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Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1899bost 



Compliments of ... 



Bertrand T. Wheeler, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



PLEASE EXCHANGE. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Street Department 



YEAR 1899 




1 bos row 

MUNICIPAL PRINTING OaFIGC 



? 



US 



60 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



PAGE 

Appropriations 2 

Construction Work 5 

Department Work (By Dis- 
tricts) 9 

Eight-hour Day 15 

Elevated Railway 23 

Employment of Labor 34 

Expenditures 2 

" (Recapitulation) 4 

Horses 18 

New District Yard, East 

Boston 18 

Organization 1 

Pedlers 16 

Pensions 16 

Permit Charges, Constitu- 
tionality of 12 

Recommendations 10 

Smoke Nuisance 23 

Snow and Rainfall 24 

Snow in Public Alleys 17 

Street Litter 22 

Summary of Work Done : 

Bridge Division 32 

Ferry Division 33 

Paving Division 33 

Sanitary Division 33 

Sewer Division 33 

Street-Cleaning Division. . 34 

Street- Watering Division . 34 

Tremont Street Tracks 14 

Veterans' Preference Act. . 23 

Boston and Cambbidge 
Bbidges: 

Attention to Details 32 

North Harvard Street 

Bridge 32 



Bbidge Division: 

Appropriation 30 

Bridge Shelters 22 

Charlestown Bridge 19 

Maiden Bridge 20 

Railroad Bridges 21 

Summer Street Bridge 20 

West Boston Bridge 20 

Widening of Bridges 21 

Work Necessary . 30 

Work Performed 27 

Febey Division: 

New Ferry-boats 31 

Purchase of Ferry-boat 

"Gov. Russell' 1 from the 

U.S. Government 31 

South Ferry Head-house, 

East Boston side 31 

Paving Division: 

Difficulties met with 25 

Necessity of increase in 
appropriations 26 

Output of Stone from City 
Crushers 27 

Removal of Snow. Effect 
on the Maintenance Ap- 
propriation 25 

Work Performed 27 

Sanitaby Division: 
Disposal of Material Col- 
lected '. 29 

Improvements in the Divi- 
sion 29 

Recommendations 29 



Contents. 



PAGE 

Sewer Division: 

Sewerage Works Act. Work 

Performed Under 7 

Maintenance Appropriation. 28 

Sewer Legislation 11 

Work Performed 28 

Street-Cleaning Division: 

East Boston District, Estab- 
lished 30 

Extension of Division Limits 30 

Kecommendations 30 

Street-Watering Division : 

Street Watering by Assess- 
ment 31 

Defects in this System 32 

Central Office: 

Areas of Pavements 70 

Asphalt Pavement, Sicilian 

Pock 66 

Asphalt Pavement, Trinidad 62 

Asphalt Pavement, Summary 68 

Contracts 43 



PAGE 

Expenditures 34 

Financial Statement, Street 

Department Maintenance . 35 

Special Appropriations 37 

Blue Hill and Other Avenues 40 
Bridge Division Specials... 37 
Comparative Table of Ex- 
penditures (Maintenance). 36 

Ferry Division Specials 37 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 39 - 

Paving Division Specials . . . 37 
Recapitulation, Maintenance 
and Special Appropria- 
tions 40 

Sewer Division Specials. ... 39 

South Union Station 40 

Street Improvements 39 

Income 70 

Increase in Length of Public 

Streets 71 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways (Assess- 
ments Collected) 71 

Street Building under Chap. 

323, Acts of 1891, etc 41 

Street Mileage 69 



/ 



PART II. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION. (Page 3.) 



Appropriation 3 

Bridge Shelters 4 

Cable Houses and Boxes ... 34 

Drawtenders' Reports 36 

Drawtenders' Reports, Re- 
capitulation 41 

Expenditures : 

Inland Bridges 17 

Recapitulation 24 

Maintenance North and 

South Yards 25 



PAGE 

Special Appropriations. . . 26 

Tidewater Bridges 8 

Recapitulation 16 

Financial Statement 6 

List of Bridges: 

Wholly Supported by Bos- 
ton 28 

Of which Boston Supports 
the Part within its Lim- 
its 30 



Contents. 



Of which Boston Pays a 
Part of the Cost of Main- 
tenance 30 

Supported Wholly by Rail- 
road Corporations 31 

Recapitulation 32 

List of Small Bridges 33 

New Bridges 3 

Object of Expenditures .... 6 

Public Landing Places 34 



PAGE 

Recommendations 4 

Special Appropriations 7 

Statement of Traffic 35 

Tidewater Bridges Operat- 
ing Power 3 

Widths of Draw Openings, 

etc 38 

Widths of Bridges 40 

Work Performed 5 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
FERRY DIVISION. (Page 42.) 



PAGE 

Actual Standing 51 

Cash Statement 49 

Cash Statement (1870-1900) . 50 

Condition of Buildings 43 

Eight-hour Day 43 

Expenditures (1857-1900). . . 50 

Financial Statement 44 

Income 47 

Location of Ferries 42 

Objects of Expenditures .. . 44 



PAGE 

Receipts 48 

Receipts (1870-1900) 49 

Special Appropriations 44 

Ticket Statement 53 

Total Appropriations 46 

Total Expenditures 46 

Traffic Statement 52 

Travel Statement 53 

Work Performed 43 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PAVING DIVISION. (Page 55.) 

PAGE 

55 



Districts 

Expenditures Utader Special 
Appropr i a t i o n s (De- 
tails) 

Abolishment of Grade 

Crossings 

Blue Hill and Other Ave- 
nues 

Blue Hill and Other Ave- 
nues (Summary) 



66 



80 



81 



THE 



Charlestown Bridge 66 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways 81 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways (Sum- 
mary) 94 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Brigh- 
ton 97 



VI 



Contents. 



PAGE 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Brigh- 
ton (Summary) 98 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Dor- 
chester 98 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Dor- 
chester (Summary) .... 102 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, East 
Boston 96 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, East 
Boston (Summary) 97 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Rox- 
bury and West Roxbury, 102 

Laying Out and Construc- 
tion of Highways, Rox- 
bury and West Roxbury, 
(Summary) 105 

Rapid Transit 66 

South Union Station 67 

Street Improvements .... 67 

Street Improvements 

(Summary) 77 



PAGE 

Financial Statement 56 

Income 57 

Inspection 119 

New Brick Sidewalks 109 

New Brick Sidewalks (Sum- 
mary) 112 

New Edgestones 106 

New Edgestones (Summary). 109 
Objects of Expenditures 

(Regular) 58 

Miscellaneous 59 

In Excess of Special Ap- 
propriations 60 

New Work 61 

Permits 117 

Property in Charge of Di- 
visions 116 

Public Alleys 113 

Streets Laid Out and Or- 
dered Constructed 114 

Streets Widened and Re- 
located 113 

Street Numbering 120 

Total Expenditures 56 

Work in Charge of 55 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. (Page 121.) 



Amount Expended for the 
Collection and Removal of 
House Dirt, Ashes, etc., 
and Offal 

Comparative Table, Show- 
ing Cost to Collect and 
Deliver at Various Dumps 

Contracts 

Cost of Hired Teams 

Cost of Towing 137 

Disposal of Combustible 

Waste 122 

Disposal of Garbage 122 



137 



136 
140 
131 



Disposal of Material Col- 
lected 130 

Division Repair Shops : 

Blacksmith Shop 141 

Harness Shop 142 

Horseshoeing Shop 143 

Paint Shop 142 

Wheelwright Shop 141 

Dumping Boats 131 

Dumping Boats (Amount 

Expended) 137 

Expenditures (Maintenance, 

Five Years ) 123 



Contents. 



vn 



Expenditures (Recapitula- 
tion) 135 

Extraordinary Expenses . . . 136 

Financial Statement 132 

Hay and Grain 149 

Hay and Grain (Recapitu- 
lation) 152 

House Dirt, Ashes, Wastes, 
and Rubbish: 

Amount Collected 127 

Comparative Statement . . 129 

Contracts 125 

Disposal of 125 

Force Employed 128 

Separation of Wastes 126 

Spring Cleaning 127 

House Offal: 

Amount Collected 123 

Contracts 124 

Disposal of 124 

Force Employed 125 



PAGE 

Revenue (5 years) 123 

Horseshoeing, Cost of 143 

Income 132 

Material Collected by Dis- 
tricts 128 

Material Collected (5 years), 128 

Method of Collecting 121 

Number and Variety of 

Vehicles, etc., Repaired.. 144 

Objects of Expenditures . . . 133 

Organization 155 

Property Schedule 153 

Recommendations 122 

Street Signs 147 

Total Cost of Removal of 
House Dirt, Ashes, Wastes, 

Rubbish and House Offal, 136 

Work of the Divisions 121 

Work Done for Other Di- 
visions 138 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. (Page 156.) 



Appropriation Maintenance 

(10 years) 156 

Assessments 181 

Catch-basins 186 

Financial Statement 182 

Objects of Expenditures . . . 183 

Property Schedule 187 

Pumping Record 188 

Schedule of Sewers Built to 

February 1, 1900 185 

Sewer Legislation: 

Chap. 450, Acts of 1899. . . 174 
Constitutionality of Chap. 

426, Acts of 1897 176 

Sewerage Works Built: 

Brighton 193 

Charlestown 192 

City Proper 223 



PAGE 

Dorchester 202 

East Boston 191 

Roxbury 218 

South Boston 189 

West Roxbury 197 

Sewers Abandoned: 

City Proper 228 

Roxbury 227 

Sewer Construction (5 years) 186 

Sludge Removed 187 

Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion 186 

Work in Charge of Division 156 
Work Performed and Rec- 
ommendations : 

Brighton 167 

Charlestown 168 

City Proper 169 



VI 11 



Contents. 



PAGE 

Dorchester 159 

East Boston 165 

Main Drainage 171 

Moon Island 169' 



PAGE 

Roxbury 157 

South Boston 157 

Stony Brook 172 

West Roxbury 168 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. (Page 229-) 



Cooperation of the Board 

of Police 229 

Cost per Mile of Cleaning 

Streets 235 

Financial Statement 230 

Cleaning Crosswalks 232 

Cleaning Gutters 231 

Cleaning Streets 230 

General Recapitulation. . . 234 

Hand Sweeping 231 

Maintaining Dumps 231 

Miscellaneous 232 

Patrolling by Districts ... 232 

Push Cart Patrol System.. 232 

Removing Snow 232 

Recapitulation of Ex- 
penditures 233 



Stable and Yard Expendi- 
tures 234 

Stock Account 234 

Force Employed 236 

Income 235 

New Districts 229 

Number of Loads of Street 

Dirt, etc., Removed 236 

Public Waste Barrels 236 

Recommendations 229 

Shops 230 

Stables 230 

Work Done for Other Divi- 
sions 235 

Work of the Division 229 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
STREET WATERING DIVISION. (Page 237.) 



PAGE 

Assessments : 

Amount of 244 

Constitutionality of 238 

Districts 237 

Rate of 237 

Distribution of Carts 245 

Financial Statement 244 

Growth of the Division 244 



PAGE 

Income 238 

Object of Expenditures 244 

Objects of Expenditures (by 

Districts) 245 

Water Posts 246 

Weather Conditions 237 

Work Performed 237 



Contents. 



IX 



APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 
AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

PAGE 

Bridges Under Control of : 

Cambridge Street 248 

Craigie's 247 



FOR THE BOSTON 

(Page 247.) 



Essex Street 249 

Harvard 247 

North Harvard Street .... 249 

Prison Point 248 

Western Avenue to Cam- 
bridge 249 



West Boston 


PAGE 

248 


Classification of Expendi- 
tures 


251 


Number of Draw Openings, 
etc 


250 
252 




250 



APPENDIX I. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER ON SPECIAL WORK. 

(Page 253.) 



Asphalt Paving Under Guar- 
anty Feb. 1, 1900 254 

Columbia Road 284 

Commonwealth Avenue 2S5 

Cost of Patching 260 

Comparative Cost of Patch- 
ing 263 

Grading Street Eailway 

Tracks 282 





282 


New Construction 


267 


South Union Station 


. . 287 


Work Performed : 




In General 


253 




.. 263 



For Ferry Division . . , 
For Sanitary Division. 



286 
2S6 



APPENDIX J. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR. 
(Page 288.) 



PAGE 

Boiler Applications 292 

Coal Importations 292 

Complaints 290 

Difficulties met with 288 

Quality of Coal Used 288 



PAGE 

Smoke Nuisances in Other 

Cities 290 

Smoke Controlling Devices. 291 

Special Reports 292 

Summary 293 

Work Performed 288 



Contents. 



APPENDIX K. 



REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE CLERK. 
(Page 294.) 



Applications 298 

Employment of Labor 294 



PAGE 

Grade and Number of Em- 
ployees 295 

Transfers 297 



APPENDIX L. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT NUM- 
BERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. (Page 299.) 



List of Illustrations. xi 
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PART I. 

PAGE 

Avenues under Construction in 1895-6-7-8 and 9 24 

Bridge Shelters 22 

Charlestown Bridge 18 

Columbia Road at Blue Hill Avenue 4 

Commonwealth Avenue at Warren Street, showing upper and 

lower roadways 2 

Congress Street at State Street, showing Devonshire and Exchange 

Streets on opposite side 28 

Dock Square, where, by cutting off corner building, good entrance 

into Union Street would be made 34 

Extension of Reservoirs, Moon Island 8 

Josiah, Prize Winner, Boston Horse Show, 1899 30 

Moon Island Reservoirs. Basin No. 4 6 

North Harvard Street, showing need of new bridge 32 

State Street at Congress, Devonshire and Exchange Streets 10 

Summer Street Bridge 20 

Summer Street at Dorchester Avenue widened and rebuilt 26 

The Terminal Station 1 

Tremont Street, showing surface cars, wires and poles 14 

Tremont Street without cars, wires and poles 16 

Washington Street, near Dover Street, showing Elevated Railway 

structure 12 

PART II. 

Atlantic Avenue in front of the Terminal Station 66 

Blue Hill Avenue Surface Drainage (Rock Cut) 164 

Columbia Road at Edward Everett Square 274 

Columbia Road, near City Point, showing yacht club-houses 272 

Commonwealth Avenue at Aberdeen 268 

Commonwealth Avenue at entrance to Chestnut Hill Reservoir . . 270 

Commonwealth Avenue, near Warren Street 264 

Commonwealth Avenue, North of Wallingf ord Road 270 

Congress Street Bridge 4 

Devonshire Street, between State Street and Adams Square 62 

Dorchester Avenue, rear of Terminal Station, showing sea wall. . 286 

Exchange Street, between State Street and Dock Square 104 

Faneuil Hall Square 118 

Merchants Row, from State Street 112 

Moon Island Extension of Reservoirs. Basin No. 3 168 

Moon Island. Discharge from flushing sewer 170 

Proposed New Head-house, South Ferry, East Boston side 42 

Proposed New Stable, East Boston 228 

Street Department Exhibit, Boston Horse Show, 1899 122 

Tenean Brook Conduit 158 

Tremont Street free from tracks and wires 60 

Washington Street, North from Clifton Place, without the Ele- 
vated Railway structure 54 

Washington Street, North from Clifton Place, showing the Ele- 
vated Railway structure 56 

Widening of Bridges, showing Berkeley Street Bridge 16 



PART I. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREETS. 



PAGES 1 TO 72. 



Hon. Thomas N. Hart, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
annual report of the operations and expenses of the Street 
Department for the year 1899 is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

Organization. 

The work of the department during the past year has been 
carried on under the same organization that was effected 
when the consolidated department was created in 1891 and 
as amended in 1895, the several divisions of the department 
being 1 as follows : 



Central Office. 

Boston and Cambridge 

Bridges. 
Bridge Division. 
Ferry Division. 



Paving Division. 
Sanitary Division. 
Sewer Division. 
Street-Cleaning Division. 
Street-Watering' Division. 



Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office and the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, is in 
charge of a Deputy Superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge Bridges are managed by two 
commissioners, the Superintendent of Streets being the 
commissioner for the city of Boston, the other commissioner 
being appointed by the Mayor of the city of Cambridge. 



City Document No. 38. 



More extensive study than is given under this resume of 
the year's work, with detail of figures and expenditure, will 
be found in the division reports of the Deputy Superintend- 
ents. 

Appropriations. 

The money assigned for Street Department work the past 
year was made available under the following appropriations : 

First. — Maintenance : From income of the city raised by 
taxes. At the commencement of the financial year, Febru- 
ary 1, the department estimates of the amounts necessary for 
the proper maintenance of the various divisions are submitted 
to His Honor the Mayor, who makes such recommendation 
as he may deem proper to the City Council. The main- 
tenance appropriations as passed by the City Council were 
as follows : 



Central Office . "• 

Bridge Division . 
Cambridge and Boston Bridges 
Ferry Division . 
Paving Division : 

Maintenance . 

Removal of snow . 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division . 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Street- Watering Division . 

Total 



818,800 00 

120,750 00 

16,000 00 

212,500 00 

690,000 
50,000 
570,000 00 
350,000 00 
315,000 00 
175,000 00 

$2,518,050 00 



Second. — Work done under loan appropriations for per- 
manent improvements : There was made available by the 
City Council from loan money within the debt limit $303,100 
for general new or reconstruction work, and for special items, 
as follows : 



Bridge Division 
Ferry Division 
Paving Division 
Sewer Division 

Total 



$34,469 80 

474 79 

316,630 53 

3,000 00 

$354,575 12 



Third. — In 1891 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
and amended in 1897 entitled, "An Act Relating to the 
Location, Laying-Out and Construction of Highways in the 



Steeet Department. 8 

City of Boston." (Chap. 323, Acts of 1891.) Loans under 
this Act are outside the debt limit. From this fund new 
streets assessable on the abutting property are built. The 
amount expended the past year was : 

Streets • $548,423 01 

Fourth. — In 1899 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled, " An Act relative to Laying-Out and Construction 
of Highways in the City of Boston." (Chap. 443.) Loans 
under this Act are outside the debt limit. The amounts 
authorized and expended last year in each district were as 
follows : 



District. 


Amount 
authorized. 


Amount 
expended. 


Brighton .... 


$200,000 00 


$16,280 36 


Dorchester .... 


500,000 00 


33,483 80 


East Boston .... 


600,000 00 


3,561 90 


Roxbury and West Roxbury . 


350,000 00 


24,037 97 


Totals . 


$1,650,000 00 


$77,364 03 



Fifth. — In 1895 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
and amended in 1898 entitled, " An Act to provide for the 
Laying-Out and Construction of Certain Highways in the 
City of Boston " (commonly known as the Boulevard Act). 
(Chap. 334 of 1895 ; chap. 236 of 1898.) Loans under this 
Act are outside the debt limit. The amount expended this 
year was as follows : 

Streets $246,053 89 

Sixth. — In 1896 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, " An Act relative to Stony Brook in the City of 
Boston." (Chap. 530.) Loans under this Act are outside 
the debt limit. $500,000. The amount expended this year 
was $46,673.24. 

Seventh. — In 1899 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, " An Act relative to Stony Brook in the City of 
Boston." (Chap. 397.) Loans under this Act are outside 
the debt limit. $350,000. The amount expended this year 
was $151,518.65. 

Eighth. — In 1895 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, " An Act relative to the establishment of a New 
Ferry Landing in the City of Boston." (Chap. 435.) 
Loans under this Act are outside the debt limit. $500,000. 
The amount expended this year was $12,187.69, and the sum 
of $200,000 was transferred to the Sewer Division under 
authority of chap. 450, Acts of 1899. 



4 City Document No. 38. 

In 1898 the City of Boston sold to the United States 
Government the ferry-boats " Governor Russell " and the 
" East Boston " for the sum of $71,000 and $57,500 respect- 
ively, making a total of $128,500, which, under an order 
of the City Council, was transferred to an appropriation for 
" New Ferry-boats." The amount expended this year was 
$64,853.80. 

Ninth. — In 1896 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, " An Act to provide for a Union Station for Passen- 
gers on Railroads entering the southerly part of the City of 
Boston." (Chap. 516.) Loans under this Act are outside 
the debt limit. The amount expended this year was as fol- 
lows : 

Streets $71,155 28 

Tenth. — In 1897 an Act was passed by the Legislature, 
entitled, " An Act relative to the Sewerage Works of the 
City of Boston." (Chap. 426.) Loans under this Act are 
outside the debt limit. From this fund all " Sewerage 
Works " are built. 

The amount expended the past year was $1,086,893.33. 

Thus the expenditures under the several appropriations of 
the year 1899 were as follows : 

From Income of the City Raised by Taxes. 

Maintenance $2,638,905 61 

From Loans Inside the Debt Limit. 

Street Improvements, general and by wards, 119,891 79 

Bridge, specials . . . . 28,724 79 

Ferry, specials . . . . . . 474 79 

Paving, specials . . . • . . 268,841 13 

From Loans Outside the Debt Limit. 

[Repaid in part to City Treasury by assessment for benefits.] 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, 548,423 01 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, 
by Districts 



Brighton ...... 


16,280 36 


Dorchester ...... 


33,483 80 


East Boston ...... 


3,561 90 


Roxbury and West Roxbury . 


24,037 97 


Blue Hill and Other Avenues (Boulevard 




Act) 


246,053 89 


Stony Brook Improvement 


46,673 24 


Carried forward, 


$3,975,352 28 



Street Department. 



Brought forivard, 
Stony Brook Improvement (Chap. 397, 

Acts of 1899) 

New Ferry Landing ..... 
New Ferry-boats ..... 
South Union Station ..... 


$3,975,352 28 

151,518 65 
12,187 69 
64,853 80 
71,155 28 


Sewerage Works . . . 


1,086,893 33 


Total 


$5,361,961 03 



Construction Work, Streets and Avenues under 
"323," "Boulevard" and "Public Alley" Acts. 

The following streets, avenues and public alleys were under 
construction during the year, and have been wholly or partially 
completed at an expenditure of $625,787.04 for surface work : 



Aberdeen street. 

Albany and Northampton sts. 

Alexander street. 

Afford street. 

Amory street. 

Andrews street. 

Angell street. 

Annabel street. 

Ashley street. 

Astor street. 

Athelwold street. 

Atherstone street. 

B street. 

Barry street. 

Belmore terrace. 

Belvidere street. 

Bennington street. 

Bernard street. 

B landlord street. 

Boston street. 

Bragdon street. 

Burt street. 

Callencler street. 

Cambridge street. 

Canal street. 

Carlos street. 

Chamblet street. 

Charlestown street. 

Chester street. 

Chiswick road. 

Columbia road. 



Commonwealth avenue. 
Congreve street. 
Cummington street. 
Custer street. 
Devon street. 
Draper street. 
Dresden street. 
Edison green. 
Edwin street. 
Elizabeth street. 
Esmond street. 
Fairmount street. 
Forest Hills street. 
Florida street. 
Fowler street. 
Francis street. 
Geneva avenue. 
Gibson street. 
Hamilton street. 
Harold street. 
He wins street. 
Homes avenue. 
Hubbard street. 
Idaho street. 
Ipswich street. 
Jersey street. 
Josephine street. 
Lauriat avenue. 
Leeds street. 
Leeds ville street. 
Leonard street. 



6 



City Document No. 38. 



Leroy street. 

Lonsdale street. 

Malvern street. 

Maryland street. 

Mellen street. 

Merlin street. 

Middleton street. 

Millet street. 

Montague street. 

Newburg street. 

Nightingale street. 

North Harvard street. 

Nottingham street. 

Oakley street. 

Oakview terrace. 

Orkney road. 

Peterborough street. 

Peverell street. 

Pontiac street. 

Qneensberry street. 

Rockford street. 

Rosseter street. 

Rowe street. 

Rozella street. 

Rnggies street. 

St. Stephen street. 

School street. 

Seymour street. 

Shafter street. 

Shirley street. 

South street. 

Spencer street, between Athel- 
wold and Park streets. 

Spencer street, between Tal- 
bot and Wheatland avenues. 

Spring street. 

Stanley street. 

Stratford street. 

Stuart street. 

Telford street. 

Thane street. 

Tonawanda street. 

Trinity place. 

Vancouver street. 

Van Winkle street. 

West Seklen street. 



Wainwright street. 
Waldeck street. 
Waterlow street. 
Warner street. 
Wensley street. 
Williams street. 
Woodcliff street. 
Woodlawn street. 
Wortlhngton street. 
Public Alley No. 101 

" " 102 

" 301 

" " 401 

" * " 402 

« 403 

« » 404 

« " 405 

" " 414 

" " 415 

« » 416 

" " 417 

" 418 

" " 419 

« « 420 

» « 421 

« 430 

" 431 

" " 432 

» 433 

" 434 

" 435 

« " 436 

» 437 

« " 438 

« " 439 

» " 440 

» 441 

u a 442 

» 443 

44 44 444 

44 701 

44 44 702 

» 703 

« 901 

« « 905 

" " 2001 



Street Department. 7 

The Department year ending February 1, 1900, marks the 
close of the four years under the administration of the Hon. 
Josiah Quincy, and the writer of this report retires, and his 
successor, Mr. Bertrand T. Wheeler, under Mayor Thomas 
N". Hart, assumes charge of the Street Department. In these 
four years many Street Department problems have been 
solved. 

The Sewer Division has been most fortunate in securing 
and working under favorable legislative conditions which 
made possible sufficient appropriations to allow the very nec- 
essary work to be done on the Main Drainage plant, the 
starting of the system of surface drains, the rebuilding of 
certain important worn-out sewers and outlets, and the- con- 
struction of much new work. 

The dangers and unwisdom of neglecting the sewerage 
system of the city and the result of a failure to correct cer- 
tain well-known defective conditions had been dwelt on at 
length by past superintendents in their reports, and many and 
various recommendations and calls on the City Council had 
been made for appropriations ; but no relief had been given, 
largely for the reason that under the then existing statutes 
covering this class of work sufficient moneys were not available. 

In 1896 this department made an extensive report of 
the conditions of the sewer system to His Honor Mayor 
Quincy, and as a result the Legislature was petitioned for re- 
lief, and the Act of 1897 was put in force, and under this 
Act and subsequent amendments the sewer system of Boston 
has been put in first-class condition, and the problems of the 
future are largely reduced to the caring for the great demand 
for new sewers. This question of new sewers is of much 
importance and magnitude, but is not so vital as was the 
problem presented in 1896 of putting in condition the main 
sewerage system, the outlets and overflows, and the laying 
out of the system of surface drainage ; all this work was not 
only necessary to the progress and development of the city, 
but was closely related to the health and comfort of the 
community. 

The good work accomplished under the Sewerage Act of 
1897 has not been realized by the community, misled as they 
have been by statements made during the fight for a change 
in the method of assessment. The benefits to the present 
and the future have been so great that a brief summary of 
the work is given as follows : 

Pumpmg-station at Cow Pasture. This station handles 
nearly 100,000,000 gallons of sewage per clay, and is the . 
heart of the great South Metropolitan District. 



8 City Document No. 38. 

All the pumps and engines have been put in order, iron 
floors substituted for wood; electric light plant installed; 
new coal run built; and contract made for a 70,000,000 gallon 
pump. This with some slight expense on boilers will put 
this plant in the best possible condition. Expenditure, 
$136,006.41. 

The storage reservoirs at Moon Island long ago reached 
their capacity of 50,000,000 gallons. These have been ex- 
tended to 100,000,000. A sea-wall has been built to protect 
the outer face of the island, and many minor improvements 
made. Expenditure, $202,304.19. 

The sewage of Charlestown and East Boston in 1896 
discharged into the adjacent water, fouling the shores and 
flats to such an extent as to create a serious nuisance. 
The North Metropolitan system controlled by the State was 
prepared to give relief, and under the statutes the City of 
Boston was paying rental for its use, but funds were not 
available for making the necessary connections. The major- 
ity of these have been made, and the sewage of East Boston 
and Charlestown is now carried to the State pumping- 
station at Deer Island. Expenditure, $58,647.54. 

As the suburban sections of the city developed the old 
water courses and natural outlets for surface water had to a 
great extent become obstructed, and as no provision had 
been made to handle this water in the existing system of 
house sewers some relief had for several years been urgently 
petitioned for. There was, however, no legislation on the 
statute books which gave the city the authority to provide 
such relief. Under the Act of 1897 the city was impowered 
to make takings of brooks, water courses and such other lands 
as might be necessary for the construction or maintenance 
of surface sewers or streams. The most important water 
courses have received attention. 

Another serious menace to public health was the condi- 
tion of the overflows and outlets which provided relief in 
time of storm. Many of these were in such condition that 
the sewers of certain important sections backed up flooding 
and damaging much property. 

Certain local sewerage systems were in broken down and 
dangerous condition. The most important of these was the 
Canal street system on which the old and most congested 
section of the city depends. For over ten years had the 
department been presenting this proposition to the City 
Council for relief. One of the properties most vitally affected 
by this defective sewer was the Quincy and Faneuil Hall 
markets. The conditions had become almost unbearable, and 



Street Department. 9 

certainly were most unfortunate for buildings used for the 
storage and sale of perishable food supplies. The rebuilding 
of the system is nearly completed. 

The great amount of boulevard and new street work has 
occasioned the construction of a large amount of new house 
sewers, and added greatly to the property available for build- 
ing purposes within the city limits. 



The Sanitary Division has adopted new methods, and 
the disposal of the wastes of the city is now made in a scien- 
tific and sanitary way. 

The Ferry Division has been able, under a special appro- 
priation authorized by the Legislature, to build two new 
boats and contract for a third, renew all the slips, drops and 
tanks, and there remains a balance of the appropriation suffi- 
cient to accomplish the only thing needed to put the entire 
plant in satisfactory condition, namely, the rebuilding of the 
south ferry head-house, East Boston side. 

The Street-Cleaning Division leaves its plant in good 
order, and by new systems has brought about better condi- 
tions. 

The Bridge Divison has been handicapped by the fact 
that no special appropriations have been made for the last 
three years, but by careful and intelligent handling of such 
moneys as were made available the bridges are left in fairly 
good condition. 

In Street-Watering, legislation has been passed which 
places the watering of all public streets under the control of 
tins department, and the cost is assessed on the abutters, 
making the Street- Watering Division self-sustaining. This 
has proved a benefit and a great advance over the old 
method of watering some streets by private subscription, 
while others were cared for by the city. 

The work of the Paving Division must be divided to 
properly state results. First, there is an appropriation for 
maintenance. The amount allowed would have been fairly 
ample had it not been for the unusual cost of snow removal 
and the very meagre snow appropriation. Second, loans 
within the debt limit made for ward improvements or special 
streets. From year to year the amount appropriated has 
become smaller, so that the last two years it was possible 
only to accomplish a portion of the reconstruction work 
desirable and necessary. In addition to the maintenance and 



10 City Document No. 38. 

regular loan moneys thus referred to, there is carried in the 
paving account the work accomplished under loans author- 
ized by the Legislature and made outside the debt limit. 
Under these special acts a great amount of work has been 
done; Brighton, Commonwealth, Huntington, Columbus and 
Blue Hill avenues completed, and a very considerable start 
made on Columbia road. 

One hundred and seven assessable streets have been built, 
and there remains a considerable balance available for new 
work. 

So, generally speaking, the most urgent demands which 
pressed upon the department in 1896 have been met. There 
is, however, very decided need of legislation which will 
make possible the correction of certain conditions which 
exist in the central or down-town districts. 

First in importance is the renewal of pavements, which, in 
a large degree, are entirely unsuited to the needs, comfort 
and proper appearance of the city which claims such a high 
place in the business and social life of the country. A few 
of the most important streets have been put in first-class 
order ; but generally speaking the down-town pavements date 
back to the time of, or before, the great fire of 1872. The 
great amount of underground work which has occasioned the 
disturbance of almost every yard of these pavements, the 
poor quality and worn condition of the blocks, the settling 
of the trenches and the general wear and tear makes a sur- 
face, which is expensive to maintain, difficult for teaming, 
impossible to keep clean, and is unsightly. There is a 
great and increasing demand for asphalt. This form of 
pavement will hardly stand the wear and tear of the heavily 
travelled streets where there are car tracks. For such streets 
and for the main lines of team travel, granite blocks on a 
concrete base seem the most suitable ; but for side streets 
and lightly travelled streets, asphalt makes a desirable pave- 
ment, for the reason that it is more cleanly and comparatively 
noiseless. 

Second, the widening or extension or building of such 
new ways as will relieve the immense team traffic between 
the freight receiving points and the business district. 

The wholesale business district is bounded on the north by 
State street, on the east by the water front, on the south by 
Kneeland street, and on the west by Washington street. 
There are thousands of tons of freight going through this 
section of Boston every day. A great part of this freight 
arrives and departs from the northern terminals and steam- 















fl , -7*** 



Street Department. 11 

ship docks. The bulk of all the freight leaving or departing 
from these northern terminals and steamship docks going 
into or coming out of the wholesale district must pass 
through Devonshire street or Exchange street, the other 
streets running north and south being almost impracticable 
for teaming purposes. 

Devonshire street, between State street and Adams square, 
is but fifty to fifty-five feet between the curbs, and is occu- 
pied by two surface tracks, over which there is continual 
car traffic. Exchange street is but twenty-three to twenty- 
six feet from curb to curb. This street should be widened 
by taking at least thirty-one feet on the easterly side, thus 
making an extension of Congress street. The building on 
the easterly side of Dock square should also be removed, 
and then, with the proper paving of Union street, a material 
improvement in the freight traffic conditions would be brought 
about, as the subway on Washington street, which will cer- 
tainly be built some time in the future, will relieve Congress 
street of much of its surface car traffic. There are other 
problems in this same connection of very considerable inter- 
est and bearing on the cost of merchandise transportation 
which should be taken into consideration by the proper 
authorities, both as to the best means of relief, and how 
sufficient moneys may be secured to pay the cost. 



Sewer Legislation. 

The history of the origin and repeal of the Sewerage Act 
of 1897 should be of interest to the tax-payers and to all who 
in other cities have this immediate branch of municipal work 
in charge. In 1896 the absolute necessity of action looking 
to the correction of certain existing conditions in the sewer- 
age systems of the city brought into being the act of the 
Legislature which, briefly stated, allowed the City of Boston 
to expend one million dollars annually on sewerage works, 
this sum to be returned to the city treasury by assessments 
on the estates according to the benefit. It also allowed for a 
maintenance charge proportioned to the use of the sewer by 
the property connected. The plan of assessment adopted 
and put in force placed the entire tax on real estate where 
such charges properly belong. Real estate derives a benefit 
from sewerage works ; personal property does not. This 
matter was very fully treated in last year's report. Since 
that time, however, the Legislature has repealed the act, and 
substituted therefor an act which retains the appropriation 



12 



City Document No. 



feature, but makes most unscientific and unbusinesslike pro- 
vision for assessment of construction cost, so that probably 
less than 40 per cent, will be paid by property benefited and 
the balance rolled up as a debt for the general tax-payer 
to care for. It also repeals the charge for maintenance. 
The text of the new act will be found in Appendix E, 
page 174. 

In addition to legislative opposition to the act, the matter 
was carried to the courts, and the adverse decision of the 
court may be of service to officials who are working along 
similar lines in an attempt to properly regulate taxation for 
sewerage benefits received. The petition and decision will 
be found hi Appendix E, pages 176 to 180. 

This decision made it incumbent on the city to return the 
tax illegally levied, and repayment was commenced at once. 
The tax ledger contained about 65,000 names of those upon 
whom sewer assessments were levied. The total amount of 
assessments to be paid back was $436,312.89. The assess- 
ments by wards were as follows : 



Ward 1 $9,316 55 

Ward 2 8,082 74 

Ward 3 6,716 60 

Ward 4 8,900 6S 

Ward 5 7,692 41 

Ward 6 51,812 32 

Ward 7 77,061 81 

Ward 8 16,268 56 

Ward 9 14,269 04 

Ward 10 22,943 71 

Ward 11 39,212 08 

Ward 12 14,104 62 

Ward 25 



Ward 13 $12,551 58 

Ward 14 9,125 20 

Ward 15 9,119 82 

Ward 16 8,994 18 

Ward 17 10,375 06 

Ward 18 11.921 44 

Ward 19 16,309 50 

Ward 20 15,610 00 

Ward 21 13,641 75 

Ward 22 13,831 90 

Ward 23 11,251 83 

Ward 24 15,542 66 

$11,656 85 



The Street-watering Act, which was passed in 1897, was 
also subject to attack both in the Legislature and in the 
court. It has, however, stood the test. The text of the act 
and the decision of the court will be found in Appendix G, 
pages 238 to 244. 



Charge foe Permits. 

Yet once again the department suffered by the ruling of 
the court in the case of the charge for permits for street 
openings, etc. A small fee had been charged varying accord- 
ing to the purposes of the permit from twenty-five cents to 
one dollar. The plan worked admirably, not only bringing 
in almost sufficient revenue to cover the cost of the Permit 
Office force, but also gave the permits better standing. The 



Street Department. 13 

following decision was given by Judge Morton in the suits 
brought by the Boston Elevated Railway Company and the 
Boston Gas Light Company, against the Superintendent of 
Streets of the City of Boston, regarding the payment of a fee 
of $1 by the companies for each permit to open streets in 

the city : 

" As I understand these cases, the only matter m contro- 
versy is the right of the Superintendent of Streets, under 
the direction or authority of the Mayor, to compel the peti- 
tioners to pay $1 for each permit which they are required 
to have to open streets in the lawful and proper prosecution 
of their business. 

" I do not understand that any question is seriously made 
that except for their refusal to pay the fee required for the 
permits they would have been issued, or that the petitioners 
are not otherwise entitled to them. 

" Something is said in the answer to the petition of the Gas 
Company about a consent to open the streets being required, 
and none having been given. How much that is relied on 
I do not know. 

" In answer to the Elevated Company's petition it is ad- 
mitted in substance, as I understand, that they need no 
further authority than they have for doing the work to 
which the applications for permits relate. If the want of 
consent in the Gas Company's case, on the part of the proper 
authorities, to the opening of the streets is relied on, then 
that case will have to stand for further hearing on that 

point. . 

" But I assume that the only want of consent that is relied 
on is that arising out of the refusal to pay the charge of $1 
for the permits. 

" There is no statute or ordinance authorizing the collection 
of the fee. In that respect this case differs from those 
cited by the respondent in which the imposition of such 
charges has been sustained. The respondent justifies it 
under Statutes of 1885, chapter 266, section 6, by which the 
executive power vested in the Board of Aldermen as surveyors 
of highways and otherwise is now vested in the Mayor, to be 
exercised by him through the heads of departments. 

" But however just and reasonable the charge may be in 
itself, I do not see how, in the absence of any statute or 
ordinance authorizing it, the Mayor and Superintendent of 
Streets have the right to impose it. It seems to me that it 
does not come within the scope of the executive and ad- 
ministrative powers of the Mayor and Superintendent _ of 
Streets to institute a fee bill, and to compel parties having 



14 City Document No. 38. 

otherwise a legal right to permits to pay the fees thus 
established therefor as a condition of issuing them Such a 
power, I think, can only be conferred in cases like these by 
statute or ordinance. y 

"The expenses rendered necessary in the way of clerical 
help and supervision and examination must be presumed to 
vided for m a PP ro P riation > or must otherwise be pro- 

« As I understand the issue presented it seems to me the 
writ should issue. 

The City Council was then requested to pass the necessary 
ordinance but the matter was killed in committee and no 
further action has been taken, and the general public thus 
continues to stand the expense of work which benefits the 
individual only. 

Tremont Street Trace:s. 

Under provisions of section 35 of chapter 548 of the 
Acts of the year 1894, it was required that the company 
owning and operating the street car tracks on Tremont 
street should remove them when the subway was put into 
service This was done in the early part of October, 1898. 

The Legislature of 1899 passed an act recommitting the 
question to the popular vote of the citizens of Boston at the 
city election held December 12, 1899. The act in part was 
as follows : r 

Section 1 The West End Street Railway Company and the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company as its agent, are hereby author! 
zed to replace upon that part of Tremont street, between Bolton 
street and Scollay square, and upon that part of Boylston street be" 
tween Park square and Tremont street, the surface track whir* 
were removed in accordance with the order of the B to l2 
Commission under the provisions of section thirty-five of chanter 
five hundred and forty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-four, and to use said tracks for he running of ttet 



cars. 



And this act shall not take effect except for'the purpose of 'film* 

he agreement above described, unless it shall be accepted by a ma S 

jonty of the voters of said city voting thereon at the munic al 

election in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-nine. nUmcIpal 

The result of the vote was as follows • 

No, 51,643; Yes, 26,166. 

The city is to be congratulated on this decision. Had the 
tracks been returned the conditions of car transit would have 



Street Department . 15 

been but slightly relieved, and the only result would have 
been to put off the question of h,ow to handle for future time 
the growing traffic of the city centre ; and also to abandon 
the opportunity of making a splendid street for the highest 
class of retail trade, and furthermore taking away the one 
street without tracks in this section of the city for those 
whom business or pleasure require to use wagons or car- 
riages. 

The accompanying cut, taken by permission from the re- 
port of the Rapid Transit Commission, shows what Tremont 
street was before the building of the subway and the taking 
up of the tracks and the condition to which it would have 
returned had the vote been " Yes." The next cut shows the 
street as it looks to-day. I trust that next year's report 
may show a picture of this street properly paved with asphalt 
from Boylston to Winter streets, and thereon to Bosworth 
street (owing to the grade) with best block paving, and from 
thence to Tremont row, either asphalt or block. 

Eight-Hour Day. 

The working hours of the department have been substan- 
tially the nine-hour day, with the exception of bricklayers, 
who have had the eight-hour day. At the city election held 
December 12, 1899, the following act was submitted to the 
citizens : 

Section 1. Eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all 
laborers, workmen and mechanics now employed, or who may here- 
after be employed, by or on behalf of any city or town in this Com- 
monwealth. 

Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent herewith are 
hereby repealed. 

Sect. 3. This act shall not take effect in any city or town until 
accepted by a majority of the voters voting thereon at an annual 
election. Such vote shall be taken by ballot. When so accepted 
this act shall take effect from the date of such acceptance. 

The following was the result of the vote : 
Yes, 60,836 ; No, 14,483. 

The eight-hour day, therefore, becomes the legal labor 
limit for the employees of the city of Boston, and was imme- 
diately put into practice. Under this new condition the 
cost of maintenance and construction will be somewhat 
increased, but by how much can only be estimated after 
actual test. 



16 City Document No. 38. 

Pensions. 

The subject of pensions for city employees is under dis- 
cussion at the State House, a bill having been introduced 
which allows a city to pension its old employees. The plan 
as outlined in the bill provides that employees shall con- 
tribute a certain sum from their wages and the city set aside 
an equal sum ; the sum so created to provide for their pay- 
ment. 

House Bill No. 18. 

January 10, 1900. 
(Introduced on leave by Mr. Jeremiah E. McCarthy of Boston.) 
AN" ACT TO AUTHOKIZE CITIES TO ESTABLISH DEATH 
BENEFIT AND BETIREMENT EUNDS EOB THEIB 
EMPLOYEES. 

Section 1. Any city is hereby authorized to provide by ordi- 
nance, as a part of the compensation to its employees, for the re- 
tirement at a certain age of any or all of such employees who have 
been in its employment for a period of not less than fifteen years, 
for the payment of death benefits to the families of such employees 
and for deducting the whole or any part of the contributions neces- 
sary to create and maintain a fund for such payments from the 
salaries or wages paid to such employees by such city; and any city 
is authorized to raise by taxation for such fund an amount each year 
not exceeding the contributions of its employees to be made during 
such year, as estimated by the city auditor of such city. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

In theory it is doubtful if an entirely sound argument can 
be advanced in favor of such a pension system, but purely 
as a matter of business my experience leads me to believe 
that the city will obtain better results and at substantially no 
cost if a means were provided for dispensing with the ser- 
vices of men who have been in the employ of the city so 
long and with good records that no superintendent will dis- 
charge them, and yet on account of their age or infirmities 
are a hindrance to proper and efficient work. 

Call the keeping of these employees sentiment, charity, or 
what you will, the fact remains that they will be kept unless 
some plan is adopted to care for them. 

The proposed arrangement therefore becomes a plain, cold, 
business proposition, and is worthy of the most careful con- 
sideration. 

Regulations Concerning Pedlees. 

After careful and thorough investigation of various com- 
plaints received regarding certain pedlers, and under 
authority vested in the Superintendent of Streets by sections 



Street Department. 17 

35 and 88, of chapter 47, of the Revised Ordinances of 
1898, a complete system of registration has been inaugurated 
at the Permit Office, 28 Court square. Under this system 
every pedler engaged in selling in the public streets of Boston 
is registered, and furnished a number by the department. 
These numbers are of such size and style as to be easily 
read, and are placed on the right-hand side of the wagons, 
and in a conspicuous position on push-carts and receptacles. 
By the system of registration the residence of each pedler 
is obtained, and his signature is also required, so that it is 
available as a means of identification at any time- 
It is expected that the careful registration and numbering 
of these pedlers, thus compelling them to obtain the proper 
license, will result in a very considerable increase in the 
amount paid into the city treasurer. While the honest ped- 
ler does not suffer from these regulations they operate as a 
check upon those who are dishonest, and their customers — 
who are found to .a large extent among the poorer classes — 
may be expected to benefit thereby. 

As it is now possible to identify any pedler giving short 
weight, acting improperly, or who scatters refuse in the street, 
it is hoped that, with the co-operation of the public in report- 
ing such violations of law, the new system will cause a marked 
improvement in the cleanliness of the streets, and the conduct 
of the pedlers in the sections frequented by this class of deal- 
ers, and will remove just cause of complaint which may have 
existed on the part of shopkeepers or residents in such locali- 
ties. 

Removal of Snow in Public Alleys. 

Owing to the great inconvenience to the department teams 
having charge of the removal of house waste, and to the mar- 
ket, milk, grocery and other wagons using these ways, caused 
by the placing in the alleys large quantities of snow from the 
yards and roofs, a bill was introduced into the Legislature 
permitting the Street Department to remove such snow at 
the cost of the abutters. 

The bill was defeated, however, and the Street Department 
therefore adopted a plan which has worked satisfactorily, 
namely : To require the abutters to provide themselves with 
a permit from the department before allowing the placing of 
snow in these alleys, and one condition of the granting of 
such permit is that the applicant must show an agreement 
with some reliable contractor to immediately remove the snow 
so placed. The list of such permits are furnished to the 
police, and, with their co-operation, the matter is now in a 



18 City Document No. 38. 

satisfactory condition. Placing of snow in these alleys with- 
out permission is, under the statute, punishable by fine. 

Street-Cleaning and Sanitary Divisions in East 

Boston. 

For some years it has been recommended and effort made 
to do away with the contract system for collecting the ashes 
and offal and the sending of the Charlestown gang to clean 
the streets in East Boston, and that the work should be done 
b}" the direct labor of an East Boston force. This has now 
been carried into effect. As regards the ashes and street 
cleaning and the offal removal by the city force will be under- 
taken later when certain arrangements can be made as to its 
disposal. 

Some time since the city yard, which comprised the district 
yard of the Sewer and Paving Divisions was sold, and ar- 
rangements made to remove to the wharf property owned by 
the city in another section of East Boston. Plans were pre- 
pared for the new building, but in order to forward the matter 
and put the new arrangements in force during the construc- 
tion of the new building the old buildings on the property 
have been utilized, and, at a small expenditure, fitted up so 
that there is now ample temporary accommodation, both 
stable and office, for the four divisions. The Sanitary and 
Street-Cleaning Divisions, with new carts and horses, and 
with a proper force of men, should now give East Boston as 
good service as that received in any section of the city. 

The proceeds of the sale of the property formerly occupied 
by the department will, with a small additional appropriation, 
be sufficient to provide for the new building. 

The new building will be a model of its kind, and better 
adapted to the needs of the department than any similar 
building in the city. The plans show that the stable accom- 
modations will be of the very best, with sanitary stalls, etc., 
and the offices will be properly and conveniently arranged. 
The architect's outside view is shown on page 42, Part II. 

Horses. 

The department owns and stables five hundred and forty- 
five horses. Care and judgment have been used in their 
purchase, and among them there are many fine specimens of 
the draught horse. At the 1899 Boston Horse Show four 
entries were made ; but owing to an accident at the runway 
but one of the horses could be exhibited. This one secured 
a prize. 



Street Department. 



19 



One improvement made at small expenditure has proved 
of great value. In the South Sanitary and Street-Cleaning 
yard, on Albany street, a small but perfectly equipped veter- 
inary hospital has been built, and has already been of much 
service in bringing back more quickly to health and good 
condition sick and injured horses. 

The following table shows the number of horses and dis- 
tribution February 1, 1900 : 



Bridge Division 
Paving Division 
Sanitary Division . 
Sewer Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Street-Watering Division 



12 
130 
224 

75 

101 

3 



New Bridges. 



545 



This year sees the completion of two new bridges and the 
beginning of the rebuilding of two others. 

• Charlestown Bridge. 
The Charlestown bridge was started in 1894, and built 
under the Rapid Transit Act; it was opened for public 
travel November 27, 1899. The old so-called Charles River 
bridge, the first bridge built in Boston, running parallel with 
the new one, was then abandoned. In connection with the 
building of this bridge the Street Department was called 
upon for the rebuilding of the roadway approaches and other 
work incidental to the changes in grade and conditions. At 
the opening ceremonies Hon. George G. Crocker, chairman 
oi the Rapid Transit Commission, delivered the following 
address : & 

_ When the government of the Company of Massachusetts Bay was 
in the summer of 1630 transferred to this country, the Governor, 
John Winthrop, first took up his abode in what was then called no 
Charlestown, but Charlton. Three meetings of the Board of Assist- 
ants in August . and September were held there, but a scarcity of 
water in that district and the abundance of good springs on the 
opposite side of the river led the Governor in the autumn" to move 
across to the peninsula, which had been known as Shawmut or Tri- 
mountaine, and to which the Board of Assistants had on the 7th of 
September given the name of Boston. 

On the 9th of November, at the fifth meeting of the Board, being 
the second held in Boston, it was ordered that whosoever should first 
notify the Governor that he was willing to undertake to set up a 
ferry between Charlton and Boston should be allowed to collect 
certain specified tolls thereon. An entry made under date of the 



20 City Document No. 38. 

14th of June of the following year (1631) shows that the operation 
of the ferry bad then been undertaken by Edward Converse. 

Nine years later, in 1640, this ferry franchise was, by the General 
Court, granted to Harvard College. For 146 years thereafter the 
profits derived from it went to promote the cause of education at 
that institution. 

In 1785 John Hancock, Thomas Eussell and others were incor- 
porated with power to build a bridge between Boston and Charles- 
town, " where an ancient ferry had been established." The corpo- 
ration was authorized to collect tolls for the term of forty years and 
during that term was required to pay two hundred pounds each year 
to the college. 

On the 17th of June, 1786, the Charles Eiver bridge, the first 
bridge connecting Boston with the mainland, was opened with much 
ceremony, including the firing of cannon, a civic procession and a 
grand dinner, with many toasts and speeches. 

The bridge which we now overlook is, therefore, in its 114th 
year. 

By the act of the year 1894, which authorized the construction of 
the subway, the Boston Transit Commission was instructed to build 
a bridge across the Charles river between the Charles Biver bridge 
and the Eitchburg Railroad bridge. The completed work is now 
before you. The engineers have been William Jackson, the City 
Engineer, and his assistant, John E. Cheney. Of their care and 
skill the structure is the proof and will be the memorial. 

Summer-street Bridge. 

The new bridge carrying Summer street over the Fort 
Point channel was completed and opened for day travel 
August 14, 1899. This bridge is a steel-plate girder deck 
bridge with a double draw of the retractile type, and relieves 
to a considerable extent the pressure on Congress-street 
bridge and is an important approach to the rapidly develop- 
ing lands of the Commonwealth, and the freight of the N.Y., 
N.H. & H. R.R. Co. 

Maiden Bridge. 

By act of the Legislature of 1899 Boston was required to 
build a new bridge connecting Boston at Alford street, 
Charlestown, with Maiden, the entire cost to be borne by 
Boston, and the amount authorized and ordered set aside 
inside the debt limit was $200,000. The accompanying pic- 
tures show the temporary bridge nearly completed, which is 
to serve during the rebuilding. 

West Boston Bridge. 

In 1898 the Legislature passed an act authorizing the ap- 
pointment of a special commission to rebuild the West 
Boston bridge connecting Boston and Cambridge. This com- 
mission, consisting of the Mayors of Boston and Cambridge 
for the time being, and E. D. Leavitt, has the work well in 



Street Department. 21 

hand, and has constructed the temporary bridge and placed 
the same in charge of the Boston and Cambridge Commis- 
sioners to maintain and care for until the new bridge is com- 
pleted. As a matter of record the following brief history of 
the old bridge about to be removed is added : This bridge 
was erected by popular subscription raised on January 7, 

1792. It was completed and opened for travel November 23, 

1793, bought by the Hancock Bridge Company July, 1846, 
and finally made a free public bridge February 1, 1858. 

WrDEKnsrG of Bridges. 

The draw of the Chelsea North bridge is being widened 
to accommodate the large modern coal-carrying barges, a 
portion of the expense being borne by the New England Gas 
& Coke Company, to whom the greatest benefit will come 
from the improvement, their extensive plant being located 
above this bridge. 

Railroad Bridges. 

To secure entrance to the new Terminal Station the fol- 
lowing changes were necessary: 

The work along the Boston and Providence Railroad ex- 
tension consisted primarily of the construction of a four- 
track railroad parallel with and immediately south of the 
location of the Boston and Albany Railroad, and on the same 
grade between Dartmouth and Albany streets, and extending 
to the new South Station at Summer street. 

The streets encountered were all restored to their original 
lines except Way street, which was reduced to about half its 
former width, and Orange lane, which was entirely aban- 
doned. The restored streets were carried over the new 
tracks at about the same grade as existed on the old Boston 
and Albany Railroad bridges, and generally by the same type 
of bridge as that over the old tracks. At Dartmouth street, 
Columbus avenue, Castle square and Broadway, the bridge 
floor consists of I-beams and brick arches with concrete and 
asphalt pavement. 

As the former grades of all the streets descended more or 
less rapidly from the old Boston and Albany bridges the 
new level of bridges carried south necessitated either an ex- 
tension of the same grade or an increase in its rate, thereby 
requiring numerous changes to houses or their entrances on 
both sides of the streets raised. Area ways were built up to 
new grade, railings erected, steps rearranged with a view 
to damage as little as possible the adjoining property. A 



■22 City Document Xo. 88. 

considerable change in grade occurred at Broadway and 
Albany street where the new grade is about six feet above old 
line. 

Street traffic was maintained on temporary wooden struct- 
ures at all streets during progress of the work excepting for 
short periods at Dartmouth and Washington streets, and at 
Ferdinand street and Broadway, which were closed except 
for foot passengers until permanent work was completed. 

Broadway is still unfinished owing to lack of material for 
the new steel bridge over the Boston and Albany Railroad 
tracks, the new lines of which were changed to connect with 
the new South Station. 

The pavements on streets which were raised were relaid as 
they existed before change was made, except at bridges, and 
at Castle square, where pitch and pebble joints took the 
place of gravel joints in the granite blocks, and at Dartmouth 
street where the former macadam was replaced with granite 
blocks laid with gravel joints. 

Bridge Shelters. 
As a result of a numerously signed petition received from 
firms doing business in the neighborhood of Congress and 
Summer-street bridges stating that their employees, many of 
whom were women, were subject to much suffering during 
inclement weather at times of opening of the bridge for the 
passing of vessels, the matter of shelters was taken in hand 
and the first of these has been erected at the Congress-street 
bridge, and should this prove of value, other bridges will 
undoubtedly be provided with such structures. On the oppo- 
site page will be found a picture of the one winch is already 
in place. 

Violation of City Ordinances. 
In order to secure the carrying out of the order for a 
third separation of the waste and to lessen a nuisance arising 
from the constant violation in certain sections of the city 
of the ordinances forbidding the throwing of refuse into the 
streets, the Board of Police, by request, assigned to the 
Street Department two regular police officers. These officers 
did duty with the department for some months under the 
supervision of the deputies of the Sanitary and Street-Cleaning 
Divisions. The officers so assigned proved to be of the 
greatest assistance, and a large number of convictions in 
court were secured, over one hundred, and much better con- 
ditions brought about. The activity, intelligence, good 
judgment and tact of these officers entitle them to the 
thanks of the department, and I herewith tender it, and I 



Street Department. 23 

also express my appreciation to the Board of Police forjtheir 
assistance. But again, as in past reports, I must state that 
much of the litter of paper and rubbish which creates the 
unsightly conditions and occasions much unnecessary expense 
to the department might be stopped if the police force gener- 
ally would give this matter their attention. 

Elevated Railroad. 

The construction of the elevated railroad was commenced 
this year. The foundation piers were placed over nearly the 
entire route, occasioning for a time much disturbance of the 
streets. The putting in place of the upper structure is now 
in progress. 

The iron structure work is of new design, and is placed 
so as to obstruct the light as little as possible. Accompany- 
ing pictures show the change occasioned in street conditions. 

Veterans' Preference Act. 

Under its operation a veteran once taken into the service 
cannot be dismissed, suspended, transferred, disrated or dis- 
ciplined in any way except after hearing and charges proven 
before the Mayor. The consequence of this act is directly 
prejudicial to the best interests of the veteran. If the act 
were amended so that only the preference clause remained, 
and that not mandatory ; or, in other words, if a veteran 
placed on the list might be appointed in preference to any 
other by the head of a department, and all other restrictions 
now in the act removed, I feel sure that many more veterans 
would receive appointments, and it would work to the best 
interest of all. 

Asphalt and Artificial Stone Guarantee. 

The practice of past years has been to require a five years' 
maintenance and good condition guarantee from the contract- 
ing companies for asphalt and granolithic walks. This year's 
contracts were all made with a ten-year guarantee clause. 

Smoke Nuisance. 

Constant supervision and activity on the part of this 
department is necessary to prevent the increase of the smoke 
nuisance. Difficulty in securing the proper grades of coal 
forced the department for a time to temporary leniency, as 
large users of soft coal in most cases seem willing, under ordi- 
nary conditions, to co-operate as far as possible in preventing 
the trouble. 



24 



City Document No. 38. 



The introduction of coke at fair prices and in sufficient 
quantities, if found practicable as fuel in the large manu- 
facturing plants will greatly aid in the solution of this prob- 
lem. 

Snowfall and Kainfall. 

The snowfall for the year was excessive. The following 
table showing the snowfall and rainfall for the years since 
the present organization of the department is of interest: 

Snowfall (inches). 



Month. 


es 
i 

o 

OS 

cc 


C5 

OS 
CC 
rH 


OS 

es 

CS 
CC 
1H 


■* 

cs 

05 
OS 
CO 


OS 

•* 

cs 
cc 

rH 


CS 

i 

10 

cs 
cc 

rH 


es 
i 
o 

CS 

cc 

rH 


cc 
cs 

t~ 

cs 

CO 
1-H 


es 

cs 

oc 

CS 

cc 


4 

cc" 








3.0 
2.0 
14.6 
35.3 
4.5 
7.9 


0.4 
18.5 
15.0 
21.6 

8.5 


6.7 
13.5 
13.9 

8.8 
3.8 
0.5 


5.2 
9.5 
9.5 
14.5 
0.2 


2.2 

S.6 

18.2 

10.9 

3.3 


8.1 
7.8 
16.3 
11.5 
6.0 
2.2 


17.8 
7.7 
6.1 

30.7 
9.3 


.1 


December 

January 

February 


14.5 
14.7 
13. 7 
16.2 


12.0 
11.5 
20.0 


8.3 












Totals 


59.1 


43.5 


67.3 


64.0 


47.2 


38.9 


43.2 


51.9 


71.6 


S.4 



Snow Account. 



1891-92 . 


$102,410 86 


1896-97 . 


. 168,741 


07 


1892-93 . 


60,190 20 


1897-98 . 


. 116,224 


20 


1893-94 . 


151,943 33 


1898-99 . 


. 172,963 


48 


1894-95 . 


78,381 71 


1899-1900 . 


. 154,625 


18 


1895-96 . 

At 


. 84,809 08 


pars irkl 1 029 


19 





Rainfall (inches). 



lO 


CO 
















00 


00 


GO 


""* 


1-1 


T ~ 1 





January . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October 
November 
December, 

Totals... 



3.40 
2.53 
2.70 
1.68 
1.56 
3.06 
3.73 
3.87 
2.29 
5.56 
2.20 
3.50 



3.85 

.36 

1.68 

.93 

5.15 

3.05 

2.56 

4.87 

1.90 

2.31 

2.94 

.87 



2.26 
4.82 
2.80 
3.13 
5.23 
2.20 
1.72 
6.46 
1.59 
2.94 
1.83 
5.16 



36.08 



30.47 



40.14 



3.01 


3.79 


2.25 


3.16 


3.50 


3.15 


1.11 


3.94 


2.12 


4.81 


1.01 


2.72 


5.41 


2.79 


1.82 


3.78 


3.65 


1.56 


3.17 


6.31 


4.12 


2.71 


1.68 


4.00 


4.33 


.80 


1.73 


2.71 


4.46 


1.60 


3.01 


2.98 


2.90 


4.22 


4.42 


3.03 


3.24 


2.15 


3.95 


6.38 


2.14 


1.53 


6.40 


2.38 


1.93 


5.11 


6.19 


3.15 


.41 


7.17 


3.10 


8.07 


3.70 


6.19 


5.32 


4.28 


2.45 


1.70 


3.92 


2.19 


36.54 


40.17 


37.55 


40.77 


49.78 



4.19 
3.03 
5.95 
1.29 
.81 
2.86 
2.52 
2.52 
5.09 
2.40 
2.51 
1.52 



34.69 



In this rainfall is included the precipitation during the 
winter months, which equals .1 of an inch to 1 inch of snow- 
fall. 




PLAN. SHOWING AVENUES UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN I 895-6-7-8 and 9. 
Solid line shows completed work. Broken line shows work gnder construction. 



Steeet Department. 25 

PAVING DIVISION. 

JEJxpe?iditures. 
Maintenance. Specials. 

1860,057.86 $1,331,729.13 

It is always extremely difficult in advance to give an esti- 
mate of the amount required for the maintenance of the 
Paving Division, for the reason that much depends upon 
weather conditions, and the sum needed is also dependent to 
some extent on the provisions made for special work in the 
annual loan bill to be passed at a later date by the City 
Council. This is well illustrated by the experience of the 
past year. The amount for maintenance recommended by 
this department was $775,000 and an additional sum suffi- 
cient to cover the cost of snow removal, whatever that might 
be. The appropriation as made was $690,000 plus $50,000 
for snow, making in all $740,000. 

This appropriation, had the weather conditions been nor- 
mal, or had any fair sum or the usual amount been appropri- 
ated from loans for special and improvement work, might 
have been made to cover the maintenance cost. The year 
preceding this (1898) the amount allowed for reconstruction 
work was nearly fifty per cent, less than the amount allowed 
for the several years previous for similar purposes, and the ex- 
penditure for snow was nearly twice the average for the 
past few years, thus making it impossible to do any work 
other than that most necessary ; and certain conditions, which 
should have been improved, had to be left unchanged until 
the present year, with the expectation that a proper amount 
would be allotted for street improvements in the various dis- 
tricts. The conditions of the present fiscal year, however, 
have been even more difficult. Commencing with the great 
storm of November 26, 1898, the winters of 1898 and 1899 
made a record for snow and difficult weather conditions 
almost unequalled in the history of the consolidated Street 
Department, and the expense of snow removal alone was 
$154,625.18. 

Under modern conditions the streets must be cleared of 
snow ; and particularly in a city where the business sections 
are so congested the streets must be promptly put in proper 
condition for travel. 

This created at once a shortage over and above the amount 
allowed for snow of $104,000. As the current revenue of the 
city had been allotted to the various departments, it was not 
possible to make good this amount. The Mayor, however, 
in anticipation of surplus income, which at the end of the 
year would be available, allowed it to be carried as an 



26 City Document No. 38. 

amount to be made good to the snow fund, whenever under 
the ordinances transfers of surplus money could be made. 
Even the necessity for this transfer to the snow fund, how- 
ever, might have been avoided if an amount in any degree 
adequate to the calls upon the Paving Division had been ap- 
propriated during the year. 

The annual appropriation for street construction and recon- 
struction under the general law had been, since the consolida- 
tion of the Street Department, an amount averaging some 
$800,000 with the exception of last year, when the amount 
dropped to $348,000 and the amount made available this year 
was but $292,600, of which but $75,000 was available for 
general work, the balance being assigned to special streets. 
Any one familiar with the cost of street construction, where 
the street is to be thoroughly rebuilt, knows that $3,000 is an 
utterly insignificant sum to cover any ward in the city ; and 
an equal division of the $75,000 allowed but that amount to 
each ward. 

To show the difficulties which this entailed, it is but neces- 
sary to refer to the fact that for some years immediately 
previous to 1898, the amount allowed for each ward was 
$25,000. Thus it was absolutely necessary, in order to re- 
lieve conditions which were either dangerous or where the 
demand for improvement was universal and proper, to use 
a considerable portion of the money, which was appropriated 
for maintenance only, for work usually and properly covered 
by loan money. It is safe to assume that at least $100,000 
of the maintenance money was required under such conditions 
as these. Thus the entire year has been a constant effort to 
keep as close to the appropriation as possible, and yet at the 
same time to do whatever was absolutely necessary and could 
be reasonably covered by the transfer expected at the end of 
the year. 

The Paving Division, which has charge of the street signs, 
has in this line done a great deal of work, so that the city is 
better supplied with signs than ever before. 

This fall, the suburban sections, the cleaning of which 
devolves on the Paving Division, have been most thoroughly 
gone over, this being deemed important work, as clean gutters 
and clean streets before the cold weather sets in mean much 
to the health and comfort of such districts during the whiter. 

The division has charge of the maintenance and recon- 
struction of about four hundred and eighty-nine (489) miles 
of streets. 

The following shows the amount and kind of reconstruc- 
tion work done by the Paving Division during the year : 



Street Department. 



27 



Granite blocks on concrete base, with pitch-joints 
Granite blocks on gravel base, with pitch-joints . 
Granite blocks on gravel base, with gravel-joints 
Asphalt 

Macadam. See note. 



Sq. yds. 

41,632 

991 

59,577 

14,190 



Note. — A very large portion of the work of the Paving Division is 
the reconstruction of macadam streets. The amount of this work is 
best shown by the number of feet of edgestone set and reset, gutters 
laid and relaid, and brick sidewalks laid and relaid, which are as 
follows: 

Edgestone set and reset, 185,260 linear feet. Gutters laid and relaid, 
92,537 square yards. Brick sidewalks laid and relaid, 79,171 square 
yards. 

Crushed Stone, Ballast and Telford. 

Output of Stone from City Crushers. 





Crushed Stone. 
Tons. 


Telford. 

Tons. 


Bleiler's ledge 


37,523 
15,585 
788 
11,163 
41,256 
22,088 
33,800 


153 


Centre street crusher 




Chestnut Hill avenue crusher 




Codman street crusher 




Commonwealth avenue crusher 


9,484 


Dimock street crusher 


Rosseter street crusher 








Totals 


162,203 


9,637 





On Commonwealth avenue the work has been nearly 
finished, so that the avenue is practically completed from 
Arlington street to the Newton line. On Columbia road, from 
Blue Hill avenue to Mt. Vernon street, the work is finished 
with the exception of the section in the immediate vicinity 
of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Midland Division, which will 
not be completed until the new bridge is built. The section 
from Mt. Vernon street easterly has been filled and graded. 

Charlestown street, from Haymarket square to Causeway 
street, has been widened, and the roadway paved with large 
granite blocks on a concrete base with pitch-joints. This 
work has been done under authority of chapter 346 of the 
Acts of 1897. 



28 City Document No. 38. 

On Ipswich street the steel superstructure over Charles- 
gate West has been constructed. 

Asphalt surfaces were laid on the following streets : Har- 
rison avenue, between Kneeland and Harvard streets ; Milton 
street, Ward 8; Endicott street, between Cooper and Thacher 
streets ; Kingston street, between Beach and Essex streets ; 
Charles street, between Fruit and Allen streets; Devonshire 
street, between Milk and Water streets, and Genesee and 
Oswego streets. 

The most important paving work was the reconstruction of 
the following streets which were paved with large granite 
blocks, with pitch-joints on a concrete base : Atlantic avenue, 
between Oliver street and Dewey square ; Blackstone street, 
between Hanover and North streets ; Congress street, between 
Atlantic avenue and about 100 feet westerly from the bridge ; 
and Kingston street, between Essex and Bedford streets. 

Harrison avenue, between Harvard and Bennet streets, and 
Leverett street, between Minot and Causeway streets, were 
repaved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Talbot avenue, between Blue Hill avenue and Norfolk 
street, was constructed and graded; Capen street, between 
Norfolk and Evans streets, was constructed ; Princeton street, 
between Meridian and Prescott streets, and Prescott, between 
Trenton and Saratoga streets, were reconstructed. 

Atlantic avenue and Dewey square, in front of the Ter- 
minal Station, has been paved with large granite blocks on 
a concrete base with pitch joints. 



SEWER DIVISION. 

The appropriation for the maintenance of the Sewer 
Division was $350,000, and this sum has been expended in 
the operation of the main drainage works, maintenance of 
Stony brook, operation of the Lyons-street pumping station, 
and the general expenses of the division, including the main 
office, and a permit office, with both clerical and inspection 
force, and also in the cleaning, flushing and repairing of 156 
miles of sewers and 6,953 catch-basins throughout the city. 

The expenses for maintenance and construction work in 
this division have been as follows : 
Maintenance ..... $347,133 61 



Sewerage Works .... 
Stony Brook Improvement 
Stony Brook Improvement (Chap. 397 
Acts of 1899) .... 



1,086,893 33 
46,673 24 

151,518 65 

$1,632,218 86 




A — m » :S 




Street Department. 29 

Action should be taken looking to the more stringent 
regulations to prevent the placing of steam in the sewers. 

During the coming year Stony brook construction should 
be extended to Keyes street. 

The city, in conjunction with the town of Brookline, 
should take action looking to the improvement of Muddy 
river. 

That portion of Stony brook from the Boston Belting 
Company's property to the Back Bay Fens should be built, 
and the new and old channels connected, so that none of the 
foul-water flow of Stony brook can be discharged into the 
Back Bay Fens. 

In the past four years the amount of sewer work has been 
very considerable, and the main drainage works, pumping 
station and reservoirs will be found in almost perfect and 
complete condition, so that the only pressing need now is the 
new engine, which has been contracted for. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 

$567,107.81. 

The plant of this division will be found in excellent con- 
dition, and the arrangements well ordered. In four years 
much has been accomplished, and in the past year the 
development of modern methods in disposing of the city 
wastes has been brought about, the garbage being treated at 
a plant at Cow Pasture, and the light waste at a refuse- 
burning plant on Atlantic avenue. 

A considerable amount of extra work has been accom- 
plished from the maintenance appropriation, such as the 
building of a new wharf on Albany street, dredging of the 
docks, and unusual repairs on the dumping scows. 

I would recommend that the spring cleaning of private 
alleys, which has been made the past two years by this divi- 
sion, be continued. Although there is no direct responsi- 
bility on the city for this work, as a matter of health it is 
very desirable and almost necessary that it should be under- 
taken. 

Suitable dumping places become less frequent every year, 
and it is very desirable that a new dumping scow be provided 
for at once. 

Electric power should be installed in the Albany-street 
workshops. 



30 City Document No. 38. 

STREET-CLEANING DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 

$322,951.15. 

The division has been somewhat crippled owing to snow 
work in the early part of the year, which was in excess of 
that usually required. The service of the division has been 
extended, so far as the limits of the appropriation would 
allow, to Dorchester and Brighton; these sections heretofore 
being cared for by the Paving Division. 

All paved streets at least should be cared for by the Street- 
Cleaning Division, and I believe that there should be a gen- 
eral extension of this work, during the summer months at 
least, to certain portions of the city now in the care of the 
Paving Division. 

The establishment of a local force in East Boston, which 
was accomplished this year, will bring about better results in 
that section, and similar arrangements should be made for the 
Dorchester District. 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. Special. 

8120,408.72. 828,724.79 

The appropriation for the Bridge Division was 8120,750. 
There should have been provided a larger sum, as it has 
been impossible with this amount to do the work urgently 
called for. 

Many of the bridges are old, and require much reconstruc- 
tion. For some years there has been neglect on the part of 
the City Council to make appropriations for reconstruction 
work, so that the coming year there should be provided a very 
considerable sum to keep the bridges in even a safe condition. 

There are on file various recommendations of the City En- 
gineer which it has not been possible to carry out, owing to 
lack of funds, a very large per cent, of the maintenance ap- 
propriation being required for the actual operation of the 
bridges, payment of draw-tenders, etc. 

I would recommend that apparatus operated by electricity 
be placed in position on Dover street, Federal street, Meridian 
street, Chelsea North, new Charlestown and Summer-street 
1 nidges, to assist vessels through the draws. This would 
save a very considerable amount of time at the openings. 



Street Department. 31 

The department has commenced the construction of a 
shelter on the Congress-street bridge, which was asked for in 
a very numerously signed petition. If this is successful I 
would recommend that it be extended to other bridges. 

FERRY DIVISION. 

Maintenance. 
Expenditures. 

1211,822.87. 

Receipts. 

$169,640.13. 

Specials. 
Expenditures. 

$77,516.28. 

Traffic. 

12,453,163 foot passengers. 
966,475 teams. 

This division will be found in excellent condition, with the 
exception of the South Ferry head-house, East Boston side, 
which should be rebuilt. Plans have been prepared, but the 
matter is now in abeyance, owing to the fact that the Boston 
and Maine Railroad Company has refused to sell land owned 
by it, adjoining the head-house, which is required for the 
building of the new structure. I would recommend that this 
matter be given early consideration, to see what action can 
be taken. 

One new boat, the "Noddle Island," has been placed in 
commission the past year, at the cost of about 175,000. 

The " Governor Russell," which was sold to the United 
States Government, was repurchased for the sum of $25,000 ; 
$25,000 has been expended in remodelling her for the ferry 
service, and she went into commission January 4, 1900, cost- 
ing the city only about $50,000 for a boat as good as new. 

A new boat has been contracted for on the lines of the 
"Governor Russell" and the "Noddle Island," which will 
cost in the neighborhood of $92,000. 



STREET-WATERING DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 

$174,625.97. 

The Street- Watering Division completes its second year 
under the new Street- Watering Assessment Act, whereby all 
public streets are watered by the city, and assessment made. 



32 City Document No. 38. 

The city for the past season was divided into four districts. 
Assessment was made for District 1, the down-town and 
Back Bay section, at seven cents per front foot, the next 
circle six cents, the next five and the next four. 

The plan of watering the whole city, paved as well as 
macadamized streets, has met with the approval of the pub- 
lic ; but the assessment as arranged now, does in some cases 
work a hardship, and I would suggest that the matter of 
assessment be taken early in hand, and an effort made to 
more equitably apportion the assessments. 



BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

Expenditures. 

$15,998.18. 

William J. Marvin, my fellow-commissioner, upon whom I 
have allowed all the detail of the work to fall, I again desire 
to thank for the very efficient, and businesslike way in which 
he has cared for the bridges between the two cities, keeping 
them in safe and good condition with a limited appropriation. 
The detail of work in this division will be found in Appen- 
dix H. 

The most important recommendation that I can make is 
the need of a new bridge connecting Cambridge and Boston 
at North Harvard street. This street has been widened and 
built at a very considerable expense on either side of the 
river, while the bridge remains a narrow, old-fashioned, poorly- 
constructed affair. As Soldiers' Field and the Cambridge 
Park are at this point, there should be a bridge to fit the sur- 
roundings. (See picture taken from the Cambridge side look- 
ing toward Soldiers' Field.) 



SUMMARY OF WORK DONE. 
Bridge Division. 

Overhauled and thoroughly repaired the following bridges, 
viz. : 

Berkeley street, Columbus avenue, Congress street, Ferdi- 
nand street, Granite avenue, Massachusetts avenue, over the 
B. & A. R.R., Massachusetts avenue, over the N.Y., N.H. & 
H. R.R. (Providence Division), Shawmut avenue, Williams 
street, over Stony brook. 

Lauriat avenue bridge, to allow the street to pass under 
the N.Y., N.H. and H. R.R. (Midland Division), was 



Street Department. 33 

completed this year at a cost of 821,000. The work of con- 
structing the bridge and abutments was done by the railroad 
company and paid for by the city. 

Ferry Division. 

Repurchased the ferry-boat " Governor Russell " from the 
United States Government for $25,000, refitted her for ser- 
vice at a cost of about $25,000, making a total cost of about 
$50,000. To duplicate this boat to-day would cost about 
$95,000, thus the city was saved about $45,000 by the 
transaction. 

One new ferry-boat has been contracted for, and will be in 
commission about August 1, 1900. 

Paving Division. 

Paved with granite blocks, 41,632 square yards on con- 
crete base and 59,577 square yards on gravel base, or a total 
of 101,209 square yards, including paving and regulating 
nine (9) streets. 

Paved 92,537 square yards gutters, set or reset 185,260 
linear feet of edgestones and laid 14,190 square yards of 
asphalt on concrete base. 

Paved and repaved sidewalks as follows : 

Brick .... 79,171 square } 7 ards. 

Crushed stone . . 39,581 square yards. 

Artificial stone . . 23,318 square yards. 

Work has progressed on 61 streets, and 11 public alleys 
laid out and ordered constructed under chapter 323, Acts of 
1891 and amendments, and 38 streets and 11 public alleys 
have been completed. Contracts for 8 streets to be con- 
structed under this Act have been executed, but the work 
has not yet been started. 

Sanitary Division. 

Collected and removed 329,096 loads of ashes, 19,815 
loads of combustible waste and 59,956 loads of house offal. 

Constructed a new dumping station at the wharf of the 
Albany-street yard. 

Erected a hospital at the Albany-street yard for the care 
and treatment of sick horses. 

Sewer Division. 

Built 21.46 miles of sewers and 412 new catch-basins ; 
flushed 156.47 miles of sewers, removed 826 cubic yards of 



84 City Document No. 38. 

deposit from sewers, and 9,224 cubic yards from the Pumping 
Station; cleaned 6,953 catch-basins, removing 21,110 cubic 
yards of deposit. 

Street-Cleaning Division. 

Removed 206,853 loads of street sweepings, etc., and 
emptied 18,409 public waste barrels. 

Street- Watering Division. 
Watered 413.59 miles of streets. 

Employment of Labor. 

The report of the Civil Service Clerk, showing the classifi- 
cation of the employees of the department and the transfers 
and requisitions made for the several divisions of the depart- 
ment, will be found in Appendix K. 



CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 
EXPENSES op the central office. 

For the current expenses of the Central Office the City 
Council appropriated the sum of eighteen thousand eight 
hundred (18,800) dollars, which was expended as follows : 

Salaries $16,077 20 

General office expenditures . . 2,722 21 



Total $18,799 41 

leaving a balance of fifty-nine (59) cents, which was trans- 
ferred to the City Treasury. 

The detailed financial statements, work done, etc., will be 
found in the pages following and the twelve appendices 
annexed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ben j. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



Street Department. 



35 









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Street Department. 



37 



Bridge Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriations. 


Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 
Transfers. 


Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1899, to 

Jan. 31, 1900. 


Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 




$10,000 00 

216 66' 

2,307 89 

21,000 00 

945 25 


$6,300 75 
216 66 
262 13 

21,000 00 
945 25 


$3,699 25 






2,045 76 












Totals 


$34,469 80 


$28,724 79 


$5,745 01 







Ferry Division Specials. 



Object op Appropriations. 



Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 

Transfers. 



Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1899, to 

Jan. 31, 1900. 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 



Clock, South Ferry head-house (Bos 
ton side) 



New ferry-boats 

New ferry landing (chapter 435, Acts 
of 1895) 



• !$474 79 
78,036 40 

2156,606 51 



$474 79 
64,S53 80 

12,187 69 



$13,182 60 
144,418 82 



Totals . 



$235,117 70 



$77,516 28 



$157,601 42 



1 Original appropriation $500 00 

Transferred to City Treasury 25 21 



$474 79 



2 Balance of appropriation, Feb. 1, 1899 $356,606 51 

Transferred to City Treasury 200,000 00 



$156,606 51 



Paving Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriations. 


Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 

Transfers. 


Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1899, to 

Jan. 31, 1900. 


Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 


Abolishment of grade crossings 

Albany street, in front of Massachu- 


$1,901 77 

1 3,137 92 

47,974 94 

299 50 


$1,901 77 

47,974 94 
299 50 




Atlantic avenue 




Atlantic street 








Carried forward 


$53,314 13 


$50,176 21 









1 See page : 



88 City Document No. 38. 

Paving Division Specials. — Concluded. 



Object of Appropriations. 



Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 
Transfers. 



Expended 

from 

Feb. 1, 1S99, to 

Jan. 31, 1900. 



Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 



Brought forward 

Blackstone street 

Brighton avenue 

Brooks street 

Buildings Chelsea street. 

Capen street 

Charles street 

Charlestown bridge 

Commonwealth avenue.. 
Congress street 



Devonshire street, Milk to Water 
street, asphalting 



Devonshire street, State to Water 
street, repaving 



Eleanor and Eidgemont streets. 

Federal street 

Freeport street 

Genesee and Oswego streets 



Harrison avenue, Asylum to Davis 
street, asphalting 



Harrison avenue, Kneeland to Bennet 
street, asphalting 

Kingston street 

Leverett street , 

Mead street 

Milton street 

Prescott street 

Princeton street 

Rapid Transit 



Retaining-wall, Marcella and Centre 
.streets 



Sydney street 

Talbot avenue 

Washington street 



Totals. 



$53,314 13 
10,000 00 

2 335 12 
32,000 00 
11,180 25 

3,000 00 

9,600 00 
13,545 38 

4,105 54 
19,000 00 

3,800 00 

6,500 00 

s 605 51 

22,993 53 

* 1,033 27 

8,000 00 

1,000 00 

9,95S 47 

13,235 01 

17,062 66 

1,7S0 96 

1,200 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,234 94 

2,500 00 

5 253 06 

50,000 00 

4,392 70 



$316,630 53 



850,176 21 
10,000 00 

32,000 00 
3,194 15 
3,000 00 
8,707 12 

13,545 3S 



13,199 75 
3,800 00 



22,993 53 

34S 50 

8,000 00 



9,958 47 
13,235 01 
17,062 66 



1,200 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,234 94 

7 60 

37,785 11 

4,392 70 



$268,841 13 



§7,986 10 



4,105 54 
5.S00 25 



1,000 00 



1,780 96 



12,214 89 



42,773 02 



Transferred to City Treasury as follows: 

1 Albany street, in front of Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital... $3,137 92 

2 Brighton avenue 335 12 

3 Eleanor and Ridgemont streets 605 51 

4 Freeport street 684 77 

& Sydney street 253 06 

o Totals $5,016 38 



Street Department. 



39 



Street Improvements. 



Object of Appropriations . 


Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 
Transfers. 


Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1S99, to Jan. 

31, 1900. 


Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 


Street Improvements, Ward 4 


$5,488 55 

117 99 

1,336 30 

12,161 IS 

696 49 

1,773 21 

892 86 

693 87 

3,174 96 

5,025 51 

2,983 77 

7,651 97 

873 71 

658 09 

1,813 10 

85,440 62 


$5,488 55 

117 99 

1,336 30 

1,270 79 

696 49 

1,773 21 

892 86 

693 87 

3,174 96 

5,025 51 

2,983 77 

7,651 97 

873 71 

658 09 

1,813 10 

85,440 62 


i $890 39 


Street Improvements, Ward 13 

Street Improvements, Ward 16 

Street Improvements, Ward 17 

Street Improvements, Ward 22 


Totals 


$120,782 18 


$119,891 79 


i $890 39 





i Transferred to the City Treasury, $890.39. 



Sewer Division Specials. 



Object of Appropriations. 


Appropria- 
tions, Balances 
and 
Transfers. 


Expended 

from Feb. 1, 

1899, to Jan. 

31, 1900. 


Balances on 

hand 
Jan. 31, 1900. 


Dam from Maverick street to Prescott 


i $3,000 00 

2,044.426 50 

46,673 24 

350,000 00 


§1,086,893 33 
46,673 24 

151,518 65 






$957,533 17 




Stony Brook Improvement (chapter 
397, -A cts of 1899) 


198,481 35 




Totals 


$2,444,099 74 


$1,285,085 22 


$1,156,014 52 





i Order creating appropriations rescinded by Board of Estimate and Apportionment. 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways. 

Expenditures. 
Street construction (general) . . . $511,250 51 

Street" construction, Charlestown street . 37,172 50 

Total . 
Street construction 
Street construction 



Brighton. 



Dorchester. 



$548,423 


01 


816,280 


36 


$33,483 


80 



40 City Document No. 38. 

East Boston. 

Street construction 



$3,561 90 



Roxbury and West Roxbury. 



Street construction 



$24,037 97 



Blue Hill and other Avenues. 

Street Construction. 

Blue Hill avenue $9,372 42 

Columbus avenue . . . ' . 5,585 10 

Commonwealth avenue extension . . 408 00 

Commonwealth avenue .... 230,688 37 

Total $246,053 89 



South Union Station. 

Expenditures. 



Street construction 



$71,155 28 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months Ending 
January 31, 1900. 



Object of Appro pkiations. 



Current 
Expenses. 



Special 
Appropri- 
ations. 



Totals. 



Street Department : 

Central Office 

Bridge Division 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division — , 

Street Cleaning Division 

Street Watering Division 

Street Improvements 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways (Brighton) 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways (Dorchester) 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways (East Boston) 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways (Roxbury and West 

Roxbury) 

Blue Hill and other Avenues 

South Union Station 



$18,799 41 
120,408 72 
15,998 18 
211,822 87 
860,057 86 
567,107 81 
347,133 64 
322,951 15 
174,625 97 



Totals. 



$2,638,905 61 



,724 79 



77,516 28 
268,841 13 



1,285,085 22 



119,891 79 

54S,423 01 

3,561 90 

33,483 SO 

16,280 36 



24,037 97 
246,053 69 

71,155 28 



§2.723,055 42 



$18,799 41 
149,133 51 
15,998 18 
2S9.339 15 

1,128,898 99 
567,107 81 

1,632,218 86 
322,951 15 
174,625 97 
119,891 79 

548,423 01 

3,561 90 

33,483 80 

16,280 36 



24,037 97 

246,053 89 

71,155 28 



$5,361,961 03 



Street Department. 



41 



Street Building under Chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, or Special 
Acts or Amendments thereto. 



Alexander st $14 

Alford st 13 

Amory st 193 

Andrews st 1,468 

Angell st 5,711 

Ashley st 21 

Astor st 6,881 

Athelwold st 421 

Atherstone st 67 

B st 53 

Belmore terrace 91 

Belvidere st 4,854 

Bernard st 171 

Blandf ord st 10 

Boston st 3 

Bragdon st 66 

Burt st 4.005 

Callender st 136 

Cambridge st 18 

Canal st 10,340 

Carlos st 164 

Chamblet st 440 

Charlestown st 37,172 

Chester st 3,931 

Chiswick road 10,960 

Columbia road 241,403 

Commonwealth ave. . . 867 

Cummington st 16 

Devon st 14,707 



41 
3S 
737 
1,416 
31 
16 
6,875 
9,748 
4,283 
5,153 
406 
44 
5,702 
Ipswich st 32,299 



Edwin st. 

Elizabeth st 

Execution of court. . 

Fairmount st 

Florida st 

Forest Hills st 

Fowler st 

Francis st 

Hamilton st 

Harold st 

Hewins st 

Homes ave ■ 

Idaho st 



41 

194 

6 

86 

54 

4,841 

86 

2,025 

382 

629 

3,904 

6 

5 

593 

10,026 

66 

5,268 

Peterborough st 12,532 



Jersey st. 
Josephine st. . 

Leeds st 

Leedsville st. . 

Leroy st 

Lonsdale st. . . 
Malvern st . . . . 
Maryland st. . . 

Mellen st 

Merlin st 

Middleton st. . 

Millet st 

Newburg st . . . 
Nightingale st. 
N. Harvard st. 

Oakley st 

Orkney road., 



65 
50 
35 
18 
73 
50 
35 
50 
45 
35 
30 
05 
98 
53 
55 
69 
17 
38 
06 
91 
75 
16 
76 
13 
34 
63 
06 
43 
43 
76 
17 
40 
06 
12 
09 
56 
61 
43 
84 
31 
22 
35 
67 
61 



Peverell st $2,404 75 

Rosseter st 817 69 

Ruggles st 504 01 

St. Stephen st 8,590 97 

School st 339 07 

Shirley st 7,906 11 

Spencer st. (Talbot to 

Wheatland ave.).... 3,845 29 
Spencer st. (Athelwold 

to Park st.) 1,842 45 

Spring st 7,765 24 

Stanley st 2,894 12 

Stuart st 38 35 

Telford st 33 21 

Thane st 1,627 14 

Tonawanda st 420 30 

Trinity pi 4,056 16 

Vancouver st 102 67 

Van Winkle st 130 17 

Water low st 137 38 

Wensley st 6,587 55 

West Selden st 3,491 31 

Woodcliff st 22 87 

Woodlawn st 6,578 10 

Worthington st 9,304 53 

Public Alley No. 101 . . 2,399 88 

" 102.. 1,013 78 

" 301.. 3 95 

" " 401.. 3,222 15 

" " 402.. 2,764 49 

" 403.. 2,480 36 

" 404.. 3,174 75 

" " 405.. 1,290 94 

" " 414.. 13 67 

" " 415.. 3 94 

" 416.. 3 94 

" 417.. 3 94 

" 418.. 253 12 

" 419.. 1,812 40 

" 420.. 119 29 

« 421.. 3 94 

" " 430.. 266 54 

" - " 431.. 1,259 46 

" " 432.. 3 94 

« "433.. 3 94 

" " 434.. 3 94 

" 435.. 3 94 

" " 436.. 11 44 

" " 437.. 752 18 

" " 438.. 3 60 

" 439.. 3 60 

" " 440.. 3 60 

" " 441.. 3 60 

" « 442.. 3 60 

" " 443.. 3 60 

" 444.. 3 60 

" 701.. 4,477 03 

«' " 702.. 1,031 76 

" 703.. 821 30 

Total $548,423 01 



42 



City Document No. 38. 



Brighton. 

Cambridge st $16,280 36 

East Boston. 



Ashley st.... $1,267 74 

Bennington st 1,711 03 



Carried forward. 



£2,978 77 



Brought forward . . . 
Public Alley No. 2001, 



Total. 



Dorchester. 



Alexander st. . 
Annabel st . . . 
Atlierstone st. 

Barry st 

Boston st 

Callender st.. . 

Draper st 

Edison Green. 

Edwin st 

Esmond st. . . . 

Florida st 

Fowler st 

Geneva ave. . . . 
Gibson st 



3,077 


02 


105 


79 


1,946 


43 


46 04 


461 


79 


118 


25 


8 


25 


127 


27 


7,221 


24 


80 


39 


4,630 


64 


9 


79 


7 


50 


413 


40 



Lauriat ave 

Leonard st 

Montague st. . . . 
Nottingham st. 

Rockford st 

Rozella st 

Shatter st 

Thane st 

Van Winkle st. . 
Wainwright st. . 

Waldeck st 

Warner st 

Wood cliff st.... 



Total . 



Roxbury and West Roxbury. 



Aberdeen st 

Albany and North- 
ampton sts 

Amory st 

Blandford st 

Bragdon st 

Congreve st 

Cummington st . . . . 

Custer st 

Dresden st 

Hubbard st 

Newburg st 



$55 


25 


350 


12 


5,747 


23 


108 


25 


3,413 


44 


3,621 


84 


115 


00 


35 


89 


109 


62 


1,922 


04 


3,257 01 



J, 978 77 
583 13 

3,561 90 



$2,629 


62 


16 


To 


17 95 


10 


55 


5 


54 


1,707 


:>6 


62 


20 


7 


00 




70 


12 


00 


10,687 


32 


72 


11 




70 



3,483 80 



Oakview terrace 

Pontiac st 

Queensberry st 

Rowe st 

Seymour st 

South st 

Stratford st 

Williams st 

Public Alley No. 901. 
Public Alley No. 905 . 



Total $24,037 97 



$2,427 


26 


285 


00 


1,765 


93 


417 


72 


155' 


23 


37 


00 


36 


50 


6 


94 


166 


60 


3 


CO 



Summary. 

Laying-out and construction of Highways $548,423 01 

Laying-out and construction of Highways, Brighton 16,280 36 

Laying-out and construction of Highways, Dorchester 33,483 80 

Laying-out and construction of Highways, East Boston 3,561 90 

Laying-out and construction of Highways, Roxbury and 

West Roxbury 24,037 97 



Total. 



,787 04 



Street Department. 



43 



List of Contracts from February 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900, 
made by the Street Department. 



Paving Blocks. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
M. deliv- 
ered on 
wharves. 


Large paving-blocks, 500,000... 

Philadelphia paving-blocks, 
500,000 


Rockport Granite Co... 

Rockport Granite Co.. . 
Rockport Granite Co. . . 
W. G.Sargent & Son... 


April 10, 1899... 

April 10, 1899... 
April 10, 1899... 
April 17, 1899. . . 


$54 90 
53 70 


Gutter paving-blocks, 800,000... 
Large paving-blocks, 50,000 


47 30 
50 00 



Bank Gravel and Sand. 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price, 
Double Load. 




Gravel. 


Sand. 




P. O'Riorden 

L. F. Leary 

"P. O'Riorden 

F. R. Kimball 


March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 
March 31, 1899.. 

March 31, 1899.. 
March 31,1899.. 


$1 44 
1 25 
1 40 
1 60 
1 07 
1 38 
1 51 

1 60 
1 35 


$1 36 
1 25 






1 10 




1 50 




1 07 




F. McGovern 

O. Nawn &Co....... 

W. Gilligan 

P. O'Riorden .... 


1 45 




1 51 








1 60 


District 10 j 


1 10 







Note. — Single loads to cost one-half of the foregoing prices. 



Crosswalk Flagging. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per sq. ft. 


On wharves. 


On streets. 




Rockport Granite Co. . . 
A. Ford & Son 


April 10, 1899... 
March 21, 1899.. 


$0 32 
29J 




North River 


$0 33 







44 



City Document No. 38. 



Spruce Lumber. 



District. 



Awarded to 



Dated 



Price per 

M. ft. B. M. 

planed or 

rough. 



South Boston. . 
East Boston. .. 
Charlestown... 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

City Proper 



Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. . . 

G. Fuller & Son 

G. Fuller & Son 

G. Fuller & Son 

G. Fuller & Son 

Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. . . 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. .. 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. . . 



Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 30, 



1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 
1899. 



$15 20 
16 75 
15 75 
15 40 
15 75 
15 90 
15 20 
15 20 



Beach Gravel. 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
ton, deliv- 
ered on 
wharves. 




W. F. Cargill 


March 21, 1899.. 


$0 73 











Iron Castings. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 

100 lbs. 




Sessions Foundry Co... 


March 14, 1899.. 


$1 10 







Coal. 



Contract. 



Awarded to 



Dated 



Price per ton, 
2,240 lbs. 



1,500 tons, Pumping Station 
Dorchester , 

1,500 tons, Pumping Station 
Dorchester , 

1,500 tons, Pumping Station 
Dorchester 

1,500 tons, Pumping Station 
Dorchester 

7,000 tons, Ferry Wharves 

2,000 tons, Ferry Wharves 



Mitchell Coal and 

Coke Company.. Feb. 20, 1S99. . . 



Metropolitan Coal 
Company 



Metropolitan Coal 
Company 

John Morrison 

Loyal Hanna Coal 
and Coke Co 

John Morrison 



April 28, 1899. 

Oct. 13, 1899. . . 
Dec. 2S.1S99... 

March 23, 1899. 
Dec. 28, 1899.. 



$3 05 

2 69 

3 87 
5 61 

2 69 
5 51 



Street Departmext. 



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56 



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Street Department. 



57 



CD <M CO *0 <N IC 

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58 



City Document No. 38. 



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59 



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60 



City Document No. 38. 



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62 



City Document No. 38. 



List of Streets Paved with Trinidad Asphalt, Feb. 1, 1900. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Location. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year 
Laid. 




80 ft. north of Broadway, across Way st. 
East Concord st. to East Springfield st. 
East Dedham st. to East Canton st .... 
Franklin st. to Milk st 


105 
450 
216 
426 
230 
134 
150 
870 

1,744 

218 

1,019 

180 
192 

656 
281 
845 
1,087 
105 


397 

2,700 

312 

1,267 

427 

186 

466 

3,800 

9,277 

1,183 

5,391 

350 
426 

3,869 

670 

1,737 

3,300 

467 

427 

100 
869 

1,061 
604 
51 

1,804 
636 
594 
614 

15,000 

5,418 
734 


1899 




1884 




1899 
18S3-93 






1887 






1894 


Batterymarch st. . . 




1896 




1891 




Dartmouth st. to within 150 ft. of west- 






1892 




150 ft. from westerly line of Gloucester 
st. to 68 ft. beyond westerly line of 






1898 




68 ft. west of Gloucester st. to Massa- 






1893 




90 ft. west of Harrison ave. to 162 ft. 






1887 


Bond st 




1895 


Boylston st 


East side Berkeley st., across Claren- 


1897 






1888 


Brighton st 




1892 






1895 




Albany st. to 105 ft. west of Albany st. . 


1899 




1899 




Columbus ave. to 45 ft. south of Colum- 


45 
313 
460 
272 


1899 






1887 


Chambers st 

Chandler st 




1894 
1S95 
1899 




Easterly side Fruit st., across Allen st.. 


706 
318 
334 
319 

3,505 

903 
33S 


1899 




1S94 






1892 




1892 


Columbus ave , 


Boston & Albany Railroad bridge, 


1884-87- 
S8-91-99 


Columbus ave. 


Massachusetts ave. to 301 ft. south of 


1896 




Washington st. to Shawmut ave 


1S83 96 






Carried forw' d . . 




16,421 


64,137 











Steeet Department. 



63 



List of Streets Paved with Trinidad Asphalt. — Continued. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Location. 



Length. 



Area. 



Year 
Laid. 



Brought foric'd 

Congress st 

Cooper st 

Cooper st 

Court st 

Court sq 

Dartmouth st 

Dartmouth st 

Davis st 

Devonshire st 

Doane st 

Edinboro' st 

Endicott st 

Exchange pi 

Ferdinand st 

Groton st 

Hanover ave 

Harrison ave 

Harrison ave 

Harrison ave 

Hollis st 

Hudson st 

Kilby st 

Laconia st 

LaGrange st 

Lincoln pi 

Malcolm st 

Massachusetts ave 

Massachusetts ave 

Massachusettsave 

Moonst , 

N. Bennet st 



Between Devonshire st. and Congress st. 

North Margin st., across Endicott st 

Endicott st. to Charlestown st 

Washington st. to Court sq 

Court st. to Court st 

Buckingham st. to B. & A. K. R. bridge. 

Boylston st. to Newbury st 

Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Milk st. to Water st 

Kilby st. to Broad st 

Essex st. to Beach st 

Cooper st., across Thacher st 

Congress st. to Kilby st 

At Castle sq 

Washington st. to Shawmut ave 

Hanover st. to North st 



22 ft. south of Kneeland st. to 22 ft. 
north of Harvard st 



East Newton st. to East Springfield st.. 

East Springfield st. to 90 ft. southerly . . 

Tremont st., toward Washington st .. 

Beach st. to 90 ft. north of Curve st. 
(minus Kneeland and Harvard sts. 
intersections) 



State st. to Milk st. (including Liberty sq.) 

Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Tremont st., toward Washington st 

Worcester st. to Springfield st 

Mt. Vernon st. to Chestnut st 



Columbus ave. to Tremont st. (south- 
erly roadway) 



Tremont st. to Shawmut ave. (southerly 
roadway) 



Shawmut ave. to Washington st. (south- 
erly roadway) 



North sq. to Lewis st 

Hanover st. to Salem st. 



Carried forw'd 



16,421 
19 
194 
205 
231 
665 
127 
266 
323 
262 
312 
470 
318 
244 
37 
335 
307 

249 
928 



1,407 
640 
330 
181 
217 
261 

267 

470 

180 
182 
552 



64,137 
37 

597 
604 
642 

1,883 
580 

2,058 
646 
786 
624 
924 
1078 
678 
107 
558 
266 

8S5 

2,681 

130 

521 

3,938 
4,059 

727 
355 
313 
290 

1,621 

2,934 

994 
384 
920 



1883 
1887 

1887-97 
1891 

1881-94 
1899 
1894 
1892 
1S99 
18S1 
1895 

1884-99 
1887 
1899 
1892 
1892' 

1899 

1888-95 

1888 

1891 



1891 
1881-88- 



1897 
1S97 
1892 

1892 

1892 

1892 
1891 

1883 



26,876 



96,957 



64 



City Document No. 38. 



List of Streets Paved with Trinidad Asphalt. — Continued. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Location. 



Length. 



Year 
Laid. 



Brought fonv'd. 

'N. Margin st 

Oxford st 

Parkman st 

Parmenter st 

Pinckney st , 

Pine st , 

Poplar st , 

Public Alley 301.. 
Public Alley 401.. 
Public Alley 402.. 

Public Alley 403.. 

Public Alley 417., 
Public Alley 419.. 
Public Alley 420., 
Public Alley 423.. 
Public Alley 431.. 

Public Alley 437.. 
Public Alley 438. 
Puolic Alley 701. 



Spring st 

Stevens st 

Stillnian st... 
Stoddard St.. . 
Sun Court st. 

Thacher st 

Tileston St.... 



Tileston st 

Tremont st — 
Trinity place.. 

Unity st 

"Warrenton st. 
Warrenton st.. 



Carried forw'd. 



Stillman st. to Thacher st 

Beach st. to Essex st 

North Anderson st., across Blossom st. . 

Hanover st. to Salem st 

Charles St., across Brimmer st 

"Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Chambers st. to Charles st 

Pinckney st. to River st 

Between lrvington st. and Garrison st.. 

Between Garrison st. and West New- 
ton st 



Between West Newton st. and Cumber- 
land st 



Exeter st. toward Fairfield St.. 
Dartmouth st. to Clarendon st. 
Clarendon st. to Berkeley st... 
Berkeley st. to Clarendon st. . . 



Hereford st. to 83 ft. west of Gloucester 
st 



Berkeley st. to Arlington st 

Arlington st. to Berkeley st 

130 ft. east of Tremont st to Shawmut 
ave 



Poplar st. to Leverett st 

Lincoln pi. toward Shawmut ave 

Endicott st. across North Margin st. 

Howard st. to Court st 

North st. to Moon st 

Charlestown st. to Endicott st 



155 ft. west of Hanover st. across 
Unity st 



Unity st. to Salem st 

At Castle square 

St. James st. across Stuart st.... 

Charter st. to Tileston st 

Eliot st. to Tremont st 

Shawmut ave. to Washington st. 



26,876 
515 
430 
241 
279 
271 
419 
1,188 
270 
350 

358 

355 
115 
575 
580 

580 

312 
631 
631 

521 
447 
16 
170 
135 
151 
203 

254 
163 
60 
398 
330 
670 
468 



38,962 



96,957 
1,154 
735 
550 
764 
723 
597 
2,442 
400 
362 

374 

370 
102 
511 
515 
516 

277 
561 
561 

611 
908 
22 
453 
150 
218 
562 

346 
124 
771 

1,150 
500 

1.5S7 
910 



1895 
1895 
189S 
1893 
1895 
1896 
1887-92 
1897 
1899 

1899 

1899 



1899 



1899 
1895 
1897 
1892 
1892 
1891 
1892 

1887 
1895 
1899 
1899 
1897 
1891 
1891 



116,783 



Street Department. 



65 



List of Streets Paved with Trinidad Asphalt. — Concluded. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Location. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year 
Laid. 






38,962 
255 
252 
107 
259 


116,783 
694 
682 
119 
240 








1889 






1896 






1887 


Wi»-et st. 




1897 












39,835 


118,518 





Charlestown. 







144 


421 
150 
533 

276 
243 
390 
284 
415 
670 


1891 




At Tufts st 


1897 


Charlest'n bridge. 


124 ft. north of Moulton st. to Moulton 
st 


60 

124 
81 
130 
128 
141 
165 


1899 




1897 


Monlton st 


Easterly side Corey st. to Vine st 


1897 
1897 






1897 


Tufts st 


Bunker Hill st., 141 ft. northerly 

Bunker Hill st. across Moulton st 


1897 




1897 










973 


3,382 





South Boston. 



Dst 

E st 

Rogers st 

West Sixth st. 
West Third st 



West Fifth st. to Gold st 

West Third st. to Bolton st 

Dorchester st. to Preble st 

160 ft. east of G St., toward D st 
153 ft. west of E St., across E st. 



126 
111 

360 
91 
185 



873 



448 
410 
480 
305 

769 



2,412 



1892 
1891 

1887 
1892 



Roxbury. 



Cabot st 

Cabot st 

Cabot st 

Columbus ave 

Public Alley 404.. 

Public Alley 405.. 



Tremont st. to Ruggles st 

Easterly side Ruggles st. to Vernon st. 

Easterly side Vernon st. to Linden 
Park st 

301 ft. south of Camden St., across Ter- 
ry st 

66 ft. south of Cumberland st. to public 
Alley No. 405 

94 ft. east of Huntington ave. to 62 ft. 
west of St. Botolph st 



1,236 
723 



2,640 
534 
100 

5,717 



3,571 

2,988 

1,390 

15,840 

533 

89 

24,411 



1891 
1892 

1897 

1896 

1899 

1899 



66 



City Document No. 38. 



List of Streets Paved with Sicilian Rock Asphalt, Feb. 1, 1900. 

City Proper. 



Name. 



Location. 



Area. 



Acton st. . 
Albany st. 



Ash st 

Avery st 

Barton st — 
Bradford st. 
Charles st... 



Cobb st 

Decatur st 

Dwight st 

Exeter pi 

Fabin st 

Fay st 

Hanover st 

Hamburg st. . . . 
Huntington ave. . . 

Kingston st 

Mason st 



Washington st. to Bradford st. 



Easterly side Stoughton st., across 
East Concord st 



Oak st., across Nassau st. 
Washington st. to Mason st... 

Leverett st. to Milton st 

Waltham st. to Shawmut ave. 



Between Revere st. and Cam bridge st., 
front of Eye and Ear Infirmary 



Washington st. to Shawmut ave. 
Washington st. to Harrison ave. 
Shawmut ave. to Tremont st — 

Chauncy st. to Harrison ave 

Newland to Ivanhoe sts 

Dover st. to Harrison ave 

Tileston st., across Charter st. . . 
Mystic st. to Harrison ave. — . 
B. & A. R.R. to Cumberland st.. 
Beach st. to Essex st 



From a point 213 ft. south of West st. 
to 444 ft. south of West st 



Massachusetts ave. 
Massachusetts ave, 



Mayo st 

Meander st 

Motte st 

Mystic st 

Mystic st 

Mystic st 

N. Margin st. . 

Norwich st 

Ohio st 

Pemberton sq. 

Prince st 

Shawmut ave.. 



Washington st. to Harrison ave. (south- 
erly roadway) 



Harrison ave. to Albany st. (southerly 
roadway) 



Castle st. to Cobb st 

E. Dedham st. to Maiden st 

Washington st. to Harrison ave 

Maiden st. to E. Dedham st 

E. Dedham st. to E. Canton st 

E. Canton st. to E. Brookline st 

Thacher st. toward Endicott st 

Mystic st. to Meander st 

Washington st. to Shawmut ave 

Front of Suffolk County Court-house . . 
Hanover st. to Bennett ave 



132 ft. south of Castle st., across 
Cherry st 



259 

285 
220 
360 
427 
600 

191 
347 
370 
716 
170 
421 
318 
315 
383 
1,591 
492 



352 

1,710 
391 
275 
723 

1,270 

225 

1,041 

781 

2,075 

387 

615 

560 

934 

597 

8,840 

1,859 



231 


470 


344 


2,030 


318 


2,121 


251 


418 


307 


437 


332 


516 


204 


226 


215 


335 


216 


337 


205 


518 


221 


339 


343 


277 


323 


1,365 


293 


654 


327 


945 



Carried fonv'd. 



11,595 33,623 



Street Department. 



67 



List of Streets paved with Sicilian Rock Asphalt.— Confuted. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Location. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year- 
laid. 






11,595 
l'J6 

249 


33,623 
274 
445 




Taylor st 


Dwight st. to Milford st 






1895 












12,040 


34,342 





Charlestown. 



Warren st. 



Winthrop st. to Soley st. 



1895 



South Boston. 



Athens st 

Athens st 

East Broadway 

Kst 

West Broadway 

West Broadway 
West Broadway 

West Broadway 
West Broadway 



West Second st. to A st 

B st. toC st 

Front of Lincoln School 

East Sixth st. to East Eighth st. 



From 196 ft. east of easterly line of 
Dorchester ave. to A st 



Gardner pi. to 150 ft. easterly 

New England Railroad bridge to E st. 
(4 ft. gutters) 



150 ft. west of F st. to 267 ft. east of F st. 



267 ft east of F. st. to 44 ft. west of 
Dorchester st 



617 
515 
180 
566 

360 

150 



448 
410 



916 

746 
1,000 
1,083 

2,000 

648 

1,487 
1,544 



1895 
1892 
1S97 
1896 

1892 
1893 

1897 

1897 



3,246 



11,242 



Roxbury. 



Columbus ave 


Terry st. to within 61 ft. north of Sta- 


884 

747 
587 


5,304 

4,150 
3,372 


1896 


Huntington ave. . . 


Easterly side Cumberland st. to Massa- 


1896 


Huntington ave... 


Massachusetts ave to Gainsborough st. 


1896 






2,218 


12,826 





Brighton. 



Cottage Farm 
Bridge 



Over Boston & Albany Railroad 



1,556 



68 



City Document No. 38. 



List of Streets Paved with Seysse! Rock Asphalt, Feb. 1, 1900. 

City Proper. 



Name. 


Location. 


Length. 


Area. 


Year 
laid. 






505 
123 
308 
506 
133 
276 
320 
182 
222 

116 
311 


1,122 
265 
274 

1,068 
236 
456 
693 
184 
222 

103 
544 


1899 


Mason st 


444 ft. south of West st. to Avery st. ... 


1899 
1S99 




1899 






1897 


Paul st 




1897-99 




Washington st. to Shawmut ave 

23 ft. south of Marshall st. to Creek sq. 

Worcester st. to West Springfield st . . . 

Between Newland st. and Public Alley 
702 


1897 


Public Alley 102... 
Public Alley 702... 
Public Alley 703... 


1899 
1899 

1899 


Water ford st 


Washington st. to Shawmut ave 


1897 






3,007 


5,167 





Other Asphalt Streets. 



Name. 



Location. 



Length. 



Area. 



Year 

laid. 



Harris st 

Hay ward pi 

Massachusetts ave. 
Public Alley 422... 
Public Alley 436.. 
I st., South Boston, 



Hanover st. to North st. (coal tar, 
Ayer's) 

Harrison ave. to Washington st (as- 
phaltina) 

Columbus ave. to Tremont st., northerly 
roadway (asphaltina) 

Arlington st., 70 ft. westerly (tar con- 
crete) 

Berkeley st. to Clarendon st. (tar con- 
crete) 

East Broadway to East Fourth st. (coal 
tar, Ayer's) 



294 
260 
267 

70 
580 



425 
578 

1,622 

62 

516 

1,027 



1,743 



4,230 



1898 
1S97 



Summary. 

Trinidad asphalt 47,898 feet, or 8.98 miles, or 148,723 sq. yds. 

Sicilian rock asphalt 17,771 " " 3.36 " " 60,331 " " 

Seyssel rock asphalt 3,007 " " 0.57 " " 5,167 " " 

Other asphalts 1,743 " " 0.33 " " 4,230 " " 

Total sheet asphalts 69,919 " " 13.24 " " 21S,451 " " 

Asphalt blocks 2,912 " " 0.55 " " 7,360 " " 

Total 72,831 " "13.79 " "225,811 " " 



Street Department. 



69 



Street Mileage. 

The following table shows the length of public highways 
and character of the pavements, February 1, 1900 : 



Districts. 


P. 
< 


M 
o 
o 

3 


o 
"u 


o 
O 


s 


a 
O 


ci 

o 

o 


o3 

O 


Year 1S98 report.. . - 


12.21 


85.18 


0.60 


1.14 


270.23 


98.72 


11.39 


479.47 


February 1, 1900. 


*11.23 
0.21 


45.40 
9.17 
4.95 

13.71 
9.40 
0.10 
4.24 


0.70 


0.79 


26.20 
13.69 
6.87 
20.93 
65.47 
50.77 
73.28 
23.36 


0.42 

15.38 
1.99 
9.22 
27.52 
22.97 
18.48 


0.06 
0.02 
0.14 
5.58 
2.02 
1.10 
1.37 
0.13 


84.80 




23.09 




0.10 


0.13 
0.05 
0.04 


27.47 


South Boston 


0.83 
1.50 


43.09 

87.75 




79.49 










101.86 




0.03 


42.00 












Total 


13.80 


f 86.97 


0.80 


1.01 


280.57 


95.98 


10.42 


489.55 



Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines 
* Of this amount 0.55 miles = asphalt blocks. 

f Of this amount 7.33 miles = granite-block paving on concrete base. 
4.21 miles of public alleys, chap. 298, Acts of 1898, included in this table. 

Total length of public streets, 489.55 miles. 

There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year, 6.59 linear miles of public streets 
and 1.92 miles of public alleys ; corrections to previous meas- 
urements on account of revision, abolishment of grade cross- 
ings and new bridges, and correction of previous tables from 
all causes show an increase of 1.57 miles, making a total net 
increase of 10.08 miles. 

The rate of increase from year to year is shown in the 
following table : 



1859 111.50 miles. 

1871 201.32 " 

1872 207.40 " 

1873 209.24 " 

1874 313.90 " 

1875 ...318.58 " 

187G 327.50 " 

1877 333.20 " 

1878 340.39 " 

1879.- 345.19 " 

1880 350.54 " 



1881 355.50 miles. 

1882 359.85 " 

1883 367.99 " 

1884 374.10 lt 

1885 379.60 " 

1886 383.55 " 

1887 390.30 " 

1888 392.72 " 

1889 397.84 " 

1890 404.60 " 

1891 409.60 " 



1892 434.59 mi 

1893 443.34 

1894 447.65 

1895 452.12 

1896 456.11 

1897 459.12 

1898 471.19 

1899 470.47 

1900 489.55 



les. 



70 



City Document No. 38. 



Areas of Pavement. 



The following table shows the area of pavements in square 
yards, arranged by districts : 



Districts. 


< 


© 
o 

3 


© 


© 

o 
O 


2 

© 

2 


OS 

5 


© 

s- 
O 

o 


"3 
o 


Year 1898 report.. 


210,388 


1,859,248 


6,050 


12,471 


4,996,684 


1,575,596 


321,391 


8,981,828 


Feb. 1, 1900. 
City Proper 


*168,590 
3,747 


989,970 
212,832 
111,012 
297,601 
204,899 
2,347 
93,515 


4,895 


7,162 


497,038 
205,143 
142,929 
370,737 

1,210,083 
873,002 

1,336,455 
608,028 


2,942 


2,107 

3,269 

27,687 

152,172 

39,836 

27,723 

60,038 

9,401 


1,672,704 
424,991 


East Boston 


480 


2,600 
1,192 

377 


284,823 
39,451 
136,828 
404,478 
366,497 
283,799 


569,051 


South Boston 

Roxbury 


14,681 
37,237 


875,834 
1,629,740 
1,307,550 










1,856,505 




1,556 


902,784 












Total , 


225,811 


tl,912,176 


5,375 


11,331 


5,243,415 


1,518,818 


322,233 


9,239,159 



Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 
* Of this amount 7,360 square yards = asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount 172,853 square yards = granite-block paving on concrete base. 
21,142 square yards of public alleys, chap. 29S, Acts of 1S98, included in this 
table. 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills and cash deposited 
with City Collector, less bills withdrawn, for the year ending 
January 31, 1900, by the several divisions of the Street 
Department : 

$123 59 

713 45 

209,305 72 

25,912 05 

18,822 65 

149,527 89 

7,665 38 

195,566 84 



Bridge Division 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Ferry Division 



Paving Division 
Sanitary Division . 
Sewer Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Street- Watering 



$607,667 57 



Street Department. 



71 



Statement showing the amount paid into the city treasury 
during the same period on account of the several divisions 
of the Street Department : 



Bridge Division 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division . 
Sewer Division 
Street-Cleaning Division 
Street- Watering 



1311 50 

924 35 

212,020 04 

25,958 75 

25,478 28 

81,187 66 

3,427 13 

177,068 99 

£526,376 70 



Laying-Out and Construction of Highways. 

From assessments on abut- 
ters for cost of sidewalk 
in front of their premises, 
chapter 401, Acts of 
1892 .... $7,711 84 
Interest on do. . . 2,326 87 



Sewer assessments, chapter 
402, Acts of 1892 . 
Interest on do. . 

Street construction, chapter 
323, Acts of 1891, and 
amendments, assess- 
ments : 

Abbotsford street 
Interest on do. 

Batavia street . 
Interest on do. 

Bloomfield street 
Interest on do. 

Canal street 
Charlestown street 
Ellet street 

Interest on do. 



Amount carried forward, 



$41,310 65 
,14,022 46 



$10,038 71 



55,333 11 



$3,167 03 
861 13 



$468 47 


82 


85 


$246 


43 


26 


01 



$981 98 
25 45 



4,028 16 



551 32 



272 44 

104 27 

1,322 43 



1,007 43 

f2,657 87 



72 



City Document No. 38. 



Amount brought forward, 



Fullerton street 
Interest on do. 

Gay lord street . 
Greenbrier street 
Interest on do. 

Ivy street 

Interest on do. 

Josephine street 
Interest on do. 

Miner street 
Interest on do. 

Morse street 
Interest on do. 

Monntfort street 
Interest on do. 

Newbury street 
Interest on do. 

Norway street . 
Interest on do. 

Ruggles street . 
St. Alphonsus street 
Interest on do. 

St. Germain street 
Interest on do. 

Vancouver street 
Wolcott street . 
Interest on do. 



$884 76 
60 80 



$2,824 05 
590 00 



$847 
875 


39 
91 


$771 
409 


93 

47 


$2,825 
456 


80 
32 


$496 
24 


46 
86 


$536 
449 


74 
38 


$954 43 
515 50 


$125 
149 


16 
30 



,584 13 
441 34 

$68 95 
34 50 



L,647 97 
119 22 



!,657 87 



945 56 
159 27 



3,414 05 
1,723 30 
1,181 40 
3,282 12 
521 32 
986 12 
1,469 93 



274 46 

419 75 



2,025 47 



103 45 

81 75 



1,767 19 



)1,013 01 



Blue Hill and other Avenues. 



Sewers 

Interest on do. 



),257 38 
679 32 



),936 70 



PART II. 



APPENDICES. 



PAGES 1 TO 305. 



APPENDIX A. 



EEPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



927 and 928 Tkemont Building, 

Boston, February 1, 1900. 

Me. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I herewith submit my annual report of the 
expenditures, income and operations of the Bridge Division 
of the Street Department for the financial year ending Janu- 
ary 31, 1900. 

There was appropriated for the care and maintenance of 
this division for the year, the sum of $120,750. 

The total number of bridges in Boston is 141, not includ- 
ing culverts. Eight of these bridges, namely, Harvard, 
Canal, Prison Point, West Boston, Essex street, Cambridge 
street, Western avenue to Cambridge, and North Harvard 
street, all connecting Boston and Cambridge, are under the 
care of two commissioners, one of whom is appointed by the 
city of Boston, and the other by the city of Cambridge. 

Thirty-nine bridges are wholly supported by railroad cor- 
porations, and 102 are supported wholly or in part by the city 
of Boston. 

There are in charge of this division 20 tide- water bridges 
provided with draws, an increase of two since last year, 
Charlestown, and Summer-street bridges, Charlestown bridge, 
connecting Charlestown with the city proper, and Summer 
street to South Boston. 

' A new bridge over Ipswich street, in the Parkway is under 
construction. 

Of the tide-water bridges there are 13 of great importance. 
Maiden and Mt. Washington avenue are operated by hand 
power, Meridian street, Chelsea North, Charlestown (new 
bridge), Summer street (new bridge), Federal street, and 
Dover street bridges are operated by electricity. Broadway, 
Congress street, L street, Warren bridge and Chelsea South 
are operated by steam power. 



4 City Document No. 38. 

The old Charles-river bridge has been discontinued, and 
was closed to public travel on November 28, 1899. 

Embodied in this report will be found a detailed statement 
of expenditures, and a description of the work done on each 
bridge, also a tabulated account of the bridges supported 
wholly or in part by the city of Boston ; widths of bridges 
and of draw-openings, widths of roadwaj^s, sidewalks, char- 
acter of pavements, and number of draw-openings made for 
navigation, and a census of traffic taken on some of the most 
important bridges. 

I would like to make special mention of the efficient work 
performed b} r the men in charge of the tide-water bridges. 
They have kept the piers and premises in a safe condition, 
and no accident has been reported that could in any way be 
attributed to the negligence or carelessness of the draw-tenders 
or their assistants. The inland bridges have all been carefully 
looked after, and special efforts have been made to keep them in 
safe condition. They have been thoroughly swept each week, 
and kept free from all debris. The material used for repairs 
lias been of good quality, and the delivery of the same has been 
prompt, thereby causing no delay in the performance of the 
work. We have exercised the same care in keeping dupli- 
cate sets of gearing and machinery on hand, and by so doing 
have taken all due precaution against inconvenience to public 
travel and accidents. 

Your attention is called to the necessity of erecting a new 
building for headquarters for the mechanics, as the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad has, b} r vote of the 
City Government, taken the land on which the present 
headquarters on Foundry street are situated,, in exchange 
for a piece of land on Dorchester avenue, near the corner 
of Broadway. The cost of such a building would be about 
12,500. 

I would also recommend that an engine, with winch attach- 
ments, to be operated by electricity, be placed on the follow- 
ing named draw-bridges, to assist vessels through the draw : 
Dover street, Federal street. Meridian street, Chelsea North, 
New Charlestown, and Summer street bridges. This would 
be a great improvement, as it would afford a great saving of 
time to public travel, as it does in the case of the one already 
in use on Warren bridge, placed there during the last year. 
To do this would cost about $3,000. 

In response to a largely signed petition, shelter sheds were 
erected on Congress-street bridge to protect the public from 
the weather while waiting for the passing of vessels through 
the draw. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 5 

I believe this to be a desirable improvement, and other 
bridges where openings frequently occur should be similiarly 
equipped. (See illustrations.) 

New work has been performed on the following-named 
bridges : An entire new bridge on Silver street, over the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Division; 
•Granite avenue, new timbers and new deck and sheathing ; 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad, 
Boston side, iron scraped and painted, new deck and new 
sidewalk, and similar work was performed on Massachusetts 
avenue bridge of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, Providence Division; Columbus avenue, 
over Boston & Albany Railroad, iron work scraped and 
painted, new floor and new sidewalks and same work done 
on Berkeley street, Ferdinand street and Shawmut avenue 
bridges over the Boston & Albany Railroad ; Williams street, 
over Stony brook, replaced old timbers with new ones, put 
in new deck, sidewalk, etc. 

Extensive repairs have been made on the roadbed of Con- 
gress street, which necessitated the removal of the paving, 
and putting in new 6-inch timbers under the roadbed, and a 
new pier has also been built. 

If the proposed new bridge at Broadway, which is now 
under consideration, is not begun in the early part of the 
■coming year, a special appropriation must be made to put 
the present bridge in good condition. 

Mt. Washington avenue bridge, also, is in need of repairs ; 
the foundation of the draw is weak, and the timbers under 
the sidewalks and bulkheads should be replaced by new 
ones. 

Congress-street bridge, with its immense amount of travel, 
should have a special appropriation. In a very short time 
the draw will have to be closed to the public for necessary 
repairs. 

Maiden bridge is in a very bad condition, but a new bridge 
is about to be constructed. 

Chelsea bridge, North draw, is under construction by the 
Engineering Department, as owing to the increased size of 
vessels and barges passing through the draw it was found 
necessary to widen it for vessels going up to the New Eng- 
land Gas and Coke Company's Works at Everett. 

Close attention has been given to the repairs and all work 
performed on the several bridges, and everything has been 
done to insure the safety and convenience of the public. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. H. Carberry, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



City Document No. 38. 



object of expenditures. 

Administration. 



Office expenses : 
Printing 

Stationery and office books 
Telephone and photographs 
Sundry office supplies 



5158 62 

277 07 

281 76 

60 15 



Salaries of Deputy Superintendent, Chief Clerk, 

Assistant Clerk and Messenger 
Salaries of Chief Draw-tender and Chief of Draws 

and Bridges ....... 

Board of Deputy Superintendent's horse, extra 

horse and carriage hire ..... 
Telephone at Deputy Superintendent's house 

Amount expended, Administration . 



$777 60 

6,470 53 

3,500 54 

668 73 

73 8$ 

$11,491 29 



Object of Expenditures. 

Office Expenses. 

Salaries ....... 

General office expenditures .... 



Regular Expenditures 



Administration . 
On tide-water bridges 
On inland bridges 
North yard and stable 
South yard and stable 

Total 



$9,971 07 
1,520 22 

$11,491 29 



$11,491 29 

83,826 85 

12,586 69 

5,218 97 

8,216 79 

$121,340 59 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Appropriation. 

Appropriation 1899-1900 $120,750 00 

Received from Boston & Albany Railroad for work 

done in 1898 86 50 

Received from Paving Division for work done in 

1898 564 07 

Received from Paving Division for work done in 

1899 367 80 



Total 



11,768 37 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



Amount of expenditures from February 1, 1899, to 

January 31, 1900 $121,340 59 

Transferred to City Treasury, January 31, 1900 . 427 78 



Total 



$121,768 37 



Special Appropriations in Charge of Bridge Division. 



Name of Appropriation. 


Appropria- 
tions and 
Balances. 


Expended 
Feb. 1,1899, to 
Jan. 31, 1900. 


Balances 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1900. 


Congress-street bridge, reconstruction, 


$10,000 00 

216 66 

2,307 89 

945 25 


$6,300 75 
216 66 
262 13 
945 25 


$3,699 25 


Harvard-street bridge, reconstruction.. 


2,045 76 






Totals 


$13,469 80 


$7,724 79 


$5,745 01 





Amount of expenditures February 1, 1899, to 

January 31, 1900 

Balances unexpended ...... 



Amount of appropriations 



$7,724 79 
5,745 01 

$13,469 80 



Amounts Charged to Special Appropriations in Charge of 
other Divisions. 



Name of Appropriation. 


Where expended. 


Amount 
expended. 


Abolishment of grade crossings 


Summer-street bridge 

Under N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R.R., Midland Division.. 

Charlestown bridge 

Charlesgate west, bridge 

Coffer dam, Roxbury 


$1,006 92 


Bridge, Lauriat avenue, Ward 24 




21,000 00 
4P 21 


Laying-out and construction of highways.. 


14,871 09 




350 01 








Total 




$37,640 23 







Amount expended and charged to regular appro- 
priation $121,340 59 

Amount expended and charged to Bridge Division 

specials . . 7,724 79 

Amount expended and charged to appropriations in 

charge of other divisons . . . . . 37,640 23 



Grand total of expenditures February 1, 1899, 
to January 31, 1900 



:66,705 61 



8 



City Document No. 88. 



A detailed statement of expenditures and description of work 
performed follows ; also a list of those bridges supported wholly 
or in part by the city of Boston ; statement of the public landing- 
places ; list of cable-houses and boxes ; census of traffic taken on 
some of the most important bridges ; number of draw openings 
made for navigation ; width of draw openings, and table showing 
widths of bridges and kind of roadway and sidewalks. 

TIDE-WATER BRIDGES. 

Broadway bridge (over Fort Point channel). 
Patched deck in various places, patched sheathing under ten 
orders issued at different times, repaired sidewalks, machinery, 
fence and engine-room floor. 



Carpenters 
Lumber and nails 


• 


1446 65 
687 34 


Repairing engine, 

chinery, etc. . 
Ironwork 


ma- 


91 67 
76 12 


Sundry expenses 


. 


26 92 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 

Substitutes 


$4,861 04 
381 65 


Coal, gas, water and 
plies 


sup- 


276 85 



,328 70 



5,519 54 

Charles=river bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town). 
Patched deck and sheathing at various times, re- 
paired fence, sidewalks, machinery, engine and 
water-pipes. 



Carpenters 


. 


$363 68 


Painters . 


. 


27 10 


Lumber and nails 


. 


148 20 


Repairing engine, 


ma- 




chinery, etc. 


. 


34 62 


Ironwork . 


. 


5 79 


Repairing sidewalk . 


. 


182 00 


Sundry expenses 




46 68 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 




$3,566 51 


Substitutes 




208 00 


Coal, gas, water and 


sup- 




plies 


• 


627 97 



$808 07 



4,402 48 



1,848 24 



Carried forward, 



5,210 55 

$12,058 79 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 9 

Brought forward, $12,058 79 

Charlestown bridge (from Boston to Ckai'les- 

town). [Newbridge.] 
Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . . . . . . 855 41 

Chelsea bridge [North] (over North channel, 
Mystic river). 
Repaired deck and sheathing several times, elec- 
trical apparatus, water-pipes, machinery, put in 
new headers and reset buoy. 



Carpenters 

Painters .... 


$138 65 
9 00 


Lumber and nails 


37 15 


Repairing electrical appa- 
ratus, machinery, etc. 
Ironwork .... 


288 69 
81 36 


Resetting buoy 
Sundry expenses 


96 00 
13 23 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 

Substitutes 


$4,228 78 
33 50 


Coal, gas, water and sup- 




plies .... 


110 62 



$664 08 



4,372 90 



Chelsea bridge [South] (over South channel, 
Mystic river). 
Patched deck and sheathing, repaired pier and 
machinery, put in new headers and painted iron 
fence. 



Carpenters 
Painters . 




$170 15 
163 30 


Lumber and nails 




67 90 


Repairing engine, 

chinery etc. . 
Ironwork . 


ma- 


27 58 
19 66 


Sundry expenses 




2 88 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 


$5,285 37 


Coal, gas, water and 


sup- 




plies 


• 


287 35 



$451 47 



5,572 72 



5,036 98 



6,024 19 



Carried fomcard, $23,975 37 



10 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 
Chelsea-street bridge (from East Boston to 

Chelsea). 
Sheathed East Boston end of bridge and patched 
deck. 



1,975 37 



Carpenters 


$33 85 






Painters . 


17 85 






Lumber and nails 


139 30 










$191 


00 






Regular expenses : 








Draw-tender 


$299 00 






Coal and supplies 


5 70 










304 


70 







Commercial Point or Tenean bridge (Dor- 
chester). 
Patched deck and sheathing, put in headers and 

repaired fence. 
Carpenters . . . $44 50 

Lumber and nails . . 128 08 

Ironwork . . . . 3 66 

$176 24 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender . . . . . 50 00 



Congress=street bridge (over Fort Point 
channel) . 
Sheathed draw three times, patched deck and 
sheathing various times, put in new headers, 
repaired sidewalk, machinery, pier and engines, 
reset buoy and painted machinery and draw- 
tender's house. 



Carpenters 


$915 87 


Painters .... 


213 15 


Lumber and nails . * 


580 57 


Repairing engines, ma- 




chinery etc. . 


62 41 


Ironwork .... 


86 54 


Resetting buoy . 


235 00 


Repairing pier . 


600 00 


Sundry expenses 


125 12 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders 


$5,205 94 


Coal, water and supplies 


469 37 



$2,818 66 



5,675 31 



495 70 



226 24 



8,493 97 



Carried forward, 



1,191 28 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 11 

Brought forward, $33,191 28 

Dover=street bridge (over Fort Point channel). 

Sheathed draw, repaired deck and sheathing, pier, 
electrical apparatus, machinery, iron fence and 
painted bridge in part. 

Carpenters . . . $396 60 

Painters . . . . 1,007 50 

Lumber and nails . . 354 39 

Repairing engines, ma- 
chinery etc. . . . 66 21 

Ironwork .... 97 98 

Repairing iron fence . . 107 07 

Repairing pier . . . 450 00 

Sundry expenses . . 5 84 

$2,485 59 



Regular expenses : 






Draw-tenders . 


. $5,186 


23 


Substitutes 


182 


50 


Coal, water and supplies 


53 


87 



5,422 60 

7,908 19 

Federal=street bridge (over Fort Point chan- 
nel). 
Sheathed draw, repaired deck and sheathing, pier, 
machinery, electrical apparatus, water pipes and 
painted iron beams and draw- tender's house. 



Carpenters 




$490 40 




Painters . 




671 


35 




Lumber and nails 




99 


60 




Repairing engines, 


ma- 








chinery etc. . 




364 


64 




Ironwork . . . 


. 


73 


93 




Repairing pier . 




94 


50 




Sundry expenses 




42 


47 


$1,836 89 








Regular expenses : 










Draw-tenders 




15,186 


23 




Substitutes 




182 


50 




Coal, gas, water and 


sup- 








plies 




127 


85 


5,496 58 









7,333 47 

Granite bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Repaired deck, sheathing and machinery. 
Carpenters . . . $151 00 

Lumber and nails . . 446 14 

Ironwork . . . 6 12 

$603 26 



Carried forward, - $603 26 $48,432 94 



12 City Document No. 38. 

Brought forward, $603 26 $48,432 94 

Regular expenses : 

Draw-tender 239 20 

842 46 



L-street bridge (over reserved channel at 
junction of Congress and L streets) . 
Repaired sheathing, engines, machinery, bulkhead, 
and put on new girder caps and bolted same. 



Carpenters 

Painters .... 


$118 
540 


25 
25 






Lumber .... 


4 


14 






Repairing engines, ma- 
chinery, etc. 
Ironwork .... 


23 
13 


00 
54 






Girder caps 


500 


00 






Sundry expenses 


12 


79 


11,211 


97 








Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 


$4,487 


83 






Substitutes 


450 


35 






Coal, water and supplies . 


395 


72 


5,333 


90 









Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett) . 
Patched deck and sheathing various times, water- 
pipes, machinery and wheel-guards. 



Carpenters 
Lumber and nails 


$378 50 
76 92 


Repairing machinery, etc. 
Ironwork . 


12 34 
5 92 


Small sundries . 


3 02 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders . 

Substitutes 


$3,521 11 
137 30 


Coal, gas and supplies 


78 07 



$476 70 



3,736 48 



Meridian=street bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea) . 
Repaired deck, sheathing, pier, fence, float-stage, 

machinery, and reset buoys. 
Carpenters . . . $299 38 

Lumber and nails . . 29 80 

Repairing machinery, etc. . 44 58 



6,545 87 



4,213 18 



Carried forward, $373 76 $60,034 45 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 13 

$60,034 45 

$602 06 



Brought forward, 


$373 76 


Ironwork . 


8 25 


Resetting buoys 


195 00 


Sundry expenses 


25 05 


Regular expenses : 




Draw-tenders . 


. $4,330 43 


Substitutes 


135 00 


Coal, gas and supplies 


130 67 


Feed 


107 59 



4,703 69 

Mt. Washington-avenue bridge (over Fort 
Point channel). 
Patched deck, sheathing, gates, machinery, and 
painted boat and gate. 



Carpenters 
Painters . 


$382 96 
40 50 


Lumber and nails 


143 68 


Ironwork . 


30 93 


Sundry expenses 


4 21 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tenders 
Substitutes . . . 


$4,763 28 
181 25 


Coal, gas and supplies 
Rent of land, two years 


93 02 
120 00 



$602 28 



5,157 55 

Neponset bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy). 
Patched deck and sheathing and repaired machinery 

and flaps. 
Carpenters 
Lumber and nails 
Repairing machinery 
Ironwork . 

$312 07 

Regular expenses : 
Draw- tender 398 84 



$175 


96 


70 


33 


31 


90 


33 


88 



North Beacon-street bridge (from Brighton 
to Watertown). 
Sheathed draw and patched sheathing in several 

places. 
Carpenters . . . $55 00 

Lumber . . . . 12 32 

Sundry expenses . . 43 00 

$110 32 



5,305 75 



5,759 83 



710 91 



Carried forward, $110 32 $71,810 94 



14 City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 




$110 32 


Regular expenses : 






Draw-tender 


$345 07 




Substitute 


54 47 


399 54 







Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown) . 
Sheathed both draws, patched same numerous 
times, repaired pier, fence, water pipes, ma- 
chinery and painted draw-tenders' and engine 
house. 
Carpenters . . . $939 70 

Painters . . . . 134 20 

Plumber . . . . 59 70 

Lumber and nails . . 456 17 

Repairing engine, machin- 
ery, etc. ' . . . 259 92 
Ironwork . . . . 8 23 
Sundry expenses . . . 14 30- 

$1,872 22 



Regular expenses : 

Draw-tenders . . . $5,109 53 

Substitutes .' . . 243 00 

Coal, gas and supplies . 750 82 



6,103 35 

Western =a venue bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown) . 
Built new sidewalk, patched sheathing and repaired 
machinery. 



Carpenters 
Lumber . 


$44 75 
20 79 




Repairing machinery 


41 65 


$107 19 


Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 


$346 07 


Substitute 


69 28 




Coal and supplies 


14 15 


499 50 









Winthrop bridge (from Breed's Island to 
Winthrop) . 
Repaired sidewalk and patched sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . $147 75 

Lumber . . . . 42 58 

$190 33 

Regular expenses : 
Draw-tender 50 00 



509 86 



7,975 57 



536 69 



240 33 



Carried forward, $81,073 39 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 15 

Brought forward, $81,073 39 

Sundry expenditures on tide-water bridges : 
Oak lumber for headers . $416 48 
Paint stock ... 202 30 

Nails .... 92 90 

Sundry car-fares, Boston 

Elevated Railway Co., 

for mechanics . . 200 00 

Sundry Street Department 

tickets, N.Y., N.H. & 

H.R.R. Co. (mechanics), 20 00 

$931 68 



Regular expenses : 






Messenger to Chief Draw- 




tender . 


. 


$722 98 


Draw-tenders' books . 


. 


124 93 


Draw-tenders' supplies 




390 17 


Public landings. 




Commercial wharf : 






Repairing float . 


. 


$31 00 


East Boston : 






Repairing float . 


• 


27 70 


Regular expenses : 






East Boston : 






Rent of flats and 






dock . . $250 00 




Care of landing . 25 


00 


$275 00 


Jeffries Point : 




Rent of flats and dock 


• 


250 00 



1,238 08 



$58 70 



525 00 



2,169 76 



583 70 



Total expended on tide-water bridges, $83,826 85 



16 



City Document No. 88. 



RECAPITULATION . 

Table showing Expenditures on the Tide-water Bridges from 
February 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900. 



Repairs, 

Labor, Lumber, 

Ironwork and 

Painting. 



Regular 

Expenses, 

Salaries, Fuel, 

and Supplies. 



Total. 



Broadway 

Charles river 

Charlestown 

Chelsea (North) 

Chelsea (South) 

Chelsea street 

Commercial Point 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Federal street 

Granite 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington avenue 

Neponset 

North Beacon street 

Warren 

Western avenue to Watertown, 

Winthrop 

Sundry expenditures 

Public landings 



$1,328 70 
80S 07 



664 08 

451 47 

191 00 

176 24 

2,818 66 

2,485 59 

1,836 89 

603 26 

1,211 97 

476 70 

602 06 

602 28 

312 07 

110 32 

1,872 22 

107 19 

190 33 

931 68 

58 70 

$17,839 48 



$5,519 54 
4,402 48 

855 41 
4,372 90 
5,572 72 

304 70 

50 00 

5.C75 31 

5,422 60 

5,496 58 

239 20 
5,333 90 
3,736 48 
4,703 69 
5,157 55 

398 84 

399 54 
6,103 35 

429 50 

50 00 

1,238 08 

525 00 

$65,987 37 



$6,848 24 


5,210 55 


855 41 


5,036 98 


6,024 19 


495 70 


226 24 


8,493 97 


7,908 19 


7,333 47 


842 46 


6,545 87 


4,213 18 


5,305 75 


5,759 83 


710 91 


509 86 


7,975 57 


536 69 


240 33 


2,169 76 


583 70 


$83,826 85 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 17 



INLAND BRIDGES. 

Albany=street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 

Patched sheathing five times. 

Carpenters ..... $48 65 

Lumber 24 61 

$73 26 



Allston bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road at Cambridge street). 
Patched sheathing three times, patched deck and 

sheathing five times. 
Carpenters . . . ' . $86 00 

Lumber . . . . . 80 06 



Athens=street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Division) . 
Repaired and painted fence. 

Carpenters . .' . . $4 50 

Painters 10 50 



Beacon=street (waterway) . 

Sheathed one side, patched the other. 






Carpenters . . 

Lumber ...... 




$20 10 
79 84 


Nails 




5 60 


Berkeley=street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 
Patched sidewalk twice, patched deck and 


sheathing five times. 






Carpenters ..... 
Lumber ...... 




$98 15 
92 62 


Nails 




2 75 


Teaming ...... 




5 00 



166 06 



15 00 



105 54 



198 52 



Berkeley-street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence Divi- 
sion) . 
Patched sidewalk and sheathing, patched deck and 

sheathing thirteen times. 

Carpenters $207 63 

Lumber 
Nails 
Cement 
Teaming . 



Carried forward, $1,119 74 



314 33 




14 70 




4 70 




20 00 






561 36 





18 City Document No. 38. 

Brought forward, $1,119 74 

Blakemore=street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 
Patched deck and sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . . . $8 50 

Lumber ...... 7 40 

Nails ...... 25 

16 15 



Berwick Park [foot] bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 
Division). 

Nails 85 

Boylston=street bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad). 
Patched sheathing twice, patched sidewalk. 
Carpenters . . . . . $71 65 

Lumber . . . . . . 42 77 

Nails 2 50 

116 92 



Broadway bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 
Patched sheathing three times. 

Carpenters $21 00 

Lumber 46 13 



CentraUa venue bridge (from Dorchester to 
Milton, over Neponset river). 
New sidewalk, patched deck and sheathing three 



times, painted fence and iron beams 




Carpenters .... 


$116 23 


Painters ..... 


349 00 


Lumber ..... 


145 93 


Nails . ■ . 


5 20 


Cohasset=street culvert. 




Sheathed. 




Carpenters . 


$23 00 


Lumber ...... 


27 12 



67 13 



Brookline=avenue bridge (over Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad) . . 
Patched sheathing. 
Carpenters ........ 64 67 

Byron=street bridge (over Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad). 
Patched sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . . . $7 35 

Lumber ...... 5 68 

13 03 



616 36 



50 12 
Carried forward, $2,064 97 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



19 



Brought fomo ard, 

Columbus-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Rebuilt in part, decked and sheathed west side, 

rebuilt sidewalk, easterly side, painted beams 

under both sidewalks and roadway. 
Carpenters ..... $727 58 

Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 

Ironwork . 
Paint stock 
Teaming . 
Mortar 

Cottage-street [foot] bridge (over flats, East 
Boston). 
Patched deck. 

Bridge-tender $728 00 

Carpenters . . . . . 24 75 

Lumber and nails . . . . 47 36 

Coal, ice and supplies . . . 11 90 



!,064 97 



597 


96 


387 


03 


25 


74 


23 


76 


88 


55 


10 


00 


3 


00 



Dartmouth-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad and New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad, Providence Division) . 
Patched sheathing. 
Carpenters ..... $67 08 

Lumber ...... 54 75 

Nails . . . . . . 3 10 



Dorchester-street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 
Division). 
Patched deck and sheathing. 

Carpenters . . . . . $41 75 

Lumber . . . . . 5 43 



Elmwood-street bridge (over Stony brook). 
Patched sheathing. 

Carpenters $11 65 

Lumber ...... 9 24 



Everett-street bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad, Brighton). 
Sheathed and patch fence. 

Carpenters $100 55 

Lumber ...... 277 20 



1,863 62 



812 01 



124 93 



47 18 



20 89 



Carried forward, 



$377 75 $4,933 60 



20 ■ City Document No. 38. 

Brought forward, $377 75 $4,933 60 

Nails 11 00 

Teaming 15 00 



Ferdinand-street bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Repaired fence, painted fences and girders. 
Carpenters . . . . . $25 15 

Painters 51 00 

Lumber . . . . . . 17 68 



Huntington-avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed one side, and patched deck and sheathing 

twice. 

Carpenters ..... $53 40 

Lumber . . . . . • 67 64 

Nails 3 10 



Irvington-street [foot] bridge (over New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division) . 
Safety stair treads . . . $165 00 

Hardware . . . . . . 3 06 



Leyden-street bridge (over Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad). 
Patched sidewalk. 
Carpenters . . ... . $3 75 

Lumber ...... 3 04 



Linden Park street-bridge (over Stony brook) 
Repaired and patched deck and sheathing. 
Carpenters . . . • • $35 65 

Lumber 39 06 



403 75 



93 83 



124 14 



168 06 



6 79 



74 71 



riassachusetts avenue-bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed, new border, patched sidewalk, patched 

deck and sheathing five times, painted beams. 
Carpenters . . . $113 15 

Painters 
Lumber 
Nails 
Teaming . 



Carried forward, $6,334 59 



113 50 




265 01 




18 05 




20 00 






529 71 





Street Department — Bridge Division. 



21 



Brought forward, 
flassachusetts-avenue bridge (over New 

York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 

Providence Division). 
Sheathed, repaired sidewalk, patched deck and 
sheathing five times, scraped and painted beams. 



1,334 59 



Carpenters 


$259 75 


Painters 


83 75 


Lumber 


286 23 


Nails 


18 40 


Teaming 


20 00 



flattapan bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
New sidewalk, and sheathed complete. 

Carpenters $69 13 

Lumber ...... 57 70 

Nails 1 40 



Hilton bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
Repaired sidewalk and abutments. 
Carpenters . . . . . $51 

Granite work and pointing . . 87 



30 
25 



Shawmut=avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany and New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, Providence Division). 
Sheathed and patched sheathing three times. 

Carpenters $96 80 

Lumber - 88 03 

Nails 3 75 



5ilver=street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Divi- 
sion) . 
Built new bridge complete, painted fence. 
Carpenters 



Painters 
Lumber 

Nails 
Bolts 



$89 20 

30 00 

234 22 

7 97 
4 40 



Summer=street culvert (West Roxbury) . 
Sheathed complete. 

Carpenters ..... $15 00 

Lumber ...... 7 47 



668 13 



128 23 



138 55 



188 58 



365 79 



22 47 



Carried forte ard, 



',846 34 



22 City Document No. 38. 

Brought forward, 87,846 34 

Swett=street bridge (west of New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Divi- 
sion). 

Lumber $182 92 

Nails 11 60 

Bolts 5 23 

199 75 



West Fourth=street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 
Division). 
Sheathed complete, patched sidewalk, patched 
sheathing eight times, patched deck and sheath- 
ing twice. 
Carpenters . . . . . $569 55 

Lumber 867 35 

Nails 43 60 

Ironwork . . . . . . 1 95 



West Newton=street bridge (over New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad). 
Patched sheathing, sheathed complete. 

Carpenters $49 45 

Lumber 65 87 



Williams=street bridge (over Stony brook, 
West Roxbury). 
Rebuilt bridge, patched deck and sheathing. 

Carpenters $354 90 

Lumber . . . ■ . . . 186 50 
Nails 2 65 



1,482 45 



115 32 



544 05 



West Rutland square [foot] bridge (over 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Providence Division) . 
Patched roadway. 
Carpenters ........ 7 50 

Sundry expenditures on inland bridges. 
Labor, on snow ..... $1,004 67 

Labor, cleaning bridges . . . 734 96 

Nails 46 45 

Paint stock 101 15 

Sundry car fares for mechanics, Bos- 
ton Elevated Railway Co. . . 125 00 
Sundry Street Department tickets, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road Co. (mechanics) . . . 11 25 



2,023 48 



Carried forward, $12,218 89 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 23 

Brought forward, $12 218 89 

Atlantic avenue (Nob. 10 to 20). 
Reconstructed sidewalk. 
Carpenters $203 30 

Charles=river fence (sea-wall op- 
posite Arlington street) . 
Repaired fence. 
Carpenters . . . . . 4 25 

North End Paving Yard shed. 

Built shed. 

Carpenters ., . . ... $144 20 

Painters . . . . 16 05 

160 25 



Work done for Paving Division . . . . 367 80 



Total expenditures on inland bridges . . $12,586 69 



24 



City Document No. 38. 



RECAPITULATION. 

lable showing Expenditures on the Inland Bridges from 
February 1, 1899, to February 1, 1900. 



Albany street (over B. & A. Railroad) 
Allston ..... 
Athens street .... 
Beacon street (waterway) 
Berkeley street (B. & A. Railroad) 
Berkeley street (N. Y., N. H. & H 

Prov. Div.) .... 
Berwick park .... 
Blakemore street 

Boylston street (B. & A. Railroad) 
Broadway (over B. & A. Railroad) 
Brookline avenue 
Byron street 
Central avenue 
Cohasset street (culvert) 
Columbus avenue 
Cottage street (E. Boston) 
Dartmouth street 
Dorchester street 
Elmwood street 
Everett street 
Ferdinand street 
Huntington avenue 
Irvington street 
Leyden street 
Linden Park street 
Massachusetts avenue (over B. & A. Railro 
Massachusetts avenue (N. Y., N. H. & H 

road, Prov. Div.) 
Mattapan . 
Milton 

Shawm ut avenue 
Silver street 
Summer street (culvert) 
Swett street (west) 
West Fourth street 
West Newton street 
Williams street 
West Rutland scpaare 
Sundry expenditures 
Work done for Paving; Division 



Railroad 



I) 
Rail 



$73 26 
166 06 

15 00 
105 54 

198 52 

561 36 
85 

16 15 
116 92 

67 13 

64 67 

13 03 

616 36 

50 12 

1,863 62 

812 01 

124 93 

47 18 

20 89 

403 75 

93 83 

124 14 

168 06 

6 79 
74 71 

529 71 

668 13 
128 23 
138 55 
188 58 
365 79 
22 47 

199 75 
1,482 45 

115 32 

544 05 

7 50 
2,023 48 

367 80 



Total 



$12,586 69 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



25 



REGULAR MAINTENANCE EXPENSES AT NORTH 
AND SOUTH YARDS. 

North Yard, District No. 1. 
Warren Bridge. 

Two messengers, watchman and yardman, 
Tools for carpenters and painters . 
Telephone ...... 

Gas, water, kerosene and supplies . 



2,480 


64 


16 


43 


151 


26 


133 


73 



$2,782 06 



Stable, District No 

Warren Bridge 
Teamster and hostler 

Feed . 

New Concord wagon 
Horseshoeing .... 

Repairing harness and clipping horses 
Supplies . . 



Total expended, North Yard and Stable 

South Yard, District No. 2. 
No. Jfi Foundry Street. 

Two messengers, watchman, lumber meas- 
urer, yardman and plumber . . $3,469 16 
Tools for carpenters and painters 
Telephone .... 
Building portable house 
Coal, water and supplies 
Medical attendance 



. $1,688 30 




324 66 




163 75 




145 50 




91 85 




22 85 






2,436 91 




:able . 


$5,218 97 



144 


32 


150 


00 


64 


90 


71 


40 


26 


00 



5,925 78 



Stable, District No. 2. 
No. 1S5 Dorchester Avenue. 
Teamster, stable boy and carriage washer, $1,371 10 



Board and shoeing of horses 


2,092 95 




Repairing vehicles and harness . 


550 07 




Veterinary service and clipping horses 


92 39 




Bay horse ..... 


175 00 




Supplies ..... 


9 50 


4,291 01 




ble 


Total expended, South Yard and Sta 


$8,216 79 



26 



City Document No. 38. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 
In Charge of Bridge Division. 

Congress=street bridge, reconstruction (over 
Fort Point Channel). 
Carpenters ...... $3,041 55 

Lumber 

Nails and hardware 
Diver examining piles 
Repairing pier 
Repairing paving 
Car tickets . 
Iron work . 
Teaming 

Total expended January 31, 1900 
Balance .... 

Appropriation 

Gold=street bridge (over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland Di- 
vision). 
Execution of Court, grade damages. Paid from 
loan . . . . . ... 

Harvard=street bridge, reconstruction (over 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Midland Division) . 
Widened bridge by building new sidewalk on north- 
erly side. 
[Labor paid for in 1898]. 
Lumber ...... 

New girder and brick addition to pier . 

Bolts 

Cutting stone ..... 
Rent for privilege of southerly sidewalk, 
two years, northerly, one year . 

Total expended, January 31, 1900 
Balance ...... 

Appropriation on hand, February 1, 1899 

Reconstruction of Bridges. 

Brookline=avenue bridge (over Boston & 
Albany Railroad). 
Sheathed bridge. 
Carpenters ........ 

Carried forward, 



695 29 




69 27 




125 00 




2,200 00 




41 50 




50 00 




63 14 




15 00 




, . 


$6,300 75 


. 


3,699 25 



$10,000 00 



5216 16 



144 00 

95 00 

17 13 

3 00 

3 00 




• 


$262 13 
2,045 76 



!,307 89 



ii 7; 



II 78 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 

Brough t forward, 
Maiden bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 
Repairing pier. 
Carpenters ........ 

Mt. Washington=a venue bridge (over Fort 
Point Channel). 
Repairing pier. 
Carpenters ........ 

Warren bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 
Repairing guard rail. 
Carpenters . . . . . 

Total expended, January 31, 1900 



27 
$61 78 

350 00 

283 47 

250 00 
^945 25 



Amounts Charged to Special Appropriations in Charge of 
other Divisions. 

Summer=street bridge. 

Salaries of draw-tenders $1,00692 

[Charged to "Abolishment of Grade Crossings."] 

Lauriat avenue. 

Building new bridge, street passing under railroad, 

[Charged to "Lauriat avenue, Bridge, Ward 

24"]. 

Charlestown bridge. 

Salaries of draw-tenders ..... 

[Charged to " Charlestown Bridge."] 

Ipswich street. 

Inspector of material ...... 

Steel superstructure ...... 

Iron, bolts and spruce ..... 



11,000 00 



1412 21 



$101 70 

13,850 00 

919 39 

$14,871 09 



[Charged to "Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways."] 
[Charlesgate west bridge completed.] 

Roxbury Crossing Coffer=dam. 

Building coffer-dam, Roxbury Crossing. 

Carpenters . . . . . . $94 10 

Lumber 153 64 

Nails 2 30 

Bolts, nuts and washers . . . 40 59 

Ironwork . . . . . . 59 38 



$350 01 



[Charged to "Stony Brook Improvement."] 



28 City Document No. 38. 

LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 

I. — Bridges wholly Supported by Boston. 

[In the list those marked with an asterisk ( # ) are over navigable 
waters, and are each provided with a draw.] 

In charge of Bridge Division. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street, 

Brighton. 
Ashland street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division, West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Baker street, at Brook farm, West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berwick park (foot-bridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Blakemore street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Bolton street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Boylston avenue, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Broadway, over Fort P oint channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

* Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Charlestown, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea (South) over south channel, Mystic river. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Commercial Point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 

* Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 
Cornwall street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Cottage Farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad, at Common- 
wealth avenue. 
Cottage street (foot-bridge), over flats, East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 

Elmwood street (private way), over Stony brook, Roxbury, 

* Federal street, over Fort Point channel. 
Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Florence street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 29 

Gold street (foot-bridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 

Midland Division. 
Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 
Irvington street (foot-bridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Keyes street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

* L street, over reserved channel at junction of Congress and L 
streets. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Linden Park street, over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

* Maiden, from Charlestown to Everett. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Massachusetts avenue, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
'* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

* Mount Washington avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany and N. Y., N. H. & H. 

Railroad, Providence Division. 
Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 
Swett street, east of N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Swett street, west of N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Divison. 
Texas street, over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Newton street, over N. Y., N-. H. & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

West Rutland square (foot-bridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. 
Railroad, Providence Division. 

Williams street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 



In charge of Park Department . 

Agassiz, in Back Bay Fens. 

Arborway, over Stony brook. 

Audubon road, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Bernier street (foot-bridge), in the Riverway. 

Boylston street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Bridle path, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

* Castle Island (foot-bridge) from Marine park, South Boston, 

to Castle Island. 
Charlesgate, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Charlesgate (West), over Ipswich street. 
Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin park. 
Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay Fens. 
Ellicott arch, in Franklin park. 
Fen, Back Bay Fens. 
Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin park. 



30 City Document No. 38. 

Leverett pond (foot-bridge), in Leverett park. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

Scarboro' pond (foot-bridge), in Franklin park. 

Stony brook, Back Bay Fens. 

In charge of Public Grounds Department. 
Public Garden (foot-bridge). 

II. — Bridges of which Boston Supports the Part within 

its Limits. 
In charge of Bridge Division. 

Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 

* Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

* In charge of Dark Department. 

Bellevue street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

Bernier street (foot-bridge), in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

Brookline avenue, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

Longwood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 

Tremont street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

III. — Bridges op which Boston pays a part of the Cost 

of Maintenance. 

In charge of Bridge Division. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Chelsea bridge, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Dorchester street, over N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 
Harvard street, over N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
West Fourth street, over N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 

In charge of Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 31 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

* West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

IV. — Bridges Supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

3d. — Boston db Maine Railroad, Western Division. 
Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach db Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — New York, New Haven db Hartford Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Norfolk " " 

Norfolk " » 

Silver street. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 
West Broadway. 
West Fifth street. 
West Fourth street. 
West Second street. 
West Sixth street. 
West Third street. 

6th. — New York, New Haven db Hartford Railroad, 

Plymouth Division. 
Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Freeport street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven db Hartford Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

Albany street (new part). 
Beech street,' West Roxbury. 
Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 



32 City Document No. 38. 

Berkeley street (new part) . 

Broadway (new part). 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 

Castle street, over the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Providence 

Division. 
Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 
Chandler street. 
Columbus avenue (new part). 
Dudley avenue, West Roxbury. 
Ferdinand street. 
Harrison avenue (new part). 
Park street, West Roxbury. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street (new part). 

Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston : 

In charge of Bridge Division ... 55 

In charge of Park Department . . . 18 

In charge of Public Grounds Department . 1 



II. Number of which Boston supports the part 
within its limits : 



— 74 



In charge of Bridge Division ... 9 

In charge of Park Department ... . 5 

— 14 
III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the 

cost of maintenance : 

In charge of Bridge Division ... 6 

In charge of Commissioners of Boston and 

Cambridge Bridges ..... 8 

— 14 
IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany .... 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division . 2 

3. Boston & Maine, Western Division . 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn . . 1 

5. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Midland Division . . . . 12 

6. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Plymouth Division .... 5 

7. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Providence Division . . . 13 

— 39 

Total number ...... 141 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



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34 City Document No. 38. 



Public Landing Places. 

The following public landing-places have been built by the 
city, and are maintained and controlled by the Street Depart- 
ment : 

Charles-river Bridge. — Size, 40x60. Built in 1890. 
Moored from city's property. 

Essex-street Bridge. — Size, 9 x 23. Built in 1890. Moored 
from city's property. 

East Boston, Public Landing. — Size, 18x30. Built in 
1893. Moored at dock of East Boston Dry Dock Company. 
Dock and flats leased at $250 per year. 

Commercial Wharf. — Size, 30x50. Built by M. F. Sulli- 
van; contract dated January 1, 1892. Moored at dock of Com- 
mercial Wharf Corporation. Dock and flats leased November 
30, 1891, at $1,000 per year. 

Eederal-street Bridge. — Size, 20 x 30. Built by M. F. Sulli- 
van, October 26, 1892. Moored from city's property. 

Jeffries' Point, East Boston. — Size, 20x50. Moored from 
Fitzpatrick's Wharf ; $250 per year. 

Cable-houses and Boxes. 

The following is a list of cable-houses and boxes on bridges in 
charge of this division : 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Charles-river bridge, 2 houses, 1 unused box. 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 house. 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Dover-street bridge, 2 houses or boxes. 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 1 box. 

Chelsea-street bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 4 boxes. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Neponset bridge, 2 boxes on poles. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Federal-street bridge, 1 house. 
Merchants' Telegraph Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Maiden bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Electric Light Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
Lynn & Boston Railroad Company : 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 4 boxes. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



35 



Chelsea [South] bridge, 8 boxes. 
Boston Elevated Railway Company : 

Cambridge-street bridge, 1 house. 

Dover-street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Federal-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Maiden bridge, 2 houses. 

Warren bridge, 2 houses. 
Boston Police Department : 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Fire Department : 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 1 box. 

Dover-street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 

Bridge Division. Traffic Account. 6 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
September 18, 1899. 

North Bridges. 



Name of Bridge. 



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680 


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1,200 


. 1,050 


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783 


1,355 


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5,394 


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Chelsea (North) . 
Chelsea (South). 

Maiden 

Meridian street . 
Warren 



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1,060 
1,418 

487 
1,344 

5,768 



2,310 
704 

1,960 
791 
550 

4,442 



388 
388 
418 
121 
1,419 



370 

370 

438 

114 

1,371 



South Bridges. 



Broadway 

Congress street 

Dover street 

Federal street 

Li street 

Mt. Washington avenue. 
Summer street 



4,900 


5,200 








3,725 


3,520 


4,475 


4,525 




4,965 


5,380 


2,475 


2,325 


395 


1,673 


938 


1,106 


1,170 


413 


1,045 


823 


600 


410 




1,352 


1,536 


861 


905 




1,316 


1,440 


1,373 


1,360 





388 
470 



36 



City Document No. 38. 



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38 



City Document No. 38. 



Table showing the Widths of Openings for Vessels in all Bridges 
provided with Draws in the City of Boston, 1899. 



Name of Bridge. 



Location. 



O M 



Width. 



Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 
Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 
Division 

Boston & Maine R.R. (freight), 
Southern Division 

Boston & Maine R.R. (passen- 
ger) , Southern Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., Western 
Division 

Boston & Maine R.R., Western 
Division 

Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Canal (or Craigie's) 

Charles river 

Charlestown 

Chelsea (south channel) 

Chelsea (north channel) 

Chelsea st. (East Boston side) — 

Chelsea street (Chelsea ' side) 

Commercial Point (or Tenean) — 

Congress street (Boston side) — 

" South Boston side 

Dover street 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Fitchburg R.R 

Fitchburg R.R. (lor teaming 
freight) 

Grand Junction R.R 

Grand J unction R.R 

Granite 

Harvard (Boston side) 

" (Cambridge side) 

L street 

Maiden 



Boston to Charlestown 

Over Miller's river 

Boston to East Cambridge 

Boston to Charlestown. . 

Over Miller's river 

Over Fort Point channel. 
Brighton to Cambridge.. 
Boston to East Cambridge 
Boston to Charlestown 



Charlestown to Chelsea. 



East Boston to Chelsea 



Dorchester 

Over Fort Point channel 



Brighton to Cambridge. . 
Over Fort Point channel 
Boston to Charlestown . . 



Brighton to Cambridge. 
East Boston to Chelsea. 
Dorchester to Milton — 
Boston to Cambridge . . . 



Over Reserved channel 
South Boston 



Charlestown to Everett.. 



1 39 feet 7 inches 



35 " 6 " 
40 " 2 " 
39 " 7 " 



36 " 

36 " 

34 " 6 

36 " 

36 " 6 

36 " 10 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



Table showing Width of openings, etc — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 


o to 
uS 

<D p 
.a 0> 

g a 
SO 


Width. 


Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 
Mt. Washington avenue (Boston 


East Boston to Chelsea — 
Over Fort Point channel . . 
Dorchester to Quincy 


2 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 


59 f 

59 

42 

42 
36 

28 
30 
36 

36 

35 
36 
50 
36 
35 
36 
36 
35 


eet 2 inches. 
11 ii 

" 2 " 


Mt. Washington avenue (South 


<i 3 <• 




" " 


New England R.R 


11 4 .1 




Brighton to Watertown 

Brighton to Cambridge 

Over Fort Point channel. . 

Dorchester to Quincy 

Charlestown to Cambridge 
Over Fort Point Channel.. 

Boston to Charlestown 

Boston to Cambridge 

Brighton to Cambridge 

Brighton to "Watertown — 


11 3 ■• 




11 " 


New York, New Haven & Hart- 
lord R.R 


ii 3 ii 


New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R 


11 10 ii 




II Q <l 




11 ii 




it o 11 


" (Cambridge side 


11 6 

" 6 " 
11 ii 




" 10 







40 



City Document No. 38. 



Table showing Width of Bridges, kind of Roadways, Sidewalks, 
etc., on Tide=water Bridges, 1899. 



Name of Bridge. 



01 




ho 


R< 


T3 




'£ 






M 








o 












"3 




£ 


£ 



Roadway. 



Kind of 
Roadway. 



Sidewalks. 



Kind of Walks. 



Broadway 

Cambridge-street 

Canal 

Charles river 



Charlestown 



Chelsea, North 

" South 

" street 

Commercial point. . . 

Congress street 

Dover st. (over water) 

Essex street 

Federal street 

Granite 

Harvard 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington ave.. . 

Neponset 

North Beacon street... 
North Harvard street. 

Prison Point 

Summer street 

Warren 



Western ave. to Cam 
bridge 



Western ave. to Water 
town 



Winthrop 

West Boston. 



Ft. In. 

60 
40 
64 
50 

100 j 

49 

50 3 

30 
about 

34 

60 
60 

31 
69 
30 2 
69 4 

60 
40 
50 

61 

30 

31 
•28 2 
50 

100 
80 

33 2 

33 
24 2 
50 



Ft. In. 
40 
32 9 

4S 

34 

1 27 9 
1 22 
1 27 9 

40 

41 2 

23 2 
about 

27 

44 
40 

22 8 
49 

24 4 
51 
44 
32 
36 
39 6 

23 10 

25 2 
.26 7 

36 
76 
60 

26 3 

24 2 
19 10 
36 



Plank 



Paved 



Plank . 

Paved . 

Plank . 
Paved . 
Plank . 

Paved . 



Plank 



I Plank part I 
( Paved part \ 

" entire... 
Paved 



Plank 



Paved , 



Ft. In. 

10 
6 

5 
8 

10 

8 

8 

6 

' 8 
10 

7 6 
10 

5 

9 2 

8 
7 
7 

10 9 
5 5 

5 

7 
12 

10 

6 

8 
3 7 

7 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 

Brick. 

Asphalt. 



Coal-tar concrete 
and plank. 
Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal-tar concrete. 



Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 
Asphalt. 
Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 



Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



41 



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42 City Document No. 38. 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE FERRY DIVISION. 



Noeth Fekky, East Boston, February 1, 1900. 

Me. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the annual report of 
the expenditures, income and operation of the Ferry Division 
for the twelve months ending January 81, 1900, and the 
amount of property and the condition of the same. 

South Ferry, Fast Boston Side. — Located at the termina- 
tion of Lewis street; covers an area of 58,725 square feet of 
land and water. On these premises are one head-house, 
one coal-shed, one workshop for carpenters, machinists and 
blacksmith, one gate-room and oil-room, all in a very 
poor condition ; three piers, which form the two ferry-slips, 
two drops and tanks, and one dock where boats are laid when 
not in use or while undergoing repairs. 

South Ferry, Boston Side. — Located at the termination of 
Eastern avenue, and covers an area of 38,135 square feet 
of land and water, upon which is one head-house with 
canopies extending over driveways, one gate-room, three 
piers, which form the two slips, and two drops and tanks. 
The wharf property adjoining these premises was leased by 
the East Boston Ferry Company for 999 years at a rental of 
84,000 per year, which lease was assigned to the Ferry De- 
partment. The whole of it is sub-let to the Public Institu- 
tions Department for $2,000 per year. This makes a net loss 
of $2,000 a }^ear to this division, and in my opinion the 
Public Institutions Department should pay the whole rental. 

North Ferry, Boston Side. • — Located at the termination of 
Battery street ; covers an area of 45,000 square feet of land 
and water, upon which are one head-house with canopies, one 
gate-room and steam boiler-room, three piers, which form the 
two slips, and two drops and tanks. 

North Ferry, Fast Boston Side. — Located at the termina- 
tion of Border street, and covers an area of 62,138 square 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 43 

feet of land and water, upon which are one head-house with 
canopy, boiler-room, oil-room, stable and coal-shed, three 
piers, which form the two slips, two drops and tanks. 
During the past year one new propeller boat, the " Noddle 
Island," was built and placed in commission, the cost of 
which was $75,000. The " Gov. Russell," which was sold 
to the United States Government for $7 1,000, was repurchased 
by the city of Boston for $25,000. She went into commis- 
sion January 3, 1900, and the total cost of her was about 
$50,000. To duplicate this boat to-day would cost the city 
$95,000, so that the city has been saved about $45,000 in the 
repurchasing of this boat. A contract has been made for 
another propeller ferry-boat, and when completed and put 
into commission I am free to say that the ferry service of 
Boston will be second to none in the country. Plans were 
drawn and bids received for the construction of a new head- 
house for South Ferry, East Boston side, but owing to com- 
plications arising in the matter of land takings the contract 
was held in abeyance. All the boats, slips, drops and build- 
ings except the head-house at the South Ferry, East Boston 
side, are in good condition, and no extraordinary expense 
will be necessary for a number of years. I again renew my 
recommendation that Battery street be widened from Com- 
mercial street to the ferry gates. On account of being unfit 
for service the ferry-boat, " Ben Franklin," which has been 
in use for twenty-eight years, was sold at public auction 
January 29, 1900, for $2,650. Upon the acceptance of the 
eight-hour law by the people, and as directed by His Honor 
Mayor Quincy, the employees in this division were put on an 
eight-hour basis. In order to do so, another crew was organ- 
ized, which practically gave the same service during week 
days at the South and North Ferries. 
Yours truly, 

William F. McClellan, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



44 



City Document No. 38. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Annual and Special Appropriations of Street De- 
partment, Ferry Division, for the year ending January 
81, 1900. 



Appropriation for year ending January 31, 1900, 
Amount of expenditures . . $211,822 87 

Transferred to City Treasury . 677 13 



$212,500 00 



212,500 00 



Objects of Expenditure 

Salaries and wages for maintenance 
Salaries and wages for repairs 
Current expenses . . 

Fuel 

Supplies for maintenance 

Supplies for repairs 

Repairs on boats .... 

Repairs on buildings, piers and drops 

Tools and fixtures .... 

Incidental expenses 



Transferred to City Treasury 



$128,080 48 
17,731 83 
13,855 04 
28,264 34 

4,693 13 

5,341 87 
10,920 47 

1,285 62 
546 81 

1,103 28 

1211,822 87 
677 13 

$212,500 00 



Special Appropriations. 



Appropriation authorized and is- 
sued for new ferry landings, head 
house, new boat slips, and drops 

Amount expended to February 1, 
1899 

Amount transferred to Sewer Di- 
vision, Street Department, by 
order of Mayor authorized by 
Acts of Legislature, chap. 450, 
sect. 14, 1899 

Amount paid on account of drops, 
piers, slips, and new boats to 
date . 

Balance of appropriation 



$143,393 49 



200,000 00 



12,187 69 
144,418 82 



$500,000 00 



$500,000 00 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 45 

Amount expended during the year as above . $12,187 69 

John M. Brooks, in full for new 

drop $2,120 00 

W. H. Ellis & Co., refitting slips, 2,500 50 

Public Buildings De- 
partment, Elec- 
trical Construction 
Division, for elec- 
tric plant of 
" Noddle Island " $3,470 80 

Less amount charged 
to appropriation 
for new boats . 301 53 

3,169 27 



Sundry bills for new head-house, 

South Ferry .... 1,090 35 

Sundry bills for labor and material 

furnished for boats, slips and 

drops 3,307 57 



$12,187 69 



Special Appropriation for New Ferry-boats. 

Amount apportioned for boat No. 3, " Noddle 

Island" $71,000 00 

Amount apportioned for repurchasing and refitting 

" Gov. Russell " 57,500 00 



Total appropriation $128,500 00 

"Noddle Island" . . . . . . . $71,000 00 

Amount of expenditure to Febru- 
ary 1, 1899 .... $50,463 60 

Amount paid William McKie in full 
for completion of contract for 
building 18,119 00 

Sundry bills for labor and material, 2,417 40 

$71,000 00 



" Gov. Russell " $57,500 00 

Amount of expenditure to February 1, 1900, as follows : 

Paid United States Government 
Navy Department for purchase 
of boat at Norfolk, Va. . . $25,000 00 

Paid for insurance on passage to 

Boston 900 00 



Carried foricard, $25,900 00 



46 City Document Xo. 38. 

Brought forward, §25,900 00 

Paid Boston Tow Boat Co. for 
towing boat to Boston 

Sundry bills for labor and material 
furnished by this division for re- 
fitting boat for ferry service 

Balance unexpended 



Special Appropriation for Xew Clock 

at South Ferry. Boston 
Amount paid Howard Watch and 

Clock Co. . . 

Labor and material furnished by 

division ..... 



1.310 00 




17,107 40 
13,182 60 


-S57.500 00 




. . 


8500 00 


$250 00 




224 79 





1474 79 
Transferred to Citv Treasurv . . 25 21 



8500 00 



Total Appropriations. 

Annual maintenance . . . 6212.500 00 

New ferry-landing loan, $500,000 00 

Less previously ex- 



pended . . . 143.393 49 



Xew ferrv-boat "Nod- 
dle Island" . . 871,000 00 

Less previously ex- 
pended . . . 50.463 60 



356.606 51 



20.536 40 



Repurchase of "Gov. Etissell" . 57.500 00 

Xew Head-house, clock, South Ferry, 

Boston . . . . 500 00 

$647,642 91 

Total Expenditures. 

Annual maintenance . 8211.822 87 

Xew ferry-landing loan, 12,187 69 

Xew ferry-boat "Nod- 
dle Island 

Xew ferrv-boat "Gov 
Russell " 

Xew Head-house 
clock 



20.536 40 

44.317 40 

474 79 



6289.330 15 



Transferred to Sewer Division from 

new ferrv-landing . . . 200.000 00 

469,339 15 



8158.303 76 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



Balances Unexpended. 

Annual maintenance . . . 1677 13 

New fen'Y-landino; loan . . . 114.418 82 

New ferry-boat " Gov. Russell " . 13,182 60 

Xew Head-house, clock . . . 25 21 



: 158.3':'o 76 



IXCO^LE. 

Cask receipts from February 1, 1899 to February 1, 1900. 

From Tollmen : 

For 11,992,521 foot passengers at 1 cent . . $119,925 21 

sales of strip team- tickets . . . . 27,517 00 
From Gatemen : 

For 308,392 foot passengers at 1 cent . . 3.083 92 

cask fares for teams ..... 13.902 38 
At office of City Collector : 

From sale of ferrv-boat •• Ben Frank- 
lin " . . . . . 82,650 00 
Less expenses of sale . . . 265 00 

2.385 00 
525 00 
101 50 
2.523 32 
200 00 
25 00 

1,016 30 

476 00 

174 50 

170 00 

8172,025 13 



From sales of foot-passes by requisitions . 

sales of strip team-tickets by requisitions 
rents ..'.... 
National Automatic Machine Co. 
free ferries. July 4, 1899 . 
At office of Ferry Division : 
From sales of foot passes 

sales of strip team-tickets 

sales of old material 

boat privileges to boot blacks . 

Total receipts of the year 
From sale of ferry-boat " Ben Frank- 



lin 



resrular ferry income 



82.385 00 
169.640 13 



8172.025 13 



48 



City Document No. 38. 



Statement showing Receipts at each Ferry. 
North Ferry. 



From Tollman. 


Foot Passengers. 


Team Tickets. 


Total. 


No 2 


$12,703 64 
12,396 92 
12,526 84 
12,224 61 
12,601 34 
12,597 06 
12,509 64 


$2,265 00 
2,112 50 
2,081 50 
2,062 00 
2,184 00 
2,090 00 
2,138 50 


$14,968 64 


" 3 


14,509 42 




14,608 34 


" 6 


14,286 61 


» 9 


14,785 34 


" 10 


14,687 06 


" 13 


14,648 14 








$87,560 05 


$14,933 50 


$102,493 55 



From Tollmen . ..... 

From Gatemen : 

For 198,769 foot passengers, at lc, $1,987 69 
cash fares for teams . . 6,954 95 



$102,493 55 





y 

South Ferry. 


<j,i»ii. \ji 


Total at North Fen 


$111,436 19 


From Tollman. 


Foot Passengers. 


Team Tickets. 


Total. 


No 1 


$7,557 39 
7,530 72 
7,821 68 
7,300 74 
930 36 
1,224 27 


$3,185 00 

3,091 00 

3,056 00 

3,072 50 

79 00 

100 00 


$10,742 39 


» 4 


10,621 72 


» 7 


10,877 68 


" 8 


10,373 24 


" ii 


1,009 36 


" 12 


1,324 27 








$32,365 16 


$12,583 50 


$44,948 66 


From Tollmen . 






$44,948 66 



From Gatemen : 

For 109,623 foot-passengers, at lc, $1,096 23 
cash fares for teams . . 6,947 43 



Total at South Ferry 



8,043 66 
$52,992 32 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



49 



North and South ferries, as above 
Tickets paid for at office of City Collector 
Tickets paid for at office of Ferry Division 
Free ferries, July 4, 1899 . 



Sale of ferry-boat .... 
Rents, head-house and bootblack privileges 
Sales of old material 



$164;428 51 

626 50 

1,492 30 

25 00 



Total cash receipts, as above 

Cash Statement. 

From February 1, 1899, to February 1, 1900 

Dr. 

To cash received from all sources 



,572 31 

2,385 00 

2,893 32 

174 50 



1172,025 13 



72,025 13 



Cr. 
By amount paid City Collector . $172,015 04 
Amount of rejected coin . . 10 09 



$172,025 13 



Statement of Receipts. 
From April 1, 1870, to February 1, 1900. 

Cash received for tolls from April 

1, 1870, to February 1, 1896 . $4,248,132 01 

Cash received for tolls from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1896, to February 1, 
1897 163,769 67 

Cash received for tolls from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1897, to February 1, 
1898 168,083 88 

Cash received for tolls from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1898, to February 1, 
1899 162,078 87 

Cash received for tolls from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899, to February 1, 
1900 166,572 31 



Cash received for rent 
Cash received for old boats . 
Cash received for one new boat 
Cash received from all other 
sources . 



$50,174 62 
75,131 71 
71,000 00 

10,614 51 



$4,908,636 74 



Total receipts in 29 years and 10 months 



206,920 84 
1,115,557 58 



50 City Document No. 38. 

Cash Statement. 

From April 1, 1870 (date of purchase by the City of Boston, 

of the East Boston Ferries), to February 1, 1900. 

Br. 

To receipts from all sources in 29 years 10 

months $5,115,557 58 

Cr. 

By amount paid to City Collector, $5,114,896 39 
By cash with tollmen as capital . 575 00 

By counterfeit and rejected money 

in 29 years 10 months . . 86 19 

$5,115,557 58 

Expenditures. 

From March 4., 1857, to April 1, 1870. 

Amount charged to the East Boston Ferries by Auditor previous 
to purchase : 

For avenues . . $250,000 00 

For repairs . . 65,815 68 

$315,815 68 

For ferry property purchased 

April 1, 1870 .... 276,375 00 

$592,190 68 

Amount of expenditure from April 

1, 1870, to February 1, 1896 . $5,901,089 97 

Amount of expenditure from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1896, to February 1, 
1897 241,057 70 

Amount of expenditure from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1897, to February 1, 
1898 270,026 45 

Amount of expenditure from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1898, to February 1, 
1899 342,908 06 

Amount of expenditure from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899, to February 1, 

1900 289,469 56 

7,053,551 74 

$7,645,742 42 
Deduct. 
Amount paid to City Treasury .... 5,114,906 48 



Net cost of ferries to city to date, not including 

interest on loans $2,530,835 94 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



51 



Statement showing the Actual Standing of Ferry Division, 
Street Department, with the City op Boston, February 
1, 1900. 

Dr. 



Amount paid previous to April 1, 1870 

Amount paid from April 1, 1870, to February 1, 

1900, as follows : 
Seven ferry steamers 
New buildings, piers and drops 
Fuel .... 

Repairs of all kinds . 
Salaries and wages 
Tools and fixtures 
Land from Lincoln's Wharf in 1887 
Land from Battery Wharf in 1893 
All other expenses 



(Jr. 

By amount paid the city for income 

amount charged to ferry property for avenues 
that were laid out as streets, August, 1880, 
and which should be credited to this division, 

rents prior to 1881 

paving avenues ...... 

estimated value of seven ferry 

steamers . . . . $109,765 59 

one added during the year . 74,629 44 



$592,190 68 



513,988 75 

442,212 22 

1,006,479 35 

695,674 16 

3,379,904 94 

14,263 30 

5,562 52 

10,000 00 

985,466 50 

57,645,742 42 



$5,114,906 48 



250,000 00 
60,277 56 
11,530 84 



less 6 per cent, for 
depreciation on 
former 

less 4 per cent, on 
latter for nine 
months' use 



$184,395 03 



£6,585 94 
2,985 18 



deduct sale January 29, 1900, 
of ferry-boat " Ben Franklin," 

estimated value of real estate 
and franchise as per last re- 
port ..... 

added during past year . 



Carried foru- ard, 



9,571 12 

$174,823 91 

2,385 00 



$702,900 00 
7,900 00 



172,438 91 



710,800 00 
1,319,953 79 



52 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward ..... 
By amount not yet charged to new buildings 

amount paid for awning, North Ferry, East 
Boston ....... 

amount paid for new clock, South Ferry, Bos- 
ton ........ 

land from Lincoln's Wharf 

land from Battery Wharf .... 

amount expended on Eastern-avenue wharf 

estimated value of tools and fixtures 

estimated value of fuel on hand 

estimated value of supplies on hand 

cash with tollmen as capital .... 

due for rent . . . . 

amount charged to "Grov. Russell "repurchased 
and being fitted out ..... 

profit and loss in 29 years and 10 months 



!, 319, 953 79 
84 73 

742 94 



474 


79 


5,562 


52 


10,000 


00 


1,499 


46 


6,000 


00 


9,148 


55 


3,281 


37 


575 


00 


16 


68 


44,317 


40 


1,244,085 


19 



$7,645,742 42 



Statement showing the Difference of Travel on the 
from February 1, 1899, to February 1, 1900. 

NortJi. 
Foot passengers, at 1 cent each . . 8,954,774 3 

Foot passengers, by ticket . . 105,990 

Foot passengers, free . . . 66,778 

One-horse teams and pleasure car- 
riages . 
Two-horse teams 



Three-horse teams 
Four-horse teams 
Two-horse pleasure 

hacks . 
Two-cent tolls (at g 

etc. 
Four-cent tolls 
Six-cent tolls . 
Seven-cent tolls 
Eight-cent tolls 
Ten-cent tolls . 
Thirteen-cent tolls 
Fifteen-cent tolls 
Twenty-cent tolls 
Thirty-cent tolls 
Free teams 



carnages 



ate), hand 



and 



carts 



251,625 
97,598 
4,383 
6,323 



6,452 



Ferries 

South. 
,346,139 
46,260 
5,634 

156,226 

110,352 

4,603 

7,740 

1,406 



4,228 


1,848 


142,665 


139,238 


3,705 


3,201 


12 


4 


10,189 


11,961 


489 


880 


521 


776 


36 


17 


1 


— 


11 


1 


4,723 


1,782 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



53 



Total Travel on both Ferries from February 1, 1895, to 
February 1, 1900. 



From Feb 

1, 1S95, to 

Feb. 1, 

1896. 



From Feb, 

1, 1896, to 

Feb. 1, 

1897. 



From Feb. 

1, 1897, to 

Feb. 1, 

1898. 



From Feb 

1, 1898, to 

Feb. 1, 

1899. 



From Feb. 

1, 1899, to 

Feb. 1, 

1900. 



One-horse teams 

Two-horse teams 

Three-horse teams 

Four-horse teams 

Two-horse carriages and 
hacks 

Two-cent tolls for hand- 
carts, etc 

Drag-wheels, etc 

Foot-passengers 



676,294 

248,291 

9,095 

16,939 

10,349 

7,059 

101 

11,929,790 



733,478 

219,306 

9,290 

14,902 

16,299 

8,321 

76 

12,034,300 



738,514 

240,434 

7,716 

14,961 

14,659 

8,819 

75 

12,466,272 



685,422 

207,402 

9,474 

15,311 

13,5S2 

6,850 
89 

12,182,842 



689,754 

230,100 

10,355 

15,360 

14,764 

6,076 

66 

12,453,163 



Ticket Statement. 

Foot-passes outstanding February 1, 1899 
Sold during the j r ear .... 
On requisitions to other divisions . 



Received and destroyed ..... 
Outstanding February 1, 1900 .... 

One-horse team-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 

Sold during the year . 

On requisitions to other divisions .... 

Received and destroyed ..... 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 . 

Two-horse team-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 

Sold during the year ...... 

On requisitions to other divisions .... 

Received and destroyed ..... 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 .... 



195,299 

153,630 

6,080 

355,009 
152,250 

202,759 



63,924 
363,456 

1,808 



429,188 
362,378 

66,810 



33,699 

208,368 

752 

242,819 
207,950 

34,869 



54 City Document No. 38. 

Three-horse team-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 2,138 

Sold during the year . . . . . . 9,198 

11,336 

Received and destroyed ..... 8,986 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 . . . . 2,350 

Four-horse team-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 ... . . • ' . • • 4,884 

Sold during the year . . . • . . 14,340 

19,224 

Received and destroyed . . . . . 14,063 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 . . . . 5,161 

One-horse carriage-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 18,941 

Sold during the year 45,400 

On requisitions to other divisions . . . . 200 

64,541 

Received and destroyed . . .■••••• . 45,473 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 . . . . 19,068 

Two-horse carriage-tickets outstanding February 1, 

1899 3,005 

Sold during the year . . . . 7,900 

10,905 

Received and destroyed . . . ... 7,858 

Outstanding February 1, 1900 .... 3,047 



Street Department — Paving Division. 55 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
PAVING DIVISION. 



Room 44, City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1900. 

Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the annual report of the 
expenditures and income of the Paving Division of the Street 
Department for the financial year ending January 31, 1900, 
showing the nature of the work, the number and variety of per- 
mits issued and the details of expenditures involved in paving, 
macadamizing, regulating and constructing various streets. 

Respectfully yours, 

John L. Kelly, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The Paving Division has charge of the following work : 

The maintenance and rebuilding of street surfaces and sidewalks. 

The placing of street signs. 

The numbering of buildings. 

The issuing of permits to open or occupy the streets, or for 
such other purpose as may be required under the ordinances. 

The removal of snow and ice from the streets, gutters and 
plank walks. 

The cleaning of streets in the outlying sections of the city not 
covered by the Street Cleaning Division. 

The division is in charge of a deputy superintendent, with 
office in City Hall, and with a clerical force under the direction 
of a chief clerk. 

The outdoor working force of the division is divided into ten. 
districts, each in charge of a foreman, as follows : 

No. 1, South Boston. 

No. 2, East Boston. 

No. 3, Charlestown. 

No. 4, Brighton. 

No. 5, West Roxbury. 

No. 6, Dorchester. 

No. 7, Roxbury. 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, City Proper. 



56 City Document No. 38. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Regular Appropriation. 

Appropriation for 1899-1900. 

General expenses . . $690,000 00 

Removal of snow . . 50,000 00 



$740,000 00 



Amount collected for repairs made by Paving 

Division and inspector's services for different 

companies, etc. ..... . 5,704 07 

Amount transferred from different appropriations, 114,353 79 



General expenditures from Febru- 
ary 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900, $705,432 68 

Removal of snow from February 1 , 

1899, to January 31, 1900 ' . 154,625 18 



,057 86 



,057 86 



Special Appropriations, Paving and Street Improvements. 

Amount of balances, 1898-99, less 

transfers $94,647 39 

Amount of appropriations, 1898-99, 

revenues and transfers . . 308,996 21 

$403,643 60 



Amount of expenditures .... 368,856 68 

Balances unexpended .... $34,786 92 
Total Expenditures. 

Maintenance appropriation . . . . $860,057 86 

Special appropriations ..... 368,856 68 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways . 510,331 12 
Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, 

Brighton 16,280 36 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, Dor- 
chester 33,483 80 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, East 

Boston 3,561 90 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways, Rox- 

bury and West Roxbury ... . 24,037 97 

Blue Hill and Other Avenues .... 246,053 89 

South Union Station 71,155 28 

Rapid Transit 1,234 94 

Charlestown bridge . . . . . . 13,54538 

Charlestown street 37,172 50 

Abolishment of Grade Crossings . . . 463 00 

Buildings, Chelsea street .... 1,920 91 

$2,188,155 59 



Street Department — Paving Division. 57 



Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the City 
Collector from February 1, 1899, on account of the Paving Di- 
vision. 

Edgestoue and sidewalk assessments . . $127 44 

Permits . . . . . . . 2,032 75 



!,160 19 



The amount paid into the city treasury during the year on ac- 
count of the Paving Division is as follows : 

Sidewalk construction assessments (law of 1892), $7,711 84 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments (law of 

1893) 1,583 01 

Permits . . . . . . . 1,789 75 

Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 152 50 

$11,237 10 



58 



City Document No. 38. 



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Street Department — Paving Division. 



59 



SCHEDULE A. 

Salaries of Paving Division office employees, Feb 
ruary 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900 . 

Salaries of Permit office employees, February 1 
1899, to January 3 f, 1900 . 

Salaries of Inspectors, February 1, 1899, to Jan 
uary 31, 1900 

Salaries of Engineers, February 1, 1899, to Janu 
ary 31, 1900 . . . ' . 

Smoke inspection ..... 

Sig'ns and numbers ..... 

Holidays ....... 

Furniture . . . . . . . 

Repairs to offices, stables, sheds, etc. . 

Printing and stationery .... 

Gas ........ 

Messenger service ..... 

Wharfage and rent ..... 

Medical attendance on injured employees 

Sundries ....... 

Fuel and oil ..... 

Taxes ....... 

Advertising ...... 

Expenses of yards and stables, including repairs to 
carts, harnesses and stables, and care of horses, 
etc $131,242 66 

Less amount earned by Division teams, 81,469 25 



$14,706 36 

7,903 39 

21,463 93 

2,558 03 

2,853 06 

8,395 81 

31,319 67 

620 73 

2,541 89 

5,124 89 

345 63 

68 65 

8,742 06 

176 00 

1,831 90 

1,768 59 

115 68 

296 92 



Tools, cost of keeping same in repair, etc. 

Veterinary service .... 

Telephones . 

Artificial stone sidewalks . . . 

Street cleaning ..... 

Eclgestones and sidewalks, new 

Building new fences and plankwalks 

Crossing repairs ..... 

Crossings (new) ..... 

Building new office at West Roxbury yard 

Executions of court .... 

Wagon plates and employees badges 

Repairing approach to temporary West Boston bridge, 

Planting trees . . . . 



49,773 41 

14,820 54 

1,163 97 

1,620 47 

5,270 32 

62,522 04 

21,894 68 

536 84 

12,243 95 

6,277 33 

1,202 26 

1,943 30 

301 50 

1,403 17 

100 50 



Less credit for stone taken from 

ledges $80,190 30 

Less amount earned by steam rollers . 4,639 92 

Decrease in stock . . . . 8,853 72 



• 1,907 47 



93,683 94 



5198,223 53 



60 



City Document No. 38. 



SCHEDULE B. 

The following schedule shows the expenditure from the main- 
tenance appropriation of this division, in excess of special appro- 
priations : 

Atlantic avenue, Dewey square to Oliver street . $6,496 97 

Capen street, Dorchester ..... 137 50 

Devonshire street, Milk to AVater street . . 214 19 

Federal street, Dewey square to Milk street . . 6,721 54 

Harrison avenue, Kneeland to Bennet street . . 106 03 

Prescott street, East Boston, construction . . 535 34 

Kingston street, Beach to Bedford street . . 363 16 

Leverett street, Minot street to Craigie's bridge . 1,115 87 

Milton street, Ward 8, asphalting . . . 103 17 

Washington street, Grove Hall and Columbia road, 631 18 

Street Improvements, General : 

Arlington street 197 22 

Beacon street 2,061 94 

Belvidere street 2,590 13 

Berkeley street ...... 331 50 

Castle square and Chandler street . . . 76 75 

Causeway and Commercial streets ... 79 47 

Congress street, B to C street . . . . 3,814 59 

Dartmouth street ...... 252 80 

Exeter street 1,171 81 

Falcon street 260 62 

Huntington avenue ...... 1,369 99 

Massachusetts avenue ..... 794 63 

Neponset avenue . . . . . . 141 33 

Northampton street . . . . . . 66 25 

Northfield street . . . . . . 1,845 02 

Park street 303 41 

Pleasant street 930 83 

St. James avenue ...... 135 35 

St. Stephen street ...... 66 98 

Third street 4,535 22 

West Concord street ..... 1,802 61 

Winchester street . . . . . . 116 53 

Street Improvements, Ward 16 : 

Pleasant street 220 44 

Street Improvements, Ward 19 : 

Brookline avenue ...... 94 39 

Street Improvements, Ward 25 : 

Foster street . . . . . . . 116 42 



1,801 18 



Street Department — "Paving Division. 



61 



SCHEDULE C. 
New "Work. — Paid from Maintenance. 
Endicott street, between Cooper and Thacher streets, asphalted. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,572 31 
Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., as- 
phalting . . . . . 



Seventh street, between E and Dorchester streets, 
macadamized, edgestone reset, gutters repaved, 
and brick sidewalks relaid. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Win. H. Glenn, paving 



3,43G 56 

$5,008 87 



5,100 83 
679 75 

(,780 58 



DETAIL OF EXPENDITURES MADE UNDER 
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Atlantic avenue, Oliver street to Dewey square, 
repaved with large granite blocks on a concrete 
base with pitch joints, and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $35,707 58 
Amount paid to Metropolitan Contracting Co., 

concrete base ....... 8,571 85 

Amount paid to P. McGovern, paving . . . 5,429 32 

Amount paid to Jones and Meehan, paving . . 4,763 16 



Amount of appropriation for Atlantic 
avenue, Oliver street to Dewey 
square ...... 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Paving Division .... 



$47,974 94 
6,496 97 



Atlantic street, Ward 15. 

Labor furnished by the city ..... 

Blackstone street, Hanover to North street, 
paved with large granite blocks on a concrete 
base with pitch joints and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to P. McGrovern & Co., paving 

Carried forward . 



,471 91 



,471 91 



$299 50 



$7,203 59 
1,914 98 

$9,118 57 



*&4,494.38 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
$2,202.27 paid by Union Freight Railroad Company. 



62 City Document No. 38. 

Brought forward ..... $9,118 57 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Contracting Co., con- 
crete base ....... 1,750 00 



Amount of appropriation for Black- 
stone street, Hanover to North 
street $10,000 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . 868 57 



$10,868 57 



Brooks street, Ward 25, construction. 
Amount paid to Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

Buildings, Chelsea street. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 

Capen street, construction, Ward 24. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 83,458 91 

Amount paid to James Dolan, paving . . . 165 42 



$10,868 


57 


$32,000 


00 


$1,920 


91 



Amount of appropriation for Capen 

street laying-out . . . . . . $3,000 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . 486 83 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Pavino- Division .... 137 50 



$3,624 33 



1,624 33 



Charles street, Fruit across Allen street, asphalted. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $2,649 99 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 

asphalting ....... 6,057 13 



5,707 12 



Congress street, Atlantic avenue to the bridge, paved with 
large granite blocks on a concrete base, with pitch joints, and 
regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $8,771 30 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, paving . . 4,428 45 



$13,199 75 

Devonshire street, Milk to Water street, asphalted. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,017 42 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 

asphalting 2,996 77 

$4,014 19 




DEVONSHIRE STREET, BETWEEN STATE STREET AND ADAMS SQUARE. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 63 

Amount of appropriation for Devon- 
shire street, Milk to Water street . $3,800 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 214 19 

$4,014 19 

Federal street, Dewey square to Milk street, paved with large 
granite blocks on a concrete base, with pitch joints and regu- 
lated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $21,944 40 
Amount paid to P. McGovern, paving . . . 9,521 67 



*$31,466 07 



Amount of appropriation for Federal 

street, Dewey square to Milk street, $22,993 53 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 6,721 54 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . 1,751 00 

$31,466 07 

Freeport street, Ward 24, retaining wall (unfinished work 

from 1898). 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $348 50 

Genesee and Oswego streets, asphalted and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1 ,792 29 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, asphalting . 6,311 90 



Amount of appropriation for Genesee 

and Oswego streets, asphalting . $8,000 00 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General , 104 19 



5,104 19 



8,104 19 

Harrison avenue, Kneeland to Harvard street, asphalted and 

regulated, and between Harvard and Bennet streets, repaved 

with large granite blocks on a gravel base. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $6,155 36 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 

asphalting ....... 3,161 01 

Amount paid to P. McGovern, paving . . 748 13 



t$10,064 50 



* $4,993.53 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
t $1,859.79 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



64 City Document No. 38. 

Amount of appropriation for Harrison 
avenue, Kneeland to Bennet street, 
asphalting . . . . . $9,958 47 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 106 03 

$10,064 50 

Kingston street, Beach to Essex street, asphalted and regu- 
lated, and between Essex and Bedford streets, paved with 
large granite blocks on a concrete base, with pitch joints, and 
regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $5,959 12 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co., asphalting, 5,609 68 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving . . 2,029 37 

* $13,598 17 
Amount of appropriation for Kingston street, 
Beach to Bedford street . . . $13,235 01 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 363 16 

$13,598 17 



Leverett street, Causeway street to Craigie's bridge, paved 
with large granite blocks on a gravel base, with gravel joints, 
and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $16,200 04 

Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, paving . . 2,030 99 

t $18,231 03 
Amount of appropriation for Leverett street, 
Minot street to Craigie's bridge . $17,062 66 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . 1,115 87 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General * 52 50 

$18,231 03 

Milton street, Brighton to Spring street, asphalted and regu- 
lated. 

Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city . $1,261 82 

Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, asphalting . 949 67 

$2,211 49 



* $560.59 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
t $2,062.66 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 65 

Amount of appropriation for Milton street, Ward 8, 
asphalting $1,200 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . 908 32 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 103 17 

$2,211 49 



Prescott street, Trenton to Saratoga street, macadamized and 

regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $6,408 15 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin, paving . . 452 69 



Amount of appropriation for Pres- 
cott street, East Boston, con- 
struction $5,000 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, 1,325 50 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . . 535 34 



5,860 84 



$6,860 84 

Princeton street, Meridian to Prescott street, macadamized and 

regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $8,709 38 

Amount paid to Ward & Conlin, paving . . 2,015 62 



Amount of appropriation for Prince- 
ton street, East Boston, construc- 
tion $10,000 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, 725 00 



,725 00 



.0,725 00 



Retaining Wall, Marcella and Centre 
streets. 

Advertising . . . . . . . $7 60 

Talbot avenue, Blue Hill avenue to Norfolk street, graded and 

regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished b} r the 

city $36,570 28 

Amount paid to James Dolan, paving . . 1,214 83 

$37,785 11 



Q6 City Document No. 38. 

Washington street, Grove Hall to Columbia road, widened, 

constructed and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $5,870 16 

Amount paid to James Dolan, paving . . 177 30 



Amount of appropriation for Wash- 
ington street, Grove Hall to Co- 
lumbia road .... $4,392 70 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, 1,023 58 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . , - 631 18 



5,047 46 



$6,047 46 

ABOLISHMENT OF GRADE CROSSINGS. 

Boston street and Dorchester avenue. 

Labor $463 00 



CHARLESTOWN BRIDGE. 

Paving done on City square, Water street and approach to bridge, 

Boston side. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $10,621 76 

Amount paid to John Turner & Co., paving . 2,923 62 



$13,545 38 



Charlestown street, Haymarket square to Causeway street, 

widened, paved With large granite blocks on a concrete base, 

with pitch joints and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the 

city $21,132 91 

Amount paid to Metropolitan Contracting 

Co., paving 16,039 59 

* $37,172 50 
RAPID TRANSIT. 

Tremont row, brick sidewalks relaid ; ScoIIay square and 

Haymarket square, crossings laid. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $1,234 94 

* $3,684.68 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 67 



SOUTH UNION STATION. 

Atlantic avenue and Dewey square, paved with large 
granite blocks on a concrete base, with pitch joints and regu- 
lated. (Work unfinished.) 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $24,610 10 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving . . 14,173 28 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn .... 385 08 



$39,168 46 

Dorchester avenue (unfinished work from 1898). 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $24,314 99 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn, paving . . 4,183 82 



,498 81 



Summer street extension (unfinished work from 1898). 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city . . $2,013 79 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn, paving . . 1,474 22 



5,488 01 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, GENERAL. 
Arlington street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $597 37 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, $400 15 
Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . . 197 22 

$597 37 



Beacon street, Arlington to Dartmouth street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $2,157 13 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, $95 19 
Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . . 2,061 94 

$2,157 13 



68 City Document No. 38. 

Belvidere street, Massachusetts avenue to Dalton street, 

resurfaced and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $3,001 55 

Amount paid to Peter Gilligan, paving . . 454 60 

$3,456 15 
Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, $866 02 
Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . . 2,590 13 

$3,456 15 

Berkeley street, Boylston to Beacon street, resurfaced. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $959 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Street Improvements, General, $627 50 
Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Paving Division . . . 331 50 

$959 00 



Boylston street, Brookline avenue to Fenway, regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $8,277 82 
Amount paid to Peter Gilligan, paving . . 721 22 

$8,999 04 



Brattle street, unfinished work from 1898. 

Materials furnished by the city . . . . $153 83 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co., for work 

done in 1898, under contract . . . . 50 36 

$204 19 



Castle square and Chandler street, repaved with large 
granite blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,551 71 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . $3,474 96 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 76 75 

$3,551 71 



Causeway and Commercial streets, repaved with large 

granite blocks and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $967 59 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . $888 12 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 79 47 

$967 59 



Street Department — Paving Division. 69 

Commercial street, State to Clinton street, unfinished work 

from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city .... $496 02 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving . . 2,789 19 

Amount paid to Perrin and Carter, concrete base . 2,104 73 

$5,389 94 

Congress street, A to C street, paved with large granite blocks 

on a gravel base, with gravel joints. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $5,257 70 

Amount paid to W. H. Glenn, paving . . . 1,694 60 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . $2,504 15 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 3,814 59 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 13 . 633 56 



>,952 30 



16,952 30 

Dartmouth street, Warren to Columbus avenue, repaved with 

old blocks and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $1,552 84 

Amount paid to J. F. Cullen, paving . . . 568 13 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Street Improvements, General 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Paving Division 



Dudley street, repaved. 

Labor and teaming furnished by the city 

Exeter street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,221 60 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $2,049 79 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . .1,171 81 





$2,120 97 


51,868 17 




252 80 






$2,120 97 




. . 


$496 50 



$3,221 60 

Falcon street, resurfaced and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,907 42 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . .$3,646 80 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 260 62 

$3,907 42 



$311 


85 


$951 


50 


$92 


69 


$465 


00 



70 City Document No. 38. 

Hanover street, Washington to Court street, unfinished work 

from 1898. 
Amount retained from H. Gore & Co. for work 

done in 1898 under contract .... 

Harrison avenue, near Dudley street, repaved. 
Labor and teaming furnished by the city 

Hay ward place, unfinished work from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city .... 

Huckins street, resurfaced and regulated. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 

Huntington avenue, Copley square to Exeter street and Gains- 
borough to Hemenway street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,636 14 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $3,266 15 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 1,369 99 

$4,636 14 

riassachu setts avenue, Beacon street to Columbus avenue, re- 
surfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,376 57 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . ..$3,581 94 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 794 63 

$4,376 57 

Neponset avenue. ^^~ ~^ 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $421 88 

Amount paid to Quincy and Boston Street Railway 

Company, building retaining wall . . . 1,500 00 

Amount paid to James Dolan, paving . . . 120 00 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . .$1,900 55 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 141 33 



!,041 88 



1,041 88 



Northfield street, resurfaced and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,454 91 

Amount paid to Bay State Contracting Company . 523 90 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $3,133 79 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 1,845 02 



1,978 81 



c,978 81 





$3,794 32 


,345 82 




145 09 




303 41 






$3,794 32 





Street Department — Paving Division. 71 

Park street, Centre to Montview street, macadamized and regu- 
lated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,445 02 
Amount paid to James Dolan, paving . . . 349 30 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . ; 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 23 . 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 



Pleasant street, Savin Hill avenue to Freeport street, resur- 
faced and regulated. 

Labor,. teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,488 98 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $2,940 83 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 1,151 27 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 16 . . 396 88 

$4,488 98 

St. James avenue, Berkeley street to Huntington avenue, re- 
surfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,233 11 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $3,097 76 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 135 35 * 

$3,233 11 

St. Stephen street, from Gainsborough street, resurfaced and 

regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $885 48 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $818 50 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 66 98 

$885 48 



Third street, B to D street, resurfaced and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,441 62 

Amount paid to Glenn & Hartnett . . . 1,198 54 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . .$1,104 94 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 4,535 22 



i,640 16 



>,640 16 



72 City- Document No. 38. 

Tremont street, Boylston to Pleasant street, unfinished work 

from 1898. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,294 57 
Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving, . . 715 36 



!,009 93 



Tremont street, Weston to Hammond street, unfinished work 

from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city . . . . $116 85 

Amount retained from James Doherty & Co. for 

work done in 1898, under contract . . . 125 48 



$242 33 



West Concord street, Tremont to Washington street, resur- 
faced and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,116 90 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . $2,314 29 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division .... 1,802 61 

$4,116 90 

West Newton street, Washington to Tremont street, resur- 
faced and regulated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $2,157 59 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . .$1,816 78 

Amount .paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 12 . . 340 81 

$2,157 59 

Winchester street, Pleasant to Ferdinand street, repaved 

with granite blocks, and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city $2,098 18 
Amount paid to Peter Gilligan, paving . . 1,402 30 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General > . 13,383 95 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 116 53 



53,500 48 



1,500 48 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 4. 

Alford street, Main street to drawbridge, repaved and regu- 
lated ; and from the drawbridge to Everett line, resurfaced, un- 
finished work from 1898. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 73 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city $4,519 10 
Amount paid to P. Brennan & Co., paving . . 1,439 38 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 4 . . $5,305 55 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 652 93 



),958 48 



>,958 48 



Mill street, Rutherford avenue to Essex street, unfinished work 

from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city . . . . $183 00 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 5. 

Mt. Vernon avenue, repaired. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city $131 49 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 5 . . $117 99 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 13 50 



II 49 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 8. 

Merrimac street, Pitts to Causeway street, repaved and regu- 
lated. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city $1,937 77 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 8 . .$1,336 30 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . * 601 47 

$1,937 77 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 9. 

Maiden street, Washington to Meander street, resurfaced, un- 
finished work from 1898. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city $1,067 05 

Shawmut avenue, Lucas street to a point 250 feet northerly, 
asphalted and regulated, unfinished work from 1898. 

Amount retained from Boston Asphalt Co., 

for work done in 1898, under contract . . $147 83 

Amount retained from H. Gore & Co., for work 

done in 1898, under contract .... 55 91 

$203 74 



74 City Document No. 38. 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 10. 

West Newton street, Huntington avenue to the bridge, resur- 
faced and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,311 43 
Amount paid to Peter G-illigan, paving . . . 103 00 



,414 43 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 10 . . $696 49 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 717 94 

$1,414 43 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 12. 

Northampton street, Columbus avenue to railroad, macadam- 
ized and regulated. (Unfinished work from 1898.) 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $2,502 14 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 12 . . $981 41 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 1,454 48 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 66 25 

$2,502 14 

Wellington street, Columbus avenue to N.Y., N.H. and H. 

R.R., Providence Div. (Unfinished work from 1898.) 

Rolling $133 33 

Amount paid to Barnes-Ruffin Co., paving . . 317 66 

$450 99 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 13. 

B street, unfinished work from 1898. 

Amount paid to William Higgins, paving . . $138 40 

Dorchester avenue, unfinished work from 1898. 

Amount paid to Higgins & McCovern, paving . $120 90 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 14. 

East Fourth street, H to N street, unfinished work from 1898. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $339 33 

Amount paid to Redmond McDonough, paving . 267 80 

$607 13 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 75 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 15. 

Broadway, Dorchester street to St. John's Church, asphalted, 
unfinished work from 1898. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $185 55 

Amount paid to Boston Asphalt Co., asphalt- 
ing 5,453 70 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving . . 1,013 97 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 15 . $3,073 46 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 3,493 02 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 14 . . 86 74 



1,653 22 



6,653 22 

Loring street, unfinished work from 1898. 

Materials furnished by the city .... $101 50 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 16. 

Bird street, Magnolia to Virginia street, resurfaced. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $1,242 72 

Burgess street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $312 45 

Ceylon street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $300 91 

Clifton street, East Cottage to Batchelder street, 

resurfaced. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $ 426 03 

Cunningham street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $514 35 

Dacia street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $534 73 

Norfolk avenue, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $1,166 02 



76 City Document No. 38. 

Robin Hood street, repaired. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $90 92 

Wayland street, unfinished work from 1898. 

Materials furnished by the city .... $40 50 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 17. 

Norfolk avenue, resurfaced and regulated. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $6,539 35 

Amount paid to J. F. Cullen, paving . . . 695 14 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 17 . .$2,983 77 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 4,250 72 



',234 49 



£7,234 49 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 19. 

Brookline avenue, Francis street to Longwood 

avenue, resurfaced. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $2,911 47 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 19 . $2,817 08 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Pavino- Division . . . . 94 39 



Parker street, unfinished wopk from li 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city 

Amount paid to J. Doherty & Co., paving . 



Wait street, "unfinished work from 1898. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Barnes, Ruffin Co., paving . 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 22. 

Sunnyside street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,595 66 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 22 . . $873 71 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, General . . 721 95 

$1,595 6Q 



$2,911 


47 


$3,642 
928 


34 
39 


$4,570 


73 


$152 
111 


85 
31 


$264 16 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



77 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 23. 
South Fairview street, unfinished work from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city . 

South Walter street, unfinished work from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city .... 

Weld street, unfinished work from 1898. 
Materials furnished by the city .... 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS, WARD 25. 
Brooks street, repaired. 
Labor furnished by the city ..... 

Foster street, resurfaced. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Street Improvements, Ward 25. . $80090 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Paving Division . . . . 116 42 



$216 


00 


$216 


00 


$81 


00 


$70 00 



(17 32 



$917 


32 


$229 


15 


$653 
59 


35 
70 


$713 


05 



Lanark road, unfinished work from 1898. 
Labor furnished by the city ..... 
Sutherland road, resurfaced. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Barnes, Ruffin Co. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES UNDER 
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

Atlantic avenue, Oliver street to Dewey square 

Atlantic street, Ward 15 

Blackstone street, Hanover street, across North 

street ..... 
Brooks street, Ward 25, construction 
Buildings, Chelsea street 
Capen street, laying-out 
Charles street, Fruit to Allen street 
Congress street, Atlantic avenue to the bridg 
Devonshire street, Milk to Water street 
Federal street, Dewey square to Milk street 
Freeport street, Ward 24, retaining wall 
Genesee and Oswego streets, asphalting 
Harrison avenue, Kneeland to Bennet street 
Kingston street, Beach to Bedford street 
Leverett street, Minot street to Craigie's bridge 
Milton street, Ward 8, asphalting 
Prescott street, East Boston, construction 
Princeton street, East Boston, construction 
Retaining wall, Marcella and Centre streets 
Talbot avenue, completion of 
Washington street, Grove Hall to Columbia road 



$54,471 


91 


299 


50 


10,868 


57 


32,000 


00 


1,920 


91 


3,624 


33 


8,707 


12 


13,199 


75 


4,014 


19 


31,466 


07 


348 


50 


8,104 


19 


10,064 


50 


13,598 


17 


18,231 


03 


2,211 


49 


6,860 


84 


10,725 


00 


7 


60 


37,785 


11 


6,047 


46 



Carried forward, 



74,556 24 



78 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 
Abolishment of Grade Crossings : 

Boston street and Dorchester avenue 
Charlestown bridge 
Charlestown street 
Rapid Transit .... 
South Union Station : 

Atlantic avenue and Dewey square 

Dorchester avenue . 

Summer-street extension . 
Street Improvements, General : 

Arlington street . 

Beacon street .... 

Belvidere street 

Berkeley street 

Boylston street 

Brattle street .... 

Castle square and Chandler street 

Causeway and Commercial streets 

Commercial street 

Congress street 

Dartmouth street 

Dudley street . 

Exeter street . 

Falcon street . 

Hanover street 

Harrison avenue 

Hay ward place 

Huekins street 

Huntington avenue . 

Massachusetts avenue 

Neponset avenue 

Northfield street 

Park street 

Pleasant street 

St. James avenue 

St. Stephen street 

Third street 

Tremont street, Boylston to Pleasant street 

Tremont street, Weston to Hammond street 

West Concord street .... 

West Newton street, Washington to Tremont 
street . . 

Winchester street 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Alford street . 

Mill street 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Mt. Vernon avenue . 
Street Improvements, Ward 

Merrimac street 

Carried forward, 



$274,556 


24 


463 


00 


13,545 


38 


37,172 


50 


1,234 


94 


39,168 


46 


28,498 


81 


3,488 


01 


597 


37 


2,157 


13 


3,456 


15 


959 


00 


8,999 


04 


204 


19 


3,551 


71 


967 


59 


5,389 


94 


6,952 


30 


2,120 


97 


496 


50 


3,221 


60 


3,907 


42 


311 


85 


951 


50 


92 


69 


465 


00 


4,636 


14 


4,376 


57 


2,041 


88 


4,978 


81 


3,794 


32 


4,488 


98 


3,233 


11 


885 


48 


5,640 


16 


2,009 


93 


242 


33 


4,116 


90 


It 

2,157 


59 


3,500 


48 


5,958 


48 


183 


00 


131 


49 


1,937 


77 


$497,242 


71 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. 



79 



Brought forward, 


$497,242 71 


Street Improvements, Ward 9 : 




Maiden street ..... 


1,067 05 


Shawmut avenue .... 


203 74 


Street Improvements, "Ward 10 : 




West Newton street, Huntington avenue to 


bridge ..... 


1,414 43 


Street Improvements, Ward 12 : 




Northampton street .... 


2,502 14 


Wellington street . . . . 


450 99 


Street Improvements, Ward 13 : 




B street ...... 


138 40 


Dorchester avenue .... 


120 90 


Street Improvements, Ward 14 : 




East Fourth street .... 


607 13 


Street Improvements, Ward 15 : 




Broadway, Dorchester street to St. 


lohn's 


Church ..... 


6,653 22 


Loring street ..... 


101 50 


Street Improvements, Ward 16 : 




Bird street ..... 


1,242 72 


Burgess street .... 


312 45 


Ceylon street ..... 


300 91 


Clifton street ..... 


426 03 


Cunningham street .... 


514 35 


Dacia street ..... 


534 73 


Norfolk avenue .... 


1,166 02 


Robin Hood street .... 


90 92 


Wayland street ..... 


40 50 


Street Improvements, Ward 17 : 




Norfolk avenue .... 


7,234 49 


Street Improvements, Ward 19 : 




Brookline avenue .... 


2,911 47 


Parker street ..... 


4,570 73 


Wait street ..... 


•264 16 


Street Improvements, Ward 22 : 




Sunnyside street ..... 


1,595 66 


Street Improvements, Ward 23 : 




South Fairview street . . . 


216 00' 


South Walter street .... 


216 00 


Weld street ...... 


81 00 


Street Improvements, Ward 25 : 




Brooks street ...... 


70 00 


Foster street ...... 


917 32 


Lanark road ...... 


229 15 


Sutherland road ..... 


713 05 



$534,149 87 
Less amount paid out of appropriation for Paving 

Division 39,801 18 



$494,348 69 



80 City Document No. 38. 

BLUE HILL AND OTHER AVENUES. 

Blue Hill avenue, Walk Hill to River street. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $9,372 42 

Columbus avenue. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 82,499 51 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, paving . . 1,890 63 

Amount paid to D. E. Lynch, paving . . . 1,194 96 



85,585 10 



Commonwealth avenue. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $161,188 60 
Amount paid to Michael Kiernan, quarrying, cut- 
ting and delivering stone ..... 10,597 42 
Amount paid to Michael Kiernan, quarrying, cut- 
ting and delivering stone . . . . . 14,078 76 
Amount paid to Michael Kiernan, pa-sing . . 1,917 53 
Amount paid to Michael Kiernan, labor . . 2,488 42 
Amount paid to A. McMurtry & Sons, quarrying, 

cutting and delivering stone . . . . 13,360-40 
Amount paid to A. McMurtry & Sons, quarrying, 

cutting and delivering stone . ... . 7,55006 
Amount paid to A. McMurtry & Sons, quarrying, 

cutting and delivering stone . . . . 3,111 00 

Amount paid to A. McMurtry & Sons, filling . 1,856 00 

Amount paid to A. McMurtry & Sons, labor . 665 93 

Amount paid to Barnes, Ruffin Company, paving . 3,065 43 

Amount paid to Bernard Malone, filling . . 3,804 00 

Amount paid to F. R. Kimball, filling . . . 5,761 00 

Amount paid to P. J. Dinn & Co., iron fence . 1,243 82 



8230,688 37 

Commonwealth avenue, Chestnut Hill avenue to Newton line. 
Amount paid to J. A. TThittemore's Sons, con- 
struction work . . . . . . . $867 35 

Labor furnished by the city ..... 408 00 



$1,275 35 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Blue Hill and Other Avenues . . $408 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways ...... 867 35 



$1,275 35 



Street Department — Paving Division. 81 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES FOR BLUE 
HILL AND OTHER AVENUES. 

Blue Hill avenue, Walk Hill to River street . . $9,372 42 

Cohfmbus avenue ....... 5,585 10 

Commonwealth avenue 230,688 37 

Commonwealth avenue, Chestnut Hill avenue to 

Newton line ....... 1,275 35 



$246,921 24 
Less amount paid out of appropriation for Laying- 
out and Construction of Highways . . . 867 35 



$246,053 89 



LAYING OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF 
HICHWA YS. 

Alford street, Mystic river to Everett line. «. 

Labor . . . . . . . . $13 00 

Andrews street, East Canton to East Dedham street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $391 11 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. Corporation, as- 
phalting ........ $1,077 55 



$1,468 66 

Angell street, Blue Hill avenue to Canterbury street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,511 69 
Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construc- 
tion work 2,200 30 



$5,711 99 



Astor street, Massachusetts avenue to Hemenway street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $4,772 08 
Amount paid to P. McCovern, construction work, 



Athelwold street, at corner School street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, paving 



B street, line of original low water to Congress street 
Labor furnished by the city ..... 



2,109 


02 


$6,881 


10 


$271 
150 


18 
00 


$421 


18 


$53 


75 



82 City Document No. 38. 

Belmore terrace, Boylston street to Boylston terrace. 
Material furnished by the city . . . . $7 11 

Amount retained from Patrick O'Hara & Co., for 

work done in 1898, under contract ... 84 65 



Belvidere street, Dalton to West Newton street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 
Amount paid to William Gilligan, filling 
Amount paid to William H. Ryan & Co., building 
bulkhead ....... 



Bernard street, Harvard street to Talbot avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to James Doherty & Co. . 



Burt street, Washington to Ashmont street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 



Canal street, Haymarket square to Causeway street 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, construction 
work ........ 

Amount paid to Simpson Bros. Corporation, artifi- 
cial stone sidewalks ..... 

Amount paid to W. A. Murtfeldt Co., artificial 
stone sidewalks ...... 



Carlos street, Lauriat to Chapman avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the city, 

Chamblet street, Magnolia to Hartford street. 

Materials furnished by the city .... 

Amount paid to W. A. Murtfeldt Co., arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks ..... 

Amount retained from John Connors, for work 
done in 1898, under contract .... 



* Includes §104.27 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



$91 


76 


3p2,o28 

1,374 

614 


35 
11 
00 


538 


40 


$4,854 


86 


$106 
65 


02 

67 


$171 


69 


$2,614 
1,391 


58 
31 


$4,005 


89 


t. 
$3,948 


50 


3,613 


74 


2,188 


76 


589 


35 


^$10,340 35 


$164 


18 


$40 


12 


343 


50 


57 


11 


$440 


73 



1,100 


69 


$3,931 


35 


$6,937 36 
4,023 14 


$10,960 


50 



Street Department — Paving Division. 83 

Chester street, Commonwealth to Brighton avenue. 

Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the city, $2,666 26 

Amount paid to John C. Newborg, artificial stone 

sidewalks . . . . . . . 164 40 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construc- 
tion work ...... 



Chiswick road, Englewood to Chestnut Hill avenue 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 



Columbia road. 

Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the city, $63,627 37 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn, construction work, 

between Blue Hill avenue and Stanwood street, 915 39 

Amount paid to H. P. Nawn, construction work, 

between Stanwood and G-lendale streets . . 16,055 63 

Amount paid to J. C. Coleman & Son, construc- 
tion work, between Glendale street and Edward 
Everett square ....... 

Amount paid to J. C. Coleman & Son, construc- 
tion work, at Edward Everett square 

Amount paid to J. C. Coleman & Son, construc- 
tion work, between Hancock and Dudley streets, 

Amount paid to D. F. O'Connell, abutments and 
piers of bridge . . 

Amount paid to Simon J. Donovan, filling 

Amount paid to Simon J. Donovan, building cul- 
vert and grading ...... 

Amount paid to J. J. Sullivan, filling between Mt. 
Vernon and Mercer streets .... 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work 
between Dorchester avenue and Buttonwood 
street ' 1,911 04 

Amount paid to J. S. Jacobs & Son, filling between 

Mercer and Mt. Vernon streets . . . . 8,306 76 

Amount paid to M. A. Meaney, filling . . . 591 44 



14,286 


87 


2,754 


67 


3,678 


04 


20,398 


04 


22,515 


81 


83,375 


59 


2,986 


80 



$241,403 45 



Devon street, Blue Hill avenue to Columbia road. 
Labor, teaming and materials, furnished by the city, $6,959 20 
Amount paid to John Connors, construction work, 3,586 05 

Amount paid to Patrick Lyons, artificial stone 

sidewalks 4,161 80 

$14,707 05 



84 City Document No. 38. 

Elizabeth street, Norfolk to Astoria street. 
Amount retained from Collins & Ham for work 

done in 1898, under contract .... $38 53 

Execution of Court. 

Amount paid on Execution of Court to Quirnb} 7 and 
Ferguson . ... ... 

Fairmount street, Washington to Morton street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city 

Amount paid to James McG-overn, construction 

work ........ 



Forest Hills street, Washington street to Glen road. 

Labor . . . 

Advertising ....... 



Fowler street, Glenway to G-lenwood street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city . S3, 922 20 

Amount paid to Barnes-Ruffin Company, artificial 

stone sidewalks . . . . . . 1,613 00 

Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 1,339 86 

$6,875 06 



$737 


55 


$368 
1,048 


36 
33 


$1,416 


69 


$3 
12 


50 

88 


116 


38 



Francis street, Huntington to Brookline avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $6,327 65 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construction 

work 3,421 26 

$9,748 91 



Hamilton street, Bowdoin street to Homes avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $3,047 57 

Amount paid to James McGovern, construction 

work 1,236 18 

$4,283 75 



Harold street, Munroe street to Walnut avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $3,246 47 

Amount paid to Patrick McGovern, construction 

work 1,546 69 

Amount paid to Patrick McGovern, retaining wall 

and fence 360 00 

$5,153 16 



Street Department — Paving Division. 85 

Hewins street, Columbia road to Erie street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $111 19 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 295 57 



$406 76 



Homes avenue, Bowdoin to Topliff street. 

Labor and advertising ..... $44 13 

Idaho street, from River street, 870 feet northerly. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $3,822 96 

Amount paid to James McGovern, construction 

work 1,879 38 



$5,702 34 



Ipswich street, Boylston road to Boylston street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $11,582 25 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 4,639 34 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, building fence . 1,206 95 
Amount paid to King Bridge Company, building 

superstructure to bridge ..... 13,850 00 
Amount paid to Osborn & Co., mill and shop in- 
spection of material . . . . . . 101 70 



Amount paid by Bridge Division 



Jersey street, Audubon road to Brookline avenue. 
Labor and advertising furnished by the city . 

Josephine street, Geneva avenue to Ditson street. 

Amount retained from J. J. Nawn for work done 

in 1896, under contract ..... 

Leeds street, Woodward street to Dorchester avenue. 
Advertising ...... 

Leedsville street, Dorchester avenue to Adams street. 

Labor $1 50 

Amount retained from Collins & Ham, for work done 

in 1898, under contract . . . . . 85 26 



$31,380 
919 


24 
39 


$32,299 


63 


$41 


06 


8194 


43 


e. 

$6 43 



$86 76 



Leroy street, Geneva avenue to Ditson street. 

Labor $4 62 

Amount retained from Philip Doherty for work 

done in 1898, under contract .... 49 55 

$54 17 



86 City Document No. 38. 

Lonsdale street, Dorchester avenue to Adams street. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 

Amount paid to Barnes-Euffin Company, construc- 
tion work ....... 

Amount paid to Barnes-Euffin Company, artificial 
stone sidewalks ...... 

Amount paid to P. O'Hara & Co., construction 
work ........ 

Amount paid to J. C. Newborg .... 



rialvern street, Brighton avenue to Ashford street. 
Labor ......... 

Amount retained from James Doherty & Co., for 
work done in 1898, under contract . 



Maryland street, Savin Hill avenue to Bay street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 



Mellen street, Ocean to Montague street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount retained from Collins & Ham for work 
done in 1898, under contract .... 



Merlin street, Athelwold to Park street. 

Labor and advertising ...... 

Amount retained from Patrick McGovern for work 
done in 1898, under contract .... 



Middleton street, Norfolk street about 600 feet northerly. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $2,477 46 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 1,427 15 

$3,904 61 



$619 


44 


709 


35 


1,564 


55 


340 
1,608 


01 
05 


$4,841 


40 


$1 


50 


84 


56 


$86 


06 


$1,128 42 
896 70 


$2,025 


12 


$98 


10 


283 


99 


$382 


09 


$314 87 


314 


69 


$629 


56 



Millet street, Park to Athelwold street. 

Advertising ........ $6 43 

Nightingale street, Talbot avenue to Bernard street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $99 82 

Amount retained from James Doherty & Co., for 

work clone in 1898, under contract . . . 234 89 

Carried forward, $334 71 



Street Department — Paving Division. 87 

Brought forward, $334 71 

Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, 

artificial stone sidewalks ..... 243 18 

Amount paid to John C. Newborg, artificial stone 

sidewalks . . . . . . . 15 42 



$593 31 



North Harvard street, Western avenue to Charles River. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $6,543 42 
Amount paid to Geo. H. Wentwortk & Co., con- 
struction work ..... 



3,482 


80 


$10,026 


22 


$66 35 



Oakley street, Bowdoin street to Geneva avenue. 

Amount retained from John Connors for work done 

in 1898, under contract ..... 

Orkney road, Sutherland to Strathmore road. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $3,930 85 

Amount paid to Daniel E. Lynch, construction 

work 1,153 02 

Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, 

artificial stone sidewalks . . . . . 184 80 



»,268 67 



Peterborough street, Audubon road to Fairhaven street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $8,034 87 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construction 

work 4,497 74 



Peverell street, Sawyer avenue to Salcombe street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction 
work . . . . . . . 



Rosseter street, Bullard street to Bowdoin avenue. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to R. L. Barrett, building retaining 

walls and fences ...... 

Amount retained from Patrick O'Hara & Co., for 

work done in 1898, under contract . 



$12,532 


61 


$1,296 


54 


1,108 


21 


$2,404 


75 


$229 


72 


502 


48 


85 


49 


$817 


69 



88 City Document No. 38. 

Ruggles street, Parker street to Back Bay Fens. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount retained from Doherty & Connors for work 
done in 1898, under contract .... 



St. Stephen street, from Bryant street, 800 feet towards 

Gainsborough street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construc- 
tion work ....... 



School street, at corner Athelwold street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, paving 



Shirley street, Massachusetts to Norfolk avenue. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to JohnF. Cullen, construction work, 



Spencer street, Wheatland to Talbot avenue. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to James McGovern, construction 
work ........ 



Spencer street, Athelwold to Park street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to James McGovern, construction 
work ........ 



Spring street, Centre to Gardner street. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 

Amount paid to N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R. " . 



Stanley street, Quincy to Bellevue street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construc- 
tion work ....... 



$225 
278 


92 
09 


8504 


01 


et towards 

$6,805 77 

1,785 20 


$8,590 


97 


$214 07 
125 00 


$339 07 


$4,576 03 
3,330 08 


$7,906 


11 


$2,659 
1,185 


65 
64 


$3,845 


29 


$1,094 08 

748 37 


$1,842 


45 


$4,754 52 
3,010 72 


$7,765 


24 


$1,696 
1,197 


52 
60 


$2,894 


12 



Street Department — Paving Division. 89 

Stuart street, Dartmouth street to Trinity place. 
Amount retained from Collins & Ham, for work 

done in 1898, under contract .... $38 35 

Telford street, Western avenue to Charles river reservation. 

Stone $4 76 

Amount retained from James Doherty & Co., for 

work done in 1898, under contract . . ... 28 45 



$33 21 



Thane street, Athelwolcl to Park street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $781 55 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 525 15 

Amount paid to Barnes-Ruffin Co., artificial stone 

sidewalks 320 44 



,627 14 



Tonawanda street, Geneva avenue to Greenbrier street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $43 93 

Amount retained from Philip Doherty for work 

done in 1898, under contract . . . . 376 37 



$420 30 



Trinity place, St. James avenue to Stuart street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $540 07 

Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 

asphalting ....... 3,516 09 

$4,056 16 



Vancouver street, Huntington avenue to Ruggles street. 

Labor $1 50 

Amount retained from Doherty & Connors for 

work done in 1898, under contract . . . 101 17 



$102 67 



Waterlow street, Harvard to Harvard street. 

Labor $36 94 

Amount retained from James Doherty & Co., for 

work done in 1898, under contract ... 60 02 

Amount paid to John C. Newborg, artificial stone 

sidewalks ....... 40 42 



Wensley street, Heath street, 720 feet westerly. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 



$137 38 


$4,117 40 
2,470 15 

$6,587 55 



90 City Document No. 38. 

West Selden street, Morton to Manchester street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $1,017 81 

Amount paid to James McGovern, construction 

work 2,473 50 



S3, 491 31 

Woodlawn street, Hyde Park avenue to Forest Hills Ceme- 
tery. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $4,740 81 

Amount paid to Thomas A. Dolan, construction 

work 1,837 29 



$6,578 10 



Worthington street, Longwood avenue to Back Bay Fens. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $3,667 98 
Amount paid to J. C. Coleman & Son, filling . 5,636 55 



Public alley 101, Richmond to Cross street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Patrick McGovern, construction 
work . . . . . . . 



Public alley 102, Marshall street to Creek square. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, construction work, 



Public alley 301 , River to Pinckney street. 
Signs ........ 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 401, Irvington to Garrison street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, as- 
phalting and regulating . 



Public alley 402, Garrison to West Newton street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, 
Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, as- 
phalting and regulating ..... 



$9,304 53 


$1,355 
1,044 


65 
23 


$2,399 


88 


$183 
830 


22 
56 


$1,013 


78 


$3 

$3 


60 
35 

95 


$1,336 

1,885 


96 
19 


$3,222 


15 


$1,263 
1,501 


47 
02 


$2,764 


49 



Street Department — Paving Division. 91 

Public alley 403, West Newton to Cumberland street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,057 29 
Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, as- 
phalting and regulating . . . . 1,423 07 



!,480 36 



Public alley 404, Cumberland street to Public alley 405. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city $1,330 01 

Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, as- 
phalting and regulating • . . . . 1,844 74 



1,174 75 



Public alley 405, Huntington avenue to St. Botolph street. 
Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the 

city . . $600 15 

Amounts paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, 

asphalting and regulating ... . . 690 79 



Public alley, 414 Massachusetts avenue to Hereford street. 
Amount paid to W. A. Murtfeldt Co., artificial stone 
sidewalks ....... 

Signs ......... 

Advertising . . . . . . - . 



Public alley 415, Hereford to Gloucester street. 
Signs ........ 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 416, Gloucester to Fairfield street. 
Signs ........ 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 41 7, Fairfield to Exeter street. 
Signs. ....... 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 418, Exeter to Dartmouth street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving 



$1,290 


94 


street. 

$9 
3 


72 
60 
35 


$13 


67 


$3 

$3 


60 
34 

94 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 


$84 90 
168 22 


$253 


12 



92 City Document No. 38. 

Public alley 419, Dartmouth to Clarendon street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, as- 
phalting and regulating .... 



Public alley 420, Clarendon to Berkeley street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving 



Public alley 421, Berkeley to Arlington street. 
Signs ........ 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 430, Massachusetts avenue to Hereford street 
Materials furnished by the city .... 
Amount paid to Peter Gilligan, paving 



Public alley 431, Hereford to Gloucester street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Simpson Brothers Corporation, 
asphalting and regulating .... 



Public alley 432, Gloucester to Fairfield street. 
Signs ........ 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 433, Fairfield to Exeter street. 

Signs . 

Advertising ...... 



Public alley 434, Exeter to Dartmouth street. 
Signs ....... 

Advertising . . . . 



Public alley 435, Dartmouth to Clarendon street. 
Signs ...;..., 

Advertising ....... 



$247 
1,564 


60 

80 


$1,812 40 


$38 44 
80 85 


$119 


29 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 


street. 
$133 
133 


54 
00 


$266 


54 


$305 
953 


79 
67 


$1,259 


46 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 


$3 
$3 


60 
34 

94 


$3 


60 
34 


$3 


94 



Street Department — Paving Division. 93 

Public alley 436, Clarendon to Berkeley street. 

Signs $3 60 

Advertising ....... 34 

Teaming 7 50 



$11 44 

Public alley 437, Berkeley to Arlington street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $261 21 
Amount retained from Barber Asphalt Paving 
Co., for work done in 1898, under con- 
tract 490 97 



Public alley 438, Arlington to Berkeley street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 439, Clarendon to Dartmouth street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 440, Dartmouth to Exeter street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 441, Exeter to Fairfield street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 442, Fairfield to Gloucester street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 443, Gloucester to Hereford street. 
Signs ........ 

Public alley 444, Hereford street to Massachusetts 
avenue ........ 

Public alley 701, Tremont street to Shawmut avenue 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Barber Asphalt Paving Co., 
asphalting and regulating .... 



Public alley 702, Worcester to Springfield street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, asphalting and 
regulating ....... 



Public alley 703, from Public alley 702. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Jones & Meehan, asphalting and 
regulating . . . 



$752 


18 


$3 


60 


$3 


60 






$3 


60 






$3 


60 






$3 


60 


$3 


60 


$3 


60 






$1,399 


57 


3,077 


46 


$4,477 


03 


$212 


86 


818 


90 


$1,031 


76 


$223 


66 


597 


64 


$821 


30 



94 



City Document No. 38. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES. 

LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 

Total Amount Expended. 
Alford street 
Andrews street 
Angell street 
Astor street 
Athelwold street 
B street 
Belmore terrace 
Belviclere street 
Bernard street 
Burt street . 
Canal street 
Carlos street 
Chamblet street 
Chester street 
Chiswick road 
Columbia road 
Devon street 
Elizabeth street 
Execution of court 
Fairmount street 
Forest Hills street 
Fowler street 
Francis street 
Hamilton street 
Harold street 
Hewins street 
Homes avenue 
Idaho street . 
Ipswich street 
Jersey street 
Josephine street 
Leeds, street . 
Leedsville street 
Leroy street 
Lonsdale street 
Malvern street 
Maryland street 
Mellen street 
Merlin street 
Middleton street 
Millet street 
Nightingale street 
North Harvard street 

Carried forward, 





$13 00 




1,468 66 




5,711 99 




6,881 10 




421 18 




53 75 




91 76 




4,854 86 




171 69 




4,005 89 




10,340 35 




164 18 




440 73 




3,931 35 




10,960 50 




. 241,403 45 




14,707 05 




38 53 




737 55 




1,416 69 




16 38 




6,875 06 




9,748 91 




4,283 75 




5,153 16 




406 76 




44 13 




5,702 34 




32,299 63 




41 06 




194 43 




6 43 




86 76 




54 17 




4,841 40 




86 06 




2,025 12 




382 09 




629 56 




3,904 61 




6 43 




593 31 




10,026 22 




$395,222 03 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



95 



Brought forivard, 
Oakley street 
Orkney road 
Peterborough street 
Peverell street 
Rosseter street 
Ruggles street 
St. Stephen street 
School street 
Shirley street 
Spencer street, Talbot to Wheatland avenue 
Spencer street, Athelwold to Park street 
Spring street 
Stanley street 
Stuart street 
Telford street 
Thane street 
• Tonawanda street 
Trinity place 
Vancouver street 
Waterlow street . 
Wensley street 
West Selden street 
Woodlawn street 
Worthington street 
Public alley 101 . 
Public alley 102 . 
Public alley 301 . 
Public alley 401 . 
Public alley 402 . 
Public alley 403 . 
Public alley 404 . 
Public alley 405 . 
Public alley 414 . 
Public alley 415 . 
Public alley 416 . 
Public alley 417 . 
Public alley 418 . 
Public alley 419 . 
Public alley 420 . 
Public alley 421 . 
Public alley 430 . 
Public alley 431 . 
Public alley 432 . 
Public alley 433 . 
Public alley 434 . 
Public alley 435 . 
Public alley 436 . 
Public alley 437 . 



69 
01 
97 
07 
11 
29 
45 
24 
12 
35 
21 
14 
30 
16 
67 
38 



5,222 03 

66 35 

5,268 67 

12,532 61 

2,404 75 

817 

504 

8,590 

339 

7,906 

3,845 

1,842 

7,765 

2,894 

38 

33 

1,627 

420 

4,056 

102 

137 

6,587 55 

3,491 31 

6,578 10 

9,304 53 

2,399 88 

1,013 

3 

3,222 

2,764 

2,480 

3,174 

1,290 

13 

3 

3 

3 

253 

1,812 

119 

3 

266 

1,259 

3 

3 

3 

3 

11 

752 



78 
95 
15 
49 
36 
75 
94 
67 
94 
94 
94 
12 
40 
29 
94 
54 
46 
94 
94 
94 
94 
44 
18 



Carried forward, 



8503,245 98 



96 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 
Public alley 438 
Public alley 439 
Public alley 440 
Public alley 441 
Public alley 442 
Public alley 443 
Public alley 444 
Public alley 701 
Public alley 702 
Public alley 703 



Amount included in cost for Blue Hill 
and Other Avenues 

Amount included in cost for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways, 
Dorchester ..... 

Amount included in cost for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways, 
Roxbury and West Roxbury 

Amount included in cost for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways, 
East Boston . . 

Amount included in cost for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways, 
Brighton ..... 



Less amount paid by Bridge Division, 



$503,245 


98 


3 


60 


3 


60 


3 


60 


3 


60 


3 


60 


3 


60 


3 


60 


4,477 


03 


1,031 


76 


821 


30 


$509,601 


27 



$867 35 



448 73 



293 66 



21 00 



18 50 



1,649 24 

$511,250 51 
919 39 

$510,331 12 



LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION 
HIGHWAYS, HAST BOSTON. 

Ashley street, Breed to Walley street. 

Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 

Amount paid to H. & D. Burnett, filling 



OF 



Amount paid out of appropriation 

for Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways, East Boston 
Amount paid Out of appropriation 

for Laying-out and Construction of 

Highways . 



,267 74 



21 00 



! 


p149 


50 




17 


24 


1 


122 


00 



$1,288 74 



51,288 74 



Street Department — Paving Division. 97 



Bennington street, Chelsea street to Belle Isle Inlet. 
Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 

Amount paid to John Cavanagh & Son Building 
Moving Co., moving building .... 

Amount paid to W. F. Hedrington, filling 



Public alley 2001, Marginal to Webster street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Ward & Conlin, paving 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES. 

LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS, 
EAST BOSTON. 

Total Amount Expended. 

Ashley street . $1,288 74 

Bennington street 1,711 03 

Public alley 2001 583 13 



$755 
17 

20 

918 


25 
24 

00 
54 


$1,711 


03 


$277 
305 


93 
20 


$583 


13 



1,582 90 



Less amount paid out of appropriation for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways . . . 21 00 



$3,561 90 



LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF 
HIGHWAYS, BRIGHTON'. 

Cambridge street, Brighton avenue to Washington street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $10,856 26 

Amount paid to J. L. Bryne & Co., construction 

work 3,797 85 

Amount paid to J. L. Bryne & Co., rock excava- 
tion 1,644 75 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways, Brighton . . . $16,280 36 
Amount paid out of appropriation for 

Laying-Out and Construction of 

Highways 18 50 



.6,298 86 



.6,298 86 



98 City Document No. 38. 

SUMMABY OF EXPENDITURES. 
LAYINa-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS, 

BRIGHTON. 

Total Amount Expended. 
Cambridge street . ... . . . . $16,298 86 

Less amount paid out of appropriation for Laying- 
Out and Construction of Highways . . . 18 50 



$16,280 86 



LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH- 
WAYS, DORCHESTER. 

Alexander street, southwardly over Oleander street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $2,306 39 

Amount paid to James McGovern, construction work, 785 01 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester . . . $3,077 02 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways. ..... 14 38 



1,091 40 



$3,091 40 



Annabel street, Columbia road to Sumner street. 

Labor $69 00 

Advertising . . . . . . . . 36 79 



$105 79 



Atherstone street, Fuller to Bailey street. ■ 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $1,347 35 
Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 666 84 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester . . . $1,946 43 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways ..... 67 76 



1,014 19 



1,014 19 



Barry Street, Quincy to Richfield street. 

Labor . s $40 50 

Advertising 5 54 

$46 04 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



99 



Boston street, Mt. Vernon street to Columbia road. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $465 54 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester . . . 1461 79 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways . . . . . 3 75 



Cal lender street, Tucker to Don street. 
Labor ....... 

Advertising ...... 

Lumber ...... 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester . . . $118 25 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways ..... 136 65 

Draper street, Robinson to Bowdoin street. 
Labor ......... 



Edison Green, 

Labor . 
Advertising; . 



Dorchester avenue to Pond street. 



Edwin street, Dorchester avenue to Shawmut park. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 
Amount paid to Patrick Lyons, artificial stone 
sidewalks ........ 



!5 54 



$120 46 
36 56 

97 88 

$254 90 



$254 90 



$8 


25 


$101 
25 


85 
42 


$127 


27 


$3,936 
1,711 

1,615 


10 

28 

84 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways ..... 



$7,263 22 



57,221 24 



41 98 



$7,263 22 



Esmond street, Blue Hill avenue to Harvard street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 



$80 39 



100 



City Document No. 38. 



Florida street, King to Templeton street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways, Dorchester . . . $4,630 64 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of 
Highways 31 17 



Fowler street, Glenway toMcLellao street. 
Labor ........ 

Advertising . . . 



Geneva avenue, Bowdoin street to Columbia road. 
Labor ......... 

Gibson street, Dorchester avenue to Adams street. 
Labor . . . . . . 

Lauriat avenue, Ballou avenue to Norfolk street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Timothy F. Bradley, construction 
work ......... 



Leonard street, Duncan to Adams street. 
Lumber ....... 

flontague street, Ashmont to Roslin street. 
Labor ........ 

Advertising ....... 



;2,933 46 
1,728 35 

4,661 81 



$4,661 81 



$4 25 
5 54 



$9 


79 






$7 


50 






$413 40 



$395 04 

2,234 58 
52,629 62 

$16 75 



$4 75 
13 20 

517 95 



Nottingham street, Bullard street to Bowdoin avenue. 
Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 



$5 00 
5 55 

$10 55 



$5 54 



Rockford street, Dudley to Clifton street. 
Advertising ........ 

Rozella street, Adams to Muzzy street. 

Labor and material furnished by the city . . $1,188 42 

Amount paid to Timothy F. Bradley, construction 

work ... 519 14 



,707 56 



Street Department — Paving Division. 101 

Shatter street, Waterlow to Faxon street. 

Labor $49 00 

Advertising . . . . . . . * 13 20 



12 20 



Thane street, Athelwold to School street. 

Labor $7 00 

Van Winkle street, Dorchester avenue to N.Y., N.H. & H.R.R., 
Plymouth Div., Shawmut Branch Railroad. 

Labor . $117 30 

Advertising . . . . . . . 13 57 



$130 87 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Dorchester . . . . $0 70 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways 130 17 

$130 87 

Wainwright street, Centre street to Welles avenue. 

Labor 112 00 



Waldeck street, Melville avenue to Tonawanda street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $6,729 97 

Amount paid to John F. Cullen, construction 

work 3,957 35 



Warner street, Harvard to Park street. 
Labor ...... 

Advertising- ..... 



Woodcliff street, Howard avenue, 200 feet eastwardly 
Labor ....... 

Advertising ...... 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Dorchester . . . . $0 70 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways . . . . . 22 87 



$10,687 


32 


$43 
28 


88 
23 


$72 


11 


rdly. 

$10 
13 


00 

57 



57 



$23 57 



102 



City Document No. 38. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES. 



LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF 



Total Amount Expended. 



Alexander street 
Annabel street 
Atherstone street 
Barry street 
Boston street 
Callender street 
Draper street 
Edison Green 
Edwin street 
Esmond street 
Florida street 
Fowler street 
Geneva avenue 
Gibson street 
Lauriat avenue 
Leonard street 
Montague street 
Nottingham street 
Rock ford street 
Rozella street 
Shafter street 
Thane street 
Van Winkle street 
Wainwright street 
Waldeck street 
Warner street 
Woodcliff street . 



Amount paid out of appropriation for Laying-Out 
and Construction of Highways . 



HIGHWAYS. 


$3,091 


40 


105 


79 


2,014 


19 


46 


04 


465 


54 


254 


90 


8 


25 


127 


27 


7,263 


22 


80 


39 


4,661 


81 


9 


79 


7 


50 


413 


40 


2,629 


62 


16 


75 


17 


95 


10 


55 


5 


54 


1,707 


56 


62 


20 


7 


00 


130 


87 


12 


00 


10,687 


32 


72 


11 


23 


57 


$33,932 


53 



448 73 



$33,483 80 

LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH- 
WA TS, R OXB URT AND WES T R OXB UR T. 

Aberdeen street, Beacon street to Brookline Branch, Boston 

& Albany Railroad. 
Labor ......... $55 25 



Albany and Northampton streets, at their junction. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $200 20 

Amount paid to H. Gore & Co., paving . . 149 92 



$350 12 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



103 



Amory street, School to Bragdon street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Patrick McGovern, construction 
work ......... 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Roxbury and West Roxbury . $5,747 23 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways 193 99 



^3,841 38 

2,099 84 
^5,941 22 



$5,941 22 



Blandford street, Commonwealth avenue to Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Labor $114 40 

Advertising ........ 4 50 



$118 90 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Roxbury and West Roxbury . $108 25 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways ...... 10 65 

Bragdon street, Columbus avenue to Amory street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to Thomas A. Dolan, construction 
work ..'....... 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Roxbury and West Roxbury . $3,413 44 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways 66 88 



$118 90 

!,480 71 
999 61 



1,480 32 



Congreve street, South to Centre street. 
Labor and materials furnished by the city 
Amount paid to William Finneran, construction 
work ......... 



Cummington street, Blandford to Avon street. 
Labor ........ 

Advertising; . . . . . . . 



1,480 32 

!,994 03 
627 81 



3,621 84 

$126 80 
4 50 



H 30 



101 City Document No. 38. 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Roxbury and West Roxbury . $115 00 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways . . . . . . 16 30 



$131 30 



Custer street, Woodman street to Arnold Arboretum. 

Labor . $23 50 

Advertising ........ 12 39 



$35 89 



Dresden street, Boylston street to Spring Park avenue. 

Labor $62 25 

Advertising . . . . . ... 47 37 



$109 62 



Hubbard street, Chestnut avenue to Lamartine street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $1,519 79 

Amount paid to Thomas Minton, construction work, 402 25 



$1,922 04 

Newburg street, Beech street to Belgrade avenue. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $2,696 21 

Amount paid to James Doherty & Co., construction 

work . . 566 64 



Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Roxbury and West Roxbury . $3,257 01 

Amount paid out of appropriation for 
Laying-Out and Construction of High- 
ways ...... 5 84 



$3,262 85 



53,262 85 

Oak view terrace, from Centre street. 

Labor and materials furnished by the city . . $1,206 44 

Amount paid to Collins & Ham, construction work, 1,221 02 



$2,427 46 

Pontiac street, Hillside to Tremont street. 

Labor $285 00 



Queen sberry street, Audubon road to Audubon road. 

Labor, teaming and materials furnished by the city, $1,765 93 




EXCHANGE STREET, BETWEEN STATE STREET AND DOCK SQUARE. 



105 



$129 75 

22 77 

265 20 



Street Department — Paving Division. 

Rowe street, Ashland to Sharon street. 

Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 

Amount paid to Philip Doherty, construction work, 

Seymour street, Canterbury street to Brown avenue. 
Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 

South street, Jamaica street to Arborway. 
Labor ......... 

Advertising ........ 

Stratford street, Anawan to Clement avenue. 
Labor ......... 

Williams street, Washington to Call street. 
Labor ......... 

Advertising; ........ 



Public alley 901, Hemenway to Hemenway street. 
Labor and material furnished by the city 



Public alley 905, west from Massachusetts avenue, between 
Commonwealth avenue and Marlborough street, and to Marl- 
borough street. 

Labor ' . $3 60 



$417 


72 


$138 
16 


75 

78 


$155 


53 


$32 
4 


25 
75 


$37 


00 


$36 


50 


$4 
2 

$6 


75 
19 

94 


$166 


60 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES 

FOR LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH- 
WAYS. 



ROXBURT AND WEST ROXBURY. 

Aberdeen street ....... 

Albany and Northampton streets (at their junction), 

Amory street 

Blandford street . 

Bragdon street 

Congreve street . 

Cummington street 

Custer street 

Carried fomoard, 



$55 25 

350 12 
5,941 22 

118 90' 
3,480 32 
3,621 84 

131 30 
35 89 

$13,734 84 



106 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 
Dresden street 
Hubbard street 
Newburg street 
Oakview terrace 
Pontiac street 
Queensberry street 
Rowe street 
Seymour street 
South street 
Stratford street 
Williams street 
Public alley 901 
Public alley 905 



Less amount paid out of appropriation for Laying- 
out and Construction of Highways 



$13,734 84 

109 62 

1,922 04 

3,262 85 

2,427 46 

285 00 

1,765 93 

417 72 

155 53 

37 00 

36 50 

6 94 

166 60 

3 60 

$24,331 63 

293 66 

$24,037 97 



NEW EDGESTONE. 

The following tables show the amount of new edgestone set 
during the year : 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18, in whole or in part. 
{Paving Districts Nos. 8, 9 and 10.) 

Lin. feet. 

Blackwood and Albemarle streets . . . . 378 

Beacon street ........ 180 

Harcourt street . . . . . . . ..278 

Massachusetts avenue . . . . . . 192 

Sundry streets in small quantities .... 382 



1,410 

ROXBURY. 

Wards 16, 17, 18, 19, 21 and 22, in whole or in part. {Pav- 
ing District No. 7.) 

Lin. feet. 

284 



Blue Hill avenue . 

Burke street 

Burrell and Batchelder streets 

Cheney street 

Harrishoff street . 

Heath street 

Howland street 



565 
447 
206 
317 
149 
140 



Carried forward, 



2,108 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



107 



Brought forward, 










2,108 


Huckins street 


590 


Homestead street 








174 


Humboldt avenue . 










327 


Hollander street . 










348 


Hartnett street 










884 


Forbes and Centre streets 










549 


Montana street . 










167 


Munroe street 










121 


Minden street 










113 


Queensberry street 










168 


Round Hill street . 










231 


Ruthven street 










. . . 187 


Schiller street 










138 


Tremont street 










391 


Waumbeck street . 










190 


Wyman street 










141 


Wabeno street 










163 


Sundry streets in small quantities 






1,144 




8,134 


East Boston. 




Wards 1 and 2. (Paving District JV( 


?. 2.) 




Lin. feet. 


Brooks street ..... 


377 


Maverick street .... 








122 


Prescott street .... 








924 


Paris street .... 








172 


Shelby street .... 








167 


West Eagle street 








148 


White street .... 








520 


Sundry streets in small quantities 






285 




2,715 


Do 


RCHE 


STER. 









Wards 16, 20 and 24, in whole or in part. 

Xo. 6.) 



Blue Hill avenue 
Bellevue street . 
Clarkson street . 
Dorchester avenue 
Elmo street 
Edson street 
Glendale street . 
Hamilton street . 



(Paving District 



Lin. feet. 

107 
100 
320 
223 
676 
230 
199 
277 



Carried forward, 



2,132 



108 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 










2,132 


Harbor View street HI& &£S& 


McLellan street . 










346 


Milton and Rockwell streets 










111 


Neponset avenue 










206 


Standish street . 










292 


Stanwood street 










212 


Talbot avenue . 










900 


Van Winkle street 










358 


"Wales street 










154 


Washington street 










158 


Sundry streets in small quantities 








1,690 




6,818 



Brighton. 
Ward 25. {Paving District No. 4-) 



Commonwealth avenue 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. feet. 

290 
149 

439 



West Roxbury. 
Wards 22 and 23, in whole or in part. {Paving District 

No. 5.) 



Birch street 

Boylston street . 

Hyde Park avemfe 

Jamaica and Woodman streets. 

Perkins street 

Park and Centre streets 

School street 

Washington street 

Weld avenue 



Lin. feet. 

156 
374 
100 
131 
155 
124 
132 
741 
352 

2,265 



South Boston. 
Wards 13, 14, 15 and 16, inwhole or in part. {Paving District 

No. 1.) 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Lin. feet. 

308 



Charlestown. 
Wards 3, 4 and 5. {Paving District No. 3.) 

Sundry streets in small quantities ..... 



Lin. feet. 
Ill 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



109 



Kecapitulation. 



City Proper . 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Dorchester . 
"West Roxbury 
Charlestown 
Brighton 



Lin. feet. 

1,410 

8,134 

308 

2,715 

6,818 

2,265 

111 

439 



22,200 



New Edgestones. (First setting.) Linear feet. 



Year. 


u 
te 
ft 

o 
u 

'0 


a 

O 


a 

o 

CQ 

o 

M 
S3 

3 
O 
CO 


a 
© 

CO 

o 
W 

CO 

cS 

H 


<D 

CO 

CD 

.d 

o 
t- 

o 
P 


u 

a 
■o 
X 
o 
M 

CO 

o 


a 

o 

S3 

'u 

pa 


a 
o 

co 

"u 
a 

si 
O 


pq 

M 
o 
eS 


"3 
o 
Eh 


1891 

1892 


8,236 
9,222 
1,118 
1,916 
2,990 
1,697 
5,097 
1,281 
1,410 


22,693 
25,506 
14,979 
39,324 
17,053 
20,111 
14,241 
13,252 
8,134 


11,724 
9,631 
4,372 
521 
2,097 
3,855 
2,311 
1,259 
308 


4,131 
11,238 
1,969 

816 
1,146 

807 
1,691 

918 
2,715 


18,138 
36,859 
10,587 

6,544 
15,205 
21,367 
37,205 
50,124 

6,818 


4,617 
9,970 
4,795 
1.56S 
8,319 
2,498 
5,228 
2,185 
2,265 


2,032 
9,001 
3,981 
1,323 
4,191 
8,507 
1,086 
5,909 
439 


2,227 

2,804 




73,798 
114,231 


1893 


41,804 


1894 


694 

668 
791 


41,917 


52,706 


1895 


51,669 


1896 


101,550 


Is97 


66,859 


1898 






74,928 


1899 


111 




22,200 






Totals 


32,967 


175,293 


36,081 


25,431 


202,847 


41,445 


36,649 


7,295 


41,917 


599,745 







NEW BRICK SIDEWALKS. 

The following tables show the number of square yards of brick 
sidewalks laid during the year : 

City Proper. 

Wards 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18, in whole or in part. 
{Paving Districts Nos. 8 and 10.) 

Sq. yds. 

Albemarle street ....... 124 

Beacon street ........ 733 

Columbus avenue ....... 901 



Carried forward, 



1,758 



110 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward, 
Belvidere street . 
Dartmouth street 
Dalton street 
Exeter street 
Harcourt street 
Hereford street 
Kingston street 
Massachusetts avenue 
Winchester street 



1,758 
1,025 
611 
171 
159 
196 
118 
647 
148 
591 

















5,424 


RoXBURY. 


Wards 16, 17, 18, 19, 21 and 22, in whole or in part. {Pav- 


ing District No. 7.) 




Sq. yds. 


Burke street ..... 


361 


Copeland street . 














108 


Columbus avenue 














153 


Crawford street . 














180 


Heath street 














303 


Haskins street . 














106 


Humboldt avenue 














279 


Georgia street . 














860 


Hartwell street . 














306 


Highland avenue 














328 


Linwood street . 














506 


Linwood square . 














353 


Parker street 














664 


Round Hill street 














158 


Schuyler street . 














151 


Tremont street . 














198 


Thornton street . 














247 


Vine street 














137 


Washington street 














243 


Warren place 














502 


Whitney street . 














398 


West Cottage street 














643 


Wyman street 














125 


Sundry streets in sma' 


1 qua 


ntitie 


3 








1,007 



South Boston. 

Wards 13, 1^., 15 and 16, in whole or in part. 
District No. 1.) 

West Seventh street ...... 

West Third street ...... 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



8,316 



{Paving 

Sq. yds. 

1,228 

1,948 

908 

4,084 



Street Department — Paving Division. Ill 



East Boston. 
Wards 1 and 2. {Paving District JVo. 2.) 



Brooks street 

Blackinton street 

Lamson street . 

Paris street 

Prescott street . 

Shelby street 

White street 

West Eagle street 

Sundry streets in small quantities 



Sq 



yds. 

468 
118 
131 
150 
1,173 
175 
498 
346 
444 













3,503 


Dorchester. 




Ward 21^. {District No. 6.) 






Sq. yds. 


Brent street .... 


757 


Dorchester avenue 










170 


East Cottage street 










160 


Geneva avenue . 










175 


Hartford street . 










185 


Neponset avenue 










105 


Quincy street 










100 


Washington street 










182 


Sundry streets in small quantities 






776 




2,610 


West Roxbury. 




Ward 23. {Districts JVbs. 5 and 11.) 






Sq. yds. 


Brandon street ....... 


140 


Danforth street ....... 


150 


Wenham street ....... 


97 


Sundry streets in small quantities 


1,061 




1,448 


Recapitulation. 






Sq. yds. 


City Proper ...... 


. . 5,424 


Roxbury . 










8,316 


South Boston 










4,084 


East Boston 










3,503 


Dorchester 










2,610 


West Roxbury . 










1,448 


- 


25,385 



112 



City Document No. 38. 



New Brick Sidewalks. 

First laying. Square yards. 



w> 











tA 


























o 


a 




3 




n 








o 


M 










p 


o 
pq 


o 
pq 


<u 


o 


a 

O 


o 

to 


>- 

C5 

£5 


.a 


^ 


^j 


o 


m 


~c 


1- 


^ 


o 


o 

CO 




o 

Q 


IS 


pq 


o 


pi 



1891 
1892 
1893 . . . 
1894 

1895 . . . 

1896 . . . 
1897... 
1898 
1899 . . . 

Total 



3,881 

10,423 
964 
1,537 
4,103 
1,044 
17,287 
10,121 
5,424 



54,784 



9,098 
20,231 

5,912 
11,533 

6,246 
15,897 
21,596 
13,783 

8,316 



112,612 



3,628 
4,484 
751 
2,706 
1,946 
2,314 
13,460 
4,487 
4,084 



37,850 



2,176 

12,847 

, 2,197 

2,115 

1,151 

681 

16,125 

6,453 

3,503 



46,948 



1,478 
10,462 
2,412 
453 
2,146 
2,616 
2,995 
4,723 
2,610 



967 
2,905 

350 

834 
1,734 

542 
1,855 
1,225 
1,448 



11,860 



377 
1,068 



2,908 



2,128 
216 



6,69: 



120 
3,451 

175 
437 
408 
288 
14,454 
4,653 



23,986 



5,073 



5,073 



21,725 
65,871 
12,761 
19,615 
20,632 
28,155 
89,900 
45,661 
25,385 



329,705 



Street Department — Paying Division. 



113 



Public Alleys. 

Accepted under Chapter S23 of the Acts of 1891, and Amendments, and 
Chapter 298 of the Acts of 1898. 



Date. 



Num- 


Dis- 


ber. 


trict. 


102, 


C. P., 


422, 


„ 


423, 


u 


424, 


" 


426, 


L( 


427, 


l( 


428, 


14 


429, 


(I 


438, 


U 


439, 


U 


440, 


11 


441, 


(I 


442, 


U 


443, 


ti 


444, 


a 


701, 


it 


702, 


;i 


703, 


it 


901, 


Rox., 


905, 


tt 



Location. 



Length, 
feet. 



July 13, 1899. 



Jan. 15, 1900 



Oct. 13, 1899 



Feb. 17,1899, 
July 25, 1899, 

it 

Mar. 23,1899, 
Oct. 19, 1899, 



Marshall st. to Creek sq., Hancock 
row 

Between Marlborough street and 
Commonwealth avenue. 

Arlington st. to Berkeley st 

Berkeley st. to Clarendon st 

Clarendon st. to Dartmouth st 

Exeter st. to Fairfield st 

Fairfield st. to Gloucester st 

Gloucester st. to Hereford st 

Hereford st. to Massachusetts ave. . . 

Between Newbury and Boylston sts. 

Arlington st. to Berkeley st 

Clarendon st. to Dartmouth st. ... 

Dartmouth st. to Exeter st 

Exeter st. to Fairfield st 

Fairfield st. to Gloucester st 

Gloucester st. to Hereford st 

Hereford st. , west 

Shawmut ave. to Tremont st., be- 
Union Park and Upton sts 

Worcester st. to W. Springfield st., 
between Newland and Tremont sts , 

Newland st. to Public alley 702, 
between Worcester and W. Spring- 
field sts., 

Between Hemenway st. and the 
Fenway, and Boylston st. and the 
Westland entrance 

West from Massachusetts ave., be- 
tween Commonwealth ave. and 
Marlborough st , and to Marlbor- 
ough st 



194.5 



596 
548 
548 
600 
500 
375 
640 



596 
548 
528 
600 
500 
375 
521.5 

627.6 

205.44 



192 



783.34 



341 



9,819.38 



The records of the Street Commissioners for the year 1899 
show the following results : 



Streets laid out or extended 
Streets widened and relocated 
Streets discontinued 
Increase in mileage . 
Public alleys . 



34,793.66 feet. 
. 867,348 square feet. 

220 square feet. 

6.589 miles. 
9,819.38 ft. = 1.859 miles. 



114 



City Document No. 38. 



Streets Laid Out or Extended and Ordered to be Constructed. 



Date. 



Street. 



Location. 



Length. 
Lin. ft. 



1899. 

June 
Oct. 

Nov. 



13, 
15, 



May 31, 

Oct. 17, 

Nov. 15, 

Nov. 22, 

Nov. 22, 

Dec. 22, 



April 24 

April 27 

June 12 

July 16 

June 26 

July 13 

July 14 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 5 

Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 

Sept. 1 

Sept. 1 

Sept. 11 

Sept. 18 

Sept. 27 

Sept. 29 

Sept. 25 

Oct. 10 

Oct. 17 

Nov. 6 

Nov. 6 

Nov. 15 

Nov. 16 



June 22, 

July 17, 

July 20, 

Aug. 4, 

Sept. 9, 

Sept. 25, 

Sept. 25, 

Sept. 27, 

Nov. 6, 

Dec. 6, 



City Proper. 

Andrews st. . . . 
Province ct. . . . 
Aberdeen st. . . 

Roxbury. 

Gainsborougb 

st 

Echo st 

Pontiac st 

Cardington st., 
Dunford st. 
Carlow st 

Dorchester. 

Waldeck st. . . . 

Lauriat ave 

Montague st. . . 

Draper st 

Esmond st 

Edison Green . . 

Warner st 

Rozella st. 

Spencer st 

Moseley st 

Wainwrigbt st. 

Barry st 

Conrad st 

Nottingham st. 
Annabel st 

Fowler st 

Thane st 

Rockford st. . . 
Leonai'd st 

Seaborn st 

Bird-st 

Templeton st. . 
Normandy st. . 
Shepton st 

West Roxbury. 

Congreve st. 
Oakview st. 
Williams st. 
Dresden st. 
Stratford st 
Rowe st. ... 
Seymour st. 
Custer st. . . 
Railroad st. 
Westbourne st 



E. Canton st. to Dedham st 

From Province st 

Beacon st. to Brookline Branch, 
B. & A. R.R 



St. Stephen st. to Hemenway st. 

Columbus ave. to Centre st 

Hillside st. to Tremont st 

Cobden st. to Fenner st 

Cobden st. to Fenner st 

Albany st. to Chadwick st 



Melville ave. to Tonawanda st. 

Tucker st. to Norfolk st 

Ashmont st. to Roslin st 

Robinson st. to Bowdoin st. ... 
Blue Hill ave. to Harvard st. . . 

Dorchester ave. to Pond st 

Harvard st. to Park st. 

Adams st. to Muzzy st 

Athelwold st. to Harvard st 

Crescent ave. to Columbia road 

Centre st. to Welles ave 

Quincy st. to Richfield st 

From Sumner st 

Bullard st. to Bowdoin st. 

Columbia road to Sumner st. . . 
Glenway st. to McLellan st. ... 
Athelwold st. to Harvard st. . . . 

Dudley st. to Clifton st 

Duncan st. to Adams st 

Centre st. to Kenwood st 

Columbia road to Hancock st. . . 

Dorchester ave. to Adams st 

Lawrence ave. to Grove st 

Dorchester ave. to Florida st. . . 

South st. to Centre st 

From Centre st 

Over location N.Y.,N.H.& H.R.R. 
Boylston st. to Spring Park ave 
Anawan ave. to Clement ave. . . . 

Ashland st. to Sharon st 

Canterbury st. to Brown ave. . . 
Woodsman st. to Arboretum. . . 

Corey st. to Willow st 

Cornell st. to Beech st 

Carried forward 



200 
163 

370.4 



786.14 
144.68 
918.66 
218.98 
187 08 
251.36 



1,615.75 
435.97 
330.70 

1,718.00 

1,493.00 
846.10 
815.75 
305.70 
322.63 

1,008.00' 
810.00 

1,291.85 
224.09 
650.27 
409.93 
337.48 
326.73 
589.61 
461.93 
423.51 
319.50 

2,088.51 
265.99 

1,040.12 



1,402.87 
850.00 
66.48 
378.74 
962.50 
431.09 

L, 140.00 
504.22 
852.62 
595 44 



28,555 28 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



115 



Streets Laid Out or Extended and Ordered to be Constructed. — 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Street. 


Location. 


Length. 
Lin. ft. 




South Boston. 

Dixfield st 

B st 


Brought forward 


28,555.28 

284.00 
1,139.62 

1,194.93 

31,173.83 ft. 
or, 5.907 
miles. 


1899. 

Nov. 6, 
Dec. 6, 


Old Harbor st. to Covington st. 
Low-water st. to Congress st. . 


Nov. 3, 


East Boston. 
Wordsworth st. 



Streets Widened, Relocated or Ordered to be Constructed. 



Street. 



Location. 



Date. 



Widen- 
ing, 
sq.'ft. 



Discon- 
tinu- 
ance. 

sq. ft. 



Boylston st., C. P. . . 
Chambers st., C. P. . 
Swett st.,C.P. & S.B. 

Cambridge st., Bri 

Tremont st., Bri 

Alford st., Chsn. 



Athelwold st., Dor., 
Centre ave., Dor, 
Gibson st., Dor. 



Hancock st., Dor. , 

Lauriatave., Dor. 
Bennington st., E.B., 

Albany and North- 
ampton sts. , Rox . . 
Brooklineave., Rox., 



L st., S. B 

Corinth st., W. R. 
Perkins st., W. R. 

South st., "W. R. . 



Tremont st. to Park sq., 

At Ashland st 

Massachusetts ave. to 
Dorchester ave 

Brighton ave. to Wash- 
ington st 

Washington st.to New- 
ton line 

Mystic river to Everett 
line 

Corner School st 

At Centre st 

Dorchester ave. to 
Adams st 

Columbia road to Win- 
ter st 

Ballou st. to Tucker st., 

Chelsea st. to Belle 
Isle inlet 



At their junction 

Longwood entrance to 
Back Bay Fens 



Centre st. to Jamaica- 



way 

Jamaica st. to Arbor- 



Washington st. , W.R. 
Williams st., W. R. . 



way 

Morton st. to Tower st., 
Washington St. to 

Call st 



1899. 
Oct. 19, 
Sept. 28, 

Nov. 6, 

July 17, 

Oct. 6, 

Aug. 2, 
Mar. 17, 
Aug. 4, 

Nov. 20, 

Nov. 15, 
April 27, 

June 27, 

April 28, 

Oct. 13, 
May 19, 
Sept. 25, 

Sept. 25, 

April 3, 
Nov. 3, 

July 20, 



59 



53 



43,092 

56,401 

36,929 

31,002 
789 
447 

21,240 

31,028 

507,406 

137 

43,300 
25,023 
11,341 

15,269 

29,261 
13,001 

1,623 

867,348 



167 



220 



116 City Document No. 38. 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY 
SUPERINTENDENT OF PAVING DIVISION 

Buildings and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon street. 
The building is of brick and wood, and covers some 8,000 square 
feet of land, and is divided into a shed for storage, blacksmith's 
and carpenter's shops, tool-room and stable. The total contents 
of the lot, including wharf and building, are 63,180 square feet. 

Fort Hill Wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge 
of the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used for the land- 
ing and storage of paving-blocks and gravel until such time as 
said wharf shall be wanted for the extension of Oliver street. 

The greater part of said wharf is occupied by the Sanitary 
Division as a garbage-dump, and the building thereon is leased to 
a tenant. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, Rox- 
bury, containing 184,671 square feet. Upon this lot are buildings 
containing a steam-engine and stone crusher. 

Highland- street stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick 
stable, erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and Paving 
Divisions ; also a brick building used as a blacksmith's shop, and 
a shed for the storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 
square feet was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed 
containing a steam-engine and stone crusher ; also a stable and 
tool-house. 

On the Almhouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there are 
two stables ; also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, con- 
taining 81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by the town 
of Dorchester in 1867. 

Downer-avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,300 square feet. 

On Child street, West Roxbury, a lot of land containing 43,024 
square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, blacksmith's shop, 
and tool-house. 

Gravel lot in the town of Milton, on Brush Hill road, contain- 
ing 64,523 square feet, hired by the town of Dorchester for 999 
years. 

Gravel lot on Morton street, Ward 23, containing about one- 
third of an acre, purchased by the town of West Roxbury in 
1870, used for storage purposes. 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing about 
37,000 square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. This 
lot is at present leased. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing about 
thirteen acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, stable and 
crusher plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm 
street containing 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, 
stable, etc. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



117 



In South Boston, corner of H and Ninth streets, stable, car- 
riage house, shed, tool-house and office on leased land. 

On Hereford street, a yard with shed, tool-house and office. 

Wharf, known as Atkin's wharf, 521 Commercial street, pur- 
chased in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square feet, hav- 
ing on it an office and stable. 

On Centre street, West Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Rosseter street, Dorchester, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Heath street, Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools etc., on leased land. 

On Revere street, wharf for storing paving-blocks, etc. 

Wharf on Chelsea street, East Boston, containing 61,000 
square feet, with buildings purchased in 1897 for $15,000. 

Permits have been issued from this office during the year 
ending January 31, 1900, as follows : 

Street Openings. 



Permits. 



Feet. 



American Telephone and Telegraph Company 

Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company 

Automatic Fire Alarm Company 

Boston Fire Department 

Boston Lamp Department 

Boston Park Department 

Boston Police Department 

Boston Public Buildings Department 

Boston Street Department (Sewer Division). . 

Boston Water Department 

Boston Water Department (Income Division) 

Boston Wire Department 

Boston & Albany Railroad Company 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

Boston Electric Light Company 

Boston Elevated Railway Company 

Boston Gas Light Company 

Boston Low Tension Wire Association 

Boston Pneumatic Transit Company 

Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. . 

Brookline Gas Light Company 

Charlestown Gas and Electric Company 

Church Green Light and Power Company .... 

Dorchester Gas Light Company 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company 

Eastern Cold Storage Company 

East Boston Gas Light Company 

Fitchburg Railroad Company 

Jamaica Plain Gas Company 

Lynn & Boston Railroad Company 

Massachusetts Pipe Line Company 

Carried forward 



27 
3 

2 

29 

632 

4 

5 

3 

300 

2,871 

60 

1 

3 

28 

384 

371 

489 

10 

3 

1 

250 

39 

1 

376 

399 

19 

103 

7 

108 

5 

51 



6,584 



912 

130 

1,075 

1,704 

3,445 

3,725 

45 

40 

23,600 

159,341 

1,085 

160 

65 

854 

32,872 

188,121 

29,863 

1,245 

610 

45 

41,643 

6,518 

20 

26,865 

27,739 

3,135 

4,740 

985 

2,973 

358 

39,546 



608,459 



118 



City Document No. 38. 



Permits. 



Feet. 



Brought forward 

Metropolitan Water Commission 

Massachusetts Telephone and Telegraph Company . . . 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 

New England Telegraph Company 

Newtonville & Watertown Street Railway Company. . 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. Company. . . 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway Company 

Postal Telegraph Cable Company 

Quincy & Boston Street Railway Company 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Company 

Roxbury Gas Light Company 

South Boston Gas Light Company 

Simpson Brothers Corporation 

Standard Oil Company 

West Roxbury & Roslindale Street Railway Company, 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

Miscellaneous 

Emergency permits, Class A 

Emergency permits, Class A, returned, 1,622 



6,584 

16 

8 

410 

16 

2 

6 

1 

24 

1 

80 

228 

193 

76 

27 

11 

25 

3,848 

1,967 



608,459 

900 

6,740 

70,861 

2,790 

312 

1,425 

2,500 

4,914 

100 

1,854 

13,455 

29,796 

8,098 

331 

27,961 

5,109 

147,307 

9,732 



Total . 



13,523 



942,644 



Total number of feet opened was 942,794 lineal feet. 
Making a total length of openings, 178.55 miles. 

Permits other than for street openings have been granted 
as follows : 

5 

156 
248 



Advertising by man wearing hat and coat 
Cleaning snow from roofs .... 
Dumping snow in public alleys . 

Driving cattle 

Erecting, removing, and repairing awnings 
Erecting and repairing buildings 
Feeding horses on the street 

Moving buildings 

Loading and unloading goods on sidewalks 

Pedlers, two different classes 

Placing signs flat on buildings . 

Painting signs or notices on obstruction fences 

Raising and lowering safes, etc. 

Selling from areas . . . - 

Selling from buildings .... 

Farmers 1 wagon stands .... 

Special permits for various purposes 

Special permits for June 17 and July 4 

Extension of permits 

Emergencies, Class B 



Permits to Project Electric Lamps and Signs, as follows 
Boston Electric Light Company .... 

Brookline Gas Light Company 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company 

Kitson Hydro Carbon Light and Heating Company 

Suburban Light and Power Company 

Washington Incandescent Company .... 



3,293 

5,932 

754 

26 

565 

1,548 

1,696 

4 

323 

75 

147 

373 

112 

200 

400 

307 



81 
1 
39 
58 
37 
19 



Total 



16,408 



Street Department — Paving Division. 119 

Total number of permits for street openings .... 13,532 
Total number of permits for all other purposes . . . 16,408 



Grand total 29,940 

Five hundred letters, postal cards and notices have been sent 
to storekeepers and householders in connection with selling fruit, 
etc., from doorways, windows, and areas. 

There have been 9,863 notices sent to the various foremen 
during the year, directing them to repair defects in the public 
streets which had been reported by the police and others, also 
577 letters and notices to private parties, departments and cor- 
porations to repair the streets where they had received permits, 
and the resurfacing, etc., had been improperly done, and to 
owners of estates where coal-holes or sidewalk lights were 
defective. 

There have been 2,740 notices sent to departments, corpora- 
tions and owners of abutting estates on streets where improve- 
ments were about to be made. 

Six hundred and sixty-four notices have been sent to depart- 
ments and corporations at the request of the Assistant City En- 
gineer, calling for changes in various ways on account of street 
improvements. 

There have been 303 new bonds filed during the year, a large 
percentage of which have been guaranteed by surety companies, 
which is considered a great improvement. 

On April 12, 1899, the charge for permits was discontinued. 
From February 1 to that time the sum of one thousand five 
hundred and forty-three dollars ($1,543) had been received 
and deposited with the City Collector, as per receipts on file. 

Inspectors. 

The Street Inspectors have been engaged in inspecting locations 
where permits have been granted for street openings, etc., and 
where defects were found the parties making said openings have 
been notified, and required to place the streets at such points in a 
condition satisfactory to the Superintendent of Streets. 

Four thousand six hundred notices were sent by the Superin- 
tendent of Inspectors regarding the defects. 

Inspectors have been detailed to serve on work done by the 
various corporations at all times while their work has been in 
progress, and a report required from them in writing giving the 
particulars of the work and its condition. 

Street numbering has been carried on as follows : 

During the year 365 whole streets were numbered or renum- 
bered, parts of streets were numbered in 1,262 cases, and 14,775 
metallic figures were supplied. 

The appending table explains the work done by districts, and 
in addition gives the number of estates numbered, and the num- 
ber of changes made necessary by renumbering or other cause. 



120 



City Document No. 38. 



Particular attention was given to Dorchester and West Rox- 
bury districts during the past year, as it was found upon investi- 
gation that the public convenience demanded extensive numbering 
in these growing sections. 

The Board of Assessors, Water Department, and Post Office 
officials were promptly notified of all changes in street numbering, 
in order that residents might be spared inconvenience. 



I I 



i> ID 



oo a 



H 






<D,Q 



■2"° a 

aj oi B 
<o t, f 3 

"•as . 






East Boston — 
Charlestown . . . 

City Proper 

South Boston . . 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury. 
Brighton 



Totals. 



91 



55 

17 

93 

39 

471 

259 

176 

92 



342 

58 

389 

75 

2,231 

768 

1,753- 

263 



140 
24 
100 



755 
185 
186 
38 



954 

129 
1,015 

207 
5,310 
2,012 
4,440 

708 



220 



149 



5,879 



1,428 



14,775 



21 

1 
7 

172 
23 

126 
19 



369 



There are now listed 252 streets to be numbered or renum- 
bered, and this work will be started at the earliest opportunity. 
In the meantime it has been found necessary to re-index all plans 
and maps on file in this office, so that any one required may be 
produced at a moment's notice. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 121 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Kooms 917-920 Tremont Building, 

Boston, February 1, 1900. 

Benj. W. Wells, Esq., 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — The following is the report of the expenditures, 
income and operation of the Sanitary Division of the Street De- 
partment, for the financial year ending January 31, 1900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patrick O'Shea, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The work of the Sanitary Division, including the removal of house 
offal, waste and rubbish, and of house dirt and ashes accumulated from 
the burning of materials for heating buildings and for domestic pur- 
poses, was for the past year greater than that of any year since its 
organization. 

The method of collecting ashes by what is known as the block sys- 
tem has been continued in the section of the city north of Massachu- 
setts avenue. 

The cost of disposing of refuse collected daily is constantly 
increasing; owing to the undesirable character of much of it for use 
as filling it is difficult to obtain suitable dumping places. The only 
available dumps are so far distant from the points of collection that 
the expense of hauling is abnormally increased. In fact, the eco- 
nomic disposal of this kind of refuse, namely, ashes, is becoming a 
serious problem, and unless it can be made of commercial value in 
the near future, it will be necessary to secure additional dumping 
places on the water front, so that it may be towed to sea. 

Through the ready co-operation of the householders, after receiving 
circulars explaining its object, we have been able to put in practice 
the further separation of the refuse called ashes, and known in the 
Division as the third separation, by which all papers and light com- 
bustible waste are put into a receptacle by themselves. 

This material is hauled in special carts designed for the purpose 
to the new Utilization Plant on Atlantic avenue, where it is sorted, 
the merchantable portion disposed of, and what is worthless con- 
sumed in an unoffensive and sanitary manner. 



122 City Document No. 38. 

The plant of the City Refuse Utilization Company has been in 
successful operation since January, 1899, and was designed^ to utilize 
all combustible refuse collected in the city proper north of Massachu- 
setts avenue. It is obvious that the disposal of clean ashes, separated 
from lighter, but more bulky, refuse, such as paper, etc., is a com- 
paratively easy matter to handle. In the short time that it has 
been tested, most satisfactory results have been obtained, and I 
would recommend its extension to other sections of the city, where 
smaller and less expensive plants might be centrally located for 
treating refuse of this kind. 

To this further separation there was objection from householders 
in some sections of the district, and it also made a more profitable 
field for the scavengers to ply their vocation, so that it became neces- 
sary to detail two special police officers who greatly assisted in 
carrying out the work. 

The principal improvements have been the establishment of the 
Garbage Plant at the Calf Pasture to which 200 tons of offal collected 
daily by the city teams is now carted and disposed of in a sanitary 
manner. Since the establishment of this plant, March 4, 1899, the 
sale of offal to farmers has entirely ceased, and the former practice 
of dumping the offal at sea which has been such a source of an- 
noyance to neighboring shore towns has been entirely discontinued. 

When the new system of disposing of the garbage was put into 
operation it was necessary to build an additional dumping-station at 
the Albany-street yard for the convenience of dumping the offal. 
The expense incurred was $5,500. 

The two Barney dumping boats used for conveying the refuse to 
sea have been put in g^od condition, extensive repairs having been 
made upon them. December 21, 1899, a stable and plant was estab- 
lished at East Boston, and the city is now collecting in that district 
the refuse which was formerly collected there by contract. 

I wish to renew my recommendation for the purchase of a new 
dumping boat, as one of the boats has been in service for over 
twenty years, and is practically worn out; the growing scarcity of 
suitable dumping-places is a further reason for its purchase, as more 
material will have to be towed to sea in the future than in the past. 
I recommend, also, that suitable wharf property be secured, for the 
same reason. Stables and sheds have been kept in good repair, so 
far as our means for such work would allow. 

The work of cleaning the private alleys and passageways in which 
the city abounds, and which are too narrow for a horse and cart to 
enter, is the duty of the abutters who are part owners therein, but 
on the ground, I suppose, that " that which is everybody's business 
is nobody's business," they are generally allowed to remain in a 
filthy condition, and are a constant menace to public health. Con- 
sequently, although it is not considered part of our duty, and has 
not been heretofore systematically carried out, I have no hesitation 
in saying that the money expended in its execution last year could 
not have been put to better use. 

I believe that this Division should be charged with the duty, and 
ample appropriation made therefor. 

The horses, carts and harnesses in charge of the department are 
in excellent condition, and a new hospital at the South yard for the 
proper treatment of sick horses has been built. 

Twelve new carts for hauling refuse have been built in the shops 
of the Division during the past year. 



Steeet Department — Sanitary Division. 123 

The following table shows the amounts expended for the mainte- 
nance of the Sanitary Division for the past five years : 



1895 $432,778 52 

1896 476,807 34 

1897 492,670 56 

1898 508,152 88 

1899 567,107 81 



Comparative Table, showing Net Cost of Maintenance of the 
Sanitary Division to the City of Boston. 









Net cost to 




Expended. 


Income. 


the city. 


1895 . 


. $432,778 52 


$42,985 53 


$389,792 99 


1896 . 


477,241 54 


36,146 77 


441,094 77 


1897 . 


492,670 56 


34,430 48 


458,240 08 


1898 . 


508,152 88 


28,269 90 


479,882 98 


1899 . 


567,107 81 


13,548 03 


553,559 78 



House Offal. 

There are employed in the removal of house offal 212 men and 92 
wagons. The offal is removed from dwelling-houses twice a week 
during the summer, and once a week during the winter months, and 
from hotels, markets and restaurants daily. The men are required 
to enter yards, collect the offal, empty into wagons and deliver to 
scows located as follows: 

On Albany street, foot of East Canton; Fort Hill wharf on 
Atlantic avenue. 

Four sections of the city are done by contract, as follows: 

The collection of house offal in East Boston, by T. Mulligan; 
Dorchester District, by John Bradley; Brighton District and a 
portion of West Roxbury, by George T. Barnes. 

The revenue received from the sale of house offal for the past 
five years has been as follows: 

1895 $27,374 47 

1896 21,884 11 

1897 17,416 75 

1S98 10,982 25 

489 00 



March 4, 1899, was the last day on which offal was sold by the 
city. 

The following table shows the number of loads of house offal 
collected and removed in the last five (5) years: 



Year. 

1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



Each load of offa 



Amount of House Offal Removed. 



No. of Loads. 
. 51,327 
. 56,402 
. 56,783 
. 57,764 
. 59,956 



is equivalent to fifty-six (56) cubic feet, and 
has a maximum weight of one and a quarter (14J tons at certain 
seasons of the year. 



124 



City Document No. 38. 



Of the amount of 59,956 loads, collected during the year 1899, 
3,740 were collected by the East Boston contractor; 1,491 by the 
Brighton contractor, 6,710 by the Dorchester contractor, and 796 
loads by the West Roxbury contractor, leaving 47,219 loads collected 
by the city teams. 

The collection of this material is attended to in winter by an 
average regular force of 71 city offal carts and 162 men, and on 
contract work 21 offal carts and 50 men, making a total of 92 offal 
carts and 212 men. 

The disposal has been made during the year in the following manner : 
The offal from the markets and that from other sections of the city 
was put on board scows and towed to the plant of the New England 
Sanitary Product Company, located on a point of land in Dorchester 
Bay known as the Cow Pasture; this included the collections in the 
sections of the city known as the City Proper, Roxbury, a part of 
West Roxbury, South Boston and Chaiiestown; that of East Boston 
was collected by contract and removed to Revere; that of Brighton 
was collected by contract and disposed of outside of the district; and 
that in Dorchester was collected by a contractor and sold to farmers, 
and apportion of West Roxbury was collected by contract and removed 
to Needham. 

Under the contract of the New England Sanitary Product Com- 
pany, for the utilization of the offal collected in the city daily, about 
76 per cent, of the total daily collection was sent to either Fort Hill 
or Albany street wharves, and there deposited on scows owned by 
this company. 

Out of the 59,956 loads collected during the past year in the city 
and suburbs, 13,618 loads, or 23 per cent., was fed to hogs, and 
45,566 loads, or 76 per cent., carried in scows to the plant of the 
New Eagland Sanitary Product Company. 

Collection and Disposal of Offal. 



Year. 


Total amount 
collected. 


Amount 
sold. 


Amount 

dumped on 

scow and towed 

to sea 

or wasted. 


Per cent, 
wasted on 

total 
collected. 


Amount of 

receipts 
from sales. 


1895 1 


41,480 loads 


36,620 loads 


4,860 loads 


12 per cent. 


$27,374 47 


1896 2 


45,844 " 


35,549 " 


10,295 " 


22 " 


21,187 76 


1897 s 


46,071 " 


32,495 " 


13,576 " 


29 " 


17,416 75 


1898* 


45,703 " 


20,463 " 


23,652 " 


51 


10,982 25 


1899" 


47,219 " 


881 " 


772 " 


.015 


489 00 



1 In East Boston, 
Roxbury, 517 loads, 
table. 

2 In East Boston, 
Roxbury, 703 loads 
table. 

3 In East Boston, 
Roxbury, 760 loads, 
table. 

•*In East Boston, 
Roxbury, 805 loads, 
table. 

°In East Boston, 
Roxbury, 796 loads, 
table. 

March 4, 1899, the 



3,732 loads; Brighton, 1,419 loads; Dorchester, 4,179 loads; West 

— total, 9,847 loads, collected during 1895 not included in above 

3,786 loads; Brighton, 1,362 loads; Dorchester, 4,707 loads; West 

— total, 10,558 loads, collected during 1896 not included in above 

3,720 loads; Brighton, 1,520 loads; Dorchester, 4,712 loads; West 

— total, 10,712 loads, collected during 1897 not included in above 

3,726 loads; Brighton, 1,472 loads; Dorchester, fi,058 loads; West 

— total, 12,061 loads, collected during 1898 not included in above 

3,740 loads; Brighton, 1,491 loads; Dorchester, 6,710 loads; West 

— total, 12,737 loads, collected during 1899 not included in above 

last day for the sale of swill. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 125 



The following table shows the full force engaged in the collection 
of offal alone throughout the entire city: 

The Force Employed. 





No. 


Hired 
Teams. 


Contractors' Teams. 




City Force. 


a 

o 
-£ © 


a . 

O 


u 

o 

00 

0> 

A 
o 

u 
o 

p 


West 
Roxbury. 


Total. 




7 
1 
1 
68 
70 
4 
1 












7 






1 


l 


1 


1 


5 


Offal clerk 


1 




3 

3 


6 
6 


4 
4 


8 
16 


3 

3 


92 




102 
4 














1 
















Totals 


152 


6 


13 


9 


25 


7 


212 







The money received from the sale of house offal was deposited 
monthly with the City Collector until March 5, 1899, as the sale of 
offal ceased March 4, 1899. 

House Dirt, Ashes, Waste and Rubbish. 

In the collection of house dirt and ashes there are employed 399 
men and 169 carts. This material is removed from hotels, tenement 
houses and stores daily ; from dwelling houses once a week. 

The City Ordinances of 1898 (chapter 38, section 1) require that 
house dirt and ashes shall be kept in an easily accessible place for 
their removal, the men being obliged to enter the yards and remove 
the receptacles to the sidewalks, where their contents are dumped 
into the carts. The receptacles are then placed in their original po- 
sition. The material is disposed of, if possible, on low lands, being 
used for filling, and is also dumped on scows, to be carried to sea. 
Of the amount collected last year 26 per cent, was carried to sea. 

The collection of house dirt and ashes in four sections of the city 
was done by contract, as follows: South Dorchester, by Denis Flynn, 
and North Dorchester by Patrick J. Lyons ; East Boston, by W. F. 
Hedrington, and a part of West Roxbury by John J. Moore. 

Of the 329,096 loads of ashes collected during the past year 207,782 
loads, or 63 per cent., were deposited on low lands in the outlying 
districts of the city, 84,127 loads, or 26 per cent., were towed to sea, 
and the balance, 37,187 loads, or 11 per cent., were collected by con- 
tractors and used on low lands for filling; 19,815 loads of waste and 
rubbish were collected, of which amount, 16,926 loads, or 86 per 
cent., were delivered at the plant of the City Refuse Utilization Com- 
pany on Atlantic avenue, 2,718 loads, or 13 per cent., being burned 
or burled on the various dumps and 172 loads, or .01 per cent., car- 
ried to sea. 

Good results were made in the collection of store sweepings of 
what is known as the business section of the city, the occupants in 



126 City Document No. 38. 

stores, etc., being requested, by the distribution of printed notices, to 
put out all waste material previous to 7.30 A.M., so that the collectors 
could remove it while the streets were passable, much annoyance 
and inconvenience which had previously existed being in a large 
measure prevented. 

Several complaints have been received concerning the failure of 
the Division to promptly remove offal and ashes ; investigation of 
these has usually shown that either offal has not been properly sepa- 
rated from ashes or other refuse, as is insisted upon by the depart- 
ment, or else that the receptacles were kept in some inaccessible 
place, or were larger than the ordinances provide and the regulations 
of the department permit. 

In order that householders might understand these regulations 
and that the work be not unnecessarily delayed, the following cir- 
cular was issued : 

Notice is hereby given that the new plant erected for the inciner- 
ation of combustible waste will be in operation at an early date, and 
the following regulations in regard to the three separations of refuse 
will be enforced by this department : 

1. Ashes must be kept free from all other refuse matter and in 
metallic vessels. 

2. House offal or garbage must be kept free from all other refuse 
matter (except food cans and food bottles) and in suitable vessels. 

3. All other refuse, such as paper, rags, excelsior, straw, mat- 
tresses, old clothes, pasteboard boxes, carpets, etc., must be kept 
free from ashes and garbage and in suitable vessels, or in bundles 
firmly fastened so as to prevent the rubbish from being scattered in 
handling, and must be protected from the weather until collected by 
the proper authorities. 

The above rules must be complied with, or refuse will not be 
removed. 

The removal of ashes and other refuse is governed by the follow- 
ing pi-ovisions of law: 

Acts of 1892, Chapter 419, Section 112. 

All receptacles for ashes, waste and other substances, liable, by 
spontaneous combustion or otherwise, to cause a fire, shall be made 
of incombustible material, satisfactory to the inspector. Every 
building used as a tenement or lodging house shall have outside, and 
appurtenant to it, a suitable space, satisfactory to the inspector, for 
the temporary deposit of garbage and other refuse matter. 

Kevised Ordinances of 1892, Chapter 43, Section 14. 

No person shall keep in his house, or on his land, any house offal, 
unless the same is placed in a suitable vessel, free from ashes and 
other refuse matter, and so placed as to be easily removed. 

Kevised Ordinances of 1892, Chapter 43, Section 17. 

No person shall place or keep in or near any building, ashes or 
cinders in such a manner as to be liable to cause fire, nor mix them 
with other substances, nor place or keep them except in metallic 
vessels, so placed as to be easily removed. 

Benjamin W. Wells, 

Superintende>it of Streets. 
Patrick O'Shea, 

Deputy Supt. Sanitary Division. 
January, 1899. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 127 

It will be noted that the circular also requires a third separation, 
viz., that all refuse other than household ashes or offal be placed in 
a third receptacle. This was done to dispose of the combustible 
waste by the City Refuse Utilization Company. 

The annual spring cleaning of the entire city was more than 
usually effectual this year, about 5,000 loads being taken from 
yards, areas and back alleys, passageways were also thoroughly 
cleaned. The following notice was issued to the public: 

CITY OF BOSTON. 

Notice to Housekeepers and Tenants. 
Housekeepers and other occupants of dwellings are requested to 
place their house and cellar dirt and sweepings in the streets oppo- 
site their premises between the hours of sunrise and 2 o'clock P.M., 
of the following days: Monday, May 1; Tuesday, May 2; Wednes- 
day, May 3; Thursday, May 4; Friday, May 5; when they will be 
removed by the city carts. After which times no person will be 
allowed to place any dirt, ashes, filth or rubbish of any kind what- 
ever in any of the ways, streets or places of the city, without a per- 
mit from the Superintendent of Streets. 

Dirt of any kind not to be placed in the streets on Saturday. 

Benjamin W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets. 
City Hall, Boston, 1899. 

Special Notice. 

On and after above-named days, ashes, etc., in order to be re- 
moved by city carts, must be placed in receptacles not larger than an 
ordinary flour barrel, and in a position on a level with the grade of 
the adjoining sidewalk. 

Vault filth, offal, bricks and mortar, gravel and earth, garden 
rakings and shrubbery are not included in the above, and will not 
be removed by the city if placed in the streets. 

Note. — This circular, printed in English, Hebrew and Italian, was posted in 
prominent places by the regular bill-posting companies, and for a week Avas also 
carried on the sides of all the wagons and carts owned by this division. 

Removal of House Dirt, Ashes, Waste and Rubbish. 

The removal of house dirt, ashes, waste and rubbish has been 
attended to during the year by a minimum force of three hundred 
and ninety-nine men and one hundred and forty-nine carts, also by 
five carts with the East Boston contractor, twelve carts with Dorches- 
ter contractors, and three carts with the West Roxbury contractor. 

This work shows a constant increase from year to year, as will be 
seen in the following table, and is an indication of the actual growth 
of the city: 

Amount of House Diet and Ashes Removed. 

No. of Loads 
Year. of 44 cubic feet. 

1895 House dirt and ashes, including waste and rubbish, 336,886 

1896 " " " " " " " " 363,975 

1897 " " " " " " - " " 1389,098 

1898 " " " " " " " " 1 394,937 

1899 " " " " exclusive of " " " i> 2 329,096 

1 Previous to the year 1897, each load of ashes contained about 44 cubic feet. During 
the year 1897 all the ash carts owned by the city were equipped with side-boards, 
increasing their capacity to 54 cubic feet, but for the purpose of comparison the old 
basis has been used. 

2 Previous to the year 1899, waste and rubbish was treated the same as ashes in 
loads removed. 



128 



City Document No. 38. 



Amount of Waste and Rubbish Removed. 

-Number of Loads- 



1899 



Ash Cart. 
1,892 



Paper Cart. 
14,903 



Market Wagon. 
3,020 



The following table shows the force engaged in this collection 
throughout the entire city: 

The Force Employed. 





No. 


Hired 

Teams. 


Contractors' Teams. 




City Teams. 


° si 

pi 

si m 

** S3 - 


(4 

° In* 

fi| 

ss 

P.P 

o » 


00 O 

H o 

pq 


to P 

?* o 


Total. 




7 
10 
4 
118 
136 
19 












7 






1 




i 


1 


13 




4 




31 
31 


7 
7 


5 
5 


5 
5 


3 
3 


169 




187 




19 
















Totals 


294 


62 


15 


10 


11 


7 


399 







Material Collected by Districts. 



Districts. 


a 

O 

00 

o 

"3 

o 

DO 


a 
o 

O 

P5 

00 

OS 
3 


a 

o 

CO 

CB 

71 
5 


a 
o 

2 
be 

« 


3 
o 


CD 

CB 

A 
o 

- . o 

O 


P 

o 
P3 


P * 
P rt o 


CO 

■a a 

P&H 

■3 cb 


CO 

-a 

03 

o 

hi 

o 

Eh 


House dirt 

and ashes. 

Waste and 


27,807 

269 
3,808 


14,832 

39 
3,740 


19,455 

259 

2,812 


12,588 


26,438 


29,654 


52,475 

l,i36 

7,648 


77,278 

10,471 
19,991 


68,569 

7,641 
10,470 


329,096 

1 9,815 
59,956 


House offal. 


1,491 


3,286 


6,710 


Totals 


31,884 


18,611 


22,526 


14,079 


29,724 


36,364 


61,259 


107,740 


86,680 


408,867 



Number of Loads of Material Collected from January 31, 1894, to February 

1, 1900. 



Years. 



Waste and 
Rubbish. 



Ashes. 



Offal. 



Total -Loads. 



1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 



3 19,815 



336,886 
363,975 
389,098 
394,937 
i 329,096 



51,327 
56,402 
56,783 
57,764 
2 59,956 



388,213 
420,377 
445,881 
452,701 
408,867 



1 William F. Hedrington, East Boston, collected 13,222 Loads. 

Patrick J. Lyons, North Dorchester, collected 18,510 " 

Denis Flynn, South Dorchester, collected 11,144 " 

John J. Moore, part of West Roxbury, collected 7,610 " 

50,486 " 

2 Thomas Mulligan, East Boston, collected 3,740 Loads. 

George T. Barnes, Brighton, collected 1,491 " 

John Bradley, Dorchester, collected 6,710 " 

George T. Barnes, part of West Roxbury, collected 796 " 

12,737 
3 This was the first year that an account of the number of loads of waste and 
rubbish was kept; heretofore no separation was called for by the division. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 129 



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130 



City Document No. 38. 



Disposition of Material Collected. 



Where Dumped. 



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•25 fc 



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° 2 5 



Swett St., J. C. Cobb 

Alford St., Park Dept 

Commonwealth ave., Mr. Carter. . . 

Norfolk ave., J. J. Sawn 

First St., E. Cambridge, J. T. Scully. 

Ward St., Sewall-Day Co 

Centre St., O. Nawn 

D st., Commonwealth of Mass 

Williams st., Mr. Parkinson 

Maverick st., E. Boston Land Co... 

Worthington st., Metr opolitan 
Water Power Co 



E. Ninth st., H. J. Bo wen, Ag't. . . 

Harold St., John Stone 

Mercer st., D. Benshimol 

P st., City Engineer 

Francis st., J. C. Spillane 

St. Mark's St., P. J. Brady 

Gardner St., Gordon Dexter 

Columbus ave 

Border st., George McQuesten 

Bay st., Mr. Everett 

Chelsea St., Patrick Haley 

Rutherford ave., B. & M. R.R. Co. 

Atlantic ave., City Refuse Utiliza- 
tion Co 



25,933 

17,221 

17,090 

15,376 

14,270 

12,894 

9,844 

8,886 

6,480 

6,179 

5,621 
5,262 
5,259 
4,733 
3,963 
3,860 
3,768 
3,159 
3,074 
2,509 
2,345 
2,325 
2,249 



Various places, city teams 

Various places , contracts 

At sea by scows 

Sold to farmers 

New England Sanitary Product Co. 

E. Boston, by Thos. Mulligan , 

Brighton, by Geo. T. Barnes 

West Roxbury, by Geo. T. Barnes 
Dorchester, by John Bradley 



25,482 
37,187 
84,127 



813 
180 
217 
666 



588 



5G 



25 



16,926 
97 



19 

881 

45,566 

3,740 

1,491 

796 

6,710 



32,658 



3,789 



26,746 

17,401 

17,307 

16,042 

14,270 

13,482 

9,844 

8,942 

6,480 

6,179 

5,621 
5,287 
5,259 
4,765 
3,979 
3,860 
3,768 
3,159 
3,074 
2,509 
2,345 
2,325 
2,276 

16,926 

26,332 

37,187 

120,765 

8S1 

45,566 

3,740 

1,491 

796 

6,710 



Totals. 



329,096 =19,815 3 59,956 32,658 3,789 



445,314 



1 1,406 ash carts without side-boards included. 

2 1,892 ash carts with side-boards; 14,903 paper carts; 3,020 market wagons. 

3 34,483 wooden wagons; 25,473 iron wagons. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 131 



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132 



City Document No. 38. 



Final disposition of all material collected from February 1, 1899, 
to February 1, 1900, together with the portion of street sweepings 
and cesspool dirt, disposed of for other divisions by the Sanitary 
Division, is shown in the following table: 





»H3 

11 


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=>« 

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:£ =3 

ft 


CO 

CD 

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CD 

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Kefuse 
Utilization Co. 


CO 

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CQ 
_ » 

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O U 

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House dirt and 


Loads . 
329,096 

19,815 

59,956 

32,658 

3,789 


Loads. 

207,782 

2,717 

753 


Loads. 
84,127 

172 

19 

32,658 

3,789 


Loads. 


Loads. 


Loads. 
37,187 

1 12,737 


Loads . 


Waste and rub- 




16,926 






45,566 


881 


Street sweepings. 
Cesspool dirt 














Total 


445,314 


211,252 


120,765 


45,566 


16,926 


49,924 


881 



1 This amount is included in the amount collected, 59,956. Of the amount 12,737 loads, 
3,740 were collected in East Boston, 6,710 in Dorchester, 1,491 in Brighton and 796 in 
West Roxbury. 

Division or Amount Expended. 





Hired Teams. 


Contractors. 


Total. 




$45,920 00 
3,330 00 


$9,690 80 
17,780 00 


$55,610 80 
21,110 00 


Offal 






Total 


$49,250 00 


$27,470 80 


$76,720 80 







The total expenditures of the Division, including work 

done for other divisions and paid for by them, was 
Less amount so repaid 



Cash paid and bills rendered to City Collector . 

Net cost of maintenance of Sanitary Division, February 
1, 1899, to January 31, 1900 



,272 65 
39,164 84 

$567,107 81 
19,377 92 



$547,729 89 



Details of expenditures, income and operation will be found on 
the succeeding pages. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Amount of appropriation 
Total amount expended 

Balance unexpended 



$570,000 00 
567,107 81 

$2,892 19 



Income. 



Amounts of moneys deposited and bills presented to the City Col- 
lector for collection for material sold and work performed by the 
Sanitary Division of the Street Department during the year ending 
January 31, 1900. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 133 



Moneys Deposited with City Collector. 



From sale of house offal . 
From sale of scow privileges 
From painting signs . 



$489 00 

1,273 80 

34 80 



$1,797 60 



Bills Deposited with City Collector. 



For the removal of engine ashes 
For the sale of manure 
For the letting of scow privileges 
For the letting of Fort Hill Wharf . 
For the sale of buildings, Gibson street 



$15,458 77 

374 25 

16 30 

750 00 

981 00 



Amount collected by the Collector 

Objects of Expenditures. 



17,580 32 

$19,377 92 
$13,548 03 



Items. 


Total amount 
expended. 


Amount paid 

by other 

Divisions. 


Amount charged 

to Sanitary 

Division. 


Salary of Deputy Superintend- 
ent 


$2,925 00 

7,452 47 
8,362 20 

145,713 22 

15,390 22 

45,920 00 

7,299 13 

2,391 67 

4,000 00 

4,095 00 
747 23 

293 85 
82,007 63 

9,523 46 
3,330 00 




$2,925 00 


Salaries of clerks and mes- 
sengers 




7,452 47 


Salaries of foremen 


$295 78 
18,726 10 

1,408 35 


8,066 42 
126,987 12 

13,981 87 

45,920 00 

7,299 13 

2,391 67 

4,000 00 

4,095 00 
747 23 


For labor in removing dirt and 
ashes 


For labor, sub-foremen and 
inspectors, collecting house 
dirt and ashes 


For extra teams collecting 
house dirt and ashes 


For collecting house dirt and 




For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in W. Roxbury, south 
of Pond, May, Arborway and 
Morton streets 




For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, south 
of Park, School and Harvard 
streets 




For collecting house dirt and 
ashes in Dorchester, north 
of Park, School and Harvard 
streets 




For ash stock, consisting of 
shovels, cart covers, etc 






293 85 


For labor removing house offal, 
For labor, sub -foremen and in- 
spectors, removing house 
offal 


- 10,266 94 
1,019 96 


71,740 69 

8,503 50 
3,330 00 


For extra teams, removing 
house offal 








Carried forward 


$339,451 08 


$31,717 13 


$307,733 95 



134 



City Document No. 38. 

Objects of Expenditures. — Continued. 



Items. 



Total amount 
expended. 



Amount paid Amount charged 
by other to Sanitary 

Divisions. Division. 



Brought forward 

For removing house offal in 
East Boston 

For removing house offal in 
Brighton 

For removing house offal in 
W. Roxbury, south of Pond, 
May, Arborway and Morton 
streets 

For removing house offal in 
Dorchester 

For offal stock, consisting of 
wagons, buckets, etc 

For disposition of offal 

For disposition of waste and 
rubbish 

For labor of men employed in 
stables and yards 

For allowed time, holidays .... 

For grain 

For hay and straw 

For medical attendance and 
allowed time on account of 
injured men 

For horses 

For veterinary services and 
medicines 

For stable stock, consisting of 
sponges, currycombs, 
brushes, etc 

For miscellaneous stable sup- 
plies 

Board, use and clipping of 
horses 

For outside horseshoeing 

For outside blacksmithing 

For outside wheelwrightmg. . . 

For labor, stock and tools, 
blacksmith shop 

For labor, stock, etc., wheel- 
wright shop 

For labor, stock, etc., harness 
shop 

For labor, stock, etc., paint 
shop 

For labor, stock, etc., horse- 
shoeing shop, South Yard . . 

For labor, stock, etc., horse- 
shoeing shop, West Yard . . . 

For rental, towage, etc 

For repairs on stables and 
sheds 

For outside harness work 

For fuel 



Carried forward 



$339,451 08 
8,000 00 
3,000 00 

1,800 00 
4,980 00 

961 59 

61,608 96 

9,560 97 

24,197 20 
23,064 29 
17,555 59 
11,414 75 



1,894 00 
9,831 00 



2,007 35 



1,505 

196 

967 
2,195 

58 
11 

9,070 

13,420 

6,321 

9,124 

3,734 

2,618 
25,551 

3,173 
8 

837 



$598,122 66 



1,717 13 



1,711 55 
617 56 
437 50 
927 55 



116 50 



90 50 



793 77 

704 38 

398 71 

923 03 

218 04 

55 00 
254 85 

198 77 



$39,164 84 



$307,733 95 
8,000 00 
3,000 00 

1,800 00 

4,980 00 

961 59 
61,608 96 

9,560 97 

22,485 65 
22,446 73 
17,118 09 
10,487 20 



1,777 50 
9,831 00 

2,007 35 



1,505 22 

196 29 

967 54 

2,105 37 

58 85 

11 05 

8,276 45 

12,716 00 

5,923 22 

8,201 79 

3,516 12 

2,563 60 
25,296 43 

2,974 44 

8 90 

837 56 



$558,957 82 



Street Department — -Sanitary Division. 135 

Objects of Expenditures. — Concluded. 



Items. 


Total amount 
expended. 


Amount paid 
by other 
Divisions. 


Amount charged 

to Sanitary 

Division. 


Brought forward 
For gas 


$598,122 66 
809 76 
511 00 

1,787 87 

1,005 63 
420 16 

1,535 33 
274 59 

1,068 36 
658 03 

79 26 


$39,164 84 


$558,957 82 
809 76 


For electric light. . : 




511 00 


For printing 




1,787 87 

1,005 63 

420 16 


For stationery 




For advertising 




For rents 


, 


1,535 33 
274 59 


For tolls and fares 




For telephones 




1,068 36 
658 03 


For office items and expenses. . 




For damages caused by city 
teams 




79 26 








Totals 


•1606,272 65 


$39,164 84 


$567,107 81 





Recapitulation of Expenditures. 



Weekly pay-rolls, foremen and laborers 
" " clerks 

Monthly pay-roll, deputy and clerk . 
" " dumping-boats 



$344,162 38 
5,697 47 

i 

4,680 00 
1,755 00 



■$349,859 85 



Monthly teaming-roll 

" bills and special drafts for stock, etc., including 
monthly pay-rolls of Sewer Division for towboat, 
etc 



Income. 



6,435 00 
49,250 00 



200,727 80 



,272 65 



From board and care of horses, rent, removing 




snow, and for repairing vehicles of : 




Paving Division 


$16,091 25 


Street Cleaning Division .... 


11,681 27 


Sewer Division .... 


6,467 71 


Street Watering Division .... 


813 10 


Central Office .'.... 


439 00 


Bridge Division ...... 


182 27 


Ferry " 


118 54 


County of Suffolk 


1,365 05 


Street Department Buildings, Chelsea street, 


1,273 24 


Public Buildings Department, Repairs Divi- 






615 70 


Water Department 


96 21 


Board of Health 


21 50 




. t90 ~\(M Rl 






Deducted from weekly pay-rolls 


$37,799 79 


" " monthly bills .... 


1,365 05 




$39,164 84 


Net cost of maintenance, Sanitary Division, 


for the year 


1899-1900 


. $567,107 81 



136 



City Document No. 



Extraordinary Expenses Included in Above. 

Rent of wharf on Atlantic avenue leased from Jacob Hecht, 
April 1, 1898 

Payments made under contract of the New England Sanitary 
Product Company 

Payments made under contract, City Refuse Utilization 
Company 

Payments made under contract, wharf, Albany street . 
" " dredging, Eastern Dredging Company . 



$2,500 02 

47,600 00 

4,881 54 
5,476 00 
1,476 66 

$61,934 22 



Total Cost of Removal of House=dirt, Ashes, Waste, Rubbish and House-offal. 

Ashes, Waste and Rubbish Account. 

Expended for labor as per pay-rolls , . $161,103 44 

" " hired teams per pay-rolls . . 45,920 00 

" " disposition of ashes . . . 747 23 

Expended for disposition of waste and rub- 
bish ... 9,560 97 

Expended for stock as per ledger accounts . 112,527 11 

" on contract, East Boston . . 7,299 13 

" " " part of West Roxbury, 2,39167 

" " " Dorchester . . . 8,095 00 

House-offal Account. 

Expended for labor as per pay-rolls . . $91,531 09 

" " hired teams per pay-rolls . . 3,330 00 

" " disposition of offal . . . 61,608 96 

" " stock, etc., as per ledger . . 65,638 38 

" on contract, East Boston . . 8,000 00 

" " " Brighton . . . 3,000 00 

" " part of West Roxbury, 1,800 00 

" Dorchester . . . 4,980 00 



■$347,644 55 



Salaries, Deputy Superintendent, clerks and foremen 



Total 



239,888 43 
18,739 67 



,272 65 



Comparative Table showing the Cost of Collecting Ashes, Waste, Rubbish 
and Offal, and Disposing of same at Various Dumps. 



Cost per cart-load, including administration expenses 

u it ii minus " " 

" " " of ashes, hired teams and contracts 

" " " " " labor, hired teams and contracts 

" " " " offal, " " " " " 

" " " " " hired teams and contracts 

" " dumping-boat load to transport garbage to sea . 

" " cart-load " " " 



$1 38 

1 34 
51 
89 

2 73 
1 48 

85 38 
23 



The cost in comparison to other years is due to the fact that this 
was the first year for the third separation of material collected by 
this division, and the new methods adopted for the disposal of 
waste, rubbish and offal. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 137 



Amount Expended for the Collection of House-dirt, Ashes and House- 
offal, Labor, Hired Teams and Contracts. 



Districts. 



Expended for Collecting. 



Ashes. 



1 — South Boston 

2 — East Boston 

3 — Charlestown 

4 — Brighton 

5 — West Roxbury 

6 — Dorchester 

7 — Roxbury 

3-9 — South End and Back Bay 

10 — West and North Ends . . . 

Total 



$16,240 88 

8,193 58 

14,602 43 

7,844 85 

14,565 53 

8,523 29 

34,680 55 

71,205 24 

47,952 89 



$223,809 24 



Offal. 



$8,413 30 

8,463 17 

6,930 90 

3,405 55 

7,347 86 

5,411 15 

18,699 09 

38,828 34 

15,141 73 



$112,641 09 



Maintenance of Dumping Boats, Amount Expended. 



For towing by department towboat 
" " hired 

For repairs on Fort Hill Wharf . 
" " " dumping-boats . ; 
" " " both by division employees 



For rents 

" disinfectants 

" dredging . 

" telephone 

" fuel . 

"salt . 

" kerosene oil, lime, and paint 

" rope, hose and canvas 

" electric light . 

" office supplies and bond . 

For labor : 

foreman .... 
crew, dumper, etc. . 
holidays .... 



Number of trips to sea by department towboats, 
Number of trips to sea by hired towboats . 

Number of loads of garbage carried to sea . 
Cost per cart-load of garbage carried to sea 
Cost per boat-load of garbage carried to sea 



$5,662 17 
2,378 00 

$43 32 
2,571 33 
2,063 61 

$4,000 00 

543 92 

216 66 

111 92 

56 84 

43 75 

16 21 

53 09 

8 75 

47 38 



> 1,755 00 

8,042 94 

391 94 



3,040 17 



4,678 26 



288 
40 



5,098 52 



10,189 88 
$28,006 83 



328 

120,765 
$0 23 

$85 38 



138 



City Document No. 38. 



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City Document No. 38. 



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Street Department — Sanitary Division. 141 



Division Eepair Shops. 

Located at the South End yards, situated at No. 650 Albany 
street. At these shops all of the repairs on carriages, carts, wagons, 
etc., are made, together with the painting of the same. All har- 
nesses are repaired and many made, and a portion of the horse- 
shoeing done. 

The mechanics in these shops are engaged also in making repairs 
on the vehicles, etc., sent by the different divisions of the Street 
Department; all street signs are painted for the Paving Division, 
and a certain amount of horseshoeing is done for the several divi- 
sions. 

Wheelwright Shop. 

Cost to maintain during the past year the sum of $13,420.38, of 
which amount $4,855.91 was expended for labor and $8,546.47 for 
stock. The carts, wagons and other vehicles of the Division were 
properly overhauled when in need of repairs, and the entire lot of 
ash and offal sleds were put in proper working order. There was 
also a certain amount of repairs and alterations made on the stables 
and sheds, together with the repairing of Fort Hill Wharf and the 
Barney dumping-boats. Of the above amount expended in main- 
taining these shops the following amounts were charged off to the 
several divisions, and others, for repairing, altering and putting in 
good condition their carts, wagons, watering-carts, sleds, etc.: 

Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Street Cleaning Division . 

Street Watering Division . 

Bridge Division 

Central Office Division 

Perry Division . 

Public Buildings Department, Repairs Division, 

County of Suffolk ...... 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways 

Abolishment of Grade Crossings 

Street Department Buildings, Chelsea street . 



This leaves a net cost of $7,948.37 for the repairs and construction 
of all work of this character for the Sanitary Division. 

There are employed in this shop five wheelwrights and one 
helper. 

Blacksmith Shop. 

Cost to maintain during the past year the sum of $9,070.22, of 
which amount $5,826.42 was expended for labor and $3,243.80 for 
stock. The carts, wagons and other vehicles of the Division were 
properly overhauled when in need of repairs. Of the above amount 
expended in maintaining these shops the following amounts were 
charged off to the several divisions for repairing, altering and 



$3,090 50 


930 


55 




40 


145 


28 


18 


54 


220 66 


14 


26 


56 


45 


20 


24 


40 


70 


15 


39 


919 


04 


$5,472 01 



142 



City Document No. 38. 



. $1,282 95 


1,402 


70 


11 


73 


224 


69 


74 


82 


97 


50 


31 


49 


l, 57 


13 


34 


27 


81 


41 


11 


12 


$3,309 81 



putting in good condition their carts, wagons, watering-carts, sleds, 
etc.: 



Paving Division 

Sewer Division 

Street Cleaning Division . 

Street Watering Division . 

Bridge Division 

Central Office . 

Ferry Division . 

Public Buildings Department, Repairs Division, 

Water Department . 

County of Suffolk 

Street Department Buildings, Chelsea street 



This leaves a net cost of $5,760.41 for the repairs and construction 
of all work of this character for the Sanitary Division. 
There are employed in this shop six blacksmiths and three helpers. 

Paint Shop. 

Cost to maintain $9,124.82, of which amount $7,164.97 was ex- 
pended on labor and $1,959.85 for stock. The work done by this 
shop was the painting and lettering of that which was either built 
or repaired in the wheelwright or blacksmith shops, together with 
different styled signs that were painted for the Paving Division. 
Of the above amount expended for maintaining this shop, the fol- 
lowing amounts were paid by the several divisions of the depart- 
ments for painting carts, wagons, buggies, signs, etc.: 

Paving Division $3,069 64 

Sewer Division 1,109 94 

Street Cleaning Division 749 76 

Street Watering Division 284 07 

Bridge Division 50 02 

Central Office . . . . . . . . . 120 57 

Ferry Division 57 08 

Public Buildings Department, Repairs Division . . 103 76 

Water Department 45 71 

County of Suffolk ' 15 97 

Laying-Out and Construction of Highways ... 92 50 

Abolishment of Grade Crossings 14 00 

Street Department Buildings, Chelsea street . . . 206 08 

$5,919 10 



Leaving the balance, $3,205.72, as the cost of this work for the 
Sanitary Division. 

This shop employs seven painters and three helpers. 

Harness Shop. 

Cost to maintain $6,321.93, of which amount $3,704.11 was ex- 
pended for labor, and $2,617.82 on stock; part of the work sent to 
the blacksmith and wheelwright shops was also repaired here, such 
as Goddard and Concord buggies, leather seats for wagons, etc., to- 
gether with all the new pieces of harness made for the several divi- 
sions. The entire lot of old and new harness, stable blankets, horse 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 143 

and cart covers owned by the Sanitary Division has during the year 
been overhauled and repaired at this shop. Of the above amount 
paid out for maintaining this shop the amounts charged to the several 
divisions of the department for work done were as follows: 

Paving Division .$197 65 

Sewer Division . 981 50 

Street Cleaning Division 100^58 

Bridge Division 11 93 

Street Watering Division 112 06 

Central Office 61 05 

County of Suffolk 20 68 

Public Buildings Department, Repairs Division . 23 86 

Ferry Division 15 71 

Water Department 10 47 



$1,535 49 



Leaving balance, $4,786.44, as the net cost of work done for the 
Sanitary Division. 

This shop employs three harness-makers and four helpers. 

Horseshoeing Shops. 
Cost to maintain during the past year: South Yard, $3,734.16; 
West Yard, $2,618.60; of which amount $2,877.63 was expended for 
labor at South Yard and $1,819.18 at West Yard, and for stock at 
South Yard $856.53, and for West Yard $799.42. All of the horses 
at the South Yard, together with the Street Cleaning Division horses 
stabled there, as also some of the horses located in different stables 
of this division, and of other divisions of this department, are shod 
at these shops, and for which the several divisions were charged the 
following amounts: 





South Yard. 


West Yard. 


Paving Division 


$208 50 

569 50 

1,034 00 


$2 50 
226 50 


Sewer Division 


Street Cleaning Division 


753 75 




180 00 






106 75 


Public Buildings Department, Repairs Divi- 


58 75 


10 75 


Board of Health 


21 50 










$1,870 75 


$1,301 75 



Leaving balance of $1,926.41, South Yard, as the cost to the 
Sanitary Division for this class of work. 

Leaving balance of $1,316.85, West Yard, as the cost to the 
Sanitary Division for this class of work. 

These shops employ three horseshoers at South Yard and two at 
West Yard. 



Cost of Horseshoeing. 



Stock 
Labor . 



Division 


Outside 


Shops. 


Shops. 


$1,655 95 




4,696 81 





$6,352 76 



2,195 87 



144 



City Document No. 38. 





Divisions. 




Kind and 
Style. 




•S.2 


a 

O 


a' 

Si 


03 OJ 


o . 

3 a 


Public 
Buildings 
Department, 
Repairs 
Division. 


h * 

OM 


Total. 


New shoes. . . 


5,605 
132 

718 
2,486 


2,702 

14 

339 

1,205 


1,123 

56 

170 

518 


321 

1 

38 

161 


299 


159 


112 


36 


10,357 
203 




10 

84 


12 
19 


4 
50 


14 


1,291 
4,537 



Average cost per shoe, 47 cents. West Yard, average cost per 
shoe, 52 cents. South Yard, average cost per shoe, 43 cents. 

Table showing the Number and Variety of Vehicles, etc., belonging to the 
Several Divisions of the Street Department, on which Repairs were made 
at the Wheelwright Shop of the Sanitary Division. 

From January 26, 1899, to January 25, 1900. 





Divisions. 


Outside 
Depart- 
ments. 




Kind. 


bo 

a 
"> 

03 
P4 


OJ 

CO 


t-t 

03 

a 

03 
GO 


si, 

a 
a 

03 

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14 


















14 




2 


















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24 


2 


















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28 




5 












?8 




1 

6 














6 


26 5 


1 

2 


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1 




4? 






6 

117 

12 


8 




















117 






















12 




4 


















4 




























7 
2 


3 
















10 




1 
















3 


Offal sleds 


14 

31 

11 

1 

29 
















14 






















31 




9 
3 
18 


20 
3 
25 




2 




1 
2 


1 

2 
6 


1 




45 




1.. 


10 






4 






84 








1 








1 




















3 


















3 




1 














1 




2 














































1 
1 




















1 






















1 






1 


















1 
































1 
















1 




















3 


3 






5 
















5 
















































Totals 


73 


106 


516 


3 


8 


7 


3 


9 


3 


3 


731 







Street Department — Sanitary Division. 145 

Table showing the Number and Variety of Vehicles, etc., belonging to the 
Several Divisions of the Street Department and Others, on which Repairs 
were made at the Blacksmith Shop of the Sanitary Division. 

From January 26, 1899, to January 25, 1900. 





Divisions 


Outside 
Depart- 
ments. 




Kind. 


a 
'? 

si 


C 
<d 

is 

as 

GO 


f-< 

oS 

"3 

oS 
GO 


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5 

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O 

a 
a 
o 

o 










320 


















320 






22 


















22 




1 

2 

34 




















1 




2 




















4 






















34 




45 


















45 




1 

9 






11 














12 




38 


3 
12 

195 
12 


1 

3 


3 






4 






58 








15 






















195 
























12 




3 
1 

1 
3 




















3 
























1 


Sleighs 


10 
1 


3 


















14 




















4 


Offal sleds 


9 
30 
10 

2 

38 


















9 
























30 




9 
3 
17 


20 
4 

32 
1 




2 
1 


1 

6 


1 


2 
1 
9 
2 


1 






44 




n 








103 










3 


























3 






















3 




2 














1 






1 


Democrat wagon 














































3 
1 






















f? 


Hose carriages 


1 




















1 


Patrol carts 


1 


1 
















?, 


















1 


Prison vans 




















4 


4 


Cesspool wagons 




4 


















4 






1 














1 




?| 






















Totals 


91 


137 


681 


5 


14 


10 


1 


14 


6 


1 


4 


964 







146 



City Document No. 38. 



Table showing the Numbers and Variety of Vehicles, etc., belonging to the 
Several Divisions of the Street Department and Others, on which Work 
was Performed by the Paint Shop of the Sanitary Division. 

From January 26, 7899, to January 25, 1900. 





Divisions. 


Outside 
Depart- 
ments. 




Kind. 


ii 

.9 
"> 

a 
Ph 


u 

GO 


u 

03 

"3 

o3 
GO 


a 

'3 

03 

5 

a> 

u 

35 


fee 

.2 

'u 

0J 

o3 

CO 


oj 
be 
2 

M 




oj 

o 

e 
o 

u 
"S 

0> 

O 


be 

5 > 

3 to 

s t 

g 0j 

■§« 

On 


8 

a 

05 

os a 


o 

*5 


go 
o 

a 

o 
O 


"3 
O 

H 




21 


11 


166 


49 
















236 


















U 




1 




















1 








1 
















1 
































25 


















25 








6 
1 
I 


5 














11 




7 


28 


3 

3 

95 

12 


2 






2 






43 

4 






















95 
























1? 


Double jiggers 


3 
1 
1 
1 




















3 






















1 




9 
2 


2 


















12 




















3 


Offal sleds 


13 
37 
10 
1 
29 


















13 
























V 


Goddard buggies 


10 

2 

17 


18 

2 

29 


o 
2 

6 


2 
2 


5 


1 

2 


1 
4 
8 
1 


1 






45 
13 






1 




97 




1 








1 
















1 




3 




















3 




2 














1 


1 




3 


















1 










11 












11 




2 




















?, 




1 




















1 








3 
















S 








1 
















1 






















2 


?, 






5 


















5 




















1 




1 
























Totals 


69 


107 


398 


82 


9 


7 


3 


14 


4 


3 


2 


698 







Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



147 



Table showing the Number and Variety of Signs built and painted for the Several 
Divisions of the Street Department by the Paint Shop of the Sanitary Division. 

From January 26, 1899, to January 25, 1900. 





Paving 
Division. 


Sanitary 
Division. 


Total. 


Style 


5 No. 1 


3 

572 
75 
38 
47 

113 
9 
8 

367 
27 
18 




3 


' 3 




572 




' 4 




'75 




' 5 " 




38 




' 6 




47 




' 7 


113 




oo c- 




9 




4 


12 




' 10 


367 




' 11 


27 


Spec 


ial 




18 








To 


tal 


1,277 


4 


1,281 





Table showing the Number of Articles and the Variety of Work Performed for the 
Several Divisions of the Street Department, and Others at the Harness Shop 
of the Sanitary Division. 

From January 26, 1899, to January 25, 1900. 





Divisions. 


Outside 
Depart- 
ments. 




Kind. 


p 
'? 

oj 
Oh 




(A 
u 

03 

'3 

cS 
03 


bo 

a 
"a 

03 

03 

3 

09 

03 

03 


bo 

.2 

03 

03 
03 

Sh 

3d 


03 

M 


u 
03 


03 

u 

6 
O 

"cS 
u 

a 

03 


§| 

'33 

o £ 
P 

2 03 

OhK 


ft 

03 



03 
H 


"o 

03 
O 

"S 

o 


"ol 

o 


Harness, new parts made 


6 


115 
1 


553 
111 
13 
10 
1 
21 


3 


8 






• 8 
1 




1 


1 


695 
113 






















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1 
11 


18 
2 
17 


1 
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6 


2 
2 


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1 
1 
6 
1 


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8 

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1 

5 


6 
17 
1 
2 
1 


1 
3 






1 












2 
1 






27 










2 
















2 


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1 


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15 
2 




















1 




16 
1 


40 


19 
















90 






1 












4 


















51 


197 


753 


30 


12 


7 


3 


18 


4 


3 


1 


1079 





148 



City Document No. 38. 



Work of Harness Shop. — Concluded. 





Divisions. 


Outside 
Depart- 
ments. 




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117 
















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Total .' 


54 


218 


1924 


37 


22 


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'301 







Street Department — Sanitary Division. 149 



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Street Department — Sanitary Division. 153 



PLANT AND PROPERTY IN CHARGE OP SANITARY 

DIVISION. 



South City Stables, Shops and Sheds. 

Situated on Albany street, opposite Newton street. The lot be- 
longed to the city before being used for this purpose, and contains 
90,780 feet. 

The stable and buildings connected therewith are of brick. There 
are also on the premises five wooden sheds, used for storing wagons, 
etc. The stable is two stories high, with French roof, and has ac- 
commodations for 100 horses. Twentv-three horses are kept in 
sheds. Total original cost, exclusive of land, $79,089.23. In 1899 
a veterinary hospital was built and equipped for the purpose of 
caring for sick and disabled horses. 

Connected with stables are blacksmith, wheelwright, paint and 
harness-makers' shops, in which the wagons, carts, harnesses, etc., 
used by the department are constructed and kept in repair; also a 
horseshoeing shop for shoeing the horses of the department located 
in this section of the city. 

Offal Depots. 
Erected in 1864, on the wharf fronting on Albany street, opposite 
Brooklme street, on the other side of the dock from that used by the 
Paving Division. The lot contains 39,511 feet, and belonged to the 
city before being used for this purpose. Total original cost of build- 
ing, $18,578.89. March 1, 1900, this building was partly demolished 
for the purpose of building a run-way to new wharf erected for the 
dumping of offal on the scows of the New England Sanitary Product 
Company. Cost of constructing new wharf and run, about $6,000. 

West Stable and Sheds. 
The stable is a brick building, a story and a half high, 128 feet by 
50 located on North Grove street; built in 1860, with suitable out- 
buildings attached to the same. It has accommodations for 90 
horses, in stables and sheds. The lot contains about 45,152 square 
feet. On May 11, 1896, a horseshoeing shop was established for 
the purpose of shoeing the horses of the department stabled in this 
section of the city. 

Highland Stable. 

With accommodations for 72 horses, on the old Almshouse lot 
Highland street, containing 81,082 square feet. A part of this 
stable and adjoining lot is used by the Paving Division. There is 
on this lot a brick stable built in 1873, which cost $88,594.13. On 
this lot is an offal shed, erected in 1875, at a cost of $1,160.12. 

April 1 1897, the offal shed, erected in 1875, was abandoned and 
renovated for the purpose of storing wagons and carts. 

Chablestown Stable. 
With accommodations for 25 horses, is situated on Rutherford 
ave ; u t e io! contains 17,300 square feet of land; stable built in 1875, 
cost, #5,083.07; sheds and outbuildings built in 1879. 



154 City Document No. 38. 



Fort Hill Wharf. 

Containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of the Sanitary- 
Division; used as a dumping station for the city's garbage and 
refuse, and as a landing-place for scows, which convey this stuff to 
sea and to the plant of the New England Sanitary Product Co.; 
cost of constructing platform and dredging dock, $6,219.33. There 
are two dumping-boats, known as the Barney dumping-scows, and 
these are in continual use for the above purpose, and are towed to 
sea by the Street Department steam tug-boat " Cormorant." The 
tug-boat is also used by the Sewer Division. 

A portion of this wharf is used by the Street Cleaning Division as 
a locker for push patrol-carts, etc.; a partis in charge of the Paving 
Division, and a portion occupied by a tenant. 

Hecht's Wharf. 

Situated at 466 to 470 Atlantic avenue, containing about 35,460 
square feet; placed in charge of the Sanitary Division under a lease 
dated March 1, 1898, and extending for a period of ten years. This 
wharf adjoins and is next to Port Hill Wharf, and is occupied in part 
by the New England Sanitary Product Company as a berth for Iheir 
scows; also by the buildings of the City Utilization Company for the 
disposal of waste and rubbish. 

East Boston Stable. 

Stable and sheds with accommodations for 15 horses is located at 
492 Chelsea street. Lot contains 61,000 feet of land, occupied 
jointly by Paving, Sewer, Street Cleaning and Sanitary Divisions. 

New England Product Company Plant. 

Situated on Pumping Station lot, Cow Pasture, Old Harbor Point, 
Dorchester. 

Gibson-street Plant. 

Containing 42,000 square feet, and situated in Dorchester District, 
which has been used and occupied by the New England Construction 
Company for the treatment and disposition of offal, and which is now 
closed. Land sold in November, 1899. 

The Sanitary Division cared for the horses of the Street Cleaning 
Division located at Rutherford avenue, Highland street and Chelsea 
street, bearing a proportionate share of the cost of maintaining both 
of these stables. 

Number of Caets and Wagons Collecting House Dirt and 
Ashes, Waste, Eubbish and Offal. 

Offal wagons in use by the Sanitary Division, < . ' „ . > 101 

" " " " Thos. Mulligan, East Boston . . ' . .6 

" " " " George T. Barnes, Brighton .... 5 

" « John Bradley, Dorchester, j J^°° d ' J J j 11 

" " " " G. T. Barnes, West Roxbury . .' ' . .3 

126 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 155 

Ash carts in use by the Sanitary Division 162 

" " '' " " Wm. F. Hedrington, East Boston ... 7 
" " " " " J. J. Moore, West Roxbury .... 3 
" " " " " Patrick J. Lyons, Dorchester . . .8 
" " " " " Denis Flynn, Dorchester .... 5 

185 

Market wagons in use by the Sanitary Division . . . .12 

Paper carts 30 

42 

Total 353 

Ash and offal sleds 178 



Organization. 



1 deputy superintendent. 

5 clerks. 

7 foremen. 

1 captain of scows. 
14 sub-foremen. 
18 inspectors. 
38 mechanics. 

5 tallymen, or aids. 

7 watchmen. 



5 feeders. 

6 messengers. 
12 stablemen. 

8 yardmen. 
21 dumpers. 

2 dumping-boat men. 
254 ash-cart drivers and helpers. 
138 offal-cart drivers and helpers. 

Total, 542 employees. 



156 



City Document No. 38. 



APPENDIX E. 

REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



30 Tremont Street. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit report of expenses, income 
and operation of the Sewer Division for the financial year ending 
January 31, 1900. 

Yours truly, 

Charles R. Cutter, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The Sewer Division has charge of the following work, viz. : 

First. Construction and maintenance of all sewerage works, 
including main drainage works. 

Second. Construction and maintenance of the channels of 
Stony brook. 

Third. Preparation of plans, and the engineering and super- 
vision required in the construction and maintenance of sewerage 
works. 

Fourth. Investigation of complaints in regard to defective 
sewerage and drainage. 

Fifth. The granting of permits to drain-layers and others to 
make connections. 

Sixth. The preparation of plans for the assessment of sewer 
construction. (See page 164, Report of 1898.) 

The following table shows the maintenance appropriation of 
this division for the past ten (10) years : 

1890 $347,000 00 



1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



350,000 00 
350,000 00 
350,000 00 
320,000 00 
300,000 00 
280,000 00 
300,000 00 
350,000 00 
350,000 00 



A general statement of the work done during 1899, and work 
necessary to be done, is given in the succeeding pages : 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 157 

South Boston. 

The most important work completed in South Boston the past 
year, which has been recommended for a number of years, was the 
Kemp-street overflow, thereby affording a much needed overflow 
for the South Boston intercepting sewer. 

The building of the house sewer in K street, between Ninth 
street and Columbia road, removes the great nuisance of house 
sewage being dumped directly into the Dorchester bay, as houses 
on this street were connected directly with the overflow, with no 
connection whatever with the intercepting sewer. 

As the Yacht Club buildings fronting on Columbia road at City 
Point were occupied last summer we were obliged to build a short 
piece of house sewer connecting directly with the intercepting 
sewer at street, thereby preventing the usual nuisance at water 
fronts. 

E-street sewer, between First street and Summer-street exten- 
sion, has been started, and will afford an outlet for sewers built 
last year in Summer-street extension. 

The K-street overflow, from Columbia road to tide water, has 
been rebuilt, as the same was in a bad condition, the Park 
Department having recommended this for the past two years. 

The rebuilding of the A-street overflow at Russell's dock has 
been started, and will give temporary relief to a large area until 
such time as money is available to rebuild sewers in this vicinity. 

As regards recommendations for future sewer buildings the 
Blake-street sewer should be kept in mind ; and as the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad will, in all probability, start 
to build a permanent road-bed here this year, this sewer should be 
attended to as soon as possible. 

As we have started on the sewer system in Commonwealth lands, 
and the completion of same will require many years, this part of 
South Boston can be recommended yearly. This district will in 
a short time be a centre for storage warehouses. 

The A-street sewer, which is much too small in time of heavy 
storm should also receive our attention. 

The filling on Columbia road is nearing completion, and it may 
be advisable to build sewers in this road during the coming year. 

ROXBURY. 

A sewer and surface drain has been built in that portion of 
Jersey street, between Boylston street and Peterborough street, 
the sewer forming the connecting link between Peterborough-street 
sewer and Boylston street, and allowing the Peterborough-street 
sewer to be put to use. These sewers and surface drains form a 
part of the general system for the Fenway lands, but the surface 
drain still discharges on to private land and will continue to do 
so until extended to a connection with the Muddy-river conduit 
in Brookline avenue. 

Work on Halleck-street sewer has been discontinued, only the 
worst parts having been rebuilt. 



158 City Document No. 38. 

A surface drain should be built in Smith and Whitney streets, 
as cellars have been flooded during heavy rains. The sewers are 
too small, and it will be better to build a surface drain to the 
channel of Stony brook in Parker street, than to enlarge the 
sewers. 

The sewers in Round Hill street and Gay Head street are too 
small and too shallow (in places not more than 18 inches between 
the surface of the street and top of pipe) and without the neces- 
sary number of manholes. These sewers were built by private 
parties, without inspection by the city, and have never been 
accepted by this division. Larger and deeper sewers are 
needed here. 

In the easterly part of Roxbury sewers built have been mostly 
pipe sewers, of which the following may be mentioned, namely, 
Linden Park-street sewer which carries off the drainage of quite 
a number of houses which have been draining into the old Stony- 
brook channel. 

Rebuilding of Chesterfield street sewer which was in very bad 
condition. 

The sewer on Swett and Atkinson streets, which the Fire 
Department were anxious to have built to drain their new stable. 

During the coming year this latter district should receive our 
attention, as there are many requests for sewers and surface 
drains for the development of this business district. 

Ruggles-street sewer is in a broken-down condition, and com- 
plaints are constantly being received from abutting property 
owners asserting that they are flooded during every heavy rain- 
storm. Complaints are also received of the sewer in Cottage 
terrace and Marshfield street. 

A beginning should also be made on the rebuilding of the sewer 
system for the Sherman-street district, a matter which has been 
called to the attention of this division for many years. 

Last year an Act was introduced in the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature requesting the city of Boston and the town of Brookline 
to prepare a report for the relief of Muddy river. A report has 
been prepared by this office advocating the construction of a con- 
duit for intercepting the foul flow from surface drains and sewer 
overflows, and conveying the same directly to Charles river, so as 
to preserve the purity of the water in the Muddy river and Fen- 
way ponds. This is accompanied by an estimate of the probable 
cost of this plan and a study of the apportionment of the same 
between the town of Brookline and the city of Boston. This 
will be a very expensive piece of work, and money should be pro- 
vided for it by an Act of the Legislature, which should also at 
the same time settle the apportionment of cost. 

At the outlet of Stony brook into the Fens ponds a similar 
problem is presented. These ponds from the outlet of the Com- 
missioner's channel to Charles river form a part of the channel 
of Stony brook, and are necessarily fouled by the flow of Stony 
brook during the early part of every storm, when the first wash 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 159 

from the streets and the populous district through which Stony 
brook flows come down. 

A plan has been prepared by this office for a by-pass foul-flow 
channel to carry this water directly to Charles river without 
admixture with the water of the Fens ponds. This will also be 
a very expensive undertaking, aud it may not be necessary to 
carry out the whole of it for a few years. It is the opinion of 
the City Engineer that if that portion of it were built between 
the outlet of the Commissioner's channel and the gate-house on 
the old channel of Stony brook, that it would prove sufficient 
for the present, as it would allow of the foul flow being turned 
through the 7 feet covered wooden channel which extends from 
this gate-house to Charles river. At least this portion of the plan 
should be carried out during the coming year. 

Dorchester. 

As might have been inferred from the reports of this division 
for the last years the question of "surface drain" (i.e., conduits 
for surface water) has rather overshadowed that of "house 
sewers " for the year 1899. 

The comparative lengths of the surface drains built, as com- 
pared with that of house sewers, is perhaps as 22,000 to 18,700 ; 
or in the proportion of 10 to 8£. 

This proportion will probably not diminish for a number of 
years; inasmuch as this district has been pretty weir filled up 
with house sewers, and will only need them where new settlements 
for population are made ; whereas the subject of surface drains 
has only been forced upon the city within a few years, and owing 
to the increased amount of sewerage diverted to the pumping 
station, it is becoming imperatively necessary to relieve the 
pumps by the building of surface drains. 

It is generally out of the question or inexpedient to construct a 
portion of a surface drain at the upper end, where perhaps most 
of the people live, and where alone the street improvements sys- 
tematically take in the storm water, without at the same time 
providing a well-built outlet at the lower end. 

If this is not done the effect is sure to be to overcrowd the 
lower end with surface water brought down much more quickly 
than before, so that the lands are inundated and cellars are 
flooded, causing claims for damage against the city. 

To briefly recapitulate what has been accomplished during the 
last year the following works are mentioned : 

Tenean creek, North Branch. This has been practically 
completed in good working order, with sizes in this district from 
14 feet by 12 feet to 4 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches ; so that 
it now takes all the surface drainage from those districts that have 
been most troubled in Dorchester ; as well as furnishing in its 
lower part an outlet for Tenean creek, South Branch. 

Tenean creek, South Branch. This much needed improve- 
ment has been much extended during the last year. To the 1,855 



160 City Document No. 38. 

feet of 6-foot surface drain built in 1898, we have added during 
the last year 1,239 feet, making 3,094 feet in all to date. 

To the 3,225 feet of 3-foot 4-inch by 5-foot house sewer 
previously built we have added during the last year 684 feet, 
making 3,909 feet in all to date. 

To the 800 feet of supplementary house sewer previously built 
in Rosemont road we have added 575 feet, making 1,375 feet 
in all to date. 

In Florida street we have built this year 947 feet of 3-foot 
6-inch circular surface conduit, and 930 feet of supplementary 
pipe house sewer. 

A very considerable proportion of the great surface drain or 
brook channel here has been built in the same trench with the 
large house sewer, which is especially needed in this district for 
the purpose of tapping and relieving the overloaded tunnel in 
Centre street. This kind of construction is familiarly known as 
the " Siamese Twins " method of building ; the two conduits being 
side by side, although perhaps at a different level, and being 
separated by only one thickness of masonry. 

Much has been done by surface drains to relieve flooding on Ed- 
win, Templeton, Florida, Lonsdale, Mallet and Shepton streets ; but 
considerable remains to be done before the just demands of the 
inhabitants of this district are satisfied, particularly on Wrentham 
(formerly Shelton) and Ashmont streets, etc. 

Gratifying progress has been made on the house sewers for 
this branch, the large main sewer being built, as before men- 
tioned, largely in the same trench with the surface drains. 

Although the final connection in full form has not yet been 
made with the Centre-street tunnel, yet a sufficient connection has 
been made at the corner of Brent and Wainwright streets to give 
a certain amount of relief to that tunnel, by taking a part of the 
excess of water backward through the old Wainwright-street (for- 
merly Carlisle street) sewer. 

On the north branch the conduit has been completed from Park 
street through to Charles street, also to G-eneva avenue, which 
latter has permitted the building of an overflow from the G-eneva- 
avenue sewer at Tonawanda street, thereby doing away with 
the flooding which occurred at this point at every heavy rain 
storm. 

The extension of Tenean creek, from Charles street to West- 
ville street, is a much-needed improvement, and should receive 
our immediate attention. 

It is highly desirable that a complete finish should be made 
during the coming year of both surface drains and house sewers 
for the territory drained by this branch. This will give a com- 
pleteness to our work and stop all further complaints. The ter- 
ritory is quite thickly settled, and although it is not the fault of 
the city that streets were laid out and built in advance of proper 
drainage, yet this situation confronts us there now ; and the 
only satisfactory solution of the problem will be to finish up 
everything in as good shape as if the city had had a chance to 
design it beforehand. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 161 

riattapan brook. The proposed extension of the Blue Hill 
avenue boulevard from Walk Hill street to the Neponset river has 
necessarily involved the construction of the lower end of a con- 
duit to carry the waters of Mattapan brook, perhaps a little in 
advance of the needs of civilization or dense settlement. 

At any rate we have constructed here about 1,675 feet of a 
6-foot 6-inch brick conduit ; the foundation for which is mostly in 
solid rock, and therefore while of a very substantial, yet also of 
an expensive character. 

Owing to the delay in formulating the plans for the grade cross- 
ing of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R, Midland Division, at their Mat- 
tapan station, we have been obliged to defer the continuation of 
this conduit upward until another season. 

The depth of the upper end of the conduit as now built is not 
less than 21 feet below the surface, owing to the necessity of 
passing the conduit under the new tracks of the railroad, which 
are to be very considerably depressed. 

This depth has been slightly exceeded (and in solid rock) by 
the part already built below there ; and in fact the average depth 
of digging for the whole job as now built will not fall much short 
of 16 feet. 

In connection with the building of the surface drain above 
spoken of in Blue Hill avenue, it has been found desirable to 
build a considerable portion of the house sewers required for this 
portion of the Blue Hill avenue boulevard. Accordingly 2,372 feet 
of 12-inch, 15-inch and 18-inch pipe sewer have been constructed. 

This is wholly in that part of Blue Hill avenue south of the 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Midland Division. 

It is to be hoped that the complications relating to the Matta- 
pan grade crossing will be settled early in the year, and this will 
give us a chance to complete the whole of the surface drainage 
and house sewers that are needed for the Blue Hill avenue boule- 
vard. 

Next after that would come naturally the extension of the 
Mattapan brook conduit upward, from Blue Hill avenue, parallel 
with and not far from the track of the N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., 
Midland Division, as far as Morton street, at the corner of Selden 
street ; thus giving a proper outlet to the somewhat expensive sys- 
tem of surface drains that we have constructed on Selden street, 
Capen street, and other streets in that immediate vicinity, where 
we have added this year 309 feet to the 3,160 feet built in 1898, 
making a total length of 3,469 feet; varying from 3-foot 6-inch 
brick conduit to 10-inch pipe. 

As this territory is, however, in a very undeveloped condition 
money could be saved at present by simply ditching the brook 
along the lines of the takings, building only masonry structures at 
the street crossings. 

Richmond-street brook. A small beginning has been made 
at improving the surface drainage in the neighborhood of Rich- 
mond street. 

This is an old and thickly settled neighborhood, and probably 



162 City Document No. 38. 

the people will never be satisfied until they get such a system of 
surface drains as will enable them to have a proper number of 
catch-basins. 

If the money is available this would be a very meritorious 
place to spend it. 

Davenport brook. No work of any consequence has been 
accomplished on this brook during the last year, but the condi- 
tions on the upper part of this brook, say in the neighborhood of 
Armandine, Ashmont, Burt, Bailey and Fuller streets, Dorchester 
avenue and Van Winkle street, are such as to invite speedy 
attention. 

The old brook has been filled up, buried out of sight, carried to 
one side and tortured in every conceivable way, so that its exist- 
ence would hardly be suspected in a dry time, although whenever 
it rains heavily it makes itself very disagreeably conspicuous. 

It happens luckily that just below Van Winkle street there is a 
steep gradient or fall in the brook which would give good clearance 
to the waters of a conduit built above that point down into the open 
channel of the brook, without involving the quite expensive and 
formidable undertaking of building a channel below there to the 
Neponset river. 

The expense therefore of improving the upper part of the 
brook will be only what is required in each, place, without any- 
thing additional for an outlet. 

Oakland brook. This brook, which drains the large extent 
of valley west of Blue Hill avenue, at Mattapan, will need event- 
ually extensive improvements ; but the progress of settlement in 
these somewhat rugged and undrained lands is not so great as to 
call for immediate attention. 

In the neighborhood of Callender and Willowwood streets, near 
Dorchester station on the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Midland Divi- 
sion, the improvements of former seasons have been perseveringly 
followed up. 

On Callencler street there have been built more than 1,600 feet 
of surface and catch-basin drains, etc., including 617 feet of 10- 
foot brick conduit (which added to the 200 feet of 1898, makes 
817 feet in all to date) ; besides 11 catch-basins and 7 inlets. 

Besides this there have been built 1,736 feet of large pipe and 
brick surface drains, and 1,889 feet of open ditch in the adjacent 
territory ; all for the purpose of remedying the disastrous flowage 
of this part of the Canterbury branch of Stony brook. 

As mentioned last year the above-named open ditches should 
be supplemented by permanent covered drains, as soon as 
convenient. 

On the Oakland Garden Fork of Stony brook we added 
444 feet of brick and pipe conduit to the 288 feet built in 1898, 
giving 732 feet in all, and 263 feet of 24-inch pipe surface 
drain. 

In this connection the speedy building is urged of about 580 
feet of brick conduit in Millet street and Wheatland avenue, being 
the connecting link between the lower conduit built in Talbot 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 163 

avenue and New England avenue in 1898-99, and the upper 
concrete conduit built in Spencer street, from Park street, and in 
Wheatland avenue in 1894. 

Until this is done the brook will always overflow here in 
storms, causing damage to the streets, and probably eventually 
to the cellars in the immediate neighborhood. 

It is true that 320 feet of conduit would make the connection 
with the old brook channel at Millet-street culvert ; but if we 
once commenced to build this connection it would be a pity not 
to build the whole system. 

It is quite desirable that, at an early date, the outlet for what 
has been built should be carried down from the track of the 
N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., Midland Division, to the Franklin park 
ditch, to afford an outlet for surface drains in this vicinity, and 
incidentally to relieve the Talbot-avenue sewer. 

The Park Commissioners have also petitioned for a brick con- 
duit to carry the waters now flowing around Franklin field in 
their open ditch. This improvement would start at our 10-foot 
conduit at the corner of Lyons and Callender streets, and run 
upwards through Lyons street and the border of Franklin field, 
to the culvert crossing Talbot avenue, not far from Blue Hill 
avenue, and thence to Franklin Park at Canterbury street bound- 
ary near Angell and Calder streets. 

As this improvement would be almost entirely for the benefit of 
Franklin field (as we can get along for the present with things as 
they now exist) it would seem reasonable that a part, at least, 
of the cost should be defrayed from the appropriation of the Park 
Commission. 

A 24-inch pipe surface drain should be extended from Kilton 
street, across Harvard street and across the railroad, in order 
to carry the water from the conduit built last year from Elmo 
street through Greenwich street, nearly down to Harvard street 
to connect with the 24-inch pipe now laid in West Park street. 
The water from this conduit has at the present time practically no 
outlet except from the ditches on both sides of the railroad 
track. The 24-inch pipe mentioned in Kilton street will serve 
for the present time, and in future, when the district is devel- 
oped and the flow consequently increased, the main channel can 
be built on the westerly side of the railroad through the brook 
conduit near Harvard street to connect with the main conduit of 
the branch where it crosses Bernard street, a few hundred feet 
south of Talbot avenue. By adopting this expedient two diffi- 
cult crossings of the railroad track will be avoided, and the ex- 
penditure of a considerable sum of money will be put off until 
such time in the future as the 24-inch pipe shows itself inade- 
quate to carry the flow, thereby saving on the interest account. 

The 2,075 feet of pipe catch-basin drain built this year in Wal- 
deck street is worthy of mention ; especially as giving a finish 
to a fine residential territory, otherwise sorely lacking. 

The North Branch of " Fine Neck creek," crossing Neponset 
avenue, near Blackwell street, also Newhall street and crossing 
Ashmont street, near Train street, deserves attention. 



164 City Document No. 38. 

The Park Department has recently improved that part of this 
water-course which is in the " Neponset playground," below 
Neponset avenue. The improvement should be extended up- 
wards, as iu the past several complaints have been filed, caused 
by the condition of the brook and some of the culverts. 

The Central=avenue and Sanford=street brook. This 
brook should be improved, as at present a number of catch- 
basins, which have been built on San ford street, are con- 
nected with the house sewer, sending storm water to the pumps ; 
and very little water flows through the old pipe which was laid in 
1886. 

The extension of the culvert under Blue Hill avenue, near Talbot 
avenue, should be continued down Blue Hill avenue to tbe open 
channel in Franklin field, as it has been the cause of many com- 
plaints in the past. 

Among the most conspicuous and desirable undertakings of the 
year may be mentioned that of Talbot avenue for purposes of sur- 
face drainage ; so as to enable the roadway of this long neglected 
boulevard to be thoroughly macadamized, with curbed sidewalks, 
and electric car tracks in the centre of the roadway. To this 
end there was built about 2,600 feet of surface and catch-basin 
drains ; and as the old brick sewer has to be extensively cleaned 
at intervals there were also built a " by-pass " or supplementary 
sewer of 15-inch pipe, about 1,680 feet in length, in which the 
sewage can flow temporarily while the old sewer is being cleaned ; 
as well as a" settling tank" 72 feet long, to catch the gravel 
and sand brought down in storms. 

Although the work was not done or paid for by the city, and 
its amount does not show as an offset to the city's expendi- 
tures, it is nevertheless a matter of interest and congratulation 
that about 2, 140 feet of pipe sewers were built by private parties in 
Harwood, Harvest, Lucerne and Ashton streets, in the tract of 
land just south of Lauriat avenue, and just east of Blue Hill 
avenue, thus opening quite t.n extensive territory for building 
purposes. 

More than this, not less than 5,500 feet of sewers were built 
by the owners of the "Ward Estate," on the tract of land just 
north of Lauriat avenue, and east of Blue Hill avenue, thus put- 
ting even more land into the market. As this is all good, and 
mostly very good, high land, it is an advantage to the whole city, 
as increasing the area available for good homesteads for citizens 
of moderate means. 

The sewer outlet for the northern half of Savin Hill has been 
completed, and will afford drainage for all property in this 
vicinity. 

A start has been made on the Ceylon-street sewer, and on the 
completion of the same a suitable outlet for a large part of Co- 
lumbia road will be available. This structure will be a brick 
conduit for storm water, with 12-inch and 18-inch pipes for 
house sewao-e on the sides. 




BLUE HILL AVENUE, DORCHESTER, SURFACE DRAINAGE. 

This surface drain will outlet into the Neponset river at Mattapan square. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



165 



For the next year's work I have selected, from the 27 house 
sewers hitherto petitioned for, the following nine streets as being 
of special importance, viz. : 



Street. 


Limits. 


Length. 


Blue Hill avenue 
Monson street. . . 
Morton street . . . 
Norfolk street. . . 

River street 

Selden street. . . . 
Shepton street. . 
Tucker street. . . 
Avonclale place. . 


River street to Walk Hill street 

Sturbriclge street to Temple street . . 
Blue Hill avenue to Norfolk street . . 
Nelson street to Stanton avenue. . . . 
Washington street to Idaho street. . . 

Nelson street to Milton avenue 

Dorchester avenue to Florida street. 
Callender street to Lauriat avenue . . 


3,750 feet. 

525 " 
1,560 " 
1,060 " 
1,855 « 
1,425 " 
1,040 " 

370 " 
3,420 " 





As a street is about to be laid out under Columbia road, at 
Crescent avenue station, which will serve as a location for a pro- 
posed storm-water conduit for the relief of the Crescent avenue 
district, I think it advisable to recommend the building of said 
conduit as soon as possible. 

The separation of the system tributary to Talbot avenue sewer 
should be started during the coming year, and we are constantly 
receiving complaints from this district. 

The intercepting sewer in private way off Dorchester avenue, 
near Freeport street, is in a bad condition, and should be 
attended to immediately. 

East Boston. 

Sewers have been built in Chelsea street, between Chelsea 
bridge and Curtis street, also in Curtis, Pope and Chaucer streets, 
and connection made with the Metropolitan sewer, near Chelsea 
street. 

In building the brick sewer in Chelsea street the ground was 
found to be completely saturated with petroleum from the 
adjacent oil-works, and this has percolated through the masonry 
of the sewer,- and caused so much gas to accumulate in the sewer 
that the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission fearing trouble to 
their work sealed off the connection. The only remedy which 
suggests itself is to ventilate this sewer thoroughly by means of 
shafts, as the ventilation from the manhole covers is liable to be 
interrupted by ice and snow, and to apply Portland concrete wash 
to the inside of the brick work to render it more impervious to the 
oil. A brick shaft for ventilating has been built on a location 
granted by the Standard Oil Company, and connected with the 
sewer and is proving very efficient in carrying off this gas. Three 
other ventilating pipes of iron have been planned to be placed on 
the summits of the connecting system, in order to establish a cir- 
culation. These shafts will be made to resemble trolley poles 
and placed on the curb line, and as they will be thirty-five feet high 



166 City Document No. 38. 

no complaints are likely to be received on account of them. The 
foundations are already in, and these pipes will be set up as soon 
as the base plate castings are received from the foundry. When 
the s} T stem of ventilation is completed the work of rendering the 
sewer impervious to oil will be attempted. 

A new culvert has been built under Bennington street, near 
Trumbull street, and extended to and across the location of the 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, under an arrangement 
with the railroad authorities. 

A small piece of the Bennington-street boulevard sewer system 
(about 1,300 feet) has also been built, between Leverett avenue 
and the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

The most important sewerage work needed in East Boston is 
the building of three lines of intercepting sewer to intercept the 
sewage from the northerly shore of the island on Chelsea creek, 
the easterly shore facing toward Winthrop, and the sewage of 
Breed's Island. These three interceptors were not included in 
the plans of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, and have 
never been built, and although East Boston territory is included 
in the assessment made by the Metropolitan Apportionment Com- 
mission, only a part of East Boston enjoys the benefit of the 
Metropolitan intercepting system. 

There is considerable complaint of nuisance still existing from 
the discharge of sewage on to the flats around the northerly por- 
tion of the island, and this state of things must continue until 
these interceptors are built. The three would cost a large amount 
of money, probably about $1,000,000, and there would seem to 
be a legitimate reason for asking for a loan for this special pur- 
pose outside of the regular sewerage loan, and outside of the 
debt limit. This would follow the precedent established in the 
case of all intercepting sewers, all of which have been built on 
long time loans, and would seem to be right in principle, as the 
benefit of these sewers will be enjoyed for all time. 

With the amount of money available out of the $1,000,000 
loan for sewer building this year it is not likely that any can 
be applied to this purpose. 

Sewers are needed in East Boston parkway with an outlet to 
the Metropolitan sewer near Bremen and Prescott streets. 

Sewers in Chelsea and Bennington streets, from Eagle square 
to Putnam street, should be rebuilt on a larger size. 

The Putnam-street outlet at Condor street should also be 
rebuilt. This has been broken down, and has been a nuisance as 
well as a menace to health for several years. It should be re- 
built so as to convey the sewage to the deep water of the channel 
of Chelsea creek, without spilling any on the flats, as this is the 
best disposition that can be made of it until the intercepting 
sewers, previously mentioned, for this portion of the island can be 
built. 

If money can be provided for this object the Porter-street over- 
flow should also be rebuilt, as it is practically all broken to pieces. 
This would be an expensive piece of work, as it should either be 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 167 

rebuilt of wood in a much more substantial manner than pre- 
viously, or of brick on a pile foundation and protected by an em- 
bankment of earth filling. 

Brighton. 

The sewer and surface drain system for Commonwealth avenue, 
between Warren street and Chestnut Hill avenue, has been com- 
pleted, and outlets built in Washington street and in Sutherland 
road and private land, both of which connect with the Brookline 
sewerage system. 

The large brook conduit has been built from Fairbanks street 
to Oak square, to carry the Oak square branch of the Faneuil 
Valley brook. As the part of Brighton, in the vicinity of Oak 
square, is developing rapidly, this conduit has been built large 
enough to serve for the district when fully developed. The other 
branch of the brook coming down from Chandler's pond and 
Lake street, and crossing Washington street, near Fairbanks 
street, should also be improved, and the covered brook conduit 
built from the junction with the first-named conduit up-stream at 
least as far as Rogers park, which would enable the Park Commis- 
sion to properly drain and improve this playground ; but inas- 
much as this portion of Brighton territory is largely rural, and a 
portion of the water-shed being in Newton, and more particularly 
as there seems to be nothing at present to cause any such rapid 
development as is taking place around Oak square and Bigelow 
Hill, it would seem more reasonable to build a conduit large 
enough to care for the brook under the existing conditions, and 
for a reasonable period in the future, and not expend the large 
amount of money necessary to build a conduit suitable for the 
district when the same shall have become completely developed. 

The Oak-square conduit and also the Lake-street branch dis- 
cussed above are improvements upon the head waters of the 
Faneuil Valley brook. They will of course result in precipitating 
the storm-flow of the brook more quickly into the lower reaches, 
and as the outlet to the whole system at the iron bridge of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad over North Beacon street is already 
inadequate to carry the flow of the brook, the building of these 
improvements makes it even more imperative than before tint an 
adequate outlet should be constructed, as flooding at this point is 
sure to take place. 

The storm-water conduit should also be built for Shepard- 
street brook from Charles river to Shannon street. The lower 
part of this will connect with the outlet for the Faneuil Valley 
brook at the railroad bridge as described above. This Shepard- 
street brook has been taken into the sewer system in several 
places, and the channel at intermediate points has been ob- 
structed. At every storm lasting one or two hours cellars are 
flooded, and much inconvenience caused to property owners. 
Takings for this brook conduit have been made, and work can 
proceed whenever there is sufficient money for the purpose. 

Salt Creek brook conduit should also^be continued if practical 



168 City Document No. 38. 

from a financial point of view, from its present ending, about 350 
feet north of Commonwealth avenue to the Charles river, but if 
the money for this is not available it should be constructed 
at least from the Charles river across the tracks of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. The railroad company is constantly filling and 
building new freight tracks at this point in order to develop the 
Beacon Park property into a freight yard, and the longer this 
work is delayed the more expensive it will be. There are already 
something like twenty tracks across at this point. 

West Roxbury. 

A conduit should be built for Goldsmith brook from the pres- 
ent ending near Jamaica street to the Arborway, and also one 
for Kirk-street brook. A surface drain should be built in Baker 
street, from Gardner street to Spring-street brook, and a con- 
duit built to improve the condition of this brook. 

A sewer should be built in Gardner street from the Metropoli- 
tan sewer near Charles river to Spring street, and in Spring 
street to Centre street. This sewer and the surface drain last 
mentioned should certainly be built during the coming summer as 
both are necessary ; the first to drain the surface water from 
around the location of the new school-house on Gardner street, 
and the sewer to take the drainage of the school-house. This 
was promised to the School Committee, and they were assured 
that the work would be done in time for the school to be occupied 
in September of 1900. The sewer will also take a large portion, 
but not all of the pollution which now finds its way into the 
Spring-street brook, and thence into Charles river. This is a 
menace to public health, as several municipalities derive their 
water supply from the river below this point. 

Culverts and surface drains are needed in Temple, Perham and 
Dent streets. 

The area bounded by New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road and Beech and Washington streets, is now quite thickly 
settled, and every street in this section should have sewers and 
surface drains. 

Charlestown. 

The Beach-street outlet has been connected with the Metropol- 
itan sewer and a new overflow outlet built, thus completing all 
connections with the Metropolitan sewer in Charlestown, except 
the Beacham-street district, so called. The sewers in this district 
are very leaky, and should be rebuilt in the near future on the 
separate system. It is possible that some of the existing sewers 
may be utilized for surface drainage, but in only few instances. 

The sewers in Main and Cambridge streets, from Beach street 
to Somerville line, should be rebuilt of larger size and at greater 
depth. The sewers in Rutherford avenue, from the outlet to 
Cambridge street, should be rebuilt ; also the sewer in Tibbets 
Town-way. The sewer in Tufts street is in poor condition ; and 
a sewer is needed in Concord street, from Monument square to 
Bunker Hill street. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 169 

City Proper. 

The Canal-street relief-sewer is now being constructed in 
Haverhill street, and is rapidly nearing completion. When the 
turn into Traverse street is made one of the most difficult sections 
of the work will be encountered, that is the crossing of the tracks 
that lead into the subway. Driving the 30 feet piles necessary in 
the construction adds to the complication. 

The sewer in South street is completed to Harvard street. 
This affords an outlet for the Harvard- street sewer through 
South and Kneeland streets under the Terminal Company tracks 
to Fort Point Channel at Mt. Washington avenue. The Har- 
vard-street outlet, below South street, is abandoned. 

The regulator at Oswego street and Albany street is nearly 
completed. When this is done the machinery can be set up in 
the district regulator in Dewey square and the Dover-street 
regulator abandoned. 

The sewer system in Charlestown street has been completed. 
The building of this sewer has afforded an outlet into the Canal- 
street relief sewer for the Beverly street sewer, which has been 
in bad condition for a long time and should be rebuilt. 

The surface drain which the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Company is building along the side of their tracks 
will cut about two feet into the arch of the intercepting sewer in 
Lehigh street. To obviate this difficulty the interceptor is to be 
cut off and rebuilt with a wider and flatter section, allowing the 
surface drain to pass over it without change of grade. This 
work will probably be done at once by this division and paid for 
by the railroad. 

Changes in the sewer system necessitated by the relocation of 
the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad and the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad have been completed, the re- 
building of the Way-street sewer being the principal change. 

The sewer in Hanover street to drain the siphon at Washing- 
ton street into the Canal-street relief sewer at Cross street has 
not been built. If the subway in Hanover street is built this 
sewer should be built into the structure. 

Sewers should be rebuilt in North street, India street, Milk 
street and adjoining streets, Fayette street, Salem street and in 
Commercial street at Clark street. 

The sewer in Essex street should be rebuilt between Kingston 
street and Chauncey street. 

The outlets to the sewers in the Back Bay district have been 
found to be too small and, although it has been recommended in 
several reports to enlarge them, the work has not been done. 

Moon Island. 

The work of extending the reservoir has progressed to such 
an extent that although the whole work on the reservoir proper 
is not completed, it is in use and admits of, if necessary, a storage 
to its full capacity of fifty million gallons per tide or one hundred 
million gallons per clay. 



170 City Document No. 38. 

A portion of the work remaining to be done is the setting up 
of the flushing sewer gates, the machinery for operating the 
same, and the buildings in which it is to be installed. The iron 
work for the above has been delayed, owing to the difficulty in 
procuring such material at the present time. 

The new method of flushing the extended portion of the res- 
ervoir cannot be put in operation until this work is done. A 
portion of the rip-rap and slope paving protecting the roadway 
embankment at the southerly end of the reservoir, a small 
amount of excavation on the slope of the hill east of the reser- 
voir, the grading and ballasting of the roadways and the loaming 
of the slopes remain to be done. 

It was considered necessary to strengthen the old division 
walls of the reservoir, one-third of this work has been done, the 
remainder being left, on account of the season, until spring. 

The sea-wall at the north-easterly end of the island, as origi- 
nally laid out, has been completed. 

The work of paving, grading and building a parapet wall on 
the out-fall sewer embankment, necessitated by the damage done 
by the storm of November 27, 1898, is practically completed. 

There should be built in the gate-house, at the dead end of 
the out-fall sewer, a relief-gate, which would work automatically, 
to prevent any sudden backing up of the out-fall sewer while the 
reservoir is being discharged. If this should occur it might 
cause a flooding at the pumping station, and it might happen 
at night if the gateman on duty was suddenly incapacitated by 
sickness or other cause. 

A ventilating pipe should also be put in connecting with the 
chamber below the gate-house floor, to relieve the air pressure 
caused by a discharge of the reservoir at a high stage of the tide. 

It seems advisable, before completing the work in progress, to 
devise some method of handling at this point an amount of 
sewage beyond the capacity of the present extension, 

If the proposed design for a high-level sewer is adopted, and 
constructed by the State, it will be several years before it will be 
in operation, and the increase in the amount of sewage received 
before such work is completed, may necessitate the handling here 
of an amount larger than our present capacity, and we should be 
able to handle an amount equal at least to the capacity of the 
tunnel. 

The recommendations made in last year's report, on which no 
action has been taken, are herewith supplemented. 

On account of the damage clone at the sewer outlet, by storm 
of November 27, 1898, and the liability of recurrence, it is advisa- 
ble to extend the sea-wall for a short distance on the opposite 
side of the gate-house, to allow for filling on all sides of the foun- 
dation, except the face, to insure the stability of it in the future. 

The bluff on the north-easterly side of the island, which is over 
one hundred feet in height, washes and furrows badly each year, 
carrying large quantities of material to the foot of the slope. 
Now that the sea-wall is built on this side of the island, with a 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 171 

fill behind it to an established grade, it will be necessary to grade 
the bluff to such a slope that a sod can be grown on it to protect 
it from the action of the rains and frost, or the grade of the filling 
at its base cannot be maintained, and will always present an 
unsightly appearance. 

A portion of the rip-rap around the island should be relaid as 
the action of the ice, together with the storms, has moved it so 
much in places that the ballast beneath it is liable to be washed, 
and endanger the embankment in which the out-fall sewer is built. 

The wharf at the Island should be extended about forty-five 
feet, and a channel dredged from it to deep water. The depart- 
ment boat cannot land at the wharf if the water is below half-tide. 
A run should be built alongside the wharf, so the small boat can 
be launched under any conditions of weather. The old boat and 
house for same were carried away by the storm of November 27, 
1898. 

An automatic tide gauge should be set up at the wharf, so that 
a continuous and correct record of the height of the tide can be 
preserved. Aside from the need of it in connection with the 
works, its usefulness is demonstrated by the repeated requests 
for such information by the different city departments and others. 

A registering gauge should also be placed at the east end of 
the tunnel, to obtain data in regard to the waves that occur there, 
so that the cause of the same may be determined if possible. 

The lack of facilities for keeping the out-fall sewer clean has 
long been felt ; and I would recommend laying a six-inch water 
pipe from the gate-house to the connection chamber, with hy- 
drants on it, so that salt water may be used for the purpose. 

The old stable, which should have been replaced long ago, can- 
not be used with economy any longer. Aside from its tumble- 
down condition it will not properly accommodate the horses, and 
there is no chance to get the wagons under cover. A new stable 
should be built with proper accommodations, and in keeping with 
the other buildings on the island. 

During the summer season the island is becoming quite a 
favorite place for visitors in carriages, and on bicycles, not only 
to see the work, but to get the sea breezes, and the fine view of 
the harbor that may be had from the top of the hill. If the pro- 
posed boulevard in Quincy and Squantum becomes a reality the 
number will increase, and a driveway around the Island and to 
the top of the hill, with grounds about the reservoir graded in 
proper shape, would greatly add to the appearance of the plant, 
and the pleasure of the public. 

Main Drainage. 

Work on Moon Island has progressed during the past year 
very rapidly, and at the present time the four basins are com- 
pleted and in use. During the ensuing year it is intended to 
finish the work upon the basins and the grading and planting and 
laying of rip-rap as well as to clean up in general. 



172 City Document No. 38. 

A new stable should be built at Moon Island, as recommended 
in the past. 

The building of a four flat tenement house for the accommoda- 
tion of the men working on the Island is recommended, as it is 
especially desirable that the night force should have their homes 
near their work. This was the original design, and it should 
be started and completed in the near future. Studies should be 
made for the extension of the reservoirs and for handling the 
sewage. In changing the city to the separate system regard 
should be had for the purification and handling of sewage in the 
future. 

At the pumping station, Cow Pasture, work has proceeded on 
the alteration and repairs of the engines, and we have increased 
the pumping capacity of the plant very materially. A new 
iron floor has been put in, and the station at the present time 
will compare favorably with any other in the country in efficiency 
and appearance. During the past two years studies have been 
made for a new 72, 000, COO gallons per day pumping-engine, and 
during the month of December, 1899, the contract was let to the 
I. P. Morris Company of Philadelphia. Work will at once pro- 
ceed upon the pump, and the apparatus will be in operation by 
February 1, 1902. 

During this year the division has begun to operate under the 
new eight-hour law. This will increase the labor of the division, 
and more money will have to be appropriated if the same amount 
of work is to be done with the present force of m£n. 

The equipment of the division is in first-class condition, and 
we are working on an average of 1,000 men per day. 

Stony Brook. 

At the close of the working season of 1898 the Stony-brook 
channel was completed from Boylston Station to the Back Bay 
Fens, with the exception of a short section in the old gate-house 
yard. Work on this section which had been suspended February 
9, 1899, was resumed March 6 by a small force from the South 
End yard, and by the middle of April the stone work for the fore- 
bay had been removed, and work on the conduit proper com- 
menced. This was pushed without interruption until it was com- 
pleted in August, making the conduit continuous from Boylston 
street to the Fens. 

The chief difficulty here — that of handling the brook water in 
the portion near Columbus avenue, where there was no chance to 
flume it around — was overcome by building a coffer-dam in three 
sections, fitting the lower end of the dam, as nearly as possible, 
to the inequalities of the rock bottom, then bolting the sections 
together- and filling between the walls of the dam with a stiff clay 
and running a double line of sand-bags around the bottom. The 
fourth side was formed by the ledge on the south side, and the 
dam successfully withstood two rain-storms which raised the water 
to a depth of nearly eight feet on the outside, an ordinary hand- 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 173 

pump being sufficient to keep the interior dry at all times. One 
side wall and about two-thirds in width of the bottom for a length 
of about thirty feet were built inside the dam ; also a wall run- 
ning lengthwise and about five feet high. .This dam was then 
removed, the water turned beyond the wall, and the rest of the 
bottom and the other side wall completed. 

Beyond this point the water was flumed around the work, as 
there was room to do so, and at the end section, the side away 
from the flume and a partition wall were first built,' the water 
turned through this part, as at the beginning, and the final con- 
nection made. 

While this work was going on the Legislature authorized 
a loan of $350,000 for the extension of the conduit south of 
Boylston street. Construction was commenced on this portion 
the last of June, and has been carried on up to the present by the 
department force. 

The first section of this work, between Boylston street and 
Boylston Station, was an extremely difficult piece to build on 
account of the railroad embankment on one side. It was carried 
through without accident by opening up the trench in short 
sections only. On account of the low elevation at which the 
established grade of many streets in West Roxbury has been 
fixed by the Board of Survey, it has been found necessary to 
lower the hydraulic gradient line for Stony brook considerably 
below that recommended by the Stony Brook Commissioners in 
their report of 1886, and the change in grade was made at 
Boylston avenue. 

A careful study was made of the problem of extending the 
Commissioners channel to the Hyde Park line, and it was deemed 
advisable to recommend the lowering of the grade of the brook 
and the division of the channel into two parts, in order to secure 
the same capacity upon a flatter hydraulic gradient. These 
recommendations were adopted, and the channel as designed in 
Boylston avenue (a channel 9 feet by 9 feet 6 inches) has been 
built as far as Cornwall street, where a temporary connection 
has been made with the old brook channel. A conduit of the 
same size as that below Boylston street, namely, 15 feet 6 inches 
by 17 feet has been designed to be built in the old channel of the 
brook, the 9 feet by 9 feet 6 inches channel being just large 
enough to make up the deficiency in the capacity of the former 
channel, due to the flattening of the hydraulic gradient. The 
turning of the brook through the temporary connection at Corn- 
wall street, thence into the 9 feet by 9 feet 6 inches channel in 
Boylston avenue has eliminated the problem of carrying the brook 
water from that portion of the old channel between Boylston 
avenue and Cornwall street, and work is now progressing on this 
part of the channel. 

The original design was to build the 9 feet by 9 feet 6 inches 
auxiliary channel the whole length of Boylston avenue, making 
the connection with the main channel at Green street, and this 
design may yet be carried out, or if the season and other con- 
ditions seem favorable a single channel may be built from 



174 City Document No. 38. 

Cornwall street up the old bed of the brook to G-reen street. In 
this case this channel would have to be 15^ feet by 20 feet. This 
question will be settled next summer when construction reaches 
Cornwall street. During the progress of the work the coming 
season additional surveys, borings, etc., should be made, and 
plans prepared for carrying the work on south of Green street, 
especially between G-reen and Washington streets, where consider- 
able difficulty will be encountered in securing an unobjectionable 
location for the conduit. The old channel of the brook from the 
Boston Belting Company's premises down to the Back Bay Fens 
should be rebuilt this coming year if possible, as the masonry of 
the channels is in such condition that a dangerous cave-in may 
be expected any time in the streets forming the roof of the 
channel. It is only a question of time when some serious 
accident will occur. Reports and estimates have been made 
upon this channel frequently, and a plan devised for rebuilding 
the old channel, and also providing house sewerage at the same 
time for all the buildings which abut upon this portion of the 
brook, and from which more or less pollution, almost unavoid- 
ably, finds its way into the brook channel. 

Sewer Legislation. 

Section 1. Section 1, of chapter 426 of the Acts of the year 
1897, as amended by chapter 257 of the Acts of the year 1898, is 
hereby further amended by striking out the whole of said section 
and inserting in place thereof , the following : Section 1. The board 
or boards authorized to make appropriations for the City of Boston, 
by a majority vote of the members of such board or boards, approved 
by the City Council of said city by the affirmative vote of two-thirds 
of all the members of each branch thereof, taken by a call of the 
yeas and nays, or, if there should be no such board or boards, then 
said City Council by such two-thirds vote, may annually appropri- 
ate, to be met by the issue of bonds as hereinafter provided, sums 
not exceeding $1,000,000 in any one year for constructing sewerage 
works in said city, and shall also appropriate, to be met by the 
annual income and taxes of said city, sums for maintaining and 
operating the sewerage works, and such sums as the Citj r Treasurer 
of said city shall each year determine to be the amount to be used 
for interest on the bonds issued for sewerage works, and also the 
amount to be used for the sinking-funds for bonds issued for sew- 
erage works, which with all other amounts so used, and their accu- 
mulations, will pay all such bonds at maturity; and there shall also 
be used for said sinking-funds all premiums received from the sale 
of said bonds, and all amounts received for breach of any contract 
for constructing sewerage works, or for securities deposited as 
security for making such contracts and declared to be forfeited to 
the city, or for sales of property. All sewers, drains, pumping sta- 
tions, and other works for the collection or disposal of sewage, or 
surface or ground water in said city shall be included in the term 
" sewerage work " as used in this act, and no such work shall here- 
after be constructed in said city, except under authority of this act, 
unless the same has been ordered to be constructed before the pas- 
sage thereof. 



Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 175 

Sect. 2. Section 5 of said chapter 426 is hereby amended by- 
inserting in the ninth line after the word " Middlesex " the word 
or for the County of Suffolk — and by inserting at the end of said 
section the words: In any case where a petition is filed by the 
Mayor in the County of Middlesex the cause shall be transferred 
to the County of Suffolk, if the owner, within thirty days after 
the filing of said petition shall file in the office of the Clerk of 
Courts for the County of Middlesex a statement in writing that 
he desires said cause to be tried in the County of Suffolk — so 
as to read as follows: Section 5. Said city shall pay all damages 
sustained by the owner of any land, water-course, right or easement 
taken by said Board, or injured in any manner, or by any person 
in doing any act or thing under section 4 of this act, the same to 
be agreed upon by said Board with the approval of the Mayor and 
said owner, and if they cannot agree the damages shall, on the 
petition of said owner or Mayor, be determined by a jury of the 
Superior Court for the County of Middlesex or for the County of 
Suffolk in the manner provided by law with respect to lands taken 
for highways in said city of Boston, and costs shall be taxed and 
execution issued in favor of the prevailing party as in civil cases. 
Any person whose water rights are thus taken or injured may apply 
as aforesaid within three years from the time of such taking or 
injury, and not afterwards. In any case where a petition is filed 
by the Mayor in the County of Middlesex the cause shall be trans- 
ferred to the County of Suffolk if the owner, within thiity days 
after the filing of said petition, shall file in the office of the Clerk of 
Courts for the County of Middlesex a statement in writing that he 
desires said cause to be tried in the County of Suffolk. 

Sect. 3. Section 7 of said chapter is hereby amended by striking 
out the whole of said section and inserting in place thereof the fol- 
io wing: Section 7. The Board of Street Commissioners of said 
city at any time within two years after any new sewer or drain for 
the collection or disposal of sewage or of surface or ground water is 
completed, shall assess upon the several estates especially benefited 
by such sewer or drain, a proportional part of the cost thereof, not 
exceeding in amount the sum of $4 per lineal foot. Any such as- 
sessment which shall be found to be invalid and is unpaid, or which 
shall have been recovered back, may be re-assessed by said Board to 
the amount for which, and to the person to whom, the original as- 
sessment ought to have been made. Every such re-assessment and 
every such original assessment shall be a lien upon the estate as- 
sessed or re-assessed for two years after such assessment or re-assess- 
ment, and shall be collected and paid into the city treasury in 
conformity with the provisions of sections 16 and 17 of chapter 323 of 
the Acts of the year 1891 , and acts in amendment thereof and addition 
thereto. Said Board may assess upon any estate heretofore or here- 
after connected with a public sewer a reasonable part of the cost of 
construction thereof; provided that no owner of the estate has paid 
for such sewer or has paid any assessment for its construction. 
Every such assessment may be revised and corrected by said Board 
of Street Commissioners and such assessments and revised and cor- 
rected assessments shall be subject to an appeal to the Superior 
Court in the manner provided for appeals from the Board of Assess- 
ors in the case of taxes, and they shall not be affected by the pro- 
visions of the statute requiring the filing of a list of estates liable to 
taxation as a pre-requisite to an appeal. 



176 City Document No. 38. 

Sect. 4. All votes heretofore passed by the City Council or by 
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment of the City of Boston 
under the provisions of chapter 426 of the Acts of the year 1897, 
and of chapter 257 of the Acts of the year 1898, authorizing the 
issue of bonds of said city for the construction of sewerage works, 
are hereby ratified and confirmed; and all bonds heretofore or here- 
after issued as authorized by said votes shall be legal obligations of 
said city, and the interest and sinking-fund requirements thereof 
shall be paid from the income and taxes of said city. The Treasurer 
of said city, upon request of the Mayor, shall issue bonds of said city 
outside the debt limit thereof, payable in five years from their date, 
to the amount required to repay all sewerage charges collected by 
said city under the provisions of section 7 of chapter 426 of the Acts of 
the year 1897, prior to the date thereof and use the proceeds of such 
bonds to repay said sewerage charges and for no other purpose. 
The Mayor of said city may authorize the transfer of an}>- loans or 
parts of any loans heretofore made or authorized, and not required 
to meet any contract, except loans for sewerage works, water-works 
or subways, to an amount not exceeding $350,000, to meet the ex- 
penses of operating and maintaining said sewerage works until the 
first day of February in the year 1900; and the Treasurer of said 
city shall thereupon hold the proceeds of the loans or parts of the 
loans so authorized, and use the same to meet said expenses. The 
Board of Assessors of said city shall include in the assessments of 
taxes, tax lists and warrants for the current year, in addition to the 
amounts already authorized to be inserted therein, the farther sum 
of $122,669.88, to meet the interest and sinking-fund requirements 
for the current year of the bonds for the construction of sewerage 
works, issued prior to said first day of Februaiy. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect on its passage. 

The following is the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court in 
the cases of J. Montgomery Sears, Joseph H. Beale and Frank 
Brewster et al., Trustees vs. the Board of Street Commissioners 
of Boston, regarding the constitutionality of the Sewer Assess- 
ment Statute (chapter 426) of 1897 : 

Knowlton, J. These are petitions for a writ of certiorari to 
quash an alleged illegal assessment of sewer charges upon prop- 
erty of the several petitioners. The law under which the respond- 
ent assumed to act in determining these charges is Statute 1897, 
chapter 426, of which sections 7 and 8 are as follows : 

Section 7. The Board of Street Commissioners with the ap- 
proval of the Mayor, shall annually, before the first day of July, 
determine just and equitable sewerage charges to be paid by estates 
in said city for the construction, maintenance and operation of the 
sewerage works, taking into consideration in determining the charges 
the necessity of the works as caused by each estate, the amount of 
use thereof, if any, by the estate or its occupants, the benefit re- 
ceived therefrom by the estate, the amount of any assessment for a 
sewer paid by any owner of the estate, the length of time which has 
elapsed since such payment, and the use, if any, that has heretofore 
been made of the sewerage works by the occupants of the estate, and 
such other matters as they shall deem just and proper. The deter- 
mination of such charges as aforesaid shall be final in all cases, and 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 177 

the amount thereof as determined for each estate shall be a lien 
thereon until paid, and said Board shall notify the Board of Assessors 
of said city of the amount thereof forthwith after it has been deter- 
mined, and the same shall be included in the next tax bill on the 
estate transmitted by said Board to the Collector, or in a tax bill 
therefor, if no other tax bill is issued for such estate, and be col- 
lected as part of the taxes on the estate. 

Section 8. All sewers and connections ordered to be made in 
constructing any way under the authority of chapter 323 of the Acts 
of the year 1891, and of acts in amendment thereof or addition 
thereto, shall be deemed to be constructed under the authority of 
this act, and the expenses therefor shall not be considered in deter- 
mining the assessable cost of the work to be assessed under the 
authority of said acts. 

The petitioners contend that these provisions of the statute 
are unconstitutional, and the most important questions in the 
cases arise on this contention. 

It is evident that these provisions cannot stand as authorizing 
an assessment of a general tax, because the assessment called for 
is not proportional and equal. The statute not only directs an 
assessment upon a particular class of property, instead of on all 
taxable property, but it expressly requires in determining the 
charges the consideration of facts pertaining to particular estates 
in their relation to the charges, and to previous assessments, 
which prevent the making of a proportional assessment, viewing 
it as a general tax, and not as an assessment of benefits. 

If we treat the determination of these charges as a local and 
special assessment upon particular estates we have to consider the 
principles on which such taxation is founded. It is well estab- 
lished that taxation. of this kind is permissible under the consti- 
tution of this Commonwealth and under the constitution of the 
United States only when founded upon special and peculiar 
benefits to the property from the expenditure on account of which 
the tax is laid, and then only to an amount not exceeding such 
special and peculiar benefits. City of Boston vs. Boston and 
Albany Railroad Company, 170 Mass. 95 101 ; Weed vs. Boston, 
172 Mass. 28; Proprietors of Mount Auburn Cemetery vs. City 
of Cambridge, 150 Mass. 12-14 ; Village of Norwood vs. Baker, 
19 Sup. Ct. 187; Sears vs. Aldermen of Boston, 53 N. E. Eep. 
138. Several of the questions now before us were considered in 
length in the recent case last cited, and it is unnecessary to repeat 
the discussion of them. 

Does this statute prescribe taxation upon these estates for 
special and peculiar benefits only ; or does it purport to authorize 
taxation on other grounds than special benefits, and for amounts 
larger than the amounts of such benefits? 

It directs the Street Commissioners annually to " determine 
just and equitable sewer charges to be paid by estates in said 
city," etc. It requires them to take into consideration several 
subjects in determining these charges, one of which is the benefit 
received by the estate, and others of which possibly have some 



178 City Document No. 38. 

relation to the benefit received, and it then authorized them to 
consider " such other matters as they shall deem just and proper." 

The benefits to be considered in taxing each estate are not in 
terms those that are special and peculiar, but so far as the lan- 
guage goes may be those that it receives in common with the 
other estates in the city, and with the inhabitants generally. The 
fact that the charges to be determined are for the construction, 
maintenance and operation of the sewerage works of the whole 
city gives some force to the possibility of a construction which 
includes all benefits ; but whether this construction should be 
adopted or not the charges may be determined on any grounds 
which the Street Commissioners deemed just and proper, and may 
not be founded in any great degree, if at all, upon special and 
peculiar benefits, and may in any particular case largely exceed 
such benefits. 

This fact in itself is enough to bring the statute within the pro- 
hibition of the constitution, inasmuch as it purports to authorize a 
taking of property to pay a charge which is not founded on a 
special benefit or equivalent received by the estate or its owner. 
Such a taking would be without due process of law. Village of 
Norwood vs. Baker, 19 Sup. Ct. 187 ; New Brunswick Rubber 
Company vs. Commissioners of Streets, 9 Vroom, 190; Barnes 
vs. Dyer, 56 Vt. 469 ; Thomas vs. Gain, 35 Mich. 155. 

The general tenor of this section seems at variance with the 
law in regard to special taxation. It seems designed to group 
together a great variety of expenses, including all that are con- 
nected -with the administration of the Sewer Department in the 
city of Boston, many of which are proper subjects for general 
taxation only, and to assess them all upon real estate. 

In determining the charge to be made upon any particular es- 
tate, it is clear that most of the expenses to be reimbursed would 
be found to have been incurred in ways that could bring no spe- 
cial or peculiar benefit to that estate. The cost of constructing 
and maintaining sewers remote from it could confer no benefit. 
In two of these cases it appears by averments of the petition, 
which are not denied in the answer, that, the estates of the peti- 
tioner have previously paid special assessments made by the city 
for the construction of sewers into which the estates drain, and in 
one of them it appears, in like manner, that no sewers have been 
constructed under the Statute of 1897, chapter 426, and no re- 
pairs made under the provisions of said act upon sewers already 
existing, with which the estates of the petitioner have or can have 
any connection, or from the use of which said estates derive any 
benefit. "Where lands have paid assessments for special benefits 
from the construction of all sewers by whose operation they are 
affected, it cannot be said that they receive an additional special 
and peculiar benefit from the general oversight and operation of 
the sewers of Boston such as to subject them to a second special 
assessment. Expenses of this kind should be made the subject 
of general taxation. The grouping of these various expenses 
would seem to make it difficult, if not impracticable, under this 



Stkeet Depaetment — Sewer Division. 179 

statute, to make assessments of special and peculiar benefits di- 
rectly received by particular estates from the construction of 
sewers near them. Indeed, it appears from the testimony that 
the Street Commissioners did not attempt to make assessments in 
accordance with the principles recognized as correct by the 
courts. 

They adopted a scheme, and applied it to the estates generally 
throughout the city, by which they charged, as a special tax, 
three and one-half cents per hundred dollars of valuation of the 
land, exclusive of buildings, together with one-half of the charge 
made for the use of water on the estate, with certain deductions 
from the charge for the use of water where the use was of a pe- 
culiar kind, like the manufacture of steam. This item of three 
and one-half cents per hundred dollars of valuation of land was 
made up of one and one-half cents per hundred dollars for gen- 
eral construction, which means construction in any part of the 
system of sewers, and two cents per hundred dollars for general 
maintenance, which means the expense of salaries, care of the 
sewers, coal and other things pertaining to the management and 
operation of the system. 

That such expenses are proper subjects for general taxation, 
and not for special assessments, has often been decided. Ham- 
mett vs. Philadelphia, 65 Penn St. 146 ; Washing Avenue, 69 
Penn St. 352 ; Appeal of City of Willi amsport, 41 Atl. Rep. 476 ; 
Dietz vs. Neenah, 91 Wis. 422-427; Dyar vs. Farmington, 70 
Me. 527 ; Hansom vs. Omaha, 11 Neb. 37. 

In Erie vs. Russell, 148 Penn. St. 384, the Court says : 

" Why should a sewer, demanded and constructed by the city, and 
paid for by assessments on the property fronting on the street under 
which it is laid, be maintained and reconstructed, on the order of the 
municipality, at the expense of such property ? It was made by the 
action of the city a part of its system of sewerage, which is as neces- 
sary for the health of its people as its paved streets are for their use. 
Its construction was at the expense of the abutting property, and 
properly so, in discharge of the obligation arising from particular 
benefits conferred. It is now a constituent of the general system 
ordained by the city for the convenience and health of its inhabi- 
tants. This system confers benefits which are general. It is a pub- 
lic necessity, and the expense of maintaining it should be provided 
for by general taxation." [See Child vs. Boston, 4 Allen, 41-52; 
Emery vs. Lowell, 104 Mass. 13-16. 

In Sears vs. Aldermen of Boston, this court held, with some 
hesitation, that watering streets, which before the passage of a 
statute on the subject, was generally done at the expense of the 
abutters, conferred a direct and special benefit upon abutting 
property occupied for business or residence. Some other Courts 
have held to the contrary. See City of Chicago vs. Blair, 149, 
111, 310; New York Life Insurance Co. vs. Prost, 71 Fed. Rep, 
1815. But in that case the relation of the expenditure to the 
abutting property was very different from that of the expenditure 
for salaries and other expenses of maintaining a sewer department 



180 City Document No. 38. 

to property whose owners have previously paid assessments for 
the special benefits to be received from the use of the sewers. In 
assessing such benefits when the sewers were constructed it was 
assumed that the sewers would be kept in operation for the ben- 
efit of the public, and that owners of property assessed would 
only be called upon to contribute as general taxpayers their prop- 
erty share of the expenses of operating them. It is probable that 
most estates which drain into sewers in Boston were specially as- 
sessed when the sewers were constructed. Because the statute 
purports to give the Street Commissioners power to levy special 
assessments on real estate upon other grounds than the receipt of 
special benefits, and for expenditures which, as against such prop- 
erty, are not proper subjects for special taxation, we are of the 
opinion that the statute is unconstitutional. 

It is also contended by the petitioners that the statute gives 
owners of property no opportunity of being heard upon their 
liability to assessment. It is well established that the determina- 
tion of the amount of taxes for special benefits to real estate by 
any tribunal to which the Legislature delegates the power is a 
quasi judicial proceeding, which cannot take final effect unless 
persons to be assessed have an opportunity to be heard. New 
London Northern Railroad Company vs. Boston and Albany Rail- 
road Company, 102 Mass. 386 ; Parsons vs.- District of Columbia, 
170 U. S. 45, 52, 54; Hagar vs. Reclamation District, 111 U. S. 
701-709 ; Falbrook Irrigation District vs. Bradley, 164 U. S. 
112-175 ; Stuart vs. Palmer, 74 N. Y. 189 ; Remson vs. Wheeler, 
105 N. Y. 573 ; matter of Trustees of Union College, 129 N. Y. 
308 ; Dietz vs. Neenah, 91 Wis. 422-427 ; Butler vs. Supervisors, 
26 Mich. 22 ; Thomas vs. Gunn, 35 Mich. 135 ; Campbell vs. 
Diggins, 83 Ind. 473 ; Ulman vs. Baltimore, 72 Md. 587. But 
if a party has a right to appeal, or to be heard upon an application 
for an abatement, it is sufficient. Weed vs. Boston, 172 Mass. 
28 ; Palmer vs. McMahon, 133 U. S. 660 ; County of Redwood 
vs. Winona, etc. Company, 40 Minn. 512. See also Sawyer vs. 
State Board of Health, 125 Mass. 186 ; Philadelphia vs. Miller, 
49 Penn. St. 400; Cleveland vs. Tripp, 13 R. I. 50. 

This statute makes no express provision for a notice or a 
hearing. It declares that "the determining of such charges as 
aforesaid (that is, by the Street Commissioner) shall be final in 
all cases," and provides for a notification of the determination 
to the Board of Assessors, and for the collection of the amount 
as a tax. In view of this language it is difficult to see how the 
statute gives by implication an opportunity to be heard at any 
stage of the proceedings. But, as we hold this section of the 
statute unconstitutional on other grounds, it is unnecessary to 
determine this question. In each case the order must be, writ of 
certiorari to issue. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 1.81 



Financial Statement. 

By the enactment of chapter 450, of the Acts of 1899, on 
June 1, 1899, the assessments for construction of sewers were 
obliged to be made on a new basis, and this division was 
required to furnish the data for all construction made since May 
22, 1897. 

This work has been carried on with the regular force and in 
connection with the regular work of the main office, and to date 
the Street Commissioners have been furnished plans giving all 
information for the assessment of 170,370 feet of sewers, costing 
$613,580. 

Bills for sewer assessments, amounting to $1,421.86, have 
been deposited for collection, representing those estates assessed 
under chapter 456 of the Acts of 1889, and amendments thereto, 
which have been connected with the public sewers during the 
year. 

There remain on the books of this division, at 5 per cent, 
interest, $23,126.51, representing the assessments under the 
Acts of 1889, and amendments thereto, for those estates which 
have not been connected with the sewers for which they were 
assessed, and bills for which will be deposited for collection as 
the connections are made. This sum represents about 17.4 per 
cent, of the total assessments made under those acts. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $4,641.80 have been collected 
from estates upon which no sewer assessment was ever paid, in 
accordance with chapter 38, section 10, of the Revised Ordi- 
nances. 

Three thousand three hundred and eighty-one (3,381) permits 
have been issued to licensed drain-layers to make connections 
with the public sewers, and the work done under these permits 
has been inspected, and a record of the same made on the plans 
of this division, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 38, 
sections 6 and 10 of the Revised Ordinances of 1898. 

The following tables and statements will show the amount of 
money expended and work done during the year : 



182 



City Document No. 38. 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



183 



OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURE. 



Street Department, Sewer Division. 

Improved Sewerage Maintenance. 



Pumping-station, inside 




$53,059 56 


Pumping-station, outside 




13,999 54 


Engines and boilers 




990 76 


Main and intercepting sewers 




16,582 05 


Moon Island ..... 




11,468 50 


Laying telephone cable to Pump- 






ing-station 




239 80 


Towboat 


$9,575 68 




Less paid by Sanitary Division 


5,196 55 









4,379 13 
$100,719 34 



Pumping Station, Forest-avenue Section, Dorchester. 
Maintenance 7,888 85 

Stony Brook. 

Maintenance $8,643 08 

Watching weirs 1,147 87 

9,790 95 



Miscellaneous Maintenance Charges 

Office expenses, Administration, Permit and 

Assessment Offices, including salaries . 
Office expenses and salaries, Engineering Office, 

not included elsewhere .... 
Current expenses of yards and lockers 
Current expenses of stables, including cost of 

horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc. . . . $36,402 51 
Less amount earned by department teams . 15,936 58 



Repairing catch-basins 

Repairing*sewers 

Cleaning and flushing sewers 

Cleaning catch-basins 

Repairing streets 

Repairing and cleaning culverts and surface 
drains not included in the Stony-brook sys- 
tem ......... 

Examining condition of sewers and catch- 
basins ........ 

Work for departments and others 

House connections ...... 

Damages and claims 

Holidays 

Travelling and incidental expenses . 

Repairing department buildings, stables and 
yards 

General repairs 

Hardware, tools and blacksmithing . 

Rubber goods 

General supplies ....... 

Carried forward 



23,598 32 

21,876 24 
32,590 54 



20,465 93 

8,968 57 

6,744 51 

12,121 69 

36,212 45 

967 18 



2,380 15 



7,840 42 


248 12 


5,213 73 


416 05 


9,608 35 


3,148 57 


1,724 09 


1,866 92 


5,142 49 


2,863 34 


1,884 27 


$324,281 07 



184 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward 
New catch-basins: 
South Boston . 
East Boston 
Brighton . 
West Boxbury 
Dorchester 
Koxbury . 
City Broper 



Engines and boilers and repairs 

New manholes 

Betterments and assessments . 

Sewers rebuilt and repaired from maintenance 

D and Anchor streets outlet . 

B street outlet . . . . 

Salt Creek sewer . . . . 

Huntington avenue sewer . . . 

BroAvning-avenue sewer .... 

Talbot-avenue relief sewer 

Ashley-avenue sewer .... 

Havre-street sewer 

Centre-street relief sewer 

Lauriat avenue connection, Board of Survey 
street . 

Montview street connection, sewer and cul 
vert 

Ventilators, Chelsea and Bope streets . 



Telephones, not included elsewhere . 



Less decrease in stock at yards 





f 324,281 07 


$700 23 




660 68 




1,607 90 




563 91 




4,819 24 




2,390 33 




4,517 09 




■ 


15,259 38 




400 80 




731 24 




665 99 


$305 95 




180 27 




522 53 




385 17 




217 29 




2,314 60 




1,135 28 




1,109 29 




160 50 




104 75 




16 77 




289 78 






6,742 18 






1,043 50 



Total maintenance . 



$349,124 16 
1,990 52 

$347,133 64 



Sewerage Works. 
Improved Sewerage Construction. 



Bumping-station, new coal run .... 
Bumping-station, partition around electric light 

engine ........ 

Bumping-station, engine-house floor 

Bumping-engines 

Air-pumps ........ 

Moon Island reservoir . 

Moon Island, sea-wall 

Moon Island, repairing damage caused by storm 

of November 27, 1898 

Moon Island, engineering expenses, including 

salaries ........ 

Main and intercepting sewers, stock . 



$577 71 

958 19 

S,630 75 

51,300 10 

250 00 

163,037 25 

13,664 17 

4,447 79 

9,686 48 
1,304 59 



$253,S57 03 



Sewer Construction. 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . 
Boxbury 
City . 



Carried forward 



As per tables on pages 189 to 225. 

$33,938 17 

39,573 55 

15,878 96 

130,557 70 

54,237 71 

309, S37 15 

63,944 96 

62,324 36 



710,292 56 
$964,149 59 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



185 



Brought forward $964,149 59 

Miscellaneous Construction Charges. 
Office expenses, Administration, Permit and 

Assessment offices, including salaries . . $22,525 92 
Office expenses, Engineering office, including 

salaries 64,233 81 

Holidays on construction work .... 19,202 64 

"Work for departments and others . . . 2,863 62 

Damages and claims 894 07 

Engines and boilers 106 62 

Rubber goods 1,563 32 

General supplies ...... 1,688 88 

Hardware, tools and blacksmithing . . . 6,262 83 

New manholes 276 63 

Sundries, incidentals and travelling expenses . 4,067 94 
Preliminary advertising on construction not 

yet begun 27 39 



123,713 67 

$1,087,863 26 
Less water charged off to sewer construction . 969 93 

Total, sewerage works $1,086,893 33 

Stony Brook Improvement. 
Building conduit between Columbus avenue and gate-house, $31,392 60 

Building conduit, Boylston avenue 142,933 35 

Engineering salaries and expenses, office rent, etc. . . 16,297 33 
Holidays 7,568 61 

Total $198,191 89 



RECAPITULATION. 

Street Department, Sewer Division . 
Sewerage works ....... 

Stony brook improvement .... 

Stony brook improvement, chapter 397, Acts 

of 1899 ........ 151,518 65 



5,673 24 



$347,133 64 
1,086,893 33 



198,191 89 
$1,632,218 86 

Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months Ending January 31, 

1900. 



District. 



Built by the 

City by 
Contractor 
Day Labor. 



Built by 
Private 
Parties. 



Total length 

built 

during the 

VI months 

ending 

Jan. 31, 1900. 



City Proper . . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown. . 
South Boston. . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . . 
Brighton 

Total 



Feet. 

3,596.27 

5,148.87 

668.18 

1,943.30 

8,909.26 

10,301.08 

45,509.46 

'23,695.73 



99,772.15 



Feet. 
551.52 



797.04 
188 . 10 

1,944.69 

899.61 

11,594.84 

1,979.25 



17,955.05 



Feet. 

4,147.79 

5,148.87 

1,465.22 

2,131.40 

10,853.95 

11,200.69 

57,104.30 

25,674.98 



117,727.20 



186 City Document No. 38. 

Summary of Sewer Construction, for Five Years, Previous to February 1, 1900. 





1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


Built by the city by con- 
tract or by day labor — 

Built by private parties . . . 


Feet. 
139,200.09 
36,287.35 


Feet. 

116,008.25 

37,825.92 


Feet. 
134,324.93 

38,969.14 


Feet. 
203,139.68 
9,325.99 


Feet. 
99,772.15 
17,955.05 


Total number of feet 
built 


175,487.44 


153,834.17 


173,294.07 


212,465.67 


117,727.20 







Schedule of Sewers Built to Date in the City of Boston, February 1, 1900. 



Total length 
built during 

the 12 months 

ending 
Jan. 31, 1900. 



Length rebuilt 

and aban- 
doned during 
the 12 months 

ending 
Jan. 31, 1900. 



Additional length for 
12 months ending 
Jan. 31, 1900. 



City Proper . . . 

East Boston 

Charlestown. . . 
South Boston.. 
Roxbury. . . — 
West Roxbury. 
Dorchester . ... . 
Brighton 



Feet. 
4,147.79 

5,148.87 

1,465 22 

2,131.40 

10,853.95 

11,200.69 

57,104.30 

25,674.98 



Feet. 
1,S13.00 

231.00 

797.04 

510.40 

619.22 

124.00 

344.65 



Feet. 
2,334.79 

4,917.87 
668.18 

1,621.00 
10,234.73 
11,076.69 
56,759.65 
25,674.98 



Totals. 



117,727.20 



113,287.89 



Length built previous to January 31, 1899. 



Total . 



Length of intercepting sewer. 
Total .' 



Miles. 
0.44 

0.93 

0.13 

0.31 

1.94 

2.10 

10.75 

4.86 



21.46 



489.20 
510.66 



Catch-basins built, February 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900. 



Day Labor. Contract. 



Total. 



City Proper. . . 

Roxbury 

Dorchester. . . . 
West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Charlestown . . 
East Boston . . . 
South Boston . 



45 
13 

111 
1 
49 
3 
9 
9 



2 

4 

128 

24 

16 



47 

17 

237 

25 

65 

3 

9 

9 



Totals 



240 



172 



412 



826,138 linear feet sewers flushed. 

826 cubic yards material removed from sewers. 

6,953 catch-basins cleaned; 21,110 cubic yards removed. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



187 



Main Drainage Station. 

Report of sludge received in and removed from the Deposit 
Sewer, for twelve months ending January 31, 1900 : 



1899. 


Received. 


1899. 


Removed. 


April 

May 


930 cubic yards. 

900 " " 
1,450 " " 
1,308 " " 
1,417 " 

740 " 

931 " " 
815 " " 
876 " 

222 " 
973 " 

1,449 " 


February .... 
March 

May 

July. 

August 

September... 

November .. . 
December. . . 

1900. 


510 cubic yards. 

850 " " 
680 " ' " 
680 " " 


June 


765 " " 

680 " 

680 " " 
1,064 " " 

595 . " " 

935 " " 
1,105 " " 

680 " 


July 


August 

September . . . 

October 

November 

December .... 

1900. 




12,011 cubic yards. 




9,224 cubic yards. 



Property in Charge of the Sewer Division. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, at 678 Albany street, South End. 

Sewer yard, with building, on North Grove street, West End. 

Sewer yard, on Gibson street, Dorchester, with buildings. 
This is Gibson School-fund land. The buildings were erected by 
the Sewer Department. 

Sewer yard, on Columbus avenue, Roxbury. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Rutherford avenue, Charles- 
town. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Chelsea street, East Boston. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Massachusetts avenue, near 
Albany street, South End. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Western avenue, Brighton. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, on Revere street, West End. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, Old Harbor and Ninth streets, 
South Boston. 

Sewer yard, with buildings, Child and South streets, West 
Roxbury. 

Land and buildings at pumping-station, Old Harbor Point, 
with roadway (Mt. Vernon street). 

Land, buildings and reservoirs at Moon Island and Squantum. 



188 



City Document No. 38. 









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203 



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204 



City Document No. 38. 



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205 



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206 



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207 



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208 



City Document No. 38. 



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209 



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210 



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53 

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215 



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216 



City Document No. 88. 





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217 



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218 



City Document No. 38. 



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Street Department — Sewer Division. 



219 



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Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 229 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE STREET-CLEANTNO DIVISION. 



921, 922, 923 Tremont Building, 

Boston, February 1, 1900. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets, City Hall, Boston: 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith the annual 
report of the Street-Cleaning Division of the Street Department, 
for the financial year ending January 31, 1900. 

The regular work of the division has been enlarged in scope by 
cleaning many of the macadamized streets of the Dorchester and 
Brighton Districts, and the care of the public alleys laid out under 
chapter 298 of the Acts of 1898. This work in itself is an added 
expense to the division. 

During the year two police officers have been detailed by the 
Police Board at the suggestion of the Superintendent of Streets for 
special duty pertaining to the enforcement of the rules of the Board 
of Health and City Ordinances. The officers have rendered excel- 
lent service, resulting in a more cleanly condition in congested 
sections, although this result was partly obtained through the con- 
viction of one hundred and fifty-two persons in the Municipal Court, 
paying in fines the amount of §610.01. 

The headquarters of the push-cart patrol system have again been 
moved to commodious and cheerful quarters on Columbus avenue. 
It was very necessary to have some sort of a station in this, the' 
central part of the city, on account of the large number of tools 
that were required down-town during the snow season. It is 
admirably adapted for the use of the push-cart patrol men, and has 
been made a sort of base of supplies for distribution of tools and 
material to adjacent districts. 

A new street-cleaning district has been established in East Boston, 
and is now in thorough running order, giving the much desired and 
needed service. 

A new district should be established in Dorchester, as at the 
present time the Paving Division is not able to cope with the paving 
work and do the street-cleaning also. While it has been possible to 
send the South Boston force to care for the paved streets in Dor- 
chester, in doing this the service in South Boston has suffered to 
some extent. 

The stables in charge of this division are in a dilapidated condi- 
tion, especially at the West Yard and in South Boston. As it is 



230 



City Document No. 38. 



probable tbat we will soon move from the South Boston stables now 
leased by the city no renovation should be undertaken, but the 
wooden stables at the "West Yard should be put in good condition as 
soon as possible. 

The shops at the South Yard should be equipped with modern 
machinery and facilities for steam and electric power. The work- 
ing equipment of the stables is in good order and needs only slight 
additions. 

The hand-sweeping force has accomplished all that was expected 
of it, and should be further extended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joshua Atwood, 3d, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Financial Statement. 

Appropriation, 1899-1900 $315,000 00 

Revenue, Boston Elevated Railway Company . 137 88 

Transferred from Surplus Revenue .... 7,813 27 

Total amount of appropriation . . . . 8322,951 15 

Total amount of expenditures .... 8322,951 15 



Objects of Expenditures 

Superintendence 

Salary of Superintendent 

Office pay-rolls . 

Stationery . 

Printing 

Board of horses, not mentioned elsewhere 

Telephone service ..... 



83,000 00 
4,560 42 
268 27 
602 89 
765 88 
566 49 







89,763 95 




Cleaning Streets. 




Including Cost 


of Sweeping, Loading and Removal 


of Street Dirt. 


District 1. 


South Boston 


$16,075 73 


Districts 2-3. 


East Boston and Charlestown . 


12,360 63 


District 2. 


East Boston 


221 39 


District 7. 


Roxbury '. 


13,349 93 


District 8. 


South End: 






Day gang ...... 


13,292 69 




Night gang 


37,940 75 


District 9. 


Back Bay ...... 


6,266 07 


District 10. 


West End and North End 
of cleaning streets . 


19,363 47 


Total cost 


$118,870 66 



On December 26, 1899, East Boston, whose main thoroughfares 
had, up to that time, been cared for by the Charlestown force, 
became a separate district, in charge of -a foreman and seven laborers. 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 231 



Hand Sweeping. 

District 10. West End and North End, 

Bag carriers and push carts ...... $19 437 03 

Piling dirt 2^252 89 

Snow work, not mentioned elsewhere . . . 5,083 33 

Teaming, patrolling, helpers 3,843 75 

Dump 509 63 

Miscellaneous ........ 87 10 

Superintendence . . . . . . . 1,454 94 

$32,668 67 

The district covered by the Hand Sweeping Force represents an 
area of 200,166 square yards of granite and asphalt pavement. 



Cleaning Gutters. 

Including Cost of Sweeping, Loading and Bemoval of Street Dirt. 



District 

Districts 

District 

District 

District 


1. 
2-3. 

2. 
7. 
8. 


District 
District 


9. 

10. 



South Boston . 

East Boston and Charlestown 

East Boston 

Boxbury .... 

South End: 

Day gang 

Night gang . 
Back Bay 
West End and North End 



Total cost of cleaning gutters 

Total length of gutters cleaned, 3,201.18 miles. 
Average cost per mile (including pro rata cost of 
dump) $6.27. 

Cost of Maintaining Dumps. 
District 1. South Boston . 
Districts 2-3. East Boston and Charlestown 
District 2. East Boston 
District 7. Koxbury . 
District 8. South End: 

Day gang . . • . 

Night gang . 
District 9. Back Bav .... 
District 10. West End and North End 



$2,466 46 

4,728 85 

47 94 

5,307 75 

3,282 55 

163 61 

4,441 45 



$20,438 61 



Total cost of dumps 



. $521 85 


516 


60 


494 


73 


511 


36 


549 10 


. 439 


43 


526 


75 


$3,559 82 



232 



City Document No. 38. 



Removing Snow. 
Including Labor on Crossings, in Streets, Carting of Snoiv, etc. 



District 


1. 


South Boston ..... 


SI ,256 64 


Districts 


2-3. 


East Boston and Charleston u . 


1,857 17 


District 


2. 


East Boston 


341 02 


District 


7. 


Boxbury . . 


3,169 43 


District 


8. 


South End: 








Day gang ..... 


1,862 56 






Night gang ..... 


10,886 95 


District 


9. 


Back Bay ...... 


2,855 48 


District 


10. 
1 cost. 


West End and North End 

(See Hand Sweeping and Crossings), 


4,556 27 


Tota 


$26,785 52 



Miscellaneous Work. 

This shows the cost of such work as may not be characterized the 
same in all districts. 

Including Miscellaneous Work, Sweeping and Carting of 
Leaves, etc. 

South Boston . 
East Boston and Charlestown 
East Boston 
Boxbury . 
South End: 
Day gang 
Night gang . 
9. Back Bay. 
10. West End and North End 



Patrolling by Districts. 

This Includes the Cost of Picking Tip and the Removal af Refuse 
Papers, etc., from the Streets. 

Cost of paper patrol $922 60 

Push-Cart Patrol System. 

Superintendence, inspection, etc. .... $3,938 17 

Push-carts, including labor and teaming . . . 30,004 45 



District 

Districts 

District 

District 

District 


1. 
2-3. 

2. 

7. 
8. 


District 
District 
Brighton 


9. 
10. 


Total cost 



$217 


•21 


784 72 


2 


10 


538 


76 


. " . 270 


78 


490 


62 


734 


82 


153 


92 


708 


58 


$3,901 


01 



Total cost 



$33,942 62 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 233 



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20,247 97 

612 45 
22,860 60 
19,219 94 
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14,736 75 
24,600 41 

708 58 
32,668 67 
3,929 28 

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33,942 62 


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234 



City Document No. 38. 



Stable and Yard Expenses. 
Including the cost of the South End, West End, Boxbury, South 

Boston, Charlestown and East Boston Stables, as follows: 
Superintendence of stables ...... $1,361 56 

Labor, including the cost of feeders, hostlers, broom- 
makers, watchmen, yardmen, messenger, etc. . . 21,100 58 
Cart and carriage repairs ...... 6,082 74 

Harness repairs . . ... . . . . 1,065 86 

Horseshoeing 2,856 90 

Sweeping machine repairs ...... 2,975 78 

Stable and shed repairs ...... 552 44 

Street-car tickets and ferry-passes . . . . 550 00 

Tool repairs . . . . . . . . 121 54 

Veterinary services and medicine ..... 910 20 

Board and care of horses, not mentioned elsewhere .... 346 37 

Hay and grain in stock and paid for .... 700 32 

Total $3S,624 29 



Stock Account. 
Broom stock purchased 
Carts and carriages purchased 
Harnesses and horse furnishings purchased 
Horses purchased .... 

Tools purchased ..... 

Bag carriers, etc. ..... 

Patrol stock and maintenance of same . 
Total . . .:' 



Miscellaneous. 
Holidays ......... 

Scow (cost of disposal at sea of 32,658 loads of street 

dirt) 

Sundries . . . . ■ 
Royalty on sweeping machines 
Annuity ..... 
Repairs, Old Public Library Building 
Repairs, Patrol System Station, 95 Columbus avenue, 
Total 



84,041 17 

320 00 

492 76 

3,450 50 

684 29 

17 20 

2,165 75 

811,171 67 



$16,560 52 


5,178 


32 


2,747 


42 


600 


00 


300 


00 


126 


21 


118 


96 



$25,631 43 



General Recapitulation of Expenses. 
Superintendence . 
Cleaning streets . 
Hand sweeping 
Cleaning gutters . 
Maintaining dumps 
Removal of snow and ice 
Miscellaneous work 
Cleaning crossings 
Paper patrol . 
Cleaning public alleys . 
Patrol system, push-carts 
Stable and yard expenses 
Stock account 
Miscellaneous 



$9,763 


95 


118,870 


66 


32,668 


67 


20,438 


61 


3,559 


82 


26,785 


52 


3,901 


01 


3,929 


28 


922 


60 


118 


73 


33,942 


62 


38,624 


29 


11,171 


67 


25,631 


43 



$330,328 86 



Street Department— Street Cleaning Division. 235 



Of the above amount, the sum of $2,164.64 was paid bv other 
departments and divisions for work done ; and in March one week's 
pay-roll, amounting to $5,213.07, was charged to the Paving Division 
Appropriation for the Removal of Snow, thus making the net ex- 
S e g5115 thiS divisi0n ' as showu iu the financial statement, 

Income. 
Amount of the bills deposited with the City Collector 

during the financial year ending January 31,1900, $7,683 50 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in each 
District, Exclusive of Supervision and Other Expenses. 



Districts. 



Miles 
of Streets 
Cleaned. 



Cost of 
Cleaning. 



Pro Rata 

Cost 
of Dump. 



1 

2-3 

2 

( Day gang 
( Night gan 

9 

10 ' 



1,328.97 

1,107.40 

21.42 

904.04 
1,207.77 
4,948.52 

482.57 
2,049.74 



12,050.43 



816,075 73 
12,360 63 
221 39 
13,349 93 
13,292 69 
37,940 75 
6,266 07 
19,363 47 



$452 41 
373 64 



Total Cost. 



Cost 
per 
Mile. 



353 97 
410 29 
546 72 
257 15 
526 75 



$118,870 66 



$2,920 93 



$16,528 14 
12,734 27 
221 39 
13,703 90 
13,702 98 
38.4S7 47 
6,523 22 
19,890 22 



$12 43 
11 49 

10 33 
15 15 

11 34 
7 77 

13 51 
9 70 



$121,791 59 



S ute V rvfs!o e n, C $l S S.ir r "^ ° f Cl6aning Stl ' eetS in ei ^ ht district *> exclusive of 

Table showing the Cost per Mile of Cleaning the Streets in 
each District, Including Supervision, Labor, Yard and Stable 
expenses. 



Districts. 



3(3 



1 

2-3 

2 

7 

(Day gang.. 
( Night gang 

9 

10 



1,328.97 

1,107.40 

21.42 

904 04 
1,207.77 
4,948.52 

482.57 
2,049.74 



12,050.43 



$16,528 14 
12,734 27 
221 39 
13,703 90 
13,702 98 
38,487 47 
6,523 22 
19.S90 22 



$121,791 59 



S^'P 



$649 25 
500 24 
8 71 
538 33 
538 30 
1,511 89 
256 26 
781 35 



<_ wo 



$4,784 33 



$2,985 04 
2,299 85 
39 98 
2,474 97 
2,474 79 
6,950 93 
1,178 12 
3,592 22 



$21,995 90 



$20,162 43 
15,534 36 
270 08 
16,717 20 
16,716 07 
46,950 29 
7,957 60 
24,263 79 






$148,571 82 



$15 17 
14 02 

12 60 
18 49 

13 84 
9 48 

16 49 
11 83 



su^vTsLVettfl^ 116 ° f CleaDing thG Stl ' eetS in ei S ht distrlcts - lnclu *ng 



236 



City Document No. 38. 



Table showing the Number of Loads of Street=dirt Removed. 



Districts. 


Number of 
loads of dirt 
removed. 


Cost per load of 
cleaning streets 
and removing 
to dumps, in- 
cluding fore- 
man's superin- 
tendence. 


1 


23,738 

12,978 

221 

14,497 

9,947 
20,377 

6,605 
11,162 


$0 78 


2-3 


1 31 


9 


1 22 


7 


1 28 


« { Dav gang 


1 66 


1 Night gang 


1 86 


9 


1 62 


10 


1 73 








99,525 

7,177 
5,900 


Barrel and bag 
loads. 


Removed by hand-sweeping force 


107,057 

92,449 

7,347 


Removed by push-cart, patrol system 

Removed by district push-carts 


Removed by paper patrol 


139 








Totals 


112,741 


206,853 






Total number of cart-loads removed 
Total number of barrel and bag loads remo 


ved 


112,741 
206,853 



Thirty-two thousand six hundred and fifty-eight loads of this 
dirt (or 28 per cent.) were delivered at the dumping-scow, the tow- 
ing of which to sea cost sixteen cents per load. 

Public Waste-Barrels. 

Total number of waste-barrels emptied ..... 16,527 

Total number of subway barrels emptied . . . . 1,8S2 

18,409 

Force Employed. 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Office clerk 1 

Office messengers 2 

Office boy 1 

Employees in the division, not including the above . . 373 

Entire force ' 378 

Average force employed during the year .... 371 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 237 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE STREET WATERING DIVISION. 



440-441 Tremont Building, 

Boston, February 1, 1900. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets: 

Dear Sir, — I herewith respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Street Watering Division for the year ending January 31, 1900 : 

Street sprinkling was commenced on March 30 in the Back 
Bay, and in all other sections April 15, and continued uninterrupt- 
edly until November 30. From November 30 up to date some work 
has been done in the Back Bay and City Proper as weather per- 
mitted. 

The weather was exceptionally dry during the year, a fact attested 
by the working of carts on 205 days from April 1 to December 1, 
and so much above the average in dryness that the supervising force 
was put to its greatest exertions. Seldom has the division been put 
to the test of the past season, and the year's work is a matter for 
great satisfaction. 

The miles of streets watered were 413.59, and the number of carts 
employed in the work was 231. This is an increase in the streets of 
3.68 miles, and 34 in the number of carts over last year. The 
increase in the number of carts was chiefly in the West Roxbury and 
Dorchester districts where the assessment went into effect for the 
first time, and in the City Proper where the conditions around the 
Union Stations required an increase in the force. 

Assessment Districts. 
The experience acquired in 1898 in the application of the Street 
Watering Act suggested that the city should be divided into assess- 
ment districts formed according to the service required in dif- 
ferent parts of the city. Such divisions were accordingly made as 
follows : 



Street Watering Districts. 



District 1. Back Bay . 

District 2. City Proper and South End 

District 3. South Boston . 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton . . . 

Part of West Roxbury 

Part of Dorchester . 

Roxbury .... 
District 4. Ward 23 and Ward 24 



Rate of Assessment 

per Linear Foot 

of Frontage. 

7 cents 

6 " 



238 City Document No. 38. 

The assessment district system may be said to be the correct 
principle upon which to proceed with street sprinkling. Some sec- 
tions must, of course, receive more service than others. The cen- 
tral portion of the city, for instance, requires more frequent water- 
ing than the outlying districts, and the difficulty in rendering the 
service in narrow and congested streets increases the expense. Ob- 
viously, the assessment should be higher in such cases. The assess- 
ment district sj'stem has settled, permanently, I think, the street 
watering question to the satisfaction of the abutters. 

Estimated Income By Districts. 

Amount. 

District 1 " . . . . .$ 16,843 05 

District 2 . . . . ... . . . 32,254 44 

District 3 . . . . . . . . . 117,901 55 

District 4 30.474 56 



Total $197,473 60 

The constitutionality of the Street Watering Act, chapter 419 of the 
Acts of 1897, was determined since the last report. As stated in the 
last report, the case was' brought b} r Joshua M. Sears vs. the Board 
of Aldermen and the Superintendent of Streets in a writ of certio- 
rari to quash alleged illegal assessments. Two questions were in- 
volved (1) the constitutionality of the act as a method of taxation 
by assessment, (2) the constitutionality of the mode of assessment. 
The Supreme Court held that the act and mode of assessment were 
constitutional. The text of the act and amendment and the decision 
of the Court is as follows: 

Acts of 1897, Chapter 419. 

Section 1. Any city may annually appropriate monej- for water- 
ing the public ways or certain public ways or portions thereof within 
its limits, at the expense, in whole or in part, of the city, and may 
determine that certain other public ways or portions thereof shall be 
watered at the expense, in whole or in part, of the abutters thereon. 

Sect. 2. If a city shall determine that the streets or certain streets 
or portions of streets within its limits shall be watered, in whole or 
in part, at the expense of the abutters, the expense of the watering 
of such streets or portions of streets for that municipal year, and the 
proportion of such expense to be borne by abutters, and the rate to 
be assessed upon each linear foot of frontage of estates upon such 
streets or portions thereof, shall be estimated and determined by the 
Board of Aldermen, and the expense so determined of such watering 
to be borne by the abutters shall be assessed in the manner herein- 
after provided, upon the estates abutting upon such streets or por- 
tions of streets, in proportion to the number of linear feet of each 
estate upon the street or portion thereof so watered. 

Sect. 3. The amount of such assessments upon each estate shall 
be determined in accordance with the provisions of Section 2 of this 
Act, by the Board of Aldermen, or according as the Board of Alder- 
men may designate, by the Board of Public Works, Board of Street 
Commissioners, or Superintendent of Streets, or by any other officer ; 
and such board or officer shall within a reasonable time after the first 
day of May of that municipal year, make or cause to be made a list of 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 239 

the streets or portions of streets which the city has determined shall 
be watered, which list shall specify each estate abutting upon such 
street or portion thereof, the number of linear feet of each estate 
upon such street or portion thereof, the amount per such linear foot 
of the assessment so authorized, and the amount of such assessment 
on each estate, and shall certify and commit said list to the Board of 
Assessors of taxes of the city. 

Sect. 4. The Board of Assessors shall assess and include in the 
tax list and warrant for that municipal year committed by them to 
the Collector of Taxes the assessment upon each estate, as specified 
in the list committed to said board under the provisions of Section 3 
of this Act, and such assessment shall be included in the tax bill 
issued for the annual tax on such estate for that municipal year, or, 
in case there shall be no such annual tax bill by reason of an estate 
being exempted from taxation, a bill shall be issued for such assess- 
ment in the same manner as if it was an annual tax bill, and such 
assessment shall be a lien upon each such estate, and shall be levied, 
collected, reassessed to the person to whom such assessment ought 
to have been made, paid, apportioned, bear interest, and become 
payable in the same manner as, and shall be a part of, the tax for 
that year on such estate ; but any abatement of any such assessment 
shall be made only by the Board of Assessors, upon a certificate 
recommending such abatement from the board or officer designated 
under the provisions of Section 3 of this Act to make and certify the 
list to the assessors. 

Sect. 5. Chapter one hundred and seventy-nine of the Acts of 
the year eighteen hundred and ninety-one is hereby repealed ; but 
such repeal shall not affect any act done, any right accrued and estab- 
lished, any liability incurred, any proceeding pending, or any assess- 
ments made for the expense of watering streets, or the right to make 
such assessments under the provisions of said chapter one hundred 
and seventy-nine for the expense of watering streets, prior to the 
passage of this Act. 

Sect. 6. This Act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Acts of 1899, Chapter 366. 

Section 1. The Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston may 
divide the territory of said city into two or more street watering dis- 
tricts, and the same shall continue until changed or abolished by 
said board; and may provide that the owners of estates abutting 
upon public ways or parts thereof in any or all of said districts shall 
pay an assessment of a certain specified sum per linear foot of their 
estates so abutting, to be used for watering each way or part thereof 
to the same extent in the same district, and may provide that any of 
such districts shall be watered at the expense of the city. 

Sect. 2. The Board of Assessors of said city shall determine the 
amount of each assessment required to be paid for each estate in 
a district, in accordance with the assessment provided for as afore- 
said, for that district. 

Sect. 3. Any person aggrieved by any charge for watering 
streets by the city may, on application to the Board of Street Com- 
missioners within one month after notice of such charge has been 
given to him, have such charge considered by said board, and the 
board, if such action is required to make the charge reasonable, shall 
abate a part or the whole thereof, and if the charge has been paid 



240 City Document No. 38. 

the treasurer of the city shall, on the certificate of the board stating 
the amount abated, repay such amount. 

Sect. 4. The provisions of chapter four hundred and nineteen 
of the Acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, relating 
to the watering of streets in cities, shall, so far as they are applica- 
ble and not inconsistent with this act, apply to the collection of 
assessments for watering streets under the provisions of this act. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Joshua M. Sears vs. the Board of Aldermen aud the Superintend- 
ent of Streets of the City of Boston regarding assessments of street 
watering : 

Knowlton, J. This is a petition for a writ of certiorari to quash 
alleged illegal assessments laid to meet the cost of watering streets 
in the City of Boston, under the statute of 1897, c. 419. 

The first and most important question in the case is whether this 
statute is constitutional. The right of the Legislature to raise money 
by taxation is founded upon c. 1, § 1, Art. XIV. of the Constitution 
of the Commonwealth. Under this article there is authority " to im- 
pose and levy reasonable duties and excises upon any produce, 
goods, wares, merchandise, and commodities, etc." This authority 
we need not consider in the present case. Secondly, there is 
authority " to impose and levy proportional and reasonable assess- 
ments, rates and taxes upon all the inhabitants of and persons resi- 
dent of estates lying within the said Commonwealth." The water- 
ing of streets in thickly settled portions of cities is such a public 
benefit that it legitimately may be provided for at the public ex- 
pense. So far as it promotes the comfort, convenience and pros- 
perity of the public generally as distinguished from land owners it 
should be provided for by general taxation, which involves the 
assessment of proportional and reasonable taxes upon all persons 
and property within the city. The statute purports to authorize 
every city not only to "appropriate money for watering the public 
ways or portions thereof within its limits at the expense in whole or 
in part of the city," but also to " determine that certain other public 
ways or portions thereof shall be watered at the expense, in whole 
or in part of the abutters thereon." St. 1897 c. 419, § 1. This last 
provision calls for another kind of taxation which is local and 
special. Such taxation, under the Constitution, can only exist when 
there is a special or peculiar benefit to certain real estate, different 
from that which is received by the inhabitants generally. 

The owners of the land upon which such an assessment is made 
must pay the same share of the general taxes in proportion to the 
value of their property that other persons pay. As the Constitution 
requires that taxes shall be proportional and reasonable, this addi- 
tional special tax can be justified only where there is a special bene- 
fit to property from the expenditure on account of which the assess- 
ment is made. Wright vs. Boston, 9 Cush. 233-234 ; Mount 
Auburn Cemetery vs. Cambridge, 150 Mass. 12-14 ; Durgan vs. 
Boston, 12 Allen, 223-237; Boston vs. Boston & Albany Railroad 
Company, 170 Mass. 95 ; Norwood vs. New York & New England 
Railroad Company, 161 Mass. 259-264; Village of Norwood vs. 
Baker, 19 Sup. Ct. Rep. 187; Stuart vs. Palmer, 74 N. Y. 189; 
Sharp vs. Spear, 4 Hill, 82; Hammett vs. Philadelphia, 65 Penn. St. 
146-157; Tide Water Company vs. Coster 18 N. J. Eq. 527; City of 
Norfolk vs. Chamberlain, 89 Va. 196-213; Nichols vs. Bridgeport, 
23 Conn. 189; Thomas vs. Gain, 35 Mich. 162; Taylor vs. Palmer, 31 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 241 

Cal. 254; Sheehan vs. Good Samaritan Hospital, 50 Mo. 155. In the 
last analysis the assessment is not laid as a part of the burden of 
public expenditure put upon the land, for the burdens which are 
strictly public are to be shared proportionately by all the people , 
according to the value of their taxable property. It is rather in the 
nature of a diminution of that which at first is a public burden, by 
subtracting from it the amount of the special enhancement of value 
of private property from the expenditure of public money in part for 
its benefit. It is taxation in the sense that it is a distribution of 
that which is originally a public burden, growing out of the expend- 
iture primarily for a public purpose. 

It is a grave question whether the benefit that comes to abutting 
property from the watering of the streets in front of it is such an 
improvement to the property that it can be made the subject of an 
assessment upon it. There must be a real substantial enhancement 
of value growing out of a public work to warrant an assessment 
upon it. The watering of streets produces only transitory effects, 
and makes no permanent change in the condition of the property. It 
greatly promotes the health and comfort of the people generally who 
use the streets from time to time, but its greatest benefit is to the 
abutting estates as places for residence or the transaction of 
business. 

Indeed, so much more important to the occupants than to the 
general public have been the benefits from watering streets, that 
until lately the expense of the work in this commonwealth has usu- 
ally been borne by the abutters, who have procured the watering to 
be done by private contractors. If a special benefit, accruing from 
day to day, which very materially increases the rental value of real 
estate by reason of the proximity of the property to the place where 
the beneficial work is done, can be treated as an improvement within 
the reason of the rule which permits "special assessments, then such 
assessments may be made to pay the expense of watering streets. 
With some hesitation we hold that there is an improvement of private 
property when this work is done by a city, which may warrant an 
assessment upon the abutters. 

It was so held in State vs. Reis, 38 Minn. 371, and in Reimkin vs. 
Fuehring, 130 Ind. 382, although the cases generally which upheld 
such assessments relate to improvements of a permanent character. 
Many improvements, from which real estate receives an incidental 
advantage, are held to justify only general taxation. Hammett vs. 
Philadelphia, 65 Penn. St. 146; Washington avenue, 69 Penn. St. 
352. Erie vs. Russell, 148 Penn. St. 384-386; Dyar vs. Farmington, 
70 Me. 527; McCloskey vs. Chamberlain, 37 1ST. J. L. 388; Dietz vs. 
Neenah, 91 Wis. 422-427. 

Treating the watering of a street in a city as a work which may 
cause a direct, special and peculiar benefit to abutting estates and 
thus enhance their value so long as it continues, we come to the 
question whether the mode of assessment directed by this statute is 
within the constitutional power of the Legislature. Section 2 of the 
statute is as follows: "If a city shall determine that the streets, or 
certain streets, or portions of streets, within its limits shall be 
watered in whole or in part at the expense of the abutters, the 
expense of the watering of such streets, or portions of streets, for 
that municipal year, and the proportion of such expense to be borne 
by abutters, and the rate to be assessed upon each linear foot of 
frontage of estate upon such streets, or portions thereof, shall be 



242 . City Document No. 38. 

estimated by the Board of Aldermen, and the expense so determined 
of such watering to be borne by the abutters, shall be assessed in 
the manner hereinafter provided, upon the estates abutting on such 
streets, or portions of streets, in proportion to the number of linear 
feet of such estate upon the street or portion thereof, so watered." 
Section 3 pi'ovides for a determination of the amount of the assess- 
ments either by the Board of Aldermen or by that one of several 
other specified boards of public officers, which the Aldermen may 
designate. Section 4 declares that each assessment shall be a lien 
upon the estate on which it is laid, and directs the collection of 
assessments in like manner as other taxes are collected, and provides 
for abatements. 

It is now established by the highest judicial authority that such 
assessments cannot be so laid upon any estate as to be in substan- 
tial excess of the benefit received. The case of Village of Norwood 
vs. Baker, 19 Sup. Ct. Kep. 187, contains an elaborate discussion of 
the subject with a citation of authorities for many of the states, and 
holds that a local assessment for an amount in substantial excess Of 
the benefit received is in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to 
the Constitution of the United States, inasmuch as it would deprive 
one of his property without compensation, and so without due pro- 
cess of law. The authority of this court is controlling in all state 
courts, and if it were not it is in accordance with sound principles 
and with the great weight of authority in other courts. The prin- 
ciples which have often been stated by this court lead to the same 
result. Boston vs. Boston and Albany Railroad Company, 170 
Mass. 95-101, and cases cited. The case of Kingman, petitioner, 
153 Mass. 566, dealt with a legislative distribution of public burdens 
among different political sub-divisions of the Commonwealth, and 
the language in it must be construed in reference to the facts to 
which it relates. The right to apportion public burdens among 
cities, towns and counties, as it deems reasonable in reference to 
benefits and to other considerations, which are not capable of exact 
estimation in money, is within the power of the Legislature under 
the first part of c. 1, § 1, Art. IV. of the Constitution, and is not the 
same as the right to impose and levy taxes upon individuals. 

It is of the same nature as the right to create, change or abolish 
cities, towns or other political subdivisions of the Commonwealth. 

While these assessments must be founded upon benefits, the 
courts have generally recognized the difficulty and in many cases 
the impracticability of attempting to estimate benefits to estates 
one by one without some rule or principle of general application 
which will make the assessments reasonable and proportional, ac- 
cording- to the benefits. Accordingly, the determination of such a 
rule or principle by the Legislature itself, or by the tribunal ap- 
pointed by the Legislature to make the assessments, has commonly 
been upheld by the courts. If, however, its effect plainly is to 
make an assessment upon any estate substantially in excess of the 
benefit received, it is set aside. 

Weed vs. Boston, 171 Mass. 51 N. E. Rep. 204. Village of Nor- 
wood vs. Baker, ubi supra. Assessments of special taxes by an 
estimate of the particular benefits to each lot, by measurement of the 
amount of frontage upon the street or sewer, by the measurement 
of the area of the lots, and by the valuation of the property, have 
all been sustained. Springfield vs. Gay, 12 Allen, 612. Dorgan v*. 
Boston, 12 Allen, 233; Downer vs. Boston, 7 Cush. 277; Wright vs. 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 243 

Boston, 9 Cush. 233; Workman vs. Worcester, 118 Mass. 168; 
Keith vs. Boston, 120 Mass. 108; Snow vs. Fitchburg, 136 Mass. 
183; Howe vs. Cambridge, 114 Mass. 388. Chapin vs. Worcester, 
124 Mass. 464; Codman vs. Johnson, 104 Mass. 491. Leominster 
vs. Conant, 139 Mass. 384. But, as we have already intimated, the 
only ground on which they can properly rest is that they are 
methods reasonably determined upon, by the tribunals charged with 
the duty of determining, in reference to the ascertainment of the 
benefits actually received by the different estates on which assess- 
ments are to be laid. It may be that, in the light of recent decisions, 
some of these cases would have been decided differently, but in 
general they rest on sound principles, on the ground already stated. 
Most of our cases and our statutes assume under the Constitution 
that these assessments, like other taxes, are to be reasonable, and, 
in a general sense, proportional. 

Under the present statute it is implied that the Board of Alder- 
men and the tribunal making assessments will proceed upon correct 
principles, and assess according to the benefits received, unless the 
requirement that the assessments are to be " in proportion to 
the number of linear feet of each estate upon the street or portion 
thereof so watered " is objectionable as founded upon a wrong 
principle. Such requirements in regard to ordinary estates front- 
ing upon streets and sewers have often been upheld. 

On the other hand, in reference to estates differently situated, 
they sometimes would call for assessments far beyond any benefit 
received, and would therefore be unconstitional and void. Weed 
vs. Boston, ubi supra. No facts appear in the present case to show 
that this rule is not proper in its application to the petitioner's 
estates, as the method of determining benefits with such approxi- 
mation to accuracy as can reasonably be required. There may be 
unoccupied lands in the city which are so situated that they could 
receive no substantial benefit, either actually or potentially, from 
the watering of adjacent streets, so long as they remain in their 
present condition. 

Assessments made upon such lands might be void; but as the 
<;ase does not disclose such we have no occasion to consider them. 
We see no reason why the Legislature may not authorize a city to 
water some of its streets at the public expense, and to assess bene- 
fits for the watering of others upon abutters, as it deems best. As 
a result some land-owners get the benefit of watering streets adja- 
cent to their estates without paying for the special benefit. 

But perfect equality in the distribution of public burdens is not 
attainable. We are, therefore, of the opinion that in its applica- 
tion to the facts of the present case the statute is constitutional. 

If the Aldermen might cause some of the streets to be watered at 
the expense of the city, and others to be watered at the expense of 
the abutters, it is not shown that their determination in regard to 
it was improper. 

Although the proceedings were in some respects informal, we see 
no fatal error in them. We are inclined to agree with the peti- 
tioner's counsel in his contention that the determination of the 
expense of watering streets to be watered in whole or in part at the 
expense of the abutters, and the proportion of such expense to be 
borne by the abutters, and the rate to be assessed upon each linear 
foot of frontage of estates upon .which such streets, or portions 
thereof, is to be by the Board of Aldermen, and cannot be delegated 



244 



City Document No. 38. 



to any other board or tribunal. But we are also of opinion that the 
action of the Superintendent of Streets in making these assess- 
ments and reporting them to the Board of Aldermen, with the com- 
munication of the Mayor, and the subsequent order making an 
appropriation, taken in connection with the previous orders, are 
equivalent to an original determination of these matters by the 
Aldermen themselves. The petitioner shows no such error as to 
entitle him to a writ of certiorari. 

Petition dismissed. 

Four years ago (1895) 112 carts had watered 301.92 miles of streets 
during the year atan expense of $76,424.70. The work during that 
year, in fact until 1898, was restricted to macadam streets. In 1896 
a small increase of territory occurred, and the same number of 
carts were operated at an expense of $71,211.81. In the report of 
1896 the assumption by this division of the care of paved streets 
was urged, and although it was impossible to carry out the recom- 
mendations in 1897, they were practically adopted later in the appli- 
cation of the Street Watering Act in 1898. During the last four 
years the force of carts has increased from 112 to 231, and the miles 
of streets watered from 301.92 to 413.59. The subscription method 
of watering paved streets has been abolished, and every accepted 
street within the city limits is now sprinkled regularly and systemati- 
cally. The permanency of this complete service is assured by the 
establishment of equitable watering assessment districts. 

Very respectfully, 

Thos. J. Finneran, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation (authorized to expend in anticipation 

of, and to be met by, assessments) .... 

Expenditures ........ 



Balance 



Assessments. 



Deposited with the City Collector 
Abatements to January 31, 1900 , 
Collections to January 31, 1900 . 
Uncollected January 31, 1900 



$175,000 00 
174,625 97 

$374 03 



$198,311 66 

3,028 10 

151,913 55 

43,370 01 



Objects of Expenditures. 
Salaries and labor 
Teaming ..... 
Water-posts, repairs, etc. . 
Board of horses .... 
Shoeing and clipping . 
Veterinary services and medicine 
Harnesses ..... 
Telephones .... 

Carried forward . , , 



$14,207 50 

141,730 75 

5,642 91 

831 82 

197 00 

80 85 

50 00 

280 00 

$163,020 83 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 245 



Brought forward 
Bicycles, repairs, etc. 
Printing 
Stationery . 
Vehicles, repairs, etc. 
Horse, purchase of 
Electric car sprinkler 
Assessments, expense 
General supplies 

Total . 



of levying 



$163,020 83 

751 87 

43 33 

176 03 

1,660 50 

200 00 

415 00 

7,768 94 

589 47 

$174,625 97 



Objects of Expenditures, Classified by Districts, from February 
1, 1899, to January 31, 1900. 



No. 


Districts. 


Teaming. 


Labor. 


Maintenance. 


Totals. 


1 . 

2 

3 

4 


Charlestown 


$11,338 50 
7,850 00 
7,132 50 
11,527 50 
18,179 25 
19,525 00 
23,408 75 
13,574 25 
10,545 00 
18,650 00 

• 


$915 25 
460 25 
460 25 
460 25 
920 50 
918 75 
889 00 
715 58 
906 50 

1,379 00 


$2,153 24 
1,399 60 
1,291 94 
2,045 58 
3,337 52 
3,768 17 
3,983 48 
1,830 25 
1,722 59 
3,337 52 


$14,406 99 
9,709 85 
8,884 69 
14,033 33 


6 




22,437 27 
24,211 92 
28,281 23 
16,120 08 
13,174 09 
23,366 52 






8 




9 


South End 


10 










Totals 


$141,730 75 


$8,025 33 


$24,869 89 


$174,625 97 







Distribution of Carts, showing Entire Amount of Work done. 



No. 



District. 



Hired 
Carts. 



Number Miles 
Covered. 



Average per 
Cart. 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



South Boston. 
East Boston . . 
Charlestown. . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . . 

Roxbury 

Back Bay 

South End. . . . 
City Proper. . . 

Totals 



20 
13 
12 
19 
31 
35 
37 
17 
16 
31 



38.34 
26.87 
22.29 
33.23 
63.58 
74.72 
81.12 
21.44 
19.56 
32.44 



1.92 
2.07 
1.86 
1.75 
2.05 
2.14 
2.19 
1.26 
1.22 
1.05 



231 



413.59 



1.79 



246 



City Document No. 38. 



The number of carts shows an increase of 34 over last year, and 
the streets an increase of 3.64 miles. Of the increase in carts West 
Eoxbury, Ward 23, had 8, and Dorchester, Ward 24, 8, because of the 
extension of assessment work to these sections, enabling the division 
to improve the service to the kind given all other sections. In 1898 
these sections were watered free, and the service was restricted of 
necessity in the frequency of the wettings. The only other notable 
increase in the number of carts was in the City Proper, where 5 had 
to be added to the force because of the service required around both 
Union stations. 



Location of Water Posts by Districts. 





Year. 


Increase 
over 1898. 


Electric 




1891. 


1S97. 


1898. 


1899. 


hydrants. 


South Boston 

Brighton 


23 

16 
19 
25 
50 
61 
53 
24 


28 
34 
20 
44 
67 
83 
68 
53 


35 
41 
20 
47 
75 
88 
76 
69 


38 
42 
21 
50 
86 
99 
80 
74 


q 
1 
1 
3 
11 
11 
4 
5 




West Eoxbury 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 


5 


Totals 


271 


397 


451 


490 ' 


39 


5 







Note. — An increase of 219 water-posts since 1891. 

The division is indebted to Mr. J. W. Smith, Local Forecast 
Official, for daily weather reports. 

Acknowledgment is also made of the prompt assistance rendered 
by the Water Department, in the erection and repair of stand- 
pipes. 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 247 



APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR THE BOSTON 
AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 



Craigie Bridge. 



New timbers and trusses have been placed under pier to keep draw- 
tender's house in place; new timbers on engine-house pier to sup- 
port new shafting that was put in to move the draw; repaired houses 
on Cambridge'end of bridge, put new gutters on engine-house, and 
had paving repaired where necessary. 

The draw is in very bad condition and had to be repaired quite 
often. The three-inch planking on the surface of the draw was 
partly renewed and the roadway surface was sheathed three times 
with two-inch spruce. The draw-tender and assistants do all ordi- 
nary repairs and keep the sidewalks and piers free from snow and ice. 

Next year a large portion of this bridge surface will needrepaving 
and the sidewalks on Boston end should be relaid, the fences and 
draw painted, the pier connecting with draw-tender's house repaired, 
also draw-pier down-stream rebuilt. 

Harvard Bridge. 

In April of this year the roadway for the entire length of the 
bridge was newly sheathed, and consequently there was a smooth 
surface all summer. 

The iron spans and panels on the outside of the bridge, and draw 
and some of the girders underneath the bridge, Cambridge end, have 
been painted; in 1897 a portion of the iron work on the Boston end 
of the bridge was painted; next year we expect to finish painting 
the iron work where needed. 

In April a new contract was made for one year with the Wels- 
bach Street Lighting Company. They have taken off the old 
globes and replaced them by putting on more ornamental ones and 
adjusting springs to them. By doing so the lights have been im- 
proved very much. This company lights the Boston end of the 
bridge. The Cambridge Electric Light Company lights the Cam- 
bridge end and draw with incandescent lights. They give good 
satisfaction. 

The draw-tender and his assistants do all ordinary repairs, clean 
the electric light globes once a week, keep the sidewalks and draw 
piers free from snow and ice in winter, and keep the electric 
machinery to move the draw in good order. They have also painted 
the inside of the house and the gates to draw. The bridge is 
cleaned once a week. 

In April, 1900, the sheathing for the entire length of the bridge 



248 City Document No. 38. 

will have to be renewed. We found that after about seven months' 
wear we have to keep repairing it. In taking up the old plank on 
roadway we saved the best ones and kept them for patching; in that 
way there was quite a saving. If the travel increases the next two 
years as it has in the past two years, it will be necessary to sheathe 
the roadway twice a year. 

Prison Point Bridge. 

New timbers have been placed under the draw, renewed the plank- 
ing and sheathed it with two-inch spruce three times. The timbers 
under the sidewalks and the covering on the surface were so de- 
cayed that it was necessary to remove them and put in their place 
two new sidewalks; the fences on bridge were repaired; the draw- 
tender does all ordinary repairs, removes the snow and ice from 
bridge and piers and sweeps the bridge at other times. 

This bridge and draw is in very bad condition; we are looking 
forward to the time when the Boston & Maine Railroad Company 
will build the overhead street and bridge as they are required to do 
under the decree of the Superior Court abolishing the grade cross- 
ings in this vicinity. • 

West Boston Bridge. 

The paving on the roadway for the entire length of the bridge was 
unsafe for travel; early in the spring it was repaired, only doing what 
was absolutely necessary to prevent accidents. The under plank of 
the draw was repaired and the whole surface sheathed. 

The bridge was closed to travel October 19. The new tempo- 
rary bridge to take the place of the old ope was opened for travel on 
the above date, the first car going over it at 10.30 P.M. This new 
bridge so far has given good satisfaction; the travel over it seems to 
be increasing since it was first opened. The roadwa}^ being sheathed 
with two-inch spruce gives a better surface for teams than the old 
bridge did with its uneven surface of paving. This new bridge has 
two flap draws, one opposite the old one, the other in the centre of 
the bridge between the park wall on the Boston side and First street 
on the Cambridge side. The length of this temporary bridge is 
2,248 feet; it is 47 feet 2 inches wide; the roadway is 36 feet wide, 
with one sidewalk 10 feet wide; there are two draws with four leaves 
each; the draw wing opening is 36 feet. The draw now in use is 
raised by electricity. It will be necessary to renew the sheathing on 
the bridge every year. It is lighted by 11 arc lights; the bridge is 
cleaned every week; the draw-tender and assistants keep the side- 
walks and piers free from snow and ice, and the electrical machinery 
to move the draw in good order, and do all ordinary repairs. 

The engine, boiler and machinery to move the old draw have 
been taken out and a cylinder stove substituted, making a large sav- 
ing in coal. 

The draw pier from the temporary bridge to the small house on 
the pier has been replanked and new timbers put in where necessary. 

Cambridge-street Bridge. 

The surface of the bridge and draw were in bad condition; the 
plank under the sheathing being decayed, we removed them and put 
in place four-inch and three-inch spruce, and sheathed the whole 
with two-inch spruce; put new flaps to draw, shingled the two 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 249 

houses on the pier, built a small house ten feet by six feet, one story, 
for storage and coal; the houses were painted inside and outside by 
the men on the bridge. 

Heretofore on the bridge there was a single track with a switch at 
each end of the bridge, travel was very much impeded and passen- 
gers in cars found a great deal of fault; the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company asked permission to lay a double track; we granted 
their request, they agreeing to strengthen the draw at their own ex- 
pense, which they did b} r putting hard pine timber under each leaf 
of draw. This bridge and draw are very old and have to be looked 
after very carefulty so no accidents will occur. The water-ways to 
the pier will have to be replanked next spring. 

The draw-tenders and assistants sweep the bridge and piers and do 
all ordinary repairs. 

Essex-street Bridge. 

The draw was replanked with three-inch spruce and sheathed with 
two-inch spruce. 

The whole length of the bridge was sheathed with two-inch spruce, 
and the guard to the bridge repaired. There has been such an in- 
creased amount of travel from Brookline over this bridge this last 
summer and fall, caused by the Cambridge Park Commissioners fill- 
ing their low lands just off the bridge on the Cambridge side and 
requiring a great many teams to be employed, that it will make it 
necessary to sheathe the whole surface of the bridge its entire length 
next spring, also to sheathe the up-stream draw pier. The draw- 
tenders sweep the bridge every week, and do all ordinary repairs. 

North Harvard-street Bridge. 

Attention is again called to the necessity of a new bridge to take 
the place of this old and worn-out one; we are continually patching 
it to make it secure for travel. This new bridge when built should 
be of iron or steel, strong and ornamental, and as wide as the road- 
ways connecting with it. It is in a very prominent place, the Cam- 
bridge park on one side with a broad avenue leading to the colleges; 
on the Boston side with a boulevard and speedway along the banks 
of the Charles river, just finished by the Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sion; a fine avenue just completed by the Boston Street Department 
from the bridge to Brighton; other improvements have been made, 
notably at Soldiers' Field; the very artistic fence surrounding the 
field, and inside the enclosure good buildings have been erected 
and still other changes are being made to beautify the places in the 
yicinty of the bridge, and it seems to me that all there is now 
required to make it complete is this new bridge. 

Western-avenue Bridge to Cambridge. 

Where it was necessary the under-flooring on the bridge was 
removed and new spruce plank put in place. The whole bridge was 
then sheathed with two-inch spruce. The Boston Elevated Railway 
Company asked permission to put a double track over this bridge, 
agreeing to make everything satisfactory to the Commissioners; the 
request was granted, they placing under the draw four hard pine 
timbers without cost to the two cities. When examining the bridge 
near the draw we found the most important timbers to sustain the 



250 



City Document Xo. 38. 



bridge at the Boston end were all decayed; they were replaced by 
putting in new hard pine timbers. To forward this work mechanics 
worked day and night. The Boston Elevated Kailway Company 
paid a portion of this expense. The bridge is in about the same 
condition as Cambridge-street bridge. The water-ways to the pier 
will have to be replanked next spring. 

The draw-tenders and assistants keep the bridge and piers clean 
and do all ordinary repairs. 

In General. 

The usual statement is appended showing the number of draw 
openings and the number of vessels which passed through. 

The amount of revenue received for rents, dockage, repairs to 
Boston Elevated Bailway Company's tracks, etc., during the year 
has been §1,426.90, one-half of which has been paid to each city. 

Advantage was taken last fall of the low price of spruce plank, 
and over fifty thousand feet of two-inch spruce was bought and 
placed on the different bridges for use. 

The following is a statement of the payments made by the City of 
Boston on account of the Boston and Cambridge Bridges from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900 : 

Amount of appropriation for financial year of 1899-1900, $16,000 00 
Expended to January 31, 1900 . . . . . 15,998 18 



Unexpended balauce February 1, 1900 ... SI 82 

Revenue, February 1, 1899, to January 31, 1900. 



Date. 


L. B. 

4 
Pages. 


Received from 


Total. 


. , o 3 
— *° ~ 
~ s u 

c o^ 

5 


O -"(4 
— - D 

- T — CD 
"7 •— J? '-C 

6^a 


1899. 

February 11 ... 

May 17 

August 28,. , 
November 29 . . 

1900. 

January 29 


270 
305 
345 
380 

418 


Boston Elevated Railway Co... 

Wharfage Rents, etc 

Boston Elevated Railway Co... 
Rents — Miller, Fox 

N. E.Tel. & Tel. Co 


$200 00 

241 00 

731 90 

54 00 

200 00 


$100 00 

120 50 

365 95 

27 00 

100 00 


$100 00 
120 50 
365 95 
27 00. 

100 00 




Totals $1,426 90 


$713 45 


$713 45 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 



251 



m 

o 
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$7,402 95 
1,640 25 
1,497 00 
1,079 17 
912 92 
542 50 
480 00 
409 29 
368 25 
284 09 
259 83 
243 75 
195 72 
174 55 
155 63 
150 00 
77 50 
32 50 
50 00 
15 10 
14 08 
13 10 


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Street Department — Engineering Division. 253 



APPENDIX I. 



City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hale, February 1, 1900. 

Mr. Benj. W. Wells, Superintendent of Streets : 

Sir, — I herewith submit the following report of the work 
done under my direction for the Street Department during the 
year ending January 31, 1900. 

In general, the construction of assessment streets and boule- 
vards, and the laying of new street paving has been supervised, 
the repairs of asphalt pavement, not under guaranty, superin- 
tended, the grading of street railway tracks determined, numerous 
estimates for street improvements made, and many miscellaneous 
matters reported upon and attended to upon your request. 

Lengths, Areas, etc., of Accepted Streets. 

The tables showing lengths and areas of paving on accepted 
streets have been brought up to February 1, 1900, and tables 
giving statistical details of the asphalt pavement in the city, and 
the cost of repairing the same have been prepared. 

Asphalt Streets. 

All repairs on asphalt streets paid for by the city have been 
supervised, and the patches measured for payment. The patches 
are carefully located in all cases, so that they may be identified, 
and where suitable plans are on file in this office they have been 
plotted. Trenches cut in asphalt roads by city departments or 
corporations are made under permit from the Permit Office, and 
the repairs are made by the company which originally put down 
the pavement, at the expense of the party making the opening. 
Asphalt streets laid under a maintenance guaranty for a term of 
years have been looked after, and the companies giving the guar- 
anty have been notified when repairs were required. The cost of 
repairing asphalt has been 24.7 cents per square yard for the 
year. The recommendation is repeated that rates for doing this 
work, for a term of years, be made with the several companies. 



254 



City Document No. 38. 



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Street Department — Engineering Division. 263 



Comparative Cost, for the Year 1899, of Patching Asphalt Pave= 
merits, having no Maintenance Guarantee. 

Trinidad Asphalt. 



Pavement Laid. 


Area 
square yards. 


Cost. 


Average cost 
per yard. 


188 L 


2,079 

957 

2,700 

4,883 

1,665 

1,142 

16,472 

26,113 

7,422 


§249 62 

654 45 

1,043 48 

1,787 77 

301 13 

320 50 

3,795 30 

4,606 02 

198 60 


$0 . 1200 
.6839 
3864 


1883 . 


1884. 


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1888* 


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1808 


1889 


2806 


1891 1 

1892 


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1893 


0268 







* Not including Columbus avenue. 

t Harrison avenue, part of which has been resurfaced, included in 18SS. 



Sicilian Rock Asphalt. 



Pavement Laid. 


Area 

square yards. 


Cost. 


Average cost 
per yard. 


1892 


'4.043 
2,723 


$395 40 
79 87 


$0.0979 
0293 


1893 







Paving. 

Street paving has been supervised in all cases where requested. 

Granite block pavement on a concrete base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 30,883 square yards. 

Granite block pavement on a gravel base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 963 square yards. 

Granite block pavement on a gravel base, laid with gravel joints, 
14,794 square yards. 

Trinidad lake asphalt, with a binder course of asphaltic cement 
concrete, on an American cement concrete base, 4,041 square 
yards, at an average cost of about $3.00 per square yard for five 
years guaranty and $3.25 per square yard for ten years guaranty, 
exclusive of cost of preparing road-bed for the concrete base. 

Trinidad lake asphalt, with a binder course of asphaltic cement 
concrete, on an Amefican Portland cement concrete base, 2,595 
square yards, 1,843 square yards in Charles street from Fruit street 
across Allen street, costing $3.25 per square yard, and 752 square 
yards in Devonshire street, between Milk and Water streets, 
costing $3.65 per square yard for ten years guaranty, exclusive 
of cost of preparing road-bed for the concrete base. 

Trinidad landaspkalt, with a binder course of asphaltic cement 



264 City Document No. 38. 

concrete, on an American cement concrete base, 2,500 square 
yards. This asphalt was laid on Public Alleys numbered 401 
to 405 inclusive, 419 and 431, the cost per square yard cannot 
be definitely stated, as the price paid was a lump sum, which 
included the cost of considerable other work, exclusive of the cost 
of preparing the road-bed for the concrete base. 

Sicilian rock asphalt, on an American cement concrete base, 
1,817 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.00 for five 
years' guaranty, and $3.25 for ten years' guaranty, exclusive of 
the cost of preparing the road-bed for the concrete base. 

Seyssel rock asphalt, on an American cement concrete base, 
3,221 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.00 for five 
years guaranty, and $3.25 for ten years guaranty, exclusive of 
the cost of preparing the road-bed for the concrete base. 

All asphalt pavement laid during season of 1899, was laid with 
a maintenance guaranty for ten {10) 3 T ears, except that on 
Genesee, Mason and Oswego streets the guaranty is for fiveyears. 

Edgestones set, 93,325 linear feet; gutter paving laid, 30,527 
square yards ; brick sidewalks laid, 26,163 square yards ; crushed 
stone sidewalks constructed, 38,860 square yards; artificial stone 
sidewalks, 80,972 square feet; flagging crosswalks laid, 5,033 
square yards; macadam surface (6 inches), 83,933 square yards; 
Telford base (8 inches), macadam (4 inches), 29,456 square 
yards. 

Endicott street, from Cooper street across Thacher street, 
was paved with 1^ inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with l£ 
inches of bituminous concrete binder on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. 
The old pavement was removed and roadway excavated by the 
Street Department. The edgestones were reset, flagging cross- 
walks and brick sidewalks relaid by Patrick McG-overn. Former 
payment was asphalt on cobblestones. 

Mason street, from 450 feet west of West street to about 
120 feet westerly, was paved with 2£ inches of Seyssel natural 
rock asphalt, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, by 
Jones & Meehan. The old pavement was removed and roadway 
excavated by the Street Department ; edgestones were reset and 
brick sidewalks relaid by Jones & Meehan. Former pavement 
was old granite blocks. 

Park street, from Tremont street to Beacon street, was re- 
paved and newly macadamized, the sidewalk on the Common side of 
the street was removed, the edgestones on that side being set one 
foot from the bases of the iron fence to form a wheel guard ; on 
the other side of the street the sidewalk was widened about two 
feet, making it twelve feet wide, by this means the roadway was 
also widened about six feet. The roadway was graded and 
macadamized, edgestones reset, granite block paving, flagging 
crosswalks and brick sidewalks relaid by W. H. Glenn & Co. 
Three new catch-basins were built, one was rebuilt, and three 
were abandoned and sealed up. Former pavement was old granite 
blocks and macadam. 



■ .-I" - 




Street Department — Engineering Division. 265 

The following streets were repaved under appropriations made 
by the Board of Apportionment : 

Atlantic avenue (including the tracks of the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company and Union Freight Railroad), from 
Dewey square to Oliver street, was paved with large granite blocks 
on a 6-inch American cement concrete base with pitch and pebble 
joints. The old pavement was removed and roadway excavated 
by the Street Department, concrete base laid by The Metropolitan 
Contracting Company. In the portion from Dewey square across 
Congress street the roadway paving was laid, edgestones set, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks laid by Jones & Meehan ; 
in the portion from Congress street to Oliver street similar work 
was done by Patrick McGovern. The Boston Elevated Railway 
Company and Union Freight Railroad, by agreement, paid for the 
portions within their tracks. Former pavement was old granite 
blocks on gravel bed with gravel joints. One new catch-basin 
was built. 

Blackstone street, from Hanover street across North street, 
was paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement 
concrete base with pitch and pebble joints. The old pavement 
was removed and roadway excavated by the Street Department ; 
concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan Contracting Company. 
Roadway paving was laid, edgestones set, brick sidewalks and 
flagging crosswalks laid by Patrick McG-overn & Co. Former 
pavement was old granite blocks on gravel bed with gravel joints. 

Charles street, from Fruit street across Allen street, ex- 
clusive of the tracks of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
was paved with 1^ inches of Trinidad lake asphalt with 1^ inches 
of bituminous concrete binder on a 6-inch American Portland 
cement concrete base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. 
The old pavement was removed, roadway excavated, edgestones 
set, flagging crosswalks and brick sidewalks laid by the Street 
Department. Former pavement was large granite blocks on 
gravel bed, with pitch and pebble joints. 

Congress street, from Atlantic avenue to the old sea-wall, 
was paved with Philadelphia size granite blocks, on a 6-inch 
American cement conciete base, with pitch and pebble joints. 
The old pavement was removed and roadway excavated by the 
Street Department ; concrete base, roadway paving, flagging 
crosswalks, and brick sidewalks were laid, and edgestones set by 
Jones & Meehan. Two catch-basins were rebuilt, and four 
abandoned ones sealed up. Former pavement was old granite 
blocks on gravel bed with gravel joints. 

Devonshire street, from Milk street to Water street, was 
paved with 2 inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with l£ inches of 
bituminous concrete binder on an American Portland cement con- 
crete base of varying thickness, by the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Company. The old block pavement was removed and former 
concrete base cleaned by the Street Department. Upon this 
existing concrete base was deposited sufficient new concrete to 
bring the base to the proper grade and crown for the new pave- 



266 City Document No. 38. 

merit ; several corporation trenches were found from which the 
former base had been removed and not replaced. These trenches 
were excavated to a depth of six inches below the top of old con- 
crete and filled with the new concrete. Flagging crosswalks and 
brick sidewalks were laid and edgestones reset by the Street 
Department. Former pavement was granite blocks on a concrete 
base. 

Federal street, from Dewey square to Milk street, including 
the tracks of the Boston Elevated Eailway Company, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints. The old pavement was 
removed and roadway excavated by the Street Department ; con- 
crete base, roadway paving, flagging crosswalks, brick sidewalks, 
were laid and edgestones set by Patrick McG-overn. The Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, by agreement, paid for the portion 
within its tracks. Former pavement was old granite blocks on a 
gravel bed with gravel joints. 

Genesee street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street, was 
paved with 2^ inches of Seyssel natural rock asphalt, on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base, by Jones & Meehan. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway evcavated by the Street 
Department ; edgestones were reset, granite block paving and 
brick sidewalks relaid by Jones & Meehan. ' Two square granite 
catch-basin frames were removed and cast-iron D frames substi- 
tuted. Former pavement was fire bricks on a gravel bed, laid 
in 1891. 

Harrison avenue, from about 20 feet south of Kneeland 
street, to about 20 feet north of Harvard street, including the 
tracks of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, was paved 
with l£ inches of Trinidad lake asphalt with 1^ inches of bitumi- 
nous concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The 20 feet at Knee- 
land and at Harvard streets was paved with large granite blocks 
on a 6-inch American cement concrete base with pitch and pebble 
joints, by Patrick McGovern, except that the Barber Asphalt 
Paving Company laid the concrete base ; from north side of 
Harvard street to north side of Bennet street the roadway was 
paved with large granite blocks on gravel bed with gravel joints, 
except that in front of the Fire Department ladder-house about 
127 square yards of paving was laid with pitch and pebble joints, 
by Patrick McG-overn. The old pavement was removed and 
roadway excavated by the Street Department ; edgestones were 
set, flagging crosswalks and brick sidewalks laid by Patrick 
McGovern. Six square granite catch-basin frames were removed 
and cast-iron D frames substituted. The Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company, by agreement, paid for the portion within its 
tracks. By changing the line of edgestones the roadway was 
widened about 1.5 feet, it now being 32 feet between the edge- 
stones. Former pavement was old granite blocks on gravel bed 
with gravel joints. 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 267 

Kingston street, from Essex street to Beach street, was 
paved with 2 inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch Ameri- 
can cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. 
From Bedford street across Essex street, including the tracks of 
the Boston Elevated Railway Company, was paved with Phila- 
delphia size granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints, by H. Gore & Co. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway excavated by the Street 
Department, eclgestones were set, flagging crosswalks and brick 
sidewalks laid by H. Core & Co. Former pavement was old 
granite blocks on a gravel bed with gravel joints. 

Leverett street," from Craigie's bridge to Causeway street, 
including the tracks of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
roadway paved with large granite blocks on gravel bed with 
gravel joints, tracks paved with Philadelphia size granite blocks 
on gravel bed with gravel joints. The old pavement was removed 
and roadway excavated by the Street Department ; granite block 
paving was laid, edgestones set, flagging crosswalks and brick 
sidewalks laid by Jones & Meehan. Former pavement was old 
granite blocks on gravel bed, with gravel joints. The Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, by agreement, paid for the portion 
within its tracks. 

Milton street, from Brighton street to Spring street, was 
paved with 2 inches of Seyssel, natural rock, asphalt on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base, by Jones & Meehan. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway excavated by the Street De- 
partment ; edgestones were set and brick sidewalks laid by Jones 
& Meehan. By changing the line of edgestones the roadway was 
widened about 1 foot, it now being 8 feet between the edgestones. 
Former pavement was old cobble stones. 

Oswego street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street, was 
paved with 2£ inches of Seyssel, natural rock asphalt, on a 
6-inch American cement concrete base, by Jones & Meehan. The 
old pavement was removed and roadway excavated by the Street 
Department; edgestones were reset, granite block paving and 
brick sidewalks relaid by Jones & Meehan. Former pavement 
was of red bricks laid in 1891. 

Assessment Streets. 

The following streets were constructed under chapter 323 of 
the Acts of 1891, and acts in amendment thereof or in addition 
thereto. 

The cost of the work herein given is the cost of the work 
done, and materials furnished, by the contractor and does not 
include the cost of materials furnished by the city. 

Albany street, northwesterly corner at Northampton street, 
was widened by taking 137 square feet of land from the corner 
estate. The contract for doing the necessary work in connection 
with this widening was awarded to H. Gore & Co. Work under 
this contract was begun October 16, 1899, and completed Novem- 



268 City Document No. 38. 

ber 22, 1899, at a cost of $149.92. The work consisted of 
repaying roadwaj^ with granite blocks, setting new edgestones, 
and paving brick sidewalks. 

Alexander street ; Alexander street southerly is about 611 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McGovern. Work under this con- 
tract was begun October 25, 1899, and suspended November 25, 
1899. 

Amory street, School street to Bragdon street, is about 725 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Patrick McGrovern. Work under this con- 
tract was begun May 1, 1899, and completed December 21, 1899, 
at a cost of $2,210.36. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and straight 
edgestones were furnished b}*the city and hauled to the site of 
the work by the contractor. Circular edgestones were furnished 
on the work by the city ; nagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by the contractor. 

Andrews street, East Canton street to East Dedham street, 
is about 216 feet long. The contract for constructing the surf ace 
of this street was awarded to the Barber Asphalt Paving Com- 
pany. Work under this contract was begun September 26, 1899, 
and completed October 22, 1899, at a cost of $1,077.55. It is 
an asphalt road with brick sidewalks. The roadway is paved 
with 1^ inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with 1^ inches of 
bituminous concrete binder on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base. New edgestones and flagging for crosswalks were furnished 
by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; 
new bricks and gutter blocks were furnished on the work by the 
city. 

Angell street, Blue Hill avenue to Canterbury street, is about 
877 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James Doherty & Co., November 2, 1898. 
Work under this contract was begun April 17, 1899, and com- 
pleted June 10, 1899, at a cost of $2,316.11. It is a 6-inch 
macadam road with brick sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter 
blocks and edgestones were furnished by the city and hauled to 
the site of the work by the contractor ; bricks for sidewalks were 
furnished, on the work, by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Annabel street, Columbia road to Sumner street, is about 
429 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McG-overn. Work under this con- 
tract was begun November 14, 1899, and suspended December 21, 
1899, only the rough grading being done. 

Ashley street, Breed street to Walley street, is about 641 
feet long. A contract for filling this street to sub-grade was 
made with H. & D. Burnett on November 20, 1899, at the rate of 
44 cents per cubic yard, measured in place. Work under this 
contract was begun December 4, 1899, and is not yet completed. 





• 



i 



KHEl . 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 269 

Astor street, Massachusetts avenue to Hemenway street, is 
about 890 feet long. The contract for constructing this street 
was awarded to Patrick McGovern, November 5, 1898. Work 
under this contract was begun May 26, 1899, and completed 
August 18, 1899, at a cost of $2,220.02. It is a 6-inch mac- 
adam road with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter 
blocks and straight edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular edge- 
stones were furnished, on the work, by the city. Flagging for 
crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. 

Athelwold street, at School street, was widened by taking 
789 square feet of land from the corner estates. The contract 
for doing the necessary work in connection with this widening was 
awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this contract was 
begun July 5, 1899, and completed July 17, 1899, at a cost of 
$150. The work done was to build a 6-inch macadam roadway 
and crushed stone sidewalk, set edgestones and pave granite 
block gutters. All stock required was furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor, except that the 
city furnished the circular edgestones on the work. 

Atherstone street, Fuller street to Bailey street, is about 314 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this con- 
tract was begun August 19, 1899, and completed October 26, 
1899, at a cost of $701.94. It is a 6-inch macadam road with 
artificial stone sidewalks (3.5 feet wide and loam space about 2 
feet wide. Cost of sidewalks not included in above cost). 
Crushed stone, gutter blocks and straight edgestones were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the con- 
tractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on the work by the 
city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. 
Artificial stone sidewalks were built at Numbers 1 and 5 by H. 
Johnson & Co., and at Number 10 by Patrick Lyons. On the 
remainder of the street the sidewalks had been previously con- 
structed. 

Belvidere street, West Newton street to Dalton street, is 
about 507 feet long. A contract for filling this street to sub- 
grade was awarded to William Gilligan, at the rate of 40 cents 
per cubic yard in place. Work under this contract was begun 
January 25, 1899, and completed May 9, 1899, 1,535 cubic yards 
of filling being deposited, costing $614. 

Another contract for building wooden bulkhead and fence was 
awarded to Wm. H. Ryan & Co. Work under this contract was 
begun April 4, 1899, and completed April 29, 1899, at a total 
cost of $538.40. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this 
contract was begun May 24, 1899, and completed July 11, 1899, 
at a cost of $1,619.59. It is a 6-inch macadam road with brick 
sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and straight edgestones 
were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by 



270 City Document No. 38. 

the contractor ; circular edgestones and bricks for sidewalks 
were furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks 
was furnished by the contractor. 

Bennington street, Chelsea street to Belle Isle inlet, is about 
10,621 feet long. A contract for depositing about 82,000 cubic 
yards of filling in this street was awarded to Jones & Meehan, 
November 20, 1899, at the rate of 53 cents per cubic yard meas- 
ured in place. Work under this contract was begun January 16, 
1900, and is being carried on at the present time. 

Blandford street, Commonwealth avenue to the Boston and 
Albany Railroad, is about 399 feet long. A contract for deposit- 
ing about 15,000 cubic yards of filling in this street was awarded 
to the Boston and Albany Railroad Co., December 27, 1899, at 
the rate of 45 cents per cubic yard measured in the bank. 
Work under this contract was begun January 3, 1900, and is 
still in progress. 

Bragdon street, Columbus avenue to Amory street, is about 
622 feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Thomas A. Dolan. Work under this con- 
tract was begun September 28, 1899, and completed October 14, 
1899, at a cost of $1,052.22. It is a 6-inch macadam road with 
crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, -edgestones, and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor. Flagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by the contractor. 

Burt street, Washington street to Ashmont street, is about 
1,365 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this 
contract was begun August 17, 1898, and completed May 22, 
1899, at a cost of $3,831.24. It is a 6-inch macadam road with 
brick sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones, and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones and bricks were fur- 
nished, on the street, by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Cambridge street, Brighton avenue to Washington street, is 
about 3,642 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to J. L. Bryne & Co. Work under 
this contract was begun October 26, 1899, and suspended Decem- 
ber 23, 1899. 

Canal street, Haymarket square to Causeway street, is about 
1,097 feet. long. The contract for paving and regulating this 
street, including the tracks of the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, was awarded to Jones & Meehan. Work under this 
contract was begun October 15, 1898, and completed May 15, 
1899, at a cost of $11,588.95, not including cost of granolithic 
sidewalks. This street' was widened on the northeasterly side 
about twenty-five feet, making it 75 feet wide between street 
lines. It was constructed in the following manner : Northeasterly, 
sidewalks 10 feet wide, paved with brick; roadway 50 feet wide, 




COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, AT ENTRANCE TO CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 




COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, NORTH OF WALLINGFORD ROAD, 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 271 

paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement con- 
crete base, with pitch and pebble joints ; southwesterly side- 
walks 15 feet wide, paved with artificial stone, sidewalks with 
grauite edgestones. Straight edgestones, granite paving blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular edge- 
stones and bricks for sidewalks were furnished on the work by 
the city. 

The artificial stone sidewalk from Haymarket square to Market 
street, 2,946.75 square feet, was laid by W. A. Murtfeldt Com- 
pany, at a cost of $589.35; from Market street to Causeway 
street, 10,943.78 square feet, by Simpson Brothers Corporation, 
at a cost of $2,188.76. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company, by agreement, paid 
for the portion of the work within its tracks. 

Charlestown street, Haymarket square to Causeway street, is 
about 1,056 feet long. The contract for paving and regulating 
this street, including the tracks of the .Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, was awarded to the Metropolitan Contracting Company. 
Work under this contract was begun July 31, 1899, and com- 
pleted November 23, 1899, at a cost of $16,883.78. This street 
was widened on the westerly side about 42 feet, making it 92 feet 
wide between street lines. It was constructed in the following 
manner: Two sidewalks, each 12 feet wide, paved with bricks ; 
roadway 68 feet wide, paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base with pitch and pebble joints ; 
brick sidewalks with granite edgestones. Straight edgestones, 
granite paving blocks and flagging for crosswalks were furnished 
by the city, and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. 
Circular edgestones and bricks for sidewalks were furnished on 
the work by the city. The Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
by agreement, paid for the portion of the work within its tracks. 

Chester street, Brighton avenue to Commonwealth avenue, is 
about 650 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to James Doherty & Co. Work under 
this contract was begun June 1, 1899, and completed August 3, 
1899, at a cost of $1,158.62, not including the artificial stone 
sidew r alk on easterly side. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with 
crushed stone sidewalks on the westerly side. Crushed stone, 
straight edgestones, and gutter blocks were furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular 
edgestones were furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for 
crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. The artificial stone 
sidewalk (easterly side) was laid by J. C. Newborg. 

Chiswick road, Chestnut Hill avenue to Englewood avenue, is 
about 2,046 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this 
contract was begun September 10, 1899, and suspended December 
28, 1899. 

Congreve street, South street to Centre street, is about 1,409 



272 City Document No. 38. 

feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to William Finneran. Work under this con- 
tract was begun November 4, 1899, and suspended January 1, 
1900. 

Cummington street, Blandford street to Avon street, is about 
1,186 feet long. A contract for depositing about 54,000 cubic 
yards of filling in this street was awarded to the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company, December 27, 1899, at the rate of 45 cents 
per cubic yard measured in the bank. Work under this contract 
was begun January 3, 1900, and is still in progress. 

Devon street, Blue Hill avenue to Columbia road, is about 
1,860 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to John Connors. Work under this contract 
was begun June 12, 1899, and completed September 8, 1899, at a 
cost of ^3, 7 74. 79, not including cost of artificial stone sidewalks. 
It is a 6 -inch macadam road with artificial stone sidewalks. 
Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter blocks were 
furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the 
contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on the work by 
the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the con- 
tractor. The artificial stone sidewalks were laid by Patrick Lyons 
at a cost of $4,161.80. 

Edwin street, Dorchester avenue to Florida street, is about 
1,188 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this con- 
tract was begun Sepetmber 28, 1899, and completed December 8, 
1899, at a cost of $1,801.35, not including cost of artificial stone 
sidewalks. It is a 6-inch macadam road with artificial stone 
sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter blocks 
were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by 
the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on the work 
by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the con- 
tractor. A contract for laying the artificial stone sidewalks was 
awarded to Patrick Lyons. Work under this contract was begun 
October 30, 1899, and suspended November 24, 1899. 

Florida street, King street to Templeton street, is about 1,133 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this contract 
was begun October 30, 1899, and suspended December 27, 1899. 

Fowler street, Greenwood street to Glenway street, is about 
874 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Collins & Ham, November 2, 1898. Work 
under this contract was begun April 24, 1899, and completed June 
5, 1899, at a cost of $1,410.38, not including the cost of artificial 
stone sidewalks. It is a 6-inch macadam road with artificial 
stone sidewalks 4.5 feet wide and loam spaces 2 feet wide, 
bounded by granite edgestones. Crushed stone, straight edge- 
stones and gutter blocks, were furnished by the city and hauled 
to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were 
furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 273 

furnished by the contractor. A contract for laying artificial 
stone sidewalks was awarded to Barnes-Ruffin Company. Work 
under this contract was begun June 12, 1899, and completed July 
27, 1899, at a cost of $1,613. 

Francis street, Huntington avenue to Brookline avenue, is 
about 1,455 feet long. The contract for constructing the surf ace 
of this street was awarded to James Doherty & Co , November 5, 
1898. Work under this contract was begun May 1, 1899, and 
completed June 28, 1899, at a cost of $8,601.33. It is a 6-inch 
macadam road with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, 
straight edgestones, and gutter blocks were furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular 
edgestones were furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for 
crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. 

Hamilton street, Bowdoin street to Homes avenue, is about 
944 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McGovern. Work under this con- 
tract was begun October 26, 1898, and completed June 15, 1899, 
at a cost of $1,869.64. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. , 

Harold street, Munroe street to Walnut avenue, is about 748 
feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Patrick McGovern. Work under this contract 
was begun November 21, 1898, and completed June 15,. 1899, at 
a cost of $1,628.10. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones, and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. A retaining wall and fence was built in front 
of Harriet V. Sanderson estate by Patrick McGovern, costing $360. 

Hewins street, Columbia road to Erie street, is about 701 
feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this contract was 
begun September 13, 1898, and completed May 17, 1899, at a 
cost of $1,432.05. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Hubbard street, Chestnut avenue to Lamartine street, is 
about 449 feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Thomas Minton. Work under this 
contract was begun November 20, 1899, and suspended December 
27, 1899. 

Idaho street, River street to Manchester street, is about 867 



274 City Document No. 38. 

feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McGrOvern. Work under this con- 
tract was begun July 20, 1899, and completed October 12, 1899, 
at a cost of $1,978.30. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones, and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Ipswich street, Boylston road to Boylston street, is about 2,366 
feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this contract was 
began August 16, 1899, and suspended December 8, 1899. 

Lauriat avenue, Ballou avenue, to Norfolk street, is about 
769 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Timothy F. Bradley. Work under this 
contract was begun August 22, 1899, and suspended November 
25, 1899. 

Lonsdale street, Dorchester avenue to Adams street. (See 
report of Superintendent of Streets for 1898, page 261.) When 
work was suspended December 28, 1898, the macadam roadway 
required a small amount of rolling, which was done early in sea- 
son of 1899. The cost of the contract work for constructing the 
surface of this street was $3,490.53, not including cost of arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks. It is a 6-inch macadam.road with artificial 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone and straight edgestones were 
furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the 
contractor ; circular edgestones and gutter blocks were furnished 
on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by the contractor. Artificial stone sidewalks were laid on north 
side (9,977.5 square f eet), by John C. Newborg, costing $1,895.73 ; 
on south side (10,228.6 square feet), by the Barnes-Ruffm Com- 
pany, costing $1,943.43. 

Maryland street, Savin Hill avenue to Bay street, is about 
474 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this con- 
tract was begun October 18, 1898, and completed May 10, 1899, at 
a cost of $1,250.05. It is a 6-inch macadam road with brick side- 
walks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter blocks 
were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by 
the contractor ; circular edgestones and bricks for sidewalks were 
furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Middleton street, Norfolk street northerly, is about 593 feet 
long. A contract for constructing the surface of this street was 
awarded to Philip Doherty, November 14, 1898. Work under 
this contract was begun April 3, 1899, and completed August 19, 
1899, at a cost of $1,502.26. It is a 6-inch macadam road with 
crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones 
and gutter blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the 
site of the work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 275 

furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Newburg street, Beech street to Belgrade avenue, is about 
1,980 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to James Doherty & Co. Work under 
this contract was begun November 14, 1899, and suspended 
December 16, 1899. 

Northampton street, at Albany street. (See Albany street.) 

North Harvard street, Western avenue to Charles river, is 
about 2,573 feet long. The contract for constructing the sur- 
face of this street was awarded to Geo. H. Wentworth & Co. 
Work under this contract was begun October 4, 1898, and com- 
pleted June 23, 1899, at a cost of $15,142.31. It is a Telford 
(8-inch) macadam (4-inch) road with crushed stone sidewalks. 
Crushed stone, stone for Telford base, straight edgestones and 
gutter blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of 
the work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished 
on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by tlje contractor. 

Oakview terrace, Centre street southeasterly, is about 861 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this con- 
tract was begun November 9, 1899, and suspended January 24, 
1900. 

Orkney road, Strathmore road to Sutherland road, is about 
841 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Daniel E. Lynch. Work under this con- 
tract was begun May 2, 1899, and suspended October 16, 1899. 

Peterborough street, Audubon road to Audubon road (see 
report of Superintendent of Streets for 1897, page 373), is about 
1,833 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James Doherty & Co. Work under this 
contract was begun July 19, 1899, and completed September 27, 
1899, at a cost of $4,734.46. It is a 6-inch macadam road with 
crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones, 
and gutter blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the 
site of the work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were 
furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Peverell street, Sawyer avenue to Salcombe street, is about 
486 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this contract 
was begun August 25, 1898, and completed May 22, 1899, at a 
cost of $2,399.94. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Pontiac street, Hillside street to Tremont street is about 919 
feet long and 40 feet wide, and is to be cut through a solid ledge 



27(5 City Document No. 38. 

for about 420 feet. The work of excavating the ledge was com- 
menced January 19, 1900, by the Paving Division, and is still in 
progress. 

Public Alley No. 101, District No. 2, Richmond street to 
Cross street, between Fulton and Commercial streets, is about 
385 feet long, and averages 15.5 feet wide. A contract for 
paving and regulating this alley was awarded to Patrick 
McGovern. Work under this contract was begun August 28, 
1899, and completed September 16, 1899, at a cost of $1,044.23. 
This alley is paved with large granite blocks on a gravel bed 
with pitch and pebble joints, and is without edgestones or side- 
walks. The paving blocks were furnished by the city and hauled 
to the site of the work by the contractor. 

Public Alley No. 102, District No. 2, Marshall street to 
Creek square, is about 205 feet long and averages 10.5 feet wide. 
The contract for paving with asphalt and regulating this alley was 
awarded to Jones & Meehan. Work under this contract was 
begun October 10, 1899, and completed November 11, 1899, at a 
cost of $874.27. This alley was paved with 2 inches of Seyssel 
natural rock asphalt on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, 
with edgestones and brick sidewalks for about half its length on 
one side. The paving blocks and edgestones required were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of, the work by the con- 
tractors. Bricks for sidewalk were furnished on the work by the 
city. 

Public Alleys Nos. 401, 402, 403 and 404, District No. 5, 
between Huntington avenue and St. Botolph street, from Irving- 
ton street to Public Alley No. 405 ; and Public Alley No. 405, 
District No. 5, from Huntington avenue to St. Botolph street. 
These alleys are respectively 490, 486, 466, 587, and 236 feet 
long, and each 16 feet wide. The contract for paving with 
asphalt and granite blocks and regulating these alleys was awarded 
to Simpson Brothers Corporation. Work under this contract 
was begun August 9, 1899, and completed October 11, 1899, at 
a cost for each alley, as follows : No. 401, $1,885.19 ; No. 402, 
$1,501.02; No. 403, $1,423.07; No. 404, $1,844:74; No. 405, 
$690.79. These alleys were paved with 1^ inches of Trinidad 
land asphalt with 1£ inches of bituminous concrete binder on a 
6-inch American cement concrete base, and also with granite blocks 
on gravel base with gravel joints where too steep for asphalt. 
These alleys, except No. 405, were constructed with a roadway, 8 
feet wide, two brick sidewalks each four feet wide, bounded by 
granite edgestones. Two turn-outs were constructed in each alley, 
excepting No. 405, 30 feet long and 14 feet wide, so that two 
teams may pass. Alley No. 405 was constructed with a roadway 
8 feet wide, and brick sidewalk on northerly side 5 feet wide and 
on southerly side 3 feet wide, each bounded by granite edgestones. 
Paving blocks, straight edgestones and flagging for crosswalks 
were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by 
the contractor ; circular edgestones and bricks for sidewalks were 
furnished on the work by the city. 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 277 

Public -Alley No. 418, District ]S T o. 5, between Beacon and 
Marlborough streets, from Dartmouth street to Exeter street, is 
about 528 feet long and 16 feet wide. A contract for repairing 
the granite block pavement and brick sidewalks in this alley was 
awarded to H. Gore & Co. Work was begun August 30, 1899, 
and completed September 6, 1899, at a cost of $168.22. 

Public Alley No. 419, District No. 5, between Beacon and 
Marlborough streets, from Clarendon street to Dartmouth street, 
is about 548 feet long and 16 feet wide. The contract for pav- 
ing with asphalt and regulating this alley was awarded to Simp- 
son Brothers Corporation. Work under this contract was begun 
August 8, 1899, and completed October 2, 1899, at a cost of 
$1,564.80. This alley was paved with 1 -J- inches of Trinidad land 
asphalt, with l£ iuches of bituminous concrete binder on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base. This alley was constructed with 
a roadway 8 feet wide, and two brick sidewalks each 4 feet wide, 
with granite edgestoues. Paving blocks, edgestones and flag- 
ging for crosswalks were furnished by the city and hauled to 
the site of the work by the contractor ; bricks for sidewalks were 
furnished on the work by the city. 

Public Alley No. 420, District No. 5, between Beacon and 
Marlborough streets, from Berkeley street to Clarendon street, is 
about 548 feet long and 16 feet wide. A contract for repairing 
the brick sidewalks in this alley was awarded to H. Gore & Co. 
Work was begun August 29, 1899, and completed September 1, 
1899, at a cost of $80.85. 

Public Alley No. 431, District No. 5, between Commonwealth 
avenue and Newbury street, from Hereford street to Gloucester 
street, is about 375 feet long and 16 feet wide. The contract 
for paving with asphalt and granite blocks and regulating this 
alley was awarded to Simpson Brothers Corporation. Work 
under this contract was begun August 7, 1899, and completed 
September 30, 1899, at a cost of $953.67. This alley was paved 
with l£ inches of Trinidad land asphalt, with lh inches of bitumi- 
nous concrete binder on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, 
and with granite blocks on a gravel bed, with gravel joints where 
too steep for asphalt. It has a roadway 8 feet wide, and 
two brick sidewalks each 4 feet wide, with granite edgestones. 
Paving blocks, edgestones and flagging for crosswalks were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the con- 
tractor ; bricks for sidewalks were furnished on the work by the 
oity. 

Public Alley No. 701, District No. 8, between Union 
Park and Upton streets, from Shawmut avenue toTremont street, 
is about 628 feet long and 20 feet wide. The contract for pav- 
ing with asphalt and granite blocks and regulating this alley was 
awarded to the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. Work under 
this contract was begun September 16, 1899, and completed No- 
vember 8, 1899, at a cost of $3,077.46. This alley was paved 
with l£ inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with 1£ inches bitumi- 
nous concrete binder, on a 6 -inch American cement concrete base, 



278 City Document No. 38. 

and with granite blocks on a gravel bed with gravel joints where 
too steep for asphalt. It has a roadway in part feet wide, and 
in part 13 feet wide, with brick sidewalk northerly side 3.5 feet 
wide, and southerly side in part 3.5 feet wide and in part 7.5 
feet wide, with granite edgestones ; the wide sidewalks were 
built to protect the trees on the alley. Paving blocks, edge- 
stones and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; bricks for 
sidewalks were furnished on the work bv the city. 

Public Alley No. 702, District No. 8, West Springfield 
street to Worcester street, is about 205 feet long and 15 feet wide. 
The contract for paving with asphalt and regulating this alley 
was awarded to Jones & Meehan. Work under this contract was 
begun September 29, 1899, and completed November 9, 1899, at 
a cost of $862. This alley was paved with 2 inches of Seyssel 
natural rock asphalt on a 6 -inch American cement concrete base. 
It has a roadway 9 feet wide, and two brick sidewalks each 
3 feet wide, with granite edgestones. G-ranite blocks, edge- 
stones and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; bricks for 
sidewalks were furnished on the work by the city. 

Public Alley No. 703, District No. 8 ; Public Alley No. 
702 to Newland street, is about 192 feet long and 10 feet 
wide. The contract for paving with asphalt and granite blocks 
and regulating this alley was awarded to Jones & Meehan. Work 
under this contract was begun October 2, 1899, and completed 
November 9, 1899, at a cost of $629.10. This alley was paved 
with 2 inches of Seyssel natural rock asphalt on a 6-inch Ameri- 
can cement concrete base and with granite blocks on a gravel bed 
with gravel joints where too steep for asphalt. It has a roadway 
8 feet wide ; the edgestones are placed 1 foot from the building- 
line, and are backed up with concrete. Paving blocks, edge- 
stones and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. 

Public Alley No. 2001, Webster street to Marginal street, 
is about 240 feet long, and for a distance of 65 feet from 
Webster street it is 10 feet wide ; from this point 60 feet further 
it is 5 feet wide, and for the remaining distance of 115 feet it is 
4.5 feet wide. The contract for paving and regulating this alley 
was awarded to Ward & Conlin. Work under this contract was 
begun September 25, 1899, and completed October 14, 1899, at 
a cost of $305.20. This alley was paved with second-hand 
granite blocks (removed from Devonshire street) on a gravel bed 
with gravel joints for 125 feet from Webster street; the remain- 
ing distance was paved with bricks, except for a distance of 10 
feet, which is occupied by a flight of wooden steps about 9 feet 
in height. These steps were repaired, as was also a board fence 
extending about 60 feet from Marginal street on the northwesterly 
side of alley. The difference in elevation of Marginal and Web- 
ster streets is 28 feet. 

Rosseter street, Bullard street to Bowdoin avenue. (See report 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 279 

of Superintendent of Streets for 1898, page 262.) Work on re- 
taining wall was completed June 26, 1899. On account of mak- 
ing an opening in fence at estate of T. F. Badlam, the cost was 
increased $28.18, making a total cost for retaining walls and 
fences of $1,303.18. 

Rowe street, Ashland street to Sharon street, is about 475 
feet long. A contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this contract was 
begun December 7, 1899, and suspended December 23, 1899. 

Rozella street, Adams street to Muzzy street, is about 322 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street and for rebuilding the retaining wall at the Mary Hemen- 
way School was awarded to T. F. Bradley. Work under this 
contract was begun November 27, 1899, and the work of rebuild- 
ing the retaining wall is still in progress. 

St. Stephen street: St. Stephen street to Bryant street is 
about 803 feet long. (See report of Superintendent of Streets 
for 1898, page 262.) The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to James Doherty & Co. Work 
under this contract was begun June 27, 1899, and completed 
August 8, 1899, at a cost of $1,879.16. It is a 6-inch macadam 
road with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks 
and straight edgestones were furnished by the city and hauled 
to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular edgestones 
were furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks 
was furnished by the contractor. 

School street, at Athelwold street, was widened by taking 
548 square feet of land from the corner estate. The contract for 
doing the necessary work in connection with this widening was 
awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this contract was 
begun July 5, 1899, and completed July 17, 1899, at a cost of 
$125. The work done was to build a 6-inch macadam roadway 
and crushed stone sidewalks, set edgestones and pave granite 
block gutters. All stock required was furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractors. 

Seymour street, Canterbury street to Brown avenue, is 
about 1,150 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to T. F. Welch. Work under this 
contract was begun December 5, 1899, and suspended December 
21, 1899. 

Shirley street, Massachusetts avenue to Norfolk avenue, is 
about 877 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to J. F. Cullen. Work under this 
contract was begun June 26, 1899, and completed October 10, 
1899, at a cost of $3,505.35. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with 
brick sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter 
blocks were furnished by* the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular edgestones and bricks were 
furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Spencer street, Athelwold street to Park street, is about 480 



280 City Document No. 38'. 

feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McG-overn. "Work under this con- 
tract was begun June 26, 1899, and completed August 3, 1899, 
at a cost of $787.76. It is a 6-inch macadam road with crushed 
stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight eclgestones and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; circular eclgestones were furnished on 
the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Spencer street, Wheatland avenue to Talbot avenue, is about 
625 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to James McG-overn. "Work under this con- 
tract was begun November 20, 1898, and completed May 25, 
1899, at a cost of $1,500.54. It is a 6-inch macadam roadway 
with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edge- 
stones and gutter blocks were furnished by the city and hauled 
to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular eclgestones 
were furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks 
was furnished by the contractor. 

Stanley street, Quiney street to Bellevue street, is about 
375 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street .was awarded to James Doherty & Co. Work under this 
contract was begun May 28, 1899, and completed July 17, 1899, 
at a cost of $1,260.63. It is a 6-inch macadam road with brick 
sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight edgestones and gutter blocks 
were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by 
the contractor ; circular eclgestones and bricks for sidewalks were 
furnished on the work by the city ; flagging for crosswalks was 
furnished by the contractor. 

Thane street, A th el wold street to Park street, is about 479 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Philip Doherty. Work under this contract was 
begun June 29, 1899, and completed August 3, 1899, at a cost of 
$552.79 (not including cost of artificial stone sidewalks). It is a 
6-inch macadam road with artificial stone sidewalks. Crushed 
stone, straight edgestones and gutter blocks were furnished by 
the city and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; 
circular eclgestones were furnished on the work by the city ; flag- 
ging for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. Artificial 
stone sidewalks were laid by the Barnes-Puffin Company from 
Park street 81 feet on the easterly side and 140 feet on the west- 
erly side, in all 1,440.2 square feet, costing $320.44. The re- 
maining artificial stone sidewalks had been constructed before the 
street was laid out. 

Trinity place, St. James avenue across Stuart street, is about 
398 feet long. The contract for paving with asphalt and regula- 
ting this street was awarded to the Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 
Work under this contract was begun August 21, 1899, and com- 
pleted September 28, 1899, at a cost of $3,516.09. It is an as- 
phalt road with brick sidewalks. The roadway is paved with lj 
inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with li inches of bituminous 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 281 

concrete binder on a 6-inch American cement concrete base. 
New eclgestones, granite blocks, and flagging for crosswalks were 
furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the 
contractor ; bricks for sidewalks were furnished on the work by 
the city. 

"Waldeck street, Melville avenue to Tonawanda street, is 
about 1,63.5 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to J. F. Cullen. Work under this 
contract was begun September 29, 1899, and completed December 
5, 1899, at a cost of $4,207. It is a 6-inch macadam road, 
with crushed stone, tar concrete and artificial stone sidewalks. 
Crushed stone, straight eclgestones, and gutter blocks were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the con- 
tractor ; circular edgestones were furnished on the work by the 
city ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the city. The 
street was constructed in the following manner : Part between 
Melville avenue and Park street, 781 feet long and 40 feet wide, 
has roadway (including gutters) 26 feet wide ; two crushed stone 
sidewalks, each 7 feet wide, bounded by granite edgestones. ' In 
this part there is 179 linear feet of artificial stone sidewalk which 
was constructed before the street was laid out. Part between 
Park street and Tonawanda street, 854 feet long and 50 feet wide, 
has a roadway 26 feet wide (including gutters), two tar concrete 
walks each 6 feet wide, and two loam spaces each 6 feet wide, 
bounded by granite edgestones ; these loam spaces were sodded 
about 2 feet in width back of the edgestones. The tar concrete 
sidewalks were constructed before the street was laid out. 

Wensley street, Heath street across Bickford avenue, is about 
720 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Collins & Ham. Work under this con- 
tract was begun May 10, 1899, and completed November 14, 
1899, at a cost of $2,600.16 (including thecostof furnishing and 
laying 472 linear feet of ground water drain 4 inches in size) . It is a 
6-inch macadam road with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed 
stone, straight edgestones, and gutter blocks were furnished by the 
city and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular 
edgestones were furnished on the work by the city. Flagging for 
crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. 

West Selden street, Morton street to Manchester street, is 
about 3,424 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to James McGrOvern. Work under 
this contract was begun July 21, 1899, and is still being carried 
on. 

Woodlawn street, Hyde Park avenue to Forest Hills Ceme- 
tery, is about 1,068 feet long. The contract for constructing the 
surface of this street was awarded to Thomas A. Dolan. Work 
under this contract was begun July 24, 1899, and completed No- 
vember 13, 1899, at a cost of $1,933.99. It is a 6-inch macadam 
road with crushed stone sidewalks. Crushed stone, straight 
edgestones and gutter blocks were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; circular edge- 



282 City Document No. 38. 

stones were furnished on the work by the city ; nagging for cross- 
walks was furnished by the contractor. 

Worth in gton street, Fenway to Longwood avenue, is about 
1,151 feet long. A contract for filling this street to sub grade 
was awarded to J. C. Coleman & Son, at the rate of 11 cents per 
cubic yard measured in the fill. Work under this contract was 
begun July 27, 1899, and completed December 30, 1899 : 17,251 
cubic yards were paid for at 41 cents per cubic yard, equal to 
§7.590.11. 

Miscellaneous. 

Contracts were awarded on the following streets, but at the 
end of the season no work had been done : 

Aberdeen street, Beacon street to Brookline branch of 
Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Callender street, Tucker street across Don street. 

Custer street, "Woodman street to Arnold Arboretum. 

Dresden street, Boylston street to Spring Park avenue. 

Edison green, Dorchester avenue to Pond street. 

Esmond street, Blue Hill avenue to Harvard street." 

Shafter street, Waterlow street to Faxon street. 

Warner street, Harvard street to Park street. 

Plans have been prepared of the following wi new streets " on 
which the work of construction has not been commenced : 

Barry street, Quincy street to Richfield street. 

Boston street, Mt. Vernon street to Columbia road. 

Draper street, Robinson street to Bowdoin street. 

Fowler street, Glenway street to McLellan street. 

Jersey street, Brookline avenue to Audubon road. 

Jlontague street, Ashmont street to Roslin street. 

Public Alley No. 901, Hemenway street to another part of 
Hemenway street. • 

South street, Jamaica street to Arborway. 

Stratford street, Anawan street to Clement avenue. 

Wainwright street, Centre street to Welles avenue. 

Williams street, Washington street to Call street. 

Woodcliff street, Howard avenue about 211 feet easterly. 

Grading Street Railway Tracks. 

The grades for tracks in the following streets have been deter- 
mined. On streets marked ** the surveys were made and levels 
taken by the companies : 

{Boston Elevated Railway Company.) 

Atlantic avenue, Dewey square to Oliver street. 
Atlantic avenue, Dewey square to Kneeland street. 
Boston street, Edward Everett square to Washburn street. 
Boylston street, Ipswich street to Brookline avenue. 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 283 

Cambridge street, Brighton avenue across Washington 
street. 

Cambridge street, North Harvard street to Charles river. 

Causeway street, Prince street to Haverhill street. 

Charlestown street, Haymarket square to Charlestown 
bridge. 

Columbia road, Blue Hill avenue to Edward Everett square. 

Commercial street, Prince street to Hull street. 

Dewey square. 

Federal street, Dewey square to Milk street. 

Ipswich street, Boylston road to Boylston street. 

Kingston street, Bedford street to Essex street. 

Leverett street, Causeway street to Craigie's bridge. 

Talbot avenue, Norfolk street to Blue Hill avenue. 

Washington street, Blue Hill avenue to G-lenarm street. 

( West Roxbury and Roslindale Street Railway Company .) 

** Ashland street, South street to 1,100 feet east of Sutton 
street. 

** Spring street, Gardner street to Dedham line. 

{Union Freight Railroad Company.') 

Atlantic avenue, Dewey square to Oliver street. 
Atlantic avenue, Dewey square to Kneeland street. 
Causeway street, Priuce street to Haverhill street. 
Commercial street, Prince street to Hull street. 
Dewey square. 
Total length of single track grades 16.9 miles. 

Plans and Specifications. 

Aberdeen street, plan and specification of retaining wall, 
fence and bulkhead. 

Belvidere street, plan and specifications for wooden bulk- 
head and fence. 

Burt street, plan and specifications for iron fence on culvert. 

Castle square, plan with elevations. 

Columbia road, plan of retaining wall and steps at Hamilton 
street. 

Edward Everett square, plan and specifications for park 
curb. 

Fairmount street, plan and specifications for ground water 
drain . 

Freeport street, plan and specifications for iron fence on wall 
at Dorchester Yacht Club. 

Harold street, plan and specifications for retaining wall and 
iron fence. 

Haverhill street, plan of sidewalk southwesterly side leading 
from Haymarket square. 



284 City Document No. 38. 

Ipswich street, plan and specifications for concrete bulkhead 
and fence along location of Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Rozella street, plan and specifications for retaining wall and 
granite steps. 

Wensley street, plan and specifications for ground water 
drains. 

A set of plans snowing the improved pavement in the central 
part of the city has been prepared for the use of the Permit 
Office, the object being to show the location of all openings made 
in this class of pavement. These openings have been plotted 
from the inspectors' notes upon request. 

Columbia Road. 

Columbia road construction has been completed from Bine Hill 
avenue to Edward Everett square, with the exception of the 
bridge by which the Midland Division of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad will cross the road ; this work has 
not been commenced. 

Bridge over the Railroad and Columbia Avenue. 

The work under the contract with Mr. Dennis F. O'Connell, 
dated October 10, 1898, was finished in June at a cost of 
$25,773.44. This work consisted of building two abutments and 
a pier. The southerly wing wall of the west abutment was left 
unfinished, as it was necessary to leave Carson street unobstructed 
until other means of access to Mt. Vernon street east of the rail- 
road can be provided. 

The foundations rest on a hard clay or sand bottom at Grade 
2.5 above city base for the West abutment and at Grade 2 for the 
East abutment and pier. The foundations below a grade 3 feet 
below the grade of the surface in front are of American cement 
concrete, and above that grade the abutments and pier are of 
granite ashlar and rubble backing with cut stone parapets and 
coping. The walls are well ballasted with quarry chips. 

Road Surfacing. 

The section of road between Dorchester avenue and Button- 
wood street has been completed. The work was done under a 
contract with Philip Doherty, dated June 14, 1899, and was 
finished August 30, 1899, at a cost of $1,911.04. 

Bridge over Shoreham Street. 

This bridge is to be built to carry Columbia road over Shore- 
ham street, a traffic street to connect Mt. Vernon street with Car- 
son street. It will be parallel with the railroad and 100 feet 
distant from it. Its grade will be the same as the existing 
streets, and the crossing of the Parkway by a traffic street at this 
point will be avoided. 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 285 

Under a contract with Mr. Michael A. Meany the excavation 
across Columbia road above the grade of Shoreham street was 
completed on January 1, 1900, at a cost of $591.44. 

Plans have been prepared for the construction of the bridge, 
but the work of erection awaits the completion of a proposed 
storm water sewer at this point. 

Filling. 

The section of Columbia road between the bridge over the 
railroad and Mercer street, South Boston, also so much of the 
proposed Columbia avenue as lies east of the old location of the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad have been filled 
to grade. For this work there were three contracts. Under a 
contract with Mr. J. J. Sullivan, dated December 24, 1898, there 
were brought from the excavation near Story street, South Bos- 
ton, 4,978 cubic yards at a cost of $2,986.80. Under a contract 
with John S. Jacobs & Son, dated October 20, 1898, there were 
brought from the site of the new high school building on Thomas 
Park 25,811 cubic yards at a cost of $9,233.85. 

The larger part of the filling was done under a contract with 
Mr. Simon J. Donovan, elated December 28, 1898. The work 
was finished in October, and there were deposited 116,471 cubic 
yards at 69£ cents per cubic yard. This contract included the 
construction of an extension of the culvert under the railroad to 
the bay outside the slope of the new filling. This culvert is of 
wood on a pile foundation ; it is 250 feet in length and 4 feet by 
5 feet 8 inches inside. The total amount paid under the contract 
was $83,375.59. 

Under the contract with Mr. Simon J. Donovan for filling 
that portion of Columbia road between Atlantic and I streets, 
dated October 25, 1898, there have been deposited 71,109 cubic 
yards. The work is not yet completed. 

Commonwealth avenue, Warren street to Chestnut Hill 
avenue, cross-section plans for estimating amount of rock exca- 
vation under five contracts, aggregating 45,857.4 cubic yards 
costing $64,634.84, which includes the cost of loading and haul- 
ing 9,851.7 cubic yards to the crusher and loading 19,436.7 
cubic yards into city teams at foot of ledge. This work 
was begun in September, 1898. Plans and specifications were 
also prepared for two retaining walls, one near Summit 
avenue and one near Sutherland road ; these walls were not built. 

During the year the reconstruction of Commonwealth avenue 
from Brighton avenue to Chestnut Hill avenue has been under 
way and is nearly completed as far as Chiswick road. 

Congress Street, South Boston. 

On Congress street, between B and C streets, a roadway about 
40 feet in width has been paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
base, granite edgestones have been set on the southerly side of 
the street, and two catch-basins have been built. The paving of 



28b' City Document No. 38. 

this short portion of Congress street in connection with the work 
clone by the Commonwealth, and that under the decree abolishing 
the grade crossing on this street has provided a continuous 
thoroughfare paved with granite from Atlantic avenue to South 
Boston by way of the L-street bridge. 

Lines and grades have been furnished for the construction of 
Talbot avenue, which is now completed. Some work has been 
done on Blue Hill avenue, between Walk Hill street and 
Mattapan. 

Two hundred and six petitions to lay artificial stone sidewalks 
have been reported upon to the Superintendent of Streets. 

The amount of edgestone required for one hundred and forty- 
nine estates has been furnished to the Paving Division. 

In seventy-three cases the Paving Division has been notified of 
the necessity of resetting edgestone on account of artificial stone 
sidewalks to be laid. 

Forty-two petitions for permits to construct coal-holes, bulk- 
heads and sidewalk areas, have been examined and reported upon. 

Ninety-one petitions, calling for eighty-seven catch-basins, were 
referred by the Sewer Division and reported upon. 

Locations were furnished the Sewer Division, for construction 
purposes,. of nine hundred and forty-three catch-basins on one 
hundred and sixty different streets. 

Dumping Wharf for the Sanitary Division. 

The high platform and runway at the Sanitary Wharf on 
Albany street was completed in March by Thomas E. Euggles, 
at a cost of $5,476. 

East Boston Ferries. 

New drop. — The northerly drop for the East Boston landing 
of the South Ferry was completed and put in commission Feb- 
ruary 4, 1899, at a cost for contract work of $5,775. 

Charlesgate Bridge over Ipswich Street. 

Under a contract with the King Bridge Co., of Cleveland, 
Ohio, dated March 25, 1899, the steel work was completed on 
January 2, 1900. A contract has been made for the erection of 
the ornamental railing of the same design as that on the bridge 
over the railroad. 

As the season was too far advanced to permit of laying cement 
concrete, when the steel work was finished, the laying of the 
concrete and asphalt floor of this bridge has been deferred until 
spring, and a temporary wooden floor has been constructed to allow 
of the bridge being used during the winter. 



Street Department — Engineering Division. 287 

South Union Station. 

The portion of the paving on the westerly half of Dorchester- 
avenue extension, between the southerly end' of the new station 
and Federal-street bridge, which was not laid in 1898, has been 
completed. The entire length of the new avenue, on which was 
laid a temporary granite pavement on fresh fillings in 1898, has 
been repaved, and the edgestone reset. The sidewalk on the 
harbor side of the avenue has been paved with brick, and an iron 
railing built on the sea wall for its entire length. 

The paving on Summer-street extension, between Dewey square 
and the harbor line, has been relaid, and a bulkhead carrying 
a plank sidewalk has been built along the property of the 
Boston Electric Light Company. 

Early in the season the narrow strip of paving on Atlantic 
avenue in front of the express buildings, which could not be laid 
when the other paving was done around the station, was com- 
pleted and the edgestone set. 

The work of paving Atlantic avenue, between Dewey square 
end Kneeland street, with pitch and pebble joints and on a con- 
arete base, was commenced early in November, 1899. This work 
had been delayed until almost the close of the season, because of 
the special track-work of the Boston Elevated Railway and the 
Union Freight Railroad in Dewey square. As soon, however, as 
any of this material was in position the work of concreting and 
paving was carried on day and night whenever the weather and 
temperature would permit. With the exception of a small area 
at Beach street, where the special track-work was not ready, all 
of the paving between the tracks and westerly of the tracks on 
Atlantic avenue has been put on a concrete base, the paving laid 
with pitch and pebble joints, the eclgestones set and the westerly 
sidewalk laid with brick or artificial stone. The work in Dewey 
square has also bee*n completed with the exception of two small 
areas adjoining Summer and Federal streets. A small refuge 
island has been built in the square, surrounded by granite edge 
stone and paved with brick. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



288 City Document No. 38. 



APPENDIX J. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR. 



64 Pemberton Square, Boston, February 1, 1900. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I herewith submit a report of the work performed 
under chapter 389, Acts of 1895, section 116; chapter 175, Acts of 
1897; and section 99, chapter 47, Revised Ordinances, 1898, relative 
to the smoke nuisance in this city. 

The severe storm of November, 1898, when a number of barges 
used in the coal-carrying trade were lost at sea, increased the cost 
of transportation, which, together with the specially keen competi- 
tion among the coal-dealers of this city for the past two years, has 
from time to time greatly augmented the quantity of low-grade 
bituminous coals brought to this market. 

So familiar are the observers with the condition of the various 
stacks throughout the city when using their regular fuel that a 
change is readily noticed and reported; these complaints, on inves- 
tigation, were found to be due in the main to the coal, and 
it required considerable efforts on our part to keep the soft-coal 
nuisance within bounds, and accept from the consumers the excuse 
that they were paying for and supposed theywere getting the best 
grade coal. 

The use of these low-grade bituminous coals by stationary plants 
has only obtained within the past few years, and is indirectly due to 
the comparatively low prices quoted on contracts. At these prices it 
has been almost impossible for the dealers to carry out the condi- 
tions of the contract without entailing a loss; hence the introduction 
of a cheaper fuel. 

As the contracts for coal with steam-users are generally made 
during the summer months for the year, and with a view of placing 
the responsibility for these conditions, which became very noticeable 
from time to time, the following letter was issued and sent to the 
coal-dealers throughout the city, and was also published in the daily 
press: 

It is reported that owing to competition in the coal business at the 
present time, importations of lower grades of soft coal maybe expected 
to fill orders on contracts now being made. I desire at this time to call 
your attention to the law which authorizes this department to take ac- 
tion in preventing smoke nuisances, and to the fact that this law will be 
rigidly enforced, and all violations vigorously looked out for. During 
the past winter, when the situation as regards coal became extreme, 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 289 

owing to natural causes which could not be overcome, this department 
waived for a time its objection to the use of certain low-grade coals, as 
the higher grades were not to be obtained. Such action, however, can- 
not apply to the present situation. 

Your attention is called to this matter now, so that there may be no 
cause for complaint on your part later on in the event of trouble, and 
that your customers may be fully advised as to the action which this 
department will certainly take unless proper coal is used. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets. 

The use of these low-grade coals which go with low-priced con- 
tracts are in the end costly and troublesome. It has been demon- 
strated that the increase in consumption will average from 15 to 40 
per cent., which will materially offset the reduction in price, not 
taking into consideration the disadvantages so far as results are 
concerned and the increased emission of smoke. 

This condition exists largely in plants equipped with smoke pre- 
venters, the owners of which feel that with the present equipment 
they can burn this fuel without creating a nuisance, but as these 
cheaper grades of soft coal contain so much volatile or gaseous 
matter the devices have been unable to control the smoke satisfac- 
torily, and I have been obliged several times during the past six 
months to caution them. 

The shipments of high-grade bituminous coals the past two months 
have been very scarce, due partly to strikes among the miners and 
the inability of the railroads to furnish transportation from the 
mines to tide-water; it is also stated that the demand for this fuel 
has increased, owing to the prosperous condition of the country; be 
that as it may it has resulted in the introduction of some very 
smoky coals into this city, and our entire time has been taken up in 
asking the co-operation of the engineers and owners to see that 
extra care was exercised in stoking, and in some cases insisting 
upon using a mixture of hard coal. Some plants adopted hard coal 
entirely. 

The present situation is one of the worst in the history of the 
coal trade in this city, with very little hope of relief in sight. 
Were it not for the open weather many of the steam-users would 
have been put to serious inconveniences, as a soft-coal famine could 
not have been avoided. 

While we have anticipated this stringency in the soft-coal market 
we have asked and are receiving the hearty co-operation of many of 
the steam users in keeping the smoke within bounds. 

There is a somewhat false impression regarding the use of soft 
coal in this city, many believing that its use is prohibited. This is 
not so, as under the present statute laws a chimney is allowed to 
emit " dark or thick-gray " smoke for five minutes continuously at 
any one time during the day, or 25 per cent, of any continuous 
period of twelve hours. 

Any person, however, who is annoyed or suffers from an adjoin- 
ing chimney, can, upon complaint, be given relief under section 116, 
chapter 175, Acts of 1897. 

Take the present situation, when for the past two months con- 
siderable low-grade coals have been used, it is safe to say, that very 
few places could be found where the present statute law is being 



290 ' City Document No. 38. 

substantially violated. Technical violations it is true have been 
found, but it is a question if the alleged violators could be fined, or 
that an injunction would be granted against them under the law, 
without a complaint showing the existence of a nuisance. 

It is therefore evident that the present law is not satisfactory, in- 
asmuch as the emission of smoke for a much shorter period than 
the law allows is a nuisance, and the statutes should be so amended, 
that its provisions when enforced would contribute to the comforts 
and good health of the community. 

This has been brought very forcibly to my attention several times 
the past two years, when chimneys have been pointed out to me as 
nuisances by adjoining owners, who refused, however, to enter 
complaint or even allow their name to be used, and after spending 
considerable time taking observations I have found that the pres- 
ent law was being complied with. This reluctance of those who 
suffer most to enter complaint I find to be one of the chief 
obstacles to a more rigid enforcement of the present laws. 

In other cities, particularly in the West, where the average coals 
used are of a much lower grade than that used in Boston, the law r s 
governing the emission of smoke are more stringent, and allow no 
such liberal standard as here. 

In Cincinnati, O., the emission of dense smoke (no time given) 
is declared a nuisance. 

In Pittsburg, Penn., the emission of smoke (kind not specified) 
is not allowed over three minutes at any one time. 

In Denver, Col., the emission of dense dark or gray smoke is not 
allowed for more than two minutes continuously, or during more 
than 12 per cent, of a continuous period of twelve hours. 

The leniency of our present statute law is such that so long as 
soft coal is used it will be taken advantage of by those who are 
unwilling to be subjected to any extra expense. 

The use of coke, made from the coal drawn from the mines of the 
Dominion Coal Company in Nova Scotia, and which is one of the 
by-products of the New England Gas and Coke Company, Everett, 
Mass., was adopted in a number of boiler plants the latter part of 
June, but was shortly after abandoned. The reasons given by 
engineers were many, and while it is claimed this fuel is being used 
successfully on locomotives, its use in stationary plants, so far, has 
not been a success. 

Its adoption, however, on locomotives attached to local trains, and 
also on the shifters, will be gladly welcomed by the residents along- 
side, or even near the line of the railroad, as it will remove a 
nuisance over which the present laws give no jurisdiction. 

The Everett plant at the present'time is operating about 300 ovens, 
which represents an out-put of about 1,200 tons per clay. This is 
being distributed to some of the steam railroads, and large shipments 
are sent to manufacturers throughout New England. For domestic 
purposes, between 30 and 40 tons are being distributed daily in this 
city and suburbs. 

The ordinance relative to the equipment of new boilers with 
smoke preventers or the burning of anthracite coal is being rigidly 
enforced, and during the past six weeks visits were made to 115 
plants, a large number of Avbich are used only at this season of the 
year for heating purposes, and who at the time the permit was ob- 
tained agreed to burn anthracite coal. Of this number, 6 were 
found using soft coal, but their attention being called to their 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 291 

agreement they immediately complied Avith the requirements of the 
ordinance. 

One hundred and ninety-eight short observations of one and two 
firings and twenty long observations, lasting from two to nine 
hours were taken on various chimneys throughout the city; three 
of these latter observations were made at the request of owners 
of steam plants, who having equipped their boiler or boilers with 
smoke devices, desired the city to inform them if the chimney was 
complying with the present law. 

These short observations, taken by the observers as they go over 
the various districts, as a rule, show a change in the condition 
of the chimney, and are immediately investigated. This method 
enables me to keep in close touch with the condition of the various 
plants from day to da3 r . 

The importations of aSTova Scotia coal recorded at the port of 
Boston for the year ending January 31, 1900, shows 240,543 tons as 
against 20,247 tons for the year ending January 31, 1899. This coal 
is in the main used at the gas works at Everett, although, during 
the past six weeks, large quantities were used in this city for steam- 
ing purposes, no other soft coal being obtainable. 

A weekly weather record of the temperature, humidity, character 
of the day, direction and miles per hour of the wind, and also the 
general precipitation, showing the nature of the same, when it began 
and ended, is compiled at this office, and a copy of the same is filed 
at the Central Office. 

Several requests have been answered from distant cities, and from 
some of the cities of this Commonwealth, regarding our laws and 
ordinances governing and regulating this nuisance. 

During the past year the steam plants of the Boston Electric Light 
Company at foot of Summer street and also Ferdinand street were 
abandoned. The power formerly supplied by these two plants is 
now supplied from their new plant, foot of L street, South Boston. 

Some new devices for controlling the smoke were- also applied 
during the year. R. Marston & Co., Brattle street, equipped their 
Babcock & Wilcox boiler with the "American Stoker," an under- 
feed arrangement. This appliance, so far, seems to absolutely con- 
trol the smoke. One boiler at the Chestnut Hill Pumping Station of 
the Metropolitan Water Works is also equipped with this type of 
smoke preventer, and will be placed under an additional boiler in a 
few months. 

The Edison Electric Illuminating Company, Atlantic avenue, is 
installing four new boilers, and is equipping them with the Bab- 
cock & Wilcox " Chain Grate Stoker." The equipment is not as 
yet complete. 

At the plant of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, Albany 
street, two new boilers are being equipped with the " Brooks Eur- 
nace," a foreign patent; these boilers are also connected with a 
separate chimney, with a view of determining its effectiveness in 
controlling the smoke. While this appliance has been in operation 
for some time, the experiments so far show that to meet the require- 
ments of this plant, it would be necessary to make some changes, 
and these are beins^ made from time to time. 



292 



City Document No. 38. 



Coal Importations. 



Month. 


Tons. 


Value. 


February, 1899 




8,299 


$12,869 


March 






2,051 


3,692 


April . 








4,671 


7,978 


May 








8,555 


8,555 


June . 








8,326 


8,326 


July . 








12,259 


12,259 


August 








8,328 


S,328 


September 








25,777 


25,784 


October 








33,290 


33,290 


November 








21,206 


24,572 


December 




62,390 


92,729 


January, 1900 




45,391 


60,922 


Total 








240,543 


$299,304 



Boiler Applications. 

' During the past year 438 applications for boiler permits were re- 
ceived from the Building Department, and disposed of as follows: 



Signed to use hard coal 
Adopted smoke devices 
Gas and other engines 
Applications withdrawn 
Soft coal and screenings 
Screenings and shavings 
Relocation 
Furnace . 



3fiS 
40 
22 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

438 



Special Reports. 

March 3. Report with observations on plant of the Best Baking 
Company, Cottage terrace, Ward 17. 

March 24. Report on complaint against chimney of estate, 77 
Milk street. 

April 24. Report on complaint against plant of the Boston Post- 
office. 

May 16. Report with observation on plant of the Eastern Cold 
Storage Company, 40-44 North street. 



Street Department — Smoke Inspection. 293 

May 22. Report on condition of plant of the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company, Albany street. 

June 1. Report on complaint against plant of the Creamer-Wins 
Laundry Company, West Newton street, 

June 1. Report on complaint against chimney of M. A. Hatch 
695 Tremont street. 

June 8. Report on complaint against plant of the Monks Build- 
ing, 35 Congress street. 

June 14. Report with observations on plant of the Norfolk Man- 
ufacturing Company, 37-49 Norfolk avenue. 

June 20. Report on complaint against chimney connected with 
bake-ovens at Merello's Bakery, 1260 Washington street. 

June 29. Report on complaint against plant of estate, 66 State 
street, 

• July 10. Report with observations on complaint against plant 
of the Niles Building, 27 School street, 

July 10. Report with observations on complaint against plant of 
Boston Elevated Railway Company, Freeport street, JJorchester. 

August 10. Report on complaint against plant of T. D. Cook & 
Company, 661 Columbia road. 

September 7. Report with observations on plant of the Eastern 
Cold Storage Company, 40-44 North street. 

September 22. Report on complaint against plant of M. A. Dyer 
4 North avenue. 

October 27. Report on complaint against plant of the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company, Atlantic avenue. 

December 19. Report with observations on plant of the Quincy 
Market Cold Storage Company, Richmond street. 

January 5, 1900. Report on complaint against Suburban Electric 
Light Company, Hawley street, 

Summary. 

The following is a brief summary of the work for the vear en din ^ 
January 31,1900: 

Number of boiler permits acted upon 438 

Number of objection notices sent .... 53 

Number of short observations taken . . . '. . ]98 

Number of observations lasting from two to nine hours . . 20 

Number of special reports made 19 

Number of complaints received .... 13 

Number of special requests for observation .... 2 
Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Keeley, 
Chief Inspector. 



294 City Document No. 38. 



APPENDIX K. 



REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE CLERK. 



Boston, February 1, 1900. 
Mr. Benj. W. Wells, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith a report of the work performed 
by me in connection with the Civil Service Commission together 
with a statement of the force emplo3 r ed and eligible for employment 
for the year ending January 31, 1900. 

One hundred and thirty-four applications were made upon the 
State Commission for 264 men of various grades of labor, and of 
this number fifteen were for promotions and two for reinstatement. 

Four hundred and twenty-five names were submitted, from which 
261 w r ere selected and appointed, sixteen of .whom were veterans, 
and forty-five persons were appointed provisionally under Civil 
Service Rule 36. 

Of the fifteen applications for promotions fourteen were granted, 
one having failed to pass the non-competitive examination. 

Eighty-six transfers were made from other city departments all 
of which the State Commission approved. 

Thirty were from the Bath Department, seventeen from Park 
Department, seventeen from Public Buildings Department, Repairs 
Division, six from Water Department, five from Lamp Department, 
four from Street Commissioners, three from Public Grounds De- 
partment, and one each from Transit, Cemetery, Police and Fire 
Departments. 

Notices for the discharge of 264 men were forwarded to the Civil 
Service Commission. 

The records of the department show that there are now 3,487 
persons eligible for employment in the several divisions, and of that 
number 3,235 were upon the January 1900 pay-rolls. 



Street Department — Civil Service. 



295 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Divisions. 


Title. 




CO 

.5 
'> 


u 

09 

09 

CO 


5 


CO 


l| 

CO_C9 
5 


(A 

99 


CO 

99 


si) 

« a 

£ S 

CO * 


O 




1 
















1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


l 


7 
] 




1 
1 
1 


Clerks 


8 
11 


16 

5 

14 

17 

11 

57 

8 

3 

50 

10 

11 


5 
6 


1 

4 


t 


2 
5 


2 
1 
1 


38 
33 
17 


















17 


Instrument men 




10 
10 

8 










1 
1 
















68 






5 


3 






24 












3 






54 

10 

21 

1 

20 


18 
7 
14 


1 

9 
15 


5 


1 
2 


1 












„ 


63 
1 






Blacksmiths and assistants 




2 


9 


5 


2 
1 






38 










1 








21 
20 










21 




] 


10 
1 




1 

1 




1 


1 


34 
2 














1 




1 










1 


3 


12 
2 


13 






25 


8 


13 
1 




51 






1 








1 

3 

' 3 








1 


















3 


















3 














1 




1 












1 




1 














1 

18 
50 




1 
















18 


Assistant drawtenders 














50 














25 


25 










21 


8 






29 


















5 


192 


ZOl 


53 


51 


97 


9 


755 









296 



City Document No. 38. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 



Continued. 





Divisions. 


Title. 




si 

a 
V- 

oS 


s 

CO 


CO 


si 

on 3 


>> 
■- 
u 


o 

QO 

2 


aj-r 

H 


o 
En 




5 


192 


261 

1 

34 


S7 


53 


51 

14 
1 


97 

8 


9 






1 






20 


76 










1 






1 


1 






2 






5 


2 


22 

18 














4 
3 


26 












21 






3 


6 


1 


11 












6 








2 

1 
2 






2 




4 












1 










1 


10 
5 
3 
5 
2 






13 


























3 






544 


542 


208 


236 






1,535 










2 








75 
3 


















S 






11 






1 
] 










1 






46 
5 
3 












47 
















5 


Mate 
















1 






3 








] 




4 






6 






6 


12 






39 
2 
1 










39 








10 




1 


6 




19 






1 






1 
4 






12 






13 
















4 














1 




1 






4 
] 










4 


















1 






] 








^ 


1 






1 












1 






















5 


313 


993 


323 


293 


158 


115 


9 


2,709 







Street Department — Civil Service. 



297 



Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Divisions. . 


Title. 


C3 q5 

8° 


si 
a 
> 
Pi 


09 

IS 

CD 

go 


U 

"a 

oS 
03 


bi . 

.2"S 
«£ 

03X3 
«;» 
O 


s 


01 


be 

a 


"3 
o 
tH 




5 


813 


993 
5 


323 


293 


158 


115 


9 


2,709 










10 

1 
27 












10 




1 


1 
5 
1 
3 












3 














32 










] 






2 






14 

1 

74 


11 


5 


1 




34 






1 






9 


186 


64 


11 


2 




335 






11 








1 

11 
2 
1 










1 






17 

7 
3 


G 


3 


8 


2 




47 






9 
















4 






6 










6 








1 

3 










1 






8 


8 


3 
1 




2 




24 






1 




















Total 


6 


975 


1,036 


540 


369 


178 


122 


9 


3,235 







Table showing Transfers made from Various City Departments 
to the Several Divisions. 





Departments. 


Divisions. 




M 
u 

OS 

Ph 


CO 

a 
a 
o 

O 

.2 

3 

IS 

Pn 


u 

CD 


m 
u 

C 

_o 

'co 

1 

02 


a 
« 2 

bc'35 

.a-? 

S3 co 

P+ 


'5 


oS 

EH 


Sh 
CD 

0) 

s 

03 

O 


P. 

■a 

OS 


oj 



"3 

Pn 


CD 
U 


"3 





7 
5 
3 
5 
9 
1 


6 
3 
4 
4 


"2' 
1 


1 
1 
1 

2 
1 


"3 


4 
2 
4 
4 
2 
1 


"i" 


1 


1 

2 




1 


19 




16 




1 




16 




17 








1 

1 






14 












3 










1 






1 




















































Total 


30 


17 


3 


6 


4 


17 


1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


86 







298 



City Document No. 



Table showing the Number of Applications for Various Grades 
of Men made upon the Civil Service Commission for the 
Year ending January 31, 1900. 













r. 
















p 










3 


T) 


•6 


P^eo 


00 


■c ffl . 








0J 




'gga 


Sn p 








•c 


23 




§£S 




S s f= 


Divisions. 


0Q 

a 


J2 
ft 
ft 


a 

SO 


o 
ft 
ft 


&|5 

'Co 

"35 a 


<a a O 

g.5« 


2=2 5 

ap'e 










POtn 


SC 2 


tcC "0 




C3 

.2 
ft 

ft 

<! 


s 
1 


■So 

p>> 


s 


O P P 

•S--.2 

<= 2 £ 
fr £ ft 


S a) P 
S73 o 

S3> 

fin" 

- Spp 

p=„-,ft 


£ cj P 
5-3 O 




26 


64 


79 


66 


32 




5 




49 

20 


'S9 
43 


146 

S6 


93 
41 


11 
1 


2 


5 




1 




14 
10 


27 

18 


49 
31 


25 
15 






1 








1 


9 


13 


18 


15 


1 




3 




4 


9 


15 


5 








Central Office 


1 


1 


1 


1 












Total 


133 


264 


425 


. 261 


45 


2 


16 







The above table includes fifteen persons that were promoted, one 
of whom failed in the non-competitive examination; also sixteen 
veterans, two as clerks, three assistant draw-tenders, one gateman, 
one tallyman, five mechanics and four laborers. 

Two requisitions were made for reinstating two discharged em- 
ployees. 

Sixty-one requisitions that were made are not included in above 
table, one of which was for a transfer from another city department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. J. Murray, 

Civil Service Clerk. 



Street Department. 



299 



APPENDIX L. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 1886, under charge of City Engineer. 

Name. Year. 



Bartholomew M. Young 
James H. Nugent 



1886 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Bridge Department 


before 1891. 




Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


U LI 
11 U 
I. (( 
U (I 


1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


1887. 
1S88 
1889 
1890 
1891 


29 
26 
29 
22 

* 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 

Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 


Year. 


Enoch Patterson, Superintendent Streets and Drains 


1827 to 1831 


Zephaniah Sampson, 


u u u 




1831 to 1846 


Thomas Hunting, Superintendent .... 




1846 to 1853 


Alfred T. Turner, 


" 










1853 to 1864 


Charles Harris, 


tl 










1864 to 1883 


Nehemiah T. Merritt, 


u 










1883 


James J. Flynn, 


" 










1883 


Charles Harris, 


u 










1884 


Michael Meehan, 


" 










1884 to 1886 


John W. McDonald, 


u 










1886 to 1889 


J. Edwin Jones, 


(1 










18S9 to 1891 



300 



City Document No. 38. 

Paving Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 


For 


Pub. 


No. of 




Year. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Quarterly report 




1851 


6 


W It 














1851 


29 


Annual report . 












1851 


1852 


2 


u it 














1852 


1853 


6 


(( It 














1S53 


1854 


6 


11 tt 














1854 


1855 


5 


( 11 














1855 


1856 


3 


it tt 














1856 


1857 


3 


" " 














1857 


1858 


3 


tl (I 














1858 


1859 


5 


tt u 














1859 


1860 


6 


u u 














1S60 


1861 


5 


.1 u 

11 11 

11 It 
11 11 














1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 


1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 


4 
3 
3 

7 


11 11 
11 11 
11 11 














1865 
1866 
1867 


1866 
1867 
1868 


3 
6 
9 


11 11 














1868 


1869 


14 


11 11 
It 11 

It 11 
It tl 
It It 
It tl 
It 11 
11 It 
11 11 














1869 
1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1S77 
1878 


1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1S74 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 


13 
12 

16 
21 
25 

27 
30 
38 
29 
24 


It It 














1879 


1880 


24 


tl It 
tl It 














1880 
1SS1 


1881 

1882 


48 
51 


11 It 
It tl 
tl 11 
It tl 
tl It 














1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 


1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 


47 
46 
97 
30 
16 


It tl 














18S7 • 


1888 


23 


11 It 














1888 


1889 


30 


11 It 














1889 


1890 


19 


11 It 














1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1,1891. 



Street Department. 
Sewer Department before 1891. 



301 



Xamb. 



Year. 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 


1827 to 1831 


Zephaniah Sampson, " 










1831 to 1837 


Charles B. Wells, " 










1837 to 1856 


Simeon B. Smith, " 










1856 to 1863 


William H. Bradley " 










1863 to 1883 


Horace A. Moses, " 










1883 to 1885 


Thomas J. Young, " 










1885 to 1887 


Seth Perkins, " 










1S87 to 1889 


Charles Morton, " 










1889 to 1891 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 


For Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. 
Doc. 


Annual report 


1859 


1861 


11 


" ' 
















1860 


1861 


12 


it < 
















1861 


1862 


12 


n t 
















1862 


1863 


13 


u ' 
















1863 


1864 


11 


It I 
















1864 


1865 


5 


11 1 
















1865 


1866 


6 


" ' 
















1866 


1867 


8 


11 I 
















1867 


1868 


13 


II 1 
















1868 


1869 


11 


II 1 
















1869 


1870 


3 


I. 1 
















1870 


1871 


11 


II 1 
















1871 


1872 


10 


11 1 
















1872 


1873 


13 


11 1 
















1873 


1874 


12 


II 1 












- 




1874 


1875 


17 


11 I 
















1875 


1876 


11 


1 1 1 
















1876 


1877 


13 


11 I 
















1877 


1878 


15 


II 1 

I I 1 

II 1 
















1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 


1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 


11 
16 
19 

18 
16 


It 1 
















1883 


1884 ( 


43 


II 1 
















1884 


1885 \ 


It 1 
















1885 


1886 


58 


II 1 
















1886 


1887 


69 


[I 1 
















1887 


1888 


81 


II I 
It I 

It 1 


'. 














1888 
1889 
1S90 


1889 
1890 
1891 


129 

14 

# 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



302 



City Document No. 38. 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name. 



Year. 



Ezra Forristall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 
Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall " 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
1869 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891, 

Sanitary. 



Name of Document. 


Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual report 


1853 


1854 


7 


















1854 


1855 


6 


















1855 


1856 


4 


















1856 


1857 


4 


















1857 


1858 


4 


















1858 


1859 


4 


















1859 


1860 


5 


















1S60 


1861 


6 


















1861 


1862 


5 


















1862 


1863 


5 


















1863 


1864 


4 


















1864- 


1865 


4 


















1865 


1866 


8 


















1866 


1867 


7 


















1867 


1868 


8 


















186S 


1869 


12 


















1869 


1870 


4 


















1870 


1871 


10 


















1871 


1872 


17 


















1S72 


1873 


40 


Annual report from 1873 to 1884, inclu- 








sive; the Superintendent's report was 








embodied in the report of the Board of 








Health 


1885 


18S6 


45 


Annual report 

u u 

11 LI 














1886 
18S7 
1888 
18S9 
1890 


1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


22 
16 
23 
21 
* 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



303 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal and Prison Point.) 



Name. 



Year. 



Frederick W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston, 
Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge, 
William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge, ] 



May 22, 1871, to 
March, 1891. 

June 14, 1871, to 
Jan. 31, 1883. 

March 28, 1883, to 
present time. 



Note. — Harvard bridge added in 1892. Essex street, Cambridge street, North 
Harvard street and Western avenue bridges to Cambridge were transferred from 
Street Department July 1, 1898. 

Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal and Prison Point.) 



Name of Document. 


For 


Pub. 


No. of 




Tear. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Annual report 


1871 


1872 


19 


" " 














1872 


1873 


12 


" " 














1873 


1874 


16 


a " 










♦ 




1874 


1875 


23 


" " 














1875 


1876 


20 


" " 














1876 


1877 


12 


u it 














1877 


1878 


10 


tt tt 














1878 


1879 


8 


It It 














1879 


1880 


12 


11 (1 














1880 


1881 


8 


11 It 














1881 


1882 


15 


11 














18S2 


1883 


15 


it 














1883 


1884 


19 


11 11 














18S4 


1885 


8 


11 11 














1S85 


1886 


12 


11 It 














1886 


18S7 


19 


n u 














1887 


1888 


25 


tt tt 














1888 


1889 


22 


ti ii 














1889 


1890 


20 


tt it 














1890 


1891 


* 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name. 


Year. 


Board of Ferry Directors 

William J. Burke, Superintendent . 

Thomas Kellough 


1870 

1891 

May 1, 1895. 


1891 
May 1, 1895. 
July 1, 1895. 



304 



City Document No. 38. 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name of Document. 



For 
Year. 



Pub. 
Year. 



No. of 
Doc. 



Annual report ...... 


1870 


1871 


41 




1 I 
















1871 


1872 


55 




' ' 
















1872 


1873 


81 




' ' 
















1873 


1874 


42 




' ' 
















1874 


1875 


65 




' ' 
















1875 


1876 


51 




' ' 
















1876 


1877 


53 




' ' 
















1877 


1878 


49 




t ( 
















1878 


1879 


60 




' l 
















1879 


1880 


74 




I ( 
















1880 


1881 


77 




' <■ 
















1881 


1882 


72 




' ' 
















1882 


1883 


93 


•' ' 
















1883 


1884 


76 


it . 
















1884 


1885 


72 


k i 
















1885 


1886 


28 


. U I 
















1886 


1887 


12 


U 4 
















1887 


1888 


10 


11 I 
















1S88 


1889 


3 


If I 
















1S89 


1890 


4 


11 I 
















1890 


1891 


* 


U I 
















1891 


1892 


12 


It t 
















1892 


1893 


11 


" ' 
















1893 


1894 


11 


U I 










* 






1894- 


1895 


11 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part I., City Documen 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department since 1891. 

Superintendent. 

Henry H. Carter, Member of American Society Civil Engineers. 

Resigned December 8, 1894. 

Charles R. Cutter, Acting Superintendent from December 8, 1894, to January 14, 1893. 

Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Bertrand T. "Wheeler, Superintendent from January 14, 1895, to February 4, 1896. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Benjamin W. Wells, Superintendent from February 4, 7896, to the present time. 



Bridge Division. 
Bridge Division. 
Bridge Division. 
Perry Division. - 
Ferry Division. - 
Paving Division. 



— John A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent until June 1, 

1895. 

— John P. "Wise, Deput Superintendent from June 7,1895, to 

February 14, 189 (i. 

— William H. Carberry, Deputy Superintendent from February 

14, 1896, to the present time. 
-Thomas Kellough, Deputy Superintendent from July 1, 1895, 

to February 14, 1896. ' 
-"William F. McClellan, Deputy Superintendent from February 

14, 1896, to the present time. 

— Charles R. Cutter, Deput i/ Superintendent until January 24, 

1895. 



Street Department. 



305 



Paving Division. — Darius N. Payson, Deputy Superintendent from January 24, 

1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Paving Division. — John L. Kelly, Deputy Superintendent from March 1, 1896, 

to the present time. 
Sanitary Division. — George W. Forristall, 1 Deputy Superintendent. 
Sanitary Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Acting Deputy Superintendent from Jan- 
uary 16, 1S94, to February 1, 1S95. 
Sanitary Division. — Charles A. Young, Deputy Superintendent from February, 

1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Sanitary Division. — Patrick O'Shea, Deputy Superintendent from March 1, 1896, 

to the present time. 
Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Deputy Superintendent until July 10, 1896. 

Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 
Sewer Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent from July 10,1896, 
to the present time. 
Member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Deputy Superintendent until 

March 22, 1895. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Benjamin M. Cram, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 22, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Joshua Atwood, 3d, Deputy Superintendent from 
March 1, 1896, to Ihe present time. 
Member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers. 
Street Watering Division. — M.Edwin Libby, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 6, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 
Street Watering Division. — Thomas J. Finneran, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 1, 1896, to the present time. 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges. — Henry H. Carter, ex-officio, Commissioner for 

Boston, until December 8, 1894. 
Charles R. Cutter, Actinq from December 8, 
1894, to January 14, 1895. 
. Bertrand T. Wheeler, from January 14, 1895, 
to February 4, 1896. 
Benjamin W. Wells, from February 4, 1896, 

to the present time. 
William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cam- 
bridge. 

i Died January 12, 1894. 

Street Department. 



Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual report, Executive Dept. Part II. 


1891 


1892 


36 


41 " " " " 


1892 


1893 


34 


" " " " " 


1893 


1894 


34 


tt tt tt -1 tt 


1894 


1895 


34 


It It tt tt tt 


1895 


1896 


29 


tt tt tt tt t. 


1896 


1897 


29 


tt tt tt tt tt 


1897 


1898 


34 


tt tt tt tt tt 


1898 


1899 


35 




1899 


1900 


38 



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