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Full text of "Annual report of the Street Dept. of the City of Boston"

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Given By 
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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofst1904bost 



ANNUAL REPORT &q£ 




Street Department 



YEAR 1904 




BOSTON 
Municipal Printing Office 
1905 






CONTENTS. 



Part I. 
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



PAGE 

Appropriations 2 

Area of Pavements 31 

Central Office 31 

Contracts 12 

Expenditures 4 

Expenditures, Recapitula- 
tion 9 

Financial Statement 10 

Financial Statement, Com- 
parison 11 



PAGE 

Organization 1 

Street Mileage 30 

Work done : 

Bridge Division 4 

Ferry Division 5 

Paving Division 5 

Sanitary Division 6 

Sewer Division 7 

Street Cleaning Division . . 8 

Street Watering Division, 9 



Part II. — Appendix A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Cable-houses and Boxes 15 

Drawtenders' Reports 21 

Drawtenders' Reports (5 

years) 22 

Expenditures 4 

Inland Bridges 8 

Tidewater Bridges 7 

North and South Yards . . 9 

Financial Statement 5 

Income 6 

Land and Buildings 15 

List of Bridges : 

Wholly Supported by De- 
partment 9 

In Charge of Park Depart- 
ment 11 

In Charge of Public 

Grounds Department. . . 11 



Maintained by Railroad 

Corporations 12 

Of which Boston main- 
tains part within its 

limits 11 

Of which Boston pays a 
part of the cost of 

maintaining 12 

Of which Boston main- 
tains the wearing sur- 
face 12 

Recapitulation 13 

Small Bridges or Culverts, 17 

Public Landing Places 14 

Recommendations 4 

Special Appropriations 5 

Width of Bridges 18 

Width of Bridge Openings.. 19 
Work Done 3 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE FERRY DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Expenditures 32 

Expenditures since 1858 .... 31 

Difference of Travel 33 

Ferry-boats 24 

Financial Statement 25 

Balance Sheets 26 

Comparison of Balances. . 36 

Keceipts at each Ferry. . . 32 



PAGE 

Receipts, Comparison .... 27 

Receipts since 1858 31 

Location of Ferries 24 

Recommendations 23 

Total Travel 34 

Ticket Statement 34 

Work Done 23 



Appendix C. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE PAVINO DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Asphalt 38 

Assessment Street Plans. ... 42 

Bitulithic Pavement 41 

Bonds 4 

Electric Light Poles 63 

Emergency Permits 61 

Expenditures 46 

Expenditures, Detail of 

Special 51 

Highways, Making of 57 

Construction of Highways 

Already Laid Out 57 

Laying Out and Construc- 

tion of Highways, 

Brighton 57 

Financial Statement 45 



PAGE 

Income 47 

Inspectors 61 

New Brick Sidewalks 58 

New Edgestones 58 

Notices 61 

Output of Crushers 59 

Permits 60 

Stone Crushing Plants 45 

Street Openings 59 

Street Numbering 63 

Work Done, General Law 

Streets 37 

Work Done, Recapitulation, 37 

Work in Charge of 35 

Property in Charge of 64 



CONTENTS. 



Appendix D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Expenditure 69 

Construction and Repair 

Accounts 75 

Cost of Collections 73 

House Dirt, Offal, Ashes 

and "Waste 73 

Maintenance of Fort Hill 

Wharf 75 

Financial Statement 67 

Force Employed 70 

Income 68 

Material Removed: 

Ashes and House Dirt 70 



PAGE 

Offal 70 

Totals 71 

By Districts 72 

Sold by Contract 74 

Final Disposition 73 

Carts, "Wagons, etc 72 

Contracts 74 

Cost Per Load, Towing to 

Sea 75 

Property in Charge of ... . 77 

Revenue 68 

Shops 75 

.Work in Charge of 66 



Appendix E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Catch-basins 116 

Charles River Basin 107 

Entrance Fees, Permits, and 

Assessments 110 

Financial Statement Ill 

Detail of Special Appro- 
priation 112 

Objects of Expenditures. . 1 12 

Property in Charge of 117 

Separate Systems of Drain- 
age 113 

Back Bay District 113 

Sewers Built to Date 115 

Sludge Account 116 

Summary of Sower Construc- 
tion 114 

Summary of Sewer Construc- 
tion (5 years) 115 

Work Done and Recommen- 
dations: 

South Boston 98 



PAGE 

Back Bay Fens 107 

East Boston 83 

Charlestown 84 

Brighton 85 

West Roxbury 86 

North Dorchester 90 

South Dorchester S8 

North Roxbury 102 

South Roxbury 93 

City Proper 100 

Main Drainage 102 

Main and Intercepting 

Sewers 103 

Pumping Station, Calf 

Pasture 104 

Lyons Street 104 

Moon Island 105 

Stony Brook 106 

Work in Charge of Division, 80 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Appendix F. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE STREET CLEANING DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Dumps 119 

Financial Statement 121 

Income 126 

New District 118 

Objects of Expenditure 122 

General Recapitulation. . . 125 

Paper Litter 120 

Property in Charge 127 



PAGE 

Push Cart Work 121 

Public Alleys 120 

Recommendations 121 

Stock 119 

Street Dirt Removed 126 

Summary of Work Done .... 127 

Tunnels and Subways 121 



Appendix G. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE STREET WATERING DIVISION. 



PAGE 

Distribution of Carts 130 

Expenditures (5 years) 130 

Expenditures, Objects of, by 

Districts 129 

Financial Statement 129 



Water Posts 

Water Used 

Work Done and Recommen- 
dations 



PAGE 

131 
130 

128 



Appendix H. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF BOSTON 
AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 



PAGE 

Draw Openings 136 

Expenditures 134 

Revenue 135 

Work done on Bridges : 

Cambridge Street 132 



PAGE 

Canal or Craigie 132 

North Harvard-street 132 

Prison Point 133 

West Boston 133 

Western Avenue 133 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



Appendix I. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER ON SPECIAL 

WORK. 



PAGE 

Gainsborough-street Foot- 
bridge 138 

Harvard-street Bridge 139 

Miscellaneous 140 

Norfolk-street Bridge 139 

Paving Wharf No. 2 140 

Street Railway Tracks 142 





142 




. 137 


Charles River Avenue .... 


138 


Circuit-street Fence 


138 


East Boston Ferries 


138 


Fort Hill Wharf 


138 


Franklin-street Tunnel . . . 


138 



Appendix J. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR. 



PAGE 

Boiler Applications 144 

Nova Scotia Coal 145 

Special Reports 149 



PAGE 

Summary 146 

Work Done 144 



Appendix K. 



REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE CLERK. 

(Page 147.) 



Appendix L. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 

NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 

(Page 149.) 



Hon. Patrick A. Collins, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir, — In compliance with the Revised Ordinances, the 
annual report of the operation and expenses of the Street 
Department for the year 1904 is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

Organization. 

The work of the department during the past year has 
been carried on under the same organization that was effected 
when the consolidated department was created in 1891, and 
as amended in 1895, the several divisions of the depart- 
ment being as follows : 



Central Office, 
Boston and Cambridge 

Bridges, 
Bridge Division, 
Ferry Division, 



Paving Division, 
Sanitary Division, 
Sewer Division, 
Street-Cleaning Division, 
Street- Watering Division. 



Each of the above divisions, with the exception of the 
Central Office and the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, is in 
charge of a Deputy Superintendent. 

The Boston and Cambridge bridges are managed by two 
commissioners. The Superintendent of Streets was the com- 
missioner for the City of Boston until October 28, 1904, 



2 City Document No. 40. 

when the Deputy Superintendent of the Bridge Division 
was appointed as commissioner, the other commissioner being 
appointed by the Mayor of the City of Cambridge. 



Appropriations. 

The money assigned for Street Department work for the 
past year was made available under the following appropria- 
tions : 

First. — Maintenance : From income of the city raised by 
taxes. Previous to the commencement of the financial year, 
February 1, the department estimates of the amounts neces- 
sary for the proper maintenance of the various divisions are 
submitted to His Honor the Mayor, who makes such recom- 
mendation as he may deem proper to the City Council. 
The maintenance appropriations, as passed by the City Coun- 
cil, were as follows : 



Central Office . 

Bridge Division 

Cambridge and Boston Bridges 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street-Cleaning Division . 

Street- Watering Division 

Total 



$20,000 00 
185,000 00 
20,000 00 
243,600 00 
850,000 00 
653,200 00 
320,000 00 
410,000 00 
165,000 00 

$2,866,800 00 



Second. — Work done under appropriations for permanent 
improvements : There was made available by the City Coun- 
cil, from income of the city raised by taxes, for general new 
or reconstruction work, as follows : 

Street Improvements $500,000 00 



Third. — Work done under appropriations for permanent 
improvements : Tbere was made available by the City Coun- 
cil, from loans within the debt limit, for new work as follows : 



Paving Division 



$300,000 00 



Fourth. — In 1891 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled " An Act Relating to the Location, Laying-out and 
Construction of Highways in the City of Boston." (Chapter 



Street Department. 3 

328, Acts of 1891, and amendments.) Loans under this 
Act previous to 1901 were outside the debt limit, but by 
chapter 199 of the Acts of 1901 the city was empowered to 
borrow the money inside the debt limit. From this fund new 
streets, assessable on the abutting property, are built. The 
amount expended the past year was : 

Highways, Making of. 

Sewers 872,718 01 

Streets 106,942 81 



Total $179,660 82 

Fifth. — In 1897 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled " An Act Relative to the Sewerage Works of the 
City of Boston." (Chapter 426.) Under this Act the loan 
is outside the debt limit. From this fund '• Sewerage 
Works " are built. 

The amount expended the past year was . . $1,012,792 48 

Sixth. — In 1901 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled " An Act Relative to Highways in the Ci^ of Bos- 
ton." (Chapter 199.) Under this Act the loan is inside the 
debt limit. From this appropriation street and sewerage 
works construction in " 323 " streets may be built. The 
amount thus expended the past year was : 

Construction of Highways Already Laid Out — 

Sewers $90,063 13 

Streets 30,168 00 



Total $120,231 13 

Seventh. — In 1899 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled " An Act Relative to Laying Out and Construction 
of Highways in the City of Boston." (Chapter 443.) Loans 
under this Act are outside the debt limit. The amount 
expended last year was as follows : 

Brighton $8,849 18 

Eighth. — In 1903 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled "An Act Relative to Separate Systems of Drainage." 
(Chapter 383.) Loans under this Act are outside the debt 
limit. 

The amount expended last year was . . . $642,965 95 



4 City Document No. 40. 

Ninth. — In 1903 an Act was passed by the Legislature 
entitled "An Act to Authorize the Construction of a Dam 
Across the Charles River between the Cities of Boston and 
Cambridge." (Chapter 465.) The loan under this Act is 
outside the debt limit. 

The amount expended last year for sewerage 

works was $540,063 29 



The expenditures under the several appropriations for the 
year 1904 were as follows : 



Maintenance . 

Sewerage Works 

Street Improvements 

Highways, Making of 

Separate Systems of Drainage 

Chai'les River Basin 

Construction of Highways Already Laid Out 

Laying Out and Construction of Highways 

Brighton ..... 
Dorchester street .... 
Bridge, Specials .... 
Hyde Park avenue .... 
Brandon street and Belgrade avenue . 
Sanitary and Street Cleaning, Specials 
Paving, Specials .... 

Total 



$3,184,092 88 
1,012,792 48 
744,086 89 
179,660 82 
642,965 95 
540,063 29 
120,231 13 

8,849 18 

45,220 60 

1,888 97 

19,710 15 

5,371 11 

145 19 

119,739 22 

$6,624,817 86 



BRIDGE DIVISION. 



Expenditures. 



Maintenance. 

$185,269.84. 



Specials. 

•11,888.97 



The Shawmut-avenue bridge over the Boston & Albany 
and New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad has been 
entirely reconstructed and opened to travel, and the expense 
of the rebuilding was met by a special appropriation. 

Attention is called to the Huntington-avenue bridge over 
the Boston & Albany railroad. 

This bridge was stripped for examination by the City 
Engineer and was found to be in a very bad condition, so 
much so that extensive repairs were necessary to make it 
safe for travel. 



Street Department. 



The traffic on this bridge is constantly increasing, and an 
appropriation should be made as soon as possible for the con- 
struction of a new structure at this point as a matter of 
public safety. 



FERRY DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. 

$258,126.20. 

The absolute necessity for a new coal pocket at the East 
Boston side of the North Ferry was never more apparent 
than at the present time. The past winter has been a severe 
one and traffic by water has been greatly hampered by ice ; 
the present storage facilities for coal are very meagre, and we 
have had some narrow escapes on account of the scarcity 
of our coal supply, due solely to the reason that we were 
unable to store coal in sufficient quantities to carry us 
through. 

An appropriation should be obtained for building a new 
pocket at the earliest possible moment. 

The gates on the boats have been equipped with patent 
locks, sockets and connections, and the possibility of injury 
caused by the falling or breaking of the gates has been prac- 
tically eliminated. 

The old piers should be replaced by new ones as soon as 
possible. These old piers are a source of great annoyance 
and may at any time become a menace to ferry travel, and 
should be removed. 



PAVING DIVISION. - 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance, Specials. 

11,073,445.42. $119,739.22. 

Work has progressed on Columbia road and Bennington 
street and the West Roxbury highways, Belgrade and Hyde 
Park avenues. Granite block paving, with pitch joints on 
a concrete base, has been laid to the extent of about 23,000 
square yards in the business section. Bitulithic pavement 
has been laid in residential districts to the extent of about 
18,000 square yards, and is proving very satisfactory. This 
pavement is laid with a ten years' maintenance guarantee. 



6 City Document No. 40. 

The advisability and absolute necessity of providing for 
the removal of snow by a special appropriation is once more 
urged upon the City Council. The expenditures for snow 
removal come at the most inopportune times, viz., the begin- 
ning and ending of the financial year, and furnishes abso- 
lutely no basis for planning expenditures for the mainte- 
nance of the department, and a special appropriation is 
requested that the work of maintenance, repairs, etc., may 
be carried along as it should be, without being hampered by 
the expense of snow removal, which is something that can- 
not be foreseen, and therefore cannot intelligently be pro- 
vided for. 



SANITARY DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. 

1706,529.89. 

The work of this division is greatly hampered by the lack 
of sufficient dumping places within easy reach of the base of 
collections, and the placing of scows for the reception of the 
collections is again respectfully urged upon you. 

There should be a dumping station at the South End and 
one somewhere in the vicinity of the Charlestown bridge, so 
that the collections of the South End, Back Bay and Rox- 
bury and a part of the West Roxbury and Dorchester dis- 
tricts could be hauled to an up-town disposal station, while 
those of the North and West Ends and Charlestown could 
be delivered to a down-town station nearer the base of collec- 
tion than Fort Hill wharf. 

An extension .of the " third system," so-called, that is, the 
separation of offal, ashes and refuse and the depositing of 
each in a separate receptacle, is recommended to cover all 
parts of the city where this system does not now obtain, 
to the end that less fault may be found by the board of 
health and owners of vacant lots where the department has 
obtained permission to dump. 

The establishment of division yards in the Dorchester and 
West Roxbury districts is a matter of vital importance to 
the residents of these sections, and would remove all cause 
for complaint as to service. The stables and sheds should 
be thoroughly overhauled, and an appropriation for this pur- 
pose provided. 



Street Department. 



SEWER DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. Specials. 

$324,360.72. $2,195,821.72. 

A great deal of necessary surface drainage work proposed 
for many years past has been started during the year and 
much of it completed. 

The work in the Back Bay Fens has been pushed rapidly 
and a start made in removing the sewage deposit from the 
Fens ponds. 

Considerable work in the territory adjacent to the Stony- 
brook conduit has been done in order that the Back Bay 
Fens conduit may be utilized by this territory and causes of 
complaint removed thereby. 

The completion of the " Separate System " in the Talbot 
avenue and Lauriat avenue districts made during the year 
and the practical completion of this system in Roxbury and 
the Back Bay will afford immeasurable relief to these sec- 
tions and will remove many fertile sources of suits for 
damages. 

The old channels of Stony brook, from Roxbury Crossing 
to the Back Bay Fens, should be rebuilt, as they are in a 
dangerous condition, and a covered channel from Jamaica 
Plain south to Forest Hills should be constructed as soon as 
possible. 



City Document No. 40. 



STREET CLEANING DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. Specials. 

$434,172.62. $145.19. 

The work of this division is constantly increasing for the 
reason that the public has been educated to clean streets, and 
even in the suburban districts the demand for more frequent 
cleanings is heard. An extension of the system to Roxbury 
and West Roxbury, an extension of the lines in Dorchester 
must soon be made to satisfy public demand. 

The experiment tried in a portion of Dorchester has re- 
sulted in the demand for its extension to the whole of the 
district, and the only reason for failure on the part of the 
department to comply has been insufficient funds. Money 
should be made available for this purpose as speedily as the 
financial condition of the city warrants it. 

The dumping question dwelt upon at some length in the 
Sanitary Division resume" applies with equal force to this 
division, and is a source to us at present of considerable 
expense. 

The South Boston stable is in a very bad condition both 
as to the structural and sanitary conditions, and another 
stable should be obtained that the horses, rolling stock and 
tools may be properly cared for. 

The push cart patrol service is very warmly commended 
as in the past, and this service is one that the business men 
are calling for more and more every day, and is without doubt 
the best way to keep the streets of the business section clean 
and in a presentable condition to the public. 



Street Department. 9 

STREET WATERING DIVISION. 

Expenditures. 
Maintenance. 

8165,071.08. 

During the past year four hundred and sixty-five (465) 
miles of streets were regularly watered, and four hundred 
thirty-five million, seven hundred twenty-three thousand, 
six hundred (435,723,600) gallons of water were used in the 
work. 



Recapitulation of Expenditures for the Twelve Months ending 
January 31, 1905. 



Object of Appropriations. 



Current 

Expenses. 



Special 
Appropria- 
tions. 



Totals. 



Street Department: 

Central Office 

Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 

Bridge Division 

Ferry Division 

Paving Division 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Street Cleaning Division 

Street Watering Division 

Street Improvements 

Highways, Making of 



Construction of Highways Already 
Laid Out 



Laying Out and Construction of High- 
ways, Brighton 



Dorchester street 

Hyde Park avenue 

Brandon street and Belgrade avenue. 



$20,S53 21 
16,263 90 
185,269 84 
258,126 20 
1,073,445 42 
706,529 S9 
324,360 72 
434,172 62 
165,071 08 



$1,888 97 



119,739 22 



2,195,821 72 
145 19 



744,0S6 89 
179,660 82 

120,231 13 

8,849 18 
45,220 60 
19,710 15 

5,371 11 



$20,853 21 

16,263 90 

187,158 81 

258,126 20 

1,193,184 64 
706,529 89 

2,520,182 44 
434,317 81 
165,071 08 
744,086 S9 
179,660 82 

120,231 13 

8,849 18 
45,220 60 
19,710 15 

5,371 11 



Totals. 



$3,184,092 88 



$3,440,724 98 



$6,624,817 86 



10 



City Document No. 40. 



Financial Statement of the Street Department Appropriation. 

February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 
Maintenance. 



Appropriation. 


Appropria- 
tions and 
Transfers 

during 1904. 


Revenue. 


Total 
Credits. 


Expendi- 
tures for the 
twelve 
months 
ending 
Jan. 31, 1905. 


Street Department : 
Central Office 


1 $20,853 21 
2 184,999 80 
3 16,263 90 
i 257,476 20 
B 1,072,682 32 
"698,515 89 
1 323,803 03 
8 434,172 62 
9 164,999 08 




$20,853 21 
185,269 S4 
16,263 90 
258,126 20 
1,073,445 42 
706,529 89 
324,360 72 
434,172 62 
165,071 08 


$20,853 21 
185,269 84 
16,263 90 
258,126 20 
1,073,445 42 
706,529 89 
324,360 72 
434,172 62 
165,071 08 




$270 04 


Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 


650 00 

763 10 

8,014 00 

557 69 








72 00 


Totals 


$3,173,766 05 


$10,326 83 


$3,184,092 88 


$3,184,092 88 





1 Appropriation 

Transferred from Cambridge and Boston Bridges 



2 Appropriation .... 
Transferred to City Treasury 



$20,000 00 
853 21 



$20,853 21 



1 Appropriation .... 
Transferred to Central Office 
Transferred to Ferry Division 



4 Appropriation 

Transferred from Boston and Cambridge Bridges 
Transferred from City Treasury .... 



5 Appropriation 

Transferred from Street Improvements 
Transferred from City Treasury . 



1 Appropriation .... 
Transferred from City Treasury 



7 Appropriation .... 
Transferred from City Treasury 



8 Appropriation 

Transferred from Surplus Revenue 



'■> Appropriation .... 
Transferred from City Treasury 







$185,000 00 
20 


$184,999 80 




$20,000 00 
853 21 

2,882 89 


$16,263 90 


$243,600 00 
2,882 89 
10,993 31 


$257,476 20 


$850,000 00 
115,000 00 
107,682 32 


$1,072,682 32 


$653,200 00 
45,315 89 


$698,515 89 


$320,000 00 
3,803 03 


$323,803 03 


$410,000 00 
24,172 62 


$434,172 62 




$165,000 00 
92 


$164,999 08 





Street Department. 



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12 



City Document No. 40. 



List of Contracts from February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905, 
made by the Street Department. 



Paving Blocks. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per M 

delivered on 

Wbarves. 




New England Granite 


June 3, 1904.... 
June 3,1904.... 

June 3,1904.... 
June 13, 1904.... 


$70 00 


Large paving blocks 


S. & R. J. Lombard 

Rockport Granite Corn- 


70 00 
70 00 


Large paving blocks 




70 00 







Bank Gravel and Sand. 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per double load 
of 40 cubic feet. 




Gravel. 


Sand. 




J. F. Brennan & Co 

J. P. O'Riorden 

J. H. Sullivan 


Feb. 1,1904 

Feb. 1, 1904 

Feb. 1,1904 .... 
Feb. 1, 1904 . . . 
Feb. 1, 1904, 
Feb. 1, 1904. 
Feb. 1, 1904, 

Feb. 1, 1904 

Feb. 1, 1904 

Feb. 1, 1904 .... 


$1 45 
1 40 
1 40 
1 40 
1 35 
1 50 
1 65 

1 60 

1 60 

1 60 


$145 
1 40 
1 05 
1 40 




Thomas F. Minton 

William Gilligan 

William Gilligan 

J. P. O'Riorden 

J. P. O'Riorden 


1 35 
1 50 




1 65 


City Proper : 
Districts 


1 25 


City Proper: 
District 9 


1 60 


City Proper : 
District 10 


1 10 



Note. — Single loads to cost one-half of the foregoing prices. 



Street Department. 



13 



Spruce Lumber. 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
M ft. B. M. 

rough. 




Curtis & Pope Lumber Co... 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co... 
G. Fuller & Son 


Feb. 1, 1904 
Feb. 1,1904, .. 
Feb. 1, 1904. . 
Feb. 1, 1904 

Feb. 1,1904 

Feb. 1, 1904. 
Feb. 1,1904. ... 
Feb. 1, 1904 


$20 90 
21 90 






22 45 




G. Fuller & Son 


22 00 




Curtis & Pope Lumber Co. . . 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co.. . 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co... 
Curtis & Pope Lumber Co... 


21 90 




20 90 




20 90 




20 50 







Beach Gravel. 



District. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per ton 

delivered 
on wharves. 


City Wharves 


Hugh Farrell 


Jan. 30,1904.... 


$0.59 





Edgestones. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per lin- 
eal foot. 


Furnishing 50,000 lineal 
feet edgestone, deliv- 
ered on wharves 


Simpson Brothers, Corpora- 


March 5, 1904. .. 


$0.70 





Iron Castings. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per 
100 lbs., de- 
livered at 
yards. 


Iron Castings 


The Sessions Foundry Corn- 


Jan. 30, 1904.... 


$1 54 







14 



City Document No. 40. 



Coal. 



Contract. 


Awarded to 


Dated 


Price per ton, 
2,240 lbs. 


1,700 tons New River, Ferry 


W. K. Niver Coal Com- 


March 10, 1904.. 
April 30, 1904... 
April 30,1904... 






$4 85 
3 65 


10,000 tons, Pumping Sta- 


Henry F. Kiley 


10,000 tons, Terry Wharves, 


3 65 



Leasing Ledge Lots. 



Contract. 


Lessors 


Dated 


Price per ton 
for stone 
removed. 


1 Lease of ledge on Columbia 

road, near Brunswick st.. .. 

2 Lease of ledge on Centre St., 

between Allandale and Wal- 


W.J. Wilcox etals., 

Thomas Minton 

James W. Kenney.. 
William J. Emerson, 

Frederick Bleiler.. 


March 22 and 
June 12, 1901.. 

May 10,1902.... 

June 7, 1902 

July 14, 1902.... 

June 8, 1903 .... 


$0.10 
.18 


2 Lease of ledge on Kenney St., 


.17 


2 Lease of ledge on Rosseter st., 
2 Lease of ledge on Heath st., 


.18 
.18 







1 Expires March 22, 1906. 2 Expires February 1, 1906. 



Street Department. 



15 



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■z 


p 
c 

1 


c/ 
P 

s 

p 

G 


- te 

"5 

■°. 

CO 










p 


c 


H- 


a 




c 


> — 






a; 


a 


a 


03 


• 


a 


| < 


te -s 

o " 

•A~. 


i X 


? 


? 


h 


! > 


^ 


■ ^ 


o 


[2 




[2 


(¥ 


Pw 




C 


a 


1 




7 

c 

1 j9 


> £ 


P 


_p 


c 


p 


P 


P 


p 

a 


a 

CO 




6 


a 
o 1 


Si 

P5 1 - 


1 


1 

3 ? 


8 


9 

p 





a 


! 8 


O 


o a. 


R 


P 
a 


P 


p 


a 

03 




s 


u 




■€ 


I 


a 
a 


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a 


e 
a 


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p? 




^ 




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-a 




a 

i 


s 


Sp 

03 f 


a 





* % 


a 


) a 


c 


9 


a 


a 


a 


a 


CD 








: e 


p 




P 


i P 


- P 


- P 


-i ft 




c 


• ~l 


a 


"- 


a 


■■- 






a 


S 














a 


Ph 


H 


a 


- 


V 


pi 


5 


p- 


a 


<ji 


s 


Si 


£ 


a 


Ph 





Street Department. 



23 



OS t- M rH 



r* S3 



1-1 00 rH 



a s s 



S S 52 






a rt 



Ph a 



o 

^ ci bo 

£ 5 o 9 

»"5 I? O I"; 



cs • fa- 

o > 

o 3 



O £ 



Ha - X 



3 -° a 



PP S 



S C5 



S ft 3 

03 S ^3 

Ph 03 O 



•E n 






Ph 



S K 



03 §• 



■a : J? • -3 o 



§ < 



a 


GO 


o : 


3 




t»> 


ft 




^ 


05 


cj 




o 


03 


CO • 


** 


t> 


03 • 














e9 
be 
O 


o 
"So 


a ; 


a 


03 • 






£2 


a 


*w 


CO 


w 


o 










a 














m 


03 


^ 


t>. 




03 


cj 


m 


P 


fc 


£ 




T3 


T^ 


QQ 


03 


o 


a 


f=5 


„ 


OS 


— 




a 


o 


a> 






a 


O 


*" 




a 










t*> 






a 


a 


03 • 








p * 


^ 










P3 'a 




M • 










3" 










CO** 




i-i : 


- ■„ 


-= •/ 





p,Si 



X — 
03 J2 

ftS, 



03 03 



2 C 



3 fe 



is a 



A k.: 



•Br 5 * 



Ph Ph Oh Ph 



Ph 



3 3 



24 



City Document No. 40. 






a 

03 
J= 
O 

u 

Qi 

•O 

a 

c 
© 



CD 05 lO 00 



O OS ~H 



CO r-l i-H 



O CO OS 



* ^n 








z> o 




o 




5 Oi 


Ci 


cr- 


en 


-" i-( 


I— < 


1-1 


rH 



~. _. z~. ~ 



tr- i-H 



H « S N 




8 3 



ft fe 



3 M Ph 



W H 



CO ^H ^ 



< o 



w s 



ho p 



a!a 

a) 



x: a 



« H 



tn ,_,- 



•* 5 



.a .a ,c © 



-° 3 



n 


~ 


a 








*i 


a 






a 


CD 




O 


O 

O 


PP 


a 


H 


H 


C5 


CO 



h q 



* w 



w s 






CO tn 

ftpq 
Pi 



> « 






&3 



.CO 



fl Ct> • . << 



es O o 

CD CJ 

&& -CO- 
CO,- 



0h Ph Ph cb 



IS 

Ph 



i o 

3 CO 

o 



^ w 



Ph Ph Pi Ph 



Street Department. 



25 



o \a n o 

CS iO CO 00 



lO lO OS OS 



OS CO iO co^ co^ 

r-T ,-T i-T -«# 



CO ^ ,— ^h 



os ot ^r 



09 H H 



O* 00 ffl CO 



OS i-H ^ 



s s s 1 



hj o M 



■O u to !_; 



■C ° .fl 



o > 



hS W 



3 O £ S 



o ^ 








U 


— 


o 


S3 


>» 


«y 


OS 


P 


CJ 


B 


« 


jj 


V 




fl 

a 

tD 

pq 






1-1 


o 

R 


5 


to 

o 


"3 

03 
© 


cS 




02 


-fl 




i"! 


-H 


*"S 


H 


<5 



i-C m *A 



H O co O O 



* .2 



.3 2 O 



5 £ 



« g s 



to £ p 



BO . 



» _c3 

•a § 



Si a 



<! 5 



= q 






a < 



^A tL» 



2 ■= 



5 * £ 5 



fe B 



£ « "2 - 

^ fl fl (U 

a e: « > 



-^ ^ to 



- fl 

a w 



o a> o o ,~ o . w 
_0.fl.fl. fl.jr g<g 

s s s s s 



3 3 ft S 3 3~ 5- - 



0) OJ O 33 

— Pi Oft) 

E E E 






=- a. 

e e 



26 



City Document No. 40. 



oo'S 03 ?s 

OS ^CJO^ 



o-S 



rH rH «S 



<! S 



P * 



& « 5 



S « 



a Ph 



- 


£> cfi 


01 


Cjrrt 


-a 


^=3 


CI 


!»<( 


b0 


^3 EH 



pq fe m pq ■ a 





^ 


H 


o 


g 


Wh 


fe 


s 


OQ 


e 




>W 


ti 


« 



Pq 





o 


a 


a 


c 


o 


o 




03 


«* 


c 


a 


c 


c 


o 


.2 


^c 


<= 


c 


e 


a 


CN 


'2 


c 


L~ 


a 


c 


e 


CO 


<n 


t~ 


a 


c 


e 


CO 














m 




oc 




oc 


-* 




m 




i— 




CO 












h 


■* 














c 


o 


"d 










— 


cs 


03 

P 


c 

T— 

c 


2 


1 




r— 

-1 


CO 




a 
p 


>> P» >*> so bo 




5 


P 


5 


= 


p 

< 




£ 


H; 


*~. 


h 


< 




>>>>!>>>,>> >» 






c 


= 


p 


P 


a 




ci 


S 


B 


c 


c- 


cS 




ft ft ft ft ft ft 


o 


s 


= 


s 


C 


E 


a 




c 


c 


c 


o c 


o 


-d 


c 


C 


C 


O C 


o 


03 


cr 


a 


a 


CO OC 


CO 


*. 


(- 


|V 


S- 


t- 


H 


H 


a 


a 


a 


CD a 


03 


CO 


,c. 


,c 


£ 




« 


S3 


£ 












c 


c 


c 


o o 


<! 


- 


f- 


t- 


H f- 


H 




£ 


P 


pc 


P6 


P= 


PP 




e 


c 


p 


p 


p 


fl 




a 


a 


a 


03 a 


o> 




t- 


»- 


t- 


(■ 


i- 


!h 




s- 


s- 


r- 


r- 




H 




gj 


S 


B 


Oj B 


OS 




£ 


|£ 


^ 


£ £ £ 














<« 
















H 
















o 
































o 
















pp 
















03 
















J3 




























a 




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B 




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a 




a 




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03 






a 


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1 








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a 




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a 


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a 


s 






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> *. 








p 




c 


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CS 




ti 


J 


c 
or 


2. 




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P- 


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■ 





i u 






<< 


P 
a 

c 

P 
C 

P 


p 


a 




a 


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55 
O 
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p 

1 

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P 

i 

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1 « 

1 

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aj 






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a 

t 


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a 

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a 


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£ 

e 
a 

1 
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p 
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a 

e 

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a 

03 
03 






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a 


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5 
7 


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a 






a 
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i ! 






a 


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& 


: P: 


PP 





Street Department. 



27 





1£ 


r- 


IT 




6 


o 


C 




o 


lO t- -* 

oj c~ cn 


Ph 


•<j 


= 


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10" 












5/ 




■c 










o 




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n 




C 


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a 


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CS< 




a 


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CJ 








a 






c 


s 




>-: 


*-. 


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o 








O 








bC 








a 










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a> 




c 


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f- 


P, 


h 




a 


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c 

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0) 










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CC 


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H 




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o 




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CC 


T— 1 


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03_ 


(3^ 




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m 






















C 1 














-* 


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O 

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03 




CO -3 




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so 


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oS 




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p 


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m 






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o 






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o 






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£ 






Bi 


■a 

cs 


a 




H 


OS 

o 








S 


P 




s 










c 












o 




< 


(B 








a 


p 


s 


bo 
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CO 

CO 

GO 


a 

a 
a 


a 
a 

DC 


s 








Sh 


t- 


<- 


^ 








o 


c 


c 


o 
























(X 


s 


CD 








0) 


a 


a 


<o 




































ft 


P 




1 ft 








oj 


& 


a 


9 








o 


c 
s 




3 










u 












ft 


CE 


" a 


- ft 

CO 








to 


61 


3 b 


bo 








a 


■ C 


> 


a 


CO 
















u 


U 


t- 




O) 


























— 


rg 


-c 


■c 


be 

bo 

a 










a 




n 


a 


* 


ci 






bo 


b 


) Si 


3 SO 






a ry 


a 


a 


a 


a 
















— oc 


X 


A 




^ 




^ T* 


2 




2 


© 




a - 




a 




o 




!; « 














B 


a 




o 




fcl 


il 


Ba 


&* 







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S3 

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C3 I— I 



ec 



= r^ -= = 



S3 ° 
SO 

pa 



<< S 



fl £ 



a ** 



o --bo 



■S IS 



28 



City Document No. 40. 



pq 



K5 





5? 


« 


H 
03 


03 
03 




03 

ft 




® da 


ir* 




a 

OS 




lO 




« S3 


cc 




s- 










03 oj 03 

ftft 


a 
ft 


03 

a 

60 




ft 




■^ „e„e 






u 















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IS CS t-; 


c 




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C3 


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oo 

g^ • - 

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3 




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£ 


2 
p 




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3 




2 

cS 

a 




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a 




O 




O 
CO 




ftbJD >>* 


- 










OS 




1 

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c 
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c 


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■„ S3SZ 

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3. 23 


t 
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c3 9 * '*' - 

03 00 o 0" 


co a g 

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03 


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C5 


R 


SO 5) 


OS 





z 


CN 


IT 


CM 




s, & 




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03 

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00 


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p 


fa 


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fcc 


bo> 


SCcS 




a 


a 




bj 


P 


a 


a 


a£ 










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3 p: 


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£ 


■§« 


^a 


a vj 




on * 1 cc co 




c/ 


CO cc 


CO Ji 


HM 




3£ s^ 


P 
a 


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3 +- 


a p 
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spq 




ft 


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pq 





31 i— i i-H 




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Street Department. 



29 



a © 

5 P< 






H S, 





be 


3 




— 




•- 
o 


fl 


03 


>d 


0) 


0> 


p 


- 




o 


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o 










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a 


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j. 




1 - 



u, 
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gJII 

a) s* . 
aa 

P.aJ ^ 

b 



3 t. 



p e 2 



£ •3 



2 2 









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OS- 
S' 3 



1? 



5 Eh Eh Eh' 



in 
OJ 

si 



— O 



"2 °s 

OJ 
& - 

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= ? 



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2 5* 



3 ? 



hw 



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Mo 



■ffl H 

2 >, o 



a s 

Oh 



H OQ P 

2 o o 



rt o-g 

pea oo 

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& p u 

£ 3 £ 

g«o 

-a § ffl 

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o oQJ 



03 P 



£°: 



■4 



30 



City Document No. 40. 



Street Mileage. 

The following table shows the length of public highways 
and character of the pavements, February 1, 1905: 



Districts. 


03 
A 
ft 


& 


ja 


•*2 


o 


O 

a 


6 

2 

S 


. s 

03 

c3 

o 

03 


03 

> 
03 
U 

O 


03 
S-i 

cs 

o 


CO 

"3 

o 


Year 1903 report.... 


20.33 


92.81 


0.91 


2.23 


0.38 


0.52 


2.16 


317.75 


57.52 


5.78 


500.39 


February 1, 1905. 


16.27 
0.30 
0.05 
1.69 
2.40 


44.06 
10.91 
5.55 
16.28 
12.38 
0.61 
5.83 


0.74 
0.17 


0.70 
0.22 
0.19 
0.33 
0.08 
0.09 
0.23 
0.26 


0.34 


0.15 
0.01 

0.14 


2.02 

0.03 
0.34 

0.77 


27.43 
12.03 
19.44 
21.11 
64.43 
74.17 
87.60 
27.79 


0.11 
0.02 
2.48 
1.63 
3.88 
5.79 
11.55 
13.08 


0.79 

0.26 
3.40 
0.40 
0.76 
0.76 
0.11 


92.61 


Charlestown 

East Boston 

South Boston 


, 23.49 
28.14 
44.78 
84.51 








81.42 






0.04 






106.01 








41 .24 
















Total 


*20.71 


t95.62 


0.91 


2.10 


0.38 


0.30 


3.16 


334.00 


38.54 


6.48 


502.20 



Note. — The above districts refer to areas enclosed by the original boundary lines. 
* Of this amount 0.22 miles = asphalt blocks. 

t Of this amount 15.43 miles = granite block paving on concrete base. 
4.71 miles of piiblic alleys, chapter 298, Acts of 1898, included in this table. 
In addition to this table there are 0.85 miles accepted foot passageways. 

Total length of public streets, 502.20 miles. 

There have been laid out and accepted by the Street Com- 
missioners during the year 0.63 linear miles of public streets ; 
corrections to previous measurements on account of revision 
and other causes show an increase of 1.18 miles, making a 
total net increase of 1.81 miles. 

The rate of increase from j^ear to year is shown in the 
following table : 



1859 111.50 miles. 

1871 201.32 " 

1872 207.40 " 

1873 209.24 " 

1874 313.90 " 

1875 318.58 " 

1876 327.50 " 

1877 333.20 " 

1878 340.39 " 

1879 345.19 tl 

1880 350.54 u 

1881 355.50 " 



1882 359.85 miles. 

1883 ....367.99 

1884 374.10 

1885 379.60 

1886 383.55 

1887 390.30 

1888 392.72 

1889 397.84 

1890 404.60 

1891 409.60 

1892 434.59 

1893 443.34 



1894 447. 65 miles. 

1895 452.12 " 

1896 456.11 " 

1897 459.12 

1898 471.19 " 

1899 479.47 " 

1900 489.55 " 

1901 491.85 " 

1902 496.90 " 

1903 499.85 " 

1904 500.39 " 

1905 ...502.20 " 



Street Department. 



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32 City Document No. 40. 

CENTRAL OFFICE DIVISION. 

Expenses of the Central Office. 

For the current expenses of the Central Office the City 
Council appropriated the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000), to which was transferred from " Cambridge and 
Boston Bridges " the sum of eight hundred fifty-three dollars 
and twenty-one cents (1853.21), making a total appropria- 
tion of twenty thousand eight hundred and fifty-three dollars 
and twenty-one cents ($20,853.21), which was expended as 
follows : 

Salaries $17,535 00 

G-eneral office expenditures . . . 3,318 21 



Total $20,853 21 

Respectfully submitted, 

James Donovan, 
Superintendent of Streets. 



PART 



APPENDICES. 



PAGES i TO 157. 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. ■ 



926, 927, 928 Trkmont Building, 
Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets, Boston : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit herewith the annual 
report of the expenditures, income, and operations of the 
Bridge Division of the Street Department for the financial 
year ending January 31, 1905. 

There are in the City of Boston 154 bridges, not includ- 
ing culverts. Eight of these, namely Harvard, Craigie's, 
West Boston, Prison Point, Cambridge, Essex street, 
Western avenue to Cambridge, and North Harvard street, 
all connecting Boston and Cambridge, are in charge of two 
commissioners, one of whom is appointed by the Mayor of 
the City of Boston and the other by the Mayor of the City 
of Cambridge. 

One hundred and fourteen bridges are supported wholly 
or in part by the City of Boston, 28 of these being tide-water 
bridges, provided with a draw. 

Forty bridges are supported wholly by railroad corpora- 
tions. There are 13 important tide-water bridges ; namely, 
Mt. Washington avenue, operated by hand power ; Maiden, 
Charlestown, Summer street, Chelsea North, Dover street, 
Dorchester avenue (formerly Federal street^), and Meridian 
street, operated by electricity; Warren, Broadway, Congress 
street, L street, and Chelsea South, operated by steam 
power. 

The force employed on the tide-water bridges work on an 
8-hour basis, which necessitates the employment of 9 men on 
each of 12 bridges, and 12 men on the Charlestown bridge, 
making a total force of 120 men employed on the 13 principal 
drawbridges. 

Repairs have been made on the different bridges at various 
times ; the operating machinery on the drawbridges has 
been frequently inspected and such repairs made as were 



4 City Document No. 40. 

needed, and the surfaces and structures of the different 
inland bridges have received attention, from time to time, as 
the necessity for same arose, and all defects promptly and 
properly remedied. 

On December 22, 1904, the Shawmut-a venue bridge, for 
which an appropriation of #28,000 was made by the city 
government, was opened to public travel. 

During the month of May, 1904, the Huntington-avenue 
bridge, over the Boston & Albany Railroad, was opened for 
repairs, and an examination of the bridge was made by the 
Engineer's Department. The bridge was found to be in a 
very bad condition. It was scraped and painted, and a new 
deck and sheathing put in, for the time being. 

From the examination above mentioned, it was demon- 
strated that a new bridge must be built to replace the present 
structure as soon as possible. Therefore I would respect- 
fully recommend that a special appropriation be provided for 
the construction of said bridge, in the interest of public 
safety. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. P. Lomasney, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



OBJECT OF EXPENDITURES. 

Administration. 
Office expenses : 

Printing and stationery . . . $1,110 68 
Sundry office expenses . . . 450 36 


$1,561 04 

6,729 27 
3,609 32 

204 17 


Salaries of deputy superintendent and clerical, 
force ........ 

Salaries of supervisors ..... 

Telephones, office, yards, and deputy superin- 
tendent's house ...... 


Amount expended, administration . 

Maintenance Expenditures. 
Administration ....... 

On tide-water bridges ...... 

On inland bridges ...... 

North yard and stable ...... 

South yard and stable 


$12,103 80 

$12,103 80 

135,234 67 

17,252 68 

10,175 03 

10,503 66 


Total 


$185,269 84 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Maintenance Appropriation. 



Appropriation 1904-05 .... 
Received from Boston and Albany Railroad Com 

pany for work done .... 
Received from Boston Elevated Railway Com 

pany for work done .... 

Total 

Amount of expenditures from February 1, 1904 

to January 31, 1905 . . . 

Balance ....... 

Total . . ' 



$185,000 00 

86 23 

183 81 

$185,270 04 

$185,269 84 
20 



55,270 04 



Labor 
Material 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

In Charge of Bridge Division. 
Congress-street Bridge, Repairs. 

$117 88 

244 21 



Amount expended to January 31, 1905 . $362 09 

Balance 613 76 

Balance of appropriation, February 1, 1904 . $975 85 



Construction of Piers, Bridge Division. 



Labor and material : 








Broadway bridge .... 


$101 50 






Chelsea (south) .... 


98 53 






Dorchester avenue (formerly Federal 








street) . ... 


198 25 






Dover street ..... 


66 35 






L street ...... 


75 00 






Summer street .... 


25 75 






AVarren ...... 


131 50 


$696 




Amount expended to January 31, 190 


5 . 


88 


Balance ..... 


1904 . 


882 


60 


Balance of appropriation, February 1 


$1,579 


48 



City Document No. 40. 



Electrical Installation and Construction, Bridge Division. 



Labor and material : 
Charlestown bridge . 
Meridian-street bridge 



$220 00 
610 00 



Amount expended to January 31, 1905 . 
Balance . 

Balance of appropriation, February 1, 1904 . 



$830 00 
101 17 

$931 17 



Special Appropriations in Charge of Bridge Division. 



Name of Appropriation. 


Appropriation 

and 

Balances. 


Expended 
Feb. 1, 1904, 

to 
Jan. 31, 1905. 


Balance 

on hand 

Jan. 31, 1905. 


Construction of piere, Bridge Division 
Electrical installation and construc- 


$975 85 
1,579 48 

931 17 
1,100 00 


$362 09 
696 88 

830 00 


$613 76 
882 60 

101 17 




1,100 00 








Totals 


$4,586 50 


$1,888 97 


$2,697 53 



51,888 97 
2,697 53 

54,586 50 



Amount of expenditures February 1, 1904, to Janu- 
ary 31, 1905 

Balances ........ 

Amount of appropriations .... 

Amount expended and charged maintenance appro- 
priation $185,269 84 

Amount expended and charged to Bridge Division 

specials 1,888 97 

Grand total of expenditures February 1, 1904, 

to January 31, 1905 $187,158 81 



Income. 

The amount of bills deposited with the City Collector 
during the year was $3,883.99, and the amount received 
by the City Collector on account of the Bridge Division 
was $447.72. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



Table Showing the Expenditures on the Tide-water 
Bridges, February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 



Name of Bridge. 



Repairs. 
Labor and 
Material. 



Regular 

Expenses. 

Salaries, Fuel 

and Supplies. 



Totals. 



Broadway 

Charlestown 

Chelsea (north). ... 
Chelsea (south). .. 

Chelsea street 

Commercial Point. 
Congress street. .. 
Dover street 



Dorchester avenue (formerly 
Federal street) 



Granite 

L street 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington avenue 

Neponset 

North Beacon street 

Summer street 

Warren 

Western avenue to Watertown. . 

Winthrop 

Sundry expenditures 

Public landings 



§1,417 10 

2,580 91 

880 86 

2,089 25 

540 47 

32 16 

1,688 87 

971 73 

2,941 21 
31 60 

1,358 43 
532 86 

1,284 29 
146 43 
347 24 
365 71 

1,340 91 

2,192 53 
150 57 
290 14 
385 45 



Totals. 



$21,568 72 



$7,700 63 

10,772 83 

7,980 07 

8,333 78 

316 07 

50 00 

7,328 40 

7,910 38 

8,328 53 

239 20 

8,087 91 

7,960 59 

8,056 69 

8,609 56 

398 84 

155 37 

9,574 62 

8,843 65 

155 3S 

100 00 

2,138 45 

625 00 

$113,665 95 



$9,117 73 

13,353 74 

8,860 93 

10,423 03 

856 54 

82 16 

9,017 27 

8,882 11 

11,269 74 

270 80 

9,446 34 

8,493 45 

9,340 98 

8,755 99 

746 08 

521 08 

10,915 53 

11,036 18 

305 95 

390 14 

2,523 90 

625 00 

$135,234 67 



8 City Document No. 40. 

Table showing the Expenditures on the Inland Bridges 
from February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 



Name of Bridge. 



Repairs. 
Labor and 
Material. 



Albany street 

Allston 

Ashland street (culvert) 

Ashmont 

Baker street 

Berkeley street (over B. & A. R.R.) 

Blakemore street 

Bolton street 

Boston street 

Boylston street (over B. & A. R.R.) 

Broadway (over B. & A. R.R.) 

Brookline avenue (over B. & A. R.R.) 

Byron street 

Cambridge street (over B. & M. R.R.) 

Central avenue 

Columbus avenue 

Cottage street 

Dartmouth street 

Dorchester avenue (over N, Y. , 1ST. H. & H. R.R.) 

Everett street 

Ferdinand street 

Florence street 

Gold street 

Harvard street 

Huntington avenue 

Irvington street 

Keyes street 

Linden Park street 

Massachusetts avenue (over B. & A. R.R.) 

Massachusetts avenue (over N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. ). 

Perkins street 

Shawmut avenue 

Silver street 

Southampton street (over N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.) 

Southampton street (west of railroad) 

Spring street 

West Fourth street 

West Newton street 

West Rutland square 

Williams street 

Sundry expenditures 



Total. 



•$172 45 

181 61 

4 00 

13 50 

222 15 

21 54 

135 25 

29 98 

71 17 

447 58 

307 47 

27 00 

418 69 

15 00 

4 00 

210 51 

793 29 

224 08 

78 20 

62 86 

125 56 

6 00 

45 02 

6 50 

2,246 82 

10 50 

315 73 

90 94 

1,356 91 

179 50 

3 00 

81 48 

60 81 

151 93 

85 85 

1,690 50 

5,800 77 

135 59 

123 25 

33 74 

1,261 95 

$17,252 68 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 9 

Maintenance Expenses at North and South Yards. 
District No. 1, Warren Bridge. 

North Yard $5,839 49 

North Stable 4,335 54 



Total expended, North Yard and Stable . $10,175 03 



District No. 2, 168-170 Broadway Extension. 

South Yard $4,957 36 

South Stable 5,546 30 



Total expended, South Yard and Stable . $10,503 66 

LIST OF BOSTON BRIDGES. 
I. — Bridges "Wholly Maintained by Boston. 

[In the list those marked with an asterisk (*) are over navi- 
gable waters, and are each provided with a draw.] 

In Charge of Bridge Division. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad at Cambridge street, 

Brighton. 
Ashland street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division, West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Baker street, at Brook Farm, West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Bennington street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Berwick park (foot-bridge), over N. Y., N. H, & H. Railroad, 

Providence Division. 
Blakemore street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 

Division. 
Bolton street, over N. Y., N. II. & H. Piailroad, Midland 

Division. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 
Charlesgate, over Ipswich street. 
*Charlestown, from Boston to Cliarlestown. 



10 City Document No. 40. 

*Chelsea [South] over south channel, Mj^stie river. 

*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 

*Congress street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Cottage Farm, over Boston & Albany Railroad, at Common- 
wealth avenue. 

Cottage street (footbridge), over flats, East Boston. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 

Elmwood street (private way), over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

*Dorchcster avenue (formerly Federal street), over Fort Point 
channel. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Florence street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

G-ainsborough street (footbridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Rail- 
road, Providence Division. 

Gold street (footbridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Mid- 
land Division. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Ipswich street, over waterway. 

Irvington street (footbridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, 
Providence Division. 

Keyes street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

*L street, over reserved channel at junction of Summer and L 
streets. 

Linden Park, over Stony brook, Roxbury. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Massachusetts avenue, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Provi- 
dence Division. 

^Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mount Washington avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany and N.Y., N.H. & H. 
Railroad, Providence Division. 

Silver street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland Division. 

Southampton street, east of N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 
Division. 

Southampton street, west of N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 
Division. 

Summer street, over A street. 

Summer street, over B street. 

Summer street, over C street. 

^Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Newton street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Providence 
Division. 

West Rutland square (footbridge), over N. Y., N. H. & H. 
Railroad, Providence Division. 

Williams street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 11 



In Charge of Park Department. 

Agassiz, in Feus. 

Audubon, iu Riverway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Boylston, iu Fens, over waterway. 

Bridle-path, in Riverway, over Muddy river. 

* Castle Island, iu Marine Park, South Boston to Castle Island. 
Chapel Arch, in Riverway. 

Charlesgate, in Fens, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Commonwealth avenue, in Fens, over waterway. 

Ellicot Arch, in Franklin Park. 

Fen, in Fens. 

Forest Hills, in Franklin Park. 

Leverett Pond (foot), iu Leverett Park. 

Neptune, in Wood Island Park, over Boston, Revere Beach & 

Lynn Railroad. 
Overlook Arch, in Franklin Park. 
Railroad Viaduct, in Arborway. 
Scarboro', in Franklin Park. 
Scarboro' pond (foot), in Franklin Park. 
Stony Brook, in Arborway. 
Stony Brook, in Fens. 
Wood Island (foot), in Wood Island Park. 

In Charge of Public Grounds Department. 
Public Garden (foot-bridge). 

II. — Bridges of which Boston Maintains the Part within 

its Limits. 

In Charge of Bridge Division. 

Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea [North], from Charlestown to Chelsea. 

* Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* AVestci'ii avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 



In Charge of Park Department. 

Bellevue, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Brookline avenue, in the Riverway, over Muddy river, 
Chapel, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Longwood, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Tremont street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 



12 City Document No. 40. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston Pays a Part of the Cost 
of Maintenance. 

In Charge of Bridge Division. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Ashmont, junction Dorchester avenue and. Talbot avenue, over 

N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth Division (75 feet south 

of northerly end). 
Dorchester street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division . 
Harvard street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 

In Charge of Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Craigie's, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

* West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

IV. — Bridges of which Boston Maintains the Wearing 

Surface. 
In Charge of Bridge Division. 

Boston street, over N. Y., N. H. & II. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 
Cambridge street, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Chelsea bridge, over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Dorchester avenue, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 
Perkins street (foot-bridge), over Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Summer street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Southampton street, over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 
West Fourth street, over N. Y., N. H. &H. Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 

V. — Bridges Maintained by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 13 

2d. — Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 
"Wauwatosa avenue, East Boston. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — New York, Neio Haven & Hartford Railroad, Midland 

Division. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Norfolk street, Dorchester [North]. 
Norfolk street, Dorchester [South]. 
Washington street, Dorchester. 
West Broadway. 
West Fifth street. 
West Fourth street. 
West Second street. 
West Sixth street. 
West Third street. 

6th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Plymouth 

Division. 
Adams street. 
Freeport street. 
Medway street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, Neio Haven & Hartford Railroad, Providence 

Division. 

Albany street (new part). 

Beech street, West Roxbury. 

Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 

Berkeley street (new part). 

Broadway (new part). 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 

Castle street. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Chandler street. 

Columbus avenue (new part). 

Dartmouth street (new part). 

Dudley avenue, West Roxbury. 

Ferdinand street (new part). 

Harrison avenue (new part). 

Park street, West Roxbury. 

Tremont street (new part). 

Washington street (new part). 



79 



14 



14 City Document No. 40. 



Recapitulation of Bridges. 

Number wholly maintained by Boston : 

In charge of Bridge Division ... 58 

In charge of Park Department ... 20 

In charge of Public Grounds Department . 1 



II. Number of which Boston maintains the part 
within its limits : 
In charge of Bridge Division ... 9 

In charge of Park Department ... 5 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the 

cost of maintenance : 
In charge of Bridge Division ... 4 

In charge of Commissioners of Boston and 

Cambridge Bridges .... 8 

— 12 

IV. Number of which Boston maintains the wearing 

surface : 
In charge of Bridge Division .... 9 

V. Number maintained by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany .... 4 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 

Railroads ..... 2 

3. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division . 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn . . 1 

5. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Midland Division . . . . 11 

6. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Plymouth Division .... 4 

7. New York, New Haven & Hartford, 

Providence Division . . . 17 

— 40 

Total number . . . . . . . .154 

Public Landing-places. 

The following public landing-places have been built by the 
city, and are maintained and controlled by the Bridge Division : 

East Boston Public Landing. — Size, 18 by 30. Built in 
1893. Moored at dock of the Atlantic Works. Dock and flats 
leased at $250 per year. 

Jeffries' Point, East Boston. — Size, 20 by 50. Moored from 
Fitzpatrick's Wharf ; $350 per year. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 15 



Cable-houses and Boxes. 

The following is a list of cable-houses and boxes on bridges in 
charge of this division : 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 house. 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Dover-street bridge, 2 houses or boxes. 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 1 box. 

Chelsea-street bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 4 boxes. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Neponset bridge, 2 boxes on poles. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company : 

Dorchester-avenue (formerly Federal-street) bridge, 1 house. 

Mt. Washington-avenue bridge, 2 boxes. 

Neponset bridge, 1 box on pole. 

Summer-si reet bridge, 1 box. 
Merchants ' Telegraph Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
Postal Telegraph Cable Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 houses. 

Maiden bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Electric Light Company : 

Congress-street bridge, 2 boxes. 
Lynn & Boston Railroad Company : 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 4 boxes. 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 8 boxes. 
Boston Elevated Railroad Company : 

Cambridge-street bridge, 1 house. 

Dover-street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Dorchester-avenue (formerly Federal-street) bridge, 2 houses. 

Maiden bridge, 2 houses. 

Warren bridge, 2 houses. 
Boston Police Department : 

Chelsea [South] bridge, 1 box. 

Maiden bridge, 2 boxes. 
Boston Fire Department : 

Chelsea [North] bridge, 1 box. 

Dover-street bridge, 1 house, 1 box. 

Meridian-street bridge, 2 boxes. 

Warren bridge, 2 boxes. 

Land and Buildings in Charge of Bridge Division. 

Broadwa/y Bridge. — Draw-house, engine-room, and storehouse. 
Land, Broadway and Dorchester avenue, containing 5,516 feet, 
on which is a brick stable and workshop. 



16 City Document No. 40. 

Charlestotvn Bridge. — Draw-house, electrical power-room, and 
six storehouses. 

Chelsea [North] Bridge. — Draw-house, storehouse and tool- 
house. 

Chelsea [.South'] Bridge. — Draw-house, engine-house and tool- 
house. 

Chelsea-street Bridge. — Tool-house. 

Congress-street Bridge. — Draw-house, storehouse, tool-house 
and two shelter-houses. 

Cottage-street (foot-bridge). — Watchman's house. 

Dover-street Bridge. — Draw-house and store-room. 

Dorchester-avenue (formerly Federal- street) Bridge. — Draw- 
house, tool-house, two motor-houses, one controller-house. 

L-street Bridge. — Draw-house, engine-house. 

Maiden Bridge. — Draw-house and tool-house. 

Meridian-street Bridge. — Draw-house, tool-house and store- 
house. 

Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge. — Draw-house and tool-house. 

Neponset Bridge. — Tool-house. 

Summer-street Bridge. — Draw-house, controller-house, two shel- 
ter houses. 

Warren Bridge. — Stable, draw-house, engine-house, boiler- 
house, tool-house. 

Western- avenue Bridge to Watertoton. — Tool-house. 



Steeet Department — Bridge Division. 



17 



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18 City Document No. 40. 

Table Showing Width of Bridges, Kind of Roadways, Sidewalks, 
etc., on Tide=water Bridges, 1904. 



Name of Bridge. 



Roadway. 



Kind of 
Roadway. 



Sidewalks. 



Kind of Walks. 



Broadway 

Cambridge street 

Charlestown 

Chelsea, North 

" South 

" street 

Commercial point 

Congress street 

Craigie's 

Dover st. (over water) 

Essex street 

Dorchester ave. (for- 
merly Federal st.) . . 

Granite 

Harvard 

L street ... 

Maiden 

Meridian street 

Mt. Washington ave.. 

Neponset 

North Beacon street... 
North Harvard street, 

Prison Point 

Summer street 

Warren 

Western avenue to 
Cambridge 

Western avenue to 
Watertown 

Wlnthrop 

West Boston (tempor 
ary) 



Ft. In. 

60 
40 

100 

49 

50 3 

30 

I about 
| 34 

60 

64 

60 

31 

69 
30 2 
69 4 
60 

60 
to 
67 6 

50 

61 

30 

31 

28 2 

50 

100 
80 

33 2 

33 
24 2 

47 2 



Ft. In. 

40 

32 9 

127 9) 
122 [ 
127 9 ) 



41 2 

23 2 

about ) 

27 OS 

44 

48 
40 

22 8 

49 

24 4 
51 
44 

44 

30 
39 6 

23 10 

25 2 

26 7 

36 

76 

60 



24 2 
19 10 

36 



Plank. . 




2 

1 

2 




Paved 




1 
1 




Plank 


1 


Paved 


? 




2 


,, 


? 


Plank . 




1 


Paved. 




2 


Plank . 




1 


Wook block . . 


2 


Paved. 




2 

? 




!) 


,, 


fl 


Plank 


1 




1 


\ Plank 
\ Paved 


part I 
part | 


2 


" entire.. 


2 






2 


Plank . 




1 

1 
1 


'• . 




,, 




1 







Ft. In. 
10 
6 

10 

8 

8 

6 

8 

8 
10 

7 6 

10 
5 

9 2 

S 

8 

7 

10 9 

5 5 

5 

7 
12 
10 

6 

8 



Coal-tar concrete. 
Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Coal-tar concrete 
and plank. 

Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 
Brick. 
Asphalt. 
Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Plank. 

Asphalt. 

Composition. 
Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 



Coal-tar concrete. 

Asphalt. 
Coal-tar concrete. 

Plank. 



Brick. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



19 



Table Showing the Width of Openings for Vessels in all Bridges 
Provided with Draws in the City of Boston, 1904. 



Name of Bridge. 


Location. 


■H 03 

. a 

S'S 

£ ft 

SO 


Width. 


Bostou & Maine R.R., Eastern 




1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
l 
o 


39 1 

35 

36 

36 

40 

39 

39 

35 
43 
36 
50 
50 
38 
60 
36 
36 
24 
43 
50 
36 

41 
37 
36 
36 
49 
36 
36 
36 

39 




Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern 


" 9 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., FItchburg 


Boston to Charlestown 
Boston to East Cambridge, 
Boston to Charlestown 


" " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Fitchburg 
Division (for teaming freight). . 

Boston & Maine R.R. (freight), 


" 

« 2 " 


Boston & Maine R.R. (paesen- 
Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


" 7 " 


Boston & Maine R.R., Western 


" 10 " 




Over Fort Point channel... 
Brighton to Cambridge. . , 


" " 




<< 4 M 


Charlestown (north channel) 


" 

" " 




1 
1 

2 


" 9 " 




" " 


Chelsea street (East Boston side), 

Chelsea street (Chelsea side) 

Commercial Point (or Tenean). .. 

Congress street (Boston side) 

Congress St. (South Boston side).. 


" 

" " 


Over Fort Point channel. .. 


1 
2 


ii 2 " 
ii 3 

" " 


Boston to East Cambridge, 
Over Fort Point channel... 

Brighton to Cambridge. . . 
Dorchester to Milton 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


ii «< 


Dorchester avenue (formerly 






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1 






1 y " 









20 



City Document No. 40. 



Table showing Width of Openings, etc. — Concluded. 



Name of Bridge. 



Location. 



So 



"Width. 



Maiden 

Meridian st. (East Boston side) . . 

Meridian street (Chelsea side) . . . 

Mt. Washington avenue (Boston 
side) 

Mt. Washington avenue (South 
Boston side) 

Neponset 

New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R 

New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R., Y-connection 

New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R 

New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R.R 

North Beacon street 

North Harvard street 

Prison Point 

Summer street 

Warren 

West Boston (temporary) 

Western avenue 

Western avenue 



Charlestown to Everett. 
East Boston to Chelsea. 



Over Fort Point channel. . 



Dorchester to Quincy 

Over South Bay 

Over Fort Point channel. 



Dorchester to Quincy 

Brighton to Watertown. . 
Brighton to Cambridge — 
Charlestown to Cambridge, 
Over Fort Point channel. . . 

Boston to Charlestown 

Boston to Cambi-idge 

Brighton to Cambridge 

Brighton to Watertown.. .. 



50 feet inches. 

59 

59 " 

42 

52 
36 

28 

41 

41 

35 
30 
36 
36 
50 
36 
36 
36 
35 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 



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Street Department — Ferry Division. 23 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE FERRY DIVISION. 



North Ferry, East Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Mr. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Ferry Division for the year ending January 31, 1905. 

The past winter has been the most severe for many years, 
perhaps the worst since the ferries were established, 
particularly as to weather conditions. We had to contend 
with the highest and lowest tides occurring at a time when 
the harbor was packed with ice, thereby compelling the 
running of boats with the utmost care to avoid accidents. 
In this particular respect we were very fortunate, as no 
serious trouble occurred. 

All the boats have been equipped with patent locks, sockets 
and connections to gates, which have eliminated the 
possibility of serious accidents to the ferries, for which 
the city has been liable in the past. 

The side-wheel ferry-boat " Revere," built in 1875, had 
been so long in service that extraordinary repairs were strongly 
recommended and consequently carried into effect, with the 
result that this boat is now doing service at the South Ferry 
as third boat. With new ends and careful use the boat can 
be used for this purpose for several years, otherwise a new 
boat must be provided. 

The coal-pocket at the North Ferry, East Boston side, is 
practically useless, as no coal can be stored there without 
grave danger of fire and great expense in handling. 
Practically all coal is now stored at the South Ferry, making- 
it very inconvenient, and as the storage capacity at this dock 
is but two thousand (2,000) tons, we are in constant dread 
of a shortage during the winter months. A new pocket 
should be constructed at once to insure a winter's supply of 
coal, and a special appropriation for this purpose ought to 
be provided. 

The old piers, which have been in use for many years, are 
a source of constant care and great expense to keep in safe 



24 City Document No. 40. 

condition for foot and boat travel. Money should be provided 
from some source to reconstruct these piers, and at the same 
time the head-house at the South Ferry, Boston side, should 
be moved to the north side of the landing to conform to the 
three other landings. This would greatly facilitate travel at 
this ferry, and the cost could be included in the appropriation 
for piers. 

The property in charge of this division is as follows : 

South Ferry, East Boston Side. — Located at the termina- 
tion of Lewis street, and covers an area of 58,725 square 
feet of land and water. On these premises are one head- 
house, with canopies ; one workshop for carpenters, machin- 
ists, and blacksmith, both of the above buildings being at 
present time in course of construction ; one storehouse and 
temporary waiting-room, one new, modern coal-pocket, three 
new piers which form the two slips, two drops and tanks, 
one new wharf and dock, where boats are laid when not in 
use or while undergoing repairs. 

South Ferry, Boston Side. — Located at the termination of 
Eastern avenue, and covers an area of 38,135 square feet of 
land and water, on which are one head-house with canopies, 
one gate-room, three piers which form the two slips, and two 
drops and tanks. 

North Ferry, Boston Side. — Located at the termination of 
Battery street, and covers an area of 45,000 square feet of 
land and water, on which are one head-house with canopies, 
one gate-room, three piers which form the two slips, and two 
drops and tanks. 

North Ferry, Bast Boston Side. — Located at the termina- 
tion of Border street, and covers an area of 62,138 square 
feet of land and water, on which are one head-house with 
canopies, one boiler and oil-room, one stable, one coal-shed, 
three piers, which form the two slips, and two drops and 
tanks. 

The following steam ferry-boats are in commission : 

Name. When built. Kind. Length. 

Revere, 1875 Side-wheel, 148 ft. 

D.D.Kelly 1879 " 148" 

Hugh O'Brien. . 1883 " 163 " 

General Hancock 1887 " 148" 

Noddle Island 1899 Propeller. 164 " 3 in. 

Gov. Russell 1900 " 164 " 3 " 

General Sumner 1900 " 164 " 3 " 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. J. Donovan, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 25 

STREET DEPARTMENT, FERRY DIVISION. 

Consolidated Financial Statement for the Year 1904-05. 

1. Receipts. 

Total cash receipts during the year . . . $176,151 20 
Cash withdrawn from tollmen's capital ... 50 00 

Cash in hands of tollmen at be- 
ginning of year . . . $600 00 
Cash withdrawn from tollmen . 50 00 

550 00 



Total $176,751 20 

Cash paid over to City Collector . $176,198 95 
Rejected money received and de- 
stroyed 2 25 

176,201 20 



Balance of cash on hand at end of the year . . $550 00 



2. Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Balance unexpended from previous years (loans) . $15 60 
Received from City Treasurer by transfer . . 14,526 20 
Received from City Treasurer, annual appropria- 
tion for this division for 1904-5 . . . . 243,600 00 



*Total appropriations of all kinds . . $258,141 80 

*Total expenditures of all kinds . . . 258,12620 



Balance unexpended (loans) .... $15 60 

3. Result of Operations for the Year. 

Receipts for the year (net income) . . . $176,151 20 

Ordinary expenses . . . $258,126.20 
Extraordinary expenses (special 

appropriation) 

Interest on ferry debts . . 16,920 00 

Depreciation on boats . . 15,122 86 

Decrease of stock of supplies . 5,100 77 



Net outgo for the year . .' . 295,269 83 



Net loss for year $119,118 63 

►Details of appropriations and expenditures given in Table 5. 



26 



City Document No. 40. 



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29 



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30 



City Document No. 40. 



6. Comparative Balance Sheets at the Close of each Year for Five 

Years. 





January 31, 
1901. 


January 31, 
1902. 


January 31, 
1903^ 


January 31, 

1904. 


Januarv 31, 
1905". 


Assets. 












Cash in hands of tollmen. 


$575 00 


$575 00 


$575 00 


$600 00 


$550 00 








62 50 
7,153 65 




12 50 


Fuel and supplies on 


10,870 05 


10,371 78 


9,793 00 


4,692 23 


City Treasurer (balance 
of appropriations) 


52,627 87 


10,639 71 


41,349 01 


15 60 


15 60 


Real estate and buildings 
(Assessors' valuations) 


498,900 00 


546,600 00 


577,400 00 


577,400 00 


577,400 00 


Ferry-boats (less depre- 


303,458 37 


285,250 85 


26S.135 80 


252,047 65 


236,924 79 


Machinery and tools 


6,000 00 


6,000 00 


300 00 


7,595 00 


7,595 00 


Total tangible assets.. . 


$872,431 29 


$859,437 34 


$894,975 96 


$847,451 25 


$827,190 12 


Cost of avenues, etc., 
East Boston (previous 
to 1870) t 


315,815 68 


315,815 68 


315,815 68 


315.S15 68 


315,815 68 


Deficiency of assets (loss) 


1,927,086 05 


2,034,374 44 


2,168,337 23 


2,309,834 96 


2,428,943 34 


Totals 


$3,115,333 02 


$3,209,627 46 


$3,379,128 87 


$3,473,101 89 


$3,571,949 14 


Liabilities. 












Capital invested by City 


$3,062,705 15 


$3,198,987 75 


$3,337,779,86 


$3,473,086 29 


$3,571,933 54 


Appropriations account 
(credit balances) 


52,627 87 
.$3,115,333 02 


10,639 71 


41,349 01 


15 60 


15 60 


Total liabilities 


$3,209,627 46 


$3,379,128 87 


$3,473,101 89 


$3,571,949 14 








i 





Details of Capital Invested by the City of Boston. 



Total expenditures to 
date, per ferry books. . 

Interest on debts for the 
year (per City Audi- 
tor) 



Interest previous years, 
etc. (net debits per Au- 
ditor) 



Total expenditures 

Deduct total receipts 
paid to Collector 

Excess of expenditure, 
viz., capital invested 
by city 



$8,049,900 02 



15,340 00 



279,148 85 



*$8,344,388 87 
*5,281,683 72 



$3,062,705 15 



$8,355,982 24 



13,420 00 



279,148 85 



'$8,648,551 09 
*5,44 9,563 34 



$3,198,987 75 



$8,666,381 23 



15,003 00 



279,148 85 



*$8,960,533 08 
*5,622,753 22 



$3,337,779 86 



$8,977,252 8 r , 



16,920 00 



279,148 85 



*$9,273,321 72 
*5,800,235 43 



$3,473,086 29 



$9,252,299 07 



16,920 00 



279,148 85 



*$9,548,367 92 
*5,976,434 38 



$3,571,933 54 



* Auditor's figures for total expenditures and receipts are $60,278.56 more than above, the 
difference (capital invested) being the same. 

$3,542.50 for additional interest, and $33, discrepancy in total stated by ferry books, have 
also been included in these figures. 

f See footnote, § under Table 4. 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 31 



7. Total Expenditures Upon Ferries Since 1858-59. 

Expenditure for avenues, paving, interest, etc., 

previous to purchase of the ferries by the city | $444,101 30 

Purchase of ferries, April, 1870 . . . 276,375 00 

* Expenditures for ferry-boats since April, 1870, 618,070 58 

* Expenditures for new buildings, piers, drops, 

etc. 530,523 64 

* Expenditures for tools and fixtures . . 14,752 46 
Expenditures for land from Lincoln's wharf in 

1887 5,562 52 

Expenditures for land from Battery wharf in 

1893 10,000 00 



Total expenditures on capital account . $1,899,385 50 

* Expenditures for repairs of all kinds . . 788,109 33 

* Expenditures for fuel ..... 1,241,406 15 

* Expenditures for salaries and wages . . 4,199,029 06 
Expenditures for all other purposes . . . 1,480,716 44 



1,608,646 48 



Total Receipts from Ferries Since 1858-59. 

Receipts from rents, etc., previous to purchase 

of ferries $29,588 56 

* Receipts from ferry tolls since purchase of 

ferries 5,756,073 36 

* Receipts from rents since purchase of ferries . 59,751 46 

* Receipts from sales of ferry-boats . . . 147,331 21 

* Receipts from all other sources, per ferry 

books 13,965 53 

Receipts from all other sources, additional per 

Auditor . . . . . . . 30,690 00 



Less rejected money destroyed . 

Less amount counted twice 

Less amount in hands of tollmen 



Total per City Auditor's figures 



$104 18 

33 00 

550 00 


$6,037,400 12 
687 18 






$6,036,712 94 



* According to books of the Ferry Division. 
fSec footnote, § under Table 4. 



32 



City Document No. 40. 



Regular Annual (Ordinary) and Special Appropriations 
(Extraordinary) of the Ferry Division of the Street 
Department for the Year ending January 31, 1905. 

Appropriation for the year ending January 31, 

&-1905 $243,600 00 

Received by transfer . . . . . 14,52620 



Total amount . 
Amount of expenditures . 



$258,126 20 
$258,126 20 



Special Appropriations. 

Appropriation authorized and issued May 27, 

1902, for ferry improvements . . . $100,000 00 

Amount expended from May 27, 

1902, to February 1, 1903 . $58,650 99 

Amount expended from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1903, to February 1, 
1904 .... 41,333 41 

Amount expended from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1904, to February 1, 
1905 



Unexpended balance of appropriation January 
31, 1905 



99,984 40 



$15 60 



Statement Showing Receipts at Each Ferry. 
North Ferry. 



From Tollman. 



Foot 
Passengers. 



Team 
Tickets. 



Total. 



No. 2 

" 3 
" 5 
" 6 
" 9 
" 10 
" 13 



$15,959 50 
15,670 20 
16,040 09 
15,830 29 
15,916 54 
4,232 51 
15,365 47 



),014 60 



$2,565 00 
2,511 50 
2,318 50 
2,653 50 
2,729 00 
1,225 00 
2,347 50 



$16,350 00 



$18,524 50 
18,181 70 
18,358 59 
18,483 79 
18,645 54 
5,457 51 
17,712 97 



.115,364 60 



From tollmen .... 
From gatemen : 

For 83,255 foot passengers, at 1 c 

For cash fare for teams 



. $115,364 60 



. $832 55 
. 7,381 75 



8,214 30 



Total at North Ferry 



. $123,578 90 



Street Department — Ferry Division. 



33 



South Ferry. 



From Tollman. 



Foot 
Passengers. 



Team 
Tickets. 



Total. 



No. 1 $7,146 45 

" 4 ! 6,605 62 

" 7 7,178 41 

" 8 ■ 6,747 10 

"11 ! 1,062 76 

"12 ! 1,147 95 



$29,888 29 



$2,927 00 

1,564 50 

2,993 00 

3,315 50 

80 00 

92 50 



$10,972 50 



$10,073 45 

8,170 12 

10,171 41 

10,062 60 

1,142 76 

1,240 45 



$40,860 79 



From tollmen .... 
From gatemen : 

For 77,774 foot passengers, at 1 cent, 

For cash fares for teams . 



Total at South Ferry 



$777 74 
6,185 62 



$40,860 79 



6,963 36 



847,824 15 



North and South Ferries, as above 
Tickets paid for at office of City Collector 
Tickets paid for at office of Ferry Division 
Received in lieu of free ferries, July 4, 1904 



.71,403 05 

438 00 

2,138 10 

1 00 



Total ferriage receipts $173,980 15 

Rents for the year . . . . . . 1,324 50 

Sales of old material, head-house and bootblack 

privileges ....... 846 55 



Total cash receipts, as above 



.76,151 20 



Statement Showing the Difference of Travel on the Ferries 
from February 1, 1904, to February 1, 1905. 



Foot passengers at 1 cent each 
Foot passengers by ticket 
Foot passengers free 

Total foot passengers 



North Ferry. 

9,984,715 

106,641 

76,525 



South Ferry. 

3,066,603 

42,074 

2,060 



10,167,881 3,110,737 



34 



City Document No. 40. 



One-horse teams and 


pleasure car- 






riages 




393,928 


256,759 


Two-horse teams 




129,522 


125,204 


Three-horse teams . 


. 


4,577 


5,028 


Four-horse teams 




6,331 


6,600 


Two-horse pleasure 


carriages and 






hacks . 




14,044 


5,924 


Hand-carts, etc. 




3,466 


1,094 


Drag-wheels . 




17 


15 


Free teams 


. 


5,460 


528 



Total Travel on both Ferries from February 1, 1900, to 
February 1, 1905. 



2 <= 






CD,Q 



0>.O 
fc CD 



c 1 ^ 



CJ.Q 

pH CD 

gfe 

go 



One-horse teams 

Two-horse teams 

Three-horse teams 

Four-horse teams 

Two-horse carriages and hacks, 

Two-cent, tolls for handcarts, 
etc 

Drag-wheels, etc 

Foot passengers 



679,746 


645,283 


210,390 


•232,557 


8,376 


9,215 


12,344 


13,804 


15,390 


16,365 


5,547 


13,582 


60 


122 


12,243,877 


12,395,649 



641,796 

249,714 

7,4S6 

13,180 

19,115 

6,720 

86 

12,923,734 



621,329 

252,048 

8,244 

12,995 

19,594 

6,847 

11 

13,213,559 



650,687 

254,726 

9,605 

12,931 

19,968 

4,560 

32 

13,200,033 



Ticket Statement for the Year 1904-05. 





o~2 
a c^ 

^ 00 CO 

ffl 


a 

ja 

to 
a 
'u 

CO 


o a 

o 

•as 

"3P3 

Q 


o 


S 0) 

Pi 


Balance out- 
standing Jan. 
31, 1905. 




205,747 

78,499 

47,912 

5,126 

6,499 

21,232 

2,308 


107,310 

354,896 

231,200 

7,974 

11,560 

24,220 

8,420 


43,050 
3,888 
1,632 


356,107 
437,283 
280,744 
13,100 
18,059 
45,752 
10,728 


14S.715 

357,492 

232,540 

8,205 

11,876 

25,004 

8,453 


207,392 
79,791 
48,204 
4,895 
6,183 
20,748 
2,275 


One-hoi'6e team-tickets.. . . 
Two-horse team-tickets. . . 






One-horse carriage-tickets 
Two-horse carriage-tickets 


300 





Street Department — Paving Division. 35 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
PAVING DIVISION. 



Room 44, City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — The annual report of the expenditures and 
income of the Paving Division of the Street Department for 
the financial year ending January 31, 1905, is herewith sub- 
mitted, showing the nature of the work, the number and 
variety of permits issued, and the details of expenditures 
involved in paving, macadamizing, regulating, and construct- 
ing various streets. 

Respectfully yours, 

H. V. Macksey, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The Paving Division has charge of the following work : 

The maintenance and rebuilding of street surfaces and 
sidewalks. 

The placing of signs. 

The numbering of buildings. 

The issuing of permits to open or occupy the streets or for 
such other purposes as may be required under the ordinances. 

The removal of snow and ice from gutters, streets and 
plank sidewalks. 

The cleaning of streets in the suburban districts not 
covered by the Street Cleaning Division. 

The division is in charge of a deputy superintendent, 
with a clerical force under the direction of a chief clerk, 
and an engineering force under the supervision of a chief 
engineer. 

The repairs upon asphalt pavement have been supervised, 
located and plotted upon plans prepared for that purpose. 



36 City Document No. 40. 

The agreement made in 1903, whereby the asphalt repairs 
on streets on which the maintenance guarantee has expired 
are guaranteed for a period of three (3) years, was continued 
during the year. 

Under the provisions of chapter 323 of the Acts of 
1891, and acts in amendment thereof or in addition thereto, 
there were seven (7) streets and one (1) public alley built, 
and two (2) streets and two (2) boulevards partly com- 
pleted during the year. 

Belgrade avenue, from South street to Anawan avenue : the 
work of constructing the street was carried on during the year ; 
the Boston Elevated Railway Company completed the track con- 
struction, and the street is sub-graded and ready for the regu- 
lating. It will be completed during 1905. 

Bennington street, from Prescott street to Bremen street, and 
from Moore street to the Revere town line has been completed. 
The portion between Moore and Bremen streets is in abeyance, 
awaiting the report of the Commission for the Abolishment of 
Grade Crossings. 

Columbia road, from the bridge over the N. Y., N. H. & 
H. Railroad to Marine Park, is completed with the exception of 
the portion from the bridge to Covington street; this section 
will be completed early in the coming season. 

Hyde Park avenue, from Walk Hill to Ashland street : the sub- 
gradins; on this street is completed ; the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company have all the track constructed except a small portion. 
The regulating will be completed during the coming season. 

During the year a number of streets in the residential section 
of the city have been surfaced with bitulithic pavement. This 
pavement was introduced two years ago and is a very satisfactory 
pavement, particularly on grades where ou account of the peculi- 
arity of its composition horses are enabled to travel upon it io 
safety. 

In the City Proper the following streets were laid with this 
pavement : 

Ashburton place, Bowcloin street to Somerset street. 
Boylston street, Dartmouth street to B. & A. Railroad bridge. 
Emerald street, Dover street to Castle street. 
West Newton street, Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 

Boxbury. 

Boxbury street, Shawmut avenue, across Kent street. 
/Smith street, St. Alphonsus street to Phillips street. 

The department force has been employed during the year in 
repairing and resurfacing streets, and about 28 miles, or 420,000 
square yards, of streets have been resurfaced. 



Street Department — -Paving Division. 



37 



A vast amount of work remains to be clone not only on mac- 
adam streets, but also upon paved streets, in order that they may 
be put in proper condition. The amount of paving and regulating 
done by the department, irrespective of the pitch and pebble work, 
is as follows : 



Edgestones set and reset . 
Block paving on gravel 
Brick sidewalks laid 
Artificial stone sidewalks laid 
Artificial stone curbing laid 
Coal-tar concrete walks . 



30,899 linear feet 
54,639 square yards 
16,268 " " 

89,154 " « 

35 linear feet 
196 square yards 



Paving. 

Edgestones set ..... 

Concrete base laid ..... 
Granite block paving on a concrete base, 

laid with pitch and pebble joints . 
Granite flagging on a concrete base, laid 

with pitch and pebble joints . 
Granite block pavement laid on a gravel 

base, with gravel joints 
Granite flagging laid on a gravel base, with 

gravel joints ..... 

Bitulithic pavement laid .... 
Trinidad asphalt laid .... 
Brick sidewalks laid .... 

Artificial stone sidewalks laid . 



18,724 linear 


feet 


15,596 


square 


yards 


22,992 


C( 


(< 


1,096 


l< 


(C 


21.026 


u 


u 


637 


u 


u 


18,211 


(( 


(( 


8,810 


u 


(( 


15,568 


(( 


u 


3,417 


i i 


u 



Beverly street, from Washington street North to Causeway 
street, was completed last year ; the portion between Causeway 
street and the Warren bridge was completed this year. It was 
paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch Portland cement 
concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints, including the track 
area, which was paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. The work was done under contract by D. J. Kiley. This 
contract was extended to include Warren avenue, Charlestown, 
as far as the railroad crossing. This section was paved with new 
blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints, including the track 
area, which was paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany ; the old blocks were removed to the different paving yards 
by the contractor, who also did the regulating. The former sur- 
face was granite blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints. 

Front street, Charlestown, from Warren avenue to Austin 
street, was paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base with 
gravel joints by P. Brennan & Co., who also did the regu- 
lating and excavating. The old blocks were hauled to the 
Charlestown paving yard by the contractor. The former surface 
was blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints. 



38 City Document No. 40. 

Kneeland street, from Atlantic avenue to Harrison avenue, 
was paved under contract by J. J. Coughlan, with large granite 
blocks, on a 6-inch Portland cement concrete base, with pitch 
and pebble joints, including the area of the tracks, which was 
paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Company. The exca- 
vating and regulating were done by the contractor. The old 
blocks were hauled to the lot on Massachusetts avenue by the 
contractor. The former surface was granite blocks on a gravel 
base with gravel joints. 

Court street, from westerly side of the Old Court House to 
Tremont street, was paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch 
Portland cement concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints, 
under contract by Benj. M. Cram, who also did the excavating 
and regulating. The former surface was granite blocks on a 
gravel base with gravel joints. 

Causeway street, from Haverhill street to Beverly street, was 
paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch Portland cement 
concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints, including the track 
area, which was paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. The paving and regulating were done, under contract, by 
D. J. Kiley, who also did the necessary excavating. The former 
surface was granite blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints. 

Asphalt. 

Boylston street, from Massachusetts avenue to St. Cecilia 
street, was paved with one and one-half (l£) inches of Trinidad 
asphalt wearing surface and one and one-half (1£) inches of 
asphaltic cement concrete binder laid on a 6-inch Portland cement 
concrete base, under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, with the track area 
paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch Portland cement con- 
crete base, with pitch and pebble joints, under contract by J. J. 
Coughlan, who also did the regulating. The excavating for the 
roadway was done by the city. The former surface was 
macadam. 

Barton court, from Brighton street to Barton street, was 
paved with one and one-half (l£) inches of Trinidad asphalt 
wearing surface and one and one-half (l£) inches of asphaltic ce- 
ment concrete binder on a 6-inch Portland cement concrete base, 
under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, by the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The excavating and regulating were 
done by the city. The former surface was Trinidad asphalt on a 
cobble base. 

Court street, from Washington street to westerly side of the 
Old Court House, was paved with one and one-half (1£) inches of 
asphalt wearing surface and one and one-half (l£) inches of 
asphaltic cement concrete binder, on a six (6) inch Portland 
cement concrete base, under a ten (10) years' maintenance guar- 
antee, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, who also did the 
excavating and regulating with the exception of that portion of 



Street Department — Paving Division. 39 

the sidewalk in front of the Old. Court House, which was laid 
with an artificial stone sidewalk, under a ten (10) years' guaran- 
tee, by the Warren Bros. Company, who furnished all materials 
and did the excavating. The former surface of the street was 
part asphalt and part granite blocks on gravel. 

Court square (westerly roadway), was resurfaced with one 
and one-half (1£) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing surface and 
one and one-half (l£) inches of asphalt cement concrete binder 
on the existing concrete base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving- 
Company, who also removed the old surface and laid some Port- 
land cement concrete which was required to smooth out inequali- 
ties in the old base. On the easterly side of the roadway a two 
(2) foot granite block gutter with grout joints, on a 6-inch 
Portland cement concrete base, was laid by the city, which also 
did the regulating. 

Columbus avenue, from 100 feet south of Ferdinand street to the 
bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad, was paved with one and 
one-half (1£) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing surface and one 
and one-half (1"£) inches of asphaltic cement concrete binder on a 
six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, under a ten (10) years' 
maintenance guarantee, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, 
who also did the regulating and excavating. The track area and 
the intersection of Berkeley street were paved with large granite 
blocks on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, with 
pitch and pebble joints. The brow outside of the rail, for one 
and one-balf (1£) feet in width, was paved with large granite 
blocks on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, and a 
two (2) inch Portland cement bed with pitch and pebble joints. 
The paving of the track area was paid for by the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company. The former surface was granite blocks on 
gravel base with gravel joints. 

Roxbury street and Washington street, Guild row, across 
Marvin street, was paved in part with one and one-half (1£) 
inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing surface and one and one-half 
(li) inches of asphaltic cement concrete binder on a six (6) inch 
Portland cement concrete base, under a ten (10) years' mainte- 
nance guarantee, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The 
track area and easterly side of Washington street, from Roxbury 
street across Marvin street, was paved with large granite blocks 
on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, with pitch and 
pebble joints, under contract b} T H. P. Nawn, who also did part 
of the regulating and excavating. The track area was paid for 
by the Boston Elevated Railway Company. The former surface 
was granite blocks on a gravel base with gravel joints and 
macadam. 

E street, from West Seventh to West Eighth street, was paved 
with one and one-half (1J) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing 
surface and one and one-half (l£) inches asphaltic cement con- 
crete binder on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, 
under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, with the excep- 
tion of the track area, which was paved with large granite blocks 



40 City Document No. 40. 

on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base with pitch and 
pebble joints, under contract by William Higgins and paid for by 
the Boston Elevated Railway Company. The regulating was 
done by William Higgins and excavating for roadway by the city. 
The asphalt was laid by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. 
The former surface was granite blocks on a gravel base with 
gravel joints. 

Harris street, from Hanover street to North street, was paved 
with one and one-half (1£) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing 
surface and one and one-half (1£) inches of asphaltic cement 
concrete binder on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, 
under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, by the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The regulating and excavating were 
done by the city. The former surface was coal tar on a cobble 
base. 

Hawes street, from Congress street to Kilby street, was paved 
with one and one-half (1£) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing 
surface and one and one-half (1^-) inches of asphaltic cement 
concrete binder on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, 
under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, by the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The regulating and excavating were 
done by the city. The former surface was granite blocks on a 
gravel base with gravel joints. 

Kilby street, from State to Central street, was resurfaced with 
one and one-half (1^) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing surface 
and one and one-half (l£) inches of asphaltic cement concrete 
binder on the existing concrete base, under a ten (10) years' 
maintenance guarantee, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, 
who also laid some Portland cement concrete base which was 
required to smooth out the inequalities in the old base. The 
excavating of the old surface was done by the contractor. 

North Bennet street, from Hanover street to Salem street, was 
paved with one and one-half (l£) inches of Trinidad asphalt 
wearing surface and one and one-half (l£) inches of asphaltic 
cement concrete binder on a six (6) inch Portland cement 
concrete base, under a ten (10) years' maintenance guarantee, by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, who also did the regulating 
and excavating. The former surface was asphalt on a concrete 
base. 

Dorchester street, easterly corner of Vinton street, in front of 
M. E. Church, in southerly roadway, was paved with one and 
one-half (1£) inches of Trinidad asphalt wearing surface and one 
and one-half (1£) inches of asphaltic cement concrete base on a 
six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, under a teu (10) 
years' maintenance guarantee, by the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Company. The excavating and regulating were done as part of 
W. J. Rafferty's contract, who constructed the balance of the 
street. The former surface of the street was granite blocks on a 
gravel base with gravel joints. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 41 



Bitulithic Pavement. 

This is a patent pavement composed of crushed stone and 
bituminous cement. It is laid six (6) inches deep, four 
inches of which is composed of No. 1 crushed stone, well 
rolled and treated with two layers of bituminous cement. 
The other two inches, or wearing surface, is composed of a 
crushed stone varying in size from two (2) inches to a fine 
dust, and heated and mixed with bituminous cement and 
rolled with a steam road roller. This pavement was laid in 
the following streets under a ten (10) years' maintenance 
guarantee, by the Warren Bros. Company. 

Ashburton place, from Bowdoin street to Somerset street. The 
intersection of Bowdoin street and twenty-five feet from Bowdoin 
street was paved with large granite blocks with pitch and pebble 
joints on a concrete base. The regulating and excavating was 
done by the Contractor. The former surface was macadam. 

Boylston street, from Dartmouth street to the bridge over 
Boston & Albany Railroad, with the exception of the track area 
and that portion of the street from Hereford street to the bridge, 
which was paved with large granite blocks on a six (6) inch 
Portland cement concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints. 
The brows and three feet of each track were paved with large 
granite blocks on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base 
with pitch and pebble joints and a cement bed. 

On this street the railroad company used a " T" rail and had 
a special block cut to take the place of the old flange in the rail. 
The work was done under contract by Warren Bros. Company, 
who also did the excavating and regulating. The track area was 
paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Company. The former 
surface was macadam. 

Emerald street, from Dover to Castle street. The contractor 
did the excavating and regulating. The former surface was 
granite blocks on gravel base with gravel joints. 

Hoxbury street, from Shawmut avenue across Kent street, with 
the exception of the track area, which was paved with large 
granite blocks on a six (6) inch Portland cement concrete base, 
with pitch and pebble joints. The contractor did the excavating 
and regulating. The track area was paid for by the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company. The former surface was macadam. 

Smith street, from St. Alphonsus street to Philips street. The 
contractor also did the regulating and excavating. The former 
surface was macadam. 

West Newton street, from Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 
The contractor also did the regulating and the excavatinu'. The 
former surface was macadam. 



•42 City Document No. 40. 



Assessment Streets. 

The following streets have been constructed under the 
provisions of chapter 323 of the Acts of 1891, and the 
acts in amendment thereof or in addition thereto : 

Belgrade avenue, from South street to Anawan avenue, is 
about 4,588 feet long and was relocated, widened and grade 
established September 5, 1903. A contract for constructing the 
surface of that portion of the street, between South street and 
120 feet west of Newburg street was awarded to Philip Doherty, 
April 25, 1904. Work under this contract was begun May 3, 
1904, and suspended October 23, 1904. A contract for con- 
structing the surface of that portion of the street between 120 
feet west of Newburg street to Anawan avenue, was awarded to 
Philip Doherty, June 6, 1904. Work under this contract 
was begun June 29, 1904, and suspended October 22, 1904. 
Work on both sections consisted of rough grading and filling by 
the contractor. The Boston Elevated Railway Company have 
completed their work on the tracks. The street will be com- 
pleted some time in the ensuing year. 

Bennington street, Day square to the Revere town line, is about 
9,621 feet long and was widened to 100 feet and relocated June 
27, 1899. This street has a 60-foot Telford macadam roadway, 
with granite block gutters, two (2) 20-foot sidewalks ; 12 feet of 
each is loam, and the balance brick or crushed stone. The 
section between Saratoga street and the Revere town line was 
awarded to Coleman Bros., May 22, 1903. Work was started 
June 10, 1903, and completed September 27, 1904. The section 
from Prescott street to Bremen street was awarded to James 
Doherty, May 12, 1904. Work under this contract was begun 
May 21, 1904, and completed August 16, 1904. There is now 
one section between Bremen street and Moore street to be com- 
pleted. The construction plans are ready, but the railroad bridge 
is not yet under way. 

Columbia road, Blue Hill avenue to Marine Park, is 20,807 
feet long and was relocated and laid out August 31, 1897. The 
portion between Blue Hill avenue and Old Colony Railroad and 
the portion between Covington street and Q street have been 
completed. Between Blue Hill avenue and Edward Everett 
square it is a Telford macadam construction, consisting of two 
roadways, one for pleasure driving and the other for ordinary 
traffic. There is a 25-foot reservation between the roadways for 
surface cars. The sidewalks are 13 feet wide on the pleasure 
drive and 10 feet wide on the traffic road. Between Edward 
Everett square and Buttonwood street is a single roadway of 
Telford macadam, sidewalks of crushed stone and planting space 
between the sidewalk and roadway. Between Buttonwood street 
and the Old Colony Railroad bridge it is composed of two road- 
ways, one of Telford macadam for ordinary traffic and a 9-foot 
macadam road for pleasure driving. Between the roads is a 



Steeet Department — Paving Division. -13 

15- foot reservation for surface cars. The sidewalks are com- 
posed of crushed stone. On the pleasure drive there is a plant- 
ing space between the sidewalk and the roadway, and on the 
traffic side there are large planting spaces back of the sidewalk. 
Between the railroad bridge and Covington street the contract 
for construction was awarded to T. F. Bradley, July 15, 1903. 
Work under this contract was begun August 18, 1903. The 
construction is progressing and will be completed during the 
summer of 1905. From Covington street to I street was awarded 
to H. P. Nawn, May 5, 1903. Work was begun under this 
contract July 20, 1903, and completed June 11, 1904. Between 
I and Q streets was also awarded to H. P. Nawn, November 18, 
1902. Work was begun under this contract April 24, 1903^ and 
completed July 1, 1904. 

Causeway street, from Beverly street 140 feet toward Medford 
street was relocated and widened August 8, 1903. A contract 
for constructing the surface of this street was awarded to D. J. 
Kiley, June 24, 1904. Work under this contract was begun July 
2, 1904, and completed September 28, 1904. It is paved with 
large granite blocks, with pitch and pebble joints, on a 6-inch 
Portland cement concrete base, including the area of the tracks, 
which was paid for by the Boston Elevated Railway Company ; 
the sidewalks were paved with brick. The paving blocks, flagging, 
edgestone and crushed stone, for the concrete, were furnished 
by the city and hauled by the contractor. The cement for the 
concrete and brick were delivered by the city on the site of the 
work. 

Cummington street, Blandford street to Lawton street, is 
about 1,186 feet long, and was laid out January 24, 1899. The 
contract for the surface of this street was awarded to James J. 
Coughlan, September 24, 1903. Work under this contract was 
begun November 16, 1903, and suspended November 30, 1903. 
Work was resumed March 13, 1904, and completed May 21, 1904. 
It is a 6-inch macadam roadway, granite block gutters and 
crushed stone sidewalks. The straight edgestone, flagging and 
crushed stone were furnished by the city and hauled by the 
contractor. The circular edgestone and gutter blocks were 
furnished by the city on the site of the work. 

Dorchester street, between West P^ighth street and Dorchester 
avenue, is about 1,917 feet long and was relocated July 29, 1903. 
A contract for constructing the surface of this street was awarded 
to W. J. Rafferty, April 29,1904. Work under this contract 
was begun May 16, 1904, and completed November 23, 1904. 
The pavement is granite blocks on a gravel base and brick 
sidewalks. The straight edgestones, paving blocks and flagging 
were furnished by the city and hauled by the contractor. The 
brick for the sidewalks and circular edgestones were furnished 
by the city on the site of the work. The rough grading was 
done by the city. On Dorchester street, at the easterly corner 
of Vinton street, in front of the M. E. Church, a contract 
was awarded to the Barber Asphalt Paving Company to construct 



44 City Document No. 40. 

and maintain under a 10-year guarantee a Trinidad asphalt wearing- 
surface with a bituminous binder on a 6-inch Portland cement 
concrete base. A contract was also made with M. J. Collins to 
build a retaining wall in front of Cyrus Alger estate, to support 
the street. 

Franklin street, from Cambridge street to Boston & Albany 
Railroad, is about 220 feet long and was relocated and grade es- 
tablished October 14, 1903. A contract for constructing the 
surface of this street was awarded to M. J. Coyle, May 14, 1904. 
Work under this contract was begun June 6, 1904, and completed 
July 2, 1904. It is a 6-inch macadam roadway with block gutters 
and brick and tar concrete sidewalks. The straight edgestone, 
flagging and crushed stone were furnished by the city and hauled 
by the contractor. The gutter blocks and circular edgestones 
were furnished by the city on the site of the work. 

Hyde Park avenue, from Walk Hill street to about 287 feet 
north of Ashland street, is about 6,576 feet long and was relocated 
and widened September 5, 1903. A contract for constructing the 
surface of the portion of the street between Walk Hill street and 
the bridge over Stony brook was awarded to Thomas F. Minton, 
May 12, 1904. Work under this contract was begun May 19, 
1904, and the work is still progressing. A contract was also 
awarded to Thomas F. Minton for that portion of the street be- 
tween the bridge over Stony brook to about 287 feet north of Ash- 
land street. Work under this contract was begun July 7, 1904, 
and is still progressing. This is a 6-inch macadam roadway with 
granite block gutters, crushed stone and brick sidewalks. The 
straight edgestones, flagging and crushed stone were furnished by 
the city and hauled by the contractor. The granite blocks for 
the gutters and circular edgestones were furnished by the city on 
the site of the work. 

Oswald street, between Calumet and Hillside streets, is about 
298 feet long and was laid out and grade established November 
24, 1902. A contract for constructing the surface of this street 
was awarded to Philip Doherty, November 19, 1903. Work was 
begun under this contract November 24, 1903, and suspended 
December 17, 1903; resumed April 14, 1904, and completed 
June 9, 1904. This is a 6-inch macadam roadway, with granite 
block gutters, brick and crushed stone sidewalks. The straight 
edgestone, flagging and crushed stone were furnished by the city 
and hauled by the contractor. The granite blocks for the gutters, 
brick and circular edgestones were furnished by the city on the 
site of the work. 

Public alley 303, from Pinckney street, southerly, is about 76 
feet long and was laid out and grade established November 6, 
1902. A contract for constructing the surface of this street was 
awarded to Benj. M. Cram, June 24, 1904. Work under this 
contract was begun June 28, 1904, and completed July 18, 1904. 
This alley is paved with No. 1 granite blocks on a gravel base 
with grout joints. The edgestones and granite paving blocks 
were furnished by the city and hauled by the contractor. The 
bricks were furnished by the city on the site of the work. 



Street Department — Paying Division. 45 

Seymour street, between Brown avenue and Canterbury street, 
is about 1,149 feet long and was laid out September 25, 1899. 
A contract for constructing the surface of this street was awarded 
to Thomas F. Minton, October 27, 1903. Work under this con- 
tract was begun October 29, 1903, and suspended December 
26, 1903 ; resumed April 20, 1904, and completed July 5, 1904. 
This a 6-inch macadam roadway, granite block gutters and 
crushed stone sidewalks. The straight edgestone, flagging and 
crushed stone were furnished by the city and hauled by the con- 
tractor. The granite blocks for the gutters were furnished by 
the city on the site of the work. 

Walter street, from Centre street to South street, is about 
3,735 feet long and was relocated and laid out October 4, 1901. 
A contract for constructing the surface of this street was awarded 
to Thomas F. Welch, June 4, 1903. Work under this contract 
was begun June 30, 1903, suspended December 23, 1903 ; 
resumed March 23, 1904, and completed June 15, 1904. This a 
6-inch macadam roadway, with granite block gutters and crushed 
stone sidewalks. The straight edgestone, flagging and crushed 
stone were furnished by the city and hauled by the contractor. 
The granite blocks for paving were furnished by the city on the 
site of the work. 



The Stone Crushing Plants. 

There are thirteen stone crushers, varying in size from 9 by 15 
to 18 by 36, with a crushing capacity of from 150 to 400 tons 
per day. These crushers are attached to eight crushing plants, 
three being in Dorchester, three in Roxbury, and one each in 
West Roxbury and Brighton. Their general condition is very 
good and with some minor repairs will be in good working order 
for the coming season. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
Paving Division. 

Maintenance .... $850,000 00 

Amount collected for repairs 
made by paving division for 
different companies, etc. . 763 10 

Transferred from appropriation 

for street improvements . 115,000 00 

Transferred from various appro- 
priations .... 107,682 32 



51,073,445 42 
Expenditures from February 1, 1904, to January 

31, 1905 $1,073,445 42 



46 



City Document No. 40. 



Street Improvements. 



Amount of appropriation . 

Amount of loan 

Amount collected for repairs 
made by Paving Division for 
different companies, etc. 

Transferred from appropriation 
for Shawmut-avenue bridge, 
rebuilding .... 

Transferred from appropriation 
for foot-bridge over N . Y., N. 
H. & H. R.R. at Sarsfield 
street ..... 

Transferred from appropriation 
for foot-bridge overN. Y., N. 
H. & H. R.R. at Northamp- 
ton street .... 

Transferred from appropriation 
for Carleton street 



Less amount transferred to ap- 
propriation for paving divi- 
sion 

Expenditures from February 1, 
1904, to January 31, 1905 . 



£500,000 00 
300,000 00 



31,768 77 
7,226 46 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 
13,000 00 



5861,995 23 
115,000 00 



Unexpended balance January 31, 1905 

Total Expenditures. 

Maintenance appropriation, Paving Division 

Street improvements .... 

Atlantic avenue, reconstruction 

Brandon street and Belgrade avenue . 

Dorchester street ..... 

Foot-bridge over N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. at 
Gainsborough street .... 

Freeport street, retaining wall . 

Hyde Park avenue ..... 

Reconstruction of bridges over railroad tracks at 
Norfolk, Harvard, Medway and West Selden 
streets ........ 

Construction of highways already laid out 

Highways, making of .... . 

Laying out and construction of highways, Brigh- 
ton . . . . . . . 



$746,995 23 

744,086 89 

$2,908 34 



>1, 073, 445 42 

744,086 89 

50,647 49 

5,371 11 

39,374 75 

2,812 13 

4,797 00 

19,710 15 



61,482 60 

30,168 00 

106,942 81 

8,849 18 



!, 147, 687 53 



Street Department — Paving Division. 47 

Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills deposited with the 
City Collector from February 1, 1904, on account of the 
Paving Division: 
Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . . $19,457 54 

The amount paid into the City Treasury during the year 
on account of the Paving Division was as follows : 

Sidewalk construction assessments (law of 1892) , $1,026 46 

Sidewalk construction assessments (law of 1893), 27,449 70 

$28,476 16 



48 



City Document No. 40. 






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Street Department — Paving Division. 



49 



SCHEDULE A. 

Salaries of Deputy Superintendent and office em 
ployees ..... 

Salaries of permit office employees 

Salaries of Inspectors . 

Salaries of Engineers . 

Holidays .... 

Signs and numbers 

Furniture .... 

Repairing offices, stables, sheds, etc 

Repairing stable at South yard 

Repairing office and buildings at North yard 

Repairing sheds, etc., at Revere-street yard 

Printing and stationery 

Gas and electric lighting 

Wharfage and rent .... 

Medical attendance on injured employees 

Fuel and oil .... . 

Taxes ...... 

Advertising ..... 

Sundries ...... 

Expenses of yards and stables, in- 
cluding repairs to carts, har- 
nesses, and care of horses, etc., $195,594 50 

Less amount earned by division 

teams . . . . . 84,163 91 



Engineering supplies ..... 

Pay allowed to injured emplo} T ees . 
Telephone service and tolls .... 

Shanties, repairing, etc. .... 

Veterinary services ..... 

Artificial stone sidewalks, repairing and rebates 
allowed ....... 

Stoves, pipes, etc. ..... 

Tools, cost of keeping same in repair, etc. 
Codman crusher, reconstructing . 
Columbia crusher, reconstructing . 
Rosseter crusher, reconstructing . 
Bleiler crusher, reconstructing 
Street cleaning . . . . . 

Edgestones and sidewalks, new . 

Fences and plank walks, new 

Crossing repairs ...... 

Crossings, new ...... 

Sanding icy streets ..... 

Sea-wall at South yard (uncompleted from 1903) 



£11,906 31 

8,544 24 

23,897 24 

20,562 15 

54,997 43 

4,982 58 

65 39 

3,726 36 

718 66 

2,421 39 

162 41 

7,274 89 

677 03 

11,608 58 

526 00 

3,883 99 

2,312 82 

195 43 

4,154 64 



111,430 59 

240 33 

419 00 

2,507 39 

195 00 

2,237 00 

7,631 86 

285 64 

26,037 35 

6,463 50 

6,898 09 

6,040 77 

9,510 54 

88,786 07 

9,741 97 

66 50 

9,174 42 

1,656 48 

382 20 

15,7.S6 71 



Carried forwa/rd 



$408,108 95 



50 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward 
Oatmeal 

Circuit street, iron fence 
Eastman street, retaining wall (unfinished) 
Chelsea bridge, damaged by fire 
Expressage on empty oil barrels 
Rent of towels 
Sawdust 

Extra postage, etc. 
Ice 

Expert services at ledge 
Travelling expenses, etc. 
Subscriptions 
Messenger service 
Damages 

Constables' bond 
Framing awards . 
Tide-water displacement, Charlestown yard 
Dredging dock at South yard 
Setting up derrick 
Photographs 
Stock . 

Stone crushers 
Steam rollers 



L68.108 


95 


241 


05 


395 


00 


97 


50 


224 


25 


25 


75 


106 


20 


4 


00 


58 


33 


112 


10 


125 


00 


1,066 


33 


23 


00 




95 


4 


00 


15 


00 


1 


40 


36 


25 


730 


80 


28 


20 


4 


20 


24,499 


39 


59,539 


88 


1,359 


46 



1556,806 99 



DETAIL OF EXPENDITURES UNDER SPECIAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

Atlantic avenue, reconstruction .... 

Brandon street and Belgrade avenue 

Dorchester street ....... 

Foot-bridge over N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad at 
G-ainsborough street ..... 

Freeport street, retaining wall .... 

Hyde Park avenue ...... 

Reconstruction of bridges over tracks at Nor- 
folk, Harvard, Medway and West Selden 



streets 



Street Improvements. 



Advertising .... 

Albion street, Castle to Dover street 
Alleghany street .... 

Carried forvmrd . 



150,647 

5,371 

39,374 


49 
11 
75 


2,812 

4,797 

19,710 


13 
00 
15 


*61,482 


60 


271 

4,047 

298 


71 

47 
56 



58,812 97 



* 35,700 paid by N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad Company. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



51 



Brought forward . 

Appleton stfree^Tremont street to Columbus avenue, 
Arlington avenue, Alford to Fred street 
Ashburton place, Bowdoin to Somerset street . 
Ash ford street, Linden to Chester street 
Ashland street ...... 

Asphcdt streets repaired .... 

Atkinson street, Southampton street to South Bay 

avenue ...... 

Autumn street, Longwood avenue to Park street 
Baker street, Centre street to Newton line 
Barton court, Barton to Brighton street 
Beach street, Lincoln street to Harrison avenue 
Beacon street, Chestnut Hill avenue to 1,200 feet 

southwest ...... 

Beacon street, Dartmouth to Exeter street 
Bellevue street, Brookline avenue to Park street 
Bennett street, Parsons street to end 
Beverly street, Washington street to the bridge, 

and Warren avenue, from the bridge to Front 

street (uncompleted work from 1903) 
Bird street ....... 

Boardman street, Saratoga to Leyden street . 
Bolton street, E to Dorchester street . 
Boylstou avenue, Boylston to Green street 
Boylston street, Boylston avenue to Washington 

street ....... 

Boylston street, Dartmouth street to Massachusetts 

avenue ...... 

Bradbury street, Franklin to Mansfield street 
Braintree street, Franklin to Everett street . 
Breed street, Bennington to Ford street 
Brighton avenue, Commonwealth avenue to Cam 

bridge street ..... 

Bromley park, Albert to Bickford street 
Brook ford street, Blue Hill to Howard avenue 
Brooks street, Condor to White street . 
Brown avenue ...... 

Bullard street, Bowdoin street to Bowdoin avenue 
Burbank street, Buckingham street to end 
Byron street, retaining wall at Baker Congrega 

tional Church ..... 

Cambridge street, Union square to the river . 
Camden street, Columbus avenue to the railroad 
Canterbury street, Ashland street to railroad 

bridge ....... 

Carried forward .... 



5188,812 97 

5,393 93 

6,328 63 

3,692 69 

696 70 

42 28 

10,855 01 

1,017 00 

366 78 

10,518 23 

898 30 

6,058 71 

6,433 33 

2,711 10 

7,547 21 

303 37 



* 19,729 19 
111 00 
472 50 

5,138 81 
1,476 83 

890 29 

159,582 89 

629 71 

1,560 04 

347 00 

7,822 09 

2,521 61 

1,490 10 

1,662 36 

350 00 

5,733 62 

253 10 

1,160 00 

8,767 89 
8,131 65 

4,539 53 

8384,046 45 



* $4,350.03 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. $133.88 paid by Lovcjoy's 
Wharf Trust. 
f $8,034.93 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



52 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward .... 

Causeway street, Haverhill to Med ford street 
Centre street, Paul Gore to Eliot street and Church 
to Weld street ..... 

Centre street and Talbot avenue, at high school 
Chandler street, Columbus avenue to Berkeley 
street ...... 

Chaucer street, Curtis to Moore street . 
Chestnut avenue, Wyman to Roys street 
ChicJcatawbut street, Neponset avenue to Glide 
street ...... 

Child street, South to Call street . 
Clarence street, Dudley to George street 
Clarkson street, Quincy to Hamilton street 
Coleman street, Quincy to Hamilton street 
Columbus avenue, Ferdinand street to bridge 
Commonwealth avenue, Beacon to Babcock street 
Compton street, Tremont to Village street 
Congress-street bridge, repairing . 
Court street, Washington to Tremont street . 
Court square, westerly side . . . . 

Covington street, East Eighth to Dixfield street 

Curve street, Broadway to Albany street 

D street, West Ninth street to Dorchester avenue 

Dacia street, Brookford to Dewey street 

Day street, Perkins to Minden street . 

Dennis street, Dudley to Woodville street 

Dewey street ...... 

Dorchester avenue, Summer to Congress street 
snow dump ...... 

Dorchester avenue, Columbia road to Mt. Vernon 
street ....... 

Dover street, Washington street to Harrison avenue 
work done in 1903! .... 

Dorrance street, Main street to Arlington avenue 
Dudley street, Hampden to Warren street, and Mt 

Pleasant avenue to Adams street, widened 
E street, West Seventh to West Eighth street 
East Concord street, Albany to Washington street, 
and West Concord street, Washington street 
to Shawm ut avenue ; 

East Dedham street, Albany to Washington street, 
and West Dedham street, Washington to Tre- 
mont street ....... 

East Fifth street, O to Q street . . . . 

Carried forward ..... 



$384,046 


45 


* 3,849 


69 


16,506 


20 


1,735 


98 


3,847 


26 


796 


39 


915 


46 


6,011 


71 


665 


86 


4,262 


62 


2,987 


12 


1,874 


84 


t 26,757 


61 


19,440 


56 


1,375 


69 


6,714 


83 


+ 8,164 


33 


2,430 


94 


1,269 


93 


1,251 


70 


2,898 


08 


3,042 


80 


2,954 


42 


2,262 


12 


54 


00 


1,308 


70 


2,112 


07 



2,058 93 

1,312 41 
** 6,357 14 



9,228 06 



11,547 33 
2,541 58 



2,582 81 



' $1,298.40 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
f $3,813.60 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
j $2,482.45 paid by Boston Transit Commission. 
§ $1,280.79 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
** $1,011.30 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



53 



Brought forward 
Easton street, Franklin to Mansfield street 
East Second street, L to M street 
East Seventh street, N- to street 
Emerald street, Castle to Dover street . 
Evergreen street, Day street to end 
Exchange place, Congress to Kilby street (un 

finished work from 1903) 
F street, West First to West Second street 
Follen street, St. Botolph street to railroad 
Ford street, Saratoga to Breed street . 
Frederick street, West Ninth street to Old Colony 

avenue ..... 

Freeport street, east of Mill street 
Front street, Warren avenue to Austin street 
G street, East Broadway to East Fourth street 
G street, East Eighth street to Columbia road 
Garrison street, Huntington avenue to St. Botolph 

street ....... 

Geneva avenue, Blue Hill avenue to Columbia road 

Gold street, E to Dorchester street 

Grant street ...... 

Green street, Boylston avenue to Washington street, 
Hale street, from Green street 300 feet north- 
easterly ....... 

Hamilton street, Bowdoin street to Barry street 
Harbor View street, Dorchester avenue to Sydney 

street ........ 

Harris street, Hanover to North street . 
Hawes street, Congress to Kilby street . 
Haynes street, Orleans to Marginal street 
Hollis street, Washington sti'eet 200 feet westerly, 
Huntington avenue, Dartmouth street to railroad 

bridge ........ 

Hutchings street, Humboldt avenue to Harold street, 

John A. Andrew street . 

Kilby street, State to Central street 

Kneeland street, Atlantic avenue to Harrison 

avenue ....... 

Eamartine street, Hoffman to Wyman street, and 

Paul Gore to Green street . 
Langdon street, Dudley to George street 
Lniigwood avenue, Huntington avenue to Phillips 

street . ....... 

Lowell street, Minot to Brighton street . 
I/yndhurst street, Allston to Washington street 
M street, East Eighth street to Columbia road 

Carried forward ..... 



5542,582 81 

792 58 

54 00 

2,855 56 

12,106 31 

1,185 73 

253 73 
1,651 99 
1,376 12 
2,612 00 

1,727 60 

660 44 

18,993 53 

2,250 56 

3,042 21 

1,204 00 

4,933 24 

5,028 83 

9 00 

666 73 

2,848 49 
7,425 09 

3,681 70 
1,782 80 
1,286 35 
4,858 38 
1,440 87 

2,286 59 

5,734 60 

11 31 

1,791 41 

*26,634 08 

11,469 78 
1,298 18 

646 80 
1,257 31 
1,729 22 

72 43 



680,242 36 



■ .-■:;, D!i I. -.'ii puiil l\\ llostoii Klcvatcil liailway Company. 



54 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward .... 

Mansfield street, Cambridge to Easton street 
Marginal street, Orleans street to railroad 
Massachusetts avenue, Columbus avenue to Hunt 

ington avenue (unfinished work from 1903) 
Massachusetts avenue, Albany street to Columbia 

road ....... 

Maverick street, railroad to Union court 

Melville avenue, Dorchester avenue to Washington 

street ....... 

Mendum street, Fairview street 500 feet northerly 
Menlo street, Sparhawk to Henshaw street 
Meridian street, Condor to Eutaw street 
Middlesex street, Castle to Dover street 
Monument street, Bunker Hill to Medford street 
Moore street, Saratoga to Pope street . 
Moreland street, Blue Hill avenue to Dennis street 
Mt. Vernon street, Garfield to Vermont street 
Mi. Washington-avenue bridge, repairing 
Murdoch street, Sparhawk to Elmira street . 
N street, East Eighth street to Columbia road 
Neponset avenue, Minot street to the bridge . 
New street, Sumner to Maverick street . 
Newbury street, Hereford street to Massachusetts 

avenue (unfinished work from 1903) 
Newbury street, Arlington to Fairfield street 
Newland street, West Dedham to West Brookline 

street ....... 

Newman street, Dorchester to Champney street 
Norfolk avenue, Hampden to Magazine street 
Norfolk avenue, Marshfield to East Cottage street 
Norman street, ...... 

Northampton street, Tremont street to Columbus 

avenue ...... 

North Anderson street, Cambridge to Fruit street 
North Bennet street, Hanover to Salem street 
street, East Second street to Columbia road 
Oneida street, unfinished work from 1903 
Park street, Freeport to Adams street 
Parker Hill avenue, unfinished work from 1903 
Parsons street, Washington to Surrey street 
Paidding street, Dale to Bainbridge street . 
Perkins street, Parkway to Brookline line 
Plain street, Chickatawbut street to Pierce avenue, 
Pleasant street, Stoughton to Elast Cottage street, 
Plymouth street, Longwood avenue to Bernier 

street ........ 

Carried forward . 



,242 36 

1,672 64 

852 60 

*946 80 



11,134 


91 


162 


90 


8,081 


69 


613 


48 


484 


46 


1,778 


40 


2,241 


16 


3,603 


78 


1,233 


20 


415 


76 


1,296 


46 


1,171 


50 


798 


60 


462 


89 


5,252 


29 


4,492 


42 


190 


25 


619 


10 


3,327 


98 


158 


50 


5,878 


22 


10,270 


53 


15 


00 


3,248 


88 


3,018 


41 


3,489 


58 


5,902 


89 


396 


00 


5,452 


18 


3,215 


24 


779 


72 


821 


38 


919 


04 


2,304 


58 


163 


10 


181 


90 


$777,290 


78 



$3,318.77 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



$777,290 


78 


2,170 


43 


2,821 


72 


7,216 


17 


953 


15 


531 


71 


2,033 


01 


2,984 


97 


10,628 


18 


904 


72 


899 


82 



Street Department — Paving Division. 55 

Brought forward ..... 

Plympton street, Harrison avenue to Albany street, 
Polk street, Bunker Hill to Medford street . 
Pope street, Swift to Saratoga street (see Saratoga 

street). 
Poplar street, Washington to Sycamore street 
Princeton street, Tufts to Lexington street . 
Prospect avenue, Sycamore street to Brown avenue, 
Providence street, Berkeley to Church street 
Putnam street, Saratoga to East Eagle street 
Q street, East First to East Fourth street 
Quincy street, Coleman street to Columbia road 

and Howard avenue to railroad 
Richfield street, Columbia road to Olney street 
Richmond street, Commercial to Fulton street and 

North to Hanover street . . . . 1,665 18 

River 'dale street, Western avenue to Raymond 

street 990 62 

Rockwell street, Milton avenue to Washington 

street 2,778 17 

Roxbury and Washington streets, Guild row across 

Marvin street * 7,758 34 

Roxbury street, Shawmut avenue to Kent street . f 10,385 83 
Roxbury street, Kent street to Columbus avenue . 3,655 66 

Russell street, Auburn to Sullivan street . . 5,107 40 

Saratoga street, Meridian to Prescott street, and 
Swift street to railroad crossing, and Pope 
street, Swift to Saratoga street . . . 10,504 71 

Savin street, Blue Hill avenue to Warren street . 1,555 30 

Shawmut avenue, Upton to West Brookline street, 858 89 

Shirley street, Massachusetts avenue 300 feet 

southerly, and Dudley to George street . 1,815 99 

Smith street, St. Alphonsus to Phillips street . 6,921 36 

South street, Kneeland to Beach street . . +6,795 90 

South street, Centre to Jamaica street, and Bussey 

street to Parkway 3,69233 

Southampton street, Massachusetts avenue to rail- 
road bridge ....... 

South Fairview street, South Walter to South street, 
South Walter streeet, South Fairview to South street, 
St. Botolph street, Massachusetts avenue to Gains- 
borough street ...... 

Spring street, Baker street to the bridge 
Sumner street, New to Liverpool and Bremen to 
Paris street ...... 

Sycamore street, Ashland to Florence street . 

Carried forward ..... 

* (1,029.75 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
t $878.70 paid by Boston Elevated Hallway Company. 
\ $1,041.97 paid by Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



13,258 


77 


371 


00 


2,031 


91 


875 


34 


766 


68 


938 


02 


2,827 


18 


$893,989 


24 



56 • City Document No. 40. 

Brought forward . . . . $893,989 24 

Tremont street, Massachusetts avenue to Hammond 

street . 5,368 68 

Trenton street, Marion to Brooks street . . 1,395 00 

Tyler street, Beach street to Broadway . . 1,511 42 

'Vale street, Mercer street to Columbia road . . 20 i 44 

Vermont street, Mt. Vernon to La Grange street . 1,514 26 

Wait street, Huntington avenue to Hillside street . 3,935 23 
Warren avenue, drawbridge to Front street (see 

Beverly street). 

Washington street, at corner State street . . 635 08 
Washington street, Marvin to Roxbury (see Rox- 

bury street). 

Washington street, Oakland to Elmore street . 400 75 

Washington street, Green to Cornell street . . 4,481 09 

Washington street, Centre street to Grove Hall . 1,552 50 

Washington street, Townsend street to Walnut park, 1,601 75 

Weld street, La Grange to Baker street . . 1,250 55 
West Broohline street, Albany street to Harrison 

avenue . . . ' . . . . 2,718 78 
West Concord street, Washington street to Shaw- 

mut avenue (see East Concord street). 
West Dedhatn street, Washington to Tremont street 

(see East Dedham street) . 

West Eagle street, Meridian to Border street . 721 13 
West JVewton street, Tremont street to Columbus 

avenue ....... 14,372 51 

West Seventh street, C to D street . . . 2,348 78 

Wttlow street, Centre street 400 feet northerly . 544 25 

Winthrop street, Blue Hill avenue to Dennis street, 793 50 

Woodoille street, Cottage street to Blue Hill avenue, 1,321 04 

Wordsworth street, Milton to Homer street . . 386 20 

Wyman street,West Roxbury, work not started . 155 00 



Total $941,201 18 

Less amount paid out of appropriation for Pav- 
ing Division ...... 12,919 06 



Total $928,282 12 



HIGHWAYS, MAKING OF. 

Bennington street, Chelsea street to Belle Isle Inlet, $40,046 82 
Bernard street, Talbot avenue southeasterly to 

railroad . . . . . . . 84 65 

Blanche street, Green Hill to Preston street . . 46 50 
Blandford street, Commonwealth avenue to Boston 

& Albany Railroad . ... . . 236 94 



Carried forward ..... $40,414 91 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



57 



Brought forward .... 

Bow street, Washington street to City square 
Causeway street, northwesterly side of Beverly 

street ....... 

Columbia road ...... 

Cummington street, Blandford to Avon street 
Devens street, Rutherford avenue to Washington 

street ....... 

Fisher avenue, Hay den street to Parker Hill 

avenue ...... 

Hale street, extended to South Margin street 
Jersey street, Brookline avenue to Audubon road 
Lindsey street, Greenbrier to Waldeck street 
Ostoald street, Calumet to Hillside street 
Berlins street, Centre street to Jamaicaway . 
Queensberry street, Audubon road to Audubon 

road ....... 

Bowe street, Ashland street to Seymour street 
Seymour street, Canterbury street to Brown avenue 
/Sjxdding street, South street to Old Colony Rail 

road ....... 

Wcdter street, Centre to South street 
Bublic cdley SOS, from Pinckney street 

Total 

Less amount paid out of appropriation for con 
struction of Highways already laid out . 

Total 



$40,414 91 
828 54 

4,481 76 

66,579 03 

8,879 26 

356 09 

5 80 

114 42 

20 17 

250 59 
1,758 90 

526 27 

22 76 

11 40 

3,863 99 

750 00 

7,810 82 

436 10 

5137,110 81 

30,168 00 



,942 81 



CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS ALREADY LAID OUT. 

Columbia road ....... * 

Bennington street, Chelsea street to Belle Isle 

Inlet * 

Amount included in cost for Highways, making of, $30,168 00 

Total $30,168 00 



LAYING-OUT AND CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS, 

BRIGHTON. 



Franklin street, subway 
Execution of court 

Total . 



$7,113 43 
1,735 75 

$8,849 18 



1 fncluded in cost for Highways, making of. 



58 



City Document No. 40. 



New Edgestones. (Not including " 323 " streets.) 
First Setting. Linear Feet. 



Year. 


a 

o 

© 

A 
D 

o 
m 


a 

o 

00 

O 

cq 

on 

H 


d 
© 

.a 


a 
o 

pq 


>> 
u 

3 
,Q 
X 
© 

OQ 


OQ 

o> 
o 

!h 
O 

Q 


>> 

u 
P 

P . 
X 

o 


u 
<o 
ft 
© 

Ph 

s 


m 
H 
O 


1894 


521 
2,097 
3.S55 
2,311 
1,259 
308 
729 
1,925 
1,957 
1,578 
1,391 


816 
1,146 

807 
1,691 

918 
2,715 

616 
1,184 
1,121 
1,581 
1,124 


694 
668 
791 

111 
100 

569 


1,323 
4,191 

8,507 

1,086 

5,909 

439 

4,627 

688 

5,838 

457 


1,568 

8,319 

2,498 

5,228 

2,185 

2,265 

614 

7,936 

990 

912 

2,677 


6,544 
15,205 
21,367 
37,205 
50,124 

6,818 

9,633 
22,574 
10,428 
10,959 

3,912 


39,324 
17,053 
20,111 
14,241 
13,252 

8,134 

8,882 
13,942 

3,842 
10,164 

3,661 


1,916 
2,990 
43,614 
5,097 
1,281 
1,410 
1,544 
2,480 
2,082 
4,131 
2,092 


52,706 


1895 


51,669 


1896 


101,550 


1897 


66,859 


1898 


74,928 


1899 


22,200 


1900 


22,118 


1901 


54,668 


1902 


21,108 


1903 


35,163 


1904 


15,883 






Totals.... 


17,931 


13,719 


2,933 


33,065 


35,192 


194,669 


152,506 


68,637 


517,852 



New Brick Sidewalks. (Not including "323" streets.) 
First Laying. Square Yards. 



Year. 


a 
o 

o 

m 
p 

o 

CO 


a 
o 

O 

W 

DO 


a 
© 

OQ 

"2 

08 

.a 
O 


a' 

O 

2 

bfl 

M 


u 

a 

X 
o 

« 


u 

m 

X 

a 
A 
o 

o 


3 
.a 

X 

o 


u 

OJ 

P. 
O 

u 

Pn 

>> 

5 


CO 

o 


1894 


2,706 
1,946 
2,314 
13,460 
4,487 
4,084 
1,069 
4,617 
1,319 
1,161 
1,529 


2,115 

1,151 

681 

16,125 

6,453 

3,503 

1,476 

1,142 

1,425 

635 

817 


437 

408 

5,361 

14,454 

4,653 


2,908 

2,128 
216 


834 

1,734 

542 

1,855 

1,225 

1,448 

1,583 

3,825 

342 

182 

432 


453 
2,146 
2,616 
2,995 
4,723 
2,610 
4,033 
5,613 
2,537 

700 
1,915 


11,533 

6,246 

15,897 

21,596 

13,783 

8,316 

4,999 

4,920 

1,688 

2,342 

2,136 


1,537 
4,103 
1,044 

17,287 

10,121 

5,424 

2,858 

549 

190 

186 

923 


19,615 


1895 


20,642 


1896 


28,455 


1897 


89,900 


1898 


45,661 


1899 


25,385 


1900 


477 
323 


873 
100 

288 


17,368 


1901 


21,089 


1902 


7,789 


1903 


5,206 


1904 


429 


940 


9,121 






Totals.... 


38,692 


35,523 


26,542 


7,453 


14,002 


30,341 


93,456 


44,222 


290,231 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



59 



Crushed Stone, Ballast and Telford. 

Output of Stone from City Crushers. 





Stone Crushed. 
Tons. 


Telford. 
Tons. 


Bleiler Crusher 


24,658 
29,345 
23,976 
19,911 
31,269 
22,461 
10,825 
26,800 




Centre-street Crusher 




Chestnut Hill Crusher 




Codman-street Crusher 






1,370 


Dimock-street Crusher 

Kenney-street Crusher 


Rosseter-street Crusher 


1,891 






Totals 


189,245 


3,261 







STREET OPENINGS. 

Permits have been issued from this office for making 
openings in the public streets for the year ending January 
31, 1905, as follows: 





Permits. 


Feet. 


American Telegraph and Telephone Company. . . . 
Auxiliary Fire Alarm Company 


15 

11 

2 

36 

334 

42 

299 

3,128 

1 

15 

294 

21 

495 

56 

11 

247 

101 

273 

187 

1,357 

8 

128 


47 
567 


Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 


128 


Boston Lamp Department 


2,034 
4,259 


Boston Police Department 


1,181 


Boston Water Department 


22,489 
105,469 


Boston and Albany Railroad Company 


50 


Boston and Maine Railroad Company 


726 


Boston Elevated Railway Company 


109,917 


Boston Low Tension Wire Association 


2,077 


Boston Gas Light Company 


22,328 


Boston Pneumatic Transit Company 


6,461 


Boston Transit Commission 


1,700 


Brookline Gas Light Company 


42,929 


Charlestown Gas and Electric Company 


5,542 


Dorchester Gas Light Company 


27,505 


East Boston Gas Light Company 


8,422 


Edison Electric Illuminating Company 


51,730 


Eastern Cold Storage Company 


321 


Jamaica Plain Gas Light Company 


12,880 


Carried forward 


7,061 


429,762 







60 



City Document No. 40. 



STREET OPENINGS. — Continued. 



Permits. 



Feet. 



Brought forward 

Lynn and Boston Railroad Company 

Massachusetts Pipe Line Gas Company 

Massachusetts Telephone and Telegraph Company, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewer Commission 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company, 

New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad 
Company 

Old Colony Street Railway Company 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Company 

Postal Telegraph Cable Company 

Roxbury Gas Light Company 

South Boston Gas Light Company 

Simpson Brothers Corporation 

Standard Oil Company 

Union Freight Railway Company 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

Warren Brothers Company 

Miscellaneous 

Emergency Permits, Class A 

Emergency Permits returned as used, 1,295; esti- 
mated length in feet 



7,061 

7 

8 

7 

12 

373 



11 

7 

229 

174 

65 

19 

5 

14 

58 

2,839 

1,609 



429,762 

5,073 

750 

310 

350 

22,926 

90 

4,941 

314 

1,031 

36,328 

12,147 

12,652 

203 

1,030 

139 

11,477 

206,870 



6,108 



Total. 



12,506 



751,501 



Making a total length of openings of about 142.3 miles. 



Permits other than for street openings have been 
as follows : 

Advertising by man wearing hat and coat lettered 
Cleaning snow from roofs .... 

Dumping snow in public alleys 

Driving cattle ...... 

Erecting, removing and repairing awnings . 

Erecting and repairing buildings 

Feeding horses on the street 

Moving buildings ..... 

Loading and unloading goods 

Pedlers (two classes) .... 

Painting signs or notices on obstruction fences 

Placing signs flat on buildings 

Projecting lamps or signs .... 

Raising and lowering safes, machinery, etc. 
Selling goods from areas .... 

Selling goods from doors and windows 
Selling fruit, etc., from stands on the sidewalks 
Special holiday permits for June 17, July 4, Grand 
Army week and Christmas 

Carried forward .... 



granted 



Permits. 

7 

181 

50 

26 

3,825 

7,963 

706 

16 

95 

1,094 

16 

2,583 

44 

566 

26 

268 

461 



849 



18,776 



Street Department — Paying Divtsion. 61 



Brought forward .... 
Special for other business purposes 
Extension of permits already issued 
Emergency permits, Class B 

Total 

Total number of permits for street openings 

Grand total of permits issued 




19,721 
12,506 

32,227 



All bonds now in use (excepting those of corporations) are 
guaranteed by some one of the surety companies authorized 
to do business in the State of Massachusetts. 

There are in force at the present time 1,291 such bonds, 
and 69 corporation bonds. During the year 1,369 bonds 
have been cancelled. 

Notices. 

There have been 14,238 notices sent to the various fore- 
men during the year directing them to repair defects in the 
public streets which had been reported by the police, inspec- 
tors and others ; also 3,841 notices to departments, corpora- 
tions and private parties to repair in streets where they had 
received permits to open or occupy, and to owners of estates 
where coal-holes or sidewalk lights were defective. 

Four thousand three hundred thirty-two notices have been 
sent to departments, corporations and owners of estates abut- 
ting on streets where improvements were about to be made 
directing changes in their structures. In each case permits 
have been granted permitting them to do the required work. 

Inspectors. 

All inspectors, excepting those required at the office for 
emergency work, are located at the various yards of this 
division the same as last year. They report by mail each 
day to the Permit Office. Notices are sent out on all their 
complaints to the proper parties. The inspector is instructed 
to see that these complaints are properly attended to. 

Corporation inspectors remain as in years past, being spe- 
cially detailed for the purpose, and paid by the corporation to 
which they are assigned. A daily report is required of each 
inspector. 

Emergency Permits. 

The conditions of the emergency permit matter have im- 
proved, and a very much better showing has been made over 
that of the year of 1903. 

The officials of the departments and corporations realize 
the importance of making proper use and return of these per- 



62 



City Document No. 40. 



mits, but are handicapped somewhat by their foremen or 
laborers who misplace them or do not make proper account of 
them. 

The table below shows the number of permits given to, 
returned, and unaccounted for by each department and cor- 
poration : 



03 O 



Boston & Maine Railroad 

Boston Elevated Railway Company. 

Boston Fire Department 

Boston Gas Light Company 



Boston Gas Light Company, Service Depart- 
ment 



Boston Pneumatic Transit Company. 



Brookline Gas Light Company (Boston^Com- 
pany), main 



Brookline Gas Light Company (Boston Com- 
pany), service 



Brookline Gas Light Company 

Charlestown Gas and Electric Light 

Dorchester Gas Light Company 

East Boston Gas Company 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company. . 

Jamaica Plain Gas Company 

Massachusetts Pipe Line Gas Company. 



New England Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 



Quincy Market Cold Storage Company 

Roxbury Gas Light Company 

South Boston Gas Light Company 

Water Department (Distribution Division) 
Water Department (Income Division) 



Totals 1,609 



12 

48 

6 

108 

48 



24 
33 
39 

132 
45 

295 

81 

9 

21 

3 

207 

72 
228 

90 



13 



100 

44 
5 

74 



23 

23 

125 

35 

277 

81 

1 



173 

60 

178 

80 



12 

35 

6 

8 

4 
1 

25 

24 

9 

9 

6 

10 

11 



12 
3 

24 
12 
44 



1,299 



275 



Street Department — Paving Division. 



63 



Electric Poles. 

There have been permits granted for the erection of 406 
new poles and the resetting of 439 old and for the removal 
of 172 unused poles. All permits for placing new poles 
have been given as per order of the Board of Aldermen, and 
plans approved by the Superintendent of Streets ; also per- 
mits for the removal of poles have been given in accordance 
with order of the Board of Aldermen or Wire Commissioner. 
This number includes trolley poles for electric railways. 

Areas Under Sidewalks. 

There have been nine permits granted for areas and bulk- 
heads under and in the sidewalks on order of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Street Numbering. 



District. 





■c 














OD 




CD 




O 


a 


* 


P4 



H 



a; cd 

- be 
2 H 
■2 * 

So 



0) o. 

_bCa3 
fa 



East Boston. . . 
Charlestown . . . 
City Proper. . . 
South Boston.. 
Dorchester . . . . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury. 
Brighton 



Totals. 



4 
27 
21 
39 
19 

7 
11 



136 



47 

217 
131 

93 
490 
178 
139 

79 



1,374 



3 

121 

'8 

15 

33 

21 

4 

2 



207 



137 

731 
295 
263 
1,165 
472 
276 
174 



3,513 



Plans for the renumbering of five streets have been 
prepared. 



64 City Document No. 40. 



PROPERTY IN CHARGE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT OF PAVING DIVISION. 

Building and wharf on Albany street, opposite Sharon 
street. The building is of brick and wood, and covers some 
8,000 square feet of land, and is divided into a shed for 
storage, blacksmith's and carpenter's shops, tool-room, and 
stable. The total contents of the lot, including wharf and 
buildings, are 63,180 square feet. 

Fort Hill wharf, containing 21,054 square feet, placed in 
charge of the Paving Department May 18, 1874, to be used 
for the landing and storage of paving blocks and gravel until 
such time as said wharf shall be wanted for the extension of 
Oliver street. The greater part of said wharf is occupied by 
the Sanitary Division as a garbage dump, and the building 
thereon is leased to a tenant. 

Ledge lot on Washington street, corner Dimock street, 
Roxbury, containing 134,671 square feet. Upon this lot are 
buildings containing a steam-engine and stone-crusher. 

Highland street stable lot. Upon this lot is a large brick 
stable, erected in 1873, and occupied by the Sanitary and 
Paving Divisions ; also a brick building used as a black- 
smith's shop, and a shed for the storage of tools, etc. 

Ledge lot on Codman street, Dorchester, containing 299,000 
square feet, was purchased in 1870. Upon this lot is a shed 
containing a steam-engine and stone-crusher, also a stable . 
and tool-house. 

On the Almshouse lot, Hancock street, Dorchester, there 
are two stables, also a shed and tool-house. 

Ledge lot on Magnolia street and Bird place, Dorchester, 
containing 81,068 square feet. This lot was purchased by 
the town of Dorchester in 1867. 

Downer avenue lot, Dorchester, containing 35,300 square 
feet. 

On Child street, West Roxbury, a lot of land containing 
43,024 square feet, upon which are a stable and shed, black- 
smith's shop and tool-house. 

Gravel lot in the town of Milton, on Brush Hill road, con- 
taining 64,523 square feet, leased May 13, 1843, by the 
town of Dorchester for 999 years ; also lot of land adjoining, 
containing about 30,000 square feet, owned by the City of 
Boston. 

Gravel lot on Morton street, Ward 23, containing about 
one-third of an acre, purchased by the town of West Rox- 
bury in 1870, used for storage purposes. 



Street Department — Paving Division. 65 

Ledge and gravel lot, rear of Union street, containing 
about 37,000 square feet, purchased by the town of Brighton. 
This lot is at present leased. 

Ledge lot on Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, containing 
about thirteen acres, upon which are an office, engine-house, 
stable, and crusher plant. 

On Medford street, Charlestown, a wharf lot, foot of Elm 
street, containing 8,000 feet, upon which are sheds, office, 
stable, etc. 

In South Boston, corner of H street and Columbia road, 
stable, carriage-house, shed, tool-house, and office on leased 
land. 

On Hereford street, a yard with shed, tool-house, and 
office. 

Wharf known as Atkin's wharf, 521 Commercial street, 
purchased in 1887 for $24,000, containing 22,553 square 
feet, having on it an office and stable. 

On Centre street, West Roxbury, buildings containing en- 
gines, stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Rosseter street, Dorchester, buildings containing en- 
gines, stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Revere street, wharf for storing paving blocks, etc., on 
leased land. 

Wharf on Chelsea street, East Boston, containing 61,000 
square feet, with buildings, purchased in 1897 for $15,000. 

Wharf on East Eagle street, East Boston, known as Glen- 
don wharf, used jointly with Sanitary, Sewer, and Street 
Cleaning Divisions. Upon this lot are sheds, stable, and 
offices on leased land. 

On Kenney street, Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Columbia road, Dorchester, buildings containing en- 
gines, stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 

On Hamlin street, South Boston, leased lot used for stor- 
age purposes. 

On Mt. Vernon street, West Roxbury, yard lot belonging to 
the Schoolhouse Commission, used for storage purposes. 

On Massachusetts avenue, South End, lot used for storage 
purposes. 

On Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester, crushing plant on ledge 
of John McMorrow. 

On Heath street, Roxbury, buildings containing engines, 
stone-crushers, tools, etc., on leased land. 



66 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Rooms 917-920 Teemont Building, 

Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — The following is the report of the expendi- 
tures, income and operation of the Sanitary Division of the 
Street Department for the year ending January 31, 1905. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel P. Sullivan, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



The work of the Sanitary Division includes the removal 
of house offal, waste and rubbish, and of house dirt and 
ashes accumulated from the burning of materials for heating 
buildings and for domestic purposes. 

The cost of disposing of refuse collected daily is con- 
stantly increasing ; owing to the undesirable character of 
much of it for use as filling, it is difficult to obtain suitable 
dumping places. The only available dumps are so far dis- 
tant from the points of collection that the expense of haul- 
ing is greatly increased. I would recommend that additional 
dumping places on the water front be procured so that it' 
may be towed to sea. 

All permits for dumping places must be approved by the 
Board of Health under the following regulations : 

Whereas, in the opinion of the Board of Health of the 
City of Boston the burning in the open air of refuse and 
waste material of any description within the city limits is 
attended with noisome odors and dense smoke, and 

Whereas, said odors and smoke are in the opinion of said 
Board liable to cause sickness among the inhabitants of said 
city. 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 67 

Ordered, That from and after June 3, 1903, no person 
shall burn or permit to be burned in the open air any refuse 
or waste material of any description within the city limits on 
any land owned by him except in accordance with a written 
permit from the said Board. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Amount of appropriation ..... $653,200 00 

Transferred by City Auditor . . . . 45,315 89 

Amount returned by City Collector . . . 8,014 00 



Total amount of appropriation . . . $706,529 89 



The total expenditure of the Sanitary Division, 
including work done for other divisions and 
departments, and paid for by them . . . $764,547 21 

Less amounts paid by other divisions and depart- 
ments 58,017 32 



Net cost of maintenance, Sanitary Division . . $706,529 89 



Total Cost of Removal of House Dirt, Ashes, Waste, 
Rubbish and House Offal. 

Salaries : deputy superintendent, clerks and fore- 
men $16,627 96 

Office supplies and expenses .... 4,394 81 

Ashes, waste and rubbish account . . . 422,330 10 

House offal account ...... 225,134 26 

Construction, Repair and Horseshoeing 

Account. 

Foreman 1,396 20 

Expended for labor . . . $34,935 54 

Expended for stock . . . 17,416 68 

52,352 22 



Allowed time for holidays . . $39,365 41 

Medical attendance and allowed 

time for injured men . . 2,946 25 



42,311 66 



Total expenditures of the Sanitary Division for 

year ending January 31, 1905 .... $764,54721 



68 



Cety Document No. 40. 



Brought forward ..... 

Revenue Received from Outside Divisions and 

Departments for Board and Care of Horses, 

Rent, use of Dumping Boats, Shoeing, and 

for Repairing Vehicles, etc. 

Bridge Division . . . . $1,03925 



$764,547 21 



County of Suffolk 
Ferry Division . 
Lamp Department 
Paving Division . 
Sewer Division 
Street Cleaning Division 
Street Watering Division 



1,771 97 

364 60 

387 05 

15,785 90 

8.487 35 

28,486 78 

1,694 42 



58,017 32 



$706,529 89 



Income. 

Amount of money and bills deposited with the City 
Collector for material sold and work performed by the 
Sanitary Division of the Street Department during the year 
ending January 31, 1905. 

Money Deposited with City Collector. 
From letting of scow privileges .... $1,931 67 

Bills Deposited with City Collector. 
For removal of engine ashes, manure, and rents . 13,573 48 



$15,505 15 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 69 

Items of Expenditures and Revenue. 



Items. 



Total Amount 
Expended. 



Amount Paid 
by Other 
Divisions. 



Amount Charged 
to Sanitary- 
Division. 



Salaries of deputy and clerks . 

Salaries of foremen 

Labor, collection and disposi- 
tion of house dirt and ashes, 

Labor, collection and disposi- 
tion of waste and rubbish . . 

Labor, collection and disposi- 
tion of house offal 

Labor and stock in stables 
and yards 

Hired teams on ashes, waste 
and rubbish and offal 

Contracts for ashes, West 
Roxbury, North and South 
Dorchester 

Contracts for offal, East Bos- 
ton, Brighton, West Rox- 
bury and Dorchester 

Ash and offal stock 

Allowed time and holidays. .. 

Grain 

Hay and straw 

Medical attendance and al- 
lowed time on account of 
injured men 

Horses 

Veterinary services and medi- 
cine 

Use of hired horses 

Outside board and care of 
horses 

Outside horseshoeing, black- 
smith, wheelwright, har- 
ness and painting 

Labor, stock, etc., wheel- 
wright, blacksmith, paint, 
harness and horseshoeing 
shops 

Dumping boats, stock and 
supplies, etc 

Repairs on stables, sheds and 
wharves 

Fuel 

Gas 

Electric light and power 

Printing, stationery, office 
items and incidentals 

Advertising 

Rents 

Tolls and fares 

Telephone 

Damages caused by city 
teams 

Taxes on Hecht's estate as 
per lease 



$9,359 29 
8,664 87 

196,618 54 
39,267 77 

145,262 92 
48,775 81 
49,425 49 

16,295 02 



16,757 20 
782 26 

39.365 41 

26.366 47 
23,199 23 



2,946 25 
24,497 50 

6,090 34 
5,991 00 

3,701 22 



5,518 77 



52,352 22 

103 07 

12,389 13 

1,107 50 

955 27 

1,380 29 

4,394 81 

360 78 

16,523 60 

1,085 78 

915 03 

28 37 

4,066 00 



$107 40 

33,210 99 

6,292 82 

12,745 31 

2,659 71 



620 68 
1,771 97 



608 44 



$9,359 29 
8,557 47 

163,407 55 
32,974 95 

132,517 61 
46,116 10 
49,425 49 

16,295 02 



16,757 20 

782 26 

38,744 73 

24,594 50 

23,199 23 



2,946 25 
24,497 50 

6,090 34 
5,991 00 

3,701 22 
5,518 77 

51,743 78 

103 07 

12,389 13 

1,107 50 

955 27 

1,380 29 

4,394 81 

360 78 

16,523 60 

1,085 78 
915 03 

28 37 

4,066 00 



Totals $764,547 21 



$58,017 32 



$706,529 89 



70 City Document No. 40. 

Force Employed on House Dirt and Ashes. 



Department 


No. 


Hired 
Teams. 


Contractors' Teams. 


Fokce. 


North 
Dorchester. 


South 
Dorchester. 


West 
Roxbury. 


Totals. 


Sub-foremen 


9 

14 

131 

131 

29 

14 










9 


Inspectors 










14 


Teamsters 


38 
38 


6 

7 


5 
5 


3 

3 


183 




184 


Dumpers 


29 


Tallymen 










14 














Totals 


328 


76 


13 


10 


6 


483 







Amount of House Dirt and Ashes Removed. 



Year. 


Materials. 


No. of Loads 
of 54 cu. ft. 


1899 


House dirt and ashes 


329,096 

344,682 
342,940 
313,844 
310,509 
325,955 


1900 


it u t< u 


1901 


11 11 It it 


1902 


(( tt 11 u 


1903 


11 11 11 11 


1904 


11 It 11 tt 







Force Employed on Waste and Rubbish. 



Number. 



Inspectors 
Teamsters. 
Helpers. . . 
Dumpers. . 

Totals 



3 
16 

22 
1 



42 



Amount of Waste and Rubbish Removed. 





Year. 


Number of Loads. 




Paper 
Cart. 


Market 
Wagon. 


1899 


14,903 
11,452 
11,534 
10,201 
8,417 
7,064 


3 020 


1900 


5,494 
7,791 
8,297 
8,753 
9,170 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 





Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



71 



Force Employed on House Offal. 











Contractors' 


Teams. 












tA 




City Force. 




g 


a 






3 








a 






41 










-a 


ID 

o 

n 


o 


(0 


O 


03 






o 










ci 
























a 






£ 






z 


a 


H 


M 





H 




5 

7 
69 
69 












5 














7 




2 
2 


6 
10 


4 

5 


5 

8 


2 
3 


88 


Helpers 


97 




4 












4 




2 












2 
















Totals 


156 


4 


16 


9 


13 


5 


203 







Amount of House Offal Removed. 



Year. 



No. of Loads. 



1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 



59,956 
62,975 
66,758 
66,287 
64,744 
64,084 



Number of Loads of Material Collected from January 31, 1898, 
to February 1, 1905. 



Year. 


Waste 

and 

Rubbish. 


Ashes. 


Offal. 


Total Loads. 


1899 

1900 


19,815 
18,400 
19,325 
18,498 
17,170 
16,234 


329,096 
344,682 
342,940 
313,844 
310,509 
325,955 


59,956 
62,975 
66,758 
66,287 
64,744 
64,084 


408,867 
426,117 
429,023 


1901 


1902 


398,629 
392,423 
406,273 


1904 







72 



City Document No. 40. 



Material Collected by Districts. 





a 
o 

CO 

o 

« 

3 

o 


a 

O 
CO 

o 

pa 

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H 


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o 

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5 


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to 

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O 

o 

Q 


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3 

,o 

o 


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CO 


CO 

•a 


EC 

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o 

EH 


House dirt 
and ashes, 

Waste and 


23,438 

3S0 
3,967 


20,799 
6,294 


18,024 

196 
2,589 


15,137 


17,020 


33,784 


53,360 

845 
9,407 


76,651 

8,894 
20,228 


68,802 

6,942 
10,515 


327,015 
17,257 


House offal. 


1,962 


3,047 


5,980 


63,989 




27,785 


27,093 


20,809 


17,099 


20,067 


39,764 


63,612 


105,773 


86,259 


408,261 



Number of Carts and Wagons Collecting House Dirt and Ashes, 
Waste, Rubbish and Offal. 



Wooden. 



Total. 



Offal wagons in use by the Sanitary Division 

" " " Thomas Mulligan, East Boston. 

" " " John Newbury, Brighton 

" " " M. Crowne & Co., Dorchester. . 

" " " John Krug 

Ash carts in use by the Sanitary Division 

" " " John J. Moore, West Roxbury 

" " " Denis D. Flynn 

" " " John D. Lyons . 



Market wagons in use by the Sanitary Division. 
Paper carts " " " " " 



Ash and offal sleds 
Total 



35 
7 
6 
13 
3 
188 
3 
5 



32 



54 
140 

507 



Collected by West Roxbury Contractor . 
" " North Dorchester " 

" South 



7,980 loads of ashes. 
20,234 " " 
13,550 " " " 



Total 41,764 " 



Collected by East Boston Contractor. 
" Brighton 
" " West Roxbury " 

" " Dorchester " 



6,294 loads of offal. 
1,962 " " 
1,380 " " " 
5,980 " " " 



Total , 



15,616 " " " 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



73 



Final Disposition of all Waste Material by the Sanitary Division 
Collected from February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 





CP 
g 03 

So 

< 


P 

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a 


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DD 

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o 
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House dirt and ashes... 


327,015 
17,257 
63,989 
3,831 
32,910 


201,716 
1,504 


S3.535 




41,764 


15,753 


327,015 
17,257 






48,373 


15,616 


63,989 
3,831 






3,831 
32,910 


Street sweepings 










32,910 










Totals 


445,002 


203,220 


120,276 


48,373 


57,380 


15,753 


445,002 







Amount Expended for the Collection and Disposition of House 
Dirt, Ashes, Waste and Rubbish and House Offal, by Dis- 
tricts, including Labor and Stock, etc. 



Districts. 



Waste 
and 

Rubbish. 



Offal. 



Totals. 



1. South Boston 

2. East Boston 

3. Charlestown 

4. Brighton 

5. West Roxbury 

6. Dorchester 

7. Roxbury 

8-9. South End and Back Bay. 

10. North and "West Ends 

11. Dumping boats 



$485 00 



144 00 



1,654 00 
12,950 50 
10,634 00 
22,276 89 



828,194 22 
21,126 22 
27,573 33 
11,331 69 
9,197 14 
17,005 38 
77,898 92 

104,469 75 
73,563 13 
26,590 24 



$14,316 23 

9,903 60 

11,459 89 

3,094 01 

4,338 78 

7,608 96 

36,122 53 

48,456 17 

27,664 55 

56,534 90 



$42,995 45 

31,029 82 

39,177 22 

14,425 70 

13,535 92 

24,614 34 

115,675 45 

165,876 42 

111,861 68 

105,402 03 



Totals. 



$48,144 39 



$396,950 02 $219,499 62 



$664,594 03 



Amount expended for the maintenance of the repair 

and construction shops ..... $58,987 05 

Income from outside divisions and departments . 22,230 95 

Net cost to Sanitary Division . . . $36,756 10 



74 



City Document No. 40. 




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Street Department — Sanitary DrvisroN. 75 

Maintenance of Fort Hill Wharf and Dujiping-Boats. 
Amount ^Expended. 

For towing by department tow-boats . $6,544 77 
For towing by hired tow-boats . . 807 50 

$7,352 27 

For repairs on wharves and boats .... 10,070 07 

For rents $4,000 00 

For dumping-boat stock and supplies . 379 66 
For labor, messengers, crew and 

dumpers ..... 9,695 65 
For holidays and allowed time, injured 

men 438 38 

14,513 69 



$31,936 03 



Number of trips to sea by department 

tow-boats ..... 333 

Number of trips to sea by hired boats . 17 

350 



Number of scows to sea, 359. 

Cost per Load, Including Rents, etc., of Towing to Sea 
"Waste Material Belonging to This and Other Divisions. 

The number of loads waste material carried to sea, 120,276 

The cost per cart load ..... .2655 cents 

The cost per boat load ..... $86 17 



Division Construction, Repair and Horseshoeing 

Shops. 

An extensive plant is located at the South yard, 650 
Albany street, opposite East Newton street, where the con- 
struction of and repairs on street and other department 
carriages, carts, wagons, etc., are made, together with the 
painting of the same. Harnesses are repaired and many 
are manufactured, horseshoeing done, and all street signs 
are painted for the Paving Division. 



76 



City Document No. 40. 



For work done and materials furnished for outside divi- 
sions and departments, the different shops received as 
follows : 



Wheelwright shop 


. $4,275 05 




Blacksmith shop, South End 


. 7,271 68 




Blacksmith shop, West End 


753 42 




Paint shop ..... 


. 4,027 32 




Harness shop .... 


. 2,538 81 




Horseshoeing shop, South End 


. 1,674 00 




Horseshoeing shop, West End 


. 1,690 67 


$22,230 95 



For work done and material furnished for 
the Sanitary Division, the following amounts 
were expended by the different shops : 



Wheelwright shop 
Blacksmith shop, South End 
Blacksmith shop, West End 
Paint shop . . . 

Harness shop 

Horseshoeing shop, South End 
Horseshoeing shop, West End 



$7,609 22 

6,857 54 

917 46 

6,144 87 

6,792 34 

2,612 69 

141 43 



Total amount paid out, stock and labor, all divi- 
sions and departments ..... 
Foreman in charge . . . .$1,396 20 
Allowed time 4,284 35 



31,075 55 



$53,306 50 



5,680 55 
$58,987 05 



Cost of Horseshoeing. 





Division Shops. 


Outside Shops. 


Stock 


$2,016 85 
4,078 63 


$3,335 40 


Labor 








$6,095 48 


$3,335 40 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 



77 



Horseshoeing for Divisions. 



Kind and Style. 


p" 
i».2 


ho 

s 

"a 
»S 


a 
o 

1 

5 


d 
o 

V 

8 

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7,338 


3,083 


988 


377 


4 


161 


149 


40 


12,140 




101 

4,202 
955 


30 
1,416 

596 


78 
433 


153 


2 


8 
4 


3 

69 


14 


222 




6,293 




265 


49 




4 


56 


3 


1,928 


Pads 


110 
6 


23 


16 
4 


50 
2 




120 


6 




325 




12 















Average cost per 3hoe, 35 cents. 

Detailed Account of Amount Paid for Work Done by the 
Sanitary Division for Other Divisions of the Street 
Department and Other Departments. 



For repair and construction work 

For horseshoeing ..... 

For use of dumping boats .... 

For hay, grain, straw, board and care of horses 
For feeders, watchmen, and stablemen . 
For fuel, light, and telephone 
For board and care of sick horses at Veterinary 
hospital ...... 

For rent for use of Litchfield's Wharf . 
For new horses ...... 

For miscellaneous items .... 



£19,314 48 
3,479 42 
9,079 50 
5,620 21 
1,893 11 
663 70 

1,965 70 

5,200 00 

10,652 18 

149 02 



$58,017 32 



Land and Buildings in Charge of the Sanitary 
Division. 



South Boston Stable. (Leased.) 

Stables and sheds, with accommodations for nineteen 
horses, located at 317 and 319 First street, South Boston. 

East Boston Stable. (Leased.*) 

Stables and shed, with accommodations for fifteen horses, 
located at 324 East Eagle street, and occupied jointly by 
Paving, Sewer, Street Cleaning, and Sanitary Divisions. 



78 City Document No. 40. 

Charlestown Stable. 

With accommodations for twenty-five horses, situated on 
Rutherford avenue ; lot contains 17,300 square feet of land; 
stable built in 1875, cost $5,083.07 ; sheds and outbuildings 
built in 1879. 

Brighton. 

Accommodation is provided by the Sewer Division at its 
stable on Western avenue for five horses of the Sanitary 
Division. 

Highland Stable. 

With accommodations for seventy-two horses on the old 
Almshouse lot, Highland street, containing 81,082 square 
feet. A part of this stable and adjoining lot is used by the 
Paving Division. There is on this lot a brick stable, built 
in 1878, which cost $88,594.13. On this lot is an offal-shed, 
erected in 1875, at a cost of $1 ,160.12. This offal-shed was 
abandoned on April 1, 1897, and in 1900 part of it was re- 
modelled, and is now used as a carriage-house and wash- 
room. 

South City Stables, Shops and Sheds. 

Situated on Albany street, opposite Newton street. The 
lot belonged to the city before being used for this purpose, 
and contains 90,780 square feet of land. 

The stables and buildings connected therewith are of 
brick. There are also on the premises five wooden sheds, 
used for storing wagons, etc. The stable is two stories high, 
with French roof, and has accommodations for one hundred 
horses. Twenty-three horses are kept in sheds. Total 
original cost, exclusive of land, $79,089.23. In 1899, a 
Veterinary hospital was built and equipped for the purpose 
of caring for sick and disabled horses. 

Connected with stables are blacksmith, wheelwright, paint 
and harnessmaker's shops, in which wagons, carts, harnesses, 
etc., used by this and other departments, are constructed and 
kept in repair, also a horseshoeing shop for shoeing the 
horses of the department located in this section of the city. 

West Stables and Sheds. 

The stable is a brick building, a story and a half high, 128 
feet by 50 feet, located on North Grove street ; built in 1860 
without buildings attached to same. It has accommodations 
for 90 horses in stables and sheds. The lot contains about 



Street Department — Sanitary Division. 79 

45,152 square feet. On May 11, 1896, a horseshoeing shop 
was established for the purpose of shoeing horses of the 
department stabled in this section of the city. 

Fort Hill Wharf. 

Containing 21,054 square feet, placed in charge of the 
Sanitary Division ; used as a dumping station for the city's 
garbage and refuse, and as a mooring place for dumping boats 
and scows, which convey this material to sea and to the 
plant of the New England Sanitary Product Company. 
Cost of constructing platform and dredging dock, $6,219.33. 
There are three Barney dumping boats which are in continual 
use, and are towed to sea by the department tugboat 
" Cormorant." 

A portion of this wharf is used by the Street Cleaning- 
Division as a locker for patrol push-carts, etc., and a part is 
in use by the Paving Division. 

Packard's Wharf. (Leased.) 

Situated at 464 Atlantic avenue ; used as a berth for 
dumping boats in connection with Fort Hill Wharf. Leased 
from the heirs of Henry C. Snow. 

Litchfield's Wharf. {Leased.') 

Situated at 466 to 470 Atlantic avenue, containing about 
35,460 square feet. Leased from Jacob H. Hecht, March 1, 
1898, for a period of ten years. This wharf adjoins Fort 
Hill Wharf, and is occupied in part by the New England 
Sanitary Product Company as a berth for their scows, and 
also by the buildings of the City Refuse LTtilization Company 
for the disposal of waste and rubbish. This property is now 
owned by the Middlesex Trust. 



80 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. 



30 Tkemont Street, Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit report of expenses, 
income and operation of the Sewer Division for the financial 
year ending January 31, 1905. 

The work of converting combined to separate system in 
the North Metropolitan district, mentioned in the last annual 
report as having been begun under chapter 383 of the 
Acts of 1903, has been vigorously carried on, contracts made 
last year on the high level branch intercepting sewers having 
been finished, and as much work done in the separation of 
the common systems as the limited time would allow, the 
new loan not having been made available until October. 

The separation of the system in the Lauriat avenue dis- 
trict and in the Talbot avenue district west of Bernard 
street has been completed ; and in the Back Bay and Roxbury, 
the Smith street and Longwood avenue districts, about 80 
per cent, of the work of conversion has been completed. 

The bill mentioned in last year's report as having been in- 
troduced upon petition of His Honor the Mayor for the pur- 
pose of providing funds for converting combined to separate 
systems in the Back Bay as an alternative to the construction 
of the marginal conduit, was passed by both branches of the 
Legislature and sent up to the Governor. 

The Charles River Basin Commission not having concluded 
at this time to meet the Mayor's views, namely that the sep- 
aration of these systems were preferable to the building of the 
marginal conduit, and not having proposed any modification 
of the marginal conduit scheme, at least so far as the Mayor 
had any knowledge, the bill was vetoed by the Governor 
upon the request of the Mayor. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 81 

The works of magnitude which should be undertaken by 
this division in the immediate future are as follows : 



Rebuilding of the Old Channel op Stony Brook. 

This old stone structure, partly a loose stone arch, partly 
a square section covered with horizontal covering stones, is 
the original channel of Stony Brook, running from near 
Roxbury Crossing, across Linden Park and Vernon streets, 
through Whittier street and Rogers avenue, to the Back 
Bay Fens. This is in a general state of dilapidation. Any 
portion of it is liable to break down at any time, letting 
down the surface of the streets which overlie it, and result- 
ing in serious damage. There have been several cave-ins 
already. In order to prevent a general break down, it has 
been braced up in numerous places with upright timbering. 
These timber uprights form obstructions and aggravate the 
accumulation of filth and sewage matter. In addition to this 
structural weakness, it is in the most unsanitary condition 
imaginable. It should be rebuilt throughout its entire length, 
both for safety of street travel and for sanitary reasons. The 
estimated cost of this improvement is $300,000. The sub- 
ject has been discussed in annual reports for many years past, 
but has not been undertaken on account of the cost. The 
rational method of procedure would be to spend a given 
amount, say $50,000 a year, on this rebuilding until it is 
completed. 

The Auxiliary East Side Intercepting Sewer. 

This intercepting sewer from Central street to Lehigh 
street has become too small for the flow which it now has to 
take. The sewer is nearly or quite full even in the dry est 
times, and the result is that it overflows at low tide through 
many of the overflow outlets and befouls the docks with 
sewage matter. It cannot be rebuilt on its present location 
on account of the fact that so much of it is covered by the 
Terminal Station railroad yards, but a new route has been 
selected running around this obstruction. A temporary 
amelioration can be accomplished to a limited extent by 
building dams and raising the height at which overflows take 
place ; but not much can be done in this line without danger 
of obstructing the overflows so as to cause iloodings of cel- 
lars throughout the business district. The East Side inter- 
cepter and the Canal-street relief sewer, which connects with 
it, are so full almost all the time that it is onlv with the 



82 City Document No. 40. 

greatest difficulty that connections can be made. The radical 
remedy is to build an auxiliary sewer to help out the 
obstructed portion of the sewer described above. The whole 
cost of this work is estimated at $230,000. This is too 
much to be done in any one year, together with all the work 
which the department has to undertake, but, like the preced- 
ing work, a certain amount might be done each year, say 
•$100,000 worth, so that relief may be obtained in a couple 
of years. 

The Extension of Stony Brook Conduit Southward 
from Jamaica Plain. 

This conduit must be extended to Forest Hills or a point a 
few hundred feet south of Forest Hills during the immediate 
future, after which it may be allowed to rest, inasmuch as a free 
outlet at this place would probably prevent serious flooding in 
the meadows beyond. Some other scheme which is less expen- 
sive may perhaps be devised, such as an open channel 
enclosed by a strip of varying width which might be con- 
verted into a park, but a covered channel is a necessity as far 
as Forest Hills. This channel carries with it a sewer at a 
lower grade than the existing main sewer of the valley, 
which will afford a sewer outlet to Washington street, 
Williams street, Keyes street, and adjacent territory which 
cannot now be sewered into the existing main sewer. The 
total cost of this improvement is about $900,000, but it 
can be done by yearly instalments of say $150,000. This 
work has rested at Green street now for several years and 
there is a crying necessity for its resumption. 

King's Mill Pond. 

This is a tidal outlet through the marsh for Tenean Creek. 
This conduit which now empties into the mill pond at Brooks 
street brings down more or less sewerage from overflows of 
the common sewer system throughout its drainage area, and 
the pond has become a nuisance, and has been so for many 
years. There has been a project for digging an open channel 
and making a water park of this place, but it does not seem 
advisable. There would be as much difficulty in preserving 
the purity of the waters as there has been in the Back Bay 
Fens, and from its proximity to the water front there does 
not seem to be reason enough for the construction of a water 
park. The best plan would be to build a coveied channel as 
far as Mill street. This work has been estimated at 
$125,000. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 83 

All of the foregoing work will have to be charged to the 
annual million dollar loan for sewerage works. 

The large work to be done out of the separation fund is 
the extension of the high level branch intercepters, of which 
many miles remain to be built, the rebuilding of Maywood's 
Brook and Dorchester Brook sewer systems, of which men- 
tion will be made later, and the separation of the common 
sewer system throughout the Metropolitan district. 

A general statement of the most important work done by 
the division during the year, accompanied with recommen- 
dations as to work for the coming year, is given in the suc- 
ceeding pages and is classified according to districts. 

East Boston. 
There have been built in this district during the year : 

1,691.47 linear feet brick sewer. 



2,312.92 

243.73 

72.30 

1,436.50 


t< 
u 
cc 

u 

t( 


a 
a 

a 

u 


pipe " 

wood " 

brick surface drain 

pipe " " 


Total, 5,756.92 


= 1.09 miles. 



The most important of this is the East Boston low level 
sewer in Addison street and a part of Kneller street, 1,170 
linear feet of which was built in tunnel ; also a section of the 
low level sewer under Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad, between Bennington street and Butler avenue. 
The Lexington street outlet was rebuilt of a permanent 
size, 3-foot circular wood, and in a new location, and outlet 
sewers for Parkway lands, so called, were started in Prescott 
and Frankfort streets. A 5-foot by 5-foot brick culvert was 
built under the Boston & Maine Railroad about 1,300 feet 
from Addison street, which gives additional tidal flow to and 
from the basin bounded by the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Addison street, Saratoga street, and Boardman street. 

Recommendations. 

The East Boston low level sewer should be completed 
from Addison street through Kneller, Boardman and Saratoga 
streets to Bennington street, thus affording an outlet for the 
sewers already built in Bennington street, from Saratoga 
street to Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. This will 
require about 3,000 linear feet of 3-foot by 4-foot 0-inch 
and 3-foot brick sewer. 



84 City Document No. 40. 

Another section of the low level sewer for which there is 
urgent need will lie between Butler avenue and Leverett 
avenue, and when built will afford an outlet for the existing 
sewers in Bennington street, between the Boston, Revere Beach 
& Lynn Railroad and Leverett avenue. To build this section 
will require about 2,400 linear feet of 3-foot and 2-foot by 
3-foot brick sewei. The above would complete the East 
Boston low level sewer. 

The separation of the systems on that portion of the high 
ground on Breed's Island, which has already been sewered, 
should be- completed, and the Moore street interceptor, 
between Kneller street and the Moore street outlet, should be 
begun early in the season and pushed to completion as 
rapidly as possible, in order to do away with the nuisance 
caused by deposit of sewage on the flats at foot of Moore 
street. This interceptor will require about 4,400 linear feet 
of 20-inch and 24-inch pipe. 

It is also desirable to build an interceptor along the north- 
erly side of East Boston, from Eagle square to Putnam street, 
to intercept the sewage from the Putnam street and the 
Glendon street outlets. These sewers now flow into Chelsea 
Creek, but a deposit is left on the flats at low water, which 
is the cause of complaint. This will require about 2,650 
linear feet of 12-inch and 15-inch pipe. 

The sewer in Prescott street, between Bremen and Frank- 
fort streets, should be completed; and the sewers built in 
Prescott street, from Frankfort street to Cleveland street, in 
Parkway, from Bennington street to Cleveland street, and in 
Frankfort street, from Parkway to Swift street. 

Chaelestown. 

During the year there have been built in this district : 

222.90 linear feet brick sewer 

777.60 " " pipe " 

267.30 " " concrete and steel sewer. 

363.03 " " pipe surface drain. 



Total, 1,630.83 " " = 0.31 miles. 

The most important of this was the rebuilding of part of 
the Rutherford avenue outlet, from Rutherford avenue 
about 300 feet southwesterly, and the starting of the 
separation of the Vine street district sewer system. The 
connection with the Metropolitan sewer at Warren street has 
been made, thus completing the connection of the Charles- 
town sewerage system with the Metropolitan sewer. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 85 

Recommendations. 

The separation of the Vine street sewerage system should 
be continued by building new pipe sewers in Bunker Hill 
street, from Chelsea street to Vine street, and in Moulton, 
Decatur, Corey and Tufts streets. 

The rebuilding of the Rutherford avenue outlet should be 
continued to tide-water. This will require about 1,300 
linear feet of 6-foot by 7-foot concrete sewer or its equivalent, 
which should be built at a grade about 2.5 lower than the 
existing outlet in order to allow a free flow. 

The existing sewer in Rutherford avenue should be rebuilt 
from the outlet to Middlesex street. 

Brighton. 
During the year there have been built: 

1,993.20 linear feet of pipe sewer. 
4,739.26 " " surface drain. 



Total, 6,732.46 " " or 1.28 miles. 

The most important work done was the building of separate 
system sewers in Brooks and Park man streets, and the new 
connection with the Metropolitan sewer at Brooks street. 
This has completed the separation of the sewerage system on 
Bigelow Hill, so that only house sewage enters the Metro- 
politan sewer from this territory, and all the surface drainage 
is carried to Charles river. A surface drain was also built in 
Nonantum street, from Oak square to Newton line. 

Recommendations. 

The Shepard brook conduit should be built from Faneuil 
Valley brook, near North Beacon street, to Shannon street. 
This will require about 5,200 linear feet of 6-foot, 5-foot, 
4-foot, 3-foot 6-inch and 3-foot brick conduit, and is 
greatly needed to relieve the congested condition of sewers 
in the Market street district in time of storm. There 
has been a crying need for this conduit for several years, 
and as the cellars in this territory are flooded at every heavy 
rain there is a liability of suits for damage if some relief is 
not afforded. 

The Everett street overflow outlet should be rebuilt from 
Charles river, across Metropolitan parkway to Western 
avenue, in order to relieve sewers in Western avenue and 
vicinity, which are gorged at ever}' heavy rainfall, and cause 



86 City Document No. 40. 

the flooding of numerous cellars. This would require about 
940 linear feet of 5-foot 9-inch circular brick sewer. Sur- 
face drains should be built in Sutherland and Lanark roads, 
in Warren street, between Commonwealth avenue and 
Brookline line, and in Allston street, between Common- 
wealth avenue and Summit avenue. 

West Roxbury. 

There have been built during the year: 

6,289.00 linear feet brick sewer. 
pipe ' ' 

" house drain, 
brick surface drain. 



16,913.27 

4,049.26 

1,066.01 

39.50 

23,469.33 

397.54 



" and stone surface drain, 
pipe surface drain, 
concrete surface drain. 



Total 52,223.91 " " = 9.89 miles. 

The most important work done during the year was the 
building of a complete sewerage system in Belgrade avenue, 
between Corinth street and Colberg avenue, and the begin- 
ning of a drainage system in Belgrade avenue, from Colberg 
avenue to Anawan avenue ; complete sewerage systems in 
Hyde Park avenue, between Lower Walk Hill street and 
Ashland street; the construction of Talbot avenue high 
level sewer, from Ashland street to 1,825 feet east of Walk 
Hill street ; sewerage systems for Rowe and Sharon streets 
and outlet. The brook lying between Rowe and Sharon 
streets has been taken into a covered conduit and carried 
under the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and 
Hyde Park avenue, and down Hadwin Way to Stony Brook. 

Recommendations. 

Talbot avenue high level sewer should be completed in 
West Roxbury from its present end, about 1,825 feet east of 
Walk Hill street to Morton street, requiring about 1,570 
linear feet of 4-foot 3-inch circular brick sewer. 

There is urgent need for sewers in Addington, Dunbar and 
adjacent streets to afford relief from the present unhealthy 
conditions existing in this locality due to the overflowing of 
cesspools. The nature of the soil is such that the liquid 
matter does not leach off from the cesspools, but fills them 
to the top and flows off over the surface. These streets will 
require about 7,000 linear feet of 12-inch pipe sewer. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 87 

Neponset avenue and Mt. Hope street, between Hyde 
Park avenue and Stony Brook, as well as Jewett and Folsom 
streets, which extend from Neponset avenue to Mt. Hope 
street, are quite closely built upon. On account of the 
impervious character of the soil the cesspools in this neigh- 
borhood constantly overflow and create a nuisance, which 
in warm weather becomes almost unbearable. This is part 
of an area which will eventually be drained by the West 
Roxbury low level sewer to be built up the valley of Stony 
Brook in connection with the permanent improvement of the 
brook. As it is very uncertain when this improvement will 
be brought up to this point, a sewer should be built during 
the coming year in Neponset avenue, between Hyde Park 
avenue and Stony Brook. This can have an outlet through 
private land to Mt. Hope street and easterly in Mt. Hope 
street to the Talbot avenue high level sewer, which connects 
with the Metropolitan high level sewer near the junction of 
Ashland and Canterbury streets. Part of this sewer and 
outlet will be only temporary, but it will relieve the existing 
unsanitary conditions until the West Roxbury low level 
sewer is built, which may not be for a period of ten years or 
more. 

There have been many requests for sewers in Poplar 
street, between Canterbury and James streets, and in 
James and Beech streets, between Poplar and Kittredge 
streets. These sewers are needed, but an outlet must first 
be built for them in Canterbury street, Hyde Park avenue, 
private land, Clifford street and Canterbury street, between 
the Metropolitan sewer and Poplar street. This will re- 
quire about 2,600 linear feet 24-inch pipe. 

Sewers have been petitioned for, and are badly needed, 
in Spring street, between Charles River and Gardner street, 
in Montclair avenue, Brookfield street, Robin street and 
Wachusett street. 

The Roslindale branch of Stony Brook should be built 
of a permanent size from Cohasset street to Linden street, 
requiring 900 linear feet 9-foot circular concrete con- 
duit, and the brook above this point should be improved 
by deepening the channel, building stone sidewalks, and 
placing permanent culverts under the cross streets from 
Linden street to Belgrade avenue. This improvement is 
particularly important in order to provide a satisfactory 
outlet for the surface drainage system, now being built 
in Belgrade avenue, between Colberg and Anawan avenues. 
It is likewise desirable to deepen the channel and wall in 
the sides of this brook in the land of the New York, New 



88 City Document No. 40. 

Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, Providence Divi- 
sion, from the point where it leaves Belgrade avenue to 
Anawan avenue. This will give a free outlet for the Cen- 
tral Station branch, which must be built at an early date in 
Anawan avenue, Beech street, Clement avenue, private laud, 
railroad and Corey streets to Centre street, in order to 
afford an outlet for the surface water from a large territory, 
which is now causing numerous complaints from the property 
owners. 

A surface drain is an absolute necessity in Penfield and 
Houston streets to afford an outlet to surface drains and 
catch-basins already built in Belgrade avenue between Dud- 
ley avenue and Linden street. 

Many complaints are received every year regarding the con- 
dition in time of storm of Poplar street near Hillside avenue ; 
also regarding the brook which has its source a little above 
this point and flows down across Poplar, Ashland, Syca- 
more and Florence streets, connecting with the Roslindale 
branch near Florence street. These complainants can and 
should be satisfied, and the existing evil conditions remedied 
by building the proposed Florence-street brook conduit from 
Roslindale branch of Stony Brook to Poplar street. Part of 
this will lie in public streets, and part along the present 
course of the brook in private land, and will require about 
4,000 linear feet of 5-foot 9-inch, 5-foot, 4-foot 6-inch, 4-foot, 
and 3-foot 6-inch conduit. 

Property between Ashland and Gilman streets, is flooded 
every spring, causing serious annoyance and expense to the 
owners. This trouble can be remedied by building 360 
linear feet of 18-inch and 24-inch pipe surface drain. 

Surface drains are needed in Boylston street, between 
Lamartine street and Chestnut avenue, and between Stony 
Brook and Washington street, to relieve the overcrowded 
condition of the sewers in this vicinity. 

South Dorchester. 

During the year there have been built in this district : 

7,864.89 linear feet pipe sewer. 
2,622.72 " . " brick sewer. 
2,230 " " brick surface drain. 

11,818.58 " " pipe surface drain. 



Total, 24,536.19 " " = 4.65 miles. 

The most important work started during the past year was 
the construction of 2,622 linear feet of 4-foot 9-inch circular 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 89 

brick sewer on the Dorchester high level sewer in River 
street, between the Hyde Park line and Fremont street. 
This sewer will drain about 1,100 acres of high level terri- 
tory, and is to be extended through Mattapan, Dorchester 
Lower Mills and Ashmont to Meeting House Hill. This 
channel will vary in size from a 4-foot 9-inch circular brick 
channel to a 2-foot 6-inch circular brick channel, and will 
cost in the neighborhood of 1500,000. 

A start has also been made on the Talbot avenue high 
level sewer and the improvement of the Canterbury branch 
of Stony Brook — both of these channels to be carried in one 
trench ; and although no actual construction can be charged 
to this item, about 100 feet of trench has been excavated to 
grade. 

The most important brook improvements are as follows : 

The building of a covered channel for Oakland Brook, 
between the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
and Bismarck street, where 100 linear feet of 8-foot 6-inch 
by 5-foot 3-inch brick conduit, and 923 linear feet of 5- 
foot 9-inch circular brick conduit were constructed. 

In Lucerne street, between Lauriat avenue and Morton 
street, 711 linear feet of 3-foot 6-inch circular brick con- 
duit on the improvement of a branch of the Canterbury 
branch of Stony Brook were built. 

The building of a brick conduit in Armandine street, on 
the Davenport Brook, was completed, and this improvement 
will remove the cause of much flooding. 

In the locality known as the " Vose's Grove District " 
1,145 linear feet of pipe sewer were built which has been 
repeatedly called for, and the improvement will remove a 
long-standing nuisance. 

In the Cedar Grove district 2,217 feet of pipe sewer were 
built, thereby doing away with the cesspools in a fine resi- 
dential district. 

Sewers were built in Rockville street, Woolson street, Flint 
street, Greenock street, and a start was made on the sewer in 
Richmond street, between Dorchester avenue and Washington 
street — all of this work having been repeatedly called for 
by petition. 

Recommendations. 

The most important work contemplated in South Dorches- 
ter during the coming year is the extension of the Dorchester 
high level sewer, from the end of the present channel in 
River street, near Fremont street, to Park street; also the 



90 City Document No. 40. 

completion of the Talbot avenue high level intercepting 
sewer, just started, from Morton street to Talbot avenue. 
This latter interceptor when completed will relieve a large 
area around Lauriat avenue and Talbot avenue, which is 
flooded after every heavy rainfall. In connection with this 
the building of a 10-foot circular brick conduit or its equiva- 
lent from the end of the present channel in Callender street, 
at Don street, to Harvard street is contemplated. 

As provided for by the Separate Systems Act, consideration 
will also be given to the many streets in which the house 
sewers are overcrowded by reason of the catch-basins being 
connected with the same. 

Plans have been made for the improvement of the brook 
course in the vicinity of Monson, Sturbridge and Sanford 
streets, from which complaints are received after every storm. 

The improvement of Mattapan brook from the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad to Norfolk street should 
receive attention, as this brook course is the outlet for surface 
water from a large portion of Blue Hill avenue. 

Oakland brook, between the Neponset river and River 
street, is also worthy of consideration, as in all probability the 
department will be called upon this year to provide catch- 
basins and catch-basin drains for River street from the Hyde 
Park line to Mattapan square, and as Oakland brook will be 
the outlet for these drains the present channel should be 
extended to the Neponset river. 

Petitions have also been received for sewers in Norwood 
street, Dorchester avenue, from Richmond street to St. 
Gregory's Church, Walk Hill street, Groveland street, Fuller 
street and many others — all of which are very important 
from a sanitary point of view. 

North Dorchester. 

There have been built in this district during the past year : 

1,935.71 linear feet pipe house sewer. 
1,128.59 " " brick surface drain. 
5,529.09 " " pipe surface drain. 



Total, 8,593.39 " "=1.63 miles. 

The principal items of construction work completed are : 
Separate system of drainage in the Harvard street district. 
This has been recommended annually for many years, and 
now that it is completed it is the means of abating numer- 
ous floodings of private estates. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 91 

Normandy street surface drain. This drain takes the 
surface water from the old Geneva avenue brook course, and 
abates the flooding between Devon street and Wilder street. 

Freeport street brook. This work was completed during 
the past year from tide- water to a point near Bowdoin street 
to more adequately care for the waters of this brook. Flood- 
ings continued to occur at the corner of High street and 
Hancock street, rendering extension of this work absolutely 
necessary. 

New house sewers have been built in Buttonwood court, 
Willow court, Field's court, Highland street and Clapp place. 

Surface drains have been constructed in Washington street, 
between Bowdoin street and Erie street, West Park street, 
Bowdoin avenue, Esmond street, Thane street and several 
other smaller streets. 

Recommendations. 

Freeport street brook. The remaining link in this work, 
between High street and Bowdoin street, should be com- 
pleted during the coming year in order to adequately care for 
the proposed extensions above this point. 

The Coleman street branch of the Freeport street brook 
should be built from the main channel, near the corner of 
Bowdoin street and Hancock street, to Quincy street. 
Extensive floodings occur here after nearly every heavy rain, 
owing to the small trunk sewer which passes through Draper 
court and Bowdoin street not being able to take even a 
moderate storm flow. 

Tenean creek, between Westville street and Speedwell 
street. This will take the flow from the Homes avenue sur- 
face drain, which is now broken down, has no outlet, and the 
water from which floods Homes avenue after every storm. 
The many estates bordering on this old brook course are 
damaged considerably from every storm, and have often 
petitioned for this improvement. 

The conduit will also serve as an overflow for the over- 
crowded sewers in this locality. 

Franklin Park brook, from Harvard street to Blue Hill 
avenue. This is the only uncompleted portion on the line 
of the Franklin Park brook, and, as the present open water 
course serves as an overflow for the Blue Hill avenue system 
of house sewers, this portion should be built during the 
coming year. 

Faxon street, between the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, Midland Division, and Washington street. 
This is needed as an outlet for the extensive svstem of 



92 City Document No. 40. 

surface drains completed in this district during the previous 
year, and as an overflow to relieve the overcrowded Wash- 
ington street common sewer. It will probably be necessary 
here to continue, this conduit from Faxon street down Kilton 
street to a point near Harvard street, where the present sur- 
face drain now crosses the railroad. 

Oakland Garden fork, Canterbury branch of Stony Brook. 
This conduit should be extended from its present terminus in 
private land, off Greenwood street, near Harvard street, down 
Standish street, thence via West Park street and Bernard 
street to Franklin Field. This is an expensive piece of 
work, and will require considerable time in which to com- 
plete it; and, as the plans for construction are all ready, 
work should be commenced here at the earliest opportunity, 
as damages have already been paid as a result of floodings 
from this drain, and the present inconvenience to the rail- 
road people at the Harvard street station is considerable. 

Dorchester brook, main sewer. Abutters along this line 
have been damaged by overflow of sewage for several years 
past, and the improvement of this sewer has been recom- 
mended many times. 

The problem has now changed considerably, since the new 
Roxbury high level sewer will, in all probability, be extended 
into Dorchester to take in this sewer some time in the future. 
As the line is very long and a difficult one to construct, no 
relief is in sight for this territory, unless a start is made on 
the Roxbury high level sewer during the coming year. 

Dorchester high level sewer. This sewer enters the North 
Dorchester area at Park street, near Greenbrier street, and 
while it is greatly needed as a relief for the main sewers 
like Geneva avenue, Coleman street, and Ceylon street, little 
can be accomplished this year, except to make final studies 
and prepare the detail plan of construction. 

Shamrock street outlet. The entire system of sewers 
drained by this outlet should be rebuilt, and an extensive 
system of surface drains established. Many of these sewers 
are too high and much too small, and they are so broken 
down and generally dilapidated that it is found very difficult 
to keep them in operation. 

Overflow at East Park street, near Harrison square. This 
overflow is built of wood and discharges into Tenean creek, 
but having no tidegates to prevent the backing up of tide- 
water, must contribute water to the system of common sewers 
at high tide. 

Carson street. There are many cellars on this street 
flooded when a storm occurs at high tide, and while several 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 93 

of these cellars are below the legal grade (Grade 12), still 
some means should be provided for their relief. If the roof 
water leaders from these houses were connected with the 
surface drain and a small regulator placed on the common 
sewer, near its connection with the Dorchester intercepter 
in Crescent avenue, floodings might be abated. 

Tonawanda street surface drain. This drain should be 
lowered from a point in Tonawanda street across private 
land, Lindsey street and Stratford street to Park street. 
This drain was built by private parties, but is now being 
used by the city to take the storm water from a considerable 
area. On account of being laid with open joints it is now 
too high and full of sand to satisfactorily serve this district. 
A petition has been received for placing it in another lo- 
cation ; that is, the portion between Tonawanda and Lindsey 
streets. 

House sewers should also be constructed in private land, 
between Moseley street and Columbia road; Baker court, 
from Willow court easterly ; Willow court, from existing 
sewer to Boston street ; Dorchester avenue, from Freeport 
street to Linden street; Dorchester avenue, from Kimball 
street to Linden street, and Pay son avenue, from Glen dale 
street northerly. 

Surface drains should be constructed in Magnolia street, 
from Dudley street to Magnolia square; East Cottage street, 
from Norfolk avenue to the railroad; Stanwood street, from 
Blue Hill avenue to Columbia road ; Devon street, from 
Blue Hill avenue to Columbia road; Geneva avenue, 
from Normandy street to Blue Hill avenue, and many other 
portions in the Dorchester high level area. 

South Roxbury. 

There have been built in this district during the past year: 
100.86 linear feet brick sewer. 
3,400.67 " " pipe 
665.82 " " brick surface drain. 
16,283.88 " " pipe surface drain. 



Total, 20,451.23 " " = 3.87 miles. 

The principal works completed in this district are : 
May wood's Brook conduit. The construction of this con- 
duit has been carried on throughout the year in Hampshire 
and Iluggles streets. This conduit is 11 feet wide by 7 
feet G inches high and is built to carry surface water only, 
draining about 35" acres in Roxbury. Two new house 



94 City Document No. 40. 

sewers are being carried along with the conduit to take the 
sewage only from this area. The house sewers empty into 
the Cabot street intercepter, while the surface water goes 
into Stony Brook channel in Whittier street. This event- 
ually reaches the Charles river by way of the Back Bay 
Fens, and is really a part of and in harmony with the con- 
struction carried on there for the removal of pollution from 
the Back Bay Fens and from Charles river above the pro- 
posed dam. This work is the most important piece of work 
undertaken by the Sewer Division in Roxbury in many years, 
and while already it is affording relief for the flooded estates 
on Ruggles and adjoining streets, it renders possible the con- 
struction of new sewers and drains in such streets as War- 
wick street, Haskins street, Westminster street and other 
streets in this low-lying area, which would otherwise be 
without adequate drainage for many years. 

This brook derives its name from the district known as 
the May Woods, now occupied by such streets as Maywood 
street, Edgewood street, and Woodbine street, Roxbury. 
These woods were formerly the head-waters of the channel 
heretofore known as the Bower and Sherman streets main 
trunk sewer. The entire area drained by the brook course 
before it reaches Stony Brook channel in Whittier street 
consists of 350 acres, and extends from Whittier street to 
the junction of Warren street and Elm Hill avenue, a 
distance of 1.8 miles. 

The main line which now passes down Warren, Bower, 
Sherman, Ottawa, Laurel, Dale, Regent, Ray, Circuit and 
Washington streets to Guild row, and Shawmut avenue to 
Ruggles street, is much too small throughout its entire 
length. This is shown in a comparison of its present maxi- 
mum size, 3 feet by 5 feet 6 inches, with the size now 
building, 11 feet by 7 feet 6 inches, or the equivalent of a 
circle 9 feet 1 inch in diameter. Sanitary conditions along 
Bower, Sherman, Ottawa and Laurel streets have been well 
nigh intolerable for many years, and much valuable property 
has been rendered practically untenantable. 

The constant floodings along other portions of this line 
have also been the cause of volumes of complaints, which the 
department has been powerless to help. Starting, as we 
have, at the lower or outlet end of the line, the conduit is 
designed large enough to take all the storm water from this 
immense area and deliver the same to Stony Brook. Pro- 
gress has been as rapid as is commensurate with such heavy 
work, and construction must still be pushed forward mate- 
rially within the next two years before any adequate relief 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 95 

can be afforded the upper regions, which are the most 
affected. 

Hammond street, from Tremont street to Shawm ut avenue. 
Petitions for better sewerage facilities in this street have been 
received from the abutting property owners at intervals for 
about fifteen years, and in every instance the starting of work 
has been recommended. This division has already built a new 
sewer, of larger size and at a much lower grade, between 
Tremont and Westminster streets, and the same will be 
extended in the near future as far as Shawmut avenue. 
Abutters have readily taken advantage of this new sewer by 
connecting their houses with the same, and it is the inten- 
tion to use this new sewer for house sewage only and utilize 
the old sewer for surface drainage. 

Crawford street. A separate system of drainage has been 
established in Crawford street, between Walnut avenue and 
Warren street. This necessitated the building of a new 
house sewer in Elm Hill avenue, between Howland street 
and Brunswick street ; also a surface drain in Elm Hill 
avenue, between Brunswick and Crawford streets. 

Stony Brook valley sewer. In private land near Amory 
street, where this sewer crossed the old Stony Brook channel 
in two 24-inch iron pipes, these latter were removed and the 
sewer restored to its full size. These iron pipes appeared to 
have caused the throttling of the flow, as the sewer for 
several hundred feet in this vicinity is nearly half filled with 
fine sand and gravel. This should be removed at the earliest 
practicable date, since it reduces the capacity of an already 
overcrowded sewer by one-half. 

Separate systems of drainage have been completed in 
Bower, Clifford, Edgewood, Fenno, Gannett, Harrishof, 
Holborn, Howland, Kensington, Mayfair, May wood, Mills, 
and Savin streets, Westminster avenue, Woodbine and 
Wyoming streets. 

Recommendations. 

Stony Brook channel, between Back Bay Fens and Hamp- 
shire street. While this work is not properly within my 
jurisdiction, I deem it wise to again call attention to the fact 
that this work must be started in the very near future, to 
afford a satisfactory outlet for the large surface drain which 
we are now building in Ruggles street, as mentioned pre- 
viously in this report. 

Fenner street, between Washington and Cobden streets. 
This is a surface drain intended to relieve the sewers of the 
Ruthven street district, and obviate the floodings so common 
on Cobden street. 



96 City Document No. 40. 

Warwick street, between Hammond and Ruggles streets. 
This street has been badly in need of better sewerage facili- 
ties for many years. The old 12-inch pipe sewer is broken 
in several places, is full of sludge, rendering it impossible to 
connect new drains, to say nothing of carrying off the 
sewage and storm-water properly. A new house-sewer and 
a separate surface drain are strongly recommended for this 
street, since the new conduit in Ruggles street has already 
provided satisfactory outlet for both sewage and surface 
drainage. 

Westminster street, between Hammond and Ruggles streets. 
Conditions in this street are similar to those that exist in 
Warwick street, and the same recommendations apply. 

Winslow street, between Dudley and Palmer streets. This 
sewer is badly settled, and it is impossible to keep it clear. 
Frequent floodings have resulted, and a new sewer should be 
constructed in this street at the earliest opportunity. 

Dorchester Brook sewer. This sewer starts at the main 
intercepting sewer in Massachusetts avenue, near the rail- 
road crossing, and has been built of sufficient size in recent 
years through private land to the junction of George and 
Rockford streets. Drainage conditions on the lower portion 
of the line are, therefore, satisfactory, but the work of 
reconstruction has not been pushed forward fast enough to 
meet the needs of the growing territory farther up the line. 
Consequently, the portions in Rockford and Dudley streets 
and private land near Brook avenue, across Cottage, Julian, 
Brookford and Dacia streets, up as far as Quincy street and 
Blue Hill avenue, have become entirely too small to dis- 
charge the storm flow. The result has been the flooding 
of very many estates, causing great damage to abutters 
along this whole line, to say nothing of the damages re- 
sulting to property along connecting streets, which have 
the main sewer for an outlet. 

Most of this line was built in 1874 along the old brook 
course, which formed the dividing line between Roxbury 
and Dorchester. In many places the old channel was sim- 
ply arched over, a brick invert put in place, and the stone 
side walls allowed to remain. This answered well enough 
for the then sparsely-settled territory, but conditions have 
so changed as to render this sewer well nigh useless in 
times of heavy storms. 

The worst conditions at the present time exist at the 
junction of Blue Hill avenue and Intervale street, and at 
the junction of Dudley and Shirley streets. 

The latter location can be relieved by the rebuilding of 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 97 

the sewer in a new location down Shirley and George 
streets, to meet the end of the completed large size. Work 
on this portion should be commenced during the coming 
year, as every delay only aggravates the conditions all 
along the line. 

The vicinity of Blue Hill avenue and Intervale street 
cannot be relieved materially until a larger sewer is built 
up to that point, and cannot be relieved at all until the 
portion just mentioned is built in Shirley and George 
streets. 

Eustis street, between Harrison avenue and Winslow 
street. This sewer is needed as an outlet for the proposed 
new sewer in Winslow street. 

Orchard park and Chadwick street, between Yeoman and 
Orchard streets. This sewer has been found to be badly 
settled, and has been the cause of considerable annoyance to 
the builders of the Dearborn School by the constant flooding 
of the cellars. The School House Commission have peti- 
tioned for a new sewer here, and the work should be started 
during the coming year. 

Fellows street, between Northampton and Hunneman 
streets, and outlet in Northampton street. A portion of the 
sewer in Fellows street, which was rebuilt in 1895, on a longi- 
tudinal platform, has settled so badly that it is desirable to 
immediately rebuild the same on a pile foundation. 

Sterling street, between Westminster and Washington 
streets. Many complaints have been received from residents 
on this street regarding the condition of this sewer, and 
the sewer should be rebuilt. It will not be possible to 
rebuild the sewer, however, until an outlet is provided for 
the same in Westminster street, which is an additional argu- 
ment for the building of the latter. 

Sussex street, between Hammond and Warwick streets. 
The houses on this street are practically without any sewer- 
age facilities whatever, and now that the new sewer in Ham- 
mond street has afforded satisfactory outlet, a new sewer 
should be constructed in Sussex street during the coming 
year. 

Williams street, between Westminster street and Shawmut 
avenue. This sewer is in the same condition as the ones 
above mentioned, and should be rebuilt throughout. 

Cabot street, between Ruggles and Sterling streets. The 
common sewer in this portion of Cabot street is 12-inch pipe 
and takes the water not only from the buildings, but from 
fifteen catch-basins, and the same is delivered to the inter- 
ceptor at the corner of Cabot and Ruggles streets without 



98 City Document No. 40. 

any overflow. A surface drain should be built to take this 
storm water, since provision has already been made for 
receiving the same into the new conduit in Ruggles street. 

Roxbury high level sewer. Recent studies show that this 
line will start from Centre street, at the corner of Boylston 
avenue, following through Boylston avenue and other streets 
to the corner of Atherton and Amory streets, where it 
enters the Roxbury district. As this will be a long and ex- 
pensive line to build, a start should certainly be made early 
in the coming year. 

Willow Park, off Shawmut avenue. Conditions here are 
as bad as can be found in any street in the city, and as soon 
as the Ruggles street conduit passes the corner of West- 
minster street work should be begun on a new sewer for 
Willow Park. 

Work on the separation of the storm water from the house 
sewage should be carried on throughout the year, and a list 
of some fifty streets has been prepared in which it will be 
desirable to prosecute this work. 

South Boston. 

There have been built in this district during the past year : 

2,290.28 linear feet brick sewer. 
2,322.05 " " pipe sewer. 

239.00 " " brick surface drain. 

335.92 " " pipe surface drain. 



Total, 5,187.25 " " = 0.98 mile. 

The principal works completed are : 

Columbia road. This boulevard, which has been in process 
of construction since 1897, and extends from Franklin Park, 
Dorchester, to Marine Park, South Boston, can now be said 
to be practically completed in so far as the work of this 
division is concerned. The Vale street outlet and other 
outlets along the South shore of South Boston are in process 
of construction, or will need extensions in the future, which 
possibly are not chargeable to Columbia road. Most of the 
work of the past year has been along Old Colony avenue, 
where an excellent system of large sewers has been con- 
structed, this portion being the outlet for a large area in the 
Preble street district, as well as taking the place of the Vinton 
street overflow, which can now be abandoned. 

D street. The sewer in this street lias been rebuilt, of a 
larger size and at a lower grade, from Dorchester avenue to 
West Seventh street, for the purpose of relieving this and 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 99 

adjacent streets from the numerous floodings which occur 
here during excessive storms at high tide. The overflow at 
the foot of D street has been provided with tide-gates and 
opened up again for use. Two new connections have been 
provided with the intercepting sewer, and an overflow estab- 
lished from the common sewer in Dorchester avenue at D 
street. All these improvements have not abated the flooding 
of cellars on D street and connecting streets. Many of these 
cellars are below mean high water, and D street itself, under 
the old railroad bridge, has an established grade of 7.90, 
making the problem of drainage a complicated one and the 
use of surface drains of no avail. Relief must be looked for 
in the intercepting system itself and the pumping facilities 
at Cow Pasture pumping station. Studies are already 
started for the relief of this long suffering district, and indi- 
cate that many important changes are necessary, the details 
of which will be submitted later in a separate report. 

Dorchester street. This street has been laid out between 
Dorchester avenue and West Eighth street, under a special 
act of the Legislature, and an entirely new system of sewer- 
age works has been constructed. 

Kemp street. This sewer was built to carry the dry 
weather flow from the system of sewers in Columbia road to 
the South Boston interceptor in Washington avenue. 

Vale street outlet. This sewer is now being built from 
Columbia road to tide-water to provide an adequate overflow 
or outlet for the system of sewers converging at the corner 
of Vale street and Columbia road. 

A street, between West First and Congress streets. 
Work has been started here on a new system of sewers and 
surface drains to care for this now very important warehouse 
district. The old sewer is found to be badly broken down 
and much too small to take the flow in time of storm. 
Pile driving is necessary here to support the structure. 
Catch-basins are being built as the work progresses, and all 
old roof water leaders and catch-basins are being connected 
with the surface drain. 

Recommendations. 

Congress street, between A street and the drawbridge. 
This is an extension of the system already started in A 
street, and conditions here being similar to those in A street 
an entirely new separate system of sewerage is imperatively 
needed. The large number of warehouses here, with exten- 
sive roof areas, discharging storm water into the present small 
sewers, not only greatly overtax the same, but will continue 



100 City Document No. 40. 

to overtax the small proposed house sewer for this street; 
therefore, the large surface drain which will be carried along 
in connection with the house sewer should receive the storm 
water by a separate connection from these large roof areas. 
This is very important, since we find it impossible to build a 
combined sewer in A street, which is the outlet for Congress 
and other streets, large enough to carry the combined flow 
from this area. 

Sleeper street, between Congress street and Northern 
avenue. This street is to be built in the very near future in 
connection with Northern avenue, and should have a surface 
drain for its entire length, with new catch-basins. 

Mount Washington avenue. This is a storm water outlet, 
which will take all the surface water from the A street 
system, discharging the same into Fort Point channel at the 
Mount Washington avenue drawbridge. On account of flat 
gradient here this conduit will necessarily be quite large, and 
it will probably be advisable to carry a house sewer along 
with it in the same trench. 

West Ninth street. The portion between Mercer street 
and Dorchester street serves as an outlet for nearly the 
whole of Dorchester street, as well as an overflow for the 
portion of Ninth street between Dorchester street and D 
street. Much of it is in very poor condition, being half 
filled with sludge, badly out of line and grade, and too high 
to properly care for Dorchester street itself. 

Swan street area. This is the area on the westerly side of 
Dorchester avenue, south of Dover street, formerly a well 
built up section, but now occupied by the tracks of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company/ A 
system of sewers draining this area and the West Fifth street 
area having been left intact, but now out of use, should be 
disconnected from the common system, as they serve no 
purpose except to admit tide-water into the system. 

D street flooding. As indicated above, this is the most 
important problem in the district and will be the subject of a 
special report. 

City Proper. 

There have been built in this district during the past year: 

415.82 linear feet wood sewer. 

3,780 " " concrete or brick sewer. 

8,314.95 " " pipe sewer. 

4,089.77 " " pipe surface drain. 

Ill " " 6-inch and 8-inch house drain. 



Total, 16,7^1.54 " " = 3.17 miles. 



/ 7 O / 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 101 

The principal sewerage works completed in the district 
are as follows : 

The sewer in Hull street, mentioned in previous reports, 
is now built. 

Court square, west side, was built by tunnel process at a 
depth of about 20 feet and is now completed. 

Back street. This sewer takes the sewage from the 
houses on the water side of Beacon street, which formerly 
discharged into the Charles River. 

Washington street subway. On account of the depth of 
the subway, sewers in the district westerly from Washington 
street, between Common street and Brom field street, will be 
cut off from their present outlets. The Transit Commission 
have built a sewer under the subway at Bennett street, 
through Bennett street and Harrison avenue to Harvard 
street and down Harvard street to Tyler street, where it 
connects with the Harvard street sewer ; also an overflow in 
Harrison avenue, from Harvard street to Kneeland street. 
This provides for sewers on the west side of Washington 
street, between Hollis and Boylston streets. 

In Summer street the Transit Commission have built a deep 
sewer from Washington street to Atlantic avenue. This 
sewer will later be carried under the subway in Washington 
street to Winter street and will take the sewage from the 
district on the west side of Washington street, between 
Boylston and Bromfield streets. 

Sewers have been built in Washington street, between 
Hollis and Boylston streets, by the Transit Commission, 
although the old sewers are not yet thrown out of 
commission. 

Recommendations. 

The Canal street relief sewer in Commercial street at State 
street, the Beverly street outlet, the Carleton and Buckingham 
street sewers were mentioned in last year's report, but nothing 
has been done this year. 

Congress street at Franklin street. In excavating for a 
new pipe, the Water Department discovered that this sewer 
was badly broken and is in danger of falling in at any time. 
About ten (10) acres of territory are drained by this sewer; 
and as this is a business district, the damage caused by a 
flood might be very heavy ; therefore, no time should be lost 
in rebuilding the sewer. 

North Grove street. This sewer has caved in several times 
recently, so that a dangerous hole has been made in the sur- 
face of the street. The sewer is of wooden construction and 
appears to be badly rotted. It should be rebuilt. 



102 City Document No. 40. 

Charter street, between Phipps and Marshall places. This 
sewer should be rebuilt. 

North Roxbtjry. 

There have been built in this district during the past year : 

118.39 linear feet pipe sewer. 

611.53 " " brick surface drain. 

14,784.01 " " pipe surface drain. 

102 " " 6-inch and 8-inch house drain. 



Total, 15,615.93 " " = 2.96 miles. 

The principal sewerage works completed in this district 
are : Surface drains in Hemenway street, Westland avenue, 
Huntington avenue, Norway, Calumet and Day streets and 
many others. 

Recommendations . 

Jersey street, Queensberry street, Huntington avenue, Vila 
street district, Fenway Lands, Muddy River conduit, and 
Francis street across Muddy River. The sewerage works 
necessary in all these streets have been mentioned in previous 
reports, but nothing has been done this year. 

Westland entrance. Surface drains should be built to 
furnish an outlet to the Stony Brook channel for a surface 
drain built in Hemenway street and connecting streets, as at 
present there is no outlet. About 50 per cent, of the surface 
drains which provide for the surface water of that part of the 
Metropolitan high level district which is situated between 
Bryant street and Massachusetts avenue and north of 
Huntington avenue, have been built. The balance should 
be constructed the coming year. The district on the east 
side of Parker Hill, and bounded roughly by Parker street, 
Hillside street, Huntington avenue and Longwood avenue, 
has about 80 per cent, of the surface drains already built. 
The balance should be constructed as soon as possible, thereby 
completing the surface drain system of the district. 

There are other smaller districts in which surface drains 
have been built, such as the west side of Parker Hill, which 
drains into the Muddy River at Huntington avenue, and 
Francis street district, which drains into the Muddy River at 
Brookline avenue, and in these districts the necessary sur- 
face drains should be built to complete the system. 

Main Drainage Works. 

Included under this head are : The main and intercepting 
sewers, Calf Pasture pumping station, outfall sewer, reser- 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



103 



voir and discharge sewers at Moon Island, Lyons street 
pumping station and the care of Stony Brook channels. 

Main and Intercepting Sewers. 

The following data shows the amount of work done in the 
building, repairing and cleaning of all tide-gates, sumps, 
overflows and regulators of the city sewerage system ; con- 
necting with the Metropolitan system, the main drainage 
works and Stony Brook, also the city intercepting sewers. 

The number of regulators, gates, sumps and overflows to 
be cared for are as follows, including twenty-one miles of 
intercepting sewers : 





Gates. 


Regulators. 


Sumps. 


Overflows. 


Brighton 


50 
26 
38 
119 
43 
45 
30 


16 

9 

15 

14 

2 

4 
1 


17 
12 
16 
37 
10 
18 
8 


27 


Charlestown 


14 


East Boston 


22 


City Proper 


67 


Dorchester 


17 


South Boston 


23 


Roxbury 


12 






Total 


351 


61 


118 


182 







The following work was done in the past^year : 

Sewers cleaned . . . . . . .18,480 feet. 

Number of new tide-gates built . . . . 13 

" " sumps ..... 4 

" " overflows . . . . . 13 

" regulators repaired .... 61 

" tide-gates repaired .... 323 

" flushing gates repaired ... 9 

" penstock gates repaired ... 4 

" manholes repaired .... 263 

" sumps repaired . . . . . 69 

" old tide-gates replaced by new . . 78 

" manhole steps put in .... 526 
" loads of sewage matter removed from 

tide-gates, sumps, and regulators . . . 1,357 

Total length of Stony Brook water-course caivd 

for and inspected after each storm is . . 6£ miles. 

The number of loads of material removed from 

channels during year ..... 3,689 



104 City Document No. 40. 

Pumping Station. 

Two new 48-inch force mains have been laid, connecting 
thereon No. 5 engine with the pipe chamber. Ten gates, 
connecting the galleries with the pump wells, have been put 
in place. These gates are operated by electricity furnished 
by the plant at the station. Two 50-kilowatt engines and 
dynamos, to furnish light and power for the station, have 
been installed and are in operation. The whole station has 
been wired in connection with the electrical plant. 

The second battery of three new 78-inch return tubular 
boilers, with a working pressure of 185 pounds to the square 
inch, has been installed and is in operation. The steam 
piping for the station has been relaid to take care of the in- 
creased steam pressure from 100 to 185 pounds. Two new 
feed pumps have been installed to work against a boiler 
pressure of 185 pounds. Two salt water pumps have been 
installed for force injections, and feed lines have been laid in 
boiler-house. Two new plungers and crossheads have been 
placed on pump No. 1, putting this pump in first-class con- 
dition. 

Ten arc-lights have been erected on the roadway to the 
station, and the same are now in operation. 

A new salt water tank for force injection has been installed. 
A new granolithic floor was laid in the boiler-house. A pipe- 
cutting machine has been set up in the machine shop. 
Pumping engine No. 5, which is being set up, is practically 
completed. A trial test of its working will be made within 
a week or two. 

Recommendations. 

A 12-inch water main should be laid to the station 
immediately. The present 6-inch main does not furnish feed 
water enough for the boilers, leaving, in case of fire, no 
supply to draw from. The road leading to the station should 
be macadamized and new fences built on the sides. The 
interior of the station needs painting. A new fence should 
be built around the grounds, as the old one is so decayed 
that it has blown down in several places and is beyond repair. 
The dock and scow berth should be dredged, as both are 
dangerous in their present condition for vessels to lie in. 
Motors for running the tools in the machine shop are 
necessary. 

Lyons Street Station. 

The station at Lyons street has been operated in a very 
satisfactory manner during the year, nothing but minor 
repairs being necessary. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 105 

Moon Island. 

Repairs have been made on the long gat'e-honse during the 
past year. Doors, windows, window casings and sills have 
been repaired and replaced, also hardware in general, putting 
the building in very good condition. Most of the gates in 
the long gate-house are now in very good shape. A large 
number of iron rods, connecting the cross-heads to the gates, 
have been renewed, as the old rods had reached the dangerous 
point. The iron lifting rods and cross-heads are being re- 
placed by new ones of composition. All of the anchor bolts 
were in bad condition, and are being replaced by new ones, of 
composition, both longer and heavier. The frames are being 
reset in clear Portland cement. The roadways are in fairly 
good condition, many loads of gravel having been placed on 
the roadbed during the past year, and still more is needed. 
There is a great shrinkage of material on the roadways on 
account of the high winds. Quite extensive repairs have been 
made on the stable, putting it in very good condition. In 
connection with the stable a new wagon shed and loft has 
been built. A new building was erected near the gate-house, 
containing an office and a room for the gatemen. 

The houses at Squantum are in fair condition, but the barn 
is in bad shape and not very safe. As it would involve a 
large expenditure, however, to make the necessary repairs, 
the barn had better be taken down. 

Recommendations. 

The steam boilers on the plant have been in use for twenty- 
two years and should not be considered safe any longer for 
purposes other than for heating. For such use they will last 
for some time, and should be retained for that purpose. 
These boilers, with the engine, were an auxiliary, furnishing 
the power for running the shafting in the gate-house when 
the turbine was not in commission. As a substitute for them, 
and to avoid getting new boilers, the present steam engine 
should be sold and two gasolene engines installed to furnish 
the necessary power to run the shafting. This is a matter 
that should receive immediate attention, as it is not safe to 
put pressure on the boilers sufficient to run the shafting in 
case anything should happen to the turbine. The turbine 
is in need of repairs, a new shaft is needed and also repairs 
in the well. The lifting rods and bolts on the turbine 
gate have been renewed. The outfall gate-house is in bad 
shape. This building should be taken down and rebuilt. 
The mortar has apparently lost its virtue, and as the interior 



106 City Document No. 40. 

of the building is often subjected to considerable pressure 
from compressed air, caused by the- waves coming into the 
discharge sewer, it would not be surprising if sometime dur- 
ing a storm the building should be wrecked. 

The old masonry in the divisions of the reservoir needs 
pointing generally. Some pointing is needed in certain por- 
tions of the out-fall sewer, but nothing is dangerously bad. 
The action of the tide, high winds, etc., has made consider- 
able change in the rip-rap. Portions of it should be relaid to 
thorougly protect the embankment. Some pointing should 
be done on the sea wall. 

Stony Brook. 

The following is an account of work done in connection 
with Stony Brook improvement for the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1905 : 

1,809 linear feet 12-foot by 12-foot brick conduit, including 8-foot 

reducer. 
1,809 " " 7-foot circular brick conduit. 
1,153 " " 12-foot by 12-foot reinforced concrete conduit. 
1,117 " " 7-foot circular reinforced concrete conduit. 
129 " " 11-foot 4-incb by 12-foot 10-inch reinforced concrete 

conduit, including 8-foot reducer. 
379 " " 26-foot 4-inch by 13-foot 6-inch reinforced concrete 
conduit. 
Sub-structure for gate-house No. 1 forebay, tailbay and connections. 
20 manholes. 
8 catch-basins. 
358 linear feet 10-inch C. B. drain. 
3,522 " " 10-inch underdrain. 

During the past year the work on the foul flow channels, 
which was started in September, 1903, has been continued. 
The conduits have been completed. They comprise the con- 
tinuation of the Commissioners' channel from Huntington 
avenue to the gate-house at Bryant street, and the building 
of the combined channels from Bryant street to the Charles 
river. There remains to be done the gate-houses with 
sub-structures and connection of same with conduits. A 
description of the conduits is as follows : 

Between Huntington avenue and the gate-house, the con- 
duit is 26 feet 4 inches by 13 feet 6 inches, of the basket- 
handle type, and is built of concrete reinforced with I-beams 
and twisted steel rods. 

The structure from Bryant street to the Charles River con- 
sists of two conduits — one 12 feet by 1 2 feet, horseshoe shape, 
to care for the foul flow from the Commissioners' channel, 
and the other 7-foot circular conduit to care for the foul 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 107 

flow of the old Stony Brook channel. These conduits were 
built of brickwork, with the exception of 129 feet between 
Ispwich and Newbury streets, 1,008 feet between Bryant 
street and Westland entrance, and 16 feet at the outlet at 
Charles River, where the construction was of reinforced con- 
crete. 

Between Ipswich and Newbury streets it was necessary to 
depress the arch of the larger conduit, giving it the dimen- 
sions of 11 feet 4 inches by 12 feet 10 inches instead of 12 
feet by 12 feet, owing to the grade of the tracks of the Boston 
& Albany Railroad. Piles were driven on which I-beams 
were placed to support the tracks during construction. 

The foundation along the line of the conduits was found 
with but few exceptions to be good ; in some parts, however, 
piles were driven, amounting in all to 838 linear feet of 
trench. 

With the completion of the gate-houses and connections, 
the flow from the Commissioners' channel and the old Stony 
Brook channel will be so controlled that when the waters 
are most foul the discharge will be diverted through covered 
channels to the Charles River, thereby preventing the deposit 
of sludge in the pond and the disagreeable and unsanitary 
results brought about by the conditions which have hereto- 
fore existed. 

The Fens Dredging. 

Since the construction of the Commissioners' channel of 
Stony Brook the Fens ponds have been receiving more or less 
sewage during rain storms. This sewage enters the Com- 
missioners' channel through the overflows of sewers which 
are in the Stony Brook drainage area. These sewers are 
built upon the combined principle, namely, they carry both 
house and storm drainage. Consequently when they become 
charged with storm water, relief is afforded through their 
overflows. This sewage is carried along in the Stony Brook 
channel to the Fens ponds, and mingling there with the salt 
water becomes precipitated, thus forming, together with the 
street wash which settles in the slower currents of the ponds, 
the deposits which have become so objectionable. These 
deposits have formed semi-submerged banks of sludge, which 
have been offensive to the inhabitants of that section. 
Sulphuretted hydrogen, marsh and other obnoxious gases, 
products of putrefaction, bubble up from these sludge banks 
in warm weather. 

In 1898 relief was sought by dredging a small portion of 
the ponds, and about 25,000 cubic yards of this sludge was 



108 City Document No. 40. 

removed. This was only a temporary expedient, as the 
cause of the pollution was not removed. 

The completion of the foul flow channels which are now 
under construction will remove the source of pollution from 
the Fens pond, and once the existing deposits are removed 
these conditions will not occur again. 

Under Acts of 1903, chapter 465, the first part of section 
10 reads : 

"The City of Boston, by such officer or officers as the 
mayor may designate, shall forthwith, after the passage of 
this act, do such dredging in the Back Bay Fens as the 
Board of Health of said city may require." 

The Mayor designated the Superintendent of Streets to do 
the work ; so in the beginning of 1904 this department was 
confronted with the problem of removing from the Fens 
ponds upwards of 100,000 cubic yards of sludge which had 
been deposited in banks 8 feet deep adjacent to the outlet 
of Stony Brook and tapering to 6 inches deep at the Muddy 
river and Charlesgate outlets. To determine the method 
of removing and disposing of the sludge, numerous consulta- 
tions were held with the Board of Health and Park Depart- 
ment, the latter department being asked to participate in the 
conferences, as the ponds to be cleaned were under their 
jurisdiction. One of the methods suggested by the Park 
Department was to drain the ponds and convey the sludge 
on the marsh land surrounding the pond. 

The Sewer Division, to which the work had been dele- 
gated by the Superintendent of Streets, had no objection 
to this method of disposing of the material, but pointed out 
that a nuisance was very likely to be created by the exposure 
of this sewage sludge to the sun and air during the warm 
weather. This department, therefore, asked that if this 
method was adopted the Park Department assume the re- 
sponsibility for such nuisance and the expense of abating it, 
if that became necessary, and that the Board of Health, to 
whose satisfaction the work must be done, would assure the 
department that it would not summarily order the removal 
of this deposit of sludge in case a nuisance developed, the 
department naturally not wishing to adopt this suggestion 
and run the risk of having to undo this work in case the 
results were objectionable. 

The Park Department refused to assume such responsi- 
bility, and the Board of Health distinctly reserved to itself 
the right to order the abatement of such nuisance instantly, 
in case it developed. The Sewer Division was, therefore, 
naturally unwilling to try such an experiment wholly at its 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 109 

own risk, preferring to find some method which certainly 
could be depended upon not to create a nuisance. If the 
method suggested had been adopted, a nuisance would have 
been created in the neighborhood, as certainly a mass which 
was objectionable when covered most of the time with water 
would be much more of a menace to health if deposited on 
the shore in the sun. 

After carefully considering numerous ways of accomplish- 
ing the work, the department adopted the only possible 
method to cleanse the ponds and at the same time not create 
a nuisance. They used a hydraulic dredge to pump the 
sludge and force it through a pipe line to a coffer-dam in the 
Charles River, from which the sludge could be dredged and 
towed to sea. By this method this offensive material was 
handled entirety under water until it reached the coffer-dam, 
which was located as far away from the Beacon street houses 
as was practicable. 

The dredge built in the Fens ponds is 80 feet long, 25 feet 
beam, and 3£ feet draught. On this the machinery is placed, 
which consists of two 100-h.p. boilers of the Penn type, 
which supply the steam for two 12-inch by 18-inch Automatic 
Atlas engines, connected with one shaft and pulley, which 
drive, with a 24-inch belt, a compound 12-inch suction and 
12-inch discharge centrifugal dredging pump. 

The suction end of the pump is connected with a flexi- 
ble suction, having a jet head to break up the material. 
The suction is on a 40-foot boom, which can be moved 
from side to side, as well as raised or lowered. The dis- 
charge end of the pump is continued to the rear end of 
the dredge, where it connects with the pipe line. The 
first 200 feet of this line next to the dredge is made up 
of alternate pieces of pipe and rubber sleeves supported 
on pontoons, this giving great flexibility in operating, for 
the dredge can be manipulated over the ponds, into coves, 
etc., for quite a period, without disconnecting the pipe 
line to add to its length. 

From the dredge the sludge is forced through a 12-inch 
spiral-ri vetted pipe line of about 5,000 feet in length to a 
coffer-dam or crib on the edge of the channel in the Charles 
river, 700 feet from shore. The crib is 100 feet long, 40 
feet wide, and 16 feet deep, and is built of 6-inch sheeting, 
with grooves and splines, reinforced with piles and walings. 

The discharge from the pipe line at the crib consists of 
solids and water. The crib acts as a settling tank, the 
solids remaining, and the clear water flowing over the top. 

The sludge is removed from the crib and deposited in 



110 City Document No. 40. 

scows by a clam-shell digger. The scows are towed down 
the Charles River, through 10 drawbridges, and then to sea, 
where they are dumped at the Minot's ledge and Egg Rock 
range, a distance of 14.25 miles. 

The portion of the ponds already dredged show a depth 
of water of 10 feet, where formerly it was from 1 to 3 feet; 
the bottom is clean mud (i.e., free from sewage deposit), 
and the surface is much clearer, with no gas bubbles rising 
to the surface. 

Dredging was carried on until ice in the Charles river 
prevented towing to sea, January 14, 1905, when the plant 
shut down. The dredging will be resumed when the river 
is free from ice. 

Entrance Fees, Permits and Assessments. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $3,828.16 have been 
collected from estates upon which no sewer assessment was 
ever paid, in accordance with chapter 38, section 10, of 
the Revised Ordinances of 1898. 

Bills for sewer assessments amounting to $665.75 have 
been deposited for collection, representing those estates 
assessed under chapter 456 of the Acts of 1889, and amend- 
ments thereto, which have been connected during the year 
with the sewers for which they were assessed. 

One thousand five hundred and nineteen (1,519) permits 
have been issued to licensed drain-layers to make connec- 
tions with the public sewers, and the work done under these 
permits has been inspected, and a record of the same made 
on the plans of this division, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of chapter 38, sections 6 and 10, of the Revised 
Ordinances of 1898. 

Four hundred and ninety-three (493) permits have been 
issued to district foremen and contractors for construction 
and repairs of sewers and catch-basins. 

Plans for the assessment of estates benefited by sewer 
construction have been furnished the Street Commissioners, 
representing 75,554 feet of sewers and appurtenances, cost- 
ing $394,876. 

Respectfully, 

George Phillips, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



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City Document No. 40. 



OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES. 

$121,199 25 



Pumping Station and Moon 

Island . 
Tow-boat . . $13,005 43 

Less paid by Sanitary 

Division . . . 6,544 77 



Main and intercepting sewers 



6,460 66 
18,235 95 



Pumping Station, Lyons Street, Dorchester. 
Maintenance ....... 



Stony Brook. 



Maintenance 



Miscellaneous Maintenance Charges. 

Office and engineering force, salaries and expenses, 
Current expenses of yards, lockers, 

stables, etc $61,690 20 

Less amount earned by division 

teams and engines . . . 28,841 60 

Repairing and cleaning catch-basin's, sewers and 

general repairs 
House connections, work for other departments, 

incidentals, etc. ...... 

Hardware, tools, rubber goods, etc. 

Telephones not included elsewhere 

Increase of stock at yards ..... 



Sewerage "Works. 
Pumping Station and Moon Island 

Sewer Construction. 



$145,895 86 
9,782 39 
6,994 33 
7,185 03 

32,848 60 

54,329 44 

56,149 60 
3,594 00 
1,663 68 
5,917 79 

$324,360 72 
$163,915 12 



South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . 
Roxbury 
City Proper 



Carried forward 



$48,150 60 
39,225 10 
24,607 02 
14,210 87 
57,222 22 

111,873 78 
26,755 94 
63,097 04 



385,142 57 

. $549,057 69 



Steeet Department — Sewer Division. 113 

Brought forward $549,057 69 

Miscellaneous Construction Charges. 

Office and engineering force, salaries and expenses, 85,685 84 

Hardware, tools, rubber goods and damages . . 23,661 40 

New manholes 9,943 36 

Sundries 22,060 93 

Foul flow channel, Stony Brook improvement, con- 
struction and engineering ..... 322,383 26 



$1,012,792 48 



South Boston . 
East Boston . 
Charlestown . 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 



Separate Systems op Drainage. 
Sewer Construction. 



$15,254 14 

20,303 88 

5,336 39 

25,370 20 

142,071 16 

184,991 53 

192,881 07 



Miscellaneous charg 
and expenses 



es, engineers' salaries, sundries 



,208 37 
56,757 58 



$642,965 95 



Charles River Basin. 

Miscellaneous charges, engineers' salaries, sundries 

and expenses ....... $26,509 24 

Construction in Back Bay Fens .... 513,554 05 



$540,063 29 



Construction op Highways Already Laid Out. 



Miscellaneous charges, engineers' salaries, sundries 
and expenses ....... 



!,377 07 



South Boston 
East Boston 
City Proper 



Sewer Construction. 



$37,539 14 

50,001) 72 
137 20 



87,686 06 



$90,063 13 



114 



City Document No. 40. 



Highways, Making of. 

Miscellaneous charges, engineers' salaries, sundries 

and expenses ....... $4,853 36 



West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
City Proper 



Sewer Construction 



Sewer Construction. 



$67,153 


62 


67 


20 


643 


83 



Dorchester Street. 



67,864 


65 


$72,718 


01 


$5,845 


85 



Re capit ul ation . 

Street Department, Sewer Division 

Sewerage Works . 

Separate Systems of Drainage 

Charles River Basin . 

Construction of Highways Already Laid Out 

Highways, Making of . 

Dorchester street ...... 



$324,360 72 

1,012,792 48 

642,965 95 

540,063 29 

90,063 13 

72,718 01 

5,845 85 

$2,688,809 43 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months End- 
ing January 31, 1905. 



District. 



Built by the 
City by Con- 
tract or Day 
Labor. 



Built by 
Private 
Parties. 



Total Length 
Built During 
the Twelve 
Months End- 
ing January 
31, 1905. 



City Proper. .. 
East Boston. .. 
Charlestown . . . 
South Boston.. 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester — 
Brighton 

Totals 



feet. 

18,362.82 

5,491.60 

1,630.83 

5,187.25 

36,067.16 

51,135.18 

32,669.63 

6,532.81 



feet. 

4,744.72 

265.32 



1,088.73 
459.95 
199.75 



feet. 

23,107.54 

6,756.92 

1,630.83 

5,187.25 

36,067.16 

52,223.91 

33,129.58 

6,732.56 



157,077.28 



6,758.47 



163,835.75 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



115 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
February 1, 1905. 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


Built by the city by con- 
tract or day labor 

Built by private parties. .. 


linear feet. 

78,255.92 
15,438.28 


linear feet. 

122,092.52 
14,004.67 


linear feet. 

120,871.32 

9,922.02 


linear feet. 

216,667.57 
9,906.96 


linear feet. 

157,077.28 
6,758.47 


Totals 


93,694.20 


136,097.19 


130,793.34 


226,574.53 


163,835.75 







Schedule of Sewers Built to Date in the City of Boston, 
February 1, 1905. 



District. 



Total Length 

Built During 

Twelve 

Months Ending 

January 31, 

1905. 



Length Rebuilt 
and Abandoned 
During Twelve 
Months Ending 
January 31, 
1905. 



Additional Length 

for the Twelve 

Months Ending 

January 31, 1905. 



City Proper . . . 
East Boston... 
Charlestown . . . 
South Boston. . 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury. 

Dorchester 

Brighton 



linear feet. 
23,107.54 
5,756.92 v 
1,630.83 ► 
5,187.25 v 
36,067.16 > 
52,223.91 v 
33,129.58 ^ 
6,732.56 " 



linear feet. 

2,149.00 

445.00 

319.90 

2,160.17 

1,373 32 



Totals 163,835. 75 

Length built previous to January 31, 1904. 
Total 



6,732.79 



Length of intercepting sewers 

Total 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works. 



linear feet. 

20,958.54 

5,311.92 

1,310.93 

3,027.08 

34,693.84 

52,223.91 

32,844.18 

6,732.56 



157,102.96 



Miles. 
3.97 
1.01 
0.25 
0.57 
6.57 
9.89 
6.22 
1.28 



29.76 
615.28 



645.04 
24.12 



669.16 
446.46 



116 City Document No. 40. 

Catch = basins built February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 



Number. 



City Proper 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Charlestown .. 
East Boston... 
South Boston.. 

Total 



244 



1,180,824 linear feet of sewers flushed. 

3,668 cubic yards material removed 
from sewers. 



10,168 catch-basins cleaned; 31,747 
cubic yards removed. 



Amount of Sludge Received and Removed from Deposit Sewers 
during Twelve Months ending January 31, 1905. 



Month. 



Received. 
Cubic 
Yards. 



Removed. 
Cubic 
Yards. 



1904 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August , 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1905 
January 

Totals 



968 



10,039 



462 


585 


481 


570 


611 


543 


649 


740 


765 


772 


1,028 


1,051 


1,062 


1,142 


992 


922 


1,022 


1,112 


961 


1,038 


1,038 


1,249 



1,148 



Sludge in sewers Feb- 
ruary 1, 1904, 1,689 
cubic yards. 



Sludge in sewers Feb- 
ruary 1, 1905, 856 
cubic vards. 



10,872 



Street Department — Sewer Division. 



11' 



Amount of Refuse Removed from Filth Hoist for the Year 
ending January 31, 1905. 



1904. 



February- 










49,100 


March 










43,100 


April 










30,000 


May- 










43,500 


June 










64,900 


July 










46,600 


August 










57,600 


September 










69,300 


October . 










57,500 


November 










40,000 


December 










42,900 


January, 1905 










49,000 



602,500 lbs. =S01£ tons. 
1,650 lbs. per day. 



Real Estate in Charge of the Sewer Division. 



Owned bt City. 



Assessed Valuation. 



Land. 



Buildings. 



Sewer yard, 678 Albany street, South End 

Gate-house, Columbus avenue, Roxbury 

Sewer yard, Rutherford avenue, Charlestown 

Sewer yard, Massachusetts avenue, near Albany 
street, South End 



Sewer yard, Western avenue, Brighton 

Pumping station, Old Harbor Point, Dorchester 

Land, buildings and reservoirs at Moon Island 
and Squantum 

Sewer yard, North Grove street, West End. (Oc- 
cupied in common with other divisions of the 
Street Department) 



Sewer yard, Child and South streets, West Rox- 
bury." (Occupied in common with Paving Divi- 
sion) 



Leased. 

Sewer yard, Revere street, West End. (Occupied 
in common with Paving Division. Leased from 
J. J . Costello) 



Sewer yard, Eagle street, East Boston. (Occupied 
in common with other divisions. Leased from 
trustees of Glendon Company) 



Sewer yard, Old Harbor 6treet and Columbia road, 
South Boston. (Ollice building owned by Sewer 
Division. Leased from estate of Choate Burn- 
ham) 



Sewer yard, Gibson street, Dorchester. ("Build- 
ings erected by Sewer Division. Leased from 
trustees of Gibson School Fund) 



$56,400 



13,000 

56,400 

8,600 

98,000 

19,500 
66,720 
19,300 



76,500 



4.S00 



7,000 



$3,000 



4,000 

3,000 

5,500 

300,000 

4,300 

28,000 



3,500 



3,200 



5,000 



118 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
STREET CLEANING DIVISION. 



941 Tremont Building, 
Boston, Mass., February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to submit the annual 
report of the Street Cleaning Division of this Department 
for the year ending Januaiy 31, 1905. 

There has been no marked departure in the methods, 
means or force in carrying on the work or solving the 
problems of this division during the year just elapsed — a 
fact which may be advanced as an argument that there is no 
longer any feature of its operations that can be considered 
tentative to-day. 

An average force per week of 450 men has been constantly 
at work during the entire year. Instead of diminishing, as 
some would suggest, this force must increase ; particularly, 
if the streets are to be cleaned as often as the citizens are 
demanding, and if the field of its operations is to be extended, 
which seems to be more than a contingency. It is impos- 
sible to ignore or wave aside the demands that are being 
made on this division for more and better service. The 
merchants, whose streets were cleaned in the primitive days 
of the division but two or three times a week, now want 
them cared for every day; and the denizens of the distant 
suburbs refuse to see any reason in our boundary lines. 

New District. 

Early in May of last year a beginning was made towards 
establishing a force in Dorchester. Up to that time the 
South Boston force cleaned only as far as Mt. Vernon street. 
A small force, including a sub-foreman, has been detailed to 
care for that part of Dorchester bounded and described as 
follows : 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 119 

Bounded on the south by Mt. Vernon street and Willow 
court ; westerly by the " Midland Division " New York, New 
Haven, & Hartford Railroad to Geneva avenue ; thence 
southerly by and including Geneva avenue to Dorchester 
avenue ; thence by and including Gibson street to Adams 
street; thence by and including Neponset avenue to the 
bridge ; easterly by the water front to the point of beginning 
— the easterly end of Mt. Vernon street. 

It is pardonable to state that with a small force this terri- 
tory has been kept in acceptable condition up to date, so 
much so that there is a clamor already that the service be 
extended to the border line of the city — Mattapan and 
Lower Mills. The demand is not unjust nor unreasonable. 
It is simply a question of money. The cost to date for the 
work was -$5,175.64. 

Dorchester's neighbors in Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and 
Brighton have seen this development and improvement, and 
are persistently agitating for similar service. 

Dudley street is the southern boundary of the Roxbury 
Street Cleaning district, if exception be made of Washington 
street, Warren street and Blue Hill avenue, which, being 
block-paved thoroughfares, are machine swept as far as Green 
street and Grove Hall, respectively. If the other half of 
that fair and thickly settled region of Roxbury does not 
receive the attention it , deserves it is because no financial 
provision has been made for it. A recommendation will be 
made later on to solve this apparent problem. 

Stock. 

Both the live and the rolling stock have been added to and 
improved during the year. Some splendid specimens of 
horse-flesh may be seen at the South and West stables, 
and they were bought at a fair market value. Many new 
carts have taken the place of old ones, and all the carts 
are in good repair. 

There was no addition to the sweeping machines, all of 
which are in working condition. 

Dumps. 

It was stated with much confidence in the report of last 
year that some provisions were being made to have an addi- 
tional scow located at the end of Charles River avenue, 
which would accommodate the West End, North End and 
Charlestown forces, but up to date nothing appears to have 
been done in this direction. Such a solution of the problem 



120 City Document No. 40. 

has no doubt been demonstrated to be expensive, but it is 
respectfully submitted that the present condition of things 
is becoming very costly and almost extravagant. The scow 
at Fort Hill Wharf, foot of Oliver street, is to-day receiving 
the collection from the entire business district of the city, 
from the South and West Ends, from the Back Bay and some- 
times from distant South Boston. It is being taxed often 
beyond its capacity, apparently. The cost of the towing to 
the sea has increased from year to year, and the expense of 
disposing of a load of dirt at its final destination sometimes 
amounts to $2.50. 

Paper Litter. 

This is another of the vexing problems of this division, 
and the nusiance is growing instead of diminishing. If there 
is a remedy it has never been applied. There is law enough 
not only to minimize but to prevent the evil. 

Public Alleys. 

It is submitted, in close connection with the above, that 
much of the litter that fouls our streets comes from both 
public and private alleys. 

The Tenement House Commission, in a very exhaustive 
report, sent by His Honor Mayor P. A. Collins to the Common 
Council, May 9, 1904, states that the condition of privately 
owned alleys and passageways in Boston has long been a 
source of complaint. The City Engineer has recently com- 
pleted an investigation which reveals the following facts : 

Public alleys in Boston ...... 49 

Private streets and alleys . . . . . 1,401 

Length of all alleys in miles . . . . . 32.8 

Area in square yards . . . . . 244,252 

Sanitary condition of private alleys : 

Clean 474 

Fairly clean ........ 452 

Dirty 401 

Filthy 74 

Concluding, it says : " The immediate problem before the 
city is to get these alleys clean. The tenants think nothing 
of casting all manner of refuse into them. Even when the 
abutters try to keep them clean, the public often uses them 
for a dump." 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 121 

Is it any wonder, then, that it was submitted in last year's 
annual report that these alleys were the filth tributaries of 
the city's streets ? Is it not preposterous to claim that it 
cannot be prevented ? It has been and is and ever will be a 
nuisance and a menace until better conditions be insisted 
upon by those who should see that the laws are observed. 

Tunnels and Subways. 

It is not idle to predict that the streets occupied and used 
by the contractors in the building of the East Boston tunnel 
and the Washington-street subway will not be in acceptable 
condition until the work has been completed. 

Like street cleaning itself, this is dirty work ; and the 
citizen whose business is carried on along its line of march 
must hope for nothing more than a minimizing of the 
nuisance. 

Push-cart Work. 

This is certainly the popular branch of the street cleaning 
service, and there is nothing to be said about it except that 
it should be extended. There is a demand for it from every 
public square in the city, in front of every church and 
theatre, and in all the immediate suburbs. 

Recommendations . 

Extend the lines of the Dorchester District. 

A larger force for Roxbury, to cover the entire district. 

Establish a small force in Jamaica Plain and Brighton. 

A new stable for South Boston and Dorchester. 

Extend push-cart system. 

Scow at the end of Charles River avenue. 

Uniform size receptacle for store and house dirt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph J. Norton, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation, 1904-1905 $410,000 00 

Transferred from surplus revenue . . . 24,172 62 



Total expenditures ..... $434,172 62 



122 



City Document No. 40. 





$3,000 


00 




4,978 


19 




384 


14 




731 


97 




712 


37 




720 


76 




$10,527 


43 



Objects of Expenditures. 
Superintendence . 

Salary of superintendent 

Office pay-rolls ..... 

Stationery ...... 

Printing ...... 

Board of horses, not mentioned elsewhere 
Telephone service .... 



Machine Sweeping of Paved Streets. 

This includes cost of sweeping, loading and removal of 
street dirt. 

District 1, South Boston $15,291 67 

District 2, East Boston 6,781 58 

District 3, Chariest own 10,38711 

District 6, Dorchester 2,440 92 

District 7, Roxbury 13,526 19 

District 8, South End : 

Up-town gang 10,273 24 

Down-town gang 33,396 08 

District 9, Back Bay 5,293 64 

District 10, West End 14,014 12 

District 10, North End . .... 14,171 29 

$125,575 84 
Total length of miles cleaned, 12,259. 

Cleaning Gutters. 

This includes cost of sweeping, loading and removal of 
street dirt. 



District 1, South Boston 
District 2, East Boston 
District 3, Charlestown 
District 6, Dorchester 
District 7, Roxbury . 
District 8, South End : 

Up-town gang 

Down-town gang 
District 9, Back Bay . 
District 10, West End 
District 10, North End 



Total length of gutters cleaned, 2,877. 



£2,142 07 
2,535 18 
2,313 95 
2,700 14 
1,919 82 

2,691 09 

4,254 76 



!,557 01 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 123 



Cost of Maintaining Dumps. 



District 1, South Boston 
District 2, East Boston 
District 3, Charlestown 
District 6, Dorchester 
District 7, Roxbury . 
District 8, South End : 
Up-town gang 
Down-town gang 
District 9, Back Bay . 
District 10, West End 
District 10, North End 



375 


90 


249 


75 


395 


85 


391 


55 


345 


45 


514 


62 


379 


60 


314 


37 


180 


69 



$3,147 78 



Removing Snow. 

This includes labor on crossings, in streets, carting of snow, 
etc. It also includes the snow work of the Patrol System. 



Labor and teaming 



11,681 54 



This shows the 
characterized the same in all districts 



Miscellaneous. 
cost of such work as may not be 



,957 89 
145 40 



1,053 43 



District 1, South Boston 
District 2, East Boston 
District 3, Charlestown 
District 6, Dorchester . 
District 7, Roxbury 
District 8, South End : 

Up-town gang . 

Down-town gang 
District 9, Back Bay . 
District 10, West End 
District 10, North End 



Patrolling by Districts. 

This includes the cost of picking up and the removal of 
refuse papers, etc., from the streets. 



2,937 


13 


1,126 


62 


743 


56 


188 


35 


230 


95 


$8,383 


33 



District 1, South Boston 
District 2, East Boston 
District 3, Charlestown 

Carried forward . 



$1,555 12 
1,493 76 

$3,048 88 



124 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward . 
District 6, Dorchester . 
District 7, Roxbury 
District 8, South End : 

Up-town gang . 

Down-town gang 
District 9, Back Bay . 
District 10, West End 
District 10, North End 



Labor and teaming 



Public Alleys. 



,048 


88 


34 


58 


34 


12 


42 


00 


175 


06 


2 


10 


246 


42 



$3,583 16 



$322 44 



Collection of Ashes and House Dirt. 

This was done to help the Sanitary Division in its spring 
cleaning work. 



Labor and teaming 



,454 48 



Push-cart Patrol System. 


Superintendence, inspection, etc. . 


$7,797 78 


Push-carts, labor, teaming, etc. . 


50,593 41 


Paper patrolling ..... 


4,395 50 


Stock 


1,931 90 


Holidays ...... 


5,763 77 


Repairs at station, 95 Columbus avenue 


131 15 


Sundries, repairs, etc. .... 


2,641 08 


Miscellaneous work .... 


3,964 36 




$77,218 95 



Stable and Yard Expenses . 

In the following statement is included the cost of the South 
End, West End, Roxbury, South Boston, Charlestown and 
East Boston stables : 



Superintendence of South stable .... 

Labor, including the cost of feeders, hostlers, broom- 
makers, watchmen, yardmen, messenger, hay, 
grain, etc. ....... 

Cart and carriage repairs ..... 

Horseshoeing ....... 

Harness repair ....... 

Carried forward ...... 



,396 20 



56,741 03 

7,026 79 

3,696 42 

1,940 79 

$70,801 23 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 125 



Brought forward . 
Sweeping machine repairs 
Stable and shed repairs 
Street car tickets 
Tool repairs 

Veterinary services and medicine 
Board and care of horses not mentioned elsewhere, 



See Patrol System. 



Stock Account. 



Broom stock purchased 
Harnesses and horse furnishings purchased 
Horses purchased . . . . 

Tools purchased ..... 
Bag carriers, bags, etc. . ... 

Carts, carriages, etc. . 



Miscellaneous. 
Holidays ........ 

Scow (cost of disposal at sea of 32,910 loads of 
street dirt) ....... 

Sundries ........ 

Annuity ........ 

Charles River dump ...... 



$70,801 23 

2,222 04 

1,321 12 

600 00 

370 05 

1,956 29 

504 15 

$77,774 88 



$5,003 70 
2,146 20 
4,178 06 
1,244 71 
6 10 
1,150 43 

£13,729 20 



$21,615 61 

8,064 00 

2,262 46 

300 00 

266 00 

$32,508 07 



General Recapitulation op Expenses. 



Superintendence .... 

Machine sweeping of paved streets 

Cleaning gutters . 

Maintaining dumps 

Removal of snow and ice 

Miscellaneous work 

Paper patrolling . 

Ashes and house dirt . 

Cleaning public alleys . 

Patrol system, push-carts 

Stable and yard expenses 

Stock account 

Miscellaneous 



$10,527 43 

125,575 84 

18,557 01 

3,147 78 

61,681 54 

8,383 33 

3,583 16 

1,454 48 

322 44 

77,218 95 

77,774 88 

13,729 20 

32,508 07 

$434,464 11 



Of the above amount, the sum of $291.49 was paid by 
the Sanitary Division for work done, thus making the total 



126 



City Document No. 40. 



net expenses of the division, as shown in the financial state- 
ment, $434,172.62. 

Income. 

Amount of bills deposited with the City Collector during 
the financial year ending January 31, 1905, $1,157. 

Table Showing the Number of Loads of Street Dirt Removed. 



Districts. 



Number of 
loads of dirt 
removed. 



Cost per load of 
cleaning streets 
and removing 
to dumps, in- 
eluding fore- 
man's superin- 
tendence. 



Up-town gang. . . 
Down-town gang. 



10 



West End. 



North End. 



Removed by push-cart patrol system. 

Eemoved by district push-carts 

Removed by paper patrol 



22,104 
7,026 
7,269 
7,532 
9,128 
8,843 

16,457 
4,578 
6,674 
7,757 



97,368 



5,499 



4,856 



107,723 



$0 78 

1 32 

1 74 

68 

1 69 

1 46 

2 02 
2 08 
2 09 
1 82 



Barrels and bag 
loads. 

74,056 
29,216 



103,272 



Total number of cart loads removed 107,723 

Total number of barrel and bag loads removed 103,272 



Thirty-two thousand nine hundred and ten (32,910) loads 
of street sweepings (or 30 per cent.) were delivered at the 
dumping scow at Fort Hill wharf, the towing of which to 
sea cost twenty-five (25) cents per load. 



Street Department — Street Cleaning Division. 127 



Public Waste Barrels. 

Total number of waste barrels emptied 
Total number of subway barrels emptied 

Total 



10,033 
3,584 

13,617 



Summary. 

Miles of paved streets cleaned 

Miles of gutters cleaned 

Loads of dirt removed 

Loads of paper and refuse removed 

Push-cart barrels emptied . 

Waste barrels emptied 

Subway barrels emptied 



12,259 

2,877 

102,867 

4,856 

103,272 

10,033 

3,584 



Property Occupied by the Street Cleaning Division. 

South Boston — Lease of stable, corner of H and Second 
streets. 

East Boston — Part of stable on East Eagle street, leased. 

Charlestown — Part of stable on Rutherford avenue. City 
stable. Office building, Rutherford avenue. City property. 

Roxbury — Part of stable on Highland street. City stable. 

South End — Part of stable, 650 Albany street. City stable. 

West End — Part of stable on North Grove street. City 
stable. 

Back Bay — Lease of building, 95 Columbus avenue. 



128 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX a. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF 
THE STREET WATERING DIVISION. 



801 Tkemont Building, 

Boston, Mass., February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the annual report of 
the Street Watering Division of the Street Department for 
the financial year ending January 31, 1905. 

The expense of watering all public streets during the 
year was $165,071.08. 

The weather conditions were, on the whole, about the 
same as 1904, and the expense showed only a slight 
increase. 

The force of carts was increased by eight (8), due to 
boulevard improvements in South Boston and East Boston, 
and improvements in the service in Charlestown, West 
Roxbury and Roxbury. 

Yours respectfully, 

Ambrose Woods, 

Deputy Superintendent. 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 1 29 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Amount of appropriation 

Revenue received during 1904-1905 

Total 

Amount of expenditures 

Balance .... 



$165,000 00 

72 00 

$165,072 00 
165,071 08 

$0 92 



Object of Expenditures. 



Salaries and labor 

Teaming 

Water posts, repairs, etc. 

Board of horses . 

Shoeing and clipping . 

Veterinary services and medicine 

Harnesses and supplies 

Horses, purchase of, and hire 

Vehicles, purchase of, repairs, etc 

Printing 

Stationery and postage 

Bicycles, repairs, etc. . 

Telephone service 

General supplies 

Total . 



$18,731 36 

139,655 00 

2,371 61 

979 67 

140 07 

224 85 

146 98 

265 00 

1,385 26 

96 15 

53 30 

383 75 

258 58 

379 50 

$165,071 08 



Objects of Expenditures, Classified by Districts, from February 1, 
1904, to January 31, 1905. 



Districts. 



Labor. 



Maintenance. 



Totals. 



South Boston.. 
East Boston. .. 
Charlestown. . . 

Brighton 

West Ro.xbury 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Back Bay 

South End 

City Proper... 

Totals 



$12,595 50 
8,652 50 
6,325 00 
11,377 50 
17,887 50 
20,036 50 
23,541 50 
13,556 50 
11,72."> no 
1 3,057 50 



$1,153 58 
1,153 58 
576 80 
1,153 58 
1,730 38 
2,307 17 
1,730 38 
1,153 5S 
1,153 58 
1,730 37 



$1,010 35 

734 80 

551 10 

964 42 

1,515 52 

1,745 15 

1,882 92 

964 42 

918 50 

1,285 90 



$14,759 43 
10,540 88 
7,452 90 
13,495 50 
21,133 40 
24.08S 82 
27,154 80 
15,674 50 
13,797 08 
16,973 77 



$139,655 00 



$13,843 00 



$11,573 08 



$165,071 08 



130 



City Document No. 40. 



Expenditures since 1899. 

The expenditures since 1899, when the city assumed for 
the first time the watering of paved streets, are as follows : 



1899 . 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 



^174,625 97 
174,742 45 
164,259 36 
160,147 25 
164,104 74 
165,071 08 



Amount of Water used in 1904.. 

Capacity of two-horse cart (gallons) 
Average loads thrown per day, per cart 
Total gallons thrown per day, per cart . 
Number of cart days work . 
Total gaUons of water used . 



600 

26 

15,600 

27,931 

435,723,600 



Distribution of Carts, showing Entire Amount of Work Done. 



Districts. 



Hired 
Carts. 



Number 

Miles 
Covered. 



Average 

per 

Cart. 



South Boston . 
East Boston. . 
Charlestown . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Back Bay 

South End 

City Proper. . 

Totals 



22 
16 

12 
21 
33 
38 
41 
211 

20 y 

28 J 



40 
25 
22 

41 
76 
92 



83 



1.82 
1.56 
1.83 
1.95 
2.30 
2.40 
2.10 

1.20 



252 



465 



1.90 



Street Department — Street Watering Division. 131 



Location of Water Posts by Districts. 













Year. 










CD 






















"C oj 




1891 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 




South Boston. . . 


23 


28 


35 


38 


39 


39 


39 


39 


40 




East Boston .... 


16 


34 


41 


42 


42 


42 


4S 


43 


45 




Charlestown. . . . 


19 


20 


20 


21 


22 


22 


22 


22 


22 




Brighton 


25 


44 


47 


50 


48 


50 


50 


50 


50 




West Roxbury. . 


50 


67 


75 


86 


81 


84 


85 


85 


*85 




Dorchester 


61 


83 


88 


99 


100 


101 


101 


102 


105 






53 


68 


76 


80 


73 


75 


75 


75 


75 




City Proper 


24 


53 


69 


74 


68 


73 


73 


72 


72 


5 


Totals 


271 


397 


451 


490 


473 


486 


488 


488 


494 


5 



Note. — During the year 5 posts were relocated, 2 posts abandoned, and 7 new 
posts erected. 
* One post not counted in 1903. 



132 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX H. 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR THE BOSTON 
AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 



926 Tremont Building, 
Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 
Sir, — I herewith submit the following report of the work 
done on the Boston and Cambridge bridges for the year end- 
ing January 31, 1905 : 

Cambridge-street Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. It 
was rebuilt in 1884; the draw was again rebuilt in 1891. 
The lower planking on the draw has been renewed. The 
planking on the Boston side is old and needs renewal, and 
some of the piles need strengthening and the draw needs 
adjusting. 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden turn-table 
draw ; it was originally built in 1808 and was rebuilt in 
1852, and was again rebuilt and widened in 1874. It is only 
in fair condition. The construction of the dam by the 
Charles River Basin Commission will cause the abandonment 
of this bridge early in the summer, and a temporary bridge 
is to be built to accommodate the travel. 

North Harvard-street Bridge. 

This bridge was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt, 
except the piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 1891. 

This bridge is in poor condition, and should be rebuilt and 
replaced by a wider structure ; the piles are in poor condi- 
tion, a few of the stringers and some of the fencing need 
renewal, the piers need replanking and the draw needs 
adjusting. 

The Cambridge Bridges Commission have been directed by 
the Legislature to rebuild the bridge not less than 60 feet 
wide ; its present width is 28 feet. The new bridge is to be 
known as Soldiers' Field bridge. 



Street Department — Bridge Division. 183 

Prison Point Bridge. 

During the work made necessary by the separation of 
grades at Prison Point street the present temporary bridge 
is maintained and repaired by the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
this commission only having charge of the operation of the 
draw; this bridge was opened to travel May 6, 1903. 

West Boston Temporary Bridge. 
This bridge was built in 1898-99 to accommodate the 
travel using West Boston bridge until the Cambridge bridge 
should be built. October 5, 1904, a section of the Boston 
end of the bridge was destroyed by fire, necessitating the 
closing of the bridge to team and car travel while the bridge 
was being repaired ; about 180 feet in length was practically 
rebuilt, except the piling, sidewalk and fences, and the 
bridge was reopened October 21. The channel-way of the 
river was changed from the Boston side to the middle of 
Cambridge bridge in June, and the westerly draw was put in 
commission, and the draw at the Boston end is no longer 
raised. 

Western- avenue Bridge. 

The original structure was built in 1824. The present 
bridge was built in 1879-80, and the draw in 1891. Several 
of the piles on the Boston end of the bridge are in poor con- 
dition, and should be renewed or strengthened. The ends 
of the caps and some of the stringers have begun to decay; 
considerable deck planking has been renewed on the Boston 
side, and the remainder of the planking and some of the 
stringers should be renewed. 

In General. 
The usual statement is appended showingthe number of draw 
openings and the number of vessels which passed through. 

The amount of revenue for rents, wharfage, etc., during 
the year has been 1810.60 ; one-half of this has been paid to 
each city. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. P. Lomasney, 

Commissioner for Boston. 



The following is a statement of the payments made by the 
City of Boston on account of the Boston and Cambridge 
bridges, February 1, 1904, to January 31, 1905: 

Appropriation for financial year 1904-05 . . $20,000 00 
Expended to January 31, 1905 . . . . 16,263 90 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1905 . $3,736 10 



134 



City Document No. 40. 



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$9,655 62 

2,361 50 

1,222 97 

1,123 26 

418 48 

301 02 

292 59 

156 38 

120 00 

94 48 

85 99 

31 00 

8 99 

260 00 

47 50 

43 00 

29 17 

16 85 

5 10 


$16,263 90 
330 00 


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135 



Revenue, February I, 1904, to January 31, 1905. 















6 

be 


Date. 


L. B. 

and 
Page. 


Items. 


Bridge. 


Total. 


a; o 


«2 


May 4 . . 


6-27.. 


Louis Gaffer, house rent 


Craigie 


$40 00 


$20 00 


$20 00 








" 


60 00 


30 00 


30 00 






Yacht " Gleam," wharfage.. 


" 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 


Aug. 10.. 


6-54.. 


J. Freedman, house rent 


" 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 


Sept. 9.. 


6-6.'.. 


" 


" 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 






J. A. Gorman, old lumber.... 


Harvard 


1 00 


50 


50 






W. B. Hoitt, Farrell boat- 


W. Boston 


25 00 
50 00 


12 50 
25 00 


12 50 




W. B. Hoitt, old wood 


25 00 






A. W. Smith, wharfage, 
barge "Charles F. Mather," 


Craigie 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 


Oct. 10.. 


6-71.. 




" 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 








" 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 






J. Freedman, house rent , . 


« 


20 00 
20 00 


10 00 
10 00 


10 00 
10 00 






Mr. Gallishaw, old wood 


W. Boston 


1 50 


75 


75 






Samuel Gould, " " 


" 


3 50 


1 75 


1 75 






Yacht " Gleam," wharfage. . 


Craigie 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 






Sprague & Nugent, adver- 




35 00 


17 50 


17 50 








« 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 








Harvard 


1 00 


50 


50 


Nov. 1 . . 


6-79.. 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


N. Harvard 
street 


46 70 


23 35 








23 35 


" 21.. 


6-S9.. 




Craigie 


17 65 


8 83 


8 82 






Boston Advertising Com- 
pany, advertising space. .. 


« 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 






Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, rent cable house, 


Camb. and 

N. Harvard 

streets 


100 00 


50 00 


50 00 






W. B. Hoitt, old wood 


W. Boston 


29 50 


14 75 


14 75 


" 29.. 


6-91 . . 


Boston Athletic Association, 
rent and wharfage 


« 


60 00 


25 00 


25 00 


Jan. 13.. 


6-119.. 




Craigie 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 






W. B. Hoitt, old wood 


W. Boston 


9 75 


4 87 


4 88 






Total 




$810 60 


$405 30 


$405 30 











136 



City Document No. 40. 





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Street Department. 137 



APPENDIX I. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER ON SPECIAL 

WORK. 



City of Boston, Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Sir, — I herewith submit the following report of the 
work done for the Street Department during the year ending 
January 31, 1905 : 

Atlantic-avenue Reconstruction. 

The roadway on the water side of Atlantic avenue, between 
Eastern avenue and the southerly driveway leading to Rowe's 
wharf, has been widened about eleven and one-half feet by 
reducing the width of the sidewalk to about one-half its 
former width. Where the old sidewalk was supported by 
pile work, the whole of the old timber was removed and new 
hard pine timber substituted. The old piles were capped at 
a lower grade so as to ensure sound wood for the bearings of 
the new caps, and a large number of new oak piles were 
driven wherever there was any question of the efficiency of 
the old piles to carry the new roadway or sidewalk. New 
catch-basins were built at the new curb line where the road- 
way was supported by filled material, and at other places cast- 
iron scuppers were set in the curb at frequent intervals to 
permit the surface water to discharge directly into the docks. 
The entire paving east of the easterly track of the Boston 
Elevated Railway and nearly all the paving between the rails 
of this track was relaid with pitch and pebble joints. A 
new brick sidewalk was laid for the whole length of the 
avenue reconstructed, and hard pine fences were built where 
buildings did not afford proper protection. 

The Boston Elevated Railway's stairs at the Rowe's 
wharf station had not been removed or chanced at the close 



138 City Document No. 40. 

of work in December, so that a small amount of work remains 
to be done at this point. The work was done under three 
contracts by D. J. Kiley, Patrick McGovern and the Metro- 
politan Contracting Company. The work was completed 
about the middle of December, but final payments have not 
been made at the date of this report. 

Charles River Avenue. 

An estimate was made of the cost of putting the Boston 
end of Charles-river bridge in repair for use as a dumping 
wharf. 

Circuit-street Fence. 

An iron fence and gate have been built on the wall on 
Circuit street, Roxbury, at the St. Joseph's church, under a 
contract with P. J. Dinn & Co., dated October 1, 1904, at a 
cost of $395. 

East Boston Ferries. 

South Ferry, Boston Side. — A report was made recom- 
mending new heads on the three piers ; the work was done 
under the supervision of the Ferry Division. 

North Ferry, East Boston Side. — An estimate was made 
for a new wharf and coal-pocket, and plans for the work 
have been begun. 

Plans have been made for repairing the north pier, but no 
work has yet been done on it. 

Franklin-street Subway. 

The building of the approaches to the Franklin-street 
subway, in progress at the date of the last report under a 
contract with William Crane, dated October 28, 1903, was 
completed about May 1, 1904, at a total cost of $3,652.05. 

The iron railings on the coping of the side walls of the 
approaches were furnished and erected under a contract with 
W. A. Snow & Co., dated January 14, 1904, at a cost of 
$845.35. Under a second contract with the same firm, a 
hand-rail was placed on the side walls of the approaches at a 
cost of $254.13. 

Fort Hill Wharf. 

A report was made recommending repairs on this wharf 
and renewing the deck on the sanitary wharf. The work 
was done by Thomas Uniacke at a cost of 



Street Department. 139 



Gainsborough-street Foot-bridge. 

A contract was made with the Eastern Bridge and Struct- 
ural Company, dated March 26, 1904, for building the steel 
superstructure of the foot-bridge on Gainsborough street, for 
the sum of $2,700, and the work was completed September 
24, 1904. 

Harvard-street Bridge. 

Plans and specifications were made last year by this 
department for building a new bridge and masonry abutments 
at Harvard street over the Midland Division of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The contract for 
building the abutments was awarded to the Metropolitan 
Contracting Company, and work was commenced about the 
first of August and completed the latter part of November. 
The abutments are built of granite, laid solid in Portland 
cement mortar, with cement concrete backing and founda- 
tions. The cost for contract work was $13,394.88. 

Upon the abutments was built a through steel plate girder 
bridge, across the railroad location, on a slight skew, and 
consists of three girders spaced 22 feet 10£ inches on cen- 
tres and are 59 feet 6i inches long, centre to centre of end 
bearings ; the floor beams are of steel, supporting a floor 
system of hard-pine stringers and 4-inch spruce deck plank, 
upon which is laid a wearing surface of 2-inch spruce. The 
centre girder divides the roadway into two parts, each 13 
feet 9 inches in the clear; there are two sidewalks, each 
7 feet \\ inches wide, the total width of the bridge being 
45 feet 9 inches, centre to centre of girders. 

The contract for building the steel superstructure was 
awarded to the Eastern Bridge and Structural Company of 
Worcester at a cost of $4,092.94. The work was commenced 
about the middle of November and the south roadway was 
opened to travel December 22, and the bridge was completed 
and opened to travel December 29. 

Norfolk-street Bridge. 

Plans and specifications were made last year by this 
department for building a new bridge and masonry abut- 
ments at Norfolk street near Dorchester station, over the 
Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

The contract for building the abutments was awarded to 
the Metropolitan Contracting Company; the work was com- 



140 City Document No. 40. 

menced in August and was completed December 24. The 
abutments are built of granite, laid solid in Portland cement 
mortar with cement concrete foundations and backing. The 
total cost for contract work was $26,829.50. 

The contract for the steel superstructure was awarded to 
the Boston Bridge Works, October 18, 1904, for $11,996. 

Paving Wharf No. 2, 600 Albany Street. 

As stated in the last annual report the old wharf at this 
place has been replaced by building a granite sea-wall on 
three sides of it and the space between the walls filled solid 
with earth and gravel. 

The work was done under a contract with John P. 
Cavanagh, and was completed June 28, at a cost for contract 
work of $26,240.10. 

Some additional dredging was done in the North and South 
docks by the Bay State Dredging Company at a cost of 
$730.80. 

Assessment Streets. 

Working plans, specifications and forms of contract were 
prepared and forwarded to the Street Department for the 
construction of the following assessment streets : 

Belgrade avenue, South street to Anawan avenue. 
Bennington street, Prescott street northeasterly 650 feet. 
Bernard street, Talbot avenue to N. E. Railroad. 
Causeway street, Beverly street northeasterly 142 feet. 
Dorchester street, Eighth street to Dorchester avenue. 
Franklin street, Cambridge street to B. & A. Railroad. 
Hyde Park avenue, Walk Hill street to 288 feet north of Ashland 
street. 

Plans and Specifications for Repaving Streets. 

Preliminary surveys were made, and the working plans, 
specifications and forms of contract were prepared and for- 
warded to the Street Department, for repaving the following 
streets : 

* Albion street, Castle street to Dover street. 

* Arlington avenue, Alford street to Somerville line. 

Ashburton place, Bowdoin street to Somerset street. 

Barton court, Barton street to Brighton street. 
* Beach street, Harrison avenue to Atlantic avenue. 

* Plana only were forwarded. 



Street Department. 141 

*Bellevue street, Brookliue avenue to Park street. 
* Bolton street, F street to Dorchester street. 

Boylston street, Dartmouth street to B. & A. Railroad bridge. 

Boylston street, B. & A. Railroad bridge to Massachusetts 
avenue. 

Bullard street, Bowdoin street to Bowdoin avenue. 

Causeway street, Haverhill street, across Beverly street. 

Columbus avenue, Ferdinand street to B. & A. Railroad bridge. 

Court street, Washington street to Tremont street. 

Court square, westerly roadway. 

E treet, West Seventh street to West Eighth street. 

East Second street, L street to N street. 

Emerald street, Dover street to Castle street. 

Essex street, Kingston street to Lincoln street. 

Front street, Austin street to Warren avenue. 

G street, East Eighth street to Columbia road. 

Hamilton street, Bowdoin street to Mt. Everett street. 

Harris street, Hanover street to North street. 

Hawes street, Congress street to Kilby street. 
*Haynes street, Marginal street to Orleans street. 
* Monument street, Bunker Hill street to Medford street. 

Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester avenue to Shoreham street. 
* Neponset avenue, Minot street to Neponset bridge. 
*New street, Maverick street to Cross street. 

Norfolk avenue, Marshfield street to East Cottage street. 

Norman street, Green street to South Margin street. 

Northampton street, Columbus avenue to Tremont street. 

* North Bennet street, Salem street to Hanover street. 
Poplar street, Washington street to Sycamore street. 
Boxbury street, Washington street to Guild row. 
South street, Beach street to Kneeland street. 

South Margin street, Staniford street to Norman street. 
Warren avenue, Warren Bridge to Front street. 
Washington street, Roxbury street to Marvin street. 
West Dedham street, Shawmut avenue to Tremont street. 
West Newton street, Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 

* West Seventh street, Dorchester avenue to D street. 

Miscellaneous. 

Preliminary surveys have been made and plans prepared 
for repaving the following streets : 

Allston street, Brighton avenue to Washington street. 
Ashford street, Malvern street to Pratt street. 
Bolton street, C street to F street. 

Columbus avenue and Park square, Eliot street to Boylston 
street. 

Congress street, Fort Point Channel to Pittsburg street. 

* Plans only were forwarded. 



142 City Document No. 40. 

Dorchester av nue, Shawmut Branch Railroad to Park street. 

East Second street, N street to P street. 

Eliot street, Washington street to Columbus avenue. 

Essex street, Harrison avenue to Kingston street. 

Newland street, West Dedham street to West Brookline street. 

Norfolk avenue, Magazine street to Marshfield street. 

Orleans street, Sumner street to Webster street. 

Shawmut avenue, Springfield street to Massachusetts avenue. 

Silver street, D street to G- street. 

South street, Centre street to Jamaica street. 

Union street, Main street to Rutherford avenue. 

Warren street, Cambridge street to the Brookline line. 

Washington street, Elmore street to Dimock street. 

Grading Street Railway Tracks. 

Grades for tracks in the following streets have been de- 
termined, and the necessary surveys made for determining 
the same. 

Boston Elevated Railway Company. 

Arlington avenue, Alford street to the Somerville line. 
Belgrade avenue, South street to near Anawan avenue. 
Bennington street, Prescott street northeasterly 650 feet. 
Boylston street, Dartmouth street to B. & A. R.R. bridge. 
Boylston street, B. & A. R.R. bridge to Massachusetts avenue. 

Cambridge street, Harvard avenue to Allston bridge. 

Causeway street, Haverhill street to Medford street. 

Columbus avenue, Ferdinand street to B. & A. R.R. bridge. 
Dorchester avenue, Shawmut Branch Railroad to Park street. 
Dorchester avenue, at Washington street (Lower Mills). 
Hyde Dark avenue, Walk Hill street to Ashland street. 
Neponset avenue, Minot street to Neponset bridge. 
Roxbury street, Washington street to Guild row. 
South street, Centre street to Jamaica street. 

Warren avenue, drawbridge to Front street. 

Washington street, Roxbury street to Marvin street. 

Washington street, Elmore street to Dimock street. 

West Seventh street, C street to D street. 

Wilton street, Cambridge street to Grant street. 

Total length of single track grades = 9.13 miles. 

Miscellaneous Plans, Specifications, etc. 

Atlantic avenue, easterly sidewalk from Broad street to Eastern 
avenue. A plan was made showing proposed new edgestone 
line, and grades were determined for said edgestone. 

Congress street, at Engine-house 38 and 39. A report was made 
as to the grade of edgestone and roadway in this vicinity. 



Street Department. 143 

Dudley street, southerly side from Mt. Pleasant avenue to Mt 

Pleasant place. A plan was made showing new location of 

edgestone, with grades for same, on account of widening the 

street between the above limits. 
Hyde Park avenue, at Stony Brook. A plan and specifications 

were prepared for rebuilding the wooden bridge at this place 

on account of the widening of Hyde Park avenue. 
Lowell street, Minot street to Brighton street. A plan was made 

for repaying the northerly side of Lowell street, so that teams 

might more easily back up to freight-house. 
Malvern street, Ashford street 180 feet southerly. A study 

was made for a revised grade of this portion of Malvern 

street to connect with a proposed revised grade of Ashland 

street. 
South street, West Roxbury, from Walk Hill street about 440 

feet westerly. A plan was made for revising the grade for 

the sidewalk on southerly side of street. 
State street, from Atlantic avenue about 140 feet westerly. A 

plan was made showing grades for paving roadway in the 

vicinity of the new Atlantic Chambers. 
Washington street, from Townsend street to Forest Hills. An 

estimate was prepared of the cost of making the sidewalks 

uniformly 10 feet wide. 

Plans showing details of construction of street and other 
structures have been made from time to time as required. 
The street book, giving lengths and areas of pavements in 
accepted streets and public alleys, has been corrected to 
February 1, 1904, and is now being corrected to February 1, 
1905. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



144 City Document No. 40. 



APPENDIX J. 



REPORT OF CHIEF SMOKE INSPECTOR. 



64 Pemberton Square,. 

Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I herewith respectfully submit a report of the 
work performed by this office during the past year. 

From personal observation and from the small number of 
complaints received, I am led to believe that there is an im- 
provement in the operation of boiler plants using soft coal 
in this city. Personal interviews with the owners of power 
and heating plants, which have been the cause of complaints 
in the past, have generally resulted in an improvement in the 
firing of boilers, and the consequent reduction in the emission 
of black smoke. I believe that the law is being more gener- 
ally observed at present than at any time since its passage. 

Boiler Applications. 

During the year 294 applications have been received from 
the Building Department for boiler permits, and were dis- 
posed of as follows : 

Signed to use hard coal ....... 282 

New consumers adopted . . . . . . 11 

Unsigned ......... 1 



294 



Special Reports. 



April 9. Report on complaint of Mr. Johansin, 15 
Hooper street. 

April 9. Report on complaint of B. S. Macloud, 3 Has- 
kell street. 

March 14. Report on communication received from Austin 
E. Griffith. 



Street Department — Smoke Inspector. 



145 



July 16. Report on complaint of Alfred Clarke. 

July 26. Report on complaint of Pneumatic Service Com- 
pany, 161 Devonshire street. 

July 27. Report on complaints against the Minot Plant, 
Devonshire street. 

July 28. Report on complaint of E. B. Goodsell. 

July 29. Report on complaint of A. B. Abbott. 

January 28. Report on complaint of Norman Cameron. 

January 28. Report on order received from Common 
Council. 

January 31. Report on complaint of W. Dwyer, 749 
Shawmut avenue. 



Nova Scotia Coal. 

Importations of Coal from Nova Scotia at the Port during the Tear 
ending January 31, 1905. 



Months. 



Tons. 



Value. 



February, 1904 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1905. 

Total 



33,902 
64,103 
50,627 
31,300 
51,750 
37,950 
43,500 
41,400 
48,150 
50,370 
55,378 
55,096 



$42,908 
97,107 
65,957 
39,126 
64,689 
47,438 
54,375 
51,750 
60,188 
62,963 
86,193 
94,216 



563,526 



$766,910 



Nova Scotia coal recorded at the Collector's office (Boston 
Custom House) for the year ending January 31, 1905, shows 
563,526 tons as against 662,788 for the year ending January 
31, 1904. 



146 



City Document No. 40. 



Summary. 

I submit a brief summary of work for the year ending 
January 31, 1905. 



Number of applications for boiler permits received 

Number of smoke preventers adopted 

Number agreeing to burn hard coal 

Number of short observations taken 

Number of special reports .... 

Number of special requests for observations received 



294 

11 

282 

135 

11 

4 



Respectfully submitted, 

John J. O'Neil, 

Chief Smoke Inspector. 



Street Department — Civil Service. 



147 



APPENDIX K. 



REPORT OF THE CIVIL SERVICE CLERK. 



Boston, February 1, 1905. 

Hon. James Donovan, 

Superintendent of Streets : 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith a report of the work 
performed in connection with the Civil Service Commis- 
sion, together with a statement of the force employed and 
eligible for employment for the year ending January 31, 
1905: 



Requisitions made ....... 

Requisitions cancelled ...... 

Certifications returned without any selection being made 
Number of men called for ..... 

Number of men certified ..... 

Number of men selected, including veterans . 
Number of veterans appointed .... 

Number of men appointed provisionally under Civil Service 

Rule No. 36 . . . " . 

Applications made for promotion .... 

Promotions allowed ...... 

Promotions allowed provisionally .... 

Provisional appointments made permanent 

Requests for permission to reinstate 

Requests for permission to reinstate allowed, includin 

one veteran ....... 

Requests for permission to reinstate not allowed 



90 

2 

25 

156 

249 

128 

5 

7 
13 
12 

1 
5 

7 

3 
4 



Transfers made from other city and state departments to 
the Street Department with the approval of the Civil Service 
Commission are as follows : 



From Bath Department . . . . , 

" Engineering Department 
" Lamp Department . 
" Public Buildings Department . 
" Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 



148 



City Document No. 40. 



Transfers from the Street Department to other city and 
state departments with the approval of the Civil Service 
Commission are as follows : 

To Public Buildings Department ..... 2 
Provisional appointments cancelled on account of failure to 

pass the required examination ..... 2 

Number of discharges forwarded to Civil Service Commis- 
sioners . . . . . . . . .174 



The records of the department show that there are now 
3,519 persons eligible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 2,997 were upon the January, 
1905, pay-rolls. 

Comparative Table Showing the Number of Employees 
February 1, 1904, and February 1, 1905. 











>> 


be 

a 






bo 

.9 




Date. 


"3 © 
2 » 

go 


to 
S 

C3 


CD 


'3 


a 
£0 




SO 

"£ 


8* 


DQ 

o 




V 


Ph 


CO 


CO 


co 


fc 


ffl 


CO 


H 


February 1, 1904 


8 


943 


963 


515 


360 


166 


167 


10 


3,132 




8 


916 


877 


516 


353 


151 


166 


10 


2,997 







Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Qutnn, 

(7itn7 Service Clerk. 



Street Department. 



149 



APPENDIX L. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS AND DOCUMENT 
NUMBERS OF ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Bridge Department before 1891. 

Previous to 1S86, under charge of City Engineer. 



Name. 



Year. 



Bartholomew M. Young. 
James H. Nugent 



1886 to 1889 
1889 to 1891 



Bridge Department before 1891, 



Name of Document. 


For 

Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 


Annual report 


1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


29 


it it 


26 


(I u 


29 


11 14 


22 


11 11 


* 







* Published in annual report, Executive Department. — Part I., City Document, 
No. 1, 1891. 

Paving Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Year. 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent Streets and Drains . 
Zephaniah Sampson, " " " " , 

Thomas Hunting, Superintendent 

Alfred T. Turner, 
Charles Harris, 
Nehemiah T. Merritt, 
James J. Flynn, 
Charles Harris. 
Michael Meehan, 
John W. McDonald, 
J. Edwin Jones, 



1825 to 
1831 to 
1846 to 
1853 to 
1864 to 



1884 to 
1886 to 
1889 to 



1831 
1846 
1853 
1864 
1883 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1886 
1889 
1891 



150 



City Document No. 40. 



Paving Department before 1891. 



Name or Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 






1851 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1S65 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


6 


ti 11 




29 




1851 

1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


2 


tt u 


6 


tt •< 


6 


tt . t 


5 


tt tt 


3 


tt u 


3 


ii ii 


3 


ii u 


5 


ii u 


6 


ii (i 


5 


it n 


4 


(i u 


3 


ii ii 


3 


u it 


7 


it it 


3 


it it 


6 


tt it 


9 


tt it 


14 


tt ti 


13 


tt it 


12 


it tt 


16 


it it 


21 


tt tt 


25 


tt it 


27 


it tt 


30 


ti tt 


38 


it tt 


29 


it tt 


24 


it tt .... 


24 


tt it 


48 


ti it 


51 


tin 


47 


it it 


46 


tt tt 


97 


1 1 tt 


30 


t< tt 


16 


tt ii 


23 


tt ti 


30 


it it 


19 


it tt 


* 







♦Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II.. City Document 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



151 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name. 



Year. 



Enoch Patterson, Superintendent 

Zephaniah Sampson, " 

Charles B. Wells, " 

Simeon B. Smith, " 
William H. Bradley, 

Horace A. Moses, " 

Thomas J. Young, " 

Seth Perkins, * " 

Charles Morton, " , 



1825 to 
1831 to 
1837 to 
1856 to 
1863 to 
1883 to 
1885 to 
1887 to 
1889 to 



1831 
1837 
1856 
1863 
1883 
1885 
1887 
1889 
1891 



Sewer Department before 1891. 



Name of Document. 


For 

Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 




1S59 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


1861 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 

1884 \ 

1885 / 
1886 
18S7 
1888 
1889 
1S«. 10 
1891 


11 




12 


It tl 


12 


It 11 


13 


ll (I 


11 


It I I 


5 


U It 


6 


ll ll 


8 


ll tl 


13 


(( It 


11 


U l( 


3 


1 1 it 


11 


t. it 


10 


it ti 


13 


it u 


12 


ll u 


17 


it ll 


11 


1 1 it 


13 


ll u 


15 


11 11 


11 


11 It 


16 


11 ll 


19 


11 11 


18 


It ll 


16 


11 ll 




11 It 


43 


tl It 


58 


ll It 


69 


11 11 


81 


11 11 


129 


11 It 


14 


11 11 


» 







* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document, 
No. 1, 1891. 



152 



City Document No. 40. 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name. 



Tear. 



Ezra Forristall, Superintendent 
Joseph W. Coburn, " 

Ezra Forristall, " 

George W. Forristall, " 



1853 to 1854 

1854 to 1855 

1855 to 1869 
1869 to 1890 



Health Department before 1891. 

Sanitary. 



Name of Document. 



Year. 



Pub. 
Tear. 



No. of 
Doc. 





1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 

1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 


1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 

1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


7 


1 1 t 




6 


It i 




4 


It 1 




4 


It 1 




4 


tt < 




4 


It t 




5 


it i 




6 


It l 




5 


it t 




5 


it t 




4 


it t 




4 


it t 




8 


tt i 




7 


it t 




8 


ti i 




12 


II l 




4 


ti t 




10 


tt t 




17 


it t 




40 


Annual rep 
sive; the 
embodied 
Health . . 


arts from 1873 to 1884, inclu- 
Superintendent's report was 
in the report of the Board of 


45 


Annual rep 
it t 

it t 

it t 

tt i 


ort 


22 




16 


c 


23 


t 


21 


i 


* 







No. 



* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part II., City Document, 
1, 1891. 



Street Department. 



153 



Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal and Prison Point.) 



NAME. 



Tear. 



Frederick W. Lincoln, Commissioner for Boston., i 
Ezra Parmenter, Commissioner for Cambridge . . 



William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cambridge., i 
George M. Clukas, Commissioner for Cambridge. . j 



May 22, 1871, to 

March, 1901. 
June 14, 1871, to 

Jan. 31,1883. 
March 28, 18S3, to 

July 22, 1904. 
July 26, 1904, to 

present time. 



Note. — Harvard bridge added in 1892. Essex street, Cambridge street, North 
Harvard street, and "Western avenue bridges to Cambridge were transferred from 
Street Department, July 1, 1S9S. 

Commissioners of Cambridge Bridges before 1891. 

(West Boston, Canal and Prison Point. ) 



Name of Document. 


For 
Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 




1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1880 
1890 


1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1S89 
1890 
1891 


19 


It 11 


12 


It It 


16 


u ti 


23 


11 ti 


20 


11 It 


12 


It 11 


10 


(I 11 


8 


11 11 


12 


11 u 


8 


11 11 


15 


11 11 


15 


11 11 


19 


1! (1 


8 


11 11 


12 


11 11 


19 


It 1 t 


25 


11 11 


22 


11 It 


20 


11 11 


* 







♦Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document, 
No. 1, 1891. 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name. 


Year. 


Board of Ferry Directors 


1870 

1891 

May 1, 1895 


1891 


Thomas Kellough 


May 1, 1895 
July 1, 1895 





154 



City Document No. 40. 



Ferry Department before 1895. 



Name of Document. 


For 

Year. 


Pub. 
Year. 


No. of 
Doc. 




1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 


1871 
1872 
1873 

1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 


41 


11 11 


55 


u u 


81 


11 11 


42 


(1 It 


65 


(I (1 


51 


1 1 11 


53 


(1 It 


49 


(( 11 


60 


it u 


74 


U (1 


77 


u u 


72 


11 It 


98 


11 u 


76 


11 (I 


72 


U (1 


28 


4 I U 


12 


tl 11 


10 


11 11 


3 


11 11 


4 


11 11 


* 


1 1 11 


12 


11 11 


11 


11 11 


11 


11 11 


11 







* Published in annual report, Executive Department, Part I., City Document. 
No. 1, 1891. 



Street Department. 155 



Street Department since 1891. 

Superintendent. 
Henry H. Carter, Member of American Society Civil Engineers. 
Resigned December 8, 1894. 

Charles R. Cutter, Acting Superintendent from December 8, 1894, to January 14, 1896. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Bertrand T. Wheeler, Superintendent from January 14, 1895, to February 4, 1896. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Benjamin W. Wells, Superintendent from February 4, 1S96, to February 1, 1900. 

Bertrand T.Wheeler, Superintendent from February 2, 1900, to November 25, 1901. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 
Resigned November 25, 1901. 

William Jackson, Acting Superintendent from November 25, 1901, to January 14, 1902. 
Member of American Society Civil Engineers. 

Guy C. Emerson, Deputy Superintendent in charge of the Department, from November 

25, 1901, to January 14, 1902. 

Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

James Donovan, Superintendent from January 14, 1902, to the present time. 



Bridge Division. — John A. McLaughlin, Deputy Superintendent until June 1, 
1895. 

Bridge Division. — John P. Wise, Deputy Superintendent from June 1, 1895, to 
February 14, 1896. 

Bridge Division. — William H. Carberry, Deputy Superintendent from February 14, 
1896, to February 3, 1900. 

Bridge Division. — Walter Reed, Deputy Superintendent from February 5, 1900, to 
January 22, 1902. 

Bridge Division. — Joseph P. Lomasney, Deputy Superintendent Jrom January 22, 
1902, to the present time. 

Ferrt DIVISION. — Thomas Kellough, Deputy Superintendent from July 1, 1895, to 
February 14, 1896. 

Ferry Division. — William F. McClellan, Deputy Superintendent from February 
14, 1896, to February 3, 1900. 

Ferrt Division. — Joseph J. Dennison, Deputy Superintendent from February 5, 
1900, to January 22, 1902. 

Ferry Division. — William J. Donovan, Deputy Superintendent from January 22, 
1902, to the present time. 

Paving Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent until January 24, 
1895. 

Paving Division. — Darius N. Payson, Deputy Superintendent from January 24, 
1895, to March 7, 1896. 

Paving Division.— John L. Kelly, Deputy Superintendent from March 1,1896, to 
February 3, 1900. 

Paving Division. — Darius N. Payson, Deputy Superintendent from February 6, 
1900, to January 24, 1902. 

Paving Division. —Joshua Atwood, 3d, Acting Deputy Superintendent from Jan. 
uary 24, 1902, to March 26, 1902. 

Paving Division.— Henry V. Macksey, Deputy Superintendent from March 26, 
1902, to the present time. 



156 City Document No. 40. 

Sanitary Division. — George W. Forristall,* Deputy Superintendent. 

Sanitary Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Acting Deputy Superintendent from Jan- 
uary, 16, 1894, to February 1, 1895. 

Sanitary Division. — Charles A.Young, Deputy Superintendent from February 1, 
1895, to March 1, 1896. 

Sanitary Division. — Patrick O'Shea, Deputy Superintendent from March 1, 1896, 
to February 3, 1900. 

Sanitary Division. — [Charles A. Young, Deputy Superintendent from February 5, 
1900, to January 22, 1902. 

Sanitary Division. — Daniel P. Sullivan, Deputy Superintendent from January 22, 
1902, to the present time. 

Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Deputy Superintendent until July 10, 1896. 
Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division. — Charles R. Cutter, Deputy Superintendent from July 10, 1896, to 
February 3, 1900. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division. —Guy C. Emerson, Deputy Superintendent from February 5, 1900, 
to November 25, 1901, and from January 14, to Janu- 
ary 22, 1902. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division. — Henry W. Sanborn, Acting Deputy Superintendent from Novem- 
ber 25, 1901, to January 14, 1902. 
Member Philadelphia Society Civil Engineers. 

Sewer Division. — George Phillips, Deputy Superintendent from January 22, 1902, 
to the present time. 

Street Cleaning Division. — Philip A. Jackson, Deputy Superintendent until 

March 22, 1895. 
Street Cleaning Division. — Benjamin M. Cram, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 22, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 

Street Cleaning Division. — Joshua Atwood, 3d, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 1, 1896, to February 3, 1900. 
Member of the Boston Society Civil Engineers. 

Street Cleaning Division. —Frank H. Haynes, Deputy Superintendent from 

February 5, 1900, to April 16, 1901. 
Resigned April 16, 1901. 

Street Cleaning Division. — Prank C. Shepard, Deputy Superintendent from 

April 16, 1901, to January 22, 1902. 

Street Cleaning Division. — Joseph J. Norton, Deputy Superintendent from 

January 22, 1902, to the present time. 

Street Watering Division. — M. Edward Libby, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 6, 1895, to March 1, 1896. 

Street Watering Division. — Thomas J. Finneran, Deputy Superintendent from 

March 1, 1896, to February 3, 1900. 

Street Watering Division. —Frederick Hammond, Deputy Superintendent from 

February 6, 1900, to January 22, 1902. 

Street Watering Division. — Ambrose Woods, Deputy Superintendent from Jan- 
uary 22, 1902, to the present time. 

*Died January 12, 1894. 



Street Department. 



157 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. 



- Henry H. Carter, ex-officio, Commissioner for 

Boston, until December S, 1894. 
Charles R. Cutter, ex-officio, Acting from 

December 8, 1894, to January 14, 1895. 
Bertrand T. Wheeler, ex-officio, from January 

14, 1895, to February 4, 1896. 
Benjamin W. Wells, from February 4, 1896, to 

February 1, 1900; ex-officio, to May 26, 1898 * 
Bertrand T. Wheeler, from February 2, 1900, 

to November 25, 1901. 
Guy C. Emerson, from November 25, 1901, 

to January 14, 1902. 
James Donovan, from January 14, 1902, to 

October 28, 1904. 
Joseph P. Lomasney, from October 28, 1904, 

to the present time. 
William J. Marvin, Commissioner for Cam- 
bridge. | 
George M. Clukas, July 26, 1904, to the 

present time. 



* See Chap. 467, Acts of 1898. 
f Died July 22, 1904. 



Street Department. 



Name of Document. 



For 
Year. 



Pub. 
Year. 



No. of 
Doc. 



Annual report, Executive Dept. Part II. 



1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 



1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



36 
34 

34 
34 
29 
29 
34 
35 
38 
38 
38 
40 
40 
40