(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

^' -'Ml, ..J 









Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1894bost 



ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1894. 




BOSTON : 
• ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1895. 



/^ i^S, 



L 3 ^^. ^'7 



^C^LJ 



CONTENTS. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

AND 

EXECUTIVE ENGINEER. 



CENTRAL OFFICE. 

PAGE 

Central Office Division 8 

Complaints 34 

Expenses Central Office 8 

Employment of Labor 31 

Financial Statement (General) , 9 
Grade and Number of Em- 
ployees 32 

Income 14 

List of Contracts 15-30 

New Work Laid Out 3 

Organization 1 

Recapitulation of Expenditures, 13 

Special Appropriations 10-12 

Stony Brook 3 

Street-building, Chap. 323 13 

Street-building, Chap. 462 14 

Bridge Division 35 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 38 

Broadway Bridge 37 

Classification of Expenditures, 41 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge .... 38 

Ciielsea Bridge 35 

Congress-Street Bridge 36 

Draw Openings 40 

Dover-Street Bridge 37 

Harvard Bridge 38 

In General 39 

L-Street Bridge 30 



PAGE 

Mt. Washington-Ave. Bridge, 37 

Prison-Point Bridge 38 

Statement of Traffic over 

Bridges 40 

West Boston Bridge 39 

Paving Division 42 

Areas of Pavements 43 

Brick Sidewalks 45 

Edgestones and Sidewalks . . . 44-45 
Length of Accepted Streets 

and Character of Pavements, 42-43 
List of Streets Paved with 

Asphalt 46-48 

Rate of Increased Mileage ... 43 
Report of City Engineer on 

Special Work 49 

Street Openings 70 

Streets Laid Out 42 

Street-Watering 72 

Comments on Street-watering, 72-73 

Distribution of Carts 77 

Income 80 

Money Expended, 1894 78 

Money Expended for Last 

Sixteen Years 79 

Style of Water Carts 74 

Summary of Day Work 74 

Summary of Contract Work. . 75 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Summary of Work done 76-77 

Water-posts 79 

Work done at Expense of 

Abutters 76 

Sanitary Division 81 

Amount of House Offal Ke- 

moved (11 years) 81 

Amount Ashes Eemoved (13 

years) 84 

Comparative Statement, Six- 
teen Weeks in Winter and 

Summer 85 

Collection and Disposal of 

Offal 82 

Capacity of Offal Wagons .... 81 

Disposition of Material 85 

Force Employed 83 

Kemoval of Ashes 84 

Sewkr Division 86 

Rainfall 87 

Sewers built 86 

Surface Drainage 88-97 



PAGE 

Street-Cweaning Division, 98 

Average No. Men Employed. . 99 

General Remarks 101 

Plant 147 

Push-cart Patrol 100 

Public Waste Barrels 100 

Street Sweepings Removed (13 

years) 99 

Sweeping Districts 98 

Smoke Nuisance 103 

Devices in Use. 104 

General Remarks 109 

New Locations 106 

Results of Inspections 105 

Conclusion 109 

Street Department — Organi- 
zation 110 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGE 
DIVISION. (Page 113.) 



Appendix Al (Draw-tenders' 

Report) 146 

Appendix A2 (Width of Open- 
ings) 148 

Appendix A3 (Width of 

Bridges) 150 

Appendix A4 (List of Culverts 

and Small Bridges) 151-155 

Appendix A4 (List of Culverts 
and Small Bridges) (Sup- 
plement) 156-159 

Appendix A5 (Statement of 

Traffic) 160 

Appendix A 6 (Draw-tenders' 

Keport) 161 

Appropriations and Expendi- 
tures 115-116 

Bridges wholly Supported by 

Boston 142 

Bridges of which Boston Sup- 
ports the Part within its 
Limits 143 



143 



144 
115 



Bridges of which Boston Pays 
a Part of the Cost of Main- 
tenance 

Bridges Supported by Railroad 

Corporations 

Cable-houses 

Financial Statement — Regu- 
lar Appropriations 115 

Inland Bridges 130-134 

Inland Bridges, Recapitulation, 135 

List of Boston Bridges 142 

Public Landing-places 114 

Recapitulation — Specials . . . 142 
Regular Maintenance Ex- 
penses at the North and 

South Yards 136-137 

Recapitulation Expenses on 

Tide-water Bridges 129 

Special Work 114 

Special Appropriations .... J37-141 

Deputy's Statement 113 

Total Regular Expenditures. . 116 
Tide-water Bridges 117-128 



VI 



CONTENTS . 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF PAVING 
DIVISION. (Page 163.) 



Expenditures (Details) 175 

Execution of Courts, etc 172 

Financial Statement 169 

Income 170 

Laying Out and Construction 

of Highways 222 

New Edgestones 227 

New Brick Sidewalks 230 

Permits Issued 164 

Property 233 

Kemoval of Snow (Table) 174 

Street Improvements (Alder- 
manic Districts) 184-197 

Street Improvements (by 

Wards) 198-217 

Summary of Expenditures 

(Specials) 217-221 



PAGE 

Street-watering Expenditures. 175 

Schedule of Property 234 

Street Numbers Assigned. .. . 163 

Streets Laid Out or Extended. 166 

Streets Widened or Relocated. 167 

Streets Discontinued 168 

Schedule of Expenditures : 

Schedule A 172 

Schedule B 172 

Schedule C 173 

Schedule D 174 

Table of Expenditures (39 

years) 163 

Table of Expenses, Regular 

Appropriation 171 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SANITARY DIVISION. (Page 235.) 



Amount Expended for Collec- 
tion and Removal of House- 
Offal 238 

Capacity Offal Wagons 242 

Contracts 244 

Cost of Carts 243 

Cost of Horse-shoeing 243 

Comparative Table, Collection 

Garbage 240 

Disposition of Material Col- 
lected 240 

Dumping-boats, Expenses of. . 242 

Financial Statement 235 

Horse Account 250 

House-Offal 249 



PAGE 

House Dirt and Ashes 2'19 

Hay and Grain 246 

Horse-shoeing and Blacksmith- 

ing (cost) 243 

Items of Expenditure 235 

Material Collected and Cost of 

Teams 241 

Material Collected by Districts, 239 

Material Sold by Contract 245 

Numbfer of Carts 242 

Organization 250 

Recapitulation (Hay and Grain) , 248 

Revenue 238 

Total Cost, Removal, etc 239 

Table of Loads (13 years) 243 



CONTENTS. 



VU 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWER 
DIVISION. (Page 251.) 



PAGE 

Catch-basins 314 

Culverts 263 

Financial Statement. 266 

Fall of Rain and Snow 298 

Improved Sewerage (Expendi- 
tures) 267 

Main Drainage Works 261 

Miscellaneous Expenses 267 

Fumping-station Record 298 

Property in charge of Sewer 

Division 299 

Recapitulation 294 

Stony Brook Improvement. . . 267 

Brighton. 

Needs of the District 256 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 272 

By Private Parties 276 

Faneuil Valley Sewer 273 

Surface Drains and Culverts . 275 

City Proper. 

Needs of the District 251 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor .' . 268 

Surface Drains 269 

By Private Parties 269 

Charlestown. 

Needs of the District 254 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 270 

Surface Drains 270 

Dorchester. 

Needs of the District 257 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 278 

Dorchester Lower Mills Trunk 

Sewer 278 

By Private Parties 281 



PAGE 

Surface Drains 280 

Culverts 281 

East Bostox. 

Needs of the District 254 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 271 

ROXBCRT. 

Needs of the District 258 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 284 

Sewers Built under Chap. 323, 

Acts 1891 285 

By Private Parties 287 

Surface Drains 287 

West Roxbury. 

Needs of the District 260 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 289 

By Private Parties 292 

Culverts 291 

Surface Drains 291 

South Boston. 

Needs of the District 257 

Sewers Built by Contract or 

Day Labor 277 



Sewer Assessments (Acts 



1894; 



Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion 

Sludge Record 

Special Construction 301- 

Summary of Construction (6 
years) 

Scliedule of Sewers to Date. . 

Work Done by Paving Di- 
vision 



265 

295 
299 
-314 

300 
296 

293 



VIU 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET- 
CLEANING DIVISION. (Page 315.) 



PAGE 

Average Force Employed. . . . 322 
Cost per Mile, exclusive of 

Supervision 320 

Cost per Mile, inclusive of 

Supervision 321 

Cleaning Streets, Cost by Dis- 
tricts 316 

Cleaning Gutters, by Districts, 316 

Cleaning Crossings 316 

Cost of Maintaining Dumps. . 316 

Cost of Removal of Snow .... 317 

Cost of Collecting Leaves 317 

Financial Statement 315 



General Recapitulation of Ex- 
penses 320 

Income 322 

Miscellaneous 319 

Objects of Expenditure 315 

Patrol System 317 

Public Waste Barrels 322 

Recapitulation of Expenses .. 318 

Stable and Yard Expenses . . . 319 

Stock Account 319 

Total Number of Loads Street 

Dirt Removed 321 



APPENDIX F. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT NUM^ 
BERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. (Page 323.) 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Artificial Stone Steps, Ruth Street, East Boston 54 

Dover-Street Bridge over Fort-Point Channel (Draw Open) 36 

Dover-Street Bridge over Fort-Point Channel (Draw Closed) 38 

_01d Wooden Sewer, Dover Street 252 

Masonry Construction within Dover-Street Sewer 25'1: 



Hon. Edwin U. Curtis, 

Mayor of the Oily of Boston : 

Sir : In complijince with the Revised Ordinances, the 
annual report of the operations and expenses of the Street 
Department for the year 1894 is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

Organization. 

The work of the department during the past year has been 
carried on under the same organization that was effected 
when the consolidated department was created in 1891, the 
several divisions of the department being as follows : 

The Central Office. 

Bridge Division. 

Paving Division. 

Sewer Division. 

Sanitary Division. 

Street-Cleaning Division. 

Boston and Cambrido;e Brido-es. 

Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office Division and the Boston and Cambridge 
Bridges, is in charge of a deputy superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge Bridges are managed by two 
commissioners, the Superintendent of Streets being the com- 
missioner for the city of Boston, the other commissioner 
being appointed by the Mayor of the city of Cambridge. 

The work of street-watering, which devolves on the 
Street Department, is carried on under the supervision of 
the Paving Division, with a foreman of street- watering in 
charge. 

This service could be more efficientlj^ rendered if it were 
undertaken as a separate division with a responsible deputy 
superintendent in charge. 

The principal features of the work of the year may be 
summarized as follows : 



2 City Document No. 34. 

Paving with new blocks and regulating about 30 streets 
in various districts, improving about 50,000 square yards of 
paved roadway surface, and repaving numerous other streets. 

Construction of Telford-macadam roadways on Common- 
wealth avenue, from Arlington street to Massachusetts 
avenue, and continuation of general construction on the 
same avenue, from the Crossroads to Brighton, amounting 
in all to about $375,000 worth of work. 

Setting 52,7o6 lin. feet of new edgestone, and laying 
19,615 square yards of new brick sidewalks. 

Increasing our asphalt pavements by about 10,500 square 
yards. 

Kebuilding Chelsea-street bridge, including a new steel 
swing draw, and repairing Charles-river bridge. 

Rebuilding bridge and draw over Fort Point channel in 
connection with the separation of grade of Dover street and 
the NY., N.H., & H. R.R. 

Building 23 miles of sewers and building 226 catch-basins, 
repairing 445, and cleaning 6,913 others, removing there- 
from about 20,000 cubic yards of filthy material. 

Cleaning about 10,500 miles of streets, removing 95,478 
loads of dirt. 

Sprinkling about 330 miles of streets for nearly eight 
months. 

Collecting and removing 326,798 loads of house dirt and 
ashes. 

Collecting and removing 50,637 loads of house ofFal. 

Building, under the Board of Survey Act, twelve macadam 
streets, at an expenditure of $106,820, nine of which have 
been practically completed. 

A perusal of the financial tables that follow shows that 
the department has expended for maintenance the sum of 
$2,038,855.91, and that the total expenditures of the con- 
solidated department, including special appropriations, have 
been $3,333,730.70. Of this amount, $490,800.14 was 
spent on laying out and constructing new streets under 
chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, as amended by chapter 418 
of the Acts of 1892, known as the Board of Survey Act. 
Under this act, seven orders of laying out were passed near 
the close of the year to construct and complete which will 



Street Department. 3 

involve an expenditure of nearly $2,000,000, while the land 
damages are estimated at 11,284,908.50 in addition. 

They are : 

Blue Hill avenue, from Washington street to Mattapan. 

Huntington avenue, from Copley square to Brookline line. 

Harvard avenue, from Commonwealth avenue to the 
Brookline line. 

Turner street, from Haviland street to Astor street. 

Sherborn street, from Commonwealth avenue to Charles 
river. 

Commonwealth-avenue extension, from Chestnut Hill 
avenue to the Newton line. 

Columbus avenue, from Northampton street to Walnut 
avenue at the Park. 

As the total amount of money available under this act for 
the coming year is only $1,921,357.41, of which $70,000 is 
required for the Board of Survey, $500,000 for sewers and 
streets begun, and $1,284,908.50 for land damages, it is 
evident that only $66,448.91 remains available for new con- 
struction. 

The laying out of Columbus avenue, together with the 
raisino- of the o-rade of the Providence Division of the N.Y., 
N.H., & H. E.R. , now in progress, again force upon the 
city the question of the final disposition to be made of Stony 
brook. 

Stony Brook. 

Between Centre street and Ritchie street, the open chan- 
nel of Stony brook, 22 feet wide and 10 to 14 feet deep and 
600 feet long, is included within the lines of Columbus 
avenue, crossing the location of the avenue twice. The 
least that can be done here is to arch over this channel be- 
fore the avenue can be constructed, a work which will cause 
the expenditure of a large sum of money, and which will 
have to be destroyed within a few years to make way for 
the low-grade channel recommended by the Stony Brook 
Commission of 1886. 

A wiser course would })e to build here a section of the 
Commissioners' channel. At a point 500 feet south of the 
point where the brook channel leaves the avenue, near 
Ritchie street, the N.Y., X.IL, & H. R.R., is now build- 



4 City Document No. 34. 

ing a section of the Commissioners' channel, extending to a 
point 500 feet south of Boylston street, a distance of 2,300 
feet, the engineers of the raih'oad, after consultation with 
the City Engineer and the Superintendent of Streets, hav- 
ing decided that this was the wisest course, when it had be- 
come evident that the raising of the grade of the Providence 
Division necessitated the filling in of the old channel. If 
the section of the Commissioners' channel is built as recom- 
mended between Centre and Ritchie streets, we shall then 
have two sections of the low-grade channel, one 600 feet 
long, the other 2,300 feet long, 500 feet apart, each drained 
by sections of the present channel, which is about 14 feet 
higher. The low-grade channels will therefore be filled at 
all times nearly to the crown of the arch with water, form- 
ing settling basins for the sand and mud of the brook, which 
will speedily fill them up. 

The Commissioners' channel is now complete from Charles 
river, or more exactly from the ponds in the Back Bay Fens, 
to the Inlet Chamber near Pynchon street. This will have 
to be extended in the near future to join the section of chan- 
nel between Centre and Ritchie streets, and this in its turn 
to join the section now beino; built by the N.Y., N.H., & 
H. R.R. 

The Commissioners in 1886 recommended that in extend- 
ino- the channel above the Inlet Chamber, the original course 
of the brook be followed; that is, alongside the railroad as 
far as Old Heath street. But the experience of the city in 
1880 may prove a valuable guide upon this point. The 
Superintendent of Sewers at that time, under whose direc- 
tion the improvement of 1880-84 was begun, found that the 
damages demanded for land and buildings were so excessive 
that he was forced to build- the channel in Pynchon street. 

The experience would doubtless be repeated now. But, 
in addition to this, unless the channel is built immediately 
the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. will have erected here a re- 
taining-wall about 19 feet high, carrying their four-track 
road ; this will add so enormously to the difiiculty and cost 
of excavating a trench 26 feet deep and 25 feet wide at its 
foot, that there cannot be any reasonable doubt that the 
city will be compelled to build this channel in Columbus 
avenue. 

These considerations seem to make it evident that the 
extension of the low-grade channel from the Inlet Chamber 
up to join the section now being built by the railroad should 
precede the construction of Columbus avenue ; otherwise 
shortly after surfacing this fine avenue the city will find 
itself forced to destroy it by excavating in it the enormous 



Street Department. 5 

trench required for this channel, — a trench 26 to 28 feet 
wide and 28 to 32 feet deep. 

But any extension of the low-grade channel of Stony 
brook immediately calls up for solution two other knotty 
problems, which are inextricalily bound up in it : one is the 
question of the rights of the Boston Belting Company to the 
water of the brook ; the other is the question of providing 
a low-grade sewer for those districts in West Roxbury which 
are too low to be sewered by extensions of the existing 
sewer system there. 

The Boston Belting Company use the water of the brook 
in their yjrocesses of rubber manufacture, and claim the right 
to it in virtue of an old mill-privilege. To extend the low- 
grade channel beyond the Inlet Chamber will cut off the 
water entirely from them unless some special device is 
adopted to cause the water to continue to flow down the old 
channel to their factory. Without attempting in this con- 
nection to discuss the relative rio;hts of the Boston Belting 
Company and the city of Boston as to Stony brook, a dis- 
cussion which would involve complicated legal points, it ma\'' 
be stated that there are three courses open to the city, if it 
be considered imperative or expedient to continue to supply 
the Belting Company with the water of the brook, viz. : 

A. To erect a movable dam or large gate at the Inlet 
Chamber, damming up the water by means of it high enough 
to cause it to flow down the old channel in fair weather, 
and removing the dam during floods to allow an uninter- 
rupted flow through the low-grade channel. This would 
require a damming up of 13J feet. 

B. To set up a pumping plant at the Inlet Chamber, and 
pump suflScient water up into the old channel to supply the 
factory. 

C To transfer the Inlet Chamber or a similar structure 
to the farthest point up stream to which the low-grade 
channel extends uninterruptedly, utilizing the existing chan- 
nel to carry the Belting Company's supply between the Inlet 
Chamber and Centre street, and building an auxiliary channel 
from this point on, upon the haunch of the arch of Commis- 
sioners' channel. 

If this latter scheme is adopted, arrangements should be 
made with the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. to build this auxiliary 
channel in connection with the section of the channel which 
they now have under construction, the city to pay the extra 
cost to the contractors. 

There is time enough to make such arrangements as no 
more masonry will l)e built until spring. 

The second problem mentioned above as connected with 



6 City Document No. 34. 

the extension of the low-grade channel, viz., the building 
of a low-grade sewer for the Stony-brook valley, is simpler. 
There are about 500 acres of land in West Roxbury adjacent 
to the channel of the brook which is too low to be sewered 
by the existing system ; some of it is being developed by 
new streets, and is being built upon. A sewer low enough 
to serve this territory can never be built half so cheaply as it 
can in connection with the building of this low-grade channel 
for the brook. 

From the head of the Stony-brook branch of the inter- 
cepting system, at the corner of Elm wood and Linden Park 
streets to the Roxbury crossing, there is an unused 7-foot 
brick channel. From this point up to the Inlet Chamber the 
channel is only partially filled by the stream which is allowed 
to flow to the Belting Company. A sewer could be built 
cheaply here. From the Inlet Chamber up, a sewer could be 
built in the open channel as well as it could be below the 
Inlet Chamber, and one of the two 7 X 10 foot brick chan- 
nels in Pynchon street would be available for it, even if the 
other were utilized for the auxiliary channel before men- 
tioned. Above Centre street this sewer would have to be 
carried upon the haunch of the low-grade channel, and the 
same arrangement made with the railroad company in re- 
gard to building it as previously discussed in regard to an 
auxiliary channel. 

These problems are so involved, each with the others, that 
this department and the city government should come to a 
decision in regard to them without delay, as the opportunity 
to build all that will be required in this narrow valley cheaply 
and without destroying previous costly work will never occur 
again. 

The interests involved are serious enough, and the 
economy which can be affected is great enough to warrant 
obtaining the necessary funds by means of a special long- 
time loan outside the debt limit, if no other means are 
available. 

The improvement of 1880-84 stopped at the Florence- 
street bridge, about a quarter of a mile north-easterly from 
Mount Hope station. 

Private parties interested in Hyde Park lands have, dur- 
ing the past year, carried this improvement on up to the 
Hyde Park line, under an agreement with the city, they to 
do the work to the satisfaction of the City Engineer, and 
the city to pay them the sum of $6,000 ; culverts at street- 
crossings have been rebuilt or underpinned where good 
enough, and the channel excavated to the theoretical grade 



Street Department. 7 

of the improvement of 1880-84, and to a width, substantially, 
of 10 feet. 

Owing to the fact that this report covers a tiscal year, 
during which' the department was in charge of another 
Superintendent, except for a small pi'oportion of the time, it 
does not seem expedient or proper for me to enter into fur- 
ther discussion of the details of the work rendered possible 
and accomplished through his acknowledged ability and 
energy. 

The report of the Executive Engineer, which follows, 
alludes in details to all the special features of the work of 
the year, and shows the force emp oyed and the work under- 
taken, together with a valuable table of prices that obtained 
on a contract basis. Special attention might be called to 
the subjects of " Surface Drainage," " Street Cleaning," and 
" Smoke Nuisance." 

In addition to this report, five appendices are herewith 
submitted, in which will be found the reports of the several 
Deputy Superintendents, showing the expenditures of each 
division in detail. They are as follows : 

Appendix A — Bridge Division. 
" B — Paving Division. 
" C — Sanitary Division. 
" D — Sewer Division. 
" E — Street-Cleaning Division. 
" F — Former Superintendents and Document 
Numbers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. T. Wheeler, 

Sujperintendent of Streets. 



City Document No. 34. 



Boston, February 1, 1895. 
Mr. Bertrand T. Wheeler, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : I herewith respectfully submit the fourth 
annual report of the operations and expenses of the Street 
Department since consolidation, the same being a full state- 
ment thereof for the year 1894 : 

CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 
Expenses of the Central Office. 

For the current expenses of the Central Office the City 
Council appropriated the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000), to which was transferred from the Paving Divi- 
sion the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000), making a total 
of twenty-one thousand dollars ($21,000), which was ex- 
pended as follows : 

Salaries $17,236 67 

General office expenditures . . 3,647 &2 



Total $20,884 29 

leaving a balance of one hundred fifteen dollars and sevent}^- 
one cents ($115.71), which was transferred to the city 
treasury. 



Street Department. 



(0 5£ 

-a = . 

O Q 00 



■5 E 2 






OX5 r 



I M 



o oo 



O rH I' O O O t 

o CO ira -* o o o 

O i-l rH Tj. O O g 

Oc'rH*^ 



■* rl 



— ■Offi'MC^O-^00 
IMQ0(NC0O-a"*O 

t^ --0 Tf 00 O: CO t~ cs 
DOOCOOOiOCOt—eO 

i-^05^oo «^^'-^'* f-* 
o".--©" ■if t-^ -*'•-'" t-^ 

OOi-HC^r^tDOOOO 
■-' t- -* CO CO — 



T-HOOiOnOrhoO 

ff500f-iOT)<-fO 

I^OOCOOiCOt-os 
COOOifSiOCOt^C^ 
t-;_0 0_ :c "T i-H •* -*. 

cT oT r-T cT w rf oT — ^ 

CO»-''MOCO'MOOi 







CO 

b 




CO . 









■cb:e: 



00 

o 


(35 
CO 




3> 


CO 




^ 


O 




CI 


to 





o t- -^ 



•2Q 



4© 



"51 



••: « a "^ 2 
en o t t^ 






a o 





o 


o ^ t- 




O 00 ^1 


CO 






O 02"* 
















CO 











_o.S 



OO 

11 = 

•E ci) 



< 2 



4 3 

-a 

a o 



„ H 



o a ki , 
.2 S > • 



^ CS i" -. 

gi-ajM o 

^£ Mm 



,__, 


^ 


o o 


o 




c^ 


o 


o o 








(^ 


o o 


o 
























































^ 


^ 


^ 





t. o 
D. SO 

2 g o 



a o- 



cs-a 
j; 6 



Efc 
o o 



P-So.2 



O 00 CO 
o t~- ^ 



M 



■ O o > 
OfflCCOQ OQ 



2J - « - 



10 



City Document No. 34. 



Paving- Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Arklow 8t 

Baker st., Ward 23 

Bellflower st 

Blakeville st 

Blue Hill ave., paving 

Bond st 

Bumstead lane 

Bunker Hill st 

Bushnell st 

Charter st 

Commonwealth ave., construction 

Congress and L sts 

Cranston st 

Dartmouth St., Boylston st. to Commonwealth ave. 

Day St., "Ward 22, macadamizing 

Fay st 

Henchman st 

Lewis-st. extension 

Millst 

Millet St. 

Montview st 

Mt. Vernon St., grade damages 

Newport st 

Oak St., Harrison ave. to Washington st 

Park St., Charlestown 

Preston st 

Prince St., Hanover st. to N. Bennett ave 

Ruth st 

Second st 

Talbot ave • 

Thetford st 

Utica St., Harvard st. to Kneeland st , 



Carried forward 



Appropria- 
tions, 
Balances, and 
Traasfers. 


Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1894, to 
Jan. 31, I&94. 


Balances on 
baud J;in. 
31, 1895. 


$1,600 00 




$1,600 00 


1,350 40 


$1,350 40 




3,000 00 


3,000 00 




1,500 00 


1,500 00 




25,000 00 


25,000 00 




1,091 18 




1,091 18 


7,327 00 


7,327 00 




3,200 00 


372 15 


2,827 85 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 




4,800 00 


9 20 


4,790 80 


301,815 55 


1 301,624 47 


191 08 


14,700 00 


558 00 


14,142 00 


568 75 


568 75 




6,200 00 


5,839 65 


360 35 


7,500 00 


7,500 00 




1,408 82 


1,408 82 




3,000 00 




3,000 00 


2,500 00 


1,834 79 


665 21 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 




595 88 


595 88 




1,273 05 


1,273 05 




1,325 00 


1,325 00 




1,904 12 


1,904 12 




3,313 18 


3,313 18 




1,138 23 


1,138 23 




5,000 00 


5,000 00 




3,500 00 




3,500 00 


5,029 74 


5,029 74 




8,000 00 


7,065 69 


934 31 


27,372 00 


18,501 41 


8,870 59 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 




4,909 46 


4,909 46 




$456,922 56 


$414,949 19 


$41,973 37 



1 Draft of $5,450.91 reserved. 



Street Department. 



11 



Paving- Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropbiation. 



Brought forward 

Utica St., Kneeland st. to Beach st 

Van Rensselaer place 

"Warren St., Soley st.to Winthrop st., asphalting 

Washington St., Ward 25 

Whiting st 

Totals 



Appropria- 
tions, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



$456,922 56 

794 28 

450 00 

600 00 

38,000 00 

2,135 00 



$498,901 84 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1894, to 
Jan. 31, 1895. 



$414,949 19 
794 28 
450 CO 



6,848 88 
2,135 00 



$425,177 35 



Balances on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1895. 



$41,973 37 



600 00 
31,151 12 



$73,724 49 



Street Improvements. 



Object of Appeopkiation. 



Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 1 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 2 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 3 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 4 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 5 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 7 
Street Improvements, Aldermnnio District No. 8 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 9 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 11 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 12 

Street Improvements, Wards 1 and 2 

Street Improvements, Ward 3 

Street Improvements, Ward 4 

Street Improvements, Ward 5 

Street Improvements, Ward 6 

Street Improvements, Ward 7 

Street Improvements, Ward 8 

Street Improvements, Wards 7 and 8 

Street Improvements, Ward 9 

Street Improvements, Ward 10 

Street Improvements, Wards 9 and 10 

Street Improvements, Ward 12 

Street Improvements, Ward 14 

Street Improvements, Ward 15 

Street Improvements, Wards 17 and 18 .... 
Street Improvements, Wards 19 and 22 .... 

Street Improvements, Ward 20 

Street Improvements, Ward 21 

Street Improvements, Wards 23 and 25 .... 

Street Improvements, Ward 24 

Street Improvements, Ward 25 

Totals 



Appropri- 

tions. 

Balances, and 

Transfers. 



$12,200 00 

17,185 75 

1,115 98 

15,037 43 

537 82 

37,003 44 

3,346 -29 

10,169 29 

32,513 88 

15,-i67 04 

1,890 69 

12,470 26 

6,666 67 

6,666 67 

7,560 41 

7,000 00 

18,668 54 

13,000 00 

20,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,0u0 CO 

20,000 00 

11,882 88 

14,500 00 

11,500 00 

30,000 00 

15,000 00 

10,000 00 

11,765 00 

30,000 00 

28,000 00 

418 01 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1894, to 
Jan. 31, 1895. 



$12,200 00 
17,185 75 

1,H5 98 

15,037 43 

537 8-2 

23,522 78 

3.346 29 
10,169 29 
32,513 88 
15,267 04 

1,890 69 
10,498 69 

2,548 58 



6,109 06 

4,849 02 

18,668 54 

13,000 00 

12,448 08 



5,000 00 

20,000 00 

124 26 

11,303 45 

7,367 20 
12,341 94 
15.000 00 

9,.363 19 

11,765 00 

25,000 23 

28,000 00 

418 01 



Balances on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1895. 



$13,480 66 



1,971 57 
4,118 09 
6,666 67 
1,451 35 
2,150 98 



7,551 92 
5,000 00 



11,758 62 
3,196 55 
4,1.32 80 

17,658 06 

636 81 
4,999 77 



$431,366 05 



$346,592 20 



$84,773 85 



12 



City Document No. 34. 



Sew^er Division Specials. 



Object or Appkopeiation. 



Boylston St., " Surface Drains " 

Sewers, Brighton 

Sewer outlet, East Boston 

Sewer between Roslindale and W. Roxbury 

Sewers, South Boston 

Stony-brook damages 

Sewers, Ward 23, Washington st,, etc. . . 

Totals 



Appropri- 
ations, 
Balances, and 
Transfers. 



$1,600 00 

2,486 47 
1,800 00 

280 00 
2,348 05 
5,670 15 

591 29 



$14,775 



Expended 
from Feb. 1, 

1894, to 
Jan. 31, 1895. 



$1,600 00 
2,486 47 
1,800 00 

280 00 
1,081 80 
5,670 15 

591 29 



$13,509 71 



Balances on 
hand Jan. 
31, 1895. 



$1,266 25 



$1,266 25 



Bridge Division Specials. 



Object of Appbopriation. 



Berwick-park foot-bridge 

Boylston-st. bridge . . 

Broadway bridge 

Bridge improvements, Wards 12 and 13 

Chelsea-st. bridge, rebuilding 

Gold St. bridge 

Totals 



Appropriations, 

Balances, and 

Transfers. 



$5,115 17 

1,094 00 

499 37 

501 77 

30,000 00 

25,000 00 



$62,210 31 



Expended from 

Feb. 1. 1894, 
to Jan. 31, 1895. 



$5,115 17 

1,094 00 

499 37 

501 77 

11,585 08 



$18,795 39 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1895. 



$18,414 92 
25,000 00 



$43,414 92 



Laying Out and Construction of Highways. 

Expenditures. 



Sewer construction 
Street construction 

Total 



i $420,138 .58 
^70,661 5(3 

1490,800 14 



1 Draft of $441.10 reserved. 



2 Draft of $150 reserved. 



Street Department. 



13 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months 
ending- January 31, 1895. 



Object or Appropriation. 



Current Ex- 
penses for the 
twelve months 
ending 

Jan. 31, 1895. 



Special ! 

Appropriations.; 



Totals. 



Street Department : 

Central Office 

Bridge Division ........ 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street-Cleaning Division . . . 

Street-Watering 

Street Improvements 



$20,884 29 

130,137 21 

11,986 8.5 

715,608 62 

467,459 02 

304,133 40 

301,477 44 

87,169 08 



$18,795 39 



1425.177 35 



Laying Out and Construction of 
Highways 



Totals . 



346,592 20 
2 490,800 14 



$20,884 29 
148,932 60 

11,986 85 

1,140,785 97 

467,459 02 

317,643 11 

301,477 44 

87,169 08 
346,592 20 

490,800 14 



,038,855 91 $1,294,874 79 $3,333,730 70 



I Draft of $5,450.91 reserved. 



2 Drafts of $150 and $441.10 reserved. 



Street-building under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, as 
amended by Chap. 418 of the Acts of 1892. 



Street. 



Paving. 



Sewer. 



Totals. 



Arundel St., Mountfort st. to Beacon st 

' Batavia St., St. Stephen st. to Parker st 

' Bay State road, Deerfield st. to Sherborn st 

' Deerfield St., Commonwealth ave. to Charles river . 
^ Huntington ave., Copley sq. to Brookline line .... 

Ivy St., St. Mary's st. to Mountfort st 

1 Miner St., Beacon St. to Brookline branch B.& A.R.R., 

Mountfort St., Ivy St. to Audubon road 

Newbury St., Charlesgate West to Brookline ave. . . 
Norway St., Falmouth st. to Massachusetts ave. . . . 

Parker St., Westland ave. to Huutin!j;tou ave 

Sherborn St., Commonwealth ave. to Charles river . . 
St. Germain St., Massachusetts ave. to Turner st. . . 
Turner st., Haviland st. to Astor st 

Totals 



$3,048 26 

"411 02 

3,589 90 

2,658 19 

10 25 

8,302 22 

255 19 

4,367 24 

' 14,6S6 S6 



$564 24 



416 43 
130 28 



3,144 12 

53 65 

1,520 75 

'.1,207 63 



$3,612 50 

411 02 

4,006 33 

2,788 47 

10 25 

11,446 34 

308 84 

5,887 99 

23,954 49 



151 35 


1,561 43 


1,712 78 


21,805 37 


18,516 18 


40,321 .55 


10 75 


195 28 


206 03 


1,747 53 


789 25 


2,536 78 


13 00 




13 00 



$61,057 13 $36,159 24 I $97,216 37 



I'.uilt mainly in 189:!. 



- Draft of $150 reserved. 



14 



City Document No. 34, 



Street-building- under Chap. 462 of the Acts of 1892 and 
Chap. 439 of the Acts of 1894. 



Street. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Totals. 


Boylston at., Boylston road to Brookline ave 


$9,604 43 




' $9,604 43 


Totals . . < 


$9,604 43 


.to 604. 43 









Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills and cash deposited 
with City Collector for the year ending January 31, 1895, 
by the several divisions of the Street Department : 



Central Office 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Sanitary Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Bridge Division . 

Street-Watering . 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 



$20 


00 


17,268 


41 


96,727 


81 


41,820 


55 


8,163 


77 


1,598 


62 


906 


77 


597 


81 



$267,103 74 



Statement showing the amount paid into the city treasury 
during the same period on account of the several divisions 
of the Street Department : 



Central Office 






$20 00 


Paving Division . . . , 






52,836 10 


Sewer Division 






106,317 20 


Sanitary Division 






44,870 94 


Street-Cleanino; Division 






2,146 05 


Bridge Division , 






1,598 62 


Street-Watering . . 






295 25 


Boston and Cambridge Bridges 






597 81 

$208,681 97 



Street Department. 



15 



List of Contracts from February 1, 1894, to January 3i. 
1895, made by the Street Department. 



Paving- Blocks. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal rec'd. 


Price per M. 


Large paving-blocks, 300,000 , . . 


Rockport Granite Co., 


March 15, 1894. 


$66 70 



Spruce Lumber. 



District, 


Awarded to 


Sed. Price per M ft. B.M. 

1 1 


Price 

for 

Planing 

per M 

ft. 


East Boston .... 
Charlestown .... 
Brighton J 
Roxbury i ... 
City proper ) 


John W. Leatherbee, 

I Curtis & Pope ) 
( Lumber Co. . ( 


April 23, 1894. 


$15 75 
15 50 
(15 38 
]14 95 
(14 45 


$1 00 
1 00 
95 
95 
95 



Beach Gravel. 



DiSTBICT. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per 
ton. 


City 


Hugh Farrell 


March 19, 1894. 


$0 59 

delivered on 

wharves. 





Coal. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per ton, 
2,240 lbs. 


1,500 tons, Pumping Station, 
Dorchester 

1,500 tons, Pumping Station, 
Dorchester 


C. H. Sprague & Son . 

H. G. Jordan & Co.. . 
(Incorporated.) 


Mar. 10, 1894. 
Aug. 14, 1894. 


$3 27 
3 17 



Iron Casting's. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Proposal 
received. 


Price per 
100 lbs. 


Iron Castings 


Mechanics' Iron Foundry Co. . . 


March 23, 1894. 


$1 43 



16 



City Document No. 34. 



S 

•H 

s 
£ 

a 
9 
-S 
cc 
I 

IS 



Pq 



I— Ol OS iCi .s 

■* I-H — 00 3J 



OS en oi 05 



ft, <^ <| 



<1 ^ 



S .^ csa 



? ^ -3 



O « 



1 o 



,o C ft i> 
oj 3 « la 
M f^ « CB 



.i: a; 



2'« 

T3 es 



o o 
c' a 



Ona^ 



O&q 



._ _ It 



SfS^ 



1-2 « 
- Ma3 
c -r S 
V a'Sb 
•r o 

a n P 
." a o 

gfS 
M I 



Street Department. 



17 





a 








1 




b 










3) 





a 

















- tH 








a 


0) 






» & 


Cl< 






10 CO 


in 






M CO 


i-l 






d 









■» ^ 


^ 




■d 




• 






«) 










> 




















■3 


^ -* 






m 


m 01 





, 


^H 


rH i-< 


^ 


v 


"« 


-* co" 





:: 







'-' 




© 


0. 



r 


!> 


4) 

a 


CO 


Ph 




> >? 


t^ 


&X) 












s 












•fH 












>» 












h 












h 












e8 






_^ 















a 

5B 


c 






^A 




« 


n 






a 
6 
r 


a 









p. 


S 


s 






p. 


h4 


a 

,13 






^ 


d 









^ 


*j • 


■fJ . 






0) 


ID 


0) 








<D 


e • 


CD 




















■^ 


-g ' 


"g 








^ 


^ • 


.^ 










a . 


(O 






















i 


a ■ 


% 








;-< 


a> . 











E- 


H • 


P5 








i3 


g * 























p 


• 










;-. 


^ 









-«1 




<u ■ 
3 . 


a 








b: 













E-i 


X 


to * 


to 






J5 





a 


a , 


a 
1 










'> 
















*a 








5 


a . 


5 










;-< 










^^ 


.^ . 


■a 




















a 


a . 














C3 








b£ 


tfj 


^^i! 






a 


a • 


5 
















>. 1 




E"* 






- t 


J t<' M; 








•-X 


t-'C 


5 ^ 






5 1 


2^ 


* h 










3 






Of 


h~ 


Q> 


II 




a) 2 



as 



W g • 

QJ rt * 

^-c: o 

11 

O O „ 









18 



City Document No. 34. 



























■d 


-3 


"? 


13 




























3 


^ 




9-H 


























>> 

0) 


ca 

>5 


3 


!>. 


























^ 






p 


























cS 


































Oi 


C8 


3 


























;-< 

ft 

d 


3 
a* 

;-< 
ai 

ft 

d 


3 
O" 

a> 
ft 

d 


3 

ft 

o 
d 




o 






















^ 


^-^ 


^-> 


^-^ 




■s 






















P3 


ca 


n 


W 




PM 






















^-' 


^-' 




^^ 






v 


^ 


^ 


'C 


t: 


■p 


'j 


■d 


■d 


,-J 


■a 


-c 


T3 


^3 








^ 


^ 










^ 


^^ 






tH 


^ 








5 


c3 


C8 


cd 


S 


js 




« 


C3 


C3 


CJ 


ca 


ca 


«J 






>> 


>i 


^ 


>■ 






>■ 


>^ 


> 


>, >> 


>s >» !>> 1 






o 


f. 


o 




„ 


-J) 


a 


u 


o 


o 


o 


a 


o 


o 






































S 


,a 


2 


)o 


)q 




? 


J= 


2 


^ 


s 


2 


,o 


-O 








3 


3 


E3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


^ 


6J) 




o 




o 






O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 




;- 


'^ 


;_ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


tH 


^ 


•^ 


•^ 


t-t 


^ 


;h 


*> 






(D 


c 






<U 










a» 


o 




Q 


ca 




ft 


ft 


Q 


ft ft Ph 


p. 


ft 


ft ft ft 


ft ft ft 


ft 




o 


O 


j^ 


CO 


o 


»o 


o> 


CS 


OS 


t- 


tn 


o 


1^- 


(M 


2 




CS 




C3 


CT 




OS 


CO 


CS 


c^ 


c 


t^ 


r- 


Tt^ 


""J 




o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


(^ 


d 


d 


d 


c 


d 


<= 


o 


I— I 


"o 




«■ 


» 


« 


« 


« 


«■ 


€e 


^ 


«. » «. 


^ ■» «■ 


6D 

a 

'> 
o 

a 

a) 




s 


S 


3 


< 


^ 


2 


5 


s 


^ 


< 


^ 


^ 


< 


< 




^^ 


~~' 




""" 


































^ 


, 


^ 














-a 






























03 


a) 
































> 


















s 












1 


■« 


-t* 


-* 


"^ 


•^ 


■^ 


-tC 


-+ 


^ 


^ 


-Tt 


-* 


t 


- 


-J, 


^-^ 




Ol 




OS 


CS 


Ci 




Oi 


CS 


OS 


c 




OS 




CS 


m 


OJ 




s 








^ 


a: 




2 


^ 


I-H 


S 


^ 


2 


"cS 


to" 


co" 


d: 


c-: 


a 


-*" 


T)< 


-*" 


, -f 


-5t 


lO 


O 


c 


" i-T 




o 

o 


T-H 












^~* 


^~* 


^^ 




f"" 


(M 


c- 






>> 


>) 


>> _>^ >i _>> 


>> >s 


^ 'E, U 


ft ft += 




C3 










3 


a 


3 




a 


0) 


a) 


a 


O 




^ 


S 


>-s 


'^ 


>-= 


*^ 


»-5 


1-5 


1-0 


'^ 


QQ OQ 


M 


CE 




o 












> 




> 










-g 










-3 














q 






_^ 








03 


















"a! 






H 


"3 








a 




3 
1 




^ 


s 


a 




P 
a 


b 


a 


b 


p 

B 


C8 


P 


a 


o 


C 




< 


> 

3 
W 


o 
O 


> 

CM 


o 
O 

b 


<i3 
> 


o 


> 


O 

o 
b 


> 








c 


a) 
3 
o 

t-1 


bi 

.9 




1-D 


W 




P=^ 


c 


w 


a) 
o 


iii 


H; 


^- 


1 Hi 


c!i^ 


C 


p^ 


S 




1-5 


Pi^ 




e 


P 


fl^ 


P 


a 


'^ 


H 


3 l-i 


EC 


P- 


p^ 


a) 






o ■ 


t. 


1, 


o 


o • 






O 




P>s • 














03 


o 






k! 

H 


o 


"*"' 




P . 
C8 






a 
o 








^ ! 




a 


■s 


■fj . 


o 


o 


■s 










a 






o 


2 


o 
O 


^ 


o 


i 


3 '. 

o . 


2 




O • 






M 


5" 






-if^ • 


p 
o 
•T3 




M " 


a 








P ■ 






o 






^ 


9 ' 


o 


o 


P . 


o 

■a 

p 

o 
3 


•g ■ 


3 




• 2 • 

3 5D . 






=3 




Eh" 
O 

< 

cc 


o 
3 
S 




a 

05 

3 


M 

-3 


o 

5 

qT 

• 3 




■p . 


O 

5 


c 
|2 


1 P 
>s S 

■1 ^3 . 


c 


1 "5 

t 

> I 


. & 

3 "^ 

ca 

i s 

3 P5 

3 "2 

ca 

M 

4 bo 




o 
O 


a 
o 
o 

C8 
0) 
« 

a 

o 


o • 

p . 


O 



o 

p 

!> 
C3 


o 

p 

6 a 


o - 
i > ■ 

3 "^ 


3 

o 
> 

03 


3 
o • 

> 

CS • 


3 
O 

6 a 
> I; 

Cj 


c 
• c 

3 P 


i '2 ■ 

Q ^ • 

>s r " 

3 fe 


p: 
c 

c 


c 

I; 






"4-1 


5« 


^ 


■ ^ 


■ 5t 


6« 


^ 


^ 


^ -2 




a • 




- C 


3 'i 






J 


Ifl 


1 


"c! 


"3 ! 

(U r 


2 Ip 


"3 


s 


^1 

a; r. 


1 -f 


" » • 


c 


I P 


H iJ 






p 


^-3 


^ 


'. 1 


• ^7 


] P^-a 


& 


^ ! 


^f- 


I |: 


» t 


i *; 






o 


3 P 


a 


P 


3 r 


1 ° c 


p 1- 


p . 


3 5 




t: 












O 0^ 


o 


O 


o I 


s o 5 


O 


° -s 


'■ < 


•J 

1 




°, >> 






P 


11 


a 
a ■>■ 

o ° 


a 
j a* 


a? 


i is 


3 t 
o " 


. a Z 




i '- 


3 1 
a ca » 


^ 


; a 

ca 

- 5 






" 


A 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


f 


£ 


) C 


) <^ 


q 





Street Department. 



19 




ja • 



c8 

o 

2 

© 

p 


















>■ 


1 
































o 
















<c 
















.a 




















1 


S-H 


ii 


d 


d 


t*H 






1 J 


d 


.s 


e 


i 


^ 




d 


o 

ft 


S 1 £ S3 
ft ft ft ft 






a" =! 


o 


o 


o 




^ 






*■; 








,^ 






^ 


o 


o 


o 


d 


o 


«.» 




ft 


« 


« 


« 


«■ 


a 




o 


^ 


,Q 


^' 


^' 


^ 


a p 


V 


(^ 












>.o 




o 


o 


c 


;3 


3 


= 


ftcS 


£ 


"5 


^ 


^H 


<4-l 


«t 


*t 


M 3 

O 




& 


c< 


o< c< c o- ^'*-' 1 




OJ 












<« a) 




t: 




^ 






M 


• ° 






a> 


ID 


CD 






c o 




(D 


ft 


ft ft ft ft s-S 1 






to 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


^ dj 




4i 


o 


O 


O 


o 


O 


S J3 






o 


d 


d 




d 


ft+j 




C" « 


m 


m 


m 


« 


O ai 
















i-H a> 




^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


='■2 




p, "a 


"3 


'^ 


"c! 


"5 


^.2 




CO 


^ 


E: 


^ 


p: 


S 


- a 
■9 '~ 




o 






» 




CU 








-a 


■a 


-c 


X 


3*^ 




o 














m m 


o3 


m 


s 


s 


o 


•d 
































!> 
































0) 


-* 


-:*' 


iti 


•* 


■* 


-l< 


-+ 


<B 




o> 


o 


C5 


05 


o 








CO 


a 


OC 




CO 


































C8 




r-T 


^ 


^ 


^ 


J_ 


j_^ 


O 
















C 
















O 










+- 






u 




■■ O 


o 








o 


b 


OQ 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


o 




O 


6 


o 


o 


o 


o 


d 


o 


r^ 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


n3 


C 


§ 




J 


c 


c 


c 




S 


3 


iii 


!3 


s 


3 


^ 


"c 


n 




C 


c 


c 


a 












(L 






&: 




1-5 




•^ 




i-s 


»^ 


< 


tE 


w 


a 


ffi 


W 


K 


K 




!- 


^ 


u 


^ 


;h 


u 


t^ 






QJ 


a 


OJ 


a 








C 


a 


a 


s 




c 


□ 




',- 


i-> 


u 


Sh 










cS 


C3 


rt 


ci 


ci 


5 


cS 




^ ^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




















t-" 




^ 
















;- 
















<; 


















K 


,C 


QJ 














H 


T; 


n 














O 


5 


^ 

■^ 3 














o 




















t: 


3 "O 


B 








tn 




1 


q 














« 


< 


a 




a 


? 




^ 


1 M 


> 


c- 


" 




^ 




e 






; 7 




1 






d 


J « 




\ C 


« c 




0/ 




T 


3 "2 




f 


! C 











3 m 


;i 


1 ^ 


3 C 


; ^ 


cT 


J 



20 



City I^ocument Ko. M. 



;5 



1 

Ph 


ca 

a 


ft 



13 rn 
S « 

c3 
a ■" 


> 

"S 

■3 

p 

pli 


'3 

1-3 




■a 
a) 


6 
a 

a 




3 




P 
cS 
W) 


H 

<! 

c: 





c 
c 

c 
c 

c 

c 
ci 

C 
a 

2 





biD 



K 



iJD 



O 





















3 








? 








S 3 !>» 






Q> a> 






>» >» 1 




d 


-5 




^ E: jr 






^ -fj 










^i-i 




CL, 


t^ 
















3 3 ^ 






<u a) iH 






t^. >j 






^ J. 


ft 








m 






ft ft 






in b^ 






CO CO 






CO en !>)_ 






t-T ira" -* 






■€& m m- 




T3 






• 














.£; 

































-f -* 






Oi 


5 c- 






^ 


00 00 CO 






T-( »- 






« 












u- 




to 











<M 




a. 










p 


r 


^ 


^ 






5 a- 







(il 


►? p^ 


pq 

























■a 


r 








OJ 


c 


c 


. 




■a 










^ 


"S 


) > 


a> 




c8 


c 




□ 




<1 


c 


rf 


C3 






n 


c 









[X 


'£ 


5 






^ 




^ 








>> 












a 












_o 
























"o 












D 






1 






2 





































'!3 












1= 




































> 


^ 










i- J- 












0) c- 








H 




'S'c 













a) c 








3 




^ := 






K 




c 






H 




>H^ 












C3 . 

OS 


*c 









a 
« ja 

m a 

Ct3 








fl 


0^ 








C 













m 



^ 









eQ*" 


60 






W 


■S^ 


a 


















02 


^ 


1 





SB 
O 



© 

M 

c 

•iH 

o 
g 











C3 




01 




P>> 




aj 




(i) 


aj 







^ 






^ 




PL, 


tH 









^ 




a 




>. 




^ 




a) 




ft 














o_ 








^ 


■6 




a) 




> 






-* 




03 










I— 1 


t^ 












C3 


I-H 





J 


ft 


p 


p 


3 


£ 


2 















■a 












■p 






a> 


3 


n 


^ 


C8 


<(J 


Si 
CD 








1 




a 




^ 









1-5 


H 













< 




K 


.4J 


B 




K 


'n 





-f-> 





•S 




T3 
















W 




P 









■a 




&o 




a 












^ 




:a 


II 



Street Dkpartment. 



21 



6X) 



fi, ::i, a & a 



Oi ^ a G^ 



^ )S ^ 



6 


o 


6 


d 


d 


d 


u 


(J 


o 


O 


U 


o 


ht) 


hfl 


60 


an 


bn 


bi) 


a 


C 


C 


a 


P 


a 


> 


^ 


> 


> 


> 


> 


trt 




a 


C3 




a 




P-. 


Ph 


CL, 


Oa 


O, 


^ 


a 


;S 


— 


a 


a 



a c a a a, a 
^ ^ ^ ^ <1 -< 



m pq pa pq ffl p5 



2 H 



2 s t: 



53 a 3 



ca o o o Q o 



Sac 

Oh 





T 


t: 




T3 


t: 


■c 




















c 


c- 





IS 


c 






>a >> >= >5 


>, >i 1 


CD 










d. 


o 






















fl 


C3 





C3 


Ph 








3 






J-i C 


-. CJ* CT* 


o< CT 1 










(E 




aj 






















a. 




a. 


O 1 




c 


-, & a a 


a a 1 






i^ 


u- 


o 








!N 




<N 


(N 


C<1 






IM 


(N 


■M 


e-i 


r^ 


C^ 




«■«■€»€& 


m m 


•a 




























&• 




































-H 






s 


o- 




a- 




?r 




































u- 




t- 


cr 












•"^ 






p 
pli 


>a >. >> -S 

S S i-s 02 


C 


O 


o 




























-a 














CD 












































< 


O C 


o 


c 


o 


^ 


C 


O O O 


C- 


O 


<J 


.iS <ii <a 


<ii 


c> 


<;« 




a 




a 


a> 


a 


<u 


















c 


o c 


o 


C 


o 




o cb e 


i) 


C 


C5 




tc 


W d: 


w 


n 


ra 










1^ 


9 














C3 


W 














^ 
































<1 


^ 














O 


















« 














o 


j:5 














bo 


O 














a 
































J3 


0) 






H 










3 
































c! 






« 




b 


) 










Eh 
















13 
O 
O 








3 
O 




3 
c3 












a rt 












> 


°l 


1^ 






c 






«l 


O 




c 


>< c 




m 


o 




c 
c 




- 


a 


^ *- 




t 








-rpi 


r 






c 


' " 


t:'^ 


0) 






^ 


li 






■5 

< 


' 



22 



City Document No. 34. 



eg 

S 
> 

0^ 



o 


o 

o 


o 


d 

03 


d 


* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


* 


£ 


o 


b 


cb 



«^ €» «. 



o 


o 


2 


o 


CO 

o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


H 


s 


s. 


s. 


H 


c. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 
4© 


o 



-!j <1 <j -d <^ 



o o o o o 



^ a 



H M 



;^ o Q H W 



^ S 



aosD 
a a 






^S; 



bo tm 



tc IS 

ftp, 



I 

c 









ii 








"S o 








S^S 








"S 1^ 
















3E 








02 
















ga 








•"IT 








*J ^w 








4-1 . 








•Sti 








§^.H 








ffl o 








O ft:2 


«j 






ao b 








r-^ 3 


(1, 






to ^ M 

o .a 
-g's 




O O -g B P. 
• . 'SO o 






5 § ^d d 




^- CO- <j«^ 




^ « C> 


-d 






• • 


OJ 








_> 
















o 
o 

2 


M •* tC 


o> ffi ro 


CO OO 00 














C5 








O (33 OJ 


o 




o 




o 




= 






TS 
"? 


c 


5 









<> 


5 




& 


d 


fr 


o 


<1 


c 


,> 


CQ 




t 


fc 


T. O 




H; 




o 






£ 


a 




a 


•- 


a 




'-: 


C 


' - 






c 










<a 










« 










a 










o 






























CS 










^ 










o 




















a 










o 








































•a 






H 




T3 






o 




C3 






EH 




c 






B 










O 
C 




to 


■s 






a 


J3 






_o 


3 






o 


P3 






ElH 


m 






«M 


ft 




"S 


"5 a 






■g 


gf2 


•a 




3 
O 


S-^ 


a 






0.2 








< 


"a 


II 



Street Department. 



23 




(M 

Ci 









bJD 



O i-l 



£. E^ 







• "CM 


H-^ 


2 o 




r^» 


o* 


d* 


*^ 


-»--. 




^S 


^:^ 


^S 


O^ 


o^ 


o--- 












.«o 


ira ° 


.0"= 




(M ^ 


tM Tjl 


.N ^ 


o*^ 


o«» 


o<^ 



a a. a 



'd a) 

S a 



a o 

C3 o 



c3 O 



53 


^ 3 




|2 


(« 4) 


rtJ:i 


CJ 3 


«'3 


£3 








a 2 


^S 


bop 




*-ij 


s 


t: a 




C3 ^ 




C8 


S,S 


bna 




II 
















fi 


a 




•n-^ 


.00 


•a <u 


'^ '3 


pm 


3J2 


fl r 


a r 




«S1 


C3 t^ 


M"" 


SB- 


tJO • 


bUw 


a t>, 




.y-/j 


n t' 


la 

•^ 3 












3^ 


tf^ 


3 fl 






H §^ 



24 



City Document No. 34. 







l^ 




S 1 






d d 






m m 






^^ '-^ 






fe ^ 






s_^ ^^ 






.„ 






to o 






o o 












m- 4e. 






^-^ '-^ 






Q Q 






^ — . ^^ 






.^>re 






Ol o '^ 




6 


•* <Mo 




•^ 


o d^ 




cS 


«■ »^ 


























;s4s^€ 






'°"'~: — -1" 






o*-o» 






^^»«&^ 






'-^'^ '—^,-^'"5 






m-sm"" 












ira o 






.«C^ -C) 






, • o o • 






".§=^2^ 






o "^ '^ 






S'T'^©*--- 






^ciJ^^e 






<i^:^'^^ 






— 




■73 






O 






> 








* * ' 




a 


-^ rt* -* 






Cl OJ Ol 






CO OO CO 










as 


t— t-T I-- 




o 


. . 'M 




2 


bsi bi) • 
= P o 




0^ 


< < O 




o 






a 




■a 
a 

;-< 
a 


O'Leary 
O'Leary 
Ferguso 




< 


herty & 
herty & 
imby & 










OOP 






fi Q O* 




















a 








o 






C3 


rt 















.3 


o 














1) 


a 




H 


^ 


S 




O 


o 


.2 




< 








03 




(U 




O 


6 
> 






O 


n 
o 


C3 






M 


C3 






.9 S il 






uut 
ing 

St., 


















*5 a 2 






ot. o S . 
s- £ ir 






«J p CD 






.i4 S (i 






i-l -t^ 






a X ^ 






p. 


.P£ 


m II 







(M 






Oi 


^ 




X 


o 




iH 


o 






G 




(<H 


§ .1 




© 






4^ 


oc a) tH 
a- -c o 





< 


- bn.2 




^ 




(M 


Saw 


■3 


© 


hj)-C bi) 




F-^ 


a a g 


Xl >> 


fl 


■■S ^s-r; 




u\ set 
ricks 
nd la 
ravel 




CS 


■^■s 


QC 


5.0 s so 


si t>. 


iH 


an OD bJ) bj) 

a B .9 .2 


F-o 


^ 


furnish 
furnish 
furnish 
furnish 


^5 


eg 


°^^5 


a g 





-J'a'6'a 


>> 


•^^ >^>,>, 


!K a> 


pO 


.S o'o>a 

— m m 


bu a 
-a 




<D 0) 0) 0) 


II' 


CD <D a> a> 


0) 






■E -e; r -s 


Sh'^ 


ptiaH&^eL. 


•ss 


s 


MM 




cS 


f^cis'^;^ 


■^ 





^ aS 

■sgS 

a 0} (£ 



O OJ ^ 

bo ■" 
a bobfi 

■n .9 .5 
S'S'o 

^a a 
cu'2,'2, 

-« 9 9 

cS bfj bo 
bDg.9 

c«a'3 



-J 

u 

Oo 



CB a) o m o 

O o c ^-'U 

'S ■£! "C JH 

PhPhI1( Ph 

III I 

<1wo P 




o S p" a k! a G~ 
^, 9 ^'a-S'ji'^'' 

- 2 '^ 1-1.^ • T3 
"^ -" H 2 ~ 5 

(S't-i^ ii i, a 



• ^, a rt o "^ 

-.9^.2 " a- 
-y S • •> > .&» £ 

"en 3 oi .9 ^^ 3 
m — '"o a dfe 
^ a 'S '"' ^-^ a 



g— t. a -tj 
o o <D p- a^ 

a^l^Ss 
o C'ao _ 

•r; S o «» t- g 

<1 s^-s^ 



bj^ 



.0 -^ (U 



§"'0.9.9'''- 

.t; «x! J? tH o «( 
^*-t > — , aj a aj 

.9.M o «S.S.i 



o ■-- i- g N a 
to .0 0) a [vT . .^— 

a -a » a> g 
^<:^ 3 • ' a =: 

"§Sft-s1'-S 






o d ? 2 

S 5 '^ S _^'T3 
a-^ g ■- £ 9 S 

aSftS-Ǥi 
CT aj • . „ a o 

^ . 3 > a; 

5"«> ie'h'o o as 



a2'^ «- a 

.<°. .-*^ a £ a 

-* >^« 3_ o 

■^ a - a.a S 

.w a> o c» ^ a 

; o £ =^ " '"" 

' a a)"* jj >< « 



-«« 



^% 



Street Department. 



25 



fl a fl 



3 CJ 






£fe.2.2-H5US.o:^.2.2. 
£ T3 S ■ ■ "a 5^ ■ I- — ^ ' '- 

.2 nTI ^^ ^^i-2Sl 2^g • 
S > o«.2 ;^ a "C^ o .^-g 2 

p C-=: --S ao g o §--0=: -^ 

•r^ ^ ,-*^ P . -^ ^>. >3 • '. IE 

? (u . o-a .M So ^ <i> 0) a o 
" a— -S— .„2o. Soa« 

_ .. a O 2 S ^ d D « o" 2 -C a -*■ g,^ g tf 



O 



a <" .g o a o 

a <p --^a'^ 
o fe ^ife o 

ca CD , .. {3<^ 
ca (-V— « oj ra ^^ ^ 
o .g<— -S " '^'i 
« S-t. a M "^ 
Q a)— « -- a 

.dS' 



^ - d S -3 3 2 



•A a 

..oq 



(o a > 



p. • a. 
a a J 
"^ "" ar 
coo 2 

l-H " — J 



cD-«r-i. a a £ 
,A p.-a .2 " S o 



^■o 13 ±1 S ra g 
JO aj p T3 " o J5 
op tc ^4-1 a ^ 



«- 



^ 


■^ 


-' 


-' 


894 ... 

1894 . . . 
1894 . . . 


"-< 


■• 


oT § e^ 1 


>, >. >. 1 






1 ^ ^ 


o 


o 


O 


O 


a 


a 


.2 f 


.2 


t; c 


<3 


o a 


o 


p = 


P 


;- 


ti 


) j- 


o & 


P 
o 


2 * 


o 








c 


> 


■» "a 


c 


A 


a 


c 


1 


.2 








« 




« 


!z 


C 


»> |2i 


> 


p 


o 




C3 


P 








o 


p 




P 

o 


S 


o 




ii 


o 


ta 




M 


© 




P 


m 


n 












P 


>, 






p 


i-, 






w 




m 




• 




aj 




■s 


m 


T3 

p 








P 




(U 








(2 


i-i 


< 




• 


" 


p 




p 


a 


.2 




o 


o 


















a 




o ■» 




p 




<u > 


a 


a 




p c: 


a 


o 




il 


a 
o 








c 




•a t. 


'2*^ 


■a 


p o 


§1 


p 
a 


a 
u p 
a o 


^2 


a)"« 


1^ 


OQ 


C/J 


OQ 


1 



26 



City Document No. 34. 



M 
CO 



f-l 









~^ II 




j: 


%< 




e 


§<J 




ffl 


<U sJ. 




§ 






o 


d'' 




^ S« 








|V 






4h 


^'1 




c 


Co 






— o 


Q 




o 


o 


-+ 


.OCO 


ts 


o 


o 




^cd II 










^ 


-J3 .^"0 












^ ;i!^ 






5 o cS 




o^ m^ a) II 






^ "^^o 




o 


^ o o 




^-^ «^a" M 






,< ^o^ 




c 


^ 0— » 






^^ 


■d 






.£; 












'S 


Tf 


^ 


a> 


c- 


Oi 














c4 


CC 


>o" 


o 


(N 




ft 


>. • II 


p 












£ 




o 


o 
















•73 








0) 


'a 






T3 


c 








c 




< 


C 


.a 

3 




"c 


<J 




a 






e 


-^ 




3 






< 






o 






-t^ 






>1 


^ 




> 


rH 




M 


-a 






3 




■s 


^ 










o 


-t-S 














H 


n 


C3 


o 


3 


^ 


<i 


o 


a 


§ 


o 


iz; 




iz; 


o 


n 


- 


O 


o 


a 




'■§ 


.2 




CI 


s 




a 


p 




o 


o 




"•c 


o 






o 




13 C 

a - 


V- 




03 c 


i 




g| 


o 




^■5 


^ 






a 


11 





^ 


-7,-=^ 


C8 


o p ■§ 


^ 






O ft^ 


fH 


oS'<i 


cS 




^— '■^-'''■— ' 


H 








4) 




C? 



5 03 
1- 




O.S 




.ss 


m 


— .o 


4) 


tcja 


^ 


*" d 


® 


T3 g 


02 



.2-Q,J 



OHM 












A 








ce 






cts 








v 






s 
























c 















' 






>o' 








^ 






CO 








«. 






^ 






















M 






w 






















>-. 














^ 






^^ 








*4-l 






<;»-■ 








a 




,c 


s 


ji 


.d 








ca 







C3 




^ 




OJ 


f-. 





0) 




ft 

















.2 







05 





d 


d 


(5 


1—i 




m 


l-H 


«■ 


^ 


m 


-6 


,_^ 


^ 




^^ 




Q 


a! 


tvl 


ft 


g 


M 


















iS 


.Q 


M-< 


^-^ 


^ 


^ 




s 



0) 


_p 


a 


d 


p 






a 






^ 













(H 


© 






ft 






ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 























(N 


m 


IM 







p 




rSt 


._.* 


^ 


^ 


1-4 




«. 


3 


^ 


» 


<& 


4^ 
























W 


fi 





■d 










• 




a) 














> 




























■3 














(U 


■* 




•* 


Ti< 


^ 


^ 








0^ 














CO 






"S 























































oi 


ft 

















n 




d 


fl 


a 


p 


^ 


ca 




« 


cS 


c3 


03 


Ph 


►^ 




i-s 


l-= 


i-s 


1-5 




fi o 









o o 



^o ^ ^ 



■r) S 



02 ai 01 



Street Department, 



27 



H iJ 



ij -^ 



-ij hJ 



£■ ^ w S" S' w 



O Q Q 



^•.J 




•^ 


t^ 


i&'~' 


^ 


CO 


rn 




*» 




* 


o-y 


w 


w 


3 




^"^ 


^~-^ 


'^^ 



c ■=< 






W M 



P, a X, 



ft O o 



4=! a> 


• '• 


.-, 


.^ 


.-. 


































a 


iz! 




r- 












j;* 




u 


T| 


T 








0) 




"hJ 


a 


^ 


j:^ 














01 




rH 


to 




S^ 


•» 


^ 


f© 


^ 




,_^ 


^^ 


^-^ 


.—^ 


5 " 


o 


« 


P 


w 



Oi Oi <^ 



CO CO T^ 



E=< < 



P ft 



« « ca -5 



I ^ P^" 



>^ o 



o ^ 



p 








^ 






^1 




2 


00 


•0 to 


a 


c 


" m 


rr 


CJ 


"c 


o 





5 




.a 

1-3 


^ 1 


ja a 







a 
ft 


y 1 

•-5 H 



El 


. o • 
i « ■ 


a 
o 

'Si 

la 


>> 

5 

q 




e4 




• 


2 




a" 

> 
< 



>1 

3 



Pi 






g • 
p . 

3 . 





a 



• 

c . 


a • 
^ '. 




a 

3 



z~, 
(Q 



-p 


1 








> 


• 






a 

2 






> 


'~ M 
- 


^_ 


M 


a 
• 


p 

< 


; 


5.2 ■ 


c: 






11 ' 


3 




m 


^ 






i<^ 




^_^ 


6B . 


^ 




m 


g o • 
^ o ■ 




.^ 


P ' 

a . 

. 






T3 

a 





> 




02 


a - 
^ 2 


2 


a 


g 
S 


3 . 


•a 



P-i 


s 


Is 


o -g • 


o 


c 


a 


a ■ 


a 



^ 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a." 


a t- 




a 1- 


a 




a 






■3 




.2 


1 


01 







_o 


.2 


i- 

uT3 


s£ 





QJ 




.2 


.2 




c c 


2 








W) 




OJ 


0^ 




0) j: 






5>ja 


a 




V 












a 


a 




a 




a 




§« 


a 




a 


a 


o-c 










j^b 











a 



a 


a 


S^ 


a 


5 

"ft 





a 


a 


«> . 













F- 







i 




u 


^^ 










^S- 


•B 5 


•0 


•c 


□ 




T3 > 


> 73 


•7- 


•a 


■d "" 


■a 


T3 - 


-o 




T) 




a 


a 




a 


= 


a 


a «^ 


«S 


a 


i=> a 


a 


a 


a 





















« 




C3 


aS 


a . 


a! 


« 














13 










^ t>> 


^a 
























Is 


V 




0) 






V 3 
^ft 


01 0. 






1 o ^ 


S^ 


g 




fc 


t; 


^ 


E: 


E: 


r,^ 


^r 


tJ 


is ^: 


^ 


^ 



ta oi CO 



CQ CH «j VJ 



28 



City Document No. 34. 



.-a 



5'°'- ►< 



o . ^^ 



HfeWJ 



(D O) OJ QJ 
T3 n3 --a T3 
5 3 ^3 n 



'O -^ TS T^ 

G a a fl 

« c3 c3 c3 



c3 rf c3 c3 
> > > > 
<S (S c3 c3 



<1> O OJ 0) 



(M r-l — IrH 

I I I I 











o 


















Oi 


01 






'~^ 


o 






o 




Ol 






■* 


Ol 






U5 




«» 


«& 


■d 






o 






> 














-c 


•* 




o 


O! 






QO 






rH 1 








OS 


oT 


'^ 


o 


"-I 




ft 


;^ 


>. 


p 


». 


t8 


fu 


< 


IS 




6 








o 






o 








■4J 










tu 






a) 

T3 


a 






;^ 


s 








iJ 


^ 


< 


»2 


C3 




ca 


^ 




O 


03 




^ 


.s 




d 






B 








O 

















« 








t< 








K 








o 








O 










^ 






s 






_2 








3 






as 




p 






Pi 










M 


a 


3 1 



Street Department, 



29 









,2 o 






CO 03 

6 1 



O 2 






o ^ 


_ 


^^ 


a 


^5 


a 


a a 


" A 


°o 


«o 


0,0 


■ 


Wo 


_^Ph 


"5- 


® Ph 


>jOS 


mM 


"3 a 


>>'^ 




■ci r 


i;o 


oW 


■^^ 


^^ 


a^ 


Aif>^ 






sf^ 


K"f^ 



< 



t^ CO Cl 



!s ;a 



<1 !zi 1^ 






J3 ^ 






= S 




H ft 



CQ 



W O 



Is 



— — ^ 



O "/^ 
O Qy o 

n ^5 3 

■? pM 
o o ^ 

gr « 

<u « • 

• a« 

<" o • 
~°X 

pA 

§ rtffi 



«« a 



a; 


>> 






Ph 
















C3 


if 



£1, CU 



n: <i> 



e Q :-H 



fa 



•^ 5 


a 


*^ ai 


Oj 


''^ " . 


a 


■^ o 




a >.o 








w 


H^ 




bn'-'-i 


o 


a • 


ja 


■pw 


n 






ay- 




K 





o ° 






15 






« 9 



30 



OlTY i)OCUMENT No. 'di. 



^. £ 


". i 


>.^ 


>.^ 


«— c 


«_ 


p.© 


ftu 








SB C3 


° h. 


a h 



•ri an .s bo 



— q -; c 



~ o — a 



"Sp^ ■wi "Ea V^ 





■^50 














::^^' 


lo'-^ 


o-^ 




«&.2 


^•s 


a 


„ a 




S3 


m 3 




J3 .., 


,Q .„ 


^ .„ 




Ot3 


■2U 

0) >>» 


^ >» 


Q) >5 


;-< ■ 


O CI 


o w 




P m 




O I, 


o 3 


SS 








a§ 


SS 


Sg 


!-!0 


Slo 





^.w s,» p,» a"^ 

o m" o m" o m 2 2 
lO-^ lO-^ OH-- "=.g. 

^.^ >.t^-^ >>«■=. >>^-^ ^ 
' -tc^ -it^ -bc-:, -bi)4. 

ooa»o^QJooajoo5;j 

P^o P^o f^'O ^"^ 

^po P^flo Kiao c^ dO 

g C3^5 cs€©g rt<^g «€& 
1-3 1-1 OQ GQ 






tc 


I 




(T 


•d 








* o 


C3 


O • 




o 


oT ■ 








Q) 


,o 














O . 


• § 


o 
a 
o 


o • 


« 




03 




a 


a . 


o 




o 


-o 




^ 


. g 


a 


a 


i .o -»- 


"o . 





so 



m O 








■^^ 


,i4 o 


^ a 


-S o 


o ■£ 

3 a 


2 » 


■^ o 


3 o 


a o 






CD . 










si" 

bJ)M 


11 
bBg 


'3 ■£ 
ati<u 


bOI-3 


a r 


^ w 


^t;i 


ja r 


















P n 


&^ 


^ p 


^ a 


bJD O 




bcO-i 


bJlSB 


It 

C3 •'- 






1^ 


^ 


Ph 


fM 


fM 



pq 



p 


























o 














































































QJ 




























lO 


vo 


urs 


>o 






o 


r-i 




lO 


rH 


lo 


a> 


r- 1 




I— 1 


1— < 






r- 1 


CC 




I-H 


C» 




o 


r^ 


,—1 


r_^ 


r-i 




^^ 


,^ 


o 


P_j 




O 


o 


^ 


€» 
























P-i 




















































« 














































































<u 




























■* 




-+ 














_f 




-* 




























C3 




2 




s 


s 






rH 


cc 




S 
























^ 




„ 


P< 


























^ 


^ 


„ 


„ 


^ 


„ 


„ 




IM 


C^ 


(M 


<M 


Ph 


o< 


ft 


ft 


p. 


a 


H, 


a 


a 




bo 


bo 
P 


> 
O 




OQ 


CO 


GQ 


m 


OQ 


GQ 


OQ 




^ 


< 


o 




















































T3 


























0) 


























-a 


























ca 


>. 






























a 


m 


O 


c 


P 




a 










1^ 


p 


c3 


rP 

bo 

W 


o 
Q 
o 


p 

p 


_bp 

5 


p 

_C3 


<u 
p 
p 


p 


P 
a 


3 
1^ 




73 

p 

c3 
M 


p^ 


"3 


t-5 
P 


_3 

a 


s 


a 


t4 

CD 

a 


a 

.s 


Ph' 


a 




< 


w 


S' 


PR 


a 


^ 


^ 




^ 


w 


^ 


<1 






• 








• 






a) 


a) 


• 


(D 






, 








, 








bn 


bn 






















-o 


T! 


-o 


■a 








































































,i3 


S^ 


A 


rP 




o 


0) 


<u 


© 


CD 


0) 


o 


ta 


fl 


a 


a 


g 








t> 


t> 


t> 


> 




> 


















C5 
CO 




m 


a 


fe 




PR 


pR 




































O) 


GJ 


0^ 






bn 


bo 


bn 


60 




p 


3 


P 


a 


3 


3 


3 


3 


CS 


n 


C3 


i5 




,a 


■a 


ja 


Si 


,4 


S3 


^ 


■P 








o 




























C8 




cS 


a 


C3 


CS 


C3 


CS 


O 
o 


u 

o 


U 
o 


O 
o 




cS 






cS 






C3 












<1 


3 


a 


;^ 


IS 


^ 


;s 


§ 


S 




■a 


T3 


-a 






o 




o 






O 




C3 


C3 




5 


H 






















O 


q 


o 


*^ 


"S 


-J 


*^ 


^ 


^ 


*^' 


*: 


Pi 


K 




P3 


o 


o 


p 
o 

bn 


p 

o 
bii 


p 
o 
bo 


P 
O 

bo 


p 


P 

o 

bn 


p 
o 
bn 


O 

o 


o 

u 


O 

5 


o 

O 




p 


p 


p 


p 




a 


.H 


p 


f=l 


q 


a 


a 










t^ 






u 


;-< 


o 




o 


o 




< 


< 


<1 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<j 


=n 




*+H 


SH 






« 


aj 


CD 


v 




6 


QJ 


6 




3 


aj 




> 


> 




P> 




> 


> 


1> 


t> 


> 




t> 




CS 




;« 




C3 


a 




cS 


C3 










Si 


•a 


si 


jq 


A 


si 


Si 


^ 


S3 


^ 


,P 


XI 






























a 


« 


c3 


a 




cS 


a 


C3 


a 


nl 


(3 


ci 






0) 




» 




0) 






0) 


a; 








^ 


^ 


^ 


E: 


^ 


& 


^ 


is 


& 


1* 


i* 


^ 






p 


P 


p 


P 


p 


a 


P 


p 


P 


P 


a 






o 




o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




c 


3 


fl 


g 


s 


a 


S 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 




a 


fl 


R 


S 


s 


s 


y 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


O 


(J 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


U 


U 


a 



Street Department. 3i 



Employment of Labor. 

During the year ending February 1, 1895, 24 applica- 
tions were made upon the Civil Service Commission for 28 
employees of various grades, and 45 names were sub- 
mitted by them, of which number 27 were given employ- 
ment in the several divisions. 

Of the 24 applications 3 were for promotions, two being- 
allowed by the Civil Service Commission. 

The rule of the Civil Service classifying bridge engineers 
and assistants went into effect October 1, 1894, and upon 
October 29, 1894, the names, rates of wages, etc., of the 
17 persons so employed in the Bridge Division were for- 
warded to the Civil Service Commissioners. Durino- the 
year 21 persons were transferred to this department from 
other city departments, and notices of 94 discharges from 
the department rolls were sent to the Commission. 

The department records show that there are 2,434 persons 
eligible for employment in the various divisions, and of that 
number 2,100 were upon the pay-rolls endino- January 24, 
1895. 

The following table shows the classification of all em- 
ployees of the Street Department as at present organized : 



32 



City Document No. 34. 



Grade and Number of Employees in the Street 
Department. 





DiTISIONS. 




Title. 


Central 
Office. 


Paving. 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Street. 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge. 


Total. 


Superintendent 


1 












1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


Executive engineer 

Purchasing agent and assistant . 
Clerks 


1 

2 

1 


1 












2 


8 
12 

26 
6 

2 


5 
11 

9 
19 

3 
10 

2 

5 
13 

1 
13 


4 
4 
6 


1 
11 

12 


1 
3 
3 


20 




41 






56 






25 












5 












10 














2 














5 














13 






2 
17 


8 
1 






10 






2 




21 






13 












4 
2 
1 


4 








24 






26 












1 










1 




1 






17 


7 
6 


2 


20 


46 






6 












21 
33 


21 














33 








1 






1 








16 


7 


17 


23 






13 


16 


46 






3 




3 








6 
4 


6 














4 
















Carried forward 


5 


104 


156 


44 


36 


106 


451 



Street Department. 33 

Grade and Number of Employees, etc. — Concluded. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Centra 
Office. 


Paving 


Sewer. 


Sani- 
tary. 


Sireet- 
Clean- 
ing. 


Bridge 


Total. 


Brought foncard 


5 


104 
2 


156 


44 

3 

171 

3 


36 


106 


451 

5 

232 






61 


















2 
2 
329 
3 
2 
31 
1 
1 




1 


3 
















389 




149 


1 


868 
3 
2 

31 
1 
1 
3 

25 
5 

34 
9 
1 
3 


















Masons (stone and biick) . . . 


































3 
5 








Messengers 


2 


5 
5 


6 




4 


Oilers 






34 












1 

1 
3 
2 


2 




6 


Pilot . 


















Plank-drivers 
















3 














2 
4 








2 
28 
6 
1 






n 

6 


7 






Steam-drillers 








1 

4 

1 

11 

12 








Stone-cutters 




13 








Store-keeper 










1 

295 

33 

3 

5 

22 


Teamsters 




67 
11 
3 
4 
5 


153 
4 


62 
2 


2 
4 


Watchmen 




Weighers 




Wharfingers 




1 
2 








Yardmen 




12 


3 










7 


660 


582 


405 


322 


124 


2,100 









34 



City Document No. 34. 



Complaints. 

The following is a complete list of all the complaints en- 
tered on the complaint book at this office since February 1, 
1894: 



Whole number of complaints 



131 



Divided as follows : 
Pavino; Division 
Sewer Division 
Sanitary Division 
Bridge Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Street- Waterino; Division 



5 
4 

97 

8 

17 



Total 



131 



Street Department. 35 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 



The Northern District headquarters are located on War- 
ren bridge, and there is ample room in the building and 
pier which is occupied by them for such horses and teams 
as are necessary for the work, and storage capacity enough 
for such tools, blocking, gearing, etc., as are demanded in 
carrying on the repairs. 

The territory covered by this district on general work 
embraces all the bridges under the charge of the Bridge 
Division from Winthrop to Watertown. 

The headquarters of the Southern District are located on 
Foundry street, and comprise" an office of limited size, which 
is also used as a storehouse in lieu of something better, and 
yard room under the bridge. During the process of 
strengthening Broadway bridge, for its use by the electric 
cars, the stable and storehouse belonging to this district 
were entirely demolished. 

A part of a stable on Dorchester avenue was rented to 
tide over the intervening time during rebuilding, but action 
on permanent location was postponed from time to time be- 
cause of certain propositions of land exchanges between the 
Board of Street Commissioners and the Old Colony Rail- 
road officials. 

These are still in abeyance, and it is to be hoped that in 
the near future a definite understanding will be arrived at, 
as the Southern District badly needs a building and land 
where they can have proper accommodations for an office, 
stable, and storehouse. As they are situated at the pres- 
ent time, they have no facilities. 

The territory of this district reaches from the city proper 
to Milton, and covers all bridges south and east of the 
Charles river. 

Both districts have telephone connections, and both forces 
can be concentrated quickly whenever it is necessary. 

The most important of the tide-water bridges under the 
care of the Bridge Division are twelve (12) in number. Of 
these, Chelsea North, Chelsea South, Charles river, War- 
ren, L street. Congress street, and Broadway are operated 
by steam-power. Two are equipped with electricity — 
Dover street, which has a General Electric motor, and 
Federal street, which has a Thompson-Houston motor. 

Maiden and Mt. Washington avenue are worked by hand- 
power, and Meridian street by horse-power. 



36 City Document No. 34. 

During the rebuilding of Dover-street bridge, Broadway 
and Federal street were taxed to their uttermost, and re- 
.quired constant attention. Warren-street bridge, in point 
of travel of all kinds, is the most important of all the tide- 
water bridges in Boston. 

The establishment of the Boston & Maine R.R. freight 
yards on the Charlestown side of the channel has augmented 
the traffic on this bridge greatly, and many times it has 
been called upon to do the work of both Charlestown 
bridges. Some idea can be gained when it is considered 
that during the closing of Charles-river bridge not less than 
ten thousand vehicles, not including car service, daily used 
that thoroughfare. All work done on this bridge, where 
travel is liable to be impeded, is performed on Sundays. 

Charles-river bridge has been overhauled and repaired 
during the year, and will relieve somewhat the immense 
strain on Warren bridge. A new bridge cannot be too 
quickly decided upon. Work is progressing rapidly on the 
new bridge from Chelsea to Charlestown. Chelsea-street 
bridge from East Boston to Chelsea is nearing completion, 
and will be opened for travel in a few weeks. 

Maiden bridge is in poor condition. Travel is increasing 
in that direction, and the draw is very narrow, and the draw- 
piers are old and entirely too short. New electric signals 
for Warren bridge have been erected at City square, Charles- 
town, to show when the draw is open. 

L-STREET Bridge. 

During the year the L-street bridge has been opened for 
travel at the urgent request of many people whose interests 
are in that direction. On account of the roadway on the 
Boston end of the bridge not being paved or graded, and 
being very uneven, and altogether in poor condition, and 
from the fact that the street was not lighted, it was deemed 
judicious to restrict the hours of accommodation for travel 
from sunrise to sunset. Under even these restrictions quite 
a traffic has developed because of the great saving of dis- 
tance to those who desire to reach the vicinity of the termi- 
nus of the bridge. Steps should be taken to put the street 
in proper condition for travel. 

A plank sidewalk has been constructed on the Boston side 
for the accommodation of foot-passengers. 

Congress-street Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge, built in 1874-5, with an 
iron turn-table draw on a masonrj'- foundation. The under- 
flooring of the roadbed and sidewalks is in a very bad condi- 
tion, decaying fast, and steps should be taken in the near 



Street Department. 37 

future for a removal of such parts of the structure. The 
importance of this bridge to the public can best be realized, 
and the demands that are required for its safety and accessi- 
bility can best be estimated, from the fact that over one and 
a half million vehicles of every description and weight trav- 
erse it yearly. To inconvenience the public as little as pos- 
sible, all work required on this bridge that might interfere 
with travel is performed on Sunday. During the present 
year new steel boilers have been constructed and set in place 
of the original ones, which were badly used up from a twenty 
years' service. 

Dover-street Bridge. 

The new structure here has been completed, and is open 
for travel. The draw is equipped with electricity, fur- 
nished by a General Electric motor of twenty-five horse- 
power. This is the second of Boston's brido:es to be thus 
operated, and from a three years' observation of its use 
on Federal-street bridge, under all conditions, we can con- 
fidently expect the same highly satisfactory results. 

The draw-tenders' house has been repaired and painted, 
and has been moved to a proper location. The draw piers 
of this bridge are inadequate and not properly located. 
Steps should be taken to build and extend a pier on the 
south-easterly side of the draw sutficient to aid navigation in 
safely passing through. 

Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge. 
The draw piers of this bridge are in bad condition, and 
should be rebuilt. They are so low that at times they are 
totally su])merged at high water, and consequently then are 
useless, and do not fulfil their mission. They should be 
raised as high as practicable. The rest of the bridge is in 
fair condition. The draw is of iron, and is the only one of 
importance in the city of Boston that still continues to be 
operated by hand-power. 

Broadway Bridge. 

The draw pier of this bridge is badly decayed, and should 
be rebuilt without delay. Constant care is required to keep 
it from collapsing, and a decided improvement would be a 
continuation of the new pier on the south side to meet the 
northeily pier of Dover street. 

The bridge is in poor condition, and requires frequent in- 
spection and attention. The report of the Deputy Superin- 
tendent (Appendix A) gives a detailed statement of 
expenditures, and amoimt of work done on each bridge, 
toirether with nmch other information of a useful nature. 



3y City Document No. 34. 



CAMBRIDGE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



Craigie's Bridge. 

The sides of the waterway for the passage of vessels 
through the bridge have been planked with 3-inch spruce ; a 
bulkhead near the draw has been rebuilt. A weak point 
near the Cambridse end of the bridge has been strengthened, 
fences have been repaired, the draw sheathed, sidewalks re- 
paired, and other ordinary repairs made by the aid of the 
men employed on the bridge. The flooring of the sidewalks 
near the Cambridge end, and the bulkhead, are in bad con- 
dition, and will be rebuilt next season. 



Harvard Bridge. 

The entire surface plank of the bridge has been renewed 
without interruption to travel. The West End Street Rail- 
way Company replanked between the rails on both tracks for 
the entire length of the bridge. The draw-tender and his 
assistants keep the sidewalks free from snow, clean the 
globes on the electric lights, make all ordinary small re- 
pairs on the bridge, and assist in cleaning the roadway. 
Experience has shown that the roadway planking will have 
to be renewed as often as once a year. The asphalt side- 
walks on the bridge have not given satisfaction, and will be 
renewed for the entire length of the bridge next year by the 
contractors. They were laid under a guarantee of main- 
tenance for five years, and are to be left in good condition 
at the end of that time. 



Prison-Point Bridge. 

The house occupied by the draw-tender has been painted 
inside and newly papered by the draw-tender. Only or- 
dinary repairs, such as planking and sheathing, have been 
made on the brids^e. The draw is in bad condition and 
needs a thorough repairing. 

The question of abolishing the grade crossing on the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad, which adjoins this bridge, is under 
discussion. If this should be accomplished by carrying the 
highway over the railroad, it would involve the rebuilding 
of the bridge. For this reason, only such repairs have been 
made as were absolutely necessary for safety. 



Street Department. 39 

West Boston Bridge. 

The underpUink of the draw has been partly renewed, 
part of the waterway on side of the pier has been rephmked, 
spurshores and braces have been bolted and spiked to the 
piles to keep the bridge in line. The whole length of the 
bridge under the planking of the roadway has been ex- 
amined, and strengthened where necessary. The bulk- 
head at the Boston end of the draw, which has been a source 
of trouble for some years, has been rebuilt. The work was 
done between 1 A.M. and 3 P.M., on Sunday, without in- 
terruption to travel. 

The ordinary repairs, such as sheathing the draw, repair- 
ing fences, renewing plank on piers, paving, etc., have been 
attended to. Much of this work has been done by the 
draw-tender and his assistants. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended of the number of draw 
openings and the number of vessels which passed through ; 
also table showing the traffic over bridges on Auo;ust 15. 

The amount of revenue received fur dockao-e, rents, re- 
pairs to West End Street Railway tracks, etc., during the 
year, has been $1,195.62; one-half, $597.81, has been paid 
to the city of Cambridge. 



40 



City Document No. 34. 



Number of Times the Draws in Canal, Harvard, Prison 
Point, and West Boston Bridj?es have been opened, 
and the number of Vessels which have passed throug-h, 
for the year ending- Jan. 31, 1895. 



Date. 


Canal. 


Harvard. 


Prison 


Point. 


West Boston. 






"Ord 




asi 




"Sja" 




"SrlJ 




be 


m SO 




S M 


.. 60 




^ on 




February 1, 1894, 


-oB 


S 2 
>2 


0.9 




O.S 

I. a 


>2 


O.S 


Ie 




S; ^ 




(0 o 


>»- J3 


o o 


jq 




Ji 


to 


|o 


oH 


ao 


OH 


SO 




ao 




January 31, 1895. 


&i 






a I 


^l 
^ 




^ ^ 

g 









^^ 





'^^ 





1^ 


5 


^'^ 


February, 189-1 


90 


119 


40 


41 


14 


22 


29 


44 




48 
256 


73 
305 


94 
139 


105 

182 


24 
21 


31 

26 


63 
172 


121 


April 


255 


May 


353 


459 


209 


285 


42 


53 


189 


308 




320 

387 


401 
407 


179 
319 


226 
375 


36 
51 


47 
70 


208 
218 


310 


July 


313 




330 


411 


210 


248 


32 


39 


207 


318 


September 


36J 


423 


424 


475 


- 19 


20 


220 


323 


October 


375 


443 


415 


456 


31 


45 


239 


336 




317 
314 
103 


388 
447 
148 


379 

212 

12 


450 

232 

18 


34 
35 
25 


46 
47 
32 


202 
145 
23 


301 




253 


January, 1895 


34 


Totals 


3,260 


4,024 


2,632 


3,093 


364 


478 


1,915 


2,916 







Statement showing- Traffic on Bridges. 



Date. 
1894. 


Bridge. 


Foot- 
Passengers. 


Teams. 


Cars. 


Car 
Pas- 
sengers. 


Bicycles 


Aug. 15, 


Canal 


6,682 
2,115 
2,200 
4,429 


5,045 
2,771 
1,867 
2,660 


492 
346 


12,570 
9,109 


104 
1,350 


6 A.M. 


Prison Point 

West Boston 


65 


to 7 P. M. 


1,008 


22,514 


96 




Total 


15,426 


12,343 


1,846 


44,193 


1,615 









Street Department. 



41 



The following is a statement of the payments made by the 
city of Boston on account of the Canal, Harvard, Prison 
Point, and West Boston bridges, from February 1, 1894, to 
January 31, 1895: 

Amount of appropriation for financial years 

of 1894-95 $12,000 00 

Amount expended to January 31, 1895 . . 11,986 85 

Unexpended balance .... $13 15 



Classification of Expenses. 



Salaries of draw-tentlers and 
assistauts 



Lumber 

Electric lighting^ 

General repairs 

Inspection 

Cleaning bridges 

Ironwork 

Sundries 

Fuel 

Electric current for motor.. 

Watering roadways 

Tools and hardware 

Electric light, repairs, etc. ^ 

Water rates 

Salaries 

Travelling expenses 

Printing and stationery 



Totals 



$1,140 00 
371 10 
287 52 
392 71 
180 00 
218 56 
124 44 
103 02 
134 31 



62 50 
36 77 



$3,066 93 



$1,271 00 

1,236 63 

1,144 51 

383 91 

157 50 

39 83 

149 52 
122 46 

13 46 

150 OO" 



50 18 



|4,757 



.2a5 



^229 11 
84 62 



121 46 
30 00 



45 37 
23 20 



$552 46 



$1,250 00 

367 77 

517 49 

380 50 

135 00 

218 79 

78 78 

97 27 



62 50 
26 94 



11 00 



$3,244 70 



o <i 



$250 00 
67 50 
47 58 

$365 08 



$3,890 11 

2,060 12 

1,949 52 

1,278 58 

502 50 

477 18 

398 11 

345 95 

246 43 

150 00 

125 00 

115 59 

50 18 

32 50 

250 00 

67 50 

47 58 

$11,986 85 



42 



City Document No. 34. 



PAVING DIVISION. 



The following table shows the length of public highways 
and the character of pavements, February 1, 1895 : 



Length in Miles. 





< 

m 


o 
o 

s 

a, 


§ 




o 
O 


11 

-a 


01 

> 

5 


1 
v. 

o 


3 

o 


In previous Report. 


5.66 


0.81 


77.68 


0.36 


3.52 


211.73 


136.00 


11.89 


447.65 


February 1, 1895. 


5.26 
0.03 


0.85 


*42.13 
8.74 
4.38 
11.92 
8.06 
0.09 
3.47 


0.42 


2.92 


28.05 
13.77 
3.05 
22.09 
55.81 
32.92 
47.23 
16.97 


0.61 
0.03 
19.18 
1.88 
14.04 
41.25 
33.24 
18.87 


0.06 
0.18 
4.03 
3.03 
2.17 
2.08 
2.18 


80 24 




22 63 






0.17 
0.05 
0.01 


26 96 




0.53 
0.37 




40.50 




81 32 




76.43 












86.03 












38 02 




6.19 












Total 


0.85 


78.79 


42 


3.15 


219.89 


129.10 


13.73 


452.12 











Note. — The above districts refer to' areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 
*Of this amount 2.70 miles =: granite-block paving on concrete with pitched joints. 

Total length of public streets, 452.12 miles. 

There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year 6.19 linear miles; many square 
feet have been discontinued without changing the mileage ; 
1,208.61 linear feet have been discontinued ; corrections to 
previous measurements on account of abolishing grade cross- 
ings, and surrender of streets to the Park Department, show 
a decrease of 1.49 miles ; making a total net increase of 4.47 
miles. Street wideninss have been ordered to the extent of 
1,025,329 square feet. "^ 

Not included in the above table, there are about 142 miles 
of private ways and alleys which are not under the care of 
this department. 



Street Department. 



43 



The rate of increase from year to year is shown in the 
followins: table : 



1859 111.50 

1871 201.32 

1872 207.4 

1873 209 24 

1874..... 313.90 

1875 318.58 

1876 327.50 

1877 3.33.2 

1878 340.39 

1879 345 19 

1880 350 54 

1881 355.5 

1882 359.85 



miles. 



1883 367.99 miles 

1884 874.10 " 

1885 379.60 " 

1886 383. 5.i " 

18«7 390. :30 " 

1888 392.72 " 

1889 :'97.84 " 

18110 404.6 

1891 409.6 

1892 434.59 " 

1893 443.34 " 

1894 447.65 " 

1895 452.12 " 



Areas of Pavements. 

The following table shows the areas of pavements in 
square yards, arranged by districts: 





Asphalt 


Block. 


Brick. 


Cobble. 


Telford 

and 

Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
graded. 


Totals. 


Feb. 1, 1894. 


111,147 


1,677,451 


3,638 


41,706 
31,896 


3,877,758 


2,245,034 


219,128 


8,175,862 


Feb. 1, 1895. 
City Proper, 


*107,113 
421 


1 902,699 
197,366 
100,361 
251,619 
171,993 
2,067 
74,594 


5,166 


523,651 
205,112 
69,.i69 
383,629 
1,005,620 
566,903 
840,059 
403,356 


11,221 

161 

355,258 

38,365 
228,745 
639,671 
543,642 
306,397 




1,581,746 
404 473 


1,413 
3,555 
83,599 
94,280 
32,321 
78,600 
80,909 






3,470 

1,192 

408 


532,213 


8. Boston .. 
Roxbury .. 
W. Roxb'y- 


7,620 
6,559 


766,024 
1,507,505 
1,240,963 
1,536,895 

790,662 
























Total .... 


121,713 


1,700,699 


5,166 


36,966 


3,997,799 


2,245,034 


374,677 


8,360,480 



* Of this amount, 14,208 eq. yds. =: asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount, 54,121 sq. yds. = granite-block paving on concrete with pitched joints. 



Total area of public streets, 8,360,480 sq. yds. 



44 



City Document No. 34. 



Edg-estones and Sidewalks— New Edgestones. (Liiu. ft. set.) 



Tear. 


City Proper. 


X 




c 




n 

s 



02 


a 



pa 



P 


5 

X 


K 


a 


.- 


a 





Total. 




1881.. 


6,294 


8,328 


6,304 


443 


13,112 


1,314 


263 


794 


36,852 




1882.. 


3,398 


10,930 


4,190 


2,119 


8,235 


5,454 


5,543 


1,595 


47,464 


(N 


1883.. 


2,763 


7,306 


4,660 


98 


2,467 


4,381 


1,895 




2;, 570 




1884.. 


4,691 


9,733 


6,189 


2,450 


18,310 


4,610 


106 


696 


46,785 




1885.. 


5,291 


4,644 


2,538 


1,333 


4,976 


1,952 


303 


646 


21,583 


^ < 


1886.. 


5,790 


8,978 


2,463 


349 


11,051 


2,451 


737 


174 


31,993 


.a 


18S7.. 


3,222 


10,192 


4,269 


436 


5,229 


2,726 


2,055 


223 


28,352 


a 


1888.. 


4,359 


5,191 


4,531 


971 


5,051 


580 


867 




21,550 


■3 
1-1 


18S9.. 


2,946 


13,224 


2,139 


1,419 


6,794 


10,404 


1,845 


573 


39,344 




1890.. 


2,781 


11,475 


4,946 


981 


9,882 


3,288 


3,042 


988 


37,383 




.1891.. 


8,236 


22,693 


11,724 


4,131 


18,138 


4,617 


2,032 


2,227 


73,798 


1892. . 


9,222 


25,506 


9,631 


11,238 


36,859 


9,970 


9,001 


2,804 


114,231 


1893.. 


1,118 


14,979 


4,375 


1,969 


10,587 


4,795 


3,981 




41,804 


1894.. 


1,916 
62,027 


39,324 


521 


816 


6,544 


1,568 


1,323 


694 


52,706 


Total... 


192,503 


68,480 


28,753 


157,235 


58,110 


32,993 


11,314 


611,415 



Street Department. 



45 



Brick Sidewalks. (Sq. yds. set.^ 



Tear. 


p 

5 


3 

.o 

11,491 
7,510 
7,675 
7,279 
3,896 
5,285 
7,693 
6,910 

10,489 
7,651 
9,098 

20,231 
5,912 

11,533 


□ 
o 

o 

P3 
,3 

P 

02 


a 

1 


pa 

a 


2 






! 


a 


Si 

.B? 


a 


— 
3 






00 

*t-t 
o 

1 • 

in 

■a 
a 

■a 

•s 


1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889.. 
.1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 


5,207 
5,905 
4,392 
4,870 
4,756 
5,273 
5,970 
2,540 
4,835 
4,913 
3,881 
10,423 
964 
1,537 


3,961 
4,984 
4,794 
4,437 
1,473 
2,112 
3,768 
3,164 
1,942 
1,915 
3,628 
4,484 
751 
2,706 


893 
1,658 
1,095 
1,616 
72? 
1,002 
1,500 
1,110 
1,362 
1,947 
2,176 
12,847 
2,197 
2,115 


337 

179 

2,795 

4,902 

892 

2,843 

1,348 

614 

638 

1,155 

1,478 

10,462 

2,412 

453 


1,096 

1,834 

3,354 

954 

479 

643 
346 
124 
274 
967 
2,905 
350 
834 


381 
117 

46 
58 

138 

900 

377 

1,068 


159 
887 
177 
739 
342 
527 
56 
75 

791 
120 
3,451 
175 
437 


23,525 
23,074 
24,282 
24,797 
12,606 
17,100 
20,978 
14,759 
19,528 
19,546 
21,725 
65,871 
12,761 
19.615 


Total . . 


65,466 


122,653 


44,119 


32,240 


30,508 


14,160 


3,085 


7,936 


319,882 



:s< 



V^l CITV 






46 



City Document No. 34. 



Full List of Streets now Paved with Trinidad Asphalt. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Albany st. .. 

Arch St 

Ashst 

Barton court. 
Beacon st. . . . 



Bennet st. 



Brattle square.... 

Brighton st 

Central st 

Chambers st 

Charter st 

Cherry St.. .. . .... 

Clark st 

Columbus ave.... 
Congress square. . 
Cooper 8t 



Court st 

Court square.... 

Davis st 

Dartmouth St.... 

Doane st 

Endicott st 

Exchange place . . . . 

Groton st 

Hanover ave 

Harrison ave 



Length. 
Feet. 



From East Concord st. to East Springfield st 

From Franklin st. to Milk st 

From Bennet st. to 220 ft. north of Oak st 

From Brighton st. to Barton st 

From Charles st. through Arlington st 

From Dartmouth St., within 150 ft. of Gloucester St.. . 

From 68 ft. of Gloucester st. to Massachusetts ave.. . . 

From 90 ft. west of Harrison ave. to 162 ft. east of 
Washington st 



HoUis St.... 
Hudson St. 



Indiana place . 

Kilby st 

Malcolm st. .. 



From Brattle St. to Elm st 

From Leverett st. to Allen st 

From Broad st. to Kilby st 

From Green st. through Poplar st 

From Hanover st. to Unity st 

From Washington st. to Shawmut ave. 

From Hanover st. toward North st. 

From B. & A . R.R. bridge through Massachusetts ave. 

From State st. through P. O. ave 

From North Margin st. to Endicott st 

From Endicott st. to Charlestown st 

From Washington st. to Court square 

From Court st. to Court st 

From Washington st. to Harrison ave 

From Boylston st. to Newbury st 

From Kilby st. to Broad st 

From Cooper st. through Thacher st 

From Congress st. to Kilby st 

From Washington st. to Shawmut ave 

From Hanover st. to North st 

From East Newton st. to East Springfield st 

From East Springfield st. to Roxbury line 

From Tremont st. toward Washington st 

From Beach st. to 90 ft. of Curve st 

(Minus Kneeland and Harvard sts.) 

From Shawmut ave. to Washington st 

From State st. to Milk st 

From Mt. Vernon st. to Chestnut st 



450 
426 
230 
134 
870 
1,744 
1,019 

180 
281 
845 
313 
460 
318 
334 
120 
3,505 
110 
166 
200 
231 
665 
323 
266 
312 
312 
244 
335 
307 



Area. 

Sq. yds. 



276 
1,407 



2,700 
1,267 
409 
179 
3,800 
9,277 
6,391 

300 
670 

1,737 
869 

1,050 
636 
594 
227 
15,578 
160 
516 
600 
642 

1,883 
646 

2,058 
624 

1,005 
678 
558 
266 

1,464 
130 
521 

3,938 

686 

2,628 

290 



Street Department. 



47 



Streets Paved with Triniilad Asphalt. — Concluded. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Massachusetts ave. . 



Moon St 

North Bennet st. . . 

Parmenter st 

Poplar st 

Stillman st 

Stoddard st 

Sun-court st 

Taylor et 

Thacher st 

Tileston st 

Warrenton st 



Water st. . 
Wiggin St. 



From Tremont st. to Columbus ave., S'ly road. 
From Tremont st. to Shawmut ave. " 
From Shawmut ave. to Washington st. " 

From between North square and Fleet st 

From Hanover st. to Salem st 



From Chambers st. to Charles st , 

From between Salem st. to Endicott st. (on cobble). 

From Howard st. to Court st. (on cobble) 

From North st. to Moon st 

From Dwlght st. to Milford st 

From Charlestown st. to Endicott st 

From between Hanover st. and Salem st . . 

From Eliot st. to Tremont st 

From Shawmut ave. to Washington st 

From Congress st. through Batterymarch st 

From North Bennet st. to Tileston st 



Length. 
Feet. 



534 
940 
710 
182 
552 
279 
1,188 
150 
135 
151 
193 
203 
254 
670 
468 
325 
107 



Area. 
Sq. yds. 



1,621 

2,934 
994 
384 
920 
764 

2,442 
417 
150 
218 
300 
562 
338 

1,587 
910 
975 
119 



South Boston. 



D st 

E st 

Rogers st 

West Sixth St.. 
West Third st. 



From West Fifth st. to Gold st... 

From Third st. to Bolton st 

From Dorchester st. to Preble st. 
From west of C st. toward D st. . . 
From west of E st. through E st.. 



126 


448 


111 


419 


360 


480 


95 


316 


185 


769 



RoTbiiry. 






1,955 


6 559 








Charlestovrn. 




From between Seminary place to Lawrence st 


144 


421 







48 



City Document No. 34. 



Streets Paved with Sicilian Rock Asphalt. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Charles st. 
Decatur St. 
Dwight St. 

Fay 8t 

Mason st. . 



Massachusetts ave. 



Motte st 

Pembcrton sq. 



From between Revere st. to Cambridge st. 

From Washington st. to Harrison ave 

From Shawmut ave. to Tremont st 

From Dover st. to Harrison ave 



From point 213 feet south of West street, a distance 
of 231 feet southerly 



From Washington st. to Albany, Southerly road (un 
tinisbed) 



From Harrison ave. to Washington st. 
In front of Court House 



Length. 
Feut. 



191 
370 
716 
318 

231 

1,224 
332 
323 



Area. 
Sq. yds. 



225 

781 
781 
560 

480 

4,151 

516 

1,365 



South. Boston. 



Athens st 

W. Broadway. 

W. Broadway. 



Prom B St. to C st. 



From 206 ft. east of easterly line of Dorchester ave. 
to A st 



From Gardner pi. to 150 ft. east. 



350 
150 



746 
1,944 



Streets Paved vrith Granite Blocks, Pitch, and Pebble 
Joints, on an American Concrete Base. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Bedford st 

Cambridge St.. 
Causeway st... 

Chardon st 

Charles st. — 

Court st 

Devonshire st. 

Eliot st 

Exchange st.. . 
Harrison ave . 

India st 

Kingston St.... 

School st 

Tremont st.... 
Washington st 



From Chauncy st. to Columbia st 

From Bowdoin sq. through Joy st 

From Nashua st. to Haverhill st 

From Bowdoin sq. to Merrlmac st 

From Beacon st. to Pinckney st 

From Pinckney st. through Revere st., one side. 

From between Revere st. to Cambridge st 

From Court sq. to Scollay sq 

From State st. to Milk st 

From Washington st. to Pleasant st 

From State st. to Dock sq 

From Beach st. toward Essex st 

From State st. to Central st 

From Summer st. to Bedford st 

From Washington st. to Tremont st 

From Scollay sq. to Boy Iston st 

From Cornhill through Eliot st 



Length. 
Feet. 



480 
741 
692 
738 
964 
243 
411 
100 
650 
1,183 
335 
338 
126 
308 
570 
2,826 
3,504 



Area. 
Sq. yds. 



1,650 

2,347 

3,807 

2,578 

3,8.56 

486 

844 

267 

2,133 

4,634 

589 

2,146 

921 

933 

1,298 

12,675 

12,967 



Street Department. 49 

The following statement of the City Engineer contains the 
main features of the special work of construction assigned to 
him by this department for engineering supervision : 

City or Boston, Engineering Departiment, 

50 City Hall, January 31, 1895. 

Mr. B. T. Wheeler, ISupermtendent of Streets : 

Sir : I herewith submit the following report of the work 

done under my direction for the Street Department during 

the year 1894. 

The following are the principal items of work done : 

Block-^tone paving, on a concrete base, laid with pitch 
joints, 12,349.5 square yards, at an average cost of about 
$4.75 per square yard. 

Block-stone paving, on a gravel base, laid with pitch 
joints, 5,410 square yards, at an average cost of about 
$3.50 per square yard. 

Block-stone paving, on a gravel base, with gravel joints, 
34,617 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.00 per 
square yard. 

Trinidad sheet, asphalt, with a binder course of asphalt ic 
cement concrete, on a concrete base, 4,577.6 square yards, 
at an average cost of about $3.75 per square yard. 

Sicilian rock asphalt, on a concrete base, 2,392.5 square 
yards, at an average cost of about $3.75 per square yard. 

Edgestone set, 48,678 lin. ft. ; brick sidewalk laid, 17,119 
square yards; flagging crosswalk laid, 2,361 square yards. 

The following is a statement of the streets paved, for 
which plans were made, lines and grades given, and the 
work supervised : 

Albany Street. — From Broadway to Lehigh street was 
paved with old granite blocks on a gravel base ; the blocks 
used were the best of those removed from Charles street, 
the street was sub-graded, and the gutters removed by P. 
F. Lonergan ; the paving, resetting of edgestone, and relay- 
ing of brick sidewalks was done by the Paving Division. 
The surface removed was macadam. 

Arlington Street. — From Beacon to Marlborough street 
was paved with vitrified brick on a concrete base ; the street 
was sub-graded by J. J. Sullivan, the gutters removed by 
James Dolan ; the concrete base was put down and street 
paved by The Interstate Vitrified Brick and Paving Com- 
pany, of New Jersey, at their own cost. The edgostoncs 
were reset and the brick sidewalk relaid by James Grant & 
Co. The surface removed was macadam. 



50 City Document Xo. 34. 

Austin Street (Charlestown). — From Washington street 
to Fitchbiii-o- Railroad crossing was paved with granite 
blocks on a gravel base ; the sub-grading was done l)y the 
Paving Division. The street was paved, the edgestones 
reset, the brick sidewalk and the crosswalks relaid by John 
Turner & Co. The surface removed was old granite blocks. 

Barton Court. — From Barton to Brighton street was 
paved with Trinidad asphalt, with a binder layer of asphal- 
lic cement concrete on the existing cobble-stone pavement, 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. 

Blue Hill Avenue. — From Dudley street to 80 feet north 
of Dalmatia street was paved with large granite blocks on a 
gravel base ; the sub-grading was done by the Paving 
Division. From Dudley to Moreland street the street was 
paved, the cdgestone reset, and the brick sidewalks and 
crosswalks relaid by the Paving Division. 

From Moreland street the paving was done by D. N. 
Payson. Two new catch-basins were built on the easterly 
side, one at StatFord street and one at Devens street. The 
surface removed was macadam. 

Bowker Street. — From Chardon to Sudbury street was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base, with pitch 
joints. The old pavement was removed and the street was 
sub-graded l)y the Paving Division. The street was paved, 
the edgestones reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid by 
James Grant So Co. The West End Street Railroad Com- 
pany, by agreement, paid for an amount of paving equiva- 
lent to the area previously occupied by their tracks. The 
pavement removed Avas cobble-stone. 

Cambridge Street. — From Joy street to Bowdoin square 
was paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base, with 
pitch joints ; the old block pavement was removed, and 
sub-grading done by S. & R. J. Lombard; the blocks and 
material excavated became the property of the contractor. 
The concrete base was put down by the Metropolitan Con- 
struction Company, the street was paved, the edgestones 
reset, and the brick sidewalks and gianite flagging cross- 
walks relaid by James Grant & Co. The West End Street 
Raibvay Company agreed to pay for the work done between 
the rails of their tracks, which work was jrlone in a similar 
manner to the rest of the street, by H. Gore & Co. The 
pavement removed was old granite blocks. 

Causeway Street. — From west side of Nashua to east 
side of Haverhill street was paved with large granite blocks 
on a concrete base ; the sub-grading was done by the Paving 
Division, the concrete base was laid by the iMetropolitiin 
Construction Company, the street was paved, the edge- 



Street Department. 51 

stones reset, and the brick sidewalks and o-ranite flaoo-ingr 
crosswalks relaid by J. Grant & Co. 

Tiiere were four new catch-basins built on the north- 
erly side of the street. The pavement removed was old 
granite blocks. The roadway was widened on the northerly 
side about 10 feet, by removing the old brick sidewalk, and 
using the space in front of the new Union Station for a side- 
walk ; the roadway was also improved by removing one of 
the West End Railway tracks between Portland street and 
Canal street and moving the other track over to the 
northerly .curb. A granolithic sidewalk was laid in front of 
the old Lowell Station by the Warner H. Jenkins Com- 
pany. 

Chambers Street. — From Green to Poplar street was 
resurfaced with Trinidad asphalt on the old cobble-stone 
pavement b}^ the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The 
surface removed Avas old Trinidad asphalt. 

Chapman Street (Charlestown). — From Austin street to 
Rutherford avenue was paved with large granite blocks on 
a gravel base, the bed was prepared by the Paving Division, 
the street was paved, the edgestones reset, and the brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by J. Turner & Co. 
The pavement removed was old granite blocks. 

Charles Street. — From Pinckney to Cambridge street, on 
the westerly side, except in front of the Eye and Ear In- 
firmar}^ was paved with large granite blocks laid with pitch 
joints on a concrete base ; the old pavement was removed and 
the street sub-graded by P. O'Riordan and by the Paving 
Division. The best of the old blocks were used on Albany 
street, from Broadway to Lehigh street. The concrete base 
was laid by the Metropolitan Construction Company. The 
paving, including the westerly track of the West End Street 
Railway, the edgestone resetting, the brick sidewalk and 
granite flagging crosswalk relaying was done by F. H. 
Covvin. The West End Street Railway by agreement paid 
for the work done in their track. It was intended to pave 
the street in front of the Eye and Ear Intirmary with 
Sicilian rock asphalt, but on account of unfavorable weather 
the work had to be postponed ; this part of the street was 
made passable by putting in crushed stone temporarily. 
The pavement removed was old granite blocks. 

Charter Street. — From Planover to Unity street was sur- 
faced with two feet of Trinidad asphalt and binder on the 
cobble-stone base by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company ; 
the cobble-stone base was regulated, the edgestones reset, 
and the brick sidewalk flagging crosswalks relaid by James 
Grant & Co. The former pavement was cobble-stone. 



52 City Document No. 34. 

Court Square. — The easterly and southerly roadways 
were resurfaced with Trinidad asphalt and binder on a con- 
crete base by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The 
old concrete base having been found to be poorly graded, 
and it not being deemed expedient to relay the same, con- 
siderable extra work had to be done in order to shape the 
binder so as to give a proper crown to the street. 

Commonivealtli Avenue. — From Arlington street to Mas- 
sachusetts avenue, see page 60. 

Dartmouth Street. — From Boylston street to Newbury 
street was paved with Trinidad asphalt on a concrete base 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The sub-grading 
was done by J. J. Sullivan; the concrete base was laid by 
the Metropolitan Construction Company. The edgestone 
■was reset in part and the brick sidewalk relaid by H. Gore 
& Co. The original intention was to pave the street from 
curb to curb with asphalt, but the West End Street Eailway 
Vv'as allowed to pave with granite blocks between the rails of 
their track, until the horse cars now running there are re- 
placed by electrics. The former surface was macadam. 

Derne Street. — From Hancock to Temple street was 
paved with Hastings asphalt blocks on a base of crushed 
stone, by J. Turner & Co. The sub-grading was done, the 
edgestone was reset (north side), and the brick sidewalk 
(north side) was relaid by J. Turner & Co. The cobble- 
stone, old edgestone, and material excavated became the 
property of the contractor. On the southerly side of the 
street the State House Commissioners put in a combination 
granite curb and gutter and a granolithic sidewalk. One 
catch-basin was rebuilt at the corner of Hancock street ; the 
former pavement was cobble-stone. 

- East Eighth Street. — Yrom. Old Harbor to G street 
(north side) and G to H street, on both sides of the railroad 
track, was paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. 
The sub-grading was done by the Paving Division, and the 
street paved, edgestones reset, brick sidewalk and flagging 
crosswalks relaid by H. Gore & Co. The former surftice 
w^as macadam. 

East Second Street. — From I to K street was paved with 
large granite blocks on a gravel base ; the sub-grading was 
done by the Paving Division, and the street paved, edgestone 
reset, Ijrick sidewalk and flagging crosswalk relaid by H. 
Gore & Co. The former surface was macadam. 

Essex Street. — From Harrison avenue to Kingston street 
was paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base, with 
pitch joints ; the sub-grading was done by the Paving Di- 
vision, and the street paved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalk 



Street Department. 53 

and flagging crosswalk relaid, by Doherty & O'Leaiy. The 
foraier pavement was old granite blocks. The street was 
"widened to a uniform width of tit'ty feet. 

Esfiex Street. — From Kingston to South street was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base, partly with 
pitch joints and partly with gravel joints. The sub-grading 
was done by the Paving Division, and the edgestone reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid, by A. A. 
Libby & Co, The former pavement was old granite blocks. 
This street was widened to a uniform width of flfty feet. 

Fay Street. — From Dover street to Harrison avenue 
was surfaced with Sicilian rock asphalt on the existing cob- 
ble-stone pavement, by H. Gore & Co. This work was com- 
menced in 1893. (See report of Superintendent of Streets 
for 1893.) 

Harrimn Avenue. — From Beach to Essex street; from 
Beach street 200 feet toward Essex street was paved with 
large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch joints. 
The rest of the street was paved temporarily until the West 
End Street Railway can obtain and put in new special work. 
The concrete base was put in by the Metropolitan Construe •> 
tion Company ; the rest of the work was done by the Paving 
Division. The work done was necessitated by the widening of 
the avenue. The former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Lewis-Street Extension. — From North to Moon street 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. The sul>- 
grading was done by the Paving Division, and the paving 
was done, edgestone set, brick sidewalk and flagging cross- 
walks laid, by P. W. Hernon. One new catch-basin was 
built at the corner of North street. This extension was laid 
out in 1893. 

Mason Street. — At Boston and Bijou theatres was sur- 
faced with Sicilian rock asphalt on cobblestone base with 
binder, by H. Gore & Co. The base was regulated, the 
edgestone reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid by Paving 
Division. The former pavement was cobble-stone. 

Massachusetts Avenue. — The southerly roadway, from 
Washington to Albany street, was to have been surlaced 
with Sicilian rock asphalt on a concrete ba>e by H. Gore Sc 
Co., but only al)out 275 feet from AVashington street was 
laid, when the weather became so unfavorable on account of 
the lateness of the season, that work had to i)e sus[)ended. 
The excavating to sub-grade and removing of gutters was 
done by J. J. Sullivan. The concrete was put down by the 
Metropolitan Construction Co. ; the edgestones reset and 
the biick sidewalk relaid by H. Gore & Co. A granolithic 
sidewalk in front of" the City Hos[)ital building was laid by 



54 City Document No. 34. 

Simpson Bros. The centre parkway was extended about 130 
feet to within 16 feet of Albany street, and a driveway was 
built across it opposite the entrance to the Hospital. The 
uncompleted roadway between Washington street and Harri- 
son avenue was made passable by covering the C(Micrete with 
crushed stone ; the part between Harrison avenue and Albany 
street was closed to travel, and the concrete covered with 
seaweed to protect it from the frost. Nine new catch-basins 
were built between Harrison avenue and Albany street, — 
four on the northerly roadway and five on the southerly road- 
way, — and one was rebuilt at the corner of Albany street. 
The former surface was macadam. 

Park Street and City Square, Oha.rle^toicn. — The pav- 
ing on this street, which was not completed in 1893, was 
finished in April of the present year. 

Pemherton Square. — In front of the new Court House 
was surfaced with Sicilian rock asphalt on a concrete base, 
by H. Gore & Co. In the southerly corner, where the teams 
of Houghton & Dutton are loaded, the square was paved 
with large granite blocks on gravel base with pitch joints, by 
J. Grant & Co. The concrete base was laid l)y the Metro- 
politan Construction Company. The excavation to sub-grade 
was done by the Paving Division ; the old gutter paving re- 
moved by J. Dolan ; the edgestone reset by J. Grant & Co. ; 
a griuiolithic sidewalk was laid on the westerly side of the 
square, and on part of the easterly side, by Simpson Bros. ; 
and five new catch-basins were built. The former pavement 
Avas macadam. The old planting space in the square, con- 
taining four trees, was removed, the edgestone in front of 
the Court House was laid out in a circular arc, very nearly 
concentric with the edgestone on the opposite side of the 
roadway, making a roadway about 36 feet wide ; at the back 
of the sidewalk was placed a curb of special design, between 
which and the building it is intended to make a grass plot. 

Ruth-Street Extension. — This way or foot-path is in East 
Boston, and serves to connect Webster street and Marginal 
street, which are parallel streets, about 240 feet apart, but 
with a difference of level at this point of about 45 feet. The 
extension is al)Out 138 feet long and 11^ feet wide. It con- 
sists of 7 flights of artificial stone steps connected by plat- 
forms of the same material. An additional flight of 13 steps 
connects Brigham street with Ruth street. The artificial 
stone work was done by Simpson Bros., at a cost of 
$2,122.93. The iron railing and fence work was furnished 
l)y G. T. McLauthlin & Co.," and cost $554.97. The exca- 
vation, foundations, stone retaining- walls, and wooden fences 
were furnished by the Street Department. This is the first 




^^»\\\"' '^ 




Street Department. 55 

example of the use of " artiticitil stone" on any considerable 
scale that the city has yet niade. It is used heie for walks, 
steps, and retaining-walls. It makes a fine-looking job, and 
thus far the experience has been satisfactory. 

Uiica Street. — From Kneehuid street to the angle was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base, i)y the 
Paving Division. About 350 square yards of the old cobble- 
stone were removed by J. Doian, the rest by the Paving Di- 
vision. The edgestone, brick sidewalks, and crosswalks 
were relaid by the Paving Division. One new catch-basin 
was built. The former ))avement was cobble-stone. 

Washington Street. — From Essex to P21iot street was 
paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch 
joints, by H. Gore &> Co. The old block paving was re- 
moved to Commonwealth avenue beyond Harvard aveime, 
by O. Doherty. The sub-grading was done by the Paving- 
Division, and the edgestone reset, brick sidewalks and 
granite flagging crosswalks relaid, by H. Gore & Co. 

The West End Street Railway, by agreement, paid for the 
work done between the rails, which work was done in a sim- 
ilar manner to the rest of the street. Two new catch-basins 
were built. The former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Grading Street-Rail way Tracks. 

The work of properly grading street-railway tracks to fit 
a permanent surface of the street has been continued. This 
requires much labor, and it seems pro[)er that the railway 
company should bear a portion of the cost of so doing. This 
has been arranged by requiring a survey of the street surface, 
with levels, to be made by the railroad engineers in all cases 
where street construction work has not been ordered by the 
Street Department. The grades for the tracks are thci 
established and blue-prints of the working plans are Gar- 
nished the railroads. 

The following tracks have been graded : 

West End Street Railway. 

Bowdoin Street. — From AVashington street to Geneva 
avenue. 

Camhridge Street. — From Joy street to Bowdoin square. 

Causeway Street. — From Billerica through Haverhill 
street. 

Centre Street. — From Cedar to Pynchon and Cedar to 
Eliot s(|uare. 

Central Square. — East Pjoston. 

Charles Street. — From Pinckney to Canil)r idjic .^^heet. 



^C^ City Document No. 34. 

Clarendon Street. — Across Commonwealth avenue. 

Commonwecdth Avenue. — From Beacon street to Cottage 
Farm bridge and St. Paul street to near Malvern street. 

Dartmouth Street. — From Boylston to Kewbury street 
and across Commonwealth avenue. 

Dover Street. — From 200 feet west of Albany street to 
Dover-street bridge. 

Eagle Street. — From junction of Lexington street to new 
car- house. 

Essex Street. — From Harrison avenue to Kingston street. 

Harrison Avenue. — From Essex to Beach street. 

Huntington Avenue. — From 2,950 feet south of Gains- 
borough to Tremoiit street. 

Lexington Street. — From Meridian to Marion street. 

Lexington Street. — From Eagle to Prescott street. 

Meridian Street. — From Central square to Chelsea street. 

Prescott Street. — From Lexington to Saratoga street. 

Treniont Street. — At Huntington avenue. 

Wan-en Street. — From Elm Hill avenue to Brunswick 
street. 

WasJdngton Street. — From Boylston to Hollis street and 
Boston & Albany Railroad bridge to Warrenton street. 

West Fourth Street. — From Dover-street bridge through 
Dorchester avenue. 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway. 

Hyde Park Avenue. — From Hyde Park line to Forest 
Hills. 

QuiNCY & Boston Street Railavay. 

Neponset Avenue. — At Neponset bridge. 

Surveys, plans, and estimates for improving and paving 
the following streets have been made ; construction not yet 
commenced : 

Albany Street. — From old East Springfield to Northamp- 
ton street. 

Arlington Street. — From Marlborough through Common- 
wealth avenue. 

Anh Street. — From Oak to Nassau street. 

Austin Street. — From Fitchl)urg Railroad crossing to 
Prison-point bridge. 

Bartlett Street. — From Washington street about 500 feet 
westerly. 

Beunington Street. — From Wordsworth to Saratoga street. 

CheUea Street. — From Bennino;ton to Saratoga street. 



Street Department. 57 

Congress Street. — From Atlantic avenue to Congress- 
street bridge. 

Court Avenue. — And Corn Hill court. 

Dartmouth /Street. — From Warren avenue to Columbus 
avenue. 

Harrison Avenue. — From Beach to Kneeland street. 

Harrison Avenue. — From Dudley to Warren street. 

Harrison Avenue. — From East Springfield to Northamp- 
ton street. 

Massachusetts Avenue. — From Washington to Albany 
street (northerly roadway). 

Merchants Roio. — From State to South Market street. 

Milk Street. — From Washington to Congress street. 

JSFortliampton Street. — From Harrison avenue to Albany 
street. 

JSForth Margin Street. — From Cooper to Stillman street. 

Norway Street. — From Massachusetts avenue to Fal- 
mouth street. 

Oxford Street. — From Beach to Essex street. 

State Street. — From Merchants row to India street. 

Washington Stieet. — From Hollis to Boston & Albany 
Eailroad bridge. 

Water Street. — From Washington to Devonshire street. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Essex and Lincoln Streets. — On February 7, 1894, a 
contract was made with A. A. Elston to take down the old 
building standing upon the widening of the above-named 
streets, and upon the estate of John Farlow, for the sum of 
$1,425, which work was satisfactorily completed. 

West End Street Railroad Co. — The tracks of the above 
company were removed from the following streets, and the 
cost of repaving the same with granite blocks on a gnwel 
base with pitch joints was paid by the company. Measure- 
ments of the areas of paving, to be so paid for, were made 
and returned. 

Bowl'er Street. — From Chardon to Sudbury street. 
Broad Street. — From Wharf to Franklin street. 
Fleet Street. — From Hanover to Commercial street. 
Foundry Street. — F'rom Division to W. Fourth street. 
Franklin Street. — From Broad through Congress street. 
High Street. — From Engine-house to Oliver street. 
Jlilk Street. — From Oliver to Contjres.s street. 
Oliver Stn^et. — From High to Milk street. 

Surveys and plans were made for work upon the following 



58 City Document No. 34. 

streets; grades and lines were given, but the work of con- 
struction was not supervised by this department : 

Dartmouth Street. — From Tremont street to Warren 
avenue was paved with old granite blocks from Dover and 
Albany streets ; a plan was prepared and lines and grades 
given for paving, resetting edgestones, relaying brick side- 
walks and flagging crosswalks, the work beingdonc by the 
Paving Division. The West End Street Railway tracks 
were not regraded. The former surface was macadam. 

Tufts Street. — From Kingston to Lincoln street was 
repaved with granite blocks, gravel base. A plan was pre- 
pared and lines and grades given. The work of paving the 
roadway, resetting the edgestone, relaying the brick side- 
walks and flagging crosswalks, was done by the Paving- 
Division. 

Rutherford Avenue. — From Devens to Chapman street 
was paved with granite blocks on gravel base. A plan was 
made and lines and grades given. The work of paving, 
resetting edgestones, relaying brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks, was done by the Paving Division. The former 
surfiice was macadam. One new catch-basin was built and 
three old ones rebuilt. 

Thoinpson Street. — From Main to Warren sti'eet was 
macadamized. A plan was made and lines and grades 
given. The work of macadamizing, resetting edgestones, 
relaying brick sidewalks, was done by the Paving Division. 
The former pavement was cobble-stone. 

Phipps Street {Charlestoivn) . — Was paved with granite 
blocks on gravel bed. A plan was prepared and lines and 
grades given. The work of paving the roadway, resetting 
edgestones, relaying brick sidewalks, was done hj the 
Paving Division. The former pavement was cobble-stone. 

Charles Street. — From iVIain to Bunker Hill street was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base; lines and 
grades were given. The work of paving the roadway, re- 
setting the edgestone, relaying brick sidewalks, was done by 
the Paving Division. The former surface was cobblestone. 

Sprague Street. — From Princeton to Bunker Hill street 
was macadamized. The edgestone was set, cobble gutters 
and brick sidewalks were laid by the Paving Division. The 
former pavement was gravel. 

Oah Street. — From Washington street to Hnrrison ave- 
nue was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base. A 
plan was prepared and lines and grades given. The work of 
paving roadway, resetting edgestone, relaying brick side- 
walks and flagging crosswalks, was done by the Paving 



Street Departjient. 59 

Division. The former pavement was blocks and cobble-stone 
mixed. 

Vtica Street. — From Kneeland to Beach street was 
paved with granite blocks on a giavel base. A i)hin w-as 
made and lines and grades given. The work of paving the 
roadway, resetting edgestone, and rehiying brick sidew^alks 
w-as done by the Paving Division. The former pavement 
was old granite blocks. 

Congress Street. — From A street to L- street bridge. The 
w^ork on the plank sidewalk and fence, which was begun last 
year, has been completed. 

Buslinell Street {called Peabody Square). — A phm was 
made showing the present and proposed h)cation of trees ; a 
plan and specification was also prepared for a circular park 
curb, and lines and grades given for setting the same. The 
work was done bv the Pavins; Division. One catch-basin 
and one drop inlet built. 

Vcde Street. — From Dorchester sti-eet to Mercer street. 
Cross section and an estimate were made for filling the above 
to grade, and lines and grades given for filling the same. 

Preliminary estimates were made for repairing or rebuild- 
ing ninety streets. 

New Streets. 

During the early part of the season of 1894 three streets, 
viz., Miner street, Bay State road, and Deortield street, 
which were reported last year as uncompleted, were finished. 
The following streets have been contracted for, under the 
provisions of Chap. 323 of the Acts of the Legislature of 
1891, as amended by Chap. 418 of the Acts of 1892; the 
entire expense of construction is borne by the abutter, and 
sewer, gas, and water pipes, with house connections to the 
sidewalk, are laid in advance of the street construction : 

Arundel Street. — From Beacon to Mountfort street, 
about 271 feet long, is practically completed at a total cost of 
$1,843.45. For itemized prices and quantities, see table 
accompanying this report. The contractors were H. Gore 
& Co. It is a 6-incli macadam street. 

Ivy Street. — From St. Mary to Mountfort, not including 
the Audubon-road intersection, is about 772 feet long. 
This contract, which was awarded to J, Grant & Co., is not 
yet completed, and there remains to be done the spreadins: 
of the binder, waterinor and rolliuii'. It is a (i-inch 
macadam street. 

Mountfort Street. — From Audubon road to Ivy street 
is about 427 feet long. This street was constructed by II. 



60 City Document No. 34. 

Gore & Co., at a cost of $2,549.93. It is a 6-inch 
macadam street. 

Newbury Street. — From Charlesgate West to Brookline 
avenue, about 1,271 feet in length, was built by F. H. 
Cowin & Co., at a total cost of $10,386.93. This is a 6-inch 
macadam street. 

Parker Street. — The contract for constructino- and re^u- 
latmg this portion of this street from Huntington avenue to 
Westland avenue, about 1,687 feet long, was awarded to 
Messrs. Doherty & O'Leary. The work is not 3^et finished. 
It is to be a Telford roadway, the base to be 10 inches, and 
the broken stone 6 inches, in thickness. 

St. Germain Street. — The contract for building; St. Ger- 
mam street, from Massachusetts avenue to Dalton street, 
about 749 feet long, was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson, 
but on account of the lateness of the season they were able 
to do only the filling to sub-grade. This is to be a Telford 
roadway, the base to be 8 inches, and the broken stone to be 
6 inches, in thickness. 

Boylston Street. — A contract for filling the Boylston- 
street extension, from Boylston road to Brookline avenue, 
about 2,070 feet in length, was awarded to J. O'Brien on 
December 1, 1894, at the rate of $0.62i- per cubic yard, 
measured in the bank. The order of laying out requires a 
gravel roadway with gravel sidewalks. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

This avenue now extends under one name from the Pub- 
lic Garden to the Newton line, a total length of 5.59 miles, 
it having been extended from the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
gate to the Newton line, where it connects with a new avenue 
bearing the same name, which, like the part in Boston, is 
only partially completed. This avenue extends through the 
heart of Newton, a farther distance of four miles. 

Commonwealth avenue in Boston varies in width from 120 
to 200 feet, and is laid out partly as a parkway, in the care 
of the Park Department, partly as a highway, with heavy 
teaming ruled otf by order of the Board of Aldermen, and 
partly as an ordinary highway. It was formed of portions 
of streets formerly bearing ditferent names, with widenings 
and extensions made at different times. The extension of 
the avenue from Beacon street has been under construction 
for the last eleven years, during which time about one 
million two hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars has 
been expended upon it. A large amount of vvork has been 
done upon every part of it, excepting the most recent 



Street Department. 61 

extension, and a large amount yet remains to be clone to 
complete the enterprise. 

The following is a short account of what has already been 
done, together with a statement of its present condition and 
an approximate estimate of the cost of completion : 

Beginning at the Public Garden in Boston, the first sec- 
tion, extending to Beacon street, a distance of 1.44 miles, 
was taken by the Park Commissioners, under Chap. 300, 
Acts of 1893, as a parkway. This section is uniformly two 
hundred feet wide. The part of it between the Public Gar- 
den and Massachusetts avenue has two roadways and a 
central planting space. The northerly roadway is thirl y-tive 
feet wide between curbs ; the southerly roadway is thirty-five 
feet between curbs ; the central planting space is one hun- 
dred feet wide, with a o^ravel walk in the centre eiohteen 
feet wide, and the sidewalks, each, fifteen feet wide. The 
roadways have been rebuilt this season in a thorough man- 
ner with Telford roads. The work was done by the Street 
Department for the Park Department. The excavation of 
the old surface was let in eight contracts. The stone for the 
Telford foundation was furnished by ten contractors and by 
the Street Department, and was set by four contractors. 
The old glitter blocks were removed by two contractors, and 
new ones were furnished by two contractors and from the 
city paving yards, and were set in place by four contractors. 
The edgestones were reset, where necessary, and the side- 
walks repaved in part by two contractors. Broken stone for 
the macadam surface was furnished by two contractors, and 
from two city crushers. Steam-rollers were furnished from 
the Street and Park Departments and from contractors, the 
maximum number used was six. Gravel for gutter paving 
was furnished by the Street Department, and the broken 
stone was received and spread, and all miscellaneous work 
required to connect the various contracts was done, by the 
regular force of the Street Department. Platform scales 
were set up on the work, and all Telford and macadam ma- 
terials were received by weight. The broken trap rock was 
weighed on cars. 

Each roadway has two gutters, three feet in width. The 
Telford road has a base of Roxbury conglomerate eight and a 
half inches thick, thoroughly rolled, and a surface of broken 
stone four and a half inches thick after rolling. Between 
Arlington and Fairfield streets, the surface is trap rock from 
Salem and Waltham, furnished by the Massachusetts Broken 
Stone Company. From Fairfield to Gloucester street, on 
the northerly roadway, the surface is Roxbury conglomerate 
from Humboldt avenue, furnished by H. P. Nawn, and the 



62 City Document No. 34. 

remainin.o; blocks are surfaced with Roxbury conorlomerate 
tVom the Tremont and Codman street ledges, mixed indis- 
criminately. No binding material, except stone screenings, 
was used, and on each section the screenings were of the 
same material as the broken stone. The intersections of 
cross streets were put in good order, and the street railways 
on Clarendon and Dartmouth streets were rebuilt with en- 
tirely new material, and Clarendon street was paved with 
"•ranite blocks. 

The total area of gutter paving was 7,446.7 sq. yds. The 
total weight of Telford base stone used was 11,806.64 tons, 
on 30,025.4 sq. yds., or 786.44 lbs. per sq. yd. The weight 
of trap rock macadam used was 7,467.36 tons, on 20,313 sq. 
yds., or 735.23 lbs. per sq. yd. The total weight of Rox- 
bury stone macadam used was 4,211.08 tons on 11,842 sq. 
yds., or 711.21 lbs. per sq. yd. The result in weight of 
stone indicates that a considerably thicker road was actually 
built than was intended. The surface was kept at grade, 
and whatever settlement was caused by the weight of the 
heavy rollers was made good by additional broken stone. 

The intersections of cross streets are built on a Telford 
base only in the continuation of the avenue roadways ; the 
balance of the intersections were surfaced with broken stone 
and rolled. The quantity of broken stone used on them could 
not be exactly determined, and it was assumed that one- 
half the regular thickness was applied. The work was begun 
on July 30, 1894, and completed on November 20, 1894. 
The total cost of work on this section was $84,373.10, less 
$9,600 allowed for old materials removed; making the net 
cost $74,773.10. 

The remainder of this section is irregularly laid out, and 
is connected with the Back Bay Fens. 

The next section, from Beacon street to Cottage Farm 
bridge, is .79 mile in length and 160 feet in width; it is 
laid out in the following manner : Commencing on the south- 
erly line sidewalk, 10 feet ; planting space, 12 feet; roadway, 
35 feet ;■ grass and electric railroad, 33 feet; roadway, 45 
feet; planting space, 10 feet; and sidewalk, 15 feet. The 
tilling on this section by the Boston Contracting Company, 
and their successors, the Fidelity and Deposit Company, of 
Maryland, was completed on September 23, 1893. The total 
quantity of material delivered was 57,675 cubic yards, at 
$0.41 per yard, amounting to $23,646.75. 

Telford stone was accumulated during the preceding win- 
ter, and the southerly roadway between Beacon street and 
Cottage Farm bridge was built during the year 1894 by the 
regular force of the Street Department. A fence and wooden 



Street Department. - 63 

sidewalk on the southerly side was built by the carpenters of 
the Bridge Division of the Street Department ; the gutters 
were paved by contract. The roadway is a Telford road, 
with a face ten inches thick, and six inches of Roxbury stone 
macadam. The northerly roadway was built in 1893 in the 
same manner, except that the macadam is trap rock. This 
section is practically completed to within three hundred 
feet of Cottage Farm bridge. The sewers, gas and water 
pipes, are laid in the side planting spaces. 

The abutments of the bridge were built during the year. 
By arrangement with the Boston & Albany Railroad 
these abutments are built partly in the railroad location, 
and the part of the bridge which was formerly maintained 
by the railroad will hereafter be maintained by the city. 
The central abutment and the bridge have not yet been 
built. 

Essex street connects with the widened avenue on the 
northerly side, so as to render considerable tilling necessary 
to make even a temporary connection. The plan, as ar- 
ranged by the Board of Survey, contemplates ultimately 
elevating Essex street and crossing the Grand Junction 
Railroad by a bridge ; but it will be necessary to make a 
temporary grade of about 6 per cent, crossing the track at 
grade, in order to keep the street open until the Board of 
Survey plan is carried out. 

Westerly from the bridge to Brighton avenue the sec- 
tion is 160 feet in width and the distance is .69 mile. For 
about 1,000 feet westerly from the bridge, through the 
marsh, there has been an excessive settlement of filling with 
a large displacement of mud ; only one temporary roadway 
has been built here. An unexpected settlement took place 
at this point, requiring some 16,000 cubic yards of surplus 
filling, for which the contractor was paid an extra sum of 
money. The filling on this section was completed on 
August 9, 1894, and while it is probable that settlement 
will continue for some years, it is probable that a fair street 
surface can be maintained. There are no sewers, gas, 
water, or surface drain pipes laid in the "marsh section," ex- 
cept the large main water and gas pipes. The remainder of 
the section to Brighton avenue has one roadway completed. 
This is a Telford road of Roxbury stone of the same thick- 
ness as those east of the l)ri(lge, and was built by the Street 
Department in 1894. The remaining roadway (on the 
southerly side) has been built to sub-grade of gravel, with 
the intention of finishing it with gravel as a soft road suita- 
ble for fast drivinir. 



64 City Document No. 34. 

The width, plan, and disposition of water, gas, and sewer 
pipes is the same as in the section east of the Cottage P'arm 
hridge. A considerable amount of work on sidewalks, loam 
spaces, and fences remains to be done. 

The section between Brighton avenue and Warren street 
is .88 mile long and 200 feet wide. It is laid out with 
three roadways, a saddle-path, three grass plots, and two 
sidewalks ; the width of each and their order, commencing on 
the southerly side, as follows : Sidewalk, 10 feet; grass plot, 
10 feet; roadway, 26 feet; grass plot, 29 feet; central road- 
way, 50 feet ; saddle-path, 20 feet ; grass plot, 9 feet ; roadway, 
26 feet ; grass plot, 10 feet; sidevvalk, 10 feet. The cen- 
tral roadway has been built and has been in use for several 
years. It was necessary to raise its grade for about 1,200 
feet in length to fit the new grade adopted ; the amount of 
this change in grade is from to 1 foot, in vertical height. 
The sub-gi'ading is completed on a large part of this section, 
and the construction of the two side roads has been com- 
menced. The side roads are to be of lighter construction 
than in the preceding section, the depth being for Telford 
base 8 inches, for macadam, 4 inches. The sewer and sur- 
face drain work on this section is substantially finished, and 
there are nearly enough paving-blocks on the ground for the 
gutters. These blocks came from the section of the 
avenue taken by the Park Commissioners, with the under- 
standing that $3,500 is to be paid for them when funds are 
available. 

The section between Warren street and Chestnut Hill 
avenue is 200 feet wide and 1.07 miles long. This is an 
uneven and rocky section, with two sidewalks, 7.5 feet wide, 
and a roadway 50 feet wide winding irregularly through the 
location ; it was built some years since. On September 15, 
1884, in the Board of Aldermen, it was " Ordered, That the 
Board adopt the plan and profile for constructing Massachu- 
setts avenue, in the Brighton District, as prepared by Henry 
M. Wightman, City Engineer, dated September 11, 1884, 
and deposited in the office of the said City Engineer, the 
said plan being a modification of a plan of said avenue 
designed by Frederick L. Olmsted. It being understood 
that the construction of said avenue shall be substantially in 
accordance with said plan. Passed." 

The plan referred to has disappeared, but a copy exists. 
The road built does not exactly follow the plan, and no de- 
sign has been adopted for the treatment of the remainder 
of the 200-feet location. A plan has recently been made 
which collects all the information concerning this section 
that is available, including the streets contemplated by 



Street Department. 65 

the Board of Survey, and the grades considered or adopted 
h}'^ them, and on this has been sketched a plan for building 
a series of side roads, and rough estimates have been made 
of the cost of completing the roads in accordance therewith. 
There will remain large areas of uneven land with high 
ledges between these roads, which, from their bold character, 
and the fine views from their summits, may be ornamentally 
treated, if desired. It would seem desirable that Mr. Olm- 
sted should complete his design, and that this portion of 
the avenue should be built in accordance with it. 

The remaining section between Chestnut Hill avenue and 
the Newton line is .72 mile long, and has been laid out as 
an ordinary highway. The plan provides for two roadways, 
three grass plots, and two sidewalks, disposed of as follows : 
Beginning at the southerly side : sidewalk, 10 feet ; grass plot, 
5 feet; roadway, 40 feet; grass and electric road, 25 feet; 
roadway, 25 feet; grass plot, 5 feet; sidewalk, 10 feet. 

The estimated cost of completing the avenue from Beacon 
street to the Newton line, as outlined above, and exclusive 
of the cost of sewers and surface drains, and including land 
damages, is $556,598, or about $400,000, excluding the 
extension recently made beyond Chestnut Hill avenue, and 
provided that material is transferred from section to section. 
The estimates by sections are appended : 

Estimated cost to complete the construction : 

Beacon street to Warren street . . $188,405 00 
Warren street to Chestnut Hill avenue . 164,157 00 
Chestnut Hill avenue to Newton line . 99,685 40 
Bridge at Cottage Farm, cost to complete, 60,159 00 
Chestnut Hill avenue to Newton line, land 
damages, estimated by Street Commis- 
sioners 44,191 00 



Total $556,598 00 

Fifteen per cent, for engineering and contingencies has 
been added in each section. 

This estimate contemplates charging the section between 
Warren street and Chestnut Hill avenue with $22,920 for 
earth filling to be received from the section between Chestnut 
Plill avenue and the Newton line, and crediting the first- 
named section with $9,000 for rock to be used on the other 
sections. 

Plans have been made showing the different methods of 
construction at different sections of the avenue, and also a 



Qd 



City Document No. 34. 



proposed method of completing the avenue from Warren 
street to Chestnut Hill avenue. 

The following table shows the sums heretofore appropri- 
ated and expended upon the avenue : 



Date. 


Appropriation. 


Land 
Damages. 


Construction and 
Miscellaneous. 


Total Amount 
expended. 


1883 


$55,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

40,000 00 

125,000 00 

111,500 00 


^24,800 00 
14,462 00 
19,713 68 

14,000 00 




$24,800 00 
64,454 03 
24,526 89 
65,481 08 
23,932 70 
46,069 45 
89,437 22 


1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 


$49,992 03 

4,813 21 

65,481 08 

9,932 70 

46.069 45 

49.070 24 
22,165 61 


1889 


40,366 98 
223,071 06 


1890 

1891 


107,438 04 


245,236 67 


1892 


286,233 01 
203,000 00 
247,000 00 




123,170 81 
209,719 65 
271,349 47 


123,170 81 


1893 

1894 


56,527 00 
30,275 00 


266,246 65 
301,624 47 


Balance. . . 


#1,275,171 05 


#423,215 72 


$846,313 34 


$1,274,979 97 
$191 08 













Sidewalk Plans. 

A set of plans was made for the Street Department some 
years ago. The design was to show on one plan all pave- 
ments, gutters, sidewalks, street railways, and crossings, 
edgestones, all sewer and water pipes, and, in fact, all struct- 
ures as they exist upon or under the surface of the public 
streets. The custody of these plans was turned over to 
this department in 1892, and a certain amount of work has 
been done each year toward bringing them up to date. The 
amount of work which the available force of the office can 
do each year is so small that most of the plans are hopelessly 
behind. They had not been recently corrected when they 
were turned over to us, and they are further behind now than 
they were then. Imperfect as they are, they are constantly 
consulted, and they can never perhaps be made absolutely 



Street Department. 67 

correct, as many streets iu the older parts of the city con- 
tain structures of which there is no record. Under the 
present reguhitions it is possible to oblige all parties or cor- 
porations, having authority to use the public streets, to Hie 
plans of their structures, and it is a work of compilation to 
gather all the information into one plan of record. Until re- 
cently, it was necessary to gather most of this information 
from the street itself. 

Unless means are provided by which more work can be 
done than is possible to do under the present conditions, the 
usefulness of these plans will diminish rapidly, and it will 
soon become a waste of effort to do anything upon them. 
An inspection of these plans has recently been made, and 
the following summary of their number and condition is 
given : 

Oity Proper. 

Of this division of the city there are 50 sectional plans, 
on a scale of 50 feet to an inch. The plans are nearly worn 
out, and as nothing has been done on them for many years, 
they are incomplete, and are incorrect in many particulars. 
These plans are used constantly. New plans should be made 
on a scale of 30 feet to an inch, similar to the Roxbury and 
Dorchester sectional plans. This would increase the number 
of plans from 50 to about 150. 

Gharlestown. 

Of this division of the city there are 30 sectional plans, 
upon a scale of 30 feet to an inch. The set is incomplete, 
as 10 plans were either never made or have been lost. The 
plans are in good condition, so far as they go; but for sev- 
eral years nothing has been done upon them. 

East Boston. 

Of this division of the city there are 37 sectional plans, 
upon a scale of 40 feet to an inch. Seven plans have either 
never been made or have been lost, and there are no plans of 
Breed's Island. The plans are in good condition. 

South Boston. 

Of this division of the city there are 39 plans, upon a 
scale of 40 feet to an inch. Eleven plans required to com- 
plete the set have never been made. The plans are in good 
condition. 



68 City Document No. 34. 

Roxbury. 
Of this division of the city there are 79 plans, upon a scale 
of 40 feet to an inch. Two plans are missing, and 12 addi- 
tional plans are required to complete the set. Twenty-five of 
these plans are very much worn and should be replaced. With 
the exception of the missing plans, this set is correct to Jan- 
uary, 1895. 

Dorchester. 

Of this division of the city there should be 215 plans in 
the complete set. One hundred and six of the plans have been 
made, and are in good condition. 

This district is growing rapidly, many new streets have been 
built since the plans were made, and many calls are made for 
the plans not yet made. These plans are upon a scale of 40 
feet to an inch. 

West Roxbury. 

Of this division of the city there are 34 sectional plans, 
upon a scale of 40 feet to an inch. The plans are in good 
condition, but nothing has been done upon them for some 
years. About 300 phins would be required to complete the 
set, but as portions of this district are thinly settled, 100 
additional plans would probably be sufficient for the next ten 
years. 

Brighton. 

Of this division of the city there are no sectional plans. 
There are 39 rolled plans, showing most of the principal 
streets, but nothing has been done upon these plans for many 
years. Sectional plans should be made of this district, the 
plans being made as needed. To make the complete set 
120 plans would be required, upon a scale of 40 feet to an 
inch. 

Summary . 

The Roxbury set has been brought up to January, 1895, 
and some work has been done upon the South Boston and 
Dorchester sets. Each sheet, when corrected, is marked 
correct to the proper date in pencil. The remaining sheets 
have not been corrected for four years certainly, and it is 
unknown just when they were last corrected. 

To maintain these plans in proper condition, a draughts- 
man and one assistant should be employed to take charge 
of them, to know all about them, to be responsible for their 
safe- keeping, to attend to people who desire to consult 
them, and to give their whole time to their correction. In 
one year, with the aid of such help as can be given by the 
remainder of the force in the winter, enough progress can be 



Street Department. 69 

made to determine what the cost of keeping up such a set of 
plans will be, and it should then be settled whether it is 
worth while to continue to do so or not. The pay of a 
draughtsman and assistant, competent to do this work, at 
present rates, need not exceed $1,000 per annum. 

Berwick Park Footbridge, over Providence Division, 
New York, New^ Haven, & Hartford Railroad. 

Plans and specifications for a retaining-wall on Follen 
street, and additions to the present retaining-wall on Ber- 
wick park, were prepared, and on June 21a contract for 
doing this was concluded with Quimby & Ferguson for the 
sum of $3,200. These retaining- walls form the supports of 
an iron footbridge similar to that over the railroad at Ir- 
vington street. The iron stairways and piers were furnished 
by the Boston Bridge Works, at a cost of $1,200. The iron 
span is that formerly used at Franklin street, Allston ; it 
was taken down, moved, and erected at Berwick park by the 
Boston Bridge Works for the sum of $500. 



Boylston-street Bridge, ovek Boston & Albany 
Kailroad. 

Iron railings have been erected on this bridge, and on one 
of the street retaining-walls. The work was done by the 
Boston Bridge Works from plans and specifications prepared 
by this Department. 

Charles River Bridge. 

This bridge, which was closed to team-travel on account of 
its dangerous condition, has been temporarily strengthened 
for the passage of light teams and foot-travel. The work 
was (lone by Trumbull & Ryan and the Bridge Division of 
the Street Department. The amount paid Trumbull & 
Ryan under their contract was $2,1)09.94. 

Chelsea-street Bridge. 

A contract was made with B. F. Nay & Co., on August 
20, for removing the old i)ridge, inchuling the draw and 
draw-pier, and rebuilding the entire pile bridge and diaw- 
pier, and on September (> a contract was made wiili tlu^ 
Boston Brid";e Works for buildinj; a steel swiiii^ di-aw. The 
work is so nearly completed that it is prol)al)le that the 
bridge will be opened for travel early in the present month. 



70 City Document No. 34. 



Cottage Faem Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 

Railroad. 

The ybutments of this bridge have been extended to pro- 
vide for a new bridge of a width equal to that of Common- 
wealth avenue at this point, and a retaining-wall built on 
the northerly line of Commonwealth avenue, betw^een the 
northerly abutment and Essex street. 

The plans and specification for this work were prepared 
by the Engineering Department, and the w^ork done by 
Leavitt, Daily, & Crockett, for the sum of $40,219.80. 

Yours respectfully, 

[Signed] William Jackson, 

Cii^ Engineer. 

Street Openings. 

Eighteen thousand five hundred and fifty-two permits 
were granted during the past year to open streets. The exca- 
vations made under these permits aggregate 198.8 miles in 
length, and show the extent of this work. 

The Street Department has been accustomed to grant to 
the various gas and other companies, whose work would in 
certain cases aduiit of no delay, a so-called " emergency 
permit," which allowed excavations to be made without 
special permission being obtained, the only requirement 
being that a daily return of o[)enings made under this form 
of permit should be forwarded to the ofiice of the superin- 
tendent. 

Two thousand five hundred and *seventy-six openings of 
an average length of six feet each were made under 
"emergency permits" for breaks in water and gas pipes 
which were alleged to require immediate attention. These 
openings were made under 99 permits. 

In addition to the above permits, various other permits 
have been issued to pedlers, mechanics, and otheTs, for 
different purposes, 14,376 in number; making the total 
number of permits issued 32,928. 

Mention was made in last year's report that real-estate 
owners are extremely careless in providing sewer and water 
connections for their several buildings, both old and new, in 
streets that are advertised to be improved and regulated, 
and frequently call for a permit to open for gas, water, or 
sewer connections soon after the department has put down a 
permanent pavement. 

Such cases are of frequent occurrence. The blame is 



Street Department. 71. 

usually shifted off on unnoticed negligence of the contractor 
or somebody else, while the utter uselessness of a building 
without gas or water is put forward in the plea for consent 
to the opening being made. 

The only remedy would seem to be to demand the 
forfeiture of a sufficient sum of money to repay the depart- 
ment for the necessary labor of making the pavement good 
with its own force. If let off with any lighter concession, 
the chances are that repetitions of neglect will occur, and 
the pavement itself will not receive the full measure of care 
in replacement that the regulations stipulate. 



72 City Document No. 34. 



STREET-WATERING. 



In 1891 for the first time the Street Department assumed 
the responsibility of watering streets on a more enlarged 
scale and on a different system. Numerous public hearings 
were given on the subject of street-watering before the work 
was started, but were productive only in stirring up opposi- 
tion to the proposed plan of assessing the expense of water- 
ing upon the estates abutting on streets and portions of 
streets watered, in proportion to the linear feet of frontage 
of each estate. 

This was decidedly objectionable to the residents of 
suburban districts. The residents of the outlying sections 
of the city contended that such assessments would be ex- 
ceedingly heavy upon them,, as their frontages are com- 
paratively large and the value of the estates relatively small. 
The owners of unimproved property also felt that such an 
arrangement would be a burden upon them. 

The objections resulted in the substitution for the pro- 
posed assessment of a yearly appropriation for street-water- 
ing to be met by the general tax-levy. 

To satisfy the comphaints from Back Bay and South End 
residents on account of the unreasonable prices hitherto 
charged for the work, these two sections were let out by 
contract, to be paid for by the city, and the rest of the 
macadamized portions were watered by day carts, also at the 
city's expense. Paved streets, however, have been made 
the exception, and are still watered by private contractors at 
the abutter's expense on the subscription plan. 

The results of the first two years were subjected to care- 
ful study, and adjustments in the distribution of the force 
and water-posts rendered the organization more efficient, 
until, with the modern equipments, the entire work was es- 
tablished on a more thorough and systematic basis. 

The year 1894 was the driest and hottest season since 
this system of street-watering was inaugurated. With the 
humidity at 40, the thermometer at 90, and high winds, it 
was impossible at times to keep the dust down, and there 
were many days during the season when the atmospheric 
conditions were such that double the number of carts would 
have been necessary to manage and control the dust. The 
full force of carts was needed every day for a period in- 



Street Department. 73 

eluding June, July, and part of August, an unusually long 
spell of dry weather. 

The total number of miles of macadam streets watered 
this year was 296.66, an increase of 17.36 miles over last 
year. The contractors watered at the expense of the abut- 
ters 32.50 miles of paved streets. The total number of 
miles of macadam and paved streets watered was 329. 5(), an 
increase over the year previous of 20.83 miles. The paved 
streets of the city proper are quite free from dust and in a 
clean condition, from frequent sweeping. 

The department feels that the original cost of paved 
streets and the extra care taken of them does not warrant 
their free watering. 

The watering of paved streets by contractors has been so 
excessive at times that it was necessary to prohibit it after 
4 o'clock P.M. in order that the pavements might dry out 
preparatory for the night sweeping. 

When asphalt streets are flanked on either side by 
macadam streets, it is well-nigh impossible to keep them 
free from dust. Beacon street, for example, is intersected 
by sixteen (16) macadam streets, from the gutters of which 
more or less dirt and dust blows on to the asphalt, and in 
wet weather mud from the same is tracked on to the asphalt 
surface by both wheels and hoofs. Constant sweeping, sup- 
plemented by occasional light sprinkling with fresh water, is 
the only proper treatment for asphalt paving, although this 
course has not obtained the past year. 

Street-watering was begun this year on March 6 (last 
year March 19) and continued until December 1. A few 
carts were out on December 20 and 22. They could have 
been used oftener in this month, but the temperature would 
not permit. Streets cannot be watered if the thermometer 
is below 34^^. 

On August 10 both roadways of Commonwealth avenue 
were deducted from the contract because of construction, 
and were not watered from then to the end of the season. 

To improve and facilitate the street-watering 24 new 
stand-pipes were erected. Much time is saved by establish- 
ing stand-pipes at convenient intervals, and more ett'ectual 
watering can be done when the distance to obtain fresh sup- 
plies of water is not great. 

I'he old style copper sprinklers have vanished and modern 
styles have taken their j)laces. 

The following: table shows the changes that have been 
effected in the style of watering-carts during the past two 
years : 



74 



City Document No. 34. 



1892. 
1894. 



Old Copper. 



61 



Studebaker 



4 
59 



Abbott- 
Downing. 



16 
30 



Potter Patent. 



27 

18 



Miller 
Knoblock. 



108 
109 



Summary of Day Work paid for by the City. 



Ko. 



3 
4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



District. 



South Boston 
East Boston . 
Charlestown . 
Brighton .... 
W. Eoxbury. 
Dorchester . . 
Eoxbury .... 
Back Bay . . . 
Beacon Hill . 
South Yard. . 

Totals . . . 



si 


>> 


S"* 


S " 




cS >. 


»■= 






.■a 


o ® 




o 


9 




7 




7 




11 


2 


35 


2 


16 


1 


18 




3 





2 




2 




90 


6 



No. miles 
covered. 



22.80 

17.61 

15.00 

32.00 

58.66 

56.99 

53.04 

5.85 

4.21 

5.04 



271.20 



^s. 

> s 

2.53 
2.52 
2.14 
2.46 
3.45 
3.35 
2.95 
1.95 
2.10 
252 

2.85 



This summary shows that ninety carts hired by the day 
and five carts owned by the city watered 271.20 miles of 
streets daily for the season. Last year ninety-four carts 
watered 257.45 miles of streets. 

The cost of day and city work, exclusive of supervision, 
was $229 per mile, or $62,192.50, as against $298 per mile 
and a total of $76,725 last year. 

The carts averaged 2.85 miles of streets per day as against 
2.74 miles last year. Watering was commenced on March 
6, and continued until December 1, although in Back Bay, 
streets were watered on December 20 and 22. 



Street Department. 75 

Summary of Contract Work paid for by the City. 



Districts. 


Contractors. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


Cost. 


Back Bay 

South End 


M. E. Nawn 


9 


11.78003 
9.18760 


$6,696 02 
5,1''8 15 


0. Nute & Son 








Totals 




m 


20.96763 


•SI 1,824 17 







This table shows that thirteen and a half carts were used 
by the contractors to wtiter 20.96763 miles of streets. 

The Back Bay was watered with fresh water entirely this 
year. In the South Knd salt and fresh water were used, as 
last 3'ear. 

The contract price in the Back Bay was $575 per mile for 
fret-h water. The price paid for the work in the South End 
■was $630 per mile for salt water and $460 per mile for fresh 
water. 

Work done by Contractors at the Expense of the Abutters. 



District. 


Contractors. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


City Proper 


Daniel Clark 


3 
5 
5 
h 

1 
1 
3 

1 


3 67 


City Proper 


Potter Bros 


8 75 




Proctor Bros. & Billings.. 
0. Nute & Son 


7.25 


City Proper 

East Boston 


1.50 


J. H. Fitzpatrick 


2.00 


Charlestown 


W. H. Quiglev 


2.00 


Roxbury and South Boston. . 
Hoxbury 


H. P. Cook & Co 


6 51 


William Gilligan 


1.25 








Totals 




19i 


32.93 









The above work was done for, and at the expense of the 
abutters. The streets watered are all paved. The table 
shows that with 10^ carts those contractors watered 32.93 
miles of streets in the City Proper, South Ik^ston, Etist Bos- 
ton, Chiiilestown, and Koxbiiry. 

This is an increase over last year of l.J carts and 3.50 
miles of streets. 



76 City Document No. 34. 

Work done by the Contractors Free of Cost to the City. 



Name. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


Proctor Bros. & Billi 


ngs. 




1 

k 
k 


1.64 


Potter Bros 




.94 


Daniel Clark 


.8r> 


H. P. Cook & Co 


.52 


Gilligan Bros 


.54 






Totals 


n 


4.50 







This summary shows that five contractors with 2^ carts 
watered 4.50 miles of streets free of cost to the city on return 
for the privilege of watering paved streets for the abutters. 

The Superintendent of Streets required that they agree to 
this watering before granting them permits which ensures 
them the exclusive right of soliciting watering patronage 
from paved streets within certain defined limits, with the 
privilege of using the city stand-pipes and water. 

Summary of Work done which was paid for by the City. 



No. 


District. 


Miles, day work. 


Miles, contract work. 


Total miles. 


1 


South Boston . . 
East Boston. . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury . 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Back Bay 

Beacon Hill 

South Yard 


22.80 

17 61 

15.00 

32.00 

58.66 

56 99 

53.04 

5.85 

4.21 

5.04 




22.80 


2 




17.61 


3 




15.00 


4 




32 00 


5 




58.06 


6 




56.99 


7 




53.04 


8 
9 


11.78 


17 63 
4.21 


10 


9.18 


14.22 




Totals 


271.20 

or about 

3,579,857 sq. yds. 


20.96 

or about 

459,384 sq. yds. 


292.16 



Steeet Department. 



77 



Cost of day and city work, exclusive of supervision, 
$229.32 per mile. 

Cost of contract work, exclusive of supervision, $5(i4.13. 

The apparent discrepancy between the cost of day work 
and that of contract work is accounted for by the fact that 
the contract watering obtained only in the South End and 
Back Bay Districts, where the streets are generally wide, 
and were partly watered with salt water. 

The slight excess in cost per mile of contract work over 
last year was due to an early start in watering. The con- 
tractors are paid by the day for work done in March and 
December, the season extending, as per contract, from April 
1 to December 1. The cost of contract, day, and city work 
was I74,01H.67. This expense is the cost exclusive of su- 
pervision, water-posts, repairs, etc. Water was furnished 
by the Boston Water Board at no expense. 

Distribution of Carts, showing- Entire Amount of Work 

done. 



No. 


District. 


City carts. 


Hired carts. 


Contractors' 
carts. 


Total. 


Miles. 


1 


Soutli Boston. . . 




9 

7 
7 
11 
15 
16 
18 
7 


1 

1 
1 


10 

8 

8 

13 
17 
17 
21 
34 

n 


24.55 


2 


East Boston .... 




19.61 


3 


Charlestown . . . 




17.00 


4 


Brighton 

W. Koxbury . . . 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 


2 
2 

1 


32.00 


5 




58.66 


6 




56.99 


7 


3 

27 
2i 


59 05 


8 


City Proper 

Free Watering. 




57.23 
4 50 














Totals 


5 


90 


3oh 


130i^ 


329.59 



78 



City Document No. 34. 



0) 
A 

O 





b 


oi ^ 


c 


i 00 <? 


1 <: 


5 li 


1 1 00 




coooc^Oco-^i 


o 


OQ 




iCCOCiO'Mt^COOl 




eo t~ -o - 


-. lO CV| lO lO 1 O 




»OCDCOQOt^Ot^<i3|i— 1 






















H 


CDlOlOCS^IKIfM'- 


t- 




€^ 






rt .-, r-l (M 1 'X 




















۩= 


















^ w 


s 
















Oi 05 






















■a 
















o o 
















CO <a3 


;3 
















lO lO 
















; €©= <j©= 


© 
















-* 1 -H 


.S 
















o 1 o 


,i3 




















a 
















IM (M 
















00 00 


















1^ o 


W 
















; ۩= ۩= 


















>o 1« 


















o 1 o 






































CO CO 

o o 


^ 
















C3 en 


» 
















^^ s& 


|Zi 


















1 " 


i 


m ^ iM )C 00 ?^ <M ir 


: o 




TOOt^"— i-TOC> 


1 CO 


o 




















ft 


CI cq '^ 05 — 


00 00 l- 


o 




lOcD-^ooooeooci 


5 lO 


» 


m= iM 


-H CO lO CO * 


» o 


^ 














» 








>0 >0 lO >0 O O 00 c^ 


a o 




"^-^itrTtfOOJOOcc 


S 00 


o 


SlOiOiOOOOOOOOt 


5 (M 


pO 


lO lO »0 lO — 


^H .— 1 t~ 


r- 


03 


OCDC050C0C0C0C 


s >o 


1-; 


^ 






-h" rn" ^ r- 


* 00 




















m 




oooooooc 


■> o 


2 


lOlOiQiOOOOC 


o 
























c^icit-t^joooi^ 


S O 


rHioinoooocoir 


1 o 




00 l- 


O lO 00 — 


—1 c 


■> Ol 


lO •* -* t- o- 


O -H ir 


00 


M 


«= 










" 




















b- 


1— 1 






















2 „■ 
















•^ 


•tH 


o 2 
















c 


o 










































a » 
















c^ 


c^l 






















y 
















# 


f m 










c 


c 


c 






o 


s 








IT 


c 


c 






1« 










oc 




IT 






as 










V. 


(?; 


tc 






(M 






















O 








r- 


r- 








CO 








€(l 


f 








^ 












> 










E^ 


c 
c 


c 


c 




s 














c 


^ 




s. 
















c 




o 

D 1 






c 




P 






c 
c 

X. 

bj 


0. 


3 
M 


^ c 

pi 

> 


o 




c 






;- 


^ 




c 








a: 


ft 


c 


PC 




« 


c 




d 




















^ 


<-H 


(N 


eo 


■* 


lO 


CO 


h- 


00 





Street Department. 



79 



The following table shows the amount expended in street- 
watering by the city for the last seventeen (17) years : 



1878 


$23,595 02 


1887 


$51,365 73 


1879 


26,747 18 


1888 


40,586 58 


1880 


. 33,306 95 


1889 


47,837 46 


1881 


. 36,178 24 


1890 


57,967 34 


1882 


45,797 00 


1891 


104,263 62 


1883 


53,502 29 


1892 


94,507 80 


1884 


34,518 47 


1893 


99,430 16 


1885 
1886 


43,854 68 
44,940 35 


1894 


87,169 08 



Water-Posts or Stand-Pipes. 

In order to inaprove the watering service this year twenty- 
four new stand-pipes were erected in different parts of the 
city. Seven stand-pipes were reestablished for various 
causes, principally on account of new streets, and new 
buildings being constructed where the pipes were formerly 
ocated. 

The following table shows the locality of the pipes by 
districts : 



District. 


1S9I. 


1893. 


1893. 


1894. 


Increase 
over 
189J. 


South Boston 


23 
16 
19 
25 
50 
61 
53 
24 


25 
23 
19 
39 
59 
72 
60 
42 


27 
28 
20 
42 
60 
75 
65 
45 


27 
32 
20 
44 
65 
82 
68 
48 




East Boston 


4 


Charlestown 




Brighton 


2 


West Roxbury 

Dorchester 


5 

7 


Roxbury 


3 


City Proper 


3 






Totals 


271 


339 


362 


386 


24 







An increase of 115 stand-pipes since 1891. 



80 



City Document No. 34. 



Income. 

The Watering Division during the year watered streets in 
front of 106 school-houses, 14 police stations, and 28 engine- 
houses. In addition to the number cited we watered around 
several school-houses in course of construction. 



The following sums were charged for street-watering: 

Board of Police 

Engine-houses 

Louishurg square 

Marcel la-street Home . 

Homoeopathic Hospital . 

Dispensary Hospital 

Fairfax and Beaumont streets 

Section, Washington street, Jamaica Plain 



$192 


57 


411 


95 


100 


00 


28 


00 


105 


00 


12 


25 


50 


00 


7 


00 



Total 



$906 77 



Owing to lack of appropriation the School Board last year 
refused to pay for the watering in front of their school- 
houses. 

The Boston Water Board, by its uniform promptness in 
furnishing new posts, in turning on or shutting off water, 
and in many other ways, has rendered the division much 
assistance during the year. 

Mr. J. W. Smith, the Local Forecast official, offered 
valuable help by the mailing of weather maps twice a day 
and the furnishing of weather records. 



Street Department. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 



The work of the Sanitary Division includes tlie removal 
of house-offal and the removal of house and store dirt and 
ashes, accumulated from the burning of materials for heating- 
buildings and for domestic purposes. 

The following table shows the number of loads of offal 
collected and removed in the last eleven (11) years : 

Amount of House-Offal Removed. 



Tear. 














No. of Load 


1884 . . . • 


. 28,520 


1885 














31,206 


1886 














33,170 


1887 














36,724 


1888 














37,409 


1889 














40,183 


1890 














40,525 


18911 














46,742 


1892 














. 46,343 


1893 














. 51,415 


1894 














. 50,637 



Each load of offal is equivalent to fifty-seven (57) cubic 

Lfeet, and weighs one and one-half (11 ) tons at certain seasons 
pf the year, at others less. 

The above table does not include previous to the year 
1893 the amount collected by contract in East Boston and 
Brighton, which amounted to about 5,100 loads per year. 
Of the amount (50,637 loads) collected during the year 
1894, 3,720 loads were collected by the East Boston con- 
tractor, 1,539 loads were collected by the Brighton con- 
tractor, and 3,296 loads were collected by the Dorchester 
contractor, leaving 42,082 loads collected by city teams. 

The collection of this material is attended to in winter by 
an average regular force of 75 city offal carts and 163 men^ 
and on contract work 16 offal carts and 32 men ; making a 
total of 91 offal carts and 196 men. At different times, and 
especially in summer, an approximate extra force of 21 
teams and 42 men are employed. 



• Thirteen months. 



82 



City Document No. 34. 



The disposal has been made during the year in the follow- 
ing manner : The offal from the markets, and offal that is 
decayed, is put on board a scow and towed to sea ; the offal 
of Charlestown is taken to the yard at Maiden bridge and 
then disposed of to farmers ; the offal of East Boston is 
collected by contractors, and is removed to Revere ; the 
offal of the City Proper and South Boston is conveyed to the 
yard at the South End, and disposed of to farmers, who 
remove it daily ; the offal of Roxbury and West Roxbury is 
conveyed to the yard on Highland street, and disposed of to 
farmers ; a portion of the collections of West Roxbury is 
collected and sold to one man, who in turn sells it in 
Dedham ; the offal of Brighton is collected by contract and 
disposed of outside of the district; and the offal in Dor- 
chester has begun to be disposed of at the Gibson-street 
yard, where it is reduced by a process patented by the New 
England Construction Company, a description of which was 
given in the report of 1893. 

This plant has been in operation for so little time that no 
judgment can at this writing be passed upon its efficiency 
from a sanitary point of view. It is designed to provide for 
the disposal of 20 tons daily, and can undoubtedly take care 
of a somewhat larger amount. Every detail is well con- 
structed, and the general appearance of the buildings is 
suggestive of neatness and cleanliness. The actual results 
obtained will doubtless be of interest, and will appear in a 
future report. 



Collection and Disposal of Offal. 



Yeak. 


Total amount 
collected. 


Amount sold. 


Amount dumped 

on scow and 

towed to sea or 

wasted. 


Per cent, wasted 

to total 

collection. 


Amount of re- 
ceipts from 
sales. 


18911 

1892 2 

1893 3 
1894* 


2 42,616 loads. 
46,343 " 
46,276 " 
42,082 " 


40,492 loads. 
30,773 " 
30,824 " 
37,0.57 " 


2,124 loads. 
15,570 " 
15,363 " 

5,025 " 


per cent. 
33 " " 
30 " " 
12 •' " 


$30,672 65 
21,282 82 
20,790 03 
26,262 40 



January 21, 1895, New England Construction Company 
commenced to reduce the offlil collected in the Dorchester 
District, and a temporary agreement was made with the con- 



1 2 s Twelve months. Above table does not include contracts in East Boston and 

«"ln East Boston, 3,720 loads; Brighton, 1,539 loads; Dorchester, 3,296 loads; total, 8,?55 
loads, — collected during 1894 are not included in above table. For 1891 and 1892, East Bos- 
ton and Brighton were estimated at 5,100 loads. 



Street Depart3ient. 



83 



tractor for that district whereby he should continue the col- 
lection and deliver all the oifal collected at the Gibson-street 
yard, and that he should be paid for the same on the basis 
of day-work. 

The following table shows in convenient form the full force 
engaged in the collection of offal alone throughout the en- 
tire city : 

The Force Employed. 







Hired 

teams. 


Contractors' teams. 


Total. 




E.Boston. 


Brighton. 


Dorch'ter. 






2 

2 

65 

71 
3 








1 


3 


Offal clerks 








2 


Teamsters 


10 
10 


6 
6 


3 
3 


7 
7 


91 


Helpers 

Dumpers 


97 
3 












Totals 


143 


20 


12 


6 


15 


196 



The problem of a speedy disposal of oifal without waste 
has not as yet been successfully solved by any large munic- 
ipalit}'. The attention given to it in the last live to ten 
years shows to what extent its importance has impressed it- 
self upon the public mind, while in large cities of the interior, 
like Buflalo, Cleveland, Chicago, and St, Louis, the element 
of hasty extinction seems more desirable than any utilitarian 
consideration, and therefore destruction by tire is in great 
preference in Chicago, at least; yet the fact remains that no 
satisfactory plant has been established in either of these large 
cities that could be run either on a self-supporting basis or 
at a sufficiently low cost to guarantee its permanency, and 
at the same time be free from public condemnation and criti- 
cism. Crematories appear too costly, as a rule, reduction 
processes too otfensive, due either to the use of objectionable 
reducing agents, or to undesirable odors from both the liquid 
and solid products of the reduction. The point of collection 
is generally the seat of complaint, because of failure to dis- 
pose of the collections })romptly, and to properly wash out 
the offal wagons. 

In some cases the city has had to come to the relief of the 
contracting corporations, and either contribute both the col- 
lected oifal and all the animal-matter, or step in and run the 



84 



City Document No. 34. 



whole plant itself. Various experiments have been tried,, 
and are being tried, and progress for the better can be re- 
ported ; but the successful solution will only come when a 
truer knowledge of real facts is obtained, and the exact cost 
of every detail is carefully examined, not under the light of 
hasty and misleading comparisons between cities, ignoring 
the many differences in local conditions and requirements 
that always exist in different localities, but under the light 
of a comprehensive judgment that is seeking, only on the 
basis of sound and conservative reasoning, to establish a 
healthful method of treatment consistent with the demands of 
a growing population, and utterly void of all glittering sug- 
gestions of a sudden and mysterious fortune for an irrespon- 
sible inventor. Profit should be of secondary consideration, 
public health of the first. 

Removal of Ashes. 

The removal of ashes, house and store dirt, has been at- 
tended to during the year b}^ a minimum force of 207 men 
and 88 city carts, also by 5 carts with an East Boston con- 
tractor, and 9 by the South Boston contractors, 5 carts by a 
West Roxbury contractor, and 8 carts by the Dorchester 
contractors. At different times, and especially during the 
winter months, an additional force of 50 teams and 100 men 
are employed. 

This work shows a constant increase from year to year, as 
will be seen in the following table, and is an indication of 
the actual growth of the city : 

Amount of Ashes, House and Store Dirt Removed. 



Ypar. 












Number of Loads. 


1882 . . . 159,197 


1883 












169,610 


1884 












182,642 


1885 












193,734 


1886 












209,129 


1887 












220,186 


1888 












233,514 


1889 












227,325 


1890 












245,730 


1891 1 












313,464 


1892 












303,87.s 


1893 












320,571 


1894 












326,798 


\ Each load of ashe 


s contains about 40 cubic feet. 








1 Thiiteen 


months. 







Street Departjient. 



85 



The following table shows the disposition of this material 
from Februar}^ 1, 1894, to February 1, 1895, together with 
the amount of house-ofikl and the portion of street-sweepings 
that were disposed of by the Sanitary Division : 





Amount col- 
lected. 


Deposited 
on low 
lands. 


Towed to Colled ^^,,„ 
tractors. f^™«"- 




Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Ashes, house and store dirt. 


326,795 

50,637 

30,478 

1,376 


164,833 


95,779 
5,025 

30,478 
1,376 


66,186 
1 8,555 


37 057 








Cesspool dirt 






164,833 






409,289 


132,658 


74,741 


37,057 



^ This amount is included in the amount collected, 50,637 of the 8,555; 3,720 loads were 
collected in East Boston, 1,539 in Brighton, and 3,296 in Dorchester. 



Comparative Statement of Number of Loads of Ashes collected 
during 16 Weeks of the Summer and 16 Weeks of the Winter. 



Summer. 


Loads. 


Winter. 


Loads. 


Difference 
for Winter. 


"May 4, 1889, to Aug. 23, 1889 


60,609 


Nov. 30, 1889, to Mar. 1, 1890 


82,866 


22,257 


" 2,1890," " 21,1890 


65,239 


1, 1890, " " 13, 1891 


93,660 


28,421 


" 2, 1891, " " 21, 1891 


76,625 


Oct. 31, 1891, " Feb. 19, 1892 


100,223 


23,598 


Apr. 30,1892, " " 19,1892 


82,034 


" 30, 1892, " " 12, 1893 


106,772 


24,738 


" 29,1893," " 18,1893 


91,721 


" 28, 1893, " " 16, 1894 


106,851 


15,130 


" 27, 1894, " " 16, 1894 


88,865 


" 25, 1894, " " 7,1895 


116,915 


28,050 



The department in this city insists on a complete separa- 
tion of offal and ashes. Receptacles containing both are not 
removed. The necessity of such separation is so obvious 
that no discussion is necessary. Other cities are recently 
following the exam])le set by Boston. 

The total expenditures of the division on account of offal 
and ashes, stock, etc., were $484,012.80. 



86 City Document No. 34. 



SEWER DIVISION. 



The past year has been one of anusual activity on the part 
of this division. The city has built with its own labor and 
by contract 90,802.77 linear feet of sewers, and designed and 
inspected 24,877.05 linear feet for private parties building 
under release ; making a total for the year of 115,679.82 
feet, or nearly twenty-two miles, which is about eight miles 
more than an average year. The total mileage of sewers 
now built is 384.72, of which 22.59 miles are intercepting 
sewers. Many new catch-basins and culverts have been 
built and old ones repaired. Over twenty miles of sewers 
have been cleaned and flushed, and 19,652.55 cubic yards of 
sludge removed from various catch-basins. 

Under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, as amended by 
Chap. 402 of the Acts of 1892, the Board of Street Com- 
missioners had laid out a number of streets, and this division 
has built, by contract, in eight different streets, all the 
sewers, catch-basins, and house-drains which will ever b» 
required, carrying the latter out to the curb-line. In the 
case of some unusually wide streets, it is the custom to build 
a sewer on each side of the street close to the curb, it hav- 
ing been found cheaper to do this than to build so many 
long house-drains. The object of building all these drains 
at one time is to make it feasible to preserve the street sur- 
face from the destructive effect of the constant digging of 
trenches for the laying of drains to connect the houses with 
the sewers. 

The water and gas mains and house connections have been 
laid in these streets in the same manner and for the same 
reason. 

In designing sewers for a large city, provision must be 
made not only for house sewage, but also for as much of the 
rainfall as will naturally find its way into the sewer system. 
The determination of the amount of house sewage is not 
complicated, as it is usually taken as about equal to the 
water supply of a given district. The size of the sewer is 
made to correspond with the maximum flow that occurs 
during the six hours of the day when the water supply is the 
greatest. 

The care of the rainfall or the determination of the pro- 



Street Department. 87 

portion of rainfall that should be provided for in the sewer 
design is a much more complicated prol)lem, and has so often 
been carelessly computed or left out of consideration, that 
the present generation is obliged to make up for the omis- 
sions of former engineers. 

While the oldest inhabitant can tell of severe rain-storms 
that occurred years ago, no definite idea of their intensity 
can be gathered from the general terms of their description. 
Not until within recent years have rain-gauges been in use 
that would determine, except in a crude way, the amount of 
rainfall in a given time. When one looks for the records 
locally, he is surprised to find so little data adapted to the 
particular locality under consideration. 

As far as Boston and vicinity is concerned, we are very 
nmch indebted to Mr. Desmond FitzGerald for the most 
careful records of both the water supply and the rainfall, 
together with a compilation of all the available data from 
difi'erent sources near this city. His records, taken with an 
automatically registering rain-gauge, show not only the total 
rainfall, but what is more essential, the rate of rainfall 
during the 'period of heaviest constant fall, which in reality 
determines the maximum flood discharge in sewers and water- 
courses. Diagrams of these rainfalls have been published 
in previous reports of this department. Recent study of 
this subject by eminent engineers has, through the published 
records of the profession, thrown much light on this ques- 
tion, and led to a much more intelligent judgment in all con- 
structive design. The diflTerence between the congested city 
area and the suburban area is fully appreciated, — the one 
with its impermeable pavements, brick sidewalks, and slated 
roofs, delivering with great rapidity the entire rainfall to 
the catch-basins and sewers ; the other uncovered, porous in 
nature, drinking up with avidity the first downfall of rain, 
until saturated, or the "drainage vehicle" is established, 
when it then begins to deliver to the sewer system. After 
taking into consideration all these facts, and determining to 
a nicety the sizes of sewers, storm-drains, culverts, and over- 
flows, and so regulating the same that no injudicious expen- 
diture of money shall be made by building too large or 
prematurely, and no injury shall ensue by building too small, 
the working success of the design is nevertheless largely in- 
terfered with, because of the disregard of pul)lic good on 
the part of private owners of land, who fail entirely to ap- 
preciate the part in such design that natural water-courses 
play, and also fail to recr)gnize that the law of equity de- 
mands that they be sacredly maintained, instead of being 
blotted out of sight. 



88 City Document No. 34. 

The following statement of facts, as given by the Engineer 
of Sewer Division, Mr. E. S. Dorr, shows the tendency of 
the day, and is worthy of the careful consideration of all 
who have the general welfare and the general ultimate and 
permanent success of all our public works at heart : 

Surface Drainage. 

" The subject of the proper disposal of the surface water in 
the suburban districts of the city is one of increasing 
importance. 

" While the sewers in the City Proper, East and South 
Boston, and Charlestown are, in the main, large enough to 
carry both the sewage and surface water, those of the out- 
lying districts are altogether too small to take the surface 
water, the areas to be drained being enormously larger than 
in the districts first mentioned. As the sewer system has 
been extended, year by year, into these outlying districts, 
the sizes designed have been but little larger than what was 
necessary to serve the needs of the district at the time of 
building. For many reasons this policy has been unavoid- 
able ; the size of outlets limits the size of extensions, and 
scarcity of funds often makes it imperative to build a sewer 
smaller than good judgment would dictate, in order to reach 
some community where the public health is endangered for 
lack of sewerage. 

"In many cases it would be not only financially im- 
practicable but would show bad business judgment to sink 
large sums of money in building sewers large enough for all 
time, when the development of the district is uncertain or 
likely to be slow. The result of these various causes is, that 
the sewer system in Dorchester, West Roxbury, Brighton, 
and parts of Roxbury, while large enough in general to take 
care of the house sewage and the street water durinof light 
rains, is totally inadequate to carry off the surface water of 
heavy rains. 

"A few instances are here arranged in tabular form to show 
the discrepancy between the capacity of the sewer and the 
storm flow from the district which it serves, the first column 
giving the names of the street in which the sewer lies, the 
second the capacity of the sewer in cubic feet per second, 
the third the size of the district in acres, and the fourth an 
estimate of the storm flow from the district : 



Street Department. 



8y 



West Roxbury District. 



Street. 


Capacity in 
cubic feet 
per second. 


Acreage. 


Storm duty, 
cubic feet 
per second. 




45 
33 
25 
34 
60 


500 
230 
1,000 
670 
720 


150 


Centre street. South to Orchard 


92 


Washington street, Keyes to Morton 

Eoslindale Main Sewer, Dudley to Albano.. . 
Cohasset to Washington 


300 
201 
216 







Dorchester District. 



Talbot avenue, Bernard to Washington 

Granite avenue, Adams street to Neponset 
River 


20 

25 

25 

30 
30 


550 

470 

950 

1,100 
1,300 


165 
140 


Centre street, Washington street to Mel- 
bourne street 


240 


Gibson street, Dorchester avenue to Adams 
street 

Adams, Parli, Clayton, and Commercial 


280 
350 



Brighton District. 



North Beacon street. 



Washington street, Market to Cambridge 
street 




110 



50 



"The difference between the capacity and duty is being 
carried by the water-courses and by running the sewers 
under a head, often with floodings in consequence. 

" The figures given above represent the flow which may be 
expected from a rainfall at the rate of an inch per hour, and 
the discharge of storm water from the districts even with this 
rainfall will increase with the development by 20% and 
over; heavier rains, which occur at intervals of a few years, 
will yield vastly more. 

"The state of things is growing constantly worse as the city 
grows, l)ecaiise, as new streets and houses are ])uilt, the 
proportion of impervious surface, from which the rain runs 



90 City Document No. 34. 

oft' rapidly, is being increased, causing the rainfall upon any 
given area to be concentrated and discharged in less time 
than in former years. 

"The inadequacy of the sewer systems to. carry the storm 
water becomes, therefore, more apparent every year as this 
change in the character of the surface of the ground goes on. 
It is also apparent that it becomes correspondingly impor- 
tant to preserve and improve the natural water-courses to 
serve as carriers of the bulk of these floods, as the alterna- 
tive to this is practically to rebuild the whole sewer system 
of the suburban districts upon a larger scale. 

"In other words, we shall be compelled to regard our sewers 
as part of a partially separate system, although they were 
built and have been used upon the combined principle. 

^' By confining the sewers to the duty of carrying the house 
sewage and the discharge from a limited number of catch- 
basins only, they will prove in most cases large enough, while 
the natural water-courses, supplemented by surface drains in 
the streets, will have to be developed into a system for car- 
rying away the storm water, 

" It is also important to keep as much surface water as pos- 
sible out of the sewer system, for the additional reason that 
all water, whether sewage or rain water, has to be lifted by 
the pumps of the intercepting system. 

"But however much those whose business it is to care for 
the city's interest may be impressed with the importance of 
preserving the water-courses, it is very difficult to impress 
the general public with its importance. This department is 
constantly involved in contests w^ith land-owners who are 
filling up and obliterating these water-courses, heedless of 
well-defined channels or conspicuous street culverts. And 
here comes in play that discouraging phase of human nature, 
in consequence of which men, who are honorable in their 
dealings with their fellows, seem to be able to make use of a 
much lower code of morals when they come to deal with that 
impersonal entity called the city. 

"Although it may be explained to them that their course 
will entail upon the city in a few years an enormous expense 
for rebuilding the sewers of larger size, and although the 
law is perfectly clear that no man has a right to obstruct a 
natural water-course and thereby damage his neighbor, still 
their personal gain outweighs these theoretical consider- 
ations, and they will persist in obliterating the channel, and 
will bring every political and other influence to bear to the 
end that the water which should flow in that channel be 
turned into the sewer, and have in many cases succeeded. 

"No one can pretend that the land speculator suffers any 



Street Department. 91 

hardship by not being allowed to improve his lot- in this 
manner, because the depreciation in the vahie of the land 
caused by the presence of the water-course has undoubtedly 
been discounted in the purchase price in every transfer 
through which it has passed, and certainly no one can claim 
that he has any moral right to the increment of value added 
thus at the city's expense. Unfortunately, his legal right to 
it is clear if he can get the thing done, and therein lies the 
temptation. 

"Now, the city's interest is such a vital one in this matter 
that it cannot aflford to remain passive : its course must be 
more aggressive in the future, or many of the most impor- 
tant of these w^ater-courses will be practically obliterated 
within a few years, as a perusal of the paragraphs describing 
their present condition (which will be given later) will 
prove. 

"The law, as it»stands, gives the city no rights which are 
at all commensurate with its interest in the matter. 

"The city's obligation is to keep a good and suiEcient 
culvert in operation on every water-course which crosses a 
public street. 

"If an abutter upon a water-course starts tilling it in, the 
city can take no action until actual damage has resulted from 
flooding the street. 

" This is the sum total of the city's duties and rights in 
regard to these channels. 

"The city should be given the right, by virtue of its in- 
terest, to prevent the obliteration of these channels, by 
notification and the imposition of suitable fines ; this would 
require the action of the Legislature. This right would serve 
to keep some kind of a channel open; but even this is not 
sufficient, as it would result in leaving to every abutter the 
right to build such a channel as he might desire without any 
uniformity of size or material, whereas a channel, to be an 
efficient carrier of water, should be fairly uniform as to size 
and grade. 

"All cities l)uild sewer systems and assess a portion of the 
cost upon those benefited, instead of leaving it to be done 
by individuals, by mutual agreement, because that is the 
only practicable way to secure a working system ; there is 
just as much reason for doing the same thing in the case of 
a system of surface drainage. In very many cases it is now 
necessary to improve the channel of water-courses by deep- 
ening, widening, and straightening. Before the city can do 
this work it must at present make formal takings and pay 
land damages. 

"It must then assume the whole cost of the work, as it has 



92 City Document No. 34. 

no power to assess. The land-owners meanwhile reap all 
the benefit, the value of lands abutting upon ^uch a stream 
being enhanced enormously by such operations, being often- 
times converted from swamps into available building lots. 

" If the city's right to secure the preservation of these 
water-courses could be clearly established by legislative 
action, as proposed above, then damages could not be proven 
in case the city made improvements upon them ; this being 
so, the necessity for making takings would in most cases be 
avoided, by obtaining easements by agreement with the land-' 
owners for such locations for the channels as the land-owners 
might prefer in order to enable them to cut up their land 
into building lots to the best advantage. If, in addition, the 
city were given the right to assess such proportion of the 
cost of improvement upon abutting lands as the Legislature 
might deem fit, the vexed question of maintaining an ade- 
quate system of surface drainage, as a necessary adjunct to 
the sewer system, would be in a fair way to be settled upon 
an equitable basis. 

" A brief review of the present condition and needs of some 
of the principal natural water-courses of the city may prove 
instructive. 

Dorchester District. 

"Tenean brook is the natural outlet for the drainage of a 
valley of about 800 acres. The advisability of improving its 
channel in order to afford relief to the overcrowded sewer, 
systems in Park and Gibson streets was discussed in the 
Report for 1892, page 112 (to which reference is made), and 
the approximate cost stated as $125,000, covering the main 
brook and its northern branch from the outlet at Mill street 
to Park street near the West End car-houses. An extension 
of the improvement of about 700 feet would reach and drain 
the 'Clay Pits,' so called, of which particular mention was 
made in the report of the committee of the Common Council 
on Dorchester marsh lands, made January 3, 1895. This 
would cost about $12,000 more, making"^ $137,000 in all. 
Farther up stream on this northern branch the city has built 
xm expensive storm sewer from Bowdoin street through 
Geneva avenue and Westville street. 

" This improvement will have to be eventually extended 
down stream to connect with the one first mentioned, and the 
surfurce water from all streets in the vicinity conducted to it 
by a system of surface drains. 

"Upon the southern branch of this brook, which reaches 
the vicinity of Rosemont street, the city has built a capacious 
culvert on Dorchester avenue, and private parties who are 



Steeet Department. 93 

developing a large tract of land west of Dorchester avenue 
will provide a channel for it there. 

" The southerly branch of Davenport brook flows through 
the Churchill swamp, to which reference is also made in 
the report of the Common Council commmittee previously 
mentioned. A systematic deepening of this brook from its 
mouth upw^ards is the only means of draining this swamp. 

" On the northerly branch the city has built culverts on 
Armandine, Bailey, and Fuller streets and Dorchester 
avenue. Private parties have obstructed and nearly closed 
this water-course on Armandine, near Washington street, and 
at Burt avenue ; early action should be taken to compel the 
reopening of its channel. 

"The Mattapan brook, which rises near Forest Avenue 
Station and flows through Mattapan Village to the Neponset 
river, if improved systematically would improve the sanitary 
condition of that region and render large areas of swamp 
lands available for building purposes. 

"The improvement of the upper part of this brook in the 
vicinity of Capen, Fuller, and Seldon streets is a necessity, 
owing to the fact that whatever system of sewers is built 
there, it will be impossible to take into them any of the 
storm water. 

" Passing over the divide into the valley of Stony brook, 
the brook which flows through the site of the Oakland 
Garden, claims our attention. The department has had a 
long controversy with the land-owners here, who have o1)lit- 
erated the channel of the brook and turned its waters into 
the sewers, to the great detriment of the latter. 

" This work will have to be undone. Farther down stream, 
where "this brook is larger, the city has built ample culverts 
on Spencer street, Wheatland avenue, and Millet street. 

West Roxbury District. 

" Stony brook and its main tributaries need not be discussed 
further, in connection with this subject, than to state that 
they are too large to be in danger of obliteration. If funds 
were available, however, improvements might be undertaken 
upon them which would amply repay the cost. Upon the Can- 
terbury branch, in the vicinity of the Austin Farm; upon 
theRosJindale branch, near Florence and Washington streets ; 
Whipi)Ie avenue and Ashland street ; a large tract between 
Walter, Weld, and Hewlett streets ; also in the vicinity of 
Anawan avenue and Colberg-street extension, and lieacii and 
Irving streets, — are localities where a comparatively light 
cost and inexpensive improvement would convert partially 
submerged marshes into habitable building land. 



94 City DocUxMent No. 34. 

" The whole valley of the Roslindale branch above the 
channel built by the City Engineer in 1891, extending across 
Dudley and Bellevue avenues and along Belgrade avenue to 
Central Station, needs attention. 

" This locality now has sewerage, and is being rapidly built 
up, but the present condition of the brook must lead to 
damp cellars, flooded lands, malaria and fever, if not bettered 
before long. 

" The brook which rises south of West Roxbury Station and 
crosses the Dedham Branch E..R. near Spring Street Station 
needs urgentl}^ a sj^stematic deepening and straightening, as 
the premises of the inhabitants of this valley are flooded by 
it every winter ; but as much sewage finds its way directl}' 
and indirectly into it, and as it flows into Charles river at a 
point above where several towns and cities take their drink- 
ing water from the river, a system of sewerage should precede 
its improvement, for this sewage is now practically destroyed 
before reaching the river by the natural processes of aeration 
and sedimentation during its slow pros^ress throu<>h reedv 
marshes. 

Brighton District. 

"In this district more abuses of the natural water-courses, 
In the way of obstruction, obliteration, and connection with 
the sewers, has taken place than in any other part of the city. 
The most important of these is the brook near Shepard and 
Winship streets, which flows northerly across Washington 
and Cambridge streets, near their junction, and North Bea- 
con, near Arthur street; it then crosses Everett street at the 
corner of Braintree street, passes under the Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad, Lincoln and Franklin streets, in a culvert of 
considerable size. From ITranklin to North Harvard streets 
the little that remains of the brook is carried in an absurdly 
small channel, consisting of 24 and 18 inch pipes; from 
North Harvard street to the river it flows in an open chan- 
nel, crossing Western avenue in a good stone culvert. It is 
taken into the sewer in Shepard street, causing the sewers 
in this street and Winship street to back into the cellars 
every spring, and during heavy storms at other seasons. It 
is taken in again at Cambridoe- street, overcharo^ino; this 
sewer badly. Again on North Beacon street, near Arthur 
street, it is turned into the sewer. On Everett street, at the 
corner of Braintree, it is again connected with the sewer, and 
the remnant is carried in a pipe through the cellars of sev- 
eral dwelling-houses. A culvert was built at the demand of 
this department through the retaining-walls and embankment 
of the approach of the new Everett-street bridge over the 



Street Department. 95 

Boston & Albany Ruilroad, but is inoperative. At this 
point the only way of restoring the brook channel seems to 
be bj^ building a capacious storm sewer. The importance of 
establishing an uninterrupted channel for this brook may be 
seen from the facts -that its water-shed, at Xorth Beacon 
street, for instance, is three hundred and five acres, yielding 
a flow of one hundred and ten cubic feet per second from 
storms of moderate intensity in the present state of develop- 
ment of the district, and probably one hundred and seventy- 
five cubic feet in heavy storms, to say nothing of tlDe 
increase of flow, which must come with the future develop- 
ment, while the capacity of the main sewer in North Beacon 
street, which is the only channel operating at present freely, 
is only thirty-five cubic feet per second. 

" Between North Harvard street and Western avenue the 
channel of the brook runs through the Rena-street district, 
so called, comprising about sixty acres. On account of its 
proximity to the Metropolitan main sewer, a part of this 
district has been sewered upon the separate system, the 
house sewers being connected with the Metropolitan sewer 
and the surface drains with the brook. Another portion, 
including Rena, North Harvard, Bayard, Weitz, and Ken- 
neth streets, has no surface drains as yet. As the connec- 
tions of these house sewers with the Metropolitan sewer had 
to be made through regulators, at the demand of the ]Metro- 
politan Drainage Commission, these sewers have no means 
of relief, except by backing up into the cellars, whenever 
the water in the Metropolitan sewer rises high enough to 
cause the regulators to cut ofi" the connection. Surface 
drains will have to be built, connecting with the brook, and 
serving as relief overflows for the house sewers, making it 
absolutely necessary for this portion of the brook channel, at 
least, to be preserved. 

"It will be seen from the foregoing description that this 
important brook is practically oT^literated in numerous 
places, and measures should be taken by the city promptly 
to reopen its channel ; for, if it is not done, the city will be 
forced to build an enormously expensive storm sewer to take 
its place, from North Harvard street to Shepard street, a 
distance of about nine thousand feet, at an early date. 

"A drain, formerly a brook channel, tributary to the main 
brook, comes from the Boston & Albany stock yards, and 
joins the main brook at Everett street, close to the railroad. 
This carries all the foul washings of the stock yards, and 
causes a nuisance in the channel of the main l)rook north 
of this point. This should be connected with the Everett- 
street sewer, as its contents are as foul as any sewage ; but 



96 City Document No. 34. 

first the main brook should be disconnected from the sewer 
and restored to its proper channel. 

"The tract of land bounded by North Beacon, Murdock, 
Sparhawk, and Market streets is laid out in streets, and has 
some sewers, built years ago by private parties. These are 
too near the surface to serve as sewers, but may be utilized 
as surface drains. A brook formerly flowed from this land 
across Market street, near Faneuil street, and down to the 
pond near North Beacon street at the iron bridge, and a por- 
tion of a good walled-up channel may yet be seen, but the 
remainder is obliterated. If this channel is not kept open 
the surface water from this area will all have to go into the 
Market-street sewer, and thence into the North Beacon-street 
sewer, aggravating the overcrowded condition of that sewer. 

" At Oak square there is a brook which runs across the 
square from Tremont street under the West End car-houses 
and through private land between Faneuil and Washington 
streets, crossing Faneuil street, and running through Brooks 
pond to join the main brook from Chandler's pond. 

" A tributary to this brook, which drains all the catch-basins 
in Oak square, and will afford a relief overflow to the Wash- 
ington-street sewer, has been cut off by the building of the 
foundations of the West End car-houses, and will have to be 
restored. 

" The main brook from Chandler's pond is too large to be 
easily obstructed, and has had culverts of ample size built 
upon it by the city at Parsons, Hobart, Faneuil, Oakland, 
and Lake streets." 

The desirability of systematically deepening and improV-. 
ing waterways like the above-mentioned, beginning at the 
outlet and working toward their source, is unquestionable, 
and should be carried out before the adjoining land is wholly 
cut up into house lots and largely built upon, as then it would 
involve expensive land takings and serious claims for damage. 

It is equally plain that the city should not be forced to 
take within its street limits a diverted waterway, and thus 
lengthen its course, and necessitate a more c'ostly construc- 
tion. Other cities are taking up this question, with a view 
of utilizing the valleys of prominent streams as a part of 
their park system, after the manner of our own Muddy 
River Parkway, with its banks terraced and planted with 
shady trees and flowering shrubs, crossed by well-designed 
stone-arched bridges, till the whole effect is most charming 
to those who admire landscape. Where necessary, the 
lowerino- of the stream-bed mioht be the means of trans- 
formino- worthless stretches of land into the choicest building 



Street Department. 97 

lots. The former City Engineer of Newton, Mr. A. E. 
Noyes, and Mr. E. A. Buss, in making a joint study of this 
question, suggest that if legislation is commendable in estab- 
lishing a Board of Survey for the city of Boston, especially 
authorized to designate the locations and grades of streets 
for the best public good, and to prevent owners of property 
from making further departure therefrom, then there is 
much more ground for seeking legislative authority for a 
city to lay out and determine the size and location of its 
surface drains, and prevent interference of the same b y 
property-holders, under fear of penalty. 

Whatever course is taken, cheap and temporary expedients 
for private interests only should be wholly discountenanced. 



98 City Document No. 34. 



STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 



Street-Sweeping Districts. 
District No. 1. — West End. 

This district includes that portion of the City Proper that 
is bounded on the west and north by the Charles river, on 
the east by Charlestown and Washington streets, on the 
south by School and Beacon streets and Boston Common. 

District JSTo. 2. — JSfortJi End, 

This district includes that portion of the City Proper 
bordering on the Charles river and harbor front that lies 
east of Charlestown and Washington streets, and north of 
Central and Milk streets. 

District JVb. 3. — South End. 

This district includes the southerly portion of the City 
Proper (business section), and is bounded on the north by 
Central and Milk streets, on the east by Fort-point channel, 
on the south and south-west by Kneeland, Lincoln, Harvard, 
and Utica streets, and on the west by Washington street. 

District JSFo. 4. — South End. 

This district includes the portion of City Proper and Back 
Bay that lies southerly from the Public Garden and Com- 
mon, and extends as far as Dartmouth and Dover streets, 
and is bounded on the west and north by Beacon and School- 
streets, easterly by Washington, Kneeland, Lincoln, Harvard, 
Utica streets, and Fort-point channel, southerly by Dover, 
Berkeley, Columbus avenue, and Dartmouth streets. 

District No. 5. — Back Bay and South End. 

This district includes all of Back Bay and South End be- 
tween Charles river and South bay from Dartmouth and 
Dover streets on the north, to Massachusetts avenue, Ham- 
mond and Hunneman streets on the soutb. 

District No. 6. — South Boston. 

District No. 7. — Roxbury. 

District No. 8. — Brighton. 

District No. 9. — East Boston and Charlestown. 



Street Department. 



99 



Owins: to the constant o-rowth of Dorchester and West 
Eoxbury, the work done by occasional visits of sections of 
gangs from the adjoining districts was no longer sufficient ; 
but, on account of the small appropriation, no additional 
force could be organized. These districts, however, are 
constantly cared for by the Paving Division force, thus saving 
the expense of extra superintendence and headquarters. 

The following table shows the average force employed 
during the year : 

Average No. men 
District. employed. 



Office 








4 


1, West End . . . . 








32 


2, North End . . . . 








32 


3, South End . . . . 








32 


4, South End . . . . 








32 


0, Back Bay . . . . 








31 


(3, South Boston 








32 


7, Roxbury 








28 


8, Brighton 








— 


9, Charlestown and East Bosto 


n 






27 


Yard and stable 








14 


Push-cart patrol 








39 



Total 



503 



The above-mentioned force use in carrying out the work 
of the division the following plant : 

Three 3-horse machines, 19 double sweeping-machines, 21 
single sweeping-machines, 11 water-carts, 90 street-carts, 
100 horses (owned by the division), 14 asphalt-scrapers. 

Eiojht of the above horses are drivino--horses. 

The push-cart patrol use : 

Fifty-nine push-carts, 63 extra barrels, 3 street-carts 
(steel), 3 horses (all hired). Of the 59 push-carts, 40 are 
in daily service. 

In addition to the above-mentioned carts, the division 
hires about 33 extra teams. 

The following table shows the numbei' of loads of street- 
sweepings removed each 3'ear during the last thirteen years : 



Year. 


No. of cartloads 


1882 


52,381 


1883 


58,272 


1884 


(52,222 


ls«5 


61,455 


l^^HO 


59,875 


1887 


68,990 



100 City Document No. 34. 

Year. No. of cartloads. 

1888 68,010 

1889 .'..... 70,476 

1890 70,449 

1891, 12 months .... 87,113 

1891, 13 months .... 91,425 

1892 106,829 

1893 110,496 

1894 95,478 

Street-Cleaning. 

With a gross expenditure of $307,113.16, this division has 
cleaned 10,432.75 miles of streets, removing 95,478 loads 
of street-dirt; has also cleaned 2,175.65 miles of paved 
gutters on macadamized streets, including special work on 
crossings, maintained 16 dumping-stations, removed excess 
of snow from pavements and crossings, paid special atten- 
tion to the collection and removal of leaves in the fall of the 
year, maintained a paper-patrol in freezing weather and a 
push-cart patrol in the retail district throughout the year ; 
and, besides making necessary repairs to its plant and pur- 
chasing the new stock needed, made a disposal at sea of 
some 30,766 loads of street-dirt. The average cost of 
sweeping streets, including supervision, labor, yard, and 
stable expenses, ^ro rata of dumps, and removal, was $15.61 
per mile. 

If the gross expenditure, including stock and all miscella- 
neous expenses, be divided by the total mileage of ihe city, 
which is 452 miles, the outside expenditure per season per 
mile of street is found to be $679, which is very low as 
compared with other cities. 

The results of the push-cart patrol system have been 
most satisfactory, and an extension of the routes is surely 
Avarrantable. Fifty thousand two hundred and eighty 
barrel-loads were taken up by this force alone. 

The public waste-barrels, located in the immediate vicinity 
of various fruit stores, inviting the deposition of refuse 
which would otherwise be thrown into the street, have found 
favor with the public, and much littering of the street is 
thereby avoided. 

District 8, or Brighton, was wholly taken care of by the 
Paving Division ; also, macadamized streets in other outlying- 
districts were scraped by this division, and 37,557 single 
and 1,948 double loads of street-scrapings were removed. 
After a severe snow-storm, the paving force is called to the 
aid of the street-cleaning force, and the cost of snow- 
removal is reported in Appendix B. 



Street Department. 101 



General Remarks. 

The general term " street-cleaning " appears to be used in 
common discussion in a very loose way, and very mislead- 
ing comparisons and erroneous conclusions result. This 
has been more apparent of late, as the subject has been of 
more than ordinary interest to the public for the past few 
years, and receives a correspondingly increased considera- 
tion by the press everywhere. In these comparisons the 
cost quantities set over against each other under the simple 
term "street-cleaning" do not apply in diiferent cities to the 
same or analogous work. 

It starts with (1) sweeping streets only ; it then grows to 
include (2) the removal of the dirt or road detritus to the 
dumps ; then gradually extends its scope by the following suc- 
cessive steps : (3) collecting and removing ashes, store-dirt, 
house-dirt, and kitchen refuse and garbage ; (4) final disposi- 
tion, either at sea, by incineration, or some rendering process ; 
(5) collecting and rendering dead animals ; (6) cleaning of 
alleys and private ways; (7) cleaning of catch-basins, cess- 
pools, and vaults, and removing night-soil ; (8) removal of 
snow; (9) scraping macadamized streets; (10) street- 
sprinkling. 

Each of the above items involves an expense varying in 
amount accordinji' to local conditions and laws. CoUectino- 
ashes, for instance, may figure but $2.00 per mile of street, 
while scraping a heavy macadamized street may cost $100 
per mile. Then, too, some cities report that a certain num- 
ber of miles of streets are kept clean throughout the year, 
which in some cases is a fair percentage of the city mileage, 
and in others it is made to equal the total mileage. Other 
cities keep a record of streets swept or cleaned each day, 
and at the end of the year report the accumulated amount, 
or total miles actually cleaned. It does not re(]uire much 
mathematical calculation to ascertain which method gives 
the l)est showing for the least amount of expenditure. 
Local conditions vary greatly. Some cities are almost 
wholly paved, few, like Boston, are mostly macadamized or 
gravelled. Some have convenient dumps, others necessitate 
long hauls. The price of labor varies, and the hours of 
labor are not always restricted. Public sentiment demands 
more in one city than in another, so that the degree of clean- 
liness satisfactory in one latitude would only be a source of 
disgust in another. Mud on a crossing not over a boot-sole 
would raise a i)rotest in some of our fashionable (juarters, 
while in some of our Western cities, less whimsical I>y nature, 
no fault is found until there is "mud eiiou<>:h to l)oi>' a duck." 



102 City Document No. 34. 

The history of the last five or ten years shows that the 
public demands a higher service, and the refinement of the 
present day asks for a greater opportunity for personal 
comfort and good health, and public opinion sanctions an 
increased expenditure. The amount spent on sanitary clean- 
liness was never so great as it is to-day in all our large 
cities. New York, for instance, about doubling the amount 
used five years ago. This desire for cleanliness has V)een 
spreading from city to city, until each one has its organized 
force with modern auxiliaries and appliances, vying with each 
other in the praiseworthy effort to banish the filthy and 
unsightly refuse from our public thoroughfares, and thus 
make them compare favorably with the streets abroad. 

The time has now come when the official in charge must 
not study as to how much money he can spend for this work 
in a single year, but how much greater area he can keep 
t7'uli/ clean without increasing the expenditure. Results 
without extravagance are really what is to be sought. In 
other words, the problem is resolved into this: By what 
methods can refuse of all kinds be turned to revenue or 
usefulness, and absolute waste be reduced to a minimum? 

This can only be accomplished by a careful and pains- 
taking process of differentiation or separating the products 
of street collections, and diverting each to a sphere of use- 
fulness consistent with its character. Just as the material 
of a gravel bank becomes more useful and of wider adapta- 
bility to constructive requirements by a simple process of 
running it through a system of wire screens of varying 
mesh, until stones of a uniform size and sand particles are 
each collected together to be used for widely different 
purposes, so our refuse separated into its different elements 
may be turned to some good account, each being appropri- 
ated to its most valuable purpose, the clean ash its bed of 
filling, the rag its paper-mill, road detritus its fertilization 
market, and house-offal its digestor, wherein it is further 
separated, yielding both animal and vegefable products of 
varying worth. This separating process must begin with 
each householder, and hence the requirement that different 
receptacles must be provided and used, one for street-dirt, 
another for ashes, and yet another for house-offal. The 
simple work of street-cleaning in its broad and sanitary 
sense must then resolve itself into a machine-like march of 
an organized force so controlled that, without interfering 
with the business use of streets, and without waste of time 
by conflicting effort, it shall take captive every scrap of filth 
and refuse legally left within its reach, and without delay 
or incidental annoyance remove the .same to the nearest 



Stkeet Depaetment. 103 

point of collection, from which its final useful disposition 
can be made. 

Its success must depend largely upon public cooperation 
with the municipal authorities, and individual efibrt through- 
out the community to refrain from carelessly allowing any of 
its waste dirt to be scattered about on any public highway. 



SMOKE NUISANCE. 

Argument is not necessary to convince the citizens of this 
city or any city that soft-coal smoke is the cause of untold 
injury to health, to the beaut}^ of our architecture, to the 
cleanliness of our office furnishings and records, and a de- 
structive agency of marked efficiency within the business 
district in its pernicious contact with the finer textile fabrics, 
and general merchandise as well. 

Theorizing as to the remedy is not what the people want, 
but a practical, energetic, and efiective activity, directed by 
proper law and ordinance, that shall forthwith demand 
compliance with such regulations as will abolish existing 
nuisances, and prevent new construction from entirely dis- 
regarding this whole question in the laying out of new plant. 
Such has been the plan of operation of this department. A 
resume of the work of the year shows some good results, not 
so much in the multiplicity of the so-called devices, as in the 
actual marked reduction of the percentage of "dense, dark 
smoke" emitted from various stacks, as shown by recent 
observations as compared with those taken upon the same 
plants a year ago. Owners of estates have been more liberal 
in their desire to contribute to the oreneral ofood of the com- 
munity by the purchase of better and more smokeless fuels ; 
engineers have been more stringent in their orders to the 
firemen, and the firing itself has not been so often intrusted 
to the elevator boy or some other equally irresponsible em- 
ployee. 

The scarcity of good coal in this vicinity last winter, due 
to the great strike among the miners, had a marked etlect 
upon plants in this city, complaints coming from stacks that 
had formerly given no trouble. 

Nothing has been more apparent from the result of the 
observations than the extreme lenity of the present law, 
allowing as it does that a stack may belch fortii dense, dark 
smoke for fully one-joiirlli of the time. The history of the 
movement here only shows that the terms of the law should 
be prescribed by the community at large which is ofl'ended 
against, rather than by the offenders themselves. City 



104 



City Document No. 3L 



Document No. 81 of 1893 shows that the consumers of soft 
coal themselves were on the alert to see that the movement 
(lid not become too stringent in its final recommendations. 

Chapter 353 of the Acts and Resolves of 1893 is still in 
force, but it is hoped that the present Legislature will modify 
it, as there is great difficulty in securing conviction in court, 
a warrant having been refused on one of the worst cases of 
violation as shown by observations of the inspector. 

During the past year 188 complaint notices have been 
served and 184 inspections made ; making a total to date of 
319 notices served, and 300 inspections completed. 

The inspections may be classified as follows ; 



With patent device attached 
Now considering the adoption of some device 
Wing walls ..... 
Using hard coal .... 
Using shavings or similarly offensive fuels 
Claim compliance with the law . 
Supplied with device of their own design 
Ready to adopt a satisfactory device . 

Devices in use are : 



38 
29 

5 

32 

35 

150 

4 

rr 
I 



1st. Down-draft J^w^naces, '^ American Down-draft." — 
Nevins estate, 78 Chauncy street ; Lyceum Theatre, Wash- 
ington street; Nevins Estate, 66 Chauncy street; Smith- 
Carleton Company, 79 Boston street. 

^^ Uawley Doivn-draft." — Brookline Gas Light Company, 
AUston ; West End Power Station, Cambridge. 

2d. Automatic Stokers, ^^ Honey Automatic Stoker.'''' — 
State House Extension, Mt. Vernon street; Boston Elec- 
tric Light Company, Boston street. 

3d. Furnaces with Hollow Walls {to admit heated air), 
" Jarvis Setting." — Edison Illuminating Company, Atlantic 
avenue ; Edison Illuminating Company, Head place ; Boston 
Electric Light Company, Condor street. East Boston ; E. 
Hodge & Co., 160 Liverpool street. East Boston ; Boston 
Fire Brick Company, 394 Federal street ; J. Roessle, 60 
Pynchon street, Roxbury ; L. Prang & Co., 286 Roxbury 
street, Roxbury. 

" Smith Setting." — 3. R. Alley & Sons, 123 Heath street, 
Roxbury; Furbush & Co., Rutherford avenue, Charles- 
town. 

^^ Jones Economic Furnace." — Crawford House, Brattle 
street ; Boston Electric Light Company, Gilbert place ; Bos- 
ton Lead Works, Hampden street ; Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Minot street; Boston Belting Company, Elmwood street. 



Street Department. 105 

4th. Steam Jet, " Andrews Hot-Air Device''' — Nahum 
Chapin, Water street ; W. Smith & Co., Marginal street, 
East Boston ; A. T. Yan Nostrand, Alford street, Charles- 
town ; Grand Hotel, 417 Columbus avenue. 

''Standard Smoke Consumer " — B. H. Murray (Drake's 
Saw-mill), Border street. East Boston; Jordan, Marsh, & 
Co. (wholesale), corner Bedford and Lincoln streets: 
Houghton & Dutton, corner Tremont and Beacon streets. 

'' Bartlett & Hayward Patent Damper" (perforated hridge- 
ivall.) — New Court-house, Pemberton square; Brown, Du- 
rell, & Co., Kingston street. 

" Fyfe's Deflector " {wing loalls) . — Homoeopathic Hospi- 
tal, corner Concord and Albany streets; Page Bros., 231 
Cambridge street. 

"Whitfleld Grate." — Boston & Albany Eailroad Grain 
Elevator, Chandler street. 

Of the thirty-two plants reported as using hard coal, 
eight have since gone back to soft coal, mainly on the ground 
that they needed greater steaming capacity. Several are 
using soft coal and hard-coal screenings, and claim that they 
can keep within the limits of the law by so doing. 

All of the above-mentioned inspections have been sub- 
jected to mechanical study, from which the following defects 
were made evident : 

Chimney too small ....... 66 

Air-space in grate too small . . ' . . - 21 

Smoke-flue too small . . . . . . ^^ 

Number of tubes small ...... 1 

Forced at times, especially in winter .... 42 

Boilers very old ....... 4 

Chimney and smoke-flue small ..... 3 

Boiler overworked ....... 1 

Boiler heated by waste gases ..... 1 

Insufficient data ....... 1 

No apparent defect . . . . . . .151 

Circulars in regard to the selection of fuel and care in 

T • • • 

firing have been issued from time to time. A disposition to 
comply with the law and with the department regulations has 
been generally evident, showing that our community is made 
up mainly of law-abiding citizens. Even when the strike 
among coal operatives was on in April, the effects of which 
were very noticeable in June and July, and complaints began 
to multij)ly, investigation showed th;it, while inferior grades 
of bituminous coal were being shipped to this port in large 
quantities, owners were for the most part willing to subject 



106 City Document No. 34. 

themselves to a little larger expense, and mix some hard coal 
with the soft, to mitigate in some degree the increased nuis- 
ance. On July 10 six additional observers were given to the 
inspector, to aid in taking records of various stacks. Later, 
this number was reduced to two men, who have covered 
the city regularly by districts, and have been keeping the 
department informed of any unusual appearance of smoke 
emission. 

Some fifty set observations have been made on various 
stacks, lasting from two to sixteen hours each. These 
showed per cents, of dense, dark smoke varying from 5.1 to 
about 60, with one abnormal one of 78.8 per cent. Plants 
well equipped for complete combustion showed from 10 to 
20 per cent. A few well-regulated and well-proportioned 
plants without device managed to keep their smoke from 2Q 
to 26 per cent. 

New Locations. 

On July 24 a standing objection was filed with the 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings Department against the 
granting of permits for new" boilers, without the applicants 
for locations first satisfying this department that they would 
endeavor to comply with the law, either by the adoption of a 
smoke-consuming device, or the use of a smokeless fuel. 

In practice, the following formalities are observed before 
the applicant can receive permission to locate a new or 
relocate an old boiler-plant. He first makes application to 
the Inspector of Buildings, and is informed that before per- 
mission can be granted, the consent of the Superintendent of 
Streets must be obtained. 

The Inspector of Buildings then fills out the upper 
portion of the following blank and sends it to the Superin- 
tendent of Streets : 

{Form A.) 

CITY OF BOSTON. 

Office of Inspector of Buildings, 

Boston, 189 



To the Superintendent oj Streets: 
You are hereby notified that... 



of has made applica- 
tion for location of a boiler at No. on 

this date. 



Inspector of Buildings. 



Street Department. 107 

No Office of Supekintendent of Streets, 

Room 47, City Hall, 189 

Td\the Inspector of Buildings : 

You ai'e hereby notified that the above-named applicant has 

signified his intention of meeting the requirements of the Superin- 
tendent of Streets relative to the prevention of smoke, either by the 
adoption of a smokeless fuel, or of a satisfactorj^ smoke-consuming- 

^ waive "^ 
device, and that I herewith ^ or > objections to the granting of 



renew 



permit 



Superintendent of Streets. 

On receipt of this notification, the Superintendent of 
Streets fills out the following blank and sends it to the 
applicant, who must then appear before the Superintendent 
of Streets to obtain his sanction of the proposed boiler 
location. 

(Form B.) 

No Street Department, 

City Hall, 

Boston, 189 

Office of the Superintendent, 
Room 47. 

M 



Dear Sir : You are herewith notified that this department objects 

to the granting of your petition for leave to locate boiler 

at as per your application on file in the office of the In- 
spector of Buildings, vmless the same provided with an 

effective smoke-consuming device. 

Will you please call at this office in reference to the matter, and 
oblige. 

Yours truly, 



Superintendent of Streets. 



Pending the granting of the location, an inspection is made 
of the proposed I)oiler plant, and if the Superintendent of 
the Street Department finds that there is reasonable proba- 
bility that it will comply with the law and ordinances, the 
applicant is required to sign the following bhuik, which states 
the nature of the boiler plant, coal to bo used, etc. : 



108 City Document No. 34. 

{Form 0.) 

No 

Boston, , 189 , 

Application for Location of Boiler : 

by- - 

of 

at : - 

To the Superintendent of Streets : 

I hereby agree to comply with the statube laws and city ordinances, 
and the requirements of the Superintendent of Streets, relating to the 
prevention or the suppression of smoke, and propose to adopt 
a device for said purpose, with- 
in days from date, and will see that due care is con- 
tinually exercised both in the selection and use of fuels, to the end that 
the amount of smoke emission and nuisance shall be reduced to a 
minimum. 



The lower half of Form A is then filled out with " objec- 
tions waived," and it is then returned to the Inspector of 
Buildings, who may then grant the location in the regular 
manner. It will be seen that by this agreement (Form C), 
signed by the applicant, the Superintendent of Streets ob- 
tains control over the boiler plant so far as smoke nuisance 
is concerned, and, in case this agreement is afterwards vio- 
lated, the permission to operate such a boiler plant may be 
revoked by the Inspector of Buildings, through request of 
the Superintendent of Streets. 

On the other hand, if the Superintendent of Streets is not 
satisfied, after investigation, that the proposed boiler plant 
will comply with the law relating to the smoke nuisance, the 
lower half of Form A is filled out with " objections renewed." 
This is then returned to the Inspector of Buildings, and the 
application is thereupon denied. In such a case the appli- 
cant, as a last resource, may apply to the Board of Appeal 
on Boiler Locations, and the decision of this Board is final. 
This Board of Appeal, as now constituted, consists of the 
present Superintendent of Streets ; the Chairman of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners, Robert G. Fitch ; the Chair- 
man of the Boston Board of Health, Samuel II. Durgin, 
M.D. ; and Messrs. George R. Swasey, Arthur H. Everett, 
and William H. Sayward. 

Under the foregoing arrangement, ninety-two notices of 
applications have been received from the Inspector of Build- 
ings. Of this number, in fifty-six cases objections have 



Street Department. 109 

been waived on account of being mainly hot-water heaters, 
constructed so as to burn hard coal only ; in thirty cases, 
the applicant has shown a satisfactory guarantee that proper 
precautions are being taken, and has signed the record-book, 
aofreeino- to conform to all necessary requirements. Three 
cases are still open and await the results of further inquiry. 
While the law is not at present as stringent as desirable, 
there is no cioubt that many owners of both large and small 
plants show a decided willingness to comply with such re- 
quirements of the department as will, without unreasonable 
cost, abate the nuisance, and thus contribute to the general 
comforts and good health of the community ; but greater 
stringency of law will be required to enforce action upon 
parties who are unwilling to be subjected to any expense 
whatever in the matter, but lean wholly to the item of 
economy, and are loath to incorporate any change, unless it 
can show a saving in their running expenses. In many 
plants the local conditions are such that the element of 
economy can readily become a factor of reasonable promise, 
but if those conditions will not admit of changes in the 
direction of economy, then it is surely the duty of the owner 
to offset his unavoidably cramped conditions with the adop- 
tion of some relieving expedient, even though it may at the 
same time subject him to a slightly increased expense. 

Conclusion. 

Allusion has been made in the foregoing report to the 
most important portions of the work of the year, but the 
limited space allotted to an executive report of this kind 
precludes the mention of numerous other features that would 
bear discussion. 

In the appendices which follow, however, detail items 
may be found, arranged in convenient form, of such street 
and sewer construction as seemed of sufficient importance 
to merit special mention. 

The table of former superintendents and document num- 
bers of the annual reports at the end (Appendix F) will be 
found of convenient reference for general use in connection 
with the history of department work in past years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry B. Wood, 

Executive Engineer. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION, 1894. 



Central Office .... Room 47, City Hall. 

HENRY H. CARTER, Superintendent of Streets. 

{Until December 8, 1894.) 

CHARLES R. CUTTER, Acting Superintendent. 

{From December 8, 1894, to January 14, 1895.) 

BERTRAND T. WHEELER, Superintendent. 
{From January 14 to the present time.) 



HENRY B. WOOD, Executive Engineer. 
JOHN W. McDonald, Purchasing Agent. 

BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 

JOHN A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent. 

FREDERICK H. SPRING, Chief Clerk. 

PAVING DIVISION. 

Room 41, City Hall. 

CHARLES R. CUTTER, Deputy Superintendent. {Until January 24.) 

DARIUS N. PAYSON. {.January 24 to the present time.) 

BENJAMIN B. TREMERE, Chief Clerh. 

SANITARY DIVISION. 

12 Beacon Street. 

PHILIP A. JACKSON, Acting Deputy Superintendent. 

M. J. MURRAY, Chief Clerk. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

Room 44, City Hall. 

HENRY W. SANBORN, Deputy Superintendent {ex officio, Engineer 

Improved Seiverage) . 

' FRANK H. RICE, Chief Clerk. 

Engineer's Office, 12 Beacon Street. 

E. S. DORR, Engineer in Charge. 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street. 
PHILIP A. JACKSON, Deputy Superintendent. 

THOMAS Mclaughlin, chief curk. 

BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

HENRY H. CARTER, Commissioner for Boston {ex officio, until De- 
cember 8, 1894) 
CHARLES R. CUTTER. {Acting Commissioner from December 8, 1894, 
to January 14, 1895.) 
BERTRAND T. WHEELER. {Since January 14.) 
WILLIAM J. MARVIN, Commissioner for Cambridge. 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 113 



APPEXDIX A. 



EEPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION. 

14 Beacon Street, 

Boston, February 1, 1895. 

Mr.'B. T. Wheeler, Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : I herewith respectfully submit the followiug leport 
of the acts aud expenditures of the Bridge Division from February 
1, 1894, to January 31, 1895. There was allotted for the care, 
maintenance, etc., of the bridges during this period the sum of 
$125,000, which by reason of the opening of L-street bridge to 
public travel, and in consequence of necessar}' work performed 
ou Charles-river bridge that it might be used as a thoroughfare, 
was found to be insufficient to the amount of $5,787.21. Thus 
the total sum regularly expended on the bridges and charged to 
this division was 8130,787.21. 

The total number of bridges in Boston, not including culverts, 
is one hundred and twelve; four of these, viz.. Harvard, Canal, 
Prison Point, and West Boston bridges, all connecting Cambridge, 
are in the care of two commissioners, one of whom is appointed 
by the city of Boston and the other by the city of Cambridge. 
The remainder are under the supervision of this division, and are 
thus tabulated : Thirty-four are wholly supported by railroad 
corporations, and seventy-eight are supported wholly or in part by 
the city of Boston. Included in this number are twenty-three 
tide-water bridges, provided with draws. The increase of two 
bridges consists of one at Audubon road, over Brookline branch 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad, and Florence street, over 
Stony brook. 

Of the tide-water bridges there are eleven of great importance, 
viz.. Meridian street (horse power), Chelsea North and Chelsea 
Soutli (both steam power), Maiden (man power), Warren, Charles 
River, Congress, L-street, and Broadway (all steam power). 
Federal and Dover streets (both electricity). 

The condition of Maiden, Charles-river draw, Broadway, and 
Congress-street bridges is unsatisfactory and require most careful 
attention. 

Charles-river bridge was closed to team travel July 18, 1894, at 
1.45 P.M., as it was considered dangerous. Extensive repairs, 
under the supervision of the Cit}- Engineer's Department, were 
performed under contract, and the bridge was reopened to team 



114 City Document No. 34. 

travel on October 16, 1894, at 9 A.M. The draw, however, is 
still in very bad shape, as its foundation is much decayed. 

Chelsea-street bridge is in process of rebuilding and will be com- 
pleted in a few weeks. Dover-street bridge has been completed and 
is in running order, giving complete satisfaction. L-street bridge 
has also been opened to public travel during the year. 

Embodied in the report will be found a detailed statement of 
the expenditures and a description of the work performed on each 
bridge ; also a tabulated arrangement of those bridges supported 
wholly or in pavt by the city of Boston ; widths of draw openings, 
widths of bridges, roadway, and sidewalks; kind of pavement 
used ; number of draw openings made for navigation, and a census 
of traffic taken on some of the most important bridges, October 8, 
1894, as a comparison with that taken in April, 1891, June, 1892, 
and September, 1893. 

The inland bridges have been carefully looked after, and special 
effort has been made to keep them safe and clean. The}^ have 
been thoroughly swept each week and scupper-holes have been 
kept free and clear. The operatives of the tide-water bridges 
have pei'formed their duties in an efficient manner and have kept 
their piers and premises in a safe condition, and no accidents have 
been reported that could in any way be charged to the negligence 
or carelessness of the draw-tenders or their assistants. 

The material used for repairs has been of good quality, and the 
delivers of the same in the different districts by those having 
the contracts has been prompt and efficient, causing no delay for 
the proper performance of the work. 

As formerly, the same care has been exercised to keep on hand 
duplicate sets of gearing, and many times during the year this- 
precaution has lessened public inconvenience. 

Special Work. 

The report contains a description of work performed and expen- 
ditures on several bridges, money for which was provided from 
special appropriations. 

The total amount of money so expended and charged — 
$33,066.55. 

Of this sum, for contract work, material, and repairs, which 
could not be performed by our men — $27,729.33. 

The balance was directly beneficial to our own bridge mechanics 
— $5,337.22. 

Public Landing-Places. 

The following public landing-places have been built by the city, 
and are maintained and controlled by the Street Department : 

Charles-river Bridge. — Size, 40 x 60. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

Essex-street Bridge. — Size, 9 x 23. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

East Boston, Public Landing. — Size, 18 X 30. Built in 1893. 
Moored at dock of East Boston Dry Dock Company. Dock and 
flats leased at $200 per year. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 115 

Commercial Wharf. — Size, 30 X 50. Built by M. F. Sullivan ; 
contract dated January 1, 1892. Moored at dock of Commercial 
AYharf Corporation. Dock and flats leased November 30, 1891, 
at $1,000 per year. 

Federal-street Bridge. — Size, 20 x 35. Built by M. F. Sullivan, 
October 26, 1892. Moored from city's property. 

Cable-Houses. 

The following is a list of cable-houses on bridges in charge of 
this division : 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Charles-river bridge . . . . .2 houses. 

Chelsea, south bridge . . . . .1 house. 

Congress-street bridge . . . . .2 houses. 

(Erected in 1882.) 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Federal-street bridge (erected in 1890) . . 1 house. 

West End Street Railway Company : 

Federal-street bridge . . . . .2 houses. 

Warren bridge ...... 2 houses. 

(Erected in June, 1892.) 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Dover-street bridge . . . . .2 houses. 

(Erected in 1894.) 

Postal Telegraph Cable Company : 

Congress-street bridge . . . . .2 houses. 

(Erected in 1894.) 

Very respectfully yours, 

John A. McLaughlin, 

Deputy Superintendeyit. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Appropriation. 

Appropriation, 1894-5 $125,000 00 

Transferred from Paving Division, December 6, 

1894 5,000 00 

Transferred from Paving Division, Januarv 25, 

1895 ...."... ^. . 787 21 



Total $130,787 21 



Amount of expenditures from February 1, 1894, to 

January 31, 1895 $i;i0,137 21 

Transferred to Citv Clerk Department, December 

31, 1894 . ." 650 00 

-SI 30, 787 21 



116 



City Document No. 34. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Administration . 
Office expenses : 

Printing ..... 

Stationery and postage . 

Office books . . . . . 

Engraving plates, etc., annual report 

Requisition book, purchasing agent 

Envelopes, Superintendent of Streets 

J^ook of warrants . 

Hepairing books, etc. 

Atlas, Dorchester . 

Telephone 

Sundries 



S72 00 

120 30 

77 25 

81 83 

7 63 
46 36 

8 03 
50 90 
36 50 

156 00 
34 67 



Salaries of Deputy Superintendent, Clerks, and Mes- 
senger ........ 

Salaries of General Foreman and two District Fore- 
men ......... 

Salary of Clerk of Committee on Streets and 
Sewers, nine weeks ...... 

Travelling expenses ...... 

IBoard of Deputy Superintendent's horse and extra 
horse ......... 

Amount expended, administration . 



1691 47 

6,394 00 

5,061 00 

258 84 

85 00 

576 00 

$13,066 31 



Total Regular Expenditures. 



Expenditures, administration . 

" on tide- water bridges 

" on inland bridges 

" north yard and stable 

" south " " " 



813,066 31 

96,805 80 

6,712 36 

4,834 47 

8,718 27 



Total amount expended for the year, February 1, 

1894, to January 31, 1895 . . . . . Sl30,137 21 



Income. 

The amount of bills deposited with the City Col- 
lector during the year was as follows : 

Work done by this division . . . . . 

Sale of old material ...... 

Rent of land and buildings . . . . . 



$98 62 

150 00 

1,350 CO 



Total 



SI, 598 62 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



117 



TIDE-WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort-Point Channel) . 
Sheathed draw and roadway, put in new section of 
iron fence, put down new wheel guards, repaired 
piers and waterways, repaired engines, machinery, 
latches, etc. 



Carpenters . 


. $2,101 23 


Painters 


15 75 


Lumber 


. 1,478 24 


Nails .... 


115 00 


Ironwork 


994 90 


Repairing engines 


48 23 


Hardware 


14 57 


Paint stock 


3 30 


Cement 


1 20 


Teaming 


9 00 


Smoke-stack 


7 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


$5,737 86 


Substitutes . 


54 42 


Coal ... 


190 08 


Gas .... 


57 07 


Water . . . 


25 00 


Falls 


22 10 


Ice . . . . . 


6 00 


Small supplies 


62 83 



t,788 42 



6,155 36 

Cambridge-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 
Sheathed roadway and draw, repaired waterways, 
piers, and draw-tender's house, and made general 



$10,943 78 



repairs on hoisting machinery. 






Carpenters .... S124 50 






Lumber 


94 88 






Nails . 


2 25 






Ironwork 


139 45 






Hardware 


1 95 






Car-fares 


9 75 






Smoke-stack 


3 75 








$376 53 




Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . . . $365 56 






Coal 4 33 






Small supplies ... 9 07 


378 96 






755 49 






Carried forward, 


$11,699 27 



118 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Charles-river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town) . 
Sheathed draw and repaired deck, put in new timbers 
on side of abutments, repaired sidewalks, capping, 
fences, draw-tender's house, piers, and waterway, 
built two new road-gates and repaired the two old 
ones, general repairs on machinery and engine, re- 
paired track-timbers and boat, painted bridge- 
buildings and fence, and special contract work 
done by Trumbull & Ryan, strengthening the piles 
and under-timbers. 



$11,699 27 



Carpenters . 
Painters 


$866 
331 


25 
00 






Lumber 


701 


87 






Nails . 


48 


70 






Ironwork 


600 


83 






Repairing engine. 
Hardware . 


105 
12 


87 
43 






Paint stock 


69 


43 






Repairing radia- 
tor, trap, etc. . 


26 


74 






Painting signs 


8 


00 






Brick . 


3 


00 














$2,774 


12 








Contract work : 










Advertising 


$5 


2£ 


^ 




Inspector 
Piles . 


188 
171 


oc 

36 






Spurshores . 


185 


OC 






Girders and brace 


5, 570 


OC 






Girders and caps, 


159 


6C 


I 




Stringers and bol 










sters 


28 


96 


! 




Labor 


959 


It 


_ 




Lumber 


353 


16 






Ironwork 


244 


70 




15% added 


237 


3£ 














- 3,103 


19 








-L U 


Regular expens 
Draw-tenders 


es : 


$5,023 


46 


Coal . 








399 


48 


Gas . 








29 


97 


Water . 








25 


00 


Cordage 








159 


30 


Ice 








6 


00 


Salt . 








5 


20 


Lubricating oil 
Grate . 








52 
11 


90 
50 



$5,877 31 



Carried forward, 



i,712 81 $5,877 31 $11,699 27 



Street Department — Bridge Division, 



119 



Brought forica rd. 
Snatch block 
Kerosene 
Small supplies 



Chelsea bridge [North] (over North channel, 
Mystic river) . 
Sheathed draw and repaired deck, also repaired 
latches, piers, waterway, and engine-house, ad- 
justed draw, general repairs on machinery and 



5,712 81 


$5,877 31 


10 50 




8 88 




72 25 






5,804 44 





engine, repaired boat and r 
Carpenters . 
Painters 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Repairing engine 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Plumbing 
Resetting buoys 
Wire cable for draw 
Repairing boat 



eset two buovs. 
^624 50 ' 
33 25 
523 06 
12 50 
159 74 
38 69 
9 03 
12 60 
4 24 
101 50 
40 83 
18 00 



Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders . . . S3, 589 04 


SubstitiUes . 






330 68 


Coal . 






290 71 


Oas 






16 77 


Water . 






27 50 


Ice 






6 00 


Lubricating oil 






14 20 


Small supplies 






53 84 



;i,577 94 



4,328 74 

Chelsea bridge [South] (over South channel, 
Mystic river) . 

Sheathed draw and repaired deck, repaired water- 
ways, road-gates, and boat, made general re[)airs 
on engine and draw machinery, and painted draw- 
tenders' house inside. 

Carpenters . 

Painters 

Luml)er 

Nails . 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Paint stock . 

Repairing boat 

170 17 



286 


25 


177 


00 


304 


96 


4 


75 


28 


78 


27 


31 


37 


12 


10 


00 



.1,699 27 



11,681 75 



5,906 68 



Carried forward. 



17 $29,287 70 



120 



City Docu3iext No. 34. 



Brought forvmo'd, 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal . 
Gas 

Water . 
Ice 

Clock . 
Hose . 
Small supplies 



S876 17 S29,287 70 



$4,386 


72 


158 


57 


232 


16 


20 


74 


32 


50 


6 


00 


10 


00 


7 


75 


38 


82 



4.893 2(3 



5,769 4a 



Chelsea-street bridge (from East Boston to Clielsea), 
Repaired sheathing on roadway and draw. 
Carpenters . 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Car- fa res 



Regular expenses 
Draw- tender 
Lubricatino; oil 



fity aim u 

S2 


LtlVV 

50 


9 


52 


10 


00 


81 


32 


1 


50 


. $287 


50 


3 


50 



$104 84 



291 00 



Commercial Point or Tenean bridge (Dor- 
chester) . 
Repaired deck, sheathing, and hoisting machinery, 

made new flaps and painted fence. 
Carpenters . 
Painters 
Lumber 
Ironwork 
Paint stock . 
Car-fares 



395 84 



$44 


25 


34 


25 


14 


94 


32 


06 


7 


17 


4 


80 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 



S137 47 



50 00 



187 47 



Congress-street bridge (over Fort-Point channel) , 

Sheathed draw twice, repaired pier, latches on draw, 
waterways, and draw-tenders' house, general re- 
pairs made on engines and machiner}^ repaired 
fender-guard and boat, painted bridge and fences, 
and red-leaded all ironwork. 

Carpenters .... $425 70 

Painters .... 980 75 

Lumber .... 512 32 

Nails 28 90 



Carried forward, 



$1,947 67 



?35,640 44 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



121 



Brought fonvard, 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Eepairing boat 
Repairing piling 
Teaming 

Regular expenses 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . 
Coal 
Water . 
Grates 
Kerosene 
Copper pans 
Clock 
Ice 

Waste . 
Salt . 
Small supplies 



$1,947 67 

389 37 

9 79 

205 72 

22 85 
186 74 

23 00 



S35,640 44 



5,133 


03 


467 


49 


289 


60 


106 


75 


47 


44 


38 


53 


7 


10 


10 


00 


6 


00 


8 


10 


6 


80 


89 


48 



^2,785 14 



6,210 3- 



8,995 4(> 



DOTer-street bridge (over Fort- Point channel) . 
Built temporary fence, repaired foot-bridge, raised 

and repaired draw-tenders' house and painted 

same inside and out two coats. 
Carpenters . 
Painters 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Paint stock . 
Plumbing 

Wire cable for draw 
Plastering house 
New chimney 
Lettering signs 



312 

207 

28 

4 

26 

37 



00 
25 
60 
00 
26 
73 
70 



12 50 

46 54 

136 25 



17 
10 



63 
00 



Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


. $2,912 63 


Substitutes . 


. 1,022 60 


Coal .... 


19 56 


Cordage 


10 05 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Small supplies 


30 59 



.,169 46 



4,001 43 



Carried forward, 



5,170 89 
$49,806 79 



122 



City Document jSTo. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Essex-street bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 
bridge). 
Repaired deck, sheathing and piers. 



406 80 



,806 79 



Carpenters . . . 


S197 96 


Lumber 


173 26 


Nails .... 


14 00 


Ironwork 


21 58 


Regular expenses : ■ 




Draw-tender 


$658 32 


Substitute . 


12 66 


Coal .... 


8 46 


Lubricating oil 


6 50 


Small supplies 


8 28 



694 22 

Federal-Street'bridg'e (over Fort-Point channel). 
Sheathed draws twice, repaired road-gates, built new 
float stage, repaired pier, waterways, and ma- 
chinery, painted fence-gate and red-leaded iron- 
work. 



1,101 02 



Carpenters . 


1244 12 


Painters 


15 00 


Lumber 


333 58 


Nails . . 


17 88 


Ironwork 


172 89 


Hardware 


24 61 


Paint stock . 


3 14 


Plumbing 


30 77 


Repairing motor-house . 


40 25 


Repairing rail-fence 


19 52 


Two wire cables for draws 


36 99 


Running wires for motor 


91 00 


Galvanized pipe . 


19 17 


Smoke-stack 


10 55 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


$5,997 86 


Substitutes . 


195 00 


Coal .... 


52 85 


Gas .... 


50 57 


Water . . . . 


10 00 


Ice . . . 


6 00 


Lubricating oil 


28 00 


Small supplies 


43 47 



$1,059 47 



6,383 75 

Granite - bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Sheathed draw and roadway, and repaired piers. 
Carpenters . . . . $59 75 



Carried forward, 



7o 



7,443 22 



^,351 03 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



123 



Brought forioard, 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 
Lubricating oil 
Small supplies 



$59 


75 


76 


62 


2 


25 


163 


03 


S239 


20 


5 


75 


1 


94 



$58,351 03 



$301 65 



246 89 



548 54 



L-street bridge (over reserved channel at junc- 
tion of Congress and L streets). 
Repaired waterways and piers, minor repairs on en- 
gines, and a little painting done inside draw-tend- 
ers' house. 



Carpenters . 


. $151 07 


Painters 


15 00 


Lumber 


101 97 


Nails . 


17 50 


L'onwork 


32 89 


Repairing engines 


12 55 


Hardware 


14 69 


Paint stock . 


18 75 


Plumbing 


56 30 


Smoke-stack 


9 85 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


82,468 11 


Substitutes . 


600 06 


Coal .... 


164 32 


Waler 


S^ 00 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Bedding 


27 00 


Stove .... 


19 45 


Lubricating oil 


11 50 


Packing 


18 96 


Clock .... 


10 00 


Grates . . . . 


9 96 


Copper pans 


27 90 


Small supplies 


78 58 



$430 57 



3,527 84 

Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 
Sheathed draw, repaired waterways, piers, wheel- 
guards, sidewalk, and fence, adjusted draw, put in 
new water service, and painted house and fence 
two coats. 
Carpenters .... $343 01 
Painters .... 24 88 



3,958 41 



Carried forivard. 



$367 89 



$62,857 9.S 



124 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward. 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Paiut stock 
Plumbing 
Car-fares 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes 
Coal . 
Gas 
Water . 
Ice 

Lubricating oil 
Row-boat 
Small supplies 



$367 89 

187 57 

4 50 
100 86 

5 21 
40 70 

2 30 



>,791 36 
75 00 
28 59 
17 83 
10 00 



$62,857 98 



S709 03 



6 

5 
67 



00 
90 
50 



44 11 



3,046 29 



Meridian-street bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 

Sheathed draw, repaired waterway, piers, fence, road- 
gates, and latches, made general repairs on draw 
machinery, repaired draw-tenders' house and boat, 
and painted bridge underneath and overhead, and 
buildings one coat. 

Carpenters 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails . 

Ironwork 

Hardware 

Paint stock 

Plumbing 

Ferry-fares 

Resetting buoy 

Making pattern 

Repairing boat 

Chimney pot 

Sundries 



3,755 32- 



479 88 
300 1] 

12 50 
288 67 

20 83 
100 66 

43 
1 



27 
00 



50 00 
12 25 

14 00 

11 18 

15 65 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes 
Coal . 
Feed . 
Gas 
Water . 
Horseshoeing 

Carried forward. 



^2,791 


36 


880 


68 


24 


81 


118 


95 


9 


73 


10 


00 


41 


55 



},032 75 



1,877 08 S2,032 75 $66,613 30 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



125 



Brought foriuard^ 


$3,877 08 


$2,032 75 


$66,613 30 


Veterinarv service 


22 00 






Ice .... 


6 00 






Lubricating oil 


11 40 






Small supplies 


36 17 






• 




3,952 65 








p; Qs!^ in 



Mt. Washingtou-aveime bridge (over Fort-Point 

channel) . 
Sheathed draw twice, repaired fence and sidewalk, 
sheathed pier, repaired waterways, latches, and 
boat, made sanitary repairs in draw-tenders' house, 
and painted bridge and buildings. 



Carpenters . . . . 


$793 


25 


Painters . . . . 


354 


00 


Lumber . . . . 


780 


63 


Nails . . . . . 


32 


55 


Ironwork . . . . 


124 


87 


Hardware 





20 


Paint stock . 


74 


26 


Plumbing 


104 


76 


Car-fares 


1 


80 


Repairing boat 


29 


50 


Damage to schooner 


11 


50 


Small sundries 


6 


48 
— $2,318 80 


Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders 


$4,486 


56 


Substitutes . 


56 


28 


Coal . . . . . 


41 


21 


Gas .... 


81 


38 


Water .... 


10 


00 


Ice 


6 


00 


Lubricating oil 


25 


75 


Stove and repairs 


12 


12 


Rent of land 


60 


00 


Small supplies 


82 


14 

4 Sdl 4.4. 






^,OUl ^tt 



Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to Qiiincyj. 
Repaired deck and sheathed roadway, repaired flnps, 

]jiers, waterways, and boat. 

[See Special, " Street Improvements, Ward 24."] 
Carpenters . 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Car- fares 
Repairing boat 

;575 16 



$362 


00 


81 


04 


39 


25 


64 


19 


7 


5.S 


3 


10 


IS 


00 



7,180 24 



Carried forvmrd, 



$575 16 $79,778 94 



126 



City Document No. 34, 



Brought forward^ 
Regular expenses : 
Di-aw-teuder 
Lubricating oil 
Small supplies 



'75 16 $79,778 94 



$398 84 
5 75 
2 63 



407 2^ 



North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 
Laid new deck on draw and sheathed the same. 
Carpenters . . . . ■ $40 00 



Lumber 


, , 


35 31 




Nails . 


, , 


2 25 




Car-fares 


' , 


16 65 




Sundries 


■ 


2 00 


$96 21 






Regular ex 


penses : 






Draw-tender 


• 


. 


74 88 



North Harvard-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge) . 
Sheathed roadway and draw, and put in new flaps. 
Carpenters .... $34 75 
Lumber .... 73 

Nails 2 

Ironwork . . . . 213 

Car-fares . . • . 5 



36 
25 
55 
80 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 



$329 71 
365 56 



Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 
Sheathed both draws three times, repaired piers, 
waterway, and fender-guard, adjusted tracks, re- 
paired boat, general repairs made on engines and 
machinery, and painted top and underside of 
bridoe and buildings one coat. 



Carpenters . 


$774 89 


Painters 


928 82. 


Lumber 


936 27 


Nails .... 


44 00 


Ironwork 


543 40 


Repairing engine . 


116 77 


Hardware . 


2 25 


Paint stock . 


194 84 


Plumbing ... 


124 57 


Wire cable foi- draw 


22 44 


Repairing roof 


35 00 


Small sundries 


9 16 



$3,732 41 



Carried forward^ 



982 38 



171 09 



695 27 



i,732 41 $81,627 68 



Street Department — Bridge Divisiox, 



127 



Brought forivard, 




Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


. ^5,047 56 


Substitutes . 


267 50 


Coal .... 


686 40 


Gas .... 


96 08 


AYater. 


50 00 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Ladders 


9 20 


Small supplies 


58 53 



^3,732 41 $81,627 68 



6,221 27 

Westeril-aTenue bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 
bridge). 
Sheathed draw and roadway, repaired deck, fence, 

and piers. 
Carpenters .... $50 50 
Lumber . . . . Ill 98 

Nails 2 25 

Ironwork .... 186 08 

Car-fares . . . . 10 10 



S3 60 91 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 
Coal . 
Lubricatino; oil 



$365 56 
6 50 

5 75 



377 81 

Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 
Sheathed roadway and draw, put in new iron ladder 
from draw to pier, built new tool-house and 
painted the same. 



Carpenters . 


. $162 50 


Lumber 


181 03 


Nails .... 


39 35 


Ironwork 


9 30 


Hardware 


4 52 


Car-fares 


8 00 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


$74 88 


Substitutes . 


48 50 


Storage of tools . 


10 00 


Small supplies 


6 98 



$404 70 



135 36 

Wintlirop bridge (from Breed's island to Win- 
throp). 



Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters . 

Carried forward, 



$143 50 
$143 50 



9,953 68 



738 72 



540 06 



$92,860 14 



128 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought fonvarcl, 


$US 50 






Lumber 


316 59 






Nails .... 


15 00 






Car-fares 


27 35 










$502 


44 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender . 


on tide- water br 


100 


00 


Sundry expenditures 


idges. 




Lumber 


$4 18 






Nails .... 


23 13 






Ironwork 


127 00 






Hardware 


19 97 






Paint .... 


25 84 






Cleaning iron trucks . 


60 00 






B. W. W. tickets, mechan 


ics, 37 50 






W. E. " " 


115 00 










$412 


,- — 






i 


Regular expenses : 








Chief draw-tender 


. $1,820 00 






Messenger . 


797 68 






Draw-tenders' books 


80 23 






Stationery and postals . 


16 38 






Repairing wagon . 


52 60 






Car- fares 


20 00 






Small supplies 


49 00 










2,835 


89 







,860 14 



602 44 



Public landings. 

Repairs. 

Commercial Wharf : 
Labor. . . $8 00 

Ironwork . . 7 05 

Painting sign . 6 00 

East Boston : 
Towage . . $7 75 

Ironwork . . 3 46 



Regular expenses 

East Boston : 
Rent 



^21 05 



11 21 



3,248 46 



V2 26 



62 50 



94 76 



Total expended on tide-water bridges 



),805 80 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



129 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table sJioiving Expenditures on the Tide-ivater Bridges for (he 
Year, February 1, 1894, to January 81, 1895. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambrido:e street 

Charles river 

Chelsea (North) 

Chelsea (South) 

Chelsea street 

Commercial point 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

L street • 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mount Washington avenue 

Neponset 

North Beacon street 

North Harvard street 

Warren . . . 

Western avenue (to Cambridge) . . . 

Western avenue (to Watertown) . . , 

Winthrop , 

Chief draw-tender and sundry expend!' 
tures 

Public landings 

Totals 



Repairs, Labor, 
Lumber, Iron- 
work, and 
Painting. 



$4,788 42 
376 53 

5,877 31 

1,577 94 
876 17 
104 84 
137 47 

2,785 14 

'1,169 46 

406 80 

1,059 47 
301 65 
430 57 
709 03 

2,032 75 

2,318 80 

575 16 

96 21 

329 71 

3,732 41 
360 91 
404 70 
502 44 

412 67 
32 26 



$31,398 72 



Regular Ex- 
penses, Sal- 
aries, Fuel, 
and Supplies. 



f6,155 36 

378 96 

5,804 44 

4,328 74 

4,893 26 

291 00 

50 00 

6,210 32 

4,001 43 

694 22 

6,383 75 

246 89 

3,527 84 

3,046 29 

3,952 65 

4,861 44 

407 22 

74 88 

365 56 

6,221 27 

377 81 

135 36 

100 00 

2,835 89 
62 50 



$65,407 08 



fl0,943 78 

755 49 

11,681 75 

5,906 68 

0,769 43 

395 84 

187 47 

8,995 46 

5,170 89 

1,101 02 

7,443 22 

548 54 

3,958 41 

3,755 32 

5,985 40 

7,180 24 

982 38 

171 09 

695 27 

9,953 68 

738 72 

540 06 

602 44 

3,248 46- 
94 7S 



$96,805 80 



130 City Document No. 34. 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

Albany-street bridge (over Boston & Albany Railroad) . 
Lumber, used in December, 1893, when bridge was 

sheathed 611 38 

Ashland-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Di- 
vision). 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters . ' $24 00 

Lumber 83 00 

Nails 4 50 

Ill 50 



Baker-street culvert, Brook Farm, West Rox- 
bury. 
Sheathed roadway and culvert. 

Carpenters $22 50 

Lumber ...... 64 30 

Nails 4 75 



Eeacon-Street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters ...... $66 00 

Lumber ...... 115 66 

Nails 4 50 



Berkeley-street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad) . 
Sheathed roadways. 

Carpenters . . . • . . $68 32 

Lumber ' . . . . . ' . 67 20 



Berkeley-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Di- 
vision). 
Repaired sheathing on roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $12 75 

Lumber . 40 95 

Hardware . . . . . . 3 50 

Nails 4 50 



Blakemore-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence Di- 
vision). 
Repaired iron fence and patched sheathing. 
Ironwork ...... $18 00 

Lumber ...... 7 39 

Nails 2 25 



91 55 



186 16 



135 52 



61 70 



27 64 



Carried forward^ . $625 45 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 131 

Brought forivard^ $625 45 

Bolton-street bridge (over New York & New 
F^nglancl Railroad) . 
^.epaired sidewalks and roadway. 

Carpenters $4 69 

Lumber 5 29 

9 98 



Boylston-street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 
Sheatbed one roadway and repaired the other. 

Carpenters $84 38 

Lumber ILS 78 

Nails ....... 4 50 



Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road) . 
Sheathed roadways. 

Carpenters $65 00 

Lumber Ill 03 

Nails . . . . . . . 9 00 



Columbus-avenue bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad. 
Sheathed roadways and repaired wheel-guards. 
Carpenters ...... $83 71 

Lumber 80 48 

Nails 11 25 



Commonwealth-avenue bridge (over outlet) . 
Sheathed roadway and laid new sidewalk. 

[Balanceof lumber used charged to special " Street 
Improvements, Wards 19 and 22."] 
Carpenters ...... 104 75 

Lumber ...... 164 35 

Nails . . . . . .. . 21 60 



Cornwall-street bridge (over Stony brook.) 
Sheutlied roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $26 50 

Luinl)er 33 66 



Cottage Farm bridge (over Boston 


& 


Albany 


Railroad at Commonwealth avenue). 






Sheathed roadway. 






Carpenters ...... 




$62 25 


Lumber ...... 




152 43 


Nails ....... 




13 12 


Car-fares ...... 




6 00 



207 66 



185 03 



175 44 



290 70 



60 16 



233 80 
Carried forward, $1,788 '2'2, 



132 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward^ 
Cottage-street [foot] bridge 

Boston) . 
Repaired piles, sway-braces, walk, and 

der's bouse and painted house. 
Bridge-tender 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 
Ironwork 
Paint stock 
Car- fares 
Lettering sign 
Smoke-stack 
Coal . 
Small supplies 

Elm wood-street bridge (ove 
Repaired sidewalk and sheathed ro 
Carpenters 
Lumber 

Nails . 

Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad ) . 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters . ^ $21 2.1 

Lumber ...... 55 49 

Nails 2 25 



$1,788 22- 



(ovei 


flats, East 


:, and bridge-ten- 


. $630 00 


. 


181 00 




20 00 




106 62 




7 74 


. 


4 19 




12 70 


, 


5 00 


. 


3 75 


. 


4 33 


• 


4 11 


r Sto 


n}^ brook). 


>adway. 


$19 25 


22 35 




4 50 



Gardner-street culvert (West Roxbury). 
Laid new deck and sheathed the same. 
Carpenters . . . . . . $15 00 

Lumber ...... 22 60 

Nails . . . . • . . " . 2 25 



Huntington-avenue 

Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters . 
Lumber 
Nails . . . ^ . 



bridge (over Boston & 



$40 50 



157 

9 



o i 

00 



Hyde Park-avenue bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Repaired deck and sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $101 75 

Lumber 138 87 

Nails . . . . . . , 7 75 



979 44 



46 10 



78 99 



39 85 



206 87 



248 37 



Carried fortvard, 



!,387 84 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 133 

Brought forivard^ . S3, 387 84 

Keyes-street culyert (West Eoxbury). 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters . ^ $45 19 

Lumber ...... 25 "26 

70 45 



Linden Park-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Repaired deck and sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $26 75 

Lumber 58 17 

Nails ....... 4 50 



Longwood-avenue bridge 


(from Roxbury to 


Brookline). 




Sheathed roadway. 




Carpenters .... 


$24 50 


Lumber .... 


58 18 


Nails 


2 25 



Massachusetts-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed one roadway and repaired the other. 

Carpenters $50 94 

Lumber . . . . . . 58 31 

Nails 4 50 



Massaclmsetts-aTenue bridge (over New York, 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $33 00 

Lumber . . . . . . 67 59 

Nails 4 50 



Mattapan bridge (from Dorchester to Milton), 
Patched roadway. 

[Balance of lumber used charged to special 
" Street Improvements, Ward 24."] 

Ciirpenters ...... $30 75 

Lumber ...... 3 26 

Nails 2 25 



Shawmut-avenue bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 
Built new sidewalk on westerly side and concreted 

same, and sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $237 95 

Painters 34 00 

Lumber ...... 357 43 

Nails 19 00 

Ironwork ...... 9 23 



89 42 



84 93 



113 75 



105 09 



36 26 



Carried forward, $657 61 $3,887 74 



134 



City Document No. 34. 



>657 


61 


58 


90 


3 


00 


134 


53 



Brought forward. 
Paint stock . 
Cement and sand . 
Concrete walk 



Summer-street culvert (West Roxbury). 
Sheathed roadway and repaired sidewalk. 

Carpenters . * $12 00 

Lumber ...... 29 33 

Nails ■ 7 85 



Texas-street bridge (over Stony brook) 
Rebuilt bridge. 
Carpenters .....; 

Lumber ...... 

Ironwork ...... 

Nails 



West Newton-street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division. 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters $18 25 

Lumber 70 50 

Nails 2 25 



$15 


50 


28 


86 


2 


40 


7 


50 



Williams-street culvert (AV^est Roxbury) . 
Laid new deck, and sheathed roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $4 50 

Lumber . . . . . . 35 71 

Nails ....... 4 75 



Woodman-street culvert (West Roxbury). 
Sheathed roadway. 

Carpenters . " $18 00 

Lumber . . . , . . 18 59 

Nails 3 30 



Sundry expenditures on 

Labor on snow 

Labor, bridge-cleaners 

Teaming snow 

Sand for slippery walks 

Salt " " ' " 

Lumber, sundry. repairs 

Nails " 

Paint " " 

Hardware " *•' 

Sundry car-fares, mechanics 



inland bridges. 

n,143 02 

221 67 

90 00 

22 50 

6 50 

12 51 

28 27 

29 95 
16 87 

120 00 



J,887 74 



854 04 



49 18 



54 2^ 



91 00 



44 96. 



39 89' 



1,691 29- 



Total expended on inland bridges 



5,712 36 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 



135 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table shoimng Expenditures on the Inland Bridges for the Tear 
February i, 1894, to January 31, 1895. 



Name of Bridge. 

Albany street ...... 

Ashland street ...... 

Baker street (culvert) ..... 

Beacon street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Berkeley street " " " " " " 

Berkeley street (over N.Y., N.H., & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division) ..... 

Blakemore street ...... 

Bolton street ....... 

Boylston street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 
Broadway " " " " " 

Columbus avenue .... 

Commonwealth avenue (over outlet) 

Cornwall street 

Cottage Farm 

Cottage street 

Elm wood street 

Ferdinand street 

Gardner street (culvert) 

Huntington avenue 

Hyde Park avenue . 

Keyes street (culvert) 

Linden Pai'k street 

Longwood avenue . 

Massachusetts avenue (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad) . 
Massachusetts avenue (over N.Y., N.H., & H 

Railroad, Providence Division) 
Mattapan 
Shawmut avenue 
Summer street (culvert) . 
Texas street . 
"West Newton street 
Williams street (culvert) 
Woodman street (culvert) 
Sundry expenditures 

Total 



Repairs, Labor, 


Lumber, Ironwork, 


and Painting 




$11 


38 


111 


50 


91 


55 


186 


16 


135 


52 


61 


70 


27 


64 


9 


98 


207 


66 


185 


03 


175 


44 


290 


70 


60 


16 


233 


80 


979 


44 


46 


10 


78 


99 


39 


85 


206 


87 


248 


37 


70 


45 


89 


42 


84 


93 



113 75 



105 


09 


36 


26 


854 


04 


49 


18 


54 


26 


91 


00 


44 


.96 


39 


89 


1,691 


29 


$6,712 


36 



136 



City Document No. 34. 



REGULAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH AND 
SOUTH YARDS. 

North Yard, District No. 1. 







Warren Bridge 


. 




Messenger . . . . . 


$797 68 




Watchmen . 










1,208 00 




Tools for carpentei 


■s 








86 99 




Tools for painters 










3 60 




Telephone 










156 00 




Gas 










41 86 




Plumbing- 










42 03 




Rubber hose . 










13 80 




New doors 










13 00 




Water . 










10 00 




Ice 










6 00 




Small supplies 










10 65 








$2,389 61 






Stable, District No. 1. 




Teamster 


$780 00 




Hostler . 
Feed . 








631 75 
330 81 




Repairing vehicles 








128 82 




Repairing harnesses 








71 15 




Horseshoeing 








112 29 




Concord wagon 










200 00 




Pung . 










65 00 




Clipping horses 










15 00 




Water . 










10 00 




Dentistry 










3 00 




Small supplies 










97 04 








2,444 86 




able . 


Total expended, North Yard and St 


S4.834 47 



South Yard, District No. 2. 



Fo^indry Street 
Messenger 
Watchman 
Y^ardman 

Tools for carpenters 
Tools for painters . 
Telephone 

Coal .... 
Building closet and lockers 
Repairing iron scrapers . 
Ladders 

Carried forward, 



^748 94 



735 


00 


420 


00 


297 


42 


163 


65 


156 


00 


29 


96 


24 


50 


25 


20 


10 


00 



$2,610 67 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



137 



Brought fonvard, 
Falls . . 
Repairing hydraulic jacks 
Shovels 
Ice chisels 
Water . 
Ice 
Small supplies 



i,610 67 
10 95 
35 60 
12 00 

7 50 
10 00 

6 00 
33 00 



Stable, District No. 2 



Teamster 
Hostler 
Feed • . 

Repairing wagons 
Repairing buggies 
Repairing sleighs 
Horseshoeing 
Three horses . 
Clipping horses 
Rent of stable 
Coal . 
Veterinary service 
Repairing harnesses 
New harnesses 
English Vegetable food 
Colic medicine 
Small supplies 



Total expended, South Yard and Stable 



737 


50 


735 


00 


683 


33 


931 


16 


294 


85 


73 


25 


229 


00 


745 


00 


18 


00 


600 


00 


19 


06 


34 


GO 


275 


•90 


295 


00 


75 


00 


15 


00 


231 


50 



!,V2o rz 



5,992 55 

^8,718 27 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort-Point channel). 
Sundry repairs on machinery. 

Ironwork $499 37 

Transferred to bridge improvements, 

Wards 12 and 13, June 4, 1894 . 501 77 



Total 

Bridge Improvements, Wards 12 and 13. 
Broadway bridge (over Fort- Point channel) . 



,001 14 



General repairs on draw machinery, new 

centre, etc. ' 
Ironwork 
Cai'penters 

Total expended 



t31 23 
70 54 



$501 77 



138 City Document No. 34. 

Berwick Park footbridge (over N.Y., N.II., 
& H. R.R., Providence Division). 
Erected footbridge and built retainiug-walls. 

Advertising . " S39 17 

Inspector . . . . . . 176 00 

Contract with Quimb}' & Ferguson for 
work done and material furnished on 
retaining-walls ..... 3,200 00 

Contract with D. H. Andrews for work 
done and material furnished, removing 
old bridge from Franklin street and re- 
furnishing and erecting same at Ber- 
wick park 1,700 00 



Total expended $5,il5 17 

Transferred to City Nursery and C4reen-houses, 

January 31, 1895 884 83 



Chelsea-street bridge, rebuilding (East Boston 
to Chelsea). 
Rebuilt by B. F. Nay & Co. 
Top sheathing done by Bridge Division. 
Advertising . . . ' . 

Inspector ...... 

Specifications ..... 

Contract with B. F. Nay & Co. for work 

done and material furnished rebuilding 

bridge (except iron draw) . 
Carpenters ...... 

Inspecting and testing at mill material 

for iron draw ..... 

Total expended ..... 
Balance ...... 



Appropriation $6,000 00 



Boylston-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 

Built new iron fence. 

Erecting fence . $1,094 00 

Transferred to surface drain, Boylston street, De- 
cember 3, 1894 1,600 00 

Transferred to Citv Nursery and Greenhouses, Jan- 
uary 31, 1895 \ . ' 38 82 



Appropriation ....... $2,732 82 



Appropriation 



[Work uncompleted.] 



$120 45 

406 00 

59 22 




0,808 60 
167 00 




23 81 




. 


$11,585 08 
18,414 92 


• 


$30,000 00 



Street Department — Bridge Diyisiox. 



VS9 



Commonwealth avenue « 




Built sidewalk aud fence. 




Carpenters . 


. $1,181 00 


Lumber .... 


. 1,610 9fi 


Nails ..... 


92 19 


Car-fares .... 


67 00 


Ice ..... 


3 00 



Chai'ged to Commonwealth avenue 

Broadway bridge (over Fort-Point chanuel) . 
Ironwork ........ 

Congress-street bridge (over Fort-Point channel) , 
Ironwork ...... SI, 507 16 

Two upright boilers, special pattern . 1,000 00 
Setting same, connections, valves, smoke- 
burners, etc. ..... 400 00 



Federal-street bridge (over Fort-Point channel). 

Plumbing $299 50 

Ironwork . . . . . . 10 22 

L-street-bridge (over Reserved channel) 
Two spar buoys ..... 
Two G-ton mooring-stones 

Mt. Wasliington-avenue bridge (over Fort-Point 
channel). 
Repairing fender-guard 
Iron- work ..... 

Congress street. 

Completed the fence and sidewalk. 
Carpenters . . . . . 
Painters ..... 
Lumber ..... 
Nails 

Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermanic Dis- 
trict No. 6 

Williams-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Rebuilt the bridge. 

Carpenters .$144 00 

Lumber . . . . . . 185 48 

Nails 15 45 



$94 


00 


210 


00 


Fort-Point 


$184 00 


12 


88 


$1,612 


05 


261 


75 


821 


63 


52 


45 



!,954 15 



[21 06 



2,907 16 



309 72 



304 00 



196 88 



2^47 _88 
16,586 70 



Charged to Street Improvements, Aldermaiiic Dis- 
trict No. 11 



S341 9:\ 



140 



City Document No. 34. 



Lstreet bridge (over Reseived chauuel). 
Overhauling eDgiue, machinery, windlass-head and 

shaft, repairing fence, draw-latch, and connecting 

steam -pump. 
Charged to Street Improvements, Ward 14 

Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Hepaired machinery . . . 

Mattapan bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Repaired roadway. 
Lumber ........ 

[See regular appropriation.] 

Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
New deck. 

Lumber $438 25 

Ironwork 204 20 

[See regular appropriation.] 
Charged to Street Improvements, Ward 24 

Brooklilie-aTeime bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 
Laid new deck and sheathed the same, and painted 

bridge two coats, also the water-pipes. 
Carpenters 
Painters 
Lumber 
Ironwork 
Hardware 
Nails ., 
Paint stock . 
Car- fares 

Commonwealth-aTenue bridge (over outlet) . 

[For description of work done, see regular appro- 
priation.] 
Lumber ......••• 



. $727 


75 


413 


89 


998 


43 


4 


80 


31 


80 


47 


75 


71 


83 


4 


90 



)1 58 



$128 90 



21 4' 



642 45 



;792 82 



>,3.01 15 



240 59 



Charged to Street Improvements, Wards 19 and 22, $2,541 74 



Florence-street bridge (over Stony brook) . 
Rebuilt bridge, sidewalks, and fence. 

[Balance of work done to be paid for in 1895.] 
Carpenters .....••• 

Charged to Street Improvements, Wards 23 and 25, $759 24 



$759 24 



Street Department — Bridge Division, 



141 



Recapitulation. 

Amounts charged to Special Appropriations 
Broadway Bridge .... 
Bridge Improvements, Wards 12 and 13 
Berwick Park footbridge . 
Boylston -street Bridge 
Chelsea-street Bridge, rebuilding 
Commonwealth avenue . 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 6 

U (I U ''' 1 1 

" Ward 14 . . . 

" Ward 24 . . . 

" Wards 19 and 22 . 

" Wards 23 and 2b . 

Total 



$499 


37 


501 


77 


5,115 


17 


1,094 


00 


11,585 


08 


2,954 


15 


6,586 


70 


344 


93 


291 


58 


792 


82 


2,541 


74 


759 


24 



$33,066 55 




142 City Document No. 34. 



LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 
I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

[Ill the list those marked with an asterisk are over navigable 
waters, and are each provided with a draw.] 

Agassiz road, in Back Bay Fens. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street, 

Brighton. 
Ashland street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division, West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Audubon road, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brookline Branch. 
Beacon entrance, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 
Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Berwick-park (foot) bridge, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Blakemore street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division, West Roxbury. 
Bolton street, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Boylston street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
*Broadway, over Fort-Point channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Byi'ou street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 
*Castle Island, from Marine park. South Boston, to Castle Island. 
*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 
*Chelsea (South), over South channel, Mystic river. 
*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 
Commonwealth avenue, over outlet to Back Ba}' Fens. 
*Congress street, over Fort-Point channel. 
Cornwall street, over Stony brook. West Roxbury. 
Cottage Farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad, at Commonwealth 

avenue. 
Cottage-street footbridge, over flats. East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albanv, and Providence Divsion 

of N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad. 
*Dover street, over Fort- Point channel. 
*Federal street, over Fort-Point channel. 
Pen, Back Bay Fens. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 143 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Florence street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Gold-street footbridge, over N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Irvington-street footbridge, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, 
Providence Division. 

*L street, over Reserved channel at junction of Congress and L 
streets. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

JJnden Park street, over Stony brook. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Boston. & Albany Railroad. 

Massachusetts avenue, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

^Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort-Point channel. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 

Public Garden footbridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony brook, Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

Swett street, west of N. Y. & N. E. Railroad. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Newton street, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

West Rutland-square footbridge, over N. Y., N. H., & H. Rail- 
road, Providence Division. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part within its 

Limits. 

*Cambridge street, from Brigliton to Cambridge. 

Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

*Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 

*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

*Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 

Longwood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 

Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 

Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 

*Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

*North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the Cost of 

Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Dorchester street, over N. Y., N. H., & 11. Railroad, Plymouth 
and Taunton Division. 



144 City Document No. 34. 

Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Prisou Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

*TVest Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

The last four bridges are in the care of two Commissioners, 
one of whom is appointed by the City of Cambridge and the 
other by the City of Boston. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporatioxs. 

1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

oth. — ISfew York & yew England Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Harvard street, Dorchester. 

Morton -' " 

Norfolk " " 

Norfolk " . 

Silver street. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 

West Broadway. 

West Fifth street. 

West Fourth street. 

West Second street. 

West Sixth street. 

West Third street. 

Oth. — New York,. New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Plymonth 

and Taunton Division. 
Adams streeet. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Free port street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 145 



7th. — New Torh, Neiv Haven., & Hartford Railroad., Providence 
, Division. 

Beech street, "VYest Roxbury. 

Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 

Canterbury street. West Roxbur}-. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, West Roxbury. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Dudley avenue, West Roxbury. 

Park street, West Roxburj'. 

Recapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . . 57 
II. Number of which Boston supports the part within its 

limits ......... 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost of 

maintenance ....... 7 

IV. Number supported b}^ railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division ... 2 

3. *•' " Western Division . . 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn ... 1 

5. New York & New England . . . . 13 

6. New York, New Haven, & Hartford, Plymouth 

and Taunton Division .... 5 

7. New York, New Haven, & Hartford, Provi- 

dence Division ...... 7 



Total number. ....... 112 

The existing regulations for the passage of vessels through 
drawbridges have been posted on the several bridges, as required 
by law. 

The records of the number of draw openings, vessels passing 
through the bridges, time of passage, kind of vessels, numbei- 
laden with cargo, etc., as kept by the draw-tenders of the several 
bridges, have been tabulated, and the totals are given in the sum- 
mary, which will be found in Appendices Al and A6. 

A list of widths of openings for vessels in all bridges provided 
with draws in the city, measurements being furnished by the City 
Engineer, will be found in Appendix A2. 

Appendix A3 is a table, also made by the City Engineer, show- 
ing widths of bridges, kind of roadways, sidewalks, etc. 

A list of culverts and small bridges will be found in Appendix 
A4. 

Appendix A5 contains a tabulated statement of traffic. 



146 



City Document No. 34. 



Q 



H 

O 
Ph 

P^ 
CO 

Q 
I 



o 
o 



o 

O 



© 



1— I 

o 

O iH 



10 



fed 


CO 


r— 


t^. 


.^ 


^ 


U^ 


rtl 


,o 




^ 


a 


eS 


C3 


Q 


o 


« 


-M 


5 


H^" 




Oi 




or 


b* 


1-1 






o 


H 


f4 


>, 


-M 


;h 


hfi 


cs 



•2 I 






© 



2 




CS O fl !K 

r2 o aa 



.>-^ Or•^ O 



^ 


CO 


CO 


>o 


t^ 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


CM (M 


5 


lO 


00 


t^ 


CD 


t^ 


CO 


00 


CO c 




















o 


>o 




[^ 


CD 


CO 




-* 


Til -H 


H 














'"' 






I3> 


lO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


(M 


■-I tH 


1^ 1—1 


Ms 


O 


CD 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




^ lo 


^ 




Oi__ 


t^ 


CI 




00__ 




f?; 






















<M 


'* 


O 


,_( 


CO 


r-l Cft 


<M O 


^^ 


(M 


t^ 


03 


•* 


CD 


r^ 


o 


oo I-- 




t^ 


I~- 


05 


lO 


(M 


o 


Tt< C5 


Mq 


^ 




in 


O 


CO 




C<l 


CO 



.— I CO CO 

CO CO .-< 

CO O rH 









'^ 


CO 


<M 


^ 


^ 


^ 


in 


C<l 


in 


CO 


05 


in 


05 


OO 


CO 






m 


CO 






















H 


'"' 




(M 


CO 


'"' 




t^ 


'"' 




• 


-* 


^^ 


t^ 


c^ 


CM 


00 


CO 


,—1 


, — 1 


^% 






IM 




03 


<M 


o 


CO 


CO 


(M 




CO 


CO 






(N 


(M 




^ 






















,_( 


(M 


in 


05 


00 


,__i 


O 


CO 


O) 


pa c4 


^ 


00 




CO 




CO 




oa 




CO 


■^ 


CO 


'*! 


t~ 




^ 


CO 


en 




















^ 




(M 


CO 


'^ 




CO 


'"' 





S5 






rH O l-^ rH 









r^ i-H i-H 



^ ^ ^ -a 



QQOOOOQW 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



147 



o •*• o 



^ -— CO 



m 


o 


Ui 


,13 


o 




._, 


>> 


o 


, — 


















a 


■^ 






U 


a 




































6(1 


o 


2 



= ;? — o 



>5 ;^< 



148 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A2. 



Table showing- the Widths of Opening-s for Vessels in all 
Bridges provided with Draws, in the City of Boston, 
January 31, 1895. 







o| 






Name of Bridge. 


Location. 






Width. 










Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 


Boston to Charlestown . 
Over Miller's river . . . 
Boston to East Cambridge 




39 i 

35 

40 




Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 


II Q 1. 


Boston & Maine R.R. (freight), 
Southern Division 


11 2 " 


Boston & Maine R.R. (passenger) , 
Southern Division 


(( U (( (< 




39 


" 7 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


Boston to Charlestown . 

Over Miller's river . . . 
Over Fort Point channel, 




39 

35 
43 


" 7 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


" 10 " 


Broadway 


" 3 " 


Cambridge street 


Brighton to Cambridge . 




3fi 


II 3 11 


Canal (or Craigie's) ......... 


Boston to East Cambridge 




36 


II I II 




Boston to Charlestown . 
Charlestown to Chelsea . 




36 
38 


„ " 


Chelsea (south channel) 


II 9 u 


Chelsea (north channel) 


" " . 




44 


" 10 " 


Chelsea st. (East Boston side) . . . 


East Boston to Chelsea . 


2 


36 


" " 


" " (Chelsea side) 


" " " . 




36 


11 '^ 


Commercial point (or Tenean) . . 


Dorchester 


1 


24 


11 " 


Congress street (Boston side) . . . 


Over Fort Point channel. 


2 


43 


" 3 " 


" " (South Boston side) . 


«' " 


• • 


43 


" 11 " 


Dover street 


(( II II II 




36 


" 10 " 




Brighton to Cambridge . 
Over Fort Point channel, 
Boston to Charlestown . 


1 

1 

1 


35 
41 
36 


« 9 II 


Federal street 


" 10 " 


EitchburgR.R 


" " 


" " (for teaming freight) 


u u 


1 


36 


II "• 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



149 



Table showing- Width of Openings, etc. 


— Concluded. 


jSTame of Bridge. 


Location. 


S.2 
3 '^ 


Width. 




Brighton to Cambridge . 
East Boston to Chelsea . 


1 

I 


35 fe 
34 ' 


et 9 inches. 




6 " 




Dorchester to Milton . . 
Boston to Cambridge . . 


1 

2 


36 ' 
36 ' 


" 


Harvard (Boston side) 


6 " 


" (Cambridge side) .... 






36 ' 


8 " 




Over Reserved chaiinel, 
South Boston 


1 


40 ' 






" 




Chariestown to Everett . 
East Boston to Chelsea , 


1 
2 


43 ' 
59 ' 


4 " 


Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 


2 " 


" " (Chelsea side) .... 


" " " 




59 ' 


" 


Mt. Washington ave. (Boston side) . 


Over Fort Point channel, 


2 


42 ' 


3 " 


" " " (South Boston 
side) . . 


<( (I li (( 




42 ' 


3 " 


Neponset 


Dorchester to Quincy . . 


1 


36 ' 


" 


New York & New England R.R. 


Over Fort Point channel. 


9. 


41 ' 


10 " 


New York & New England R.R. 
(South Boston side) 






40 ' 


11 " 


New York & New England R.R. . 


Over SoutbJBay .... 


1 


28 ' 


4 " 


North Beacon street 


Brighton to Watertown , 


1 


30 ' 


2 " 


North Harvard street 


Brighton to Cambridge . 


1 


36 ' 


" 


New York, New Haven, & Hart- 


Over Fort Point channel, 

Dorchester to Quincy . . 

Chariestown to Cam- 
bridge 


1 

1 
1 


36 ' 
36 ' 
36 ' 


4 " 


New York, New Haven, & Hart- 
ford R.R 


" 








'^ 


Warren 


Boston to Chariestown . 
Boston to Cambridge . . 


1 
2 


36 ' 
36 ' 


2 " 


West Boston (Boston side) .... 


6 " 


" " (Cambridge side) . . 


u u 




36 ' 


1 " 


Western avenue 


Brigliton to Cambridge . 
Brighton to Watertown, 


1 
1 


36 ' 
35 ' 


" 




10 " 







150 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A3. 



Table showing Width of Bridg-es, kind of Roadways, Side- 
walks, etc., on Tide-water Bridges, January 31, 1895. 



Name of Bridge. 



Bi'oadway 

Cambridge street .... 

Canal 

Charles river 

Chelsea, North 

" South 

" street 

Commercial point .... 

Congress street 

Dover street (over water) 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

Harvard 

L street 

Maiden . . 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington avenue . 

Neponset 

North Beacon street . . . 

North Harvard street . . 

Prison Point 

Warren 

W. avenue to Cambridge . 
" " " Watertown 

Wiuthrop 

West Boston 



Ft.In. 
60 
40 
64 
50 

49 

50 

30 
about 

34 

60 
60 

31 
69 
30 2 
69 4 

60 
40 
50 

61 

30 

31 
28 2 
50 
80 
33 2 
33 
24 2 
50 



Roadway. 



Ft.In. 
40 

33 2 

48 

34 
40 
37 

23 2 
about 
27 

44 

40 

22 8 

49 

24 4 
51 
44 
32 
36 
39 6 
2310 

25 2 

26 7 
36 
60 
26 3 
24 2 
19 10 
36 



Plank 



Paved 



Kind of 
roadway. 



Plank 

Paved 

Plank 
Paved 
Plank 

Paved 



Plank 



f Plank 
I Paved 

Paved 
Plank 



Paved 



Sidewalks. 



Ft.In. 
10 
6 
8 
8 
8 
6 6 

6 

8 
10 

7 6 
10 

5 

9 2 

8 
7 
7 

10 9 
5 5 

5 

7 
10 

6 

8 
3 7 

7 



Kind of walks. 



Coal-tar concrete . 

Plank. 

Brick. 

Coal-tarconcrete. 

Plank. 

Coal-tarconcrete. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal-tarconcrete. 



Plank. 



Coal-tarconcrete. 
Plank. 



Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 151 



*0 ■ 



cc 




!Ji (Xl Oi 







^ 








o 
















oi 




^ 












a 
o 


"3 






o 


a 












a 




a 




o 


o 




cc 


Q 


m 


















"Sd"S 




o 


lO 


gl^ 


o 


CO 


C4 








VA 












o bo 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 




^ 


00 


-* 


lO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


lO 


■M •* 






'3 
















KO 




o 

















a2cccoaQcccca!a2«2cccc 



-) S 



© 



|1h "5 



s t^ 



S ^ ^ P5 

o 3 S " 



Q fe 



o ^ 



z o 



I' ^ 



p^ ^ 



o S 



= ^ 



!>: ^ 



§ 03 



&. ^ 



•■s < 



:- Q t: 



5 P5 



rt S 



a !3 -3 "S 



•^ ii ^ ^ 



pa P 



I jZ _- c 



5 = o 



« M pq w 



152 



City Document No. 34. 







s 
o 



























(^ 












o 


lit 


C: 


o 


o 


i^ 


o 


IC 


o 


13 


irr 


o 


1^ 


o 


ITS 


o 


t^ 


cc 


CC 


(M 


- 


(M 


^ 


(M 


"^ 


'"' 


!M 


C<1 


C^l 


CO 


CC 


-^ 






































o 




















_ 














• 








>, 










• 


• 
















































>i 








— 




























































— 
























>, 










-p 


5 






o 
















S 








.1^ 

o 

M 

o 


o 
d 

i 


.a 


o 
p 

en 


d 


o 

3 

> 


6 




>> 


6 


6 

o 


c 




o 

P4 

_5 


c 


5 




o 
Hi 


5 

o 


o 
a 

-^ 
o 


o 

c 


1 
o 


o 
a. 
o 


3 




5 


s 


1 


_c 


> 


^3 


o 

p 


Tc 




Is 


> 




o 

s 






CO 


^ 


^ 


j> 


o 
3 


"x 


iC 


'^ 




c 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Ts 


"ci 


o 


> 


a 


- 


•— . 


"3 




o 




































































































m 


> 


> 


>i 


>. 


>, 


o 
o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


9 


o 
o 


p 




u 






































































^ 


c 


- 


- 


- 


- 


oo 


to 


tn 


K 


tn 


„ 


tr 


^ 


— 


— r 






































^ 


"So 


Td 


o 


o 








C 








O 


3 


o 


^ 




g^ 






d 




C3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




O 










M 


n 


O 


O 


u 


o 


u 


U 


CJ 


o 


O 


U 


\^ 


t^ 


<^ 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



153 



3 
T^J <:£ -i^ ir: 



o o o o o c-i 
1-^ t— cj ot cJ >— 



L~ oi Tj! CO c^i t-^ c-i c^i 



> c 




o c 






o 



5 ?2 ^ 



cccci(/2cca3cc!xx:cca} 






c c - 



S CO 02 CC 03 OJ 



,n o ^ 



_2 CJ CJ 2 O '3 o 



O G5 ITS O 



-~ 3c: — 



o o o 



^ 


S 


Sfl 














X 


^ 


M 


o 


br 




« 


;-i 


-^i 


m 


« 


o 


;> 


o 


-s 






vh a ■— 



^^ ^^ I K ^_ 1-^ 



J: - t> 
^ O I" 



6 I— I 



= fe 



pj ^ 



Q g 



= s > 



i i J2 o 



en -^ — — 



!« ? -2 ^ 



* — — 



O O O 



^ = -S a 



1— I u^ O 



o 4) 



?5 t'. 



154 



City Document No. 34. 



u 

> 

© 



"!:; be 




















t^ 


lO 














o ^ ^ 


o 


C£ 






O 


o 


iC 


o 


CO 


CD 


c< 


q 


iq 






iq 




CO 








iC 


^ 


■^ 


c>i 


^ 


^ 


^^ 


CD 


CO 






CD 


«5 


























»o 














































^ 




























'B 






_C 




























O 


fci) 




.2 














5 

03 














o 


































'S 


^ 


















C 














a 


0) 

o 




c 














C3 














c« 


<L 


c 


nr 


^ 


c 


o 


o 


(D 




03 


03 


^ 


lyl 


'^ 


r^ 


r^ 


o 




c 


c 


O 








a 


O 


C 


c 


a 


a 


O 


O 


■^ 


c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 


o 


'O 


C 


o 


o 






O 


O 


S 

w 




s. 


s 


^ 


^ 


5 


^ 


'Si 


m 


^ 


m 


M 


M 


fa 


^ 


^ 










































c 
































'^ 
^ 




^ 








'p 




'p 








_C, 


03 

a 
o 










6 






-' 






s 




S 










03 










T3 


a 


0, 


c 


o 


1 


0) 


<u 


0) 




03 


c 


-^ 


% 


03 


03 


t; 


cc 


e 


c 


= 


a 






fl 


c 


C 






"5 

> 


d 


a 


O 




c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


c 


O 


c 


Q 


o 


o 


o 




















^ 






P 






^ 




a 


OC 


a 


^ 


a 


QQ 


^ 


th 


th 


s. 


C 


th 


S 






IC 






























-p -Ki 


































bc§? 


c 


c- 


C 


o 


t= 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


c 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


§f^ 


-v 


o; 


ic: 


lO 


^ 


'^ 




-* 


Tf 


^ 


"C 


IC 


CO 


CD 


^ 


-# 


































a 


































o be 


1-- 




r- 












cc 


lO 








t^ 




»o 


cc 


in 


cc 


o 


c 


o 


in 


o 


o 


l^ 


>c 


c 


iq 


q 


lO 


CM 




(M 


It: 


o: 


>d 


^ 


-* 


I— 1 


"* 


>c 


c^ 


IM 


cc 


t-H 


c<i 


'^ 


CO 




























^ 
































lO 








tdo 


























CO 




























t^ 


lO 






t^ 




lO 


C3 J^ 


C 


o 


c 


ICS 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 




c< 


q 


o 


CD 


q 


o? 


-* 


CE 


ICt 


CO 


-* 


lO 


CO 


t-^ 


oi 


OJ 


CO 


iri 


C<l 


c<i 


'^ 


CD 




























>q 
















, \ 


















^, 






>. 












o 




















>> 


s 












"gq 




















^ 


^ 












O 




















^ 


X 










c 


13 
o 




t^. 


^ 












t^. 


o 

P5 


^ 






£ 




'c! 


p 




y. 


^ 
>< 






5 






o 




03 






"b 


' 1 


1 


4 


c 


o 


o 






03 






p^ 


^ 






1^5 

o 

M 

o 
o 


c 

c 

a 
a 


1 

c 
c 

c 

3 a 


1 

< i 

J E 
r < 


- Pi 

K 

■ t 

3 O 


_b 

c 
f 

c 

E 


O 
3 CS 

. a 

> ce 


CD 

o 

(D 

g 
p 

<D 
O 

o 


o 

03 

oT 
d 




c 

1 
E 


"P 
O 
P 

oT 

a 

03 

03 

i 1 

3 =* 


c 
c 

E 


C 
C 




03 

: ^ 

s 

o 

i -^ 


a" 
.2 

"S 

0^ 
03 

be 

_a 


.2 

03 

03 

its 

.9 

E. 
cc 

0) 

a 

03 


3 

03 

1 

o 

p 

a' 
'a 
5 

03 

a 






i c 


J '' 




a 


3 "E 
















4^ 


03 


03 




t: 








a 


i P 


CD 


o 













03 


^ 


03 
















Q 


03 




- 03 


c 




J 03 


03 










"^ 


1 c 


3 03 












03 






03 










^ 


^ E 


Q 


; p 





2 K 


•^ 


m 


E 




!- 


3 b 


i) m 


■s 


03 


a 






I ° 


n m 


E 


5 .2 


S 


^ 


C 


. 




c 


I A 


£p 


a 


03 

a 

03 




z 


5 "t 


l C 


\ S 




2 "^ 

3 S 


"fti 

O 


o 


c 


3 S 


C 


> ? 




c 




a 



!z; C P-i Ph fw Ph P-i 



P5 Ph cc CO cc 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



155 



CO CO CO 



'■n rji ^ m 



02 CB CC 



S !=! 



'J:! :n rJl !Ji (/i 



m > 



o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o ira o 


^ 00 


CO CO 


'^H 


-H t^ 


(M -* m lo 
























































o 






















rt 






















o 




































i. 




'- 


-^. 


















^ 




o 


^ 




^ 




^ 










'P 


> 




^ 








c 










o 


— 


;rj 


^ 


^ 


>-i 




p^ 










P4 


n 


iS 


Pi 


c 

Pi 


•A 




f5 











^ 


« 


o 






f§ 




c 










"S 


a 






^ 


o 


r 


c 










o 


r^ 


o 




p' 


Ph 


r- 










en 


^ 


s 
o 


^ 


cu 


m~ 


m 


s 












rt 


g 

5 


t> 


r* 


g 


^ 


3 

H 




^ ?-. 


-^ 


E) 


o 




^ 


a 
o 
Ph 

OS 

a 


1? 


a 


D •a 


T 


X 


1 


^ 


o 


o 


s 


o 

a 




^ 


Ph 


^ 


r^ 


- 


■z. 




o 




o 


^ 


a 




t> 






o 

o 
p 


















o 


o 


a 
o 


a 
o 


p 

a 
o 


a 
o 


a 


o 

E 


p 




^' 


s 


'/J 


a 


a 




J _a 




a 


a 


S 


■y 


^ 


o 


J 


« 


^ 




■-; 


3 


s 


2 


















o 






H 


'^ 


•_^ 


•_^ 


S^ 


►^ 


•^ 


>^ 


jj 


t" 




*^ 


•^ 


^ 


-y- 




-'•<■ 


'-^ 


r^ 


V 


? 





156 



City Document No. 34. 



S 00 



do CS 
I CK 



<< c« 



^K<l 




1— 1 


»» 


Q 


5 


^25 


U 


&q 


5W 


(Ih 


© 


Pm 


-M 


<1 


in 



tM . • 




in 


o 


in 


o 


\a 


o 


m 


o 


o 


c 


m 


m 


in 


(N 










!N 


05 


— 1 


r-H 






<M 


IM 


C-5 


(M 


(M 


•-H 


r-H 


-a-- ■^ 
































f|^ 
































«a 
































hi) 
































fl 
































































































> 

a 


































a. 


m 





o 


0) 


<1 


0. 


o: 


C 


(L 




c 




<a 






a 


c 


c 


fl 


c 


E 




c 




a 




o 


a 




r 


o 


c- 


c 


o 


r 


c 


c 


c 


C 




-1 c 




o 






































a. 


m 


U^ 


C/3 


m 


«. 


c/. 


a. 


a: 


t/. 


Ph 


a 


p: 


CC 


































































































03 
































& 
































a> 
































































































CC! 




(1 


o 


Q. 


Q 


a 


<i 


a 


a 


c 


Q. 




c 


a 


o 








fl 


P 


a 


a 


c 






c 


t- 


0, 


c 


E 


a 






r 


o 




c 


o 


r 


c 


c 


c 


C 


a- c 


c 


o 






































a 


m 


C/. 


a; 


cc 


a 


a 


c/. 


a; 


C/. 


P- 


c/. 


a: 


CC 


^ 




































































ir 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c~ 


Cv 


o 


CO 


c 


o 




•^ 


o 


a.S 




Of 


-* 




^ 


CO 


cr 


o 


■51 


t- 


^ 




'i 






.fe, 
































tr-l . 














1, 


















O bX) 




^1 


C<" 


r<i 


IM 


(M 


cq 




CM 


(M 


C<1 




C5 










-+ 


TJH 




^ 


-* 


en 


o 


"* 


C2 


o 


in 




o 


o 




-* 


-* 


cc 


00 


CO 


-^i 


m 


CO 


CO 


CO 


'"' 


CO 


!>- 


in 


MO 




































c 


o 


C: 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


o 


IC 


lO 


o 


c 


o 






\r. 


lO 


^ 


^ 


Tfl 


■+ 




CO 


^ 


CO 


f-H 


-* 


cc 


in 
















IC 
































































































0) 








tH 












1^ 
o 


W 


4- 

a 


3 














D 






0. 


o 




O 
O 
1-^ 


W 

w 

o 
O 

Q 


> 
c 

a 

a 

a 
> 


a 

s 

o 


a 
c 

c- 

3 

a 
c 

a 

c. 




'a 

% 

5' 
l> 

a 
oT 
a 

> 


a 
a 

& 
c 


c 

0. 

C 
C 

5 
a 
c 

1 
c. 


0. 

"^ 

c 

a 
cz: 

c 
J. 


o 

W a. 

^1 
a 

c 

o: 
a 


b 

t 

Q. 

Q. 




E 

c 

"b 

a 

r 
a 

"c 

a 


W 

1 

E 

s 

0. 

J. 


CO 

a 
o 

W 

-a 

1 

c3 
O 

a 
£ 






a 


3 
> 


> 
a 




o 




r 


c 

E 


E 
0- 


' 


E 
C 


5 
"c 


_a 






PC 


M 


p: 


h 


W 




C 


L. 


cc 


< 




(- 


P 





Street Department — Bridge Division. 



157 






(M (M C<1 



P^ tJi m rji tXl 



ai iji ai 






SO 





D 


H) 


<D 


o 


o 


(D 


o 


o 


(U 


o , 


a 


a 


c 


fl 


a 


fi 


a 


a 


a 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






















P^ 


7J 


C/J 


C/J 


M 


02 


C/J 


cc 


02 


C/J 



^ O r-H 



g op (» & ^ 
CO 'S ^1 <D 

Op ^ 



d ^ 



^ P 



P5 ?f -s 



<u -te: -^ 



9 ;±; ^ 



•^ d j- 



« 5 a 



a s 



158 



City Document No. 34. 



O 






^ 


n>, 


< 


-n 




+j 




^ 


X 


4) 
> 


1— I 


I— ( 


Q 


s 


^ 


"w* 


w 




Pm 




0^ 




^ 


, 1 



o to 


o o o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


■S'i-i 


o o "R '^ 


O lO 


cq 


coo 


Sl,<U JU 


oi c<i CO CO 


'^ CO 


CO 


ici KO 


o>^ 


















Qa 


















bo 




















_g 




























































(U 




















> 




















o 








!U 




OJ 


o 


O (D 


O 








a 

O 




a 


a 
5 


^ a 
cccc 






























































03 




















^ 




















i 




















r3 


























o 




<D 


CD 


CD D 


M 








c 




3 


a 
o 

m 


a a 
_o o 

OQOQ 




ic 


c 




o 


c 


O 


o 


oo 


ii 


^ 


i> 


-* 


CS 


GC 


<= 


CO 


oo 


or 


(M 




o 


c 


<o 


<=> 


cdo' 


-* 


1^ 


5< 


'*' 


■^ 


o 


ira 


^co 

CM CO 


Cm . 


















o bo 


















HO 








o 




CO 


CO 


CO CO 








o 

CO 




CO 


CO 


CO CO 

^ CO 




oo^ 


-iiJ 


v. 
















_o 


|o 














5 


















*f 
















-S • 


,2 












a -ti 




3 


o 


a. 


o 


o 


oo 


1 * S 








o 


c 


- '^. 


<r> 


coo 


' cg-"^ 


g 1 
g.s-s 


^ Is 


O 

H _a.S 


CO 


H 


H oi 


CO 


coco 




(M 


(M 




o 


















o 






__ 


















a 












ic 






o 


































'^ 






Ji2 


























o 

a 
o 

to 
a 








1 


<D 




< 






cu 

a 
_o 

bJD 

a 


O 




>> 

Pi 


9 

o 

'5 

g 


CD 
p 

CD 


a 

be 
.fcp 

6 




!5 


H a 

S 2 

Pi'" 
o 
9 


^ 


r— " 


tD OO 




p 


il 

a-' 


a 




O 

M 

H 




03 


o a 

-a 

o 
o 


o 
o 

P-I 


CD 


CD 

CD 




o 


a 
p 

>o 


a 
p 

"S 


q3 
> . 

CD . 
p 


O 

d 

o 

CO 


2S 
pg a_^ 

> 


CD 

> 

C3 


















'^ ■ 






tD 


p^ 


"m 


(U 


c-^ 


o 


o 


o 






.9 


Cfi 


^^ 


p 


:;2 


p 


^ 


^ • 






a 


a 
o 


"o 

^ 


p 


^ CD 

CK p 


"§ 


a 
o 

a 


a m 

is 






S 


o 
o 


o 


CD t-i 

o * 


o 


a 

o 


1^ II 




< 


M 


Ph 


CD 


&:< 


m 


O 


o 


II 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



159 

















(D 

a 












o 


-^ 


a 


















o 










o 


3 


~; 
















" 










« 




^ 
















_o 










_o 


^ 


-t^ 3 
































-> 














3 










^ 


f, , 


s s 




























o 




cS 














o 










o 




c» 


a 
S 

M 










^ 




'^"S 
^ « 




^ 


^ 




;S 3 


_S 


2^ 














.r- >. 










•— • > 
















<*. 




■^ s 




^ 


_f 




n a 


3 














"aj 




O CJ 




o 


d 




"3 cj 


X 


> O 












rt 




23 




P3 


P5 




P3 


W 




oiv ^ 










o 








o 


o 


o 


CO 




. 




o 


-S'-« "S 










o 








lO 


iq 


lO 


CO 




lO 








^i 




CO 




c^ 




t-^ 


(N 


c^' 


Tii 






bX) 


































































D 




o 








(U 






























-^ 












<u 






£ 




9 








9 












o 






o 

a 
o 




s 




o 




s 






0) 




a 


O 








o 




o 




o 


"3 




o 




o 








Q 




O 




^ 




O 


M 


M 


^ 




to 


i 




































































ca 


































^ 






ID 




o 










o 


o 


p 










_£ 






2 




"5 








9 


p 


p 














O 




5 




o 




3 


G 


3 


o 




o 

a 
o 


m 






O 




a 
o 




o 




a 
o 


o 


o 


o 










O 




O 




.^ 




O 


O 


O 


M 




th 


i-t 






o 








o 




o 


o 


(M 


o 




o 


E3 r-^ 






lO 




o 




>— ^ 




CJ 


CO 


t^ 


o 




o 






r-A 




CD 




o 




(^ 


ir£ 


CO 


o 




^ 


Sfei 






•^ 
t^ 




lO 




CO 




^ 


■* 


^ 


t^ 




i:^ 


•^ 






























Vi . 






























O bD 






























ill 






CO 




o 




o 




IQ 


O 


o 


o 




i^ 






CO 




IC 




o 




l--- 


o 


in 


c:> 










CO 




CO 




CO 




r-l 


CO 


00 


CO 




co' 
































l-l< %^ 






























C 1^ 






o 




CO 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




c> 








o 




CO 




o 




o 


lO 


iri 


IQ 




o 






CO 




-^ 




<m' 




CO 


CO 


o 


lO 




c4 






^ 


-^ 


— ^ 


















^ 












r 






tfj" 












j3 














■^ 






1n 












cj 










"S 




^ 


o 




'w 












^ 
































O 














Pi 


o 




1 












^ 










5 




rt 






<!i 








p 


p 


B 










:» 


































o 


H 




n 








"oo 


■^ 










65 


S 




g 


s 






55 


o 
u 


p 


s 

"So 




p 






!5 


E-i 






rt 


-c 




O 


-*-» 


^ 


a 


^ 


^ 






O 

<; 
o 
o 
A 


cc 










y. 




H 

M 

S 










o 






ta 
o 

K 
O 
P 


5 

O 

<D 




0^ 

a 

O 

o 


a 


w 

CO 


5 

w 

a 

5; 


'3 

o 

a 


o 

a 


1 
a 


ci 
"3 


3 

ci 
















C3 




O 




a 


a 




p 










6 


















p 


a 


p 


o 
p 






rt 




1^ 


3" 




OJ 




■s 




^ 


o 


a 










o 
a 


VI 




o 




to 


J^ 


a 


a 


o 


in 






o 




OJ 




a 

C2 
p 




a 
p 


S 






S 
S 








r' 




a. 


r^ 




(/ 


•^ 

2 




fi^ 


;S 


P^ 


t^ 


o 
O 







160 



City Document No. 34. 



APPENDIX A5. 



Statement of Traffic on Monday, October 8, 1894, 
between the hours of 6 A.M. and 7 P.M. 

North Bridges. 



Name of Bridge. 



Charles river . . 
Chelsea (North) 
Chelsea (South) 
Meridian sti-eet . 
Warren . . . . 



s s 

M O « 


li 


g^ o 

J= £ o 

§SdM 


o S 


4,485 


4,670 


733 


862 


1,799 


2,113 


2,415 


2,260 


8,647 


8,210 



a s 

H 



03 O 
l5« 



693 
1,002 
1,320 
5,983 



737 
1,092 
1,325 
5,424 



" ,;, 


to 


^W a 


<y rf o 


i-> o 


tec: 


284 


287 


109 


1,146 



288 

294 

106 

1,167 



South Bridges. 



Broadway 

Congress street .... 

Dover street 

Federal street .... 
Mt. Washington avenue 



8,885 


9,700 


2,505 


2,375 


208 


200 


4,000 


6,250 


3,337 


2,950 






4,043 


4,225 










7,575 


9,625 


1,650 


2,080 


478 


489 


2,651 


2,709 


1,492 


1,647 







Street Department. — Bridge Division. 



161 



Q 



< 



o 

O 

© 








g ^ 




■^® 




S GO 


- 


H 




« 


T 




•-< 




« 


bt "^ 






o 


•S CO 


p-l 


-5 X 


H 


^H 


p^ 


03 




OS 


J/3 

P^ 


s2 






^ 


iH 


Q 


^S 


^ 


^ '^ 




O 


f^ 


jj cc 


H 


+s 5 


1 


OJ 


^ 


^^ 


^ 








Pi 


« -^ 


C 


" bf} 




xn 2 




■?& 




as !3 







0) 

.2 

a 



■3> 



•6681 

't -qs^ 

OJ 'I68I 

'I 'qs^ 



f'68T 





,_( 


« 


t^ 


•* 


OD 


o> 


^^ 


CO 


00 


























eesi 
























lO 








lO 




s 




^ 


to 




rH 


oo 


CO 


ca 


,—1 




Tf ■« 


to 


_, 


























S6$T 


■^ 




^ 












IM 


OJ 




>o 


'"' 


^~ 








s 


TH 


'^ 


>o 



I68I 



f-esT 





^ 


o 


(M 


t. 


00 










OD 




























«681[ 








r-T 


CO 






(if 


to 


(^» 






to 


Ci 


o 


in 


CO 










t^ 


CO 


























S68T 






in" 




CI 






cT 




<M 


to 



168t 



*68X 



J:68X 



C68I 



I68t 



fresT 



8681 



S68T 



I68T 



C-l CO i-l 



e68T 



1681 



tN <N IM ■-! 



^ 1-^ CO to r-1 O rH 



eq n iH 



Cq (M CO o 



r-* O Cl 

•<* i-H lO 

00^ 00 rH 

co" i-T 



X) to i-H 



C5 CO -^ Ol CO 
O CO U5 C5 c-l 



»o -^ t- 



r-l (M CO t^ O 



CO i-H CO 



Th iH .- 



00 UO Cq C^ 



■J:; ♦J -w Q_, 



.E: ^ 



S 



PQOOOOOOOfiWpq 






II 



162 



City Document. No. 34. 



o 



i 







•5681 


CT. i-l Cl O -* 


O t- ^ 1 


^ ^J 


00 


o 










t- CD rH lO 




(M 






Oi 






C3 


'i-qa^ 


CO CT f^ lO CO 


■"- 


CO 01^ iO_ 


rH 


^ 










i-h" TjT t-^ co" CO 




r-T uo" CO* 










O 


o; 'l68l 






Oi ^ 








(N 




S2 






H 


'I -qsi 






















CO 










03 T-^ o 


»- 


-1 t~ 


Ol 


(J 


D t- CD 


lO 


(3 










CO t^ CD i-H ■* 




CO CO t- 


o 


Oi 








¥-6$! 


CO °5. "-l "=. "^ 


CO 


<» ca^ to 




00_ 












-* C^ I 


o 














co" 






o 
































O . O I 


1-1 


CD C-l rH u 


^ o 


oo 


(N 






S . 

^ to 








:. OS CO 


O 


IM CD O 


CO 


^ 






£6St 


<^ 


i c< 


5 0^ i^ 


'^ 


C^ r^ t- 










3 S 

no 






i-H :o o 










3 




oT 








•; 


!■ . O 00 o 


i-H ^ T-H CO CO 


a; 


l^ 










^ t- O CO 


Ol 


CO c-< >i:> 


(M 


CO 






1^ 


eesT 


'^ 


' "^ '-^ <>1 


CO 


•* (M__ 0_ 


















3 T-l 








CC r-H 










o 










?H 














*>• 








^ 


tH OS o 


^ rH •* C-1 t- 


t-- 


_l 












t- CS § 


O 


O CD O 


CO 


a> 








T6SI 


0- 


o_ '^ t- 


^ 






°°- 












oT wr o" 








CD T-H 




















T~t 














QO 










t- 


lO -HH on CO 


o 


CD o: CO 


o 


rH 












CO t- 00 ^ 


-^ 


CO OJ lO 


OJ 










1^6 ST 




•ra "O o_ c<j^ 








CO r-i 




rH^ 














(>» (M 












CTl 






































^ 


oc 


cc 


C5 


,_( 


CC 


O t- 


rli 


i£D 










c^ 


t- ^ 




CO 




(N CO 










h 


S6ST 




•* t- o 












iC^ 






o 








rH IM 








'"' 




co' 








o- 


cr 


05 


Oi 






en 


C 


00 




lO 












t~ cr 








oo 




<M 




"5 






^ 


S68T 




-* 


^ 


(N 








-* 


C-l 




(M 

■o" 








t- 


CO 


t- 


T^ 






CO 


t^ 


CO 


-* 


lO 










CO 




CO 


<N 






(M 








o 








168t 




Tf 


T-H 












C-l 




CO 










o 


TJH to 


o 


r-T 


^ 




OJ 


^ 


CD 


00 


■n 












>n o; 


CO 


00 


S 




CC 


C 


(M 


C<1 










1^681 


(M 


t-^ c< 


o 

-* 


TlT 


IM 








^ 




en 

CO 








t-. 


t- 


CD 


;i^i 


"^ 


r- ^ 


,-H 


o; 


PH 


00 


(M 










CO 


o 




-:*< 










00 




CO 






^ 


£681 


0-1 


T-< 


CO 


'*" 


C^ 




■"• 


a 


■# 




co" 






S) 
























CO 








-)* 


cn 


^_, 


-ft 


^00 


CO 


IM 


o 


cn 


o 


Ol 






Eh 










(31 


OS 






^ 






o 






r.e8i 


■"I 


02 


CO 


O^ 






<M 


en 


CO 


















CO 


lO 








*~* 






CO 








03 


t^ 


J-^ 


»o 




rH 


CO 


o 


,__, 


OD 


en 














C-l 




CO 




-f 




o 




o 








1681 


c5 


C-1 


w 


'^ 


C-l 






a 


>o 




OS 
CC 










00 


s § 


-* 


CO 


o 




3 




lo 


•^ 


s 








¥681 




CO CO 




^ 


rH 












t- 






i 










CO 








c^ 






^" 








CI 


^ 


^^ 


CI 






^ 


ir 


o^ 


CO 


.n 






"3 




o 




1-- 


<M 


5 








CO 




Tt< 






So 


£681 




C-l 
























o 










co" 








!N 






co' 






i> 
























IM 








,— t 


"0 


T_< 


CO 


~C0 




o 


CD 


,-H 


Ol 


a> 








C-j 








o- 




■M 


a- 












.a 


S6SI 




55 


00 


en 






rH 


t- C-1 




co_ 
















co" 








c^ 












'3 

CO 
























(M 








^ 


<M 


t- 


(M 


t^ 




OD 


X 


CO 


.n 


00 










o 






O 


CD 






O CO 












T68T 


J-H 


e< 


"" 


•^ 






^ 


rH CA 

CO 




U0_ 

oT 






























(M 












Tt* CO t— t~- 








CO (M 












¥681 






'^ CO 








to 




i 










\a ^ a> 




T- 




t 






o 






o 

a 

C3 


£68T 






■* l- 
























CO •* o 




— 




tZ 




,—1 


^ 






S 


e68T 






t- t- 








'"' 




§ 






m 


































IM •* CT. 








t- (M 












1681 






CO CO 








■^ 
































a 
































1 


































































iO 


■p 
































s 


a) 














































H 






















C3 












n 








0) 










a 


^ 












K 








a 






aj 




o 


O 












PQ 








> 




a 


? 


















o 

1^ 


t 




a 


CS 

a 
o 




c 
c 


i 




o 
a) 

a 


3 

a 
1 












H 


? 




<t- 


a 




c 


> 




> 


P 










^ 


2 


"S C 





C3 


a 





i 




C3 




5 










'i 


i; t: 


■z 


^ 


c 
o 


j: 




i 


o 


a) 


o 










cj 


«= ~ 






P 




^ 







CS 






1 








hJ ^ 


0) 


S 




a) 


O 


o 


^ 


^ 


^ 




1 





Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



163 



APPENDIX B. 



RP:P0RT of DltPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PAVING DIVISION. 



Office Paving Division, 
Room 41, City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1895. 
B. T. Wheeler, Superintendent, of Streets: 

Dear Sir : The following report is submitted, showing the 
expenditures of this division from February 1, 1894, to January 
31, 1895, the nature of the worlc, the number and variety of per- 
mits issued, and the details of expenditures involved in paving, 
macadamizing, and regulating the various streets. 

The following list shows the total yearly expenditures of the 
Paving Division, according to the report of the Superintendent of 
Streets, for the last thirty-nine years, the expenditures being 
from January 1 to December 31, inclusive, of each year, except of 
1891, that year extending to Januarv 31, 1892, making a period 
of thirteen months, the years after extending from February 1 to 
Januarv 31 : 



1856 . . 


$192,458 48 


1877 






$1,077,475 81 


1857 . . 


201,528 49 


1878 






644,821 76 


1858 . . 


187,160 92 


1879 






727,340 05 


1859 . . 


186,295 77 


1880 






1,015,063 06 


1860 . . 


197,170 63 


1881 






966,366 49 


1861 . . 


176,978 76 


1882 






1,088,551 14 


1862 . . 


175,981 68 


1883 






934,656 58 


1863 . . 


151,130 27 


1884 






1,310,172 16 


1864 . . 


156.959 65 


1885 






1,018,693 39 


1865 . . 


173,258 13 


1886 






1,170,863 01 


1866 . . 


214,953 55 


1887 






1,260,530 03 


1867 . . 


283,641 bQ 


1888 






1,043,475 52 


1868 . . 


407,053 89 


1889 






1,051,460 18 


1869 . . 


667,817 90 


1890 






1,061,722 40 


187U . . 


804,384 89 


1891 






1,991,524 28 


1871 . . 


923,312 37 


1892 






1,972,857 88 


1872 . . 


1,010,508 48 


1893 






1,552,913 17 


1873 . . 


931,019 01 


1894 






1,642,491 48 


1874 


1 f;H3 84-S r>7 




1875 \ . 


i_ ^ \ J < J *J ^ O T- (J \J i 

1,062,408 55 


Total . . 132,329,591 4(; 


1876 . . 


980,741 42 











Street NnMUERiNG. 



Numbers have been assigned to the estates in the different dis- 
tricts as follows : 



164 



City Document No. 34. 



City Proper . 
South Boston, 
East Boston . 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
Dorchester . 
Charlestown . 

Totals . 



7 streets and 
1 street and 
1 street and 
5 streets and 
4 streets and 
1 street and 
15 streets and 



parts of 
parts of 
parts of 
parts of 
parts of 
parts of 
parts of 
parts of 



47 streets- 
20 steeets- 
17 streets 
47 streets 
38 streets 
20 streets 
53 streets 
14 streets 



34 streets and parts of 256 streets 



Permits. 

Permits have been issued to make openings in the streets of the 
city between February 1, 1894, and January 31, 1895, as follows : 

Company. 

American Telegraph Co. 

Boston Electric Light Co. 

Boston Gas Light Co. 

Boston Water Dept. (Eastern Division) 

Boston Water Dept. (Mystic Division) 

Brookline Gas Light Co. 

Boston Transit Co. 

Boston & Maine R.R, Co. 

Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn R.R. 

Barber Asphalt Co. 

CharlQstown Gas and Electric Light Co 

Dorchester Gas Light Co. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 

East Boston Gas Light Co. 

Fire Alarm Department . 

.Jamaica Plain Gas Co. . 

Lamp Department .... 

Lynn & Boston R.R. Co. 

Metropolitan Construction Co. 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 

N.E. Telephone and Telegraph Co. 

Norfolk Suburban R.R. Co. 

N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. Co 

N.Y. & N.E. R.R. Co. . 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. 

Park Department . 

Police Department. 

Quincy & Boston Street R.R. Co 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Co. 

Roxbury Gas Light Co. . 

Sewer Division 

South Boston Gas Light Co. 

Standard Oil Co. . 

United States Government 

Union Freight Railway Co. 

West End Street Railway Co. 



Permit. 


Feet. 


1 


4 


479 


30,543 


645 


23,817 


4,111 


113,675 


142 


3,649 


5,521 


423,599 


37 


588 


15 


2,286 


1 


60' 


16 


1,320 


58 


1,698 


486 


14,510 


399 


18,941 


248 


8,311 


102 


3,021 


335 


24,464 


10 


143 


14 


1,125 


14 


4,325 


3 


3,600 


1,426 


59,536 


211 


2,040 


5 


58 


8 


281 


40 


6,763 


15 


14,263 


6 


6& 


17 


364 


2 


20O 


376 


14,655 


158 


35,090 


294 


6,839 


18 


246 


1 


600 


1 


150 


1,107 


153,215 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



165 



Company. 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 
Miscellaneous 



Permit. 

154 

2,076 



Feet. 

770 
75,497 



Total openings, 18,552, aggregating 1,050,309 feet, or 198.8 
miles. 

In addition to tlie foregoing there have been issued uinet^'-nine 
(99) emergencj' permits to the various departments and corpora- 
tions. On these permits 2,576 openings were made, at an average 
of about six feet each. 

Permits other than for opeuiug streets have been issued as 
follows : 



Advertising by man wearing hat and coat lettered 

Cleaning snow from roofs 

Driving cattle . . . . 

Distributing sand ..... 

Feeding or baiting horses on the streets . 

Erecting, repairing, and removing awnings 

Erecting and repairing buildings . 

Moving buildings ..... 

Occupying sidewalks for loading and unloading goods 

Pedlers (four different classes) 

Raising and lowering safes, machinery, etc 

Special for various purposes . 

Watering carts ..... 

Making a total of . 

Or a grand total of . . . 



26 

124 

16 

56 

1,055 

4,264 

6,816 

53 

35 

877 

560 

354 

140 

14,376 

32,928 



There have been 12,070 notices sent to the various foremen, to 
repair defects in the streets, which have been reported by the 
police, or from other sources; also 1,934 to private parties, to 
repair work which had been improperly done by them, where they 
have received peimits to open the streets, and to owners of estates 
where there are coal-holes or Hyatt lights. 

In accordance with section 8, chapter 36, Revised Ordinances of 
1892, 1,653 notices have been sent to the foremen of the several 
districts, directing them to make necessary repairs where parties 
making openings have neslected to attend to them within a speci- 
fied time, after being notified to do so. 

Three hundred and eighty-nine notices have been sent to depart- 
ments, corporations, and abutters, regarding proposed street im- 
provements during the year. There have been 307 new bonds filed 
<luring the year ; also 591 applications referred to the Police De- 
partment, asking for information regarding locations wliere per- 
sons have asked for permits to sell fruit, etc., from windows, 
bulkheads, and areas, and tiie granting or refusal has generally 
been governed by the recommendations received. The same 
course has been pursued in cases of individuals desiring to occupy 
sidewalks for more than ten minutes to load or unload goods. 



166 



City Docibient No. 34. 



Streets Laid Out or Extended. 



Date. 



Mar. 30; 

April 6 

April 21 

April 30 

May 8 
May 8 
June 9 

June 12. 
June 12 
June 12, 
June 22. 
June 22, 
June 22, 
July 26; 

July 26, 

July 26, 

Aug. 10, 
Aug. 10, 
Aug. 10, 

Sept. 14, 

Sept. 14, 

Sept. 14, 
Sept. 22 
Oct. 4 
Oct. 4, 
Oct. 4. 
Oct. 4, 
Oct. 12. 
Oct. 12, 
Oct. 16. 
Oct. 16, 
Oct. 20, 

Oct. 20. 

Nov. 5, 
Nov. 16, 
Nov. 16 

Dec. 14, 
Dec. 12. 



Street. 



Newbury st. 



AVilkes st. 



Franklin st. 



Buena Vista st. 



Lyndhurst st. 
Bellflower St. 
Varney st. . . 



Arundel st. . . , 
Mountfort st. , 

Ivy st 

Algonquin St. . , 
Bradlee st. . . . , 
Plymouth st. . , 
Mishawuni st. . 



Rice St. 



Victor St. 



Evergreen st.. . 
Batchelder st. . 
Glenway st. . . . 



Norway st 

St. Germain st. . 



Temple st 

Arklow st 

Boylston st 

Cunard st 

Kenwood st. . . . 
Wrentham st. . 
Moss Hill road . 
Woodland road. 



Location. 



(Formerly West Newbury st.) from 
Charlesgate, west, to Brookline ave. 

(Formerly Wells pi.) from Washing- 
ton st. to Bradford st 

Footway under the tracks of the B. & 
A. R.R. Company. 

(Formerly Buena Vista ave.) from 
Walnut ave. to Warren st 

From Washington st. to Allston st. . . 

From Dorchester ave. to Boston st. . . 

(Formerly Yale st.) from Wenham 
St. to Wachusett st 

From Beacon st. to Mountfort st 

From Ivy st. to Audubon road 

From St. Mary's st. to Mountfort St., 

From Harvard st. to Washington st.. 

From School st. to Washington st. . . 

From Longwood ave. to Bernier st. . . 

(Formerly Ham's court) from Mainst. 
to Rutherford ave 

(Formerly Wood st.) from Walnut 
St. to Taylor st 

(Formerly Granville pi.) from Brook 
ave. to Dean st. 

(Formerly Atwood ave.) from Day st. 

From Marshfield st. to Pontine st. . . . 

(Formerly Glen road) from Glen ave. 
to Harvard st 

(Formerly Caledonia st.) from Fal- 
mouth St. to Massachusetts ave. . . . 

(Formerly Cromwell st.) from Mas- 
sachusetts ave. to Dalton st 

From Mt. Vernon st. to Baker st. . . . 

From Walden st. to Gay Head st 

From Back Bay Fens to Brookline ave. 

From Tremont st. to Cabot st 

From Washington st. to Allston st. . . 

From Dorchester ave. to Shelton st. . 

From Pond st. to Woodland road. . . . 

From Moss Hill road 



Lenath, 
LinT ft. 



McLellan st I From Erie st. to White st. 

Sydney st.. . 
Sherborn st. 

Burbank st. . 



Wren st.. . . 
Turner st. . 
Montello st. 



Fairbury st. 
Kenmore st. 



From Harbor View st. to Crescent ave. 

From Commonwealth ave. to Charles 
river 

(Formerly Buckingham pi.) from 
Buckingham st 

From Rutledge st. to Oriole st 

From Haviland st. to Astor st 

(Formerly Grace ave.) from Robin- 
son St. to Arcadia st 

From Blue Hill ave. to Rand st 

From Commonwealth ave. to New- 
bury st 



Carried forward 23,692.61 



1,258.21 
247.19 



460.43 

1,237.39 

670.07 

279.26 
255.77 
428 06 
777.47 
929.94 
756.01 
396.50 

.^04.31 

143.00 



553.84 
167.82 

1,338.54 

582.92 

722.33 

959.97 

173.00 

2,094.00 

172.07 

1,275.31 

1,008.50' 

834.61 

472.17 

765.48 

834.47 

472.71 

269.02 

1,247.88 

731.70 

352 94 

308.72 

211.00 



Street Department — Paving Division. 167 

Streets Laid Out or Extended.. — Concluded. 



Date. 



Dec. 14, 

Dec. 14, 
Dec. 14, 

1895. 
Jan. 4, 

Jan. 5, 



Street. 



Ridgemont st. . . 

Eleanor st 

Bicknell st , 



Brought forward 

(Formerly Ridgemont ave.) fromAU- 
ston Heights to West Eleanor st. . . 
Erom Cambridge st. to Ridgemont St., 
(Formerly Bicknell ave.) from Har- 
vard St. to White st 



Length, 
Lin. ft. 



Columbus ave. . . From Northampton st. to Franklin 
park 

Commonw'thave.| From Chestnut Hill ave. to Newton 
boundary line 



Extensions total . . 
Discontinued total 



23,692.61 

891.48 
155.61 

833.71 



5,750.00 
1,336.00 



Total. 



Or 5.956 miles. 



32,659.41 
1,208.61 



31,450.80 



Streets Widened and Relocated. 



Date. 



Street. 



April 11, 

April 12, 
April 21, 
April 16,j 
Aug. 10, i 

Sept. 8, 



Oct. 
Oct. 



Oct. 20, 



Nov. 
Nov. 



Nov. 5, 
Nov. 16, 
Dec. 5, 
Dec. 14, 



Parker St.. . . 

Congress st. . 
Franklin st. . 
Bunker Hill. 
Ruggles St. . . 

•Saratoga St.. , 

Salem st 

Cunard st. . . . 

Harvard ave. . 

Boylston st. . 
Blue Hill ave 

South St. . . . 
Brookford st. 

Seaver st 

Cambridge st. 



1895. 
Jan. 5, Huntington ave., 



Sq. ft. 



From Westland ave. to Huntington 

ave I 16,092 

Between State st. and Congress sq. . . 241 

Between Cambridge st. and Lincoln st. 4,080 

Between Vine st. and Moulton st. . . 5,008 

South-westerly side between Auburn 

St. and Westminster st 198 

Between Bennington st. and the Bos- 
ton, Revere Beach, and Lynn Rail- 
road 7,934 

Near, and north of Parmenter st. . . . 
South-westerly side between Tremont 

St. and Berlin st i 4,032 

From Commonwealth ave. to the i 

Brookline boundary line ' 10,568 

Easterly side, junc'on of Lamartine st. 1,262 

From Washington st. , Roxbury, to 

River st., Dorchester 696,213 

Southerly side at and near Poplar st. 266 

At and near Rand st 41 

From Blue Hill ave. to Walnut ave. 83,502 

Between Harvard ave. and Charles 

river 3,601 

From Copley sq. to Brookline l)oun- 

dary line 192,216 

1,025,329 



168 



CiTr Document No. 34. 



Streets Discontinued. 



Dati 




April 


12, 


June 22, 


Oct. 


3, 


1895 




Jan. 


4, 


Jan. 


4, 


Jan. 


4, 


Jan. 


4, 


Jan. 


4, 


Jan. 


5, 


Jan. 


0, 



Street. 



Congress sq. 
Revere st. . . 
Salem st. . . 



Pierpont st. 

Gary st 

Terry st. . . . 
Riverside st. 
Chapel st, 



Beacon st. . 



Beacon st. 



Easterly side, adjoining estate 
of R. Worthington 

Between S. Russell st. and Ir- 
ving st 

Part near and north of Parmen- 
ter St. adjoining estate of 
Mark Lewis and Meyer Ber- 
man 



Lin. ft. 



Prom Station st. to Prentiss st. 
From Terry st. to Culvert st. . . . 
Part of, near Columbus ave. . . . 
Part of, near Columbus ave. . . . 

Part of, near Sarsfield st 

Building line established on the 

southerly side from Arlington 

St. to Massachusetts ave. 
Building line established on the 

northerly side from River st. 

to Massachusetts ave. 



74.80 



Sq. ft. 



503.65 

542.84 

39.30 

48.02 



1,208.61 



295 

2,195 



15,110 

21,714 

1,084 

1,585 

580 



42,566 



The records of the Street Commissioners for the year 1894 
show the following results : 



Streets laid out or extended 
Streets widened and relocated 
Streets discontinued . 
Increase in mileaoe 



42,566 sq. ft. 



32,659.41 lin. ft. 

1,025,329 sq. ft. 

or 1,208.61 lin. ft. 

5.956 miles. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 169 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation for 1894-95 $800,000 00 

Ainouot collected by City Collector for repairs 
made by Paving Division for different com- 
panies, etc. ....... 7,702 30 



Amount of expenditures from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1894, to January 31, 
1895 S715,608 62 

Transferred to Central Office . 1,000 00 

Transferred to Bridge Division . 5,787 21 

Transferred to Sanitary Division . 1,959 02 

Transferred to Street-C leaning 

Division ..... 21,240 44 

Transferred to Sewer Division . 1,638 66 

Transferred to New Lunatic Hos- 
pital 18,000 00 

Transferred to County of Suffolk . 30,000 00 

Transferred to New Buildings, Long 

Island . . . ^ . . 10,000 00 

Transferred to Police Station House 

No. 13, land and addition to . 1,371 97 

Transferred to Grammar School, 

Pierce District .... 777 98 

Transferred to Primary School- 
House, Oak Square, etc. . . 218 40 

Transferred to Primary School- 
House, Emerson District . . 100 00 



)7,702 30 



i7,702 30 



Total expenditures from regular appropriation , $715,608 62 
Total expenditures from street-watering appro- 
priation " . 87,169 08 

Total expenditures from special appropriations . 839,713 78 



Grand total (regular and special) . . $1,642,491 48 



170 



City Document No. 34. 



IXCOME. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the City 
Collector from February 1, 1894, to February 1, 1895, on account 
of the Pavino- Division : 



Sidewalk construction assessments (Law of 1892) , 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (Law of 

1898) 

Repairs of streets (Rev. Ord. 1892) 
Old paving blocks 
Rent of part of Fort Hill Wharf 
Miscellaneous .... 



SI, 359 35 

6,998 07 

2,112 52 

5,429 45 

500 00 

869 02 

^7,268 41 



The amount paid into the city treasury during the year on ac- 
count of the Paving Division is as follows : 



Sidewalk construction assessments (Law of 1892) 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (Law of 

1893) 

Repairs of streets (Rev. Ord. 1892) . 
Rent of part of Fort Hill Wharf 
Miscellaneous ...... 



In addition to the above amount, there was an in- 
come from street-watering of . 



$32,334 14 

15.546 89 

3,600 50 

500 00 

854 57 

S52,836 10 



77 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



171 



s 



o 



.ffi 



« . 

d « 

'-5 ♦- 

S J? 

;^ •♦ 

O ;. 






s 

© 










O cc 


^^ 


lO 


co 


xc: 


N 


CO 


,— « 


c 


ir: 


<M 


'1 






^CCJ^O0<M^-*C5 


CO IC CO 


1 ^ 






-*CO — (MOOOCO 


t^ 00 CO 


00 




* 


eo c; lO >o lo o CO i- 


CO CO OC 


o 




C3 


O^C^t^'^ — (MO 


CO ^ 1— 


i ^ 














p 


— (MCOCOOOiMinO 


-# CO -+ 


irT j 




! 




CO >c .— 


i 1 




rid 












o ; 


C>5 








1 (M ' 
















-a- . 


^1- 








1 00 




r;^ 












•<*■ ■ 


-;)- 








i 00 ! 














r~ ; 














1 














C 








C<J_ 
















c^ • 


CM 








TiT 




^ 












m ] 










4©= 




"S o 


o ; 




CO 


CO o — 








1 c. 




o .„ 


cc . 




-<*• 


CO I- c 








^H 




£■3.2 


■* ■ 




t-- 


00 lO '* 








o 




• S'3 z; 


00 ■ 




CO 


'^i »o o: 








lO 






«©= : 






CO t^ t> 








CO 
CM 




a A 
















Ǥ= 


























>r 


ift 




a ^ 






















C£ 


CO 




O '^ 






















CT 


CD 


























x 


00 

7-t 


























-rt 


■*" 


















































if 


m^ 




<B 




















o 


o 




o 




















la 


lO 




O 




















3D 


OO 
























CO 


CO 






















^__ 


^ 




o 




















co" 


CO 
K3 




*■-; 




















^ 


€& 




<5 












^ O O <M ^1 'C -- ec 


'i' 


_ 




■g^ 


O — OOC<lC3lMOOC3C 


^ 


'iH 




cs'a 


»OC2t^CCCCOCO<M 


l.O 


>o 




1^ 


O ^ -H W <— i(^ -T C^ 


o 


o; 




0;t^t^-*C<10t-<X 


CO 


t^ 




o^ 










S o 


„ --I <M .-H ^ T 




-# 






^ 




m- 




oD* * bo 
ffl =2 a 


>nicit-cc-*Mc£i— 


03 


CO 




iOcC'*<i:oot^cMCi 


CO 


CO 








' CO 


05 

CO 




III 


05 ""l ■* ^„ ''v ^„ ^ ^ 
CO CD ^ — .— 1 ^ — 1 t>- 




03_ 




Ma's 

C3 


m: ^ '^ 




CD 






r^ooi-iOiooooiMC 


) OD 


T-l 






-*oiooc5co-*»r 


00 


t- 




^ 


b-C0O-*OC500l> 


o 


^H 




COlCC5M^0D-*'0C 


) CD 


00 




O 


CO ^ "-H lO O l^ :M c- 


o 


CO 














02 


t--*C0l010C3CDC 


5 CO 

) 


00 






(310C<: CO<Mt-COC£ 


5 O 


00 






05CO'*OCOlO(M«' 


5 CO 


O 




CQ 


CI O 'M O CI lO !M H 


CO 


00 




,jz 


1~- CO (M — O CO -* '- 


I— i 


CD 




" 


-<j<CO^iO-*OCiO'- 


^ iM 


-*l 














o 


-f — iCOCOCO-fH 


■■ r- 


c. 




^ 


(jq^r-<lC-*t~t~C>- 


; oi 




















• ^ 




















































• ZJ 
























■ t 


'- fe 
























r 






1 




















^ 


i, 




















'• '^i 






: -3 










m 


c 




, ^ 




. ' 


: c 










O 


£ = F 


. ^ u. 


• ' 










2 


O 'S s _ 


. /< a. 


• J 


^'>-2 












- t- -O 








7) 










G 


1 "^ u -*" ^t" CJ — 




CO 






fl '/-v ^ .i^- 2 t H ^ 


o 1 






c 


■5 . 


H 






















^—t 






1 


1 



* m O CJ 
« S !3 . ■" 

•si ill 

« ID S p.ja 



OQCO " 
a) Qj-r! 
01 a) 



2 :? 



WoqEh H 



172 



City Document No. 34. 



SCHEDULE A. 

Expenditures. (Details.) 

Salai-y of Charles R. Cutter. Deputy Superiuteudent 
of Streets, February 1, 1894, to December 9, 1894, 

' and from January 13, 1895, to January 30, 1895, $3,147 88 

Salaries of office clerks ...... 9,487 53 

Salaries of- permit office clerks .... 3,761 47 

Advertising in and subscribing for daily papers . 341 95 

Horses, carts, and harnesses (new) . . . 6,133 33 

Printing and stationery ...... 2,576 12 

Printing and stationery (permit office) . . . 550 46 

■Repairing stables, sheds, etc. ..... 2.751 73 

Sundries ........ 7,776 35 

Street signs and numbering ..... 1,189 68 

Telephones, expense of . . . . . . 1,552 49 

Tools, cost of keeping the same in repair, etc. . 13,427 51 

Removal of permit office to Old Court House . . 742 00 

$53,438 50 



SCHEDULE B. 

Executions of Court, etc. 

Bouge, Alfred F. O. and Emilie A., damage to 

property ..... 
Chandler, Lucinda, personal injuries 
Cochran, Agnes L., * 

Corkey, John F., Adm., " 
Cross, Michael, " 

Donahue, Nellie E., " 

Dowd, John, grade damages . 
Dunaken, Lucinda C, personal injuries 
Farrell, James, • " 

Fay, Ann, damage to property 
Finnegan, Fred. C, personal injuries 
Ford, Daniel W., " 

Gray, Rachel B., grade damages 
Jordan, Sarah, personal injuries 
Keohane, Cornelius, " 
Kelley, Henry, damage to property 
Kneeland, Frank, " " 

Lane, Mary A., Adm., personal injuries 
Lane, Patrick, damage to coupe 
McDowell, Gordon, personal injuries 
McManus, Catherine A., " 
Milliken, Caroline, " 

Murphy, Peter, " 

Carried forioard^ 



Wbl 


44 


,126 


77 


94 


79 


150 


00 


76 


83 


125 


00 


857 


86 


300 


00 


65 


00 


400 


00 


100 


00 


250 


00 


227 


10 


526 


19 


126 


83 


501 


44 


462 


43 


100 


00 


152 


00 


100 


00 


500 


00 


170 


56 


50 


00 



$5,614 24 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



173 



$5,614 


24 


1,906 


42 


350 


00 


2,222 


78 


254 


24 


250 


00 


100 


00 


527 


43 


330 


07 


150 


00 


1,661 


75 


326 


44 


25 


00 


468 


28 


$14,186 


Qo 



Brought forwcwd, 
Norton, Martin, personal injuries 
Orcntt, Ira A., " . . 

Pratt, Isaac, Jr., abatement sidewalk assessment 
Purcell, James, personal injuries 
Quiucv, W. H., damage to property 
Richmond, Mary L., personal injuries 
Russell, Mary A., " 

Sterling, Andrew W., '• . . 

Sweeney, Catherine, '• . . 

Tucker, Florence E., et als., damage to estate 
Weatherbee, Marguerite, personal injuries 
Whalley, William, damage to coach 
Woodward, Joseph, damage to property . 



SCHEDULE C. 

The following schedule shows the expenditure from the main- 
tenance appropriation of this division in excess of special appro- 
priations : 

Vale street, AVard 15. 

In excess of special appropriation .... $284 35 

Commonwealth avenue, between St. Paul street and 
Brighton avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 7,967 43 

Blakeville street, Ward 24. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 569 01 

Buslinell street. Ward 24. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 1,363 33 

Duncan street, Ward 24. 

In excess of special appropriation . . . . 407 85 

Glen way street. Ward 24. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 268 95 

(jreenheys street. Ward 24. , 

In excess of special appropriation . . . . 186 90 

King street, Adams street to Neponset avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 4,082 44 

Lyndhurst street, Ward 24. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 4,026 30 

Park street, Adams street to Upland street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 



Til wing street. Ward 21. 

In excess of special appropriation 



443 S'y 



755 70 



Carried forward^ 



$20,356 11 



174 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $20,356 11 

Albany street, at Northampton and between Massa- 
chusetts avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation . . . . 896 00 

Charles street, Cambridge to Pinckney streets. 

In excess of special appropriation . . . . 64 11 

Commonwealth avenue, between cross-roads and St. 
Paul street. 
In excess of special appropriation . . . . 120 00 

Harcourt street, Retainiug-wall. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 1,713 90 



SCHEDULE D. 



}3,150 12 







NEW WO J 


RK. 










Stockton street, Washington street to Milton avenue. 


Labor . 




. $286 88 




Teaming 




97 


00 




Gravel . 




894 


00 




Steam-roller . 




180 


00 




Stone 




716 


52 


$2,174 40 


Bay State road, south side, between Raleigh and 


Beacon streets. 










Labor . 




1295 


88 




Teaming 




226 


00 




Blocks . 




140 


34 




Steam-roller . 




90 


00 




Stone . 




. 1,292 


20 














9 04-4 4-> 








^ >j\J^^ t; *- 






$4,218 82 




REMOVAL OF 


SNO W. 






South Boston . 




, 




$7,367 47 


East Boston . 














4,453 08 


Charlestown . 














6,199 51 


Brighton 














5,524 99 


West Roxbury 














5,940 98 


Dorchester 














9,789 88 


Roxbury 














6,248 42 


City Proper . 














29,787 50 


Roxbury and West 


Roxbury (Distri 


ct XI.) 






3,069 88 
















$78,381 71 



iSXEEET DePAET31ENT — PaYING DlVISlOX. 



175 



STREET- WA TERING. 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Cbarlestown 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 
Citj' Proper 



$6,471 95 

5,411 95 

5,316 95 

9,629 45 

12.368 90 

12,083 90 

12,448 88 

23,437 10 

^87,169 08 



$930 


82 


522 


00 


189 


00 


10 


08 


81.651 


90 



DETAIL OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER SPECIAL 
A PER OPR I A TIONS. 

Baker street, Ward 23, Baker place to Mt. Vernon street, 
grading and gravelling. 

Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Sundries 



Amount of special appropriation . .$1,350 40 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 11 . . 102 50 

Amouutpaid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 23 and 25 .... 199 00 

SI, 651 90 

Bellflower street, Dorchester avenue to Boston street. Filling 
to sub-grade. 

Labor $46 25 

4,075 cubic yards filling ...... 2,241 25 

750 double loads filling . . . . . . 712 50 



Amount of special appropriation 



$3,000 00 
$3,000 00 



Blakeville street, Ward 24. Grading and macadamizing; edge- 
stones set; gutters paved ; sidewalks gravelled. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
' Stone 
Rolling . 
Paving . 
Advertising 



5970 30 
400 00 
486 75 
220 50 
60 00 
198 46 
6 00 



Carried forvjard, 



$2,34 2 01 



176 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, 
Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 24 

Amount paid out of Paving Division 



SI, 500 00 



273 

569 



00 
01 



!,342 01 



{,342 01 



Blue Hill avenue, Dudley street to within 80 feet of Dalmatia 
street, grading and reconstructing street, edgestone set, brick 
sidewalks laid, crosswalks paved, roadway paved with large 
granite blocks, catch-basins built. 

8,146 sq. yds. granite block paving. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel . . 

Sand ...... 

Stone ...... 

Advertising . 

46,000 paving-bricks 

207,035 large granite blocks . 

2,664 feet of flagging 

1,150 feet of edgestone, and nine large corners 

Amount paid to D. N. Paysou : 
5,811 sq. yds. block-paving laid, at 25 cts. 
3,344 feet edgestorie set, at 8 cts. . 
2,005.5 sq. yds. brick-paving laid, at 

18 cts. ." 

295 sq.yds. flagging crosswalks laid, at 

25 cts. ...... 



$5,944 

4,706 

5,763 

1,225 

540 

35 

575 

13,866 92 

2,130 57 

798 39 



61 
50 
00 
80 
75 
63 
00 



.,452 
267 



7o 
52 



360 99 



75 



Work done bv the Sewer Division 



2,155 
439 



01 
79 



5,181 97 



Amount of special appropriation . . $25,000 00 

Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Ward 20 8,160 58 

Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Ward 21 5,021 39 

$38,181 97 

Bumstead lane (now St. Alphonsus street) , Tremont street to 
Huntington avenue, grading and widening, edgestone set, 
brick sidewalks laid, gutters paved, heavy Telford-Macadam 
roadway built, crosswalks laid, catch-basins built, fences built, 
and retaining-walls constructed. Length, 1,173 feet; width, 
40 feet. 

Labor $1,725 91 

Teaming 1,788 00 

Gravel 2,878 10 



Carried forward, 



;,392 01 



Street Department — Paving Diyision. 



177 



Brought fonvard, 
Stone . . . . . . 

Sand ....... 

1,500 large granite blocks 

2,12'd^^ feet edgestone, and 12 small corners 

280.4 feet of flagging .... 

Retaining-wall ..... 

Rolling ....... 

Sundries ...... 

Amount paid to M. Kiernau : 
682^ days' labor, at $1.75 . . . $1,194 37 
Plus 15% 179 15 



Amount paid to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
388.1 feet old edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . 
2,218 feet new edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 

769.8 sq. yds. block-paving laid, at 25 cts. 
826 sq. yds. round-stone paving laid, at 

25 cts. ...... 

204.3 sq. yds. brick sidewalks relaid at 
18 cts 

065.9 sq. yds. brick sidewalks laid (new) , 
at 18 cts. ...... 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 9 . 
Amount paid out of street improvements. 

Wards 19 and 22 . 





$6,392 01 


4,491 11 




478 80 




105 00 




1,424 43 




224 32 




50 00 




190 00 




4 23 



$31 


05 


177 


44 


192 


45 



206 50 



36 78 



86 



^7,327 00 

8,059 32 

165 18 



1,373 52 



818 08 



;i5,551 50 



15,551 50 



Bunker Hill, Tine, and Moulton streets (work unfinished), 
grading. 

Labor ^ . $141 45 

Gravel ......... 11 70 

Filling 219 00 



72 15 



Bushliell street (now Peabody square), Ashmont street to Dor- 
chester avenue, grading and macadamizing, edgestones set, 
crosswalks laid, gutters paved, catch-b 

Labor 

Teaming 

(iravel . 

Stone 

Rolling . 

5,125 large paving blocks 



)asin built. 






$998 60 




3')0 50 




201 30 




331 50 




30 00 




358 75 



Carried forvxird, 



L>,310 65 



178 



City Document No. 34. 



Br ov gilt forward., 
\hl^^ feet park edgestone 
88y^2 f^^^ circular edgestone 
"I'd-^ feet straight edgestone 
604 feet flagging 



Amount of special appropriation 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 

Charter street (work not started). 
Advertising ..... 



$2,000 00 
1,363 33 



$2,310 65- 

408 42 

80 95 

19 23 

544 08 

$3,363 33 



1,363 33 



20 



Commonwealth avenue, construction, Beacon street to Chest 

nut Hill avenue. 
Labor, including engineering and inspection 
Teaming 
Gravel . 



Loam 

Gravel filling . 

Stone 

Rolling . 

Cement . 

Powder and fuse 

Fuel 

Hardware, tools, etc. 

177,128 large granite blocks . 

6,935 large granite blocks (culls) 

8.780yV feet straight edgestone 

273i|^ feet circular edgestone . 

29 large corners and 6 small corners 

Lumber ..... 

Advertismg .... 

Land damages 

Building Inspector's shanty ■ . 

Sundries .... 

Amount paid to A. McMurtry : 
348 cii. yds. rock excavating, at $1.75 
Grading off slopes 



$609 00 
125 00 



Amount paid to R. A. Davis : 
Final payment for work done under contract in 1893, 

Amount paid to Boston Contracting Co. : 
43.509 cu. yds. gravel filling, at 41 cts., $17,838 69 

Less amount paid to laborers, 477 92 

$17,360 7 7 
Less amount drawn on the Cit}- Treas- 
urer but not paid .... 5,633 05 



?39,017 64 

8,977 50 

12,250 45 

6,846 31 

18,544 67 

50,962 05 

2,980 00 

7 50 

126 00 

76 65 

282 56 

12,980 32 

381 85 

5,707 26 

279 31 

182 50 

247 45 

95 58 

30,275 00 

228 38 

904 00 



734 00 
661 87 



11,727 72 



Carried forivard, 



$204,476 57 



Street Department — Paving Division. 179 

Brought forivard, $204,476 57 

Executions of Court for services rendered by laborers 

to the Boston Contracting Co 660 06 

Amount paid to Fidelity and Deposit Co. : 
14,166 cu. yds. gravel filling, at 41 cts. . . , 5,808 06 

Amount paid to F. H. Cowin : 
Final payment for work done under 

1893 

4,052 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. 
6,014 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
Extra labor, as ordered , 

2,702 70 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,626 sq.yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts., 
854 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts., 
3,205 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 

Amount paid to Leavitt, Daily, & Crockett : 
Building abutments to Cottage Farm bridge, contract 

price $40,150 50 

Extra work and material, relaying wall: 
S^-^ days, foreman, at $4 
3 days, mason, at S3. 50 
6^Q days, mason tender, at $1.50 
^To c^'\vs, engineer, at $3 
^To days, derrick, at $1.50 
3j^ days, engine, at $2 . 
12 barrels cement, at $1.15 . 

Work done by the Bridge Division 
Work done bv the Sewer Division 



contract 


m 


$783 


83 


1,418 


20 


481 


12 


19 


55 


$569 


10 


213 


50 


256 


40 



1,039 00 



13 20 




10 50 




10 35 




9 90 




4 95 




6 60 




13 80 






40,219 80 






2,954 15- 


• 


46,400 65 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Commonwealth avenue . . . $296,173 56 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 8,087 43 



$304,260 99 



$304,260 99 



Congress and L streets (work uncompleted). 

Labor $282 00 

Fence 276 00 



$558 00' 



Cranston street, Ward 23 (unfinished work from 1893). 
Labor ...,...,. 
Teaming ........ 

Carpentering ........ 

Powder and fuse ....... 



Ainoniit of special appropriation 



$425 


00 


96 


^00 


34 


00 


13 


75 


$568 


75 


$568 


75 



180 City Document No. 34. 

Dartmouth street, Boylston to Newbury street, asphalted. 

Labor $232 36 

Lumber ......... 84 26 

Paving 98 62 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan for excavating 859 

cu. yds., excavation, at 97 cts. .... 348 23 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co., 

274.4 cu. yds., cement concrete base, at S5.00 . 1,372 00 
Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 1,646.3 

sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt pavement, at $2.25 . 3,704 18 



i,839 65 



Day street, Centre to Heath street, graded, heavy Telford- 
Macadam road built, edgestones set, sidewalks gravelled, 
gutters paved, crosswalks laid, fences built, catch-basins 
' built. 

Labor $1,677 30 

Teaming ' . 1,506 00 

Gravel ' . . . 2,461 60 

Stone and stone screenings ... . 3,991 62 

Lumber . . . . . . . . • 71 83 

2,958 ft. straight edgestones, 2 large and 10 small corners, 1,967 40 

177yV ft. circular edgestone 230 88 

Sundries . . . . • • • . 10 75 

Amount paid to to T. H. & S. D. Pay son : 
3,702 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $288 16 
1,458.8 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 

25 cts 364 70 

56.3 sq. yds brick paving laid, at 18 cts., 10 13 

132 days labor . . ... 265 65 

■ 928 64 



$12,846 02 
Amount of special appropriation . . $7,500 00 
Amount paid out of Street rmprovements, 

Wards 19 and 22 .... 4,948 33 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 9 . ' . . 397 69 

$12,846 02 

Fay street, asphalted. 

Advertising ........ $7 00 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
250 sq. yds. cobble paving dug out and 

relaid, at 75 cts $187 50 

529. 7sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt laid, 

at $2.25 1,214 32 



L,401 82 



$1,408 82 
Amount of special appropriation .... $1,408 82 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



181 



Lewis-street extension, graded, paved with large 
blocks, edgestones set. brick sidewalks laid. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

464 ft. straight edgestoue 

75.8 ft. flagging 

10,520 large granite blocks 

1,000 paving brick 

Amount paid to P. W. Hernan : 

658.4 sq. yds. block paving, at 25 cts. 

448 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 

112.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts., 

45 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks laid, at 
25 cts 

Work done by the Sewer Division . 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Lewis street $1,834 79 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 6 484 50 



oranite 





$417 85 




367 00 




111 34 




301 60 




60 64 




701 68 




13 00 


$164 60 




35 84 




20 28 




11 25 






231 97 


• 


114 21 



5,319 29 



!,319 29 



Mill street, Ward 24, Houghton street to railroad, macadamized. 

$336 65 
126 50 

272 25 

1,620 50 

80 00 

131 10 



Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone 

Rolling . 

Work done bv the Sewer division 



Amount of special appropriation . . $2,000 00 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 .... 567 00 

Millett street. Ward 24, culvert. 

Labor ......... 

Work done by the Sewer Division .... 



Amount of special appropriation . • . 

Montriew sti'eet. Ward 23, graded, macadamized. 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 



!,567 00 



$2,567 00 



$50 50 
545 38 



Carried forward^ 



$595 88 



$1,933 02 
1,275 00 

$3,208 02 



182 



CiTr Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
Gravel . 
Stone 
Advertising , 



Amount of special appropriation . . $1,273 05 

Amount paid out^ of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 11 . 2,618 55 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 23 and 25 . . . 321 68 



$3,208 


02 


443 


88 


543 


00 


18 


38 



t,213 28 



t,213 28 



Mi. Ternon street, Ward 24, grade damages. 
Amount paid to O.C. R.R. Co. : 

Judgment paid by the railroad company in settle- 
ment of personal injuries sustained at the pumping- 
station crossing ....... 

Amount of special appropriation .... 



;i,325 0,0 
51,325 00 



Newport Street, Ward 24, Crescent avenue to Harbor View 
street, macadamized, edgestones set, gutters paved- 



Labor . . ... 








$240 95 


Teaming . , . 








130 50 


Gravel . . . ... 








107 25 


Filling 








115 50 


Stone ..... 








1,044 59 


Rolling ..... 








80 00 


Paving ..... 








76 11 


Work done by the Sewer Division 








109 22 




$1,904 12 


Amount of special appropriation 








$1,904 12 



Oak street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, paved with 
large granite blocks, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. 

810 sq. 3"ds. block paving. 



Labor .... 










$916 


89 


Teaming 










732 


00 


Gravel .... 










200 


30 


52 feet of edgestone 










33 


80 


6,650 paving-brick 






. 




86 


45 


18,125 large paving-blocks 










1,208 


94 


40 feet flagging 










32 


00 


Masonry 










92 


00 


Advertising . 










11 


00 




$3,313 38 


Amount of special appropriati( 


)n 








$3,313 


38 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



183 



Tark street, Charlestown, City square to Henle}' street, 

widened, paved witli large granite blocks. 
Labor $327 10 



Teaming 

Gravel .... 

4,182 large paving-blocks 

Advertising 

Amount paid to Patrick Brennan 
917 sq. yds. block paving 



Amount of special appropriation 



111 50 

170 49 

294 89 

5 00 

229 25 

[,138 23 

.,138 23 



Preston street, Ward 24, graded, macadamized, culvert built. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Filling . 
Stone 
Rolling . 

Amount paid to P. J. Lyons 
Buildino; culvert 



Amount of special appropriation . . $5,000 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 24 390 12 



$980 67 
339 50 
631 95 
154 00 
2,464 00 
120 00 

700 00 

$5,390 12 



$5,390 12 



Ruth street, East Boston, extended to Marginal street, graded, 
heavy granite retaining wall on westerly side, wall, steps, plat- 
form, fences, and iron hand-rails built. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Stone 

Sand 

Lumber . 

ICdgestone 

Paint and oil . 

Cement . 

Masonry 

Pipe 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. 

Building granite, cement, wall, and steps. 

1,946.3 cu. ft. wall, at 36 cts. 

7()8.8 sq. ft. surfacing, at 10 cts. . 

6i)1.3 lin. ft. steps, at $1.15 . 

1,020 4 sq. ft. platforms, at 30 cts. 
Carpenter work, as ordered : 

Labor, $121.50; plus 15%, $18.22 









$1,721 55 








289 50 








252 07 








17 00 








147 25 








23 00 








43 14 








29 00 








248 50 








26 44 


$700 66 




76 88 




794 99 




306 12 






139 72 





Carried forward, 



!,018 37 $2,797 45 



184 



City Document No. o4. 



Brought forward, $2,018 37 

Lumber, nails, and leading, $90.93 ; plus, 

15%, $13.63 104 56 

Amount paid to Geo. T. McLauthlin & Co. : 

Putting up fence and painting . . $335 00 

Extra work, as ordered .... 221 97 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Ruth street ..... 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 
Wards 1 and 2 . 



$2,797 


45 


2,122 


93 


556 


97 


109 


36 


$5,586 


71 



i,029 74 



556 97 



Second street, I to L street, paved with large granite 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

53,442 large paving-blocks 

23,000 paving-brick 

Wharfage 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
2,391 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts., 
73 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
470 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts., 
49 sq. yds. block stone crossings, at 25c., 







rge granite blocks. 




$1,284 95- 




543 00 




524 54 




3,564 58 




287 50 




160 68 


$597 75 




5 84 




84 60 




12 25 






700 44 






$7,065 69- 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC 
DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Bennington street, Wordsworth to Saratoga street, filled to 
grade. 



Labor ..... 


$1,533 10 


Teaming .... 


2,204 00 


Gravel ..... 


308 02 


Advertising .... 


5 50 


Paving ..... 


115 56 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 1 . . . $3,861 81 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 1 and 2 304 37 



:,166 la 



t,166 18 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



185 



Chelsea street, Porter street to Chelsea bridge, macadamized. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel . 
Rolling . 
Advertising 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 1 . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 1 and 2 . 



^4,563 93 
4,486 51 



$2,986 55 

1.347 50 

3,023 55 

747 84 

940 00 

5 00 

$9,050 44 



1,050 44 



Moore street, Bennington to Cowper street, filled and gravelled. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 1 . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 1 and 2 . 



New edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters. 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ...... 

Sand ...... 



Amount paid out of street improvements, Aldermanic 
District No. 1 

Work done by the Sewer Division .... 



$259 75 
236 50 
407 93 

$904 18 

!853 70 

50 48 

$904 18 



$461 82 
63 00 
13 88 
11 00 

$549 70 

$549 70 

!,370 86 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

NO. 2. 

Alford street, paving, edgestone set. 
Labor . . . . . • . 

Teaming ...... 

Gravel ....... 

Amount paid to P. Brennan : 
1,215 feet of edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
1,290 sq.yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts., 





$620 64 


, , 


72 00 


• 


323 47 


$97 20 




322 50 





Carried forvard^ 



19 70 $1,()1(; 1 i 



186 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward^ $419 70 

24 sq. yds. bnck paving laid, at 18 cts., 4 32 



Amount paid out of street improvements, Aldermanic 
District No. 2 



;i,016 11 

424 02 

M,440 13 

51,440 13 



Austin street, Washington street to the railroad, paved 
large granite blocks, edgestones set, brick sidewalks laid. 



with 



Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Sundries 

11,000 paving-brick 

377 feet of granite flagging 

32,625 large paving-blocks 

Amount paid to John Turner & Co. : 
2,646 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts., 
787 feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . 
512 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts., 
67 sq. yds. crosswalks laid, at 25 cts. . 



Less 10,000 old blocks, at 



Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Aldermanic District No- 2 . 
Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Ward 5 



361 

62 
92 
16 



50 
96 
16 

75 



1833 37 
100 00 



$1,179 97 
3,884 13 



$824 
232 
532 
2 
132 
290 

2,316 



25 

50 
35 
97 
00 
29 
37 



733 37 



^5,064 10 



$5,064 10 



Chapman street, Rutherford avenue to Austin street, paved 
with large granite blocks, edgestones set, brick sidewalks relaid. 

Labor ......... $385 23 

Teaming .... 

Gravel ..... 

Masonry .... 

430 feet granite crossing stone 

35,775 large paving-blocks 

Amount paid to John Turner & Co. : 

1,431 sq. yds. block paving, at -25 cts. 

5.8 feet edgestone, at 65 cts. 

654.5 feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 

506 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 18 cts. 

]] 1.7 sq. vds. crosswalks laid, at 25 cts. 

. 532 89 



foov /o 
3 77 
36 
08 
93 



52 
91 

27 



itf38o 

415 

343 

10 

331 

2,540 



10 
20 
00 
10 
03 



Carried forward^ 



$4,557 55 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



187 



Brought forward, 
Amount paid out of street improvemeuts, 

Alder manic District No. 2 . . . $3,536 50 

Amount paid out of street imDrovemeuts, 

Ward . . . ^ . . 1,021 05 



r,557 55 



!tJ>4:,00 / 00 

Charles street, Ward 4, paved with large granite blocks, edge- 
stone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks relaid. 

Labor $374 90 

Teaming 94 50 

Gravel 112 86 

11,400 large paving-blocks ..... 760 38 



Main street, crossing. 
Labor 



.,342 64 



$29 90 



Medl'ord street, work done by the West End Street Railway Co. 
•9,000 large paving-blocks $585 00 

Phipps street, paved with large granite blocks, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks relaid. 

Labor $299 00 

78 50 

71 28 

755 06 

24 00 



Teaming 

Gravel .... 
11.210 large paving-blocks 
2,000 paving-brick 



.,227 84 



Kutlierford avenue, Devens to Chapman street, paved with large 
granite blocks, brick sidewalks laid, edgestones reset, crosswalks 
laid. 

Labor $1,516 50 



Teaming 

Gravel . 

Sand 

Advertising . 

54,034 large granite blocks 

9,000 paving-brick . 



441 50 

589 38 

27 90 

18 00 

3,701 81 

108 00 



),403 09 



Thompson street, macadamized, edgestones reset, brick side- 
walks relaid, gutters paved. 

Labor $161 00 

Teaming ........ 46 50 

Gravel . 41 68 

1,500 paving-brick 18 00 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$267 18 
;i.l7.". 50 



188 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

No. 3. 

Chambers street, Ashlaud to Brighton street, wicleued, graded^ 
paved with large granite blocks, edgestones set, brick side- 
walks laid, crosswalks laid. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Sand 

Lnmber . 

Advertising . 

243.5 feet, of flagging 

621 feet edgestone, 4 large and 4 small corners 

35,650 large granite blocks 

33,500 paving-brick 





$1,687 74 




949 oO 




372 40 




45 00 




12 20 




6 00 




219 15 


s 


432 75 




2,377 86 




418 75 







Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 3 . $1,038 80 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 8 . . . . . 5,482 55 



),521 35 



?6.521 35 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



;77 18 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

No. 4. 



Court Square, asphalted on a concrete base. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming . . . - . 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., 1,020.7 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt 
paving, at $2.25 .... $2,296 58 

1,222.5 cu. ft. asphalt concrete binder, at 

32.1 cts 392 42 



$173 20 
130 00 



2,689 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 4 . $2,457 35 

AiBount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 9 and 10 . . .507 25 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 10 27 60 



!,992 2a 



>,992 20- 



Street Depart^ient — Paving Division, 



189 



Harrison avemie, Essex to Beach street, graded, widened, 
paved with large granite blocks, partly on a concrete and partly 
on a gravel base, with pitch joints ; edgestone reset, sidewalks 
laid and relaid, crosswalks relaid. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

Pebbles .... 

Masonry 

Fuel .... 

Templets 

Advertising . 

6,115 paving-brick 

7,404 gallons road-pitch 

16y% feet circular edgestone 

91i§ feet straight edgestone 

15,583 large paving-blocks 

165.7 cu. yds. concrete base 

182 feet of flagging- 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 4 . 8308 20 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 9 and 10 . . . 6,188 60 



?2,148 


61 


871 


00 


306 


60 


122 


51 


126 


00 


12 


75 


38 


82 


41 


00 


79 


50 


666 


36 


21 


34 


59 


80 


1,039 


39 


828 


50 


134 


62 



;,496 80 











<lP<J,-ti'U fJU 


Mason street, asphalted over old cobblestones. 




Labor ........ 




$157 84 


Teaming . . . • 












24 00 


Templets 












7 94 


Gravel .... 












9 10 


Masonry 












14 00 


1,550 paving-brick 












20 15 


117y\ feet edgestone 












76 27 


1 large and 1 small corner 












8 95 


Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 






479.8 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt, at 






$2.25 $1,079 


51 




Extra work as ordered . . . . 137 


24 










1,216 79 








$1,535 04 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 






ments, Aldermanic District No. 4 . $1,481 


0( 


) 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 






ments, Wards 9 and 10 . . . 53 


96 


I 








$1,535 04 









190 



City Document No. 34. 



Pemberton square, graded, asphalted on a concrete base, gran- 
olithic sidewalks laid, new edgestones set, crosswalks laid. 

Labor $1,555 52 

Teaming 1,020 50 

Gravel 41 SO 

Templets 12 10 

5,000 large paving-blocks 333 50 

463§2 feet edgestoue 106 79 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
227.9^ cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 . 1,139 50 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,373 sq. yds. Sicilian rock asphalt, at $2.25 •. . 3,089 25 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
4,360.7 sq. yds. artificial stone sidewalk, at 25 cts. 1,090 17 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 
226 sq. yds. block paving tar joints laid 

at 90 cts $203 40 

27 sq. yds. crosswalks laid, at 90 cts. . 24 30 

28 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . 2 24 
Labor, and material furnished in setting 

edgestone and steps . . . . 315 85 

* 545 79 



Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 4 . . . $7,034 66 

Amount paid out of street improvements, 

Wards 9 and 10 .... 1,899 76 



^934 42 



!,934 42 



Washington street, Essex to Kneeland street, 
large granite blocks on a concrete base, edgeston 
walks relaid, crosswalks laid. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Templets 

Sundries 

1,620 feet of flagging 

53+4 feet circular edgestone 

219 ft. straight edgestone 

1 large corner 

10,500 paving-brick 

52,825 large granite blocks 

1,290 sq. yds. block paving removed 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
371.8 cu. yds. cement concrete base at $5.00 . 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
2,221.8 sq. yds. block paving, pitch 

joints, at 90 cts $1,999 62 



paved with 


e reset, side- 


$2,946 


50 


1,558 


00 


339 


10 


26 


27 


89 


44 


1,296 


00 


70 


09 


142 


35 


5 


60 


131 


25 


3,523 


43 


185 


35 



1,859 00 



Carried forward^ 



$1,999 62 $12,172 38 



Street Department — Paving Divisiox. 191 

$1,999 62 $12,172 38 
1,368 75 



Brought forivard., 
1 ,095 sq. yds. block paviug, pitch joints 

at 81.25 .... 
265.7 sq. yds. block paving, pitch joints 

at 90 cts 

56.8 sq. yds. block paving, gravel joints 

at 25 cts. ; . . . 

563.6 ft. edgestone set at 8 cts, 
360 sq. yds. brick paving at 18 cts 



Less amount paid by J. H. Prav's Sons 
& Co. . . . . ' . 

Less amount paid by West End Street 
Railway Co. 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements 

Aldermanic District No. 4 . 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements 

Ward 10 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements 

Wards 9 and 10. 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



239 13 

14 20 

45 09 

64 80 



63 GO 
4,999 17 



^3,276 75 
4,186 80 
3,378 25 



3,731 59 
L5,903 97 



5,062 17 
$10,841 80 



-0,841 80 
S479 41 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

NO. 5. 

Harcourt street, retaining-wall built. 
Labor and inspection 
Advertising . . . ' . 

Sundries ..... 

Amount paid to J. S. Jacobs & Son. : 
Building retaining-wall, as per contract 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 5 . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



. 


$160 00 


. 


22 88 




2 50 


• 


1,974 00 




$2,159 38 


$445 48 




1,713 90 






$2,159 38 



Work done by the Sewer Division. 



)2 34 



192 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

NO. 6. 

Asli street (work not finished). 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
5 hours labor, stone-cutter, at $4.50 ... $2 50 

3,000 paving brick, at $12.50 . . . . ' .' 37 50 

71 sq. yds. cobblestone paving laid, at 50 cts. . 35 50 

415 feet edgestoue reset, at 15 cts. .... 62 25 

236 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 43 cts. . . 101 48 



$239 23 



Paved with large 
and partly with 
reset, sidewalks 



$1,528 20 

39 76 

7 38 



JEssex street, Chauncy to South street. 

blocks on gravel, partly with pitch, 

joints. Widened, graded, edgestone 

crosswalks laid. 
Labor .... 
Teaming 

Gravel .... 
Masonry 

4311 feet circular edgestone 
71_8^ feet straight edgestone and 2 small corners 
40,700 paving brick 
594.5 feet flagging .... 
19,175 large granite blocks 

Amount paid to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
1,698 sq. 3'ds. block paving, pitch joints, 

at 90 cts. ...... 

497 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 

41 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. . 

68 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks laid, pitch 

joints, at 90 cts 61 20 

1,256 sq. yds. block paving, gravel joints, 

at 25 cts 314 00 

6 sq. yds. brick paving, herring-bone, at 

36.1 cts 2 17 



Amount paid to Doherty & O'Leary : 
1,442 sq. yds. block paving, pitch joints 

at 90 cts. . . ' . 
652 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
531 sq. yds. brick paving, at 18 cts. 
70 sq. yds. flagging crossings, pitch joints 

at 90 cts 

7 sq. yds. cobble-stone repaying, at 25c. 



Essex and Lincoln streets, (Burnt district) , 

Amount paid to A. A. P^llstou : 
Taking down walls, as per contract 



a 




. $1,297 
52 
95 


80 
16 

58 


! 63 
, 1 


00 

75 



granite 
gravel 
relaid, 

!,613 56 

},636 22 

718 96 

377 00 

57 09 

53 28 

508 75 

429 88 

L,278 97 



1,952 71 



1,510 


29 


$12,136 


71 


$1,455 


00 



Street Department — Paving Division, 



193 



Foumlry street, Division to W. Fourth street. Paved witli large 
grauite blocks. AVork done by the Brookline Gas Light Co. 

Labor S7 87 

Teaming 252 00 

37,495 large granite blocks 2,500 92 



Tufts street. 

Labor 
Teaming 



Work done by the Bridge Division . 



$2,760 79 


$240 35 
104 00 


$344 35 


$6,586 70 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

No. 7. 

Boston street, Andrew square to Mt. Vernon street. Macad- 
amized. 



Labor . 














$2,076 61 


Teaming 














523 50 


Gravel . 














53 50 


Stone 














6,251 97 


1,420 small blocks 














75 26 


500 paving-brick 














6 50 


Crossing-blocks 














325 00 


Rolling 














475 00 


Advertising . 














11 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 7 . . $3,130 77 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 6,667 57 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



1,798 34 



),798 34 
$215 52 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

No. 8. 

Albany street, at Massachusetts avenue. Repaved ; edgestones 
reset ; sidewalks relaid. 

Labor $1,444 72 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

348 ft. flagging 

12,80,0 large paving-blocks 

$3,810 7G 



749 


00 


442 


64 


278 


40 


896 


00 



194 



City Document No. 84. 



Brought forward^ 

Amount paid out of Street 
Aldermauic District No. 8 

Amount paid out of Street 
ments. Wards 17 and 18 



Improve- 

. $2,057 45 
Improve- 

857 31 



Amount paid out of Paving Division 



896 00 



$3,810 76 



;,810 76 



Massachusetts avenue, Albany to Washington street. Work 
unfinished. Sicilian rock asphalt on a concrete base, edge- 
stone reset, sidewalks relaid, granolithic sidewalks built in 
front of hospital buildings 

Labor .... 

Teaming 



Gravel 

Stone .... 

Advertising . 

Sundries 

2fi2 ft. flagging 

688 ft. straight edgestone 

104 ft. circular edgestons 

7 large and 2 small corners 

1,000 large paving-blocks 

900 paving-brick . 

Amount paid to J J. Sullivan : 
876 cu. yds. earth excavated, at 75 cts. 
566 sq. yds. cobble-stones removed, 

12.2 cts 



at 



Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. 
693 lu. yds. cement concrete base, at 

$5.00 $3,465 

Extra work as ordered .... 17 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
525 sq. yds. Sicilinn rock asphalt, at $2.25 
less 15% retained 

1,979 ft. edgestone reset, at 18 cts. 
98 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 43 cts. 
221 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 28 cts. 
60.5 sq. yds. flagging crossing laid, a 

40 cts 

68 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts. 

10^ days stone-cutter 

3f days labor cementing joints 

2^ barrels American cement . 

373 sq. ysd. block paving dug and laid 



357 00 



70 75 



00 
80 



$1,181 


25 


. 177 


19 


. $356 


22 


42 


14 


61 


88 


t 

24 


20 


23 


80 


45 


25 


6 


66 


3 


13 


. 130 


55 



L,341 
678 
260 
340 



189 

209 

447 

135 

45 

70 

11 



93 
50 
02 
90 
40 
62 
60 
19 
20 
90 
00 
70 



727 75 



3,482 80 



1,004 06 



693 83 



Carried forward^ 



1,647 40 



Street Department — Paving Division. 195 

$9,647 40 
1,152 00 



Brought fori/mrd, 
Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
4,608 sq. ft. artificial stone sidewalk 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic Dictrict No. 8 . . $7,529 93 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . . . 3,269 47 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 



[0,799 40 



$ 10,79 9 40 
S581 91 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

No. 9. 



Brookliiie 


avenue, Longwood avenue to Bellevue street. 


Widened, 


graded, macadamized. 


Labor . 


$349 60 


Teaming 


190 00 


Filling . 


.... 416 50 


Stone 


766 50 


Rolling . 


180 00 



$1,902 60 

Heath street, Tremont to Day street. Widened, graded, 
macadamized, edgestone set, brick sidewalks laid, sidewalks 
gravelled, crosswalks laid, fences built. 

Labor 
Teaming 



Gravel . 

Sand 

Stone 

Rolling . 

181^ feet circular edgestone 

1,155 feet straight edgestone 

14 small corners 

4,000 paving brick . 

1 ,000 large granite blocks 

4,327 small granite blocks 

161 feet flagging 

Amount paid to T. II. & S. D. Payson : 
2,497 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . 
508 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts., 
1,193 sq. 3'ds. round-stone paving laid, 

at 25 cts. ...... 

723 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts., 
Extra labor, as ordered .... 



?2,571 98 
2,250 50 
2,861 50 

543 60 
5,733 75 

220 00 



217 
751 



95 
13 



46 90 
50 00 
70 00 
53 38 
114 31 



^99 76 
127 00 

298 25 
130 14 
122 50 



877 65 



16,365 65 



196 



City Document No. 34. 



Sewall street. Graded, macadamized, edgestone 

sidewalks laid, gutters paved. 
Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Sand 
Stone 
Rolling . 

382^^3- feet edgestone 
4 small corners 
7,.'i00 paving-brick . 

Amount paid to Payson & Co. : 
668 feet edgestone reset, at 8c. . . $53 44 
20*J sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25c. . 52 25 

16.3 sq. yds. round paving laid, at 25c. . 4 07 

303 sq. yds. brick sidewalks laid, at 18c , 54 54 



set, brick 

$2f.9 19' 

226 50 

300 90 

97 20 

108 90 

40 00 

248 73 

13 40 

93 75 



164 30 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 



,562 87 
[,225 75 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC DISTRICT 

NO. 11. 



Heushaw street (work done in 1893). 
1,725 gutter-blocks . . . . 



$48 30 



Lagrange street, Washington to Centre street (unfinished work 
from 1893). Graded, macadamized, sidewalks gravelled, cul- 
verts built, fences built. 

Labor $2,378 40 



Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone 

Powder and fuse 

Lumber . 

Fuel 



Sycamore street. 

Labor . . , 



1,080 50 

1,287 36 

491 00 

93 00 

32 38 

• 2 33 

$5,364 97 
$46 00 



Washington street, Lagrange street to Dedham line, graded, 
macadamized. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 



Carried forward^ 



$251 70 

809 00 

1,663 20 

2,723 90 



Street Department 



Paving Division. 



Brought f ovular 
Filling . 
8loue 
Lumber . 
Aclvertisino- 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Aldermanic District No. 11 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 23 and 25 . . ... 



Wilson square. Concrete sidewalks. 
Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 

1162.3 sq. yds. new concrete sidewalks, 
at $1 . "■ 

26.5 sq. yds. concrete sidewalks resur- 
faced, at 65c. . . . . . 



Work done by the Bridge Division . 
Work done bv the Sewer Division . 



^3,549 07 
3,089 17 



197 

M,723 90 

1,618 35 

2,167 00 

121 04 

7 95 

^6,638 24 



6,638 24 



,162 30 




17 22 


$1,179 52 




• 


$344 93 


. 


S2,013 20 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, ALDERMANIC .DISTRICT 

No. 12. 



Park street. 


Macadamizing. 




Labor . 




1465 21 


Teaming 




129 50 


Gravel . 




677 10 


Stone 




2,175 63 


Rolling 




^ 170 00 


Paving . 




68 55 


Advertising 




7 50 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Aldermanic District No. 12 . $1,573 54 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 .... 1,576 10 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 4-13 85 



;,693 49 



$3,693 -19 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



Vni 15 



198 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 1 AND 2. 



New Edgestones, Sidewalks and Grutters. 
Teaming . . . ... 

Gravel ....... 

Sand 

Paid to J. B. O'Rouvke & Co. : 
1,397.4 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 

25 cts. ...... 

1,186.7 sq. yds. cobble-stone paving laid, 

at 25 cts. ...... 

206 davs' labor ..... 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 



$349 36 



1409 50 

748 83 

90 00 



296 68 
414 57 


1,060 61 






$2,308 44 


. 


2,791 92 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 3. 

8praglie street. Graded, macadamized, edgestone set, brick side- 
walks laid, gutters paved. 

Labor . . . . . . ' . . . $1,069 50 

Teaming . . . . . . . . 314 50 

Gravel 294 12 

Stone 809 92 

Lumber 23 84 

1 small corner ....... 3 75 

Advertising . . , . . . . . 16 20 

$2,531 83 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 5. 

Charles-river bridge. Electric signals to notify when the draw 

is off. 
Labor $266 34 



Teaming 

Gravel . 

9,000 paving- brick 

Masonry 

Electric signals 



55 50 
61 85 

108 00 
4 00 

400 00 

^895 69 



Work (lone bv the Sewer Division . 



$308 19 



Street Department — Paving Divrsiox. 



199 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 6. 



Batterymarch street, at Milk street. 

Labor 

Tearaiug 

Gravel . 

Pebbles 

Pitch . 

21 ft. flagging 

2,100 large granite bloc-ks 

500 paving-brick 



Graded, widened. 



pav 


ed. 


437 


45 


130 


(JO 


74 


80 


33 


00 


78 


84 


16 


80 


147 


(0 



6 50 



$924 39 

Charter street, Hanover to Unity street. Aspl)altcd over round 

stone paving, edgestone reset, sidewalks relaid. 

Labor , . . . $658 35 

Teaming . . 277 50 

8,600 paving-brick 107 50 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
631.3 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt pavement laid, 

at $2.25 1,420 43 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 
671 sq. yds. round-stone paving laid, at 

25 cts. ..... 

688. 5 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. . 
8.6 sq. yds. brick paving laid, herring 

bone, at 18 cts. .... 
40 sq. yds. crosswalks laid at 25 cts. 



. $167 75 
55 08 




59 22 
10 00 


90 1 15 








$2,758 93 


. 


$681 20 



Work done by the Sewer Division 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 7. 

Bowker street, Chnrdon to Sudbury street. Paved with large 
granite blocks on a gravel base, with pitch joints, edgestone 
reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks laid. 

Labor $819 18 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

201 ft. edgestone 

4 small corners 

122 ft. flagging 

10,000 paving-brick 

31,432 large granite blocks 

Advertising . 

Sundries 

Carried forward,, $4,284 92 



774 


50 


186 


60 


130 


65 


15 


00 


97 


60 


125 


00 


2,096 


51 


18 


38 


21 


50 



200 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought fonoard , 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 
1.477.4 sq. yds. block paving, pitch 

joints, at 90 cts. .... 

686 ft. edgestoue set, at 8 cts. 
419 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 18 cts. 



Less amount paid by West End Street 
Railway Company .... 

Less amount paid by Bowker, Torrey, 
& Co. . . " . 

Less amount paid by James W. Tufts . 



$1,329 66 
54 88 
75 42 



^325 50 

200 00 
35 00 



1,284 92 



1,459 96 

^5,744 88 



560 50 

$5,184 38 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 7 $4,730 82 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 7 and 8 453 56 

$5,184 38 

Causeway street, Haverhill to Nashua street. Paved with large 
granite blocks on a concrete base, with pitch joints, edgestone 
reset, granolithic sidewalks built, brick sidewalks relaid, cross- 
walks laid. 

Labor . . $2,948 24 

Teaming ........ 2,522 50 

Gravel . . . . 543 97 

Sand 90 00 

Templets 18 22 

Advertising . 9 90 

Pebbles 85 80 

Sundries 33 00 

87,100 large granite blocks 5,809 58 

1.968.3 ft. of flagging . ' 1,701 12 

228 ft. of edgestone 148 20 

2 small corners . . . . . . . 6 70 

9,832 paving-brick 120 48 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
686 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5.00 . . 3,430 00 

Amount paid to Warner H. Jenkins & Co. : 

2.414.4 sq. ft. artificial stone sidewalk, at 16 cts. . 342 62 
Amount paid to James Grant &, Co. : 

4,512 sq. yds. block paving, pitch joints, 

at 90 cts 

810 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 

343 sq. yds. brick-paving laid, at 18 cts., 

731 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 35 cts.. 



Carried forward, 



$4,060 80 




64 80 




61 74 




255 So 






A. 448 1 9 








$22,253 52 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



201 



JBronght forward. 
Less amount paid bv the West End 

Street Railway Co. " . . . . $2,390 73 

Less amount paid by the Boston & Maine 

Railroad Co 292 81 

Less amount paid by the Brookline Gas 

Light Co 109 17 



$22,253 52 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 7 $13,339 87 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 7 and 8 6,120 94 



North Margin street. Graded. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 



2,792 71 
$19,460 81 



19,460 81 



$71 30 
30 00 



il 30 



Salt lane, Union street to Creek square. Paved with granite 
blocks taken from Causeway street, on a gravel base, with 
pitch joints, brick sidewalks laid, edgestone reset. 

Labor 
Teamino; 



Pitch . 

PebMes . 

1,500 paving brick 

Sundries 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$232 10 

105 00 

48 87 

13 20 

19 50 

2 00 

$420 67 
i75"88 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 8. 

Barton COnrt, Barton to Brighton street. Asphalted over cobble- 
stones, edgestone reset, biick sidewalks laid. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

3,000 paving-brick ....... 

Advertising ........ 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 

180.6 cu. yds. Trinidad asplialt laid, at $2.25 . 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 8 $693 13 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 7 and 8 20 32 



165 


60 


99 


00 


37 


50 


5 


00 


406 


35 



$713 45 



$713 45 



202 



City Document No. 34. 



Cambridge street, Joy street to Bowdoin square, 
large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch 
stone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks laid 

Labor 

Teaming 

Advertising 

Gravel . 

Sand 

Pebbles . 

Templets 

57,516 large granite blocks 

23,000 paving-brick 

40 feet edgestone . 

1 large corner 

704 feet flagging 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 
431 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 . 

Amount paid to S. & R. J. Lombard : 
427 cu. yds. earth excavation, at 15 cts., $64 05 
1,928 sq. yds. pavement removed. 289 20 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
1,991 sq. yds. block paving pitch joints, 

at 90 cts 

1,222 feet edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 

7-t6 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 18 cts. , 

752 sq. yds. block paving, 

pitch joints, at 1.087 . $817 42 

14 sq. yds. block paving, 

gravel joints, at .217. . 3 04 

53 feet edgestone reset, at 

.652 . . . ' . 34 56 

51|- days stone-cutter, at 

.3913 
2^ days rammer, at $2. 1 7 . 
2^ days laborer, at $1.74 



Paved with 


joints, eil 


g«- 


$1,277 


36 


644 


50 


31 


40 


318 


60 


99 


00 


44 


55 


9 


10 


3,836 


32 


280 


00 


28 


80 


5 


60 


698 


72 



,791 


90 


97 


76 


136 


08 



Add 15% 



Amount paid by the Brookline Gas Light 

Co $2,272 07 

Amount paid by the West End Street 

Railway Corapan3' . . . . 2,105 60 



2,155 00 



353 25 



801 30 






4 82 






3 86 






H,065 00 




159 75 


1,224 75 






3,250 49 
$13,032 69 







4,377 67 



!,6.")5 02 



Street Department — Paving Division. 203 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 8 $3,077 21 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 7 and 8 . . . . . 5.577 81 

$8,655 02 

Chambers street, Green to Poplar street. Asphalted over cobble- 
stones. 

Labor $271 34 

Teaming 188 00 

Sand 34 20 

Templets ........ 7 12 

Amount paid to Barbei- Asphalt Paving Co. : 
1,098.7 sq. yds. Trinidad asphalt laid, at 

$2.25 . . . . • . . $2,472 07 

12.1 sq. yds. asphalt repairs, at $2.50 . 30 25 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 
AVard 8 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 
Wards 7 and 8 . 





, - - 




$3,002 98 


,879 38 




123 60 


$3,002 98 
$867 73 


• 



Work done by the Sewer Division . 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 7 AND 8. 
Work done by the Sewer Division . . . $151 85 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 10. 
Work done by the Sewer Division . . . $785 60 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 9 AND 10. 

Derne street, Hancock to Temple street. Paved with asphalt 

blocks, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. 

Labor $250 73 

Teaming ........ 134 00 

Amount paid to John Turner & Co. : 
135 sq. yds. asphalt blocks on a concrete 

base, at $1.40 . . . . ' . $189 00 

224 ft. edgestone set, at 25 cts. . . 56 00 

131 sq. yds. brick paving, at 45 cts. . 58 95 

3J days' pavers, rammers, and 

tenders, at $8 . . . $28 01 

^ days' stone-cutter, at $4 . 2 00 



Carried fonvard, $30 00 $303 95 $384 73 



204 



City Document No. 34. 



Brovght forward^ 

1 double load of gravel . 
19.2 ft. edgestone and circles, 

at $1.13 . 
179.6 ft. straight edgestone, 
at .626 .... 

2 small corners, at $3.13 
3,968 paving-brick, at $8,696, 
459 sq. yds. asphalt blocks on 

cracked stone and gravel 
bed, at $1,087 . 



Add 15% 



;30 00 
2 00 

21 70 



$303 95 



112 

6 

34 



43 

26 
51 



498 93 

$705 83 
105 87 



$384 73 



811 70 



$1,115 65 
$1,500 38 



Charles street, Cambridge to Pinckney street 
P«ved with large granite blocks on a concrete 
joints, edgestones reset, sidewalks relaid. 

Labor . . . 

Teaming 

Gravel ..... 

Sand . . . _ . 

Templets 

Adveriising .... 

36,773 large granite blocks 

8,000 paving brick . 

254 ft. flagging 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co 
327.2 cu. yds. cement concrete base, at $5 

Amount paid to F. H. Cowin : 
1 ,000 ft. edgestone set, at 18 cts. . 
1.512 sq. yds. block paving pitched joints, 

at 90 cts 

391 sq. yds. block paving, gravel joints, 

at 25 cts. . 
757 sq. yds. brick paving, at 28 cts. 
13|^ days' stone cutter, at $4.50 



(westerly side), 
base, with pitch 



^1,487 79 

557 00 

224 20 

96 30 

9 74 

26 85 

2,452 76 

100 (to 

223 52 



00 
1,360 80 



97 
211 

61 



75 
96 

00 



Less amount paid by West End Street 

Railway Co. . ' . . . . $1,596 Q& 

Less amount paid bv BrooUline Gas Light 

Co. . . .' . . . . 1,118 76 



1,636 00 



1,911 51 
58,725 67 



2,715 42 



).0l0 25 



Steeet Department — Paying Division. 205 

Amount paid out of Street Tmproveraents, 



Wards 9 and 10 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$5,940 14 
64 11 



$6,010 25 
$525 64 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 12. 
Work done by the Sewer Division .... 



L24 26 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 14. 

East Eighth street, G- to H street. Paved with large granite 

blocks, edgestone set, bricli sidewalks laid. 
Labor ... . iR-7 

Teaming 



Gravel . 

Lumber. . 

Wharfage 

66,629 large granite blocks 

43,700 paving-brick 

117 recut crossing-blocks 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
3,242 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 

cts $810 50 

2,202 ft. edgestone reset, at 8 cts. . 176 16 

1,467 sq. vds. brick paving laid, at 18 

cts. . " 264 06 



New edgestones, sidewalks, and gutters 

Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 



Story street. 

Labor 
Teaming 



Work done by the Bridge Division 
Work done by the Sewer Division 



.729 81 

797 50 

668 47 

15 41 

157 26 

,444 15 

546 25 

58 50 



1,250 7: 



$10,668 07 


$171 
78 


35 
00 


$249 


35 


$50 
18 


60 
00 


$68 
$•291 

$25 


60 
58 

85 



20g 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 15. 

Ne^v edgestones, sidewalks, aud gutters : 
Labor ......... 

TeamiDff • . . . 



.78 15 
76 00 



Tale street. Filling. 

Filling ......... 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward lo ^426 80 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 284 35 



$254 15 



1711 15 



1711 15 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$18 68 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 17 AND 18. 

Dartmouth street, Tremout street to Warren avenue. Paved 
with granite blocks taken from Dover and Albany streets, edge- 
stone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks laid. 



I^abor ..... 








$1,993 37 


Teaming 








1,080 00 


Gravel ..... 








192 90 


Masonry .... 








125 50 


Stone 








84 15 


193 ft. flagging 








137 03 


6,950 paving-brick 








90 35 


3,000 large granite blocks 








210 00 


1.4'S8 sq. yds. granite blocks taken from Albany and 




Dover streets . . ' . 


2,232 00 










16.145 30 



Ivanhoe street, Dedham to Canton street. Cobblestone removed 



and roadway resurfaced with 


crack stone, edgestone reset, brick 


sidewalk laid, gutters paved 




Labor . . . . . 


$200 56 


'J'eaming . . . . 


188 50 


Gravel ...... 


21 52 


Stone . . . . . 


133 00 


360 small blocks 


19 08 


427 ft. flagging 


38 43 


1,800 paving-brick 


23 40 




$624 49 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



207 



TV'ilkes street. Graded. 
Labor .... 

Teaming 
Masonry 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$49 60 
12 00 
70 00 




STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 19 AND 22. 

Edge Hill street, Gay Head to Round Hill street. 
Labor and material ..... 



Evergreen street. Resurfaced, sidewalks gravelled 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Stone 

Paving; . 



Resurfaced. 


$710 


80 


$65 


22 


72 


00 


278 


80 


313 


50 


24 


70 



;754 22 



Moimtfort street, Beacon to Arundel street, graded, gravelled, 
cdgestoue set, brick sidewalks laid, gutters paved, crosswalks 
laid. 



LaV)or .... 






$701 80 


Teaming 






199 00 


Gravel •. . . . 






2,430 80 


Lumber 






32 83 


168^^5- ft. edgestone 






109 47 


2 large and 6 small corners 






27 95 


88 ft. flagging 






70 40 


Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 






870 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 


$69 60 




309 sq. yds. brick paving laid, at 25 cts. 


77 25 


146 85 








$3,719 10 


New edgestones, sidewalks and gutters 




Labor ...... 


, . 


$18 40 


Gravel ...... 


. . . 


693 60 


Sand ...... 


■ ■ 


246 60 




$958 60 


Work done by the Bridge Division 


■ • • 


$2,541 74 


Work done by the Sewer Divi 


sion . 


$1,202 03 



208 



City Document No. 34. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 20. 

New edgestones, sidewalks and gutters : 

Labor . . . . . . . . 

Gravel ......... 

Sand . . . . . 



Norfolk avenue. Graded. 
Labor and material 

Work done by the Sewer Division 




STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 21. 
Catawba street. Edgestones set, gutters paved, brick sidewalks 



laid. 
Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Sand ......... 

Gravel ......... 

Amount paid to A. A. Libby & Co. : 
642 feet edgestone set, at 8 cts. . . $51 36 

220 sq. yds. rouud-stone paving, at 25 cts. 55 00 
623 sq. yds. brick sidewalks laid, at 18 cts, 94 14 



$466 90 

232 50 

52 20 

45 90 



200 50 



$998 00 



Centre street, Eliot square to Pynchon street. Resurfaced. 

Labor $381 90 

Teaming 272 5o 

Gravel . . . . ' 185 30 



Holland street. Graded. 

Filling ....... 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Labor 
Teaming 



Gravel . 
Sand 
Paving . 



^ 


$839 


70 


$434 25 


$497 09 




685 


50 




1,207 


00 




946 


80 




593 


14 




$3,929 53 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



209 



Thwing street. Edgestone set, brick sidewalks laid, gutters 

paved. 
Labor $112 70 



Teaming 

Gravel . 

.566.3 feet edgestone 

Pavins . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 21 . . 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



304 00 
387 60 
368 10 
125 43 



^542 13 
755 70 



,297 83 



)1,297 83 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 23 AND 25. 
d 23. Graded, macadamized. 



Brookfleld street, War 

Labor 
Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel . 
Lumber . 
Advertisius 



Cambridge street, Ward 25. Concrete sidewalks. 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
745 sq. yds. concrete walks laid . . . . 



$468 05 

237 00 

207 50 

157 68 

12 40 

24 25 



Catharine street, Ward 23. 
Labor .... 



(Work unfinished.) 



$1,106 


88 


$745 


00 


$773 


50 



Concrete sidewalks, Ward 23. 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
444.1 sq. yds. new concrete walks . 
111.9 sq. yds. resurfaced concrete walks. 



$444 10 
72 73 



$516 83 



Elko street, Cambridge to Sparkawk street. Graded, macada- 
mized, sidewalks gravelled. 

Labor $276 60 

Teaming 83 50 

Gravel . 505 40 

Advertising ........ 9 80 



Farrington avenue, Ward 25. Concrete sidewalks. 
Labor ......... 

83.9 sq. yds. concrete sidewalks laid 



75 30 



$21 GO 
83 90 



$104 90 



210 



City Document No. 34. 



Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Wards 23 and 25 ... . $2,721 46 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 25 356 21 



Highgate street, Farrington avenue to Cambridge street. 

Graded, macadamized, edgestone set, gutters paved, concrete 

sidewalks laid. 

Labor $903 51 

Teaming 

Gravel 

Loam 

Stone 

Sand 

4.968 large granite blocks 

4 small corners 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
453.4 sq. yds. new concrete sidewalks laid 



350 


00 


651 


35 


278 


53 


54 


GO 


5 


85 


367 


63 


13 


40 


453 


40 



$3,077 67 



1,077 67 



Laiitlseer street, Ward 23. 

iabor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone 
Lumber . 



Graded, macadamized 



$604 90 

298 00 

154 44 

274 20 

56 29 

1,387 83 



Linden street, Ward 25. 

Labor . . 

Teaming 

Gravel . . . . 

190 ft. of flagging . 



Graded, crosswalks laid. 



$499 73 
129 50 
189 35 
134 90 

$953 48 



New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Sand 
Paving . 

Paid to W. A. Murtfeldt : 
5,253 feet artificial stone sidewalk 



$32 90 
181 50 
335 39 
154 80 
348 36 

315 18 



,368 13 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



211 



Ophir street, WashiDgton street to Brookline avenue (work un- 
finished). Graded, widened, macadamized, sidewalks gravelled. 

Labor ^112 00 

Teaming 103 ;.0 

Filling ■ 381 00 

Stone 381 50 



Pond street, Ward 23. Concrete gutters. 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
1,418.7 sq. yds. concrete gutters 



$978 00 



$2,173 05 



Roberts street. Ward 28. Graded. 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ...... 

Stone ...... 



$47 50 
51 00 
73 44 
29 50 

^201 44 



Washington street. Ward 25, Oak square to the Newton line. 

Graded, gravelled, concrete gutters laid. 

Labor $697 65 

Teaming 525 50 

Gravel 1,581 30 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
1,355 sq. yds. concrete gutters laid, at 

$1.50 . . . . . . $2,032 50 

Labor, excavating, grading, etc. . . 373 62 

2,406 12 



$5,210 57 



Work done by the Bridge Division 
Work done by the Sewer Division 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 24. 

Brent street. 

Labor . . . . . . . . . 

Teaming ........ 

Tile 

500 paving-brick 




MO 00 

10 50 

16 57 

6 00 



$43 07 



212 



City Document No. 34. 



Clarkson street. 


Edgestone set, brick sidewalks laid, gutters 


paved. 




Labor 


$23 00 


Teaming 


92 50 


G^ravel . 


42 90 


Sand 


37 80 


Paving . 


105 96 




$302 16 



Crescent avenue, Dorchester avenue to railroad. Macadamized, 
edgestone set and reset, sidewalks laid and relaid, gutters paved. 

Labor $166 62 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Filling . 

Stone 

528 feet straight edgestone 

22/j*2 f^st circular edgestone 

2 small corners 



285 


00 


509 


85 


341 


00 


1,076 


75 


343 


20 


29 


03 


6 


70 









$2,758 15 


Duncan street. Filling. 




Labor . . . . 


. 


, 


$38 25 


Teaming . . . . 


. 


. 


36 00 


Gravel . . 


. 


. 


333 60 


Filling 


• 


• 


232 50 




$640 35 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 








ments, Ward 24 


$232 


50 




Amount paid out of Paving Division 


407 


85 


$640 35 


Glenway street. Graded, macadamized 






Labor . 


. 


. 


$809 00 


Teaming ...... 


. 


. 


437 00 


Stone ....... 


, 


. 


2,977 00 


Gravel . . . . . 


• 


• 


153 45 




$4,376 45 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 








ments, Ward 24 .... 


$4,107 


50 




Amount paid out of Paving Division 


268 


95 


$4,376 45 








Greenlieys street. (Work unfinished). 








Labor . ...... 


. 


. 


$74 65 


Teaming ...... 


• 


• 


15 00 



Carried forward., 



$89 65 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



213 



Brought forward, 
Stone 
Gravel . 



Amonnt paid out of Street Improve- 
meijts, Ward 24 . . . . 

Amount paid out of Paving Division 



King street, Adams street to Dorcliester 
concrete sidewalks laid, crosswalks laid. 

Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 

Gravel ....... 

Stone ....... 

Rolling . . 

214 ft. flagging ..... 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 

436.3 sq. vds. concrete sidewalks (new), 
at $1.00 

128.5 sq. 3'ds. concrete sidewalks (resur- 
faced ) , at 65 cts. .... 



• 


$89 65 
48 00 
67 65 


$18 40 
186 90 


$205 30 

$205 30 
cadamized, 

$509 55 

15 00 

532 95 

2,688 75 

210 00 

151 92 


avenue. Ma 



$436 30 



83 52 



519 82 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 .... $545 55 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 4,082 44 



Lawrence avenue 

Labor 
Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel . 



Granolithic sidewalks laid. 



.,627 99 



1,627 99 



$694 60 
9 00 

558 00 
94 05 



Lyndhurst street, (work uncompleted) 

stone gutters and sidewalks laid. 
Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone 
Tile drain 

Amount paid to W. II. Jenkins Co. 
19,644.3 sq. ft. digging and filling, at 
6 cts. . . ■ . . . . $1,1' 



$1,355 65 
Macadamized, artificial 



$332 35 


51 


Ot) 


90 


75 


1,069 


25 



■8 65 



Carried forix ard. 



11,178 ^b 



108 38 



,651 73 



214 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forivard, 
7,407 sq. ft. artilicial stoue gutters, at 
20 cts 



$1,178 65 


$1,651 73 


1,481 40 


2,660 05 





Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 . . . . 285 48 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 4,026 30 



Mayfleld street. Granolithic sidewalks laid. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 

Gravel ....... 

Sand ....... 



New edgestone, sidewalks and gutters : 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Sand ...... 

Gravel ...... 



Sagamore street. Granolithic sidewalks laid. 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel ........ 



Spencer street. Filling. 
Teaming . . . ' . 

Yirginia street. Brick sidewalks laid. 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Sand ...... 



Willis street. Gr 

Labor 
Teaming 
Stone 
Rolling . 



aded, macadamized. 



t,311 78 



:,311 78 



$46 00 


37 


50 


363 


00 


25 


20 


$471 


70 


$639 


25 


10 


00 


39 


60 


92 


40 


$781 


25 


$25 


30 


16 


50 


108 


90 


$150 


70 


$97 50 


$40 25 


18 


00 


25 


20 


$83 45 


$411 


15 


209 


50 


1,601 


25 


170 


00 


$2,391 


90 



Street Department — Paving Division. 215 

Work doue by the Bridge Division . . . $792 82 

Work done by the Sewer Division . 



$7,908 .S7 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 25. 

Brighton avemie. Concrete sidewallvs laid. 

^ cost of concrete sidewalk ..... 

Talbot avenue, Washington street to Dorchester avenue 

uncompleted.) 
Lal)or 
Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel . 
Lumber . 
Tools, etc. 

Advertising . . . . 
468.3 ft. circular edgestone 
2,2C4y^2^ ft. straiglit edgestone 
1,000 paving-brick . 
1,829 sq. yds. old blocks ttiken from Foundry and 

Division streets . 
34,221 small granite ])locks 

Amount paid to Citizens' Relief Company : 
6,270 cu. yds. excavation, at 80 cts. . $5,016 00 
Tools, etc. . . . . . . 120 00 



11 80 



. (Work 



$2,479 


71 


1,829 


oO 


884 


75 


1,495 


05 


16 


16 


235 


■26 


94 


81) 


608 


77 


1,471 


77 


11 


50 


731 


60 


1,197 


74 



Less 1114- days' labor. Paving 

Division m'en, at $2.25 . $250 87 
Less 4 days, single team, at 

$3.00 .... 12 00 

Tools and lumber . . 251 42 



Amount paid to William McEleney : 
1,615.9 ft. edgestone set, at 8 cts. 
250.4 ft. edgestone reset, at 8 cts. 
687 sq. yds. block paving laid, at 25 cts. 

Work done by the Sewer Division . 



Thetford street. Graded, macadamized. 
Lal)or ....... 

Teaming ...... 

Gravel ....... 

Stone ....... 



$5,136 00 



514 29 



27 
20 03 
171 75 



4,621 71 



321 05 

3,002 04 

$18,501 41 



$1,422 55 

238 00 

843 15 

3,102 84 



Carried forw<trcl, 



$5,606 54 



216 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward^ 




$5,606 .54 


Rolling ........ 


220 00 


Advertising ....... 


31 50 


Work done hy the Sewer Division . 


9 09 




$5,867 13 


Amount of special appropriation . . $3,000 00 


Amount paid out of street Improvements, 




Ward 24 2,867 13 


V 




<r!^ «R7 1 ^ 




<p<J,oo< lO 


Utica street, Harvard to Kneeland street. Paved with granite 


blocks, taken from Swan, Albany, and Dover streets, edgestoue 


reset, brick sidewalks lelaid, crosswalks laid. 




Labor ........ 


$1,327 05 


Teaming . . . . 




760 50 


Gravel ...... 




208 86 


Masonry ..... 




80 00 


138 ft. edgestone .... 


. - 


89 70 


1 large and 1 small corner 




8 95 


145 ft. flaggino- .... 




102 95 


1,554.3 sq. yds. blocks, taken from Swan, Albany 




and Dover streets ..... 


2,331 45 




$4,909 46 


Amount of special appropriation 


• 


$4,909 46 



Utica street, Kneeland to Beach street. Repavod, edgestone 
reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crosswalks laid. 

Labor $388 96 

Teaming 
Gravel . 
Masonry 
4.300 paving-brick 



Amount of special appropriation 
Van Renssalaer place. Paved. 

Amount paid to Payson & Co. : 
Paving laid as per agreement . 




$450 00 



Washington street, Brighton, Oak square to Winship street. 
Widened. (AVoik uncompleted.) 

Labor . . $412 40 

Teaming ........ 956 00 

Gravel ......... 543 55 

Filling . . 1,314 72 



Carried forward, 



53,226 67 



Street Department — Pavixg Division. 



217 



Brought forward, 
Drain tile ........ 

Lumber ......... 

Amount paid to Michael Kiernan : 
Cutting away bank and building stone wall. 
8 davs foreman, at $3.00 . . . $2i 00 

24 days labor, at $2.00 . . . . 48 00 

19 days mason, at 83.20 . . . 60 80 

] 8 days double team, at $5.00 ' . . 90 00 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



Whiting street. Excavated, 
Teaming and labor 

Amount paid to John J. Nawn : 
882 cu. yds. rock excavation, at $2.00, 
250 cu. yds. earth excavation, at $1.00, 



Amount of special appropriation 



$1,764 00 
250 00 



1,226 67 
11 90 
88 89 



222 80 
3,298 62 

$6,848 88 



$121 00 



2,014 CO 



t>,135 00 
>2,135 00 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 



Total 
Baker street . 
Bellflower street 
Blakeville street 
Blue Hill avenue 
Bumstead lane 
Bunker Hill street . 
Bushiiell street 
Charter stieet 
Commonwealth avenue 
Congress and L streets 
Cranston street 
Dartmouth street . 
Day street 
Fay street 
Lewis street . 
Mill street 
Millet street . 
Moiitview street 
Mount Vernon street 
Newport street 
Oak street 



Amount Expe 



$1,651 90 

3,000 00 

2,342 01 

38,181 97 

15,551 50 

372 15 

3,363 33 

9 20 

304,260 99 

558 00 

568 75 

5.839 65 

12,846 02 

1,408 82 

2,319 29 

2,567 00 

595 88 

4,213 2S 

1.325 00 

1,901 12 

3.313 38 



Carried furward, 



106,192 24 



218 



City Document No. 34. 



Aldermanic District No 



No. 
street 



Brought fortcard, 
Park street 
Prestou street 
Ruth street 
Second street 
Street Improvements, 

Bennington street 

Chelsea street .... 

Moore street . . . ' . 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Sewers ..... 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

Alford street 

Austin street 

Chapman street . 

Charles street 

Main street crossing 

Medford street • 

Phipps street 

Rutlierford avenue 

Thompson street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic Distric: 

Charaheis street, Ashland to Brighton 

Sewers ..... 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

C(Hii't square 

Harrison avenue, Essex to Beach street 

Mason street .... 

Pemberton square 

Washington sti'eet, Eliot to Kneeland 

Sewers ..... 
Street luiproveraeuts, Aldermanic District No 

Harcourt street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

Ash street ..... 

Essex street, Chauncy to South street 

Essex and Lincoln streets . 

Foundry street . . . . 

Tufts street .... 

Bridges ..... 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No 

Boston street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic Distric 

Albany street 

Massachusetts avenue 

Sewers 

Carried forward, 



treet 



tNo 



$406,192 


24 


1,138 


23 


5,390 


12 


5,586 


71 


7,065 


69 


4,166 


18 


9,050 


44 


904 


18 


549 


70 


2,371) 


86 


1,440 


13 


5,064 


10 


4,557 


55 


1,342 


64 


29 


90 


585 


00 


1,227 


84 


6,403 


09 


267 


18 


1,173 


50 


6,521 


35 


77 


18 


2,992 


20 


6,496 


80 


1,535 


04 


8,934 


42 


10,841 


80 


479 


41 


2,159 


38 


92 


34 


239 


23 


12,136 


71 


1,455 


00 


2,760 


79 


344 


35 


6,586 


70 


9,798 


34 


215 


52 


3,810 


76 


10,799 


40 


581 


91 


$553,363 


91 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



219 



Brought forward, 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 9 

Brookline avenue 

Healh street 

Sewall street 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 1 1 

Henshaw street . 

Lagrange street . 

Sycamore street . 

Washington street (Roslindale) 

Wilson square 

Bridges .... 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Aldermanic District No. 12 

Park street 

Sewers .... 

Street Improvements, Wards 1 and 2 : 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Sewers ..... 
Street Improvements, Ward 3 : 

Sprague street .... 

Sevvers ..... 
Street Improvements, Ward 5 : 

Charles-river and Warren bridges 

Sewers ..... 

Street Improvements, Ward 6: 

Batterymarch street . 

Charter street 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Ward 7 : 

Bowker street 

Causew.iy street . 

North Margin street . 

Salt lane . ' . 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Ward 8 : 

liartou court 

Cambridge street 

Ch.imbers street. Green to Poplar street 

Sevvers .... 
vStreet Improvements, Wards 7 and 8 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Ward 10 : 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Wards 9 and 10 

Cliarles street 

Derne street 

Sewers .... 
Street Improvements, Ward 12 : 

Sewers .... 

Car lied forward, 



553,363 


91 


1.902 


60 


16,365 


65 


1,562 


87 


4,225 


75 


48 


30 


5,364 


97 


46 


00 


6,638 


24 


1,179 


52 


344 


93 


2,013 


20 


3,693 


49 


217 


15 


2,308 


44 


2,791 


92 


2,531 


83 


16 


75 


895 


69 


3U8 


19 


924 


39 


2,758 


93 


681 


20 


5,184 


38 


19,460 


81 


101 


30 


420 


67 


75 


88 


713 


45 


8,655 


02 


3,002 


98 


867 


73 


151 


85 


785 


60 


6,010 


25 


1,500 


38 


525 


64 


124 


26 


57,764 


12 



220 



City Document No. 34. 



Broiiglit forioard 
Street Improvements, Ward 14: 

East Eighth street . . . . 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Story street . . . . , 

Bridges . . . . ., . 

Sewers ...... 

Street Improveraents, Ward 15 : 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Vale street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Wards 17 and 18 

Dartmouth street 

Ivanhoe street 

Wilkes street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Wards 19 and 22 

Edge Hill street . 

Evergreen street 

Mountfort street 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Bridges 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 20 : 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Norfolk avenue .... 

Sewers ..... 

Street Improvements, Ward 21 : 

Catawba street .... 

Centre street .... 

Holland street .... 

Howland street .... 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Thwing street .... 
Street Improvements, Waids 23 and 25 : 

Brookfield street . . - . 

Caml)ridge street 

Catharine street .... 

Concrete sidewalks 

Elko street ..... 

Earrington avenue 

Highgate street .... 

Landseer street .... 

Linden street .... 

INew edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Opliir street .... 

Pond street 

Roberts street 

Washington street (Brighton) 

Bridges .... 

Sewers .... 

Carried forioard^ 



$657,761 


12 


10,668 


07 


249 


35 


68 


60 


291 


58 


25 


85 


254 


15 


711 


15 


18 


68 


6,145 


30 


624 


49 


131 


60 


1,313 


77 


710 


80 


754 


22 


3,719 


10 


958 


60 


2,541 


74 


1,202 


03 


638 


69 


187 


70 


376 


22 


998 


00 


839 


70 


434 


25 


203 


80 


3,725 


73 


1,297 


83 


1,106 


88 


745 


00 


773 


50 


516 


83 


, 875 


30 


104 


90 


3,077 


67 


1.387 


83 


953 


48 


1,368 


13 


978 


00 


■ 2,17-1 


05 


201 


44 


5,210 


57 


759 


24 


1,514 


77 


1718,601 


71 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



221 



Bwught forward^ 
Street Improvements, Ward 24 : 

Brent street 

Clarkson street 

Crescent avenue 

Diiucan street 

Glenway street 

Greeuheys street 

King street . 

Lawrence avenue 

Lyndhurst street 

Mayfield street . 

New edgestone, sidewalks, and gutters 

Sagamore street . 

Spencer street 

Virginia street 

Willis street 

Bridges .... 

Sewers .... 

Street Improvements, Ward 25 : 

Brighton avenue . 

Talbot avenue 

The! ford street . 

Utica street, Harvard to Kneeland street 

Utica street, Kneeland to Beach street 

Van Reiissalaer place . 

Washington street, Brighton 

Wliiting street 
Laying Out and Construction of Highways 

Sewer construction 

Arundel street 

Batavia street 

Bay State road . 

Boylston street . 

Deerfield street . 

Huntington avenue 

Ivy street . 

Miner street 

Mountfort street . 

Newbury street . 

Norway street 

Parker street 

St. Germain street 
Sherborn street . 

Turner street 



Total 

Less amount [)aid out of appropriation 
Division ..... 

Total 



for 



Pavin 



$718,601 71 

43 07 

302 16 

2,758 15 

640 35 

4,376 45 

205 30 

4,627 99 

1,355 65 

4,311 78 

471 70 

781 25 

150 70 

97 50 

83 45 

2,391 90 

792 82 

7.908 87 

61 80 

18,501 41 

5,867 13 

4.909 46 
794 28 
450 00 

6,848 88 
2,135 00 

2,883 58 

3,048 26 

411 02 

3,589 90 

9,604 43 

2,658 19 

10 25 

8,302 22 

255 19 

4,367 24 

14,536 86 

151 35 

21,805 37 

1,747 53 

10 75 

13 00 

$862,863 90 

23,150 12 

$839,713 78 



222 



City Document No. 34. 



LAYING OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 



Sewer construction 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel 



Arundel street, Beacon to Mouutfort street. 

Labor .... 

Stone .... 

Advertising . 

447 ft. straiglit edgestone 

42j-^2 ft' circular edgestone 

1 large and 3 small corners 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
122 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 25 cts 
796 sq. yds. macadam, at 20 cts. . . 159 
228.8 sq. yds. gutters, at $2.35 . . 537 

579.5 ft. edgestone set, at 30 cts. . . 173 

411.7 sq. yds. brick paving, at $1.05 . 432 

48.4 sq. vds. flagging crossings, at $4 . 193 
246.5 en. yds. gravel, at $1.20 . . 295 

10.5 sq. yds. gutters repaved, at 85 cts 
Work at Beacon street, moving shanty, etc 

^ day, single team, at $3 . . $1 50 

7 hours' labor, at $1.75 . . 1 36 
^ day double caravan, at $7 . 3 50 

8 hours' labor, at $1.75 . . 1 56 
5 hours' stone-cutter, at $3.91 . 2 17 



50 
20 
68 
85 
29 
60 
80 
93 



Add 15 per cent. 



10 09 
1 51 
11 



60 



Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. 



Batavia street, St. Stephen to Parker. street. 
Amount retained from James Grant & Co. for work 
done under conti act in 1893 . . . . 



$1,800 16 
6S2 50 
400 92 

$2,883 58 



5278 46 

557 70 

99 37 

250 55 

55 25 

15 6o 



1,843 45 

$3,140 43 
92 17 

S3.048 26 



.1 02 



Bay State road, Raleigh to Sherborn street. 
Laboi ....... 

Carried forward, 



$52 00 
$52 00 



Street Departmrnt — Paving Division. 



223 



Brought forward^ 
Amount paid to James Killian : 
542 cu. 3'ds. sub-grading, at 35 cts. 
4,647 sq. yds. macadam, at 48 cts. 
1,069 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2 60 
2.616 lin. ft. edgestoue set. at 98 cts. 
3,209 sq. yds. gravel sidewalks, at 46 cts 
183.4 sq. yds. cross-walks laid, at $1.20, 
4,682 cu. yds. gravel filling, at 84 cts. . 

Resetting edgestone, gutters, and 
crosswalks : 
5^ days, foreman, at $5 . . $26 25 

12 days, paver, at $4.00 . . 48 00 
1211 days, rammer, at $2.25 . 29 06 
SoJ^days, laborers, at $2.00 . 71 00 
145 lin. ft. circ. edgestone, at 

55 cts. . . . . 79 75 

11 double loads crushed stone, 

at $4.00 
2%^ days' labor at $2.00 . 



$52 00 



44 

5 



Plus 15 per cent. 



Amount paid in 1393 



00 

9-> 



$303 28 
45 49 



$189 
2,230 
2.779 
2,563 
1,476 
220 
3,932 



70 
56 
40 
68 
14 
08 



348 77 



U3,741 21 
10,203 31 



3,537 90 



1,589 90 



Boylston street, Brookliue avenue to Boylston road. 

finished.) 
Labor ......... 

Advertising . . . > . 

Amount paid to John O'Brien : 
16,602 cu. yds. filling at 62.5 cts. . . $10,376 25 
15% retained 1,556 44 



(Worl 



$613 60 
171 02 



8,819 81 
^9,604 43 



Deerfield street, Commonwealth avenue to Charles river, 
Labor ...... 

F'ence ...... 

54 lin, ft. granite coping 

Amount paid to James Killian : 
87 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 35 cts. 
1,983 sq. yds. macadam, at 47 cts. 
342 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2 60 
998 lin. ft. edgestone set, at 97 cts. 

Carried forward, 



, , 


$2S0 00 


^ 


87 50 


• 


324 00 


$30 45 




932 01 




889 20 




968 06 




$2,819 72 


$641 50 



224 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forward, $2,819 72 

900 sq yds. gravel sidewalks, at 46 cts. 414 00 
7.2 sq. yds. crosswalks laid, at Si. 20 . 8 64 

1,741 cu. yds. gravel tilling, at 84 cts . 1,462 44 

Resetting edgestoue, gutters, and cross- 
walks : 
1 day, foi'eman . . . $5 00 

4f days, paver, at $4.00 . 19 00 

4 davs, rammer, at $2.25 . 9 00 

10 days, laborer, at $2.00 . 20 00 

5.4 lin. ft. circular edgestone, 

at 55 cts. . . . . 2 97 

n double loads stone, at $4.00 68 00 

3 days' labor at $2.00 . . 6 00 



$641 50 



Plus 15% 



Less 1 day's use of steam-roller 



Amount paid in 1893 



1 29 97 
19 50 



149 47 

4,854 27 
15 00 

;4,839 27 
2,822 58 



Huntington avenue. 

Labor 



(Work not started.) 



2,016 69 
^2,658 19 

$10 25 



Ivy street, St. Mary's to Mountfort street. 

Labor .... 

Stone .... 

Advertising . 

1.465 ft. straight edgestone 

^o^^ ft. circular edgestone 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 
70 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 25 cts. . $17 

2,380 sq. yds. macadam, at 4 cts. . . 95 

512 sq. yds. gutters laid, at $2.32 . . 1,187 

1,528 ft. edgestone set, at 25 cts. . . 382 
1,124 sq. yds. brick paving, at $1.10 . 1,236 
3,896 cu. yds. gravel, at 95 cts. . . 3,701 



50 
20 
84 
00 
40 
20 



$214 50 

1,393 03 

7 20 

952 25 

108 12 



6,620 14 



Amount retained from James Grant & Co. 



»,295 24 
993 02 



5,302 22 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



225 



Miner street, Beacon street to Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Labor $10 00 

Amount retained from Doherty and O'Leary, for 

work done in 1893 245 19 



5255 19 



oad to Ivy street. 



Moimtfort street, Audubon 1 
Labor .... 
Stone .... 
764if ft, straight edgestone 
Q8-^2 ^t- circular edgestom- 
5 small corners 
2 large coi-ners 
Advertising . 
Sundries 

Amount paid to H. Goie & Co. 
133.7 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 25 cts. 
1,349 sq. yds. macadam, at 20 cts. 
303 sq. yds. gutters paved, at $2.35 
768 ft. edgestone set, at 30 cts. 
627.5 sq. yds. block paving, at $1.05 
9 sq. yds. flag crossings, at $4.00 . 
455 cu. yds. gravel, at $1.20 . 
25 sq. yds. gutters relaid, at 85 cts. 
19 sq. yds. brick paving relaid, at 65 cts 
9 sq. yds. flagging crosswalks relaid, at 

50 cts. ...... 

115 ft. edgestone reset, at 

.157 . . . . $18 06 

1 day, stone-cutter . . 3 91 



Add 15% 



Amount retained from H. 



$33 43 

269 80 

712 05 

230 40 

658 88 

36 00 

546 00 

21 25 

12 35 

4 50 



$163 37 

1,098 81 

497 14 

89 16 

16 75 

11 20 

64 00 

4 38 



$21 97 
3 30 


25 27 






2,549 93 




, , 


Gore & Co. . 


$4,494 74 
127 50 



,367 24 



Newbury street, Charles-Gate West to Brookline avenue 

Labor 

Stone 

Filling . 

Printing 

Advertising . 

354V feet circular edgestone 

2,616 feet straight edgestone 



$769 


63 


1,825 


99 


383 


20 


59 


62 


103 


38 


45 


96 


1,631 


50 



Carried forward, 



t,819 28 



226 



City Docuivient No. 34. 



Brought fortoard. 
Amount paid to F. H. Cowin : 
192.5 cu. 3^ds. sub-grading, at 35 cts. 
3,208 sq, yds. macadam, at 54.5 cts. 
18 sq. yds. macadam, at 54.5 cts. . 
871 sq.*^yds. gutters, at $2.00 . 
2,551 feet edgestoue, at 92 cts. 
2,071 sq. yds. brick paving, at SI. 07 
45.1 sq. yds. flagging crossings, at $4.00 
4,752 cu. yds. gravel, at $1.17 
23 sq. yds. gutters relaid, at 50 cts. 
37 feet edgestone reset, at 42 cts. . 



:,819 28 



$67 38 

1,748 36 

9 81 

1,742 00 

2,346 92 

2,215 97 

180 40 

5,559 84 

11 50 

15 54 



Credit by : 

2,510 feet edgestone, at 

65 cts. . . . $1,631 50 

41 feet circular edgestone, 

at $1.30 . . . 53 30 

J ,106.66 tons stone screen- 
ings, at $1.65 . . 1,825 99 



Amount retained from F. H. Cowin 



$13,897 72 



$3,510 79 



Norway street. 

Labor 
Advertising . 



(Work not started.) 



10,386 93 



$15,206 21 
669 35 



$14,536 86 



$119 35 
32 00 



$151 35 



Parker street, Huntington avenue to Westland avenue. 

Labor . 

Filling . 

Advertising . 

Printing 

Fuel 

Sundries 

Amount paid to Doherty and O'Leary 
7,081.3 cu. yds. gravel filling, at $1.00 
1,454 cu. yds. sub-grading, at 37 cts. 
6,107 sq. yds. Telford base, at 62 cts. 
1,009 sq. yds. block gutters laid, at $2.06 
3.086 feet edgestone set, at 87 cts, 
10 sq. yds. gutters relaid, at 56 cts. 

Carried forward, 





$986 &(j 




6,147 31 




125 73 




7 28 




14 55 




16 80 


. $7,081 30 




537 98 




. 3,786 34 




3 2,078 54 




. 2,684 82 




5 60 




$16,174 58 


$7,298 33 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



227 



Brovglit foricard, 
126 feet edgestoue reset, at 37 cts. . 
769 cu. yds. gravel, at $1.10 . 



!16,174 58 $7, -298 33 
46 62 
845 90 
17,067 10 



Amount retained from Doherty and O'Leary 



St. Germain street. 

Labor ...... 

Advertising ..... 

Amount paid to Quimby & Ferguson 
1,840 cu. yds. gravel, at 95 cts. 



Amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson 



Sherborn street. 

Labor . 

Turner street. 

Labor 



$24,365 43 
2.560 06 

$21,805 37 

$177 25 
84 48 

1,748 00 



$2 


.009 


73 




262 


20 


81 


,747 


53 




$10 


75 




$13 


00 



NEW EDGESTONE. 

The following tables show the amount of new edgestoue set 
during the year : 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, S, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18. {Paving Districts 
Nos. 8, 9, and 10.) 

Liu. ft. 

Chambers-street extension 
East Lenox street . 
Lewis street extension 
Massachusetts avenue 
Cambria street 











115 










428 










669 










36 




1,916 


)XBUR 


y. 









Wards 19, 20, 21, and 22. {Paving Districts 7, 9, and 11.) 

Lin. ft. 

Arundel street ........ 580 

Batavia street . ........ 1,015 

Bay State road 2,616 



Carried, forvjard. 



4.211 



228 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
Beacon street . 
Blue Hill avenue 
Catawba street 
Centre street . 
Commonwealth avenue 
Day street 
Deerfield street 
Gaston street . 
Hamerton street 
Harold and Ruthven streets 
Heath street . 
Holborn street 
Howland street 
Humboldt avenue 
Hulbert street 
Ivy street . • . 
Miner street . 
Mindeu street . 
Moreland and Montrose streets 
Mountfort street 
Munroe street . 
Newbury street 
Parker street . 
Raleigh street . 
Ruthven street 
St. Alphonsus street 
St. Botolph street . 
Sewall street . 
Thorndike street 
Thwing street . 
Westminster street . 
"Woodward avenue . 



Lin. ft. 

4,211 
162 

1,102 

549 

175 

10,227 

3,072 
998 
257 
220 
254 

1,373 

332 

180- 

64 

50 

1,611 
626 
43 
240- 

2,310 
495 

2,615 

3,086 
204 
250 

2,219 
719 
342 
564 
566 
150' 
.58 

39,324 



South Boston. 



yywiLis J..J, j.'±, uiui ±u. \^' 


Lin. ft. 


D street and Dorchester avenue 


77 


East Third street .... 


72 


East Second street .... 


165 


East Sixth street .... 


77 


Story street . . . ' . 


105 


Vinton street ..... 


. . 25 



521 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



229 



'Condor street 
Everett street 
JFalcon street 
Havre street 
.Paris street 
ionclon street 



East Boston. 
Wards 1 and 2. {District No. 2.) 



Lin. ft. 

186 
5-5 
207 
110 
175 
83 

816 



Dorchester. 

Ward 24. {District No. 6 ) 













Lin. ft. 


Algonquin street ........ 656 


Ashmont street 










95 


Blakeville street 










793 


Busbnell street 










275 


Clarlvson street 










337 


Crescent avenue 










537 


Glenway street 










64 


Neponset avenue 










155 


ISewport and Harbor View streets 










566 


Quincy street .... 










62 


Roslin street .... 










405 


Talbot avenue 










2,264 


Welles avenue 










50 


West Park street 










285 




6,544 



West Roxbury. 
Ward 23. {Districts Nos. 5 and 11.) 













Lin. ft. 


Atherton street ........ 153 


Boylston and Washington streets 










159 


Brookfield street 










116 


Hyde Park avenue . 










232 


Paul Gore street .... 










93 


Metropolitan avenue 










326 


»Sedgwick street 










65 


Washington street . 










285 


Weld Hill street . 










139 



1,568 



230 



City Document No. 34. 



Brighton. 
Ward 25. {Dislrict No. 4.) 



Farrington avenue 
Highgate street 
Murdock street 
Raymond street 



Charlestown. 

Wards 3, 4, and 5. (District No. 3.) 



Lin. ft^ 

123- 
987 
107 
106 



1,323 















Lin. ft. 


Sprague street 


G94 




Recapitulation. 




Lin. ft. 


City Proper 


1,916 


Roxbury 












39,324 


South Boston . 












521 


East Boston . 










^ 


816 


Dorchester 










^ 


6.544 


West Roxbury 










. 


1,568 


Brighton 










. 


1,323 


Charlestown . 










• 


694 




' 


52,706 



NEW BRICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of new 
brick sidewalks laid during the year : 



City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18. 
Districts Nos. 8, 9, and 10.) 



Castle street . 
Cambria street 
Chambers- street extension 
Harrison avenue 
Lewis-street extension 
Massachusetts avenue 
Shawmut avenue 



(Paving 



Sq. yds.- 

"96 
28- 
361 
150 
186 
570 
146- 



1,537 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



231 



ROXBUKY. 

Wcu-ds 19, 20, 21, and 22. {Districts 7, 9, and 11.) 



Arundel street 
Batavia street 
Beacon street . 
Blue Hill avenue 
Cedar street . 
Centre street . 
Dudley street . 
Elm Hill avenue 
Forest street . 
Gaston street . 
Hartford street 
Heath street . 
Holborn street 
Howland street 
Humboldt avenue 
Ivy street 
Laurel street . 
Miner street . 
Mouadnock street 
Mountfort street 
Moreland and Mont 
Munroe street 
Newbury street 
Raleigh street 
St. Alphonsus street 
St. Botolph street 
Terrace street 
Thorndike street 
Vine street 



ose streets 



Sq. yds. 

412 

850 

283 

1,100 

81 
184 
120 
160 
185 

47 
444 
440 
112 
129 
(577 
1,124 
200 
488 

91 
628 
158 
393 
2,071 
163 
327 
120 

84 
376 

86 











11,533 


South Boston. 




Wards 13, 14, and 15. {District No. 1 


.) 




Sq. Yds. 


Broadway ....... 


90 


D street ..... 








84 


Dorset street .... 








52 


E street ..... 








75 


East Eighth street . 








804 


East Second and Story streets 








713 


East Sixth street 








63 


East Third street 








132 


Howell street .... 








400 


I and ICast Ninth streets . 








172 


Vinton and F streets 








51 


Wasliburn street .... 








70 




2,706 



232 



City Document No. 34. 



East Boston. 



rr u./ 


ItO J. I 


iioLi ^. yxjv-->vi tut xyi^. ^' ) 


Sq. Yds. 


Bremen street . ' . 


76 


Brooks street . 






314 


Condor street . 






148 


East Eagle street 






558 


Everett street . 






52 


Falcon street . 






184 


Havre street . 






200 


London street . 






62 


Morris street . 






53 


Paris street 






128 


Prescott street 






114 


West Eagle and Saratoga streets . . ... 


226 




2.115 






Dorchester. 




Ward 24. {District m. 0.) 






Sq. Yds. 


Dorchester avenue ....... 


95 


Carriith street ..;..... 


177 


Mt. Vernon street ....... 


75 


Virginia street 






106 



West Roxbury. 
Ward 23. (Districts JVos. 5 cuid 11.) 



Egleston arid School streets 
Hyde Park avenue .... 
Weld Hill street .... 
West Walnut Park and Copley street 



Brighton. 

Ward 25. {District No. 4.) 

Nothing. 

Charlestown. 
Wards 3, 4, and 5. {District No. 3.) 



Essex street and Rutherford avenue 

Moulton and Vine streets 

Sprague street . . . ' . 



453 



Sq. Yds. 
189 

342 
187 
116 



834 



1. Yds. 

88 
126 
223 

437 



Street Department — Paaing Division. 



233 



Recapitulatiox. 













Sq. Yds. 


'City Proper 1,537 


Roxbury . 










11,533 


South BostoQ 










2,706 


East Boston 










2,115 


Dorchester 










453 


AYest Roxbury . 










834 


Brighton . 













Chailestown 










437 




19,615 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY SUPER- 
INTENDENT OF PAVING DIVISION 

Buildings and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon street. 
The building is of brick and wood, and covers some 8.000 square 
feet of land, and is divided into a shed for storage, blacksmith's 
and carpenter's shops, tool-room, and stable. The total contents 
of the lot, including wharf and building, are 63,180 square feet. 

Fort-hill Wharf, containing 21,054 square feet placed in charge 
of the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for the land- 
ing and storage of paving-blocks and gravel until such time as 
said wharf shall be wanted for the extension of Oliver street. A 
part of said wharf is occupied by a tenant-at-will, at $500 per 
annum, part by Sanitary Division. 

Lot on Chelsea, Marion, and Paris streets, East Boston, con- 
taining 43,550 square feet. Part of this lot used by the Sewer 
Division. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Roxbury, 
containing 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are buildiugs con- 
taining a steam-engine, and stone-crusher. 

Highland-st. Stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick stable, 
erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Paving 
Divisions ; also a brick building used as a blacksmith's shop, and 
a shed for the storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 
square feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed con- 
taining a steam-engine and stone-crusher, also a stable and tool- 
house. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are 
two stables, also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, con- 
taining 81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by the town 
of Dorchester in 1867. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,300 square feet. 

West Roxbury. — On Child street, a lot of land containing 
43,024 square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, blacksmith's 
shop and tool-house. 

Gravel Lots. — Li the town of INIilton, on Brush Hill road, con- 



234 City Document No. 34. 

tainiug 64,523 square feet, hired by the town of Dorchester for 
nine hundred and ninety-nine years. Morton street. Ward 23, 
containing about one-third of an acre, purchased by the town of 
West Roxbury in 1870, used for storage purposes. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 
37,000 square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This lot 
is at present leased. 

Gravel and stones on lot on Market street, Ward 25, purchased 
by town of Brighton. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing about 
13 acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, stable, and 
crusher plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm street, 
containing 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, stable, etc. 

Property belonging to the Paving Division, consisting of 91 
horses, 71 carts, 15 water-carts, 16 wagons, 5 steam-rollers, 7 
stone-crushers, and 7 engines. 

In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets: stable, 
carriage-house, shed, tool-house, and office, on leased land. 

On Hereford street : a yard with shed, tool-house, and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkin's wharf, 521 Commercial street, pur- 
chased in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square feet, having: 
on it an office and stable. 

On Boylston street, at Boj'lston Station, office and shed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Darius N. Payson, 
Deputy Superintendent of Pacing Division. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 235 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Street Department, Sanitary Division, 
12 Beacon Street, Boston, Februai'y 9, 1895. 

Mr. B. T. ^YHEELER, S ujyer Intend ey}t of Streets: 

Dear Sir : Herewith I send you a statement of the doings of 
the Sanitary Division during the year 1894, showing the expendi- 
tures and income of this division from February 1, 1894, to 
January 31, 1895. 

Philip A. Jackson, 
Acting Deputy Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount of appropriation . 
Transferred from Paving Division 
Transferred from surplus revenue 
Transferred from street-watering 

Total amount expended 

Balance transferred to City Clerk's 
Department . . . . . 

Balance transferred to Countv of 
Suffolk " . 



$450,000 00 

1,959 02 

24,923 82 

76 18 


$476,959 02 
467,459 02 




$9,459 04 
40 96 


iffiQ r.nn 0(v 



236 



City Document No. 34. 



Items of Expenditures. 


Aniounls charged 

to the Sanitary 

Division. 


Amount paid 

by 

other Divisions. 


Total amount 
expended. 


For salaries of Deputy Superin- 
tendent and clerks in office. . . . 


$6,078 90 

141,530 93 

90,353 83 

17,779 75 

11,718 08 

18,617 66 

10, .597 80 

3,125 00 

5.607 54 
4,471 19 
2,606 08 

772 00 

23,809 00 

16,335 00 
4,044 36 
1,549 39 

1,367 99 

J, 449 16 

1,463 35 
835 80 

1,889 77 

1,215 00 

1.608 06 
47,164 22 

8,154 02 

4,937 62 
5,875 00 
4,100 00 




$6,078 90 

141,530 93 

90,353 83 


For labor in collecting and re- 
moving house-dirt and ashes.. . 




For labor in collecting and re- 
moving house-offal 




Fur labor of foremen, mechanics, 
watchmen, and feeders. ....... 




17,779 75 


For labor of men employed in 




1 1,718 08 


For grain used in stables 

For hay and straw used in stables 
For horses 


$4,133 27 
1,639 43 


22,750 93 

12,237 23 

3,125 00 


For stock and tools used in 


38 00 


5,645 54 


For stock and tools used in 
wheelwright-shop 


4,471 19 


For stock and tools used in 
harness-shop 


8 00 

89 08 

10,504 50 


2,614 08 
861 08 


For stock and tools used in 
paint-shop 


For extra teams, collecting ashes 


34,313 50 
16,335 00 


For extra teams, collecting 
house-offal 


For repairs on stables and sheds. 
For fuel, gas, and electric lights. 




4,044 36 




1,549 39 


F''or veterinary services and medi- 
cines for horses 




1,367 99 


For shoeing horses (outside 
shops) 


13 5U 


1,462 66 


For printing, stationery, and 
advertising 


1,463 35 


For water-rates 




835 80 


For offal stock, consisting of 
buckets, etc 




1,889 77 
1,215 00 


For ash stock, consisting of cart-- 
covers, baskets, etc 




For stable stock, consisting of 
curry-combs, brushes, soap, etc. 

For dumping-boat, rental, roy- 
alty, towage, etc 




1,608 06 


12.-, 00 


47,289 22 


For collecting house-dirt and 
ashes in East Boston 


8,154 02 


For collecting house-dirt and 
ashes in South Boston, west 
of Dorchester st 




4,937 62 


For collecting house-dirt and 
ashes in South Boston, east 
of Dorchester st 




5,875 00 


For collecting house-dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, south of 
Park, School, and Harvard sts. 




4,100 00 








Carried forward 


$439,056 


50 


$16,550 78 


$455,607 28 



Street Department — Sanitary Division, 



237 



Items of Expenditures. 



Brought forward 

For collecting house-dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, north of 
Park, School, and Harvard sts. 
For collecting liouse-dirt and 
ashes in West Roxbury, south 
of Seaver and Boylston sts. . . . 
For collecting house - oflfal in 

East Boston 

For collecting house -offal in 

Brighton 

For collecting liouse - ofFal in 

Dorchester 

For incidental expenses : 
Telephone . . . ^561 00 
Board of horses, etc. . 901 12 
Committee expenses, 

"disposal of offal" . 400 00 
Travelling expenses . 384 46 
Damage by city teams, 35 00 
Newspaper . . 6 00 

Miscellaneous supplies 
for office . . .282 06 

Total 

Paid by Street-Cleaning Division 

Paid by Paving Division 

Paid by Sewer Division 

Paid by County of Suffolk 



A mounts charged Amount paid 
to the Sanitary by 

Division. other Divisions. 



$439,056 50 

3,538 49 

5,850 00 

8,000 00 

2,800 00 

5,644 39 



2,569 64 



,459 02 

15,119 42 

164 50 

222 08 

1,047 78 



.$484,012 80 



$16,550 78 



Total amount 
expended. 



3 00 



$16,553 78 



155,607 28 

3,538 49 

5,850 00 

8,000 00' 

2,800 00 

5,644 39' 



2,572 64- 



l$484,012 SO- 




23.S 



City Document No. 34. 



Revenue. 

Amount of moneys deposited and bills presented to the Citj' 
Collector for collection, for material sold and work performed by 
the Sanitary Division of the Street Department during the year 
ending January 31, 1895. 

Moneys deposited toith the City Collector. 
From sale of house-offal . . . $26,262 40 



From letting of scow privileges 



677 65 



Bills deposited loith the City Collector. 

P^or the removal of engine ashes . 

For the sale of manure . 

For the sale of ashes and house-dirt 

For the sale of house-offal 

For the sale of tin cans 

For the letting of scow privileges . 

For the letting of Fort Hill wharf . 



Amount collected by the City Collector 



Collectoi 




$10,586 41 


870 


36 


2,665 


62 


160 


50 


73 


91 


23 


70 


1,000 


00 



$26,940 05 



15,380 50 
$42,320 55 
. $44,870 94 



Amount expended for the Collection of House-dirt and Ashes and 
House-olTal, Labor and Contracts. 



Districts. 



City Proper . . . 
South Boston. . 
East Boston. . . 
Charlestown. . . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . . . 
Brisbton 



Expended for collectlns 



Ashes. 



iSi93,187 05 

2 12,320 00 

3 8,154 02 

11,920 00 

27,241 50 

''9,042 00 

' 6<),409 49 

2,712 00 



Totals $173,986 06 



Offal. 



^53,541 33 
8,096 00 

^ 8,000 00 
5,620 00 

13,847 50 
6,892 00 

9 8,001 39 

s 2,800 00 



#106, 798 22 



Ashes Contract. 



Offal Contract. 



1 F. J. Mohan . . . 

"- D. O'SuUivan . . . 
3 Wm.F. Uedrington, 

* James Doonan . . 

5 John Bradley . . . 

6 John McShane . . 

' Thomas Mulligan . 

8 Allen Clarke . . . 

■' John McShane . . 



$5,875.00 for territory east of Dorchester street. 



937.62 
154.02 
850.00 



3,000.00 
2,800.00 
5,fi4-l.o9 



west of Dorchester street. 

in East Boston. 

south of SeaverandBoylston 

streets. 
south of Park, School, and 

Harvard streets, 
north of Park, School, and 

Harvard streets. 
of East Boston, 
of Brighton, 
of Dorchester. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division, 



239 



Total Cost for Removal of House-dirt, Ashes, and House-ofial. 

House-dirt and Ashes Account. 



Expended for labor, per pay-rolls 
Expended for stock, etc., per ledger account 
Expended on contracts. South Boston 
Expended on contracts, Dorchester . 
Expended on contract, part of West Roxbury 
Expended on contract. East Boston . 



$&14l,530 93 

10L209 14 

10,812 62 

7,638 49 

5,850 00 

8,154 02 



$275,195 20 



House-offal Account. 

Expended for labor, per pay-rolls 
Expended for stock, etc., per ledger account 
Expended on contract. East Boston . 
Expended on contract, Brighton . 
Expended on contract, Dorchester 



Salaries 
Incidentals 



§90,353 83 

76,817 06 

8,000 00 

2,800 00 

5,644 39 

$6,078 90 
2,569 64 



183,615 28 



8,648 54 
$467,459 02 



Material collected by Districts. 





Teams. 




Yaeds. 




Material. 


South. 


West. 


5 

o 
Pi 


a 
o 

C3 

• ja 
O 


5 

w 


a 
o 

o 

pa 

d 

02 


o 
o 

pa 

H 


"3 
3 



.a 

K 
O 

Pi 


Total loads. 


House-dirt 
and ashes.. 


104,136 


83,484 


48,650 


18,528 


5,864 


21,589 


13,175 


17,-522 


13,900 


326,798 


House-offal.. 


29,202 




10,.524 


2,356 
20,884 


1,539 
7,403 


21,589 


3,720 


3,296 


13,900 


50,637 


Totals 


1.33,338 


83,4S4 


59,174 


16,895 


20,818 


377,435 



240 



City Document No. 34. 



Disposition of Material Collected. 



Where dumped. 


Loads 
house-dirt 
and ashes. 

23,801 
23,34? 
17,198 
11,993 
11,894 
9,612 
7,995 


Loads 
house- 
offal. 


Street-sweep- 
ings, Street- 
Cleaning Div. 


Cesspoal 

matter, 

Sewer Div. 


Total 
Loads. 


First street, East Cam- 






23,801 
23,342- 
17,198^ 
11,993 
11 894 


Swett street, ' ' Lamb " . . 








Mill pond, Charlestown, 














Bartlett court 








Centre street 








9,612 
7,995 
6 199' 










Bryant street 


6,199 

3,74.i 
3,4 97 
2,924 
2,893 

2,890 

36,336 

66,293 
96,186 








Brookline ave., " Gilli- 








3,745 










3,497 
2,924 


Swett street, " Cobb ". . 








Duncan street, " Paine," 








2,893 


Duncan street, " Berrl- 
cran " 








2,890 

36,336 

66,203 

133,065 

37,057 

3,720 


Various places, "City 
TeapQs " 








Various places, " Con- 
tracts " 








At sea by scows 


5.025 
37,057 

3,720 

1,539 

3,296 


30,478 


1,376 


East Boston, by Thomas 








Brighton, by Allen 
Clarke 








1,539 
3, ''96 


Dorchester, by John 
McShane 




















326,798 


50,637 


30,478 


1,376 


409,28^ 



Comparative Table showing Cost of collecting As-hes and Offal and 
delivering same at Dumps. 

Cost per cart-load, including administration expenses 

minus " " . . 

of ashes, labor only ..... 
" " hired teams, including contracts 
" " labor, hired teams, and contracts 
" oiFal, labor only ..... 
" " hired teams, including contracts . 
" " labor, hired teams, and contracts 

scow-load to transport garbage to sea 

cart-load " " " '* «' 



$1 


24 


1 


22- 




74 




49- 




84 


2 


32 


2 


77 


3 


ea 


86 


75 




20 



Total. 


1 
•UBra Bj^xa qilAi 


o' 




O 0^ 
O_00 
CO rH 




o 

00_ 

■^ 

o 


•aiB3j aiSnig 


CO 

CO 


c a . 
•l,}uoo ubuooq; 'Z'-'wt 

'uojsi^oa puB a " B a 

asABBg JO qjnos §•" S a 
'jfjnqxoa 1S9Ai I -^ ^ -^ S 






O . 

s : 

CO 




§ 1 

CO- 


o 
o 

o 


-noo s,9nBqgoi\[ 
'lB;go .io}89qojOQ 






i 


50 




CO 

CO 


CO 


•lOBJJUOO A^i 
-pBJg 'piBAIBH 
pUB 'lOOqOg '3IJB<J 

JO qinos 'uoQ 


5 teams in 
winter. 

3 teams in 
summer. 




CO 
CO . 


f CO 


o 

o 

o 
o 


•j.iuoo s.auBqgoK 

'p.lBA.lEJJ pUE 

'looqog '-^i^d 
JO q?.ioa ''iOQ 


6 teams in 
winter. 

5 teams in 
summer. 






1 




05 


c 
cc 

CO 
CO 


•^OBJinoo ueq 
-OH '"i« '-loa JO 
ISBS 'uo}9oa 'og 

1 


4 teams in 

winter. 
3 teams in 
summer. 






00 
00_^ 




oT 


o 


■■JOB-ll 

-noo s,UBAinng 
-,0 '"is "-loa JO 
■jsaji. 'no^sog; 'og 


Steams in 

winter. 
4 teams in 
summer. 






rH 




t» 


§ 

CO 


Brighton. 


•UBcn •B.ijxa qji^ 


(M 


00__O_ 


<M 

co" 


4& 


•niBa} a[Saig 


CM 


a 
o 

o 

ffl 


•jauiuins 
ui BcnBaj f 






lO o 
coro* 




o 


•ja}n!Ai. nt scuBaj g 






Charles- 
town 
Yard. 


■UBca B.qxa ^'^\M. 


00 


s • g 


o 
o 

o 


•tuBa:i aiSnig 


« 


Roxbury 
Yard. 


•UBCQ Bj^xa q}iA\. 


CO 


O CO 
ITS 00 

oTcf 


1 


o 
o 

s 

•*- 


•tuBa; ajSuig 


00_ 




•QBUI BJJX9 q^iAV 


1^" 


^ 




co" 


s 

otT 


•mBai ajSaig 


0-1 


V 

a 

a 
o 
CO 


•UBca BJixa qiiAl 


CO 

to" 


05 00 

5" 


00 


o 
o 

M 
4» 


•CUB35 8|3aig 








c 

*« 

a 




0)- 

<u '■ 




1 
c 




T3 

a 
o 

a 

a 
o 

a 



O o o o 
■oo o o 

t-o o o 
CO o'no 

OJ_S 00 o 

^TjTuo'oo' 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

o o o ire o 

o o w 00 o 

CO_C0 O OS Ol 

ofi-Too-o ire" 



242 City Document No. 34. 



Expenses of Dumping-Boats. 

Amount expended for Royalties (per vear) . . $2,415 00 
" Rental " ' " . . 4,560 00 

" " Towing by department tow-boat *.$4, 996 18 

" " Towing by hired tow-boat . 783 00 

" " Repairs on boats . . . $5,059 26 

" " " " wharf . . . 2,598 81 

" " Labor, captain . . . $1,500 00 

" " " crew and dumpers . 3,903 29 



^6,975 00 

5,779 18 

7,658 07 

5,403 29 

Insurance .... 100 00 

Incidentals, Disinfectants . $63 40 
Removing refuse, 

Nantasket Beach, 75 00 

Manilla rope . 52 03 

Telephone . . 30 00 

Blocks, cleats, etc. 2 80 

Flags ... 8 50 

Kerosene oil . 4 50 

Stove, etc. . . 9 70 

Coal ... 13 91 

Salt ... 10 50 

Keys, etc. . . 2 40 

Ferry-tolls, etc. . 4 23 

276 97 

Purchase of dumping-boat, 

royalties, etc. . . . 25,000 00 



$51,192 51 



* Paid Sewer Division towards maintenance of boat. 
Number of trips to sea by department tow-boat . 279 

Number of trips to sea by hired tow-boat ... 23 

302 
Cost per trip, $86.73. 

Number of cart-loads of garbage carried to sea, 133,065. 
Cost per cart-load, 20 cents. 
April 14, 1893, department tow-boat, the " Cormorant," commenced work. 

Number of Carts collecting House-dirt, Ashes, and Offal. 

Oflfal-wagons owned by Sanitary Division .... 86 
" in use " Thomas Mulligan, East Boston . . 6 

" " " Allen Clark, Brighton ... 3 

" " " -John McShane '7 

— 102 

Capacity of Oflal-Avagons 

During the fall of 1892, 24 offal-wagons were measured and 
contents weighed for the purpose of obtaining the capacity of 
wagons and the weight of offal per cart-load. Their capacity 
averaged 3|| cord ft., or 56.25 cu. ft., and the weight averaged 
3,115 lbs. A cord equals 128 cu.ft., or 7,091 lbs. Price per 
cord for offal same as 1892: South yard, $4.00; Highland 
yard, $5.00; Charlestown yard, $4.00. 

Ash-carts. 

Ash-carts owned by Sanitary Division ..... 159 

" in use " Wm. F. Hedrington, East Boston . . 6 

" " " James Doonan, West Roxbury . . 7 

Carried forward , 172 102 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 243 



Brought forward, 

Ash-carts in use by John Bradley, Dorchester 

" " " Francis J Mohan, South Boston 

" " " Denis O'Sullivan. " " 

" " " John MeSliane, Dorchester 

JMarket-wagons owned by Sanitary Division . 



total 




1884. 


Ash- carts 


1886. 




1888. 




1891. 




1892. 




1898. 




1894. 





Cost of Carts 



172 
4 
4 
6 
6 
7 



aris. 




.$148 


00 






142 


00 






107 


00 






133 


00 






142 


00 






142 


00 






140 


00 



102 



199 
301 



Account of the JVumber of Loads of Material collected from 
1882 to February 1, 1895. 



Year. 


Ashes. 


Offal. 


Street- 
sweepiDgs. 


Cesspool 
matter. 


Total loads. 


1882 ... 

1883 . . . 

1884 ... 

1885 . . . 

1886 . . . 

1887 ... 

1888 ... 

1889 . . . 


159,197 
169,610 
182,642 
193,734 
209,129 
220,186 
233.514 
227,325 
245,730 
2 313,464 
303,878 
320,571 
326,798 


28,385 
27,408 
28,520 
31,206 
33,170 
36,724 
37,709 
40,183 
40,525 
46.742 
46,343 
51,415 
* 50,637 


52,381 
58.272 
62,222 
61.455 
59,875 
68,990 
68,019 
70,476 
70.449 
^ 10,564 


10,051 
8,801 
12.578 
13,151 
11,392 
14,333 
' 5,644 


250,014 
264,091 
285,962 
299,546 
313,566 
340,233 
344,886 
337,984 
356 704 


1890 . . . 




1891 . . . 




370,770 


1892 . . . 




350 2-^1 


1893 . . . 






371,986 
377,435 


1894 . . . 














Total.. 


3,105,778 


•498,967 


582,703 


75,950 


4,263,398 



1 July 1, 1888, the Sewer Department commenced cleaning out cesspools. 

■i Ashes from January 1, 1891, to May 1, 1891 104,046 

Ashes from May 1, 1891, to February 1, 1892 209,418 

■' May 1, 1891, the Street-Cleaning Division commenced cleaning streets. 

* Thomas Mulligan, East Boston, collected 3,720 

Allen Clarke, Brighton l,-i39 

John McShane, Dorchester 3.296 



8,555 



Stock 
Labor 



Cost of Horseshoeing and Blacksniithing. 

Division Shop. Outside Shops. 

$1,884 08 

2,498 75 

$4,382 83 



NUMBKR OF ShoICS PUT ON. 



Horses owned by Sanitary Division . 

'■ " " Street-Cleaning Division 

■' " Pavinu Division 



L,582 07 



6,921 

1,781 

227 



Total 

Average cost per slioe, about 35 cents. 



8,929 



244 



City Document No. 34. 






OOCl 10C505NN 
00-*i OOOCOCO(M 



0CCOCOO5COOD00000000 



lO ,-1 r-i ^ -_ 






oocOaooooOQOOooooDCO 



<5 P g ^:5 g S § § S p=( 






OOOOOOOOOOCO 

ooooooo»ooooo 

oooooooi^iooioo 
ooooio>notoooOi-'0 

oo O O W t- 00 ^- <>) C5 Ci"; lo 
(m" 00 00 J^l lO lO ■* ■* lO I— ■— c 



-M 



S ..2 3 

ills 



;S«3 



CO 



■ = 2 = c 



^3 pq 



S o £ K 



d 



^ E t- - 



:«^ 






2't' ^ 

!» 3 a< 



C^^^G 









Street Department — Saxitary Division. 



245 



^ 


,^ 


o o 


o ir: o 


o 

a) — 


C5 


o o 


o t~ o 


CO 


ec o 


t- cq i^ 


t~ 


(M O 


C^l Cq CO 


1.1 o 


S& 


rt CO 


■* 


&3^ 








Q 









c o OJ 
o g « 



^ CSi 0-5 







OQ 






^ . 


o 


o 


c at. 


^' ^ 


— 03 


ti 


g:c3 


^^M 


o 

c 
c 


W^ 


Dh (^ ^ 


o 


c £ 


■ J, S 


C ) 




<1 


b 


4^ 


O^^H 



■ «.- 




to ■ 






<!' .' 




















-a^ : 


■ r^, 


« E ■ 


. 3 


>. « : 


• o; 


_3 to ; 






2 


?> • 


■— 


CC 










a> 


OS ■" • 








» " . 


a. > 


■^ a* ,« • 






"0 5 


;^ 


• 



; 2 ^ = S to C 

I _ H — ~ 'a ^ 

• 7t Q «*- ^*-' ii; t4_ 

jgW c o «^ 

' „■, to »;. fc, c >- 

I S; a> 5 3 ^ 3 

, s fe = c c c 



246 



City Document No. 34. 



s 


f^ 




1 




s 


■o 


!>, 


Si 




eS 


e 


>. 


s.^ 


es 




» 


:p 



's 



CQ 



..q 


o 

CO 
(M 

CO 

CO 


CO 

o 

CO 






bfi 




CO 
CO 










i :) ^ ^4 3 

« ^ ^ q 2| i 

fc.T3 ca c-1 -1 ^1 


CO • 


t 


do 

CO 


03 

U 

33-0 

o 
O 


HcDr^ -1 u:) tcl -rfl ol cl 
CTjotq cd H ^1 c-J cc| a| 
oirata rel uS c| t-j u;| tq 

i^-*^ ^ --I t-1 ^\ H 

^ Ci — 1 CO — ' 

-H ,-^ o o o 
do 


CO 

<6 


o 

a 

o 

H 


t^t-^ — -#ooo 
oot~coiM<x>oaooo 

C0^Cfi--t-OO^ 
lO 05 ■<*< CO — CO rt 
i-l OO —I CO ■* '^l 

lO GO r-^ , 


CO 

t- 

co" 
I-l 


■a 
a 


CO OO O N ■* o 
^ 00 (M CO CD O 
OO -* O -* -T_^ 

t-^ oT -* CO lO CO 
CO '^ T-H CO CO 
lO CO -H 


O 
CO 


CO 

1-4' 


Bushels. 


00 

o~ 




• 05 






• 




Bales. 
2,619 




CO 


3 


s 








1 


> 


c 


c 


w 


2C 


C 
a 
"n 

S 

a 

1 
c 


3 


3C 














o 

32 


■a 


2 











Ol 














1 


1 


Oi tH 


1 


t~ OJ (M 




r-n' &I to 




6 1 
9,515 

rage 
day. 




" (M (U 




"^ > Ol 




t- < '^ 




1—1 




^.-1 d f^ =( ! 

Ocl_iC-.| & N| C( 

c:j^iM| id ^ cl 


=! 


t-l.n 


id 


id- 


oa 


ed-n 


rtOO:) H "1 " 


cg| 


id=> 


I^H r]l 




ci|c^ 


CO lO (M 




tH 






CO 


Jltj-j id rii d m| o 

"^-H«:| H aj c| cd -H 
JiJiocH d -*^ ini Nl i> 
3='^ H o^ «l A 




-t)< — ' ^ 


05 


.-. (N O 


CO 


d d 


d 


«a 


€& 


CO CO lO t-- O 00 o 


Ol 


00 t^ t~ 05 O CO 1— 1 


t~ 


IJI t- C5 Ci lO <M t- 


■*! 


.-. (M t- 00 (M ^ 


lO 


1^.1 -* »o CJ 


«o_ 






^ CO 


*— t 


«= 


.—1 




s©' 


00 CO O CO o 


C 


t— 


■*! .-1 O lO o 


•n 


CO 


CO o lo •* o 


cc 










cq c^i t~ 1-1 CO 


IM 


o 


t^ CO 00 




(M 


-* ^ 




o 




CO 














CO 














-*_ 














■* 














*"' 










1 


00 

o 








o_ 




coS % 




i>r 






*) 






















































1 
























o 
















t*- 
















OJ 
































































^ 
































Oj 
















be 
















0/ 
















> 
















^ 
























c^ 




Eh 


W O £» 03 p!3 £» C 




CO ^ — ' 




£ tH XI 








^ 


C5 













Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



247 



" o ■ 

^0: 



K>' 






<1 - 



!=;-:( o H c| 


=t 


Jt-riil cj ct d 


■=1 


'^-^ '■■^ c, XI 
ixuti D^ H ri| 






O lO rt 





-a^a-' 


•^ 


■^ =i H 




H 


H H Ml 


H 


=1 =) >--:l 


x,x^| 






CD cq 




--^ 1— t 


r-~ <M 




o o 


o o 




o o 


«^ 






00 ff: 


»o -* o o 


00 c; 


t- >o ^ o 



;>i ift t^ O O JO 

(N — W CO CO CO 

lO c: --c .-I 



lo 00 o «; o o 

CO O O CO o o 
Ci CD >0 05 CC CO 



u 1^ c — 

>« ® £ S S'- ^ 



fc-^ 






QC|C)0:1 



Ju-cc| id c:| H i^ 
^tr-m 0C| Tfj -h| Ml 

is?j s 3 3 ^ 



1-1 cq C5 cc CD o 
1— I ir^ i^ e^ — — . 
CO I>5 -# 05 



IM CO O lO X O 

1 ■* CO O CO (M O 

I -^ -g^ t^ '^ c; 00 

cc' »c t>^ O C; 5<r 

1^1 ^ CO CO 

C<1 IM 



K0a3a3O(ila3O 



.a ? b! 



M >^ 



248 



City Document No. 34. 



P4 







c 




1 


l« 




*r 


c: 


1 


-M 






^ x> 


t~ 01^ 


1^ 


7 i 


o^t- 


CO 1— < 


cq 


^ 


o'oo" 


05" 








t- CM 1 


05 




<D 


' .. c 












1 


a -^ .2 




W 


.2 ,2 •- 


















O 


Is s; cfi 








- '^ P- O fc„ 




« 


c -^ .-» be 




^ 


- ;j CO c 




a 
si 


•- be oj •- — 
2 c ^ .S C 








g _' c >^a 


^ 






>.0 5 a; c« ^ 


le 






5 « H £ c £ 


H 






COOJ <1 






'd 


H<^o| u^ s| ci| o| u-:| 


" l« 




p 


Ht-'f:) c-il oq ■*! c( od 
-Jlnc^ ^ H td c( r^l 
c^s»ri ccl H *1 «l -1 
-»jc»i>j :ci -1 CO -1 H 


c^l^ 




3 
O 


raia 




fL, 






-* ■* 0<l 


Th 


>' 


♦^ 


t-H 1— ( 


CO 


<i 








Q 


O 






b; 


o 






H 


Eci 
















Mloxi ed --| cj id . cd H 
tc|l>o:| H c-i cj N| - t-l 

as3 Si :^ 3 :^ ^ ^ 










w 


■*j 


<T\Oi\r\ cc| eci oc| 


o 

o 


(MO- ^ ,-t ^ 


00 




rH <M o q o 


CO 






do odd 


d 






^ 


€6^ 






C0C050C010O00 — 


t- 






500i^C5iMO^t- 


Ci 






COl^(:^Tt<'*OOOI> 


CO 






O 00 -*■ O 1:0 lO tc 


CO 


< 


3 


01 CO JO CO CO 


CO 


c 








;) 


^1 i-H rH — 


00 






-H CO 


CO 






^ 


«= 






-H Tj CO CO • IC 


05 






00 CO CO 05 


CC 


>o 






t^ CO -- fflJ CO 


c; 



















-* t^ CO 10 CO ^ 




01 


1 


3 


CO CO '- tH 




t^ 




a 


'jf -r CO CO 




CO 




3 








c 


3 


t— 1 i-H 




CO 


Ci 












































































\ 












^ 






P 


3 












2i 






P 


; 












3 






E 


n 












_g 








^ 












bD 


























^S £ p bC;S fc 














^iS^rSOCees 








tr 


c 


a 


jo: 


c 


(^ 


a 


c 





t- 


|_ 


00 ^ 


~ 


CO t^ 


cn 


CO -^ 




— 


:>! 






-J 


^ 


CO rt 


CO 


«■ 


m 


II 


II 


tMo 


c-lo 


^It- 


^n- 


-!m 


-1^: 


1-^35 


H3> 



— I CO 






ho 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 249 



House-offal. 

There are employed in removing house-offal 195 men and 91 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses twice a week 
during the summer months and once a week during the winter ; 
from hotels, markets, and restaurants it is removed daily. There 
are sixty-two routes. The men are required to enter the yards, 
collect the offal, and empt}^ the same into wagons, then drive to 
one of the depots, located as follows : One on Albany street, one 
on Highland street, Roxbury, and one at the Almshouse, Charles- 
town ; also to the dumping-boat wharf on Atlantic avenue. 

The offal is sold to farmers of adjoining towns mostly ; the 
balance is dumped on the scow and carried to sea. About 10 per 
cent, of the quantity collected during the past year has been dis- 
posed of in this manner. 

During the past year the collection of house-offal in the Dor- 
chester District was let out by contract ; this makes three districts 
let out by contract for the collection of house-oft'al. 

The New England Construction Company made an agreement 
during the 3-ear to dispose of all house-offal collected under the 
McShane contract at the rate of $2,500 per year; their plant 
was erected on land owned by the city of Boston on Gibson 
street, Dorchester, and is now in running order. 

House-dirt and Ashes. 

In the collection of house-dirt and ashes there are employed 
207 men and 159 carts. This material is removed from hotels, 
tenement-houses, and stores daily ; from dwelling-houses once a 
week. There are eighty-two regular routes. The City Ordinances 
of 1892 require that house-dirt and ashes shall be kept in an easy, 
accessible place for removal, the men being obliged to enter yards 
and areas, remove receptacles to the sidewalk, where their con- 
tents are loaded upon teams. The receptacle is then replaced in 
its original position. The material is disposed of, if possible, on 
low lands, being used for filling, and also dumped on scows to be 
carried to sea. Of the amount collected last year, 29 per cent, 
was disposed of at sea. 

Three sections of the city were let out by contract, to wit: 
territory lying west of Dorchester street. South Boston, part of 
Dorchester lying north of Park, School, and Harvard streets, also 
East Boston ; making a total of six ash contract districts. 



250 



City Document No. 34. 



Horse Account. 



1894. 


Dr. 


1894. 






Cr. 


.Tan. 1. On hand, 


202 


Fel). 1. 


Transferred 


to 


Street- 


July 28. Purchased, 


1 




Cleaning Division, 1 


Oct. 30. 


1 


Feb. 19. 


Died, 




1 


Dec. fi. 


6 


Mar. 2. 


Returned Pavir 


igDiv., 1 


" 13. 


1 


April 17. 
May 15. 


Died 




1 

1 






" 22. 


Sold, 




2 






" 29. 


" 




4 






June 5. 


Killed, 




1 






7. 


i( 




1 






Sept. 27. 


Died, 




1 






Dec. 15. 


" 




1 






" 27. 


" 




1 






" 31. 


" 




1 




. 


1 895. 










\^^ 


Jan. 19. 


" 




1 




^ 


" 31. 


On hand. 




193 


Total, 


211 


Total 


1 


• 


211 



1 deputy superintendent. 

4 clerks. 

3 foremen. 

I captain of scows. 

6 sub-foremen. 

1 inspector. 

9 mechanics. 

8 talle^^men or aids. 



Organization. 

4 watchmen. 
3 feeders. 

6 messengers. 

7 stablemen. 
12 yardmen. 
16 dumpers. 

188 ash-cart drivers and helpers. 
136 offal-cart drivers and helpers. 
405 employees. 



The mechanics of this division are engaged in the painting of 
carts, street signs, wagons, etc., shoeing of horses for the Paving, 
Street-Cleaning, and Sewer Divisions, also the making and repair- 
ing of harnesses. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 251 



APPEXDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



City Hall, Room 44, Boston, Februaiy 1, 1895. 
Mr. B. T. Wheeler, Superintendent of Streets : 

Sir: The following report of the expenses, income, and busi- 
ness of the Sewer Division, from February 1, 1894, to February 
1, 1895, together with a brief statement of the present condition 
of the sewers and other property, the work done this year, and 
what should be done in the near future that the efficiency of the 
sewers may be improved, is respectfully submitted. 

The Sewer Division has charge of the following work : 

1. The maintenance and construction of all common sewers and 
catch-basins. 

2. The maintenance of the Main Drainage Works. 
.3. The maintenance of Stfjny brook. 

4. The maintenance and construction of all street culverts. 

5. The preparation of plans and^ the engineering and super- 
vision required on the construction and maintenance of all work 
connected with the division. 

6. The granting of permits for all connections to be made with 
the common sewers, and the custody of bonds tiled by drain- 
layers authorized to make such connections. 

7. The levying of assessments on estates benefited by the con- 
struction of sewers. 

Ninety thousand eight hundred and two (90,802) liu. ft. of 
sewers have been built during the p^st 3'ear by the city, and 
twenty-four thousand eight hundred and seventy- seven (24,877) 
lin. ft. have been built by private parties accoi'ding to the plans 
and under the inspection of this division and accepted by the city 
under the usual forms of release. 

• City Proper and Back Bay Districts. 

The sewers in Hull, Bevt-rly, Commercial, Fayette. Falmouth, 
and Caledonia streets are broken down or settled to such an extent 
as to require rebuilding. 

The main sewer in the two streets last named is very badly 
settled and has been shored up for years; if it fall in, it will cut 
off the drainage of a considerable territory. 

The sewers in the Canal-street district remain in practically the 



252 City Documenn No. 34. 

same condiliou as they have been since 1883, filled with sewage 
and sludge. The level of the sewage in the system has been low- 
ered a little by the building of the sewer in Lancaster street last 
season, and will be reduced a little more upon the completion of 
the sewer in Merrimac street now building, but the benefit so 
obtained must be considered as a slight relief only, not a remedy. 
The condition of this system of sewers was fully discussed in the 
report for 1891, to which reference is made. The building of the 
relief sewer therein described, across the city, has been postponed 
on account of the uncertainty in regard to the proposed subway, 
the route of which crosses that of the proposed sewer. JBut the 
work need not be longer deferred, as the plans for the subway are 
now sufficiently well defined as to show that, if built, it will only 
cause an unimportant deviation in the ruute of the sewer. There 
is no other large district in the city in which tiie sewers are in 
such a deplorable condition ; the fact that much of it is occupied 
by tenement-houses makes the case worse. 

In 1888-89 a large main sewer was built from Fort Point 
Channel through Mt. Washington avenue, Federal and P'.ssex 
streets, to the corner of Kingston street, intercepting at this point 
the heavy flow of sewage and storm water which formerly flooded 
out the district in the vicinity of Beach street. The underlying 
idea was to isolate the Beach-street district from the rest of the 
system, and connect it directly with the intercepting system, in 
the same manner as the Dover and Dedhani streets district have 
been treated, so that it, like them, might receive the benefit of 
direct connection with the pumps, and its low cellars be thereby 
ensured against flooding. An essential feature of the scheme is to 
shift the district regulator from Dover street to a point upon the 
east side interceptor north of Beach street, and to build small regu- 
lators at the connections of the Harvard and the Oswego streets 
sewers. 

These three regulators have not been built; the system, tliere- 
fore, does not operate as designed. Moreover, the Harvard-street 
sewer, where it crosses the interceptor, is reduced in size. The plan 
for the regulator at this point comprises an enlargement of the 
sewer ; the fact that cellars in this district have been flooded dur- 
ing storms shows that such enlargement is necessary. 

The work of building these three regulators, to complete the 
system, although difficult and expensive, should not longer be 
delayed. 

Incidentally it should be mentioned that the old wooden 4x5 
ft. box sewer in Federal street, now practically unused, should be 
filled with gravel in order to ensure the safety of the street, as it 
will rot and fall in. 

Attention has been repeatedly called to the condition of the 
sewerage of the Faneuil Hall markets ; plans are ready for a satis- 
factoi"y system, and the work should be done before warm weather. 

Throughout the greater portion of the Back Bay territory the 
sewers have been built in the passageways between the main 
streets, instead of in the main streets, as in the remainder of the 
■city. This system, although an excellent one as far as conven- 




OLD WOODEN SEWER — DOVER STREET. 



Steeet DEPARTaiENT — Sewer Divisiox. 253 

ience in sewering the bouses is concerned, and in preserving the 
surface of the streets from being dug up in putting in house con- 
nections, has this defect, that it supplies nothing for the drainage 
of catch-basins in the streets. 

In many places catch-basins have been needed for man}' years, 
but have not been built because there was no sewer in the street to 
drain them into ; an investigation of this matter has been made 
by this office, in consultation with the City Surveyor's office, and 
an estimate made of the number of catch-basins and amount of 
surface drainage needed to make up those deficiencies. 

One hundred and thirty-three catch-basins and 7,000 linear feet 
of pipe sewers and surface drains will give an adequate system of 
surface drainage for the public streets of the Back Bay. 

The four principal systems of sewers in the Back Bay, whose 
outlets are at Berkeley, Dartmouth, Fairfield, and Hereford streets, 
have very little storage capacit}', and there have been complaints 
of flooded cellars during unusually heavy storms which occur at 
the time of high tide. The overflow outlets of these systems into 
Charles river should be enlarged, including the tide-gates, and 
considerable relief would be afforded in this manner. 

In Charlesgate East there are twelve catch-basins connected 
with the sewer, which is a tributary of the Hereford-street system ; 
these should he disconnected, and connected into the covered chan- 
nel of Stony brook which lies in the same street. A large amount 
of surface water would be kept out of the sewers by this inexpen- 
sive change. 

No sewer has been built as 3'et to drain the houses on the water 
side of Beacon street, and the sewage of these houses continues to 
pollute the water of Charles river. A plan has been made for a 
sewer in the passageway on the bank of the river, but nothing- 
built yet except the connection with the Beacon-street sewer at 
the corner of Hereford street. 

If a boulevard is to be built on the bank of the river, this sewer 
can be built more cheaply in conjunction with it ; if not, it might 
as well be built at once. 

Wherever there is a sewer outlet into a dock the city is periodi- 
cally called upon to pay damages on account of the shoaling of 
the dock, caused, it is alleged, by the material thrown into it b}' 
the sewer. Where the common sewers are not intercepted, but 
flow continuously into the docks during dry weather, there is some 
ground for this claim ; but around the city proper, the common 
sewers have all been tap])ed by interceptors and the dry-weather 
flow conveyed away, and nothing flows out of the old outlets 
except during storms, and then the flow consists of storm water 
and greatly diluted sewage only. 

Yet, nevertheless, in numerous cases it becomes necessary to 
dredge a dock in which a sewer outlet exists ; the city is invited to 
pay the bill, and if it refuse it has to stand suit. These suits are 
hard to defend, because it is difficult to make a jury understand 
the operation of the common sewers as affected by the intercept- 
ing system. The most conspicuous facts are, that there is a sewer 
which sometimes flows into the dock, and that dock has become 



254 City Document No. 34. 

partially filled up ; and it is impossible to distinguish between 
deposits caused by a sewer and the ordinary shifting silt of the 
harbor. 

A systematic series of observations should be made, extending 
-over a series of years, to determine the rate at which docks silt 
up where there is a sewer outlet and where there is none. The 
subject furnishes a strong argument in favor of the public owner- 
ship of docks. 

Wo7'k done during 1894. 

Five thousand three hundred and seventy-seven linear feet of 
sewers have been built by the city, either by contract or day labor, 
and 160 feet by private parties. 

In Dover street there is an old wooden box sewer 5x6 ft. 
which has been in very bad condition for over fifteen years; the 
illustration shows a section of it thrown over to one side and 
wrecked. As it did not actually fall in, it was not rebuilt; but 
when the raising of the Dover-street bridge made it necessary to 
grade Dover street up, it was not thought judicious to put any 
more weight upon it without strengthening it. It was therefore 
decided to line it with masonry or build a brick sewer inside of it. 
The photograph shows a section of this work. Where the old 
sewer was found to i^e tipped over and thrown olf line too much, 
for this it was opened up from the sui'face and rebuilt in open cut, 
more piles being driven to furnish a foundation wherever necessary. 

A new sewer has been built in Lancaster street, and one is in 
progress at this time in Merrimac street, which connects with the 
west side intercepting sewer, and will lower the level of the water 
in the Canal-street system of sewers to some extent. 

Charlestown. 

The Hoosac Tunnel Dock outlet, a large wooden box sewer, has 
been repaired, and sewers built in Mishawam and Bo3'le streets. 

The Somerville branch of the Metropolitan sewer having been 
completed in Arlington avenue, the system of sewers projected in 
the Alfred-street district may and should now be built. 

The connections with the Metropolitan, eleven in number, 
should also be made this year. There are a large number of old 
defective sewers, built of slate, wood, and brick, which should be 
rebuilt, as they are not fit to be connected with the Metropolitan 
system on account of the quantities of ground water which they 
admit. 

Work done during 1894. 

Four hundred and twenty-two linear feet of sewers was built by 
the city, none by private parties, and nothing requiring special 
attention. 

East Boston. 

Jeffries, Decatur, and Brooks streets outlets should be rebuilt, 
and the outlet at Dock 13 extended. 

Nothing has been done to the Porter-street outlet, and the 




MASONRY CONSTRUCTION WITHIN DOVER STREET SEWER. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 255 

sewage escapes along its entire length, and is distributed over the 
flats.^ 

Repairs on this old box sewer are expensive and ineffectual, as 
the ice of the succeeding winter strains it apart again. It should 
be rebuilt of wood, upon a substantial pile foundation, and of 
such size and form as to serve subsequently as the foundation for 
a brick sewer. All the ashes collected by the Sanitary Division 
in E:ist Boston should be hauled to it, to form an embankment to 
protect the new structure from the ice, and when such embank- 
ment has attained the proper size and solidity, the permanent 
brick sewer may be built. 

The Havre-street sewer, between Meridian and Sumner, has not 
been rebuit, as recommended last year, but should be this year. 

Lsst year's report stated that work was about to be started on 
an outlet sewer for Leyden street, west of Breed street ; this Avas 
postponed, and has not been done, but should be built without 
further delay, as a large number of houses on this street lack 
sewerage. 

The new main sewer in Chelsea street, near Chelsea-street 
bridge, also mentioned last year, should be built, as it will afford 
an outlet to a number of neighboring streets. 

A connection with the Metropolitan intercepting sewer has been 
allowed at the corner of Orleans and Gove streets, at the request 
of this department, and the Orleans-street sewer has been started. 

This sewer will do away with the damming up of the sewers at 
this point, and will convey the storm water from a large section 
directly to the Porter-street outlet, thereby relieving the over- 
crowded condition of the sewer in Bremen street to some extent. 
This relief will be complete when the Porter-street outlet is rebuilt 
of adequate size. 

The building of the Metropolitan intercepting sewers in Bremen 
and Porter streets has caused some damage to the common sewers 
iu those streets. 

When the back filling in these trenches has become sufficiently 
well settled these sewers will need repairing, and the arch of a 
portion of the Bremen-street sewer will have to be rebuilt. 

The Metropolitan intercepting sewers being now practically 
completed, connections may be made ; the ordinary regulators and 
sump manholes will have to be put in at each connection, of 
which there are twelve, which may be built this year, and three 
more after building 2,500 feet of pipe sewer in Condor, Glendon, 
and Eagle streets. 

Work clone during 1894. 

Thirteen hundred and twenty-three linear feet of sewers have 
been built by the city ; none by private parties. 

^Morrison's wharf outlet has been repaired, and a row of piles 
have been driven along the edge of the wharf as far as the sewer 
extends to protect it from the action of the ice, by which it has 
been injured, more or less, every winter in the past. 

Eagle-square outlet, which was nearly choked up by the banks 
of filling near by, has been extended 250 feet, which is sudicient 
for the present. 



256 City Document No. 34. 

The Paris-street sewer, from Wesley to Edgeworth place, has- 
been rebuilt. Many complaints liave been received on account of 
the settlement and breaking down of this sewer. 

Brighton District. 

The main sewers for the systems for the western part of the dis- 
trict — called the Faneuil Valley system — having been built, any 
streets requiring sewers in this vicinity ma}^ now be accommodated. 
A branch main sewer has just been started on Lake street. This 
sewei will receive eventually the sewage from a large tract of land 
in Newton ; and as this city is sewered npon a separate principle, 
it has been found expedient to build the Lake-street sewer upon 
the same principle, although the remainder of the system is built 
upon the combined principle, supplemented by relief overflows for 
storm water into the water-courses at all convenient points. 

Hobart street and the streets upon Bigelow Hill may now be 
drained. 

A sewer should be built in Nonantum street, between Oak 
square and the Newton line. The sewage from the houses on the 
west side of the street must at present seep out of cesspools or 
flow over the surface from privies into the brook atTremont street. 

On Commonwealth avenue everything necessary for drainage of 
any kind has been built as far as Warren street, except a few 
catch-basins near the latter street, and except the structures re- 
quired in that part of the avenue crossing the marshy hollow just 
west of Cottage Farm station, where the settlement of the filling 
has not yet ceased. 

The outlet sewer for this whole Commonwealth-avenue S3'stem, 
known as the Salt Creek outlet, from the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road to the Metropolitan sewer, will require strengthening. The 
soil of the marsh through which it is built is of very light and 
spongy character ; and the covering of this material — which was 
the only material accessible without considerable expense — has 
not proved to have sufficient weight to afford the lateral support 
to the sewer which is necessary. 

The district bounded by Chestnut Hill avenue. Union street, 
Washington street. Commonwealth avenue, and Sidlaw road is 
being cut up into streets by the Westminster Land Company. 
Part of this district will drain into Union street and Chestnut Hill 
avenue ; and the sewers in these streets will afford but a poor out- 
let for the new sewers to be built in this district, on account of the 
fact that they are overcharged now far beyond their capacit}' by 
the admission at the water of the brook which flows through this 
valley. Unless this surface water is excluded from the sewers and 
restored to the brook channel, it will probably be necessary to 
sewer this district with an expensive separate system of house 
sewers and surface drains. 

The remainder of the district will drain into Commonwealth 
avenue, near Chestnut Hill avenue, and eventually into Brookline. 

The district between Commonwealth avenue, Washington street. 
Chestnut Hill avenue, and the Brookline line has many streets 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 257 

laid out by the Aberdeen Laud Compau}^ Some of these streets 
have surface drains, and one street, viz., Englewood avenue, has 
a sewer built by the city. This whole district drains into Brook- 
line, and must be provided with house sewers and surface drains. 

WorJc done during 1894. 

Thirty-two thousand six hundred and sixty-four linear feet of 
sewers have been built b}' the city, and 377 feet by private parlies. 

This includes the mains of the Faneuil Valley system, and the 
practical completion of the sewers and surface drains of Common- 
wealth avenue as far as "Warren street, and of the outlet sewer for 
the system. 

South Boston. 

The main sewer in Dorchester avenue, from its outlet at Fort 
Point Channel to Broadway, should be rebuilt, the portion between 
First street and Broadway being entirely rotten. 

The sewer outlets on the southern shore of the peninsula, at N, 
K, I, and H streets, have all been destro^^ed b}^ ice. The one at 
N street should be rebuilt immediately, after the pattern of the 
outlet at Denny street. Savin Hill. The building of the others 
may be dela^'ecl until the Park Department has deposited part of 
the filling for the proposed boulevard, which will protect them. 

Defective outlets at B and Seventh streets, and at D street, 
cause trouble in the sewers of the south-western part of the penin- 
sula. A comprehensive plan for uniting these and rebuilding the 
defective D-street sewer has been prepared by this department. 
This plan is also a means of draining effectively the depressed 
part of D street, at the Old Colony Railroad crossing. 

The South Boston intercepting sewer has no proper overflow for 
relief when shut off from the main intercepter by the regulator. 

A plan has been prepared for such an overflow^ sewer upon the 
location of the old Kemp-street sewer. The sewer in Mercer 
street should be rebuilt of larger size, to do away with flooding of 
cellars on Mercer and Yale streets. 

Work done during 1894. 

Three hundred and fifty-eight linear feet of sewet-s have been 
built by the city, and none by private parties. Nothing requiring 
special mention. 

Dorchester District. 

A sewer system is needed for the northern half of the Savin Mill 
peninsula similar to the system built in the southern half; that is, 
a separate system of house and storm sewers. The house-sewer 
system would connect witli the Dorchester intercepter in Sydney 
street. 

At Dorchester Lower Mills advantage has been taken of the 
completion of the Lower Mills main sewer to build sewers in some 
of the streets ; but there are other streets which need sewering, and 
which may now be sewered, such as River, Monson, and Idaho 
streets, and i)arls of Temple, Morton, and Washington streets. 



258 City Document No. 34. 

Between Lawrence and Geneva avenues a main sewer will have 
to be built through private land parallel with Blue Hill avenue, and 
crossing Stauwood avenue. Geneva avenue, between Wilder 
street and Washington street, cannot be sewered until this main is 
built. The Lauriat and Chapman avenues district, also the Nelson 
and Corbet streets district (sometimes called the Forest-avenue 
district), continue to call for sewers, and up to the present time, 
in vain. The difficulty of sewering this district, and the various 
routes by which it may be done, were very fully discussed in the 
report of the Street Department for 1892. 

In short, it involves a low, level sewer, starting at the Dorches- 
ter intercepting sewer and running through Park and West Parl^ 
streets, cutting through the bounding ridge of the Stony brook 
water-shed in tunnel, and costing, for a rough estimate, $250,000. 
As any tunnel sewer to reach this district would lake several 
years to build, it was also proposed to erect a small pumping- 
station, and pump the sewage of this district into the Talbot- 
avenue sevver, as a tempoi'ary expedient. 

A petition was received in 1893 that this scheme be carried out ; 
there does not seem to be any other means of affording sewerage 
to this region within a reasonable time. 

An effort has recently been made to have a sevver built up 
Morton street, cutting through the ridge low enough to sewer 
Nelson and Corbet streets, leaving the rest of the district out. 
The objections to this plan are the large expense to be incurred 
for only a partial solution of the problem, and the fact that the 
sewer would have to be built for a long distance through an unin- 
habited country where nobody needs it. 

A sewer has been projected through Adams and Rosemont 
streets, to drain all that valley, afford better sewerage to Car- 
lisle street, and make it practicable to build a sewer in Mel- 
bourne street, and also incidentally to relieve the overcrowded 
Centre-street sewer by withdrawing a portion of its flow through 
Carlisle street; this important main is badly needed. 

Work done during 1894. 

Fifteen thousand and seventeen linear feet of sewers have been 
built by the city, and 17,036 linear feet by private parties. The 
Dorchester Lower Mills main sevver has been completed, and 
lateral sewers may now be built throughout the village of Lower 
Mills. 

A sewer is under construction in Geneva avenue, between 
Bowdoin and Wilder streets, which will afford an outlet for a num- 
ber of streets between this avenue and Washington street. 

RoxBURY District. 

The Harrison -avenue and Northampton-street sewers are settled 
so badly as to make it impossible for workmen to have access to 
them to clean them out, unless a steam-pump should be used to 
keep the water down ; they should be rebuilt. 

As these sewers lie upon unusually deep beds of mud, pile 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 259 

foundations would be very expensive ; a form of construction simi- 
lar in principle to that employed on Fellow street might be used. 
This Fellows-street sewer was a pipe sewer upon the same kind of 
a mud bed. It was relaid last year, supported by a wide timber 
platform having a longitudinal stringer upon each side, which was 
built up in the trench of strii)s forming a coutinuous built-up beam 
A recent examination showed it to be in good condition, not hav- 
ing settled appreciably under the weight of the back-fill. Harrison 
avenue and Northampton street require sizes too large for pipe, 
but the plan could be modified to adapt it to the support of a 
brick sewer. 

The sewers in Halleck and Ward streets should be rebuilt. 
The sewer in Huntington avenue, between Rogers avenue and 
Gainsborough street, which was built in 1882, is in a very dangerous 
condition, the arch in some cases being flattened to the level of 
the springing-line ; also, the manholes are in a very dangerous con- 
dition. 

Unless this sewer is attended to very soon it will probably cave 
in, as the electric cars running on the avenue cause a very notice- 
able vibration inside the sewer. 

In the district bounded by Hammond, Tremont, Lenox streets 
and Shawmut avenue the cellars are but little above the level of 
the sewers, and are flooded by the surface water which enters the 
sewers in storms. 

A plan has been prepared for building new house sewers at a 
lower level, utilizing the existing sewers for surface water, thus 
developing a separate system for this district; but nothing has 
been built. 

Another district, bounded by Culvert, Tremont, and Davenport 
streets, and the Providence Division of the New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad, is in a similar condition, and a 
similar plan was worked up for it. The extension of Columbus 
avenue now cuts through this territory ; the plan has been modified 
to suit the change, and some of the sewers required will be built 
in constructing that avenue. 

There are numerous sources of pollution along the old channel 
of Stony brook between Huntington avenue and the Roxbury 
crossing which cannot be removed until pipe sewers are built on 
each side of the brook channel back of the walls, and in some 
places in the bottom of the channel itself. 

This subject was thoroughly discussed in the report of 1892. 
About 3,050 linear feet of pipe sewers will be required ; none 
have been built. 

Dorchester- brook sewer has been built from the South bay to 
the point where it leaves Norfolk avenue, running through private 
land from Clifton street. 

The new brick channel should be extended al)Out 600 feet, as 
this portion of the old sewer is a stone arclied channel, with no 
covering over the arcli, and so smj\ll that the floods sometimes 
crack and lift the arch. 

Complaints have been received at various limes of floodiiigs in 
Ouild row ; a plan was prepared several years ago for extending 



260 City Document No. 34. 

the large Vernon-street sewer up to Washington street to remedy 
the trouble ; but it has never been built. 

At Notre Dame street there is much trouble from flooding ; the 
sewers here are too small ; an overflow into an old water-course 
now fails to give relief, because of the partial obliteration of the 
latter. 

The extension of Columbus avenue will afford an opportunity to 
build a relief sewer for this vicinit3^ 

The sewer in Vila street is the main for quite a large territory ; 
it connects with the Metropolitan sewer, but has no overflow. 
Before any catch-basins can be connected with this sewer or its 
tributaries it should have a storm-overflow sewer built to connect 
it with the cover channel of Muddy river in Brookline avenue. 

Work done during 1894. 

Twenty-two thousand four hundred and forty-seven linear feet 
of sewers have been built by the city, and 2,807 feet by private 
parties. A large main sewer is in progress in Massachusetts 
avenue, east of the Roxbury canal, which will afford sewerage to 
a large territory bounded by Swett and Magazine streets, Norfolk 
avenue and Gerard street. In Parker street a brick sewer has 
been built from Bryant street to Westland avenue, which is low 
enough to be extended, and furnish an outlet for sewers in the 
low territory lying between Parker street, Massachusetts avenue, 
and Westland avenue. 



West Roxbury District. 

The district in the vicinity of South, Anson, and St. Mark 
streets should be sewered, the outlet sewer to run through private 
land from South street to Washington street, there to connect 
with the Roslindale main sewer. It will cross the location of the 
Providence R.R., and this section at least must be built before 
the tracks are raised. 

Another branch of the Roslindale main sewer should be carried 
from the northerly of the two intersections of South and Washing- 
ton streets to the extreme north-westerly point of Florence street, 
in order to afford sewerage to Florence, Sycamore, Brooks, and 
Ashland streets and the neighborhood of Mt. Hope Station. 

North of Roslindale Village lies the neighborhood of Hewlett 
and Arundel streets, a swampy region, unsuited to cesspools. 
Sewers should be built here ; the petitions date back to 1886. 

At the request of interested citizens the grade of the sewer 
being built in Maple street, from the main sewer in Centre street, 
was depressed, and the sewer run through the divide low enough 
to take a part of the territory lying on the Charles-river side of 
the ridge. Portions of Weld, Ruskin, Porafret, Westover, Wil- 
low, Corey streets, and Garfield avenue may now be drained 
into it. 

The only other region in West Roxbury calling for special 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 261 

mention is the valley of the Spring-street brook. This is quite 
thickly settled, and its sewage pollutes the above-mentioned brook, 
which flows into Chailes river above the point where Brookline, 
Newton, Needham, Wellesley, and Walthani get their water-supply. 
A scheme of pumping the sewage of this place back over the ridge 
into the Roslindale main sewer at Mt. Vernon street has been 
recommended by this department as a temporary expedient, to last 
until such time as an intercepting sewer can be built down the 
valley of Mother brook and the Neponset river to join the 
Dorchester iutercepter at Central avenue. In a recent report by 
Mr. Jackson, City Engineer, on the drainage of the Charles-river 
water-shed in West Roxbury, the pumping scheme is condemned, 
for various good and sufficient reasons, as ^ permanent solution of 
the question. 

It was not recommended as a permaaeut solution, but only as a 
temporary expedient. It appears from the City Engineer's report 
that it will require about 7i miles of intercepting sewer to be built, 
at a cost of 8380,000 (exclusive of land damages) to reach Spring 
street; and will require the concurrent action of Boston, Hyde 
Park, and Dedham, probably practicable only b}'^ action of the Leg- 
islature. In view of the length of time likely to elapse before this 
can be accomplished, it would still seem that the pumping scheme 
offers the only means of relieving this district within a reasonable 
time. Upon the completion of the intercepter the local sewers 
would all drain into it, and the pumping would be discontinued ; 
the only portion of the system W'hich w^ould then be useless would 
be the force main ; the system of local sewers would be sub- 
stantially the same as recommended hy the City Engineer. 

The question of the advisability of building this pumping 
system depends wholly upon the length of time during which it i? 
likely to be in use, that is, whether this time is likely to be long 
enough to justify us in incurring the expense of the temporay 
portions of the scheme ; namely, the force main and the pumping 
plant. This time will lie the time which w'xW elapse between the 
completion of the intercepter by way of the valley of Mother 
brook. 

Work done during 1894. 

Thirteen thousand one hundred and ninety-four linear feet of 
sewers have been built by the city, and 4,41)7 feet by private 
parties. A branch of the Roslindale main sewer has been carried 
across the tracks of the Dedham Branch R.R. at Highland 
Station, to form an outlet for Clement avenue. Park and Bellevue 
and contiguous streets. 

Main Drainage AVorks, 

The amount of sewage handled by this branch of the Sewer 
Division is increasing quite rapidly, not only by the amount due to 
the annual increase in the mileage of the common sewei's of the 
city, but by the addition of the systems of the suburban districts 
in the Charles-river valley. During the last two years the sewer 



262 City Document No. 34. 

systems of Brookline, Brighton, Newton, Watertown, and Wal- 
tham have been added, and the town of Milton, in the Neponset 
valley, is looking for accommodation shortly. 

The amount of sewage from these districts will increase annually, 
and unless action is taken very soon towards increasing the pump- 
ing capacity of the plant at the pumping-station the pumps will not 
be able to handle properly the sewage coming to them. 

It will take two years to get a new pump built, set up, and in 
operation, if action in the matter is taken immediately, and the 
urgency of it can be seen from the fact that even the average 
daily amount pumped last year is 70% of the capacity of the 
plant when all the pumps are working, and it is sometimes neces- 
sary to shut down a pump for repairs for a week at a time. 

A high-level intercepting sewer was included in the original- 
design of this system, to be built when the increase in the amount 
of sewage should show the necessity for it. It consists*of a sys- 
tem of intercepting sewers to be built through Dorchester, Rox- 
bury, and Brighton, that will intercept all the sewage above grade- 
40 and carry it to the outlet at Moon island by gravity. 

Although attention has been called to this in a previous report 
no action has been taken towards providing for its construction. 
It should be considered without delay, as it would help relieve the 
pumps of the present tax upon their capacity. 

The force in charge of the main and intercepting sewers has 
been taxed to keep up with their work for tlie last year. The 
addition of a number of new connections to the system has in- 
creased greatly the amount of ironwork to look after, and the 
points that have to be inspected during every storm. The head- 
quartei's of this force, on Massachusetts avenue, should be put in 
proper condition. The men have to be on duty regardless of the 
weather, and the buildings are entirely inadequate for their use 
and comfort. 

At the pumping-station the condition of the plant has been con- 
siderably improved since the last report. While, owing to a lack 
of appropriation, but a small part of the repairs necessary to put 
the plant in proper working condition have been done, still those 
that have been made are such that the cost of pumping has been 
reduced considerably. 

The renewals of the valve seats of the pumps have been com- 
pleted and the water ends of the pumps are in very good condition. 
The pump records indicate that less sewage was pumped last 
year than the year before, but the reverse is the actual case. The 
discrepancy in the figures is caused by the difference in the slip of 
the pumps in the two years, it being greater in 1893 than in 1894. 
Some of the principal repairs completed are : retubing the 
boilers ; new sleeves in pump No. 1 ; relining of boxes on beam 
centres of No. 3 and No. 4, and of cam shaft on No. 3 ; new feed- 
water heater and feed pump ; new steam-pipe from engine-house 
to filth-hoist ; two new cages and chains at filth-hoist and repairs 
on hydraulics ; re-covering of boilers No. 1 and No. 2, and a part 
of main steam-pipe. 

A few of the repairs that cannot be deferred without liability of 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 263 

having shut-clowns, and tlie certainty of increased cost of mainten- 
ance, are the refitting of the gallery-gates, rebabbiting of main 
shaft boxes on No. 4 pump, the retubiug of reheaters, new valve ' 
gear on pumps No. 1 and No. 2, and a new supplementary main 
steam-pipe. Without the latter the proper repairs cannot be 
made on the main pipe, as it is continually under a pressure of 100 
pounds to the square inch. 

The wharf needs reflooring, and should be extended about 
seventy feet, as suggested in a previous report. 

The sludge tank, which is of wood, is decaying rapidly, and will 
soon have to be rebuit. 

The last test of the tunnel, to determine its condition as regards 
deposits, gave a coefficient of 115, which corresponds closely to 
that obtained a year ago. 

The working condition of the plant at Moon island is good, 
with a few exceptions. The whole of the iron fence around the 
reservoir, which is set on the stone coping, had to be removed and 
reset. It is mostly machine-work, and takes considerable time, 
but is nearly completed. 

There has been quite an amount of filling put into the cove, 
near the outlet, to prevent the nuisance caused b}' the deposit 
formed by the discharge. This trouble would be removed if the 
sea-wall, which is part of the original design of these works, and 
spoken of in previous reports, were built. 

The turbine wheel which works the gallery gates will have to 
be replaced without dela}'. The sewage has so acted on the iron 
that it is next to useless. 

The gates on the outfall sewer at the reservoir will all have to 
be refitted, as has been done on the discharge gates ; but before 
this work can be done the boat chamber in the outfall sewer, which 
has been so much needed for other purposes as well, will have to be 
built. 

New hydrants and piping in the I'eservoir are necessary, the 
latter having become so thin that breaks are frequent. 

Culverts. 

The city has built numerous culverts during the past year in the 
Brighton, Dorchester, and West Roxbury districts. In building 
street culverts the city labors under a great disadvantage, as else- 
where commented upon, from not having control of the water- 
course througiiout its entire length. In almost every case the 
bottom of the culvert has to be depressed several feet below the 
general level of the bottom of the brook in order to obtain a 
Avaterway of sutticient size, and, at the same time, to provide for 
sufficient filling for the roadway over the top of it. The city has 
no right to enter upon private land and deepen the adjacent 
jjortions of the brook channel a corresponding amount. The con- 
nections of the culverts with the bi'ook channels at each end are, 
therefore, necessarily unsatisfactory, and the culverts become set- 
tling b;isins, and wcnild speedily become filled with sand and mud 
if not cleaned out. Culverts are usually built at those points in 
the course of the brook where the comi)laiut is loudest of floods 



264 City Document No. 34. 

caused by the insufficieut size of the existmg culverts, and the 
building of an enlarged waterway answeis its purpose of freeing 
the city of the responsibility of the nuisance at this point ; but the 
immediate effect is to transfer the flood to the next insufficient 
culvert down stream ; and a new complaint arises, often accom- 
panied by the allegation that the city is responsible for the 
damage, on account of having enlarged the up-stream culvert, and 
thereby let the water flow down more rapidly than it ever had 
before. 

The proper way for the city to proceed, if it had the powers, and 
if funds w^ere available or the cost were assessable, would be, as a 
matter of course, to begin at the outlet of a water-course and 
improve the channel and rebuild the street culverts systematicall,y, 
always proceeding up stream. Another aspect of this subject 
deserves attention. Land-owners, in developing their land for 
building purposes, now proceed to lay out streets or grade those 
laid out by the Board of Survey, and having satisfied the require- 
ments as to line and grade, obtain their acceptance by the Board 
of Street Commissioners, having meanwhile made only such pro- 
vision (often no provision at all) for water-courses that happen 
to cross the location of their streets as their own judgment and 
penuriousness may suggest. 

As soon as the street is accepted the responsibility for obstruct- 
ing the stream at the crossing of the new street devolves upon the 
city, and entails upon it the expense of building a suitable culvert. 
No street should be accepted by the city until after it has been 
examined by the Superintendent of Streets, and the provisions 
have been made for water-courses, if any, have been sanctioned 
by him. 

Sewer assessments have been made by this division for the year 
ending January 31, 1894, in accordance with Chapter 402 of the 
Acts of 1892, and amendments thereto, to the amount of $154,- 
401.73, and the bills have been deposited for collection with the 
City Collector. 

Bills for sewer assessments, amounting to $4,047.44, have also 
been deposited for collection, representing those estates assessed 
under Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1889 and amendments thereto, 
which have made connection with the public sewers during the 
year ; making the total amount of assessments deposited for col- 
lection, $158,449.17. 

There remain on the books of this division at 5 per cent, interest 
$36,422.33, representing the assessments under the Acts of 1889, 
and amendments thereto, for those estates which have not been 
connected with the sewers for which they were assessed, and bills 
for which will be deposited for collection as the connections are 
made. This sum represents 27.5 per cent, of the total assess- 
ments made under those acts. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $2,923.59 have been collected 
from estates upon which no sewer assessment was ever levied, in 
accordance with Chapter 36, Section 10, of the Revised Ordinances. 

Two thousand one hundred and thirteen (2,113) permits have 
been issued to drain-lavers to connect house drains with the public 



Street Depaetment — Sewer Division. 265 

sewers, or to replace old couuectious ; aud the work done uuder 
these permits has been inspected and a record of same made on 
the plans of this division. 

The following amendments to the law for the assessment of 
sewers in the city of Boston have been passed b}^ the Legislature 
dui'ing the year : 

[Chapter 227.] 

An Act Relative to Interest on Sewer Assessments in the 

City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc. , as follows : 

Section 1. Section six of chapter four hmidred and two of the acts 
of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two is hereby amended by 
adding at the end thereof the following words : "■ provided, that interest 
shall not begin to run uj^on sewer assessments until after the expiration 
of thirty days from the completion of the sewer on account of which 
the assessment is made" — so as to read as follows: Section 6. The 
provisions of sections sixteen, seventeen, and eighteen of chapter three 
hundred and twenty-three of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-one, and acts in amendment thereof shall, so far as applicable, 
apply to all assessments made under this act : 2})-ovided, that interest 
shall not begin to run upon sewer assessments until after the expiration 
of thirty days from the completion of the sewer on account of which 
the assessment is made. 

Sect. 2. This .act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
April 11, 1894.] 

[Chapter 256.] 

An Act Relating to Assessments for the Construction of 
Sewers in the City of Boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as folloivs : 

Section 1. Section three of chapter four hundred and two of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two is hereb)' amended by 
inserting in the seventh line, after the word " parcels," the words : " But 
the nuniber of linear feet of an}^ such parcel which has been assessed for 
the building of any other sewer shall be reduced by one hundred in de- 
termining the number of such feet by which the proportions aforesaid 
shall be determined," so as to read as follows : Section 3. Said superin- 
tendent shall so aj^portion the said assessable cost to the parcels of land 
aforesaid that the amount apportioned to each parcel shall bear to the 
total assessaljle cost the proportion which the number of linear feet of 
each parcel on said highway or strip of land bears to the number of such 
linear feet of all such parcels ; but the number of linear feet of any such 
parcel which has been assessed for the building of any other sewer 
shall be reduced by one hundred in determining the number of such 
feet hy which tlie proportions aforesaid shall be determined, and as a lien 
shall attai^h to the parcel and to any Ijuildings which may be thereon for 
such amount, as a part of the tax on such parcel. Said superintendent 
shall give notice of the amount of every such assessment and the interest 
thereon to the owner of tiie parcel liable therefor, forthwith after such 
amount has been determined. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
April 16, 1894.] 



266 



City Document No. 34. 



O CO 

a a • 

2^i 



03 



m 






5 M 
■°B ■ 

^ 3 3 

ft-o 
<1« 



OOt-OOOiOCO 



COO CO O 1-1 ' 



OOl— ooosoco 



) O -* Ol O Ci 



O .mm'" 

^ o fi] CQ 01 f 
a d -^ 

•^ -^ oq" ° uT «" 

^ tH t- ^H t- i- 

oj o 0) oj It at 

& ^ p: & ^ ^ 

O © d) '1' G> 03 

mmaiaimm 



t4 t>i 



O o 

o o 

CO 



13 



gpq 



^"5 ;-S' 




*^ 'm 


53o.2§ 


0) 


9^ >. 
-3 o 


^'fSr'V. o 


t 


a 


>"!::; O m 


p - 


o o ii S 


_^ 


«4H 


'i.B S'a 


d 




D 


« 


0) o ^ d 


o 






a 

C3 


=2. 


2 MS ■= 






d-SSS 


d 


^^ 


•2^^^ 


EL| 


H 


^a« 




<i o 


T3 .- 






cs a> 






d^. 






KH »0 







Steeet Department — Sewer Diaision. 



267 



Improved Sewerage. 



Office salaries . 

Pumping-station, inside . 

Pumping-station, outside ■ 

Engines and boilers 

Main and intercepting sewers 

Moon Island 

Tow-boat 



S500 00 
50,417 89^ 
16,476'69 

8,919 07 
12,887 22 
10,360 20 

3,178 32 

$102,739 39 



Stony-Brook Improvement. 



Maintenance 
Retaining-walls 



Stables and sheds, Brighton 
Yard, Revere street 



$10,674 08 
1,274 73 



$11,948 


81 


$511 


00 


$2,933 


05 



Miscellaneous. 

Office expenses, including salaries of Deputy Superintendent, 
clerks, and draughtsmen, stationery, drawing materials, etc. 

Engineering expenses, including salaries of engineers, instru- 
ments, etc. ......... 

Current expenses of yards and lockers ..... 

Current expenses of stables, including cost of horses, vehicles, 
harnesses, etc $37,005 98 \ 

Less amount earned by department teams . 8,388 65 J 

Repairing sewers ......... 

Cleaning and flushing sewers ....... 

Cleaning catch-basins ........ 

Repairing streets ......... 

Building, repairing, and cleaning culverts and surface drains 
not included in the Stony-brook system .... 

Examining condition of sewers and catch-basins 

"Work for departments and others, including inspection of 
construction of private sewers ...... 

House connections ......... 

Damages and claims ........ 

Holidays . ......... 

Travelling and incidental expenses ...... 

Repairs of department buildings, stables, and yards 

Engines and boilers and repairs ...... 

Hardware, blacksmithing, and tools, not included elsewhere . 

Rubber goods, not included elsewiiere ..... 

Stock and supplies, not included elsewhere .... 

General repairs ......... 

Inspection of smoke ........ 



Less over credit on water-rates charged off to sewer construc- 
tion .......... 



$21,001 30 

27,541 70- 
19,866 93 

28,617 33 

7,882 78 
10,184 01- 
33,701 82 

1,894 83 

69,421 88 
2,043 99 

1,638 02 
4,168 37 
5,161 23 

15,905 25 
5,035 00 
2,585 73 
1,598 20 

10,769 10 

1,696 92 

5,814 12 

512 60 

955 50 

.$277,996 64 

2,471 56 

$275,525 08 



268 



City. Document No. 34. 



« 



rzS --• 



>o 



s£ 



















o 

Ol 






0. .^ 








o 




o 














^o 




O 
















•c g 




CO 




(1) 




















X! ^ 






o 






























r- 




'C 








be 




be 








o 




bo 


0^ 




"O J=E 




bn 




c 




c • 












c 


^ 




c 




c 






T- 


.- ^3 




















— ! 






2 


0) 

> 


7:3 > 












QJ 




o2 


> 


'^ 


a> 


p 


o 


3 O 








2 "S 




a 






-ua S 


o 


a 


o 


CD 


? 










•S"© 






Ml 






S 


0) 




K 




K 








w 




« 








M 




lo o 




-* 


o o o 


o 


O 00 




1 


O '^ 




^_i 




-^ 00 




^T 


o 


o 


zo 


o 


C2 


Ol 




CO O lO 




to 




00 -# 




CO 


lO 


t- -^ 


>o 


CO 


CO 






(M CO 




■^ 




o o 




lO 


»0 '^l 


o 


CO 


Ci 


f^ 




CO 


t.t GO 




o 




CO CO 




»o 






CO 


35 


cc 


Ol 




<c 


lO ^ 




>o 




m 































o 



>> 

s 



>> S 



CQ 



be oj 
C Eli 

I-:) 



pq 



(n 0) m 



ft ft 

o'j 00 



^ - J-* 
_ft_ft_ft >; 

■ft'ft'ft.g ^ 

"T ■" -V >e X2 
C5 eq (M ^ 



ft M _ft 
'ft C 'ft 



ft ft 

cq 00 oi ^ CO 

I— I — i-i Cq r-H 



00 t- r-l O 
00 ^ CO o 



O Ol C<1 00 (M 

^ -*i >— I O CO 

r-l ■*! (M 1-H >-! 



CO =s 



O 



i;^ 



>. ^ 



O 



f- t» — G 


cS 'r' 


ii br- ° 


ra a> 


dBut 
Sprin 
Snow 
Harri 


-1 


t. an 
and 
and 
and 




";^ ^>. 


s>. 


tham 
ton s 
e all 
thba 




2 's a 3 


-w a 


Ocq^^oQ 


oiO 






t B 








C3 


tier s 
ambe] 
arter 
ver St 


2^ 


rt m 


.—1 


S J2 ^ O 


n w 


M 


MOOG 


a^ 






Street Department — Sewer Divisiox, 



269 



&3 



-= 




























5 
























> 
























o 
















































c 
























o 
























%^ 
























u 
























<5i 
























^ « 














o 










01 o 














^ 










"= rt 














^ 










r: i: 
























o§ 














i 










tj 














13 










■J, >> 














>> 










~ ^ 














,Q 


































3 ■»-» 
















































^ r^ 
























0) a 














^ 










P^pq 














pq 












CO 








irs 








o 


(M 


1— 1 






^ 








N 








CO 


>— 


lO 






_ 1 








C5 








h- 


<M 


c; 






o 








CO 








OO 


(M 


o 






lO 








t^ 








Ol 




































1—1 
















CO 


l> 


. o 






€& 
















CO 










_^^ 








^^^^ 


- 


-^ 










' 














o — 


w 






P5 


pq 














^ o 


d 




a 


d 


d 




to 

n 










m ^ 


cT 




S 


oT 


qT 














o 2^ 


. gn 




-2 


.Cj 


. .B' 




^ 










.c = 


t. C tn 




.S 


i.i 


5 












<>>'tS 


o 






(>1 


^ ci 


















o 


~^ 


^ 




-* 










^ o 


o 






C^ 


CD 






OO 








■^. "-^ 


o 






o 


C<) 






C5 








« 3^' 


(^ 






CO 


^ 






_^ 








CM CO 


<» 






CM 


-*l 






cq 








CO -a< 








O 
















cu 
















































C3 








oj 
























> 








































o 








-2 
















d 








<D 
































































o 








a 
































































CO 








t> 
















to 








OS 












t: 




s 








^ 












a 




























c 








«=5 

a 












K 

C 
a 












ci 
















CO 




















cc 




'^ 








1 * 








































3 
























o 








c 












t: 












o 












c 
























K 


























M« 








ci 












.^ 




fM 








c 












^ 
























<^ 


























^ 








































































































CIC 


























R 














^ 












x: 














<n 












X 














c 












c 
























•*j 




CO 








sS 

a 
















>. 








21^ 












S; 




ci 








a> 














St 








O 












OJ 

C 




c 










cc 












00 







Oh P^ 

a a 



a 



&3 



270 



CiTr Document No. 34. 






&5 

"6 







^ 










^^3 






^ 






O 






tH 






h 






0) 






^ 












3 




C 


P^ 












c 




0) 






fq 


«• 


w 






B 




c 2: 








h^ 




d rt 






g 



g 



&! 




o 




-o 




e 




^ 




&i 




e 




Ci 




^ 




o 




■K> 




^^ 




« 




V 








s 




J3 




C^i 




>1 










la 




rfS 




;t«a 




<U 




„ 




»C! 




Ci 




CO 




!--( 




M 




?=^ 




<> 




e 




s 


aj 


c* 


&. 




■£, 


■fc, 












'H 


•^ 




(N 


§ 


^^ 




^" 




■Ci 


O 


00 


o 


M 


>o 




t- 






M 




s^ 




s> 




e 






s 


^ 


i-O 


"S 


c^ 


.2 




■3 


S 


^ 




o 


J 


O 




'S 






►o 


5 


•vs 
















-S 


■^ 






« 


CS 






•'S' 


CS 


e 


a; 








an 




^J 




.« 




V. 


CO 






CQ 


■^3 








i 




- 




4J 




CO 




(U 








>> 




C 




cq 



Street Department— Sewer Divisioisr. 



271 






"6 





























o 


o3 














1-1 „ 












t: 'z; pa 












fe 03 . 












CO ^ 








s 




CO QO '^ C 00 ^ . 








<u 




'Z 'Z • M • t! ^ +^ '^ 

•- •"■ 7^ ^ .^ •- .„ a; rH 








Qi 














*J -^SS-k^ pi-. 












^ ^ -g 1 ^ 3 -S'-s^ 

pq M P5 ►^ P5 W P5 




- 


















05 CSO^OlMO tN 


(M 


C5 


^ 






OO lOCOt-OCMlO CO 


O 


o 


t- 


. 




SO CO 1^ O '^ O IC o 


o 


CO 


CO 


■+^ 




b- <M — ■* O 13 i^ CO 




'S- 


lO 


o 




rt I-H -H O C<1 lO t~ 


o 


o 


o_ 


O 




^ sq -T ^" 




b- 












^ : 




(^ « 














-^ • 


o 5 • 












■^ 






-S ■ 


o o • 












C 






'C • 


> & : 




o cJ 








d . 






pO ; 






^ 3 






Of) c3 












'5< & 






C T" 




















.2 S 






«4-l • 


=Hl tW . 


o aj 


c c 








— ca 






»c ! 


CO CO 


_&_&( 


o o 








f2 ii2 










"p.'p< 














X \ 


XX 




- 


















d c 


d c 








S 
























mh ; 


=H =HI 


GO CO 


O 'i 














^ ■ 


CO CO 


^ " 


M <^^ 














o 


o o 


c^ ;0 


>o c 


o 








OO 


o o 


O OO 


rt CC 


05 










o 


-* c6 


cd oj 


lO cc 


0^' 












lO 


^ M 


^^ f— • 


o t> 


(M 










(M 


<M 


o 




CO 






^.s 














'^ 
















a; 










p^ 


P3 








a 


Is 


i. 

a 
c 


o 






C5 












a> 




5 




o ci • 






















f2 o . 
c o 


PP 




^ 










-w tn "^ 




cd +J ■~T' "T 














cS 3 oi cJ r^ 




^ SfP5 § pq 1 




a 


j- 








C -f O a ^ 


0- .- c c 




!- 












-^ c t, d iH = 














1 S 2^H gF- 
^ cqo O 




C 


) 


3 












c 














c 




































o 




























•; 


1 


)-:? 




























c 


3 












































(M 


IM 


IN 




5| 








.S 


— 


(M 


r: 


^ 






-^ 








« 


'Ho -2 


i-> 


cS 






i 










ci "^ cS • S- 




!> 














^s ^-^ S 


« ^ 

















*r <u ^-pS (i* 






; 










a;!- a,"' JJ-wt-i:, t- 




a 










a;" Qj<n iSO'-ti*-' tS 




c 










t.S p-%« iol'"''" 














*- cr* ->-' E •- -iJ . "H 






• 








cox »iO tfi-r^*jtH tlj 








































p 


5P^ 




r_ 


^ .^ 




C 


) P- 


P- 


■< J 




P 











272 



City Document No. 34. 




















o 












a, 




















"S* 




























B 


















o 
u 








.S 










>% 








cq 










^ 


















JJ 






















































3 








Cm 




CO 






^ 












M 














CO 










4h 








00 




S 
IB 






CO 
>* 








CD 

-* c« 

- fci 

„ 










OO 
















»< 








a, w 


















:2 >> 


















OS ^ 








o 


M 
















oi 


















ij 


^ 








j: ri 


























o 


o 














O 


^ 








^ 








t- 


^ 


C^l o 




Oi -< 


iM 






(>j 


t^ 


t^ o 




-1 


■— ' 


^ 




M 


u-5 


CO CO 




^ 





zo 




C^l 


lO 


CD CO 




CO CO 


t^ 


O 




CO 


o 


O0_ 35 




CO -* 


(M 


O 






-* 


oo" 




!^ ^ 


■* 






s= 










(N 








,— '— , 










' V /-^ 


^ 










42 




■S 


4h 


tti 


=* . 








CO 




CO 


v; ^ • 


CO 


c 3 








v.-^ 






•¥, .^ 






(D q3 


oj 


X.i 


a> 


X 


•r* A .^ OJ Oj C 


X 


.2 S 






■ft 


a ■^ 


'Dh 


c 






S^ 




" r 


^ 


CS c 


- 


CO 


=' ^ c r r r' r 




.S .S 


C 




r^ 




•~ . •'- c c a c c 


• 'sh 


S 






•—1 


tti cr 


•7 


%-l 


05 if CD "V "T" "V "T '7 






o C^ 


C<I 




CO 




-* 00 (M »C (M 








.-H r- 


'~' 


<M 


'"' 


CO 


(M (M -H rH T-H ■- 


IM 


.s 




IM O 


(M 


o 








CO CO 




t- t^ 


lO 


CO 





"^ 


!•- Oi ^ CO 00 C5 


■ ^ ^ 




ZD O 


aJ 


^ 


'^ 


d 


CO ^ CO -^ si t>^ d 


:;2 0) 




CD lO 


'^i 


00 


-^ 





00 iC CD C5 -» 


r— 1 


be aj 




lO ^ 


t- 


o 


10 





^ f-H CD ^ IT 


CO 


0) 














^ ^ 


" 


h^ 




w-- 










, 


_, 




' ^^^ 
















1 














^ 


















U 






(i3 ^-' 














M 




c 




> 






J> c« 


c» 


^ 








to 






o 
O 




OS 






'^s 

^CM 


C 


.■;:; 






c 

0) 








'73 

> 




> 

^ -4- 

^ ?• 






« 
> 


> 

^5 


c 






"5 


n3 
C 


"^ 1 


"" 15 


t. 




°2^ 


a: 


> 








a 


P-I 


. 1' 


w^ 




f3 10 M W^ 


s 








6^ 

IB 




^-^ 2 


--§ 






a> 


>] 






C5 ;i 


^ 


cS 




ce > 10 cc 


0) 








o 


O 


« 


CO 




t2 — 1 


^ 


O 
1-1 
























IC 




^, 


^'" ^ — ~ 


^^ 


^ 1 






~^iO 








IM 


•^r^ 


' *> ,^'" 


r'« 




„— , . r.^ 


• (M 






.S 


^3 












■ iH 






n 


O 


CD r3 




tec 




11: II 


i 








§5^ 


C "S_'»^ 


S6i2 




§5^ §^ 


?q-S 












§ oi:;2 


^^ L' 






' M 








be 


'sou:: 

5 ^ 00 


? )C 

5 CSM 




s 1 'i 1 % 


Co 

^1 3 








w 


O 




O 











6 





— 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



273 



^§ 



• 


C5 CS 


n 


00 00 


3 




fcc 


c c 


XI 


.rH •»-i 










K 


S 3 


t-s 


PM 


^ o 


■># t~ 


— 00 


i-i ?o 


«^ o 


O N 


Oi t^ 


C-. eo 


IM W 


ff« CS 



H c ii "" 
; u -5 -c uo 



J4 s. 
•- ^ r 2 • -S 

7 Ci ,^_ Tec C 
C . ZT C . — 

■T if rH -7 >: CD 



Q; I 



?-x « X i ' 



U-5 ^ 



_r CO c o ^ X .3i J « 



C X x: "E X u aJ 



"" .E 5 



c . •- ™ 



dO 



:'-',•" -^ T i: — ,■" 









£■? 



« 










-0 05-H 



<u « ^ 

c ^ i: 

O K °* 



"^ 



274 



City Document No. 34. 






Si 

>* 

s 





>o 


a 


Oi 


e 


00 


1 


f~r 


s 


;s^ 







-M 


cs 


A 


s 


bt 


-11 


^ 


^ 



n 



ic 



ai — 



r 


.^ 




c^ 




S 


u 


^ 


o 


(U 








«<5 










br 


■^ 


CJ 






•s 


o 


c 


c 


n 


o 










.-) 


(U 


V 


(~ 


c 












o 


£ 


T3 



s — — 

O = 3 



O 



5 .E 

— (M 



—, ir. Ci -* ri 
S " <M O 












^ 



-^ c =■ c = .5 .5 «■ .E .5 
.5 c cc lo c^ "I ^ ;« M -o ^1 

-^ ■'"'—• — '-< j^ V 



O C>1 h- ■>*■•.* CO >n (M — >c 

— 1 cr 1- t^ c^ CD If; CO C5 in 



I- -3 



-=-3 >' 



5 !^ i^" 



^ 6 



Strket Department — Sewer Division. 



275 




(U o oj 

CI. c a- 



0) oj oj aj i X 
_c- a. c. a. a, 



O; CO 



•;: •=; •- -r « 
C P< 2, 



P.'5,'i:i.X • ^ • c, d, ci, £- c c c i^ ~ • "■■' • — . c;, p< a, &"' •'•'•' 

o-o r r r r ru5'^»c'^rX-i:'X--; r r r r-^cX 

= = o = ccccC^5.?J ?^ ?Jcc = c.o. 



. . . . u r- ^ • • ■ ■ 
CC = r-C.^OCCCC 

•T -7 -r — ?: • 

•>* lO (M 
(M _ ^ tr~ 



-« iJcS U 



c c c c -2 • 



<M "O C5 — 'O 



O O O O lO o 

00 O O O 03 O 

o o o o -^ -H 

(jj >o 1- CO r^ .—1 

Oi Xi -r (M .-I 



«^ 









'S, 



2^76 



City Document No. 34. 



C5 



5!i 






'S, 



&5 



w 



o 



P5 P5 



o 



CO -fc-» 



. . ^ .X 

^ ^ « .s .s 
X =x • ^ a;« = 

O ^ QJ cS ii =*-■ o 
la to itfi Pi 



= fc^ 





















U 










a 










"S 


a> 
















& 


1; 












t- 




CS 


M 




tr 


<K 




1^ 






^ 


Cr 


ft 


c8 
P=( 








;- 




b 









R 


e 


cS 






a 


a 


5 


0) 






Iz 


|z 


|z 


^ 






IT 












r^ C^ 


IT 


IT 


13 






^:e 


C^ 


Cv 


!^ 










t: 


„ 




c 


- ^ 


^ 


« 




^ 


^t 






- c 




P3 


c 


^1 


a 
e 


1/ 


o 
.S 






■1-1 t« 



^ :^ 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



277 






>5 

■<5 



S '^^ 

© 



n 






O 



03 Z 



— cs cs 
0)0 

PSOO 



CO N 

O 00 



f=* 



o 









278 



City Document No, 34. 



1-^ 



P5 







^ 


,id 










.-) 






CJ 


p 














r> 




C 
C 


y 


iJ 


u 




3 


3 


•— < 




^§<1 


„ 


t — +1 


-+ 


l^ 


(M 


Ci 


00 C5 


■^ 


10 


(M 


— 


^ 


CO 


(M 


-^ 


O 


IM 


•o 


or. 


•—I 


SI 


■— 


o 



o 



> 



Oirs 



O 



ft, 






S 



PQ 



O 



.£ .5 .S 

7^1 o o 



C^ -f ^ 
-f O t^ 
0<1 C^ (M 



^2 

-"S ^^ 
OJi: "-a 

OS 3 ^5 • 

O 3 (U 4^ 
3 3 <S 3 tn 

k f^ 3 (l* ^ 



;tx 



■z be 



o J:' ^ 



CO — "^ •" ^ 



o o -+ 'o -1" 

C — TC S^l 'O 
l^ CJ l^ lO Tti 



o ^ 



^ 1^ 

3 = -3 
;:i — 3 



S c=tij5q 



W2 3 '> 3-5 
3 r* O r- ^ 

^ 3 -r -- 3 



« 


B 


^ 




o 


U 


h-5c» 


tt 


[^ 


M 


y, 


H 


D 


»j 


Si 


UJ 


t-( 






CJ 




BJ 




O 




Q 





e 


btifcC^ 


X 


3 — 


m 


2; cc — 






f^ 


— &< 


^ 




<4- 

c 


= 'o = 






-S 


IP 



o 



"3 X -= "3 



o vTi. ./^ if ? 

■£ - -s -^ "^ i o g 



Stkeet Department — Sewer Division, 



279 



eo •x ri --5 



p55;ssa 



c c c c 
00 = 



Q P3 



M « 



t. t- — 1- 



O U. 




O 



(MO 1— ' 



<M i2 ™ 



10 rr — 



d cccE ceded d 

1^1 iM X GO M T-l 10 IM C-1 'M C-l 






10 1^ t^ '^ " ;■: r^ ~ ~ O 

-r lO CO O 1" '-C O — IM 

i-H CD I-l L^ O CO 00 



^2 



E i' ^ ^ ^ ^ 
— > ^ ^ :j '^ 



§^^ 



1-^ o 




•« 'O P 



O 






« I o - c^ 



— ^ ^ ^ ~ c 



^ --; "3 i; 









X ^ E CS 



« KtitiiW 



o 



~ 


— 






•- 


C/3 


c 




e 


m 


-3 




^ 




> 












ci 


■*- 




." 


,« 


,fcj 


-^ 


^ 


CS 


c 


C 




i 


!B 


c; 


































1. 


fct 





^ 












Ph 


ai<J 


> 





£ ~ L^ 9 



5 (u ♦- -c „ 

" -- 'A u ■*^ -- a* 

= ^ I. ~ '^ — " 

'->~ ^ 't. Sf' "2 i-" 

P^ f*i ~ ^ -i hJ J^ 



^ a '3 



« ■" '^ 

-DO 



IS 



>5i,i,;L, Hh 03 cc c/:y:H 



280 



City Document No. 34. 



&5 





!» 








^ 




"S 




V 




^ 




>, 












o 




■u 




.« 


»« 




a 


Si 


s 








S 


*o 


Ci 


<3 


03 




r-1 


1 


^ 




f-H 


■•-1 




m 


-0 




eS 





T^ 


fi 


a 




^ 




■* 




Oi 




^ 




^ 




f. 




M 




Si 








«s 



6Q 



I 








ji 














erable roc 
in 1893. 








50 


-a « 








^ 












1 ^ 








S 


M 








P5 


Contract. 
Contract. 










c» C5 -^ eo t^ 


-" V. 


-* 






<x> -T -* »<;: 


■» IT 


C5 




^ 


00 ^ 


Oct 


-V- 




Ol 


rt 55 oi i-t c; 


1 ^ — 


c6 







so 00 cc 


c;__i>. 1 5j 







oi" ^ 


1-1 .^ 


CO 






»» 


:o 


w 






^ 


^ 


m 


















3 




























'S 














OJ 




























K 














S 














73 














C 














cS 














'» 














c 




oj aJ 


OJ 













G. & 


c 


- 






a 




'E-'p* 


'p 


4 






OJ 




». r. 


.> 






S 




.5 .5 


c 



























01 10 


i-H 








c 


-* 


»o 


«i 






c^i C^t 





"* 






rt ■ 


^ >o 0" 


C5 


W5 






-*-* OJ 


00 >o 00 


00 









feO S 


CM 


CM 


M^ 






(ii '^ 


^ 




CO 






kJ 


^ '^ 




" 








. 


2 














to 


CJ 














^ 


T! 































c 


.^ 














3 


c« 










c 




Q 


C3 


1^ 








0) 








a 








0) 




'n 


-a 


I- 








t> 




s 












0/ 

P5 






5 


c 

a 


* 


^ 








c 









H 










s 


c 


•^ 










-< 


3 


c 

















*^ 




1-4 










i 






X 










'? 









c 










^ 


















s 


•-^ 






'S 








d 


s 


C 






a 








^ 


'^ : 1 






1 








"S 


light 

ngto 

elds 
ave. 

St. . 




c 


' 








g S «ii.2 










e^ S S-ga 


= 












^ 


^ 


^ 




•^ 





Si 

C5 



^j 



S) 



CO 

''I 

Si 





or 












rt 
















s 


C 








o 






« 








t- 


2 






c 


« 






S 


c 














c 


>■ 


.ii 








JJ 




t 










K 








t- 


■^ 


*.* 






^ 


CJ 

3 






— 




K 








C 


c 






_© 


a 






oo 









c 






C 


^ 














■'* 


.-^ 




flj a 


■w dj 


V- 




D. a.^ G, 


cc 




■&"E.^ 'p. 


X 


;• 


X r 


^ 




^ ^ 


. c 










c 




00 >fl 


■^4^ 


=c 






tC <N 




c 




'ff 


C 


c 






'O 


0; 




b w 


t-^ t^ 


c 




C5 -* 


— 


CM 




f, CM 


CO 


^ S 




_1 


7^ 


■w 










CS 






g 








^ 






-g^- 




> 


rj 




=e>H 




-a 


5 








c 

c3 


tJ 




2 ** -^ 
2 S " 




c 


SS 




^1? 




C a 


= ^ 


_u a, 2 




ti a 

3 — 


r^ 


P-i 




a 


z 


t: 












c 










c3 




C 

c 


c 








c 




0) 




t. 


ci 


be 




a- 


, ^ 


J2 




> 





^ 








a 




*^ 


— ' 


c 






^ 


cl. 







Street Department — Sewer Division. 



281 



-1^ o 



a. > 




-r, « 












:2s 


en 


sS 





— «5 



4I 
















c 














"§ 














•^ 














9i 














e 














Ci 














J- 





























.^^ 














v> 














« 














^ 




























S 





























C> 














>5 














-a 














!^ 














<u 














:g 














•5- 














<u 


^ 








, 




^ 


ZJ 








c 




>1 

















'&-. 








0) 






.a 












?;:> 










c 




<u 














►si 


c 












>» 


.rH 













>5 


00 


4J 






jj 




-0 




01 






>«H 


^ 


^ 


4,^ 


> 






CO 


u 


"O 


l^-l 










OJ 


Ci 






aj 




X 


> 


CO 


(M 




3 




"s 


i^ 


X 


c 



"5. 


.5 




0) 


r-H 




"H. 


g 


CO 


0; 


>i 


a 


>i 


-* 




*; 


y 


§ 


■* 




(M 




-<* 




;2 














-0 




































i^i 


CO 








« 


d 


'^S 






3 




10 


=0 






























e 








































CO 


3 '• 






c 






„ 


C ', 




0) 


"ff 






I'i 


^ . 




> 

OS 


H 






Si 


citf 




a; 








§ 


~;^ 




!C si 






^ 


w 




e- 








rS 


-o^ 




-c 









c^ 


§6 




S 


d 






^ 








C 


























t 












^ 

•« 






j> 


1 


r 






























































^ 
















to 
































c* 
















^ 
















fo 
































































6 






c 

01 




r 
5 


\ 








c 






c 


5 









01 








eS 




















P5 






Ol 


















W"^ 






m 
























HH 


















S.I 






"E. 


















HO 








CO 
















( 


-- ?" 































i-s 


















'^< 






CM 



















g 

























« £ 






« 


















"S,=s 






5 


















^ [£, 














































S 


w 






W 
















•^ 








^-v-- 
















§ 
























a. 
























« 
























>o 
























e 
























» 
























*«?* 
















































a; 

>5 














































-0 
























'cT 
























Oi 
























00 
























I'i 
























I-^' 
























Si 
























!~ 
























« 
























-S 


a; 
3 




OJ 01 
a, ::_ a 


a, 


d 







c*: 
























'p. 




z. 


- C £. 




c 


P< 


c 


'« 


- 






r r 








: 








K 


_c 




c 


d c 




c 




c 




c 




« 
























(M 




cli 


CO 10 




c'j 




w 




(M 




























'^ 
























Ci 
























CO 










30 X) 




la 




I-- 







■» 


M 


C5 






— 




in 




GO 




^ 


us 




to 




« 


r: 









-^ 




c 


CO 


'"H 







c: 


« — 








« 




^ 


■J 






CO ^ C5 




iO 




« 




c; 





s, 






















■* 


























e 
























s 


























en 


c 
en 




C 


f 








•| 








s 

2 


.2 


C 
C3 





0) 




c 






rt 










>* 




c 






















■J3 








^3 
S 
C4 


cji 


c 


r 












•<s 


C 


c; 












< 












rt 









.s 

















-=> 




«- 




> 




c 






> 








to 


C 



a 




ni -tji 


'^ 






c 


K 








~ 


-Ji 


a 




^ t. 


^ 








K 










3 


"o 




> c. 

St 


M 


c 




C 

c 


> 

a 



w 








(» 









e4 






CO 
























'i 


























•^ 




P^ 








V. 
















3 












c 



















TJ 








::5 














C/J 




C 








^^ 




« 






to 






<A 








-s, 












OJ 






oJ 


^ 


^ 








ca 






en 






^ 








1^ 






^ 




c 



'0 




c 


a 


5 




c2 




rt, 


1 






c 




%— 


"^ 


c 








p: 




P 




^ 




M 




M 




C 









282 



City Document No. 34. 





Ci 




UO 




I--I 




>~i 


-« 


S^ 


'Vi 


■>■ 


s 












K 


-O 






O 


i^ 


1 


'e 


(0 


3 


■w 


„ 


!/J 


^ 


CJ 


c^ 


;= 


CO 


ZJ 


""i 


u 




o 


f-H 



t^ 



&3 



C.2 



C = 



^ 



O 



C5 



K 


:; 




m 


r1 


1) 








:« 


K 


y 




o 



t^f^ 



p^ p^ p- p- p- ft ftp. ftftftftftftftftftftftft ft 

(M e<i (M (M n lo N ■>! c-i ira r'l -m c^ n li m m "m t^ >4 t-i 




trc CO cvcot^ooioo 



CO — ■M ^c — . r: t: 3C tc ?-i -/:. ~ TO 
cosqcqioc^o-H -t-*coco-* 

















-V 


^ ' 




-. 


■- : 




























_^ 


„ 










?j 














■ 










Oj 


a 
























j^ 










a 


a 










rt 














X 










>-( 


u 






^ 








Ml V 


., 
































































c; 
















c 


> 


(_ 


O 


o 


,, 


OJ 


t 






<- — 


'^ — -3 










































fs- 


a 


c 
c 


-a 
c 

c 
es 




c 

c 


p '/ 

c 
c c 

rt *- 
>- 


1^ 


•S 


— i !■ 0) 11 
0, O u (U 

~ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

C a X X cs 

= c3 2q2qcq 






21 


fS 


> 


S 


a 


S 


5 






c 3 

r: it 


X 


5 K 


t and 
t and 
t and 






=5 a 


= ^ 




u 


S 


h- 


w 


CS 




c 1= 




- n 


c = c 
s :S ee 






t- t^ 


"^ s 


= 


t 


01 
3 


2 


o 


0, 


E = 


-5 i 


t. 


^ 1 


rt « cS 
1/ i 0/ 




































S :_ 


o;5C 


^ 


K 


tt 


M 


>- 


C-t 


< ^ 






=Ha-,?H 




-ts '• 






















i 












t>. 






















> 












e • 


































s ■ 






















^"* 












































.s 


<£.£ 




to 




> 




:/ 




— 






c 




"» 




^ . 


ox 


-Wi ^ -A- 


4~i 'w 






(j 






c 


•jJ 4- 








c^ *~ 




CO 


(5 




% E 


3C 


O 

a) 
)0 


> 


_ 


> 

- 5 
c 


c 

p 


a 


lis 


S 


to 


c 


11 


u 

^ 


_a/ (o 



Street Department — Sewer Divisiox. 



283 



£ u o o 



c ^ ^ ^ 




O 







cccn = = c = 




c>'i oc) ri eq •>> M ri >o 





»> « t~ lO lO <M O^ 



•S c ^ — 



•esq 



^1 o o s ^ 

•E =3 -r ^ ^ 






- Sf — --2 



^ X E-i S cc 






" 3 o 



o «■-' II — — 
Is '- - ^'' "5 



1/5 ^ cc n «i a: 






284 



City Document No. 34. 



■Si 





'O 




Ci 


^ 


00 






.s 


I""! 


« 


^ 


o 


« 



« 



CO 



&2 



? >H 4> 

s aJ = 

^ to a; 



so 



-^ "■ -' - o ^ 



S ^ ^ s: o 



E a- 



1 i; -— o 

3 '5 3 

.55:3 g 



O 



o — < o 



<M —1 (^c^ 

CC 1— I CO 



-* -^ CO 

O -*i c: C5 

i^ o cq " 



C^ O 00 

-i o — 
lO -r in 






tJi o 



C 3 C 
00 <o 0<) 



•* ^ :o -H CO 



.E 5 .5 

(M C<I C^ 



<X> ^ >1 

CM l~ GO 

n- l« -# 






So CO 
O t. CO 



^ ?^:= 

« 



^ -►^ 0/ 



f .1' — 
o c 






.^ = •= £ =<=■ -^^ 



W C5:2 



^ « t^ 


: I 








Oi «i 


• OS 




o -i 


«^ 






1 = 




Id sewer n 
t. and Rii 
t St. and S 




^ OJ 




5S 


^ 


P ^ 


^ i 


O 


- ': B 






C t- 


c 


3 ■** ci 


- c5 


—« 


a ox M 





cq 



lO ^- 



« 3 



o 



is ® 2 *' 3 



ji: is = 



-3 :« 



O CS K 



O) D C 
1= = 



O 3 »j 
C i. 0) 

W h5 



Street Departjient — Sewer Dia^ston. 



285 



CO <M ^ 






-w *: ~. '^ 'd 

« ^ I ^ " 

a^XV 5^ oXaJ aj aJ d d 

c- . . :« .Br •.£- .£■ .£• 3 3 

'E. c _c .c 60 'p. c 'o, "a, "S, 'S< ■&, 

iS22i i'^i -s i i i 

^V-^-=*-j, eq'^IM iM C^ N CO 

1— iO-*-*hH •— iNt-H rl 1—1 1—1 — 



o — o o o 

O CO o o o 


i« -* m 
t^ la o 


00 


i« -+ lO o •* 

C5 " ^ O — ' 
r-1 I^J r- 


tr >* lo 

^ O N 


ao 



— o 



^ . a> . ;^ 



'^ -o 






3 



~ 'S * S 



• ^ 


!» 


^ 


-c 1 


• "o 


ts 


C 
IS 


c . 




w 




d • 




M r 


§ 


> • 


:ffi 


c 


cs • 




cS 






• ns 






J2 • 


• C 


-4-3 


ej 


*i 


■ cs 


t/1 




es ; 


• CO 


c 


« 




:■% ? 




C 
a* 


2 t-" 



a ^ 





^_ 







•!^ 5 K IS 2; 



CO 






Co f~i 



S ^ 



S5 



3 . . 
O O to 

" d" w 



« . 

re 
C2 CS 



•^ 



286 



City Doce.ment No. 34. 



'e 



't?. 



CO 

fo 






w> 






5 
O 



o6 ^ 



^ 











^ 


CO 








CJ C5 






OO • 00 






^" 1— ( 


1 




.S .5 . 


1 


i 


— o 4S 2 "S 


1 


^ 


*n cC •« OT c3^ 


1 


c: 


3 tn 3 ^ ^H 


1 


P 


^ 3 M c C 




o 


o o o 




K 


Contract. 

Built by c 

Contract. 
Built by c 

Built by c 






OO CO (M ira in CO 






CO 5^ i-i o t^ to 




■s 


^ O -* CO O l^ 




CO ^; "■ »o <M O 




o 


\r. -^ ^^ 'n (?J_ 




O 


crT co~ t-H oT 






' ^ 










'. f-> 










i> 




^ 






fe 




.5 
"C 






• , ^ • , Oi 




0) 






rain, 
ain. 

ain. 
rain. 

irick 

rain. 
Irain. 
rain. 




ct 








g 






j 


c 






sewer, 
sewer, 
sewer. 
C. B. d 
louse-di 
ns. 

sewor. 
ouse dr 
C. B. d 
ns. 

3 ft. , 1; 
sewer. 
C R d 

C. B. c 
house-d 
iins. 
ts. 




c 








c 










c 








1 


cu 








s 






.CCCC .- .3 • C -^ .C3CC?*^ 








00 >c c-'i O -T "" • ri "7 O ^ '*^ C^'l IN O ti CO CO 














c 


CO 


coCiOCO -cooo O — Ot- O' 






CO 


-*iOocOO -cooo ^-^coao O 




'■ 4-S 


=o 


•^i ->! CO 1--^ O ; ic iM O ■*" O O O o 




♦^ i> 




!M O CO !M t^ . -^ C^ O (M 30 t^ l^ O 




br. 1) 


o 


c: .-1 CO . ?; i~ o <M CO 00 


1 


0) 


t-T 


^ : '^ 




t-5 




^ J . t , V J 


' • ^ " " 












, 


'. '. ■ TS 














c 


'a 3 














3 

o 


on roa 

St a 














'Ti 


j3 <^ 








c 

(D 






CS 


: 3 ^ oi 






O 








3 OS 






pq 






<» " 


id A 

ate 
line 












. Mary 
fort St, 

y St. ai 

larlesg 
Brook] 


H 










^ 










< 










m : ^ ^ 


s 














—sr—' ' ' ^-v— ' 








^s .■ 


; ' 








b. . 


.. - . , 








e • 








c 


^ : 


; J " ', 










- ^z 








<;t*^ . • « « 






r7^ 


• to . - ^ M 






3 


Brovght 
eerfield 

•y St. . . 

itier St. 
ountfor 

ewbury 










a 


h- 1 


S ^ ^ 





Street Department — Sewer Division. 



287 



c3 '=: 









c c c : a o 



lO ■X « t^ C-. IC tC -H 

O ■— t5 CC CC -f Ci 

— ,-1 — • CO CO 1- 



be ci 



-^^ 


S 






3 


« 


^ 






^ 


B 


H) 






SS 


<? 




!-. 


^ 





Oi QJ Ol OJ 

.£-.S"3 3 

.E .5 .S .5 

10 -M O 01 



O 



t£ ■" 



So 




? c« 



PM 



; 


^ 


.i 




5 C 


> 




tC!:; 




















-^ 
















« 








a 


■*-* 




~ 


'3 




^ 


* c 






C E 






^ c 




« 


^ a] 




<o 


<; 


P*i 







28S 



City Document No. 34. 



5si 






S CO 



o 



4_> QJ 

be O) 





a3 


cu 


a; 


6 


n3 


QJ 


•" 




a, &, 


o- c- & 


ft 


S^ 




















C ft 


ft O. p. 


ft 








- 




- 


^ 




X 




c 


c 


C 


c 


c 


a 






"-• 


•r-t 




"7* 






s 




lO 


I>l 


IM 


C^J 


■>} 


(M 






'"*' 


'"' 


'"' 


'^ 


^ 


'"' 


o 


(M 


r^ eo 


tfi 00 O 


iM 


on 


<M 


•* 


o 


•^ 


■* 


lO 


CO 


t^ 


O 


». 


^H 


H2 


(M 


o 


,^ 


eo 


CO 


.— * 


t^ 


C5 


lO 


10 


■* 


CD 


C«j 


-^ 


o 


C^ 




e^ 







M 



W 



'Sfa 



;o 



^ r-l 



CS 



Ol 






•2 



; „ CM n3 -2 



^= =s i: c _ 



— " >- o; 1- — t. 



3 4-1 











5i ^ 






«2 =« 
?; fc =j 

® '« o 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



289 



























d 










Is 










.2 




^* 














cr 


CJ 

o 


C.0 


bo 








C5 C5 C- 


O M 

tH OP 


o- 


^ 


c- 




'o .i: "3 








C C C 






00 
.S 


bti o j; 
c £ S 

— a; c 












>^ 


w 


S S 3 

Si 






s 


'3 "5 "= 


CC 1^ 


o — ■;: 


1) 










Ph 


^ ^ ^ 


. ^ 


"o .- . . 


> 


^ 






o cj CJ y CJ 


£ cj i> w 


y 


o 


a 




rt ct c; c" 


ce 


C ci K r 


rA 


rt 


2^-S 


C3 




u u ^ t- 


;^ 


^ =- !- S- 




^ 


>-< 








fc-^j-J *^ *. 








K O ^ 






c c c c 


C 


s- S = c 


C 


c 


C 




c o o o o 
OOOO O 


0; o o o o 

t>ooo O 


o 
O 


w 


C 


) 


^ 








CO O iM IM 


O 


l^ O 00 o « 


o 


CO 


t^ V 




rl -;f< C5 ■- 


»o 


O 1— c^ t- 


Ci 




-* 


O i-H 


• 


O O C£! 55 t^ 


C5 -^ <M ?- 


C5 


o 


CO 


O ,-1 


GO 


1 r-< »0 CO 


CI — ' !M -^ CO 


00 


C5 






— o 


o 


O -* -r 


t- 






O Ci 


a 


m 


,-r 


■>ii' rj cvT 


GO 






lo" 


CO d" 




















c^ 






,-^ 










,---. 




«= 


-a 


























c 


























e: 


























CO ■""• 


















^ 








t: .2 


















_CJ 








O ^H 


















"S 








*S ^ 


















^ 




























































i S 




o 




o cj 


6 6 6 


6 6 






jj o 


o 






-*< 




c a, 




& a 






=- a 
































« 




^ 




& A 


"Z^ Z- c^ 


z~ a, 




co'H, 


&i 






- 




r r 


r r r 


r r 






X r 




.N 








c* 




c c 


c c d 


.S ^ 






g 








*v 




"T "7* 


•^ •" •--' 










•>- 










■M 




IC ■M 


ic i.o ri 


«•'! li 






"^".5 


C<1 








'"' 




1— ( 1— 1 


1— 1 ^ ■— I 


t— 1 1—, 






Cq rH 








c 




00 




o "O 


IC >o o 


o => 






"O O 


If 


ei; 




"^ 




o 




^ CO 


cc t-- O 


c o 






•": '^ 


■:; 


CO 


-S -tJ 




^ 




i~^ <m' 


O (N t^ 


d d 






d d 


c- 


1 d 






-t< 




f— 1 1^ 


rt 1^ Ji 


O CO 






Tf :r5 


OC 


1 ^' 




CO 




CO 0^ 


CO .-o ^ 


— » 






IM 




























OJ >— 1 






















i ^ 


K^ 


















.__^ 
^~^ 








1 








Ol 






, 


• a> 








-^ TI 




















> 




aJ jj 


c 


• c 








M — 














ei 




ctf =" 


IS 


-t>' -5 


^ 






C 

c4 M 








c 




■3 






o 

-3 




^ 












0) 




r3 




Hi 

0* 0^ 




^1 


r3 

c 










o 






^ 




— -^ _ 




c 
o 
O 












' 








































































^« 










































=.;:! 








'tj 
































-1 












_e 




























•j^ t; 








::3 




01 ^• 
>■ * n 


1« 








« 










c c 
c c 








P 


' I " cS 


0) 


*i^ M 'A ^ 


-4^ 


? 


a S 


C C 










-, C ■// 


3 












-^ 






C — fc- '- 

c i, 1/ r: 


Xi 


u a, i> — 


o 


'£ 




a; c 

^ > 










V 


33 5J li ~ 


^ 


- 


c^ 


*J »J 




e 






t 




-< 


pi 


p: 




C 




c 


^ 


^4 


r^ 




S 


^X 


p^ 


<« 




C 





290 



City Document No. 34. 



O 



4> ^S 



^ 






^-1 = 



O 




O 



o 



'^ 


C5 o 


o 


CO 


CI >o 




CO O 


o 


Ci 


c; t^ 


>« 


rH CO 


o 


lO 


o n- 




1- o 


o 


to 


^1 "M 


■31 


lO 00 


o> 


o 


cc o 














CO CO 









rt c^ ^ 



a —I 



o H =« 



cc 



Geo "S 

- s: ^ s; 

t- <u c ? i: 

?^ S K = 

12; o o 



'^ 



C C C E 



C CI t^ <M 

00 T O O 
L- ■* l- 



> -2 



(D S 






CO c "-i oj 
= 2:= = 

-5 ^ 



3 _&i 

ft 'a, 



<M I «D 



i o c tu 
— P- I' to 



PL| Ph 



: 6 



(Ih Ph 



eg -^ ab 

(D *-< C 

— rt O) •- 
cS !- CJ -3 

- *j r^ CO 

~ cc .= ^ 

Ph Ph^ 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



291 











a; 




0/ 




o 


0) 












c 




^* 




!_:, 


a. 


































a 


ni 


a 




&. &.(M 










c 


C 


r^ 




c 


c 


X 










Oi 


a 




^ 


Oi 


0^ 


























0; 0) 


■^ 


c 




c 


'H 


;h 


c 


■p,'ft'5-'a 


0^ 


t- 




k. 


0) 


OJ 




.- 


" 


»- 


•^ 


•^ 


#- 


" 


^ 


•^ 


•- 




_c 


c 


_c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


.5 


.s 


4h 


lO 


"M 


CO o o o o o o 


CO 






•— • 




»— « 


f— ' 


1— < 


i-H 


I-H 


f— t 


?— t 


<M 



CO I CO 



c< - 
O u 



i 'O •— 



O) ^ ^ 



O 



>. . 




rt 


Ci (A 


^ 


M 


^ 1> 


a 


i 


t- !-. 


Uh 


3h 


c a 


0) 


01 


uO 


^ 


•^ 



2 K w o 




Cj 


^ 






,i<J 




t- 


ca 


►;^ 


S 



292 



City Document No. 3t. 









a ^ 



•A 
O 











t4 

o 














«*-. 








tT 








o 
















o 








si 








^ 
















s 








o 








O lo 




-S 




^0) ^i 




^ 






5 




■ £ S 2 




s 




is Ch 




a) 




O J 








t^-- ^ 
^s. ^ 






^1 > 












is 
















's-( 








01 
















ci 








S 








13 








C 








cd 








on 




Oi G^ QJ O ID ^ C 




C 




o^ Q, & a. a Cu cli 


o 












p. a, a & &( =1. Oh 


C 








s 

S 




E c _c 6 _c _d _c 






C<) ^ 'C c!l ■M (TJ Cq 






i-H OJ i-H ^ r-H i-J ^ 




c 




as lo o o o o 00 


1 CO 


• t-H 




-<1- rH 32 "O O --H — ' 


1 CO 


^ +^ 




« CO >— O i-i O 1^ 


1 >^ 


be u 




o — ^ X I- 'O <:£ 


C5 


Cfs, 




^^ CO CO T— ( CO ■* CO 


-*_ 


0) 




1— < •— < 


■*" 


Hi 




w-- 










• jj _ • 












* CO 4_3 


' l-H 










. ,^ «M • 












t» -i^ 












"n^3-" 


«£q 










OJ P-i ^ 


^-T3 








d 


1^1^1-25 








0) 


o -■« " "o C o a; 




>< 
H 








■> 


>J 








) 










O 
































c 








































^ 




6 






CO 










"t; > 












"3 


" cS 


CO 


C 








m 


ID « 
^ C *- 


be en rt 










li; Igl 










•— t aj ^ *^ fc- o 












CCl 


^ 


;^ 


^ 







Street Department — Sewer Division. 



293 



Work done for and paid hj Paving- Division, including- 
the following Class of Work: Building and Repairing 
Culverts, Surface Drains, Catch-Basins, and Sewers. 



Alclermanic District, No. 1 
Aldermanic District, No. 2 
Alclermanic District, No. 3 
Aldermanic District, No. 4 . 
Aldermanic District, No. 5 . 
Aldermanic District, No. 7 . 
Aldermanic District, No. 8 . 
Aldermanic District, No. 9 . 
Aldermanic District, No. 11 
Aldermanic District, No. 12 
Street Improvements, Wards 1 and 2 
Street Improvements, Ward 3 
Street Improvements, Ward 5 
Street Improvements, Ward 6 
Street Improvements, Ward 7 
Street Improvements, Wards 7 and 8 
Street Improvements, Ward 8 
Street Improvements, Wards 9 and 10 
Street Improvements, Ward 10 . 
Street Improvements, Ward 12 . 
Street Improvements, Ward 14 . 
Street Improvements, Ward 15 . 
Street Improvements, Wards 17 and 18 
Street Improvemenis, Wards 19 and 2 
Street Improvements, Ward 20 . 
Street Improvements, Wards 23 and 2 
Street Improvements, AVard 24 . 
Commonwealth ave.. Construction 
Washington St., Ward 25 
Ruth-st. Extension 
Lewis-st. Extension 
NewDort St. 
Mill St. 
'I'hetford st. 
INIillet St. . 
Talbot ave. 
Blue Hill ave., Paving 



$2,370 8Q 

1,173 50 

77 18 

479 41 

92 34 

215 52 

581 91 

4,225 75 

2,013 20 

217 15 

2,791 92 

16 75 

308 19 

681 20 

75 

151 

<S67 

525 

785 

124 26 

25 85 

18 68 

1,313 77 

1,202 03 

376 22 

1,514 77 

7,908 87 

46,400 65 

3.298 62 

109 36 

114 21 

109 22 

131 10 

9 09 

545 38 

3,002 04 

439 79 



88 
85 
73 
64 

60 



b,295 49 



294 



City Document No. 34. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Sewers. 



City Proper 










$33,287 


39 




Charlestown 










1,121 


88 




Briiihton 










142,062 


30 




East Boston 






\ 




7,010 


62 




South Boston 










1,598 


73 




Dorchester . 










61,920 


41 




Roxbury 










82,163 


99 




West Roxbury 










56,620 


99 










$385,786 31 


Catch-basins. 




City Proper .... 


$7,122 


12 




Charlestown 










4,463 


92 




Brighton 








- 


4,484 


44 




East Boston 










7,643 


09 




South Boston 










802 


64 




Dorchester . 










4,713 


53 




Roxbury 










6,267 


80 




West Roxbury 










1,024 


75 










36,522 29 
102,739 39 


Improved Sewerage maintenance 






Stony Brook Improvement . 






11,948 81 


Building stables and sheds, Brighton 






511 00 


Yard, Revere st. ... 






2,933 05 


Miscellaneous .... 






275,525 08 




$315,965 93 



Of the above, 
Division. 



?,883.58 was for streets resurfaced by Paving 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



295 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months 
ending- January 31, 1895. 



District. 



City 

Cliarlestown . 
East Boston. . 

Briijliton 

Soutli Boston 
Dorchester. . . 
Roxliury . . . . 
WestRoxbury 

Total 



Built by the 
City, by Coa- 

traot or 
Day l>abor. 

Feet. 



5.377.39 

422. 12 

1,322 90 

32,fi(U.19 

357.95 

15,016.74 

22,447.42 

13,194.00 



90,802 77 



Built by 
Private Parties 



Feet. 



1()0.41 



376.93 



17,035.52 
2,806.86 
4,497.33 



24,877.05 



Total 

Length built 

during itie 12 

Momhs ending 

Jan. 31, 1895. 

Feet. 



5,537.80 

4 22.12 

1,322.90 

83 041.12 

357.95 

32.052.26 

25,254.28 

17,U91.39 



115.079.82 



226 catch-bnsins built. 

445 '^ repaired. 

21 manholes built. 

249 " repaired. 

1,125,151 linear feet of sewers flushed. 

655.30 cu. yds. of material removed from sewers. 

6,913 cateh-basins cleaned. 

19,652.55 cu. yds. of material removed from catch-basins. 

2,646 feet of culverts built. 

245 " " " rei)aired. 

There are now 384.72 miles of sewers in charge of the Sewer 
Divi:5ion. 

Tile amount expended by this division during the twelve months 
ending January 31, 1S95, including the amount spent under special 
appropriations, was $815,965.93. 

The items of expenditure are shown in the financial statement. 



29G 



City Document No. 34, 



Schedule of Sewers built to Date in the City of Boston. 



Wards. 


Feet. 


Wards. 


Feet. 




1 


81,717 
4 2,916 
31.794 
42,102 
40,018 
45.945 
37,032 
18,636 
27,247 
38.382 
76,431 
42,146 
52,654 

pting sewers. 

Total . . . 


14 


75.777 

48,336 

31,626 

42,765 

59,573 

47.3(14 

106.987 

133,218 

124,476 

191,434 

3->4.6(;5 

148,892 




2 


15 




3 


16 




4 


17 




5. ..,.,.., . 


18 




6 


10 




7 .. 


20 




8 


21 




9 


'-'2 




10 


23 




11 


24 




12 


25 . . . 




13.. . . 






Interce 


1,912,073 


302.13 miles. 
22 59 " 












384.72 miles. 













Street Department — Sewer Division. 



297 



Fall of Rain and Snow in inches at South Yard, Albany 
Street, in twelve months ending- January 31, 1895. 



Day. 


a 

O 






<1 


1 


o 
c 
3 


3 
1-5 


be 

< 


S 

CI 

Hi 


C 

o 


C 

o 

Z 
o 


s 

<V / 

o 

Ol 

.40 


5 

c 
<-> 


1 


.19 
.04 
.14 




2 








.02 




3 








.18 
.06 


.10 

.04 






.40 
1.56 




4 


.17 




.39 


.00 
.22 
.40 


.09 


.22 

.28 














.13 


.42 








.12 


.04 






8 .... 












.25 


.15 


9 


.28 

.2(3 




1.21 










.38 
1.27 


.08 


.57 




]0 








.58 






] 1 












MS 


12 












.01 










.79 




18 


.88 


.19 

.07 


1.54 












.01 
.13 




]4 






.05 


.25 


".08 


1.12 


.02 


15 


.SQ 










Ifi 












.49 


17 














.09 


.13 




.09 






IS 








.01 








n 


.3+ 






.14 














2.15 


1.09 




.13 

.10 


.19 




21 




.16 


.OG 




.33 


.78 
.40 

1.12 


.22 


22 












23 




.32 


".17 


.03 






24 






25 




.01 


1.05 








.19 




.52 






1.30 


1.09 


27 














.01 


2.;i3 








.24 




.80 


.01 












•nj 


17 














.C2 
3.19 


4.34 




31 








05 










.59 






2.98 


.99 


3.50 


4.03 


.83 


3.22 




2.24 


5.22 




Totals 


3.18 


8.88 



Note. — Total for twelve months, 37.6 inches. 



298 



City Document Xo. 34, 



CO 



s 


« 


o 


s 




?■ 




>< 


C8 


"> 


-u 




xn 




6c 


on 




M 


s: 


» 


f- 


M 



« 


^ 


s 


s 


f 




H 




C8 


•*-, 



4) 







1 p> 


^ 




-I 




^ 


t_ 


_^ 


Oi 






^ 
























Ol 


CO 












•TlBjnicy: 1 <N 




'-' 


CO 




CO 


IM 




o 


CO 


CO 


CO 






to 


■» 


IM 


CO 


to 


fM 








1^ 




— ^si 


































•pasn [BOO <^i 


^ 










a> 


l-^ 


o 


tt> 


to 




m 




•sqi 001 -i^ii •'^ni-w S 


■* 


n 


[^ 


t^ 


f?l 


o 


-* 


to 




Ol 


-f 


01 




ai .Cjnp aSciaAu A'[iu(i "*. 


^ 


c^ 






'^V 




"-I 


CO 




CO 


CO 



















Ol 














""" 


•^ 


CO 


CO 




t- 






'- 


to 










' OD 


-p 


05 


"M 


CO 


— ; 


00 


,^ 


to 


_( 


to 




J^ 




•jaaf 1 


^ 












Ol 


in 


Ol 


CO 









at ;jii oSe-iaAu .<[icc[ 1 ^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


10 

CO 




■ t— 




(M 


,-~ 


t» 


o 




tC 


oo 








1 .— ( 




•pasti ]r;o3 jo panod 1 g 


to 


s 






i^ 




fcJ 


o 


00 




^ 


! CI 




aad paduiQcl 8U0[|B9 1 (^^ 


(M 


O) 


0-1 


Ol 


01 


Ol 


Ol 


Ol 


IM 




01 


1 -- 




•sjajfnip 1 "^ 


O 


t- 


^ 


CO 


CO 


r* 


r-l 


oq 


■* 


Ol 


CO 


1 ''' 






























p^B saqsB JO -I'lai laj 1 "^ 
























1 






,— 1 


-t* 


CO 


CO 


1^ 


00 


t^ 


lO 




1^ 


T^ 




































•pasa JROD 


o> 


1— 1 


OJ 


o 










Ol 


CO 


CO 


in 


i " 




epnnod o3ii.iaAB i^iiBQ; 


CO 


o 

CO 


!N 


o< 


o 

Ol 


Ol 


o3 


Ol 


o5 


^ 


Ol 


to 

CO 


1 "^ 




lo 


l^ 


05 




rH 


ai 


-t 


IM 


lO 


no 




^^ 




































o 


O 
























•padrand o 


o 




o 


1^ 


CO 


o 


Ol" 


CO 


^ 


in* 








eno[iuS aSiuaAu A|ib(i £ 


CI 


o 




s 










00 


CO 


Ol 
00 











OJ 


0-1 


CO 


oo 


-rfl 


-n 


'O 


^ 




in 


^4* 










to 




uo 


to 




to 






CO 








c» 




(^I 


OD 


-f 


to 


lo 


oo 


to 


ilO 










































t— 


(» 




t— ' 










in 


oo 


CO 


1- 








,_, 




Ol 


to 


1^ 


o 


CO 


.f4 


00 


rH 


r_J^ 








•padrand 


§ 








TO 


CO 




o 


r/^ 


t- 


Ol 




to 




8n01[BS 1B(0X 




.-^ 


o 


lo" 


(M 


^ 


tc 


Ol 




^ 




^ 








































'f 


CO 


Ol 


t^ 


00 


C5 


t- 


o 






to 


00 






IM 


IM 


(N 


'-" 


-' 


-' 


'-' 


" 


01 


01 


01 


IM 


in" 
01 










































00 




















































































































































Ti<' 


•padcand 


m 


-1- 


3 


o 




uO 


to 




-* 


!» 


tii 





J:: 




w 


HUO[lBf) 


•(^ 


ccT 


.(-T 


to* 


o 


otT 


^ 


to 




itO* 


to" 


1^ 










































































































" 


■^ 
















^ 


^ 


^ 








ira 




to 




Ol 


trs 










^ 




<;o 


<N 


o 


















?H 


lO 






•aim; gaidcnnj "^E? 


-H 


^ 


in 


o 


Ol 


o 


^ 


o 
o 


^ 


to 


in 


01 






-5^° 


^^ 


^^ 










'^ 


■■' 




^~ 




00' 










OD 










•^ 


OD 


-f 


^ 


o 


IM 








































O 


lO 


o 


CO 


to 


tf 


Oi 


CO 






Ol 












1^ 


t^ 




VD 




00 


r-l 


r-4 









-r 






■padnind 2 


1!.~ 


o 




or- 




OS 




o 


CO 




■^ 


to 






saoiiBQ o 


^ 




^ 


^ 


J^ 


^ 


to" 


o 


od' 


Oi 


r-T 


01 




H 
K 
































o 




03 


oo 


00 


o 




a> 


CO 


£31 











































































































CO 






o 




CO 


CO 






H 




»n 


CO 


CO 


OO 




-* 


r-l 


-Tl< 


-* 


CI 


TH 


l-l 






•aiunSuidoinj ;g 


J° 


;^ 


o 


CO 


c^ 


Ol 


r? 


te 

Ol 


in 


•* 


01 

CO 


to 






■ ■ t:?^ 


*- 


"^ 


■^ 




to 






to 


IM 


to 




00 




























1^ 












IN 


co- 


o 


00 


OD 


IM 


05 


-t< 


CO 


OD 


-fl 


CO 


Ol 










































t^ 


C.5 


r^ 


o 


01 


to 


OD 


Ol 




I— • 


01 


CO 






•padnind 


to 


ro" 




'^l 




^^ 




Ol 




















to 






















































» 


snoiiBO 


^ 


Ol 


^ 




05 


ira 




o 


lO 




en" 


CO 


oT 






































-* 


CO 


CO 


















CO 


































01 




1 o 


.ra 


>Q 


^ 




.-^ 




o 


o 


in 


o 


in 


in 




W 


<« 


(M 


■* 


C-I 




o 


Ol 






CO 




01 


CO 




•oniu Suidoan,! "'?, 


S 


JJ 


-* 


o 


Si 


CO 


-* 








to 


to 






|t-co 










r^ 








"^ 




01 


2 




















^1 


oo 


oo 






»n 




t^ 


f^ 










































CO 


T— 1 


, 








Ol 








o 


Ol 


CO 






-: 


•padcand 


CO 


O 
-* 










Ol 


CO 


^ 




t' 


00 - 


s 


2 






K 


8U01[B£) 




^ 




















in" 


CO 


,c 








































O 


















'-' 






•-* 


01 


■"I 


'-' 


o_ 




f5 








































































-* 










uo 


Ol 




CO 


Ol 




rH 




01 






•acaii Saiduinj 


>-^ •* 


ir, 












^ 


en 




in 




IM 


^ 
























































•-1 










'■^ 




1^ 




. 














• 




f-l 




1^ 


£4 in 


. 






































IS 5 


^ 
















3 


4) 


J3 

a 


,noD 


£ 






.Q 


it 
ca 


:~. 


>, 

a 


a 


>» 


61) 

3 


»< 


o 


> 
o 


OJ 


a 








• 


fe 


;a 


< 




1^ 




1-3 


1-5 


<i 


OQ 


o 


^ 


« 


►t 







Street Department — Sewer Division. 



2ii9 



The following table shows the amounts of sludge received in, 

and removed from, deposit sewers each month from February 1, 
1894, to January 31 , 1895 : 

Months. Received. 

February 612 cubic yards 

jMarch 475 " 

April 838 " 

May n79 " 

June 558 " 

July 927 '• 

August S64 " 

September 549 '' 

October 821 '• 

November 344 '' 

December 4(10 '• 

January, 1895 517 '• 



'ds. 


394 


cubic 


V 


ards 




478 










400 










477 










558 










711 










711 










711 










032 










n.To 










557 


1 1 








398 









7,044 



6,582 



Property in Charge of the Sew-er Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street. 

Sewer 3'ard, with building, on North Grove street. 

Sevver yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. This 
is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were erected by the 
Sewer Department. 

Sevver yard, Avith shed, on Boylston street, Jamaica Plain. 

Small lot of land on Stony brook, corner of Centre street, 
Ward 21. 

Gatehouse on Stony brook, Pynch>)n street, built in 1881). 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Kutherford avenue, Charlestown. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, corner Paris and Marion streets. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Eiist Chester park, near Albany 
street. 

A small shed on Cypiess street, Ward 9, on land hired by the 
city. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on AVestern avenue, Ward 25. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Revere street, City. 



300 



City Document No. 34. 



y. 
•H 

a 

o 

•iH 

S 

o 

;;> 

u 

OD 

o 



QO 







i^ >o 


CO 


1 






■^ 9 


00 






w l-I 


d 


-^ 


<^ 


O t^ 


t^ 


C5 


^^ 


00 CO 


co_ 


00 


fe, 








o"-* 


lo" 






C5 IM 


^ 






lO 3i' 


^i- 






00 o 


Ci 




"S 


d 1-^ 


r^ 


CO 


o « 


CO 


o 


.'u 


■^_CO 


co^ 


00 


c^ 








o"!^" 


d 






■;c s>) 


OO 






?o CO 


C5 






-q- t^ 


»— 1 






00 o 


ifi 


c^l 


"^ 


i-l -o 


00 


Ci 


"iJ 


CC lO 


00 


OO 


►*. 






1— 1 


-H Cq" 


CO 






t- CO 


o 






00 -* 


C-I 






— sq 


-* 


^ 


■Ki 


d -*' 
»o — ■ 


■^ 


o 


ON 


ci^ t-- 


d 


00 


t*, 






r-i 


do 


d" 






»0 CO 


t~ 






>o o 


lO 






CvJ rH 


CO 




^ 


d » 


30 


o 


o — 




o 




C<l CO 


-* 


Xi 


t^ 








-r t-^ 








0~\ 1-1 


-rf 






CO lO 


00 






o -^ 


^i- 






cc' — 1 


-* 


C5 


*^ 


C 02 


o; 


00 




o -^ 




CO 


t*H 








dec 


CO 






CO — 


^ 






bi 










o 










X! 










.5 




















^ 












4J 






■^ 


-^ 






tM 


3 






O 


-Q 






,jj 


■4-a 






o 


01 






=C tf 


<v 






t- r 


«M 






"^ *- 


i^-l 






c i 


O 






iJ - 


Si 






^1 
















, s 


s 








c 






CJ C 








>> > 


, 




^ X 


o 








H 






















S ^ 








pqp: 




1 



Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 



301 



"f 



Faueuil Street. 
Labor .... 
Bricks, 657,653 
Cement, 1,483 bbls. 
Sand, 60 double loads 
Manhole frames and covers, 18 
Manhole steps, 75 . 
Teaming 

Lumber, 18,407 feet 
Pipe .... 
Trench-machine hire 
Engine-hire . 
Blacksmithing and hardware 
Profiles, centres, etc. 
Tide-gates 
Fuel and oil . 
Miscellaneous supplies . 
Water .... 
Water-pipe 



Size cmd Length of Seicer. 
12.60 feet 48-in., iron pipe. 
710.49 feet 3 ft. 9 in. x 3 ft. llf in., brick. 
42. (1 7 feet 4 ft. cir. brick. 
432.24 feet 4 ft. 9 in. x 5 ft. 0^ in., brick. 
Overflow and tide-gates. 



;16,1S1 44 

7,234 18 

1,853 75 

117 45 

172 21 

1,166 00 
29:i 80 
546 48 
970 83 
575 00 
236 50 
501 31 
349 40 
437 23 
117 80 
471 57 
194 52 

;31,419 47 



'{ 



Geneva Ayemie 
Labor .... 
Bricks, 103,750 
Cement, 228 bbls. . 
Sand, 73^ double loads . 
Gravel, 12 double loads . 
M. H. frames and covers, 10 
Powder 
Ynse 
Caps ) 
Teaming 

Lumber, 9,434 feet 
Pipe .... 
Hardware and blacksmithins; 



Size and Length of Sewei'. 

700.10 feet 2x3 ft., brick. 
734.14 feet 24 in., i^ipe. 
210.30 feet 18 in., pipe. 
525.55 feet 15 in., i)ipe. 
454.91 feet 12 in., |)ipe. 



$7,775 03 

1,141 25 

285 00 

132 30 

18 15 

66 50 

154 90 



154 


50 


146 


22 


1,839 


80 


255 


65 


$11,969 30 



302 



City Document No. 34. 



Pond Street, May to Avon. 

W. T. D:ivis, contractor 

Inspection 

CY'iiifnt, 74 bids. 

iM. H. frames and covers, 10 

Teaming 

Pipe .... 

Fuel and oil . 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Water .... 

Resurfacing street by Paving Division 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

80.71 feet 24 in., pipe. 
749.73 feet 15 in., pipe. 



5.502 


73 


378 


50 


88 


25 


79 


69 


21 


50 


1,667 


37 


416 


00 


41 


26 


255 


07 


928 


60 



S,967 13 



Mt. Vernon Street, Centre to Pleasant. 



Labor . 












S2,539 10 


Bricks, 70,500 












846 00 


Cement, 245 bbls. . 












275 60 


Sand, 39 double loads 












. . 43 46 


Gravel, 4 double loads 












4 32 


Teaming 












376 25 


Lumber, 3,000 feet 












48 75 


Pipe 












143 20 


Trench-machine hire 












287 60 


P"ngiue-hire . 












172 oO 


Fuel and oil . 












176 95 


Blacksmithing 












218 50 


Miscellaneous supplies 












61 20 














$5,193 43 



49.15 feet 2 ft 
299.60 feet 15 in 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

X 3 ft., brick, 
pipe. 



Dover Street. 



Labor . 
Bricks, 83,000 
Cement, 422 bbls. . 
Sand, 102 double loads 
Gravel, 38 double loads 
M. H. frames and covers, 2 
M. H. steps, 84 
Castings to order 



12,052 64 

830 00 

607 75 

183 60 

67 50 

66 32 



Carrii'd forward^ 



$13,807 81 



Street Department — Sewer Division, 



503 



Brovgli t forica rd, 
Teamino' 

Liimbeis 34,800 feet 
Pipe 

I'rofiles, centres, etc. 
Pile driving . 
Blacksniithiug 
Fuel and oil 
Granite curl)ing 
Miscellaneous supplies and hai 



dwar 



$13,807 


81 


736 


00 


511 


58 


61 


12 


100 


67 


165 


(0 


87 


66 


98 


11 


50 


00 


367 


11 



SI 5,985 06 



Size and Lerig'h of Sevx-r. 
442 feet 3 ft. 4 in. x 4 ft. 6 in., brick. 

Massachusetts Avenue. 

Labor 

Bricks, 52,650 

Cement, 165 bbls. . 

Sand, 47 double loads 

Gravel, 30 double loads 

Teaming 

Lumlier'^ 30,362 feet 

Pipe 

Granite 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Fuel and oils 

Blacksmithing 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Ironwork 



Size and Length of Sewer 

214.31 feet 6 ft. x 6 ft. 4^ in., brick. 
15 feet 4 ft. X 4 ft. 2a in., brick. 
100 feet 4 ft. dr., brick. 
Tide-gate chamber and sump. 



7,176 


40 


526 


50 


198 


00 


84 


60 


48 


00 


916 


50 


438 


72 


7 


19 


50 


00 


168 


56 


33 


22 


8 


01 


135 


97 


250 


71 



SI 0,042 38 



Common wealth-aYenue Outlet. 
Labor .... 
Pricks, 110.250 
Cement, 302 bbls. . 
Sand, 12 double loads 
M. IL Frames and covers, 6 
M. H. steps, 100 . 
Teaming 
Luml)cr, 34,451 feet 

Carried fornard , 



^5,590 57 
1,212 75 



356 


00 


23 


40 


47 


15 


55 


00 


305 


50 


562 


53 



!,152 90 



304 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 
Pipe 

Protiles, centres, etc. 
Treocli-macliine hire 
Engine-hire . 
Fuc4 and oil . 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Seiuer. 
1,081.80 feet 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft. 9 in., brick. 



Faneuil Yalley Overflow Outlet. 



Size and Length of Seicer. 

114.46 feet 3 ft. 9 in., circular brick. 
13.00 feet 5 ft. 6 in., circular brick. 
125.00 feet 5 ft. X o ft., wood. 
1 tide- sate M. H. 



^,152 90 

118 14 

51 66 

204 00 

122 50 

120 17 

99 35 

^,868 72 



Labor . 












$2,752 67 


Bricks, 21,750 












239 25 


Cement, 65 bbls. . 












81 25 


Sand, 12 double loads 












23 40 


Teaming 












121 50 


Lumber, 1,2.t0 feet 












22 50 


Centres, profiles, etc. 












83 15 


Tide-gates, 2 . 












161 96 


JMiscellaneous supplies 












72 50 


• 


$3,558 18 



Fairbanks Street, Br 

Labor 

Bricks, 143.500 

Cement, 350 bbls. . 

Sand, 83 double loads 

jNI. H. frames and covers, 4 

Teaming 

Lumber, 3,733 feet 

Pipe 

Trench-machine hire 

Engine-hire 

Centres, profiles, etc. 

Fuel and oil . 

Hardware, tools, and blacksmithing 



ighton. 



^5,807 78 

1,578 50 

437 50 

161 85 

27 53 

248 50 

57 41 

173 31 

140 00 

87 50 

42 40 

39 63 

178 11 



^980 02 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



305 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

12.60 feet 48 in., iron pipe. 
710.49 feet 3 ft. 9 in. x 3 ft 
42.07 feet 4 ft., circular brick. 
432.24 feet 4 ft. 9 in. x 5 ft. OJ in. 
Overflow and tide-oates. 



llf in. 



brick, 
brick. 



Mt. Ternou Street, Pleasant Street to Garfield Avenue. 

James Dolan . 

Labor 

Cement, 86A bbls. . 

M. H. frames and covers, 5 

Teaming 

Pipe .... 

Coal .... 

Water .... 



$1,955 


28 


206 


50 


98 


32 


39 


87 


67 


50 


556 


96 


7 


28 


144 


96 



$3,076 67 



Size and Length of Seioer. 
1,189.65 feet 12 in., pipe. 

Parkway, between Pond and Centre Streets. 

Labor .... 

Bricks, 23,900 

Cement, 77 bbls. 

Sand, 16^ double loads . 

M. H. frames and covers, 17 

M. H. steps, 72 

Teaming 

Lumber, 3,622 feet 

Pipe 

Fuel and oil . 

Hlacksmithing 

AVater . 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and I^ength of Sewer, 
2,811.62 feet 12 in., pipe. 



583 


33 


260 


90 


96 


25 


29 


88 


153 


26 


152 


75 


61 


57 


904 


59 


3 


30 


27 


80 


281 


16 


22 


93 



t,577 62 



Stratford Avenue. 




Labor ........ 


$2,233 37 


Bricks, 47,750 


573 00 


Cement, 148^ bbls. . " . 


181 23 


8und, 21 double loads ..... 


36 75 


Gravel, 26 double loads ..... 


45 50 



Carried forvjard. 



$3,069 85 



506 



City Document No. 34. 



Brought forivard, 












$3,069 


85 


M. H. fr 


ames and covers 


,2 17 


92 


Teaming 


by contractors 












45 


on 


Lumber, 


7,246 feet 












119 


32 


Pipe 
Fuel 


• 












41 

3 


47 
00 


Profiles, 


centres, etc. 












71 


40 


Water 


. 


X 










29 


81 


Blacksmitbing, etc. 












72 


14 


N. Y., ^ 


^ H., &H. R.E 


.. Co 










101 


48 






$3,571 


3^ 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
298.14 feet 2 ft. X 3 in., brick. 

Prince Street. 

M. Kiernan, contractor . 

Labor .... 

Cement, 45 bbls. 

M. H. frames and covers, 8 

Teaming 

Pipe .... 

Coal .... 

Water .... 

Resurfacing street by Paving Division 



,184 


35 


28 


00 


50 


80 


63 


49 


5 


50 


566 


28 


1 


56 


157 


42 



745 60 



i,803 00 



Size and Length of Seiver. 

675 feet 15 in., pipe. 
900 feet 12 in., pipe. 



Maple Street, West Roxbury. 



James Dolan, 


contractor . . ' . 


$7,108 30 


Labor . 


....... 


462 00 


Cement, 48 bbls. ...... 


60 00 


M. H. frames 


and covers, 6 . 


41 37 


Teaming 


...... 


1 50 


Pipe 


. 


954 70 


Water . 


..... 


110 00 


Fuel 


* 


2 12 




$8,739 99 



Size and Length of Sewer. 



1,100 feet of 12-in. pipe. 
680 feet of 15-in. pipe. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



307 



Stiirbridge Street. 




D. F. O'Connell & Co., contractors 


$2,227 7.> 


Labor ........ 


248 50 


Cement, 40 bbls 


47 20 


M. H. frames and covers, 4 . . ' . 


32 80 


Pipe ........ 


415 24 


Citizeos' Relief Association .... 


122 70 


Water 


81 27 



^3,175 46 



Size and Length of Seiver. 
767.72 feet of 15-in. pipe. 

Centre Street, between Lakeville Place and Kobinwood 



Avenne. 



Labor .... 

Bricks, 1,500 

Cement, 12 bbls. 

M. H. frames and covers, 2 

M. H. steps, 8 

Powder ") 

Fuse > 

Caps ) 

Teaming 

Luml)er, 6,619 feet 

Pipe 

Blacksmithing and tools 

Fuel and oil . 

Water . 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Seiuer. 
310.35 feet of 15-in. pipe. 



Shirley Street 
Labor ..... 

Bricks, 100,200 

Cement, 335 bbls. . 

Sand, 80 double loads . 

Gravel, 145 double loads 

M. H. frames and covers, 3 ] 

M. n. steps, 17 j" 

Teaming .... 

Lumber, 10,245 feet 

Pipe ..... 



!,580 19 
16 50' 

14 41 

15 98 



194 65 





499 


50 




107 


84 




172 


10 




244 


95 




14 


46 




39 


03 




100 


06 




$4,999 


67 



H,310 


09 


1,002 


00 


386 


53 


144 


00 


239 


25 


30 


72 


536 


00 


164 


50 


177 


85 



Carried forward, 



$6,990 94 



308 City Document No. 34. 

Brought forward, 

Fuel 

Blacksmithing ...... 

Water . . . . . . . . 

Miscellaneous supplies ..... 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

164.54 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 
25.05 feet 12 in., pipe. 



Billerica Street. 



Labor .... 
Bricks, 93,375 
Cement, 339 bbls. . 
Sand, .81 5-6 double loads 
Gravel, 65 double loads . 
Screenings, 71 double loads 
Teaming by contractors ) 
Teaming by department j 
Lumber, 20,909 feet 
Pipe 

Profiles, centres, etc. 
Water . 

Miscellaneous supplies 
Resurfacino; street . 



Size and Length of Sewer 
632.15 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 



16,990 


94 


22 


34 


33 


58 


123 


62 


33 


10 


^7,203 


58 



,060 


11 


924 


75 


409 


80 


163 


71 


116 


60 


124 


25 


830 


00 


290 


67 


210 


83 


66 


33 


63 


22 


32 


88 


260 


29 



',553 44 



Commonwealth Ayemie, No. 3. 



Labor . . . . . 

Bricks, 385,650 

Cement, 916 bbls. . 

Sand, 11 double loads . 

M. H. frames and covers, 13 

M. H. steps, 100 

Powder, 40 lbs. ") 

Fuse > 

Caps ) 

Teaming 

Lumber, 41,964 feet 

Pipe ^ . 

Coal, 60f tons 

Blacksmithing 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Carried forward. 



$14,070 88 

4,242 15 

1,134 50 

21 45 

148 96 



17 60 



601 


00 


656 


80 


1,150 


64 


311 


66 


108 


23 


89 


66 



!,553 53 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



^09 



Brought forward, 
Engine-hire . 
Trench machine-hire 
Water . 

Miscelkineous supplies 
Engine and burning oils 



Size and Length o'f Sewer. 
600.60 feet 3 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft. 9 in., brick. 
1,483.70 feet 2 ft. 4 in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
104.98 feet 24 in., pipe. 
656.10 feet 18 in., pipe. 

Commonwealtli Avenue, No. 7 
Labor .... 
Cement, 57 bbls. . 
Screenings, 19 double loads 
M. H. frames and covers, 7 
Lumber, 10,059 feet 
Pipe .... 
Metropolitan Construction Co., contractors 

Water 

Miscellaneous supplies .... 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
1,464.86 feet 12 in., pipe. 



522,553 53 

336 00 

600 00 

290 03 

317 38 

81 96 

m,178 90 





$189 00 




69 25 




33 25 




56 81 




164 93 




529 26 




1,988 31 




146 48 




8 00 




$3,185 29 



Commonwealth Avenue, No. 4. 


Labor $3,899 43 


Bricks, 21,700 








217 10 


Cement, 79^ bbls. . 








93 42 


Sand, 24 double loads 








48 00 


M. H. frames and covers, 12 








96 32 


Teaming 








553 50 


Lumbei', 2,691 feet 








44 08 


Pipe .... 








938 57 


Coal, 2 tons . 








10 90 


Wood, 17 cords 








144 50 


Oil .... 








9 89 


Tools and blacksmithing 








144 12 


Manure, 1 cord 








6 00 


Water .... 








274 IS 




$6,480 01 



Size and Length of Sewer, 
99 feet 15 in., pipe. 
1,547.80 feet 12 in., pipe. 



310 



City Document No. 34. 



Western Avenue and Duck Lane. 



Labor 

Bricks, 97,000 

Cement, 214 bbls. . 

Sand, 90 double loads 

Gravel, 35 double loads 

M. H. frames and covers 

Teaming 

Lumber, 1,094 feet 

Pipe 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Blacksmithing 

Water . 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Seioer 
610.90 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 



2,136 


48 


1,042 


00 


267 


50 


180 


00 


61 


25 


19 


95 


334 


50 


16 


83 


78 


13 


52 


42 


14 


45 


61 


09 


5 


52 



t,270 12 



Parsons, No. Beacon, and Faneuil Streets. 



Labor .... 

Bricks, 235,375 

Cement, 521 bbls. . 

Sand, 51 double loads 

M. H. frames and covers, 4"i 

M. H. steps, 100 I 

I. S. G. M. H. F. and C. 2 [ 

2 tide-gates J 

1 keg powder and fuse 

Teaming 

Lumber, 25,415 feet 

Pipe 

Trench-machine hire 

Engine-hire 

Blacksmithing 

Engine and burning oil 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Coal, 32^ tons 

Wood . 

Water . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

14.16 feet 24 in., pipe. 

766.90 feet 3 ft. 9 in. X 3 ft. llf in., brick. 

12.00 feet 48 in., iron pipe. 

102.05 feet 4 ft. 3 in. x 4 ft. 6 in., brick. 



$5,637 36 

2,589 13 

633 85 

99 45 



299 40 

3 10 
473 75 
414 92 
178 60 
525 49 
228 02 

73 65 

9 67 

223 23 

290 88 

167 15 

49 00 
117 88 

$12,014 53 



Street Department — Sewer Division, 



m 



Washingtou Street, Brigliton. 
Labor ....... 

Bricks, 261,000 . . . 

Cement, ISfi bbls. ..... 

Sand, 201 double loads .... 

Gravel and screenuigs, 261 double loads 

M. H. frames and covers, 17 

M. H. steps, 45 

Powder, 80 lbs. 

Teaming 

Lumber, 15,723 feet 

Pipe .... 

Hire of engine 

Hire of treuch-inachiue . 

Coal, 25 tons 

Profiles, centres, etc. 

Engine and burning oil . 

Miscellaneous supplies . 

Blacksmithing and hardware 

Tide- gates 

Water .... 



Size and Length of Seioer. 
715.37 feet 3 ft. 9 in. x 3 ft. llf in., brick. 
362.23 feet 18 in., pipe. 
902.20 feet 15 in., pipe. 
267.14 feet 12 in., pipe. 
682.66 feet 2 ft. x 3 ft., brick. 
Overflow chamber and tide-aate. 



0,320 


15 


2,870 


75 


997 


35 


391 


95 


456 


75 


146 


86 


22 


00 


1,265 


25 


244 


96 


1,014 


94 


362 


50 


508 


46 


118 


17 


306 


14 


26 


14 


74 


70 


515 


53 


172 


09 


295 


42 



$20,110 11 



Wexford Street, Brighton. 
Labor ........ 

Cement, 41 bbls. ...... 

]M. H. frames and covers, 5 . 

Pipe ........ 

INIetropolitan Construction Company, contractors 
Coal ......... 



Size and Leyigtli of Sewer. 
491 feet 15 in., pipe. 
7oo,3H feet 12 in., pipe. 

Saiiford Street. 

D. F. O'Connell & Co., contractors 
Labor ....... 

Cement, 63 bbls. ..... 



$141 


50 


47 


76 


40 


46 


550 


08 


2,399 


06 


2 


60 


^3,181 


46 



:,244 90 

431 12 

75 30 



Carried forivard, 



t,751 32 



312 



City Document No. 34. 



Broi 


iglit forward, 


$4,751 32 


M. H. fr 


\mes and covei'S, 6 . 


47 72 


Teaming 


. 


22 50 


Pipe 


. 


554 65 


Coal 


. 


8 75 


Water . 




220 47 




$5,605 41 



Size and Length of Seiver. 
93.65 feet 18 in., pipe. 
663.90 feet 12 in., pipe. 

Fellows Street 

Labor 

Bricks, 10,000 

Cement, 53 bbls. 

Sand, 10 double loads 

M. H. frames and covers, 5 

M. H. steps, 68 

Teaming 

Lumber, 83,253 feet 

Pipe 

Blacksmitliing and tools 

Oil ... 

Coal, 27i tons 

Water . 

Miscellaneous supplies 



Size and Length of Sewer 
519.18 feet 15 in., pipe. 
535.71 feet 12 in., pipe. 

Townsend Street. 
Labor .... 
Bricks, 3,000 . 
Cement, 13 bbls. 
Sand, 5 double loads 
Gravel, 19^ double loads 
M. H. frames and covers, 2 
M. H. steps, 14 
300 lbs. powder, and fuse 
Teaming 

Lumber, 1,372 feet 
Pipe .... 
Hardware and blaclismithing 
Water .... 
Coal and oil . 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



7,478 


81 


100 


00- 


66 


05 


18 


20 


71 


00 


940 


75 


1,264 


m 


700 


01 


144 


99 


20 


9^ 


122 


93 


105 


48 


10 


76 



111,044 06 



,009 


39 


30 


50' 


15 


27 


8 


90 


31 


71 


23 


79 


95 


85 


321 


25 


21 


95 


72 


35 


358 


35 


34 


63 


8 


08 


103 


00 



3,135 02 



Street Depaetment — Sewer Division. 



3ia 



Size and Length of Seioer 
158.81 feet 12 in., pipe. 



Ivy street. 



Quimby & Ferguson, contractors 


Si, 892 Oa 


Labor ....... 


151 40 


Cement, 71 bbls. ..... 


88 75 


M. H. frames and covers, 6") 




M. H. steps, 56 1 
C. B. frames and grates, 7 j ' 


182 83 




C. B. traps and books, 7 j 




Teaming ...... 


22 75 


Pipe 


614 02 


Granite and flagging .... 


66 50 


Advertising ...... 


35 96 


Water ....... 


89 88 




$3,144 12 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

22.43 feet 18 in., pipe. 

62.59 feet 15 in., pipe. 

933.80 feet 12 in., pipe. 

127 feet 10 in., pipe, C. B. drain. 

1,379 feet 6 in., pipe, house drain. 

7 catcli-basins. 

Newbury Street. 

Metropolitan Construction Company 
Labor ....... 

Bricks, 157,600 

Cement, 352^ bbls 

M. H. frames and covers, 5 

D catch-basin frames and grates, 6 

M. H. steps, 61. 

Teaming .... 

Flagging .... 

Pi[)e ..... 

Water ..... 



Size and Length of Sewer 

924.10 feet 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft., brick. 
280.40 feet 12 in., pipe. 
370.30 feet 12 in., pipe, C. B. drain. 
70.87 feet 10 in., pipe, C. B. drain. 
1,809 feet 6 in., pipe, house drain. 
3 catch-basins and 3 drop inlets. 



;5,987 13 
345 85 

1,650 50 
434 37 

101 69 





1 


50 




24 


00 




602 


47 




120 


1-2 


S9 


,267 


63 



314 



City Document No. 34. 



Parker Street. 

National Cousti'uctiou Company, contractors 
Labor ....... 

Bricks, 193,300 . . . . 

Cement, 796 bbls 

M. H. frames and covers, 14 ^ 

M. H. steps, 100 I 

D catch-basin frames and grates, 6 
C. B. covers, 15 
C. B. traps and hooks, 15 
Tide-gates, 2 
Teaming 

Pipe .... 
Flagstones, 3 

C. B. heads and gutters, 15 
Advertising- 
Water .... 



Size and Length of Sewer, 

1.105.40 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 
163 feet 18 in,, pipe. 

7 feet 20 in., pipe. 

1.189.41 feet 12 in., pipe. 

385.93 feet 12 in., pipe, C. B. drain. 
346.82 feet 10 in., pipe, C. B. drain. 
1,794 feet 6 in., pipe, house drain. 
18 catch-basins and 3 drop inlets. 



2,206 92 

867 90 

1,888 15 

991 25 



354 30 



96 


00 


1,471 


27 


312 


50 


59 


50 


268 


39 



5,516 1) 



Dorchester Lower 
Labor ..... 
Bricks, 200,450 
Cement, 393^ bbls. 
Sand, 110 double loads ■. 
Gravel, 28 double loads . 
Frames and covers, 5 ) 
Iron steps, 38 ) * ' 

Explosives . . . . 

Teaming .... 

Lumber, 16,110 feet 
Pipe 

Blacksmithing and hardware . 
Fuel and oil .... 
Rent of steam-drill . 
Miscellaneous supplies . 



599.74 feet 2 ft. 
547.17 feet 2 ft, 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
6 in. X 3 ft., brick. 
X 3 ft., brick. 



Mills Trunk Sew 


er. 


. $10,408 32 








2,204 95 








480 67 








198 00 








46 20 








53 39 








892 42 








197 50 








258 20 








102 33 








344 29 








271 96 








648 00 








221 77 




$16,328 00 



Street Department. — Street-Cleaning Division. 315 



APPENDIX E. 



REPOET OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET- 
CLEANING DIVISION. 

14 Beacon St., Boston, Februaiy 1, 1895. 

Mr. B. T. Wheeler, Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : I respectfully submit my aunual report of the 
expenditures and income of the Street-Cleaning Division of the 
Street Department for the financial 3-ear ending January 31, 1895 : 



Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation ..... $273,000 00 
Revenue from Brookline Gas Light Company on ac- 
count of work done by this Division . . . 237 00 
Transfers from Paving Division .... 21,240 44 
Transfer fi-om Watering Division .... 8,000 00 



Transferred to County of Suffolk . 

Total amount of appropriation 
Total amount of expenditures . 



,477 44 
1,000 00 



.,477 44 
$301,477 44 



Objects of Expenditures. 
Superintendence . 



Salary of Deputy Superintendent 

Office pay-rolls 

Stationery 

Printing 

Board of horses 

Telephone service . 



$3,000 00 

4,580 60 

198 48 

378 72 

600 00 

142 56 



Total cost of superintendence 



58,900 36 



316 



City Document No. 34. 



Cleaning Streets. 

Including the Cost of Sweeping, Loading and Removal of Street- 
dirt. 

District 1. West End . . . . - . . $17,388 13 

District 2. North End 20,000 92 

District 3. South End ...... 21,352 50 

District 4. South End 17,010 64 

District 5. Back Bay . . . . . , 14,027 81 

District 6. South Boston 11,868 20 

District 7. Roxbury 14,868 93 

District 9. Charlestown and East Boston . . 11,634 15 



Total cost of cleaning streets 



28,151 28 



Cleaning Gutters. 
Including Cost of Siveejnng., Loading and Removal of Street-dirt. 



District 1. 


West End 


$2,068 38 


District 2. 
District 3. 


North End ) t^- ^ • 4. 4.- i ^ 
South End j ^'^^''''^ ^""^''^^y P^^^^- 




District 4. 


South End 


1,577 94 


District 5. 


Back Bay ..... 


3,613 49 


District 6. 


South Boston .... 


5,272 19 


District 7. 


lloxbury . . . . . 


4,362 01 


District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
ost of cleaning gutters . . . 


3,871 86 


Total c 


$20,765 87 



Total length of gutters cleaned, 2,175.65 miles. 
Average cost per mile, $9.75. 



Cleaning Crossings. 

Including Cost of Manual and Machine Labor. 
Cost of cleaning crossings -. . . . . $618 95 

Removing snow by patrol ..... 2,877 88 



Total { 


iOSt ...... 

Cost of Maintaining Dumps. 


$3,496 83 






District 1. 


West End 


$527 94 


District 2. 


North End 


524 22 


District 3. 


South End ..... 


513 18 


District 4. 


South End 


521 02 


District 5. 


Back Bay ..... 


470 40 


District 6. 


South Boston .... 


433 00 


District 7. 


Roxbury . . . . . 


. 


District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
;ost of dumps .... 


453 00 


Total c 


$3,442 76 



Street Department. — Street-Cleaning Divisiox. 317 



Snow. 
Including Labor on Crossings^ in Streets, Car 



District 1. 


West End . 




District 2. 


North End . 




District 3. 


South End . 




District 4. 


South End . 




District 5. 


Back Bay . 




District 6. 


South Boston 




District 7. 


Roxbnrv 




District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 


Total cost 





ting of Snow, etc. 



2,683 


98 


2,990 


69 


3,780 


73 


2,776 


69 


2,965 


49 


3,153 


55 


4,381 


44 


2,780 


58 



$25,513 15 



Miscellaneous Work. 

Tliis shows tlie cost of such work as may not be characterized 
the same in all districts. 



Including miscellaneous ivorJc, siveeping and carting of leaves, etc. : 



District 1. 


West End 


$635 97 


District 2. 


North End 


1,115 10 


District 3. 


South End 


476 99 


District 4. 


South End . , . 


707 29 


District 5. 


Back Bav . . . . . 


1,641 Qo 


District 6. 


South Boston . . . . 


1,724 76 


District 7. 


Roxbury . . . . . 


1,429 94 


District 9. 


Charlestown and East Boston 
30St 


640 83 


Total ( 


S8,372 58 



Patrolling by Districts. 

This includes the cost of picking up and removal of refuse 
papers, etc., from the streets. 



Cost of paper patrol 



!,435 92 



Push-Cart Patrol System. 

Superintendence . . . . . . . SI, 196 52 

Board of horses ....... 293 49 

Push-carts, including labor and teaming . . . 22,747 94 



$24,237 95 



318 



City Document No. 34. 



A 




X 




M 




-* 








CS 




J« 




•d 




d 




CS 




® 








^ 




CS 


^ 


-M 


yi 


r/; 


-p 




fl 


a»' 





c» 





M 


f 


0) 


« 


-^ 


^ 






4) 


rr 


■M 




c 


O 


'h 


0) 


0) 


fl 


ft 




S 




cc 




«H 




O 




flj 




> 








m 




r» 












« 




X 




0) 





cS 



lOJiBd JO ;soo 



OCOOCO^O(Mt-lOC<JlC 

-^OCCCOCO-^NOOOiCt^ 
coo — >Ot^^l'OCC«5^(M 

oo~-*'o s^ToJ c^icTcT co^-*~ 



■sjoujstp 
ssanisnq ui Sa!iioj}B<j 



•i[jOAi. snoauBiiaosij^ 






•M-ons JO |soo 



cooocoioeo^O 

COCiOOt^OlOoOCO 

ocit^t-^c^— __co^- 
<^^ ci co" c^ im' CO -* (>r 



•sdranp JO }soo 



t- -* CO ■— I O CO 
Ofl 7>l ^H cq t^ CO 

lO lO lO O -* "^ 



•sSnissojo 
lninB9[o JO ^800 



•sj8un3 
^niaBop JO ^soQ 



t^ CO (M S<l -H 

r t— o t— 

m o 05 0-: 00 
1— I CO o -* CO 



•S}S9J^S 

^mnBep jo isoQ 



COOC<)Ot-COOO'* 

COOiCi— iI^lCDtOCO 
COOCOCOOOOOCO 

— IIMCqi-HrHi— l'-^ 



C to _ 

S =^ s 

U3 p3 <u 



0-, 



.ft 






O O 3 

s^ico-^ioot-csCJOPn 



Street Department. — Street-Cleaning Division. 319 



Stable and Yard Expenses. 

InchicUny the Cost of the South End, West End, Roxhury, South 
Boston, and. Charlestown Stables, as follows: 



Superintendence of stables .... 
Labor, including the cost of feeders, hostlers, brooiH' 

makers, blacksmiths, carpenters, watchmen, yard 

men, etc. .... 
Cart and carriage repairs 
Harness repairs 
Horse-shoeing 

Painting .... 

Sweeping-machine repairs 
Stable and shed repairs . 
Street-car tickets and ferry passes 
Tool repairs .... 
Veterinary services and medicine 

Total .... 



$2,691 78 



19,122 83 
4,568 73 

795 97 
3,276 65 

605 37 
2,904 72 
1,001 53 
1,285 00 

172 03 
1,753 30 

^38,177 91 



Stock Account. 

Broom stock purchased .... 

Carts and carriages purchased . 

Harnesses and horse furnishings purchased 

Horses purchased. (Net) 

Sweeping-machines purchased 

Tools purchased ..... 

Waste barrels purchased 

Patrol stock and maintenance of same . 

Total .... 



^6,044 33 
1,755 00 
1,730 79 
6,450 00 
3,240 00 
706 12 
100 00 
1,127 12 



!1,153 36 



Miscellaneous. 

Fort Hill wharf repairs $875 46 

New shed in Roxbury, completing of . . . 241 05 

Holidays 10,081 45 

Scow (cost of disposal at sea of 30,766 loads of 

street-dirt) 6,765 20 

Sundries 2,602 03 



Total 



^21,465 19 



320 



City Document No. 34. 



General Recapitulation of Expenses. 



Superintendence 

Cleaning streets 

Cleaning gutters 

Cleaning crossings . 

Maintaining dumps 

Removal of snow and ice 

Miscellaneous work 

Paper patrol in business districts 

Patrol system, push-carts 

Stable and yard expenses 

Stock account 

Miscellaneous , . 

« 
Total .... 



$8,900 36 

128,151 28 

20,766 87 

3,496 83 

3,442 76 

25,513 15 

8,372 58 

3,435 92 

' 24,237 95 

38,177 91 

21,153 36 

21,465 19 

^307,113 16 



Note. — Of the above amount, the sum of $5,635.72 was paid by other departments and 
divisions, on account of worlj done, etc., making the net expenses of this division, as shown 
in iinancial statement, $301,477.44. 



Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, exclusive of Supervision and other Expenses. 



Districts. 


Miles of 

Streets 

Cleaned. 


Cost of 
Cleaning. 


Pro Rata Cost 
of Dumps. 


Total Cost. 


Cost per 
Mile. 


No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 


1,582.07 

1,837.88 

2,330.33 

1,785.09 

707.78 

894.96 

494.51 

800.13 


$17,388 13 
20,000 92 
21,352 50 
17,010 64 
14,027 81 
11,868 20 
14,868 93 
11,634 15 


$471 22 
524 22 
513 18 
476 29 
373 13 
299 80 


$17,859 35 
20,525 14 
21,865 68 
17,486 93 
14,400 94 
12,168 00 
14,868 93 
11,973 95 


$11 28 
11 16 
9 38 
9 79 
20 34 
13 59 
30 06 


No. 4..... 

No. 5 

No. 6 

No. 7 


No. 9 


339 80 


14 96 




10,432.75 


$128,151 28 


$2,997 64 


$131,148 92 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in eight districts, ex- 
clusive of supervision, etc., $12.57. 



Street Department. — Street-Cleaning Division. 321 



Table shoAving the Cost per Mile of cleaning Streets in each Dis- 
trict, including Supervision, Labor, Yard and Stable Expenses. 











m of the 






Districts. 


Miles of 
Streets 


Cost of 
Cleaning 


6l5f of the 
Total Cost 


Total Cost 
of Yard and 


Total Ex- 


Total Cost 




Cleaned. 


Streets. 


of Superv'n. 


Stable 
Expenses. 






No. 1.... 


1,582.07 


fl7,859 35 


$739 33 


$3,587 26 


$22,185 94 


$14 02 


No. 2.... 


1,837.88 


20,525 14 


849 69 


4,122 72 


25,497 55 


13 87 


No. 3.... 


2,330.33 


21,865 68 


905 18 


4,391 87 


27,162 73 


11 65 


No. 4. . . . 


1,785.09 


17,486 93 


72:^ 91 


3,512 46 


21,723 30 


12 16 


No. 5.... 


707.78 


14,400 94 


596 16 


2,892 61 


17,889 71 


25 27 


No. 6 


894.96 


12,168 00 


603 72 


2,444 10 


15,115 82 


16 89 


No. 7.... 


494.51 


14,868 93 


615 53 


2,986 61 


18,471 07 


37 35 


No. 9.... 


800.13 


11,973 95 


495 69 


2,405 12 


14,874 76 


18 59 




10,432.75 


$131,148 92 


$5,429 21 


$26,342 75 


$162,920 88 





Average cost per mile of cleaDing streets in eight districts, iu- 
elucling sapervision, etc., $15.61. 



Table sliowing tUe JVumljer of ZiOads of Street-dirt removed. 



Districts. 


Number of Loads of 
Dirt removed. 


1 


9,517 


2 


9,916 

9,777 

10,641 

12,590 


3 


4 


5 


6 


9,611 
16,312 
10,970 


7 


9 




Paper Patrol and Leaves 


89,334 
2,260 


llemoved by Push-cart Patrol 


3,884 




Total Cart-loads 


95 478 







Cost per Load of cleaning 


streets and removing to 


dumps, inch 


ding Fore- 


man's Superintendence. 


$2 


04 


2 


01 


2 


18 




74 




40 




78 




17 




41 


equal to 50 


280 


barrel-loi 


ids. 







30,76G loads of the above dirt (or about 33 per cent.) were 
delivered at the diiinpiiig-scow, tlie lowing of which to sea cost 22 
cents per load. In addition to the al)ove, 37, o')? single loads and 
1,948 donljle loads of street-scrapings were removed from llie 
streets by tlie Paving Division. 



322 City Document No. 34. 

Public "Waste-Bakrels. 
Total number of waste-barrels emptied . . . 17,724 

Income. 

Amount of bills deposited with the Cit}- Collector 

during the financial year ending January 31, 1895, $8,163 77 

Force Employed. 

Deputy Superintendent ] 

Clerk 1 

Messengers ........ 9 

Employees in the Division, not including the above, 827 

Entire force ....... 331 

Average force employed during the year, 298. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip A. Jackson, 

Duputy Superintendent. 



Steeet Department. 



323 



APPEISTDIX F. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 18S6 under charge of City Engineer. 



Bartholomew M. Young 
James H. Nugent 



1886 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report. 



For 


Pub. 


. Tear. 


Tear. 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



Ko. of 
Doc. 



29 
26 
29 
22 



Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Enoch Patterson, .Supt. Streets and Drains 
Zeplianiah Sampson, " " " " 

Thomas Hunting, Superintendent 

Alfred T. Turner, 
Charles Harris, 
Nehemiali T. Merritt, 
James J. Flynn, 
C'harles Harris, 
Michael Median, 
John VV. McDonald, 
J. Edwin Jones, 



Tear. 



1827 to 1831 


1831 to 1846 


1846 to 1853 


1853 to 1864 


1864 to 1883 


18H3 


1883 


1884 


1884 to 1886 


1886 to 1889 


1889 to 1891 



324 



City Document No. 34. 



Pavin? Department before 1891. 



Name op Document. 



Quarterly Eeport. 



Annual Report. 



For 
Year. 



1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1868 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 



Pab. 
Year. 



1851 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



6 
29 
2 
6 
6 
5 
3 
3 
3 
5 
6 
5 
4 
3 
3 
7 
3 
6 
9 

14 
13 
12 
16 
21 
25 
27 
30 
38 
29 
24 
24 
48 
51 
47 
46 
97 
30 
16 
23 
30 
19 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



325 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Tear, 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 

Zephaniah Sampson, " 
Charles B. Wells, 

Simeon B. Smith, " 

William H. Bradley, " 

Horace H. Moses, " 

Thomas J. Young, " 

Seth Perkins, " 

Charles Morton, " 



1827 to 
1831 to 
1837 to 
1856 to 
1863 to 
1883 to 
1885 to 
1887 to 
1889 to 



1831 
1837 
1856 
1863 
1883 
1885 
1887 
1889 
1891 



SeAver Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report 



For Year. 


Pub. 
Tear. 


1859 


1860 


1860 


1861 


1861 


1862 


1862 


1863 


1863 


1864 


1864 


1865 


1865 


1866 


1866 


1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884 \ 
1885/ 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



11 
12 
12 
13 
11 
5 
6 
8 
13 
11 
3 
11 
10 
13 
12 
17 
11 
13 
15 
11 
16 
19 
18 
16 

43 

58 
69 
81 
129 
14 



* PuhliHhud ill Annual Hoport, Executive Department, Part II., City Document No. 1, 1801. 



326 



City Document No. 34. 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Namb. 



Ezra Forristall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 
Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall " 



Tear. 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
18G9 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report. 



Annual report from 1873 to 1884 inclusive ; the 
Superintendent's report was embodied in the 
report of the Board of Health 

Annual Report 





Pub. 


No. of 




Year. 


Doc. 


1853 


1854 


7 


1854 


1855 


6 


1855 


1856 


4 


1856 


1857 


4 


1857 


1858 


4 


1858 


1859 


4 


1859 


1860 


5 


1860 


1861 


6 


1861 


1862 


5 


1862 


1863 


5 


1863 


1864 


4 


1864 


1865 


4 


1865 


1866 


8 


1866 


1867 


7 


1867 


1868 


8 


1868 


1869 


12 


1869 


1870 


4 


1870 


1871 


10 


1871 


1872 


17 


1872 


1873 


40 


1885 


1886 


45 


1886 


1887 


22 


1887 


1888 


16 


1888 


1889 


23 


1889 


1890 


21 


1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



327 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point.) 



Year. 



Frederic W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston < 

Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge < 

William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge . . . , -j 



May 22, 1871, ' to 
March, 1891. 

June 14, 1871, to 
Jan. 31, 1883. 

March 28, 1883, to 
present time. 



Harvard Bridge added in 1892. 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point.) 



Namb of Docusient. 



Annual Report. 



For 


Pub. 


Tear. 


Year. 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


1883 


1884 


1884 


1885 


1885 


1886 


1886 


1887 


1887 


1888 


1888 


1889 


1889 


1890 


1890 


1891 



No. of 
Doc. 



19 
12 
16 
23 
20 
12 
10 

8 
12 

8 
15 
15 
19 

8 
12 
19 
25 
22 
20 



* Publislied in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document No. 1, 1891. 



328 



City Document No. 34. 



street Department since 1891. 

Superintendent. 

Henry H. Carter, Member American Society Civil Engineers. 

Resigned, December 8, 1S94. 

Char'es R. Cutter, Acting Superintendent from December 8, 1894, to 
Janiia. y 14, 1895. 

Member of tlie Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Bertrand T. Wheeler, Superintendent from January 14, 1895, to the 
present time. 

Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Executive Engineer. 
Henry B. Wood, Member Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Paving Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent until Janu- 
ary 24, 1895. 
Paving Division. — Darius N. Payson, Deputy Superintendent from Janu- 
ary 24, 1895, to the present time. 
Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Deputy Superintendent. 

Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 
Sanitary Division. — George W. Forristall,* Deputy Superintendent. 
Sanitary Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Acting Deputy Superintendent 

since January 16, 1894. 
Street-Cleaning Division. — Philip A. Jackson. 
Bridge Division. — John A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent. 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges. — Henry H. Carter, Ez-ojficio, Commis- 
sioner for Boston until December 
8, 1894. 
Charles R. Cutter, Acting, from De- 
cember 8, 1894, to January 14, 
1895. 
Bertrand T. Wheeler, since January 

14, 1895. 
William J. Marvin, Commissioner for 
Cambridge. 

* Died January 12, 1894. 



Street Department. 



Name of Document. 



Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II. 



For 


Pub. 


Year. 


Year. 


1891 


1892 


1892 


1893 


.1893 


1894 


1894 


1895 



No. of 
Doc. 



36 
34 
34 
34