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Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



Street Department 



lOilli Compliments of 



imj. m. mdh, 



Superintendent of Streets. 



PLEASE EXCHANGE. 




BOSTON: 

Municipal Printing Office, 

1897. 



atv 0( 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Street Department 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



1896. 




BOSTON: 

Municipal Printing Office, 

1897. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1896bost 



CONTENTS. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



PAGE 

Appendices 48 

Appropriation, Maintenance, 

1896 2 

Appropriation, Street Im- 
provements 3 

Construction under the 

"323 " Act 4 

Blue Hill Avenue 5 

Brighton Avenue 9 

Clinton Street, Widening . 9 

Columbus Avenue 6 

Commonwealth Avenue . . 6 

Huntington Avenue 8 

Employment of Labor ... 42 
Expenditures: 

Street Department(6 years) 2 
Blue Hill and other Ave- 
nues 3 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 3 

Maintenance and Specials 4 

New Ferry Landing 4 

South Union Station 4 

Stony Brook Improvement 4 
Grade and number of Em- 
ployees 43 

Horses 34 

Labor 35 

Organization 2 

Purchase of Supplies 34 

Smoke ISTuisance 36 

Speedway 7 

Stables and Buildings 35 

Summary of work per- 
formed during 1896 : 

Bridge Division 46 

Ferry Division 46 

Paving Division 47 



Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street Cleaning Division . . 
Street Watering Division . 
Towboat " Cormorant " . . 



PAGE 

47 
47 

47 
48 
36 



Boston and Cambridge 
Beidgks: 

Draw Openings 42 

Expenditures 41 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. . . 38 

Harvard Bridge 38 

Prison Point Bridge 39 

West Boston Bridge 39 

Statement of Traffic 40 

Beidge Division: 

AiDpropriations 30 

Appropriation Necessary. . . 31 

Expenditures 30 

Foundry Street Yard 31 

Work performed during 

1896 31 

Fekky Division: 

Appropriations 31 

Exjpenditures 31 

New Ferry Landing 31 

Work performed during 

1896 32 

Paving Division: 

Appropriations 9 

Expenditures 9 

Output of Stone fi'om City 

Crushers 10 

Permits, Charges for 11 

Repaving in the business 

section 13 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Stone Crushers 10 

Street Cleaning 11 

Street Signs 11 

Sanitary Division: 

Appropriation 28 

Expenditures 28 

Disposal of Ashes and Gar- 
bage ... 28 

Fort Hill Wharf 29 

Highland-Street Yard 29 

Horseshoeing Plant 29 

Sewek Division: 

Appropriations 13 

B and Seventh-Streets Out- 
let 17 

Canal-Street Sewer System, 14 

Dorchester Brook 16 

Expenditures 13 

Forest Avenue Section 15 

Gruild Row Relief Sewer. ... 16 

High Level Sewers 25 

Maintenance 26 

Main Drainage System 23 



PAGE 

Pumping Station 10 

Sewer Rental Act 11 

Shamrock Street Outlet 15 

Stony Brook Improvement, 17 

History of 17 

Work performed during 18 

1896 18 

Work Necessary 19 

Surface Drainage 20 

Work in Charge of Division, 13 

Street Cleaning Division: 

■A-Ppropriation 29 

Expenditures 29 

Relations of Board of Police 

and this Division 30 

Work performed during 1896, 29 

Street Watering Division: 

Appropriation . 32 

Expenditures 32 

Electric Car Sprinkling Ser- 
vice 33 

Work jierf ormed during 1896, 33 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE ENGINEER. 

(Page 49-) 



Appropriation , Central 

Office 49 

Expenditures, Central Office, 49 

Areas of Pavements 87 

Blue Hill aud Other Ave- 
nues :. . . . 56 

Comparative Table 51 

Financial Statement 50 

Income . 88 

List of Contracts 58-81 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 55 



PAGE 

Recapitulation of Expend- 
itures 56 

Special Appropriations 52-55 

Street Building under chap. 

323, Acts of 1891 57 

Street Mileage and Char- 
acter of Pavements 86 

Streets Paved with Sicilian 
Rock Asphalt 84 

Streets Paved with Trinidad 

Lake Asphalt 82 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGE 
DIVISION. (Page 89-) 



Bridges wholly Supported 

by Boston 12.5 

Bridges of which Boston 
Supports the Part within 

its Limit 127 

Bridges of which Boston 
Pays a Part of the Cost of 

Maintenance 127 

Bridges Supported by Rail- 
road Corporations 127 

Broadway Bridge 90 

Cable-house and Boxes 121 

Charles River Bridge 90 

Congi-ess Street Bridge 89 

Cottage Farm Bridge 91 

Dartmouth Street Bridge, 

Smoke Fenders 90 

Draw-tenders' Reports 134 

Draw-tenders' Reports (five 

years) 139 

Exj)enditures 91 

Financial Statement 92 

Income 94 

In General 90 



Inland Bridges: 

Expenditures 108 

Recapitulation 115 

List of small Bridges and 

Culverts 130 

Maintenance Expenditures, 

North and South Yards . . 116 

Maiden Bridge 89 

Meridian Street Bridge 89 

Mount Washington Avenue 

Bridge 89 

Public Landing Places . ... 131 

Recapitulation of Bridges . . 129 
Rox. Crossing, Footbridge 

over ]Sr.Y.,N.H. & H. R.R. 90 

Special Appropriations 93 

Special Appropriations (De- 
tails) 118 

Statement of Traffic on 

North and South Bridges, 133 
Tidewater Bridges : 

Expenditures 95 

Recapitulation 107 

Width of Draw-openings . . . 136 

AVidth of Bridges 138 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF FERRY DIVISION. 
(Page 141.) 

PAGE 

Actual Standing 146 

Cash Statement 144 

Difference of Travel on 

North and South Ferries . 147 

Expenditures 145 

Financial Statement 141 

Income 143 





PAGE 


Pleasure Carriage Tickets . . 


149 


Receipts at North and South 




Ferries 


143 


Special Appropriations 


142 


Team Tickets 


149 


Ticket Statement 


148 


Total Travel 


148 



Vlll 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 
DIVISION. (Page 150.) 



OF PAVING 



PAGE 

Appropriations (6 years) . . . 150 

Districts 151 

Expenditures (6 years) 150 

Financial Statement (Main- 
tenance) 153 

Financial Statement (Main- 
tenance and Specials) .... 155 

Income 155 

ISTew Brick Sidewalks 275 

New Edgestones 270 

Objects of Expenditures 

(Maintenance) ........... 154 

Permit Office 151 

Permit Office (Details) .... 284 
Property in charge of the 

Division 279 

Schedules of Expendi- 
tures : 

Schedule A 156 

Schedule B. (Executions of 

Court, etc. ) 156 

Schedule C. (In excess of 

special appropriations). 156 

Schedule D 1.58 

Blue Hill Avenue 234 

Columbus Avenue 238 

Commonwealth Avenue . . 241 

Huntington Avenue 242 



Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 254 

Special Appropriations. . . 159 
Street Improvements (New 

Wards) 186 

Street Improvements ( Old 

Wards) 165 

Sumiuary of Expenditures: 
Blue Hill and other Ave- 
nues 253 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 254 

Paving Division, Specials. 247 

Street Improvements 247 

Snow and Ice 152 

Stone Crushers 152 

Streets Discontinued 283 

Streets laid out or Ex- 
tended 281 

Street Names Changed 283 

Sti-eets ordered consti-ucted, 283 
Streets widened and relo- 
cated 282 

Street Numbering 286 

Street Signs 151 

Work in charge of the Divi- 
sion 150 

Work to be Pei-formed 152 



CONTENTS. 



IX 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SANITARY 
DIVISION. (Page 287.) 



PAGE 

Amount of Ashes, etc., Ke- 

moved 290 

Amount of House Offal Ke- 

moved 288 

Amount received from other 
Divisions for work Per- 
formed 308 

Ash Contracts 296 

Com]3ai'ative State in en t, 

Ashes, etc., Collected .... 291 

Contracts 300 

Cost of Horsehoeing 304 

Disposal of Material Col- 
lected 297 

Disposal of Offal and Gar- 
bage 287 

Disposal of Offal (5 years) . . 289 
Division Eepair Shops : 

Harness Shop 303 

Horseshoeing Shop 303 

Paint Shop 302 

Wheelwright Shop 302 

Dtimijing Boats 296 

Final Disposition of all 

Materials Collected 291 

Financial Statement 292 

Force Employed 290 

Hay and Grain 309 

House Dirt and Ashes 301 



PAGE 

House Offal 301 

Income 292 

ISIaintenance Statement (.5 

years) 287 

Materials Collected (5 years) 298 
Materials Collected by Dis- 
tricts 297 

Material Collected, Cost of 
Hired Teams, including 

Contracts 299 

Material sold by Contract . . 300 
N"otice to Housekeepers and 

Tenants 288 

Object of Expenditures.... 293 

Offal Contracts 296 

Organization 314 

Recapitulation Hay and 

Grain 312 

-Eevenue House Offal (5 

years) 301 

Schedule of Property 313 

Shops at the South Yard ... 288 

Signs painted 307 

Total Cost of Removal of 
House Dirt, Ashes and 

Offal 295 

Vehicles Repaired, etc 305 

Wagons 314 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWER 
DIVISION. (Page 315.) 



Details of Cost and Construc- 
tion 406 

Difficulties met with 317 

Financial Statement 364 

Main Drainage: 

Expenses of Disposal of 
Sewage from Metropol- 
itan System by City of 
Boston, to be borne by 
Metropolitan Sewerage 

Commission 360 

History of, and Work Per- 
formed 352 

Interest on cost of Main 
Drainage System used 
by Metropolitan System 
to be borne by Metro- 
politan Sewerage Com- 
mission 362 

Population and Water Con- 
sumption of Metropoli- 
tan System : 

Charles Paver Valley 358 

Neponset Eiver Valley . . . 359 
Proposed acquisition of 
Main Drainage System 
by Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Commission 355 

Sewage from the Metropoli- 
tan System: 

Charles Eiver Valley 360 

Neponset Eiver Valley . . . 360 

Organization 315 

Pumping Station. Eecord 

of Pumping 404 

Eainfall 403 

Eecapitulation 400 

Schedule of Property 405 

Sludge Account 405 

Summary of Sewer Con- 
struction 401 



Summary of Sewer Con- 
struction (5 years) 406 

Surface Drainage 338 

Brighton, Length and 

Cost : 

Dorchester, Length and 

Cost 

West Eoxbury, Length 

and Cost 

Brighton, Drainage Area.. 
Dorchester, Drainage 

Area 

West Eoxbury, Drainage 
Area 

Ventilation of Sewers 

Work Performed for, and 
paid by Paving Division. . 

Work in charge of the Divi- 
sion 

Sewers Built by Contract or 
Day Labor: 

South Boston 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 395 

West Eoxbury 381 

Dorchester 385 

Eoxbury , 376 

City Proper 368 

Work Performed and Work 
'Necessary to be Per- 
formed: 

South Boston 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 323 

West Eoxbury 324 

Dorchester 326 

Eoxbury 330 

City Proper 333 



341 
340 

341 

348 

342 

345 
303 

400 

315 



373 
371 
372 



319 
320 
323 



CONTENTS. 



XI 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY 

CLEANING 

Civil Service 

Conclusion 

Cost of Cleaning Streets . . . 

Crowded Sections 

Districts 

Dumps 

Equipment 

Financial Statement 

Force Employed 

Income 

Loads of Street Dirt Re- 
moved 

Miscellaneous 

Object of Expenditures .... 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET 
DIVISION. (Page 437.) 



PAGE 

440 
441 
447 
439 
437 
440 
438 
442 
448 
447 

448 
446 
442 



PAGE 

Paper Nuisance 440 

Public Waste Barrels 448 

Pusli Cart System 439 

Recapitulation of Expendi- 
tures 445 

Relation of this Division to 

Paving Division 441 

Snovr Work 440 

Stable and Yard Expenses . . 446 

Stock Account 446 

Subway 439 

Violation of City Ordi- 
nances 438 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERiNTENDENT OF STREET 
WATERING DIVISION. (Page 449-) 



PAGE 

Auxiliary Force 450 

Distribution of Carts 455 

Electric Sprinkling Cars . . . „450 

Expenditures (six years) . . . 451 

Financial Statement 451 

Income 453 

Object of Expenditures 452 

Subscription Work 454 



PAGE 

Summary of Day Work 453 

Water Consumption 450 

Watering done Free of Cost 

to City 455 

Watering Paved Streets .... 454 

Work Performed during 1896, 449 

Water Posts and Stand Pipes, 456 



Xll 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER ON SPECIAL WORK 

(Page 457.) 

PAGE 

Blue Hill Avenue 457 

Bridge Construction, etc. . . 473 

Brighton Avenue 460 

Columbus Avenue 458 



Commonwealth Avenue .... 460 

East Boston Ferries 474 

Grading Street Kailway 

Tracks 469 



PAGE 

Huntington Avenue 459 

Street work in 1896 (New 

Work) 466 

Street work in 1896 ('Kepav- 

ing) 461 



APPENDIX 



REPORT OF CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR (Page 475-) 



PAGE 

Boiler Applications 481 

Boiler Plants 479 

Coal Importations 480 

Observations Taken 476 



PAGE 

Special Eeports 482 

Summary 478 

Summary of Work done . . . 483 

Table of Observations 477 



APPENDIX J. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT NUM- 
BERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. (Page 484.) 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Broadway Bridge , 90 

Central Street Sewer (Old Construction) 14 

Central Street Sewer (New Construction) 334 

Centre Street Crusher (West Eosbui'y) 152 

Columbus Avenue (Asphalt pavement and car tracks) 6 

,D Street, under IST. Y., :N. H. & H. R.R. Co.'s tracks 17 

Electric Car Sprinkler, location of hydrants for 32 

Heath-Street Crusher, Bleiler ledge 10 

Huntington Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue, asphalt surface, 

reserved space, and car tracks 8 

Kemp-Street Outlet 320 

Normandy Street Sewer, comparative size of house and storm 

sewers 23' 

Eadial Avenues 5 

Stony Brook, Old Stone Channels (need of strengthening) 18 

Stony Brook, Old Stone Channels (method of strengthening) .... 330 

Stony Brook Construction, trench 20 

Stony Brook Construction, masonry 316 

Stony Brook Construction, rock excavation 318 

St. Martin Street, artificial stone retaining walls, platforms, etc. . 168 



Hon. Josiah QuiiTCY, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
annual report of the operations and expenses of the Street 
Department for the year 1896 is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

Organization. 
The work of the department during the past year has 
been carried on under the same organization that was 
effected when^ the consolidated department was created in 
1891 and as amended in 1895, the several divisions of the 
department being as follows : 

Central Office. 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 

Bridge Division. 

Ferry Division. 

Paving Division. 

Sanitary Division. 

Sewer Division. 

Street-Cleaning Division. 

Street-Watering Division. 

Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office and the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, is in 
charge of a Deputy Superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge Bridges are managed by two 
commissioners, the Superintendent of Streets being the 
commissioner for the city of Boston, the other commissione^r 
being appointed by the Mayor of the city of Cambridge. 

The year 1896 has been a most successful one in the 
Street Department, inasmuch as in addition to the great 
amount of new construction accomplished, a large amount of 
most necessary work, which has been contemplated and 
recommended for years past, has been completed, or is under 
way. 



2 City Document No. 20. 

More extensive study than is given under this resume 
of the year's work, with detail of figures and expenditure, 
will be found in the division reports of the Deputy Superin- 
tendents. 



Mainteistance. — Appeopetations and Expenditures. 



Appropriations 
and transfers, 



Expenditures . 



1891-92. 

13 monttis. 



g-2,318,874 82 
2,299,621 33 



1892-93 



82,528,859 52 
2,487,095 87 



1893-94. 



g2,231,517 76 
2,174,095 35 



1894-96. 



i,107,939 30 
!,038,855 91 



1895-96. 



g2,165,018 56 
2,140,177 63 



1896-97. 

53 weeks. 



g2,088,690 05 
2,134,944 49 



The weekly pay-rolls of the department are made up to 
the close of work Thursdays, approved Fridays, and charged 
on the books of the City Treasurer Saturdays. Feb. 1, 
1896, falling on a Saturday, one roll of the 1895 year was 
paid from the 1896 appropriation, thus making fifty-three 
payments. The amount of this roll was 122,155.12. 

The money assigned for Street Depaitment work the past 
year was made available under the following appropriations : 

First. — Maintenance : At the commencement of the finan- 
cial year, February 1, the department estimates of the 
amounts necessary for the proper maintenance of the various 
divisions are submitted to His Honor the Mayor, who.jnakes 
such recommendation as he may deem proper to the City 
Council. The appropriations passed for this purpose were 
as follows : 



Central Office . 
Bridge Division 
Cambridge and Boston Bridges 
Ferry Division . ... 

Paving Division 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division . 
Street-Cleaning Division . 
Street- Watering Division . 



$19,000 00 
120,000 00 

13,000 00 
218,000 00 
630,000 00 
435,000 00 
280,000 00 
300,000 00 

70,000 00 



Total 



2,085,000 00 



Street Department. 3 

Second. — Special work done under loan appropriations for 
permanent improvements : There was made available from 
loan money, $25,000 for new or reconstruction work in 
each of the twenty-five wards. Ward 23 receiving |25,000 
additional, or a total of |650,000 for all. 

In addition to the above amount, balances and orders 
passed during the year for special items amounted as 
follows : 

Bridge Division 155,543 86 

Ferry Division 742 94 

Paving Division . ... . . 362,931 99 

Sewer Division . . . . . . 205,343 80 



Total '. . . . . . 1624,562 59 

Third. — In 1891 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled, " An Act Relating to the Location, Laying Out, 
and Construction of Highways in the City of Boston." 
(Chap. 323.) From this fund new streets and sewers 
assessable on the abutting property are built. The amount 
expended the past year was : 

Streets ' . 1174,961 88 

Sewers . 435,538 20 



Total . . ... . . 1610,500 08 

Fourth. — In 1895 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, "An Act to Provide for the Laying Out and Con- 
struction of Certain Highways in the City of Boston " 
(commonly known as the Boulevard Act). (Chap. 334.) 
The amount expended this year was as follows : 

Streets $703,118 93 

Sewers . . . . . . . 143,759 89 



Total . . . . . . $846,878 82 



4 City Document No. 29. 

Fifth. — In 1896 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, "An Act Relative to Stony brook in the city of 
Boston." (Chap. 530.) $500,000. The amount ' ex- 
pended this year was $98,150.74. 

Sixth. — In 1895 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, "An Act Relative to the Establishment of a New 
Ferry Landing in the city of Boston." (Chap. 435.) 
$500,000. The amount expended this year was $21,961.61. 

Seventh. — In 1896 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, "An Act to Provide for a Union Station for Pas- 
sengers on Railroads entering the southerly part of the city 
of Boston." (Chap. 516.) The amount expended this 
year was as follows: 

Sewers $1,847 02 

Thus the expenditures under the several appropriations of 
the year 1896 were as follows: 



Maintenance . . • . 

Street huprovements (by wards) 

Bridge, specials . 

Ferry, specials . 

Paving, specials 

Sewer, specials . 

Laying Out and Construction of Highways 

Blue Hill and Other Avenues (Boulevard 

Act) .... 
Stony Brook Improvement . 
New Ferry Landing . 
South Union Station . 

Total . 



J,134,944 49 

677,900 11 

27,172 77 

742 94 

199,195 79 

70,084 42 

610,500 08 

846,878 82 

98,150 74 

21,961 61 

1,847 02 

t,689,378 79 



consteuction woek, streets and avenoes under "323 " 

Act. 

The following streets and avenues were under construc- 
tion during the year, and have been wholly or partially 
completed at an expenditure of $230,194.03 for both sewer 
and surface work : 



Abbotsford street. 
Audubon road. 
Bay State road. 
Boylston street. 
Brighton avenue. 



Chamberlain street. 
Clinton street. 
Fenelon street. 
Fullerton street 
Gaylord street. 



BOSTON 
HARBOR 




o PLAN SHOWING AVENUES 
^ UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN 1896 

O SCALE OF MILES 



FEB. I, 1897 ^ 



-/Ji^^^^ 



: g;^^^ 



Street Department. 5 

Geneva avenue. Norway street; 

Granby street. Parker street. 

Greenbrier street Peterborough street. 

Harvard avenue. Ruggles street. 

Harvard street. Sherborn street. 

Ivy street. St. Alphonsus street. 

Josephine street. St. Germain street. 

Kenraore street. Turner street. 

Lauriat avenue. Vancouver street. 

Morse street. Wilder street. 

Newbury street. Wolcott street. 

The work on the Boulevards commenced in 1895, has 
made great progress this year. The original appropriation 
for the reconstruction and building of the four avenues, in- 
cluding land damages, was $2,800,000. The four avenues 
are: 

First : Blue Hill avenue. 
Second: Columbus avenue. 
Third: Commonwealth avenue. 
Fourth : Huntington avenue. 

In addition, Brighton avenue was ordered and constructed 
under a special Act relating to the " Laying Out and Con- 
struction of Highways Act." 

The general design of the five radial avenues in their re- 
lation to city parks and other points of interest to the pub- 
lic is shown roughly in the accompanying sketch, the new 
portions being marked in heavy black lines. 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

From the diagram it will be seen tha.t Blue Hill avenue 
will form the most direct means of connection with Milton 
and the Blue Hills Reservation of the Metropolitan Park 
Commission, and, passing as it does the whole length of 
Franklin Park and Field, and through a section noted for its 
beautiful landscape views, it will be valued not only as a 
driveway for pleasure carriages, but as a most desirable resi- 
dential street convenient for electrical transit. One road- 
way of this avenue in Telford macadam was built this year, 
and the other will be completed during the working season 
of 1897 to Walk Hill street. The remaining part from Walk 
Hill street to Mattapan, involving the abolishment of the 
grade crossing of the New Yoik, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, should be ordered as soon as possible. 



6 City Document No. 29. 

Columbus Avenue. 

From Massachusetts avenue to within sixty feet north of 
Station street has been constructed as an asphalt roadway 
fifty-four feet in width from curb to curb, including a double 
track with full grooved rails sixty feet long, flush in guard 
and tread, with the asphalt surface. These rails were especially 
designed and constructed for this avenue, and are put to trial 
for the first time, and, if successful, will probably become the 
standard rail for asphalt streets. It is the only sample of this 
style of construction in the city. 

From Massachusetts avenue to Terry street is laid with 
Trinidad Lake asphalt. From Terry street to 'sixty feet 
north of Station street with Sicilian Rock asphalt. 

The section from Roxbury Crossing to Ritchie street is at 
present occupied Avith Stony brook construction, and its 
paved surface will be laid as soon as this and other under- 
ground work are completed. 

In the section from Ritchie street to West Walnut park 
the sewer is nearly finished, and this section will be ready in 
the early summer for contract for the street surface. 

The last section from West Walnut park to Walnut 
avenue is built of Telford macadam with granite edgestone 
and brick sidewalks. This section opens into Franklin Park, 
making Columbus avenue the most direct line to the Park 
from the city proper. 

COJMMON WEALTH-AVENUE EXTENSION. 

A portion of the avenue, known as Commonwealth-avenue 
extension, built under the " Boulevard "Act, extending from 
Chestnut Hill avenue to the Newton line, was partly sewered 
last year. This year the sewers have been completed, water 
mains laid, and the construction of the roadway with Tel- 
ford macadam finished. 

The width is one hundred and twenty feet and a double 
roadway of twelve-inch Telford macadam has been con- 
structed during the past jea.r. This extension of the 
avenue forms a connecting link between Boston and New- 
ton, so that a continuous drive is possible without leaving 
the boulevard from the Public Garden to the Charles river 
at Auburndale, or a distance of 11.14 miles. Their total 
length in Boston is 8.06 miles, and the total cost, exclusive 
of land damages, will be within the total appropriations 
therefor. The details of construction and of items of in- 
terest relating to the above-named boulevards may be 
gathered from the City Engineer's report. 



Street Department. 



Commonwealth Avenue. 

That portion of Commonwealth avenue laid out under the 
general law still remains to be finished. 

Much work has been done this year, the most important of 
which was the building of the bridge over tracks of the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad at Cottage Farm, a most substantial 
structure of stone and iron, with an asphalt surface. 

Much work has also been done on the sidewalks and road- 
ways, and the widening at a point beyond Washington street 
carried on. 

There remains a considerable further amount of work to 
be done; the section from Warren to Chestnut Hill avenues, 
to cost exclusive of sewers 1167,000, although one roadway 
of the entire avenue is now in a safe and passable condition. 

The construction of this avenue depends on an annual ap- 
propriation, and the expenditure to date is within the en- 
gineer's estimate. 

The speedway, planned in 1895, to be built on the southerly 
side of Commonwealth avenue, starting at Brighton avenue 
and extending to Cottage-Farm bridge, a distance of five- 
eights of a mile, was constructed this year. Great care was 
taken, and the best advice of race-track experts solicited, 
and under their direction a loam track was constructed. As 
this matter of speedways has been agitated somewhat the 
past year, I append herewith a letter written to His Honor 
the Mayor, covering the views of this department: 

Street Department, City Hall, 

Boston, Dec. 9, 1896. 
Hon. Josiah Quincy, Mayor : 

Sir : I herewith inclose, without the approval of this department, 
the request of the Board of Aldermen and citizens' petition for the 
construction of a speedway on Blue Hill avenue, between Morton 
street and Talbot avenue. 

I am a firm believer in the establishment of a speedway, and this 
year built such a road at Brighton, and this would have been more 
successful had the lay of the land been more favorable. The draw- 
backs discovered on this location are the same that would exist on 
Blue Hill avenue. The proper construction of a speedway calls for 
a deep loam road construction similar to a I'ace track. On this there 
can be no crosswalks, and cross streets cause a depression, at the 
point of intersection, and the crossing of teams makes speeding 
dangerous. 

The location should also be such that the speedway could be closed 
within certain hours, so that heavy travel could be kept out without 
a police watch such as has been necessary on Commonwealth avenue. 
The part of Blue Hill avenue asked for this purpose has running 
into it cross streets. Residents on these streets and teams entering 
for the delivery of ice, coal and other purposes must cross or follow 



8 City Document No. 29. 

the speedway. Also,, to take the cars which run through the central 
space of the avenue, peoi^le must cross without crosswalks ; and 
the nature of a loam road makes this very muddy in wet weather. 

The building up in the near future of the land bordering on the 
speedway would ruin the road during operations ; and thereafter, 
the householders might properly object to restrictions as to driving, 
or standing a team opposite their houses, which must be enforced if 
the object of the drive is to be maintained. The very considerable 
expense attending the construction of a road of this kind should 
prevent the location of a speedway in any but a fairly permanent 
locality. In regard to the Blue Hill location the avenue was laid 
out under chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891 and amendments thereto, 
and a definite construction was ordered by the Street Commissioners. 
One roadway has been completed, and the other let by contract, in 
accordance with this order. Inasmuch as Blue Hill avenue is a 
through turnpike road, had a speedway been contemplated, the lay 
out would have been different. 

On the Brighton speedway I have had located an inspector for the 
sole purpose of determining its value to the horsemen and lovers 
of fast driving, and his reports show that the idea is a most excel- 
lent one ; but experience there proves my argument that a straight 
stretch of land should be found along the line of the parkways, on 
the 1 iver front, or in a reserved central space on some broad avenue, 
Avhere travel of all kinds except the light and fast could be kept off 
without detriment to the surrounding property or an unnecessary 
expense to the police appropriation. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Bekj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

As an outcome of a meeting held at this office of some of 
the fast horse owners in Boston, a committee was appointed, 
and the matter laid before the Legislative Committee on 
Metropolitan Affairs, requesting that an appropriation be pro- 
vided by the Metropolitan Park Commissioners for the build- 
ing of a speedway, as suggested in this letter. 

Huntington Avenue. 

From Copley square to Francis street has been entirely 
reconstructed the past year, widened to one hundred feet, 
with a central reserved space for the West End Street Rail- 
way tracks twenty-five feet wide ; and from Francis street 
to the Brookline line it is finished as a single roadway fifty- 
four feet in width. All of Telford macadam except the part 
between the Boston & Albany Railroad bridge and Gains- 
borough street, which is laid in Sicilian Rock asphalt. This 
avenue is a direct thoroughfare to Brookline and the Back 
Bay parks, and is especially convenient for access to the 
Mechanics Building, used as it is for exhibition purposes 
that requires the transportation of bulky merchandise. 



Steeet Department, 9 

Brighton Avenue. 

The avenue extends from Commonwealth avenue to Union 
square, and is 100 feet wide with a twenty-five foot reserved 
space for the tracks of the West End Street Railway Com- 
pany. It is built of Telford macadam, and also has two 
roadways. This should be extended in a straight line to 
the Watertown bridge, and would then become a popular 
drive to Waltham. 

These beautiful avenues, costing large sums of money, are 
bound to be greatly appreciated, and the increase in land 
values and the improvement in property will more than 
repay for the outlay. 

Vast areas of land, formerly of little value, are now made 
available by the introduction through these new avenues of 
sewers, water, gas, electric light, and electric cars. 

Clinton- street Widening. 

Another improvement, which will bring back many fold its 
cost, is the widening of Clinton street at its junction with 
Commercial street. This narrow street was like the neck of 
a bottle. At all hours of the day in this busy locality might 
be found delays and blockades of teams, extending many 
squares, from this cause. The widening at this point has 
fully overcome the difficulty, and is a great relief. 



PAVING DIVISION. 

Appropriation. 

Maintenance. Specials. 

1630,000 00 11,198,127 93 

Expenditure. 

Maintenance. Specials. 

$628,675 46 1877,095 90 

For expenditures under Laying Out and Construction of 
Highways and Blue Hill and Other Avenues, see page 3. 

This division has charge of the maintenance and recon- 
struction of about four hundred and fifty -nine (459) miles of 
streets. 

These streets include all the different kinds of construc- 
tion, from the simple gravel road for light suburban travel 
to the heavy paved streets with concrete base. 



10 



City Document No. 29. 



The immense quantities of Telford and cracked stone to be 
required by the city in road building operations of the year, 
and to be furnished by the Paving Division, was a subject of 
careful study and preparation during the winter months. 
The various crushers were inspected, and many changes 
found necessary, both as regards the economy of operation 
and in the line of improvement in the quality of the output. 
Screens were changed, platforms raised, boilers and ma- 
chinery overhauled, and every effort made to improve the 
quality of stone used on the streets. 

A new crushing plant was built at Bleiler's Ledge on 
Heath street. The stone in this ledge has been known for 
many years for its hardness. A portion of this plant was 
brought from Kenney's Ledge where a double crusher had 
been set up in 1895. The poor quality of the stone in that 
ledge and the small quantity remaining made it advisable 
not to continue the operation of a large plant at that point. 

To replace the Roslindale crusher, which was a small, 
crude, flat screen affair, supplied with stone from various un- 
reliable sources, a model plant was erected on Centre street, 
West Roxbury, in a large quarry of most excellent stone, 
adjacent to an extensive territory needing in the near future 
a great supply of cracked stone. This section of the city 
has been growing very rapidly, and street improvement has 
not kept pace with development of property, owing to 
the lack of suitable road stock in the neighborhood for the 
avenues, new streets, street improvements, and repairs. 

Ceackbd stone. Ballast oe Telford. 
Output of stone from city crushers. 



Bleiler's ledge 

Centre street crusher . 

Chestnut Hill avenue crusher 
Codman street ledge. ........ 

Commonwealth avenue ledge. 

Dimock street crusher ... 

Kenney street ledge 

Eosseter street ledge 

Totals ... 



157,394 



Crushed Stone. 


Telford. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


25,638 


925 


9,777 




17,757 




12,668 


291 


16,134 


10,217 


36,899 




19,505 


1,377 


19,016 


3,544 



16,354 




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Street Department. 11 

Greater care was exercised in the care and cleaning of 
the streets covered by the paving division and a special 
patrol service for the collection of waste paper, loose stones, 
etc., extended to the sections of the city not covered by the 
street-cleaning division. 

This division also has charge of the placing of street 
signs. The work this year was unusually extensive owing 
to the change in the ward lines, making necessary many 
new signs. 

Permits. 

Under the law and by ordinance, permits, allowing cer- 
tain work to be done on or within the streets, must be 
obtained from the Superintendent of Streets. This requires 
the maintenance of a special force by the Paving Division 
for the purpose of issuing and keeping track of the permits, 
and also requires the services of a large number of inspec- 
tors whose duty it is to see that the conditions of the 
permits are not violated. No charge has heretofore been 
made. 

Commencing Jan. 1, 1897, regulations for payment were 
adopted, and the following circular issued : 

CITY OF BOSTON 
Street Department. 

Notice to Corporations and Contractors. 

On and after Jan. 1, 1897, a charge will be made for each permit 
issued from the Permit Office of this Department in accordance with 
the following schedule: — 

Class A, $1.00 each. 
Permits for the following purposes : 

Ordinary excavations. 

Laying drains. 

Laying wires, conduits, and railroad tracks. 

Occupying streets for erecting and repairing buildings, and other 

purposes connected with buildings, when they do not become the 

part of another permit. 
Placing electric poles in the streets. 
Placing coal holes and vaults under the sidewalks. 
Moving buildings. 
Feeding horses. 

Selling fruit, etc., from buildings. 
Occupying sidewalks for more than ten minutes for the purpose of 

loading and unloading goods, (yearly permit.) 
Driving cattle. 

Wearing advertisement coat and hat, (yearly permit.) 
Making emergency openings. 



12 City Document No. 29. 

Class B, $0.25 each. 

Permits for the following purposes : 
liaising and lowering goods into and from buildings. 
Erecting signs. 

Erecting and repairing awnings. 
Selling from vehicles, pedlers, class 1. 
Selling from receptacles, pedlers, class 2. 
Selling from areas, pedlers, class 4. 
Projecting electric lamps. 
Distributing fine sand on pavements. 
Occupying sidewalk and portion of street for cleaning snow from 

roofs of buildings, (yearly permit.) 
Watering sti'eets with watering carts. 

On extension of permits, there will be a charge of f 0.25 each. 

Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

This system has thus far worked well, and the city put in 
receipt of an estimated income of from twenty to thirty 
thousand dollars a year. 

Even with the most rigid inspection, however, the annual 
loss to the city by the disturbance of the streets by the cor- 
porations amounts to many thousands of dollars, and I 
would recommend that the law be so amended as to require 
a deposit by the corporations of a sum sufficient to pay for 
the replacing of the streets in proper condition, and that 
the city undertake that work. 

The enforcement of the ordinance requiring a permit to 
parties selling from area, Avindow or sidewalk has led to 
better conditions, and is appreciated not only by the mer- 
chants but the public. 

The following clause in their permits has been maintained 
and better results as regards the cleanliness of streets in 
certain localities brought about : 

CITY OF BOSTON". 

Street Department Regulations. 
This permit will be granted only to persons who are tenants of the 
first story or basement of the buildings from which they sell, and who 
are tax-payers of the City of Boston, and upon the express condition 
that the pei'son to whom it is issued shall keep the street, within fifty 
feet of his premises, free from all refuse paper and litter created by 
the sale or handling of his wares. This permit must be shown to 
police officers or any authorized person on application. 

Failure to observe these regulations will be a suflScient cause for 
the revocation of this permit. 

Bekj. W. Wells, 
Superintendent of Streets of the City of Boston. 

The maintenance appropriation allowed for the Paving 
Division is out of proportion to the demands made upon it. 



Street Department. 



13 



With the great increase of street mileage the past few years, 
the appropriation allowed for the maintenance has grown 
less, making it impossible to adopt a proper system whereby 
the streets might be kept in such constant repair that recon- 
struction would be required at less frequent intervals. 

The need of a large outlay for repaying the business sec- 
tion of the city is most apparent. Other large cities, such 
as New York and Philadelphia, have in the past few years 
repaved immense areas of streets ruined by the process of 
placing underground wires, pipes, etc. A special loan of 
$500,000, outside the debt limit, should be authorized by the 
Legislature for the purpose of putting the down-town pave- 
ments in a condition in accordance with the standard of a 
first-class city. The tendency in many of the large cities 
has been towards asphalt, but owing to the severity of the 
winters in this city, the greater amount of snowfall and icy 
rains, I believe that the modern form of granite block pav- 
ing on concrete base is the most desirable pavement for the 
heavy travelled business section. 

Asphalt paving, however, should be used more extensively 
in many of the sections of the city where macadam roads 
are now maintained, owing to the low cost of maintenance, 
freedom from mud and dust, .comparative noiselessness, and 
the more healthful conditions brought about by its use. 

Owing to the small appropriations made for street recon- 
struction, the department has not been able to extend the 
asphalt paving as much as would have been desirable. 
Asphalt paving in addition to Columbus and Huntington 
avenues, has been extended as far as present conditions 
would allow to the sections where narrow streets and 
tenement houses exist. 



SEWER DIVISION. 

Appropriation. 

Maintenance. Specials. 

1280,000 00. $705,343 80. 



Expenditure. 

Maintenance. Specials. 

1276,615 25. $170,082 18. ■ 

For expenditures under Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways and Blue Hill and Other Avenues, see page 3. 



14 City Document No. 29. 

The Sewer Division has charge of the construction and 
maintenance of all the sewers and sewerage works. 

The mileage of sewers Feb. 1, 1897, is estimated to be 
446 miles. 

One hundred and sixteen thousand and eight (116,008) 
linear feet of sewers have been built during the past year 
by the city by contract or day labor, and thirty-eight 
thousand two hundred and forty-two (38,242) linear feet 
have been built by private parties according to the plans, 
and under the inspection of this division, and accepted under 
the usual forms of release. 

Canal -STREET Sewer System. 

As far back as 1887, attention was called to the condition 
of the Canal-street sewer system. A system of sewers 
filled to the top of the arch for over thirteen years, with- 
out being cleaned, most surely needed the immediate 
attention of this department, more especially as it is 
located in the heart of the city. 

The only proper remedy is to build a main sewer across 
the city, from the east-side intercepting sewer, which is 
about four feet lower in grade than the west-side inter- 
cepting sewer, which, when built, will immediately drain 
out all the branch sewers of the district, and will also 
admit of placing cellars of new buildings at a much 
lower grade than formerly. In the annual report of 
the Superintendent of Streets, of 1891, and in all suc- 
ceeding reports, the urgent need of reconstruction in this 
district has been dwelt upon. In the 1891 report, to 
quote briefly : 

" Many of the old wooden sewers in the city proper are 
in very bad condition, and are really ready to fall in, notably 
those in Beverly, Billerica and Commercial streets. The 
district drained by Canal street, and bounded approximately 
by Causeway, Beverly, Endicott, Hanover, Portland and 
Merrimac streets, is in as bad condition, from a sanitary 
point of view, as can be imagined. All that portion of the 
city west of Hanover street, extending to the boundaries 
named, has been partly or wholly filled with water and accu- 
mulated sewage since 1883." 

The report of 1892 said : 

"The condition of the first of these, the Canal-street 
district, was fully described last year. It is not necessary 
to go into a full explanation this year, Suffice it to say that 
the sewers are filled from one to three feet with sewage 




OLD SEWER IN CENTRAL STREET, CANAL-STREET RELIEF SEWER. 



Street Depaetment. 15 

sludge, which has been accumulating now about ten years. 
It is doubtful if there could be anywhere found sewers in 
worse condition than some in this district. Much of the 
district drained by these sewers is occupied by crowded 
tenement houses." 

This was the condition four years ago. The need of fur- 
ther comment as to the necessity of pushing the work is 
unnecessary. Until this year, however, no action was taken. 
On the urgent recommendation of this de{)artment the City 
Council passed an appropriation of 125,000 for the begin- 
ning of this improvement, and the work is well started. 
This amount will complete Ae section from the outlet at 
Atlantic avenue and Central street to a point near Chatham 
row. From there a further loan of $76,000 will be neces- 
sary, and will, doubtless, be provided the coming year. 

Forest-avenue Section. 

No work undertaken by this department relating to 
drainage is more manifestly in the interests of the public 
health than that providing for the sewerage of this fast 
developing section. It is well known that no sewer sys- 
tem or outlet could be built in this locality until the 
Dorchester interceptor should have been extended far 
enough to connect thBrewith. This is not likely to happen 
for ten or fifteen years. By providing a pumping plant, 
however, so as to lift the sewage something less than twenty 
feet, it could be discharged into an existing sewer. 

A former loan to provide for this work was made in 1895, 
the sura appropriated being 119,400. Since that time, 
however, in the development of the plans of Blue Hill 
avenue, it was found that a long stretch of sewers would 
have to be constructed therein without an outlet, but that if 
an increased depth of sewer and an increase of the lift of the 
pumps at this pumping station were made, at a slightly 
greater expense, this whole difficulty would be overcome. 

Accordingly, the plans were changed, giving a greater 
depth of wheel-pits, making the whole system ample to take 
care of both territories. The sum of 16,000 is therefore 
necessary in order that the plan, as already made, may be 
carried on to completion, the ironwork and machinery hav- 
ing already been designed with this end in view. 

Shamrock-street Outlet. 

Previous to 1887, a single wooden outlet sewer, foUr feet 
by four feet, was in existence at the junction of Shamrock 



16 City Document No. 29. 

street and Freeport street (then Commercial street), being 
the old outlet of the Shamrock-street sewer. As the Dor- 
chester interceptor terminated at this point, this outlet 
served as an overflow outlet for both sewers, being provided 
with proper tide-gates. Later the interceptor was extended 
along the water front toward Neponset, and two more sets 
of tide-gates were established, to relieve the interceptor 
during storms. 

During the year 1895, the filling of the fiats adjoining the 
City's taking by the owning abutters began to approach the 
outlets, and proceeding at a rapid rate it has now extended to 
and across the outlets, which are therefore practically closed. 
It was necessary to make an additional taking, and to extend 
the outlet for a considerable distance, and ultimately to the 
main channel, at an estimated cost of about ^8,000. 

The necessity for this immediate construction may be 
appreciated from the fact that it is the only existing over- 
flow for the Dorchester interceptor between the main 
interceptor on Mt. Vernon street and Davenport brook. A 
heavy rainfall would undoubtedly cause extensive backing 
up of the sewers in all this part of Dorchester, flooding of 
cellars, leading to claims and suits for damages without 
limit, if this outlet had not been provided for. An appropri- 
ation was secured and the work is nearly finished. 

DOECHESTEE, BrOOK. 

During the past year there has been constructed that por- 
tion of Dorchester brook between Norfolk avenue and 
Clifton street mentioned in last year's report. The construc- 
tion of the old brook channel being poor and having gone to 
pieces, it became necessary that this brook be reconstructed. 
In the reconstruction of the same, the lines of the old channel 
were abandoned and the new sewer built through a proposed 
street. One of the principal reasons for reconstruction vm,s 
on account of the necessity of increased size. 

The same question of si-ze comes up on this brook for that 
portion between Lawrence avenue and the connection, and 
also from the branch to Columbia street. This brook as at 
present constituted carries both surface water and house 
drainage, and is overloaded; and in all probability the brook 
channel will have to be used for surface water and a house 
sewer put through, discharging into the interceptor. 

Guild Row Relief Sewer. 
This is a piece of sewer work that has been advocated in 
previous reports for a number of years, and the old sewer 



Street Department. 17 

has been a continual source of complaint from the abutters 
on account of its small size and high level. During the 
past year the sewer has been reconstructed on a low level 
with increased size, and removes all trouble and complaints 
for the future from this locality. 

B AND Seventh Streets Outlet. 

In the beginning of the year the government made an ap- 
propriation for the construction of this outlet of $35,000. 
This was a very difficult piece of work, having to cross the 
tracks of the New England Railroad, but the city has con- 
structed this outlet of ample size clear to the channel in the 
South Bay. This will remove all trouble in this locality 
and is the beginning of an extensive scheme of furnishing 
drainage for this end of South Boston. 

The city contemj)lates proceeding with this system by re- 
building the sewer on Dorchester avenue from the outlet to 
D street, and continuing up D street to Eighth street. The 
relief to be afforded by these sewers is very much needed, 
and especially for that part of D street which is undei' the 
Old Colony Railroad tracks, where it is always flooded 
whenever a storm and a high tide come together, as can be 
seen by the annexed picture. 

Stony-brook Improvement. 

The largest single sewer undertaking has been the com- 
mencement of the construction of the extension of the Stony- 
brook channels. 

The following is a brief history of Stony brook : 

Stony Brook first claimed the attention of the Legislature 
in 1868, when an act was passed authorizing the city of 
Boston and the town of West Roxbury to divert the waters 
out of the channel for the purpose of improving said brook. 
This act was amended in 1879 by giving said city and town 
authority to delegate to commissioners the powers granted 
them by the Acts of 1868. In 1874, after the annexation of 
West Roxbury, an act was passed, granting to the city of 
Boston the same powers, which, by the Act of 1868, were 
vested in the city of Boston and the town of West Roxbury. 
In all of these acts it was provided that the cost of the 
works might be assessed on the abutting property. 

The channel, as it existed in 1886, was severely tested by 
the disastrous floods of February of that year, and proved to 
be entirely too small to handle the water which was de- 



18 City Document No. 29. 

livered. The inadequacy of the existing structure was 
particularly evident in that portion of the valley lying below 
Roxbury Crossing, where an area of sixty-three acres was 
flooded, having more than one hundred buildings. 

The occurrence of this flood led to the immediate appoint- 
ment by the city government of a commission of experts to 
devise a plan for the prevention of floods in the future. 
This commission recommended in brief: 

First. That in order to prevent floods in Roxbury at, and 
below Roxbury Crossing, a channel be at once constructed, 
capable of discharging two thousand cubic feet per second, 
extending from a point seven hundred feet above said cross- 
ing to the point of Back Bay park, a distance of forty-five 
hundred feet. 

Second. That gradually, as West Roxbury became built 
up, thereby increasing the amount of flood discharge, the 
new channel should be extended up stream reaching finally 
the Hyde Park line. 

Third. If West Roxbury should become a thoroughly 
urban district, the channel should be constructed to Neponset 
river, which, in conjunction with the channel, would handle 
the ultimate amount that would be delivered. 

Steps were immediately taken to carry out the first part of 
the commissioners' recommendation, viz. : a new channel from 
a point about seven hundred feet above Roxbury crossing to 
the Back Bay park. In 1887 legislation was granted author- 
izing the city of Boston to build a new channel for, and to 
alter course of. Stony brook, within the above limits ; the cost 
of same to be met by issuing a loan of $500,000 outside the 
debt limit. This work was begun immediately and completed 
early in 1889. 

The first step toward carrying out the second recommen- 
dation of the commissioners, the extension of the channel up 
stream into the Roxbury District, was made in 1895, when a 
section of the channel, about 2,300 feet in length, was built in 
connection with the separation of grades on the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, for which the necessary 
special legislation was obtained in 1892-94. 

In this section, extending from the sharp turn of the brook, 
near the railroad, and about 300 feet west of Amory street, 
to a point about 300 feet south of Boylston station, an old 
open channel was located on tne site of the proposed widen- 
ing of the embankment, which rendered it imperative that the 
new channel be constructed in advance of said embankment. 

In 1896 legislation was asked from the State Legislature 
necessary to enable the department to divert and enlarge the 




-_J 



Steeet Department. 19 

channel of Stony brook between the section of the commis- 
sioners' channel, built in 1887-88, and the section built in 
1895, and also the right to borrow outside the debt limit the 
money for carrying on this work. The length of the proposed 
improvement was about 3,000 feet, and the estimated cost in 
round numbers, $500,000. This request was granted and the 
act was passed. 

The opportunity to do the work at this time made it possi- 
ble to relocate the channel of the brook within the lines of 
new Columbus avenue, which is under process of construction 
through what was formerly known as Pynchon street, extend- 
ing from Roxbury crossing to Hog bridge. It also made 
it possible to conduct the work in connection with the 
improvements being carried on by the city of Boston and 
by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Com- 
pany simultaneously, thus saving a very considerable sum of 
money. 

As the work will be accomplished for a sum well within 
the appropriation, the Legislature has been petitioned to au- 
thorize the expenditure of any balance for the further exten- 
sion of the covered channel of the brook, which in time must 
be carried still further towards its sources. 

The work of reconstructing the channels was commenced 
in the middle of the summer from what is known as the old 
Stony brook gate house to the existing channel constructed 
by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Com- 
pany above Centre street. ' Work has progressed in a rapid 
manner and will be finished during the coming summer. 
When this work is completed. Stony brook will be con- 
structed according to the commissioners' plans as far as a 
point beyond Boylston street, Jamaica Plain. From this 
point to a point near Neponset avenue, at the junction of the . 
Canterbury branch, a distance of 13,500 feet, it should be 
constructed in the same manner, as this portion of the coun- 
try is low and has become very thickly settled, and the 
brook needs to be reconstructed so as to afford surface 
drainage ; also, for the purpose of carrying along what is 
known as the West Roxbury low level sewer, which is built 
in conjunction with this conduit. 

I would strongly advise that the government go to the 
Legislature the following year and procure another loan for 
the construction of this brook to the point above mentioned. 
If this is done there will be opened up and developed a large 
territory that can be used for suburban residential purposes. 
With the numerous improvements in the building of the park 
system, the park driveways, the extra facilities that have been 



20 City Docuisient No. 29. 

furnished by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road Company for transportation, this territory will become 
so thickly settled that unless this is done, the open channel 
becomes an intolerable nuisance and the object of complaint 
by the Board of Health. 

I also think it is necessary that the next Legislature 
should be petitioned for a sum of money for the reconstruc- 
tion of the old Stony brook channels from the Belting Com- 
pany to the outlet. These were constructed many years ago, 
and were not planned with any engineering skill, as the 
country at that time was only partially developed, and the 
brook was walled in and covered with old stone ; and as this 
part of the territory has become very thickly settled, and a 
number of these channels are under public streets, namely. 
Culvert street, Rogers avenue and Vernon street, it becomes 
necessary, not only from a sanitary point of view, but also 
for public safety, to reconstruct these channels. 

The condition of these channels can be seen by the ac- 
companying engravings. The views show under Culvert 
street, a street that is heavily travelled, and unless some 
action is taken it is only a question of time when there will 
be an accident. Also in rebuilding this, I would recommend 
that the house sewers be reconstructed at the same time, so 
as to take out the drainage, as at present considerable house 
drainage goes into this brook and is discharged into what is 
called the Back Bay Fens. 

During the past year, owing to the reconstruction of 
Huntington avenue across Stony brook at Rogers avenue, 
after an examination the brook was found in a condition 
shown in the accompanying view, and it was decided to line 
it up with brick work. This shows the manner in which 
these channels were strengthened, and the remainder of this 
stone arched construction should be lined with brick work in 
the same manner. 

Surface Drainage. 

Stony brook is but one of the many natural surface drains 
existing in the suburban sections of the city. Owing to 
the building up of this suburban territory, and the lack of 
legislation which gives control of the brook channels, great 
difficulty has been met by the department to regulate the 
disposal of surface water. Many of these brook channels run 
dry in summer, and in many cases houses have been built 
upon them. The city can take no action in the matter 
under the present law unless the public street is in some 
way damaged by the blocking of the water courses. This 



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TRENCH FOR STONY-BROOK CONDUIT, COLUMBUS AVENUE. 



Street DEPARTiiENT. 21 

may not occur until the brook channel is practically 
obliterated, and even then action is slow and difficult. 

The following bill presented by this department through 
His Honor the Mayor, is under consideration by the Com- 
mittee on Metropolitan Affairs of the State Legislature : 

AN ACT KELATIVE TO SURFACE DRAINAGE IN THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Sectioist 1. The board of street commissioners of the city of 
Boston m^y order that any streams or water courses within the 
limits of said city be diverted from their original channels, or that 
such channels, or any new channels, be widened, deepened, straight- 
ened, paved and covered, or that any part of such streams or water 
courses be so treated, or that any one or more of such things be done. 
The mayor of said city shall thereupon, by such officer as he shall 
direct, cause such orders to be carried out. 

Sect. 2. The board of street commissioners of said city, for the 
purposes aforesaid, may take any lands in fee, easements, rights, and 
other property that they may deem necessary and desirable therefor ; 
and to take any property by right of eminent domain, shall sign and 
cause to be recorded in the registry of deeds for the county of Suf- 
folk a statement containing a description thereof, as certain as is 
required in a common conveyance of land, and stating that the same 
is taken for the purposes of this act, and upon such recording the prop- 
erty described in the said description shall be taken for said city. The 
city of Boston shall pay all damages sustained by any person by the 
taking of any property under the authority of this act, the same to 
be agreed upon by said person and said board; and if they cannot 
agree thereon, the same shall be determined by a jury in the sup.erior 
court of said county, on petition of said person or said board, in the 
same manner as damages are determined for taking of lands and 
laying out of highways in said city. 

Sect. .3. The city of Boston shall annually, by ordinary vote, ap- 
propriate money for carrying on said work, to an amount not exceed- 
ing two hundred thousand dollars, the money so appropriated to be 
obtained from the sale of bonds and certificates provided for in 
section three. The total amount of all such bonds and certificates 
outstanding shall never exceed by more than five hundred thousand 
dollars the sinking funds established for the payment of the debt 
created as aforesaid. 

Sect. 4. The treasurer of said city shall, from time to time, on 
the request of the mayor in writing, issue to the amount or amounts 
so appropriated, negotiable bonds or certificates of indebtedness, 
payable in twenty years from their date, and bearing interest at a 
rate not exceeding four per centum per annum, payable semi- 
annually and fixed by said treasurer with the approval of the 
mayor, and shall sell said bonds or certificates, or any part thereof, 
and credit the proceeds thereof, except premiums, to the aforesaid 
appropriations. The aforesaid bonds and certificates shall not be 
considered or reckoned in determining the authorized limit of in- 
debtedness of said city. 



22 City Document No. 29. 

Sect. 5. The expenses incurred in doing any work under the 
authority of this act, including interest on the amount expended at 
the rate of five per centum per annum from the date of tlie passage 
of the order, shall be repaid to said city, and such portion thereof 
as the commission hereinafter provided for shall deem just and 
equitable shall be assessed upon the several estates any part of 
which is situated within the natural water shed of the part of the 
water-course upon which the work is done in proportion to the 
benefit received by them therefrom, as determined by said commis- 
sion, and the balance of such expenses shall be repaid by the other 
estates, any lands of which are so situated, in proportion to the valu- 
ation of such lands. 

Sect. 6. The assessment aforesaid upon each estate, and for 
which the estate shall be liable as a part of the taxes thereon, and 
for which a lien shall attach to the estate, shall be determined by a 
board of commissioners consisting of the superintendent of streets, 
the city engineer and the chairman of the board of street commis- 
sioners of said city, in accordance with the proportions in which the 
said board shall determine that the said estates are increased iu value 
by the aforesaid work, such determination to be subject to appeal 
therefrom to the superior court to determine its correctness, as pro- 
vided in the case of appeals from the board of assessors relating to 
taxes. 

Sect. 7. Said superintendent of streets shall give notice of the 
amount of every such assessment to the owner of the estate liable 
therefor forthwith after such amount has been determined, and a 
lien shall attach to the estate for the amount, as a part of the tax of 
such estate, and said commission shall deliver to the city collector 
the bills of said assessments for collection. 

Sect. 8. The treasurer of said city shall, from the premiums on 
loans, and assessments, received during any financial year of said 
city under the provisions of this act, pay the interest on the afore- 
said bonds and certificates accruing during that year, and shall pay 
over any surplus of the moneys so received to the board of commis- 
sioners of sinking funds of said city, to be by them credited to the 
sinking funds established for the debts incurred under this act. If 
the amount so received in any such year is insufficient to meet the 
interest aforesaid, said treasurer shall, unless other provision is made 
by said city, pay the deficiency from the aforesaid appropriation; and 
unless said city otherwise orders, shall, when an}^ certificates become 
due, pay from said appropriation any deficiency existing in the sink- 
ing funds established to pay the same, and no moneys shall be raised 
for interest or sinking fund requirements on said bonds and certifi- 
cates except as herein provided, unless ordered by said city ; but any 
excess of moneys received by the treasurer in any one financial year 
above the amount required to meet the interest on the aforesaid 
bonds and certificates and the requirements of the sinking fund 
established for said debts, shall be credited by said treasurer to the 
appropriation for carrying on said work. 

Sect. 9. The supreme judicial court, and any justice thereof, 
and the superior court, and anjr justice thereof, shall have jurisdic- 
tion in equity, on the petition of said city, by its attorney, to enforce 
the i^rovisions of this act and to prevent the unlawful pollution or 
obstruction of the channel of any natural stream or water course in 
said cit3^ 

Sect. 10. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



Street Department. 23 

The passage of this, it is believed, would largely remedy 
the trouble, and at small expense compared with the enor- 
mous amounts of money which would be required if the 
provisions for maintaining these natural water channels 
were delayed much longer. 

Careful statistics by districts bearing on this subject will 
be found in the report of the Deputy Superintendent of the 
Sewer Division. 

Main Drainage System of Boston. 

During the past year great attention has been given by 
the department to the improvement of the present condition 
and planning for the future development of the main drain- 
age system of Boston. This is the part of the sewer system 
from Gainsborough street to the pumping station, and in- 
cludes the pumping station, tunnel, reservoirs, outfall and 
intercepting sewers. This work was originally constructed 
by the city of Boston for the purpose of taking care of the 
sewage of Boston, and by wise foresight was made commo- 
dious enough to accommodate the outlying towns and cities 
that are now under the control of the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Commission of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
they discharging into the sewer at the corner of Gainsbor- 
ough street and Huntington avenue, and another branch into 
the Dorchester interceptor at Central avenue. The city has 
been taking this sewage now for six years and has never 
been able to make definite settlement with the State for the 
payment of this service. The amount of money that has 
been received from the State has not been over 50 per cent 
of the actual value of the work done. 

Without consultation with the authorities of the city of 
Boston, a bill was introduced into the present legislature by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, providing for the 
seizure of the main drainage works of the city, the same to 
be placed under the control of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commissioners. In the opinion of this department, should 
this act become a law, it would be most unfortunate for the 
interests of the city, as the present construction to a large 
degree, and all plans for the future, are made with a view of 
disposing of house drainage of the city through the main 
drainage system and the outfall at Moon Island. 

The citizens of Boston are directly interested in preventing 
the pollution of the waters of the harbor, and at a great 
expense the present system has been designed with a view 
to discharging the sewage in as unobjectionable a form as 



24: City Document No. 29. 

possible. The interest of the inland cities and towns con- 
necting with the Metropolitan system lies in the direction of 
the smallest cost for the disposal of their sewage, and this 
matter of harbor pollntion, which is of the most vital interest 
to the residents of Boston, is to them a secondarj^ considera- 
tion. That this is no imaginary danger, it is fair to state 
that the North Metropolitan System, which has been con- 
structed, and is maintained under the control of the State 
Board of Metropolitan Commissioners, disposing of the sew- 
age of Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somerville, Stoneham, Wakefield, 
Winchester, Winthrop, and Woburn, and as soon as connec- 
tions can be made, Charlestown and East Boston, has its 
outlet one hundred yards from the shores of Deer Island, the 
pumping station being on the island. No storage basins or 
settling channels are provided, the sewage being pumped 
directly into the harbor at all stages of the tide. 

The system on the south Metropolitan, which has always 
been controlled and planned under the direction of the city 
of Boston officials, maintains at the pumping station settling 
basins, from which the deposits, or so called "Sludge," is re- 
moved to barges and carried to sea. The grease deposits, 
which are very offensive if allowed to pass into the bay, are 
collected at the east shaft. The sewerage water then passes 
to Moon Island, where it is held in storage basins until one 
hour after the beginning of the ebb tide, and is then allowed 
to pass out to sea. 

In addition to this most vital objection to State control of 
the Boston Sewerage System, it can be stated that with the 
taking of the main sewers, all regulation of the connecting 
sewers must necessarily be placed in the hands of the State 
Commission. In the arguments made by those favoring the 
bill, no claim was made that under the control of the city of 
Boston, these works had not been wisely, efficiently, and 
economically carried on. 

It is hoped that representatives of the cities and towns in 
this so called Charles-river district will in the future avail 
themselves of the opportunities for information which this 
department most freely offers them. 

In the past, although the subject of seizure by the State 
was of the most vital interest and importance, no represen- 
tative of the district outside of Boston conferred with, or 
asked for information from this department. 

Plans for additional pumps and storage basins are being 
prepared, as the present capacity of the plant is nearly 



Street Department. 25 

reached, the pumps handlmg an average of 75,000,000 
gallons per day. 

Pumping Station. 

During the past year extensive repairs have been made 
on the machinery of the Main Drainage Works at Cow pas- 
ture. Both the high and low duty pumps have been over- 
hauled and new laggings put on. These pumps are now in 
a first-class condition, excepting the valves, which will be 
overhauled this ensuing year. The old buildings and sheds 
around the station have been removed, the grounds graded 
and seeded, making a great improvement in the looks of the 
station. 

Mr. Leavitt, the mechanical engineer, who designed the 
original pumps of this station, is now designing a sixty- 
million gallon pump, which will be erected as soon as possible ; 
in the meantime the pumping capacity of the two high duty 
pumps will be increased so that their maximum duty will 
amount to one hundred and fifty million gallons per day. 

One of the great troubles experienced at this station is 
the disposal of filth from the filth hoist. The engineers 
of this department are now working upon a method of dis- 
posing of this by cremation, which will probably be put in 
operation as soon as possible. 

High-Level Sewers. 

I would also recommend that the coming year the city of 
Boston apply to the Legislature for a certain sum of money 
to begin what is known as the high-level intercepting sewers. 
These sewers were recommended by the original commission 
in 1876 to be constructed so as to afford relief to the pumps. 
It was also recommended by the Superintendent of Streets 
in the annual report of 1891, he then making the statement 
that this was an essential part of the scheme to intercept the 
sewers of Boston, to carry the sewage from the highlands 
directly to the outlet by gravity and thus avoid pumping. 
To do this a system of intercepting sewers was projected in 
Dorchester, Roxbury and Brighton, to intercept the sewage 
from all lands above grade 40. The engineers of this de- 
partment have not made a more extensive study of this 
scheme for the reason that it was thought that inasmuch as 
this sewer would have to be located in part in territory out- 
side the city limits, the work would be advocated and carried 
out by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, but as yet 



26 City Document No. 29. 

they have done nothing towards furthering this scheme. The 
city of Boston should, therefore, take hold of the matter, and 
especially build those portions that lie within the city limits. 

In regard to the maintenance appropriation provided for 
this division, it is entirely inadequate. The past few years 
miles of sewers have been added, and, as in the Paving 
Division, the amount of money provided for their care has 
been decreased. 

The maintenance appropriation is used for the purpose 
of administrative expenses, engineering, cleaning and flush- 
ing of sewers, which is something that needs to be done 
thoroughly every year, the sewer becoming a festering place 
if not kept clean, generating disease and making a nuisance 
to the neighborhood, the gases and odors arising from the 
manholes finding their way into the houses. 

The care of some 12,000 catch-basins, if properly attended 
to, is expensive but necessary. A majority of these basins 
should be cleaned from three to four times a year. Under 
present conditions, not over five or six thousand are cleaned 
annually. Unless cleaned frequently, the catch-basin fills, 
rises over the trap, and then the basin becomes useless. In 
other cases the dirt and debris are carried through the trap 
into the sewer. This clogs the sewer and makes an expense 
to the department for the cleaning of the sewer. 

Maintenance money is also used for the reconstruction of 
those portions of the sewers that break in or become dam- 
aged, and have to be replaced with new sewers. 

One hundred thousand dollars of the maintenance appro- 
priation is used in the running of the Pumping Station at 
Cow Pasture and the main drainage outlets at Moon Island, 
and the sum necessary increases each year. 

There should be legislation passed putting within control 
of the Street Department the making of all house connections, 
with the power to assess the cost of so doing ; the compelling 
of stables, factories, and other parties who use a sewer, if 
necessary, to put in catch-basins or settling tanks for any 
material and matter which is detrimental to the sewers. 

Inspectors for the Street Department should have the 
right to enter buildings and inspect, in cases of doubt, the 
quality of sewage that is discharged therefrom, as, for 
instance, numerous complaints are received of naphtha gas and 
other detrimental materials, discharging into sewers. No 
entry can be made into the sewer on account of the gas, and 
yet the department has no authority to enter any factory or 
building to make proper examination. 



Street Dei'autme^'t. 27 

The great importance of a proper maintenance of the 
sewerage system of the city, and the difficulty which has 
been, and will always be met, of obtaining from the tax levy 
the amount necessary to properly do the work, has led this 
department to suggest the passage of an act providing for 
the adoption of a rental system for sewer service, much on 
the lines of th^ Water Department system of charges, and the 
following bill was drafted, and is now under consider- 
ation of the Legislative Committee on Metropolitan Affairs. 



AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOE THE CO]S"STEUCTIOX OF 
SEWERS IX THE CITY OF BOSTON. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Sectiok 1. The board of street commissioners of the city of 
Boston may from time to time, with the approval of the mayor, order 
the consti'uction of sewers in said city, as they deem that public 
necessity and convenience require, and may take land therefor 
in the same manner, and under the same provisions of law, as said 
board takes land for the laying out of highways, the expenses in- 
curred for such taking, and other expenses of constructing said 
sewers, to be paid from the proceeds of the loan hereinafter author- 
ized. 

Sect. 2. The treasurer of the city of Boston shall from time to 
lime., on the request of the mayor of said city, issue bonds or certifi- 
cates of indebtedness of the city of Boston to an amount not ex- 
ceeding five hundred thousand dollai's. Said bonds shall not be 
considered in determining the limit of indebtedness of said city. 
Said bonds shall be issued for the term of thirty years from their 
date, shall be registered or coupon, and shall bear interest, payable 
semi-annually, at such rate, not exceeding four per centum as the 
treasurer of said city, with the approval of the mayor, shall de- 
termine. Said treasurer shall sell said bonds and hold the proceeds 
thereof in the treasury to meet the expenses aforesaid. 

Sect. 3. Said board shall establish just and equitable charges for 
the use of sewers constructed after the passage of this act, to be paid 
by every estate abutting on the portion of the street in which such 
sewers are located, and may change said charges from year to year; 
said board shall likewise establish just and equitable charges for the 
use of sewers heretofore constructed, and in determining the amount 
of such charges shall give all estates for which any assessment has 
been paid for the construction of a sewer, such credit on account of 
such payment as in the judgment of said board would be just and 
equitable, having regard in every case to the amount of assessments 
paid and the length of time which has elapsed since such payment, 
and the amount of use that such estate has made of the sewer. The 
determination of such charges by said board shall be final in all cases. 
Such charges shall constitute a lien upon the real estate, and the 
annual amount thereof shall be inserted in the tax bill for such 
estate, and be collected in the same manner and as a part of the 
taxes on such estate. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



28 City Document No. 29. 

Under this system, it would be possible for sewers to be 
built when needed, and not as at present, when the city can 
find available money. The proposed plan seems fairer to 
each individual and no hardship on property. The subject 
is worthy of the most careful consideration and study. 
From the investigation made by this department, the plan 
seems a wise one. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 

Appropriation. Expenditure. 

1435,000. 1477,241.54. 

The past year the collections of this division were as 
follows : 

363,975 loads of house dirt and ashes ; 
56,402 loads of house offal. 

The matter of collection and disposal of offal in large 
cities becomes each year a more serious problem. In the 
city of Boston some action of the government towards a 
more scientific and sanitary method of its disposition is 
advisable. 

During the last fiscal year about 86 per cent of the offal 
collections were sold to farmers, the remainder being towed 
to sea. 

The scarcity of convenient dumping places for the disposal 
of ashes and other dry refuse collected from stores and 
dwellings is a steadily increasing expense, and will so con- 
tinue until some arrangement is made for the destruction of 
the combustible portion, which amounts to some 50 per cent 
of the total. Much of the dry material collected, though not 
heavy, is very bulky in its nature, and during the past year 
it was deemed advisable to increase the capacity of the col- 
lection carts one third. Boards were attached to the sides, 
flaring outward to prevent the refuse from littering the 
streets while the load was in transit. Some objection was 
raised to this plan on the ground that it caused excessive 
loading, but the erection of platform scales on the corner of 
Massachusetts avenue and Swett street, near one of the 
dumps, showed that of a total of 1,000 loads in February, 
the average weight per load was about 1,600 pounds. 

A committee has been appointed by the City Council, 
consisting of the City Engineer, Chairman of the Board of 
Health, and the Superintendent of Sti-eets, to investigate the 



Street Department. 29 

subject of garbage disposal, and a report will soon be made 
on this subject to His Honor the Mayor. 

During the past year residents have been instructed to 
report the non-removal of ashes or offal to the police. The 
complaints are promptly forwarded to this office and receive 
immediate attention. This system should be encouraged. 

The property at Fort Hill Wharf, used as the principal 
dumping station, is in a dangerously dilapidated condition. 
Its reconstruction and enlargement so as to accommodate an 
additional dumping boat and also to remove the present 
objectionable features is recommended, and an appropriation 
will be asked from the city government. 

It is the purpose of the department to abolish, April 1, the 
offal station in the Highland-street yard, Roxbury. It has 
long been objectionable, on account of its proximity to the 
Marcella-street Home, which provides for the care of several 
hundred children. This will add to the maintenance expense 
of the division, as the offal must now be hauled to the South 
End yard. 

A new horse-shoeing plant has been established at the 
West End yard, giving satisfaction to the department, and 
making a saving in expense. The greater part of the horse 
shoeing of the Street Department is done by this division, 
which also builds and repairs the carts, harnesses, etc., and 
paints all the street signs. 



STREET CLEANING. 

Appropriation. Expenditure. 

$300,000 00 1310,266 39 

Cleaned 12,080 miles of streets. 
Removed 112,961 loads of dirt. 

This division has been maintained on the old lines, but 
with an increased force and efficiency. 

The work of the push cart patrol service has been ex- 
tended, and a further extension is recommended. 

As in the other divisions, the maintenance appropriation 
for the work is not sufficient. From year to year the public 



30 



City Document No. 29. 



expect a higher standard in the cleanliness of the streets, 
and although the mileage is increased, the amount of the 
appropriation remains at a standstill. In New York, under 
the administration of Colonel Waring, the appropriation is 
comparatively very much greater, and special appropriations 
for snow work are made. The public in that city, appre- 
ciating the great value of clean streets, both from a sanitary 
and commercial point of view, have been liberal in the matter 
of expenditure. 

Every effort has been made the past year to secure the 
active assistance of the police in the enforcement of the ordi- 
nances forbidding the throwing of paper and other rubbish 
into the streets ; circulars printed in various languages have 
been distributed and co-operation with the charitable organi- 
zations in this work encouraged ; but the results have not 
been very satisfactory. It would seem that this matter might 
be better controlled by the police. An effort was made 
through the Police Commissioners to secure the appoint- 
ment within the department of special officers who might 
give this matter of unnecessary dirt in the streets their 
entire attention with some authority to arrest. The Com- 
missioners have decided that this under the law could not be 
allowed. The remedy, therefore, remains in the hands of 
the police. A more detailed account of the conditions 
existing in Boston as regards street cleaning will be found 
in the report of the Deputy Superintendent in charge of that 
division. 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 

Maintenance . 



Appropriation. 

$120,000 00 



Expenditure. 

1119,963 55 



Appropriation. 

155,543 86 



Specials. 



Expenditure. 

$27,172 77 



This division has charge of 128 bridges. Many of these 
are old and in poor condition, and it requires the most con- 



Stebet Depaetment. 



31 



stant care and activity on the part of the Deputy Superin- 
tendent to Iteep all safe and in condition for travel. 

Special appropriations should be passed the coming year 
for reconstruction work on the following bridges : 



Warren avenue 

Mt. Washington avenue 

Congress street 

Maiden . . . . 

Columbus avenue .. 

Broadway 



$5,000 00 
4,500 00 
7,000 00 
6,000 00 
2,000 00 

10,000 00 



The past year in the Bridge Division has been a most 
active one. The work of the division has been systematized, 
and the amount of maintenance work on the bridges greatly 
increased. With the money available, a great deal has 
been accomplished. New features of the work being the 
reconstruction of Meridian-street bridge, and the introduc- 
tion of electric power in place of horse power, and the re- 
building of the Essex-street bridge, Boston side. 

I would recommend for this division a larger and more 
convenient building than the present quarters on Foundry 
street for an office, storehouse, and work shop. There 
should also be attached a stable with yard room, which 
would give ample accommodations for the storage of lumber. 

The drawtenders should be given authority as special 
police officers so that the rules governing the use of the 
bridges and waterways might be better enforced. 



FERRY DIVISION. 



Appropriations. 



INIaintenance. 

.$218,000. 

Specials. 

1742 94. 



Expenditure. 

1217,999 95. 

Expenditure. 

1742 94. 



For expenditure under the New Ferry Landing, see 
page 4. 

The need of additional and improved ferry facilities for 
East Boston was recognized by the Legislature, and an act 
was passed authorizing the city to borrow outside the debt 
limit the sum of $500,000 for new ferry landing. This 
subject has received considerable attention and study by a 
committee of the City Council, this Department and the 
East Boston Trade Association. Definite plans of location. 



32 City Docitment No. 29. 

however, have not been decided upon, owhig to the difficulty 
of securing the proper sites for new landings. 

The sum of $30,000 of the special appropriation by a vote of 
the City Council was made available for the building of cer- 
tain drops and slips which had long been considered and con- 
demned as unsafe. These would be a part of any new plan 
of public improvements which ultimately might be adopted. 
Plans are also being prepared for a new boat, the construc- 
tion of which will be pushed forward as rapidly as possible. 

The best plan presented for the general improvement 
seems to be for the city to retain its present locations, mak- 
ing additional slips at the South Ferry, rebuilding the head 
house of the South Ferry, East Boston side, and the taking 
of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Company 
boats and landing for a southern terminus. 

From special appropriations there were added this year a 
permanent awning over sidewalk at North Ferry, East Boston 
side, an illuminated clock on the head house. North Ferry, 
Boston side ; electric motors at the North Ferry, East Boston 
and Boston sides, for hauling heavy teams up the drops, thus 
replacing horse power. 

Great satisfaction has been expressed at this latter 
improvement, by which frequent and tedious delaj^s have 
been overcome, and in addition a substantial saving in cost 
has been made. 

Two boats have been coppered, and all the boats have been 
on the ways, thoroughly repainted and overhauled, and 
various minor, but important as regards public comfort, 
improvements made in the head houses. 



STREET WATERING DIVISION. 

MaiiitCDaBce. Expenditures. 

170,000 00 $71,211 81 

The street watering season of 1896 was a most trying one 
as regards weather, and with the appropriation smaller b}^ 
many thousands than in past years, the results attained were 
quite satisfactory. The growth of the city and the exten- 
tion of the street watering into the early spring and late 
fall months, make it imperative that a larger appropriation 
should be made, if the work is to be done in a manner 
satisfactory to the public. Under the present ordinances, the 
city undertakes the watering of all macadam roads, paved 
streets being paid for by the abutters. 



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Street Depaetjnient. 33 

• The work of the division the past season commenced on 
the 25th of March, and carts were employed in portions of 
the city proper, as late as the 4th of December. Certain 
sections of the city are greatly troubled with dust after the 
freezing season sets in and many complaints are received. 
No plan of watering is possible, owing to the fact that the 
water in the stand pipe becomes frozen, or if put on the 
streets becomes iced, and there seems to be no way of abating 
the nuisance. 

The construction of the subway has been the occasion of 
much dust and consequent complaints. 

As Blue Hill, Huntington, Commonwealth, Brighton and 
Columbus avenues near completion, it becomes necessary to 
provide for their care. The present force of carts are given 
more miles of streets than efficiency should require, and an 
increase in the expenses must be allowed for the above 
avenues and other new streets. 

It is the intention the coming season to provide for an 
auxiliary force to be called out on days when the conditions 
are exceptional, and the regular number of carts inadequate 
to the demands upon them. 

Considerable attention was given the past year to the 
system of watering, in use in other cities, by means of elec- 
tric watering cars. This system has been on trial for some 
years with great success. After formal correspondence and 
apparently satisfactory arrangements with the West End 
Street Railway Co., hydrants were constructed in the section 
of the city, shown on the map herewith annexed, for the 
purpose of giving the system a thorough trial. From the 
five hydrants as indicated on the map, a very large territory 
might be watered at a comparatively small expense. After 
one day's trial, the West End Railway Company notified the 
department that under their charter, such service was not 
allowed, and the experiment was discontinued. A bill has 
been introduced in the State Legislature this year, providing 
that street railways may enter into contract to perform such 
work, and on its passage, this system will be given a fair 
trial, and, if the results are satisfactory, plans will be made 
for the extension of the service the coming year. Pending 
the passage of the bill, the West End Street Railway Co. 
have refused to consider any proposition. They opposed 
the department bill, and will probably be able to hold 
back the so called " permissive bill " until such time as it is 
too late to make arrangements for this season. This electric 
sprinkling car service would be of the greatest value on the 
long macadam roads extending through the suburban dis- 



34 



City Document No. 29. 



tricts, where proper watering is a matter, under the present 
system, of too great expense to be undertaken. 

PUKCHASE OF SUPPLIES. 

It has been found impossible for the Superintendent to 
give more than a supervisory attention to the purchasing of 
supplies for the department, so that the title of the official 
charged with this responsibility has been changed from "Pur- 
chasing Clerk" to "Purchasing Agent." Requisitions are 
still signed by the Superintendent, but the detail of the work 
all falls on the Purchasing Agent. There has been estab- 
lished a central supply department and a stock room, so that 
the Purchasing Agent may take advantage of the market by 
purchasing in larger quantities and at advantageous periods. 
The distribution of supplies can also be handled better in this 
way, and a closer check kept on the quantities used in the 
various districts. 

Horses. 

The number of horses owned and cared for by the depart- 
ment averages over five hundred, divided by divisions as 
follows: — 



Central Office . 


4 


Bridge Division 


10 


Ferries .... 


1 


Paving Division 


112 


Sanitary Division 


197 


Sewer Division 


74 


Street-Cleaning Division . 


97 


Street- Watering Division 


2 



Total . 



497 



Up to the present year, there had been no system of record, 
the only figures being so many horses assigned as might be. 
A horse was a horse, and there was on file no information as 
to the date of purchase, cost or description. In March, 1896, 
an examination was made by the head veterinary, each horse 
duly described under a number assigned and attached around 
his neck by a strap with a brass tag thereon. Such informa- 
tion as could be gathered from the stablemen was also added 
to the record. At the central office is now kept a general 
book containing by number a description of each horse, as- 
signment, time bought, price paid, transfer, sale, or death ; 
and at each stable is also kept a local book of record. Veter- 
inary bills are now rendered, giving the number of the 



Street Department. 36 

patient, cause of visit, etc. This not only puts an end to 
certain abuses whicli have existed heretofore in tlie depart- 
ment, but is in many ways serviceable and business-like. 
New horses can only be received in the department after 
examination by the head veterinary and his written approval 
on a blank provided therefor. Likewise, horses sold or 
killed must be examined and condemned in due form by the 
head veterinary. 

Labor. 

The labor of the department has this year been put on a 
permanent basis, under the following plan : 

At the beginning of the financial year the number of men 
in each division who, under the maintenance appropriation, 
can be safely carried is estimated, and these constitute the 
permanent men, and they can feel assured of steady work the 
year through, unless by act or fault of their own they forfeit 
their place. Such additional men as are needed in the 
active working season of the department will be rated as 
reserve or substitute men. These men can depend on em- 
ployment only so long as the work of the department 
requires their services. As vacancies occur in the perma- 
nent force, promotions will be made from the reserve men. 

I believe this will remedy the very unsatisfactory con- 
dition which has prevailed up to this time. It is only 
justice and common sense that the men should know their 
true position. Under the old organization, when the winter 
cut-down came, no one was prepared. It may have been 
common knowledge that the cut was coming, but each 
individual felt that he was not the one who should go. 
This not only created suffering and loss to the men sus- 
pended, but brought an almost unbearable pressure for 
reinstatement on the heads of the department. 

The new plan should meet with success, and prove an 
incentive to faithful effort, of the permanent men to hold 
their places, and of the reserve men to gain promotion. 

Stables and Buildings. 

At the Highland yard, Roxbury, much-needed additional 
stable room was made by building a runway to, and stalls 
on, the second floor. These stalls are of the latest sanitary 
pattern, and at a slight expense the number can now be in- 
creased. 

The condition of the Street Department buildings was 
such that, by request, the Superintendent of Public Buildings 



36 City Document No. 29. 

made a rej)ort to His Honor the Mayor. This report showed 
a very pressing need of expenditure for putting in repair, 
and needed extension, of the buildings. 

It is very important that there be provided for the depart- 
ment a hospital for new and sick horses. Plans have been 
drawn and a location selected, and it is hoped that the city 
government will make available a sufficient appropriation, so 
that a model hospital may be established. At present the 
conveniences and apparatus necessary for the proper care of 
sick horses are wanting, and the consequent loss by death 
and sickness is very considerable. 

The expenditures for improving the Street Department 
plant have been very considerable. Carts, horses and tools 
were in poor condition. 

Owing to the expiration of the lease of No. 12 Beacon 
street, the Sanitary, Street Cleaning, Bridge, and Street 
Watering Divisions removed to the Tremont Building un- 
til such time as room would become available to them iu the 
reconstructed Historical Society Building, of which lease has 
been taken by the city. 

It would greatly benefit and advance the administration of 
the Street Department if all the divisions were gathered 
under one roof with the Central Office. 

Tow Boat " Cormorant."' 

The department tow boat, "Cormorant," built in 1893, has 
been put in first class condition. She was taken on the 
ways, caulked, painted inside and out, wear and damage 
caused by her constant and rough work repaired, machinery 
and boilers thoroughly overhauled, and a most important im- 
provement made by the addition of steam-steering gear. 
This latter expense was deemed warranted, from the fact that 
this boat must make her daily trip to sea in any and all con- 
ditions of the weather. With weather heavy, this steam- 
steering gear is a mattej' not only of comfort, but of safety. 

Smoke Nuisance. 

Following out the provisions of the statute law relative to 
the abatement of the smoke nuisance in the city of Boston, 
the work has been authoritatively assigned by the Mayor to this 
department. A careful inspection of all boiler plants has been 
made from time to time, and strict regulations have been en- 
forced in all cases. Especial attention has been given to the 
setting of new boilers in order to prevent the entire disregard 
to the smoke question which seems to have been customary. 



Street Department. 37 

No permit is now given by the Inspection of Buildings De- 
partment unless the applicant has first filed satisfactory evi- 
dence with this department that reasonable precautions have 
been taken to reduce smoke to a minimum. 

During 1896, 331 boiler applications have been received 
and disposed of. Careful and detailed observations have been 
made in many cases, both with and without the knowledge 
of the owners, and from the tables the percentage of total 
smoke and clear stack have been computed. When com- 
plaints have been received, they have been immediately fol- 
lowed up until the source of the trouble has been located and 
remedied. Eight prominent buildings during the year have 
equipped their plant with good smoke preventers. Numerous 
other plants have been willing to use hard coal or a mixture 
of screenings and soft coal with good results. 

Twenty-six special reports have been made by the smoke 
inspector on various alleged violations of the smoke law, re- 
quiring in some cases extended observations. Forty-four 
observations have been taken, lasting from five to nine hours 
each, while 285 short observations have been taken and 
cautionary notices issued where they seemed to have been 
required. 

In general, the citizens of this community have shown a 
commendable desire to operate their various plants, not only 
within the law, but consistent with the just requirements of a 
congested business district. 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

It is but fair to state that the care and responsibility has 
been chiefly borne by my associate Commissioner, Mr. William 
J. Marvin, of Cambridge, and I desire to express my appre- 
ciation of his work. 

The condition of these bridges is such that only by the 
most careful management can the work of keeping safe be 
done at an amount near the appropriation, which this year, 
on the part of the city of Boston, was $13,000. The actual 
cost to each city was 113,835.54. 

A new bridge to Cambridge, to replace the West Boston 
Bridge, should be planned for at once. The present struct- 
ure is entirely inadequate to the demands of travel, and the 
condition is such that it cannot possibly be made to do duty 
but a short time longer. 



38 City Docuinient No. 29. 

Cakal ok Ceaigib's Bridge. 

The bulkhead at the end of the bridge at the draw has 
been rebuilt with oak piles and 6-inch hard pine plank. 
The end of the down-stream draw pier has been strengthened 
by driving additional oak piles, and planking with 6 -inch hard 
pine plank. The roadway pavement has been repaired and the 
sheathing of the draw kept in repair. The ordinary small re- 
pairs have been made by the drawtender and his assistants. 

The bridge is swept once a week, always after midnight, 
and the roadway is watered with salt water three times daily, 
when necessary to lay the dust. 

The sidewalks on the southerly side of the bridge on the 
Cambridge end, and part of the northerly sidewalk are in 
poor condition and will require rebuilding next year. The 
drawtender's house and the power house on the draw pier 
should be painted. 

Haevaed Beidge. 

Harvard bridge is in good condition. The principal 
repairs made during the year are as follows : The wearing 
plank on the surface of the roadway has been entirely re- 
newed, without interrupting public travel. Experience has 
shown that the two-inch spruce plank making the wearing 
surface of the roadway will have to be renewed every year. 

The ironwork underneath the surface of the bridge has 
been cleaned from rust and painted. Paint stock was 
bought at wholesale prices, and the work done by the day. 

The asphalt sidewalks on the bridge were in bad condi- 
tion. They were originally laid by two asphalt paving 
companies, each of which gave bonds in the sum of one thou- 
sand dollars conditioned upon maintaining the work in good 
condition for five years. One-half of the sidewalk on the 
bridge laid by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company has been 
entirely renewed by them without cost to the two cities, and 
the remaining sidewalk will be made good by the guarantors 
next year. 

The avenue connecting the bridge with Boston has been 
paved at the request of the Commissioners, and the part of 
the avenue in Cambridge next the bridge should also be 
paved to prevent cracked stone and dirt from being carried 
on to the bridge by teams. 

The drawtender's house, the iron fences, and the iron 
work outside the rail will require painting next year. 

The smaller repairs are made by the drawtender and 
assistants. They also clean the surface of the bridge 
weekly, and keep the electric light globes clean and in order. 



Street Department. 39 

Peison-Point Bredge. 

The abolition of the grade crossing of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, which will soon be made, will require an entirely 
new bridge at this point. The old bridge is in bad condition, 
as only such repairs as are necessary to keep it safe have 
been made. 

The smaller repairs have been made by the drawtender. 
The drawtender's house will have to be painted next year. 

West-Boston Bridge. 

This bridge is entirely worn out, and only constant inspec- 
tion and repairs prevent serious accidents. During the year 
the piles supporting the bridge settled in places as much as five 
inches under the extreme loads carried. To stop this alarm- 
ing settlement repairs were made on small seistions at a time 
without interrupting travel. Additional piles were driven 
through small openings made in the bridge, and 62 oak 
piles, 30 spruce piles, 41 new stringers and 12 new girder 
caps were used. 

The bridge for a long time has been too narrow to accom- 
modate the travel which is constantly increasing. It is in 
the line of the heaviest travel from Boston to Cambridge and 
the country beyond, and the Commissioners recommend the 
immediate construction of a substantial modern bridge. 

The curb was reset and brick sidewalks laid in front of 
the estates of Rawson & Morrison and G. Damon. The 
roadway on the draw has been resheathed when necessary. 

The bridge has been swept once a week, always after mid- 
night, and watered three times daily with salt water in dusty 
weather. The sweeping of the piers and draw, the cleaning of 
snow from draw-piers and sidewalks and the small ordinary 
repairs have been done by the drawtender and assistants. 

The house on the draw-pier will need painting and other 
repairs next year. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended, showing the number of 
draw openings and the number of vessels which passed 
through, also table showing the traffic over bridge on April 
18, 1896. 

The amount of revenue received for rents, dockage, repairs 
to West End Street Railway Company's tracks, etc., during 
the year has been |1,424.02 ; one-half, 1712.01 has been 
paid to each city. 



40 



City Docu^sient jSTo. 29. 



statement showing Traffic over Bridges. 



Date. 
1896. 


Bridge. 






.2 

0) 
0) 


o 

O 

s 


't^ to 


S 
- o 






7,284 
3,801 
1,975 
4,035 


10,926 
4,851 
2,916 
5,466 


14,913 

7,998 
3,962 
9,902 


202 

3,352 

95 

246 


563 
478 

1,046 


12,695 


April 18, 




13,7.50 


6 A.M. 
to 7 P.M. 


Prison Point 

"West Boston 


20,231 




Totals 


17,095 


24,159 


36,775 


3,895 


2,087 


46,676 









The following is a statement of the payments made by the 
city of Boston on account of the Canal, Harvard, Prison 
Point and West Boston Bridges, from Feb. 1, 1896 to Jan. 
31, 189T. 
Amount of appropriation for financial year 

of 1896-97 $13,000 00 

Transferred from Street Department, Pav- 
ing Division . . . . . 835 51 



Amount expended to Jan. 31, 1897 



$13,835 54 



Street Departjient. 



41 



Classification of Expenses. 



Feb. 1, 1896, to 
Jan. 31, 189T. 



Canal or TT„,.„„,.ri Prison 

Craigie's ^^^1^4 P^^^* 
Bridge, ^"cifte. ^^.^f^g^ 



West 
Boston 
Bridge. 



General 
Account. 



Totals. 



Salaries, draw-tenders and 
others 



General repairs 

Lumber 

Electric lighting 

Inspection 

Cleaning Bridges 

Paint and painting 

Ironwork 

Watering roadways 

Fuel... 

Tools and hardware 

Electric current 

Sundry small supplies . . . 

Paving 

Travelling expenses, etc. 

Water rates 

Printing and stationery . 
Electric light repairs 



§1,307 50 
505 68 
328 73 
281 27 
162 50 
197 12 



Totals 



41 00 
175 00 
137 55 

28 63 



§1,275 00 

420 28 

1,103 99 

1,141 67 

95 00 

54 20 

375 56 

153 37 



$273 94 
140 49 
130 54 



47 50 



48 93 



16 00 



§3,229 91 



13 95 

73 85 

150 00 

56 13 



25 98 



§1,250 00 

1,255 21 

577 31 

506 27 

242 50 

278 38 

1 06 

129 48 

175 00 

78 61 

. 21 58 



§4,940 .50 



$655 60 



37 06 
104 96 



11 00 



$4,668 42 



$250 00 



62 30 



$341 11 



§4,356 44 

2,321 66 

2,140 57 

1,929 21 

547 50 

529 70 

376 62 

355 50 

350 00 

230 11 

150 04 

150 00 

142 12 

104 96 

62 80 

32 50 

28 81 

27 50 

$13,835 54 



42 



City Docxjiment No. 29. 



Number of times the draws in Canal, Harvard, Prison Point and 
West Boston Bridges have been opened and the number of 
Vessels which have passed through for the year, beginning 
Feb. 1, 1896 and ending Jan. 31, 1897. 





Canal or 














Date. 




. 


Harvard. 


Prison 


Point. 


West IJoston. 




Ceaigie's. 






















m 




03 




m 




to 


'^^ 




o.d 


!" 


®J3 


m 


aid 


Feb. 1, 1896, 


tJ3 

^•3 


11 


O.S 


^5P 

02 






O.S 






S a 




S ® 


ti-.i3 


S "^ 


CHr?; 


S OJ 




to 
Jan. 31,1897. 


5 


'op. 

si 




OH 
II 





II 


Si 


OH 
II 


February, 1896 


125 


175 


22 


32 


21 


28 


27 


44 


March 


149 
289 
397 
384 
329 


201 
320 
504 
448 
421 


20 
50 

124 
88 

107 


38 
70 
187 
123 
158 


15 
39 
74 
32 

9 


22 
50 
94 
41 
13 


31 

70 
155 
113 
154 


66 




107 


May 


239 


June 


. 161 


July 


257 




433 


731 


127 


194 


52 


65 


285 


644 


September 


323 


465 


85 


131 


41 


53 


17C 


354 


October. ... . 


229 
276 
281 
186 


325 
346 
362 

237 


65 
115 
144 

36 


98 
161 
155 

38 


42 
36 
37 
15 


57 
54 
51 

22 


121 

110 

109 

33 


214 




175 


December 


171 


January, 1897 


51 


Totals 


3,401 


4,535 


9S3 


1,385 


413 


550 


1,384 


2,483 



Employment of Labok. 

The following statement from the Civil Service Clerk 
shows in detail the classification of labor of the whole de- 
partment tabulated by divisions which is self explanatory : 

During the year ending Jan. 31, 1897, 82 applications 
were made upon the Civil Service Commission for 226 men 
of various grades, and 330 names were submitted by them, 
of which number 250 were given employment in the several 
divisions ; of the 250 people employed, 6 were provisional 
appointments (Civil Service Rule 36), 5 were promotions, 
and 32 were veterans. During the year authority was 
granted to reinstate 49 former employees (Civil Service Rule 
60), 48 men were transferred from various city departments 
to this department, to wit : 15 from Water Department, 9 
from Transit Commission, 9 from Improved Sewerage, 8 from 



Street Department. 



-13 



Public Grounds, 4 from Parks, and one each from Mt. Hope, 
Health, and City Engineer's Department, making the total 
of 347 persons employed during the year. Notices of 372 
discharges from the department rolls were forwarded to the 
Commission, and at their suggestion the names of persons 
who had not worked for a year or more for the Street De- 
partment were dropped from the rolls, and their discharges 
are included in the figure quoted above. The department 
records show that there are 2,909 persons eligible for em- 
ployment in the various divisions, and of that number 2,708 
were upon the pay rolls for the week ending Jan. 28, 1897. 
The following table shows the classification of all the em- 
ployees of the Street Department on the pay roll of Jan. 28, 
1897. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


c5 a5 

u 


PL, 




S 


.5 


U 

Em 


bD 

2 


6X) 
C 


+3 

o 


Superintendent 


1 














1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


7 


Executive eng'lneer 


1 
1 
2 


1 


Purchasing agent 
















1 


Clerks 


7 
10 
25 

1 

20 


10 
10 
14 


3 
6 
13 


1 

8 
16 


2 

1 


1 

1 

2 




26 




36 


Sub-f oi'einen 




70 


Superintendent of inspectors 
(P.O.) 




1 


Inspectors 




36 


10 










6fi 


Superintendent of street- 
patrol 




1 


- 






1 


Civil engineers 




1 


7 
16 

9 
14 

52 

2 










8 


Draughtsmen 














16 


Transitmen 




7 
3 
5 
1 
19 












16 


Levelmen 














17 


Eodmen 














57 


Aid or tallymen 




7 
7 


1 

4 








9 


Blacksmith and assistants... 




2 
2 






34 


Boiler-makers 








2 


Bracers 






18 










18 




















Carried forward 


5 


100 


189 


47 


32 


8 


5 


1 


387 



44 



City Document No. 29. 



Qrade and Number of Employees. 



Continued. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


% 6 






1 
m 


a 




CD 


ch 
c 

5^ 


o 




5 


100 


189 
2 
17 


47 


32 


8 


5 


1 


387 




2 




1 


11 




6 
5 




- 18 


1 


54 




5 














2 




2 










1 


3 


11 

5 


12 






19 


9 


11 

1 




47 


Caulkers 




1 








1 
4 








1 


















4 


Chief of draws and bridges . . 












1 

1 

20 

34 




1 


Chief drawtender 














1 
















20 


Assistant drawtenders 














34 


Deck-hands 






2 






25 


27 








19 


5 






24 








1 
25 








1 


Engineers and assistants. .. 




15 






11 


18 




69 


Feeders 




5 




5 


Firemen 






4 
3 
4 




20 






24 


Flushers 














3 












16 






20 


Harness-makers and assist- 




3 


4 

179 

6 








7 


Helpers 




62 








241 


Horseshoers 














6 


Hostlers 






5 

1 

1 










5 


















1 


Janitors 










9 

5 
7 
2 






10 


Janitresses ... 














5 


Laborers 




482 


317 










806 














2 


Ledg'emen 






93 
3 










93 


Machinists 










5 






8 














Cavried forward 


6 


630 


681 


261 


113 


124 


111 


2 


1,928 





Steeet Department. 



45 



Grade and Number of Employees. 



Concluded. 





Divisions. 




Title. 


Is 


a 
'> 




"3 


«"3 

a> o 


fA 




bH 

4j 33 
m 






6 


630 


681 

32 

6 

1 


261 


113 


124 


111 


2 


1,928 




32 


















6 


















1 






2 
10 












2 




1 


6 

7 


7 


3 


2 
4 


6 


* 1 


36 




11 


Patch pavers and assistants . . 




32 










32 




7 




11 


5 




18 


Pilots 






1 
3 


12 
















2 






4 












4 






1 












1 








6 










6 


■ 




7 


2 










9 




1 












1 




17 


3 
1 












20 


Storekeepers 








1 






2 










130 

4 

65 






130 






11 

74 


6 
24 


6 
173 


27 


Teamsters 




12 
4 


2 




338 


Tollmen 




12 






13 
5 
3 


16 


5 


1 


3 




42 






5 






1 












4 


Wheelwrights 




3 
18 










3 






7 


2 


2 








29 














Totals 


8 


815 


792 


486 


318 


159 


127 


3 


2,708 



The report of the Executive Engineer, which follows, 
alludes to the work of the Central Office, and includes a 
statement of the general finances of the department, with ap- 
propriations and expenditure from loans for special work, 
statistics of paved streets, together with a valuable table of 
prices that obtained upon a contract basis. 



46 City Document No. 29. 

Attention is also called to the general work of the divisions, 
under the special division headings following. 

Summary of Work Done. 

The principal features of the work of the year may be 
summarized as follows : 

■ Bridge Division. 

Overhauled and repaired deck, sheathing, and machinery 
of the following tide-water bridges : Broadway, over Fort 
Point channel. Congress street, and Warren, and recon- 
structed the Essex-street bridge, between Brighton and Cam- 
bridge. Of the inland bridges, the most important repairs 
were made to the Albany-street bridge, Berkeley, over the 
Providence and Albany railroads, and Dartmouth bridge, 
while special work was done on Chelsea bridge, north, in 
rebuilding the draw, and general repairs and additions to 
racks, shafts, pinions, gears, etc., preparatory to use of elec- 
tric motor for power. 

Meridian-street bridge required a reconstruction of draw, 
renewing spur-shores, girder caps, fender guard, new deck, 
and the painting of both bridge and fence. 

A new bridge was built over Geneva avenue by the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co., according to 
plans submitted and approved by this department, at a cost 
to the city of $14,026.58. 

Saratoga-street bridge was repaired where rendered unsafe 
by the action of ice and tide. Cottage-Farm bridge at Com- 
monwealth avenue was completed, the roadway being fin- 
ished with asphalt ; a slight portion of sidewalk is yet to be 
topped. 

A new public landing was built at Jeffries Point. 

Ferry Division. 

The extra boat, so called, was run throughout the year. 
Two new ferry drops were built; repaired the middle pier 
at the Boston landing of the South Ferry; supplied the ferry 
drops with special hoisting motor operated by electricity, 
used for hauling heavy teams up the drop ; and supplied an 
illuminated clock for the North Ferry head-house, Boston 
side, beside doing an unusual amount of painting and over- 
hauling, the details being given in the Deputy Superintend- 
ent's report. 



Street Depaetment. 47 

Paving Division. 

Established two new stone crushing plants. 

Paved with granite blocks and regulated some 45 streets, 
six of which were laid on a concrete base, covering 108,952 
square yards of block paving in roadway, and 69,800 square 
yards of gutter paving. Over 2,000,000 new paving blocks 
were used during the season. 

Paved sixteen short streets with asphalt, and two long- 
stretches of boulevards, involving 24,782 square yards of 
Trinidad lake asphalt and 26,717 square yards of Sicilian 
rock asphalt, all on concrete foundation, and increasing the 
asphalt surface by 51,500 square yards. 

Furnishing and setting 101,550 linear feet of new edge- 
stone as against about 50,000 feet for an ordinary year, and 
making a total length of edgestone set and reset of 227,991 
linear feet. 

Laying 13,647 square yards of artificial stone sidewalks. 

Laying and relaying 117,492 square yards of brick paving. 

Construction has been in progress on twenty-five streets 
laid out by the Board of Street Commissioners under chap- 
ter 323 of the Acts of 1891, and amendments relating 
thereto, beside the general construction of the four large 
boulevards mentioned elsewhere. Fifteen of these streets 
have been finished. 

In connection with the work of the Paving Division the 
West End Street Railway Co. have paved over forty miles 
of track, over twenty-four miles of which required new 
blocks, laid under city inspection. 

Sewer Division. — Pumping Station. 

Built over twenty-nine miles of sewers, 346 catch-basins 
and drop inlets, repaired 381 catch-basins, and cleaned 6,041 
catch-basins, removing therefrom about 20,550 cubic yards 
filthy material. Also built 474 linear feet of culverts. Six 
thousand four hundred and thirty-one cubic yards of sludge 
were received at the Improved Sewerage Pumping Station. 
There are now 444.47 miles of sewers in charge of this 
division. 

Sanitary Division. 

Collected and removed 363,975 loads of house dirt and 
ashes, and 56,402 loads of house offal. 

Street Cleaning Division. 

Cleaned 12,080 miles of streets, removing 112,961 loads 
of dirt. 



48 City Document No. 29. 

Street Watering Division. 

Sprinkled 347.16 miles of streets during the season at a 
less cost than for any year since 1891. 

In addition to this report, nine appendices are herewith 
submitted, in which will be found the report of the several 
Deputy Superintendents and Smoke Inspector, showing the 
expenditure of each division in detail ; also the report of the 
City Engineer relative to work assigned to him by this de- 
partment for either supervision or estimate. They are as 
follows : 

Appendix A — Bridge Division. 
" B — Ferry Division. 

'•'■ C — Paving Division. 

'' D — Sanitary Division. 

" E — Sewer Division. 

" F — Street-Cleaning Division. 

" G — Street-Watering Division. 

" H — Street Construction, etc., assigned to the 

City Engineer. 
'' I — Smoke Inspector. 

" J — Former Superintendents and Document 

Numbers. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin W. Wells, 

Superintendent of /Streets. 



Street Department. 49 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE ENGINEER. 



BosTOif, Feb. 1, 1897. 

Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : I herewith respectfully submit the annual 
report of the operations and expenses of the Street Depart- 
ment, the same being a full statement thereof for the year 
1896. 

Yours respectfully, 

Henry B. Wood, 

JExecutive Engineer. 

CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 

Expenses of the Central Office. 

For the current expenses of the Central Office the City. 
Council appropriated the sum of nineteen thousand dollars 
($19,000), which was expended as follows: 

Salaries $17,045 91 

General office expenditures . . 1,735 94 



Total $18,781 85 

leaving a balance of two hundred eighteen dollars and fifteen 
cents ($218.15), which was transferred to the Street Clean- 
ing Division. 



50 



City Document No. 29. 



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52 



("iTY Document No. 29. 

Bridge Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 


Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and Transfers. 


Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1896, to 

Jan. 31, 1897. 


Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1897. 




$2,924 16 
13,261 64 
See note. 
6,500 00 
18,597 58 
14,260 48 


|2,517 12 
8,231 10 

4,969 43 

28 25 

11,426 87 


$407 04 


Chelsea Bridge, North, rehuilding, etc.. 
Chelsea-street Bridge, rebuilding, etc... 
Essex-street Bridge, reconstruction — 


5,030 54 

1,530 .57 
18,.569 33 
2,833 61 


Meridian-street Bridge, reconstructing, 


Totals 


$55,543 86 


$27,172 77 


$28,371 09 





Note. — The balance on hand, $4,260.48, Feb. 1, 1896, was transferred to the appro- 
priation for Meridian-street Bridge. 



Ferry Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and Transfers. 



Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1896, to 

Jan. 31, 1897. 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1897. 



Awning, North Ferry, East Boston side. 

New Ferry Landing (Chap. 435, Acts of 
1895) 



South Drop, South Ferry, Boston side. 



$742 94 

500,000 00 
See note. 



$742 94 
21,961 61 



$478,038 39 



Totals. 



$500,742 94 



$22,704 55 



$478,038 39 



Note. — The balance on hand, Feb. 1, 1896, $96.09, was transferi'ed to the appro- 
priation for Ferry Division " Clock for Head-house." 

Paving Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and Transfers. 



Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1896, 

to Jan. 31, 1897, 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1897. 



Adams St., Ward 24 

Adelaide st.. Ward 22 

Arklow st 

Bennington and WaUey sts 

Brooks St., Ward 25 

Bunker Hill st 

Carleton st.. Ward 10 

Centre st., Dorchester 

Carried forward 



$7,500 00 

4,000 00 

635 20 

11,924 90 

25,000 00 

366 19 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 



$11,924 



867 10 



$7,500 00 

4,000 00 

635 20 

25,000 00 

366 19 

8,000 00 

7,132 90 



65,426 29 



$12,792 00 



$52,684 ^9 



Street Department. 



53 



Paving Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appkopriation. 



Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and Transfers. 



Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1896, to 

Jan. 31, 1897. 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1897. 



Brought forward 

Centre st., Roxbury, from Hog 
Bridge to Day st 

Columbus ave., Asphalt, from Massa- 
chusetts ave. to Northampton st 

Commonwealth ave., Construction 

Congress and L sts 

Eleanor and Ridgemont sts., Ward 25. . 

Elmira st., Ward 25 

Franklin st.. Ward 25 

Freeport st., Ward 24 

Hanover st.. Charter to Tileston st 

Leicester st., Ward 25 

McLellan st., Old Road to White st 

Orleans st., Maverick to Gove st 

Quincy st., Ward 4 

Rand st., Roxbury 

Saratoga st.. Filling 

State St., Paving 

Sydney st.. Ward 20 

Talbot ave., Dorchester ave. to Wash- 
ington st 

Tremont st., Lenox st. to Roxbury 
Crossing 

Wall St., Paving 

Washington St., Eliot to Dover st. .. . 

Totals 



$65,426 29 

5,000 00 

7,100 00 
137,227 88 

10,566 78 
716 36 
1,000 00 
1,800 00 
7,500 00 
3,827 66 
2,000 00 
5,756 40 
2,578 80 

14,138 00 
3,600 00 
2,022 20 

18,000 CO 
7,500 00 

2,171 62 

25,000 00 

5,000 00 

35,000 00 



$12,792 00 



$362,931 99 



7,100 00 

130,471 33 

7,608 17 

110 85 

1,000 00 

99 48 



3,827 66 
2,000 00 
4,056 84 
2,578 80 
8,419 18 



2,022 20 



436 40 

2,171 62 

9,501 26 
5,000 00 



$52,634 29 
5,000 00 

6,756 55 

2,958 61 

605 51 

1,700 52 
7,500 00 

1,699 56 

5,718 82 
3,600 00 

18,000 00 
7,063 60 

15,498 74 
35,000 00 



$199,195 79 



$163,736 20 



Street Improvements. 



Object of Appkopriation. 


Appropria- 
tions, Bal- 
ances and 
Transfers. 


Expended 

fi-oni Feb. 1, 

1896, to Jan. 

31, 1897. 


Balances 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1897. 


Street Improvements, Old Wards 1 and 2 

Street Improvements, Old Ward 3 


$16,296 95 

13,006 81 

1,643 16 

5,125 85 

5,850 24 


$16,296 95 

13,006 81 

1,643 16 

5,125 85 

5,850 24 




Street Improvements, Old Ward 4 




Street Improvements, Old Ward 5 




Street Improvements, Old Wards 9 and 10. . . 






$41,923 01 


$41,923 01 









54 



City Document No. 29. 



street Improvements. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropriation. 


Appropria- 
tions, Bal- 
ances and 
Transfers. 


Expended 

ft-om Feto. 1, 

1896, to Jan. 

31, 1897. 


Balances 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1897. 




$41,923 01 


$41,923 01 






22,509 32 


1 22,509 32 




Street Improvements, Old Ward 13 


20,937 95 


20,937 95 




Street Improvements, Old Wards 14 and 15. . 


27,320 87 


27,320 87 




Street Improvements, Old Ward 15 


891 39 


891 39 






1,092 13 
5,086 99 


1,092 13 




Street Improvements, Old Wards 17 and 18. . 


5,086 99 




Street Improvements, Old Wards 19 and 22. . 


15,857 22 


15,857 22 




Street Improvements, Old Ward 20 


12,889 36 


12,889 36 






7,530 60 


7,530 60 






4,409 11 


4,409 11 




Street Improvements, New Ward 1 ... 


25,000 00 


24,851 84 


$148 16 




29,621 20 


29,283 92 


337 28 




25,000 00 


7,227 61 


17,772 .39 




25,000 00 
25,000 00 


11,.530 61 


13,469 39 


Street Improvements, Kew Ward 5 


24,467 48 


532 52 




25,860 86 
28,069 85 


24,698 36 


1,162 50 




25,000 00 


3,069 85 




27,670 13 


24,280 84 


3,389 29 




38 525 95 


23,916 01 


14,609 94 




25,000 00 


22,924 99 


2,075 01 




25,000 00 


23,275 63 


1,724 37 


Street Improvements, New Ward 12 


25,000 00 


19,882 77 


5,117 23 




25,000 00 


14,882 15 


10,117 85 




25,000 00 


10,472 11 


14,527 89 




25,000 00 


10,153 64 


14,846 36 




25,000 00 


15,267 17 


9,732 83 


Street Improvements, New Ward 17 


25,000 00 


25,000 00 






25,000 00 


18,317 52 


6,682 48 




25,000 00 


9,421 82 


15,578 18 




25,000 00 


25,000 00 






25,000 00 


20,426 59 


4,573 41 




25,000 00 


23,308 63 


1,691 37 




50,000 00 


50,000 00 






25,000 00 


25,000 00 






25,000 00 


8,862 47 


16,137 53 






Totals 


$835,195 94 


$677,900 11 


$157,295 83 







1 Draft of $1,444.15 retained toy Auditor. 



Street Department. 



55 



Sewer Division Specials. 



Object of Appropeiation. 



Back Bay Outlet 

Canal Street Relief Sewer . 



Connections with Metropolitan Sewer, 
Charlestown 



Connections with Metropolitan Sewer, 
East Boston 



D-Street Outlet and Relief Sewer, Dorchester 
ave., South Boston 



Forest-avenue Section, Temporary Sewer 
Outlet, etc 



Pumping Station Improvements 

Sewer Outlet, Porter st 

Sewer Outlet, Low Level, W. Roxbury Dist. . 

Sewers, South Boston 

Sewer Outlets, South Boston 

Shamrock-street Outlet 



Storm Sewer, Cornwall and Washington sts.. 
Ward 22 



Stony Brook Damages 

Stcmy Brook Improvement 

South Union Station (Chap. 516, Acts of 1896.) 



Appropri- 
ations, Bal- 
ances and 
Transfers. 



$5,000 00 
25,000 00 

23,000 00 

25,000 00 

23,000 00 

23,116 65 
10,000 00 
16,000 00 

7,824 64 

877 51 

35,000 00 

8,000 00 

3,500 00 

25 00 

500,000 00 



Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1896 to Jan. 

31, 1897. 



$7,537 97 
2,369 64 
5,874 33 



21,801 71 
5,017 75 



4,643 57 

82 80 

18,895 08 

958 05 

2,903 52 



98,150 74 
1,847 02 



Balances on 

hand Jan. 

31, 1897. 



$5,000 00 
17,462 03 

20,636 36 

19,125 67 

23,000 00 

1,314 94 

■ 4,982 25 
16,000 00 

3,181 07 

794 71 

16,104 92 

7,041 95 

596 48 

25 00 

401,849 26 



Totals . 



$705,343 80 



$170,082 18 



§537,114 64 



Laying Out and Construction of Highways. 

Expenditures. 

Sewer construction ..... $485,538 20 
Street construction ..... 1174,961 88 



Totals 



$610,500 08 



1 Drafts of $380.00 retained by Auditor. 



56 



City Document No. 29. 



Blue Hill and other Avenues. 

Expenditures. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Blue Hill ave . 

Columbus ave 

Commonwealth ave 
Huntington ave — 

Totals 



Street 
Construction. 



L $170,319 56 

205,425 15 

2 49,628 73 

s 277,745 49 



$703,118 93 



Sewer 
Construction. 



$63,714 00 
48,481 68 
15,467 49 
16,096 72 



$143,759 89 



Totals. 



$234,033 56 

253,906 83 

65,096 22 

293,842 21 



$846,878 82 



1 Draft of $800.00 retained by Auditor. 

2 Draft of $4,051.99 retained by Auditor. 
s Draft of $919.19 retained by Auditor. 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months ending 
Jan. 31, 1897. 



Object of Appropriation. 



Street Department : 

Central Office - ■ 

Bridge Division 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges . . 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Street Watering Division 

Street Improvements 



Laying Out and Construction of 
Highways 



Blue Hill and other avenues 



Totals. 



Current 
Expenses for 

the twelve 

months ending 

Jan. 31, 1897. 



$18,781 85 
119,963 55 

13,835 54 
218,353 10 
628,675 46 
477,241 54 
276,615 25 
310,266 39 

71,211 81 



$2,134,944 49 



Special 
Appropria- 
tions. 



$27,172 77 



22,704 55 
199,195 79 



170,082 18 



677,900 11 

610,500 08 

846,878 82 



$2,554,434 30 



Totals. 



$18,781 85 
147,136 32 

13,835 54 
241,057 65 
827,871 25 
477,241 54 
446,697 43 
310,266 39 

71,211 81 
677,900 11 

610,500 08 

846,878 82 



$4,689,378 79 



Street Department. 



57 



street Building Under Chap. 323 of the Acts of 1891, or 
Special Acts or Amendments thereto. 



Abbotsford st..., 
Audubon Road . . 
Bay State Road.. 

Boylston st 

Brighton ave 

Chamberlain st... 

Clinton st 

Fenlon st 

Fullerton st 

Gay lord st 

Geneva ave 

Granby st 

Greenbrier st 

Harvard ave 

Harvard st 

Ivy st 

Josephine st. ... 

Kenmore st 

Laiiriat ave 

Morse st 

Newbury st 

Norway st 

Parker st 

Peterborough st. 

Ruggles st 

Sherborn st 

St. Alphonsus St. 
St. Germain st . . . 

Turner st 

Vancouver st..... 

Wilder st 

Wolcottst 



Street. 



Pavins 



$4,777 42 

9,299 55 

7,722 79 

11,516 65 

51,243 19 



Totals.- 



6,942 71 
1,915 66 



17,249 19 

4,737 01 

5,317 10 

2,498 39 

1,224 39 

366 12 

3,210 79 

48 71 

16,577 13 

2,086 09 

66 70 

1,460 87 

1,192 51 

5,869 98 

5,017 34 

210 71 

7,276 14 

251 92 

1,834 49 

' 1,643 12 

3,405 21 



$174,961 88 



Sewer. 



$179 85 

631 13 

119 36 

21,464 02 

231 57 

910 77 

842 36 

648 78 

85 20 

927 93 

4,597 48 

14 26 

1,674 01 

139 96 



60 18 



12,360 79 
375 26 



5,218 93 



159 33 
1,101 93 

2,870 89 



$55,282 15 



Totals. 



$4,957 27 

9,930 68 

7,842 15 

32,980 67 

51,474 76 

910 77 

7,785 07 

2,564 44 

85 20 

927 93 

21,846 67 

4,751 27 

6,991 11 

2,638 35 

1,224 39 

366 12 

3,270 97 

48 71 

28,937 92 

2,461 35 

66 70 

1,460 87 

1,192 51 

5.869 98 
10,236 27 

210 71 
7,894 30 

251 92 
1,834 49 
1,802 45 
4,507 14 

2.870 89 



$230,194 03 



58 



City Document No. 29. 



List of Contracts from Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 1897, made 
by the Street Department. 



Paving=Blocks. 



CONTKACT. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
M. deliv- 
ered on 
wharves. 


Large paving-blocks, 300,000 

Large paving-blocks, 300,000 

Gutter paving-blocks 500,000 


Lanesville Granite Co. 
Rockport Granite Co. 
Rockport Granite Co. 


March 30, 1896. 
April 6, 1896. 
April 21, 1896. 


$48 24 
48 24 
39 50 



Spruce Lumber. 



District. 



East Boston 

Charlestown 

South Boston 

Brighton 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

City Proper 

Harvard Bridge, 170 
M. Ft. B.M 



Awarded to 



Jewett Lumber Co 

J. O. Wetherbee : 

Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. 



G. W. Gale Lumber Co. . . 



Dated 



Feb. 24, 1896. 



Sept. 2, 1896. 



Price per M. 
It. B. M. 



$15 45 
15 70 
15 25 
15 25 
15 88 

15 45 

16 00 
15 25 

13 88 



Price for 
Planing 
per M. 

ft. 



§1 50 
1 00 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 



Beach QraveL 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
ton. 




J P O'Riorden 


March 12, 1896. 


$0.57%, 

delivered on 

wharves. 







Street Depaetment. 



59 



Coal. 



Contract. 



1,500 tons, Pumping Station 
Dorchester 

1,500 tons. Pumping Station 
Dorcliester 

1,500 tons. Pumping Station 
Dorchester 

2,500 tons. Ferry "Wharves. . 
2,500 " 

3,000 " 



Awarded to 



li. G. Burnham & 
Co 

L. G. Burnham & 
Co 

L. G. Burnham & 
Co 

John Morrison 

L. G. Burnham & 
Co 

John Morrison 



Dated 



Feb. 14, 1896. 

May 25, 1896. 

Oct. 16, 1896. 
Feb. 5, 1896. 

April 11, 1896 
Nov. 23, 1896. 



Price per ton, 
2,240 lbs. 



S3 15 


3 11 


3 31 


3 03 


3 28 


3 31 



Iron Castings. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated. 


Price per 
100 lbs. 




Oso^ood & Hart 


March 16, 1896. 


$1 20 









Bank Qravel and Sand. 





Awarded to 


Dated 


Price. 


Contract. 


Gravel. 


Sand. 




A. 


B. 


A. 


B. 


South Boston, District 1.. . 

Charlestown, District 3 . . 

City Proper, Districts 8, 9 
and 10 


P. O'Riorden. .. 
P. O'Riorden... 

P. O'Riorden... 

L. F. Leary 

W. Scollans 

J. Doonan 

J. McGovern. . . 
O. Nawn 


March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 

March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 
March 13, 1896.. 


$1.49 
1.73 

1.49 
1.49 
1.70 
0.90 
1.32 
1.75 


$0.73 
0.80 

0.75 
0.75 
0.85 
0.45 
0.66 
0.75 


$1.49 
1.60 

1.60 
1.49 
1.80 
0.90 
1.59 
1.85 


$0.73 
0.80 

0.70 


East Boston, District 2 

Brighton, District 4 

West Roxbury, District 5, 
Dorchester, District 6 . . . . 
Roxbury, District 7 


0.75 
0.90 
0.45 

0.80 
0.90 



Explanation of Letters. 

A. — Double Loads. 

B. — Single Loads. 



60 



City Document No. 29. 



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64 



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72 



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76 



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80 



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82 



City Document No. 29. 



Full List of Streets now^ Paved with Trinidad Asplialt. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Albany st 

Arch St 

Ash st 

Barton court . . . 
Batterymarch st 

Beacon st 

Beacon st 

Beacon st 

Bennet st 

Bond st 

Brattle sq 

Brighton st 

Birmmer st. . . 

Central st 

Chambers st 

Chambers st. . . . 

Charter st 

Cherry st 

Clark st 

Columbus avc. 

Columbus ave. . 

Corning st 

Congress sq — 

Cooper st 

Cooper st 

Court st 

Court sq 

Davis st 

Dartmouth st. . 

Doane st 

Edinhoro' st 

Endieottst 



Carriedforward 



Limits. 



East Concoul st. to East Springfield st. . 

Franklin st. to Milk st 

Bennet st. to Nassau st 

Brighton st. to Barton st 

Milk St. to Kilby st 

Charles St., across Arlington st 

Dartmouth st. to within 150 ft. east of 
Gloucester st 

68 ft. west of Gloucester st. to Massachu- 
setts ave 

90 ft. west of Harrison ave. to 162 ft. east 
of Washington st 

Hanson st. to Milf ord st 

Brattle st. to Elm st 

Leverett st. to Allen st 

Beacon st. to Pinckney st 

Broad st. to Kilby st 

Green st., across Poplar st 

Brighton st. to Charles st 

Hanover st. to Unity st 

Washington st. to Bhawmut ave 

Hanover st. towards North st 

Boston & Albany Railroad bridge, 
across Massachusetts ave 

Massachusetts ave. to 301 ft. south of 
Camden st 

Washington st. (o Shawmut ave 

State St. to Congress square 

North Margin st. to Endicott st 

Endicott St. to Charlestown st 

Washington St. to Court square 

Court St. to Court st 

Washingtonst. to Harri-onave 

Boylston st. to Newbury st 

Kilby St. to Broad st 

Essex St. to Beach st. 

Cooper St., across Thacher st 



Length, 



450 


2,700 


426 


1,267 


230 


409 


134 


186 


260 


857 


870 


3,800 



1,744 



1,019 



3,505 



17,336 



Area. 



9,277 



6,391 



180 


300 


192 


426 


281 


670 


845 


1,737 


,087 


3,300 


313 


869 


460 


1,061 


272 


604 


318 


636 


334 


594 


120 


227 



15,578 



903 


5,418 


338 


734 


110 


160 


166 


516 


200 


600 


231 


642 


665 


1,883 


323 


646 


266 


2,058 


812 


624 


470 


924 


312 


1,005 



65,099 



Street Department. 



83 



Streets Paved with Trinidad Asplialt. — Concluded. 
City Proper. 



N.iiue. 


Limits. 


Length. 


■ Area. 


Year 
Laid. 


Brought forw'd. 
Exchange pi 




17,336 
244 
335 

307 
928 


65,099 
678 
558 
266 
2,681 
130 
521 

3,938 

2,628 

727 

290 

1,621 

2,934 

994 

384 

920 

1,154 

735 
764 
723 
597 

2,442 
908 
417 
150 
218 
562 
470 

1,587 
910 
975 
682 
119 


. 


Congress st. to Kilby st 


1887 


Washington st. to Shawmut ave 

Hanover st. to North st 


1892 




1892 


Harrison ave 

Harrison ave 


East Newton st. to East Springfield st... . 
East Springfield st. to Roxbury line 


1888-95 
1888-95 


HoUis St 


Tremont st. tovrards Washington st 

Beach st. to within 90 ft. north of Curve 
(minus Kneeland and Harvard sts.) . . . 

State St. to Milk st 

Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Mt. Vernon st. to Chestnut st 


276 

1,407 
618 
330 
261 

267 

470 

180 
182 
552 
515 
430 
279 
271 
419 
1,188 
447 
150 
135 
151 
203 
417 
670 
468 
325 
252 
107 


1891 


Hudson 8t 




Kilby St 


1891 
1881 


Laconiast 


1896 
1892 


Massachusetts av., 


Columbus ave. to Tremont st. (southerly 


1892 


Massachusetts av., 


Tremont st. to Shawmut ave. (southerly 
roadway) 


1892 


Massachusetts av., 


Shawmut ave. to Washington st. (south- 
erly roadway) 


189-2 


Moon St 


Between North sq. and Fleet st. . 


1891 






1883 


North Margin St., 
Oxford st 


Thacher St. to Wiget st 


1895 


Beach st. to Essex st 


1895 


Parmenter st 


Hanover st. to Salem st 


1893 


Pinckney st 

Pine st 




1895 


Washington st. to Harrison ave. . . 

Chambers st. to Charles st 


1896 


Poplar st 

Spring st 


1887-92 


Pop'ar St. to Leverett st 

Between Salem st. and Endicott st 

Howard st. to Court st 


1895 


Stillman st 

Stoddard st 


1892 
1892 


Sun-court st. 


North ft. to Moon st 


1891 


Thacher st 




1892 


Tileston st 

Warrenton tt 


155 ft. west from Hanover st. to Salem St., 
Eliot St. to Tremont st 


1887-95 
1891 


Warrenton st 

Water st 


Shawmut ave. to Waehington st 

Congress st., across Batterymarch st 


1891 
1889 


Water st 


1896 


Wiggin st 


North Bennet St. to Tileston st 


1887 












30,150 


97,782 





84 



City Docuivibnt No. 29. 



streets Paved with Trinidad Asphalt. — Concluded. 
Charlestown. 



Name. 


Limits. 


Length. 


Area. 


Yea I 
Laid. 






144 


421 


1891 










South Boston. 








D St 


W. Fifth St. to Gold st 


126 
360 
91 
111 
185 


448 
480 
343 
419 
769 


1889 




1891 


W Sixth st .... 


West of C St. toward D st 


1887 




W. Third st. to Bolton st 


1892 


W Third et 


1.53 feet west of E St., across E st 


1892 












873 


2,459 




Roxbury. 


Cabot St 

Columhus ave. . . . 




1,955 
2,640 


6,559 
15,840 


1891 92 


From 301 feet S. of Camden St., across 


1896 












4,595 


22,899 





Streets Paved with Sicilian Rock Asphalt. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Limits. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year 
Laid. 


Acton st 




259 
220 

427 

191 
370 
716 
421 
318 
383 
315 

1,591 


352 
391 

723 

225 
781 
2,075 
615 
560 
597 
934 

8,840 


1896 


Oak St., across Nassau st 

Level ett st. to Milton st 


1895 




1895 


Charles st 


B( tween Revere st. and Cambridge st. (in 
front of Ej e and Ear Infirmary) 

"Washington st. to Harrison ave 


1895 
1892 




1893 




Newland st. tolvanhoest 

Dover st. to Harrison ave 


1895 


Pay st 


1894 


Hamburg st 




1896 




1896 


Huntington ave... 


Boston & Albany Railroad bridge to 


1896 








Carried forw' d. 




5,211 


16,093 









I 



Street DepaetjVient. 



85 



Streets Paved with Sicilian Rock Asphalt. — Concluded. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Limits. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year 
Laid. 


Brought foriv'cl, 




5,211 

231 

662 
307 
332 
204 
215 
216 
221 
343 
323 
293 
196 
249 


16,093 
480 

4,151 
437 
516 
226 
335 
337 
339 
277 

1,365 
654 
274 
445 




From a point 213 feet south of West St., 
for a distance of 231 feet southerly .... 

Washington st. to Albany St. (southerly 




Massachusetts ave. 


1894 
1894 




E. Declham st. to Maiden st 


1896 




Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Maiden st. to E. Dedliam st 


1892 


Mystic St 


1896 


Mystic St. . 


E. Dedham st. to E. Canton st. 


1896 






1896 






1896 


Oliio Bt 


In front of Suffolk County Court-house. . 


1896 


Pemberton gq 


1894 

1895 


Taylor st 


Dwight St. to Milford st."" 


1896 






1895 












9,003 


25,929* 





South Boston. 

Est. to est 

W. Secdid St. to A st 

E. Sixth St. to E. Eighth st 

Prom 206 ft. eist of easterly line of Dor- 
chester ave. to A st 

Gardiner place to 1,50 feet easterly 



Athens st 

Athens st 

Kst 

W. Broadway 

W. Broadway 



515 


746 


617 


916 


566 


1,083 


350 


1,944 


150 


648 


2,198 


5,337 



1892 
1895 
1896 

1892 
1893 



Charlestown. 



Warren st Winthrop st. to Soley st. 





Roxbury. 








Columbus ave 


Terry st. to within 61 feet north of Sta- 


884 

747 
587 


5,304 

4,150 
3,372 


1896 


Huntington ave. . . 


Easterly side of Cumbeiland st. to Mas- 
sachusetts ave 


1896 


Huntington ave... 


Massachusetts ave. to Gainsborough st. 


1896 






2,218 


12,826 





City Document No. 29. 

other Asphalt Streets. 



Name. 


Limits. Length. 


Area. 


Year 
Lai<l. 


Harris street, city 


■ 
Hanover st. to North tt., coal tar (Ayer), 

E. Broadway to E. Fourth St., coal tar 
(Ayer) 


294 
272 


425 
1,027 




I St. Soutli Boston, 














566 


1,45-2 





Summary. 

Trinidad Asphalt. . . . Length, 35,762 ft. or 6.77 miles, or 123,061 sq. yds. 

Sicilian Rock Asphalt, " 13,546 " "2.57 " " 44,457 " " 

Coal Tar Asphalt " 566" " 0.10 " " 1,452 " " 

Asphalt Blocks " 4,009" " 0.76 " " 13,827 " " 



Total. 



53,883 " " 10.20 



" 182,797 



Street Mileage. 

The following table shows the length of public highways 
and the character of pavements, Feb. 1, 1897 : — 



Districts. 


< 
a 


o 

s 


o 

o 

s 


o 


6 

1 
o 


1=1 3 


o 

5 


o 


"3 


In previous report . . . 


8.06 


0.85 


79.79 


0.42 


2.43 


228.29 


125.57 


11.55 


456.11 


Feb. 1, 1897. 
City proper 


7.47 
0.05 


0.76 


*42.72 
8.90 
4.42 
12.88 
8.24 
0.09 
3.47 


0.41 


1.64 


27.29 
13.85 
6.13 
21.80 
59.95 
40.29 
54.71 
18.56 


0.13 

16.43 
1.40 
10.98 
34.94 
30.22 
19.07 


0.04 

3.74 
2.66 
1.44- 
1.14 
1.15 


80.42 

2:i.84 






0.14 

•0.05 

0.01 


27.12 




0.63 
1.29 




40.50 




83.13 




76.79 












89.54 












38.78 








80.72 








Total 


9.44 


0.76 


0.41 


1.84 


242.58 


113.20 


10.17 


459.12 







Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 
* Of this amount, 3.98 miles ^granite-block paving on concrete base. 

Total length of public streets, 459.12 miles. 
There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioner^ during the year, 2.893 linear miles ; 2.294 scLuare 



Street Department. 



87 



feet have been discontinued ; corrections to previous measure- 
ments on account of revision and correction of previous tables 
from all causes, show an increase of 0.117 miles; making a 
total net increase of 3.01 miles. Street widenings and reloca- 
tions have been ordered to the extent of 38,477 square feet. 

Not included in the above table, there are about 142 miles 
of private ways and alleys which are not under the care of 
this department. 

The rate of increase from year to year is shown in the 
following table : — 



1859 111. 50 miles. 

1871 201.32 

1872 207.4 

1873 209.24 

1874 313.90 

1875 318.58 

1876 327.50 

1877 333.2 

1878 .340.39 

1879 345.19 

1880 350.54 

1881 355.5 

1882 359.85 

1883 367.99 



1884 374.10 miles. 

1885 379 60 

1886 383..55 

1887 390.30 

1888 392.72 

1889 397.84 

1890 404.6 

1891 409.6 

1892 434.59 

1893 443.34 

1894 447.65 

1895 452.12 

1896 456.11 

1897 459.12 



Areas of Pavements. 

The following table shows the area of pavements in square 
yards, arranged by districts : — 



Districts. 


It 


o 

s 


p 
£2 


o 


a s 


0! 

> 


(0 

o 


CO 

o 


Feb. 1,1896 


132,702 


1,718,0.50 


5,166 


28,504 


4,182,438 


2,062,394 


316,517 


8,445,871 


Feb. 1,1897. 
City Proper — 


*137,96.3 
786 


t913,748 
198,938 
101,144 
271,602 
178,484 
2,067 
74,594 


5,082 


15,846 


510,517 

206,888 
128,680 
379,216 
1,0^,653 
688,795 
962,365 
492,664 


1,508 


1,073 

77,857 
64,619 
21,347 
59,760 
24,337 


1,584,664 
407 685 






2,867 

1,192 

408 


302,635 

27,976 
173,255 
533,187 
501,828 
305,388 


535,326 


South Boston.. 

Roxbury 

WestRoxbury. 
Dorclieater 


8,828 
35,225 


766,666 
1,538,644 
1,245,396 






1,598,047 

822,389 


Brighton 


















Total 


182,797 


1,740,577 


5,082 


20,313 


4,455,778 


1,845,277 


245,993 


8,498,817 





* Of this amount, 13,827 sq. yds. = asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount, 77,728 sq. yds. = granite-block paving on concrete base. 

Total area of public streets, 8,498,817 square yards. 



City Document No. 29. 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills and cash deposited 
with City Collector, less bills withdrawn, for the year ending 
Jan. 31, 1897, by the several divisions of the Street Depart- 
ment : 



Bridge Division . 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Street-Watering . 



Statement showing the amount paid 
during the same period on account of 
of the Street Department : 

Bridge Division . 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division . 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street-Cleaning Division 

Street- Watering . 



$4,998 65 

712 01 

166,971 74 

38,616 32 

36,881 77 

222,318 24 

5,864 08 

4,438 14 

1479,800 95 



into the city treasury 
the several divisions 



12,702 32 

712 01 

167,056 74 

76,652 34 

27,735 68 

130,294 32 

1,996 45 

687 65 



1407,837 51 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 89 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



927 AND 928 Teemont Building, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 

Benj. W. Wells, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir : I respectfully submit my annual report of the ex- 
penditures, income and operation of the Bridge Division of the 
Street Department for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897. 

Respectfully yours, 

Wm. H. Carberry, 

Deputy Superintendent. 

There was appropriated for the maintenance of this division 
during the year the sum of $120,000. The total number of 
bridges in Boston is 132. This number does not include cul- 
verts. 

Four of these bridges, viz., Harvard, Prison Point, Canal and 
West Boston, all connecting with Cambridge, are in the care of 
two commissioners, one of whom is appointed by the city of 
Boston and the other by the city of Cambridge. 

Thirty- three are wholly supported by railroad corporations, 
and 99 are supported wholly or in part by the city of Boston. 

There are 23 tide-water bridges provided with draws. 

Six of these bridges are in the north district — three operated 
by steam, two by electricity and one by hand- power. 

The division has this year constructed and put in operation an 
electric motor on Meridian-street bridge, at a cost of $1,535. 
This new device for operating the bridge is a decided improve- 
ment over horse-power, which was formerly used. 

It also gives better facilities for public travel. 

On the south side there are six bridges. Three of these are 
operated by steam, two by electricity and one by hand-power. 

The most important of these are the Maiden and Mount 
Washington-avenue bridges, which are now operated by hand- 
power, and which should during the coming year be sujaplied 
with electric or steam-power. 

Congress street, Broadway span over the railroad, Mount 



90 City Document No, 29. 

Washington-avenue, Charles-river and Maiden bridges require 
constant care, as they are old and patched. They should be rebuilt. 

The draw on Broadway bridge has been reconstructed and 
adjusted so it can be reversed, for the first time in five years. 

The smoke fenders which were attached to Dartmouth-street 
bridge, over the B. & A. R.R., and also on Broadway, over the 
N. Y., N. H & H. R.R , were placed there in December, 1895. 

After a few months' trial this division was requested by the 
above railroad corporations to remove the same, as they proved 
to be dangerous to the men operating the trains. 

The fenders were removed in compliance with their request. 

The temporary foot-bridge erected in 1895, over the N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R.R. at Roxbury Crossing, was removed in July, 
1896, on account of the elevation of the tracks, in abolishing 
the grade crossings ; also the one at Centre street, called Hog 
bridge, cared for by the same railroad. 

The lumber used in this structure was removed to Foundry- 
street yard. 

The headquarters for District No. 2, located at Foundry street, 
South Boston, is not a suitable place for office or storehouse, as 
it is altogether too small. 

The following-named bridges, being in a most dangerous 
condition, were closed to public travel while extensive repairs 
were being carried on under the supervision of the City 
Engineer and this division : — 

Meridian street, from May 28 'to July 3. 
Essex street, from Oct. 2 to Dec. 26. 
Albany street, from Sept. 11 to Oct. 10. 
Broadway, from Dec. 9 to Jan. 4. 

An inspection of all inland bridges has been carefully made, 
and all necessary repairs have been promptly done to insure 
their safe condition. 

Several of these bridges have been painted and all have been 
thoroughly swept at regular intfervals and kept clean. 

Better discipline has been maintained among the drawtenders 
by transferring some of them and placing them at the kind of 
work for which they seemed best adapted. 

They have faithfully and efficiently performed their various 
duties, as have their assistants, and no accidents have been re- 
ported which could be attributed to any neglect, or inattention 
on the part of the employees. 

All material bought and used in construction and repairs has 
been promptly delivered by the contractors. 

A considerable saving in the item of lumber alone was made 
by the policy adopted of supplying the exact measurements and 
lengths required. Duplicate sets of gearing, truck wheels, 
cables, sprocket wheels, pinions, shafting and new patterns have 
been furnished the various bridges during the year. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



91 



The road-bed and one sidewalk of the Cottage Farm bridge 
over the B. & A. R.R. have been completed and reopened to 
public travel. 

A new public landing at Jeffries Point, East Boston, has been 
constructed at an expense of $700. 

Inclosed in this report will be found a financial statement 
and a detailed description of the work performed on each bridge, 
also a tabulation of all bridges supported wholly or in part by 
the City of Boston, giving the widths of bridges, draw openings, 
roadways and sidewalks, the number of draw openings made 
for navigation, and a census of trafiic taken on the most im- 
portant bridges. 



OBJECT OF EXPENDITURES. 



Administration. 






Office expenses : 






Printing $ls8 62 






Stationery and postage 




89 63 






Office books 




35 50 






Engraving plates, etc., annual re{. 


ort 


55 88 






Telephone .... 




166 33 






Subscription (newspapers) . 




10 50 






Directory .... 




&-o0 






Atlas (West Roxbury) 




36 50 






Messenger service 




1 40 






Capillary bath 




6 00 






Typewriter paper 




19 75 






Repairing typewriter . 




10 50 






Index .... 




2 50 






Repairing office stamp 




7 00 






Repairing clocks 




11 00 






Incandescent lamps 




1 87 






Portable lamps . 




7 00 






Mats 




15 50 






Fireboard .... 




3 50 






Press-stand 




12 00 






Repairing desk . 




5 50 






Baskets and cuspidores 




3 16 








1694 


64 


Salary of Wm. H. Carberry, Deputy Superintend- 


\J^ 


ent, 10|i months ...... 


2,641 


67 


Salary of John P. Wise, Deputy Superintendent, 






li§ months ....... 


358 


33 


Salaries of Chief Clerk, Messenger, 8i| months. 






and Messenger, 8i^ months .... 


2,800 


00 


Salaries of Chief of Draws and Bridges, l|i months, 






and Chief of Draws and Bridges for 41 weeks. 






and foreman for 39 weeks, 5^ ( 


lays 


. 


3,143 


63 



Carried forward, 



),638 27 



92 



GiTY Document No. 29. 



Brought foricard. 

Salary of Chief Draw-Tender, 48 weeks 

Salary of Clerk of Committee on Streets and Sew- 
ers, 9 weeks ....... 

Salary of Civil Service Clerk (i part) . 

Travelling expenses ...... 

Board of Deputy Superintendent's horse and extra 
horse ....... 

Telephone, Deputy Superintendent's house . 

Amount expended, administration 



Object of Expenditures. 

Office Expenses. 

.$10,959 43 



Salaries 

General office expenditures 



1,205 69 



19,638 


27 


1,656 


96 


258 


84 


100 


00 


44 


50 


413 


99 


52 


56 


112,165 


12 



$12,165 12 



Total Regular Expenditures. 



Administration 
On tide- water bridges 
On inland bridges . 
ISTorth yard and stable 
South yard and stable 



^2,165 12 

85,804 55 

8,436 66 

4,276 29 

9,280 93 



Total amount expended for the year, Feb. 1, 

1896 to Jan. 31, 1897 . . - . 1119,963 55 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Appropriation. 

Appropriation, 1896-97 .... 

Received from Boston and Albany Railroad Com^ 
pany for work done on Albany-street bridge 

Total 

Amount of expenditures from Feb. 1, 1896 to Jan 
31, 1897 . 

Transferred to Street Cleaning Division, Jan. 29 
1897 

Total 



1120,000 00 

870 42 

1120,870 42 

$119,963 55 

906 87 

$120,870 42 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



93 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Special Appropriations in Charge of Bridge Division. 



Object of Appeopeiati()n. 



Appropria 

tioDS, Balances 

and 

Transfers. 



Expended 

from Fel). 1, 

1896, to Jan. 

31, 1897. 



Balances 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1897. 



Charles-river bridge draw, re- 
modelling, etc 



Chelsea bridge, North, rebuilding 
draw, etc 



Gold-street bridge 



Meridian-street bridge, recon- 
structing draw 



Reconstruction of Essex-street 
bridge 



$2,924 16 

13,261 64 
18,597 58 

14,260 48 

6,500 00 



$2,517 12 

8,231 10 
28 25 

11,426 87 

4,969 43 



$407 04 

5,030 54 
18,569 33 

2,833 61 

1,530 57 



Totals 



$55,543 86 



,172 77 



,371 09 



Amount of expenditures Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 

1897 . . - $27,172 77 

Balances unexpended ..... 28,371 09 



Amount of appropriations and transfers 



$55,543 86 



Amounts Charged to Special Appropriations in Charge 
OF other Divisions. 



Name of Appropriation. 



Where expended. 



Amount 
Expended. 



Laying out and construction of high- 
ways 



Railroad bridge over 
Geneva avenue. . . 



Saratoga street, filling solid old bridge 
Blue Hill and other avenues 



Winthrop bridge. 



Huntington avenue 
Bridge and Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir arch- 
way 



Commonwealth avenue, construction. 
Street Improvements, Wards 1 and 2, 



Cottage Farm bridge. 

Public Landing, Jef- 
fries Point 



$14,026 58 
2,022 20 

10,466 68 
27,440 85 

417 66 



Carried forward 



$54,373 97 



94 



City Document No. 29. 



Amounts Charged to Special Appropriations in Charge of 
OTHER Divisions. — Concluded. 



Name of Appropriation. 



Brought forward 

Street Improvements, new Ward 2. 



Street Improvements, new "Ward 13. 

Street Improvements, Ward 20 

Street Improvements, Ward 25 



Reserved Fund. 



Total 



AVhere expended. 



Public Landing, Jef- 
fries Point 



Broadway (draw) 
bridge 



Amoniit 
Expended. 



Savin Hill avenue 
bridge 



Cottage Farm bridge 
and Everett street 
bridge 



Executions of Court 
and award of Com- 
mittee on Claims. . . 



$54,373 97 
300 00 

3,582 15 

•43 72 

5,629 79 

4,413 94 



,343 57 



Amount expended and charged to regular appro- 
priation ^ . . $119,963 55 

Amount expended and charged to Bridge Division 

specials 27,172 77 

Amount expended and charged to special appro- 
priations in charge of other divisions . . 68,343 57 

Grand total of expenditures Feb. 1, 1896, to 

Jan. 31, 1897 $215,479 89 

Income. 

The amount of bills deposited with the City Collector during 
the year was as follows : 

Work done by this division $69 90 

Rent for location of cable houses and boxes . 2,950 00 

Rent of buildings and pier ..... 83 33 

Rent of land and buildings (Leases) . . . 1,266 67 



Total 



14,369 9P 



A detailed statement of expenditures, and description of work 
performed follows ; also a list of those bridges supported wholly 
or in part by the City of Boston ; statement of the public land- 
ing places; list of cable-houses and boxes; census of traffic 
taken on some of the most important bridges ; number of draw 
openings made for navigation ; width of draw openings ; and 
table showing widths of bridges, and kind of roadways and side- 
walks. 



Street Department — Bridge Divisrox. 



95 



TIDE- WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

Patched deck in various places, and thoroughly patched 
sheathing the whole length of the bridge, under orders issued at 
sixteen different times during the year, or practically sheathed 
the whole bridge. 

Repaired pier and fender guard, machinery, engines, iron 
fence, gates, latches, gas fixtures, concrete walk, etc. 

Paid for smoke fenders erected during 1895, and which were 
removed this year. 

Cleaned and painted eight plain posts, or supports to the 
bridge, and eight with over- hanging brackets, also beams with 
two coats of metallic mixture. Painted boat, two coats. 



Carpenters 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails .... 

Ironwork . 

Repairing engines and 

machinery 
Hardware . 
Paint stock 
Metal smoke fenders . 
Repairing pier and fender 

guard 
Repairing pipe and gas fix 

tures ... 
Repairing concrete walk 
Painters' tools . 
Removing smoke fenders 
Teaming lumber 



L,557 
356 
552 

78 
283 

255 
14 
98 

431 



76 
94 
97 
47 

52 



53 
25 
00 



161 72 



69 

6 

59 

14 

127 



90 

27 
22 
80 
50 



Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


■$5,506 82 


Substitutes 


210 00 


Coal .... 


179 68 


Gas . 


44 40 


Water 


25 00 


Insurance on boiler . 


100 00 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Small supplies . 


24 99 



$4,068 74 



6,096 89 

Cambridge-street bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 
Repaired deck and sheathing on bridge and draw, 

and sheathed the bridge. 
Carpenters ... $40 00 



810,165 63 



Carried forvmrd. 



140 00 



$10,165 63 



96 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward^ 


140 00 




Lumber 


67 97 




Nails 


8 58 




Ironwork . 


5 50 




Spar for buoy . 


12 50 








1134 55 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


. $372 59 




Coal .... 


9 30 




Small supplies . 


8 22 






— = 


390 11 



),165 63 



Charles-river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town), 
Patched sheathing, repaired float and bridge fence, 
repaired machinery, also set new mooring stone 
for buoy. 



Carpenters 
Lumber 


154 50 
45 86 


Nails 


16 05 


Ironwork . 


31 90 


Paint stock (labor 1895) 


33 75 


Mooring stone and chain 


70 00 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 


14,910 32 


Coal .... 


371 64 


Gas .... 


35 37 


Water 


25 00 


Cordage 

Ice . . . . , 


151 67 
6 00 


Watering . 
Insurance on boiler . 


100 00 
50 00 


Supplies 


21 38 



$252 06 



5,671 38 



Chelsea bridge, North, (over North channel, 
Mystic river). 
Repaired machinery, gates, gear, latches, etc., 
and re-set buoy. 



524 66 



5,923 44 



Carpenters 
Nails 

Ironwork . 
Repairing gate . 
Repairing machinery . 
Setting buoy 


$6 75 
8 99 

27 35 

14 16 
6 91 

50 00 


$114 16 






Carried forward^ 


$114 16 $16,613 73 



I 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



07 



Brought forward^ 




1114 16 


$16,613 73 


Regular ex23enses : 








Draw-tenders , 


$4,333 02 






Substitutes 




157^50 






Coal . 




30 36 






Electric lights . 




44 00 






Water 




10 00 






Stove, pipe, etc. 




18 35 






Furniture . 




7 00 






Grease 




9 65 






Ice . 




6 00 






Small supplies . 




8 94 










4,624 82 








zl 7Pe Q« 



Chelsea bridge, South (over South Channel, 
Mystic river). 
Sheathed draw, repaired machinery, engine, gates, 

etc. 
Carpenters . . . |81 50 



Lumber . . . 


88 


14 




Nails .... 


13 


48 




Ironwork . 


35 


14 




Repairing engine 
Paint stock 


60 
4 


56 
25 


$283 07 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 


. $4,309 


98 


Substitutes 


107 


50 




Coal .... 


231 


20 




Gas .... 


36 


97 




Water 


32 


50 




Cleaning boiler tubes 


18 


00 




Insurance on boiler . 


50 


00 




Ice .... 


6 


00 




Small supplies . 


5 


46 


4,797 61 









5,080 e8 



Chelsea -street bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 
Sheathed one side and repaired iron fence. 
Carpenters . . . $13 75 

Nails 3 94 

Repairing iron fence . , 8 95 

Tide- water displacement . 27 00 

_. 153 64 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . $304 75 



Carried forward^ 



$304 75 $53 64 $26,433 39 



98 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward, $304 75 

Coal ..... 4 65 

Small supplies ... 33 



f53 64 126,433 39 



309 73 



363 37 



Commercial Point or Tenean bridge, Dor- 
chester. 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . 

Congress-street bridge (over Fort Point 
channel). 
Sheathed draw, repaired deck under paved road- 
way, patched sheathing in various places, repaired 
concrete walk, fence, sidewalk, and put in new 
oak headers. Repaired machinery, engines, 
iron fence, latches, gears and water-pipe. 
Painted draw-house and fence on bridge. 



50 00 



Carpenters 


. 1571 


44 


Painters . 


142 


00 


Lumber 


593 


73 


Nails. 


34 


83 


Ironwork . 


326 


78 


Repairing fence 


111 


20 


Bolts, etc. . 


36 


71 


Repairing machinery . 


399 


10 


Sprocket wheel 


11 


83 


Repairing engines 


119 


43 


Boiler grate 


24 


65 


Hardware . 


14 


19 


Paint stock 


15 


64 


Plumbing . 


20 


30 


Repairing concrete wj 


ilk . 50 


56 


Teaming lumber 


7 


50 


Asphaltum 


12 


25 

«^0 4QO 11 






— qp^jj^t/^j J. *T 


Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders 


. 15,984 


12 


Substitutes 


210 


00 


Coal . 


305 


40 


Water 


74 


25 


Insurance on boilers 


100 


00 


Kerosene . 


38 


88 


Ice 


6 


00 


Small supplies . 


20 


60 

6 739 25 









9,231 39 



Carried forward, 



,078 15 



Street Dbpaetment — Bridge Division. 



99 



Brought forioard, 
Dover=street bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 
Patched sheathing in various places under eight 
different orders, and put in new oak headers ; 
repaired machinery, trucks, motor, iron fence, 
water-pipe, and put in new armature ; painted 
draw- house. 



$36,078 15 



Carpenters 


. $295 37 


Painters . 


175 01 


Lumber 


280 94 


Nails 


21 87 


Ironwork . 


100 66 


Repairing iron fence 


48 75 


Repairing motor 


47 32 


New armature and sup 


)plies, 197 03 


Hardware . 


6 01 


Paint stock 


18 39 


Plumbing . 


20 13 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


. $5,309 16 


Substitutes 


183 63 


Coal 


27 90 


Repairing stove, etc. 


24 75 


New stove 


12 00 


Damage to team 


5 25 


Ice . 


6 00 


Small supplies . 


7 07 



11,211 48 



5,575 76 

Essex=street bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 
bridge). 

Sheathed draw and patched deck ; patched sheath- 
ing at five different places on the bridge and 
repaired ring bolts. 

Carpenters • . 

Lumber 

Nails 

Ironwork . 



6,787 24 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 
Substitute 
Coal . 
Small supplies . 



$102 


62 


141 


36 


10 


26 


14 


00 


$670 


98 


25 


32 


12 


33 


2 


58 



$268 24 



711 21 



979 45 



Carried forward, 



5,844 84 



100 



City Document No. 29. 



BroxigJit forward^ 
Federal=street bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 
Sheathed draw twice, patched sheathing, repaired 
sidewalk, foundation to sheave, railing to run, 
and concrete sidewalk ; repaired machinery, put 
in new steel cable on draw, and repaired water- 
pipes, latches and iron fence ; painted draw-house 
and boat. 



$43,844 84 



Carpenters 


$104 38 






Painters . 


155 


80 






Lumber 


143 


35 






Nails 


12 


15 






Ironwork . 


157 


77 






Steel cable 


14 


73 






New smokestack 


17 


90 






Paint stock 


19 


05 






Plumbing . 


24 


60 






Repairing concrete walk 


113 


75 


$763 48 




Regular expenses : 








Draw-tenders . 


15,519 


98 






Substitutes 


120 


00 






Coal .... 


43 


80 






Gas . 


50 


70 






Water 


10 


00 






Zinc, etc. . 


6 


92 






Ice . 


6 


00 






Oil and grease . 


8 


25 






Small supplies . 


17 


77 


5,783 42 




















6.546 90 



Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Mil- 
ton). 
Sheathed draw, relaid sidewalk, repaired sheathing 
and fence. 

Carpenters 

Lumber .... 

Ironwork . 

Nails . . . 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 



$44 75 

77 08 

2 20 

6 00 


$130 03 

243 80 





373 83 



Carried forward^ 



),765 57 



Stbeet Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 



101 



Brought forward^ 
L-street bridge (over reserved channel at 

junction of Congress and L streets). 
Repaired draw-house, machinery, etc., and put in 
water-pipe from hydrant on L street to engine- 
house, also overflow to tank work done in 1895, 
afterwards repaired said pipe; painted engine- 
house and top, sides and underside of draw, two 
coats. 



S50,765 57 



Carpenters 


125 00 


Painters . 


178 25 


Lumber 


3 54 


Nails 


32 


Ironwork . 


2 90 


Repairing machinery 


20 57 


Paint stock 


16 51 


Plumbing 


889 18 


Painting signs , 


27 40 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


84,568 90 


Coal .... 


246 60 


Water 


56 00 


Insurance on boiler . 


100 00 


Ice .... 


6 00 


Lubricating oil 


6 75 


Gauge glasses, etc. 


7 33 


Small supplies . 


28 09 



$1,113 67 



5,019 67 



— 6,133 34 



Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 
Sheathed the draw, repaired deck and sheathing, 
wheels and shaft, wheel-rest, guard-rail and 
latch ; also repaired concrete sidewalk. 



Carpenters 


896 50 


Lumber . 


74 60 


Nails 


2 65 


Ironwork . 


90 17 


Bolts, etc. 


57 26 


Plumbing . 


5 53 


Repairing concrete walk 


32 25 


Spar for buoy . 


12 50 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


. 83,512 34 


Substitutes 


202 29 



$371 46 



Carried- forward, 



714 63 $371 46 $56,898 91 



102 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forioard^ 


13,714 


63 $371 46 


Coal .... 


86 


70 


Gas .... 


26 


00 


Water 


17 


00 


Lubi-icating oil . 


4 


50 


Ice .... 


6 


00 


Small supplies . 


2 


56 




:e (from 


0,0U t Oa 


Meridian-street bridg 


East Boston to 


Chelsea). 






Repaired waterway, machinery on draw and re-set 


two buoys. 






Carpenters 


1116 


00 


Lumber 


23 


21 


Ironwork . 


40 


94 


Repairing machinery . 


41 


26 


Resetting buoys, shackles 


> 


, 


etc. 


265 


47 


Signs 


8 


48 
S|t;4Q5 .86 


Regular expenses : 




-— — qpTTt/v tjyj 


Draw-tenders 


. 14,224 


03 


Substitutes 


110 


66 


Coal .... 


23 


00 


Gas .... 


47 


34 


Feed .... 


117 


22 


Water . 


10 


00 


Horse-shoeing . 


40 


75 


Pasturing horse 


6 


00 


Ice ..... 


9 


00 


Lubricating oil . 


4 


50 


Small supplies . 


19 


93 



$56,898 91 



4,178 85 



4.612 43 



5,107 79 



Mt. Washington-avenue bridge (over Fort- 
J'oint channel). 
Sheathed draw, patched deck, repaired sheathing, 
sidewalks, beams, machinery and water-pipes; 



Carpenters 


. 1223 76 


Painters . , 


97 50 


Lumber 


193 15 


Nails 


9 75 


Ironwork . 


10 67 


Hardware . 


5 73 



Carried forward, 



$540 56 



5,185 55 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 103 

166,185 55 



Brought forward^ 


1540 56 


Paint-stock 


12 70 


Plumbing . 


27 60 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


. 1-4,912 94 


Coal .... 


32 55 


Gas . 


58 80 


Water 


10 00 


Rent of land 


60 00 


Ice . . . 


6 00 


Small supplies . 


15 95 



5,096 24 

Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy). 
Sheathed the draw, built new sidewalk, patched 

sheathing and repaired machinery. 
Carpenters . . . $88 50 

Lumber . . . . Ill 03 
Nails .... 5 72 

Ironwork .... 274 72 

1479 97 



Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . $406 51 
Small supplies ... 33 



406 84 



North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton 
to Watertown). 
Sheathed the draw. 

Carpenters ... 18 00 

Lumber .... 12 98 

Nails 1 05 

$21 98 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 76 32 



North Harvard- street bridge (from Brighton 
to Cambridge). 
Patched deck and sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . $14 75 

Lumber . . , . 17 39 

Nails .... 1 55 

133 69 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . 372 59 



5,677 10 



886 81 



98 30 



406 28 



Carried forward^ #73,254 04 



104 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward, 
Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 
Patched sheathing various places under thirteen 
orders, sheathed the draw twice, and repaired 
deck, fence, pier, stable floor and ladder ; put in 
three trucks and repaired engines, machinery, 
trucks, concrete sidewalk, water-pipes, water- 
closet, iron fence, guard rails, and put in two 
new steel cables on the draw; also painted 
draw house. 
Carpenters . . . |420 33 

Painters . . . . 235 72 
Lumber .... 362 01 
Nails .... 37 53 

Ironwork .... 370 18 
Repairing machinery . . 136 73 
" trucks , . 286 40 
« engines . . 177 85 
Grate , . . , 16 02 

Steel cables . . ; 34 84 

Paint stock . . . 27 38 

Plumbing .... 226 97 
Repairing concrete walk . 13 62 

Doors .... 17 25 

Window glass . . . 6 30 

2,868 18 



173,254 04 



Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders, , 


15,613 99 


Substitutes 


273 75 


Coal .... 


709 12 


Gas . 


30 76 


Water 


50 00 


Insurance on boiler . 


100 00 


Watering 


450 00 


Ice . . . . 


6 00 


Small supplies . 


35 65 



7,269 27 



Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge) . 

Sheathed the draw and patched deck and sheath- 
ing. 

Carpenters ... 163 00 

Lumber 

Nails 

Ironwork . 

Hardware 



94 


98 


9 


30 


9 


70 




50 



9,637 40 



Carried forioard, 



,77 48 



2,891 44 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 



105 



Brought forioard, 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 



$177 48 
372 59 



2,891 44 
550 07 



Western-avenue bridge (from Brighton to 

Watertown). 
Sheathed the draw, repaired headers, latches, 

clamps, chain, and hand-wheel. 
Carpenters ... $93 57 



$193 28 



Lumber 


53 86 


Nails . . . 


12 06 


Ironwork 


32 67 


Hardware 


1 12 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tender 


$76 32 


Small supplies . 


75 



77 07 

Winthrop bridge (from Breed's Island to 
Winthrop). 
Patched deck and sheathing. Nails . $13 50 
[Balance of material charged to 

special appropriation.] 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . $100 00 
Lanterns .... 3 42 

Kerosene oil . . . 7 68 



270 35 



111 10 



124 60 



Sundry Expenditures on 

Carpenters, sundry repairs. 
Oak lumber « " 

Hardware " " 

Car fares (mechanics) 



tide- water bridge 
$119 84 

136 61 
9 43 

150 00 



Regular expenses : 
Messenger 
Draw-tenders' books 
Stationery 
Mops 

Window brushes 
Scrubbing " 
Floor « 

Dusters 
Sponges 

Lanterns and globes 
Metal polish 

Carriul forioard^ 



$797 68 

66 42 

10 16 

11 52 

12 90 
10 50 
27 00 
17 04 
21 00 
15 30 



$415 88 



00 



$997 52 $415 88 $83,836 46 



106 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward^ 
Soap 
Waste 

Heavy brooms 
House " 
Padlocks . 
Soapine 
Matches 

Salt, north bridges 
Salt, south " 



Public landings. 

Repairs. 

Commercial wharf : 
Labor . . $26 75 

Towage . . 10 00 



Charles river : 
Labor 

Jeffries Point 
Labor 
Signs . 



$66 50 
5 35 



Regular expenses : 
East Boston : 
Rent . . . 



1997 52 

18 15 

46 02 

8 80 

13 00 

41 32 

24 00 

5 50 
15 60 

7 20 



$415 88 $88,836 46 



— 1,177 11 



$36 75 
16 50 

71 85 



$125 10 
250 00 



1,592 99 



875 10 



Total expended on tide- water bridges 



$85,804 55 



Street Departjnient — Bridge Division. 



107 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table showing Expenditures on the Tide-water Bridges for the 
Year Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 81, 1897. 



Name of Beidge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Charles river 

Chelsea (North) 

Chelsea (South) 

Chelsea street 

Commercial point. 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. "Washington avenue 

Neponset 

North Beacon street 

North Harvard street 

Warren 

Western avenue (to Cambridge). . 
Western avenue (to Watertown).. 

Winthrop 

Sundry expenditures 

Public landings 



Repairs, Lahor, 
Lumber, Iron- 
work and 
Painting. 



Totals. 



$4,068 74 
134 55 
252 06 
114 16 
283 07 
53 64 



2,492 14 

1,211 48 
268 24 
763 48 
120 03 

1,113 67 
371 46 
495 36 
580 86 
479 97 
21 98 
33 69 

2,368 13 
177 48 
193 28 
13 50 
415 88 
125 10 

16,161 95 



Regular Ex- 
penses, Sala- 
ries, Fuel and 
Supplies. 



$6,096 89 

390 1] 
5,671 38 
4,624 82 
4,797 61 

309 73 

50 00 

6,739 25 

5,575 76 

711 21 
5,783 42 

243 80 
5,019 67 
3,807 39 
4,612 43 
5,096 24 

406 84 

76 32 
372 59 

7,269 27 
372 59 

77 07 
111 10 

1,177 11 
250 00 

69,642 60 



Total. 



$10,165 63 

524 66 
5,923 44 
4,738 98 
5,080 68 

363 37 

50 00 

9,231 39 

6,787 24 

979 45 
6,546 90 

373 83 
6,133 34 
4,178 85 
5,107 79 
5,677 10 

886 81 
98 30 

406 28 
9,637 40 

550 07 

270 35 

124 60 
1,592 99 

375 10 

$85,804 55 



108 



City Document No. 29. 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

Aibany=street bridge (over Boston and 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed bridge, repaired sidewalk and iron fence, 
patched sheathing various times, patched deck 
and painted all ironwork. 



Carpenters . 








1458 12 


Painters 








657 15 


Watchman . 








98 51 


Lumber 








335 62 


Nails . 








12 81 


Ironwork 








2 40 


Lag screws 








5 00 


Repairing iron fence 








54 95 


Mortar 








6 00 


Paint stock 








109 85 



Allston bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road, at Cambridge street). 
Patched sheathing. 

Carpenters $9 50 

Lumber ...... 15 78 

Nails 79 



Ashland-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Patched sheathing. 

Carpenters 15 00 

Lumber ...... 5 85 

Nails 47 



Beacon -street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Repaired deck and sidewalk and sheathed the 

bridge. 

Carpenters 178 63 

Lumber 121 80 

Nails . 9 91 

Bolts . 1 00 



Beacon-street bridge (over outlet). 
Repaired sidewalk. 
Carpenters .... ... 

Nails 



63 62 

32 



.,740 41 



26 07 



11 32 



211 34 



3 94 



Carried forward, 



11,993 08 



Street Depaetjnient — Bridge Division. 109 

Brought forward, $1,993 08 

Berkeley-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed one roadway and painted bridge. 



Painters .... 


157 86 


Lumber .... 


30 08 


Nails 


2 05 


Repairing painters' tools 


3 20 


Paint stock . . 


10 94 



Berkeley-street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Sheathed roadway, patched deck, also patched 

sheathing six different times. 
Carpenters . . . , . . 1119 62 
Lumber . . . . . . 394 50 

Nails 25 08 



Berwick Park (foot) bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Painted bridge. 

Painters $164 31 

Paint stock 19 00 



224 07 



539 20 



183 31 



Bolton-street bridge (over New England 
Railroad). 
Repaired sidewalk. 
Carpenters ........ 1 25 

Boylston-avenue bridge (over Stony brook). 
Patched sheathing three times. 

Carpenters |16 38 

Lumber 23 92 

Nails . 2 89 

43 19 



Boylstofi-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Patched sheathing. 
Carpenters ........ 7 00 

Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, repaired deck and patched 

sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . . ' . . $15 25 



Carried forward, 115 25 $2,991 10 



110 City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward^ 
Lumber 
Nails .... 



Brookline-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed one roadway. 
Carpenters ...... $16 50 

Nails 1 58 



$15 25 


$2,991 10 


9 70 




6 81 






31 76 



[Lumber to be paid for in 1897.] 

Byron-street bridge (over Boston, Revere 
Beach and Lynn Railroad). 

Laid new deck and sheathing. 

Carpenters $117 48 

Lumber 250 19 

Nails 13 20 



Central-avenue bridge (from Dorchester to 
Milton over Neponset river). 
Patched deck, sheathing and sidewalk. 
Carpenters ...... $105 71 

Lumber 136 56 

Nails 5 80 



Cohasset-street (culvert). 
Laid new deck and sheathing. 

Carpenters $41 01 

Lumber 71 28 

Nails . . . . . . . 3 55 



Columbus-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed both roadways, repaired sidewalks and 

guard rail. 
Carpenters 
Lumber 
Nails . 
Ironwork 

Cornwall-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Sheathed the bridge. 

Carpenters $15 00 

Lumber 47 99 

Nails 2 36 



$75 


34 


95 


77 


5 


51 


7 


21 



18 08 



380 87 



248 07 



115 84 



183 83 



65 35 



Carried fonoard, $4,034 90 



Street Department — Bridge Division. Ill 

Brought forward, $4,034 90 

Cottage Farm bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad at Commonwealth avenue). 

Carpenters $22 00 

Lumber 25 30 

Nails . . . , . . * 10 11 

Use of telephone, etc. ... 3 70 

61 11 



Cottage-street (foot) bridge (over flats, East 
Boston). 
Bridge-tender ..... $747 36 
Ice 6 00 



Dartmouth-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany, and Providence Division of New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad). 
Patched sheathing, paid for smoke fenders erected 

in 1895, and which were removed this year, also 

removed wooden ornaments. 

Carpenters $20 00 

Painters 

Lumber 

Nails .... 

Erecting smoke fenders 

Removing smoke fenders 

Dorchester-street bridge (over New York, 

New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 

Division). 

Repaired sheathing, and cleaned ironwork under 

southerly sidewalk, and painted same two coats. 

Painters $28 13 

Paint stock 9 40 

Repairing sheathing by Railroad Co. . 2 64 



2 


50 


4 


93 




93 


362 


14 


30 


90 



Elmwood-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Sheathed the bridge. 

Carpenters $7 38 

Lumber 17 49 

Nails 1 20 



Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed roadway, patched deck and sheathing 

and painted bridge. 

Carpenters $48 25 

Painters 73 65 



753 36 



421 40 



40 17 



26 07 



Carried forward, $121 90 $5,337 01 



112 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward, $121 90 $5,337 01 

Nails 5 15 

Paint stock 21 68 

148 73 



[Lumber to be paid for in 1897,] 

Hyde Park-avenue bridge (over Stony 
Brook). 
Sheathed bridge, repaired fence and sheathing. 

Carpenters |16 18 

Lumber 16 42 

Nails 1 92 



Irvington street (foot) bridge (over New 
York,- New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division). 
Cleaned bridge and painted same two coats. 

[Part of stock taken from yard.] 
Painters ...... 

Paint stock . . . . . 

Jamaica street (culvert). 
Patched sheathing. 
CarjDcnters ...... 

Lumber ...... 

Nails 

Keyes-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Sheathed the bridge, afterwards patched the 

same. 

Carpenters $16 00 

Lumber 19 97 

Nails 2 27 



$29 


38 


3 


96 


$1 


25 


5 


28 




23 



Leyden-street bridge (over Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad). 
Patched deck and sheathing. 

Carpenters $25 97 

Lumber 60 47 

Nails 4 50 



Linden Park-street bridge (over Stony 
brook). 
Sheathed bridge, patched deck and sheathing. 
Cai'penters ...... $65 33 

Lumber 62 69 

Nails 4 25 



34 47 



33 34 



6 76 



38 24 



90 94 



132 27 



Oarried forward, $5,821 76 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



113 



Sr ought forward, 
Longwood-avenue bridge (from Roxbury to 
Brookline). 
Repaired deck and sheathing at five different 
times, afterwards laid new sheathing and re- 
paired sidewalk. 

Carpenters $106 00 

Lumber 131 92 

Nails 11 82 

Teaming ...... 1 50 



Massachusetts-avenue bridge (over Boston 
&> Albany Railroad). 



Sheathed the roadways. 

Carpenters 

Lumber 

Nails 



142 75 

106 10 

10 80 



Massachusetts-avenue bridge (over New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division). 
Sheathed the roadways and painted bridge. 



Painters 


231 57 


Lumber 


67 88 


Nails . 


5 80 


Paint stock 


24 96 


Teaming 


1 50 



Roxbury Crossing (foot) bridge (over New 

York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division). 
Removed the bridge July 13, 1896. 

Carpenters |21 00 

Removing trusses . . . . 73 03 

Teaming . 10 00 



Shawmut avenue 

Albany Railroad). 
Carpenter's . 
Lumber 
Nails .... 



bridge (over Boston & 

17 50 

6 85 

94 



Swett-street bridge (west of New England 
Railroad), 
Patched sheathing and repaired sidewalk. 
Carpenters |18 00 



Carried forward^ 



,821 76 



251 24 



159 65 



355 96 



104 03 



15 29 



118 00 66,707 93 



114 



City Document No. 29. 



JBr ought forward^ 
Lumber 
Nulls .... 

Swett=street bridge 

Railroad). 
Repaired sidewalk. 
Carpenters 



$18 00 

41 59 

. . 2 42 

(east of New England 



West Newton=street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Sheathed bridge. 

Carpenters '$34 25 

Lumber 72 31 

Nails 4 50 

Teaming 4 50 

West Rutland square (foot) bridge (over 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division). 
Painted bridge. 

Painters $63 86 

Paint stock 19 86 

Repairing tools . . . . . 3 85 



Williams=street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Patched sheathing. 
Carpenters ...... $3 00 

Lumber 15 64 

Nails 1 11 



Sundry expenditures on Inland Bridges 

Labor, on snow . 

Labor, cleaning bridges 

Sand, for slipi^ery walks 

Teaming sweepings 

Carpenters, sundry repairs 

Car fares, mechanics, sundry bridges 



$640 


34 


567 


58 


40 


25 


55 


00 


59 


92 


80 


00 



,707 93 



62 01 



1 25 



115 56 



87 07 



19 75 



1,443 09 



Total expended on Inland Bridges 



$8,436 66 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 



115 



RECAPITULATION. 

Table shovnng expendUxvres on the Inland Bridges for the Year 
Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 81, 1897. 



Name of Bridge. 

Albany street 
Allston 
Ashland street 
Beacon street (over 
Beacon street (over 



B. & A. Railroad) 

outlet) . 
Berkeley street (over B. & A. Railroad) 
Berkeley street (over Providence Division) 
Berwick park 
Bolton street 
Boylston avenue . 
Boylston street 

Broadway (over B. & A. Railroad) 
Brookline avenue . 
Byron street 
Central avenue 
Cohasset street (culvert) 
Columbus avenue . 
Cornwall street 
Cottage Farm 
Cottage street 
Dartmouth street . 
Dorchester street . 
Elmwood street 
Ferdinand street . 
Hyde Park avenue 
Irvington street 
Jamaica street (culvert) 
Keyes street 
Leyden street 
Linden Park street 
Longwood avenue 
Massachusetts avenue (over B. & A. Railroad) 
Massachusetts avenue (over Providence Division) 
Roxbury Crossing 
Shawmut avenue . 
Swett street (west) 
Swett street (east) 
West Newton street 
West Rutland square 
Williams street 
Sundry expenditures 



Repairs, Labor, 

Liimber, Ironwork, 

and Painting. 


11,740 


41 


26 


07 


11 


32 


211 


34 


3 


94 


224 


07 


539 


20 


183 


31 


1 


25 


43 


19 


7 


00 


31 


76 


18 


08 


380 


87 


248 


07 


115 


84 


183 


83 


65 


35 


61 


11 


753 


36 


421 


40 


40 


17 


26 


07 


148 


73 


34 


47 


33 


34 


6 


76 


38 


24 


. ' 90 


94 


132 


27 


251 


24 


159 


65 


355 


96 


104 


03 


15 


29 


62 


01 


1 


25 


115 


56 


87 


07 


19 


75 


1,443 


09 



Total 



5,436 66 



116 



City Document No. 29. 



REGITLAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH 
AND SOUTH YARDS. 

North Yakd, District No. 1. 



Warre7i Bridge. 



Messengers 

Watchman . 

Tools for carpenters . 

Gas .... 

Repairing steam apparatus 

Telephone . . 

Kerosene oil 

Water 

Ice .... 

Plumbing 

Red flags 

Shovels 

Hardware 

Small supplies 



L,003 72 

714 00 

63 70 

23 07 

17 83 

156 00 

14 00 

20 00 

6 00 

2 50 

13 25 



5 

7 

15 



85 
19 
03 



Stable, 


District 


No. 1. 






Warren Bridge. 






Teamster $780 


00 




Hostler 








575 


75 




Stable boy . 








122 


50 




Feed .... 








340 


10 




New buggy- 








185 


00 




Repairing wagon 








16 


30 




Repairing sleigh . 








26 


75 




Repairing harness 








12 


00 




Horseshoeing 








63 


00 




Veterinary service 








23 


00 • 




Horse- clipping 








9 


00 




Fur robes . 








30 


92 




Blanket, whip, and we 


ight 






5 


25 




Insect powder 








7 


50 




Small supplies 








17 


08 










2,214 15 




. 




Total expended, North Yard and Stable 


$4,276 29 


South Yard, District No. 2. 




No. 45 Foundry Street. 






Messengers $1,288 


56 




Watchman . 








742 


00 





Carried forward., 



$2,030 56 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 117 



Brought forward 








12,030 66 


Yard and stock boys .... 740 50 


Tools for carpenters 








68 18 


Tools for painters 








166 44 


Telephone . 








156 00 


Hardware . 








6 70 


Cordage 








11 92 


Coal . 








18 60 


Water 








10 00 


Red flags 
Ice . . 








23 25 
6 00 


New stove and pipe 








24 00 


Shovels 








16 47 


Ice choppers 








4 65 


Street horses 








12 83 


Small supplies 








54 46 



Stable, District No. 2. 
No. 6Jf Dorchester Avenue. 



Teamster ..... 


1792 50 


Hostler . , . . . 


750 00 


Stable boy ..... 


649 25 


Feed . . . . . 


449 49 


Repairing wagons 


212 55 


Repairing buggies . . . 


179 85 


Repairing sleighs 


86 25 


Repairing vehicles by Sanitary Division 


400 60 


Rent of stable .... 


600 00 


Coal 


18 60 


Veterinary service 


189 43 


Two new harnesses 


113 00 


Repairing harnesses 


69 15 


Clipping horses .... 


38 00 


Horseshoeing .... 


333 75 


Horse hire ..... 


13 85 


Use of buggy .... 


57 50 


Second-hand buggy 


100 00 


New sleigh . . . . . 


150 00 


New buggy .... 


250 00 


Bay mare . . 


195 00 


Bay gelding .... 


130 00 


Fur robes ..... 


37 07 


Blanket, whip, and weight . 


7 88 


Small supplies .... 


107 15 



5,350 56 



Total expended. South Yard and Stable 



5,930 37 

^9,280 93 



118 



City Document No. 29. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Ik Charge of Bridge Division. 

Charles=river bridge, draw, remodelling, etc. 
(Boston to Charlestown). 
Repaired deck and piling under paved roadway, 

sheathed the draw twice, put in truck and re- 
paired fence. 

Carpenters 1291 08 

Spruce 247 46 

Oak 39 13 

Bolts, nuts, etc 14 18 

W. H. Ellis, repairing planking under 

roadway, etc, ..... 1,925 27 

Total expended Jan. 31, 1897 
Balance ..... 

Appropriation ..... 

Chelsea bridge (North) rebuilding draw, etc. 
(over North channel. Mystic river). 

Made general repairs and additions to racks, shafts 
pinions, gears, etc., of the draw, preparatory to 
the use of electric motor, and made extensive 
repairs upon the waterway. 
Contract with Augustus Bellevue & Co. : 

Eighth and final estimate . $4,561 80 

Extra work done . . 255 48 

14,817 28 

Setting rack, trolley-posts, etc., and re- 
pairing float stage, fence and north 
pier ...... 

Castings, rack, boxes, shafts, pinions, 
etc. ...... 

Castings for counterbalance weights 

Inspector 

Repairing motor .... 

Installing motor, etc. . 

Melting lead for ballast 

Two mitre gears 

Two spare axles with wheels 

Painting track stringers 

Express ..... 

Carpenters, on waterway 

Lumber, on waterway 

Repairing machinery . 

Resetting buoy . . . . 



548 02 



934 


77 


59 


00 


92 


00 


103 


88 


279 


74 


6 


60 


50 


00 


136 


00 


126 


84 


3 


90 


513 


00 


142 


42 


23 


40 


165 


00 



$2,517 12 
407 04 

$2,924 16 



Carried fortvard, 



^,001 85 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 119 



Brought forioard, 
Ringbolts, repairing latches, etc. 
Car fares ..... 


•$8,001 85 
39 00 
25 00 






Elastic paint mixture . 


47 25 






Painting ten signs 


118 00 


88,231 




Total expended Jan. 31, 1897 . 


. 


10 


Balance 


. 


5,030 


54 


Appropriation 


. 


$13,2(31 


64 



Gold=street bridge (over New England Rail- 
road). 
Paid New England Railroad Company 
for flagmen while bridge was being 
placed in position .... $28 25 

Total expended Jan. 31, 1897 .... 
Balance ........ 

Appropriation . . . 

Meridian-street bridge, reconstructing draw 
(from East Boston to Chelsea). 

Rebuilt trusses of the draw, and repaired spur- 
shores, piles, girder caps, and fender-guard. Put 
in new deck on draw, sheathed the same, re- 
paired waterway, pier, fence, concrete sidewalk, 
machinery and float stage, reset buoy and painted 
bridge and fence. 

Carpenters 

Painters 



Spruce 

Hard pine 

Oak . 

Nails . 

Bolts, straps, plates, wedges, etc. 

Repairing machinery ... 

Repairing rack pinions, gear, etc. 

Laddez's, rope, grindstones, wrenches 

etc 

Lead, oil, turpentine and japan . 
Car fares ..... 
Contract with W. H. Ellis> rebuilding 

trusses of the draw . 
Driving piles, repairing fender-guard 

etc. ...... 

Resetting buoy, chain, etc. . 

Carried forward^ 



11,852 96 

1,631 36 

790 

712 

23 

69 

289 

52 

75 



64 
79 
80 
73 
12 
50 



54 

128 
100 



87 
90 
00 



2,025 96 



731 
125 



18 
00 



S28 25 
18,569 33 

$18,597 58 



18,664 69 



120 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward, $8,664 69 

Repairing float stage . . . . 31 08 

Inspector 276 00 

Repairing concrete sidewalk . . 870 10 
Contract with Lockwood Manufactur- 
ing Co., for dynamo and macliinery, 1,585 00 

Total expended Jan. 31, 1897 .... $11,426 87 
Balance 2,833 61 

Appropriation $14,260 48 

Reconstruction of Essex-street bridge (from 
Brighton to Cambridge). 
[Work not completed.] 
Contract with Wm. S. Rendle, making 

repairs, first approximate estimate, $4,688 70 
Specifications ..... 31 10 

Advertising 25 63 

Inspector 224 00 



Total expended Jan. 31, 1897 .... $4,969 43 
Balance 1,530 57 



Appropriation . . . ' . . . $6,500 00 



Amounts Chaeged to Special Appropbiations in Charge 
OF OTHER Divisions. 

Paid New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company for the construction of railroad bridge 
over Geneva avenue, Dorchester, at Shawmut 
Branch. 

Charged to " Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways" . . . . . . . $14,026 58 

Winthrop bridge (from Breed's Island to Win- 

throp) . 
Repaired damage to bridge caused by ice and the 

tide ; also sheathed the bridge. 
Contract with J. N. Hayes & Co., mak- 
ing repairs, driving piles, etc. . . $1,519 92 

Inspector 144 00 

Carpenters 105 26 

Lumber 253 02 



Charged to Saratoga street, filling solid old bridge, $2,022 20 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 121 



Huntington avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Rairoad). 

Stripped the bridge, flattened the curve on top of 
roadway and sidewalk girders and stringers, put 
in new deck on roadway, and sidewalks of hard 
pine, laid new asphalt sidewalks, sheathed the 
bridge, built new fence, and cleaned all iron 
and painted same with two coats of red lead. 

Painters $1,510 86 

Paint, oil-mixer, red lead, oil, etc. . 241 29 

Repairing painters' tools . . . 18 

Contract with Wm. L. Miller, stone- 
work, hard pine roadways, sidewalks, 
etc. ....... 

Contract with Boston Bridge Works, 
work on girders .... 

Contract with Boston Asphalt Co., as- 
phalt sidewalks . , . 

Services of flagman .... 

Car fares ...... 

Repairing sheathing, carpen- 
ters ..... 

Lumber .... 

Teaming .... 

39 49 



4,358 

2,646 

635 
117 

25 



80 



00 

99 

25 
00 
00 



^11 

23 

5 



25 
24 
00 



Contract with Wm. L. Miller, removing archway 
at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir .... 



Charged to Blue Hill and other avenues 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over Boston 
Railroad at Commonwealth avenue) 

Completed new bridge 

Advertising 

Portland cement 

Hard brick . 

Hollow brick 

Sand . 

Bolts (150) 

Inspector 

Covering steel beams with lead 

Pieces stone (16) 

Contract with Metropolitan Construc- 
tion Co. laying brick arches and con- 
crete filling ..... 

Contract with A. C. Richmond, plac- 
ing 124 steel beams 

Carried forward, 



& Albany 



$55 


75 


2,968 


40 


47 


25 


20 


00 


405 


00 


20 


42 


330 


00 


1,647 


00 


227 


96 


3,041 


48 


1,900 


00 


110,663 


26 



19,592 68 

874 00 

10,466 68 



122 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward, $10,663 26 
Repairing old bridge, carpen- 
ters $51 63 

Lumber . . . . 117 26 

168 89 

T3ailding temporary fence, car- 
penters .... $53 25 
Lumber . . . . 46 35 

99 60 

Charged to Commonwealth avenue (old appropria- 
tion) $10,931 75 

Cottage Farm bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad at Commonwealth avenue). 

Completed new bridge. 

Sand, gravel and screenings . . $611 60 

Hollow brick and skews . . . 756 00 

Portland cement . . . . . 1,917 60 

Rods (616) 87 20 

Contract with Metropolitan Construc- 
tion Co., laying brick arches and 
concrete filling, southerly section . 2,243 15 

Contract with E. B. Badger & Son, 

covering 91 steel beams with lead . 955 50 

Contract with A. C. Richmond, exten- 
sion of abutment, resetting parapet 
stone and placing filling back of 
abutment 2,937 38 

Contract with Boston Bridge Works, 
steel superstructure, southerly sec- 
tion 2,400 00 

Contract with Boston Asphalt Com- 
pany Sicilian rock asphalt, northerly 
roadway ...... 1,751 68 

Sicilian rock asphalt, southerly road- 
way 1,707 86 

Artificial stone sidewalk and curbing, 864 85 

Setting stone bearing blocks, resetting 
parapet, northerly abutment, recut- 
ting stone for beams and removing 
old parapet ..... 276 28 

Charged to Commonwealth avenue (new 

appropriation) ...... $16,509 10 

Public Landing, Jeffries Point (East Boston). 
Built new landing. 
Carpenters ^180 00 

Carried forward, $180 00 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioi:^. 123 

Brought forioard, $180 00 

Lumber 89 38 

Two old masts 70 00 

Nails 2 26 

Bolts, hinges, clamps, etc. . ' . . 76 02 



Charged to Street Improvements, Wards 1 

and 2 $-417 66 



[Part 


of 


appropria- 


11,792 


18 


617 


70 


635 


50 


133 


00 


152 


98 


8 


09 


45 


50 


197 


20 



Public Landing, Jeffries' Point (East Bos- 
ton). 
Bailt new landing. 
Putting in foundation, placing old ferry drop on 

same and driving guide piles for float. 
Charged to Street Improvements, New Ward 2. $300 00 

Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 

Removed deck, sheathing and sidewalk, put in 
new beams of hard pine, and deck of kyanized 
spruce, sheathed the draw with spruce, laid 
sidewalks of hard pine, built two new sets of 
stairs, from draw to pier, of hard pine, boxed 
around trusses with cypress. Painted centre, 
chords and iron beams with red lead, also 
painted fence and draw-house, 
mechanics labor charged to regular 
tion.] 
(Work not completed.) 

Carpenters ...... 

Painters ...... 

Kyanized spruce ..... 

Spruce ...... 

Hard pine ...... 

Surveying kyanized spruce . 

Iron clamps, bolts, wedges, dogs and 
repairing painters' hangers 

Repairing iron fence .... 

Charged to Street Improvements, New Ward 13, $3,582 15 

Savin Hill-avenue bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 
Division). 
Paid New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company for making repairs, city's part or two- 
fifths $43 72 



Charged to Street Improvements, Ward 20 . . $43 72 



124 City Document No. 29. 

Everett-street bridge (over Boston & Albany- 
Railroad). 
Sheathed the bridge. 

Carpenters 1108 38 

Lumber ...... 827 36 

Teaming 20 00 



Cottage Farm bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad at Commonwealth avenue). 
Completed new bridge. 
Inspector . . . . . . |415 00 

Sand and screenings .... 308 80 

Portland cement . . . . 881 25 

Pier column . . . . . 44 00 

Contract with A. C. Richmond, remov- 
ing old bridge and placing 91 beams, 1,400 00 
Contract with Cape Ann Granite Co. 
for parapet and bearing courses, 
southerly section .... 2.125 00 



S455 74 



5,174 05 
Charged to Street Improvements, Ward 25 . . $5,629 79 

Paid award of Committee on Claims to 
John P. Donovan, for personal in- 
juries received Dec. 3, 1895, on Mt. 
Washington-avenue bridge . • $150 00 

Paid execution of court to James O. 
Stone, for personal injuries received 
June 4, 1894, on Broadway bridge, 
over Boston & Albany Railroad . 1,201 35 

Paid execution of court to Nathaniel 
P. Doane et al., for damage to tug 
"Nellie," Nov. 18, 1893, at Chelsea 
(North) bridge .... 3,062 59 

Charged to Reserved Fund . . $4,413 94 



Steebt Department — Bridge Division. 125 



LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

[In the list those marked with an asterisk (*) are over navigable 
waters, apd are each provided with a draw.] 

In charge of Bridge Division. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street, 

Brighton. 
Ashland street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division, "West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over New England Railroad. 
Baker street, at Brook farm. West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Berwick-park (foot) bridge, over N". Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Blakemore street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Bolton street, over New England Railroad. 
Boylston avenue, over Stony brook. West Roxbury. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Broadway, over Fort-Point channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston &, Albany Railroad. 
Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 
*Chelsea (South), over south channel. Mystic river. 
*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad, 
^Commercial Point, or Tenean, Dorchester, 
*Congres8 street, over Fort- Point channel, 
Cornwall street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 
Cottage Farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad, at Commonwealth 

avenue. 
Cottage-street foot-bridge, over flats, East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany, and Providence Division 

of N, Y., N. H, & H, Railroad. 
*Dover street, over Fort- Point channel. 
Elmwood street (private way), over Stony brook, Roxbury. 
*Federal street, over Fort-Point channel. 
Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Florence street, over Stony brook. West Roxbury. 
Gold-street foot-bridge, over New England Railroad. 



126 City Document No. 29. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Irvington-street foot bridge, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 
Providence Division. 

Keyes street, over Stony brook. West Roxbury, 

*L street, over reserved channel at junction of Congress and L 
streets. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

Linden Park street, over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

^Maiden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Massachusetts avenue, over N. Y,, N. H. & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort-Point channel 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Swett street, east of New England Railroad. 

Swett street, west of New England Railroad. 

Texas street, over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Newton street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

West Rutland-square foot-bridge, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Rail- 
road, Providence Division. 

Williams street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

J)i charge of I^ ark Department. 

Agassiz, in Back Bay Fens. 

Arborway, over Stony brook. 

Audubon road, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Bernierstreet (foot-bridge), in the River way. 

Boylston-street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Bridle path, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

*Ca8tle-island (foot bridge), from Marine park. South Boston, to 

Castle Island. 
Charlesgate, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin Park. 
Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay Fens. 
EUicott arch, in Franklin park. 
Fen, Back Bay Fens. 
Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin park, 
Leverett-pond (foot-bridge), in Leverett park, 
Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, 
Scarboro' pond (foot-bridge), in Franklin park. 
Stony brook, Back Bay Fens, 

Jn charge of Public Grounds Department. 
Public Garden (foot-bridge). 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 127 

II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 
WITHIN ITS Limits. 

In charge of Bridge Division. 

*Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
*GraDite, from Dorchester to Milton. 
fLongwood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 
"^North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedhara. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

In charge of lark Department. 

Bellevue street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Bernier-street (foot-bridge), in the Riverwaj^, over Muddy river. 
Brookline avenue, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Tremont street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

III. — Bridges of avhich Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Ii charge of Bridge Dimsion. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Chelsea bridge, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Dorchester street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division, 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 
West Fourth street, over N. Y,. N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 

In charge of Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges. 

*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 
*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge, 
*Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 
*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

lY. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad, 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

tTo be rebuilt and maintained by Park Departments of Boston and Brookline by Act 

of Legislature. 



128 City Document No. 29. 



2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad^ Eastern Division. 

Mystic aveniie. 
Main street, 

3d. — Boston <& Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

_^tJi, — Boston., Revere Beach S Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — -Neio England Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Harvard street, Dorchester. 

Morton " " 

Norfolk " " 

Norfolk " " 

Silver street. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 

West Broadway. 

West Fifth street. 

West Fourth street. 

West Second street. 

West Sixth street. 

West Third street. 

Qth. — Neio York., New Haven S Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Freeport street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven c& Hartford Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

Beach street, West Roxbury. 

Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Dudley avenue. West Roxbury. 

Park street, West Roxbury. 



Street Depaetjvient — Bridge Division. 129 



Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston : 

In charge of Bridge Division ... 54 

In charge of Park Department . . 17 

In charge of Public Grounds Department 1 



II. Number of which Boston supports the part 
within its limits : 
In charge of Bridge Division ... 14 
In charge of Park Department . . 4 



III. Number of which Boston pays a part of 

the cost of maintenance : 
In charge of Bridge Division . . 
In charge of Commissioners of Cambridge 

Bridges ...... 



72 



— 18 



— 9 



IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany . , . . 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division . 2 

3. " " Western Division . 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn. . 1 

5. New England 13 

6. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Plymouth Division . . . 5 

7. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Providence Division ... 6 

• — 38 

Total number 132 



130 



City Document No. 29. 



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Street Departribnt — Beidge Division. 131 

Public Landiis^g-Places. 

The following public landing-places have been built by the 
city, and are maintained and controlled by the Street Depart- 
ment : — 

Charles-river Bridge. — Size, 40 x 60. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

Essex- street Bridge. — Size, 9x23. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

East Boston, Puhlic Landing. — Size, 18 x 30. Built in 1893. 
Moored at dock of East Boston Dry Dock Company. Dock and 
flats leased at $250 per year. 

Commercial WJuirf. — ^xzQ, 30x50. Built by M. F. Sulli- 
van ; contract dated Jan. 1, 1892 Moored at dock of Commer- 
cial Wharf Corporation. Dock and flats leased Nov. 30, 1891, 
at $1,000 per year. 

Federal-street Bridge. — Size, 20 x 30. Built by M. F. Sulli- 
van, Oct, 26, 1892. Moored from city's property. 

Cable -Houses ajjd Boxes. 

The following is a list of cable-houses and boxes on bridges in 
charge of this division : — 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company: 

Charles-river bridge, 2 houses, 1 unused box. 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 house. 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Dover-street bridge, 2 houses or boxes. 

Chelsea [NorthJ bridge, 1 box. 

Chelsea-street bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 4 boxes. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Neponset bridge, 2 boxes on poles. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Federal- street bridge, 1 house. 
Merchants' Telegraph Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

]\[alden bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Electric Light Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
West End Street Railway Company : 

Cambridge-street bridge, 1 house. 

Dover-street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Federal-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Maiden bridge, 2 houses. 

Warren bridge, 2 houses. 



132 City Document No. 29. 

Lynn & Boston Railroad Company: 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 4 boxes. 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 8 boxes. 
Boston Police Department : 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Fire Department: 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 1 box. 

Dover- street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 

On Warren bridge there are also five small boxes; the owners 
of the same are unknown. 



Street Department — Bridge Divisioisr. 



133 



statement of Traffic on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1896, between the 
Hours of 6 A.M. and 7 P.M. 

North Bridges. 



Name of Bkidge. 


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Charles river 

Chelsea (North).... 
Chelsea (South).... 
Maiden 


5,280 
1,270 
1,702 
590 
2,079 
4,047 


4,770 
1,137 
1,936 
683 
2,132 
5,121 


2,350 

807 
861 
812 
590 
2,585 


2,175 
862 

1,075 
792 
656 

3,203 


343 
343 
328 
125 
1,122 


338 
338 
351 
121 
1,132 


8,080 
9,390 
8,460 
1,424 
30,452 


7,193 
9,119 
8,395 
1,549 
34,941 


Meridian street. .. 





South Bridges. 



Broadway . . . 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Federal street 

L street 

Mt. Washington 
aveniie 



9,940 


9,600 


2,035 


2,215 


93 


91 


1,860 


5,463 


5,257 


2,470 


2,560 








3,974 


4,895 


74.i 


912 


162 


172 


4,033 


6,570 


3,950 


1,718 


1,572 


498 


497 


9,621 


855 


985 


98 


322 








1,592 


1,789 


717 


850 









1,820 

4,124 
11,348 



134 



City Docujment No. 29. 





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136 



City Document No. 29. 



Table showing the widths of Openings for Vessels in all Bridges 
provided with Draws in the City of Boston, Jan. 31, 1897. 



Name of Bridge. 



Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 
Division , 

Boston & Maine R.E., Eastern 
Division 

Boston & Maine E..E. (freight), 
Southern Division 

Boston & Maine E..R. (passen- 
ger), Southern Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., "Western 
Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., Western 
Division 

Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Canal (or Craigie's) 

Charles river 

Chelsea (south channel) 

Chelsea (north channel) 

Chelsea st. (East Boston side).. 

Chelsea street (Chelsea side).. . 

Commercial point (or Tenean). 

Congress street (Boston side)... 

" (South Boston side) 

Dover street , 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Fitchburg RR 

Fitchburg R.R. (for teaming 
freight) 

Grand Junction R.R , 

Granite 



Location. 



Boston to Charlestown 

Over Miller's river 

Boston to East Cam- 
bridge 

Boston to Charlestown.. 

Over Miller's river 

Over Fort Point channel 

Brighton to Cambridge.. 

Boston to East Cam- 
bridge 

Boston to Charlestown.. 

Charlestown to Chelsea. 
II ' II 

East Boston to Chelsea. 



Dorchester 

Over Fort Point channel 



Brighton to Cambridge 
Over Fort Point channel 
Boston to Charlestown.. 

II II 

Brighton to Cambridge 
East Boston to Chelsea.. 
Dorchester to Milton.. 



1° 



Width. 



39 feet 8 inches. 
35 " 6 " 

40 



7 
7 

10 
3 

4 

1 

9 

10 



3 
9 

10 
9 

10 



9 
6 




Street Department — Bridge Division. 



137 



Table showing Width of Openings, etc. — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 






Width. 


Harvard (Boston side) 




?, 


^fi 




" (Cambridge side) 






36 


11 IQ « 


L street 


Over Reserved channel. 
South Boston 


1 
1 


40 






" " 


Maiden 




II 2 " 


Meridian st. (East Boston side), 


East Boston to Chelsea. 


2 


59 


« 2 " 


" (Chelsea side) 


« 




59 


" " 


Mt. Washington avenue (Bos- 
ton side) 







<]0 


" 3 " 


Mt. Washington avenue (South 
Boston side) 


II <i 




4^ 


" 3 " 


Neponset 


Dorchester to Quincy. . . 
Over Fort Point channel 


1 


Sfi 


" " 


NewEngland R.R. (Boston side) , 


2 


41 


" 8 " 


New England R.R. (South Bos- 
ton sid^e) 


<i i< 




10 


" 8 " 


New England R.R 


Over South Bay . ... 


1 


''8 


• I 4. " 


North Beacon street 


Brighton to Watertown. 
Brighton to Cambridge. 

Over Fort Point channel 


1 


90 


« 2 " 




1 


36 


" " 


New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R 


1 


36 


« 4 .< 


New York, New Haven & Hart- 


Dorchester to Quincy. . . 

Charlestown to Cam- 
bridge 


1 


36 


" " 


Prison point 


1 


Sfi 






" " 


Warren 




1 


% 


" " 


West Boston (Boston side). .... 


Boston to Cambridge... . 


2 


35 


" 6 " 


" (Cambridge side). 


II ti 




36 


" 6 " 


Western avenue 


Brighton to Cambridge. 
Brighton to Watertown. 


1 


96 


II Q << 


II 


1 


35 


" 10 " 







138 



City DocuaiEisrT No. 29, 



Table showing Width of Bridges, kind of Roadways, Sidewalks, 
etc., on Tide=water Bridges, Jan. 31, 1897. 



Name of Bridge. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Canal 

Charles river 

Chelsea, North 

South 

" street 

Comnaercial point 

Congress street 

Dover st. (over water) 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

Harvard 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington ave . . 

Neponset 

North Reacon street. . . 

North Harvard street. . 

Prison Point 

"Warren. ^ 

Western ave. to Cam- 
bridge 

Western ave. to Water- 
town 

Winthrop 

West Boston 



Ft. In. 
60 

40 

64 

50 

49 

50 3 

30 
abont 

34 

60 
60 

31 
69 
30 2 
69 4 

60 
40 
50 

61 

30 

31 
28 2 
50 
80 

33 2 

33 
24 2 
50 



Roadway. 



Ft. In. 
40 

32 2 

48 
34 

40 

41 2 

23 2 
about 

27 

44 
40 

22 8 

49 

24 4 
51 
44 
32 
36 
39 6 

23 10 

25 2 

26 7 
36 
60 

26 3 

24 2 
19 10 
36 



Kind of 
roadway. 



Plank 

Paved 

Plank 

Paved 

Plank 

Paved 

Plank 

Paved 

Plank 

( Plank part ] 
\ Paved part \ 

Paved 

Plank 

Paved 



Sidewalks. 



Ft. In. 
10 

6 

8 

8 

8 

8 

6 

8 
10 

7 6 
10 

5 

9 2 

8 
7 
7 

10 9 
5 5 

5 

7 
10 

6 

8 

3 7 

7 



Kind of walks. 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 

Brick. 



Coal-tar concrete 
and iJlank. 

Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal-tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



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140 



City Document No. 29. 



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Street Department — Feery Division. 141 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF FERRY 

DIVISION. 



North Ferry, East Boston, Feb. 1, 1897- 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir: I respectfully submit the annual report of the 
expenditures, income, and operations of the Ferry Division of 
the Street Department for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 
1897. 

Respectfully yours, 

William F. McClellak, 

Deputy Superintendent. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular AppROPRiATioisrs. 

Appropriation for year ending Jan. 31, 1897 . $218,000 00 
Transfers for an illuminated clock at North Ferry, 

Boston side, viz. : 
From special appropriation for 

awning . . ... . 1257 06 

From special appropriation for 

South Drop, South Ferry, 

Boston side ..... 96 09 353 15 



Total appropriation . . $218,353 15 

Amount of expenditures . . 1217,999 95 
Amount for illuminated clock at 

North Ferry .... 353 15 

Amount transferred to Street 

Cleaning Division ... 05 

. 1218,353 15 



Objects op Expenditure. 

Salaries and wages, running expenses . . . 1130,091 68 

Salaries and wages, repairs ..... 16,172 74 

Fuel . 29,803 55 

Current expenses ....... 19,028 49 

Carried forward, 1195,096 46 



142 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forioard, ■ 
Supplies for running expenses 
Supplies for repairs 
Repairs on boats .... 
Repairs on buildings, piers and drops 
Tools and fixtures 
Incidental expenditures . 
Damages to persons and property 
Transfer to Street Cleaning Division 





8195,096 


46 


5,696 


80 




3,996 


77 




9232 


76 




3,226 


05 




956 


76 




102 


50 




45 


00 
05 




1218,353 


15 



Appropriation for awning at North 
Ferry, East Boston . 

Less amount transferred to regu- 
lar appropriation for illuminated 
clock . . . . . 



Special AppEOPRiATioisrs. 

11,000 00 



257 06 

$742 94 



Appropriation authorized for new 
ferry landing . $500,000 00 
Amount issued ..... 

Total available special appropriations 



30,000 00 



J42 94 



Objects oe Expenditure. 

Special Appropriations. 

Awning at North Ferry, East Boston . 

John M. Brooks, contract for building two tanks 

for drops . • 
William McKie, contract for building one ferry 

drop ......••• 

William McKie, contract for building second ferry 

drop ......... 

W. H. Ellis & Co., contract for repairing middle 

pier, Boston landing. South Ferry 
Charles I. Albee, contract for one special hoisting 

motor, with all appliances for hauling teams up 

ferry drop . . • • • • 

Sundry bills . . ... 

Total expenditures, special appropriations 
Balance unexpended ...... 



$742 


94 


3,500 


00 


4,165 


00 


4,122 


50 


1,802 


15 


838 
7,533 


00 
96 


$22,704 
8,038 


55 
39 


$80,742 


94 



Street Depaetment — Ferry Division. 



143 



Total appropriations 



1218,353 15 
30,742 94 



1249,096 09 
241,057 70 

18,038 39 



Total expenditures ..... 
Balance unexpended of special appropriations 

Income. 

Cash Receipts from Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897. 

At office of City Collector : 

For rent ...... 

re-imbursed damages . 
free ferries July 4, 1896 
sales of foot-passes 
" " team tickets . 
At Ferry Division office : 
For old material sold 
For sales of foot-passes 
For sales of team tickets . 
From Tollmen : 

For 11,703,349 foot-passengers at Ic. 
team tickets .... 

From Gatemen : 

For 248,080 foot-passengers at Ic. . 
teams ..... 

Total receipts for the year 

Statement Showing Receipts at each Ferry. 
North Ferry. 



« 


12,572 00 

700 00 

25 00 

432 00 

77-50 




37 85 
856 70 
533 00 




117,033 49 
27,442 00 




2,480 80 
14,889 18 




. $167,079 52 



From Tollmen. 


Foot-passengers, 
at 1 cent. 


Team Tickets. 


Total. 


No. 2 

" 3 


$11,813 05 
11,401 27 
11,798 21 
11,359 45 
11,722 71 
11,797 16 
12,399 88 


$1,807 00 
1,891 50 
2,069 00 
1,777 50 
1,902 00 
1,812 50 
1,652 00 


$13,620 05 
13,292 77 


" 5 


13,867 21 
13,136 95 
13,624 71 
13,609 66 
14,051 88 


" 6 


" 9 


" 10 

" 13 








$82,291 73 
(• 


$12,911 50 


$95,203 23 



From Gatemen : 

For 141,516 foot-passengers at Ic. 
For teams .... 



81,415 
5,792 



16 
36 



Total at North Ferry 



$7,207 52 
102,410 75 



144 



City Documekt No. 29. 



South Ferry. 



From Tollmen. 


Foot-passengers, 
at 1 cent. 


Team Tickets. 


Total. 


No. 1 


$8,127 56 
7,920 18 
8,386 82 
8,049 66 
1,012 80 
1,244 74 


$3,423 00 

3,401 00 

3,653 50 

3,686 00 

94 50 

272 50 


$11,550 56 
11 321 18 


" 4 


" 7 


12,040 32 

11,735 66 

1,107 30 

1,517 24 


" 8 


" 11.. 


" 12 






$34,741 76 


$14,530 50 


$49,272 26 



From Gatemen : 

For 106,564 foot-passengers, at Ic. . Sl,065 64 
For teams 9,096 82 



Total at South Ferry .... 

North and South Ferries, as above 
Tickets at office of City Collector 
Tickets at office of Ferry Division 

Eent 

Damages, old material and free ferries, July 4 

Total receipts for year 1896 



Cash Statement. 
From Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897. 
Dr. 
To cash received 

Cr. 

By amount paid City Collector . _ $167,056 74 

By amount rejected money . . 11 39 

By balance on hand . . . 11 39 



$10,162 46 

$59,434 72 

$161,845 47 

509 50 

1,389 70 

2,572 00 

762 85 

1167,079 52 



$167,079 52 



$167,079 52 



Statement of the Receipts. 

From April i, 1870 (date of purchase hy the City of Boston 

of the East Boston Ferries), to Feb. /, 1897. 

Cash received for tolls from April 

1, 1870, to Feb. 1, 1893 . . $3,779,486 03 



Carried forward, 



13,779,486 03 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 

3,779,486 03 
149,388 61 



145 



Brought forioard, 
Cash received for tolls from Feb 

1, 1893, to Feb. 1, 1894 . 
Cash received for tolls from Feb 

1, 1894, to Feb. 1, 1895 . 
Cash received for tolls from Feb 

1, 1895, to Feb. 1, 1896 . 
Cash received for tolls from Feb 

1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897 . 

Cash received for rent 
Cash received for old boats . 
Cash received for old material, etc 



Total receipts for 26 years 10 months 



152,950 04 
166,307 33 
163,769 67 



$42,371 

15,246 

9,061 


30 
71 

98 



14,411,901 68 



66,679 99 



1,478,581 67 



Cash Statement. 
From April 1, 1870, to Jan. 31, 1897. 
Dr. 
To receipts from all sources 

Cr. 

By amount paid City Collector 

By cash with tollmen and gate- 
men as capital .... 

By counterfeit and rejected money 
in 26 years and 10 months 

By balance on hand 



EXPBNDITUKES. 

From Ilarch 4, 1857, to April 1, 1870. 

Amount charged to the East Boston ferries by Auditor pre- 
vious to purchase : 

For avenues . . $250,000 00 
For repairs . . 65,815 68 



. 


97 


14,478,581 


67 


,477,897 






608 


00 






64 
11 


31 
39 


14,478,581 


67 









For ferry property, purchased 
April 1, 1870 .... 

From April 1, 1870, to Feb. 1, 1893, 
From Feb. 1, 1893, to Feb. 1, 1894, 



$315,815 68 

276,375 00 

5,214,551 71 
249,370 65 



1592,190 68 



Carried forward. 



),463,922 36 $592,190 68 



146 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward, 5,463,922 36 

FromFeb. 1,1894, to Feb. 1,1895, 224,441 04 

From Feb. 1,1895, to Feb. 1,1896, 221,813 94 

FromFeb. 1,1896, to Feb. 1,1897, 241,057 70 



Deduct. 
Amount paid to City Treasury . 



1592,190 68 

6,151,235 04 

16,743,425 72 

4,477,897 97 



Net cost of ferries to city to date, not including 

interest on loans . . . . . . $2,265,527 75 



Statement Showing the Actual Standing op Ferry 
Division, Steeet Department, with the City op Boston, 
Feb. 1, 1897. 

Dr. 



Amount paid previous to April 1, 1870 
Amount paid from April 1, 1870, to Feb. 1, 1897 

as follows : 
Seven new ferry steamers . 
New piers, buildings and drops 

Fuel 

Repairs of all kinds 

Salaries and wages 

Tools and fixtui-es 

Land from Lincoln wharf in 1887 

Land from Batteiy wharf in 1893 

All other expenses 



Cr. 

By amount paid the city for income 

" amount charged to ferry property for avenues 
that were laid out as streets, August, 1880 
and which should be credited to this division 

" paving avenues ..... 

" amount received for rents previous to Jan. 1 
1881, by Department of Public Buildings 
and should be credited to this division 

" estimated value of seven ferry 

steamers .... $188,175 53 

" less 6 per cent for depreciation, 11,290 53 



Carried forward, 



$592,190 68 



371,956 04 

379,818 35 

916,232 60 

664,539 28 

2,939,147 12 

12,877 44 

5,562 52 

10,000 00 

851,101 69 

^6,743,425 72 



t,477,897 97 



250,000 00 
11,530 84 



60,277 56 



176,885 00 
4,976,591 37 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



147 



JBro^igh t forioard^ 


14,976,591 37 


By estimated value of real estate 




and franchise as per last re- 




port $627,600 00 




" added for improvement daring 




year 21,900 OC 






649,500 00 




" value of awning, N orth ferry, East Boston 


742 94 


" new ferry landing, not yet charged off . 


61 61 


" land from Lincoln wharf 


5,562 52 


" land from Battery wharf . , . . 


10,000 00 


" estimated value of tools and fixtures 


6,000 00 


" estimated value of fuel on hand 


5,798 52 


" estimated value of supplies for maintenance 


361 91 


" estimated value of supplies for repairs . 


8,092 90 


" amount expended on Eastern- avenue wharf 


1,499 46 


" cash with employees as capital 


608 00 


" cash on hand 


11 39 


" transfer to Street-Cleaning Division 


05 


" profit and loss for 26 years 10 months . 


. 1,083,595 05 




16,743,425 72 



Statement Showiistg the DiFFEEEisrcE op Travel on the 
Ferries from Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897. 

North. South. 

Foot passengers, at 1 cent each . . 8,229,173 3,474,176 

Foot passengers by ticket , . 82,871 47,267 



One-horse teams 

Two-horse teams 

Three- horse teams 

Four-horse teams 

Two-horse carriages and hacks . 

Two- cent toll (at gate) handcarts, etc 

Four-cent toll . 

Six-cent toll 

Seven-cent toll . 

Eight-cent toll . 

Ten-cent toll 

Thirteen- cent toll 

Fifteen-cent toll 

Twenty-cent toll 

Thirty-cent toll 

Free teams 

Free foot . 



8,312,044 


3,521,443 


218,078 


203,144 


76,254 


122,600 


3,403 


4,547 


4,623 


9,165 


5,238 


2,672 


4,175 


4,146 


118,729 


188,527 


3,608 


4,781 


2 


3 


7,865 


12,587 


454 


886 


471 


643 


31 


28 


1 





8 


8 


3,824 


1,407 


32,086 


910 



148 



City Document No. 29. 



Total Travel on both Ferries from Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1897. 



One-horse teams 

Two-horse teams 

Three-horse teams 

Four-horse teams 

Two-horse carriages and hacks, 

Two-cent tolls for hand-carts, 
etc 

Drag-wheels, etc 

Foot-passengers 



(13 mos.) 
1891. 



727,170 
228,287 
4,639 
14,273 
19,189 

7,196 

62 

11,686,505 



From Feb. 

1, 1892, to 

Feb. 1. 

1893. 



689,978 

219,354 

6,547 

13,180 

17,598 

6,633 

85 

11,095,832 



From Feb, 

1,1893, to 

Feb. 1, 

1894. 



665,967 

202,323 

7,573 

16,641 

16,340 

6,259 

88 

10,988,027 




5,726 

57 

11,281,321 



From Feb. 

1, 1895, to 

Feb. 1, 

1896. 



676,294 

248,291 

9,095 

16,939 

10,349 

7,059 

101 

11,929,790 



From Feb. i, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897. 



Foot passengers, at 1 cent 

and ticket 
Two-cent tolls 


eac] 


1, tol 


[ and 


gate 


> 

12,081,567 
8,321 


Four- cent tolls 










307,256 


Six- cent tolls 










8,389 


Seven-cent tolls . 










5 


Eight-cent tolls . 
Ten-cent tolls 










20,452 
1,340 


Thirteen-cent tolls 










1,114 


Fifteen-cent tolls . 










59 


Twenty-cent tolls. 
Thirty-cent tolls , 
One-horse pleasure carriages 










1 

16 

61,170 


Two-horse pleasure carriages 
One-horse teams .... 








7,910 
365,052 


Two-horse teams . 










198,854 


Three-horse teams 










7,950 


Four-horse teams . 










13,788 


Free teams . 










5,231 


Free foot .... 










32,996 


Ticket Statement. 


Foot-passes outstanding Feb 
Foot-passes sold during the 


.1,1 
year 


896 . 




• 


187,777 
128,870 



Foot-passes delivered on requisitions to other 
divisions ........ 



Received and destroyed during this year 
Outstanding Feb. 1, 1897 . 



7,200 

323,847 
130,138 

193,709 



Street Depaetjment — Ferhy Division. 



149 



Team Tickets. 





1-Horse. 


2-Horse. 


S-Horse. 


4-Horse. 


Outstanding Feb. 1, 1896 


51,533 

367,888 

2,080 


30,135 

199,968 

304 


1,986 
7,974 


4,344 
14,380 




Delivered on requisitions 


Kereived and destroyed diiring 


421,501 
365,052 


230,407 
198,854 


9,960 
7,950 


18,724 
13,788 




Outstandin"' Feb. 1, 1897 


56,449 


31,553 


2,010 


4,936 





Pleasure Carriage Tickets. 





1 -Horse. 


2-Horse. 


Outstanding Feb. 1, 1896 


14,129 

62,500 

760 


2,828 




7,860 










Received and destroyed during tlie year 


77,389 
61,170 


10,688 
7,910 


Outstanding Feb. 1, 1897 


16,219 


2,778 





150 City Document No. 29. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PAVING DIVISION. 



Room 44, City Hall, Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir: I respectfully submit my annual report of the ex- 
penditures and income of the Paving Division of the Street 
Department for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897, showing 
the nature of the work, the number and variety of permits 
issued, and the details of expenditures involved in paving, mac- 
adamizing, and regulating the various streets. 
Respectfully yours, 

John L. Kelly, 

Deputy Sitperintendent. 

The following table shows the amount expended for main- 
tenance of the Paving Division and from special appropriations 
derived from loans for the last six (6) years, not including the 
cost of street- watering, to be found on another page : — 

Waintenaiice. Specials. Totals. 

1891 (13 months) ..$872,936 40 $1,014,324 26 $1,887,260 66 

1892 915,460 99 962,889 09 1,878,350 08 

1893 745,681 52 707,801 49 1,453,483 01 

1894 715,608 62 839,713 78 1,555,322 40 

1895 ; 683,899 42 823,011 70 1,506,911 12 

1896 628,675 46 1,755,176 71 2,383,852 17 

There was appropriated for the maintenance of this division 
during the year the sum of $630,000. 

The large amount of money expended under special appropri- 
ations in 1896 was due to the construction of the street surfaces 
on the boulevards, a large part of which was done this year. 

The Paving Division has charge of the following work : — 

The maintenance of street surfaces and sidewalks. 

The jDlacing of street signs. 

The numbering of buildings. 

The issuing of permits to open or occupy the streets, or for 
such other purpose as may be required under the ordinances. 

The removal of snow and ice from the streets, gutters and 
plank walks. 

The cleaning of streets in the outlying sections of the city not 
covered by the Street-Cleaning Division. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 151 

The division is in charge of a deputy superintendent, with 
office in City Hall, and with a clerical force under the direction 
of a chief clerk. 

The outdoor working force of the division is divided into ten 
districts, each in charge of a foreman, as follows : — 

No, 1, South Boston. 

No. 2, East Boston. 

No. 3, Charlestown. 

No. 4, Brighton. 

No. 5, West Koxbury. 

No. 6, Dorchester. 

No. 7, Roxbury. 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, City Proper. 

The Permit Office is an important branch of the work of the 
division, and is in charge of a clerk, the outdoor force of inspec- 
tors being under a Superintendent of Inspectors. During the 
past year 11,239 permits for street openings were issued, and 
229y7jf miles of trench opened. The importance of the work of 
this office can be readily seen from the fact that dependent on 
its vigilance is the proper maintenance of the surfaces of streets 
where openings have been made. In case of trench openings, an 
inspector is assigned on the work, and his time charged to the 
corporation. Service and repair openings are regularly in- 
spected, and, in case of settlement or improper paving, the com- 
panies are notified ; and if work is not properly attended to, the 
department replaces the pavement, and a bill is sent to the com- 
pany responsible for the defect. 

The inspectors also look after the permits for the occupancy 
of streets for building purposes, and see to it that proper fences 
and walks are placed as called for by the permit. 

In addition to street permits, there were issued by this di- 
vision permits for various other purposes to the number of 
16,882. 

No opening in the street can be made except by permit. 
These permits are collected by the police, and returned to the 
office. A change was instituted this year in the method of re- 
turning emergency permits. Formerly, in case of gas leak, 
water break or other causes requiring immediate action, the 
companies were allowed to make the opening, showing a general 
emergency permit to the police, and making their own returns 
to the office. This year a form of emergency permit was issued, 
for which the companies pay, and, in case of opening, give up to 
the police a permit with date and location filled in by them- 
selves. In this way, the openings are better regulated, and 
there is no possibility of a street being disturbed without 
authority. 

The work of placing street signs has this year been very con- 
siderably increased from the fact that, owing to the redistricting 



152 City Document No. 29. 

of the city wards, many of the signs bearing the ward numbers 
required to be changed. 

The cost of the removal of snow and ice is charged to the 
regular maintenance appropriation. I believe it would be ad- 
visable that a separate appropriation be made for this work, so 
that a comparison made from year to year of the cost of the 
maintenance of the streets would have some value. Under the 
present system, a comparison of figui-es is of little value, as 
the item for the removal of snow may vary many thousands of 
dollars from one year to another. 

At the present time the department is running with a smaller 
appropriation for maintenance than at any time since the con- 
solidated department was organized, although there is a greater 
amount of streets to be cared for. The practice of appropriating 
$25,000 for each ward for so-called ward improvements — mean- 
ing work of a more or less permanent nature — is in some 
respects an improper one, for the reason that, without regard to 
the size or character of the ward, the amount appropriated is 
the game ; and with the small maintenance appropriation and 
the large amount of work oftentimes to be done in one ward 
with $25,000, it is not possible to do the work in the most 
thorough and economical manner. Macadam streets, in districts 
where conditions have so changed that the maintenance of a 
macadam roadway is exceedingly expensive, are reconstructed 
of the same material, for the reason that sufficient funds for 
granite or asphalt paving are not available. Thus the cost in a 
series of years is excessive. 

A large loan should be authorized for thoroughly repaving 
certain sections of the city, and the tax-payers would be the 
great gainers in the end. In cities where the residential 
portions are almost exclusively asphalted, the maintenance cost 
is comparatively small ; whereas in Boston, the residential 
sections of the city, even to the very edge of the downtown dis- 
trict being macadam, the condition is always more or less 
unsatisfactory, and the expense of maintenance comparatively 
enormous. If the ordinances were enforced with regard to heavy 
loads on teams, and the wagons were compelled to have a 
broader tire, the life of our macadam roads would be somewhat 
longer. 

Great attention has been given this year to the stone-crushing 
plants, and two new ones have been established and paid for out 
of the regular maintenance money. This is an important feature 
of the Paving Division work, and from the city crushers nearly 
all the stone required on the streets is furnished. This insures a 
good quality of stone at a reasonable price, and makes it possible 
to maintain the labor of the division on a permanent basis, as in 
winter a large portion of the force can be worked in the ledges 
and are immediately available for snow and street-cleaning 
work. The labor force of the division for the year 1896 has 
been in the neighborhood of 900 men constantly employed. 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 153 

Certain of the stables are in need of repairs and additions, as 
a larger proportion of the teaming might be done with city teams 
if accommodations were provided for the horses. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular AppEOPRiATioisr. 

Appropriation for 1896-97 . . . . $630,000 00 
Amount collected by City Collector for repairs 
made by Paving Division for different com- 
panies, etc 2,472 85 



Amount of expenditures from 

Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 1897, $628,675 46 

Transferred to Street Cleaning 

Division 2,961 85 

Transferred to Boston and Cam- 
bridge bridges . . . 835 54 



,472 85 



$632,472 85 



154 



City Document No. 29. 






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<10 Q 



Street Depaetment — Paving Divisioisr. 155 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Special AppeopeiationSj Paving and Street Improvements. 

Amounts of balances 1895-96, less 

transfers $328,437 53 

Amount of appropriations,! 896-9 7 869,690 40 

$1,198,127 93 

Amount of expenditures 877,095 90 



Balance unexpended 1321,032 03 



Total Expenditures. 

Maintenance appropriation ..... |628,675 46 

Special appropriations . . . . . . 877,095 90 

Laying out and construction of highways . . 174,961 88 

Blue Hill and other avenues .... 703,118 93 



Grand total 12,383,852 17 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the City 
Collector from Feb. 1, 1896, on account of the Paving Division : 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . . $14,348 33 
Miscellaneous 2,615 85 



116,964 18 

The amount paid into the city treasury during the year on 
account of the Paving Division is as follows : 

Sidewalk construction assessments (law of 1892), $38,256 89 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (law of 

1893), 114,127 46 

Miscellaneous $2,615 85 

$55,000 20 



156 



City Document No. 29. 



2,878 


38 


421 


21 


8,330 


36 


2,518 


54 


3,249 


20 


6,863 


79 


11,008 


61 


718 


59 


1,702 


08 


11,871 


36 


7,976 


38 


5,946 


88 


$93,606 


68 



SCHEDULE A. 

Expenditures. (Details.) 

Salaries of Paving Division office, Feb. 1, 1896, 

to Jan. 31, 1897 $13,348 74 

Salaries of Permit Office, Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 

1897 16,772 56 

Salaries of engineers, Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 
1897 

Advertising in and subscribing for daily papers 

Horses, carts and harnesses 

Printing and stationery .... 

Repairing stables, sheds, etc. 

Stock and supplies not included elsewhere . 

Sundries ....... 

Street signs and numbering 

Telephones, expenses of ... . 

Tools, cost of keeping the same in repair, etc. 

Construction of Centre- street crusher . 

Construction of Bleiler's crusher 



SCHEDULE B. 

Executions of Court, etc. 

Bennett, William H., settlement of claim . 
Casey, Michael, personal injuries 
Clarke, Cordelia B., personal injuries . 
White, Sophie E., personal injuries 



SCHEDULE C. 

The following schedule shows the expenditure from the main- 
tenance appropriation of this division in excess of special appro- 
priations : 

Bennington and Walley streets. 

In excess of special appropriation .... |856 70 

Bigelow street, between Faneuil and Brooks streets. 

In excess of special appropriation . . . 6,356 36 

Washington street, between Fairbanks street and 
Oak square. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 10,485 53 




Carried forward 



$17,698 59 



Street Department — Paving Division. 157 

Brought forward 117,698 59 

Elmira street, between Murdock and Aetna streets. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 696 30 

Leicester street, between Washington and Surrey 
streets. 
In excess of special appropriation . . . 488 40 

Rockland street, between Washington and Chest- 
nut Hill avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Canterbury street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 

Center street, between Spring street and Dedham 
line 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Howland street, entire length. 

In excess of special appropriation . . . • 

Sycamore street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 

Walk Hill street, Harvard street to Mt. Hope Ceme- 
tery. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Corey street between Weld and Montview streets. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Lamartine street, between Green and Paul Gore 
streets. 
In excess of special appropriation . . . . 55 13 

Boylston street, between Washington street to 
Boylston avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 285 29 

Creighton street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 454 17 

Weld street, between Arnold and Ruskin streets. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 763 86 

Norfolk street, between Elizabeth and Walk Hill 

streets. 
In excess of special appropriation . . . . 219 36 

Island street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 536 53 

Massachusetts avenue, between Swett and Albany 
streets. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 186 58 



652 


10 


613 


50 


1,299 


07 


995 


56 


245 


90 


139 


20 


229 


07 



Carried forward . . . . . . $25,558 61 



158 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward 
Eustis street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Magazine street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Fellows street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Sherman street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Howland street. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

St. Botolph street, Irvington street and Massacha 
setts avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation . 

Boylston and Exeter streets. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Beacon street, Massachusetts aveune to Commom 
wealth avenue. 
In excess of special appropriation . 

Brookline avenue. 

In excess of special appropriation . 

Arlington street, between Boylston and Marlboro 

streets. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Dartmouth street, between Copley square and New 
York, New Haven and Hartford railroad 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Berkeley street, between Boylston and Beacon 
streets. 
In excess of special appropriation .... 

Yarmouth street. 

In excess of special appropriation .... 



. $25,558 


61 


537 


74 


137 


31 


107 


00 


246 


52 


274 

L- 


35 


. 1,613 


25 


. 4,460 


55 


. 1,986 


88 


173 


36 



165 24 
159 67 

903 64 

173 83 
5,447 95 



SCHEDULE D. 

New Work. 

Clarendon street, Boylston street to Beacon street, macadam- 
ized, edgestones reset, sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid, gut- 
ters repaved. 

Labor . $1,202 90 

Teaming . 1,261 50 



Carried forward 



$2,464 40 



Street Department — Paying Division. 150 



Brought fortoard .... 


$2,464 40 


Steam roller 


200 00 


Flagging 


163 28 


Gravel and sand ..... 


238 06 


Stone ....... 


1,756 65 




$8,422 69 



DETAIL OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIA TIONS. 

Bennington and Walley streets, filled, plank sidewalks laid. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Filling . 

Gravel . 

Lumber 

Nails 

Advertising 



$2,419 


04 


1,347 


00 


7,876 


80 


1,568 


93 


233 


30 


17 


61 


7 


20 



Amount of appropriation for Benning- 
ton and Walley streets . . . $11,924 90 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 1 .... 688 28 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 856 70 



113,469 88 



$13,469 88 



Centre street, Dorchester, reconstruction (work unfinished). 
Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Advertising ........ 



$545 10 

316 00 

6 00 

$867 10 



Columbus avenue, Massachusetts avenue to Northampton 
street, asphalted. Area 1,327 square yards. 



Labor 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Sand 
Paving . 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan : 
3,624 square yards excavation, at 25 cents 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
1,327.4 square yards asphalt, at $2.90 . 



Amount of special appropriation 



$1,179 90 
358 00 
175 10 
480 40 
151 14 

906 00 

3,849 46 

$7,100 00 
$7,100 00 



160 



City Document No. 29. 



Commonwealth avenue, construction 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming 

Stone . 

Gravel , 

Filling . 

Loam 

85,315 gutter blocks 

250 feet flagging . 

682 4-12 feet straight edgestone 

340 7-12 feet circular edgestone 

23 large corners . 

Carting edgestone 

Fuel 

Lumber .... 

Hardware, nails, hammers and shovels 

Steam drills . 

Repairing engine and boiler 

Metal coating 

Oil ... . 

Water for crusher 

Repairing crusher platform 

Executions of Court 

Steam rolling 

Planing machine 

Use of engine 

Watering cart 

Sundries 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. 
603 square yards block paving laid 
1,894 square yards barrel paving laid 
892 feet edgestone set . 
23 square yards crossings laid 



ction. 






114,094 80 








16,848 


50 








30,086 


09 








5,933 


00 








774 


50 








5,859 


60 








3,369 


94 








145 


74 








423 


16 








442 


76 








128 


80 








13 


40 








757 


61 








433 


24 








134 


67 








123 


79 








289 


81 








87 


50 








123 


44 








26 


60 








60 


00 








. 14,631 


69 








1,637 


00 








120 


00 








39 


75 








100 


00 








70 


36 


. 1150 


75 






. 662 


90 






71 


36 








5 


75 







Less 9 days' use of steam roller, at $15.00 



76 
135 00 



755 76 



Work done by Bridge Division 
Work done by Sewer Division 



^97,511 51 

32,732 90 

226 92 



,471 33 



Congress and L streets. 

Work done by the Sewer Division 



$7,608 17 



Street Depautment — Paving Division. 161 



Eleanor and Ridgemont streets, Ward 25, resurfaced, side- 
walks built. 

Labor $98 10 

Advertising . . . . . . . . 12 75 





1110 85 


Elmira street, Ward 25, graded and macadamized. 


Length, 


340 feet; area, 982 square yards. 




Labor ... ...... 


1440 60 


Teaming ........ 


148 00 


Filling 


291 00 


Gravel . . . . . . . . 


113 90 


Advertising ........ 


6 50 


Stone . . . . 


696 30 



Amount of appropriation for Elmira 

street $1,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division , 696 30 



11,696 30 



$1,696 30 



Franklin street, Ward 25 (work unfinished). 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Advertising ....... 



$73 


60 


12 


00 


13 


88 


$99 


48 



Hanover street, between Charter and 
asphalted, area, 923 square yards. 

Length, 315 feet. 

Labor 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

75 ft. edgestone and 2 small corners 

25,000 paving bricks 

Flagging 

Blocks 

Pebbles 

Paving 

Masonry 

Templets 

Advertising 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co 

923.4 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt on con 
Crete base, including granite block brows, at 

Carried forioard .... 



Tileston streets, 







1946 75 






585 00 






190 88 






53 20 






237 50 






10 44 






77 18 






81 11 






161 16 






42 00 






16 28 






16 25 



$3.00 2,770 20 



),187 95 



162 



City Document No. 29. 



Broiight forward . 
Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. 



Amount of appropriation for Hanover 

street $3,827 66 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 6 1,221 78 



,187 95 
138 51 



i,049 44 



85,049 44 



Leicester street, between Washington and Surrey streets, 
graded, macadamized, sidewalks built. Length, 413 feet ; area, 
1,193 square yards. 



Labor 


$1,063 85 


Teaming .... 


•674 00 


Gravel .... 


69 70 


Steam drilling 


70 50 


Advertising .... 


12 75 


Stone 


567 60 


Steam roller , . . . 


30 00 



Amount of appropriation for Leicester 

street 12,000 00 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 488 40 



,488 40 



J,488 40 



McLellan street, Old road to White street, macadamized. 



sidewalks built, four catch basins built 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
Lumber 
Advertising 

Work done by the Sewer Division 



$745 20 

1,018 00 

114 84 

1,195 59 

140 00 

62 31 

8 00 



5,283 94 
772 90 



$4,056 84 



Orleans street, Maverick street to Gove street, repaved. 
Length, 258 feet; area, 917 square yards. 

Labor . $857 90 

Flagging 144 00 



Carried forward 



$1,001 90 




QUINCY STREET, CH ARLESTOWN - SHOWI NG ARTIFICIAL STONE 
RETAINING WALLS, STEPS AND PLATFORMS. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 163 



JBrouglit forioard 
Crossing blocks 
Teaming 
Stone 
Gravel . 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Ward & Coniin : 
243 feet edgestone set . 
1,392.9 square yards block paving laid 
197.3 » « brick " 



Amount of appropriation for Orleans 

street $2,578 80 

Amount paid out of street improve- 
ments. Ward 2 567 93 





$1,001 90 




540 00 




499 00 




340 00 




357 65 




5 00 


. $19 44 




. 348 23 




35 51 






403 18 







$3,146 73 



5,146 73 



Quincy street, Ward 4, laying out and construction, including 

granolithic stone steps. (Now St. Martin street.) 
Labor . 
Teaming 



Stone 
Gravel . 
Masonry 
Sundries 
Advertising 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. : 
Constructing artificial stone retaining 

vralls, steps and platform , . . |2,803 00 
20 cubic feet concrete, at 36 cents . 7 20 

10 square feet surfacing, at 10 cents . 1 00 



Saratoga street, filling solid old bridge. 
Work done by the Bridge Division 

Sydney street, Ward 20, reconstructing. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 

Paving ....... 

Advertising ...... 



,437 76 

603 00 

275 80 

183 38 

31 83 

71 21 

5 00 



2,811 20 



18,419 


18 


12,022 


20 


$200 

188 

38 

10 


10 

00 
30 

00 


$436 


40 



164 



City Document No. 29. 



Talbot avenue, Dorchester avenue to Washington street. 
Labor |638 94 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Paving . 
Blocks . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
Building wall 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



518 24 

191 40 
53 30 
64 85 

307 55 
40 00 

250 00 

2,064 28 
107 34 

J,171 62 



Tremont street, between Lenox street and Roxbury 

paving. (Work unfinished.) 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 
Sand ..... 
67,164 large granite blocks . 
15,000 paving bricks 
150 feet flagging . 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Jones & Meehan : 
1,753 square yards block paving, at 25 

cents $438 

806 feet edgstone set, at 8 cents . . 64 
683 square yards brick paving, at 18 

cents 122 

58 square yards flagging crossings, at 

25 cents 14 



crossing. 





$2,009 95 
2,194 00 

873 25 




305 25 




3,239 99 




146 25 




87 00 




5 40 


25 




48 





94 



50 



640 17 



),601 26 



Wall street, between Causeway and Minot streets, paved with 
large granite blocks on a gravel base with pitch joints, edge- 
stone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, flagging crossings relaid. 



Length, 


653 feet ; 


area 1,488 square yards. 




Labor . 






$1,149 80 


Teaming 


. 




843 50 


Gravel . 


• « 




286 41 


Sand 






85 50 


233.8 feet flagging 




134 94 



Carried forward 



$2,500 15 



Street Department — Paving Division. 165 



Brought fonoard . 


$2,500 15 


27,365 large granite blocks . 


1,320 08 


15,000 paving bricks 


142 50 


Advertising 


8 00 


Masonry 


51 50 



Amount paid to Dennis J. Kiley & Co. : 
1,255 feet edgestone set, at 8 cents . |100 40 
532 square yards brick paving, at 18 

cents . 95 76 

90.7 square yards round paving, at 25 

cents ....... 22 67 

1,488 square yards block paving pitch 

joints, at 90 cents .... 1,339 20 



Amount of appropriation for Wall street, ^5,000 00 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 8 .... 580 26 



1,558 03 
$5,580 26 



$5,580 26 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS — OLD WARDS. 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 1 AND 2. 
Bennington street (uncompleted work from 1895). 



Labor 



$250 00 



Bremen street, between Maverick and Sumner streets, paved 
with large granite blocks, brick sidewalks laid, edgestone re- 
set. Length, 500 feet ; area, 2,053 square yards. 

Labor 11,281 10 

Teaming 547 00 

Gravel 748 99 

43,850 large paving blocks 2,115 32 

12,000 paving bricks 114 00 

Wharfage 97 40 

Advertising ........ 14 75 

Amount paid to Charles L. Ward : 
494.6 feet edgestone set . . . $39 57 

2,053 square yards block paving . . 513 25 

485.8 square vards brick paving . . 87 44 

640 26 

• 

$5,558 82 



166 



City Document No. 29. 



Saratoga street, between Meridian 
macadamized, gutters paved, crossings 
repaved. Length, 3,425 ; area, 11,417 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Filling . 

Sand 

Stone • 

9,195 large paving blocks 

108,800 paving bricks . 

2,260 feet flagging 

Advertising . 

Steam roller 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin 

4.161.5 feet edgestone set 
479.9 square yards block paving . 
1,390 square yards round paving . 
618.9 square yards excavation 

4.815.6 square yards brick paving laid 

Amount paid to P. J. Attridge : 
2,715 feet edgestone set 
268.1 square yards crossings laid . 
889.4 square yards round stone paving 
285.3 square yards excavation 
2,956.8 square yards brick paving laid 



and Chelsea streets, 
relaid, brick sidewalks 
square yards. 

$4,204 40 

4,285 00 

2,298 13 

208 95 

1,120 65 

8,507 85 

491 53 

1,033 75 

1,363 41 

28 65 

343 33 

$624 23 

167 97 

486 50 

61 89 

1,107 59 

2,448 18 



1407 25 

93 84 

311 29 

28 53 

6s0 06 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 1 and 2 . . .19,589 52 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 1 18,265 28 

Sumner street, repaired. 

Labor , 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Advertising . 



Walley street, repaired. 
Gravel .... 
Teaming 



Work done by the Bridge Division 



1,520 97 
$27,854 80 



J7,854 80 



1274 


58 


19 


50 


69 


45 


6 


60 


$370 


13 


145 


82 


65 


00 


1110 


82 


1417 


66 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



167 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 3. 

Corey street, repaired. 

Gravel ......... 

Teaming ........ 



$33 82 
35 00 

168 82 



Decatur street, Bunker Hill street to Medford street, macad- 
amized, gutters paved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, 
new and old crosswalks laid. Length, 1,185 feet ; area, 3,428 
square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

28,500 paving brick 

804 feet flagging 

Crossing blocks 

Advertising . 

Sundries 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. 
2,997 feet edgestone set 
1,399 square yards block paving . 
1,888 square yards brick paving . 





12,109 10 




639 00 




702 38 




871 76 




270 75 




583 35 




58 50 




10 00 




5 57 


$239 76 




349 75 




339 84 






929 35 





Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (old) . . . |5,804 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (new) . . .375 76 



,179 76 



^6,179 76 



Prospect street, between Chelsea and Tremont streets, ma- 
cadamized, gutters paved, edgestone set, brick sidewalks re- 
laid, new and old crosswalks laid. Length, 692 feet; area, 
1,999 square yards. 

Labor $1,085 60 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

125.2 feet flagging 

Advertising . 

15,000 paving brick 



502 


00 


472 


29 


624 


77 


72 


62 


5 


00 


142 


50 



Carried forward 



$2,904 78 



168 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward . 
Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. : 
1,916/^ feet edgestone set 
746 square yards block paving 
1,231 square yards brick paving 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (old) .... -S2,331 47 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (new) . . . 1,179 46 







$2 


,904 


78 


1174 


22 








204 


20 








227 


73 




606 


15 









5,510 93 



1,510 93 



Tremont street, between Monument square and Chel-iea 
street, macadamized, gutters paved, edgestone set, brick 
sidewalks relaid, new and old crossings laid. Length, 1,021 
feet; area, 2,668 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel , 

Stone . 

300 feet flagging 

17,500 paving brick 

Sundries 



m dries .... 

Amount paid to Dennis Haley 
2,111.3 feet edgestone set 
919 square yards block paving 
1,298 square yards brick paving 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (old) . . . 84,187 28 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 3 (new) . . . 233 72 









609 50 








615 88 








933 23 








174 00 








166 25 








32 35 


& Co. : 










1168 


90 






229 


75 






233 


Q4 










632 29 




$4,421 00 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$4,421 00 



$615 24 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 4. 

Essex street, between Main street and Rutherford avenue, 
macadamized (in part), gutters paved, edgestone set, brick 
sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 794 feet ; area, 
2,661 square yards. 

Labor $404 80 

Teaming 80 50 



Carried fonoard 



$485 30 







$485 


30 






207 


01 






23 


75 


$80 


73 






107 


50 






123 


84 










312 


07 









Street Depaetinient — Paving Division. 169 



Brought forward . 
Gravel ...... 

2,500 paving brick 

Amount paid to Joiin Turner & Co. 
1,009.2 feet edgestone set 
430 square yards block paving 
688 square yards brick paving 



11,028 13 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 4 (old) . . . $556 33 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 4 (new) . . .471 80 

11,028 13 

Medford street, between Pearl and Quincy streets, repaved 
(in part), edgestone set, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings re- 
laid. Length, 1,591 feet; area. 7,071 square yards. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ...... 

16,000 paving brick 

Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. : 

1,230.6 feet edgestone set 

841 square yards block paving 

1,239.4 square yards brick paving 

Masonry . , . . . 



$1,715 38 
Amount paid out of Street Imj)rove- 

ments. Ward 4 (old) . . . $1,086 83 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 4 (new) . . . 628 55 

.^ $1,715 38 





$613 43 


, , 


75 00 


, 


217 98 




152 00 


$134 78 




232 85 




248 34 




41 00 






fi5fi 97 







STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 5. 

Main street, between City square and Miller street, paved 
with large granite blocks, edgestone set and reset, new brick 
sidewalks laid, new crossings laid. Length, 1,900 feet; area, 
8,440 square yards. 

Labor $4,217 40 

Teaming 1,418 00 

Gravel 1,946 25 

2,180 feet edgestone 1,536 59 



Carried forward $9,118 24 



170 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward . 
190,507 large paving blocks 
75,000 paving brick 
1,601 feet flagging 
Sand 
Masonry 
Sundries 

Amount paid to John Turner & 
4,309.7 feet edgestone set 
11,901 square yards block paving 
64.2 square yards round paving 
3,750.1 square yards brick paving 
153 feet track lowered . 



Co. 





$9,118 24 




10,233 93 




712 50 




928 58 




119 00 




120 76 




19 19 


1391 49 




3,041 00 




16 05 




680 52 




137 70 





$4,266 76 
Credit by 164,182 second hand blocks, 1,641 82 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 5 (old) .... $4,754 35 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 5 (new) . . . 19,122 79 



Washington street, repaired. 

Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 
AdverUsinor .... 



2,624 94 
$23,877 14 



$23,877 


14 


$232 
63 
69 

7 


30 
00 

20 
00 


1371 


50 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 9 AND 10. 

Chestnut street, between Charles street and Charles river, 
paved with large granite blocks, edgestone reset, flagging 
crossings relaid, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 818 feet ; 



area, 2,725 square yards. 




Labor 


$1,320 50 


Teaming ..... 


1,433 00 


Gravel ...... 


360 00 


Sand . 


101 40 


40 small corners .... 


134 00 


192.5 feet edgestone 


119 35 


405 feet flagging .... 


240 70 



Carried forward 



5,708 95 



Street Department — Paving Division. 171 



brought forioard . 
54,061 large paving blocks . 
15,000 paving brick 
Lumber .... 

Masonry .... 
Advertising .... 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 

1,507 feet edgestone set . . . $120 

2,688 square yards block paving laid . 672 

716 square yards brick paving laid . 128 88 
7.8 square yards brick paving herring 

bone on edge .... 3 35 





$3,708 95 




2,607 90 




142 50 




7 96 




101 50 




15 45 


56 
00 





924 79 



$7,509 05 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 9 and 10 . . . $5,257 29 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 .... 2,251 76 

$7,509 05 

Parkman street, between North Grove and North Russell 
streets, resurfaced. 

Labor . . $269 10 

Stone 264 25 

Gravel 59 60 



$592 95 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 12. 

Beach street, between Harrison avenue and Washington 
streets, paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base 
with pitch joints, edgestone reset, sidewalks relaid. Length, 
483 feet; area, 1,878 squai-e yards. 

Labor $378 75 

Teaming 1,295 00 

Gravel , 215 43 

74 feet edgestone ...... 45 88 

216 feet flagging 128 27 

52,946 large granite blocks 2,537 01 

20,000 paving brick 195 00 

Templets 12 20 

Masonry . ' 98 00 

Cement 11 00 

Amount paid to J. B. O'Rourke : 
1,302 square yards paving barred up and 

roadway excavated .... $325 50 



Carried forioard 



$325 50 $4,916 54 



172 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward .... 

295 cubic yards American cement con- 
crete base ...... 

1,852.6 square yards granite block pav- 
ing, pitch joints .... 

595 feet edgestone reset 

431 square yards brick paving relaid 

18 square yards block paving gravel 
joints . . . . . . 

Extra work, as ordered .... 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 (old) . . .|;6,113 44 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 7 (new) . . . 2,485 38 



$325 50 


$4,910 54 


1,475 00 




1,667 34 




89 25 




99 13 




4 50 




21 56 






3,682 28 





^,598 82 



$8,598 82 



Chauncy street, between Summer and Essex streets, paved 
with large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch joints, 
edgestone reset, sidewalks relaid. Length, • 872 feet ; area, 
2,325 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

57,652 large granite blocks 

71.5 feet edgestone 

8,200 paving brick 

377 feet flagging 

Templets 

Masonry 

Advertising 

Lumber . 

Cement . 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co 

2,050 square yards pavement barred up and 
roadway excavated .... 

428.4 cubic yards American cement con- 
crete base ...... 

2,570.2 square yards granite block pav- 
ing, pitch joints .... 

223 feet edgestone reset 

147 square yards brick sidewalks relaid, 

87 square yards granite block paving, 
gravel joints ..... 



Carried forward 



)Vl 50 



2,142 00 



$792 


09 


1,442 


50 


210 


82 


2,781 


13 


48 


07 


79 


95 


219 


78 


4 


40 


84 


00 


31 


14 


15 


81 


11 


00 



2,313 18 
33 45 

33 81 

21 75 


5,056 69 




. 


$10,777 38 



Street Department — Paving Division. 173 



Brought forward ...... 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 (old) . . . $8,208 09 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 6 (new) . , . 474 49 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 7 (new) . . . 2,094 80 



^0,777 38 



,777 38 



Essex street, repaired. 
11,696 large paving blocks 



1564 21 



Harvard street, between Hudson street and Harrison avenue, 
paved with large blocks ; and between Harrison avenue and 
Washington street, paved with small blocks, edgestone re- 
set, sidewalks relaid. Length, 751 feet ; area, 1,416 square 
yards. 

Labor $1,478 12 



Teaming 

Gravel .... 

436.1 feet flagging 

28.1 feet circular edgestone 

12,200 paving brick 

14,500 granite paving blocks 

Masonry 



1,021 00 

262 26 
257 36 
36 51 
122 00 
699 48 
357 00 

>4,233 73 



Pine street, between Washington street and Harrison avenue, 

asphalted, edgestone reset and sidewalks relaid. Length, 
419 feet ; area, 570 square yards. 

Labor $626 95 

Teaming 578 00 

Gravel 54 70 

225 small blocks 9 23 

6,400 paving brick 64 00 

335 feet edgestone 207 70 

57 feet flagging . . ... . . 33 18 

Masonry 147 00 

Templets ........ 15 60 

Advertising . 23 63 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
567.5 square yards Trinidad lake asphalt with 

binder and cement concrete base, at $3 . . 1,702 50 

$3,462 49 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 85 13 



Carried forioard 



S3,377 36 



174 



City Document No. 29. 



brought forvKird ...... 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 .... $3,327 15 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 7 . . . . . 50 21 



5,377 36 





Amount i-eta 
under contract 

nts Ward 13. 


ined from 
in 1895 

A street, 

ird street 

area, 1912 


<(|)U,<J » 1 




Whitmore street. 

Co. for work done 


Boston Asphalt 

62 70 


Street Improveme 

Labor 
Teaming 
Paving 
Advertising . 


repaved. 

1108 

18 

140 

26 


10 
00 
50 
65 




293 


25 


C street, between First and T 

gutters paved. Length, 506 feet 

Labor 

Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 
Stone ..... 
Advertising .... 


h 

5 


s, macadamiz 

square yards 

372 

314 

47 

455 

26 


ed, 

60 
50 
93 
43 
23 






$1,216 


69 



D street, between First and Third streets, paved with 
large granite blocks, edgestone set and reset, brick sidewalks 
laid, flagging crossings laid and relaid. Length, 506 feet ; 
area, 1,912 square yards. 



Labor 


, 




11,864 91 


Teaming ..... 






864 00 


Gravel 






560 75 


510 feet flagging .... 
39,229 large granite blocks . 
Wharfage on blocks ... 






319 06 

1,892 41 

103 20 


10,000 paving brick . . . . 
354 3-12 feet edgestone and 2 small c( 


)rners 




97 50 
226 33 


Advertising . . . . . 






40 48 


Amount paid to H. Gore & Co.: 








2.091.5 square yards block paving 

1.017.6 feet edgestone set . 
561.6 square yards brick paving . 
138.3 square yards flagging crossings . 


1522 

81 

101 

34 


88 
41 
09 

58 


739 96 











Carried forioard 



$6,708 60 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



175 



Brovght forward $6,708 60 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 18 (old) . . . $5,436 93 
Amount paid out of Street Improv- 

ments. Ward 13 (new) . . 1,271 67 

16,708 60 

Dorchester avenue, between First street and N. Y., N. 
H. «& H. R. R. crossing, paved witli large granite blocks, 
brick sidewalks relaid, flagging crossings 
Length 2,125 feet; area, 9,445 square yards. 

14,993 05 



edgestone reset, 

laid and relaid, 
Labor 

Teaming .... 
Gravel and sand . 
902 feet flagging . 
63,000 paving brick 
148,062 large paving blocks 
Wharfage .... 
Advertising ' . 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. 
6,716. 4 square yards block paving 
3,267 feet edgestone, set 
2,977.7 square yards brick paving 
463.3 square yards flagging laid 
36.9 square yards block paving laid 



11,679 10 

261 36 

535 99 

115 83 

9 23 



3,470 

1,446 

523 

614 

7,142 

674 

36 



50 
87 
16 
25 
50 
75 
50 



25.2 square yards brick paving herring bone 9 07 



2,610 58 



,512 16 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 13 (old) . ' . $11,605 10 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 13 (new). . . 9,907 06 

$21,512 16 

Dove street, between E and Dorchester streets, macad- 
amized, gutters repaved, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks re- 
laid. Length, 1,255 feet; area, 1,841 square yards. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ..... 

Stone ...... 

10.000 paving brick 
Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 

2,522.1 feet edgestone set 

64.1 square yards block paving 
573.7 square yards round paving . 
612.2 square yards brick paving , 





$1,202 90 


. 


389 50 


, 


87 20 




332 61 




97 50 


$201 77 




16 03 




143 43 




110 20 






171 1«? 



Carried forvmrd 



12,581 14 



176 



City Document No. 29. 



brought foriowrd ...... 

Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 13 (old) .... $2,144 38 
Amount paid out of Street Improvements, 

Ward 14 436 76 



$2,581 14 



2,581 14 



Work done by tbe Sewer Division 



$241 60 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 14 AND 15. 

Bellflow^er street, between Dorcbester avenue and Boston 
street, macadamized, edgestone set, gutters paved, crossings 
laid, brick sidewalks laid. Length, 691 feet ; area, 1,996 
square yards. 

Labor $1,337 91 

Teaming 

Filling . . 

Stone . 

1,318.3 feet edgestone 

102.2 feet flagging 

Paving 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to John McMorrow : 

Building retaining walls as per agreement 



413 


00 


1,064 


35 


553 


02 


817 


35 


59 


27 


238 


48 


29 


63 


519 


00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . . . $4,135 62 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 (old) . . .891 39 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 16 (new) ... 5 00 



$5,032 01 



$5,032 01 



East Eighth street, between Old Harbor and Mercer streets, 
paved between the tracks with large granite blocks. Length, 
500 feet ; area, 778 square yards. 

Labor ..... 

Teaming .... 

12,420 large paving blocks . 

1,500 paving brick 

Advertising .... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. 
704 square yards block paving . . $176 00 
440 square yards paving barred out, dug 

out, laid, and gravel furnished . . 308 00 

- 484 00 



$274 54 

132 50 

599 14 

14 78 

31 50 



Carried forward 



$1,536 46 



Street Depaetmext 



Paving Divisiox. 177 
Sl,536 46 



Brought forward ...... 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . . .$1,228 46 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 (new) . . .308 00 



$1,536 46 



East Sixth street, between L and IST streets, paved with large 
granite blocks, edgestone set and reset, brick sidewalks laid 
and relaid, crossings laid and relaid. Length, 1,141 feet; 
area, 4,310 square yards. 

Labor $2,019 60 

Teaming .... 

Gravel ..... 

•300 feet flagging . 

10,500 paving brick 

Lime ..... 

Crossing blocks 

255 feet edgestone 

69,225 large paving blocks . 

Wharfage .... 

Advertising 

Sundries .... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. 
2,709 square yards block paving 
2,081 feet edgestone set 
1,277 square yards brick paving 
24 square yards flagging laid 
534 square yards paving barred out, dug 

out, teamed, laid and gravel furnished 



$677 25 

166 48 

229 86 

6 00 

480 60 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 14 (new) 



$8,785 17 



299 95 



866 


00 


400 


58 


174 


00 


102 


38 




90 


231 


50 


158 


10 


3,339 


42 


217 


60 


8 


25 


6 


60 



1,560 19 



),085 12 



— $9,085 12 



K street, between East Sixth and East Eighth street, asphalted, 
paved between tracks with large granite blocks, edgestone set, 
brick sidewalks laid, flagging crossings laid. Length, 567 
feet; area, 1,083 square yards. 

Labor $1,449 75 

Teaming 488 00 

280 feet flagging 162 40 

14,500 paving brick 141 38 



Carried forward 



$2,241 53 



178 



City Document No. 29. 



brought forioard . 
13,890 large granite blocks . 
Stone ...... 

Advertising ..... 

Sundries ..... 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
286 square yards paving barred out, dug 

out, teamed, laid and gravel furnished, 
356 square yards block paving 
1,133 feet edgestone set 
976 square yards brick paving 
103 square yards flagging crossings 





$2,241 53 




670 04 




465 16 




6 00 




4 96 


$257 40 




89 00 




90 64 




175 68 




25 75 


fi«« A7 



Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 
1,082.7 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt with con- 
crete base ....... 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . . . -$3,868 86 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 14 (new) ... 1,700 15 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 (new) . . . 1,542 85 



3,248 10 

$7,274 26 

162 40 

$7,111 86 



^lll 



Rawson street, between Dorchester avenue and Boston street, 
macadamized, edgestone set, gutters paved. Length, 475 feet ; 
area, 1,372 square yards. 



Labor 


$688 10 


Teaming ....... 


360 54 


Gravel 


191 78 


Stone 


. " 558 79 


893^2^ feet edgestone and 6 small corners 


573-86 


15,000 gutter blocks 


300 00 


Paving ........ 


156 60 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . .$1,065 73 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 16 (new) . . . 1,763 94 



i,829 67 



J,829 67 



Street Department — Pavestg Division. 



179 



Swett street, Massachusetts avenue to railroad bridge, macad- 
amized, plank and gravel sidewalks laid. Length, 2,224 feet ; 
area, 9,884 square yards. 



luauuiL .... 

Teaming 


1,963 00 


Gravel .... 


991 37 


Stone .... 


5,136 02 


Steam roller 


340 00 


Masonry 


. . . 24 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 14 and 15 . . . $2,749 21 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 20 (old) . . . 6,429 68 



$9,178 89 



$9,178 89 

Vale street, between Burnham street and water front, macadam- 
ized. Length, 400 feet; area, 1,155 square yards. 

Teaming $10 00 

Gravel . 31 00 

Stone . 136 50 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$177 50 
$5,310 32 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 16. 
Compton street, Shawmut avenue to Washington street, side- 



Labor 


$230 


00 


Teaming . . . . . . 


348 


00 


Gravel and sand 


134 


19 


4,875 large granite blocks 


. . 318 


83 


55 feet flagging 


44 


00 


12,300 paving brick .... 


123 00 


Masonry 


84 


00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 16 (old) . . , $1,092 13 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 9 (new) . . . 189 89 



L,282 02 



$1,282 02 



180 



City Document No. 29. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 17 AND 18. 

Albany street, between Concord street and Massachusetts 
avenue, repaved, edgestone reset, gravel walks laid. Length, 
690 feet; area, 4,140 square yards. 

Labor ^319 00 

Teaming 12 00 

Gravel 86 62 

400 second quality blocks . . . . . 12 00 

300 paving brick 3 00 

Masonry 63 00 

Amount paid to Doherty & Connors : 
2,300 square yards block paving laid . $805 00 
393 feet edgestone set . . . . 31 44 
130 square yards brick paving laid . 23 40 
49 square yards flagging crossings . 17 15 



Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., 450.35 square yards Trinidad 
asphalt . . . . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . . . $1,085 49 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 (new) . . . 1,412 99 



Fabin street. 

Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co., for 
work done under contract in 1895 



876 99 



1,125 87 
;2,498 48 





sidewalks. 




East Lenox street, new 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

550 large granite blocks 

675 paving brick . 


$207 15 
48 16 
37 21 
30 25 

6 75 



$329 52 



$92 27 



Fellows street, macadamized. Length, 1,061 feet; area, 
3,065 square yards. 

Labor $175 38 

Teaming 541 00 

Stone 2,451 95 

Advertising ........ 7 50 



Carried forward 



$3,175 83 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



181 



Brought forward .... 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 (new) 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 17 (new) 

Amount paid out of Paving Division 



$3,175 83 



1862 13 
1,713 20 



493 
107 



50 
00 



$3,175 83 



Flagg street, between Washington and Reed streets, macad- 
amized, edgestone reset, sidewalks relaid. 
Labor ....... 

Teaming ...... 

Gravel ....... 

Stone ....... 

100 feet edgestone and two small corners 
5,000 paving brick .... 

Masonry ...... 

Advertising ...... 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . . $1,653 75 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 . . . .292 05 



Harrison avenue. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., for work done under contract in 1895 

Pembroke street (unfinished work from 1895) 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 (new) 



West Canton street (unfinished work from 1895) 
Masonry ..... 

Teaming ..... 



$457 


22 


762 


96 


82- 


05 


348 


62 


68 


70 


47 


50 


168 


00 


10 


75 



$1,945 80 



$1,945 80 



$245 39 



1895). 


$73 60 

590 00 

29 64 


$665 64 
27 60 


$693 24 

$693 24 

$119 00 
12 00 


om 1895). 




$131 00 



182 



City Document No. 29. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARDS 19 AND 22. 

Bay State road. 

Gravel |187 55 

Teaming 54 00 



$241 55 



Beacon street, Massacliusetts avenue to Commonwealth avenue, 
macadamized, gutters paved, edgestone reset, crossings laid 
and relaid, sidewalks relaid. Length, 1,750 feet ; area, 8,944 
square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

Stone 

Steam roller . 

11,500 paving brick 

200.3 feet flagging 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 

2,600 feet edgestone set 

1,496 square yards block paving laid 

989 square yards brick paving laid 

123 square yards brick paving laid, her 
ring bone ..... 

4.8 square yards brick paving laid, her 
ring bone, on edge 







1256 43 






1,653 50 






710 05 






2,726 59 






150 00 






112 50 






116 17 






26 70 


$390 


OO 




523 


60 




227 


47 





50 43 



2 64 



21 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 19 and 22 . . . $4,596 99 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 (new) . . .412 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 1,936 



Boylston street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Gravel ........ 

Calumet street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Stone ........ 

Lawn street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Gravel ........ 

Stone . . 



1,194 14 

^6,946 08 



$6,946 


08 


$86 


80 


$360 


00 


$265 
60 


60 
00 


1325 


60 



Street Departiment — Paves^g Division". 



183 



Marlborough street, between Massachusetts avenue and Park- 
way, macadamized, edgestone reset, gutters repaved, sidewalks 
relaid. Length, 647 feet ; area, 2,444 square yards. 



Labor ...... 




166 70 


Teaming 




731 42 


Gravel 




286 08 


Stone ...... 




992 32 


Steam roller ..... 




60 00 


200 feet flagging .... 




116 00 


Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 






827 feet edgestone set . 


. $124 05 




443 square yards block paving 


. 155 05 




447 square yards brick paving 


. 102 81 


.S81 Q1 










82,634 43 


Parker street (unfinished work from 


1895). 




Gravel 


• 


$55 80 



Roxbury street, between Washington street and Shawm ut 
avenue, repaved with large granite blocks ; between Shaw- 
mut avenue and Cabot street, macadamized, gutters repaved, 
brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, paved 
350 feet; area, 1,633 square yards. Length, macadamized 
2,651 feet; area, 13,685 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

301.3 feet flagging 

18,650 paving brick 

51 feet edgestone and two small corners 

20,000 large granite blocks . 

Masonry ..... 
Amount paid to Austin Ford & Son : 

3,303 feet edgestone set 

2,917 square yards block paving . 

2,278 square yards brick paving 







12,517 25 






3,765 50 






2,298 75 






2,445 48 






40 00 






174 76 






201 05 






51 72 






964 80 






29 20 


1264 24 




729 25 




410 04 






1,403 53 








$13,892 04 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 19 and 22 . . . $6,188 28 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 18 (new) ■. . . 7,703 76 



Westland avenue (unfinished work from 1895). 
Stone . . . . . . . . . 



113,892 04 



11,367 77 



184 



City Document No. 29. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 20. 
Newcomb street, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone 



reset, brick sidewalks relaid. 


Length, 611 feet; 


area, 1,289 


square yards. 






Labor 




1345 95 


Teaming .... 




545 50 


Gravel ..... 




883 95 


Stone ..... 




464 45 


3,000 paving brick 




29 25 


Paving .... 




251 97 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 20 (old) . . |1,636 82 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 17 (new) . . .884 25 

Quincy street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Teaming ........ 

Gravel ......... 

Stone ... 

Steam roller ........ 



J,521 07 



$2,521 07 



Shirley street roadway and sidewalks gravelled. 

Gravel . . . . 

Filling 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 24. 
Alban street (entire length), excavated, filled, subgraded, 
macadamized, sidewalks built. Length, 1,358 feet; area, 3,948 
square yards. 



$20 
308 
717 
240 


00 
00 
35 
00 


$1,285 


35 


$2,846 
390 


00 
00 


$3,236 


00 


$301 


51 



±uuuvr . . ...... 

Teaming . 


887 00 


Gravel 


282 48 


Stone 


903 24 


Steam roller 


240 00 


Masonry ....... 


34 50 


Artificial stone sidewalk . . . 


30 66 


Paving ........ 


9 00 




$3,201 54 



Street Department — Paving Division. 185 



Bicknell street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Teaming ....... 

Gravel ........ 



$124 00 
88 20 

$212 20 



Bradshaw street, between Glenway and Bicknell streets, 
macadamized, gutters paved, sidewalks surfaced, two catch 
basins built. Length, 450 feet; area, 1,300 square yards. 

Labor $593 98 

Teaming 730 50 

Gravel 119 10 

Stone 305 00 

Steam roller 70 00 

Paving 155 50 



Morton street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Teaming ....... 

Gravel ....... 



$1,974 08 


$310 00 
8 40 


$318 40 


$1,824 38 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 25. 

Washington street, between Commonwealth avenue and Oak 
square, widened, macadamized, gutters paved, sidewalks 
built. 

Labor $209 48 

Teaming 1,148 00 

Gravel 2,356 20 

Stone 8,738 99 

Steam roller , 210 00 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 
5,300 feet edgstone set . . . . $424 00 
45.1 square yards block paving . . 11 28 
1,787 square yards round stone paving . 446 75 

882 03 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 (old) . . . $2,119 67 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 (new) . . .939 50 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 10,485 53 



J,544 70 



$13,544 70 



186 



City Docuimeistt No. 29. 



Western avenue, between Western-avenue bridge and Mar- 
ket street, resurfaced, plank walks repaired, crossings laid 
and relaid. Length. 

Labor $384 10 



Teaming 
Stone . 

97.6 feet flagging 
Paving . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 (old) . . . $388 07 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 (new) . . . 646 56 



484 00 

37 30 

58 56 

20 67 

$984 63 





^ 


Winship street (unfinished work from 1895). 

Stone . . . 

Gravel 


11,478 63 
17 00 


Work done by the Bridge Division 


$1,495 63 

8455 74 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, NEW WARDS. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 1. 

Blackinton and Leyden streets, gravelled, new edgestone 
and gutters built, sidewalks gravelled. Area, 728 square 
yards. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Gravel ......... 

Stone screenings ....... 

Edgestone 



Byron street, between Pope and Bennington streets, gravelled, 
crossings paved. Length, 1,164 feet; area, 4,397 square 
yards. 

Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel ........ 

Stone screenings ...... 



$554 


30 


159 


94 


180 


29 


40 


80 


6 


40 


1941 


73 



$368 


00 


406 


00 


1,683 


70 


34 


85 


$2,492 


55 



Street Department — Paving Division. 187 



Chelsea street. 

Teaming 
Sand 
Gravel . 



Cowper street. 

Gravel . 

Stone screenings 



Shelby street. 

Teaming 



Gravel 



$72 
26 
44 


00 

82 
70 


$143 


52 


147 
25 


68 
50 


$73 


18 


$15 
17 


50 
88 


133 


38 



Wordsworth street, between Bennington street and cemetery, 
resurfaced. Length, 350 feet ; area, 1,322 square yards. 

Labor $98 90 

Teaming 16 00 

Gravel 298 00 

Stone screenings ....... 147 05 



$559 95 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



L,653 97 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 2. 

Havre street, between Maverick and Meridian streets, macad- 
amized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks re- 
laid. Length, 613 feet ; area, 2,316 square yards. 



Labor 

Teaming .... 

Gravel 

Stone ..... 
10,000 paving brick 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin 
1,080.3 feet edgestone set 
523.9 square yards block paving . 
985.7 square yards brick paving . 


. $162 
. 183 

. 226 


05 
37 
71 


$496 80 

477 62 

497 66 

135 94 

95 00 

572 13 










$2,275 15 



188 



City Document No. 29. 



Haynes street macadamized, gutters paved, brick sidewalks 
relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 642 feet; area, 1,480 square 
yards. 

Labor ..... 

Teaming .... 

Gravel .... 

Stone ..... 

23,000 paving brick 

881 gutter blocks . 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin 

1,303.5 feet edgestone set. . 

471.1 square yards block paving 

700.3 square yards brick paving 



575 
391 
102 

222 
25 



18 
63 
87 
41 
50 
06 



1104 
117 
126 



28 
78 
05 



— 348 11 



12,581 


76 


ed to new 

$278 30 

234 00 

47 68 

1,346 38 


$1,906 


36 


$177 
237 


10 
00 


$414 


10 



Marion and Bremen streets, filled and resurfaced 

grade. Area 1,200 square yards. 
Labor ........ 

Teaming ....... 

Gravel ........ 

Stone ........ 



Maverick Street, repaired. 
Labor .... 
Teaming 



Sumner Street, between Orleans and Webster streets, mac- 
adamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks 
relaid, crossings relaid. Length 2,259 feet; area 9,789 square 
yards. 

Labor . . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

Cement 

80,000 paving bricks 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin : 

4,893.1 feet edgestones set . 

2,032.9 square yards block paving 

3,537 square yards round stone paving 

1,800.3 square yards brick paving 

20.5 square yards hexagonal paving 

$10,451 73 





$2,815 62 




1,865 00 




1,552 42 




890 33 




415 00 




23 00 




760 00 




17 25 


. $391 45 




. 508 23 




. 884 25 




. 324 05 




5 13 


2,113 11 



Street Depaetment — Pavin^g Divisioi^. 189 



Webster Street, between Orleans and Sumner streets, mac- 
adamized ; between Orleans street and B, & M. R.R, repaved, 
edgestones reset, gutters repaved, brick sidewalks relaid. 
Length, macadam 2,315 feet; paving 210 feet; area, mac- 
adam 7,460 square yards ; paving 1,093 square yards. 



Labor ...... 






11,735 52 


Teaming ..... 






1,320 00 


Gravel and sand .... 






1,740 79 


Stone 






1,328 18 


Steam roller 






351 66 


5,220 granite blocks . . 






273 58 


765 feet flagging .... 






478 70 


63,750 paving bricks . 






605 62 


Advertising 






7 40 


Amount paid to Ward & Conlin : 






5,136.1 feet edgestone set 


. 1410 Si 


) 


841.6 square yards block paving . 


210 4C 


) 


1,611.3 square yards round paving 


402 82 




5,756.4 square yards brick paving 


. 1,036 15 




Extra work as ordered . 


15 5C 


2,075 77 






$9,917 22 


Work done by the Bridge Division 


• 


$300 00 


Work done by the Sewer Division 


1869 67 


STREET IMPROVEMENT 


S, WARD 3. 


Ferrin street (entire length), macadamized, gutters paved, 


edgestones set, brick sidewalks laid. 


crossings 


laid or relaid. 


Length, 1,121 feet; area, 2,330 squar 


e yards. 




Labor ...... 


, ^ 


11,566 20 


Teaming ..... 






473 50 


Gravel 






739 32 


Stone 






955 30 


19,000 paving brick 






180 50 


326 feet flagging .... 






189 08 


10.6 feet edgestone and 2 small corners 






14 55 


Masonry ..... 






9 65 


Cement 






3 30 


Advertising ..... 






9 75 


Lumber ..... 






16 00 


Amount paid to Healey & O'Hara : 






2,883 feet edgestone set 


1230 64 




1,033 square yards round paving . 


258 25 




1,313 square yards brick paving . 


236 34 


725 23 








$4,882 38 



1 29 



190 City Document No. 29. 

Work done by the Sewer Division 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 4. 

Alford street, from end of block paving to Everett line, 
macadamized, plank walk laid, fence built. Length, 2,114 
feet ; area, 7,249 square yards. 

Labor 11,201 75 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Nails . 
Lumber 



452 00 

442 88 

1,036 21 

19 08 

293 16 

$3,445 08 



Beach street (entire length), macadamized, gutters paved, 
edgestone set, brick sidewalks laid, crossings relaid, gravel 
sidewalks built. Length, 337 feet ; area, 665 square yards. 

Labor $147 20 

Teaming 50 50 

Gravel 29 41 



11 



Walker street (entire length), macadamized, gutters paved, 
edgestone set, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 



755 feet; area, 1,526 square yards. 








Labor . . 






$1,016 60 


Teaming 






364 50 


Gravel ....... 






522 16 


Stone 






574 49 


Edgestone 






13 04 


82 feet flagging .... 






69 70 


20,000 paving bricks 






190 00 


Masonry 






26 01 


Advertising ..... 






28 88 


Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co. : 








2,285 feet edgestone set 


$342 


7.5 




283 square yards block paving 


99 


01 




728 square yards round paving 


. 254 


8( 




1,306 square yards brick paving . 


300 


3^ 




Extra work as ordered . 


. 134 


0( 


) 

$1,130 98 










$3,936 36 


Work done by the Sewer Division 


. 




$2,821 71 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



191 



City Square, repaved 

yards. 
238 feet edgestone set . 
834 square yards block p 


edgestone reset, 
aving 


Area, 


834 square 

$19 04 

208 50 




$227 54 


Park Square, rep 

crossings laid an 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 

250 feet flagging . 
Paving . 


aved, edgestone 
d relaid. Area, 


rese 
351 


t, brick sidewalks relaid, 
square yards. 

$216 20 

76 00 

58 82 

145 00 

99 78 
















$595 80 



Stacey street (entire length), paved with old granite blocks, 
edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, gravel sidewalks built. 
Length, 492 feet ; area, 820 square yards. 

Labor $894 70 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Sundries 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Healey & O'Hara : 
907.7 feet edgestone set 
925 square yards block paving 
81 square yards brick paving 



, , 


255 00 




266 42 


, , 


30 00 


• 


5 00 


$72 62 




231 25 




14 58 


R1S d.?> 



1,769 57 



Union street, between Lynde and Washington streets, macad- 
amized, gutters paved, edgestone set, crossings laid. Length, 
84 feet; area, 215 square yards. 
Labor ......... $264 50 

Teaming . 68 40 

Gravel 74 39 

Flagging . 68 85 

Edgestone ........ 7 20 

Paving 60 87 



$544 21 



192 



City Document No. 29. 



Warren Avenue, between City square and railroad tracks, re- 
paved, edgestone reset, crossings laid and relaid. Length, 200 
feet ; area, 1,330 square yards. 

Labor $591 10 

Teaming 9 00 

Gravel 242 20 

350 feet flagging 203 00 

$1,045 80 



Warren street, between Winthrop and Soley streets (unfin- 
ished work from 1895). 

Teaming $102 00 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 

365,3 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt with con- 
crete base $1,095 90 

Less amount paid in 1895 . . . 714 16 

381 74 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$483 74 
$678 53 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 6. 

Batterymarch street, between Milk and Kilby square, 

asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings 

relaid. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Edgestone 
Paving . 
Templets 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
428.9 square yards Trinidad lake asphalt with con 

Crete base and binder .... 



$414 00 

194 00 

19 47 

17 57 

11 20 



Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 



$1,286 70 

$1,942 94 

64 33 

1,878 61 



City Hall avenue, between School street and Court square, 
paved with asphalt blocks on a gravel base, brick sidewalks 
relaid. Length, 196 feet ; area, 271 square yards. 

Labor $346 80 

Gravel and sand 55 90 

Electric lights 14 45 



Carried forward 



$417 15 



Street Department — Paving Divisioisr. 



193 



Brought forioard |417 15 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
262.5 square yards asphalt blocks fur- 
nished and laid $787 50 

7.3 square yards brick paving, herring- 
bone 1 82 

789 32 

$1,206 47 

Devonshire street, between Dock square and State street, 
paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch 
joints, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings laid. 
Length, 303 feet ; area, 1,155 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 

23,975 large granite blocks 

226.1 feet flagging 

70 feet edgestone 

6,000 paving bricks 

Electric lights 

Masonry 

Templets 

Amount paid to J. B. O'Rourke & Co. 

187.5 cubic yards American cement con- 
crete base ...... 

1,130 square yards block paving, pitch 
joints ...... 

247 feet edgestone reset 

198 square yards brick paving relaid 

159 square yards block paving relaid 

159 square yards barring and excavating 











$1,271 75 










1,169 50 










200 10 










1,156 55 










131 14 










43 40 










57 00 










19 95 










3 50 










37 24 



$937 50 



1,017 
19 
35 
55 
15 



00 
76 
64 
65 
90 





$2,081 45 


Less 13 double loads screened 




gravel .... 


$19 37 


Less 60 single loads screened 




gravel 


45 00 




6^1 37 







2,017 08 

$6,107 21 

Garden Court street, between Fleet street and North square, 
paved with large granite blocks, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 230 feet; area, 358 
square yards. 
Labor ......... |462 91 

Teaming 338 50 



Carried forioard 



$801 41 



194 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forioard . 
Gravel and sand . 
8,910 large granite blocks 
8,000 paving brick 
80 feet edgestone . 
Masonry 
Paving .... 





$801 


41 




141 


85 




429 


82 




76 


00 




49 


60 




14 


00 




187 


95 




11,700 


63 



North street, between Blackstone street and Merchants row, 
paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch 
joints, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings re- 
laid. Length, 162 feet; area, 648 square yards 

Labor 
Teaming 



Gravel and sand . 

150 feet flagging . 

16 feet circular edgestone 

11,945 large granite blocks 

Templets 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co 
618.7 square yards block paving, pitch 

joints ...... 

52 feet edgestone set . 

37 square yards brick paving 

108.1 cubic yards American cement, 

concrete base . . . . 
618.7 square yards paving removed and 

excavated ...... 

109 square yards barring and preparing 

bed ....... 



$449 50 
574 50 
86 63 
90 00 
20 80 
567 48 
38 45 



1556 83 

7 80 

8 51 

515 50 
154 68 



54 50 



1,297 82 

$3,125 18 



North square, between No, 20 and North street, paved with 
small blocks, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings 
relaid. Area, 350 square yards 

Labor 
Teaming 



Gravel and sand . 
2,500 paving brick 
Advertising . 
Paying . 



^182 
111 
66 
23 



96 



65 
00 
25 
75 
20 
15 



$488 00 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



195 



North Margin street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., for work done in 1895 .... 



$173 51 



North Market street, repaved. 




Labor 


$800 15 


Teaming ...... 


22 50 


Gravel ....... 


38 00 


Blocks ....... 


16 50 


Cement ...... 


132 50 




1509 65 



Prince street, between Hanover street and North square, 
paved with large granite blocks, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 140 feet. Area, 218 
square yards. 
Labor ......... $389 85 

Teaming 330 50 

Gravel 73 05 

Edgestone 26 04 

Flagging . 19 72 

Brick 38 00 

Blocks 349 74 

Masonry 10 50 

Paving 123 48 

11,360 88 



Stillman street, between Charlestown and Endicott streets, 
asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings 
relaid. Length, 202 feet; area, 600 square yards. 



Labor 






1769 35 


Teaming 

Gravel and sand ..... 






470 00 
254 13 


Edgestone 

Flagging 

14,300 gutter blocks .... 






43 90 

15 60 

564 85 


Brick 






85 50 


Advertising ...... 






10 34 


Amount paid to Dennis J. Kiley & Co. 








478 feet edgestone set ... 


138 


24 




748 square yards block paving 
237 square yards brick paving 


187 
42 


00 
66 


267 90 












$2,481 57 



196 



City Document No. 29, 



Tileston street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., for work done under contract in 1895 



^19 54 



Water street, between Broad street and Kilby square, 
asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalk relaid, crossings 
relaid. Length, 252 feet ; area, 654 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 

321 feet edgestone 

12.2 feet circular edgestone 

10,000 paving brick 

50 feet flagging 

Templets 

Advertising 

Amount paid to J. B. O'Rourke & Co. 

159.3 square yards block paving . 
Amount paid to D. J. Kiley & Co. : 

539 feet edgestone set .... 

335 square yards brick paving 

11 square yards crossings laid 

16 square yards block paving 





S782 11 




337 50 




34 55 




199 02 




15 87 




95 00 




29 00 




28 85 




7 60 



143 


12 


63 


90 


2 


75 


4 


00 



Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
657.8 square yards Trinidad lake asphalt with 
American cement, concrete base 



Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



143 37 



113 77 

1,973 40 

53,760 04 

98 67 

^3,661 37 

$289 47 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 7. 

Corning street, between Shawmut avenue and Washington 

streets, asphalted. 
Labor $11 75 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
680.8 square yards Trinidad asphalt on existing 

concrete base ....... 1,361 60 



Carried forward 



,373 35 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



197 



JBrought forward ...... 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co.: 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 7 $1,293 52 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 9 11 75 



Edinboro' street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 
for work done under contract in 1895 



L,373 35 
68 08 

L,305 27 



Sl,305 27 



^36 17 



Milk street, between Oliver and India streets, paved with large 

granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch joints, edgestone 

reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 556 

feet; area, 1,870 square yards. 
Labor .... 
Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 
11,000 paving brick 
755 feet flagging . 
75 feet edgestone . 
24,445 large paving blocks 
Templets 
Masonry 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Jones &> Meehan : 
325.47 cubic yards American cement, 

concrete base ..... $1,627 35 
1,996 square yards granite block paving, 

pitch joints ..... 

444 feet edgestone reset 
288.5 square yards bi-ick sidewalks 

relaid ....... 

590.5 square yards block gravel, gravel 

joints ...... 







$2,191 16 






1,567 00 
351 62 






104 50 






437 90 






46 50 






1,179 23 
38 33 






24 50 






3 10 



1,796 
85 



40 
52 



51 93 



147 63 



3,658 83 

$9,602 67 

Ohio street, between Washington street and Shawmut avenue, 
asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 
343 feet ; area, 268 square yards. 

Labor $256 65 

Teaming . . 110 50 



Carried forward 



$367 15 



198 



City Document No. 29, 



Brought forward ..... 


$367 15 


Gravel ........ 


10 78 


2,300 paving bricks ..... 


23 00 


Templets 


7 85 


Masonry 


154 00 


Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 




263.7 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt 




with cement, concrete base 


791 10 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. 



West street. 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co., for work 
done under contract in 1895 .... 



$1,353 88 
39 56 

$1,314 32 



$147 26 



Winter street, between Washington and Tremont streets, 

paved with large granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch 

joints, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 503 

feet ; area, 1,146 square yards. 
Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel ...... 

25,860 large granite blocks . 
336 feet flagging .... 

131 feet edgestone and 1 large corner 

Cement . . . 

Lumber ..... 

Masonry ..... 

Templets ..... 

Advertising ..... 

19,000 paving brick 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
185.3 cubic yards American cement, 

concrete base ..... $926 50 
1,141.4 square yards block paving with 

pitch joints ..... 1,027 26 
292 feet edgestone reset 
181 square yards brick sidewalks relaid, 
53.5 square yards block paving, gravel 

joints ...... 

Extra work as ordered . . . 

2,175 49 

;6,995 90 







1,231 


00 






150 


08 






1,810 


20 






194 


88 






86 


82 






22 


00 






91 


88 






210 


00 






9 


60 






21 


00 






185 


25 



23 


36 


32 


58 


13 


38 


152 


41 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



77 



Street Department — Pavestg Division. 



199 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 8. 

Ashland street, between Chambers and Leverett streets, paved 
with gutter blocks, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, 
crossings relaid. Length, 210 feet ; area, 523 square yards. 

Labor $590 60 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

15,100 gutter blocks 

56 feet flagging 

6,000 paving brick 

35 feet edgestone . 

Masonry 

Paving 



531 


00 


141 


00 


596 


45 


32 


48 


57 


00 


21 


70 


24 


60 


236 


28 



>,231 01 



Barton street 

Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co., for 
work done under contract in 1895 



41 



Cotting street, between Leverett and Lowell streets, paved 
with small blocks, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, 
crossings relaid. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

100.2 feet flagging 

15,470 gutter-blocks 

7,000 paving brick 

35 feet edgestone . 

Paving . 



603 


52 


451 


50 


123 


68 


58 


11 


611 


07 


66 


50 


21 


70 



256 41 



$1,292 49 



Lowell street, between Causeway and Brighton streets, paved 
with large blocks on a gravel base with pitch- joints, edge- 
stone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 
1,139 feet; area, 5,545 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming ... 

Gravel and sand . 

92,662 large granite blocks 

424 feet flagging . 

218.2 feet edgestone 

27 -^-^ feet circular edgestone 

40,000 paving brick 

Masonry 

Carried forward . 











2,768 50 










689 67 










4,417 57 










249 42 










135 28 










36 77 










380 00 










87 50 


. 


. $12,804 36 



200 



City Document No. 29. 



Kiley & Co. 



Brought forward 

Cement 

Advertising . 

Sundries 

Amount paid to D. J. 

5,752 squai-e yards block paving, pitch- 
joints ...... 

1,933 feet edgestone set . . . 

1,272 square yards brick paving . 

86 square yards block paving, gravel- 
joints ...... 

Extra work, as ordered . . . . 



Milton street repaired. 
Labor .... 



^2,804 36 

16 50 

• 26 64 

4 67 



,176 80 
154 64 
228 96 

21 50 

40 25 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



5,622 15 

18,474 32 

$324 30 

$382 05 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 9. 
Acton street work unfinished. 
Labor . 
Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 
Flagging 

2,050 paving brick 
Masonry 
Advertising . 



$273 50 

267 00 

21 20 

16 82 

20 50 

189 00 

9 50 

$797 52 



East Dedham street, between Harrison avenue and Washing- 
ton street, macadamized, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks 
relaid, gutters paved. Length, 512 feet ; area, 1,934 square 
yards. 

Labor 1174 80 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
185 feet edgestone 
320 feet flagging . 
17,500 paving brick 
450 large blocks . 

Carried forioard 



1,315 

320 
777 

10 
114 
185 
174 

24 



00 
63 
15 
00 
70 
60 
45 
75 



5,097 08 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



201 



JBrought forioard . 
Cement ..... 

Masonry 
Advertising .... 

Amount paid to Jones & Meehan 
1,023.7 feet edgestone set . 
721 square yards block paving 
803.2 square yaids brick paving . 





, 


$3,097 


08 






22 


00 




, 


315 


00 


• 


• 


5 


40 


$153 


56 






2.52 


35 






184 


74 










590 


65 










14,030 


13 



Hamburg street, between Mystic street and Harrison avenue, 

asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 

383 feet ; area, 596 square yards. 
Labor .... 
Teaming 

Gravel .... 
59 feet edgestone . 
59 feet flagging 
150 large blocks . 
6,300 paving bricks 
Masonry 
Templets 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. 
5,864 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt with Amer 

ican cement concrete base 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. 



$351 


10 


295 


22 


17 


16 


36 


58 


34 


22 


8 


25 


63 


00 


196 


00 


7 


80 


12 


00 



1,759 20 

^2,780 53 
87 96 

^2,692 57 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 9 $2,680 57 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . . . 12 00 

2,692 57 

Laconia street, between Harrison avenue and Washington 
street, asphalted, edgestone set, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 
330 feet; area, 725 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

350 feet edgestone 

31 j-\ feet circular edgestone 

Carried forward . . . .. . . $2,441 58 



$1,247 


65 


844 


50 


91 


70 


217 


00 


40 


73 



202 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward 
140 feet flagging . 
750 blocks . 
9,750 paving brick 
Templets 
Masonry 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
686.76 square yards Trinidad lake asphalt with 

binder and concrete base . . . . . 



Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co, 



J,441 58 
81 20 
30 04 
97 50 
21 60 
273 00 
17 50 



2,060 28 

$5,022 70 
103 01 

14,919 69 



en streets, 


, Leng 


th, 


$310 


50 


310 


00 


14 


27 


8 


08 


11 


66 


14 


50 


43 


00 


147 


00 


9 


80 



1,251 60 



Meander street, between East Dedham and Maid 

asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid 

307 feet ; area, 460 square yards. 
Labor .... 
Teaming . . 
Gravel .... 
175 large blocks . 
Edgestone 
Flagging . 
4,300 paving brick 
Masonry 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co 
417.2 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt with 

American cement, concrete base 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co, 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 9 $2 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Wards 17 and 18 . 



Mystic street, between Maiden and East Brookline streets, 
asphalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 
636 feet ; area, 890 square yards. 

Labor $843 75 

Teaming . . 530 81 

Gravel . 46 81 



, 


$2,120 41 
62 58 




$2,057 83 


,048 03 




9 80 


$2,057 83 



Carried forward 



1,421 37 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



203 



Brought forvmrd .... 
245 feet edgestone and 4 small corners 
150 feet flagging . 
400 large blocks . 
5,050 paving brick 
Masonry 
Templets 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 
803.7 square yards Sicilian rock as- 

halt with American cement concrete 

base . 
11.9 cabic yards concrete base 



2,411 10 
59 50 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. 



L,421 37 
165 30 

87 00 
19 30 

50 50 
210 00 

7 80 



2,470 60 

$4,431 87 
123 53 

$4,308 34 



Norwich street, between Mystic and Meander streets, as- 
phalted, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 221 
feet ; area, 344 square yards. 



Labor , 




$303 15 


Teaming 




262 50 


Gravel . 




14 28 


35 feet edgestone . 




21 70 


30 feet flagging 




17 40 


4,050 paving brick 




40 50 


150 large blocks . 




8 25 


Masonry 




140 00 


Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 




339.4 square yards 


Sicilian rock asphalt with Ame 


r- 


ican cement concrete base 


1,018 20 



$1,825 
50 


98 
91 


$1,775 


07 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co. . 



Taylor street, between D wight and Milford streets, asphalted, 
edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 196 feet; 
area, 262 square yards. 

Labor $91 15 

Teaming 

400 paving brick . 

Gravel and sand . 

Masonry 

Carried forward 



58 


50 


4 


00 


6 


00 


102 


00 



$261 65 



204 



City Document No. 29. 




I^rought forward . . 
Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 
257.2 square yards Sicilian rook asphalt on existing 
concrete base ....... 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co, 



Union Park street, between Harrison avenue and Washing- 
ton street, macadamized, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks 
relaid. Length, 460 feet; area, 1,007 square yards. 

1485 30 
392 00 
50 25 
206 33 
9 28 
104 32 
245 00 



Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

Flagging 

10,700 paving brick 

Masonry 



L,492 48 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$912 21 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS WARD 10. 

Boylston street, between Dartmouth street and B. & A. R.R. 

bridge (southerly side), edgestone set, gutters paved, fence 

built, and 
Exeter street, between Huntington 

street, filled, macadamized. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Filling . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
1,071 feet edgestone 
Hardware 
Lumber 

Amount paid to William Higgins 
1,302 feet edgestone set 
800 feet edgestone reset 
532 square yards block paving 
267 square yards block paviog 



Carried forioard 



avenue 


and Boylston 




12,655 32 




1,734 50 




896 78 




479 70 




4,771 47 




10 00 




664 02 




19 77 




299 88 


1104 le 


' 


120 00 




133 OC 


■ 


93 4£ 






450 61 






^ 


. $11,982 05 



Steeet Department — Paving Divisioisr. 



205 



.1,982 05 



Uroitght forvKird ...... 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 10 ... . 13,698 91 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 . . . . 3,822 59 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 4,460 55 

_ $11,982 05 

Columbus avenue. 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co., for work 

done under contract in 1895 .... $719 00 

Dartmouth street, between Copley square and N. Y,, N. H. & 
H. R.R., macadamized, edgestone relaid, gutters repaved, 
brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 467 feet; 
area 1,764 square yards. 

Labor $170 20 

Teaming 237 00 

Gravel 117 59 

Stone 88 27 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 10 .... |324 40 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 .... 128 99 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 159 67 



$618 06 



Holyoke street, macadamized, edgestone re 


t^KJi-KJ \J\J 


set, brick sidewalks 


relaid. Length, 460 feet ; area, 1,688 square yards. 


Labor 1302 00 


Teaming ...... 


673 00 


Gravel 


190 11 


Stone ....... 


356 78 


Steam roller 


25 00 


2,000 paving bricks .... 


20 00 


Masonry 


98 00 


Advertising ...... 


18 00 




$1,682 89 



St. Botolph street, between Irvington street and Massachu- 
setts avenue, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone set 
and reset, brick sidewalks laid and relaid, crossings laid and 
relaid. Length, 2,257 feet; area, 8,526 square yards. 

Labor $895 85 

Teaming . . . . . . . . 4,186 90 



Carried forward 



),082 75 



206 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forioard 

Gravel and sand . 

Stone 

Steam roller 

Loam and sods 

23,250 paving brick 

6 large corners 

300 feet flagging . 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 

5,682.9 feet edgestone set 

2,668.5 square yards block paving 

610 feet fence curb set .... 

3,493 square yards brick paving , 

108 square yards brick paving, herring- 
bone ........ 

12.7 square yards brick paving, cement 
joints ...... 

Extra work resetting iron fence and rais- 
ing coal chutes ..... 







$5,082 75 






4,249 66 






3,226 00 






200 00 






111 00 






357 75 






33 60 






174 00 






9 00 


$852 4J 


: 


933 9^ 


■ 


122 OO 




803 3S 





49 68 



6 35 



115 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 10 . . . . $14,713 35 
Amount paid out of Paving Division, 1,613 25 



2,882 84 



$16,326 60 



$16,326 60 

Yarmouth street, macadamized, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid. Length, 464 feet ; area, 1,753 square yards. 

Labor |280 60 

Teaming ........ 175 00 

Stone 472 85 

Masonry 7 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 10 . • . . 1761 62 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 173 83 



$935 45 



$935 45 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



11,024 82 



STKEET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 11. 

Arlington street, between Boylston and Marlborough streets, 
macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 1,064 feet; area, 5,911 
square yards. 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 207 



Labor . 
Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 
4,600 gutter blocks 
289 feet flagging . 
10,000 paving bricks 
Stone . 
Steam roller . 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co. 
1,334.8 square yards block paving 
2,064.5 feet edgestone set 
3,120 square yards brick paving . 
171 square yards flagging crossings 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 ... . 110,347 68 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 165 24 







$1,160 67 






3,361 00 






1,792 96 






181 70 






167 62 






135 00 






1,961 03 






190 00 






8 63 


. $467 le 


i 


. 309 68 




. 717 60 




59 8£ 


) 




1,554 31 







),512 92 



$10,512 92 



Berkeley street, between Boylston and Beacon streets, mac- 
adamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks 
relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 1,325 feet; area, 5,889 square 
yards. 



Labor . 






$914 70 


Teaming ...... 






1,646 00 


Gravel 






424 81 


Stone 






577 12 


Steam roller ...... 






110 00 


2,000 paving brick . . . . 






20 00 


Amount paid to James Grant & Co. : 








714 feet edgestone set . 


157 


12 




649 square yards block paving 


194 


25 




651 square yards brick paving 


117 


IS 


368 55 








tJ\JiJ *J%J 




14,061 18 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 








ments, Ward 11 . . 


13,157 


54 




Amount paid out of Paving Division 


903 


64 


$4,061 18 









Brimmer street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
for work done under contract in 1895 



$490 80 



208 



City Document No. 29. 



Brookline avenue. 

Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Advertising . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 11 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Charles street. 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. for work 
done under contract in 1895 .... 



• 


$258 50 

133 76 

39 60 

9 00 




$440 86 


1267 50 
173 36 


$440 86 





$25 49 



Mt. Vernon street, between Charles and Willow streets, 125 
square yards, repaved ; 1,543 square yards macadamized, 
edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, crossings relaid. 



Labor . 


. . . a 


$891 


25 


Teaming 


. . . 


454 


50 


Gravel . 


..... 


79 


95 


8,000 paving 


brick 


76 


00 


Masonry 




10 


50 




$1,512 


20 



Pinckney street. 

Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
for work done under contract in 1895 



$106 50 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$752 37 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 12. 

East Brookline street, between Harrison avenue and Wash- 
ington street, macadamized, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks 
relaid, gutters repaved. Length, 567 feet ; area, 2,142 square 
yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 

50 feet flagging 

20,640 paving bricks 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

Masonry 



$702 


62 


979 


50 


273 


92 


29 


00 


201 


24 


683 


28 


60 


00 


294 


00 



Carried forward 



i23 56 



Stebet Department — Paving Division. 209 



^Brought forward ...... 

Amount paid to Jones and Meehan : 
1,010 feet edgestone set ... $80 80 

444 squai-e yards block paving . . Ill 00 
931 square yards brick paving . . 167 58 



},223 56 



1359 38 

3,582 94 



Massachusetts avenue, between Huntington avenue and St. 
Botolpli street, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone 
reset, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 259 feet; area, 1,727 
square vards. 

Labor , "' . . |154 65 



Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

Stone 

Loam and sods 

Paving . 



66 00 
128 58 
295 77 
158 12 
244 12 

$1,047 24 

Reed street, between Northampton and Hunneman streets, 
macadamized. Length, 1,205 feet ; area, 3,036 square yards. 

Labor 1273 42 

Teaming 738 50 

Stone 1,405 98 









$2,417 85 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 


ments, Ward 12 . . . .$1,775 20 


Amount paid out of Street Improve- 


ments, Ward 17 . . . . 642 65 






$2,417 85 




West Brookline street, between Tremont and Washington 


streets, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick 


sidewalks relaid. Length, 1,035 feet 


area, 3,680 square yards. 


Labor ...... 


$309 38 


Teaming ..... 






1,812 80 


Gravel and sand .... 






628 25 


275 feet flagging . . 






159 50 


159 feet edgestone and 8 small corners 






100 58 


48,705 paving bricks 






478 99 


Stone . . . . . . 






1,485 78 


Steam roller . . . . . 






175 00 


Masonry 






511 00 


Cement . . . . . 






11 00 


Advertising 






7 60 



Carried forward 



$5,679 88 



210 



City Document No. 29. 



684 88 



Brought forward . . . . . . $5,679 88 

Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 
1,473 feet edgestone set 
433 square yards block paving 
729 square yards brick paving 
194 square yards brick paving, herring 

bone ...... 

171 square yards excavation . 

Amount paid to Jones & Meehan : 

2,364.3 feet edgestone set 

1,127 square yards block paving . 

95.8 square yards round paving 

1,738.8 square yards brick paving . 

34.4 square yards brick paving, herring- 
bone on edge . . . , . 18 92 



Work done by the Sewer Division 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 13. 
Athens street. 

Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Company 
for work done under contract in 1895 



. $265 


14 


. 151 


55 


. 167 


67 


83 


42 


17 


10 


. 1354 


65 


. 394 


45 


33 


53 


. 399 


92 







$7,566 


23 


1408 


90 



Work done by the Bridge Division 



$121 27 
13,582 15 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 14. 

L street, between Ninth street and Broadway, macadamized, 
gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick sidewalks relaid, cross- 
ings laid. Length, 1,753 feet; area, 6,622 square yards. 

Labor . . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

332 feet flagging 

15,000 paving bricks 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to William Higgins: 

2,079.4 feet edgestone set 

169.2 square yards block paving . 

902 square yards round paving 

1,584.8 square yards brick paving . 

84.5 square yards brick paving, herring 
bone ...... 





$2,639 25 




755 50 




274 00 




1,812 81 




192 56 




146 25 




35 25 


. $166 35 




42 30 




. 225 50 




. 285 27 




30 42 






749 84 






$6,605 46 



Street Depaetment — Paves^g Divisioisr. 211 
Work done by the Sewer Division . . . |797 14 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 15. 

East Fifth street, between G and H streets, macadamized. 

Labor 1385 25 

Teaming 106 00 

Gravel ......... 75 00 

Stone 320 63 



East Fourth street, between Linden and G streets, mac- 



ea, 646 square yards. 



adamized. Length, 171 feet; ar 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Stone . 
Flagging 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 .... $703 32 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 14 .... 56 00 



$271 40 

141 50 

287 26 

59 16 

1759 32 



1759 32 



G street, between Dorchester and Fifth streets, macadamized. 

Length, 886 feet ; area, 3,336 square yards. 
Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Stone . . ... . . . . . 

Advertising ........ 



1724 


50 


484 


50 


533 


54 


8 


40 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 15 .... $1,174 29 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 14 .... 576 65 



L,750 94 



11,750 94 



Old Harbor street, between Thomas park and Dorchester 
street, macadamized. Length, 520 feet ; area, 1,964 square 
yards. 

Labor $271 40 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Advertising 



442 00 
112 00 
575 11 

18 00 



L,418 51 



212 



City Docuivient No. 29. 



Telegraph street, between Thomas park and Dorchester 
street, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, cross- 
ings relaid, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 926 feet ; area, 
3,070 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

15,000 paving brick 

Amount paid to J. B. O'Rourke 

1,686.6 feet edgestone set 

50.5 square yards block paving 

709.1 square yards round paving 

1,363.9 square yards brick paving 

22.5 square yards brick paving, herring 
bone ...... 



17 

248 
313 



99 
68 
19 

70 



9 23 



1577 
121 
118 
654 
146 
16 



30 
50 
41 
95 

25 
00 



841 79 

5,258 24 



Thomas park, between Old Harbor and Atlantic streets, 
macadamized. Length, 300 feet ; area, 1,000 square yards. 

Labor 1239 20 

Teaming 27 00 

Gravel ' . . . 78 00 

Stone 517 35 



$861 55 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 16. 

East Cottage street, between N. Y. & N. E. R.R. and Dor- 
chester avenue, macadamized, sidewalks gravelled, crossings 
laid. Length, 3,290 feet ; area, 10,200 square yards. 

Labor $956 80 

517 50 

455 40 

3,142 76 

240 00 

116 00 

24 00 

36 54 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Steam roller . 
200 feet flagging 
Advertising . 
Paving . 



),489 00 



Dean street, between Howard avenue and Judson street, 
macadamized, gutters paved, edgestone laid, brick sidewalks 
laid. Length, 533 feet ; area, 1,094 square yards. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



213 



Labor 


. 






, 


$133 


40 


Teaming .... 






. 


. 


648 


67 


Gravel and sand . 






, 




441 


45 


Stone 


. 




, 


. 


595 


81 


Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 












1,081 feet edgestone set 


, 




1194 


58 






24 square yards block paving 


. 




9 


60 






367 square yards round paving 






146 


80 






154 square yards brick paving 






43 


12 






6 days, paver 


$30 


00 










24 days, labor 


48 


00 










60 days, quarrying 


150 


00 










80 days, grading and cleaning 














lip 


160 


00 










20 days, foreman . 


60 


00 










18 days, stonecutter 


90 


00 










12i days, mason . 


42 


00 










29 days, watchman 


58 


00 












$638 


00 




Plus 15 per cent 


95 


70 


733 


70 






Dynamite and explosives 






t tJtJ 

25 


1 \J 

00 


1,152 


80 








ou 




$2,972 


13 



Fairbury street, between Blue Hill avenue and Rand street. 



macadamized. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Stone . 
Building wall 



retaining- wall built. 



$142 


60 


324 


00 


21 


00 


68 


04 


$555 


64 



Ley land street, between East Cottage street and Burgess 
street, macadamized, sidewalks built, one catch-basin built. 
Length, 715 feet; area, 2,065 square yards. 



Labor 


$414 00 


Teaming ..... 


421 00 


Gravel 


42 24 


Stone ...... 


1,282 09 


Advertising . , . . 


17 40 


Steam-roller ..... 


100 00 




$2,276 73 



214 



City Document No. 29. 



Monadnock street, between Dudley and Bird streets, macad- 
amized. (Work unfinished.) Length, 1,429 feet ; area, 4,129 
square yards. 

Labor $193 20 

Teaming 29 00 

Stone 215 94 

Steam-roller 50 00 



14 



"Work done by the Sewer Division 



$1,716 59 



152 square yards flagging laid 
Extra work as ordered : 

20 days, foreman, cleaning up 
and loading teams 

122| days, labor, cleaning up 
and loading teams 

20 days, mason, cementing 
joints .... 

59 days, labor, grading 

1|^ days, putting in retaining 
plank .... 

f days, fixing manholes . 

27 days, paver, repaying gut- 
ters and sidewalks 

Carried forward . 



$721 
501 
617 



80 
10 
21 



14 28 



5 
53 



23 

20 



$60 00 



244 88 



70 


00 


118 


00 


2 


67 


2 


33 


135 


00 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 17. 

Eustis street, between Dearborn and Magazine streets, 
macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick side 
walks relaid, crossings relaid. Length, 1,976 feet ; area, 5,762 
square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand . 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

48,000 paving brick 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 

4,010 feet edgestone set 

1,431.7 square yards block paving 

2,683.5 square yards brick paving 

33.2 square yards brick paving, herring 
bone ...... 

9.5 square yards brick paving, herring 
bone on edge 



1,519 

1,467 

2,405 

210 

468 

44 



95 
00 
90 
33 
00 
00 
40 



$632 88 $1,912 82 



),518 58 



Street Department 

Brought foricard . 

16 days paver, tender, gut- 
ters and sidewalks 

27 days, paver laborer, gutters 
and sidewalks . 

23 days, stonecutter 

92 days, labor, barring and 
ramming .... 

13 days, watchman, lighting 



Add 15 per cent . 



«TT — Paving Division. ^ 


il5 


$632 


88 $1,912 


82 


$6,518 


58 


36 


00 








54 
115 


00 
00 








184 

26 


00 
00 


05 


$3,117 




$1,047 
157 


88 
17 

1 '^05 








S7 











19,636 45 
Amount paid out of Street improve- 
ments. Ward 17 ... . $8,320 84 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 .... 777 87 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 537 74 

$9,636 45 

Island street, between Hampden and Magazine streets, mac- 
adamized. Length, 708 feet; area, 2,045 square yards. 

Labor $165 60 

Teaming 222 00 

Stone and stone screenings ..... 1,820 53 

Advertising 8 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 17 ... . $1,679 60 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 536 53 



J,216 13 



2,216 13 



Magazine street, between Norfolk avenue and Swett street, 
graded, gutters paved. Length, 2,096 feet; area, 6,055 square 
yards. 

Labor $1,051 10 

Teaming 968 50 

Gravel . 97 02 

Stone 65 31 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 17 ... . $1,426 62 



$2,181 93 



Carried forward . . . .$1,426 62 $2,181 93 



216 



City Docuinient No. 29. 



Brought forward .... |1,426 62 ^2,181 93 
Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 .... 618 00 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 137 31 

12,181 93 

Marshfield street, resurfaced. Length, 837 feet; area 2,419 
square yards. 

Labor . . . . $438 15 

Teaming 212 00 

Gravel and sand 267 40 

Paving . 92 16 



L,009 71 



Massachusetts avenue, between Swett and Albany streets, 
paved with large granite blocks, edgestone set, gravel side- 
walks built. Length, 519 feet ; area, 3,575 square yards. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Gravel .... 

850 feet flagging , 

44,538 large paving blocks 

2,875 asphalt blocks 

734 feet edgestone, 4 large and two small corners 

10,500 paving bricks 

Lumber 

Masonry 

Rent 

Sundries 

Advertising 

Amount paid to Doherty & Connors : 

3,811 square yards block paving . . $952 75 

1,065 feet edgestone set . . . 85 20 

124 square yards flagging laid . . 31 00 



$1,926 


69 


1,077 


19 


2,072 


30 


493 


00 


1,918 


75 


115 


00 


s 484 


18 


102 


50 


46 


21 


42 


00 


80 


00 


12 


00 


18 


00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 17 ... . $8,609 64 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 12 . . . . 660 55 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 186 58 



Pontine street, sidewalks made. 
Teaming .... 
Screenings .... 

Carried forward . 



1,068 95 
^9,456 77 



$9,456 


77 


$10 

58 


00 

50 



$68 50 



Street Department — Pavestg Dr'ision. 217 



Brought forward 
Gravel and sand . 
Paving . 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$68 50 

204 70 

50 67 

$328 87 
11,609 32 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 18. 

Linden Park street, between Tremont and Cabot streets, 
macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid. 



Labor ...... 






$220 80 


Teaming ..... 






1,125 00 


Gravel and sand .... 






1,225 95 


Stone 






568 50 


12,000 paving bricks 






117 00 


Advertising ..... 






10 40 


Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 








2,496 feet edgestone set 


. $449 


28 




706 square yards block paving 


. 247 


10 




408 square yards round paving . 


. 142 


8U 




1,046 square yards brick 


. 240 


58 


1 079 76 








$4,347 41 


Tremont street (at Cabot street), 


repaved. 






Gravel and sand .... 






$190 10 


Paving 






298 55 




$488 65 



Washington street, between Roxbury and Eustis streets, re- 
paved, crossings reset. Length, 1,200 feet ; area, 5,333 square 
yards. 

Labor ...... 

Teaming ..... 

Gravel and sand .... 

Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 
112 feet, edgestone set 
5,374 square yards block paving . 
99 square yards brick paving 



. 


$173 70 


, , 


518 00 


• 


1,039 85 


$20 16 




1,880 90 




22 77 





Carried forward 



L,923 83 11,781 05 



218 



City Documeint No. 29. 



Brought forward 
Extra work as ordered, resetting cross- 
ings, loading and unloading teams, 
cleaning up, etc. 

40 days, foreman . . S126 00 
36 days, paver 
18 days, rammer 
56 days, laborer . 
140 days, laborer 

41 days, stonecutter 
46 days, watchman 
Furnishing electric lights 



$1,923 83 $1,731 05 



180 

40 

112 

280 

205 

92 

10 



00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Add 15 per cent 



$1,045 50 
156 83 



1,202 33 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



3,126 16 

54,857 21 
$920 49 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 19. 

Smith street, between Parker street and Huntington avenue, 
macadamized, gutters paved, edgestone reset, brick side- 
walks relaid. Length, 1,750 feet ; area, 5,055 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand , 

Stone . 

Steam roller 

20,000 paving brick 

127 feet flagging . 

350 gutter blocks 

Masonry 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Thomas O'Leary : 

3,300,1 feet edgestone set 

637.2 square yards block paving . 

1,041 square yards round paving . 

1890.6 square yards brick paving . 



Wait street, repaired. 

Labor . 

Teaming 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



^ , 




$821 41 






1,528 00 






1,653 60 






2,304 33 






160 00 






195 00 






73 66 






19 25 






14 00 






19 50 


. $264 01 




. 159 30 




. 260 25 




. 340 31 






1,023 87 






17,812 62 




$23 00 




86 00 




$109 00 


• 




$1,500 20 



Street Department — Paving Division. 219 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 20. 

Blue Hill avenue, between Warren and Savin streets, resur 

faced. 
Labor . 
Teaming 



Gravel 
Stone . 
Steam roller 



$167 20 

304 50 

227 60 

582 83 

20 00 

$1,302 13 



Charles street, between Ditson street and Geneva avenue, and 
between Ditson street and Dorchester avenue, macadamized, 
sidewalks repaired. Length, 1,390 feet ; area, 4,015 square 
yards. 

Labor . $1,200 60 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Advertising 



994 00 

142 56 

640 32 

9 20 

i,986 68 



Faulkner street, between Dorchester avenue and Freeman 
street, macadamized. Length, 509 feet ; area, 1,301 square 
yards. 

Labor $142 60 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Advertising 



155 00 

104 28 

586 54 

27 00 

$1,015 42 



Freeport street, between Dorchester avenue and Pleasant 
street, macadamized, gutters repaved, edgestone reset, cross- 
ings relaid, brick sidewalks relaid. Length, 750 feet ; area, 
3,300 square yards. 

Labor 11,065 40 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

Steam roller 

230 feet flagging 



510 


00 


432 


96 


1,632 


19 


130 


00 


133 


40 



Carried forioard 



$3,903 95 



220 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward . 
Amount paid to James Dolan & Co.: 
1,416 feet edgestone set 
88.5 square yards block paving 
672.4 square yards round paving . 



$113 

168 



28 
13 
10 



83,903 95 



303 51 



$4,207 46 

Geneva avenue, between Bowdoin and Columbia streets, mac- 
adamized, edgestone set. Length, 2,062 feet; area, 5,536 
square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming . - 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

153^^ feet edgestone 

Paving . 



$818 


55 


593 


70 


314 


16 


2,005 


57 


199 


35 


31 


26 



Length, 319 feet 



area, 922 square yards. 



S3,962 


57 


ts, macad- 

$110 40 

85 48 

38 28 

560 18 


$794 


34 



Hartland street, between Sydney and|Saxton streets, macad 

amized. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 



Mayfield street, between Pleasant and Bakersfield streets, 
macadamized, gutters paved. Length, 407 feet; area, 1,174 
square yards. 

Labor 1262 20 

Teaming 270 00 

Gravel . 105 60 

Stone 404 90 

Paving 93 81 

Advertising ....... 10 60 



L,147 11 



Romsey street, between Dorchester avenue and Sydney street, 
macadamized, filled, gutters paved, sidewalks repaired. 
Length, 1,546 feet ; area, 4,466 square yards. 

Labor $648 60 

Teaming 413 50 



Carried forward 



$1,062 10 



Street Depabtment — Paving Division. 



221 



Brought forward .... 

Gravel 

Stone ....... 

Steam-roller ...... 

Paving . ....'. 


$1,062 10 

198 00 

1,216 64 

110 00 

111 41 


Sagamore street, resurfaced. 

Gravel 

Stone ....... 


$2,698 15 

$22 44 
528 04 




1550 48 



Salcombe street, between Stoughton street and Gushing ave- 
nue, excavated, filled, edgestone set, gutters paved, sidewalks 
constructed, 4 catch-basins built. Length, 735 feet; area, 
1,961 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

Lumber 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to James Dolan : 

1,481 feet edgestone set 

494.1 square yards block paving 







1783 37 






645 69 






195 36 






238 34 






17 50 






9 00 


. $222 


15 




. 172 


94 








395 09 










12,284 35 



School street, between Harvard and Washington streets, re- 
surfaced. 
Labor ......... 

Teaming . . 

Gravel . , . . . . . . . 

Stone ......... 



$41 


40 


60 


00 


52 


80 


228 


32 


1382 


52 



Washington street, between Bowdoin street and Talbot ave- 
nue, resurfaced. Length, 3,300 feet ; area, 14,667 square 
yards; between Brent and Ashmont streets (northerly side), 
and opposite estate of Dorchester Baptist Temperance Church,, 
widened, excavated, filled, sub-graded, rock cutting, edge- 
stone set, gutters paved, brick sidewalks laid ; corner Walton 
and Roslin streets. Length, 1,236 feet; area, 1,785 square 



222 



City Document No. 29. 



yards ; between Brent and Ashmont streets 
Telford base, macadamized. Length, 1,236 
square yards ; corner Brent and Washington 
wall constructed. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

Stone 

100 feet flagging 

270y\ feet edgestone 

92y*^ feet circular edgestone 

Crossing blocks 

Powder and fuse . 

Laying steps 

Paving 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 20 $2,422 93 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 .... 4,700 81 



(one-half street), 


feet ; area, 5,493 


streets, retaining- 


$2,346 83 




1,934 28 




420 39 




1,536 67 




58 00 




189 24 




120 02 




250 00 




32 79 




76 00 




159 52 



r,123 74 



$7,123 74 



Work done by the Bridge Division 
Work done by the Sewer Division 



$43 72 



$1,202 14 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 21. 

Crawford street, macadamized. Length, 3,560 feet; area, 
10,285 square yards. 



juauur ..... 

Teaming .... 


1,890 59 


Gravel ..... 


923 55 


Stone ..... 


2,407 88 


Paving ..... 


73 32 


Advertising .... 


7 40 




$6,641 73 



Holborn street, macadamized, gutters relaid. Length, 1,185 
feet ; area, 3,423 square yards. 

Labor $174 80 

Teaming 477 00 

Gravel 330 50 



$982 30 



Street Departiment — Paving Division. 



223 



Howland street, between Humboldt and Elm Hill 
macadamized, edgestone reset, gutters repaved, brick 
laid. Length, 2,022 feet ; area, 5,842 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel and sand 

Stone . 

Steam-roller . 

Edgestone 

Amount paid to Austin Ford & Son : 

63.2 feet edgestone set . . . . $9 48 

21 square yards block paving . . 7 35 

102 square yards brick paving . . 23 46 



Amount paid to John McCourt 
1,072 feet edgestone set 
527.4 square yards block paving 
770.9 square yards brick j^aving 



$192 96 
184 59 
177 31 



sidewalks 


1778 


55 


1,099 


69 


575 


65 


921 


98 


10 


00 


26 


64 



40 29 



554 86 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 21 .... $3,733 21 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 274 35 



May wood street (unfinished work from 1895). 
Teaming ........ 

Gravel . . . . . ... 

Paving ........ 



t,007 56 



$4,007 56 



$177 50 

106 75 

34 48 

$318 73 



Ruthven street, macadamized. Length, 2,287 feet; area, 

7,582 square yards. 
Labor $266 80 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Paving . 



967 88 

336 80 

448 50 

84 91 

2,104 89 



Sherman street, macadamized, gutters paved, crossings laid. 
Length, 1,238 feet; area, 3,165 square yards. 

Labor $278 30 

Teaming 610 00 



Carried forward 



$888 30 



224 



City Document No. 29. 



Mrought forioard 
Gravel and sand . 
Stone . 

180 feet flagging . 
600 gutter blocks . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 21 . . . . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



1,562 78 
246 52 



$888 30 

218 90 

569 35 

104 40 

28 35 

$1,809 30 



$1,809 30 



Walnut avenue, macadamized. Length, 5,572 feet; area, 

21,976 square yards. 
Labor 

Teaming 



Gravel and sand 
Stone . 
Steam roller . 
Paving . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 21 ... . $3,820 59 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . . . . 190 90 



$407 70 

955 50 

588 25 

1,943 61 

60 00 

56 43 

$4,011 49 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$4,011 49 

$1,262 36 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 22. 
Bickford street, edgestone set, sidewalks gravelled. 
Labor .,.....•• 

Teaming 

Gravel ......... 

Paving ......... 



$43 70 

374 50 

84 00 

98 64 

$600 84 



Boylston street, between Washington street and Boylston 
avenue, macadamized. Length, 1,292 feet ; area, 3,732 square 
yards. 

Labor $234 60 

Teaming 220 67 

Gravel : • 94 45 

Stone 285 29 



Carried forward 



$835 01 



Stebet Depabtmbnt — Paving Division. 



225 



Brought forwcvrd 
Paving 
Advertising . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 

Bromley park, crossings laid. 

Labor ....... 

150 feet flagging ..... 

Paving ....... 



Bromley street, repaired. 

Teaming 

Sand and gravel . 

50 feet flagging 



Burroughs street, sidewalks repaired. 
Stone dust . . . . . . 





$835 01 

872 34 

7 60 


$929 66 
285 29 


$1,214 95 
$1,214 95 






$18 80 
92 22 
43 23 


• 


$149 25 

$87 00 
78 50 
29 00 




$194 50 


. . 


$88 75 



Creighton street, between Day and Sunnyside streets, mac- 
adamized, gutters paved, crossings laid, edgestone set 
Length, 825 feet; area, 2,383 square yards 

Labor . 

Teaming 



Gravel 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
304 feet flagging 

Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes 
412 feet edgestone set 
26.8 square yards block paving 
509 square yards barrel gutters paved 



$74 16 

9 38 

229 05 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . $4,816 21 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 454 17 



Green street, sidewalks repaired. 
Stone dust . . . . . 



$291 38 

1,052 65 

843 50 

1,953 94 

140 00 

176 32 



312 59 



$4,770 38 



1,770 38 



$142 50 



226 



City Document No. 29. 



Lamartine street, between Green and Paul Gore streets, mac- 
adamized, edgestone reset, gutters repaved, crossings relaid. 



ea, 6,673 square yards. 



Length, 2,608 feet ; ar 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
70 feet flagging 
Advertising . 

Amount paid to James Dolan 
53 square yards block paving 
49 days, pavers 
43 days, rammers . 
90 days, tenders . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . . . . $3,876 41 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 55 13 



$18 


55 


220 


50 


107 


50 


202 


50 



$565 22 

1,080 50 

316 25 

1,345 87 

20 00 

40 25 

14 40 



549 05 



$3,931 54 



13,931 54 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$811 96 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 23. 

Ashfield street, repaired. 

Teaming ........ 

Gravel ......... 



$135 00 

378 00 

$513 00 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 .... $135 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . . . . 378 00 

$513 00 

Baker street, between Centre and Spring streets, resurfaced. 
Length, 2,250 feet ; area, 6,500 square yards. 

Labor $135 15 

Teaming 76 50 

Gravel 206 10 

Stone 1,346 36 



$1,764 11 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



227 



Canterbury street, between Morton street and Ashland street, 
resurfaced. Length, 8,340 feet ; area, 21,300 square yards. 

Labor $1,076 40 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Paving . 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 ... . $6,522 25 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . 1,117 50 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 613 50 



2,292 00 

2,873 60 

1,920 00 

91 25 

$8,253 25 



$8,253 25 



fientre street, between Spring street and Dedtam line, resur- 
faced. Length, 7,846 feet; area, 30,002 square yards. 

Labor . 11,660 95 

Teaming 
Gravel and sand 
Filling . 
Stone . 
Steam roller . 
Paving . 
Sundries 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 $6,080 15 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . 3,164 35 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 1,299 07 



971 


02 


492 


20 


2,173 


00 


4,959 


01 


50 


00 


211 


78 


25 


61 



),543 57 



),543 57 



Conway street, repaired. 

Teaming . . 
Gravel .... 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 . . . . $150 00 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . . . . 274 75 



1150 00 

274 75 

$424 75 



$424 75 



228 



City Document No. 29. 



Corey street, between Weld and Montview streets, resurfaced. 

Length, 1,300 feet; area, 3,756 square yards. 
Labor . 
Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Paving , 



$124 


20 


209 


00 


66 


60 


1,260 


34 


147 


70 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 ... . $547 50 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . . .. 1,031 27 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 229 07 



$1,807 84 



Fairview street, resurfaced. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Gravel ..... 



L,807 84 

$78 20 
217 50 
260 75 



$556 45 



Hastings street, between Centre and Montview streets, resur- 
faced, gutters paved. Length, 1,152 feet; area, 3,329 square 
yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

Steam roller 

Paving . 

Advertising 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 ... . 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 . 





$660 10 




820 00 




357 30 




1,178 57 




110 00 




252 50 




28 20 




$3,406 67 


,239 67 




167 00 


$3,406 67 



Hewlett street, between Centre and Walter streets, resur- 
faced. Length, 1,677 feet; area, 4,880 square yards. 
Labor $523 40 



Teaming 
Gravel . 
Stone . 
Steam roller 
Advertising 



Carried forward . 



530 50 

124 20 

873 56 

50 00 

6 00 

$2,107 66 



Steeet Department 



Mrought forvmrd . 
Amount paid out of Street Improve 
ments, Ward 23 ... . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Pavestg Division. 229 

$2,107 66 



L,112 10 
995 56 



^107 66 



Hyde Park avenue, between Forest Hills and Mt. Hope 

streets, resurfaced. 

Stone ......... 11,388 14 

Teaming ........ 9 50 

Gravel 16 20 



$1,413 84 

Morton street, between Washington and Harvard streets, re- 
surfaced. Length, 7,740 feet; area, 24,444 square yards. 

Labor 1836 12 

Teaming 1,339 50 

Gravel 359 10 

Stone 7,486 49 



),021 21 



Keyes street, between Forest Hills street and railroad, re- 
surfaced. Length, 1,920 feet; area, 5,547 square yards. 

Labor $177 70 

Teaming 428 50 

Gravel 51 30 

Stone 1,193 00 



L,850 50 



Ruskin street, between Corey and Weld streets. Length, 545 

feet; area, 1,574 square yards. 
Labor .... 
Teaming . . . 



Gravel 

Rock excavating . 

Paving . 



Sycamore street, repaired. 
Teaming ... 
Gravel . . . . , 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward- 23 ... . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 



173 60 
209 00 
45 00 
150 75 
171 85 

S650 20 

$225 00 
153 90 

$378 90 



$133 00 

245 90 

_ $378 90 



230 



City Document No. 29. 



Temple street, between Ivory and Mt. Yernon streets, resur- 
faced. Length, 2,300 feet; area, 7,645 square yards. 

Labor $377 20 

Teaming 526 00 

Gravel 39 60 

Stone 508 14 



feet; area, 4,306 square yards. 
Labor ..... 
Teaming .... 
Stone 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 ... . 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . 



Walk Hill street, between Harvard street and Mt. Hope 
Cemetery entrance, resurfaced. Length, 1,000 feet; area, 
2,889 square yards. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

Stone 

Gravel ......... 





$1,450 94 


faced. Ler 


gth, 1,442 


• 


$581 90 

347 50 

42 08 




$971 48 


$800 90 




170 58 


$971 48 





$239 


20 


530 


50 


502 


50 


343 


20 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 ... . $769 70 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 .... 706 50 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 139 20 



$1,615 40 



$1,615 40 



Washington street, Lagrange street to Dedham line, repaired. 
Length, 7,415 feet; area, 32,846 square yards. 

Labor $2,796 73 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

138 feet flagging 

Stone 

Steam roller 

Advertising . 

Carried forward 



2,373 
554 


13 

40 


80 


04 


5,705 
90 


30 

00 


4 


50 


$11,604 


10 



Streitt Dbpartiment — Paying Division. 231 



JBroiight forxoard . 
Amount paid to James Dolan : 
65 days, paver 
51 days, rammer . 
108 days, tender . 
372.3 feet edgestone set 
124.5 square yards block paving 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 . . . . $8,787 86 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . 3,540 15 

$12,328 01 

Weld street, between Arnold and Raskin streets, resurfaced. 
Length, 1,600 feet; area, 3,556 square yards. 

Labor S161 00 

Teaming . 610 50 

Stone 3,122 97 



• 


• 


Sll,604 


10 


, S292 


50 






. 127 


50 






. 243 


00 






29 


78 






31 


13 










723 


01 










112,328 


01 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 23 .... 81,673 06 

Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 22 ... . 1,457 55 

Amount paid out of Paving Division . 763 86 



$3,894 47 



},894 47 



Work done by the Sewer Division . . . $2,341 56 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 24. 

Adams street, between Dorchester avenue and O. C. R.R., re- 
surfaced. 
Labor . . ... . . . . 

Teaming ........ 

Stone . . 




Ashraont street, between Adams and Wrentbam streets, re- 
surfaced, gutters paved, sidewalks gravelled. Length, 990 
feet ; area, 3,080 square yards. 

Labor $220 80 

Teaming 219 00 

Gravel . 93 72 

Paving 81 55 

$615 07 



232 



City Document No. 29. 



Norfolk street, between Morton and Walk Hill streets, mac- 
adamized, sidewalks constructed. Length, 2,392 feet; area, 
7,973 square yards. 

Labor |1,037 71 

Teaming 

Gravel . 

Stone . 

Drain pipe 

Lumber 

Advertising 



1,980 


00 


680 


30 


4,421 


80 


40 


80 


15 


81 


6 


80 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 24 ... . $7,963 92 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 219 36 



^83 28 



$8,183 28 



Oakland street, between River street and N. Y. & N. E. R.R., 
constructed, excavated, filled, rock-cutting, sub-graded, mac- 
adamized. Length 1,290 feet ; area 4,300 square yards. 

Labor $1,353 43 

Teaming 720 50 

Gravel 274 56 

Stone 1,104 73 



13,453 22 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$7,904 94 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 25. 

Bigelow^ street, betAveen Faneuil and Brooks streets, sub- 
graded, gutters paved, crossings laid, sidewalks built. Length, 
3,010 feet ; area, 9,336 square yards. 

Labor . 

Teaming 



Gravel 
Stone . 
Flagging 
Gutter blocks 

Amount paid to James Grant & Co : 
163 feet edgestone set . 
8,035.8 square yards block paving 



$13 04 
758 95 



12,338 33 

2,888 00 

4,586 60 

160 05 

39 12 

7 90 



771 99 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 ... . $4,435 63 
Amount paid out of Paving Division . 6,35 366 



3,791 99 



$10,791 99 



Street Department — Paving Division". 



233 



Linden street, between Brighton and Commonwealth avenues, 
resurfaced, edgestone set, gutters paved. Length, 630 feet ; 
area, 1,820 square yards. 

Labor . $103 26 

Teaming 62 50 

Gravel 42 50 

Stone 199 80 



$408 06 

Market street, between Western avenue and Washington 
street, resurfaced, crossings laid and relaid. Length, 4,963 



Labor ..... 


$189 75 


Teaming .... 


419 50 


Gravel ..... 


166 60 


Stone ..... 


326 17 


Flagging .... 


43 50 


Paving ..... 


23 75 




$1,169 27 



Reedsdaie street, between Brighton and Commonwealth ave- 
nues, resurfaced. Length, 621 feet; area, 2,070 square yards. 

Teaming $112 50 

Gravel . 47 60 

Stone ' . 246 45 

Steamroller 50 00 



$456 55 



Rockland street, between Washington street and Chestnut 
Hill avenue, macadamized. Length, 680 feet ; area, 1,889 
square yards. 

Labor $148 35 

Teaming . . 174 00 

Gravel 42 50 

Stone 435 60 



Amount paid out of Street Improve- 
ments, Ward 25 ... . 
Amount paid out of Paving Division 



Tremont street, repaired. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Stone .... 



$148 35 
652 10 


$800 45 
$800 45 






$80 50 
50 00 
28 05 



Work done by the Sewer Division 



$158 55 
$500 00 



234 



City Document No. 29. 



BLUE HILL AND OTHER- AVENUES. 



Blue Hill avenue, construction. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming ..... 

290,810 gutter blocks . 

I,751y9^ feet edgestone . 

12 small corners . 

7 large corners .... 

1,31 7 j3^ feet circular edgestone 
Gravel ...... 

Stone ...... 

Steam roller . . . . . 

Lumber ..... 

Hardware, tools, etc. 

Fuel 

Printing ..... 

Advertising ..... 
Rent of office .... 

Wharfage on blocks 
Shanties, carting and furnishing . 
Engineer's expenses . . . 
Sundries ..... 

Amount paid to J. McDonald (Section 1) 
3,728.72 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

11.35 f5,033 77 

2,030.84 cubic yards rock hauled, at 25 

cents 507 71 



Less amount paid in 1895 



),541 48 
459 00 



Amount paid to Davern & Cronin (Sections 
2 and 3) : 
6,989.36 cubic yards sub-grading, at 44 

cents $3,075 32 

5,995.30 square yards Telford base 

hauled and placed, at 20 cents . 1,199 06 
5,995 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 6 cents .... 359 70 
585.9 square yards granite block gutters 

furnished and laid, at $2.50 . . 1,464 75 
1,428 cubic yards loam hauled and 

placed, at 30 cents . . . . 428 40 
627.6 feet edgestone furnished and set, 

at $1.75 1,098 30 



$22,416 42 

4,139 72 

11,486 99 

1,074 93 

40 20 

39 20 

1,713 09 

223 08 

17,486 61 

313 75 

432 57 

18 85 

37 15 

152 34 

248 18 

204 00 

504 60 

372 59 

437 36 

166 91 



5,082 48 



Carried forivard 



. $7,625 53 $66,591 02 



Street Depaetment — Pavestg Divisiois. 235 

Brought forward .... $7,625 53 $66,591 02 
4,081.9 square yards gravel sidewalks 

furnished and laid, at 15 cents . . 612 29 
45.5 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $5.00 . . 227 50 
2,091.8 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 

12.00 4,183 60 

Removing treea, etc. . . . . 10 00 
17 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 51 00 
356 square yards old gutters relaid, at 

$1.00 356 00 . 

2,103.8 feet edgestone (old, reset), at 

$1.25 2,629 75 

Extra work as ordered : filling and 
grading settlement in gas and sewer 
trenches: 
2^ days, foreman, at $3.00 . $8 31 
29 days labor, at $1.75 . . 50 75 
2 days double team, at $5.00 10 00 
1^ days single team, at 13.00 4 50 

Fence at park — stock and 

labor 5 00 

8 double loads gravel, at $1.70 13 60 



$135 71 
Plus 15 per cent . . . 20 36 



156 07 



),851 74 



Credit by lOi days steam road roller, at 

$15.00 153 75 



$15,697 99 
Less amount paid in 1895 . . . 2,927 74 



Amount paid to Collins & Ham (parts of Sec- 
tions 3, 4 and 5) : 
12,481.46 cubic yards earth excavation, 

at 99 cents ... . $12,356 65 

54 cubic yards rock excavation, at 50 

cents ...... 27 00 

Removing trees, etc. . . . . 50 00 



Amount paid to Collins & Ham (parts of Sec- 
tions 3, 4 and 5) : 
23,867 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

37^ cents $8,950 13 



12,770 25 



12,433 65 



Carried forward . . . $8,950 13 $91,794 92 



236 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward . . . .$8,950 13 $91,794 92 
27 cubic yards boulders broken and 

piled, at 37^ cents . . . . 10 13 

70 cubic yards extra haul, at 20 cents . 14 00 
1,594 cubic yards loam rehauled, etc., 

at 44 cents 701 36 

Removing trees, etc. . . . . 100 00 



$9,775 62 
Less amount paid in 1895 . . . 2,709 38 



Amount paid Collins & Ham (Sections 
6 and 7 and parts of 5 and 8) : 
9,870.6 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

42 cents $4,145 65 

77 cubic yards stone broken and hauled, 

at 75 cents 57 75 

17,495.5 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

90 cents 15,745 95 

Removing trees, etc 75 00 



Amount paid to J. D. Gennaro (Sections 9 and 

10, and 8 and 11 : 
22,605.37 cubic yards earth excavation, 

at 33 cents $7,572 80 

221.80 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

$1.10 243 98 

Removing trees, etc 25 00 



17,841 78 
Less amount paid in 1895 . . . 939 68 



Amount paid to H. P, ISTawn (Sections 11, 12 and 13) 
31,879 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

34 cents $10,838 86 

105.5 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

11.30 137 15 

Removing trees, etc 50 00 

2 days labor, removing trees, at 11.75 ; 

plus 15 per cent .... 4 03 

$11,030 04 
Less amount paid in 1895 . . . 1,097 35 

Amount paid to Davern & Cronin (Sections 14 and 

15): 
3,517 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

44 cents 11,547 48 



7,066 24 



20,024 35 



6,902 10 



9,932 69 



Carried forward . . . . $1,547 48 $135,720 30 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 237 

Brought forward . . . 11,547 48 $135,720 30 
9,322 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

$1.00 ...... 9,322 00 

Removing trees, etc 25 00 

236 cubic yards stone, broken and 

hauled, at 60 cents . . . 141 60 

11,036 08 



Amount paid to D. E. Lynch (between Washing- 
ton and Seaver streets) : 

2,661.7 cubic yards sub-grading, at 40 

cents ...... 11,064 68 

8,714.5 square yards Telford base 

hauled and placed, at 31 cents . 2,701 50 

9.346.5 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 15 cents . . , 1,401 98 
1,928 square yards block gutters laid, 

at 65 cents . . . . . 1,253 20 

2.492.6 feet edgestone set, at 29 cents . 722 85 
2,576 square yards gravel sidewalks 

furnished and laid, at 30 cents . 772 80 
34.8 square yards flagging crossings fur- 
nished and laid, at $4.50 . . 156 60 
20 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 

$1.75 35 00 

25 covers reset, at $3.00. ... 75 00 

32.8 square yards crossings (old,relaid), 

at $1.50 49 20 



Amount paid to Doherty & Connors 

(Lauriat avenue to Walk Hill street): 
1,433 cubic yards sub- grading, at 27 

cents $386 91 

10,564 square yards Telford base, 

hauled and placed, at 14 cents . 1,478 96 
10,663 square yards macadam (unfin- 
ished), at 24 cents . . . 2,559 12 
3,102 square yards block gutters, 

hauled and laid, at 55 cents . . 1,706 10 
3,123 square yards loam, hauled and 

placed, at 10 cents . . . . 312 30 
260 feet edgestone, hauled and set, at 

25 cents ...... 65 00 

3,420 square yards gravel sidewalks, 

furnished and laid, at 20 cents . 684 00 
71.06 square yards flagging crossings, 

at $4.35 ..... 809 11 

621 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 

60 cents 372 60 



8,232 81 



Carried forward . . . $7,874 10 $154,989 19 



238 City Document No. 29. 

Brought fonoard . . . 17,874 10 $154,989 19 
952 feet 6-inch drain furnished and 

laid, at 51 cents 
26 covers reset, at $8.00 



Less 3,762 cubic yards filling taken to 
Lauriat avenue .... 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn (Canter- 
bury street to Lauriat avenue) : 

1,219 cubic yards sub-grading, at 40 
cents ...... 

11,436.5 square yards Telford base, fur- 
nished and placed, at 40 cents . 

600 square yards Telford base hauled 
and placed, at 15 cents 

11,689 square yards macadam hauled 
and placed, at 39^ cents . 

3,719.7 square yards block gutters 
hauled and placed, at 61 cents 

3,826 square yards loam hauled and 
placed, at 9 cents .... 

2,388 feet edgestone hauled and set, 
at 20 cents ..... 

94.3 square yards flagging crossings 
furnished and laid, at 14.50 . 

50.5 cubic yards grav«l, furnished, at 
11.00 

48 covers reset, at $3.00 



Amount retained from Davern & Cro- 
nin ....... 

Amount retained from D. E. Lynch . 

Amount retained from Doherty & Con- 
ners ...... 

Amount retained from H. P. Nawn 



©olumbus avenue, constructing: 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming ..... 

134,344 gutter blocks . 

7,91 6^1^^ feet edgestone . 

Carried forward . . . . . . $62,443 42 



485 52 
78 00 




18,437 62 




1,279 08 


7 1 58 54 


$487 60 


I J 1 UO 0'± 


4,574 60 




90 00 




4,617 16 




2,269 02 




344 34 




477 60 




424 35 




50 50 
144 00 


13,479 17 






$175,626 90 


$784 90 
1,234 92 




1,265 64 
2,021 88 


5 307 34 




tJ.tJXJ 1 %J^ 




$170,319 56 


jction 


127,774 29 

24,154 29 

5,606 76 

4,908 08 



Street Department — Pavestg Division. 



239 



Mrought forward . 

967 feet circular edgestone 

22 small corners . 

6 large corners 

2,401 feet flagging 

676,000 paving brick 

Filling . 

Gravel . 

Sand 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

Lumber 

Hardware, tools, etc. 

Fuel . 

Printing 

Advertising . 

Shanty and furnishing 

Repairs at Police Station No. 10 

Repairs at New England Hospital 

Tearing down buildings 

Engineer's expenses 

Sundries 

Amount paid to Turnbull & Ryan : 

Furnishing materials and building bulkhead . 
Amount paid to Neal & Preble : 

Alterations on fence and moving flag-staff, as per 
estimate ; digging and filling in trench for water- 
pipe, and repairing paving in yard of George 
Putnam School $1,336 00 



156 hours labor, at 32 cents . 
52 hours, mason, at 50 cents 
350 paving brick .... 
i barrel cement .... 
1 load sand . . . 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty : 
16,474 feet edgestone set 
6,545 square yards brick paving laid 
910 square yards flagging crossings 
8 square yards gutters paved 
76 days labor, at S1.75 . . $133 
Plus 15 per cent ... 19 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
2,875 asphalt blocks 
4,528 square yards block paving laid 
733.2 square yards brick paving laid 



49 

26 

4 



92 
00 
90 

87 
75 





907 


6^ 


. 


8,50 


84 




163 


80 




2 


00 


00 






95 






— 


152 


95 




$316 25 


. 


1,132 


00 




131 


98 



^62,443 42 

1,257 10 

73 70 

33 60 

1,392 58 

6,471 37 

14,973 00 

2,494 00 

3,043 70 

3,709 10 

30 00 

125 45 

111 50 

1 17 

17 50 

223 70 

88 55 

345 67 

364 07 

330 00 

523 69 

84 00 

727 00 



1,419 44 



2,077 19 



Carried forward 



$1,580 23 $102,360 50 



240 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward . . .* . $1,580 23 $102,3.60 50 
1,333 feet edgestone set . . . 106 64 

209 square yards flagging crossings laid, 52 25 

1.739 12 



Amount paid to Joseph D. Gennaro : 
11,634 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

32 cents ...... $3,722 88 

2,540 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

$1.29 . . . . . . 3,276 60 

Removing trees, etc. . . . . 25 00 

7,024 48 

Amount paid to Neil McBride : 
10,986.7 cubic yards gravel filling, at 99 cents . 10,876 83 

Amount paid to Collins & Ham : 
5,400 cubic yards sub-grading, at 45 

cents $2,430 00 

7,61 8 square yards Telford base hauled 

and placed, at 15^ cents . . . 1,161 75 
7,816 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 5^ cents .... 429 88 
1,330 square yards block gutters laid, at 

30 cents 399 00 

3,555 feet edgestone set, at 14 cents . 497 70 
3,526 square yards brick sidewalks laid, 

at 53 cents 1,868 78 

19 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 30 cents . . 5 70 
260.8 square yards flagging crossings, 

furnished and laid, at $5.25 . . 1,369 20 
2^ cubic yards ledge excavation, at $1.75, 4 08 

204 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 50 

cents 102 00 

Removing trees, etc. .... 325 00 
16 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 48 00 
80 square yards gutters (old, relaid), at 

30 cents 24 00 

8,665 09 



Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co. : 
20,433.6 square yards Trinidad lake 
asphalt pavement with concrete base 
and binder, at $2.90 . . . $59,257 44 
866,6 cubic yards concrete base (extra 

depth), at $5.00 . . . . 4,333 00 
Extra work making extra excavations 
and truing sub-grade of roadways : 
80 hours, foreman, at 50 cents, $40 00 



Carried forward . . $40 00 163,590 44 $130,666 02 



Street Department — Pavii^g Division. 241 



Brought forioard . . $40 00 $63,590 44 $130,666 02 
1,205^- hours labor, at 20 cents, 241 10 
18 hours, water boy, at 10 cents, 1 80 



Add 15 per cent 



$282 90 
42 44 



325 34 



Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 
5,323 square yards Sicilian rock asphalt with Ameri- 
can cement concrete base, at $2.90 



Amount retained from Collins & Ham . $433 25 
Amount retained from Barber Asphalt 

Paving Co ^ . 3,388 26 

Amount retained from Boston Asphalt 

Co 771 84 



Commonwealth avenue, construction. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming 

191,693 gutter blocks 

Gravel . 

Advertising . 

Fuel . 

Printing 

Stone . 

Steam roller . 

Engineer's expense 

Sundries 

Amount paid to H. P 

198.2 cubic yards rock excavation, at $1.75 . 
Amount paid to Neil McBride : 

10,300 cubic yards earth excavation, at 

33 cents $3,399 00 

6,365 cubic yards rock excavation, at 

$1.29 . . . ■ . . . 8,210 85 

Removing trees, etc. . . . . 50 00 

896.3 tons stone, broken and hauled, at 

65 cents 582 60 



Nawn 



63,915 78 



15,436 70 

$210,018 50 



Less payments made in 1895 
Carried forioard 



$12,242 45 
. 755 23 



4,593 35 

,425 15 



^5,815 47 

1,937 50 

7,571 88 

52 70 

138 83 

8 08 

45 49 

5,251 92 

300 00 

128 56 

11 20 

346 85 



11,487 22 
133,095 70 



242 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward ...... 

Amount paid to John A. Whitte- 
luore's Sons : 
4,700 cubic yards sub-grading, at 25 

cents $1,175 00 

22,218 square yards Telford base placed, 

etc., at 15 cents 3,332 70 

22,750 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 15 cents . . . 3,412 50 
6,650 square yards block gutters hauled 

and laid, at 69 cents .... 4,588 50 
13,208 square yards loam, hauled and 

placed, at 9 cents .... 1,188 72 
7,250 square yards gravel sidewalks, 

furnished and laid, at 18 cents . . 1,305 00 
340 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 

$1.00 340 00 

955 cubic yards loam hauled and stored 

at 20 cents . . . . . 191 00 
3,135 tons stone, broken and hauled to 

crusher, at 30 cents .... 940 50 



$33,095 70 



Amount paid to John A. Whitte- 
more's Sons: 
621 cubic yards wall, at $12.50 . .$1,552 50 
20 cubic yards ledge excavation, at $1.00 20 00 
279 cubic yards earth excavation, at 30 

cents 83 70 



— 16,473 92 



Work done by the Bridge Division 



Amount retained from John A. Whittemore's Sons, 



Huntington avenue, construction. 

Labor, including engineering and inspection 

Teaming ..... 

261,849 gutter blocks . 

20,674^1 feet edgestone 

10,193 feet special edgestone 

l,146j52 feet circular edgestone 

106i|^ feet special circular edgestone 

27 small corners .... 

41 large corners .... 

Carried forward . . . 



1,656 


20 


$51,225 

874 


82 
00 


$52,099 
2,471 


82 
09 


$49,628 


73 



144,703 75 

33,760 81 

10,590 90 

12,818 33 

3,975 27 

1,490 38 

283 11 

92 95 

228 60 

$107,944 10 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



243 



Brought forward 
239 feet flagging . 
914 crossing blocks 
526,960 paving brick 
Gravel . 
Filling . 
Loam and sods 
Sand 
Cement 
Stone 

Steam roller . 
Lumber 
Fuel . 
Advertising , 
Shanty, and furnishing 
Printing 

Hardware, tools, etc. 
Engineer's expenses 
Sundries 

Amount paid to William Scollans : 
9,746 cubic yards gravel filling, at 79f 

cents ..... 

Less amount paid in 1895 



$7,772 44 
4,067 25 



Amount paid to Metropolitan Construction Co. : 

4,396 cubic yards filling, at 65 cents 
Amount paid to Donovan & Brock : 

Labor and stock, moving fence and wall at Martin 
School, and taking down, moving and erecting 
new frame and step block for flag-pole 
Amount paid to Jas. Grant & Co., paving 
intersecting streets : 

781.8 feet edgestone set ... $117 

284.9 square yards block paving . . 99 
1,376.5 square yards brick paving . 316 
342.2 square yards fence curb set . . 68 



at 

27 
72 
60 
44 



Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co. : 

16,393.8 square yards Sicilian rock 

asphalt with American cement con- 



;107,944 10 

139 40 

457 00 

5,104 60 

5,335 67 

5,606 00 

294 54 

3,730 00 

33 00 

32,104 85 

880 00 

450 82 

14 66 

235 69 

91 93 

31 59 

345 77 

250 65 

36 92 



3,705 19 
2,857 40 

2,102 68 



602 03 



Crete base, at $2 90 


. $47,542 02 


21.7 cubic yards ex- concrete base, 


at 


$5.00 


108 50 




Al 6^0 'i'> 


Amount paid to Chas. E. Barnes : 


-■ - rr i j\)0\} O Ai 


2,100.9 feet edgestone set 


. 1205 27 


670 square yards brick paving 


. 120 60 


945.6 square yards gutter paving . 


. 253 45 


499.5 square yards crossings laid . 


. 124 87 



Carried forward . 



$704 19 $220,004 96 



244 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward 


, 


451 days, foreman . 


.1272 66 


100|- days, pavers . 


. 503 87 


45|- days, helper 


. 113 87 


2851 days, labor 


. 570 22 



$704 19 $220,004 96 



Plus 15 per cent 



,460 62 
219 09 



1,679 71 



. 132 


40 


. 424 


62 


. 599 


34 


32 


00 


. 398 


15 


. 419 


07 


. 538 


95 


17 


50 


. 521 


80 


. 186 


00 



Amount paid to J. B. O'Rourke : 
162 square yards block paving 
7,077 feet edgestone set 
4,281 square yards brick paving 
160 square yards flagging crossings 
1,219 square yards gutters paved . 
3,106 feet edgestone set 
2,614 square yards brick paving 
70 square yards flagging crossings . 
2,609 feet coping reset . 
62 coal holes reset 



Amount paid to Doherty & Connors : 
12,053 cubic yards sub-grading, at 39 

cents H700 67 

17,144 square yards Telford base hauled 

and placed, at 21 cents . . . 3,600 24 
17,822 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 25 cents . . . 4,455 50 
3,235 square yards gutters laid, at 45 

cents 1,455 75 

10,095 feet edgestone set, at 23 cents . 2,321 85 
9,172 square yards brick sidewalks laid, 

at 44 cents 4,035 08 

393 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 25 cents . . 98 25 
385.6 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $4.50 . . 1,735 20 
7 cubic yards ledge excavation, at $1.75 12 25 
Removing trees, stumps, etc. . . 255 00 

33 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 99 00 

158 square yards crossings (old, relaid), 

at $1.50 237 00 

Extra work as ordered : 
19 double loads loam furnished 

and placed, at 87 cents . $16 53 



2,383 90 



3,169 83 



Carried forward 



$16 53 $23,006 39 $225,558 69 



Street Department — Paving Division. 245 

Brought forioard . . $16 53 123,006 39 |225,558 69 
45 days labor, culling bricks, at 

$1.75 78 75 



$95 28 
Plus 15 per cent . . . 14 29 



109 57 



1,939 


50 


5,448 


07 


4,415 


00 


2,049 


18 


1,480 


02 


1,096 


05 


349 


86 


2,747 


70 


3,231 


00 



Amount paid to H. Gore & Co. : 
7,758 cubic yards sub- grading, at 25 

cents ...... 

22,237 square yards Telford base hauled 

and placed, at 24^ cents 
22,641 square yards m'acadam hauled 

and placed, at 19i cents . 
4,182 square yards block gutters laid, at 

49 cents ...... 

8,706 feet edgestone set, at 17 cents 
7,307 feet edgestone set, at 15 cents 
833 square yards brick sidewalks laid, 

at 42 cents ..... 
9,159 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 30 cents , 
718 square yards flagging crossings fur- 
nished and laid, at $4.50 
21 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 75 

cents . . . . . . 15 75 

Extra work rebuilding catch-basins 
and manholes : 
43| days, mason, at $4.50 . $197 25 
43| days, mason tender, at 

$2.25 98 63 

21|- days labor, at $1.75 . . 36 94 
33^ barrels American cement, 

at $1.10 . . . . 36 85 
9,255 bricks, at $9.00 . . 83 30 
6 double loads sand, at $1.75 . 10 50 

Resetting and re join ting 
edgestone : 
22|- days, stone cutter, at $4.00 89 33 

Resurfacing street, regrad- 
ing water-works trench, 
and extra excavations : 
4'^^^ days, foreman, at $5.00 
37f days labor, at $1.75 
4^ days, double team, at $5,00 

Transplanting : 
1 day, foreman 



24 


17 


65 


14 


20 


55 


5 


00 



23,115 96 



Carried forward . . $667 66 $22,772 13 $248,674 65 



246 



City Document No. 29. 



£rougJit forvmrd . 

5 days labor, at $1.75 

f day double team, at $5.00 . 
2 double loads loam, at $1.75 . 

Hauling crushed stone : 
64| days, double team, at $5.00 
1| days, single team, at $3.00 . 

Resetting edgestone, resur- 
facing sidewalks and 
loaming : 
5-1 days, foreman, at $5.00 
26f days labor, at $1.75 
I day, double team, at $5.00 . 
45 double loads loam, at $1.75 . 

6 single loads loam, at 87^ 

cents .... 
Taking down fence and cut- 
ting through fence at 
Chutes : 
^-^ days, foreman, at $5.00 
9 8^^ days labor, at $1.75 
Breaking Telford base, 
38 days labor, at $1.75 
Rolling at place where scales 
were located | day, steam 
roller, at $15.00 



Plus 15 per cent 



$667 66 $22,772 13 $248,674 65 
8 75 
1 11 
3 50 

320 28 
5 00 



25 28 
46 67 

2 78 
78 75 



5 25 



3 61 
17 40 

66 50 



13 33 



L,265 87 
189 88 
1,455 75 



,227 88 



Work done by the Bridge Division 



Amount retained from Boston Asphalt 

Co $2,382 53 

Amount retained from Doherty & 

Connors 1,155 80 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. . 1,211 39 



$272,902 53 
9.592 68 



1,495 21 



4,749 72 
177,745 49 



Street Department — Pavixg Division. 



247 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES UNDER 
SPE CIAL A PPR OPRIA TIONS. 



Total Amount Expended. 

Bennington and Walley streets 

Centre street (Dorchester) 

Columbus avenue 

Commonwealth avenue 

Congress and L streets 

Eleanor and Ridgemont streets 

Elmira street 

Franklin street 

Hanover street 

Leicester street 

McLellan street 

Orleans street 

Quincy street 

Saratoga street 

Sydney street 

Talbot avenue 

Tremont street 

Wall street . 

Street Improvements, Old Wards. 

Street Improvements, Wards 1 and 2 : 

Bennington street 

Bremen street . 

Saratoga street . 

Sumner street . 

Walley street . 

Bridges 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Corey street 

Decatur street . 

Prospect street . 

Tremont street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Essex street 

Medford street . 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Main street 

Washington street 
Street Improvements, Wards 9 and 10 

Chestnut street . 

Parkman street . 

Carried forward 



$13,469 

867 


88 
10 


7,100 
130,471 

7,608 
110 


00 
33 
17 

85 


1,696 


30 


99 


48 


5,049 

2,488 


44 
40 


4,056 
3,146 


84 
73 


8,419 

2,022 
486 


18 
20 
40 


2,171 

9,501 
5,580 


62 

26 
26 


250 


00 


5,558 


82 


27,854 


80 


370 


13 


110 


82 


417 


66 


68 


82 


6,179 

3,510 

4,421 

615 


76 
93 

00 

24 


1,028 
1,715 


13 

38 


23,877 
371 


14 

50 


7,509 


05 


592 


95 



,747 57 



248 



City Document No. 29. 



brought forward . 
Street Improvements, Ward 12 : 

Beach street 

Chauncy street . 

Essex street 

Harvard street . 

Pine street 

Whitmore street 
Street Improvements, Ward 13 

A street 

C street 

D street 

Dorchester avenue 

Dove street 

Sew^ers 
Street Improvements, Wards 14 and 15 

Bellflower street 

East Eighth street 

East Sixth street 

K street 

Rawson street . 

Swett street 

Vale street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 16 

Compton street . 
Street Improvements, Wards 17 and 18 

Albany street . 

East Lenox street 

Fabin street 

Fellows street . 

Flagg street 

Harrison avenue 

Pembroke street 

West Canton street 
Street Improvements, Wards 19 and 22 

Bay State road 

Beacon street . 

Boylston street . 

Calumet street . 

Lawn street 

Marlborough street 

Parker street 

Roxbury street . 

Westland avenue 
Street Improvements, Ward 20 

Newcomb street 

Quincy street . 

Carried forioard 



1288,747 57 



8,598 


82 


10,777 


38 


564 


21 


4,233 


73 


• 3,377 


36 


62 


70 


293 


25 


1,216 


69 


6,708 


60 


21,512 


16 


2,581 


14 


241 


60 


5,032 


01 


1,536 


46 


9,085 


12 


7,111 


86 


2,829 


67 


9,178 


89 


177 


50 


5,310 


32 


1,282 


02 


2,498 


48 


329 


52 


92 


27 


3.175 


83 


1,945 


80 


245 


39 


693 


24 


131 


00 


241 


55 


6,946 


08 


86 


80 


360 


00 


325 


60 


2,634 


43 


55 


80 


13,892 


04 


1,367 


77 


2,521 


07 


1,285 


35 


$429,287 08 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



249 



JBrought forioard . 

Shirley steet 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 24 : 

Alban street 

Bicknell street . 

Bradshaw street 

Morton street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 25 

Washington street 

Western avenue 

Win ship street . 

Bridges 

Street Improvements, New Wards 
Street Improvements, Ward 1 ; 

Blackinton and Leyden streets 

Byron street 

Chelsea street . 

Cowper street . 

Shelby street 

Wordsworth street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Havre street 

Haynes street . 

Marion and Bremen streets 

Maverick street 

Sumner street . 

Webster street . 

Bridges 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Ferrin street 

Sewer Division , 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Alford street 

Beach street 

Walker street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

City square 

Park street 

Stacey street 

Union street 

Warren avenue . 

Warren street . 

Sewers 

Carried forward . 



$429,287 


08 


3,236 


00 


301 


51 


3,201 


54 


212 


20 


1,974 


08 


318 


40 


1,824 


38 


18,544 


70 


984 


63 


1,495 


63 


455 


74 


941 


78 


2,492 


55 


143 


52 


78 


18 


83 


88 


559 


95 


1,658 


97 


2,275 


15 


2,581 


76 


1,906 


86 


414 


10 


10,451 


73 


9,917 


22 


800 


00 


869 


67 


4,882 


38 


556 


29 


3,445 


08 


227 


11 


3,936 


86 


2,821 


71 


227 


54 


595 


80 


1,769 


57 


544 


21 


1,045 


30 


483 


74 


678 


58 


$512,663 


78 



250 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward . 
Street Iiuprovements, Ward 6: 

Batterymarch street 

City Hall avenue 

Devonshire street 

Garden Court street 

North street and North square 

North Margin street 

North Market street 

Prince street 

Stillman street . 

Tileston street . 

Water street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Corning street . 

Edinboro' street 

Milk street 

Ohio street 

West street 

Winter street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Ashland street 

Barton street 

Cotting street 

Lowell street 

Milton street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 9 

Acton street 

East Dedham street 

Hamburg street 

Laconia street 

Meander street 

Mystic street 

Norwich street 

Taylor street 

Union Park street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 10 

Boylston and Exeter streets 

Columbus avenue 

Dartmouth street 

Holyoke street . 

St, Botolph street 

Yarmouth street 

Sewers 

Carried forioard 



1512,663 


78 


1,878 


61 


1,206 


47 


6,107 


21 


1,700 


63 


3,613 


18 


173 


51 


509 


65 


1,360 


88 


2,481 


57 


19 


54 


3,661 


37 


289 


47 


1,305 


27 


136 


17 


9,602 


67 


1,314 


32 


147 


26 


6,995 


90 


879 


77 


2,231 


01 


96 


41 


2,192 


49 


18,474 


32 


324 


30 


382 


05 


797 


52 


4,030 


13 


2,692 


57 


4,919 


69 


2,057 


83 


4,308 


34 


1,775 


07 


750 


33 


1,492 


48 


912 


21 


11,982 


05 


719 


00 


613 


06 


1,682 


89 


16,326 


60 


935 


45 


1,024 


82 



,767 85 



Street Depaetmekt — Pavestg Divisiok. 



251 



brought forioard . 
Street Improvements, Ward 11 

Arlington street 

Berkeley street . 

Brimmer street . 

Brookline avenue 

Charles street . 

Mt. Vernon street 

Pinckney street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 12 

East Brookline street 

Massachusetts avenue 

Reed street 

West Brookline street 

Sewer Division . 
Street Improvements, Ward 13 

Athens street . 

Bridges 
Street Improvements, Ward 14 

L street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 15 

East Fifth street 

East Fourth street 

G street 

Old Harbor street 

Telegraph street 

Thomas Park . 
Street Improvements, Ward 16 

East Cottage street 

Dean street 

Fairbury street . 

Leyland street . 

Monadnock street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 17 

Eustis street 

Island street 

Magazine street 

Marshfield street 

Massachusetts avenue 

Pontine street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 1\ 

Linden Park street 

Tremont street . 

Washington street 

Sewers 

Carried forward . 



,767 85 



10,512 92 



4,061 


18 


490 


80 


440 


86 


25 


49 


1,512 
106 


20 
50 


752 


37 


3,582 
1,047 
2,417 
7,566 
408 


94 

24 
85 
23 
90 


121 


27 


3,582 


15 


6,605 

797 


46 
14 


886 


88 


759 


32 


1,750 
1,418 
3,258 


94 
51 
24 


861 


55 


5,489 

2,972 


00 
13 


555 


64 


2,276 


73 


488 


14 


1,716 


59 


9,636 
2,216 
2,181 


45 
13 
93 


1,009 

9,456 

323 


71 

77 
87 


1,609 


32 


4,347 

488 


41 
65 


4,857 


21 


920 


49 


$740,280 


96 



252 



City Doctjivient No. 29. 



Brought forward . 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Smith street 

"Wait street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Blue Hill avenue 

Charles street . 

Faulkner street 

Freeport street . 

Geneva avenue . 

Hartland street . 

Mayfield street . 

Romsey street . 

Sagamore street 

Salcombe street 

School street 

Washington street 

Bridges 

Sewers ' . 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Crawford street 

Holborn street , 

Howland street 

Maywood street 

Kuthven street 

Sherman street 

Walnut avenue 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Bickford street . 

Boylston street . 

Bromley park . 

Bromley street . 

Burroughs street 

Creighton street 

Green street 

Lamartine street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Ashfield street . 

Baker street 

Canterbury street 

Centre street 

Conway street . 

Corey street 

Fairview street 

Hastings street . 

Carried forward 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



1740,280 


96 


7,812 


62 


109 


00 


1,500 


20 


1,302 

2,986 


13 

68 


1,015 

4,207 

3,962 

794 


42 
46 
57 
34 


1,147 

2,698 
550 


11 
15 

48 


2,284 
382 


35 
52 


7,123 
43 


74 

72 


1,202 


14 


6,641 

982 


73 
30 


4,007 


56 


318 


73 


2,104 

1,809 


89 
30 


4,011 


49 


1,262 


36 


600 


84 


1,214 


95 


149 


25 


194 


50 


88 


75 


4,770 
142 


38 
50 


3,931 
811 


54 
96 


513 


00 


1,764 

8,258 
10,543 


11 

25 

57 


424 


75 


1,807 
556 


84 
45 


3,406 


67 



$839,716 26 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



253 



brought forioard 

Hewlett street . 

Hyde Park avenue 

Morton street . 

New Keyes street 

Ruskin street . 

Sycamore street 

Temple street . 

Vermont avenue 

Walk Hill street 

Washington street 

Weld street 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 24 

Adams street . 

Ashmont street . 

Norfolk street . 

Oakland street . 

Sewers 
Street Improvements, Ward 25 

Bigelow street . 

Linden street . 

Market street . 

Reedsdale street 

Rockland street 

Tremont street . 

Sewers 



Less amount paid out of appropriation for Paving 
Division ....... 



89,716 


26 


2,107 
1,413 


66 

84 


10,021 

1,850 


21 

50 


650 


20 


378 


90 


1,450 


94 


971 


48 


1,615 


40 


12,328 


01 


3,894 
2,341 


47 

56 


362 


04 


615 


07 


8,183 
3,453 


28 
22 


7,904 


94 


10,791 


99 


408 


06 


1,169 


27 


456 


55 


800 


45 


158 


55 


500 


00 



$913,543 85 
36,447 95 

$877,095 90 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES FOR 
HILL AND OTHER AVENUES. 



BLUE 



Blue Hill avenue . 
Columbus aventie . 
Commonwealth avenue 
Huntington avenue 



$170,319 56 

205,425 15 

49,628 73 

277,745 49 



$703,118 93 



254 



City Document No. 29. 



SUMMAR T OF EXPENDITURES— LA YING UT 
AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 



Total Amount Expended. 



Abbottsford street 
Audubon road 
Bay State road 
Boylston street 
Brighton avenue 
Clinton street 
Fenelon street 
Geneva avenue 
Granby street 
Greenbrier street 
Harvard avenue 
Harvard street 
Ivy street 
Josephine street 
Kenmore street 
Lauriat avenue 
Morse street . 
Newbury street 
Norway street 
Norway street 
Parker street 
Peterborough street 
Ruggles street 
St. Alphonsus street 
St. Germain street 
Sherborn street 
Turner street 
Vancouver street . 
Wilder street 



H777 


42 


9,299 


55 


7,722 


79 


11,516 


65 


51,243 


19 


6,942 


71 


1,915 


66 


17,249 


19 


4,737 


01 


5,317 


10 


2,498 


39 


1,224 


39 


366 


12 


3,210 


79 


48 


71 


16,577 


13 


2,086 


09 


66 


70 


152 


86 


1,308 


01 


1,192 


51 


5,869 


98 


5,017 


34 


7,276 


14 


251 


92 


210 


71 


1,834 


49 


1,643 


12 


3,405 


21 





OUT AND 


CONSTRUCTION 


$174,961 


88 


LA YING 


OF HIGH- 






WAYS. 








Abbotsford street, between Walnut avenue and Harold street. 


Labor . 


• • • 


, , 




1428 


34 


1,184t-V feet 


edgestone . 












734 


54 


38 iV feet cii 


cular edgestone 










49 


49 


2 small corners 












6 


70 


11,600 large 


gutter blocks 












458 


20 


Stone . 


. 












1,144 


61 



Carried forward 



,821 88 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



255 



Brought forward .... 

Steam roller ...... 

Catch basin stone ..... 

Advertising ...... 

Amount paid to Quimby & Ferguson : 

997 cubic yards sub- grading, at 38 cents, 

1,357 square yards macadam hauled and 
placed, at 26 cents .... 

427 square yards granite block gutters 
hauled and laid, at 83 cents 

1,233 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 
24 cents ...... 

818 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 26 cents 

27.3 square yards flagging crossings fur- 
nished and laid, at $4.25 . 

121.4 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 
$2.00 

4 covers reset, at 13.00 . 

Extra work lowering catch-basins : 

22 hours, mason, at 42 cents $9 24 

22 hours, tender, at 20 cents 4 40 

1 hour, stonecutter . . 50 

2 barrels cement, at $1.50 . 3 00 
2 single loads sand, at $1.00 . 2 00 



Plus 15 per cent 



119 14 

2 87 



$378 86 

352 82 

354 41 

295 92 

212 68 

116 03 

242 80 

12 00 



22 01 



Credited by 9 J days steam roller, at 



L,987 53 
123 50 



^2,821 88 

123 50 

16 00 

45 21 



1,864 03 



Amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson 



1,870 62 
93 20 

t,777 42 



Audubon road, Beacon street across Ivy street, 

Labor ..... 

Stone ..... 

Advertising .... 

13,000 gutter blocks , 

42 ly^^ feet straight edgestone 

41 2^^ feet circular edgestone 

Sundi'ies .... 



1422 15 

1,878 80 

136 75 

513 50 

261 28 

536 47 

27 46 



Carried forward 



5,776 41 



256 



City Docuiniekt No. 29. 



Brought forward, ...... $3,776 41 

Amount paid to William Scollans : 
568 cubic yards sub-grading, at 25 cents, $142 00 
2,669 square yards Telford base hauled 

and placed, at 37 cents . . . 987 53 
3,330 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 31 cents . . . 1,032 30 
438 square yards block gutters hauled 

and laid, at 85 cents .... 372 30 
385 square yards loam furnished and 

placed, at 40 cents .... 154 00 
877 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 30 

cents 263 10 

953 square yards brick paving furnished 

and laid, at 95 cents .... 905 35 
1,493 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $4.25 . . 634 53 
1,539 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 

75 cents 1,154 25 

7 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 21 00 

2.4 square yards brick sidewalks (old, 

relaid),at 55 cents . . . 1 32 

Extra work as ordered : 
7 days, stonecutter, at $3.50 . $24 50 
78 days labor, at $1.75 . . 136 50 



Plus 15 per cent 



$161 00 
24 15 



Credit by 3 days steam road roller, at 
$13.00 



185 15 

$5,852 83 

39 00 



Less amount retained from William Scollans 



Bay State road, between Sherborn and Granby streets 

Labor .... 

Stone .■ . . . 

Advertising . 

l,499y®2 feet edgestone . 

62|| feet circular edgestone 

Sundries 

Carried forvmrd . 



5,813 


83 


$9,590 
290 


24 

69 


$9,299 


55 



2,590 


35 


43 


50 


929 


80 


81 


68 


8 


51 



t,091 22 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



257 



Brought forumrd . 

Amo.unt paid to Quimby & Ferguson : 
192.5 cubic yards sub-grading, at 38 

cents ...... 

2,586 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 27 cents . 
517 square yards granite block gutters 

furnished and laid, at $2.10 
1,582 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

22 cents ...... 

1,898 square yards gravel sidewalks 

furnished and laid, at 27 cents 
1,502 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 

78 cents 

11 covers reset, at $3.00 
11 square yards gutters (old, relaid), at 
60 cents ..... 

Extra work repaving gutters and brick 
sidewalks : 
19 hours, paver, at 40 cents . 
19 hours, tender, at 20 cents 
9 hours labor, at 17 cents 
3 double loads sand, at $1.57, 



Plus 15 per cent 



1,091 22 



$7 


60 


3 


80 


1 


53 


4 


71 


$17 


64 


2 


65 



$73 


15 


698 


22 


1,085 


70 


348 


04 


512 


46 


1,171 
33 


66 
00 



6 60 



20 29 



$3,949 02 
Credit by 20 days (clause M. of contract), 

at $10.00 200 00 



Less amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson, 



3,749 02 

17,840 24 
117 45 

$7,722 79 



Boylston street, between Boylston road and Brookline 

avenue : 
Labor ...... 

Advertising ..... 
42,650 gutter blocks . 
4,342^^2" feet edgestone . 
2l4i| feet circular edgestone 
Teaming , . . . . 
Fuel ...... 



86 


98 


1,684 


68 


. ■ . 2,737 


53 


279 


39 


955 


32 


2 


33 



Carried forward 



r,258 18 



258 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forioard |7,258 18 

Amount paid to Neil McBride : 
2,187 cubic yards sub-grading, at 20 

cents $437 40 

9,630 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 14 cents .... 1,348 20 
1,246 square yards block gutters laid, at 

20 cents 249 20 

4,157 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

20 cents 831 40 

67 square yards flagging crossings fur- 
nished and laid, at $5.00 . . .335 00 
1,967 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 

80 cents 1,573 60 

Hauling crushed stone as per agree- 
ment: 
434 double loads crushed stone, at 25 

cents 108 50 

190 double loads crushed stone, at 66|- 

cents 126 67 



Less amount retained from Neil McBride 



5,009 97 

$12,268 15 
751 50 

$11,516 65 



Brighton avenue, Commonwealth avenue to Cambridge street. 



Labor ..... 

5,747 3% feet edgestone 

496 feet circular edgestone . 

18 large and 6 small corners 

Stone ..... 

Concrete sidewalks 

Lumber .... 

Amount paid to Doherty & Connors (section 
between Commonwealth avenue and Harvard 
avenue) : 

9,241 cubic yards sub-grading, at 31 

cents $2,864 71 

9,643 square yards Telford base hauled 

and placed, at 39 cents . . . 3,760 77 

9,643 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 33 cents . . . 3,182 19 

3,028.4 square yards block gutters fur- 
nished and laid, at $2.00 . . . 6,056 80 

4,043 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

31 cents 1,253 33 



Carried forward 



$17,117 80 



12,391 71 

3,563 60 

644 87 

120 90 

12,447 78 
110 00 
114 25 



),393 11 



Street Department — Paving- Division. 259 

Brought forward . . . $17,117 80 $19,393 11 
3,706 square yards gravel sidewalks 

furnished and laid, at 31 cents . 1,148 86 
124.7 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $4.50 . . 561 15 
Removing trees, etc. .... 450 00 

36 covers reset, at $3.00 . . .108 00 

37 square yards block gutters (old, re- 
laid), at 50 cents . . . . 18 50 

70 square yards crosswalks (old, relaid), 

at $1.00 70 00 

Extra work as ordered : 
26f days labor, at $1.75 . $46 67 
7 days, double team, at $5.00 35 00 
If days, steam roller, at 

$15.00 . . . . 23 33 



Plus 15 per cent 

Removing house . 

652 tons crushed stone hauled, at 10 
cents 



$105 00 
15 75 


120 75 


d, at 10 


100 00 
65 20 


$19,760 26 
1,557 71 



Less amount paid in 1895 

Amount paid to Doherty & Connors (section 
between Harvard avenue and Cambridge 
street) : 
6,534 cubic yards suB grading, at 35 

cents $2,286 90 

8,526 square yards Telford base, at 41 

cents 3,495 66 

8,526 square yards macadam, at 35 

cents 2,984 10 

2,158 square yards block gutters, at 

$2.05 4,423 90 

2,999 feet edgestone set, at 33 cents . 989 67 
2,688 square yards gravel sidewalks, at 

35 cents 940 80 

136.5 square yards flagging crossings, 

at $4.65 634 73 

Removing trees, etc. .... 150 00 
25 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 75 00 
88 square yards gutters (old, relaid), at 

55 cents ...... 48 40 

99 square yards flagging crossings, at 

11.15 113 85 



18,202 55 



Carried forward . . . $16,143 01 $37,595 66 



260 



City Document No. 29. 



Srought forioard . 

Extra work as ordered : 
21 days labor, at $1.75 , 
13 days, double team, at $5.00, 
2^ days, steam roller, at 

$15.00 .... 



Plus 15 per cent 



5,143 01 $37,595 66 



136 75 
65 00 

41 67 

$143 42 
21 51 



557 tons crushed stone hauled, at 10 
cents . . 



Less amount paid in 1895 



Amount retained on Section 1 
Amount retained on Section 2 



Clinton street. 

Labor .... 

Tearing down buildings 

53^?^ feet circular edgestone 

Advertising . 

Teaming 

Masonry 

Gravel and sand 

Lumber 

23,175 large paving blocks 

428 feet flagging . 

18,000 paving bricks . 

Amount paid to Dennis J. Kiley & Co. 

482 feet edgestone set, at 8 cents . 

999 square yards block paving (new), at 
25 cents 

859 square yards block paving (old), at 
25 cents ...... 

98 square yards granite flagging laid, at 
25 cents ...... 

422 square yards brick paving, at 18 
cents ...... 

Extra labor, night and Sun- 
day work . . . . $81 00 
Add 15 per cent . . 12 15 



164 93 

55 70 

$16,363 64 
. 909 92 



15,453 72 







$53,049 38 


$988 01 




818 18 






1,806 19 






$51,243 19 




$1,839 40 






643 05 






69 77 






27 60 






1,607 50 






42 00 






439 98 






39 54 




, , 


1,117 96 


, , 


248 24 




, 


171 00 



$38 56 

249 75 

214 75 

24 50 

75 96 



93 15 



696 67 



$6,942 71 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



261 









$259 45 








5 


92 








98 


15 








396 


80 








46 


80 








203 


43 








287 


27 



at 28 



Fenelon street, between Washington and Merrill streets. 

Labor ..... 

Teaming .... 

Advertising .... 

640 feet edgestone 

36 feet circular edgestone 

5,150 gutter blocks 

Stone ..... 

Amount paid to D. E. Lynch : 
224.6 cubic yards sub-grading, 

cents ...... 

650 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 12 cents .... 
246.5 square yards block gutters hauled 

and laid, at 65 cents .... 
668 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

23 cents 

428 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 22 cents 
20.2 square yards flagging crossings^ at 

14.50 

^ cubic yard ledge excavation, at $1.75 
1 cover reset ..... 

€.7 square yards gutters (old, relaid), at 

65 cents ...... 

2.3 square yards crossings laid, at 11.00 



$62 89 



78 00 



160 23 



153 64 



94 16 



90 90 



3 00 



36 
30 



Less amount retained from D. E. Lynch 



650 36 

L,948 18 

32 52 

L,915 66 



Geneva avenue, between Westville street and Dorchester 

avenue. 

Labor $1,319 20 

Advertising ........ 55 88 

Fuel 1 17 

3,850 gutter blocks 152 08 

679.7 feet edgestone ...... 421 41 

Amount paid to Finneran and O'Hearn : 
800 cubic yards sub-grading, at 32 cents, $256 00 
1,975 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 15 cents . . . 296 25 
445 square yards block gutters laid, at 

27 cents 120 15 

1,125 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

16 cents 180 00 



Carried forward 



$852 40 $1,949 74 



262 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward .... $852 40 
547 square yards gravel sidewalks, at 

22 cents 120 34 

120 square yards flagging crossings, at 

$4.30 516 00 

5 cubic yards ledge excavation, at $1.75 8 75 



[,949 74 



Less amount retained from Finneran & O'Hearn, 



Work done by the Bridge Division 



Qranby street, between Commonwealth avenue 
river. 

Labor . 

Teaming 

716 y3_. feet edgestone 

Stone . 

Cap-stone wall 

Iron fence on sea wall 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Quimby & Ferguson : 

373 cubic yards sub-grading, at 38 cents, $141 74 

1,718 square yards macadam hauled 
and placed, at 27 cents . 

358 square yards block gutters fur- 
nished and laid, at $2.10 

855 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 
22 cents ...... 

680 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 27 cents . 

102.6 square yards flagging crossings 
furnished and laid, at $4.10 . 

110 cubic yards gravel, at 78 cents 

4 covers reset, at $3.00 

14 square yards gutters (old, relaid),at 
60 cents ...... 



1,497 


49 


$3,447 
224 


23 

62 


$3,222 
14,026 


61 

58 


$17,249 


19 



and Charles 


$322 


02 


30 


50 


444 


07 


1,376 


10 


320 


00 


110 


00 


41 


26' 



463 86 



751 80 



188 10 



183 60 



420 


66 


85 


80 


12 


00 


8 


40 



Credit by 659.25 feet edgestone, hauled 
by city 



$2,255 96 



52 74 



Less amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson 



2,203 22 

54,847 17 
110 16 



t,737 01 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



263 



Greenbrier street, between Bowdoin and 

Labor ..... 

Stone . . . . 

Advertising .... 

1,304 /^ feet edgestone 

103 j^-^ feet circular edgestone 

Amount paid to Quimby & Ferguson : 

1,317 cubic yards sub-grading, at 32 

cents $421 44 

1,546 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 22 cents .... 340 12 

524.7 square yards block gutters fur- 
nished and laid, at $2.15 . . 1,128 11 

1,579 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

24 cents 378 96 

970 square yards gravel sidewalks, at 

22 cents 213 40 

45.2 square yards flagging crossings fur- 
nished and laid, at $4.25 . . .192 10 

Removing trees, etc. . . . . 25 00 

11 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 33 00 
35 square yards gutters (old, relaid), 

at 65 cents . . . . . 22 75 
Extra work, puddling and filling 
trench, cutting edgestone and re- 
building sewer manhole : 

12 hours, stonecutter, at 50 



Bloomfield streets. 

$451 15 

1,217 79 

47 25 

808 94 

134 77 



cents .... 

1 day, mason 

20 hours labor, at 20 cents . 

6 hours, single team, at $3.00, 

6 hours, 2-horse roller, at 

$5.00- .... 

2 barrels cement, at $1.50 
Sand ..... 


$6 
4 
4 

2 

3 
3 
1 


00 
20 
00 
00 

33 

00 
10 


27 17 
15 00 

-•guson . 




, Add 15 per cent 
Pulling down shed 


$23 63 
3 54 

mby & Fei 


2,797 05 


Less amount retained from Qui 


$5,456 95 
139 85 




$5,317 10 



264 



City Document No. 29. 



Harvard Avenue, Commonwealth avenue to Brookline line. 

Teaming . $45 00 

Stone 2,287 74 

Amount retained from William ScoUans for work 

done under contract in 1895 .... 165 65 



$2,498 39 



Harvard street, west of Blue Hill avenue. 
Labor ....... 

Advertising ...... 

Amount paid to James McDonald : 
1,337.36 cubic yards excavation, at 83 cents 

Amount retained from James McDonald 



$129 25 
25 13 

1,110 01 

$1,264 39 

40 00 

$1,224 39 



Ivy street, St. Mary's street to Mountfort street. 
Amount retained from James Grant & Co., for 
work done under contract in 1895 



$366 12 



$21 34 

233 58 

897 00 

29 10 

47 04 

159 53 

485 10 

12 00 



$384 70 

506 96 

128 28 

445 57 

51 05 



Josephine street, between Geneva avenue and Ditson streets 

Labor ..... 

Stone ..... 

98 A feet circular edgestone . 

Artificial stone sidewalk 

Advertising .... 

Amount paid to J. J. Nawn : 
97 cubic yards sub- grading, at 22 cents 
1,374 square yards macadam, hauled 

and placed, at 17 cents . 
460 square yards granite block gutters, 

furnished and laid, at $1.95 
145.5 feet edgestone, hauled and set, at 

20 cents ....... 

156.8 square yards gravel sidewalks, 

furnished and laid, at 30 cents . 
37.1 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $4.30 . 
539 cubic yards gravel, at 90 cents 
4 covers reset, at $3.00 .... 

Extra work furnishing lumber and 
banking sidewalks : 
100 feet B. & M. lumber, at 
- $17.00 . . . . $1 70 



Carried forward 



II 70 $1,884 64 



L,516 56 



Brought forward . 
day labor .... 


$1 70 $1 
1 75 


884 69 


$1,516 56 


Plus 15 per cent 


$3 45 
52 

J. Nawn 


$3 97 


1,888 66 






Less amount retained from J. 


$3,405 22 
194 43 








13,210 79 



Kenmore street, between Commonwealth avenue and Newbury 
street. 
Amount retained from Doberty & Connors, for work done 



under contract in 1895 

Lauriat avenue, Blue Hill avenue to Tucker street. 

Labor ..... 

5,279y\ feet edgestone 

488 ^2 feet circular edgestone 

16 small and 2 large corners 

64,250 gutter blocks 

Stone ..... 

Filling 

Advertising .... 

Amount paid to Doberty & Connors : 

2,300 cubic yards sub-grad- 
ing, at 29 cents . . . . 

6,000 square yards macadam, hauled 
and placed, at 20 cents . 

1,460 square yards block gutters hauled 
and laid, at 54 cents .... 

4,800 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 
25 cents ...... 

3,100 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 20 cents 

169 square yards flagging crossings, 
furnished and laid, at $4.50 

95 cubic yards ledge excavation, at $1.75 

37 cubic yards gravel furnished, at 61 
cents . 

14 covers reset, at $3.00 



$48 71 



$989 00 

3,273 33 

635 11 

64 80 

2,537 87 

3,063 49 

1,279 08 

87 74 



00 
1,200 00 

788 40 
1,200 00 

620 00 

760 50 
166 25 



22 57 
42 00 



Less amount retained from Doherty & Connors 



5,466 


72 


$17,397 
820 


14 
01 


$16,577 


13 



266 



City Document No. 29. 



between Washington street and Bowdoin 



Morse street, 

avenue. 

Labor .... 
Teaming . . : 

Stone .... 
645 feet edgestone 
46 ji^ feet circular edgestone 
7,250 gutter blocks 
Advertising . 
Printing 

Amount paid to D. E. Lynch : 
305 cubic yards sub-grading, at 28 cents, 
733 square yards macadam hauled and 

placed, at 14 cents . . . . 
238 square yards block gutters hauled 

and laid, at 65 cents . . . . 
700 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

12 cents ...... 

400 square yards gravel sidewalks fur- 
nished and laid, at 22 cents 
22.2 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at 14.50 
4 covers reset, at 13.00 
23 square yards gutters (old, relaid), at 

65 cents . 



Amount retained from D. E. Lynch 









$272 45 








10 75 








394 22 








399 90 








59 96 








286 37 








49 95 








3 00 



$85 40 



102 62 



154 70 



84 00 



88 00 



99 
12 



90 
00 



14 95 



641 57 

12,118 17 

32 08 

$2,086 09 



Newbury street, Charlesgate west to Brookline avenue. 

Amount retained from F. H. Cowin for work done 

under contract in 1894 ..... $66 70 



Norway street, Falmouth street to Massachusetts avenue. 

Amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson for 

work done under contract in 1894 . . . $152 86 



Norway street, Massachusetts avenue to Parker street. 

Labor 133 75 

Filling 1,274 26 



L,308 01 



Stjreet Department — ^ Paving Division. 267 
Parker street, Huntington avenue to Westland avenue. 

11,192 51 



Amount retained from Doherty & O'Leary for 
work done under contract in 1895 



Peterborough street, Audubon road to Fairhaven street 

Labor ........ 

Printing ....... 

Sundries ....... 

Amount paid to Boston and Albany P.P. Co. 
11,880 cubic yards filling, at 51 cents 



Amount retained from Boston & Albany P.P. Co., 



Ruggles street, Parker street to Back Bay Fens. 

Labor ......... 

Piinting ........ 

7,496 cubic yards filling, at 65 cents 



St. Alphonsus street, Tremont street to Calumet street. 



treet. 

$652 


25 


59 


55 


8 


20 


6,058 


80 


16,778 


80 


908 


82 


$5,869 


98 


157 


74 


87 


20 


4,872 


40 


$5,017 


34 



Labor ..... 
fStone ..... 
15,615 gutter blocks 
l,379y^^ feet straight edgestone 
70j^*2 feet circular edgestone 
1 large corner 
Repairing fence . 
Advertising 

Amount paid to Quimby & Ferguson : 
847 cubic yards sub-grading, at 38 cents, $321 
2,297 gquare yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 27 cents. 
576 square yards block gutters hauled 

and laid, at 82 cents 
1,525 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

24 cents ...... 

1,152 square yards gravel sidewalks 

furnished and laid, at 22 cents . 
22.3 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $4.25 



$753 17 

1,468 74 

616 79 

855 39 

91 43 

5 60 

20 83 

36 00 



620 19 



472 32 



866 00 



253 44 



94 78 



Carried forward 



$2,128 59 



^3,847 95 



268 City Document No. 29. 

Brought forward . . . $2,128 59 $3,847 95 

232 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 

11.80 417 60 

8 covers reset, at $3.00 . . . 24 00 

Retaining walls, fences, etc. . . . 787 00 
24 square yards flagging (old, relaid),at 

$1.25 30 00 



Extra work as ordered : 






187.4 feet capstone for wall. 






at 75 cents 


$140 


55 


47 square yards brick side- 






walks, at 50 cents . 


23 


50 


19 double loads binding- 






gravel, at $1.50 


28 


50 




1192 


55 


Plus 15 per cent 


28 


88 



— 221 43 



$3,608 62 

$7,456 57 
Less amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson, 180 43 



r,276 14 



St. Germain street, Massachusetts avenue to Dalton street. 
Amount retained from Quimby & Ferguson for 

work done under contract in 1895 . . . 1251 95 

Sherborn street, Commonwealth avenue to Dalton street. 
Amount retained from Doherty & Connors for 

work done under contract in 1895 . . . $210 71 

Turner street. 

Labor ......... 

Teaming ........ 

2,380 cubic yards filling ..... 



Vancouver street, Huntington avenue to Ruggles street. 

Labor " $40 13 

Filling 1,602 99 

11,643 12 



$548 

■ 96 

1,190 


49 
00 
00 


11,834 


49 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



269 









$671 


14 








8 


28 








627 


86 








441 


41 








523 


28 








22 


32 








48 


75 



Wilder street, Washington street to Geneva avenue. 

Labor .... 

Teaming 

Stone .... 

11,175 gutter blocks 

844 feet edgestone 

17^^ feet circular edgestone 

Advertising . 

Amount paid to Finneran & O'Hearn : 
1,201 cubic yards sub-grading, at 23 

cents ...... 

1,235 square yards macadam hauled 

and placed, at 15 cents 
375 square yards block gutters hauled 

and placed, at 60 cents 
874 feet edgestone hauled and set, at 

20 cents ...... 

22.7 square yards flagging crossings 

furnished and laid, at $5.00 
1.7 cubic yards ledge excavation, at 

$1.75 

6 covers reset, at $3.00 .... 

Extra work rebuilding catch-basin : 

3 days mason work, at $4.50 . $13 50 
1 barrel cement . 

I barrel sand 
100 paving bricks . 
Carting. .... 
142 feet edgestone reset 
97 square yards gutters re- 
paved .... 

II square yards brick side- 
walks .... 

68^ tons screenings hauled, 
1 day, double team 
4|- days labor resurfacing 
sidewalks .... 



;276 23 
185 25 



225 00 



174 80 



113 50 



2 98 
18 00 



Plus 15 per cent 



1 


00 




50 


1 


25 




50 


17 


04 


33 


95 


1 


76 


23 


98 


5 


00 


7 


88 


$106 


36 


15 


95 



122 31 



Less amount retained from Finneran & O'Hearn . 



1,118 07 

53,461 11 
55 90 



5,405 21 



270 



City Document No. 29. 



NEW EDGESTONE. 

The following tables show the amount of new edgestone set 
during the year : — 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18, in 'whole or in part. 

(^Paving Districts JVos. 8 and 10.) 





Lin. ft. 


East Lenox street ..... 


323 


Fellows street ..... 


88 


Flagg street 


106 


Laconia street 


381 


Massachusetts avenue .... 


760 


Sundry streets in small quantities 


39 




1,697 



ROXBURT. 

Wards 16, 17, 18, 19, 21 and 22, in whole or in part. 
{Paving District No. 7.) 



Abbotsford street 
Alleghany street 
Atherton street 
Batchelder street 
Bickford street 
Cobden street 
Centre street 
Columbus avenue 
Crawford street 
Creighton street 
Dean street . 
Dennis street 
Dudley street 
Egleston street 
Elmore street 
Fairland street 
Fellows street 
Fenno street 
George street 
Georgia street 
Glenwood street 
Harold street 
Heath street 
Holborn street 
Howland street 
Hunneman street 



Lin. ft. 

1,233 

55 

51 

60 

328 

95 

305 

8,983 

149 

256 

1,037 

84 

140 

87 

203 

116 

57 

159 

111 

394 

108 

67 

110 

50 

312 

143 



Carried forward 



14,693 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



271 



Brought forioarcl 




. 




. 




14,693 


Hatchings street . . . . . 


137 


Kensington street 












71 


Langdon street 












154 


Logan street 












64 


Marcella street 












52 


Marshfield street . 












328 


Newcomb street . 












60 


Northampton street 












77 


Parker street 












124 


Paul Gore street . 












176 


Pontine street 












60 


Reed street . 












120 


Ruthven street 












100 


St. Alphonsus street 












1,454 


Savin street . 












213 


Southwood street . 












527 


Thornton street . 












80 


Townsend street . 












246 


"Walnut avenue 












129 


Williams street 












61 


Winthrop street . 












214 


Whiting street 












499 


Sundry streets in small quantities 








472 














20,111 



South Boston. 
Wards 13, 14, 15 and 16, in whole or in part. 
District JVo. 1.) 

Bellflower street . 

Buttonwood street 

D street 

East Fifth street . 

East Second street 

East Seventh street 

East Sixth street . 

East Third street 

K street 

L street 

Lark street . 

N street 

Rawson street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



(^Paving 



Lin. ft. 

1,311 

63 

359 

175 

50 

188 

255 

83 

50 

250 

50 

61 

890 

70 



3,855 



272 



City Docuiviekt No. 29. 



East Bostok. 
Wards 1 and 2. {Paving District No. 2.) 



Blaokinton street 

Falcon street 

Leyden street 

London street 

Morris street 

Paris street . 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. ft. 

130 
142 
246 

74 
75 
99 
41 

807 







Dorchester, 








Wards 16, 20 and 24, in lohole or in part. {Paving District 


JVo. 6.) 


Lin. ft. 


Adams street 124 


Algonquin street . 










194 


Allston street 










100 


Armandine street 










564 


Barrington street 










120 


Bellevne street 










277 


Bird street . 












65 


Blue Hill avenue . 












3,787 


Bowdoin street 












197 


Brookford street 












72 


Centre street 












50 


Danube street 












201 


Dewey street 












651 


Dorchester avenue 












233 


Draper court 












105 


Edwin street 












163 


Eldon street 












80 


Erie street . 












252 


Fenelon street 












668 


Geneva avenue 












882 


Greenbrier street 












1,579 


Hartland street 












190 


Howard avenue 












197 


Ingleside street 












208 


Josephine street 












100 


Lauriat avenue 












4,800 


Morse street 












693 


Park street . 












402 


Robinson street 












104 


Richmond street 












200 



Carried forward 



17,258 



Street Department — Paving DivisiOiSr. 



273 



Brought forioard 
Rosedale street 
Roslin street 
Sagamore street 
Salcombe street 
Sydney street 
Talbot avenue 
Washington street 
"Welles avenue 
Westville street 
Wheatland avenue 
Wilder street 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. ft. 

17,258 

52 

272 

53 

1,417 

100 

207 

537 

155 

132 

87 

877 

220 



21,367 


West Roxburt. 


'Wards 22 and 23^ in whole or in part. (^Paving District No. 5.) 


Lin. ft. 


Ashland street ....... 75 


Birch street . 












78 


Boylston street 












514 


Cheshire street 












60 


Clive street . 












171 


Cohasset street 












100 


Corey street . 












86 


Forest Hills street 












225 


Florence street 












99 


Hyde Park avenue 












67 


Keyes street 












156 


Mt. Vernon street 












102 


Peter Parley street 












292 


South street , 












79 


Washington street 












348 


Sundry streets in small quantities 








46 














2,498 



Back Bay. 
Wards 10, 11 and 19, in lohole or in part. {Paving District 

No. 9.) 

Lin. ft. 

Audubon road ....... 834 

Bay State road ....... 1,562 

Beacon street ....... 70 

Boylston street . . . . . . . 5,629 



Carried forioard 



8,095 



274 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought foncard 
Dundee street 
Falmouth street . 
Granby street 
Huntington avenue 
Marlboro' street 
Norway street 
Scotia street . 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. ft. 
8,095 

70 

177 

716 

32,405 

200 

116 

60 

78 



Ward 25. 

Brighton avenue . 
Commonwealth avenue 
Linden street 
Reedsdale street . 



Bkighton. 

(^Paving District No. ^.) 



41,917 



Lin. ft. 
7,042 

1,230 
125 
110 



CHAELEST0W]Sr. 

Wards 3, 4 <^^^<^ 3- {Paving District No. 



St. Martin street 
Union street 



8,507 



Lin. ft. 
645 

146 



791 



Recapitulation". 



City proper , 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
East Boston . 
Dorchester . 
West Roxbury 
Back Bay 
Brighton 
Charlestown . 



Lin. ft. 
1,697 

20,111 

3,855 

807 

21,367 

2,498 

41,917 

8,507 

791 



101,550 



Street Department — PAvma Division. 275 



Edgestones and Sidewalks. 

Kew Edgestones. {First setting.) Lin. Ft. 



1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

Totals. 



A 
O 

S 


u 

1 


a 
1 

o 

P3 
,g 

'3 

o 
w 


d 
o 

o 
M 






d 


o 
s> 
a 
o 

2,227 
2,804 




8,236 
9,222 
1,118 
1,916 
2,990 
1,697 


22,693 
25,506 
14,979 
39,324 
17,053 
20,111 


11,724 
9,631 

4,372 

521 

2,097 

3,855 


4,131 
11,238 
1,969 

816 
1,146 

807 


18,138 
36,859 
10,587 
6,544 
15,205 
21,367 


4,617 
9,970 
4,795 
1,568 
8,319 
2,498 


2,032 
9,001 
3,981 
1,323 
4,191 
8,607 




694 
668 
791 


41,917 


25,179 


139,666 


32,203 


20,107 


108,700 


31,767 


29,035 


7,184 


41,917 



73,798 
114,231 
41,804 
52,706 
51,669 
101,550 

435,758 



iVifi'TF BRICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of 
brick sidewalks laid during the year : — 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18, in whole or in ]jart. 

{^Paving Districts Nos. 8 and 10.) 





Sq. yds. 


Albany street ....,, 


103 


East Dedham street ..... 


75 


East Lenox street 


170 


East Newton street ..... 


67 


Fellows street ...... 


60 


Flagg street ...... 


100 


Harrison avenue ...... 


140 


Massachusetts avenue . . . . . 


200 


Northampton street . . • . . 


75 


Sundry streets in small quantities 


54 




1,044 



ROXBURT. 

Wards 16, 17, 18, 19, 21 and 22, in whole or in part. (Paving 

District, iVb. 7.) 



Bower street 
Camden street 



Sq. yds. 

73 
53 



Carried forward 



126 



276 



City Document No. 29. 



Carried forward 
Centre street 
Cedar street . 
Cobden street 
Columbus avenue . 
Dean street . 
Dennis street 
Dudley street 
Egleston street 
Elm Hill avenue . 
Farnham street 
Fenno street . 
Glenwood street . 
Georgia street 
Howland street 
Humboldt avenue . 
Hunneman street . 
Hutchings street . 
Howland street 
Langdon street 
Lamont street 
Lambert street 
Moreland street 
Northampton street 
Oakland street 
Parker street 
Paul Gore street . 
Pontine street 
Reed street . 
Regent street 
Roxbury street 
Rockland street . 
St. Alphonsus street 
South wood street . 
Walnut avenue 
Whiting street 
Windsor street 
Woodward avenue 
Sundry gtreets in small quantities 



South Boston. 

Wards 13, 14-, 15 and 16, in lohole or in part. 
District No. 1.) 



Bellflower street . 
Broadway 



Sq. yds. 

126 

172 

166 

50 

11,500 

128 

113 

193 

66 

88 

52 

182 

62 

333 

226 

152 

100 

98 

226 

67 

75 

65 

50 

53 

57 

112 

128 

66 

75 

60 

111 

70 

51 

154 

96 

104 

57 

50 

363 

15,897 



[Paving 

Sq. yds. 

100 

50 



Brought forioard . 



150 



Street Depabtment — Paving Division. 



Brought forward 
Buttonwood street 
D street 

Dorchester avenue 
East Eighth street 
East Fifth street . 
East Second street 
East Seventh street 
East Sixth street 
East Third street 
Emerson street 
II street 
Harvest street 
Howell street 
L street 
N street 

Washburn street 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



East Boston. 
Wards 1 and 2. {Paviyig District No. 2.) 

Border street ....... 

Morris street ....... 

Paris street ........ 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



27T- 

Sq. yds. 

150 
184 

85 
156 
177 
186 

50 
160 

68 
127 

50 
236 
120 
143 
210 

52 

98 

62 

2,314 



Sq. yds. 

85 

54 

70 

172 

381 



DOECHESTER. 

Wards 16, 20 and 2^, in lohole or in part 

No. 6.) 
Alban street . 
Armandine street 
Bird street . 
Brookford street 
Buttonwood street 
Blue Hill avenue 
Dewey street 
Dorchester avenue 
Erie street . 
Mt. Vernon street 
Stoughton sti-eet 
Talbot avenue 
Washington street 
Welles avenue 
Sundry streets in small quantities 



{^Paving District 



Sq. yds. 

178 
333 

50 

55 
100 

99 
275 
251 

57 
269 
110 
214 
375 
110 
140 



2,616 



*278 



City Document No. 29. 



Wbst RoxBURr. 
Wards 22 and 23, in lohole or in part. {Pamng District 

iVo. 5.) 

Sq. yds. 

Boylston street ....... 164 



Centre street 

Green street ..... 

Keyes street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 


70 
70 

77 
161 




542 


Back Bat. 




Wards 10^ 11 and 19, in lohole or in part. 


{Paving Dis- 


trict 1^0. 9.) 

Beacon street 

Falmouth street 


Sq. yds. 

200 
138 


Huntington avenue ..... 
Norway street . . . . 

Newbury street 

Parker street ...... 

St. Botolph street 


4,380 
70 

100 
50 

135 




5,073 



Chaelestown. 

Wards 3, 4 and 5. (Paving District No. 3.) 



Beach street 
Sprague street 
Union street 
Walnut street 



Sq. yds. 

85 
68 
80 
55 



288 



Recapitulation. 



City Proper . 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
East Boston . 
Dorchester . 
West Roxbury 
Back Bay 
Charlestown . 



Sq. yds. 

1,044 

15,897 

2,314 

381 

2,616 

542 

5,073 

288 



28,155 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



279 



New Brick Sidewalks. 

First laying. Square yards. 



Year. 


a 

ft 

2 
>> 

5 


1 


d 
_o 

o 
pq 

3 
O 
EC 


a 
o 

o 

fq 


o 



u 

.a 
o 

ID 


a 
o 

-4-> 

'u 
M 


o ■ 

6 


o 


3 

o 


1891 


3,881 
10,423 
964 
1,537 
4,103 
1,044 


9,098 
20,231 

5,912 
11,533 

6,-246 
15,897 


3,628 
4,484 
751 
2,706 
1.946 
2,314 


2,176 
12,847 
2,197 
2,115 
1,151 
381 


1,478 
10,462 
2,412 
453 
2,146 
2,616 


967 
2,905 

350 

834 
1,734 

542 


377 
1,068 

2,908 


120 

3,451 

175 

437 
408 
288 


5,073 


21,725 
65,871 
12 761 


1892 

1893 


1894 


19,615 
20,632 
28,155 


1895 


1896 




Totals. 


21,952 


68,917 


15,819 


20,867 


19,567 


7,332 


4,353 


4,879 


5,073 


168,759 





PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY 
SUPERINTENDENT OF PAYING DIVISION 

Buildings and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon street. 
The building is of brick and wood, and covers some 8,000 
square feet of land, and is divided into a shed for storage, black- 
smith's and carpenter's shops, tool-room and stable. The total 
contents of the lot, including wharf and building, are 63,180 
square feet. 

Fort- Hill wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in 
charge of the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for 
the landing and storage of paving-blocks and gravel until such 
time as said wharf shall be wanted for the extension of Oliver 
street. The greater part of said wharf is occupied by the Sani- 
tary Division as a garbage-dump, and the building thereon is 
leased to a tenant. 

Lot on Chelsea, Marion and Paris streets. East Boston, con- 
taining 43,550 square feet. Part of this lot used by the Sewer 
Division. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Rox- 
bury, containing 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are build- 
ings containing a steam-engine and stone- crusher. 

Highland-street Stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick 
stable, erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Pav- 
ing Divisions ; also a brick building used as a blacksmith's shop, 
and a shed for the storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 
squai-e feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed 
containing a steam-engine and stone- crusher ; also a stable and 
tool-house. 



280 City Document No. 29. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are 
two stables ; also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, con- 
taining 81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by the town 
of Dorchester in 1867. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,300 square feet. 

On Child street. West Roxbury, a lot of land containing 
43,024 square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, black- 
smith's shop, and tool-house. 

Gravel lot in the town of Milton, on Brush Hill road, contain- 
ing 64,523 square feet, hired by the town of Dorchester for nine 
hundred and ninety-nine years. 

Gravel lot on Morton street, Ward 28, containing about one- 
thiid of an acre, purchased by the town of West Roxbury in 
1870, used for storage purposes. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 
37,000 square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This 
lot is at present leased. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing 
about thirteen acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, 
stable and crusher jjlant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm 
street, containing 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, 
stable, etc. 

In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets, stable, car- 
riage-house, shed, tool-house and office on leased land. 

On Hereford street, a yard with shed, tool-house and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkin's wharf, 521 Commercial street, pur- 
chased in 1887 for 824,000, containing 22,558 square feet, having 
on it an office and stable. 

On Kenney street, Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Centre street. West Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Rosseter street, Dorchester, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Heath street, Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone- crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Revere street, wharf for storing paving blocks, etc. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



281 



Streets Laid Out or Extended. 



Date. 



Dec. 29 

May 6 

Nov. 21 

July 10 

May 1 

.July 10 

*June 2 

Oct. 12 

July 10 

*N'ov. 18 

Dec. 12 

Feb. 15 

Oct. 12 

Xov. 2 

June 2 

July 10 

Nov. 16 

.Jan. 2 

May 29 

June 10 

June 30 

May 11 



Street. 



Abbotsford st. 
Atlielwold St. . 
Atberton st. . . 
Cliamberrn st. 

Edwin st 

Elizabeth st. . . 
Fenelon st. . . . 

Fullerton st. . . 

Gaylord st. . . . 



EUet St. . . 
Judson St. 



Laconia st. . . . 

Leicester st. . . 
Leonard st. . . . 

Morse st 

Norway st. . . . 

Peterboro' st. . 
Pontine st. . . . 

Eeed st 

Ruggles st. . . . 
St. Botolph St. 
St. Martin st. . 



Location. 



From Harold st. to Crawford st. , 
Roxbury 

From School st. to Kilton st., 
Dorchester 

From Amory st. to Lamartine st. , 
Roxbury .... 

From Harvard st. to Algonquin 
st. , Dorchester 

From Dorchester av. to Shawmut 
park, Dorchester 

From Norfolk st. to Astoria st. , 
Dorchester , 

(Formerly Burbank st.) from 
Washington st. to Merrill st., 
Dorchester 

(Formerly Miner st.) from Brook 
line av. to Fairhaven st., Back 

' Bay 

(Formerly Cook st.) from Wash- 
ington st. to Chamberlain st. , 
Dorchester 

From Adams st. to Dorchester 
av. , Dorchester 

Over part of a private way known 
as Dromey av. to Brookford st., 
Roxbury and Dorchester 

(Formerly Ashland pi.) from 
Washington st. to Harrison av. , 
City Proper 

From Bennett st, to Washington 
st. , Brighton 

From Duncan st. to Clayton st., 
Dorchester 

From Washington st. to Bowdoin 
av. , Dorchester 

(Formerly Caledonia st.) from 
Massachusetts av. to Parker st.. 
Back Bay 

From Boylston road to Audubon 
road, Back Bay 

From Batchelder st. to Clifton 
St., Dorchester 

From Thorndike st. to Hunne- 
man st.. City Proper and Rox. . 

From Parker st. to Back Bay 
Fens, Roxbury 

From Massachusetts av. to Gains- 
borough St., Back Bay 

(Formerly Quincy st.) from Bun- 
ker Hill St. to Medford st., 
Charlestown 

Carried forward 



Length, 
Lin. ft. 



60.00 

1,031.00 

650.23 

459.60 

1,168.00 

280.43 

308.74 

447.04 

433.97 

425.28 

217.00 

307.75 
764.57 
430.14 
316.41 

683.48 
1,840.73 
383.00 
854.98 
945.21 
566.86 

513.46 



12,587.88 



City Document No. 29. 

streets Laid Out or Extended — Concluded. 



Date. 


Nov. 
Sept. 


11, 


May 


20, 


May 


29, 


July 


10, 


July 


10, 


Oct. 


29, 



Tappan st 

Union st 

Vancouver st. . 

Whiting st 

Wilder st 

Wolcott St. . . . 
Woodward pk, 



Location. 



Brought forward 

From South st., W. Koxbury. . . . 

From Washington st. to Lynde 
st. , Charlestovfn 

From Huntington av. to Kuggles 
st. , extended to the Back Bay 
Fens, Roxbury 

(Formerly Homer pi.) from More- 
land St. to Winthrop st., Eox. . . 

FrOm Washington st. to Geneva 
av., Dorchester 

From Columbia st. to Erie st. 
Dorchester 

From Howard av. to Folsom st. 
Dorchester 



Length, 
Lin. It. 



12,587.88 
446.51 

70.21 



253.94 
320.00 
523.29 
672 64 
403.18 



15,277.65 



Streets Widened and Relocated. 



Date. 



July 

Sept. 

Nov. 

May 

Dec. 

Nov. 
Oct. 
May 

Jan. 

Oct. 



10, 

n, 

27, 

9, 
24. 

21, 
19, 
23, 

21, 

29, 



Street. 



Clinton st 

Centre st 

McLellan st. . . 

Prentiss st.. . . 

Eiver st 

Ruggles st. . . . 

State st 

Tremont st. . . 

Washington st 

Washington st 



Location. 



From Fulton st. to Commercial 
St., City Proper 

From Washington st. to Reming- 
ton St. , Dorchester 

Between Erie st. and Blue Hill 
av , Dorchester 

On southwesterly side at N. Y. , 
N. H. & H. R.R., Roxbury 

Between Oakland st. and Blue 
av. , Dorchester 

At corner of Columbus av. , Rox. . 

At corner of Devonshire st 

Between Columbus av. and Lin- 
den Park st 

Between Dale st. and Circuit st., 
Roxbury 

Between Brent st. and Welles av., 
Dorchester 



Sq. ft. 



4,887 
28,242 



97 

3,027 

408 

46 

124 



1,647 
38,478 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 283 

streets Discontinued. 



Date. 


Street. 


Location. 


Sq. ft. 


Oct. 19, 


State st 

Windsor st 


At corner of Congress sq., City 
Pi'oper 


59 


Feb. 4, 


Portions northwesterly and south- 
easterly of the extension of 
Columbus av., Roxbury 


2,235 




2,294 



Streets Ordered to Be Constructed. 



Date. 


Street. 


Location. 


Aug. 


7, 


Athelwold st 


From School st. to Kilton st. Dorchester. 


July 


10, 


Chamberlain st. . . 


From Harvard st. to Algonquin st., Dor. 




u 


Elizabeth st 


From- Norfolk st. to Astoria st., Dor. 


Nov. 


18, 

2, 


Ellet st 


From Adams st. to Dorchester av.. Dor. 


June 


Fenelon st 


(Formerly Burbank st.) from Washington 








st. to Merrill st., Dorchester. 


Oct. 


12, 


FuUerton st 


(Formerly Miner st.) from Brooklineav. to 
Fairhaven st.. Back Bay. 


July 


10, 


G-aylord st 


(Formerly Cook st.) from Washington st, 
to Chamberlain st., Dorchester, 


June 


2, 
10, 


Morse st 


From Washington st, to Bowdoin av., Dor. 


July 


Norway st 


(Formerly Caledonia st.) from Massachu- 








setts av, to Parker st.. Back Bay. 


Nov. 


16, 


Peterboro ' st 


From Boylston road to Audubon road, 
Back Bay. 


June 


10, 


Ruggles st: 


From Parker st, to Back Bay Fens, Back Bay. 


Jan. 


29, 


Turner st 


From Haviland st, to Astor st., Back Bay, 


May 


20, 


Vancouver st, . . . 


From Huntington av. to Pvuggles st. , ex- 
tended to the Back Bay Fens, Ptoxbury. 


July 


10, 


Wilder st 


1^'rom Washington st. to Geneva av.. Dor. 


u 


a 


Wolcott st 


From Columbia st. to Erie st. , Qor. 



Names of Streets Changed. 



Date. 


Street. 


Location. 


March 4, 


Back st 


Now Harvard st , Dorchester and West 




Bread st 




March 4, 


Now Franklin st. , City Proper 

Now Batterymarch st. , City Proper 


March 4, 


Hamilton 



The records of the Street Commissioners for the year 1896, 
show the following results : — 



Streets laid out or extended . 
Streets widened and relocated 
Streets discontinued 
Increase in mileage 



15,277.65 lin, feet 

38,477 sq. feet 

2,294 sq. feet 

2.89 + miles. 



284 



City Document No. 29. 



Permit Office. 

Permits have been issued from the Permit OfSce during the 
year ending Jan. 31, 1897, as follows : — 



Steeet Openings. 



Name. 


Permits. 


Openings. 


Feet. 


American Telegraph Co. . 


4 


24 


72 


Boston Electric Light Co. 


438 


584 


61,977 


Boston Fire Department . 


48 


90 


3,541 


Boston Gaslight Co. . 


667 


657 


46,476 


Boston & Albany K.E. Co. 


6 


6 


240 


Boston Lamp Department 


44 


44 


421 


Boston Low Tension Wire Asso- 








ciation . . 


39 


39 


4,501 


Boston & Maine R.K. Co. 


12 


12 


1,000 


Boston Park Department . 


6 


6 


295 


Boston Sewer Division 


165 


155 


29,929 


Boston Transit Commission 


15 


15 


265 


Boston Water Department East- 








ern Division 


3,347 


3,347 


162,175 


Boston Water Department Mys- 








tic Division .... 


279 


279 


7,643 


Broolcline Gaslight Co. 


812 


812 


36,604 


Charlestown Gaslight Co. . 


64 


64 


5,338 


Church Creen Light & Power 








Co 


6 


6 


1,490 


Dorchester Gaslight Co. 


488 


488 


36,268 


Edison Electric Illuminating Co., 


559 


559 


42,995 


East Boston Gaslight Co. . 


145 


145 


7,978 


Jamaica Plain Gaslight Co. 


228 


228 


17,762 


Lynn & Boston R.E. Co. . 


3 


3 


1,900 


Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 








sion 


9 


9 


830 


Metropolitan Construction Co. . 


7 


7 


12,350 


l^ew England Telegraph & Tele- 








phone Co., of Mass. 


389 


1,393 


50,101 


New England Telegraph Co. 


1 


1 


3 


N. Y.,N. H. &H. R.E. Co. . 


4 


4 


130 


N. Y. & I^. E. E.E. Co. . 


4 


4 


2,650 


N'orfolk Suburban Street E.E. 








Co 


6 


6 


295 


Postal Telegraph Cable Co. 


15 


38 


1,244 


Quincy Market Cold Storage Co. 


24 


24 


5,215 


Eoxbury Gaslight Co. 


270 


270 


37,522 


South Boston Gaslight Co. 


248 


248 


10,865 


Union Freight E.E. Co. . 


4 


4 


364 


West End Street Eailway Co. 


416 


1,608 


302,295 


Western Union Telegraph Co. . 


35 


560 


5,612 


West Eoxbury & Eoslindale 








Street E.E. Co. . 


11 


764 


44,550 


Miscellaneous .... 


2,432 


2,433 


109,587 


Totals 


11,289 


15,017 


1,055,171 



Street Department — Paving Divisioisr. 



285 



There were also 2,075 openings made between Feb. 1, 1896 
and Jan. 1, 1897, on emergency permits issued Jan. 1, 1896. 

On Jan. 1, 1897, the new form of emergency permits went 
into effect, and there were 215 openings to Feb. 1, 1897. 

These openings as near as can be ascertained averaged about 
6 feet each, making 13,740 feet. 

Making the total length of openings about 229.7 miles. 

Permits other than for opening streets have been issued as 
follows : — 



Advertising, by man wearing hat and coat lettered 
Clearing snow from roof ..... 

Driving cattle ....... 

Distributing sand ...... 

Erecting projections (illuminated signs, etc.) . 
Erecting, repaiiiug and removing awnings 
Erecting and repairing buildings 
Feeding horses on the street .... 

Moving buildings ...... 

Occupying sidewalk for loading and unloading goods 
Pedlers, four different classes .... 

Placing signs flat on buildings .... 

Eaising and lowering safes, machinery, etc. 
Special for various purposes .... 

"Watering carts ...... 



Total 



29 

63 

3 

9 

310 

4,264 

7,216 

1,064 

42 

15 

877 

2,138 

522 

230 

110 

16,882 



Total number permits for street openings 
Total number permits for all other purposes 

Grand total ...... 



11,289 

16,882 

28,171 



There have been 60 applications for permits to sell fruit from 
windows, doorways and areas, and for occupying sidewalks for 
loading or unloading goods, and these were referred to the 
Board of Police for report as to location, etc., and their recom- 
mendation has been carefully considered in the issuance of 
these permits. 

Previous to April 25, 1896, there were 18,390 notices sent to 
the various foremen directing them to repair defects in the 
streets, which had been reported by the police or others ; also 
1,074 to private parties to repair work improperly done, where 
permits had been granted to open the streets, and to owners of 
estates where coal-holes, sidewalk-lights, etc., were defective. 
After that date the Superintendent of Inspectors assumed charge 
of the Inspectors, and 3,884 notices were sent to private indi- 
viduals and 135 claims for damages investigated. 



286 



City Document No. 29. 



Four hundred and sixty-one notices have been sent to depart- 
ments, and others, regarding proposed street improvements. 

Three hundred and eighty-three new bonds were filed this 
year, and these with all bonds previously filed are now being 
investigated by a clerk specially detailed. 



Street-Numbering. 

Numbers have been assigned to the estates in the different 
districts as follows : — 



City Proper 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 
W. Roxbury 
Brighton 
South Boston 
Charlestown 
East Boston 



8 whole 

18 whole 

8 whole 

4 whole 

1 whole 

2 whole 
1 whole 



streets, 
streets, 
streets, 
streets, 
streets, 
streets, 
street, 



and 63 parts 
and 73 parts 
and 46 parts 
and 33 parts 
and 25 parts 
and 32 parts 
and 11 parts 
18 parts 



of streets 
of streets 
of streets 
of streets 
of streets 
of streets 
of streets 
of streets 



Total . . 42 whole streets, and 301 parts of streets 
About 5,000 figures were required for this work. 



Steeet Department — Sanitary Division. 287 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Rooms 917 to 920, Tremont Building, 
Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 
Benj. W. Wells, Esq., Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : — I respectfully submit the annual report of the ex- 
penditures, income, and operation of the Sanitary Division of the 
Street Department for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897. 
Yours respectfully, 

Patrick O'Shea, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The work of the Sanitary Division includes the removal of house- 
offal and the removal of house and store dirt and ashes, accumu- 
lated from the burning of materials for heating buildings and for 
domestic purposes. 

The following table shows the amounts expended for the main- 
tenance of the Sanitary Division for the past five (5) years : — 



1892 .... 


$469,370 74 


1893 .... 


481,300 63 


1894 .... 


467,459 02 


1895 .... 


432,778 52 


1896 .... 


476,807 34 



Comparative Table Showing Net Cost of Maintenance of the 
Sanitary Division to the City of Boston. 

Expended. Income. Net cost to City. 

1892 $469,370 74 $36,426 16 $432,944 58 

1893 481,300 63 32,056 27 449,244 36 

1894 467,459 02 42,320 55 425,638 47 

1895 432,778 52 42,985 53 389,792 99 

1896 477,241 54 36,146 77 441,094 77 



The present system of disposal of offal and garbage in this city is 
expensive and unsatisfactory, and early action should be taken 
looking to the introduction of more modern and sanitary methods. 
Cremation or reduction process works, properly located, and. con- 
structed and operated with due care, could be established with 
advantage to the general public, and without offence to the indi- 
vidual. 



288 



City Document No. 29. 



The City Government should make a sufficient appropriation to 
accomplish this object. 

But few complaints have been received concerning the failure of 
the division to promptly remove offal and ashes ; investigation of 
these has usually shown that either offal has not been properly sep- 
arated from ashes or other refuse, as is insisted upon by the 
department, or else that the receptacles were deposited in some 
inaccessible place, or were larger than the ordinances provide and 
the regulations of the department permit. 

In order that householders might understand these regulations, 
and that the work be not unnecessarily delayed, the following cir- 
cular was issued : — 

CITY OF BOSTON. 

Notice to Housekeepers and Tenants. 

Housekeepers and other occupants of dwellings are requested to plac 
their house and cellar dirt and sweepings in the streets opposite their prem- 
ises between the hours of sunrise and 2 o'clock, P.M., of the following days: 
Monday, May 4 ; Tuesday, May 5 ; Wednesday, May 6 ; Thursday, May 7 ; 
Friday, May 8; when they will be removed by the city carts. After which 
times no i^erson will be allowed to place any dirt, ashes, tilth or rubbish of 
any kind whatever, in any of the ways, streets or places of the city, without 
a permit from the Superintendent of Streets. 

Dirt of any kind not to be placed in the streets on Satvirday. 

Benj. W. "Wells, 
Swperintendent of Streets. 

City Hall, Boston, 1896. 

Special Notice. 

On and after above-named days, ashes, etc., in order to be removed by 
city carts, must be j)laced in receptacles not larger than an ordinaV.-y flour 
barrel, and in a position on a level with the grade of the adjoining sidewalk. 

Vault filth, offal, bricks and mortar, gravel and earth, garden rakings and 
shrubbery, are not included in the above, and will not be removed by the 
city if ijlaced in the streets. 

Note.— This circular, printed in English, Hebrew, and Italian, was posted in prom- 
inent places by the regular bill-posting companies, and for a week was also carried 
on the sides of all the wagons and carts owned by this division. 

During the past year the shops of the division at the South Yard 
have been continued. These are now established with competent 
mechanics upon the same basis as any journeyman shop in the city, 
and the repairs and some constructive work of this and other 
divisions has been done cheaply and well. They consist of a wheel- 
wright and blacksmith shop, paint shop, harness shop, and horse- 
shoeing shop, and a statement of the work performed will be found 
later in Appendix 

The following table shows the number of loads of offal collected 
and removed in the last five (5) years : — 



Amount of House offal Eemoved. 



Year. 


No. of Loads 


1892 


46,343 


1893 


51,415 


1894 


50,637 


1895 


51,327 


1896 . . . . ■ . 


56,402 



Stbbet Department — Sanitary Division. 289 

Each load of offal is equivalent to fifty-seven (57) cubic feet and 
has a maximum weight of one and one-half (1^) tons at certain 
seasons of the year. 

The above table does not include previous to the year 1893 the 
amount collected by contract in East Boston and Brighton, which 
amouQted to about 5,100 loads per year. Of the amount (56,402 
loads) collected during the year 1896, 3,786 were collected by the 
East Boston contractor, 1,362 were collected by the Brighton con- 
tractor, and 4,707 were collected by the Dorchester contractor, and 
703 loads were collected by the West Roxbury contractor, leaving 
45,844 loads collected by city teams. 

The collection of this material is attended to in winter by an aver- 
age regular force of 75 city offal carts and 171 men, and on contract 
work 17 offal carts and 34 men; making a total of 92 offal carts and 
205 men. At different times, and especiallj^ in summer, an approxi- 
mate extra force of 21 teams and 42 men are employed. 

The disposal has been made during the year in the following man- 
ner : The offal from the markets, and offal that is decayed, is put on 
board a scow and towed to sea ; the offal of Charlestown is taken to 
the yard at Maiden bridge and there disposed of to farmers ; the offal 
of East Boston is collected by contractors, and is removed to Revere ; 
the offal of the City Proper and South Boston is conveyed to the 
yard at the South End, and disposed of to farmers, who remove it 
daily ; the offal of Roxbury and a part of AVest Roxbury is conveyed 
to the yard on Highland street, and disposed of to farmers ; a portion 
of the collections of West Roxbury is collected by contract and 
removed to jSTeedham ; the offal of Brighton is collected by contract 
and disposed of outside of the district ; the offal in Dorchester, col- 
lected by the contractor who sells it to farmers from his own offal- 
sheds near Commercial Point. 



Collection and Disposal of Offal. 



Year. 


Total amount 
collected. 


Amount sold. 


Amount dumped 

on scow and 

towed to sea or 

wasted. 


Per cent wasted 

to total 

collection. 


Amount of 

receipts 
from sales. 


18921 

1893 2 

1894 3 
1895* 
1896 5 


46,343 loads. 
46,276 " 
42,082 '< 
41,480 " 
45,844 " 


30,773 loads. 

30,824 " 
37,057 " 
36,620 " 
35,549 " 


15,570 loads. 
15,363 

5,025 

4,860 
10,295 


33 per cent. 
30 " " 
12 " " 
12 " 
22 " 


$21,282 82 
20,790 03 
26,262 40 
27,874 47 
21,187 76 



12 Twelve months. Above table does not include contracts in East Boston and 
Brighton. 

3 In East Boston, 3,720 loads; Brighton, 1,539 loads; Dorchester, 3,296 loads; total, 
8,555 loads,— collected during 1894 are not included in above table. For 1891 and 1892, 
East Boston and Brighton were estimated at 5,100 loads. 

* In East Boston, 3,732 loads ; Brighton, 1,419 loads; Dorchester 4,179 loads; "West 
Roxbury, 517 loads; total, 9,847 loads, — collected during 1895, not included in above 
table. 

sin East Boston, 3,78Q loads; Brighton, 1,362 loads; Dorchester, 4,707 loads; West 
Eoxbury, 703 loads ; total, 10,558 loads, — collected during 1896 not included in above 
table. 



290 



City Document No. 29. 



The following table shows in convenient form the full force 
engaged in the collection of offal alone throughout the entire city : — 



The Force Employed. 



City Force. 


Hired 
teams. 


CONTRACTOKS' TEAMS. 


TotaL 


E. Boston. 


Brighton. 


Dorch'ter. 


W.Roxbury. 




4 
5 
1 

68 
72 
3 










1 


5 


Inspectors 

OfEal Clerks.... 


7 
7 


1 


1 


1 


8 




1 


Teamsters 

Helpers 


6 
6 


2 

2 


7 

7 


2 
2 


92 
96 
3 
















Totals 


153 


14 


13 


5 


15 


5 


205 



Kemoval of Ashes and House Dirt. 

The removal of ashes, house and store dirt, has been attended to 
during the year by a minimum force of 250 men and 105 city carts, 
also by 6 carts with an East Boston contractor, 5 carts with a South 
Boston contractor, 10 carts with a Dorchester contractor, and 3 
carts with a West Eoxbury contractor. At different times, and 
espe(iially during the winter months, an additional force of 43 teams 
and 86 men are employed. 

This work shows a constant increase from year to year, as will be 
seen in the following table, and is an indication of the actual growth 
of the city : — 



Amount 


of 


Ashes 


, House and Store 


Dirt 


Removed. 


Year. 














No. of Loads. 


1892 














303,878 


1893 






















320,571 


1894 






















326,798 


1895 






















336,886 


1896 






















363,975 



Each load of ashes contains about 44 cubic feet. 



Street Depaetment — Sanitary Division. 291 



ia this coUectiou throughout the entire city : — 
The Force Employed. 







Hired 
Teams. 


CONTEACTOBS 


Teams. 




City Force. 


d 
2 
o 

M 


CO 

0) 

.a 
_ a 

IS 




o 

o 

« 

1 


3 


Total. 




7 
9 
6 
105 
107 
16 












1 


8 


Inspectors 


1 


1 




1 


12 
6 




43 
43 


5 
5 


5 
5 


5 

5 


6 
6 


3 
3 


172 




174 




16 


















Total 


250 


86 


11 


11 


10 


13 


7 


388 



Comparative Statement of Number of Loads of Ashes Collected 
during 1 6 Weeks of the Summer and 1 6 Weeks of the Winter. 



Summer. 


Loads. 


Winter. 


Loads. 


Difference 
tor Winter. 


Apr. 30, 1892, to Aug. 19, 1892 


82,034 


Oct. 30, 1892, to reh. 12, 1893 


106,772 


24,7S8 


" 29,1893, " " 18,1893 


91,721 


" 28, 1893, " " 16, 1894 


106,851 


15,130 


" 27, 1894, " " 16, 1894 


88,865 


" 25, 1894, " " 7, 1895 


116,915 


28,050 


" 26, 1895, " " 15, 1895 


94,671 


" 18, 1895, " " 6, 1896 


121,873 


27,202 


" 30, 1896, " " 13, 1896 


101,185 


" 16, 1896, " Jan. 28, 1897 


117,214 


16,079 



Final Disposition of all material collected from Feb. 1, 1896, to 
Feb. 1, 1897, together with the portion of street sweepings and cess- 
pool dirt, disposed of for other divisions by the Sanitary Division is 
shown in the following table: — 





Amount 
collected. 


Deposited 
on low 
lands. 


Towed 
to fea. 


Collected 
by con- 
tractors. 


Sold to 
farmers. 




Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Ashes, house and store dirt. 


363,975 

56,402 

36,072 

1,011 


220,907 


102,491 

7,910 

36,072 

1,011 


40,577 
no 558 


37,754 






Cesspool dirt 








! 




457,460 


220,907 


147,484 


51,135 ! 37,754 



1 This amount is included in the amount collected, 56,402. Of the 10,558 loads, 3,786 
were collected in East Boston, 1,362 in Brighton, 4,707 in Dorchester, and 703 ia West 
Roxbury. 



292 City Document No. 29. 

The total expenditures of the division, including work 

done for other divisions and paid for by them, was . ^508,443 23 
Less amount so repaid ...... 31,201 69 



$477,241 54 
Cash paid and bills rendered to City Collector . . 36,146 77 



l^et cost of maintenance of Sanitary Division, Feb. 1, 

1896, to Jan. 31, 1897 S441,094 77 

Details of expenditures, income, and operation will be found iu 
Appendix D. 



FINAl^CIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount of appropriation . . . .143.5,000 00 

Transferred from Soldiers' Eelief Fund 11,000 00 

Transferred from Police Department . 29,330 39 

Transferred from Surplus Kevenue . 1,911 15 



Total amount appropriation ..... S477,241 54 
Total amount expended 477,241 54 

Income. 

Amount of moneys deposited and bills presented to the City 
Collector for collection for material sold and work performed by the 
Sanitary Division of the Street Department during the year ending 
Jan. 31, 1897. 

Moneys deposited with City Collector. 

From sale of house offal . . . $21,187 76 
From letting of scow privileges . . 696 35 

$21,884 11 



Bills deposited with the City Collector. 

For the removal of engine ashes . $12,642 66 

For the sale of manure . . . 591 60 

For the letting of scow privileges . 28 40 

For the letting of Fort Hill Wharf . 1,000 00 



$14,262 66 



.$36,146 77 
Amount collected by the City Collector . . . $27,735 68 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 293 



Objects of Expenditures. 



Items. 



For salaries of Deputy Super- 
intendent and clerks in office, 
For labor in collecting and re- 
moving house dirt and ashes, 
For labor in collecting and re 

moving house offal 

For labor of foremen 

For labor of sub-foremen and 

inspectors collecting house 

dirt and ashes 

For labor of sub-foremen and 

inspectors collecting house 

offal 

For labor of men employed in 

stables and yards 

For holidays (allowed time) 
For labor, stock, and tools used 

in blacksmith shop 

For labor, stock, and tools used 

in vfheelwright shop 

For labor, stock, and tools used 

in harness-shop 

For labor, stock, and tools used 

in paint shop 

For labor, stock, and tools used 

in horseshoeing shop 

For labor, rental, tovrage, etc., 

on account of dumping-scovr, 
For shoeing horses (outside 

shops) 

For extra teams collecting 

ashes and house dirt 

For extra teams collecting 

house offal 

For grain used in stables . . . 
For hay and straw used in 

stables 

For horses 

For repairs on stables and 

sheds 

For fuel, gas, and electric 

lights 

For veterinary services and 

medicine for horses 

For printing, stationery, and 

advertising 

For water rates 

For ash stock, consisting of 

cart-covers, baskets, etc 

For offal stock, consisting of 

buckets, etc 



Carried forward. 



Total amount 
expended. 



$9,707 70 

135,815 71 

87,034 11 
7,438 97 

10,696 29 

7,111 30 

20,210 15 
17,307 56 

6,512 72 

5,137 57 

5,246 71 

6,274 42 

6,052 18 

18,795 40 

2,412 37 

66,004 74 

5,289 00 
14,660 16 

17,018 86 
7,031 00 

2,010 59 

1,788 52 

2,370 09 

1,807 40 
854 60 

377 55 

399 35 



35,365 02 



Amount paid 
toy other 
Divisions. 



Amounts charged 

to the 
Sanitary Division 



75 09 



8 00 

16,653 00 

1,117 50 

3,783 32 

4,588 59 

2,611 00 



242 06 
14 00 

156 00 



$29,248 56 



$9,707 70 

135,815 71 

87,034 11 
7,438 97 

10,696 29 

7,111 30 

20,210 15 
17,307 58 

6,512 72 

5,062 48 

5,246 71 

6,274 42 

6,052 18 

18,795 40 

2,404 37 

49,351 74 

4,171 50 
10,876 84 

12,430 27 
4,420 00 

2,010 59 

1,788 52 

2,370 09 

1,565 34 
840 60 

221 55 

399 85 



1436,116 46 



294 



City Document No. 29. 



Items. 



Brought fortoard 

For stable stock, consisting of 
curry combs, brushes, etc. 

For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in East Boston 

For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in South Boston, west 
of Dorchester st 

For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, south of 
Park, School, and Harvard 
sts 

For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, north 
of Park, School, and Har- 
vard sts 

For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in West Koxbury, 
south of Pond, May, Arbor- 
vpay, and Morton sts 

For collecting house offal in 
East Boston 

For collecting house offal in 
Brighton 

For collecting house offal m 

JL' part of West Roxbury .... 

For collecting house offal in 
Dorchester 

For incidental expenses 



Telephone 

Travelling expenses . 

Board of horses 

Rent of stables 

Goddard buggy 

Miscellaneous sup- 
plies for office 

Miscellaneous sup- 
plies for stable .... 

Damage by city team, 

Use of horses 

Newspapers 



$657 04 
817 80 
610 05 
600 00 
390 00 

284 08 

29 03 

20 25 

13 45 

6 50 



$3,428 20 

Paid by Street-Cleaning Di 
vision 

Paid by Paving Division 

Paid by Sewer Division 

Paid by Bridge Division. . 

Paid by Street-Watering 
vision 

Paid by Central Office 

Paid by County of Suffolk 

Paid by City Engineer .... 

Paid by Ferry Division . . , 



Di- 



Total amount 
expended. 



$465,365 02 
1,693 26 
7,400 00 

1,496 25 

3,985 00 

4,387 50 

1,700 00 

8,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,488 00 

7,500 00 
3,428 20 



$508,443 23 



$508,443 23 



Amount paid 
l3y other 
Divisions. 



),248 56 

13 18 

608 33 



323 75 



365 62 



625 00 
17 25 



$31,201 69 



$31,201 69 



Amounts charged 

to the 
Sanitary Division 



$436,116 46 
1,680 08 
6,791 67 

1,496 25 

3,661 25 

4,021 88 

1,700 00 

8,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,488 00 

6,875 00 
3,410 95 

$477,241 54 



22,740 49 

3,947 40 

2,043 40 

400 60 

398 50 

108 30 

1,442 00 

71 00 

50 00 



$508,443 23 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 295 



Total Cost for Removal of House=dirt, Ashes and House-offal. 

House-dirt and Ashes Account. 

Expended for labor, as per pay-rolls . . $146,512 00 

Expended for stock, etc., per ledger account, 154,714 55 

Expended on contracts, South Boston . . 1,496 25 

Expended on contracts, Dorchester . . 8,372 50 

Expended on contracts. East Boston . . 7,400 00 

Expended on contract, part of West Roxbury, 1,700 00 



$320,195 30 



House-offal Account. 



Expended for labor, as per pay-rolls 
Expended for stock, etc., as per ledger ac- 
count ........ 

Expended on contract. East Boston 
Expended on contract, Brighton . 
Expended on contract, Dorchester 
Expended on contract. West Roxbury . 



Salaries 
Incidentals 



$94,145 41 

61,978 52 
8,000 00 
2,000 00 
7,500 00 
2,000 00 

$9,707 70 
3,428 30 



Total 



175,111 93 



13,136 00 



,443 23 



Comparative Table showing the Cost of Collecting Ashes and Offal and De= 
livering same at various Dumps. 

Cost per cart-load, including administration expenses . . $1 14 

" " " minus '• " . . 1 10 

" " " of ashes, hired teams, and contracts . 59 

" " " " " labor, hired teams, and contracts, 88 

" " " " offal, " " " " " 3 10 

" " " " " hired teams, and contracts . . 1 85 

" " dumping-boat load to transport garbage to sea . 55 94 

" " cart-load " " " " " . 13 



Amount expended for the Collection of House=dirt, Ashes and House=offal, 
Labor, Hired Teams and Contracts. 



Districts. 



1 — South Boston 

2 — East Boston 

3 — Charlestown 

4 — Brighton 

5 — West Roxbury 

6 — Dorchester 

7 — Roxbury 

3,9 — South End and Back Bay 

10 — West and North End 

Totals 



Expended for Collectiuo 



Ashes. 



$16,603 74 

7,681 25 

14,581 15 

6,279 50 

13,938 75 

8,839 00 

39,416 50 

73,270 79 

50,874 81 



Offal. 



$8,334 00 
8,270 75 
6,530 11 
2,362 50 
6,587 50 
7,939 50 
21,819 59 
52,001 91 
4,576 55 



$231,485 49 $118,422 41 



296 



City Document No. 29. 



D. 0' Sullivan. 



W. F. Hedrington, 
Matthew E. ISTawn, 

John McShane . . . 



Ash Contracts. 

SI, 496 25 for territory, South Boston, west of Dor- 
chester street. 

7,400 00 " " in East Boston. 

1,700 00 " " " West Eoxbury, south of 

Pond street. 

4,387 50 " " " Dorchester, north of Park 

and School streets. 

3,985 00 " " " Dorchester, south of Park 

and School streets. 



Thomas Mulligan. 
George T. Barnes. 
John McShane. . . . 
D. B. Morrill 2,000 00 " 



Offal, Contracts. 

^8,000 00 for territory in East Boston. 
1,488 00 " " " West Roxbury. 

7,500 00 " " " Dorchester. 



" Brighton. 



Expenses of Dumping Boats. 

Amount expended for towing by department tow- 
boat $5,786 34 

Amount expended for towing by hired tow-boat, 1,082 00 



Amount expended for Eepairs on boats 
" " " " " wharf 



1,2.34 56 
309 26 



Amount expended for Labor, Captain . . . $1,750 00 
" " " " crews and dumpers, 4,513 63 



Amount expended for Dredging 

" " " Canvass dust protectors 



16,868 34 
4,543 82 



6,263 63 
350 00 
453 25 



Incidentals. 

Amount expended for Disinfectants 

" " " Manilla rope, blocks, etc. 

" " " Telephone, salt, etc. 

" " " Dories 

" " " Kerosene oil 

" " " Coal .... 

" " " Ferry tolls, etc. . 



Number of trips to sea by department tow-boat 
" " " hired tow-boat 



$110 72 
63 30 
76 87 
41 08 

5 04 
12 87 

6 48 



316 36 



$18,795 40 



309 

27 



336 



Cost per trip, $55.94. 

Number of cart loads of garbage carried to sea, 147,484. 

Cost per cart load, 13 cents. 



Street Department — SAisriTARY Division. 297 



Material Conecte4 by Districts. 











^ 










>, 










>. 


8 


rt 


fl 




o 


-2 


S 


o 


Material. 


Wrap; 




g 










o 




iJ 




1^^. 


■S 




S 


"bi) 


o 
P5 


o 

C2 


a 


P^ 


is 




o =s 


^ 


o 


3 


M 


CO 


a 


Q 


^ 


o 


House dirt and 
























106,755 


88,669 


57,839 


21,031 


9,802 


25,240 


11,112 


23,099 


20,928 


363,975 


House offal 


24,053 


2,244 


10,325 


2,665 


1,362 


4,092 


3,786 


4,707 


3,030 


56,402 


Total 


130,808 


90,913 


67,664 


23,696 


11,164 


29,332 


14,898 


27,806 


23,958 


420,377 







Disposition of Material Collected. 



Where Dumped. 


O 3 
'C'S 


o 

ai 

o 
o 

ll 

o o 

1-5 


Loads of Street 

sweepings. 

Street Cleaning 

Division. 


o . 

S3 
— <^ 

o «■« 
■A 


ci 
o 

o 


Massachusetts ave., J. C. Cobb, 


31,911 

20,603 
15,948 
15,410 

13,063 

10,903 

10,661 
10,030 

7,958 
7,382 

6,539 
6,394 

5,725 
5,232 
4,813 
4,691 

4,543 
3,612 
3,523 

2,836 

2,666 
2,492 








31,911 

20,603 
15,948 


First St., East Cambridge, J. T. 
Scully 








Ward St., Sewall-Day Co 

Norfolk ave., J. J. Xawn 














15,410 


Mill pond, Cliarlestown, City 
Park Departinent 








13,063 


Huntington ave., J. C. Gal- 
lagher 








10,903 

10,661 
10,030 

7,958 


Vale St., Choate Burnham 
estate 








Centre st., Ovpen Nawn 








431 Medford st., City Park De- 
partment 








Harold st., J. Stone 








7,382 


First St., cor. Congress, State 
of Massachusetts 








6,539 
6,394 
5,725 


Williams st., Mrs. Carey 

Parker st. , Mr. Bowers 














Swett St., J. C. Cobb 








5,232 


May St., Seaverns estate 








4,813 


Devon st., Frank Foster 








4,691 


Maverick st., E. Boston Land 
Company 








4,543 
3,612 
3,523 


Ninth & H sts., Thomas Hills, 








Proctor St., Mr. Brown 








Brighton ave., A. Timmins . . . 








2,836 
2,666 


Prescott St., E. Boston Land 
Company 








Massachusetts ave., L. A. 
Brown 








2,492 










Brought forvKird 


196,935 








196,935 











298 



City Document No. 29, 



Deposition of Material Collected. — Continued. 



Where Dumped. 


Loads of House 
dirt and Aslies. 


o 
o 

11 


Loads of Street 
sweepings, 

Street Cleaning- 
Division. 


o 
o . 

II, 
op 


o 

S 

o 




196,935 

2,357 

2,279 
2,128 
2,057 
2,042 

2,009 

20,362 

31,315 

102,491 








196,935 
2,357 


Congress st.. State of Massa- 
cliusetts 








Condor st., Jolm Hayes 

Brookline ave., Jas. H. Barry, 
Harold st., Harris estate 








2,279 
2,128 
2,057 
2,042 

2,009 

20,362 

31,315 

147,484 

37,934 

3,786 














Shirley st., Star Brewery 

Cottage St., Dorchester His- 
torical Society 














Various places, city teams .... 

Various places, contracts 

At sea by scows 












1,011 


7,910 
37,934 
3,786 
1,362 
4,707 
703 


36,072 


Sold to farmers 


E. Boston, by Thos. Mulligan, 
Brighton, by D. B. Morrill. . . . 












1,362 


Dorchester, by John McShane, 
W. Koxbury, by G. T. Barnes, 









4,707 






703 








Totals 


363,975 


56,402 


36,072 


1,011 


457,460 



Account of the Number of Loads of Material Collected from Jan. 31 
to Feb. 1, 1897. 



1892, 



Tears. 



Ashes. 



Offal. 



Total loads. 



1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



303,878 
320,571 
326,798 
336,886 
363,975 



46,343 
51,415 
50,637 
51,327 
2 56,402 



350,221 
371,986 
377,435 
388,213 
420,377 



1 Dennis O'SuUivan, West South Boston, collected 2,402 Loads 

William F. Hedrington, East Boston, collected 11,112 " 

John H. McShane, North Dorchester, collected 13,447 " 

John H. McShane, South Dorchester, collected 9,652 " 

Matthew E. Nawn, part of West Roxbury, collected . . 3,964 " 

40,577 " 

2 Thomas Mulligan, East Boston, collected 3,786 Loads 

David B. Morrill, Brighton, collected .^ 1,362 " 

John McShane, Dorchester, collected 4,707 " 

George T. Barnes, part of West Eoxbiu y, collected 703 " 

10,,55S " 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 299 



Material Collected, Cost of Hired Teams, including Contracts. 



South Yard 

West Yard 

Roxbury Yard 

Charlestown Yard 

Brighton Yard 

South Boston, Yard 

South Boston, east of Dor 
Chester st, O'Sullivan 
contract 

"West Roxbury by Roxbury 
Yard 

West Roxbury, south of 
Pond and Morton sts., 
ashes, M. E. Nawn; offal, 
George Barnes 

East Boston, ashes, W. F. 
Hedrington ; offal, T. Mul- 
ligan 

Dorchester, ashes, south of 
Park, Scliool and Harvard 
sts., John McShane 

Dorchester, ashes, north of 
Park, School and Harvard 
sts., John McShane 

Dorchester, offal, John Mc- 
Shane 



NuMBEK OF Loads. 



Ashes. Offal. Total 



35,009 
18,910 
22,971 
2,353 
5,606 
11.404 



2 2,402 
5,106 

B 3,964 
1 11,112 

* 9,652 
3 13,447 



141,936 



596 

5 

1,043 

317 

' 1,362 

79 



475 

8 703 
3,786 



9 4,707 



13,073 



35,605 
18,915 
24,014 
2,670 
6,968 
11,483 



2,402 
5,581 

4,667 
14,898 
9,652 

13,447 

4,707 



155,009 



Ajiount Expended. 



Ashes. Offal. Total 



$23,898 24 

11,791 00 

15,811 00 

1,760 00 

3,502 50 

5,644 50 



1,496 25 
3,417 50 

1,700 00 
7,400 00 
3,985 00 
4,387 50 



$84,793 49 



$842 50 

12 50 

2,367 50 

696 50 
2,000 00 

297 50 



1,072 50 

1,488 00 
8,000 00 



7,500 00 



$24,277 00 



$24,740 74 

11,803 50 

18,178 50 

2,456 50 

5,502 50 

5,942 00 



1,496 25 
4,490 00 

3,188 00 

15,400 00 

3,985 00 

4,387 50 
7,500 00 



$109,070 49 



Ashes. 

1 Hedrington $7,300 00 

2 O'Sullivan 5,985 00 

s McShane 4,2.37 50 

* McShane 3,885 00 

6 Nawn 1,700 00 



Contracts. 



Offal. 



e Mulligan $8,000 00 

'Morrill 2,000 00 

8 Barnes 1,488 00 

" McShane 7,500 00 



Division of Amount Expended. 





Hired Teams. 


Contractors. 


Total. 




$65,824 74 
5,289 00 


$18,968 75 
18,988 00 


$84,793 49 


Offal 


24,277 00 






Total 


$71,113 74 


$37,956 75 


$109,070 49 







300 



City Document No. 29. 



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Street Department — Saxitary Division. 301 

The money received from the sales of house-offal is deposited 
monthly with the City Collector, and then credited to the sinking 
fund of the city of Boston. 

House Dirt and Ashes. 

la the collection of house dirt and ashes there are employed 383 
men and 200 carts. This material is removed from hotels, tenement- 
houses and stores daily; from dwelling-houses once a week. 

The City Ordinances of 1892 (chapter 36) require that house dirt 
and ashes shall be kept in an easily accessible place for their removal, 
the men being obliged to enter the yards and remove the receptacles 
to the sidewalks, where their contents are dumped into the carts. 
The receptacles are then placed in their original position. The ma- 
terial is disposed of, if possible on low lands, being used for filling, 
and is also dumped on scows, to be carried to sea. Of the amount 
collected last year, 28 per cent was disposed of ia this manner, 
viz., carried to sea. 

There are five sections of the city let out by contract for the col- 
lection of house dirt and ashes. Both Dorchester contracts are held 
by JohnMcShane; East Boston, by Wm. F. Hedrington; and a part of 
West Koxbury by Matthew E. Nawn. xlt the expiration of one of 
the South Boston ash contracts — that one held by Dennis O'Sulli- 
van, west of Dorchester street, the work was continued by day labor, 
as a yard had been established on Ninth street, corner of Vale; all of 
the teams for the collection of ashes and offal in this section are 
located there, in order that the work be done by day labor. 

House Offal. 

There are employed in the removal of house offal 205 men and 93 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses twice a week 
during the summer months, and once a week during the winter; from 
hotels, markets and restaurants it is removed daily. The men are 
required to enter yards, collect the offal, empty into wagons and 
deliver at the depots, located as follows: One on Albany street, one 
on Highland street, Roxbury, and one at the Almshouse, Charles- 
town; also to the dumping-boats located at Fort Hill wharf on 
Atlantic avenue. 

The offal is largely sold to farmers of adjoining towns, the remain- 
der is dumjDed on the scows and carried to sea. About fourteen 
per cent of the quantity collected during the past year has been dis- 
posed of in this manner. The Dorchester contractor disposes of the 
offal at present in the same manner as the city itself, by sale to 
farmers. 

At present there are four sections of the city let out by contract 
for the collection of house offal: East Boston, by Thomas Mulligan; 
Dorchester District, by John McShane; Brighton District, by D. B. 
Morrill, and a portion of West Roxbury, by George T. Barnes. 

The cash revenue received from the sale of house-offal for the 
past five years has been as follows: — 



1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



$21,282 82 
20,790 03 
26,262 40 
27,374 47 
21,884 11 



302 



City Doctjme^tt No. 29. 



Division Repair-shops. 

Located at the South End yards, situated at No. 650 Albany street. 
At these shops all of the repairs on carriages, carts, wagons, etc., 
are made, together with the painting of the same; all harnesses are 
repaired and many made, and a portion of the horseshoeing done. 

The mechanics in these shops are engaged also in making repairs 
on the vehicles, etc., sent by the different divisions of the Street 
Department; all street signs are painted for the Paving Division, and 
a certain amount of the horseshoeino: is done for the several divi- 











.JP-L,0-LO 

660 


62 










372 


04 










279 


70 










168 


75 










50 


00 










123 


14 










169 


69 










$3,637 


26 



Wheelwright and Blacksmiths' Shops. 

Cost to maintain during the past year, the sum of $11,650.29 of 
which amount $6,461.77 was expended for labor, and $5,188.52 for 
stock. The carts, wagons and other vehicles of the division were 
properly overhauled, when in need of repairs, and the entire lot of 
ash and offal sleds were put in proper working order. Of the above 
amount expended in maintaining these shops, the following amounts 
were charged of£ to the several divisions, and others for repairing, 
altering and putting in good condition their carts, wagons, watering- 
carts, sleds, etc.: — 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division . 

Street Cleaning Division 

Bridge Division ■ 

Street Watering Division 

Perry Division 

Central Office . 

County of Suffolk 



This leaves a net cost of $8,013.03 for the repairs and construction 
of all work of this character for the Sanitary Division. 

There are employed in these shops three wheelwrights, four 
blacksmiths and three helpers. 

Paint Shop. 
Cost to maintain $6,274.42 of which amount $5,008.64 was ex- 
pended on labor and $1,265.78 on stock. The work done by this 
shop was the painting and lettering of that which was either built 
or repaired in the wheelwright and blacksmiths' shops, together with 
1,170 different styled signs that were painted for the Paving Division. 
Of the above amount expended for maintaining this shop, the fol- 
lowing amounts were paid by the several divisions of the department 
for painting carts, wagons, buggies, signs, etc.: — 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Street Cleaning Division 

Bridge Division 

Street AVatering Division 

Central Office . 

County of Suffolk 









238 


1 u 

82 








542 


50 








82 


45 








214 


86 








52 


70 








140 


47 








$2,889 58 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



30n 



Leaving the balance ^3,384.84, as the cost of this work for the 
Sanitar}^ Division. 

This shop employs four painters and three helpers. 



Harness Shop. 

Cost to maintain, ^5,246.71, of which amount ^3,028. 00 was 
expended for labor and S2,218.71 on stock; part of the work sent to 
the blacksmith and wheelwright shops was always repaired here, such 
as Goddard and Concord buggies, leather seats to wagons, etc., 
together with all the new pieces of harness made for the several 
divisions. The entire lot of old and new harness owned by the Sau- 
itar}^ Division has dunng the year been overhauled, repaired and 
oiled at this shop. Of the above amount paid out for maintaining 
this shop, the amounts charged to the several divisions of the depart- 



t lor work done were as follows : — 




Paving Division .... 


$286 96 


Sewer Division ..... 


415 24 


Street Cleaning Division . . 


430 51 


Bridge Division .... 


38 47 


Street Watering Division . 


8 37 


Central Office ..... 


29 14 


County of Suffolk .... 


38 96 




$1,247 65 



Leaving balance, 83,999.06, as the net cost of work done for the 
Sanitary Division. 

This shop employs four hai'ness-makers and helpers. 



HOKSESHOEING ShOP. 

Cost to maintain during the past year .^6,062.18, of which amount 
$4,421.96 was expended for labor, and $1,630.22 for stock. All of 
the horses at the South yard, together with the Street Cleaning 
Division horses stabled there, as also some of the horses located in 
the different stables of this Division, and of other divisions of this 
department, are shod at this shop, and for which the several divisions 
were charged the following amounts: — 

Paving Division 
Sewer Division . 
Street Cleaning Division 
Street Watering Division 
Central Office . 
County of Suffolk 



$195 71 


442 


68 


1,541 


55 


1 


60 


13 


75 


48 


75 



$2,244 04 



i, 808. 14 as cost to the Sanitary Division for 



Leaving balance of 
this class of work. 

These shops employ six horseshoers and helpers. 



304 



stock 
Labor 



City Document No. 29. 

Cost o{ Horseshoeing. 



$1,630 22 
4,421 96 



Division 
Sliops. 



$6,052 18 



Outside 
Stiops. 



2,412 37 



Kinds and Style. 



I^ew shoes 
Bar shoes. 

Resets 

Leathers . . 







Divisions. 








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rt8 




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6,528 


3,009 


1,148 


354 


63 


139 


146 


79 


12 


9 






466 


179 


91 


45 


2 


2 


1,415 


727 


233 


112 


6 


40 



11,241 

246 

785 

2,533 



Average cost per slioe, 45 cents. 



Steeet Department — Sanitary Division. 305 



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306 



City Document No. 29. 



Table showing the Number of Articles and the Variety of Work Performed for 
the Several Divisions of the Street Department at the Harness Shop of the 
Sanitary Division. 



Harness and parts of har- 
ness repaired 

New parts of harness made, 

New harness made 

Concord buggies repaired . . 

Goddard buggies repaired . . 

Box buggies repaired 

Express wagons repaired. . . 

Water carts repaired 

Sleighs repaired 

Pungs repaired 

Horses numbered 

Saddle pads made 

Collar pads made 

Sweat collars made 

Poultice boots made 

Interfering boots made 

Muzzles made 

Carpet blankets made 

Blacksmiths' aprons made, 

Buffalo robes repaired 

Prison wagons repaired .... 

Covers oiled 

Carriage washers cut 

Whips repaired 

Calking boots made 

Two-seated democrat re- 
paired 

Cushions for office chairs. 

New strings of bells made 

Shoe-boil boots made .... 

New halters made 

Eubber boots for Concord 



wagon 

New leather hose made .... 
Cushions for water carts, etc 
Blankets repaired and 

shades covered 

Cover for scow cabin 

Hooks for paint shoj) cov 

ered 



U m 



450 

365 

1 

17 

12 

7 

1 



6 

1 

223 

75 

13 

34 

8 

2 

1 

40 

2 

5 



2 

5 

136 

3 

20 

2 



153 

67 



2 


14 




4 




3 


1 


4 


9 


2 


1 


4 




1 


99 


109 


7 




2 








12 

2 



18 



SP 



14 






11 



12 



^S 






Street Department — Sajstitaey Division. 307 



Number of Signs Painted and Deliveked since Jan. 22, 1896. 

375 Black and Gold, Street and Ward. 

White, Street and Ward (sanded). 
Gold, Street. 
White, Street. 
Gold, Street Double Face. 
" Electric (Shaw's Patent). 
"■ Private Way. 
White, Private Way. 
" Ko Passing Through. 
" IST® Dumping Allowed. 
•' Large Speedway. 
" Bridge Closed. 
" This is not a Public Dump. Police Take 

Kotice (sanded). 
" ISTo Admittance Except on Business. 
Gold, Swett street to South Boston. 
" Massachusetts avenue to Dorchester. 
" Marlboro street. jSTo Heavy Teaming 

Allowed through Here. 
" Large Yard or District. 
" ISTo Dumping Allowed Here. 

JSTo Dumping Allowed. (Sanitary.) 
Large Yard or District. 



4 
405 

38 
6 

20 

25 
198 

94 
6 
2 
1 
4 

3 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
1 
1 



1,190 



508 



City Document No. 29. 



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Street Department — Sanitary Division. 3] 3 

Plant and Property in Charge of the Sanitary Division. 

South City Stables, Shops and Sheds. 

Situated on Albany street, opposite N'ewton street. The lot be- 
longed to the city before being used for this purpose, and contains 
90,780 feet. 

The stable and buildings connected therewith are brick. There 
are also on the premises five wooden sheds, used for storing wagons, 
etc. The stable is two stories high, with French roof, and has 
accommodations for 100 horses. Twenty-three horses are kept in 
sheds. Total original cost, exclusive of land, $79,089.23. 

Connected with stables are blacksmith, wheelwright, painters and 
harness-makers shops, in which the wagons, carts, harnesses, etc., 
used by the department, are constructed and kept in repair. 

Offal Depot. 

Erected in 1864, on the wharf fronting on Albany street, opposite 
Brookline street, on the other side of the dock from that used by the 
Paving Division. The lot which the building occupies, and the 
yard attached to the same contains 39,511 feet, and belonged to the 
city before being used for this purpose. Total original cost of build- 
ing, S18,678.89. This building is used for the deposit of house-offal 
daily collected in the city carts, and from which it is thence conveyed 
without the city limits by purchasers. 

West Stable and Sheds. 

The stable is a brick building, a story and a half high, 128 feet by 
60, located on ITorth Grove street, built in 1860, with suitable out- 
buildings attached to the same. It has accommodations for 83 
horses, in stables and sheds. The lot contains about 45,152 square 
feet. 

Highland Stable. 

With accommodations for 68 horses, on the old Almshouse lot, 
Highland street, containing 81,082 square feet. A part of this stable 
and adjoining lot is used by the Paving Division. There is on this 
lot a brick stable, which cost $88,594.13. On this lot is an offal- 
shed, erected in 1875, at a cost of $1,160.12. 

Charlestow7i Stable. 
With accommodations for 25 horses, is situated on Eutherford 
avenue; lot contains 17,300 square feet of land; stable built in 
1875, cost $5,083.07; sheds and outbuildings built in 1879. 

Fort Hill Wharf. 

Containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of the Sanitary 
Division, used as a dumping station for the city's garbage and refuse, 
and as a landing place for scows, which convey this stuff to sea. 
There are two dumping-boats, known as the Barney dumping-scows, 
and these are in continual use for the above purpose, and are towed 
to sea by the Street Department steam tug boat " Cormorant." The 
tug boat is also used by the Sewer Division. 

A portion of this wharf is used by the Street Cleaning Division as 
a locker for push patrol-carts, etc. ; a part is in charge of the Paving 
Division, and a portion occupied by a tenant. 



314 



City Document No. 29. 



Gibson Street Plant. 

Containing 42,000 square feet, and situated in Dorchester district, 
which has been used and occupied by the New England Construc- 
tion Company for the treatment and disposition of offal, and which 
is now closed. 



Number of Carts and Wagons Collecting House=dirt 

OfEal wagons owned by the Sanitary Division 

" " in use " Thomas Mulligan, East Boston 

" u u c; David B. Morrill, Brighton 

" " " " " John McShane, Dorchester 

" " " " "• George T. Barnes, West Koxbury 



Ash carts owned by the Sanitary Division 

" " in use " Wm. F. Hedrington, East Boston 

" " " " M. E. Nawn, West Eoxbury . 
" " " " " John McShane, Dorchester . . 

Market wagons owned by the Sanitary Division , 



Ashes, and Offal. 

81 



6 

3 

10 



172 

6 

3 

8 

11 



103 



200 



Capacity of Of fal= Wagons. 



303 



During the fall of 1892, 24 offal-wagons were measured and contents 
weighed for the purpose of obtaining the capacity of wagons and the 
weight of offal per cart load. Their capacity averaged 3|J cord feet, or 
56.25 cubic feet, and the weight averaged 3,115 lbs. A cord equals 128 
cubic feet, or 7,091 lbs. Price per cord for offal, §4.00. 



Oeganizatiox. 



1 Deputy Superintendent. 
3 clerks. 

6 foremen. 

1 captain of scows. 
11 sub-foremen. 
14 inspectors. 
27 mechanics. 

7 tallymen or aids. 
5 watchmen. 



5 feeders. 

. 7 messengers. 

6 stablemen. 

18 yardmen. 

19 dumpers. 

. 6 dumping-boat men. 

210 ash-cart drivers and helpers. 

140 offal-cart drivers and helpers. 



Total, 486 employees. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 315 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Probate Building, 28 Court Square, 
Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 

Mr. Benjamin W. Weli.s, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir : I respectfully submit report of expenses, income, and 
operations of the Sewer Division for the financial year ending Jan. 
31, 1897; together with a statement of the present condition of the 
sewers and the other property in the charge of this division; the 
work done this year, and what should be done in the near future 
that the eflficiency of the sewerage system of the city of Boston may 
be improved and maintained in projier condition. 

Respectfully yours, 

Charles E. Cutter, 
Deputy Superintendent. 

The Sewer Division has charge of the following work: 

1. Construction and maintenance of all sewers and catch-basins. 

2. Completion and maintenance of the Main Drainage Works. 

3. Construction and maintenance of the channels of Stony brook. 

4. Construction and maintenance of street culverts and surface 
drains. 

6. Preparation of plans, and the engineering and supervision 
required on the construction and maintenance of all work connected 
wiih the division. 

6. Investigation of complaints in regard to defective sewerage 
and surface drainage. 

7. Granting of permits for all connections to be made with the 
common sewers, and the custody of bonds filed by drain layers 
authorized to make such connections. 

8. Levying of assessments on estates benefited by the construc- 
tion of sewers. 

Organization. 

The department is in charge of a deputy, who is also engineer of 
the Main Drainage Works which are connected with this division. 

The engineering of this division is in charge of a chief eogineer, 
who has supervision of the engineering and construction, and he has 
three assistant engineers in chai'ge of the three divisions of the 
city; a chief draughtsmaa, a chief inspector, who has charge of 
the inspectors on contract and release work. 



316 City Document No. 29. 

The chief engineer is held accountable for all work that comes 
under his supervision, all plans and estimates for new sewers and 
rebuilding of old sewers, and for all storm or relief sewers, surface 
drains, street culverts, and the connections between the common 
sewer and the intercepting system of the city or State. 

In preparing these plans or estimates, it is often necessary to make 
forecasts of probable increases of population for long periods in the 
future, to avoid on the one hand spending an unnecessary amount 
of money at the present time, and on the other hand the building of 
sewers which will prove too small in the immediate future. 

On the designing of enlarged channels for surface water, the same 
principles apjDly ; a forecast of the probable development of the dis- 
trict has to be made for a reasonable period of time to determine the 
probable flood discharge, for which provision should be made, as 
this increases largely with the development. The duties of this divi- 
sion are not confined simply to actual work of construction, as the 
studies that ai'e necessary for future work, or immediate work that 
money cannot be furnished for at present, have to be worked out in 
this division. It not only means a study which is different from 
other cities in this country, but it means a scientific adjustment of 
the present requirements with those of the future. 

In the low parts of the city the sewers have to be designed for 
storage purposes during periods of high tides, as on most all the 
new made land parts of the city the average run of cellars is much 
below the possible high tides. The average tides of Boston are 
about grade 10, but at the same time we have to figure on the possi- 
ble high tides which are apt to go to grade 14, and are known to 
have gone to grade 15. This makes a very complicated study, and 
especially in designing the connections with the interceptor, because 
in case of high tides or floodings the interceptor shuts oif , the water 
discharging through the outlets to the sea. 

Also in designing sewers for the new territories which are to be 
developed, the division does not feel that it would be wise to design 
large sewers that would accommodate the future indefinitely; but 
they are designed so that they can be used for twenty or twenty-five 
years, and the amount of money that would be expended between 
that and the largest system saved to the city. The interest on this 
amount would often equal the original cost of the sewer, so that it 
might be actually cheaper at the end of twenty-five years to destroy 
the sewer built, and rebuild the size required at that time. 

The clerical force is in charge of a chief clerk, who has charge of 
the finances, making of assessments, the granting of permits, the 
custody of bonds filed by drain layers, and the making and filing of 
plans showing the connections that are made of the whole sewerage 
system and house connections. 

The city is divided into seven districts, each district being assigned 
to a foreman, who has charge of all the construction and mainte- 
nance work in his district. 

The Main Drainage Works consist of the main sewer from its 
connection with the Metropolitan system at Gainsboro' street and 
Huntington avenue to the pumping station at Cow Pasture, the 
pumping station tunnel across the bay, the tunnel and its connec- 
tion with the reservoirs at Moon Island, the reservoirs and outfall at 
this place, together with the regulators, connections, and branch 
interceptors of the common sewers with this system. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 317 

The care and maintenance of this system is in charge of three fore- 
men, one of whom has charge of the pumjoing station and work at Cow 
Pasture, one has charge of the reservoirs and outfalls at Moon 
Island, and one has charge of the main drain, the gates and con- 
nections on the main drain and the interceptors ; also of the regu- 
lators and connections in East Boston and Charlestown with the 
IS'orth Metropolitan system. 

The workings of the Main Drainage System have been under dis- 
cussion for the last year, as can be seen by the Superintendent's 
report. The history of the Main Drainage will be found later on in 
this report. 

There is also connected with this division the tow boat "Cormo- 
rant," which is used for the towing of sludge from the pumping 
station at Cow Pasture. When not employed in this work, it does 
the towing of garbage scows for the Sanitary Division. 

Stony brook is in charge of a foreman who looks after the main- 
tenance of the brook. During the present year, during the recon- 
struction of the channels of Stony brook, we have a separate force 
under a resident engineer. 

There are at j^resent about eight hundred (800) men employed in the 
Sewer Division. The work of this division for the last year has been 
very extensive, more men being employed, and moi'e money expended 
for the construction of sewers than in any previous year in the history 
of the division. 

Owing to the growth of the city, especially the suburban districts, 
the work of this division has increased rapidly in the last few years, 
and the demands on the division are more and more; but notwith- 
standing this it is impossible to obtain the money necessary for the 
proper maintenance of the division. The City Council does not 
furnish this division with the i^roportionate increase of appropria- 
tion for maintaining the ever-increasing mileage of sewers ; and 
if the City Council is not able to furnish the necessary money to 
maintain, clean and flush the sewers and clean the catch-basins, the 
only remedy is to make the division a self supporting one, provide it 
with an income, and put it on the same basis as the Water Depart- 
ment. 

The following table shows the maintenace appropriation of this 
division for the past five (5) years: 



1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



$350,000 00 
350,000 00 
320,000 00 
300,000 00 
280,000 00 



Some of the difficulties and problems considered by this division 
are the following : There is a great deal of trouble in this division 
on account of sewer assessments, as it is very hard to convince an 
abutter, who happens to have a trunk sewer constructed in front of 
his house, and is assessed at perhaps $2 or $2.50 per front foot, 
and receives only the benefit of sewerage for a couple of persons, 
that there is anything equitable in assessing the estate at this rate, 
when another abutter on a side street where only a pipe sewer is 
built, is only assessed perhaps $1.15 or .fl.25 per front foot, and 
yet furnished with drainage for ten or a dozen persons. This is a 
hard problem to solve, but the city of Boston in the last fifty years 



318 City Document No. 29. 

has tried all conceivable laws for assessment, both by area and front 
foot, yet none have been found to be satisfactory. 

The question of surface drainage in the outlying districts: The 
surface drainage of Boston is in such a condition, in the outlying 
districts, especially, that it became a problem for extensive study 
during the past year. This subject will be discussed later on. 

The need of proper ventilation of the sewers. An article on this 
subject will be found later on. 

The legal grade of cellars: The building laws o£ the city of 
Boston give a man the right to build his cellar at grade 12, when 
the tide frequently rises above this. 'No cellar should be built in 
Boston lower than grade 14. 

The grade of sewers in the residential portions of the city: The 
sewers are hardly ever built lower than eight or nine feet from the 
surface of the street. This will furnish all proper drainage for the 
common run of cellars ; but as the residential portions of the city 
change to the business portion, the cellars are put in deeper, and 
there is no law to stop it, and then the parties apply for a low-grade 
sewer. In reconstructing these sewers to fit the low grade, gener- 
ally twenty or thirty estates are passed, and the parties rtceiving no 
actual benefit are assessed, and they generally object to paying for 
the benefit of some individual above them. I think there should 
be a law fixing the legal depth of cellars below the grade of the 
street in front of the premises, and when cellars are put in at a 
greater depth than that prescribed by law, and the sewer is rebuilt 
to accommodate these low cellars, it should be paid for by the parties 
benefited. 

The work that is done by drain-layers: The aim of this division 
has been to build tight sewers for house drainage, so as to prevent 
ground water from finding its way into the sewer system and 
increasing the volume of pumpage; generally these sewers run in the 
centre of the street. A party applies for a house-connection which 
may be anywhere from twenty to forty feet in length. The house- 
connection is put in by a drain-layer, over whom this division has no 
control except in making the connection where it joins the sewer. 
Of course, everybody is anxious to put it in as cheaply as possible, 
and in doing this they are very apt to put in a leaky connection. I 
think that this division ought to make all connections up to the house, 
charging the individual for so doing. 

In connection with the above, we should have the right to compel 
stables, factories, or other parties that use a sewer, and use material 
and matter that is detrimental to the sewers, to put in catch-basins 
or settling-tanks to settle this debris before it enters our sewers. 

This division should have the right to have inspectors enter build- 
ings and inspect the quality of the sewage that they discharge into 
our sewers. 

During the last year the City Council authorized a number of 
loans for sewer construction, thereby enabling this division to pro- 
ceed with work that had been contemplated for a long time as 
follows: The starting of the Canal-street sewer system, which is 
going to relieve the North End; the Shamrock-street outlets, which 
will relieve the interceptor at this point and prevent the flooding of 
cellars in this neighborhood. 

■ The large outlet which discharges into the South bay, known as 
the B and Seventh-streets outlet, and is the beginning of the relief 




STONY BROOK CONDUIT-SHOWING ROCK EXCAVATION NEAR 

HOG BRIDGE. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 319 

for the sewer system of the lower end of South Boston. In con- 
junction with this it will be necessary for the government to provide 
money to extend this system up Dorchester avenue, from B to Dor- 
chester streets. This, with the building of the sewers in D, Dorr, 
Dexter, and EUery streets, will furnish relief for this neighborhood; 
the Guild row relief sewer and the rebuilding of the Dorchester 
brook from Norfolk avenue to George street. 

The pumping-plant, known as the Lyons-street pumping station, 
is now in working order. This furnishes relief for what is known as 
the Lauriat-avemie and Forest-avenue system of sewers, and it en- 
ables the people in this district to get proper drainage. 

Connections with the Metropolitan system in Charlestown and 
East Boston. 

The overflow on Congress street, from Atlantic avenue to the 
Fort Point channel, has been constructed to take the place of the 
old Pearl-street overflow, which was cut off by the filling in of 
Russia wharf dock. 

South Boston. 

The rebuilding of the B and Seventh-streets overflow outlet, now 
about two-thirds completed, will afford relief to the sewers in a large 
part of Wards 13 and 14, which, on account of the insufficient size 
of the outlet, were flooded at every heavy storm. Many of the 
sewers in the area drained by this outlet are, however, in very jDoor 
condition, or of too small size; and those in the following streets 
should be rebuilt as soon as money can be provided: — 

B steeet, between Dorchester avenue and Fou)-th street. 

Gold street, between B and C streets. 

Gold street, between C and D streets. 

Silver street, between C and D streets. 

Silver street, between B and C streets. 

Silver street, between Dorchester and G streets. 

West Fourth street, between C and E streets. 

West Fifth street, between B and F streets. 

West Sixth street, between B and D streets. 

West Seventh street, between B and D streets. 

West Eighth street, between D and E streets. 

The sewers in the following streets are also in very poor condi- 
tion, and liable to cause trouble at any time: — 

Athens street, between E and Dorchester streets. 

Bolton street, between B and D streets. 

Bolton street, between D and E streets. 

Bolton street, between E and Dorchester streets. 

Dove street, between F and Dorchester streets. 

D street, between Second street and Bi'oadway. 

East Fourth street, between Dorchester and E streets. 

East Fourth street, between O and P streets. 

East Second street, between K and L streets. 

East Fifth street, between H and K streets. 

Jenkins street. 

A sewer is needed in Dorchester avenue, between B and D streets, 
and the sewer in Dorchester avenue between D and Dorchester 



320 City DocuMEisrT No. 29. 

streets should be rebuilt. This will enable the overflow from D 
street, and from all sewers draining into Dorchester avenue, north 
of Dorchester street, to discharge by means of the B and Seventh 
streets overflow, which was designed large enough for that purpose. 

The D-street sewer, which is now in very poor condition between 
Dorchester avenue and Eighth street, can then be rebuilt in such a 
manner as to do away with the flooding of the street under the Old 
Colony Railroad, which occurs whenever heavy rain falls at high 
tide. 

The sewers in Dexter and Ellery streets are in a ruinous state. 
Complaints are constantly received regarding the condition of these 
sewers, which have settled and become so distorted that the clean- 
ing rods cannot be pushed through from one manhole to the next. 
In its present condition the sewer is nothing but an elongated cess- 
pool. Temporary relief can be obtained by a frequent flushing, but 
not until the completion of the sewer in Dorchester avenue above 
mentioned, can any permanent relief be obtained. 

The sewer in Mercer street should be rebuilt of a larger size, and 
thus prevent the flooding of cellars in that locality. 

A sewer is badly needed in Dorr street to do away with the 
nuisance existing in that neighborhood. 

The Kemp-street outlet is almost useless in its present state; the 
arch and side walls having fallen in for several hundred feet. The en- 
tire structure should be rebuilt at once, of sufficient size to serve as 
an overflow for the South Boston Interceptor, which has no proper 
overflow when the regulator at the main sewer is closed. 

It is a question whether it is advisable to build this overflow large 
enough to act as an outlet for the Dorchester brook sewer, when it 
becomes necessary to extend the latter, but with our present knowl- 
edge of the extent to which South bay will be filled in, it seems at 
this time unwise to expend the extra amount necessary to make the 
Kemp-street outlet answer this purpose. 

There are many sewers in South Boston where the manholes are 
so far apart that the cleaning rods cannot reach the entire distance 
between them; also many cases where there is no manhole at the 
upper end of the sewer, and therefore no means of flushing in a 
satisfactory manner. Money should be provided to remedy these 
defects. 

Work done during the year. 

Two thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight (2,898) linear feet 
of sewers were built by the city by day labor; nine hundred and 
seventy-nine (979) linear feet were built by private parties and re- 
leased to the city. 

East Boston. 

The work of connecting sewers in this district with the Metro- 
politan sewer system was begun last August, and is being carried on 
with all possible despatch. The original estimate for the connec- 
tions with this system was forty-seven thousand dollars ($47,000), 
twenty-three thousand dollars ($23,000) of which were provided last 
year. It will be necessary for the City Council to authorize the 
other twenty-four thousand dollars ($24,000), so that this work can 
be carried on with despatch and finished this summer. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 321 

The house sewage system of East Boston depends wholly on the 
Metropolitan sewer system for outlets, and in designing the inter- 
cepting system the necessary branches to make the connections with 
the different drainage areas and their interceptors were not in all 
cases put in, and there are a number of areas lor which, as yet, no 
provisions have been made. 

I wish to call your attention to a few of the defects of the present 
system . 

The interceptor on the west side of East Boston was built at an 
unnecessarily high elevation, its end at Condor and Meridian streets 
being at grade 13.2, and as the abutters had a right to build their cel- 
lars at grade 12, the existing houses on Meridian street, between 
Condor street and Chelsea bridge, cannot be drained in a satisfactory 
manner. 

No intercepting sewer has been built by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission to take the outlets at Eagle square and Glendon and 
Putnam streets, bordering on Chelsea creek. This ought to be con- 
structed immediately for the relief of this district. 

On the south side of the island is a considerable area sewered on 
the combined system, and draining through the Moore-street outlet. 
No means have been provided by the Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 
mission for dealing with the sewage from this area. Money should 
be provided for building this system of sewers immediately. 

The Act under which the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission was 
created, namely, chapter 439 of the Acts of 1889, states in sect. 3: 
"Said Board shall construct . . . which systems shall be in 
substantial accordance with the plans reported and recommended by 
the Slate Board of Health in its report to the Legislature of 1889." 
In the report alluded to, which is Senate Document No. 2, it is stated 
on page 105 that " Breed's Island and the portions of East Boston 
north-east of Swift street now have no sewers except in Moore street 
and a street crossing it. In the whole of this territory it is proposed 
to exclude storm water from the sewers." 

This statement was correct as far as Breed's Island was concerned, 
but the area drained by Moore-stx'eet outlet had at the time this re- 
port was made about five thousand (5,000) linear feet of sewers, or 
about one-third the total amount it will contain when the area is 
fully developed. 

These sewers were all designed on the combined system, and since 
1889 all extensions have been made on the same plan. There seems 
to be no good reason for changing to the separate system, and yet 
with this area practically under the combined system at the time the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Commission designed their sewers, they now 
inform us that we must have separate drainage for our surface water, 
and that we cannot drain even roof water into their sewers. It 
seems as though the city and the Commonwealth ought to revise 
these statements, and compel the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sion to provide a branch interceptor for the present system of this 
district, and all future construction should be on the separate system. 

At Orient Heights thei-e is an area of about 300 acres of low-lying 
territory, to drain which it will be necessary to build a low-level 
sewer, from twenty to thirty feet deep, and about one and one-half 
miles in length, extending back to the East Boston pumping station 
of the Metropolitan sewerage system at Chelsea and Addison streets. 
This should have been built by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 



322 City Document No. 29. 

sion at the time of construction of the main sewer, and they ought 
to be compelled to build this immediately, so that we could enjoy the 
benelits of connection with this portion of the Metropolitan system 
for which we are paying at the present time, or we should receive an 
abatement on account of not receiving any service for this portion of 
East Boston. Numerous petitions have been received during the 
year for sewers in this district, which cannot be built until this low- 
level sewer is constructed. 

At the present time the amount of money paid by the city to the 
State for pumping the sewage on the North Metropolitan system, is 
based on population for the maintenance item, and on valuation for 
the item representing interest and sinking fund; and as we are pay- 
ing our proportionate part for the whole of East Boston on this basis, 
you can see by the above statements that we are not being used 
in a fair manner, as the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission has 
failed to provide us with the necessary outlets to drain this territory. 

The following sewer outlets, which are now in a very dilapidated 
condition, should be rebuilt. They will be used for storm-water 
overtlows, when the areas which they now drain are connected with 
the Metropolitan sewer: Jeffries street, Sumner street, Putnam street 
and Porter street. Outlet at Dock 13 should be extended about four 
hundred and fifty feet. 

The Porter-street outlet is in a particularly bad state, and as the 
open space between the B., R. B. & L. R.E. and the sea wall, about 
two hundred feet south-westerly, is being filled in, the overflow from 
this outlet in time of storm will be retained in the basin, formed by 
the railroad. Wood Island Park, Bremen and Maverick streets. The 
outlet should be extended to the open water beyond the sea Avail. 

The time is not far distant when it will be necessary to take some 
action regarding the drainage of the land owned by the East Boston 
Company, between Bremen street and the B., E. B. & L. R. R. Com- 
pany. Streets have been built on this tract for some years and 
several houses have been erected. Considerable study has been given 
to developing a proper system of drainage for this tract, and a well- 
considered scheme has been evolved. 

In view of the fact that a large amount of water will be encoun- 
tered in building these sewers, it would be to the advantage of the 
city to build them, and assess the cost on the owners of the land 
rather than to have them built by the owners and released to the 
city. 

A sewer should be built in Chelsea street, between Curtis street 
and the bridge. This Avill afford an opportunity to drain Pope, 
Chaucer and Curtis streets, which are badly in need of sewers. 
Sewers are also needed in Wordsworth street, between Saratoga and 
Pope streets, and in Ashley avenue, between Bennington and Breed 
streets. 

Worh done during 1896. 

Connections have been made with the Metropolitan sewerage 
system at Meridian street, near Condor, Bremen street, near Porter, 
and Border street, near Decatur. Twenty-nine hundred and ninety- 
seven (2,997) linear feet of sewers were built by the city by contract 
and day labor. 



Street Department — Sewee, Divisioisr. 323 

Charlestowk. 

The work of connecting the city sewers with the Metropolitan 
sewerage system has been begun, and is being carried on as rapidly 
as possible. In order to complete this wox-k during the coming year, 
nineteen thousand dollars ($19,000) will be required in addition to 
the amount now on hand. 

The Beacham-street district, bounded by Main and Alford streets, 
Mystic river and the city of Somerville, should be connected with the 
Metropolitan sewer system. The existing sewers in this district can 
be used for storm- water outlets; and pipe sewers, to carry house 
drainage only, should be laid to connect with the Metropolitan sys- 
tem. About six thousand (6,000) feet of pipe sewers will be re- 
quired for this; and in those streets where there are at i^resent no 
sewers, about three thousand (3,000) feet of surface drain will be 
needed. 

Complaints are made every year regarding the backing up of 
sewage in the Cambridge-street sewer. This is due partly to the 
small size and flat gradient of the sewer itself and partly to the in- 
sutiicient size of the outlet in Beach street. The outlet should be 
built of proper size, and also the sewer as far as the junction of Per- 
kins and Kingston streets. 

The sewer in Rutherford avenue, between Dunstable and Beacham 
streets, is in a very defective state, and requires rebuilding. 

During every heavy storm the sewers in the vicinity of Tibbetts 
townway and Eutherford avenue have given trouble. This is 
caused by the fact that the Rutherford-avenue outlet is too small, 
and the sewers in Tibbetts townway and adjacent streets are not 
only too small but are in a tumble-down condition. The trouble can 
be partially remedied by rebuilding the sewers in Tibbetts town- 
way, Lyndeboro' and Middlesex streets, and a part of Essex street. 
A complete removal of the trouble will necessitate building a large 
storm-water outlet, parallel wiili the present Rutherford-avenue 
outlet. Estimates of cost for this have been prepared. 

There are at present some twenty (20) streets in Charlestown 
which contain about eight thousand (8,000) feet of slate, wood and 
brick sewers. These were built many years before the annexation 
of Charlestown and are of a type long since condemned by experts 
in sewer design. Money should be provided for replacing these with 
pipe or brick sewers as may be required. 

Work done during 1896. 

One thousand and thirty (1,030) linear feet of sewers have been 
built by the city, and the connections with the Metropolitan system 
have been made at Alford street and at Chelsea near Vine street, all 
by day labor. 

Brighton. 

Sewers have been called for in the tract owned by the Westmin- 
ster Land Company, south of Union street and east of Chestnut 
Hill avenue. These streets will drain partly into Commonwealth 
avenue, at points where at present there are no sewers or surface 
drains and where the avenue has not yet been constructed to more 
than one-half its full width. The remainder will drain into Chestnut 
Hill avenue. This latter part presents some features for considera- 
tion. 



324 City Document No. 29. 

If we build sewers on the combined system we carry into the exist- 
ing sewers in time of storm, an amount of water which they are 
totall}^ unable to carry on account of their insufficient size. If we 
build on a separate system, connecting the surface drains with the 
brook, which rises near Union street, we meet with a similar diffi- 
culty, since the brook itself is taken into the sewer in Shepard street. 
The remedy for the latter evil is discussed in another part of this 
report. 

Sewers should be built during the coming season in the streets 
laid out by the Aberdeen Land Company, between Commonwealth 
avenue and the town of Brookline. As these drain into a part of 
the town of Brookline, where the sewers are on a separate system, it 
will be necessary to design our sewers on the same plan. 

Two brooks flow through this territory, which have for part of 
their lengths been taken into covered channels, and can be used as 
outlets for the surface water system. 

As mentioned in previous reports, a sewer should be built from 
Buffalo street to Everett street to take the drainage of the stock 
yards into the Everett street sewer, instead of allowing it to enter 
the brook as at present. 

Work done during 1896. 

The sewers and surface drains for the Commonwealth-avenue 
boulevard have been completed, and the outlet to Lake street is 
under contract. 

House sewers and surface drains have been built in ISTorth Harvard 
street, between the Metropolitan sewer system and the Charles river, 
and in Holmes avenue, between Harvard avenue and Warren street. 

Twenty-two thousand four hundred and sixty-six (22,466) linear 
feet of sewers and surface drains have been built by the city under 
contract or by day labor. Two thousand and sixty-nine (2,069) linear 
feet have been built by private parties. 



West Koxbury. 

The West Roxbury low level sewer will be completed to Boyl- 
ston station during the coming year. Estimates have been made for 
extending it from that point as far as the Hyde Park line. This 
extension is very necessary in order to obtain di'ainage for a number 
of streets which are at too low a grade to be accommodated in any 
other manner. 

Sewers are very much needed in the following streets in the Mt. 
Hope district : Florence, Sycamore, Brook, Sherwood, Ridge and 
Garden streets and Prospect and Brown avenues. The outlet for 
these will be through a projected street into the Washington-street 
sewer, near the junction of South and Washington streets. These 
sewers are designed on the separate system; the surface water to be 
taken into the brooks in the vicinity. 

The Neponset valley intercepting sewef now being constructed by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission will be nearly, or quite com- 
pleted during the coming season, and will afford an outlet for the 
drainage of about sixteen hundred (1,600) acres, lying south of the 
city of ISTewton and east of Charles river. As the Neponset valley 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr. 325 

sewer is designed to carry only house sewage and will have no over- 
flows it will be necessary to design, on a separate system, all sewers 
draining into it; and all storm water must be rigidly excluded. This 
can be easily accomplished, as no sewers are yet built in this area. 

As the East Boston and West Eoxbury low level sewers will be 
built with the idea of excluding storm water altogether, an ordi- 
nance should be passed, forbidding under heavy penalties, all house 
owners from entering roof water into the house drains or sewers, 
and ordering all roof water to be entered into the surface drains. 
It will of course be necessary for the city to provide surface drains 
throughout the whole length of the streets for this purpose. 

A sj-stem of sewers should be begun during the comino- season 
in that part of the district in the neighborhood of Spring street, 
as a considerable quantity of sewage at present flows into the 
Spring-street brook, and thence finds its way to Charles river, enter- 
ing above the points where several cities and towns obtain their 
water supply. 

A system of surface drains will very soon be required for Hewlett 
and Arundel streets and the vicinity. 

Bordering on Hyde Park and bounded on the west by Stony brook 
reservation, is a tract of about three hundred and sixty (360) acres 
which drains naturally into Hyde Park. 

In the studies made by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission it 
was intended ; to drain about half this area into what is called the 
Clarendon Hills branch of the Metropolitan system. 'No provision 
was made for the remainder; but to drain it in any other way than 
by means of this branch would put the city of Boston to laro-e 
unnecessary expense. 

A conference was held in January between the Deputy Superin- 
tendent of the Sewer Division, the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sioners and the chairman of the Hyde Park Sewer Commission re- 
garding the advisability of building this branch at an early date; 
but no definite agreement was made. It appears to be the intention 
of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission to leave this branch to be 
built by the town of Hyde Park, and as that part of the town is not 
developed to any great extent there will be no necessity to build a 
sewer there for some time to come. As, however, the area lying in 
Boston is partially developed, and has one school-house, accommodat- 
ing some 500 scholars, it would seem that means for connecting 
with the Metropolitan system should be provided by the building of 
this branch under the supervision of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission; otherwise, if the area is not drained until the building 
of this branch is necessitated by the requirements of Hyde Park or 
until the high level sewer, so called, is built, the residents of this 
part of West Roxbury cannot have proper drainage for a period of 
at least four years, and probably more. 

Wo7'k done during 1896. 

Fifteen thousand nine hundred and thirty-six (15,9.36) linear 
feet of sewers, surface drains and culverts were built by the city by 
contract and day labor, and ten thousand two hundred and forty-two 
(10,242) linear feet of sewers and surface drains were built by pri- 
vate parties and released to the city. 



326 City Document No. 29. 

DORCHESTEE. 

In discussing the drainage of Dorchester there are several consid- 
erations to be taken into account, both of the natural formation of the 
territor}', and of the history of the work that has been already done. 

As regards the natural formation of the territory, the district is 
now made up of valleys, gently rising from the surface of Dor- 
chester bay and the !N'eponset river, for a large part of the way and 
at the upper end rising more abruptly to the dividing ridges eighty 
and one hundred feet above tide water. 

The western third of the district, however, is peculiar in this 
respect, in that it forms the head waters of a branch of Stony brook, 
draining naturally in a westerly direction by Forest Hills and 
Jamaica Plain to Old Koxbury and the Back Bay. 

The ground on these head waters of Stony brook is swampy, and 
about fifly feet above tide water. Owing to the great distance to be 
traversed in following down the natural but sluggish slope of Stony 
brook, and owing to the fact that the territory to be traversed in 
that direction is almost unsettled, and not calling for any drainage 
at present, it becomes almost necessary to carry the drainage of both 
house and surface water easterly through the dividing ridge into 
Dorchester bay. 

As to the history of what has been already done : 

When Dorchester was annexed, twenty-five years ago, it was 
practically entirely destitute of any system of sewerage, although 
parts of it were as thickly settled and as long inhabited, as were 
many parts of the older Boston (including Eoxbury), which had 
been sewered for a generation or more. 

With the small appropriations available for a remote suburb, it 
became necessary to spread comparatively little money over a large 
area. Probably the only solution practicable was the one of build- 
ing a combined system of sewers, capable, in addition to the house 
sewage, of taking a considerable amount of storm water, say per- 
haps on an average not far from one-tenth of the expected rainfall. 

This system worked very Avell in the infancy of things, and has 
continued to work fairly well in most places tip to the present time. 
But the growth of this suburb has been so rapid of late years, the 
number of new streets laid out so large, and the standard of street 
comfort held by the average citizens so much elevated, that it is 
evident that such a system cannot be continued indefinitely in the 
future; in fact, that the time has already come in many places when 
a change must be made. 

Each suburb now vies with its neighbor for the cleanest and 
smoothest streets, and the quickest removal of surface water during 
storms. The number of catch-basins has greatly increased; and 
while this does not mean that more rain will fall on a given territory 
than before, it means that more of it must find its way to the 
sewers, when formerly it spread itself over unsettled territory and 
vacant lots. 

To illustrate how inadequate the old sewers in Dorchester must be 
to carry off all the storm water (an inadequacy which they share 
generally with combined sewers as built in most cities and towns of 
this and other countries) I will give a few specimen figures as to 
the probable rainfall to be expected in several localities in Dorches- 
ter, and also of the amounts capable of being handled by the exist- 
ing combined sewers. 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr. 



32T 



Dorchester. 



Name of Sewbk. 


Demand at 

1-3 inch 

Rainfall 

cubic feet 


Demand at 
2-3 inch 
Rainfall 

cubic feet 


Demand at 

1-iDch 

Rainfall 

cubic feet 


Present 

Capacity 

cubic feet 

per sec. 




per sec. 


per sec. 


per sec. 


Crescent-avenue Sewer. 










Spring Garden street 






57 


11 


Imj) roved sewer 






60 


10 


Pleasant Street. Glover's Corner, and 
Hancock-street Seiver. 










Dorchester avenue, at Creek street . . . 






75 
216 


37 


Dorchester avenue, where it empties. . 






49 


Shamrock-street Sewer. 










Dorchester avenue, at Linden street . . 






24 
39 

48 


S 








23 


Dorchester ave., at Shamrock street . . 






Zi 


Talbot-avenue Sewer and Outlet. 








Blue Hill avenue 


97 


193 


290 


31 




108 
292 


216 

584 


324 
876 


20 




2i 


Centre-street Sewer. 










Shawmut Branch Railroad 


317 
330 


633 
660 


950 
990 


41 


Centre street, at Dorchester avenue. . . 


15 


Dorchester avenue, at Centre street. . . 


331 


662 


994 


47 


Dorchester avenue, at Dix street 


338 


676 


1,014 


53 


Dorchester avenue and Gibson street.. 


416 


832 


1,248 


30 


Gibson street, at Adams street 


476 


952 


1,428 


34 


Adams street, at Park street 


476 


952 


1,428 


39 


Park street, at Clayton street 


478 


956 


1,434 
1,479 


30 


Clayton street, at Greenwich place 


493 


986 


30 


Neponset-avenue Sewer. 










Neponset avenue, cor. Taylor street . . . 


16 


32 


48 


17 


Oranite-avemie Sewer. 












147 
156 


294 
312 


441 

468 


15 




25 







It will be seen from these figures that the limit of availability of 
the existing sewers for storm water would be very soon reached, if 
indeed it has not already in many cases been exceeded. 

1 Below Washington street the areas include the whole of that part of the Stony- 
brook valley draining into Talbot avenue. 



328 City Document No. 29. 

There would be practically two remedies for this state of things. 
One would be to rebuild, at an immense increase of size, and at 
great inconvenience, the present combined system; making it large 
enough to take all the storm water of the future. 

There are many reasons why this cannot well be done. 

One is that the cellars or the private drains from them are gen- 
erally quite near the level of the existing sewers; consequently, if 
the size of the sewers was to be doubled or quadrupled, or even 
more, the new sewer would have to be sunk entirely below the level 
of the old one in order to avoid flooding the cellars. This would 
very much increase the expense. 

Another is the general inconvenience to, and partial interruption 
of, the old house service, while rebuilding it anew. 

A third is (now that all house sewage is intercepted and pumped 
out to Moon Island) the increased difficulty of separating the storm 
water and house sewage in time of flood, leading to pollution at the 
overflows, even with costly and cumbrous appliances for its attempted 
prevention. 

For these, and many other reasons of a professional nature, it is 
considered impracticable to enlarge the present combined systems 
for the wants of the future; and recourse must be had to a separate 
system of storm sewers, or as they may be better called, surface 
drains. 

It will be seen from the preceding table that the existing sewers 
will accommodate but a relatively small percentage of the surface 
water ; probably generall}^ not more than five per cent to fifty per 
cent, or an average of twenty-five per cent. 

The capacity of the existing sewers can of course be very closely 
calculated by well appi'oved methods ; for the purjjose of this 
report, however, they have been hastily taken at an approximate 
value. 

The amounts of storm water coming from each district, on the 
other hand, can never be absolutely calculated in advance. It may 
be known how many inches of rain have fallen on a given territory 
in the largest storm of which we have any record ; but this division 
can never be sure that it would not be exceeded by some future 
storm. The exceptional " great " storms which do such great dam- 
age occur twice or three times in a century. 

Even if this division was sure of the maximum future amount of 
rainfall there would be no means of absolutely deciding how much 
of this will reach the mouth of a sewer or surface drain in any given 
time ; this depending on the slope, roughness, and other qualities of 
the ground. Various observations have been taken to try and de- 
termine the effect of these various factors ; the conclusions reached 
by the Swiss engineer, Bourkli-Zeigier, have met with wide accept- 
ance. His estimate of the jDercentage of rainfall reaching any 
one point at one time varies from ninety-five per cent on small 
tracts of a few acres, with a sharp slope, to ten per cent on level 
tracts of several square miles. His estimates for tracts of medium 
size and slope, such as we find in Dorchester, would vary from 
thirty to sixty per cent, usually we might say about fifty per cent. 

As the rainfall for short periods is at the rate of as much as from 
two to three inches an hour, it does not seem extravagant to use an 
inch of rain per acre per hour as the maximum for computing the sizes 
of surface drains. 



Street Depaetivient — Sewer Divisro]^. 329 

It happens, curiously enough, that one inch of rainfall per hour 
gives almost exactly one cubic foot per second per acre, which is the 
maximum used in the foregoing table. 

It would seem, therefore, that beside the advantage of cutting off 
all the sewage from the shores of the harbor, which now runs on to 
them during storms, that we must inevitably be driven to the use of 
surface drains for the water from the catch-basins, because the ex- 
isting combined sewers are only adequate to take one-tenth, one-fifth, 
or one-half of it, as the case may be. 

It has always been considered a part of the scheme for intercept- 
ing the sewers of Boston that a " high-level " sewer would be built, 
which would intercept the sewage from the high streets in the in- 
terior of the suburbs, and carry it direct by gravity to Moon Island, 
without the expense of pumping it up. 

The engineers of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission have made 
a study for such a sewer for Dorchester, which would include about 
950 acres of the west part of Dorchester, or about one-third of the 
whole district. 

Of course, it would be essential to the working of such a sewer 
(the size of which must be quite limited) that the house-seAvage 
must be separated from the rain-water. This separation would be 
physically possible by means of overflows into the brooks, but in 
order to avoid all possibility of nuisance, it would seem to be better 
that a new set of surface drains should be made, to take the water 
from any catch-basins that now go into the combined sewers, and 
that all new sewers within this high-level district should be built on 
the separate principle. 

The system, then, which is looked forward to for Dorchester is a 
separate system of surface drains, large enough to take all of the 
storm-water that experience and theory combined lead us to expect 
from the areas they serve. The existing sewers to be retained for 
house-sewage, and also for such moderate quantities of storm-water 
as they can easily carry, and will serve to keep them clean. 

All new sewers for house drainage in this way will be constructed 
of small pipes, usually of ten, twelve, or fifteen inches in diameter. 
The surface drains would often have to be of brick or concrete, 
often ranging from two to five feet in diameter, and even larger in 
exceptional cases, and near tide water. 

The surface drainage problem for Dorchester will be found fully 
discussed in the article on Surface Drainage. 

The subject of new house sewers for immediate use in Dorchester 
is a very complicated one. The district has grown so rapidly that 
the division has not been able to furnish the amount of sewers that 
have been called for, so that the vicious system of allowing the 
abutter to build release sewers has been carried on to quite an extent 
in this district. This, in my opinion, is a bad system, which will be 
discussed later on. 

To take up some cases where house sewers are required, in geo- 
graphical order from north to south, the first case is an outlet from 
Wesley and Savin Hill avenues on the north side of Savin Hill. 
This has been petitioned for for several j-ears, and is much needed 
to remedy unsanitary conditions, and to complete the drainage of 
that whole district, which is otherwise well supplied. 

Another case of house sewers needed at the present moment is that 
of those in what is called the Forest-avenue district; in streets which 



330 City Document No. 29. 

liave been long settled, and suffering for want of sewers, but wbich 
it has only been possible to sewer properly since tlie completion of 
the Lyons-street pumping station. These streets, embracing Morton, 
Selden, Fuller, Capen, Evans, Maxwell, Corbett, !N'elsou and other 
streets in that immediate neighborhood, should be sewered as soon 
as practicable during the coming season, as it has long been a 
pressing necesssity. 

The pumping station at Lyons street has been designed with a 
liberal factor of safety, so as to be capable of pumping up, not only 
the legitimate amount of house sewage due to the future probable 
number of inhabitants, but also a moderate amount of leakage, or of 
other storm water accidentally finding its way into the house sewers. 
But for an outlet it has to depend at present on the old sewer in 
Talbot avenue, which was not designed to meet any such emergency, 
and which would prove of much too limited capacity in case the 
amount pumped at Lyons street should seriously increase. I would 
state that this plant at Lyons street is only designed for a temporary 
relief, as eventually the only remedy for this district will be the con- 
struction of a large tunnel sewer through the dividing ridge to 
Dorchester bay, allowing the sewage to flow by gravity to the 
Dorchester Interceptor. 

WorTc done during 1896. 

Forty-three thousand four hundred and fifty-three (43,453) linear 
feet of sewers and surface drains were built by the city by contract 
and day labor; and thirteen thousand six hundred and twenty-eight 
(13,628) linear feet by private parties and released to the city. 

Box BURY. 

If the scheme to fill in the South bay is carried out as contem- 
plated, it will be necessary to extend the Dorchester-brook sewer. 
The route for the extension of this sewer is not as yet decided, as 
much depends upon when and how much of the bay is filled. If it 
is filled as far as Dover street, it would be better to run the sewer to 
Kemp street. South Boston, where it will join a proposed overflow 
sewer for that district, of almost equal size as itself, and from that 
point a sewer large enough to take the flow of both sewers will be 
carried to Dorchester bay. This route may be adopted even if the 
filling is only carried as far as the present Harbor Commissioners' 
line. The expense of this work, on account of its great size, makes 
it necessary to give this subject careful study, and it is also necessary 
to have a better understanding of what is to be done by the parties 
owning the territory before adopting a route for this sewer. 

The district bounded by Swett street, Dorchester brook, ISTorfolk 
avenue and Gerard street, is one of the low districts in which (if 
the combined system of sewers is built) there is going to be the same 
old trouble about flooding. The few sewers that are now built, 
which have been started on the combined plan, can be converted into 
surface drains. Few houses are built and connected with the 
sewers, but as streets have recently been laid out and built through 
this territory, more houses will be Ibuilt and more sewers called for. 
As the main interceptor runs through this district, it is easily 
reached with house sewers from all parts of the district. The 
sewer in Magazine street, which is situated in this district, is still 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 331 

discliargiuf? sewage on the flats at Massachusetts avenue. This 
state of things must continue until a sewer is built to the Dorchester- 
brook sewer. If the above suggestion for the district is to be 
carried out, a pipe connection could be made with the interceptor at 
Massachusetts avenue, and an overflow sewer built in Massachusetts 
avenue to the Dorchester-brook sewer, connecting below the tide 
gates. This will be the surface drain when the system is completed. 

This is comparatively a new district. After the experience this 
division has had it seems unwise to keep on building a system of 
sewers (because the first cost is cheaper) that is almost sure to cause 
trouble in storms, to say nothing of forever pumping the surface 
water. 

The sev/ers in Yeoman, Chadwick, Hampden and Albany streets 
are in the same condition as mentioned in former reports. These 
sewers are on the combined system, in a district the topography of 
which makes the small size of the sewers in the low land more evi- 
dent. The sewers in the high land, on account of their steep grades, 
rapidly discharge the rain water into the sewers of the low laud. If 
the tide is up during a severe rain, the sewers in the low land are 
immediately filled, and on account of the great amount of water from 
the high lands, are often filled above the level of the tide before it 
can escape. 

One remedy for the trouble is to rebuild the old sewers to a larger 
size, or to build new sewers along the side of the present sewers, old 
and new sewers combined to have the desired capacity. 

The other remedy is to run a pipe sewer from the interceptor in 
Massachusetts avenue to drain the cellars in the low district, the 
present sewers to carry the storm water of the low land, and both 
storm water and sewage of the high land. This would be an ideal 
system for the district, one from which absolute freedom from flood- 
ing would be insured, but, on account of the great expense, may not 
be adopted. 

The sewers in Parker street, between Westland avenue and Boyl- 
ston street, in Haviland street, and in passageway north of Ilaviland 
street, between Parker street and Massachusetts avenue, should be 
rebuilt. 

The sewer in Boylston street, between the Parkway and Parker 
street, is badly settled, and should be rebuilt. 

Sewers are needed on the sides of Stony brook to take sewage 
out of the brook between Huntington avenue and Elmwood street, as 
mentioned in former reports. 

The ownership of the Muddy-river conduit was transferred from 
the Park Department to this division in 1895. This is a wood and 
concrete affair, 9 feet x H feet, in a dilapidated condition, and if not 
rebuilt will be in danger of collapsing. As this structure is about 
1,600 feet long, and at a grade of one foot below city base, the 
expense of rebuibling will be large. 

An overflow sewer to connect with the Muddy-river conduit is an 
essential part of the system of sewers, of which the sewer in Vila 
street is the main. This is not yet built, but will have to be before 
many sewers receiving surface water can be added to the system. 

The sewer inprivate street, north of Dale street, between Wakul- 
lah street and Kockland street, and in Hewes street, has caused a 
great deal of trouble. This is an ancient structure with plank bot- 
tom, stone sides, and brick arch. It is too small for the amount it 



332 City Document No. 29. 

has to carry; therefore, at times, running under a head which forces 
the water out through the sides into the neighboring cellars. To 
remedy this, it will be necessary to start about 1,100 feet down stream, 
and rebuild with a larger size and flatter grade as far as Walnut 
avenue. 

About 2,200 feet further up stream is the Sherman-street district, 
which has been troubled a great deal by the small size of the sewers 
between Sherman street and Walnut avenue. To relieve this district 
it will be necessary to continue the proposed new sewer, mentioned 
above, as far as Warren street. This subject was discussed in the 
annual report for 1892. 

The sewer in Columbus avenue, between Stony brook and the 
new Dimock street, being about completed, the proposed sewer in 
Dimock street, Notre Dame street and passageway to Washington 
street, should be built. The people in this district have been 
patiently waiting for a long time, and now that means of relief are 
about to be provided, it should be pushed ahead as rapidly as 
possible. 

The surface drain built in 1895, in Huntington avenue, from 
Muddy river to Heath street, should be extended up Heath street as 
far as South Huntington avenue. Parties owning property in that 
neighborhood are about to build streets and sewers. The city will 
require sewers on the separate system, and unless the surface drain 
is carried up Heath street, there will be no outlet available for their 
surface drains. 

The sewers in the Hammond-street district, the condition of which 
has been noted in former reports, have not yet been rebuilt. 

The Harrison-avenue sewer, from N'orthampton street to Eustis 
street, which is in a deplorable condition, has been neglected year 
after j'ear. It is now to be rebuilt, and work will commence at once. 

The following is a list of defective sewers requiring rebuilding : 

Davenport sti'eet, Columbus avenue to Tremont street. 
Walpole street, Columbus avenue to Tremont street. 
George street, Clarence street to Dorchester brook. 
Geoi'ge street, Gerard to Magazine street. 
Haskins street, Yeruon to Ruggles street. 
Orchard street, off Yeoman street. 
Winslow street, Palmer to Eustis street. 
Marshfield street, Batchelder street to Norfolk avenue. 
Hunneman street. Brown street to Harrison avenue. 
Newcomb street. Reed street to Harrison avenue. 
Lenox street, Sanford. place to Harrison avenue. 
Halleck street, Euggles to Ward street. 

The district bounded by Centre street, Day street, Parker Hill 
and Columbus avenue, is made up of a somewhat level country on 
the south, and the south side of Parker Hill on the north. The 
trunk sewer for this district is the Old Heath and Minden-street 
sewer. This sewer is large enough to take cai-e of the level section; 
but as there are no sewers and catch-basins on the south side of 
Parker Hill the rain-water rushes down the side of the hill to the 
sewers in the low land, causing a great deal of flooding. The first 
step was to put in a relief sewer through Old Heath street. This 
has been built this year; but the full benefit will not be felt until 
sewers and basins on the south side of Parker Hill are built. 



Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 333 

As the owners have begun to develop the land this year, one new 
street having been built and a sewer laid there, there is a good pros- 
pect for a demand for sewers, which, when built, will end the 
troubles that have so long existed. 

One short piece of sewer should be built immediately between the 
manhole on Heath street, at Wensley street, and the manhole on new 
relief sewer at Parker street and Heath street. 

The sewers in Shawmut avenue, Eoxbury street and Guild row, 
Burke street, Dorchester brook, Clapp to George street, are under 
construction by day labor; and the sewers in Euggles street, Parker 
street tO Back Bay Pens, Vancouver street, Ruggles street to 
Huntington avenue, PuUerton street, Columbus avenue, Kitchie to 
Dimock street are under construction by contract, 

TFbrfc done in 1896. 

Twenty-one thousand and eighty-three (21,083) linear feet of 
sewers and surface drains were built by the city by contract and day 
labor, and five thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight (5,788) 
linear feet by private parties and released to the city. 

City Proper. 

The sewers in the South Cove district are now in a fair way of 
general overhauling. The final decision of the Boston Tei'minal 
Company to build the new Union Station with its tracks over many 
of the sewers of the district, makes it necessary to commence this 
work at once. The principal sewers within their taking are the east 
side interceptor and common sewer in Federal street, and the Mt. 
"Washington avenue and Harvard-street sewers. The two latter, 
with the Pederal-street sewer, below Kneeland street, are the over- 
flow sewers for the storm water of the district. The proposed de- 
pressed tracks for suburban traffic are designed at a grade which will 
cut off these sewers, making it necessary to lower all three sewers 
from the depressed tracks to their ends at the channel. As this 
would bring the sewer below low tide, the expense of this work would 
be very large. Another serious consideration is that the Federal- 
street sewer, northerly from the depressed tracks, is built of wood, 
and eventually, though perhaps not for many years, will have to be 
rebuilt. As this sewer will then lie under many of the tracks, cross- 
ing at an acute angle, the work of rebuilding will be an inconvenience 
to the railroad and an expense to the city well nigh incalculable. It 
was, no doubt, these considerations that led the Terminal Company 
to suggest that the intercepting sewer be rebuilt around their station 
between East and Beach streets; and that the Harvard street, 
Federal street, and Mt. Washington-avenue overflow sewers be com- 
bined in one large sewer to be built in Mt. Washington avenue. 
All other sewers, regulators, tide-gates, etc., (with the exception of 
the main interceptor south of Beach street, which they propose to 
leave intact) lying within their taking, are to be abandoned by the 
city. The sewer in Federal street, between Kneeland street and 
Essex street, is to be replaced by a new sewer in the new Cove street, 
between the same limits. 

The changes in the sewer system required by the Terminal Com- 
pany now offer the opportunity so long delayed, but so much needed, 



334 City Document No. 29. 

of completing the design of 1888-89; that is, to give the Beach- 
street sewer direct or open connection with the interceptor, first 
shifting tlie district regulator at Dover street to a point on tlie inter- 
ceptor in new Cove street, near Essex street, and building the neces- 
sary regulators at Oswego and Kneeland streets. The regulator at 
Harvard street will not then be needed; that sewer being abandoned 
south of Harvard street and connected with the ivneeland-street 
sewer by a sewer through South street. 

Measurements taken during the heavy rains of .January 21, on the 
interceptor at Beach street, showed a difference of six feet in the 
level of the water at this point and the water in the interceptor on 
Massachusetts avenue and Albany street; when the district regulator 
is shifted the water in the interceptor at Beach street will be 
lowered several feet during a storm of the severity of that of Jan- 
uary 2 1 . 

It will be seen at once what an advantage this will be to the Beach- 
street district, as in all heavy rains the interceptor, being cut off at 
Dover street, is immediately filled up, and the Beach-street sewer is 
obliged to discharge against the tide. Moving the regulators from 
within the taking of the Terminal Company will require the exten- 
sion of branches from the interceptor to Cove street, at Kneeland 
street and Beach street. This will be the commencement of what 
is the only practical solution of the sewerage question for districts 
situated as this is. The main sewers are chiefly wooden boxes, cut 
off from the interceptor in heavy rains, therefore filling up to the 
level of the tide, which has many times risen to grades 13 and 14, 
while cellars connected with the sewers are legally allowed to be 
built at grade 12. The result is evident, unless every drain is pro- 
vided with a back-water trap, and that must not fail to Avork. 

The branches of the interceptor mentioned above should be built 
at such a grade that they can be extended all over the district and 
converted into house sewers, discharging directly into the interceptor. 
The old sewers can then be disconnected from the interceptor, 
and used as surface drains only. This, though the most expensive 
scheme on the start (it requiring another sewer or, perhaps, surface 
drain in streets where there are now good sewers on the combined 
system) will in the end be the cheapest, not only on account of the 
freedom from danger of flooding and making low land more desir- 
able for business purposes, but also by taking from the pumps, that 
are now overburdened, all surface water and leakage, discharging it 
directly into the sea. 

"Work was started on the rebuilding of the sewers in Tyler street, 
between Beach and Curve streets, and was completed between 
Kneeland and Curve streets; the balance between Beach and Knee- , 
land streets has not been rebuilt. Instead of completing this work 
as designed, on the combined system, the low-level house sewer pro- 
posed in Kneeland street at new Union Station, should be continued 
up Kneeland street, and a branch built up Tyler street, the old sewer 
then converted into a storm sewer; this to be one of the first 
steps towards carrying out the system proposed for this district, and 
could be carried into the Church-street district, giving the relief so 
much needed in that district. 

Work has been started on the Canal-slreet relief sewer. This is 
perhaps the most important of the many heirlooms that have been 
handed down from year to year. The original line for the upper 




NEW SEWER IN CENTRAL STREET, CANAL-STREET RELIEF SEWER. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 335 

part of this sewer was from Blackstone street, across Haymarket 
square to Canal street, and through that street to Causeway street. 
For this work a loan of i$100,000 was asked. 

The proposed route of the subway cut through this line at Hay- 
market square, and the line was shifted to Haverhill and Causeway 
streets to Canal street. Later when the subway plans were devel- 
oped, it was found that the structure would occupy so much of Hav- 
erhill street that there would be no room for a sewer of the size 
required, and the lines were again shifted to Charlestown, Beverly 
and Causeway streets to Canal street; this change will necessarily 
increase the expense of the work over the cost of the line as origi- 
nally proposed. To commence this work a loan of S25,000 has been 
made, which will build up the sewer to about State street. This 
work should not stop at this point; every effort should be made to 
push it along to its completion. 

The excavation for the subway has already cut off the sewer in 
Haymarket square, and a temporary siphon has been built. The 
building of the subway has caused the destruction of many 
of the sewers along its route. In all cases they have been replaced 
on the sides of the streets in a manner satisfactory to this 
division, the work being inspected by one of the inspectors of this 
division. 

Large buildings with deep cellars are growing up near the sta- 
tions of the subway, and wherever practicable the grade of the 
sewers which the Transit Commission is building, to take the place 
of the old sewers, destroyed by the building of the subway, has been 
lowered to give the best drainage possible to these deep cellars. 
The proposed sewer on the north side of Hanover street, between 
Portland and Sudbury streets, and the proposed sewer on Tremont 
row, will be built at grades considerably lower than those proposed 
by the Transit Commission, which were substantially the same as 
the grades of the old sewers, but in these cases the Transit Com- 
mission has taken the ground that they have no right to build a 
sewer any better than the old one which it is designed to replace, 
and, if any additional expense is to be incurred to obtain better 
drainage, that the Street Department must pay the difference ia 
cost. Although this division does not concur in their view, it has 
nevertheless agreed to bear the additional expense in the case of 
the sewers above mentioned. 

It was foreseen, previous to the building of the subway on Tre- 
mont street, between Pemberton square and Beacon street, that a 
deep sewer should be built in connection with the work of the sub- 
way, on account of the extreme difficulty of ever building it after 
the subway was completed; and this division used its utmost efforts 
to induce the Transit Commission to build this sewer at a grade low 
enough to drain out the deep cellars in this locality by gravity. The 
Transit Commissioners refused to accede to the request of this divi- 
sion, and the discussion was prolonged to such an extent that the 
subway was practically completed without the low-grade sewer hav- 
ing been built. This is particularly unfortunate from the fact that 
there is no other way of approaching those buildings with a low 
sewer except through Tremont street, on account of the high grade 
of the land in the rear of these blocks. If a low-grade sewer is ever 
built in this locality it would be an exceedingly interesting and 
expensive undertaking. Until such a sewer is built the owners of 



336 City Document No. 29. 

these expensive buildings will be compelled to maintain some form 
of pumping-plant to raise their sewage into the existing sewer, 
which is quite shallow. 

The connections with the interceptor for the Church-street, Dover- 
street and Dedham-street districts are direct or open connections, 
the flow of rain water being taken in without regulators. On ac- 
count of the many floodings in this district this was deemed advisa- 
ble; but the amount of rain-water to be pumped depends only upon 
the amount that falls and the height of the tide, and must go on 
forever under the present system. The present sewers in these 
districts should be cut off from the interceptor, and converted into 
storm sewers and small tight house-sewers at a good depth should 
be connected with the interceptor. This would be a serious under- 
taking, on account of the amount of money required and the engi- 
neering difficulties to be encountered; but when completed, not only 
would these districts feel the benefit, but other districts situated 
above the district regulator would also feel the benefit, as from the 
decrease in the amount of water poured into the east side inter- 
ceptor, the sewage would not rise to the cut-off line of the regulator 
nearly so quickly; thus the sewer situated above the district regu- 
lator would be helped out. They are now cut off during every hard 
rain, and fill up to the height of the tide, flooding out cellars. 

The surface drainage of the Back Bay should be attended to. The 
sewers of the Back Bay districts are on the combined system. The 
trunk sewers, which run in a northerly direction, lie in Berkeley, 
Dartmouth, Fairfield and Hereford streets. The lateral sewers, 
running east and west, are in the passageways, thereby making it 
necessary to have only surface drains in the streets running east 
and west, and in Arlington, Clarendon, Exeter and Gloucester 
streets, running north and south. It was stated last year that to 
complete the surface drainage of the Back Bay would require 133 
catch-basins and about 7,000 linear feet pipe surface drains or 
sewers. 

The result will be a very complete surface system ; but in all 
cases the storm water would still be drained into a combined system 
of sewers. The combined system is the cheapest of all sewer 
systems to construct, and for a district in which the cellars are at or 
above grade 15 is a very good system, as far as the danger of flood- 
ing cellars is concerned; but for this, in which the cellars are about 
grade 12, it seems to be only a matter of favorable circumstances 
when every cellar may be flooded, for when the storm water has 
raised the level of the water in the interceptor to a certain height, 
the regulators on the above-mentioned four trunk sewers, close the 
connections with the interceptor, and the storm water in the trunk 
and lateral sewers must rise to a height above the level of the tide 
before it can force open the tide gates and escape to the sea. The 
predicted tides for 1897 show, in a number of cases, that the tide will 
rise to grade 11.6. In a heavy easterly storm, the tide may be 
forced one foot or more higher. The combination of rain storm 
and high tide has happened, and floodings have occurred, as this 
division is well aware. 

The only way to insure absolute safety for this district is to 
separate the storm water from the house sewage, and although this 
would be very expensive, when the value of property that may be 
destroyed in a flood is considered, it may be advisable to attempt it. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 337 

The present trunk sewers are large enough to carry the storm 
water. They could be converted into storm sewers. Pipe sewers 
could be built from the interceptor along the side of the present 
trunk sewers and connected with the present sewers in the passage- 
ways, which would then be house sewers. Shallow surface drains 
could be laid in the passageways, taking the flow from the catch- 
basins and discharging it into the existing trunk sewers. Similar 
surface drains could be carried where they do not already exist, up 
streets that are j^arallel with the passageways, reaching all parts of 
the district. 

The regulators and connections between the interceptor and 
trunk sewers could then be removed, and a district regulator placed 
on the interceptor, just above Brimmer street. 

On the water side of Beacon street one hundred and fifty-nine 
(159) houses and forty-five (45) stables discharge drainage itito 
Charles river. In 1892 a sewer was designed to drain these houses, 
which was to be built in Back street. The outlet in Hereford street 
was to run into Beacon street, and, as about that time that part of 
Beacon street was to be asphalted, it was decided to build the out- 
let across Beacon street. The work was carried to this point and 
stopped, as at that time there was a proposition to build a boulevard 
one hundred (100) feet wide back of the houses. As it would be 
very much cheaper to build a sewer one hundred feet from the 
water than to build it against an old sea wall in ground made of 
clam shells and ashes, and in which tide water rises in many cases 
as high as the tide itself, it was decided to delay the construction of 
the sewer until something more definite was learned about the 
boulevard. As the building of the boulevard seems to be as far in 
the future as ever, and the houses still drain into the river, I would 
suggest that the construction of the sewer be no longer delayed. 

The sewers in Prince street, between Salem street and Bennet 
avenue, and in the Eliot school-yard to Tileston street, and in Tiles- 
ton street, between Salem and Hanover streets, should be rebuilt. 
This system of sewers is in poor condition, and when rebuilt their 
grade should be lowered, as the present system is too shallow. 

The sewer in Hull street, an old wood, stone and brick affair, 
should be rebuilt. This sewer was in bad condition in 1892, but on 
account of the very steep slope on which it is built, and the exceed- 
ingly hard nature of the ground in which it is built, it has 
managed to continue to flow. This sewer is likely to be choked up 
at any time. 

A very large number of sewers in the city proper, especially in 
the South Cove district, have settled, and are defective. The follow- 
ing list will give an idea of the extent to which the city will be called 
upon to rebuild sewers in the near future ; the rebuilding of a large 
proportion of these cannot and should not be much longer post- 
poned if the appropriation can possibly be secured, as the cleaning 
of them is a continual expense. 

Brighton street, from Milton to Leverett street. 
Wall street, from Minot to Causeway street. 
Wiget street, from I^orth Margin to Salem street. 
Haverhill street, from Traverse to Causeway street. 
Nashua street, from Minot to Causeway street. 
India street, from Central street to India square. 



338 City Document No. 29. 

Milton street, from Brighton to Spring street. 

Leverett street, from Causeway to Green street. 

Chatham street, from Commercial street to Merchants' row. 

Bread street, from India to Broad street. 

Stillman street, from Charlestown to Salem street. 

Way street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street. 

East street, from Cove to Lincoln street. 

Edinboro' street, from Essex to Beach street. 

South street, from Beach to Kneeland street. 

Winchester street, from Church street to Edgerly place. 

Appleton street, from Tremont to Berkeley street. 

Albany street, from Genesee to Troy street. 

Oak street, from Albany to Hudson street. 

Warren avenue, from Dartmouth to Clarendon street. 

Passageway between Concord street and Worcester square. 

St. Charles, Guy, Piedmont, Ferdinand and Kirkland streets are 
badly settled, and need either partial or complete rebuilding. 

Work done during 1896. 

The filling in of the dock into which the Pearl-street district 
sewer overflowed made it necessary to remove the overflow sewer. 
A sewer was built in Atlantic avenue and Congiess street, pitching 
toward Pearl street, where it is connected with the interceptor. At 
the outer or seaward end of the sewer, tide gates were built. This 
sewer does the work of two sewers, in dry weather carrying sewage 
to the interceptor, and in rain storms flowing up hill, forcing open 
the tide gates, and discharging storm water into the sea. This seems 
to be a very desirable design to adopt when the interceptor is situ- 
ated back from the shore line. 

The old leaky wooden sewers in Endicott street, between Cause- 
way and Thacher streets, between Endicott and I^Torth Margin streets, 
have been replaced with tight brick sewers. 

The sewerage system for the markets, that has been so long in a 
most deplorable condition, has been rebuilt, and is now in satisfac- 
tory working order. 

The Falmouth and INorwa^^-street sewers that have been in so 
much danger of collapsing for a number of years have been rebuilt. 

Sewers in Webster avenue and Unity street, and Beacon street,, 
west of Charlesgate West, are under construction by day labor. 

Six thousand one hundred and forty-five (6,145) linear feet of 
sewers and surface drains were built by the cily by contract and day 
labor, and five thousand five hundred and thirty-seven (5,637) linear 
feet by private parties and released to the city. 

Surface Drainage. 

The problem of surface drainage for the city of Boston has been 
exhaustively discussed in the annual reports for a number of years, 
but yet a few words more upon the subject, together with some 
statements of the amount of work it will be necessary to do, may 
not be amiss. 

There are two different aspects in which the problem of surface 
drainage presents itself; the first is that of providing outlets for 
new catch-basins other than the old existing house sewers. Surface 



Street Depaet]ment — Seaver Division. 339 

drains for this purpose might often be of no very great length, say 
300 to 600 feet, and twelve, fifteen, and eighteen-inch pipe. But in 
that case they would have to empty into the existing water-courses 
where those cross the streets through culverts. 

The second aspect of surface drainage is that concerned with the 
keeping open and preservation of these same water-courses; or of 
substituting for them, when more convenient, large drains in the 
neighboring streets. It may often be a question whether it will 
be cheaper, wiser and better every way, to preserve the old brook 
channel, or to make one in a parallel street. Each case must be 
decided on its own merits. But as the old stream always runs in 
the lowest ground, it is better to preserve the old channel, unless it 
has been so far obliterated as to render it impracticable. 

The history of the water-courses in the suburbs of Boston, that 
is, in Dorchester, West Roxbury and Brighton, would be a curious 
one. In many cases it seems as if the residents had regarded them 
as nuisances which could be removed by simply filling them up; 
forgetting that the same amount of rain must fall on any territory, 
no matter how highly improved, as has always fallen from the crea- 
tion of this continent. This rain, of course, must be disposed of by 
artificial means if the natural means have been destroyed. 

The course, therefore, that se&ms best for the city of Boston to 
pursue about surface drainage would be two-fold. 

1. The city should, in the majority of cases where new catch 
basins are built, empty them into short surface drains leading to the 
nearest culvert or brook channel. 

2. The city should take charge of straightening and deepening 
the channels of the brooks between the streets. In a great many 
cases this can be done by means of open channels; bi'ick, stone, or 
concrete culverts being built of the proper size and at the proper 
depth, where the brooks cross the streets. In this way the 
" regime" of the stream will be fixed beyond the possibility of un- 
authorized change, while the expense of covered channels for the 
whole length of the brooks will be postponed for many years, until it 
is forced by dense settlement. 

The following tables, hastily prepared, give an approximate bird's- 
eye view of the surface drains which would be required in the 
principal valleys of Dorchester, West Roxbury, and Brighton during 
the next ten years. This is meant only as an illustration of the 
size and importance of the subject. It is impossible to predict in 
advance just which or how many of these surface drains will be re- 
quired first; this would depend on a number of uncertain circum- 
stances, the priority of settlement, the number of inhabitants, and 
many other circumstances, only known as they appear from time to 
time. 



340 



City Document No. 29, 



General Scheme for Surface Drains in Dorciiester District. 

[Approximate.] 



District. 



Dorchester brook 

Crescent-avenue brook 

Sidney and Soudan-streets brook 

Wesley-avenue and Sidney-street brook . 
Midland-street brook 



Dorchester avenue, between Savin-Hill and 
Roach -street brook 



Glover' s-corner brook 

Clayton and Greenwich- streets brook 

Ashland and Capen-streets brook 

Preston and Mills-streets brook 

Elm- street brook 

Park street at Harrison-square brook 

Park, Dickens and Adams-streets «brook.. 

Tenean brook or Smelt brook 

Tenean street, near Freeport-street brook . . 

Neponset brook 

Taylor-street brook 

Davenport brook 

Richmond and Adams-streets brook 

Central- avenue brook 

Idaho-street brook 

Brook, 750 feet west of last above 

Brook, 2,250 feet west of last above 

Brook, 300 feet west of last above 

Mattapan brook 

Oakland-street brook 

Stony brook 



Grand total. 



Length of 
Surface Drain 
needed in next 

ten years. 
Linear Feet. 



9,000 
1,000 

650 
1,600 

700 

3,000 
1,500 
3,000 

400 
1,000 
1,000 

400 

1,000 

30,000 

1,500 

4,000 

500 
6,000 
3,000 

800 
1,500 
3,000 

500 

500 

13,000 

2,500 

7,500 



Approximate 
Cost. 



120,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,450 00 
4,000 00 
1,000 00 

6,000 00 
4,000 00 
6,000 00 
600 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
600 00 
2,000 00 

72,000 00 
2,500 00 
6,000 00 
1,000 00 
9,000 00 
800 00 
1,200 00 
3,000 00 
6,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

27,000 00 
5,000 00 

22,000 00 



$209,650 00 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



341 



General Scheme for Surface Drains in West Roxbury. 

[Approximate.] 



DISTEICT. 



Goldsmith brook 



Arundel street branch of Roslindale branch 
of Stony brook 



Hewlitt and Farquhar streets branch of 
Stony brook 



Spring-street brook 

Eoslindale branch of Stony brook . 
Montview and Kirk -streets brook . 



Grand total 



Length of 
Surface Drain 
needed in next 

ten years. 
Linear Feet. 



Approximate 
Cost. 



2,155 


$21,095 00 


3,990 


24,925 00 


2,010 


12,940 00 


7,060 


28,207 00 


3,500 


35,920 00 


1,200 


4,200 00 



$127,287 00 



General Scheme for Surface Drains in Brighton. 

[Approximate.] 



District. 


Length of 
Surface Drain 
needed in next 

ten years. 
Linear Feet. 


Approximate 
Cost. 


Faneuil-valley brook 


6,525 
1,480 

1,800 
2,400 
1,700 

800 

2,150 
10,525 


$53,768 75 
10,712 50 

12,600 00 
21,500 00 
24,400 00 

5,800 00 

17,225 00 
152,956 25 


Oak-square branch of Faneuil-valley brook. 

Market-street branch of Faneuil-valley 
brook 


Holmes-avenue brook 


Salt-creek brook 


Brook across Commonwealth avenue, be- 
tween Kinross and Sutherland roads 

Brook, from Chiswick road to Common- 
wealth avenue, and down Strathmore 
road , 


Brook, from Shepard street to Western 
avenue 




Grand total 




$298,962 50 







342 City Document No. 29. 

Taking up the various principal valleys in Dorchester, somewhat 
in their order, from north to south, and then from east to west, I 
will begin with the west branch of Dorchester bx'ook. 

This rises in Washington street near Grove Hall, and runs down 
just east of Blue Hill avenue, crossing Lawrence avenue and Quincy 
street, and running through the old William Gray estate, near 
Howard avenue, joining the easterly branch, near Durginville. 

The city is now building a separate system of sewers in the 
territory between Geneva and Lawrence avenues ; house-sewer, 
12-inch pipe; surface drain, from 3 to 4|- feet diameter. Below 
Lawrence avenue there is onlj- a combined system, sewer and brook 
being in one channel, a good deal of which is of a capacity of about 
50 to 70 cubic feet per second. The area above Lawrence avenue is 
about 180 acres. The area of the whole brook is about 430 acres. 
It is evident that if storm water is to be admitted more freely at the 
upper end (which must happen as the settlement increases) some 
new outlet must be found for the storm water below, or flooding of 
low cellars will result. 

The largest size of the existing old combined sewer is 4 feet X 4 
feet 6 inches, cross sectional area, 15 square feet; the largest size of 
the surface drain needed for this valley would probably be about 11 
feet ; cross sectional area 95 square feet. 

The easterly branch of Dorchester brook rises on Mount Bowdoin, 
near the New England Eailroad, and follows the general route of that 
railroad to Dudley street, and then through Humphreys street to 
the other branch at Durginville. 

This valley, like the preceding, is supplied by combined systems; 
that is, the brook and sewer are all one. The size of the sewer at 
Columbia-street crossing is about 42 inches X 36 inches; area above 
this point 70 acres. Total area of the brook, 225 acres; largest 
size of existing sewer, 5 feet, with cross sectional area of 20 square 
feet. Probable largest size of surface drain required, 6 feet 3 
inches, with cross sectional area of 30 square feet. 

The inadequacy of the existing sewer for the storm water is 
already shown, at the Quincy-street crossing under the bridge, where 
it is reported that the street has had two feet of water in it during 
storms. 

The next valley of interest is at Crescent avenue. Area of valley 
above Dorchester avenue, 40 acres; size of combined sewer below 
Dorchester avenue, 3 feet; capacity, 30 cubic feet per second and less. 

This is a place where the culvert under Dorchester avenue has 
been obstructed, and much complaint has been made from the flow- 
age in the neighborhood of Pond and East Cottage streets. Prob- 
ably the only substantial relief for this district will be had in the 
building of additional surface drains, to supplement the existing 
combined sewer. 

We now come to the valley of Hancock and Freeport streets, 
emptying at Glover's corner. There has been more or less com- 
plaint of flooded cellars and surface water, particularly from the 
neighborhood of Trull street, and also of Draper's court. No 
permanent relief or improvement can be obtained here without a 
system of surface drains. 

We now come to the valley of what is called at its lower end, 
where tide flows, " Tenean creek," and in its upper part, "Smelt 
brook." 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 343 

This brook is divided into two sections. The northern part rises 
at Washington street, near Olney, and flows down b}"^ Geneva avenue 
to the " clay pits," so called, and from there through the sewer yard 
to Park and Mill streets. The south branch rises on Washington 
street above Carlisle street, and flows down across Melbourne street 
and Dorchester avenue, by the way of Lonsdale and Edwin streets, 
crossing King, Centre, Dix, Parkmau, and Gibson streets, to the 
sewer yard, where it joins the other branch. 

With regard to the first named or north branch, the city has 
already built a liberal surface drain in Geneva avenue and Westville 
street, as well as culverts under Josephine and Charles streets, also a 
wooden channel, 6 X 6, in what is called the " old garbage yard." 
It would be well to complete this work as soon as practicable, at 
least to the extent of building culverts under the remaining streets, 
and deepening and straightening the channels between culverts. 

On the south branch of this brook there is much swampy terri- 
tory, and there are many new streets laid out and built upon in the 
square formed by Dorchester avenue. King, Adams, and Ashmont 
streets. On one of these new streets, Lonsdale street, also across 
Dorchester avenue, new culverts have been built of the proper size. 
'No other scientific improvement of the channel has been made, but 
on the contrary it has been diverted through small pipes to suit the 
convenience of land owners. Some petitions have been sent in, 
asking the city to build a system of drainage for this whole territory. 
The least to be done is to straighten the line between existing cul- 
verts. Below this square, culverts have been built across King, 
■Centre, Dix, Parkmau, and Gibson streets. 

Between the outlet of the last named at Commercial point and 
USTeponset there are some small outlets, mostly tidal and draining, but 
little area. The only one needing mention here is one crossing . 
Tenean street, 300 feet north of Fulton street, where the old 
wooden culvert has broken in, and should be rebuilt, either in wood 
or in better material. 

We now come to a somewhat extensive stream called Davenport 
"brook, which rises on Codman hill, also on the edge of Lower Mills 
Village, and also near Armandine street, and fiows down, one branch 
through the Churchill meadow and Codman street, the other 
branch from Armandine, through Bailey and Van Winkle streets, to 
join the other, near the corner of Adams and Minot streets, from 
which point they flow by Marsh street to the Neponset river. 

On the north branch of this brook, in Armandine, Ashmont, 
Bailey and Puller streets, the condition of things is bad. Private 
parties have apparently fought the brook as if it were an enemy, and 
liave so abused it as to put it clean out of sight; except in times of 
freshet, when it asserts itself bj filling cellars, spreading over low 
lands, and sending the neighboring citizens into this division to ask 
for protection against malaria and diphtheria. (There doubtless 
being on this brook, as on most others, sink drains and water-closets 
emptying into the stream.) 

On the south branch of this brook, leading from the rear part of 
Lower Mills Village, there is not so much complaint, as the locality 
is not so much settled. There is, however, some zymotic disease, 
calling for sewerage facilities; and there is an excellent chance to 
improve the sluggish, swampy brook channel now, while the terri- 
tory is still unsettled. 



344 City Document No. 29. 

The next brook along the ISTeponset river is the Mattapan brook, 
which rises at Capeu and Selden streets, and flows along by the 
Forest-avenue station and the 'New England Railroad to Mattapan 
station on that railroad, whence it follows nearly the line of Blue 
Hill avenue, crossing it very obliquely to the Neponset river at Mat- 
tapan square. 

Between the New England railroad and the N"eponset river, this 
brook would so much affect the proposed widening of Blue Hill 
avenue (running in it a good deal of the way) that some scheme for 
its improvement in that part would have to be incorporated into the 
widening. The upper part of the brook is so extremely fiat and 
swampy that it would very soon be a menace to the health of that 
rapidly-growing neighborhood, and ought to be straightened and 
deepened as a measure of sanitar}' precaution. There are on this 
brook probably 150 acres of swampy land, flowed every winter and 
spring, out of a total of 300 acres. 

The last brook on the Neponset river is the Oakland brook, which 
rises on Oakland street, near Calvary Cemetei-y, flows northward in 
front of Mount Hope Cemetery, turns and runs eastward, then south- 
eastward, parallel with Walk Hill street ; thence southerly, cross- 
ing Oakland street, and crossing the New England Railroad, near 
Rugby station, where it receives a large branch from the town of 
Hyde Park, and crossing River street makes its way into the Nepon- 
set river. 

This brook has recently been studied by this division, in connec- 
tion with the " Board of Survey " squares, being prepared for filing 
by the surveyors of the Street Commissioners' Department. Almost 
the whol6 valley of this brook is in a dense forest; but evidently the 
time when it will come into market in competition with its immedi- 
ate neighbors is not far off, and it would be a great blessing to its 
future inhabitants if a scheme for improving the channel of the brook 
could be carried out in advance of the building of streets and houses. 

We now come to the westerly quarter of Dorchester, which lies 
in the valley of Stony brook. This territory in its northerly part is 
high and rolling, sloping gently from Mount Bowdoin and Grove 
Hall to Talbot avenue. This portion of it needs very soon a good 
many lengths of surface drain, but no very extensive system at 
present, until the brooks are improved lower down. But south of 
Talbot avenue the condition of things is very different. There is a 
territory centring at Lauriat avenue and Dorchester station on the 
New England Railroad, which is natui'ally very swampy, and which 
has been settled up in advance of any system of drainage. The 
wants of the inhabitants here for house sewerage will soon be met 
by the comiDletion of the new pumping station, by which their house 
sewage will be pumped over through Talbot avenue and the Centre- 
street tunnel to Dorchester bay. But this can evidently do abso- 
lutely nothing towards the surface drainage of the land; that is, 
towards relieving it from the rain water of 800 acres, brought down 
from Mount Bowdoin and Franklin Park, and diffusing itself over 
acres of swampy land. The natural course of the water from this 
territory is by the "Canterbury branch" of Stony brook, which 
crosses Blue Hill avenue, near Chapman avenue; thence crossing 
Harvard, Morton, and Walk Hill streets, passes just eastward of 
Canterbury street, to join the main stream of Stony brook, which 
flows from there by Forest Hills and Roxbury stations to the Back 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 346 

Bay. But this course from Dorchester to the Back Bay is very long 
and flat. From the new pump house, near Dorchester station, by 
the route of the most convenient streets to Dorchester bay, near 
Harrison square, is about 2| miles. From the same pump house by 
the valley of Stony brook to its outlet at Beacon street, near Charles 
street, is about 5^ miles. There is practically the same fall of 50 
feet to high tide in either direction. This implies an average slope 
of about 9 feet to the mile towards the Back Bay, and an average 
slope of about 22 feet to the mile to Dorchester bay. But in the latter 
case, inasmuch as the intervening ridge is about 40 feet above the 
point of starting, the utilization of this route would probablj^ be by a 
tunnel, passing at a flat grade 60 or 60 feet below the summit, and then 
by a channel having a quick descent to the waters of Dorchester bay. 

l^To doubt the drainage of this section of Stony brook in Dorches- 
ter, as well as of quite a tract lying on the brook in West Roxbury, 
could be most speedily and effectually handled by means of such a 
tunnel, were it made large enough. The cost, however, would be 
considerable; it has been variously estimated at from S250,000 to 
$300,000 which has probably prevented it from being favorably con- 
sidered up to the present time. There would be various advantages, 
however, connected with this tunnel, for the disposition of house 
sewage, which will be touched on later. 

If it should prove that the time is not ripe for such a tunnel, a 
comparatively inexpensive relief for the surface drainage of the 
Lauriat-avenue and Chapman-avenue region can be obtained by 
deepening the open channel of the Canterbury branch of Stony 
brook down to the main brook, a distance of about 10,000 feet. 
(The main brook at this point was straightened and deepened to the 
established grade by the town of West Roxbury previous to annexa- 
tion.) This is an improvement, by the way, which ought to be 
made at an early date for purjDoses of general sanitation and agricul- 
tural improvement. 

Meanwhile, the existing state of things near Lauriat avenue is 
about as bad as anywhere in the city of Boston. This large brook, 
for the reception of which the city has built culverts across Lauriat 
avenue, 6 feet square, has been interrupted at many points by 
private streets with only 15 and 18-inch pipes provided for culverts. 

West Roxbury. 
GoldsmitlVs 'brook. 

The two branches of this brook rise near the line between West 
Roxbury and Brookline, and flowing down on opposite sides of Moss 
hill come together near Goldsmith street. From this point to Wood- 
man street, a distance of about 400 feet, there is at present an open 
channel which needs widening and deepening. From Woodman 
street, across private land to Jamaica street, there is a culvert of 
about 15 square feet cross-sectional area, which should be increased 
to at least 30. 

From Jamaica street to the easterly side of South street, a dis- 
tance of about 600 feet, the present channel is large enough to sat- 
isfy the probable needs for the next ten years. 

At South street the area naturally drained by the brook is about 
650 acres, and the sewers at present built in this area receive more 
or less storm water which properly should be taken directly to the 
brook. 



346 City DocumejS't No. 29. 

From South street to Call street, a distance of about 950 feet, the 
channel of the brook is, for the greater part of the distance, in a most 
deplorable condition. The yards and cellars are flooded during 
heavy storms and, except for a very small part of the way, no pre- 
tence is made of providing a sufficient channel, or of confining the 
brook within proper bounds. 

Under Call street and the iN". Y., IST. H. & H. E.R., Providence 
Division, the channel is of sufficient size, but from the railroad to 
Washington street, a distance of about 450 feet, there is an open 
channel, of shallow depth, which seems to be a receptacle for all 
sorts of rubbish, and in warm weather is a menace to the health of 
the residents in this locality. 

From Washington street to Stony brook is a large well-built cul- 
vert constructed by the city in 1895. 

Arimdel-street hrcmch of JRoslindale branch of Stony brooh. 

This brook drains a considerable area of swampy land bounded by 
Walter, Weld and Selwyn streets, containing about 40 acres. The 
main brook runs across Selwyn, Knoll, Arundel, Mozart, Hewlett, 
Parquhar and South streets, and the Ills'. Y., N. H. & H. R.E.., and 
Birch street, below which point it requires no attention at present. 

At South and Hewlett streets are culverts of sufficient size. 
Under the other streets the culverts are much too small and should 
be rebuilt at a very early date. 

The channel in other places, except where it crosses streets, re- 
quires deepening and widening. 

Hewlett and Farquhar-streets branch. 

This branch rises a little above Centre street, between Hewlett 
and Farquhar streets, and joins the Arundel-street branch about 250 
feet from Walter street. 

The culvert under Centre street is at present in a tumble-down 
condition, through which the water trickles without any pretence of 
free flow, and on the up-stream side stands in a large pool during 
wet weather. 

Between Centre and Hewlett streets is, for part of the way, an 
open channel, and for the remainder of the distance a 6-inch pipe. 
The care of the water, after the culvert under Centre street is re- 
built, will require a .30-inch pipe. This will connect with the 30-inch 
pipe under Hewlett street, built in 1896. 

From Hewlett street to Selwyn street there is an open channel 
which, for some three or four years to come, will probably require 
no attention. Within ten years, however, it will be necessary to 
make this into a walled channel. 

At Selwyn street the brook was taken a few years ago by private 
parties into a 15-inch pipe, and carried up Selwyn street to Hewlett 
street, and thence down Hewlett street to the main branch, near 
Walter street. This 15-inch pipe has a capacity of about 3^ cubic 
feet per second, and will in a few years be called upon to carry some 
40 cubic feet per second, thus necessitating the rebuilding of the 
channel between the limits given above. 

The area drained by these two brooks contains at present over 100 
houses. There is a sewer in Hewlett street, and sewers nearly com- 
pleted in Mozart, Selwyn and Arundel streets; also a demand for 
sewers in other streets in this area. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 347 

There is every reason to suppose that the usual attempt will be 
made by the property owners to fill in the brooks where they cross 
their land, particularly as these brooks in the summer time carry 
very little water. As the sewers in this vicinity are all designed on 
the separate system, they are utterly inadequate to care for any sur- 
face water from the streets. 

Spring-street brook, heticeen Charles river and head waters of the 
brook near Bellevue street. 

This brook at present receives the sewage from quite a number of 
houses lying in the area between Centre, Spring and Baker streets. 
The sewers to be built in this area in the near future will connect 
with the Metropolitan sewer, now in process of construction, and are 
designed to carry only house sewage. This brook, therefore, will 
be an outlet for surface drainage for quite a large territory, and it is, 
therefore, of great importance that the channel be preserved in good 
condition, and when improvement is necessary that the improve- 
ments be built of proper size. 

From the river to Baker street, a distance of about 3,500 feet, it 
is proposed to have an open channel, part being with sloping earth 
sides, and part with walled sides. 

From Baker street to Centre street will be required a brick chan- 
nel, containing from 12|^ to 23^ square feet cross-sectional area. The 
existing culverts vary from 1 to 6 square feet in cross-sectional area. 

From Centre street up, an open channel will answer for some 
time to come. 

Boslindale branch of Stony brook, from Washington street to Central 

station. 
This brook has been abused much less than any of those above 
mentioned, probably owing to the fact that building operations have 
begun in this territory within only a few years. It will require a 
wider and deeper channel, with proper culverts under the various 
streets, as the area becomes settled. 

Brook from Montvieio street, near Kirk street, to Centre street, near 

Corey street. 

This case is the worst that has been brought to notice in AVest 
Boxbury. At Centre street the brook has been taken into the sur- 
face drain in that street, and from Montview street nearly, or quite 
to Centre street, the channel is practically obliterated. For some 
little distance down from Montview street, however, there is a blind 
•drain which replaced the brook, and the location of which, I am 
informed, can be easily determined in wet weather. 

This blind drain does not operate to any extent, and as the surface 
of the ground at the outlet to the culvert under Montview street has 
been filled in to a height somewhat above the water line of the cul- 
vert, the water instead of running off becomes stagnant. 

A request was made by the West Eoxbury Improvement Society 
that the culvert be abandoned, and the basins connected with it be 
connected with the sewer in the street. 

The sewers in the neighborhood are on the separate system and 
should receive no storm water whatever. 

The above request is a fair sample of what always comes to pass if 
owners of land are allowed to interfere with natural water courses. 



348 City Document No. 29. 

Brighton. 

Faneuil Valley 'brooTc, from upper culvert at Lake street, to 
Wool pond, near North Beacon street. 

Culverts of size sufficient to answer for many years were built in 
1891, under Lake street, at the two points where this brook crosses it. 
Between these points it is probable that no change will be made in 
the brook until the streets laid out by the Street Commission on the 
east side of Lake street are constructed, some of which cross this 
brook. Culverts under the streets will then be necessary, and the 
brook in the land between the streets will require walled sides. In 
this area the brook will receive all the surface water from the 
streets. 

From the lower culvert, under Lake street, to Hobart street, the 
conditions are the same as above. 

There are culverts under Washington, Fairbanks Oakland, and 
Faneuil streets built by the city, of proper size, but at Hobart street 
the culvert will require to be much larger than at present. 

From Hobart street to Wool pond the brook is carried part of the 
way in an open-walled channel, and part of the way in a covered 
channel. Neither of these is of sufficient capacity to last for many 
years, except at Parsons street, where there is a culvert of proper 
size. 

Oak-square branch of Faneuil Valley hrooTc, from Brooks pond 
to Oak square. 

Under Brackett street and at Faneuil and Brooks streets, at the 
junction of the two streets, culverts of about 25 square feet cross- 
sectional area are needed in place of the very small culverts at 
present in use. 

In the private land between the streets the channel should be 
deepened and widened and the sides protected by stone walls. 

At Oak square this brook receives all the surface water from Tre- 
mont and ISTonantum streets, and a large part of Washington street, 
northwest of Oak square. 

Brook from Market street, near Faneuil street, to outlet near North 

Beacon street. 

The upper part of this brook, near Market street, has been filled 
in within two years. The lower part is in a covered channel of in- 
sufficient size. The middle part of the brook is open, and receives 
water from the hills in the vicinity. 

There has been complaint by the owner of the land that in time 
of storm, or when the snow melted in the spring, that his land was 
flooded on account of the outlet being obstructed. 

The upper and lower part of this brook should be taken into a 3- 
foot 6-inch circular brick conduit, and the middle part improved 
for the present by building an open channel, with walled sides. 

Holmes-avenue hrook, from Harvard avenue to culvert, under 
Commonwealth avenue, near Griggs street. 

Culverts have been built in 1896 under Holmes avenue, at the 
two crossings of this brook. Owing to the proximity of Common- 
wealth avenue, and the fact that streets running perpendicular to 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 349 

Holmes avenue have recently been completed in the town of Brook- 
line, the line between which town and Boston is only about 250 feet 
from Holmes avenue, it seems probable that the land abutting on 
this street will soon be developed. On this account the proper thing 
to do is to take the brook into a brick conduit, which will vary from 
16 to 24 square feet in cross-sectional area. 

Salt Creek brook, between Boston & Albany Bailroad and Com- 
monwealth avenue. 

This brook is the outlet for all the surface water falling on Com- 
monwealth avenue, between Pleasant street and the summit south- 
west of Warren street, as well as for all the streets already built or to 
be built between the avenue and the southerly limits of the drain- 
age area which lies in the town of Brookline. It is also the outlet 
for several branches lying wholly or in part in Brookline. This 
brook should be widened and deepened, with stone-wall sides, from 
the railroad up to the northerly line of Commonwealth avenue. 
From that point, for a distance of about 100 feet under the avenue, 
a new culvert was built in 1892, but in the southerly 60 feet of the 
avenue the old culvert of inadequate size and poor condition remains. 

From the southerly side of the avenue a new culvert, following 
about the course of the brook, was built by private parties in 1893. 
It lies in private land, and is too small in size and of poor con- 
struction. 

The last two mentioned should be rebuilt, thus aifording an ade- 
quate outlet for the present concrete conduit in Commonwealth 
avenue. 

Brook across Commonwealth avenue, between Kinross and Suther- 
land roads. 

There is at present a culvert under the avenue and under Suther- 
land road which is not in very good condition, but will probably 
answer until the avenue is built to its full width. Below the avenue 
the brook should be taken into a brick conduit and carried down to 
connect with the brick drain built by private parties when the land 
along the lower part of the brook was developed. 

The land in this vicinity is of considerable value, and as the sew- 
ers all drain into Brookline territory, and must be on the separate 
system, it is of importance that the brook be preserved to carry the 
surface water. 

Brook from Chiswick road through prioate land to Commonwealth 
avenue, thence across the avenue and down Strathmove road to 
connect with existing channel at Engleuoood avenue. 

This brook should be taken into a channel of proper size, as it will 
receive the surface water from streets covering considerable terri- 
tory. The upper 650 feet of this brook lies in private land, and as it 
contains water only a few months in the year, and the land in this 
vicinity is being rapidly developed, means should at once be taken 
to preserve the channel. The remainder of the brook is carried in 
streets by small pipes and tumble-down stone drains to a brick con- 
duit, built by private parties, and extending into the town of Brook- 
line. It will require a channel containing about 1^ square feet cross- 
sectional area. 



350 City Document No. 29. 

Shepard-street hrooh^from Shannon street to Western avenue. 

The present condition of this water course is a source of annoy- 
ance to the property owners in various parts of this drainage area, 
and will become more so as the territory increases in population. 
The brook rises near Union and Shannon streets, and formerly 
flowed across Shannon, Shepard, Washington and other streets to 
Western avenue, and thence to the Charles river. The condition 
of the brook at this time is as follows: 

It is carried across Shannon street in a 24-inch pipe, laid by the 
city, from a point near its source to about half-way between Shannon 
and Shepard streets, where it empties into the open channel. A 
short distance below it is taken into a 15-inch pipe, built by private 
parties several years ago, and carried to Shepard street, at which 
point it is taken into the Shepard-street sewer. As the sewer in 
Shepard street has a capacity of only 4 cubic feet per second, and 
the water delivered by the brook at this point may, in time of aver- 
age storm, amount to 15 or 20 cubic feet per second, it is not 
at all remarkable that some of the cellars and yards in this vicinity 
are flooded during storms. 

From Shepard street to the West End car-house, near Washington 
street, the channel of the brook is obliterated; but the channel under 
the car-house still remains. From that point to Sparhawk street, 
the old, covered stone channel is in existence. Its location is known 
approximately, but not its size or condition. The catch-basins at 
the junction of Cambridge and Washington streets, which formerly 
emptied into the brook at this point, are now running into the sewer 
in Washington street, and in time of storm assist in overcrowding 
this sewer and flooding the cellars in the vicinity. From Sparhawk 
street to Murdock street the brook is entirely wiped out. 

From Murdock street to IsTorth Beacon street, the channel remains; 
but at North Beacon street the brook was several years ago taken 
into the sewer at the earnest solicitation of one of the large property 
owners of Brighton. As the sewer was never designed to carry any 
such quantity of water as is brought to it by the brook, and is en- 
tirely inadequate for such purposes, the natural result has been that 
the sewer, in time of storm, is greatly overtaxed, and cellars along the 
valley of the brook are often flooded. It is perhaps a case of poetic 
justice that the man who was chiefly instrumental in having the 
brook taken into the sewer in order that it might be removed from 
his land farther down, has been one of the greatest sufferers from 
the overcrowding of the sewer. To restore the brook to this point 
will require a conduit, varying from 24 inches to 5 feet 6 inches in 
diameter. 

From ISTorth Beacon street, nearly to Everett street, the channel is 
entirely obliterated; and, although there is a short length of open 
channel near Everett street, it has no outlet. From ISTorth Beacon 
street to Everett street would require a conduit of about 40 square 
feet cross-sectional area. 

From the easterly side of Everett street to North Harvard street, 
the brook is carried in a covered channel, laid by private parties, 
consisting of wooden culverts and earthenware pipes, which vary in 
capacity from 3 to 8 cubic feet per second. If we consider 
only the area between Everett and Franklin streets, the quantity 
that will be brought to these pipes when the land is a little more 
developed will be at least 40 cubic feet per second. If we 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 351 

consider the entire drainage area of the brook down lo this point it 
will ultimately amount to 260 cubic feet per second. As the 
territory between Lincoln street and North Harvard street is sewered 
on the separate system, the necessity of providing an adequate out- 
let for surface water can readily be seen. 

From a little beyond North Harvard street to Western avenue, 
and thence to the Charles river, there is an open channel which 
would only require deepening and widening, with perhaps walled 
sides. 

It will be seen by the above report on surface drains that thi& 
division has made a very careful study of this, both on an engineer- 
ing and scientific basis. This is a subject that has caused a great 
deal of trouble to the division, but the trouble in the past is nothing 
to what the trouble will be in the future, unless some remedy is 
given. The city has re^^orted a bill to the Legislature for the relief 
of surface drainaee. 



352 City Document No. 29. 



MAIN DRAINAGE. 



In the early history of Boston, when any citizen, or number of cit- 
izens, deemed it necessary to have a sewer to drain tlieir cellars or 
lands, they proceeded without reference to the town government to 
construct and control a sewer to discharge by gravity on the most 
direct route to the tide water, of such size and materials as they 
saw fit. 

With the increased importance of the town government, no drain 
was allowed to be laid or repaired without permission of the select- 
men; but even then drains of all sorts, sizes and shapes were laid, 
sometimes more than one in a street, side by side, or one above the 
other, with no plans to show their location or the position of those 
previously laid. 

Until it became a city, in 1823, and took control of all the sewers, 
new and old, the greater part of Boston was sewered in this way. 
Fourteen years later a " Superintendent of Sewers" was appointed 
to have entire charge of the sewers. 

While Boston was a small city, situated on hilly land, with good 
slopes on all sides toward the water, allowing the sewers a grade 
that prevented any accumulation of deposits, the amount of sew- 
age, insignificant when compared with the immense volume of sea 
water, caused little annoyance b}'' the method of sewage disposal 
in use. 

The increasing population and growth of the city, the territorial 
enlargement being for the most part hj reclaiming the tidal marshes 
and flats, requiring the extension of sewers on slight, and, in some 
cases, level grades to the tide water, brought the evils of the sewer- 
age sj'stem, or lack of system, into public notice. 

The flood tide in closing the tide gates at the sewer outlets pre- 
vented the escape of the sewage, and forced the sewers to act for the 
greater part of twelve hours as stagnant, elongated cesspools, whose 
efficiency was being lessened daily by amassing deposits too solid to 
be removed by the feeble current produced by the ebbing of the 
tide. During high tide a heavy rain would surcharge the sewers, 
flood the cellars, and force the sewage itself into the houses. 

Such an unbearable stench arose from the deposits putrifying in 
the sewers and in the catch-basins, constructed on the sewer lines, 
that all ventilating openings were sealed. In event of the wind 
blowing into the sewer, or the rising sewage, dammed by the flood 
tide, compressing the air, the foul sewer gas was forced up the badly 
constructed drains into the houses. 

The sewage discharged from the seventy independent outlets dur- 
ing the latter part of the ebb, returning on the flood, was deposited, 
not only on the flats about the sewer outlets, but also far inland, 
there to decompose and fill the atmosphere with vile, penetrating 
odors that hung over the city from end to end. 

The air was so polluted, especially in the neighborhood of the 
marsh lands, that houses were closed, and their occupants left the 
city; business was blocked, and laborers were obliged to quit work; 



Street Department — Sewer DivisiOiSr. 353 

public atteution was aroused, and complaints were received daily. 
To quote from a report of the city Board of Health : " Large terri- 
tories have been at once and frequently enveloped in an atmosphere 
of stench so strong as to arouse the sleeping, terrify the weak, and 
nauseate and exasperate everybody." 

The nuisance became so intolerable that an Act, to provide for a 
commissioQ to be paid by the city of Boston, on the subject of 
drainage and water supply for the city of Boston and vicinity, was 
passed in a special session of the State Legislature (chap. 360, 
Acts of 1872). On the ground that the expense should be shared 
by the other cities and towns interested, Boston refused to comply 
with the terms of the Act. 

Time passed, and although the complaints of the citizens became 
louder, the adjacent towns manifested no desire to co-operate with 
Boston in constructing a comprehensive Metropolitan sewerage 
system. The city, however, deciding to proceed alone, began by 
passing the following order in the City Council: 

" Ordered: That the Committee on Sewers be requested to ex- 
amine into the present system of sewerage in this city, and report 
to the City Council whether any improvement of the present sewer- 
age facilities is necessarj^ for the protection of the public health." 

The Committee on Sewers reported that the sewerage system was 
very satisfactory, and that no improvements were needed. 

In spite oE the favorable report of the Committee on Sewers the 
question of improving the sanitary condition was again and again 
brought before public attention by the City Board of Health and by 
progressive citizens, with the result that early in 1875 His Honor, 
Mayor Samuel C. Cobb, appointed E. S. Chesborough, City En- 
gineer of Chicago, Moses Lane, City Engineer of Milwaukee, and 
Charles F. Folsom, M.D., Secretary of the Massachusetts State 
Board of Health, as a commission to thoroughly investigate the 
sewerage of Boston, and the best method and scheme of sewage 
disposal for the future. 

The carefully prepared, far-seeing report of this commission 
justified the anticipation of their ability to cope with the great 
question involved. In brief, they advised the construction of two 
trunk intercepting sewers, one designed to include the part of Boston 
and the adjoining territory lying to the north of the Charles river, 
to discharge at Point Shirley; the other, designed to drain, until 
the population was greatly increased, all the territory lying between 
the Charles river. Mother brook, Neponset river and the sea, an 
area of about 67.8 square miles; the sewage to flow by gravity 
to a pumping station at Dorchester bay, there to be raised about 30 
feet, and then flow through a siphon, under the JSTeponset river to 
Moon Island. The sewage from both lines was to be stored in 
large masonry reservoirs, constructed near the points of discharge, 
and run out during the first two or three hours after high water. 
The reservoir at Moon Island was designed tu store about 2.5,000,000 
gallons of sewage, representing somewhat more than twice the 
amount then discharged in six hours. The outfall sewer was to be 
able to carry 445 cubic feet per second, or over 280,000,000 gallons 
per day. This was the am-)unt of sewage calculated to be received 
from a population of 1,000,000, allowing 150 gallons per day per in- 
habitant and an amount of storm water equal to one-fourth of an 
inch of rainfall per twenty-four hours. They appi-ehended that in 



354 City Document No. 29. 

ten or fifteen years the population would increase so that the build- 
ing of a high-level sewer to drain the greater part of the territory- 
above grade 40, about 46 square miles, would be advisable and 
economical, as the sewage from that district would then be dis- 
chai-ged by gravity into the reservoir at Moon Island, and greatly 
relieve the work at the pumping station. 

The commissioners' report embodied in substance the principal 
features of the main drainage systems as they exist to-day, and are 
proposed for the future. 

The adoption of the commissioners' plan, so far as it applied to 
the territory south of the Charles river, the portion of the city 
where improved sewerage was the most urgent, was recommended 
by the special committee to examine the report. A joint special 
committee to take charge of the construction of the proposed im- 
proved sewerage system to be built under the direction of the City 
Engineer was appointed. 

Extensive float experiments were made at Spectacle, Thompson's, 
Castle and Moon Islands, to determine the force and direction of the 
tidal currents, and the most fitting site for discharging the sewage. 
Moon Island was found to be by far the most favorable for the 
reservoir and outfall work. The studies prosecuted to determine 
the location of the pumping station showed a good clay foundation 
at the Cow Pasture at Old Harbor Point. These and some other 
alterations, as building a tunnel under Dorchester bay, change of 
location of part of the main sewer, etc., were found advisable after 
an accurate survey of the proposed route had been accomplished; 
but the principal features of the original scheme, a main sewer with 
branch interceptors traversing the low coast line of the city, a 
pumping station, an outlet sewer, with a siphon under the ISTeponset 
river, and reservoirs for storing the sewage during the flood tide, 
were incorporated in the plan. The work began in July, 1876, was 
pushed rapidly forward, and the first contract let during 1877. 

Owing to the unexpected difficulties encountered, and to the rise 
in price of labor and materials between the letting and finishing of 
the contracts, a large part of the main sewer was built below cost, 
and several of the contractors failed. Many difficulties were over- 
come, and problems new to engineering science were solved. A 
number of the old sewers, some of which were working satis- 
factorily, bad to be rebuilt to accommodate the new grade. 

As it was desirable to relieve the city from the evils of the old 
sewerage system as soon as possible, the new works were put into 
operation on Jan. 1, 1884, although considerable work remained to 
be done. The total cost of the improved sewerage to Jan. 1, 1888, 
was $5,000,000. 

The solution of the sewerage problem for the towns adjoining 
Boston by large intercepting sewers to carry the sewage to pumping 
stations, there to be raised to such a height that it would flow by 
gravity into the sea, the intercepting sewer on the north side for 
Cambridge, Everett, Maiden, Chelsea, Winthrop, Somerville, etc., 
to discharge at Point Shirley, reservoirs storing the sewage during 
flood tide, a high-level sewer to drain the territory 40 feet above 
the low water plane, when the capacity of the main intercepting 
sewer of the district between the Charles and IS'eponset rivers 
should be exceeded, was embodied in the report of the commission 
of 1875. 



Street DepaeTxAjent — Sewer DivisiOiT. 355 

Improved plans, including an additional trunk line skirting the 
southern boundary of the city, designed to relieve the country in 
the ISTeponset-river valley, were subsequently made by the City 
Engineer. 

The building of a sewerage system for the cities and towns north 
of the Charles river was taken in hand by the State, which 
appointed the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners in 
1889, under whose jurisdiction the work was carried on and com- 
pleted in 1895. 

Interceptors receiving sewage from Melrose, Maiden, Somerville, 
"VVoburn, Arlington, etc., unite in a large main sewer passing through 
Everett, Chelsea, East Boston and Winthrop to Deer Island, where 
it continuously discharges its contents into the sea. The reservoirs 
recommended in the original report of 1875 have not as yet been 
built. 

The construction of this system, as well as the annual interest on 
the first cost, is borne by the municipalities and towns benefited 
according to the ratio of the valuation of each municipality or town 
to the total valuation of the tributary territory, and the annual cost of 
maintaining and operating the works is divided among those cities 
and towns according to the ratio of the population of each city and 
town to the total population of the tributary territory. 

East Boston and Charlestown lie wholly within the system north 
of the Charles river, and by valuation Boston paid in 1896 on their 
account, 22 per cent of the cost of construction of the entire system, 
and of the interest on the cost, and 22.82 per cent of the annual 
cost for maintenance and operation. 

In 1889 the work of extending the Boston main drainage from 
Huntington avenue and Parker street up the valley of the Charles 
river tp the Waltham line, to abate the nuisance caused by emptying 
the sewage of Waltham, Watertown, Newton, Brighton, and Brook- 
line into the Charles river, was placed in the hands of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Commissioners. The building of the sewer was 
begun in 1890, and connections were allowed to all of the above 
towns in the spring of 1892. 

The system outlined by the City Engineer for the Keponset- 
river valley, including Milton, Hyde Park, Dedham, parts of West 
Koxbury, Dorchester, Newton and Brookline, lying within that 
water-shed, was partially built by Boston, and later taken up by the 
Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, who have prac- 
tically completed the main sewer nearly to the West Koxbury line 
at the time of writing. 

The sewage from the Metropolitan sewers in the Charles and 
Neponset-river valleys, together with sewage from the Boston and 
Dorchester main drainage works, is raised at the Dorchester 
pumping station a distance of 35 feet, allowing it to flow without 
further pumping through the tunnel under Dorchester bay to the 
reservoirs at Moon Island, where it is stored until one hour after the 
beginning of the ebb tide. 

As the sewage from the Charles system was discharged at Gains- 
borough street into the original main city sewer, and flowed from 
thence to the sea by Boston's disposal works, it was necessary to 
contract with Boston for disposing of this additional amount of 
sewage. Conferences were held between the city and State oflScials, 
resulting in certain arbitrary sums being paid annually to Boston 



356 City Document No. 29. 

up to the year 1896, although these amounts were considerably less 
than what the city would have received had the amounts been deter- 
mined on the lines laid down by the Apportionment Commission of 
1890. That commission determined the per cent of the interest and 
cost of construction and of annual cost of maintenance of the sewers 
built by the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners that 
each city and town should pay for a period of five years. In 1895 
when a new Apportionment Commission was appointed to determine 
the amounts to be paid by the several cities and towns in the Metro- 
politan sewerage district, it became necessary for the city of Boston 
to make a new settlement of the amount which should be paid for 
disposing of the sewage from the Charles and J^^eponset branches of 
the Metropolitan sewerage systems for a period of five years (1896- 
1900, inclusive).. In January, 1895, negotiations began between the 
city olficials and tbe Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners. 
Figures were made by the Superintendent of Streets, basing the 
amount to be paid Boston on the ratio of the amount of sewage con- 
tributed by the surrounding cities and towns to the amount of sew- 
age contributed by Boston. Exception to those figures was taken by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in a letter dated Jan. 11, 
1896, but in place of a computation on ihe same basis as that adopted 
by the Superintendent of Streets, changed to correspond with their 
criticisms, they forwarded a table showing that if their sewerage 
system was combined with the system of Boston, and the expenses 
of construction and interest borne according to the ratio of the 
respective valuations, and the expenses for maintenance borne 
according to the ratio of respective populations, that the total yearly 
cost to them for the Charles-river sewerage would be S62,000, and 
as their expenses, exclusive of any sum paid Boston, were then 
about 131,000 per year, they intimated that Boston should charge 
them not more than the difference (.$31,000) between their existing 
expenses and their expenses under any combination which they 
could get the authority of the Legislature to form, irrespective of 
what it cost the city of Boston to dispose of their sewage. 

As the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners were not willing to 
accept the amounts proposed by Boston, the Superintendent of 
Streets, Mr. B. T. Wheeler, forwarded them a letter, which they 
received, oifering to leave the amount to be paid Boston to three dis- 
interested men, viz.: F. P. Stearns, E. C. Clarke, Joseph P. Davis, 
and to abide by their decision. No acknowledgment of this pro- 
posal was made. 

Without further correspondence with Boston, the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission recommended to the Legislature " that the 
main trunk sewer of the Boston main drainage system, from 
the point at Gainsborough street, in Huntington avenue where the 
Charles-river S3'stem now connects with the main drainage system, 
to its outlet of discharge at Moon Island, the pumping station, stor- 
age basins, and discharge plant and sewers, should be taken, con- 
trolled and operated by the Commonwealth." 

On the election of the Hon. Josiah Quincy to the mayoralty of 
Boston, the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission addressed a letter 
to him, stating their readiness to secure a settlement of the amounts 
to be paid Boston for disposing of the sewage from the Charles- 
river system. At a conference with the Sewerage Commissioners, 
it was decided that the engineering departments of the contracting 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 357 

parlies should compute the amount of sewage contributed by the 
Charles-river system in order to determine the division of expenses. 
Accordingly studies were begun by the Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 
mission and the Boston Street Department. While these studies 
were in progress, the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission submitted 
a bill to the Chairman of the Committee on MetroiDolitan Affairs 
authorizing the Commonwealth to acquire the Boston main drain- 
age system by purchase or otherwise. At a hearing appointed by 
that committee, a verbal agreement was made by the city of Boston 
with the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners to accept 
the provisional amount of $27,000 for disposing of the sewage from 
the cities and towns in the Charles-river system after it entered the 
Boston main sewer at Gainsborough street, Boston, during the year 
1896; it being understood that any amount should be jiaid to the 
city of Boston or to the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sioners according to the balance shown by the computations then 
being made by the engineering departments. 

Meanwhile the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, 
in their report of 1896, requested the Legislature to pass an Act as 
before requested, authorizing the Commonwealth to take the Boston 
main drainage system. 

A study of the sewage contributed and anticipated from the 
Charles-river system for sixteen years (1895 to 1910, inclusive) was 
first made. This involved an extended investigation of the popula- 
tion, water consumption and sewage of Waltham, Watertown, ifew- 
ton, Brookline, Brighton, and the part of Boston above Gainsbor- 
ough street. Whenever possible, the population for 1895 was 
obtained from advance sheets of the State census. After the second 
count and pubUcation of the census, these figures were revised. In 
determining the water consumption, use was made of the best data 
possessed by the Metropolitan Water Board, the Boston Water 
Board, and the State Board of Health. 

As it was expected that the IsTeponset-river system would be in 
operation by Jan. 1, 1898, a study of the cities and towns in 
that system was also conducted. Milton, Hyde Park, Dedham, part 
of West Roxbury, and part of Dorchester came properly within that 
system. The city of Quincy lies almost wholly without that water- 
shed and connects its sewerage with the Boston system, at a point 
below the tunnel at Squantum Head. Quincy uses, therefore, only 
the portion of the Boston sewerage system from Squantum to the 
sea, consisting of the outfall sewer, the reservoirs and the outlet 
sewer. Although Quincy does not lie within the Metropolitan sew- 
erage district, yet in view of the connection with the Boston system 
and its possible absorption by the State Commission, a study of its 
population, water consumption and sewage was made. 

The final figures adopted by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sion and the Boston Street Department for the Charles and Hepon- 
set valleys are as follows: — 



358 



City Document No. 29. 



Population and Water Consumption of the Charles=river ValJey 

System. 



DlSTKICT. 



Year. 



Population. 



Average Daily 

Water 

Consumption, 

per capita. 

Gallons. 



Total Daily 

Water 

Consumption. 

Gallons. 



Waltham .... 



Watertown . 



Newton ...... 



Brighton . 



Brookline . 



Part of Boston. 



Charles-river District . . 



f 1895 
J 1900 
] 1905 
[1910 

fl895 

j 1900 

] 1905 

[l910 

fl895 
j 1900 
} 1905 
tl910 

fl895 
j 1900 
"^1 1905 

^1910 

ri895 
j 1900 
1 1905 

[l910 

fl895 
j 1900 
\ 1905 
^1910 

fl895 
J 1900 
] 1905 
L1910 



20,876 
23,600 
28,300 
34,000 

7,788 

9,300 

11,200 

13,400 

27,590 
33,700 
41,100 
50,100 

15,001 
19,500 
24,500 
30,700 

16,164 
20 2C0 
25,000 
31,000 

10,790 
16,500 
22,500 
30,000 

98,209 
122,800 
152,600 
189,200 



59 
70 

75 
80 

40 
54 
58 
62 

65 
70 
75 
80 

70 

72 
74 
76 

81 
88 
91 
94 

81 
86 
91 



67 
74 
79 
83 



1,222,000 

1,652,000 
2,122,000 
2,720,000 

312,000 

502,000 

. 650,000 

831,000 

1,802,000 
2,359,000 
3,082,000 
4,008,000 

1,050,000 
1,404,000 
1,813,000 
2,333,000 

1,308 000 
1,778,000 
2,275,000 
2,914,000 

874,000 
1,419,000 
2,048,000 
2,850,000 

6,568,000 

9,114,000 

11,990,000 

15,656,000 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



359 



Population and Water Consumption of the Neponset=river 
Valley System. 



District. 



Year. 



Milton . 



Hyde Park. 



Dedham 



Part of W. Roxbury.. 



Part of Dorchester . 



Neponset-river valley, 



fl895 
J 1900 
i 1905 

[l910 

f 189.5 

J 1900 

] 1905 

[l910 

fl895 
J 1900 
i 1905 

[l910 

ri895 
j 1900 
1 1905 

^1910 

fl895 
J 1900 
] 1905 
[.1910 

ri895 
J 1900 
] 1905 
tl910 



Population. 



5,518 

6,900 

8,600 

10,700 

11,826 
14,100 
16,600 
19,600 

7,211 

8,000 

9,500 

12,000 

2,030 

4.000 

8,000 

13,000 

7,343 

13,000 
18,000 
24,000 

33,928 
46,000 
60,700 
79,000 



Average Daily 

Water 

Consumption 

per capita. 

Gallons. 



24 
45 
50 
55 

41 
45 

50 
55 

57 
60 
63 



60 
63 
66 
69 

60 
63 
66 
69 

47 
54 
59 
63 



Total Daily 

Water 

Consumption. 

Gallons. 



133,000 
311,000 
430,000 
589,000 

482,000 

635,000 

830,000 

1,078,000 

411,000 
480,000 
599,000 
792,000 

122,000 
252,000 
528,000 
897,000 

441,000 

819,000 

1,118,000 

1,656,000 

1,589,000 
2.497,000 
3,575,000 
5,012,000 



360 



City Document No. 29. 



The leakage, as determined by this division, was found to be 
about Iwenty-tAvo gallons per capita per day, making the total 
amount of sewage from the Metropolitan sewer system as follows : — 

Sewage from the Gliarles-river Valley System. 



Year. 


Population. 


Average daily 

sewage per 

capita. 


Total daily sew- 
age discharge. 
Gallons. 


1895 . 

1900 


98.209 
122,800 
152,600 
189,200 


89 

96 

101 

105 


8,729,000 
11,816,000 
15,347,000 
19,819,000 


1905 


1910..... 



Sewage from, the Neponset-valley System. 



1895 
1900 
1905 
]910 



33,928 
46,000 
60,700 
79,300 




2,3.35,000 
3,509,000 
4,910,000 
6,750,000 



The sewage contributed by Boston to the pumping station, together 
with that from the Metropolitan sewer system and the waste sea 
water from the manufactories constituted the total amount of sewage 
to be cared for. 

The annual expense of disposing of the sewage was found to be 
$1,465 per million gallons discharged daily. 

Owing to the probable admission of the ISTeponset-river system in 
1898 the maintenance account was divided into two i^arts : tirst, 
from 1895 to 1898; second, from 1898 to 1910. 

The division of the expenses for disposal, according to the ratios 
of the respective populations for the period from 1895 to 1898 are 
given herewith. 



District. 



Charles-river system 

I 

Boston, excluding East Boston f 

Charlestown and Boston in 

C. R. V. and W. Roxbury in N. R. V. [ 

Tributary to Dorchester pumpin 
station 



Year. 


Popu- 
lation. 


Sewage. 


By Popu- 
lation. 
Per cent. 


1895 


98,209 


8,729,000 


20.27 


1896 


103,127 


9,346,000 


20.77 


1897 


108,045 


9,964,000 


21.25 


1895 


386,200 


50,592,000 


79.73 


1896 


393,220 


51,509,000 


79.23 


1897 


400,240 


52,431,000 


78.75 


1895 


484,409 


62,621,000 


100.00 


1896 


496,347 


64,155,000 


100.00 


1897 


508,285 


65,695,000 


100.00 



Mainte- 
nance. 
Payment. 



$18,600 
19,i500 
20,500 
73,100 
74,500 
75,800 
91,700 
94,000 
96,300 



Note. — Total sewage includes 3,300,000 gallons waste sea water. 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr. 



361 



On the admission of the ISTeponset system in 1893, a porlion 
of the Boston territory will pass under the jurisdiction of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners. The division of expenses 
for disposal during the period of 1898 to 1910, inclusive, is as 
follows: — 



District. 



Charles-river valley... 

and 
Neponset-river vaUey. 



Boston, excluding East Boston, 
Charlestown, and parts in C. R. 
andN.R. V 



Tributary to Dorchester pumping 
station 



Year. 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1905 
1910 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1905 
1910 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1905 
1910 



Popu- 
lation. 



154,133 
161,465 
168,800 
213,300 
268,.500 
396,521 
402,409 
408,300 
435,700 
466,100 
550,654 
563,874 
577,100 
649,000 
734.600 



Sewage. 



13,620,600 
14,472,800 
15,325,000 
20,257,000 
26,569,000 
51,944,000 
52,716,000 
53,487,000 
57,512,000 
61,991,000 
68,865,000 
70,489,000 
72,112,000 
81,069,000 
91,860,000 



By Popu- 
lation. 
Per cent. 



27.29 
28.64 
29.25 
32.88 
36.55 
72.01 
71.36 
70.75 
67.12 
63.45 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



Mainte- 
nance. 
Payment. 



$28,000 
29,000 
31,000 
39,000 
49,000 
73,000 
74,000 
75,000 
80,000 
86,000 
101,000 
103,000 
106,000 
119,000 
135,000 



Note. — Total sewage includes 3,300,000 gallons waste sea water. 



The total cost of that part of the Boston improved sewerage sys- 
tem which is utilized in disposing of the sewage from the tributary 
territory in question, comprises the original cost, together with the 
interest on the cost, up to the date when the city began to use said 
system. The interest on the total cost, at four per centum per an- 
num, was apportioned between the Charles and I^eponset-river dis- 
tricts and the city of Boston according to the ratio of their respective 
valuations in agreement with the award of the Apportionment Com- 
mission. 

As far as known, no forecast of the growth of the valuation of the 
various cities and towns has been made heretofore. 

These valuation studies, ranging from the year 1861 to 1910, pre- 
sented many difficulties and consumed considerable time. As far as 
possible the property valuations as set forth in the "Aggregate of 
Polls, Property, Taxes, etc.," as annually compiled by the Common- 
wealth, were used. The actual valuation of the portions of Boston 
tributary to the Metropolitan sewer system were deduced from a care- 
ful inspection of the assessors' books of the city of Boston. 

The cost of that portion of the Boston main drainage works used 
by the Charles-river system was $4,743,000; the interest upon which, 
borne according to the ratios of valuation, would be: — 



362 



City Document No. 29. 



Interest-1 895=1 898. 



District. 


Tear. 


Valuation. 


Per cent. 


Interest. 
Payment. 


Charles-river valley 

Boston, excluding East Boston and 
Charlestown portions, in C. R. V. 
and W. Roxbury, in N. R. V 

Tributary to Dorchester pumping sta- 


1895 

1895 
1895 


$183,884,413 

841,135,048 
1,025,019,461 


17.94 
82.06 


$34,000 

156,000 
190,000 









The cost of the Dorchester interceptor, omitting the portion 
between Granite brids^e and Central avenue, which the State pro- 
poses to buy, whicli drains the ISTeponset system, would bring the 
total cist of the Boston drainage works used by the Charles and 
Neponset-river systems to $5,134,000, the interest upon which 
should be borne as follows: — 



Interest— 1898=1910. 



District. 



Year 



Valuation. 



Per cent. 



Interest. 
Payment. 



Charles -river and Neponset-river val 
leys 

Boston, excluding parts in C.R. &N.R, 
valleys, East Boston and Charles 
town 

Tributary to Dorchester pumping sta 
tion 



1898 
1900 
1905 
1910 
1898 
1900 
1905 
1910 
1898 
1900 
1905 
1910 



$232, 

284, 

341, 

400, 

832, 

986, 

1,065, 

1,162, 

1,064, 

1,271 

1,406 

1,562 



226,534 
400,000 
000,000 
000,000 
445,348 
,900,000 
,800,000 
,200,000 
,671,882 
,300,000 
,800,000 
,200,000 



21.78 
22.35 
24.24 
25.61 
78.22 
77.65 
75.76 
74.39 



$45,000 
46,000 
50,000 
53,000 
160,000 
159,000 
155,000 
152,000 
205,000 
205,000 
205,000 
205,000 



In a letter to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, dated 
Jan, 25, 1897, containing the above tables and a detailed account of 
their derivation, the Street Department stated that the amounts due 
Boston for disposing of the sewage from the Charles and oSTeponset 
systems, consisting of their proportionate share of the annual in- 
terest and the cost of maintenance and operation, were: — 

Tor 1896 $53,500 For 1900 $77,000 

" 1897 54,000 " 1905 89,000 

" 1898 73,000 " 1910 102,000 

" 1899 ..... 74,000 



Street Department — Sewer Diyisiok. 363 

No acknowledgment of tlie receipt of this letter has been made to 
the Street Department. 

The first hearing before the Committee on Metropolitan Affairs 
on the bill of the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners to 
authorize the Commonwealth to take the part of the Boston main 
drainage works used by the Stale is set for an early date in the en- 
suing month. The officials of the city will strenuously oppose the 
taking of this plant by the State, for the reasons that have been 
enumerated previously in this report. 

During the past year this division has been able to make large and 
extensive repairs on the pumping-station through the generosity of 
the government authorizing special loans for that purpose. 

During the ensuing year this division will advocate the extension 
of the storage reservoirs at Moon Island, the increasing of the pres- 
ent pumping powers of the pumps that are at present in the station, 
and also of the designing of a 60,000,000 high-duty pump. With 
these additions made to the works, the city will then be in condition 
to handle its sewerage and that of the Metropolitan district for a 
number of years. In all probability the pumping plant at Cow 
Pasture, with these additions, will be as large as this plant will ever 
need to be, as it will then have a capacity of over 200,000,000 gallons 
a day. The city should proceed with the designing and construct- 
ing of what is known as the high level sewers, which were advo- 
cated at the time that this plant was put in, so as to relieve the pumps. 

Yentilation of Sewers. 

The subject of the ventilation of our sewer system is one that has 
received considerable attention in the past, but no practicable scheme 
has yet been evolved. A plan was at one time proposed for drawing 
out the foul air from the sewers by means of a large fan, or fans, sit- 
uated at or near the outlets of the systems; but it is evident that this 
plan would not be practicable, because the fan would be supplied 
with air which would rush in through the perforations in the covers 
of the manholes on the system nearest to the point where the fan 
was located, and little or no effect would be felt in the sewer system 
at points more distant. jSTow, these distant points, that is, the sum- 
mits of the system, are precisely the points where ventilation is most 
needed. 

At the present time the perforations in the manhole covers are 
depended upon to keep the sewers ventilated, and in the summer 
time this system works fairly well, the only complaint being from 
some very particular persons, who observe the perforated manhole 
cover opposite their dwelling, and imagine they are exposed to in- 
fectious diseases from the emanations from the sewer. These per- 
sons are usually quieted by replacing the perforated cover by a closed 
cover, and the majority of citizens make no complaints. 

There are, however, a few cases in which citizens suffer serious 
annoyance, where their dwellings are situated near the highest points 
or terminals of the sewer system upon steep hillsides, because at 
these places, owing to the steepness of the grade of the sewer, more 
foul air is probably thrown out at the extreme upper manhole, and 
less out of the others along the line of the sewer, than is the case 
in more level country where the sewers are laid on flatter grades. 
But, however satisfactorily the system may work in the summer 
time, it is a total failure in the winter, when the perforations in the 
manhole covers are completely sealed by snow and ice. At such 
times the system is entirely unventilated, and when, owing to a 



364 City Document No. 29. 

sudden rain or thaw, the sewers are quickly filled with water, and 
their gaseous contents consequently expelled, the latter are un- 
doubtedly forced into the houses through the traps. 

It is, therefore, very desirable that a better system should be de- 
vised for ventilating the sewers, and one which will work at all 
seasons of the year. Some channel for the egress of the foul air 
should be provided at all the terminal points, or so called " dead 
ends," of the sewer system, for the reasons which have been just 
mentioned. Now it is evident that no opening can be left in the 
surface of the street, neither can any column or shaft be erected in 
the middle of the street, where the sewers are usually situated. 
The only location in the street which seems to be available is the 
same as is usually occupied by electric light or trolley poles; namely, 
the strip just back of the curbstone on the sidewalk. I recommend 
that tall iron columns or poles should be erected in these locations, 
just back of the curbstone, which columns should be hollow and 
lai'ge enough to go above the roofs of the surrounding buildings; 
these high columns or shafts to be connected by a pipe with the 
sewers, and thereby always afford a free outlet for the foul air of the 
sewers. The objection to this is, of course, that they would not be 
ornamental, but they might be used for some other purposes, as, for 
instance, the support of electric arc lights, and therefore be ren- 
dered not quite so objectionable or conspicuous. In the residential 
districts of the city these would not be excessively high; and in the 
business portion, where the high buildings are situated, it might be 
possible to make connections with high chimneys, by permission of 
the owners or by paying for the privilege, which would serve the 
same purpose. 

Financial Statement. 

Sewer assessments have been made by this division for the year 
ending Jan. 31, 1897, in accordance with chap. 402 of the Acts of 
1892, and amendments thereto, to the amount of ^193,078. 28, and 
the bills have been deposited for collection with the Cily Collector. 

Bills for sewer assessments, amounting to $4,317.71, have also 
been deposited for collection, representing those estates assessed 
under chap. 456 of the Acts of 1889, and amendments thereto, 
which have made connection with the public sewers during the year, 
making the total amount of assessments deposited for collection 
$197,395.99. 

There remains on the books of this division, at 5 per cent inter- 
est, $28,546.64, representing the assessments under the Acts of 
1889, and amendments thereto, for those estates which have not 
been connected with the sewers for which they were assessed, and 
bills for which will be deposited for collection as the connections are 
made. This sum represents 21.5 per cent of the total assessments 
made under those Acts. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $3,196.21 have been collected from 
estates upon which no sewer assessment was ever paid, in accord- 
ance with chap. 36, sect. 10, of the Revised Ordinances. 

Permits have been issued to licensed drain-layers to make 2,631 
connections with the public sewers, and the work done under these 
permits has been inspected, and a record of same made on the- 
plans of this division. 

The following tables and statements will show the amount of 
money expended and work done by this division during the year: — 



Street Departmeisit — Sewer Divisioisr. 



365 



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366 



City Document No. 29. 



OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE. 



Improved Sewerage. 

Office Salaries 

Pumping station, inside 

Pumping station, outside 

Engines and boilers 

Main and intercepting sewers 

Moon Island 

Towboat 



$500 00 
44,863 02 
14,028 47 
12,778 26 
12,935 39 
13,459 76 

4,874 48 

$103,439 38 



Pumping Station, Forest-avenue Section, Dorchester. 



Building and machinery . 
Grading over gravity main 



$13,797 42 
378 75 

$14,176 17 



Stony-brook Channel. 

Maintenance $15,003 78 

Repairing Linden Park-street wall 170 20 

Repairing Boylston-avenue bridge 427 03 

Altering channel at Ruggles street 1,299 15 

$16,900 16 

Stony-brook Improvement. 

Section 5 . . . ' $33,298 33 

Section 6 46,880 45 

Section 7 \ 141 59 

Centre street and private land ) 

Altering gate house 2,081 58 

Office and engineers, salaries 10,246 35 

Engineering expense . . 2.383 36 

Land damages 2,278 75 

Miscellaneous 898 80 



3,209 21 



Miscellaneous. 

Office expenses, including salaries of Deputy Superintendent, 

clerks and draftsmen, stationery, drawing materials, etc. . $24,891 88 
Engineering expenses, including salaries of engineers, instru- 
ments, etc 58,778 70 

Current expenses of yards and lockers 23,927 07 

Current expenses of stables, including cost of 

horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc $34,369 25 

Less amount earned by department teams . . 9,413 00 

24,956 25 

Repairing sewers 7,146 44 

Cleaning and flushing sewers 8,211 19 

Cleaning catch-basins 29,528 11 

Repairing streets ■ 286 62 

Building, repairing and cleaning culverts and surface drains, 

not included in the Stony-brook system 16,792 35 

Examining condition of sewers and catch-basins . . . 4,065 81 

Carried forward $198,584 42 



Street Department — Sewer DivisroN. 367 

Brought forward $198,584 42 

"Work for departments and others 2,347 38 

House connections 4,965 19 

Djmages and claims 619 87 

Holidays 8,962 07 

Travelling and incidental expenses 5,552 87 

Repairs of department buildings, stables and yards . . . 579 97 

Engines and boilers and repairs 231 18 

General repairs . 1,230 74 

Smoke inspection 1,312 00 

Balances on old contracts 724 60 

Hardware, tools and blacksmithing not included elsewhere . 8,790 01 

Rubber goods, not included elsewhere ..... 1,275 88 



Less over credit on water rates, charged off to 

sewer construction $6,133 51 

Less decrease in stock 1 ,015 54 



$235,176 18 

7,149 05 
$228,027 13 



368 



City Document No. 29. 



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373 



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375 



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379 



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382 



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387 



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393 



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396 



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399 



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400 



City Document No. 29. 



Work done for and paid by Paving D 
lowing class of work. Building and 
drains, catch=basins and sewers- 
Commonwealth avenue 
Congress and L streets 
McLellan street . 
Talbot avenue 

Street Improvements, Ward 1 

2 
3, old 

3, new 

4, new 

5, new 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 

12, new 

13, old 
U 

Wards 14 and 15 
Ward 16, new 
"17 
" 18 
" 19 
" 20, old 
" 20, new 
"21 
" 22 
" 23 
" 24, old 
" 24, new 
" 25 



ivision, including the foU 
repairing culverts, surface 



$226 92 

7.608 17 
772 90 
107 34 

1,653 97 

869 67 

615 24 

556 29 

2,821 71 

678 53 

289 47 

879 77 

382 05 

912 21 

1,024 82 

752 37 

408 90 

241 60 

797 14 

5,310 32 

1,716 59 

1.609 32 
920 49 

1,500 20 

301 51 

1,202 14 

1,262 36 

811 96 

2,341 56 

1,824 38 

7,904 94 

500 00 















$48,804 84 




RECAPITULATION. 








New Sewers. 






South Boston . 


. $36,270 


44 




East Boston . 








28,322 


79 




Charlestown . 








6,772 


40 




Brighton 








76,851 


03 




West Roxbury 
Dorchester 








57,259 
153,260 


53 

69 




Roxbury 
City Proper . 








152,272 

72,178 


20 
01 


$583,187 09 











Carried forward 



$583,187 09 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



401 



Srough t forward 



,187 09 









Catch-Basins 








South Boston . 


• • • • 


$4,611 


05 




East Boston . 












2,438 


36 




Charlestown . 












3,345 


62 




Brighton 












1,609 


89 




West Roxbury 












1,434 


74 




Dorchester 












4,612 


00 




Roxbury 












6,724 


08 




City Proper . 












6,085 


48 












30 861 29 


Improved Sewerage Maintenance . 






103,439 38 


Pumping Station, 


Chapman avenue 






14,176 17 


Stony Brook, Maintenance . 






16,900 16 


Stony Brook Construction . 






98,209 21 


Miscellaneous 






% 


228,027 13 




1,074,800 36 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months 
ending Jan. 31, 1897. 



District. 



City 

East Boston. . . 
Charlestown . . 
South Boston . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . . 
Brighton 

Total 



Built by the 
City by Con- 
tract or Day 
Labor. 

Feet. 



6,145.24 

2,997.41 

1,029.88 

2,897.55 

21,083.43 

15,936.22 

43,452.77 

22,465.75 



116,008.25 



Built by 
Private 
Parties. 



Feet. 



5,536.68 



979.05 

5,787.58 

9,825.98 

13,627.79 

2,068.84 



37,825.92 



Total length 
built during 
the 12 months 
ending Jan. 
31, 1897. 

Feet. 



11,681.92 

2,997.41 

1,029.88 

3,876.60 

26,871.01 

25,762.20 

57.080.56 

24,534.59 



153,734.17 



122 catch-basins, built by contract. 

50 drop inlets, built by contract. 

168 catch-basins, built by day labor. 

381 catch-basins, repaired by day labor. 

6 drop inlets, built by day labor. 

16 manholes built, 

262 manholes repaired. 

557,311 linear feet sewers flushed. 

423.55 cubic yards material removed from sewers. 



402 



City Document No. 29. 



6,041 cateh-basins cleaned. 

20,327|^ cubic yards material removed from catch-basins. 

474 feet culverts built. 

There are now 444.47 miles of sewers in charge of the Sewer 
Division. 

The amount expended by this division during the twelve 
months ending Jan. 31, 1897, including the amount spent under 
special appropriations, was $1,074,800.36. 



Schedule of Sewers built to date in the City of Boston. 



DISTEICTS. 


Total length 
built during 

12 months 

ending Jan. 

31, 1897. 

Feet. 


Length rebuilt 

during 

12 months 

ending Jan. 

31, 1897. 

Feet. 


Additional length for 12 

months ending Jan. 

31, 1897. 




Feet. 


Miles, 


City 


11,681.92 

2,997.41 

1,029.88 

3,876.60 

26,871.01 

25,762.20 

57,080.56 

24,534.49 


5,997.00 


5,684.92 

2,997.41 

922.28 

1,105.32 

23,436.28 

25,762.20 

57,080.56 

24,299.47 


1.08 
.57 


Charlestown 

South Boston 

Koxbury 


107.60 
2,771.28 
3,434.73 


.17 

.21 

4.44 


West Eoxbury 


4.88 




10.81 


Brighton 


235.12 


4.60 


Total 


153,834.17 


12,545.73 


141,288.44 


26.76 



Length built previous to Jan. 31, 1896. 



Total 

Length of Intercepting Sewer . 



393.52 



420.28 
24.11 



Total. 



444.39 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



403 



Rainfall. — Albany Street Yard. 



Date. 


1 




ft 




6 




4J 

to 
< 


03 

a 

ft 

<s 


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g 

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03 
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2 




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.60 












3 




3.64 
.21 


















4. . . 














.40 










5 










.22 










.77 


6 














2.28 


.62 


.92 






7 


1.67 


.30 








.67 


.83 




8 












.77 


i!62 




9 










.91 
.40 












10 


.27 












2.81 








11 














.20 






12 




.38 


















13 
























14 
















.49 


'41 


.37 






15 










1.15 


.18 
.29 






16 
















.30 




17 




.90 


















18 




.21 
.42 












.09 






.28 


19 . 


.36 


.43 


.40 








53 








20 








.60 










21 








.11 




.18 






.40 




.67 


22 






.37 










23 










.06 










17 




24 












.22 




.93 


.06 




25 












.41 




26 








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.28 






27 




















28 










.12 
















29 








.45 
















30 




1.05 














.70 






31 






SS 








































Totals 


2.84 


6.91 


1.53 


1.42 


2.58 


2.01 


1.65 


7.11 


2.05 


3.70 


1.49 


1.72 



Note. — Total inches for twelve months from Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31,1897, inclu- 
sive, 35.01. 



404 



City Document No. 29. 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



405 



Pumping Station^ 

Record of sludge received and removed for twelve montlis end- 
ing Jan. 31, 1897. 

Received. Removed. 

February 412 cubic yards. 170 cubic yards. 

March 374 " " 360 

April 416 " " 425 

May 683 " " 595 

June 545 " " 680 

July ...... 721 " " ,510 

August 829 " " 850 

September 417 "" " 510 

October ...... 653 " " 590 

November 635 " " 365 

December 297 " " ••■■ 

January 449 " " • ■ ■ • 



Total 6,431 



5,055 



Sent down the harbor 360 cubic yards of filth hoist screenings 
from September 2 to December 9. 



Property in Charge of the Sewer Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street, South End. 

Sewer yard, with building, on North Grove street. West End. 

Sewer yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. 
This is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were erected by 
the Sewer Department. 

Small lot of land on Stony brook, corner of Centre street, 
Roxbury. 

Gatehouse on Stony brook, Pynchon street, Roxbury, built in 
1889.- 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Rutherford avenue, Charles- 
town. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, corner Paris and Marion streets, 
East Boston. 

Sewer yard, with buildings on East Chester park, near Albany 
street, South End. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Western avenue, Brighton. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Revere street. West End. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, H and Ninth streets. South Boston. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, Childs and South streets. West 
Roxbury. 



406 



City Document No. 29. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years previous to 

Feb. 1, 1897. 





1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 




Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Built by City 
by contract 
or day labor. 

Built by pri- 
vate parties. 


71,318.46 
22,566.73 


66,400.85 
22,837.09 


90,802.77 
24,877.05 


139,200.09 
36,287.35 


116,008.25 
37,825.92 


Total number 
of feet built, 


93,885.19 


89,237.94 


115,679.82 


175,487.44 


153,834.17 



Details of Cost and Construction 
are given of the following sewers which have been constructed 
during the year at a cost exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000) 
each : 



Adams, between K 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



ng and Lonsdale Streets. 

$1,440 76 

658 75 

249 60 

138 30 

27 09 

149 00 

60 07 

59 62 

66 74 



^2,849 93 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
116.23 feet 30 in. x 36 in., brick. 

Alford Street Connection with Metropolitan Sewer. 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drainpipe . 

"Water 

Miscellaneous 









50 76 








39 60 








18 23 








80 40 








223 00 








96 70 








94 79 








22 50 








57 63 




$2,384 13 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



407 



Size and Length of Sewer 

225 feet 15 in. pipe. 
1 sump manhole. 
1 tide-o-ate manhole. 



Allston Square, between Commonwealth Avenue and 
Allston Street. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

L'on castings 

Explosives 

Teaming 

Drain pipe 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



!,541 73 
109 92 
29 90 
47 44 
33 00 
49 00 
268 91 
94 81 
58 44 

1,233 15 



Size and Lertgth of Sewer, 



l'2b.bl feet 10 in. 
222.60 feet 12 in. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



pipe, 
pipe. 

Audubon Road. 



!,831 82 
139 20 

46 85 

47 80 
401 50 
141 57 
300 76 

89 70 
8 10 















$5,007 30 






Size and Length of Sewer. 






897. 


06 feet 12 in., pipe. 












B 


and Seventh 


Streets 


Ove 


rflow. 




Labor . 

Bricks 

Cement 

Teaming 

Lumber 




. . . ' . 








$10,164 60 

1,161 00 

668 25 

423 50 

1,432 90 



Carried forward . 



$13,850 25 



408 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward 


. $13,850 


25 


Pipe 


12 


96 


Hire of machinery 


745 


70 


Carpentry ..... 


498 


75 


W. S. Kendle, contractor 


762 


77 


Advertising and printing 


61 


08 


Miscellaneous .... 


426 


08 


Gravel and filling 


2,117 


99 




$18,475 


58 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
480 feet 6 x 6 ft., circular brick. 

Beach Street, between Harrison Avenue and Washing- 
ton Street. 



Labor 












$3,065 93 


Bricks 












545 35 


Cement 












143 00 


Sand and gravel . 












83 60 


Iron castings 












6 00 


Teaming 












611 00 


Lumber 












7 65 


Drain pipe . 












8 67 


Hire of machinery 












242 01 


Carpentry . 












30 07 


Water 












39 69 


Miscellaneous 












21 46 




$4,804 43 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
396.90 feet, 2ft. 6 in. x 3 feet, brick. 



Beech Street, between Anawan and Newburgh Streets. 

Labor $1,700 69 

Bricks . . . . . . . . 124 73 

Cement 60 95 

Sand and gravel ....... 10 80 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



67 


65 


155 


00 


16 


64 


638 


23 


164 


64 


49 


35 


$2,988 


68 



Street Depabtment — Sewer Division. 



409 



Size and Length of Sewer, 

200.45 feet 15 in., pipe. 
1,445.99 feet 12 in., pipe. 



Labor 


VC:iIU 


c, .:7c 


CL. 1 




11,019 58 


Cement 










223 15 


Iron castings 










251 68 


Teaming 










49 00 


Drain Pipe . . , 










2,371 15 


Stone 










8 27 


D. E, Lynch, contractor 










7,580 43 




$11,503 26 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
398.63 feet 24 in., pipe. 

113.79 feet 18 in., pipe. 
27 feet 15 in., pipe. 
498.16 feet 12 in., pipe. 

438 feet 6 in., pipe, house drain. 
59.80 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
112.20 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
212.90 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

141.80 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
14 catch-basins. 

2 drop inlets. 

1.42 feet 24 in., pipe culvert. 

Blue Hill Avenue Sect. 2 and part Sect. 3 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Pipe .... 

J. P. O'Connell, contractor 

Advertising. 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
1,092.50 feet 12 in., pipe. 
116.60 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
243 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
154.70 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
596.20 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
113 feet, pipe, culvert. 
6 catch-basins. 
2 drop inlets. 



$902 99 

135 95 

164 67 

26 50 

884 10 

6,147 16 

41 33 

17 15 

^8,319 85 



410 



City Document No. 29. 
Blue Hill Avenue Sect. 7. 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Advertising and printing 

Stone 

J. P. O'Connell, contractor 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

295.70 feet 12 in., pipe. 

287.16 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

64.66 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

3 catch-basins. 

2 drop inlets. 



Blue Hill Avenue, Sect. 10. 



Labor 

D. O'Connell, contractor 

Miscellaneous 



Built in 1895. 



Blue Hill Avenue, Sect. 13. 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipes 

Advertising and printing 

T. H. Connelly, contractor 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

1,934.77 feet 12., pipe sewer. 
40.52 feet 20 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
400.80 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
457.90 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
266.42 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
167.65 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
8 catch-basins. 
5 drop inlets. 



$331 27 

40 25 

82 35 

10 00 

168 81 

90 50 

9 50 

1,734 79 

52,467 47 



$14 65 

3,985 35 

359 27 

K,359 27 



$408 35 

80 50 

123 95 

15 00 

1,116 60 

111 
3,347 



29 
19 



$5,202 88 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



411 



Blue Hill Avenue, Sect, 14. 



Labor ..... 


1308 05 


Cement ..... 


46 00 


Iron castings .... 


81 88 


Teaming ..... 


2 25 


Drain pipe ..... 


546 82 


Advertising and printing . 


67 88 


J. Dolan, contractor . 


2,331 25 




$3,384 13 



Size and Length of Sewer. 



944.88 feet 12 in 
78.55 feet 15 in., 



, pipe sewer. 

pipe catch-basin drain. 
313.20 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
25.43 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
69.21 feet 10 in., pipe catcli-basin drain. 
2 catch-basins. 
2 drop inlets. 



Blue Hill Avenue, Sect. 15. 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe 

J. Dolan, contractor 

Advertising and printing 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

143.10 feet 18 in., pipe. 

429.06 feet 15 in., pipe. 

845.15 feet 12 in., pipe. 

136.40 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

447.05 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

162.63 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

6 catch-basins. 

2 drop inlets. 



$547 92 

97 75 

110 48 

5 00 

671 65 

5,242 41 

81 60 

^6,756 81 



Blue Hill Avenue, Sect. 16. 



Labor 
Cement 
Iron castings 
Teaming; 



$212 20 

100 25 

25 77 

5 00 



Carried forward . 



$343 22 



412 



City Document No. 29. 



Brought forward 
Drain pipe , 

Advertising and printing 
J. P. O'Connell, contractor 



$343 22 

787 02 

130 37 

1,936 62 

53,197 23 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

362.77 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
422.10 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
136.35 feet 30 in., pipe culvert. 
2 catch-basins. 
4 drop inlets. 

Border Street, near Decatur, connection with Metropol= 

itan Sewer. 



Labor 

Gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Miscellaneous 



^2,242 47 

7 45 

25 90 

81 00 

11 51 

7 09 

^2,375 42 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

26 feet 15 in., pipe. 

1 sump manhole. 

1 regulator manhole. 

1 overflow and tide-gate manhole. 



Boylston Street, between Brookline Avenue and Back 

Bay Fens. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Advertising and printing 

Stone .... 

H. P. Nawn, contractor 

J. H. O'Donnell, contractor 



$1,279 42 

1,337 61 

1,340 75 

318 99 

116 50 

18 33 

2,095 44 

90 01 

182 00 

12,973 64 

1,711 33 



$21,464 02 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



413 



Size and Length of Seioer. 

17.10 feet 30 in., catcli-basin drain. 
618.30 feet 24 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
789.90 feet 18 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
263,50 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
219.60 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

, pipe catch-basin drain. 

i in. X 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 

iron pipe. 

15.85 feet tide gate manhole and connection. 
13 catch-basins. 
11 drop inlets. 



515.10 feet 10 in 
796.78 feet 2 ft 
19.67 feet 16 in 



Central Street, between Atlantic Avenue and India 

Street. 



Labor 

Cement 

Sand and gravel . 

Iron castings 












$5,413 54 
52 80 
38 30 
15 00 


Teaming 
Lumber 












817 50 
403 13 


Drain pipe . 
Hire of machinery 
Carpentry . 
Miscellaneous 












178 45 
150 50 
129 59 
297 56 

$7,496 37 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
218 feet 5 ft. X 5 ft., 3^ in., brick. 



Central Street, between Boylston Street and Boylston 

Terrace. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand 

Iron castings 

Explosives 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe 

Rock excavation 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



^2,210 11 

32 30 

15 90 
4 25 

16 95 
73 49 

322 75 

33 50 
114 53 
550 50 

34 99 
183 64 



1,592 91 



414 City Document No. 29. 

Size and Length of Sewer. 
349.90 feet 12 in., pipe. 

Chapman Avenue and Private Land. 



Labor 
Bricks 














$13,958 05 
143 40 


Cement 














136 70 


Sand and Gravel 














41 55 


Iron castings 














50 55 


Explosives . 














124 70 


Teaming 














563 00 


Lumber 














864 90 


Drain pipe . 
Hire of macMner 

Miscellaneous 


r 












6,935 62 
386 33 
562 81 




$23,767 61 



Size and Length of Sewer. 



33.40 feet 24 in.. 


brick. 














674 feet 24 in., pipe. 






909.84 feet 24 in., pipe 






44 feet 18 in., pipe. 






Chelsea and Vine Streets, 


Metropolitan Sewer Connection. 


Labor 


$1,991 


79 


Bricks 














80 


60 


Cement 














46 


20 


Sand . 














8 


00 


Iron castings 














6 


20 


Teaming 














24 


00 


Lumber 














31 


40 


Drain pipe . 














21 


93 


Carpentry . 














93 


66 


Miscellaneous 














12 


83 
















$2,316 


61 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

120.76 feet 4 ft. x 4 ft. 3-in., brick. 
24.02 feet 18-in., pipe. 
24.40 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Chestnut Hill Avenue, between Beacon Street and 
Commonwealth Avenue. 

Labor $283 61 

Cement 64 90 



Carried forward. 



$348 51 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr. 



415 



Brought forward 


$348 51 


Iron castings .... 


61 26 


Teaming ..... 


6 00 


Drain pipe ..... 


37 83 


F. A. Snow, contractor 


2,432 15 


Miscellaneous .... 


5 17 




$2,890 92 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

315 feet 10 in., pipe. 

481 feet 18 in., catch-basin drain. 



Columbus Avenue, Sect 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand . 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe 

Quimby & Ferguson, contractors 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

4 feet 10-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
200 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
240 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
2 drop inlets. 



$582 72 

230 82 

75 40 

9 65 

11 93 

53 00 

185 00 

1,645 67 

22 36 



i,816 55 



Columbus Avenue, Sect 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Quimby & Ferguson, contractors 

Miscellaneous 



$591 57 

948 88 

457 30 

159 08 

77 00 

1,914 83 

3,675 97 

7 61 



^832 24 



416 



City Document No. 29. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

229.35 feet 15-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
27.50 feet 12-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
256.85 feet 10-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
43.65 feet 18-in., pipe sewer. 
.80 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3-ft., brick. 
10 catch-basins. 
3 drop inlets. 





Columbus 


Avenue, 


Sect 


3. 




Labor 

Bricks 












$1,735 65 
1,426 99 


Cement 












1,103 40 


Iron castings 












532 37 


Teaming 












43 00 


Drain pipe . 
Advertising and 
J. P. O'Connell, 


printing 
contractor 










2,113 50 

55 75 
9,808 49 


Miscellaneous 


• 










76 04 






$16,895 19 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

10.80 feet 3 ft., circular brick. 

278.50 feet 3 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft. 8^ in., brick. 

267.75 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 

11.20 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 4 ft. 4 in., brick. 

173.27 feet 24 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

172.87 feet 15 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

308.73 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

339.50 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

15.86 feet 8 in., pipe house drain. 

61.75 feet 6 in., pipe house drain. 

853.50 feet 18 in., pipe sewer. 

173.23 feet 18 in., pipe sewer. 

493.40 feet 15 in., pipe sewer. 

1,338.49 feet 12 in., pipe sewer. 

25.06 feet 12 in., iron pipe. 

13 catch-basins. 

3 drop inlets. 

708 feet concreting invert in old conduit. 



Columbus Avenue, Sect. 8. 



Labor 
Bricks 

Cement 



11 
687 55 

189 75 



Carried forward . 



.,366 41 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



417 



Brought forward 


$1,366 41 


Iron castings ..... 


136 34 


Drain pipe ...... 


302 90 


Printing and advertising 


104 66 


Thomas O'Leary, contractor 


1,835 66 


Miscellaneous ..... 


4 45 




$3,750 42 



Size and Length of Seimr. 

239 feet 3 ft. 6 in. x 4 ft. 10 in., brick. 

316 feet 2 ft. 4 in. x 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 

1,085 feet 12 in., pipe. 

5 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

39 feet 6 in., house drain. 

1 catch-basin. 



Columbus Avenue, Sect. 9. 



Labor .... 

Joseph P. O'Connell, contractor 
Miscellaneous 



$107 64 

3,392 25 

154 67 

$3,654 56 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

6 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 
22 feet 8 in., pipe house drain. 



Commonwealth Avenue, Sect. 5, between Chestnut Hill 
Avenue and Newton line. 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Drain pipe . 

F. A. vSnow, contractor 

Advertisins; 



$178 72 

40 25 

57 09 

211 07 

2,048 40 

48 38 

^2,583 91 



Size and Length of Sewer, 

487.63 feet 10 in., pipe. 

77.50 feet 10 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

199 feet 12 in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

2 catch-basins. 

2 drop inlets. 



418 



City Document No. 29. 



Congress Street, between Atlantic Avenue and Sea Wall. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Pipe . 

Hire of machinery 

Carpentry . 

"Water 

Miscellaneous 



t,743 53 

466 66 

314 60 

236 69 

120 38 

846 25 

320 10 

59 68 

278 66 

75 54 

41 43 

162 33 

^665 85 



Size and Length of Sevier, 

409.13 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 
8.67 feet in tide gate manhQie. 

D Street, between W. First and W. Second Streets. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Hire of machinery 

Carpentry . 

Miscellaneous 



!,418 05 
471 22 
119 95 
197 93 

13 25 
235 50 
129 07 

38 67 
148 00 
349 50 

81 11 



t,202 25 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

62.73 feet 2 ft. x 3 ft., brick, 
33.63 feet 4 ft. x 3 ft. 6 in., brick. 
244.42 feet 4 ft. x 4 ft. 3 in., brick. 

D Street and Dorchester Avenue. Dorr=Street Outlet, so 

called. 

Labor , $3,476 55 

Bricks 105 68 

Cement 82 19 

Sand and gravel ....... 68 49 



Carried forward 



;,732 91 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr, 



419 



Brought forward 
Iron castings 
Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe . 
Hire of macliinery 
Pile driving 
Carpentry . 
Miscellaneous 



^ize and Length of Sewer. 

31.43 feet 2 ft. 6 in., circular brick. 
76.64 feet 3 ft. 3 in., circular brick. 
591.84 feet 3 ft. x 4 ft., wood. 



,732 


91 


11 


25 


383 


50 


996 


46 


8 


23 


48 


00 


262 


50 


256 


30 


100 


20 



i,799 35 



Dorchester Avenue, between Washington and Richmond 

Streets. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Explosives . 

Teaming 

Drain pipe 

Paving 

Hire of machinery 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
640.41 feet 12-in, pipe. 



},887 48 

66 95 

27 65 

77 94 

36 20 

102 89 

125 50 

405 36 

111 00 

340 00 

64 04 

164 30 

c,409 31 



Dorchester-=brook Sewer, between Norfolk Avenue and 
George Street. 

Labor . . . . . . . . $11,128 28 

1,136 22 



Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 
Iron castings 
Teaming 



630 30 

984 75 

27 30 

1,126 00 



Carried forward 



$15,032 85 



420 



City Document jSTo. 29. 



JBrovgJit fortoard 
Lumber 
Drain pipe . 
Carpentry . 
Hire of machinery 
Miscellaneous 



$15,032 85 
795 31 

152 24 

412 82 
399 50 
678 97 



$17,471 69 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
541 feet 8 ft. 6 in. x 8 ft., brick. 

Dundee Street, between Dalton Street and Massachusetts 

Avenue. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



$1,345 21 
60 13 
24 20 
41 30 

30 70 
242 50 
110 68 
229 46 

68 34 

31 34 

$2,183 86 



Size and Length of Seicer. 
683.65 feet 12-in., pipe. 



Endicott and Thacher Streets 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Limiber 

Drain pipe . 

Hire of machinery 

Carpentry . 

Paving 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



$5,988 51 
843 14 
520 30 
363 95 

15 15 
1,330 00 
489 51 
143 91 
845 00 
175 96 
544 73 

67 40 
366 27 



$11,693 83 




ROCK EXCAVATION FOR WHEEL PITS, CHAPMAN AVENUE 
PUMPING STATION. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



421 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

498.80 feet 2 ft. 8 in. x 4 ft., brick. 
175.24 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 

Etna Street, between North Beacon and Elmira Streets. 



Labor 














$1,617 03 


Bricks 














124 00 


Cement 














40 25 


Sand . 














1 80 


Iron castings 














48 96 


Teaming 














68 50 


Drain pipe . 














357 39 


Water 














97 02 


Miscellaneous 














17 17 




$2,372 12 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
970.20 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Falmouth and Norway Streets 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe 

Hire of machinery 

Carpentry . 

Pile driving 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



$5,795 36 
371 15 
244 20 
207 37 
4 20 
918 50 
597 26 
129 94 
183 00 
104 78 
440 30 
37 18 
219 11 

$9,252 35 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

238.97 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft. 3 in., brick. 
.127.84 feet 2 ft. x 2 ft. 7 in., brick. 

Forest Avenue Main, 5ect. 1 (Willowwood Street and 
Ballou Avenue.) 

Labor $600 48 

Cement '. . . . . . , . 51 75 

Iron castings . . , . , , . 82 10 



Carried forward , 



^34 33 



422 



City Document No. 29. 



^Brought forward 
Teaming ...... 

Drain pipe . 

Printing and advertising 

T. H. Connolly, contractor 


$734 33 

12 50 

954 34 

72 24 

2,906 00 




$4,679 41 



8ize and £.ength of Sewer. 

865.49 feet 18-in., pipe. 
494 feet 15-in., pipe. 

Geneva Avenue and Park Street 



Labor. .... 








$152 13 


Cement . . • . 








285 15 


Iron castings 








68 52 


Team 








2 50 


Drain pipe .... 








309 18 


Advertising and printing 








84 25 


Stone . . . . . 








18 00 


J. P. O'Connell, contractor 








752 40 


D. F. O'Connell, contractor 








2,925 35 




$4,597 48 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

591.48 feet 12-in., pipe. 
244.60 feet 15-in., pipe. 
621 feet 6-in., pipe. 
3 catch-basins. 



Gerard Street, between Massachusetts Avenue and 
Norfolk Avenue. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand . 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Hire of machinery 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



,421 58 
377 42 
103 50 

73 80 

28 23 
298 50 

63 45 
210 01 
407 50 
170 90 

93 36 



;,248 25 



Street Depabtment — Sewer Division. 



423 



Size mid Length of Sewer. 
106.59 feet lo-in., pipe. 



Hobart Street, between Brooks 


and 


Faneuil Streets. 


Labor ... ... 


$634 45 


Bricks ..... 








44 05 


Cement .... 








42 45 


Iron castings .... 








60 04 


Catcli-basin stone 








44 00 


Teaming .... 








17 00 


Drain pipe 








875 90 


T. J. Young & Co., contractors . 








2,362 24 


Miscellaneous 








2 64 




$4,082 77 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

350.01 feet 12-in., pipe. 
817.56 feet 12-in., pipe. 
261.23 feet 15-in., pipe. 



Holmes Avenue. 



Labor 














$4,111 34 


Brick . 














248 50 


Cement 














355 50 


Sand and gravel 














217 20 


Iron castings 














63 14 


Teaming 














223 50 


Lumber 














28 35 


Drain pipe . 














1,457 38 


Carpentry . 














69 52 


Water 














182 35 


Miscellaneous 














33 02 




$6,989 80 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

378.20 feet 10-in., pipe. 

794.89 feet 15-in., pipe. 

650.42 feet 18-in., pipe. 

600 feet 12-in., pipe, catch-basin drain. 

250 feet 18-in., pipe, catch-basin drain. 

64.32 feet 18-in., pipe, culvert. 

50.05 feet 5 ft. 4 in x 3 ft. 4-in., concrete culvert. 

55.85 feet 5 ft. x 6 ft., concrete culvert. 



424 



City Document No. 29. 



■ lUIILllI^LUll 

Labor 
Bricks 




lUC, 


^CWLl 




$3,721 02 
732 19 


Cement 










307 75 


Sand .... 










140 23 


Iron castings 










296 30 


Team .... 










576 00 


Lumber 










70 12 


Drain pipe . 

H. P. Nawn, contractor 










181 26 
2,974 72 


Hire of machinery 
Carpentry . 
Miscellaneous 










188 00 
245 74 
268 94 




$9,702 27 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
261 feet 8-in., pipe house drain. 



Hyde Park Avenue, between Walk Hill Street and 1,040 
feet Southerly. 

$1,415 25 
74 98 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Iron casting 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



23 00 

49 80 
223 50 

69 90 
348 00 
104 09 

36 96 

$2,345 48 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
1,040.94 feet, 12-in., pipe. 



Jamaicaway, between Castleton 


and 


Perk 


ins Streets. 


Labor $1,005 53 


Bricks 










98 00 


Cement 










42 00 


Iron castings 










50 38 


Teaming . . . 










664 00 


Lumber 










140 60 


Drain pipe . 










410 32 


Water 










112 45 


Miscellaneous 










204 98 




$2,728 26 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



425 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
282.27 feet 12-in., pipe. 



Kearsarge Avenue, between Warren Street and Win 
throp Street. 

Labor 
Bricks 
Cement 
Sand . 
Iron castings 
Explosives 
Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe 
Paving- 
Water 
Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Setoer. 
402.40 feet 12-in., pipe. 



$1,530 


71 


45 


58 


30 


75 


8 


10 


25 


80 


138 


59 


661 


00 


7 


74 


152 


41 


12 


25 


39 


99 


188 


98 



$2,841 90 



Lauriat Avenue. 



Labor ..... 
Cemeut ..... 


$1,094 12 
. . 827 10 


Teaming ..... 
Luinber ..... 


59 00 
35 96 


Drain pipe .... 
H. P. Nawn, contractor 
Miscellaneous .... 


586 48 

9,558 56 

32 70 




$12,193 92 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

678.12 feet 15-in., pii^e. 

1,841.14 feet 12-in., pipe. 

125.15 feet 10-in., pipe. 

29.02 feet 18-in., pipe. 

2,570 feet 6-in., pipe house drain. 

69.49 feet 8 ft. x 8 ft., stone culvert. 
61.80 feet 8 ft. x 6 ft. 8-in., stone culvert. 
52.42 feet 4 ft. x 4 ft., stone culvert. 

58.50 feet 24-in., pipe culvert. 
6 catch-basins. 

5 drop inlets. 



426 



City Docctment No. 29. 



Leyden Street and Private Land 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Pipe 

Hire of machinery 

Water 

Pile driving 

Miscellaneous 



$10,187 31 

793 90 

485 00 

380 87 

110 59 

826 00 

263 82 

1,962 41 

798 00 

230 47 

310 40 

743 80 

S17,092 57 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
200.40 feet 15-in., pipe. 
472.30 feet 18-in., pipe. 
518.68 feet 24-in., pipe. 
502.80 feet 12-in., pipe. 
373.58 feet 30-in. x 36-in., brick. 

Liverpool Street, between Decatur and Central Square. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

J. Ettridge, contractor 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
610 feet 18-in., pipe. 



$1,249 36 

19 13 
32 45 
26 46 

20 72 
103 50 

31 16 

392 00 

345 92 

21 18 

$2,241 88 



Lyons Street and Franklin Field. 



Labor 














$2,555 81 


Bricks 














190 53 


Cement 














206 30 


Sand 














26 25 


Iron castings 














253 91 


Explosives 














32 38 


Team 














286 00 


Drain pipe . 














6,921 38 


Miscellaneous 














668 43 




$11,140 99 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



427 



Size and Length of Sewers, 

1,109.36 feet SO-in., pipe. 
38.63 feet 30 -in., iron pipe. 
36.73 feet 30-iu., brick. 

Mt. Vernon Avenue, between Rockland Street 

Labor ........ 

Cement ... 

Drain pipe ........ 

T. J. Young & Co., contractors ..... 



and End. 

$139 10 

11 50 

146 51 

1,822 26 

$2,119 37 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
420.90 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Munroe Street, between Walnut Avenue and existing 

Sewer. 

Labor . . . - $2,014 97 

Bricks 36 50 

Cement . . . . . . . . 16 50 

Iron castings ....... 25 10 

Teaming 279 25 

Explosives ... . . . . . . 100 53 

Drain pipe ........ 85 80 

Water 50 14 

Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 16837 



Size and L^ength of Sewer. 
243.96 feet 12-in., pipe. 



^2,777 16 



Newton Street and Private Land. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand 

Teaming 

Drain pipe 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

525.42 feet 15-in., pipe. 

245 feet 12-in., pipe. 

199.58 feet 18-in., pipe. 

297 feet 20-in., double thick pipe. 



$3,102 97 

67 00 

18 20 

9 00 

103 00 

694 50 

14 73 

$4,009 40 



428 



City Document No. 29. 



Northampton Street, between Albany an 

Streets. 

Labor 
Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron casting 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Carpentry . 

Paving 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Seioer. 
278.70 feet 2 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft., brick. 
772 feet 20-in. pipe. 



$6,596 


74 


386 


12 


212 


35 


122 


11 


38 


82 


816 


50 


712 


72 


97 


62 


103 


76 


155 


30 


29 


00 


196 


36 



1,467 40 



North Harvard Street 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand . 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe 

Water 

Hire of engine 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

700.03 feet 12-in., pipe. 

349.79 feet 15-in. pipe. 

1,035.05 feet 18-in., pipe. 

514.25 feet 24-in., pipe. 

498.40 feet 18-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

1449.34 feet 24-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 



Old Heath and Parker Streets. 



Labor 
Bricks 
Cement 



^5,355 31 

201 24 

135 30 

35 10 

144 28 

316 50 

164 74 

5,273 76 

259 93 

182 20 

95 81 

12,164 17 



H,339 49 

1,086 11 

392 50 



Carried forward 



15,818 10 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioir. 429 



Brought forioard 
Sand and gravel 
Iron casting- 
Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe 
Carpentry 
Water 
Miscellaneous 



;5,818 10 

104 75 

46 65 

1,190 50 

124 62 

379 51 

153 63 

90 00 

43 15 

57,950 91 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

729.15 feet 3 ft.X3 ft. 2}i in., brick. 
180.48 feet 24-in., pipe. 

Parkway, between Pond Street and Dorchester Avenue. 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Explosives . 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Seioer. 
430.97 feet 12-in., pipe. 



$1,192 08 

34 47 

22 20 

120 04 

32 39 

830 00 

350 44 

295 76 

60 34 

$2,437 72 



Pierce Farm Sewer, West Roxbury. 



Labor 














$13,678 05 


Bricks 














512 60 


Cement 














230 20 


Sand and gravel 














1,095 55 


Iron castings 














300 21 


Teaming 














15 56 


Lumber 














472 44 


Drain pipe . 














3,240 31 


Rubble stone 














181 25 


Water 














666 89 


Hire of machinery 












194 00 


Miscellaneous 












635 84 




$22,763 34 



430 



City Document No. 29. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

5,190.96 feet 15-in., pipe. 
862.96 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Private Land, between Lawrence Avenue and Stan- 
wood Street. 



Labor 
Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gr 

Iron casting 

Explosives 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Pipe . 

Carpentry 

Masonry 

Miscellaneous 



avel 



$5,362 58 

1,241 10 

552 10 

308 85 

26 25 

15 43 

608 00 

108 18 

661 75 

294 27 

948 00 

43 98 

$10,170 49 



Size mid Length of Sewer 



1,300 feet 15-in., pipe. 
48 feet 12-in,, pipe. 

Private Land, Mozart, Selwyn and Arundel Streets. 

Labor $4,259 06 

Bricks 
Cement 
Iron castings 
Explosives . 



Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe . 
Miscellaneous 



116 08 
28 46 
36 35 
15 21 

315 00 
43 99 

741 86 

132 98 

i,688 99 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
967 feet 18-in., pipe. 

Private Land, Parkman, Brooks and Bigelow Streets. 

Labor $7,227 73 

Bricks 958 50 

Cement 287 80 



Carried forward . 



5,474 03 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



431 



Brought forioard 
Sand and gravel 
Iron castings 
Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe . 
Carpentry . 
Water 

Hire of machinery 
Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

124.82 feet 2 ft. 4-in. X 3 ft. 6-in., brick. 
395.74 feet 12-in., pipe. 
870.50 feet 18-in., pipe. 
757.21 feet 20-in., pipe. 



$8,474 03 
104 40 
129 05 
442 50 
133 63 
2,785 70 
15 06 
325 25 
668 50 
723 68 

$13,801 80 



Porter Street at Bremen Street. Connection with Metro- 
politan Sewer. 



Labor 












$2,235 07 


Bricks 












179 35 


Cement 




- 








158 40 


Sand and gravel . 












30 78 


Regulator castings 












231 08 


Teaming 












203 50 


Lumber 












249 31 


Pipe . 












23 08 


Hire of engine 












24 00 


Miscellaneous 












233 29 




13,567 S& 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

6 feet 2 4-in., pipe. 
8 feet 20-in., iron pipe. 
1 sump manhole. 
1 regulator manhole. 



Rockland Street, between Mt. Vernon Street and Mt. 
Vernon Avenue. 

Labor ....,,.. $127 44 



Iron castings 

Teaming - . 

T. J. Young & Co., contractors 

Water .... 



17 98 

3 00 

1,750 73 

119 86 



!,019 01 



432 



City Document No. 29. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
289.49 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Ruggles Street, between Parker Street and Back Bay 

Fens. 



Labor .... 








$781 62 


Bricks .... 








102 00 


Cement .... 








157 75 


Iron castings 








51 90 


Drain pipe .... 








66 42 


Advertising and printing 








85 76 


D. E. Lynch, contractor 








3,971 59 


Miscellaneous 








1 89 




$5,218 93 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
756 feet 2 ft. 6 in. X 3 ft., brick. 

Shawmut Park, Edwin and Templeton Streets. 



Labor 














$3,310 60 


Bricks 














184 06 


Cement 














83 95 


Sand and gravel 














57 15 


Iron castings 














101 25 


Teaming 














96 00 


Lumber 














32 01 


Drain pipe . 














1,738 05 


Water 














390 46 


Miscellaneous 














76 08 




$6,069 61 



Size and Length of Seioer. 

392.89 feet 18-in., pipe. 
432.05 feet 15-in., pipe. 
2,603.87 feet 12-in., pipe. 



Shawmut Avenue, Roxbury Street and Guild Row. 

Labor $9,475 50 

Bricks 1,112 34 

Cement 386 00 

Sand and gravel 
Iron castings 
Teaming 
Lumber 
Drain pipe . 

Carried forward 



222 


00 


16 


60 


1,629 


25 


284 


77 


13 


43 


$13,139 


89 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



433 



Brought forward 
Hire of^achinery 
Carpentry . 
Paving 
Miscellaneous. 



-3,139 89 

283 64 

373 69 

141 67 

258 73 

L4,197 62 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

823 feet 3 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 6 in., brick. 
16 feet 2 ft. 2 in. x 3 ft. 3 in., brick. 

Tyler Street, between Oak and Curve, and Kneeland 



and Harvard Streets 



Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Hire of machinery 

Carpentry . 

Piles . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

325.95 feet 2 ft.X3 ft., brick. 
288.97 feet 2 ft.X3 ft., brick. 
19.80 feet 20-in., iron pipe. 



$12,004 79 

1,223 67 

501 50 

698 47 

54 71 

3,304 00 

1,397 17 

242 16 

838 99 

48 91 

151 25 

74 62 

712 68 

$21,252 92 



Walk Hill and Bourne Streets, between Patten Street 
and Hyde Park Avenue. 



Labor 














$3,609 96 


Bricks 














95 00 


Cement 














28 75 


Iron castings 














32 60 


Explosives . 














46 59 


Teaming 














142 50 


Lumber 














135 94 


Drain pipe . 














408 29 


Miscellaneous 














101 10 




$4,600 73 



434 



City Document No. 29. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
578 feet 15-iu., pipe. * 

Washington Street, between Lower Mills and Fairmount 

Street. 

$3,025 50 



Labor 
Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 
Iron castings 
Teaming 
Drain pipe . 
Water 

Miscellaneous 
Explosives . 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

442.49 feet 15 -in., pipe. 
1,279.59 feet 12-in., pipe. 

Wensley Street, between New Heath and 

Avenue. 

Labor 

Bricks 

Cement 

Sand and gravel 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Lumber 

Drain pipe . 

Water 

Miscellaneous 



170 63 

55 20 

26 22 

64 69 

167 00 

623 39 

172 20 

97 00 

16 92 

.,418 75 



Bickford 


$2,004 


66 


63 


03 


22 


47 


15 


00 


31 


05 


241 


25 


46 


15 


227 


54 


69 


99 


22 


23 



$2,743 37 



Size and Length of Sewer. 

434.92 feet 12-in., pipe. 
264.98 feet 10-in., pipe. 

Western Avenue, between 180 feet West of Everett and 
Waverley Streets. 

Labor . . ... . . . $4,465 56 

Bricks . . ... ... 803 15 

Cement 359 85 



Carried fortvdrd . 



),628 56 



Street Department — Sewer Divisioisr. 



435 



Hr ought forioard 










$5,628 56 


Sand .... 










19 80 


Teaming 










291 00 


Lnmber 










128 42 


Drain pipe . 










54 16 


Hire of machinery 










172 00 


Carpentry . 










85 97 


Water 










124 20 


Miscellaneous 










171 70 




$6,675 81 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
279.38 feet 15-in., pipe. 
682.10 feet 3 ft. x 3 ft. 2 in., brick. 
280.53 feet 2 ft. 6 in., circular brick. 

West Roxbury Low-level Sewer. 

(In private land between Amory street and 400 feet south of 



Boylston.) 
Labor 
Bricks 
Cement 

Sand and gravel 
Teaming 
Lumber 
N.y., N. H. & H. R.R. Co 
Carpentry . 
"Water 
Miscellaneous 



Size and Length of Seiuer, 
159 feet 2 ft. x 3 ft, 6 in., brick. 



^,391 28 

212 02 

116 90 

98 60 

143 00 

224 77 

2,292 73 

38 46 

15 90 

52 09 

H,585 75 



West Second Street, between E and D Streets. 



Labor 












$1,261 20 


Bricks 












204 93 


Cement 












118 80 


Sand and gravel . 












149 33 


Teaming 












208 00 


Lumber 












47 76 


Paving 












105 25 


Hire of machinery 












164 00 


Carpentry . 












102 51 


Water 












23 03 


Miscellaneous 












21 86 




$2,406 67 



436 



City Document No. 29. 



Size and Length of Sewer. 
230.38 feet 2 ft. x 3 ft., brick. 



Wolcott Street. 



Labor 

Cement 

Iron castings 

Teaming 

Drain pipe . 

Advertising and printing 

C. B. Stone 

J. P. O'Connell, contractor 



Size and Length of Seioer. 

301 feet 6 -in., pipe house drain. 

234.95 feet 30-in., pipe catch-basin drain. 

, pipe catch-basin drain. 

, pipe catch-basin drain. 

pipe catch-basin drain. 



152.15 feet 24-in 
372.60 feet 12-in 
52.18 feet 10-in., 
3 catch-basins. 
2 drop inlets. 



69 00 

61 96 

2 50 

1,258 50 

82 62 

38 50 

1,208 33 

^2,870 89 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 437 



APPENDIX F. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STREET CLEANING 
DIVISION OF THE STREET DEPARTMENT. 



923 Trbmont Building, Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 
Bekjamin W. Wells, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

Deae Sir : I respectfully submit the annual report of the 
expenditures and income of the Street Cleaning Division of the 
Street Department for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897. 

I assumed charge of the Street Cleaning Division of the Street 
Department on March 1, 1896, which was one month after 
the beginning of the financial year. The district lines of 
the Division were changed in 1895 with a less number of dis- 
tricts than had been originally established and covering less 
territory ; that is to say, that the change was not intended to 
cover the Brighton and Dorchester Districts, the scope of the 
push-cart patrol system being continued about the same. 

District No. 1, South Boston, — formerly West End. 

Districts No, 2 and No. 3, East Boston and Charlestown, — 
formerly North End, and South End respectively. 

District No. 7, Roxbury, remaining as before. 

District No. 8, South End and city proper, — formerly South 
End and Back Bay. 

District No. 9, Back Bay, — formerly Charlestown and East 
Boston. 

District No. 10, West End and North End, — formerly called 
No. 1 and No. 2, practically remaining the same. 

All of the headquarters of the respective districts are at the 
Sanitary Division stables and yards, with the exception of Dis- 
trict No. 1, South Boston, where the stable is directly under 
control of the Division. The push-cart system headquarters are 
at the dumping scow on Atlantic avenue and are also separated 
from the Sanitary Division. I would respectfully recommend 
that any change that may be contemplated for any reorganization 
or enlargement of the office and yard facilities of this Division be 
considered in such a manner that the Street Cleaning Division 
stables and offices of the different districts be so arranged that 
they may be entirely separated from those of any other Division. 

The Charlestown force, covering the Charlestown and East 
Boston districts, is obliged to care for the streets of East Boston, 
giving two days a week for that purpose. It is not only taking 



438 City Document No. 29. 

away from Charlestown the care that it should receive, but it is 
not giving the East Boston District the necessary attention ; and 
I respectfully recommend that some action be taken as regards 
the establishment of a separate street cleaning district in East 
Boston. 

Equipment. 

The principal part of the equipment of the Division consists 
of double and single sweeping machines, dirt carts, water carts, 
cart horses, machine horses, single and double harnesses, rubbish 
wagons, waste barrels, push carts and barrels and a snow- 
plough, which has been tried during the winter, and will probably 
be purchased. 

The dirt carts are in bad shape, many of them needing exten- 
sive repairs, and some entirely unfitted for use. The time has 
come when a tight cart must be used. Since the Division 
was organized, it has been using exclusively the old-style ash 
cart, which seems to me no longer fully useful for the work on 
account of being leaky. I am about ready to place on the 
street a cart, built on somewhat different lines than the one now 
in vogue. The cart is made in a somewhat heavier manner, but 
the remodelling has been confined wholly to the tail-boards, 
with a view to making the carts nearly water-tight ; this cart 
will be given a thorough test as regards water-tight properties. 
I respectfully and earnestly recommend that twenty new dirt 
carts be purchased during the year. 

The various double and single machines and the water carts 
have undergone extensive repairs during the past year, so that I 
am able to say that the machines, at least, are in better condition 
than ever before. 

The harnesses, although old, are in very fair shape. No new 
harnesses have been purchased during the year. 

The Division maintains a blacksmith and carpenter shop in 
the South yard of the Sanitary Division. Here the machines, 
carts, push-carts, etc., are repaired. 

Violation of Citt Obdinances. 

The greatest drawback to street cleaning that we have in 
this city to-day is the constant and unrestrained violation of the 
City Ordinances in relation to throwing rubbish and waste 
material into the streets. With a good and effective street 
cleaning organization as we have to-day, and with a determined 
and constant co-operation of the Police Department of the city, 
we ought to be able to preserve a state of cleanliness that 
would be reasonably acceptable to the public. If it should 
prove impossible, for any reason, to secure such co-operation, it 
might be practicable — and it would certainly be worth the experi- 
ment — to have special oflScers or inspectors appointed, who should 
be invested with all the authority of the police to enforce these 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 439 

sanitary ordinances. As we have not had the power of acting 
directly ourselves, I have instructed my foremen throughout the 
city to act as inspectors and to make formal complaints to the 
captains of the various precincts. In this way, at least, I hope 
to be able to bring to the attention of the police authorities all 
persons who are violating the City Ordinances. 

Crowded Sections. 

I would call to your attention certain sections of the city 
which, so far as street cleaning is concerned, do not become any 
better. At the North and West Ends there is a large foreign 
population, and, although we have now to contend with* streets 
travelled more than formerly, with an increased population and 
in a small crowded area, peopled by entirely new and in many 
cases ignorant classes, the Street Cleaning force has not been 
materially increased since the organization of the Division. 

Subway. 

The operations of the Transit Commission during the past 
year have made our work extremely laborious and expensive, on 
account of the large amount of teaming of materials used in the 
construction, not to mention the dirt that has been excavated 
and carted away. The work on the subway being along the prin- 
cipal thoroughfares, we have endeavored to maintain the same 
standard of efficiency, in spite of the many annoyances and dis- 
turbances occasioned by this important work. While there has 
been some disposition, on the part of the Transit Commission, 
to remove the excess of dirt occasioned by the operations, there 
has not at all times been a satisfactory amount of painstaking on 
the part of the contractors. 

Push-Cart System. 

The push-cart system has been managed effectively and 
efficiently during the past year. The force has been increased 
by the addition of nine new routes, covering the newly- paved 
portion of Huntington and Columbus avenues, the Salem street 
section at the North End and the Genesee street section at the 
South End. Beacon street has been patrolled from Charles to 
Tremont street, and we have also placed a man in charge of all 
the crossings at Copley square. We have also adopted a uniform 
cap and badge, and are now contemplating the semi-uniforming 
of the push-cart patrolmen, 

I will endeavor during the coming year to still further extend 
the system, and also to make some minor changes that I believe 
will render the force more efficient, such as the addition of an 
extra barrel to all the men and the shortening of some of the 
routes, in order that the sections covered may be kept in a more 
cleanly condition. 



440 City Document No. 29. 

Daring the past year the barrels have been kept in a much 
neater condition ; both carts and barrels being constantly re- 
painted. I would recommend that some facilities be afforded 
at the dock for the cleaning of the barrels and carts used in the 
push-cart system. 

Paper Nuisance. 
In the outlying districts, where the streets are mostly of 
macadam, the paper nuisance shows to the greatest disadvan- 
tage. Macadam streets are cleaned only once a week, and unless 
a paper patrol is maintained, it would seem at times as if they 
were totally neglected. My idea is to map out routes, so that 
all macadam streets north of Massachusetts avenue, and also in 
South Boston, Charlestown and Roxbury will be covered or 
patrolled every day by teams, which will be required to gather 
up only waste papers, jDieces of wood, and other such unsightly 
matter that may be blown or cast into the streets. 

Snow Work. 
During the past winter we have maintained, in addition to our 
regular force, an emergency force, which had the care of all cross- 
ings in one of the down-town sections, namely, between Kneeland 
and State streets, and Atlantic avenue and Tremont street. 
This work has also been extended in a measure around the 
market section, and the thoroughfares leading from the centre 
of the city to the Union Station. The work of the emergency 
and the regular force has been to keep the crossings free from 
snow, slush and water at all times ; it has proved very effective, 
and has almost wholly put a stop to the incessant complaints 
that the Division was in the habit of hearing in previous winter 
seasons. 

Dumps. 
Boston is at a great disadvantage, especially in the city 
proper, as regards its dumping facilities. Although we have an 
extensive wharf front for the placing of dumping scows, the 
city maintains but one. In New York City there are nine- 
teen dumping-stations equipped with one or more scows. A 
dumping- station should be maintained at the North End or along 
the line of the Charles river. At the present time, long hauls 
are necessary, and result in an increased expenditure for carting. 
At the South End and Back Bay we are still able to hold a few 
good places on the low lands ; but the time will soon come when 
even these will be filled, and then it will be necessary to find 
new dumps, either along the water front or farther back in the 
suburban localities. 

Civil Service. 
At the present time, there is a large percentage of old men 
employed by this Division, and the Veterans' Preference Act 
makes it hard to draw into the service the best and most 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 441 

desirable. Men of fifty years and upward are not fitted for the 
energetic and arduous duties of this Division. It would seem 
that this Division of the Street Department, like the Police and 
Fire Departments, should have an age limit, and that a con- 
siderably lower one than fifty years, or else should not be 
handicapped by the workings of the Veterans' Preference Act 
as regards the appointment of its force. Appointments and 
promotions have been made wholly with regard to fitness, ability 
and merit, and no discharges have been made without first a fair 
consideration and only for good and sufiicient cause. It has 
been my constant aim to conform to the Civil Service rules and 
requirements. 

Relations of the Street Cleaning Division to the 
Paving Division. 

I would respectfully call to your attention, that during the 
past year — part of the time in the ppring — the Paving Division 
was employed in shaping the macadam street surfaces and scrap- 
ing the gutters; and I would, consequently, suggest the impor- 
tance of showing, in connection with the work of this Division, 
the number of cart loads of waste and dirt taken from the mac- 
adamized streets of the city by the Paving Division. 

Good and successful pavements are essential for good and 
successful street cleaning. 

The many poor and uneven pavements throughout the city 
proper make the work of the Street Cleaning Division much 
hai'der, especially in streets where there are railroad tracks. The 
tendency of pavements for many years in Europe, and for half a 
generation in America, has been toward smoother surfaces and 
fewer joints. Macadam and Telford streets are not desirable 
within the truly city limits ; the wear of heavy traffic and the 
effect of wet, dry and freezing weather disintegrate them rapidly. 
Under more than the lightest traffic, Telford and macadam can- 
not compete in economy, if maintained with proper care, with 
granite, asphalt, or even wood pavements. Smooth and durable 
pavements upon the streets would encourage efforts to clean 
them, and the entire neighborhood is influenced to a better 
appearance. Streets in the tenement and similar quarters should 
be laid with asphalt, as the surface of such pavements, being with- 
out joint, is easily cleaned, and could also be flushed or washed 
free from germs of all kinds by each rainfall. 

Conclusion. 

Realizing that the push-cart system is one of the most ef- 
fective means of keeping our streets clean, I have endeavored to 
enlarge it, and have done so consistently with my appropriation. 
With streets cleaned every twenty-four hours by machinery, 
and patrolled every day by push-carts, a reasonable state of 
cleanliness can be expected. 



442 



City Document No. 29. 



I cannot conclude this report until I have expressed my appre- 
ciation of the good work of the clerks, the foremen and sub-fore- 
men of this Division. Their co-operation and support have been 
at all times cordial and earnest, without which I am free to say 
it would have been impossible to show the work I here submit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joshua Atwood, 3d., 
Deputy Superintendent. 



Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation 
Transferred from Central Office . 
Transferred from Bridge Division 
Transferred from Ferry Division . 
Transferred from Paving Division 
Transferred from Sewer Division . 
Transferred from Surplus Revenue, 1896-97 

Total amount of appropriation 
Total amount of expenditures 



1300,000 00 

218 15 

906 87 

05 

2,961 85 

2,172 94 

4,006 53 

S310,266 39 
$310,266 39 



Objects of Expendituees. 
Superintendence. 



Salary of Deputy Superintendent 


$3,000 00 


Office pay-rolls . . 


4,210 90 


Stationery 


161 54 


Printing 


545 77 


Board of horses ..... 


612 32 


Telephone service .... 


271 65 


Total cost of superintendence 


18,802 18 



Cleaning Streets. 

Including the Cost of S%oeeping^ Loading^ and Memovcd of 

Street Dirt. 



District 1. South Boston 

District 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown 

District 7. Roxbury . . 

District 8. South End . . . , 

District 9. Back Bay . . . , 

District 10. West End and North End 



$16,531 62 

13,942 11 

16,349 50 

53,280 47 

6,566 18 

39,012 79 



Total cost of cleaning streets 



$145,682 67 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 443 



Cleaning Gutters. 

Including Cost of Sioeeping, Loading, and Removal of 

Street Dirt. 

District 1. South Boston .... $2,862 72 

District 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown . 3,569 34 

District 7. Roxbury 6,425 16 

District 8. South End 3,334 90 

District 9. Back Bay 3,960 33 

District 10. West End and North End . . 1,229 92 



Total cost of cleaning gutters 

Total length of gutters cleaned, 2,819.94 miles. 
Average cost per mile (including dump), $7.74. 

Cost oe Maintaining Dumps. 

District 1. South Boston 

District 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown 

District 7. Roxbury .... 

District 8. South End .... 

District 9. Back Bay .... 

District 10. West End and North End . 

Total cost of dumps .... 



$21,382 37 



$498 00 
568 00 

1,289 74 

439 95 

1,124 32 

?3,920 01 



Removing Snow. 
Including Labor on Crossings^ hi Streets, Carting of Snow, etc. 



District 1. South Boston 


$2,862 94 


District 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown 


2,326 03 


District 7. Roxbury .... 


5,964 70 


District 8. South End .... 


9,918 29 


District 9. Back Bay .... 


779 82 


District 10. West End and North End 


6,439 08 


Total cost ...... 


. $28,290 06 



Miscellaneous Work. 
This shows the cost of such work as may not be characterized 
the same in all districts. 

Including Miscellaneous Work, Sweeinng and Carting of 



Leaves, etc. 




District 1. South Boston . . . . 


1195 82 


District 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown 


6 30 


District 7. Roxbury . . . . . 


278 50 


District 8. South End 


271 95 


District 9. Back Bay . . . . . 


7 35 


District 10. West End and North End 


192 38 


Total cost 


$932 30 



444 (^iTY Document No. 29. 

Cleaning Crossings. 

Including Cost of Manual and Machine Labor. 

Cost of cleaning crossings $1,382 84 

Removing snow by patrol ..... 2,463 60 



Total cost ....... 13,846 44 

Patrolling by Districts. 
This Includes the Cost of Piching up and Removal of Refuse 
Paijers^ etc.^from the Streets. 
Cost of paper patrol 11,697 95 

Push-cart Patrol System. 

Superintendence, inspection, etc. .... $2,137 98 
Push-carts, including labor and teaming . . 29,483 55 



$31,621 53 



Street Department — Street Cleaisting Divisioisr. 445 



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446 



City Document No. 29. 



Stable and Yard Expenses. 

Including the cost of the Soicth End^ West Und, Hoxhury, 

South Boston and Gharlestown stables, as folloios : 



Superintendence of stables .... 
Labor, including the cost of feeders, hostlers 

broom-makers, blacksmiths, carpenters, watch 

men, yardmen, messenger, etc 
Cart and carriage repairs 
Harness repairs 
Horse- shoeing 
Sweeping- machine repairs 
Stable and shed repairs 
Street car tickets and ferry passes 
Tool repairs ..... 
Veterinary services and medicine . 

Total 



Stock Accoitnt. 
Broom stock purchased 
Carts and carriages purchased 
Harnesses and horse furnishings purchased 
Horses purchased ..... 
Tools purchased ..... 
Waste barrels ..... 
Patrol stock and maintenance of same . 



Total 

Miscellaneous. 
Holidays . . . ■* . 
Scow (cost of disposal at sea of 36,072 loads of 



$1,219 53 



20,100 


71 


4,796 


16 


1,014 


19 


3,103 


14 


2,635 


35 


302 


78 


806 


00 


101 


05 


1,268 


19 



),347 10 



4,705 


15 


530 


00 


297 


70 


1,835 


00 


537 


32 


175 


00 


1,211 


23 



),291 40 



1,562 46 



street-dirt) . . . , 


4,794 97 


Sundries 


2,353 56 


Committee on claims, vote of 


1,500 00 


Total 


. $20,210 99 


General Recapitulation 


OF Expenses. 


Superintendence . . . . . 


18,802 18 


Cleaning streets 


. 145,682 67 


Cleaning gutters . . . . . 


21,382 37 


Maintaining dumps 


3,920 01 


Removal of snow and ice 


28,290 86 


Miscellaneous work 


932 30 


Cleaning crossings 


3,846 44 


Paper patrol in business districts . 


1,697 95 


Carried forward . . . . 


. 1214,554 78 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 447 



Brought forward , 
Patrol system, push-carts 
Stable and yard expenses 
Stock account 
Miscellaneous 



$214,554 78 

31,621 53 

35,347 10 

9,291 40 

20,210 99 

$311,025 80 



Note. — Of the above amotmt, the sum of $759.41 was paid by other departments 
and divisions, on account of wovk. done, etc., maliing the net expenses of this division, 
as shown in the financial statement, §310,266.39. 

Income , 

Amount of the bills deposited with the City Collector during 
the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897, $5,833.08. 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in 
each District, exclusive of Supervision and other Expenses. 



Districts. 


Miles of 

Streets 

Cleaned. 


Cost of 
Cleaning. 


Pro Rata Cost 
of Dumps. 


Total Cost. 


Cost per 

Mile. 


1 

2-3 

7 


990.46 
1,046.47 

655.01 
5,280.72 

676.08 
3,430.82 


$16,531 62 
13,942 11 
16,349 50 
53,280 47 
6,566 18 
39,012 79 


$424 49 
452 21 


$16,956 11 
14,395 32 
16,349 50 
54,494 20 
6,846 60 
40,102 73 


$17 11 
13 75 
24 96 


8 

9 

10 


1,213 73 

274 42 
1,089 94 


10 31 

10 11 

11 68 




12,079.56 


$145,682 67 


$3,455 79 


$149,138 46 





Average cost per mile of cleaning streets in six districts, ex- 
clusive of supervision, etc., 112.34. 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 

District, including Supervision, Labor, Yard and 

Stable fcxpenses. 



Dis- 
tricts. 


Miles of 

Streets 

Cleaned. 


Cost of 
Cleaniug 

Streets. 


62% of the 

Total Cost 

of 

Supervision. 


73% of the 

Toiai Coat of 

Yard and 

Stable 
Expenses. 


Total 
Expense. 


Total 

Cost 

per 

Mile. 


1 . . 

2-3 . 

'7. . 

8 . . 

9 . . 
10. . 


990.46 

1,046.47 

655.01 

5,280.72 

676.08 

3,430.82 


$16,956 11 
14,395 32 
16,349 50 
54,494 20 
6,840 60 
40,102 73 


$620 48 
526 76 
598 27 

1,994 08 
250 32 

1,467 44 


$2,933 69 
2,490 63 
2,828 74 
9,428 38 
1,183 53 
6,938 41 


$20,510 28 
17,412 71 
19,776 51 
65,916 66 
8,274 45 
48,508 58 


$20 70 
16 62 
30 19 
12 48 
12 23 
14 13 




12,079.56 


$149,138 46 


$5,457 35 


$25,803 38 


$180,399 19 





Average cost per mile of cleaning the streets in six districts, 
including supervision, etc., $14.93. 



448 City Document No. 29. 

Table showing the Number of Loads of Street Dirt Removed. 



DiSTKICTS. 


Kumber of 

Loads of Dirt 

Removed. 


Cost per load of 
cleaning streets 
and removing 
to dumps, in- 
cluding Fore- 
man's auperin- 
tendence. 


1 

2-3 

7 

8 

9 ...... . 

10 


15,751 
11,692 
21,240 
29,396 
6,502 
21,411 


$1 23 
1 49 
1 07 
1 92 
1 61 
1 87 




105,992 
1,616 
5,353 




Eemoved by paper patrol 


Barrel loads. 


Removed by push-cart, patrol system . 
Removed by district push-carts . 


58,986 
2,692 


Totals 


112,961 


61,678 



Total number of cart loads removed 112,961 

Total number of barrel loads removed 61,678 

36,072 loads of the above dirt (or 31 per cent) were delivered 
at the dumping scow, the towing of which to sea cost 15 cents per 
load. In addition to the above, 28,819 single loads and 3,688 
double loads of street scrapings were removed from the streets 
by the Paving Division. 



Public Waste Barrels. 
Total number of waste barrels emptied 

Force Employed. 

Deputy Superintendent ..... 

Clerk 

Messengers ........ 

Employees in the division not including the above 

Entire force ...... 

Average force employed during the year 



26,346 



1 

1 

3 

321 



326 
316 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 449 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF STREET 
WATERING DIVISION. 



, 742 Tremont Building, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 

Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Sitperintendent of Streets : 

Deae Sir : I herewith respectfully submit the annual report 
of the expenditures, income and operations of the Street Water- 
ing Division, for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1897. 

The street watering season of 1 896 has been a remarkable 
one in many ways. It was one of the most trying from a 
weather standpoint, and this, coupled with the fact that the ap- 
propriation was smaller by many thousands than heretofore, 
makes the results attained highly satisfactory. While express- 
ing satisfaction with the work accomplished during the year, the 
division does not wish to give its approval to continued small 
appropriations for street watering purposes. The growth of the 
city, and the open character of our winters, necessarily lengthen- 
ing the season, make it imperative that a substantial increase 
should be made in the amount assigned for this work. 

The season began the 25th of March, and carts were employed 
in parts of the city proper as late as the 4th of December. 
Some were really needed during days in January, but the ther- 
mometer was so low that ice formed as soon as water was 
thrown from the carts, which were called out to relieve the dust 
nuisance. It is decidedly dangerous to horse travel to attempt 
to water streets when the temperature is below freezing, and 
there seems to be no method by which the dust can be over- 
come, except, perhaps, by frequent sweeping and scraping. 

The construction of the subway has been the occasion of 
much dust, and consequent public complaint. The best possible 
effort has been made to keep the dust down along Tremont 
and the other streets used by the Transit Commissioners, but 
when the weather becomes cold it is a nuisance that frequent 
sweeping cannot altogether abate. 

As Blue Hill, Huntington, and Commonwealth avenues near 
completion it becomes necessary to provide for their care. 
The present force of carts has been given more miles of 
streets than efficiency should require, and an increase must be 
made to water the avenues mentioned. It is also the opinion of 



450 City Document No. 29. 

the division that an auxiliary force should be maintained to use 
in emergency cases and on exceptional days when the regular 
number of carts is inadequate. Fully seven extra carts are 
needed for regular work during the coming season. They are 
required by the natural growth of the city, the acquisition of the 
above avenues, and the reduction of some of the overworked 
routes. 

The auxiliary force should be maintained as follows : South 
Boston, 2 carts; East Boston, 2 carts; Charlestown, 1 cart; 
Brighton, 3 carts; West Roxbury, 4 carts; Dorchester, 4 carts; 
Roxbury, 4 carts ; city proper, 5 carts ; total, 25. This force 
would be very valuable during an unusually dry spell, and in case 
of negligence on the part of any of the regular force could be 
called upon to displace them. To discipline a cart-owner, where, 
there are only enough carts to do the work, is like punishing 
the division ; for the force is made so much less, no carts as a rule 
being available to do the work of the negligent one. In con- 
nection with providing this auxiliary force it may be well to ask, 
will the contractors invest in a plant which insures so little 
profit as a watering cart ? This is the one great impediment in 
providing the force. 

During an average season some 202,160,000 gallons of water 
are used for street watering. This tremendous use of fresh 
water must, as years go on, be prevented by the use of salt 
water. The systematic and gradual construction of salt water 
mains is the only solution to the introduction of salt water, and 
this has already been s-uggested in connection with the use of 
salt water for tire purposes. To use salt water now by the old 
pumping-stations would entail a very large expense, and is im- 
practicable. Attention is called to this matter here to show the 
necessity of providing for some method of saving the fresh 
water, and it is needless to state that salt water for watering 
streets is superior to it. 

The expense of the division last year was $71,211.81, the 
smallest in its history. It may be considered the lowest figure 
at which our 305 miles of macadam streets can be watered. 
The efiiciency and method of the department has reached the 
highest degree of excellence ; and in the future the expenses may 
be expected to show an increase commensurate with the growth 
of the city. 

The trial of watering streets by electric watering cars has 
proved such a success that it should be one of the earliest efforts 
of the department to make the West End Stieet Railway Com- 
pany water the streets through which its tracks run. If this is 
accomplished the increase demanded for the regular force could 
be provided from the carts removed from the streets on which 
the West End Street Railway Company will operate its cars. 
Nothing is risked in saying that not only could the division do 
this, but it could also give extra watering service throughout the 
city. 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 451 

The following sums have been expended for street watering 
during the past six (6) years : 



1891 


. $104,263 62 


1894 


$87,169 08 


1892 


94,507 80 


1895 


76,424 70 


1893 


99,430 16 


1896 


71,211 81 



The income during the last year was $952.50. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ThOS. J. FlNNEKAX, 

Deputy Superintendent Street Watering Division. 



Financial Statement. 

Amount of appropriation . . . 170,000 00 
Transferred from Sewer Division . 1,211 81 



Total amount of appropriation . . $71,211 81 

Total amount of expenditures . . $71,211 81 



452 



City DocuiMENt No. 29. 



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Stueet Depaetmbkt — ^ Street Watering Division. 453 



Income. 

The ^ division watered in front of 127 school-houses, 9 poHce 
stations and 37 engine-liouses. The charges against the Board 
of Police and Fire Department have been paid, but the School 
Committee, as usual, ignores its debt. 

The following sums were charged for street watering, and bills 
for the same deposited with the City Collector during the financier 
year ending Jan. 31, 1897 : — 



Fire Department .... 


. $470 40 


Board of Police .... 


. 136 85 


Homoeopathic Hospital . 


. 105 00 


Louisburg Square 


. 100 00 


Fairfax and Beaumont streets 


75 00 


Marcella-street Home . 


. 28 00 


State House grounds 


25 00 


Boston Dispensary 


12 25 


' Total 


. $952 50 



The bill against the School Committee amounts to $3,466.54. 
Summary of Day Work paid for by the City. 



No. 


District. 


No. Carts. 


No. Miles 
Covered. 


Average per 
Cart. 


1 . . 


South Boston 


9 


23.0.5 


2.56 






East Boston 






8 


21.63 


2.70 






Charlestown 






7 


15.00 


2.14 






Brighton 






13 


32.6.5 


2.51 







West Roxbury 






18 


61.06 


3.39 


6 




Dorchester . 






19 


63.31 


3.33 


7 




Roxbury 






19 


54.19 


2.85 


8 




Back Bay 






10 


15.93 


1.59 


9 




Beacon Hill . 






2 


4.25 


2.12 


10 




South End . 






7 


14.36 


2.05 




Totals 


112 


305.41 


2.72 



The above summary shows that 112 carts watered 305.41 
miles of macadam sti'eets this year. Last year the same num- 
ber of carts watered 301.92 miles of streets. The cost of 
the watering exclusive of supervision was $184 per mile, or 
$56,333.25, against $214 per mile last year and an expense of 
$64,532.75, The work this year, as last, was done entirely by 
day work under the immediate control of the division. The 
abolition of the contract work and substitution of day work has 
given street watering service at the lowest possible cost, and 
hereafter with the growth of the city and the open character 
of our winters the expense may be expected to increase. 



4.54: 



City Document No. 29. 



Attention should be directed to the fact that the appropria- 
tion is now so small that only the absolute necessities of the ser- 
vice are provided for, and little or no freedom is allowed for 
unusual conditions. Streets outside of the City Proper are 
watered twice a day and this is sufficient for the majority of 
them, but there are many on which the traffic is so great that 
they should be watered three and four times. Provisions are 
now made whereby all important highways are watered at least 
three times, but in some sections the force and expense will not 
permit of this really necessary arrangement. 

Our citizens are continually demanding increased service, and 
no work done by any other branch of the department is more 
appreciated than that of street watering. 

Work done by Contractors at the Expense of the Abutters. 



Districts. 


Contractors. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


City Proper . 

City Proper . 

City Proper . 

City Proper . 

East Boston . 

Charlestown 

Eoxbury and South Boston 

Eoxbury 




Daniel Clark . 
Potter Bros. . 
Proctor Bros. & Co 
C. Nute & Son 
J. J. Fitzpatrick 
W. H. Quigley 
H. P. Cook & Co. 
Gilligan Bros. 




4 
5 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 


4.4.5 

8.75 
7.25 
2.73 
2.00 
2.00 
7.78 
1.25 


Totals .... 




21 


36.21 



The above table gives the work done by contractors for the 
abutters on paved streets. The work is substantially the same 
as last year. Nothwithstanding how many times explained it 
always seems necessary to state for a large number that the 
division waters only macadam streets. 

While upon this subject it is perhaps well to point out that 
the method of watering paved streets is not altogether satisfac- 
tory, inasmuch as some receive service they do not, or are not 
willing to pay for. There is no compulsion about the watering 
of paved streets, and where A desires it done B may not be 
willing to pay for his share. Such conditions frequently arise, 
and the contractor refuses to water except where he is assured 
a profit for his work. 

From a careful investigation it would appear that the watering 
of all paved streets could be done by the division for $50,000. 
It needs no argument to prove that the watering could be done 
better under day than contract work, and there are many parts 
of the city not now watered because of the expense, where this 
privilege would be a great benefit to the health of the people 
living in the congested communities. 



Street Departjnient — Street Watering Divrsrox. 455 

In connection with the suggestion that the city water the 
paved streets free of cost to the abutter it should be urged that 
the division still feels that the West End Street Railway Com- 
pany ought not to be relieved by any such arrangement of its 
manifest duty to water its tracks. If the West End took care of 
the t-treets through which it runs its cars the expense would be 
very much reduced; but $125,000, it may be safely stated, will 
water every accepted street, paved and macadam, within the 
city limits. This matter is respectfully set forth for your con- 
sideration. 

Work done by the Contractors Free of Cost to the City. 



Name. 


Carts. 


Miles. 


Daniel Clark 

Potter Bros. . 

Proctor Bros. & Co 

0. Nute & Son 

n. p. Cook & Co 

Gilligan Bros. 


1 

i 

ii 


0.86 
1.12 
1.75 
0.21 
1.09 
0.54 


Totals 


OS 


5.. 57 



The amount of work done by the contractors in return for 
their franchises remains the same as last year. Most of this 
gratuitous service is done in sections, where it would be exceed- 
ingly difficult to operate a day cart under the control of the 
division, as there is not enough work to keep one cart employed 
all the time. An expense of $2,000 is saved the division by this 
watering. 



Distribution of Carts showing Entire Amount of Work done. 



No. 


District. 


Hired 

Carts. 


Contractors' 
Carts. 


Total. 


Miles. 


1 . . 


South Boston . . , 


9 


1 


10 


2.T.9S 


2 , 




East Boston , 








8 


1 


9 


23.63 


3 . 




Charlestown . 








7 


1 


8 


J7.00 


4 . 




Brighton . . 








13 




13 


32.65 


5 . 




West Roxbury 








18 




18 


61.06 


6 . 




Dorchester . 








19 


. 


19 


63.31 


7 . 


Roxbury . , 








19 


3 


22 


60 2t 


8, 9, 10|City Proper , 








19 


15 


34 


57.72 




Free watering 








• • 


Bf 


3f 


5.57 




Totals 


112 


2^1 


136f 


347.16 



456 



City Document No. 29. 



Water=Posts or Stand- Pipes. 

During the year three new stand-pipes were erected and three 
relocated for the benefit of the service. Five hydrants were 
established to test street sprinkling with electric cars. 

The location is shown by districts : — 



Districts. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


Electric 
Hydrants. 


Incr. 


South Boston . 


2.3 


25 


27 


27 


28 


28 






East Boston . 


16 


23 


28 


82 


33 


34 






Charlestown . 


19 


19 


20 


20 


20 


20 






Brighton . . 


25 


39 


42 


44 


44 


44 






West Roxbury, 


50 


59 


60 


65 


66 


67 




1 


Dorchester . . 


61 


72 


75 


82 


82 


S3 




1 


Roxbury . . 


53 


60 


65 


68 


68 


68 






City Proper 


24 


42 


45 


48 


52- 


53 


5 


1 


Total . . 


271 


339 


362 


386 


393 


396 


5 


3 



Note. — An increase of 125 stand-pipes since 1891. 

The use of bicycles by the men having charge of the watering 
in the various sections continues to give highly satisfactory results 
in the matter of efficiency. 

Mr. J. W. Smith, the Local Forecast Official, still obliges us 
with daily weather reports of great value. 

The Water Department continues its assistance in the matter 
of meeting our requirements in the repair of stand-pipes and the 
use of water. 



Street, Department — Engineering Dr^sion. 457 



APPENDIX H. 



City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, Jan. 31, 1897, 

Mr. Bek.tamijst W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets : 

SiK : I herewith submit the following report of the work done 
under my direction for the Street Department during the year 
1896. 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

The work on this avenue from Grove Hall to Walk Hill street 
a distance of 2.21 miles is in a forward state. It is substantially 
completed from Grove Hall to the principal entrances to Frank- 
lin Park, and the remaining portion was so far advanced, that 
one fairly good roadway for the entire length under construction 
was in use during the winter. During the year the excavation 
or rough grading has been completed, the work on the sewers, 
water and gaspipes has been carried forward nearly to com- 
pletion and about one-half the work of roadway construction 
done. The avenue to Walk Hill street should be completed 
during the working season of 1897. 

The construction of the remaining part of the avenue from 
Walk Hill street to Mattapan, a distance of .65 mile has not 
3'et been ordered. 

The total amount of excavation made has been as follows : — 

Earth 136,984.53 cubic yards- 

Rock 33,913.59 " 



Total 170,898.12 " 

There has been a large surplus of excavated material, and 
after completing the filling required, the remainder has been 
disposed of as follows : — 

Delivered on Lauriat avenue (haul about 0.46 mile), 7,524 cu.yds. 
" Geneva » ( " " 1.67 " ), 6,083 « 
" " Columbus avenue between Dimock 

street and West Walnut Park (haul about 1.60 

miles) 7,899 " 

Delivered on Talbot avenue (haul about 0.17 mile), 5,000 " 



Total .26,506 " 

In addition to the above, large and unmeasured quantities of 
filling have been delivered on Franklin Field, Franklin Park, and 



458 City Document No. 29. 

on Blue Hill avenue beyond Walk Hill street. On the section 
nearest Grove Hall, the surplus, amounting to 3,291 cubic yards, 
was disposed of by the contractor under the contract. A large 
part of the rock excavated was of such inferior quality as to be 
only suitable for filling. From the cut near Walk Hill street, 
however, suitable stone was found, and enough was saved to 
furnish stock for Telford base for about 16,000 square yards or 
about 1.07 miles of one roadway. 

The total cost of excavation including its delivery as above 
indicated has been as follows : — 

Earth, 136,984.53 cubic yards .... $57,603 44 

Average cost per cubic yard .... 0.4205 

Rock, 33,913.59 cubic yards .... 35,620 87 

Average cost per cubic yard .... 1 05 

Most of the work remaining to be done is under contract and 
partially completed. There remains one section of roadway, 
from Glenway street to Canterbury street, which can be put 
under contract on the completion of the sewer, gas and water- 
pipe work. The construction of a retaining-wall next Franklin 
Park must follow the completion of the above-named section of 
roadway, as its site is now occupied by the temporary roadway. 

The Street railroad has been rebuilt from Grove Hall, and 
extended 0.95 mile to Harvard street. 

The grade established for Blue Hill avenue caused a cut of 
about 11 feet at the entrance to Back street (now Harvard 
street) and a temporary connection was made between them ; 
this was done by contract and is not yet entirely completed. 
The cost will be about |1,110. 

At McLellan street the difference in grade was about 10.5 
feet and excavation for a connection has been in progress by the 
Street Department during the winter ; at other intersections, 
where there are only slight differences in grade, connections will 
be made by the contractors. 

Columbus- Avenue Extension. 

Colambus avenue, from Northampton street to the Roxbury 
crossing, has been substantially completed. It has an asphalt 
roadway, from curb to curb, 54 feet in width, with a double- 
track street railway. The rails used are full grooved, with both 
tread and guard on a level with the asphalt surface. 

From Northampton street to the southerly line of Terry 
street, a distance of 3,276 feet, the surface is Trinidad asphalt, 
laid by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, the concrete base 
is generally 6 inches in thickness, but for a part of the length 
over the deepest mud the thickness was increased to 10 inches. 
The remainder of the work, 884 feet in length, was laid on a 
6 inch concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company, with im- 
ported Sicilian natural rock asphalt. The preparation of the 



Street Department — Engenteeeestg Division. 459 

roadbed was made by the regular force of the Street Depart- 
ment, large quantities of unsuitable material was removed, and 
10,987 cubic yards of gravel was delivered by contract and used 
for grading. A steam-roller was kept in use upon it for several 
months, and while settlement is apparent in places, the general 
result is better than could have been reasonably expected, when 
the very bad character of the ground is taken into account. The 
edgestone were set and the brick sidewalks laid under the super- 
vision of the Street Department. The price ^aid for asphalt, 
including a 6 inch base of American cement concrete, was $2.90 
per square yard for both sections. The section of the avenue 
from Massachusetts avenue to Northampton street was surfaced 
with Trinidad asphalt, so that Columbus avenue now has a con- 
tinuous asphalt surface from the Boston & Albany R.R. bridge 
to the Roxbury crossing, a distance of 1.5 miles. 

The section of the avenue between Roxbury crossing and 
Stony brook, near Ritchie street, is occupied at present by the 
contractors for the new conduit for Stony brook, and the sur- 
facing of the street can only be commenced upon the com- 
pletion of this work, and of the work upon the other sewers, gas 
and water pipes. 

The section between Ritchie street and West Walnut park 
can be put under contract upon the completion of the under- 
ground pipe work, which is in a forward state. The remaining 
section of the avenue, extending from West Walnut park to 
Walnut avenue, is nearly completed. It is a Telford macadam 
roadway with edgestones and brick sidewalks. It was let in one 
contract. The surplus excavated material was used upon the 
adjoining section, and the work was carried far enough before it 
was closed by the weather, to allow the roadway to be kept open 
during the winter. 

It is expected that the avenue can be completed during the 
working season of 1897. 

Huntington Avenue. 

This avenue extends from Copley square to the Brookline line, 
a length of 2.25 miles. From Copley square to Francis street, 
a distance of 1.75 miles, it is 100 feet in width, and is built with 
a central reserved space 25 feet wide for street cars, two road- 
ways each 25 feet wide and two sidewalks each 12^ feet wide. 
The remainder of the avenue is 80 feet in width, with one road- 
way 54 feet in width, with a double track street railway in the 
centre, built in the usual manner without a special reservation. 
The sidewalks are each 13 feet wide. Beginning at Copley 
square the first section .13 of a mile long, to the Boston & Albany 
R.R. bridge, has Telford macadam roadways and brick sidewalks. 
This section was built by the regular force of the Street Depart- 
ment. The bridge over the railroad was stripped, cleaned, 
painted and newly floored above the iron girders . One new girder 



460 City Document No. 29. 

was added to carry a new 42-inc]i water pipe, and in rebuilding, 
the surface of the bridge was rectified to correspond with the 
revised grade and cross section of the avenue. 

From the bridge to Gainsborough street, a distance of .57 of 
a mile, the roadways are laid with natural rock asphalt, on a 6- 
inch American cement concrete base. The grading was done by 
the regular force of the Street Department. The edgestones and 
brick sidewalks were laid by contract with materials furnished 
by the department. The asphalt including base was laid by the 
Boston Asphalt Company and cost $2.90 per square yard. The 
intersection at Massachusetts avenue which has double street 
railroad tracks on each avenue, connected by eight curves, is 
paved with granite blocks on gravel. The next section, from 
G-ainsborough to Longwood avenue .78 of a mile in length has 
Telford macadam roadways and gravel sidewalks ; it was built by 
H. Gore & Co. with materials principally furnished by the Street 
Department. The remainder of the avenue, .74 of a mile in 
length has Telford macadam roadways and was built by Dohertj^ 
& Connors, with materials furnished by the Street Department. 
A few details remain to be completed upon this avenue and the 
work done upon it late in the season will require some further 
attention early in the spring. 

The reserved space upon which the street cars run has been 
loamed, with the intention of seeding it to grass ; this work has 
been done by the West End Street Railway Company which has 
also done similar work upon Commonwealth-avenue extension and 
Blue Hill avenue. 

Brighton Avenue, 

This avenue extends from Commonwealth avenue to Union 
square, Allston, a length of .67 of a mile. It is 100 feet wide, 
with a central loamed reservation 25 feet wide, for street cars, two 
roadways, the northerly one 30 feet wide, and the southerly one 
25 feet wide, and two sidewalks, each 10 feet wide. The road- 
ways are built of Telford macadam, with 10-inch base and 6-inch 
cracked stone covering, with block stone gutters, edgestones and 
gravel sidewalks. 

The work was done by Doherty & Connors, with materials 
(except gutter blocks and flagging) furnished by the Street De- 
partment. The surplus excavated material was deposited on 
Commonwealth avenue, near Cottage-Farm bridge. The work 
of building has been completed, with the exception of repairing 
such defects as may develop during the winter. 

Commonwealth-Avenue Extension. 

The extension of Commonwealth avenue to the Newton line 
has been so far completed as to be in use during the winter. 
Some work is yet to be done, and work done late in the season 
will require attention in the spring. The avenue has been in use 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 461 

since September. The work of excavation under Neil McBride's 
contract, let in 1895, was completed early in the year, and large 
quantities of excellent stone for Telford base and for crushing, 
including a quantity of the finest trap rock, was quarried and 
stored on adjoining land, and enough to supply the city's crusher 
was delivered daily at the Chestnut Hill avenue crusher, near by. 
Substantiall}^ enough stone was quarried and saved to build the 
roadways and furnish a foundation for the sidewalks. The work 
of building the avenue was let to John A. Whittemore's Sous, in 
May, 1896. Block stone for gutters was furnished by the Street 
Department, and the contractors hauled the stone previously 
quarried and not required for Telford base to the crusher, and 
drew crushed stone from the stock there as required. The road- 
ways are built with an 8-inch Telford base and 4-inch crushed 
stone surface, block stone gutters, without edgestones, and gravel 
sidewalks, with broken stone foundation. 

The width of the avenue at this section is 120 feet. The 
northerly roadway is 25 feet wide, the southerly roadway 40 feet 
wide, the reserved and loamed space for street cars is 25 feet 
wide, and the two sidewalks are each 15 feet wide. 

The stone arch which marked the entrance to the Chestnut Hill 
Driveway was taken down and stored on the grounds of the Water 
Department by William Miller, at the contract price of $874. 
The face wall on the Water Department front on the avenue was 
rebuilt in its new position at a cost of $1,684.10. The contracts 
of both McBride and Whittemore are not yet settled. 

The construction of this section completes the connection 
between Commonwealth avenue in Boston, and Commonwealth 
avenue in Newton, making a continuous wide avenue extending 
from the Public Garden in Boston to Charles river on the further 
boundary of the city of Newton, a distance of 11.14 miles, 5.59 
miles of this avenue being in Boston, and 5.55 miles in Newton. 

The table showing lengths and areas of paving on accepted 
streets has been brought up to Feb. 1, 1897. 

Street paving has been supervised in all cases where requested. 
All paving laid on the before-mentioned avenues is included in 
the quantities given. All granite paving laid on concrete base 
has been laid with pitch and pebble joints. 

Block stone pavement, on a concrete base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 9,308.9 square yards. 

Block stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 5,752 square yards. 

Block stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with gravel 
joints, 29,046.7 square yards. 

Trinidad sheet asphalt, with a binder course of asphaltic 
cement concrete on an American cement concrete base, 24,782.76 
square yards, at a cost of $2.90 per square yard for large areas, 
and $3 per square yard for small areas, not including the 
preparation of the roadbed. 

Sicilian rock asphalt on an American cement concrete base, 
26,717.2 square yards, at an average cost of about $2.90 per 



462 City Document No. 29. 

square yard for large areas, and $3. per square yard for small 
areas, not including the preparation of the roadbed. 

Edgestones set, 107,833 linear feet; gutter paving laid and 
relaid, 44,823.3 square yards; brick sidewalks laid, 49,314.2 
square yards; gravel sidewalks constructed, 43,888.3 square 
yards; flagging crosswalks laid, 6,044.16 square yards. 

All asphalt paving is laid with a maintenance guarantee for 
five years. 

Acton street, "Washington street to Bradford street, was 
paved with 2}j inches of Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. 
The roadway was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks 
and flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street Department. The 
former surface was macadam, with cobble-stone gutters. One 
new catch-basin was bviilt on Bradford street, and one square 
granite catch-basin frame was removed and a cast-iron D frame 
substituted. 

Batterymarch street, Milk street to Liberty square, was 
paved with 2 inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with l-^-iuch bitu- 
minous concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The old pave- 
ment was removed and the roadway subgraded by the Paving 
Division. Edgestones were reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kelley. Two square granite catch- 
basin frames were removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. 
Former pavement, old granite blocks. 

Beach street, Washington street, across Harrison avenue, 
was paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement 
concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints, including tracks of 
the West End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was 
barred out and loaded, roadway subgraded, concrete base and 
paving laid, the edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks were relaid by J. B. O'Rourke. The Street Department 
furnished teams for carting away old paving blocks and surplus 
material. The West End Street Railway Company, by agree- 
ment, paid for the portion within its tracks. Former pavement, 
old granite blocks. 

Chauncy street. Summer street to Essex street, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints, including the tracks of the 
West End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was 
barred out and loaded, roadways graded, concrete base and 
paving laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross- 
walks relaid by the Metropolitan Construction Company. The 
Street Department furnished teams for carting away old granite 
blocks and surplus material. The West End Street Railway Com- 
pany, by agreement, paid for the portion within its tracks. 
Former pavement, old granite blocks. 

Corning street, ShaAvmut avenue to Washington street, was 
resurfaced with Trinidad lake asphalt by the Barber Asphalt 



Street Department — Engesteering Division. 463 

Paving Company. This work was done by the burning process, 
which consists in heating the old surface of the asphalt, scraping 
off the dead asphalt, and applj^ing a new wearing surface. The 
price paid for this work was $2. per square yard. 

CoJumbus avenue, Massachusetts avenue to Northampton 
street, was paved by the Barber -Asphalt Paving Company with 
2 inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with 1^ inches bituminous 
concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base. 
The roadway was subgraded by J. J. Sullivan ; edgestones were 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by Philip 
Doherty. Former surface was macadam with block gutters. 

Devonshire street, State street to Dock square, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints, including tracks of the West 
End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was removed 
and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. Concrete base 
and paving laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid by J. B. O'Rourke. The West End Street Rail- 
way Compan}^, by agreement, paid for the portion within its 
tracks. At the Dock-square end of the street, about 100 square 
yards were repaved on a gravel base temporarily, so that the 
Boston Transit Commission might readily make certain gas pipe 
connections. Former pavement, old granite blocks on a gravel 
base. 

Hamburg street, Mystic sti^eet to Harrison avenue, was paved 
with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The road- 
way was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid, by the Street Department. Former surface 
was macadam, with cobble gutters. Two square granite catch- 
basin frames were removed, and cast-iron D frames substituted. 

Hanover street, Tileston street to Charter street, and across 
Charter street on the north side, was paved with 2^ inches of 
Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6 -inch American cement concrete base, 
by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old pavement was re- 
moved and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. Edge- 
stones were reset, iDrick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by H. Gore & Co. One square granite catch-basin frame was 
removed and a cast-iron D frame substituted. Former pavement 
was old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

K street. East Sixth street to East Eighth street, not includ- 
ing tracks of the West End Street Railway Company, was paved 
with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The 
roadway was subgraded by the Street Department. Edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore 
& Co. Former surface was macadam with cobble-stone gutters. 
The laying of the concrete base and asphalt surface was super- 
vised by the Street Department. 

Laconia street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, was 



464 City Document No. 29. 

paved with 2 inches of Trinidad Lalte asphalt on li-inch bituminous 
concrete binder, on a 6-incli American cement concrete base, by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. This street was formerly 
a private way, with brick sidewalks on either side, and a park- 
way in the centre with two rows of trees,; the usual cross section 
for a street of this width was modified so as to preserve the best 
of the trees in the northerly row. The roadway was subgraded, 
edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks laid by 
the Street Department. Two new catch-basins were built. 

Lowell street, Causeway street to Brighton street (including 
tracks of the West End Street Railway Company and Union 
Freight Railroad Company) , was paved with large granite blocks 
on a gravel base and bed, with pitch and pebble joints. The old 
pavement was removed and the roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Block paving was laid, edgestones reset, brick side- 
walks and flagging crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kiley & Co. By 
agreement, the West End Street Railway Company and the 
Union Freight Railroad Company paid for the portion within 
their tracks. Three granite catch-basin frames were removed 
and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement, old gran- 
ite blocks on a gravel base. 

Meander street, Maiden street to East Dedham street, was 
paved with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch Ameri- 
can cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company, The 
roadway was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and 
flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street Department. Two square 
granite catch-basin frames were removed and cast-iron D frames 
substituted. Former pavement, cobble stones on gravel base. 

Milk street, Oliver street to India street, was paved with 
large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base. The old pavement was removed and roadway subgraded 
by the Street Department. Concrete base and paving was laid, 
edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by Jones & Meehan. Four square granite catch-basin frames 
were removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pave- 
ment, old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Mystic street, Maiden street to East Brookline street, was 
paved with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. 
The old pavement was removed, roadway subgraded, edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by the 
Paving Division. Four new catch-basins were built. Former 
pavement was 12-inch square granite blocks on gravel base, 
between Maiden and East Canton streets, and macadam between 
East Canton and East Brookline streets. 

North street. Merchants row to Blackstone street, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints. The old pavement was barred 
out and loaded, roaclway subgraded, concrete base and paving 
laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks 



Street Depaetmext — ExGiiSrEERiNG Division. 465 

relaid by tlie Metropolitan Construction Company. The Street 
Department furnislied teams for carting away old blocks and 
surplus excavation. Two granite catch-basin frames were 
removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement, 
old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Norwich street, Mystic street to Meander street, was paved 
with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded, edgestones reset, 
and brick sidewalks relaid by the Street Department. Two 
square granite catch-basin frames were removed and cast-iron D 
frames substituted. Former pavement, cobble stones on gravel 
base. , 

Ohio street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue, was paved 
with 2i inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-iuch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street 
Department. Former pavement, old granite blocks on gravel 
base. 

Pine street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, was paved 
with 2 inches of Trinidad Lake asphalt, with li inches bitumi- 
nous concrete binder on a 6-inch American cement concrete base 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The roadways were 
subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flag'ging cross- 
walks relaid by the Street Department. One new catch-basin 
was built, and one square granite catch basin frame was removed 
and a cast-iron D frame substituted. Former pavement was 
macadam with block gutters. 

St. Martin street. Bunker Hill street to Medford street, is 
about 533 feet long, with a diiference in level between the above- 
named streets of 55 feet ; from Medford street it rises at the rate 
of 14.34 feet per 100 for 170 feet; from this point five flights 
of artificial stone steps and platforms, 61 feet long and rising 
25.8 feet, were built by Simpson Bros., at a cost of $2,811.20. 
Iron hand rails and fences were built by G-. T. McLauthlin & 
Co., at a cost of $310. The excavation was made and founda- 
tions prepared by the Street Department. The portion of the 
street 170 feet from Medford street is to be constructed with a 
macadam roadway, granite block gutters, edgestones and brick 
sidewalks. The work of constructing the street was not very 
far advanced at the end of the working season. 

Taylor street, Dwight street to Milford street, was paved 
with Sicilian rock asphalt on the existing concrete base, by the 
Boston Asphalt Company. Two granite catch-basin frames were 
removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement 
was Trinidad lake asphalt. The laying of the asphalt was super- 
vised by the Street Department. 

Water street. Liberty square to Broad street, was paved 
with 2 inches Trinidad Lake asphalt, with 1^ inches bituminous 



466 City Documbe^t No. 29. 

concrete biBcler, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The old pavement was 
removed and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. 
Edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by D. J. Kiley. Former pavement, old granite blocks on a 
gravel base. 

Winter street, Tremont street to Washington street, was 
paved with special cut granite blocks on a 6 -inch American 
cement concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Concrete base and paving laid, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore & 
Co. Former paveigent, old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

New Streets. 

The following streets were constructed under chapter 323 of 
the Acts of the Legislature of Massachusetts of 1891, and Acts 
in amendment thereof or in addition thereto : — 

Abbotsford street, Walnut avenue to Harold street, is about 
599 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was begun 
June 16, 1896, and completed Aug. 29, 1896, at a total cost 
of $1,864.03. It is a 6-iuch macadam road with gravel side- 
walks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edgestones were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the 
contractors. Flagging for crosswaUis was furnished by the 
contractors. 

Audubon road, Beacon street across Ivy street, is about 315 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to William ScoUans. Work was begun June 
29, 1896, and completed Sept. 10, 1896, at a total cost of 
$5,813.83. This street is 100 feet wide ; it has a 60 foot roadway, 
two brick sidewalks 10 feet wide, and a planting space on either 
side between the sidewalk and roadway. The roadway is Telford 
macadam (8 inches and 4 inches respectively) with granite block 
gutters. Telford stone, crushed stone, edgestone and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor. Bricks, loam and flagging for cross- 
walks were furnished by the contractor. 

Bay State road, Sherborn street to Granby street, is about 
795 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was begun 
May 4, 1896, and completed Sept. 11, 1896, at a cost of 
$3,749.02. It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Cutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the contractor. 

Boylston street extension, Boylston road to Brookline 
avenue, is about 2,070 feet long. The work of filling to sub- 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 467 

grade was Ibegnn in 1894, and completed on April 27, 1895, at a 
cost of $47,819.37. The contractor was John O'Brien. A con- 
tract for constrncting the surface of this street was awarded to 
Neil McBride. Work was begun Oct. 20, 1896, and is still in- 
complete. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones are furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Gutter blocks 
are furnished and delivered on the street by the city. Flagging 
for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. Before the cold 
weather stopped work the contractor had set all the edgestones, 
paved the gutters and placed nearly all the crushed stone. Dur- 
ing the winter, as the weather permitted, he has been hauling in 
gravel to fill out the slopes. 

Clinton street, Fultoa street to Commercial street, is about 
187 feet long. This street was widened 30 feet on the northerly 
side ; it is now 70 feet wide. For taking down a building at the 
corner of Fulton street and removing old area and party walls, 
the sum of $643.05 was paid to A. A. Elston & Co. The old 
pavement was barred out and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. The order for construction required granite block 
paving on a concrete base, with pitch joints, but, as it is intended 
to build part of an outfall sewer in the street, the roadway was 
paved temporarily with granite blocks on a gravel base. The 
granite block paving was laid, edgestones set, brick sidewalks 
and flagging crosswalks relaid by Dennis J. Kiley & Co. 

Fenelon street, Washington street to Merrill street, is about 
324 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Daniel E. Lynch. Work was begun Oct. 
19, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted; 
it is very nearly completed. The street has a 6 -inch macadam 
road, with gravel sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and 
edgestones were furnished by the city, and hauled to the site of 
the work by the contractor. Flagging for crosswalks was fur- 
nished by the contractor. 

Geneva avenue, West\'ille street to Dorchester avenue, is 
about 2,137 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Finneran & O'Hearn. Work was com- 
menced Nov. 13, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather 
permitted. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones are furnished by the city, and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; gutter blocks 
are furnished and delivered on the street by the city ; flagging 
for crosswalks is furnished by the contractor. The street is 
practically finished for a distance of about 600 feet. 

Qranby street. Commonwealth avenue to Charles river, is 
about 439 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson, Work was 
begun May 8, 1896, and completed Sept. 11, 1896, at a cost of 
$2,203.22. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city, and 



468 City Document No. 29. 

hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; gutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the contractor. A 
contract for furnishing and setting a cap stone on the sea wall at 
Charles river was awarded to Trumbull & Eyan ; capstone, 64 
feet long, cost $320.00. Another contract for furnishing and 
erecting an iron fence on the above capstone was awarded George 
T. McLauthlin & Co. for $110.00. 

Greenbrier street, Bowdoin street to Bloomfield street, is 
about 700 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Qaimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun June 16, 1896, and completed Oct. 8, 1896, at a cost of 
$2,797.05. It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; gutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the contractor. 

Josephine street, Geneva avenue to Ditson street, is about 
627 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to J. J. Nawn. Work was begun June 4, 
1896, and completed Oct. 16, 1896, at a cost of $1,888.66. It 
is a 4-inch macadam road. Gravel sidewalks were ordered to 
be built, but on account of a petition from the abutters, a gran- 
olithic sidewalk and edgestone was laid, except in front of two 
lots. Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Gutter 
blocks and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the con- 
tractor 

Lauriat avenue. Blue Hill avenue to Tucker sti-eet, is about 
3,160 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Doherty & Connors ; work was begun 
Oct. 5, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted. 
It is a 6 -inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. Crushed 
stone, gutter blocks and edgestones are furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; flagging for 
crosswalks is furnished by the contractor. This street is practi- 
cally finished for a distance of about 1,950 feet. 

Morse street, Washington street to Bowdoin avenue, is about 
223 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Daniel E. Lynch. Work was begun Oct. 
12, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted ; it 
is nearly completed. This street has a 6-inch macadam road 
with gravel sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edge- 
stones were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by the contractor. 

St. Alphonsus street, Tremont street to Calumet street, is 
about 720 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun June 24, 1896, and completed Oct. 10, 1896, at a cost of 
$3,608.62 It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edgestones were furnished by 



Street Department — Engineering Division. -469 

the city and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; 
flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. The 
above contract includes building about 187 feet of retaining-wall, 
average height about 7.5 feet. 

Wilder street, Washington street to Geneva avenue, is about 
539 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Finneran & O'Hearn. Work was begun 
Oct. 5, 1896, and was practically finished Nov. 28, 1896 ; a small 
amount of work remains to be done to finish the surface of the 
roadway. It is a 6-inch macadam roadway. Gravel sidewalks 
were ordered to be built, but at the request of the owner of 
abutting land they were omitted, so as to allow him to lay gran- 
olithic next season. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edge- 
stones were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Streets were filled to subgrade, by the Metropolitan Construc- 
tion Company, as follows : — 
Norway street, from Massachusetts avenue to Parker street, 

2,541 cubic yards, at 50 cents = $1,270.50. 
Ruggles street, from Parker street to Back Bay Feus, 7,496 

cubic yards, at 65 cents = $4,872.40 
Turner street, from Haviland to Astor streets, 2,380 cubic 

yards, at 50 cents = $1,190.' 
Vancouver street, from Huntington avenue to Ruggles street, 

1,444.6 cubic yards, at 65 cents" = $938.99. 

Peterborough street, Bo^dston road to Audubon road, is 
about 1,833 feet long. A contract for filling this street to sub- 
grade was made with the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, on 
Oct, 30, 1896, at the rate of 51 cents per cubic yard measured 
in the cut. Work was begun under this contract Dec. 2, 1896. 

Grading Street Railway Tracks. 

The grades for tracks in the following streets have been de- 
termined. On streets marked * the surveys were made and levels 
taken by the companies. 

( West End Street Railway.') 

Aiford street, from Maiden Bridge to the Everett line. 

Amory street, Roxbury, from Centre street to the car house. 

Beach street, from Washington street across Harrison ave- 
nue. 

Beacon street, from Massachusetts avenue to Deerfield 
street. 

Blue Hill Avenue, from Washington street to 1,200 feet 
south of Back street. 

Centre street, Roxbury, at Linwood street. 

Centre street, Roxbury, from Columbus-avenue extension to 
near Wise street. 



470 City Docume:n^t No. 29. 

Chauncy street, from Summer street to Essex street. 

* Chestnut Hill avenue, from Commonwealth avenue to 
Sutherland road. 

Columbus avenue, from Massachusetts avenue to Roxbury 
Crossing. 

Columbus avenue, from West Walnut Park to Washington 
street. 

Commonwealth-avenue extension, from Chestnut Hill 
avenue to the Newton line. 

Devonshire street, from State street to Dock square. 

Dorchester avenue, from West First street to West Seventh 
street. 

East Eighth street, from Dorchester street to Mercer street. 

East Sixth street,' from L street to N street. 

Essex street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Hanover street, from Tileston street to Charter street. 

Huntington avenue, from Dartmouth street to the Brookline 
line. 

K street, from East Sixth street to East Eighth street. 

Main street, Charlestown, from City square to Pleasant 
street. 

Main street, Charlestown, from Wood street to School 
street. 

* Market street, Brighton, from Western avenue to Wash- 
ington street. 

* Massachusetts avenue, from Boylston street to Hunting- 
ton avenue. 

* Roxbury street, from Pyuchou street to Eliot square. 
Sumner street, East Boston, from Orleans street to Web- 
ster street. 

Tremont street, from Columbus avenue to Vernon street. 

Tremont street, Brighton, from Oak square to Newton 
line. 

Washington street, from Elm street to Haymarket square, f 

Washington street, Roxbury, from Vernon street to War- 
ren street. 

* Western avenue, from Charles river in Cambridge to 
Market street. 

West Fourth street, at Dorchester avenue. 

( West Roxhicry and Roslindale Street Raihoay Company.^ 

* Beech street, from Centre street to Belgrade avenue. 

* Brandon street, from Amherst street to South street. 

* Centre street, from Beech street to Alaric street. 

* South street, from Brandon street to Washington street. 

* Washington street, from Forest Hill station to the Ded- 
ham line. 

t Survey by tlie Boston Transit Commission. 



Street Department — ENGmEERixG Division. 471 

Total length of single track grades, 29.4 miles. 

Surveys and plans were made for work upon the following 
streets and grades and lines given. The work of construction 
was supervised by the Street Department : — 

Albany street, from Massachusetts avenue toward East Con- 
cord street, was repaved with granite blocks on a gravel base, on 
account of the paving of Massachusetts avenue, between Albany 
street and Swett street, and raising it to the established grade. 
The old paving was barred out and bed prepared by the Street 
Department. The roadway was repaved, edgestones reset, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by Doherty & Connors. 

Arlington street, from Boylston street to Marlborough street, 
was resurfaced with macadam by the Street Department. Gutters 
relaid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks 
relaid by James Grant & Co. 

Ashland street, from Chambers street to Leverett street, was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Granite block paving was laid, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kiley. 
Former pavement was cobble stones. 

City Hall avenue, a footway from School street to Court 
square, was paved with Hastings asphalt blocks on a gravel bed, 
blocks were laid on their broadest faces by H. Gore & Co. The 
old pavement was removed, walk subgraded and bed furnished 
and placed by the Paving Division. Blocks were furnished by 
H. Gore & Co. Former surface was brick on gravel base. 

Commonw^ealth avenue, from Cottage-Farm bridge to 
Warren street. Lines and grades were given and work measured, 
east and west of Cottage-Farm bridge and between Harvard 
avenue and Allston street. 

D street, from West First street to West Third street, was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The roadway 
was subgraded by the Paving Division. Granite block paving 
was laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross- 
walks relaid by H. Gore & Co. Former surface was macadam. 

Dorchester avenue, from West First street to West Sef enth 
street, was repaved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. 
The old pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the 
Street Department. Granite block paving was laid, edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore 
& Co. Former pavement, old granite blocks on granite base. 

East Eighth street, from Dorchester street to Mercer street 
(on southerly side between edgestone and car track), was paved 
with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The old pavement 
was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street Depart- 
ment. Granite block paving was laid by H. Gore & Co. Former 
pavement was old granite blocks on gravel base. 

East Sixth street, from L street to N street, was paved with 
large granite blocks on a gravel base. The roadway was sub- 



472 City Document No. 29. 

graded in part by the Street Department and in part by H. Gore 
& Co. G-ranite block paving was laid, edgestones reset, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore & Co. 
Former surface was macadam with cobble-stone gutters. 

Eustis street, from Hampden street to Magazine street, v/as 
resurfaced with macadam by the Street Department. Cobble- 
stone gutters were relaid, edgestones reset, and brick sidewalks 
relaid (including excavation) by C. E. Barnes. 

Massachusetts avenue, from Albany street to Swett street, 
was paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The I'oad- 
way was subgraded b}'- the Street Department. Granite block 
paving was laid, edgestones set and flagging crosswalks laid by 
Doherty & Connors. Five new catch-basins were built. Former 
surface was macadam. 

Tremont street, from Columbus avenue to Prentiss street 
(on northerly side), was repaved with large granite blocks on a 
gravel base. The old pavement was removed and roadway sub- 
graded by the Street Department. Granite block paving, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks were relaid, and edgestones 
reset by Jones & Meehan. Former pavement was old granite 
blocks on gravel base. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir Archway. Specifications were 
prepared, and a contract made with W. L. Miller for taking down 
this archway. All stones were lettered and numbered, and a plan 
showing such numbering is on file in the office of the City Engi- 
neer. Cost of work was $874. 

Commonwealth=avenue Speedway. A plan and details 
for swing-gates for either end of the speedway was made. 

Commonwealth=avenue ledge. Plans of cross sections of 
ledge, for measurement of stone removed. This stone was used 
in the construction of Brighton avenue, Bay State road, Granby, 
Boylston and other streets ; also plan of ledge showing outlines 
Oct. 1, 1895, and Dec. 5, 1896, and positions of camera when 
photographs of the face of the ledge were taken Dec. 10 and 11, 
1896. 

Boylston street, from Exeter street to Hereford street. Plan 
and estimate for fence. 

Hawthorn gravel bank (Brookline), plan and cross sections 
of bank for gravel xised in filling Columbus-avenue extension and 
Huntingtou-avenue widening, 

Livermore gravel bank (Roxbury), plan and cross sections 
of bank for gravel used in filling Columbus-avenue extension. 

Ruggles street, under bridge of Providence Di%dsion, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. Plans, elevations, sections 
and details of elevated sidewalk. 

Surveys, plans and estimates for improving and paving the 
followino- streets have been made : — 



Street Department — EisraiNEEEmG Division. 473 

Alford street (Cbaiiestown), from Maiden bridge to the 
Everett line. 

Essex street, from Sontli street to Federal street. 

Milk street, from Pearl street to Kilby street. 

Washington street, from Marvin street to Warren street, 

Essex=street bridge. A contract was made Oct. 14, 1896, 
with William S. Rendle for rebuilding the upper part of this 
bridge and doing other work in connection therewith. The 
total cost of the work was 17,038.95. 

Meridian=street bridge. Specifications were made for re- 
building the trusses of the draw, and a contract for doing the 
work was made April 11 with W. H. Ellis & Co.; the timber 
used in the trusses was furnished by the city. The cost of tlie 
contract work was $2,025.96. 

Winthrop bridge. The sidewalk and sidewalk bulkhead 
were rebuilt for about three-quarters of their length, and repairs 
were made to ten bents of piles; the work was done by J. N. 
Hayes & Co., and was completed March 10, 1896, at a cost for 
contract work of $1,519.92. 

liuntington=avenue bridge. (Over Boston & Albany 
R.R.) During the past year the flooring of the bridge has been 
entirely rebuilt and made to conform to the new grade; parapets 
were raised and new asphalt sidewalks built. The old girder on 
the centre line of the westerly sidewalk was moved to the 
easterly sidewalk and two new plate girders put in under the 
westerly sidewalk. This change was made necessary because of 
the new 42-inch water-pipe which was carried across the bridge 
on the westerly side. The girders were built by the Boston 
Bridge Works under a contract dated ISTov. 9, 1895, and the 
work of moving the old girder was done by the same company ; 
the total cost being $2,646.99. The contract for the woodwork 
and for the changes in stonework was made with W. L. Miller, 
dated April 11, 1896, and amounted to $3,097.28. The side- 
walks were built by the Boston Asphalt Company, at a cost of 
$635.25. The cleaning and painting of the girders was done 
by the Bridge Division of the Street Department. 

Cottage=Farm bridge. During the early part of the year the 
northerly roadway was completed; the 20-inch steel beams being 
placed in position by A. C. Richmond ; the bricks, the skewbacks 
and concrete being furnished by the city, and put in place by the 
Metropolitan Construction Co. A Sicilian rock asphalt wear- 
ing surface was put on the roadway by the Boston Asphalt Co. 

On the completion of the northerly roadway travel was 
turned on that side of the bridge July 9, and the old wooden 
bridge and the two iron girders supporting the water and gas 
pipes were removed. 

ISTew parapets and bearing blocks were furnished by the Cape 
Ann Granite Co., and set in position on the old bridge seats on 
the southerly section of the bridge. 

Slight extensions were made to the easterly end of the north 



474 City Document No. 29. 

abutment and middle pier, the work being done by A. C. Rich- 
mond. 

The 20inch steel beams were furnished by Page, Newell & 
Co., and placed in position by A. C. Richmond. The lead cover- 
ings for the steel beams were furnished by E. B. Badger & Sons. 
The bricks, skewbacks and concrete arches between the beams 
were set by the Metropolitan Construction Co., the materials being 
furnished by the city. The asphalt surface was put on by the 
Boston Asphalt Co. 

The two iron girders on the easterly side of the bridge, and the 
sidewalk floor beams connected to them were furnished in place 
by the Boston Bridge Works. 

Granolithic sidewalks were laid on this section of the bridge 
by Simpson Brothers, of Boston. 

A central way between the car tracks, ISi feet wide and 5 
inches above the roadway was built, upon which are j)laced two 
gaspipes and one waterpipe. 

Travel was turned over this part of the bridge late in the fall 
and the bridge is practically completed with the exception of the 
sidewalk on the northerly section, and the placing of fence rails 
on the main girders. 

East Boston Ferries. 

A report was made Aug. 5, 1896, on the condition of the slips, 
drops and tanks of the East Boston Ferries. 

South Ferry, Boston side. Plans and specifi3ations were 
made for repairing the outer end of the middle pier, and the 
work was done by W. H. Ellis & Co., under contract dated Oct. 
8, 1896, at a cost of $1,802.15. 

New drops. A contract was made Sept. 16, 1896, with 
William McKie, to build three new drops to replace three old 
ones ; the old drops to be the property of the contractor, the 
tanks and machinery to remain the property of the city. The 
contract price was $14,718; they were placed at the northerly 
landing of the North Ferry, East Boston side ; at the northerly 
landing of the South Ferry, Boston side, and at the southerly 
landing of the North Ferry, Boston side. These drops were 
respectively put in use at the following dates : November 23, 
Dec. 7, 1896, and Jan. 26, 1897. 

New tanks. Two new tanks were built by J. M. Brooks, 
and were used under the new drops at the East Boston landing 
of the North ferry, and at the Boston landing of the South ferry. 
The contract price was $8,500. 

Awning at the North Ferry, East Boston. Plans and 
specifications were made for an awning over the sidewalk in 
front of the head-house at the North Feriy, East Boston ; the 
work was done by W. H. Ellis & Co., at a cost for contract 
work of $698.64. 

Yours respectfully, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



Steeet Department — Smoke Inspectiok. 475 



APPENDIX I. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR. 



28 Court Square, Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 
Benj. W. Wells, Esq., Superintendent of Streets : 

SiE : I herewith submit a report for the year ending Jan. 
31, 1897, of the work done under chapter .389, Acts of 1895, 
entitled, "An Act to Abate the Smoke ISTuisance in the city of 
Boston." 

This law has been in operation since July, 1895, and those 
who have not followed the matter closely are not aware of the 
progress which has been made by its enforcement. Reforms 
have been accomplished, particularly in the business section, not 
alone by the adoption of smoke devices, but by a more care- 
ful method of stoking, and in some cases a change of fuel. 

If smoke could be abated only by entailing an added expense, 
it would no doubt be found difficut to enforce the law ; but a de- 
vice used for the suppression of smoke, not only abates the 
smoke nuisance, but invariably shows an absolute economy of 
fuel, as it promotes combustion, and prevents before they can 
be utilized the escape of valuable gases for heating purposes to 
produce steam. 

Following the passage of this law in 1895, a large number of 
owners or representatives of boiler plants who were likely to 
become amenable to the law, were waited upon and informed that 
this department intended to strictly enforce the regulations 
authorized by its provisions. The enactment clause of the law 
relating to the emission of smoke for more than five minutes 
being particulai-ly called to their attention. 

The observers, of which there are two, were instructed to keep 
a close watch, particularly in the business section, and to take 
short observations of 1, 2 and 3 firings. The necessity for a 
constant watch in the business section may be accounted for by 
the fact, that even the emission of a small quantity of smoke, 
due to various causes, destroys, for the time-being, valuable prop- 
erty. 

When a chimney was found emitting an unwarranted amount 
of smoke the owner's attention was at once called to it, and im- 
mediate action suggested. 

Some of these required time and patience, particularly where 
devices were attached, owing to the delays occasioned in the 



476 City Docujnient No. 29. 

selection of a proper smoke preventer. Generally we have found 
a disposition to abate the existing evil. 

These short observations have been taken by the observers as 
they go over the several districts from day to day, and serve to 
keep the office informed of the condition of the various plants 
throughout the city. 

Other observations have been made at the request of boiler- 
plant owners, who, having equipped their plant with a smoke 
consuming device, desired the city to inform them if the same 
was acceptable and complying with the law. These latter obser- 
vations, lasting from eight to nine hours, with reports, are on file. 

When a request for inspection is received from a boiler-plant 
owner, arrangements are made to take two observations, aver- 
aging from eight to nine hours, so as to cover the actual working 
time of the boilers. 

The first observation is taken without the knowledge of any 
one connected with the plant, to show the results when the 
plant is being run under every day conditions. Another obser- 
vation is later taken, the owners being previously notified ; this 
affords them an opportunity to be exceedingly careful in their 
stoking and manipulation of the device. 

It would seem that with a knowledge of the fact that the 
chimney is being watched, and with the stoker using his best 
efforts to show the best possible results, that this would obtain 
in this latter set of observations; but it is frequently the case, 
that the observation, taken without their knowledge, shows the 
better results. 

These observations show the interval in minutes and seconds 
of the various grades of smoke; also the interval of clear stack. 
This is followed by a summary, showing the total time of the 
observation, total time of the various grades of smoke and also 
the percentage. A report accompanies these observations show- 
ing the number of boilers connected with the plant, the amount 
and nature of the work exacted from the same, the coal con- 
sumption, etc., to complete which takes from five to seven days. 

A better idea may be obtained from the table herewith given. 
This shows an observation taken without the knowledge of any 
one connected with the plant, the boilers being equipped with a 
smoke preventer. A summary is also given of the observation 
taken with their knowledge on the same plant. 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 477 





Smoke. 


^i 




Time 


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go 


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a 


6 




8.05.00 






8.05.30 


.30 


8.05.50 


.20 


8.05.50 


.30 


8.06.20 


8.06.25' 


" " '.05 


8.07.00 


.35 


8.07.40 


.40 






8.07.40 


8.08.00 


,20 


8.08.20 


.20 


8.08.50 


.30 


8.0S..50 


4.40 


8.13.30 


8.13.40 


.10 


8.13..55 


.15 


8 14.40 


.45 


8.14.40 


22.00 


8.36.40 






8.37.30 


.50 










8.37.30 


8.37.40' 


'"".16 


8.38.10 


.30 


8.39.00 


.50 


8.39.00 


9.00 


8.48.00 










8.48.30 


.30 


8.48.30 


6.40 


8.55.10 






'"8.5'5'.i50 


"".40 


8.56.00 


.10 


8.56.00 


4.30 


9.00.30 






9.01.10 


.40 


9.01.30 


.20 


9.01..30 


3.00 


9.04.30 


9.04.56' 


""".26' 


9.05.20 


.30 


9.05.40 


.20 


9.05.40 


17.20 


9.23.00 










9.23.40 


.40 


9.23.40 


19.20 


9.43.00 






'9.43.36' 


" .36 


9.43.40 


.10 


9.43.40 


.20 


9,44.00 










9.44.20 
9.45.30 


.20 
.20 


9.44.20 
9.45.30 


.20 


9.44.40 






"'9.4'5'.i6' 


""'.30 


.30 


9.46.00 






9.46.10 


.10 


9.46.20 


.10 


9.46.20 


4.10 


9.50.30 










9.51.10 
9.53.30 


.40 
.10 


9.51.10 
9.53.30 


1.50 


9.53.00 






'9.5'3'.26' 


""'.26' 


5.10 


9.58.40 


9.58.50 


""'.16' 


9.59.20 


.30 


9..59.30 


.10 


9..59.30 


6.40 


10.06.10 


10.06.20 


.10 


10.07.10 


.50 


10.07.30 


.20 


10.07.3J 


18.30 


10.26.00 






10.27.00 


1.00 


10.27.30 


.30 


10.27.30 


1.30 


10.29.00 










10.29.10 


.10 


10.29.10 


2.30 


10.31.40.. .. 






' 'l'6.3'2'.o6' 


" " '.26' 


10.38.20 


.20 


10.38.20 


5.00 


10.37.20 


' 16.37.36' 


""'.16' 


10.38.00 


.30 


10.38.20 


.20 


10.38.20 


1.20 


10.39.40 






10.40.00 


.20 


10.40.30 


.30 


10.40.30 


3.50 


10.44.20 






10.44.40 


.20 


10.44.50 


.10 


10.44.50 


3.40 


10.48.30 






10.49.00 


.30 


10.49.10 


.10 


10.49.10 


3.50 


10.53.00.. 






10. .53. 30 
10..55.40 


.30 

.20 


10.53.50 
10.56.00 


.20 
.20 


10.53.50 
10.56.00 


1 20 


10.55.10.... 


' 'l6.55'.26' 


""'.16' 


16;20 


11.12.20 






11.12.40 


.20 


11.12.50 


.10 


11.12.50 


5.40 


11.18.30 










11.18.50 


.20 


11.18..50 


1.40 


11.20..30.. 






"il'.'2'o'.56' 
11 ..30.10 


""'.26' 

.20 


11.21.10 
11.30.20 


.20 
.10 


11.21.10 

11.30.20 


8.20 


11.29.30 


' ii^id-ho 


" " .26' 


1.50 


11.32.10 


11.32.20 


.10 


11.32.30 


.10 


11.32.50 


.20 


11.32.50 


15.10 


11.48.00 


11.48.20 


.20 


11.48.40 


.20 


11.49.30 


.50 


11.49.30 


4.30 


11.54.00 






11.54.20 


.20 










11..54.20.. 


' 'Hm.bo 

11.55.40 
12.00.30 


' ' ' '.16' 
.20 
.10 






11.54.50 
11.56.00 
12.01.00 


.20 
.20 
.10 


11.54.50 
11.56.00 
12.01.00 


.30 


11.55.20.. 






4.20 


12.00.20.... 


' 'i2'.'ob'.56' 


" " '.26' 


17.80 


12.18.30 






12.18 50 


.20 


12.19.20 


.30 


12.19.20 


.40 


12.20.00... 


' 'l2.'2'o'.i6' 


"'.i6' 


12.20.30 


.20 


12.21.00 


.30 


12.21.00 


3.50 


12.24.50... . 


12,25.10 


.20 


12.25.30 


.20 


12.26.00 


.30 


12.26.00 


. 5.30 


12.31.30 






12..32.10 


.40 


12.32.45 


.35 


12.32.45 


.30 


12..33.15.. 






12.34.00 
12.34.30 


.45 
.10 


12.34.20 
12.35.00 


.20 
.30 


12.35.00 




12.,34.20...;;' 






.10 


12.,3o.l0 


'i2.'3'5'.26' 


""'.16' 


12.35.40 


.20 


12.36.00 


.20 


12.36.00 


.55 


12.36.55.... 


12.37.05 


.10 


12.37.15 


.10 


12.37.20 


.05 


12.37.20 


2.20 


12.39.40... .' 


12.40.00 


.20 


12.40.20 


.20 


12.40.30 


.10 


12.40.30 


2.00 


12.42 ..30.. 


12.43.00 


.30 


12.44.00 


1.00 


12.44.10 


.10 


12.44.10 


.55 


12.45.05.. 


12.45.15 


.10 


12.45.20 


.05 


12.45.35 


.15 


12.45.35 


2.55 


12.48.30.. .. 






12.49.00 


.30 


12.49.15 


.15 


12.49.15 


1.15 


12.50.30.. 


12.50.45 


""'.ih' 


12.51.00 


.15 


12.51.10 


.10 


12.51.10 


.35 


12.51.4.5..'; 


12.52.20 


.35 


12.52.30 


.10 


12.52.40 


.10 


12.52.40 


1.05 


12.53.45 


12.54.10 


.25 


12.54.20 


.10 


12.54.25 


.05 


12..54.25 


15.85 


1.10.00 


1.10.20 


.20 


1.10.30 


.10 


1.10.40 


.10 


1.10.40 


1.50 


1.12..30 


1.12.45 


.15 


1.13.10 


.25 


1.13.20 


.10 


1.13.20 


.40 


1.14.00 


1.14.20 


.20 


1.15.00 


.40 


1.15.15 


.15 


1.15.15 


6.05 


1.21.20 






1.21.30 


.10 


1.22.00 


.30 


1.22.00 


8.05 


1.30.05 


'l.'3'o'.5.V 


" " '.56' 


1.32.00 


1.05 


1..32.30 


.30 


1.32.30 


.15 


1.32.45 






1.33.30 


.45 


1.33.45 


.15 


1.33.45 


7.40 


1.41.25 






1.41.50 


.25 


1.42.30 


.40 


1.42.30 


2.30 


1.45.00 






1.45.30 


.30 


1.46.00 


.30 


1.46.00 


2.30 


1.48.30 






1.49.10 


.40 


1.49.30 


.20 


1.49.30 


1.00 


1.50.30 


'1.51.26' 


"'.50 


1.52.20 


1.00 


1.53.00 


.40 


1.53.00 


1.80 


1.54.30 






1.55.00 


.30 


1.55.15 


.15 






1.55.15 


1.55M 


"".3.5' 


1..56.45 


.55 


1.57.00 


.15 


1.57.00 


4.55 


2.01.55 


2.02.10 


.15 


2.02.40 


.30 


2.03.00 


.20 


2.03.00 


5.15 


2.08.15 






2.08.45 


.30 


2.09.00 


.15 


2.09.00 


1.10 


2.10.10 


'i'lo'.ss' 


"'.45' 


2.11.20 


.25 


2.11.45 


.25 


2.11.45 


9.35 


2.21.20 






2.21.35 


.15 


2.22.00 


.25 


2.22.00 


1.45 



478 



City Document No. 29. 





Smoke. 


4 




Time 










^ 






OF 


rt 








r^ 




00 




Firing. 


'BO 


7i 




> 


3 




rt 

> 




^a 


'^ 


S 




>> 


'Q 


u 


s 




















Q^ 


a 


5 


a 
I— I 


> 


a 


3 


a 


2.23.45 






2.24.10 


.25 


2.24.20 


.10 


2.24.20 


3.10 


2.27.30 






2.28.20 


.50 


2.28.30 


.10 


2.28.30 


2 35 


2.31.05 


2.31.10 


.05 


2.31.20 


.10 


2.32.00 


.40 


2.32.00 


13.20 


2.45.20 










2.46.10 
2.46.45 


.50 
.05 


2.46.10 

2.46.45 


.10 


2 46.20 


2.46.25 


.05 


2.46.40 


.15 


9.25 


2.56.10 


2.46..50 


.40 


2.57.10 


.20 


2..57.20 


.10 


2..57.20 


.50 


2.58.10 






2.58.40 


.30 


2.59.10 


.30 






2..59.10 


2.59.25 


.15 


2.59.35 


.10 


2.59.45 


.10 


2.,'i9.45 


1.45 


3 01 30 






3.01.40 
3.05.20 


.10 
.25 


3.02.00 
3.05.30 


.20 
.10 


3.02.00 
3.05.30 


2.50 


3.04.50 


3.04.55 


.05 


8.30 


3.14.00 






3.14.30 


.30 










3.14.30 


3.14.45 


.15 


3.14.50 


.05 


3.15.00 


.10 


3.15.00 


1.05 


3.16.05 






3.16.30 


.25 


3.16.40 


.10 


3.16.40 


5.50 


3.22.30 






3.22.50 


.20 


3.23.10 


.20 


3.23.10 


.30 


3.23.40 


3.23..50 


.10 


3.24.00 


.10 


3.24.10 


.10 


3.24.10 


.20 


3.24.30 


3.25.00 


.30 


3.25.10 


.10 










3.25.10 


8.26.15 


1.05 


3.26.30 


.15 


3.26.45 


.15 


3.26.45 


2.40 


3.29.25 


3.29.40 


.15 


3.29.55 


.15 


3.30.10 


.15 


3.30.10 


2.40 


3.32.50 


3.33.00 


.10 


3.33.10 


.10 


3. .33. 30 


.20 


3.33.30 


2.40 


3.36.10 






3.36.40 


. .30 


3.36.50 


.10 


3.36.50 


3.10 


3.40.00 


3.40.10 


.10 


3.40.30 


.20 


3.40.45 


.15 


3.40.45 


2.15 


3.43.00 


3.43.10 


.10 


3.43.20 


.10 


3.43.30 


.10 


3.43.30 


10.50 


3.54.20 






3..55.00 


.40 


3.55.15 


.15 


3..55.15 


8.15 


4.03.30 


4.03.40 


.10 


4.03.45 


.05 


4.03.50 


.05 


4.03.50 


14.20 


4.18.10 






4.18..55 


.45 


4.19.10 


.15 


4.19.10 


5.20 


4.24.30 






4.25.10 


.40 


4.25..50 


.40 


4.25.50 


3.30 


4.29.20 


4.29.25 


.05 


4.29.40 


.15 


4.29.50 


.10 


4.29.50 


4.15 


4.34.05 






4.34.20 


.15 










4..34.20 


4.34.35 


.15 


4.34.45 


.10 


4.35.10 


.25 


4..35.10 


1.45 


4.36.55 


4.37.20 


.25 


4. .37. 45 


.25 


4.38.10 


. .25 


4.38.10 


.20 


4.38.30 


4.39.05 


.35 


4.39.30 


.25 


4.39.45 


.15 


4.39.45 


2.35 


4.42.20 




15.55 


4.42.45 


.25 


4.43.10 


.25 
32.10 


4.43.10 






38.50 


7.11.15 



Sumjnary. 





Dark or Thick 
Gray. 


Light. 


Very Light. 


Clear. 


Time 


m. s. 

15 55 

3.1 


m. s. 

38 50 

7.5 


m. s. 

32 10 

6.2 


h. m. s. 
7 11 15 




83.2 







Total time of observation 

" time of smoke 

" smoke .... 

Dark or thick gray smoke . 
Total number of firings, etc. 
Average time between each firing 



H. M. s. 
8 38 10 
1 26 55 
16.8 per cent 

3.1 « 
101 

5 minutes. 



Street DEPAET]\rENT — Smoke Inspectio2^. 479 
/Summary of Observation taken ivith their Knowledye. 



Time 

Per cent . 



Dark or Thick 
Gray. 



m. 8. 

20 55 

4.0 



Light. 



m. s. 

47 15 

9.1 



Very Light. 



m. s. 

38 50 

7.5 



Clear. 



h. m. s. 
6 51 50 
79.4 



H, 



Total time of observation 

" time of smoke 

" smoke 
Dark or thick gray smoke 
Total number of firings, etc. 
Average time between each firing 



M. s. 

8 38 50 

1 47 

20.6 per cent. 

4. " 

135 

4 minutes. 



I had, during the past two years, occasion to call and see the 
owners or managers of a large number of boiler plants through- 
out the city, and while it may seem strange, yet it is a fact, that 
quite a large number know little or nothing concerning their 
boiler plant, dejsending almost entirely on their engineer; and 
the engineer seeing the necessity for a change which would be 
beneficial, makes recommendations which are immediately set 
aside, if involving any expense. 

When owners of steam plants fully realize that the maintain- 
ing of a smoke nuisance entails an actual money loss, then, and 
only then, will suggestions from those in charge be considered. 

There are a number of boiler plants in this city where the 
boilers at times are being worked far beyond their rated 
caj^acity, and emitting smoke to the detriment of their neigh- 
bors. These parties do little, if any, damage to their own 
property, but the smoke and soot are entering the doors and 
windows of neighbors, destroying goods, the value of which 
would aggregate many thousands of dollars. 

While these plants are not flagrantly violating the law, and 
the department has frequently called their attention to the neces- 
sity of a change, and as their neighbors refuse to complain, the 
owner as a rule is unwilling to go to any expense, especially if 
he sees a chimney near by, that in his judgment smokes worse. 

The engineer is well aware of these conditions, but finds 
himself handicapped, on account of refusal of owner to properly 
equip the plant. 

When a recommendation is received from an engineer to 
equip a plant with a device such as will increase the boiler 
capacity, the first cost is in most cases considered excessive ; but 
i£ owners would only estimate the financial returns, aside from 
the knowledge, that as public- spirited citizens each had done his 



480 City Document No. 29. 

share, not alone towards complying with the law, but also 
towards reducing his smoke emission to a minimum, better 
general results would follow in the ready adoption of it. 

Cases have been found where the smoke nuisance is due to bad 
or careless stoking ; it is essential therefore, that the best class 
of stokers be employed, as a poor fireman will be found not only 
dangerous, but also very expensive. 

Up to the present time it has been the established policy of 
this ofRce not to recommend devices. At the same time, the 
owners of plants are entitled to our advice and experience to 
protect themselves against the adoption of worthless devices. 
For this reason the endeavor is made to keep informed in regard 
to all devices, not alone as to temporary results so far as smoke 
is concerned, but also as to the permanency of the same. 

In the selection of a smoke preventer, the conditions of the 
plant to be equipped and the type of boiler to be used, must be 
carefully considered, and any capable engineer can solve the 
problem after an examination of the various types, a list of 
which is readily furnished on application, and the advice given 
to examine those in operation first of all. In general, each one 
must decide what his peculiar local conditions call for. 

Among those who have equipped their plant with smoke pre- 
venters during the past year may be mentioned the following: — 

Boston " Herald," Washington street. 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington street. 

Shepard, Norwell & Co., Winter street. 

Hathaway Building, Atlantic avenue. 

Carter Building, Water street. 

New England Building, Summer street. 

Church Green Electric Lighting Co., Sullivan place. 

C. A. Millen Co., Charlestown street. 

The New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad have adopted 
the use of smokeless coal at the repair shops at the foot of Sars- 
field street, and also at their steam-heating plants on Rogers 
avenue. Several smaller plants have adopted the use of hard coal, 
while many others are using a mixture of screenings with soft 
coal, all with good results. 

Coal Iiipoetatiosis. 

Some attention has been given to the grades of coal commonly 
in use, and, as it seemed to be doubtful if sulphurous mines 
could be safely utilized in the city limits, some inquiry was made 
as to how far Dominion coal was being adopted. 

The following table shows the number of tons and value of 
importations of Nova Scotia coal recorded at the port of Boston 
for the year ending Jan. 31, 1897, the main portion of which is 
used outside the city limits : — 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 481 



Month. 



Tons. 



Value. 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . . 

October 

November . . . . 

December 

January, 1897. 

Total- 



1,670 

2,126 
2,800 
4,333 
1,1S8 
7,877 

10,841 
8,066 

10,793 
2,064 
4,890 



$3,006 

3,827 

5,040 

7,779 

2,138 

14,181 

19,514 

13,105 

17,090 

3,092 

8,519 



56,648 



&97,311 



Boiler Applications. 

With a view of providing against future smoke nuisances the 
department found it necessary to insist that all new boilers 
erected in the city be properly equipped, if soft coal was to 
be used. This was done with the co-operation of the building 
department, and during the past year .331 applications have been 
received and disposed of as follows : — 



Hot- water heaters, furnaces, etc. 

Signed to use hard coal . 

Adopted smoke devices . 

Screenings and soft coal mixed 

Applications withdrawn 

Oil engines . 

Gas engine 

Engine . 

Board of Appeal 

Duplicate 

Unsigned 



245 
35 
31 
9 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Total 



381 



482 City Document No. 29. 

In order that parties signing to use hard coal may be made to 
live up to their agreement, frequent visits to the plants are 
made, as a few cases have been found violating the same. 

Plants equipped with devices are also visited with a view of 
seeing that the same are properly manipulated and not shut off, 
as all devices are more or less at the mercy of the stoker. 



Special Reports. 

The following special repoi'ts have been made from time to 
time : — 

February 6. Report with observations on plant of the F. L. 
Ames estate, corner Lincoln and Tufts streets. 

February 21. Report on complaint against the Bogart Steam 
Laundry, 205 Florence street, Roslindale. 

March 27. Report with observations on plant of Jordan, 
Marsh & Co., Avon street. 

April 14. Report on complaint against Houghton & Dutton, 
Tremont street. 

April 21. Report with observations on plant of Mr. G. D. 
Hill, 13 Randolph street. 

May 4. Report with observations on plant of Shepard, Nor- 
well & Co., Winter street. 

May 4. Report of complaint against house chimney attached 
to L of estate, 22 Kingston street, Charlestown. 

June 19. Report with observations on plant of the Boston 
" Herald," Williams court. 

June 22. Report on complaint against Messrs. Krey & Co., 
11 Province court. 

July 3. Report on complaint against Minot estate, 113 Dev- 
onshire street. 

August 3. Report on complaint against Merello's bakery, 
1260 Washington street. 

August 6. Report on complaint against Monks' estate, 35 
Congress street. 

August 12. Report on complaint against Fox's bakery, corner 
Edgeworth and Ferrin streets, Charlestown. 

September 4. Report on complaint against Alfred Mudge & 
Son, 24 Franklin street. 

September 22. Report on complaint against Roessle and 
Pfaff's breweries, Pynchon street. 

October 1. Report with observations on plant of the Charles 
A. Millen Company, 28 Beverly street. 

October 6. Report with observations on plant of the Hatha- 
way building, G20 Atlantic avenue. 

October 8. Report on complaint against the Church Green 
Electric Lighting Company, Sullivan place. 

October 22. Report with observations on the New England 
building, 180 Summer street. 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 483 

November 5. Report on complaint against the Homceopathic 
Hospital, Albany street. 

November 10. Report on complaint against the repair shop 
of the N. Y., N. II. & H. R.R., foot of Sarsfield street. 

November 18. Report with observations on plant of Swain, 
Earle & Co., 67 Commercial street. 

November 23. Report on complaint against the Minot estate, 
J. S. Pushee & Sons, lessees, 9-13 Randolph street. 

November 24. Report with observations on plant of the 
Church Green Electric Lighting Company, Sullivan place. 

December 7. Report with observations on plant of the Star 
brewery, Shirley street. 

December 17. Report on complaint against Osgood & Hart, 
Sherman square, Charlestown. 

Summary. 

The following is a brief summary of the work for the year 
ending Jan. 31, 1897 : — 

Number of boiler permits acted upon .... 331 

Number agreeing to burn hard coal .... 280 

Number adopting smoke devices . . . . . 31 

Number of short observations taken .... 285 

Number of observations lasting from 5 to 9 hours . 44 

Number of special reports made . , . . . . 26 

General Summary. 

It would be somewhat difficult to indicate by statistics, how- 
ever carefully gathered, the extent of the work done by this 
office since its organization in August, 1893, but the following 
figures are given as possessing public interest : — 



Number of boiler plants inspected 

Number found equipped with smoke devices . 

Number since equipped ...... 

Number of short observations taken 

Number of observations lasting from 5 to 9 hours 

Number of new boiler permits acted upon 

Number agreeing to burn hard coal 

Number of new boilers equipped with smoke devices 



325 

16 

59 

601 

108 

549 

449 

62 



In addition to the above, a large number of plants are burn- 
ing hard coal screenings mixed with soft coal, and some to avoid 
any further trouble preferred to burn hard coal entirely. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Kelley, 

Chief Inspector, 



484 



City Document No. 29. 



APPENDIX J. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 1886, under charge of City Engineer. 



Bartholomew M. Young 
James H. Nugent 



1886 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Bridge Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 


For 


Pub. 


No. of 




Year. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Annual Report 


1886 


1887 


29 


i( 11. 


1887 


1888 


26 


U tl 


1888 


1889 


29 


ii il 


1889 


1890 


22 


U ii 


1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in Annual Keport, Executive Department, Part I., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 


Year. 


Enoch Patterson, Supt. 


Streets and Drains .... 


1827 to 1831 


Zephaniah Sampson, " 


u u u 








1831 to 1846 


Thomas Hunting, Superintendent 








1846 to 1853 


Alfred T. Turner, 














1853 to 1864 


Charles Harris, 














1864 to 1883 


Nehemiah T. Merritt, 














1883 


James J. Flynn, 














1883 


Charles Harris, 














1884 


Michael Meehan, 














1884 to 1886 


John W. McDonald, 














1886 to 1889 


J. Edwin Jones, 














1889 to 1891 



Street Department. 



485 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 

Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Quarterly Report 




1851 


6 


i( ii 














1851 


29 


Annual Report . 












1851 


1852 


2 


















1852 


1853 


6 


















1853 


1854 


6 


















1854 


1855 


5 


















1855 


1856 


3 


















1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 


1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 


3 
3 
5 
6 

5 
4 
3 
3 

7 


















1865 
1866 
1867 


1866 
1867 ■ 
1868 


3 
6 
9 


















1868 


1869 


14 


















1869 

1870 


1870 
1871 


13 

12 


















1871 


1872 


16 


















1872 


1873 


21 


















1873 
1874 


1874 
1875 


25 

27 


















1875 
1876 


1876 
1877 


80 

38 


















1877 


1878 


29 


















1878 


1879 


24 


















1879 


1880 


24 


















1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 


1881 

1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 


48 
51 
47 
46 
97 
30 
16 


















1887 
1888 
1889 


1888 
1889 
1890 


23 
30 
19 


















1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



486 



City Document No. 29. 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name. 


Year. 


Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 
Zephaniah Sampson " 
Charles B. Wells 
Simeon B. Smith " 
William H. Bradley " 
Horace A. Moses " 
Thomas J. Young " 
Seth Perkins '" 
Charles Morton " 










1827 to 1831 
1831 to 18.37 
1837 to 1856 
18.56 to 1863 
1863 to 1883 
1883 to 1885 
1885 to 1887 
1887 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Sewer Department before 1891. 







Piib. 


No. 


Name of Document. 


For 1 ear. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Annual Report ...... 


1859 


1861 


11 




i u 














1860 


1861 


12 


















1861 


1862 


12 


















1862 


1863 


13 


















1863 


1864 


11 


















1864 


1865 


5 


















1865 


1866 


6 


















1866 


1867 


8 


















1867 


1868 


13 


















1868 


1869 


11 


















1869 


1870 


3 


















1870 


1871 


11 


















1871 


1872 


10 


















1872 


1873 


13 


















1873 


1874 


12 


















1874 


1875 


17 


















1875 


1876 


11 


















1876 


1877 


13 


















1877 


1878 


15 


















1878 


1879 


11 


















1879 


1880 


16 


















1880 


1881 


19 


















1881 


1882 


18 


















1882 


1883 


16 


















1883 


1884 \ 


43 


















1884 


1885/ 


















1885 


1886 


58 


















1886 


1887 


69 


















1887 


1888 


81 


















1888 


1889 


129 


















1889 


1890 


14 


















1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Depabtmekt. 



487 



Health Department before 1891. 

SanitarT/. 



Year. 



Ezra ForrisLall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 
Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall, " 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
1869 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 







Pub. 


No. of 


Name of Document. 


"i ear. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Annual Eeport 


1853 


1854 


7 


U I 
















1854 


1855 


6 


(( 1 
















1855 
1856 


1856 

1857 


4 
4 


(1 1 
















1857 


1858 


4 


(1 1 
















1858 


1859 


4 


1( < 
















1859 
1860 


1860 
1861 


5 
6 


















1861 

186^ 


1862 
1863 


5 ■ 
5 


1( c 
















3863 


1864 


4 


H 4 
















1864 
1865 


1865 
1866 


4 
8 


" ' 
















1866 
1867 


1867 
1868 


7 
8 


U 1 
















1868 
1869 


1869 
1870 


12 

4 


U i 
















1870 


1871 


10 


U 1 
















1871 
1872 


1872 
1873 


17 
40 


Annual Repot from 1873 to 1884, inclu- 








sive; the Superintendent's report was 








embodied in the Eeport of the Board of 








Health 


1885 


1886 


45 


Annual Report 

u " 
a (1 










1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 


1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


22 
16 
23 
21 


11 (( 










1890 


1891 


« 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



488 



City Document No. 29. 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891, 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point. ) 



TSame. 



Yeak. 



Frederick W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston 
Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge . 
William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge 



May 22, 1R71, to 
March, 1891. 

June 14, 1871, to 
Jan. 31, 1883. 

March 28, 1883, to 
present time. 



Note.— Harvard Bridge added in 1892. 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal, and Prison Point.) 



Name of Document. 


For 


Pub. 


No. of 




Year. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Annual Repoit 


1871 


1872 


19 
















1872 


1873 


12 
















1873 


1874 


16 
















1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 


1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 


23 
20 
12 
10 

8 
















1879 


1880 


12 
















1880 


1881 


8 
















1881 


1882 


15 
















1882 


1883 


15 
















1883 
1884 


1884 

1885 


19 

8 
















1885 
1886 


1886 

1887 


12 
19 
















1887 
1888 


1888 
1889 


25 

22 
















1889 


1890 


20 
















1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in Annual Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name. 


Year. 


Board of Ferry Directors .... 
William J. Burke, Superintendent . 
Thomas Kellough " . . 


1870 

1891 

May 1, 1895. 


1891 
May 1, 1895. 
July 1, 1895. 



Street Department. 



489 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual Report 


1870 


1871 


41 














1871 


1872- 


55 
















1872 
1873 


1873 
1874 


81 
42 
















1874 
1875 
1876 

1877 
1878 


1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 


65 
51 
53 

49 
60 
















1879 
1880 
1881 


1880 
1881 
1882 


74 

77 
72 
















18.^2 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 


93 
76 
72 

28 

12 

10 

3 

4 

» 

12 
















1892 


1893 


11 
















1893 


1894 


11 
















1894 


1895 


11 



* Published in Anniial Report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department since 1891. 

Superintendent. 

Henry H. Carter, Member of American Society Civil Engineers. 
Resigned Dec. 8, 1894. 

Charles R. Cutter, Acting Superintendent from Dec. 8, 1894, to Jan. 14, 1895, 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Bertrand T. Wheeler, Sux>erintendent from Jan. 14, 1895, to Feb. 4, 1896. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Benjamin W. Wells, Superintendent from Feb. 4, 1896, to the present time. 

Executive Engineer. 
Henry B. Wood, Member American Society Civil Engineers. 

Engineer of Construction. 
Nathan S. Brock, from March 1 to June 1, 1896. 

Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers, 



490 



City Document No. 29. 



Bridge Division. — John A. McLaughlin, Deputy S^qjerlntendent until Jime 1, 

1896. 
Bridge Division. — John P. Wise, Deputy Superintendent from June 1, 1895, 

to Feb. 14, 1896. 
Bridge Division. — William H. CarbeiTy, Deputy Superintendent from Feb. 14, 

1896, to the present time. 
Ferry Division. — Thomas Kellough, Deputy Superintendent from, Jidy 1, 1895, 

to Feb. 14, 1896. 
Ferrt Division. — William F. McLellan, Deputy Superintendent from Feb. 14, 

1896, to the present time. 
Paving Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Dex>uty Superintendent until Jan. 24, 1895- 
Paving Division. — Darius N. Payson, Deputy Superintendent from Jan. 24, 1895, 

to March 1, 1896. 
Paving Division. — John L. Kelley, Deputy Superintendent from March 1, 1896, 

to the present time. 
Sanitary Division. — George W. Forristall,i Deputy Superintendent. 
Sanitary Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Acting Deputy Superintendent from Jan. 

16, 1894, to Feb. 1, 1895. 
Sanitary Division. — Charles A. Young, Deputy Superintendent frotn Feb. 1, 1895, 

to March 1, 1896. 
Sanitary Division. — Patrick O'Shea, Deputy Superintendent from March 1, 1896, 

to the present time. 
Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Deputy Superintendent until July 10, 1896. 

Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division.— Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent from Jul p 10, 1896, to 

the present time. 

Member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 

Street Cleaning Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Deputy Sujoerinteyident until 

March 22, 1895. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Benjamin M. Cram, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 22, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Joshua Atwood, 3d, Dej^uty Superintendent front 

March 1, 1896, to the present time. 
Member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 
Street Watering Division. — M. Edwin Libby, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 6, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Street Watering Division. — Thomas J. Pinneran, Deputy Superintendent from, 

March 1, 1896, to the present time. 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges. — Henry H. Carter, ex offl.eio. Commissioner 

for Boston, until Dec. 8, 1894. 
Charles R. Cutter, Acting, from Dec. 8, 1894, 

to Jan. 14, 1895. 
Bertrand T. Wheeler, from Jan. 14, 1895, to 

Feb. 4, 1896. 
Benjamin W. Wells, from Feb. 14, 1896, to the 

present time. 
WiUiam J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cam- 
bridge. 

iDied Jan. 12,1894. 



Street Department. 



Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual Eeport, Executive Dept. Part II — 


1891 
1892 


1892 
1893 


36 
34 


" " " " " .... 


1893 


1894 


34 


4 1 4 1 44 (4 .4 


1894 


189") 


34 


44 44 64 44 44 


1895 


1896 


29 


44 


1896 


1897 


29 



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