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : In compliance with the order conveyed in your 
letter of January 14, 1893, requesting a statement of the work of 
the Paving Division for the year 1892, the following report is sub- 
mitted, showing the expenditures of this division from February 
1, 1892, to Januaiy 31, 1893, the nature of the work, the number 
and variety of permits issued, and the details of expenditures 
involved in paving, macadamizing, and regulating the various 
streets. 

The following list shows the total yearly expenditures of the 
Paving Division, according to the report of the Superintendent of 
Streets, for the last thirty-seven years, the expenditures being 
from January 1 to December 31, inclusive, of each year, except of 
1891, that year extending to January 31, 1892, making a period 
of thirteen months, and for the year 1892, which extends from 
February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893 : 



1856 






$192,458 48 


1876 






$980,741 42 


1857 






201,528 49 


1877 






1,077,475 81 


1858 






187,160 92 


1878 






644,821 76 


1859 






186.295 77 


1879 . 






727,340 05 


1860 






197,170 63 


1880 






1,015,063 06 


1861 






176,978 76 


1881 






966,366 49 


1862 






175,981 68 


1882 






1,088,551 14 


1863 






151,130 27 


1883 






934,656 58 


1864 






156,959 65 


1884 






1,310,172 16 


1865 






173,258 13 


1885 






1,018,693 39 


1866 






244,953 55 


1886 






1,170,863 01 


1867 






283,641 56 


1887 






1,260,530 03 


1868 






407,053 89 


1888 






1,043,475 52 


1869 






667,817 90 


1889 






1,051,460 18 


1870 






804,384 89 


1890 






1,061,722 40 


1871 






923,312 37 


1891 






1,991,524 28 


1872 






1,010,508 48 


1892 






1,972,857 88 


1873 






931,019 01 




1874 






1,683^848 67 


Total . . $29,134,186 81 


1875 






. 1,062,408 55 











19(5 



City Document No. 34. 



Street Numbering. 

Numbers have been assigned to the estates in the different dis- 
tricts as follows 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Brighton . 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Roxbury . 
City Proper 

Total . 



parts of 21 streets. 

parts of 15 streets. 

2 streets and parts of 6 streets. 

10 streets and parts of 20 streets. 

4 streets and parts of 30 streets. 

10 streets and parts of 38 streets. 

7 streets and parts of 52 streets. 

2 streets and parts of 32 streets. 

35 . . . 214 



Permits. 

Permits to open the streets for r 
February 1, ,1892, and January 31, 1893, have been issu 
lows : 

Company. 

Barber Asphalt Co. 

Boston Electric Light Co. 

Boston Gas Light Co. .... 

Boston Water Department, Eastern Division 

" " " Mystic 

Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 
Boston & Revere Electric Railway Co. 
Brookline Gas Light Co. 
Charlestown Gas Light Co. . 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. 
East Boston Gas Light Co. 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 
Fire-Alarm Department 
Improved Sewerage Co. 
Jamaica Plain Gas Light Co. 

" Pond Aqueduct Co. . 
Lynn & Boston Railway Co. . 
New England Telegraph &VTelephone Co. of 

Massachusetts 
New England Telegraph Co. . 
National Construction Co. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Co. . 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. 
Sewer Division 

South Boston Gas Light Co. . 
Standard Oil Co. . 
West End Street Railway Co. 
Western Union Telegraph Co. 
Miscellaneous 



und work, 


between 


3 been issu 


2d as fol- 


Permits. 


Feet. 


42 
140 


3,460 
765 


972 


30,709 


. 3,231 


99,720 


133 

2 


2,257 
210 


1 
138 


2,000 
17,680 


38 


685 


404 
122 
626 


15,410 

5,931 

50,505 


13 


184 


1 


20 


194 
3 


11,080 
90 


3 


3,496 


164 


17,634 


3 


22 


8 
10 


1,080 
206 


338 


11,390 


326 

111 

1 


43,590 

4,600 

600 


269 


125,995 


34 


6,270 


. 3,369 


82,357 



10,696 537,946 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



197 



One hundred and one and nine-tenths miles (101.9), an average 
length for each permit, 50.3 feet. 

There have been issued, in addition to the above, 79 emergency 
permits to the various departments and corporations, on which there 
have been 2,237 openings, at an average length of about 6 feet 
each. A record of these openings is on file in this office. 

Other permits have been granted as follows : 

Coal-holes and areas . . . . . . . 19 

Moving buildings ......... 55 

Distributing sand ........ 43 

Erecting awnings ........ 383 

Driving cattle ........ 59 

Erecting and repairing buildings . . . . . 4,477 

Raising and lowering safes, machinery, etc. . . . 405 

Advertising by man wearing hat and coat (lettered) . 17 

Cleaning snow from roofs of buildings .... 54 

Special to Sewer Division ...... 10 

Special for various purposes ...... 255 

Occupy sidewalks for more than teu minutes to load and 

unload ......... 40 

Watering carts . . . . . . . .88 

Pedlers, four different classes ...... 685 

To feed or bait horses in the streets .... 1,430 



Total number of permits of all kinds issued 



8,020 
18,795 



There have been 10,349 notices sent to the various foremen to 
repair defects in the streets which had been reported by the police ; 
also 2,065 to private parties to repair defects in Hyatt lights, coal- 
holes, and work which had been imperfectly done under permits 
granted them. 

During October last the form of notice was changed to conform 
to the Revised Ordinances (Sect. 8, Chap. 36), and at the same 
time the notices were sent to the various parties, an order was 
sent to the foreman of the district, directing him to make the nec- 
essary repairs in case the parties notified failed to do so within 
the time specified in the notice, charging the expense to the per- 
sons notified. 

The system seems to have had a good effect, as 301 such notices 
have been sent, and but very few have failed to repair within the 
limited time. 

There have been about 1,000 notices sent to the various depart- 
ments and corporations, regarding contemplated street improve- 
ments, during the year. 

There have been 543 bonds filed during the year in accordance 
with Chapter 35, Revised Ordinances, 1892. 

There have been 140 requests sent to Police Department, asking 
for information regarding locations, where people had asked for 
permits to occupy the sidewalk to load and unload goods. In 
most cases the answers have been favorable, and the permits have 
been granted when called for. 



198 



City Document No. 34. 



Streets Laid Out or Extended. 



Date. 

Feb. 26, 
April 8, 

April 21, 

April 29, 

May 5 . . 

May 6.. 
May 6. . 

June 8. . 
June 13. 
June 13. 
June 15. 
June 16. 

June 16. 
June 22. 
June 24. 
July 8 . . 
July 18 . 
July 21 . 

Julv 21 . 

July 28 . 
July 28 . 
Aug. 4. . 
Aug. 4. . 
Aug. 10. 

Aug. 10. 
Aug. 12, 

Aua;. 16, 
Aug. 24, 

Aug. 24 
Aug. 24 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 



Street. 



Judson st. 
Windom st. 



Denny st. . 
Hopedale st. 



Seattle st. 



Burney st. . 
Sorrento st. 



Howland st. 
Landseer st. 
Hastings st. 
Evelyn st. . . 
Porter st. . • • 



Lawn st 

Child st 

Cornell st. . . 
Shannon st. 
Amboy st. . . 
Mt. Hope st. 



Newark st 

Cunningham st. 
Hartwell st. . . . 

Tudor st 

Woolson st. . . . 
Svdney st 



Sprague st. 
Talbot ave. 



Hecla st.. . . 
Coolidge st. 



Haskell st. 
Royal st. . 
Holraan st. 
Hooker st. 
Arden st. . 
Ophir st. . . 



Location. 



Length. 
Lin. Feet. 



West Cottage to Dromey ave., 
Cambridge st. to near and ! 

north-west of Home ave. . . 
Savin Hill ave. to Springdale 

st 

North Harvard to north-east of 

Windom st 

Cambridge st. to near and 

north-west of Hopedale st., 

Tremont st. to Delle ave 

Cambridge st. to land of 

Boynton heirs 

West of Humboldt ave 

La Grange to Bellevue st. . . . 

Centre to Carl st 

Blue Hill ave. to Norfolk st. . 
from near Jess st. to Bismarck 

st 

Heath to Hayden st 

Lee to South st > 

Washington to Poplar st 

Washington to Union st 

Seattle to Windom st 

Canterbury st. to Mt. Hope 

Cemetery 

Cedar st. southwardly 

Howard avenue to Hartford st. , 

Schuyler to Georgia st 

F. to Dorchester st 

Blue Hill ave. to Norfolk st. . . 
Savin Hill ave. to Harbor 

View st 

Bunker Hill to Princeton st.. . 
Washington st. to Dorchester 

ave 

Adams st. to Dorchester ave. . 
Mansfield st. to North Harvard 

st , 

Coolidge st. to Hooker st. . . 
Cambridge st. to Coolidge st 
Coolidge st. to Hooker st. . . 
North Harvard st. to Royal St., 
Coolidge st. to Hooker st. ... 
Washington st. to Brookside 
ave 



Carried forward 26,632 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



199 



Streets Laid Out 01* Extended. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Sept. 23, 
Oct. 7 . . 
Oct. 7 . , 
Oct. 11 . 



Oct. 12 . 

Oct. 15 . 
Oct. 14 . 
Oct. 15 . 
Oct. 15 . 
Nov. 3.. 
Nov. 3.. 
Nov. 15. 
Nov. 21. 
Nov. 26. 

Nov. 26. 
Nov. 26. 
Nov. 29. 

Nov. 29. 
Dec. 1.. 
Dec. 2., 
Dec. 28. 
Dec. 28, 
Dec. 28, 
Dec. 28, 
Dec. 29, 
Dec. 29, 



Street. 



Brought 

Penfield st 

Pierpont st 

Hopkins st 

Sutherland road, 

E. st 

Fairbanks st 

Dean st 

Intervale st 

Brunswick st. 
Shenandoah st. . . 

Ingleside st 

Hammett st 

St. Joseph st.. . . 
Brigham st 

Ida st 

Ruth st 

Savoy st 

Elmo st 

Hamerton st 

Holworthy st. . .. 

Aldie st , 

Hollander st 

,1 Howell st 

, Sunnyside st 

, I Rawson st 

; McLellanst , 

I 

or 7.715 miles. 



Location. 



forward 

Brandon st. to Birch st 

Station to Prentiss st 

Evans st. to Corbet st 

Englewood ave. to Common- 
wealth 

West Ninth st. to Old Colony 
R.R 

Washington st. to Faneuil st. 

Howard ave. to Judson st. . . . 

Warren st. to Blue Hill ave. . . 

Warren st. to Blue Hill ave.. . 

Wessex st. to Carruth st 

Blue Hill ave. to Dacia st. . . , 

Grinnell st. to Sarsfield st. .. . 

South st. to Woodman st 

Webster st. to south-east of 
Ida st. 

Ruth st. to Brigham st 

Webster st. to Brigham st. . . . 

Washington st. to Harrison 
ave. * 

South of Erie st 

Crawford st. to Harold st 

Walnut ave. to Harold st. 

Athol st. to Everett st 

Crawford st. to Harold st 

Boston st. to Dorchester ave., 

Centre st. to Creighton st. . . . 

Boston st. to Dorchester ave., 

Old road to Erie st 



Length. 

\Lin.Feet. 



26,632 

1,052 

504 

477 

1,526 

198 
1,166 
519 
583 
470 
390 
346 
189 
402 

434 

72 
340 

301 
1,354 
285 
378 
469 
340 
582 
922 
455 
351 

40,737 



200 



City Document No. 34. 
Streets Widened and Relocated. 



Date. 



April 21, 
Aug. 10. 
Sept. 23 . 

Oct. 3 . . 

Oct. 7 . . 
Oct. 10 . 

Oct. 12 . 
Oct. 12 . 
Oct. 14 . 

Oct. 14 . 
Oct. 14 . 
Oct. 15 . 

Oct. 15 . 

Nov. 29. 

Dec. 28. 

1893. 
Jan. 31. 

Jan. 31. 



Jan. 31. 
Jan. 31. 



Street. 



Linden st. 
North sq. . 
High st. . . 



Park st. 



Dorchester ave. 
Kingston st. . . 



Tremont st. 
Heath st. . . 
North sq . . . 



Norfolk st 

Harvard st. . . . 
Washington st. 



Water st 

Blue Hill ave. . 
Milk st 



Commonwealth 
ave 

Commonwealth 
ave 



Beacon st. 
Brookline ave. 



Location. 



Corner of Cambridge st 

Corner of Moon st 

North-east side, bet. Pearl 

and School st 

North-west side, bet. City sq. 

and Henley st 

Corner of Centre st 

East side, north cor. of Essex 

st 

Corner of Heath st 

At and near cor. of Tremont. 
On north-west side, near North 

st 

Milton ave. to New Eng. R.R. 
Harvard ave.. to Warner ave. . 
East side, bet. Water st. and 

Spring Lane 

South side, at and near 

Washington st 

Bet. Mt. Pleasant ave. and 

La Grange pi 

North-west side, Battery- 
march to Broad 



North side, junct. Beacon st. . . 

South side, junction of Brook- 
line ave 

South side, junction of Brook- 
line ave 

North side, junct. Beacon st. . . 



Sq. Ft. 
75 

133 

22 

97 
165 

14 

7,639 
4,502 

41 

42,589 
14,489 

273 

69 

166 

966 

1,545 

1,927 

195 
37 



74,944 



Streets Discontinued. 



Date. 



Oct. 10 . 

Oct. 10 . 

Dec. 29. 
Jan. 6. . 



Street. 



Kingston st. 
Essex st. . . 



E. Chester Park . 
Spring Lane 



Location. 



Cor. of Essex St., north-east 
side 

Cor. of Kingston st., north- 
easterly 

Junction of Boston st 

At and near Washington st. . . 



Sq. Ft. 



0.40 

12.50 

69.50 

139.00 

221.40 







■-■- %? ■■ m : 






Street Department — Paving Division. 201 

The record of the Street Commissioners for the year 1892 
shows the following results : 

Streets laid out or extended . 40,737 lin. ft., or 7,715 miles. 

Streets widened and relocated . 74,944 sq. ft. 

Streets discontinued . . . 221.4 sq. ft. 

Increase in mileage . . . 40,737 lin. ft., or 7,715 miles. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation for Paving Division for 1892-93 . $850,000 00 

Transferred from Boat Landing .... 30 00 

Transferred from Street-Cleaning Division . . 7,500 00 

Transferred from Street-Watering . . . 4,500 00 
Transferred from Laying Out and Construction of 

Highways 207,500 00 

Transferred from Washington street on account 

of old blocks removed ..... 4,729 64 
Amount collected by City Collector for- repairs 

done by Paving Division for different companies, 61 71 



Expenditures. 

Amount of expenditures from Feb- 
ruary 1,1892, to January 31,1893, $915,460 99 

Transferred to Sewer Division . 72,323 67 

Transferred to Sewer Division from 
Laying Out and Construction of 
Highways 19,034 66 

Transferred to Bridge Division . 2,047 22 

Transferred to Sanitary Division . 12,370 74 

Transferred to Street-Cleaning Di- 
vision 11,820 42 



,074,321 35 



— 1,033,057 70 



Transferred to city treasury .... $41,263 65 

Total expenditures from regular appropriation . $915,460 99 
Total expenditures from street-watering appro- 
priation . 94,507 80 

Total expenditures from special appropriations . 962,889 09 



Grand total (regular and special) . . $1,972.857 88 



202 City Document No. 34. 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the City 
Collector from February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893, on account 
of the Paving Division : 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (old law) . $36,469 09 

Sidewalk construction assessments (new law) . 224,171 76 

Old paving-blocks ...... 4,729 64 

Repairs of streets (Chap. 36, Sect. 8, R. 0. 1892), 524 23 

Fort Hill Wharf (rent) 500 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 431 50 



,826 22 



The amount paid into the city treasury during the same period 
on account of the Paving Division : 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (old law) 
Sidewalk construction assessments (new law) 
Old paving-blocks ...... 

Repairs of streets (Chap. 36, Sec. 8, R. O. 1892), 
Fort Hill Wharf (rent) . .... 

Miscellaneous ....... 



$30 


,624 


10 


31 


,616 


92 


4 


,729 


64 




61 


71 




500 


00 




260 


00 


$67 


,792 


37 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



203 






.2 



S* 

J- CO 

© >> 

-3 o 
— •+- 

ex * 

4* ,h 



w 



1 






OJ 


to 


b- 


O 


so 


X 


X! 


H 


i.O 


o 


OS 






OC-'QO'NH[>OiOI»CO 


OS 


1 


lOCOH-*COrl'*lO'N«0 


O 




ri 


■#H(D(MOr(IM(»HOCO 


CO 




cS 


05-hCOO-*I>COC00005CO 


-* 




o 








Eh 


0XH05ff)<0 05i0HOa 


o 






CONW'OOiOWfflHiO'-i 


1— ' 






^ i— I »-< <M 


OS 


























o 


o 




a 






















cc 


co 




mS 




























? "a 






















c 


o 




£ g 






















CO 


co 


























cc 


co 




T3 In 




























sg 






















3i 


as 




D 






















I— 1 


























-M 


<M 


























<X 


























iC . 




3 




















co • 


CO 




O 


























o 




















CO • 


00 




5 




















o • 


o 




o 




















OS • 


OS 




o 




















c> ! 


© 




§ 




















o 


uO 












-; 


-; 


- 






#=* . 


ee 
















, ( 




i-H 




o 


















iO < 




lO 




ll 


















(M ■ 




CM 
























i-H 




3 ° 


















CO " 




CO 




do 


























o 


















^H 








M 


























H 


















^ 




m 




1* 


i— 1 CO CO l> CO C5 (M (M 






© 




o 


t-h O CO CO i— I -^ © ■>* 






(M 




GQ . 


iQOilM'^'NaHCD 






o 




o 


■rrNiO(NCO«JH(N 






as 






NGOO-*rJ<TiiCOCO 






T— ( 




"3 












> 


NCOOCO^^iQiO 






o 




a 

3 


«© CM 






CO 


: 








۩ 




P5 












G O 


otomot-NtD'* 






co 




s° 


l>HCOCOOCON«D 






to 




^ o • 


o 










o .,5 ai 

§11 


O^CftO-^'HCOOO 






as 




(MCOOOt^O-t^iO 










3 2 £ 


-CM QO^Oi'NOO 






<M 






CO ~ » •« •» ~ «- •< 










3 o 


(N^OiONfN^O 






co 




^(NCTiOOOiOCOt> 






c- 




a^ 


i— I -J 




























'. : 


5 




























. -+^> 




























* 0) 






























• < 


5 
























. -»-3 






























^ 


3 
























• ^ 




J 
























• o 


























:o 


. + 
















• r^ 






• «M rn 5 


3 










oca 


' S * 


: p ° ^ < 
- 8.3 1^ 

>, O O 9 - 

D *2 H — 3 


3 








mtb Bost 

ast Bosto 
harlestow 


1 XI h 


I H 









Q& 


3 Z 


2P 


5P 


= f 


}p 


3C 


2P 


le 


" > 


5 





204 



City Document No. 34. 



EXPENDITURES. (Details.) 

Salary of C. R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent of 
^ Streets, January 29, 1892, to January 26, 1893 . 
Salary of office clerks ...... 

Advertising in and subscribing for daily papers 

Dorchester ledge, construction of . 

Horses, carts, and harnesses (new) 

Printing and stationery 

Repairing stables, sheds, etc. 

Savin Hill ledge, construction at . 

Sundries ..... 

Street signs and numbering . 

Telephone, expenses' of 

Tools, cost of keeping the same in repair, etc. 



Executions of Court, etc. 

Baker, Rebe T., personal injuries 
Billings, Alfred E., 
Carroll, Patrick, " 

Conley, Cornelius F., " 
Clark, Thomas, " 

Costello, James J., Execution Court 
Davidson Archibald T., personal injuries 
Dolan Edward J., " 

Fallon, Patrick, " 

Fa,y Martin, injury to horse 
Finley, Michael, damage to premises 
Freeman, Annie C, personal injuries 
Farrington, Ellen A., " 

Horgan, Mary A. C, " 

Hanley, John J., " 

Hart, Jennie E., " 

Jordan, Jediah P., " 

Knowles, Josephine, grade damages . 
Mulchinock, Mary E., personal injuries 
McQueeney, Francis J., carriage damage 
Murray, John, damage to wagon 
Murphy, Mary A., personal injuries . 
McGill, Timothy, " 
McShane, William 
Moakley, John F., personal injuries 
Moore, Charles A., " 

Maguire, Mary E., " 

Parker, Sarah, " 

Perry, Helen P., " 

Richardson, Robert, " 

Ritchie, Hannah K., " 

Shute, Benj. P., damage to herdic 
Sharkey, Katherine, personal injuries 



$3,402 03 
9,851 13 

905 99 
2,690 95 
7,418 74 
2,748 46 
1,250 84 

494 08 

6,993 42 

2,985 73 

1,321 19 

10,845 79 



Executors for Estate of Dan 1 ! Hughes, 



$50,908 


35 


$150 00 


152 


49 


327 


49 


300 


00 


120 


52 


3,109 


43 


976 


77 


400 


00 


150 


00 


33 


55 


55 


00 


125 


78 


200 


12 


325 


78 


500 


00 


230 


12 


1,525 


1-2 


616 


61 


75 


00 


6 


00 


50 00 


100 


00 


750 


00 


50 


00 


144 79 


150 


00 


350 00 


150 


00 


120 


52 


426 


50 


15 


80 


125 


12 



$11,812 51 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



205 



Regular Expenditures. 

The following schedule shows the expenditures from the main- 
tenance appropriation of this division, devoted to the various 
streets in the several districts : 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

Bnttonwood street. 

In excess of special apjsropriation $798 25 

Silver street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 73 50 

Vinton street. 



In excess of special appropriation . 




635 75 


Yale street, grading. 










1,206 23 


Crossings. 










843 50 


Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 






Labor 


$3,089 67 




Teaming ....... 


1,900 50 




Material . . . . . 


2,495 53 









7,485 70 


Fences and plank -walks. 






Labor ....... 


$704 56 




Material ....... 


1,109 12 









1,813 68 


Snow. 






Labor ....... 


$6,855 61 




Teaming ....... 


• 889 50 









7,745 11 


Repairs on streets. 






Labor ....... 


$2,153 99 




Teaming . . 


4,023 00 




Material 


4,167 10 








10,344 09 




$30,945 81 



EAST BOSTON. 

Border street, at Condor. 
In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aklermanic District jSTo. 1.) 

Chelsea street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aklermanic District No. 2.) 

Falcon street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 
Carried fo mvard , 



$350 00 

1,397 50 

294 03 

$2,041 53 



20 tf City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, $2,041 53 

Crossings. 

Labor and material . 443 25 

Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 

Labor $1,184 81 

Teaming 721 50 

Material 757 n 

2,663 42 

Fences and plank walks. 

Labor $173 01 

Material 792 98 

965 99 

Snow. 

Labor . $3,519 03 

Teaming 360 00 

3,879 03 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor $10,735 64 

Teaming 3,360 00 

Material 4,024 33 

18,119 97 

$28,113 19 
CHARLESTOWN. 

Bunker Hill street. 

In excess of special appropriation . . . . $355 80 

Rutherford avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 2,656 32 

Crossings. 

Labor and material ....... 1,056 98 

Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 

Labor $1,619 97 

Teaming 888 00 

Material 1,646 80 

4,154 77 

Fences and plank walks. 

Labor $536 81 

Material 133 22 

670 03 

Snow. 

Labor . $4,520 63 

Teaming 1,032 00 

5,552 63 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor $8,611 10 

Teaming 4,882 50 

Material 3,421 83 

16,915 43 

$31,361 96 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



207 



BRIGHTON. 

Ashford Street, regulating and grading 

Labor 

Teaming 

Paving 

Edgestone 

Gravel 



$301 20 
279 00 
181 84 
654 91 
530 25 



Bradbury street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 
(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Cambridge street, regulating and macadamizing. 
5,000 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . $882 83 

Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel 
Paving 
Blocks 



1,165 50 

2,021 50 

1,698 47 

441 43 

756 56 

169 20 



Dustill Street, grading and gravelling. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel . . . . 

Filling 

Englewood avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Menlo street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Murdock street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 



$228 75 
405 00 

1,764 40 
963 60 



$1 



947 20 
766 60 



7,135 49 



,361 75 

,702 85 

113 50 
865 45 



North Beacon Street, regulating and grading. 






Labor ....... 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel 

Stone ....... 


$149 20 
■276 00 
478 80 
399 00 


1,303 


00 






Seattle, Hopedale, Wiudom, and Son 


rento streets. 






In excess of special appropriation . 


. 


1,349 


50 


Union Street, grading and gravelling. 








Labor ....... 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel ....... 


$129 55 
199 50 
962 50 


1,291 


55 







Carried forward, 



$19,836 89 



208 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

Western avenue, grading and macadamizing 

5,500 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam 

Labor 

Teaming . 



$19,836 89 



$342 21 
901 50 

1,642 45 
608 65 

76 68 



Si one 

Gravel 

Flagging 

Crossings. 

Labor and material ........ 

Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 

Labor and material ........ 

Fences and plank walks. 

Labor $791 58 

Material 1,527 83 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor $7,607 27 

Teaming . . . . . . . 6,0l'6 50 

Material 13,752 28 

Snow. 

Labor $2,359 37 

Material 1,065 00 



WEST BOXBUBY. 

Allandale street. 

In excess of special appropriation 

Centre street, at Baker, ' grading and gravelling. 

Labor $242 20 

907 50 

1,393 20 



Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 



559 75 



Centre street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 

Cohasset street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 
(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Canterbury street, grading and macadamizing. 



6,000 sq. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 

Filling 



ds. 6-in. macadam. 



$691 80 

2,059 50 

2,541 92 

2,427 25 

103 80 



3,571 49 
229 80 

2,266 66 
2,319 41 

27,376 05 

3,424 37 
$59,024 67 

2,261 04 



3,102 65 
1,133 00 

662 28 



7,824 27 



Carried forward. 



4,983 24 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 209 

Brought forward, $14,983 24 

Henskaw street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 2,733 74 

Keyes street, grading and macadamizing. 

2,500 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor $43 70 

Teaming- 168 00 

Gravel 200 88 

Stone 985 00 

1,397 58 

Mount Hope street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 534 05 

(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Poplar street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 2,053 72 

Sycamore street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 2,235 32 
(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Spring and Baker Streets, grading and gravelling. 

Labor $207 25 

Teaming 622 50 

Gravel 1,398 60 

Stone ....... 298 00 



Short street. 




2,526 35 


In excess of special appropriation . 


• 


70 50 


Washington street, at Green, resurfaci 


Qg. 




Labor ....... 

Teaming 

Stone . . 


$456 75 
750 00 
821 50 


2,028 25 


Wenham street. 




In excess of special appropriation . 




77 50 


Walter street. 






In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District, No. 


11.) ' 


1,653 16 


Crossings. 










1,283 30 


Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 






Labor ....... 

Teaming ....... 

Material 

Fences and plank walks. 


$471 43 

3:i0 00 

2,085 33 


2,886 76 




$2,077 31 





.Material 1,773 74 

3,851 05 



Carried forward, $38,314 52 



210 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor $13,508 62 

Teaming ....... 19,668 00 

Materia! 16,479 93 

Snow. 

Labor $3,303 13 

Teaming- . . . . . . . 1,179 00 



5,314 52 



49,656 55 



4,482 13 
$92,453 20 



DORCHESTER. 

Geneva avenue . 

In excess of special appropriation . . . . . $5,955 05 

Minot street. 

In excess of special appropriation 4,953 15 

Shenandoah street, grading and regulating. 

Labor $126 50 

Teaming Ill 00 

Material 1,188 97 

1,426 47 

Crossings. 

Labor and material 1,071 95 

Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 

Labor $781 65 

Teaming 544 50 

Material 806 46 

2,132 61 

Fences and plank walks. 

Labor $1,163 74 

Material . 3,751 96 

4,915 70 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor $2,107 97 

Teaming 9,234 10 

Materia? 20,474 67 

31,816 74 

Snow. 

Labor $3,227 19 

Teaming . 1,242 30 

& 4,469 49 



$56,741 16 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



211 



ROXBURT. 
Brunswick street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 
(Alderinanic District No. 10.) 

Cabot street. 

In excess of special appropriation 

(Alderinanic District No. 9.) 

Dale street, Washington to Warren, regulating and 
macadamizing. 

4,900 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel 

Stone 

Dearborn street. 

In excess of special appropriation 

Dalmatia Street, regulating and macadamizing. 

1,000 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 

Labor . $242 80 

Teaming 

Stone 

Gravel 

Paving 

Dudley street. 

In excess of special appropriation 

Elmore street, regulating and resurfacing. 
2,000 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 
Labor 
Teaming 
Steam roller 
Stone 
Gravel 

Forest street, regulating and macadamizing. 
3,802 sq. yds. 4 in. macadam. 
Labor 
Teaming 
Stone 

Steam roller 
Gravel 

Fultla street. 

In excess of special appropriation 

Hartwell street, regulating and macadamizing. 
540 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . - $183 95 

Teaming 240 00 

Gravel 193 80 



51,118 50 
1,448 48 



$187 38 
621 00 
698 70 

1,981 00 


3,488 08 
371 53 





302 


50 




813 


75 




132 


60 




75 


36 


1,567 01 








• 


954 11 


$185 80 




144 00 




90 00 




472 


25 




129 


20 


$1,021 25 






$113 80 




285 


00 




1,069 


00 




110 


80 




235 


40 


1,814 00 










1,690 51 



Carried ; forward, 



[:i,t; 



17 



212 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

Stone •• ' 

Paving ....... 

Heath street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Intervale street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 10.) 

Judson Street, grading. 



$223 75 
82 15 



Labor 
Filling 



$59 66 
1,031 50 



Kemfole street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 10.) 

Marcella street, Highland to Centre, regulating 
and macadamizing. 

2,246 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Steam rol 

Stone 

Blocks 

Paving 

MaywOOd street, regulating and macadamizing 
1,880 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
Labor 
Teaming . 
Blocks 
Stone 
Sand 
Gravel 
Steam roller 



Prentiss street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 9.) 

Reading street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

(Aldermanic District No. 10.) 

Regent Street, regulating and macadamizing. 

5,100 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming- . 



Steam roller 

Gravel 

Stone 



Carried forward, 



$216 00 
354 00 
290 00 
423 30 

1,053 25 



L3,473 47 

923 65 
4,675 72 

878 55 



1,091 16 
1,886 99 



$244 70 






393 00 






348 50 






130 00 






914 75 






74 00 






22 92 








2,127 


87 


!g- 




$457 40 






271 50 






470 41 






751 75 






57 60 






236 30 






80 00 








2,324 
1,210 


96 




76 



803 17 



2,336 55 



$31,732 85 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



213 



Brought forward, 
Roxbury street, Washington 



^31,732 85 



street to Centre, 



regulating and macadamizing 




4,635 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 




Labor ..... 


$•243 70 


Teaming ..... 


255 00 


Stone ..... 


1,236 25 


Gravel ..... 


515 10 


Steam roller .... 


150 00 



TreillOllt Street, Roxbury crossing to Huntington 
avenue. . 
In excess of special appropriation ..... 

YerilOll street, regulating and macadamizing. 

3,960 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 
Labor 



Teaming . 
Gravel 
Stone 
Steam roller 



Warren street, granite blocks. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Warren street, at Blue Hill avenue. 

In excess of siDecial appropriation . 



$212 00 



2,400 05 



393 75 



438 00 

549 10 

1,055 00 

100 00 


i 

2,354 10 
448 80 





2,923 64 



Zeigler street, Harrison avenue to 


Washington 




street, regulating and macadamizin 


or. 




1,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 






Labor ....... 


$258 58 




Teaming 


300 00 




Gravel . . . 


249 90 




Steam-roller ...... 


100 00 




Stone ....... 


552 25 


1,460 73 






Crossings. 










2,210 73 


Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 






Labor ....... 


$4,231 28 




Teaming . 


2,631 00 




Material . 


10,028 24 









16,890 52 


Fences and plank walks. 






Labor ....... 


$1,493 08 




Material ....... 


923 34 









2,416 42 


Repairs on streets. 






Labor ....... 


$8,661 86 




Teaming ....... 


27,327 00 




Material 


34,853 31 


70,842 17 







Carried forward. 



$134,073 76 



214 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

Snow. 

Labor 
Teaming" . 



$134,073 76 



$3,772 02 
1,539 00 



5,311 02 
39,384 78 



$997 60 




852 00 




3,365 99 




217 56 




505 00 




153 00 




18 60 






6,109 75 




xith. 


135 07 



CITY PROPER. 

Allen street. 

In excess of special appropriation $1,559 95 

(Aldermanic District, No. 3.) 

Beacon Street, Park to Charles. Regulating and 
macadamizing. 

7,636 square yards 8-in. macadam 

Labor 

Teaming . 

Stone 

Gravel 

Steam roller 

Flagging . 

Edgestone 

Beacon Street, West Chester park to Dartmouth 
In excess of special appropriation 

Boylston street, Washington to Tremont, north side, 
repaying. 

Teaming $261 00 

Blocks ....... 886 80 

Edgestone 16 56 

Flagging 23 58 

Brighton street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 
(Aldermanic District, No. 3.) 

Boylston street, Exeter to West Chester Park, west 
side, paving gutters and regulating. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Stone 

Blocks 

Paving 

Chester square, Shawmut avenue to Washington. 
In excess of special appropriation 

Commonwealth avenue, West Chester Park to 
Arlington. 
In excess of special appropriation 2,159 96 

Carried forward, $14,251 83 



1,187 94 
418 11 



$257 60 






139 


50 






1,092 


97 






258 


12 






102 


86 










1,851 


05 








gton. 












830 00 



Street Department — Paving Division. 215 

Brought forward, $14,251 83 

Chestnut avenue, at Malcolm. 

In excess of special appropriation 273 21 

(Aldermanic District, No. 4.) 

Charles Street, Mt. Vernon to Pinckney. 
In excess of special appropriation ..... 369 35 

Dartmouth street, Huntington avenue to Boylston, 
regulating and macadamizing. 

Labor $772 80 

Teaming . - 432 00 

Material 335 64 

1,540 44 



Eliot street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 180 40 

Groton Street, resurfacing. 

Teaming $15 00 

Inspection ...... 25 00 

Asphalt 1,016 81 

1,056 81 

Kilby Street, resurfacing. 
Asphalt 2,296 91 

Long wood avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 100 00 

McLean Street, regulating and macadamizing. 



Labor 


$789 78 




Teaming ....... 


526 50 






820 05 


2,136 33 


Motte street. 




In excess of special appropriation . 




165 49 


Park square, regulating. 






Labor ....... 


$22 50 




Teaming; ....... 


204 00 




Material 


220 00 




Paving ....... 


1,028 99 









1,475 49 


Poplar street. 






In excess of special appropriation . 




819 75 


(Aldermanic District No. 


3.) 




Stanhope street. 






In excess of special appropriation . 




2,098 45 


School street. 






In excess of special appropriation . 


. 


1,306 96 


Stoddard street. 






In excess of special appropriation . 




168 50 


(Aldermanic District No. 


3.) 





Carried forward, $28,239 92 



216 



Crrr Document No. 34. 



$838 73 




919 50 




193 05 




1,436 47 




311 61 




241 44 




195 60 






7,136 40 






1,127 40 



Brought forward, $28,239 92 

West Chester park, Huntington avenue to Beacon, 
regulating and macadamizing. 

21,500 sq. yds. 3-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 

Paving 

Blocks 

Flagging 

Worcester square. 

In excess of special appropriation 

Washington street, Davis to Florence. 

hi excess of special appropriation . . . . 119 25 

West Newton street, Columbus avenue to O. C. R.R. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 1,592 05 

West Chester park, Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation 242 66 

Worcester street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 107 40 

(Aldermanic District No. 8.) 

West Dedhain street. 

In excess of special appropriation 104 37 

(Aldermanic District No. 8.) 

Crossings. 

Labor $1,062 07 

Teaming 343 50 

Material 4,966 01 



Edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming ....... 

Material ....... 

Fences and plank walks. 

Labor ....... 

Material . . . ... 

Repairs on streets. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming 

Material 

Roxfoury Canal, sea wall, South yard. 
Contract construction .... 

Carried forward, 



$10,879 08 
6,444 00 
9,383 57 



£3,287 12 
2,942 20 



^25,044 59 
22,760 16 
31,619 89 



6,371 58 



26,706 65 



6,229 32 



79,424 64 

12,657 00 
$170,058 64 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



•217 



Bro ught forward 




$170,058 64 


Snow. 






$18,333 42 




6,993 00 




ok ooi; to 




REMOVAL OF SNOW. 


' 




$195,385 06 






South Boston 


$7,745 11 


East Boston . 




3,879 03 


Charlestovvn . 




5,552 63 


Brighton 




3,424 37 


West Roxbury 




4,482 13 


Dorchester 




4,469 49 


Roxbury 




5,311 02 


City Proper . 


25,326 42 




STREET-WATERING. 


$60,190 20 






South Boston 


$6,785 40 


East Boston . 




5,353 20 


Chailestown . 




5,859 90 


Brighton 




10,174 84 


West Roxbury 




14,759 20 


Dorchester 




11,522 30 


Roxbury 




14,309 80 


City Proper . 




25,743 16 






$94,507 80 



DETAILS OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

Allantlale Street, Brookliue, line to westerly line Souther estate, 
grading and macadamizing. 

Areas: 6,211 sq. yds. macadam and 3,105 sq. yds. gravel sidewalks. 
Labor . .' $3,484 09 



Teaming 

Gravel 

Powder 

Roller 



2,127 00 
661 58 
126 00 
220 00 



Amount of special appropriation . . $3,770 59 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

street improvements, Aldermanic District 

No. 11 587 04 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division 2,261 04 



5,618 67 



$6,618 67 



218 



City Document No. 34. 



Austin street, paving and regulating 

Area: 1,077 sq. yds. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ..... 

30,692 granite paving-blocks 
4,500 paving-bricks 

Amount of special appropriation 

Allston Bridge. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 



$1,230 lb 

195 00 

284 24 

2,240 51 

49 50 

$4,000 00 



$144 90 
108 00 



Baldwin Street, Ward 4, Main st. to Rutherford avenue, 
ing, grading, and macadamizing. 

Area : 762 sq. yds. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Filling 

Gravel 

Stone 

454 feet 8 inches edgestone, and two large corners 

Paving ...... . . 

Work done by Sewer Division, building 2 new catch-basins 
and laying 258.5 feet of 15-inch pipe sewer 



Amount of special appropriation ..... 

Beacon Street, Ward 25, grading and macadamizing 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 

Powder and fuse 



$252 90 
regulat- 



L.686 09 

501 00 

339 00 

176 16 

712 77 

329 07 

81 77 

981 40 

1,807 26 
t,807 26 



51,457 25 

975 00 

1,984 15 

610 75 

124 00 



),151 15 



Beacon street, Dartmouth street to Gloucester street, regulating 
and asphalting, edgestones reset and sidewalks relaid. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming 

Gravel 



Sand . 

Stone . 

1,825 paving-blocks 

20,500 paving-brick 

Sundries 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Company : 
1,546 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 . $7,730 

821 sq. yds. sand bedding, at 21 cts. . 172 

821 sq. yds. asphalt block pavement, at 

$2.89 2,372 



5,252 34 

3,024 00 

120 00 

36 75 

905 20 

49 27 

330 50 

115 59 



10,275 10 



Carried forward, 



),108 75 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



219 



Brought forward. 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Company : 
9,277 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt laid, at $2.25 

Amount paid to F. H. Cowin & Co., for paving: 
3,308.5 lin. feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . $264 68 

103 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

36 cts 3; 

544 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

18 cts 9^ 

119 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 2{ 



$20 ; 
20. 



108 75 
873 25 



08 



92 



Amount paid to James Grant : 

7 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . $1 75 

3,502 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 630 36 

83 sq. yds. brick paving on edge, at 36 cts., 29 88 
314 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

36 cts 113 04 

187 sq. yds. brick leaving, herring bone, on 

edge, at 50 cts 93 50 

9.5 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at 25 cts., 2 38 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
24 catch-basins and 7 manholes ..... 



Amount of special appropriations . . $41,174 62 
Amount charged to appropriation for Street 

Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 5, 1,334 70 

Amount charged to Paving Division . . 135 07 



Berkeley-Street bridge, regulating approaches. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand .... 

37.8 feet of edgestone 

14.6 feet of flagging . 

Lumber 

Sundries 



Boat Landing, Commercial Wharf. 

Building landing, according to contract .... 

Bolton street, Second street to D street, regulating 
and macadamizing. 

Labor . 

Teaming . . 

Gravel 

Stone ..... 



429 43 



870 91 
362 05 



$42,644 39 



$42,644 39 



L,376 20 

300 00 

681 25 

198 47 

48 97 

11 68 

26 65 

32 00 

?,675 22 



$970 00 



1,346 45 

256 50 

129 00 

35 05 



Amount of special appropriation . 

Boston street, Andrew square to Mt. Vernon street, 

grading and regulating. 
Areas: 2,151 sq. yds. gutters, 8,605 sq. yds. of roadway. 



!1,767 00 
HJ67 00 



220 



City Document No. 34. 



Labor $1,683 62 

Teaming 1,003 50 

Gravel 1,341 30 

Sand ... ... . 262 90 

126 18 
2,347 75 

274 63 



Stone . 

86,954 gutter blocks 

Building fences . 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
551.8 l'eet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
1,304.2 sq. yds. of block paving relaid, at 25 

cts .... 

157.5 sq. yds. of brick paving relaid, at 18 cts. . 



$44 15 

326 06 

28 35 



Amount of special appropriation . . .$5,00000 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Street 

Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 7 . 2,438 44 



398 56 

>7,438 44 

>7,438 44 



Boylstoil street, Church street to Arlington street, paving and 
regulating (tar joints on gravel base) . 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $457 84 

Advertising 42 68 

71 feet edgestone 39 76 

45,175 granite paving-blocks . . . . . . 3,321 52 

Amount paid to Jas. Doherty & Co., as per contract: 
l,7i J 8 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at $1.49, $2,574 72 
709 lin. ft. edgestone reset, at 23 cts. . . 163 07 

947 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 69 cts. . 653 43 

61 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks relaid, at $1.25, 76 25 

3,467 47 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
3 catch-basins, 2 manholes, and building 1 new catch- 
basin .......... 

Amount of special appropriation . . ■ . 

Breilt street, regulating and grading. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming • . 

Stone ........... 

32,000 gutter blocks from Washington street 

Amount paid to John Bradley : 
645 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 60 cts. .... 

Amount paid to Jas. Doherty & Co. : 
1,098 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 60 cts. 



Bristol street, regulating and grading. 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Masonry . . . . 

Gravel . 



181 76 



r ,511 33 



$503 


42 


318 


00 


806 


50 


800 


00 



387 00 
658 80 



$3,473 72 


$457 22 

232 50 

90 00 

30 00 


$809 72 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



221 



Bunker Hill street, between Pearl and Sackville streets, paving 
and regulating. 

Labor and inspection ........ $1,364 30 

Teaming 369 00 

Gravel 268 88 

6 9-12 ft. of edgestone 4 72 

42,975 granite paving-blocks ...... 3,352 05 

Sundries .......... 9 58 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. : 
744 lin. feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . $59 52 
1,711 sq. yds. of block pavingdaid, at 25 cts. . 427 75 

487 27 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$5,500 00 
355 80 



£5,855 80 



>,855 80 



Button WOO(l Street, between Mt. Vernon and Locust, streets, 
macadamizing and regulating. 

Area: 1,348 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel ...... 

Filling. ..... 

Stone . . . . . . 

901.75 feet of edgestone 

4 small curb-corners . 

500 paving-brick .... 

Steam roller .... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
992.5 lin. feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts 
500.5 sq. yds. block paving laid (blocks from 

Dorchester avenue), at 25 cts. 
35.4 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 36 cts. 
12.8 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at 25 cts 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Centre Street, Ward 23, Holbrook street to Lowder's lane, 
macadamizing. 

Area, 3,780 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor $652 02 

Teaming 405 00 

Gravel 204 12 

Stone 1,008 00 

Roller 125 00 







! 


5704 26 








126 00 








422 40 








60 50 








68 76 








541 06 








15 00 








6 00 








120 50 


$79 4C 






125 Vc 


1 




12 74 


t 




3 21 


) 










220 47 






$2 


,284 95 


$1,486 7( 


) 




798 21 


» 








- $2 


,284 95 





Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



51,133 00 

1,261 14 



52,394 14 



$2,394 1 i 



222 



City Document No. 34. 



Cliardoil Street, paving and regulating (tar 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming ..... 
Advertising ..... 
57,990 gi'anite paving-blocks 
22,000 paving-brick 

362 feet of edgestone and 12 small curb-corners 
543 feet of flagging ..... 

Amount paid to Jones and Meehan, for paving, as per 
contract : 
2,198.8 sq. yds. block paving on concrete, 

at $2.50 $5,497 00 

1,348.5 lin. feet of edgestone reset, at 40 cts., 539 40 

833.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 65 cts. . . 541 78 

104 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at $2.90 . 301 60 

Extra work as ordered .... 109 26 



joints ou concrete) . 

$661 80 

67 50 

33 33 

3,995 52 

275 00 

311 70 

434 40 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division 
3 catch-basins, 1 manhole, and building 2 
basins ....... 



Amount retained from Jones & Meehan 



Repairing 
new catch- 



6,989 04 



252 70 

$13,020 99 
349 45 

$12,671 54 



Charles street, Beacon street to Pinckney street, paving and reg 

ulating (tar joints on concrete). 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming 
Gravel 



Sand 

Cement 

196 ft. of edgestone 

25,500 granite paving-blocks 

21,200 paving-brick 

81 ft. of flagging 

Sundries 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Con. Co. : 
2,345 sq. yds. cement concrete base, at 60 cts. . 

Amount paid to James Grant : 
1,585 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . $126 80 

950 lin. ft. of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . 142 50 

982 sq. yds. of brick paving, at 23 cts. . 225 86 

37 sq. yds. of brick paving, at 50 cts. . 18 50 

343 sq. yds. of brick paving, at 18 cts. . 61 74 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co. : 
2,290 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at 

91 cts $2,083 90 

95 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at 91 cts., 86 45 

110 cubic yds. earth excavation, at $1 . 110 00 

136 cubic yds. earth excavation, at $1.40 . 190 40 

7 cubic yds. earth excavation, at $125 . 8 75 

172 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. . 60 20 

Amount paid out for work done by Sewer Division : Re- 
pairing 5 catch-basins ....... 

Carried forward, 



52,052 54 

1,663 50 

195 99 

35 10 

552 90 

147 00 

1,884 45 

246 40 

64 80 

7 19 

1,407 00 



575 40 



2,539 70 

38 09 

$11,410 06 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



223 



Brought forward. 
Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Cherry street, asphalting and regulating. 
Labor and inspection .... 

Amount paid to John Casey : 
77.6 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 89 cts. 
221.8 sq. yds. paving removed, at 35 cts. . 



$11,040 71 
369 35 



$69 06 
77 63 



Amount paid to Metropolitan Con. Co. ; 
96.44 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
578.7 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt pavment laid, at $2.25 



Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 



$11,410 06 
$11,410 06 

$36 00 

146 69 

482 20 

1,302 07 

$1,966 96 
65 10 

$1,901 86 



Chester square, Washington street to Tremont street, asphalting, 
and regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming ....... 

Sand 

5.8 feet of flagging . . . 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Con. Co. : 
655 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
3,928 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt pavement, at 



52.25 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$14,000 00 
830 08 



$1,285 14 

1,353 50 

73 80 

4 64 

3,275 00 

8,838 00 

$14,830 08 

$14,830 08 



Chestnut avenue, Ward 9, asphalting and regulating. 

Labor and teaming 

Gravel 

Sand . 

3,000 paving-brick 

50 feet of edgestone 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
145.9 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt paving laid, at $2.25 

Amount j:>aid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
158.9 sq. yds. concrete base, at 83 cts. .... 

Amount paid to Jas. Grant: 
542 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $43 36 

62.9 sq. yds. of block paving, at 25 cts. . 15 73 

84.5 sq. yds. of brick paving at 28 cts. . 23 66 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$650 00 
273 21 



$276 00 
14 80 
18 00 
39 00 
32 50 

328 27 

131 89 



82 75 
$923 21 



$923 21 



224 



CiTr Document No. 34. 



Child street, macadamizing and regulating 

Areas : 2,018 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam and 865 sq 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gutter blocks 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Roller 

Paving 



yds 



paved gutters. 

$329 20 
363 00 
580 50 
91 80 
807 20 
140 00 
188 30 



Amount of special appropriation .... 

City Wood Yard, Commercial street, paving. 

Paving ......... 

Commonwealth avenue, construction. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Shovels, etc. 

Stone . 

Advertising 

Stakes 

Powder and fuse . 

Sundries 

Amount paid to M. Kiernan : 
15,666 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 45 cts. 

Amount paid to Boston Contracting Company 
46,640 cu. yds. filling, at 49£ cts. . . $23,086 60 
21,099 cu. yds. filling, at 37£ cts. . . 7,806 63 

Gravel 7,000 00 

Amount paid to James H. Seamans, George H. Worthley, 
and Emery B. Gibbs, Trustees, for gravel : 

26,054 cu. yds. gravel, at 12£ cts. . . 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 2,492 ft 
32-in. X 42-in. brick sewer ; 3,490 ft. 18-in. pipe sewer 
206.5 ft. 24-in. pipe sewer; 1,103.5 ft. 15-in. pipe sewer 
6 ft. 12-in. sewer ; 160 ft. 6 ft. X 6 ft. stone culvert 
304.64 ft. 7 ft. X 7 ft. stone culvert 



$2,500 00 
$2,500 00 

$121 25 



$18,614 91 

3,936 00 

902 30 

145 56 

1,474 83 

102 23 

198 30 

72 00 

348 32 

7,049 70 



37,893 43 
3,256 75 

50,360 49 



Amount retained from Boston Contracting Co. 



Commonwealth avenue, Arlington street to Berke- 
ley street, west side, macadamizing and regulating ; 
and from Berkeley street to West Chester park, re- 



$124,354 82 
1,184 01 

$123,170 81 



pairs. 
Area: 2,300 sq. yds. 

roadway. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Stone . 
Roller . 

Carried forward, 



6-in. macadam, excluding repaired 



$591 06 


565 


00 


2,050 


00 


350 


00 


$3,556 


06 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



Brought forward, 
Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$1,396 10 
2,159 96 



Conant Street, macadamizing and regulating. 

Area, 3,511 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand . 



Stone . 

Amount paid to Pay son & Co. : 
1,267 sq. yds. of block paving, at 25 cts. 
220 sq. yds. of brick paving, at 18 cts. 
2,143 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 



$316 75 

39 60 

171 44 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
5 catch-basins, 1 manhole, and building 1 new catch- 
basin .......... 



Cornwall street, laying out and constructing. 
Grade damages 

Davis Street, asphalting and regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming 

Sundries . ... 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Company : 
106.5 cu. yds. 6-in. concrete base, at $5 

Amount paid to Daniel Sullivan : 
661 lin. feet edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . $118 98 

353 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 28 cts., 98 84 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Company : 
639.5 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt paving, at $2.25 



Amount of special appropriation 

Dearborn street, Eustis street to Dudley street, pavi 
regulating. 

Area, 917 sq. yds. 

Labor 

Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Sand 

18,910 granite paving-blocks 
205.7 feet of flagging . 
3,700 paving-brick 



225 

£3,556 06 

£3,556 06 



$768 40 
586 50 

1,462 00 
152 20 

1,440 00 



527 79 



214 17 



$5,151 06 


$1,000 00 


$351 

295 

24 


27 
50 

75 



532 50 



217 
1,438 


82 

87 


$2,860 71 
$2,860 71 



112; and 









$415 


48 








189 


00 








212 


50 








66 


60 








1,321 


63 








185 


13 








48 


10 



Carried forward, 



,438 44 



226 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$2,066 91 
371 53 



Decatur street, Ward 16, asphalting and regulating. 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 



Teaming: 

Sand 



47 feet of nagging . 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Company : 
118.5 cu. yds. 6-in. concrete base, at $5 

Amount paid to P. W. Hernan : 
477.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. . $133 70 

887 lin. feet edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . 159 66 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., for paving : 
711 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt pavement, at $2.25 



Amount of special appropriation 



,438 44 



52,438 44 



$399 71 

205 50 

5 40 

37 60 

592 50 



293 36 

1,599 75 

$3,133 82 
$3,133 S2 



Dorchester avenue, Wards 15 and 24; paving, macadamizing, 
and regulating. 

Area : AVard 15, 3,917 sq. yds. of block stone paving. Areas : Ward 24, 
17,578 sq. yds. block-stone paving, 6,812 sq. yds. gutter paving, 
and 17,585 sq. yds. 12-in. Telford macadam. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming .... 

Gravel .... 

4,636 lin. feet of flagging . 

555,479 granite paving-blocks 

Wharfage . 

Stone 



Poller . 

Powder and fuse . 

Grade damages . 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan 
1,744 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 80 cts. . 
328.9 sq. yds. pavement removed, at 35 cts., 
415 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 25 cts. 
15 cu. ycls. rock excavation, at $1.75 

Amount paid to M. Donnellan : 
870 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 62 cts. 
1,266 cu. yds.]pavement removed, at 18J cts., 

Amount paid to Jas. McGovern : 
6071 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 70 cts. . 
2,655.5 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 62 J cts., 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
16,152.3 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 
525 sq. ycls. crosswalks, at 25 cts. 
420 sq. yds. block paving, at 35 cts. . 



Carried forward, 



$23,869 20 

10,224 00 

12,544 05 

3,613 20 

34,754 74 

505 80 

14,068 00 

1,180 00 

705 00 

1,175 00 



$1,395 

1,151 

103 

26 



$539 


40 


234 


21 


$425 25 


1,659 


69 



2,676 35 



773 61 



2,084 94 



$4,038 08 
131 25 
147 00 



4,316 33 
$112,490 22 



Street Department — Paying Division. 



227 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid to Chas. J. Coates : 
9,024.4 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
93 sq. yds. crosswalks, at 25 cts. 



,255 35 
23 25 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
15 nevv catch-basins, repairing 3 catch-basins, and laying 
195 ft. of 12-in. pipe sewer ...... 



$112,490 22 

2,278 60 

2,530 81 
$117,299 63 



Dorchester Street, Ninth street to Broadway, paving, macadam- 
izing, and regnlating. 

Ninth street to Eighth street — Area: 525 sq. yds. 

street to Broadway — Area : 5,475 sq. yds. 4-in. 

Labor 

Teaming ..... 
Gravel ..... 

Stone ...... 

Roller 

8,912 granite paving-blocks 
27,000 paving- brick . 
437 feet of flagging 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,754 lin. feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
1,386 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
2,351 sq. yds. brick paving, at. 18 cts. 
158 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

36 cts 56 88 



block paving ; Eighth 

macadam. 

$2,971 19 
963 50 
567 00 
1,664 45 
500 00 
658 60 
324 00 
349 60 

$140 32 
346 50 
423 18 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new manholes . . . . , . 



Dudley Street, Blue Hill avenue to Shirley street, 
avenue to Dennis street, paving and regulating. 

Area: 3,199 sq. yds. paving. 

Labor 

Teaming .... 

Gravel 

Sand ..... 

91,487 granite paving-blocks 

71 feet of flagging 

Advertising .... 

Amount paid to Wm. McEleney : 
799 feet of edgestones reset, at 8 cts. . . . $63 92 
1,199 sq. yds. block leaving, at 25 cts. . . 299 75 

563 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . . 101 34 



Amount paid Cor work done by Sewer Division: Building 
1 new catch-basin and repairing 40 feet of sewer . 



Amount of special appropriations 
Amounl paid out of Paving Division 



1,157 98 

in I II 



966 88 
99 43 
$9,064 65 

and Brook 



$2,025 80 

996 00 

1,159 40 

104 40 

5,879 95 

56 80 

8 40 



465 01 

416 33 

$11,112 09 

s I 1 , 1 12 09 



228 



City Document No. 34. 



Dudley Street, Washington street to Vine street. 
Amount paid to James Grant & Co. (being the amount re 
tained for paving laid in 1891) .... 

East Fifth Street, L street to N street, macadamizing an 

ulating. 
Area: 3,063 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel 
Stone . 
Roller . 



21 61 



d reg- 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 
1 new catch-basin ..... 



Amount of special appropriation 

Edgestones, Ward 21. 

Sand ...... 

Gravel . . . . . 

898.5 feet of edgestone 

Paving 



Building 



Amount of special appropriation . . . . 

Eighth street, L street to street, grading and regulating. 



90 

473 10 

225 00 

1,253 30 

300 00 

112 61 

$3,244 91 
$3,244 91 

$23 40 
178 50 
503 16 
294 94 

$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



Labor 
Teaming 
Hill gravel 
Beach gravel 
Stone 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,335 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. 
1,198 sq. yds. round paving,* at 35 cts. 
830 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. . 



$240 30 
419 30 
232 40 



1,564 06 
472 50 
347 00 
303 00 
171 75 



892 00 
53,750 31 



* Round stone for gutters taken from Dorchester street. 

Eliot street, Washington street to Park square, paving 

ulating (tar joints on concrete). 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming .... 
Advertising 
711 ft. of edgestone . 
942.65 ft. of flagging . 
64,780 granite paving-blocks 
41,600 paving-brick 
Wharfage 

Amount paid to C. B. Payson & Co. : 
2,655 sq. yds. block paving on American 

cement concrete base, at $2.97 . . $7,885 35 

554 sq. yds. block paving on gravel, tar 

joints, at $2.37 1,312 98 



and reg- 


$705 46 


84 00 


9 


00 


496 


12 


784 


97 


4,787 


24 


499 


20 


220 


22 



Carried forward, 



),198 



',586 21 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



229 



Brought forward, $9,198 33 
1,837 ft. of edgestoue set, at 23 cts. . . 422 51 
1,88-1 sq. yds. brick paving, at 69 cts. . 951 96 
116 sq. yds. crosswalks on American con- 
crete base, at $2.97 .... 311 52 
26| days stone-cutter, at $1.00 ... 123 05 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 
Repairing 2 catch-basins, 2 manholes, and building 2 new 
catch-basins . . . . . ' 



',586 21 



11,043 37 



276 39 



Amount retained from C. B. Payson & Co. 



Amount of special appropriation . . $9,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 180 40 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements. 

Ward 12 9,173 40 

Ellery Street, macadamizing and regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel .......... 

430 feet edgestoue, and 10 small corners .... 

Amount paid to Collins & Ham : 
782.6 lin. feet of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . $117 39 

305.2 sq. yds. block-paving laid, at 35 cts. . 106 82 

Blocks furnished from Dorchester avenue, between South 

Boston Line and Mt. Vernon streets. 
Amount paid for work clone by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch-basins 



Amount of special ajspropi'iation ..... 

Falcon Street, macadamizing, grading, and regulating. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Sand 

Stone and stone screenings . 
Paving .... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
3 manholes and building 2 new catch-basins . 



$18,905 
552 



$18,353 80 



18,353 



$511 
165 
410 

278 



42 
00 
85 
30 



224 21 



190 61 



$1,780 
$1,780 



:)0 
39 



$1,425 

636 

259 

18 

1,035 

60 

277 

$3,711 



31 

00 
00 
00 
00 
'03 

99 

33 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 1 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



$2,286 60 

1,130 70 
291 03 



13,711 33 



First Street, Ward 14, paving and regulating at I street. 
400 sq. yds. block paving. 

Labor $ 365 

Teaming .......... 105 

339.8 feet of edgestone and 6 large curb-corners . . 223 



7d 
00 



Carried forward , 



$694 58 



230 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

180.95 feet of flagging ....... 

9,695 granite paving-blocks ...... 

Beach gravel 

Amount paid to Collins & Hani (being the amount retained 
from work done in 1891) ...... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing 
1 catch-basin, 1 manhole, and building 2 new catch- 
basins .......... 



$694 58 

190 00 

711 30 

51 75 

646 21 



270 97 



$2,564 81 

Florence street, laying asphalt blocks on concrete base, and 
regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . .. $506 04 

Teaming 279 00 

Sundries 31 82 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Company : 
76.5 cu. yds. 4-in. concrete base, at $5 . . . . 382 50 

Amount paid to Daniel Sullivan : 
334 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts 93 52 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Company : 
688 sq. yds. asphalt block pavement laid, at 

$3.10 . • $2,132 80 

Less allowance for reduction of gravel base 144 48 



Amount of special appropriation 

Flllda street, macadamizing and regulating 

Ai'ea: 1,622 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand .... 

Stone .... 

Rolling 

208 feet of edgestone . 

326 feet of flagging 

2,240 granite paving-blocks 

Paving: .... 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 9 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 10 

Amount paid out of Paving Division 



1,988 32 

$3,281 20 
$3,281 20 







$345 24 






567 00 






900 10 






25 20 






617 75 






85 00 






116 48 






293 40 






165 76 






209 79 




$3,325 72 


$505 51 


! 


327 0C 




802 6£ 




1,690 51 


<K3 39fi 79 



Geneva avenue, Bowdoin street to Josephine, grading and mac- 
adamizing. 

Area: 4,300 sq. yds. 15-iu. Telford macadam and 2,000 sq. yds. 6-in. 

macadam. 
Labor $1,777 88 



Carried forward, 



!,777 88 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



231 



Brought forward, 
Teaming ........ 

Gravel ........ 

Filling . 

Stone ......... 

Roller 

Execution of court ...... 


750 
955 


21 
05 


$1,777 88 

2,236 50 

851 40 

1,800 00 

4,614 36 

500 00 

925 12 


Amount of special appropriation . . $6 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 5 


$12,705 26 
$12,705 26 


Harvard street, Washington street to Albany 


street. 








$239 80 


Haviland street, macadamizing. 








Labor ......... 






$156 28 

42 00 

343 70 

$541 98 


Amount of special appropriation 






$541 98 


Hawes street, paving. 








Area : 247 square yards. 

Gravel 

5,745 granite paving-blocks .... 






$398 39 

186 00 

96 80 

418 81 

$1,100 00 


Amount of special appropriation 






$1,100 00 



Heath Street, widening, etc., Day street to Tremont street, 
macadamizing and regulating. 

Area: 7,980 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor ......... 



Teaming 
Gravel 
Stone . 



Powder and fuse ...... 

1,026.96 feet of edgestone and 4 small corners 
151.6 feet of flagging ..... 

80,000 granite paving-blocks 

Roller 

Sundries ....... 

Amount paid to Jas. Doherty & Co., 
445 feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. 
1,707 sq. yds. block paving, at 35 cts. 
257.6 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$746 10 

597 45 

64 40 



$14,398 67 
4,675 72 



,575 28 
,964 00 
,777 80 
,239 00 
297 00 
631 18 
136 44 
100 00 
653 30 
232 44 



1,407 95 
$19,074 39 



$19,074 39 



232 City Document Xo. 34. 

Henshaw Street (now Hastings street), macadamizing and 
regulating. 

Area: 3.829 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .' $737 00 

Teaming 1,129 50 

Gravel 980 64 

Stone 1,438 00 

81,285 14 
Amount of special appropriation . . 81,000 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 11 551 40 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 2,733 74 • 

$4,285 14 

Horace and Homer streets, grading. 

Labor $636 26 

Teaming 99 00 

Gravel 509 00 

Stone 91 00 

81,335 26 
Amount of special appropriation . . 81,169 26 

Amount paid out of Street Improvement, 

District Xo. 1 166 00 

$1,335 26 

Houghton street, macadamizing. 

Labor $437 60 

Teaming 12 00 

$449 60 

Hudson street, asphalting. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co., as per 

contract, for asphalt laid in 1891 $886 32 

Humboldt avenue, extension. 

Grade damages $1,650 00 

Hunueman Street, grading and construction. 

Labor $330 00 

Teaming 229 50 

Stone 740 85 

Gravel 239 70 

Filling 3,713 70 

Grade damages 7,800 00 

$13,053 75 

India Street, State street to Central street (tar joints on con- 
crete), paving and regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $603 34 

Teaming .......... 676 50 

144 feet of edgestone 108 00 

24,750 granite paving- blocks . . . . . . 1,829 03 

Carried forward, $3,216 87 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



233 



Brought forward, 
500 feet of flagging ..... 
3,000 paving-brick ..... 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan : 
805 sq. yds. block paving removed, at 60 cts. 

Amount paid to H. P. JSTavvn : 
153.4 cu. yds. American cement concrete base, 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co. : 
841.9 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at 

91 cts 

141 feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. 



137.3 sq. yd: 
78.5 sq. yds. 



brick paving laid, at 28 cts. 
crosswalks laid, at 91 cts. 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 
District No. 3 





$3,216 87 

400 00 

87 50 




483 00 


£5.25 . 


805 35 


$766 13 
25 38 
38 44 
71 44 


901 39 


$979 01 


$5,844 11 


4,865 10 


$5,844 11 





K street, Broadway to First street, m 


acadamiz 


ing 


and reg- 


ulating. 








Area: 3,320 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 








Labor . * . 






$563 66 


Teaming ....... 






280 00 


Gravel . . 






190 05 


Stone 






866 29 


Roller 






100 00 

$2,000 00 


Amount of special appropriation 






$2,000 00 


L street, grading, etc., First street to the 


bridge. 






Labor, including inspection and engineering 






$863 65 


Filling ....... 






3,150 06 


Advertising ...... 






54 23 


Lumber ....... 






67 67 


Amount paid to Perkins & White : 








Building abutment to bridge 


$3,118 3' 




733 cu. yds. material dredged at bulkhead 


146 


60 











3,264 90 


Amount paid to Thomas A. Rowe : 








Building retaining- wall, as per contract 


$9,431 


00 




Part payment for coping for retaining- wall, 


163 


02 


9,594 02 










sir,. inn 53 


La Grange Street, Ward 23, grading. 








Labor ....... 






$1,060 in 


Teaming ....... 






497 50 


Gravel 






172 80 




$1,730 70 


Landing, Federal-street bridge. 








M. F. Sullivan, building landing as per agreement . 




$500 00 



234 City Document No. 34. 

Lexington avenue, now Shannon street. 

Labor $200 10 

Filling 597 00 



>7 10 



Loilg'WOOd avenue, Parker street to Huntington avenue. 

Labor $100 00 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co. : 
Amount retained on contract for work done in 1891 . 407 88 



Amount of special appropriation . . $407 88 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 100 00 



$507 88 
$507 88 



Lynde street, Charlestown. 

Labor $244 85 

Teaming 99 00 

Gravel 52 36 

$396 21 
Amount of special appropriation $396 21 

Magazine Street, East Chester park to Norfolk avenue, grading 
and gravelling. 

Labor • . $561 09 

Teaming 135 00 

Screenings .......... 610 20 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

2 new catch-basins . 267 91 

$1,574 20 
Amount of special appropriation . ... . . $1,574 20 

Medford street, Lexington street to Chelsea street, and Main 
street to Quincy street, regulating. 

Area: 4,500 sq. yds. repaving. 

Labor $989 29 

Teaming . ■ . . 227 50 

Gravel 910 74 

1,976 granite paving-blocks ...... 144 24 

8.66 feet of edgestone 6 07 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. : 
1,350.6 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . $108 05 

3,235 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 25 

cts 808 75 

916 80 

$3,194 64- 
Amount of special appropriations ..... $3,19464 

Mercer street, resurfacing. 

Labor and material $945 02 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



235 



Minot street, Neponset avenue to Adams street. 

Area, 7,411 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Stone . 

Gravel 

Roller . 

Paving 

52 small and 6 lai'ge corners 

2, 304 gutter blocks 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



5*1,559 63 
4,953 15 



Motte street, asphalting and regulating. 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming .......... 

Gravel .......... 

Sundries .......... 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn : 
101 cu. yds. American cement concrete 

base, at $5 $505 00 

7 loads crushed stone, at $2.10 ... 14 70 



Amount paid to National Construction Company 
616 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt laid, at $2.25 . 



Amount retained from National Construction Company 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 5 . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



$1,500 00 

424 17 
165 49 



Murdock street, Ward 25, grading and gravelling, 

Labor 

Teaming ......... 

Gravel ......... 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



$993 94 
865 45 



Ninth street, Old Harbor street to N street, macad- 
amizing and regulating. 
Area : 3,000 square yards 6-in. macadam. 
Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Roller . 

228 feet of edgestone 

Carried forward, 



00 

1,230 00 

3,423 00 

348 30 

320 00 

69 04 

223 10 

52 99 

56,512 78 



>,512 78 



5112 30 

21 00 
34 50 

85 46 



519 70 

1,386 00 

52,158 96 
69 30 

52,089 m 



$2,089 m 

$288 86 

232 50 

1,338 03 

$1,859 39 
$1,859 39 



$570 35 
390 00 
300 00 

1,210 00 
200 00 
L27 68 

$2,798 03 



236 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid to P. W. Hernan, 
1,101.4 sq. yds. block paving,* at 25 cents, 
30.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 

* Blocks furnished from Dorchester avenue. 



$275 85 
5 49 



*2,798 03 

280 84 
53.078 87 



North Margin Street, continuation of laying out at Stillman 
street. 



Labor . 

Teaming 

200 feet of edgestone 

Paving 



Parker Street, Huntington avenue to Westland avenue. 
Labor ........... 

Poplar street, regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming .......... 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
1,292.5 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt laid, at $2.50 . 



$988 40 

373 50 

150 00 

34 31 

H,546 21 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$3,000 00 
819 75 



Randolph street, regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Gravel .......... 

Paving .......... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Laying 
827 feet of sewer and connections and building new 
catch-basins . . 



$580 00 

$471 50 
117 00 

3,231 25 

$3,819 75 

$3,819 75 



5345 65 
43 20 

407 83 



4,055 03 
H.851 71 



Rutherford avenue, South Eden street to Allen street, 
and regulating. 

Area: 5,000 sq. yds. paving. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Lumber .... 
Crossing-blocks . \. 
421 .75 feet of edgestone 
127,731 granite paving-blocks 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co., for paving 
322.1 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
996.7 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts 
54.2 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 



$25 77 

249 18 

9 75 



paving 



3,609 39 

883 50 

1.883 14 

102 80 

68 25 

295 22 

9,510 28 



284 70 



Carried forward, 



$16,637 28 



Steeet Department ■ — Paving Division. 



237 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid to J. Turner & Co. : 

1,606 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . $128 48 

2,619.1 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 654 77 

27 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 4 86 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

15 new catch-basins and repairing 1 . . . . 



Amount of special appropriation . . $5,696 73 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 2,656 32 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 2 10,089 04 

Sawyer avenue, grading and regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Stone . . . . . . . . . . • 

268 cu. yds. earth excavation ...... 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co., for paving: 

743.6 feet of edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . $133 85 

1,150.7 sq. yds. block paving (blocks fur- 
nished from South yard), at 60 cts. . 690 42 



$16,637 28 



788 11 
1,016 70 

$18,442 09 



$18,442 09 



$279 60 
255 00 
740 09 
187 60 



824 27 



School Street, paving and regulating (tar joints on 

base). 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming .... 
Sand ..... 
8,800 paving-brick 
31,700 paving-blocks . 
44 feet of edgestone 
369 cu. yds. earth excavation 

Amount paid to C. B. Payson & Co. : 
1,246.2 sq. yds. block paving, pitch joints, 

at $1.18 $1,470 52 

378 feet of edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . 69 84 

213 sq. yds. brick paving, at 23 cts. . . 48 99 

50.6 sq. yds. crosswalks, at $1.18 . . 59 71 



$2,286 56 
concrete 

$809 10 

306 00 

8 10 

114 40 

2,342 63 

26 40 

369 00 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division 
1 new manhole ..... 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Bull dins: 



54,500 00 
1.306 96 



1,649 06 
82 27 

$5,806 96 

$5,806 96 



Seattle, Hopedale, Windom, Sorrento, and Amboy streets, 

Brighton, construction. 

Labor $753 30 

Teaming 1,135 50 



Carrii d forward, 



$1,888 80 



238 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $1,888 80 

Gravel 5,026 35 

Filling- 6,106 80 

Stone . . 1,340 50 



Amount of special appropriation . . $9,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,349 50 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 11 4,012 95 



L,362 45 



$14,362 45 



Second street, B street to E street, paving and regulating. 
Labor, including inspection and engineei'ing . . . $829 90 

Teaming 103 50 

162,336 granite paving-blocks , 11,929 60 

1,600 feet of flagging ...*.... 1,280 00 

52,500 paving-brick 630 00 

120 feet of eclgestone, 4 small and 2 large corners . . 114 60 

Advertising . . . . . . . . . 12 08 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
6,647 sq. yds. block paving, at 90 cts. . $5,982 30 

3,073 feet of edgestone set, at 30 cts. . . 921 90 

2,547 sq. yds. brick paving, at 60 cts. . 1,528 20 

288 sq. yds. crosswalks, at $1.10 . . 316 80 

Extra work as ordered .... 145 51 



Amount of special appropriation 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 6 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 



$5,000 00 

7,142 91 

11,651 48 



8,894 71 
$23,794 39 



523,794 39 



Second Street, Dorchester street to I street, paving and regu 
lating. 

Area: 3,501 sq. yds. j>aving 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 



11,800 paving-brick . 

1,127.1 feet of flagging 

89,215 granite paving-blocks 

Wharfage .... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division 



$3,477 54 

832 50 

687 75 

140 70 

901 68 

6,418 84 

76 81 

94 88 

42,630 70 



Seventh street 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming 

Gravel 

159 feet of flagging 

21,000 paving-brick 

59,526 paving-blocks 



D street to E street, paving and regulating. 

$1,255 73 
474 00 
510 75 
127 20 
262 50 
2,748 05 



Carried forward, 



$5,378 23 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



23 C J 



$273 00 
66 20 



$60 


70 


426 


50 


17 


28 


95 


31 



Brought forward, 

Wharfage . 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan : 
455 cu. yds. earth removed, at 60 cts. 
331 sq. yds. paving removed, at 20 cts. 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
758.8 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
1,706 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
48 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

36 cts 

529.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Repairing, 



Amount of special appropriation . . $6,000 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 7 435 06 



Shirley street. 

Filling 

Short street, West Roxbury, grading. 

Labor . ." . 

Teaming- ...... 



Amount of special appropriation . . $3,403 40 

Amount paid out of Paving Division ... 7U 50 

Silver street, C street to D street, regulating. 
Labor . . . . . . . . . . 

Teaming .......... 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvement, 
Ward 13 



$409 34 
73 50 

184 50 



Smith street, construction, grading and regulating. 

Labor 

Teaming 
Gravel 

Stolid 

13,099 gutter blocks 
Paving 

Amount paid for work clone by Sewer Div 
:\ catch-basins and repairing 3 manholes 



ision : Buildinj 



Stanhope street, paving and regulating. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming . 



^5,378 23 
33 00 



339 20 



599 79 

84 84 

i,435 06 



$ 6,435 06 

$150 00 

$2,093 90 
1,380 00 

$3,473 90 
$3,473 90 



$409 34 
258 00 

$667 34 



$667 34 

$571 55 
583 50 
834 7o 
144 00 
353 6't 
17 1 75 

432 42 

13,094 59 



$7H7 (15 
mi.-, 50 



Carried forward, 



$1,603 L5 



240 



City Document No. 34. 



Bro ught forward, 
Gravel ....... 

Sand '. 

4,100 paving-brick 

64 ft. of flagging ..... 

130 ft. edgestone and 8 small corners 
9,435 granite paving-blocks 

Amount paid to C. B. Payson & Co. : 
378 ft. of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
202.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 
1,635 sq. yards block paving (blocks from 

Eliot street) , at 25 cts . 

Amount paid to F. H. Cowin & Co. : 
129 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . 
458 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : 
2 new catch-basins and 2 manholes . 





$1,603 15 




320 54 




89 25 




49 20 




36 80 




114 50 




698 24 


$30 24 




36 45 





408 75 



$10 32 
114 50 

Building 



Amount of special appropriation . . $1,683 50 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 2,098 45 

Stanton Street, grading and regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Stone ........... 

32,000 gutter-blocks ........ 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co. : 
201 feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . . $36 18 

831.8 sq. yds. block paving, at 60 cts. . . 499 08 



Stillman street, asphalting. 

Asphalt pavement ........ 

Amount of special appropriation . . $837 05 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 44 05 

Story Street, excavation. 

Labor . . . . . . . 

Teaming: .......... 



475 44 

124 82 
270 01 
,781 95 

,781 95 



,648 SL 
663 00 
352 93 
800 00 



535 26 
4,000 00 

$881 10 



$881 10 


$38 93 
659 37 


$698 30 
$698 30 



Amount of special appropriation 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Bennington Street, Porter street to Marion street, paving and 
regulating ; Saratoga street to Wadsworth street, regulating. 

Area: 2,139 sq. yards. 

Labor $1,416 80 

Teaming .......... 496 50 

Gravel 877 85 

49,849 granite paving-blocks 3,738 68 



Carried forward, 



5,529 83 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



241 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid to P. J. Attridge : 
305 cu. yards earth removed, at -44 cts. 
1,082 sq. yards paving removed, at 19 cts. . 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co., for paving 



$134 20 

205 58 



$6,529 83 



339 78 
481 39 

$7,351 00 



Border street, White street to Condor street, paving and reg- 
ulating. 

Labor ...... 

74,694 granite paving-blocks 
Advertising .... 

195 feet ofilagging 

Sundries ..... 

Building iron fence 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
2,767 sq. yds. block-paving, at 96 cts. 
1,475 feet of edgestones set, at 35 cts. 
831 sq. yds. brick paving, at 65 cts. . 
40 sq. yds. flagging, at 96 cts. . 
124 cu. yds. mason work, at $3.70 
174 cu. yds. mason work, laid dry, at $3.30, 
314| tons new wall stone, at $2.30 
117.7 tons stone ballast, at $1.50 
225.5 ft. cap stone, furnished and set, at $2.55, 
Extra work as ordered .... 





$365 00 




5,602 05 




47 78 




175 50 




21 99 




350 00 


656 32 




516 25 




540 15 




38 40 




458 80 




574 20 




723 93 




176 55 




575 02 




127 63 






a 387 9 a 



Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. 



12,949 57 
319 36 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District Xo. 1 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



Central square 

Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel 
Paving 



Chelsea street, regulating, paving gutters 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 

Stone 

64,446 granite paving-blocks 
Rolling .... 
800 crossing-blocks 
21 feet of edgestones . 

A mi unit paid to J. Doherty &Co. : 

139.5 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 

1,691.2 Sq. \<\*. Mock paving, at 25 cts, 

< 'nrrii <l forward, 





$12,630 21 


280 21 




350 00 






$12,630 21 




$118 82 




51 00 




20 00 




24 35 




$214 17 




$3,103 32 




558 00 




547 58 




1,890 00 




1,740 12 




260 00 




4oo 00 




10 so 


$11 1( 




422 81 






133 '17 




$8,949 79 



242 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 1 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 

North ferry, regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

2,875 granite paving-blocks 

400 feet of flagging ..... 

Amount paid to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
1,833 sq. yds. block repaving, at 60 cts. 
■539 feet of edgestone reset, at 25 cts. . 
195 sq. yds. brick paving, at 50 cts. 
236.3 sq. yds. flagging, at $1.20 . ' . 
1 day's labor, mason ..... 



Porter street, regulating and resurfacing 

Labor ...... '. 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel . . . . . " . 

Stone 



17,552 29 
1,397 50 



$1,099 80 

134 75 

97 50 

283 56 

4 50 



West Eagle street. 

Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel 



Work done by Surveyor's Department .... 

Work done by Bridge Division 

Work clone by Sewer Division : Laying 337 feet of 18-inch 
pipe sewer, 210 feet of 12-inch pipe sewer, building 10 
new catch-basins, repairing 5 catch-basins and repairing 
7 manholes 



5,949 79 



,949 79 



$83 33 
215 62 
360 00 



1,620 11 
52,279 06 



$759 00 
489 00 
200 73 
659 20 

2,107 93 



$25 30 

6 00 

39 00 



$70 30 


$185 49 


$39 70 



$2,088 98 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 2. 
Work done by Bridge Division, on Maiden Bridge . . $1,710 9 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 3. 



Alien suet 

Labor . 


■U, icguiziLiug. 


$687 13 


Teaming 




610 50 


Gravel 




354 55 


Sand . 




111 60 


Stone . 




792 25 


8,654 paving- 


brick ...... 

r orward, 


112 50 


Carrieclj 


$2,668 53 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



243 



Brought forward, 

"Wharfage 

50 crossing-blocks 

Amount paid to P. W. Hernan : 
174 feet of edgestone, at 8 cts. . 
440 sq. yds. round paving, at 25 cts. 
585 sq. yds. brick paving, at 25 cts. 
839 feet of edgestone reset, at 15 cts. 
394 sq. yds. block paving, at 35 cts. 
706 sq. yds. brick paving, at 23 cts. 
27 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, 

41 cts 



at 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 3 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



BlOSSODl Street, regulating. 

Labor 

Teaming . 

Gravel ....... 

7,000 paving-brick 

Amount paid to P. W. Hernan : 
730 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . $58 40 

343.5 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 25 cts., 85 87 

549 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 18 cts., 98 82 







$2,668 


53 


. 


, 


200 


00 






25 


00 


$13 92 






110 


00 






105 


30 






125 


85 






137 


90 






162 


38 






11 


07 











666 


42 






$3,559 


95 


$2,000 


00 






1,559 


95 










$3,559 
$563 


% 






50 






154 


50 






138 


75 






87 


50 



Brighton Street, asphalting and regulating 
Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Teaming ....... 

Gravel ....... 

Advertising 

9,500 paving brick ..... 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
1,876.7 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt laid, at $2.25, $4,222 57 
Amount paid for extra work as ordered . 811 37 

Amount paid to P. W. Hernan : 

1,195 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 25 cts., $298 75 

772 ft. edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . 61 76 

380 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 68 40 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 3 $6,216 61 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 418 11 



Clark street, asphalting and regulating. 
Areas: 336 sq. yds. asphalt; 76 sq. yds. paving. 



243 09 



Amount paid for asphalting, etc. 



L,187 34 



$581 62 

361 50 

90 00 

20 00 

118 75 



5,033 94 

428 91 
56,634 72 

56,634 72 

$795 54 



244 City Document No. 34. 

Hanover avenue, asphalting and regulating. 

Area: 304.5 sq. yds. asphalt. 
Asphalting . . . . . 

Advertising ....... 



Hawkins Street, paving and regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel 

8,000 paving-brick 

19,060 granite paving-blocks ...... 

250 ft. of edgestone . 

Amount paid to Jas. Grant & Co. : 
794 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . $63 52 

834 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 208 50 

157 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at 97 

cts. 152 29 

3.6 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, at 

36 cts 1 30 

346 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 62 28 



Stoddard street, asphalting and regulating. 

Teaming . . . . . . . . 

Labor . . . . 

Gravel . . 

2,000 paving-brick 

16.8 ft. edgestone 

Paving ........ 

Asphalting ....... 

Sand ... 

25 crossing-blocks 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 3 $555 79 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 168 50 




487 89 



$4,244 


95 


$123 


00 


121 


90 


44 


70 


25 


00- 


21 


67 


299 


25 


65 


47 


10 


80 


12 


50 



$724 29 



5724 29 



Pay-roll $125 51 

Engineering Department $190 00 

Work done by Sewer Division : Building 6 new catch- 
basins, 2 new manholes, and repairing 3 manholes . $1,029 67 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Beacon street, Tremont street to Somerset street. 

Labor and material ........ $605 34 



Street Department — Paving Division 



245 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 6. 



Broadway, Dorchester avenue to A street, asphalting 
lating. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand . 

17,200 paving-bricks 

Amount paid to National Construction Company : 
116.8 sq. yds. block paving, on concrete, 

at $3.55 $414 64 

1,276.5 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt paving, 

at $3 55 4,531 58 

684 feet of edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . . 123 12 

1,145 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 28 cts., 320 60 

15.3 sq. yds. cross-walks relaid, at 65 cts. . 9 95 

Extra work as ordered .... 34 30 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 6 $5,728 76 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 . 108 80 

Third street, A street to B street, regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Sand 

Gravel 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 6 $527 40 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 153 00 



and regu- 

$58 54 
72 00 
52 50 
13 50 

206 83 



5,434 19 

55,837 56 



837 56 




Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
8 new catch-basins and repairing 1 . 



$680 40 



$680 40 



)5 85 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Dorchester Street, First street to Third street, paving and regu- 
lating. 

Area: 2,100 sq. yds. paving. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

r»l, jiis granite paving-blocks 
386 feet of fla^ino- . 



$2,027 50 


555 


00 


434 


25 


3,763 


38 


443 


61 


$7,223 


71 



246 



City Document No. 34. 



I Street, First street to Second street, paving and regulating- 
Area: 1,200 sq. yds. paving. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming . . 
Gravel .... 



4,100 paving-brick 

30,000 granite paving-blocks 

177.9 feet edsrestone . 



$1,288 00 

343 50 

219 75 

49 20 

2,217 00 

142 32 

$4,259 77 

Sixth street, N street to O street (south side), paving and reg- 
ulating. 

Labor $305 80 

Teaming 73 50 

Gravel 326 20 

16,000 second quality blocks 400 00 

Amount paid to M. Donnellan : 
195 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 6ih cts. . . $125 78 
157 sq. yds. paving removed, at 19h cts. . . 30 62 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 

124.5 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 

660.6 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
114 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 



$9 96 

165 15 

20 52 



156 40 



195 63 



Tudor street, regulating. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Paving .... 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
19 new catch-basins, repairing 7 catch-basins, and build- 
ing 5 new manholes 



11,457 53 



$249 84 

615 00 

168 25 

76 61 

$659 70 



$2,244 26 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 8. 

West Dedhain street, regulating. 

Labor $468 53 

Teaming . 156 00 

Rolling 75 00 

Stone 600 00 

Gravel 11 37 

$1,310 90 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, Dis- 
trict No. 8 $1,206 53 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 104 37 

$1,310 90 

West Newton Street, Columbus avenue to St. Botolph street, 

macadamizing and regulating. 
Area: 2,400 square yards 6-in. macadam. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 247 

Labor $542 45 

Teaming 465 00 

Material 1,123 05 

Roller 100 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, Dis- 
trict No. 8 $638 45 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,592 05 



$2,230 50 



$2,230 50 



Worcester street, regulating. 

Labor $613 10 

Teaming 156 00 

Gravel 44 40 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, Dis- 
trict No. 8 $706 10 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 107 40 



$813 50 



$813 50 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Burke street, regulating. 

Labor . . . . . 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel .......... 



$127 
36 
95 


60 
00 

20 


$258 80 



Cabot Street, Ruggles street to Vernon street, asphalting and 
regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $2,012 15 

Teaming 1,303 50 

Gravel 520 20 

Sand 154 80 

Stone 350 00 

12,200 paving-brick 153 60 

198.5 ft. of flagging 206 44 

Sundries 15 45 

Amount paid to T. H. Payson: 
1,292.4 ft. of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . $103 39 

370.4 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 25 cts. 92 61 

968 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 18 cts. . 174 24 

370 24 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
479 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 .... 2,395 00 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
2,907 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt laid, at $2.25 . . . 6,540 75 

$11,022 13 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 9 $12,573 65 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,448 48 

$14,022 13 



248 



City Document No. 34. 



Prentiss Street, paving and regulating. 
Labor ....... 

Advertising ...... 

60,078 granite paving-blocks 

126 ft. edgestone, 1 large and 2 small corners 

24,250 paving-brick ..... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,737 sq. yds. granite blocks on gravel, at $1.08, 
1,020 ft. edgestone set, at 38 cts. 
749 sq. yds. brick paving, at 65 cts. . 
79 sq. yds. crosswalks, at $1.20 
Extra work as ordered .... 



Less amount for old blocks teamed by the 
city . . . . . . * 



Less amount retained from H. Gore & Co. . 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 9 $5,389 95 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,210 76 

Buggies street, regulating. 

Teaming 

Gravel - 

Stone 

Texas Street, paving and regulating. 

Labor ............ 

Teaming 

Gravel 

12,415 granite paving-blocks ...... 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Build- 
ing 5 catch-basins, repairing 6 catch-basins, and repair- 
ing- 8 manholes 





$21 20 




154 80 




3,364 36 




106 80 




291 00 


$1,875 96 




387 60 




486 85 




94 80 




78 48 




$2,923 69 




114 96 






2,808 73 






$6,746 89 




146 18 



$6,600 71 



5,600 71 



$168 00 
120 70 
100 00 


$388 70 


$164 05 

22 50 

209 10 

695 24 


$1,090 89 



$971 01 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Brunswick street, grading. 

Labor $366 73 

Teaming 399 00 

Filling 1,320 00 

Stone .... 706 50 

$2,792 23 
Amount paid out of Street Improvement, 

District No. 10 $1,673 73 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,118 50 

$2,792 23 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



249 



Eustis Street, Washington street to Dearborn street, paving 

and regulating. 
Labor, including- inspection and engineering . . . $2,043 01 
Advertising ......... 5 60 

74,464 granite paving-blocks . ... . . 5,461 15 

656 feet flagging 605 77 

135 feet of edgestone 101 25 

25,200 paving-brick 302 40 

Amount paid to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
3,456 sq. yds. block paving, at $1.05 . . $3,628 80 

2,150 feet of edgestone set, at 20 cts. . . 430 00 

1,425 sq. yds. brick paving, at 65 cts. . 926 25 

326 sq. yds. crosswalks, at $1.50 . . 489 00 

Extra work as ordered .... 54 17 



Amount retained from A. A. Libby & Co. 



Amount paid out 'of Street Improvements, District No. 
10 

Georgia street, regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Highland Park avenue and Fort avenue, regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming 

Sand ........... 

Gravel .......... 

Amount paid to Wm. McEleney : 
1,152 feet of edgestone i*eset, at 8 cts. . . $92 16 

3,776 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 94 39 

681.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 122 67 



5,528 22 

$14,047 40 
276 41 

$13,770 99 

$13,770 99 



17 20 



$497 00 

129 00 

72 00 

433 50 



309 22 



Intervale street, grading. 

Area: 1,742 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Filling .... 
Stone ..... 
Roller 



$1,440 72 



$443 57 
441 00 
640 00 
694 75 
170 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 10 

Ann nint paid out of Paving Division . 

Kemble street, paving and regulating. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 
Advertising ...... 

88.263 granite paving-blocks 



$1,510 77 
878 55 



,389 32 



$2,389 32 



$724 91 

4 00 

6,510 05 

623 07 



Curried forward, 



$7,s62 03 



250 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
26,550 paving-brick ........ 

Sundries .......... 

Amount j)aid to Collins & Ham : 
3,667 sq. yds. block paving, at 90 cts. . $3,300 30 

2,337 feet edgestone set, at 48 cts. . . 1,121 76 

553 sq. yds. brick paving, at 80 cts. . . 442 40 

183 sq. yds. flagging-walks, at $1.50 . . 274 50 

Extra work as ordered .... 316 68 



Amount retained from Collins & Ham 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 10 . . . . . $11,030 18 

Amount jDaid out of Paving Division . . 1,886 99 

Longmeadow street, paving gutters. 

Gravel .......... 

8,099 gutter-blocks 

Paving 



57,862 03 

331 87 

85 98 



5,455 64 

$13,735 52 
818 35 

$12,917 17 



$12,917 17 

$73 10 

218 67 

85 48 

$37? 25 

Moreland Street, Blue Hill avenue to Dennis street, grading, 
macadamizing, and regulating. 

Labor 
Teaming 



}g • 







Gravel 

Stone 

Paving 

Amount paid to John J. Nawn : 
780 cu. yds. earth excavated, at 40 cts. 
274 cu. yds. rock cutting, at $2 . 



$312 00 
548 00 



$920 20 
303 00 
266 90 
402 00 
103 78 



860 00 



Newcomb street and Reed street, grading. 

Labor 

Filling 



Reading Street, paving and regulating gutters. 

Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 
39,202 granite paving-blocks 

Stone 

958 sq. yds. block paving . 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 10 $2,466 96 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 803 17 



},855 88 



$130 70 
513 00 

$643 70 



$435 70 
308 50 
719 60 

1,071 37 
399 66 
335 30 

53,270 13 



,270 13 



Str'eet Department — Paving Division. 251 

Engineering- Department $279 91 

Surveyor's Department $72 00 

Work done by Sewer Division : Laying 110 feet 12-inch 
pipe sewer, building 18 new catch-basins, repairing 6 
catch-basins, and building 6 new manholes . . . $3,728 03 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 11. 

Arlington Street, regulating and gravelling. 

Labor $301 30 

Teaming 223 50 

Gravel 956 20 

$1,481 00 
Asphalt sidewalks repaired. 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
2,028 sq. yds. new concrete laid, at $1 . $2,028 00 

670.3 sq. yds concrete repaired, two layers, 

at 65 cts 435 69 

1,131.1 sq. yds. concrete repaired, one layer, 

at 50 cts 565 55 

$3,029 24 

Bradbury Street, regulating and gravelling. 

Labor $165 60 

Teaming 159 00 

Gravel . 607 60 

$932 20 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 11 $165 60 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 766 60 

$932 20 

Cokasset street, grading. 

Labor $75 40 

Teaming 174 00 

Filling 131 00 

Gravel 281 88 

$66 2 28 
Dustin street,, grading. 
Labor $259 30 

Easton street, grading. 

Labor $108 70 

Teaming 32 40 

$141 10 

Eilglewood avenue, grading, paving gutters. 

Labor $558 85 

Teaming fc23 00 

Gravel 1,603 35 

Carried forward, $2,580 20 





$2,580 20 
266 00 
146 40 


$284 75 
6 11 


290 86 




$3,283 46 



252 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, 

Stone 

162.67 feet of flaggiug 

Amount paid to D. Sullivan : 

1,139 sq. yds. block paving (blocks from Brigh- 
ton yard), at 25 cts. ...... 

76.4 feet edo-estone reset, at 8 cts. 



Amount paid out of Street Improvement, Dis- 
trict No. 11 $1,580.61 

Amount paid out of PaAdng Division . . . 1,702 85 

$3,283 46 

Menlo street, regulating. . Bi ^^ 

Labor $287 90 

Teaming 123 00 

Gravel ' 22 75 

Paving . . ' . 83 72 

$517 37 
Amount paid out of Street Improvement, Dis- 
trict No. 11 $403 87 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . . 113 50 

$517 37 

Mount Hope-street extension, grading. ssa = Br 

Labor . $210 05 

Teaming 514 50 

$724 55 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, Dis- 
trict No. 11 $190 50 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . . 534 05 

$724 55 

South street, Centre street to railroad, resurfacing. 

Labor $583 51 

Teaming 988 50 

Gravel 569 16 

$2,141 17 

Sycamore Street, Florence street to Ashland street, grading. 

Labor $737 00 

Teaming 2,389 50 

Material 1,170 62 

$4,297 12 
Amount paid out of Street Improvement, 

DistrictNo.il $2,06180 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 2,235 32 

$4,297 12 

Walter street, Proctor street to Mendum street, grading. 

Labor $504 70 

Teaming . . . 1,147 50 

Material 893 08 

Carried forward, $2,545 28 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



25, 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid out of Street Improvement, 

DistrictNo.il $892 12 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 1,653 16 

Washington Street, at Roslindale, regulating. 
Teaming .......... 

Labor ........... 



Work done by Bridge Division 

Work done by Sewer Division : Building 200 feet 4X3 
stone culvert, 23 feet 3 X 3} stone culvert, building 6 
new catch-basins ........ 



$2,545 28 



$2,545 28 



$309 00 
159 40 

$468 40 

$468 02 



£3,502 45 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Adams Street, Templeton street to a point within 200 feet of 

Minot street, Ward 24. 
Area: 7,270 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 



1g • 











Labor 

Teaming 

Stone 

Gravel 

Roller 



Bailey street. 

Area: 4,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone .... 

52,000 gutter blocks . 

Amount paid to J. McGovern : 
843 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 70 cts. 

Amount paid to C. J. Coates : 
1,329 sq. yds. block paving, at 49 cts. 



$916 16 

1,314 00 

3,635 00 

390 00 

500 00 

56,755 16 



$1,299 82 

568 50 

961 95 

1,680 00 

1,300 00 

590 10 

651 21 

$7,051 58 



Billiard street, regulating. 
Labor 



Freeport street, Dorchester avenue to Mill street, repav 

regulating. 
Labor ..... 



$87 40 
ins and 



Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

37,595 granite paving-blocks 
170.6 feet of flagging 

Amount paid to F. II. Cowin & Co. : 
2,053.4 feet of edgestone set, at 18 cts. 
7,700.6 sq. yds. block paving, at 35 cts. 
9.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. 



is 
552 00 
2,277 0() 

',,",'.10 00 

136 48 



$369 61 

2,698 36 

2 66 



— 3,070 63 



254 



City Document No. 34. 



Harvard street, widening and grading. 

Labor 

.Material . . . . . 



$184 00 
265 60 



Hecla street, grading. 

Labor .... 
Teaming- 



Nelson and Evans streets, grading 

669 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 55 cts. 
20 cu. yds. rock cutting, at $2.25 

Norfolk street, grading. 
Teaming and labor .... 



$367 95 
45 00 



$449 60 


$207 00 
156 00 


$363 00 


$412 95 


$48 00 



Whitfield Street, South Park street to Wheatland avenue, 
grading and macadamizing. 

Area: 3,800 sq. yards. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming ......... 

Stone ......... 

Gravel 



Surveyor's Department 

Engineering Department 

Work done by the Sewer Division : Building 175 ft. stone 
culvert, 685 ft. pipe sewer, 17 new catch-basins, repair- 
ing 1 catch-basin and 9 manholes 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 12. 

Bread street, paving and regulating. 
Labor .... 

Gravel .... 

Advertising 
100 ft. edgestone 
11,075 granite paving-blocks 
Amount paid to Jas. Grant : 
156 ft. of edgestone reset, at 8 cts 
427 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . . 106 75 
71.5 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . . 12 87 



$926 60 
560 50 
786 32 
212 20 


$2,485 


62 


$385 


57 


$168 93 


$5,761 


94 



$320 25 

90 00 

22 20 

65 00 

841 70 



132 10 



L,471 25 



Fort Hill Square, regulating, concreting sidewalks around square. 

Labor $276 42 

Teaming 18 00 



Carried forward, 



$294 42 



Street Department — Paving Division 



255 



Brought forward , 

Advertising 

Amount paid to Daniel Sullivan : 
663 ft. edgestoue reset, at 18 cts. . . $119 31 

662 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 35 cts. 231 70 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros., concreting: 
559 sq. yds. Sicilian asphalt, at $2.31 



Labor . 

Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 
31,620 granite paving-blocks 
200.5 feet of flagging . 

Amount paid to E. A. Janse : 
262 cu. yds. earth excavated, at 78 cts. 
231 sq. yds. cobble removed, at 20 cts. 
96 sq. yds. crossings removed, at 20 cts. 

Amount paid to James Grant : 
691 feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
1,015.1 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
310 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. 
11 days, stone cutter, at $4.50 



Pleasant Street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue, 
and regulating. 

Labor ........... 

Teaming .......... 

Gravel t ■ 

Sand 9 ■ . 

351 feet of edgestone and 1 large corner .... 
64.4 feet flagging . 

Amount paid to J. Turner & Co. : 
759 feet of edgestone set, at 15 cts. . . $113 85 

435 sq. yds. brick paving, at 23 cts. . . 100 05 

876 sq. yds. block paving (blocks from 

Motte and Eliot streets), at 57£ cts. . 503 70 



§294 42 
16 00 



351 04 

1,308 06 
$1,969 52 



n street, paving. 






$701 32 




132 00 




186 75 




1,938 72 




160 33 


$204 36 




46 20 




19 20 







269 76 


$55 52 




261 28 




86 80 




49 50 







453 10 




$3,811 98 



paving 

$143 40 
159 00 
158 25 

11 70 
268 65 

51 52 



717 60 



$1,510 12 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 13. 



Athens street, B street to C street, 


regulating and asphalting. 


Labor ....... 


$105 22 


Teaming ...... 


27 00 


Gravel ...... 


66 75 


124 feet edgestone and 2 large corners 


101 20 


21.3 feet flagging .... 


17 04 


9,400 paving-brick .... 


117 50 



( 'an ii ii forward, 



$137 71 



256 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 

726 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt, at $3.55 cts., $2,577 30 

1,013 feet of edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . 182 34 

443 sq. yds. brick sidewalks, at 28 cts. . 124 04 

43 sq. yds. crosswalks, at 55 cts. . 23 65 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 $3,187 67 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District 6 157 37 



Gold street, B street to railroad, regulating. 

Labor . . 

Teaming . . . . 

Gravel 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 $60 75 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 66 30 



Seventh street, B street, towards C street, paving. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Excavating 

Paving 



137 71 



2,907 33 
53,345 04 



5,345 04 



$31 10 
31 50 
64 45 

$127 05 



— $127 05 



$89 70 
67 50 
157 50 
364 00 
145 55 

$824 25 



Engineering Department 
Work done by Bridge Division 



.77 00 



$7,902 55 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 23. 

Poplar street, grading and regulating. 

Labor . 

Material 

Rolling 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 23 $1,800 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

District No. 11 110 40 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 2,053 72 

Terrace street, paving. 

Amount retained from A. A. Libby & Co., for work done 
in 1891 . . . 



51,240 74 

2,503 38 

220 00 

53,964 12 



53,964 12 



$477 20 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



257 



Thacher Street, Clmrlestown street to Enclicott street, asphalting. 

Labor . . . . 

Teaming ....... 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
158.7 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $3.10 
289.1 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.25 . 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



TremOllt Street, Roxbury crossing to Huntington avenue, regu- 
lating. 

$887 17 
288 00 
880 60 



$491 97 
650 47 


$339 80 
126 00 

1,142 44 
• $1,608 24 

$1,608 24 


$1,578 69 
29 55 





Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Fuel 



Amount of special appropriation . . $2,304 46 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 393 75 

Tuttle street. 

Area: 2,500 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor ... 

Teaming .......... 

Stone ...... 

30,000 gutter blocks (from Washington street) . 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co. : 
816.5 sq. yds. block paving, at 60 cts. . $489 90 

30.5 feet edgestone reset, at 18 cts. . . 5 49 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
2 new catch-basins 



Amount of special appropriation 

Tinton Street, macadamizing and regulating. 

Area: 1,800 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Rolling- 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$1,000 00 
035 75 



624 44 

18 00 

$2,698 21 
$2,698 21 



$296 70 
168 00 

1,023 54 
750 00 



495 39 

184 78 

$2,918 41 
$2,918 41 



$940 50 

102 00 

99 00 

334 25 

160 00 

! 1,635 75 



$1,635 75 



258 



City Document No. 34. 



Walnut avenue, Warren street to Townsend street. 

Area: 13,100 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone . 

Rolling; 



Amount of special appropriations 



$1,570 42 

1,210 50 

1,099 08 

5,220 00 

900 00 

$10,000 00 
$10,000 00 



Warren street, Dale str 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Sand . 

Stone . 

241.33 feet of flagging 

Amount paid to Payson & Co. : 
709.5 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
1,203 feet of edgestone reset, at 18 cts. 

238.8 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 25 cts., 
255 sq. yds. block paving i-elaid, at 35 cts., 

786.9 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 18 cts., 
21.6 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 28 cts., 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



eet to Blue Hill avenue, regulating. 



?2,694 65 

2,049 00 

1,394 00 

174 60 

824 25 
217 20 



$56 76 

216 54 

59 70 

89 25 

141 64 

6 05 



$5,000 00 
2,923 64 



569 94 

',923 64 



r,923 64 

Warren Street, Walnut avenue to Rockland street, paving with 

granite blocks. 
Ai*ea: 1,000 square yards. 

Labor $749 80 

Teaming . 591 00 

Gravel 368 90 

22,719 granite paving-blocks 1,657 35 

$3,367 05 
Amount of special appropriation . . $2,918 25 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 448 80 

Warrenton street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co., for 
work done in 1891 $250 56 

Washington street, Boylston street to Adams square, paving. 
Labor $3,959 16 



3,367 05 



Teaming .... 

193,525 granite paving-blocks 

Wharfage .... 

3,333.2 feet of flagging 

915 feet of edgestone, 1 large and 2 small corners 

30,650 paving-brick ...... 

Carried forward, 



552 00 
14,258 92 
825 52 
2,681 70 
703 58 
371 30 

$23,352 18 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



259 



Brought forward, 

Advertising 

Sundries ....... 

528 sq. yds. concrete base laid . 

486.4 sq. yds. paving- on concrete, at $1.18 
39.3 sq. yds. crosswalks on concrete, at $1.18 
Excavating ....... 

Amount paid to Jones and Meehan : 
7,254.5 sq. yds. block paving on concrete, 

at $2.73 

1,415.2 feet of edgestone set, at 35 cts. 
947.6 sq. yds. brick paving, at 65 cts. 

761.5 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at $2.70, 
Extra work as ordered .... 



Less amount chai-ged to Dorchester avenue 
for old blocks 





$23,352 18 




77 00 




22 01 




475 20 




573 95 




46 37 




321 00 


$19,804 79 




495 32 




615 94 




2,056 05 




1,057 34 





$24,029 44 
1,462 36 



Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 9 
new catch-basins, 4 manholes, repairing 21 catch- 
basins and 16 manholes ....... 



Amount retained from Jones & Meehan 



Amount of special appropriation 



22,567 08 

1,766 68 

$49,201 47 
1,201 47 

$48,000 00 
$48,000 00 



Washington street, Florence street to Davis street, paving. 
Area : 350 square yards paving. 

Labor : $404 33 

Gravel 59 77 

350 paving-brick 4 55 

8,802 paving-blocks 650 60 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 

Way street, paving and regulating. 

Area: 1,600 sq. yds. paving. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Sand ..... 
82.2 feet of flagging . 
40,19.') granite paving-blocks 
Repairing coal-holes . 



Amount of special appropriation 



$1,000 00 
119 25 



$1,119 25 
$1,119 25 



$1,750 12 

447 00 

227 20 

72 00 

65 76 

2,88:; 25 

160 00 

$5,605 33 
5,605 33 



Wenham Street, construction, edgestones, sidewalks, gutters 

paved. 
2,831 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 
Labor ..... 



Carrii (I forward, 



* 1,592 72 
$1,592 72 



260 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, $1,592 72 

Teaming . . . 655 50 

Gravel 746 03 

Stone 1,132 40 

Roller 260 00 

1,018 feet of edgestone and 6 small corners . . . 681 09 

Amount paid to T. H. Payson: 
1,824.6 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . $145 97 

439 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 79 02 

940.2 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 235 06 

460 05 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

5 new catch-basins 549 71 

$6,077 50 
Amount of special appropriation . . $6,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 77 50 

$ 6,077 50 

West Chester park, Columbus avenue to Tremont street, asphalt- 
ing and regulating. 

Labor ' $1,817 33 

Teaming 1,712 50 

Sand 91 80 

Sundries 79 93 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
262.5 cu. yds. concrete base, at $5 . $1,312 50 

1,607 sq. yds. Hastings asphalt block laid, 

at $3.02 4,853 14 

6,165 64 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
1,575 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt pavement laid, at $2.25 . 3,543 75 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 

7 new catch-basins and repairing 2 catch-basins . . 1,028 18 

$14,439 13 
Amount of special appropriation . . $14,196 47 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 242 66 

$14,439 13 

West Newton Street, Shawmut avenue to Washington street, 

paving with asphalt blocks and regulating. 

Labor $223 85 

Teaming • . . . 303 00 

Paving 325 27 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
1,116 sq. yds. Hastings asphalt block, 

at $2.89 $3,225 24 

Extra work, as ordered .... 234 36 

3,459 60 

$4,311 72 
Amount retained from Metropolitan Construction Co. . 172 98 

$4,138 74 

Worcester square, resurfacing and regulating. 

Labor $210 22 

Teaming 704 65 

Carried forward, $914 87 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



261 



Brought forward, 

Gravel 

Sand 

Stone . 

Repairing coal-holes . . 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co. : 
1,290 feet of edgestone reset, at 15 cts. . $193 50 

429.5 sq. yds. block paving relaid, at 21 cts. 90 20 

1,158 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 21 cts., 243 18 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 

Worthiiigton street, macadamizing and regulating. 

Area: 2,150 sq. yds. 6-in macadam. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming 

Gravel . . ' 

Stone ... 

Amount paid to Payson & Co. : 
444 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
760.8 sq. yds. block paving (blocks from 

Roxbury yard), at 25 cts. 
516.1 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 
903 ft. of marble set, at 8 cts. . 
4.3 sq. yds. marble set, at 25 cts. 
20.4 sq. yds. brick paving, herring bone, 

at 36 cts. ....... 

Amount paid for work done by Sewer Division : Building 
5 new catch-basins ..... 



$914 87 

342 40 

54 25 

756 00 

133 00 



526 88 



Amount of special appropriation 



$1,600 00 
1,127 40 


$2,727 40 
$2,727 40 


g-ulatiiiff. 






$1,132 74 
303 00 
629 00 
850 00 


$35 52 




190 19 

92 89 

72 24 

1 07 




7 34 
Building 


399 25 

686 01 




$4,000 00 




$4,000 00 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 



Total Amount Expended 

Allandale street . 

Allston bridge . 

Austin street 

Baldwin street, Ward 4 

Beacon street, Ward 25 

Beacon street, Arlington to Gloucester 

Berkeley-street bridge 

Boat landing, Commercial wharf 

Bolton street, Second street to D street 

Boston street, Andrews square to Mt. Vernon street 

Boylston street, Church street to Arlington street 

Brent street ....... 

Bristol street 

Bunker Hill street, between Pearl and Sackville streets 
Buttonwood street, between Mt. Vernon and Locust streets, 

Carried forward, 



$6,618 67 

252 90 

4,000 00 

4,807 26 

5,151 15 

42,644 39 

2,675 22 

970 00 

1,767 00 

7,438 44 

7,511 33 

3,473 72 

809 72 

5,855 80 

2,284 95 

$96,060 55 



262 



City Document No. 84. 



Brought forward, 
Centre street, Ward 23 . . . . 

Chardon street ........ 

Charles street ........ 

Cherry street . . . 

Chester square, Washington street to Tremont street 

Chestnut avenue, Ward 9, paving 

Child street 

City Wood-yard, Commercial street, paving 

Commonwealth avenue, construction 

Commonwealth avenue, West Chester park to Arlington 

street 

Conant street, macadamizing 

Cornwall street, laying out and constructing 

Davis street, asphalt .... 

Dearborn street, Eustis street to Dudley street 

Decatur street, Ward 16, asphalt 

Dorchester avenue, paving, Wards 15 and 24 

Dorchester street, Ninth street to Broadway 

Dudley street, Blue Hill avenue and Shirley street, and be 

tween Dennis street and Brook avenue 
Dudley street, Washington street to Vine street ' . 
East Fifth street, between L and N streets 
Edgestones, Ward 21 ....... 

Eighth street, L to O street, edgestones, etc. 

Eliot street, Tremont street to Park square 

Ellery street 

Falcon street, macadamizing 

First street, Ward 14 

Florence street, asphalt 

Fulda street, macadamizing 

Geneva avenue, grading 

Harvard street, Washington street to Albany street 

Haviland street, macadamizing . 

Hawes street .... 

Heath street, widening, etc. 

Henshaw street, construction 

Horace and Homer streets . 

Houghton street, macadamizing . 

Hudson street, asphalting . 

Humboldt-avenue extension, grade damages 

Hunneman street, grading and constructing 

India street, paving ....... 

K street, Broadway to First street .... 

L street, grading, etc. ....... 

La Grange street 

Landing, Federal-street bridge ..... 

Lexington avenue ....... 

Longwood avenue, Parker street to Huntington avenue 
Lynde street ........ 

Magazine street, between East Chester park and Norfolk 

avenue ......... 

Medford street, Lexington street to Chelsea street, and be 

tween Main street and Quincy street 
Mercer street, Dorchester street to Eighth street 

Minot street 

Motte street, asphalt . . : . • . 

Murdock street ........ 

Carried forivard, 



$96,060 55 

2,394 14 

12,671 54 

11,410 06 

1,901 86 

14,830 08 

923 21 

2,500 00 

121 25 

123,170 81 

3,556 06 
5,151 06 
1,000 00 
2,860 71 
2.438 44 
3,133 82 
117,299 63 
9,064 65 

11,112 09 
721 61 

3,244 91 

1,000 00 

3,750 31 

18,353 80 

1,780 39 

3,711 33 

2,564 81 

3,281 20 

3,325 72 

12,705 26 

239 80 

541 98 

1,100 00 

19,074 39 

4,285 14 

1,335 26 

449 60 

886 32 

1,650 00 

13,053 75 

5,844 11 

2,000 00 

16,994 53 

1,730 70 

500 00 

797 10 

507 88 

396 21 

1,574 20 

3,194 64 
945 02 
6,512 78 
2,089 66 
1,859 39 

$563,601 76 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



263 



ento 



streets, rnacad 



Brought forward, 
Ninth street, Old Harbor street to N street 
North Margin street, construction .... 
Parker street, Huntington avenue to Westland avenue 
Poplar street, regulating, Ward 8 
Randolph street .... 
Rutherford avenue, paving . 
Sawyer avenue .... 
School street .... 
Seattle, Hopedale, Windom, and Sorr 

amizing ...... 

Second sti-eet, B street to D street, paving 
Second street, Dorchester street to I street 
Seventh street, D street to E street 
Shirley street .... 

Short street, West Roxbury 
Silver street, A street to D street 
Smith street, construction . 
Stanhope street .... 

Stanton street .... 

Still man street, paving 

Story street ..... 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 10 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 11 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 12 

Street Improvements, Ward 12 

Street Improvements, Ward 13 . 
Street Improvements, Ward 23 . 
Terrace street, paving ...... 

Thacher street, Charlestown street to Endicott street, as 

phalt ......... 

Tremont street, between Roxbury crossing and Huntington 

avenue .... ... 

Turtle street ....... 

Vinton street, macadamizing .... 

Walnut avenue 

Warren street and Blue Hill avenue . 

Warren street, granite blocks .... 

Warrenton street ...... 

Washington street, Boylston street to Adams square 
Washington street, Florence street to Davis street 
Way street, paving ...... 

Wenham street, construction .... 

West Chester Park ...... 

West Newton street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue 
Worcester square, Washington street to Harrison avenue 
Worthington street, edgestones, etc 



$563,601 76 
3,078 87 
1,546 21 
580 00 
3,819 75 
4,851 71 
18,442 09 
2,286 56 
5,806 96 



14,362 45 

23,794 39 

12,630 70 

6,435 06 

150 00 

3,473 90 

667 34 

3,094 59 

3,781 95 

4,000 00 

837 05 

698 30 

35,216 63 



96 
72 
34 
81 
00 



1,710 

19,665 

905 

7,423 
15,845 

4,354 90 
23,332 24 
44,884 53 
24,452 94 
33,232 04 

8,792 87 
12.375 89 

3,964 12 
477 20 

1,578 69 

2,698 21 
2,918 41 
1,635 75 

10,000 00 

7,923 64 

3,367 05 

250 56 

48,000 00 
1,119 25 
5,605 33 
6,077 50 

14,439 13 
4,1:18 74 
2,727 40 
4,000 00 



Total 



$1,031,253 49 



Less amount paid out of appropriation for Paving Division . 68,86 I in 



Total 



SIMONS'.) 09 



264 



City Document No. 34. 



NEW EDGE STONE. 



The following tables show the amount of 
year: 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18. 

9, and 10.) 

Bay State Road . 

Beacon street 

Boylston street . 

Bristol street 

Commonwealth avenue 

Dalton street 

Fairfield and Boylston streets 

Falmouth sti*eet . 

Follen and St. Botolph streets 

Harcourt street . 

Huntington avenue 

Newbury street . 

Randolph street . 

St. Botolph street 

Stanhope street . 

West Chester Park . 



new edo-estone set during the 



{Paving Districts Nos. 8, 



Lin. ft. 

96 
204 

1,484 
367 
296 
963 
129 
131 
413 
114 
105 
122 

1,150 
666 
263 

2,719 



9,222 



ROXBURT. 

Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. (District No. 7.) 



Bickford street . 

Blue Hill avenue 

Burke street 

Con ant street 

Cunningham street 

Dacia and Dalmatia streets 

Danube and Dewey streets 

Elmore street 

Fulda street 

Gaston street 

George street 

Georgia street 

Gerard street 

Hartwell street . 

Hewes street and Rock street 

Heath street 

Holborn street . 

Howland street . 

Hulbert street 

Humboldt avenue 

Intervale street . 

Kemble street 

Longmeadow street 

Maple street 

Maywood street . 

Moreland street . 

Munroe street 

Carried forward, 



Lin. ft. 

181 
212 
590 
368 
632 
544 
347 
162 

1,680 
272 
287 

1,254 
115 
656 
185 

1,227 
260 
333 
175 
183 
142 

2,227 
572 
209 
841 
719 
322 

14,695 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



265 



Brought forward, 
Oregon street 
Newcomb street 
Parker street 
Reading street . 
Reed and East Lenox streets 
Ruthven street . 
St. Stephen street 
Smith street 

Thornton and Ellis streets . 
Valentine street . 
Walnut avenue . 
Ward street 
Warren street 
Westland avenue 
Westminster street 
Williams street . 
Worthington street 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



South Boston. 

Wards 13, 14, and IS. (District No. 1.) 



Lin. ft. 

14,695 
454 
174 
185 

1 ,855 
475 
550 
300 

1,118 
620 
782 
553 
211 
807 
103 
197 
204 

1,482 
741 

25,506 



Lin. ft. 



Boston street 
















3,832 


Buttonwood street 
















867 


Colton street 
















358 


East Eighth street 
















1,360 


East Sixth street 
















411 


Ellery street 
















775 


Gold street 
















301 


Tudor street 
















482 


West Seventh street 
















353 


West Third street 
















615 


Sundry streets in small quantities 












277 




9,631 




East Boston. 


Wards 1 and 2. (District No. 2.) 


Lin. ft. 


Bennington street 4,023 


Border street 














1,002 


Chelsea street 














4,898 


Falcon street 














693 


Putnam street . 














116 


West Eagle street 














357 


Sundry sti'eets in small quantities 








149 




11,238 


^^^^atm 


Dorchester. 


Ward 24. (District No. 6.) 


Lin. ft. 




Beach street 415 


Brent street 
















2,191 



Carried forward, 



6.50J 



266 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Bullard street 

Columbia and Quincy streets 
Centre street 
Dorchester avenue 
Freeport street 
Houghton street 
King street 
Lawrence avenue 
Mt. Everett street 
Sagamore street and Beifort street 
Sawyer avenue 
Shenandoah street 
Stanton street 
Tuttle street 
Washington street 
Welles avenue 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



West Roxbttry. 

Ward 23. {District No. 5.) 



Alveston street . 

Armstrong street 

Brookside avenue 

Child street 

Dan forth street . 

Lamartine street 

Paul Gore street 

Sylvia street 

Walnut avenue . 

Washington street 

Wenham street . 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Brighton. 
Ward 25. (District No. 4.) 



Ashford street . 
Bennett street 
Cambridge street 
Chester street 
Englewood avenue 
Menlo street 
Pomeroy street . 



Lin. ft. 

6,501 

333 

263 

160 

16,370 

2,0*2 
903 
205 
179 
219 
491 

3,143 
829 

2,274 

2,348 
282 
102 
175 

36,859 



Lin. ft. 
470 

1,007 
205 

2,380 
130 
273 
131 
500 
103 

1,950 

2,583 
238 



9,970 



Lin. ft. 

1,033 
232 

2,860 
484 

3,229 
933 
230 

9,001 



Charlestown. 

Wards 3, 4, and 5. (District No. 3.) 

Lin. ft. 

Baldwin street 502 

Rutherford avenue ......... 2,253 

Cedar and Bartlett streets 49 



2,804 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



267 



Recapitulation . 



City Proper 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Dorchester 
West Roxbuiy 
Brighton 
Charlestown 



Lin. ft. 
9,222 

25,506 
9,631 

11,238 

86,859 
9,970 
9,001 
2,804 

114,231 



NEW BRICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of new brick 
sidewalks laid during the past year : 



City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 21, 12, 16, 17, and 18. 

and 10.) 



Bay State road . 

Beacon street 

Belvidere street 

Boylston street . 

Bristol street 

Exeter street 

Falmouth street . 

Follen and St. Botolph streets 

Harcourt street . 

Huntington avenue . 

[Marlborough and Exeter streets 

Newbury street . 

Randolph street . 

St. Botolph street 

Stanhope street . 

Union Park street 

West Chester park 



Roxbury. 

Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. (District No. 7.) 



Bickford street . 

Bower street 

Burke street 

( ionant street 

Dudley street 

East Lenox and Reed streets 

El more street 

Fulda street 

Gaston street 

Georgia street 

Harrison avenue and Newcomb street 

Hart well street . 



(Districts Nos. 8, 9, 



Sq. yds. 

116 
249 

50 

2,313 

382 

442 

98 
321 

95 
577 
529 

88 
630 
492 
129 
124 
3,788 

10,423 



Sq. yds. 

133 

147 
338 
1,770 
508 
270 
105 
957 
189 
536 
253 
317 



Carried forward, 



i>.:n:: 



268 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Howl and street . 
Holborn street . - 
Humboldt avenue 
Hewes, Rock, and Regent streets 
Kemble street 
Maywood street 
Maple street 
Moreland street 
Munroe street 
Oscar street 
Oregon street 
Parker street 
Prentiss street 
Reading street 
Ruthven street 
St. Stephen street 
Smith street 
Thornton street 
Valentine street 
Walnut avenue 
Warren street 

Washington and Dale streets 
Westland avenue 
Westminster and Williams streets 
Worthington street . 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



South Boston. 
Wards 13, 14, and 15. (District No. 1.) 



A street 

Boston street 

Broadway . 

Colton street 

Dorchester avenue 

East Eighth street 

East Sixth street 

Gold street . 

West Seventh street 

O street 

Tudor street 

West Third street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



East Boston. 

Wards 1 and 2. (District No. 2.) 



Bennington street 

Border street 

Chelsea street 

Falcon street 

Orleans street 

Putnam street 

West Eagle street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Sq. yds. 

5,523 

220 

253 

146 

193 

537 

423 

145 

472 

127 

112 

209 

208 

381 

1,171 

263 

241 

714 

449 

494 

1,103 

4,319 

118 

131 

213 

1,008 

1,058 

20,231 



Sq. yds. 

102 
1,836 
362 
126 
219 
416 
280 
100 
311 
123 
142 
108 
359 

4,484 



3q. yds. 
4,065 

767 
6,609 
495 
300 
107 
316 
188 



12,847 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



2(59 



Dorchester. 

Ward 24. {District No. 6.) 



Bailey street .... 
Brent street .... 

Codman street .... 
Columbia and Quincy streets 
dishing avenue .... 
Dorchester avenue 
Dracut street .... 
Minot street and Neponset avenue 
Mt. Everett street 
Sagamore and Belfort streets 
Savin Hill and Dorchester avenues 
Sawyer avenue .... 
Stanton street .... 
Tuttle street .... 
Washington street 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



West Roxbury. 
Ward 23. {District No. 5.) 



Alveston street .... 

Armstrong street 

Centre and Wyman streets 

Child street .... 

Paul Gore street 

Wenham street .... 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Brighton. 
Ward 25. {District No. 4.) 



Cambridge street 



Charlestown. 
Wards 3, 4, and 5. {District No. 3.) 



Cedar and Bartlett streets 
Rutherford avenue 



City Proper 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Dorchester . 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
Charlestown 



Recapitulation. 



Sq. yds. 

2,695 

1,072 

175 

185 

139 

117 

130 

100 

119 

349 

193 

1,449 

1,311 

1,632 

270 

526 

10.462 



Sq. yds. 

246 
613 
112 
878 
404 
439 
213 

2,905 



Sq. yds. 

1,068 



Sq. yds. 
26 

3,425 
3,451 



Sq. yds. 

10,423 

20,231 

4,484 

12,847 

10,462 

2,905 

1,068 

3,451 



65,871 



270 



City Document No. 34. 



The folloAving tables show the number of square yards of block-stone 
driveways (gravel and asphalt) laid in various parts of the city, as part 
of sidewalk work, during the year : 



City Proper. 



Wabds 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18. 



Bristol street 

Dalton street 

Follen street 

Newbury street 

Randolph street 

Stanhope street 

St. Botolph street, cor. Albemarle street, 
West Chester Park 



Driveway. 

sq. yds. 



50.3 
12.9 

9.2 
80.6 
97.3 

4.7 
16.2 
14.7 



285.9 



Gravel, 
sq. yds. 



Asphalt, 
sq. yds. 



ROXBTJRY. 



Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. 



Burke street 

Conant street 

Clifton street 

Dudley street 

Bast Lenox street . 

Elmore street 

Fulda street ... 

George street 

Georgia street 

Gerard street 

Heath street 

Howland street . . . 
Hulbert street .... 
Intervale street . . . 
Kemble street ... . 
May wood street... 
Moreland street. . . . 
Newcomb street. . . 

Oregon street 

Prentiss street .... 
Reading street .... 

Smith street 

Ruthven street .... 
Thornton street . . . 
Worthington street 



Driveway. 
sq. yds. 



5.30 

80.00 

7.25 

9.30 

15.10 

7.00 

5.20 

51.80 

8.90 

31.30 

81.50 

6.00 

6.30 

12.30 

17.00 

35.20 

7.40 

11.20 

9.50 

25.20 

254.80 

31.80 

6.70 

4.80 

7.30 

73S.15 



Gravel, 
sq. yds. 



Asphalt, 
sq. yds. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



271 



Socth Boston. 



Wards 13, 14, and 15. 



Boston street 

Dorchester street . . 
East Eighth street. . 
East Sixth street . . 

Ellery street 

Tudor street . 

West Seventh street 
West Third street.. 



Driveway. 


Gravel. 


Asphalt. 


sq. yds. 


sq 


yds. 


sq. yds. 


115.0 








7.8 








20.3 








50.2 








28.7 








70.5 








82.6 








16.3 








391.4 









East Boston. 



Wards 1 and 2. 


Driveway, 
sq. yds. 


Gravel, 
sq. yds. 


Asphalt. 

sq. yds. 




45.1 

82.1 

353.6 
















480.8 







Dorchester. 



Ward 24. 


Driveway, 
sq. yds. 


Gravel, 
sq. yds. 


Asphalt, 
sq. yds. 




32.50 
7.05 
6.70 


287.0 
439.7 
241.0 

13,864.0 

448.1 
15.8 










10.90 
721.06 
189.10 






















14.50 


Tuttle street 


62.50 
22.25 

31.50 
32.40 


385.4 
1,123.0 

16,804.0 






1,115.96 


L4.50 



272 



City Document No. 34. 



West Roxbury. 



Ward 23. 



Armstrong street. 
Brookside avenue 

Child street 

Cohasset street. . . 
Danforth street . . 
Lamartine street. 
Sylvia street .... 
Washington street 



Driveway, 
sq. yds. 



57.9 

23.0 

56.9 

6.Q 

7.8 

18.0 

6.0 

19.3 



195. 



Gravel. 

sq. yds. 



224.0 



224.0 



Asphalt. 

sq. yds. 



Brighton. 



Ward 25. 


Driveway. 
sq. yds. 


Gravel. 

sq. yds. 


Asphalt, 
sq. yds. 


Ashford street 


26.3 

12.5 

141.9 




1,326.1 










Chester street 


347.5 




53.0 




2,498.0 










233.7 




4,171.6 







Charlestown. 



Wards 3, 4, and 5. 


Driveway. 
sq. yds. 


Gravel. 

sq. yds. 


Asphalt, 
sq. yds. 


Rutherford avenue 


173.4 











Street Department — Paving Division. 



273 



Recapitulation. 



b. s. 

Driveways. 
sq. yds. 



City Proper j 285.90 

Roxbury 738.15 

South Boston I 391.40 

East Boston | 480.80 

Dorchester i 1,115 96 

West Roxbury 195.50 

Brighton 233.70 

Charlestown i 173.40 

Total 3,614.81 



Gravel 

Walks, 
sq. yds. 



16,804 
224 



17,028 



Asphalt 
Walks, 
sq. yds. 



14.50 
4,171.60 



4,186.10 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTEND- 
ENT OF PAVING DIVISION. 

Buildings and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon street. The 
building is of brick and wood and covers some 8,000 square feet of 
land, and is divided into a shed for breaking stone for macadamizing, 
blacksmith's and carpenter's -shops, tool-room, and stable. The total 
contents of the lot, including wharf and building, are 63,180 square 
feet. 

Fort Hill wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of 
the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for the landing and 
storage of paving-blocks and gravel until such time as said wharf shall 
be wanted for the extension of Oliver street. A part of said wharf is 
occupied by a tenant-at-will, at $500 per annum, part by Sanitary 
Division. 

Lot on Chelsea, Marion, and Paris streets, East Boston, containing 
43,550 square feet. Part of this lot used by the Sewer Division. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Roxbury, con- 
taining 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are buildings containing a 
steam-engine and stone-crusher. 

Highland-street Stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick stable, 
erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Paving Divisions ; 
also a brick building used as a blacksmith's shop, and a shed for the 
storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 square 
feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed containing a steam- 
engine and stone-crusher, also a stable and tool-house. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are two 
stables, also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, containing 
81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by the town of Dorchester 
in 1867. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,:!00 square feet. 

West Roxbury. — On Child street, a lot of land containing 43,024 
square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, blacksmith's shop and 
tool-house. 

Oravellols. — In the town of Milton, on Brush hill road, containing 
64,523 square feet, hired by the town of Dorchester for nine hundred 
ami ninety-nine years. .Morion street, Ward 2.">, containing about one- 



274 City Document No. 34. 

third of an acre, purchased by the town of West Roxbury in 1890, used 
for storage purposes. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 37,000 
square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This lot is at present 
leased. 

Gravel and stones on lot on Market street, Ward 25, purchased by 
town of Brighton. 

On Rockland street, Ward 25, adjacent to engine-house, a brick build- 
ing, containing a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing about 13 
acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, stable, and crusher-plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm street, con- 
taining 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, stable, etc. 

Property belonging to the Paving Division, consisting of 90 horses, 
65 carts, 16 water-carts, 13 wagons, 6 steam-rollers, 9 stone-crushers, 
and 5 engines. 

In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets, stable, carriage- 
house, shed, tool-house, and office, on leased land. 

On Hereford street, a yard with shed, tool-house, and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkins 1 wharf, 521 Commercial street, purchased 
in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square feet, having on it an office 
and stable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. R. Cutter 

Deputy Superintendent Paving Division. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 275 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Street Department, Sanitary Division, 
12 Beacon Street, February 1, 1893. 
H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

Sir : I herewith submit my annual report of acts and expendi- 
tures from February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893. 

George W. Forristall, 

Deputy Superintendent. 

Items of Expenditures. 

For labor in collecting and removing house-dirt and 

ashes ........ 

For labor in collecting house-offal .... 

For labor of foremen, mechanics, watchmen, and 

feeders ....... 

For labor of men employed in stables and yard 
Official pay-roll : Salaries of deputy superintenden 

and clerks in office .... 
Grain used in city stables 
Hay and straw used in city stables . 
For collection of ashes in East Boston 
For purchase of new horses 
For stock and tools used in blacksmith shop 
For stock and tools used in wheelwright shop 
For stock and tools used in harness shop 
For stock and tools used in paint shop 
Extra team work in collecting ashes 
Repairs on stables and sheds . 
Fuel, gas, and electric lights . 
Medical attendance on horses and medicine 
Shoeing horses (outside shops) 
Printing, stationery, and advertising 
Contracts for the collection and removal of house 

offal in East Boston and Brighton 
Water-rates ...... 

Offal stock, consisting of buckets, etc. 

Ash stock, consisting of cart covers, baskets, etc. 

Carried forward, 



Amount expended. 


$144,423 


51 


100,258 


75 


26,056 


38 


14,624 


35 


8,769 


06 


22,391 


12 


14,251 


48 


10,404 


00 


8,140 


00 


3,246 


64 


2,614 


30 


1,730 


65 


469 


90 


69,275 


00 


2,647 


32 


1,868 


38 


676 


96 


705 


13 


1,043 


13 


7,650 


00 


•854 


22 


501 


82 


297 


50 


$442,899 


60 



276 



City Document No. 34. 



Amount expended. 

$442,899 60 

1,160 33 

23,898 74 



Brought forward, 

Stable stock, consisting of curry-combs, brushes, 
sponges, soap, blankets, manure-forks, etc. 

Dumping-boat, rental, royalty, towage, rent of wharf, 
repairs, labor, etc. ...... 

Incidental expenses, as follows : 

Telephone rental . . . . $491 40 

Stabling horses, East Boston, Dorches- 
ter, and West Roxbury ... 433 96 
Travelling expenses . . . . 120 10 

Boston Directories . . . . 22 00 

Damages by city teams . . . 277 31 

Clipping horses ..... 9 00 

Newspapers ..... 9 50 

Office furniture, miscellaneous supplies, 

etc 48 80 



Revenue. 

Amount of money deposited and bills presented to the City Col- 
lector for collection, for material sold and work performed by the 
Sanitaiy Division of the Street Department during the year ending 
January 31, 1893 : 

Money deposited with City Collector. 

From the sale of house-offal 

From the sale of tin cans 

From the sale of manure 

From the sale of wood . 

From the letting of scow privileges 



1,412 07 
,370 74 



.$21,282 


82 


. 3,041 


10 


26 


00 


2 


00 


504 


25 



$24,856 17 



Bills deposited with City Collector. 

For the removal of engine-ashes . . $5,447 25 

For the sale of manure .... 1,191 75 

For the sale of ashes .... 4,084 79 

For the sale of house-offal . . . 198 84 

For the sale of tin cans .... 647 36 



Amount collected by City Collector. 
Placed to the credit of the division 



11,569 99 
536,426 16 



.,856 70 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



277 



Amount expended for the Collection of House-dirt and House-ofTal, 
Labor and Contracts. 



Districts. 



City Proper . . 
South Boston . 
East Boston. . , 
Charlestown . . 
Roxbury .... 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Brighton 

Totals .... 



Expended for 
collecting Ashes. 



Expended for 
collecting House- 
offal. 



$88,24-1 56 

6,376 00 

1 10,404 00 

10,974 00 

23,408 75 

5,661 00 

7,141 00 

2,621 50 



$54,795 25 

7,824 00 

1 5,500 00 

6,178 00 

14,192 50 

6,146 00 

11,123 00 

• '2,150 00 



5156,827 51 



)7,908 75 



1 Contract work. 

Total Cost for Removal of House-dirt and House-ofTal. 

House-dirt Account. 



Expended labor, per pay-rolls . . . . $144,423 51 
Expended for stock, per ledger account . . 133,547 13 

Expended for East Boston contract . . 10,404 00 



House-offal Account. 



Expended labor, per pay-rolls . 
Expended for stock, per ledger account . 
Expended for contracts, East Boston 
Brighton ...... 



and 



Salaries . 
Incidentals 



258 75 

62,906 22 

7,650 00 

8,769 06 

1,412 07 



,374 64 



170,814 97 



10,181 13 
,370 74 



Material collected by Districts. 



Teams. 



South 
Yard. 



West 
Yard. 



Roxbury 
Yard. 



House-dirt and I 

ashes j 125,445! 77,780 

House-offal 33,931 



159,376 



77,780 



64,311 
9,802 



74,113 



Chas'n 
Yard. 



18,548 
2,610 



21,158 



E. Boston 
Yard. 



12,751 



12,751 



Brigh'n 
Yard. 



5,043 



5,043 



Total 
Loads. 



303,878 
46,343 



350,221 



278 



City Document No. 34. 



Disposition of Material collected. 



Where dumped. 


Loads 
House-dirt 
and Ashes. 


Loads 
House- 
offal. 


Street-sweep- 
ing by Street- 
Cleaning Div. 


Total 
Loads. 




37,085 

29,876 

21,400 

11,876 

11,509 

8,582 

7,630 

6,490 

6,090 

5,965 

74,112 

83,263 






43,476 
29,876 
21,400 
11,876 


















Mill Pond, Charlestown 






12,210 








8,582 
7,630 


East Boston Land Company 










6,490 
6,090 
6,060 

74,888 
124,240 

30,773 














7,963 

7,607 

30,773 




33,370 












303,878 


46,343 


33,370 


383,591 



Comparative Table, showing Cost of collecting Ashes and Garbage 
and delivering Same at Dumps. 

Cost per eart-load, including administration expenses . . . $ 1.31 

" " " minus " " ... 1.28 

" " " of ashes, labor only ...... 0.74 

" " " " " hired teams 0.65 

" " " " offal, " " . . ... . 2.17 

" " " " " labor only • 2.47 

" " " " " city labor and hired team . .. . 2.43 

" " " " " ashes, " " " " . . . 0.73 

" " boat-load to transport garbage to sea ..... 93.75 

' " cart-load " " . <<<<<«. . . . . . .22 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



279 







-O | 












05 








Hi 


QO Hl> 


GO 


© 




CO — lO 


CC 


OS 




eo "-^ 


CO_ 


CM 


n 




i-H W lO 




CN 


o 






CM 


CO 


fH 


» . 


-o 




-* 






OS 




os 




S 3 


CO 
lO 




<& 
















lO 










-« 


•1 










C£ 










■3 * d 

111 


CC 


i—i 




© 






co . 


CO 


JO 


a 










o 








CM 


.5? 










CO 

co 








33= 


'u 


o . 










a 


a « 
£2 














-* 


-) . 










cr 


) 








.S £3 • 


C£ 


> _> " 




O 

OS 




^ ^ G 


>r 


>o : 


lffl 


d 
o 

o 


£is 








CO 

o 


0> 


■" 




© 


W 


ij>a 

■ S3 








§& 


V 




CC 


> 






s 


flS.j 




< OS t- 


co 


o 


a 






o cc 


t- 


o 




l> — 


00 


CM 


& 






CM 


CM 


CN1 


o 










C- 


03 


-ti 


< 


„4" 


™ 


M£J 


cc 


) 




€& 


5 


2 =3 










O 


GO .2 














-« 


s 










IT 


) 






T3 


32p 


Ot 


> O tr- 


t- 


O 


5 


■* 


ie lO 


© 


l£5 


£22 


cc 


tH cm" 
CM 


CO 

CO 

CM 


OS 


2 
.a 


a> , 


ff 






_T 


o 

S3 


a 5 


c 


> 




CM 


mS. 














HC 


•) 










a 










5 * a 


i> 


. 


OS 


O 


■d 


£ll 




«*> ; 


<N 


lO 


3 




CM 


CN 


t-. 






co" • 


co" 


-* 


to 






■""' \ 


1—1 


CO 


«> 


ir 


• 




t- 


* 


■a g 

o3S 


oc 

if 


• 




۩= 






er 

C 










-d OS • 


^H CO 


<# 


o 


•a 


53 t; p 

^5a 


a 


-* CO 
> t- CO 

^"co 


© 
io 


CO 
CM 


5 






r~ 


t- 


1« 










3 


0) 


-f 


q 






O 


2 § 
S3 


c 

cr 














to 














* "53 
» 33 














<30 




T3 








T3 




T3 








0) 




C 












a> 






t- 

c 


O 55 

S3 S 










& 




c 






"a 






3 

o 

a 






a 


3 O 








P 


&-" 




< 





280 



City Document No. 34. 



Expenses of Dumping-boats. 



lount expen 


ded for Eoyalties ( 
" Rental 
" Towing 
" Wharfage 


per year) . 


• 


• 


$1,500 00 
5,362 00 
8,078 00 
2,000 00 




" Repairs on 


boats 


#3,531 


67 






11 n << 


wharf, etc. 


1,302 


10 


4,833 77 




" Labor 








5,164 76 




" Dredging 


. 






255 00 




" Insurance 








160 00 




" Incidentals 


, Manila rope 


. $95 


29 








Log, repairs, etc. . 35 


86 








Disinfectants 


41 


04 








Car-fares 


11 


75 








Coal 


9 


70 








Survey . 


10 


00 








Oil-can, cards 


, etc., 6 


33 


209 97 




$27,563 50 



Number of trips to sea, 294. 

Making the cost per trip, $93.75. 

Number of cart-loads of garbage carried to sea, 124,240. 

Making the cost per cart-load, 22 cts. 



Number of Carts collecting House-dirt, Ashes, and Offal. 

Offal-wagons owned by Sanitary Division . . . . 93 
" in use by Thomas Mulligan, E.B. ... 6 

" " " Allen Clarke, Brighton ... 2 



Ash-carts owned by Sanitary Division . 
Market-wagons owned by Sanitary Division . 
Ash-carts in use by Patrick Morrison, E.B. . 



172 
7 
5 



101 



184 



Total 



285 



1884. 
1886. 
1888. 
1891. 
1892. 



Ash-carts 



Cost of Carts. 

$148 00 
142 00 

107 00 Light, built for Roxbury District. 
133 00 
142 00 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



281 



Account of the Number of Loads of Material collected from 1882 to 
February 1, 1893. 



Yeab 


_ 


Ashes. Offal. 


Street- 
sweepings. 


Cesspool 
Matter. 


Total Loads. 


1882 . 

1883 . 

1884 . 

1885 . 

1886 . 

1887 . 

1888 . 

1889 . 




159,197 
169,610 
182,642 
193,734 
209,129 
220.186 
233,514 
227,325 
245,730 
2 313,464 
303,878 


28,385 
27,408 
28,520 
31,206 
33,170 
36,734 
37,709 
40,183 
40,525 
46,742 
46,343 


52,3S1 
58,272 
62,222 
61*455 
59,875 
68,990 
68,019 
70,476 
70,449 
3 10,564 


10,051 
8,801 
12,578 
13,151 
11,392 
14,333 
1 5,644 


250,014 
264,091 
285,962 
299,546 
313,566 
340,233 
344,886 
337,984 


1890 . 

1891 . 




356,704 
370,770 


1892 . 




350,221 














2,458,409 


396,915 


582,703 


75,950 


3,513,977 



1 July 1, 1S88, the Sewer Department commenced cleaning out cesspools. 

2 Ashes from January 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891 104,046 

Ashes from May 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892 209,418 



3 May 1, 1891, cleaning of streets transferred to Street-Cleaning Division. 



313,464 



Cost of Horse-shoeing and Blacksmithing. 

HORSE SHOEING. Division Shop. Outside Shops. 

Stock $1,887 44 

Labor 3,310 87 

$5,198 31 $627 06 



NUMBER OF SHOES PUT ON. 
Horses owned by Sanitary Division . . . . 
" " Street-Cleaning Division 
" " Paving Division . . . . 



Total 

Average cost per shoe, about 38 cents. 

BLACKSMITHING. 
Teams and cart repaired at division shop. 

Stock 

Labor ........ 



$1,660 08 
4,404 25 



10,052 
2,198 
1,348 

13,598 



3,064 33 



282 



City Document No. 34. 







o o 


o o 


00 


o o 


o © 


§-S|? 


o o 


Oi © 


a cao 
^a ^ 


o o 

— lO 
CN~0~ 


oo oo 














^ 00 Oi 








■-H 00 






-a 

a 


< P 1-5 




Eh 






cj 

<1 






E-i 














K 








O 




rr oo 


• ,_; 




eg 


0i Oi 




o 
a 
a 

a 
a 

o 


00 00 




°* © 


i-Too 




O 


*£ o 


C -*> 






a <u 


3 ° 






<J P 


^O 












& 




C 


lO 




a 


^oo CO 


o 


W 


s «& 


_o 


>> 


"3 


Ph 


s-. 


§ - 


CD 


CO CO 




& 


€9= 




© © © 






o o o 


_,. CO 




oo >o o 


"^ C^J 




oT to oo 


m 




s§= 


W-* 






O ~ 






O 




a 


+3 




c3 


CS 


GQ 

*-. 
O 


.SP- 


o „ 


-£ 


CD s 




§ 


•*i2 


£ 


a 


^ 


O - 




O 


o g_ 


a 




cB" 


o r -1 




CD o 


en — 




3 -G 


O o 




«s<H 


mo 




^J ■ • 






05 




















P : : 










a d 










° 2 




















S» : 










M° 










■c« 










W to. 










0) o3 " 










5H 








H 


.s ■• •* 








O 










S 


, , 








3 
o 


° - 














0) " " 


^ 




CO 


o •* 




G 


*i 




o 


CO 




J3 


& 




o - - 


o " 






CO 




OS 

> 

O ; - 


60 

c 
















CD 


o * 






P5 


E- 







u 




t- 


© m 


© © 


CM 


© CM 


O IQ 


jog 










oo 


W CM 


eo Oi 


P->csO 


00 


■* CO 




IO 


CO 


CO 


a* a >> 








O 











CO 






Oi 




-a 


oo 










H 


CD 
PR 












(M 










<p 






eg 






P 












a 


1-1 


+J 


a 

o 
O 




CO 


O 


G 




be 




§ 


«1 



£ Si 

G & 


„ 


-* 




n3 CD 

"S d 


O CD 




o M 


C co 




fH 


»- 2 












P< cS 




© 

o 


© © 


© lO ■ 


© © 


© CM tH 



ffl 



G 
O 

D 



O £ 



Mi 



G c^ 

•S bD 
^§ 

o <1 
CD 



o 






«^^^^ 



.5 fe « 



G G fe S- 
j3 <4-i C G o G 



WW 






Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



2$l 



Amounts and Payments made under O'Connor Bros. 

Contract for Refuse Tin Cans. 



Date. 



April 


11, 


It 


92.. 


April 


lli 






May 


11, 






July 


9, 






Aug. 


24, 






Oct. 


3, 






Nov. 


1, 






Dec. 


6, 






Jan. 


4, 


1893. 


Jan. 


24, 


(( 



52^ tons. 
13JJMU1 

14790 

16 lliA 

18 2JJii 

QZ&X. 

31S65. 

12 iiU!. 



5 2 Wti tons. 
107MU " 



Price per Ton. 



!1.25 



51 25 



§5.50 



$5 50 



Amount. 



$6 67 
74 60 
78 94 
92 35 
104 24 
50 19 
21 08 
86 82 
70 35 
14 51 



Less 



$599 75 



g Over- 

's" charges 



$1 38 











$6 69 


$10 10 


46 
23 





$10 10 



m O — 
= o 

5 5 



$6 67 
74 60 
78 94 
92 35 
104 24 
39 40 
21 08 
86 36 
70 35 
14 28 



$588 27 



284 



City Document No. 34. 



?0 






S 

13 
£ 
8 



IS 
£ 

is 
s 
e 

8 

e 



^ 



..o 



W 



OS 



S3 



Wft 



<< 00 






«« cj o d Nl H «l 

> C( 81 «| C| «| ri d 

i-l 00 T ^H 

i-l rH O O 



iocwao 

M o ■* t— O O 

■* O N H o as 

"* OS -* «D 00 -* 



o te 
o ,2 +^ o t-i s-. g 

W tCOtBQOiBi 




HNOMKJO 
O <N 1> CO w a 
O — r-l t~ 



(M O C O t- O 

t- lO ->f >o —i o 
SC l>f)cOHCM 



cS be 



* ce=Jfl o ceS «) 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



285 



Horses. 

Divisions : 

San. St.-Cl. 




co 

CO 
3S 




Average per 

day, 
45 4 










.0 


op 


a 1 3 . g a g 1 =fe 

-sr cm .-t -* 

H 1 CO 


Horse 
per Day, Cost. 


.0 .3| =) 

*u h -<n -< H mi =1 -*i 

-* O <M — 1 
1-1 CN O O 

O 
3=f 


Ho 

C5 

CO 

d 

4& 



O 

"3 



i-h O CO O O © CO O 

lft !-H -*VO -* t-h HO lffl 
CO QOONWU)^ 
fc— CO >— lO CM 

cm" co" 
4& 


5 

CM 

co 


m 
rs 

a 



PL) 


O • ^t" © © O CM © 1 lO 

O " CO © -* O -* © 

©_ ■ mmwio K5 ts loo 
! ocTh -3- r-^ -* 
00 . t- id cm »o 
<M . N ' to 


"3 




• CO 

; co 


10 

C3 






CM 

1C 

1 »o 

1 °* 


Bales. 

1,263 

2 sacks. 








co J2 

CM j3 

i-H j2 

CO 




n 
< 
> 

! 
i 


> 


X 


c 


/ 


C 


or 

c 

t- 

C 


7 


c 

«S 

-_ 

r 

a 

tn 
a 

> 


) 












a 

7r 

















S-. 










10 CD to 






- • p- 






01 






- 






CJj >> 






cS OS 












s > >o 






- -< H 











t-^o x) 0, -*j oj cj| 

-Q30 Kj c| x( c| H =1 




t-]x 


S 3 51 3 3 3 3 


s 


CO 


10 .-1 


t^ 






CO 


tJ=, L -j c| o! d tJ e| 
di -1 H H ^ tj d 
<=|» c( H ia td =) ol 
ci[x c| fl q H fl ^ 


-*IX 


t^ 




cq 




CM O 


1 -* 


c 




1 O 


«©= 


9& 


CJ- 


— HO O CO c 


OS 


CC 


CM CO I— CN CO C 


CO 


LT 


^HlOCENlC 


co 


O OO lO » H O ■* 


OS 


IT 


CO i-H 


CO 












CO 


5^ 


«& 


ir 


OOO^OOOC 


IO 


CO NOtOOOC 


lO 


CO 10 t>i> 10 sec 


1 S 








CO 00 Tf t~ CM CO 


co 


>c 


CO •-< 


O) 






1 ro 




OS 


O 






CO 




CM 


CO 






CO 




CO 








1 ■* 
















■>* 








""* 


_, 






<M „ 




CO 






co Z 











XL 












X 












V 














~ 














: 














z 














+- 














a 




























1 




.CO - (T- 

CO . *J . S 




p 


» s S S g | s 


) 


Q 


rtx o « i; a 




n 


OiCOUtC> 






e 






te 

























CO 






cu 












t- 






ei 






J3 










O 









286 



City Document No. 34. 




Street Department — Sanitary Division. 287 



House-offal. 

There are employed in removing house-offal 154 men and 93 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses three times a 
week during the summer months, and twice a week during the 
winter; from hotels, markets, and restaurants it is removed daily. 
There are 62 routes. The men are required to enter the yards, 
collect the offal, and empty the same into wagons ; then to drive to 
one of the depots, located as follows : one on Albany street, one 
on Highland street, Roxbury, and one at the Almshouse, Charles- 
town. 

The offal is sold to farmers of adjoining towns mostly, the 
balance is thrown away on scow and carried to sea ; about 30 
per cent, of the quantit} - collected during the past year has been 
disposed of in this manner. 

During the past year numerous patents have been introduced for 
the disposal of garbage b}' crematory process, etc. ; at the present 
time private parties are making an experiment of the city's offal at 
the Division yard on Albany street. 

HOUSE-DIRT AND ASHES. 

In the collection of house-dirt and ashes, there are employed 
202 men and 179 carts. This material is removed from hotels, 
tenement-houses, and stores daily, from dwelling-houses once a 
week. There are 82 regular routes. The City Ordinances of 
1892 require that house-dirt and ashes shall be kept in an easy, 
accessible place for removal ; the men being obliged to enter 
yards and areas, remove receptacles to the sidewalk, where their 
contents are loaded upon teams. The receptacle is then placed in 
its original position. The material collected is disposed of if 
possible on low lands, being used for filling, and also dumped on 
scows to be carried to sea. Of the amount collected last year, 
35 per cent, was disposed of in this manner. 



288 City Document, No. 34. 

Organization, 1893. 

Street Department, Sanitary Division. 

1 deputy superintendent. 
4 clerks. 

4 foremen. 

1 captain of scows. 

6 sub-foremen. 

2 inspectors. 
16 mechanics. 

3 tallymen. 

5 watchmen. 

4 feeders. 

3 messengers. 

7 stablemen. 
11 yardmen. 
16 dumpers. 

202 ash-drivers and helpers. 
154 offal-drivers and helpers. 

439 employees. 

The mechanics of this division are engaged in the construction 
of new wagons and carts, the painting and repairing of same, 
shoeing of horses for this division, and a number of horses for the 
Street-Cleaning and Paving Divisions, and the making and repair- 
ing of harnesses. 

Horse Account. 



1892. 






Br. 


1892. 




Or. 


Jan. 1. 


On 


hand, 


199 


Feb. 12. 


Exch'd, W. K. Porter, 


T 


Jan. 5. 


Purchased, 


2 


Mar. 8. 


Died, 


1 


Jan. 7. 




t i 


2 


Mar. 22. 


" 


1 


Jan. 12. 




1 1 


2 


April 6. 


Exch'd, M. Kiernan, 


1 


Jan. 16. 




<£ 


2 


July 17. 


Killed, 


1 


Jan. 27. 




it 


2 


July 22. 


" 


1 


June 10. 




(( 


1 


Sept. 4. 


Died, 


1 


July 1. 




" 


1 


Sept. 16. 


Exch'd, M. Kiernan, 


3 


Aug. 25. 




" 


2 


Sept. 20. 


" W.K.Porter, 


3 


Sept. 1. 




li 


2 


Nov. 1. 


S. S. Chase, 


1 


Sept. 9. 




" 


2 


Dec. 6. 


" W.K.Porter, 


6 


Sept. 12. 




C £ 


1 


Dec. 16. 


Killed, 


1 


Nov. 21. 




" 


2 




On hand, 


198- 


Dec. 1. 




" 


1 








Dec. 6. 




ti 


2 








Dec. 6. 




a 


2 








Total, 






225 


Total, 




225 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 289 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. 

Citt Hall, Room 44, Boston, February 1, 1893. 
Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : I herewith submit my report of work done and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division from February 1, 1892, to 
January 31, 1893. 

Yours respectfully, 

H. W. Sanborn, 
Deputy Supt. Seiver Division. 



290 



City Document No. 34. 



Ms 

"a P 



CD CD 
O CO 

CO C^T 



H Tj* »0 CI 

UO CD rH t- 

m" h" ics" 



&3 



OJ^iQOCOiOO CO t- t- CO 
©HON 

NOOO 

co'aTo' 



H CD O <N CO a o 

OOQONHCOWO 
O rH CM CO CO CO O 
CD NOCOOC 



H -* "* 

OO rH 

N b- iO 

CO CO O-l 

CD -rf CD 

C^TrH CO~ 



K)COO©'*ONO^Ot'OH OHO 
COCO"*COt-lr-T*<00>COeOCOO NiOb. 

to t- to — :: ri — '" <x — - c/: o -* co cd 



H2 



Ol "H O OJ CO o o 
HtOCXNMOiO 



CO CO t- rH CO CO C 



:o t 



■ o o 



A CN CO CO CO O 



(OH C 

r- a> cd co 

CO t- CO CI 

rco"cN 



)COCD'*COOt-t'COCDQO-* O^O 



CN T 



COCOClCOOOONO-'-tiOCCOCD 

COCO-rHcOCOO^aiOJCOGOOCD 
O l— CO NONffliOOCKOOO) 

CON OO H CO © t- O Ol 

H* CON t£tr? -r&CQC? 



o P S 
S S n (J 

■g jits o 



2T3rt 

.3 a 

03 £8 







o 
o 








■ " o 
. . co- 
co 

• • o" 

CO 








; ;° 





o o 
o o 

o o 
o o 

CN CO 









o o . 

o o 

© o • 
o o , 
© o_ 
o"of • 





o o o o 



loeoo 



OfOOWl 
CDQOt-HCOcO 
CM^ CM O *~^'" 

cm" of?i~-*~ 



CO I 



• o o 



CO ^H CO i 

t— a; co co 

CO t- CO CM 
r-H COHt- 

co aTco" 



X c 



> CO -t< CO 



jcncoi 

CO CO ■* CO CO 
lOt-CD CM 
CC^Ol ©^ 

i-T""^ co 



cm. ©-* us <x> 

-* a> OS CO CO 

CM CT1 lOCO CO 

i-l 00 CM t- 



-# o <* 



61) ? - 
P ■£ a p 

p a-o 
W 2 cc 2 



c u S 

CD CD h 

^3 



5 ° i?j 



■S M 

£ o 



CD 



a 5 5 



.SS 



Q.S P 

■S5C3C 



s 



-2-3 £ ~ 

P CDGO CD o 



w 3H P 



.p a p > 
p> -g -k p 



p-p 



t> o o 

73 2"^ 



p^pS 

O r- Q O 

p a fe 5P- 

V 1 CD 



gsg?- 



jCQ CDCCCC c3 -~ x Si 



^1 P C5 ^ 






mnRd 



^p^^:^ o 



.- CD CD 

O 5 p 
■OO 



OS 

ja 25^ 
K"> p 5 
o a >. 






a— a *= 

c3 a o p 

So tic 
£ ••& £ 
h|fl o 

CD CD CO Ph 
— fe"S fl 

"5 2 "m 

^ a* . 

CD-^ _.-^ 



&2S a, 



I rt 3 CD 



DCUCUCPOCDCUOCDCD0OCUCP 

ci&&c=^^feci&&c:&fe c : 

CUOJCDiUQJCUCUCUCDCDCUCDCUfli 
GC 0Q 0Q OQ CC CO .X< ^ 7j CO GO 0Q CC 02 



cu <u CU 

e p & 

CD CD CD 

■/j r /j */. x •nmmaimai 



CD CD 

CD CD 



% >"^ C P 
QOOQCOWb-l 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



291 



Z a 



o •— 



Stci 

v.* 

o c 
■M o 

3 .2 



ot— ©tocoototo 

OiDOOr-OCO - * 
OOOcotDO-MCO 
O^tM «3MHOnO 

o 53 ONC5 

CO iH 



O '> o 
cs <s m 

c;~-3 
0:3 &, 
ffl.o-3 

Sua 

- = 2 
« = S 
«•£ 

a g^ 
o> a-g 

J! 3" 

5a° 

^=3 

« - a, 
p.3^ 
»M.9 

o-- a 
-■* & 
s 2 o 
p S.a 
o .« 
ES3 ■ S 

- ? - : - s 

:- S ~ § 

5 s 1 ■= 

G -S S. 

- ° £ a 1 

s s ° -3 § j 



^2 

05 



= 5^.2 

5 • • a 

'op 



N o 



osalil 

mo 5 .2 £ " 

T • St St 

* a> a> £ — -~ 



o a> 



<2rj2 0-i: 



a -a 
r. -a 

h pfri a 



*»JbOSPsiHE-iS|sIS h5 



°!zi 



^.2 
A S 

o"S 

a 2 
a c 

a S 

33 

2< 

_£ a 



> 2 

2 £>o 

KH IS'- 1 ° 

o 2 ccto 
CO Q 



^ CS . o J 
"fi a, <u -r .a — 

a*SSS£ 






; x -x 



f-t o 
<N CO 
to <N 



- ; 



n°. H 
N*grH 

P q a 

•2.2 2 
a '5 -S 

^ft/^ a 
?ogo 



"E -r vn 



O >TJQ >2^ 
£ B 2 g srP„'g 






•— 1 2 a l2 o«w 



2fV 



P a 2 



Z Q ? t o a 2 

2 ** O CD > ^ 

g b 00 S E « o. 

t- 0) ^ i^ 0) r-i . 

n a o 5 a _■§ 
a, p ^ O; s jq & 

fe e °3 * " o 

O Og^O ©CO 
o o f o „ ■* 

.2.2 -•"•2 S* 



o o r 

o"o" 



O . to - 2 a * 3 a r 

ooSo™-= 



!3^ 



5 Q 



a a 



§ ^ 



o > 

52 



^3 a 

.23 

-a a 



o „ 

s o 



►S«fe». 



OQ - O 

S 2 J E S g§3 

ooaao-^z: 

2 2 *° T ' ~ 2 • 



!3.S 

IH S 

« '" 

2 o 

2 a 

a s 

E C3 
4) 3 

- o 



00 J3 

o & 



S< 



2 ° 

2 to" 






2 o ■? 

sal 

p a 2 



no, 1 

>" _ o 
- t'A 

■O-OtJ 

2<j-c 



2 I ^ 

0. W a 

<§2 



292 



City Document No. 34. 



Improved Sewerage 

Office salaries 
Pumping-station, inside 
Pumping-station, outside 
Engines and boilers . 
Main and intercepting sewers 
Moon Island 
Tow-boat .... 





$500 00 




39,447 61 




14,722 05 




5,629 23 




11,709 98 




19,479 28 




4,555 03 




$96,043 18 


Improvement. 




. 


$15,038 98 




2,790 00 



Maintenance 
Damages and claims . 

Roslindale channels .... $982 03 
Less amount furnished by Paving Divis- 
ion 802 39 



179 64 



$18,008 62 



Note. — The total amount expended by the Sewer and Paving Divisions on account of 
Stony-Brook Improvement is $18,811.01. 

Buildings, stables, and sheds, Brighton 

Building dike, Winthrop Junction 

New tow-boat (partial payment) .... 



$8,542 


08 


$2,333 


33 


$12,567 


50 



Miscellaneous . 

Office expenses, including salaries of deputy 
superintendent, clerks, and draughtsmen, sta- 
tionery, drawing materials, etc. 

Engineering expenses, including salaries of engi- 
neers, instruments, etc. ..... 

Current expenses of 8 yards and lockers 

Current expenses of 7 stables, including cost 
of horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc. . 

Repairing sewers . . . $9,485 26 

Less amount paid by Paving 

Division 2,402 66 



Cleaning and flushing sewers 
Cleaning catch-basins . 
Repairing streets 

Less amount furnished by Paving- 
Division ..... 



,040 35 
40 50 



U7,237 64 

27,355 28 
22,766 58 

24,176 55 



7,082 60 
21,334 85 
34,519 76 



999 85 



Carried forward, 



$155,473 11 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



253 



Bi ought forward, 
Building and repairing culverts 

and surface drains . . . $26,578 50 

Less amount furnished by Paving 

Division . . . . . 18,579 76 

Examining and locating ..... 

Work for departments and others, including in- 
spection of private jobs 

House connections ..... 

Water-rates ...... 

Damages and claims ..... 

Holidays ....... 

Travelling and incidental expenses 

Balances on old contracts .... 

Repairs of department buildings, stables, and 
yards . - . 

Hardware, blacksmithing, and tools 

Rubber goods ...... 

Engines and boilers, and repairs . 

Rebates on assessments .... 

Assessments for school-honse property, charged in 
error to this department .... 

Stock and supplies not included elsewhere . 

General repairs ...... 



1155,473 11 



7,998 74 
5,578 78 



6,808 
4,673 
6,643 
21,660 
19,463 
4,051 



76 
87 
70 
70 
72 
69 



18,350 92 

1,223 27 

14,178 91 

1,574 13 

770 62 

199 43 

265 00 

6,272 33 

917 36 

!76,105 04 



Note. — The total amount expended by the Sewer and Paving Divisions, on account of 
miscellaneous expenditures, is $297,127.96. 



294 



City Document No. 34. 



3 



=0 



0> 00 

z 
•- 



o 



s§ 



to CD 



c bO 



.- — X! 

S3* 



CN 00 

CO CO 



CO —i 

I-H t~- 

CO — 



.5 . c .S 

in eqio 











CD 








► 








. +£ 


cS 




03 
1 t 


CO 


C 
O 




■B !, 


a 






o a 


w 


■— 




i 
*& 


eS 


* 




§ 




<s 


ci p 






m 


tH « 


CO 






a) 








£ « 


rz5 








JZ 


>> 




02 Cf 

o £ 


Ss 

o 

B 
CO 


C 
e3 

< 




















to 






c 






3 






-t-3 






o 

CO 

T3 


CO 


3 


a 




3 




M 


« 


S 


a 


& 




,C 


a 


rG 


O 
T3 




5 


g 


o 


3 




O 


^ 


Szj 


B3 





*r a 
S3 .2 

3 co 

= Q 
■2 to 
u S 

c > 

C cS 

O M 
" >> 

co — 

'5 '2 

■?<£ 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



295 



M 




P3 


■« 


P4 


•<* 


=8 


-o 




<o 


pq 


S 




B 











d 












a> 












CO 












Sn 






CD 






S» 












3 






« 




OJ 


bo 







H C 










p 


" 2 




c 


'3 




<n 


&- 






O 






73 




»o 


a> 




OS 


id 

c 




OS 


o 




o 


M 

C 












o 




K 


s 




> 




c 






ec 


2 




.£ 












< 


a 




e 






a 


_3 




> 


« 




«e 


C 




c 






c 


•2h 




a 






5 


■a 

p 




H 


CO 

CH 

O 

cm 
O 




-4- 


U 




V 


0> 


















u H 




"c 






'■c 






c 






(5 







296 City Document No. 34. 

Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, City. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewers. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length 
in feet. 


Size. 


Charles st 




5 
3 

2 
24 

15 


2 
4 
1 


2 

7 

16 

3 


16 rep'd. 
680.24 




Boylston st 

St. Botolph st. . . 
W. Chester park, 
Dartmouth st. . . . 


1 
1 
7 
2 




Pearl st 


1 
2 
9 




Stanhope st 

Washington st. . . 




So. Market st 

Allen st 


1 






Kilbj st 








12-in. pipe. 


Stillman st 

India st 


1 

2 
2 




2 


1 


Hawkins st 




Eliot st 


1 

2 
2 
2 


3 


12-in. pipe. 


2 




2 







SUBIMARY. 

36 catch-basins built. 
54 " repaired. 

9 manholes built. 
31 " repaired. 

696.24 feet of sewers built and repaired. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



297 






p. 


•~ 


? 

~ 


o» 


00 


+J 


M 


/ 




V 


r»i 






- 


S* 



•5 § 



o 



a 



bo 03 

c fa 

1-J 





*- s- 




— o 
































so o 




3 J3 




So 

43 




«J r3 


o 


r- e8 








*- CO 




- f- 






- 


s -2 



ri = 


? 


— 


'3 


CO 

3 


CD 0) 








o 


r, « 


1—1 


1—1 




ffi 


a; fe 


03 


£ 


s 










o 


H3 


o> 3 


O 


£ 


w 


CD 












co *"■ 








ft 


s ■" 


•2 
CJ 


o 


^A 


s 


5 ^ 




o 


o 


CO CD 


3 

cd 


o 


0) 


CD 'O 



<U 3 « M — 



o » j 







"& 5 

c • - 

CD 

— CD 



S 3 C cS 3 

2 2 5^C 



i-H lO 
■* CO 
CO -*i 



c a 

CM CM 



r-1 — 1 CO 



CO O 
CO 00 
CM —i 



.a .a 

CM I^J 



S s 



*: ssi 



cd *j <y 

in 3 ^* 
OP-I 



CQ eS «3 

__ og t- ■— ■— i 

— ' — ' ct* -^ CD 

3 cd « co X 

eS rw 3 »i 

O rd C^K 

B d d cs C 

— ' u a> _ e8 

"S £~ C 3 



W - 



> CD CD rs ^ 

^ 3 3 B 9? 



a -. 



pq « 



PQS 



5 5 fe.,2 £ 






ft ft 
d b 






298 



City Document No. 34. 














CO -M 

oS B 
















CD 




























.S-e 














_ o « 














o £~ 


























CH? 














<n <C 












co 
A! 
cS 

S 


sewer wa 
iec. plans. 
est pits to 












35 














CO -M 














of old 
own on 
digging 
in 1891. 






















































-* 00 !-H 


CO 


cr 


■* 


-* CO 






OS CM -* 


CO 


c 


> CO 


i-H (-- 




^ 


<N ■* CM 


OS 


e> 


CO 


CO CM 




CO 


C2 — CO 


CO 


t- 


C5 


00 00 




o 


lO CO CO 


CN 


« 


> lO 


i— i r~ 




O 














CO 


t>^ 




CO 


i-i t- 






«= 


m 




€6= 


m 




T3 
















a 
















CS . 
































S3 

.2 | 




cu 

2* 






o <x 


1 








'Sh ; 






t- w 








E el 




B '. 






00 c\ 

03 p- 


1 
















-* cr 


























p 




CM 






(M _ 










1—1 
























c 




»o 


>« 




cu 












© 


CO 




S-. 








•s -s 




d '. 


I© 




'3 








SO cu 

S fq 




oo 

• 


CO 
05_ 




Ph 

cu 








0) " 






cm" 












H] 










CO 

E 














-U 


















CU • 






oS 














4> • ,A 




















CO 






'3 














b- .. c 






^2 














o 




c 




















c 


25 c 










e 
a> 

cu 




ect st. abou 
terly 

ea and Moul 




'5 

"> 

P 

b 
c 
"> 


B - 
O.S 

" '> 

cu •- 

B C 
E^ 

o b 
o c 


i 




(h 













T) "> 






EH 








Cu CO CO 




P- 


B ee 






3 
< 








Pros 
we 

Chel 




c 
B 

d 


C3p- 
B > 

.5 .a 


* 




O 












CO 




















N^-V^ 




c 


,q a 
















CJ 

CJ 


.E a 














OS 


5 -3 












a : 




a 


CS tn 










e 




c 












■s 


^ i : 




it 


cu B 


O 
H 






'3 

P3 


3 ■ : 

s 5 *» 




'3 


s d 

S a 








O O M 




cu 


CU a 










£ E CJ 




cu 


!h a 










S- :- 




CO 


13 cu 












H > 




* 


HJ 







Street Department — Sewer Division. 299 



Work done for and paid by Paving Division, Charlestown. 



Rutherford avenue. 
Baldwin street 



Catch-Basins. 



Built. Repaired 



Sewers. 



Length in 
Feet. 



Size. 



258.51 15-in. pipe. 



Summary. 



10 catch-basins built. 

1 catch-basin repaired. 
258.51 feet of sewers built. 



300 



City Document No. 34. 



s 



o 



00 




r 




CO C5D 


I— < 




i-H 






B 




c 




C T3 


■a 




ia 


























3 








3 0) 


pq 




pq 




PAW 


CO CO 


Ti< ■* OS »0 ■* 


00 O 


CO 


50 


TO 


CO 00 


CO -# 


>o 


CO 


(M 


— o 


CO cm 


-f 




co 


CO — ' 



M pq 



U 



i-i •<* 



CO CO 
CO >o 
CM (M 









pq 



H 



o S 

S 05 
© "H 



0} 

>5 



QQ 



bo o> 



pq 



CO-- 

X . 



t- oo 

— i OS 
CM CO 



• m Xi 




Sh CO 




>>5 K 


• O 


~«^ 


■w 






-w Sh CS 


* T3 


co CD te 

CD e O 


: b 

eS 


00 ft. 
ion u 
. and t 


• E 


• O 


- Oh M 


► s 



. is 

-a » .• 
o« •< 

o «H =S 

^ CO T*4 c 
CD jU X X . 

S."* a a 

" X -* -*H " 



i— i CO CM CM 



CM «# 00 CM m 

CC-OOiO 



B <D B 


C«U» 


O <73 O 


oS^ 


t- - - 


S- CD I* CD 


>> O >, 


>>£ c^ 


PQpqpq 


BKSO 



o 5 o s « «« 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



301 



ic — < 
IQ CM 
00 CO 



a C5 

-* CM 






^ 
















a 






































O 




XI 










'E 




„ 










,fi 














































OJ 










so 


















<*. 










<£ 




"* 










■* 


4 


X 




ai 






ft . ft - 




a 




'q 






■g B "g '? 


















cc 




_' 
























v- 




eq 






N tH CO0' 






-* 




' ' -l 






1-1 CM i-H r- 




o 




o 






O ■* t~ O 1 o 


o 




o 






CM CM CO QC 


1 CO 


z£ 




^1 






OS CM CO -* 


LO 


so 




— 






NNOlT 
CM 00 CO cr 




=8 : 










■ itr 




w : 




■2 






■S "R c 




/■v* 










to qj 4, 
CU C3 **> 




CQ ; 




■g 






rQ 12 CD 














J ».s 




c 




cd 








cS 




~. 






r~ C S- 

1 oj! 
















ft" 




- 

CO 

O 






alley a 

enning 

ingsev 


^ 


o ^ 

o 




o 






£ cU 


£-1 






CO 




-r 


















c 














7i 


















Oi 










T3 >> 


















O " 








5 




a> 


w 














">, 


/ 




^ c 








B 




a> 






3 












i-3 


e 


tr ' 









c 


: « 


>> 

u 


/ 


4 


M g « 

o ; r 





<co O 
oo oo 
O *& 



„ 


B 


i^ 


O 






s 




— 


> 






e 


n 


s 


bn 


o 


B 


cu 


l> 


a 


Bi 


b 


?H 


o 




CJ 


>•> 


T1 


J2 


c 




rt 


a> 






CO 

B 


CO 




C 



£><3 



5 " ? .- CJ ■? 






5*5 



CQ 



"TS 


o o 


o 


s 


t~ t- 


■>* 


« 


t- C5 


t~ 




CO o 


-* 


<M 


CO CM 


lO 


^ 






CO 






l"H 







3 * 



302 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, East Boston. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewers. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Length in 
Feet. 


Size. 




2 
4 
1 




3 
4 


J 337.7 \ 
\ 209.7 j 












No. Ferry 

Bennington st 


1 
4 








3 
2 


18-in. pipe 










12-in. pipe 



Summary. 

12 catch-basins built. 

5 " repaired. 

7 manholes " 

547.40 feet of storm-sewer built. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



303 



Cj 



C eS 
!-, C ** 

"2 B .a 
3 s 

ft o 
£* .O 

■S cfl 

& c3 , 



B 

o 

a 

bo 



£ £ 



,_, GO 

c e 

g3 c3 . 



£ P-, .2 
-#* e 



.2 



g ci o c 



•5 * 

a>C0 



=8 S 



oSl 



JO 



O 



- ■= ~ B > 

_ 3 S O e3 

5 c -° be o o 

• 2 a ° e _ x 

W 02 



E 
PP 



xj '3 "a 
o pp pp 



O VH 

on E 
X. eS O 



o 

o o 



5 «s 





ft! 












<o 




V 




rf- 








fti 




-o 


. 


on 


c 


<» 


t 


00 


+J 


M 


— 




if 


i"1 






•- 





o 



co -* CO 



to n a 



pq 



.2 S 

C cc 





ft 


<D 


0) 


ft 


0) 

ft 


03 
ft 


CD 
ft 


a> a> a> 
a. ft ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft ft ft 


r 








- 




r 


r r r 



"7 - T E 

r-l i-l •* 



.5 .5 .5 .5 

00 00 >0 CO 



&2 



fits 

on <x> 

E ta 



oiMoo 
W.S co co 



«5 i-H i—i CO >o IO 



i-l -^ -* i— I CO O 



tf 2 



CO to CO CO Ci 



IO to 00 -* 
CO CO i—i i— I 
CO CO 




< o 



a w k a: w 



- E W E 5s 

So o 

> E E 

u, Oj c 01 - 

K .£55 .£ o S 

^Ph p^ 



304 



City Document No. 34. 



to 

ffl 















bD c3 


C 




C3 U 

^h CD 
















c.-S o 


« c e o 














W"OT3 


n r c « 5 
.2 ° ^ So 

o J a 


























73 

CJ 

> 
eg 

a 
M 

O) 












CO 




gS cd 
c 


s- . CO ^ 

o c >> 

1 — ' ^° CD t- 








a 
2 

CD 




o 

o 

S-. 


T3 C qJ 

'Mil 

^ QJ — C 


3 P u o 
be ~> i=h c +-" 

CD S r— 

'" — J2 .is 










o 
>> 


^ c -3 S 


c2 * a ^ 

O 03 ., CD £ 

„ be^ ^2 « 








a 

5- 


CM 


os . n 

#>< i 3 
^ « J D 


ci ' ^ C 
S" CD 03 O o 

S '*" _, IT ^ 

CD C to -^ 








a 


5 

o 


c O ^ 

s i -5 s ^ 








r 


-5 


o 


O 5 








l"t 


< 




,__^ ,fC 








y 


Y 






-* OC 


•* 






O cy 


»f 




— to 




t~ cc 


co 






1-H C" 


c 




CO CO 


• 


t~- .ec 


CO 






— c- 


CX 




OS 1 if) 


CO 


OS cc 


b- 






>o »> 


cc 




<X 1 CO 


O 


-* C 


t~ 






lO if 


-* 




— 1 1 If) 


O 


















»o i- 








CN 


i— 




•* lO 














CN 




CM 




s 










m= 


€& 








,-^-v 


A 




t~ CC 












nd 














i-i CC 




a 










^j 








C* 










_o 




os cr 




CO »-H 






CD 


aj a3 










o'C 






& 


a a, 


p_a< a, _c 


u 


rf 




'S3 ^ 

S ^ 






d 


c a 


g '&,'a 'e 

.EC C 


u 


9& 














,+3 "7^ "7 "^ 










5 






lO 


ob co 


i -* IC CN 

■* CM i-l i- 










.5 






o 


.-H CM 


CO O O « 


ec 








oo 


CO OS 


CO lO CM CC 


o 






_— ^ 






cm 


-*" .-H 


C5 O CM rt 


»o 




"Cj cd 






t— 


CO CM 


i-H SS «^ 


b- 




be <u 






t~ 




v 


, C£) T3 
















" t-" £ 




Hi 








w- 




! 


CD 




' 




























, — *— 












h 












CO 








(/ 




OS 












03 








a 




a 












5 








^ 




a 












fc 








a 




*r c 






c 

CD 
0) 






^3 
C 

c3 








% 




^3 c 






£ 










S c 
















+j 


CO 


CD K 




c*p 






PQ 






» a 


CD 




1— 
q 


o 
•ra b 

o P 


) 










cd ^ 


03 


W B 




CD -f 




h 








P< a 


a 


= 


c n 




o 

o 
1-5 








cu j; 


5 P= 

CD 

!Z5 Sz 


E- 


o > 

c3 a 
CO J= 
C .2 


^ 








^ 


o 






































"S P 






.5 


<3 3 

^ be 


-t- 


















« 


| 
b(> 

a 


CD 


CD 




r^3 -^= 






"3 


^ cp > 
§>£ a 


a 


c8 " 

C S 

<- .c 












CD 


CD r- 




> a: 








33 


CD 


S .s 




CD 








eS 


!> 


> 


fe > 




CM ^ 










CO 


l> 




K- 




> 


K* 




CM 


1— 





Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 



305 



• 


CJ 


a) 


o 


0) 


a> 


a) 


a> 




■— 




c a* 






— 


















a 


z. — : 1 


- 


— 


ft 


d 


c 


c 


c 


a 


c 


B 


c 



N CO K} CT IN N N 



ID i-i CM CM CN) 



» be 



-3^.2^ 



03 

Si rr3 

Ph b 




0) 


Baya 

Bern 

nd U 

Baya 


T3 












0) 


T3 e T3 






bd 


B 2 s s 








08 O 08 


2 


a 
= 
a 
a 


T3 


sS »c 




c: 
§ 


Frankli 
Arlingt 
Washin 
Frankli 



^ J. Oj 
Oi m 2 N 
C v d '3 













3 






















TJ 




^5 






C 










E 




e> 










t> 






<2 




s> 






■g 




•o 






^ 




4. 






d 










O 














<u 












5>i 












"K> 












3 












<u 












-sS 












•K. 












5S> 










rO 










CO" 










Oi 










00 










f-( 


<u sj 


a! s <» 




a a 


CiCi&Ph 












M 


Ph ft 


ch — ;- — 


g5 


a a 


c a c e 


8 










S 


CO CO 


-* CO CO 00 








<M — 1 .-c — 




«o 










£ 


>o o 


OOWif 


1 

CO 


s 


co m 


b-»H^ 


»o 


OS CM - 


1006©^ 





OS o 


■* as to ir 


t~ 


i—i lO 


NlflHi 




Cif 








of 


OS 










00 












'•M 










■ <a 






»*H 






. a> 
















?J 


»3 O 


*J O _£ iy 


' 


e 


rs en 


^ T3 ^3 ^ 


• 




■^ W 


12 *- 


'. 


rO 


01 o 


■g ^ 03 TT 

£ T3 T5 a 






CO co 


&C3C 


u 


T3 T3 

s a 
a 03 


r-, * ° £ 


< 


j 


o o 


T> B B C 
u 5 03 a 


5 





T3 TI 
B C 
















££ 


co^^< 




hO 










CO 






fi 












•<s> 






ci 












e 




































(^ 
















w 








" T3 














00;^ 




+1 •- 




c— « c 




> 


>> a 


a> 








5 2 


4,> 


* '£ «r 








' — 








< 


= 


fc 




H( 


V 


P 





306 



City Document No. 34. 



a 
© 

A 

'7* 



CO 

M 

S-i 

a 










CO 

O 

u 




Dimensions and 
Material. 


6 ft. X 6 ft., stone. 

7 ft. X 7 ft., stone. 


c 

*j CD 
bo CD 


160.00 
304.64 


to 
to 

1*H 


Eh 

<* 

Q 

o 

hi 


c 

cp 
CD 
JS 

<d 
P3 


About 550 ft. east of Mal- 

About 600 ft. west of Es- 
sex st 


2 

c 
E- 






Commonwealth ave. . . 
Commonwealth ave. . 









Ph 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 307 



Work clone for and paid by Paving- Division, Brighton. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 




Built. 


Repaired. 




2 

1 









Summary. 



3 catch-basins built. 



308 



City Document No. 34. 



© CO 

2 °o 







ti 




















c 












-a 


















3 






4= 




CO 


0) 




44 


« 




cc) 






a 


*i *j 




CD 


CJ u 




(4 


Built by contra 
Built in 1891. 
Built by contra 
Built in 1891. 






co o oo co 


t- © 


t^ 




05 t- lO i— 


CO O 


CO 




HCONC 


CO O 


CO 




CM CM -* i— 


° s 


o 


o 


00 >o 


^ CM 


CD 


o 


#^ C5~ 


© 


© 














& 


Ǥ= 








CO CO 




73 




■73 


00 00 






a 




O 


CD CD 






e« 






OS 05 










£ 


-* CM 






c3 






hT-* 






O fc 


6 




۩= 




.S CD 

« i2 


3 
ft 


^1 






2^ 




X 


tk 








c 


_c 












s 


lO 


45 


cu 

> 










1-1 


lO 




Ti 
















c 


o 


o 


° C 










CO 


o 








^ -s 


CO 


as 


id 








-^ CD 
ho 1) 


CM 
CM 


CM 
















'3 








Hi 








4= 

CO 




























C 




















O 








































CJ 


c 
















0) 


o 












CO 




s 


'co 








CO 


CO 




e 
o 


'? 






c 

CD 


CO 


H 




o 


3 






a) 


43 


T3 

C 




c 

c3 


bt) 

C 






0) 


s 






'> 




h 


C 
e3 






.5 

*C0 

eg 






O 




43 


0) 




4= 

43 

CJ 


T3 
CD 
43 




o 










Is 

CJ 


CO 

'S 




^ 




































DO 




1> a)' 












CO 




E .^ c 






c 






o 

43 




-six 
repa 
mou 

otal 




'3 
ffl 




c 


o 

C 


Total 

Thirty 

one 

Less a 

T 






"^ ■ — C ff 








c 


C 


Q£ 

















cc 

















CD 


CD 




ft 


ft 








ft 


ft 


- 






c 


B 










CM 


IN 




1-1 


1-1 




O 


•M 


CM 


CO 


1- 


00 


lO 


CO 




co 


— 


co 


I— i 


c* 


•* 


in 


O 










O 








00 


CM 








CD 










^ 


ZZ 








CJ 


O 








«4 


X 








o 










Q 


T3 








c 


a 


> 






eS 


ta 


a 






CO 

o a 


QQ 
QQ 
CD 


a 






« S c 

O * O 








M O 








4-: 














« 


O CD 
w ex, 




O 


4S CD 






CJ CD 












l-i 




VI 









Street Department — Sewer Division. 



309 



Work done for and paid by Paving Division, South 

Boston. 



Street. 



First st 

Dorchester ave 

Athens st 

Second and B sts 

Second st., Dorchester to I st. 

E. Fifth st., L to N st 

Seventh st., between B and E sts. 

Ellery st 

Dorchester st - 

I and Second sts 

C st 

N and Sixth sts 

Boston st 



Catch-Basins. 



Built. Repaired. 



2 

13 

3 

2 

1 
1 



1 

1 

14 



Built. I Repaired. 



Summary. 



44 catch-basins built. 
12 " repaired. 

3 manholes built. 

1 manhole repaired. 



310 



City Document No. 34. 






M 



o 



« O 



B £ 



PQO 



2 ,a t< r? 



I— I ^H 



o 






Q 



o s 



Si 



. ^ 

S GO 

-t- M 



6Q 



be a; 

B fa 
CD " 

h3 



SO CO CO <M 



O i-H 00 



pq 



b- 00 

i-i o 



as <u <u 

'p,ft a 

.5 .5 .3 

00 IO N 



a5X 

ft . 

ft.B 



.2-^2 

°Sh ° H "C 

-S CO X! 
CO _C CO 

x^x 

5tH <H 43 

<N <M "M 



O OS 

US CO 

CO ■* 



bII 



h? ts'S 



05 bn-S 



>-> CD 



if; 



ft 


0) 


ft 


ft 


^ 


ft 


s 


r 




B 



_ft _ft 
'ft 'ft 



O =* 

O +i 
J-« GO +J 

,o ■ 

: s c 

Oi « o 

Io.b. 

rB rrJ J 

° c u , 

O * 3 

O X 



Ql TO 



o <io 



B 

o .3 

a-B 

— CO 



S ^a >^ cd a; 

<3 <jpqpqo 





ai 








> 








a 




^i 


cf 


-2 




CO 

CD 


IS 


go 


"5 


OK 



o 



CO fe 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 311 



< CO 



•X 



O 



O Q 



Hi o 



S S o 



o o 



o 



^H t- 



CO -H 00 

OS co t- 

t— ^0» CO 

i— i cnT i-T 



f-h CO i-i 



P. Pi *" p, ft, P, P* p< 

"p/p< M "p,'p, "eV3L"E< 

r r X r r r r r 

EC .PC P C P 



— i CO 



P-^ 


CO X CO & <B 


P, ftftft 


P W 




Q<C APhP< 


-X 






C C P P 






o ** 


X 1 *" ICO N 


rl CM 


HHHHH 


lO co 


lO •* « o ■* 


OS — 


t). O l- CO ■* 



•"*• OS co o co 1C oo >o 
-3> -* fq iot- coco-* 
-rCN coco-* i — i i — i -«*> 



N lO i-> 



os m oo o co io cm 
<M -* oo -sr os t— *a 

CM l>* lO lO CO OS 




— . oo s 



sa 



HPhP 



PQC 



bn c > 






PS- <v 

-M O W fH . 



g'.S CS " _g >> £ p ^ 



3 



"S - 



a p .a .- ^ ju c2 ~ 



MHO' Oh § C5 Q O 



03 5 on 

"h bC 
Ph br Jr _ 



S°i"i'S 


-B : . % * 


lm 
land 

Jaqi 
mon 
reem 
arva 


2 o-; m3 


•-> r 3 ° 

s « O 1 


W fe3 


S3 SK 



^ si 






^ > ex . 



aw Phjs 



co Eh 



*8 



312 



City Document No. 34. 



o 



« 



o 



•- 

■Jl 

c 

.4 

© 

© 



pq 



X a3 © o3 ai <d c 

co r r r r r r 

. c c c c c c 



CO to «* CI t- CM 

CO GO C£> ^-i CO i— I 
CM CO CO CO CM 



e 



.S C 



0) si 



o s 



p 




CO HO 
CO CO 
t~ C3 



■s'ifi 

S.S 

CO CU *> 
fl > e8 
'£ Ti P-i 



s ° 

t> to 

& § £ 

a> c 3 

C 43 

- cj C 

5 „g 

oj a> g 



Ph ^ 



O 



O 



cc 



-1 




►O 




?0 




OS 




UD 




M 








M 




>i 








W 












^ 




i-O 


o a) 


£ 


a. a> 




a &. 


S? 


- „ 


M 


c c 










CO 


lO <M 




fi 


o io 




c t~ 


M 


i-c CO 


F* 5 








W 




S 




* 


r- A — . 



a 



o 



Street Department — Sewer Division, 



313 



, pipe. 
, pipe. 
, pipe. 


0> CU O O) 0> 0) 

ft as-aaa 
ft a & ft ft ft 


a) m 

_ft_ft 
'ft'ft 


CU 0> 0> 0> 

ft ft_ft_ft 
'ftl'ft'ft ft 


0) 0) 

ft ft 
'ft'ft 


01 

ft, 

'ft 


, pipe. 
, pipe. 
, pipe. 


co a> 

_ft_ft 
'ft'ft 


, pipe. 
, pipe. 
, pipe. 


c c c 


c a c a c c 


s .ft 
CM lA 


esse 

O CM >0 CM 


a a 

CM CM 


ft 

CM 


ft c c 

CM CM CM 


.5 .5 

CM CM 


c a c 


lOlOM 


C>1 « M lO CM l.O 


CM >0 CM 




O O OS 

»Q © CO 


ao wioistc 

-t O © CO N N 


CM O 


o o t- >o 

o vocoro 


>o o 

t~ CO 


o 
o 


lOOW 


O lO 

O CO 


O O iO ] — ' 
CS OS CO OS 



^WCICOCON 


OS -f 


OS CO CO -H 


CM O 


CM 


t- OS OS 


O — " 


-# O — i 


CI i-i 'O CM t~ CM 


«S OS 


U5-* U5C5 


CM IQ 


CO 


tooo 


OS -* 


rf CO-* 


t- i— 1 ■— 1 CO »o 


-* CM 


— CM CO CO 


^H CM 


CM 


CO -* -*■ 




IO CO »o 



«i a) 

CO S 



-- co *-* ^ 
T3 ft =* to 

o3 ^ o o> 
~ ,2 S>3 
* a 5 £ 

^ rt u to 
!-. 0) >- 0) 
eS — 03 k 

P-,023!? 



B 5 

O o 



03 — - 

-co 



c o M ^G 
ft- *- — e 
GPP 



e3 e8 



3_o8 O 

OK 



p ^ 

< * 









o3 • 




> • 






• c 


C 


* o 






^ ' 






:p 


o . 






■ -— 




= 


u 


ai 


0) ' 




is . 






. > 


CO 






• eS 





i— o* 



=3 03 b!) 



Ph 0) 



CO rg 






O 53 • bD 



ft 0) 



o'J c3 

5 c 



cc di :c jj 



.t- S .ft o •& 

ft OS T5 ft 



•3 EG 



o8 t3 .ft 



S;C 



•£ bo ft 
08 .S 5 
08 tS " 

o> •£ .£ 



3 rft 0) ^ « 

03 S > «.- > 

c « o8 c 

i Sri or 

O ft H r- *3 

' o u C ft 08 

0) O ,—l co " 

co pq -3 



ft ^ 2 cS 

ft o: ft: i- 



0) o o 

hi K 



08 5 



..- ai 

ft£- 
o> P 

co f 

o *> 



SO « rt 



^ ^ s 



o <u 






e O C cu t; 

.ft c — ' ca ~ 


*j OJ 


h u 


O bOt. >, ft 


ft Vj 


03 O 


~ 03 O 03 O 


5 '3 






s s 


r-, * ^5 ^j 



«, 



314 



City Document No. 34. 



S 

>> 



qq 



K 



& P< P< & p* &, pHOnfilpH 

_g _c _c c a c _a d c c 

Cl W lO N N O (MlO N « 



fc 



— i O O CO CO t~ lO 

ffiorococooco 
o o 10 o c6 co csi 

N ■* 5N -h ■* G5 G5 
1Q -*10 WOJH 



lOfflNN 
lO -*■ -* t^ 
1-1 <N C<) -* 



pq 



Ph c 



SPh 



o 



3 ^ r- 



S £ 



0) -3 fc> 



*J =8 £ Q 



§ * fe 



0) ^ 

B S 

^ 0) 

T3 ^ 

5 H 



0> oj 0) 

OP-, 



o s 



.J5 aS C 



«s 



S ° g 

*■ fH d 

^ s-s. 



0) d, 

5fc 



53 S o s ^ 



»£)££££ ^^ 



O 

e 
e 

St. 
O 

U 

e 

V. 

>~ 

a 

s> 

•si* 

3 




o 

o 






00 

e 

s 


12-in., pipe. 

18-in., pipe. 
18-in., pipe. 
10- in., pipe. 


30 
5-. 


442.43 

332.48 
/ 174.00 
1 75.00 


S 

<u 

1 

r-O 
"fa 
'«■& 

i-O 

-i 

e 

o> 

8 
•is 

* 

5 


Dorchester ave. and Wash- 
Culvert, near King st. and 

Tenean brook to Park st. . 


> 

a. 

"S 

p: 


■> 


Dorchester ave. . . . 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



315 



o 




fe 






o 



eS +j 



u 



M 



o 







c 


a 


a> 


a> 


2 a 




c 


> 




c 




co 


a 




« 


a 


^h 




P 


e 




a 














' Vh 












; o 


2 






















o — 






a 






.i c 




c- 


a 






>-. ^ 




M 




<u 


o> 


t-. 










<« O 


0) 




£ 




^ 


"'n 


£ 


> 






01 


^.ft 




a: 


> 




- 



^5 o 

a o 






.2 .2 














J* - 










.S 6 .S 




( « L 


d 6 




^ ^ 










oi o a ^ '5 6 i 


CJ 


a> <u 


QV "S "3 * 






ft 


ft a 


& . ft 














-" ~* ■"" ' t- . rt " *"*cq 


ft 


ft ft 


ft c ~ ft 




ddd' 5 :* c r d>< 


r 


r r 


To co r 




c 


c c 
















c ?'i o V ^ 4 oo ^ 


00 


CO io 


ia t **'~* ta 




HHHBJSINi-<« 


1-1 


■- ' ■"" ' 


— • tf CO .-< 




OOOOOt-O© 


o 


<M IO 


O O CO o 


C5 


OOOOOOiOOiC 


c 


O !N 


OOCCO 


CO 


OX-*OOCOlOCl3 


t~ 


CO CO 


OOINOO 


CO 


CHtote-tonn 




O <N 


t— >o ■* CI 


G> 


■-i NNNW 


~ 


"* 


<M i-h 


CO 

CO 


v_^ « , ' 




sW^ 


' , ' 





3W 



City Document No. 34. 









o 


~ 


- 


-o 




£ 


t 


'W 


r? 


S 




« 




<M" 




c> 




00 




M 



CO 


















-^ 










* 


E 




o 
qc 


cu 




!h 


PS 




CD 
> « 

o o 

* s 

* s 

0) o 






CD 






c 






o 


.2 










CO 


'£ 




. . . . - <B 


<D 




• aj. -qj © q> • b 






« B B G B S O 

•-3 2 2 2 -* » 

^ 03 CO . CO CO ~ 


T3 




" - - 2 - »*» A 


b 




• . • B • "«H C 


c3 




• S .g = O C E - 

^ .r-l .)-| ^ .r-l .rH CM .^ 


co 




■* ■»* co ■*<* w . 


o 

'co 




O* "S ^ ^ b CO 
•S JJ CO CO CO CO CO •- 

:»XX X XX oX 


2 




5 




B -Q . _ta -1-3 

■■# o ^ ^ t * H tfH 5 *"' •-# co 

CN T3 CO ■"*! CO CO CO _.,_/ 


b 




oooo o ooo 


o 






lOOOO o oo o 


"*. 


-° -s 




tc^oco © ^O^H 


CO 


bX3 0) 




i-'om^ »o -* •* -* 


CO 


Bfe 








CD 








1-3 














• +j • • n ■ r o 








co " • B • B • 








'• C *i *± £ '.£ '. *3 +i 








' 2 ™ as ^ * & ' °° r/J 








; be » > £> ; t> * ,m ^ 






d 


CD w « W (-« r- 

"^ o ° & : 1 :« a 

o ct? ° e .0) ! c S 






CD 












M 




(^ 






j* 3 -w C •" a; u qj ."^ j— 1 


H 






m°° M o * o eil8 *° 

^cocnHP-I PQ t-i i-h 


3 






O 


























.5 
































■t-3 




co ; 


CP 












(U "S 


> 








'3 


»5 c * « +. 


• ^ 








«> C O ^^ to « " J 

S rt B ?•? ^ » - 




























< 


<<l<p: 


1? 


i p- 


< M H 





Street Department — Sewer Division. 



317 



to 
— 

> 

o 






ca 
c 
c 

M 

X 

a 
a 

«H 

c 


0) 

c 
o 

d"" c 

xd t 

CO ^ 

£X | 

't CO £ 

0) _A 




6 
aJ g 

3 to 

CO 

r d 

c "~ 

"* +3 
■J tw 

«H CO 

x x 

<C -^ 

CO ^j- 

f £ 

dj 
«H OS 

O CO 






00 

si 

-1 
GO 


6 
cc 










cj a> a> ai 




a a & a 
cede 




NOCNO 




0) 

.s 

+^> 
60 

c 

(J 










CC 


a 

te 

... a- 
OCCtJ °" 

i — i • — 
- 






CO 

K 

►j 
o 

s 

55 

-< 


a 

0) 


-*H -rh rt 














ffl 




















02 

o: 

i 
o 

H 
«! 

o 


-d 

o 

'3 
55 
















- 




pq 


(M I— 




Ol 


-* 


t- CO CM 




c 


a 


a 

a 


a 

0. 

c 
a 
C 


' go a 

? s e 

-1 E 




ii 


> 
a 
s 


4- 


J 


c 

s. 
C 

< 
fa 


* 

i 4 « E 

! 5 5 

AC 







0) © 




■'S * 




g cu 




Cu GO 




O 




00 ^j 




2 CJ „J 




Ot£a 














= 22-° 






C3 


«s g 


•ai 




S 




s 




p 


o 


7 










CP 




<v 




f-l 




• 'd °^ 




±2 ^ rf 




■a .5 c- 






pQ C 



-Q ci 



U8 



City Document No. 34. 



a 

8 



Si 

3 



S»5 



02 







bio £ 
.5 cS 


.5 


s 

o 










E 
oi 
J3 




sion. 

sion. 
and 


rete. 
on. 






J5 










° 'co 






a, o> 








>^ 


.b > a 




DO 

M 
u 
a 

S 

OS 




?r co 
S 

a 73 

» o 

73 

a JIT 

oS — 

rH "W 

s cd 

Si -H 

73 ^h 
CD 

SB t-i 


_ CD 

► Is 

73 2 g> 

? £ ° 

> o ^ 

O rO 

S CD 

w 


03 

>» 

3 
'? 

CD 
s- 

a 


r* 
u 

5 


§ .Q 5-2 

-S .^^ £>-§ 

_ cu o .5 .5c 

73 O fc, > _. >. C3 

3 «.S^q!cr£=2 

CJ u ftj M CJ M 

" o2 53-o-H-° to 

- =^3 >3 « 

^ 2 ej 'S 's o3 'S B 

, o ■* o T a * o 


O > 

rr^ « * W> 

w S .2 '> 

B CJ 73 7H 
CJ rt^ 3 J2 

a- ,o 

•H +J ^ 73 

rH" CD'S 

r2?^ 






o C_ 








X 


<1 CO 


o 


^ 


_;-qpn* 


"^ 




V 








_, 


OS 


CM 


>« 


00 C35 


■* lO UO 


t-- o -* 






CO 


00 


CO 


>o 


CM -* 


o as i— i 


t- CO CO 






>0 


«5 


CO 


lO 


■* t^ 


t- ifl CM 


t- c- t~ 






to 


CD 


CM 


as 


as t~ 


rH ■* -* 


lO CO CM 


o 




t~ 


°5. 


o 


X 


""3, "^ 


■* t- 00 


lr- CM CO 


O 






of 


■>* 


c-I 




rH CO r4~ 
CM rH 


lO 
CM 




















*5 




































n 


















a 


















K 








M 










§ 








CJ 






3 
CJ 


rM 


73 




1 * 




rB 






*C 


CJ 


e 








~ 






rQ 


"rH 


OS 




CD 












,£2 


en 




a, 




<^H 






r 




B 




. "a 




CO 


' *■ 


TT^ ' 


c 


^J" 


o 




111 c 


q3 


X 


q3 


it cj a! a! 


i is, 


CD ^ CD 


c 




a 


a a o_. a a 


0,05 _a 


a 

s 




a.S 


'a 


B 


a a a a. a 


°: x'^ 


av P* 








CO 








5 




B E 


a 


a 


E B B B 


E E B 


.a ^HH .H 




-HH -* 


»o 


<£ 


CM O id CM o 


CM CM O0 


CM CO CM 






CM CM 


■ ' 


CM 


1-1 r 


_ ^h rH — . 


rH CO rH 


1—1 ■""' ,— 


a 




00 o 


CO 


O (35 O © CM i— I 


rH O CM 


CO 1^ CS 






t- o 


t~ 


-* 


OffiCllOc- 


t- o o 


CO ■* t^ 


jZ 




oo oo 


cm 


cicco cm dm 


o tid 


O -rjH OS 


"S 


<D 


to o 




o 


HCJHCCCO 


CO C7i Oi 


OS CO o 


cd 






-* 


CM CO CO CO CM 


CO "* ■"* 


CO ->T r-t 














CM CO 




Hi 




W^ 








"'s- 


v-^ 










bo 

'53 




a) ; 






« 


CO 

73 +H 


'. h4 

: cd * 

"CS2 

Ir^-a 

r° ^5 •- 

P=HOT3 




a 

CD 


<I> 


Is 
PS 

73 

S 
oS 




■— * 

03 

O • 

73 • 


Cm 
w cr 

& a 

O i- 

_ c 


eS 
S 
01 

O 


o M 
S M 

fe CD 
E K 

.S CO 

rJ H 




cd 








B • 


73 


CJ 73 


73 73 


^3^ S 




cd 


>> 

73 
73 


6 

as 




• CO 


cc 


a c 

73 


B E 
OS oS 


— oS 

03 g +i 




pq 


3 






■*"' CD 

CO . 


cr 

•z 

rr. 


B -^ 


-t-s _jj 


^ OS M 


3 




CO 
CO 

O 
!h 
U 


C 

o 

2 - 




bO cj 
'53 o3 


CO CO 


co w 

cj B 
B O 
73 CJ 

rH OS 

OS 0) 


CO . CD 

s= » .5 

=3 _ *- 

a ^ e 
b a d> 

>% oS — 






O 


P3 


pq 


PC 


o 


O pq 


o 


















1-1 


.s 
















'C 

73 




CJ 
> 

OS 

rE 


'rM • 

• o • 

; O ; 




> 














B 

CS 




la 


: -° : 




^H 


oS 













™ « 




(U 


. rH . 




pq 


CD 

o 


c 
o 
cj 


CO 

O 

CJ 


^ 

^ 

•= 


E co C 


m E 


CO CO -*^» 

«rS d 

£ Org 






O 


OS 


e8 


c 


O) ^ b 




5 o a 








CD 


0) 


i. 


— t: 


CJ o 






cq 


PC 






PC 




C 


) c 


>o 




O 


O^r^ 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



319 



.2 £ 



pq 



3 3 

P3PP 



IONOOOW 



CO ^ 



c 50 a p. 

IX r r 



X d q3 a3 X 
a "pVpYp, s 



'a ^ 



CBS 
00 <M CO 



WON-* 
»o ■* ■* I— I 



■* io m t- t— >o © >— i 

a ioo — i o -3< o -+ 

i— i CN una i— ( CN 



£ CO 



•A • 'O 



£ 



. • 




• : 


1 ^ 




3 - 

s : 


• a 

■ 0) 


^ 


PP . 


' -3 




T3 ; 


>> 


a 


3 . 






o3 . 


• w 


T. 








<li • 


• t3 


as 





"3 J 3 

O .3 (h 
^ Of 
e3 >> 



73 



O H 



to 03 
l> 



0) o3 3 3 

> . 3 o 03 * 
» P "Silt o, 

o d * .5 * .S- « 

O « « t2 O ■— ' 3 

5: g » 3 «!S- 



-73 O 
3 rrt 



PH -c 



.3 3 



3 T3 



a ce c 



; Olrg 
0> 



: «3 



• *i 3 
03 CO 03 



o3 



0) 



■ X =3 



• S <° 5 * 3' 

! u O .- 3 B s_ — 
) 03 0J 03 3 --1 03 
JfqOOCQ Ph 



> 5 



go » 

- o3 



-^ CO 



! a 


3 




y 


03 . OT 



Oj ^ be *j 

"3 2 "3 -"S '8 '■§ ? r M 

— « ca fa — I — i 3 » I; c 

.«"o3 r3 r3 3 -3^30 

tc Dd ac tti a ^»j^ 



0) .3 o> ~ - 

<* 3 ~ x s 

Pn Ph 50 09 CO 



IS 



320 



City Document No. 34. 



« 



O 



t3 



1j "^ 



pq 



P-. pq 



co co -# 

oo -# O 



t- 1—1 

H C5 



01 01 

'EL'S* 


u 
'5 


0) 
ft 


.. .. 


•. 


.9.5 


c 


c 


io cq 




N 


CO -* 

GO i-H 


o 
o 


CO 


i-H -* 
CXJ CO 


o 

«5 


C-l 

O 
05 



. CJ3 


i) . 


• a 


vi 


o 


H • 


■i-J 






T3 • 


• 'H 


c 


• a 


* : 


' e3 




. w 




• o> 




; fn o3 : 




o » 



s ® 



" o ^ c 

^ O MO 

O te C G 

rr* »** *-\ ►** 



O Pq 



«v 






C§ ^ ^ 



O «8 

OJ — ' 
OS 00 



c Ph 



£ £ 



CO 
OS 
=0 



&5 













(B 




a 




a, 


- 












a 


P 




•* 






c 




s 












IN 




o 




1-1 




i-H 




-* 




- 




"* 




o 




O 




y~ 




■<* 




CI 




-* 




CM 


G . 


a> 




<U . 


htl 




S-. 


si 










e8 I 






£ : 


O 




T3 - 






(3 * 


00 




e3 • 










fe 




0) 


1" 




k* • 


T3 








a 








a 












K : 


3 










" 




rrt 


T3 


-? 






a 




p- 




•-S 












QC 




(1) 




c 








a 




G 
















S*i 




t- 




ed 




pc 




O 





Street Department — Sewer Division. 



321 



o. 


0) <D 

o, a* 


Oh 


CD 

Oh 


<D 


Oh Oh 


a> 


a> 


o. 


a> 


Oh 


Oh Oh 


Oh 


Oh 


Oh 


Oh Oh 


ft 


~ 


Oh 


& 


c 


C C 


C 


C 


C 


a a 


B 


c 


C 


C 


<N 


(M <M 


<N 


o 


csi 


cq o 


(M 


<N 


O 


CSJ 



CO C5 
CD OS 

CD i-H 




pq 



. 'O 


; c : 


: "3 


. a> . 








'. «s ; 


■ W 


•fe: • 






. 13 

. S 


; <n ; 


• e3 


13 a • 




05 » : 
« £ : 






. -a 


T3 ^ ■ 


o 


oS ■' 



b to cS 



o o 



a 



OB c»P3 



c3 co 

rt g Oh 3 



• £ jo 



O ^ ^cg 



1 5c * 
OQ 



■ =*-. 


^ 


• o 


c : 




s • 


•13 
• C 






,S • 




GO • 


• 13 






T3 . 


■ e3 


C • 




c« • 


• H-J 


^ . 




ce 


• HJ 


m 


O 4J 

• o 3- 


y : 


3 t 


.5 flj 
3 > 



£ H 



a e =« ►= 



S* P-.PL, fL, 





>» 


ft 


eS 




1* 








-r 


! j 








fe 





65 



Pn 



CD CO CD 
O O 



i 2 



M 



322 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, Roxbiiry. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Sewers. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. | Repaired. 


Length in 
Feet. 


Size. 


Halleck st 

Creighton st 

Cabot st 


2 
1 
2 


2 
4 




4 
4 

3 


90 rep'd. 
109.76 




Prentiss st 

Blue Hill ave. . . . 

Walnut ave 

Gaston and Ga- 

Cherry st 

Worthington St., 

Brunswick and 
Intervale sts.. . 


1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 

] 
1 
4 
2 

1 
5 
1 

4 




5 
6 


4 


1 




Pulda st. 


1 
2 


12-in.,pipe. 






2 





Summary. 

36 catch-basins built. 
17 " repaired. 

6 manholes built. 
12 " repaired. 

199.76 feet of sewer built and repaired. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



323 



8 

8 



>5 
To 

8 



M 



O 



M 



o 



c 



3 
3? 



U 



E S 



CO "* C5 
OOIMJ) 

NOlO 



t~ i-i 



rH t- i-H ,-H 



a) 


a) q3 o 


X 


a, 


ft a a 










& 


ft ft a 


s 


r 


r r r 


CO 


c 


esc 










o 


CTNOO 




' H 


i-h r-H i-H 


-M 


CO 


o o o 


© 


CO 


O O CO 


o 


-* 


O CO o 


© 


OS 


00 CM 00 


o 


CO 


rtOSH 


t~ 



c c 

lO CM 



© CO CO Oi 
00 CO b- to 

OJOOi-itJi 



tn H T. ■— 



I £ 



(Srt'Ct! 



• ■ c 




• . ft 

S -co 






T3 . 


e?^ C 




H C 83 




*5 o 




■aPn *j 


OJ . 


C r-3 « <U ft' . 


Ci r >■ S • 


T3 ca g *e : 


el ® S ^ 





>>s = ft « 



w a 



OOOP5 £h 






*8 



2 * «"£ <" * 
c £ h a> *- 

O S O,™- 0) 



324 



City Document No. 34. 



o 





H 

O 



l-H 



CO & 

.s ^ 
-* x 



lO TO 
O 00 



pq 



O 



C CO 

^X 






a 



*5 


B 






s 




^ 






> 









Q 


'.£ 


hO 


CJ 


C 






fi 


> 




'A 


o 


PH 








>~. 


13 


pfi 




*S H 



35 



^ £ 1? | OQ 8 3 £ | "J. S g 

WaJt^oiS J E * cj <» csbB 
-£fl ti & o C - C 

_ H g ■£ -d e -«j js -o "« -a 

I* co . c ^ at & o 

P3. F 



.rt T3 



n3 -S -t; 



* s 



Sri 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



325 



ft 


co 

a 


ft 


0) 


0) 


— 


ft 


a 


ft 


ft 


c 


a 


c 


c 


a 



co '—j 



cq > 



Offl 



bo 


to ci >- 
CD 


T3 


H « ® 




O CO S 


cS 


Ph « 


C 


T> S Q 


o 












:>> 


£-55 


CQ 


££ 



si 

Ji E 



WC5 





«s <— 


T3 : 








= 


© — 


O M 


e3 




^ c 


be 


— CO 


■73 


O 
0) 


>> CO 


,2 * 



*3 



a 


cu 


0) CU <u 


a> 


CD CD 




XJ 


^ 




"O 


ft 


a ft ft 


ft 


ft ft 


=*-i 








£ 


ft 


ft ft ft 


ft 


ft ft 


■* 


.£co 


CO 




S 


r 


r r r 


~ 


r r 


X 


CO X 


X 




c 


ace 


c 


c c 


























S3 


CM 


X lO o 


CM 


1C CO 


=4H 


m c,.. 


1-1 




oq 


'~ l 


— 1-1 ^H 


1-1 


i—i i—. 


CD 


CO -* 


CO 




OS 


















uo 


O 


o o o 


O 


o o 


o 


iO o 


o 


IO 


M 


o 


CO o o 


o 


O IO 


o 


i-H o 


o 


CI 


„ 


C5 


Hffl-* 


lO 


m io 


^*l 


co o 


CO 




M 


CO 


CM ^* 




^* t~ 


^ 


CO o 


CM 


Oi 




CM 


-* 








CM 






^ 




































W 


















s 




1 




' ' 











o 



<1 o 






.2 « rt 



c3 CO 

Ph CJ 

,9 a 



'C S ^ ft 



5- . fe «"P-T 
cu jj cu cj i 



iO ££; 



• _ 








• , 






' CJ • 




a 




: <s 




















5 • 




cc 




:ce 






:o : 




o 




* c 








V 

a 


-a 

c 




• 2 » 


co C 


*» «* I 








• c ■•- 




t- 




c 


• t. v 


(- bo 


cu cu 


c 


CJ 


S 


-2a 


5= 


a 



m 5 



Ph 






OK as! 



326 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, West 
Roxbury. 



Street. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Culverts. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 




South and Hall 
sts 


1 
1 
3 










Washington st. . . 


200 ft., 4 ft X 3 ft., 








stone. 
23 ft. , 3 ft. X 3 ft. 


Wenham st 

Brook channels. 


5 








4 in., stone. 



Summary. 



10 catch-basins built. 
223 feet of culverts built. 



City Proper 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
East Boston 
South Boston 
Dorchester . 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 



City Proper 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
East Boston 
South Boston 
Dorchester . 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 



RECAPITULATION. 

Sewers. 



$5,568 61 
7,269 63 
21,436 05 
34,091 43 
10,403 37 
66,883 46 
130,170 92 
47,002 49 



Catch-Basins. 



£7,813 49 
2,498 70 
4,449 17 
6,086 62 
4,496 83 
6,733 55 
8,990 23 
2,559 97 



Improved Sewerage maintenance 
Stony- Brook Improvement . 
Building stables and sheds, Brighton 

Carried forward, 



,825 96 



43,628 56 

96,043 18 

18,811 01 

8,542 08 



,850 79 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



327 



Brought forioard, 
Building dike, Winthrop Junction 
New tow-boat • 
Miscellaneous . 



Less total amount furnished in fiscal year 1892-93 
by Paving Division ...... 



$489,850 79 

2,333 33 

12,567 50 

297,127 96 

8801,879 58 

87,569 02 
$714,310 56 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months 
ending Jan. 31, 1893. 



Built by the 
City, by Con- 
tract or 
Day Labor. 

Feet. 



Built by 
Private Parties. 



Feet. 



Total 

Length built 

during the 12 

Months ending 

Jan. 31, 1S93. 

Feet. 



City 

Charlestown . . 
East Boston.. 

Brighton 

South Boston . 
Dorchester . . . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Total 



1,699.88 

2,935.65 

7,492.70 

9,845.59 

755.30 

19,998.25 

17,714.86 

10,939.62 



2,442.46 

461.82 

11,450.49 

3,956.25 

4,192.32 



71,381.85 



22,503.34 



1,699.88 

2,935.65 

7,492.70 

12,288.05 

1,217.12 

31,448.74 

21,671.11 

15,131.94 



93,885.19 



249 catch-basins built. 

382 " repaired. 

51 manholes built. 

320 " repaired. 

944,684 lineal feet of sewers flushed. 

3,037 cu. yds. of material removed from sewers. 

6,927 catch-basins cleaned. 

19,213 cu. yds. of material removed from catch-basins. 

1,158.19 feet of culverts built. 

239 " " " repaired. 

There are now 349.1 miles of sewers in charge of the Sewer 
Division. 

The amount expended by this division during the twelve months 
ending Jan. 31, 1893, including the amount spent under special 
appropriations, was $801,879.58. 

The items of expenditure are shown in the financial statement. 



328 



City Document No. 34. 



Schedule of Sewers built to Date in the City of Boston. 



Wards. Feet. Wards. Feet. Wards. Feet 



1.. 
2.. 

3 . 

4.. 

5.. 

6.. 

7.. 

8. 

9.. 



79,801 
42,477 
31,363 
40,782 
39,687 
45,434 
36,779 
18,532 
27,119 



Wards. 


10.... 


11.. 




12.. 




13 . 




14.. 




15.. 




16.. 




17.. 





Intercepting sewers. 
Total, 



38,382 
74,575 
41,817 
52,179 
75,097 
46,954 
31,626 
42,765 



18. 
19. 

20. 
21 . 
22. 
23. 

24. 
25. 



59,573 
46,501 
100,196 
128,394 
99,515 
153,300 
274,586 
100,959 



1,728,393 



or 327.3 mile 
21.8 
349.1 " 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



329 



Fall of Rain and Snow in Inches at South Yard, Albany 
Street, in twelve months ending January 31, 1893, 



Day. 


S-c 

s 

0) 


^3 
o 

a 


< 


>> 

OS 


c 

1-5 


►-a 


bt) 
< 


S 


,o 

O 

o 
O 


<u 

Xt 

S 
m 
> 
o 


s 

cj 

01 




13 
B 

OS 

i-s 


1 








.10 
.06 




.07 


1.04 












2 








1 08 


3. 


.88 


.16 




.26 


.48 


.36 






.55 

.14 


.02 
.15 
.63 

.27 
.08 




4 


.05 


.68 




2.01 












6 
















.06 






.29 


.60 






.21 


.02 




.05 


1.89 

1.34 

.19 




8 




9 














1 19 


11 




.40 










2.11 


1.19 


.23 




12 


.06 




13 






.57 


.14 

.98 


.10 
.27 




14. .. . 










15 


.08 






.97 

.89 


.10 


16 








17 










19 

20 




.80 








21 


.02 




.40 
.19 


2.00 
.48 


.48 
.61 


.26 


1.89 


1.20 


.07 


.15 




22 




23 

24 


'.08 


.65 




25 




26 








.30 
.12 




27 










28 








.30 

.12 






29 






.17 




.16 






.08 


.33 


30 






.25 




.40 


1.15 




31 




























Totals 


1.41 


2.61 


.81 


6.17 


3.10 


1.36 


5.65 


2.45 


2.44 


4.66 


2.70 



Total for twelve months, 34.51 inches. 



330 



City Document No. 34. 



Oi 



rt 


e 


z 


~ 






4- 


w 


cs 




+j 


n 


t/J 


>^ 


if 


^ 


— 


l> 


,J3 


CO 


A 


M 


= 


« 




M 



•+- 


r_ 


Q 


r-O 


D 


£ 






z, 


g 


■M 


o 






eS 


■*-» 


a 


Qi 


D 




2 


"a 




t> 


- 


£ 


01 


•<S> 




gn 


t/J 


a- 



V. 



= 







CM 


CO 


CD 


t- 




CO 


CI 




CM 


CO 


-V 


^x 


■» 






CO 


CO 


-* 


CM 


CO 


CO 


xa 






CO 


CO 




■IWntE'a 


!-! 


Ol 




CO 


CM 


CO 


-* 


■" 


CM 


CO 


i-! 


1-1 


fr- 

Ol 




o 


Cv 






CI 


© 


o 


-# 


Ift 


-+ 


© 


CC: 


CO 












CM 




-T 


CM 


CN 


00 


-p 




© 


•pasn |boo 
•sq[ 00X -wrt 'sqi-'W 
ui Anp aSruaAt! A"[ie(j 


ifl^ 


CO 


o 


CO^ 


©, 


CT^ 


CM_ 


°^ 


b- 


©_ 


CO 


1-^ 


°i 


T-T 


irS* 


cm" 




co" 


:c" 


co" 


-t 


cf 


7-< 


CO 


•*" 


00 


00 


CM 


-p 


o 


o 






CO 


o 


00 


CO 


© 


00 


© 

00 


CC^ 
I~* 


00 




CO 
CM 


ci_ 

oo" 


oo" 




co^ 

c6" 


00^ 




fr^* 


© 

CO 




oc 


t- 


**■ 


00 


CO 


"■■" 


00 


CO 


t " 


CO 


CC 


CO 


CC 




o 


O 


CM 


CC 


CC 


ta 


CO 


-+ 


fr- 


»T5 


CO 


CO 




"»aaj 


to 


OJ 


CO 


lO 


°5 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 




CO 


UO 


©_ 


CO 

CO 


U3 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ire 
CO 


IC5 
CO 


CO 


-p 

CO 


lO 

CO 


CO 


ICO 

CO 




-* 


iC 


^ 


1- 


CD 


CO 


■<# 


fr- 


00 




-p 






•pasn [boo jo punod 


CD 


CD 


CO 
CO 


CM 

CO 


00 


CO 


CO 

© 


CO 




CO 

© 


-p 


CM 


CO 
00 


iad padtnnd snojp3£) 


CO 


cm" 


CM 


of 


CM 


of 


CM 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 


of 




© 


CM 


00 


U0 


t-- 


i.C 


tO 






»o 


^Jl 




Ol 


9J3>[ni[0 




























O 


05 


o 


00 


t- 


t- 


t~ 




© 


© 


o 


© 




pnra saqsB jo 'laao aaj 


























© 




tfC 


O 


o 


CM 


co 


c. 


© 


CO 


CI 








CO 


■pasn iboo 


CO 


©_ 


CO 


oo 


CO 

1?- 


<* 


CC 

°1 


c: 
c^ 


co 

©^ 


o 


-p 

0» 


£ 


IO 
00^ 


spnnod aSe.iaAi3 Xjibq; 


CM 


00* 
CM 


i>r 


co" 

CM 


©" 

CM 


©" 

CM 


Ol 


©" 

CM 


CI 


CM 


© 

CM 


Ol 


Ol 




Ol 


CO 


o 


-J-J 




CI 




CO 


CM 




— 


Ol 


© 




o 


00 


■* 


o 


■* 


© 


© 


CI 


CM 


■* 


c. 


ICO 


© 






■* 


CO 


CO 


00 


i.C 


CM 


*a 


CM 




IO 


CO 


00 


•padtnnd snon«8 


© 


CO 


b^- 


— 


^^ 


CO 


CO 


^n 


tT 


o" 


CO 


^p 


© 


.laqmnn aSeaaAB A"jp3<j 


CD 

co_ 


CM 

co_ 


CO 


CC 


CO 




»G> 


CO 


^*_ 


IC3 


CO_ 


12 


© 




of 


co" 


CO 




oo" 


-+" 


of 


oo" 


-* 


of 




©" 






t ~ 


fr- 


•<* 


CO 


m 


in 


CO 


m 


*a 


CO 


CO 




© 




o 


00 


CO 


CC 


CO 


CD 


CI 


© 


CO 


CC 


CO 








lO 


IT3 


o 


o 


CO 


-t< 


ta 




oo 


-f 


© 


Ol 






CO 


o 


CI 




CM 


CO 


CI 


CO 




CM 




© 


00 




i-H 


CO 


o 


o 




-p 


U0 


lO 


CO 


CO 


-p 


rp 




•padtnnd 


CM 


00 


CI 


CI 


M 


»o 




CO 


■* 




fr- 


00 


CO 








■* 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OJ^ 


iC 


© 


CO 


© 


sno[[«g pnoj. 


t-T 


co" 


CO 


■*" 


-f 


CO 


,_r 


■*" 


t-^ 


CO* 


r4 


CO 


of 




o 




o 




m 


© 


lO 


Tjl 


oo 


t- 




© 


"2 






CM 


-+ 


o 


t- 




© 




CO 


00 


© 




© 




Ol 


CM 


r« 


CM 


■- 1 


rH 


rH 


^ 


"- 1 


rH 


•"' 


CM 


CM 








CM 


01 


oo 


CO 




•^ 




'O 


CO 


© 


CM 


CM 


Ol 






© 




CD 




-p 


CO 


CO 


lO 


~- 


-f 




© 


© 








lO 




CO 




CO 


-+ 


■* 


cc 


© 


© 




© 




































CM 


00 




o 


CO 


CO 


-V 


© 


-t- 


■* 


o 


Ol 






•padtnnd 


CD 

© 


-* 


o 

-1- 


IC3 


CM 


CO 
l-H 




© 


>.c 


in 


© 


© 




■* 


snoi[B-o 


CD 


00 


co 




© 




CM 


CO 


CM 


© 


CO 












CM 


CM 




-+ 


CO 


© 


o 


© 




1- 


CO 






© 


©_ 


OS 


OS 


© 


© 


©_ 


00 


© 


00 


© 


© 


•^ 
































3 
































^ 


-* 




o 


© 




>o 


o 


o 


00 


© 


i£0 




H 




in 


o 


o 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


Ttl 


CO 


CO 




•araii 3nidtnn<j 


h?£ 


© 
01 


CO 

o> 


CO 


CO 


CI 


CM 

CO 


£: 


CO 


CM 

© 


cc 


CO 


o 






CD 


*" 


CO 


"^ 




*" 


" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


*^ 


"1 

cc" 






O 


CO 


00 


'O 


CO 






-f 


-t- 


00 




o 


-* 






-* 




00 






© 




CO 


o 


CO 


CM 


© 


cc 








CO 


CO 


CI 




CM 


CO 


oo 


CO 


CC 


© 




o 




































■* 


0-. 


CO 


© 


© 






CM 


•-f 


CO 




O0 






■padtnnd 


iO_ 


CC 
CO 


>o 


^J 


CO 


CO 

CC 


00 
CM 


t- 


•* 


o 

CO 


CM 


z\ 


© 


cc 


saonBf) 


CO 


o 


cf 


o* 


^ii* 


IO* 


co" 


c6" 


CO 


of 


CO 


of 


CC 


H 






© 


r- 






CO 




CO 








t- 


■* 


iz; 




o_ 


CO 


■* 


t^ 




to 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


00 


© 


<*i 


5 




rH 
























© 




^§ 






CC 


© 


CM 


o 


CO 






CM 


lO 


-n 


H 




CM 


o 


CM 


o 


•* 


•H 


-■# 


># 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 




•ami} Snidtunj 


tqS 


© 

CI 


CO 


CO 


■* 


:c 


J; 


CO 
CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 

© 


© 
o 


CO 






CD 


CO 


CC 


m 




"* 


CO 


CO 


CM 


cc 


© 




00 

©* 






CO 
















CO 




© 


00 


CM 






CD 


o 














^H 


© 






lO 




















CO 


CO 


CO 


Ol 






ci° 


•padcund 


CO 


CM 

o 












CM 

o 


CO 

CO 


lO 

o^ 


00 

© 


1C 
00 


© 
fr- 

co 


a 


snoipJ-Q 


l-H 


CO* 












,_r 


of 


of 


rf 


r-f 


>J<* 


iz; 




CO 


















© 


00 


CM 


00 


3 

z; 






rH 














■* 






Ol 


© 






m 












© 


<c 


o 


© 


lO 


ICO 




ICO 












CO 




© 


CO 


© 


■* 




•aoai} Suidain<j 


oo 












CO 


rH 


00 


U0 


lO 


CC 




















OS 


CD 


lO 


ira 


fr- 






















CI 








© 








iO 




o 


-t< 


CO 


o 


CI 




CM 


© 


CO 




CO 






iO 


CM 






t- 


© 






-+ 








■sf 






co^ 


CM 


o 




CO 


CO 


<* 




CO 


lO 




lO 


pH 


































•padtnnd 




UO 


CO 




CM 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 




CO 


© 

© 


iCO 
b- 


CO 
CM 


o 


H 




iro 


T-^ 


Ifi 


■* 


00^ 






CM_ 




© 




o_ 


8n0[[B£) 


uT 


ICO 




t^ 


©" 


o" 


of 




©" 


rS 




■** 


iccT 




GO 


CO 






© 




CO 




^* 


-* 




Ol 




3 










CO 




* H 














©_ 




5=5 


o 


r 


o 


© 


© 


o 




© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




CO 


CM 


— 


CO 


© 


CM 




•* 


CO 


CO 


lO 


© 


•araij Snidtnnj 


fcqg 


£ 


o 


© 

CM 


CO 
CO 


© 


CM 




CO 
CO 


© 

Ol 




[5 


© 








1-1 




CM 




1-1 














*" 




. >» 

Ol % 


fl 










3 


s 

cu 


cu 


CO 

5 

> 

o 


CO 


co r* 5 

© g 
SS 3 

a 


"3 




1-1 5 


ca 


p( 


C3 


a 




&0 




Ph 


o 


a 

CO 


o 






ft 


3 


<j 


a 


*-i 


< 


CQ 


o 


* 


fl 


i-o 





Street Department — Sewer Division. 



331 



The following is a record of sludge received in and removed 
from deposit sewers for twelve months ending January 31, 1893 : 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

January 





Received. 






Removed. 


390 cub 


ic yai 


ds. 


474 cubic yards 


352 




K 




398 


tc 


469 




I i 




478 


"■ 


753 




a 




550 


" 


,114 




u 




470 




454 




tc 




703 


i . 


971 




l( 




785 


1 . 


536 




11 




705 


" 


527 




u 




550 


" 


672 




I ( 




399 


>' 


246 




l< 




558 


" 


230 




u 




396 


1 ' 



6,714 



6,466 



Property in Charge of the Sewer Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street. 

Sewer yard, with building, on North Grove street. 

Sewer yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. This 
is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were erected by the 
Sewer Department. 

Sewer yard, with shed, on Boylston street, Jamaica Plain. 

Small lot of land on Stony brook, corner of Centre street, 
Ward 21. 

Gatehouse on Stony brook, Pynchon street, built in 1889. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Rutherford avenue, Charlestown. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, corner Paris and Marion streets. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on East Chester park, near Albany 
street. 

A small shed on Cypress street, Ward 9, on land hired by the 
city. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Western avenue, Ward 25. 



332 



City Document No. 34. 



© 

4) 

0) 

3D 

© 
S- 

c3 



- 




co eo 


as 








-* t- 


*— < 






CO CO 


lO 


CM 


T-i 


i—i co 


CO 


OS 




CO lO 


CO 


00 


^ 


^~oi 


co 






b- <M 


OS 






CO -* 


CM 






T-k CM 


■* 






© >* 


-* 




-Si 


lO -J 


CO 


05 




CM t- 


OS 


QC 


£ 






i— 1 


as o 


OS 






io eq 


tr- 






io o 


io 






CM .— 


CO 






O 00 


CO 


o 


*SS 


o •— 




03 




CM CM 


-* 


CO 


$ 








■^l t- 








CM F-H 


«* 






CO lO 


CO 






o ■* 


** 






CO i— 


■* 


OS 




o : o: 


OS 


co 

CO 


o — 


""I 




OK 


CO 






CO i— 


-* 






^H t- 


CO 






00 "* 


CM 






CO oc 


CM 


CO 


•Si 
1} 


CO CO 


o 


00 


CO CO 


© 


CO 


$ 






1— i 


-* -* 


oT 






CO -* 


"* 






OS CC 


CM 






t~- C- 


o 






CM <M 


lO 


t-- 


>s 


co cc 


OS 


00 




o o: 


OS 


co 


$ 








CO cc 


r— 1 






CO 


t- 






u 










O 










x> 










ea 


















S>> 








d 








T3 


T7^ 






s-( 


S 






O 


.0 














O , 


01 






2.4 


Cm 






C t 
O a 


O 






O £ 


0) 


! 




>»1 


,fi 






.O +■ 








B 


S 






£.fc 


3 
B 






3 c 








>»> 






.ox 


,° 






4^> -t- 


H 






















3 P 








pqff 







Street Department — Sewer Division. 



O O Q 

ooo 



Brookline-Avenue Improved Sewerage Connection. 



Labor .... 










$2,668 15 


16,700 brick . 










174 00 


141 bbls. cement 










187 82 


39 double loads sand 










78 00 


52 double loads screenings 










98 00 


44 double loads gravel . 










83 25 


114 double loads clay 










228 00 


4 manhole frames and covers 










53 69 


42 manhole steps . 










23 10 


Teaming 










423 00 


9,755 feet lumber . 










159 98 


183 feet pipe 










215 77 


Bends, etc. 










43 


Regulator 










246 25 


Iron pipe 










19 50 


8 tons coal 










35 60 


Hardware, tools, and blacksmithing 






70 77 












$4,765 31 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

168.78 feet of 24-in. drain pipe. 
108 feet of 24-in. iron pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done in 1891. 



Townseiid Street. 



Labor .... 

2,030 brick . 

13 bbls. cement 

1 manhole frame and cover 

10 manhole steps . 

Powder .... 

Teaming 

3,773 feet lumber . 

183 feet pipe . 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Tools and blacksmithing 

9 tons coal 

Miscellaneous supplies . 



,105 


35 


20 


30 


15 


69 


11 


75 


5 


50 


153 


95 


238 


88 


61 


88 


73 


96 


44 


30 


254 


53 


46 


80 


10 


5 .' I 



!,043 42 



Size and Length of Sewer 
221.83 feet of lo-in. pipe. 



334 



City Document No. 34. 



Centre Street, between Orchard Street and 

Labor 

177,436 brick 

423 bbls. cement 

2 double loads sand 

6 manhole frames and < 

Teaming 

2,554 feet lumber . 

15 feet pipe . 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

3,000 lbs. coal 

Blacksmithing 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
1,700 feet of 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft. 3 in., brick. 



May Street. 


$5,018 


81 


1,940 


48 


504 


79 


2 


16 


70 


50 


42 


00 


42 


78 


4 


92 


20 


82 


44 


07 


8 


21 


10 


65 


4 


78 



r ,714 97 



Norfolk Avenue. 



Labor .... 

245,850 brick 

871 bbls. cement 

313 double loads sand 

100 double loads screenings 

317 double loads stone . 

6 manhole steps 

Teaming 

46,990 feet lumber 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

217 feet pipe . 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Hire of trench machine 

Hire of engine and derrick 

Pile-driving 

36 t 3 q tons coal 

Tide gate 



Size and Length of Sewer 
517.51 feet of 8 ft. 6 in. X 8 ft., brick. 



1,769 


83 


2,458 


50 


1,037 


02 


563 


40 


135 


00 


427 


95 


3 


30 


857 


00 


781 


36 


747 


26 


32 


04 


16 


23 


160 


74 


240 


60 


565 


75 


920 


22 


201 


29 


38 


50 



1,955 99 



Dorchester-Brook Sewer. 



Labor . 
457,872 brick 
1,837 bbls. cement 

Carried forward, 



$11,546 94 
4,578 72 
2,174 26 

$18,299 92 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 






Brought forward, 
418 double loads sand 
132 double loads screenings 
18 manhole steps . 
278 double loads stone . 
Profiles, centres, etc. 
Teaming .... 

Tools, supplies, and hardware 
118,838 feet lumber 
646 feet pipe .... 
Branches, bends, etc. 
Hire of derrick, engine, and box 
Pile-driving .... 
64 tons coal .... 
Blacksmithing 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

484.47 feet of 13 ft. X 9 ft., brick. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1891. 

Washington Street, Cohasset Street, and Private Land. 







$18,299 92 


. 






178 20 






9 90 






375 30 






270 90 






1,177 50 






356 56 






1,995 62 






124 03 






3 00 






505 00 






675 84 






313 75 






27 34 






202 09 




$25,267 35 



Labor .... 

158,500 brick 

540 bbls. cement . 

94 double loads sand 

96 double loads gravel . 

10 manhole frames and covers 

24 manhole steps . 

32 tons coal . 

Teaming 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

13,022 feet lumber 

1,100 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Hire of trench machine . 

Hire of engine 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

559.96 feet of 2 ft. 4 in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
837.99 feet of 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 



$8,386 10 
1,902 00 
659 61 
114 54 
121 74 
118 13 

13 20 
186 37 
270 50 

30 54 
239 70 
111 75 

14 52 
600 60 
388 85 
595 03 

$13,753 18 



The cost of this sewer and amount of work done is a continu- 
ation of the cost and work done during the year 1891. 



336 



City Document No. 34. 



Railroad Avenue. 



Labor ..... 
188,000 brick 
645 bbls. cement . 

Ill double loads sand . 
268 double loads gravel . 

1 manhole frame and cover 
24 manhole steps 

19§ tons coal 

Teaming .... 

21,770 feet lumber 

350 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Rent of trench machine and engine 

Blacksmithing 

10 cords manure . . . 

2 double loads loam 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

211.55 feet of 2 ft. 4 in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick, 
1,168 feet of 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 



58,536 32 

2,256 "00 

811580 

119 88 

272 16 

11 81 

13 20 

121 70 

149 50 

357 87 

34 13 

3 50 
738 81 
125 62 

60 00 

4 00 
49 16 

13,665 46 



Huntington Avenue. 



Labor . . . • 

96,100 brick 

350£ bbls. cement . 

112J double loads sand . 

107 double loads screenings . 

3 manhole frames and covers 

Teaming .... 

6,421 feet lumber . 

500 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Rent of trench machine and engine 

13 tons coal .... 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Blacksmithing 

Miscellaneous supplies . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

523.29 feet of 2 ft. 4 in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
465.68 feet of 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 









$3,876 70 








1,056 90 








405 93 








224 67 








187 25 








35 25 








846 00 








105 30 








54 03 








12 53 








372 50 








81 75 








172 75 








23 70 








30 50 




$7,485 76 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



337 



Commonwealth Ayenue 

{Pipe Seiver.) 
Labor . 
19,525 brick . 
273 bbls. cement . 
20£ double loads sand 
2 double loads gravel 
359 double loads screenings 
12 manhole frames and covers 
Teaming 

23,550 feet lumber . 
3,273 feet pipe 
Branches, bends, etc. 
Blacksmithing 



$7,338 06 

195 25 

314 59 

40 

3 



25 

50 



634 50 
141 00 
668 25 
385 51 
1,698 18 
315 34 
107 72 



111,842 15 



Size and Length of Sewer 
3,490 feet of 18-in. pipe. 



(Brick Seiver.) 








Labor . $11,049 80 


348,550 brick 








3,483 00 


1,424^ bbls. cement 








1,660 21 


243 double loads sand 








485 05 


548 double loads screenings 








981 75 


2 40 double loads gravel . 








394 60 


10 manhole frames and covers 








117 50 


42 manhole steps 








23 10 


Teaming ..... 








3,499 00 


Lumber, profiles, etc. 








452 61 


1,666 feet pipe 








190 10 


Branches, bends, etc. 








24 22 


41 tons coal .... 








204 20 


Trench machine and engine hue 








964 00 


Miscellaneous supplies . 








216 81 




$23,745 95 



Size and Length of Seiver. 
2,492 feet of 32 in. X 42 in., brick. 

Elm Road and Ashmont Street, Dorchester. 

D. O'Connell, contractor 

Inspection 

65,UO0 brick . 

206 bbls. cement 

5 manhole frames and covers 

1,201 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 





150 


50 




747 


50 




255 


44 




58 


75 




282 


01 




110 


97 




$3,929 


61 



338 



City Document No. 34. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

356.42 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
350.86 feet, 15 in., pipe. 
476.06 feet, 12 in., pipe. 

Savin Hill Avenue. 

D. O'Connell, contractor 

Inspector 

15,100 brick . 

39 bbls. cement 

7 manhole frames and covers 

974 feet pipe . 

Branches, bends, etc. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

45.04 feet, 1 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 6 in., brick. 
593.72 feet, 15 in., pipe. 

Topliff Street. 

Labor . 

9,200 brick . 
30^ bbls. cement . 

3 double loads sand 

4 double loads gravel 
6 manhole frames and covers 
Powder 
Fuse 
Caps 
Teaming 
1,183 feet pipe 
Branches, bends, etc. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

375.80 feet, 15 in., pipe. 
952.44 feet, 12 in., pipe. 



;,286 04 

140 00 

151 00 

46 02 

82 25 

385. 28 

81 67 

i,172 26 



!,468 11 
94 85 
36 29 

5 40 

6 60 
70 50 

49 78 

174 00 
371 65 
121 00 



1,398 18 



Park Street. 




D. O'Connell, contractor 


$3,718 78 


Inspection ...... 


281 00 


106,100 brick 


954 90 


310 bbls. cement ..... 


364 70 


5 manhole frames and covers . 


58 75 


Teaming ..;... 


18 00 


1,135 feet pipe ..... 


318 68 


Branches, bends, etc. .... 


133 30 




$5,848 11 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



339 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

745.16 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
588.45 feet, 18 in., pipe. 



Englewood Avenue. 




Metropolitan Construction Co., contractors 


$2,601 75 


Inspection ....... 


357 00 


20 bbls. cement ...... 


23 80 


30 double loads gravel ..... 


52 50 


6 manhole frames and covers .... 


70 50 


1,031 feet pipe ...... 


284 45 


Branches, bends, etc. ..... 


134 99 


Coal 


3 72 




$3,528 71 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
745 feet, 12 in., pipe. 



Bennington Street. 






D. O'Connell, contractor ... . $6,822 99 


Labor ...... 






518 50 


179,855 brick 








1,692 67 


849 bbls. cement . 








987 15 


7 manhole frames and covers . 








87 08 


38 manhole steps 








20 90 


Teaming .... 








1 50 


1,503 feet pipe 








303 28 


Branches, bends, etc. 








82 09 


Miscellaneous supplies . 








1 95 




$10,518 11 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
1,217.29 feet, 30 in. X 36 in., brick. 
398.80 feet, 15 in., pipe. 

Poplar Street, West Roxbury. 
Labor ........ 

116,750 brick 

269 bbls. cement ...... 

Sand ........ 

7 manhole frames and covers 

Powder 

Fuse 

Caps 

Teaming 

3,294 feet lumber . 

357 feet pipe . 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Miscellaneous supplies 



£2,562 02 

1,401 00 

332 98 

78 84 

82 25 

11 25 

114 00 
55 17 
89 70 

137 94 

26 81 



$4,891 96 



340 



City Document No. 34, 



Size and Length of Sewer 

868.84 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 
176.30 feet, 15 in., pipe. 
459.54 feet, 12 in., pipe. 

Saratoga Street. 
Labor .... 
161,000 brick 
564£ bbls. cement . 
158 tons sancl 
200 double loads gravel . 
6 manhole frames and covers 
40 manhole steps . 
Teaming 

10,300 feet lumber 
788 feet pipe . 
Branches, bends, etc. 
15 tons coal . 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



Less excavated material sold 



Size and Length of Sewer 

872.24 feet, 2 ft. 10 in. X 4 ft. 3 in., brick. 
303.37 feet, 18 in., pipe. 
354.80 feet, 12 in., pipe. 

Armandine Street. 









$2,035 


61 








1,610 


00 








720 


31 








275 


75 








400 


00 








70 


50 








22 


00 








395 


00 








176 


95 








258 


18 








95 


00 








76 


20 








16 


25 




$6,151 


75 


• 


75 


00 








$6,076 


75 



Collins & Ham, contractors 


$3,781 78 


Inspection ...... 


472 50 


51,500 brick 


515 00 


113 bbls. cement ..... 


133 34 


2 manhole frames and coveis . 


23 50 


510 feet pipe ...... 


107 27 


Branches, bends, etc. .... 


16 67 




$5,050 06 



Size and Length of Seiver. 

112 feet, 2 ft. 4 in.X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
284 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 

Hutchinson and Brook Streets and Dorchester Avenue. 
Labor $4,519 64 



141,050 brick 
315 bbls. cement 



1,421 50 
383 05 



Carried forwai d, 



i,324 19 



Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 



341 



Brought forward, 








$6,324 19 


50 double loads sand . ... 90 00 


5 single loads rubble stone 








3 75 


6 manhole frames and covers . 








70 50 


Powder, etc. .... 








22 77 


Teaming .... 








163 50 


15,290 feet lumber 








250 75 


1,424 feet pipe 








207 10 


Branches, bends, etc. 








24 71 


Size and Length of Sewer. 


$7,157 27 




1,035.27 feet, 30 in. X 36 in., brick. 


Beacon Street (Raleigh to Charlesgate west). 


Labor . . $1,890 82 


53,155 brick .... 








531 55 


252^ bbls. cement . 








288 93 


06^2 double loads sand . 








114 58 


51 double loads gravel . 








89 25 


76 double loads screenings 








133 00 


3 manhole frames and covers . 








35 25 


Teaming .... 






, 


541 50 


Lumber ..... 








130 02 


142 feet pipe .... 








13 85 


Branches, bends, etc. 








6 07 


Trench machine and engine hire 








185 00 


7 tons coal .... 








36 90 


Blacksmithing 








31 60 


Vi%/) riirkri I nnr\ rvili s\-f Si s,nnsi\* 


$4,028 32 



409.41 feet, 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft., brick, 



Cottage-Street Outlet. 






Labor $1,455 88 


41,500 brick . 








415 00 


197 bbls. cement . 








228 52 


50 tons sand 








87 50 


131J double loads gravel 








263 00 


1 manhole frame and cover 








11 75 


6 manhole steps 








3 30 


Teaming 








235 00 


104,148 feet lumber 








1,744 48 


60 feet pipe . 








20 59 


Branches, bends, etc. 








6 42 


Pile-driving . 








1,403 85 


Bolts and washers (galvanized) 






1,059 65 


Hardware and supplies . 






64 65 


4 tons coal .... 






20 55 




$7,020 U 



342 



City Document No. 34. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 



514.41 feet, 3 ft. X 4 
308.10 feet, 2 ft. 4 in. 
102.90 feet, 2 ft. 4 in. 
255.90 feet, 2 ft. 4 in. 



ft., wood. 
X 3 ft., wood. 
X 4 ft., wood. 
X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 



Randolph Street. 



Labor .... 

12,300 brick . 

60 bbls. cement 

Sand .... 

Gravel .... 

7 manhole frames and covers 

56 manhole steps . 

Teaming 

Lumber 

1,140 feet pipe 

Branches, bends, etc. 

Miscellaneous supplies . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
827.49 feet, 12 in., pipe. 

Sewer Outlet, D and Anchor Streets. 

A. A. Hall, contractor . 



$2,963 56 

123 00 

73 44 

15 75 

114 99 

82 25 

30 80 

519 00 

199 29 

314 90 

108 52 

4 49 

$4,549 99 



Inspection 

3 manhole frames and covers 

20 manhole steps . 

1 ton coal 



>,141 29 

355 00 

35 44 

11 00 

4 85 

),547 58 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

529 feet, 5 ft. x 4 ft., wood. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1891. 

Lawrence Avenue and Magnolia Street. 

Labor $2,627 19 

2,150 brick 21 58 

9 bbls. cement ....... 10 86 

Sand 4 60 

2 manhole frames and covers . . . . . 23 50 

5 manhole steps . . . . . . . 2 75 

450 lbs. powder 162 00 

500 caps . . . • 20 20 

Carried forward, $2,872 68 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



343 



Brought forward, 
Teaming 
156 feet pipe . 
Branches, bends, etc. 
Blacksmithing 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
566.90 feet, 12-in. pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1891. 





$2,872 


68 


. 


00 




45 


76 




56 


08 




200 


50 




8 


81 




$3,456 


83 



Rena and North Harvard Streets. 




Labor . $3,346 75 


16,870 brick . 






161 70 


64£ bbls. cement . 






79 89 


Ik double loads sand 






14 45 


6 manhole frames and covers 






77 00 


14 manhole steps . 






7 70 


Teaming 






142 50 


Lumber .... 






126 92 


2,564 feet pipe 






834 51 


Branches, bends, etc. 






215 35 


1 set regulator stones 






50 00 


13 tons coal . 






60 16 


Miscellaneous supplies . 






51 23 




$5,168 16 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

345.45 feet, 15-in. pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and amount of work done is a continu- 
ation of the cost and work done during the year 1891. 

Ashmont, Washington, and Armandine Streets. 

Labor 

128,650 brick 

270 bbls. cement . 

67 double loads sand 

24 tons sand 

2 manhole frames and covers 

150 lbs. powder 

1 ,200 feet fuse 

388 caps 

Teaming 

764 feet pipe, branches, bends, etc. 

Blacksmithing and repairs of tools . 



4.359 


14 


1,316 


63 


318 


60 


144 


60 


23 


50 


54 


00 


5 


81 


4 


85 


160 


50 


84 


65 


310 


60 



;,782 88 



344 



City Document No. 34. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 



469 feet, 2 ft. 4. in. X 3 ft. 6 in. 
100 feet, 2 ft. X 3 ft., brick. 



brick. 



The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during; the year 1891. 



Westville, Freeman, and Charles Streets. 



84,110 75 

2,214 53 

517 32 

244 70 

8 25 
199 75 

6 19 

7 12 



Labor ...... 

214,500 brick . 

438 bbls. cement .... 

120 double loads sand } 

29 tons sand ) 

5 double loads gravel 

17 manhole frames and covers 

1 lamphole hydrant frame and cover 

Powder ") 

Fuse V 

Caps ) 

Teaming ..... 

2,250 feet pipe .... 
Branches, bends, etc. 
Blacksmithins: .... 



Size and Length of Seioer. 

111.67 feet, 2 ft. 3 in. X 2 ft. 11 in., brick. 

263.98 feet, 24 in., pipe. 

386.01 feet, 18 in., pipe. 

319.65 feet, 15 in., pipe. 

602.31 feet, 12 in., pipe. 

12.60 feet, 12 in., iron pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during: the year 1891. 



234 


00 


1,056 


22 


260 


94 


195 


20 


89,054 97 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 345 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

Street Department, Street-Cleaning Division, 

14 Beacon St., Boston, Feb. 25, 1893. 

H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets, Boston, 31 ass. : 

Sir : In reply to your circular of the 14th ult. in regard to the 
annual report, I beg leave to present the following record of the 
expenditures, business, and income of the Street-Cleaning Divis- 
ion of the Street Department during the financial year ending 
January 81, 1893: 



Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation 

Transfer from Street- Watering Division . 

Transfer from Paving- Division 



Transferred to Sewer Division 
Transferred to Paving Division 
Total amount of expenditures 



$20,000 00 

7,500 00 

288,320 42 



6300,000 00 

4.000 00 

11,820 42 

$315,820 42 



$315,820 42 



Objects of Expenditdre. 

Superintendence. 

Salary of Deputy Superintendent . 

Office pay-rolls, including pay of clerks, messengers, 

etc. 
Stationery 
Printing 

Maps, plans, etc. . 
Telephone service . 
Board of horses 
Use of carriages 



Total cost of su peril 



tendence 





$3,000 


00 


ngers, 




5,043 


08 




185 


47 




496 


01 




93 


25 




156 


60 




483 


33 




24 


50 




$9,482 


24 



346 



City Document No. 34. 



Cleaning Streets. 

Including the Cost of Sweeping, Loading, and Removal of Street- 
dirt. 
West End . 



District 1. 

District 2. North End 

District 3. South End 

District 4. South End 

District 5. Back Bay 

District 6. South Boston and Dorchester 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Total cost of Cleaning streets . 



$17,662 71 
20,508 54 
20.894 41 
17,670 
12,847 
17,423 
12,145 



03 

77 
39 
69 



12,088 08 
$131,240 62 



Cleaning Gutters. 
Including Cost of Sweeping, Loading, and Removal of Street-dirt. 



District 1. 


West End 


$2,250 93 


District 2. 


North End 




District 3. 


South End .... 




District 4. 


South End ..... 


2,354 68 


District 5. 


Back Bay ..... 


7,229 58 


District 6. 


South Boston and Dorchester 


2,411 18 


District 7. 


Roxbury ..... 


7,068 09 


District 8. 


Brighton . . . . 




District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
cost of cleaning gutters . 


4,554 80 


Total 


. $25,869 26 



Total length cleaned, 1,923 miles. 
Average cost per mile, $13.71. 

Cleaning Crossings. 

Including Cost of Manual and Machine Labor. 

Total cost of cleaning crossings .... $1,432 70 



District 1 . West End . 

District 2. North End . 

District 3. South End . 

District 4. South End . 

District 5. Back Bay . 

District 6. South Boston and Doi 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Total cost of dumps 



ning Dumps. 




$570 52 




525 76 




450 20 




428 44 




560 55 


chestcr 


' . 457 10 


Boston 


503 02 




$3,495 59 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 347 



Cost of Removal of Snow. 



Including Labor and Carting. 



District 1. 


West End 


$3,252 18 


District 2. 


North End 


3,434 71 


District 3. 


South End ...... 


2,947 64 


District 4. 


South End 


3,217 36 


District 5. 


Back Bay ..... 


3,652 23 


District 6. 


South Boston and Dorchester 


4,313 00 


District 7. 
District 8. 


Roxbury ) 
Brighton \ 


3,983 63 


District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 


2,204 33 


Charged b\ 


Sanitary Division 
30st of removing snow 


511 00 


Total < 


. $27,516 08 



Cost of Scraping. 
Macadamized Streets. 



District 8. 
Labor 
Carting 
Watering 



Brighton. 



Total cost of scraping 



$2,067 28 

569 40 

2 17 

$2,638 85 



This shows the cost of scraping with hoes the entire streets 
from curb to curb. 27.33 miles ; cost per mile, $96.55. 



District 7 

Leaves 
District 8 

Leaves 

Weeding, etc. 



Cost of Collecting Leaves 

And of Weeding, etc., in Districts 7 and 8. 
Roxbury. 



Brighton. 



Total cost of collecting leaves, etc. . 

Cost of Cleaning Private Ways. 
Labor and teaming, not including superintendence 



$328 53 

273 00 

1,319 42 

11,920 95 



$1,100 91 



This represents work done for the Health Department during 
the "cholera" excitement, exclusive of superintendence, etc., the 
cost of same to be made good to this division later by said de- 
partment. 

Patrol System. 

Push carts, including labor and teaming . . . $21,385 94 

Paper patrol, including labor and teaming . . 1,373 11 

Snow 3,033 99 

Superintendence . . . . . . . 1,196 52 



Total 



$26,989 56 



348 



City Docu^ient No. 34. 



o 

9 
9 

< 



S3 



9 

H 

d 

-d 
a 

9 
eg 

.-I 

= 1 

9 ~ 

d 3 

S 9 
© 9 

fi 

II 






s 

9 
ft 

o 

- 

o 



- 





~3 
o 


1 ■*rtif)-H«N'*NnO'HCo 

CO O <M »S — i!C5NMOS!lOt> 
CONOOtXXOHOOJI 

1 ejeeiNcsoracia-oooM 

CM CM CM CM CM CM CM i-> CM 


CM 
IS 

■«* 

o 

CM 
CM 
CM 

1 m= 




XOJiBd jo isoo 


1 


















• • 00 

• • en 




co 

IS 

C5 
00 

CO 

cm 




•SA^M. 9}EAIjd 

SninBap jo }soq 


1 


















• O • 

• o • 




© 
o 

3= 




•0J9 
'Snip99Ji 's9AE9f 

Saij09H03 jo 1S03 














• CO cm 

• IS -# 

' CO CM 

• CM C5 

• CO IS 

: «&,-" 










C5 

o 

CM 
CI 




•8139J]S 

pgzitnBpBDBtn 

SquIB-IOS JO }803 














CO 

CO 

CO 
CO 










IS 

CO 

CO 
CO 
CO 

cm" 




•Avons 
SaiAonigj jo isoq 


00--*CS«O CO cc 

~^ c^ co co cm o co «" 
cm ■* r~- t- cm co co -*t 

IOCO-C- IS — > 00 c 
IN -f OS CM CO CO C5 C>- 

CO*" CO' SnT CO CO ^t" CO* CN 


o 

o 

IS 




• 


CO 

o 

o 

cm 




•sdmnp jo isog 


MOO*iOO 
IS t- CM T lO <-H 

O >S © CO O •>• 

N Jl lO N " a 

15 O * ■* O 'j* 




- CM 

• o 

• CO 

• o • 
. is • 








IS 
IS 

**_ 

co" 




•sSaissojo 
gainBgp jo isoq 
























• o 

• t- 

• CM 

■ CO 1 

• ■* 


o 
1-- 

oq 

CO 




•sigjiriS 
3nmB3[o jo ?so3 | 


CO • 
S3 • 

o • 
is • 
cm • 

cm" '. 
4& - 




2,354 08 
7,229 58 
2,411 18 
7,008 -09 


o • 

CO • 

— H 
»a • 

1S_ • 

■* '. 






| 

i 


CO 
CM 

05 

co 

00 

is" 

IM 




• 8} 99.113 
2aiUB9p JO 1S0Q 


— -* — CO t- Cft C5 

t-ie-*ot>coc 

(M 30 -H O f- CO IS 
CO IS CO O CO -* — • 
t>T o~ o »" IT* t-" of ! 

— ■ CM CM ^ h ~* n . 


CO 

s 

CO 

cc 
© 

cm 


c : 

o . 
"rrt t» 

•r >■ 
- * 


00 
• 01 

'. .5 


i 


CO 

o 

CM 
CO 




(0 

6- 

o 

3 

E-i 
02 




CM 


CO 


■* 


U5 


cc 


t~ 


X 




"c -r 5 9 
CO >> 

rt '5ofi 

4 « h d 

- 2 _ij " ffl 
£oPhO 




o 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 349 



$2,393 


04 


15,014 


10 


2,840 


61 


13 


95 


366 


85 


2,585 


64 


864 


27 


765 


17 


656 


45 


18 


00 


281 


65 



Stable and Yard Expenses. 

Including the Cost of the South End, West End, Roxbury, South 
Bosto7i, and Charlestown Stables, as follows : 

Superintendence ....... 

Labor, including cost of feeders, hostlers, broom- 
makers, blacksmiths, carpenters, watchmen, yard- 
men, etc. .... 

Cart and carriage repairs 

Coal 

Harness repairs 

Horse-shoeing 

Repairs on sweeping-machines 

Repairs on stables, sheds, etc. 

Street-car tickets and ferry passes 

Tool repairs .... 

Veterinary services and medicine 

Total stable and yard expense . 

Stock Account 
Broom stock purchased . 
Carts and carriages purchased 
Harnesses, horse furnishings purchased 
Horses purchased .... 
Sweeping-machines purchased 
Tools purchased ..... 
Patrol stock and maintenance of same 

Total . . . . . . 

Miscellaneous 
Holidays ..... 

Sand ...... 

Building South Boston stable, grading yard, etc 
Sundries .... 



Total 



General Recapitulation of Expenses 



Superintendence 
Cleaning of streets 
Cleaning of gutters 
Cleaning of crossings 
Scraping macadamized streets 
Maintaining dumps 
Removal of snow and ice 
Collecting leaves, weeding, etc. 
Patrol system 

Carried forward, 





. $25,799 


73 


$6,378 


78 




545 


00 




2,742 


31 




3,700 


00 




778 


00 




1,051 


30 




2,408 


77 




. $17,604 


16 


. $11,858 57 


206 


30 


tc. . 1,481 


83 


PENSE 


531 


79 


$14,078 


49 


s. 




$9,482 


24 




131,240 


62 




25,869 


26 




1,432 


70 




2,638 


85 




3,495 


59 




27,516 


08 




1,920 


95 




26,989 


56 



$230,585 85 



350 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Cleaning private ways . 
Stable and yard expenses 
Stock account 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



8230,585 85 

1,100 91 

25,799 73 

17,604 16 

14,078 49 

$289,169 14 



$848.72 of the above amount paid by other divisions and departments on account of 
work done by this division, making the net expenses of this division, as shown in finan- 
cial statement, $288,320.42. 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, exclusive of Supervision and other Expenses, 



CO 
Eh 
O 

3 
H 

CO 

5 


No. Miles 
Cleaned. 


.2 
■s'5 
§g 
°5 


S ft 

ft "- 1 


o 

O 

O 


o 

ftu 

IS 


No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 ... 
No. 4 
No. 5 

No. 6 

No. 7 
No. S 1 . .. 


1,322.35 

1,943.39 

1,331.49 

1,468.06 

538.71 

659.42 

361.80 


$17,662 71 
20,508 54 
20,894 41 
17,670 03 
12,847 77 
17,423 39 
12,145 69 


$507 76 
525 76 
450 20 
377 03 
353 15 
402 25 


$18,170 47 
21,034 30 
21,344 61 
18,047 06 
13,200 92 
17,825 64 
12,145 69 


$13 74 
10 82 
16 03 
12 29 
24 50 
27 03 
33 57 


No. 9 


672.83 


12,088 08 


367 20 


12,455 28 


18 51 




8,298.05 


$131,240 62 


$2,983 35 


$134,223 97 





1 See tables on page 347. 

Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight districts, ex- 
clusive of supervision, etc., $16.17. 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning Streets in each Dis- 
trict, including Supervision, Labor, Yard, and Stable Expenses. 



a3 

H 
O 

3 


CO . 

a a 

" 03 


O.S5 




o a 
2-2 
— o.S 




of the 
1 Cost of 
rd and 
table 
pense. 


* . 

"3s g 


5* 


CO 

ft 


£3 


OqQQ 




E-lOQ 




"*. as 3 02 X 

S3!* H 


O ft 

ft 


° 2 
E-ift 


No. 1.... 


1,322.35 


$18,170 


47 


$770 


18 


$2,374 98 


$21,315 63 


$16 12 


No. 2.... 


1,943.39 


21,034 


30 


891 


5S 


2,749 29 


24,675 17 


12 69 


No. 3.... 


1,331.49 


21,344 


61 


904 


72 


2,789 85 


25,039 18 


18 80 


No. 4.... 


1,468.06 


18,047 


06 


764 


9G 


2,358 85 


21,170 87 


14 42 


No. 5.... 


538.71 


13,200 


92 


559 


55 


1,725 43 


15,485 90 


28 74 


No. 6.... 


659.42 


17,825 


64 


755 


58 


2,329 92 


20,911 14 


31 71 


No. 7.... 


361.80 


12,145 


69 


514 


83 


1,587 52 


14,248 04 


39 38 


No. 8 


















No. 9.... 


672.83 


12,455 


28 


527 


94 


1,627 97 


14,611 19 


21 71 




8,298.05 


$134,223 


97 


$5,689 


34 


$] 7,543 81 


$157,457 12 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight districts, in- 
cluding supervision, etc., $18.97. 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 351 



Table showing the Number of Loads of Street Dirt removed. 



Districts. 


Number of Loads of 
Dirt removed. 


Cost, including Foremen's 
Superintendence . 


2 

3 


10,361 
10,294 
11,514 
10,841 
13,767 
13,332 
16,104 
5,793 
10,928 




$1.92 
1.99 
1.81 


4. 


1.84 


5 


1.45 


7 


1.48 
1.19 


S 1 




9 


1.52 








102,934 
3,456 

439 


equal 

loac 

carted 


to 43,545 barrel 




s. 
by paper patrol. 






106,829 









1 See previous note on District 8. 

About thirty-three per cent, of these loads delivered at the 
dumping scow. 

Income. 

Amount of bills deposited with the City Collector 

during the financial year ending January 31, 1893, $8,256 37 



Complaints. 

Through Central Office .... 

Made by individuals, personally and by letter 
Anonymous ...... 

By telephone ...... 

. Total number of complaints 



22 

19 

3 

2 

46 



Average Force employed January 31, 1893. 

Deputy Superintendent ...... 1 

Chief Clerk 1 

Messengers ........ 2 

Employees ........ 343 



Entire force 



347 



Respectfully submitted, 

Philip A. Jackson, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



i 



rfciL 



car 



CCCC 









^cjCL 


















-xzwijm 





















«"CX<T 



<So <*<«; 






^c-^-«at 



^s^t_ 






<£c_ -SCO • 



«r:ccc 












c<^o««r 












CCCH 











< 


«5 


^ 




' : & 






«£^L CSC 






OKC:X 









«r^s 





'"<T S 




d <r 




B& 




c < 


^2s5s 




^^ < 


% 


<c 


<c 


S <C« 


C 


re; 












TcC ^ 






C5ST <Si 



crcr x 






^ 





<CCCCC 






C'.ccO OC<r- «_