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Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

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Given By 
Boston Street Dept, 



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With Compliments of 



iwrg 1)L (forte, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1893bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



189 3. V C$4 (9 
















BOSTON : 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 
1894. 






/n-3. 



CONTENTS. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



CENTRAL OFFICE. 

PAGE 

Central Office Division 2 

Complaints 25 

Expenses Central Office 2 

Employment of Labor ....... 22 

Financial Statement (General), 3 
Grade and Number of Em- 
ployees 23-24 

Income 8 

Laying Out and Construction 

(new law) 7 

List of Contracts 9-21 

Organization 1 

Recapitulation of Expenditures, 8 

Special Appropriations 4-7 

Bridge Division 26 

Abolition of Grade Crossings. 34-38 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 47 

Broadway Bridge 46 

Classification of Expenditures, 50 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge .... 48 

Chelsea Bridge 27 

Court Decree 29 

Draw Openings 51 

Dover-Street Bridge 40 

Harvard Bridge 48 

In General 49 

Prison-Point Bridge 49 

Statement of Traffic over 

Bridges 51 

West Boston Bridge 49 

West Fourth-Street Crossing, 38 



PAGE 

West Fourth-Street, Finding 

of Commissioners 40-45 

West Chester-Park Bridge ... 45 

Paving Division 52 

Areas of Pavements 53 

Brick Sidewalks 69 

Comments on Assessments. . . 69 
Chap. 401 of the Acts of 1892, 70 
Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, 71 
Chap. 437 of the Acts of 1S93, 73 
Distribution of Pavements ... 54 

Edgestones and Sidewalks 68 

Length of Accepted Streets 

and Character of Pavements, 52-53 

Pavements laid in 1891 55-58 

Pavements laid in 1893 (Com- 
ments) 59 

Philadelphia Ordinance 74 

Report of City Engineer on 

Special Work 60-68 

Street Openings 75 

Streets Laid Out 52 

Street-Watering 77 

Contracts for Street-sprinkling, 80 

Comments on Street-watering, 78 

Distribution of Carts 82 

Income 84 

Money Expended, 1893 83 

Money Expended for Last 

Sixteen Years ; 84 

Style of Water Carts 78 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Summary of Day Work 79 

Summary of Contract Work . 80 

Summary of Work done 81 

Water-posts 84 

Work done at Expense of 

Abutters . . . 80 

Sanitary Division 86 

Amount of House Offal Re- 
moved (10 years) 86 

Amount Ashes Kemoved (12 

years) 98 

Comparative Statement, Six- 
teen Weeks in Winter and 

Summer 99 

Comments on Tow-boat and 

Dumping-wharf 101-102 

Collection and Disposal of 

Offal 87 

Capacity of Offal Wagons .... 97 

Cremation of Offal 89 

Disposition of Material 99 

Experiments on Cremation of 

Offal 91 

Eoree Employed 97 

General Discussion 96 

New England Construction 

Company 88 

Eemoval of Ashes 98 

Store Dirt 100 

Tow-boat 101 

The Brown Crematory. ...... 89 

Sewer Division 103 

Brighton District 1 09 

Charlestown District 105 

City Proper and Back Bay 

District ..'. 106 

Dorchester District 107 

Diagrams 113 

Dynamite 112 

East Boston District 1 04 

Intercepting Connections. . . . Ill 
Laws and Ordinances concern- 
ing Sewer Assessment .. . 114-127 



PAGE 

Main Drainage Works 110 

Operation of Law of 1889 ... 133 

Boxbury District 108 

Sewer Assessments (Discus- 
sion) 128 

Sewer Assessments, 1878 132 

Sewer Assessments, under Acts 

of 1889-90 133-138 

Sewer Assessments under Law 

of 1892 139 

South Boston District 106 

Stony Brook 109 

West Roxbury District 108 

Street-Cleaning Division, 145 
Average No. Men Employed. . 146 
Ordinances and their Enforce- 
ment 149 

Plant 147 

Push-cart Patrol 147 

Public Slovenliness 149 

Public Waste Barrels 149 

Street Sweepings Removed (12 

years) 148 

Sweeping Districts 145 

Smoke Nuisance 151 

Chap. 353, Acts of 1893 153 

Circular 155 

Coking Arches 161 

Down-draft Furnaces 157 

Eurnaces with Hollow Walls. 161 

General Remarks . 164 

Instructions for firing 156 

Ordinances 165 

Remedies without using device, 163 

Steam Jets 158 

Conclusion 168 

Street Department — Organi- 
zation 169 



CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGE 
DIVISION. (Page 171.) 



Appendix Al (Draw-tenders' 
Report) 204 

Appendix A2 (Width of Open- 
ings) 206 

Appendix A3 (Width of 

Bridges) . . 208 

Appendix A4 (List of Cul- 
verts and Small Bridges) . . 209-213 

Appendix A4, List of Culverts 
and Small Bridges (Supple- 
ment) 214-216 

Appendix A6 (Statement of 

Traffic) 217 

Appendix A6 (Draw-tenders' 

Report) 218 

Appropriations and Expendi- 
tures 173-174 

Bridges wholly Supported by- 
Boston 199 

Bridges of which Boston Sup- 
ports the Part within its 
Limits 200 



Bridges of which Boston Pays 
a Part of the Cost of Main- 
tenance 200 

Bridges Supported by Railroad 

Corporations 201-202 

Cable-houses 173 

Financial Statement — Regu- 
lar Appropriations 173 

Inland Bridges 187-193 

List of Boston Bridges 199 

Public Landing-places .... . 172 
Recapitulation — Specials ... 198 
Recapitulation Expenses on 

Inland Bridges 193 

Regular Maintenance Ex- 
penses at the North and 

South Yards 194-5 

Recapitulation Expenses on 

Tide-water Bridges 186 

Special Work 172 

Special Appropriations .... 196-198 
Superintendent's Statement .. 171 
Total Regular Expenditures . 174 
Tide-water Bridges 174-185 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF PAVING 
DIVISION. (Page 221.) 



Driveways, Block-stone, As- 
phalt, and Gravel 265 

Expenditures (Details) ...... 229 

Execution of Courts, etc 229 

Einancial Statement. ....... 226 

Income 227 

Laying Out and Construction 

of Highways 259-261 

New Edgestones 261 

New Brick Sidewalks 263 

Permits Issued 222 

Property 265 

Removal of Snow (Table) ... 233 
Street Improvements (Alder- 
manic Districts) 243-255 

Summary of Expenditures 

(Specials) 256-258 



Street-watering Expenditures, 233 

Schedule of Property 265 

Street Numbers Assigned . . . 222 

Streets Laid Out or Extended, 224 

Streets Widened or Relocated, 225 

Streets Discontinued 225 

Schedule of Expenditures : 

Schedule A 229 

Schedule B 229 

Schedule C 230 

Schedule D 231-243 

Table of Expenditures (38 

years) .....' 221 

Table of Expenses, Regular 

Appropriation 2i^8 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SANITARY DIVISION. (Page 267.) 



Amount Expended for Collec- 
tion and Removal of House 

Offal 269 

Contracts 275 

Contract for Refuse Cans . . . 276 

Cost of Carts .... - 274 

Cost of Horse-shoeing 274 

Comparative Table, Collection 

Garbage 271 

Disposition of Material Col- 
lected 271 

Dumping-boats, Expenses of .. 273 

Einancial Statement.. 267 

Horse Account 281 

House Offal 280 



PAGE 

House Dirt and Ashes 280 

Hay and GraiD 277 

Horse-shoeing and Blacksmith- 

ing (cost) 274 

Items of Expenditure 267 

Material Collected and Cost of 

Teams 272 

Material Collected by Districts, 270 

Number of Carts 273 

Organization ... 281 

Recapitulation(Hay and Grain), 279 

Revenue 268 

Total Cost, Removal, etc 269 

Table of Loads (12 years) ... 274 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWER 



DIVISION. 

PAGE 

Catch-basins 315 

Financial Statement 2S4 

Fall of Eain and Snow 318 

Improved Sewerage (Expendi- 
tures) .... 285 

Miscellaneous Expenses 285 

New Tow-boat 285 

Pumping-station Record 319 

Property in Charge of Sewer 

Division 320 

Recapitulation 315 

Stony Brook Improvement. . . 285 

Brighton. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 293 

By Private Parties 295 

Surface Drains 295 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 296 

City Proper. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 287 

Surface Drains 287 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 288 

Charlestown. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 289 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 290 

Dorchester. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 299 

By Private Parties 302 

Surface Drains 303 

Culverts 303 



(Page 283.) 



Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 

East Boston. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 
Day Labor 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 

Roxbttry. 

Sewers Built by Contract or 
Day Labor 

Sewers Built under Chap. 323, 
Acts 1S91 

By Private Parties 

Surface Drains 

Work done for Paving Di- 
vision 

West Roxbury. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 

By Private Parties 

Culverts 

Surface Drains 

Work done for Paving Division, 



30-1 



291 
292 



305 

307 
308 
309 

310 



311 
313 
314 
314 
315 



South Boston. 
Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 297 

By Private Parties 297 

Work done for Paving Division, 298 



Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion 310 

Sludge Record 320 

Specials, etc 322-329 

Summary of Construction ((i 

years) 321 

Schedule of Sewers to Date.. 317 



Vlll 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET- 
CLEANING DIVISION. (Page 331.) 



PAGE 

Average Force Employed. .. 338 

Complaints 338 

Cost per Mile, exclusive of 

Supervision 336 

Cost per Mile, inclusive of 

Supervision 337 

Cleaning Streets, Cost by Dis- 
tricts 332 

Cleaning Gutters, by Districts, 332 

Cleaning Crossings 332 

Cost of Maintaining Dumps . • 332 

Cost of Removal of Snow 333 

Cost of Scraping Mac. Streets, 333 

Cost of Collecting Leaves 333 



PAGE 

Financial Statement 331 

General Recapitulation of Ex- 
penses 336 

Income 338 

Miscellaneous 335 

Objects of Expenditure 331 

Patrol System 333 

Public Waste Barrels 338 

Recapitulation of Expenses . 334 

Stable and Yard Expenses 335 

Stock Account . . 335 

Total Number of Loads Street- 
dirt Removed 337 



APPENDIX F. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT NUM- 
BERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. (Page 339.) 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Beacon street — Laying Trinidad Asphalt Paving on Cement Concrete 

Base 54 

Chart of Dumping Stations 88 

Discharge of Outfall Sewer at Moon Island 110 

Dumping-Scow (Loading) 98 

Dover-street Bridge over Fort-point Channel .... 40 

Gate-house at Moon Island 112 

Old Paving — Tremont street 



58 
New Paving — Washington street. 

Sewer Diagram, Drainage Area Curves , . 116 

Sewer Diagram, Kutter's Formula 114 

The Street Department Tow-boat "Cormorant" 102 



Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
third annual report of the operations and expenses of the 
Street Department for the year 1893 is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

Organization. 
The work of the department during the past year has been 
carried on under the same organization that was effected when 
the consolidated department was created in 1891, the several 
divisions of the department being as follows : 

The Central Office. 

Bridge Division. 

Paving Division. 

Sewer Division. 

Sanitary Division. 

Street-Cleaning Division. 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges . 

Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office Division and the Boston and Cambridge 
Bridges, is in charge of a deputy superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge Bridges are managed by two 
commissioners, the Superintendent of Streets being the com- 
missioner for the city of Boston, the other commissioner being 
appointed by the Mayor of the city of Cambridge. 

The work of street- watering, which devolves on the Street 
Department, is carried on under the supervision of the Pav- 
ing Division, with a foreman of street- watering in charge. 



City Document No. 34. 



CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 



The work of the Central Office Division consists of gen- 
eral supervision over the work of the several divisions of the 
department ; attending to all correspondence, purchasing sup- 
plies, investigating complaints, drawing and executing con- 
tracts, keeping of all records, financial, civil service, and 
legal, preparing estimates for public improvements, and other 
miscellaneous work. 



Expenses oe the Central Office. 
For the current expenses of the Central Office the City 
Council appropriated the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000) , to which was transferred from the Paving Division 
for the care of horses the sum of eight hundred five dollars 
and ninety-six cents ($805.96), making a total of twenty 
thousand eight hundred five dollars and ninety- six cents 
($20,805.96), which was expended as follows 

Salaries ..... 

Travelling expenses, carriages, etc. 
Board, shoeing, clothing, etc., of horses 
Stationery, printing, postage, etc. 
Telephone and telegraph 
Miscellaneous expenses (office) 
Copying and compiling 
Newspapers, periodicals, etc. 
Messengers .... 
Atlases, maps, etc. 
Typewriter supplies 
Rubber stamps, pads, etc. 

Total "$20,805 96 

The following condensed statement shows the various ap- 
propriations and amounts expended for the maintenance of 
the department for the year ending January 31, 1894 ; also, 
in separate tables, the special appropriations and amounts ex- 
pended for specific objects designated by the City Council : 



$17,057 


78 


1,032 


10 


966 


60 


714 


80 


396 


28 


161 


06 


159 


76 


90 


08 


86 


95 


72 


50 


55 


65 


12 


40 



Street Department. 



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City Document No. 34. 



Paving Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Baker st., Ward 23 

Beacon st 

Bellflower st. . . . 

Berwick park, foot-bridge , 

Blue Hill ave., paving 

Blakeville st 

Brent st 

Bristol st 

Broadway, Harrison ave. to Broadway bridge , 

Burneyst., Ward 22 

Bushnell st 

Ctaardon st 

Cherry st 

Commonwealth ave 

Congress and L sts , 

Cooper St., between N. Margin and Salem sts. , 

Cranston st., Ward 23 , 

Dickens st 

Dorchester ave., paving, Wards 15 and 24 . . 

Dorchester st., between Eighth st. and Dorchester 
ave., paving , 



Eighth St., L st. to O st., edgestones, etc. 
Englewood ave. and Sutherland road . . 

Ereeport st 

Grant st., Ward 24 

Harbor View st 



Harrison ave., Kneeland st. to Bennett St., 
asphalting 



Harvard St., construction 

Houghton st., macadamizing 

Howell st., construction . . . • . 

Humboldt-ave. extension, grade damages . . 
Hunneman St., grading and constructing . . 



Carried forward 



Appropri- 
ations, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



$2,000 00 

108 90 

3,000 00 

6,000 00 

25,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,526 28 

2,869 28 

7,782 42 

7,500 00 

2,000 00 

349 45 

65 10 

321,062 20 

30,000 00 

1,500 00 

3,000 00 

785 00 

2,700 37 

386 09 

1,249 69 

4,739 95 

10,849 55 

241 52 

562 96 

3,900 00 
6,000 00 
6,550 40 
2,880 61 
225 52 
963 45 



$457,298 74 $335,690 



Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1893, to Jan. 

31, 1894. 



1,526 28 
2,869 28 
7,782 42 



349 45 

65 10 

266,246 65 

15,300 00 

1,500 00 

1,158 20 

785 00 

2,700 37 

386 09 

1,249 69 

4,739 95 

10,849 55 

241 52 

562 96 



6,000 00 

6,550 40 

2,880 61 

225 52 

963 45 



Balance on 

hand, Jan. 

31, 1S94. 



$1,350 40 

3,000 00 

6,000 00 

25,000 00 

1,500 00 



7,500 00 
2,000 00 



54,815 55 
14,700 00 

1,841 80 



3,900 00 



$121,607 75 



Street Department. 



Paving Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Broil ght forward 

Jackson st., construction 

L st., grading, etc 

LaGrange st 

Landing, East Boston 

Lehigh St., paving 

Lexington ave 

Millst 

Mt. Vernon st., grade damages 

Newport st 

Ninth st., Old Harbor st. to N St., macadamizing . 

Norfolk st., Milton st. to Corbett st 

Parmenter st., construction 

Preston st 

River st 

Sawyer ave 

Short St., Ward 23 

Smith St., construction . 

South Margin st., between Pitts and Prospect sts., 

Stanton st 

Thetford st 

Utica st., Harvard st. to Kneeland st 

Vale St., Ward 15 

Van Rensselaer place, paving 



West Newton st., between Washington st. and 
Shawmut ave., asphalt blocks 



West Third St., Ward 13 . . . . 

Whiting St., Ward 21 

Worthington St., edgestones, etc. 

1 Allston bridge 

Park St., Charlestown 



Totals $530,603 47 $383,880 72 $146,782 75 



Appropri- Expended 

ations, from Feb. 1, 

Balances, and 1893, to Jan 
Transfers. 31, 1894. 



$457,298 74 
1,500 00 
2,346 50 
3,269 30 
500 00 
2,831 78 
1,702 90 
2,000 00 
1,325 00 
2,500 00 
5,827 14 
2,350 00 
1,500 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,713 44 
1,806 73 
2,008 10 
4,500 00 
2,000 00 
3,000 00 
7,000 00 
1,000 00 
450 00 

161 26 
1,900 00 
5,500 00 
1,000 00 
2,504 56 
1,168 02 



$335,690 99 
1,500 00 
2,346 50 
3,269 30 
500 00 
2,831 78 
1,702 90 



5,827 14 
2,350 00 
1,500 00 



4,000 00 
2,713 44 
1,806 73 
2,008 10 
4,500 00 
2,000 00 



1,000 00 



161 26 
1,900 00 
1,600 00 
1,000 00 
2,504 56 
1,168 02 



Balance on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1894. 



$121,607 75 



2,000 00 
1,325 00 
2,500 00 



5,000 00 



3,000 00 
7,000 00 



450 00 



1 Money furnished by the City Engineer's Department. 



City Document No. 34. 



Sewer Division Specials. 



Object or Appropriation. 



Appropri- 
ations, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1893, to 
Jan. 31.1S94. 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1894. 



Sewer, between Roslindaleand West Roxbury 

Sewers, Brighton 

Sewer outlets, East Boston 

Sewers, South Boston 

Sewers, Ward 23, Washington St., etc. ... 
Sewers, Westville, Freeman, and Charles sts. 

Stables and sheds, Brighton 

Tug-boat ' 

Totals 



$380 00 

2,486 47 

1,762 95 

3,475 14 

716 41 

215 00 

5,957 92 

12,432 50 



$27,426 39 



$100 00 



1,762 95 

1,127 09 

125 12 

215 00 

5,957 92 

12,432 50 



$21,720 58 



$280 00 
2,486 47 

2,348 05 
591 29 



5,705 81 



Bridge Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriations. 



Appropri- 
ations, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1893, to 
Jan. 31, 1894. 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1894. 



Berkeley-st. bridge 

Boylston-st. bridge 

Broadway bridge ........ 

Congress-st. bridge, guard . . . 
1 Savin Hill-ave. bridge, widening 

Totals 



$433 75 
1,432 82 
8,500 00 
534 31 
5,000 00 



$433 75 



7,498 86 

534 31 

5,000 00 



$1,432 82 
1,001 14 



$15,900 88 



$13,466 92 



$2,433 96 



1 Work done by and paid for by the Paving Division. 



Street Department. 



Aldermanic District Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No.l 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 2 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 3 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 4 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 5 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 7 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 8 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 9 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 10 
Street Improvements, AldermanicDisirictNo.il 
8treetImprovements, Aldermanic DistrictNo. 12 

Street Improvements, Ward 6 

Street Improvements, Ward 7 

Street Improvements, Ward 8 

Street Improvements, Ward 9 

Street Improvements, Ward 10 

Street Improvements, Ward 12 

Street Improvements, Ward 14 

Street Improvements, Ward 15 

Street Improvements, Wards 17 and IS .... 

Totals 



Appropri- 
ations, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



§34,000 00 
2S,000 00 
11,000 00 
14,000 00 
44,465 30 
20,897 76 
24,281 50 
15,000 00 
12,610 65 
19,000 00 
35,000 00 
34,0U0 00 
13,000 00 
18,668 54 
13,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
6,283 73 
14,500 00 
11,500 00 
15,000 00 



$394,207 48 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1893, to 
Jan. 31,1894. 



$34,000 00 

24,314 25 

9,884 02 

9,962 57 

43,927 48 

17,444 32 

20,935 21 

9,830 71 

9,096 77 

19,000 00 

34,732 96 

32,109 31 



6,283 73 



$271,521 33 



Balance on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1894. 



$3,685 75 
1,115 9S 
4,037 43 
537 82 
3,453 44 
3,346 29 
5,169 21 
3,513 8S 

267 04 
1,890 69 
13,000 00 
18,668 54 
13,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 

14,500 00 
11,500 00 
15,000 00 



$122,6S6 15 



Laying Out and Construction of Highways. 

^Expenditures. 
Sewer construction ..... $260,724 44 



Street construction 
Sidewalk construction 

Total . 



29,817 30 
21,771 74 

$312,313 48 



Streets built under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, as 
amended by Chap. 418 of the Acts of 1892. 





Paving. 


Sewer. 


Total. 




$9,063 73 

10,634 20 

3,098 18 

7,021 19 


$5,027 04 

11,734 00 

3,291 64 

1,431 39 


$14,090 77 




22.36S 20 




6,389 82 




8,452 58 








$29,817 30* 


$21,484 07* 


$51,301 37* 







* Amount retained on Paving contracts 

* " " Sewer " 



$2,881 57 yet to be paid. 
600 36 " 



* Total amount retained $3,481 93 



City Document No. 34. 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months 
ending 1 January 31, 1894. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Current 
Expenses for 
the twelve 
months end- 
ing Jan. 31, 
1894. 



Special Ap- 
propriations. 



Totals. 



Street Department : 

Central Office 

Bridge Division 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges ...... 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Sanitary Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Street-Watering 

Street Improvements, Aldermanie Districts 
Laying Out and Construction of Highways . 



$20,805 96 
133,159 24 

11,493 16 
745,681 52 
373,517 38 
481,300 63 
308,707 30 

99,430 16 



$13,466 92 



383.8S0 72 
21,720 58 



271,521 33 
312,313 48 



$20,805 96 

146,626 16 

11,493 16 

1,129,562 24 

395,237 96 

481,400 63 

308,707 30 

99,430 16 

271,521 33 

312,313 48 



Totals 



$2,174,095 35 



$1,002,903 03 



$3,176,998 3S 



Income . 

Statement showing the amount of bills and cash deposited 
with the City Collector for the year ending January 31, 1894, 
by the several divisions of the Street Department : 

Paving Division $46,855 92 

Sewer' Division 151,929 78 

Sanitary Division . . . . .32,056 27 

Bridge Division . . . '. . . 1,687 00 

Street-Cleaning Division .... 6,049 82 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges . . . 752 68 

Street-Watering 110 00 

' $239,441 47 



Statement showing the amount paid into the city treasury 
during the same period on account of the several divisions 
of the Street Department : 

$75,867 60 

87,207 65 

28,969 27 

2,699 50 

2,748 27 

752 68 

704 52 



Paving Division . 
Sewer Division 
Sanitary Division 
Bridge Division . 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges 



Street- Wate ring 



$198,949 49 



Steeet Department . 



List of Contracts from February 1, 1893, to January 31, 
1894, made by the Street Department. 



Paving- Blocks. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per M. 


Large paving blocks, 300,000 . . . 


liockport Granite Co , 


April 12, 1893. 


$73 50 

delivered on 

wharves. 



Paving" Bricks. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


100,000 on 
wharves. 


<B.) 

100,000 on streets 
in South and 
East Boston, 
Chariest o w u, 
and City 
Proper. 


cc.) 

100,000 on streets 
i u Brighton, 
West It o x - 
bury, Dorches- 
ter, and R o x - 
bury. 


Paving bricks, 
300,000 . . . 


Ham & Car- 
ter .... 


April 5, 1893. 


$12.00 
per M. 


$13.00 per M. 


$13.50 per M. 



North-River Flagging. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per Sq. Ft. 


North-River flagging, city . 


J. J. Cuddihy . . . 


March 13, 1893. 


$0 35^ 
on wharves. 


$0 40 
on streets. 



Spruce Lumber. 



Contract. 



Spruce lumber. Dints, 
1,2, 3, 8, 9, and 10 . 



Awarded to 



John W. Leatherbee, 



Spruce lumber, I >ists. | 
5, 6, and 7 . . . . Otis Eddy 



Spruce lumber, Dist. 
4 



Curtis & Pope . . 



Proposals 
received. 



Feb. 20, 1893. 



1893. 



Price per M Ft. B. M\ 



Dints. 1, 8, 9, and 10, 
$16.00; Dist. 2, 
$16.90; Dist. 3, 
$16.40. 



Dist. 5, $16.25; Dists. G 
and 7, $16.00. 



$Hi.:;s 



Price 

for 

Pinning 

per M 

ft. 



;-■! no 

1 00 
1 50 



10 



City Document No. 34. 



Beacli Gravel. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per 
Ton. 






March 13,1893. 


SO 67 

delivered on 

wharves. 



Coal. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposals 
received. 


Price per Ton of 
2,240 lbs. 


Coal (1,000 tons), Pumping- 
Stalion (Dorchester) . . . 

Coal (1,500 tons), Pumping- 
Station (Dorchester) . . . 

Coal (2,000 tons), Pumping- 
Station (Dorchester) . . . 


J. A. Bradford & Co. . 
Thomas &Pike .... 


Feh.14,1893. 
May 6, 1893. 
Sept. 2,1893. 


$4 58 
3 82 
3 84 



Cement. 





Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


American Cement. 


Contract. 


Delivered in South and 
East Boston, Charles- 
town, and City 
Proper. 


Delivered in West Rox- 
bury, Brighton, Dor- 
chester, and Roxbury. 




Ham & Car- 
ter .... 


Mar. 22, 1893. 


$1.10 per bbl. 


$1.12 per bbl. 


Cement . . . 


Portland Cement. 




Delivered in South and 
East Boston, Charles- 
town, and City 
Proper. 


Delivered in West Rox- 
bury, Brighton, Dor- 
chester, and Roxbury. 




$2.20 per bbl. 


$2.25 per bbl. 



Iron Castings. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal re- 
ceived. 


Price per 

100 lbs. 




Mechanics' Iron Foundry . . . 


March 27, 1893. 


$1 74 



Street Department. 



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22 City Document No. 34. 

Employment of Labor. 

During the year ending February 1, 1894, 47 applications 
were made upon the Civil Service Commission for 103 em- 
ployees of various grades, and 185 names were submitted 
by them, of which number 107 were given employment in the 
several divisions. 

The department records show that there are 2,520 persons 
eligible for employment in the various divisions, and of that 
number 2,189 were upon the pay-rolls ending January 
25, 1894. 

The followino- table shows the classification of all em- 
ployees of the Street Department as at present organized * 






Street Department. 



23 



Grade and Number of Employees in the Street 
Department. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Centra] 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 




1 












1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


Purchasing agent and assistant . 


1 

2 
1 


1 












2 


7 

12 
25 
13 


5 

10 
11 
24 

3 
11 

2 

5 
16 


5 

4 
5 

2 


1 

11 
12 


1 
3 


20 




40 






53 
39 










3 














11 






2 
3 

4 








4 












8 












20 






2 
5 






2 






16 


1 

14 


2 




24 






14 












5 

1 


5 








22 






23 








1 




1 






20 


7 
5 


2 


16 


45 






5 












20 
30 


20 














30 








1 






1 








15 


7 


13 


22 






14 


16 


43 






4 




4 








6 
3 






6 














3 






2 


3 






5 














5 


119 


163 


47 


36 


90 


460 



24 City Document No. 34. 

Grade and Number of Employees, etc. — Concluded. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Central 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 




5 


119 


163 


47 
195 

4 


36 
61 


90 


460 
256 










4 








2 

2 
348 
6 
2 
32 
1 




1 














2 






437 




141 


1 


927 






6 














2 














32 














1 






2 

5 








2 




2 


4 
5 


4 


2 


4 


21 
5 






34 
1 








34 






1 

2 


2 


1 


2 


6 






1 














2 






4 








4 






2 

2 








2 






13 

7 


8 


5 




28 












1 

7 

1 

12 

11 








1 






11 








18 












1 






68 
10 
3 
4 


158 
5 


61 
2 


2 
3 


301 






31 






3 






1 








5 






2 
10 






2 






9 


2 


1 


1 


23 










7 


727 


607 


435 


310 


104 


2 190 







Street Department. 



25 



Complaints. 

Fewer complaints have been received during the last 
year than at any time since the organization of the depart- 
ment ; the majority were in relation to the non-removal of 
ashes when the yards and alleys were blockaded with snow. 
A noticeable feature of the list is the freedom from com- 
plaints as to the uncleanliness of streets, there having been 
but seven for the entire year. 

This shows how an appreciative public welcomes the 
extra efforts that have been made continuously for the past 
three years to clean up and remove the street litter as often 
as possible. 

A number of complaints find their way to this office 
that should have been sent to the Board of Police. It 
may be stated that the Superintendent of Streets is not 
responsible for violations of city ordinances, and that in 
cases of refuse or obstructions left unlawfully in a public 
way, it is the privilege and duty of all good citizens to 
promptly report the same to the Board of Police, as the 
Superintendent of Streets is obliged to refer all such matters 
to this board when called to his attention. 

It may also be said that alleys and private ways are not 
under the jurisdiction of the Street Department ; and the 
filthy, unsanitary, or neglected condition of them can only find 
redress through the Board of Health or through the courts. 

The same decrease in complaints is shown in the street- 
watering returns. If due allowances are made at the begin- 
ning and end of a season for the non-watering of streets 
during low temperature, owing to the impossibility of keeping 
the water turned on in the post-hydrants, and also for the very 
sudden changes in the humidity of the atmosphere, dropping 
from the average of seventy-five points to thirty-five points, 
or sixty-five points below saturation, all of which conditions 
render perfect and satisfactory work impossible, we may fairly 
conclude that the streets were much better watered than ever 
in the history of Boston, and that if any cause of complaint 
remained, it lay in the fact that the annual appropriation for 
this work is not sufficient to water all side streets, as was 
shown in the department estimates. 

Whole number of complaints ..... 129 
Distributed as follows : 

Paving Division ..... 24 



Sewer Division . 
Sanitary Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Bridge Division 
Street-Watering 



4 
73 

7 

5 

16 



26 City Document No. 34. 

BRIDGE DIVISION. 



The establishment of two districts in the Bridge Division, 
one known as the Northern District, including all bridges 
north and west of the Charles river, and the other known as 
the Southern District, with headquarters at Foundry street, 
including all bridges south of the Charles river, each divi- 
sion being in charge of a foreman, has continued to give 
satisfactory results. 

With the exception of the closing of the Charles-river 
bridge from time to time, due to the need of frequent repairs, 
owing to its worn-out condition, no delay has been occasioned 
to the travelling public by the breaking down of draw- 
bridges during the past year. 

There are twelve important tide-water bridges under the 
care of the Bridge Division. Of these bridges, seven are 
operated by steam-power ; viz. , Chelsea North, Chelsea South, 
Charles river, Warren, L street, and Broadway. Meridian 
street is operated by horse power. Maiden, Mt. Washing- 
ton avenue, and Dover street (foot-bridge) are worked by 
hand power, and Federal-street bridge is operated by elec- 
tric power. 

A comparison of the cost of maintenance of the steam, 
horse, and electric power in use, shows that electricity is by 
far the cheapest motive power. As Federal-street bridge, 
which is operated by electric power, is one of the most 
important bridges with sufficient work to test it under all 
conditions, the highly satisfactory results that have been 
attained at this bridge show that electricity not only is the 
cheapest power in use on the bridges, but is also the best. 

Several radical changes in bridges have been undertaken 
during the year, among which the most important are the 
rebuilding of Dover-street and Chelsea-street bridges, abol- 
ishing the grade crossing at these streets, the strengthening 
of Broadway bridge to permit the passing of electric cars, 
and the alteration of the West Chester-park bridge over the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, to remove the objectionable crown 
of the bridge, which interfered with travel and with the ap- 
pearance of the street. The reconstruction of Chelsea-street 
bridge has been undertaken under the " Act to abolish grade 
crossings on Chelsea bridge and Chelsea-bridge avenue," 
which is as follows : 



Street Department. 27 

Chelsea Bridge. 

[chapter 374.] 

An Act relating to the abolition of grade crossings of chelsea 
bridge and chelsea-bridge avenue in the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Upon petition of the mayor and aldermen of the city of 
Chelsea, the Superior Court, or any justice thereof sitting- in equity for 
the County of Suffolk, after such notice by public advertisement or 
otherwise as the court shall deem desirable, and a hearing, shall ap- 
point, according to its discretion, a commission of three disinterested 
persons not residents of the county of Suffolk, who shall, after due 
notice and a hearing, prescribe the alterations and improvements neces- 
sary to abolish or ovei'corue all grade crossings on that part of Chelsea 
bridge or Chelsea-bridge avenue crossing Mystic river in Boston in said 
county. 

Sect. 2. The said commission shall prescribe the manner and limits 
within which such alterations and improvements shall be made, and 
shall further determine how the work shall be done ; and if said com- 
mission shall decide that said grade crossings shall be abolished or over- 
come by carrying the highway by a bridge or superstructure over the 
present railroad crossings on said bridge or avenue, it may discontinue 
the present highway under such bridge or superstructure, except so far 
as the use of the same may be required for the proper and convenient 
construction, maintenance, alteration, and repair of said overhead struct- 
ure and the foundation and support thereof and of any reconstruction 
of the same : "provided, however, that the Lynn & Boston Railroad 
Company and the Boston & Chelsea Railroad Company shall have the 
same rights in any superstructure that maybe erected hereunder as they 
have in the present bridge and roadway. 

Sect. 3. The Lynn & Boston Railroad Company, subject to the 
approval of the board of harbor and land commissioners, may build a 
temporary bridge or bridges, upon which bridge or bridges it may run 
its cars while said alterations and improvements are being made, and it 
shall primarily pay all the expenses thereof, including those of removal, 
and be liable for all damages arising in consequence thereof. 

Sect. 4. The Boston & Maine Railroad shall carry out such altera- 
tions and improvements as said commission shall prescribe, and do all 
the work required therein ; and of the cost incurred by said Boston & 
Maine Railroad in doing said work and making said alterations and im- 
provements, as audited and approved by the auditors provided for in 
chapter four hundred and twenty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety, including in such cost the cost of the hearing and 
the compensation of the commissioners and auditors for their services, 
and including also damages mentioned in section five of chapter four 
hundred and twenty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety and in all acts in addition thereto or in amendment thereof, and 
including further all expenses of the Lynn & Boston Railroad Com- 
pany in changing its tracks to said superstructure and in building said 
temporary bridge, five per centum shall be repaid to said Boston & 
Maine Railroad by said Lynn & Boston Railroad Company, and thirty 
per centum shall be repaid to said Boston & Maine Railroad by the Com- 
monwealth, in the same manner and from the same funds that money is 
paid by the < 'ommonwealth under the provisions of chapter four hun- 
dred and twenty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety; and of the amount so repaid to said Boston & Maine Railroad 
by the Commonwealth, eighteen per centum shall be repaid to the Com- 



28 City Document No. 34. 

monwealth by each of said cities of Boston and Chelsea, in three equal 
annual payments of six per centum of said amount. 

Sect. 5. Six per centum of the total amount to be repaid to the 
Commonwealth by the cities of Boston and Chelsea, as provided in the 
preceding section, shall be included in and made a part of the sum 
charged to each of the cities of Boston and Chelsea for each of the ensu- 
ing three years, and shall be assessed upon them in the apportionment 
and assessment of their annual state tax. The state treasurer shall in 
eacli of said three years notify each such city of the amount of such as- 
sessment, which amount shall be paid by the city into the treasury of 
the Commonwealth at the time required for the payment, and as a part 
of its state tax. 

Sect. 6. Sections four to twelve, inclusive, of chapter four hundred 
and twenty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety, and 
all acts in addition thereto or in amendment thereof, shall be applicable 
to all proceedings under this act, so far as they shall not conflict with the 
provisions of this act: provided, however, that all damages occasioned by 
the taking of land, whether by either city or said railroad company, 
shall primarily be paid by said railroad company. 

Sect. 7. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved June 14, 1892.'] 

October 5, 1892. The Mayor and Aldermen of the City 
of Chelsea petitioned the Superior Court in Equity for the 
appointment of a commission " to prescribe the alterations 
and improvements necessary to abolish or overcome all 
grade crossings on that part of Chelsea bridge crossing 
Mystic river in Boston, Suffolk county," in accordance with 
Chapter 374, Acts of 1892. 

The court appointed Messrs. George F. Tucker, E. D. 
Hayden, and A. H. Wright as the commissioners prayed for. 
After giving several hearings, at which representatives were 
present from the cities of Chelsea and Boston, Boston & 
Maine Railroad, Lynn & Boston Railroad Company, and the 
Boston & Chelsea Railroad Company, they submitted the 
folio wino' finding : 

Description. 

The grade of the highway shall be so raised that the said 
highway shall pass over the tracks of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad. 

The limits within which the said alterations shall be made 
shall be as follows : Beginning at a point in Chelsea street 
in the city of Boston, in a continuation of the southerly line 
of Scott court, then northerly along the easterly side of 
Chelsea street, Chelsea avenue, and Chelsea bridge, a dis- 
tance of 2,777 feet, to a point 188 feet southerly from the 
southerly end of the drawbridge at the main channel of the 
Mystic river. The above-described line shall be the easterly 
side line of the street as altered and improved. 



Street Department. 29 

The grade of the street as altered and improved shall be 
as follows : Beginning at the southerly end of the present 
grade of Chelsea street the grade shall rise at a rate not 
exceeding 3 feet per 100 feet, for a distance of 449 feet to 
the southerly end of the south drawbridge ; thence on a 
level grade of 36 feet above the city base to the northerly 
end of said drawbridge ; thence with a rise not exceeding 
1.5 feet per 100 feet to a height of 38 feet above the city 
base: thence level 1,100 feet; thence with a fall of 3 feet 
per 100 feet to a point about 188 feet from the south end 
of the drawbridge over the main channel of the Mystic 
river. 

This grade line as described shall be the grade of the 
centre of the driveway, except that it shall be softened at 
all intersections by vertical curves. 

And they also declare in their report " that a safe and con- 
venient way for public travel shall be provided outside the 
limits of the present street across lands of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, and the same kept open so long as it can 
be without interfering with the completion of the alterations 
ordered." 

This temporary structure is in process of construction, 
that part being already built which commences at the north- 
erly end of the south drawbridge and extends to the extreme 
northerly end of the proposed new structure. Work is also 
being rapidly pushed on the temporary drawbridges. 

The full text of the finding is as follows : 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

SUPERIOR COURT. 



Suffolk, ss. In Equity, 1893. 

In the matter of the petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city 
of Chelsea for the appointment of a commission to prescribe the altera- 
tions and improvements necessary to abolish or overcome all grade 
crossings on that part of Chelsea bridge or Chelsea-bridge avenue, 
crossing Mystic river in Boston in the County of Suffolk, in accordance 
with Chapter 374, Acts of 1892. 

Report and Finding of Special Commission. 

In the above-entitled matter, the undersigned, George F. Tucker, 
E. D. Hayden, A. H. Wright, duly appointed by the Superior Court 
sitting in equity, in Boston, in and for said County of Suffolk, on the 
5lh day of October, A.D. 1892, on a commission for the purpose prayed 
for in said petition hereto annexed, having given due notice to all parties 
interested in the matter of said petition that they would meet at the City 
Hall in Chelsea on Tuesday, the 17th day of December, then next, at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon, to hear all parties interested, said notice 



30 Cixr Document No. 34. 

being given, by due service thereof, on the cit}~ of Boston, the city of 
Chelsea, the Boston & Maine Railroad, the Lynn & Boston Railroad 
Company, and the Boston & Chelsea Railroad Company, and also by 
publication three weeks successively in the newspapers called the 
"Boston Journal" and " Chelsea Evening Record " ; and in pursuance 
of said order and notice, the commissioners met at the City Hall in 
Chelsea at ten o'clock in the forenoon of Tuesday, the seventeenth day 
of January, A.D. 1893, and the following-named parties, interested in 
the matter of the aforesaid petition, appeared before them, to wit : The 
petitioners, the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Chelsea, by City 
Solicitor Fitz ; the city of Boston, by Assistant City Engineer Cheney ; 
the Boston & Maine Railroad, by Chief Engineer H. Bissell ; the Lynn & 
Boston Railroad Company, and the Boston & Chelsea Railroad Company, 
by Messrs. Proctor and Wai'ren ; and it was shown and duly appeared 
that due notice of the time, place, and purpose of said meeting as 
ordered by the commissioners had been given. A view of the premises 
was taken. 

By adjournment, further hearings of the said parties wei'e given on 
Tuesday, January 31st, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, at the City 
Hall in the city of Boston, and on Tuesday, February 14th, at the City 
Hall in the city of Boston. And on Tuesday, August 15th, a further 
hearing was given at the old Court House in the city of Boston. 

Having carefully viewed and considered the said crossing mentioned 
in the aforesaid petition, and having heard and carefully considered all 
evidence, plans, and suggestions of the several parties, the said com- 
missioners do find and decide : 

That alterations and improvements as described in the following 
specifications or descriptions, and in accordance with the plans sub- 
mitted herewith, are necessary to abolish or overcome all grade cross- 
ings on that part of Chelsea bi'idge or Chelsea-bridge avenue, ci'ossing 
Mystic river in said county, and the commission does prescribe the 
manner and limits within which said alterations and improvements shall 
be made, and does determine how the work shall be done as set 
forth in the said specifications and descriptions and shown on said 
plans. 

And the said commission does decide that said grade crossing shall 
be abolished or overcome by carrying the highway, by a bridge or 
superstructure, over the present railroad crossings on the said bridge or 
avenue, and orders that the present highway, within the limits of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad property, be discontinued, except so far as 
the use of the same may be required for the proper and convenient 
construction, maintenance, alteration, and repair of said overhead 
structure and the foundation and support thereof, and of any re- 
construction of the same. 

Description. 

The grade of the highway shall be so l'aised that the' said highway 
shall pass over the tracks of the Boston" & Maine Railroad. The limits 
within which the said alterations and improvements shall be made shall 
be as follows : Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Chelsea 
street in the city of Boston, about eighty-five feet southerly from the 
southerly line of Scott court produced, then northerly along the easterly 
line of Chelsea street, Chelsea avenue, and Chelsea bridge, a distance 
of two thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven feet to a point one 
hundred and eighty-eight feet southerly from the southerly end of the 
drawbridge at the main channel of Mystic river. The above-described 
line to be the easterly side line of the street as altered and improved. 

The grade of the street as altered and improved shall be as follows : 
Beginning at the southerly end, at the present grade of Chelsea street, 
the grade shall rise at a rate not exceeding three feet per one hundred 



Street Department. 31 

feet to the southerly end of the southerly drawbridge ; thence on a level 
grade of thirty-six feet above the city base to the northerly end of said 
drawbridge ; thence with a rise not exceeding 1.50 feet per 100 feet to a 
height of 38 feet above the city base ; thence level at said height of 38 
feet about 1,100 feet ; thence with a fall not exceeding 3 feet per 100 
feet to a point about 188 feet from the southerly end of the drawbridge 
over the main channel of the Mystic river, these grades to be softened 
at all intersections by vertical curves. The grade line, as described, 
shall be the grade of the centre of the driveway. 

The viaduct, carrying the street over the tracks of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, shall be constructed as follows : 

Suitable piles shall be driven under each pier in three rows, 2£ feet 
between centres of rows, with piles 2& feet apart in the rows, the piles 
to be cut off at grade 7 above city base. On the piles, a pier of granite 
or other equally durable stone. The bottom course to be 6 feet wide, 
the second course 5 feet wide. The piers shall have a coping or bridge 
seat course 4 feet wide, 54 feet long, and 2 feet thick, except the three 
northerly piers, which shall be 51 feet long. 

The piers under the bridge seat course shall be 3 feet thick and batter 
1& inch per foot to the second foundation course named above. The 
stone shall be cut, bed and build, with cut vertical joints, the joints not 
to exceed £ inch ; no stone to have a thickness less than its rise, and 
at least J of the stone above the foundation courses shall be headers 
extending through the pier; stone shall belaid in cement mortar and 

§ routed with cement. The angle of the piers with the line of the via- 
uct shall be 72 degrees, right-hand end forward, except the three most 
northerly piers, which shall be at light angles to the line of the viaduct. 
The viaduct shall consist of iron or steel plate girders of span shown 
on plan marked "Sheet 1" accompanying this report. Approximate 
length on centre line of viaduct spans : 



1. 


53 feet. 


8. 


70 feet. 


15. 


70 feet 


2. 


70 " 


9. 


70 " 


16. 


70 « 


3. 


70 " 


10. 


70 " 


17. 


70 '■ 


4. 


70 " 


11. 


70 " 


18. 


70 " 


5. 


70 " 


12. 


65 " 


19. 


40 " 


6. 


70 " 


13. 


65 " 


20. 


40 " 


7. 


70 " 


14. 


70 " 


21. 


40 " 



The plate-girders shall rest on the iron or steel posts, the foot or 
bottom of each post to be bolted to the stone pier, one end of each girder 
shall be firmly fastened to the post, the other end to have suitable pro- 
vision for expansion and contraction ; floor-beams of iron or steel shall 
be riveted to the girders; and upon the floor-beams hard-pine stringers 
shall be placed. The dimensions of the stringers shall be 10 X 12 
inches under each rail of the street-railroad tracks, and 6 X 12 under 
the rest of the driveway, spaced 24 inches apart, centre to centre. 

All parts of the structure which are of iron or steel shall be so pro- 
portioned that the weight of the structure and floor, including paving, 
in addition to one hundred pounds per square foot on the driveway and 
sidewalk for live load, shall not strain any part more than 13,000 pounds 
in tension, or 10,000 pounds in compression per square inch. Such ad- 
ditional strength shall be given to the westerly girder that a sidewalk 
8 feet wide can be added on brackets, without straining it beyond the 
limit noted above. 

On the stringers, plank 6 inches thick, of hard-pine or spruce, treated 
with some approved preservative process, shall be placed. The plank 
shall be laid close and painted on top with a mixture of paving pitch 
and crude coal tar, put on hot, and then covered with four thicknesses 
of roofing felt, in the manner used for the best quality of tar and gravel 



32 City Document No. 34. 

roofing ; the felt will then be covered with a layer of concrete 2 inches 
thick, upon the concrete will be laid a bed of fine, sharp sand, clean 
and dry, 1 to 1| inches thick. The granite paving-blocks shall be of 
dimensions 10 to 14 inches long, 4 inches wide, and 6 to 6£ inches deep, 
to be laid at right angles to the line of the street, each course to be of 
blocks of a uniform width and thickness, and so laid that all longitud- 
inal joints shall be broken by a lap of at least two inches. After the 
blocks are laid, the joints are to be filled with clean, fine, hot, dry, 
washed pebbles, and the blocks carefully rammed to a firm, unyielding 
bed, with uniform surface and with proper grade. 

The joints are to be poured full of paving cement, of approved con- 
sistence and composition, at a temperature of 300 degrees Fahrenheit, 
two or more pourings to be made, if necessary, to fill the joints. 

The sidewalk shall be covered with two-inch clear hard-pine plank, 
planed one side. Guard-timbers and cast-iron curbs of form and di- 
mensions used by the city of Boston shall be placed on both sides of the 
driveway throughout its entire length, except on the drawbridge, and 
such portions of the south approach as may be solid fill. 

Scuppers or drains shall be provided on each side of the Viaduct, 
near each pier, to consist of a circular cast-iron pipe, 10 inches in diam- 
eter, the top £ inch below the paved surface, and the bottom reaching 
2 inches below the bottom of the floor plank, the opening to be properly 
protected with a perforated cover. A board fence 5 feet high shall be 
built on each side of the Viaduct across land of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad ; on remaining parts of the structure a neat fence of wrought- 
iron or pipe shall be built, the same to be well and firmly fastened to 
the structure. 

The width of the driveway on the Viaduct shall be 45 feet, with a 
sidewalk 8 feet wide on the easterly side. 

Provision shall be made for fastening to the Viaduct, at each pier, 
poles to carry the wires of the street railroad. 

An inclined driveway leading to the driveways or yards of the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad shall be built ; that portion of the inclined 
driveway which is at a less height than grade 21 shall be made solid 
with retaining walls and earth fill. That portion which is above grade 
21 shall be constructed on oak piles with hard-pine girders and stringers. 

The entire inclined driveway shall have a paved floor similar to that 
on Viaduct already described. -The width of the inclined driveway 
shall be 30 feet clear between fences. The grade shall be 3j| feet 
per hundred, with a level s.pace 55 feet long near the centre, from which 
two inclined ways shall descend, as shown on plan marked " Sheet I." 

Substantial fences shall be built on each side of the inclined driveway. 
The curves of the side lines at the upper end of the inclined driveway, 
where it joins the Viaduct, shall have a radius of not less than 40 feet. 

Approaches to the Viaduct. 

The inclined approaches to the Viaduct shall, at both ends, be built 
upon the present piles, with hard-pine timbers, as shown on plan 
mai'ked " Sheet 3" accompanying this report. 

The drawbridge now in use at the South Channel shall be raised to 
conform to the new grade established above by adding to the draw 
foundations a proper timber structure. 

The structure of the approaches above the present piles shall be as 
follows: The girders now on the piles shall be fastened with addi- 
tional bolts wherever those now in use show weakness, a rider 6 X 16 
inches shall be put on the girders, 5 stringers 12 X 12 inches shall be 
bolted to the rider, posts 12 X 12 inches shall be put over each pile, 
girders 6 X 12 at the top of posts, a rider 6 X 16 on top of the girders, 
bolsters 6 feet long, 12 X 14 on top of rider over each post, stringers 
12 X 14 on top of each bolster, proper crown of centre being made by 



Street Department. 33 

fitting bolsters. A floor and paving similar to that ordered on the 
Viaduct shall be made on the stringers. Transverse braces 4 X 12 inch 
shall be spiked or bolted to each bent of posts, longitudinal braces 
6 X 12 inch to each alternate row of posts, those next the stringers 
provided for on the lower stage. 

All timbers to be of hard-pine of the quality known as " Prime. 11 
All timbers to be bolted and fastened in a thorough manner. 

At the southerly end, from the point of beginning to within 18 feet 
of the sea wall, the inclined approach shall be made solid, with a re- 
taining wall on each side on the street line, and on the northerly end of 
the fill. 

The retaining wall shall be of granite rubble laid in cement and 
grouted with cement. The wall shall have at every point a thickness of 
at least one-half the height of the wall above that point, shall have a 
proportion of at least one-quarter headers 4 feet long, well bonded and 
joints broken, shall have a coping course not less than 18 inches thick 
and 2£ feet wide, with a smooth even top. 

The space behind the wall shall be rilled with gravel or earth well 
packed, no clay being placed within six feet of the stone work, or 
within four feet of the street sm-face. 

The surface shall be paved with the same stone now in use, and the 
sidewalks left in as good condition as at present. 

Such provision as may be necessary to provide access to the adjoining 
property may be made. 

Gutters and drains shall be made to ensure free drainage. 

Fences shall be built on each side, where needed, to protect public 
travel. 

All iron work provided for, and fences and other timber structures, 
where exposed to the weather, shall be painted with two coats of lin- 
seed oil and lead paint. 

A safe and convenient way for public travel shall be provided outside 
the limits of the present street, across lands of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, and the same kept open as long as it can be without interfer- 
ing with the completion of the alterations hereby ordered. 

All permanent alterations and improvements hereby ordered shall be 
made within the present limits of the street and bridges. 

Three sheets of plans accompanying this order are made part of this 
order. 

George F. Tucker, 
Edward D. Hayden, 
A. H. Wright, 

Commissioners . 

Fees and charges of three commissioners .... $900 00 

Expenses of commissioners $121 20 

E. K. Turner, engineer 275 00 

396 20 



Total $1,296 20 

Boston, September 2, 1893. 



I hereby certify that the above charges for services and expenses are 
correct. 

George F. Tucker. 
Copy. 

Attest : 

JOS. A. WlLLARD, 

Clerk. 



34 City Document No. 34. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

SUPERIOR COURT. 



Suffolk, ss. October 15, 1893. 

ALFRED C. CONVERSE, Mayor of Chelsea, et al., 

Petitioners, etc. Equity, No. 495. 

DECREE CONFIRMING DECISION OF COMMISSIONERS. 

And now on this sixth day of September, 1893, upon motion of the 
petitioners that the decision of the commissioners in this matter be con- 
firmed, and notice having been given to the following parties in interest, 
to wit, the Attorney General, the City of Boston, the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, and the Lynn & Boston Railroad Company, and it appearing 
by certificate from the railroad commissioners that in their judgment 
the expenditure required by such decision on the part of the Common- 
wealth for the current year will not exceed the limit prescribed by 
Chapter 428 of the Acts" of the year 1890, it is ordered, adjudged, and 
decreed that such decision of the commissioners be accepted and con- 
firmed. 

By the Court, 

Theodore M. Osborne, 

Assistant Clerk. 
Copy. 

Attest : 

JOS. A. WlLLARD, 

Clerk. 



Abolition of Grade Crossings. 
The abolition of the grade crossing at Dover street by the 
erection of an overhead bridge was undertaken under the 
General Statutes for the abolition of grade crossings, which 
is as follows : 

(CHAP. 428 OF THE ACTS OF 1890, AS AMENDED IN 1892 AND 

1893.) 
An Act to promote the abolitiox of grade crossings. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Upon petition of the mayor and aldermen of a city or of 
the selectmen of a town, in which a public way and a railroad cross 
each other at grade, or of the directors of the railroad company, setting 
forth that the petitioners are of the opinion that it is necessary for the 
security and convenience of the public that an alteration should be 
made in such crossing, in the approaches thereto, in the location of the 
railroad or public way, or in the grades thereof, so as to avoid a cross- 
ing at grade, or that such crossing should be discontinued with or with- 
out building a new way in substitution therefor, — the superior court, 
or any justice thereof sitting in equity for the county in which such 
crossing or a portion thereof is situated, after such notice by public 
advertisement or otherwise as the court shall deem desirable and a hear- 
ing, may in its discretion appoint a commission of three disinterested 
persons. 



Street Department. 35 

Sect. 2. A petition under the preceding section may embrace several 
crossings, or by order of the court several separate petitions may be 
consolidated and heard as one. 

Sect. 3. The members of the said commission shall meet as soon as 
may be after receiving notice of their appointment ; and if, after due 
notice and hearing, the commission decide that the alterations are neces- 
sary for the security and convenience of the public, it shall prescribe 
the manner and limits within which such alterations shall be made, and 
shall determine which party shall do the work, or shall apportion the 
work to be done between the railroad companies and the city or town. 
The railroad companies shall pay sixty-five per centum of the total 
actual cost of the alterations, including in such cost the cost of the hear- 
ing and the compensation of the commissioners and auditors for their 
services, and all damages, including those mentioned in section five of 
this act ; and the said commission shall apportion the remaining thirty- 
five per centum of said cost between the Commonwealth and the city or 
town in which the crossing or crossings are situated : provided, however, 
that not more than ten per centum of such cost shall be apportioned to 
such city or town : provided, further, that the Commonwealth shall not 
be charged any part of the expenses of abolishing grade crossings which 
are established after the passage of this act. 

Sect. \. If the commission decide that any portion of an existing 
public way should be discontinued it shall so specify, and it shall further 
specify the grades for the railroad and the public way or ways and the 
general method of construction, and also what land or other property it 
deems necessary to be taken : ^provided, however, that if such decision 
involves a change in the grade of the railroad, the consent of the rail- 
road commissioners to such change of grade shall first be obtained. 
Said commission shall forthwith return said decision into the said su- 
pei'ior court. The decree of the court confirming the decision of the 
commission shall be final and binding. If the commission decides that 
the location of the railroad or of the public way shall be changed, the 
decree of the court confirming such decision shall constitute a taking of 
the specified land or other property ; and it shall be the duty of the 
clerk of said court, within thirty days after the making of said decree, 
to cause a copy of such decision and decree to be filed with the county 
commissioners of the county or counties in which the land or other 
property taken and the crossing are situated, and also to be I'ecorded in 
the registry of deeds for the counties and districts in which such land, 
property, and crossings are situated, and also to be filed with the auditor 
of the Commonwealth. Said taking shall be deemed to be a taking by 
the city or town if the land is to be used for a public way, or by the 
railroad company if the land is to be used b}~ the railroad^. 

Sect. 5. All damages sustained by any person in his property by the 
taking of land for, or by the alterations of the grade of, a public way 
shall primarily be paid by the city or town ; and all damages occa- 
sioned by the taking of land for the railroad shall primarily be paid by 
the railroad company ; and in case the parties interested cannot agree 
upon said damages, the city, town, railroad company, or other party 
may have the damages determined by a jury at the bar of the superior 
court for the county wherein the property and crossing are situated, on 
petition, brought within one year after the day of the date of the decree 
of the court confirming the decision of said commission, by cither of 
said parties, in the same manner and under like rules of law as damages 
may be determined when occasioned by the taking of land for the locat- 
ing and laying out of railroads and public ways, respectively, in such 
city or town. 

SECT. 6. After the completion of the work, the crossing and its 
approaches shall be maintained and kept in repair as follows: when 
the public way crosses the railroad by an overhead bridge, the frame- 



36 City Document No. 34. 

work of the bridge and its abutments shall be maintained and kept in 
repair by the railroad company, and the surface of the bridge and its 
approaches shall be maintained and kept in repair by the town or city in 
which the same are situated. When the public way passes under the rail- 
road, the bridge and its abutments shall be maintained and kept in repair 
by the railroad company, and the public way and its approaches shall be 
maintained and kept in repair by the town or city in which they ai*e 
situated. 

Sect. 7. The court shall appoint an auditor, who shall be a disinter- 
ested person, not an inhabitant of the city or town in which the crossing 
is situated, to whom shall from time to time be submitted all accounts 
of expense, whether incurred by the railroads, city, town, commission, 
or auditor, who shall audit the same and make report thereon to the 
court; which auditing, when accepted by the court, shall be final. The 
compensation of the auditor shall be determined in accordance with the 
provisions of law relative to the compensation of auditors appointed by 
the superior court in civil cases. Said court shall, from time to time, 
issue its decrees for payment on the part of the railroad corporation, 
not exceeding - the amounts apportioned to it by said auditor, and for the 
payment on the pai't of the Commonwealth, not exceeding the amounts 
apportioned to the Commonwealth and to the city or town ; and such 
city or town shall repay to the Commonwealth the amount apportioned 
to the city or town by said auditor, in such annual payments as the 
auditor of the Commonwealth may designate ; and the amount of the 
payment designated for the year, with interest thereon at the rate of 
four per cent per annum from the date of the acceptance of the report of 
the auditor, in the case of the first payment, and for one year, in the 
case of each of the other payments, shall be included by the treasurer 
and receiver general in, and made a part of, the sum charged to such 
city or town, and be assessed upon it in the apportionment and assess- 
ment of its annual state tax; and said treasurer shall in each year notify 
such city or town of the amount of such assessment, which amount shall 
be paid by the city or town into the treasury of the Commonwealth at 
the time required for the payment and as a part of its state tax. 

Sect. 8. The superior court or any justice thereof sitting in equity in 
any county shall have jurisdiction to compel compliance with this act, 
and with the decrees, agreements, and decisions made thereunder ; and 
may issue and enforce such interlocutory decrees and orders as justice 
may require ; and it shall be the duty of the attorney-general or his assist- 
ants to appear and represent the Commonwealth in all suits and pro- 
ceedings arising under this act. Service of the petition and all notices 
or processes may be made upon the Commonwealth by leaving an 
attested copy in the hands or in the office of the attorney-general. 

Sect. 9. If the board of aldermen of a city or the selectmen of a- 
town in which a public way and a railroad cross each other, and the 
board of directors of the railroad company, are of opinion that it is 
necessary for the security and convenience of the public that alterations 
should be made in such crossing, in the approaches thereto, in the loca- 
tion of a railroad or public way, or in the grades thereof, or in a bridge 
at such ci'ossing, or that such crossing should be discontinued with or 
without building a new way in substitution therefor, and if they agree 
as to the alterations which should be made, an instrument in writing 
signed in behalf of a city by the mayor, on being thereto duly author- 
ized by the board of aldermen, or in behalf of a town by the chairman 
of the selectmen, on being thereto duly authorized by the board of se- 
lectmen, and by the president of the railroad company, on being thereto 
duly authorized by its board of directors, specifying the manner and 
limits within which the alterations shall be made, and by which party 
the work shall be done, or how it shall be apportioned between the city 
or town and the railroad company, the general method of construction, 



Street Department. 37 

the grades for the railroad and the public way or ways, and also what 
land or other property it is necessary to take, and what portion, if any, 
of an existing public way is to be discontinued, and how the cost thereof 
shall be apportioned between the city or town and the railroad company, 
shall be valid and binding on the city or town and the railroad company, 
respectively, and have the same force and effect as a decree of the court 
under the provisions of this act : provided, that the board of railroad 
commissioners, after notice to all parties interested by advertisement 
and a public hearing, approve of the alterations set forth in the agree- 
ment as necessary for the convenience and security of the public. Said 
approval by the board shall constitute a taking of the land and other 
property specified in the agreement as necessary to be taken, and it shall 
be the duty of the clerk of said board, within thirty days after such ap- 
proval, to cause a copy of the agreement and approval to be tiled with 
the county commissioners of the county or counties in which the land or 
other property taken and the crossing are situated, and also to be re- 
corded in the registry of deeds for the counties and districts in which 
such land, property, and crossing are situated, and also to be filed with 
the auditor of the Commonwealth. The provisions contained in this 
act relating to the taking of land under a decree of the court and in re- 
lation to the recovery of damages sustained by any person in consequence 
of such taking, or of the alterations made in pursuance of said decree, 
shall apply to the taking of land and damages sustained under an agree- 
ment between the city or town and the railroad company made as herein 
provided; except that the petition for the determination of damages 
may be brought within one year after the date of the approval of such 
agreement by the board of railroad commissioners. After the completion 
of the work the crossing and approaches shall be maintained and kept 
in repair as provided in section six of this act. If the agreement pro- 
vides for the abolition of a public grade crossing it shall be the duty of 
the board of railroad commissioners to keep itself informed of the 
progress and character of the work and the amounts reasonably expended 
for work done or for damages, so far as rendered necessary for the abo- 
lition of the grade crossing ; and for that purpose it may employ any 
necessary agents, and from time to time as it may deem proper shall 
issue certified statements of the amount legally and properly expended 
for such abolition of a grade crossing; and the Commonwealth shall 
pay to the parties entitled thereto under the agreement twenty per cen- 
tum of such expenditure. 

Sect. 10. The amount to be paid under the provisions of this act by 
the Commonwealth in any one year (the year beginning with the passage 
of this act) shall not exceed five hundred thousand dollars, and the 
total amount to be paid by the Commonwealth under the provisions of 
this act shall not exceed five million dollars ; and the treasurer and re- 
ceiver-general of the Commonwealth shall pay the amount of cost al- 
lotted to the State from any money not otherwise appropriated, and is 
hereby authorized, when requested by the governor and council so to 
do, to issue and sell bonds from time to time, under such terms and 
conditions, and with a sinking-fund for their redemption, as shall best 
jjromote the welfare of the Commonwealth. 

Sect. 11. Notice shall be filed by the petitionei'S with the railroad 
commissioners of the entry of any petition under the provisions of this 
act; and in case application shall he made for changes in grade cross- 
ings, which will require, in the opinion of said commissioners after an 
examination of the decision of the commission appointed by the court, 
a larger expenditure in any one year on the part of the Commonwealth 
than the amount provided for by this act, said railroad commissioners 
shall have full power to decide which, if any, of said pending petitions 
shall be proceeded with during the year; and no decree shall be entered 
under any such petition until a certificate is tiled thereon by the railroad 



38 City Document No. 34. 

commissioners, that, in their judgment, the expenditure on the part of 
the Commonwealth will not exceed the amount provided for by this act. 

Sect. 12. The provisions of sections one hundred and twenty-nine to 
one hundred and thirty-six, inclusive, of chapter one hundred and 
twelve of the Public Statutes, chapter one hundred and thirty-five of 
the acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty-two, chapter one hun- 
dred and ninety-four of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty- 
five, and chapter two hundred and ninety-five of the acts of the year eigh- 
teen hundred and eighty-seven, so far as they relate to proceedings for 
the abolition of grade crossings, shall not apply to the provisions of this 
act : provided, however, that nothing in this act shall have effect upon 
cases pending or upon any right accrued at the time of its passage. 

Sect. 13. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved June 21, 1890. .] 

This act was amended in Section 4 by the Act of May 
19, 1892 (Chapter 312), and by the Act of May 3, 1893 
(Chapter 283). 

The wording of the act is given as amended. 

West Fourth-street Crossing. 

The Directors of the Old Colony Railroad Company peti- 
tioned the Superior Court for the alteration of the grade 
crossing of the railroad and West Fourth street. A hearing 
was given in November, 1892, at the office of the Railroad 
Commissioners, at which Mr. J. H. Benton, Jr., appeared 
for the Railroad Company, and the City Solicitor for the 
city of Boston. 

It was decided that it was necessary for the convenience 
and security of the public that an alteration should be made 
in the crossing, and in the approaches thereto, by which 
" the crossing at grade " should be abolished. 

The limits of the alterations were determined upon as 
follows : 

From the westerly line of Dorchester avenue at West 
Fourth at a point ten feet south of the southerly line, to in- 
clude the area of West Fourth street and areas of private 
land taken to Foundry street, crossing Foundry street to 
intersection of Fourth and Dover streets : to include Dover 
street from Foundry to Albany, Albany street to a point 
320 feet south of southerly line of Dover, Bristol street 
100 feet west of Albany, Dover street 188.6 feet west 
of Albany, and Albany street 345 feet north of Dover to 
Troy street. 

Grades. 

The grade beginning at Dorchester avenue and West 
Fourth at grade 17.50 rises 3.5 feet per hundred for about 
471 feet, thence by an ascending grade of 0.32 feet 
per hundred for 400 feet ; thence level 245 feet at grade 



Street Department. 39 

35.27 ; thence descending 3.5 feet per hundred for about 
344 feet; thence level across Albany street at grade 23.23 ; 
thence descending 3.5 feet per hundred 188.6 feet to grade 
16.63 at Dover street (present grade). 

Albany street was to rise from Troy 2.18 feet per hun- 
dred to Dover; thence level at grade 23.23 across Dover; 
thence descending 2.0 feet per hundred for 320 feet to the 
present grade of Albany. 

Bristol street was to begin at grade 18.93 at the westerly 
line of Albany ; thence descending by 2.0 feet per hundred 
for 100 feet to meet the present grade. 

All intersections of grade lines were to be softened by 
easy transition curves from one grade to another. Certain 
parcels of land were necessarily taken, one belonging to 
Charles U. Cotting and Francis Weld, trustees under the 
will of Samuel K. Williams ; one belonging to Hervey C. 
Corey, two parcels, to trustees of Cyrus Alger estate ; one 
to the Old Colony Railroad company ; one to Mary C. 
Devine ; and one to William H. Devine. 

The portion of streets lying between Dorchester avenue 
and Foundry street were to be supported by rubble masonry 
retaining walls where necessary, with dimension stone cap 
at the level of sidewalk. 

The portion from the easterly line of Foundry street ex- 
tending about 480 feet over Old Colony Railroad to the 
dock of the Fort Point channel was to be constructed 
with an iron truss bridge with plank roadway and sidewalks, 
the bridge to be supported upon stone piers upon pile 
foundation, with stone abutments at Foundry street. The 
portion over Fort Point channel was to be supported upon 
an iron bridge with paved roadway, supported upon iron 
columns or stone piers and provided with draw span, the 
westerly end of the bridge to be supported by a stone abut- 
ment. From this point westerly, the roadway was to be 
supported by rubble masonry retaining walls where neces- 
sary, with dimension stone cap. 

The railroad company was to do all the work except the 
building of bridge across Fort Point channel, which was as- 
signed to the city of Boston. 

Sixty-live per cent, of the cost was to be borne by the 
Old Colony Railroad Company, twenty-five per cent, by 
the Commonwealth, and ten per cent by the city of Boston. 

Dover-street Bridge. 

The old Dover-street bridge, now removed on account of 
the abolishing of the grade-crossing at West Fourth street, 



40 City Document No. 34. 

was of wood on a pile foundation with a double iron draw, 
operated by horse power; it was originally built in 1805, 
was rebuilt in 1858-1859, and later in 1876. 

On July 26, 1893, the Board of Harbor and Land 
Commissioners granted to the city of Boston a license 
to rebuild a portion of Dover-street bridge in and over the 
tidewaters of the Fort Point channel, as directed by a 
special commission appointed under the provisions of the 
grade-crossing act. The Board in granting this license im- 
posed the condition that the draw-way in said bridge should 
be built with an opening of not less than forty feet at all 
stages of the tide for the passage of vessels ; but it was fur- 
ther provided that until the draw-way in the bridge of the 
Old Colony Railroad Company over Fort Point channel 
shall be rebuilt and widened, the city may maintain its water- 
pipes temporarily in their present position on the Dover- 
street bridge and draw-way, with such structures as are 
necessary for their support and protection, leaving a clear 
opening of 36 feet in the draw- way, such water-pipes and 
temporary structures to be removed or changed by the city 
so as to leave a clear opening of 40 feet in the draw-way 
whenever such removal or change shall be ordered by the 
Board after hearing. The Old Colony Railroad bridge is 
below the Dover-street bridge, so that the additional width 
in the passageway in the Dover-street bridge draw will be 
useless until the draw-way in the bridge of the Old Colony 
Railroad Company is correspondingly widened. 

In September, 1893, Dover street was closed to public- 
travel, and work was commenced on the new structure. For 
the convenience of foot-passengers a temporary draw was 
erected, and passageways for foot travel constructed on either 
side. These are maintained by this division. The work on 
the South Boston end of the new structure is progressing 
rapidly. 

The full text of the decree of the court was as follows : 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

SUPERIOR COURT. 



Suffolk, ss. 

directors of the old colony railroad company, petitioners for 
alteration of the grade crossing of the railroad of said 
company, and west fourth street, in the city of boston. 

Decision of Commission. 
The commissioners, heretofore appointed in said matter, decide and 
report as follows : 




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Street Department. 41 

First. We gave notice of a heaving upon said petition on the 
fourteenth day of November, 1892, at the office of the Railroad Com- 
missioners in the city of Boston, by publishing a copy of said petition 
and an order of notice of said time and place of hearing in the " Boston 
Journal" and the "Boston Herald, 1 ' newspapers published in the city 
of Boston, and by serving an attested copy of said petition and notice 
upon the Secretary of the Commonwealth and the Attorney-General, 
and the Treasurer and Clerk of the city of Boston, more than thirty 
days before said time of hearing, as appeai-s by the return of service 
upon said petition and order of notice herewith returned. 

Second. At the time and place notified, as above set forth, a hearing 
was held by the commissioners, at which J. H. Benton, Jr., appeared 
for the petitioners, the City Solicitor appeared for the city of Boston. 

And now, having duly considered the evidence and arguments sub- 
mitted to us in this matter, we decide and report as follows : 

First. We decide and report that it is necessary for the convenience 
and security of the public that an alteration should be made in the 
crossing of West Fourth street and of the railroad of the Old Colony 
Railroad Company in the city of Boston, in the approaches thereto, and 
in the gi-ades of said West Fourth street and Dover street, so as to avoid 
such crossing at grade as alleged in the petition. 

Second. We prescribe the manner and limits within which such 
alterations shall be made, as follows : 

The grade of West Fourth street, Dover street, and Albany and 
Bristol streets shall be altered and established within the following 
limits, as follows : 

Limits. Beginning at a point in the intersection of the westerly side 
line of Dorchester avenue and a line drawn ten (10) feet southerly from 
and parallel to the southerly side line of West Fourth street ; thence 
running westerly ten (10) feet from and parallel to the southerly side 
line of West Fourth street about three hundred and ninety-eight (398) 
feet to the easterly side line of Foundry street; thence in the same 
straight line across Foundry street fifty (50) feet to the intersection of 
the westerly side line of Foundry street with the southerly side line of 
West Fourth street ; thence westerly by said southerly side line of West 
Fourth street and Dover street, crossing the Old Colony Railroad and 
Fort Point channel about fourteen hundred and sixty (1,460) feet to the 
easterly side line of Albany street ; thence southerly in said easterly side 
line of Albany street about three hundred and twenty (320) feet_ to a 
point; thence westerly at right angles to the last described line eighty 
(80) feet to the westerly side line of Albany street; thence northerly in 
said westerly side line of Albany street about eighty-five (85) feet to 
its intersection with the southerly side line of Bristol street; thence 
westerly in said southerly side line of Bristol street about one hundred 
(100) feet to a point; thence northerly at right angles to said last 
described line forty (40) feet to the northerly side line of Bristol street; 
thence easterly in said northerly side line of Bristol street about one 
hundred (100) feet to its intersection with the westerly side line of 
Albany sh-eet; thence northerly in said westerly side line of Albany 
street about one hundred and ninety-five (195) feet to the southerly side 
line of Dover street; thence westerly in said southerly side line of 
Dover street one hundred and eighty-eight and six-tenths (188.6) feet; 
thence northerly at right angles to the last described line sixty (60) feet 
to the northerly side line of Dover street; thence easterly in said 
northerly side line one hundred and eighty-eight and six-tenths (188.6) 
feet to the westerly side line of Albany street ; thence northerly in said 
westerly side line of Albany street about three hundred and forty-five 
(846) feet to its intersection" with the southerly side line of Troy street; 
thence easterly at right angles to said westerly side line of Albany 
street eighty (80) feet to the easterly side line of Albany street; thence 



42 City Document No. 34. 

southerly in said easterly side line of Albany street about three hundred 
and forty-live (345) feet to the northerly side line of Dover street ; 
thence easterly in said northerly side line of Dover street across the 
Fort Point channel and the Old Colony Railroad about fourteen hundred 
and sixty (1,460) feet to the westerly side line of Foundry street; thence 
in the same straight line across Foundry street fifty (50) feet to the 
intersection of the easterly side line of Foundry street -with the 
northerly side line of West Fourth street; thence easterly in said 
northerly side line of West Fourth street about three hundred and 
eighty-eight (388) feet to the westerly side line of Dorchester avenue ; 
thence southerly in said westerly side line of Dorchester avenue about 
sixty-three (63) feet to the point of beginning. 

The grades of the surfaces of West Fourth street, Dover street, 
Albany street, and Bristol street, as altered, are established upon the 
city of Boston base or datum plane, and upon their centre lines are as 
follows : 

The alteration of grade of West Fourth street and Dover street begins 
in the centre line of West Fourth street at its interesection with the 
westerly side line of Dorchester avenue at elevation 17.50, thence by an 
ascending grade of three and five-tenths (3.5) feet per hundred (100) 
feet, about four hundred and seventy-one (471) feet to elevation 34.00 ; 
thence by an ascending grade of thirty-two one-hundredths (0.32) feet 
per hundred (100) feet four hundred (400) feet to elevation 35.27; 
thence level two hundred and forty-five (245) feet to elevation 35.27 ; 
thence by a descending grade of three and five-tenths (3.5) feet per 
hundred (100) feet, about three hundred and forty-four (344) feet to the 
easterly side line of Albany street at elevation 23.23 ; thence level 
eighty (80) feet to the westerly side line of Albany street at elevation 
23.23 ; thence by a descending grade of three and five-tenths (3.5) feet 
per one hundred (100) feet one hundred and eighty-eight and six-tenths 
(188.6) feet to elevation 16.63 at the present grade of Dover street. 

The alteration of grade of Albany street begins in the centre line of 
Albany street at its intersection with the southerly side line of Troy 
street produced at elevation 15.70 ; thence by an ascending grade of two 
and eighteen one-hundredths (2.18) feet per one hundred (100) feet 
about three hundred and forty-five (345) feet to the northerly side line 
of Dover street at elevation 23.23 ; thence level sixty (60) feet to the 
southerly side line of Dover street at elevation 23.23 ; thence by a de- 
scending grade of two (2) feet per hundred (100) feet about three hun- 
dred and twenty (320) feet -to elevation 16.83 at the present grade of 
Albany street. 

The alteration of grade of Bristol street begins in the centime line of 
Bristol street at its intersection with the westerty side line of Albany 
street at elevation 18.93; thence by a descending grade of two (2) feet 
per hundred (100) feet about one hundred (100) feet until it meets the 
present grade of Bristol street. 

All the grade lines as described shall have their intersection so 
altered by a curved line as to form an easy transition curve from one 
grade to the other. The length of these curves shall not exceed one 
hundred (100) feet. 

Said alteration of the grades of Albany street and Bristol street is 
incidental to and necessai'ily required by the alterations hereinabove 
provided for and in the grades of West Fourth street and Dover street. 

To make the alterations hereinabove provided for, it is necessary to 
take for highway purposes the following-described parcels of land 
which are hereby taken for highway purposes : 

A parcel of land supposed to belong to Charles U. Cottine: and Francis 
Weld, trustees under the will of Samuel K. Williams, being a strip of 
land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly by the westerly side line of 
Dorchester avenue about eleven (11) feet; northerly by the southerly 



Street Department. 43 

side line of West Fourth street about ninety-nine (99) feet ; westerly 
by land supposed to belong to Hervey 0. Corey ten (10) feet ; southerly 
by remaining land of said Cotting and AVeld, trustees, about one hun- 
dred and three (103) feet, and containing ten hundred and ten (1,010) 
square feet, more or less. 

Also, a parcel of land supposed to belong to Hervey C. Corey, being 
a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly by land supposed to 
belong to said Cotting and Weld, trustees, ten (10) feet ; northerly by the 
southerly side line of West Fourth street, about thirty-one (31) feet ; 
westerly by land supposed to belong to trustees of Cyrus Alger estate 
ten (10) feet; southerly by remaining land of said Hervey C. Corey, 
thirty-one (31) feet, and containing three hundred and ten (310) square 
feet, more or less. 

Also, a parcel of land supposed to belong to the trustees of Cyrus 
Alger estate, being a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly 
by land supposed to belong to said Corey, ten (10) feet; northerly by 
the southerly side line of West Fourth street, about sixty-three feet ; 
easterly by land of Old Colony Railroad Company, about ten (10) feet ; 
southerly "by remaining land of said trustees of Cyrus Alger estate, 
about sixty-one (61) feet, and containing six hundred and twenty 
(620) square feet, more or less. 

Also, a parcel of land belonging to the Old Colony Railroad Com- 
pany, being a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly by land 
supposed to belong to said trustees of Cyrus Alger estate, about ten (10) 
feet ; northerly by the southerly side line of West Fourth street, about 
twenty-five (25) feet; easterly by other land supposed to belong to 
said trustees, about ten (10) feet; southerly by remaining land of said 
Old Colony Railroad Company, about twenty-five (25) feet, and con- 
taining two hundredand fifty (250) square feet, more or less. 

Also, a parcel of land supposed to belong to trustees of Cyrus Alger 
estate, being a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly by 
land of said Old Colony Railroad Company, about ten (10) feet; noi'th- 
erly by the southerly side line of West Fourth street, about ninety- 
seven (97) feet; westerly by land supposed to belong to Mary C. De- 
vine, ten (10) feet; southerly, by remaining land of said trustees, about 
ninety-nine (99) feet, and containing nine hundred and eighty (980) 
square feet, more or less. 

Also, a parcel of land supposed to belong to Mary C. Devine, being 
a strip of land ten feet wide, bounded easterly by land supposed to be- 
long to trustees of Cyrus Alger estate, ten (10) feet; noi-therly, by the 
southerly side line of West Fourth street, thirty-eight (38) feet; west- 
erly by land supposed to belong to William H. Devine, ten (10) feet; 
southerly by remaining land of said Mary C. Devine, thirty-eight (38) 
feet, and containing three hundred and eighty (380) square feet, more 
or less. 

Also, a parcel of land supposed to belong to William H. Devine, 
being a strip of land ten (10) feet wide, bounded easterly by land 
supposed to belong to said Mary C. Devine, ten (10) feet; northerly by 
the southerly side line of West Fourth street, about forty-one (41) feet; 
westerly by the easterly side line of Foundry street, ten (10) feet; south- 
erly by remaining land of said William H. Devine, about forty-one (41) 
feet, containing four hundred and ten (410) feet, more or less. 

Dover street, West Fourth street, Albany street, and Bristol street, 
as thus altered in the location and grade thereof, shall be constructed of 
the full width of the limits shown upon the plan herewith filed, en- 
titled " Plan of Proposed Alteration of the Crossing of the Old Colony 
Railroad and West Fourth street in the City of Boston," and verified by 
the signatures of the commissioners, and to the full width of said 
streets, as widened by the taking of land hereinabove provided for. 

Said streets shall also have a sidewalk ten (10) feet wide on each side 
thereof, forming a part of^aid streets. 



44 City Document No. 34. 

The portion of said streets, from the westerly side of Dorchester 
avenue to the easterly side line of Foundry street, shall be supported by 
rubble masonry retaining walls, where necessary, upon the side lines 
thereof, with a dimension-stone cap at the level of the sidewalk and 
forming part thereof . and earth filling; and it shall have a paved road- 
way and curbing and brick sidewalks. 

The portion of said streets, from the easterly side line of Foundry street, 
extending about four hundred and eighty (480) feet over the Old Col- 
on}' Railroad to the dock of Fort Point channel, shall be constructed with 
an iron truss bridge with plank roadway and sidewalks, as shown on 
the plan thereof, made by the Boston Bridge Works, and verified by 
the signatures of the commissioners, and hereto annexed and made part 
of this report. Said bridge shall be supported upon stone piers upon 
a pile foundation and with a stone abutment in the easterly side line of 
Foundry street, as shown on said plan last mentioned. 

The portion of said way extending about four hundred and ten (410) 
feet over Fort Point channel shall be supported upon an iron bridge 
that shall have a paved roadway and be supported upon iron columns or 
stone piers, and shall have a draw span of such width, design, and con- 
struction as shall be approved by the Harbor and Land Commissioners. 

The westerly end of said bridge shall be supported by a stone abut- 
ment upon pile foundations at or near the westerly dock line of Fort 
Point channel. The portion of said streets lying westerly of said last- 
named abutment and at the westerly dock line of Fort Point channel 
shall be supported by rubble-masonry retaining walls, whei*e necessary, 
upon the side lines thereof, with a dimension-stone cap at the level of 
the sidewalk and forming a part thereof, and earth filling. It shall 
have a paved roadway and curbing, and brick sidewalks of the width 
hereinabove described. 

Said streets and bridge within the limits described shall be suitably 
fenced upon both sides. 

Third. The Old Colony Railroad Company shall do all the work 
herein provided for, except that the city of Boston shall build the bridge 
over Fort Point channel and the draw therein and its appurtenances. 

Fourth. The work herein oi'dered is to be done and the land to be 
taken in accordance with the plans filed with this our decision, and 
hereinbefore referred to as verified bj- our signatures. 

Fifth. We decide that the expense of the alterations hereinabove 
provided for, including the cost of the hearing and the compensation of 
the Commissioners and Auditors, and all damages shall be borne and 
paid as follows, to wit : 

Sixty-five (65) per cent, thereof by the Old Colony RailroadCompany, 
as required by law; twenty-five (25) per cent, thereof by the Common- 
wealth, and (10) per cent, thereof by the city of Boston. 

(Signed) Chas. S. Lilley, 

Fred'k H. Gili.ett, 
Chas. Mills, 

Commsisioners . 

The city of Boston does not desire to be heard on the question of con- 
firmation of this report by the court, but agrees thereto. 

By its Attorney, 

A. J. Bailey, 

City Solicitor. 
For the Commonwealth. 

A. E. Pillsbdry, 

Attorney- General . 

By C. N. Harris, 

2d Assistant Attorney -General for the Commonwealth. 



Street Department. 45 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
In Board of Railroad Commissioners, November 17, 1892. 
On the application of the Old Colony Railroad Company : 
Ordered, That the Board hereby consents to the construction of a 
bridge over the Old Colony Railroad at West Fourth street in Boston, at 
a height provided for in the report of a special commission on the 
alteration of the crossing of said Old Colony Railroad and West Fourth 
street. 

Attest : Wm. A. Crafts, 

Clerk. 
A true copy. 

Attest: Wm. A. Crafts. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
In Board of Railroad Commissioners, November 17, 1892. 
In the matter of the alteration of the grade crossing of the Old Colony 
Railroad and West Fourth street in the city of Boston, an estimate of 
the total cost of which alteration has been submitted to the Board. 

The Board of Railroad Commissioners hereby certifies that in its 
judgment the expenditure on the part of the Commonwealth for the 
current year under this and previous certificates issued under the provi- 
sions of Section 11 of Chapter 428, Acts of 1890, will not exceed the 
limit prescribed by said Act. 
Attest : 

(Signed) Wm. A. Crafts, 

Clerk. 
A true copy. 

Attest : Wm. A. Crafts, 

Clerk. 

West Chester-park Bridge, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

This bridge has been thoroughly repaired and new asphalt 
sidewalks have been laid. The granite abutments have been 
raised so that the uneven grade that formerly existed in the 
street has been greatly relieved. The carpenter and wood 
work was performed by employees of the bridge division, 
and all work was done under direction and supervision of 
the City Engineer. 

The bridge was stripped of its woodwork and the iron- 
work was cleaned and painted. Such old hard-pine stringers 
as were sound were replaced, and the surface of the bridge 
was moulded to the required form by additional woodwork, 
and replanked. 

The sidewalks were rebuilt of the full width of the side- 
walks on the street, or 15 feet in width in place of 12 feet. 

The stone parapet was taken up and reset in cement mor- 
tar to the new grade, and the new stone required by the 
change in sidewalk furnished. The sidewalks were laid with 
coal-tar concrete. 

The street railroad was relaid mostly with new material to 



46 City Document No. 34. 

the new grade, and the street was regraded and macadam- 
ized, the edgestones reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid 
from Newbury street to Boylston street and beyond. 

The grades adopted were such as to cause no damage to 
adjoining real estate. The bridge was in such condition as 
to require stripping and painting, and the special work of 
the railroad at the corner of Boylston street was torn out ; 
this intersection was in bad condition from settlement, and 
was about one foot below the established grade. 

The cost of the work on the bridge and parapet was 
$5,118.71, and the cost of resurfacing West Chester park 
and the adjoining streets was $4,081.95. 

Broadway Bridge. 

Extensive work has been done on this bridge. The Le- 
high-street and Foundry-street spans have been strengthened 
by hard-pine cross-beams and upright hard-pine supports ; 
the other spans have been in like manner reinforced with 
hard-pine beams hung under the iron girders ; the spans 
nearest to the draw on both sides have been strengthened by 
heavy trusses from above. 

This work was done by contract and is finished. The 
process of strengthening caused the demolition of the di- 
vision stables, which were under the bridge, at Foundry 
street, and no provision has as yet been made for rebuilding. 
This matter should receive attention at the hands of the city 
government, as the division is greatly inconvenienced by the 
loss of this stable. 

L-street Bridge. 

It is to be hoped that early the coming summer this 
bridge will be opened to foot travel. Owing to the fact 
that Congress street from C street to L street has not yet 
been laid out as a public street, it will be impossible for this 
bridge to be used for team travel during the coming year. 

Late in the fall preparations were made and work was 
begun on a plank sidewalk on the Boston side of the bridge, 
but the severity of the weather interfered with its continu- 
ance during the winter months. Work will be commenced 
at the earliest moment and pushed until completed. 

Charles-river Bridge. 

The original bridge was built in 1785-86 ; the present 

structure was built in 1854-55 ; the draw was built in 1870. 

The condition of this bridge has been growing worse from 



Street Department. 47 

year to year, and the very frequent closings to public travel, 
which have occasioned much inconvenience, have prompted 
the city government of 1894 to pass the following order : 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be hereby directed to issue, at his 
discretion, and sell either coupon bonds or registered certificates of in- 
debtedness of the city of Boston for the aggregate sum of seven hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars ; said bonds or registered certificates of 
indebtedness to be made payable at the office of the said City Treasurer 
twenty years from the date of the same, with interest thereon at the 
rate of four per centum per annum, payable semi-annually; and the 
money received from the sale thereof is hereby appropriated for a 
bridge between the city proper and Charlestown. 

Ordered, That any premium obtained by the said City Treasurer in 
the negotiation or sale of said bonds or certificates of indebtedness shall 
be paid to the Board of Commissioners of Sinking-Funds for the re- 
demption of the debt hereby created. 

Approved February 12, 1894. 



New asphalt sidewalks have been laid on Berkeley- street 
bridge over the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. and on West Ches- 
ter-park bridge over the B. & A. R.R. 

The abutment walls of the following bridges have been 
pointed with Portland cement mortar : 

Berkeley street (B. & A. R.R.). 
Ferdinand street (B. & A. R.R.). 
Berkeley street (N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R.). 
Huntington avenue (B. & A. R.R.). 

The report of the Deputy Superintendent (Appendix A) 
gives a detailed statement of expenditures on the various 
bridges, and contains much useful information concerning 
the nature of repairs and other matters. 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 



By the provisions of the Acts of Legislature of 1870 and 
1882, the care of the bridges uniting the city of Boston with 
the city of Cambridge is placed in the hands of two commis- 
sioners, one of whom is appointed by the city of Cambridge, 
the other by the city of Boston. 

The Boston commissioner, according to the Revised Ordi- 
nances, is the Superintendent of Streets, and the present 
commissioner for Cambridge is Mr. William J. Marvin. 
The bridges thus provided for are four in number, namely : 



48 City Document No. 34. 

Canal or Craigie's bridge. 
Harvard bridge. 
Prison Point bridge. 
West Boston bridge. 

The following report will show, briefly, the general con- 
dition of the various bridges, the repairs made, the work 
needed to be done, together with a detailed statement of 
expenditures : 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

The up-stream fender on the Cambridge side has been re- 
built in a substantial manner, the sides of the water-way 
through the draw have been replanked, and the Samson 
posts of the draw have been securely fastened in place. A 
new boiler has been provided for the engine used for turning 
the draw. The ordinary repairs have been made. 

The West End Kailway Company has improved its appa- 
ratus for crossing the draw, and the cars now run smoothly 
and without delays. The drawtenders have kept the side- 
walks clean, have painted the engine-house on the inside, 
and made ordinary repairs on the bridge and engine. 

The roadway is cleaned once a week, after midnight. 

The draw is old and weak, and requires careful attention 
to keep it in safe condition. 

The replanting of the water-way should be completed and 
the fences painted at once. 

Harvard Bridge. 

The fences, the plank outside the fences, and the watch- 
houses at the ends of the bridge have been painted. 

The switch of the electrical motor used for moving the 
draw has been placed in a more convenient position, and the 
apparatus for moving the draw rearranged. The switch is 
now in a better position for use, and can be more easily kept 
in condition and repairs can be more readily made than 
before. This work was done by the drawtenders. 

The position of the draw has been marked for navigation 
at night by showing red and green electric lights. The red 
light is shown on the up-stream side of the draw at the Bos- 
ton end, and the green light on the down-stream side of the 
draw at the Cambridge end. 

The house on the draw pier should be painted and the 
entire surface plank of the bridge renewed. 

The roadway is cleaned once a week, and the surface plank 
patched when necessary. The drawtenders keep the road- 
way in order, the sidewalks free from snow, clean the elec- 



Street Department. 49 

trie light globes (72 in number) and help to clean the road- 
way. 

Prison-point Bridge. 

The ell of the drawtenders house has been repaired, the 
roof tinned and painted and the house renovated inside. 
The work was done by the drawtender. 

Ordinary repairs, such as planking draw, etc., have been 
made. 

This draw is old and hard to raise. It should be replaced 
by a new draw before many years. 

West Boston Bridge. 

All the ironwork under the draw has been painted, an 
addition made to the engine-house for a workshop, coal, ash, 
and store house. The engine-house has been painted inside. 
The usual repairs, such as paving, carpentering, etc., have 
been attended to. 

Cleaning on this bridge is done once a week, always after 
midnight, so as not to interfere with travel. The addition 
to engine-house, painting outside and inside, also repairs on 
draw, and cleaning sidewalks, has been done by the draw- 
tenders. 

The sides of the water-way on the draw-pier will have to 
be replanked. 

The trusses for carrying the trolley-wires which were 
placed on the draw in 1892 weighed about one ton each, and 
were very unsightly. The West End Railroad Company's 
attention was called to them, and this year they have re- 
placed them by others weighing about six hundred pounds 
each, thereby relieving the draw of a large and unnecessary 
weight. 

The filled part at the Cambridge end of the bridge has 
been watered at a small expense, the abutters paying part of 
the cost. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended of the number of draw 
openings and the number of vessels which passed through. 

The amount of revenue received for dockage, rents, re- 
pairs to West End Street Railway tracks, etc., during the 
year has been $1,505.36 ; one-half, $752.68, has been paid to 
the city of Cambridge. 

The following is a statement of the payment made by the 
city of Boston on account of Canal, Harvard, Prison Point, 
and West Boston bridges, from February 1, 1893, to Jan- 
uary 31, 1894: 



50 City Document No. 34. 

Amount of appropriation for financial year, 

1893-94 

Amount expended to January 31, 1894 . 

Unexpended balance .... 



$13,000 00 
11,493 16 

1 $1,506 84 



Classification of Expenses. 



1893. 


General 
Account. 


Canal 
Bridge. 


Harvard 
Bridge. 


Prison 

Point 

Bridge. 


West Bos- 
ton Bridge. 


Total. 




$250 00 
56 55 
31 77 
10 12 










$250 00 
56 55 


Travelling ex- 
Printing and sta- 

Advertising, mes- 
sengers, etc. . , 

Draw-tenders and 


















31 77 










10 12 


$1,140 00 
281 68 
1,417 68 
371 26 
289 77 
242 10 
190 00 


$1,271 00 
1,104 09 
64 63 
8 42 
67 35 
73 25 
112 50 

301 69 
13 63 

111 90 
49 87 
23 71 


$274 12 

147 37 
63 55 

54 78 

37 50 


$1,250 00 
480 00 
218 21 
228 75 
237 53 
295 25 
147 50 


3,935 12 






1,865 77 






1,847 89 






671 98 






649 43 






610 60 






487 50 


Electri c cu rrent an d 




301 69 


Fuel 




131 03 
21 47 
51 13 


10 55 

11 87 


114 55 
48 04 
28 95 
41 49 
62 46 
11 00 


259 21 


Paint and painting, 




181 41 
140 50 


Tools and hardware, 




10 34 

11 25 
16 00 


87 41 
73 71 








5 50 


32 50 










$348 44 


$4,173 71 


$3,202 04 


$605 24 


$3,163 73 


$11,493 16 



1 The above balance was transferred to the Board of Aldermen. 



Street Department. 



51 



dumber of Times the Draws in Canal, Harvard, Prison 
Point, and West Boston Bridges have been opened, 
and the number of Vessels which have passed through, 
for the year ending Jan. 31, 1894. 



Date. 


Canal. 


Harvard. 


Prison 


Point. 


West Boston. 


February 1, 1803, 


OS 

ft . 


OS 


is 

u 

Q . 


2& 

a £ 

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a 


sg 


u 
A . 


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to 






"S 50 


O *> 
t-T3 


°l 


^3 
2^ 




















4. a 




January 31, 1894. 


x> 55 
SB 




a ft 


£ « 


£ a 


£ si 


P P. 


£ a 




§o 


a P.. 


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a P< 


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to 


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to 


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February, 1893 . . 




9 


10 








23 


48 








March . . 








75 


95 


20 


33 


30 


42 


26 


40 


April . . 








257 


293 


169 


202 


47 


I 62 


105 


159 


May . . . 








437 


497 


248 


316 


49 


i 91 


217 


308 


June • . 








470 


510 


297 


361 


49 


66 


249 


356 


July . . . 








449 


497 


210 


271 


48 


67 


270 


376 


August . 








351 


385 


222 


276 








173 


243 


September 








316 


336 


198 


270 


10 


: 12 


179 


277 


October . 








307 


333 


158 


268 


73 


113 


193 


313 


November . 








299 


338 


131 


203 


54 


75 


154 


277 


December 








189 


229 


73 


10S 


42 


73 


102 


186 


January, 1894 . . 




73 


95 


10 


13 


19 


26 


41 


63 


Totals .... 




3,232 


3,618 


1,736 


2,321 


444 


675 


1,709 


2,598 



Statement showing Traffic over Bridges. 



Date. 
1893. 


Bridge. 


Foot 
Passengers. 


Teams. 


Cars. 


Car 
Passengers. 


September 8, 
6 A.M. 




6,704 
2,515 
2,883 
5,428 


5,517 
2,690 
2,121 
3,015 


496 
270 


11,928 
10,612 


to 7 P.M. 


923 


20,743 






17,530 


13,343 


1,689 


43,283 



52 



City Document No. 34. 



PAVING DIVISION. 



The following table shows the length of public highways 
and the character of pavements, February 1, 1894: 



, Length in Miles. 





OS 
P. 
< 

m 


Asphalt Blocks. 



Block. 


a 

m 


o 

O 

O 


Telford and 
Macadam. 


"3 

6 


•a 
<u 

■a 

So 
o 


"3; 

o 


In previous Report. 


5.31 


0.69 


74.78 


0.36 


4.59 


208.74 


137.21 


11.66 


443.34 


February 1, 18S 
City Proper . . 
Charlestown . . 
East Boston . . 
South Boston . 
Roxbury . . . 
W. Roxbury . • 
Dorchester . . . 
Brighton . . . 


4. 




4.73 
0.03 

0.53 
0.37 





81 


*41.89 
8.45 
4.38 
11.58 
7.82 
0.09 
3.47 


0. 


36 


3.15 
0.14 
0.17 
0.05 
0.01 


29.24 
13.86 
1.92 
22.43 
53.49 
28.25 
45.38 
17.16 


0.55 
0.09 
20.31 
1.88 
15.95 
45.09 
33.73 
18.40 


0.09 

0.20 
4.03 
1.48 
2.26 
1.80 
2.03 


80.82 
22.57 
26.98 
40.50 
79.12 
75.69 
84.38 
37.59 




5.66 


0.81 


77.68 


0.36 


3.52 


211.73 


136.00 


11.89 


447.65 



Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 
* Of this amount 2.13 miles = granite-block paving on concrete with pitched joints. 

Total length of public streets, 447.65 miles. 

There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year 6.293 linear miles ; many square 
feet have been -discontinued without changing the mileage ; 
24 linear feet have been discontinued; corrections to pre- 
vious measurements on account of abolishing grade crossings, 
and surrender of streets to the Park Department, show a 
decrease of 1.98 miles, making a total net increase of 4.31 
miles. 

Not included in the above table, there are about 142 miles 
of private ways and alleys which are not under the care of 
this department. 



Street Department. 



53 



The rate of increase from year to year is shown in the 



following table 



1859 111.50 miles. 

1871 201.32 " 

1872 207.4 " 

1873 ....209.24 " 

1874., 31390 " 

1875 318.58 " 

1876 , 327.50 " 

1877 333.2 " 

1878 3-10.39 » 

1879 345.19 " 

1880 350.54 " 

1881 .355.5 

1882 359.85 " 



1883 367.99 miles. 

1884... 374.10 " 

1885 379.60 " 

1886 383.55 " 

1887 390.30 " 

1888 392.72 " 

1889 397 84 " 

1890 404.6 

1891 409.6 

1892 .434.59 " 

1893 443 34 " 

1894 447.65" 



Areas of Pavements. 

The following table shows the areas of pavements in 
square yards, arranged by districts : 





Asphalt 


Block. 


Brick. 


Cobble. 


Telford 

and 
Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
graded. 


Totals. 


Feb. 1,1893. 


100,812 


1,615,925 


3,638 


57,321 


3,820,830 


2,264,965 


220,217 


8,083,708 


Feb. 1,1894. 
City Proper, 
Charlest'n . 


*96,558 
421 


tS94,034 
194,668 
104,206 
244,457 
163,425 
2,067 
74,594 


3,638 


35,593 

1,043 

3,470 

1,192 

408 


569,581 
205,861 
38,118 
390,809 
969,522 
482,227 
805,971 
415,669 


10,913 

1,105 

386,208 

38,365 
260,268 
711,081 
555,365 
281,129 


1,222 

3,731 

83,599 
28,274 
33,727 
36,036 
32,539 


1,611,539 
403,098 
535,733 


8. Boston . 
Roxbury . 
W. Roxb'y 


7,609 
6,559 


766,031 
1,428,456 
1,229,702 






1,471,966 








729,337 














Total . . 


111,147 


1,677,451 


3,638 


41,706 


3,877,758 


2,245,034 


219,128 


8,175,862 



* Of this amount, 13,586 sq. yds. = asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount, 42,619 sq. yds. = granite-block paving on concrete with pitched joints. 

Total area of public streets, 8,175,862 sq. yds. 

For the sake of comparing the character of the pavements 
in the city of Boston with that of o.ther large cities, state- 
ments were received direct from the cities named, which 
cannot be classified exactly on the same basis on account of 
the differences in the laws by which they become public, but 
which will show iu ;i general way what styles of roadway 
have been adopted in the several large cities by percentage : 



54 



City Document No. 34. 



Distribution of Pavements in Public Highways. 





S3 

o 

hn 

S3 - 
"3 a 

01 


u 
09 -h 


.J 

an a 

° 

.£3 0) 
O Ph 


■s i 

o3 a 

& z 

S3 S 


£5 Oh 


03 

3 

<D *3 

13 S3 

Ph Ph 


Boston. 
Per cent. 


Sheet asphalt . . 


43.90 

15.74 

7.56 

15.82 


2.40 


1.65 


37.97 


11.42 


9.2 


1.26 


Asphalt block . 
Block stone . . 


12.50 

2.40 


0.36 
2.51 
64.38 


0.08 
30.25 


0.05 
72.28 


2.2 
24.4 


0.18 
17.35 


Cobble 


8.98 




0.06 


31.0 
5.8 
13.4 


0.79 






0.11 
0.11 

30.86 


0.81 


0.08 


Rubble 








♦Telford . 




9.60 
73.10 


0.13 

0.47 

30.26 

0.03 




10.12 


* Macadam . . . 


8.00 


16.19 


13.4 


37.18 
33.04 








0.02 
















0.6 


















Percentages . . 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


Mileage .... 


165.00 


365.83 


1,007.05 


396.4 


455.75 


852.14 


417.65 



*.Not usually well separated in the reports of the various cities. 

The most striking feature of the above table is the fact 
that Boston shows such a small percentage of paved streets, 
and still further, that every other city shows from two to 
thirty times as much, sheet asphalt as Boston. Well may 
Buffalo boast of being the best-paved city in America, with 
its one hundred and fifty miles of asphalt and one hundred 
and twenty miles of block-stone pavement, or two hundred 
and seventy odd miles of improved pavement, out of a total 
mileage of three hundred ninety-six miles, as against our 
eighty miles, mostly of stone pavement, out of a mileage of 
four hundred and forty-seven miles. 

Asphalt pavements in Europe are said to have the follow- 
ing approximate areas and lengths : 

London . . . . 

Paris ..... 

Berlin ..... 
Other cities .... 



Square Yards. 

3-70,000 

401,617 

1,280,796 

271,000 


Miles. 

24 

26 
83 
18 


2,323,413 


151 




fctl) 



Street Department. 55 

The city of Buffalo alone has more miles of asphalt than 
all the cities in Europe, where these pavements have been 
in use since 1854, while the industry has only been develop- 
ing in this country for sixteen years. In this short time the 
United States and Canada are said to have laid in seventy- 
five cities upwards of 14,000,000 square yards or 3,000 
acres, and an aggregate length of nearly 800 miles. 

Such cities as Scranton, Pa., Wilkesbarre, Erie, St. 
Joseph, Mo., Louisville, Ky., all contain more asphalt than 
Boston, while Omaha has five times as much, Washington 
ten times as much, and Buffalo thirty times as much. This 
condition of things largely increases the expense of the 
maintenance of pavements in this city, as the excessive 
mileage of unpaved streets not only calls for large expendi- 
tures for repairs, but the expense of cleaning is increased 
from $12 per mile to seventy-five dollars ($75), and in 
some cases to over one hundred dollars ($100) per mile. 

The unevenness and irregularity of slope of some of our 
older pavements are appalling, due in some cases to a poor 
foundation or bed, and in some to the free and unrestricted 
license to private corporations in former years to tear up a 
pavement without a guarantee of its proper replacement, and 
to locate drip-boxes, manholes, gate-boxes, and covers of 
various sizes and kinds, all without due attention to the es- 
tablished grade and crown of the streets. 

The inevitable conclusion, both from the comparison of 
our scant mileage of pavement with other cities, and from 
the consideration of the inferior, not to say disgraceful, con- 
dition of many of our older business streets that have not 
been repaved for many years, is that a strong effort should 
be made to provide means for the replacing of these pave- 
ments with more perfect and sanitary forms of pavement. 
Such pavements should be extended as rapidly as possible 
until they cover the majority of our streets. 

Pavements laid in 1891. 

In the year 1891 several experimental pavements were 
laid, under varying conditions of travel, with a view of 
special study as to the merits of some of the newer forms of 
paving, notably brick paving, Hastings' asphalt-block pav- 
ing, and Sicilian rock paving, all of which could be compared 
with the Trinidad asphalt. 

Three streets were paved with brick: Genesee and Seneca 
streets were paved with a fire-clay brick made by the Park 
Fire-Clay Company of Park Quarries, Beaver County, Pa. 
Oswego street was paved with red brick made by the .New 



56 City Document No. 34. 

England Pressed Brick Company, of Rhode Island. The 
three streets are about five hundred (500) feet long and in 
the same section of the city. 

Rochester street, which is of the same length and parallel 
with the others, was paved with Hastings' compressed as- 
phalt blocks. All of these .streets extend from Harrison 
avenue to Albany street, and none of them are connected in 
such a way as to make them thoroughfares, yet all have a 
fair amount of travel. 

Seneca street is fourteen (14) feet only between the curbs ; 
the others are about twenty (20) feet between curbs. The 
cost of paving with fire-clay brick on gravel foundation 
(Seneca and Oswego streets) was $2.75 per square yard, the 
contractor preparing the bed and furnishing all materials. 

The Cost of the red New England brick (Oswego street) 
was $2.40 per square yard, on the same conditions. Com- 
pressed asphalt-block paving (Rochester street) cost about 
$2.85 per square yard, exclusive of the cost of preparing 
the roadbed, which cost about 40 cents, making the total 
cost about $3.25; the price paid for asphalt-block paving 
includes a five-year guarantee on maintenance. 

West Newton street, from Shawmut avenue to Columbus 
avenue, was paved with Hastings' blocks in the same year, 
and cost $3.10 per square yard, exclusive of preparing the 
roadbed, which cost about 27 cents per square yard, making 
the total cost about $3.37 per square yard, with a five-year 
maintenance guarantee. The contract for brick paving car- 
ried no maintenance guarantee. 

In the same year Trinidad asphalt paving on concrete 
foundation cost $3.60 per square yard on Beacon street, 
including guarantee of five years for maintenance ; and 
Columbus avenue was resurfaced on the old concrete founda- 
tion, at the rate of $2.25 per square yard, with five years' 
guarantee. All the paving except the Trinidad asphalt was 
laid on a prepared and rolled gravel bed without a concrete 
base. 

The City Engineer was requested to make an examination 
of these special pavements this year, and his opinion is ex- 
pressed in the following statement of their condition : 

" Of the three streets paved with brick, there is not much 
to choose as regards their present condition ; all of them are 
in need of repairs at the present time. There is no record 
that Seneca street has up to this time received any repair on 
account of wear. Oswego street has been repaired at a cost 
of $211. 

" Genesee street has been repaired at a cost of $160.23. 
As there are 1,091 square yards of paving, the cost has been 



Street Department. 57 

about 15 cents per square yard, and about 20 cents per square 
yard is known to have been expended on Oswego street. 

" No substantial reason is found why Seneca street should 
be less worn than Genesee street. Both were paved from 
the same lot of brick, except that Seneca street being nar- 
rower than Genesee street, it may possibly receive less 
travel. The condition of these streets is unsatisfactory, 
and shows a wear of the material, aside from an unevenness 
of surface, on account of defective foundation. Oswego 
street is in worse condition than Genesee street. 

"Rochester street (asphalt blocks) shows wear on the 
blocks, but is in good condition. Slight repairs only have 
been necessary. 

" Beacon street and Columbus avenue have been repaired 
by the contractor, and although they will require repairs this 
season, they are in good condition. 

" The red brick paving is in the poorest condition of any 
examined, and next in order comes the fire brick, then 
asphalt blocks, and lastly the sheet asphalt, which stands 
the best of all. The bricks are worn and broken in places 
where most used. This is particularly noticeable at the 
entrances where teams turn as they enter. 

"The same fact is noticeable in Hamilton place (private 
way), paved in 1888 with fire-clay brick, made in Boston. 
The pavement is worn at the entrance and at the end next 
the Music Hall where carriages turn, while it is in very good 
condition otherwise. The same condition obtains with the 
asphalt-block pavement. 

" The asphalt blocks wear during cold weather Iry spalling 
off corners, and leaving the blocks rounding on the tops like 
old granite olocks ; when warmer weather comes, the blocks 
soften and flatten under the traffic, and the streets appear in 
much better condition than earlier in the season. 

"While the experience with brick paving in Boston is not 
encouraging, yet there is much being done in the way of 
producing better paving-brick, and doubtless progress has 
been made in the last three years, and it is recommended 
that limited areas be paved with the best procurable bricks, 
on a concrete base." 

The experience of other cities on this subject is not to be 
ignored, since many attempts have been made to put brick 
paving on a surer basis. The results of investigations of 
our own engineers seem to agree with the reports of special 
committees of some other cities, to the effect that while, in 
form, brick paving is commendable; both as to cleanliness 
and sanitary features, yet it cannot be fully relied upon in 
huge cities where the traffic is heavy. 



58 City Document No. 34. 

It has given the best satisfaction in the smaller cities, and 
its principal weakness has been in the failure to produce the 
exact degree of vitrification and uniformity required to build 
a street that is impregnable throughout the entire length. 
Useless and costly experiments of trying to use bricks made 
from clays that are incapable of vitrification are unwarranted ; 
but, taking advantage of the experience of Philadelphia, 
Wheeling, Newark, Columbus, Cincinnati, Kansas City, 
Quincy, Galesburg, Rock Island, Davenport, Detroit, and 
other cities noted for their brick paving, the right clay may 
yet be found that will stand the tests of absorption, abrasion, 
compression, vitrification, and the more practical test of 
actual street wear. 

When a proper clay is found, there remains yet another 
problem, — how to handle and deliver the same so that the 
element of cost due to freight, etc., shall not have been in- 
creased to the high-water mark of granite or asphalt, whose 
durability is not questioned. 

No sheet rock-asphalt was laid in 1891, but in 1892 con- 
siderable areas were laid. Two streets were laid in the near 
vicinity of the brick pavement ; namely, Decatur street and 
Motte street. Davis street, parallel to these streets and 
lying between them, was paved with Trinidad asphalt also, 
in 1892. All three streets are in good condition ; only one 
break, due to wear, having been found on them, that being in 
the gutter of Motte street. 

It would be difficult to distinguish the natural rock-asphalt 
from the Trinidad asphalt by its appearance. During the 
examination, the policeman whose beat includes all these 
streets was asked if he had observed any difference in slip- 
periness between Davis . and Decatur streets, but he could 
not say that one was more slippery than the other. In gen- 
eral, the asphalt streets continue to give excellent satis- 
faction. 

Streets paved with granite blocks on concrete in 1891 
have required no expense for maintenance, and will require 
none for many years. They retain their grades perfectly, 
are easily cleaned, shed water without trouble even where 
but little fall can be obtained, and, from the fact that they 
have been carefully graded, a marked appearance of stability 
is given to the street. This stable appearance is never seen 
after the first year in streets without the concrete base, as 
even small settlements or changes of form give an appear- 
ance of unstability and weakness, and this generally occurs 
when only the gravel base is used. 




o 



o 



Steeet Department. 59 



Pavements laid in 1893. 



The general character of the work done during the year 
1893 has been similar to that of the previous year. No 
conditions have developed to change the conclusions already 
stated as to the method of laying granite-block paving on a 
cement concrete base and pitching the joints. 

The advantage of the concrete base is beyond dispute, 
while the practical superiority of the pitched joint over the 
gravel joint may be stated in two essential particulars : 
first, a newly laid pitched pavement can be opened up for 
travel at once, in absolutely clean condition, in contrast to 
the former method of covering off with gravel that must 
require months of travel to grind it into the joints, while 
in the meantime the alternate mud and dust thus created is 
a source of annoyance and discomfort to the abutters ; and, 
second, the tight joint prevents the surface-water from 
leaking through into the sand-bed and washing it out from 
under the blocks, and thus causing them to settle. Neither 
should the point be lost sight of or ignored that if the street 
wash is carried at once by an impervious pavement and 
gutter directly into the catch-basin, and thence into the drain- 
age system, the sanitary condition of the street is imme- 
diately changed. No longer can there exist the process of 
fermentation and putrefaction of the confined masses of 
stagnant street liquids, animal and vegetable matter, that 
fill every crevice and hollow between and under the blocks 
where joints are left open. If such a source of danger to 
public health can be thus removed, the benefits received 
more than offset the temporary annoyance of the tar-kettle 
and the additional cost of the pitching. 

Large blocks have been preferred, measuring in width 
from three and a half (3 J) to four and one-half (41) inches ; 
in length, from nine (9) to fourteen (14) inches; "and aver- 
aging not less than eleven and one-half (11 J) inches; and 
in depth, from seven and one-half (7^) to eight (8) inches. 
They have cost seventy-three and one-half dollars ($73.50) 
per M., delivered on the wharves. No brick pavements have 
been laid during the year. Too much care and attention 
cannot be given to the design of manhole frames and covers, 
as to form, dimension, non-perishable material, and location, 
as they tend to break up the general evenness and true slope 
of the theoretical cross-section, if laid irregularly, and also 
lead to an uneven wear of the pavement due to the extra 
hammer blows of heavily loaded vehicles passing over these 
jogs. Both Trinidad and Sicilian rock-asphalt have been 



60 City Document No. 34. 

laid during the year, and continue to give good satisfaction 
when laid in localities to which they are adapted. 

The following statement of the City Engineer contains 
the main features of the special work of construction assigned 
to him by this department for engineering supervision : 

City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, February 1, 1894. 
Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir : I herewith submit the following report of the work 
done under my direction for the Street Department during 
the year 1893 : 

The following are the principal items of work done : 

Block-stone paving on a concrete base laid with pitch 
joints, 569.5 square yards, at an average cost of about $4.75 
per square yard. 

Block-stone paving on a gravel base laid with pitch joints, 
1,816.5 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.50 per 
square yard. 

Block-stone paving on a gravel base with gravel joints, 
24,583.8 square yards, at an average cost of about $3 per 
square yard. 

Trinidad sheet-asphalt on a concrete base, 7,361.3 square 
yards, at an average cost of about $3.75 per square yard. 

Sicilian rock-asphalt on a concrete base, 2,734.5 square 
yards, at an average cost of about $3.75 per square yard. 

Edgestones set, 15,765 lineal feet. Brick sidewalks laid, 
11,124 square yards. Flagging crosswalks laid, 847 square 
yards. 

The following is a statement of the streets paved, for 
which plans were made, lines and grades given, and the 
work supervised : 

Arch Street. — From Milk street to Franklin street was 
resurfaced above the old concrete base, with Trinidad 
asphalt, by the Barber Asphalt Company. The surface re- 
moved was asphalt. 

Beacon Street. — From Tremont to Bowdoin street was 
paved with granite blocks, with pitch joints, on a gravel 
base. The surface removed was macadam. The edgestones 
were reset and brick sidewalks put in order ; contractor, 
F. H. Cowin & Co. Two new catch-basins were built, one 
on Somerset street and one on Beacon street. 

Beacon Street. — From Gloucester street to W. Chester 
park was paved with Trinidad asphalt by the Barber Asphalt 
Company. The concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan 
Construction Company, and edgestones and sidewalks put 



Street Department. 61 

in order by F. H. Cowin & Co. The surface removed was 
macadam. 

Bennington Street, East Boston. — From Marion to 
Chelsea street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
base. The edgestones were reset and brick sidewalks put in 
order. The suface removed was macadam. Contractors, 
Doherty & O'Leary. The street railroad was relocated, and 
the edgestones set on new lines. Three new catch-basins 
were built. 

Carver Street. — From Eliot to Pleasant street was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. The edge- 
stones and sidewalks were put in order. The surface 
removed was cobble pavement. Contractors, F. H. Cowin 
&Co. 

Condor Street, East Boston. — From Border to Meridian 
street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. The 
edgestones and sidewalks were put in order. The surface 
removed was macadam. Contractors, Doherty & O'Leary. 

Cove Street. — From South to Kneeland street was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel base and the edge- 
stones and brick sidewalk put in order. The old cobble- 
stones were removed by J. J. Sullivan, and the remainder 
of the work was done by the Street Department. The 
surface removed was cobble pavement. 

Dwight Street. — From Tremont to Shawmut avenue 
was paved with natural rock sheet-asphalt by H. Gore & Co. 
The concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan Construc- 
tion Company. The surface removed was macadam. One 
new catch-basin was built. 

Bast Sixth Street, South Boston. — From K to L street 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, and the 
edgestones and sidewalks were put in order. The surface 
removed was macadam. Contractors, H. Gore & Co. 

Exchange Street. — From State street to Dock square 
was paved with granite blocks with pitch joints on a con- 
crete base. The old granite paving-blocks were removed by 
J. J. Sullivan. The concrete base was laid by the Metro- 
politan Construction Company, and the paving and brick 
sidewalks were laid by F. H. Cowin & Co. 

Fay Street. — From Dover street to Harrison avenue 
was put in order for paving with natural rock asphalt on 
cobble-stones. On account of the lateness of the season, 
before the sewer and gas pipes were put in condition, the 
asphalt was not laid. Contractors, H. Gore & Co. The 
edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in order. 

Fulton Place. — From Fulton to North street was paved 
with granite blocks on a gravel base, and the edgestones 



62 City Document No. 34. 

and brick sidewalks were put in order. The surface re- 
moved was cobble pavement. Contractors, James Grant & 
Co. 

Lehigh Street. — From Albany street to South street was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, and the edge- 
stones and sidewalks were put in order. The surface 
removed was cobble-stone paving! The tracks of the 
Albany-street freight railroad were rebuilt, and regraded to 
allow more head room under Broadw r ay bridge than before. 
Four new catch-basins were built and the location of five 
others changed. 

Kemble Street. — From Gerard street westerly 318 feet 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base ; edgestones 
were set and gravel sidewalks built. The surface removed 
was gravel. Contractors, Doherty & O'Leary. 

Market Street. — From Merrimac street to Portland 
street w r as paved with granite blocks on a gravel base ; and 
the edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in order. The 
surface removed was macadam. Contractors, H. Gore & 
Co. 

Maverick Street. — From New street to Border street was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, and the edge- 
stones and brick sidewalks were put in order. The surface 
removed was cobble pavement. Contractors, Doherty & 
O'Leary. 

Mystic Avenue. — From Main street to Boston & Maine 
Railroad bridge was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
base. The edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in 
order. The surface removed was macadam. Contractor, 
P. Brennan. 

New Street, East Boston. — From Maverick street south- 
erly 281 feet was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
base, and the edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in 
order. The surface removed was cobble-stone paving. 
Contractors, Doherty & O'Leary. 

North Hudson Street. — From Hull street to Snow Hill 
street was macadamized. The gutters were paved, edgestones 
were set, and the sidew 7 alks were paved with brick. The 
surface removed was gravel. Contractor, D. N. Payson. 

Park Street, Charlestoion. — From City square to Warren 
street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. The 
street was widened and the work of paving is not quite com- 
plete on account of the unfinished condition of new build- 
ings. The street railroad was regraded. The edgestones 
were reset and brick sidewalks were put in order. Sur- 
face removed was granite-block paving. Contractor, P. 
Brennan. 



Street Department. 63 

Parmenter Street. — From Hanover street to Salem street 
was paved with Trinidad asphalt by the Barber Asphalt 
Company. The concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan 
Construction Company. The former surface was a so-called 
asphalt pavement. The sidewalks were in good condition. 

Rutherford Avenue, Charlestoicn. — From Allen street to 
Cambridge street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
base, and the edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in 
order. The surface removed was macadam. One new catch- 
basin was built. The contractor was John Turner & Co. 

South Eden Street, Charlestown. — From Hancock square 
to Rutherford avenue was paved with granite blocks on a 
gravel base ; the edgestones and brick sidewalks were put 
in order. The surface removed was cobble-stone pavement. 
Contractors, John Turner & Co. 

South Margin Street. — From Pitts street to Prospect 
street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. The 
old cobble-stones were removed by J. J. Sullivan, and 
the work of paving was done by the Street Department. 
The edgestones and brick sidewalks were put in order. Two 
new catch-basins were built. 

Spring Lane. — From Washington street to Devonshire 
street. This lane has been discontinued as a way for teams 
and is used for foot travel only. It was regraded and paved 
with Hastings' compressed asphalt blocks laid on a con- 
crete base. The base was laid by the Metropolitan Con- 
struction Company, and the paving was done by J. Turner 
& Co. The surface removed was a granite paved roadway 
with brick sidewalks. One new catch-basin and one drop 
inlet were built. 

Wesley Street, Charlestown. — From Sullivan street to 
Pearl street was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. 
Edgestones were set and the brick sidewalks were put in 
order. The surface removed was cobble pavement. Con- 
tractor, P. Brennan. 

W. Broadway, South Boston. — From Gardner place 150 
feet easterly was paved with natural rock-asphalt on a con- 
crete base, by H. Gore & Co. The surface removed was 
granite-block pavement. Edgestones were reset and the 
brick sidewalks were put in order. 

The work of properly adapting the grades of street rail- 
roads to the surface of the street has taken much time and 
labor. The success of new pavements depends upon this 
being carefully done, and it cannot be properly done with- 
out also arranging the grades for paving, even if the paving 



64 City Document No. 34. 

is not done at the same time. Grade plans have been pre- 
pared and given to the railroads in the following cases : 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway. 

River Street. — From Hyde Park line to Blue Hill ave- 
nue. 

West End Street Railway. 

Battery Street. — At the North Ferry. 

Boylston Street. — From Arlington to Exeter street. 

Boylston Street. — From W. Chester park to Bothnia 
street. 

Bennington Street. — From Marion to Putnam street. 

Bennington Street. — From Putnam to Chelsea street. 

Broadway Extension. — From Harrison avenue to Lehigh- 
street bridge. 

Beacon Street. — At West Chester park. 

Causeway Street. — At Merrimac square. 

City Square, Charlestown. — Partty built. 

Dartmouth Street. — From Boylston street to Huntington 
avenue. 

East Eighth Street. — From Old Harbor to Hamlin 
street. 

Huntington Avenue. — From north of West Chester park 
to 2,950 feet south of Gainsborough street. 

Lehigh Street. — From Albany to South street. 

Park Street, Charlestown. — From City square to Joiner 
street. 

Scollay Square. 

Washington Street. — From Essex street to Boylston 
square. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

The following miscellaneous work has been done : 

Sewall- Street Extension. — Plans and estimate for retain- 
ing-wall. 

The wall has been built by the Street Department force. 

Hotcell Street, Dorchester. — The filling has been measured 
and two small re taming- walls were constructed. 

Washington Street, West Roxbury. — Plans for a retain- 
ing-w T all, with two sets of entrance steps were made, and the 
construction supervised. 

West Chester Parle. — Bridge over Boston & Albany 
Railroad, and approaches were regraded. (See special re- 
port, p. 45.) 

Bushnell- Street Extension. — Plan for construction made. 

L Street. — Between First street and bridge. A plan for 



Street Department. 65 

a wooden fence on the bulkhead was made, and the work 
supervised. The work was done by the Street Department ; 
also, plans were made for iron fences on two retaining- walls 
on the same street. The iron fence was built by George W. 
McLauthlin & Co., at a cost of $276. 

Congress Street. — From A street to L-street bridge. A 
plan for a plank sidewalk and fence was made. The work 
was begun by the Bridge Division of the Street Department, 
and was unfinished at the close of the working season. 

Athens Street and I Street. — Plans showing condition of 
old so-called asphalt pavement have been made. 

Surveys, plans, and estimates for improving and paving 
the following streets have been made : 

Adams Street, Dorchester. — An estimate of cost of re- 
taining-wall at Cedar Grove cemetery. 

Battery Street. — North Ferry. 

Ruth Street. — East Boston. 

East Street. — South to Federal street. 

Savoy Street. 

Pemberton Square. 

Warren Street, Charlestoivn. — From Winthrop to Soley 
street. 

Vine Street, Charlestown. — From Tufts to Moulton 
street. 

Mason Street. — From Tremont to West street. 

Beacon Street. — From Charlesgate East to Charlesgate 
West. 

E. Ninth Street. — Old Harbor to H street. Surveys, 
plan, and estimate for plank sidewalk and fence were made. 

Dorchester Avenue. — Near Washington street (Dorches- 
ter Lower Mills) . Estimates were made of the cost of build- 
ing two retainino-walls. 

A very large number of preliminary estimates have been 
made for paving and improving streets. 

New Streets. 

In September four contracts were made by the Street 
Department for building streets, under the provisions of 
chapter 323 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1891, as 
amended by chapter 418 of the Acts of 1892, by which the 
entire expense of construction is borne by the abutters. In 
these streets, sewer, gas and water pipes, with house connec- 
tions to the sidewalk, are laid in advance of the street con- 
struction. 

Batavia Street. — About 936 feet long; this street was 



66 City Document No. 34. 

built by James Grant & Co., at a total cost of $7,809.39. 
The itemized prices and quantities are shown on the tabular 
statement accompanying this report. (See Appendix B.) 

Miner /Street. — About 319 feet long, is still incomplete, 
the construction of two retaining-walls delaying the work 
until the winter prevented its completion. The work is sub- 
stantiallycompleted with the exception of rolling and finishing 
the roadway. A retaining-wall was built next to the Brook 
line branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad, attheend of- 
the street, and another against the back yard of a house, 
where the right to slope the filling could not be obtained. 
These walls were built by John Sutherland, and cost 
$1,298.35 and $875.90, respectively. 

Bay Stale Road. — From Raleigh street to Sherborn 
street, 1,389 feet long, and 

Deerfield Street. — From Commonwealth avenue to 
Charles river, 572 feet long, — are still incomplete. The con- 
tractor is James Killian. These two streets have a macadam 
roadway with gravel sidewalks. Batavia and Miner streets 
have a Telford base with brick sidewalks. 

Commonwealth Avenue. — Work has been carried on dur- 
ing the entire year on the construction of Commonwealth 
avenue. The contract for filling one roadway between 
Brookline and Brighton avenues, by the Boston Contracting 
Company, was completed in September, 1893. 

The total amount of filling deposited, under the contract, 
was 161,119 cubic yards. For 46,640 cubic yards of this 
amount, 49^- cents per cubic yard was paid, amounting to 
$23,086.80. Under the modification of the contract, dated 
October 1, 1892, 114,832 cubic yards of filling was delivered 
at 37 cents per cubic .yard, for transportation, loading, and 
unloading, amounting to $42,487.84, the city buying the 
filling directly from the owners of the gravel bank. In July 
the contract was extended to include about 30,000 cubic 
yards of material, to be deposited near Cottage Farm bridge, 
on space that had been acquired by the city since the date of 
the original contract. Including the sum of $7,000 paid the 
contractors, by order of the city government, to reimburse 
them for extraordinary losses on account of displacement of 
material in the hollow near Cottage Farm bridge, the whole 
amount paid to the contractors was $72,444.03. 

In April a contract was made with Robert A. Davis for 
building a section of the Telford foundation of the northerly 
roadway, about 1,500 feet long, between Brookline avenue 
and Granby street. This is a heavy Telford road. The city 
furnished edgestones and granite blocks for gutters. The 
contract did not include furnishing broken stone for the sur- 



Street Department. 67 

face, or the labor upon it. The amount paid under this 
contract was $15,010.37. 

In July a similar contract was made with F. H. Cowin & 
Co. for building the continuation of the same roadway for 
1,700 feet, and within about 300 feet of Cottage Farm 
bridge. The amount paid under this contract was $16,- 
207.07. 

The broken stone for the completion of this road was fur- 
nished by the Massachusetts Broken Stone Company, and 
delivered on the road. Including the construction of the 
very large intersection at the crossing of Commonwealth 
avenue and Beacon street, which was built by the Paving 
Division, the total quantity of stone delivered by the Massa- 
chusetts Broken Stone Company was 9,330 tons. The 
price paid was $1.90 per ton, amounting to $17,728.80. 

Placing and rolling this stone was done by the men and 
steam-rollers of the Paving Division. 

A contract was made in July with John T. Scully for 
building a wooden bulkhead on the northerly side of the 
avenue near Cottage Farm bridge, for the purpose of re- 
taining the filling and in place of an expensive retaining- 
wall. The cost of this work was $850. 

In November a further contract was made with the Boston 
Contracting Company, after public advertisement, for fur- 
nishing and delivering about 65,000 cubic yards of filling on 
the remaining width of the avenue between Brookline avenue 
and St. Paul street. Work was not commenced on this con- 
tract until January 15, 1894, and but a small quanthvy of 
filling was deposited before February 1. The contract price 
is 41 cents per cubic yard, measured in the bank. 

The work done on the avenue during the year may be 
summarized as follows : 

The northerly roadway between Brookline avenue and St. 
Paul street has been filled and the road built as far as Cot- 
tage Farm bridge, and the filling has been commenced for 
the southerly roadway. The design of the avenue provides 
for two roadways, — the northerly one 45 feet wide, the 
southerly one 35 feet wide, with a central loamed space 33 
feet wide. The northerly sidewalk is to be 15 feet wide, 
with a planting space 10 feet wide between the sidewalk 
and the roadway. The southerly sidewalk is 10 feet wide, 
with a planting space 12 feet wide. Gas, water, house 
sewer, surface-water drain, and telegraph poles are all 
placed in the side planting spaces and under the sidewalks. 

When houses are built, they can be connected to any of 
these without breaking up the street. 

During the winter, material for Telford base has been 



68 



Citt Document No. 34. 



accumulated on the ground in readiness for work in 1894, 
and soundings have been made for the construction of the 
bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad at Cottage Farm 
station. 



Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point Channel.) 

All of the floor-beams of the fixed spans on this bridge 
have been strengthened by the addition of hard-pine timber. 
In each of the spans adjoining the draw, a hard-pine truss 
has been erected, to which the floor system has been attached, 
and the spans over Lehigh and Foundry streets have been 
strengthened by hard-pine stringers resting on timber trestles 
in the streets below. This work was done by William L. 
Miller, under a contract dated September 30, 1893. 

The table showing the total length of public streets in 
Boston, and the areas of the various classes of pavement, 
has been corrected to February 1, 1894. 



[Signed] 



William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



Edg-estones and Sidewalks— New Edgestones. (Liu. ft. set.) 



Veab. 


ft 
o 

>> 

5 


H 

S 

O 

P5 


a 

O 
O 

pa 
3 

o 
OQ 


a 

O 
O 

pq 

CS 


M 
ft. 

o 

ft 


3 
.o 
M 
O 

P5 

0) 


a 

o 

pa 


a 
o 

o 

CS 
XI 

O 


"3 
o 




' 1881 . 


6,294 


8,328 


6,304 


443 


13,112 


1,314 


263 


794 


36,852 




1882. 


3,398 


10,930 


4,190 


2,119 


8,235 


5,454 


5,543 


1,595 


41,464 




1883. 


2,763 


7,306 


4,660 


98 


2,467 


4,381 


1,895 




23,570 


H 


1884. 


4,691 


9,733 


6,189 


2,450 


18,310 


4,610 


106 


696 


46,785 


i* 


1885. 


5,291 


4,644 


2,538 


1,333 


4,976 


1,952 


303 


546 


21,583 


z. 


1886. 


5,790 


8,978 


2,463 


349 


11,051 


2,451 


737 


174 


31,993 


HI 


1887. 


3,222 


10,192 


4,269 


436 


5,229 


2,726 


2,055 


223 


28,352 


3 


1888. 


4,359 


5,191 


4,531 


971 


5,051 


580 


867 




21,550 


2 

"5. 


1889 . 


2,946 


13,224 


2,139 


1,419 


6,794 


10,404 


1,845 


573 


39,344 


1890. 


2,781 


11,475 


4,946 


981 


9,882 


3,288 


3,042 


9SS 


37,383 




. 1891 . 


8,236 


22,693 


11,724 


4,131 


18,138 


4,617 


2,032 


2,227 


73,798 


1892. 


9,222 


25,506 


9,631 


11,238 


36,859 


9,970 


9,001 


2,804 


114,231 


" 


1893 . 


1,118 


14,979 


4,375 


1,969 


10,587 


4,795 


3,981 




41,804 


rotal . 


60,111 


153,179 


67,959 


27,937 


150,691 


56,542 


31,670 


10,620 


558,709 



Street Department. 



69 



Brick Sidewalks. (Sq. yds. set.) 



Teak. 


u 
o 
C 
p 

Pu 
>> 

5 


3 

M 
O 


a 

o 

o 
pq 

.g 

3 
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a 
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o 

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3 

P 


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3 

,o 

X 

o 
PS 

1 


a 

o 

5 

M 


3 

is 

O 

O 

C8 
.3 

o 


*3 
o 




r 

1881 . 


5,207 


11,491 


3,961 


893 


337 


1,096 


381 


159 


23,525 




1882. 


5,905 


7,510 


4,984 


1,658 


179 


1,834 


117 


887 


23,074 




1883. 


4,392 


7,675 


4,794 


1,095 


2,795 


3,354 




177 


24,282 




1884. 


4,870 


7,279 


4,437 


1,616 


4,902 


954 


• . . . 


739 


24,797 


— 


1885. 


4,756 


3,896 


1,473 


722 


892 


479 


46 


342 


12,606 


1886. 


5,273 


5,285 


2,112 


1,002 


2,843 




58 


527 


17,100 


53 


1887. 


5,970 


7,693 


3,768 


1,500 


1,348 


643 




56 


20,978 


a 
3 


1888. 


2,540 


6,910 


3,164 


1,110 


614 


346 




75 


14,759 


"3 


1889. 


4,835 


10,489 


1,942 


1,362 


63S 


124 


138 




19,528 




1890. 


4,913 


7,651 


1,915 


1,947 


1,155 


274 


900 


791 


19,546 


1891. 


3,881 


9,098 


3,628 


2,176 


1,478 


967 


377 


120 


21,725 


1892. 


10,423 


20,231 


4,484 


12,847 


10,462 


2,905 


1,068 


3,451 


65,871 


1893. 


964 
63,929 


5,912 


751 


2,197 


2,412 


350 




175 


12,761 


1 


rotal . 


111,120 


41,413 


30,125 


30,055 


13,326 


3,085 


7,499 


300,267 



The laying of edgestones and sidewalks from 1881 to 1891 
was done under the laws of 1872. 

Chapter 50 of the Acts and Resolves of that year provided 
that "... the Mayor and Aldermen or Selectmen or 
Road Commissioners may establish and grade sidewalks in 
such streets as, in their judgment, the public convenience 
may require, and may assess the abutter on such side- 
walks one-half of the expense of the same. All assessments 
so made shall be a lien upon the abutting lands, and be col- 
lected in the same manner as taxes on real estate." 

The Mayor and Aldermen or the Selectmen 
or Road Commissioners may grade and construct sidewalks 
and complete partially constructed sidewalks in any street as 
the public convenience may require, with or without edge- 
stone, and may cover the same with brick, flat stones, con- 
crete, gravel, or other appropriate material, and may assess 
not exceeding one-half of the expense proportionally upon 
the abutters on such sidewalks. . . . " 

The cost to the city of Boston of laying the edgestones 
and brick sidewalks, shown in the foregoing table, from 1881 
to 1891, was $581,230.21. 



70 City Document No. 34. 

Of this amount the sum of $277,698.88 was assessed on 
the abutters. 

Of this sum of $277,698.88 the sum of $10,810.48 was 
abated by order of the Board of Aldermen, and the balance 
($266,888.40) was paid into the city treasury. 

The entire half cost of this work ($290,615.10) was not 
assessed, for the reason that it was a common practice for 
individuals to furnish the materials for the sidewalk, such as 
brick and edgestones, whereupon the department laid the 
same at no expense and with no assessment to the individual, 
on the theory that the furnishing of the materials offset the 
assessment of one-half of the total cost which would have 
been made, provided the department furnished both the labor 
and materials. The cost of the labor which entered into the 
laying of the edgestone and sidewalks laid in this manner 
( where the abutters furnished the materials) is included in 
the total cost ; whereas the half assessment was only made 
on the edgestone and sidewalks where the department fur- 
nished both labor and materials. 

This law, while it had the effect of obliging the abutter on 
the sidewalk to pay only one-half the cost of the work, and 
was therefore favorable to him in that respect, provided no 
special appropriation from which could be defrayed the pro- 
portion of the expense which the city of Boston was obliged 
to assume. 

The cost of this work came out of the so-called regular 
maintenance appropriation of the Street Department, or else 
out of such special loans for street improvements as were 
made from time to time by the city government. 

On account of the limited amount of money which could be 
spared for the purpose of laying edgestones and constructing 
sidewalks from the maintenance appropriation of the Street 
Department, the practical effect of the old law was that 
hundreds of unsatisfied petitions for the construction of side- 
walks were on file in the office of the Superintendent of 
Streets, and these petitions remained on file sometimes for 
several years before they were granted. 

To provide a remedy for this state of affairs and enable all 
applications to be promptly attended to, the present admin- 
istration interested itself in the Massachusetts Legislature 
to obtain the passage of the following act : 

[CHAP. 401 OF THE ACTS OF 1892.] 

An Act relating to sidewalks in the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston may pass 
an order that the superintendent of streets of said city may make a 



Street Department. 71 

sidewalk along any highway or part thereof in said city, specifying; in 
the order the locations, heights, widths, and materials for the sidewalks, 
and said superintendent shall carry out such order. 

Sect. 2. Any expenses incurred for any work so ordered and per- 
formed shall be paid out of the moneys appropriated under the pro- 
visions of section one of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and shall be repaid to 
said city as the assessable cost of the work by the owners of the several 
parcels of land bordering on the part of the highway along which the 
sidewalk is made ; provided, hoivever, that if any such parcel is devoted 
to public use, said city may assume and pay the whole or part of the 
amount assessed thereto, if said city shall deem proper so to do. 

Sect. 3. Said superintendent shall so apportion the said assessable 
cost to the parcels of land aforesaid that the amount apportioned to each 
parcel shall bear to the total assessable cost the propoi'tion which the 
number of lineal feet of each parcel on said highway bears to the num- 
ber of such lineal feet of all such parcels, and a lien shall attach to the 
parcel and to any buildings which may be thereon for such amount, as 
a part of the tax on such parcel. Said superintendent shall give notice 
of the amount of every such assessment to the owner of the estate as- 
sessed therefor, forthwith after the amount has been determined. 

Sect. 4. The provisions of sections sixteen, seventeen, and eighteen 
of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-one and acts in amendment thereof shall, 
so far as applicable, apply to all assessments made under this act. 

Sect. 5. Sidewalks in said city shall hereafter be made and paid for 
only in accordance with the provisions of this act, the provisions of 
chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-one, and acts in amendment thereof. 

Sect. 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 16, 1892. 

Section 2 of the foregoing act provides that the expense 
shall be defrayed out of money appropriated under the pro- 
vision of Section 1 of Chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, as 
amended by Chapter 418 of the Acts of 1892, commonly 
known as the " Laying Out and Constructing of Highways " 
act, which is as follows : 

CHAP. 323 OF THE ACTS OF 1891, AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 
418 OF THE ACTS OF 1892. 

An Act relating to the location, laying out, and construction 
of the highways in the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows ; 

Section 1. The city of Boston shall annually, by ordinary vote, ap- 
propriate money sufficient to meet the salaries and expenses incurred 
under sections four, five, and six of this act, and any deficiencies of in- 
terest and sinking-fund requirements to be paid by the treasurer of the 
city of Boston from the appropriation herein specified, as provided in 
section eighteen, and may by such vote appropriate one or more addi- 
tional amounts in gross for carrying out the other provisions of this act; 
the money so appropriated shall be obtained from the sales of the bonds 
and certificates provided for in section two, and shall constitute; an appro- 
priation for the purposes of this act; the total of all amounts so ap- 
propriated in any one year shall not exceed one million dollars, nor 
shall the total amount of all such bonds and certificates outstanding; 



72 City Document No. 34. 

ever be more than three million dollars in excess of the sinking-funds 
established for the payment of said debt. 

Under this act an annual appropriation of not more than 
one million dollars ($1,000,000) could be made by the city 
of Boston for the purpose of laying out and constructing of 
highways, the constructing of sidewalks, and the construct- 
ing of sewers. 

This appropriation was not considered in the determina- 
tion of the authorized limit of indebtedness of the city, and 
could therefore be made annually by ordinary vote. The 
practical effect of this law was to provide a large sum of 
money available for the purposes of sidewalk construction, 
so that all petitions for this work in the future could be 
promptly satisfied. The effect of it is plainly visible in the 
table on page 68, showing the greatly increased amount of 
work done in 1892. 

The change in the law by which the abutters, instead of 
defraying one-half of the cost of the work, were obliged to 
defray the whole cost, created some dissatisfaction. This 
dissatisfaction arose largely from the fact that the citizens of 
Boston up to the year 1892 obtained street, sidewalk, and 
sewer improvements largely at the expense of the general 
tax-levy. 

In no other city in this country is such a method pursued. 
In many cities the whole expense of the paving of a street, 
the expense of building a sidewalk, and the expense of the 
sewer is charged directly on the abutting property. In 
other cities a proportion varying from one-half to three- 
quarters of the entire expense is charged to the abutters. 
This method permits these cities to do enormous amounts of 
paving, sewer, and sidewalk work, the expense of which is 
not defrayed from money raised by general tax, but is as- 
sessed directly on the abutters. In some cases, where all the 
work is done by contract, the contractor is paid by certifi- 
cates issued as a bill against the abutting property, and he 
is obliged to collect his money directly from the owners. 

The previous law concerning the payment by the city of a 
large proportion of the expense of sewers and sidewalks has 
had the effect of retarding public improvements of this 
character, and it was only under the laws of 1892 that im- 
provements of this character could be carried out as fast as 
they were demanded. 

Notwithstanding that the law of 1892 was satisfactory, in- 
asmuch as improvements in the nature of sidewalks could 
be carried out as fast as demanded by the public, a rural 
legislator representing that portion of the community who 



Street Department. 73 

believe that all work on streets, sewers, and sidewalks 
should be conducted largely at the expense of the general 
tax-levy, succeeded in getting the law of 1892 repealed and 
a new law passed. 

This law is as follows : 

[CHAP. 437 OF THE ACTS OF 1893.] 
An Act in relation to sidewalks in the city of boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The board of mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston 
may grade and construct sidewalks, and complete any partially con- 
structed sidewalk in any street of such city as the public convenience 
may require, with or without edgestones, as said board shall deem ex- 
pedient, and may cover the same with brick, flat stones, concrete, gravel, 
or other appropriate material, and may assess upon the abutters on such 
sidewalks in just pi - oportions, not exceeding one-half of the expense of 
the same ; but all assessments so made shall constitute a lien upon the 
abutting land, and be collected in the same manner as taxes on real 
estate are now collected; and such sidewalks, when constructed with 
edgestones and covered with brick, flat stones, or concrete, shall after- 
wards be maintained at the expense of such city. When any such side- 
walk shall be permanently constructed with edgestones and covered with 
brick, flat stones, or concrete, as aforesaid, there shall be deducted from 
the assessment therefor any sum which shall have been previously as- 
sessed ivpon the abutting premises and paid to the city for the expense 
of the construction of the same in any other manner than with edgestones 
and with brick, flat stones, or concrete as aforesaid; and such deduction 
shall be made pro rata and in just proportions from the assessments 
upon different abutters who at the time of such assessments are owners 
of the estate which at the time of such former assessments was the 
estate of the abutters who had previously paid such former assess- 
ments. 

Sect. 2. In estimating the damage sustained by any party by the 
construction of sidewalks as aforesaid there shall be alloAved by way of 
set-off the benefit, if any, to the property of the party by reason thei'eof. 

Sect. 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act are 
hereby repealed. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
June 9, 1893.2 

The practical effect of this law is to stop all sidewalk and 
edgestone improvements. In the law of 1892 it was speci- 
fied that the cost of this work (which was on the completion 
of the work charged to the abutters and therefore returned 
to the city treasury) should be originally paid from the 
appropriation of Si, 000, 000 which could be annually made 
under Chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891 as amended by 
Chapter 418 of the Acts of 1892 (previously quoted). 

In the 1893 law no provision whatever has been made for 
;in appropriation from which the cost of edgestones and side- 
walks can be made, and construction will therefore cease 
until such time as a proper law is passed similar to the one 
of L892. 



74: City Document No. 34. 

The work done during the year 1893 under the 1893 law 
has been done in the districts where specific loans were 
available for street improvements. 

It is interesting to observe the effect that liberal laws con- 
cerning the construction of sidewalks have on the carrying 
out of public improvements of this character. As an ex- 
ample of such laws the following ordinance of the city of 
Philadelphia is quoted : 

The ordinance passed February 11, 1889, 

Provides whenever in the judgment of the Director of the Department 
of Public Works, the footways or sidewalks of any public streets in the 
city of Philadelphia shall require to be graded, paved, repaved or re- 
paired, or the curbstones thereof to be set or reset, or it shall be necessary 
to reset curbstones in accordance with the ordinances relating to the 
laying of improved pavements in the cartways of public streets, it shall 
be the duty of the Director of the Department of Public Works, and he 
is hereby authorized, to give written notice to the owner or owners of 
the property adjoining which any of such work is required to be done, 
to do such work at their own cost or expense within thirty days from the 
date of such notice, and on the failure of any such owner or owners to 
comply with such notice within the time specified therein, it shall be the 
duty of the Director of the Department of Public Works, and he is 
hereby authorized, to cause the necessary work to be done under the 
contract entered into in accordance with the provisions of this ordi- 
nance. 

Sect. 3 Upon the completion of any work done under the contract 
entered into by virtue of this ordinance, it shall be the duty of the 
Director of the Department of Public Works, and he is hereby au- 
thorized, to estimate the cost and expense thereof, in accordance with the 
provisions of the contract therefor, and to assess such cost and expense 
against the property adjoining which the work is done, in the name of 
the registered owner or owners thereof, and the said Director shall then 
cause bills for said work to be made out in duplicate against each 
property, one copy of which shall be served on the registered owner or 
owners of such property, or in case he or they cannot be found, the 
same shall be left upon the premises, and the other copy of the said bill 
shall be endorsed by the Director of the Department of Public Works, 
in favor of the contractor or contractors, and be delivered to him or them 
in lieu of cash as provided in the first section of this ordinance, and if 
the same be not paid within thirty days from the service thereof upon 
the owner or owners of the property, a lien therefor, together with the 
penalty of ten per cent, for non-payment, may be tiled in the proper 
court against the respective properties, and the registered owner or 
owners thereof, in the name of the city to the use and at the expense of 
the contractor, who may in the name of the city, but at his own expense, 
take all necessary legal proceedings for the enforcement of said lien, 
and also employ all other legal remedies for the collection of said claim 
together with the penalty aforesaid, to which the city may be compe- 
tent. 

From this ordinance it will be seen that property owners 
are liable for the entire cost of construction and maintenance 
of the curbing and footway paving. The property owner is 
notified to curb and pave, or reset curb, and repave footways 
in front of property owned by him. In case of neglect to 



Street Department. 



75 



do so within thirty days from date of service of notice, the 
city contractor is directed to do the work according to the 
specifications prepared by the Department of Public Works. 
The laws concerning the construction of sidewalks in Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, and other large cities in this country are 
similar to the above-quoted law, and the following table is 
given to show the results obtained under the laws governing 
this question in Boston and those in force in the other cities 
of this country : 




From comparing the above table with table on page 69, 
it is seen that the city of Philadelphia laid more square 
yards of sidewalk in 1893 than the city of Boston laid in 
the twenty-two years prior to 1892. 

The sidewalk was also of better material and was much 
more expensive, as an ordinary brick sidewalk costs approxi- 
mately $1.25 per square yard, whereas a granolithic or con- 
crete sidewalk costs about $2 per square yard. 



Street Openings. 

Sixteen thousand five hundred and nineteen permits were 
granted during the past year to open streets. The excava- 
tions made under these permits aggregate 222.9 miles in 
length, and show the extent of this work. 

The Street Department has been accustomed to grant to 
the various gas and other companies, whose work would in 
certain cases admit of no delay, a so-called K emergency per- 
mit," which allowed excavations to be made without special 
permission being obtained, the only requirement being that 
a daily return of openings made under this form of permit 
should be forwarded to the office of the Superintendent. 

Two thousand one hundred and ninety-nine openings of 
an average length of six feet each were made under " emer- 
gency permits," for breaks in water and gas pipes which 



76 City Document No. 34. 

were alleged to require immediate attention. These open- 
ings were made under 79 permits. 

In addition to the above permits, various other permits 
have been issued to pedlers, mechanics, and others, for dif- 
ferent purposes, 10,251 in number, making the total number 
of permits issued 26,928. 

It may here properly be mentioned that real-estate owners 
are extremely careless in providing sewer and water connec- 
tions for their several buildings, both old and new, in streets 
that are advertised to be improved and regulated, and fre- 
quently call for a permit to open for gas, water, or sewer 
connections soon after the department has put down a per- 
manent pavement. It is believed that this trouble will 
remedy itself in time, as the public is gradually finding out 
the difficulty of obtaining permits where the department has 
recently done work. 

The enforcement of the new ordinances of 1892 and the 
new regulations in regard to hawkers and pedlers in the 
retail district, as incorporated in the permits issued last year, 
has resulted in freeing the retail district of what has been 
considered the greatest of nuisances to pedestrians and the 
public generally, who formerly were besieged at every step 
to stop and trade on the street, thus blocking off travel in 
either direction and leading to much confusion and annoy- 
ance. 

In general it has served to open up the sidewalks to the 
use of the travelling public, for whom they were originally 
made, while at the same time the restrictions are such as to 
give the abutting merchants a proper use of their immediate 
sidewalk as far as necessary for the proper conduct of their 
business. 



Street Department. 77 



STEEET-W A TERING. 



The work of street- watering has been carried out during 
the year on the same general method that was laid down the 
year previous. 

The watering of paved streets at the city's expense was 
entirely discontinued, and the appropriation of $100,000 
devoted to the watering of macadamized streets only. About 
29^ miles of paved streets were watered by contractors at 
the expense of the abutters, who seem to be willing to pay 
for the continuance of this work. 

While the department has no special objection to con- 
tractors watering paved streets at the expense of the abutters, 
it is found that frequently a nuisance is created. The con- 
tractors are unable to collect their money from subscribers 
until the end of the watering season, and if any complaint 
has been made on account of dust, there is frequently a dis- 
pute concerning the payment of the stipulated amount. The 
contractors are, therefore, very careful to avoid this trouble, 
and prefer to deluge the streets with water, so that no possi- 
ble dispute can arise concerning the payment of their bills. 

In this way the streets are kept wet and greasy, and it be- 
comes difficult to clean them. To remedy this trouble the 
department prohibited the watering of paved streets after 
4 P.M., so that they might have a chance to dry out prepara- 
tory to the night sweeping. 

As the privilege of being allowed to water paved streets 
at the expense of abutters is undoubtedly a valuable one to 
the contractor in many sections of the city, all contractors 
who obtain this privilege will be obliged, during the coming 
year, to agree to water, free of cost to the city, all macad- 
amized streets within their districts. 

This order will result in the watering of about five miles 
of macadamized streets at no expense to the city. 

This method seems preferable to the one adopted in New 
York, where the privilege of watering paved streets is sold by 
the city to contractors. 

During the past year the macadamized streets of the South 
End and Back Bay districts were watered by contract at the 
city's expense. All other watering of macadamized streets 
has been done by carts hired by the day. A gratifying in- 
crease in efficiency has been obtained over the work done 
the previous year, as will be seen by an inspection of the 
table on page 79. 



78 



City Document No. 34. 



This is partly attributable to better organization and super- 
vision, and partly to improved equipment. 

A large number of new water-posts have been erected 
during the year, and, as a result, carts do not have to waste 
time in travelling long distances to obtain fresh supplies of 
water, and therefore cover more distance while eno;ao;ed in 
actual watering. 

Owing to regulations made last year, the old-style cart 
with copper sprinkler has been about done away with, and 
the carts now in use by the department are of modern man- 
ufacture. 

The following table shows the changes that have been 
effected in the style of hired water-carts in use during the 
past two years : 



1892. 
1893. 



Old Copper. 



61 
2 



Studebaker, 



4 

45 



Abbott Downins 



16 
33 



Potter Patent. 



27 
14 



108 
94 



Considering the fact that contractors are only sure of one 
season's work, and that a possible change of administration 
may result in their carts lying idle for an unknown length 
of time, the change from old-fashioned carts to new ones 
was effected with considerable reluctance. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced, as in former years, 
in watering streets both in early spring and late fall while 
the thermometer was below freezing. It is impossible to 
keep the water permanently turned on in the water-posts, 
until such time as there is no possibility of the temperature 
dropping below the freezing point. This necessitates the 
shutting off of the water-supply every night, and consequent 
delay in turning the supply on in the morning, with the result 
that during March, April, and November it is impossible to 
keep the streets continuously watered. 

The watering season of 1893 lasted the unusual length of 
195 working days, watering being commenced on the 19th 
day of March. 

On April 9th, 200 water-valves were frozen and burst, 
owing to a sudden fall in temperature. 

The following table gives a summary of the work done by 
teams hired by the day and teams owned by the city, classi- 
fied by districts, with the number of miles covered in each 
district : 



Street Department. 



79 



Summary of Day Work paid for by the City. 



No. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



District. 



So. Boston. . . 
East Boston. . 
Charlestown . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. 
Roxbury 
South Yard 
Back Bay . . 
North Yard 
Beacon Hill . . 



Total .. 



Number of teams 
hired by the day. 



9 

7 

7 

11 

15 

16 

18 

1 

2 



Number of teams 
owned by city. 



Number of 
miles covered. 



21.50 

16.50 

15.00 

31.25 

58.07 

51.10 

52.72 

2.08 

3.55 

1.64 

4.04 



257.45 



This summary shows that eighty-eight (88) carts hired by 
the day and six (6) carts owned by the city have watered 
257.45 miles of streets this year, as compared with 230.12 
miles of streets watered with eighty-seven (87) carts last 
year. 

The expense of this work was borne entirely by the city. 
The cost of day work and city work, exclusive of super- 
vision, was $298 per mile, or $76,725. 

These carts averaged about 2.74 miles per day, as against 
2.64 last year. Watering was beiran on the nineteenth of 
March, and continued up to December 1 in some districts. 
As the watering covered a longer period this year than last, 
the expense was slightly more per mile, although greater 
efficiency was obtained. 

The West Roxbury carts averaged 3.42 miles per day; 
the Dorchester carts averaged 3.00 miles per day ; the Back 
Bay carts averaged 1.78 miles per day. 



80 



City Document No. 34. 



1893. 
Summary of Contract Work paid for by the City 



Districts. 


Contractors. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


Cost. 


Back Bay 

South End 


M. E. Nawn 


9 
4 


12.49550 
9.36891 


$6,947 27 


0. Nute & Son 


* 4,764 13 


Totals 




13 


21.86441 


$11,711 40 









* $280 additional is yet to be paid to the contractor. 

This summary shows that thirteen (13) carts were used by 
the contractors to water 21.86441 miles, of which 5.938 
miles were watered with salt water, and 15.924 miles were 
watered with fresh water, paid for entirely by the city. 
The amount of money paid out for contract work was about 
$5,100 less than for the same work last year. 

The contract price in Back Bay was $890 per mile for salt 
water, and $575 per mile for fresh water. The contract 
price in South End was $630 per mile for salt water, and 
$460 per mile for fresh water. 

These prices are much lower than the prices obtained the 
year previous, and cannot be reduced to any great extent 
and allow a profit to the contractor. As the contract runs 
for two years, the city will have the benefit of these prices 
during the coming year. 

1893. 

Work done by Contractors at the Expense of the 
Abutters. 



DlSTEICT. 


Contractors. 


Carts. 


Miles. 






3 

5 

5 

Oh 

3 

Oh 

1 


3.67 




Proctor Bros. & Billings . . 
O. Nute & Son 


8.75 




7.25 
1.50 


Roxbury and South Boston, 


H. P. Cook & Co 


6.51 
0.50 






1.25 










18 


29.43 









Street Department. 



The expense of the watering of these streets was borne 
entirely by the abutters. This table shows that with 
eighteen (18) carts these contractors watered 29.43 miles of 
paved streets in the City Proper, South Boston, East Bos- 
ton, and Boxbury. About 2,300 feet of asphalt on Columbus 
avenue and West Newton street was also watered at the 
expense of the abutters. 

1893. 

Summary of Work clone, which was paid for by the City. 



No. 


District. 


Miles, day work. 


Miles, contract work. 


Total miles. 


1 


South Boston. . . 

East Boston 

Charlestown . . . 


21.50 
16.50 
15.00 
31.25 




21 50 


2 




16 50 


3 




15 00 


4 




31.25 


5 


West Itoxbury. . 


58.07 




58.07 


6 




51.10 




51.10 


7 


South Yard 


52.72 




52.72 


8 


2.08 


9.36 


11.44 


9 




3.55 


12.49 


16 04 


10 


North Yard 


5.68 




5 68 










Totals 


257.45 

or about 

3,398,357 sq. yds. 


21.85 

or about 

478,891 sq. yds. 


279.30 



Cost of day and city work, exclusive of supervision, 
$298 per mile. 

Cost of contract work, exclusive of supervision, $535.64 
per mile. 

The extra cost of the contract work is accounted for by 
the fact that this work is done in districts having a great 
amount of travel ; the streets are also wide and mostly un- 
shaded, so that a cart is obliged to water the streets more 
frequently than in other districts. 

Total cost of contract, day, and city work, $88,436.40. 

The above expense is the cost exclusive of supervision, 
new carts, water-posts, etc. Water was furnished by Boston 
Water Works at no expense. 



82 



City Document No. 34. 



1893. 

Distribution of Carts, showing- the Entire Amount of 
Work done. 



No. 


District. 


City carts. 


Hired carts. 


Contractor's 
carts. 


Total. 


Miles. 


1 


South Boston . . 




9 

7 

7 

11 

15 

18 
5 


1 

Oh 


10 

74 

7 
13 
17 
17 
21 
324 


23.25 


2 

3 


East Boston. . . 
Charlestown . . . 




17.00 
15.00 


4 


Brighton 

W. Roxbury . . . 


2 
2 
1 




31.25 


5 




58.07 


6 




51.10 


7 


3 

264 


58.73 


8 


City Proper .... 


1 


54.33 




Totals 


6 


88 


31 


125 


308.73 









Street Department. 



83 



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City Document No. 34. 



The following table shows the amount expended in street- 
watering, by the city, for the last sixteen years : 



1878 


. $23,595 02 


1886 


$44,940 35 


1879 


. 26,747 18 


1887 


51,365 73 


1880 


. 33,306 95 


1888 


40,586 58 


1881 


. 36,178 24 


1889 


47,837 46 


1882 


. 45,797 00 


1890 


57,967 34 


1883 


. 53,502 29 


1891 


104,263 62 


1884 


. 34,518 47 


1892 


94,507 80 


1885 


. 43,854 68 


1893 


99,430 16 



Water-Posts. 

In order to improve the service this year, 23 new water- 
posts were erected in different localities. Nine water-posts 
were changed for various causes, mostly on account of new 
streets and new buildings being built where the pipes were 
formerly located. 

The following table shows their location by district : 



District. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


Increase 
over 
1892. 




23 
16 
19 
25 
50 
61 
53 
24 


25 
23 
19 
39 
59 
72 
60 
42 


27 

28 
20 
42 
60 
75 
65 
45 


2 
5 




1 




3 
1 
3 

5 
3 


Total 


271 


339 


362 


23 



Great assistance has been rendered in the work of street- 
watering by the Boston Water Board in promptly furnishing 
new water-posts, turning on or shutting off water, and in 
many other ways. 

Income. 

The Street Department during the year watered streets in 
front of 106 public schools, 13 police-stations, and 31 engine- 
houses, and received the following sums for this work : 



Street Department. 85 

Police-stations .... $192 57 

Engine-houses . . . . 411 95 

Louisburg square . . . 100 00 



Total $704 52 

Owing to lack of appropriation, the School Board were 
unwilling to pay for the watering of streets in front of 
school-houses, and the Street Department lost the usual 
income from this source, amounting to about $2,500. 

Louisburg square (a private way) was watered by the 
department as in former years at an expense to the abutters 
of $100. 

In the report for 1892 it was stated that " a close inspec- 
tion of the results accomplished this year (1892) with those 
of last year shows that the cost of the work done by the 
city had decreased, and that the distances covered per day 
with each team employed by the city has shown an increase. 
This is the natural result of better organization and super- 
vision, and an increase in economy and efficiency may be 
confidently looked for during the year 1893." 

This prediction has been realized, and it is believed that 
the close study which has been given to the subject of street- 
Avatering by the department, for the last three years, has 
resulted in a large financial saving to the city. 

The cost per mile of streets watered shows that great 
economy has been attained, and the results compare favorably 
with those attained by any city in the country. 



86 



City Document No. 34. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 



The work of the Sanitary Division includes the removal 
of house offal and the removal of house and store dirt and 
ashes. 

The following table shows the number of loads of offal 
collected and removed in the last ten (10) years : 



Amount or House Offal 



Tear. 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 1 

1892 

1893 



Removed. 

No. of 

28 
31 
33 
36 
37 
40 
40 
46 
46 
51 



Loads. 

,520 
,206 
,170 

,724 
,409 
,183 
,5-25 
,742 
,343 
,415 



Each load of offal is equivalent to fifty-seven (57) cubic 
feet, and weighs one and one-half (1^) tons. 

The above table does not include previous to the year 
1893 the amount collected by contract in East Boston and 
Brighton, which amounted to about 5,100 loads per year. 
Of the amount (51,415 loads) collected during the year 
1893, 3,744 loads were collected by the East Boston con- 
tractor, and 1,395 loads were collected by the Brighton con- 
tractor, leaving 46,276 loads collected by city teams. 

The collection of this material is attended to in winter by 
an average regular force of 62 city offal carts and 175 men, 
and on contract work 8 offal carts and 16 men ; making a 
total of 70 offal carts and 191 men. At different times, and 
especially in summer, an extra force of 21 teams and 42 men 
are employed. 

Complaints received concerning the failure of the division 
to promptly remove offal usually show on investigation that 
either the offal has not been properly separated from ashes 
or other house refuse, as is insisted on in this city, or else 
that the receptacles were deposited in some inaccessible 
place. If householders would see that the employees have 
easy access to the receptacles, and that the men are not 

1 From January 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892, or 13 mouths. 



Street Department. 



87 



unnecessarily delayed in this work, the service would be 
greatly facilitated. The blocking of yards and alleys with 
snow invariably leads to complaints, as this necessitates 
either the removal of offal through the residences, or neglect 
till the alleys are passable. 

The .disposal has been made during the year in the manner 
described in last year's report, viz. : The offal from the 
markets, and offal that is decayed, is put on board a scow 
and towed to sea ; the offal of Charlestown is taken to the 
yard at Maiden bridge and then disposed of to farmers ; the 
offal of East Boston is collected by contractors, and is re- 
moved to Eevere ; the offal of the City Proper, South 
Boston, and Dorchester is conveyed to the yard at the 
South End, and disposed of to farmers, who remove it 
daily ; the offal of Roxbury and West Roxbury is conveyed 
to the yard on Highland street, and disposed of to farmers ; 
and the offal of Brighton is collected by contract, and dis- 
posed of outside of the district. 

For three years this subject has been agitated in the 
public press, but no change has been inaugurated in the 
method of disposal, although the sale of offal to farmers, 
who feed it to pigs which are afterwards brought to market 
in this city, has been severely condemned. 

The effect of the agitation that has been going on for the 
past three years is plainly visible in the receipts of the 
department for the sale of offal, which have fallen off in a 
marked degree. 

Collection and Disposal of Offal. 



Year. 


Total amount 
collected. 


Amount sold. 


Amount dumped 

on scow and 

towed to sea or 

wasted. 


Percent, wasted 

to total 

collection. 


Amount of re- 
ceipts from 
sales. 


18911 
1892 
1893 2 


i 42,616 loads. 
46,343 " 
46,276 " 


40,492 loads. 
30,773 " 
30,824 " 


2,124 loads. 
15,570 " 
15,363 " 


5 per cent. 
33 " " 
30 " " 


$30,672 65 
21,282 82 
20,790 03 



This falling off in receipts is accounted for by the fact 
that the Boards of Health of many suburban towns have 
prohibited the carrying on of piggeries within the town 
limits. Many farmers have therefore been obliged to dis- 

1 Twelve months. Above table does not include contracts in Bust Boston and Brighton. 

2 In Kast Huston, 3,744 loads; Brighton, 1,895 loads; total, 5,139 loads, collected during 
1893, are not included in above table. For 1891 and 1892 East Boston and Brighton wero 
estimated at 5,101) loads. 



88 City Document No. 34. 

continue the raising of pigs, and the market for the city's 
offal is becoming more and more restricted. 

It is probable that the practice of selling offal for food 
purposes will be prohibited by the Legislature duiing the 
coming year, and that a radical change in the method of 
getting rid of this material must be inaugurated by the 
city. * 

The method of disposal at sea of part of the city's offal 
has been successfully carried out during the past year, and 
will be continued unless the city government makes pro- 
vision for some sanitary method of disposal by cremation or 
utilization. It is possible, even in this event, that a certain 
amount of offal will be towed to sea, owing to the cheapness 
of this method. 

The position of dumping-stations is shown on the chart. 

A complete description of all the utilization and crema- 
tion processes in use in this country was made in last year's 
report. This report, taken in connection with that of the 
committee for the disposal of offal, which made an ex- 
tended tour throughout the country, and rendered an elab- 
orate report (City Document No. 91, 1893), gives valuable 
information on this subject. The only new utilization pro- 
cess brought to notice during the year is the process of the 
New England Construction Company, a description of which 
follows : 

The New England Construction Company. 

Process. 

The patented process owned by this company consists in reducing 
house offal to its component parts in a manner which is perfectly sani- 
tary and free from noxious or deleterious odors. 

Plant. 

The plant consists of a stack of steel digestors holding from five to 
ten tons each, built in a steel frame-work, and arranged in a triangle 
or pentagon, a closed receiving-tank, settling vats for grease, presses, 
driers, and grinders. 

Operation. 

The offal when received is hoisted to a large hopper, central to 
the stack, from which a pipe leads to the mouth of the digestors. The 
garbage passes through the hopper into a digestor, and when the 
digestor is filled, the orifice is closed, and steam at a temperature of 
300 degrees or more is introduced. The jets of steam are so arranged 
that the whole mass is subjected to its influence, and all germs and 
bacteria are immediately destroyed. At the same time, the passage of 
the steam reduces the mass into its component parts, which are animal 
and vegetable matter. The product of the animal matter is oil, which 
is carried to the settling vats, and ammonia and phosphates, which are 
held in suspension in the tankage. The vegetable matter is reduced 




si 






Street Department. 89 

by this process to 20 per cent, of its original volume, and is drawn off 
as tankage into receiving-tanks. 

The steam which enters carries off all the gases which result from 
reduction, into a condenser, where they are condensed into clean water, 
which is allowed to flow off. The tankage in the receiving-tank is 
racked and placed in presses, then carried to the drier and then to the 
grinder, after which it is ready for shipment. During the processes 
of drying and grinding, ail steam and odors arising from the operation 
are carried off by an exhaust into a separate condenser. The raw ma- 
terial of one day is l'eady for shipment the next day, as a finished 
product. 

Construction. 

The entire construction of stack is of steel, the building is of iron, 
and the flooring of slate and iron, making an absolutely fire-proof con- 
struction. 

The above process was thoroughly investigated during the 
year at Washington, D.C., where it had been in use, and 
also at Wakefield, Mass., where an experimental station has 
been erected by the company. 

The process is a sanitary one, and is well adapted for use 
in cities of over 35,000 inhabitants. There can be no objec- 
tion to the erection of a plant of this description in the city 
proper, as the process is entirely unobjectionable. 

It can only be a question of a very short time when the 
city of Boston must adopt some such plant as that of the 
New England Construction Company for the purpose of 
treating its offal. 

Cremation of Offal. 

In last year's report it was mentioned that the Brown De- 
veloping Company, or more correctly "The American Gar- 
bage Cremator Company," erected (at their own expense) 
an experimental furnace at the division yard on Albany 
street, and were conducting experiments, under the supervi- 
sion of the Street Department, with a view of ascertaining the 
exact cost of burn ing offal . 

The process is one of cremation, and no attempt is made to 
extract any of the valuable constituents of the offal. 

A brief description of their furnace, as given by the 
inventor, is as follows : 

The Brown Crematory. 

The Brown Crematory of standard size is 43 feet in length, with an 
inside width across the grate of 9i feet. It stands aboul 9 feet high. 
It is constructed with thick walls of fire-brick. This fire- brick, further- 
more, is glazed on its inner surface with boracic acid, a preparation 
which protects the brick from the action of all aqueous gases, and keeps 
it from disintegrating under the influence of the great heat. Surround- 
ing the furnace on the outside is a water-jacket, in which water is con- 
stantly moving. This preserves the exterior of the furnace at an even 



90 City Document No. 34. 

temperature ; it keeps the bi'ick annealed, and greatly retards any ten- 
dency to disintegration. It is a well-known fact that furnaces supplied 
with this water-jacket have been known to endure in active service for 
many years. 

Combustion. 

At one end of the furnace, near the top, is situated the combustion 
chamber, into which enters the burner. This burner or gas generator 
consists of a cylinder composed of three concentric pipes. The inner- 
most of these pipes contains steam, the second pipe crude petroleum, 
while the third pipe contains mixed gases, which have been drawn out 
from the combustion chamber itself and which are now returned to it. 
These three pipes, emptying their contents at the same time, have this 
effect: the steam converts the oil to gas, and this gas in turn mingles 
with the gases of the outer pipe, forming a new gas of the highest com- 
bustibility. This is ignited as it enters the combustion chamber. It is 
subjected to three transverse currents of superheated air, one entering 
from either side and one from the back of the chamber. Then, in a 
state of high combustion, it is driven by a blast over the bridge that 
separates the combustion chamber from the grate, and is sent with great 
force and volume over the mass of offal. This voluminous flame, in- 
tensely heated and charged with oxygen, turns and passes back again 
under the grate, attacking the offal on its under surface, and thence 
goes through the flue into the smoke-stack, thus transversing the offal 
twice, first over its entire upper surface, and then underneath, or 
through a distance of 80 feet before passing through the flue into the 
smoke-stack. This ensures absolute and complete combustion. 

The Orate. 

The Brown Crematory, after many experiments, long since discarded 
fire-brick as a suitable substance for the construction of the grate, for 
the reason that fire-brick is a non-conductor of heat; and, furthermore, 
the action of the sodium in the offal is such as to vitrify the surface 
of the brick, rendei'ing it still more a non-conductor. 

In place of fire-brick, a grate has been introduced formed of cross- 
bars, made of a metal called " semi-steel," which is an alloy known 
only to the inventor, which, while it will stand an enormous degree of 
heat, is an excellent conductor. 

These bars which comprise the grate are, furthermore, filled with 
brasque, a refractory material which does not readily receive or retain 
heat; so that, while the semi-steel that covers the brasque is heated to a 
high degree, and is in turn radiating its heat to the matter that comes in 
contact with it, this tilling remains at a comparatively low degree, thus 
at once saving the heat for the consumption of the offal, and adding 
very much to the strength of the bar. 

In order to secure the greatest possible area of exposure, these grate- 
bars are made in the form of an inverted V, rising up some ten inches 
from the bottom, where they are one and three-quarters inches apart, to 
a sharp edge. 

This peculiar wedge-shaped formation of the grate-bars makes, in 
fact, simply a series of red-hot troughs, into which the offal falls, 
burning not only on top, but being consumed on both sides by the radi- 
ation of these rising wedges of highly heated steel. 

The Holloiv Arch. 

The hollow arch is also a distinctive and most valuable feature of the 
Brown Crematory. 

The smoke-stack consists of fifteen feet of brickwork, surmounted by 
fifty feet of iron. 



Street Department. 91 

As the Brown furnace is somewhat similar to other fur- 
naces, the experiments made by the department on this 
furnace may be fairly taken to give the results that may be 
expected from an introduction of the system of cremation, 
and they are therefore of general interest in this connection. 

The following is the report of the engineers assigned to 
this duty : 

Experiments on Cremation of Offal. 

Boston, March 21, 1893. 

Two experiments have been made in Brown's Patent Cre- 
matory Furnace at the sanitary yard on Albany street. 
The furnace used was not of the above-described standard, 
type, and size, but consisted of a rectangular box of fire-brick 
about 21^ feet long by 9 feet wide by 6|- feet high, with a 
fiat arched top and exterior braces and tie-rods of iron. It 
was divided practically into two equal parts by a horizontal 
grate made of railroad rails, and the lower part was further 
divided into two parts by a vertical longitudinal partition. 
There was a combustion chamber at one end, and a stack 
50 feet high at the other end, the lower part of fire-brick, 
the upper part of boiler-iron. 

The fuel used was petroleum (from which the kerosene 
had been removed) ; the burner consisted of three concentric 
pipes, the interior one carrying live steam, the next one 
petroleum, and the exterior one gaseous products of com- 
bustion drawn back from the furnace itself, as above de- 
scribed in the standard type. 

Air, to support the combustion of the oil, was forced in by 
a 10-in. Sturtevant blower, through apertures on three 
sides of the combustion chamber. 

The draft was a forced draft maintained by the blower. 
Steam, both for converting the oil into gas and for running 
the blower, was supplied by a 15-horse power boiler, which 
consumed, when serving both these purposes, about 400 
pounds of coal in ten hours, furnishing steam at 70 pounds 
pressure. 

The first experiment commenced February 10. Ten loads 
of offal were dumped near the furnace, to begin on. 

This offal consisted principally of all kinds of vegetable 
refuse, mainly potato peelings, considerable raw fish, empty 
tins, glass and crockery, and much of it was frozen in masses 
and very wet, a rain having occurred a few days previous 
The ten loads measured 20.55 cubic yards; 1 cubic yard 
weighed 0.(>5 tons ; total weight, 13.34 tons; 1 ton measured 
1.54 cubic yards. The burning of the ten loads commenced 



92 City Document No. 34. 

at 10.20 A.M., February 10, and continued until 7.30 
P.M. of the same day; began again at 8.30 A.M. of 
February 11, and at 12.30 P.M. the last of ten loads was 
fed to the furnace. Allowing 20 minutes for this last por- 
tion to be consumed, it would give 13.34 tons consumed in 
thirteen and one-half hours, or about 1 ton, or 1.54 cubic 
yards, per hour. 

A supplementary quantity of offal, 5 loads equal 10.20 
cubic yards, equal 7.78 tons, was hauled on February 11 ; 
this was all consumed at 8 P.M. Of this offal, 1 ton 
measured 1.31 cubic yards ; 1 cubic yard weighed 0.76 tons. 
Time of burning was seven hours and ten minutes, or 1.09 
tons, or 1.42 cubic yards, per hour. 

The total amount of offal destroyed during the two days, 
February 10 and 11, weighed 21.12 tons; 1 ton equalled 
1.45 cubic yards, measured 30.75 cubic yards; 1 cubic yard 
equalled 0.69 tons. 

Time of burning was twenty hours and forty minutes, or 
1.02 tons, or 1.49 cubic yards, per hour. 

The consumption of fuel oil was at the rate of 33 gallons 
per hour during the first day, and 30.94 gallons per hour the 
second day ; for the entire two days' test the average rate 
was 32 gallons per hour, making for twenty and two-thirds 
hours 661.3 gallons total. 

At 10.25 A.M. on February 11, nine of the first ten 
loads had been fed to the furnace ; up to this point all the 
tin cans in the offal had been put in with the rest, but the 
furnace evidently becoming choked with the accumulation, 
they were excluded after this time. 

Through the courtesy of Professors Holman and Wendell, 
of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, we were able 
to get the temperature of the furnace. These gentlemen 
measured the heat February 11. 

The temperatures are as follows : 



Near bridge and nozzle, — 

First trial 

Second trial 

Outer end of furnace 

Flue gases 

Opening in top of furnace 



2,580° Fahrenheit. 

2,460° 

1,850° 

1,680° 

1,760° " 



At this point the inventors became dissatisfied with the 
performance of the furnace, and asked for delay in order 
to make alterations ; the experiment was therefore dis- 
continued. 

It was evident that the furnace had not been well man- 



Street Department. 93 

aged, too large quantities of offal having been dumped in 
at a time, cooling and choking the furnace. 

Second Experiment. 

The stack having been rebuilt of larger size, the grate- 
bars spaced wider apart, and the upper chamber of the 
furnace lengthened two feet by taking that much off the 
combustion chamber, the experiment was resumed March 
9 at 8.30 A.M. and continued without intermission until 
6 P.M. on the 10th, a period of thirty-three and a half 
hours. 

Volume of offal consumed was 71.77 cubic yards, or 2.14 
cubic yards per hour. Weight of offal consumed was 
44.86 tons, or 1.34 tons per hour. Volume of ashes (in- 
cluding tins) taken from furnace equalled 2.72 cubic yards, 
equalled 3.8 per cent, volume of offal. 

Weight of ashes, etc., equals 1.G6 tons, equals 3.7 per 
cent, weight of offal. About 1,340 lbs. of coal were burned 
under the boiler, or 40 lbs. per hour; 1,257.6 gallons of 
oil were used, or 37.54 gallons per hour. 

The empty tins form about 4 per cent, by weight of the 
offal in which they are found. Up to about 3 o'clock of 
March 10 the tins were put into a furnace as they came in 
the offal, but after that time they were turned to one side 
and all burned together at the conclusion of the experiment. 
At that time enough of them had accumulated to form a 
layer about 18 inches deep over the area of the grate, and 
they were reduced to the brittleness of egg-shells in 12 
minutes. 

The rate of consumption per hour as given above does 
not give a fair idea of the capacity of the furnace. 

From 8.30 A.M. of March 9, to 8.30 A.M. of March 
10, 36 tons out of the total 45 tons were destroyed, or at 
a rate of 1£ tons per hour; and Mr. Kidd, under whose 
immediate supervision the experiment was carried on, esti- 
mates that during the latter part of this period, when the 
furnace had attained its highest heat, the rate equalled 
2 tons per hour. 

This rate was the result of good management, and was 
obtained by putting on small quantities of offal at a time, 
and keeping the layer thin, which caused it to burn rapidly. 
At the time last named, an unfortunate misunderstanding 
occurred between the parties running the furnace, the man- 
agement of it changed hands, the offal was dumped in in 
large quantities, and the result was that the remaining 
9 tons took 9 hours to burn, or 1 ton per hour. 



94 



City Document No. 34. 



Approximate Cost per Ton and Cubic Yard. 



1 engineer, at 31 cents 

1 stoker (for furnace), at 25 cents 

2 laborers, at 22 cents 

Making a total of 

Coal, 40 lbs 

Oil, 36 gallons, at 4 cents 

Making a total of 



$0 31 per hour. 
25 " 
44 " 



$1 00 
= 10 
= 1 44 



$2 54 per hour. 



Or $1.90 per ton, or $1.19 per cubic yard, when burning at 
the rate of 1.34 tons per hour ; or $1.69 per ton, or $1.06 per 
cubic yard, when burning at the rate of 1.50 tons per hour. 

There is no item for depreciation of plant included in the 
above estimate. 

Third Test. 

The railroad rails used for the grate-bars in the garbage 
furnace being replaced by bars designed for this purpose, an- 
other test was started. 

April 25 — 9.15 A.M. Furnace empty and cold; 9.45 
A.M., four tons of offal having been put in furnace, the fires 
were started. 

11.15 A.M., about one ton put in. From this time the 
offal was put in as fast as it was consumed in loads of about 
one ton, until 7.05 P.M., when the last of the nineteen and 
one-half tons used in this test was put in the furnace. 

7.45 P.M. Fire extinguished, as all the offal is reduced 
to ashes. 

Time fires were burning = 10 hours. 

Oil used, 323 gallons, or 32.3 gallons per hour. 

Offal consumed, 19.5 tons-}-, or 1.95 tons per hour. 



Approxir 

1 engineer, at 31 cents 

1 stoker (for furnace), at 

2 laborers, at 22 cents 

Making a total of 
Coal, 40 lbs. . 
Oil, 32.3 gallons, at 4 cents 



mate Cost. 




. - $0 31 
25 cents = 25 

. = 44 


per hour 
<< 


$1 00 

. = 10 

ts . = 1 29 


(< 



Making a total of $2 39 per hour. 

1.95 tons in 10 hours, at $2.39 per hour = $1.22 per ton. 



Street Department. 95 

The ashes weighed back =1,085 lbs., or 55 lbs. to a ton, 
or 2.75 per cent. 

The offal was collected from hotels, and is considered the 
most difficult to burn. 

There were practically no cans in this collection ; when one 
was found it was thrown out, as were also the pieces of crock- 
ery and glass. No note of the weight of these few things 
was taken, as its effect on the result was insignificant. 

Conclusions. 

It is evident that the furnace should be fed lightly, and the 
offal kept in a thin layer, also that the tins should not be put 
in with the offal. If some means could be devised to press 
out a portion of the water in the offal without requiring too 
much additional handling, the efficiency of the furnace would 
be increased. 

As to depreciation of plant there is no data upon which to 
base a conclusion. The furnace shows no sign of injury at 
present. 

The inventors claim that the furnace should have been 
longer in order to utilize more of the heat ; this claim is 
borne out by the fact that the temperature of the flue gases 
was 1,680°, the stack itself being red hot for a height of 20 
feet. 

It may also be granted that if a number of furnaces were 
set up, the items of expense for engineers and laborers would 
be reduced, as the same force would attend to several fur- 
naces. 

Comparison of Results. 

It is interesting to compare the known results of this ex- 
perimental furnace with the results obtained at Lowell dur- 
ing the past year, as this city has been cremating its offal 
and refuse for some time past. 

Through the courtesy of the Lowell Board of Health the 
following statement has been furnished : 

Total cost of running the crematory, Jan. 1, 1893, to Dec. 
31, 1893, $7,670.77. 
Itemized as follows : 

Coal $2,394 78 

Oil 1,023 26 

Labor 2,149 20 



Carried forward, $5,567 24 



96 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward , 
Plumbing 
Piping . 
Lead 

Spark-arrester 
Rebuilding 
Fire-brick 
Carpenter 
Miscellaneous . 



$5,507 


24 




297 


26 




99 


46 




150 


00 




147 


b6 




553 


95 




48 


66 




147 


10 




659 


44 


ST 


,670 


77 



The work done by this crematory consisted of burning 
3,500 tons of swill, 150 carcasses of animals, and infected 
clothing. 

The cost of burning the offal varied from $2.75 per ton in 
April, 1893, to $1.15 per ton in July, 1893, with the total 
cost as stated above. 

It would be out of the question for the city of Boston to 
treat the enormous amount of offal gathered daily (210 tons) 
in this manner, as the expense, based on actual results at 
Lowell, or on the experimental results obtained at Albany 
street (making a large allowance for a more economical 
result to be obtained by the erection of longer and better 
furnaces according to latest plans of the Brown Crematory 
Co. ) , at the cost of even 80 cents per ton to cremate the offal, 
would involve an immense outlay. 

The method of cremation must therefore be left to those 
cities and towns which from their size cannot produce offal 
enough to warrant the erection of a utilization plant. 

Recommendations were made in last year's report concern- 
ing the best method of disposing in the future of the offal of 
the city of Boston. The experience and knowledge gained 
on this subject during the last year has not changed in any 
way the recommendations then made, and they are therefore 
renewed. 

First. All offal collected in the vicinity of the wharf 
where the present dumping-boat is located should be taken 
there, and then towed to sea. If new dumping-wharves are 
established either in East Boston, Charlestown, South Bos- 
ton, or the Xorth End, all the offal of these districts should 
also be disposed of at sea. 

Second,. A central place (such as the site of the old 
small-pox hospital at the South Bay or the site of the 
present offal-house on Albany street) should be selected and 
a plant erected for the disposal of offal by a utilization treat- 
ment. 



Street Department. 



97 



It would be advisable to dispose of the offal of Roxbury, 
the South End, and parts of Dorchester, City Proper, and 
South Boston at this place. The amount of offal to be 
treated at this station would amount, at the present time, to 
about 130 tons per day, and would ultimately increase to 
about 160 tons per day. 

Third. As the erection of a utilization-treatment plant 
could not be undertaken unless a considerable amount of 
offal can be treated, it would be necessary to establish sev- 
eral small cremation plants : one to be located in Brighton, 
another in West Koxbury, and another in Dorchester, to 
cremate the small amount of offal collected in these dis- 
tricts. 

By adopting the above-described system the greatest 
economy would be effected, as the offal would be disposed 
of in the vicinity where it is collected, and the expense of 
hauling the material long distances would be done away 
with. 

During the fall of 1892, 24 offal wagons were measured 
and contents weighed for the purpose of obtaining the 
capacity of wagons and the weight of offal per cart load. 
Their capacity averaged 3ff cord feet, or 56.25 cubic feet, 
and weight averaged 3,115 lbs. 

A cord equals 128 cubic feet, or 7,091 lbs. 

The price per cord received by the city for the sale of 
offal was the same as 1892: South yard, $4.00; Highland 
yard, $5.00 ; Charlestown yard, $4.00. 

Force Employed. 



City Force. 


Hired 
Teams. 


Contracts. Teams. 




E.Boston. 


Brighton. 






1 

2 

07 

85 

2 








1 
2 


Offal clerks 








Teamsters 


9 
9 


6 
6 


2 
2 


48 




102 
2 










Totals 


157 


18 


12 


4 


191 







Note. — For capacity of offal wagons Bee Appendix C. 



98 



City Document No. 34. 



Removal of Ashes. 

The removal of ashes, house and store dirt, has been 
attended to during the year by a minimum force of 221 men 
and 103 city carts, also by five carts with an East Boston 
contractor, and 4 by a South Boston contractor, 4 carts by 
a West Roxbury contractor, and 4 carts by a Dorchester 
contractor. At different times, and especially during the 
winter months, an additional force of 50 teams and 100 men 
are employed. 

This work shows a constant increase from year to year as 
will be seen in the following table, and is an indication of 
the actual growth of the city : 



Amount of Ashes, House and Store Dirt Removed. 



Year. 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 l 

1892 

1893 



Number of Loads. 

159,197 
169,610 
182,642 
193,734 
209,129 
220,186 
233,514 
227,325 
245,730 
313,464 
303,878 
320,571 



Each load of ashes is equivalent to 43 cubic feet. 

This enormous amount of waste material is used largely 
for the purpose of filling low and swampy lands ; about 27 
per cent, of the entire amount collected is towed out to sea 
and dumped. 

The following table shows the disposition of this material 
from February 1, 1893, to February 1, 1894, together with 
the amount of house offal and the portion of street sweep- 
ings that were disposed of by the Sanitary Division : 

1 Thirteen months, from January 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892. 



Street Department. 



99 





Amount col- 
lected. 


Deposited 
on low 
lands. 


Towed to 

sea. 


Collected 
hy con- 
tractors. 


Sold to 
farmers. 




Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Ashes, house and store dirt . . 


320,571 
51,415 
33,740 


233,854 
2,243 


86,717 
13,197 
33,740 


i 5,139 


30 836 






Total 


405,726 


236,097 


133,654 


5,139 


30,836 





Comparative Statement of Number of Loads of Ashes collected 
during 16 Weeks of the Summer and 16 Weeks of the Winter. 



Summer. 


Loads. 


Winter. 


Loads. 


Difference 
for Winter. 


May 4, 1889, to Aug. 23, 1889 


60,609 


Nov. 30, 1889, to Mar. 1, 1890 


82,866 


22,257 


" 2, 1890, " " 21, 1890 


65,239 


" 1, 1S90, " " 13, 1891 


93,660 


28,421 


" 2, 1891, " " 21, 1891 


76,625 


Oct. 31,1891, " Feb. 19, 1S92 


100,223 


23.59S 


April 30,1892, " " 19,1892 


82,034 


" 30, 1892, " " 12, 1893 


106,772 


24,738 


" 29,1893, " " 18, 1893 


91,721 


" 28, 1893, " " 16, 1894 


106,851 


15,130 



The recommendation made in last year's report to the 
effect that the city acquire land in the South Bay territory 
is renewed. 

The city would not only acquire territory which for years 
would be available for a central dumping-station, but the 
rise in valuation of this land when filled to grade 12 
would be enormous, and would prove a most profitable in- 
vestment. The gradual filling in of this territory would do 
away with the nuisance existing when these flats are un- 
covered. The South Bay in its present condition is a men- 
ace to the health of the community, and the city should 
acquire the territory and fill it in. 

The filling in of low land within the city limits is pro- 
gressing at such a rapid rate that the procuring of dumps 
convenient to the locality where the material is collected is 
a mattei of extreme difficulty. A large amount of material 
has to be hauled a long distance, which adds largely to the 
cost of disposal. 

As the amount of house and store dirt began to show a 
remarkably large increase, greater than could be provided 

1 This amount is included in the amount collected, 51,415; of the 5,139, 3,744 loads were 
collected in East Boston and 1 ,395 loads in Brighton. 



100 City Document No. 34. 

for in the available appropriations, steps were taken to 
restrict the removal of store dirt, in particular by issuing the 
following circular to large business houses, where excessive 
amounts were regularly set out for collection : 

Street Department, 
City Hall, Boston, June 30, 1893. 
Dear Sir : Under the Revised Ordinances of 1892 the Street 
Department of the city of Boston is not obliged to remove rubbish and 
dirt from stores and places of business. As it has been the practice of 
the department, however, for a number of years, to remove a certain 
amount of this material, it will continue to remove a quantity not ex- 
ceeding five barrels per week from each store. The extra amount of 
dirt made by you over and above these five barrels will have to be pro- 
vided for at your own expense on and after July 10, 1893. 

In case you desire the Street Department to remove this extra amount 
of material, the work will be undertaken at a charge to you of fifteen 
cents per barrel. 

Please notify this department as to the course which you desire to 
pursue in this matter. 

Yours truly, 

H. H. Carter, 
Superintendent of Streets. 

Later this was followed by a second circular, designed to 
call attention to the fact that the city was being called upon 
to remove large bulky waste that was a direct production of 
business, and which should be destroyed or removed by the 
party producing it, and not by the city. This rubbish was 
placed in various-sized boxes and cases, irregular and large 
enough to fill a cart in a very short space of time, and there- 
fore necessitating the employment of an unreasonable num- 
ber of teams. 

This circular read as follows : 



Street Department, 

City Hall, Boston. 

Dear Sir: Under the Revised Ordinances of 1892 the Street 
Department of the city of Boston is not obliged to remove rubbish and 
dirt from stores and places of business. As it has been the practice of 
the department, however, for a number of years, to remove a. certain 
amount of this material, arrangements have been made to continue to 
remove a limited quantity of non-combustible material each week. It 
is found that many storekeepers put out large quantities of light, bulky 
material, such as paper boxes, pasteboard, dry straw, etc., etc., which 
could readily be burned on the premises or elsewhere. 

Since the city is under no obligation to remove such rubbish, you are 
hereby notified that such combustible material will in future have to be 
removed or disposed of by you. 

Yours truly, 

H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



m 




o 



Street Department. 1^1 / 

There are still many firms that fail to realize their respon- 
sibility in the matter, who show great reluctance to incur 
any expense in carting away the waste productions of their 
own business. 

The ordinances do not include such waste in defining the 
duties of the Street Department, and for this cause, under a 
fair construction of the ordinances, the custom and practice 
in vogue for years has not been wholly discontinued, but 
limited, practically, to the removal of a reasonable portion of 
the legitimate sweepings of the floor. 

The Tow-Boat "Cormorant." 

A considerable reduction of expense in towing waste 
material to sea has been effected by the building of a power- 
ful tow-boat for this purpose. In former years the bills for 
hired tow-boats amounted to about $8,000 per year, and as 
the department was under the expense of also maintaining 
a small unsea worthy tow-boat, the building of a new boat, 
capable of doing all the work of the department, will result 
in an annual saving of this amount. 

The new tow-boat " Cormorant," adapted to the work of 
the Sewer and Sanitary Divisions, which was under construc- 
tion at the time last year's report was issued, was accepted 
by the department April 11, 1893. The boat was launched 
February 7, 1893, and the trial trip was made on April 7. 
It was built at the Atlantic Works, East Boston. 

The hull was designed by John H. Dahl, N.A., and the 
engines by James T. Boyd, M.E. V 

The work done by the boat is the towing of the sludge 
scows of the Sewer Division and the o-arbao-e scows of the 
Sanitary Division. In view of the fact that tows have to be 
made regardless of the weather, and that in the winter season 
the bay about the Pumping-station is liable to be frozen over, 
the designers were informed that there were three primary 
qualities that the boat must possess; namely, stability, 
power, and ability to break ice. The result of their work, 
as well as that of the builders, has proved that the boat 
not only has the required qualities, but is also a fine-looking 
boat and a credit to the designers, as well as the depart- 
ment. 

The following are some of the principal dimensions, etc. : 

Length from outside of stem to outside of guard at stern, 
93 feet 8 inches; breadth of beam, 20 feet; draft, 9 feet. 

The keel, steam-propeller post, shaft-log, deadwood, and 
planking are all white oak, the hitter being 2^ inches thick. 

As a protection when breaking ice the sides are coppered 



102 City Document No. 34. 

with 40-ounce copper from the under side of lower guard, 
to 18 inches below water-line. 

The engine is an inverted , compound, high-pressure cylin- 
der 15-in. diameter; low-pressure cylinder, 28-in. diameter, 
and 20 inches stroke of piston. 

Steam is supplied by a Scotch boiler 9 feet 6 inches in 
diameter and 11 feet long; working pressure, 110 lbs. per 
square inch. 

Diameter of propeller wheel, 7 feet. 

Dumping- Wharf . 

No action has been taken on the recommendation that a 
new dumping-wharf be procured at the North End. At the 
time this recommendation was made, there were several 
wharves available, which have since been bought by steam- 
ship companies, or condemned for the North End park. 

The procuring of a suitable wharf will now be a matter of 
some difficulty, even if an appropriation is made. 

In July, 1892, an injunction was asked of the Superior 
Court by the Boston and Portsmouth Steamship Company, 
against the use of the Fort Hill wharf as a dumping-wharf, 
on the ground that it was a nuisance to the company and 
the passengers using its steamships running to the Isles of 
Shoals and Portsmouth from Snow's Arch wharf. After 
consideration of the testimony, the Court refused to grant the 
injunction, as it was shown that it was imperative for the 
city to maintain this wharf as a dumping-station. .Grave 
doubts exist as to the Court's having the same opinion when 
it comes to a final hearing of the case. 

The advisability of the department having another wharf 
is manifest, as it would be a very serious matter if, for any 
reason, the present wharf could not be used, even for a short 
time. 

The refuse material which has been towed to sea and 
dumped during the year has been conveyed in the Barney 
dumping-scows in use by the city. 

The recommendation made in last year's report, that the 
city purchase a second dumping-boat in place of leasing one, 
has not received consideration from the government. 

Considering- the fact that a new scow could be built for 
$14,000, and that the city pays a rental of $15 per day for 
the one it hires, the purchase of a scow would be a matter 
of economy. 



Street Department. 103 



SEWER DIVISION. 



The Sewer Division has charge of the following work : 

1. The maintenance and construction of all common 
sewers and catch-basins. 

2. The maintenance of the Main Drainage Works. 

3. The maintenance of Stony brook. 

4. The maintenance and construction of all street cul- 
verts. 

5. The preparation of plans, and the engineering and 
supervision required on the construction and maintenance of 
all work connected with the division. 

6. The granting of permits for all connections to be made 
with the common sewers, and the custody of bonds filed by 
drain-layers authorized to make such connections. 

7. The levying of assessments on estates benefited by 
the construction of sewers. 

The general work of the year, with comments, maybe out- 
lined as follows : 

Sixty-six thousand four hundred linear feet of sewers have 
been built during the past year by the city, and 22,837 feet 
have been built by private parties, according to the plans and 
rules of this division, and accepted by the city under the 
usual form of release. 

Under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, as amended by Chap. 
402 of the Acts of 1892, the Board of Street Commissioners 
had laid out a number of streets, and this division has built, 
by contract, all the sewers, catch-basins, and house-drains 
which will ever be required, carrying the latter out to the 
curb-line. In the case of some unusually wide streets, a 
sewer has been built on each side of the street close to the 
curb, it having been found cheaper to do this than to build 
so many long house-drains. The object of building all these 
drains at one time is to make it feasible to preserve the 
street surface from the destructive effect of the constant dig- 
ging of trenches for the laying of drains to connect the 
houses with the sewers. 

The water and gas mains and house connections have been 
laid in these streets in the same manner and for the same 
reason. 

The necessity of preserving and improving the oatural 



104 City Document No. 34. 

watercourses in the larger valleys of the suburban districts 
becomes more apparent every year, and is coming to be 
better understood by the citizens generally. On the penin- 
sula which formed the original town of Boston there were 
no extensive valleys ; the sewers were naturally designed to 
take all surface-water as well as house sewage proper, and 
this practice was naturally applied to the outlying districts 
when sewer-building began there ; but there it was entirely 
inapplicable, on account of the enormous size of the valleys. 
For example, in the valley which includes the western third 
of Brighton, the main outlet sewer has been begun, being de- 
signed to take the house sewage of the future population 
together with a small quantity of surface-water from the 
streets (the first flow from a street being the dirtiest) ; this 
sewer is four feet in diameter. If the large brook now exist- 
ing in this valley were to be obliterated and the sewer were 
required to take all the surface-water, it would have to be 
7^ ft. in diameter ; the economy of preserving the existing 
watercourse is obvious. 

In order to relieve to some extent the distress caused by 
the large number of men being out of employment during 
the winter, a number of sewers have been built, 13,878 feet 
in all, which would not ordinarily have been built in cold 
weather ; these sewers have been partly paid for out of the 
fund contributed for the relief of the unemployed. 

Although the work could not be prosecuted as economi- 
cally as it could have been under more favorable weather 
conditions, it is believed that much relief has been afforded 
to the laboring class. 

There are a number of large main sewers, for which the 
necessity has long been felt, but the building has been post- 
poned from year to year, owing to their great cost and to 
the small proportion recoverable in the form of assessments ; 
these should be begun at once, and the funds provided, as 
specified in Chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, or else long- 
time loans should be negotiated for this purpose. 

East Boston District. 

The sewer outlet under Morrison's wharf was nearly de- 
stroyed by ice last winter, and it is about to be rebuilt ; 
a row of piles, to protect it from the ice, will be driven along 
the edge of the wharf. 

The other outlets mentioned last year — Eagle square and 
Dock 13 outlets — should be extended, and Jeffries, Decatur, 
and Brooks street outlets should be rebuilt as soon as money 
can be obtained for this purpose. 



Street Department. 105 

The sewer in Havre street, between Meridian and Sumner, 
an old sewer, partly of wood and partly of brick and stone, 
is in very bad condition, and should be rebuilt. 

The Metropolitan Intercepting Sewer is now being built in 
East Boston, and a number of connections may be built this 
year. If a connection is allowed at the corner of Orleans 
and Maverick streets, the damming up of the Orleans-street 
sewer, as described last year, may be remedied in that way ; 
but the necessity for a connection with the Porter-street outlet 
will remain, in order to convey the storm- water directly to 
that outlet. 

The Porter-street outlet, a large wooden box sewer on 
piles, which was built in 1886, and has been exposed to the 
action of large masses of ice every winter, is becoming badly 
wrecked, and now fails to convey all the sewage to the 
extreme outlet, much of it leaking out and spreading over 
the flats enclosed by the sea-wall. It has been repeatedly 
repaired, but will soon have to be entirely rebuilt. 

A new main sewer will have to be built shortly in Chelsea 
street, with storm overflow at the Chelsea-street bridge. This 
will afford an outlet for sewers in Chaucer, Pope, Curtis, and 
adjacent streets. 

The sewer in Paris street, near Meridian street, which 
drains through Wesley street, will have to be rebuilt. 

Work is about to be commenced on the outlet sewer for 
Ley den street, west of Breed street. 

The Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, not 
having completed the siphon under Belle Isle Inlet, no ar- 
rangement could be made to take the sewage of Orient 
Heights into the Metropolitan sewer, as proposed in last 
year's report. 

Work done during 1893. 

Two thousand three hundred and ninety-five linear feet of 
sewers were built last year, including the completion of the 
Moore-street and Lamson-street outlets to deep water. 

ClIARLESTOWN DISTRICT. 

In the Alford-street district the sewer in Alford street has 
been built, and now discharges temporarily into the Mystic 
river at the bridge, and will continue to so discharge until it 
is possible to connect it Avith the Metropolitan sewer. The 
sewers in the rest of the streets of this district will all (with 
the exception of West street) drain through a sewer to be 
built in Arlington avenue ; it is not advisable to build this 
sewer until after the Somcrville branch of the Metropolitan 



106 City Document No. 34. 

sewer, which is designed to go in the same avenue, has been 
built ; this will probably be done this year, after which the 
sewerage of this district may be completed. 

Work done during 1893. 

Two thousand three hundred and thirty-four linear feet of 
sewers, all 12 and 15 inch pipe, were built last year. 

City Proper and Back Bay Districts. 

Owing to the uncertainty in regard to the proposed build- 
ing of a subway to the abandoned site of the Boston and 
Maine station in Haymarket square, the route of which 
would cut across the line of the proposed sewer for the 
relief of the Canal-street district, it has not been thought 
expedient to make a beginning on this sewer. 

If such a subway is built, the sewer systems of this 
vicinity will all have to be remodelled, and lines and grades 
adopted, which will not interfere with the subway. 

The sewer in Hull street, although it continues to perform 
its office, should be rebuilt, as it is liable to fall in. 

No sewer has been built yet to take the sewage of the 
houses on the water side of Beacon street. If a boulevard 
or parkway is to be built there, the sewer should be built 
in connection with it. 

Nothing has yet been done to improve the sanitary condi- 
tion of the Faneuil Hall markets ; when a new sewer is built 
across the city, to relieve the Canal-street system, the mar- 
kets can be satisfactorily sewered. 

An overflow sewer, to connect with the Muddy-river con- 
duit, is an essential part of the system of sewers of which 
the sewer in Vila street is the main ; this is not yet built, but 
will have to be, before many sewers receiving surface-water 
can be added to this system. 

Work done during 1893. 

One thousand five hundred and one linear feet of sewers 
were built by the city, and none by private parties. 

South Boston. 

There is little to be said about the sewers in South Boston 
which has not been said in previous reports ; in general, 
there are many defective sewers, which will have to be 
rebuilt from time to time, and there is need of a capacious 
outlet to the South Bay, for the sewer systems of the south- 
western part of the peninsula. 



Street Department. 107 

The sewer outlets on the southerly side of the peninsula 
at N, K, I, and H streets are all stopped up, and the sewage 
discharges upon the beach. These will have to be rebuilt, 
and extended to low-water mark ; but the work had better be 
deferred until some of the filling has been deposited to form 
the new proposed Park boulevard. 

Work done during 1893. 

Six hundred and ninety -four linear feet of sewers were 
built by the city, and 475 by private parties. 

Dorchester District. 

The Dorchester Lower Mills sewer is now nearly done, 
and the Dorchester intercepting sewer is also approaching 
completion, that is as far as Lower Mills ; and the time is 
now at hand when the whole of Dorchester Lower Mills vil- 
lage may be sewered. A petition for sewerage, signed by 
about 150 persons, was presented as long ago as 1887, and 
numerous other petitions have been received since. 

The people of this district should be given the benefit 
of these two expensive sewers, aggregating in cost about 
$200,000, at the earliest possible time ; to accomplish this, 
the pipe sewers in the various streets should be built at 
once in anticipation of the completion of the mains, so that 
all may be put into operation this year. 

Sewers have been built in Sturbridge and Sanford streets 
during the past winter, in accordance with this idea, and 
have afforded labor to many of the unemployed, through 
the cooperation of this department with the Citizens' Eelief 
Committee. The necessity for sewering the " Corbett, Max- 
well, and Capen street" district is as urgent as that of Dor- 
chester Lower Mills. 

A petition has been received asking to have the tempo- 
rary pumping scheme, as proposed in last year's report, car- 
ried out ; and there does not seem to be any other feasible 
plan for affording immediate relief to this locality, as a 
sewer largely in tunnel, by the Park street or any other 
route, would require several years to build. 

The portions of the system proposed which would have to 
be abandoned upon the completion of the tunnel sewer 
would cost but a small percentage of the whole, as most of 
the sewers would be of a permanent character. 
. The northern portion of the Savin Hill peninsula will 
have to be provided with a system of sewers very soon, as 
building is going on there quite rapidly, and the rocky char- 
acter of the ground makes cesspools expensive and trouble- 
some. 



108 City Document No. 34. 

Work clone during 1893. 

Twelve thousand seven hundred and fifty linear feet of 
sewers were built by the city, and 8,606 feet by private 
parties. 

ROXBURY. 

There are, in Eoxbury, many bad sewers, and in some 
places whole systems of sewers which are defective, and ex- 
tensive rebuilding will have to be done at some time in the 
future. Most of it is of an expensive character, and is put 
off from year to year on that account. 

In the City Proper and in South Boston a similar state of 
things exists. It would seem that the only practical way in 
which anything can be accomplished is to issue a long-time 
loan for the purpose of providing funds for rebuilding defec- 
tive sewers in these districts. 

Work done during 1893. 

Twenty-two thousand one hundred and eighteen linear 
feet of sewers were built by the city, and 3,028 feet by pri- 
vate parties. 

West Roxbury. 

Now that the Eoslindale and West Roxbury Trunk sewer 
has been practically completed, at an expense of about 
$150,000, advantage should be promptly taken of it to build 
tributary sewers in all streets on which there are many 
dwellings. 

Work will be commenced very soon upon a branch of the 
main sewer which is to cross the railroad tracks at Highland 
Station, and connect with sewers already built by private 
parties. Upon the completion of this connection, the land 
owners on Park, Bellevue, and adjacent streets propose to 
combine and build quite an extensive system of sewers to be 
released to the city. 

The land in the vicinity of South street, between Keyes 
and Morton streets, sometimes called the Anson and St. 
Mark street district, needs sewers badly ; and the outlet sewer 
to Washington street must be built at once, before the opera- 
tions of raisins: the grade of the Providence Railroad begin. 
A main sewer here would open up much valuable land for 
building purposes, near the village of Jamaica Plain. 

Streets in the low lands near Stony brook in Jamaica 
Plain need sewers, but none can be built because the main 
sewer in Washington street is too high. 

These streets cannot be properly sewered until a new main 



Street Department. 109 

sewer is built at a lower level, probably in the channel of 
Stony brook, as discussed in previous reports : drainage 
might be temporarily secured by some scheme of pumping. 
If a separate system were built in these streets, and surface 
and roof water rigidly excluded from the sewers, the amount 
of sewage to be pumped would be small. 

Work done during 1893. 

Twelve thousand three hundred and thirty-six linear feet of 
sewers have been built by the city, and 8,107 feet by private 
parties. 

Brighton. 

A beginning has been made on a system of sewers for the 
western part of the town, as discussed in former reports, and 
the outlet sewer is now being built. 

All the abattoir drains which are in operation have been 
connected with the Metropolitan sewer, and this source of 
pollution of the river has been done away with. 

A large amount of sewer-building has been done on Com- 
monwealth avenue, and everything in the nature of sewers, 
surface drains, and catch-basins between Beacon street and 
Brighton avenue will soon be completed, with the exception 
of the structures which are to be built at the marshy spot 
just west of Essex street, where the filling is not yet suffi- 
ciently well settled. The greater part of the work of the 
same nature between Brighton avenue and Warren street has 
also been completed. 

Sewers are needed in North Harvard street and Western 
avenue, north-easterly from their junction. As previously 
explained, a separate system of sewers will have to be built 
in each of these streets, one sewer to convey surface-water 
to the river, and another sewer to convey house sewage to 
the Metropolitan sewer. 

Work done during 1893. 

Twelve thousand two hundred and seventy-three linear 
feet of sewers were built by the city, and 2,621 feet by pri- 
vate parties. 

Stony Brook. 

The engineers of the New York, New Haven, & Hartford 
Bail road have included, as an essential part of the work of 
raising the railroad, the building of a new channel for Stony 
brook between :i point near Aniory street and a point about 
400 feet south of Boylston street. 

This proposition obviates most of the dillicultics discussed 



110 City Document No. 34. 

in former reports, as likely to ensue in consequence of the 
raising of the tracks. 

By constant attention the water in the brook has been 
satisfactorily handled during the past winter, a sufficient 
quantity having been turned down the old channel to satisfy 
the Boston Belting Company, and the remainder having 
been turned into the new channel at the inlet chamber near 
Pynchon street. The flow of water into either channel is 
regulated by changing stop-planks in the various openings, 
controlling in this manner the flow of water in the old 
channel, and preventing flooding in Roxbury. Dams of ice 
and snow have formed occasionally, but have been removed 
before damage could result. 

Main Drainage Works. 

This branch of the Sewer Division is in about the same 
general condition as when last year's report was issued. 
There has never been a time since these works were put in 
operation that a satisfactory report could be made in regard 
to them, for the reason that, while they are works that are 
unequalled in the country, and the original design has proved 
to be all that was expected, the plant was started in opera- 
tion before it was completed, and there has been practically 
nothing done towards completing it since. Each successive 
year attention has been called to the incompleteness of 
different portions of the works and the need of completion 
stated, but the necessary appropriations for the work have 
never been furnished. 

The conditions at the pumping-station this year over last 
show an increased amount of repairs needed to put the works 
in proper working condition. The refitting of the valve- 
seats on the pumps spoken of last year has been continued, 
so that three of the four pumps are now complete in this 
respect, and work on the fourth is in progress. 

The failure to do any of the other work mentioned last 
year, in connection with the pumps even, has caused the 
amount of repairs now necessary to be greatly increased, as 
well as the cost of maintenance under the present conditions. 
The lack of money, either in the amount allowed for mainten- 
ance or by special appropriation, is the only thing that has 
prevented this costly plant from being kept in its proper and 
efficient condition. The most important items necessary at 
the pumping-station are : the refitting of the gates of the 
pump-wells, also those at the filth-hoist, and a new set of 
cages and chains at the latter place, new tubes for the four 
boilers, and a second main steam-pipe to the pumps. There 



Street Department. Ill 

is a large loss of duty caused by leakage at the steam end of 
the pumps. The steam-pipes have been under constant 
pressure for ten years, and need to be thoroughly overhauled. 

This cannot be done without an auxiliary main pipe, as 
the plant is never shut down, and proper repairs cannot be 
made while the pipes are under steam pressure of 100 lbs. 
per square inch. 

The extension of the wharf and the dredging of the chan- 
nel, spoken of in last year's report, have not been done, but 
the urgency for both is greater than ever. The usual tests 
of the tunnel, to ascertain the reduction of area, if any, from 
deposits, have been made, and its condition is very satisfac- 
tory. On account of complaints that the grease taken 
from the east shaft, towed to sea and dumped, was finding 
its way to the shores and beaches of the bay, this way of 
disposing of it was stopped. After trying to dispose of it 
in several different ways, a method of separating the grease 
from the other impurities has been found, so that now it is 
of some value, as the revenue from it will at least pay for 
the cost of its removal . 

At Moon Island there is considerable needed in the way 
of repairs. 

The work on the gates and frames in the discharge sewer 
has been completed. The same repairs are necessary on 
the outfall sewer gates. The walls of all the divisions of 
the reservoir need repointing, as does the brickwork of the 
southerly wall of the long gate-house. The gas from the 
sewage has a decided effect on mortar, — much more so than 
the sewage itself. The difference was showm very plainly in 
the outfall sewer, where the pointing was done last year. 
The mortar between the bricks above the surface of the 
sewage, was gone for an inch in depth, while that below the 
surface was intact. 

A boat chamber should be built in the outfall sewer near 
the gate-house for convenience in entering the sewer, and for 
ventilation, of which there is great need. All of the iron 
fence around the reservoir will have to be repaired, as it is 
in a dangerous condition. 

An iron balcony should be built on the front of the out- 
fall building for the use and safety of the men on the work. 

The turbine wheel will probably have to be renewed the 
coming year, as it is about destroyed. 

Intercepting Connections. 

All the Brighton sewers that emptied into the Charles 
river were, during the past season, connected with the ex- 



112 City Document No. 34. 

tension of the Main Drainage Works constructed by the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Commission. 

The main and intercepting sewers throughout the city 
have received more than the usual attention. The large 
number of new connections with the interceptors has greatly 
increased the work of the force having charge of this por- 
tion of the system, and the construction of proper buildings 
at its headquarters, spoken of in the last report, should not 
be longer delayed. 

Dynamite. 

The increasing use of dynamite in rock-blasting in this 
city has been accompanied by a number of accidental explo- 
sions. This peculiar explosive is safe enough if handled 
properly, but if not so handled is exceedingly dangerous. 
The principal source of danger arises from the necessity of 
warming it before using, in order to make it effective in 
cold weather. Various methods are resorted to : the car- 
tridges are sometimes embedded in hot sand, they are some- 
times warmed by being placed around a stove or on a shelf 
over the stove in the tool-house ; quite a common practice is 
to warm them in one of the pine boxes in which they are 
packed by the dealers. If the same box is used for a con- 
siderable length of time, the wood becomes saturated with 
the nitro-glycerine oil which oozes slowly from the cartridges ; 
the box then becomes a source of danger, being sensitive to 
concussion. After consultation with the manufacturers, a 
code of rules has been drawn up, which, if rigidly enforced, 
would render accidental explosions almost impossible. These 
rules are as follows : 

Rules 

For the use of Dynamite, Dualin, Forcite, and other Nitro-Glycerine 

Compounds. 

No quantity of dynamite or other similar explosive in excess of twenty 
pounds shall be kept in the immediate vicinity of the work. 

Any larger amount shall be stored in a locked shed or box at a dis- 
tance of two hundred feet or more from the trench. 

Exploders shall not be kept in same shed, box, or other enclosure with 
dynamite. Exploders shall not be put into the cartridges until the 
moment of loading the holes. Cartridges with exploders attached shall 
not be carried about the work. 

In case four or more cartridges are loaded into one hole, a common 
fuse cap shall be inserted into the cartridge which lies ujoon the one at 
the bottom of the hole, more than usual care being exercised to ram 
gently this cartridge and those above it. 

When cold weather makes it necessary to warm the cartridges, the 
warming shall be done in the following manner : Water shall be 
heated to the boiling point in an iron pot (to be furnished by the city 
for that purpose), and a sufficient quantity of hot water shall be poured 
into the space between the inner and outer walls of a galvanized iron 






Street Department. 113 

warming pail (to be furnished by the city) to fill that space ; the car- 
tridges are then to be placed in the inner pail to warm. 

The water is to be boiled in a separate pot as directed ; the galvanized 
iron pail is not to be put over the fire. 

The cartridges are to be carried to the holes which are to be loaded in 
this double pail, the space between the inner and outer pails being kept 
filled with hot water, and the pail covered with the cover. 

If the cartridges have to be carried a long distance, the first water 
used may be thrown out, after the cartridges are thawed, and the space 
filled again with hot water. 

The cartridges shall not be removed from the inner pail except at the 
hole to be loaded ; they shall then be primed by attaching the exploders, 
and shall then be immediately loaded into the holes. 

Cartridges shall not be warmed in any other receptacle or in any 
other manner than has been directed ; foremen shall be responsible for 
the rigid enforcement of these rules on their work ; and inspectors shall 
require the same rules to be rigidly enforced by contractors both upon 
work under contract to the city, and on sewers which are being 
built by private parties to be released to the city. 

Contractors will be furnished by the city with the proper appliances. 

These rules can be enforced by this department only on 
work over which it has supervision, but much rock- work is 
done by the contractors, frequently close to travelled streets, 
where such supervision cannot be exercised. 

The safety of the general public demands that the City 
Council should compel, by ordinance, the observance by 
contractors of these or a similar set of rules ; permits should 
be required for this kind of work, and the city should send 
properly instructed inspectors to enforce such rules rigidly. 

Diagrams. 

The diagrams for sewer calculations, published in last 
year's report, are again inserted. These diagrams are used 
to determine approximately and very readily the size which a 
sewer should have, when the conditions of slope and char- 
acter of the surface of the area to be drained and the slope 
of the sewer are known. 

Plate 1 is intended to show the maximum rate of flood 
discharge which it is reasonable to provide for from a 
given area of a certain degree of steepness, according to the 
Buerkli-Ziegler formula, using for the factor R the value 1 ; 
i.e., one cubic foot per second per acre or its equivalent, 
one inch of rain per hour. 

Plate 2 shows the discharging capacity of sewers of a 
given size at a given inclination. 

Each curve represents two sets of values, one for a sewer 
of a certain size running full, and another for a sewer of a 
larger size running at approximately three-fourths full. 



114 City Document No. 34. 

Laws and Ordinances concerning the Building and 

Assessing of Sewers. 

The following complete compilation of the various laws 
and ordinances under which sewers have been built in the 
city of Boston has been made for convenient reference. 

Province Laws, 1709-10. 

Act, Passed at the Session begun and held at Boston, October 26, 1709. 

(Chapter 5.) 
An Act for Regulating of Drains and Common Shores.* 

For preventing of inconveniences and damages by frequent breaking 
up the highways, streets, and lanes, in towns, for the laying and repair- 
ing of drains, or common shores, and of differences arising among part- 
ners in such drains, or common shores, about their propoi'tion of the 
charge for making or repairing the same, 

Be it enacted by His Excellency the Governor, Council, and Repre- 
sentatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the 
same. 

Section 1. That from and after the 25th day of March, 1710, no 
person may presume to dig or break up the ground, in any highway, 
street, or lane, within any town, for the laying, repairing, or amending 
of any drain, or common shore, without the approbation and consent of 
the selectmen, signified in writing under the hand of the town clerk, 
on pain of forfeiting twenty shillings to the use of the poor of such 
town, to be levied by warrant from any one of her majestj^'s justices of 
the peace, and to make good all damages occasioned by such bi'each. 

And be it further enacted, 

Sect. 2. That all drains and common shores for the draining of 
cellars, hereafter to be made or repaired in any streets or highways 
shall be substantially clone with brick or stock, in such manner as the 
selectmen of the town shall direct. 

Sect. 3. And that it shall and may be lawful to and for any one or 
more of the inhabitants of any town, at his or their own cost and charge, 
to make and lay a common shore, or main drain, for the benefit of them- 
selves and others that shall think fit to join therein. 

And every person that shall afterwards enter his or her particular 
drain into such common shore, or main drain, or by any more remote 
means receive benefit thereby', for the draining of their cellars or 
lands, shall be obliged to pay unto the owner or owners of such com- 
mon shore or main drain, a proportionable part of the charge of making 
or repairing the same, or so much thereof as shall be below the place 
where any particular drain joins or enters thereinto, at the judgement 
of the selectmen of the town, or major part of them ; saving a right of 
appeal to such determination ; provided, 

Sect. 4. This act shall not extend to the altering of any particular 
agreement, or contract made betwixt persons interested in any drain or 
common shore. 

Passed Nov. 17. 

* Sewers. 









26O0 
ZAOQ 
2200 



C - O „ Aft 6*,-6-*T,-X-6 < 






NUMBER 


ACRES 


DRAINED. 








DRAINAGE -At 


?E4 < 


curve: 






FROM BUERTHZfEGLER FORMULA 

FOR SUb'JRBAN DISTRICTS. 



J? 
p 



PLATE/. 



'05 SI 



1 s 

» - - *o 



»;- ,• S 




DRAINED. 



O o 6 o o O 

Qo8§r§o§?§o 



Street Department. 115 



Province Laws, 1762-63. Chapter 27. 

An Act in addition to the act made and passed in the Eighth Year of the 
Reign of Her Majesty Queen Anne, Intitled " An Act for regulating 
of Drains or Common Shores.' 1 '' 

Whereas, in and by an act made and passed in the eighth year of the 
reign of her late majesty Queen Anne, intitled " An act for regulating of 
drains and common shores," it is enacted, among other things "that it 
shall and may be lawfull to and for any one or more of the inhabitants 
of any town, at his and their own cost and charge, to make and lay a 
common shore, or main drain, for the benefit of themselves and others 
that shall think fit to join therein ; and every person that shall after- 
wards enter his or her particular drain into such common shore, or 
main drain, or by any more remote means receive benefit thereby, for 
the draining of their cellars or lands, shall be obliged to pay unto the 
owner or owners of such common shore, or main drain, a proportion- 
able part of the charge of making or repairing the same, or so much 
thereof as shall be below the place where any particular drain joins or 
enters thereinto, at the judgment of the selectmen of the town, or major 
part of them ; " and whereas it frequently happens that the main drains, 
or common shores, decay and fill up, and the persons immediately affected 
thereby are obliged to repair such common shore to prevent damage to 
themselves and others whose drains enter above, as well as below, 
them, and no particular provision is made by said Act to compell such 
persons as dwell above that part where common shores are repaired, 
and have not sustained damage, to pay their proportionable share 
thereof, as shall be adjudged by the selectmen, nor in what manner the 
same shall be recovered, which has already occasioned many disputes 
and controversies ; wherefore, for preventing the same for the future, 

Be it enacted by the Governor, Council and House of Representa- 
tives, 

Section 1. That whensoever it shall hereafter happen, after the 2d 
of April next, that any common shore, or main drain, is stopped or gone 
to decay, so that it will be necessary to open such common shore, or 
main drain, to remove such stoppage, and repair it; not only the person 
or pei-sons who shall so do, or cause the same to be done, but all others 
whose drains enter, either above or below, such common shore, or main 
drain, or receive any benefit by said common shore or main drain, shall 
pay such a proportionable part of the whole expense of opening and 
repairing the common shore, or main drain, as shall be adjudged to 
them by the selectmen to the town or the major part of them to be 
certified under their hands; if any person or persons, after such certifi- 
cate is made, shall refuse to pay the same within ten days, to the person 
so appointed by the selectmen to i m eceive it, being duly notified thereof, 
he shall be liable and subject to pay to such person appointed, double 
the sum mentioned in such certificate, and all costs arising upon such 
refusal ; and such person is hereby fully authorized and impowered to 
bring an action or actions for the same accordingly. 

Provided always, 

Sect. 2. That the persons who have occasion to open any common 
shore, or main drain, in order to clean or repair the same, shall first 
notify all persons who are interested therein, that they may have an 
opportunity of making their objections against such persons proceed- 
ing, and laying the same before the selectmen ; and if the selectmen, 
or major part of them, judge their objections reasonable, then such 
person or persons shall not be obliged to pay any part of the charge 
thereof; but it' they do not make their objections in person, or writ- 
ing, within three days niter warning given, or the selectmen, or the 
major part of them, determine their objection not of sufficient force, 
then such person or persons may (having tirst liberty therefor, under 



116 City Document No. 34. 

the hands of the major part of the selectmen) proceed to open such com- 
mon shore, and clean and repair the same; and all interested in such 
common shore, or main drain, shall pay their proportion as is provided 
in this act. 

Provided also 

Sect. 3. That nothing in this act shall be construed or understood 
to set aside or make void any covenants or agreements already made, 
or that hereafter may be made, among proprietors of such drains or 
common shore. 

Sect. 4 This act to continue and be in force from the last day of 
March next, to the 2d of Api'il 1770, and no longer. 

Passed February 24, 1763. 

1769-70. 

An Act for reviving and continuing Sundry Laws that are 
expired and near expiring. 

(Here follows among other acts) 

An Act made and passed in the 8th year of her late Majesty Queen 
Anne, inlitled •' An act for regulating drains and common shores.''' 1 
(As before printed.) . 

That such of the before mentioned acts as are expired, be revived and 
such of said acts as are not yet expired, be continued, with all and every 
clause, matter and thing therein respectively contained, and shall be 
in force untill the 1st of July 1773 and no longer. 

Passed April 26th 1770. 

Revived and continued in 1773 until November 1778. 

Continued in 1778 until 1782. 

Continued until 1797. 

Chapter 14. 

An Act for regulating Drains and Common Shores. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same. 

That if any person shall dig or break up the ground in any highway, 
street or lane in any town, for the laying altering, repairing or amend- 
ing of any drain or common shore, without the consent of the Selectmen 
of the town, signified in writing under the hand of the town clerk, such 
person shall forfeit and pay four dollars for each offence, to the use of 
the poor of the town, to be recovei'ed with costs of suit in action of debt 
by the Treasurer thereof, before any disinterested Justice of the Peace 
in the county. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, that all drains and common shores 
for the draining of cellars, which shall hereafter be made or repaired in 
any street or highway, shall be substantially done with brick or stone, 
or with such other materials as the Selectmen of the town shall permit, 
and in such manner as said Selectmen shall direct. 

And when any one or more of the inhabitants of any town shall, by 
the consent, and under the direction aforesaid, at his or their own 
charge, make and lay any common Shore or main drain for the benefit 
of themselves and others, who may think fit to join therein, every per- 
son w r ho afterwards shall enter his or her particular drain into the 
same, or by any more remote means shall receive any benefit thereby, 
for the draining of their cellars or lands, shall be held to pay to the 
owner or owners of such common Shore or Main Drain, a proportion- 
able part of the charge of making or repairing the same, to be ascer- 
tained and determined by the Selectmen of the town, or a major part 
of them, and certified under their hands, saving always to the party 



LENGTH OF SEWER FOR 



540&. 



4SOfA 
42.00 






FALL 
e 



CT QA/£T 



FOOT: 

8 5 5 5 s i 



o 






G=VA 

Q^SscharseIn cubic feet 



SEWER DIAGRAM 



PEP- SECOND 



MOO 
1300 
/ZOO 



JCITr IN FEE! 



TABLES (BASED ON'KiJTTEjiS FORMULA} 
.YvEk CUV ATREET Bt.PT CITY OF BOSTON. 



v-om~! a 



-ztm 



rtSiL + 0.4 
V.OJS __ _ 

it+ oooi m 



ira 



J35 



AREA^CROSS_iEC-TION OF STREAM 
WETTEU PERIMETER 
c = JL-FAE.-OFJ\/ATER surface 
i-~. -t-t LENGTH' 



PLATE 2. 



I ISOO 






r~?' 



IP? 

gpcs 

ii 



I; 






LENGTH OF SEWER FOR FALL OF ONE FOOT 



o§ 



Street Department. 117 

aggrieved at any such determination, a right to appeal to the court of 
General Sessions of the Peace. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, 

That when any common Shoi*e or main drain shall be stopped or gone 
to decay, so that it shall be necessary to open the same in order to 
repair it or remove such stoppage, all the persons who shall be benefited 
by such repairs or removal of obstructions, shall be held to pay their 
proportionable part of the expenses thereof, as well as those who do 
not as those who do cause such repairs to be made or obstruction 
removed ; to be ascertained and determined by the Selectmen as afore- 
said, having an appeal as aforesaid. 

And each person so held to pay his or her part shall have notice 
thereof, of the sum, and to whom to be paid; and if such person shall 
not pay the same within 10 days after such notice, to the person ap- 
pointed by the Selectmen to receive it he or she shall be held to pay the 
person so appointed, double the sum mentioned in such certificate, with 
all costs, arising upon such neglect; and such person is hereby empow- 
ered to bring an action or actions for the same accordingly. 

Provided always, That the person or persons who shall have occasion 
to open any common shore or main drain, in order to clear and repair 
the same, shall, seven days at least before they begin to open the same, 
notify all persons interested therein, by advertising in such manner as 
the Selectmen may direct, that they may (if they think proper) object 
thereto, and lay their objections in person or writing before the Select- 
men ; and if the Selectmen or the major part of them, shall judge the 
objections treasonable, then the person or persons making the same 
shall not be held to pay any part of such expenses, but if they do not 
make their objections as aforesaid to the Selectmen within 3 days after 
being so notified, or if they shall deem the objections not to be sufficient, 
then they shall under their hands give liberty to the persons applying 
to proceed to open such common Shore or main Drain and clean and re- 
pair the same; and all interested therein shall pay their proportions as 
is provided in this act. 

Provided also, That nothing in this act shall be understood or con- 
strued to effect or make void any covenants or agreements already 
made or that may hereafter be made, among the Proprietors of such 
Drains or common Shores. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That this act shall take effect and be 
in force on and after the 1st day of July next and that an act passed 
1701J for regulating drains and common Shores and another act passed 
1763 in addition thereto and continued in force to the 1st of November 
next, be repealed on and after the 1st day of July except as to the en- 
forcing payment of such forfeitures as may before that time accrue by 
virtue thereof. 

Passed Feb. 20th, 1797. 

The laws passed from 1709 to 1797 provided for the 
building of individual drains and sewers by the inhabitants, 
the only restriction being that the materials entering into 
the work, and the proportionate part of the cost that per- 
sons should pay for the privilege of connecting with the 
sewer, should be determined by the selectmen. 

City Ordinance relative to Drains and Common Severs, passed 
July 7, 1823. 

Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common 
Council of the City of Boston, in City Council assembled, That all com- 



118 City Document No. 34. 

mon sewers which shall hereafter be considered necessary by the mayor 
and aldermen, in any street or highway in which there is at present no 
common sewer, shall be made and laid, and forever afterward shall be 
kept in repair, at the expense of the city and under the direction of the 
mayor and aldermen, or of some person or persons by them appointed. 

Sect. 2. Be it further ordained, That every person who shall enter 
his or her particular drain into such common sewer, or shall otherwise 
be benefited thereby, shall be held to pay the city such sum of money 
as the mayor and aldermen shall deem just and reasonable, having 
reference always to the valuation of each estate connected with said 
drains, in the assessors 1 books ; and in the case of any subsequent repair 
of such common sewer the mayor and aldermen shall assess the amount 
of such repair on those whose particular drains connect therewith, or 
are otherwise benefited thereby, in such amount as they deem just and 
reasonable. 

Sect. 7. Be it further ordained, That whenever any common sewer 
shall go to decay, and the mayor and aldermen shall deem it necessary 
to rebuild or repair the same, they shall have power to cause the same 
to be clone under their direction, and to assess the amount of such re- 
building or repairs upon the owner, agent, or tenant, as in the foregoing 
ordinance provided for the case of streets in which there is no common 
sewer. 

This ordinance provided that sewers should be built by 
the city instead of by the individual, and that the expense 
of the work should be defrayed by the persons who connected 
with the sewer in such sums as determined by the Mayor and 
Aldermen. 

City Ordinance relative to Sewers and Drains, passed February 13, 

1834. 

This ordinance is almost identical with the Ordinance of 
1823, with the exception that the superintendence of all 
sewers was put into the hands of the City Marshal. As the 
Ordinance of 1823 was very ambiguous concerning sewer 
assessments, the Ordinance of 1834 contained the following 
clauses relative to this matter : 

Section 4. Be it further ordained, That it shall be the duty of the 
auditor of accounts to keep an accurate account of the expense of con- 
structing each common sewer, and on receiving the report of the city 
marshal relating thereto, to assess the expense upon the persons and 
estates deriving benefit therefrom, in conformity with the provisions of 
this ordinance and the laws of the Commonwealth ; and after having 
completed such assessment, he shall report the same to the mayor and 
aldermen, and if sanctioned by them he shall enter the same in books 
to be kept for that purpose, and proceed forthwith to collect such as- 
sessments. 

It would also seem that under the Ordinance of 1823 some 
difficulty had* arisen concerning the levying of assessments, 
as section 5 of the Ordinance of 1834 provides for the col- 
lection of back assessments, as follows : 



Street Department. 119 

Section 5. Be it further ordained, That for the purpose of making 
and collecting assessments for common sewers heretofore constructed by 
the city, the expenses of which have not already been assessed and col- 
lected, it shall be the duty of the city marshal and the auditor of accounts 
to proceed in relation to all such sewers in the same manner as they are 
by this ordinance directed to proceed in relation to those which may 
hereafter be constructed. 

An Ordinance to establish the Office of Superintendent of Sewers. 
June 6, 1837. 

Section 1. There shall be appointed annually in the month of May 
or June, by concurrent vote of the city council, a superintendent of 
common sewers. . . . 

Sect. 3. The said Superintendent, whenever any common sewer is 
ordered to be built or repaired, shall ascertain its depth, breadth, mode 
of construction, and general direction, and make apian thereof, and insert 
the same, with all those particulars, in a book to be kept for that 
purpose, and forthwith ascertain and insert on said plan all entries 
made into such sewer, and obtain from the assessors' book the valuation 
of all estates which shall be benefited thereby. 

Sect. 4. The said Superintendent shall keep an account of the 
expense of constructing each common sewer, and assess the expense 
upon the persons and estates deriving benefit therefrom ; and after having 
completed said assessment he shall report the same to the mayor and 
aldermen, and if sanctioned by them, he shall enter the same in books 
to be kept for that purpose, and shall forthwith make out bills for the 
said assessments against all persons whose drains have entered the 
common sewer, or who have been otherwise benefited thereby, and 
deliver the same to the city treasurer for collection ; and the said 
treasurer shall forthwith present the same for payment; and all bills 
or dues under this ordinance which shall remain unpaid at the expira- 
tion of sixty days shall be handed to the city solicitor, and forthwith 
be put in suit. 

Sect. 5. The said Superintendent shall proceed forthwith to make 
all assessments for common sewers heretofore constructed by the city, 
the expenses of which have not already been assessed and collected, in 
the same manner as he is by this ordinance directed to proceed in rela- 
tion to those which may hereafter be constructed. 

The above ordinance comprises, in a condensed form, all 
the provisions of former statutes and ordinances. 

An Act in relation to Main Brains or Common Sewers. Passed 1841. 
Accepted by the City Council April 7, 1841. 

The only new feature introduced by this act is the clause 
relative to the sewer assessment, and the clause under which 
the city of Boston assumed one-quarter of the expense of 
construction, which is as follows : 

And all assessments so made shall constitute a lien on the real estate 
assessed for one year after they are laid, and may, together with all in- 
cidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale thereof if the assessment 
is not paid within three months after a written demand of payment 
made, either upon the person assessed or upon any person occupying 
the estate, such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales for the 
non-payment of taxes. 



120 City Document No. 34. 

Sect. 4. Any person who may deem himself aggrieved by any such 
assessment may, at any time within three months from receiving notice 
thereof, appeal to the county commissioners, or if the case arise in the 
city of Boston . . . to the court of common pleas; . . . pro- 
vided, however, that in all cases of appeal as aforesaid, the appellant, 
before entering it, shall give one month's notice in writing to . . . 
mayor and aldermen of his intention to appeal and shall therein par- 
ticularly specify the points of his objection to the assessment made by 
them, to which specification he shall be confined upon the hearing of 
the appeal. 

Sect. 5. . . . and in the city of Boston not less than one-quarter 
part of such expense [of constructing, maintaining, and repairing main 
drains or common sewers] shall be paid by said city, and shall not be 
charged upon those using the said main drains or common sewers. 

Ordinance passed June 14, 1841. 

This ordinance is drawn in conformity with the act passed 
April 7, 1841, and contains no new features. 

Ordinance passed December 31, IS 62. 

~No owner or owners of any real estate, to whom permission has been 
or shall be given to construct pi'ivate drains for such estate, shall by the 
construction of such private drains be exempted from an assessment 
lawfully imposed for constructing common sewers in the same vicinity. 

Statutes and Ordinances in Force 1869. 
Statutes. 

Section 4. Every person who enters his particular drain into such 
main drain or common sewer, or who, by more remote means, receives 
benefit thereby, for the draining his cellar or land, shall pay to the city 
or town a proportional part of the charge of making and repairing the 
same, to be ascertained, assessed, and certified by the mayor and alder- 
men or selectmen, and notice thereof shall be given to the party to be 
charged, or his tenant or lessee. 

Sect. 5. Assessments so made shall constitute a lien on the real 
estates assessed for one year after they are laid, and may, together 
with incidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale thereof, if the 
assessment is not paid within three months after a written demand for 
payment, made either upon the person assessed, or upon any person 
occupying the estate ; such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales 
for the non-payment of taxes. 

Sect. 6. A person aggrieved by such assessment may, at any time 
within three months from receiving notice thereof, apply for a jury. 
Such application shall be made in like manner, and the proceedings 
thereon shall be the same, as in case of lands taken for laying out of 
highways ; provided, that before making his application the party shall 
give one month's notice in writing to the selectmen or mayor and alder- 
men of his intention so to apply, and shall therein particularly specify 
his objections to the assessment made by them ; to which specification 
he shall be confined upon the hearing by the jury. 

Sect 7. . . . and in the city of Boston not less than one-quarter 
part of such expense [of constructing, maintaining, and repairing main 
drains and common sewers] shall be paid by the city, and shall not be 
charged upon those using the main drains and common sewers. 



Street Department. 121 

Ordinances. 

Section 5. He [superintendent of sewers] shall keep an accurate 
account of the expense of constructing and repairing each common 
sewer, and shall report the same to the board of aldermen, together 
with a list of the persons and estates deriving benefit therefrom, and 
an estimate of the value of the lands upon which said expense ought to 
be assessed, exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon. 

Sect. 6. The board of aldermen, in making assessments for defray- 
ing the expense of constructing or repairing common sewers-, pursuant 
to the provisions of this ordinance, shall deduct therefrom such part, 
not less than one-quarter, as they may deem expedient, to be charged to 
and paid by the city; and they shall assess the remainder thereof upon 
the persons and estates deriving benefit from such common sewer, 
either by the entry of their particular drains, or by any more remote 
means, apportioning the assessment according to the value of the lands 
thus benefited, exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon ; 
and they shall also fix the time when the proportion of the assessments 
charged upon persons benefited shall be paid. 

Sect. 7. The superintendent shall enter in books kept for that pur- 
pose all such assessments made by the board of aldermen, and shall 
forthwith make out bills for the same and deliver them to the city 
treasurer for collection ; and the city treasurer shall forthwith demand 
payment in writing of the said bills, in the manner prescribed by law; 
and if any bills or dues under this ordinance remain unpaid at the 
expiration of three months after demand for payment or collection, the 
city treasurer shall cause the same to be collected by the proper legal 
process. 

Sect. 9. It shall be lawful for all persons, having the care of any 
buildings, to carry the rain water from the roofs of said buildings, at 
their own expense, into any common sewers, free of any charge from the 
city ; provided, hoivever, that the same be done by tight water spouts and 
tubes under ground, and under the direction of the board of aldermen. 

Sect 14. No owner or owners of any real estate to whom permis- 
sion has been or shall be given to construct private drains for such 
estate shall, by the construction of such private drains, be exempted 
from an assessment lawfully imposed for constructing common sewers 
in the same vicinity. 

An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance in relation to Common Sewers 
and Drains. Passed July, 1875. 

Be it ordained by the Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Boston, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
Section 1. The ordinance in relation to common sewers and drains 
is hereby amended by striking out, in the twelfth line of the sixth section, 
the word "value," and inserting in place thereof the word "area;" 
also by striking out, in the thirteenth and fourteenth lines of said sec- 
tion, the words " exclusive of any buildings or improvements thereon." 

An Act to establish the Office of Collector of Taxes. Passed May 3, 1875. 
Sect. 2. Said collector shall have the powers now possessed by the 
treasurer of said city as collector of taxes, and shall also collect and re- 
ceive all assessments. ... , 

Acts and Resolves -passed by the General Court of Massachusetts, 1878. 

(Chapter 232.) 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Section 4 of chapter 48 of the Statutes of 1869 of the 
General Statutes is hereby amended by inserting before the words " to 



122 City Document No. 34. 

be ascertained " the words " and of the charge, not already assessed, of 
making and repairing other main drains or common sewers through 
which the same discharges." 

Sect. 3. The city council of any city . . . may adopt a system 
of sewerage to apply to any part or the whole of the territory of such 
city . . . and may provide that the assessment authorized by sec- 
tion four shall be made upon the owners of the estates embraced in 
such system, by a fixed uniform rate, based upon the estimated average 
cost of alLrthe sewers therein, according to the number of feet of area 
their said estates contain within a fixed depth from such street or way, 
or both, according to such frontage and area, which rate when adopted 
shall not be changed. 

Approved May 8, 1878. 

Section 1 above mentioned makes a radical change in the 
method of assessing the cost of sewers, inasmuch as it pre- 
scribed that not only the cost of the particular sewer should 
be assessed on the abutter, but also a proportionate part of 
the cost of all other sewers through which the same dis- 
charged. 

Acts and Resolves passed by the General Court of Massachusetts, 1879. 

(Chapter 55.) 
Be it enacted, etc. : 

Section 1. Section 3 of chapter 232 of the Acts of "the year 1878 is 
hereby amended by adding at the end thereof the following words : 
'■'■provided, however, that in respect to any estate fronting upon such 
street or way which by reason of its grade or level, or for any other 
cause, cannnot be drained into such sewer, the selectmen shall not ascer- 
tain, assess, and certify the assessment thereon, or give notice of such 
assessment to the owner of such estate, until the incapacity of such 
estate to be drained into such sewer has been removed. 

Approved February 21, 1879- 

Public Statutes. Enacted November 19, 1881, to take effect February 1, 

1882. 

(Chapter 50.) 

Sect. 4. Every person who enters his particular drain into such 
main drain or common sewer, or who, by more remote means, received 
benefit thereby for draining his cellar or land, shall pay to the city or 
town a proportional part of the charge of making and repairing the 
same, and of the charge, not already assessed, of making and repairing 
other main drains and common sewers through which the same dis- 
charges, to be ascertained, assessed, and certified by the mayor and 
aldermen or selectmen ; and notice thereof shall be given-to the party 
to be charged, or to his tenant or lessee. 

Sect. 5. Assessments so made shall for one year after they are laid 
constitute a lien on the real estates assessed, and may, together with 
incidental costs and expenses, be levied by sale of such real estate, if 
the assessment is not paid within three months after a written demand 
for payment, made either upon the pei*son assessed or upon any person 
occupying the estate; such sale to be conducted in like manner as sales 
for the payment of taxes. 

Sect. 6. A person aggrieved by such assessment may, at any time 
within three months after receiving notice thereof, apply for a jury. 
Such amplication shall be made in like manner and the proceedings 



Street Department. 123 

thereof shall be the same as in case of lands taken for laying out high- 
ways ; provided, that before making his application the party shall give 
one month's notice in writing to the selectmen or road commissioners, 
or mayor and aldermen, of his intention so to apply, and shall therein 
particularly specify his objections to the assessment; to which specifi- 
cation he shall be confined upon the hearing by the jury. 

Sect. 7. The city council of a city or the legal voters of a town may 
adopt a system of sewerage for a part or the whole of its territory, and 
may provide that assessments under section 4 shall be made upon own- 
ers of estates within such territory by a fixed uniform rate, based upon 
the estimated average cost of all sewers therein, according to the front- 
age of such estates on any street or way where a sewer is constructed, 
or according to the area of such estates within a fixed depth from such 
street or way, or according to both such frontage or area; but no assess- 
ment in respect to any such estate which, by reason of its grade or level, 
or for any other cause, cannot be drained into such sewer, shall be 
made, certified, or notified until such incapacity is removed. 

Sect. It. Nothing herein contained shall prevent a city or town 
from providing, b} r ordinance or otherwise, that a part of the expense of 
constructing, maintaining, and repairing main drains or common sew- 
ers shall be paid by such city or town. And in the city of Boston not 
less than one quarter of such expense shall be paid by the city, and 
shall not be charged upon those using the main drains or common 
sewers. 

Sect. 25. In a city or town which has accepted the provisions of 
this section or of chapter 249 of the Statutes of 1878, if the owner of 
real estate within sixty days after notice of a sewer or sidewalk assess- 
ment thereon notifies in writing the board making such assessment to 
apportion the same, said board shall apportion it into three equal parts, 
and certify such apportionment to the assessors ; and the assessors 
shall add one of said parts, with interest from the date of apportion- 
ment, to the annual tax of said real estate for each of the three years 
next ensuing. All liens for the collection of such assessments shall 
continue until the expiration of two years from the time when the 
last instalment is committed to the collector; and all sewer and side- 
walk assessments remaining unpaid after the time of payment stated 
in the order making the same shall draw interest from such time until 
paid. 

Section 25 passed 1878. Accepted by the city January, 1885. 

Chapter 145 of the Acts of 1883. 

Section five of chapter fifty of the Public Statutes, relating to sewer 
assessments constituting a lien upon real estate, is hereby amended by 
adding thereto the following clause, viz. : " And real estate so sold may 
be redeemed the same as if sold for the non-payment of taxes, and in 
the same manner." April 24, 1883. 

Chapter 237 of the Acts of 1884. 

Section 1. All assessments on account of betterments and other 
public improvements which are a lien upon real estate shall bear inter- 
est from the thirtieth day after assessment until paid. 

Sect. 2. in case of any suit or other proceeding calling in question 
the validity or amount of such assessment, the assessment shall continue 
to be a lien for one year after final judgment in such suit or proceed- 
ings, and may, witii all costs and interest, be collected by virtue of such 
lien in the same manner as provided for the original assessment. 

Approved May 15, 1884. 



124 City Document No. 34. 

Chapter 210 of the Acts of 1886. 

Section five of chapter fifty of the Public Statutes is hereby amended 
so that assessments for main drains or common sewers hereafter made 
shall constitute a lien on the real estates assessed for two years instead 
of one year. 

Passed May 14, 1886. 

Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1889. 

An Act to Provide for the Making and Collecting of Sewer 

Assessments in the City of Boston. 

Section 1. The owner of each estate in the city of Boston bordering 
on a street or on a strip of land through which a main drain or common 
sewer shall hereafter be constructed in said city, may enter a particular 
drain into such main drain or common sewer from that part of said estate 
which is situated within one hundred feet from said street or strip of 
land ; and shall upon and after such entry pay to the said city an assess- 
ment on such estate equal to the number of square feet of land thereof, 
within one hundred feet of such street or strip of land multiplied by the 
number representing one two-hundredth part of the average cost per 
running foot of all the main drains and common sewers of the city of 
Boston, built during the five fiscal years preceding the date of the order 
to build such main drain or common sewer. 

No estate shall be assessed more than once for the construction of a 
di'ain or sewer except as hereinafter provided, but such estate may be 
assessed in the manner aforesaid for the cost of renewal or repair of a 
drain or sewer. 

Sect. 2. The amount of every such assessment shall, immediately 
upon the completion of the main drain or common sewer, be made and 
determined by the superintendent of sewers of said city, and interest 
shall be added to the amount assessed at the rate of five per cent, per 
annum from the date of completion of the main drain or common 
sewer, as certified in writing by said superintendent in a book to be 
kept for that purpose in his office ; and notice of the date of such com- 
pletion and of the amount of such assessment shall be given by said 
superintendent to the person assessed forthwith after the amount of the 
assessment has been determined. 

Sect. 3. The owner of an estate not bordering on a street or strip of 
land through which a main drain or common sewer is constructed, or 
of an estate bordering on such street or strip of land extending more 
than one hundred feet in depth therefrom, may, after the amount of the 
assessment on such estate to be paid therefor has, on the petition of 
such owner, been fixed by the board of aldermen of said city, enter from 
such first-named estate, or from any part of such last-named estate, 
situated more than one hundred feet from the street or strip of land, a 
particular drain into the main drain or common sewer, and shall upon 
and after such entry pay to the said city the amount of the assessment 
fixed as aforesaid ; but such amount shall not exceed the amount he 
would have had to pa)' under section one of this act if his estate had 
bordered on such street or strip of land and had been only one hundred 
feet in depth therefrom. 

Sect. 4. Upon the request of an owner of an estate on which an 
assessment has been made under this act, made to the board of assessors 
of said city within ten days after any entry aforesaid, said board of 
assessors shall apportion the same into three equal parts, and shall add 
one of said parts with interest as aforesaid to the annual tax of said es- 
tate for each of the three years next ensuing. 

Sect. 5. Every assessment made under this act shall constitute a 
lien upon the estate assessed until it is paid, and may with all incidental 
costs and expenses be levied and collected, in the same manner as taxes 



Street Department. 125 

on real eslate are levied and collected ; and a person aggrieved by any 
such assessment may, at any time within ten days after any entry afore- 
said, apply for and have an abatement of his assessment in the same 
manner and under like rules of law as a person may apply for and have 
an abatement of taxes. 

Sect. 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 7, 1889. 

In Board of Aldermen, October 7, 1889. 
Ordered, That the amount of sewer assessment which any owner of 
an estate not bordering on a street or strip of land through winch a main 
drain or common sewer is constructed, or of an estate bordering on such 
street or strip of land extending more than one hundred feet in depth 
therefrom, shall pay, upon entry into said main drain or common sewer, 
is hereby fixed and determined at the same amount per square foot 
which the estates bordering on said street or strip of land are obliged to 
pay, under the provisions of chapter 456 of the Acts and Resolves of the 
Legislature of 1889. And the Superintendent of Sewers is hereby 
instructed to levy assessments for such amounts on all parties apptying 
for permission to enter said main drains or common sewers from estates 
coming under the provisions of section 3 of said chapter. 

Chapter 346 of the Acts of 1890. 

An Act to Amend an Act relating to Sewer Asesssments in the 
City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Section one of chapter four hundred and fifty-six of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty-nine is hereby amended by 
striking out, in the ninth line, the words, "the number of square feet," 
and inserting in place thereof the words " one cent for each square 
foot," and also by striking out all after the word "land" in the tenth 
line, and before the words " No estate" in the fifteenth line, and insert- 
ing in place thereof the words: "provided, however, that if the total 
amount of the assessments for said sewer exceeds the total sum of the 
cost of the sewer, plus a proportionate part of the cost of the outlet 
thereof, each of said assessments shall be proportionately reduced so 
that the total amount thereof shall be equal to said sum," so that said 
section shall read as follows : 

Section 1. The owner of each estate in the city of Boston border- 
ing on a street or strip of land through which a main drain or common 
sewer shall hereafter be constructed in said city may enter a particular 
drain into such main drain or common sewer from that part of said 
estate which is situated within one hundred feet from said street or strip 
of land; atid shall upon and after such entry pay to said city an assess- 
ment on such estate equal to one cent for each square foot of land there- 
of within one hundred feet of such street or strip of land ; provided, 
however, that if the total amount of the assessments for said sewer 
exceeds the total sum of the cost of the sewer, plus a proportionate part 
of the cost of the outlet thereof, each of said assessments shall be pro- 
portionately reduced, so that the total amount thereof shall be equal to 
said sum. No estate shall be assessed more than once for the con- 
struction of a drain or sewer, except as hereinafter provided, but such 
estate may be assessed in the manner aforesaid for the cost of renewal 
or repair of a drain or sewer. 

Sect. 2. Section five of said chapter is hereby amended by striking 
out, in the second line, the word " assessed," and inserting in the place 
thereof the words, " on which the assessment is made ; " also by striking 
out, in the fourth and fifth lines, the words " levied and," and also by 
striking out all after the word " collected " in the fifth line, and insert- 



126 City Document No. 34. 

ing in the place thereof the words : " The city collector of said city shall 
have power to collect, and the assessors of taxes of said city shall have 
power to abate, such assessments ; and all laws relating to the col- 
lection and abatement of taxes in said city shall, so far as applicable, 
apply to the collection and abatement of such assessments ; and when 
an assessment is made upon a person or corporation by law exempt 
from the assessment of taxes, the said assessors shall notify said col- 
lector not to enforce the collection of such assessment ; but when an 
estate, the collection of the assessment upon which has not been en- 
forced under such notice, comes into the possession of another person as 
owner, the amount of such assessment shall be paid by such new owner 
in like manner, subject to the same provisions of law as if an original 
assessment," so that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

iSect. 5. Every assessment made under this act shall constitute a 
lien upon the estate on which the assessment was made until it is paid, 
and may, with all incidental costs and expenses, be collected in the same 
manner as taxes on real estate are collected. 

The city collector of said city shall have power to collect, and the 
assessors of taxes of said city shall have power to abate, such assess- 
ments ; and all laws relating to the collection and abatement of taxes in 
said city shall, so far as applicable, apply to the collection and abate- 
ment of such assessments ; and when an assessment is made upon a per- 
son or corporation by law exempt from the assessment of taxes, the said 
assessors shall notify said collector not to enforce the collection of such 
assessment; but when an estate, the collection of the assessment upon 
which has not been enforced under such notice, comes into the posses- 
sion of another person as owner, the amount of such assessment shall be 
paid by such new owner in like manner, subject to the same provisions 
of law as if an original assessment. 

Sect. 3. The board of aldermen of said city shall adjust all sewer 
assessments made under this act so that the said assessments shall be as 
if made under the said act as hereby amended, and said city shall there- 
upon refund any excess in the amount of said assessments paid to said 
city. 

Sect. 4. The repeal or alteration by this act of any provisions of law 
shall not affect any act done, liability incurred, or right accrued and 
established, or any suit or proceedings to enforce such right or liability, 
under the authority of the laws hereby repealed or altered, except as 
hereinbefore provided. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 28, 1890. 

An Ordinance to amend Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordinances of 1890, 
relating to the Street Department, as approved by the Mayor, March 
9, 1891. 

Section 5. Said superintendent [of streets] shall keep a book in which 
he shall record the date of every order for constructing a sewer, the 
name of the contractor or builder constructing it, the date of commenc- 
ing and the date of completing the work, and the cost of the sewer; also 
a book in which he shall certify the names of the owners of estates 
assessed for the constructing of the sewer, the number of feet of land 
of each estate bordering on the street or strip of land 'in which the sewer 
was laid, the depth of each estate, the amount of each assessment, the 
date of completion of the sewer, and the dates when the notices of as- 
sessment were given. 

He shall make and deliver to the city collector all bills for assess- 
ments as they become due. 

Sect. 10. . . . but before issuing a permit for entering a particular 
drain into a public sewer, from land upon which a sewer assessment has 
not been paid, he [superintendent of streets] shall be paid for the city 



Steeet Department. 127 

an assessment of one cent per square foot, for all land in the estate from 
which the entiy is made, within one hundred feet of the street or strip 
of land in which the sewer or particular drain is laid, except as other- 
wise provided in section 1 of chapter 346 of the Acts of 1890. 

Chapter 402 of the Acts of 1892. 
An Act relating to Sewers in the City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston may 
order that the superintendent of streets of said city make a sewer or 
sewers in any highway or strip of land and any other places in said city, 
specifying in the order the locutions, sizes, and materials for the sewer 
or sewers, and the said superintendent shall carry out said order. 

Sect. 2. Any expenses incurred for any work so ordered and per- 
formed shall be paid out of the moneys appropriated under the pro- 
visions of section one of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and shall, to an 
amount not exceeding four dollars for each lineal foot of sewer, be re- 
paid to said city as the assessable cost of the work, by the owners of the 
several parcels of land bordering on the highway or strip of land in 
which the sewer is made. 

Sect. 3. Said superintendent shall so apportion the assessable cost to 
the parcels of land aforesaid that the amount apportioned to each parcel 
shall bear to the total assessable cost the proportion which the number 
of lineal feet of each parcel on said highway or strip of land bears to 
the number of such lineal feet of all such pai'cels, and a lien shall attach 
to the parcel and to any buildings which may be thereon lor such 
amount, as a part of the tax of said parcel. Said superintendent shall 
give notice of the amount of every such assessment and the interest 
thereon to the owner of the parcel liable therefor, forthwith after such 
amount has been determined. 

Sect. 4. When an assessment is made for a parcel of land for 
which the owner is by law exempt from being taxed, as determined and 
certified to by the assessors of said city on application to them therefor, 
the collector of taxes of said city shall suspend the collection of such 
assessment ; but after the day on which the pai*cel ceases to be owned 
by a person or corporation so exempt, the amount of such assessment, 
less any payment made for an entry under the following section, shall 
be collected as if that day were the date of the passage of the aforesaid 
order for making the sewer. 

Sect. 5. The owner of any parcel of land on which an assessment 
has been made for said cost, and the collection of which has not been 
suspended, under the provisions of the preceding section, may enter 
from any part thereof, within one hundred and twenty-five feet of said 
highway or strip of land, a particular drain into such sewer, and the 
owner of any parcel of land, the collection of the assessment upon 
wilich has been so suspended, or of any other parcel of land, may, 
after the amount to be paid for an entry has been fixed by the mayor 
and aldermen of said city, enter a particular drain from such parcel 
into said sewer, and there shall be clue and payable to said city, upon 
any such entry, the amount of the assessment apportioned or fixed as 
hereinbefore provided. 

Sect. 6. The provisions of sections sixteen, seventeen, and eighteen 
of chapter three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and acts in amendment thereof, so far 
as applicable, apply to all assessments made under this act. 

Sect. 7. Chapter four hundred and fifty-six of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, and chapter three hundred and forty - 
six of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety, are hereby 



128 City Document No. 34. 

repealed, and sewers in said city shall hereafter be made and paid for only 
in accordance with the provisions of this act or the provisions of chapter 
three hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-one and acts in amendment thereof. 

Sect. 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 16, 1892. 

Chapter 418 oj the Acts of the Year 1892. 

Section 16 of chapter 323 of the acts of the year 1891 amended. 

If the amount of the aforesaid assessable cost for which any parcel of 
land is liable, determined as provided in section fifteen, is not paid 
before the expiration of one year from the date of said determination, 
or if such amount as found by the court, on an appeal or other suit or 
proceeding, is not paid before the last day of May next succeeding the 
finding of the court, in each case with interest from the date of the 
passage of the aforesaid order of said street commissioners, at the rate 
of four and one-half percent, per annum, the board of assessors of said 
city shall include a sum equal to nine per cent, of such amount in the 
next succeeding annual tax bills issued for the tax on the said parcel, and 
in the tax bills issued the first year shall also include interest on the 
whole of said amount at the rate of four and one- half per cent, per 
annum from the date of the afoi'esaid order to the last day of October of 
the year of the date of such tax bill, and in the tax bills for each suc- 
ceeding year shall include one year's interest on the whole of said 
amount at the aforesaid rate, and shall so include such sums and 
interest until ten such sums with interest have been paid ; said board 
shall issue tax bills for such sums for any parcels for which no tax bill 
would otherwise be issued. Every such sum in a tax bill shall be 
abated, collected, and paid into the city treasury, as if a part of and in 
the same manner as the city taxes. 

Section 17 of chapter 323 of the acts of the year 1891 amended. 

The owner of any parcel of land aforesaid may at any time pay to 
said city the balance of the amount of the said assessable cost for which 
his parcel is liable, remaining due after deducting therefrom the several 
sums, exclusive of interest, included in tax bills as provided in section 
sixteen, with interest on the whole amount assessed at the rate of four and 
one-half per centum per annum from the last day of October pi'eceding. 
to the date of payment, and his parcel shall then be relieved from 
further lien and liability for said cost, or he may at any time pay a part 
of said balance, and the board of street commissioners may then, at 
their discretion, with the approval of the mayor, relieve a proportional 
part of said parcel from further liability and lien for said cost. 

Approved June 16, 1892. 

(N.B. — The Board of Aldermen have taken no action in regard to 
fixing the amount to be paid for entry into sewer by the owner of a 
parcel of land, the collection of the assessment upon which has been 
suspended) . 

Sewer Assessments. (Discussion.) 

The question of assessing the cost of a sewer upon the 
people benefited by its construction is a perplexing one. 
The foregoing; r6sum& of laws and statutes relative to sewers 
shows how the method of assessment has been repeatedly 
changed. 

The earliest law (1709) provided that the inhabitants of 



Street Department. 129 

the town build their own sewers and pay for them, and no 
reference in this law is therefore made to assessments. 

The law of 1823, which tirst provided that the city should 
build the sewers, was very indefinite concerning the method 
of assessment ; and as future laws referred to the manner in 
which the expense of all sewers built and not previously 
assessed was to be collected, it is fair to suppose that trouble 
was experienced in interpreting the law of 1823 in regard 
to assessments. 

The law of 1834 introduced a clause referring to the valu- 
ation of the estate benefited by the sewer, which was to 
have some bearing on the amount of the assessment levied. 
As the law did not specify exactly in what manner the valu- 
ation of the estate bears on the amount of the sewer assess- 
ment, it must have been impossible to determine the amount 
of sewer assessments. 

The law of 1841 provided that the city should assume one 
quarter of the cost of construction of the main sewers. 

This clause was probably introduced on account of the 
increased cost of main sewers. The assessing of the whole 
expense of large main sewers on the abutters probably 
proved burdensome, and this method was adopted to even 
up the difference in cost of main and branch sewers. 

The amendment of the ordinance of 1875 in regard to 
sewer assessments provides that the benefit from sewers 
should be proportionate to the area instead of to the value of 
abutting property. 

The report of the Superintendent of Sewers of that year 
mentions that " the change has diminished the amount of ar- 
bitrary judgment demanded in fixing values and reduced the 
labor of equably apportioning the cost of sewers." 

The next radical change is found in the law of 1878, in which 
it is provided that a person who enters his drain into a com- 
mon sewer shall not only pay a proportional part of the cost 
of the common sewer, but also a proportional part of the 
cost of all other common and main sewers through which the 
particular sewer discharges. 

While this law had the advantage that after the cost of all 
sewers in a given drainage district had been determined, it 
would be possible to assess the cost on the abutters in such 
a manner that all assessments were in proportion to the bene- 
fit gained, and while it solved the vexed question of whether 
a drain was a main drain and the city should therefore pay 
one-quarter of the expense, or whether it was a common drain 
and the abutter should therefore pay the whole cost, it had 
the great disadvantage that it became impossible to levy 
sewer assessments until every sewer in the drainage area had 



130 City Document No. 34. 

been completed, as the cost of mains through which a branch 
sewer discharged was* in some cases an unknown quantity. 

The following extract from the report of the Superinten- 
dent of Sewers for the year 1887 is given as bearing on this 
subject, and as bearing on the general question of sewer 
assessment laws in force at that time : 

The question of how to equitably assess a proportion of the cost of 
sewers upon those deriving benefit therefrom is a vexing one. 

The ordinary interpretation of the statutes and the city ordinances 
bearing upon the question allows such a large margin for the exercise 
of judgment, that there is always a chance for objections being raised 
and dissatislaction expressed at every schedule of assessment. 

The present method (1887) of laying assessments is based upon 
the custom of the department for the last fifteen years, and though 
having, perhaps, some points in its favor, is certainly open to objections. 

A party draining into a sewer receives the same benefit per square 
foot of land drained, or any other unit, whether entering a 10-inch, 
12-inch, or 15-inch pipe sewer, or a 4-foot sewer, whether the sewer is 
laid in easy digging or in a rock cut; and as, according to the present 
method (1887) of making up assessments, the cost of the particular 
sewer in front of the premises to be drained (except in the case of 
main sewers) is the basis on which the assessment is calculated, one 
sewer may call for an assessment $0,005 per square foot, and another, 
where rock cutting or other obstacle is encountered, may call for as 
high as $0.(1-1 or $0.05 per square foot for exactly the same benefit ; i.e., 
the right of entering the sewer for the purpose of drainage. Thei'e 
being this difference in the charges, parties desiring sewers generally 
assume the smallest cost when petitioning for sewers, and are dissatis- 
fied if the bills, when rendered, amount to more. 

I am satisfied that the uniform rate per square foot of land benefited, 
or a uniform cost per linear foot of sewer, can be established, based 
upon the average cost of sewers already built, which will yield an 
equal amount of revenue to the city, and be more equitable and satis- 
factory to those assessed. 

This fixed charge being known in advance, parties wanting sewers 
may determine to a certainty what they will have to pay, and therefore 
be able to decide intelligently on the advisability of petitioning the 
Board of Aldermen. It is difficult to see why an individual, in order 
to drain his house lot, should be called upon to pay a high rate because 
rock or other obstacle was encountered during the construction of a 
sewer in his immediate vicinity, or because the conditions were such as 
to render an 18-inch pipe necessary, when in other places a 10-inch 
pipe might answer. 

As the question of assessments is an important one, and involves a 
deal of s udy to find out, through the successive changes in statutes and 
ordinances, why the present system was adopted, I would recommend 
that a special committee, or the Committee on Sewers of the Board of 
Alderman, together wtith the Corporation Counsel and the Superinten- 
dent of Sewers, take the matter under considei'ation, with a view to 
seeing if the present system could not be improved upon. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Superin- 
tendent of Sewers, the passage of Chapter 450 of the Acts 
of 1889 was obtained, providing for an assessment on land 
within 100 feet of the street in which the sewer was sit- 
uated, amounting to the sum obtained by multiplying the 



Street Department. 131 

number of square feet of land within 100 feet of the street 
by the number representing one two-hundredth part of the 
average cost per running foot of all the main and common 
sewers of the city of Boston built during the five fiscal years 
preceding. 

Assuming that land extended back 100 feet from the 
street, and that the average cost of all sewers was $4.00 per 
linear foot, this method gave an assessment of two cents per 
square foot. 

This act, which returned a fair percentage of the cost of 
sewers to the city treasury, was amended by Chapter 346 of 
the Act of 1890, by making the sewer assessment one cent 
per square foot of land instead of two cents, and further pro- 
vided that if the cost of the sewer was less than the amount 
returned to the city by an assessment of one cent per square 
foot, then the assessment should be reduced proportionately. 

All sewer assessments made under the Act of 1889 were 
adjusted according to the Act of 1890, and the money col- 
lected was refunded. 

In order to show the effect of the law of 1878 and the 
law of 1889, as amended in Chapter 346 of the Acts of 1890, 
on the finances of the city, the following tables are inserted. 
As shown by the tables the practical effect of the law of 
1878 is to return to the city treasury only 38 per cent, of the 
amount expended for sewer construction, and the effect of 
the law of 1889, as amended in 1890, is to return only 21 per 
cent, of the amount expended. 



132 



City Document No. 34. 



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Street Department. 



133 



An analysis of this table shows that of the sum of $3,760,- 
158.87, the sum of $1,827,151.69 was expended for actual 
sewer construction; of the balance, or $1,933,007.18, the 
sum of $608,422.40 was expended for Stony Brook construc- 
tion, and the sum of $1,324,584.78 was expended for the 
maintenance of the Sewer Division, including the mainten- 
ance of the Main Drainage Works. 

Of the amount expended for sewer construction, the sum 
of $687,897.67 has been levied against abutting estates in the 
form of assessments ; this amount being about 38 per cent, 
of the actual cost of the sewers constructed. 

The amount of assessments levied, in comparison with the 
amount expended for sewer construction, has varied largely 
from year to year, both on account of former looseness in 
making up sewer assessments, and also owing to the changes 
which have been made in the laws. An inspection of this 
table shows that in 1884 the sum of $240,027.27 was ex- 
pended for sewer construction, and only the sum of 
$14,334.81 was levied in assessments. On the other hand, 
in 1888 the sum of $129,268.49 was expended 'for sewer 
construction, and the sum of $151,017.48 was levied in 
assessments. This is accounted for by the fact that the 
department that year made up a large number of back assess- 
ments which had been allowed to accumulate. 



Operation of the Law or 1889 as amended in 1890. 
In order to determine the exact amount which the city 
received in assessments for sewers constructed under the law 
of 1889, as amended in 1890, the following table has been 
prepared showing the cost and amount assessed of every 
sewer built under this law. The table shows that the cost of 
building 151 sewers amounted to $637,785.38, of which 
amount the city assessed the sum of $132,594.78 on the 
abutters, or about twenty-one per cent. 

Table Xo. II. — Sewer Assessments under Law of 1889 as 
amended in 1890. 



Sewers built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 1S89, as amended by Chap. 

346 of the Acts of 1890. 


Cost. 


Assess. 
ment. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Rate per 
foot sewer. 


Adams, Beaumont, and Burgoyue streets, 
Ward 24 


$5,899 32 
21,095 01 

343 26 


$1,410 83 
4,078 54 

355 00 


$4,488 49 
17,010 47 


$5 72 
8 07 

1 06 


Adams and Codman sta., Ward 24 . . . 

Allian street, Ashmont to end of sewer, 
Ward 24 








$27,337 69 


$5,844 37 


$21,004 96 





134 



City Document No. 34. 

Table No. II. — Continued. 



Sewers built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 1889, as amended by Chap. 

346 of the Acts of 1890. 




Brought forward 



Allston street, Medford to Bunker Hill, 
Ward 4 



Arlington street, Ward 25 

Ashford st., Chester to Malvern, Ward 25, 
Ashmont street, Ward 24 



Ashmont street, private land, Washing- 
ton street, and part of Armandine 
street, Ward 24 



Back street, Austin street, and private 
land, Wards 23, 24 



Bailey street, Ward 24 . . 
Bainbridge street, Ward 21 
Baldwin street, Ward 4 . . 



Bay street, private land, Springdale 
street, etc., Savin Hill ave., and Gram- 
pian, way, Ward 24 



Bay State road, Ward 22 



Beacon street, Mountfort street to R.R., 
Ward 22 



Bellevue and Kane streets, Ward 24 . . . 

Blue Hill avenue, Dewey to Dalmatia, 
Ward 20 



Blue Hill ave., Southwood to Damascus, 
Ward 20 



Border, Eutaw to White St., Ward 1 . . 
Border, White to Condor, Ward 1 . . . 

Bowdoin street, Ward 24 

Bremen St., Porter to Brooks, Ward 1 . . 

Brent street, Ward 24 

BuukerHill st.,Ferrin to Green, Ward 2, 
Bunker Hill st., Green toConcord,Ward 2, 
Burnett street, Ward 23 



Byron street, Cowper to Coleridge, and 
Coleridge st., Byron to Rice, Ward 1 . 

C street, Fifth to Sixth, Ward 13 ... . 

Call street, Ward 23 

Calumet and Sachem sts., Ward 22 . . . 

Cambridge street, North Beacon to Web- 
ster avenue, Ward 25 



Cambridge street, from Saunders street, 
westerly, Ward 25 



$27,337 59 

880 10 
4,203 50 

448 35 
1,240 32 

14,887 11 

11,816 34 

5,059 78 

1,321 78 

672 99 

&23,929 45 
1,502 01 

454 82 

3.520 50 

501 27 

640 21 
1,563 09 
1,080 22 
1,299 97 
12,004 42 

924 35 
3,315 71 

429 70 

569 16 

1,499 77 

821 93 

1,033 37 

17,196 42 

1,292 78 

1.521 96 



Assess- 
ment. 





$5,844 37 


352 30 


1,490 91 


486 33 


1,176 99 


2,552 98 


2,848 93 


192 49 


7 35 


7,695 06 


1,052 16 


814 70 


303 11 


600 35 


1,153 73 


1,004 22 


1,288 00 


1,255 98 


821 54 


520 94 


«647 26 


1,208 00 
136 75 



487 86 
2,466 61 

684 40 

1,014 33 



Assumed 
by City. 



$21,504 96 

527 80 
2,712 59 



12,334 13 

11,816 34 

2,210 85 

1,129 29 

665 64 

16,234 39 
449 85 

454 82 
2,705 80 



409 36 

76 00 

11 97 

10,748 44 

102 81 

2,794 77 

429 70 



291 77 

685 18 

545 51 

14,729 81 

608 38 

507 63 



Rate per 
foot sewer. 



Curried forward $142,968 97 $38,107 65 $104,989 14 



Street Department. 

Table No. II. — Continued. 



135 



Sewers built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 18S9, as amended by Chap. 

346 of the Acts of 1890. 



Brought forward . . . 

Carruth St., Minot to Codman, Ward 24 . 

Cedar place, Ward 20 

Centre st., Highland to Marcella, Ward 21, 

Centre street, Pond to Lakeville pi., 
Ward 23 



Chelsea St., Vine to Perry, Ward 3 

Childs street, Ward 23 

Cleveland place, Ward 6 



Cohasset street, Corinth street to Stony 
Brook, Ward 23 



Colton st., First to Second, Ward 13 . . 

Columbia street, New Seaver to Oakland, 
Ward 24 



Common and Adams streets, Ward 5 . . 

Commonwealth avenue, Charlesgate W. 
to Brookline avenue, Ward 22 .... 



Commonwealth ave., Brookline ave. to 
Essex street, Ward 22 



Condor st., Meridian to Border, Ward 1, 

Condor St., Brooks to Putnam, Ward 1 . 

Crawford street, south-east from Hol- 
land, Ward 21 

Crawford and Holland ets., Ward 21 . . 

Creighton street, Ward 22 

Dalmatia and Cherry sts., Ward 20 . . . 

Day st., Minden to Mansur, Ward 22 . . 

Decatur St., Meridian to Border, Ward 2, 

Dewey street, Dacia to Blue Hill avenue, 
Ward 20 

Dorchester avenue, Crescent avenue, 
northerly, Ward 24 



Dunreath street, Warren, 200 feet east, 
Ward 21 



Dunstable street, Ward 5 , 
Dustin street, Ward 25 . , 
Edson street, Ward 24 . , 
Essex street, Ward 4 . . 



Essex and Federal streets and Mount 
Washington avenue, Ward 12 . . . . 

Everett street, Ward 25 



Carried forward 



Cost. 


$142,968 97 


875 61 


1,181 84 


379 84 


4,910 96 


1,380 64 


246 46 


320 88 


1,349 25 


370 01 


311 84 


1,247 22 


12,816 11 


37,677 00 


324 07 


625 52 


5,218 94 


7,865 41 


1,194 28 


753 79 


1,249 60 


7,928 69 


547 01 


1,506 37 


1,320 72 


232 27 


6,153 33 


1,710 86 


782 33 


57,061 22 


1,451 32 





38,107 65 
563 52 
202 56 
163 63 

850 00 
258 92 

52 25 
73 09 

1,152 46 



1,066 80 

5,916 44 
324 07 
625 52 

1,802 43 
879 49 

1,146 28 
120 80 
257 37 
542 21 

308 36 

914 63 

118 33 

139 30 
2,360 48 
1,419 33 

322 99 

492 87 



Assumed 
by City. 



$104,989 14 
312 09 
979 28 
216 21 

4,060 96 
1,121 72 

194 21 
247 79 

196 79 
370 01 

311 84 
956 50 

11,749 31 

31,760 56 



3,416 51 

6,9S5 92 

48 00 

632 99 

992 23 

7.3S6 48 

238 65 

591 74 

1,202 39 

92 97 

3,792 85 

291 53 

459 .34 

57,061 22 
958 45 



$301,962 36 $60,472 50 S241/.17 



Rate per 
foot 



$2 18 

4 55 
2 45 

■9 43 
2 42 

1 34 

5 09 

2 15 

1 88 

2 08 

3 SO 

11 28 

5 87 
1 19 

92 

4 60 

1 30 

1 72 

2 38 

5 85 
S 34 

2 13 

2 17 

4 62 
2 29 
4 30 
1 50 
1 90 

24 44 
4 68 



136 



City Document No. 34. 

Table No. II. — Continued. 



Sewers built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 1S89, as amended by Chap. 

348 of the Acts of 1890. 



Brought forward 



Exeter street, Providence to Huntington 
avenue, Ward 11 



Falcon St., Brooks to Putnam, Ward 1 

Faneuil street, Ward 25 

Florence street, Ward 23 



Franklin street, east from Raymond, 
Ward 25 



Gladstone street, Ward 1 . 
Leyden street, Ward 1 . . 
Walley street, Ward 1 . . 
Bennington street, Ward 1 



Gustin street, Ward 15 
Hill street, Ward 4 . . 



Cost. 



Hillside street, Parker Hill avenue to 
Sunset, Ward 22 



Homer st., Byron to Moore, Ward 1, 
and Byron, Homer to Horace 



Horace st., Moore to Byron, Ward 1 . . 

Howard avenue, Ward 20 

Hudson st., Curve to Beech st., Ward 12, 

Humboldt avenue, Walnut avenue to 
Munroe, Ward 21 



Humboldt avenue, Homestead to Seaver, 
Ward 21 



Irvington street, Ward 11 

Jeffries St., from No. 11 to Everett st., 
Ward 2 



Kent street, Ward 19 

Kilby street, Ward 6 

Kilton and Harvard streets, Ward 24 . . 

Lamartine street and private land, 
Ward 23 



Lawrence avenue, Ward 24 

Liberty and Preble streets, Ward 15 

Lincoln street, Ward 25 

Lynde street and outlet, Ward 5 . . 
Magazine street, Ward 20 



Magnolia street, Wayland to Robert 
avenue, Ward 20 



Magnolia and Lawrence ave., Ward 24 . 
Market street, Ward 25 



$301,962 36 

705 82 

1,748 82 

81 84 

1,178 95 

359 10 

40,447 29 

574 78 
886 05 

700 38 

1,845 65 

894 59 

1,124 82 

24,098 07 

2,546 26 

1,964 58 
623 78 

266 68 
2,558 97 
1,070 51 
13,246 74 

1,166 06 
241 47 

1,924 93 
238 18 
740 01 

4,993 48 

943 19 

7,896 15 
1,440 03 



Carried forward $418,469 54 



$60,472 50 

34 20 
936 24 

82 34 
864 54 

249 00 

8,525 00 

381 82 
85 33 

458 41 

1,000 00 
898 36 
121 88 

1,209 74 



1,012 16 
623 78 

135 00 

370 83 

188 01 

3,374 95 



Assumed 
by City. 



$241,617 68 

671 62 

812 5S 



123 50 
248.54 
238 18 



1,634 43 

175 33 

1,724 92 

343 86 



$86,259 28 



314 41 
110 10 

31,922 29 

192 96 
800 72 

241 97 

845 65 



1,002 94 
.22,888 33 

1,799 83 

952 42 



131 68 
2,188 14 

882 50 
9,871 79 

1,166 06 

117 97 

1,676 39 



740 01 
3,359 05 

767 86 
6,171 23 
1,096 17 



Rate per 
foot 



$332,342 35 



Street Department. 

Table No. II. — Continued. 



137 



Sewers 'built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 1889, as amended by Chap. 

346 of the Acts of 1890. 


Cost. 


Assess- 
ment. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Rate per 

foot 
sewer. 




$418,469 54 

978 72 


$86,259 28 
560 21 


$332,342 35 




Maverick street, Maverick square to 


418 51 


$1 82 


Maverick St., Short to Jeffries, Ward 2 . 


616 55 


578 37 


38 18 


1 96 




1,623 22 
6,595 61 


647 17 
991 40 


976 05 
5,604 21 


3 11 


Meridian St., Decatur to Saratoga, Wd. 2, 


5 84 


Monks St., Sixth to Seventh, Ward 14 . . 


336 38 




336 38 


1 64 


Morris St., Brooks to Putnam, Ward 1 . 


674 13 


484 50 


189 63 


1 26 


Mozart street, Lamartine to Chestnut 


352 52 
259 65 


129 30 
55 00 


223 22 
204 65 


1 41 


Mozart St., Centre St., 100 ft. south, Wd. 23, 


1 71 


Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester avenue to 


264 85 


192 00 


72 85 


1 51 


Mt. Vernon St., Boston to end of sewer, 
Ward 24 


1,099 72 
298 76 


932 00 
101 83 


167 72 
196 93 


2 24 


Myrtle St., Ash pi. to end of sewer, Wd. 9, 


2 06 


N St., Second to Third, Ward 14 ... . 


349 36 


330 00 


19 36 


1 67 


Neponset ave., Adams to Mill, Ward 24, 


817 20 


708 93 


108 27 


1 36 


New St., Maverick to Cross, Ward 2 . . 


321 35 


321 35 




1 59 


North Harvard and Rena sts., Ward 25 . 


5,174 16 


2,301 05 


2,873 11 


3 77 


street, First to Second, Ward 14 . . . 


461 21 


185 00 


276 21 


1 85 


Ocean St., Ashmont to Roslin, Ward 24 . 


712 69 


619 70 


92 99 


1 48 


Orleans street, Maverick to Sumner, ~| 
Ward 2 ! 

Sumner street, and Orleans to Cottage f 










15,467 71 
1,088 66 


1,666 97 
650 84 


13,800 74 
437 82 


12 79 


Parker Hill avenue, Tremont to Hillside, 
Ward 22 


3 14 


Parker Hill avenue, Hillside street, south, 
Ward 22 


1,177 34 
602 21 


899 56 

88 48 


277 78 
513 73 


2 32 


Paulding St., Bainbridge to Dale, Wd. 21, 


2 67 




2,861 47 


1,457 51 


1,403 96 


3 69 




414 67 


61 49 


353 18 


2 30 


Pope's Hill st. and Neponset ave., Wd.24, 


2,502 78 


1,640 90 


861 88 


2 66 


Porter St., Bremen to Bennington, Wd. 1, 


13,859 05 


1,051 79 


12,807 20 


10 53 


Private st., Leyden to Walley, Ward 1 . 


429 33 


77 48 


351 85 


1 55 


Putnam St., Bremen to Chelsea, Ward 1 . 


322 41 


160 00 


162 41 


1 85 


Raleigh and Beacon streets, Ward 22 . . 


12,107 41 


59] 64 


11,575 77 


13 47 




64,549 99 


1,111 14 


3,438 85 


5 24 




676 65 


450 14 


226 51 


1 66 


Reading street, Maiden lane to Farnham, 
Ward 20 


347 90 


286 34 


61 56 


2 04 








?495,873 20 


$105,591 37 


$390,413 92 





138 



City Document No. 34. 



Table No. II. — Concluded. 



Sewers built under Chap. 456 of the 

Acts of 1889, as amended by Chap. 

346 of the Acts of 1890. 



Brought forward . , 
Rockland street, Ward 25 



Roslindale main sewer, Washington to 
Beech, Ward 23 



Russell street, Ward 4 

Sackville street, Ward 4 

Scotia St., Bothnia to end of sewer, Wd. 11, 

St. Botolph street, Garrison to Harcourt, 
Ward 11 



Sterling street. Shawrnut ave. to Wash- 
ington, Ward 19 .... 



Stoughton street, Ward 18 

Summer street, "Ward 3 

Synimes street, Ward 23 . 

Townsend street, Ward 21 

Townseud St., fromHarold st. east,Wd. 21 

Texas street, Ward 19 

Third street, I to K, Ward 14 

Tremont street, Ward 3 

Tyler street, Oak to Harvard, Ward 12, ) 
Oak street, Harrison avenue to Hud- > 
son, Ward 12 . . . ) 

Union street, Ward 25 

Vine street, Ward 3 

Walden St., Arklow to Centre, Ward 22 . 

Walk Hill street, Ward 23 

Walnut ave. and Cobden st., Ward 21 . . 

Walnut avenue, Harrishof to nolworthy, 
Ward 21 



Washington street, Forest Hills to Corn- 
wall, Ward 23 



Waverley street, Ward 25 

Welles avenue, Washington to Harley, 
Ward 24 



Wenbam street, Ward 23 



WestChester Park, Beacon to Marlboro', 
Ward 22 

West Park and Whitfield sts., Ward 24 . 

Westville St., private land, and Charles 
St., Ward 24 



Cost. 



£495,873 20 
633 12 

61,779 74 

554 20 

1,597 50 

243 04 

1,538 07 

1,279 81 
1,896 06 

212 33 
1,426 86 
3,043 42 

485 15 
1,020 94 

430 69 

314 28 

12,055 79 

2,610 13 

5,805 59 

673 53 

1,428 29 

18,594 60 

1,035 56 

1,031 10 
3,067 64 

753 38 
2,268 66 

307 81 
2,241 70 

613,583 19 



Assess- 
ment. 



$105,591 37 
240 41 

8,024 20 
188 83 
542 31 



1,121 31 

20 80 

1,147 50 

396 15 



28 92 

29S 70 

83 52 

815 97 

1,897 86 
190 90 
571 14 
811 98 
709 75 

270 00 

544 17 
2,358 86 

591 51 
802 98 



1,557 68 
2,610 96 



$637,785 38 $132,594 78 $505,322 69 



Assumed 
by City. 



$390,413 92 
392 71 

53,755 54 

365 37 

1,055 19 

243 04 

858 13 

782 75 
774 75 
191 53 
279 36 
2,647 27 

485 15 
992 02 
131 99 
230 76 

11,239 82 

712 27 

5,614 69 

102 39 

616 31 

17,884 85 

765 56 

486 93 

708 78 

161 87 
1,465 68 

307 81 
684 02 

10,972 23 



Rate per 
foot 



$3 54 

9 82 
2 98 
2 67 

64 

2 93 

2 09 

3 65 

3 27 

1 72 

4 63 

5 16 
5 12 

1 94 

3 53 

13 93 

2 25 
12 97 

2 09 

2 75 

29 36 

4 16 

2 75 

2 28 

1 64 

3 62 

1 92 

2 20 



a Including proportionate cost of main sewer. 
b Storm sewer included. 



Street Department. 



139 



Per cent, of cost assessed, 20.8 per cent. 

Per cent, of cost collected, 13.8 per cent. 

Collected to February 1, 1894, $88,225.14. 

Average cost per foot of sewer, $5.79. 

Per cent, of assessments collected, 66.5 per cent. 

The assessments are one cent per square foot of land 
within one hundred feet of street line ; for the purpose of 
comparison with the 1892 law, the average assessment per 
front foot is calculated to be eighty-four cents. 

The foregoing table shows that even less money is returned 
to the city treasury under the law of 1890 than under the 
law of 1878, as the percentage assessed falls off from over 
thirty-eight per cent, to twenty-one per cent. 

In order that a greater proportion of the expense might 
be assessed on the abutters the law of 1892 was passed. 
(See Chapter 402 of the Acts of 1892.) 

Calculations made to date show that the city will recover 
in assessments about sixty-five percent, of the cost of sewers 
instead of the thirty-three percent, recovered under the 1878 
law, and the twenty- one per cent, under the 1890 law. 

The following table, from which these conclusions are de- 
rived, is published as a matter of reference : 



Table No. III. 



Sewer Assessments under the Law of 
1S92. 



Assessment of sewers (built 
under Chap. 402 of the Acts 
of 1892; from June 16, 1892, to 
February 1, 1894. 


Cost. 


Rate per 
foot of 
sewer. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Assess- 
ment. 


Bate per 
frout 
foot. 


Albano street, Ward 23 .... 

Alexander street, Ward 20 . . . 

Alford street, Ward 4 .... 1 
Maiden bridge to West . . . . \ 

Alford street, Ward 4 . . . . ) 

Ashmont street and private 

Bainbridge street, Ward 3 . . . 
Barrington street, Ward 24 . . . 

Bartletl street, Ward 3 

Benedict street, Ward 5 .... 
Bowdoin avenue, Ward 24 . . . 


$664 02 
1,087 45 

3,367 01 

651 90 
423 51 
733 06 

4,051 95 
315 48 
942 01 
455 15 
559 77 
463 25 


$1 73 
3 10 

3 34 

4 00 
3 29 

1 86 

3 42 

2 11 

1 31 

2 11 

1 69 

2 24 


$98 68 


$664 02 
1,087 45 

3,367 01 

651 90 
324 83 
733 06 

4,051 95 
315 48 
942 01 
455 15 
559 77 
463 25 


$1 04 

1 77 

1 72 

1 72 
1 5S 
1 06 

1 81 
1 09 

70 

1 18 

87 

1 47 




$13,714 56 




$98 08 


$13,615 88 





140 



City Document No. 34. 



Table No. III. — Continued. 



Assessment of sewers (built 
under Chap. 402 of the Acts 
of 1892) from June 16, 1892, to 
February 1, 1894. 


Cost. 


Kate per 
foot of 
sewer. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Assess- 
ment. 


Rate per 
front 
foot. 




$13,714 56 




$98 68 


$13,615 88 




Boynton street, Ward 23 ... . 


924 33 


' $1 00 




924 33 


$0 52 




732 39 


1 26 




732 39 


1 46 


Brown avenue, Ward 23 ... . 


1,585 51 


1 94 




1,585 51 


1 03 


Byron street, Ward 1 (Horace 


333 83 


1 67 




333 83 


83 


Byron street, Ward 1 (Benning- 


396 84 


1 98 




396 84 


99 


Centre street, Ward 21 (Gardner 


1,417 04 


3 93 




1,417 04 


2 01 


Centre street, Wards 22-23 ( Wy- 


1,359 69 


3 48 




1,359 69 


1 87 


Centre street, Ward 23 (near 


207 34 


2 76 




207 .34 


1 75 




752 14 


2 58 




752 14 


1 41 


Clive street, sewer extended . . 


349 84 


1 57 




349 84 


86 


Codman street and Dorchester 


1,346 00 


1 91 




1,346 00 


1 16 


Corwin and Westville streets, 
Ward 24 


780 51 
1,007 97 


1 99 
3 52 




780 51 
1,007 97 


1 10 




1 74 




572 19 


1 58 




572 19 


85 




458 49 


2 19 




458 49 


1 16 


Ellwood street, Ward 5 .... 


515 19 


2 42 




515 19 


1 29 


Faulkner street and private land, 
Ward 24 


1,916 09 

1,748 33 


2 27 

3 99 




1,916 09 
1,748 33 


1 16 


Forest Hills street, Ward 23 . . 


2 17 


Freeman street, Ward 24 ... . 


421 97 


2 55 




421 97 


1 74 


Fulda street, Ward 21 


327 64 


2 98 




327 64 


1 81 


Harbor View street, Ward 24, 
from Newport street, East . • 


235 46 


1 60 




235 46 


91 


Harbor View street, Ward 24, 
from Sidney street, West 


289 85 


1 24 




289 85 


77 


Harvard street, Ward 5 .... 


689 42 


2 06 




689 42 


1 16 


Harvard street, Ward 24, Algon- 
quin to Harvard avenue . . . 


999 74 


1 77 




999 74 


1 09 


Harvard street, Ward 24, Kilton 


1,385 10 


2 51 




1,385 10 


1 42 


Harvard avenue, Ward 25 . . . 


1,584 98 


2 59 




1,584 98 


1 36 


Hecla street, street, Ward 24 . . 


1,378 31 


1 54 




1,378 31 


1 02 


Henshaw street.Ward 25, Market 


1,285 76 


2 07 




1,285 76 


1 25 








$38,716 51 




$98 68 


$38,617 83 





Street Department. 

Table No. III. — Continued. 



141 



Assessment of sewers (built 
under Chap. 402 of the Acts 
of 1892) from June 16, 1892, 
to February 1, 1894. 



Brought forward 



Henshaw street, Ward 25, Menlo 
to Washington 



Hillside, Sunset and Eldora 
streets 

Hillside street, sewer extended, 
Ward 22 



Hillside street, Ward 22, Harles- 
ton to Calumet 



Houghton street, Ward 24 
Mill street, Ward 24 . . . 
Johnston street, Ward 23 
Joiner street, Ward 5 . . 
Kelley court, Ward 25 . . 
Lawn street, Ward 22 . . 



Lawn street, sewer extended. 
Ward 22 



Longwood avenue, Ward 22, 
Huntington avenue to Bum- 
stead lane 



Longwood ave., Ward 22, Hunt- 
ington ave. to Worlhington . 

Maxwell street, Ward 24 ... . 

Mead street, Ward 4 

Monument street, Ward 3 . . . 

Mountfort street. Ward 22 . . . 

N. Harvard street, Ward 25 . . 

N. Hudson street, Ward 6 . . . 

Passage, rear St. Botolph st. . , 

Peter Parley street, Ward 23 . , 

Poplar street, Ward 23 ... . 



Private land between Rockwell 
street and land of Kawn, 
Ward 24 



Revere street, Ward 9 

Rockland street. Ward 25, 
Washington to Peaceable . . 

Rockland street, Ward 25, from 
Peaceable street, south . . . 

Saratoga, Ford, Breed, and Ley- 
den streets, Ward 1 



School street, Ward 3 



Cost. 


Rate per 
foot of 
sewer. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Assess- 
ment. 


Rate per 
front 
foot. 


$38,716 51 




$98 68 


$38,617 83 




387 32 


$1 13 




387 32 


$0 68 


1,083 75 


2 12 




1,083 75 


1 24 


173 99 


1 72 




173 99 


1 51 


611 25 


1 78 




611 25 


92 


2,692 00 


1 92 




2,692 00 


1 01 


239 90 


2 12 


239 90 




1,188 11 


1 99 




1,188 11 


1 00 


750 94 


1 77 




750 94 


99 


658 34 


2 25 




658 34 


1 25 


862 49 


1 81 




862 49 


99 


304 46 


2 03 




304 46 


1 33 


795 83 


3 33 

2 06 


795 83 






402 39 


402 39 


1 33 


543 50 


2 36 




543 50 


1 31 


1,130 22 


2 37 




1,130 22 


1 29 


641 19 


1 61 




641 19 


85 


1,259 52 


3 15 




1,259 52 


1 80 


1,087 30 


3 14 




1,087 30 


1 71 


304 14 


1 69 




304 14 


91 


233 89 


94 




233 89 


49 


2,606 22 


2 23 




2,606 22 


1 18 


4,891 96 


3 25 




4,891 96 


1 84 


622 46 


3 83 




622 46 


2 25 


337 85 


2 54 




337 85 


1 90 


575 56 


1 70 




575 56 


98 


167 98 


1 39 




167 98 


75 


6,076 75 


3 97 




6,076 75 


2 50 


435 01 


2 17 




435 01 


1 09 


$09,780 83 




$1,134 41 


$68,646 42 





142 



City Document No. 34. 

Table No. III. — Continued. 



Assessment of sewers (built 
under Chap. 402 of the Acts 
of 1892) from June 16, 1892, 
to February 1, 1894. 



Brought forward 

School-house court, Ward 4 . . 

Sedgwick street and private 
land, Ward 23 



Shannon street, Ward 25 



Shannon st., outlet to Shepard 
street 



Shirley street, Ward 20 . . . . 

Smith street, Ward 22, between 
Bumstead lane and Whitney . 

Smith street, Ward 22, between 
Whitney and Worthington . 

So. Margin street, Ward 7 . . . 

Sprague street, Ward 3 . . . . 

Stacey street, Ward 5 

Sunset street, Ward 22 

Topliff street, Ward 24 . . . . 

Townsend street, Ward 21 . . . 

Washington street, Ward 23, 
Atherton to Albano . . . . . 



Washington street, Ward 25 . . 

Whitfield street and private 
land, Ward 24 



Wicklow street, Ward 25 . . . 

Winter street, Ward 24 . . . . 

Woodbury street, Ward 19 . . . 

Worthington street, Ward 22, 
between Huntington avenue 
and Tremont 



Cost. 



Worthington street, Ward 22, 
between Longwood and Hunt- 
ington avenues 



Wrentham street, Ward 24 . 
A street, Ward 23 .... , 



Adams street, Ward 24, Linden 
to East 



Adams street, Ward 24, East to 
Bowdoin street 



Armandineand Rockwell streets, 
Ward 24 



Beacon street, Ward 22 . 
Bennington street, Ward 1 



Carried forward $138,304 



$69,780 83 
245 38 

1,018 96 
1,301 53 

508 12 
108 90 

299 00 

211 99 

1,872 58 

593 18 

1.127 30 
346 69 

3,531 20 
1,704 46 

1,026 67 
1,773 84 

324 48 

2,679 91 

439 89 

384 42 

1,140 80 

329 76 
1,557 94 
1,849 75 

4.128 27 

1,097 78 

24,015 72 

4,028 32 

10,877 21 



Rale per 
foot of 
sewer. 



$1 64 

1 74 
1 87 

1 87 
1 08 

1 77 

1 77 
3 56 

1 67 

2 25 

3 25 

2 62 

3 92 

2 07 

2 30 

1 82 

1 95 

3 83 

2 44 

1 63 

1 65 

2 49 

4 64 

4 81 

4 81 

9 22 
9 84 
6 73 



Assumed 
by City. 



$1,134 41 



1,872 58 



19 12 
256 43 

1,177 77 

185 58 

13,599 48 
2,390 72 
4,412 85 



Assess- 
ment. 



$25,048 94 



$68,646 42 
245 38 

1,018 96 
1,301 53 



912 20 

10,416 24 
1,637 60 
6,464 36 



$113,255 94 



508 12 


1 03 


108 90 


75 


299 00 


77 


211 99 


1 25 


593 18 


88 


1,127 30 


1 28 


346 69 


2 05 


3,531 20 


1 34 


1,704 46 


1 96 


1,026 67 


1 20 


1,773 84 


1 25 


324 48 


92 


2,679 91 


1 08 


439 89 


1 69 


384 42 


1 58 


1,140 80 


97 


329 76 


98 


1,538 82 


1 38 


1,593 32 


2 02 


2,950 50 


2 22 



Street Department. 

Table No. III. — Concluded. 



143 



Assessment of sewers (built 
under Chap. 402 of the Acts 
of 1892) from June 16, 1892, to 
February 1, 1894. 


Cost. 


Rate per 
foot of 
sewer. 


Assumed 
by City. 


Assess- 
ment. 


Rate per 
front 
foot. 




$138,304 88 




$25,048 94 


$113,255 94 




Boylston street, Ward 22 ... . 


1,741 32 


$5 97 


574 88 


1,166 44 


$1 89 


Cambria street, Ward 11 ... . 


729 48 


6 48 


279 12 


450 36 


2 43 


Carlisle street, Ward 21 ... . 


1,277 49 


4 89 


757 43 


520 06 


2 43 


Centre and May sts., Ward 2." . 


9,571 94 


5 21 


2,223 42 


7,348 52 


2 13 


Culvert and Cary sts., Ward 19 . 


4,548 40 


7 08 


1,977 52 


2,570 88 


2 37 




1,029 77 


5 70 


307 37 . 


722 40 


2 64 


Dewey street, Ward 20 .... 


866 84 


6 50 


373 04 


493 80 


2 00 


Englewood avenue, Ward 25 . . 


6,175 35 


4 07 


107 99 


6,067 36 


2 29 


Harold street, Ward 21 .... 


811 62 


4 65 


113 14 


698 48 


2 15 


Huntington ave., Ward 22, Van- 
couver st. to Longwood ave. . 


8,572 28 


8 67 


4,616 40 


3,955 88 


2 17 


Hutchinson street, Ward 24 . . 


1,565 00 


7 06 


678 24 


886 76 


2 10 


Brook st. and Dorchester ave., 
Ward 24 


5,593 00 


6 72 


2,062 24 


3,530 76 


2 21 


Lawrence avenue, Ward 24 . . 


1,587 22 


6 61 


628 02 


959 20 


2 03 


Magnolia street, Ward 20 ... 


1,142 38 


6 37 


425 18 


717 20 


2 24 




2,654 43 
31,311 91 
20,218 60 


7 37 
45 78 


2,654 43 
30,433 41 
14,965 64 






Norfolk avenue, Ward 20, Oak 


878 50 


2 65 


Norfolk avenue, Ward 20, Clapp 


15 40 


5,252 96 
4,393 77 


2 20 




6,041 92 


4 53 


1,648 15 


2 49 




2,654 90 


11 12 


1,700 02 


954 88 


2 11 


Roslindale main, Beech street ] 

Rosliudale main, Beech to | 

Willow y 








3,257 90 
1,642 80 
3,403 52 
1,962 96 


2 15 


26,193 13 


12 03 


17,888 91 


1 96 


Roslindale main, Willow to 


2 05 


Savin Hill avenue, Ward 24 . . 


2,322 23 


4 73 


359 27 


2 31 


Savin Hill ave., extensiou.Wd. 24, 


970 35 


5 91 


313 75 


656 60 


2 23 




1,911 48 


6 76 


780 76 


1,130 72 


2 44 


St. Stephens street, Ward 22 . . 


4,671 77 


12 78 


3,362 65 


1,309 12 


2 28 




2,316 19 


9 65 


1,356 15 


960 04 


2 19 


Vila Bt. and Longwood ave. . . 


24,106 31 


7 41 


11,085 39 


13,020 92 


2 09 




2,041 90 


5 41 


631 86 


1,510 04 


2 52 


Totals 


$310,932 09 




$127,253 32 


$183,678 77 









144 City Document No. 34. 



Average cost per foot of sewer 



Average assessment per front foot . 
Per cent, of cost assessed 
Amount collected to February 1, 1894 
Per cent, of assessments collected . 
Per cent, of cost collected 



$4.81 



$1.62 

59.10% 

$57,902.34 

31.50% 

18.6% 

If the main sewer in Norfolk avenue, between Oak and 
Clapp streets, is left out, which is a sewer of extraordinary 
cost, the following results are obtained : 

Average cost per foot of sewer . . . $4.36 

Average assessment per front foot . . . $1.62 

Per cent, of cost assessed .... 65.4% 

Sewer assessments have been made by this division for 
the year ending January 31, 1894, to the amount of $113,- 
469.57, as follows : 
In accordance with Chap. 456 of the Acts of 

1889, as amended by Chap. 346 of the Acts 

of 1890 $5,916 44 

In accordance with Chap. 402 of the Acts of 

1892 107,553 13 



$113,469 57 

Bills for sewer assessments have been deposited with the 
City Collector for collection to the amount of $121,699.41. 
This sum is made up of all the assessments levied during 
the year under the Acts of 1892, and the bills for those 
estates assessed under the Acts of 1889-90, from June, 1889, 
to January 31, 1894, that have been connected with the 
public sewers during the year,* and which amount to $14,- 
146.28. 

There remain on the books of this division at 5 per cent, 
interest the sum of $40,548.26, representing the assessments 
made under the Acts of 1889-90 for those estates which have 
not been connected with the sewers for which they were 
assessed, and bills for which will be deposited for collection 
as the connections are made. This sum represents 30.6 per 
cent, of the total assessments made under those acts. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $6,882 have been col- 
lected from estates upon which no sewer assessment was 
ever levied, in accordance with Chap. 36, Sect. 10, of the 
Revised Ordinances. 

Two thousand and sevent} 7 -nine permits have been issued 
to drain-layers to connect house-drains with the public 
sewers, or to repair old connections ; and the work done 
under these permits has been inspected and a record of 
same made on the plans of this division. 



Street Department. 145 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 



The work of the Street-Cleaning Division consists of the 
sweeping and cleaning of paved streets, the scraping and 
cleaning of gutters and macadamized roads, and the patrolling 
of streets by a cart and a push-cart patrol to gather up 
papers and other unsightly materials that have been care- 
lessly thrown into the streets. 

For the convenience of operation the city is divided into 
nine (9) sweeping districts, as follows : 

Street-Sweeping Districts. 

District No. 1. — West End. 

This district includes that portion of the City Proper that 
is bounded on the west and north by the Charles river, on 
the east by Charlestown and Washington streets, on the 
south by School and Beacon streets and Boston Common.. 

District No. 2. — North End. 

This district includes that portion of the City Proper 
bordering on the Charles river and harbor front that lies 
east of Charlestown and Washington streets, and north of 
Central and Milk streets. 

District No. 3. — South End. 

This district includes the southerly portion of the City 
Proper (business section), and is bounded on the north by 
Central and Milk streets, on the east by Fort Point channel, 
on the south and south-west by Kneeland, Lincoln, Harvard, 
and Utica streets, and on the west by Washington street. 

District No. 4. — South End. 

This district includes the portion of City Proper and Back 
Bay that lies southerly from the Public Garden and Com- 
mon, and extends as far as Dartmouth and Dover streets, 
and is bounded on the west and north by Beacon and School 
streets, easterly by Washington, Kneeland, Lincoln, Howard, 
Utica streets, and Fort Point channel, southerly by Dover, 
Berkeley, Columbus avenue, and Dartmouth streets. 

District No. 5. — Back Bay and South End. 

This district includes all of Back Bay and South End be- 
tween Charles river and South bay from Dartmouth and 
Dover streets on the north, to Massachusetts avenue, Ham- 
mond and Ilunneman streets on the south. 



146 



City Document No. 34. 



District JVb. 6. — South Boston. 
District No. 7. — Roxbury. 
District JSFo. 8. — Brighton. 

District JVo. 9. — Bast Boston and Charlestoion. 

These districts each contain approximately 200,000 square 
yards of paving (stone, brick, or asphalt), and also from 
2,000 to 129,000 square yards of paved gutter surface on 
macadamized streets. 

Depending on the character of the district, the pavements 
are swept and cleaned from two to six times per week. 

The force to clean paved streets is practically adjusted on 
the basis that a double sweeping-machine covers 51,000 
square yards of surface in nine hours, and, depending on the 
number of square yards in the district, and on the number 
of times per week the district is swept, the number of men 
and sweeping-machines is adjusted. 

The force and plant assigned to a district usually consists 
of a foreman, two sub-foremen, sixteen sweepers (who broom 
up into heaps the windrows of dirt swept into the gutter by 
the machines), six helpers (who together with the teamsters 
load the teams), six teamsters, one dump-man, one water- 
cart driver, and three sweeping-machines. 

Owing to the constant growth of Dorchester and West 
Roxbury the work done by occasional visits of sections of 
gangs from the adjoining districts was no longer sufficient ; 
but, on account of the small appropriation, no additional 
force could be organized. These districts, however, are 
constantly cared for by the paving division force, thus saving 
the expense of extra superintendence and headquarters. 

The following table shows the average force employed 
during the year : 

Average No. men 
District. employed. 

Office 4 

1, West End 33 

2, North End 33 

3, South End 33 

4, South End. . 32 

5, Back Bay 30 

6, South Boston ....... 32 

7, Eoxbury 29 

8, Brighton ........ 8 

9, Charlestown and East Boston .... 25 

Yard and stable ....... 14 

Push-cart Patrol 40 



Total 



313 



Street Department. 147 

The above-mentioned force use in carrying out the work 
of the division the following plant : 

Fifteen double sweeping-machines, 10 single sweeping- 
machines (1 transferred to Paving Division), 10 water-carts, 
83 street-carts, 84 horses (owned by the division), 21 
asphalt-scrapers. 

The Push-cart Patrol use : 

Fifty-nine push-carts, 49 extra barrels, 3 street-carts 
(steel), 3 horses (all hired). Of the 59 push-carts, 38 are 
in daily service. 

In addition to the above-mentioned carts, the division 
hires about 25 extra teams. 

Push-Cart Patrol. 

The working of the Push-cart Patrol has been quite satis- 
factory, and the results have been so gratifying that the 
number has been increased during the year. Forty men are 
now employed in this service, and the area covered com- 
prises the following-named streets : 

Arch street, Avon place, Beach street (Washington street 
to South street), Beacon street (Arlington street to Charles 
street), Bedford street, Blackstone street (Hanover street to 
Cross street) , Boylston street (Washington street to Arling- 
ton street), Bowdoin square, Brattle street, Brattle square, 
Bi'omneld street, Bulfinch street (Howard street to Bowdoin 
square) , Causeway street (Merrimac street to Beverly street) , 
Central street, Chardon street, Chauncy street, Columbus ave- 
nue (Park square to West Chester park — now Massachusetts 
avenue) , Congress street (Milk street to State street) , Congress 
square, Cornhill, Court street, Devonshire street, Doane street, 
Eliot street, Elm street, Essex street (Washington street to 
South street) , Exchange place, Federal street (Summer street 
to Milk street) , Franklin street (Washington street to Federal 
street), Friend street, Hanover street (Scollay square to 
Blackstone street), Harrison avenue (Bedford street to 
Kneeland street) , Hawkins street, Hawley street, Haymarket 
square, Harvard street, Kilby street, Kingston street, Knee- 
land street, La Grange street, Lincoln street, Mason street, 
Merrimac street, Milk street (Washington street to Broad 
street), Otis street, Park square, Portland street, Post-office 
square, School street, South street, State street (Washington 
street to Broad street), Sudbury street, Summer street, 
Temple place, Travers street (Merrimac street to Beverly 
street), Tremont street (Eliot street to Court street), Tre- 
mont row, Union street (Hanover street to Haymarket 
square), Washington street (Kneeland .street to Haymarket 



148 



City Document No. 34. 



square), Water street, West street, Winter street, Winthrop 
square, and the following asphalt streets : 

Beacon street from Dartmouth to Massachusetts avenue, 
W. Newton street from Washington to Columbus avenue, 
Chester square, south side, from Washington to Columbus 
avenue, Chester square, north side, from Tremont to Colum- 
bus avenue, Broadway from Dorchester avenue to Dorchestei 
street. 

The contents of the barrels collected by the Push-cart 
Patrol are removed at regular intervals by odorless iron 
dumping-carts. This cart does not leak, is easily dumped, 
and has proved of good service in the work of collecting 
the contents of the barrels. 

The refuse collected by the patrol is taken to the dumping- 
scow and towed to sea. The refuse has considerable value 
as manure, but the extra cost of teaming it to the railroad 
stations, where it could be sold to farmers, and the difficulty 
of making arrangement for cars, prevent the division from 
disposing of it in this manner. 

Three thousand nine hundred and seventeen loads of street- 
sweepings were collected by the Push-cart Patrol. 

The following table shows the number of loads of street- 
sweepings removed each year during the last twelve years : 



Tear. 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891, 12 months 

1891, 13 months 

1892 . ' . 

1893 



No. of Cartloads. 

52,381 

58,272 

62,222 

61,455 

59,875 

68,990 

68,010 

70,476 

70,449 

!87,113 

291,425 

3106,829 

4110,496 



A large number of permits are yearly issued to store- 
keepers and venders for the purpose of allowing them to sell 
during the summer time goods from their basements or first- 
story "windows to people on the street. These permits are 
required under the ordinances of the city of Boston, which 

i Jan. 1, 1890, to Jan. 1, 1891. 

2 Jan. 1, 1890, to Feb. 1, 1892 (date made necessary by the change In the financial year). 

Of this amount 4,290 loads were collected by the Push-cart Patrol, 
s « » 3,456 " " " " " 

4 « « 3 )917 .. <« » « 



Street Department. 149 

provides that no person shall so sell without a permit from 
the Superintendent of Streets. 

As the privilege is a valuable one, given without compen- 
sation, and as it is largely obtained for the purpose of sell- 
ing fruit, the refuse from which is almost immediately thrown 
into the street, the department issued the following letter : 

Street Department, 

City op Boston, 1893. 

Dear Sir: Complaint having been made of the condition in which 
the street is kept in front of your premises, where you are doing busi- 
ness under a permit obtained from the Street Department, you are 
hereby notified that it will be necessary for you to procure a waste- 
barrel, to be located in the immediate vicinity of your stand. In order 
that these barrels may be of uniform dimensions, color, and lettering, 
you will be obliged to purchase the same of the city of Boston. Appli- 
cation for one of these barrels must be made to Mr. P. A. Jackson, 
Deputy Superintendent of the Street-Cleaning Division, at his office at 
li Beacon street, within ten days from date. 

Yours truly, 

H. H. Carter, 

Supt. of Streets. 

Acting under these directions, eighty-nine barrels were 
applied for and placed in front, or in the immediate vicinity, 
of various fruit-stores, where they would obstruct the side- 
walk as little as possible, at the same time being conspicuous 
enough to attract attention and to invite the depositing of 
any refuse which might otherwise be thrown into the street. 

A sign was placed on each barrel, reading as follows : 

PUBLIC WASTE BARREL. 

PLEASE PUT RUBBISH IN THIS BARREL AND NOT IN THE 

STREET. 

The contents of these barrels were regularly collected by 
the same force attending to the push-cart barrels. 

The experiment was very satisfactory, as the barrels be- 
came filled in from one to five days. The number will be 
increased this summer. 

Attention has been directed to the subject of public slov- 
enliness, both by numerous communications to the public 
press and by editorials during the past year. The following 
editorial taken from a leading daily paper expresses this 
subject clearly : 

"Public Slovenliness. 

" An American who was recently in Berlin relates Hint one 
day, in walking about the city, he chanced to have; a bit of 



150 City Document No. 34. 

waste paper in his hand. His first impulse was to fling it 
into the street. At home he would have done so. f But,' 
said he, f as I looked at the pavement, I was struck by its 
cleanliness, and I would as soon have thought of littering 
the parlor floor in a house where I was a guest.' It is a 
pity that our Boston public cannot be as regardful of the 
proprieties of out-door conduct. Our City Government is 
now caring for the streets as never before, and the attention 
given to their appearance is the subject of universal remark. 

"But it is hopeless to expect to keep them in the thoroughly 
neat condition that might otherwise characterize them so 
long as the public persists in its present slovenly habits. 
These are generated by years of slovenly streets, but now 
that the city is at such pains and expense in the matter, it is 
time that people learned to respect their appearance. The 
most of the litter that now disfigures the pavements is cast 
into the street by persons passing along the sidewalks. 
They fling banana skins and orange peelings into the thor- 
oughfare to the peril of their fellows, they tear paper into 
bits and scatter it broadcast, and carelessly throw away 
circulars, newspapers, envelopes, paper bags, etc. This is 
all clearly forbidden by the city ordinances, and it is time 
the police began to enforce them. The police are not doing 
their duty in this respect. Whether or not it is because 
they are not amenable to the city authorities, it is difficult to 
say, but there is a common impression abroad that, if the 
Mayor had the power to make his word felt in this matter, 
there would very soon be a different aspect of things. 

" If it is true that the police authorities are purposely not 
as active in this respect as they should be, lest too. much 
credit be given the present administration, then they are 
only hastening the day when the existing form of police con- 
trol shall come to an end. This piggish abuse of the streets 
would soon terminate should there be a few dozen arrests, 
and a few hundred admonitions to persons guilty of such 
violations of the ordinances regulatino- the care of the streets." 

While this agitation has had some effect, there is still 
much to be desired, and the following quotation from the 
New York report on street-cleaning puts the subject in its 
true light : 

"It is a hopeless task to keep the streets of this city 
clean so long as the people themselves are determined to keep 
them dirty." 



Steeet Department. 151 



THE SMOKE NUISANCE. 

In view of the progress that Boston has made in the im- 
provement and development of its water-supply, and in the 
creation of a sewerage system more complete and perfect in 
its operation than is to be found elsewhere in this country, 
and in view, too, of the endeavors to purify the city through- 
out, and to give to the public the free and unobstructed use 
of clean and wholesome streets, with solid pavements and 
comfortable sidewalks void of all refuse, unsightly waste 
and dust, it is not strange that public attention is called to 
the condition of the air, laden as it is with soot, cinders, and 
gaseous compounds that are being belched forth without let 
or hindrance from numerous stacks located within the busi- 
ness limits of the city, or close to the windows of stores or 
residences. 

That smoke is a nuisance, detrimental to the exterior of 
buildings, to merchandise, and household goods, and to pub- 
lic health as well, is an established fact that needs no proof. 

The chief incentives toward the banishment of such a 
nuisance appear to be : 

1st. The excessive cost of repairing the damage caused 
by soot. 

2d. The increased death-rate due to lung, bronchial, and 
kindred diseases. 

3d. The lowering of the standard of cleanliness in the 
defacement of landscape. 

4th. The general discomfort and depression of spirits 
which a murky atmosphere produces. 

Asa philanthropist and practical engineer has said : 

" When we consider how closely cleanliness is allied to 
godliness, how largely civilization consists in the removal 
of the dirt, and the suppression of the nuisances which 
characterize savage life, and the fact that its power to pur- 
chase comfort is that which gives to money its value, the 
subject takes on a higher aspect, and becomes one of first 
importance." 

The smoke problem, although comparatively new in Bos- 
ton, has received considerable attention in other large indus- 
trial cities for many years, where various types of bituminous 
coals are used in large quantities for generating steam. 
While it is a well-known fact that the fuels used in Boston, 
as a general thing, produce less offensive smoke and in less 
quantities than other cities, where a larger proportion of soft 



152 City Document No. 34. 

coal is necessarily used in the interests of economy, it still 
remains an undoubted fact that dense, black smoke is emitted 
in large volumes in places where its effect is very apparent, 
and from which numerous complaints arise as to the. injury to 
merchandise and other goods with which it comes in contact. 

The tendency to change from the use of hard coal to a 
softer quality containing more sulphur, iron, and other or- 
ganic smoke-producing elements, is on the increase, both on 
account of the high price of hard coals due to enormous 
freight rates, and also on account of the acknowledged higher 
steaming capacity of soft coal. 

It is certain that we are getting more and more smoke 
every year, and unless some radical steps are taken to check 
this increase, it is difficult to predict to what extent we may 
be obliged to suffer on account of such neglect. 

The history of the movement in Boston so far is very brief. 
Previous to 1892 no regulations were in existence other than 
the general rules framed for - the guidance of the Inspector of 
Buildings, having no special reference to smoke consumption. 

An ordinance was first adopted on the 7th day of May, 
1892, prohibiting the use of bituminous coal for the genera- 
tion of steam, unless the furnace be provided with "some 
effectual device for consuming smoke." This was followed 
by an order instructing the Inspector of Buildings to enforce 
this regulation. 

As that official set the standard efficiency of smoke-con- 
suming devices at 90 f > and as coal consumers were not in- 
formed as to existing devices for its prevention, and were 
uncertain as to the exactions of the ordinance in detail, a 
public meeting of the owners of boiler plants and others 
interested was held September 16, 1892, at which a commit- 
tee was appointed to look into the whole matter and report. 
This committee was instructed as follows : " Voted, That a 
committee of three be appointed by the Chair to make such 
investigations as they may deem necessary to ascertain the 
relative merits and expense of various smoke consumers and 
other devices on the market, and what measures have been 
taken in other cities to decrease the amount of smoke emitted ; 
and the committee is further authorized in their discretion to 
confer with the Mayor and the City Government as to the 
advisability of a commission to investigate the subject." 

The report of this committee was submitted by His Honor 
Mayor Matthews to the City Council, April 7, 1893, and is 
given in full in City Document 6l, 1893. 

It shows that an examination was made of some forty-eight 
devices, and their use inspected in various cities, but does 
not state definitely "the relative merits and expense of various 



Street Department. 153 

smoke consumers and other devices on the market," nor does 
it state explicitly the results of any tests made by it, or the 
results obtained in other cities. 

It does contain general information of value on its findings, 
and its conclusions suggest a form of statute afterward 
adopted, together with the following significant paragraph : 
" The important fact remains that with good tiring and good 
draught, the average furnace can be run without the necessity 
of a smoke consumer to avoid the creation of a nuisance." 

As this committee were not justified in assuming any great 
expense, extensive experiments with the various types of 
devices were not undertaken, but from their investigations 
they were enabled to classify these types,, and gave a brief 
description of each of four types mentioned. Doubtless 
much other information from plans and descriptions were 
received by the committee, which was not included in their 
repoit. 

As an outcome of this report, a bill was introduced into 
the Legislature, passed and approved May 15, 1893, limiting 
the amount of smoke so that at least 75% of all smoke 
should either be consumed or otherwise prevented from en- 
tering the atmosphere, and authorizing the Mayor to desig- 
nate some proper person from among the city officials who 
should be charged with its enforcement. In accordance 
with this provision. His Honor N. Matthews, Jr., Mayor, 
designated on June 14, 1893, Henry H. Carter, Superinten- 
dent of Streets, as the official to be charged with the enforce- 
ment of this act, and in January, 1894, his appointment 
was continued for the ensuing year. 

Measures were at once taken to ascertain the location of 
the principal soft- coal users producing an objectionable amount 
of smoke, and the following circular was served upon the 
owners of the building where complaints from any sources 
had been received : 

City of Boston, Street Department, 

Boston, August 14, 1893. 
Dear Sir : T desire to call your attention to Chapter 353 of the Acts 
and Resolves of 1893, which reads as follows : 

[Chap. 353.] 
An Act to Ahate the Smoke Nuisance in Large Cities. 
Be it enacted, etc., as folloios : 

Section 1. In cities of over three hundred thousand inhabitants no 
person shall, after the first day of July in the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-three, use bituminous coal I'm- the purpose of making steam in 
boilers in any building, unless the furnace in which such coal is burned 
is so built, managed, arranged, or equipped thai al least seventy-five per 
cent, of the smoke from said coal is consumed or otherwise prevented 



154 City Document No. 34. 

from entering the atmosphere, the degree of suppression being deter- 
mined by the quantity of such smoke emitted, as shown by the density 
and color of the issuing smoke and the length of time which it is visible, 
the maximum standard of comparison being a continuous discharge of 
dense, dark smoke during the time the furnace is in active operation. 

Sect. 2. The mayor of any city to which this act applies shall, within 
one month from its passage, designate some proper person from among 
the city officials who shall be charged with its enforcement; and such 
designation shall thereafter be made annually in the month of January, 
but shall be subject to change at any time. 

Sect. 3. Whoever violates any provision of Section 1 of this act shall 
be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than one hundred 
dollars for each week during which such violation shall continue. [Ap- 
proved May 15, 1893. 

In accordance with the provisions of the above act. the Mayor of 
Boston has designated the Superintendent of Streets as the official to be 
charged with enforcement of the act. 

Complaint has been made that smoke from the chimney on your prem- 
ises is emitted in violation of this law, both as to quantity and density. 

This department has no special smoke-consuming apparatus to recom- 
mend, and is not prepared to advise you in respect to the method of 
remedying this nuisance. It is possible that the chimney is of insufficient 
capacity for your boiler plant, which fact could be ascertained by consul- 
tation with some competent mechanical engineer. 

You are hereby notified that immediate steps must be taken by you to 
provide some arrangement whereby seventy-five per cent, of the smoke 
produced is consumed, as required by law. 

Yours truly, 

H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

A temporary inspector was employed to gather further 
information as to the kind, size, horse power of boilers, 
heating surface, grate area, area of smoke and chimney flues, 
height of chimneys, amount of coal burned daily summer and 
winter, the percentage of air space in and above grates, and 
the device for smoke prevention in use or contemplated, 
etc. These detail reports have been critically examined and 
approximate deductions made therefrom. 

During the year 129 notices upon soft-coal burners have 
been served and 115 complete inspections made. 

These inspections show that — 

23 plants are supplied with a patent smoke-consuming de- 
vice ; 
4 are provided with " wing walls," a device not patented ; 

12 are using hard coal ; 

4 are using mostly shavings for fuel ; 

13 are considering the adoption of some device ; 
4 are supplied with device of their own design ; 

7 are ready to adopt a device when one is found that will 
satisfy the demands of the statute, and do economic 
work, while 48 claim that they are complying with 
the law at present. 



Street Department. 155 

Some claims are made that a compliance with the law is 
effected by the use of a mixture of soft and hard coal screen- 
ings. The use of hard coal alone is an infallible remedy, as 
the law applies only to soft coal. 

The following defects in arrangement of plant were 
apparent from inspection : 

Chimney too small . . . .37 cases. 

Air space in grate too small . . 20 " 

Smoke-flue small . . . . 8 " 

Number of tubes small ... 1 case. 

Forced at times, especially in winter . 24 cases. 

Several boilers are forced above their rated capacity, 
especially those furnishing power for electric-light dynamos, 
at the hour when the lights are turned on. Many of the 
most serious smoke nuisances in this city are caused on this 
account. 

In a few cases the height of boiler above the grate was 
found to be small, which should not be less than 21 inches 
for boilers 4 ft. in diameter, 24 inches for boilers 5 ft. in 
diameter, and 27 inches for boilers 6 ft. in diameter. 

In some 37 cases examined, while the arrangement of the 
plant was not open to severe criticism, and the relation of 
the area of grate to that of the smoke and chimney flues 
was apparently proportional, the smoke produced might have 
been due either to a poor quality of fuel or to careless and 
indifferent tiring. 

The following circular-letter was sent to certain offenders, 
where the inspection seemed to show a well-arranged plant 
that should, under careful manipulation and with good fuel, 
be free from offensive smoke : 

City of Boston, 
Street Department, Boston, , 1894. 

Dear Sir: From an inspection of your premises with reference to 
complying with the requirements of the law in regard to the smoke 
nuisance, it is found that your stack, at times, gives forth an unwarrant- 
able amount of dense, black smoke. While the general dimensions and 
proportions of your boiler plant appear to be properly adjusted, yet 
from some cause unknown, complete combustion does not ensue. 

This may be due to one of three causes: first, the character of the 
fuel used may not be of the right standard ; second, it may be due to 
the carelessness and indifference of the firemen employed ; or third, to 
alack of some device or expedient whereby the gases arc retained in 
the combustion chamber long enough to attain the required heat neces- 
sary for complete combustion. 

your careful attention is, however, invited to the quality of the fuel 
used, and you are hereby cautioned against the use of cheap and inferior 
grades of sulphurous coal, which must require the most extraordinary 
conditions as to draught, arrangement of grates with regard to removal 



156 City Document No. 34. 

of clinkers, etc., as such coals never show a quick and easy capacity for 
development of steam. 

The necessity of employing a more reliable and intelligent fireman 
than is often found in charge of such work cannot be called too em- 
phatically to your attention. The substitution of any extra or miscel- 
laneous help in place of a man especially trained for this purpose is to 
be deprecated as well from the point of economy as from the greater 
liability to produce a smoke nuisance. 

The following simple rules in regard to firing are often overlooked : 

Instructions for Firing Boilers with Bituminous Coal. 

1. All large coal should be broken up so that the largest pieces are 
no greater than a man's fist. 

2. Begin to charge the furnace at the bridge end, and keep firing to 
within a few inches of the dead plate. 

3. Never allow the fire to burn so low, before a fresh charge is 
thrown in, that there shall not be at least three to four inches 
deep of clean incandescent fuel on the bars, and equally spread 
over the whole grate. 

4. Keep the bars constantly covered, particularly at the sides and 
bridge end where the fuel burns away most rapidly. 

5. If the fire burns unequally, or in holes, the vacant spaces must 
be filled up. 

6. Under ordinary conditions the thickness of fire will vary from 
four to eight inches for different amounts of draught and rate of 
combustion. The best thickness to carry must be determined for 
each case, bearing in mind, however, that a very thick fire is 
conducive to smoke production. 

7. The greatest preventive of smoke is frequent firing of small 
quantities on alternate sides of the furnace. 

8. With a battery of boilers, one boiler must be fired at a time on 
one side of the furnace only, then the next boiler in the same 
manner, and so on to the end ; then beginning again with the 
first boiler, fire the other side of the furnace, and so on down 
through the battery. 

9. If there are no other means of admitting air than through the 
grate and at the fire door, the register in the fire door should be 
left open after firing, and if the boilers are foi'ced, it should be 
left open all the time. 

10. With a shallow ash-pit the ashes should be removed frequently 
to allow free inlet for air, and to prevent burning the grates. 

By calling the attention of your firemen to the above instructions, it 
may be possible that you will be able to reduce the quantity of smoke 
emitted so that there shall be no further cause for complaint. If you are 
unable to reduce the smoke the proper amount by this means, it will be- 
come necessary for you to adopt some one of the effective devices now 
in use in this city and elsewhere for this purpose, the selection of which 
must be determined by your local conditions and the nature of the work 
demanded of your particular plant. 

If you are guided in such selection by a competent mechanical en- 
gineer who understands the peculiar needs of your individual case, you 
will doubtless be saved any unnecessary expenditure of money, and 
arrive at the results desired without loss of time. 

It is desirable that you give this your immediate and continued atten- 
tion, to the end that the emission of smoke may be entirely done away 
with, and the department awaits the development of future inspection. 

Yours truly, 

H. H. Carter, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Street Department. 157 

Doubtless the above simple instructions for firing will 
tend largely to a reduction of smoke, if carefully and con- 
stantly followed up. 

No matter what style of combustion chamber is used, or 
what device for smoke prevention is added thereto, if an 
irresponsible and careless fireman is employed, no good re- 
sults can follow. In many cases, where a proper device was 
in place, the inspector found that the fireman had neglected 
to use it through sheer laziness. 

The 23 patented smoke-preventing devices examined rep- 
resent the following well-known types, having been experi- 
mented with here and elsewhere for a number of years : 

1st. Down-draft Furnaces. — In this form the back of 
the fire-place is closed so that all smoke and volatile mat- 
ter must pass downward through the fire bed. This closure 
is effected either by a water-leg passing below the level of 
the grate, or by a drum, set below the level of the grate and 
connected with the boiler at either end by tubes, with the 
space between the drum and the boiler shell bricked in solid. 

For the ordinary grate bars are substituted a water-tube 
grate connected at the back with the water-leg or drum, and 
at the front by means of headers and connecting tubes with 
the boiler shell, thus adding to the heating surface of the 
boiler. 

This is considered a most rational form of combustion, as 
the fresh coal and fresh air are both applied and admitted on 
the top and cooler part of the bed, while the gases are all 
made to pass through incandescent coke below. The claim is 
made "'that the moisture of the coal and the combined water 
of the volatile matter are decomposed into hydrogen and 
carbon monoxide gases which, with the aid of additional air 
supplied below the grate, burn with useful effect, while the 
separated carbon disappears into invisible carbon dioxide 
gas." 

With moderate firing the loss of fuel from falling through 
the grate is very slight. One form of this type introduces a 
second grate some distance below to catch the glowing coals 
which do drop through, and through which air is admitted as 
in the ordinary manner. Fresh coal is never applied to the 
lower grate, so that the incandescent fuel falling from above 
the space between the two grates is in a favorable condition 
for completing the combustion, being highly heated and sup- 
plied with heated air. Such a system is well adapted to en- 
sure a good smoke record even when the fire is forced, or 
carelos firing exists. 

The objections to this type arise principally from the de- 
fects at the joints and connecting pipes, where there is an 



158 City Document No. 34. 

unusual strain, and also at the water-leg or drum, where the 
heat is intense, so that, with impure or dirty water, a ten- 
dency to scale is shown on the lower surface of the drum. 
Notwithstanding these objections (which have been largely 
obviated in recent designs), it gives great promise for the 
future, and is well worth attention and study. 

Examples of this type, with a singlegra te called the 
"American Down-Draft Furnace," may be seen at the follow- 
ing places : 

Nevins Estate, 78 Chauncy street. 

Lyceum Theatre, Washington street. 

Nevins Estate, 66 Chauncy street (with lower water-grate). 

The other form supplied with a second ordinary grate, 
and called the " Hawley Down-Draft Furnace," may be 
seen at 

The Brookline Gas Light Co., Allston. 

Also at the West End Power Station, Cambridge. 

An elaborate test of this device has been made by the St. 
Louis Smoke Commission, composed of mechanical experts, 
which shows that in comparison with a common furnace, the 
Hawley furnace emitted 70 per cent, of smoke as a maxi- 
mum, but this occurred only three times during the day, 
averaging less than a minute at a time, while the common 
furnace emitted 100 per cent. 68 times during the day with 
an average duration of four minutes, and ao-o;re°;atina' 45.5 
per cent, of the whole time of test. 

In addition to the prevention of smoke, the report gives 
credit to this furnace for merit in the following points : 

(a.) Increase in evaporation of 24.54 per cent. 

(b. ) Utilization of calorific power of coal showing increase 
of 21.08 per cent. 

(c.) Increase in horse-power developed of 11 .25 per cent., 
due principally to increased heating surface. 

(d.) Convenience of attachment. 

The cost, for ordinary tubular boilers, varies from $550 
for a 48-inch boiler to $850 for an 84-inch boiler, and for 
water tube boilers from $600 for 100-horse power to $1,750 
for 500-horse power, showing that this type is more adapted 
to the larger and more expensive plants. 

2d. Steam Jets. — The principle of steam injectors is to 
supply air, either fresh or heated, in such a manner as to form 
water gas by the decomposition of steam. They are applied 
at different points of the boiler in different devices, either at 
the side-walls or over the fire-doors, or at the bridge- wall. 
They work satisfactorily in boilers where the demands are 
light, but require careful firing ; and again, if not properly set 
and adjusted, there ensues a blow-pipe action upon the boiler 



Street Department. 159 

shell or grate bars, which leads to a rapid burning out of 
the metal. 

With ample boiler capacity and faithful and efficient fire- 
men satisfactory results may be obtained where steady ser- 
vice is required from the steam jet ; it must, however, be 
turned on at each firing, or its efficiency soon becomes im- 
paired. 

Being comparatively inexpensive, it is well adapted to 
small plants. 

This type is exemplified by the Standard Smoke Con- 
sumer Company, and may be seen in operation at the Grand 
Hotel, 417 Columbus avenue; Estes estate, .196 Summer 
street; Jordan, Marsh, & Co. (wholesale), corner Bedford 
and Lincoln streets. 

From a mechanical standpoint, it may be said that the 
principle upon which this device works is that of admitting 
to the furnace above the fire a mixture of superheated steam 
and air, the steam being blown in at boiler pressure or less, 
and the air being induced by the natural draught and by 
suction caused by the injection of the superheated steam. 

Steam is taken from the boiler or main steam-pipe and 
passed through the super-heating coil of f -inch pipe which is 
in the brick setting at the side of the furnace, with one course 
of brick between it and the fire. The amount of steam which 
passes through this coil is regulated at will by a valve. The 
steam escapes into the furnace through nozzles which are 
made by screwing an ordinary plug into a reducing coupling, 
this plug having been drilled through the centre and slotted 
on the sides to form channels for the steam to escape. 

Air is admitted through pipes which are 2^ inches in di- 
ameter. These pipes connect with cast-iron boxes, and in 
these boxes the nozzles are located. 

In small boilers two nozzles are placed oyer the fire-doors. 
In large boilers, in addition to those over the fire-door, are 
two nozzles on each side of the furnace. 

For the prevention of smoke it is necessary to admit air 
enough to produce complete combustion. It is of no impor- 
tance where the air is admitted provided the mixture of air 
and gas is continuously affected before the temperature is too 
low for ignition of carbon, or not under 800° Fahrenheit. 

This apparatus brings into the furnace above the fire an 
additional supply of air, and the escape of the superheated 
steam through the various orifices causes the air to get thor- 
oughly mixed with the gases and thus assists in their com- 
bustion ; that it very much lessens the smoke produced 
there is no doubt. 

It also is of benefit in many places, in increasing the 



160 City Document No. 34. 

draught, and making it possible to get more work from the 
same boilers. 

In the plants visited in this city the device seemed to be 
giving very good results, especially in enabling them to do 
more work without increasing the number of boilers. 

3d. Automatic Stokers. — The feature of this type is the 
use of mechanical tiring by means of screw or hopper feeders 
to fixed inclined grates or to movable inclined or step grates. 
"Nut," "pea," or "slack" grades of coal must be used, 
excluding " lump coal " and the " run of the mine." Regular 
feeding does away with periods of heavy smoke develop- 
ment at time of firing. They require that a coal be used 
which does not readily coke and does not clinker to any 
serious extent. Mechanical stokers with natural draught re- 
duce the capacity of the plant ; on this account it would be 
impossible to introduce them into plants which are now in- 
sufficient in capacity. They are effective smoke preventers. 

It involves laborious firing to clean an inclined or step 
grate, and the tendency is towards neglect. It is not adapted 
where caking or hard clinkering coals are used, or where 
plants are apt to be overworked. 

In these devices mud and scale will more readily settle at 
points that are covered or obscured from the eye of the fire- 
man or engineer, increasing the danger. With pure feed- 
water, no trouble should ensue. Examples are found in the 
Roney Stoker, the Murphy Furnace, and the Jones Under- 
feed. 

The former may be seen at the State House Extension, and 
at the Boston Electric Light Co.'s plant, Boston Street, Dor- 
chester ; also, at the manufacturing establishment of Curtis, 
Davis, & Company, Cambridgeport, may be seen a fine sam- 
ple of a modern boiler plant, provided with four Roney 
stokers, and an ingenious system for elevating and convey- 
ing the coal, distributing it into bunkers, supported on iron 
girders in front of and above each boiler. 

This stoker furnishes a continuous supply of coal to the 
furnace at a slow and uniform rate of feed, being operated 
by one small engine set at the end of a battery of four boil- 
ers. The action of the stoker is first to liberate the free 
gases and partially coke the coal on a dead plate, under- 
neath the coking arch in connection with an indraft of hot 
air through perforated channels in the fire-brick tile. The 
coal is then slowly worked down over rocking grates into 
the hottest portion of the fire, and when consumed, the ash 
and cinder, falling on the dumping grates, is dropped into 
the ash. pit, from which it is carried by means of a screw 
conveyor into a bin at the end of the building and there dis- 



Street Department. ]61 

charged into carts. The chief advantage of this type is that 
it ensures a steady rate of combustion, does away with the 
periodical lowering of the temperature and consequent loss 
of efficiency, caused by hand firing (which, in some cases, is 
of marked irregularity), and reduces the work of the fire- 
man to watchfulness and supervision without any violent 
manual labor. Such regularity of duty may incidentally add 
to the life of a boiler. 

4th. Furnaces with Hollow Walls. — Arranged for the 
admission of heated air. 

There is, probably, a larger variety of this type than of any 
other class, except, perhaps, the steam jet. In some forms, 
the air is passed through tortuous ducts and hollow passages 
left in the brickwork of the boiler settings, and is admitted 
above the grate through slots or round openings at the sides 
of the furnace or at the bridge wall. This style is open to 
objection in many cases, on the ground of instability, and 
lack of durability, due to the clogging up of the opening for 
the admission of air, through lack of proper attention. 

Notwithstanding these defects, the necessity of admitting 
more oxygen at a proper temperature for combustion with 
the gases that tend to escape unconsumed, has led to much 
experiment, the result of which has been to simplify the de- 
vice, strengthen the setting, and to increase the evaporation. 
For samples of this type, the Jones Economic Furnace can 
be seen at the 

Boston Electric Light Plant, Gilbert place. 

Boston Lead Works, Hampden street. 

Boston & Maine R.R., Minot street. 

Scranage Bros. & Co., 48 Beverly street. 

The device of the Bacon Engineering Company can be 
seen at the Youth's Companion Building, where public in- 
spection of regularly conducted mechanical tests has been 
offered by the proprietors to students of Harvard College 
and the Mass. Institute of Technology, and others specially 
interested. 

The " Jarvis Setting " can be seen at the Edison Illuminat- 
ing Company, at Atlantic avenue, and Edison Illuminating 
Company, Head place. 

The demands on the latter plant are so excessive in the 
early evening that the device does not work to advantage, 
and until a better distribution of duty is arranged, by ad- 
ditional feed services from the other plant, this plant cannot 
be expected to give good satisfaction. 

5th. Coking Arches of Firebrick or Steel. — In this device 
the arch is placed over the forward part of the fireplace, with 
the chamber above and over the fresh coal charged, where 



162 City Document No. 34. 

the greater part of the volatile matter is drawn off. The re- 
sultant coke is then pushed to the rear to serve as a hot-bed 
over which the volatile matter from the fresh coal in front is 
made to pass. Arch structures are reported as usually short- 
lived, being exposed to high and changing temperatures, re- 
quire expensive repairs, and cause annoying delays in the 
operation of plant. 

Many other arrangements have been tried, such as the in- 
troduction of " wing walls " of various patterns ; " the hollow 
grate-bar" discharging hot air back of the bridge wall, and 
the use of " double combustion chambers," where the two 
fires are charged alternately. In the latter, suitable arrange- 
ments are made to pass the gases and smoke from one tire 
freshly charged, beneath and through the other fire-bed, 
which is in a state of glowing coke ; or the gases may be 
passed through a single fire-bed a second time by means of a 
fan blower. Both are open to objection as requiring extra 
room or extra skilled attention. 

As to the merits or demerits of the various smoke-prevent- 
ing devices, as shown by methodically conducted experiments, 
this city has never taken the necessary steps to determine. 
No appropriation has ever been set apart for conducting 
mechanical tests, to determine to what extent the reduction 
£>£ smoke can be carried and show economy. 

Other cities are doing this to a large extent, and useful 
information is being made public. 

Perhaps the most interesting and complete results have 
been reached by the commission of skilled experts now 
organized in St. Louis. Officially, they have made a public 
report on three devices, which have been indorsed after most 
thorough and complete tests, viz. : 

1. The Improved Zigzag Grate-Bar and Smoke-Pre- 
venting Co.'s Device, or the Boileau Device. 

2. The Hawley Down-Draft Furnace. 
.3. The Standard Smokeless Furnace. 

All three receive a favorable endorsement, and the special 
advantages of each are amply set forth in their report, which is 
a public document. Their reports contain, also, an analyt- 
ical statement of the principles and reactions upon which 
combustion depends, showing the chemical process by which 
the pure carbon is set free, which makes the visible smoke ; 
also a discussion of the various fuels in use, their relative 
cost, etc. , all from a local standpoint. One report concludes 
with a form of ordinance recommended as practical, and the 
suggestion that an authoritative and impartial determination 
should be made. The ordinance suggested has been adopted 
with a few modifications, and is now in successful operation. 



Street Department. 163 

The Hawley Furnace is the only one of the three that is in 
use in this city and vicinity. The most extensive experi- 
ments here have been made and are now in progress at the 
West End Power Plant in Cambridge, conducted solely by 
private parties. 

The American Down-Draft Furnace, which is somewhat 
similar to the Hawley, seems to be meeting with good results, 
especially since the recent introduction of a lower water- 
grate. 

From all the facts now apparent, these two furnaces are the 
only two that show good steaming capacity, with inferior 
fuel, and which are at the same time successful smoke-pre- 
venters. 

Remedies without using a Device. 

In many cases it is possible to abate the smoke nuisance 
without reverting to a so-called patent device. 

This may be accomplished effectually as follows : 

1st. By the adoption of " smokeless fuels." 

2d. By the adoption of electricity as a motive power. 

3d. By special care and attention to the manner of firing. 

The use of " smokeless fuels " is a most valuable remedy for 
the smoke nuisance, for the reason that the duty required of 
some boilers and heating furnaces is such that this change could 
be effected with little inconvenience and not excessive cost. 

The smokeless fuels are (a) anthracite or hard coal, 
(5) coke, a smokeless and almost nameless fuel, (c) coal or 
retort gas, (d) water gas, (e) natural gas, (f) petroleum 
oil (nearly smokeless). 

The general consideration against the adoption of the 
above fuels, except for heating and industrial purposes, has 
been their excessive cost, which for evaporating a given 
weight of water has proved much greater than if soft coal 
were used. Constant experiment, however, has led to 
economy in the manufacture and distribution of coke and gas, 
which will undoubtedly result in their more general use. It is 
computed that, when gas can be sold for 75 cents per 1 ,000 cubic 
feet, it would come very near to competition with soft coal. 

The outlook for a reduction in the cost of petroleum oil is 
still more promising. Oil can be delivered in St. Paul at 
such a price that its use for power purposes equals in cost 
that of coal at $3.00 per ton. If delivered by pipe-lines, a 
still greater reduction is effected. 

We may look for surprising results within the next few 
years in the development of economy in the use of the above- 
mentioned fuels. 

The gas-engine is receiving a great deal of attention, and 



164 City Document No. 34. 

is very efficient. For intermittent power, it is very satisfac 
tory. The petroleum engine will soon receive greater attention. 

Electricity is also making rapid strides in this direction. 
It is particularly adapted to small plants not requiring " live 
steam," or steam for other purposes than power. 

The limit of horse-power under which electricity can be 
used to advantage varies under different conditions, but it 
can be used profitably to a considerable amount of power 
under favorable conditions, and, of course, does away w 7 ith 
all smoke. 

From experiments that are being made abroad, it has been 
discovered that the carbon particles held in suspension in 
smoke can be thrown down by electricity, and deposited 
instantly upon electrocized plates, ingeniously arranged with 
proper insulation. This discovery may lead to a practical 
device for reducing smoke. 

General Remarks. 

The enforcement of the present law in the city of Boston 
has made apparent several practical defects. In the first 
place, there is difficulty in determining the exact per cent, 
of smoke emitted. 

The law reads that 75 per cent, of the smoke from the coal 
must be consumed or prevented, and then adds that the 
" maximum standard " should be " a continuous discharge of 
dense, dark smoke, during the time the furnace is in active 
operation." 

This is equivalent to allowing that for one-fourth part of 
the time the furnace is in operation, a continuous stream of 
dark dense smoke would be permissible, provided that dur- 
ing the remaining time it is of medium density and color. 

As a matter of fact, much of the light-gray smoke is as 
injurious to fabrics as the dense dark smoke. The simple 
injection of steam into the stack will change the color of the 
smoke, and perhaps clear the law, but will not get at the 
heart of the nuisance, nor would it effect combustion. 

The law should lean toward complete combustion, regard- 
ing smoke as only the visible sign of incomplete combustion, 
which really creates the nuisance. It matters not whether 
the small particles of carbon floating off are jet black, dark- 
brown, light-brown or gray, they are injurious all the same, 
alike to health and to goods on which they are deposited. 

Another defect in the law is that it is confined to soft coal 
as fuel. Numerous complaints have come to the depart- 
ment where the principal fuel was shavings and other 
waste. The law should include all kinds of fuel. 

The ordinance at present in force reads as follows : 



Street Department. 165 

An Ordinance to amend Chapter Forty-three of the Revised Ordinances 

of 1892. 

(Chapter 3.) 

Be it enacted by the City Council of Boston, as follows : 

Section 1. Chapter forty-three of the Revised Ordinances of 1892 is 
hereby amended by inserting between sections ninety-eight and ninety- 
nine, the following new section, to be numbered ninety-nine, and 
sections now numbered ninety-nine to one hundred and three, inclusive, 
with said amendment, to be numbered one hundred to one hundred and 
four respectively : 

" Sect. 99. No person shall use bituminous coal for the purpose of 
generating steam in boilers in any building, unless the furnace in which 
said coal is burned is provided with some effectual device for consuming 
its own smoke." 

Approved May 7, 1892. 

From the wording of the ordinance, it is evident that a de- 
vice of any kind must at least be " effective " in preventing 
or consuming the smoke, and the officer designated to en- 
force the law is the sole judge of such effectiveness. 

What is needed in this city is a new ordinance of more 
definite form, authorizing proper tests and providing the 
means for defraying expenses, and so regulating the use of 
all fuels, soft coal, hard coal, shavings, waste, etc., included, 
that better results may be obtained. 

Such an ordinance should clothe the smoke-inspector with 
certain power and authority, that will allow him free and un- 
restricted access to all plants. It should declare in plain 
terms that the emission of smoke beyond a limited degree is 
a nuisance, and should regulate the settings of all boiler 
plants and furnaces, and should be extended in scope to in- 
clude all domestic establishments, manufacturing and indus- 
trial concerns of all descriptions as far as the use of fuel is 
concerned, and provide at the same time for the publication 
of useful and proper information leading to the adoption of 
the best methods and the least offensive fuels. 

As an example of a complete and well-framed ordinance 
of practical merit, the following St. Louis ordinance is 
quoted : 

Ordinances 17049 and 17050 relating to Smoke Prevention. 
(17049.) 

An ordinance declaring the emission of dense black or thick gray 
smoke to be a nuisance, and to provide for the suppression thereof. 

Be it ordained by the Municipal Assembly of the City of St. Louis, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The emission into the open air of dense black or thick 
gray smoke within the corporate limits of the City of St. Louis is hereby 
declared to be :i nuisance. The owners, occupants, managers, or agents 
of any establishment, locomotives, or premises from which dense Black 
or thick gray smoke is emitted or discharged, shall be deemed guilty of 
a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall pay a line of not 
less than ten nor more than fifty dollars. 



166 City Document No. 34. 

And each and every day wherein such smoke shall be emitted shall 
constitute a separate offence. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect at the expiration of sis 
months after its approval by the Mayor. 

Approved February 17, 1893. 

(17050.) 

An ordinance authorizing and providing for the making of regulations 
limiting and defining permissible smoke emissions, and for the testing 
of smoke prevention devices, and for the making of such tests and ex- 
periments as may be deemed advisable with a view to the abatement or 
suppression of the smoke nuisance. 

Be it ordained by the Municipal Assembly of the City of St. Louis, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The President of the Board of Public Improvements is 
hereby authorized and directed to appoint, with the approval of the 
Mayor, a commission composed of three competent persons, who shall 
not be directly or indirectly interested in the manufacture, sale, or con- 
struction of any furnace or other article having practical relation to the 
jjroduction or prevention of smoke. Said commission shall ascertain by 
a thorough canvas of the city, and report to the Board of Public Im- 
provements within four months after their appointment, the conditions 
and liabilities under which manufacturing and other parties cannot 
wholly or reasonably prevent the occasional production and emission of 
dense visible smoke. 

Such ascertained conditions and liabilities, when approved by the 
Board of Public Improvements and Mayor, shall be published, and 
thereafter shall constitute instructions to guide and limit the officials 
charged with the enforcement of smoke suppression ordinances. And 
it shall be a valid and sufficient defence against any complaint that the 
offence charged comes within such recognized conditions and liabilities. 

Said commission shall conduct and make practical tests of all devices 
for the prevention or suppression of smoke which shall be submitted to 
them, in accordance with the conditions hereinafter set forth, and shall 
prepare detailed reports, stating the facts and conclusions based thereon, 
as to the efficiency of such device, the conditions of its successful opei'a- 
tion, and the limitations to its efficiency. Said report shall be made 
promptly, when any test is completed, to the Board of Public Improve- 
ments, which report may be rejected by said Board if found to be unfair 
or untrue. If accepted by said Board, the report shall be published for 
the information of the public. 

Said commission shall also be called upon by the President of the 
Board of Public Improvements to make such tests and experiments, as 
may, in his judgment, be needed to determine the applicability of 
special or smokeless fuels to domestic, locomotive, or other uses, with a 
view to the abatement or suppression of smoke, and shall prepai'e de- 
tailed reports of the results, together with such conclusions and recom- 
mendations as in their judgment may be warranted by the facts, said 
reports to be made promptly, and printed for the information of the 
public. 

Sect. 2. The commissioners authorized by the preceding section 
shall receive, in compensation for their services in ascertaining, by a 
thorough canvas of the city, and reporting the conditions and liabilities 
of smoke suppression, the sum of one thousand dollai's each, payable 
upon the certificate of the President of the Board of Public Improve- 
ments that such report has been made to and accepted by the Board of 
Public Improvements. For their services in conducting testsof devices, 
and making reports thereon, they shall each receive the sum of seventy- 
five dollars for each device tested and reported, and for conducting the 
special tests and experiments, as provided in the preceding section, one 
hundred dollars for each series of tests or experiments, together with a 



Street Department. 167 

full report of the same. Said respective sums to be paid on the certifi- 
cate of the President of the Board of Public Improvements that the 
report of such test has been received and accepted by said Board. 

Incidental and necessary expenses for the above-described investiga- 
tions shall be allowed and paid for as other expenses of the office of the 
President of the Board of Public Improvements. 

Sect. 3. Any party having, or claiming to have, a plan or device 
whereby smoke can be prevented or suppressed, and desiring to have 
the same subjected to a practical test and determination, may do so on 
the following conditions : 

First. He or they shall notify, in writing, the President of the Board 
of Public Improvements that such a test is desired, and with such notice 
shall file a full and complete description of the device, with all neces- 
sary drawings to show its character, construction, and mode of operation. 
Accompanying such notice shall be a certificate of the City Treasurer 
that there has been deposited with him to the account of the fund for 
testing smoke-prevention device, the sum of four hundred dollars, and 
said sum of four hundred dollars shall thereupon absolutely become the 
property of the City of St. Louis, and no claim shall hereafter be made or 
allowed to refund the same or any part thereof ; and upon the presen- 
tation of the Treasurer's certificate to that effect, the President of the 
Board of Public Improvements shall order the commission to make the 
test. 

Second. The party or parties submitting a device shall erect the same 
at such place as the commission may approve, at their own cost and ex- 
jjense, under their own supervision, with such provisions for the attach- 
ment of instruments as the commission may require, and when iully 
ready shall deliver the premises and equipment to the commission. 

Third. If, after test is begun, alterations or improvements are desired 
to be made, the party interested must proceed as if submitting a new 
plan or device, unless the several commissioners shall each consent to 
such alterations, and waive all claim for compensation for a special test. 

Sect. 4. Whenever the Mayor shall be of the opinion that the public 
interest does not warrant the further testing and reporting on devices, 
under the authority of the City of St. Louis, he shall notify the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Public Improvements to that effect, in which event 
the existence of the commission hereby authorized shall terminate 
when tests already in hand shall have been completed and reported as 
herein provided. 

Sect. 5. When the commission created by the preceding sections of 
this ordinance shall have made its report as provided in section one, and 
shall have found that there are practicable methods of appliances by 
which the emission of dense, black, or thick gray smoke may be pre- 
vented, and such report shall have been approved as hereinbefore pro- 
vided; and also, when an ordinance declaring the emission of dense 
black or thick gray smoke to be a nuisance, and to provide for the sup- 
pression thereof shall have come into full force and effect, then the 
President of the Board of Public Improvements is hereby authorized and 
directed to appoint, with the approval of the Mayor, such inspectors as 
may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the following section or 
this ordinance. Said inspectors shall receive a salary of one hundred 
dollars a month each, payable monthly. 

Sect. 6. The inspectors shall have a right to enter in the perform- 
ance of their duties, at reasonable hours, upon all premises other than 
dwelling-houses occupied by less than four families or tenants. They 
shall collect evidence of the facts in the cases of the violation of this 
ordinance, declaring the emission of black or thick gray smoke to be a 
nuisance, and to provide for the suppression thereof, and, with the ap- 
proval of the President of the Board of Public improvements, shall re- 
port I In; same to I he City Attorney for prosecution. The inspectors shall 



168 City Document No. 34. 

be guided in the performance of their duties by instructions given by the 
Board of Public Improvements from time to time. 
Approved February 17 ', 1893. 

With a full and complete ordinance in operation, similar 
in character to the one quoted above, but adapted to our 
organization as provided by the City Charter, backed up by 
an annual appropriation by the board of government, the 
city of Boston might easily keep the emission of smoke 
under full control, and reduce the nuisance to such a limit 
that this could well be called the cleanest city in the country. 

Conclusion. 

On January 12, 1894, the death occurred of Mr. George 
W. Forristall, Deputy Superintendent of the Sanitary Di- 
vision, and formerly, for many years, the Superintendent of 
the Health Department. 

Mr. Forristall entered the service of the city in 1855, as 
foreman of the North End yard, under his father, Mr. Ezra 
Forristall, the Superintendent of Health at that time. 

In 1869 Mr. Forristall was appointed Superintendent of 
the Health Department, and remained in that position until 
the department was abolished and consolidated with the 
Street Department, in 1891, when he was appointed Deputy 
Superintendent of the Sanitary Division. 

Mr. Forristall was a very conscientious and painstaking 
official, and was devoted to his work, making it a point to 
personally inspect and oversee all details pertaining to his 
division. The loss of his services to the city of Boston will 
be severely felt. 

Five Appendices are herewith submitted, in which will be 
found the reports of the several deputy superintendents, 
showing the expenditures of each division in detail. They 
are as follows : 

Appendix A — Bridge Division. 
' <■ B — Paving Division. 

'- C — Sanitary Division. 

" D — Sewer Division. 

' l E — Street-Cleaning Division. 

" F — Former Superintendents and Document 

Numbers. 
I desire to extend to His Honor Mayor Nathan Matthews, 
Jr., my thanks for his cooperation and support in matters 
connected with the department, and to the Honorable City 
Council for their liberal spirit shown in making appropria- 
tions. Respectfully submitted, 

H. H. Carter, 
Superintendent of Streets. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION, 1893. 



Central Office .... Room 47, City Hall. 

HENRY H. CARTER, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



JOHN W. McDONALD, Purchasing Agent. 
HENRY B. WOOD, Secretary and Executive Engineer. 

PAVING DIVISION. 

Room 41, City Hall. 

CHARLES R. CUTTER, Deputy Superintendent. 
BENJAMIN B. TREMERE, Chief Clerk. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

Room 44, City Hall. 

HENRY W. SANBORN, Deputy Superintendent (ex officio, Engineer 

Improved Sewerage). 

FRANK H. RICE, Chief Clerk. 

Engineer's Office, 12 Beacon Street. 

E. S. DORR, Engineer in Charge. 

SANITARY DIVISION. 

12 Beacon Street. 

PHILIP A. JACKSON, Acting Deputy Superintendent. 
M. J. MURRAY, Chief Clerk. 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

PHILIP A. JACKSON, Deputy Superintendent. 
THOMAS MCLAUGHLIN, Chief Clerk. 

BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

JOHN A. MCLAUGHLIN, Deputy Superintendent. 
FREDERICK H. SPRING, Chief Clerk. 

BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

HENRY II. CARTER, Commissioner for Boston (ex officio). 
WILLIAM J. MARVIN, Commissioner for Cambridge. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 171 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street, 
Boston, February 1, 1894. 
H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : The following report of the expenditures, acts, aud 
doiugs of the Bridge Division from February 1, 1893, to Jauuary 
31, 1894, is respectfully submitted. 

On February I, 1893, the sum of $135,000 was assigned to this 
division for the care, maintenance, etc., of the bridges, and there 
was expended the sum of $133,159.24, leaving a balance of 
$1,840.76. The total number of bridges in Boston, not including 
culverts, is one hundred and ten; four of these, viz., Harvard, 
Canal, Prison Point, and West Boston bridge, all connecting 
Cambridge, are in the care of two Commissioners, one of whom is 
appointed by the City of Boston, and the other by the City of Cam- 
bridge. The remainder are under the supervision of this division, 
and are thus tabulated : thirty-five are wholly supported by railroad 
corporations, and seventy-five are supported wholly or in part by 
the City of Boston ; included in this number are twenty-three tide- 
water bridges, provided with draws. The increase of two bridges 
consists of one at Everett street, Allston, over tracks of Boston 
& Albany Railroad, the other at Castle Island. 

Embodied in the report will be found a detailed statement of 
the expenditures and a description of the work performed on 
each bridge ; also a tabulated arrangement of those bridges sup- 
ported wholly or in part by the City of Boston ; widths of draw 
openings ; widths of bridges, roadways, and sidewalks ; kind of 
pavement used ; number of draw openings made for navigation ; 
census of traffic taken on some of the most important bridges, 
September 5, 1893, as a comparison with that taken in June, 1892, 
and April, 1891 ; also an inventory of tools, vehicles, etc., on hand. 

The general condition of the bridges is good, except in the fol- 
lowing case: Chelsea-street bridge, from East Boston to Chelsea, 
is in a decayed state and has outlived its usefulness. The follow- 
ing is an extract from report of the City Engineer, 1891 : "This 
is a wooden pile bridge; was originally built in 1834, was rebuilt 
in 1848, and again rebuilt in 1873, and the present draw was built 
in 18GS. The part of the bridge between the draw and Chelsea, 
was burned in 1887. and rebuilt in a temporary manner, and 
the draw is so low that it will be necessary to raise the grade of 



172 City Document No. 34. 

the whole bridge when a new draw is built. Estimates for rebuild- 
ing this bridge were made in 1889. It is narrow and inconvenient 
and the draw and its foundations are in a dangerous condition. 
The travel over the bridge is increasing, and the passage of 
vessels through the draw is increasing. It is a dangerous bridge, 
and its rebuilding should not be delayed." The present condition 
of the bridge is such that at times it requires the services of a 
tow-boat to turn off the draw, and some measures should be 
adopted to rebuild at the earliest opportunity. 

Provision has recently been made by the City Government of 
1894 for a new structure to take the place of the present Charles- 
river bridge, which is worn out. 

Extensive repairs have been made on Broadway bridge, to 
strengthen the structure, and it is expected that soon the electric 
cars will operate on the bridge, thus relieving South Boston in a 
degree from the loss of Dover-street bridge during rebuilding, and 
also relieving Federal street from the present arrangement of car 
service, all cars now from Boston to South Boston being compelled 
to run over Federal-street bridge. 

The report also contains a statement of the maintenance ex- 
penses of the two districts comprising the Bridge Division. A 
larger amount of work has been performed than at any other 
equal period of time, and the results have been highly satisfac- 
tory both from the manner in which the work was performed, and 
the prompt way in which material whenever ordered was de- 
livered. 

The operatives of the tide- water bridges have performed their 
duties in an efficient manner, and have kept their houses, piers, 
etc., in a clean and safe condition. 

The same care has been exercised as formerly to keep on hand 
duplicate sets of gearing, and no delay has been occasioned through 
lack of material for repairs. 

The inland bridges require muclr care, and special effort has 
been made to keep them safe and clean. They have been swept 
each week, and the scupper-holes kept free and clear. 

Special Work. 

The total amount of money so expended and charged was 
$18,478.25. Of this sum $15,285.33 was paid to various persons 
for material and work which could not be performed by our own 
men. The balance, $3,192.92, was directly beneficial to our own 
mechanics. 

The report contains a description of the work performed on the 
several bridges for which money was provided from special ap- 
propriations. 

Public Landing-Places. 

The following public landing-places have been built by the city, 
and are maintained and controlled by the Street Department. 

Charles-river Br idg p. — Size, 40x60. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 173 

Essex-street Bridge. — Size, 9x23. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

East Boston, Public Landing. — Size, 18x30. Built in 1893. 
Moored at dock of East Boston Dry Dock Company, dock and 
flats leased at $200 per year. 

Commercial Wharf. — Size, 30 x 50. Built by M. F. Sullivan ; 
contract dated January 1, 1892. Moored at dock of Commercial 
"Wharf Corporation. Dock and flats leased November 30, 1891, 
at $1,000 per year. 

Federal -.street Bridge. — Size, 20x35. Built by M. F. Sullivan, 
October 26, 1892. Moored from city's property. 

Cable-Houses. 

The following is a list of cable-houses, on bridges in charge of 
this division : 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

Charles-river bridge .... 2 houses. 

Chelsea, south bridge .... 1 house. 

Congress-street bridge .... 2 houses. 

(Erected in 1882.) 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

Federal-street bridge (erected in 1890), 1 house. 

West End Street Railway Company. 

Federal-street bridge .... 2 houses. 
Warren bridge ..... 2 houses. 

(Erected in June, 1892.) 

The cable-houses that were on the Dover-street bridge were cut 
off by the rebuilding of the bridge. 

Very respectfully yours, 

John A. McLaughlin, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Appropriation. 
Appropriation, 1893-4 $135,000 00 

Amount of expenditures charged to Bridge Division, 

February 1, 1893, to January 31, 1891 . . 133,159 24 

Transferred to City Treasury, January 31, 1894 . 1,840 76 



Total $135,000 00 



174 



City Document No. 34. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Administration. 

Office expenses : 

Printing $147 10 

Stationery and postage .... 77 41 

Office books 31 25 

Telephone 139 30 

Engraving plates, etc., annual report . 59 11 

Repairs on books, etc. . . . . 65 05 

Sundries 23 70 

$542 92 

Salaries of Deputy Superintendent, Clerks, and Mes- 
senger ........ 6,145 12 

Salaries of General Foreman and two District Fore- 
men 5,147 50 

Travelling expenses of Deputy Superintendent and 

General Foreman ...... 40 00 

Board of Deputy Superintendent's horse and extra 

horse . . . 484 00 

Amount expended, administration . . . $12,359 54 

Total Regular Expenditures. 

Expenditures, administration ..... $12,359 54 

" on tide-water bridges . . . 90,344 78 

" on inland bridges . . . . 14,660 48 

" North yard and stable . . . 4,671 63 

South " « . . . 11,122 81 

Total amount expended for the year, February 

1, 1893, to January 31, 1894 . . . $133,159 24 

TIDE-WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort Point channel) . 

Sheathed roadway and repaired deck where defec- 
tive, put in new oak headers on draw, repaired 
pier, waterway, wheel guards and latches, repaired 
boat, repaired engines and painted bridge overhead 
and underneath one coat. 

Carpenters . . . $1,564 25 

Painters 



Lumber 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 

Hardware 



666 50 
1,134 70 

108 61 

1,514 38 

12 39 



Carried forward, 



$5,000 83 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



175 



i,000 83 

147 27 

175 80 

25 89 



Brought forward, 
Paint stock .... 
Plumbing .... 
Carpenter-work and stock 
New gas service pipe . 
Repairing boats . 
Veterinary service (accident) 
Repairing concrete walk 
Teaming . 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal . 
Gas 
Water 
Sand . 

Lubricating oil 
Hose . 
Ice 

Cautionary signs 
Small supplies 



Cambridge-street bridge 

Cambridge). 
Reset buoy and made small repairs on draw. 

Resetting buoy ... $75 00 

Ironwork .... 7 00 

Hardware .... 1 40 

Car-fares .... 72 



60 18 






14 50 






69 00 






5 00 






36 00 








$5,534 


47 


5,779 49 


93 80 






255 60 






36 02 






25 00 






4 25 






16 25 






15 00 






6 00 






45 00 






129 45 








6,405 


86 




(from Brighton 


to 



1,940 33 



$365 


56 


5 


45 


4 


35 



$84 12 
Regular expenses 
Draw-tender 
Coal . 
Small supplies 

375 36 

Charles-river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town). 
Repaired piles and pier, repaired deck and sheathed 
draw three times, new sidewalk stringers and walk 
on draw, put in trucks five times, strengthened 
fence entire length of roadway, repaired engine 
and waterway, reset buoy, repaired brick sidewalk, 
and painted fence two coats. 
Carpenters .... $1,272 07 
Painters .... 246 50 

Lumber . . . . 621 86 

Nails and spikes . . . 21 75 



459 48 



Carried forward, 



5,165 18 



$12,399 81 



176 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Ironwork 
Repairing engine 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Resetting buoy 
Bricks, sand, etc. 



52,165 18 

753 33 

166 49 

3 83 

88 94 

25 00 

11 60 



$12,399 81 



Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders . . . $5,047 56 


Coal . 






514 20 


Gas 






54 70 


Water . 






30 75 


Cordage 






285 99 


Bedding 






5 40 


Salt . 






9 45 


Kerosene oil 






8 64 


Lubricating oil 






20 56 


Hose . 






16 25 


Ice 






6 00 


Small supplies 






80 31 



5,214 37 



6,079 81 



Chelsea bridge [North] (over North channel, 
Mystic river). 
Repaired draw-tenders' house and fence, sheathed 
draw and approaches twice, repaired deck where 
defective, put in new rests on draw abutment, 
repaired wheel-guard, put in trucks three times, 
repaired piles and waterway, repaired and painted 
machinery. 



9,294 18 



Carpenters . 






$410 88 


Painters 






21 00 


Lumber 






286 72 


Nails and spikes 






5 85 


Ironwork 






226 66 


Repairing engine 






133 60 


Hardware 






5 98 


Paint stock . 






5 25 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . . $3,589 04 


Substitutes . 






120 00 


Coal . 






294 75 


Gas 






39 37 


Bedding 






6 20 


Salt . 






5 75 


Lubricating oil 






17 25 


Shovels 






9 75 



$1,095 94 



Carried forward, 



$4,082 11 $1,095 94 $21,693 99 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



177 



Brought forward, 
Ice 
Small supplies 



)82 

6 

65 



11 

00 
00 



L,095 94 $21,693 99 



4,153 11 



Chelsea bridge [South] (over South channel, 
Mystic river). 
Sheathed draw twice, put in new oak headers, built 
new ladder from pier to float-stage, repaired deck, 
waterway, and fence, repaired and painted ma- 
chinery. 



Carpenters . 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 

Repairing engine 

Hardware 

Paint stock . 



Regular expenses 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal . ' . 
Gas 
Water . 
Bedding 
Salt . 
Ice 

Lubricating oil 
Shovels 

Tug, breaking ice 
Small supplies 



$262 
5 



03 
00 



122 47 

20 25 



112 

64 
3 
4 



00 
17 
05 

75 



1,386 72 

87 50 

250 65 

27 30 

12 

5 

5 

6 

4 

7 
24 
34 



$593 72 



50 

40 
20 
00 
75 
51 
00 
93 



4,852 46 



bridge (from East Boston to 
draw. 



Chelsea-street 

Chelsea). 
Repaired gearing and sheathed 

from stock.] 
Carpenters . . . . $59 00 

Lumber .... 2 28 

Nails and spikes ... 8 00 

Ironwork . . . . 27 75 

Car- fares . . . . 12 80 



[Lumber 



Regular expenses 
Draw-tender 
Small supplies 



$299 00 
3 53 



$109 83 



302 53 



5,249 05 



5,446 18 



412 36 



Can U'<1 forward, 



52,801 58 



178 



Crrr Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Commercial Point or Tenean bridge (Dor- 
chester) . 
Repaired and sheathed draw, deck where defec- 
tive, fence and flaps. 



1,801 58 



Carpenters . 


$96 19 




Lumber . 


174 05 




Nails .... 


4 50 




Ironwork 


4 70 


$279 44 






Regular expenses : 






Draw-tender 




50 0C 



Congress-Street bridge (over Fort Point channel), 
Sheathed draw twice, repaired deck where defec- 
tive, put in new headers three times, repaired 
gates, steps, fences, latches, pier, and boat, re- 
paired waterway four times, also repaired en- 
gines and water connections. 



329 44 



Carpenters . 


$493 50 


Painters . 


22 50 


Lumber 


402 84 


Nails and spikes . 


20 50 


Ironwork 


533 70 


Repairing engines 


299 61 


Hardware 


6 44 


Plumbing . . 


186 32 


Repairing buoy . 


25 60 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


$5,317 09 


Substitutes . 


564 24 


Coal .... 


374 00 


"Water .... 


106 13 


Bedding 


13 80 


Sand .... 


7 25 


Salt .... 


4 50 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Kerosene oil 


20 16 


Lubricating oil 


20 05 


Lanterns 


10 83 


Shovels 


6 92 


Hose .... 


26 41 


Small supplies 


102 75 



,991 01 



Dover-Street bridge (over Fort Point channel). 
Sheathed one roadway, built fence, repaired gates, 

boat, waterway, water-pipes, and stable. 
Carpenters . . . . $178 75 

Lumber . . . . 41 23 



6,580 13 8,571 14 



Carried forward, 



$219 98 



,702 16 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



179 



BrougJit forward., 
Nails and spikes . 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Plumbing 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal . 
Feed . 
Gas 
Water . 
Bedding 
Tan . 

Lubricating oil 
Ice 

Horse-shoeing 
Veterinary service 
Small supplies 



$219 98 
4 50 

70 40 
3 08 

43 25 



,702 16 



,375 


24 


651 


86 


32 


70 


151 


83 


19 


42 


15 


00 


18 


20 


22 


00 


38 


75 


6 


00 


29 


50 


29 


00 


51 


89 



$341 21 



4,441 39 



Essex-Street bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 
bridge) . 
Sheathed roadway and repaired wheel-guard and 
row-boat. 



4,782 60 



Carpenters . 

Lumber 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Car-fares 

Repairing boat 



$75 00 
101 56 
13 00 
7 45 
11 45 
20 00 
17 80 



Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


$658 32 


Substitute 


20' 00 


Coal . 


10 90 


Small supplies 


8 56 



$246 26 



697 78 

Federal-street bridge (over Fort Point channel) . 
Sheathed both roadways, repaired pier and water- 
way three times, put in trucks once, new oak 
headers on draw twice, repaired motor-house and 
draw-tenders' house, repaired boat, machinery, and 
water-pipes, and painted bridge underneath one 
coat. 
Carpenters . . . . $178 43 

Painters .... 396 50 



944 04 



Carried forward, 



$574 93 



$47,428 80 



180 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

Lumber 

Nails and spikes 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Paint stock . 

Plumbing 

Repairing roofs of draw-ten- 
ders' and motor houses 

Repairing buildings, carpen- 
ters' bills for labor and stock, 

Repairing boat 



Regular expenses 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes 
Coal . 
Gas . 
Water . 

Lubricating oil 
Hose . 

Motor-house pans 
Ice 

Portable furnace 
Small supplies 



$574 93 

299 83 

13 45 

346 47 

26 43 

91 29 

124 50 

52 10 



$47,428 80 



184 


01 


18 


85 


,247 


69 


195 


00 


53 


25 


54 


13 


15 


00 


23 


90 


25 


89 


40 


00 


6 


00 


110 


40 


39 


03 



51,731 86 



6,810 29 



Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Put in new deck and sheathed the same, also new 
flaps on draw. 



$305 37 



243 55 

L-street bridge (over reserved channel at junc- 
tion of Congress and L streets). 

Repaired damage done to pier, and repaired build- 
ings. 

Carpenters . . . . $111 25 

Watchman during building of 
bridge b} 7 the City Fmgi- 
neer . . . . 740 25 

Lumber . . . . 17 30 



8,542 15 



Carpenters . 


$192 25 


Lumber 


85 44 


Nails and spikes . 


4 75 


Ironwork 


22 03 


Hardware 


90 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


$239 20 


Small supplies 


4 35 



548 92 



Carried forward, 



$868 80 



1,519 87 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



181 



Brought forward, 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Plumbing 
Carpenters' bill 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 
Substitutes . 
Watchman . 
Coal 
Water . 
Small supplies 



$868 


80 


16 


35 


9 


39 


11 


62 


105 


00 


$322 


14 


519 


03 


635 


00 


58 


70 


2 


50 


33 


90 



$56,519 87 



$1,011 16 



1,571 27 



Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 
Sheathed draw, put in new oak headers, repaired 

wheel-guard, waterway, aud latches, painted house 

and bridge one coat. 
Carpenters . 
Painters 
Lumber 

Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Car-fares 
Plumbing 



Regular expenses 
Draw- tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal . 
Gas 

Bedding 
Salt . 
Lubricating oil 
Ice 
Small supplies 



$419 


13 


147 


50 


361 


50 


70 


65 


48 


72 


2 


00 


48 


27 


37 


25 


4 


34 


2,791 


36 


280 


00 


37 


40 


17 


40 


3 


10 


3 


70 


5 


00 


6 


00 


46 


66 



,139 36 



3,190 62 



Meridian-street bridge (from East Boston to 

Chelsea). 
Sheathed draw twice, repaired sidewalk, latches, 

stable, road-gates, and waterway, put in new rack, 

repaired machinery and gear. 
Carpenters .... $572 14 
Painters .... 3 00 

Lumber .... 278 79 

Nails and spikes . . . 27 00 



2,582 43 



4,329 98 



Carried forward, 



$880 93 



;,i;;2 28 



182 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 


$880 93 




Ironwork 


591 92 




Hardware 


2 32 




Plumbing 


36 98 




Car-fares 


31 97 




Damage to tug 


275 17 


$1,819 29 






Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders 


. $2,037 99 




Substitutes . 


. 1,192 50 




Coal . 


27 25 




Feed . 


118 80 


• 


Gas . 


19 00 




Horse-shoeing 


31 50 




Veterinary service 


69 00 




Repairing stove . 


19 05 




Lubricating oil 


10 00 




Hose . 


7 56 




Ice 


6 00 




Small supplies 


56 22 


3,594 87 




venue bridge ( 


Mt. Waskington-a 


aver Fort 



!,432 28 



5,414 16 



Point channel.) 

Sheathed draw twice, repaired wheel-guard, piers, 

latches, and draw-tender's house, put in new oak 

headers on draw twice, set one new and one old 

buo}', repaired row-boat and also water-pipes. 



Carpenters . 


$467 88 


Painters 


7 50 


Lumber 


139 09 


Nails and spikes . 


5 00 


Ironwork 


68 29 


Hardware 


14 63 


Plumbing 


106 83 


Repairing and setting buoy 


. ' 114 08 


Repairing boat 


12 50 




tw^ 8 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


$4,780 20 


Substitutes . 


173 29 


Coal .... 


36 90 


Gas . 


64 75 


Water. 


5 00 


Rent of land 


60 00 


Bedding 


16 80 


Hose .... 


15 06 


Lubricating oil 


13 00 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Shovels . . . 


6 01 



Carried forward, 



^5,177 01 



15 80 



i,846 44 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 



183 



Brought forward, 
Salt . * , 
Sand .... 
Small supplies 


$5,177 01 

4 50 

7 00 

54 71 


$935 80 
5 943 22 









Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to* Quincy). 
Sheathed roadway 'and repaired deck where defec- 
tive, repaired flaps, piers, waterway, and row- 
boat, also reset buoy. 



Carpenters . 


$153 94 




Lumber 


125 87 




Nails and spikes . 


7 70 




Ironwork 


9 85 




Car-fares 


10 00 




Resetting buoy 


77 35 




Repairing boat 


26 40 


$411 11 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


. $382 40 




New row-boat 


45 00 




Small supplies 


9 75 


437 15 









North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 
Repaired sheathing and deck where defective, put in 

new latches, sheathed draw, and painted bridge 

one coat. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 

Nails and spikes . 
Ironwork 
Paint stock . 
Car-fares 



$70 


75 


78 


50 


118 


75 


6 


75 


44 


88 


21 


51 


5 


92 



Regular expenses 
Draw-tender . 



$347 06 



74 88 



North Harvard-street bridge (from Brighton 
to Cambridge). 
Sheathed draw and roadway and repaired deck where 

defective, painted draw-tender's house and bridge 

one coat. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 

Nails and spikes 
Ironwork 



$25 


00 


135 


75 


41 


13 


29 


30 


2 


00 



$68,846 44 



6,179 02 



848 26 



421 94 



Carried forward, 



233 18 



176,295 GG 



184 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Paint stock 
Car-fares 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 



233 


18 


35 


14 




80 



$76,295 66 



$269 12 



365 56 



Warreil bridge (from Boston to Charlestown) . 
Sheathed easterly draw five times, westerly draw 
four times, put in new deck on westerly draw, 
new oak headers on both draws twice, put in 
trucks six times, I'eset tracks and repaired track 
timbers in pit, repaired fence, road-gates, engine- 
house, waterway, engines, water connections, 
boilers, and painted road-gates. 



Carpenters 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails and spikes . 

Ironwork 

Repairing engines 

Hardware 

Paint stock . 

Plumbing 



$728 

77 

915 

39 

489 

228 

4 

15 

66 



50 
75 
25 
70 
23 
93 
16 
00 
45 



Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders 


Substitutes . 






217 50 


Coal . 






855 50 


Gas 






116 40 


"Water . 






50 00 


Bedding 






18 00 


Sand . 






3 75 


Salt . 






8 75 


Lubricating oil 






19 75 


Hose . 






33 44 


Ladder 






22 61 


Shovels 






10 52 


Ice 






6 00 


Clock . 






7 00 


Small supplies 






53 11 



!,564 97 



bridge 



6,366 64 
(from Brighton to 



Western-avenue 

Cambridge) . 

Sheathed draw and roadway, put in new flaps, re- 
paired fence, piles, and waterway, and painted 
bridge one coat. 
Carpenters .... $285 50 
Painters . . . . 134 50 



634 68 



8,931 61 



Carried forward, 



$420 00 



II -95 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



185 



Brought forivard, 
Lumber 
Ironwork 
Paint stock . 
Car-fares 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 
Coal . 
Stove-pipe . 



$420 00 

114 68 

20 56 

33 82 

13 94 



8365 56 
5 45 
5 07 



55,861 95 



$603 00 



376 08 



Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 

Watertown). 
New draw-chains and repairing old one. 
New chains .... 
Ironwork .... 



04 40 
4 75 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 

Winthrop bridge 

Winthrop) . 
Painted bridge one coat. 
Painters 
Paint stock . 
Carfares 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 

Small supplies 



15 



74 88 



(from Breed's Island to 



.82 25 

37 60 

5 80 



$100 00 
1 25 



>5 65 



101 25 



Sundry expenditures on tide-water bridges. 
Tug-hire .... $35 00 
Car-fares, mechanics . . 179 42 

Lumber, sundry repairs . 119 53 

Nails, sundry repairs . . 18 00 



Regular expenses : 










Chief draw-tender (37 


week 


s) 


, $1,295 


00 


Messenger . 






782 


34 


Lubricating oil, suppl 


ies 




616 


50 


Galvanized barrels 






24 


00 


Stationery . 






8 


95 


Printing 






4 


08 


Car-fares 






10 


00 



551 95 



2,740 87 



979 08 



84 03 



326 90 



3,092 82 



Total expended on tide-water bridges . 



$90,344 78 



186 



City Document No. 34. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Tide-water Bridges for the 
Tear, February 1, 1893, to January 31, 1894. 



Name of Bridge. 



Repairs, labor, Regular ex- 
lumber, iron- penses, sal- 
work, and aries, fuel, and 
painting. supplies. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Charles river 

Chelsea (North) .:..... 

Chelsea (South) 

Chelsea street 

Commercial Point 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

E street 

Maiden 

Meridian street . . i 

Mt. Washington avenue ...... • . 

Neponset 

North Beacon street . . • 

North Harvard street 

Warren • 

Western avenue (to Cambridge) . . . 

Western avenue (to Water-town) . . . . 

Winthrop 

Chief draw-tender, and sundry expendi 
tures 

Totals 



£5,534 47 

84 12 

3,214 37 

1,095 94 

593 72 

109 83 

279 44 

1,991 01 

341 21 

246 26 

1,731 86 

305 37 

1,011 16 

1,139 36 

1,819 29 

935 80 

411 11 

347 06 

269 12 

2,564 97 

603 00 

9 15 

225 65 

351 95 



25,215 22 



^6,405 86 

375 36 
6,079 81 
4,153 11 
4,852 46 

302 53 

50 00 

6,580 13 

4,441 39 

697 '78 
6,810 29 

243 55 
1,571 27 
3,190 62 
3,594 87 
5,243 22 

437 15 
74 88 

365 56 
6,366 64 

376 08 
74 88 

101 25 

2,740 87 



35,129 56 



11,940 33 

459 48 

9,294 18 

5,249 05 

5,446 18 

412 36 

329 44 

8,571 14 

4,782 60 

944 04 

8,542 15 

548 92 

2,582 43 

4,329 98 

5,414 16 

6,179 02 

848 26 

421 94 

634 68 

8,931 61 

979 08 

84 03 

326 90 

3,092 82 



),344 78 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 187 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

Albany-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway 
Carpenters . 
Watchman 
Lumber 
Nails . 



$71 


00 


10 


00 


99 


86 


4 


50 



Askland-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Div'n) . 
New deck laid, sheathed the same, and painted bridge 

one coat. 

Painters $180 00 

Paint stock 38 92 

Car-fares 10 00 



Atlantic avenue (at Commercial Wharf) . 
Built new bulkhead, rebuilt about twenty feet of 

sidewalk, new fender-guards, and repaired fence. 
Carpenters ...... $181 25 

Lumber . ' 125 81 

Ironwork . . . . . . 35 11 



Beacon-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 
Sheathed roadways, repaired sidewalks and fences. 
Carpenters ...... $33 50 

Lumber ...... 133 15 

Nails 4 50 



Beacon-street bridge (over outlet to Back Bay 

Fens). 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters ...... $16 44 

Lumber . . . . . . 74 51 

Nails 4 20 



$185 36 



228 92 



342 17 



171 15 



95 15 



. Berkeley-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad). 
Repointing underpinning ... 373 50 

Berkeley-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Div'n). 
Sheathed roadways twice, repaired deck where de- 
fective, built new sidewalks, pointed abutments, 
and painted bridge underneath one coat. 

Carpenters $860 49 

Painters 241 75 

Watchman 17 50 



Carried forward, $1,119 74 $1,896 25 



188 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Lumber 

Nails . 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Paint stock 

Pointing abutments 

Teaming 

Cement and sand . 



Blakemore-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Div'n) . 
Painted bridge underneath and top one coat. 

Painters $188 25 

Paint stock 46 41 

Cleaning rust 60 00 

Car-fares 10 00 



$1,119 


74 


914 


85 


53 


45 


32 


56 


4 


85 


125 


19 


307 


00 


78 


00 


6 


00 



,396 25 



Boylstoil-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Repaired sheathing, and painted bridge underneath 

and top two coats. 
Carpenters ...... $25,00 

Painters ...... 217 25 

Lumber 19 78 

Paint stock 31 01 



Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $54 00 

Lumber 149 16 

Nails 9 00 



Byron-street bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach, 

& Lynn Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, and painted bridge underneath 
and top one coat. 

Carpenters $27 50 

Painters 37 50 

Lumber ...... 85 65 

Nails 4 50 

Paint stock 50 22 

Car-fares 7 20 

Canterbury-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Laid new deck and sheathed the same. 
Carpenters ...... $70 83 

Lumber 93 38 

Nails 9 50 



2,641 64 



304 66 



293 04 



212 16 



212 57 



173 71 



Carried forward, 



i,234 03 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



189 



Brought forward, 
Cass-street culvert, West Roxbury. 
Put in new deck. 

Carpenters ..... 
Lumber ..... 



$11 00 
23 22 



Central-avenue bridge 


(from Dorchester to 


Milton). 




Repaired sheathing. 




Carpenters . 


$10 75 


Lumber 


37 48 


Car- fares 


10 00 



Columbus-avenue bridge (over Boston & 

Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway and repaired sidewalk. 

Carpenters $57 25 

Lumber 94 50 

Nails 4 50 



Congress street (South Boston). 
Built new plank-walk and fence. 

[For balance expended see *' Street Improvements, 
Aldermanic District No. 6." ] 
(Work uncompleted.) 
Carpenters . . ' . . . . $371 00 

Lumber 2 28 

Tools 24 05 

Nails 7 50 



Cottage-street [foot] bridge (from 
Point to Wood Island). 
Watchman (permanently employed) 
Coal ....... 

Car- fares . . . . . 

Displacement of tide-water . 



Jeffries 

$728 00 

5 45 

84 

18 80 



Dartmouth-street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad and Providence Division of New 
York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters . . . . . . $61 70 

Lumber . . . . . . 173 30 

Nails 9 00 



Dorchester-street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth & 
Taunton Division). 

Sheathed roadway and made repairs. 

Carpenters ...... $5 00 



$5,234 03 



54 22 



58 23 



156 25 



404 83 



753 09 



244 00 



Carried forward, 



$5 00 $6,884 65 



190 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $5 00 
Paid bill of N.Y., N.H., & H. Railroad 
for carpenter-work and labor, being 

one-fifth, or city's part . . . 94 48 

Elmwood-street bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Sheathed roadway and put in new deck. 

Carpenters $63 75 

Lumber ...... 55 46 

Nails 7 25 



Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Repaired and pointed abutments and wings. 

Masons' bill 

Gold-street [foot] bridge (over New York & 
New England Railroad) . 
Repaired roadway. 
Carpenters . . . . . . . $10 00 

Lumber ...... 1 30 



Huntington-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed roadways, rebuilt sidewalks, repointed 
abutments, and painted bridge underneath and 
top. 



Carpenters . 








$306 83 


Painters 








239 00 


Watchman . 








27 50 


Lumber 








373 35 


Nails 








12 25 


Paint stock . 








46 67 


Pointing abutments 








88 25 


Cleaning rust 








18 00 


Teaming 








42 00 



Hyde Park-avenue bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Sheathed roadway, repaired deck where defective, 

and repaired fence. 
Carpenters ...... $41 33 

Lumber 50 73 

Nails 4 50 



Irvington-street [foot] bridge (over New 
York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad). 
Painted bridge underneath and top. 

Painters $112 50 

Paint stock 16 68 



1,884 65 



99 48 



126 46 



288 75 



11 30 



1,153 85 



96 56 



129 18 



Carried forward, 



5,790 23 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



191 



Brought forivard, 

Jamaica-street culvert (West Roxbmy). 
Repaired deck and sheathing. 
Carpenters ...... $14 38 

Lumber 16 25 



Leyden-street bridge (over Boston, Revere 
Beach, & Lynn Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway and painted bridge underneath 

and top. 
Carpenters . $40 00 

Painters 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Paint stock . 
Car-fares 

Long wood-avenue bridge (from Roxbury to 
Brookline). 
Repaired sheathing and sidewalk, and put in new 

wheel-guard. 
Carpenters ...... $33 50 

Watchman 5 00 

Lumber 22 87 

Nails ....... 2 25 



149 


00 


68 


12 


4 


50 


99 


99 


7 


40 



Shawmut-avenue bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad ) . 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $93 57 

Lumber ...... 121 25 

Nails 11 25 



Swett-street bridge (east of New York & New 
England Railroad). 
(For description of work done see " Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 7." ) 

Carpenters $25 50 

Lumber ...... 8 96 



Swett-street bridge (west of New York & New 
England Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, put in new deck, new sidewalk, 
and wheel-s;uards. 



$8,790 23 



30 63 



369 01 



63 62 



226 07 



34 46 



Carpenters .... 


$132 00 




Watchman .... 


15 00 




Lumber .... 


181 41 




Nails 


11 75 




Ironwork .... 


18 61 


358 77 



Carried forward, 



1,872 79 



192 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

West Chester-park bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 

For description of work done see ' k Street Im- 
provements, Aldermanic District No. 9.") 

Teaming: ...... $93 00 



1,872 79 



60 00 

15 30 

3 15 

33 00 



Cleaning rust 

Ironwork 

Nails 

Rebolting iron, etc 



West Chester-park bridge (over 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, 
Division.) 
Put in new deck, sheathed the same, 

sidewalks and fence, painted bridge 

and top one coat. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Watchman 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Paint stock . 
Cleaning rust 
Fixture for tool-house 
Teaming: 



West Newton-street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division.) 
Sheathed roadway and painted bridge underneath 
Carpenters 
Painters 



New York, 


Provide 


me 


rebuilt two 


underneath 


$618 


50 


354 


63 


49 


00 


177 


02 


36 


00 


10<S 


84 


140 


or 


60 


00 


28 


75 


48 


00 



Lumber 
Nails 
Paint stock 



$31 93 

26 (i0 

73 75 

4 50 

15 70 



West Rutland-square (foot) bridge (over New 
York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division). 
Painted bridge underneath and top. 

Painters $70 50 

Paint stock 16 68 



Williams-street culvert (West Roxbury). 
Repaired deck and sheathed the same. 
Carpenters . . . . • • $7 19 

Lumber 16 59 



204 45 



1,620 75 



151 88 



87 18 



23 78 



Carried forward, 



$11,960 83 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



193 



Brought forward, 

Williams-street bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Repaired deck where defective and sheathed the 

same. 
Carpenters ...... $41 75 

Lumber 43 19 

Nails ....... 2 25 



Sundry expenditures on Inland Bridges : 
Labor, bridge-cleaners . 
Labor on snow 
Teaming snow 
Sundry car-fares, mechanics 
Sand for slippery walks 
Salt .... 
Bolton-street bridge, small repairs 
Cornwall-street bridge, " 
Brookline-avenue bridge " 



.1,960 83 



,423 


76 


837 


41 


189 


00 


89 


71 


35 


75 


22 


40 


5 


00 


4 


86 


4 


57 



87 19 



Total expended on Inland Bridges 



2,612 46 

$14,660 48 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Inland Bridges fur the Year, 
February 1, 1893, to January 31, 1894. 



Name of Bridge. 

Albany street ...... 

Ashland street ...... 

Atlantic avenue (sidewalk) .... 

Beacon street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Beacon street (over Outlet) .... 

Berkeley street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Berkeley street (over New York, New Haven, 

Hartford Railroad, Providence Division) 
Blakemore street ...... 

Boylston street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 



Broadway (over Boston & Albany Railro 

Byron street . 

Canterbury street . 

Cass street 

Central avenue 

Columbus avenue . 

Congress street (plank-walk) 

Cottage stieet 

Dartmouth street . 

Dorchester street . 

Elm wood street 

Carried forward, 



ad) 



Repairs, Labor, 

Lumber, Ironwork, 

and Painting. 


$185 


36 


228 


92 


342 


17 


171 


15 


95 


15 


373 
> 


50 


2,641 
304 


64 
66 


293 


04 


212 


16 


212 


57 


173 


71 


34 


22 


58 


23 


156 


25 


404 


83 


753 


09 


244 


00 


99 


48 


L26 


46 



r ,110 59 



194 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Ferdinand street 
Gold street 
Huntington avenue 
Hyde Park avenue 
Irviugton street 
Jamaica street 
Leyden street 
Longwood avenue 
Shawniut avenue 
Swett street (East) 
Swett street (West) 

West Chester park (over Boston & Albany 
West Chester park (over New York, New Haven, & 

Hartford Railroad, Providence Division) 
West Newton street 
West Rutland square 
Williams street (culvert) 
Williams street (over Stony brook) 
Sundry expenditures 

Total .... 



Railroad) , 



$7,110 


59 


288 


75 


11 


30 


1,153 


85 


96 


56 


129 


18 


30 


63 


369 


01 


63 


62 


226 


07 


34 


46 


358 


77 


, 204 


45 


s 

1,620 


75 


151 


88 


87 


18 


23 


78 


87 


19 


2,612 


46 


. $14,660 48 



REGULAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH AND 
SOUTH YARDS. 



North Yard, District No. 1, 
Warren Bridge. 



Messenger . 








$797 68 




Watchman 








728 00 




Tools for carpenters 








131 15 




Tools for painters 








29 42 




Telephone 








156 15 




Gas 








59 71 




Steam apparatus . 








84 58 




Two hydraulic jacks 








315 00 




Painting signs 








10 80 




Office desk . 








19 00 




Street horses 








60 25 




Repairing buildings 








28 54 




Waste .... 








13 20 




Ice 








6 00 




Brooms 








5 25 




Ladder . 








6 25 




Soap 








7 38 




Small supplies 








72 90 








$2,531 26 





Carried forward, 



52,531 26 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



195 



Brought forward, 



Teamster 
Hostler . 
Feed . 

Repairing wagons 
Horse-shoeing 
Repairing harness 
Clipping horses 
Water . 
Small supplies 



Stable, District No. 1. 



£791 25 

591 50 

337 61 

82 82 

124 50 

78 20 

9 00 

20 00 

105 49 



Amount expended, North Yard and stable 



!,531 26 



2,140 37 
54,671 63 



Stable, District No. 



Teamster 
Hostler 
Feed . 

Repairing wagons 
Repairing buggy 
Harness and repair 
Horse-shoeing 
Four horses . 
Vegetable food 
Clipping horses 
New buggy . 



Carried forward, 



South Yard, District No. 2. 

Foundry Street. 
Messenger 
Yardman 
Watchmen 
Tools for carpenters 
Tools for painters 
Telephone 
Plumbing 
Coal . 

Two hydraulic jacks 
Ice 

Painters' locker 
Repairing buildings 
Street horses 
Temporary paint-shop 
Brooms 
Small supplies 
Stock, white-lead and linseed-oil 



00 
600 00 
1,126 50 
124 97 
150 60 
131 50 
364 71 

54 50 

315 00 

6 00 

46 25 
478 53 

40 11 
115 50 

32 75 
102 88 
523 75 



2. 




$813 


75 


780 


00 


623 


86 


785 


91 


170 


45 


630 


20 


212 


25 


1,200 


00 


225 


00 


33 


00 


200 


00 



,,998 55 



$5,671 12 



,'.i'.i.s .-,;, 



196 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
Water . . . 

Veterinary service . 
Rent of stable (2 mos.) 
Two new sleighs . 
Use of buggy 
Blankets 
Small supplies 



Amount expended, South Yard and stable, 







$5,674 


42 


. 


00 






5 


00 






100 


00 






190 


00 






14 


00 






8 


75 






117 


09 



$4,998 55 



6,124 26 
511,122 81 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Berkeley-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Building new iron fence on top of girders. 
Iron railing, as agreed .... $400 00 
Labor, altering railing . . . . 33 75 



Amount expended 



$433 75 



Broadway bridge. 

Strengthening and improving Broadway Bridge, 
over Fort Point channel. 

Advertising $36 51 

Inspector 124 25 

Lumber (labor on same paid out of reg- 
ular appropriation) . . . . 1,169 28 

Repairing iron gates and fence . . 317 75 

Contract with W. L. Miller, 
for work done and material 
furnished . . . $5,337 00 

Extra work ordered : 

Rebuilding old stable and floor, 211 14 

Labor and material in B. & A. 
R.R. yard . 

Bolts and wrench 

15 per cent, added 

5,851 07 



197 


14 


38 


74 


67 


05 



Amount expended ..... $7,498 86 
Transferred to Bedford and Kingston streets, Jan- 
uary 31, 1894 1,220 00 

Transferred to sewer between Roslindale and West 

Roxbury, January 31, 1894 ..... 280 00 

Balance 1,001 14 



Loan 



$10,000 00 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 197 

Congress-street bridge guard. 

Repairing fender-guard. 

Contract with Josiah Shaw, for work done and mate- 
rial furnished $1,781 00 

Extra work ordered, rebolting low-water spurshore 
and repairing fender at angles near draw open- 
ing . 90 00 



Amount expended $1,871 00 

Appropriation .... . . $534 31 

Furnished from appropriation, Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 6 ..... 1,336 69 



Total ........ $1,871 00 



Dover-street bridge (over Fort Point channel) . 
Advertisements (old iron for sale) . . . . $51 10 

Congress street. 

Building new plank-walk from B street southeast- 
erly. 

[See regular appropriation for balance expended.] 
(Work uncompleted.) 

Carpenters ...... $555 25 

Lumber ...... 574 49 

1,129 74 



Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic Dis- 
trict No. 6 .... $1,180 84 



West Chester-park bridge (over New York, 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division) . 
[For description of work done, see West Chester- 
park bridge, regular appropriation.] 
Lumber . *" . ' $410 22 

Berkeley-street bridge (over New York, New 
Havcm, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Divis- 
ion). 
Laid new concrete sidewalk on southerly side. 

[For balance of description of work done, see 
Berkeley-street bridge, regular appropriation.] 

Lumber 323 19 

New concrete sidewalk .... 553 19 

876 38 



Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic Dis- 
trict No. 5 $1,286 60 



198 



City Document No. 34. 



Swett-street bridge (east of New York & 
New England Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, laid new deck, built new side- 
walks and wheel-guards. 

Carpenters $398 50 

Lumber . . . . . . 825 25 

Nails and spikes 30 55 



Swett-street bridge (west of New York & 
New England Railroad) . 

[For description of work done, see Swett-street 
bridge, regular appropriation.] 

Carpenters . . ' . . . . $12 25 

Lumber ...... 24 14 

Nails and spikes ..... 2 25 



Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic Dis- 
trict No. 7 . 

West Chester-park bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad) . 
Sheathed roadways, put in new deck, laid new con-' 

crete sidewalks on both sides, and painted bridge 

underneath and top. 

Carpenters $1,545 67 

Painters 

"Watchman 

Granite work 

Lumber 

Nails 

Ironwork 

Paint stock . 

Cement, sand, etc 

New concrete sidewalks 

Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic Dis- 
trict No. 9 

Recapitulation. 

Amounts charged to Special Appropriations : 

Berkeley-street Bridge ..... 

Broadway Bridge ...... 

Congress-street Bridge guard .... 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6 
" " " " No. 5 

U <C <c u n 0# 7 

" « " " No. 9 



593 


75 


87 


50 


1,150 


54 


1,057 


29 


33 


45 


53 


34 


130 


00 


16 


13 


246 


59 



,254 SO 



38 64 



,292 94 



,,914 26 



75 

7,498 86 
534 31 
2,517 53 
1,286 60 
1,292 94 
4,914 26 



Total 



!,478 25 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 199 



LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported bt Boston. 

In the list those marked with au asterisk are over navigable 
waters, and are each provided with a draw. 

Agassiz road, in Back Bay Fens. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street, 
Brighton. 

Ashland street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division, West Roxbury. 

Athens street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Beacon entrance, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division. 

Blakemore street, over N. Y.,N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division, West Roxbury. 

Bolton street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Boylston street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

*Broadway, over Fort Point Channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

*Castle Island, from Marine park, South Boston, to Castle Island. 

*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 

*Chelsea (South), over South Channel, Mystic river. 

*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 

Commonwealth avenue, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

*Congress street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Cottage Farm, Brighton. 

Cottage-street foot-bridge, over flats, East Boston. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany, and Providence Division 
of N. Y., N. H., & EL Railroad. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point Channel. 

*Federal street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Fen, Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Franklin-street foot-bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Gold-street foot-bridge, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 



200 City Document No. 34. 

Irvington-street foot-bridge, over N. Y., N. EL, & EI. Railroad, 
Providence Division. 

*L street, over Reserved Channel at juuction of Congress and L 
streets. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

Linden Park street, over Stony brook. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort Point Channel. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony Brook, Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Swett street, west of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Chester park, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

West Chester park, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division. 

West Newton street, overN. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division. 

West Rutland square foot-bridge, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Rail- 
road, Providence Division. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 



II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part within its 

Limits. 

*Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
*Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Longwood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the Cost of 

Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Dorchester street, over N. Y., N. EL, & H. Railroad, Plymouth and 

Taunton Division. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 2U1 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 
*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 
*Prisou Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 
*\Vest Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

The last four bridges are in the care of two Commissioners, 
one of whom is appointed by the City of Cambridge and the other 
by the City of Boston. 



IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Harrison aveune. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington slreet. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — Neiv Yurk & New England Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Harvard street, Dorchester. 

Morton tk " 

Norfolk " " • 

Norfolk " " 

Silver street. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 

West Broadway. 

West Fifth street. 

West Fourth street. 

West Second street. 

West Sixth street. 

West Third street. 



202 City Document No. 34. 

6th. — New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 
a?id Taunton Division. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Freeport street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence 

Division. 

Beech street, West Roxbury. 

Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 

Canterbury street. West Roxbury. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, West Roxbury. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Dudley avenue, West Roxbury. 

Park street, West Roxbury. 



Recapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston ... 55 

II. Number of which Boston supports the part within its 

limits ... 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost of 

maintenance ....... 7 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division . . 2 

3. " " Western Division . . 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn ... 1 

5. New York & New England . . . . 13 

6. New York, New Haven, & Hartford, Plymouth 

and Taunton Division .... 5 

7. New York, New Haven, & Hartford, Provi- 

dence Division ..... 7 

Total number 110 



The existing regulations for the passage of vessels through 
drawbridges have been posted on the several bridges, as required 
by law. 

The records of the number of draw-openings, vessels passing 
through the bridges', time of passage, kind of vessels, number 
laden with cargo, etc., as kept by the draw tenders of the several 
bridges, have been tabulated, and the totals are given in the 
summary, which will be found in Appendices Al and A6. 

A list of widths of openings for vessels in all bridges provided 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 203 

with draws in the city, measurements being furnished by the City 
Engineer, will be found in Appendix A2. 

Appendix A3 is a table, also made by the City Engineer, show- 
ing widths of bridges, kind of roadways, sidewalks, etc. 

A list of culverts and small bridges will be found in Appendix 
A4. 

Appendix A5 contains a tabulated statement of traffic. 



204 



City Document No. 34. 



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206 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A2. 



Table showing 1 the Widths of Opening's for Vessels in all 
Bridges provided with Draws, in the City of Boston, 
January, 1894. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 


o oc 


Width. 


Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 


Boston to Charlestown . 
Over Miller's river . . . 


1 

1 


35 feet 10 inches. 


Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 


35 " 11 " 


Boston & Maine R.R. (freight), 
Southern Division ....... 


Boston to East Cambridge 


1 


40 " 4 " 


Boston & Maine R.R. (passenger) , 


a a << << 


1 


35 " 10 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


Boston to Charlestown . 

Over Miller's river . . . 
Over Fort Point channel, 


1 

1 

1 


39 " 7 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


35 " 9 " 




43 " 3 " 




Brighton to Cambridge . 


1 


36 " 3 " 




Boston to East Cambridge 


1 


35 " 11 " 




Boston to Charlestown . 
Charlestown to Chelsea . 


1 
1 


36 " " 


Chelsea (south channel) 


38 " 9 " 


Chelsea (north channel) ..... 


<i it << 


1 


44 " 10 " 


Chelsea st. (East Boston side) . . . 


East Boston to Chelsea . 


2 


33 " 1 " 




« II M « 




34 " 3 " 


Commercial point (or Tenean) . . 




1 


24 " " 


Congress street (Boston side) . . . 


Over Fort Point channel, 


2 


43 " 3 " 


" " (South Boston side) . 


(I << H >c 




43 " 11 " 




(t (( « << 




Rebuilding. 




Brighton to Cambridge . 
Over Fort Point channel, 
Boston to Charlestown . 


1 

1 
1 
1 


35 feet 9 inches. 




41 " 10 " 




36 " " 


" " (for teaming freights) 


35 " 11 " 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



207 



Table showing- Width of Opening's, etc — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 



Grand Junction R.R 

a a a 

Granite 

Harvard (Boston side) 

" (Cambridge side) .... 
L street 

Maiden 

Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 

" " (Chelsea side) . . . . 

Mt. Washington ave. (Boston side) . 

" " " (South Boston 

side) . . . 

Neponset 

New York & New England R.R. 
(Boston side) 

New York & New England R.R. 
(South Boston side) 

New York & New England R.R. . . 

North Beacon street 

North Harvard street 

New York, New Haven, & Hart- 
ford R.R 

New York, New Haven, & Hart- 
ford R.R 

Prison Point 

Warren 

West Boston (Boston side) . . . . 

" " (Cambridge side) . . 

Western avenue 



Location. 



Brighton to Cambridge 
East Boston to Chelsea 
Dorchester to Milton . 
Boston to Cambridge . 
a a a 

Over Reserved channel 
South Boston .... 

Charlestown to Everett 

East Boston to Chelsea 

<( ■< K << 

Over Fort Point channel, 

Dorchester to Quincy . . 
Over Fort Point channel, 

it a a Ci 

Over South Bay . . . . 
Brighton to Watertown . 
Brighton to Cambridge . 

Over Fort Point channel, 

Dorchester to Quincy 

Charlestown to Cam 
bridge 



Boston to Charlestown 
Boston to Cambridge . 



Brighton to Cambridge 
Brighton to Watertown 



° be 

ss.s 

xj a 
~ S 

— Ch 


Width. 


1 


35 feet 9 inches. 


1 


34 " 


7 " 


1 


36 ' 


" 


2 


36 ' 


6 " 




36 ' 


S " 


1 


40 ' 


" 


1 


43 ' 


4 " 


2 


59 ' 


2 " 




59 ' 


" 


2 


42 ' 


3 " 




42 ' 


3 " 


1 


36 ' 


" 


2 


41 ' 


10 " 




40 « 


5 " 


1 


28 ' 


4 " 


1 


30 ' 


2 " 


1 


36 ' 


" 


1 


36 ' 


4 " 


1 


36 ' 


'< 


1 


36 ' 


" 


1 


36 ' 


2 « 


2 


35 ' 


7 " 




36 ' 


3 " 


1 


36 ' 


" 


1 


35 ' 


10 " 



208 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A3. 



Table showing Width of Bridges, Kind of Roadways, Sidewalks, 
etc., on Tide-water Bridges, 1894. 





6 

hp 

pq 

o 


Roadway. 


Sidewalks. 


Name of Bridge. 


^3 


Kind of 
Roadway. 


"B 


Kind of walks. 




£ 


£ 




I £ 






Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 




Ft- In 






60 


40 


Plank .... 


2 10 


Coal-tar concrete. 




40 


33 2 


tt 


1 6 


Plank. 




64 
50 


48 
30 2 
40 


Paved .... 


2 8 
2 8 
1 8 


Brick. 




(< 




49 


Coal-tar concrete. 


" South 


50 


43 


" .... 


2 6 6 


a << 




30 2 
about 


24 
about 


Plank .... 


1 5 6 


Plank. 


Commercial Point .... 


34 


37 


" 








60 


44 


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2 8 


Coal-tar concrete. 


Dover street (rebuilding). 












Essex street .... ... 


31 


22 8 


Plank .... 


1 7 6 


Plank. 




69 


49 


Paved .... 


2 10 


Asphalt. 




30 2 
69 4 


24 4 
51 


Plank .... 


1 5 

2 9 2 


Plank. 




Asphalt. 




60 
40 
50 


34 
32 
36 


Paved .... 
it 


2 8 
1 7 
I 7 


« 




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ti a 


Mt. Washington avenue . 


61 


39 6 


(i 


I 10 9 


« (( 




30 


23 10 


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I 5 5 


Plank. 


North Beacon street . . . 


31 


25 2 




I 5 


tt 


North Harvard street . . . 


28 2 


26 7 


a 








50 


36 


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( Paved part J ' 


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80 
33 2 


60 
26 3 


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6 


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W avenue to Cambridge . 


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" " " Wateitown . 


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8 


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24 2 


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" . . . . 1 


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50 


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7 ] 


Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



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211 



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213 



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215 



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216 



City Document No. 34. 



ISJI 



6S 
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Street Department — Bridge Division. 



217 



APPENDIX A5. 



Statement of Traffic on Tuesday, September 5, 1893, 
between tbe bonrs of 6 A.M. and 7 P.M. 



North Bridges. 



Name of Bridge. 


is . 

£ ? a 

a. m 
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4,315 
910 
2,030 
1,251 
5,965 


4,115 

890 

2,347 

1,190 

7,670 


2,335 
830 
966 
687 

3,035 


2,130 
719 
839 
670 

3,680 






Chelsea (North) 


282 
287 
115 
975 


289 

295 

106 

1,147 




South Bridges. 




7,980 
4,020 
7,210 
1,385 


6,810 
4,935 
7,115 
1,720 


2,250 

2,480 

2,875 

840 


2,475 
2,330 
4,051 
1,240 










Federal street ....... 


624 


624 









218 



City Document No. 34. 



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Street Department — Bridgk Division. 



219 





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Street Department — Paving Division. 



221 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PAVING DIVISION. 



Office Paving Division, 
Room 41, City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1894. 
H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : The following report is submitted, showing the 
expenditures of this division from February 1, 1893, to January 
31, 1894, the nature of the work, the number and variety of per- 
mits issued, and the details of expenditures involved in paving, 
macadamizing, and regulating the various streets. 

The following list sbows the total yearly expenditures of the 
Paving Division, according to the report of the Superintendent of 
Streets, for the last thirty-eight years, the expenditures being 
from January 1 to December 31, inclusive, of each year, except of 
1891, that year extending to January 31, 1892, making a period 
of thirteen months, the years after extending from February 1 to 
January 31 : 



1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 



$192,458 48 
201,528 49 
187,160 92 
186,295 77 
197,170 63 
176,978 76 
175,931 68 
151,130 27 
156,959 65 
173,258 13 
244,953 55 
283,641 56 
407,053 89 
667,817 90 
804,384 89 
923,312 37 
1,010,508 48 
931,019 01 
1,683,848 67 
1,062,408 55 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 



),741 42 
1,077,475 81 

644,821 76 

727,340 05 
1,015,063 06 

966,366 49 
1,088,551 14 

934,656 58 
1,310,172 16 
1,018,693 39 
1,170,8*3 01 
1,260,530 03 
1,043,475 52 
1,051,460 18 
1,061,722 40 
1,991,524 2.s 
1,972,857 88 
1,552,913 17 



Total 



$30,687,099 98 



222 



City Document No. 34. 



Numbers have 
tricts as follows : 
South Boston . 
East Boston . 
Charlestown . 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Roxbur} 7 
City Proper . 

Total . 



Street Numbering. 
been assigned to the estates in the different dis- 

Parts of 24 streets. 
. 5 streets and parts of 18 streets. 
Parts of 13 streets. 
. 5 streets and parts of 22 streets. 
. 3 streets and parts of 25 streets. 
7 streets and parts of 44 streets. 
. 12 streets and parts of 67 streets. 
. 2 streets and parts of 41 streets. 

. 34 streets and parts of 254 streets. 

Permits. 
Permits to make openings in the streets of the city, between 
Feb. 1, 1893, and Feb. 1, 1894, have been issued as follows: 

Company. 

American Telegraph Co. 
Boston Electric Light Co. 
Boston Gas Light Co. 
Boston Water Department 
Boston Water Department (Mystic) 
BrooklineGas Light Co. 
BrooklineWater Board . 
Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 
Charlestown Gas Light Co. 
Commercial Cable Co. 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 
East Boston Gas Light Co. 
Fire Alarm Department 
Fitchburg Railroad Co. . 
Jamaica Plain Gas Light Co. 
New England Telegraph & Teleph< 

Massachusetts . 
New England Telegraph Co. . 
Norfolk Suburban Railway Co. 
New York & New England Railroad Co. 
Old Colony Railroad (N.Y., N.H. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Co. 
Park Department . 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. . 
Sewer Division 
Saucier Bros. 

South Boston Gas Light Co. . 
Standard Oil Co., of New York 
Union Freight Railway Co. 
West End Street Railway Co. 
Western Union Telegraph Co. 
Miscellaneous 







Permit* 


i. Feet. 




5 


15 






117 


388 






759 


24,868 






. 3,519 


124,037 






97 


3,383 






4,167 


650,106 






1 


2,250 






20 


538 






64 


1,545 






4 


20 






367 


23,343 






794 


54,498 






146 


2,951 






68 


242 






1 


30 






206 


18,961 


Lone ( 


3o. ol 


: 








1,487 


26,636 






5 


17 






34 


1,899 


I Co. 


10 


765 


e H. R.R.) 


17 


1,042 




6 


18 






8 


381 






379 


13,756 






191 


36,738 






1 


120 






227 


6,264 






114 


1,980 






3 


8,800 






642 


91,778 






4 


155 






3.046 


79,2530 




16,519 


1,176,777 






or 222f miles. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 223 

In addition to the foregoing permits, there have been issued 
seventy-nine emergency permits, on which there have been made 
2,199 openings, at an average length of about six feet each. A 
record of these openings is on file in the office. 

Other permits have been granted as follows : 

Advertising by a man wearing hat and coat ... 11 

Cleaning snow from roofs of buildings 

Driving cattle .... 

Distributing sand .... 

Erecting awnings .... 

Erecting and repairing buildings 

Moving buildings .... 

Occupying sidewalks for more than ten minutes to unload 

or load goods 
Pedlers (four different classes) 



99 
86 
33 

287 

6,070 

49 

170 
1,028 
Raising and lowering safes, machinery, etc. . . . 385 



Special to Sewer Division 
Special for various purposes . 
To feed or bait horses on the streets 
Watering-carts .... 



10 

205 

1,747 

121 



Making a total of 26,928 

There have been 9,920 notices sent to the various foremen to 
repair defects in the streets which have been reported by the police 
and otherwise ; also 1,531 to private parties to repair defects in 
Hyatt lights, coal-holes, and work which had been improperly done 
under permits granted them. 

Under the provision of the Revised Ordinances (Sect. 8, Chap. 
36), at the same time notices were sent to the various parties, an 
order was sent to the district foreman directing him to make the 
necessary repairs in case the parties so notified had failed to do 
so within the specified time, charging the expense to the person 
notified. 

The system seems to be a good one, as 1,509 such orders were 
sent, and comparatively few have been returned with expense in- 
curred. 

There hove been 1 ,350 notices sent to the department, various 
corporations, and citizens regarding contemplated street improve- 
ments during the year. 

There have been about 200 new bonds filed during the year. 

There have been 700 requests sent to the Police Department, 
asking for information regarding locations where persons have 
asked for permits to sell goods from areas and windows, or to 
occupy the sidewalk for more than ten minutes to load or unload 
goods, all of which have been returned with the desired informa- 
tion, and if favorable and no objections were found the permits 
have been granted. 



224 



City Document No. 34. 



Streets Laid Out or Extended. 



Date. 

Mar. 13 
May 11 
May 15 

May 16 
May 16 
May 22 
June 7 
June 7 
May 22 
July 19 
July 31 
Aug. 10, 

Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 24 
Oct. 12 
Oct. 12 
Oct. 12 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 23 
Dec. 4 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 14 
Dec. 14 
Dec. 14 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 27 
Dec. 27 
Dec 2is 
Dec. 29 

Dec. 30. 
Dec. 30. 
Dec. 30. 



Street. 



Location. 



Lewis st 

Batavia st. ... 
Miner st 

Howard st. . . 
Hewlett st. . . . . 
Gannett st. . . . 
Deerfield st. . . 
Bay State road 
Chambers st. . 

Alcott st 

Glenway st. . . 
Weld Hill st. . , 

Bushnell st. . . . 

Lyon st 

Elko st 

Willis st 

Tremlett st. . . . 
Leicester st. . . , 
Germania st. . 

Ruth st 

Hollander St.. , 
Hamerton st. . 
Edge Hill st.., 
Westerly st. . . 
Holworthy st. , 
Portsmouth st. , 

Elmira st 

Etna st 

Adelaide st. . . . 
Montview st. . , 
Highgate st . . , 

Selden st , 

Newport st. 
Greenheys st. . . 
Hazelwood st. . 

Tolman st 

St.Alphonsusst 

Lawn st 

Duncan st 

Millet st 

Harrishof st. . . 
Buttonwood st. 

Robert st 

Brookfield St.. . 
Catherine st. 
Kenmore st. . . . 

Pontine st 

Round Hill St.. 
Spencer st 



Essex pi. 



North st. to Moon st , 

St. Stephen to Parker st 

Beacon st. to Brookline branch B. 
& A. R.R 

To Magazine st 

Centre st. to Walter st. 

Hoi born st. to Gaston st 

Commonwealth ave. to Charles river 

Sherborn st. to Deerfield st 

Spring st. to Brighton st 

Franklin st. to Mansfield st 

Old road to Glen ave 

Hyde Park ave. to Forest Hill 
Cemetery 

Ashmont st. to Dorchester ave 

Adams st. to Dorchester ave 

Cambridge st. to Sparhawk st 

Pleasant st. to Sumner st 

Hooper st. to Waldeck st 

Bennett st. to Arlington st 

Bismarck st. to Boylston st 

Angle in said street to Marginal st. 

Harold st. to Humboldt ave. ....... 

Harold st. to Humboldt ave 

Gay Head st. to Round Hill st 

Centre st. to Sunnyside st 

Harold st. to Humboldt ave 

Waverley st. to Lincoln st 

Murdock st. to George st 

Noi'th Beacon st. to Elmira st 

Boylston st. to Spring Park st 

Corey st. to Mt. Vernon st. 

Cambridge st. to Partington ave. . . 

Milton ave. to Morton st 

Harbor View st. to Crescent ave.. . 

Cedar st. to Magnolia st 

Townsend st. to Munroe st 

Neponset ave. to Norwood st 

Tremont st. to Huntington ave 

Hayden St.. easterly, to Heath st. . . 

Greenwich st. to Leonard st 

Park st. to Talbot ave 

Harold st. to Humboldt ave 

Grafton st. to Crescent ave 

Brookfield st. to Walter st 

South st. to South Fairview st 

Florence st. to Bourne st 

Commonwealth ave. to West New- 
bury st 

Norfolk ave. to Batchelder st 

Day st. to Walden st 

Park st. to Wheatland ave 

End discontinued 

Total 

Or 6.293 miles. 



Length in 
Feet. 

200 

926 

304 
121 

1,657 
467 
518 
802 
264 
484 

1,039 

1,012 
106 
839 
459 
693 
559 
263 
658 
138 
703 
648 
591 
359 
757 
818 
641 

1,120 
635 

1,368 
504 

LS09 
637 
390 
364 
940 

1,165 
956 
664 

1,139 
807 
341 
373 
463 
881 

211 

391 

1,433 

643 

33,260 
3f 



33,226 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



225 



Streets Widened and Relocated. 



Date. 



Street. 



Jan. 31, 
Jan. 31, 

Jan. 31, 

Jan. 31, 

Feb. 16, 

April 24, 
April 24, 

May 22, 
Aug. 16, 

Aug. 21, 
Sept. 13, 

Sept. 20, 

Sept. 20, 

Oct. 16, 

Nov. 23, 
Dec. 7, 
Dec. 8, 

Dec. 29, 



Commonwealth 
ave 

Commonwealth 
ave 

Beacon st 

Brookline ave. . 

Commonwealth 

ave 

Essex st 

Lincoln st 

Chambers st. . . 
City sq 

Boston st, 

Causeway st. . . 

Hancock st. . . . 

Columbia st. . . . 

Henshaw st. . . . 

Harrison ave . . 
Washington st, 
Poplar st 



Location. 



Poplar St. 



On the southerly cor. Brookline ave. 

On the northerly side at the junction 
of Beacon st 

On the southerly side at the junction 
of Brookline ave 

On the northerly side at the junction 
of Beacon st 



Sq. Ft. 



At Beacon st 

Between Chauncy and South sts. . . . 
On the easterly side between Essex 

and Tufts sts 

Between Ashland st. and Spring st. 
On the northerly side between Main 

and Park sts 

Northeasterly cor. of Pond st 

On the southerly side between Endi- 

cott and Prince sts 

Northerly side between Rocky Hill 

ave. and Dudley st 

Northerly side between Bird and 

Rocky Hill ave 

Between Menlo st. and Washington 

st 



Between Essex and Beach sts 

From Cambridge st. to Oak sq 

Easterly side between Washington 

st. and Ashland st 

At Washing-ton st 



1,927 

534 

195 

37 

1,545 
9,150 

854 
2,663 

18 
1,386 

25 

959 

4,193 

2,570 
10,213 

48,826 

5,228 
466 

90,789 



Streets Discontinued. 



Date. 

Jan. 6, 
July 19, 



Street. 



Spring lane. 
Essex st 



Aug. 21, Pond st. 



Location. 



Aug. 26,' Essex place. 
Oct. 16, Ilenshawst. 



At and near cor. Washington st. . . . 

Northerly side between Columbia 
and Lincoln sts 

Northerly side near and east of Bos- 
ton st 

South of Tufts st 

Between Menlo st. and Washington 
st 



Sq. Ft. 

131 

57 

1,607 
622 

1,324 

3,741 



226 City Document No. 34. 

The record of the Street Commissioners for the year 1893 
shows the following results : 

Streets laid out or extended . 33,226 lin. ft., or 6.293 miles. 

Streets widened and relocated . 90,789 sq. ft. 

Streets discontinued . . . 3,741 sq. ft. 

Increase in mileage . . . 33,226 lin. ft., or 6.293 miles. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Appropriations . 



Appropriation for 1893-94 .... $850,000 00 

Amount collected by City Collector for repairs 
done by Paving Division for different com- 
panies, etc 4,093 74 



Expenditures. 

Amount of expenditures from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1893, to January 31, 
1894 ..'... $745,681 52 

Transferred to Central Office . 805 96 

Transferred to Sewer Division . 40,000 00 
Transferred to Sanitary Division . 15,000 00 

Transferred to Street-Cleaning 

Division 15,000 00 



54,093 74 



816,487 48 

Transferred to City Treasury . . . $37,606 26 

Total expenditures from regular appropriation . $745,681 52 
Total expenditures from street-watering appro- 
priation 99,430 16 

Total expenditures from special appropriations . 707,801 49 

Grand total (regular and special) . . $1,552,913 17 



Street Department — Paving Division. 227 

Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with City 
Collector from February 1, 1893, to February 1, 1894, on account 
of the Paving Division : 

Sidewalk construction assessments (Law of 1892), 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (Law of 1893) , 
Old paving-blocks ...... 

Repair of streets (Rev. Ord. 1892) 

Rent of part of Fort Hill wharf .... 

Miscellaneous ....... 



The amount paid into the city treasury during the same period 
on account of the Paving Division is as follows : 

Sidewalk construction assessments (Law of 1892), $58,008.95 

Edgestone and side walk assessments (Law of 1893), 10,537 55 

Repairs of streets (Rev. Ord. 1892) ... 989 05 

Rent of part of Fort Hill wharf .... 500 00 

Miscellaneous •. . 5,832 05 



$18,694 


57 


18,344 


93 


2,913 


64 


2,912 


65 


500 


00 


3,490 


13 


146,855 


92 



$75,867 60 



In addition to the above amount, there was an 

income from street-watering of $704 52 



228 



City Document No. 34. 



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Street Department — Paving Division. 



229 



SCHEDULE A. 

Expenditures. (Details.) 

Salary of Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent of 

Streets, January 27, 1893, to January 25, 1894 
Salary of office clerks 

Advertising in and subscribing for daily papers 
Horses, carts, and harnesses (new) 
Printing and stationery 
Repairing stables, sheds, etc. 
Sundries ..... 
Street signs and numbering 
Telephones, expenses of 
Tools, cost of keeping the same in repair, etc. 



$3,500 00 

12,312 33 

508 66 

10,724 52 

3,048 91 

2,098 29 

8,304 98 

1,441 08 

1,056 90 

10,820 76 

£53,81 6 43 



SCHEDULE B. 

Executions of Court, etc. 

Aldrich, Warren D., personal injuries 

Barbier, Gabriel, " 

Beekman, Emma, " 

Bennett, Mrs. C. H., " 

Bidnead, Ann B., " 

Conant, Elizabeth, " 

Conway, Thomas, grade damages 

Cutter, Dr. Charles K., damages to sleigh 

Davy, George A., damages to estate . 

Devlin, Joseph, personal injuries 

Drisco, Ormando H., grade damages 

Estabrook, Edward L. and George W., grade 

Eitzgerald, J. R., personal injuries . 

Ford, Noah, " 

Ford, Patrick, loss of time on account of 

ceived ...... 

Fowlie, James, personal injuries 

Frink, Alden, damage to house 

Fuller, Ellen M., damages to estate . 

Gateley, Michael C, personal injuries 

Gray, Mary E., damage to estate 

Harrington, Edmund D. T., injuries to hor 

Horan, Patrick, grade damages 

Kerrigan, Owen, personal injuries 

Keyes, Samuel, injuries to team 

Leonard, Mary, personal injuries 

Nash, Susan \V., grade damages 

Newhall, Horatio, grade damages 

Sullings, Ada L , personal injuries 

Swib Patrick .1., grade damages 

Taylor, Abbie, " 

Whittier, Laura E., personal injuries 

Woodbury, Louisa, damages to estate 

Woods, Ellen T., Henry E., Herbert, and 

grade damages ..... 





. $1,052 31 




130.81 




926 11 




150 00 




889 43 




126 44 




126 77 


. 


40 00 




500 00 




66 00 




796 19 


damages 


761 33 




125 45 




375 78 


ljuries re- 






244 00 




100 00 




5 00 




875 92 




100 (JO 




300 00 




175 00 




150 00 




150 00 




25 00 




100 00 




792 64 




3,09s 41 




:;(io on 




2,025 45 




796 1!) 




1,606 87 




501 11 


\rthur L. 





100 00 



517.512 21 



230 



City Document No. 34. 



SCHEDULE C. 

The following schedule shows the expenditure from the main- 
tenance appropriation of this division in excess of special appro- 
priations. 

Dorchester Street, Eighth street to Dorchester avenue. 
In excess of special appropriations . . . . . $110 78 

I Street, Fourth to Sixth street . 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 1,127 51 

(Aldermanic District No. 7.) 

Vale street, Ward 15. 

In excess of special appropriation 45 03 

Englewood avenue, Chestnut Hill avenue to Brook- 
line line, Brighton. 
In excess of special appropriation 3,788 57 

Lexington avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation 432 40 

La Grange street. 

In excess of special appropriation 1,605 21 

Short street, Ward 23. 

In excess of special appropriation 129 00 

Washington street. 

In excess of special appropriation 3,096 37 

(Aldermanic District No. 11.) 

Brent street. 

In excess of special appropriation 3,177 98 

Dorchester avenue, paving, Wards 15 and 24. 
In excess of special appropriation 1,799 55 

Harvard street. 

In excess of special appropriation 1,533 00 

Harbor Tiew street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 50 00 

Stanton street. 

In excess of special appropriation 777 00 

Arch street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 1,447 78 
(Aldermanic District No. 4.) 

Bristol street. 

In excess of special appropriation ..... 313 18 

Chardon street. 

In excess of special appropriation 60 38 

Cooper Street, North Margin to Salem Street. 
In excess of special appropriation ..... 127 50 

West Newton street, Washington street to Shawmut 
avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation 1 1 72 



$19,632 96 



Street Department — Paving Division. 231 

SCHEDULE D. 

NEW WORK. 

Dewey Street, Ward 20, Blue Hill avenue to Howard 
avenue. 

Length, 887 feet. Grading, heavy rock cuts, 2,562 square 
yards 8-inch macadam. 

Labor $1,300 51 

Teaming, including rolling . . . . 1,563 00 

Gravel 771 80 

854 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 1,494 50 



Highland street, Ward 21, Dudley to Centre street. 

Street repairs, 3,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $169 75 

Teaming, including rolling. . . ' '. 449 50 

Gravel 325 45 

803 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 1,405 25 

Intervale Street, Ward 21, Warren street to Blue 
Hill avenue. 



Length, 603 ft. ; area, 1,742 sq. yds. Setting t 


dgestone, 


paving gutters, brick sidewalks, flagging 


crossing, 


resurfacing roadway. 




Labor ....... 


$577 13 


Teaming, including street-rolling 




364 00 


Pavers' bills ..... 




350 31 


Gravel 




450 50 


Gutter blocks 




537 24 






194 40 


574 ft. edgestone, at 75 cts. . 




430 51 


10,014 paving brick, at $13 per thousand 




130 18 


166.3 ft. flagging, at 90 cts. 




149 67 


292 tons macadam, at $1.75 




511 00 



Huntington avenue, Ward 22, Gainsboro' to Parker 
street. 

Street repairs, 4,080 sq. yds. 6-inch macadam. 

Labor $145 50 

Steam-roller 200 00 

Gravel 188 25 

1,020 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 1,785 00 

Poplar Street, Ward 23, at Beech street. Street 
and sidewalk repairs. 

2,244 sq. yds. of 6-inch macadam. 

Labor $150 75 

Teaming, including rolling .... 262 00 

Gravel 698 7.", 

561 tons macadam, at $1.75 .... 98175 



$5,129 81 



2,349 95 



3,694 94 



2,318 75 



2,093 25 
Carried forward, $15,586 70 



232 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $15,586 70 

St. Joseph Street, Ward 23, South to Woodman 
street. Length, 415 feet. Eclgestone set, gutters 
paved, sidewalks gravelled, street macadamized. 

922 sq. yds. 4-inch macadam. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming, including rolling 

819.6 feet eclgestone, at 75 cts. 

6 small corners, at $8.35 .... 

8,136 gutter blocks, at $27 per thousand 

Pavers' bills 

Gravel ....... 

155 tons macadam, at $1.75 



322 


50 


614 


70 


20 


10 


219 


67 


138 


85 


68 


29 


271 


25 



Stockton street 

Milton avenue. 

Grading. 
Area, 3,712 sq. yds. 
Excavating, 739 cubic yds., at 50 cts. 
Labor ..... 

Teaming 

415 double loads rubble, at $1.50 
474 tons crushed stone, at $1.75 
Gravel 



Ward 24, Washington street to 
Length, 1,285 feet. Unfinished. 



$369 50 

16 88 

51 00 

622 50 

829 50 

64 35 



Alcott Street, Ward 25, Mansfield to Franklin street. 
Length, 498 feet. Edgestones set, gutters paved, 

sidewalks gravelled. 
1,440 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam roadway. 

Labor $616 50 

Teaming, including rolling . . . 295 50 

17,825 gutter blocks, at $26 . . . 463 45 

1,026.4 feet edgestone, at 75 cts. . . 769 80 

4 large corners ...... 22 40 

4 small corners 13 40 

Gravel 782 95 

333 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 582 75 

Cambridge street, Ward 25 ; street repairs be- 
tween Allston street and Cambridge bridge. 
2,805 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 

Labor $78 75 

Roller 300 00 

Gravel 426 15 

935 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 1,636 25 

Western avenue, Ward 25 ; street repairs between 

Watertown aud Cambridge bridge. 
5,604 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $148 38 

Roller 420 00 

Gravel 505 70 

1,401 tons macadam, at $1.75 . . . 2,45175 



2,024 36 



1,953 73 



3,546 75 



2,441 15 



3,525 83 



Total $29,078 52 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



233 



REMOVAL OF SNOW. 

South Boston 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester . 

Roxbury 

City Proper 

Roxbury and West Roxbury (new district) 



$11,558 03 

6,823 88 

11,182 69 

7,679 03 

10,109 21 

13,979 82 

15,621 49 

74,530 30 

508 88 

5151,943 33 



S TREE T- WA TERING. 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . 
Roxbury 
City Proper 



$7,771 09 

6,505 57 

6,397 58 

11,859 10 

15,487 36 

14,465 37 

15,885 57 

21,058 52 

$99,430 16 



DETAIL OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIA TIONS. 

Allston bridge, Ward 25. 

Resetting edgestones, relaying sidewalks, repaying gutters, and resur- 
facing roadway to approaches. 

Labor . $579 60 

Teaming 456 00 

Materials 1,468 96 



Baker Street, Ward 23, grading and widening. 
Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Stone ........ 




Beacon Street, Ward 25 (unfinished work from 1892). 

Material $10* 90 

Brent Street, Ward 24, Washington street to Carlisle street. 

Length, 1,202 ft. ; 2,670 sq. yds. 18-in. Telford macadam. 

Labor ..... 

Teaming .... 

Steam-roller 

Gravel .... 

Paving .... 



$664 


10 


876 


50 


L30 


00 


445 


50 


57 


89 



Carried forward, 



11,673 



234 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Filling ..... 

1 ,598 tons of macadam 
Work done by Sewer Division 

Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



51,526 28 
3,177 98 



$1,673 99 

122 90 

2,796 50 

110 87 

$4,704 26 



.704 26 



Uristol Street, Ward 17, Harrison avenue to Albany 
street. Length, 588 feet. 

1,217 sq. yds. granite block paving. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Brick . 

Gravel and sand . 

Edge stone . 

28, 0U0 large paving blocks 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 
Aldermanic District No. 8 



Broadway, Ward 12, Harrison avenue to Lehigh-street bridge 
and Albany street, Broadway to B. & A. R.R. bridge. Reset- 
ting edgestoue, relaying sidewalks and paving. 

2,200 sq. yds. granite block paving. 

Labor . $2,378 32 

Teaming 1,345 50 

Gravel 330 31 

50,725 large granite blocks 3,728 29 





$761 78 




417 00 




39 65 




211 38 




62 15 




2,058 00 




$3,549 96 


$2,869 28 




313 18 




367 50 




— : — 


$3,549 96 



Amount of special appropriation 

Chardon Street, Ward 8. 

Amount retained from Jones & Meehan, on their con- 
tract .......... 

Amount of special appropriation . . . $349 45 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . . 60 38 



Cherry Street, Ward 16. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co., on 
their contract in 1892 



Commonwealth avenue, construction. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming ....... 

Gravel ....... 

13,571.92 tons of stone .... 

3,049 double loads of stone 



Carried forward, 



$7,782 42 
$7,782 42 



$409 83 



$109 83 



$65 10 



539,611 87 
8,926 50 
1,307 30 

25,109 08 
4,573 50 

£79,528 25 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



235 



Brought forward, 
1,660 cu. yds. of stone 
Powder and fuse . 
Lumber 
Advertising 
Sundries 

71,706 large granite blocks 
48,676 asphalt blocks . 
341 T 9 2 feet circular edgestone 
4,693 T 7 o feet straight edgestone 
48 perch of wall . 
Paid for building bulkhead 

Paid to R. A. Davis, as per contract : 
2,676 cu. yds. filling, at 83 cts. . 
3,471.9 cu. yds. excavation, at 30 cts. 

6.416.1 sq. yds. Telford base, at 95 cts. 

1.149.2 sq. yds. gutters paved, at 95 cts. 
4132 sq. yds. loam furnished, at 50 cts. 
1,535.8 lin. ft. edgestone, at 45 cts. 
1,501 lin. ft. plank-walk, at $1 . 
1,501 lin. ft. fence, at 50 cts. 

Extra work as ordered : 
923 loads of stone chips, at $1.50 
90 days' labor, at $2 . 
18| days, foreman, at $3 

4 days, paver, at $4.50 

5 days, rammer, at $2.50 
4 days, tender, at $2 . 
2 days, stonecutter, at $4.50 
1 day, single team, at $3.50 
10 double loads gravel, at $2 









$79,528 25 








3,735 00 








361 50 








715 81 








298 54 








994 94 








5,213 20 








1,947 04 








420 76 








3,896 18 








216 00 








850 00 




$2,221 


08 






1,041 


57 






6,095 


30 




;ts. 


1,091 


74 




5. 


2,066 


10 






691 


11 






1,501 


00 






750 


50 






1,384 


50 






180 


00 






55 


50 




J18 00 








12 50 








8 00 








9 CO 








3 50 








20 00 









$71 00 
10 65 



Add 15 per cent. . 

904 cu. yds. excavation, at 10 cts. 
3 days watering-cart, at $6 
3 clays steam-roller, at $6 



Less b\ days' use of steam-roller, at $10, 



Excavation : 
1,131 cu. yds. i'ock removed, at $1.48 
Labor and teaming . 



81 65 
90 40 
18 00 
18 00 

.17,286 45 
55 00 



$1,969 88 
326 00 



Paid to Boston ( lontracting Co., as per contract: 
96,933 cu. yds. of filling, at 37 cts. ..... 

Paid to James II. Seamans, George If. Worthley, and 
Emery B. Gibbs, trustees: 
96,646 cu. yds. of gravel, at 12£ cts 

Furnishing base : 
5,039 sq. yds. Telford base, at HO cts. . $4,031 20 

882 cu. yds. earth cutting, at 45 cts. . . 396 90 

24 cu. yds. rock, at $1.48 .... 3552 

Labor and material ..... 954 99 



17,231 45 

2,295 88 
35,865 22 

12,080 75 
5,418 61 



Carried fo rward, 



$171,069 08 



236 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

Paid to F. H. Cowin & Co., as per contract: 
4,740 cu. yds. sub-gi'ading, at 30 cts. 
7,521 sq. yds. Telford base, at 79 cts. 
1,293 sq yds. gutters paved, at 85 cts. 
7,314 sq. yds. loam (unfinished), at 53 cts., 
1,799 lin. ft. edgestones, at 45 cts. 
1,685 lin. ft. plank-walk, at $1.02 
1,685 lin. ft. fence, at 48 cts. 

Extra work as ordered : 
8J days, paver, at $4 . 
2 days, roller, at $3 . 
29,223 blocks carted, at $4 per M 
2 days' labor,. foreman, at $3.50 . 
134| days' labor, at $2 
16 clays' single team, at $3 . 
1 day, double team 
12i ft. edgestones set, at 20 cts. . 
13 sq. yds paving gutters, at 40 cts. 
186 T 8 2 ft. edgestones reset, at 20 cts. 

Land damages .... 
Work done by Sewer Division . 



Amount retained from F. H. Cowin & Co. 
Amount retained from R. A. Davis 





$171,069 08 


1,422 00 




5,941 99 




1,099 05 




3,876 42 




809 55 




1,718 70 




808 80 




31 00 




6 00 




116 89 




7 00 




268 67 




48 00 




5 00 




2 50 




5 20 




37 30 






16,207 07 
56,527 00 






23,889 20 




$267,692 35 


$783 83 




661 87 


1 A.AR 70 



$266,246 65 



Congress and L streets, and L street, grading, from First street to 
Congress street, Ward 14. 

Area, 5,464 sq. yds. 
Labor . 
Team in o- 



Gravel 

Lumber 

Filling 

125,783 large granite blocks 

Paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
4,992 sq. yds. block paving 
Work done by Sewer Division 



Amount of appropriation for L-street grad- 
ing ....*... 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Con- 
gress and L streets . . • . 



$2,876 32 
700 50 

1,514 20 
494 82 
586 50 

9,245 06 

1,248 00 
981 10 

$17,646 50 



$2,346 50 
15,300 00 



$17,646 50 

Cooper street, North Margin street to Salem street, Ward 7. 

Resetting edgestone, relaying sidewalks, and 452 sq. yds. granite block 
paving. 

Labor $437 39 

Teaming 334 50 

Gravel and sand 72 00 



Carried forward, 



$843 89 



Street Department — Paving DivrsiON. 



237 



Brought fo rioard, 

Brick 

10,396 large granite blocks 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Cranston street, Ward 23. 

Grading: rock excavation. 

Labor 

Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 



i,500 00 
127 50 



$843 89 

19 50 

764 11 

$1,627 50 

$1,627 50 



$982 


90 


126 


00 


49 


30 


$1,158 


20 



Dickens Street, Adams street to N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. Depot, 
Ward 24. 



Length, 876 ft. ; 2,531 sq. yds. 9-in. macadam. 




997 tons of stone ...... 


. $1,495 50 


Steam-roller ....... 


80 00 


Teaming 


105 00 


Gravel ........ 


210 00 


Labor ......... 


182 71 



Amount of appropriation for Dickens street, $785 00 

Amount paid out of applanation for Street 

Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 

12 1,288 21 



!2,073 21 



52,073 21 



Dorchester avenue, paving, Wards 15 and 24. 
Grading avenue at Milton Lower Mills. Area, 1,148 sq. yds. Heavy 
rock cut, and 1,148 sq. yds. 12-in. Telford macadam roadway. 







$2,272 55 






306 00 


Gravel 




363 80 






731 50 






292 42 






150 00 


Work done by the Sewer Division 


• 


383 65 
$4,499 92 


Amount of appropriation for Dorchester 






ave. ........ 


$2,700 37 




Amount paid out of Paving Division . 


1,799 55 









$4,499 92 



Dorchester street, Eighth street to Dorchester avenue. 
Amount retained from Collins & Ham, on their contract in 

1891 

Amount of appropriation for Dorchester 

street $386 09 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 110 78 



$496 87 



sine, 87 



238 City Document No. 34. 

Eighth street, L to O street, Ward 14, gravelling sidewalks 
and patching street. 

Labor $1,150 52 

Teaming 60 00 

Paving 93 44 

Macadam . . . 364 54 

Gravel 1,022 22 

$2,690 72 
Amount of appropriation for Eighth street . $1,249 69 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 7 1,441 03 

$2,690 72 

Englewood avenue, Ward 25, Chestnut Hill avenue to Brookline 
line, grading. 

Length, 1,657 ft. ; 6,260 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor $2,611 03 

Teaming, including rolling 1,017 00 

Steam-roller 140 00 

Flagging 141 48 

Gravel 1,237 95 

Powder and fuse 90 00 

1,736 tons of macadam 3,038 00 

Work done by Sewer Division ...... 253 06 

$8,528 52 
Amount of appropriation for Englewood 

avenue $4,739 95 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 3,788 57 

$8,528 52 

Freeport Street, Ward 24, Beach to Tenean street. 

3,115 sq. vds. block paving; 5,920 sq. yds. 4-inch, macadam. 

Labor $1,568 38 

Teaming 1,072 50 

Gravel 1,042 90 

62,542 large granite blocks ' . . . . . 4,557 31 

Wharfage 107 00 

Paving . . . . . . • . . . . 785 96 

Steam-roller 295 00 

947 tons cracked stone 1,420 50 

$10,849 55 

Grant Street, Ward 24, grading. 

Labor and material ........ $241 52 

Harbor View street, Ward 24, repairs. 

Labor . . . $158 71 

Material 454 25 

$612 96 
Amount of appropriation for Harbor View 

street $562 96 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 50 00 

$612 96 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



239 



Harvard street, Ward 24, Washington to School street, grading, 

gutters paved. 
4,584 sq. yds. 12-inch Telford; between School street and Glen road, 

grading. 
Labor -• mM6 44 



Teaming 

Gravel 

1,201 tons of macadam 

Gutter blocks 

Stone . 

Steam-roller 

Flagging 

Edgestone . 

Paving 

Lumber 

Work done by the Sewer D 



vision 



Amount paid out of appropriation for Har- 
vard street ...... 

Amount paid out of appropriation for street 
improvements, Aldermanic District No. 
12 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Pav- 
ing Division ...... 



16,000 00 

4,271 36 
1,533 00 



1.832 95 
752 40 

1,801 50 
677 30 

3,084 10 
250 00 
319 50 
151 31 
189 »0 
18 98 
209 98 

$11,804 36 



ill, 804 36 



Houghton street, Ward 24, Mill street to Pope's Hill. 
Grading; 3,618 sq. yds. 4-inch Telford macadam. 



Labor ...... 












$3,155 71 


Teaming .... 












1,234 80 


Gravel .... 












754 05 


Steam-roller 












150 00 


585 tons macadam 












877 50 


Work done by Sewer Division 












378 34 




$6,550 40 


Amount of appropriation for Houghton street 

Howell street, Ward 15, Dorchester avenue to B< 


. $6,550 40 


3ston street. 


Length, 602 feet; 1,739 sq. yds. 12-in. Telford macadam. Setting 


edgestones, gravelling sidewalks, and. paving gutters. 


Labor ......... 


$1,573 93 


Teaming .... 












250 50 


Roller .... 












150 00 


Gravel .... 












570 75 


702 tons of macadam . 












1,053 00 


1,150 feet of edgestone 












865 50 


23 feet of circular edgestone 












29 90 


Lumber .... 












57 84 


Sundries .... 












41 50 


Paid for building; wall 












230 00 


5.:; 17 cu. yds. filling, at 30 cts. 








$1,604 10 


71.5 " retaining- wall, at $4 




286 DO 


Carried for ward, 








$1,* 


90 1( 


) $4,822 92 



240 



City Document No. 34. 



$1,890 10 

87 50 

25 00 

93 12 

111 55 

6 75 

5 04 


$4,822 92 
9 9J9 06 






$2,880 61 
! 4,161 37 


$7,041 98 
$7,041 98 





Brought forward, 
50 lin. feet of capping, at $1.75 
Excavation ...... 

1,164 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
446.2 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 

27 sq. yds. round paving, at 25 cts. 

28 " brick " " 18 " 



Amount of appropriation for Howell street 
Amount paid out of street improvements, 
Aldermanic District No. 7 



Humboldt Avenue, Ward 21. 

Grade damages ......... 

Hunneman street, Ward 20, grading. 

Grade damages 

Labor ........... 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Jackson Street, Ward 15, grading. 

Labor . . . . . . . . . • • 

2,171 cu. yds. filling 

Amount of appropriation for Jackson street 

La Grange street, Ward 23, grading. 

Labor .......... 

Teaming .......... 

Powder, fuel, etc. 

678 cu. yds. rock removed, at $1.75 . . $1,186 50 

461 double loads filling, at 75 cts. . . 345 75 



Amount paid out of appropriation for La 
Grange street ...... 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
street improvements, Aldermanic District 
No. 11 . . . . . m . 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Paving; Division 



Landing, East Boston. 
Building landing as per contract 
Rent ...... 



5,269 30 



$225 52 



$100 00 
380 45 
126 00 
357 00 

$963 45 



$414 50 
1,085 50 

$1,500 00 



&2,928 05 

1,644 00 

302 46 

1,532 25 

56,406 76 



1,532 25 




1,605 21 


$6,406 76 

$250 00 
250 00 


# # 



Amount of appropriation for landing, East Boston 



$500 00 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



241 



Lehigh street, Wards 12 and 16, Albany to South street. 

Resetting edgestone, relaying sidewalks ; 2,890 sq. yds. granite block 

paving. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 



1,431 47 
1,578 00 

529 30 
4,791.10 

449 11 



Gravel .... 

65,185 large granite blocks 
Work done bv Sewer Division 



Amount of appropriation for Lehigh street, 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 12 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Alderman ic District No. 6 . . . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 5 . . . 



Lexington avenue, Ward 25, Washington to Union street. 

Length, 736 ft. ; grading, gravelling sidewalks 2,126 sq. yds. 6-in. 
macadam. 

Labor $420 00 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 462 00 

400 tons of macadam 600 00 

Gravel 653 30 



2,831 78 


$11,778 98 


6,283 73 




2,198 17 




465 30 


$11,778 98 



Amount of appropriation for Lexington ave., $1,702 90 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 432 40 

Ninth street, Ward 14, Old Harbor to N street. 

Resurfacing 9,200 sq. yds. 6-in. macadam. 

Labor 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 

2,314 tons of macadam ....... 

Gravel .......... 



$2,135 30 



$2,135 30 



111,060 17 

1,404 00 

3,471 00 

439 50 



$6,374 67 
Amount of appropriation for Ninth street . $5,827 14 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 7 . . . 547 53 

$6,374 67 

Norfolk Street, Ward 24, Milton to Corbett street. 
Length, 1,840 ft. ; widening and grading, gravelling sidewalks, 7,006 
sq. yds. 12-in. macadam. 

Labor $2,223 18 

Teaming 717 50 

Gravel 706 18 

Holler 100 00 

2,934 tons of macadam 4,406 00 

$8,152 86 
Amount of appropriation for Norfolk street, $2,350 00 

Amount paid out of Streel Improvements, 
Aldermanic District No. 12 . . . 5,802 86 

$8,152 86 



242 



City Document No. 34. 



Park street, Charlestown, widening and repaying. 

Labor $810 50 

Teaming 85 50 

Gravel 196 02 

Blocks 222 94 

Brick 91 00 

Paving • . . . . 262 06 

$1,168 02 
Parmeilter street, Ward 6, Salem to Hanover street. 

Labor $375 35 

Teaming 285 00 

Paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
134 T % eu. yds. concrete base, at $5 673 00 

Paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
764 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.25 . 1,719 00 

$3,052 85 
Amount of appropriation forParmenter st. , $1,500 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 3 . . . 1,552 35 



$3,052 35 

River Street, Ward 24, Washington street to Blue Hill avenue. 

Length, 7,149 ft. ; resurfacing and reconstructing 21,000 sq. yds. 15-in. 
Telford macadam. 

Labor $4,045 97 

Teaming .' 697 50 

2,702 tons of macadam 4,053 00 

419 double loads gravel 691 35 

Steam-roller . 890 00 



Amount of appropriation for River street . $4,000 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 12 6,377 82 



),377 82 



$10,377 82 



Savin Hill avenue, Ward 24, resurfacing street at railroad bridge. 

..... $810 40 



Labor and material 



Sawyer avenue, Ward 24, Cushing avenue to Pleasant street. 



5,833 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam 



Length, 2,021 ft 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Steam-roller 

Gravel 

680 tons of macadam 

Work done by Sewer Division 

Amount of appropriation for Sawyer avenue 

Short street, Ward 23, grading, earth excavation. 

Labor 

Teaming- 



Amount of appropriation for Short street . $1,806 73 

Amount paid out for Paving Division . 129 00 



$783 18 
296 00 
150 00 
300 30 

1,020 00 
163 96 

^2,713 44 



$1,421 23 
514 50 

$1,935 73 



! 1,935 73 



Street Department — Paving Division. 243 

Smith street, construction, Ward 22. 

Labor $942 20 

Teaming .......... 366 00 

Roller 200 00 

Gravel and sand 159 90 

128 tons of macadam 224 00 

Work clone by the Sewer Division 116 00 

Amount of appropriation for Smith street .... $2,008 10 

So. Margin street, Pitts to Prospect street, resetting edgestones, 
relaying sidewalks, 1,147 sq. yds. granite block paving. 

Labor $1,075 80 

Teaming 597 00 

Gravel . . . 167 50 

Excavating . . . 246 48 

26,885 laro;e o T anite blocks 1,939 30 

280 feet of edgestone 210 00 

Work done by Sewer Division ...... 263 92 

Amount of appropriation for So. Margin street . . $1,500 00 

Stanton street, Ward 24, Norfolk to Evans street. 
Length, 1,100 ft. ; 3,300 sq. yds. 4-in. macadam. 

Labor $1,222 47 

Teaming 409 50 

Roller 200 00 

Stone 796 53 

Gravel 148 50 



Amount of appropriation for Stanton street, $2,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . . 777 00 



$2,777 00 
$2,777 00 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Bennington street, Marion to Chelsea street, and across Chelsea 
street, paving and regulating. 

Length, 2,2!H ft. ; area, 6,456 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $4,818 89 

Teaming L,231 50 

Gravel ' 1,711 27 

Sand 501 00 

Lumber 154 36 

Advertising 31 SO 

149,420 large granite blocks 10,982 37 

45,000 paving brick 585 00 

388 ft. flagging :'. II 1 1 

Paid to Doherty & O'Leaiy, for paving: 
6,456.5 Bq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts., $1,614 13 

2,419.5 I'm. l't edgestone set, al 8 cts. . 193 56 

2,951 sq. yds. brick paving, at is cts. . 531 18 

21 s<j. yds brick paving, h. b., at 36 cts. . 8 64 

Carried forward, $2,317 51 $20,360 63 



244 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
165.5 sq. yds. flag crosswalks, at 25 cts. 
35 days' labor, at $ 2.00 



$2,347 51 
41 38 
70 00 



Border Street, White street to Condor street. 
Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. on their contract in 
1892 . 



$20,360 63 



2,458 89 
>2,819 52 



$410 67 



Condor Street, Border street to Meridian street, paving and regu- 
lating. Length, 271 ft. 

Area, 1,080 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $510 85 

Teaming 178 50 

Gravel 315 43 

218.5 feet of edgestone 163 88 

22,584 large granite blocks 1,659 92 

Paid to Doherty & O'Leary, for paving : 
1,024 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . $256 00 

298.2 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . 23 86 

56 sq. vds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. . 14 00 

293 86 



53,122 44 



Maverick Street, Border street to New street, paving and regu- 
lating, including excavation and sub-grading. 

Length, 189 ft. ; area, 651 sq. yds. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 



Sand 

17,035 large granite blocks . 
13,000 paving brick 

Paid to Doherty & O'Leary, for paving ; 
638 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 
379 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
354 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 
13 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. 



1,217 83 

75 00 

219 22 

44 00 

1,252 07 

169 00 



$159 50 

30 32 

63 72 

3 25 



256 79 



^3,233 91 



New street, Cross street to Maverick street. Length, 281 ft. ; 
851 sq. yds. granite block paving, 291 sq. yds. cobble-stone 
paving. 

Area, 1,142 sq. yds. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $503 69 

Teaming 142 50 

Gravel 231 25 

Sand 34 00 

170.5 feet edgestone, and 1 large corner .... 133 38 

17,213 large paving blocks 1,265 16 

13,000 paving brick . 169 00 



Carried forward, 



M,478 98 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



Brought forward. 
Paid to Dokerty & O'Leary, for paving : 
1,082 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
548 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
349 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 
60 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. 



Work done by Sewer Division 



$270 50 
43 84 
62 82 
15 00 



245 

},478 98 



392 16 
>,87 1 14 
L,542 32 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Mystic avenue, Main street to Sonierville line. Length, 280 
ft. ; area, 1,616 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $1,149 47 

Teaming 249 00 

Gravel 374 22 

31.236 large granite blocks . . . . . . 2,280 23 

3,200 paving brick 41 60 

Paid to P. Brennan, for paving: 
1,616 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . $404 00 

215 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . . 38 70 
10 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. . . 2 50 

440.5 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . 35 24 

480 44 



Rutherford avenue, Allen to Cambridge street 
ft. ; area, 4,725 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming .... 

Gravel .... 

Advertising 

Sundries .... 

114,020 large granite blocks 

Paid to John Turner & Co., for pav 
12 T V feet of edgestone, at 70 cts. 
25 feet of circular stone, at $1.30 
201 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
4,725.4 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts 
54.5 sq. yds. brick sidewalks laid, at 18 cts. 
1 larofe corner 



$4,574 96 



Length, 1,029 





$2,841 38 




700 50 




1,081 08 




11 40 




12 00 




8,323 46 


$8 46 




32 50 




16 08 




,181 35 




9 81 




5 40 





1,253 60 
$14,223 42 



South Eden street, Main street to Rutherford avenue. Length, 
513 ft. ; area, 1,671 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $758 80 

Teaming Ill 00 

Gravel 433 62 

Sundries 24 50 



Carry d forward, 



[,357 92 



246 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
15,000 paving brick .... 
35,992 large granite blocks 

Paid to John Turner & Co., for paving : 
9.5 feet of edgestone, at 70 cts. . 
1,121 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
1,625 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
46 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. 
626 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 
1 small corner 



$6 65 
89 68 

406 25 
11 50 

112 68 
3 60 



$1,357 92 

195 00 

2,627 41 



630 36 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



4,810 69 

$705 18 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Exchange Street, State street to Dock square. Granite block 

paving on concrete with pitch joints. 
Length, 335 ft. ; area, 569.5 sq. yds. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $815 30 

Teaming 502 50 

Beach gravel 46 90 

13,798 large granite blocks 1,018 93 

3,011 paving brick 39 14 

115 feet of edgestone ' 86 25 

Advertising 50 00 

Paid to J. J. Sullivan : 
553 sq. yds. block removed, at 24 cts 132 72 

Paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
97.4 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 . . . . 487 00 

Paid to F. H. Cowin & Co., for paving : 
569.5 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at 79 cts. . $449 91 
19 sq. yds. flagging laid, at 79 cts. . . . 15 01 

138 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . . 24 84 

50 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . 12 50 

11 sq. yds. flagging laid, at 25 cts. . . . 2 75 

505 01 



Fulton Place, North to Fulton street. 
Length, 306 ft. ; area, 820 sq. yds. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming ..... 
Beach gravel .... 
Advertising ..... 
17,500 large paving blocks . 
6,000 paving bricks 

Paid to James Grant & Co., for paving: 
810 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . 
678 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
289 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 
10.3 sq. yds. flagging crossing laid, at 25 cts. 
13 sq. yds. flagging sidewalks laid, at 25 cts. 



$202 50 
54 24 
52 02 

2 58 

3 25 



5,683 75 



$746 95 

654 00 

134 00 

9 60 

1,286 25 

78 00 



314 59 



$3,223 39 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



247 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



Ud 75 
8 64 

14 40 
7 13 



$265 45 

151 00 

76 80 

441 00 



Market Street, Portland to Merrimac street, and portion of Port- 
land street. 

Area, 260 sq. yds. 

Labor, including inspection and engineering 

Teaming ....... 

Beach gravel ...... 

6,000 large granite blocks .... 
Paid to H. Gore & Co., for paving : 

199 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 

108 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 

80 sq. yds. brick sidewalks laid,- at 18 cts. . 

28.5 sq. yds. flagging crossings laid, at 25 cts. . 

79 82 

$1,014 17 



$110 36 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Arch street, Milk to Franklin street. Length, 426 ft. 

Area, 1,206 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $193 50 

Teaming 186 00 

Gravel 8 88 

Flagging 59 40 

Paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 1,206 sq. yds. asphalt 
laid, at $2.25 



Amount paid out of appropriation for Street 

Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 4, $1,713 50 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Pav- 
ing Division 1,447 78 



2,713 50 

$3,161 28 



&3.161 28 



Beacon street, Tremont to Bowdoin street. Length, 630 ft. 

Area, 1,751 sq. yds. Granite blocks on a gravel base with pitch joints. 

$461 43 
1,014 00 



Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming 

Gravel ....... 

Sand ........ 

37,076 large granite blocks 

Paid to F. H. Cowin & Co., for paving : 
210.5 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
564 sq. yds. block laid, tar joints, at 70 cts. 
27 sq. yds. block laid, tar joints, at 90 cts. . 
1,048 sq. yds. block laid, tar joints, at 79 cts. 
59 sq. yds. tlagging crosswalks, tar joints, 

at 79 cts. . " . . . . 
53 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 
1864 sq. yds. brick pavmg laid, at 18 cts. . 
74£ hours' labor 



$16 84 

394 80 

24 30 

827 92 

46 61 
13 25 
33 57 
21 37 



201 30 

168 00 

2,725 09 



1,378 66 



$5,9 I* is 



248 



City Document No. 34. 



Spring lane, Washington to Devonshire street. 

Length, 215 ft. ; area, 391 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming 

Lumber .......... 

10,000 asphalt blocks 

Paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
43.5 cu. yds. concrete base, at $7.50 . . . . 

Paid to John Turner & Co. : 

Labor $434 70 

Material 82 97 



$511 05 

207 CO 

4 18 

400 00 

326 25 



517 67 

$1,966 15 



Work done by Sewer Division 



$334 44 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Beacon Street, Gloucester street to West Chester park. 

Length, 1,019 ft. ; area, 5,391 sq. yds. asphalt, and 204.5 sq. yds. 

block paving on gravel with pitch joints, edgestones reset, and side- 
walk repaved. 
Labor, including engineer and inspection .... $3,175 42 

Teaming 1,434 00 

Sand .' . 95 40 

Sundries 59 27 

Paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
898.5 cu. yds. concrete base, at $5 . . . . 4,492.50 

Paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
5,391.3 sq. yds. asphalt laid, at $2.25 12,130 42 

Paid to F. H. Co win & Co. : 
204.5 sq. yds. block paving, tar joints, at 79 

cts $161 56 

1,487 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . 118 96 
1,641 sq. yds brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 295 38 

90 sq. yds. brick paving, h. b., at 36 cts. . . 32 40 

113 sq. yds. brick paving, h. b., on edge, at 

50 cts 56 50 

154 sq. yds. brick paving on edge, at 36 cts. . 55 44 
67 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, at 25 cts. . . 16 75 

736 99 



$22,124 00 



Carver street, Eliot to Pleasant street. 

Length, 724 ft. ; area, 1,851 sq. yds. Granite block paving on gravel 

base, edgestones reset and sidewalks relaid. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 



Teaming 
Beach gravel 
Sand . 



38,165 large granite blocks 
18,000 paving brick . 
115 feet of edgestone . 



,376 88 
,387 50 
338 35 

63 00 
,805 13 
234 00 

86 25 



Carried forward, 



5,291 11 



Steeet Department — Paving Division, 



249 



Brought forward, 
Paid to F. H. Cowin & Co., for paving : 

1,851 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . $462 75 

1,424 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . 113 92 

840 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . . 151 20 

43.75 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. . 10 94 



S6.291 11 



738 81 



$7.029 92 
Dwig'ht street, Sliawmut avenue to Tremout street. == ^^^ 

Length, 716 ft. ; area, 2,075 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $958 33 

Teaming 870 00 

Lumber 23 30 

Sundries 71 00 

Paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 

345.8 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 .... 1,729 00 

Paid to H. Gore & Co. 

2,075 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt, at $2.25 . . . 4,668 75 

$8,320 38 
West Chester park, Haviland to Newbury street. "^"^^ 

Length, 470 ft. ; area, 1,600 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. Edgestones re- 
set, sidewalks and crossings relaid. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $1,485 77 

Teaming 472 50 

Gravel 441 60 

Sand 196 00 

Stone 1,095 90 

Paid to J. Dohertv & Co. : 
526 sq. yds. brick paving, at 25 cts. . . . $131 50 
879 ft. of edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . . 70 32 

877 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . . 157 86 
122 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. . . 30 50 

390 18 



Work done by Sewer Division 
Work done by Bi'idge Division 



$4,081 95 

$619 33 

$1,286 60 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS. ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Broadway, from Gardner place, 150 ft. easterly. 

Paid to H. Gore & Co. : 

647 8 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt, at $3.75 . . . $2,429 25 

Extra work : 
11.7 sq. yds. block paving and concrete founda- 
tions, at $3.75 $43 88 

10 sq. yds. block paving, at 40 cts. . . . 4 00 

304 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. . . . 54 72 

419 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. . . . 117 32 

Teaming 73 00 

Mason- work . . . . . . . 18 15 



Labor . 

K), nom paving brick 



311 07 
80 50 

140 40 



$2,961 22 



250 



City Document No. 34. 



Coye Street, Kneeland to East street. 

Length, 589 ft. ; area, 1,590 sq. yds. Edgestones reset and sidewalks 

relaid. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection . . . $1,851 15 

Teaming 748 50 

Beach gravel 117 92 

31,770 large granite blocks 2,335 10 

256 ft. of edgestone 192 00 

Paid to J. J. Sullivan : 

1,424 sq. yds. cobble removed, at 24 cts 341 76 



Eliot street. 

Amount retained from C. B. Payson & Co. for work done 
in 1892 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 
Work done by the Bridge Division . 



$5,586 


43 


$552 17 


$1,229 


53 


$2,517 


53 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 7. 

E. Eighth street, Old Harbor to G street. 

Length, 916 ft.; area, 1,500 sq. yds. Edgestone reset and sidewalks 

gravelled. 
Labor, including inspection and engineering . . . $1,058 00 

Teaming 399 00 

Gravel 234 50 

Wharfage 101 13 

Advertising . 6 00 

31,530 large granite blocks 2,317 46 

2,000 paving brick 26 00 

Paid to II. Gore & Co., for paving: 
1,494.2 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . $373 55 
855.8 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . . 68 46 

242.6 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 43 67 



E. Sixth street, K to L street. 
Length, 519 ft. ; area, 1,399 sq. yds. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming .... 
Gravel .... 

Wharfage .... 
30,884 large granite blocks . 
5,600 paving brick 

Paid to H. Gore & Co., for paving: 
1,389 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. . . $347 25 
1,007.6 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . 80 61 

779 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . .140 22 
10 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at 25 cts. . . 2 50 



485 68 

$4,627 77 



$991 72 

432 00 

75 60 

77 37 

2,269 97 
72 80 



570 58 



54,490 04 



Street Department — Paving Division. 251 

I Street, Fourth to Sixth street. 

Length, 560 ft. ; area, 1,742 sq. yds. Resurfacing. 

Labor $250 70 

Teaming 45 00 

Macadamizing ......... 850 81 

Gravel and blocks 231 70 

$1,378 21 
Amount paid out of the appropriation for Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 7 . . $250 70 
Amount paid out of the appropriation for 

Paving Division 1,127 51 

$1.378 21 

Third Street, E to Dorchester street, and I to L street. 

Length, 2,478 ft. ; area, 7,710 sq. yds, Resurfacing. 

Labor $630 28 

Teaming, including roller 457 50 

Gravel and stone 1,962 18 

$3,049 96 

Work done by the Sewer Division $1,073 87 

Work done by the Bridge Division ..... $1,292 94 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Randolph Street, Harrison avenue to Albany street. 
Length, 807 ft. ; area, 2,331 sq. yds. 

Labor $1,258 10 

Gravel . 819 11 

55,033 large granite blocks 4,044 93 

$6,1 22 14 

Savoy street, Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Length, 320 ft. ; area, 602 sq. yds. Paving roadway, setting edge- 
stones, and laying sidewalks. 

Labor $949 10 

Teaming 502 50 

Beach gravel ......... 54 27 

Advertising ......... 6 30 

22,480 small granite blocks 1,079 04 

275 feet of edgestone 213 75 

$2,8 04 96 

Work done by the Sewer Division $536 11 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Tremont Street, Huntington avenue to Heath street. 
Length, 2,121 ft. ; area, 4,428 sq. yds. Resurfacing. 

Labor $419 DO 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 690 00 

Carried forward, $1,109 00 



252 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Gravel 
Stone . 



$1,109 00 

712 30 

1,977 89 



"Work done by the Sewer Division . 
Work done by the Bridge Division . 



$3,799 


19 


$383 32 


$4,914 


26 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Centre street, Eliot square to New Heath street. 

Length, 2,000 ft.; area, 6,123 sq. yds. 8-inch macadam. Edgestones 
reset, sidewalks relaid, gutters re'laid, and crossings laid. 

Labor $1,196 08 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 2,125 50 

Gravel 1,783 65 

Sand 2,035 09 

Stone 2,840 00 

99.5 feet of circular edgestone 129 35 

1,482 feet of edgestone and 2 small corners . . . 1,118 20 

56,800 paving brick 436 75 

18,900 gutter blocks 378 00 

Advertising ' 22 50 

Paid to Win. McEleney, for paving: 
3,051 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . . $244 08 

1,795 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . . 448 75 

1,382 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . . 248 76 

120 sq. yds. brick paving, h. b., at 36 cts. . 43 20 

984 79 



Dean avenue. 

Filling 



$13,049 91 



$767 50 



Kemble street, G-erard street, westerly, 318 feet 

Length. 318 ft. ; area, 1,143 sq. yds. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ..... 

Filling ..... 

21,150 large granite blocks 

576 feet of edgestone . 

Paid to Doherty & O'Leary. for paving: 
1,143.4 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
636 feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
73.4 sq. yds. crossings laid, at 25 cts. 



$285 85 
50 88 
18 35 



$572 23 
447 00 
712 80 
332 50 

1,554 53 
432 00 




"Work done by the Sewer Division 



76 45 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



253 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 

Concrete Sidewalks. 

Paid to Simpson Bros. 



11. 



2,032.5 sq. yds. concrete laid, W. Roxbury 
1,966.8 sq. yds. concrete laid, Brighton 



$1,860 92 
1,918 66 

$8,779 58 



Henskaw Street, Market to Cambridge street. 
Length, 799 ft. ; area, 2,940 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. Grading, edge- 
stones set, gutters paved, crosswalks laid, and sidewalks gravelled. 



Labor 

Teaming, including rolling 

Gravel .... 

Stone 

Advertising 
24,000 gutter blocks . 
1,532 T 8 2 feet of edgestone, ) 
1 large and 8 small corners, $ 
158 T 2 o feet of circular edgestone 



2,400 


55 


1,230 


00 


1,653 


05 


1,569 


50 


15 


75 


480 


00 


1,181 


90 


176 


24 



8,302 99 



Peter Parley street, Forest Hills street to Walnut avenue. 
Length, 1,132 ft. ; area, 3,271 sq. yds. 12-inch. Telford macadam. 

Grading, edgestones set, gutters paved, sidewalks gravelled, and 

crossings laid. 

Labor 

Teaming, including rolling 
Gravel .... 

Stone 

25,000 gutter blocks . 

2,200 ft. edgestone and 4 small corners 

208 T 2 2 ft. circular edgestone 

Paid to T. H. & S. D. Payson, for paving: 
2,706.5 ft. of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
959.4 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 





$1,702 95 




1,450 00 




1,272 00 




3,080 25 




797 55 




1,663 40 




208 17 


$216 52 




239 85 


456 37 




$10,630 69 



Washington street, Poplar to Albano street. 

Resurfacing, edgestone set, sidewalks gravelled, and gutters 

Retaining-wall built. 

Labor i 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 

Sundries .......... 

30,950 small granite blocks ...... 

Paid to James Doonan : 
137.3 perches mortar wall ....... 

Paid to T. II. & S. I). Payson: 
1,736.3 feel of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
793 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 
411 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. . 



$138 90 

198 26 

74 52 



paved. 

1622 03 
868 50 
752 76 
845 50 
112 50 
690 05 

664 38 



411 68 



t'urrit d forir.ard, 



$4,967 40 



254 



City Document No. 34. 





$4,967 40 


1,871 03 




3,096 37 


$4,967 40 



Brought forward, 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Street 
Impi-ovements, Aldermanic District No. 
11 

Amount paid out of appropriation for Pav- 
ing: Division ...... 



Wirt Street, Washington to Henshaw street. "^^~- — 

Length, 287 ft. ; area, 829 sq. yds. Grading, edgestone reset, side- 
walks gravelled, and gutters paved. 

Labor $713 70 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 402 00 

Gravel ' . . . . ■ . 687 40 

Stone 1,211 00 

34.5 feet circular edgestone 44 85 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



33, 058 95 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT NO. 

Beale street, Dorchester avenue to N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 

Length, 535 ft. ; area, 1,493 sq. yds. 6-inch macadam. 

gravelled. 
Labor . . . . . . . . 

Teaming, including rolling ...... 

Gravel . - . 

Stone 

Advertising- 



12. 



Sidewalks 


$343 


25 


134 


50 


158 


40 


652 


75 


14 


25 



Dorchester avenue. 

Grade damages . 

Glen road. 

Labor and material 



$1,303 15 



5,355 00 



$507 40 



Park street, Washington to Whitfield street, 
edgestone, and paving gutters. 



Grading, setting 



Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 



Advertising ...... 

Paid to Chas. J. Coates, for paving : 
1,919.6 feet of edgestone reset, at Sets. 
700 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. . 



$153 57 
175 00 



$880 90 

640 50 

488 40 

50 08 

7 20 



328 57 



52,395 65 



Sydney Street, Savin Hill avenue to Hartland street, grading, 
edgestone set, sidewalks laid, gutters paved, and crossings laid. 

Length, 1,255 ft. ; area, 3,626 sq. yds. 8-in. macadam. 

Labor $783 15 

Teaming, including rolling 544 00 



Carried forward, 



[,327 15 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



255 



Brought forivard, 








$1,327 15 


Gravel ...... 






407 55 


Sand ..... 








358 20 


Stone ..... 








1,429 57 


Advertising .... 








7 80 


970 feet of edgestone . 








727 92 


8,250 paving brick 








99 00 


36,067 gutter blocks . 








792 42 


Paid to Chas. J. Coates : 








2,555 feet of edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 


. $204 4i 




898.1 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 


224 


53 




1,780.6 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 


320 


51 


749 44 












$5,899 05 


Work done by the Sewer Division 




• 


$908 81 


Tale Street, Ward 15. Grading. 














$269 78 


1,105 double loads of filling, at 50 cts. 






552 50 


891 single loads of filling, at 25 cts. . 






222 75 




$1,045 03 


Amount of appropriation for Vale street . 


. $1,000 00 




Amount paid out of Paving Division . 


45 


03 


$1,045 03 









West Newton Street, Ward 18, Shawmut avenue to Wash- 
ington street. 

Amount retained from Metropolitan Construction Company 

on their contract in 1892 $172 98 

Amount of appropriation for West Newton 

street $161 26 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 11 72 

$172 98 



West Third street, Ward 13, A street to 150 ft. from E street. 

Length, 1,984 ft. : area, 7,173 sq. yds. 9-in. macadam. 

$441 27 

16 50 

200 00 

625 00 

3,016 50 



Labor 

Advertising 

Steam-roller 

Gravel 

2,011 tons of macadan 



Amount of appropriation for West Third 

street $1,900 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldevmanic District .No. 6 . . . 2,399 27 



t,299 27 



1,299 27 



Whiting street, Ward 21. (Unfinished.) 

Paid td J. J. Xawn : 
800 en. yds. rock excavation, at $2.00 .... $1,600 00 

WorthingtOn street, Ward 22, resurfacing. 

Labor and material $1,000 00 



256 



City Document No. 34. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIA TIONS. 



Total Amount Expended. 



to Broadway bridge 



Margin and Salem streets 



Dorchester 



Allston bridge 

Baker street, Ward 23 

Beacon street, Ward 25 

Brent street 

Bristol street 

Broadway, Harrison avenue 

Chardon street 

Cherry street 

Commonwealth avenue 

Congress and L streets 

Cooper street, between No 

Cranston street . 

Dickens street 

Dorchester avenue, paving, Wards 15 and 24 

Dorchester street, between Eighth street and 

avenue ....... 

Eighth street, L to O street, edgestones, etc. 
Englewood avenue and Sutherland road 
Ereeport street . . . . 

Grant street 

Harbor View street .... 

Harvard street, construction 

Houghton street, macadamizing . 

Howell street, construction 

Humboldt avenue extension, grade damages 

Hunneman street, grading and constructing 

Jackson street, construction 

L street, grading, etc. (See Congress and L str 

La Grange street ..... 

Landing, East Boston .... 

Lehigh street, paving ..... 

Lexington avenue ..... 

Ninth street, Old Harbor street to N street, macadamizing 

Norfolk street, Milton street to Corbett street 

Park street, Charlestown 

Parmenter street, construction 

River street .... 

Savin Hill avenue 

Sawyer avenue . 

Short street, Ward 23 

Smith street, eonsti'uction . 

South Margin street, between 

street .... 
Stanton sti'eet 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

Bennington street 

Border street . 

Condor street . 

Maverick street 

New street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

Mystic avenue . 

Rutherford avenue . 

Carried forward, 



Pitts street an 



eets.) 



d Prospect 



$2,504 56 

649 60 

108 90 

4,70-1 26 

3.549 96 
7,782 42 

409 83 
65 10 

266,246 65 

17,646 50 

1,627 50 

1,158 20 

2,073 21 

4.499 92 

496 87 

2,690 72 

8,528 52 

10,849 55 

241 52 

612 96 

11,804 36 

6.550 40 
7,041 98 

225 52 
963 45 

1.500 00 

6,406 76 

500 00 

11,778 98 

2,135 30 
6,374 67 

8,152 86 

1,168 02 

3,052 35 

10,377 82 

810 40 

2,713 44 

1,935 73 

2,008 10 

4,500 00 
2,777 00 

22,819 52 

410 67 
3,122 44 
3,233 91 
2,871 14 
1,542 32 

4,574 96 
14,223 42 

$482,022 27 



Street Department — Paving Division. 257 

Brought forward, $482,022 27 

South Eden street ........ 4,810 69 

Sewers ... '705 18 

Street Improvements, Aklermanic District No. 3 : 

Exchange street 3,683 75 

Fulton place . 3,223 39 

Market street 1,014 17 

Sewers 410 36 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 4 : 

Arch street 3,161 28 

Beacon street 5,948 48 

Spring lane 1^966 15 

Sewers 334 44 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 5 : 

Beacon street ......... 22,124 00 

Carver street 7,029 92 

Dwight street 8^320 3S 

West Chester pai'k 4,081 95 

Sewers '619 33 

Bridges 1,286 60 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6 : 

Broadway 2,961 22 

Cove street . 5,586 43 

Eliot street 552 17 

Sewers 1,229 53 

Bndges 2,517 53 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 7 : 

E. Eighth street 4,627 77 

E. Sixth street 4,490 04 

I street l|378 21 

Third street 3,049 96 

Sewers 1,073 87 

Bridges 1,292 94 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 8 : 

Randolph street 6,122 14 

Savoy street 2,804 96 

Sewers '536 n 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 9 : 

Tremont street 3,799 19 

Sewers '333 32 

Bridges 4,914 26 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 10: 

Centi-e street 13,049 91 

Dean avenue ......... 767 50 

Kemble street 4,406 14 

Sewers '776 45 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 11 : 

Concrete sidewalks 3,779 58 

Henshaw street ........ 8,302 99 

Peter Parley street 10,630 69 

Washington street ........ 4,967 40 

Wirt street 3,'o58 95 

Sewers 5,557 47 

Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 12 : 

Beale street . 1,303 15 

Dorchester avenue ........ 8,355 00 

Glen road ,,07 40 

Park street 2,895 r>."> 

Carried forward, $660,920 27 



258 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, $660,920 27 

Sydney street . . . 5,899 05 

Sewers 908 81 

Vale street 1,045 03 

West Newton street, Washington street to Shawm ut 

avenue 172 98 

West Third street 4,299 27 

Whiting street, Ward 21 ...... 1,600 00 

Worthington street . 1,000 00 

Laying out and Construction of Highways : 

Batavia street ......... 9,063 73 

Bay State road ........ 10,634 20 

Deerfield street ........ 3,098 18 

Miner street 7,021 19 

Sidewalk construction ....... 21,771 74 



Total $727,434 45 

Less amount paid out of appropriation for Paving Division . 19,632 96 

Total ..>>..... $707,801 49 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



259 



LAYING OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 

Under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891 as amended in 1892. 



Batavia street, St. Stephen to Parker street. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Advertising 

Filling 

Paid to James Grant & Co. : 
411 cu. yds. subgrading, at 25 cts. 
1,107 sq. yds. Telford base, at 65 cts. 
2,042 sq. yards macadam, at 45 cts. 
664.7 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2.40 
1,015.3 feet of edgestone, at 84 cts. 
849.7 sq. yds. brick sidewalks, at $1.05 
31.3 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at $4.95 
6 catch-basins, at $100 
691 cu. yds. gravel filling, at $1.35 
1,076.5 feet of old edgestone set, at 19 cts. 
723.9 sq. yds. old brick sidewalks laid, at 

65 cts 



Extra work as ordered : 
103.9 sq. yds. gutters paved, at 

431 c ts $45 20 

8.2 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks, 

at 431 cts 3 57 

Relocating catch-basins, raising sewer 
manholes, raising coal-holes, and build- 
ing curbs around windows : 

15 days' labor, at $2 . . . $30 00 

3 days, stone-cutter, at $4.50 . 13 50 
7 days 5.5 hours, mason, at $6.50, 49 46 
15£ days, tender, at $2.50 . . 38 06 
2,900 hard bricks, at $12 per M., 34 80 

4 barrels cement, at $1.25 . . 5 00 

Loam grading : 

111 cu. yds. loam, at $1.50 . $166 50 

3£ days' labor, at $2 . . . 7 55 

Seed 1 48 

Resetting edgestone, gutters, and furnish- 
ing chip stone : 

1* days, paver, at $4.50 . . $6 50 

9$ days' labor, at $2 . . . 19 78 
18 double loads stone chips, at 

$2.50 45 00 

2 double loads gravel, at $2 . 4 00 



47 T 5 2 linear feet edgestone set and furnished, 
at $1.50 

Macadam on St. Stephen street : 
14 double loads crushed stone, 

at $6 $84 00 



$102 75 
719 55 
918 00 

1,595 28 
852 85 
892 19 
154 94 
600 00 
932 85 
204 54 

470 54 

7,443 49 



48 77 



170 82 



175 53 



$361 20 

98 94 

794 20 



Carried forward, 



$84 00 



75 28 
71 12 

$7,985 91 $1,254 31 



260 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, $84 00 $7,985 91 $1,254 34 

3 double loads stone dust, at $5.50, 16 50 

4 days 3.5 hours, labor, at $2 . 8 78 
11 days' steam-roller, at $16 . 24 00 

133 28 

Add 15% on $674.80 .... 101 22 

8,220 41 

$9,474 75 
Amount retained from James Grant & Co. . . . 411 02 

$9,063 73 

Bay State road, Raleigh to Sherborn street. 

(Work unfinished.) 

Labor $308 20 

Advertising 122 69 

Paid to James Killian : 
542 cu. yds sub-grading, at 35 cts. . . $189 70 

4,591 sq. yds. macadam (unfinished), at 45 

ets 2,065 95 

889 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2.60 . . 2,311 40 

2,556 lin. ft. edgestone, at 98 cts. . . 2,504 88 

2,247 sq. yds. gravel sidewalk (unfinished), 

at 43 cts 966 21 

75 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at $1.20 . 90 00 

4,614 cu. yds gravel filling, at 84 cts. . 3,875 76 

— : 12,003 90 

$12,434 79 
Amount retained from James Killian 1,800 59 

$10,634 20 

Deerfleld street, Commonwealth avenue to Charles river. 

(Work unfinished.) 

Labor $197 40 

Advertising 78 20 

Paid to James Killian : 
87 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 35 cts. . . $30 45 

579 sq. yds. macadam (unfinished) , at 40 cts., 231 60 

317 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2.60 . . 824 20 

1,037 lin ft. of edgestone, at 97 cts. . . 1,005 89 

130 sq. yds. gravel walks (unfinished), at 

43 cts 55 90 

1,396 cu. yds. gravel filling, at 84 cts. . 1.172 64 

3,320 68 

$3,596 28 
Amount retained from James Killian ..... 498 10 

$3,098 18 

Miner street. 

(Work unfinished.) 

Labor $355 77 

Advertising 108 74 

1,414 cu. yds. filling 1,117 06 

Carried forward, $1,581 5" 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



261 



1,581 57 



Brought forward, 
Paid to John Sutherland : 
Building retaining-wall No. 1 
Building retaining-wall No. 2 

Paid to Doherty & O'Leary : 
154 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 30 ets. 
933 sq. yds. Telford base, at 80 cts. . 
933 sq. yds. macadam (unfinished), at 20 

cts . 

254 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2.31 . 
616 lin. ft. edgestone, at $1.11 . 
481 sq. yds. brick sidewalk, at $1.25 . 
22 sq. yds. flagging ci'osswalks, at $3.95 
425 sq. yds. gravel filling, at §\.\1\ . 



Amount retained from Doherty & O'Leary 



NEW EDGESTONE. 

The following tables show the amount of new edgestone set during 
the year : 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16. 17, and 18. (Paving Districts 
Nos. 8, 9, and 10.) 

Lin. ft. 

Cambria and Dalton streets ....... 208 

Fairfield street .......... 127 

North Hudson street 283 

Savoy street i 275 

St. Botolph street 188 

Sundry streets in small quantities 37 



$875 90 






1,298 


35 










2,174 


25 






$46 20 






746 


40 






186 


60 






586 


74 






683 


76 






601 


25 






86 


90 






499 


38 










3,437 


23 






$7,193 05 


. 




171 


86 




$7,021 19 



PtOXBURY. 

Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. (Districts 7, 10, and 11.) 



Alexander street 
Beacon street 
Bickford and Centre streets 
Centre street 
Commonwealth avenue 
Eldora and Sunset streets 
Gannett street . 
Gaston street 
Ilammett street . 
Howard avenue . 
Howland street . 
Humboldt avenue 
Intervale street . 
Kemble street 
Kingsbury street 



Carried forivard, 



1,118 



Lin. ft. 

467 
442 
187 
1,788 
5,368 
226 
983 
153 
118 
209 
279 
461 
664 
1,337 
291 

12,973 



262 



City Document No. 34. 



BorugJd forward, 
Leyland street . . . . 
Townsend street 

Walnut avenue and Cobden street 
Winthrop street .... 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. ft. 

12,973 
628 
323 
199 
248 
608 

14,979 



South Boston. 
Wards 13, 14, and 15. {District No. 1.) 

Lin. ft. 

East Fifth street 115 

East Sixth street . 50 

East Third street 264 

Howell street 1,146 

L street 2,614 

Story street . . . 186 



East Boston. 
Wards 1 and 2. {District No. 2.) 



Condor street .... 
Falcon street .... 
West Eagle and Brooks streets . 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



4,375 



Lin. ft. 

241 

1,548 

129 

51 

1,969 



Dorchester. 
Ward 24. {District No. 6.) 



Lin. ft. 
792 

230 
2,184 
1,383 

103 



Adams street ......... 

Blue Hill avenue 

Harvard street 

Houghton street 

Lawrence avenue ........ 

Park street 1,892 

Savin Hill avenue ■ . . 97 

Stanley street . . . 1,054 

Sydney street 2,535 

Washington street 197 

Sundry streets in small quantities 120 

1 0,587 

West Roxbury. 

Ward 23. {Districts 5 and 11.) 

Lin. ft. 

Brookside avenue . 160 

Centre street 252 

Lamartine street . . . . . . . . 240 

Peter Parley street 2,316 

Poplar street 347 

School street 190 

St. Joseph street 845 

AVise and Roys streets 445 

4,795 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



263 



Brighton. 
Ward 25. {District No. 4.) 

Lin. ft. 

Alcott street 1,057 

Commonwealth avenue . 888 

Henshaw street .......... 1,034 

Sparhawk street 250 

Wirt street 802 



3,981 
Recapitulation. 

Lin. ft. 

City Proper 1,118 

Roxbury 14,979 

South Boston 4,375 

East Boston 1,969 

Dorchester 10,587 

West Roxbury 4,795 

Brighton 3,981 



41,804 



NEW BRICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of new brick 
sidewalks laid during the past year. 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18. 

8, 9, and 10.) 



(Paving Districts Nos. 



Albany and East Newton streets 

Beacon street 

Cambria and Dalton streets 

Fairfield street . 

North Hudson street . 

St. Botolph street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Sq. yds. 

173 
229 
110 
119 
133 
157 
43 

964 



Roxbury. 
Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. (Districts Nos. 7, 10, and 11.) 

Sq. yds. 

Alexander street 342 

Bay State road 260 

Beacon street 369 

Biekford and Centre streets 177 

Blue Hill avenue 243 

Centre street 614 

Dale street ........... 511 

Gannett street 685 

Howard avenue .......... 155 

Howland street 235 

Humboldt avenue 371 

Intervale street ... ....... 407 

Kingsbury street 231 

Leyland street 270 

Carried forward, 4,870 



264 City Document No. 34. 

Sq. yds. 

Brought forward, 4,870 

Munroe street 109 

Walnut avenue and Cobden streets 144 

Sundry streets in small quantities 789 



5,912 

South Boston. 
Wards 13, 14, and 15. {District No. 1 .) 

Sq. yds. 

Broadway 87 

East Fifth street 98 

East Third street 270 

Story street 75 

Sundry streets in small quantities 221 

751 
East Boston. 
Wards 1 and 2. {District No. 2.) 

Sq. S'ds. 

Falcon street 1,290 

Maverick street . 254 

Meridian street . 271 

New street . 164 

West Eagle and Brooks streets 101 

Sundry streets in small quantities 117 

2,197 
Dorchester. 
Ward 24. {District No. 6.) 

Sq. yds. 

Columbia street . . . • . . . . 278 

Dorchester avenue 130 

Sydney street . 1,613 

Washington street ......... 275 

Sundry streets in small quantities 116 

2,412 
West Roxbury. 
Ward 23. {Districts 5 and 11.) 

Sq. yds. 

Centre street 228 

Chestnut avenue 76 

Sundry streets in small quantities 46 

350 
Charlestown. 

Wards 3, 4, and 5. {District No. 3.) 

Sq. yds. 

South Eden street 175 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



265 



Recapitulation. 

Sq. yds. 

City Proper 964 

Roxbury 5 912 

South Boston 751 

East Boston 2.197 

Dorchester 2.412 

West Roxbury 350 

Charlestown 175 



12,761 



DRIVEWAYS AND SIDEWALKS. 



The following table shows the number of square yards of blockstone 
driveways and concrete sidewalks laid in the various sections of the 
city during the year : 



City Proper . . 
East Boston. . 

Roxbury 

"West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . . 
Brighton 



671 



Driveway, 


Concrete, 


sq. yds. 


sq 


yds. 


10 






17 






348 




372 


16 






203 




589 


77 




842 



1,803 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTEND- 
ENT OF PAVING DIVISION. 

Buildings and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon street. The 
building is of brick and wocd, and covers some 8,000 square feet of 
land, and is divided into a shed for storage, blacksmith's and carpen- 
ter's shops, tool-room, and stable. The total contents of the lot, includ- 
ing wharf and building, are 63,180 square feet. 

Fort-hill Wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of 
the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for the landing and 
storage of paving-blocks and gravel until such time as said wharf shall 
be wanted for the extension of Oliver street. A part of said wharf is 
occupied by a tenant-at-will, at $500 per annum, part by Sanitary 
Division. 

Lot on Chelsea, Marion, and Paris streets, East Boston, containing 
43,550 square feet. Part of this lot vised by the Sewer Division. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Roxbury. con- 
taining 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are buildings containing a 
steam-engine and stone-crusher. 

Ilighland-st. Stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick stable, 
erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Paving Divisions; 
also a brick building used as a blacksmith's shop, and a shed for the 
storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 square 
feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed containing a steam- 
engine and stone-crusher, also a stable and tool-houso. 



266 City Document No. 34. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are two 
stables, also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, containing 
81,068 square feet. This lot was piu'chased by the town of Dorchester 
in 1867. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,300 square feet. 

West Roxbury. — On Child street, a lot of land containing 43,024 
square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, blacksmith's shop and 
tool-house. 

Gravel Lots. — In the town of Milton, on Brush Hill road, containing 
64,523 square feet, hired by the town of Dorchester for nine hundred 
and ninety-nine years. Morton street, Ward 23, containing about one- 
third of an acre, purchased by the town of West Roxbury in 1890, used 
for storage purposes. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 37,000 
square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This lot is at present 
leased. 

Gravel and stones on lot on Market street, Ward 25, purchased by 
town of Brighton. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing about 13 
acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, stable, and crusher plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm street, con- 
taining 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, stable, etc. 

Property belonging to the Paving Division, consisting of 94 horses, 
66 carts, 19 water-carts, 15 wagons, 6 steam-rollers, 7 stone-crushers, 
and 7 engines. 

In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets: stable, carriage- 
house, shed, tool-house, and office, on leased land. 

On Hereford street : a yard with shed, tool-house, and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkins 1 wharf, 521 Commercial street, purchased 
in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square feet, having on it an office 
and stable. 

On Boylston street, at Boylston Station, office and shed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. R. Cutter, 
Deputy Superintendent Paving Division. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 267 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Street Department, Sanitary Division, 
12 Beacon Street, Boston, February 9, 1894. 

H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : Herewith I send you a statement of the doings of 
the Sanitary Division during the year 1893, showing the expendi- 
tures and income of this division from February 1, 1893, to 
January 31, 1894. 

George W. Forristall, Deputy Superintendent, died Januarv 
12, 1894. 

Philip A. Jackson, 
Acting Deputy Superintendent. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount of appropriation ..... $470,000 00 

Transferred from Paving Division .... 15,000 00 



$485,000 00 
Total amount of expenditures .... 481,300 63 



Balance transferred to city treasury . . . $3,699 37 



Items of Expenditures. 

Amount expended. 

For salaries of Deputy Superintendent and clerks in 

office . . .■ $8,511 60 

For labor in collecting and removing house-dirt and 

ashes ......... 152,467 55 

For labor in collecting and removing house-offal . 102,456 34 
For labor of foremen, mechanics, watchmen, and 

feeders 26,448 74 

For labor of men employed in stables and yards . 13,451 87 

For grain used in stables ..... 24,061 34 



Carried forward, $327,397 44 



2(58 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 

For hay and straw used in stables . 

For horses ....... 

For stock and tools used in blacksmith-shop . 

For stock and tools used in wheelwright-shop . 

For stock and tools used in harness-shop 

For stock and tools used in paint-shop 

For extra teams, collecting ashes and house-dirt 

For extra teams, collecting house-offal 

For repairs on stables and sheds 

For fuel, gas, and electric lights 

For veterinary services and medicines for horses 

For shoeing horses (outside shops) 

For printing, stationery, and advertising 

For water-rates ...... 

For offal stock, consisting of buckets, etc. 

For ash stock, consisting of cart-covers, baskets, etc., 

For stable stock, consisting of curry-combs, brushes, 
soap, etc. ........ 

For dumping-boat, rental, royalty, towage, etc. 

For collecting house-dirt and ashes in East Boston . 

For collecting house-dirt and ashes in South Boston, 
east of Dorchester st. ..... 

For collecting house-dirt and ashes in Dorchester, 
south of Park, School, and Harvard sts. 

For collecting house-dirt and ashes in West Roxbury, 
south of Seaver and Boylston sts. 

For collecting house-offal in Brighton 

For collecting house-offal in Eust Boston 

For incidental expenses : 

Telephone expenses .... $350 30 

Board of horses .... 506 89 

Committee expenses, "Disposal of 

Offal" . . . . . . 1,525 00 

Travelling expenses . . . . 166 30 

Damage, by city teams . . . 74 19 

Inspectors' badges . . . . 37 00 

Newspapers ..... 6 00 

Miscellaneous supplies for office and 

yards ...... 74 76 



Total 



$327,397 44 

16,730 98 

8,625 00 

3,033 28 

2,880 31 

1,499 86 

666 19 

43,506 50 

8,780 00 

944 77 

2,021 32 

548 09 

662 60 

1,298 66 

810 30 

353 41 

339 59 

937 77 
24,559 08 
10,325 50 

4,791 60 

2,904 19 

4,143 75 
2,800 00 
8,000 00 



(,740 44 



$481,300 63 



Revenue. 

Amount of moneys deposited and bills presented to the City 
Collector for collection, for material sold and work -performed by 
the Sanitary Division of the Street Department during the year 
ending January 31 , 1894 : 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



260 



Moneys dej^osited with the City Collector. 

From sale of house-offal . . . $20,790 03 

From sale of a condemned horse . . 50 00 

From letting of scow privileges . . 822 01 



Bills deposited with the City Collector. 

For the removal of engine ashes . . $5,862 75 

For the sale of manure .... 906 51 

For the sale of ashes and house-dirt . 3,013 97 

For the sale of house-offal . . . 99 00 

For the sale of tin cans . . . 502 05 

For the letting of scow privileges . . 9 95 



$21,662 01 



10,394 23 



!,056 27 



Amount collected by the City Collector 



$28,969.27 



Amount expended for the Collection of House-dirt and Ashes and 
House-offal, Labor and Contracts. 



Districts. 



City Proper . 
South Boston 
East Boston . 
Charlestown . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . 
Brighton .... 

Totals . . . 



Expended for collecting. 



Ashes. 



$99,869 05 
'7,230 10 

2 10,325 50 
11 886 00 
24,456 00 
3 8,137 75 

4 10,080 19 
2,648 00 



174,632 59 



Offal. 



55^.303 34 
7,686 00 

5 8,000 00 
5,550 00 

14,030 00 

7,444 00 

11,443 00 

6 2,800 00 



.$113,256 34 



Ashes Contract. 


1 F. J. Mohan . . 


$4,791 60 for territory east of Dorchester street. 


" 


- P. Morrison . . 


10,325 50 " " 


in East Boston. 


" 


3 James Doonan . 


4,143 75 " 


south of S caver and Boylston 
streets. 


" 


4 John Bradley . . 


2,904 19 " " 


south of Park, School, and 
Harvard streets. 


Offal Contract. 


5 Thomas Mulligan, 


8,000 CO " " 


of East Boston. 


" 


'> Allen Clarke . . 


2,800 00 " " 


of Brighton. 



Total Cost for Removal of House-dirt, Ashes, and House-offal. 

House-dirt and Ashes Account. 



Expended for labor, per pay-rolls . 
Expended for stock, etc., per ledger account . 
Expended on contract, part of 

South Boston . . . $4,791 60 



Carried forward, 



$152,467 55 
124,211 62 



$4,791 60 $276,679 17 



270 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $4,791 60 

Expended on contract, part of 

Dorchester .... 2,904 19 

Expended on contract, part of 

West Roxbury . . . 4,143 75 

Expended on contract, East Bos- 
ton 10,325 50 



6276,679 17 



22,165 04 



,844 21 



House-offal Account. 

Expended for labor, per pay-rolls . . . .$102,456 34 
Expended for stock, etc., per ledger account . 57,948 04 

Expended on contract, East Boston, $8,000 00 
Expended on contract, Brighton . 2,800 00 



Salaries . 
Incidentals 



10,800 00 



^8,511 60 
2,740 44 



171,204 38 



11,252 04 

$481,300 63 



Material collected by Districts. 





Teams. 


Material. 


Yards. 






South. 


West 


Roxb'y- 


Ch'rlest'n. 


E.Boston. 


Brigh'n 


Total 
Loads. 


House-dirt and 


128,930 
33,829 


84,341 


70,615 
9,931 


17,898 
2,516 


13,372 

3,744 


5,415 
1,395 


320,571 




51,415 




162,759 


84,341 


80,546 


20,414 


17,116 


6,810 


371,986 







Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



271 



Disposition of Material collected. 



Where dumped. 


Loads 
house-dirt 
and ashes. 


Loads 
house- 
offal. 


Street-sweep- 
ings, Street- 
Cleaning Div. 


Total 
loads. 


First street. East Cambridge .... 


27,990 

20,955 

15,259 

18,163 

15,164 

14,073 

12,059 

10,544 

9,218 

8,464 

8,110 

6,012 

5,945 

5,806 

5,420 

4,340 

46,332 

86,717 






27,990 






20,955 








15,259 








18,163 








15,164 








14,073 


Mill Pond, Charlestown 






12,059 








10,544 








9,218 


Brookside avenue, Roxbury .... 






8,4*4 






8,110 






6,012 








5,945 








5,806 








5.420 


Bryant street, Eoxbury 






4,340 


2,243 

13,197 

30,836 

3,744 

1,395 


33,740 


48,575 
133,654 




30,836 


East Boston, by Thomas Mulligan 





3,744 




1,395 








320,571 


51,415 


33,740 


405,726 



Comparative Table shoAving Cost of collecting Ashes and Offal and 
delivering same at Dumps. 

Cost per cart-load, including administration expenses . . . $1.29 

" " " minus " "... 1.26 

" " " of ashes, labor only ...... .81 

" " " " " hired teams, including contracts . . .62 

" " " " " labor, hired teams, and contracts . .73 

" " " " offal, labor only 2.43 

" " " " " hired teams, including contracts . . 2.09 

" " " labor, hired teams, and contracts . 2.37 

" " scow-load to transport garbage to sea . . . . 92.18 

" " cart-load " " «!•»«« .... .21 



272 



City Document No. 34. 



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273 



Expenses of Dumping-boats. 



Amount expended for Royalties (per year) 
" " " Rental " " 



$1,500 00 
5,275 50 



Towingby department tow-boat *$4, 091 84 
Towing by hired tow-boat . 4,652 98 

"Wharfage ..... 
Repairs on boats . . . $4,126 18 
" wharf ... 627 05 

Labor, captain . . . $1,500 00 
" crew and dumpers . 3,800 05 

Dredging ..... 

Insurance ..... 

Incidentals, Disinfectants . $126 52 

Inspection of scows 71 00 

Manila rope . 36 99 

Telephone . 30 00 

Blocks, cleats, etc., 24 75 

Compass . . 25 00 

Log ... 18 00 

Marine glass . 12 00 

Stove, etc. . . 14 00 

Coal ... 10 90 

Salt ... 6 00 

Hoops, etc. . 2 00 



* Paid Sewer Division towards maintenance of boat. 
Number of trips to sea by department tow-boat 
Number of trips to sea by hired tow-boat . 



3,775 50 



8,744 82 
1,833 37 



4,753 23 



5,300 05 
600 00 
100 00 



377 16 



5,484 13 



202 
107 

309 



Cost per trip, $92.18. 

Number of cart-loads of garbage carried to sea, 133,654. 

Cost per cart-load, 21 cents. 

April 14, 1893, department tow-boat, the " Cormorant," commenced work. 

Number of Carts collecting House-dirt, Ashes, and Offal. 



Offal wagons owned by Sanitary Division .... 
" " in use " Thomas Mulligan, East Boston . 

" Allen Clark, Brighton 

Capacity of Offal-wagons. 

During the fall of 1892, 24 offal-wagons were measured and 
contents weighed for the purpose of obtaining the capacity of 
wagons and the weight of offal per cart-load. Their capacity 
averaged 3\\j cord ft., or 56.25 cu. ft., and the weight averaged 
3,115 lbs. A cord equals 128 cu. ft., or 7.091 lbs. Price per 
cord for offal same as 1892: South yard, $4.00; Highland 
yard, 85.00; Charlestown yard, $4.00. 

Ash-carts. 

Ash-carts owned by Sanitary Division 

" in use " Wm. F. Hedrington, East Boston 
" " " James Doonan, West Roxbury 

" " " John Bradley, Dorchester 

" " " Francis J. Mohan, South Boston 

Market-wagons owned by Sanitary Division . 

Grand total ....... 



93 
6 
2 



101 



162 
6 
7 
4 
4 



190 



274 



City Document No. 34. 



Cost of Carts. 



1884. 


Ash-carts 


. $148 00 


1886. 
1888. 




142 00 
107 00 


1891. 




133 00 


1892. 




142 00 


1893. 




142 00 



Account of .the Number of Loads of Material collected from 
1882 to February 1, 1894. 



Tbae. 


Ashes. 


Offal. 


Street- 
sweepings. 


Cesspool- 
matter. 


Total loads. 


1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 




151,197 
169,610 
182,642 
193,734 
209,129 
220,186 
233,154 
227,325 
245,730 
2 313,464 
303,878 
320,571 


28,385 
27,408 
28,520 
31,206 
33,170 
36,724 
37,709 
40,183 
40,525 
46,742 
46,343 
4 51,415 


52,381 
58,272 
62,222 
61,455 
59,875 
68,990 
68,019 
70,476 
70,449 
3 10.564 


10,051 
8,801 
12,578 
13,151 
11,392 
14,333 
1 5,644 


250,014 
264,091 
285,962 
299,546 
313,566 
340,233 
344,886 
337,984 


1890 
1891 




356,704 
370,770 


1892 




350,221 
371,986 


1893 














2,778,980 


448,330 


582,703 


75,950 


3,885,963 



1 July 1, 1888, the Sewer Department commenced cleaning out cesspools. 

2 Ashes from January 1, 1891, to May 1,1891 104,046 

Ashes from May 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892 209,418 

3 May 1, 1891, the Street-Cleaning Division commenced cleaning streets. 

i Thomas Mulligan, East Boston, collected 3,744 

Allen Clarke, Brighton 1,395 



313,464 



5,139 



Stock 
Labor 



Cost of Horseshoeing and Blacksmithing. 

Division Shop. Outside Shops. 



J 1,556 79 
3,311 88 



$4,868 67 



$667 11 



Number or Shoes put on. 



Horses owned by Sanitary Division 

" " " Street-Cleaning Division 

" " " Paving Division 



Total ........ 

Average cost per shoe, about 35 cents. 

Blacksmithing. 
Teams and carts repaired at division shop. 

Stock 

Labor ........ 



10,782 

2,208 

834 

13,824 



$1,433 45 

4,015 50 



,448 95 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 275 






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Amount and Payments made nnder O'Connor Bros. 

Contract for Refuse Tin Cans. 



Date. 



April 1 
April 1 
May 1 
June 1 
July 1 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 1 
Dec. 1 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 



1893 



1894 



Weight. 



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Price per ton. 



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32.95 


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84.88 




76.45 




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$502.69 


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46.09 
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32.61 
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76.45 
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Street Department — Sanitary Division. 277 






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Street Department — Sanitary Division. 279 







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280 City Document No. 34. 

House-offal. 

There are employed in removing house-offal 191 men and 101 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses twice a week 
during the summer months and once a week during the winter ; 
from hotels, markets, and restaurants it is removed daily. There 
are sixty-two routes. The men are required to enter the yards, 
collect the offal, and empty the same into wagons, then drive to 
one of the depots, located as follows : one on Albany street, one 
on Highland street, Roxbury, and one at the Almshouse, Charles- 
town ; also to the dumping-boat wharf on Atlantic avenue. 

The offal is sold to farmers of adjoining towns mostly ; the 
balance is dumped on the scow and carried to sea. About 26 per 
cent, of the quantity collected during the past year has been dis- 
posed of in this manner. 

HOUSE-DIRT AND ASHES. 

In the collection of house-dirt and ashes there are employed 
221 men and 190 carts. This material is removed from hotels, 
tenement-houses, and stores daily ; from dwelling-houses once a 
week. There are eighty-two regular routes. The City Ordinances 
of 1892 require that house-dirt and ashes shall be kept in an easy, 
accessible place for removal, the men being obliged to enter yards 
and areas, remove receptacles to the sidewalk, where their con- 
tents are loaded upon teams. The receptacle is then replaced in 
its original position. The material is disposed of, if possible, on 
low lands, being used for filling, and also dumped on scows to be 
carried to sea. Of the amount collected last year 27 per cent, 
was disposed of at sea. 

During the year the removal of ashes and dirt in three sections 
of the city was let out by contract, to wit : territory lying east of 
Dorchester street, South Boston, part of Dorchester lying south 
of Park, School, and Harvard streets, also the part of West Rox- 
bury lying south of Seaver and Boylston streets. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 2«1 

Horse Account. 



1893. 




Br. 


1893. 




Cr. 


Jan. 1. 


On hand, 


197 


Jan. 29. 


Died, 




Jan. 3. 


Purchased, 


2 


Feb. 21. 


" 




Jan. 11. 


t i 


2 


Feb. 22. 


" 




Jan. 19. 


" 


2 


March 7. 


Killed, 




April 3. 


(C 


2 


May 19. 


Trans, to Austin F 


irm, 2 


April 7. 


" 


2 


June 16. 


Died, 




April 10. 


u 


2 


June 27. 


Killed, 




Aug. 3. 


" 


1 


June 29. 


Died, 




Aug. 10. 


( ( 


1 


Sept. 29. 


Exchanged, 




Sept. 12. 


" 


1 


Oct. 6. 


Killed, 




Sept. 25. 


i £ 


3 


Nov. 14. 


li 




Oct. 31. 


" 


1 


Dec. 14. 


" 




Dec. 2. 


" 


2 


1894. 






Dec. 11. 


(« 


2 


Jan. 4. 


Died, 




1894. 






Jan. 11. 


Killed, 




Jan. 5. 


iC 


1 


Jan. 15. 


" 




Jan. 12. 


Trans, from Pav. 


Div. 1 


Jan. 31. 


On hand, 


202 




Total, 


222 




Total, 


222 



Organization, 1894. 

1 deputy superintendent. 
5 clerks. 

4 foremen. 

1 captain of scows. 

5 sub-foremen. 

2 inspectors. 
16 mechanics. 

2 talleymen or aids. 
5 watchmen. 
4 feeders. 
4 messengers. 
8 stablemen. 
10 yardmen. 
15 dumpers. 
207 ash-cart drivers and helpers. 
146 offal-cart drivers and helpers. 

435 employees. 

The mechanics of this division are engaged in the construction 
of new wagons and carts, the painting and repairing of same, 
shoeing of horses for the Paving, Street-Cleaning, and Sewer 
Divisions, also the making and repairing of harnesses. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 283 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



City Hall, Room 44, Boston, February 1, 1894. 
Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : I herewith submit my report of work done and ex- 
penditures of Sewer Division from February 1, 1893, to January 
31, 1894. 

Yours respectfully. 

H. W. Sanborn, 
Deputy Supt. Sewer Division. 



284 



City Document No. 34. 



C3 T3 ' 






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380 

2,486 

1,762 


3,475 
716 
215 
5,957 
2,432 
5,000 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



285 



Improved Sewerage. 



Office salaries 

Pumping-station, inside 

Pumping-station, outside 

Engines and boilers 

Main and intercepting sewers 

Moon Island . 

Tow-boat 



Stony-Brook Improvement. 
Maintenance of main channel and tributaries . , . 

Building, stables, and sheds, Brigh- 
ton $12,539 07 

Less amount furnished by Paving 

Division . . . " . . 2,104 00 



Stable foundation, Pynchon street .... 
New tow-boat (partial payment) .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Office expenses, including salaries of Deputy Super- 
intendent, clerks, and draughtsmen ; stationery, 
drawing materials, etc. ..... 

Engineering expenses, including salaries of engi- 
neers, instruments, etc. ..... 

Current expenses of 8 yards and lockers 
Current expenses of 7 stables, including cost of 
horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc. .... 

Repairing sewers .... $11,405 97 

Less amount paid by Paving Division 297 01 



Cleaning and flushing sewers ..... 

Cleaning catch-basins ...... 

Repairing streets .... $620 66 

Less amount furnished by Paving 

Division . . . * . . 106 29 



Building, repairing, and cleaning 
culverts and surface drains, not in- 
cluded in the Stony-brook system, $27,005 18 

Less amount furnished by Paving 

Division . . . . 22,459 10 

Examining condition of sewers and catch-basins 

Carried forward, 



$500 00 
49,903 05 
12,758 85 

5,147 04 
13,370 56 
14,711 14 

2,944 08 

£99,334 72 



$10,756 34 



$10,435 


07 


$941 


50 


$14,889 


05 



£20,473 08 

26.376 85 
23,808 74 

28.377 54 



11,108 96 
13,716 60 
39,525 74 



514 37 



4,546 08 
4,631 39 

$173,079 35 



286 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Work for departments and others, including 

spection of construction of private sewers 
House connections 
Water-rates . . . 
Damages and claims 
Holidays ..... 

Travelling and incidental expenses . 
Repairs of department buildings, stables, and yards 
Hardware, blacksmithing, and tools 
Rubber goods .... 

Engines and boilers, and repairs 
Stock and supplies not included elsewhere 
General repairs ..... 



$173,079 35 

2,431 07 

4,472 57 

4,361 09 

18,089 37 

17,741 04 

4,238 29 

3,609 65 

9,451 42 

1,514 48 

1,166 29 

2,650 14 

848 28 

$243,653 04 



Note. — The total amount expended by the Sewer and Paving Divisions, on account of 
Miscellaneous Expenditures, is $266,515.44. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



287 



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288 City Document No. 34. 

Work done for and paid by Paving Divison, City Proper. 



Streets. 



Exchange st 

Auburn st 

North Hudson st 

Fleet st 

Washington and Water sts. 

Arch st. • 

Beacon st 

Lehisrh st 



So. Margin st 

Cove st. . . 

West Chester Park 

Boylston st 

Dwight st 

Stanhope st 

Randolph st 



and 



Catch-Basins. 



Built. Repaired. 



12 

7 



Manholes. 



Built. Repaired, 



Sep. street. 
Rep. street. 

180 ft. 12-in. 

sewer. 



Summary. 



20 catch-basins built. 
29 " repaired. 

15 manholes " 

Repairing streets. 
180 feet 12-in. sewer. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



289 



H 



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290 City Document No. 34. 

Work done for and paid by Paving" Division, Charlestown. 





Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 






5 








1 













1 catch-basin built. 

5 catch-basins repaired. 



Summary. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



291 



£ 



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292 City Document No. 34. 

Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, East Boston. 



Streets. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 






Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 




Brooks and Morris 

Saratoga and Words- 
worth streets . . 

Bennington and Or- 
leans streets 

Bennington street . . . 

Falcon and Meridian 


1 

1 

1 
5 

1 
2 










Gladstone street 





11 catch-basins built. 



Summary. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



293 



















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294 



City Document No. 34. 



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Street Department — Sewer Division 



295 



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296 City Document No. 34. 

Work clone for and paid by Paving Division, Brighton. 





Catch-Basins. 




Streets. 


Built. 


Repaired. 




Henshaw and Market sts. . . . . 
Sparhawk and Bentley sts.. . 


1 

1 




Filling. 

/431.88 ft. 18-in.storm sewer. 
602.27 ft. 24-in. " 
775 ft. 3 ft. X 4 ft. 4 in. 


Washington and Wirt sts. . . . 
Englewood avenue and Suth- 


6 
2 

2 




Warren st. to Brighton > 






■ culvert. 

\6U ft. 3 ft. X 3 ft. 4 in. 








J culvert. 

( 72 ft. 4 ft. X 4 ft. wooden 

v culvert. 



Summary. 

12 catch-basins built. 

Filling. 

431.88 feet 18-in. storm sewer. 

602.27 feet 24-in. " " 

775 feet 3 ft. x 4 ft. 4 in. culvert. 

611 feet 3 ft. x 3 ft. 4 in. 

72 feet 4 ft. X 4 ft. wooden culvert. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



297 



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298 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, South 
Boston. 



Streets. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 




Third St., bet. A and B sts. 








1 

1 

1 






4 
4 

2 
8 








Howell st 

Mercer and Ninth sts 

L st 














6 washouts. 














18 catch-basins buill 
6 shutes built. 
3 manholes repaire< 


Summary. 
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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



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City Document No. 34. 



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304 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving 1 Division, 
Dorchester. 



Streets. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 






Built. 


Rep'd. 


Built. 


Rep'd. 




Houghton st. ... 
Grampian Way . . 


4 
1 

1 

2 

1 

2 
2 






1 


1 washout. 






1 washout. 








Relaying 198 ft. 
sewer. 


Clarkson and 
Barrington sts. 

Duncan and 
Granger sts. 

Brent st 




3 




Dorchester ave. 
and Adams sts. 

Harvard st 





13 catch-basins built. 

2 washouts '' 

3 manholes " 
1 manhole repaired. 

198 ft. sewer relaid. 



Summary. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



305 



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306 



City Document No. 34. 



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307 



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308 



City Document No. 34. 



CO 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



309 



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a 


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& 


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a c a 


c 


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310 



City Document No. 34. 



Work done for and paid by Paving Division, Roxbury. 



Streets. 


Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 




Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 




Blue Hill ave. . . . 
Centre and Mar- 

Cobden st 

Beacon st., "Ward 
22 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

15 










Commonwealth "] 
ave 

Essex s t . to j 
Cross Roads, J 


2,363 ft. 12-in., 15- 
in., and 18-in. pipe 
surface drain. 

10 drop inlets built. 















Summary. 

23 catch-basins built. 
10 drop inlets. 
2,363 ft. 12-in., 15-in., and 18-in. pipe surface drain. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



311 



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«. 



312 



City Document No. 34. 



a- 



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a n m « 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



313 



O) 


a> 


« 0) » 


© 


<D 


©a)Dooa)©Q/OODO 


ft 


ft 


ft ft ft 


ft 


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ft 


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co ciion 



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314 



City Document No. 34. 



Si 

cs 





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W 




^ 






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ts 




s 








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o "3 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



315 



Work done for and paid by Paving- Division, 
West Koxbnry. 



Streets. 



Byron and School sts. 
Peter Parley road 

South st 

Keyes st 

Centre and Alaric sts. 



Catch-Basins. 


Manholes. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


Built. 


Repaired. 


1 

7 








1 
1 









60 ft. culvert. 



10 catch-basins built. 
60 feet culvert. 



Summary. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Sewers. 



City Proper 




$5,519 


74 




Charlestown 




6,297 


20 




Brighton 




39,139 


93 




East Boston 




9,582 


51 




South Boston 




469 


63 




Dorchester . 




46,726 


54 




Roxbury 




106,445 


19 




West Roxbury . 




44,172 


95 


$258,353 69 










Catch-Basins. 






City Proper 




$5,638 


27 




Charlestown 




1,947 


72 




Brighton 




2,187 


10 




East Boston 




6,681 


25 




South Boston 




2,146 


72 




Dorchester . 




6,169 


18 




Roxbury 




8,703 


49 




West Roxbury . 




2,334 


17 


35,807 90 








Improved Sewerage 


uaintenance . 


. 




99,334 72 


Stonv Brook maintenance . 


, 




10,756 34 


Building stables and 


sheds, Brighton 






12,539 07 


Stable foundation, P 


ynclion st. . 


. 


, 


941 50 


New tow-boat 


1 




* 


14,889 05 


Carried forward 


$432,622 27 



316 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Miscellaneous 



2,622 27 
266,515 44 



Less amount furnished in fiscal year 1893-94 by 
City Engineer for work performed in 1892-93 . 



Less amount furnished in fiscal year 1893-94 by 
Paving Division ...... 



,137 71 
1,898 93 



,238 78 
41,276 38. 
$655,962 40 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months 
ending Jan. 31, 1894. 



District. 



City 

Charlestown . . 
East Boston . . 

Brighton 

South Boston . 
Dorchester . . . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 



Built by the 
City, by Con- 
tract oi- 
Day Labor. 

Feet. 



1,501.20 

2,333.70 

2,394.88 

12,272.87 

694.60 

12,750.15 

22,117.76 

12,335.69 



Built by . 
Private Parties. 



Feet. 



2,621.07 
475.00 

8,606.22 
3,027.82 
8,106.98 



Total 

Length built 

during the 12 

Months ending 

Jan. 31, 1894. 

Feet. 



1,501.20 

2,333.70 

2.394.88 

14,893.94 

1,169.60 

21,356.37 

25,145.58 

20,442.67 



Total . 



66,400.85 



22,837.09 



89,237.94 



1S3 catch-basins built. 

283 " repaired. 

35 manholes built. 

192 " repaired. 

958,775 lineal feet of sewers flushed. 

1,813.86 cu. yds. of material removed from sewers. 

6,891 catch-basins cleaned. 

21,806.21 cu. yds. of material removed from catch-basins. 

1,616.7 feet of culverts built. 

60 " " " repaired. 

There are now 365.58 miles of sewers in charge of the Sewer 
Division. 

The amount expended by this division during the twelve months 
ending January 31, 1894, including the amount spent under special 
appropriations, was $697,238.78. 

The items of expenditure are shown in the financial statement. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 317 

Schedule of Sewers built to Date in the City of Boston. 



Wards. 


Feet. 


Wards. 


Feet. 




1 


81,467 
42.828 
31,719 
42,102 
40,018 
45,434 
36,779 
18,532 
27,247 
38,382 
74,880 
42,006 
52,654 


14 


75,582 

47,504 

31,626 

42,765 

59,573 

47,304 

103,477 

130,413 

113,798 

173,743 

294,385 

117,403 




2 


15 




3 


16 




4 


17 




5 


18 




7 

8 


20 

22 




9 




10 


23 




11 


24 




12 

13 


25 






1,811,620 


or 343.1 miles. 
22 48 " 


Total . . 

















318 



City Document No. 34. 



Fall of Rain and Snow in Inches at South Yard, Albany 
Street, in twelve months ending- January 31, 1894. 



Day. 


>> 

u 
eS 
3 
u 
,0 

CD 


o 
.25 


"S 
p. 

< 


.23 


cd 
c 




GO 

be 

< 


S-i 

<o 

a 

CO 


u 

CD 

O 

o 

O 


u 

CD 

a 

CD 
O 


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a 

a> 
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CD 

A 
.40 
1.40 

.78 

.37 


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a 


1 




2. . 


.24 

.27 








.35 


.15 


.83 




3 


















.11 


.05 


3.49 














.09 


.17 


2.48 
2.85 


.26 




.04 








.27 

.83 






.55 






8 




10 


.90 


1.30 


















02 


11 




















0] 


13 . . 




.20 






.05 


.03 






1.07 


.19 

.67 

.52 


.01 
1.61 

.07 

.01 

.25 

.24 

5.14 






1.48 


.79 


.85 


.43 


.31 












33 


16 






.08 
.23 


.55 


.09 


.59 

.19 

.03 
.09 


2.06 
.23 




17 








1.47 
.05 






1. 














15 


20 .... 


.08 


.03 


1.02 

.08 








1.71 
.20 




21 




22 


1.52 




1.59 


.76 
.16 
.21 




24 

25 




.16 




.02 


.68 


26 

27 






.12 
.09 


.63 




.20 




.90 


28 








29 












.26 




1.15 


30 














.04 
1.55 


3.51 


2.21 




31 . 


6.04 


2.84 


3.31 


6.32 


2.35 


2.08 


7.59 








Totals 


3.28 



Total for twelve months, 46.22 inches. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



319 



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320 



City Document No. 34. 



The following table shows the amounts of sludge received in, 
and removed from, deposit sewers each month from February 1 , 
1893, to January 31, 1894 : 



Month. 








Received. Removed 


. 


February. ..... 319 cubic yards. 397.61 cubic 


March 








276 l 


" 320 < 




April . 








407 ' 


" 479.34 ' 




May . . 
June . 








679 « 
134 ' 


" 319 ' 
" 399.45 ' 




July . . 
August . 








740 ' 
606 ' 


" 477.49 ' 
" 796 * 




September 
October . 








141 ' 

772 ' 


638 
^ 639 ' 




November 








854 « 


" 479 * 




December 








161 ' 


400 ' 




January, 1894 






. 553 « 


" 559 





yards. 



5,642 



5,903.89 



Property in Charge of the Sewer Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street. 

Sewer yard, with building, on North Grove street. 

Sewer yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. This 
is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were erected by the 
Sewer Department. 

Sewer yard, with shed, on Boylston street, Jamaica Plain. 

Small lot of land on Stony brook, corner of Centre street, 
Ward 21. 

Gatehouse on Stony brook, Pynchon street, built in 1889. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Rutherford avenue, Charlestown. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, corner Paris and Marion streets. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on East Chester park, near Albany 
street. 

A small shed on Cypress street, Ward 9, on land hired by the 
city. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Western avenue, Ward 25. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



321 



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322 



City Document No. 34. 



.7,184 44 

4,068 00 

1,229 80 

255 96 

43 20 

134 12 



19 74 



West Roxbury Trunk Sewer. 

Labor . 

339,000 bricks 

1,075 bbls. cement. 

217 double loads sand 

40 double loads gravel 

11 manhole frames and covers 

5 lamphole frames and covers 

50 lbs. powder") 

Fuse > 

Caps J 

Teaming 

15,569 feet lumber (B.M.) 

Pipe .... 

47 tons coal . 

Centres, etc. . 

24 manhole steps . 

Miscellaneous supplies . 

Tools, blacksmithing, and hardware 

Hire of trench machine 

Hire of engine 



Size and Length of Seiver. 
455.25 feet of 28 in. x 42 in., brick. 
2,297.55 feet of 24 in. x 36 in., brick. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done in 1892. 

Sewer in Norfolk Avenue, between Clapp and Magazine 

Streets. 









232 00 








255 32 








94 77 








303 97 








116 62 








13 20 








157 57 


A 






668 40 








1,200 00 








782 50 




$26,759 61 



Labor .... 










. $12,885 59 


230,050 bricks 










2,250 50 


605 bbls. cement . 










767 20 


147 double loads sand . 










264 60 


47 double loads gravel . 










77 55 


6 manhole frames and covers 










58 40 


37 manhole steps . 










20 35 


Teaming 










1,055 00 


21,325 feet lumber . 










341 20 


Pipe .... 










216 06 


50£ tons coal . 










269 93 


Blacksmithing and hardware 










259 71 


Centres, etc. . 










194 52 


Rent of land for storage . 










24 00 


Pile-driving . 










150 80 


8 double loads stone 










24 00 


Miscellaneous supplies . 










130 40 


Hire of trench machine . 










871 29 


Hire of engine 










357 50 




$20,218 60 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 

Size and Length of Sewer. 
603 feet of 2 ft. 8 in. X 4 ft., brick. 
676.88 feet of 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft., brick. 
31.61 feet of 15-in., pipe. 



Yila 


l Str 


eet. 








Labor ...... 


$7,318 15 


265,225 bricks 










2,910 48 


1,138^ bbls. cement 










1,305 32 


205£ double loads sand . 










410 84 


1,145 \ double loads gravel 










2,005 87 


6 manhole frames and covers 










7.7 25 


72 manhole steps . 










39 60 


Teaming .... 










1,072 50 


41,262 feet (B.M.) lumber 










663 03 


Pipe .... 










210 88 


Centres, etc. . 










356 94 


Blacksmithing 










25 45 


1£ tons salt hay 










25 00 


\\ tons coal . 










8 18 


Miscellaneous 










29 40 


Roadway 










802 00 


Pile-driving . 










1,302 08 


Regulator castings . 










369 75 




$18,932 72 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

42.79 feet of 2-ft., circular brick. 
1437.47 feet of 3 ft. 3 in. x 3 ft. 5| in., brick. 
27.20 feet of 30 in. X 36 in., brick. 
24.17 feet of sump and regulator. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1892. 

Dorchester Lower Mills Trunk Sewer. 
Labor ........ 

335,000 bricks 

821 bbls. cement ...... 

218J double loads sand ..... 

20 double loads gravel and filling . 

11 manhole frames and covers 

1 lamphole frame and cover .... 

200 lbs. powder"| 

Fuse V 

Caps ) 

Teaming ....... 

12,969 feet (B.M.) lumber .... 

Pipe ........ 

Carried forward, $18,211 34 



$12,053 


31 


3,663 


50 


929 


19 


393 


30 


31 


80 


88 


70 


7 


20 


88 


74 


585 


00 


207 


51 


Hi;; 


09 



324 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
15 tons coal . 
69 manhole steps . 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

1,738 feet of 30 in. X 36 in., brick. 
255 feet of 24 in. X 36 in., brick. 

The cost of this sewer and amount of work done is a continu- 
ation of the cost and work clone during the year 1892. 



$18,211 


34 


79 


04 


37 


95 


5 


72 


$18,334.05 



Commonwealth Avenue, No. 1 


. 


Labor ........ 


$9,339 17 


154,050 bricks 


1,694 55 


421 bbls. cement ...... 


471 52 


15 double loads gravel and screenings 


26 25 


21 manhole frames and covers 


178 05 


12 manhole steps ...... 


6 60 


250 lbs. powder ^ 




Fuse >■ 


97 17 


Caps ) 




Teaming . . . . 


806 00 


31,638 ft. lumber 


520 03 


Pipe ........ 


1,647 43 


Hire of trench machine ..... 


633 66 


Hire of engine ...... 


360 00 


Centres, etc. ....... 


63 24 


Blacksmithing ...... 


244 02 


56 tons coal ....... 


288 30 


Miscellaneous supplies ..... 


61 47 




$16,437 46 



Size and Length of Sewer, 
872.12 linear feet 2 ft. 4 in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
348.20 linear feet 24-in., pipe. 
269.05 linear feet 18-in., pipe. 
1,432.93 linear feet 15-in.. pipe. 

Bay State Road. 

D. O'Connell, contractor 
132,250 bricks 
395 bbls. cement . 
10 manhole frames and covers 
15 manhole steps . 
Teaming .... 

Pipe ..... 
2 catch-basin frames and grates 
Inspection .... 





$8,238 12 




1,452 75 




446 92 




76 65 




8 25 




14 25 




1,153 31 




20 00 




323 75 




$11,734 00 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



325 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
595.37 feet of 2 ft. 6-in. X 3 ft., brick. 
699.44 feet of 18-in., pipe. 
165.53 feet of 15-in., pipe. 
1,024.59 feet of 12-in., pipe. 
165 feet of 10-in., pipe. 
2,309.5 feet of 6-in., pipe. 
7 catch-basins. 
7 drop inlets. 

Norfolk Avenue, Oak to Clapp Streets. 

Labor . 
172,850 bricks 
528 bbls. cement . 
97 double loads sand 
4 double loads gravel 

2 manhole frames 

3 manhole covers 
Teaming 

14,230 feet lumber 
Pipe 

Centres, etc. . 
15 perch stone 
25 manhole steps . 
Rent of land . 
46 tons coal . 
Tools and blacksmithing 
Miscellaneous supplies 
Hire of trench machine 
Hire of engine 



4,737 


48 


1,728 


50 


620 


64 


174 


60 


6 


00 


28 


35 


837 


75 


230 


93 


153 


86 


451 


68 


26 


25 


13 


75 


48 


00 


250 


30 


121 


04 


69 


29 


600 


00 


257 


50 



$10,355 92 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
102.09 feet, 8 ft. X 8 ft. 6 in., brick. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done in 1892. 



Sewer and Culvert in Rockwell and Armandine Streets. 

Collins & Ham, contractors 

70,450 bricks 

48 1£ bbls. cement . 

6 manhole frames and covers 

Pipe .... 

6 manhole steps 

2 stone frames 

2 iron grates . 

8,620 lbs. granite . 

Inspection 



,075 


71 


714 


30 


556 


65 


62 


50 


794 


73 


3 


30 


30 


00 


18 


22 


1!) 


40 



850 50 



1,125 31 



326 



City Document No. 34. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

395.48 feet 24 in. X 36 in., brick. 
513.20 feet 15-in., pipe. 
1,309.38 feet 12-in., pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work clone is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1892. 

Batavia Street, between St. Stephen and Parker 
Streets. 



S. Connelly, contractor . 










$3,374 11 


66,510 bricks . 










692 60 


270^ bbls. cement . 










308 54 


^2 double load of sand . 










16 


4 manhole frames and covers . 










34 75 


Teaming .... 










6 00 


Pipe .... 










173 27 


Centres, etc. . 










• 124 50 


Inspection 










313 11 




$5,027 04 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
501.86 feet of 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 
68.4 feet of 10-in , pipe. 
520 feet of 6-in., pipe. 

Shirley Street, between Norfolk Avenue and George 

Street. 



Labor .... 








$3,824 80 


215,000 bricks 


, . 






262 50 


68 bbls. cement 


. 






76 16 


25 double loads sand 


, . 






45 00 


12 manhole steps . 


, . 






6 60 


2 manhole frames and covers 


. 






15 40 


Teaming 


. 






318 00 


4,136 feet lumber . 


, 






66 45 


Pipe .... 








16 27 


Blacksmithing and tools . 


, 






23 35 


Miscellaneous supplies . 


• 






8 52 




$4,663 05 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
473 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 



Cary Street, between Buggies and Terry Streets. 

Labor $3,243 01 

10,500 bricks 



Carried forward, 



105 00 



5,348 01 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



327 











S3, 348 01 


. 










18 53 










170 00 










38 90 










22 55 










366 00 










141 62 










200 42 










45 00 










64 15 










39 28 










6 22 




$4,548 40 



Brought forward, 
79 bbls. cement 
10 double loads sand 
100 double loads gravel . 
4 manhole frames and covers 
41 manhole steps . 
Teaming 

8.851 feet lumber . 
Pipe (Akron) 
45 feet (iron) pipe 
Centres and templates 
Blacksmithing 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
645.22 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Longwood Avenue, between Brookline Avenue and 
Wigglesworth Street. 

Labor 

11,700 bricks. 

39 bbls. cement 

3£ double loads sand 

73 double loads gravel 

7 manhole frames and covers . . . . . 70 15 

1 lamphole frame and cover ..... 7 20 

Teaming . 618 00 

Pipe 857 25 

Blacksmithing ....... 50 90 

$4,458 36 

Size and Length of Sewer. 
212.22 feet 24-in., pipe. 
835.99 feet 15-in., pipe. 
651.47 feet 12-in., pipe. 



,553 


68 


122 


75 


43 


68 


7 


00 


127 


75 



Alford Street, Charlestown. 



Labor . 

11,337 bricks 

34 J bbls. cement . 

lOf single loads sand 

30 double loads gravel 

.") manholes and covers 

Teaming 

3,512 feet lumber . 

Carried forward^ 



$2,650 


82 


99 


10 


37 


95 


10 


75 


60 


00 


42 


60 


176 


50 


57 


60 



5,135 32 



328 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 


$8,135 32 


Pipe ...... 


427 44 


Hire of trench machine . 


234 98 


Hire of engine .... 


157 50 


10^ tons coal ..... 


54 60 


Miscellaneous supplies . 


9 07 




$4,018 91 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
609.85 feet of 12-in., pipe. 
560.15 feet of 15-in., pipe. 

Adams Street, between Linden and Bowdoin Streets. 

Labor .... 

10,200 bricks 

29 bbls. cement 

15 single loads sand 

3 manhole frames and covers 

575 lbs. powder 

Fuse 

Caps 

Teaming 

Pipe 

Blasting logs . 

3 tons coal 

Miscellaneous supplies 



. $2,517 


31 


104 


10 


33 


80 


13 


50 


35 


40 


224 


67 


121 


50 


436 


13 


130 


00 


16 


35 


4 


02 



5,636 78 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
470.65 feet of 12-in., pipe. 

The cost of this sewer and the amount of work done is a con- 
tinuation of the cost and work done during the year 1892. 

Commonwealth Avenue, No. 2. 



Labor ........ 


$2,386 90 


9,000 bricks ....... 


99 00 


10 bbls. cement ...... 


11 20 


6 double loads sand ..... 


11 70 


3 manhole frames and covers .... 


23 10 


Teaming ....... 


85 50 


1,002 feet lumber 


16 41 


Pipe ........ 


791 58 


l£ tons coal ....... 


7 80 


Black smithing ...... 


6 45 


Miscellaneous supplies ..... 


4 80 




$3,444 44 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



329 



Size and Length of Sewer 



960.30 feet of 18-in , pipe. 
671.65 feet of 15-in., pipe. 
828.05 feet of 12-in., pipe. 



Deerfleld Street, between Commonwealth Avenue and 



Charles River 



D. O'Connell, contractor 
30 bbls. cement 
Teaming 
Pipe . 

Inspection 



$2,621 71 

33 60 

1 50 

577 08 

57 75 

$3,291 64 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

752.13 feet of 18-in. pipe. 
249.96 feet ofl2-in., pipe. 
42 feet of 10-in., pipe. 
39.5 feet of 6-in., pipe. 
2 catch-basins. 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 331 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

Street Department, Street-Cleaning Division, 
14 Beacon St., Boston, February 1, 1894. 

H. H. Carter, Esq., Superintendent of Streets, Boston: 

Dear Sir : I respectfully submit my annual report of the ex- 
penditures, business and income of the Street-Cleaning Division 
of the Street Department for the financial year, ending January 
31, 1894: 



Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation . 

Revenue from Brookline Gas Light Company on ac- 
count of work done by this division 
Transfer from Paving Division . . . . 

Transfer from Sewer Division . 



Total 



$290,000 00 

154 50 

15,000 00 

3,552 80 

$308,707 30 



Total amount of expenditures 



,707 30 



Objects of Expenditure. 





Sujierhitendence. 


. 


Salary of Deputy Snpe 


'intendent 


$3,000 00 


Office pay-rolls 


. 


4,668 02 


Stationery 


. 


185 11 


Printing 


.... 


440 61 


Board of horses 


. 


575 00 


Telephone service . 


intendence . 


244 72 


Total cost of supei 


$9,113 46 



332 



City Document No. 34. 



Cleaning Streets. 
Including the Cost of Sweeping, Loading and Removal of Street- 



dirt. 

District 1. West End . 

District 2. North End . 

District 3. South End . 

District 4. South End . 

District 5. Back Bay . 

District 6. South Boston 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton. 1 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Total cost of cleaning streets . 

Cleaning Gutters. 
Including Cost of Sweeping, Loading and Removal of Street-dirt. 

$2,151 56 



$17,029 12 
20,711 74 
21,461 08 
17,992 67 
13,183 81 
13,855 96 
14,607 46 

11,297 03 

$130,138 87 



District entirely paved. 



District 1 . West End 

District 2. North End 

District 3. South End 

District 4. South End ...... 

District 5. Back Bay 

District 6. South Boston . 

District 7. Roxbury ...... 

Distiict 8. Brighton. (See "Cost of Scraping.") 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 



Total cost of cleaning gutters . 

Total length of gutters cleaned, 2,047.17 miles. 
Average cost per mile, $12.91. 

Cleaning Crossings. 
Including Cost of Manual and Machine Labor. 
Cost of cleaning crossings .... 
Removing snow by patrol .... 

Total cost ...... 



Cost of Maintaining Dumps. 

District 1 . West End . 

District 2. North End . 

District 3. South End . 

District 4. South End . 

District 5. Back Bay . 

District 6. South Boston 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 



2,440 61 
6,334 68 
5,627 19 
5,652 04 

3,646 24 

$25,852 32 



Total cost of dumps 



$1,160 


56 


3,308 


43 


$4,468 99 


$584 08 


497 


15 


527 


95 


517 


40 


575 


40 


548 


00 


466 


02 


$3,716 


00 



1 See "Scraping. 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 333 



Snow. 
Including Labor on Crossings, in Streets, Carting of Snow, etc. 

District 1. West End . 

District 2. North End . 

District 3. South End . 

District 4. South End . 

District 5. Back Bay 

District 6. South Boston 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Charged by Sanitary Division 



Total cost 



$3,931 


85 


4,023 


19 


3,288 


62 


3,654 


75 


4,426 


56 


4,207 


68 


5,062 


31 


390 


00 


3,255 


49 


168 


25 


$32,408 


70 



Cost of Scraping. 

Macadamized or Gravelled Streets. 

District 8. Brighton $2,422 34 

This shows the cost of scraping with hoes the entire street from 
curb to curb. 

Total length of miles scraped, 36.01. 
Cost of scraping per mile, $67.26. 



Miscellaneous Work. 

This shows the cost of such work as may not be characterized 
the same in all districts. 

Including miscellaneous work, sweeping and carting of leaves, etc. : 



District 1. West End . 

District 2. North End . 

District 3. South End . 

District 4. South End . 

District 5. Back Bay . 

District 6. South Boston 

District 7. Roxbury 

District 8. Brighton 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston 

Total cost ..... 



$4 


73 


26 


95 


23 


75 


75 


24 


1 ,424 


49 


432 


60 


403 


41 


1,635 


16 


23 


81 



!4,050 14 



Patrol System. 

Superintendence . . . . . 

Push-carts, including labor and teaming 

Total cost . 



$1,196 52 
22,900 42 

$24,096 91 



334 



City Document No. 34. 



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$24,096 49 


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2,440 61 
6,334 68 
5,627 19 
5,652 04 


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$17,029 12 
20,711 74 
21,461 08 
17,992 67 
13,183 81 
13,855 96 
14,607 46 


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Districts. 




<M 


K 


■«* 


« 


co 


i- 


X 


c 


Cost of Sweepi 
Paid to Sanitar 
Patrol System 


* 




c 
E- 





Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 335 



Stable and Yard Expenses. 

Including the Cost of the Soitth End, West End, Roxbury, South 
Boston, and Charlestown Stables, as follows: 



Superintendence of stables .... 
Labor, including the cost of feeders, hostlers, broom 

makers, blacksmiths, carpenters, watchmen, yard 

men, etc. .... 
Cart and carriage repairs 
Harness repairs 
Horse-shoeing 
Sweeping-machine repairs 
Stable and shed repairs . 
Street-car tickets and ferry passes 
Tool repairs* .... 
Veterinary services and medicine 

Total .... 



{,393 04 



18,414 27 

3,355 00 

420 63 

3,001 44 

839 31 

1,830 86 

1,160 00 

25 35 

604 30 

$32,044 20 



Stock Account. 

Broom stock purchased .... 

Carts and carriages purchased 

Harnesses and horse furnishings purchased 

Horses purchased. (Net) 

Sleighs purchased ..... 

Sweeping-machines purchased 

Tools purchased ..... 

Waste barrels purchased 

Patrol stock and maintenance of same 

Total 



£7,050 06 

1,225 00 

1,379 90 

3,170 00 

190 00 

2,175 00 

498 02 

524 00 

2,462 32 

18,674 30 



Miscellaneous. 

Building new shed, in Roxbury .... $1,691 97 

Building shed, at West End 338 50 

Holidays 11,340 21 

Scow (cost of disposal at sea of 33,699 loads of 

street-dirt) 7,723 30 

Sundries 919 56 



Total 



£22,013 54 



336 



City Document No. 34. 



General Recapitulation op Expenses. 



Superintendence 

Cleaning streets 

Cleaning gutters 

Cleaning crossings 

Maintaining dumps 

Removal of snow and ice 

Scraping macadamized streets 

Miscellaneous work 

Patrol system 

Stable and yard expenses 

Stock account 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



$9,113 46 

130,138 87 

25,852 32 

4,468 99 

3,716 00 

32,408 70 

2,422 34 

4,050 14 

24,096 94 

32,044 20 

18,674 30 

22,013 54 

$308,999 80 



Note. — Of the above amount, the sum of $292.50 was paid by other departments, on 
account of work done, etc., maUing the net expenses of this division, as shown in financial 
statement, $308,707.30. 



Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, exclusive of Supervision and other Expenses. 



Districts. 


Miles of 
Streets 
Cleaned. 


Cost of 
Cleaning. 


Pro Rata Cost 
of Dumps. 


Total Cost. 


Cost per 
Mile. 


No. 1 
No. 2 ... 
No. 3 . . 
No. 4.... 
No. 5 
No. 6 
No. 7. ... 


1,442.57 

1,797.73 

1,867.93 

1,726.66 

643.93 

843.31 

502.23 


$17,029 12 
20,711 74 
21,461 08 
17,992 67 
13,183 81 
13,855 96 
14,607 46 


$519 83 
497 15 
527 95 
460 49 
385 50 
389 08 


$17,548 95 
21,208 89 
21,989 03 
18,453 16 
13,569 31 
14,245 04 
14,607 46 


$12 16 
11 79 
11 77 
10 68 
21 07 
16 89 
29 08 


No. 8 






No. 9. . . 


696.52 


11,297 03 


349 51 


11,646 54 


16 72 




9,520.88 


$130,138 87 


$3,129 51 


$133,268 38 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight districts, ex- 
clusive of supervision, etc., $13.99. 



Street Department — Street-Cleaning Division. 337 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning' Streets in each Dis- 
trict, including Supervision, Labor, Yard and Stable Expenses. 









66$ of the 






Districts. 


Miles of 

Streets 


Cost of 
Cleaning. 


58f e of the | Total Cost 
Total Cost of of Yard and 


Total Ex- 


Total Cost 
per Mile. 




Cleaned. 


Streets. 


Supervision. Stable 










( Expenses. 






No. i...., 


1,442.57 


$17,548 95 


$696 04 1 $2,784 95 


$21,029 94 


$14 57 


No. 2 ... 


1,797.73 


21,208 89 


841 201 3,365 77 


25,415 86 


14 13 


No. 3.... 


1,867.93 


21,989 03 


872 14 3,489 57 


26,350 74 


14 10 


No. 4.... 


1,726.66 


18,453 16 


731 90 2,928 44 


22,113 50 


12 SO 


No. 5. . . . 


643.93 


13,569 31 


538 20 2,153 39 


16,260 90 


25 25 


No. 6.... 


843.31 


14,245 04 


565 00; 2,260 64 


17,070 68 


20 24 


No. 7.-.. 


502.23 


14,607 46 


579 38 2,318 15 


17,504 99 


34 85 


No. 8. ... 












No. 9.... 


696.52 
9,520.88 


11,646 54 


461 94 


1,848 26 


13,956 74 


20 03 




$133,268 38 


$5,285 80 


$21,149 17 


$159,703 35 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight districts, in- 
cluding supervision, etc., $16.77. 

Table showing the Number of Loads of Street-dirt removed. 



Districts. 


Number of Loads of 
Dirt removed. 


Cost per Load of cleaning 
streets, and removing to 
dumps, including Fore- 
man's Superintendence. 


1 


10,063 
'11,103 

11,688 

11,534 
'15,541 
'12,542 

17,322 
5,758 

11,028 


$1.90 
1 86 


2 . ... 


3 


1 83 


4 ,. 

5 


1.77 
1 32 


6 

7 


1.63 
1 16 


8 




9 


1.35 




106,579 
3,917 


equal to 50,629 barrel 
loads. 






110,496 









33,699 loads of the above (or about 30 per cent.) were delivered 
at the dumping scow, the towing of which to sea cost 22 cents per 
load. In addition to the above, 39,151 single loads and 305 
double loads of street scrapings were removed from the streets by 
the Paving Division. 

1 Includes loads from Miscellaneous Work, 



338 City Document No. 34. 



Public Waste Barrels. 

Total number of waste barrels emptied (about five 

months' work) . 4,410 



Income. 

Amount of bills deposited with the City Collector 

during the financial year ending January 3] , 1894 . $6,049 82 



Complaints. 

Through Central Office 2 

By letter 1 

Total number of complaints . 3 



Average Force Employed January 31, 1894. 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Clerk 1 

Messengers ........ 2 

Employees 309 



Entire force ....... 313 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip A. Jackson, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Street Department. 



appe:nt>ix f. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 1886 under charge of City Engineer. 



Name. 


Year. 




1886 to 1889 




1889 to 1891 









Name of Document. 



Annual Report 



For 


Pub. 


Year. 


Year. 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



29 
26 
29 
22 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Enoeli Patterson, Supt. Streets and Drains 
Zephaniali Sampson, " " " " 

Thomas Hunting, Superintendent 

Alfred T. Turner, 
Charles Harris, 
Nehemiah T. Merritt, 
James J. Flynn, 
Charles Harris, 
Michael Meehan, 
John W. McDonald, 
J. Edwin Jones, 



1827 to 
1831 to 
1846 to 
1853 to 
1864 to 



1884 to 
1886 to 
1889 to 



1831 
1846 
1853 
1864 
1883 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1886 
1889 
1891 



340 



City Document No. 34. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 



Quarterly Report. 
Annual Report . . 



For 
Year. 



1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
I860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
18H6 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 



Pub. 
Year. 



1851 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



6 

29 

2 

6 

6 

5 

3 

3 

3 

5 

6 

5 

4 

3 

3 

70 

3 

6 

9 

14 

13 

12 

16 

21 

25 

27 

30 

38 

29 

24 

24 

48 

51 

47 

46 

97 

30 

16 

23 

30 

19 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



341 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 

Zephaniah Sampson, 

Charles B. Wells, 

Simeon B. Smith, 

William H. Bradley, 

Horace H. Moses, 

Thomas J. Young, 

Seth Perkins, 

Charles Morton, 



Tear. 



1827 to 
1881 to 
1837 to 
1856 to 
1863 to 
1883 to 
1885 to 
1887 to 
1889 to 



1831 
1837 
1856 
1863 
1883 
1885 
1887 
1889 
1891 



Sewer Department before lSOl^ 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report 



1 

For Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


1 80S 


1860 


1860 


1861 


1861 


1862 


1862 


1863 


1863 


1864 


3 864 


1865 


1865 


1866 


1866 


1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


18S0 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884 \ 


1884 


18H5 j 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 
1890 


1890 
1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



11 
12 
12 
13 

11 



13 
11 
3 
11 
10 
la 
12 
17 
II 
13 
15 
11 
16 
19 
IX 
16 

43 

58 
69 
81 
129 
14 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



342 



City Document No. 34. 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name. 



Ezrn Forristall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 
Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall, " 



Year. 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
1869 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report 



Annual report from 1873 to 1884 inclusive; the 
Superintendent's report was embodied in the 
report of the Board of Health 

Annual Report • • 



Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


1853 


1854 


1854 


1855 


1855 


1856 


1856 


1857 


1857 


1858 


1858 


1859 


1859 


1860 


1£60 


1861 


1861 


1862 


1862 


1863 


1863 


1864 


1864 


1865 


1865 


1866 


1866 


1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



7 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
8 
7 
8 

12 
4 
10 
17 
40 



45 
22 
16 
23 
21 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



343 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point.) 



Frederic W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston . . < 

Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge ...... < 

William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge < 



May 22, 1871, to 
March, 1891. 

June 14, 1871, to 
Jan. 31, 1883. 

March 28, 1883, to 
present time. 



Harvard Bridge added in 1892. 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point.) 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report. 



For 


Pub. 


Tear. 


Year. 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884 


1884 


1885 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



19 
12 
16 
23 
20 
12 
10 

8 
12 

8 

15 
15 
19 

8 

12 
19 
25 
22 
20 



♦Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



344 



City Document No. 34. 



Street Department since 1891. 

Superintendent. 
Henry H. Carter, Member American Society Civil Engineers. 

Executive Engineer. 
Henry B. Wood, Member Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Paving Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent. 
Member Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Deputy Superintendent. 
Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 



Sanitary Division 
Sanitary Division 



George W. Forristall,* Deputy Superintendent. 
Philip A. Jackson, Acting Deputy Superintendent 
since January 16. 
Street-Cleaning Division. — Philip A. Jackson. 
Bridge Division. — John A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent. 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges. — Henry H. Carter, Ex-Officio, Commis- 
sioner for Boston. 
"William J. Marvin, Commissioner for 
Cambridge. 



* Died January 12, 1894. 



Street Department. 



Name or Document. 


For 

Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II. . 


1891 
1892 
1893 


1892 
1893 
1894 


36 
34 




34 



6 ]Q$o 



I