(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the Commonwealth of Virginia : with accompanying documents"

CIBRARK ^ 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 




BROWN um^^'-m 

LIBRAE. . 
JAN 3 1 1972 



annual report 
1969-1970 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION . RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 23216 

DECEMBER 1970 



ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



Superintendent of Public Instruction 

of the 
Commonwealth of Virgmia 



School Year 1969-1970 




State Board of Education 

Richmond 

November, 1970 



L Zio 

/ CONTENTS 

One-Hundredth Annual Report of the Superintendent 
of Public Instruction 



Page 

Letter of Transmittal 7 

State Board of Education 8 

State Superintendents of Public Instruction 9 

State Department of Education 10 

Division Superintendents in Virginia 19 

State Superintendent's Advisory Council 22 

Introduction 24 

Division of Elementary and Special Education 30 

Elementary Education 30 

Special Education 34 

The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind 39 

Virginia School at Hampton 39 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 1 — Number of Months of Employment of Non-teaching 

Elementary School Principals 32 

Table 2 — Classroom Teachers — Pupils Enrolled 33 

Table 3 — Pupil Progress in Elementary School 34 

Division of Secondary Education 41 

Supervisory and Administrative Responsibilities 41 

Adult Education 47 

Art Education 49 

Driver Education 50 

English 51 

Foreign Languages 52 

Health, Physical Education, Safety and Recreation 53 

History, Government, and Geography 54 

Mathematics 55 

Music Education 56 

Science 58 

Other Secondary Schools Accredited by the State Board of Education, 

1969-70 92 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 4— Enrollment in Grades 8-12 and in Mathematics; Number 

of Mathematics Teachers 1959-60 and 1969-70 56 

Table 5 — Virginia High Schools — Enrollment and Graduates. ... 59 

Table 6— Summer Public High Schools, 1969 83 

Table 7— Summer Private High Schools, 1969 91 



6t 



4 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Page 

Division of Special Services 94 

Guidance and Testing 94 

School Buildings 96 

Pupil Transportation 108 

Educational Television 133 

Bureau of Teaching Materials 134 

Film Production 140 

School Libraries and Textbooks 141 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 8 — Elementary School Building Projects Approved — July 1, 

1969, Through June 30, 1970 99 

Table 9 — Secondary School Building Projects — Intermediate, 
Junior High, High, Senior High, Combined Schools 

Approved July 1, 1969, Through June 30, 1970 104 

Table 10— Growth in Pupil Transportation, 1965-70 109 

Table 11 — Number of Buses Operated Annually, 1965-70 109 

Table 12— Pupil Transportation 110 

Table 13 — Transportation by Public Carrier 124 

Table 14 — Direct Payment of Money in Lieu of School Bus Trans- 
portation 125 

Table 15 — Payment of Money to Other School Divisions for Trans- 
portation 126 

Table 16— Special Trips 126 

Table 17 — Federal Programs or Projects 128 

Table 18 — Transportation Between Schools 129 

Table 19— Summer School 130 

Table 20 — Distribution and Use of Educational Motion Pictures, 

1969-70 137 

Division of Vocational Education 145 

Agricultural Education 145 

Business Education 148 

Distributive Education 152 

Home Economics Education 155 

Trade and Industrial Education 159 

Industrial Arts Education 162 

Manpower Training 163 

School Food Service 165 

Veterans Education 167 

Construction of Vocational Facilities 168 

Fire Service Training 169 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 21— Summary of Agricultural Education, 1969-70 148 

Table 22— High School Enrollments by Business Subjects, 1969-70. . 149 
Table 23 — Enrollment of Students in Vocational Business Edu- 
cation i According to Business Curriculums or Job 

Objectives 150 



stjperintendent op public instruction 5 

Page 

Table 24 — Summary of Work in Business Education, 1969-70 152 

Table 25— Summary of Work in Distributive Education, 1969-70. ... 155 

Table 26— Home Economics Summary, 1969-70 158 

Table 27— Summary: Trade and Industrial Education, 1969-70 162 

Table 28 — Manpower Development Training Programs, 1969-70 165 

Table 29 — Vocational Education Construction Projects 169 

Division of Educational Research and Statistics 171 

Division of Teacher Education 177 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 30 — In-Service Education Courses Offered Locally 179 

Table 31 — Highest Degrees Held by Instructional Personnel 

During 1969-70 180 

Table 32 — Number and Percent of Certificates and Licenses 
Held by Virginia Instructional Personnel — Supervisory, 
Principals, and Assistant Principals, Elementary, 
Secondary— 1969-70 180 

Table 33— Total Number of Instructional Personnel for 1969-70 

Compared with 1968-69 182 

Table 34 — Resignations and Changes in Positions Among In- 
structional Personnel, 1969-70 183 

Table 35 — Certificates and Licenses Held by Instructional Per- 
sonnel, 1960-61 to 1969-70 184 

Table 36 — New Certificates and Licenses Issued July 1, 1969, 
Through June 30, 1970, by Institutions and by Types of 
Certificates and Licenses 185 

Table 37 — Old Certificate and License Activity July 1, 1969, 

Through June 30, 1970 187 

Evaluation and Planning 188 

Federal Programs 190 

Statistical Tables — 

Table 38 — Financial Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of 
Funds Under the Control of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, 1969-70 194 

Table 39— Literary Fund of Virginia 203 

Table 40 — Funds Received and Disbursed by the County and City 

School Boards— Session 1969-70 204 

Table 41 — Funds Received by County and City School Boards — 

Session 1969-70 215 

Table 42 — Consolidated and Adjusted Statement of School Funds, 

1969-70 217 

Table 43— Receipts by Counties and Cities, 1969-70 222 



6 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Page 



Table 44— Disbursements by Counties and Cities, 1969-70 228 

Table 45— Distribution of State Funds, 1989-70 240 

Table 46 — Administrative and Service Personnel Positions 252 

Table 47 — Total Instructional Positions and Average Annual 
Salaries — Principals, Assistant Principals, Supervisors, 

Visiting Teachers, and Teachers 256 

Table 48— Number of Teachers 264 

Table 49— School Census— 1968 270 

Table 50— Cost of Salaries Per Pupil in Average Daily Attendance 
and Cost of Operation Per Pupil in Average Daily 

Attendance, 1969-70 278 

Table 51— Enrollment, 1940-41—1969-70 283 

Table 52— Number of Pupils Enrolled 284 

Table 53— Age-Grade Distribution 290 

Table 54— Number of Days Taught; Average Daily Attendance; 
Average Daily Membership; Percent Attendance; and 
A. D. A. used to Determine Cost of Operation Per 

Pupil in 1969-70 292 

Table 55A— Number of High Schools According to Average Daily 
Membership and Number of Teaching Positions — 

1969-70 296 

Table 55B— Number of Combined Schools According to Average 
Daily Membership and Number of Teaching Positions- 

1969-70 296 

Table 55C— Number of Elementary Schools According to Average 
Daily Membership and Number of Teaching Positions- 

1969-70 297 

Table 55D— Number of One-Teacher Elementary Schools by Aver- 
age Daily Membership and Grades Taught — 1963-70.. . . 297 

Table 56— Value of School Property— 1969-70 298 

Table 57— Comparative Data Virginia Public Schools 302 



Letter of Transmittal 



COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA 
State Board of Education 



Richmond, Virginia, September 1, 1970. 



To His Excellency, Linwood Holton 
Governor oj Virginia. 

Sir: 

I transmit herewith the annual report of the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion for the period beginning July 1, 1969 and ending June 30, 1970. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WOODROW W. WILKERSON 
Superintendent oJ Public Instruction 



state Board of Education 



WALDO G. MILES 

President of the Board 

17 Long Crescent 

Bristol 24201 

THOMAS C. BOUSHALL 

24 Rio Vista Lane 

Richmond 23226 

MRS. CATHERINE HOOK 

704 Prince Edward Street 

Fredericksburg 22401 

HILARY H. JONES, Jb. 

1008 Cliurch Street 
Norfolk 23510 

ROBERT E. R. HUNTLEY 

Washington and Lee University 

Lexington 24450 

HAROLD W. RAMSEY 

325 Main Street, S. W. 

Rocky Mount 24151 

PRESTON C. CARUTHERS 

3800 N. Military Road 
Arlington 22200 

WOODROW W. WILKERSON 
Superintendent of Public Instruction and Secretary of the Board 



state Superintendents of Public Instruction 
of Virginia 



WiLUAM H. RUFFNER 

March 6, 1870— March 15, 1882 

R. R, Farr 
March 15, 1882— March 15, 1888 

John L. Buchanan 

March 15, 1886— January 1, 1890 

John E. Massey 
January 1, 1890— March 16, 1898 

Joseph W. Southall 
March 15, 1898— February 1, 1908 

Joseph D. Eggleston, Jr. 
February 1, 1906 — January 1, 191S 

Reaumur C. Stearnes 
January 1, 1913— February 1, 1918 

Harris Hart 
February 1, 1918— January 1, 19S1 

Sidney B. Hall 
January 1, 1931— August 31, 1941 

Dabney S. Lancaster 
September 1, 1941— June 15, 1948 

G. Tyler Miller 
June 15, 1946— August 31, 1949 

Dowell J. Howard 
September 1, 1949— February 23, 1957 

Davis Y. Paschall 
March IS, 1957— August 15, 1960 

WOODROW W. WiLKERSON 

August 16, 1960 to date 



STAFF OF THE 
State Department of Education 

AS OF JUNE 30, 1970 



OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT 

WooDROW W. WiLKERSON Superintendent of Public Instruction and 

Secretary of the State Board of Education 

Harry R. Elmore Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction 

J. G. Blount, Jr Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Finance 

George W. Burton Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

Alfred L. Wingo Special Assistant for Federal Programs 

Fendall R. Ellis Special Assistant for School Evaluation 

Harry L. Smith Special Assistant for Public Information and Publicniions 

LouEASA C. HiGHTOWER Tuition Grants Supervisor 

Linda K. Kelley Illustrator 

V. Virginia Davis Information Officer 

Judith A. Thomason Information Technician 

Myrtle R. Pritchard Secretary to State Superintendent and Recording 

Secretary of the State Board of Education 

Neil C. Bennett Secretary 

LiLLiE B. Clements Secretary 

Carolyn S. Dunn Secretary 

Ann W. Gillenwater Secretary 

Ila C. Martin Secretary 

Wanda H. Parrish Secretary 

Catherine S. Scott Secretary 

Eleanor H. Weston Secretary 

Glenice W. Berry Clerk 

Jane B. Sk,\ggs Clerk 

Accounts and Records 

Graham H. Bryant Director of Accounts 

Howard W. Harris Scholarship Collection Officer 

Robert L. Seward, III ChieJ Accountant 

Joseph E. Wynn Accountant 

Louise A. Vest Fiscal Clerk 

M. J. Smith Chief Clerk 

Sandra C. Hauser Clerk 

Janis K. Hamil Bookkeeping Machine Operator 

Mary J. House Secretary 

Gloria M. Madison Secretary 

Sharon McNeely Secretary 

Wharton Y. Page Secretary 

Marshall L. Evans School Records Examiner 

Paul B. Michelle, Jr School Records Examiner 

Leigh R. Trotter School Records Examiner 

Thurman E. Bennett Shipping Clerk 

O. Bertrand, Jr Clerk 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 11 

Austin B. Hale Cleric 

Patricia W. Fender Clerk 

Joyce C. Miles Clerk 

Gloria J. JYowers Clerk 

DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 

Charles E. Clear Director 

Joseph P. Roberts Supervisor of Educational Research 

Emma P. Fonda Assistant Supervisor of Pilot Studies 

Daniel C. Link, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Pilot Studies 

Philip F. Boepple Supervisor, Special Studies 

Howell L. Gruver Supervisor of Statistical Services 

Charles D. Miller Assistajit Supervisor of Statistical Services 

Roy T. Lewis, Jr Computer Systems Analyst 

Joseph E. Breeding Computer Programmer 

Howard B. Crane Computer Programmer 

R. Terry Thacker Computer Programmer 

Robert L. Hinson ADP Manager 

Doris W. Ryman Computer Operator 

Everett P. Upshaw Computer Operator 

Patricia M. Bickley Accounting Machine Operator 

Linda S. Cash Accounting Machine Operator 

Marjorie S. Johnson Accounting Machine Operator 

Gayle B. Meador Accounting Machine Operator 

Irene C. Soltes Accounting Machine Operator 

Dorothy C. Stanley Accounting Machine Operator 

Donna L. Hinkle Secretary 

Gwendolyn D. Jackson Stcretary 

Delores K. Martin Secretary 

DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

A. Gordon Brooks Director 

O. Kenneth Campbell Supervisor of Institutional Services 

Frances H. Gee Supervisor of Teacher Certification 

Frank A. Cain, Jr Supervisor of Teacher Education 

Wayland H. Jones Supervisor of Teacher Preparation Programs 

Eleanor W. Smithey Assistant Supervisor of Teacher Certification 

Hazel P. Ellis Certification Analyst 

RosENA R. Farmer Certification Analyst 

Jeanette B. Richardson Certification Analyst 

Vivian H. Tillinghast Certification Analyst 

Erie J. Wilkerson Certification Analyst 

Annette A. Andrews Secretary 

Brenda L. B.\ber Secretary 

Beverley P. Browne Secretary 

Joyce S. Harris Secretary 

Nancy S. Hobson Secretary 

Deborah K. Jones Secretary 

Jeanne O. Little Secretary 

Donna S. Smith Secretary 



12 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Bonnie R. Snapp Secretary 

Judy L. Henshaw Scholarship Clerk 

Catherine B. Latta Certification Clerk 

Vernelle D. Emerson Clerk 

Deborah G. Hall Clerk 

Sue J. Mayton Clerk 

Delores G. Stephens Clerk 

DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

F. Brent Sandidge Director 

Mary S. Walden Secretary 

Guidance, Testing, Research, and Surveys 

Clarence L. Kent Supervisor of Guidance and Testing 

O. Pauune Anderson Assistant Supervisor of Guidance 

John R. Cook Assistant Supervisor of Guidance 

Gertrude D. Lewis Assistant Supervisor of Guidance 

Janice G. Williams Assistance Supervisor of Guidance 

Elizabeth G. Woodson Assistant Supervisor of Guidance 

Helen M. Harvey Secretary 

Stacey S. Keeton Secretary 

M. Monica Parker Secretary 

Arlene L. Strauss Secretary 

Gladys C. Mejia Clerk 

Kathleen M. Smith Clerk 

Pupil Transportation 

Raymond L. Wimbish Supervisor 

G. Winston Gilbert Assistant Supervisor 

Fred T. Bennett Assistant Supervisor 

Rewel a. Bynum Assistant Supervisor 

Bob Wilson Assistant Supervisor 

Margaret S. Dowdy Secretary 

School Buildings 

John P. Hamill Supervisor 

Robert T. Belchee Assistant Supervisor 

James Q. M\rchant Assistant Supervisor 

JNELSON K. Waldrop, Jr Assistant Supervisor 

Phiup M. Hank, Jr Draftsman 

Virginia H. Burkhalter Secretary 

Georgia T. Withers Secretary 

Production of Films 

J. E. Oglesby Supervisor 

J. Sol Wrenn Assistant Supervisor 

Jon H. Petersen Film Specialist 

Brenda B. Myers Secretary 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 13 

Educational Television 
Marian P. Carlton Secretary 

School Libraries and Textbooks 

Mary Stuart Mason Supervisor 

Rebecca S. Corley Assislajil Supervisor School Libraries 

Donna M. Atkisson Secretary 

Josephine K. Dowdy Secretary 

Mary L. Hundley Clerk 

Carole B. Nichols Clerk 

Lois D. Winn Clerk 

Bureau of Teaching Materials 

Selden H. Watkins Supervisor 

Ralph H. Lewis Assistant Supervisor 

Sandra L. Chapman Secretary 

Claudia M. Conway Secretary 

Marian O. Browning Clerk 

AsHFORD R. Harrison, Jr Clerk 

Helen G. Link Clerk 

Emma M. Malcomb Clerk 

Bertha M. Parsons Clerk 

Alma S. Smith Clerk 

Bessie D. Soukup Clerk 

Laura N. Sunday Clerk 

Alice M. Todd Clerk 

Dorothy S. Wilkerson Clerk 

Bessie N. Woodson Clerk 

SCHOOL EVALUATION, PLANNING, AND SURVEYS 

RoBY S. Hager Supervisor of Evaluation and Planning 

John W. Harville Supervisor of School Plant Surveys 

Bettie L. Murray Secretary 

DIVISION OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 

NuMA P. Bradner Director 

John F. Banks Associate Director 

James H. Stiltner Supervisor 

Robert B. Jewell Assistant Supervisor 

Gilbert Mays Assistant Supervisor 

Dai£ G. Robinson Assistant Supervisor 

Emmett G. Shufflebarger Assistant Supervisor 

Wayne S. Bowman Supervisor— English 

Mary F. Lovern Assistant Supervisor — English 

Mary F. Neff Assistant Supervisor — English 

William F. Young, Jr Supervisor of Evaluation 

Henry B. Brockwell Supervisor— NDE A 

Geealbnb M. Sutton Supervisor — History, Government, and Geography 



14 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Clyde J. Haddock. .. .Assistant Supervisor — History, Government, and Geography 

James C. Page Assistant Supervisor — History, Government, and Geography 

Clarence J. Hesch Supervisor — Music 

Lena M. Long Assistant Supervisor — Music 

Paul B. Sanger, Jr Assistant Supervisor — Music 

J. A. Yeager Assistant Supervisor — Music 

Frances A. Mays Supervisor — Health and Physical Education 

Charles D. Hamm Assistant Supervisor — Health and Physical Education 

Harold D. Lakey Assistant Supervisor — Health and Physical Education 

Del L. Moser Assistant Supervisor — Health and Physical Education 

Billy G. Johnson Supervisor — Driver Education 

Donald J. Faley Assistant Supervisor — Driver Education 

Franklin D. Kizer Supervisor — Science 

Charles R. Davis, Jr Assistant Supervisor — Science 

Clarence D. Haley, Jr Assistant Supervisor — Science 

Alvin M. Pettus Assistant Supervisor — Science 

Baylor E. Nichols Supervisor — A rt 

Charles R. Flynn, Jr Assistant Supervisor — Art 

Shirlee C. Loomer Assistant Supervisor — Art 

Isabelle p. Rucker Supervisor — Mathematics 

James M. Bagby Assistant Supervisor — Mathematics 

Edgar L. Edwards Assistant Supervisor — Mathematics 

Leila A. Stalker Assistant Supervisor — Mathematics 

Helen P. Warriner Supervisor — Foreign Language 

Martha L. Payne Assistant Supervisor — Foreign Language 

Selma L. Wright Fiscal Clerk 

Harrietts F. Brendlinger Secretary 

Elsie M. Brooks Secretary 

Margaret K. Doherty Secretary 

Shirley W. Fleming Secretary 

Martha L. Godwin Secretary 

Janie S. Graham Secretary 

Peggy W. Griffitts Secretary 

Betty A. Harris Secretary 

Norma F. Jiggetts Secretary 

Bonnie B. Mead Secretary 

Sherry L. Miller Secretary 

Sally D. Montgomery Secretary 

Patricia N. Murphy Secretary 

Marcia L. Orem Secretary 

Dinah S. Perkins Secretary 

Letitia W. Peterson Secretary 

Betty J. Rankin Secretary 

Debra C. Roberts Secretary 

Edith D. Snellings Secretary 

Thdmasine L. kStroble Secretary 

Brenda S. Thomas Secretary 

Elsie L Wilkins Secretary 

Rebecca R. Wolfe Secretary 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 15 

Adult Education 

Gordon H. Fallesen Supervisor 

Phyllis F. Byrd Assislant Supervisor — Adult Basic 

Claiborne R. Leonard Assistant Supervisor — Adult Basic 

William M. Moore Assistant Supervisor — Adult Basic 

William C. Pursi^ey Assistant Supervisor — Adult Basic 

Levin B. Cottingham Assistant Supervisor — Civil Defense 

Mary J. Bowles Secretary 

M.\TTiE L. Harris Secretary 

Deborah B. Lewis Secretary 

Elaine M. Robertson Secretary 

DiANNE W. Taylor Secretary 

Nancy M. Thomas Secretary 

DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 

S. P. Johnson, Jr Director 

Grace M. Byrd Secretary 

Elementary Education 

Bernard R. Taylor Supervisor 

Virginia S. Cashion Assistant Supervisor 

Sandra E. Dutemple Assistant Supervisor 

Mary E. Ellmore Assistant Supervisor 

Dorothy M. Faulconer Assistant Supervisor 

John G. Foley Assistant Supervisor 

Helen S. Lukens Assistant Supervisor 

Hattie H. Ragland Assistant Supervisor 

Robert M. Sandidge Assistant Supervisor 

Callie p. Shingleton Assistant Supervisor 

Sandra G. Ashworth Secretary 

Queen E. Butler Secretary 

Gloria J. Murphy Secretary 

Annette D. Seawell Secretary 

Viola M. Thomas Secretary 

Mary L. Shelton Clerk 

Special Education 

James T. Micklem Supervisor 

LuciLE T. Anderson Assistant Supervisor 

Lucille J. Clarke Assistant Supervisor 

Ardella M. Curtis Assistant Supervisor 

Helen J. Hill Assistant Supervisor 

Kathleen S. Kerry Assistant Supervisor 

Wayne B. Largent Assistant Supervisor 

Esther R. Shevick Assistant Supervisor 

Thelma J. Wright Assistant Supervisor 

Betty C. Baughan Secretary 

Nellie G. Burnette Secretary 



16 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Bessie M. Hicks Secretary 

Gwendolyn M. Parker Secretary 

FEDERAL PROGRAMS OFFICE— ELEMENTARY AND 
SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT 

Title I Program 

Robert W. Sparks, IV Director 

Charles L. Conyers Assistant Supervisor 

James S. Lewis Assistant Supervisor 

WiLUE H. McCann Assistant Supervisor 

Alpha G. Smith Assistant Supervisor 

Barbara T. Fletcher Education Grants Advisor 

Carolyn D. Seymore Fiscal Clerk 

Barbara A. Carter Secretary 

Ka.rin S. Haywood Secretary 

Title III Program 

Anne E. Tucker Supervisor 

Don F. Gobble Assistant Supervisor 

Francts T. Phillips, Jr Assistant Supervisor 

Nora H. Nestor Fiscal Clerk 

Elona a. Wallace Secretary 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

WooDROW W. Wilkerson Executive Officer for Vocational Education 

George L. Sandvig Director 

Bertha K. Dickinson Secretary 

Laurence A. Hill Coordinator — Vocational Education 

George S. Orr, Jr Assistant Supennsor 

Ivy B. Britton Secntary 

Katherine E. Sydnor Fiscal Clerk 

Agricultural Education 

JuLUN M. Campbell Supervisor 

John W. Myers, Jr Assistant Supervisor 

Lloyd M. Jewell, Jr Assistant Supervisor 

Bobby L. Albrite Assistant Supervisor 

James H. Copenhaver Assistant Supervisor 

William R. Crabill Assistant Supervisor 

William C. Dudley Assistant Supervisor 

Jesse C. Green Assistant Supervisor 

Joseph A. Hardy Assistant Supervisor 

Clifton B. Jeter Assistant Supervisor 

Mary R. Bryant Secretary 

M. Pauline Glynn Secretary 

Barbara U. Hounshell Secretary 

Doris R. Mitchell Secretary 



STJPERINTENDBNT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION l7 

Marian F. Morris Secretary 

Helen N. Simpson Secretary 

Ruth M. Steinruck Secretary 

Mary Z. Young Secretary 

Business Education 

L. Marguerite Crumley Supervisor 

Florence G. Bailey Assistant Supervisor 

Carl E. Jorgensen Assistant Supervisor 

James R. Manning Assistant Supervisor 

Berenice K. Hazelwood Secretary 

Geraldine K. Howard Secretary 

Diana F. Weatherington Secretary 

Distributive Education 

James Horan, Jr Supervisor 

Isaac W. Baughman Assistant Supervisor 

Marjorie G. Belshee Assistant Supervisor 

Walter J. Raines Assistant Supervisor 

W. Elwood Roache Assistant Supervisor 

Eva B Hobby Secretary 

Dorothy F. Vick Fiscal Clerk 

Martha A. Bendall Clerk 

Fire Service Training 

Robert E. Carter Coordinator 

Frank W. Hubble Fire Training Specialist 

Daniel D. Jackson Fire Training Specialist 

R. Lawrence Oliver Fire Training Specialist 

Felicla M. French Secretary 

Home Economics Education 

Hazel D. Wilhoite Supervisor 

Catherine R. Bauserman Assistant Supervisor 

Loula Connelly Assistant Supervisor 

Eliza C. Gordon Assistant Supervisor 

Grace E. Harris Assistant Supervisor 

Pauline C. Morton Assistant Supervisor 

Emily J. Rickman Assistant Supervisor 

Margaret B. Snyder Assistant Supervisor 

Eliza H. Trainham Assistant Supervisor 

Ellen S. Hiller Fiscal Clerk 

Gladys A. Davis Secretary 

Florice S. Tayix)r Secretary 

Bernetta a. Thompson Secretary 

Industrial Arts 

Thomas A. Hughes, Jr Supervisor 

M.\rshall O. Tetterton Assistant Supervisor 

Anne B. Dumouchelle Secretary 



18 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Manpoweb Development 

Cleve E. Loman Supervisor 

Harbert E. Agee Assistant Supervisor 

Howard A. Hawkins Assistant Supervisor 

D. Leighton Stanley Assistant Supervisor 

Rosalie A. Jones Secretary 

Thelma R. Williams Fiscal Clark 

Carole B. Clark Clerk 

Inez P. Detweiler Clerk 

School Lunch Program 

John F. Miller Supervisor 

Evelyn N. Hyde Assistant Supervisor 

M. Virginia Allen Assistant Supervisor 

Victoria M. Chappell Assistant Suptrvisor 

V. Ruth Crabtree Assistant Supervisor 

Dorothy C. Delmar Assistant Supervisor 

Almeda G. Donald Assistant Supervisor 

Grace H. Jenkins Assistant Supervisor 

Cordelia K. Powell Assistant Supervisor 

Sarah M. Sipe Assistant Supervisor 

Lois T. Smith Fiscal Clerk 

Nancy E. Benton Clerk 

Gladys H. Cahoon Clerk 

Trade and Industrial Education 

George W. Swartz Supervisor 

Benjamin L. Baines Assistant Supervisor 

Cectl H. Erickson Assistant Supervisor 

McClell.\nd M. Gray Assistant Supervisor 

Jacob H. Lowe Assistant Supervisor 

Grover Wade, Jr Assistant Supervisor 

Nettie T. Yowell Assistant Supervisor 

Ella M. Nokman Fiacal Clerk 

Brenda a. Lockett Secretary 

Karon M. Luffman Secretary 

Shirley R. Wilmoth Secretary 

Veterans Training Program 

Z. H. Taylor Supervisor 

Edward J. Harford Assistant Supervisor 

Charles D. Woodring Assistant Supervisor 

Dorothy G. Hobgood Secretary 



Division Superintendents in Virginia 

1969-1970 

As of June 30, 1970 



County Superintendent 

Accomack Philip B. Tankard 

Albemarle Leslie H. Walton 

Alleghany Walter L. Hodnett 

Amelia Waverly E. Copley 

Amherst Tyler Fulcher 

Appomattox Earl J. Smith, Jr 

Arlington Dr. Robert L. Chisholm. 

Augusta Hugh K. Cassell 

Bath Russell L. Thomas 

Bedford F. L. Frazier 

Bland Victor R. Gilly 

Botetourt J. W. Obenshain 

Brunswick Edwin E. Will 

Buchanan J. M. Bevins 

Buckingham Mercer W. Kay 

Campbell G. Hunter Jones, Jr 

Caroline P. T. Atkinson, Jr 

Carroll E. R. Worrell 

Charles City Byrd W. Long 

Charlotte G. O. McGhee 

Chesterfield Dr. Robert F. Kelly 

Clarke Wade G. Jolinson 

Craig W. B. Watkins 

Culpeper H. W. Monger 

Cumberland E. Armstrong Smith 

Dickenson Paul W. Skeen 

Dinwiddle G. M. Hodge 

Essex W. A. Harrow, Jr 

Fairfax S. Barry Morris, Acting. 

Fauquier Ryland Dishner 

Floyd Alonzo Monday, Jr 

Fluvanna W. D. Manby 

Franklin C. I. Dillon, Jr 

Frederick Dr. Melton F. Wright. . . 

Giles Paul E. Ahalt 

Gloucester William B. Blanks 

Goochland B. F. Carpenter 

Grayson James E. Hodges 

Greene Wm. H. Wetsel 

Greensville Sam A. Owen 

Halifax Udy C. Wood 

Hanover J. K. Samples. 



Henrico Dr. Walter E. Campbell. 

Henry Branch K. Rives 



Date of 




Appointment Address 


1966 


Accomac 


1969 


Charlottesville 


1958 


Covington 


1968 


Amelia 


1953 


Amherst 


1962 


Appomattox 


1969 


Arlington 


1947 


Staunton 


1968 


Warm Springs 


1965 


Bedford 


1962 


Bland 


1959 


Fincastle 


1961 


Lawrenceville 


1964 


Grundy 


1967 


Buckingham 


1961 


Rustburg 


1965 


Bowling Green 


1968 


HillsviUe 


1962 


Providence Forge 


1957 


Charlotte C. H. 


1969 


Chesterfield 


1968 


Berryville 


1966 


New Castle 


1968 


Culpeper 


1961 


Cumberland 


1962 


Clintwood 


1962 


Dimviddie 


1969 


Saluda 


1970 


Fairfax 


1968 


Warrenton 


1961 


Floyd 


1960 


Palmyra 


1968 


Rocky Mount 


1968 


Winchester 


1953 


Pearisburg 


1969 


Gloucester 


1961 


Goochland 


1964 


Independence 


1955 


Stanardsville 


1968 


Emporia 


1965 


Halifax 


1965 


Ashland 


1969 


Highland Springs 


1962 


Martinsville 



20 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS IN VIRGINIA— Continued 



County Superintendent 

Highland H. C. Lunsford. Jr 

Isle of Wight Jackson E. Reasor 

James City Dr. Henry A. Renz III. . . 

King George Homer M. Kline 

King and Queen Clarence E. Major 

King William Clarence E. Major 

Lancaster Alexander McD. Fleet 

Lee R. K. Strickland 

Loudoun R. E. Butt 

Louisa Harry S. Martin 

Lunenburg J. W. Thweatt 

Madison Wm. H. Wetsel 

Mathews William A. Keith 

Mecklenburg Alonzo B. Haga 

Middlesex W. A. Harrow, Jr 

Montgomery Raynard T. Hale 

Nansemond Robert A. Wood 

Nelson Henry D. Conner 

New Kent H. Kenneth Brown 

Northampton George W. Young 

Northumberland Arthur A. Pickett 

Nottoway Thomas W. Strafford, Jr.. 

Orange Renfro C. Manning 

Page C. Jack Harner 

Patrick D. O. Spangler 

Pittsylvania J. H. Combs 

Powhatan J. S. Caldwell 

Prince Edward Ronald J. Perry 

Prince George Dr. James E. Rooks 

Prince William S. M. Beville 

Pulaski Kenneth J. Dobson 

Rappahannock O. A. Norton 

Richmond James N. Stover 

Roanoke Arnold R. Burton 

Rockbridge W. Hermann Lee 

Rockingham Wilbur S. Pence 

Russell A. P. Levicki 

Scott Jack B. Renick 

Shenandoah Woodrow W. Robinson. . . 

Smyth J. Leonard Mauck 

Southampton E. M. Trice 

Spotsylvania John D. Neely 

Stafford Andrew G. Wright 

Surry Robert H. Moore 

Sussex J. A. Semones 

Tazewell Lester L. Jones 

Warren O. A. Norton 



Date of 




Appointment Address 


1957 


Monterey 


1967 


Isle of Wight 


1968 


Williamsburg 


1969 


King George 


1963 


King William 


1963 


King William 


1969 


Lively 


1969 


Jonesville 


1989 


Leesburg 


1968 


Mineral 


1967 


Victoria 


1955 


Madison 


1969 


Mathews 


1949 


Bovdton 


1969 


Saluda 


1968 


Christiansburg 


1968 


Suffolk 


1969 


Lovingston 


1967 


Providence Forge 


1969 


Eastville 


1969 


Heathsville 


1969 


Nottoway 


1969 


Orange 


1968 


Luray 


1965 


Stuart 


1960 


Chatham 


1952 


Powhatan 


1969 


Farmville 


1967 


Prince George 


1954 


Manassas 


1965 


Pulaski 


1961 


Front Royal 


1969 


Warsaw 


1965 


Salem 


1969 


Lexington 


1950 


Harrisonburg 


1965 


Lebanon 


1965 


Gate City 


1957 


Woodstock 


1948 


Marion 


1965 


Courtland 


1965 


Spotsylvania 


1968 


Fredericksburg 


1967 


Dendron 


1969 


Sussex 


1965 


Tazewell 


1961 


Front Royal 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



21 



DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS IN VIRGINIA— Continued 



County Superintendent 

Washington Dr. E. B. Stanley 

Westmoreland C. Bruce Chandler. . . . 

Wise William D. Richmond. 

Wythe A. Strode Brockman... 

York George H. Pope 



CUy 

Alexandria Dr. John C. Albohm 

Bristol Dr. Richard W. Hislop . . 

Buena Vista James C. Bradford, Jr. . . 

Charlottesville Dr. E. W. Rushton 

Chesapeake Edwin W. Chittum 

Clifton Forge C. E. Darnell 

Colonial Heights Horace M. Hill, Jr 

Covington James E. Laughlin 

Danville O. T. Bonner 

Emporia Sam A. Owen 

Fairfax Robert B. Walker 

Falls Church Dr. Dwight E. Knox. . . . 

Franklin Dr. Richard L. Vaughn.. 

Fredericksburg Raymond W. Snead 

Galax William G. Davis 

Hampton Garland R. Lively 

Harrisonburg Wajoie E. King 

Hopewell C. W. Smith 

Lexington Dr. Robert Parlier 

Lynchburg Dr. James F. Young 

Martinsville John D. Richmond 

Newport News George J. Mcintosh 

Norfolk E. L. Lamberth 

Norton Bobby Joe Dotson 

Petersburg John D. Meade 

Portsmouth Dr. M. E. Alford 

Radford William H. Cochran 

Richmond Lucien D. Adams 

Roanoke Dr. Roy A. Alcorn 

Salem Arnold R. Burton 

South Boston Udy C. Wood 

Staunton Thomas C. McSwain. ... 

Suffolk Wm. R. Savage, Jr 

Virginia Beach E. E. Brickell 

Waynesboro F. B. Glenn 

Williamsburg Henry A. Renz III 

Winchester Jacob L. Johnson 



Date of 




Appointment Address 


1953 


Abingdon 


1969 


Montr OSS 


1963 


Wi.se 


1945 


Wytheville 


1964 


Yorktown 


1963 


Alexandria 


1969 


Bristol 


1969 


Buena Vista 


1966 


Charlottesville 


1949 


Chesapeake 


1968 


Clifton Forge 


1969 


Colonial Heights 


1967 


Covington 


1948 


Danville 


1968 


Emporia 


1962 


Fairfax 


1965 


Falls Church 


1969 


Franklin 


1965 


Fredericksburg 


1967 


Galax 


1968 


Hampton 


1968 


Harrisonburg 


1946 


Hopewell 


1969 


Lexington 


1968 


Lynchburg 


1961 


Martinsville 


1965 


Newport News 


1960 


Norfolk 


1969 


Norton 


1943 


Petersburg 


1965 


Portsmouth 


1962 


Radford 


1969 


Richmond 


1969 


Roanoke 


1965 


Salem 


1965 


Halifax 


1961 


Staunton 


1949 


Suffolk 


1968 


Virginia Beach 


1948 


Waynesboro 


1968 


Williamsburg 


1965 


Winchester 



state Superintendent's Advisory Council 



The State Superintendent's Advisory Council is composed of the following 
nine Division Superintendents who represent the regions as indicated: 

Region No. 1: Chairman, E. Armstrong Smith, Superintendent of Cumberland 
County Public Schools, Cumberland 23040. 



Amelia Co. 
Brunswick Co. 
Chesterfield Co. 
Colonial Heights City 
Cumberland Co. 
Dinwiddle Co. 



Goochland Co. 
Greensville Co. 
Hanover Co. 
Henrico Co. 
Lunenburg Co. 
Mecklenburg Co. 



Nottoway Co. 
Petersburg City 
Powhatan Co. 
Prince Edward Co. 
Richmond City 
Southampton Co. 
Sussex Co. 



Region No. 2: Chairman, W. R. Savage, Jr., Superintendent of Suffolk City Public 
Schools, Box 1549, Suffolk 23434. 



Accomack Co. 
Charles City Co. 
Chesapeake City 
Franklin City 
Hampton City 
Hopewell City 
Isle of Wight Co. 



James City Co. 
Nansemond Co. 
New Kent Co. 
Newport News City 
Norfolk City 
Northampton Co. 
Portsmouth City 



Prince George Co. 
Suffolk City 
Surry Co. 

Virginia Beach City 
Williamsburg City 
York Co. 



Region No. 3: Chairman, Clarence Major, Superintendent of King William-King 
& Queen County Public Schools, King William 23086. 



Caroline Co. 
Essex Co. 

Fredericksburg City 
Gloucester Co. 
King and Queen Co. 



King George Co. 
King William Co. 
Lancaster Co. 
Mathews Co. 
Middlesex Co. 



Northumberland Co. 
Richmond Co. 
Spotsylvania Co. 
Stafford Co. 
Westmoreland Co. 



Region No. 4: Chairman, O. A. Norton, Superintendent of Rappahannock-Warren 
County Public Schools, Front Royal 22630. 



Alexandria City 
Arlington Co. 
Clarke Co. 
Culpeper Co. 
Fairfax Co. 
Fairfax City 



Falls Church City 
Fauquier Co. 
Frederick Co. 
Loudoun Co. 
Page Co. 



Prince William Co. 
Rappahannock Co. 
Shenandoah Co. 
Warren Co. 
Winchester City 



Region No. 5: Chairman, William H. Wetsel, Superintendent of Greene-Madison 
County Public Schools, Stanardsville 22973. 



Albemarle Co. 
Buckingham Co. 
Charlottesville City 



Fluvanna Co. 
Greene Co. 
Louisa Co. 



Madison Co. 
Nelson Co. 
Orange Co. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



23 



Region No. 6: Chairman, F. B. Glenn, Superintendent of Waynesboro City Public 
Schools, 301 Pine Avenue, Waynesboro 22980. 



Alleghany Co. 
Augusta Co. 
Bath Co. 
Buena Vista City 



Clifton Forge City 
Covington City 
Harrisonburg City 
Highland Co. 
Lexington City 



Rockbridge Co. 
Rockingham Co. 
Staunton City 
Waynesboro City 



Region No. 7: Chairman, O. T. Bonner, Superintendent of Danville City Public 
Schools, Danville 24541. 



Amherst Co. 
Appomattox Co. 
Bedford Co. 



Campbell Co. 
Charlotte Co. 
Danville City 



Halifax Co. 
Lynchburg City 
Pittsylvania Co. 



Region No. 8: Chairman, Paul E. Ahalt, Superintendent of Giles County Public 
Schools, Pearisburg 24134. 



Bland Co. 
Botetourt Co. 
Carroll Co. 
Craig Co. 
Floyd Co. 
Franklin Co. 



Giles Co. 
Henry Co. 
Martinsville City 
Montgomery Co. 
Patrick Co. 
Pulaski Co. 



Radford City 
Roanoke Co. 
Roanoke City 
Wythe Co. 



Region No. 9: Chairman, J. Leonard Mauck, Superintendent of Smyth County 
Public Schools, Marion 24354. 



Bristol City 
Buchanan Co. 
Dickenson Co. 
Galax City 
Grayson Co. 



Lee Co. 
Norton City 
Russell Co. 
Scott Co. 
Smyth Co. 



Tazewell Co. 
Washington Co. 
Wise Co. 



President of the State Board of Education, Waldo G. Miles (Ex officio) 



One-Hundredth Annual Report of the Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, 1969-70 



INTRODUCTION 

July 11, 1870, in the words of Dr. William H. Ruffner, the first 
State superintendent of public instruction, was "a day which marked 
an epoch in the history of Virginia." Dr. Ruffner referred to the effec- 
tive date of legislation establishing a system of free public schools 
which had been provided for in the Constitution of 1889. 

The importance of this event was emphasized in a joint resolution 
adopted by the 1968 General Assembly proclaiming 1970 as the cen- 
tennial year of the State's public school system and urging that appro- 
priate steps be taken at the State and local levels to commemorate 
this event. 

To fulfill this request numerous commemorative projects were 
undertaken by the State Department of Education during the year. 
These included a special centennial issue of the agency's news magazine 
Public Education in Virginia, a booklet presenting highlights of the 
development of the school system, a brochure containing suggested 
activities for schools and communities, and production of a motion 
picture film entitled A Certain Degree of Instruction. 

Dr. Ruffner, in his first annual report, noted that "the hostile and 
the feeble-hearted expected that in a year or two our public system 
would end its existence; but it was born a giant, and has grown with 
giant vigor." 

Statistics prove that Dr. Ruffner's stout-hearted optimism was 
well founded. At the end of the first year of the pubUc school system 
in 1871, 130,000 pupils and 3,000 teachers were in the public schools. 
During 1969-70, 1,108,973 students were enrolled in the public schools 
and the instructional personnel totaled 53,503. Added to the student 
enrollment were large numbers of adults who were continuing their 
education. 

State, local, and federal expenditures for the operation of public 
schools totaled $889,888,708. In addition, Virginians had more than 
$1,500,000,000 invested in school property. 

The holding power of the public schools continued to increase. 
Eighth-grade enrollment was approximately 95 percent of the first- 
grade enrollment eight years earlier. Twelfth-grade enrollment in- 
creased to almost 68 percent of the first-grade enrollment in 1958-59. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 25 

High school graduates totaled 64 percent of the first-grade enrollment 
12 years earlier. More than 55 percent of the high school graduates 
entered college and at least 11 percent enrolled in business, trade, 
technical, or nursing schools. 

Continued progress was made in salaries paid classroom teachers 
and other instructional personnel. During 1969-70 the average salary 
for classroom teachers was $8,070, compared with $7,328 for the previous 
year. In the same period, the average salary of all instructional per- 
sonnel increased from $7,576 to $8,351. 

ACCREDITATION 

A major development during the year was the adoption by the 
State Board of Education of an accreditation program for elementary 
schools. As a result of this action the State for the first time had an 
accreditation program ranging from kindergarten through grade 12. 

The elementary accreditation program and revised standards for 
accrediting secondary schools were approved by the Board to become 
effective at the beginning of the 1970 school year. The study lead- 
ing to adoption of the elementary school accreditation program was 
initiated in 1967 by the State Board at the request of the Superintendent 
of Public Instruction as a major step in efforts to upgrade the quality 
of public education in Virginia. 

Prior to adoption of the accreditation standards, personnel of the 
Elementary Education Service held regional conferences with school 
officials throughout the State to acquaint them with the proposed 
program and to obtain their comments and suggestions. 

The elementary accreditation standards and the revisions in 
standards for accrediting junior and senior high schools were proposed 
by committees of representatives of pubhc, private, and parochial 
schools and by college professors which were appointed by the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

PERFORMANCE CONTRACTING 

At the request of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
plans were approved in principle by the State Board for a pilot project 
featuring a new concept involving private enterprise in public education. 

The "performance contracting" project, scheduled to begin during 
the fall in seven school divisions — Norfolk City and Dickenson, Wise, 
Buchanan, Prince Edward, Mecklenburg, and Lunenburg Counties — is 
designed to raise the reading level of approximately 2,200 children. 
The project, which is the first of its kind in which the State and local 



26 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

educational agencies jointly developed operational plans and specifica- 
tions, is financed with funds from Title I of the Elementary and Sec- 
ondary Education Act of 1965. 

At the end of the fiscal year proposals were being prepared for 
bids from private educational concerns that would guarantee improve- 
ment in reading for the children involved on a per pupil cost basis. 
Management support and evaluation services will be provided by the 
State Department of Education. 

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION 

As part of a comprehensive program to emphasize citizenship 
education an instructional guide, The Democratic Legacy — Basis for 
Freedom, was completed and distributed to high school social studies 
teachers in the State. The guide was designed to develop in students 
an appreciation for the American heritage and the responsibilities of 
citizenship. 

The major objective of the citizenship education program, which 
was approved by the State Board of Education in 1968, is to assist 
school divisions in strengthening instruction in responsible citizenship. 
The program is focused on the need for added instructional emphasis 
in helping students to develop a basic understanding of contemporary 
problems in terms of responsible citizenship. 

DRUG ABUSE EDUCATION 

Efforts were accelerated during the year to combat the use of 
dangerous drugs among the State's school-age population. A coordi- 
nator of drug education was appointed in the State Department of 
Education and a training program, designed to reach all teachers during 
the 1970-71 school year, was begun. 

The Department also conducted a survey of school superintendents 
to determine the extent of the drug problem, held training seminars for 
public school instructional personnel, made plans for local in-service 
training programs, and prepared and distributed a classroom instruc- 
tional guide entitled, Drugs and Drug Abuse. 

The guide was prepared to assist school administrators and health 
and physical education teachers to recognize symptoms of drug abuse, 
to help them in dealing with drug abusers, and to provide instruction 
about the dangers involved in the use of drugs. 

The educational program was coordinated with that of the Gov- 
ernor's Council on Narcotics and Drug Abuse Control. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 27 

NEEDS ASSESSMENT STUDY 

A study to assess Virginia's present and future needs in public 
education was nearing completion at the end of the fiscal year. The 
study was conducted for the State Department of Education by the 
Bureau of Educational Research at the University of Virginia. 

Fifty-seven school divisions, reflecting differences in school enroll- 
ment and population density, were selected for the study and work- 
shops were held to inform personnel involved of the objectives and the 
structure of the project. 

The needs assessment study was required under an amendment to 
Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and 
was financed with Title III funds. 

EVALUATION AND PLANNING 

Evaluation and planning studies to upgrade the quality of public 
education were completed in 14 school divisions in the State during the 
fiscal year. 

The evaluation and planning program was begun during 1968-69 
with studies scheduled for 19 school divisions. During 1969-70 seven 
additional divisions were included in the program. 

The studies are designed to assist localities in identifying needs 
related to educational programs, staff and in-service education, teaching 
aids and materials, school plants and pupil transportation, and in 
formulating plans for meeting these needs. Procedures developed to 
assist local" ties in meeting needs include the use of a systems approach 
to educational planning and the establishment of planning councils in 
each school division. The several divisions and services of the State 
Department attempt to pool their resources to assist the localities in 
developing improved programs. 

The program is supervised by a Special Assistant for Evaluation 
and Planning in the Department who is assisted in these studies by 
task forces from the local school divisions, the Department, and colleges, 
as well as consultants. 



28 ANNTJAL REPORT OP THE 

COMPARATIVE DATA ON PUBLIC EDUCATION IN VIRGINIA 

1960-61—1969-70 

1960-61 1969-70 

School Enrollment 871 ,546 1 , 108,973 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 27.2% 

Eighth-grade enrollment expressed as 
a percent of the first grade enroll- 
ment in 1953-1954 and 1962-1963.. 79.5% 94.8% 

Twelfth-grade enrollment expressed 
as a percent of the first grade en- 
rollment in 1949-1950 and 1958- 
1959 42.5% 67.6% 

Graduates in 1969-1970 expressed as 
a percent of ninth graders in fall of 
1966 76.1% 

Graduates expressed as a percent of 
first-grade enrollment in 1949-1950 
and 1958-1959 38.7% 

Number of high school graduates.. . . 34,521 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 

Percent of high school graduates en- 
tering college 39 . 6% 

Percent of high school graduates en- 
tering business, trade, or nursing 
schools 6.7% 9.6% 

Pupils transported in public school 

buses (average daily) 445,510 618,960 

Estimated value of school property . . $765 , 423 , 494 $1 , 571 , 208 , 020 

Instructional Personnel 35 , 056 53 , 503 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 52.6% 

Ratio of pupils to classroom teaching 

positions 28.9—1 22.1—1 

Elementary 31.3—1 24.5—1 

Secondary 24.8—1 .. 18.8—1 



61.2%* 


56,003t 


62.2% 


53.9% 



SUPERINTEFTOENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCmON 29 

COMPARATIVE DATA ON PUBLIC EDUCATION IN VIRGINIA 

— Continued 

1960-19G1 1969-1970 



Guidance counselors devoting at least 
half of their time per day to guid- 
ance in public high schools 551 1 ,289 

(193 full time) (1,043 full time) 

Average salary of classroom teachers . $4 , 398 $8 , 070 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 83.5% 

Average salary of instructional per- 
sonnel $4,520 $8,351 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 84.6% 

State appropriations for public edu- 
cation $105,437,674 $355,602,235 

Total expenditure for public educa- 

cation $310,696,618 $889,888,708 

Cost of operation per pupil in average 
daily attendance $296 $697 

Percent of increase over 1960- 

1961 135.5% 

*Is 6i% when 2,553 sumraar school graduates are included. 
fDoes not include 2,556 summer school graduates. 



DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
Purpose and Scope 

The major function of the Elementary Education Service is to provide leader- 
ship for the improvement of elementary education in Virginia in keeping with the 
law and established policies of the State Board of Education. A related function 
is that of assisting in improving the services of supervisory personnel and ele- 
mentary school principals. Elementary Education Service personnel continually 
study all phases of elementary education in the State, help determine progress 
in school divisions, identify problems m elementary education, and provide leader- 
ship and assistance in the development of the elementary school curriculum and 
in the preparation of curriculum materials for local school use. 

The Elementary Education Service staff serves, directly or indirectly, all 
school personnel concerned with elementary education. In 1969-70 these included 
125 elementary supervisors, 55 general supervisors, and 74 directors of instruction 
employed with State aid in 83 counties and 27 cities; 1,283 principals of elementary 
schools, 104 principals in combined elementary and junior high schools, 109 princi- 
pals in combined elementary and high schools; and 29,409* classroom teachers 
in schools enrolling 714,597* pupils. 

Accomplishments 

Conferences. A Statewide conference for supervisory personnel, which em- 
phasized the theme "Supervision as Involvement," was held during the year. Major 
features of the conference included addresses by outstanding educators, and panel 
and group discussions focused on the importance of involving persons in decision 
making. The annual conference of elementary school principals emphasized in- 
service education. A report was made on standards for the accreditation of ele- 
mentary schools. 

Members of the Elementary Education Service staff attended and participated 
in other conferences sponsored by the Virginia Education Association, the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools, the Association for Supervision and Curricu- 
lum Development, the National Science Teachers Association, the National Coun- 
cil of Teachers of Mathematics, the International Reading Association, the 
Department of Elementary School Principals, the National Council of State 
Consultants in Elementary Education, the Association for Childhood Education 
International, and the National Council of Teachers of English. 

Accreditation of Elementary Schools. The State Board of Education in Septem- 
ber 1969 adopted standards for use in accrediting elementary schools beginning 
with the 1970-71 school year. Standards established by the State Board of Educa- 
tion must be met by all elementary schools. Analysis of reports submitted, to- 
gether with information obtained through visitation by State Department per- 
sonnel, will serve as the basis for a report to the State Board of Education. The 
State Board of Education will determine whether a school is accredited or not 
accredited. Schools found to be deficient in meeting standards will be advised, 
warned, or dropped from the list of accredited elementary schools, depending 
upon the seriousness of the deficiencies. 

*SuperiDtendents' Annual Report submitted July 16, 1970 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION Zl 

Curriculum Development. The Elementary Education Service staff and a 
review committee revised the publication entitled Using Maps and Globes. Copies 
of the guide were distributed to classroom teachers, supervisors, and elementary- 
school principals. 

Three curriculum committees consisting of classroom teachers, supervisors, 
principals, and college representatives were appointed to work with the Elemen- 
tary Education Service staff to develop material in language arts, science, and 
art. Each of these committees held five two-day work sessions during the regular 
school term and a two-week workshop in June of 1970. 

Field Work. Staff members made a total of 2,041 classroom visits, worked in 
74 counties and 27 cities, and participated in local workshops and conferences, 
met with superintendents, principals, supervisors, and worked with Parent- 
Teacher Associations. Staff members made 14 visits to regional meetings of 
supervisors and six visits to regional meetings of elementary school principals. 

The Cooperative Program in Elementary Education of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools. School systems in states served by the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools may participate in an elementary school improvement 
program by becoming members of the Cooperative Program in Elementary 
Education. Since 1960-61, two options have been available to members in the 
Cooperative Program: (1) affiliated membership with a continuous program of 
school improvement conducted in each school, and (2) membership through 
accreditation. AflSliated membership of at least one year must precede applica- 
tion for membership through accreditation. 

Virginia has a State Elementary Committee which is responsible for giving 
leadership in the State to the Southern Association's program of affiliation and 
accreditation of elementary schools. Members of the State Committee serve on 
the Association's Commission on Elementary Schools. 

During 1969-70, 497 elementary schools held affiliated membership in the 
Cooperative Program in Elementary Education. Eighteen city school divisions 
and 13 county divisions held division-wide affiliated membership. Eleven public 
schools, six private, and three military reservation schools also participated in 
the program. 

The Cooperative Program in Elementary Education has accredited 175 ele- 
mentary schools since 1964. Two of these were in Buena Vista City, 99 in Fairfax 
County, two in Prince William County, two in Radford City, 36 in Richmond City, 
six in Roanoke City, 14 in Washington County, seven in Waynesboro City, four 
in York County, and three at the Quantico Marine Base. Elementary schools in 
Harrisonburg, Martinsville, Richmond, and Roanoke cities and in Chesterfield 
and Fairfax counties were engaged in self-studies and were visited by representa- 
tives of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Title III, National Defense Education Act. During 1969-70 staff members 
reviewed applications providing for the purchases of materials and equipment 
with funds available from Title III of the National Defense Education Act. 

Number of Number of 
Subject Projects School Divisions 

Civics 9 9 

English 36 30 



32 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



Number of Number of 

Subject Projects School Divisions 

Geography 36 34 

History 51 39 

Mathematics 36 35 

Modem Foreign Languages 1 1 

Reading 66 38 

Science 75 57 



Length of Employment of Non-Teaching Elementary School Principals. The 

number of non-teaching elementary school principals continues to increase. The 
following table shows the length of employment of non-teaching elementary school 
principals. 

TABLE 1— NUMBER OF MONTHS OF EMPLOYMENT OF 
NON-TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 





Less 
Than 10 
Months 


10 
Months 


103^ 

Months 


11 

Months 


12 

Months 


Totals 


Non-teaching Elementary 
Principals: 
1968-69 


10 
17 


183 
161 


2 
2 


201 
204 


690 
716 


1,086 


1969-70 


1,100 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



33 



Size of Schools. The following table shows the size of elementary schools 
in terms of the number of classroom teachers and enrollments for 1967-68, 1968-69, 
and 1969-70. 



TABLE 2— CLASSROOM TEACHERS— PUPILS ENROLLED 



CLASSROOM TEACHERS 



Number of 
Teachers 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12-15. . . 
16-20. . . 
21-25. .. 
26-30... 
31-40... 
41-50... 
51-60... 
Over 60. 



Number of Schools 



1967-68 



12 

35 

34 

51 

29 

36 

76 

55 

43 

54 

41 

229 

258 

194 

121 

55 

2 

1 



1968-69 



5 

28 

27 

43 

29 

34 

67 

55 

55 

47 

38 

217 

236 

223 

141 

60 

5 

2 



1969-70 



3 

18 

28 

28 

21 

34 

39 

56 

47 

48 

42 

188 

252 

197 

164 

96 

19 

3 



PUPILS ENROLLED 



Number of 
Pupils 



Below 100. . 

100-199. . . 

200-299. . . 

300-399. . . 

400-499. . . 

500-599. . . 

600-699. . . 

700-799. . . 

800-899. . . 

900-999. . . 
1,000-1,099 
1,100-1,199. 
1,200-1,299. 
1,300-1,399. 
1,400-1,499. 
1,500-1,599. 
1,600-1,699. 
Over 1,700. 



Number of Schools 



1967-68 



102 

181 

177 

187 

180 

169 

139 

84 

58 

27 

16 

5 

1 



1968-69 



86 

159 

196 

162 

181 

154 

145 

110 

65 

28 

16 

5 

3 

1 

1 



1969-70 



57 

141 

186 

181 

165 

168 

145 

108 

76 

24 

17 

6 

3 

3 

2 



34 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Pupil Progress. The number and percent of pupils not making normal prog- 
ress in the elementary grades during seven-year periods are reflected in Table 3. 

TABLE 3— PUPIL PROGRESS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



Year 


Number 

Enrolled 

iu 

First 

Grade 


Year 


Number 
Enrolled 

in 

Seventh 

Grade 


Number Children 

Not Making Normal 

Progress During 

Seven- Year Period 




Number 


Percent 


1953-54 

1954-55 


98,550 
93,665 
91,092 
88,570 
90,348 
91,502 
91,983 
95,126 
97,942 
99,344 
101,876 


1959-60 

1960-61 

1961-62 


79,483 
78,863 
78,715 
79,286 
81,592 
83,474 
85.784 
87,946 
89,975 
92,472 
94,981 


19,067 
14,802 
12,377 
9,284 
8,756 
8,028 
6,199 
7,180 
7,967 
6,872 
6,895 


19.35 
15.80 


1955-56 


13.59 


1956-57 


1962-63 

1963-64 

1964-65 

1965-^6 

1966-67 


10.48 


1957-58 

1958-59 


9.69 

8.77 


1959-60 

1980-61 


6.74 

7.55 


1961-62 


1967-68 


8.13 


1962-63 


1968-69 


6.92 


1963-64 


1969-70 


6.77 



SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICE 
Overview 

The primary responsibility of the Special Education Service is to provide 
consultation, leadership, and direction to local school divisions in the initiation, 
expansion, and improvement of programs and services for exceptional children, and 
to disburse State and federal special education funds in accordance with rules and 
regulations of the State Board of Education. 

Exceptional children are defined as children whose educational needs differ 
from those of other children to such an extent that they require a differentiated 
or specialized program. Generally, these children are identified as having handi- 
capping conditions physically, mentally, in speech, in hearing, visually, neurologi- 
cally, or a combination of these conditions. This classification includes children 
who are hospitalized as well as those who are homebound. The gifted child who 
has the capacity for superior achievement is also identified as an exceptional 
child requiring special education to develop the use of his unique potential. 

During 1969-70, 1,485 special education teachers were employed to serve 
37,846 handicapped children in Virginia's public schools. These figures reflect an 
increase of 202 teachers and 2,096 children above the totals for the preceding year. 
Increased State, local, and federal appropriations have made this growth possible. 
Enlarged teacher education programs and continuing improvements of diagnostic 
procedures and teaching programs will contribute to a refinement of services to 
these children. While Virginia's total program of special education has grown 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



35 



steadily, its services are not spread evenly over the State. Population density, 
geography, financial ability, and public concern vary to such degrees that some 
areas of the State provide sophisticated, comprehensive programs while other 
areas have none. During the past school year, however, many of the smaller 
school divisions have been encouraged to cooperate with each other and have 
been developing regional programs to meet the educational needs of their excep- 
tional children. More educational programs and improved services for handi- 
capped children were developed in Virginia during 1969-70 requiring increased 
consultative assistance from members of the staff of the Special Education Service. 
The following charts illustrate the growth in special education classes and 
teachers during the past five years. Although the greatest expansion has been in 
classes for the mentally retarded, programs in other areas also have progressed. 

Number of Classes and Teachers 



Mentally Retarded 

Emotionally Disturbed. . 
Neurologically Impaired. 
Physically Handicapped. 

Speech 

Hearing 

*Hospital Teachers 

*Visiting Teachers 

*Homeboimd Teachers . . 
*School Psj'chologists. . . 



Total. 



1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


542 


691 


810 


951 


26 


38 


45 


72 


10 


15 


21 


23 


27 


25 


25 


29 


100 


118 


151 


178 


8 


9 


21 


30 


27 


29 


30 


35 


137 


185 


208 


216 


1,265 


1,181 


1,214 


1,561 




30 


47 


52 


713 


896 


1,073 


1,2S3 



1969-70 



1,083 
98 
39 
29 

195 
41 
40 

239 
2,257 

115 



Number of Children Served 



Physically Handicapped 

*Homebound 

Blind 

Partially Sighted 

Hard of Hearing 

Speech Handicapped 

Emotionally Disturbed 

Neurologically Impaired 

Mentally^Retarded 

*Hospitalized Children 

Aphasic and Severely Handicapped. 

Total 

•Not included in total. 



1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


976 


995 


618 


848 


1,785 


1,745 


2,032 


2,477 


266 


256 


255 


283 


3.30 


309 


303 


313 


1,452 


1,590 


1,721 


1,239 


13,536 


15,696 


16,786 


17,999 


1,105 


1,151 


689 


1,274 


319 


441 


228 


248 


8,195 


10,470 


11,508 


13,493 


1,559 


1,854 


1,999 


2,306 


13 


14 


17 


53 


26,192 


30,922 


32,125 


35,750 



1969-70 



631 

3,338 

301 

384 

1,127 

18,333 

1,222 

743 

15,027 

2,419 

78 



37,846 



36 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Description of Programs 

Instruction for the Physically Handicapped. Children with physical handicaps 
are encouraged to attend regular classes whenever possible. This can be accom- 
plished by slight modifications of physical facilities to facilitate the child's move- 
ment in the school. Some divisions have found it desirable, however, to operate 
schools especially designed and equipped for children with crippling conditions. 

Homebound Instruction. This program is designed to meet the educational 
needs of children confined either temporarily or permanently to their homes 
because of illness, accident, or congenital deformity. 

Blind and Partially Sighted Children. Through the utilization of federal 
funds and in cooperation with the Virginia Commission for the Visually Handi- 
capped, 685 children were aided by the Special Education Service with apparatus, 
Braille, and/or large-print books. 

Children with Speech Impairments. Special programs for children with de- 
fective speech were available in 48 school divisions served by 195 speech specia- 
lists; 18,333 children received speech therapy. 

The number of speech specialists in a school division determined the number 
of schools served. Priority was given to primary and elementary grades, and the 
high schools were given full-time, part-time, or consultative service. The sched- 
uling of classes was based upon two systems, or a combination of these systems. 
In the block system one school was scheduled for daily therapy for several weeks 
and the chilciren were seen every day. Tlie mtermittent system covered a longer 
period of time with the children being seen once or twice a week. In some instances, 
a combination of these two systems was used. 

The average number of classes scheduled a day was nine, with four children 
in a therapy group for 30 minutes a session. Whatever space was available in the 
school generally was used as the therapy room. Therapy material was furnished 
by the school division. 

Children with Hearing Impairments. In 93 school divisions where hearing 
tests were administered by audiometric technicians, speech therapists, and other 
trained persons, 112,791 children were tested; 6,820 children were found to have 
significant hearing impairments; and 3,558 children received a medical follow-up 
for corrective purposes. 

During the school year 1969-70, 1,127 hearing-impaired children were served 
by 41 teachers of the hearing impaired in 17 school divisions. Four regional pro- 
grams for preschool and hearing inpaired children of school age were in operation. 

Emotionally Disturbed. These are children, who, because of emotional or 
organic difficulties, are too distraught to adjust successfully to the regular class- 
room environment. 

In addition to instruction provided in treatment centers and homes, 98 special 
classes were held for 1,222 children in Arlington, Augusta, Chesterfield, Greens- 
ville, Fairfax, Henrico, Loudoun, Orange, and York counties and in the cities of 
Charlottesville, Falls Church, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, 
and Virginia Beach, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



37 



In some instances resource teachers were provided so that emotionally dis- 
turbed children could remuin in regular classrooms. 

Neurologlcally Impaired. Thirty-nine classes in 13 school divisions provided 
services to children classified as being neurologically impaired. These are children 
who manifest severe learning problems, usually accompanied by evidence of im- 
pairment of the central nervous system. 

Children with Retarded Mental Development. An increasing number of school 
divisions are providing programs for mentally retarded children. A total of 15,027 
mentally retarded children were enrolled in 1,083 special classes in 75 counties and 
33 cities throughout the State. The following statistics contrast the scope of the 
program m 1968-69 and 1969-70: 

Children Classes 

Classification 68-69 69-70 68-69 69-70 

Severely retarded (trainable) 1 ,741 1 ,888 142 156 

Moderately retarded (educable) U ,752 13, 139 809 927 



13,493 15,027 951 1,083 

Instruction of Children in Hospitals. Forty hospital teachers were paid from 
State and federal funds to teach 2,419 children and youths in 13 hospitals, reha- 
bilitation centers, and sanatoriums as follows: 

Number of Number 

Persons of 

Hospitals Taught Teachers 

Crippled Children's Hospital, Richmond 330 5 

De Paul Hospital, Norfolk 89 1 

Eastern State Hospital, Williamsburg 165 5 

Johnston Memorial Hospital, Abingdon 112 1 

Kings Daughter's Hospital, Norfolk 15 1 

Medical College of Virginia Hospital, Richmond 208 4 

National Orthopaedic & Rehab. Hospital, Arlington 54 1 

Roanoke Memorial Rehabilitation Center 80 1 

University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville 460 3 

Centers 

Children's Rehabilitation Center, Charlottesville 121 4 

Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center, Fishersville 626 7 

T. B. Sanatoriums 

Blue Ridge, Charlottesville 107 3 

Catawba, Catawba 52 4 



2,419 



40 



School Psychological Services. Reimbursement was made to localities for 
psychological evaluations of children who were found eligible for placement in 
special education classes. In addition, localities received partial reimbursement 
on the salaries of 63 full-time school psychologists employed in 19 school divisions. 



38 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Visiting Teacher Services 1969-70 

There were 239 persons serving as visiting teachers in 52 school divisions 
throughout the State. E,eimbursement from State funds was made on 83 positions 
and 156 positions were financed entirely by local divisions or through federal 
projects. 

In addition to persons employed as visiting teachers, there is an increasing 
number of home-school coordinators employed mider Title I of Public Law 89-10 
who, to all intents and purposes, are serving as visiting teachers m target areas. 
In many instances, they are working imder the direct supervision of a visiting 
teacher, a coordinator of visiting teachers, a supervisor of visiting teachers, or 
a director of pupil persoimel services whose responsibility incorporates ancillary 
personnel of various disciplines. 

During the school year 1969-70, with the assistance of special funds, the 
Special Education Service utilized the services of a consultant on a per diem basis 
to lead two-day workshops on matters of professional concern for all visiting 
teachers in the State. 

The following information was taken from the annual reports submitted by 
visiting teachers to the Special Education Service: 

Referrals to Visiting Teachers 

56,675 new referrals for the current year 

14,608 referrals carried over from the previous year 

Reason Jor Referral Boys Girls 

Child-centered problem 6,942 4,034 

Home-centered problem 7,538 6,476 

School-centered problem 4,032 2,643 

Attendance problem 10,946 8,220 

Health problem 2,748 3,096 

Total— 56,675 

Analysis of visiting teachers' annual reports indicates that the basic causes 
for referrals were the following: 

Basic Causes Frequency 

Child-centered problem 12,610 

Home-centered problem 19 .073 

School-centered problem 8,535 

Attendance problem 16,218 

Health problem 6,542 

Total 62,978* 

•The discrepancy In statistics can be explained by the fact that several factors may be involved in causes of prob- 
lems, whereas » rcierral will generally state only a single problem. 

Activities of Members of the Special Education Staff 

During 1969-70 one supervisor and seven assistant supervisors in the Special 
Education Service made 378 visits to local school divisions; participated in 285 
conferences and staff meetings; and attended or conducted 222 State, local, and 
national conferences and workshops. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 39 

The staff gave leadership to the establishment of new special education pro- 
grams in the State and to the improvement of existing programs. The Special 
Education Service received 33 applications for utilizing Title VI-A funds involving 
54 school divisions. Seventeen of these applications, involving 32 school divisions, 
were awarded fimds requiring an expenditure of approximately $560,000. The 
projects generally were within one of three general areas: preschool programs 
for handicapped children; regional diagnostic and planning projects; or pilot 
programs. The utilization of Title VI-A administrative funds included: salarj^ 
of the Title VI-A coordinator and two regional assistant supervisors of special 
education, office furniture, travel and incidental expenses coimectcd with these 
positions, and the expenses of the Title VI-A Advisory Committee. The staff 
also determined eligibility and awarded fellowships and traineeships with funds 
provided by Public Law 85-926, as amended, and conducted workshops and insti- 
tutes for hospital teachers, visiting teachers, and teachers of emotionally disturbed 
children. 

Special Education Service personnel evaluated credentials of applicants for 
positions as school psychologists and visiting teachers in various school divisions; 
evaluated applications for financial assistance for the education of children classi- 
fied as severely handicapped and/or aphasic, and disbursed State aid totaling 
$5,275,919 to localities for services to handicapped children. 

THE VIRGINIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND 
THE BLIND, STAUNTON 

The school completed its 131st session on May 30, 1970. Many of the graduates 
secured jobs shortly after graduation, while others are continuing their education 
in business colleges and vocational schools. Three of the deaf graduates qualified 
for Gallaudet College and one blind senior will attend college. 

The school sponsored a number of professional workshops, and teachers 
attended numerous conferences and workshops during the year. Two extension 
courses were conducted by the University of Virginia on the school's campus. 

During the 1969-70 session, the high school division of the Department for 
the Deaf was accredited by the State Board of Education. The high school divi- 
sion of the Department for the Blind has been accredited for a number of years. 

School for School for 
the Deaf the Blind Total 

Number of girls enrolled 175 62 237 

Number of boys enrolled 193 86 279 

Grand Totals 368 148 516 

Number of graduates 18 8 26 

Number of teachers employed 70 36 106 

Total per capita cost (exclusive of capital outlay) $ 3,389.15 

Cost of operation (exclusive of capital outlay) 1 ,708,134.38 

VIRGINIA SCHOOL AT HAMPTON 

The Virginia School at Hampton was established by legislation passed by 
the General Assembly in 1906 for the education of deaf and blind children. The 



40 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

objectives of the School's program include the development of self-realization, 
proper human relationships, economic self-sufficiencj', and civic responsibility. 

The School consists of the Department for the Deaf and the Department of 
the Blind. Vocational training is offered in both. The high school is accredited 
by the State Board of Education and graduates of the two departments are eligible 
for advanced educational opportunities. 

School for School f 01- 

the Deaf the Blind Total 

Number of girls enrolled 73 29 102 

Number of boys enrolled 93 71 164 

Total number of students enrolled 1969-70. 166 100 266 

Number of graduates 2 2 4 

Number of teachers 31 21 52 

Total cost per capita (exclusive of capital outlay) $ 4,095.21 

Total operating expenses (exclusive of capital outlay) 1 ,089,326 .08 



DIVISION OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 



The Division of Secondary Education supplies leadership and assistance in 
matters concerning secondary education in the public schools of Virginia. The 
staff of the Division provides supervisory and administrative services to local 
school divisions and assists them in developing and maintaining quality education 
in Virginia's high schools. 

Division personnel are primarily concerned with improving instruction in 
academic subjects, the fine arts, health and physical education, driver education, 
and adult education. The work of the Division is carried out through 10 different 
services: Adult Education; Art; Driver Education; English; Foreign Languages; 
Health and Physical Education, Safety, and Recreation; History, Government 
and Geography; Mathematics; Music; and Science. The Division also is respon- 
sible for approving and supervising projects conducted under Title III of the 
National Defense Education Act (NDEA). 

Staff members work with local school divisions to achieve specific objectives. 
These include: interpreting the policies of the State Board of Education; providing 
leadership in the development of the curriculum and the improvement of instruc- 
tion; giving impetus to the continuous evaluation of secondary education; serving 
as a resource agency to assist in the study of specific local problems; providing 
consultative services; assisting in accreditation and licensing procedures; and 
working with professional personnel at every level of education in as effort to 
improve secondary education in Virginia. 

Supervisors and their assistants in each service perform a number of important 
duties such as serving on evaluation committees, participating in Statewide con- 
ferences, arranging in-service opportunities for teachers, conducting surveys, 
addressing civic and educational groups, assisting in the development of library 
facilities, participating in regional and national efforts devoted to curriculum im- 
provement, and conferring with representatives of school divisions throughout 
the State. 

Reports were received during 1969-70 from 486 public high schools and 68 
private high schools. 

In addition to the overall activities performed by the Division staff to promote 
the improvement of secondary education, accomplishments during the year in- 
cluded the following: 

SUPERVISORY AND ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES 

Accreditation of Secondary Schools. The concept of accreditation as a means 
of stimulating growth and improvement of secondary school programs provides a 
measure of quality in the secondary school. Section 22-21 of the Code of Virginia 
provides statutory impetus for the accreditation of secondary schools by the State 
Board of Education. The Board is authorized and required to do all things neces- 
sary to stimulate and encourage improvement of the schools, including accredita- 
tion of schools in accordance with prescribed standards. These standards are de- 
signed as guidelines for secondary schools to assist in the continuing efforts to 
provide educational opportunities to meet the needs, interests, and aspirations of 
all students. 

The State Board of Education bulletin, Standards for Accrediling Secondary 
Schools in Virginia, has been revised and will be effective for the 1970-71 school 



42 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

session. This revision was effected through the efforts of a committee of public 
and private school educators appointed by the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

Staff members of the Division of Secondary Education are developing new 
forms and instructions for implementing the revised standards. Six regional 
meetings were held in the spring of 1970 to familiarize secondary school adminis- 
trators with the revised standards and the new forms for gathering data pertinent 
to the standards. 

During 1969-70, 473 public secondary schools (schools containing one or more 
of grades eight through 12) and 66 private secondary schools were accredited by 
the State Board of Education. Data processing was used to analyze the Prelimi- 
nary Annual High and Juinor High School Reports of all schools offering studies 
on the high school level. Visits were made to 12 new public and two new private 
secondary schools making applications for accreditation for the first time. Forty- 
seven previously accredited public secondary schools and four previously accred- 
ited private secondary schools were consolidated, discontinued, or converted 
during the 1969-70 school session. 

High Schools Closed, Consolidated, or Converted. During 1969-70 the follow- 
ing public and private secondary schools were closed, consolidated, or converted: 

Division School Status 

Amelia County Russell Grove High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Amherst County Central High School Converted to Am- 
herst County 
Jimior High School 

Augusta County North River Junior High Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Brunswick County J. S. Russell High School Converted to Bruns- 
wick Junior High 
School 

Campbell County Campbell County High School Converted to Rust- 
burg Intermediate 
School 

Caroline County Caroline High School Converted to Bowl- 
ing Green Jtmior 
High School 

C. T. Smith High School Name changed to 

Ladysmith High 
School 

Union High School Name changed to 

Bowling Green 
Senior High School 

Carroll County... . Hillsville High School Converted to Hills- 

ville Intermediate 
School 
Woodlawn High School Converted to Wood- 
lawn Intermediate 
School 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 43. 

Division School Status 

Charles City County. .Charles City High School Consolidated to 

Charles City 
County High 
School 

Ruthville High School Consolidated to 

Charles City 
County High 
School 

Charlotte County Central High School Converted to Cen- 
tral Junior High 
School 

Culpeper County Culpeper High School Converted to Cul- 

peper Junior High 
School 
Ann Wingfield Junior High Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Cumberland County.. .L. P. Jackson High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Dinwiddle County Southside High School Converted to Din- 
widdle County 
Junior High 

Fauquier County W. C. Taylor High School Converted to W. C. 

Taylor Junior 
High School 

Fluvanna County S. C. Abrams High School Converted to Flu- 
vanna Junior High 
School 

Goochland County. . . .Central High School Converted to Gooch- 
land Junior High 
School 

Greensville County.. . .E. W. Wyatt High School Converted to 

Greensville Junior 
High School 

Hanover County John M. Gandy High School Converted to ele- 

m.entary school 

Henrico County Virginia Randolph High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Isle of Wight County... Georgie Tyler High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 
Westside High School Discontinued 

King & Queen County. .Marriott High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

KingWilliam County. .Hamilton Holmes High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Lancaster County Brookvale High School Converted to Man- 
tua Intermediate 
School 

Loudoun County Douglas Junior High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 



44 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Division School Status 

Louisa County A. G. Richardson High School Converted to A. G. 

Richardson Junior 
High School 

Lunenburg County . . . .Lunenburg High School Converted to Lunen- 
burg Junior High 
School 

Mathews County Thomas Hunter High School Converted to 

Mathews Inter- 
mediate School 

Mecklenburg County. .East End High School Converted to Park 

View Junior High 
School 
West End High School Converted to Blue- 
stone Junior High 
School 

Middlesex County St. Clare Walker High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

New Kent County George W. Watkins High School Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Northumberland 
County Central High School Converted to North- 
umberland Junior 
High School 

Pittsylvania County.. .Northside High School Converted to Gretna 

Junior High School 

Southside High School Converted to Blairs 

Junior High School 

Powhatan County Pocahontas High School Converted to Powha- 
tan Middle School 

Prince Edward County. R. R. Moton High School Name changed to 

Prince Edward 
County High 
School 

Chesapeake City G. W. Carver High School Converted to G. W. 

Carver Jimior 
High School 

Fredericksburg City.. .Fredericksburg Middle School Name changed to 

Walker-Grant 
Middle School 

Hopewell City Carter G. Woodson High School Converted to Carter 

G. Woodson Com- 
bined School 

Portsmouth City S. H. Clarke Junior High Converted to ele- 
mentary school 

Suffolk City B. T. Washington High School Converted to Booker 

T. Washington 
Combined School 

Virginia Beach City.. .Union Kempsville High School Discontinued 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 45 

Division School Slalus 

Private School Bishop D. J. O'Connell Fiigh School 

(Boys) and Bishop D. J. O'Connell 

High School (Girls). Arlington Consolidated 

Private School The Congressional Preparatory 

School, Falls Church Did Not Apply 

Private School John S. Mosby Academy, Front 

Royal Closed 

Private School Douglas Mac Arthur Academy, 

Norfolk Closed 

State Aid for Employment of Supervising Principals for Twelve Months. State 
funds are provided for the employment of supervising principals on a 12-month 
basis to support local efforts to improve the administrative and supervisory pro- 
gram in the schools. Employment on a year-round basis should enable the princi- 
pal to coordinate more effectively the work of all concerned with his school, to 
extend his service to the pupils and the community, and to plan and execute an 
increasingly effective program of supervision. 

Reimbursement totaling $965, 172 was made to 92 counties, 32 cities, and seven 
towns where 1,127 principals of elementary and secondary schools were employed 
on a 12-month basis. These figures represent increases over the preceding year of 
43 positions and approximately $79,034. 

Conferences. The Division of Secondary Education sponsored and participated 
in numerous Statewide, regional, and divisional meetings, conferences, and work- 
shops during 1969-70. Statewide conferences concerned with curriculum and in- 
struction were held for classroom teachers and supervisory personnel in the fol- 
lowing subjects: Art; Driver Education; Foreign Languages; Health and Physical 
Education; History, Government and Geography; Mathematics; Music; and 
Science. 

The Annual Conference of Virginia Secondary School Principals was conducted 
at the Donaldson Brown Center for Continuing Education on the campus of Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute, June 17-19. The conference theme, "A New Century 
for Virginia's Secondary Education," focused primarily on the secondary school 
curriculum. More than 400 princip.ils, assistant principals, superintendents, and 
other school administrators attended. 

A series of six regional conferences for school administrators was held between 
May 19 and 27. More than 500 persons registered for these sessions. The purpose 
of the meetings was to introduce principals, superintendents, and other school 
administrators to the new regulations and procedures as prescribed in Standards 
for Accrediting Secondary Schools in Virginia and the Preliminary Annual Secondary 
School Accreditation Report. 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The primary function of the Asso- 
ciation is to stimulate and improve education through regional accreditation of 
schools in 11 southern states. The Association's Commission on Secondary Schools 
recognizes quality education programs in secondary schools by granting member- 
ship based on the organization's self-imposed standards. Schools seek regional 
accreditation on a voluntary basis. 

A total of 255 public and private secondary schools in Virginia were accredited 
in the 1969-70 school year by the Association at the annual meeting in Dallas, 



46 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Texas, in December, 1969. Thirty-two schools were granted initial accreditation 
and nine schools were dropped from the accredited list for a net gain of 23 schools. 
Thirty-one of the 255 accredited schools are private secondary schools and 224 
are public secondary schools. 

Leadership for member schools is provided by the Virginia Conamittee which 
is composed of nine members and 11 associate members representing all geographic 
areas of the State. Operating within the Commission to carry out the Associa- 
tion's policies, the members of the Virginia Committee seek to encourage and 
stimulate progress in member schools, promote conditions which will enable mem- 
ber schools to meet requirements of the Association, and to assist non-member 
schools in their efforts to obtain membership. 

The supervisor of secondary education serves as executive secretary of the 
Virginia Committee. 

Secondary School Evaluation. The program of high school evaluation which 
is sponsored and organized by the State Department of Education continues to 
render service to many school divisions. The program is designed to provide 
opportunities for faculty members to participate in an organized effort to improve 
and expand educational opportunities and programs for children. The program also 
provides opportunities for visiting committee members to gain valuable in-service 
experiences as they assist in school evaluations. 

Staff members of the Division of Secondary Education gave assistance and 
guidance to self-evaluation programs conducted in 17 high schools and seven inter- 
mediate or middle schools during 1969-70. Teams of educators, including local 
administrative and supervisory personnel, classroom teachers, and personnel from 
colleges and the State Department of Education, reviewed the progress made by 
each school and gave written appraisals of the programs. 

The following secondary schools completed self-evaluations and were evalu- 
ated by visiting committees during 1969-70: Alexandria City — John Adams Middle 
School, Minnie Howard Middle School, Parker-Gray Middle School; Augusta 
County — Buffalo Gap High School, Fort Defiance High School; Botetourt Coun- 
ty — James River High School, Lord Botetourt High School; Fairfax Coimty — 
Holmes Intermediate School; Franklin County — Franklin County High School; 
Nansemond County — Forest Glen High School, John F. Kennedy High School, 
John Yeates High School; Page County — Page County High School; Powhatan 
County — Powhatan High School; Prince George County — Prince George High 
School; Prince William Coimty — Garfield High School, Osbourn High School; 
Roanoke Covmty — Glenvar High School; Tazewell County — Richlands High 
School; Williamsburg City— James Blair High School; Winchester City — Handley 
High School; York County — Queens Lake Intermediate School, Tabb Intermediate 
School, Yorktown Intermediate School. 

Title III, National Defense Education Act of 1958. The National Defense Edu- 
cation Act was enacted in 1958 to strengthen instruction in specific subject areas. 
Through matching grants, Title III of the NDEA provides for the purchase of 
specified types of equipment and materials and for State administration of the 
NDEA program. 

During 1969-70 Title III funds were used in Virginia to strengthen science, 
mathematics, modern foreign languages, history, civics, geography, English, 
reading and industrial arts. In April, 1970, Virginia received oflBcial notification 



SUPERINTENDENT OK PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 47 

that the State's Title III allocation for the year included $882,413 for equipment 
and materials and $42,696 for the administration of the NDEA program at the 
State level. This was a substantial reduction from the 1968-69 allotment of $1,949, - 
649 for equipment and materials and $42,701 for administration. 

During the year 897 elementary and secondary education projects were ap- 
proved for 93 school divisions. Under the matching provisions of the NDEA, 
Title III program, local school divisions received federal reimbursements totaling 
approximately $788,078 for the approved projects. This sum included $358,944 
for equipment and materials for elementary schools and $429,134 for secondary 
schools. 

No federal funds were made available in 1969-70 under Section 12 of the Nation- 
al Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act of 1965 to continue the program 
of matching grants to public schools for strengthening instruction in the arts and 
humanities. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

The General Adult Education Program had 23,982 adults enrolled in 1,362 
classes in 77 local school divisions. State funds provided 37 percent of the cost 
of instructors' salaries. 

During 1969-1970, State funds totaling $150,000 were allocated for a minimum 
of 50,000 hours of instruction. In 1970-1971, these funds will increase to $157,500 
for a minimum of 52,500 hours of instruction. Reimbursement is made on 60 per- 
cent of the instructor's salary up to a maximum salary of $5 per hour. 

Under the authority of Title III of the Adult Education Act of 1966 (Public 
Law 89-750), Virginia offered Adult Basic Education classes in 95 school divisions. 
The core curriculum, consisting of language arts and computational skills, forms 
the basis of the program which is designed to offer an eighth-grade education to 
adults 18 years of age or older. 

Since 1965, 34,489 adults have been enrolled in the program and 5,523 of these 
have completed the eighth grade. During 1969-1970, 9,750 adults were enrolled 
and 1,592 completed the eighth grade. 

During the year the learning center concept was expanded to include an addi- 
tional 13 school divisions, bringing to 19 the total number of learning centers 
operating in the State. The learning centers which provide full-time 12-hour per 
day educational opportunities for under-educated adults, utilize such innovative 
teaching methods as programmed text and teaching machines. 

The State Board of Education, on August 20, 1969, authorized the Adult 
Education Service to initiate procedures to govern the administration and imple- 
mentation of a revised program using the American Council of Education's General 
Educational Development (GED) Testing Program. The revision included the 
establishment of 37 official testing centers. 

The superintendent of each school division was requested to designate a mem- 
ber of his staff as the authorized school official who would be responsible for the 
local GED program. 

The Iowa Test of Educational Development (ITED), which had been used 
for many years, was no longer administered as a complete battery after March 1, 
1970. However, local school divisions were authorized to provide for ITED re- 
tests from March 1, 1970, until June 30, 1971. 



48 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

GED ITED TOTAL 
Total Number OF Tests Administered 6,482 28,868 35,350 

GED Battery of Five Tests Administered 

Number of Persons: 

1. Taking complete battery in counties 680 2,322 

2. Taking complete battery in cities 537 1,611 

3. Taking complete batterj' in Dept. of Welfare and 

Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 51 272 



GED Certificates Issiied 

Number of Persons: 

1. Passing complete battery 

2. Passing complete battery after re-tests 

3. Qualified for GED Certificates from United 
States Armed Forces and other sources 



Failing Tests 

1. Passing battery of tests whose minimum standard 
scores are over 35 but below the average standard 
score of 45 

2. Failing one or more tests in battery 



1,268 4,205 5,473 



677 


3,113 


11 


1,593 


710 





1,398 4,706 6.104 



312 

279 



1,092 



591 1,092 1,6S3 



Failing the Re-Tests 

1. Passing the complete battery of re-tests whose 
minimum standard scores are over 35 but below 
the average standard score of 45 

2. Failing re-tests 



28 
18 



2,405 



46 2,405 2,451 

Seventy-three classes were offered in the Civil Defense Education Course in 
Personal and Family Survival with 2,040 persons completing the course. Of these 
2,015 were local school personnel. Since the program began a total of 17,040 
teachers and school staff members have completed the course. 

In eight school divisions, 100 percent of the teachers and staff personnel com- 
pleted the course, to make a total of 65 school divisions in this category. Nation- 
ally Virginia ranks among the top six states in the number of teachers and school- 
staff personnel who have completed the PFS Course. 

Basic revisions in the Emergency Operations Plan changed the Warden Service 
to the Public Education Civil Defense Service, which includes Emergency Plan- 
ning for Schools. 

The alien program, conducted in cooperation with the U. S. Department of 
Justice, assisted 478 aliens. Letters of welcome were sent to 368 aliens; home 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 49 

study materials were sent to 77 aliens; information concerning naturalization was 
sent to 11 aliens; and 22 non-resident aliens from other states sought information. 

ART EDUCATION 

During 1969-70 the Art Education Service devoted much of its attention to 
working with school divisions and individual schools through consultation, obser- 
vation, and evaluation. Student enrollment in art education courses in Virginia's 
public schools totaled 68,161 in grades seven through 12 during 1939-70, compared 
with 66,115 the previous year. Art personnel in the State increased from 812 in 
1968-69 to 848 during 196J-70. The personnel included 619 secondary school art 
teachers, 198 elementary school art teachers, 15 combination elementary and 
secondary school art teachers, and 23 art supervisors. 

Of particular importance this year was the completion of the State secondary 
art curriculum guide which will be printed and distributed to public schools during 
1970-71. Work on the guide began more than a year ago. The elementary curricu- 
lum guide committee, which is made up of teachers, principals, and supervisors, 
as well as art spe'^ialists. met three times during the year. At the last meeting, 
held June 22-July 3 at Mary Washington College, considerable progress was made 
and much of the written content of the elementary guide was completed. These 
meetings were held in cooperation with the Division of Elementary Education of 
the State Department of Education. 

The Annual Summer Art Conference was held at Randolph-Macon College in 
Ashland, June 14-26 for the talented youth group, and June 21-26 for teachers. 
Forty-two talented high school students attended the conference, compared with 
26 last year. During the year the Art Education Service also conducted three 
regional conferences to assist teachers in the local schools. These were held in 
Staunton, October 17-18, at Mary Washington College November 7-8, and at Emory 
and Henry College March 20-21. Supervisory personnel of the Art Education 
Service conducted division workshops in Chesterfield, Carroll, Botetourt, and 
Northampton counties. They also assisted various committees in the school 
divisions by judging art exhibits, making talks, helping State and local study com- 
mittees and helping to plan art facilities for new schools. 

The Aesthetic School Environment Program which was started at Dickenson, 
Scott, Wise, and Lee counties was concluded successfully. This project, which 
was devoted to the beautification and aesthetic environment in four elementary 
schools, was conducted with the cooperation of principals, teachers, students, art 
specialists, and staff members of the Art Education Service. StafT personnel 
attended local, State and regional conferences. At the Southeastern Arts Con- 
ference, held in Richmond April 15-18, the staff assisted in planning for the con- 
ference and participated in the program. One member of the staff attended the 
National Conference on Youth Education and the Arts which was held in St. 
Louis May 20-23, under the sponsorship of the Associated Councils of the Arts. 
Two members of the staff attended a special art research institute conducted by 
the National Art Education Association in Richmond, April 12-15. 

The staff worked closely with several colleges in planning, encouraging, and 
conducting workshops. Personnel evaluated the Stratford College art department 
and made several trips to Longwood College to conduct workshops with students 
and professors. The Art Education Service assisted Madison College with a 
special summer institute for art teachers for which credit was offered. Members 



50 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

of the staff worked with related professional organizations in various capacities 
serving as officers and active committee members. 

The Art Education Service assisted and cooperated with the Governor's 
Commission on the Arts and Humanities in plamiing the first summer humanities 
camp for high school students, which was held at Mary Washington College June 
22-July 10. One staff member was active in conducting two of the sessions during 
the camp. The Art Education Service continues to cooperate with the music 
education and physical education services in conducting humanities workshops 
throughout the State. Three of these cooperative ventures already are planned 
for 1970-71. 

DRIVER EDUCATION 

The goal of Virginia's driver education program is to improve the quality of 
human decisions and performance related to highway transportation and to en- 
courage continuing improvement, especially with potential drivers. To meet this 
aim, the State's public schools are offering driver education opportunities to an 
increasing number of potential drivers. 

The Driver Education Service provided leadership and assistance to public 
secondary schools as well as to private, parochial, and commercial schools in the 
development, expansion, and improvement of driver education programs. Total 
enrollment and State reimbursement surpassed previous records. 

During 1969-70, 54,715 students in 321 high schools successfully completed the 
State-approved driver education program which was conducted in 134 school 
divisions, this was an increase of 24% over 1968-69. Reimbursement in State 
funds to localities totaled $2,042,354.09. A total of 1,335 teachers taught the 
State-approved driver education programs, and 471 new driver education teachers 
were certified. 

These figures reflect the impact of legislative action, effective July 1, 1969, 
which requires that students under the age of 18 who apply for an operator's 
license must have successfully completed a State-approved driver education pro- 
gram. 

In compliance with this legislation, many school divisions expanded and im- 
proved their programs, especially by using simulators and multiple-car driving 
ranges for the laboratory phase. These new methods made it possible for school 
divisions to enroll more students at a lower cost per student. School divisions 
received financial assistance from federal funds appropriated under the Highway 
Safety Act of 1966 and approved by the Virginia Highway Safety Division with 
assistance from the Driver Education Service. 

Staff" personnel made more than 100 visits to assist local school divisions in 
evaluating programs, making recommendations, and providing leadership, direc- 
tion, coordination, supervision, and promotion of better driver education programs. 

In accordance with the new Standards for Accrediting Secondary Schools in 
Virginia, the Driver Education Service assisted school personnel in Danville to 
implement the first semester course offering in driver education. Because of in- 
creasing interest in highway safety, the city of Danville was authorized to offer 
a 90 semester-hour program in driver education. The program, consisting of both 
classroom and in-car instruction, grants one-half unit elective credit toward grad- 
uation. 

With the cooperation of the Film Production Service of the State Department 
of Education, a'slide presentation, entitled "Expanding Driver Education To Meet 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 51 

New Challenges," was completed and is available for in-service workshops, teach- 
ers' meetings, and public programs. 

Staff personnel attended State, regional, and national driver education con- 
ferences. The State Conference for Health, Physical Education, and Driver 
Education teachers was held on March 19-21 at Natural Bridge for college and 
high school instructors. In addition, the First Regional Driver Education Con- 
ference was conducted at First Colonial High School in Virginia Beach. 

Seventj'-one non-public schools conducted State-approved programs of driver 
education with 4,937 students enrolled. 

Commercial driver training schools, licensed by the Director of Professional 
and Occupational Registration and approved by the State Department of Educa- 
tion's Driver Education Service, conducted approved programs for 3,089 students 
under the age of 18 (Section 40.1-357 of the Code of Virginia). 

Working jointly with the Division of Motor Vehicles and the State Police, 
the Driver Education Service continued to make available the IBM card known 
as the Driver Education Certificate (DEC-1) for research and evaluation data. 
This certificate must be presented at the Division of Motor Vehicles examining 
station before a student is eligible to apply for an operator's license. 

The Driver Education Service assisted driver education teachers and admin- 
istrators in organizing and developing programs, improving instructional tech- 
niques, and selecting and using equipment and materials for classroom and labo- 
ratory phases of driver education. The Driver Education Service also assisted 
colleges in developing and planning preparatory programs for driver education 
teachers. 

ENGLISH 

During 1969-70 the English Service assisted the secondary schools of Virginia; 
local, district. State, and national professional organizations; institutions of higher 
learning; and various agencies and school personnel in a variety of ways. Pri- 
marily, this assistance was the dissemination of information either through per- 
sonal contact, such as speaking to or consulting with groups of school personnel 
or individuals, or through correspondence, or through the distribution of printed 
materials. Included among these materials were two new publications. Resource 
Units and an Individualized Free-Reading Program Jor English, Grades 8-12, designed 
for use by teachers of low-achieving pupils, and A Survey oj English Requirements 
in Virginia Colleges. Information on high-school English programs was dissemi- 
nated not only in Virginia, but also in many other states and in Canada and Eng- 
land. 

In addition to routine consultation concerning English programs, the English 
Service consulted with administrators, supervisors, and teachers regarding inno- 
vations in scheduling, experimental courses, federal programs, and educational 
television programs for English courses. Considerable time also was spent con- 
sulting with members of the Commission of the Arts and Humanities and school 
personnel regarding proposed programs of the Commission. The Service assisted 
in continuing, for the second summer, a drama institute for teachers at the Barter 
Theatre of Virginia, in initiating a similar institute at the Wayside Theater in 
Middletown, and in establishing a humanities institute at Mary Washington 
College for selected pupils from high schools throughout tlie State. 

Staff members also reviewed proposals of many types, evaluated books and 
audio-visual materials, assisted with the evaluation of schools, and observed 



52 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

English classes in schools which were not being formally evaluated. Additional 
efforts centered upon workshops and pre-school conferences. 

In working with related professional organizations, staff members of the 
English Service worked in a number of capacities. These services included: 
serving as President and Members of the Executive Board of the Virginia Associ- 
ation of Teachers of English; as a Member of the Board of Directors of the National 
Council of Teachers of English; as chairmen of committees for the annual con- 
vention of the National Council of Teachers of English, which was held in Wash- 
ington with Virginia serving as co-host; and as a consultant for a regional educa- 
tional television station. One staff member spoke at the Southeast Regional 
Conference on English in the Two- Year College and also participated in the Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English Leadership Conference held at Cherry Hill, 
New Jersey. Another member of the staff was Secretary of District "Q," Virginia 
Education Association. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Classes in English as a Second (Foreign) Language continue to be offered 
in several schools in Northern Virginia. A workshop was conducted during the 
summer to help prepare teachers to teach these groups. 
Enrollments for foreign languages in 1969-70 follow: 

Total 
Level Level Level Level Level Level Enroll- 
I II III IV V VI menl 

Spanish 27.976 15,560 4,997 1,242 279 10 50,064 

French 23,562 14,591 6.492 2,087 615 98 47,445 

Latin 6,771 4,716 937 433 10 12,867 

German 3,787 2,498 1,039 184 9 7,575 

Russian 280 207 78 9 574 

Portuguese 15 15 

Total 118 ,540 

Spanish and German continued to grow while the other languages decreased in 
enrollment. The loss in Latin is significant, and that trend unfortunately appears 
to be irreversible. 

In order to offer needed support to Latin teachers, the Foreign Language 
Service, in cooperation with a Latin professor from the University of Virginia, 
produced and distributed free of charge a set of three filmstrips on topics of class- 
ical antiquity to each high school in Virginia offering Latin. The effectiveness of 
this project was evaluated, and plans were made to produce an additional 17 
filmstrips to complete the series which will be made available at minimum cost 
to the schools. 

Six colleges responded to requests from the Foreign Language Service that 
summer workshops be offered for foreign language teachers. Two of these pro- 
grams were for Latin teachers. Contemporary methodology and improvement of 
language proficiency were the objectives of most of these programs. 

The foreign language staff assisted teachers and instructional and adminis- 
trative personnel throughout the State by offering advisory and supervisory 
services and by conducting workshops on regional and divisional levels. These 
workshops emphasized new teaching and testing techniques in both classical and 
modern foreign languages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 63 

In addition, the staff planned and conducted a two-day conference for local 
foreign language supervisors and coordinators, served on visiting committees to 
evaluate schools and language institutes, and attended national and State pro- 
fessional meetings. 

The Annual Conference for Foreign Language Teachers held at Old Point 
Comfort attracted 400 teachers. The theme was evaluation of student performance 
in foreign language classes. A separate session was held for college professors. 
Several of the foreign language professional organizations met jointly with the 
Conference. 

A number of workshops were held to help initiate use of the curriculum guide 
distributed in the fall of 1969. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SAFETY AND RECREATION 

The Health and Physical Education Service provided leadership and assis- 
tance in the development and improvement of health education, physical educa- 
tion, and general safety education programs in Virginia's elementary and secondary 
schools. During 1969-70 staff members of the service assisted six school divisions 
in curriculum development in health education and/or physical education. They 
conducted m-service workshops in physical education for classroom teachers in 
14 school divisions and for special physical education teachers in the elementary 
schools in two divisions. In addition, assistance was provided in selecting mate- 
rials and equipment, in planning outdoor activity areas, in evaluating plans for 
health and physical education facilities, and in appraising the health-physical 
fitness status of pupils. 

Attention was focused on growing drug abuse and emphasis was placed on the 
importance of providing students wnth appropriate instruction on drugs and the 
dangers of drug abuse. A publication, "Drugs and Drug Abuse," was prepared to 
assist school administrators and health and physical education teachers to recog- 
nize symptoms of drug abuse, to help them in dealing with the drug abuser, and to 
provide instruction about the dangers involved in the use of drugs. Copies were 
distributed to all school divisions in January, 1970. 

Virginia received an Education Profession Development Act (EPDA) grant 
of $68,000 for drug education. The grant will be used to supplement a continuing 
drug education program and to train educational personnel who will assist local 
teachers to receive training related to drugs, their use and abuse. Plans were made 
for conducting four training programs for representatives from local school divi- 
sions. James H. Davis was selected to attend the National Drug Education Train- 
ing Center at Adelphi University before joining the staff of the Health and Physical 
Education Service on July 1 as Coordinator of Drug Education. 

Continued interest in the improvement of physical education in the elementary 
schools was apparent throughout the year. This was evidenced by the number 
of requests for in-service workshops, clinics, and materials, and by the increase 
in the number of special physical education teachers assigned to elementary 
schools. For the first time, Virginia participated in the President's Council on 
Physical Fitness and Sports' Physical Fitness Demonstration School Project. 
Six elementary schools were recognized for offering outstanding health and physi- 
cal education programs which placed emphasis on physical fitness. 

The physical fitness test for secondary schools was changed from the Virginia 
Test to the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation's 



54 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Youth Fitness Test. As a result, the same test was administered to both elemen- 
tary and secondary school students. 

The annual Health, Physical Education, and Driver Education Conference was 
held in March, 1970. The conference consisted of two meetings — one for repre- 
sentatives from the colleges and the other for teachers of health, physical educa- 
tion, and/or driver education in the public schools and colleges. The college 
representatives discussed a report of the national conference on professional prep- 
aration in health and physical education and both groups, for the first time, par- 
ticipated in a workshop in movement education. 

The staff continued to work with the Division of Teacher Education in the 
approval of teacher preparation programs. Staff members analyzed and submitted 
a report on the "Content Indentification Chart" and on course descriptions sub- 
mitted by the colleges. Special college committees appointed to study (1) an 
endorsement in health education and (2) an endorsement in elementary physical 
education submitted reports. 

Revision of the health education guides continued and it is anticipated that 
the guides will be distributed during the 1970-71 school year. 

Two physical education camps for high school students were conducted in 
June at 4-H Camp Farrar, Virginia Beach. Two hundred ninetj^-two girls from 86 
secondary schools attended. The camps provided opportunities for girls to have 
camping experience, to gain better understanding of physical education, to de- 
velop interest in the teaching profession, and to develop leadership. 

HISTORY, GOVERNMENT, AND GEOGRAPHY 

Staff members of the History, Government, and Geography Service assist 
personnel in local school divisions in efforts to improve instruction in history and 
the social sciences. During 1969-70, staff members participated in special programs 
planned by local school divisions, assisted in selecting instructional materials, 
developing new courses, and evaluating instructional activities; conducted in- 
service meetings, demonstration sessions, curriculum projects, and pre-school 
conferences; and served on visiting committees in the evaluation of secondary 
chools. 

Within the Department, staff members cooperated with the School Libraries 
and Textbook Service and the Bureau of Teaching Materials in evaluating supple- 
mentary materials and assisted in the administration of National Defense Educa- 
tion Act, Title III, funds for instructional materials and equipment for history, 
civics, and geography. Staff members also: prepared a statistical analysis on 
the status of course offerings in the fields of history and the social sciences; main- 
tained a professional library which includes research projects, curriculum guides, 
and general titles on history, government, geography, economics, and related 
areas; and developed special materials for teachers and students. 

The Service planned two meetings for local supervisors of history and the 
social sciences and a Statewide conference for Virginia teachers of history and the 
social sciences. 

Publications prepared and distributed through the Service included: A Guide 
to Instructional Preparation for Virginia and United States History; An Instructional 
Guide Jor Virginia and United States Government; Citizenship Education as to Law, 
Disorder, Extremism, and Civil Disobedience; Curriculum Analysis in History and the 
Social Sciences; Directory of Social Studies Curriculum Projects; In-Service Education 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 55 

in History and the Social Sciences; Our American Heritage: Documents and Symbols 
of Democracy; Selective References for a Professional Library in History and the 
Social Sciences; The Social Studies Department; Bibliography for Geography Educa- 
tion; The Democratic Legacy-Basis for Freedom — A Program of Citizenship Educa- 
tion for Virginia's Public Schools; The Social Studies Curriculum in Virginia's Public 
Schools; and Reflective Questions — Analyzing the Social Studies I'rogram. 

In addition to specific services rendered to secondary school personnel, staff 
members attended regional and national professional meetings related to the 
teaching of history, government, and geography; cooperated with various agencies 
and organizations, such as the Senate Youth Program, Virginia State Chamber 
of Commerce, Model General Assembly, Virginia Federation of History, and the 
Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs; assisted lay groups interested in history, 
government, and economic education; assisted representatives of teacher-training 
colleges; participated in various studies; and worked with various committees, 
including the Humanities Development Panel, Executive Committee of the Vir- 
ginia Council for the Social Studies, Junior Historians Committee of the Associa- 
tion for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, and the Virginia Commission on 
Children and Youth. 

MATHEMATICS 

The year 1969-70 marked the beginning of a new six-year adoption period for 
mathematics textbooks. For the first time in the history of the Department, the 
State Board of Education had, in December 1968, listed textbooks whose content 
was considered appropriate and manageable for three levels of learners in grades 
eight, nine, and ten. Such a listing is to be applauded and was well received by 
the school divisions throughout the State. 

Staff members directed their primarj^ efforts during 1969-70 to problems re- 
lated to classroom use of textbooks. These involved: (a) the mathematical back- 
ground of students, (b) the amount and depth of content to be expected of students, 
(c) the placement of students (especially in the early high school years) to afford 
maximmn opportunity for success, and (d) the selection of textbooks for all groups 
of students. 

In conjunction with the major Statewide activity and in a continuing effort 
to improve mathematics instruction, the staff conducted pre-school and in-term 
conferences for teachers and planned and conducted the Seventh Annual State 
Mathematics Conference, held in Arlington, and the Third Regional State Mathe- 
matics Conference, held in Bath County. Staff personnel also assisted school 
divisions in developing curriculum guides; in coordinating testing activities for a 
State Mathematics Fair; in judging entries in local mathematics fairs; in evaluating 
mathematics programs; in planning and conducting workshops; in selecting courses 
and textbooks for special groups of students; and, in consulting with college and 
university personnel about projects and procedures for up-dating preservice and 
inservice training of mathematics teachers. These activities involved visits, 
ranging in number from one to five, to 94 of the 133 school divisions. 

To keep abreast of the general aspects of secondary education, members of 
the staff attended regional and Statewide meetings of supervisors, principals, and 
superintendents, and the State Educational Research Conference; served on the 
Board of Dilenowisco (Educational Cooperative for Dickenson, Lee, Wise, Scott 
counties, and Norton City); and, served as coordinators and members of visiting 
committees to evaluate high schools. 



66 ANNUAL REPORT OP THES 

In national activities concerning mathematics education staff participation 
included thn following: 

(a) chairman of the Committee on Mathematics for the Non-College Bound, 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; 

(b) assistant director of the National Conference on Low Achievers spon- 
sored by the National Science Foundation, the Association of State 
Supervisors of Mathematics, and the University of Virginia; 

(c) first vice-president of the Association of State Supervisors of Math- 
ematics; 

(d) chairman of the Program for the 48th Annual Meeting of the National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics; 

(e) member of Committee on Meeting of the National Council of Teachers 
of Mathematics; 

(f) participants in the National Conference on Mathematics in the Inner 
City sponsored by the School Mathematics Study Group; 

(g) participants in the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics 
for a conference on the Low Achiever; 

(h) speakers at meetings of the National Council of Teachers of Mathe- 
matics held in Washington, D.C.; Memphis, Tennessee; and Raleigh, 
North Carolina; and at annual meetings of mathematics teachers in 
Delaware, California, and Wisconsin; and, 

(i) evaluator of summer institute proposals to the National Science Foun- 
dation. 

On the international level one staff member visited, observed, and consulted 
with teachers, students, and administrative personnel in several schools of Ameri- 
can Samoa. Two members of the staff represented Virginia at the First Inter- 
national Congress on Mathematical Education held in Lyon, France. 

TABLE 4 

Total Enrollment in Grades 8-12 and in Mathematics (Grades 8-12) and 
Number of Mathematics Teachers, 1959-60 and 1969-70, and Percent of In- 
crease FOR THE Decade 



Total 1959-60 1969-70 Percent of Increase 

High School Enrollment 
Mathematics Enrollment 
Number of Mathematics Teachers 

'These figures include all teachers who taught at least one class per day in Mathematics, grades eight through 12. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

The Music Education Service provided leadership during the year by: (1) 
continuing intensive and extensive field service at both the secondary and ele- 
mentary levels; (2) organizing a State music conference in which approximately 
475 teachers and students participated; (3) conducting a two-day seminar for 
music supervisors; (4) directing the Virginia Music Camp, which provided growth 



247,699 


381,736 


54.1 


169,479 


329,460 


94.4 


*1,853 


*3,562 


92.2 



SUPElllNTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



67 



and stimulation for approximately 900 teachers and students; and (5) making in- 
depth survej's of the organizational structure of the music education programs 
in three school divisions. 

During the year, final drafts of "Resource Book— MUSIC IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION" were completed, reviewed by a committee and the supervisors 
of music of the State, and approved by the State Board of Education. The publi- 
cation will be available for distribution during September, 1970. 

The following chart based on information supplied by the Division of Educa- 
tional Research and Statistics, provide a comprehensive analysis of music pro- 
grams in the public secondary schools of Virginia. 



Music Classes 1969-1970 



Type Class 



No. 
Schools 



19 

41 
45 

51 

44 



General Music, Exploratory, Grade 

7, less than 36 weeks 82 

General Music, Grade 7, 36 weeks. . 
General Music, Exploratory, Grade 

8 and above, less than 36 weeks. . 
General Music, Grade 8, 36 weeks.. 
General Music, Grade 9 and above, 

36 weeks 

Music History and Literature, 

Grades 9-12 

Music Theory I, Grades 8-12 50 

Music Theory II, Grades 9-12 4 

Band, Grade 7, 9-36 weeks 53 

Beginning Band, Grades 7-12 204 

Intermediate Band, Grades 7-12, 

18-36 weeks 282 

Advanced Band, Grades 7-12 264 

Instrumental Music, Grades 7-12, 

18-37 weeks 

Small Instrumental Ensembles, 

Grades 7-12 

Orchestra, Grade 7, 18-36 weeks. . 
Beginning Orchestra, Grades 7-12, 

18-37 weeks 

Intermediate Orchestra, Grades 7- 

12, 18-37 weeks 40 

Advanced Orchestra, Grades 7-12. 
Girls Chorus/Glee Club, Grades 

7-12 

Bovs Chorus/Glee Club, Grades 

8-12 

Chorus, Grade 7, 6-36 weeks 42 

Small Vocal Ensembles, Grades 

8-12 40 

Mixed Chorus/Choir — Unselected, 

Grades 7-12 254 

Mixed Chorus/Choir — Selected, 

Grades 8-12 177 



22 

12 
15 

28 



27 
106 



33 



No. 
Sections 

532 
56 

280 
56 

68 

48 

55 

4 

71 

278 

402 
300 

62 

20 
16 

41 

44 
26 

134 

34 
66 

42 

440 

198 



Increase 
Over 1967- 

Enroll- 1968 School 
ment Year 



10,414 
2,073 

7,427 
1,492 

1,559^ 

897, 
7761 
38 
2.2701 
5,802 

10,633 
14,922 

1,069 



407, 
27r 



528 

759 
600 

5,481, 

973} 
2,602^ 

781 

13,427 

9,553 



40% 

10% 

30% 

11% 



32% 

7% 
0% 

10% 



TOTALS 3,273 100,754 

Proportion of total secondary school population enrolled in music classes 

1907-68 20.2% 
1969-70 21.7% 



58 



ANNUAL HEPORT OF THE 



SCIENCE 

Staff members of the Science Education Service assisted local school divisions 
throughout the year in the improvement of science instruction by serving as con- 
sultants to local school personnel and by participating in local, State, and national 
programs. Approximately 1,000 secondary school science teachers, college per- 
sonnel, school administrators, and others attended conferences sponsored by the 
Service. These meetings included the Seventh Annual State Science Teachers 
Conference, held at Blacksburg, October 3 and 4, and the Tidewater Regional 
Science Teachers Conference, held at Virginia Beach in March. Participants at 
the Tidewater conference took full advantage of the opportunity to view a total 
eclipse of the sun. Other activities in which staff members participated, included: 
the scheduling of the NASA Spacemobile Program in 98 schools; a survey of plane- 
tarium locations which revealed 16 planetariums in operation by 10 school divisions 
and five by Virginia colleges; the distribution to local school divisions for their 
evaluation of the guidelines for Physical Science and Earth and Space Science, 
prepared by the Science Curriculum Study Committee, and the distribution of the 
revised safety bulletin, "Pin Up for Safety"; and the selection of students to par- 
ticipate in the Virginia Flight Seminar for Youth and the National Youth Science 
Camp Program in West Virginia. 

Members of the staff attended two national conferences on youth science 
programs, a regional and national conference on conservation, a conference on 
environmental science education, and made presentations to several college groups 
of participants in the National Science Foundation. 

Staff members also cooperated with other services in the Department in 
evaluating films, books, and school plans, and in school evaluations. 

The first showing of the safety film, "Science Laboratory Safety — Part I," 
was held in the Harrisonburg High School auditorium. The Service received an 
Award of Merit for this film from the National Committee on Films for Safety. 

1969-70 Enrollment in Science Courses 

Schools 

Offering No. Enroll- No. 

Course the Course Sections ment Teachers 

Science Grade 7 124 1,259 35,126 397 

Science Grade 8 489 3,639 96,762 1,080 

Science Grade 9 492 2,693 70,090 774 

Biology 505 2,993 75,246 971 

Chemistry 339 1,081 23,183 411 

Physics 279 449 7,879 263 

Others 38 57 1,025 39 



Regular Session Totals. . . . 
18 Summer Session Science Courses . 101 



12,171 
301 



309,311 
4,254 



303 



TOTALS. 



12,472 



313,565 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



59 



TABLE 5 VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS 


ENROLLMENT AND 


GRADUATES 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
of High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Accomack: 
Atlantic 




75 
45 
44 


59 
49 
70 
262 
73 
64 


70 
47 
47 
214 
58 
63 


42 
51 
50 
163 
55 
48 


51 
44 
31 
146 
33 
51 


297 
236 
242 
785 
287 
306 
320 
76 


49 


Central 




42 


Chiucoteague 




31 


Mary N. Smith 




141 


Onancock 




68 

80 

272 

16 


31 


Parkslev 




50 


T.C.Walker 


48 




Tangier 


15 


22 


10 


13 


12 








Total 


48 


600 


592 


521 


419 


369 


2,549 


356 






Albemarle: 
Albemarle 








646 


556 


418 


1,620 
702 
769 
243 


364 


Jack Jouett Jr. 




374 

290 

82 


328 

220 

73 




Joseph T. Henley Jr.. 
Scottsville 


259 

88 




























Total 


347 


746 


621 


646 


556 


418 


3,334 


364 






Alleghany: 
Alleghany County. . . 




298 


264 


234 


187 


186 


1,169 


173 








Total 


298 


264 


234 


187 


ISO 


1,169 


173 








Amelia: 
Amelia County 




259 


158 


106 


96 


85 


704 


87 








Total 




259 


158 


106 


96 


85 


704 


87 








Amherst: 
Amherst Countv. . . . 




53 

379 


385 


349 


287 


257 


1 ,331 
379 


245 


Amherst Countv Jr. 




















Total 




432 


385 


349 


287 


257 


1.710 


245 









60 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5- VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Appomattox: 
Appomattox 




150 
269 


202 
55 


165 
53 


123 
33 


150 

47 


790 
457 


147 


Appomattox Int 












Total 




419 


257 


218 


156 


197 


1,247 


147 








Arlington: 

Gunston Jr 


330 
380 
405 
301 
310 


308 
371 
425 
287 
305 


345 
359 
400 
318 
258 








983 
1,110 
1,230 
906 
873 
2,311 
2,119 
1,217 
1,833 




Jefferson Jr 










Kenmore Jr 










Stratford Jr 










Swanson Jr 










Wakefield 


789 
702 


755 
731 


767 
686 




Washington-Lee 








630 


Williamsburg Jr 

Yorktown 


428 


414 


375 




666 


683 


484 


456 












Total 


2,1.54 


2,110 


2,055 


2,157 


2,169 


1,937 


12,582 


1,707 


Augusta: 
Beverley Manor Int.. 
Buffalo Gap 


118 


78 
169 
191 
114 
335 










196 
880 
892 
573 
1,451 




211 
215 
116 
329 


163 
181 
131 
294 


189 

148 

93 

259 


148 
157 
119 
234 


135 


Fort Defiance 




146 


Riverheads 




113 


Wilson Memorial .... 




212 








Total 


118 


887 


871 


769 


689 


658 


3,992 


606 






Bath: 
Millboro 




38 
50 


30 
74 


20 
45 


24 

47 


22 

37 


134 
253 


22 


Valley 




33 








Total 




88 


104 


65 


71 


59 


387 


55 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



61 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— CovTivtTED 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School En 


rollment 




Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Bedford: 

Liberty 




408 
195 
132 


398 
176 
107 


352 
169 
117 


304 
140 

78 


260 

109 

91 


1,722 
789 
525 


243 


Staunton River. . . . 




100 


Susie G. Gibson 




83 








Total 




735 


681 


638 


522 


460 


3,036 


425 








Bland: 
Bland 




70 

72 


49 

48 


35 

47 


35 

44 


45 
29 


234 
240 


45 


Rocky Gap 




27 








Total 




142 


97 


82 


79 


74 


474 


72 








Botetourt: 

Botetourt Int 


424 


367 
11 

29 










791 
490 

787 




James River 


130 
244 


128 
167 


114 
184 


107 
163 


101 


Lord Botetourt 




149 








Total 


424 


407 


374 


295 


298 


270 


2,068 


250 






Brunswick: 

Brunswick Jr 




381 


300 


270 






951 
479 




Brunswick Sr 




252 


227 


214 














Total 




381 


300 


270 


252 


227 


1,430 


214 








Buchanan: 

Buchanan Co. Voc. 




2 

94 

117 

306 


2 

89 
110 
365 


2 
63 
84 


76 
49 
84 


52 
54 
64 


134 
349 
459 
731 
810 
447 
301 


47 


Council 




52 


Garden 




58 


Grundy Jr.. 






Grundy Sr 




365 
95 
63 


240 
80 
44 


205 
64 
56 


167 


Hurley 




112 
75 


96 
63 


42 


Whitewood 




50 








Total 




766 


725 


672 


573 


495 


3,231 


416 









62 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5-VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— CoNTiNXjED 



1 


2 


.3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 






High School Enrollmei 


^T 




Number 
of High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Buckingham: 
Buckingham Central 
Carter G. Woodson.. 




121 
114 


106 
64 


105 

89 


82 
72 


88 
66 


502 
405 


87 








Total 




235 


170 


194 


1.54 


154 


907 


1.52 








Campbell: 
Altavista 




183 
337 
20 
275 
150 


155 
293 
241 


135 
304 
226 


120 
241 
186 


119 

248 
157 


712 
1 ,423 
830 
551 
658 


114 


Brookville 




227 


Rustburg 




152 


Rustburg Int 


276 




William Campbell. . . 


157 


127 


109 


115 


98 








Total 


276 


965 


846 


792 


656 


639 


4,174 


591 






Caroline: 
Bowling Green Jr.. . . 


100 


123 
113 

89 










223 

787 
376 




Bowling Green Sr.. 


205 
94 


168 

77 


153 

60 


148 
56 


132 


Ladvsmith 




54 








Total 


100 


325 


299 


245 


213 


204 


1,386 


186 






Carroll: 
Carroll County 








410 


280 


273 


963 
665 
231 

71 
494 


246 


Hillsville Int 


225 
82 
24 

167 


230 

88 

23 

195 


210 
61 
24 

132 




St. Paul Int 










Vaughan Int 










Woodlawn Int 




















Total 


498 


536 


427 


410 


280 


273 


2,424 


246 






Charles City: 
Charles City Cty.... 




157 


157 


113 


100 


110 


637 


105 


Total 




157 


157 


113 


100 


110 


637 


105 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



63 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enuollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Charlotte: 
Central Jr 




253 


253 








506 

587 




Randolph-Henry. . . . 




212 


202 


173 


154 












Total 




253 


253 


212 


202 


173 


1 ,093 


154 








Chesterfield: 
Carver 




19 
523 
293 
469 
446 

37 


63 


69 


77 


65 


293 
1,080 

815 
1,429 
1,364 

133 
1,391 
1,167 

618 
1,062 

923 
1,277 
1,543 


58 


Chester lut 


557 

308 
530 

482 




Elkhardt lut 


214 

430 

436 

37 










Falling Creek Jr 










F. D. Thompson Int. 










Grange Hall 


21 
523 
496 
128 
399 
234 


25 

469 
373 
96 
374 
181 


13 

398 
298 
86 
289 
141 


11 


Huguenot 




387 


Manchester 








287 


Matoaca 




179 


129 


73 


Meadowbrook 




265 


Midlothian 




180 
430 


187 
380 
529 


135 


Providence Jr 


467 




Thomas Dale 


426 


293 


295 


279 










Total 


2,344 


2,576 


2,405 


2,296 


1,888 


1,585 


13,095 


1 495 






Clarkf,: 
Clarke County 






158 


147 


100 


90 


495 
313 


88 


Clarke County Int.. 


160 


153 














Total 


160 


153 


158 


147 


100 


90 


808 


88 






Craiq: 
New Castle 




71 


79 


55 


40 


40 


285 


39 








Total 




71 


79 


55 


40 


40 


285 


39 








Culpeper: 

Culpeper Countj' .... 






316 


304 


225 


189 


1,034 
753 


164 


Culpeper County Jr.. 


445 


308 














Total 


445 


308 


316 


304 


225 


189 


1,787 


164 







64 



ANNtAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Cumberland: 
Cumberland 




152 


136 


115 


86 


83 


572 


69 








Total 




152 


136 


115 


86 


83 


572 


fiQ 








Dickenson: 
Clintwood 




185 
127 
128 


139 

96 

101 


150 
128 
113 


125 
91 
84 


116 

83 

119 


715 
525 
545 


99 


Ervinton 




71 


Haysi 




106 








Total 




440 


336 


391 


300 


318 


1,785 


276 








Dinwiddie: 

Dinwiddie Co. Jr.. . . 




516 


389 








905 

876 




Dinwiddie Co. Sr... . 


358 


290 


228 


205 












Total 




516 


389 


358 


290 


228 


1,781 


205 








Essex : 
Essex County 




71 
97 


71 

84 


54 
66 


61 

69 


54 

49 


311 
365 


55 


Tappahannock 




43 








Total 




168 


155 


120 


130 


103 


676 


98 








Fairfax: 
Annandale 






637 


623 


627 


526 


2,413 
960 
1,201 
1,911 
1,798 
1,993 
2,516 
1,209 
1,481 
931 
1,578 
2,497 
1,802 
1,359 
1,176 
1,828 
2,165 
2,022 
1,077 


418 


Brvant Int 


489 
592 


471 
609 




Cooper Int 












Edison 


459 
514 
515 
676 


432 
484 
526 
591 


445 
427 
491 
650 


575 
373 
461 
599 


504 


Fai rf ax 






348 


Falls Church 






418 


Ft. Hunt 






554 


Foster Int 


582 
628 
448 


627 
853 

483 




Frost Int 












Glasgow Int 

Groveton 












451 
525 
565 


446 
442 
478 


353 
358 
416 


328 
"343 


297 


Hayfield 


599 


573 




Herndon 


327 


Herndon Int 


689 

661 

1,175 


670 
515 
653 




Holmes Int 












Irvine Int 












J. E. B. Stuart 


534 
536 


570 
539 


547 
486 


514 
461 


471 


Jefferson 






440 


Kilmer lot 


563 


514 





SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



65 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Fairfax — Continued 
Langlev 






517 


502 


524 


419 


1,902 
1 ,409 
2 , 132 

958 
1,382 
2,039 
2,281 
2 ,090 
1,570 
2,573 
1.405 
1,333 

902 
2,842 
1,141 
1,191 
2,818 


404 


Laxiier Int 


088 

459 
095 


721 

405 
499 

087 




Lee High and Int.. . 
Longfellow Int 


483 


449 


383 


352 


324 


Luther Jackson Int.. 












Madison 


580 
602 
509 
418 
733 


563 

588 
519 
418 
689 


442 
533 
533 
338 
601 


454 
498 
469 
396 
5.50 


408 


Marshall 






440 


McLean 






425 


Mt. Vernon 






379 


Oakton 






490 


Poe Int 


710 
GOO 
449 


095 
073 
4,53 




Thoreau Int 












Twain Int 












West Springfield. . . . 


814 


767 


()76 


585 


570 


Whitman Int 


577 
010 


.564 

581 




Whittier Int 












Woodson 


753 


761 


688 


616 


555 










Total 


11,274 


11.300 


10,941 


10,387 


9,518 


8.519 


61,945 


7,8:^5 


Fauquier: 
Cedar-Lee Jr 




180 
141 
307 


132 
J 95 
237 








312 

1 .415 

544 




Fauquier 




412 


337 


321 


308 


W. C. Taylor Jr.... 


















Total.. 




028 


504 


421 


337 


321 


2.271 


308 








Floyd: 

Floyd County 




204 


204 


188 


158 


127 


881 


123 








Total 




204 


204 


188 


158 


127 


881 


123 








Fluvanna: 

Fluvanna Jr 




103 


115 








278 
334 




Fluvanna Sr 




138 


102 


84 


74 












Total 




!(« 


115 


138 


102 


84 


612 


74 








Frankun: 

Franklin County .... 








448 


361 


364 


1.173 

1.145 

J 94 


311 


Franklin County Jr.. 
Lee M. Waid 




034 
42 


511 
48 




36 


32 


36 


32 








Total 




076 


559 


484 


393 


400 


2,512 


343 



66 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Frederick: 
Frederick County Jr. 


393 


307 


248 








948 

1,255 

925 




James Wood 


509 


409 


337 


311 


Robert E. Aylor Jr. . 


381 


292 


252 














Total 


774 


599 


500 


509 


409 


337 


3,128 


331 






Giles: 
Giles 




229 
126 


200 
132 


202 
111 


190 
110 


180 
115 


1,001 
594 


175 


Narrows 




103 








Total 




355 


332 


313 


300 


295 


1,595 


278 








Gloucester: 
Gloucester 








175 


18,5 


166 


526 
799 


145 


Gloucester Int 


340 


246 


213 














Total 


340 


246 


213 


175 


185 


166 


1,325 


145 






Goochland: 
Goochland 








148 


134 


109 


391 

418 


82 


Goochland Jr 




220 


198 
















Total 




220 


198 


148 


134 


109 


809 


82 








Grayson: 
Bavwood 


34 
44 


26 
36 
63 
142 
26 










60 




Fairview 










80 
359 
590 

88 




Fries 


84 

142 

20 


62 

111 

14 


79 

103 

24 


71 

92 

4 


67 


Independence 




93 


Mt. Rogers 




4 








Total 


78 


293 


246 


187 


206 


167 


1,177 


164 


Greene: 
William Monroe. . . . 




98 


81 


71 


55 


56 


361 


53 


Total 




98 


81 


71 


55 


56 


361 


53 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



67 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OK High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Greensville: 

Greensville County.. 








325 


247 


222 


794 
695 


190 


Greensville Co. Jr.. . 




406 


289 
















Total 




406 


289 


325 


247 


222 


1,489 


190 








Halifax: 

Halifax County 




464 
952 


441 
822 


766 
300 


630 
252 


585 

228 


2,886 
2,554 


546 


Halifax Countv Jr. . . 












Total 




1,416 


1,263 


1,066 


882 


813 


5,440 


546 








Hanover: 
Lee-Davis 








363 


261 


209 


833 
771 
925 

823 


199 


Ijihprt V Jr . 




376 


395 




Patrick Henrv 




364 


304 


257 


236 


Stonewall Jackson Jr. 




426 


397 
















Total 




802 


792 


727 


565 


466 


3,352 


435 








Henrico: 

RrnolvlanH .Tr 


515 
744 


672 
594 


609 
559 








1,796 
1,897 
1,817 
1,491 
1,660 
1 ,336 
1,737 
1,875 
993 




T*^airfipl(i Jr 










Freeman 


636 
294 
627 
518 


622 
286 
518 
412 


559 
274 
515 
406 


526 


Henrico 




352 


285 


249 


Hermitace 




477 


Highland SDrines.. . . 








379 


Tiirkahop .Ir 


377 


666 
459 
227 


694 
397 
223 




Tucker 


392 

212 


336 
171 


291 
160 


276 


Varina 




154 








Total 


1,636 


2,970 


2,767 


2,679 


2,345 


2,205 


14,602 


2,061 






Henry: 
Drewrv Mason 




288 
374 
300 
289 


237 
333 
276 
258 


212 
267 
177 
183 


183 
258 
200 
158 


162 
222 
162 
137 


1,082 
1,454 
1,115 
1,025 


141 


Fieldale-Collinsville. 
George W. Carver... 




182 
150 


John D. Bassett 




123 








Total 




1,251 


1,104 


839 


799 


683 


4,676 


596 









68 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THK 



TABLE 5- 


VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES Continued 




1 


2 


3 


1 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
of High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Highland: 

Highland 




58 


46 


44 


45 


38 


231 


36 








Total 




58 


46 


44 


45 


38 


231 


36 








Isle of Wight: 
Smithfield 




268 
127 


220 

167 


180 
124 


154 
123 


160 
92 


982 
633 


114 


Windsor. 




83 






Total 




395 


387 


304 


277 


252 


1,615 


197 






King George: 
Kine Georee 




195 


167 


140 


106 


120 


728 


102 








Total 




195 


167 


140 


106 


120 


728 


102 






King AND Queen: 

Central 




84 


70 


70 


55 


56 


335 


54 








Total 




84 


70 


70 


55 


56 


335 


54 








King Wtlt.iam: 
King William 




131 

79 


82 
62 


92 
59 


67 

58 


75 
56 


447 
314 


70 


West Point 




56 






Total 




210 


144 


151 


125 


131 


761 


126 








Lancaster: 
Lancaster 






183 


162 


139 


113 


597 
398 


98 


Mfliitua Tnt .. 


196 


202 
















Total 


196 


202 


183 


162 


139 


113 


995 


98 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



69 



TABLE 5-VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Lee: 
Dryden 




49 
32 
74 
30 
158 
68 
99 


46 
38 
76 
25 
124 
42 
88 


46 

37 
77 
22 
95 
23 
62 


37 
27 
66 
23 
[)0 
35 
50 


:53 
28 
55 
25 
109 
29 
35 


211 
162 
348 
125 
576 
197 
334 


33 


Flatwoods 




Joneaville 




5'? 


Keokee 




22 


Pennington 




8,3 


St. Charles 




'>fi 


Thomas Walker 




26 








Total 




510 


439 


362 


328 


314 


1,953 


265 








Loudoun: 
Broad Run 




295 
263 
338 


269 
195 
302 


210 
179 
221 


193 
150 
203 


136 
124 
188 


1 , 103 

911 

1 ,252 


123 


Loudoun County .... 




1 11 


Loudoun Valley 




178 








Total 




896 


766 


610 


546 


448 


3,266 


412 








Louisa: 
A. G. Richardson Jr. 




378 


238 








616 
566 




Louisa County 




235 


178 


153 


128 










Total 




378 


238 


235 


178 


153 


1,182 


128 








Lunenburg: 
Central 








251 


165 


157 


573 
492 


131 


Lunenburg Jr 




266 


226 
















Total 




266 


226 


251 


165 


157 


1,065 


131 








Madison: 
Madison County. . . . 




153 


132 


123 


107 


98 


613 


83 








Total 




153 


132 


123 


107 


98 


613 


83 








Mathews: 
Mathews 






107 


113 


78 


90 


388 
253 


88 


Mathews Int 


128 


125 
















Total 


128 


125 


107 


113 


78 


90 


641 


88 







70 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Mecklenburg: 

Bluestone Jr 




354 


285 








639 

737 
587 
661 




Bluestone Sr 




262 


270 


205 


195 


Park View Jr 




372 


215 




Park View Sr 




263 


226 


172 


126 












Total 




726 


500 


525 


496 


377 


2,624 


321 








Middlesex: 
Middlesex 




133 


92 


122 


89 


92 


528 


81 








Total 




133 


92 


122 


89 


92 


528 


81 








Montgomery: 
Alleghany District. . 




105 

91 

303 

271 


82 

85 

307 

260 


82 

50 

247 

237 


63 
62 

227 
204 


37 

41 

212 

153 


369 

319 

1,296 

1,125 


37 


Auburn 




34 


Blacksburg 




167 


Chiistiansburg 




124 








Total 




770 


734 


616 


556 


443 


3,109 


362 








Nansemond: 

Forest Glen 




217 
432 
182 
108 


188 

405 

182 

80 


146 

222 

130 

59 


152 
220 
140 

78 


117 
186 
104 

58 


820 
1.465 

738 

38:3 


103 


Jolin F. Kennedy. . . . 




178 


John Yeates 




103 


Southwestern 




54 








Total 




939 


855 


557 


590 


465 


3,406 


438 








Nelson: 
Nelson County 






215 


228 


159 


164 


766 
537 


151 


Nelson Jr 


285 


252 
















Total 


285 


252 


215 


228 


159 


164 


1,303 


151 






New Kent: 
New Kent 




124 


115 


88 


90 


61 


478 


55 








Total 




124 


115 


88 


90 


61 


478 


55 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



71 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


NuNrBER 

of High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Northampton: 
Cape Charles 




25 
202 
111 


21 
207 
115 


20 
138 
115 


35 

142 

91 


18 

125 

94 


119 
814 
526 


18 

114 

83 


Northampton Co. . . . 




Northampton 








Total 




338 


343 


273 


268 


237 


1,459 


215 






Northumberland: 
Northumberland. . . . 








168 


143 


152 


463 
381 


146 


Northumberland Jr. . 




198 


183 
















Total 




198 


183 


108 


143 


152 


SiA 


146 






Nottoway: 
Blackstone 




81 
123 
147 


51 

92 

104 


45 

71 

117 


24 
61 
98 


37 
78 
75 


238 
425 
541 


35 
74- 


Crewe 




Luther H. Foster. . . . 




7'i 








Total 




351 


247 


233 


183 


190 


1,204 


182 








Orange: 
Orange County 




313 


279 


240 


189 


147 


1,168 


133 








Total 




313 


279 


240 


189 


147 


1,168 


133 








Page: 
Luray 




152 
159 


155 

163 


98 
151 


81 
93 


91 
89 


577 
655 


86 


Page County 




82 








Total 




311 


318 


249 


174 


180 


1,232 


168 








Patrick: 
Blue Ridge 




50 
87 
26 
29 
109 
52 


50 
55 
17 


57 
60 
18 


54 
51 
17 


43 
52 
17 


254 
305 
95 
29 
399 
173 


30 


Hardin Reynolds. . . . 




50 


Meadows of Dan. . . . 




16 


Red Bank 






Stuart 




69 
34 


86 
29 


62 
35 


73 
23 


68 


Wool wine 




23 








Total 




353 


225 


250 


219 


208 


1,255 


187 









72 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Pittsylvania: 

Blairs Jr 




781 
235 


302 
238 
191 
346 








1,083 

1,096 

1,030 

801 

802 

982 




Chatham 




206 
332 


186 
273 


231 
234 


191 


Dan River Sr 




202 


Gretna Jr 


69 


386 




Gretna Sr 


286 
277 


260 
267 


256 
245 


225 


Tunstall Sr 







193 


211 










Total 


69 


1,402 


1,270 


1,101 


986 


966 


5,794 


829 






Powhatan: 
Powhatan 






127 


92 


61 


46 


326 
240 


44 


Powhatan Middle. . . 


132 


108 
















Total 


132 


108 


127 


92 


61 


46 


566 


44 






Prince Edward: 
Prince Edward Co... 




188 


115 


09 


43 


47 


462 


45 


Total 




188 


115 


69 


43 


47 


462 


45 








Prince George: 
Prince George 








450 


315 


287 


1,052 
1,017 


273 


Prince George Jr. . . 




577 


440 
















Total 




577 


440 


450 


315 


287 


2,069 


273 








Prince William: 
Brentsville District . 
E. H.Marsteller Jr. 


""447' 
594 


120 
377 
522 


112 


98 


78 


74 


482 

824 

1,116 

1,835 

853 

433 

1,314 

846 

884 

1,526 

1,868 


74 


Fred M. Lynn Jr 

Gar-Field 












594 


516 


404 


321 


292 


Graham Park Jr. 


465 
226 


388 
207 




Jennie Dean Jr. . 












Osbourn 


439 


354 


286 


235 


189 


Parkside 


439 
518 


407 
36G 




RioDon 












Stonewall Jackson . . . 


490 
003 


438 
545 


315 
406 


283 
314 


253 


Woodbridee ... 






280 










Total 


2,689 


2,387 


2,238 


1,951 


1,489 


1,227 


11,981 


1,088 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



73 



TABLE 5- 


VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
of High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


r2th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Pulaski: 
Dublin 




312 
337 


241 
280 


225 
273 


225 
250 


195 
251 


1,198 
1,391 


177 


Pulaski 




219 








Total 




649 


521 


498 


475 


446 


2,589 


396 








Rappahannock: 
Rappahannock Co.. . 




120 


90 


71 


46 


48 


375 


45 








Total 




120 


90 


71 


46 


48 


375 


45 








Richmond: 
Rappahannock 




89 
85 


77 
23 


62 
36 


65 
16 


58 
23 


351 
183 


57 


Richmond County. . . 




23 


Total 




174 


100 


98 


81 


81 


534 


80 








Roanokr: 

Andrew Lewis 




111 


410 
276 
218 
249 
420 


346 
393 


301 
315 


237 

298 


1,405 

1,282 

1,118 

1,011 

1,707 

298 

735 

924 

609 


285 


Cave Soring 




282 


Cave Spring Int 

Glenvar 


363 


537 

292 
445 




200 

331 

15 


150 
247 
123 


120 
264 
160 


107 


Northside 




250 


Roanoke Co. Ed. Ctr. 




154 


Salem Int 


442 


293 






William Byrd 


301 


255 


181 


187 


210 


William Byrd Int... 


309 


300 














Total 


1,114 


1,978 


1,874 


1,540 


1,317 


1,266 


9,089 


1,288 






Rockbridge: 
Natural Bridge 




128 
137 


105 
125 


97 
94 


95 

78 


74 
68 


499 
502 


67 


Rockbridge 




65 








Total 




265 


230 


191 


173 


142 


1,001 


132 








Rockingham: 
Broadwav 






307 
130 


260 
126 


212 

76 


180 
64 


959 
536 
594 
706 
741 
1,043 


165 


Elkton 




140 
269 
340 
208 


67 


John C. Myers 

John W. Wayland. . . 
Montevideo 


.325 
366 














138 
351 


143 
241 


123 
218 


129 
233 


112 


Turner Ashby 




219 










Total 


691 


957 


926 


770 


629 


606 


4,579 


5&3 







74 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Russell: 
Castlewood 




216 
51 

247 
163 


162 

45 

170 

143 


140 

39 

136 

125 


114 
35 
91 

105 


136 
31 
89 

106 


768 
201 
733 
642 


127 


Cleveland 




31 


Honaker 




73 


Lebanon 




98 








Total 




677 


520 


440 


345 


362 


2,344 


329 








Scott: 
Gate City 






255 


262 


209 


201 


927 
77 
454 
389 
451 
63 


196 


Hilton 


39 


38 
104 
198 
126 

31 




Rve Cove 


111 


107 


71 


61 


54 


Shoemaker. ... 


191 




Twin Sorines 


92 


84 


72 


77 


77 


Yuma 


32 
















Total 


262 


497 


458 


453 


352 


339 


2,361 


327 






Shenandoah: 
Central 




188 
149 
120 


177 
134 
149 


158 
103 
106 


117 
96 
98 


149 
103 
105 


789 
585 

578 


129 


Stonewall Jackson.. . 




94 


Strasburc 




97 








Total 




457 


460 


367 


311 


357 


1,952 


320 








Smyth: 

Chilhowie 




142 


133 
168 
180 
117 

85 


109 

288 


103 
225 


8:3 
210 


570 
891 
701 
523 
358 
101 


79 


Marion 




177 


IVIarinn .Tr 


208 


313 

119 

85 

44 




R. B. Worthy 


97 

68 


101 
60 


89 
60 


67 


Rich Valley 




55 


Sugar Grove 


57 














Total 


265 


703 


683 


562 


489 


442 


3,144 


378 






Soitthampton: 

Riverview 




249 
132 


116 
160 


134 
169 


133 

94 


118 
99 


750 
654 


105 


SouthamDton 




95 








Total 




381 


276 


303 


227 


217 


1,404 


200 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



75 



TABLE 5- 


-VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Spotsylvania: 
Soots vlvania 








291 


237 


236 


764 
762 


223 


Snntsvlvania Jr.. 




436 


326 
















Total 




436 


326 


291 


237 


236 


1,526 


223 








Stafford: 

Gavlp Jr. .... 


367 


333 


289 








984 

1,079 

563 




Stafford 


439 


360 


280 


250 


Stafford Jr. 


191 


214 


158 














Total 


558 


547 


447 


439 


360 


280 


2,626 


250 






Surry: 
Luther P. Jackson.. . 




92 


115 


71 


68 


51 


397 


45 


Total 




92 


115 


71 


68 


51 


397 


45 








Sussex: 

Central 




183 
75 
79 


138 
76 
74 


120 
28 
44 


119 
37 
32 


101 
35 

28 


661 
251 
257 


94 


Stonv Creek 




32 


Waverly 




28 








Total 




337 


288 


192 


188 


164 


1,169 


154 








Tazewell: 
Graham 






187 


193 


179 


166 


725 
399 
399 
1,199 
815 
938 
456 


159 


rir.n h.nm .Ir 


210 


189 
90 




Pocahontas 


79 
389 


78 
316 


93 
266 


59 
228 


56 


Richlands 




194 


T? if»hlMnH^ .Tr 


416 


399 




Tazewell 


243 


238 


236 


221 


204 


T'nKPWplI .Tr 


191 


265 
















Total 


817 


943 


898 


825 


774 


674 


4,931 


613 






Warren: 

Warren County 






268 


234 


221 


206 


929 
611 


197 


Warren County Int. . 


278 


333 














Total 


278 


333 


268 


234 


221 


206 


1,540 


197 







76 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


COUNTIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Washington: 
Abingdon 




189 

83 

321 

219 


195 

91 

354 

197 


163 

90 

315 

169 


143 

66 
234 
144 


145 

88 
208 
137 


835 

418 

1 ,432 

866 


138 


Holston 




84 


JohnS. Battle 

Patrick Henrv 




195 
123 








Total 




812 


837 


737 


587 


578 


3,551 


540 








Westmoreland: 

A. T. Johnson 

Colonial Beach 




142 
40 
97 


94 

31 

105 


85 
36 
82 


69 
30 
89 


57 
25 

66 


447 
162 
439 


54 
25 


Washington and Lee. 




55 


Total 




279 


230 


203 


188 


148 


1,048 


134 








Wise: 
Aooalachia 




131 
179 
253 
130 
182 
68 


110 

168 
184 
123 

178 
57 


99 
139 
169 
105 
160 

38 


79 
127 
143 

72 
121 

43 


92 
127 
122 

90 
111 

38 


511 
740 
871 
520 
752 
244 


83 


Coeburn 




123 


J.J.Kelly 




110 


Pound 




72 


Powell Valley 




95 


St. Paul 




34 








Total 




943 


820 


710 


585 


580 


3,638 


517 








Wythe: 

Fort Chiswell 




189 


172 
195 
118 


147 

152 

92 


129 
131 

84 


108 

132 

76 


745 
610 
486 
390 


106 


George Wythe 

Rural Retreat 




130 




116 
209 


66 


Wytheville Int 


181 














Total 


181 


514 


485 


391 


344 


316 


2,231 


302 






York: 
Poquoson 




120 
194 
311 


102 

165 
276 


92 


97 


89 


500 

556 

897 

1,551 

587 


80 


Queens Lake Int — 
Tahh Int 


197 
olO 












York 


577 


534 


440 


407 


Yorktown Int 


202 


180 


205 












Total 


709 


805 


748 


669 


631 


529 


4,091 


487 






Total of Counties. 


29,390 


62,599 


56,579 


51 ,263 


44,480 


40,178 


284,485 


36,487 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



// 



TABLE 5-VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
of High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Alexandria: 
Francis C. Hammond 






425 

537 


455 
425 


398 
337 


370 

328 


1,648 

1,627 

913 

985 
1 .094 
1,879 


302 


Georee Washington. 






275 


John Adams Middle 


-lOS 

514 

578 


505 

471 
516 




Minnie Howard 
Middle 












Parker Gray Middle . 
T. C. Williams . . . 












513 


475 


464 


427 


344 










Total 


1,500 


1,492 


1,475 


1.355 


1,199 


1,125 


8.146 


921 


Bristol: 
Virginia . . 






302 


255 


238 


201 


996 
606 


187 


Virginia Jr 


314 


292 














Total 


314 


292 


302 


255 


238 


201 


1,602 


187 


BuENA Vista: 
Parry McCluer 




138 


HI 


112 


109 


92 


562 


86 








Total 




138 


HI 


112 


109 


92 


562 


86 








Charlottesville : 
Riiford Jr. 


301 


262 


253 








816 

1,397 

829 




Lane 


524 


433 


440 


381 


Walker Jr 


276 


300 


253 














Total 


577 


562 


506 


524 


433 


440 


3 ,042 


381 






Chesapeake: 
Crestwood 






395 


373 


334 


293 


1 ,395 
602 

1 ,084 
680 
343 

1 ,308 
932 

1 .372 

1 , 153 
780 

1,128 


253 


Clrpsf.wnorl Jr 


290 


312 




Deep Creek 


364 


268 


246 


206 


195 


Deep Creek Jr 

G W Carver 


325 
181 


355 
162 














Great Bridge 


381 


363 


295 


269 


267 


Great Bridge Jr 

Indian River 


478 


454 
316 




313 
366 

"255 


276 
312 


258 
253 


209 
222 


199 


Oscar Smith 




192 


Truitt Jr 


388 


392 
257 




Western Branch 


233 


230 


153 


141 








Total 


1,062 


2,248 


2,074 


1,825 


1,616 


1 ,352 


10,777 


1,247 







78 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5-VIRGINTA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


CuFTON Forge: 
Clifton Forge 




114 


82 


83 


76 


79 


434 


69 








Total 




114 


82 


83 


76 


79 


434 


69 








Colonial Heights: 
Colonial Heif^lits. ... 






289 


299 


279 


271 


1,138 
672 


252 


Colonial Heights Jr. 


355 


317 














Total 


355 


317 


289 


299 


279 


271 


1,810 


252 






Covington: 
Covington 




197 


183 


163 


122 


130 


795 


112 


Total 




197 


183 


163 


122 


130 


795 


112 








Danville: 
George Washington. 






695 


636 


493 


546 


2,370 
82 
797 
978 
370 
543 


437 


Irvin W. Taylor 

Jolin AL Langston.. 


39 


43 




240 


246 


161 


150 


114 


Robert E Lee Jr. 


517 
188 
27U 


461 
182 
273 




Wpstmorplanrl 












Woodrow Wilson Jr. 
























Total 


1,014 


959 


935 


882 


654 


696 


5,140 


551 






Falls Church: 
Georee Mason 




187 


182 


190 


184 


173 


916 


154 








Total 




187 


182 


190 


184 


173 


916 


154 








Franklin City: 

Franklin 




130 

97 


126 

98 


116 

48 


99 

47 


87 
65 


558 
355 


79 


Hay den 




61 








Total 




227 


224 


164 


146 


152 


913 


140 








Fredericksburg: 
James Monroe 






236 


240 


195 


174 


845 
446 


158 


Walker Grant Middle 


218 


228 
















Total 


218 


228 


236 


240 


195 


174 


1,291 


158 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



79 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 






High School En 


ROLLMENT 




Number 
OF High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Galax: 
Galax 




173 


178 


161 


175 


158 


845 


146 








Total 




173 


178 


161 


175 


158 


845 


146 








Hampton: 

Benjamin Sj^ms Jr.. . 
Bethel : 


522 


435 


420 








1.377 
1,511 

709 
1,252 
1,146 

997 
1,885 
1,252 
1,802 

954 
1,341 




547 


547 


417 


355 


Buckroe Jr 


250 
467 
412 
381 


255 
421 
370 
319 


204 
364 
364 
297 




C. V. SpratleyJr.... 

C. A. Lindsay Jr 

H. Wilson Thorpe Jr. 
HaniDton 


























739 


608 


538 


489 


Jefferson Davis Jr.. . 


443 


456 


353 




Kecouchtan 


704 
369 


610 
332 


488 
253 


429 


Pembroke 








224 


Thomas Eaton Jr. 


437 


481 


423 














Total 


2,912 


2,737 


2,425 


2,359 


2,097 


1,696 


14,226 


1,497 


Harrisonburg: 

Harrisonburg 






183 


207 


157 


178 


725 

438 


158 


Thomas Harrison Jr. 


230 


208 
















Total 


230 


208 


183 


207 


157 


178 


1,163 


158 






Hopewell: 

Carter G. Woodson 


73 


95 










168 
1,517 

878 




Hopewell 


451 


402 


342 


322 


274 


Jas E. Mallonce Int. 


404 


474 
















Total 


477 


569 


451 


402 


342 


322 


2,563 


274 


Lexington: 
Lexington 




226 


216 


194 


139 


166 


941 


162 








Total 




226 


210 


194 


139 


166 


941 


162 








LYNCireuRG: 

Dunbar 








162 


170 


117 


449 
595 
2,055 
872 
561 
921 


107 


Diinhar .Tr 


254 


183 


158 
64 
276 
183 
263 




E. C. Glass 


731 


668 


592 


530 


Linkhornp .Ir 


294 
176 
303 


302 
202 
355 




T?ohprt I^ TjPP .Tr 










Sandusky Jr 


















Total 


1 ,027 


1,042 


944 


893 


838 


709 


5,453 


637 







80 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TUK 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


S 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
of High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


11th 
Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Martinsville: 

Martinsville 






445 


390 


337 


306 


1,478 
763 


271 


Martinsville Jr. 


358 


405 
















Total 


358 


405 


445 


390 


337 


306 


2,241 


271 






Newport News: 
Denbigh 




665 
189 
479 
525 
333 
551 


705 
253 
416 
560 
313 
523 


564 
242 
415 
457 
257 
476 


509 
218 
378 
411 
293 
380 


349 
221 
324 
333 
231 
357 


2,792 
1,123 
2,012 
2,286 
1 ,427 
2,287 


305 


George W. Carver. . 
Homer L. Ferguson 
Huntington 




171 
281 
270 


Newport News 

Warwick 




194 

276 








Total 




2,742 


2,770 


2,411 


2,189 


1,815 


11,927 


1,497 








Norfolk: 

Azalea Garflens Jr. 


707 


718 


434 








1,859 
2,378 
1,626 
1,210 
2,483 
1,210 
2,588 
1,642 

445 
2,103 
1,801 
2,586 
1.373 

408 
1,320 

897 




B. T. Washington . 


847 


833 


698 


561 


Blair Jr. 


482 
460 


732 
414 


432 
336 
293 
452 
207 
530 
135 
181 
623 




Campostella Jr 

Granbv ... 










869 


724 


597 


501 


Jacox Jr.. 


425 


333 




Lake Taylor 


875 


899 


607 


507 


Lake Taylor Jr 

Madison .Ir . 


525 
143 


587 
167 












Maury 


775 


598 


549 


451 


North si dp .Tr 


247 


931 




Norview 


987 


949 


650 


558 


Norview Jr. 


448 
191 
541 
316 


519 
106 
404 
323 


406 
111 
375 
258 




Ti nspmont Jr 










Riiffnpr .Tr 










WillardJr.. 




















Total 


4,465 


5,234 


4,773 


4,353 


4,003 


3,101 


25.929 


2,578 






Norton: 
John I. Burton 




85 


88 


77 


85 


64 


399 


57 








Total 




85 


88 


77 


85 


64 


399 


57 








Petersburg: 
Peabodv . . ... 




403 
381 


339 
347 


252 
306 


257 
295 


244 
266 


1,495 
1,595 


236 


Petersburg 




237 








Total 




784 


686 


558 


552 


510 


3,090 


473 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



81 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS— ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School Enrollment 


Number 
OF High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Portsmouth: 

Alf J. Mapp 

Churchland 


772 


572 
263 










1,344 
1,186 
1 ,592 
1,384 
1,938 
1,191 
2,331 




258 
494 


235 

487 


234 
350 


196 
261 


170 


Cradock 




228 


Harry Hunt Jr 

I. C. Norcom 


735 


649 




642 


442 


391 


463 


423 


W E Waters Jr. 


590 


601 




Woodrow Wilson. . . . 


709 


666 


522 


434 


380 










Total 


2 ,097 


2 ,085 


2,103 


1,830 


1 ,497 


1,354 


10,966 


1,201 






Radford: 
Radford 




165 


166 


160 


135 


119 


745 


121 








Total 




165 


166 


160 


135 


119 


745 


121 








Richmond: 
Albert Hill Jr 


362 


381 


239 
472 








982 

1,788 

731 

932 

522 

402 

1,041 

868 

1,810 

1,614 

1,437 

1,461 

1,245 

454 

1,811 

354 




Armstrong 


490 


349 


477 


409 


Bainbridge Jr 

Rpn A Graves Jr 


409 
293 
212 
185 
523 
438 


322 
342 
193 
165 
518 
430 
276 
92 




297 

117 

52 










Rinfnrd Jr 










Rlaokwell 










C^hnndlpr Jr 










East End Jr 












George Wythe 


533 
622 
405 


369 
428 
371 
530 


322 
294 
310 
444 


310 
178 
351 

487 


257 


John F. Kennedy. . . . 




153 


John Marshall 




295 


Maecie L. Walker. 






455 


Moshv 


()63 
175 


582 
164 






Randolph Jr 

Thomas Jefferson 


115 
304 










592 


433 


482 


401 


Westhampton 


197 


157 














Total 


3,457 


3,622 


3,156 


2,780 


2,152 


2,285 


17,452 


1.970 






Roanoke: 

Addison 






240 


188 


176 


169 


773 
438 
966 

1,150 
639 
945 

1,427 
800 

1,463 
803 


148 


B. T. Washington Jr. 

Breckinridge Jr 

Jefferson 


223 
331 


215 
293 




342 
33 
177 
263 
357 
208 










381 


419 


317 


291 


Log Jr 


245 
364 


217 
318 




^Tonrnp Jr 










Patrick Henrv 


369 


379 


322 


297 


Rtonfi\v5ill Tfif*W^nn Jr 


328 


264 




William Fleming . . . 


522 


497 


444 


394 


^/^nnHrnw? ^/^il'^on Jr 


392 


411 


















Total 


1,883 


1,718 


1,620 


1,460 


1,471 


1,252 


9,404 


1,130 







82 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 5— VIRGINIA HIGH SCHOOLS-ENROLLMENT 
AND GRADUATES— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




High School ENROLLME^ 


JT 




Number 
OF High 


CITIES 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


9th 
Grade 


10th 
Grade 


nth 

Grade 


12th 
Grade 


Total 


School 
Gradu- 
ates 


Staunton: 

.Tnhn T^pwis .Tr 


260 


212 


209 








681 

1,038 

605 




Robert E. Lee : 


346 


364 


328 


296 


Shpl blimp .Tr 


226 


195 


184 














Total 


486 


407 


393 


346 


364 


328 


2,324 


296 






Suffolk: 
B T Washineton 




25 
190 


26 
143 








51 

780 




Suffolk 




148 


172 


127 


123 








Total 




215 


169 


148 


172 


127 


831 


123 








Virginia Beach: 

Bavside 








516 


430 


367 


1,313 
1,680 
2,444 
2,1.32 
1,754 
1,640 
1,454 
1,228 
2,265 
1,137 


321 


Rflv<?i Hp .Tr 




1,144 
373 
264 
415 


536 
376 
219 
373 




First Colonial 




646 
681 
373 
679 


559 
547 
344 
517 


490 
421 
249 
444 


394 


Flovd E. Kellam.. 
Frank W. Cox 




351 
225 


TCpmnsville 




415 


TCpnnn'?villp .Tr 




821 
729 
299 
425 


629 
499 
570 
274 




Plara .Tr 












Princess Anne 




540 


455 


401 


324 


Virginia Beacli Jr. . . 


438 












Total 


438 


4,470 


3,476 


3,435 


2,852 


2,372 


17,047 


2,030 






Waynesboro: 
Kitp Collins .Tr 


367 


356 


339 








1,062 
839 




Wavnesboro 


319 


260 


260 


246 












Total 


367 


356 


339 


319 


260 


260 


1,901 


246 


Williamsburg: 

■Rprb-plpv .Ir 




370 


314 








684 
871 




James Blair 




318 


306 


247 


221 












Total 




370 


314 


318 


306 


247 


1,555 


221 








Winchester: 
John Handle V 




282 


271 


225 


216 


185 


1,179 


173 








Total 




282 


271 


225 


216 


185 


1,179 


173 


Total of Cities... 


23,837 


34,856 


31,765 


29,118 


25,590 


22,439 


167,609 


19,519 


Total of State. . 


53 ,227 


97,455 


88,344 


80,381 


70,070 


62,617 


452 ,094 


56,006 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



83 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969 





a 
















o 


to 
















k> 




m 




T3 


m 






<a 




•5 




0) 


-0 « 






-a 




(0 


tn 


T, *-■ 


03 i: «3 


COUNTIES 


TJl 

«^^ 
O 

A 
-♦-> 
bO 




o 

C!3 

o 


a 


o 


of Pupil 
g New 

es 


of Pupil 
g Repea 

es 


of Pupil 
g New ar 
ted Cour 




4> 


a> 


a 


(U 1- 


S.S £ 


{-• C M 


t- c « 




^ 


p^ 


^£. 


XiJ4 3 


SiJ< 3 


s:^ 0. 






s 

3 


o 

c 


3O 


C cj 


G :i 

5HO 


P 3J 0) 






SHPi 




Days 


^ 


W 


^ 


^ 


^ 


J^ 


Accomack: 
















Onancock 


40 


7 


111 


12 


27 


84 




Alleghany: 
















Alleghany 


35 


3 


59 


14 


18 


37 


4 


Amelia: 
















Amelia 


40 


4 


63 


5 


14 


41 




Amherst: 
















Amherst 


32 


5 


144 


14 


83 


61 




Appomattox: 
















Appomattox 


32 


4 


88 


11 


80 


8 




Arlington: 
















Jefferson Jr 


31 


16 


52 


1 




52 




Swanson Jr 


31 


57 


812 


22 


606 


270 


19 


Yorktown 


32 
32 


67 

7 


1,400 
105 


34 

1 


688 
105 


688 


24 


Stratford Jr 




Augusta: 






Riverheads 


40 


3 


40 


9 


26 


14 




Bedford: 
















Liberty 


40 


9 


135 


19 


97 


38 




Botetourt: 
















Botetourt 


40 


12 


172 


21 


66 


106 




Brunswick: 
















Brunswick 


40 


7 


80 


8 


39 


41 




James S. Russell 


40 


3 


49 


6 


36 


13 




Buchanan: 
















Garden 


40 


2 


53 


5 


43 


8 


2 


Grundy 


40 


15 


142 


16 


73 


69 




Council 


40 


2 


28 


2 


25 


3 




Hurley 


30 


7 


84 


15 




84 




Campbell: 
















Allavista 


34 
32 


7 
10 


150 
184 


16 
13 


81 
87 


69 

97 




Brookville 




Carroll: 
















Hillsville 


40 


14 


217 


16 


96 


121 





84 



ANNUAL IlIiPORT OF THE 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969— Continued 



COUNTIES 



a 
o 

• 1—4 

to 

m 

O 

A 
-u 
bO 
G 
01 
1^ 



Days 



4> 

H 



(1 

s 

2; 



-4J 

a. 



o 

n 



OQ 




TS 


0) 




a> 


CO 


m 


73 +J 






r: c3 


3 
O 

O 




§•& 


3 S" 


(X, « 


»H^ 




O . CO 


O m 


« 


tJO <a 


tiC u 


<K OJ 


fe.S £ 


o.g £ 


X!ic: 


J3-^ 3 


-Q^ 3 


ao 
3 


G S3 O 


G 03 O 


'^ 


:^ 


^ 



i2 G £ 

•a°^ § 

fc- a o5 
a> .G 4> 

-O-a a, 

G 03 a> 



Chesterfield: 

Huguenot 

Manchester 

Thomas Dale 

Clarke: 

Clarke County 

Craig: 
New Castle 

Culpeper: 
Culpeper 

Dickenson: 

Clintwood 

Dinwiddie: 
Dinwiddle County. . . 

Fairfax: 

Fairfax 

Annandale 

J. E. B. Stuart 

Langley 

West Springfield .... 

Oakton 

Fort Hunt 

Fauquier: 
Fauquier 

Floyd: 
Floyd County 

Franklin: 
Franklin County .... 
Franklin County Jr. . 

Frederick: 

James Wood 

Frederick County Jr. 

Giles: 
Giles 



36 
36 
36 



29 



3-2 



40 



40 



35 



32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
-.>0. 



38 
40 



40 
40 



32 
32 



40 



27 
20 
24 



10 



17 



1 
1 
4 
25 
51 
45 
37 



11 
4 



8 
5 



411 
346 
290 



53 

50 

171 

342 

45 



31 

26 

85 

560 

1 ,350 

1,172 

823 



88 
48 



147 
50 



177 
22 



29 



14 
14 
21 



12 
14 
13 
14 

8 



1 
1 
4 
23 
24 
25 
26 



14 
12 



13 
2 



240 
221 

167 



34 



70 



157 



31 
26 
85 
178 
459 
410 
305 



33 



26 



99 
10 



67 
2 



171 
125 
123 



45 



18 



101 



185 



45 



382 
848 
678 
518 



09 



48 
40 



110 
20 



69 



43 

84 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



85 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969— Continued 



COUNTIES 



c 












o 


m 










03 


u 




in 




"O 


^ 




(U 




<u 




ja 




CO 


CO 


m -kJ 


(4-1 

o 

-J3 


o 


-u 




1^ 


f Pupil 
Repea 


bC 


o 


a 


■2^ 


O to 


O 00 


fl 




o 




bC 0) 


M (U 




q; 


S 




!r: c3 tn 


!r, d M 


J2 


i~~] 


s>£ 


^^ 3 


^Al 3 




s 

3 


o 


go 


g rt o 


g oj o 
3HO 






Days 


^ 


W 


^ 


^ 


^ 



- g £ 

cu «^ 

«~ ^ 35 
o aj 

t- Cl o3 
a o3 aj 



Gloucester: 

Gloucester County. 

Grayson : 

Fries 

Independence 



Greensville: 
Greensville County. . 

Halifax: 
Halifax County 

Hanover: 

Lee-Davis 

Patrick Henry 

Henrico: 

Highland Springs 

Hermitage 

Freeman 

Tuckahoe Jr 

Varina 

Tucker 

Henrico 

Henry: 
Fieldale-CoUinsville . 

Highland: 

Highland 

Isle of Wight: 

Smithfield 

Westside 

King William: 
West Point 

Lancaster: 

Lancaster 

Lee: 

St. Charles 

Jonesville 

Thomas Walker 



40 



20 
40 



40 
40 



32 
32 



36 
36 
35 
36 
36 
36 
36 



36 
40 



40 
40 



40 
40 



40 
40 
40 



1 

7 

8 
13 



14 
10 



19 

14 

27 

6 

2 

16 
10 



40 
1 



6 
6 

6 

7 
7 



15 



16 
113 



103 
216 



183 
149 



374 
286 
537 
67 
27 
311 
134 



793 
8 



143 
127 



67 
98 



59 

81 

lOS 



2 
15 



8 
13 



11 
14 



16 
10 
16 
3 
1 
12 



21 
2 



15 
14 



17 
13 



13 

8 

16 




75 



166 



101 
54 



243 
175 
353 
34 
25 
99 
76 



451 



92 
80 



28 



16 
45 
48 



119 



16 
43 



28 
50 



82 
95 



130 
111 
184 

33 

2 

212 

58 



342 
4 



51 
47 



60 
70 



42 
36 
60 



86 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 6— SUMIVIER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969-Continuisd 



COUNTIES 



a 
.2 
m 
CO 



a 
(to 



Days 



03 
(-. 
(U 

-a 

o 

o 
Eh 



s 

3 





CO 








« 




TS 




CO 


m 


m <U 








»— -*j 




3 
O 

O 




Pupi 
epea 


•^ 


U-l 


^Z 


^a 


a 


°^ 






V 


o 


bO V 


isC cu 


a 




fe.a £ 


!r c "'' 

a>.3 t. 


^^ 


^ « 


^^ 3 


J2JSJ D 


o 


30 


q c3 


C 03 


a 


W 


z 


^ 


^ 



to 

-a « 

i2 a 2 

a'' I 

fc- a 03 

4>.H (U 

a 33 tu 



Loudoun: 
Loudoun County . . 
Loudoun Valley. . . 

Lunenburg: 
Central 

Madison: 
Madison County. . 

Mathews: 
Mathews 

Mecklenburg: 
Park View 

Montgomery: 

Christiansburg. . . . 
Blacksburg 

Nelson: 
Nelson County 

Northumberland: 
Northumberland. . 

Orange: 
Orange County 

Page: 
Page County 

Patrick : 
Stuart 

Pittsylvania: 

Gretna 

Dan River 

Chatham 

Tunstall 

Prince George: 
Prince George 

Prince William: 
Stonewall Jackson, 
Woodbridge 



40 
40 



40 
35 
40 
40 



40 
40 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



40 
40 
40 
40 



36 



32 
32 



8 
6 


179 
105 


19 

7 


66 
69 


106 
36 


9 


182 


16 


34 


148 


2 


16 


7 




16 


6 


83 


18 


17 


66 


7 


144 


15 


46 


98 


15 
11 


224 
212 


16 
18 


81 
123 


143 

89 


8 


81 


14 


27 


54 


4 


67 


12 


14 


53 


8 


109 


12 


62 


47 


5 


40 


8 


14 


26 


20 


172 


27 


21 


125 


5 
6 
9 
9 


76 
105 

86 
196 


7 
10 

7 
11 


39 
52 
45 
93 


37 

53 

41 

103 


36 


168 


11 


49 


119 


28 
33 


351 
588 


24 
27 


154 
423 


197 
165 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



87 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969— Conttnued 



COUNTIES 



a 












o 


CO 










m 
oo 






03 


to 


t3 


to 


03 


-tj 


3 
o 
O 


f Pupil 
New 


f Pupil 
Repea 


bO 


O 


a 


°-^ 


O . . m 




q 




<v 


to OJ 


bfl S 


^ 


(U 


a 


0) t-. 


fe.a £ 


fe.ae 


JD 


; ^ 


■^£ 


JD-W 3 


J2^ 3 




a 

3 


o 




g 03 o 


C 03 O 




1 


Days 


Jz; 


;z; 


^ 


^ 





-T-l 


0} 


m 


a 


Sli 


a 

3 

a, 


o3 


3 
O 

O 


<4-l 


Ztj 


n 




<u 




hf 


■*-> 


s^ 


n 


03 


0) 




<U 


^^ 


a 


a 

3 


c3 


4> 


H 


rt 


^ 







Pulaski: 
Pulaski. 



Rappahannock: 
Rappahannock County 

Richmond : 

Richmond County 

Roanoke: 

Cave Spring 

Cave Spring Int 

Rockingham: 

Montevideo 

Broadway 

Turner Ashby 

Russell: 

Lebanon 

Scott: 

Rye Cove 

Gate City 

Twin Springs 

Shenandoah: 

Stonewall Jackson 

Smyth: 

R. B. Worthy 

Marion 

Southampton: 
Southampton 

Spotsylvania: 
Spotsylvania 

Tazewell: 

Tazewell 

Warren: 

Warren County 

Warren County Int.. . . 

Washington: 

Holston 



32 


11 


102 


17 


48 


54 


40 


1 


20 


2 


16 


4 


40 


1 


18 


2 


1 


17 


40 
40 


34 
17 


716 
364 


16 
5 


429 
42 


287 
315 


40 
40 
40 


9 

7 
10 


118 

84 
118 


14 
13 
16 


50 
59 
79 


68 
25 
39 


40 


14 


238 


10 


168 


70 


40 
40 
40 


10 

10 

4 


GO 

247 

38 


9 
11 

7 


50 

1&3 

38 


10 
64 
25 


40 


7 


131 


12 


41 


90 


40 
40 


5 
9 


77 
203 


18 
20 


19 
97 


58 
106 


40 


6 


95 


4 


51 


44 


40 


7 


104 


9 


46 


58 


40 


34 


551 


25 


376 


175 


40 
40 


12 
3 


118 
22 


10 
2 


75 


43 
22 


40 


17 


283 


18 


185 


98 



88 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 6-SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969 -Continued 



COUNTIES 



a 
o 

'm 
m 

CQ 

O 

bO 

a 



Days 



-a 

o3 
m 

H 



J2 



3 
^ 



a 

Ol 



o 

a 



X 






(U 




-d 


tn 


m 


TO a> 








3 
O 

O 




Pupi 

epea 


Xl 


^12; 


««p^ 


°73 


O ... cc 
bc a> 


O ... tn 
bC 4) 




'^ a 02 


'^ a M 


0) t. 


(u.a t. 


a>.a t. 


J2 <I> 


j3-iil a 


j3^ a 


IS 


a o3 o 


a c3 o 


^ 


Z 


^ 



-a 4> 
^ q 2 

bO*f 

»-• Q 03 

(u.a 03 
a 03 oj 



Westmoreland : 
A. T. Johnson. 

Wise: 

Pound 

Coeburn 

Appalachia . . . . 

St. Paul 

J.J.Kelly 

Powell Valley. . 



Wythe: 

George Wythe. 

York: 
York 



Total Counties. 
CITIES 



Aujxandria: 
Parker Gray. ... 
Minnie Howard. 
T. C.Williams.., 
John Adams 

Bristol: 

Virginia 

BtTENA Vista: 
Parry McCluer. . 

Charlottesville: 
Lane 

Chesapeake: 
Indian River 

Clifton Forge: 
Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights: 
Colonial Heights 

Covington: 
Covington 



40 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



40 



32 



32 
31 
32 
32 



3(j 



32 



40 



40 



32 



40 



40 



1,353 



4 

6 

54 

9 



13 



29 



35 



12 



115 



118 
160 
164 

67 
236 
174 



82 
124 



22,880 



32 

50 

971 

34 



184 



16 



387 



773 



54 



190 



173 



15 



91 
U 
11 

7 
14 

7 



8 
14 



1,423 



4 

4 

27 

7 



15 



17 



22 



10 



17 



15 



12 



90 
101 

30 
112 

56 



41 



52 



11,269 



403 
6 



49 



12 



230 



504 



25 



102 



37 



J 03 



36 
64 
52 
25 

115 
118 



41 



/z 



11,370 



32 

50 

543 

28 



135 



157 



269 



29 



81 



133 



6 
11 
12 

9 



241 



25 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



89 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969— Continued 



CITIES 



ci 
o 

CO 

<D 
CO 

o 
a 

h-1 



Days 



0) 



0) 

a 

3 

12; 



0) 



o 
a 



OT 






u 




-3 


T> 


to 


» a> 






-^ .*j 


3 
o 
O 


f Pupi 
New 


f Pupi 
Repea 


°T3 


O ^. to 






f- q to 


o.e '£. 


-°^ 


X5^ 3 


S1^4 3 


IS 


3 o3 O 


3 c3 O 


1^ 


^ 


Z 



in 

"3 O) 

o a> 

1-. q 33 

<D .3 a> 

XiJal ft 

3 o3 a> 



Danville: 
Robert E. Lee Jr. . . 
John M. Langston. . 
George Washington 

Falls Church: 
George Mason 

Franklin Cxty: 
Franklin 

Fredericksburg: 
James Monroe 

Galax: 
Galax 

Hampton: 
Kecoughtan 

Harrisonburg: 
Harrisonburg 

Hopewell: 
Hopewell 

Lexington: 

Lexington 

Lynchburg: 

Linkhorne Jr 

Martinsville: 
Martinsville 

Newport News: 

Newport News 

Huntington 

Denbigh 

Warwick 

Norfolk: 

Maury 

B. T. Washington.. 

Granby 

Norview 

Lake Taylor 



35 
32 

32 



31 
40 
40 
32 
40 
40 
36 
40 
32 
36 



40 
40 
40 
40 



40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



8 
13 
33 



13 
12 
16 



11 
11 
16 
6 
19 
16 



26 
21 
20 
35 



24 
21 
32 
21 
27 



54 
158 
542 


4 
30 
16 


39' 

309 


54 

65 

142 


76 


17 


34 


39 


145 


7 


40 


105 


330 


13 


149 


181 


58 


14 


20 


38 


,470 


41 


423 


1,002 


122 


10 


32 


90 


231 


9 


94 


137 


107 


11 


76 


31 


393 


18 


239 


154 


196 


n 


126 


70 


304 
606 
507 
959 


18 
20 
19 
34 


102 
318 
239 
526 


202 
248 
256 
424 


355 
454 
696 
577 
576 


17 

20 
27 
18 
18 


150 
143 
280 
246 
254 


201 
306 
416 
331 
322 



54 
91 



45 



40 

12 

9 



4 
5 



90 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



TABLE 6— SUMMER PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969— Coxtinued 



OQ 

^ c £ 
'a 
CITIES ^ H c3c2gcS&cSl^ 

o I* 
t- C oj 

q g3 0) 
3HP5 



a 












o 
























in 


OQ 










OQ 






CQ 
IC 


_M 




o 


id 




3 


O"^ 


aS 




OJ 




O 


3 ^ 


3 a 


^ 


H 




O 


f^^ 


Ph 01 


bC 


(4-1 


-i-s 


tM 


^^ 


.«« 


C 


o 




o-o 


° mS 


°b0S 


hJ 


a; 


a 




fe.S £ 


fe.9£ 




SI 




^ « 


^-« 3 


_0^ 3 




a 

3 


p 


12; 


g oj o 
3HO 


C c3 O 


Days 


c 



Norton: 
John I. 



Burton . 



Petersburg: 
Petersburg. 
Peabody.. . 



Portsmouth: 

Harry Hunt Jr 

I. C. Norcom 

Woodrow Wilson 

William E. Waters Jr. 

Churchland 

Alf J. Mapp 



Radford: 
Radford . 



Richmond City: 
Thomas Jefferson . . . . 

Albert Hill Jr 

Maggie L. Walker 

John Marshall 

George Wj-^the 

Richmond Tech. Cen. 
John F. Kennedy 



Roanoke City: 
Jefferson 



Staunton: 
John Lewis Jr. 

Suffolk: 
Suffolk 



Virginia Beach: 
First Colonial. 
Kempsville . . . 



Waynesboro: 
Waynesboro . 



Williamsburg: 
James Blair.. 



Total Cities. 
Grand Total. 



40 



35 
35 



29 
39 
39 
32 
40 
29 



40 



32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 



40 



39 



31 



39 
39 



40 



40 



27 
21 



12 

23 

39 

2 

1 

6 



10 



14 
12 
28 
20 
22 
11 
22 



45 



24 



14 



38 
38 



16 



2,374 



3,727 



149 



417 
318 



280 

630 

793 

42 

40 

58 



191 



220 
193 
575 
321 
344 
71 
388 



793 



344 



196 



825 
911 



219 



121 



42,074 



64,954 



16 



27 
34 



o 
20 
20 
2 
1 
6 



16 



12 
12 
29 
20 
15 
2 
25 



27 



25 



17 



24 
22 



19 



14 



945 



2,368 



78 



132 
164 



64 
419 

489 
42 
40 
58 



126 



141 
66 
356 
215 
170 
71 
222 



350 



42 



31 



432 
503 



79 



35 



20,458 



31,727 



71 



202 
118 



290 



165 



393 
408 



140 



86 



20,939 



32.309 



S3 
36 



216 




211 




303 


1 


65 




79 




127 




217 


2 


106 




174 




162 


4 


443 





12 



677 



918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



91 



TABLE 7— SUMMER PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS— 1969 



SCHOOL 



a 












o 






























CO 
0) 




OQ T3 


cc 


^ 




M 
U 


03 




hi 
O 


o3 




3 
o 


s. ^ 




a 


O 


a 


U 


3 S= 


2u a 


^ 


<a 


a 


fei 


!r>.S2 


fe.S £ 




^ 


»— 4 


IS 


X!-^ 3 


^Jii 3 




s 

3 


o 


C o3 O 


C 03 O 


Days 


a 


^ 


W 


;z; 


^ 


2; 



" C '-" 

a"=' 3 

3 > O 

—I (ui^ 

o aj 
«- c "5 

CD .3 (U 

C C3 <U 



Augusta Military Academy. . . . 

Bishop Denis J. O'Conneil 

Blue Ridge School 

Christchurch School 

Fishbume Military School 

Fork Union Military Academy. 

Hampton Roads Academy 

Hargrave Military Academy. . . 

Huguenot Academy 

Norfolk Academy 

North Cross School 

Oak Hill Academy 

Prince Edward Academy 

Quantico High School 

Randolph-Macon Academy .... 
Shenandoah Valley Academy.. 
St. Margaret's High School. . . , 

St. Marj^'s Academy 

Staunton Military Academy. . . 
Viaud High School 



Total. 



42 
32 
41 
42 
42 
41 
34 
48 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
42 
28 
45 
30 
36 
40 



11 

9 

19 

23 

16 

14 

6 

25 

2 

9 

2 

7 

6 

7 

13 

1 

13 

5 

11 

5 

204 



26 
39 
63 

100 
58 
08 
17 

199 
12 
49 
10 
63 
40 

116 
38 
10 
73 
43 
42 
18 

1,084 



12 
9 

16 

29 

24 

12 
8 

26 
5 
9 
2 

17 
9 
4 

16 
1 

20 
3 

20 
5 

247 



2 

9 

10 

21 



43 

4 

5 

6 

33 

9 

30 

3 

10 

19 

16 



12 
239 



618 



19 




39 




55 


6 


5 


86 


48 




46 


1 


17 




58 


98 


8 




42 


2 


4 




23 


7 


31 




86 




33 


2 


29 


25 


27 




42 




6 





227 



92 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

OTHER SECONDARY SCHOOLS ACCREDITED BY THE 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1969-70 

I. Private 

Bors 

Augusta Military Academy Fort Defiance 

Benedictine High School Richmond 

Bishop Ireton High School Alexandria 

Blue Ridge School Dyke 

Christchurch School Christchurch 

Episcopal High School Alexandria 

Father Judge Mission Seminary Monroe 

Fishburne Military School Waynesboro 

Fork Union Military Academy Fork Union 

Frederick Military Academy Portsmouth 

Hargrave Military Academy Chatham 

Massanutten Academy Woodstock 

The Miller School of Albemarle Charlottesville 

Randolph-Macon Academy Front Royal 

St. Christopher's School Richmond 

St. Emma Military Academy Powhatan 

St. John Vianney Seminary Richmond 

St. Stephen's School Alexandria 

Staunton Military Academy Staunton 

Virginia Episcopal School Lynchburg 

Woodberry Forest School Woodberry Forest 

Girls 

Chatham Hall Chatham 

Foxcroft School Middleburg 

The Maderia School Green way 

Marymount School Richmond 

Notre Dame Academy Middleburg 

Seven Hills School Lynchburg 

St. Agnes School Alexandria 

St. Anne's School Charlottesville 

St. Catherine's School Richmond 

St. Francis de Sales High School Powhatan 

St. Gertrude High School Richmond 

St. Margaret's School Tappahannock 

St. Mary's Academy Alexandria 

Stuart Hall Staunton 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 93 

Co-Educational 

Amelia Academy Amelia 

Bishop Denis J. O'Connell Arlington 

Broadwater Academy Exmore 

Bnmswick Academy Lawrenceville 

Carolton Oaks School Norfolk 

Cathedral Central High School Richmond 

The Collegiate Schools Richmond 

Eastern Meimonite High School Harrisonburg 

Flint Hill Preparatory School Farifax 

Gibbons High School Petersburg 

Hampton Roads Academy Newport News 

Holy Cross Academy Lynchburg 

Huguenot Academy Powhatan 

Kenston Forest School Nottoway 

Norfolk Academy Norfolk 

Norfolk Catholic High School Norfolk 

Norfolk Christian High School Norfolk 

North Cross School Roanoke 

Oak Hill Academy Mouth of Wilson 

Peninsula Catholic High School Newport News 

Portsmouth Catholic High School Portsmouth 

Prince Edward Academy Farmville 

Roanoke Catholic High School Roanoke 

Rock Hill Academy Charlottesville 

Shenandoah Valley Academy New Market 

Surry County Academy Dendron 

Tidewater Academy Wakefield 

Viaud School, Inc Roanoke 

Walsingham Academy Williamsburg 

York Academy Shacklefords 



II. School Operated By U. S. Government 

Quantico High School Quantico 



DIVISION OF SPECIAL SERVICES 



The Division of Special Services assists the public schools in the areas of 
guidance and testing, school buildings, pupil transportation, educational televi- 
sion, teaching materials, film production, and school libraries and textbooks. 
Its scope of services affects many phases of the public school program. The 
Division's continuing objectives are: 

• To discover and promote practices and procedures which will improve 
instruction and guidance. 

• To assist localities in planning and constructing eflBcient and econom- 
ical school buildings. 

• To aid localities in providing safe, adequate, and eflBcient pupil trans- 
portation systems. 

• To encourage and assist localities to enrich children's learning experi- 
ences through the provision of educational television, adequate library 
services, and materials — including textbooks, a variety of audio-visuals, and 
equipment. 

Reports of the 1969-70 activities of the services in the Division of Special 
Services follow in this order: Guidance and Testing, School Buildings, Pupil 
Transportation, Educational Television, Bureau of Teaching Materials, Film 
Production, and Libraries and Textbooks. 

GUIDANCE AND TESTING SERVICE 

Purpose and Scope 

The Guidance and Testing Service assists local school personnel in extending 
and improving guidance services in the public schools of Virginia. 

Activities of the Guidance and Testing Service include: visiting and con- 
sulting with local school personnel; participating in conferences, institutes, and 
workshops; evaluating guidance services in local schools; working with community 
groups and agencies interested in guidance; and developing and providing certain 
materials for local schools. 

Guidance and testing personnel also assist school divisions in accomplishing 
the following objectives: 

Employing qualified guidance personnel. 

Assisting each pupil in understanding his strengths, limitations, interests, 
and needs. 

Assisting each pupil in choosing a program of study and planning for 
continuing education beyond high school. 

Assisting pupils in making vocational choices compatible with interests 
and abilities. 

Assisting pupils in developing their potentials, achieving worthwhile 
goals, and assuming responsibility for their decisions and actions. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 95 

Providing information to parents who will assist the pupil in understanding 
his abilities, interests, and the requirements involved in his educational and 
vocational goals. 

Providing in-service training for the professional growth of staff members. 

Evaluating the outcome of guidance activities to determine their effec- 
tiveness and to discover additional ways to improve these services. 

Activities and Accomplishments 

During the school year, members of the Guidance Service visited all school 
divisions in the State and worked with individuals and groups interested in guid- 
ance. The staff participated in conferences and meetings at local. State, and 
national levels. These included preschool and other local conferences for teachers 
and counselors; district guidance meetings; meetings with counselor education 
classes, local directors of testing, and civic groups; annual guidance conferences 
of counselor education institutions; and State conferences with division super- 
intendents, and elementary and secondary principals, supervisors, and visiting 
teachers. 

The staff also participated in meetings and conferences sponsored by the 
following professional associations: The National Conference on Guidance Coun- 
seling and Placement, Virginia Education Association, American Vocational Asso- 
ciation, American Personnel and Guidance Association, National Vocational 
Guidance Association, American School Counselor Association, Association of 
Counselor Education and Supervision, Southern Association of the Counselor 
Education and Supervision, Virginia Personnel and Guidance Association, Virginia 
Counselor Educators, College Admissions Officers, Virginia Association of Colle- 
giate Registrars and Admissions Officers, and the United States Office of Educa- 
tion. 

The staff served on evaluation committees and reviewed guidance materials. 

Five State-sponsored vocational guidance conferences were held between Feb- 
ruary 1970 and April 1970 to help counselors improve their effectiveness in voca- 
tional guidance. Staff members of the Guidance Service and the Division of Vo- 
cational Education planned and supervised the institutes, attended by approxi- 
mately 590 principals, counselors, vocational educators, program participants, and 
visitors. 

By June 30, 1970, there were more than 2,300 counselors who met or exceeded 
the minimum qualifications adopted by the State Board of Education. More than 
1,462 of these held masters degrees. There were 1,339 school coimselors employed, 
of which 1,058 were full-time counselors. 

During the 1969-70 school year, guidance and testing materials were distri- 
buted to all secondary schools. These materials included two issues of "Guidance 
News and Views," and materials used in the State testing program. The bulletin, 
"Financial Assistance to Attend Virginia Colleges and Universities," was revised 
and sent to all divisions and secondary schools during fall 1970. 

During 1969-70, 58 full-time counselors were emploj'ed in elementary schools 
in 22 divisions. Members of the Guidance and Testing Service visited approxi- 
mately 19 of these schools or school divisions. 

School divisions were reimbursed for guidance personnel in secondary schools 
through an appropriation of $2,102,997 from the General Assembly and $323,583 
from the National Defense Education Act, Title V-A. School divisions were reim- 



96 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

bursed at the rate of 60 percent of the State Minimum Salary Scale per position 
for 577 counselors. Funds totaling $2,426,580 were allocated for 97 counties and 
32 cities. 

The Statewide Testing Program continued to emphasize the use of tests for 
improving guidance and instruction. The following tests were administered to 
597,274 pupils in 1969-70: 

*Grade 1 — Metropolitan Readiness Tests, Form A — involving 73,397 pupils. 

*Grade 2 — Kuhlmann-Anderson Intelligence Tests, Form B — involving 67,098 
pupils, 

*Grade 3 — Kuhlmann-Anderson Intelligence Tests, Form CD — involving 
32,698 pupils. 

Grade 4 — The Lorge-Thorndike Intelligence Tests, Level 3A — SRA Achieve- 
ment Series, Form C — involving 88,540 pupils. 

Grade 7— California Tests of Mental Maturity, 1963— S Form— Level 3— 
Iowa Silent Reading Tests, Form DM — involving 90,329 pupils. 

Grade 8 — Differential Aptitude Tests, Battery, Form L — involving 87,839 
pupils. 

Grade 9— School and College Ability Tests, Form 3A — Sequential Tests of 
Educational Progress, Form 3A — involving 73,665 pupils. 

Grades 10*, 11, 12* — School and College Ability Tests, Form 2A — Sequential 
Tests of Educational Progress, Form 2A — involving 83,708 pupils. 

Answer sheets for grades four through 12 were machine-scored by test scoring 
agencies and the results were sent to the school divisions and to the Guidance 
and Testing Service of the Department. Tests for grades one, two, and three 
were scored locally and duplicate copies of class reports were sent to the Depart- 
ment. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS SERVICE 
Purpose and Scope 

The functions of the School Buildings Service are: 

1. To review and approve plans and specifications for school buildings. 

Section 22-152 of the Code of Virginia and regulations of the State 
Board of Education stipulate that the plans and specifications for all 
public school buildings, including additions and major alterations, shall 
be approved by the Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

The School Planning Manual contains regulations governing the plan- 
ning and construction of school buildings in Virginia. This manual, which 
is made available to local school authorities, architects, and engineers, 
provides the basis for the review and approval of plans by the School 
Buildings Service. 

2. To assist local school authorities in planning fimctional school plants. 

Members of the staff of the School Buildings Service assist local 
school authorities in the study of building needs by analyzing proposed 



'lodioates grades in which testing is optionaL 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 97 

educational programs, population trends, enrollment patterns, and the 
adequacy of facilities and sites. Planning conferences are held with divi- 

. sion superintendents, architects, and engineers and the program for each 

new school or addition is reviewed in terms of current trends in school 
•, offering, size, and organization. 

Preliminary plans are studied to obtain the best possible relationships 
of instructional spaces, services, housekeeping, safety, comfort, and econ- 
omy which are consistent with the site and available funds. Final working 
drawings are reviewed for fire safety, planning and equipment details, 
construction, mechanical equipment, and adequacy of contract provisions. 

3. To maintain school plant records. 

Plans, specifications, and cost data are on file for all public school 
plants constructed in Virginia since 1948, and an incomplete file is main- 
tained for earlier schools. Drawings have been microfilmed, and prints 
or duplicate microfilm are available to local school authorities. 

A new school plant inventory and reporting sj'stem is being developed 
through the Division of Educational Research and Statistics to coordinate 
school plant identification for all agencies and to provide current infor- 
mation on school plant needs, cost, maintenance, and efficiency. 

4. To suggest changes in school building regulations. 

Studies are made at the suggestion of the Governor's Advisory Re^ 
search Committee in an attempt to keep school building regulations up 
to date and in line with current educational developments. These studies 
involve reviews of information on building design, equipment, and con- 
struction, and on research related to school plant planning. 

Activities and Accomplishments 

During 1969-70 plans and specifications for 182 school construction projects 
were approved, as listed in the following table. Of these, 60 approvals were for 
relocatable classroom units, distributed as indicated in column (PF). These units 
were approved for temporary use, but a few prefabricated units were approved for 
permanent use. 



98 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT APPROVALS (1969-70) BY 
TYPE OF SCHOOL ORGANIZATION* 



New Schools 


ADDmoNS, Alterations, 


Renovations 


















Co.&Cy. 


Type School 


County 


City 


Total 


County 


PFt 


City 


PFJ 


Total Total 


Elementary 


8 


5 


13 


40 


22 


5 


13 


80 93 


Junior High, Inter- 


















mediate 


5 





5 


5 


1 


5 


2 


13 18 


High, Senior High. 


3 


3 


6 


22 


13 


11 


9 


55 61 


Vocational 


5 





5 


3 





1 





4 9 


Miscellaneousf 


1 





1 














1 


Totals 


22 


8 


30 


70 


36 


22 


24 


152 182 



Staff members participated in school plant surveys; 10 visits were made to 
school divisions to assist with planning and construction projects. 



'Combined school facilities are listed as high schools, but may include elementary facilities. 

tSpecial Education School. 

}PF — Prefabricated units approved for temporary use. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



99 



o 
OS 



•-5 

w 
o 

D 
O 

W 
OS 



& 

Q 

> 
O 

a. 

(X, 

<j 

M 

H 
O 

•-5 
O 
« 

Oh 

o 

Q 
►J 

o 

o 
a 
o 

>H 

rt 

H 

w 

I 

00 

eq 
< 



wqio 




— ' CJ ^ C^l ♦- 


« CO 












; —' 




• CO c^ ei CO cv 


•- 


c^ 


c 


Cs 


Cs 


CO 


enioo^ aajnos^g 












• Oi 






















,-, ^H .-H ^ lO CJ 


r-< CO -^ 


mnuojipny 


























































«ija}3jB3 




— • 


rt ^ — 1 




















: — ' 








-" 






^ ^ 


Xwiqrj 






^^ ^* -- C<l — ^ 


















■ .-H *-t 


^^^^^^C^j„ 


smoog icipsnis^ 














-^ 










































Disnj^ 






»-* T-H .— 1 






















C^C**«^-^<M^^^H^-CS 


asodjndnjnj'^ 










'^ 
























— ' 






— ' 






^ 




8B3JV nioojs8S]Q Xjeipny 




































« <M 


















snoi}B?g jaqoBax reaiy nadQ 






o 

CI 


■<r 


« 








CO 
































aoijBonpg (sioadg 
































C^ »-H 








« 






^ ^ 


i(jB)a3ni3i3 jaddf^ 






-H OJ 


a> 






CO -H 


-^ 


.-< 










-H rt U5 O to «D 


AlBUIUJ 






«l 








CO CO 












C000i0r'-»0«3^»0^(M»0«D 


aa^JBSjapai^ 


-rP lO CO 


-• 




















C^ CO 




C^C^COCOCOCOCOCO 


rooijBjg jidnj 


ooO'^»^or-c^i>.t^c;coccco 

.-1 kO C^ T lO C^J ^ 




S 

■< 

§ 


c 

a 

C 

c2 


"2 

a 
o 


5 


3 


a 
o 

bj 

a 
< 


O 


CIS 


2 


, c 


a 
g 


T3 

'> 
en 


s 

15 


e 

1 

> 

en 


a 
S 

c 

'> 

u 


a 

'E 


c 

G 

-a 

o 


n 

> 

s 
c 


a 

is 


S 


c 
c 
•J. 

e 

3 

o 


s 


ki 
A 

C 

Si 

o 


K 

bl 
C 
'iZ 

a 

CO 


CO 

o 


> 

"a 
> 


"a 
Can 


I 

s 




^Dsfojj uoijDnj^snoQ 


0(i.<:OOOOcoraMccCQa20cnO<KlCac>a5<pacQC2<:«!l 


noi^Bogijnapi ^uBy jooqag 




8 


a 
1 




g 

-5 

s 










c 
c 

3 

•f 

n 




=3 

■1 
1 




2 




c 

1 

(5 































100 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

C5 



o 

1-5 

w 
o 

O 
W 

Oi 

o 



Q 

> 
O 
P4 

Ph 
Ph 

<; 

CO 

H 
O 

W 



5V 
p^ I 
p^ 

o 

I— I 

Q 

►-:] 

m 

►J 
o 
o 
w 
o 

M 

P4 
< 

W 
I 

00 

H 

P5 
<5 
H 



jaqjO 






- 














IN 
























'- 










80100^ 33Jnosay 






















































mnijo^ipny 




















i-t 
































euajajBQ 
















-H 


















" -^ " 




-1 -. : 


K3X1(\V\ 


-^ 












„ „ rt rt 
















— — 










fitnooy [Bipamgy 




1— < 
















































aisn}^ 






















































asodjndiijinj^ 


'- 


1— 1 
































1— 1 1-1 








'-< 


SBajy niooJssBiQ j(jBi]ixnv 






















































sno^B^g jsqauax SBajy nadQ 




















































:--"• 


noi^Bonpg [Bpadg 
















-H rt -H 
































jfiB^usraaia jaddfi 


to 






C<I 1-1 -H 


■^ ec 


-H rt 


C'^ T-^ 


TJ* 














W 


jfjBtnijj 


■Oi 


•^ 








CO OO U5 












M 




■^ TJ* 










najiBajapnig 






-^ T-< 










































^ 


saoijB}g ijdnj 


oooooooooo 

CO.-HaO(MCOCOCOO<MCO 


o o 

CO CO 


o o o o 

!D CO IC (M 


o o 

o o 










z 

►J 
o 
o 

a 


c: 

c 

II 


, E 

1 


> 

c 
c 


1 


c 

1 

1 

C 


•* 

Q 

C 
> 


(L 

c 

J 


E 

ca 

a. 

> 


C 
1 


£ 
c 


1 
o 

c 

03 
U 

c 


> 

> 


> 

n 

£ 

c 
c 


. > 
> 


I 

J 


> 
« 
E 

1 


• c 


-a 
- 

3 


t 


s 
o 

1 

1 

-*^ 
o 


g 
c 

g 

c 

ja 
J 


1 

S 

& 
■r; 

1 


c 
c 

■•J 

c 
T 


St 

l 

o 




a 

3 


jaatojj noiptiJisnoQ 


■<c»mMcocQa!Capaoii<majPt<cDoat«Ua3a30QoQooa 


nopeagiiuapi ^ubu looqog 




H 
Z 
P 
O 


c 




a 


a 


c 

c 
a 

t 

c 






> 

c 
c 


c 

1 




C 

a 

a 

6 

,c 
ci 

b 

c 


f 




s 


1 




o 
£ 




c 


a 

c 


1 


•f 








- 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



101 



lO -^ 1— < CO •-• CM »-< 



u^ »o o o o o o 
OJ a; c-i «o CM '^p c^ 

03 TT 



O O O lO 
CD I-- CM CM 

1-4 '■a* 









tm 



> M 



CO 

_=^ 1- 



H 



o o o 



S x; -o -jJ 

^ ■- S. -^ B .= cii a 



^ -a -Q o3 
■n -»j ■•J - 



Q, 

a 



> ^ = ?: 
S o 0^ ju 



■s ;2 >. 



a 5 
IS O 



OcaWpa-aJ-aJcoajQcciaiOOQcQeqO 






•6 =! 

c " 

en ^ 



g 

^ 



o 
-a 



1.8 



102 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

C5 



o 
CO 

o 
p 
o 
Pi 

H 

C5 



>^ 

D 

P 

> 

o 

Oh 
Pi 
< 

CO 

H 
O 

•-5 



p:; I 

p^ 

o 

I— I 

Q 

I— I 

P5 

O 
O 

w 
o 

Pi 
< 

lir-l 



PQ 



'^qio 



smoo^j aomosay 



nmuo^ipnY 



BU3}3JB3 



XJBjqil 



Biuoo^ jBipatna'a 



Disnp^ 



asodjndninj^ 



seajy mooJsssiQ j{JBXi]mv 



suouB'jg j3qaB3x SB3JV uadQ 



noijBonpa iBpadg 



XJB)n9rasi3 J3dd{\ 



jtJBinuj 



ndjjBSjapnrg 



8noi}Big jidnj 



z 

pj 
o 
o 

w 
o 



Cv| ■ ^ -^ 



CD -^ (M C^ -^ CO 



C^ IM C^ 



CO CO C~J GO CO 



CJ .-t CI c^ • c^ ^^ 



■^ r^ CO »o '^ 



iOO»0»0»OOOCDOOO'OiriOOO"^OC)0 

r^iM -ric/:ocncocDiOco»oc^c^ioc^ioc^*o»0':o 
csjT— (r-.r-.-^cor-!x>»-« cm 



parojj noi'jDnj'jsxioQ 



uojiBogiinapi jnuij looqog 



CO 






o 






M (^ « m 



in < 



OJ 









o. 
S 

o s;; H S 



3 Ph 
I § J O D. 






« 



w 



oa 



o 


CQ 


< 


-< 


a 


< 


< < 


Q 


M 


CO 


CC 


ai 


CQ 


M 


CQ 


CO 


CO 


M 


03 


m 


■^ 




O 




CD 

CO 




•*r -* 


cc 


CO 


cs 


S 


*** 

CO 


o 






g 


CO 


o 

CD 


CO 
CD 


CO 



-a ^ o 

51 o a 

-!j Q M 



M 2 

I o - 9 a 

P. » o o o 

5z Z S; p. 



M 



•7 

en 

J- 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



108 









CO 










^ 












^ 








»o 


■^ 
CA 




; — ' 


oo 


CO 








TJ4 r^ 






1 : - 






to 


CO 








c^ 


w? 










CM 

OO 








CO 


CM 


<^ -t* 


t^ 


oo 

CM 








00 


CM 










C3 


o o 


Oi 

«o 

»0 


WD 

CO 


d 

1 


-o 

a 
I 
n 








m Q 






6D Oi 






d 

3 


C3 

2 




G 
3 

o 
H 




1 





a 



"3. 

3 
Pi 



s 



Q. 



a 
as 

ji 






^ 


a 


a 


Fl 


■*» 






£ 


9> 

a 


•o 




IM 


s 







£? 


O 0« 






•o 


■S o. 






.2 


X _ 






K^ 


■2 " 






o 

CM 


^■3 






s 


s. » 




A 

a » 


■o 
.S. 


S a 

a. 2 






.a 

3 


.2^ 








o 5 


g 


3 .2 


u 
^ 


hT 


"^ -tj 


-*> 




■3 <a 


•3 


1 k 
1-= 


.2 


a a 


j? 


i^ 


a 


3 .2 


a 


a a 




•T3 .-S 


u 


a .2 


"o 


<K -a 


f> 


o 


-o 


J= 




>) 


n 




^ 


^ ^ 




(U V 


a 


5« 


1 

< 


ob pQ* 


a 


2 a 
Z 2 



.2 a 
■a " 



<a 



104 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



M 

O 

I— I 

a 

Pi 
o 

t-H 

m 

o 

Go 

I— c fO 

Bo 
:d 

wo 
Hoi 

<a 
(^ . 

W-H 

otq 

H> 

eg 
o<^ 

OO 
hJO 

^5 

s« 

^« 

PiO 

<5 

Q 

O 
O 

I 



BIjapjBQ 




























i 


■ 


; 






t—i 


*-H 






F- 1 


i-( 


-- 




mnuojipny 




























- - : 






-, - : 






: - : 


XjEjqiq 










- ; 
















- - : 






- - ; 






„ ^ - 


8jn}|nju8v |Buo[}B30^ 




















- ; 




























sapwx 
































•« • 






W3 


Cl 


c^ ^ 




ssaaisng 


































(M 




OT 






QO O ^ 


8ni5(Bca3n]Oj] 




























IM « 


- ; 


—1 t^ 






• CO CM 


Ijy iBu^snpnj 




























C~J CM • 






M OO 1 






— < CM CM 


asodjndmni^ 










































ninisBuraXo 








1— ( 


















<M <M 


-^ : 








« „ ^ 


qBT miB3H 




















(N 






M CO 






^H t^ 






CO to '^ 


qcq ijy 




























(M C<) 






CO ^o 




•-< CM CO CM 


niooy oistij^ 








- 


















<M C^ 


'^ 


(M ■» 




■ CM (M CM 


q^q aonaiog 




o 


















r- 


oc cc 


IM 


CO o 




- : 


CO ^ 


qBq punog 






































Tf CO 


1—1 i-H 




raooy dnojr) agjE^ 
















































CO -» 


mooJssBiQ ijEing 




















-' : 




1-1 M (M 


<M 




<M 








e<i ■>r' 


ra00JSSBI3 pjBpUEJg 




CC »-i o 


lO Csl lO 


CO • 




o -^ -rr 

^ CJ OI 


C3 « OD O -H 


lO CO CD -^ 
-H rr CO 


snoijBjg [idnj 




lO IC O 

O) <M lO 

lO CO 


in o lo 

C-l lO (M 

t-H t-H 


I--. 




* T-T ^'' ^" CO ^ CO ^ 


1-3 
O 
O 

w 


1 


c 

£ 

J 


^ 

3 I 

il 

5 < 


• t 

1 c 

3 e 

3 J 


. a 
• H 
■» ^ 

s i 

H 


i 

it 

n 

3 1 


5 c 


3 — 


:3 

• £ 

: 1 

h 

; e 

a 3: 

3 p 


i 

3 

3 1 
a J 

3 \ 

- P 


a c 


1 
c 

! I 

i 


I I 

3 C 
10 -*■ 

3 5 


■ u 

'. ^ 

. c 
1 

it 

w 




3 

■I c 

5 J 


a 

II 


• C 

• c 

• c 

■ -£ 

II 


£ 

3 t 


.13 

a 

o 

"3 

T3 

a 

* ul 

: "-s 

> e z 

i, Pi r 


. c 

• c 

• c 

• C 

: > 

• t 

• t 

• c 

• c 

: c 

; c: 

3 K 

: c 


3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

? i 
3 C 

! £ 

3 s 


I c 
J (/: 

!J 

3 "^ 

: if 


E 

z 


a 

1 

£ 

< 

»- 
t: 

: a 

-t: 
c 

1 
c 

a 


> 

3 

3 
3 

J 

3 

H 

3 

5 

3 
D 

■< 
*i 

3 

3 


^aarojj noiianajsnoQ 


ooc/3nferacc:fc.omfeoo<;<im<;cc<;<!ra-s;ww-<;<! 


noiiBogijnapi jubij [ooqag 




CO 

g 

Z 

8 


*x 

e 

£ 

i 

5 


J 

i 

3 




• 


3 . 


3 


3 

5 

Q 13 


5 c 


a 
a. 




IS 

< 

1 
t 


i 

; 
1 

) 








i: 


3 

5^ 


< 


.j 

'l 


I i 


> 1 

H 1^ 


J 

3 


5& 


5 

3 

J 

3 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



105 















- 












































— 








r^ 
















- 


















































CO 














- : 


















































OS 
















CO r-i 


































- 










CO 










M CO 


»o c^ 




- 
















- 


<M Ci 






■^ 
















^^ -^ ^rp 


i-O CO 




























- ; 








CO 


















« « r-. 




























-^ i 








- 








































































O 
C<1 




































































- 




- 




- 


- 














t-H i-H f-H 




-> 




















Oi 


.— « 








- 


1— « 








































'- 


CO 

CO 








- 




- 
















-- 






















- 


















CO 


- 














-- 


1— t 


















CO 






CO 








CO 




CM 














































eo 


CO 




























































'-' 


CO 














- 


















































»o 
















- 












Oi 
































o 




-^ .-■ 


C^ 


•^ CO ^ 


■^ »-« -ra^ • C^ OJ 


■* 


•^ 












t~ .-1 o 


eo 

CO 


OO»COi0U5OOO»0Oi0Oi0OO»raOOOU5OOO • 

oooc^cor-t^oajioi>.o»-<0(MOcot^»r300eosoooco - 




lO O »— W5 lO 
.-• (O TTi C^ CO 






. Q 
3 C 


1 ( 
< i. 

: c 

1 ^ 


■ *• 

. a 
; j^ 
• s 

n 


> 

IJ 

I t 


■J 

n 


• t: 

■; s 

1 ~ 
3 i 


.1 

• ■£ 

i^ 

[ c 
; C 

a 

: ^ 

: > 

3 c 
- c/ 

3 ^ 


1 
1 

s 

3 C 

35 


. > 


j 1 

3 C 


1 c 
i a 

; c 


1- 

a 

; c 

: ^ 

* c 
1 * 




- £ 
; c 


■ s 

ii 


1 
1 

: 5 


1. 

3 £ 

J 

5 c! 


• 1. 

• c 

• B 

'. »— 

: 't 

• s 

h 

• 

• ■*■ 

' i 

a £ 
3 J 

- & 

5 S 


i 

1 
i 

; 

j ^ 

11 


• 1 

! *c 

. X 

ii 

s > 


1 

■ 

! 

- u 


: "c 

i| 
iJ 


1 c 
: c: 

3 * 


: c 
: c 
5 c 

i 1 

- > 


a 


£ 


* C 

: c 
\ c 

3 > 


: % 

j j 

\ c 
- X 


ii 

! t: 
: c 

1 

: c 

i c 

1 "e 
: c 

3 

: ^ 


! 

h 
I \ 

2 c 


3 

\ 

> 

3 

T 
> 

4 




OMMQcQca<<:Oa3cnScQram<;QQfflffi<i-.<i<;QcaMWfecQa 




oo.^«--ioocCTrCi»o<:?:c:coooooc<)»-^o^--C3.^oo-^oiO'»f'OS'^»ftc>JC^e*5 


: 
<f 

t: 
c 
e 
t 

1 

b 


a 

J 

3 

H 


i 


J 


4 w 


3 
3 
3 
3 






. 

. 1 

? J 

n 


i 1 

55 




3 

i 1 
\ 1 
5 2 


n 

L) C 

5 S 


\ \ 

3 : 

: 


3 

? 

A 


I 








c 
< 

! 



: £ 

H 

1 E 

i B 


3 
a 

3 

3 1 
i a 


■1 


J. 
1 

£ 


3 t 
1 a 




i 

> 
a 
) 

4 




c 

£ 
1 


i 
I 

> 

3 

» 

3 


ft 




1 





106 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Pi 

O 
I— I 

05 

*^ o 

t— I 

H« 
^S 

QO 
Wp:3 

piH 

F-i CD 

^S 

I—' 

I- 

$Q 
£h 

^> 

ote 
00 

9p 

MO 



tr. 
W 

H 



W 



BuaispO 




«-* 






























ranjjoiipny 


































XjEjqiq 


































ajniinouay ]BuopBaO;\ 


































BapBJX 




. .^ -^Jl 






to 






















SESuisng 


































2ai3iBraau30H 


































}JV pij^snpui 










. -t« 






<M 














asodjndjiinj^ 


































tnniSBamjCf) 


• 1— t 
































q«l 1?F8H 


































qBqjJV 


































niooy Disnj^ 


































qsq aonaiog 


































qs^j punog 


































uiooij dnojo agiBq 


































mOOJSSBIQ llEUIg 


































tnOOJSSB]3 pjBpUBJg 


<o 


















. ^H ^H CO W5 -^ CO ^^ 


BuoiiB^g jidnj 


• c 


3 ■ »C 

:> • »-. CO 




:§§ 






•-1 CO 





w 



^ a 

.53 « 
a 60 
° o - 

OJ 

00c 


• 

. : : t 

• 

; * 

; i -1 ; 
■■.^^' 

2 ■ 
5 H CQ e 


3 

3 
3 

V 

1 

3 
s 


2£ 


-a - 
a 


'■ '■ 

. 
; : 

: ; t 


S-i 

if. 

il 
- <; c 


* 
■ 

3 *" 

i 

3 . 

5 

3 ^^ 


3 
a 

a 

1 

2. 

1. 


1 V 

3£ 


B c 

3 : 

►-5 1- 

« > 

c 

C 

^ J. 

la c 
rt c 


2 £ 

- C 

'J 

5 

: 5 




• 'c 

5 t 




Q 

4 


}33fojj noi?Dnj!)sno3 


CQOfeOWQcQQfcOOOWPaQOaDcocQcwMcwa: 


noijBogijnapi ;ut;|j jooqog 




g 

H 



•a : 

'S '■ 
W : 

's ■? 

OS 

Q C 


I d 
. 




is 




• 1 
PS e 




s 

CI 

3 






1 
> 















SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



107 











.— < ^ 




CO 


o 




-^ 




— 


CO 


Oi 




- 




-H - 


CO 


CM 
















CO 




GO 










OS 


::: 




oo 




CO to 


o 

CM 


oo 

CO 




u3 




C-1 OJ 


OS 


CO 
CO 










CO M 


CJ 


CO 


















CI 




(M CM 


r^ 


cr> 

CM 




CO 




CO CO 


a> 


CM 




■^ 






CO 


CO 




•^ 




CM <M 


QO 


CO 




O C4 








C^ 


CO 
QO 




CO 










CO 


CO 
CM 




^ 




^ ^ 


t^ 


CM 




-- 






- 


CM 


CO CO -^ (M Ci Oi 
»0 ^ (M <M 


CO 


O 


»o o o o r- t^ 
r^ CO o u5 lo »o 

^ -n* CO CO 
CO ^ ^ 


GO 


CO 
CO 
CO 

C5 


■E 
o 

o 

0! 


c 

■g 

> 

a 

'5 






s 



c 


j: 
I 

a 
n 

1 








C/i -< '-5 OQ •< "< 






^ <M M (M CO -^ 

CO OS cc 








1 


1 







1 




C 






1 





s 



o w 

o. M 

. B " 






-2 -5 >. 5 



J3 i I. 

_ ^^ O 

'S '5 a 

•a a ? 

«, -^ 

-2 -c 1^ 

GO JS '. 

« r w 



a 



_• a 

c -d 



O. j2 



.■s a 

o. — 

? « 

M £ "b 

C O OS 

OJ ._ O 

o « ^ 

<u o S 

f5 a " 

^ a -a 

; S « o 

■■5 « a 

bh- OJ CJ 

" b *^ 

>^ a a 

S 2 •" 

-t3 '-3 ♦* 

o 2 § 

^ W ™ 

? § § 

!s ^ oj 



J, - 



S S "^ 

rt ■* u 

._ " a a 

T3 a O 

>> ♦- '5 

"O "S U3 

§ 2 'f 

:/-j Z ~ 



3 
O 



CO _ 

— o 



Pk dS 



108 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

PUPIL TRANSPORTATION 

Purpose and Scope 

The major purpose of the Pupil Transportation Service is to promote the safe 
transportation of pupils to and from public schools. More than 60 percent of the 
pupils attending public schools in the State are transported in school buses. The 
number of pupils has been increasing at an annual rate of approximately 3.5 percent. 
Specifications for buses are established to provide maximum safety for pupils, as 
well as economy of operation. Greater pupil safety also is provided by the careful 
selection and proper training of school bus drivers. A good transportation system 
must be adequate, eflBcient, and economical. Such a system includes: 

1. Sufficient buses to provide reasonable comfort, prevent overcrowding, and 
serve pupils and schools within reasonable time limits. 

2. Bus routes which permit pupils to travel as directly as possible to and 
from school and routes planned to permit maximum use of the buses, with 
minimum mileage and minimum waiting periods at schools. 

3. School buses that are properly designed, with provisions for a good pre- 
ventive maintenance program and instruction of drivers in the care of 
equipment. 

All school buses are inspected each year by representatives of the Pupil Trans- 
portation Service. Monthly inspections by competent mechanics are also required. 
This procedure is intended to insure that buses meet all requirements and that 
they are maintained in a safe operating condition. When an inspection indicated 
a need for corrections, subsequent reports showed that the deficiency had been 
remedied. 

Each year meetings with school bus drivers are held throughout the State to 
discuss many phases of school bus transportation. Requirements for school bus 
drivers are explained, and safe transportation of pupils, observance of State laws, 
regulations of the State Board of Education, local regulations, and safe driving 
practices are emphasized at these meetings. 

An adequate program of preventive maintenance also is stressed as a means 
for providing safe and economical transportation. Emphasis is placed on the im- 
portance of properly designed facilities and competent mechanics in an eflScient 
pupil transportation program. 

Plans and specifications furnished by the Pupil Transportation Service for 
facilities and equipment have been used by local school officials to provide many 
well-equipped school bus repair shops. Visits to shops, discussions of maintenance 
problems with mechanics, and recommendations for better methods and practices 
have contributed to an improved maintenance program. 

Surveys of transportation systems are made upon request. Maps showing 
recommended bus routes are prepared, presented, and explained to local school 
officials. Such transportation surveys involve a careful analysis of the data obtain- 
ed from the school system under study and the preparation of a spot map which 
shows where pupils board buses. Routes are planned so that buses can operate at 
maximum capacity with time and distance reduced to the minimum. 

Accomplishments 

Safety meetings, attended by school bus drivers, substitute drivers, mechan- 
ics, safety patrols, superintendents, law enforcement agents, and others connected 
with pupil transportation, were held in school divisions throughout the State. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



109 



Drivocator programs were shown in 47 school divisions during the year. Two 
programs, "Attitudes and Emotions" and "Defensive Driving," were used. The 
first wq,s shown 87 times and the latter 81 times. They were seen by 3,088 drivers 
who responded favorably to audio-visual programs presented in a unique way. 
These two programs will be shown until all have an opportunity to see them, other 
programs will be used where these have been shown. 

During 1969-70 the number of buses in operation increased by 209; there was 
a gain oi 20,187 in the number of pupils transported; and an increase of 315,039 
in the miles traveled in transporting pupils. 

These figures and those for the past five years, given in the following table, 
indicate that the number of children transported, the number of buses operated, 
and the number of miles traveled continued to increase. 

TABLE 10— GROWTH IN PUPIL TRANSPORTATION— 1935-70 











m 


tc 






CO 










"a 


-2 






CO 
01 

a 


YEAR 


pils T 
DA) 


to 


4) 


S3Q 
So, 


3 «^ 


'a 

3 


JH 


u 




^s 


3 


S 


^ s? 




P-t 




§s 




t,-a 


u 


(-1 


flCQ 


0) 


^ 


^H 




0) <u 


<v 


<V 


bc^ 


Ph 


CL; 


o 




-Q H 


Si 


J2 


a fc. 


^ u 




CO 




3 a 


s 

3 


a 

3 






o 


-4.3 
CO 

o 


go 




Z 


^ 


^ 


< 


<1 


O 


o 


o 


1965-66 


538,544 


5,945 


49,347,492 


91 


46 


$ 23.76 


.S.259 


$12,796,362.84 


1966-67 


555.829 


6,157 


50,824,192 


90 


46 


25.93 


.284 


14,410,405.47 


1967-68 


573,207 


6,368 


52,060,826 


90 


45 


26.91 


.297 


15,447,463.45 


1968-69 


598,773 


6,599 


54,624,083 


91 


46 


29.46 


.323 


17,637,364 09 


1909-70 


618,690 


6,808 


54,954.507 


91 


45 


31 70 


357 


19,632,046 93 



During the year, some school divisions were aided in routing school buses. 
As.siistance was given to school building survey committees, and a member of the 
Pupil Transportation Service served on some of these committees. 

Seventeen school divisions lowered their per unit cost of operation and .seven 
divisions reduced their total net cost of operation for the year. These reductions 
are attributed largely to improved maintenance programs and better planned bus 
routes. 

The number of buses according to tjrpe of ownership and operation is shown 
in the following table: 

TABLE 11— NUMBER OF BUSES OPERATED ANNUALLY— 1965-70 



YEAR 


Number 

of Publicly 

Owned Buses 


Number 
of Privately 
Owned Buses 


1965-66 


5,852 
6.0t)0 
6,313 
6,554 
6,777 


93 


1966-67 


67 


1967-68... 
1968-69 . . , 


• • • •'• ir-m\-4-*''i% «'«W.i"« ■ • •••••• •.•■••'•■ 


55 

45 


1969-70 


31 



110 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 















TABLE 


12— PUPIL 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 












Total 


Num- 


Number op Dritebs 




Atebaqe Daily Attendance op 
Transported Pupils 


Total 

Number 


Miles 
Pupils 


ber 
of 














COUNTIES 








of 


Transported 


Days 


Adult 


Student 










Buses 
Oper- 


on 
Regular 


Buses 
Oper- 


























Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


ated 


Route 


ated 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Accomack 






















Publicly-owned 


3,347 


1,880 


5,227 


73 


530,100 


180 


41 


32 






Albeuarle 






Publicly-owned 


4,569 


2,570 


7,139 


107 


891,642 


181 


55 


32 


20 




Alleqhant 






















Publicly-owned 


1,661 


1,019 


2,680 


31 


277,704 


180 


31 








Amelia 






















Publicly-owned 


990 


696 


1,586 


25 


207,216 


180 


14 


7 


4 




Amherst 






















Publicly-owned 


3,040 


1,445 


4,485 


60 


635,400 


180 


38 


21 


1 




Appomattox 






















Publicly-owned 


1,230 


685 


1,915 


34 


292,248 


180 


20 


8 


6 




Ablington 






















Publicly-owned 


4,914 


4,686 


9,600 


70 


422,549 


188 


50 


20 






AnonsTA 






















Publicly-owned 


5,802 


3,457 


9,259 


110 


887,292 


180 


36 


19 


55 




Bath 






















Publicly-owned 


646 


330 


976 


18 


140,040 


180 


17 




1 




Bedfobd 






















Publicly-owned 


4,458 


2.589 


7,047 


100 


1,017,270 


180 


35 


51 


14 




Bland 






















Publicly-owned 


541 


377 


918 


19 


124,146 


180 


19 








Botetoubt 






















Publicly-owned 


2,415 


1,388 


3,803 


47 


371,574 


180 


34 


8 


5 




Brunswick 






















Publicly-owned 


2,016 


1,136 


3,152 


62 


738,936 


180 


32 


12 


18 




Buchanan 






















Publicly-owned 


5,562 


2,596 


8,158 


81 


480,384 


180 


65 


12 


4 




BUCKINOBAU 






















Publicly-owned 


1,644 


795 


2,439 


43 


422,676 


180 


20 


12 


11 




Campbell 






















Publicly-owned 


5,518 


2,944 


8,462 


100 


672,120 


180 


32 


56 


12 




Contract 


181 
5,699 


154 
3,098 


335 

8,797 


6 
106 


41,040 
713,160 


180 
180 


2 
34 


56 


4 
16 




Total 




Caroune 






















Publicly-owned 

Carroll 


2 043 


1 073 


3 116 


48 


339,048 


180 


16 


32 


























Publicly-owned 


2,951 


1,608 


4,559 


74 


740,160 


180 


68 




6 




Charles Citt 






















Publicly-owned 


1 021 


560 


1 581 


21 


178 542 


180 


5 


16 






114 
1 135 


14 
574 


128 
1,709 


2 
23 


17,100 
195,642 


180 
180 


2 
7 








Total 


16 






Charlotte 


















Publicly-owned 


1,656 


898 


2.554 


46 


371,998 


180 


33 


12 


1 





Columns 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9, 10. II. and 12 are averases. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



111 



TRANSPORTATION 



10 



11 



13 



13 



14 



15 



IS 



Arerage 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 



72 
67 
86 
63 
75 
56 

137 
84 
54 
70 
48 
83 
50 

101 

57 

85 
56 
83 

65 

62 

76 
64 

75 

56 



Average 

Miles 

Per Bus 

Per Day 



40 

46 

50 

46 

59 

48 

32 

45 

43 

57 

36 

44 

66 

33 

55 

37 
38 
37 

39 

56 

47 

48 
47 

45 



Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 



37 79 
43 84 

41 86 

40 69 
43 11 

42 73 

49 09 
27 98 

50 45 

34 43 
45 16 
33 68 
60 55 

27 14 
45 02 

28 09 
49 01 

28 89 

38 19 

41 06 

35 90 

43 24 

36 45 

51 04 



Cort 
Per 

Mile 



.373 

351 

.404 

.311 

.304 

.280 

1.116 

.292 

.328 

.239 

334 

.345 

.259 

.461 

.260 

354 
400 
.356 

351 

253 

318 

324 
318 

350 



Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 



197,552 35 
312,967 34 
112,192 42 

64,530 17 
193,366 95 

81,829 44 
471,292 60 
259,088 16 

45,891 88 
242,654 09 

41,452 74 

128,081 56 

190,866 42 

221,383 40 

109,792 87 

237,703 17 

16,418 75 

254,121 92 

118,986 97 

187,215 07 

56.765 41 

5,535 00 

62,300 41 

130 357 02 



Cost of 
Replacement 



34,890 73 



6,640 00 
30,476 17 
10,689 40 
41,199 96 
53,756 88 
30,810 33 
32,000 00 

8,881 62 
32,072 85 
39,862 44 
35,747 76 
33,255 75 
53,870 52 



53,870 52 

15,857 13 

272 28 

8,296 36 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total of 

Columns 

13, 14, and 15 



5 18,671 76 



12,0J5 23 
5,314 70 



6,l.n 25 



16,920 75 
30,802 34 



24,288 65 
24,2SH 65 



8,206 36 
20,451 00 



197,552 AS 
366,529 83 
112,192 42 

71,170 17 
235,938 35 

97,863 54 
512,4')2 56 
319,006 29 

76,702 21 
274,654 09 

50,334 36 

130,154 41 

247,649 61 

288,933 50 

143,048 62 

315,862 34 

16,418 75 

332. 2S1 09 

134,844 10 

1S7.4S7 35 

65,061 77 

5,535 00 

70,596 77 

150,808 02 



112 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 12— PUPIL 



^1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 












Total 


Num- 


Number of Drivers 




Average Dailt Attendance of 
Transported Pupils 


Total 
Number 


Miles 
Pupils 


ber 
of 














COUNTIES 








of 


Transported 


Days 


Adult 


Student 










Buses 
Oper- 


on 

Regular 


Buses 
Oper- 


























Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


ated 


Route 


ated 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Chesterfield 






















Publicly-owned 


16,627 


8,088 


24,715 


228 


1,518,085 


180 


17 


211 






Clarke 






















Publicly-owned 


1,005 


478 


1,483 


14 


117,900 


180 


9 


4 


1 




Craiq 






















Publicly-owned 


472 


205 


677 


11 


108,000 


ISO 


9 


1 


1 




CULPEPEB 






















Publicly-owned 


2,506 


923 


3.489 


42 


342,396 


180 


13 


21 


8 




CUMBERLA.VD 






















Publicly-owned 


972 


466 


1,438 


25 


273,600 


180 


14 


6 


5 




Dickenson 






















Publicly-owned 


2,307 


1,437 


3,744 


50 


401,760 


180 


49 


1 






DiNWIDDIE 






Publicly-owned 


3,297 


1,454 


4,751 


86 


754,020 


180 


22 


61 


2 




Essex 






















Publicly-owned 


964 


491 


1,455 


26 


286,380 


180 


7 


17 


2 


■ • • • 


Fairfax 






















Publicly-owned 


41,682 


37,607 


79,289 


608 


5,415,046 


182 


80 


524 


3 




Fauquier 






















Publicly-owned 


3,927 


1,881 


5,808 


77 


587.538 


180 


29 


43 


4 




Flotd 






















Publicly-owned 


1,224 


776 


2,000 


34 


295.740 


180 


19 


9 


6 


.... 


Fluvanna 






















Publicly-owned 


1,245 


538 


1,783 


27 


207,918 


180 


27 








Franklin 








Publicly-owned 


3,914 


2,072 


5,986 


89 


774,861 


181 


62 


14 


13 


.... 


Frederick 






















Publicly-owned 


4,584 


1,909 


6,493 


50 


459,900 


180 


31 


14 


5 




Contract 


53 

4,037 




53 
6,546 


1 
51 


17.820 
477,720 


ISO 
180 


1 
32 








Total 


1,909 


14 


5 


.... 


Giles 






















Publicly-owned... U 


2,109 


1,371 


3,480 


38 


270,504 


180 


24 


1 


13 


.... 


Gloucester 






















Publicly-owned... L. 


1,897 


601 


2,498 


36 


333,338 


180 


2 


34 






GOOCHLAN-D 






Publicly-owned..... 


1,527 


675 


2,202 


36 


355,500 


180 


14 


18 


3 




Gratson 






















Publicly-owned 


1.726 


1,054 


2,780 


51 


337,058 


181 


44 


2 


5 


■ • • > 


Greene 






















Publicly-owned 


760 


313 


1,073 


16 


142,200 


180 


9 


3 


4 


. . • • 


Greensville 






















Publicly-owned 


2,070 


1,075 


3,145 


44 


306,864 


180 


23 


19 


2 


.... 


Halifax 






















Publicly-owned 


4,149 


2,914 


7,063 


115 


892.692 


ISO 


44 


27 


43 





Columns 2, 3, 4, 5. 6. 7. 8. 13, 14. 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9. 10, 11, and 12 are averages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



113 



TRANSPORTATION— Continued 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



Average 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 



108 

106 

62 

83 

58 

75 

55 

56 

130 

75 

59 

66 

67 

130 

53 

128 

92 

69 

61 

51 

67 

71 

61 



Average 

Miles 

Per Bus 

Per Day 



37 
46 
55 
45 
61 
45 
49 
61 
49 
42 
48 
43 
48 

51 

99 
52 

40 

51 

55 

37 

49 

39 

43 



Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 



25 40 

27 21 
54 81 
29 02 
41 25 
43 85 
40 79 
54 98 

28 64 
38 50 



Cost 
Per 
Mile 



.414 
.342 
.344 
.296 
.217 
.408 
.257 
.279 
.419 
.381 



Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 



54 40 


.367 


41 00 


352 


37 48 


.289 


24 30 


.342 


83 30 


.247 


24 77 


339 


30 86 


398 


39 77 


.298 


43 91 


.267 


43 53 


.359 


35 75 


.270 


33 98 


.348 


45 01 


356 



627,659 19 
40,356 02 
37,107 18 

101,269 39 
59,312 88 

164,122 28 

193,783 14 

80,001 17 

2.270,857 76 

223,624 70 

108,818 10 
73,102 38 

224,250 23 

157,756 23 

4,415 00 

162,171 23 

107,405 15 
99,347 51 
95,095 71 

121,003 82 
38,364 91 

108,871 31 

326. 56S 18 



Cost of 
Replacement 



114,140 16 
7,207 89 
11,987 59 
13,350 28 
5,542 84 
43,716 68 
54,415 21 
12,178 00 
44,370 00 
32,187 12 
28,264 04 
13,827 32 



t 63,163 44 



Capital 
Outlay 



41,084 47 
41,084 47 
13,260 17 
13,492 00 



25,336 78 
7,990 00 



2S,408 20 



20,025 44 



83 80 



122,082 95 
9,249 15 



Total of 

Columns 

13, 14, and 15 



34,873 60 
34,873 60 



6,746 00 
33,250 00 



26,734 24 



804,962 79 
47,563 91 
49,094 77 

134,645 11 
64,855 72 

207,922 76 

248,198 35 

92,179 17 

2,437,310 71 

265,060 97 

137,082 14 
86,929 70 

224,250 23 

233,714 30 

4,415 00 

238,129 30 

120,665 32 

119,585 51 

128,345 71 

146,340 60 

46.354 91 

133,605 55 

354.076 38 



114 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 12-PUPIL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 












Total 


Num- 


Numbeb of Drivers 




Average Daily Attendance of 
Transported Pupils 


Total 
Number 


Miles 
Pupils 


ber 
of 














COUNTIES 








of 


Transported 


Days 


Adult 


Student 










Buses 
Oper- 


on 
Regular 


Buses 
Oper- 


























Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


ated 


Route 


ated 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Hanovek 






















Publicly-owned 


4,981 


2.669 


7,650 


84 


733,320 


180 


13 


69 


2 




Henrico 






















Publicly-owned 


12,790 


9,694 


22,484 


199 


1,139,006 


180 


30 


165 






Henrt 






















Publicly-owned 


7,354 


3,364 


10,718 


120 


1,008,792 


ISO 


64 


56 






Contract 


67 
7,421 




67 
10,785 


1 
121 


8.892 
1,017,684 


180 

ISO 


1 
65 








Total 


3,364 


56 






Highland 






















Publicly-owned 


317 


211 


528 


10 


89,280 


180 


9 








Isle of Wight 






















Publicly-owned 


2,647 


1,233 


3,880 


63 


419,184 


180 


16 


47 






James Citt 






















Publicly-owned 


2,485 


1,163 


3,648 


49 


350,100 


180 


9 


40 






EiNO Georob 






















Publicly-owned 


1,110 


592 


1,702 


26 


188,460 


180 


6 


20 






Kino and Queen 






















Publicly-owned. . . . 


691 


288 


979 


20 


208,872 


ISO 


4 


15 






Kino William 






















Publicly-owned 


817 


376 


1,193 


23 


189,792 


180 


5 


18 






Lancaster 






Publicly-owned 


1,044 


618 


1,662 


28 


209,160 


180 


4 


24 






Contract 


123 
1,167 




123 
1,785 


2 
30 


14,436 
223,596 


180 
180 


2 
6 








Total 


618 


24 






Leb 






Publicly-owned 


2,311 


1,347 


3.658 


51 


351,792 


180 


49 




2 






98 
2,409 


37 
1,384 


135 
3,793 


4 
55 


39 816 
391,608 


180 
180 


4 
53 








Total 




2 




Loudoun 






















Publicly-owned 


4,215 


2,599 


6,814 


98 


590.994 


180 


23 


5S 


17 




Louisa 






















Publicly-owned 


2,103 


920 


3,113 


47 


517,860 


180 


19 


13 


14 


1 


LUNBNBURO 






















Publicly-owned 


1,440 


861 


2,301 


39 


357,840 


ISO 


26 


12 


1 




Madison 






















Publicly-owned 


1,250 


529 


1,779 


26 


201,924 


180 


17 


5 


4 




Mathews 






















Publicly-owned 


799 


459 


1,258 


IS 


170,998 


180 


2 


15 


1 




Mecklenburo 






















Publicly-owned 


3,526 


2,308 


5,834 


95 


824,814 


180 


38 


37 


20 




Middlesex 






















Publicly-owned 


822 


434 


1,256 


21 


174,600 


180 




21 






Montoomert 






















Publicly-owned 


4,270 


2,037 


6.307 


58 


417,276 


ISO 


54 


3 


1 





Columns 2, 3, 4. 5. 6. 7, 8. 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9. 10, 11, and 12 are averac**- 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



115 



TRANSPORTATION— Continued 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



Average 


Average 


Number 


Miles 


PupiU 


Per Bus 


Per Bus 


Per Day 


91 


49 


113 


32 


89 


47 


67 


49 


89 


47 


53 


50 


62 


37 


74 


40 


65 


40 


49 


68 


52 


46 


69 


42 


62 


40 


60 


41 


71 


38 


34 


65 


69 


40 


70 


34 


66 


62 


59 


61 


68 


43 


70 


63 


61 


48 


60 


46 


109 


40 



Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 



29 79 
25 66 

32 95 

52 24 

33 07 

48 16 
37 61 
33 74 
43 65 

53 23 

49 71 

35 88 

47 56 

36 69 

39 18 
134 80 

42 58 

56 15 
35 09 
46 50 

37 58 
33 27 

43 88 

48 71 
29 46 



Cost 
Per 
Mile 



.311 

.507 

350 
394 
.350 

.285 

348 

.352 

.394 

,245 

.312 

.285 
.405 
.293 

.407 
.457 
.412 

.583 

.211 

.299 

.331 

245 

310 

350 

445 



Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gaa 

Tax Refund 



Cost of 
Replacement 



227,874 14 

676,975 18 

353,197 99 

3,500 25 

356,698 24 

25,429 95 

145,938 36 

123,094 46 

74,298 55 

51,134 68 

59,307 69 

59,633 06 

6,850 00 

65,483 06 

143,319 24 

18,198 54 

161,517 78 

344,526 09 

109,237 83 

106,988 05 

66,858 91 

41,858 86 

256,015 45 

61,182 61 

185.827 33 



47,667 80 
31,800 00 
42,809 01 



42,809 01 

6,332 47 

17.031 84 

19,959 15 

25,268 32 

5,398 69 

5,398 69 

6,916 38 



6,916 38 
19,994 94 



19,994 94 
38,393 00 
12,789 15 
20,622 52 
14,617 80 

7,115 10 
31,324 95 

6,602 33 
49,669 63 



Capital 
Outlay 



14,052 60 
29,970 00 
34,634 22 
34,634 22 



22.185 37 
13,306 10 



i6,251 05 



16,251 05 
3,300 00 
3,300 00 



24,946 83 



24,751 08 



Total of 

Columns 

13, 14, and 15 



289,594 54 

638,745 18 

430,641 22 

3,500 25 

434,141 47 

31,762 42 

185.155 57 

156,359 71 

99,566 87 

56,533 37 

64,706 38 

82,800 49 

5,850 00 

88,650 49 

166,614 18 

18,198 54 

184,812 72 

382,919 09 

122,026 98 

127,610 57 

81,476 71 

48,973 96 

312,287 23 

67.784 94 

260.248 04 



116 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 















TABLE 12— 


PUPIL 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 












Total 


Num- 


Number of Drivers 




Average Daily Attendance op 
Tkansported Pupils 


Total 
Number 


Miles 
Pupils 


ber 
of 














COUNTIES 








of 


Transported 


Days 


Adult 


Student 










Buses 
Oper- 


on 
Regular 


Buses 
Oper- 


























Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


ated 


Route 


ated 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Nansemond 






















Publicly-owned 


4,333 


2,701 


7,034 


86 


706,500 


180 


17 


69 






Nelson 






















Publicly-owned 


1,715 


941 


2.656 


51 


500,076 


180 


25 


20 


6 




New Kent 






















Publicly-owned 


785 


42,3 


1,208 


24 


241,082 


180 


2 


15 


7 




Northampton 






















Publicly-owned 


1,852 


1,140 


2,992 


35 


321,174 


180 


27 


8 






NORTHUMB ERLAND 






PuMicly-owned 


1,186 


690 


1,876 


38 


324.900 


ISO 


4 


33 


1 




Nottowat 






















PubIicl5»-owned 


1,246 


798 


2,044 


33 


277,362 


180 


15 


16 


2 




Orange 






















Publicly-owned 


1,765 


821 


2,586 


38 


336,294 


ISO 


13 


24 


3 




Page 






















Publicly-owned 


1,969 


997 


2.966 


30 


179,424 


ISO 


16 


11 


3 




Patrick 






















Publicly-owned 


2,028 


1.026 


3,054 


33 


369,342 


180 


33 








Pittsylvania 






















Publicly-owned 


8,342 


4,743 


13,085 


191 


1.884.960 


180 


71 


47 


73 




Contract 


30 

8,372 


18 
4,761 


48 
13,133 


1 

192 


6,120 
1,891,030 


180 
180 


1 

72 








Total 


47 


73 




Powhatan 




Publicly-owned 

Prince Edward 


878 


373 


1,251 


23 


165 060 


180 


8 


15 


























Publicly-owned 


999 


405 


1,404 


22 


224,910 


180 


11 




11 




Prince George 






















Publicly-owned 


3.428 


1,708 


5,136 


70 


637,200 


180 


17 


49 


4 




Prince William 






















Publicly-owned 


14.933 


7.558 


22,491 


147 


1,212,924 


183 


12 


134 


1 




Pulaski 






















Publicly-owned 


2.970 


1.659 


4.629 


49 


299.682 


181 


33 


2 


14 




Rappahannock 






















Publicly-owned 


779 


332 


1,111 


18 


152,712 


180 


13 


1 


•4 




Richmond 






















Publicly-owned 


941 


556 


1,497 


21 


176,436 


180 


2 


11 


7 


1 


Roanoke 






















Publicly-owned 

Rockbridqb 


11 282 


6,281 


17,563 


130 


1.041,750 


180 


54 


76 






















Publicly-owned 


1,518 

757 

2.275 


994 


2,512 
1,100 
3,612 


36 


272 826 


ISO 


25 


11 






343 
1.337 


14 
50 


121,680 
394.506 


180 
ISO 


14 
39 








Total 


11 













Columns 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9, 10, 11, and 12 are averages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



117 



TRANSPORTATION— Continued 



10 



II 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



Average 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 



82 
52 
50 
86 
49 
62 
68 
99 
93 

69 

48 
68 

54 

63 

73 

153 
94 
62 
71 

135 

70 
79 
72 



Average 

Miles 
Per Bus 
Per Day 



46 

54 

56 

51 

48 

47 

49 

33 

62 

55 
34 
55 

40 

57 

51 

45 

36 

47 

47 

45 



Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 



27 84 
70 90 
49 97 
32 98 
44 39 

37 32 
39 57 
26 53 

38 93 

35 25 
fiS 21 
35 37 

42 63 

43 25 
41 42 
18 99 
22 97 
43 17 
30 14 
22 91 



42 


38 44 


48 


48 34 


44 


41 45 



Cost 
Per 
Mile 



.277 

.377 

.250 

.307 

.256 

.275 

.304 

.439 

322 

.245 
.535 
.245 

.323 

.270 

.334 

.352 

.355 

314 

.256 

.386 

354 
.437 
3S0 



Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 



195,858 65 

185,309 77 
60,364 43 
98,677 56 
83,272 50 
76,274 54 

102,322 41 
78,687 64 

118,897 12 

461,234 76 

3,274 00 

464,558 76 

53,335 45 

60,725 70 

212,741 50 

427,090 42 

108,305 40 

47,967 12 

44,272 81 

402,302 97 

96,556 09 

53.171 83 

149,727 92 



Cost of 
Replacement 



65,244 84 
11,650 00 



22,240 36 
25,591 89 
20,266 98 



11,698 32 
42,543 54 
95,077 80 



95,077 80 
20,347 56 
13,515 06 
41,430 60 
68.467 96 
16,285 50 
5,761 31 
14,430 00 
58,876 53 
26,071 56 
26.071 56 



Capital 
Outlay 



14,453 64 



5,538 79 



40,798 20 



80,326 63 
27,893 75 
27.893 75 



222,418 34 
21,458 82 



71,250 94 
28.727 93 
28.727 93 



Total of 

Columns 

13, 14, and 15 



261,103 49 
199.959 77 

74,818 07 
120,917 92 
114,403 18 

96,541 52 
.143,120 61 

90.385 96 

241,787 29 

585,256 31 

3,274 00 

587.530 31 

73,683 01 

74,240 76 

254,172 10 

707,976 72 

144,049 72 

53.728 43 

, 68.702 81 

532,430 44 

151 .355 58 

53.171 83 

204 527 41 



118 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 12-PUPIL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 












Total 


Num- 


Number or Drivers 




Average Dailt Attendance op 
Transported Popils 


Total 

Number 


Miles 
Pupils 


ber 
of 










COUNTIES 








of 
Buses 
Oper- 


Transported 

on 

Regular 


Days 
Buses 
Oper- 


Adult 


Student 




















Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


ated 


Route 


ated 


M 


F 


M 


F 


ROCKINOHAU 






















Publicly-owned 


6,976 


3,342 


9,318 


110 


759.798 


180 


86 


24 






Rdsseli, 






Publicly-owned 


3,606 


1,808 


5,414 


67 


496,620 


180 


66 


1 






Scott 






















Publicly-owned 


2,893 


1,762 


4,655 


64 


673,560 


180 


60 




3 




Sbena^ndoah 






















Publicly-owned 


2,775 


1,641 


4,416 


51 


393,750 


180 


28 


19 


4 





SUTTH 






















Publicly-owned 


3,950 


2,071 


6,021 


39 


323,820 


180 


39 








Southampton 








Publicly-owned 


2,631 


1,026 


3,657 


74 


640,728 


180 


16 


51 


7 




Spotsylvania 






















Publicly-owned 


2,615 


1,225 


3,840 


50 


532,908 


180 


2 


26 


20 


2 


Stafpobd 






















Publicly-owned 


3,264 


1,615 


4,879 


47 


375,448 


181 


8 


34 


5 




SUBBT 






















Publicly-owned 


750 


332 


1,082 


18 


184,320 


180 


5 


8 


5 




Sussex 






















Publicly-owned 


1,732 


895 


2,627 


39 


490,500 


180 


11 


25 


3 




Tazewell 






















Publicly-owned 


5,252 


3,127 


8,379 


79 


580,790 


ISO 


72 


2 


5 




Warhen 






















Publicly-owned 


1,801 


890 


2,691 


23 


170,784 


180 


18 


5 






Washinoton 






















Publicly-owned 


5,063 


2,592 


7,655 


78 


691,002 


180 


74 


2 


2 


.... 


Westsiorsland 






















Publicly-owned 


1,582 


711 


2,293 


40 


360,016 


180 


7 


32 


1 


.... 


Wise 






















Publicly-owned 


4,412 


2,505 


6,917 


67 


505,171 


181 


65 




2 


.... 


Wtthh 






















Publicly-owned 

YOBX 


2 410 


1 550 


3 960 


42 


340 023 


180 


39 


3 


























Publicly-owned 


4,642 


2,490 


7,132 


88 


751,968 


180 


3 


85 






Total Counties. . . 


329,836 


194.956 


524,792 


6,029 


49,926,133 




2,621 


2,857 


543 


9 



Columns 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Colunuis 9, 10, 11. and 12 are averages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



119 



TRANSPORTATION— Continued 



10 



II 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



Avtrage 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 



85 
81 
73 
87 

155 
49 
79 

104 
60 
67 

106 

117 
98 
57 

103 
94 
85 



Average 

Miles 

Per Bus 

Per Day 



87 



38 
41 
58 
43 
46 
48 
59 
44 
57 
70 
41 
41 
49 
50 
42 
45 
48 



Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 



47 



30 94 
35 27 
45 09 
28 99 

18 49 
41 34 
41 90 
26 66 
37 73 
37 49 
25 89 

19 79 

31 15 
44 32 
25 43 
34 35 
30 97 



Cost 
Per 
Mile 



$ 33 05 



.379 

385 

.312 

325 

344 

.236 

302 

347 

.221 

.203 

.374 

.313 

345 

.282 

348 

400 

294 



Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 



348 



288.298 53 
190,941 23 
209,915 63 
127.968 75 
111,333 69 
151.162 59 
160,933 77 
130,092 73 
40,820 79 
99,823 10 
216,925 07 
63,242 87 
238,730 85 
101.644 74 
175,873 76 
136,019 31 
220,853 00 



Cost of 
Replacement 



$ 47.712 33 

35,622 00 



$ 17,353,536 32 



27,150 77 

29,562 67 

35,292 25 

175 00 



20,186 68 
20,023 23 
40,163 28 



50,563 02 
27,813 32 
31,913 11 
23,025 93 



I 2,349,205 10 



CapiUl 
Outlay 



14,532 12 



14,893 12 



6,674 41 



6,199 78 



Total of 

Columns 

13. 14. and 15 



13,198 32 



40,246 03 



$ 1,222,506 37 



350,542 98 
226,563 23 
209.915 63 
155.119 52 
155,794 48 
186,454 84 
161,108 77 
130,092 73 

61,007 47 
126.520 74 
257.088 35 

59,442 65 
289,293 87 
129.458 06 
220.985 19 
159.045 24 
261.099 03 



$ 20,925,247 79 



120 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 12— PUPIL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




Average Daily Attendance op 
Transported Pupjls 


Total 
Number 
of 
Buses 
Oper- 
ated 


Total 

Miles 

Pupils 

Transported 

on 

Regular 

Route 


Num- 
ber 
of 
Days 
Buses 
Oper- 
ated 


Number of Dbiverb 


TOWNS 


Adult 


Student 




Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Abingdon 
Publicly-owned 


621 

185 

772 
278 


256 

76 

398 

188 


777 

261 

1,170 

466 


3 

2 

16 
4 


20,034 
10,458 
93.780 
16,920 


180 
180 
180 
180 


3 

2 








Colonial Beach 








POQOOSON 

Publiclv-owned 


16 

4 






WEsr Point 
Publicly-owned 










Total Towns . . . 


1 756 


918 


2.C74 


25 


141,192 




5 


20 























Columns 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9, 10, 11, and 12 are averages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



121 



TRANSPORTATION— CoNTTNTED 



9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


Average 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 


Average 

Miles 

Per Bus 

Per Day 


Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 


Cost 
Per 

Mile 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 


Cost of 
Replacement 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total of 

Columns 

13, 14, and 15 


259 


37 
29 
32 
24 


$ 14 55 

14 41 

28 02 
17 19 


$ .564 
.360 
319 
.473 


$ 11,307 13 

3,760 05 

32,784 82 

8,009 48 






1 11,307 13 
4,060 05 


131 


1 300 00 




73 


$ 5,458 63 


38,243 45 
8 009 48 


117 












107 


31 


$ 20 89 


$ 396 


$ 55,861 48 


$ 300 00 


$ 5.45S 63 


$ 61,620 11 



122 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



TABLE 12— PUPIL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




Average Dailt Attendance op 
Transported Pupils 


Total 
Number 
of 
Buses 
Oper- 
ated 


Total 

Miles 

Pupils 

Transported 

on 

Regular 

Route 


Num- 
ber 
of 
Days 
Buses 
Oper- 
ated 


Number op Drivers 


CITIES 


Adult 


Student 




Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


M 


F 


M 


F 


Alexandria 
Publi d v-o wned 


1,213 

11,266 

459 

282 

1,082 

6,804 

12,817 




1.213 

17,205 

738 

282 

1,510 

6,859 

22,125 

558 

541 

2,674 

1,017 

36,772 


11 

140 

2 

3 

14 

64 

221 

5 

2 

22 

14 

256 


62,694 

984,762 

14,656 

11,099 

92,009 

342,160 

1,327,482 


180 
180 
180 
185 
180 
182 
183 
180 
180 
180 
180 
181 


7 

2 
3 

2 
1 

1 
7 


4 
140 






Chesapeaki 
Publicly-owned 

COVINOTOM 

Publicly-owned 

Falls CanRCH 

Publicly-owned 

Frankun 

Publidy-owned 

Hampton 

Publicly-owned 

Newport News 

Publicly-owned 

Norfolk 


5,939 
279 
















428 

55 

9,308 

558 

174 

824 

246 

12,835 


14 

64 

221 

5 


















Norton 
Publicly-owned 

PORTSUODTH 

Publidy-owoed 

Richmond 

Publicly-owned 

ViROiNiA Beach 

Publicly-owned 


367 

1,850 

771 

23,937 


13.986 

130.788 

100,080 

1,807,466 






21 

12 

246 






1 
2 
3 


1 


Total Cities 


60.848 


30,646 


91.494 


754 


4.887.182 




23 


727 


1 


Total State 


392.440 


226,520 


618,960 


6.803 


54,964,507 




2,649 


3,604 


546 


10 



Oolumns 2. 3, 4. 6, 6, 7. 8. 13, 14, 15, and 16 are totals. Columns 9, 10. 11, and 12 are averages. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



123 



TRANSPORTATION— CoNTiNUKD 






10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


Average 

Number 

Pupils 

Per Bus 


Average 

Miles 
Per Bus 
Per Day 


Cost Per 

Pupil 
Per Year 


Cost 
Per 
Mile 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 

Less Gas 

Tax Refund 


Cost of 
Keplacement 


Capital 
Outlay 


ToUl of 

Columns 

13, 14. and 15 


110 
123 
369 
94 
108 
107 
100 


31 
39 
41 
20 
37 
29 
33 


$ 37 78 
23 60 
12 64 
55 04 
17 43 
27 94 
25 81 


$ 731 

.412 
.636 
1 398 
.286 
.560 
.430 


$ 45,829 31 

405,943 25 

9,324 88 

15.519 98 

26,314 57 

191,609 60 

570,977 78 


f 6,039 32 


J 6,939 32 


$ 59,707 95 
405,943 25 






9,324 88 






15,519 98 


5,291 17 
68,899 36 
28,897 81 


5,291 17 
25,693 81 


36,896 91 
284,202 77 
599.875 59 




7.067 45 


7,067 45 


270 


38 
33 
40 
33 


7 32 
42 46 
82 60 
20 55 


.283 
.868 
.841 
418 


3,963 48 

113,542 85 

84,102 64 

755,520 79 




3,963 48 


199 






113,542 85 


73 

144 


7,481 00 
51,651 83 


22,443 00 
29,818 55 


114,026 64 
836,991 17 


121 


36 


24 20 


455 


t 2,222,649 13 


1 167,160 49 


1 97,253 30 


i 2,487,062 92 


91 


45 


$ 31 70 


$ .357 


$ 19,632,046 93 


1 2,516,665 59 


} 1,325,218 30 


$ 23,473,930 82 



124 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 13— TRANSPORTATION BY PUBLIC CARRIER 



COUNTIES 



Number 

Pupils 

Transported 



Cost 



Arlington 

Buchanan 

Franklin 

Rockingham 

Total Counties 

CITIES 

Alexandria 

Buena Vista 

Colonial Heights 

Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 

Lynchburg 

Martinsville 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Staunton 

Waynesboro 

Winchester 

Total Cities 

Total State 



87 

7 

65 



159 



213 



213 



372 



272 24 

1,944 17 

990 00 

11,491 75 



$ 14,698 16 



26,712 18 

3 ,498 62 

1,216 00 

952 50 

25,745 00 
5,577 90 
8.703 00 
5,500 00 
1 .610 35 

72,987 42 

2.730 30 

6,200 00 

6 50 



$ 161 ,439 77 



$ 176,137 93 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



125 



TABLE 14— DIRECT PAYMENT OF MONEY IN LIEU OF 
SCHOOL BUS TRANSPORTATION 



COUNTIES 



Accomack 

Bedford , 

Botetourt 

Buchanan 

Campbell 

Carroll 

Craig 

Dinuiddie 

Franklin 

Giles 

Grayson 

Henrico 

Henry 

Lee 

Loudoun 

Mecklenburg.. . 
Montgomery.. . 

Page 

Pulaski 

Rappahannock. 

Smyth 

Warren 

Wise 



Total Counties 

TOWNS 



Poquoson . 



Total Towns. 



CITIES 



Charlottesville. 

Norfolk 

Virginia Beach. 



Total Cities. 
Total State. 



Number 

Pupils 

Transported 



1 
1 
3 

277 
6 
1 
2 
12 
11 
1 
2 

124 
7 

"i 
4 
4 

"e 

3 

4 
18 
21 



512 



127 
1 



128 



640 



Cost 



299 88 

142 80 

934 20 

15,179 50 

360 00 

751 50 

600 00 

2,273 43 

882 45 

85 50 

135 00 

10,887 

811 

4,228 76 

196 83 

172 35 

761 52 

900 00 

1,056 48 

95 40 

270 00 

609 20 

905 40 



93 
40 



$ 42,539 53 



95 00 



95 00 



9.505 00 

19,565 25 

250 00 



$ 29,320 25 



$ 71,954 78 



126 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 15— PAYMENT OF MONEY TO OTHER SCHOOL 
DIVISIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION 



COUNTIES 


Number 

Pupils 

Transported 


Cost 


Campbell to Appomattox County 


16 
3 
3 


s 


592 00 


Isle of Wight to Kirk-Cone Rehabilitation Center.. 
York to James City County 


270 00 
109 95 






Total Counties 


22 


« 


971 95 






TOWNS 
Cape Charles to Northampton County 




$ 


4,125 00 






Total Towns 




$ 


4,125 00 






CITIES 

Clifton Forge to Bath County 




$ 


54 50 






Total Cities 




$ 


54 50 






Total State 


22 


$ 


5,151 45 







TABLE 16— SPECIAL TRIPS 



COUNTIES 


Number 
of Miles 


Cost 


Accomack 


13,134 

6,913 
29,079 
11,933 
68,542 
74,850 

6,687 
88,887 

9,111 
21 ,343 

8,750 
21,200 

6,282 
24,894 
33,116 

7,673 
59,249 

3,692 
29,617 

8,019 

6,222 

193,199 

11,406 

9,414 
11,970 
29,131 


$ 4,898 98 


Albemarle 


2,426 46 


Alleehanv 


11,865 00 


Appomattox 


3,384 81 


Arlincton 


76,754 97 


Aueusta 


21,856 11 


Bath 


2,193 34 


Bedford 


21,199 55 


Bland 


3 ,043 07 


Botetourt 


7 ,356 97 


Brunswick 


2,116 35 


Buchanan 


8,480 00 


Burkinerham . 


1 ,627 04 


Camobell 


8,869 73 


Carroll 


8,334 94 


Charlotte 


2,746 93 


Chesterfield 


23,598 71 


Clarke 


738 40 


Culoeoer 


8,757 75 


Dickenson 


3,271 75 


Dinwiddle 


1,504 90 


Fairfax 


81 ,020 06 


Fauouier 


4,358 10 


Floyd 


3,454 94 


Fluvanna 


1 ,436 40 


Franklin 


9,077 22 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



127 



TABLE 16— SPECIAL TRIPS— Continued 



COUNTIES 



Frederick 

Giles 

Goochland 

Grayson 

Greensville 

Halifax 

Hanover 

Henrico 

Henry 

Highland 

Isle of Wight 

James City 

King George 

King and Queen 

King William 

Loudoun 

Louisa 

Madison 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery , 

Nansemond 

Northampton 

Northumberland 

Nottoway 

Orange , 

Page , 

Patrick 

Pittsylvania , 

Powhatan , 

Prince Edward 

Prince George 

Prince William 

Pulaski 

Rappahannock 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Rockbridge 

Rockingham 

Russell 

Shenandoah 

Smyth 

Southampton 

Spotsylvania , 

Stafford 

Surry 

Sussex 

Tazewell 

Warren 

Washington 

Westmoreland 

Wise 

Wythe 

York 

Total Counties 



Number 
of Miles 



10 

20 

6 

19 

4 

1 

8 

26 

7 

2 

5 

13 

9 

2 

4 

16 

6 

5 

19 

28 

18 

22 

3 

8 

10 

9 

4 

83 

9 

2 

5 

39 

30 

2 

3 

13 

14 

16 

12 

14 

11 

5 

6 

22 

2 

10 

21 

6 

29 

7 

35 

15 

19 



,820 
,096 
,685 
,264 
,350 
,873 
,121 
,417 
,605 
.615 
,352 
,284 
,483 
,204 
,734 
,947 
.200 
,741 
,261 
,157 
,959 
,168 
,567 
,245 
,443 
,450 
,820 
,200 
,357 
,820 
,000 
,291 
,888 
,275 
,326 
,535 
,686 
,632 
,849 
,480 
,942 
,186 
,586 
,983 
,420 
,759 
,958 
,850 
,879 
,004 
,483 
,739 
,500 



1,526,654 



Cost 



3 
7 
1 
6 
1 

2 

13 

2 

1 

4 
3 



9 
1 
1 
5 

12 
5 
6 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 

20 
2 

1 
13 
10 



5 
5 
6 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
7 

2 
8 
1 
5 
1 
10 
6 
5 



,700 44 
,998 21 
,784 90 
,922 35 
,498 80 

262 25 
,403 81 
,393 42 
,709 08 

744 75 
,819 68 
,808 81 
.736 30 

275 50 

591 75 
,880 10 
,302 00 
,900 27 
,778 30 
,529 87 
,270 60 
,805 58 
,105 77 
,065 37 
,241 89 
,191 87 
,552 04 
,384 00 
,994 24 

770 42 
,400 00 
,830 43 
.965 24 

568 75 

848 13 
,224 51 
,198 84 
,303 52 
,940 44 
,706 00 
,149 56 
,223 90 
,797 84 
,971 89 

534 82 
,184 08 
,201 31 
,712 50 
,245 36 
,975 13 
,644 90 
,295 00 
,729 38 



$ 564,446 38 



128 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



TABLE 16— SPECIAL TRIPS— Continued 



TOWNS 



Colonial Beach 

Poquoson 

West Point 

Total Towns 

CITIES 

Alexandria 

Chesapeake 

Clifton Forge 

Covington 

Falls Church 

Franklin 

Galax 

Hampton 

Newport News 

Richmond 

Virginia Beach 

Total Cities 

Total State 



Number 
of Miles 



2,359 
5,332 
3,640 



11,331 



15 
51 



14 
55 

24 
44 



,189 
,762 

;,917 

946 

,372 

,014 

,428 
,897 

,785 



215,310 



1 ,753 ,295 



Costs 



995 25 
799 80 
455 00 



$ 2,250 05 



11,113 05 

21 .325 94 

2,111 03 

184 87 

1,322 63 

1,216 44 

1,591 47 

4,204 20 

23,834 04 

20,938 38 

18,700 73 



$ 106,542 78 



$ 673,239 21 



TABLE 17— FEDERAL PROGRAMS OR PROJECTS 



COUNTIES 


Number 
of Miles 


Cost 


Albemarle 


48,342 
10 .087 
30,433 

3,440 
24,678 
16,363 
47.894 
20,005 
11,600 
16,176 
26,760 
117,269 
13,496 
26,536 
24,787 
16.352 

6 000 

9,198 
25 050 

9.970 
15,603 

8,500 


$ 16,947 05 


Arlington 


11,257 10 


Augusta 


8,886 41 


Bath 


1,128 32 


Buchanan 


11,973 93 


Caroline 


3,600 00 


Carroll 


12.072 77 


Chesterfield 


8,282 09 


Clarke 


3 ,000 00 


Culpeper 


4,783 24 


Dickenson 


10,918 08 


Fairfax 


49,178 00 


Fauquier 


5,156 67 


Franklin 


6,266 23 


Frederick 


8,477 15 


Giles 


6,508 10 


Goochland 


1 .602 00 


Greene 


2,299 50 


Henry 


8,7S0 03 


Isle of Wight 


3,389 80 


James City 


5,648 29 


King & Queen 


1,062 50 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



129 



TABLE 17— FEDERAL PROGRAMS OR PROJECTS— Continued 



COUNTIES 



King William 

Lancaster 

Lee 

Louisa 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Northumberland 

Nottoway 

Page 

Powhatan 

Pulaski 

Rockbridge 

Russell 

Scott 

Shenandoah 

Smyth 

Southampton 

Surry 

Tazewell 

Wise 

York 

Total Coimties 

CITIES 

Hampton 

Newport News 

Richmond 

Virginia Beach 

Total Cities 

Total State 



Number 
of Miles 



8 

8 

21 

25 

8 
8 
13 
16 
8 
33 
40 
43 
25 
18 
17 
37 
13 
61 
60 
31 



.000 
,238 
,971 
,000 
449 
.957 
,966 
.266 
,560 
MO 
,143 
.547 
,554 
,848 
,045 
,859 
,536 
,487 
.789 
,994 
,016 



1,032,604 



4,766 
40,950 
11.021 

1,480 



58,217 



1,01W,821 



Costs 



1,000 00 

2,553 72 

5,595 85 

5,250 00 

134 70 

3,985 87 

2,779 46 

1,989 90 

7,345 66 

2,828 80 

11,765 77 

10.651 40 

16,746 51 

8.064 58 

6.065 30 
5,421 02 
8,858 50 
2.980 67 

23.078 19 

18 298 30 

9,109 40 



$ 345,720 86 



2,742 81 

17,608 50 

9,268 66 

618 64 



$ 30,238 61 



$ 375,959 47 



TABLE 18— TRANSPORTATION BETWEEN SCHOOLS 



COUNTIES 


Number 
of Miles 


Cost 


Auciista 


22,580 
11,880 
23,580 

8,952 
360 

2,520 
18,504 
23 .040 

7,110 
10,080 

6,154 

5.512 


$ 6,593 34 


Bnin.swick 


2,927 01 


Buchanan 


10.493 10 


Camnbell 


3.189 60 


Clarke 


72 00 


Carroll 


593 15 


Ciilnpner 


5,471 63 


DioKenson 


9.400 32 


Giles 


2.829 78 


Goochland 


2.691 36 


Gravson 


2 ,209 29 


Greensville 


1,891 86 



130 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 18— TRANSPORTATION BETWEEN SCHOOLS— Continued 



COUNTIES 



Henry 

King George 

King William 

Lee 

Loudoun 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Powtiatan 

Prince Edward 

Shenandoah 

Surry 

Tazewell 

Washington 

Wythe 

York 

Total Counties 

CITIES 

Chesapeake 

Hampton 

Newport News 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

Total Cities 

Total State 



Number 
of Miles 



448,350 



Cost 



16,488 


$ 5,779 04 


5,400 


2,127 60 


8,640 


2,160 00 


48 276 


21,426 48 


17,640 


10.284 12 


6,480 


1,944 00 


6 020 


2,678 90 


16,560 


5,299 20 


700 


189 00 


18,720 


6,084 00 


720 


159 12 


46,500 


17,398 41 


12,690 


2 071 06 


11,880 


4,752 00 


2,340 


687 26 


358,597 


$ 131,402 63 


38,663 


$ 15.929 16 


5,460 


3,057 60 


17,910 


7,701 30 


19,620 


14,789 41 


8,100 


6,812 10 


89,753 


$ 48,289 57 



$ 179,692 20 



TABLE 19— SUMMER SCHOOL 



COUNTIES 


Number 
of Miles 


Cost 


Accomack 


44,772 

15,288 

22,261 

9,390 

66,122 

16,662 

24,165 

20,462 

22,190 

4,384 

7,956 

1,659 

15,678 

17,680 

2,800 

177^314 


$ 26,866 90 


Amelia 


5,498 40 


Amherst 


3,568 00 


AoDomattox 


2,695 86 


Arlincton 


35,198 71 


Bedford 


5,317 50 


Brunswick 


9,308 95 


Burkinsrham . 


6,138 60 


Camnbell 


7,802 00 


Carroll 


1,109 25 


Charles Citv . 


2,286 00 


Charlotte.... 


3,451 00 


Chesterfield ... 


3,697 79 


Cumberland 


4,420 00 


Dickenson 


6,380 93 


Essex 


5,053 30 


Fairfax 


27,405 75 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 
TABLE 19-SUMMER SCHOOL— Continued 



131 



CITIES 



Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Giles 

Gloucester 

Goochland 

Grayson 

Halifax 

Henry 

Lee 

Lunenburg 

Madison 

Middlesex 

Montgomery 

Nansemond 

Nelson 

New Kent 

Nottoway 

Orange 

Page 

Patrick 

Pittsylvania 

Powhatan 

Prince William 

Rappahannock 

Roanoke 

Rockingham 

Russell 

Scott 

Spotsylvania 

Stafford 

Tazewell 

Warren 

Washington 

Westmoreland 

Wise 

Wythe 

York 

Total Counties 

TOWNS 

West Point 

Total Towns 

CITIES 

Alexandria 

Buena Vista 

Charlottesville 

Chesapeake 

Falls Church 

Galax 



Number 
of Miles 



22 
11 



,314 
,200 



26 
12 
25 
43 
14 



,409 
,478 
,729 
,239 
.653 
,760 



15 

2 

17 

10 



,840 
,865 
,054 
,674 



4 

4 
14 

1 

18 

107 

10 

17 

7 
57 

1 
22 
25 



,937 
,779 
,688 
,500 
,320 
,432 
,000 
,684 
,215 
,528 
,266 
,486 
,844 
722 
,946 
,320 
,806 
,040 



27 
22 
12 



,915 
,776 
,132 



5,500 



Cost 



7,787 72 
4,331 38 
6,904 89 
5,896 43 
3,149 00 
2,030 00 
9,086 32 
13,965 70 
5,173 38 
1 ,546 53 

4.315 09 
6,636 96 
1 ,002 75 

7.316 12 
3,218 32 
6,196 28 
1 ,466 50 
1 ,313 77 
6,166 29 

200 00 
7,328 00 

38,386 79 
4,000 00 
2,992 00 
2,395 38 

13,557 91 
480 00 
8,646 00 
7,039 94 
1,972 15 
2.753 29 

18,792 20 
1,701 30 
1 ,472 00 
2,838 00 

16,738 75 
4,618 62 
4,124 50 



1,049,334 


$ 


393,739 80 




$ 


20 00 




$ 


20 00 



5.595 00 
2.965 00 
1 ,723 83 
4,182 96 
17 51 
498 89 



132 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 19— SUIVDVIER SCHOOL— Continued 






CITIES 


Number 
of Miles 


Costs 


HamDton 


30,950 
"i,655 


$ 


658.25 


Npwnort News 


18,278 31 


Portsmouth 


1,685 39 


Richmond . 


1 ,846 75 






Total Cities 


38,105 


$ 


37,451 89 






Total State 


1,087.439 


$ 


431.211 69 







SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 133 

THE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION SERVICE 
Purpose and Scope 
The Educational Television (ETV) Service: 

1. Administers State funds to school divisions for the support of educational 
television in accordance with regulations of the State Board of Education. 

The 1968 session of the General Assembly appropriated $2,000,000 for 
the 1968-70 biennium to assist localities utilizing ETV. This fund is dis- 
tributed to counties and cities on a 50-50 matching basis not exceeding 
$2 per pupil in membership as of November 30 (or the last day of school 
in November) in those schools usmg ETV on a systematic basis in their 
school programs. In addition, localities are eligible for reimbursement 
for 100 percent of the cost of the ETV service in excess of $2 per pupil, 
providing such costs do not exceed the per pupil charge made by each 
ETV station as of December 31, 1968. If ETV is used only in the high 
school department or in the elementary department of a combined school, 
only the membership of the department using it is counted. 

2. Cooperates with other agencies and organizations within the State which 
are concerned with the development and operation of ETV. 

Every effort is made to maintain a close working relationship with all 
agencies and organizations concerned with the development and use of 
ETV in the State. These include the Virginia Advisory Council on Edu- 
cational Television, the educational directors of ETV stations, and local 
groups that seek to improve educational programs through the use of ETV. 
This relationship enables the Department to keep abreast of developments 
and programs and to identify areas in which it can assist. 

3. Works with school divisions in developing more effective use of ETV. 
The Educational Television Service; (1) assisted local school divisions in 
planning and conducting workshops, short courses, and seminars to de- 
velop knowledge and skills for the effective use of television; (2) assisted 
in planning and conducting demonstrations, seminars, and workshops for 
prospective studio teachers; and (3) developed local leadership by working 
with personnel responsible for encouraging and improving the use of tele- 
vision in local school systems. 

4. Encourages institutions of higher education in developing programs for 
training teachers in the use of ETV. 

During the period of professional preparation, student teachers should 
become skilled in the teaching media, materials, and methodology in- 
volved in ETV. Such preparation enables the "receiving" teacher to 
play her supporting role more effectively. 

5. Coordinates activities related to educational television in the public 
schools. 

The Department encourages the exchange of information and services 
among the ETV stations. The exchange of video-tapes, for example, re- 
duces duplication of effort and permits specialization by the stations in 
the production of high quality programs. 



134 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

6. Provides information concerning developments and activities related to 
ETV in Virginia and in other states. 

Many inquiries concerning ETV in Virginia and in other states come 
to the Department. The ETV Service has developed library resources 
which provide a centralized information service for ETV personnel and 
other interested persons and groups. 

Activities 

During the 1969-70 school year, the ETV staff administered funds appropriated 
by the 1968 session of the General Assembly for reimbursing schools using ETV. 
A total of .^990,569.95 was paid to school divisions during the 1969-70 school year. 
The reimbursement was approximately $250,000 more than the sum distributed 
for 1968-69 and was based on enrollment of 785,286 pupils in 1,372 public schools 
using ETV during 1969-70. The previous year's reimbursement was based on an 
enrollment of 756,206 pupils in 1,363 public schools using ETV. 

The staff attended national and regional conferences of the National Associa- 
tion of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) and responded to inquiries concerning 
the handbook, "Instructional Television — A Utilization Guide for Teachers and 
Administrators." The fourth printing of the guide was completed in February 
1969. To date 162,000 copies have been printed and approximately 113,000 sent to 
32 states and several foreign countries. 

The ETV Service also worked with teachers and administrators in preschool 
conferences and workshops on techniques for the use of ETV programs. The ETV 
staff participated in the utilization program presented at the annual convention 
of the NAEB. 

Other activities for 1969-70 included completion of a film, "Educational 
Television: The Fourth Network," designed to explore current practices in ETV 
and its potential for the future. This film portrays television as a partner with 
the classroom teacher and follows an entire production sequence of a television 
lesson, from the development of a study guide through the final taping. Other 
educational and cultural potentials are demonstrated through excerpts from vari- 
ous programs. 

BUREAU OF TEACHING MATERIALS 

Purpose and Scope 

The major purpose of the Bureau of Teaching Materials and the four regional 
bureaus, located at Longwood College, Madison College, Radford College, and 
the University of Virginia, is to improve instruction through the effective use of 
instructional media. • 

The State and regional bureaus perform the following services: 

1. Distributive educational motion pictures to public schools and State- 
supported colleges; private degree colleges engaged in training teachers 
(by special contract); State Department of Health; county and city health 
departments; State and county agriculture agencies; parent-teacher asso- 
ciations, and other State agencies. 

• ■ "2. • Provide consultative services to assist local school divisions in the selec- 
tion, acquisition, and distribution of instructional media. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC USFSTRUCTION 135 

3. Prepare listings of filmstrips, slides, and recordings for purchase with 
State matching funds provided through the School Libraries and Text- 
books Service. 

4. Evaluate educational motion pictures for purchase by the State and re- 
gional bureaus of teaching materials and by local divisions. 

5. Provide assistance in the pre-service and in-service training of super- 
visors and teachers in the use of media for instruction. 

6. Provide assistance to other services of the State Department of Education 
to promote more effective use of materials by teachers. 

7. Prepare graphic materials (transparencies and slides) for other divisions 
and services in the State Department of Education. 

8. Furnish media equipment and materials to other divisions and services. 

Accomplishments 

Accomplishments during the 1969-70 school year included: 

DISTRIBUTION OF EDUCATIONAL MOTION PICTURES. A total of 
523,934 educational motion picture films were booked from the State, regional, 
and division teaching materials centers by the public schools and state supported 
institutions. The number of educational motion picture films available to the 
public schools from the State, regional, and divisional teaching materials centers 
increased 61,023, a gain of 5,100 over the previous year. 

PUBLICATIONS. A supplement to the catalog, "Educational Motion Pic- 
tures for Virginia's Public Schools," was distributed to the public schools and 
State supported institutions. This supplement lists all new films added to the 
State and regional Bureaus. The catalog, "Handmade Transparencies," was re- 
vised and circulated to the schools. 

TAPE DUPLICATION. Conferences sponsored by the Department of Edu- 
cation and programs from the educational tape library of the Bureau of Teaching 
Materials were duplicated and sent to the schools as requested. 

EVALUATION OF MATERIALS. The professional staff of the Department 
of Education evaluated 500 educational motion pictures during the school year 
1969-70. This list is used as a guide in the purchase of films by the State and re- 
gional bureaus and local school divisions. The professional staff also previewed 
and recommended for the State-aid list, recordings, transparencies, filmstrips, 
multi-media kits, study prints, and slides. 

GRAPHIC SERVICE. The graphic service of the Bureau of Teaching Ma- 
terials produced overhead transparencies and 35mm slides for various divisions 
and services within the Department. 

REGIONAL CONFERENCE. An educational media conference was spon- 
sored for the media directors and/or directors of instruction in Southwest Virginia 
to bring together media personnel to discuss topics of common interest. Discus- 
sions included the services of a division media center, the cataloging of non-book 
materials, and the quantitative standards of materials and equipment. 



136 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

VISITATION. The professional staff visited each of the regional bureaus at 
least twice during the year. Visits also were made to colleges, and local school 
divisions. Bureau personnel participated in conferences to promote educational 
media. 

JOINT MEDIA REPORT. The Bureau of Teaching Materials cooperated 
with the School Libraries and Textbooks Service to prepare a computer processed 
report on the use of media materials and equipment in the public schools of Vir- 
ginia. The report showed the ratio of media materials and equipment per teacher 
in each school and served as the basis for a comparison with state and national 
standards. 

AUTOMATED INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SYSTEM. A new film distri- 
bution and information retention system was initiated, with date on the State 
film libraries and those of each school division maintained in computer files. For 
the first time, inormation for the catalog, "Educational Motion Pictures for 
Virginia's Public Schools," was compiled by use of computers. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



137 



TABLE 20— DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF EDUCATIONAL 
MOTION PICTURES, 1969-1970 



COUNTY 



Accomack 

Albemarle 

Alleghany. .... 

Amelia 

Amherst 

Appomattox ... 

ArlingtOD 

Augusta 

Bath.. 

Bedford 

Bland 

Botetourt 

Brunswick 

Buchanan 

Buckingham 

Campbell 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Charles City 

Charlotte 

Chesterfield 

Clarke 

Craig 

Culpeper 

Cumberland 

Dickenson 

Dinwiddle 

Essex 

Fairfax 

Fauquier 

Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Gile« 

Gloucester 

Goochland 

Grayson 

Greene 

Greensville 

Halifax 

Hanover 

Henrico 

Henry 

Highland 

Isle of Wight 

James City 

King George 

King and Queen. 



Number 
of Titles 

in 
Center 



2S5 
116 



83 

205 

2,42(1 

205 



45 

86 
526 
265 



4 82 
145 
103 



198 
543 



70 

ISO 
237 

368 



1,695 

65 

55 

28 

13 

239 

576 

251 



195 

927 



839 
217 



152 



Number 
of Prints 

in 
Center 



265 



116 



83 

206 

3.129 

210 



55 

79 
528 
226 



475 
145 
103 



198 
570 



70 
180 
243 
366 



,656 

65 

55 

28 

13 

240 

582 

253 



200 
1,021 



947 
221 



148 



Films 
Booked 

From 
Division 
Center 



2,059 



1 85 



233 

381 

28,696 
854 



107 

40 

6,443 

35 



1,751 
313 
264 



717 
3,129 



39 

472 

1,448 

1,681 



79,512 

1,657 

42 

379 

58 

1,312 

2.960 

680 



311 
5,556 



6,897 
478 



173 



Films 

Booked 

From 

SUte 



533 
2,128 

74 
107 

98 

88 
145 
279 
127 
845 
119 
300 

97 
150 
281 

7M1 

120 

575 

520 

217 

7,697 

225 

27 

673 

60 

186 

234 

1,063 

2,395 

311 

20 

209 

471 

323 

208 

943 

323 

182 

444 

161 

66 

671 

4,607 

1,172 

172 

833 



398 
91 



Films 
Booked 

From 
Region 



3,242 
360 
273 
245 
121 
110 

1,074 
391 

1,338 
176 
416 
223 
196 
790 

1,674 
151 
953 



477 



650 
31 
961 
168 
225 



4,000 
425 
28 
477 
798 
888 
211 



3 SO 

2.H5 
482 
206 
178 
(93 



2,0)9 
370 



663 



Total 

Films 

Used by 

Division 



2,592 

5,370 

619 

380 

576 

590 

28,951 

2.207 

518 

2,183 

402 

756 

6,763 

381 

1,071 

4,212 

584 

1,792 

520 

1,411 

10,826 

875 

58 

1,673 

700 

1,859 

1,915 

1,063 

85.997 

2,393 

90 

1,065 

1,327 

2,523 

3,379 

1,623 

703 

467 

926 

678 

5,S00 

1,664 

11,504 

3,709 

542 

1,003 



1,061 
91 



Average 
Bookings 

Per 
Teacher 



8.61 

14 02 

4 95 

4 26 

2 75 

5 72 
20 13 

4 79 
9 59 

6 15 
8 04 
4 06 

33 64 
.95 

8 56 

9 48 

3 91 
8 53 

6 41 
9.10 

7 91 

10 80 
1 75 
9.95 
9.72 

8 98 
8 21 

13 45 
14.73 

8 00 
1 03 

11 45 
4.89 

9 30 
17 50 

12 29 

6 16 

4 24 
19.70 

3.72 

14 94 
4 37 

7 33 
7 47 

16 93 
4 53 



11 92 
t 54 



Average 

lioo kings 

Per 

Print of 

Locally 

Owned 

Filmi 



7 76 

1 59 

2 .80 
1.84 
9 17 
4 06 



1.94 

.50 

12 20 

15 

3 69 
2 15 
2 42 



3 62 

5 48 



55 

2 62 
5 95 
4 59 



17 07 

25 49 

.76 

13 53 

4 46 

5 46 
5 08 
2.68 



1 55 
5 44 



7 28 
2 16 



1 16 



138 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 20 -DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF EDUCATIONAL 
MOTION PICTURES, 1969-1970— Continued 



















Average 




Number 


Number 


Films 


FUms 


FUms 


Total 


Average 


Bookings 




of Titles 


of Prints 


Booked 


Booked 


Booked 


Films 


Bookings 


Per 


COUNTY 


in 


in 


From 


From 


From 


Used By 


Per 


Print of 




Center 


Center 


Division 
Center 


State 


Region 


Division 


Teacher 


Locally 
Owned 
Films 


King William 


45 


55 


q 


60'' 




611 


9 11 


16 


Lancaster. 






547 
212 


308 


547 
3,228 
1,968 


6 14 
11 56 




Lee 


491 
29 


498 


2,708 
135 


5 43 


Loudoun 


29 


861 


972 


4 76 


4 65 


Louisa 


102 


102 


1,093 


141 


303 


1,537 


10 31 


10 71 


Lunenburg 








147 
432 


334 

482 


481 
989 


3 38 
11.77 




Madison 


47 


47 


75 


1 59 


Mathews 


35 
659 


35 

817 


79 
3,066 


143 
140 


266 


222 
3,472 


2 96 
10 15 


2 25 


Mecklenburg 


3 75 


Middlesex 








526 
459 


935 


526 
1,473 


7.51 
4 39 




Montgomery 


72 


72 


79 


1 09 


Nansemond 


155 


153 


423 


1,125 




1,548 


3 66 


2.76 


Nelson 


335 


329 


843 


64 


108 


1,015 


8 25 


2.56 


New Kent 








250 
548 




250 
581 


3.90 
4 12 




Northampton 


84 


95 


33 


.34 


Northumberland 








527 
205 
800 
286 
632 


457 

1,465 

760 

854 


527 

662 

2,265 

1,046 

1,564 


5 37 
3.82 

14 33 

6 33 
11 50 




Nottoway 










Orange 










Page 










Patrick 


44 


44 


78 


1.77 


Pittsylvania 


998 


1,133 


6,377 


180 


305 


6,862 


10 24 


5 62 


Powhatan 


18 


18 


20 


33 


62 


115 


1 57 


1 11 


Prince Edward 


24 


31 


104 


49 
1,064 
1,372 


137 
1,510 


290 
1,064 
9,715 


3 53 

4 20 
8 07 


3 35 






Prince William 


542 


594 


6,833 


11.50 




276 


278 


571 


262 


557 


1.390 


5.11 


2 05 


Rappahannock 








92 


96 


188 


3.83 












321 
906 


1,363 


321 

7,094 


4 39 

7 76 




Roanoke 


5S6 


638 


4,825 


7 56 




41 


41 


15 


393 


1,828 


2,236 


10.85 


.36 


Rockingham i 








194 


220 


414 


.90 






317 


317 


1,505 


385 


425 


2,315 


7.90 


4.74 


Scott 


94 


94 


189 


254 


392 


835 


3 35 


2 01 




236 


238 


885 


347 


940 


2,172 


9.16 


3 71 


Smyth , 


101 

281 


101 
279 


134 
440 


633 

619 


873 


1,640 
1,059 


5 59 
5.14 


1 32 




1 57 


Spotsylvania 


23 


23 


67 


247 


327 


641 


3 62 


2.91 


Stafford 


24 
20 


24 
20 


82 
52 


581 
5 


662 


1,325 
57 


5 25 
1 07 


3 41 


Surry 


2.60 




311 


311 


788 


477 




1,265 


8,60 


2 53 


Taiewell 


452 


464 


3,300 


244 


567 


4,111 


8 52 


7.11 


Warren 


188 
681 


187 
684 


711 
9,712 


265 

239 


488 
430 


1,465 
10,381 


11 09 
27.75 


3.80 


Washington 


14.19 


Westmoreland 


8 


8 


100 


348 




448 


3.96 


12 50 


Wise 


753 


777 


7,550 


193 
399 


224 
732 


7,967 
1,131 


18 39 
4.96 


9.71 






York 


96 


94 


1,131 


2.900 




4,031 


11 68 


12.03 



SUPERINTENDlENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



139 



TABLE 20— DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF EDUCATIONAL 
MOTION PICTURES, 1969-1970— Continued 



















Average 




Number 


Number 


Films 


Films 


Films 


Total 


Average 


Bookings 




of Titles 


ofPrints 


Booked 


Booked 


Booked 


Films 


Booking- 


Per 


CITY 


in 


in 


From 


From 


From 


Used By 


Per 


Print of 




Center 


Center 


DiviBion 
Center 


State 


Region 


Division 


Teacher 


Locally 
Owned 
Filma 


Alexandria 


657 
158 


712 
155 


5.444 
1,477 


527 
558 


430 

1,097 


6,401 
3,132 


6.71 

17 69 


7,64 


Bristol 


9.52 










96 
1,205 


252 

1,997 


348 
3,514 


5 04 
10 27 




Charlottesville 


56 


56 


312 


5,57 


Chesapeake 


1,601 


2,508 


20,643 


263 




20,906 


19 63 


8 23 


Clifton Forge 


8 


8 


36 


261 


503 


800 


14.28 


4 50 


Colonial Heiffhts . . 








1,198 




1,198 


8,14 




CovinctoD 


59 


58 


118 


181 


537 


836 


7.74 


2,03 


Danville 


660 


651 


1,337 


592 


1,753 


3,682 


7.65 


2 05 




















Falls Church 


32 


32 


156 


416 
966 

493 


843 

599 


1,415 

966 
1,127 


11 41 

8 70 
8.73 


4,87 


Franklin 






40 


40 


35 


.87 


Galax 


1 


1 


6 


100 


124 


230 


3.10 


6 00 


Hampton 


1,077 


1,304 


13,931 


590 




14,521 


10 38 


10 68 


Harrisonburg 


29 


32 


447 


443 


1,591 


2,481 


10 65 


13 96 


Bopewell 


78 


73 


3 


709 
111 


406 


712 
517 


3 01 
6 38 


.04 


Lexington 




Lynchburg 


771 


992 


11,832 


929 


1,292 


14,053 


22 52 


11.92 


Martinsville 


216 


216 


572 


177 




749 


3.24 


2 64 




1,256 


1,750 


18,223 


109 




18,332 


13 3-1 


10 41 


Norfolk 


1,997 


3,573 


21,259 


1,266 




22,525 


8.54 


5.94 


Norton 


56 


56 


244 


233 


364 


841 


15 29 


4.35 


Petersburg 


1,036 


1,113 


8,821 


81 




8,902 


21.65 


7.93 


Portsmouth 


1,228 


1,352 


6,908 


250 




7,158 


6.30 


5.10 


Radford 








186 

868 


513 


699 
22,148 


7.94 
10 31 




Richmond 


2,918 


4,517 


21,280 


4.71 


Roanoke 


1,237 


1,319 


7,391 


494 


760 


8,645 


9 37 


5 60 


South Boston 


















Staunton 


3 


3 


67 


685 


2,112 


2,864 


12 34 


22 33 


Suffolk 


152 


152 


1,292 


1,457 




2,749 


24.54 


8.50 


Virginia Beach 


1,022 


1,215 


13,221 


2,527 




15,748 


8,95 


10.88 


•Waynesboro '. 


52 


52 


184 


949 


2,896 


4,029 


18.14 


3.53 


Williamsburg 


63 


63 


107 


1,968 




2,075 


9.38 


1.69 


Winchester 


241 


241 


442 


90 


170 


702 


4,77 


1.83 


Grand Total 


38,695 


46,601 


358,665 


74,380 


64,399 


497,444 


10 26 


7.69 







140 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



STATE AND REGIONAL BUREAUS 



Longwood College 

Madison College 

Radford College 

University of Virginia 

State 

Total 

State, Regional and Division Total 



Number 
Titles 



1,686 
1,416 
1.406 
1 ,266 
3,512 
9,286 



45,981 



Number 
of Prints 



1,722 
1,895 
1,822 
1,8:30 
7,153 
14,422 



61 ,023 



Films 
Booked 



12,100 
28,620 
17,582 
20,052 
86,915 
165,269 



523,934 



FILM PRODUCTION SERVICE 
Purpose and Scope 

The primary responsibility of the Film Production Service is to produce mo- 
tion pictures and filmstrips on Virginia history and natural resources for public 
schools in the State. The Service also produces films dealing with other areas of 
public education as well as films for other State governmental agencies. 

The secondary responsibility of the Film Production Service is to support the 
Department of Education in the production of informational color slides, photo- 
graphs, tape recordings, and other audio-visual aids. 

Accomplishments 

During 1969-70 the following films were completed: 

Cooperative Office Education: 11 minutes, color. The film shows the opera- 
tion of a high school cooperative office training program in which students working 
part-time and attending school part-time learn the role of oflSce workers in business. 

Educational Television — The Fourth Network: 25 minutes, color. In- 
structional aspects of ETV are documented in an organized sequence which traces 
the development of a program from its conception to studio production. Educa- 
tional and cultural programs are demonstrated through excerpts from various 
programs. 

Science Laboratory Safety — Part I: 20 minutes, color. Emphasizes the 
importance of safety measures in using laboratory equipment and performing ex- 
periments in the school science laboratory. 

Magnets for Millions: 12 minutes, color. A film for the State Park Com- 
mission on five new parks being developed throughout the State. 

A Certain Degree of Instruction: 22 minutes, color. The film includes the 
significant periods of growth in public education and its contributions to the Com- 
monwealth, particularly since the establishment of the public school system in 
1870. 

Sets of color slides were produced for the Division of Secondary Education, 
Social Studies and Driver Education Services, and the Virginia Music Camp. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 141 

Public relations photographs and photographs for the Department's magazine, 
PUBLIC EDUCATION IN VIRGINIA, were taken in response to requests. The 
service also assisted with conferences held by several services and divisions in the 
State Department of Education. 

Work in Progress 

Opportunities Unlimited: 25 minutes, color. Shows how vocational education 
prepares a student to enter the vocation of his choice and how it develops a stu- 
dent's personality and qualities which are needed in the business world. 

Foreign Language Project: Six filmstrips on ancient Roman culture are being 
produced. 

Pupil Transportation: 15 minutes, color. Produced for Pupil Transportation, 
Division of Special Services. This film will update the film on pupil transportation 
entitled "School Bus Safety." 

Film Distribution 

The Film Production Service sold 510 filmstrips and 128 motion pictures to 
Virginia public schools during the year. Twelve prints were sold outside the state 
and more than 90 film rentals were made to public schools in other states. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES AND TEXTBOOKS SERVICE 

Purpose and Scope 

The School Libraries and Te.xtbooks Service assists local school divisions in 
improving the quality of media services in the public schools of the State. Guid- 
ance and leadership are provided by: 

1 . Offering supervisory and consultative service through visitation and cor- 
respondence. 

2. Assisting in the establishment of library programs in new schools and in 
the reorganization of library programs in old schools. 

3 . Informing media personnel and other educators in the State of the services 
of the Department and of new developments in the field of library service 
through speeches and through distribution of the "Newsletter" at regular 
intervals throughout the year. 

4 . Preparing and distributing lists of recommended teaching materials, bulle- 
tins, and memoranda and compiling statistics relating to the library pro- 
gram of the State. 

5. Maintaining a professional library and a collection of juvenile literature 
to serve educational personnel. 

6. Distributing State-aid funds for the purchase of library materials and 
processing State-aid library orders. 

7. Administering the textbook program by coordinating the State program 
for the adoption of basic textbooks. 

8. Administering the Title II Public Law 89-10 program by distributing 
funds for the acquisition of library resources, textbooks, and other in- 
structional materials available under the federal act. 



142 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

9. Reviewing library layouts for new schools. 

10. Reviewing printed materials submitted by publishers for inclusion on the 
State-aid library list. 

11. Cooperating with other Services of the Department of Education in such 
ways as serving on visiting evaluation committees, by reviewing appli- 
cations for federal projects, and by the furnishing of statistics and other 
requested information. 

Accomplishments 

School Library Development Fund. The School Library Development Fund 
provides help to localities for the purchase of materials for new school libraries. 
The fund, established in 1964, provides one $60 unit for every 20 pupils enrolled in 
eligible schools. During the past year grants were made to 60 schools in 35 divi- 
sions. Orders totaling $80,520 in State funds were placed with publishers. 

State-Aid Funds. During 1969-70 State funds amounting to $808,450 were budg- 
eted for the purchase of library materials for the public schools of Virginia. This 
appropriation, supplemented by local contributions and refunds from publishers 
and dealers, permitted the placing of orders amounting to $1,235,052. 

Books Reviewed far State List. During 1969, 5,536 books were reviewed by 
members of the Elementary Materials Committee, the High School Materials 
Committee, and members of the professional staff of the State Department of 
Education. More than 100 school libraries assisted in this work. The State Board 
of Education approved the addition of 5,178 items to the State-aid purchase list, 
including audio-visual materials reviewed by the Bureau of Teaching Materials. 

Professional and Library Collection Available to Educational Personnel. The 

professional library of the State Department of Education continued to lend mate- 
rials to school personnel throughout the State and to the staff of the Department. 
A number of new books were added to the collection. The library subscribes to 
130 magazines of professional interest which are available to staff members of 
the Department. 

Book Exhibits. The School Libraries and Textbooks Service maintains a col- 
lection of outstanding books which are approved by the State Board of Education 
for purchase with State-aid library funds for Virginia schools. The books are 
available for use by school personnel, and portions of the collection are used as 
exhibits to aid teachers, librarians, and parents in selecting books for purchase. 
An exhibit of new books approved for the 1970 list was used in four school divisions 
during the spring of 1970. 

Certified Librarians. During the 1969-70 school year, Virginia Public Schools 
employed 1,307 librarians with teaching certificates endorsed for library science. 
Of this number, 679 were employed in 744 elementary schools, 339 in 248 high 
schools, 86 in 72 combined schools, 156 in 132 junior high schools, 32 in supervisory 
positions, and 15 in professional libraries and central processing centers. 

Free and Rental Textbook Systems. The 1968 General Assembly appropriated 
funds to reimburse localities providing free or rental textbook systems at the rate 
of $2 per pupil enrolled in these localities. During the 1969-70 school year, reim- 
bursement amounting to $504,452 was made to 28 divisions. Of this amount, 
$165,226 was for free systems and $339,226 for rental systems. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 148 

Operation of Title II of Public Law 89-10. During 1969-70 Virginia received 
$909,907 under Title II of Public Law 89-10 for the acquisition of school library 
resources, textbooks, and other printed and published instructional materials for 
children and teachers in public and private elementary and secondary schools. 

Demonstration School Libraries Project. During 1969-70, $12,000 in ESEA Title 
II funds was used to continue support for the three school libraries most recently 
added to the project. A supplement to the booklet, "Demonstration School 
Libraries in Virginia," was published. 

Staff Addition. Miss Rebecca Sue Corley joined the staff of the School Librar- 
ies and Textbooks Service as assistant supervisor of school libraries on August 1, 
1969. 



144 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o3 
O 



00 



r-HO 

CD Tfi 
CD CI 



rM 00 CO -^ (M 

CD r-H CO i-H 

lO O O I— I !>. 



00 



Oi 
00 



OOO 



OOQ l^ 

-Hco CO 

CO 



CD 



CO 

o 
co_ 
»o 



o 

CO 



Oi 

CO 



CO ^ 



CD 

o 



lO 



-H t^ Tfl 

-f Oi lO 

«ci Oi CO 

OiCD 

(>! 

C^ 

CO 






CO 



t^OO 



00 ci 

CO !M 

"OCO 
CO 



t^ 00 ic 

CO "^o^ 



m 



(M 

CD 



CI 

00 

00 






s© 






O 



iM 



CO 



CD 



m 



— < CO oo 

CO ■— • 

l> 

CO 









^00 

CD Oi 



OCO 

CO »o 

00^ lO 

oca 

C) Oi 

o 



00 



OCO 
OOiO 
t^O 



00 
CI 
00 



no 



00 rH 

■-DC! 

t^ .-1 



^ 



CO 

Oi 



00 



CO 

CI 



00 

Oi 

00 

CI 

e© 



CD CD 

rt CO 



CO r-l 



s 



■* CDCI 

I^ O CD 

CO 00 "^ 

CD 00 

co_ 

CI 






oo 

—I Oi 



Oi —I 
OiCJ 

t^oo 

rt 00 

^3 



00 



00 ^ 
00 o 
OiO 



CD 
00 

o 



00 



d CD 

ctci 

CI 



CI 

CO 



00 






Oi 
CD 
CO 



00 CO 

CO -H 



«^ 



CO 



>oo t^ 

CI 00 00 

oo"^ 

00 



c-?„ o 



CI 



r^ 00 

C) --I 



Cl^O: 

OOO 

1— I Oi 



Oi 
CO 



Tt<CD 

Oi lO 

-H Oi 



CD 



o 



s§^- 



CO 



CO 



o 



00 



CD 

00 

Oi 
1—1 
CD 



00 



CO 

CO 



CO '-< 



^ 



CD 



iC 



CO CI O: 

CI r-co 



00 CI 

o 



o 



n 

bC o 

02 



CO 

CI 



coo 

CI C4 



00 CI 

CO CI 

CD CD_ 

Oi t^ 

00 CO 

^H CO 

CI 



ca 



CJ lO 00 

-^ t^ CO 

ca lO lo 

— ir^ o 

coo CI 



Oi 

Oi 

00 

lO 
CI 
CI 



CJ 

ca_ 

00 



^ 



ca 



CO 



^ 



00 



00 
no 



Tt< 



m 



oot^o 

OiO CD 
l-H CD -* 

CI 

->D 

CO 



H IK 
O t- 

IS +^ 

■> a 




CI CI 

lOOO 

co^io 

00 IC 



^ 



00 
CI 
CI 



CO 

O 

00 

00 



00 

CD 

Oi 

CI 
CI 



OOiQO 

rt TflOO 

00 

CO 



. CO 
. <u 

" ^— « 

: o. 

■-^^ 

^ O sj 

O QJ -^ 

w 1. 1- 1. 

« O O O 

j; a G c ^ IK 
B oj oj a; c a oj 



> 

I 

o 

<J 

o 

5fl 



GO 

o 
o 

« 

o 



T3 

3 

<3 



"3 2 o3 X 

o-i-< o fc; o 
CQQo2 



02 



woo 
9 



z a. a, o,"S 02 -3 

W =3 3 3-0 3^3 

^ o o o a o i-H 

« S S S =3 s^ 



o 



a. 

3 
V 

Oh 



3 
Ph 

cg-.2^§ 

§ - §1 

< < 



a, 

3 
Oh 
(-■ 
(U 

CIh 

a 

0< (T> 

O w 

si 

'3 i; 

-M o 






a 

3 
02 

a> 



o 

o: 
CD 
Oi 



3 "S 



pQ.^ 



O) 3 

g* p3-0 (n 

r/i _ O c3 »^^ 



a 



pqpL, 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 



The Division of Vocational Education serves school divisions in developing 
an effective vocational program as an integral part of the total curriculum in the 
public schools. Changing demands in our economy and new technological develop- 
ments have resulted in a need for broader and more flexible occupational programs 
for persons attending high school; for those already in the labor market who need 
training and retraining; and for those who have academic, socio-economic, or 
other handicaps which prevent them from succeeding in the regular vocational 
education program. Geared to the needs of the individual and of society, these 
programs contribute to a wholesome economy, satisfactory employment, and a 
high standard of living. 

Emphasis is being placed on increasing the number of teachers in training and 
updating the content of teacher education programs. More teachers are being 
prepared for special and innovative vocational programs, including pre-vocational 
programs, consumer homemaking courses, work-study and special cooperative 
programs, off-farm related occupations, data processing, and cluster programs for 
the skilled trades. 

The addition of many new area vocational centers has provided opportunities 
for occupational training and retraining to many more youth and adults through- 
out the State. Several localities have provided experimental, developmental, or 
pilot projects designed to meet particular vocational needs of youth. 

Assuring that people are equipped with skills which are useful in our changing 
world of work is the continuing challenge faced in vocational education. In the 
years ahead, it is expected that employers will require more specialized training 
for a higher percentage of their workers whose skills will cover a wider range of 
occupations to keep pace with labor market demands and scientific and technolog- 
ical developments. 

Reports of the activities of the services of the Division of Vocational Educa- 
tion for 1969-70 follow in this order: Vocational Agriculture, Business Education, 
Distributive Education, Fire Service Training, Home Economics Education, 
Industrial Arts Education, Manpower Training, School Food Service, Trade and 
Industrial Education, Veterans Education, and Construction of Vocational Facil- 
ities. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The purpose of the Agricultural Education Service is to lead the development 
and improvement of all phases of vocational education in agriculture, including 
programs for high school students and young and adult farmer groups. The general 
aim of these programs is to provide basic instruction for agricultural occupations 
and to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or 
preparing for both on-farm and off-farm agricultural occupations. Therefore, the 
primary function of the Service is to assist school administrators and teachers in 
developing and improving the instructional program in agricultural education 
based on the needs of students. Assistance was given by the staff through (a) 
observation, (b) discussion, (c) on-farm and job instruction, (d) evaluation of 
local programs, (e) group conferences, (f) in-service training programs, and (g) 
correspondence and other appropriate means. In cooperation with teacher edu- 
cation institutions, staff members prepare instructional materials and curriculum 



146 ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 

guides for use by vocational agriculture teachers, conduct research, and assist in 
planning and conducting in-service and teacher education programs. 

During the year the staff placed major emphasis on implementing the basic 
and optional courses in agricultural education. Curriculum guides outlining these 
courses were published and distributed during the year. The optional courses 
include agricultural production, agricultural machinery service, agricultural busi- 
ness, conservation and forestry, and ornamental horticulture. Seventy-three 
developmental programs emphasizing one of the four options other than production 
agriculture were conducted. Further emphasis was given to placing students in 
supervised occupational experiences in agriculture, and to evaluating local pro- 
grams in agricultural education. Implementation of instructional programs for 
disadvantaged students received greater emphasis than ever before, with the 
enrollment tripled. 

The staff provided professional services to 204 high schools in the 85 counties 
and six cities offering agricultural education programs. In these schools 19,515 
high school students were enrolled in regular agricultural education classes, 2,299 
in general mechanics classes, and 1,293 in special classes for disadvantaged stu- 
dents. In addition, 1,973 out-of-school youth were enrolled in 112 young farmer 
classes and 4,934 farm men and women were enrolled in 231 evening classes devoted 
to the discussion of production, conservation, marketing of farm products, and 
farm-management problems. Adult agricultural mechanics classes offered instruc- 
tion in the selection, operation, preventive maintenance, repair, and construction 
of farm machinery. During 1969-70, 21,102 persons participated in 57 school com- 
munity cannery programs devoted to the production and conservation of foods 
for family consumption. This is a joint activity of the Home Economics and 
Agricultural Education Services. 

Staff personnel cooperated with division superintendents, high school princi- 
pals, and teachers of vocational agriculture, to improve facilities, equipment, and 
curriculum materials for vocational agriculture. Six schools erected greenhouse 
facilities for instruction in ornamental horticulture. The results of developmental 
programs and studies conducted last year continued to provide important guide- 
lines for the staff, local school officials, and teachers in continuing their redirection 
and reorientation of agricultural education to meet the needs of today's rural 
youth. 

High School Students. During 1969-70, 8,572 high school students received 
occupational experience through supervised farming programs, 2,751 were enrolled 
in placement on farms and in off-farm agricultural businesses for occupational 
experiences, and 2,607 students received occupational experiences primarily in 
school facilities such as agricultural mechanics shops and greenhouses. The total 
labor income for these students was $6,126,900. Efforts were made to coordinate 
agricultural education departments in intermediate and junior high schools with 
those in senior high schools. The dramatic increase in the number of intermediate 
and junior high schools in rural areas is indicated by the fact that a year ago there 
were only nine such schools offering agricultural education; this year the number 
rose to 38. 

Future Farmers of America. The staff provided guidance for the Future 
Farmers of America, a national organization of students studying agricultural 
education in high schools. In Virginia's 197 FFA chapters membership totaled 
14,319, and more than 1,000 members attended the FFA Convention at Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State University. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 147 

In cooperation with the Home Economics Education Service, the staff pro- 
vided guidance and leadership in conducting the FFA-FHA Camp at Morgart's 
Beach and the J. R. Thomas Camp, near Petersburg. During the summer of 1969, 
1,081 boys and girls attended these camps, which provided leadership training 
and recreation. 

Young Farmer Classes. A total of 1,973 young farmers were enrolled in 112 
classes. The staff provided guidance for the Statewide program which is designed 
to assist young farmers in becoming better established in the business of farming 
and to help them keep abreast of the many changes in farm technology. The 
Young Farmer Convention was held at the Hotel Roanoke in February, in conjunc- 
tion with the meeting of the Young Homemakers of Virginia. Appro.ximately 500 
young farmers and their wives discussed common problems and made plans to 
expand and improve the Young Farmer and Young Homemaker training programs. 
Instruction in all phases of farm management and agricultural mechanics was 
emphasized during the year. A statewide series of seven educational television 
programs on agricultural chemicals and pesticides was developed and telecast to 
supplement instruction for young and adult farmers. 

Farm Families. A total of 4,934 adult farmers received an average of 65.5 
hours of instruction in evening classes and an average of two visits for on-farm 
instruction during the year. Farmers who were enrolled in agricultural mechanics 
classes repaired, overhauled, and/or constructed farm equipment. 

Participation in the food production and conservation program was promoted 
through the cooperation of the staff and teachers of agricultural education and 
home economics. In school community canneries the equivalent of 2,080,012 pints 
of food was processed by persons receiving instruction in the preservation of food 
for family consumption. 

Conferences, Workshops and Other Activities. The Agricultural Education 
Service assumed leadership in conducting a number of State, area, and group con- 
ferences to assist localities in providing in-service training for agricultural educa- 
tion teachers. "Serving the Industry of Agriculture through Agricultural Educa- 
tion" was the theme of a statewide conference held at Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute and State University in July. The staff also helped plan and conduct 167 State, 
area, and group conferences for agricultural education teachers. 

In cooperation with the teacher education staffs at VPI and Virginia State 
College, the Agricultural Education Service conducted in-service training pro- 
grams with emphasis on program planning, agricultural mechanics, farm electri- 
fication, agricultural business, conservation and forestry, mechanized timber 
harvesting, and ornamental horticulture. A series of workshops was devoted to 
agricultural mechanics, safety, and motor analyzing equipment. Staff assistance 
also was given in: developing lists of curriculum materials and equipment for 
agricultural education courses; planning agricultural education programs for urban 
areas where such courses are being requested in increasing numbers; and, imple- 
menting standards and guidelines for young and adult farmer programs. In addi- 
tion, a two-year study was initiated to determine the competencies needed for 
high school teachers instructing ornamental horticulture. 

In cooperation with guidance and other vocational services, the staff partici- 
pated in five Vocational Guidance Institutes for high school counselors and prin- 
cipals. 



148 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 21— SUMMARY OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION— 1969-1970 





IN-SCHOOL 


OUT-OF-SCHOOL 




Number 
Teachers 


Alj>Dai 


General 
Mechanics 


Stddents With 
Special Needs 


Young Farmer 
Classes 


Adult 
Classes 


•Production and 
Conservation of Foods 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 




Number 
Schools 


Em-oU- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


EnroU- 
ment 


tNumber 
Teachers 


Number 
Centers 


tEnroll- 
ment 




349 


204 


19,515 


151 


2,960 


52 


1,293 


112 


1,973 


231 


4,934 


69 


57 


21,102 


47,524 



'School-community canneries. 

tPart-time teacliers. 

tEnroUment served jointly by agriculture and home economics teachers and shown also in the Home Economics Education report. 

Note: Six cities and 85 counties were served by the State program of agricultural education. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Education Service ia concerned with developing (1) the voca- 
tional knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by youths and adults for employ- 
ment and advancement in business careers; and (2) the knowledge, understanding, 
and non-vocational skills needed by all persons in everyday contact with business 
and economic activities. The major function of the service is to improve instruction 
in business and office occupations education at the secondary, adult, and teacher- 
education levels. 

Instructional programs are being revised to offer student-oriented vocational 
programs centered around job clusters, such as secretarial, stenographic, and re- 
lated occupations; typewriting and related occupations; data processing occupa- 
tions; clerical accounting occupations; filing, ofiice machine operator, and general 
clerical occupations. 

Following a successful tryout in 13 high schools of a double period class, office 
procedures, 17 high schools instituted new curriculum patterns in office occupation.s 
education during 1968-69. These new curriculums employ larger blocks of time 
(double and triple periods), integrated instructional units, and office simulations 
as instructional methods. By 1969-70, 113 high schools in 53 school divisions had 
instituted 166 new curriculums (block-time programs) as follows: 24, business 
data processing; 61, stenography; 59, clerk-typist; nine, clerical accounting; seven, 
office procedures; three, office services (disadvantaged youth); one, medical office 
procedures; one, filing and related occupations; and one, VOT-related. Twenty- 
two of these block programs were cooperative programs. 

Reimbursement from federal and State funds on a matching basis with local 
funds were used to purchase instructional equipment for office occupations educa- 
tion. One hundred fifteen high schools in 52 school divisions participated in these 
funds, as well as one post high school, four teacher-education institutions, and 
one school for the deaf and the blind. 

Secondary School Program. During 1969-70, 1,383 teachers taught busmess 
subjects in 319 high schools, 51 junior high schools, and two schools for the deaf 
and blind. Thirty-seven schools which had business programs last year were 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



149 



consolidated with other schools this year. In the 372 schools, 131,867 students 
were enrolled in 36 courses. Of approximately 62,000 individual students enrolled 
in vocational courses for office occupations, 44,000 followed a vocational curriculum 
in grades 10-12, with most of these students reported in grades 11 and 12. There 
were 545 full-time reimbursable teaching positions, of these, 218 received salary 
reimbursement through vocational education funds. There were 11 full-time and 
two part-time local business education supervisors in the State. In the 319 high 
schools, 280 had vocational programs. 

TABLE 22— HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENTS BY BUSINESS 

SUBJECTS— 1969-70 



Number of Schools 



Combined 

and 
High School 



2 

284 

68 

6 

70 

21 

13 

310 

263 

82 

*56 

•22 

255 

207 

15 

1» 

•61 

•36 

265 

33 

2 

59 

•11 

2 

190 

7 

107 

12 

•ri 

'2 

•23 

•10 

1 

•4 
3 
1 



Intermediate 
and Junior 
High School 



13 



13 

12 

4 



Total 



11 

327 

6S 

B 

83 

21 

13 

322 

263 

86 

56 

22 

255 

207 

15 

19 

61 

36 

265 

33 

2 

5(1 

11 

2 

K'O 

I 

107 

12 

t) 

2 

23 
10 
1 
4 
3 
1 



Subject 



Enrollment 



Business Exploration 

General Business 

Business Law 

Business Management 

Business Mathematics 

Business Economics 

Business English 

Beginning Typewriting. 

Advanced Typewriting 

Personal Typewriting 

tClerk-Typist I— Block Program 

tClerk-Typist II— Block Program 

Beginning Shorthand 

Advanced Shorthand 

Notebaod 

Notehand and Personal Typing 

tStenography I — Block Program 

fStenography II — Block Program 

Beginning Bookkeeping 

Advanced Bookkeeping 

Accounting 

Record Keeping 

fCIerical Accounting I— Block Program 

tClerical Accounting II — Block Program 

Office and Clerical Practice 

fOffice Procedures (Double Period) 

Vocational Office Training 

tlntroduction to Data Processing 

fData Processing— Unit Records 

tData Processing — Unit Records — Computer. . . 
tBusiness Data Processing I — Block Program. . 
fBusiness Data Processing II — Block Program . 

fFiling Occupations I 

fMedical Office Procedures 

tOffice SerWces I — Disadvantaged 

tOffice Services III — Disadvantaged 



I 



291 

21,377 

2.055 

230 

3,699 

570 

514 

45,269 

10,991 

5,419 

2,137 

630 

7,598 

2,476 

384 

654 

3,616 

1 , 105 

10.005 

3'.i5 

32 

2.S71 

360 

20 

3,935 

208 

2,273 

364 

754 

78 

1.095 

217 

47 

24 

150 

24 



131,867 



'Number of schools varies because programs may be reported individually at home schools or combined at a voca- 
tional education center. 

fNumber is stated in pupil periods. For a double period class, students are counted twice for enrollment figures 
in determining the number of class periods and teachers needed. 



150 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 23— ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS IN VOCATIONAL BUSINESS 

EDUCATION ACCORDING TO BUSINESS 

CURRICULUMS OR JOB OBJECTIVES 



Curriculum 



Stenographic . 



Filing, Office Machine Operator. 



Clerical Accounting. 



Bookkeeping-Data Processing. 

Clerk-Typist 

Totals 



Sex 



M 
F 

M 
F 

M 
F 

M 
F 

M 
F 



Grade 
10* 



49 
5,071 

564 
1,711 

203 
315 

437 
683 

1,214 
4,409 



14,656 



Grade 
11 



87 
5,610 

573 
1,825 

336 
599 

632 
1,223 

1,097 
4,364 



16,346 



Grade 
12-13 



46 
3,984 

571 
2,457 

267 
504 

575 
1,045 

703 
3,300 



13,452 



Total 



182 
14,665 

1,708 
5,993 

806 
1,418 

1,644 
2,951 

3 014 
12 ,073 



44,454 



'Incomplete. Many schools do not collect this information before the 1 1th grade. 

An additional 19,663 students were enrolled in one or more business subjects 
to round out their occupational programs in some other vocational field. 

A follow-up study of the 11,228 June 1969 high school graduates in business 
education was completed, showing the following: 



Number 
Graduates 



Occupations 



4,698 In office employment full time 

3 ,680 In school full time 

867 Married, ill, deceased, etc. 

859 In non-office employment 

728 Unemployed 

241 In military service 

155 In office employment part time 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 151 

Those entering the field of office work were employed in the following occupa- 
tional areas: 



Number 
Graduates Office Occupations 



1 ,256 riecreterial-Stenographic Occupations 

1 , 164 Clerk-Typists and Related Occupations 

601 General Office Clerk 

306 Computing and Accounting Clerical 

155 Filing 

149 Office Machine Operator (Miscellaneous, no data 

processing) 

124 Keypunch Operators 

71 Information, Message Distribution 

37 Materials and Production Clerical 

11 Computer Console Operators 

9 Miscellaneous Data Processing 



Cooperative Office Training. Cooperative part-time work training programs 
in business education, both VOT and block programs, were offered in 128 high 
schools for 2,273 students. Annual earnings reported for 2,088 students amounted 
to $2,530,541, an average of $1,211 each. 

Conferences, Workshops, Services. One in-service workshop was held for the 
benefit of teacher educators and the State staff. The purpose was to review regu- 
lations for approved programs and to consider needs for in-service teacher-educa- 
tion programs. 

Two conferences were held for local business education supervisors to discuss 
policies, procedures, and problems in business education, and to develop improved 
supervisory techniques. 

The educational television course entitled, "Introduction to Data Processing 
for Business Teachers," was telecast in cooperation with three educational tele- 
vision stations and one commercial station. This course consists of 30, half-hour 
telelessons. 

Three in-service workshops in automated data processing were held at three 
State colleges which train business teachers. Two extension courses were offered 
by two teacher-education institutions for teachers of block-time programs. 

Seven area conferences were held to discuss the teaching of tj-pewriting in 
the block-time programs. Four of these conferences were sponsored jointly by 
the State staff and teacher-education institutions. Fifty-six percent of the business 
teachers attended these conferences. 

Two workshops were held for teachers of block-time program and one for 
teachers of business data processing. 

Bi-monthly meetings of VOT coordinators were held in seven geographic areas. 
The annual Business Education Conference was concerned with the analysis of 
entry jobs for below-average students. 



152 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



FBLA. There were 145 active chapters of the Virginia Chapter, Future Busi- 
ness Leaders of America. Five regional planning meetings were held in the fall; 
six regional meetings and the twentieth annual convention were held in the spring. 

Post-High School Pragrams. In two State colleges and one post-secondary 
school offering programs of less than college level, 25 teachers taught 206 students 
enrolled as follows: data processing, 91; secretarial, 112; clerical, three. 

Programs for the Handicapped. Well defined programs for the handicapped at 
the post-high school level were offered at the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation 
Center, which employed six teachers and one supervisor for an enrollment of 164 
students. Verj' limited offerings in the two schools for the deaf and blind enrolled 
31 students. 

Adult Programs. Sixty-five high schools in 27 school divisions and two colleges 
enrolled 10,182 adults in 522 evening classes. Three hundred seven adults were 
enrolled in special programs for the disadvantaged. Two school divisions offered 
daytime adult programs for unemplo3'ed persons. 

TABLE 24— SUMMARY OF WORK IN BUSINESS EDUCATION— 1969-70 



Junior-Senior High School 


Post High School 


Business Education Subjects 


Cooperative Office Training 




Number 
Teachers' 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
mentt 


Number 
Teachers 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Earnings! 


Number 
Teachers 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment t 


1,383 


372 


131,867 


130 


128 


2,273 


$ 2.530.541.00 


31 


4 


314 



•Teachers teaching one or more business subjects. 
tCumulative enrollment. 
^Reported for 2,088 students. 
Slndividual students. 

DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

The staff of the Distributive Education Service assists local school adminis- 
trators, distributive education teachers and college personnel in the development 
of the distributive education program to meet the following goals: (1) to prepare 
secondary youth for successful employment and careers in the field of distribution; 
(2) to provide middle-management training programs at the junior college level 
to meet the need for junior executives and specialty salesmen in retail, wholesale, 
and service fields; (3) to provide a community adult training program for persons 
preparing to enter or already engaged in a distributive occupation; and (4) to 
provide pre-service and in-service teacher education programs for teachers, super- 
visors and other professional workers in a rapidly expanding and changing distri- 
butive education program. 

The staff of the Distributive Education Service provided professional services 
to 298 local DE teachers and supervisors in 198 high schools and 13 junior high 
schools. These servicesjncluded: (1) conferences with school administrators, 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 153 

(2) individual visits with teachers, (3) cluster meetings of teachers, (4) in-service 
workshops and conferences, (5) participation in local pre-school conferences, and 
(6) evaluation of programs. 

As a result of these activities, considerable improvements were made in pro- 
gram standards, facilities, equipment, and quality of instruction in distributive 
education. In addition, the program was expanded to serve more youth and adults 
who desired training to enable them to function more effectively in this phase of 
the state's economy. 

Program Development in Keeping with Current Needs 

Distributive education programs were introduced for the first time in eight 
schools. Most of these were in small, rural high schools. Ten additional programs 
of a specialized nature were added to DE offerings in other schools to serve the 
needs of disadvantaged students and students desiring more specialized instruction. 
As a result of this expansion, 12,943 students in grades seven through twelve re- 
ceived preparatory instruction for employment in distribution. A study showed 
that 7.1 percent of all tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade students in Virginia's 
public schools were enrolled in one or more distributive education courses, an 
increase from .08 percent in 1960. 

To provide needed leadership for expanding distributive education training 
programs for youth and adults in the Appalachian region, a DE supervisor was 
employed jointly be Lee and Wise Counties. 

Sixty-seven schools in 32 school divisions were equipped with new or replace- 
ment equipment for the distributive education program. 

Programs for Out-of-School Youth and Adults 

Through local distributive education adult programs 26.112 persons enrolled 
in 864 classes to upgrade their performance, to transfer to a new job, or to prepare 
for entry employment in distribution. Because of emphasis on long-term diploma 
programs, instruction totaled 203,980 manhours and averaged approximately 10 
hours of instruction per enrollee. The classes were taught by 395 part-time in- 
structors from business and industry supplemented by 167 teacher-coordinators. 

Specialized 150-hour diploma programs in personnel management, retail man- 
agement, and hotel-motel management were developed and offered to approxi- 
mately 600 persons. 

Programs for the Disadvantaged 

Twenty DE programs for 656 disadvantaged students seeking job preparation 
in distribution were offered in grades seven through twelve. A Manual of Partici- 
pation Activities and Projects was developed for these courses to insure vocational 
application of instruction in the business community. 

In two metropolitan school divisions a new "alternate week" cooperative 
program was established with students spending a week on the job and a week in 
school. Five DE II cooperative programs were established on an evening schedule 
for dropouts seeking a high school diploma. 

A 90-hour pre-employment program was conducted in two metropolitan areas 
to train unemployed welfare mothers for jobs in distribution. A specialized food 
store checker-education program in the Appalachian area enrolled 644 disadvan- 
taged adults in 80 hours of pre-employment training. Follow-up studies are in 
progress to evaluate the employment status of trainees in all of these programs. 



154 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

New and Innovative Programs and Activities 

The distributive education curriculum was reorganized to focus on the follow- 
ing competencies needed in distributive emploj'ment: (1) social competencies; 
(2) basic competencies in mathematics and communications; (3) product or service 
technology; and (4) the marketing competencies of economics, management, mar- 
ket research, merchandising, operations, sales promotion and selling. 

Curriculum materials, administrative standards, and guidance criteria were 
developed for adding new options to the high school DE program in Marketing I 
and II, Senior Marketing, Fashion Merchandising, Introduction to Hotel-Motel 
Management, Food Distribution, and Petroleum Marketing. Twenty-three high 
schools will ofTer these new options on a pilot basis in 1970-71. 

A revised unit of study, "Visual Merchandising," was completed for the 
Studies in Marketing (DE II) option. 

A management training program was developed in cooperation with Southern 
States Cooperative, Inc. which will permit DE students employed by the company 
to move immediately after graduation into the firm's mid-management training 
program. 

A State-wide study committee of local distributive education personnel com- 
pleted a two-year study to reorganize the DE adult offerings into seven diploma 
programs. 

Research 

The following studies were conducted to evaluate the state-wide distributive 
education program: 

(1) Employment status of youth and adults completing preparatory courses; 

(2) Effectiveness of the special courses for disadvantaged in-school youth; 

(3) Status of students enrolled in experimental programs in grades seven 
through nine. 

A follow-up study of 1969 graduates showed that 84 percent were employed 
full time. Of these, 81 percent remained in distributive occupations. 
Five research studies were completed as follows: 

(1) "Characteristics of High School Distributive Education Students" 

(2) "A Congruency Study of the Training Needs of Middle Management in 
Department Stores as Perceived by Post-Secondary Marketing Educators 
and Businessmen in the Department Store Industry" 

(3) "A Ten Year Follow-Up Study of Virginia Polytechnic Institute Distri- 
butive Teacher Educator Graduates" 

(4) "A Comparative Analysis of the Cost Per Pupil in Average Daily Attend- 
ance with the Cost of Salaries Per Pupil Enrolled in Distributive Educa- 
tion in Virginia— 1968-69" 

(5) "A Distributive Teacher Education Curriculum Theory Design" 

In-Service and Pre-Service Teacher Education 

Teacher education programs in distributive education at Virginia Common- 
wealth University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Old 
Dominion University constitute one of the largest State programs in the nation 
with a total enrollment this past year of 384 undergraduate students working 
toward degrees in distributive education. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



155 



In the distributive education graduate program at VCU, 31 DE coordinators 
were enrolled in part-time graduate study and eight teacher-coordinators received 
master's degrees in distributive education. 

The teacher educators at VCU and VPI, in cooperation with the state DE 
supervisory staff, conducted in-service workshops for 243 DE teachers. 

The supervisory staff also conducted 37 in-service workshops for local DE 
personnel. Ten of these were devoted to evaluation through statistical data; two 
were devoted to curriculum development; two were held for new coordinators; six 
were conducted for local DE supervisory personnel; seven dealt with the adult 
program; and two were held for teachers of disadvantaged classes. 

Distributive Education Clubs of America 

Special committees of local DE personnel were set up to refine standards and 
guidelines in an effort to strengthen the co-curricular purposes and activities of 
DECA, the professional youth organization of DE students. Considerable atten- 
tion also was given to ways of broadening the base of participation in the youth 
organization by providing individual and chapter activities for every level of DE 
instruction in secondary schools. The student selected as Virginia's 1970 DE 
Student of the Year was first runner-up in the national competition. Two post- 
secondary DE students placed among the top eight in the nation in the manage- 
ment decision making competition. 

TABLE 25— SUMMARY OF WORK IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION— 

1969-70 



IN-SCHOOL 


OUT-OF-SCHOOL 




Cooperative and Preparatory 


Evening and Part-Time Extension 




Number of 
Coordinators 


Number of 
Schools 


Enrollment 


Earnings 

Part-Time 

Cooperative 


Number of 
Teachers 


Number of 
Schools 


Enrollment 


Total 
Enrollment 


281 


211 


13,050 


$ 6,353,439.00 


532 


167 


26.112 


39,162 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The staff of the Home Economics Education Service serves secondary school 
administrators and home economics teachers in the development of a program 
which has these goals: preparation for the vocation of homemaking; preparation 
for employment in occupations using home economics knowledge and skills; and 
motivation of students with scholastic and leadership abilities to pursue college 
education in preparation for professional careers in home economics. 

The staff works cooperatively with Virginia colleges in the pre-service edu- 
cation of students who are preparing to teach home economics. 

Scope of Program — In 1969-70, home economics education programs were 
operated in each of the State's school divisions. In these divisions 484 high schools 



156 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

offered home economics programs under the direction of 884 teachers. Enrollment 
in all home economics courses, both in-school and out-of-school, totaled 106,778. 

The in-school program enrollment totaled 84,624, including 55,611 pupils in 
regular classes (grades eight-12); 804 in home economics-related employment 
courses, and 2,575 in separate classes for the disadvantaged. Enrollment of dis- 
advantaged pupils in regular home economics classes totaled 7,346. In addition, 
1,428 seventh-grade students were enrolled in consumer and homemaking classes 
for the entire year, and 24,206 seventh- and eighth-graders received instruction 
in consumer and homemaking classes for less than a full year. 

The Home Economics Service reached 22,154 post-secondary youth and adults 
in various programs: 6,399 were enrolled in consumer and homemaking classes 
for adults; 704 received instruction in home economics through the organization, 
Young Homemakers of Virginia; and 139 adults were enrolled in pre-employment 
preparatory home economics classes. In addition, 14,912 adults participated in 
food production and conservation classes conducted in cooperation with the Agri- 
cultural Education Service. 

Improvement of Instruction — Supervisory personnel visited 354 schools and 
worked with 620 teachers to review teachers' work plans for the year, to observe 
units of instruction, to determine strengths and weaknesses in the program, and 
to make suggestions and recommendations for improvement in local programs. 

Staff members worked with local administrators and teachers in 66 group 
meetings to discuss program offerings and the scheduling of courses in consumer 
and homemaking education and in occupational offerings using home economics 
knowledge and skills. 

In cooperation with local school administrators, the State staff served on 
evaluation committees which studied eight secondary school home economics 
programs. 

Three Statewide workshops were conducted to aid 50 teachers who were 
developing emploj'^ment courses as a part of local home economics programs. 
Madison College cooperated in providing two of these workshops. 

A Statewide in-service education conference was held to assist home economics 
teachers in planning effective programs and in determining ways to improve in- 
struction. The conference focused on promoting and developing home economics 
courses for employment; instructing the disadvantaged; working cooperative'y 
with other groups in the school and community; and improving the instructional 
offering in consumer and homemaking education for youth and adults. 

Development of Curriculum Materials — The first section of curriculum mate- 
rials for consumer and homemaking education was developed for trial use. This 
portion, "Consumption of Goods and Services," is one of four categories considered 
most likely to present problems in family living. Nineteen committees of home 
economics teachers participated in developing this section which lists specific 
learning experiences leading to the development of particular concepts. The re- 
maining major topics in which curriculum materials will be developed during the 
coming year are: "Management in the Family," "Individual Development in the 
Family," and "Cultural Development in the Family." 

To aid in the development of the occupational phase of the program, curri- 
culum materials in foods, clothing, homemaker's assistant services, child care 
services and home and institutional services have been prepared and made avail- 
able for use. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 157 

Future Homemakers of America — Staff members planned and directed a State- 
wide leadership training meeting which was attended by representatives and 
advisers of the youth organization, Virginia Association, Future Homemakers of 
America. This organization, with a membership of 16,520 persons in 335 chapters, 
is designed to enrich and supplement classroom instruction. The membership is 
made up of students who are enrolled, or have been enrolled, in the home economics 
program. FHA activities supplement instruction in improving family living and 
preparing for entrance into home economics-related occupations. 

Instruction for Adults — Staff members worked with local school adminis- 
trators and teachers to develop instructional programs in consumer and home- 
making education for adults and members of Young Homemakers of Virginia. 

These courses included instruction in consumer problems of families, clothing 
selection and construction, meal planning and preparation, child development, and 
home management. Primarily, classes were taught by regular home economics 
teachers as a part of the total program; however, in situations where heavy in- 
school enrollment made this impossible, part-time teachers were employed. 

Occupational home economics education courses to prepare adults for work 
as homemakers' assistants were taught in Norfolk. Other classes prepared adults 
for entry and advancement in such occupations as child care services, clothing 
services, food services and home and institutional services. Particular emphasis 
was placed on work with disadvantaged adults. 

In-School Instruction for Disadvantaged Students — Separate classes in home 
economics were provided for 2,575 disadvantaged students; an additional 7,346 
disadvantaged students were enrolled in regular home economics classes. These 
were students who, for specific reasons, were not functioning effectively in the 
regular school program. These courses were designed to hold potential dropouts 
in school and to make the students better homemakers and wage earners. 

Improvement of Space and Facilities — Assistance was given to school divisions 
in planning 26 new and remodeled departments and in determining standards and 
preparing purchasing lists for equipment in 40 school divisions. A total of 27 new 
departments were opened during 1969-70. 

Staff members reviewed 19 school building plans and offered recommendations 
for home economics department facilities, including departments for consumer 
and homemaking classes and for occupational home economics classes. 

Cooperative Work with Other Services and Divisions — Staff members partici- 
pated in five area vocational guidance institutes which were held to acquaint high 
school guidance counselors with opportunities and offerings in all fields of voca- 
tional education. Interpretive materials about home economics education were 
distributed to the 590 guidance counselors, administrators, supervisors, and voca- 
tional teachers who attended the institutes. 

In cooperation with the Bureau of Teaching Materials, new home economics 
reference books were reviewed and evaluated and a list of recommended books 
was made available to local school administrators and teachers. 

Designs for new home economics departments were reviewed in cooperation 
with the School Building Service, and revisions were recommended to provide 
optimum facilities for instruction. These plans included departments for consumer 
and homemaking courses as well as instruction in occupational home economics. 



158 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Cooperative Work with Teacher-Training Institutions— Department heads of 
home economics and teacher educators from eight teacher-training institutions in 
Virginia met with members of the State staff to discuss new developments and 
progress being made in the home economics program. Special emphasis was placed 
on the preparation of home economics teachers who will instruct high school 
students in both phases of the home economics education program. 

As a result of these meetings each college agreed to study and evaluate current 
teacher-education programs and to find waj's of incorporating experiences which 
will assist pre-service teachers to prepare for teaching employment courses. Each 
college agreed to take the following steps: 

Discuss the objectives of home economics courses for employment and 
review curriculum materials for these courses with teaching candidates; 

Place student teachers, if possible, in schools with home economics pro- 
grams which include all phases of a well-rounded program; 

Assist home economics education majors to plan individual summer work 
experience programs in occupations requiring home economics knowledge 
and skills; 

Guide home economics education majors to select courses from home 
economics subject areas in which they have a special interest and in which 
there are employment opportunities; 

Plan courses at the college level to prepare candidates to teach home 
economics courses for employment as well as for consumer and home- 
making opportunities. 

The assistant supervisors of the Home Economics Education Service visited 
colleges and met with home economics majors to discuss the program being devel- 
oped in secondary schools. They also worked closely with teacher educators in 
colleges which train home economics teachers. 



TABLE 26— HOME ECONOMICS SUMMARY— 1969-70 



OUT-OF-SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



Young Homemaker and 
General Adult Classes 

IN Consumer and 
Homemakinq Education 


Post Secondary 

Occupational Home 

Economics 


Food Production and 
Conservation Classes 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Grand 

Total 

Enroll- 


Number 
Schools 


Number 
Centers 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Number 
Centers 


Enroll- 
ment 


ment 


188 


196 


7,103 


4 


139 


16 


18 


14,912 


22,154 


106,778 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



159 



TABLE 26— HOME ECONOMICS SUMMARY— 1969-70 



IN-SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



Number of 
Teachers 


Consumer and Homemakino 
(36 Weeks) 


Consumer and Homemakino 
(6-18 Weeks) 


Occupational 

Home Economics 

(36 Weeks) 


Disadvantaged 

Students 

Reached 

IN Separate 

Consumer and 

Homemakino 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 




Grade 7 


Grades 8-12 


Grade 7 


Grade 8 




Classes 




Total 


Voc. 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


EnroU- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 


Number 
Schools 


Enroll- 
ment 




884 


684 


31 


1,428 


482 


55,611 


112 


15,642 


75 


8,564 


43 


804 


109 


2,575 


84,624 



TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The Trade and Industrial Education Service provides assistance and leader- 
ship to local school divisions in the development and improvement of instruction 
in trade and industrial education. 

Trade and industrial education includes preparatory as well as supplementary 
instruction in industrial, service, and health occupations. Preparatory classes 
are for selected students who wish to enter the world of work. Supplementary 
classes are for gainfully employed persons who wish to improve their skills and 
performance or to advance to higher level positions. 

Preparatory programs in trade and health occupations are provided for youth 
and adults with special academic, social, or economic needs. 

Preparatory Programs 
Trade and Industrial Occupations 

A significant factor in trade and industrial education has been the expansion 
of centers where trade preparatory programs are offered for selected high school 
students who have made occupational choices. These programs provide entrance- 
level skills for employment in such skilled crafts and service trades as air condi- 
tioning, cosmetology, mechanical, welding, electrical, masonry, machine shop, 
carpentry, drafting, cooking, etc. A total of 11,808 high school students received 
training in these programs. 

Industrial Cooperative Training (ICT) programs were conducted for eleventh 
and twelfth grade high school students who were 16 years or older. These students 
attended school half of each day and received on-the-job work experience in their 
chosen occupation the other half of the day. Planned work experiences were pro- 
vided in approved establishments for at least three hours of the day with one hour 
of job-related instruction given in school by the coordinator. A total of 2,306 
high school students received training through I.C.T. programs. 

Post-secondary programs in trade and industrial education were provided 
for persons who had graduated from, or had left school, and wished to pursue 



160 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

occupational training on a full-time basis. A total of 1 ,291 post-secondary students 
were enrolled in 1969-70. 

To utilize more fully the trade and industrial facilities, evening classes were 
offered for adults. Part-time preparatory classes were provided by local school 
divisions, usually during evening hours. Displaced and underemployed persons 
received training for entry-level jobs; and short-term, full-time classes were con- 
ducted in local school divisions to train persons in skills needed for employment 
in local industries. A total of 2,539 adults received training in T and I preparatory 
classes. 

Health Occupations 

The primary responsibility of the health occupations staff is to provide leader- 
ship, consultation, and direction to local school divisions in initiating, expanding, 
and improving services and programs connected with employment in the health 
occupations. A related function is to assist the instructors in establishing sound 
relationships with the supervisory and administrative staffs of cooperating agen- 
cies. 

Although practical nursing education has grown steadily in Virginia during 
the last 24 years, the lack of adequate clinical experiences prevents even Statewide 
coverage. To compensate, many of the smaller school divisions have cooperated 
to establish sound courses in practical nursing in conjunction with a local hospital 
or hospitals which offer adequate clinical experiences. 

Guidance in establishing approved schools of practical nursing and other pro- 
grams in health occupations was provided in cooperation with local advisory 
committees and a number of in-service activities were conducted. 

Secondary and post-secondary classes were conducted in practical nursing, 
health assistants, nursing assistants, hospital attendants, medical assistants, labo- 
ratory assistants, x-ray technicians, dental assistants, dental hygienists, operating 
room assistants, intensive care assistants, and medical transcriptionist, and other 
fields. A total of 2,404 persons received training in health occupations during 
1969-70. 

Coordination between public education and the health and welfare of com- 
munities is being strengthened to meet the rising demand for health services and 
the growing shortage of trained health workers in all health occupations. 

Technical Occupations 

Post-secondary preparatory programs were conducted for high school grad- 
uates enrolled as full-time students in post-secondary institutions. The courses, 
including architectural technology, civil technology, electrical and electronic 
technologies, and police science, were conducted in three schools for 419 persons. 
In addition, enrollment in evening classes in the same technologies totaled 553 
adults. These were under the supervision of the Trade and Industrial Education 
Service of the Department. Many other persons were trained in post-secondary 
technologies at community colleges. 

Programs for Disadvantaged or Handicapped Youth 

Programs for disadvantaged youth were conducted in the intermediate and 
secondary schools for persons with social, economic, or academic handicaps who 
had made poor adjustments in school. The purpose was two-fold: (1) to provide 
an opportunity for a student with special needs to learn an occupational skill in 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 161 

accordance with his abilities and to become employable upon leaving school, or 
(2) to provide opportunities for the student to make sufficient adjustments and to 
acquire sufficient knowledge to enable him to re-enter the regular school program. 
A total of 2,315 disadvantaged students were enrolled in these special classes. 
An additional 1,225 students were enrolled in special secondary and post-secondary 
classes for the handicapped. 

Supplementary Programs 

Six hundred classes were conducted in 88 schools to offer supplementary pro- 
grams for employed adults who desire to supplement their skills and knowledge 
in the technical, health, or trade occupations in which they were or had been 
employed. A total of 13,199 persons received instruction in supplementary classes 
which included the following types of training: 

Technical — to upgrade technicians in their technical field; 

Health — to improve health care through such courses as operating room 
techniques, intensive therapy, pharmacology, obstetrics, medical technology, 
and administration of medicine; 

Trade — to upgrade skilled craftsmen in their occupational field; 

Supervisory Personnel Development — to assist supervisory personnel by 
increasing their supervisory, teaching, or managerial abilities; 

Safety and Job Training — to offer on-the-job safety instruction through- 
out the year to employees of electric cooperatives; 

Apprentice Training — ^to provide related instruction either in regular 
classes or via a group study plan; 

Public Service — ^to improve technical skills of public service employees 
including policemen and surveyors. 

Summary of Additional Activities 

To meet the challenge of Virginia's rapidly developing industrial technology, 
trade and industrial vocational preparatory programs were expanded to provide 
111 new or enlarged programs and 142 new teaching positions. 

Staff members of the Trade and Industrial Education Service assisted local 
school divisions in conducting community surveys to determine the need for in- 
structional programs in various fields. The Service issued evaluative criteria to 
each school division offering trade and industrial education programs. These 
criteria were reviewed bj' staff members and served as a basis for continuing pro- 
gram evaluation. 

A Statewide conference was conducted for trade and industrial education 
personnel and several curriculum workshops were held. 

More than 6,000 students participated in the State youth organization of the 
Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. Staff personnel assisted in providing 
leadership training activities through district rallies and conventions and a State 
leadership conference. Sixty-five VICA members from Virginia made up the 
second largest delegation at the National VICA Leadership Conference in St. 
Louis, Mo., and Virginia's students ranked fourth in the national contest and 
awards program. 

Other conferences included one for local supervisors and principals of area 
vocational schools, one workshop for I.C.T. coordinators, one workshop for appren- 



162 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



ticeship coordinators, and four curriculum development conferences for individual 
trade and health fields. StafT members attended a number of regional and national 
conferences and institutes. 

The following publications were developed by the Service: TIES (four issues); 
VICA Review (two issues); Follow-Up Report of I.C.T., Trade and Technical 
Graduates; Analysis of I.C.T. Occupations; Instructional Materials Outline for 
I.C.T.; Guide for Planning Programs in Trade and Industrial Education for Vir- 
ginia Public Schools; I.C.T. Coordinator's Guidebook; Annual Statistical Report 
for Trade and Industrial Education; Trade and Industrial Education Directory; 
and Listing of Trade and Industrial Library Materials. 



TABLE 27— SUMMARY: TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION— 1969-70 



Preparatory 


Supple- 
mentary 


Secondary 


Post Secondary 


Adult 


Adult 


Regular 


Disad- 
vantaged 


Handi- 
capped 


Regular 


Handi- 
capped 


2,539 




15,089 


2,315 


130 


1,064 


1,095 


13,199 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

The Industrial Arts Education Service provides leadership in the development 
and improvement of industrial arts education at all levels of instruction. 

Ninety-six school divisions offered courses in industrial arts in 366 secondary 
schools. A total enrollment of 66,942 students were instructed by 765 teachers. 

Emphasis was placed on in-service programs to prepare teachers and super- 
visors to implement the new curriculum patterns which have been researched and 
developed through national curriculum projects. A primary effort was given to 
the "Maryland Plan" developed by the University of Maryland. Two hundred 
teachers and supervisors were involved in this statewide effort. Regional work- 
shops were held in Chesapeake, Danville, Fairfax County, Hampton, Henrico 
County, Prince William County, Richmond, and Roanoke County. 

Additional workshops were held to introduce personnel to the research of the 
Industrial Arts Curriculum Project (lACP) based at Ohio State University and 
the Olson Plan developed at North Carolina State University. 

Two hundred and fifty industrial arts teachers attended the State conference 
held August 11-14 in Richmond. A conference for local supervisors and teacher 
educators was held in Hampton November 24-25 to plan strategies for supervising 
contemporary programs. 

Projects totaling .$224,541 for industrial arts equipment were approved under 
provisions of Title III of The National Defense Education Act. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 163 

MANPOWER TRAINING SERVICE 

In accordance with the policies of the State Board of Education in cooperation 
with the Virginia Employment Commission, the Manpower Training Service is 
responsible for providing training in occupational categories for unemployed and 
under-employed youth and adults who qualify under provisions of the Manpower 
Development and Training Act of 1962, including the Amendments to the Act in 
1963, 1965, and 1968. These amendments provide for basic education, orientation 
to the world of work, and training and counseling services for individuals who are 
excluded from occupational training because of an inadequate educational achieve- 
ment level. The Act as amended also provides for refresher or other training for 
individuals who have become unemplo^'ed because of the specialized nature of 
their previous employment or who are in need of specialized skills for advance- 
ment. Priority is given to Manpower Training Skills Centers. 

Basically, the purpose of the manpower development and training program 
is to relieve unemployment caused by automation, shifts in market demands, 
employment trends and other economic changes and to provide training oppor- 
tmaities for the disadvantaged persons in Virginia. The program does not replace 
the need for existing vocational training but ex-pands and broadens the training 
programs available for workers in all occupations. Close cooperation is main- 
tained with the Virginia Employment Commission in an effort to identify voca- 
tional training needs, changes in employment patterns, and trends throughout the 
State. The Manpower Development and Training Act mandates dual responsi- 
bility to the two agencies in the total operation of the program. 

Staff members of the Manpower Training Service work with school divisions 
in their localities to achieve certain objectives. These include: providing assis- 
tance in organizing curriculum guides and course outlines, and developing standards 
of occupational competency; preparing budgets for each proposed training program 
and reviewing upon completion; providing courses in instruction based on the 
recognized needs of individuals who are to receive training, periodically reviewing 
and evaluating training programs, making recommendations for improvement and 
assessing the need for continuing the training; initiating steps to assure that 
training projects are formulated without delay; taking steps to maintain the 
quality and adequacj' of the available training and following-up all trainees who 
complete the courses in an effort to insure their success in the occupation for which 
they have prepared. 

During 1969-70, 70 manpower training programs were planned, budgeted, and 
approved to train 2,604 persons in Virginia. Training was provided in 31 occupa- 
tional fields in programs operated in 17 school divisions. The length of the pro- 
grams varied from eight to 100 weeks, depending on the occupational field. 

Programs starting during 1969-70 and those continuing from the previous year 
totaled 133 with an enrollment of 4,134. Manpower development and training 
programs graduated 1,876 trainees during the year. 

Five multiple centers for unemployed workers were in operation providing 
job-oriented-basic education, orientation to the world of work and occupational 
training. Job-oriented basic education was provided for school dropouts who had 
not completed the sixth grade and remedial education was provided for those 
functioning below the eighth grade. Guidance, counseling, and testing services 
were an integral part of each center. 

In cooperation with the Norfolk City school division, programs in six occu- 
pational areas were developed, funded and put into operation as a part of the 



164 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

Norfolk Concentrated Emploj'ment Program. Orientation to the world of work, 
job-oriented basic and remedial education, occupational training, and counseling 
services were made available for all disadvantaged persons who were referred. 

Based on criteria from the U. S. OfBce of Education, four manpower training 
centers were officially designated Manpower Training Skills Centers and an addi- 
tional center has been upgraded to qualify for official designation. These centers 
have their own identity, provide all services needed by the unemployed and 
imderemployed youth and adults seeking employment, and have a permanency 
not experienced by other manpower training programs or centers. 

Accomplishments 

1 . Ten project review and approval sessions were held in cooperation with 
representatives from the Virginia Employment Commission, the Bureau 
of Employment Security, U. S. Department of Labor, Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare, U. S. Office of Education. 

2. Forty-eight planning sessions were held with representatives of local 
school boards and local employment office managers. 

3. Cooperated with business and industry in planning training to meet the 
needs of the employers and the available trainees. 

4. Attended two regional conferences on Manpower Development and Train- 
ing. 

5. Attended a regional conference on program evaluation. 

6. Presented the manpower training program at five vocational guidance 
institutes. 

7. Conducted two workshops for local manpower training supervisors. 

8. In cooperation with the Manpower Division of the Virginia Employment 
Commission, conducted a Statewide conference on manpower training for 
manpower training supervisors and local employment office managers. 

9. Conducted a five-day inservice teacher training workshop for manpower 
training instructors. 

10. Served as a member of the Virginia Mampower Coordinating Committee 
working to coordinate the manpower services available through the 
various public agencies as set forth by the Cooperative Area Manpower 
Planning System (CAMPS). 

11. Served as a member of the State Rural Areas Development Committee. 

12. Represented the Manpower Training Service at the annual conference of 
the American Vocational Association. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



165 



TABLE 28— MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT TRAINING 
PROGRAMS— 1969-70 



Number of 
Occupation Title Programs Enrolled 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 1 22 

Auto Body Repair 4 98 

Auto Mechanics 8 218 

Auto Service Mechanic 3 91 

Basic Education 5 99 

Bricklayer 3 79 

Building Custodian 2 53 

Cement Mason 1 34 

Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant 2 24 

Clerk Stenographer 8 322 

Clerk Typist 13 371 

Cook, Hotel and Restaurant 2 56 

Diesel Mechanics 2 39 

Duplicating Machine Operator 2 75 

Horticulture 3 75 

Key Punch Operator 2 57 

Licensed Practical Nurse 6 122 

Maintenance Man, Building 5 164 

Meat Cutter 1 22 

Mine Machinery Repair 4 147 

Nurse Aid 12 485 

Nurse Refresher 1 20 

Office Machine Repair 2 57 

Production Machine Repair 7 194 

Radio and TV Repair 3 53 

Salesperson 2 64 

Seamstress 4 132 

Secretarial Science, Occupational Cluster 1 106 

Sheet Metal Worker 1 41 

Truck Driver 4 190 

Upholsterer 2 51 

Welder 17 573 

Totals 133 4,134 



SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE 

The National School Lunch Act and the Child Nutrition Act are designed to 
safeguard the health and well-being of the nation's children, and to encourage the 
domestic consumption of nutritious agricultural commodities and other food. This 
is accomplished by assisting the State, through grants-in-aid and other means, to 
establish, maintain, operate, and expand school lunch and breakfast programs. 



166 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

The school food programs are being recognized as a vital part of the total 
school program. Research has proven that proper nutrition is related to the 
physical, mental, emotional and social development of the pupil. It is necessary 
to provide attractive nutritious meals in a relaxed pleasant atmosphere and to 
teach pupils that the meal hour is an enjoyable experience. Only then will proper 
nutritional habits be a way of life as pupils grow into adulthood. 

The food service programs are under the direction of the local school divisions 
which determine the most desirable food program for their locality. All school 
divisions in the State participate in the National School Lunch Program. How- 
ever, in five divisions, seven junior and senior high schools served a-la-carte 
lunches which received no federal reimbursement. Five of these schools received 
milk reimbursement. Breakfast programs with federal reimbursement have ex- 
panded as more school divisions realized that many pupils were coming to school 
with little or no breakfast. 

Fifty-seven local supervisors were responsible for directing the food programs 
in 39 of the school divisions. 

Ten State staff members give technical assistance and evaluate the local 
programs. The State staff also coordinates the programs and acts as a liaison 
between schools and the federal government. 

The staff visited 851 schools and made 611 lunch and 22 breakfast reviews. 
They also participated in 67 group meetings with an attendance of 1,570. Seven 
regional three-day conferences were held with an attendance of 702 participants 
and 17 resource persons. Major emphasis has been placed on providing lunches 
to more pupils and increasing the number of breakfast programs. Staff members 
assisted cafeteria personnel in improving their skills, in making the best use of 
their equipment, and in increasing their nutritional knowledge. This has resulted 
in more effective program operations. 

Active participation in the Virginia and American School Food Service Asso- 
ciation provided opportimity for professional growth. The State association has 
a membership of more than 1,100. 

The National School Lunch Act 
National School Lunch Program 

Lunches served under this program provide one-third of the daily required 
nutrients for the child. Lunch was available in 1,791 schools with an average 
daily participation of 646,731. The total number of lunches served to pupils was 
108,140,489. Of this number, 24,660,731 lunches were served free or at a reduced 
price. 

School divisions have been encouraged to provide adequate lunchroom and 
kitchen facilities in each school. Twenty- five new school buildings were opened 
during 1969-70 with excellent cafeterias. 

Fifty-five floor plans for new and remodeled kitchens were reviewed and rec- 
ommendations were made concerning the types of equipment to purchase and the 
best location of the equipment to assure maximum use for an uncongested flow of 
traffic. These recommendations were designed to assist localities in making the 
best use of funds available for equipment and also in reducing labor hours in food 
preparation and service. 

In schools where the facilities are inadequate or the enrollment is too small 
to justify a cafeteria, recommendations have been made to transport foods. In 34 
divisions 78 schools transported lunches to 140 schools. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 167 

Every effort has been made to provide lunch in schools which serve only 
milk. Lunches were provided in 16 of these schools for the first time during 1969- 
70. Arrangements have been completed to provide lunches in six schools next year; 
three schools will not provide lunch programs in 1970-71; cafeteria plans for one 
school have been reviewed; and conferences were held concerning lunch programs 
for two additional schools. 

School divisions received reimbursement amounting to $9,430,853.83 for the 
lunch program. 

The Child Nutrition Act 

The Child Nutrition Act governs special milk and breakfast programs, non- 
food assistance, and the State administrative expense fund. 

Special Milk Programs 

In the 1,804 schools participating in the special milk programs, 48,906,534 
half pints of milk were served to pupils at a reduced price. Local school divisions 
received $1,746,842.02 in reimbursement. 

Breakfast Programs 

In the 20 school divisions operating breakfast programs, 94 schools served 
1,493,582 breakfasts. The school divisions received $221,826.71 in reimbursement. 

The number of breakfast programs increased from 1968-69 by 40, with an 
increase of 607,672 total breakfasts served. 

Nonfood Assistance 

The nonfood assistance program provided 75 percent of the cost of needed 
equipment in schools which had inadequate facilities for expanding lunch programs 
or providing breakfast programs and in schools which had no facilities. In 49 
school divisions, funds totaling $291,506.00 were given to 104 schools. 

State Administrative Funds 

Approval has been given for an addition to the professional staff. These 
funds will provide for the salaries of the new staff member and supporting clerical 
assistance and for the purchase of office furniture. 

Donated Foods 

The State Department of Agriculture has the responsibility of handling and 
distributing donated foods made available by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. Staff members of the School Lunch Service work with the staff of 
the State Department of Agriculture to provide proper storage and the best use 
of these foods. The National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs received 
donated foods valued at $12,440,236.85. 

VETERANS EDUCATION 

The State Department of Education is the approving agency for institutions 
and establishments desiring to provide education and training for eligible persons 
under the provisions of Title 38, United States Code. The eligible persons are 
veterans who may receive financial assistance under the provisions of the Veterans 
Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966, war orphans, and widows and dependants of 
seriously handicapped veterans. 



168 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

The Committee on Veterans Education has established policies to be followed 
by the Executive Officer of the Committee in carrying out the provisions of the 
law in accordance with fundamental principles of education. The agency approves 
only such institutions and courses which will offer a sound program of education 
and training. 

The following tj-pes of institutions are approved: Virginia institutions of 
higher education accredited by the State Board of Education; secondary schools 
accredited by the State Board of Education; public and private vocational schools; 
hospitals accredited by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of The 
American Medical Association; and flight schools approved by the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration. 

Private vocational schools must meet approval requirements established by 
the Department's Division of Vocational Education and must have had two years' 
successful operation as a school within the State before approval can be given for 
veterans' training. 

During the year the Committee received 234 applications for approval of 
courses from institutions in the State. They were handled as follows: 218 approvals 
and 16 disapprovals. 

The following changes were made during the year in the number of approved 
institutions: 228 institutions approved as of July 1, 1969; 32 institutions approved 
during the year; and 248 institutions approved as of June 30, 1970. Approvals for 
12 institutions were withdrawn during the year. 

Staff members made 267 visits to public, non-profit, and proprietary institu- 
tions in the State. These visits were made to ensure that the requirements of the 
law were being met, to inspect for approval and upon the request of the Veterans 
Administration. 

The Committee received 381 applications from establishments requesting 
approval to train veterans on the job. Action was taken as follows: 360 approvals 
and 21 disapprovals. 

The following changes were made during the year in the number of approved 
establishments: 380 approved as of July 1, 1969; 343 establishments approved 
during the year; 692 establishments approved as of June 30, 1970. Approvals for 
31 establishments were withdrawn during the year. 

There were 788 visits made to establishments to inspect for approval and to 
determine if the requirements of the law were being followed. 

CONSTRUCTION OF VOCATIONAL FACILITIES 

The first construction of vocational education facilities was started during 
1964-65 with funds made available under the Vocational Education Act of 1963. 

This Act describes an area vocational school as one which offers five or more 
occupational programs for full-time students. To be eligible for aid, a construction 
project must provide facilities for five or more occupational offerings which will 
be housed in one school. Such a facility can be the vocational department of a 
comprehensive high school, a separate vocational education center serving the 
students from one or more high schools, or a school offering post-secondary voca- 
tional and technical training. 

These vocational facilities should be available after school hours for classes 
for persons who have already entered the labor market and who need training or 
retraining to achieve stability or advancement in employment. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



169 



These construction projects also may include vocational facilities for youth 
who are potential dropouts and who are not able to compete in regular vocational 
programs for junior and senior high school students. 

National and local studies show that the majority of high school students 
enter the labor market when they leave high school as dropouts or as graduates. 
To be prepared to compete for available jobs, it is important that these young 
persons have the opportunity to secure vocational training in high school. 

The vocational staff assists local school administrators in planning job oppor- 
tunity surveys and student interest surveys to secure information which is used 
in selecting the occupational training programs to be housed in a proposed building; 
assists localities in determining the space requirements for each training program; 
reviews the equipment arrangements that are developed by the architect; and 
cooperates with the School Building Service in evaluating the functional aspects 
of building plans and specifications. 

During 1969-70 six construction projects were started and three more projects 
in the Appalachian region were planned. The financing for these three projects for 
an estimated cost of §3,345,000 was approved by the Appalachian Commission. 

TABLE 29— VOCATIONAL EDUCATION CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 



NUMBER 
PROJECTS 
STARTED 


Training 
Stations 
Provided 


Expendi- 
tures 


1964-65—1969-70 


14,071 


$25,425,821* 



*0f this expenditure !S5,356,921 was from Appalachian Act Funds. 



FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 

Fire Service Training became a separate service in the Division of Vocational 
Education on June 1, 1969. Prior to this date, the activities were under the super- 
vision of the Trade and Industrial Education Service. 

The purpose of Fire Service Training is to coordinate a comprehensive fire 
training program for fire departments in the State. The program includes both 
paid and volunteer departments in communities of all sizes. Training is available 
on officer and firefighter levels. In addition to the Basic, Standard, and Advanced 
Courses, specialized courses include pump operation, driver training, home safety, 
arson detection, and fire prevention. 

Instructors for these courses are trained in Methods and Techniques of Instruc- 
tion by staff members of the Service, and instruction in specialized subjects is 
conducted by Fire Training Specialists on the staff. Service personnel closely 
supervises, monitors, and evaluates the work of the Certified Fire Instructors. 

Course Offerings 

During 1969-70, 70 local, 34 zone, 33 regional, and two State fire schools were 
funded or sponsored by Fire Service Training. Included among these courses were 
26 Basic, 38 Standard, 14 Advanced, and 15 combined Basic, Standard, and Ad- 
vanced Courses. Specialized training included nine driver training courses, 8 



170 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

pump schools, two officer and leadership seminars, two aerial ladder courses, and 
one Certified Instructors' Conference. Courses were offered in: fire department 
indoctrination, first aid, home safety, arson, LP gas hazards, industrial safety, 
and fire safety in schools. 

The total attendance of fire department personnel at these State fire training 
schools was 4,462, with 288 fire departments and 20 industrial fire brigades repre- 
sented. These figures do not include representation at in-station training activities 
conducted by fire department personnel on a continuous basis. 

Supplementary Activities 

Staff personnel prepared a course outline in General Firemanship. Completion 
of this 60-hour course is recommended for every firefighter in Virginia within a 
reasonable period after affiliation with a fire department. The program includes 
the basic skills necessary for the safety of the individual firefighter and his col- 
leagues. 

Training films, transparencies, and texts have been made available on a 
limited basis for use by fire department personnel in the State. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 



The activities of the Division of Educational Research and Statistics during 
1969-70 are summarized below under the four functions of the division. 

Function 1: To conduct research studies requested by the State Board of Educa- 
tion and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

A Study of Educational and Occupational Aspirations of Virginia's 1969-70 High 
School Seniors. Following a conference called by the governor of Virginia in 1966, 
at which concern was expressed about the low percentage of Virginia's college-age 
population enrolled in college, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
requested the division to conduct a survey of the educational and occupational 
aspirations of high school seniors. The primary purpose of the study was to pro- 
vide guidance and curriculum specialists, school administrators, and faculties of 
colleges and universities with information that would be useful in planning more 
effective educational programs. The first study was conducted in May, 1967, and 
a detailed analysis of the results was published in 1969. 

A second survey of Virginia's seniors was conducted in May, 1970, and a re- 
vised form of the questionnaire prepared for the 1967 study was used. Data ob- 
tained from the 1970 survey are being analyzed and the results will be published 
during 1971. A follow-up study of a representative sample of the 1970 high school 
graduates also is planned. 

As a supplement to the survey, approximately 5,000 seniors, selected at ran- 
dom, received a questiormaire to determine their reasons for discontinuing the 
study of foreign languages. The results of this study should be available later 
this year. 

As an adjunct to the 1970 survey, a second and more thorough studj' of the 
College Entrance Examination Board advanced placement students in Virginia 
will be conducted in collaboration with the College Entrance Examination Board 
staff. 

A preliminary analysis of the data from the 1970 survey disclosed that approx- 
imately 77.1 percent (41,948) of the 54,272 high school seniors responding said 
they planned to continue their education. This was an increase over 1967 when 
57 percent (28,106) said they planned to continue their education on a full-time 
basis and 7.4 percent (3,643) on a part-time basis. 

Replies from 20,305 seniors (37.4 percent) indicated that they plaimed to 
attend a four-year college; 6,374 (11.7 percent) said they planned to enroll in a 
two-year junior college or community college and transfer to a four-year college; 
5,042 (9.2 percent) planned to enroll in a two-year college terminal program; and 
10,227 (18.8 percent) planned to enroll in some other type of educational program. 

The study also showed that 3,784 (6.9 percent) of those not continuing their 
education indicated that further schooling was not required for the work they 
wanted to do, and 3,627 (6.6 percent) simply were "not interested in further edu- 
cation." Other reasons given for not continuing the educational program included 
low grades (1,587), the need to earn money at once (2,505), and the lack of money 
for college expenses (821). 

Acceptable and Desirable Uses of the National Teachers Examination and Other 
Teacher Behavior Measures in Virginia. 



172 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

This study was initiated during the 1967-68 school year, at the request of the 
State Board of Education. Teachers who participated were ramdomly chosen 
from 20 city and county school systems, and data on behavior measures were col- 
lected in 1988 for each teacher. Separate ratings by principals and supervisors 
also were obtained for each teacher at the end of the 1967-68, 1968-69, and 1959-70 
academic year. Preliminary analyses of the data have been completed. 

Function 2: To Encourage and Assist School Divisions in Designing and Con- 
ducting Pilot Studies. 

The 1968 General Assembly appropriated $75,000 for each year of the 1968-70 
biennium to aid localities in preparing and conducting educational pilot studies. 
The purpose of State support for pilot studies is to encourage local school divisions 
to define their educational problems and to use new methods in solving them. 

During the 1969-70 school year, 25 pilot studies were conducted in 17 school 
divisions. Ten of the studies were continued from 1968-69 and 14 will be continued 
through 1970-71. All proposals for pilot studies are reviewed by the research staff 
of the division and by specialists in the respective problem areas. Proposals that 
are well formulated and clearly defined and which have potential Statewide value 
are approved for funding. 

The Division published a revised edition of Pilot Studies Program: A Manual 
of Procedures in March, 1970. This publication includes the objectives of the pilot 
study program, procedures for conducting a pilot study, and a survey of services 
which the Division offers to local school systems which conduct pilot studies. 

Pilot Studies in Progress during 1969-70 were: 

A Thematic Approach to Virginia History and English (Albemarle 
County) 

A proposal for the Introduction of Computer-Oriented Mathematics in 
Selected Secondary Schools (Second Year of Study, Arlington County) 

Effects of Indirect Versus Direct Teaching on Long-Term Subject Growth 
(Arlington County) 

Attitudes Toward Classroom Activities (Arlington County) 

A Comparative Study of the Lecture-Demonstration Approach With An 
Inquiry Approach in the Teaching of Ninth-Grade General Science 
(Botetourt County) 

Project VA-LEAD: An Instructional Program to Develop Values, Valu- 
ing and Leadership (Third Year of Study, Fairfax County) 

An Ungraded Boys' Physical Education Program Which Permits Students 
to Select Activities (Fairfax County) 

A Program for Continuous Learning (Fairfax County) 

Speech and Language Development in Trainable, Mentally Retarded 
Children (Hampton City) 

A Non-graded Multi-Grouped English Program for Eleventh- and Twelfth- 
Grade Students (Fourth Year of Study, Harrisonburg City) 

A Comparison of the Relative EfTectiveness of Two Different Sequences 
of Courses in High School Algebra and Geometry with Student Achieve- 
ment in Chemistry (Henrico County) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 173 

A Study to Test the Experience Approach as a Means to Facilitate the 
Language Growth of "Language Deprived" Children (Second Year of 
Study, Montgomery Count}') 

An Investigation of an Instrument Designed to Predict Reading Failure 
of Pupils in Grade One (Third Year of Study, Newport News City) 

The Effectiveness of Selected Materials and Special Teaching Techniques 
in a Fifth-Grade Social Studies Course to Improve Pupil Understanding 
of Man's Behavioral Characteristics (Newport News City) 

A Continuous School Year Program (Norfolk City) 

A Multi-Media Communications Skill System (Prince Edward County) 

Movement Patterns of Early Childhood (Fourth Year of Study, Richmond 
City) 

The Use of Summaries to Publicize Educational Research Findings Among 
Teachers and Principals (Second Year of Study, Richmond Cit}^ 

Concurrent Plaiming-Operation of a Model Elementary School Using Con- 
tinuous Educational Programming (Richmond City) 

A Vertical Long-Range Follow-Up Study of Pupils Enrolled in the Model 
Kindergarten Project (Second Year of Study, Roanoke City) 

Introductory Physical Science Study for an Eighth-Grade Group of Slow 
Learners (Second Year of Study, Russell County) 

Interaction of Matter and Energy — An Inquiry in Physical Science (Rus- 
sell County) 

The Process Approach to Teaching Science (Wythe County) 

The Development of a Block Curriculum Program in History and English 
and A Comparison with an ETV and Departmentalized Approach at 
the Seventh- and Eighth-Grade Levels (Third Year of Study, York 
County) 

The Effect of a Continuous Progress Program on Mathematics Achieve- 
ment Scores at the Seventh-Grade Level (York County) 

Function 3 : To Coordinate Educational Research in the State. 

Research is a vital element in the process of educating children. It aids 
administrators, curriculum specialists, and guidance counselors in making impor- 
tant decisions which affect the operation of the school, the nature of the instruc- 
tional process, and the occupation and vocational choices of students. Decisions 
based on data obtained in an objective manner play an important role in efforts 
to provide a program of quality education for Virginia's school population. 

Under Fimction 3 the division is charged with coordinating educational re- 
search being done in local school divisions throughout the State. Examples of 
the coordination provided by the division include the following: 

1. The Pilot Study Program provides leadership and assistance to local 
divisions wishing to conduct research. Two studies dealing with the extended 
school year were conducted in the cities of Norfolk and Richmond during 
1969-70. 



174 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

2. The Second Annual Conference on Educational Research sponsored 
by the division was held at Natural Bridge in May, 1970. One hundred fifty 
participants from school divisions, colleges, and universities took part in a 
program that covered many areas of research activities. This conference 
represents a continuing efTort by the Division to coordinate educational re- 
search on a Statewide basis. 

3. Research studies conducted under the auspices of the division are 
considered for publication on the basis of: their timeliness and impact as 
they relate to public education in Virginia, the quality of the research design, 
and the degree to which the research design was followed during the studies. 
During 1969-70, the Division published the following: 

The Effect on Academic Achievement of Increased Emphasis on Basic Skills 
for Disadvantaged Children. Newport News Public Schools, March, 1970. 

Pilot Studies Approved for State Aid in the Public School Systems in Virginia 
1969-1970 

4. Staff members of the Division represent the Department on the boards 
of directors of two Regional Education Laboratories which operate within 
the State and which were established under Title IV, PL 89-10, to find answers 
and new approaches to persistent educational problems. They are: 

Appalachia Educational Laboratory — Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, 
Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia 

Regional Education Laboratory for the Carolinas and Virginia — North 
Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia 

Directing the formulation of plans for an extended school year is a major 
responsibility of the Division under Function 3. Following an August, 1968, 
workshop, committees were formed under the leadership of Division staff 
members to develop prototype plans during the 1968-69 school year. Two pilot 
studies on the extended school j^ear were conducted during 1969-70. The 
titles and respective school divisions were: 

Concurrent Planning-Operalion of a Model Elementary School Using Con- 
tinuous Educational Programming, Richmond City Public Schools. 
A Continuous School Year Program, Norfolk City Public Schools. 

The latest conference on the extended school year was held in Portsmouth 
on May 13-14, 1970. Divisions represented at the conference were Campbell, 
Fairfax, Henrico, and Prince William coimties; and the cities of Chesapeake, 
Lynchburg, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Richmond. Presentations were made 
at the opening session bj^ representatives of the two pilot study projects. Two 
pilot study proposals have been approved for the 1970-71 school session to be 
conducted on the elementary and middle school levels. 

Function 4: To provide a Two- Way Flow of Educational Data Between Local 
School Systems and the Department of Education. 

The collection and exchange of information about educational programs in 
the State is an important asset in providing quality education. Machine data 
processing provides information quickly and in great quantity and depth for State 
and local use. Such data are valuable for use in formulating policies for public 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 175 

education, in interpreting programs to the public, and as a basis for educational 
research. 

Educational data are collected bj' the Department from local school divisions 
through regulatory obligations and through other service functions. Three prime 
goals under Function 4 are: (1) to reduce duplicate requests for data, (2) to increase 
the use and analysis of available information for decision making, and (3) to in- 
crease services to local school divisions with a minimum increase in their own 
work load. 

In developing an educational information system the Division of Educational 
Research and Statistics has concentrated on five sources of information — property 
accounting, financial accounting, personnel accounting, pupil accounting, and in- 
structional programs accounting. Each source is part of a large information sys- 
tem. For example, records on an individual teacher should include certificate 
information (personnel accounting), grade or subjects he is teaching (instructional 
programs accoimting), the school to which he is assigned (property accounting), 
number of pupils he is teaching (pupil accounting), and financial information such 
as his salary (financial accounting). 

Fimction 4 also includes the responsibility for returning information to the 
local school divisions. Information returned to the divisions consists primarily 
of summaries and analyses of data to be used for decision-making at the local 
level. 

Accomplishments under Function 4 included: 

1. Installation of a new computer of which increased the data-processing 
capabilities of the Department. 

2. A new system, planned in cooperation with the Adult Education Service, 
for administering the General Educational Development Testing Program. 
The new sj'stem uses computer for scoring, reporting, and preparing sta- 
tistical summaries of the tests. 

3. The first annual conference on educational data processing, which was 
held in Richmond. Approximately 70 participants attended including 
representatives of local school divisions, colleges, universities, and pri- 
vate industrj\ 

Topics discussed included computer-assisted instruction, administrative 
applications of the computer by local school divisions, and the curriculum 
in ADP and computer science in secondarj^ schools and colleges. 

4 . Planning and design activities, conducted in cooperation with the Division 
of Elementary and Special Education and the Division of Secondary 
Education, for developing a system for accrediting elementary and secon- 
dary schools. Use of the new system will begin in September, 1970, the 
effective date of the new Standards for Accrediting Elementary Schools, 
and the revised Standards for Accrediting Secondary Schools. 

5. Continuation, in cooperation with the Bureau of Teaching Materials, of 
planning and design activities for developing an automated system for 
scheduling films that are loaned to schools. This operation includes the 
use of a computer to print the list of films for the catalogue. 

6. Development of revised reporting systems for the Special Education 
Service and the School Lunch Service. 



176 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

7. Appointment of committees of representatives of local school divisions 
and the Department of Education to develop a school census procedures 
manual and a pupil accounting procedures manual. 

8. Collection, analysis, and dissemination of data on various aspects of 
public education. Examples of these activities include preparation of 
information for the following reports: 

Facing Up, Statistical Data on Virginia's Public Schools 
Virginia High School Dropouts, Grades 8-12, Statistical Report 
Virginia's Supply of Teachers 
Projected Enrollment in Virginia Public Schools 

9. The acquisition and maintenance of the ERIC system, to keep State and 
local public school personnel up-to-date on national educational research 
and information, has provided a vital and comprehensive resource center. 



DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 



Purpose and Scope 

The Division of Teacher Education administers programs for teacher certi- 
fication, approved programs in teacher preparation, State teaching scholarships, 
in-service education of teachers, the Education Professions Development Act 
(Subpart B-2), and scholarships for law enforcement officers. The following is a 
summary of the Division's responsibilities and activities during the 1969-70 fiscal 
year: 

Certification of Teachers. Virginia statutes, like those in other states, require 
that teachers employed in the public schools hold certificates in accordance with 
"rules of certification" prescribed by the State Board of Education. These regu- 
lations are published in the bulletin, Certification Regulations for Teachers and 
Qualifications for Administrative, Supervisory, and Related Instructional Positions, 
1968. Reports of Instructional Personnel, giving basic information for each regular 
teacher employed, are submitted to the Division by the local school superin- 
tendents. The reports are examined to verify that each teacher employed holds 
the proper certification credentials. Master lists are prepared and used in the 
program of school accreditation. 

Approved Programs in Teacher Preparation. In September, 1968, the State 
Board of Education adopted Standards for Approval of Teacher Preparation Pro- 
grams in Virginia colleges and universities. The Department of Education was 
authorized, upon receipt of acceptable credentials, to issue a teaching certificate 
to a graduate who has completed a State Board approved teacher preparation 
program in a Virginia college. 

The Department also was authorized to issue a regular Virginia certificate 
to a graduate of an out-of-state institution, provided that the program completed 
by the applicant is approved by the State Board of Education and/or the Depart- 
ment of Education m the state in which the institution is located and it meets the 
minimum standards of the National Association of State Directors of Teacher 
Education and Certification. 

At the annual meeting of the State Board of Education in August, 1969, teacher 
preparation programs in the following institutions were approved: Longwood 
College, Madison College, Old Dominion University, Radford College, University 
of Virginia, and Virginia State College. 

During the year the Department, in cooperation with the Virginia Advisory 
Committee on Teacher Education, examined the teacher preparation programs 
in the following institutions and recommended approval by the State Board, 
effective for the 1970-71 school session: Norfolk State College, Stratford College, 
and Virginia Commonwealth University. Additional programs at the University 
of Virginia were also recommended for approval. 

State Teaching Scholarships. This program of scholarship aid, which is limited 
to .?350 per school year, is available to residents of the State who are preparing to 
teach in Virginia public schools. The scholarship aid, which is in the form of 
loans cancellable by teaching, may be used only in State-supported or private 
nonsectariau institutions of higher learning in Virginia. 



178 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

During 1969-70, 5,986 Regular Term Scholarships were granted. In addition 
811 Prorated Summer Quarter Scholarships were granted to prospective teachers 
who were working to obtain a degree in less than four years. 

In-Service Education of Teachers. As a result of appropriations by the General 
Assembly, the State Board of Education has provided financial assistance to help 
teachers become more proficient in their teaching fields. These planned programs 
of in-service education for teachers constitute an important part of the effort to 
improve the quality of public education in the State. During 1969-70, 12,413 
teachers were enrolled in: (1) specially designed extension courses offering college 
credit in their teaching subjects; (2) summer graduate courses offered at State 
colleges to give selected teachers the opportunity to keep up with developments 
in history, economics, government, English, foreign languages, guidance, mathe- 
matics, science, reading, or other subjects usually taught in the elementary schools; 
and (3) courses to qualify teachers to teach additional subjects in public schools. 

Education Professions Development Act (Subpart B-2). This federal program 
is designed to attract and train teachers and teacher aides to meet critical short- 
ages in the public schools. During the 1969-70 school year, the nine school divi- 
sions listed below conducted EPDA B-2 training programs which cost a total of 
$134,369.54: 

Bedford Teacher Training $ 8,383.52 

Chesterfield Teacher Aide Training 29,578.55 

Page Teacher Training 4,452.48 

Stafford Teacher Training 15,855.77 

Wise (Regional) Teacher and Teacher Aide Training 23,040,55 

York Teacher Aide Training 7,265.82 

Lynchburg Teacher Training 27,867.57 

Richmond Teacher Aide Training 13,726.00 

Roanoke Teacher Training 4,199.28 

Virginia's allocation for Subpart B-2, the State grant program, for the 1970 
fiscal year totaled .$318,302. Project proposals from 14 school divisions, based on 
State EPDA plan guidelines, were reviewed by the State EPDA advisory com- 
mittee, which is composed of division superintendents, representatives of the 
State Council of Pligher Education, college personnel, and members of the staff 
of the Department of Education. Projects totaling $170,332 were approved for 
operation during the summer of 1970 and the 1970-71 school year. 

Law Enforcement Scholarships. The General Assembly in 1966 passed an 
act which states that: 

"Any law enforcement officer of the State, or of any county, city or town 
thereof who attends any college which offers a degree or associate degree in 
Law Enforcement, may, upon appHcation and acceptance in such college in 
an accredited course toward such degree, apply to the Department of Educa- 
tion for Virginia for reimbursement of the tuition paid for such course. Upon 
such application, which shall be accompanied by evidence of the satisfactory 
completion of such course, the Council shall pay to such oflBcer fifty per 
centum of the tuition cost of such course, not to exceed forty dollars for each 
such course. Upon receiving satisfactory evidence that such officer has 
continued to serve as a law enforcement officer for one year in Virginia follow- 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



179 



ing completion of such course, the Council shall pay to such ofBccr the re- 
maining fifty per centum of the cost of such tuition, not to exceed an additional 
amount of forty dollars for each such course." 

To carry out the provisions of this act, $50,000 was appropriated for each year 
of the 1968-70 biennium. During the year ending June 30, 1970, first and second 
installments paid to eligible recipients totaled $22,854. 

A total of 239 from the following localities were reimbursed for law enforce- 
ment courses completed: Alexandria (7), Arlington (20), Charlottesville (1), 
Chesapeake (3), Chesterfield (4), Courtland (1), Danville (1), Fairfax (20), Fred- 
ericksburg (1), Hampton (26), Henrico (16), Herndon (1), Norfolk (11), Ports- 
mouth (18), Richmond (64), Roanoke (24), Salem (1), Suffolk (1), Virginia Beach 
(9), Virginia State Police (9), and Alcoholic Beverage Control Board (1). 

TABLE 30— IN-SERVICE EDUCATION COURSES OFFERED LOCALLY 

Distribution of Classes According to Subjects 
1969-70 



Art 

Audio Visual Instruction 

English (Speech, Language Arts, and Children's Literature) 

Guidance 

History 

Kindergarten 

Library Science 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Education (Safety and First Aid) 

Driver Education 

Reading 

Science 

Social Sciences: 

Basic Economics 

Geography 

Government 

Special Education 

To raise a Certificate: (Ed. 184, 111, 112, Etc.) 

Education 164: Culturally Deprived Children and Prob- 
lems in Teaching in a Multi-Cultured Society 

Requirement for Endorsement 

Family Life Education 

Business Education (Data Processing) 

Distributive Education 

Total G51 



No. of 




Classes 


Enrollment 


32 


543 


48 


819 


37 


617 


94 


1,606 


11 


183 


36 


600 


13 


221 


76 


1,286 


12 


196 


7 


122 


20 


331 


50 


846 


26 


445 


37 


631 


3 


45 


1 


16 


32 


534 


95 


1,610 


1 


29 


7 


113 


6 


94 


6 


108 


1 


8 



11,008 



180 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 31— HIGHEST DEGREES HELD BY INSTRUCTIONAL 
PERSONNEL DURING 1969-70 





Counties 


Cities 


State 


Doctors 

Masters 

Bachelors 


38 

5,812 

25,188 

2,552 


13 

4,011 

15,218 

644 


51 

9,823 
40 406 


No Degree 


3,196 


Total 


33,590 


19,886 


53,476 



TABLE 32— NUMBER AND PERCENT OF CERTIFICATES AND 
LICENSES HELD BY VIRGINIA INSTRUCTIONAL PER- 
SONNEL—SUPERVISORY, PRINCIPALS AND ASSISTANT 
PRINCIPALS, ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY— 1969-70 





Male 


Female 


1969-70 Total 


1968-69 
Total 


Percent 
Gain 


TYPE OF CERTIFICATE 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


or 
Loss 


SoPBRVisoRT Personnel 

Postgradaate Professional 

Collegiate Professional 


465 

181 

26 


67 7 

26 3 

3.8 


450 

509 

52 


43 2 

48 9 

5 


915 

650 

78 


53 

39 9 

4 5 


801 
625 

72 


14 2 
10 4 


Collegiate 


8 3 


Total Regular 


672 


97-8 


1,011 


97 1 


1.6S3 


97 4 


1,498 


12 3 






Normal Professional 






5 


.5 


5 
1 

18 


.3 

.1 

10 


4 

1 
16 


25 


Special Certificate 


1 
8 


.1 
12 




Vocational Industrial 


10 


1.0 


12 5 


Elementary 




Special License 


6 


.9 


15 


1.4 


21 


12 


24 


—16 






Total Other 


15 


2.2 


30 


2.9 


45 


2.6 


45 








Total 


687 


100 


1,041 


100 


1,728 


100 


1,543 


12 


Principals an" Assistant Principals 

Postgraduate Professional 

Collegiate Professional 

Collegiate 


1,543 

357 

21 


80 2 

18 5 

11 


299 
126 


67.8 
26.6 


1,842 

483 

21 


77.9 

20.4 

.9 


1,698 

485 

17 


8.5 
— .4 
23 5 








Total Regular 


1,921 


99.8 


425 


96.4 


2,346 


99 2 


2,200 


6.6 


Normal Professional 


1 


.1 


12 

1 


2 7 
.2 


13 
1 


.5 




18 
2 


—27.8 


Special Certificate 


—50 










Elementary 






1 
2 


.2 
.5 


1 
5 


.2 


1 

/ 




Special License 


3 


.2 


—28 6 






Total Other 


4 


2 


16 


3 6 


20 


.8 


28 


—28.6 






Total 


l,y25 


100 


441 


100 


2,366 


100 


2,228 


6.2 


. 



















SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



181 



TABLE 32— NUMBER AND PERCENT OF CERTIFICATES AND 
LICENSES HELD BY VIRGINIA INSTRUCTIONAL PER- 
SONNEL— 1969-70— Continued 





Male 


Female 


1969-70 Total 


1968-69 
Total 


Percent 
Gain 


TYPE OF CERTIFICATE 


Number 

245 

1,627 

620 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


or 

Loss 


Elementaut Teachers 

Postgraduate Professional 

Collegiate Professional 


9.5 
63.2 
24 1 


1,592 
19,482 

8S5 


6.5 

79.2 

3.6 


1,837 

21,109 

1,505 


6.8 

77,7 

5.5 


1,616 

20,010 

1,324 


13.7 
6 5 


Collegiate 


13.7 


Total Regular 


2,492 


96 8 


21,959 


89.2 


24,451 


90.0 


22.956 


6.5 


Normal Professional 


19 


.7 


1,689 
49 


6.9 
.2 


1,708 

49 

1 

213 

760 


6.3 
.2 


2,000 
62 


—14 6 


Snerial Certificate 


—21 




1 

2 

61 






Elementary 

Special License 


.1 

2 4 


211 

699 


.9 
2.8 


.8 
2.8 


271 
953 


-21 4 
—20 3 






Total Other 


83 


3 2 


2,643 


10.8 


2,731 


10.0 


3,2S6 


—16 9 






Total 


2,575 


100 


24,607 


100 


27,182 


100 


26,242 


3.6 


Second ART Teachers 

Postgraduate Professional 

Collegiate Professional 


1,7!4 
5,468 
1,352 


19 4 
61.9 
15 3 


2,088 

10,427 

715 


15.6 

78 

5 3 


3,802 

15,895 

2,067 


17 1 

71 6 

9.3 


3,373 

15,486 

1,937 


127 
2 6 


Collegiate 


6.7 


Total Regular 


8,534 


96 7 


13,230 


98.9 


21,764 


98 


20,796 


4 7 






Normal Professional 






17 
5 

60 
2 

58 


.1 

.4 
.4 


17 
7 

267 
2 

143 


.1 

1.2 
.6 


22 
10 

185 
3 

211 


—22 7 


Special Certificate 


2 
207 


2 3 


—30 


Vocational Industrial 


44 3 




—33 3 


Special License 


86 


10 


—32 2 






Total Other 


294 


3.3 


142 


1.1 


436 


2 


431 


1 2 






Total 


8,826 


100 


13,372 


100 


22,200 


100 


21,227 


4.6 


Gband Totals 

Postgraduate Professional 


3,967 
7,633 
2,019 


28,3 
54 5 
14 4 


4,429 

30.544 

1,652 


11 2 

77.4 
4 2 


8,396 

38,177 

3,671 


15 7 

71.4 

6.9 


7,488 

36,612 

3,350 


12.1 
4 3 


Collegiate 


9 6 






Total Regular 


13,619 


97 2 


36,625 


92.8 


50,244 


94.0 


47,450 


5 9 






Normal Professional 


20 
3 

216 
2 

155 


.1 

1.5 
1.1 


1,723 

55 

70 

214 

774 


4 4 
.1 
.2 
.5 

2 


1,743 

58 

2S6 

210 

929 


3 3 
.1 
.5 
.4 

1.7 


2,044 

75 

201 

275 

1,195 


—14.7 


Special Certificate 


—22 7 


Vocational Industrial 


42 3 


Elementary 

Special License 


-21.5 
—22 3 






Total Other 


396 


2.8 


2,836 


7 2 


3,232 


6 


3,790 


—14.7 






Total 


14,015 


100 


39,461 


100 


53,476 


100.0 


51,240 


4.4 



182 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 33— TOTAL NUMBER OF INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL 
FOR 1969-70 COMPARED WITH 1968-69 





1969-70 


1968-69 


Net 
Change 


Supervisory Personnel 

Male 

Female 


687 
1 ,041 


636 
907 


51 
134 


Total 


1,728 


1 ,543 


185 


Principals and Assistant Principals 

Male 

Female 


1,925 
441 


1,793 
435 


132 
6 


Total 


2,366 


2,228 


138 


Elementary Teachers 

Male 

Female 


2,575 
24,607 


2,318 
23,924 


257 

683 


Total 


27,182 


26,242 


940 


Secondary Teachers 

Male 

Female 


8,828 
13,372 


8,234 
12,993 


594 
379 


Total 


22,200 


21,227 


973 


Grand Totals 

Male 

Female 


14,015 

39,461 


12,981 
38,259 


1,034 
1,202 


Total 


53,476 


51 ,240 


2,236 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



183 



TABLE 34— RESIGNATIONS AND CHANGES IN POSITIONS 
AMONG INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL, 1969-70 





Number 


REASON 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Accepted teaching position in another state or private 
school in Virginia or another state, including U. S. 
Office of Education 


329 

32 

322 

73 

42 
66 
97 
34 
4 
23 
229 


537 

2,392 
145 

15 
205 

75 
753 

48 
1,783 

51 
587 


866 


Resigned teaching position for marriage, household 

duties, or maternity 

Left teaching profession to accept private employment. 

Military service 

Illness 


2,424 

467 

88 

247 


Unsatisfactory service 

Retirement 


141 
850 


Death 


82 


Transfer of husband to another location 

Not re-employed — replaced by certified teacher 

Other 


1,787 

74 

816 






Total 


1 .251 


6,591 


7,&42 


Transfer to non-instructional duties within the system. 
Accepted teaching position in another school division 
in Virginia 


45 

489 
146 


30 

878 
300 


75 

1,367 


Leave of absence for study or travel 


446 


Total 


680 


1,208 


1,888 



184 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

03 



O 
H 

1—1 

CO 

I 

o 

CO 
05 



O 

P4 
H 
Pm 

O 
I— I 

H 

O 

P^ 

I— I 

« 

p 
hj 
w 
w 

o 



Q 

H 
O 

>— ( 

H 

Pi 

O 
I 

W 

W 
<1 
H 



« o 



i 




00 


SI 


31 




1—1 
O 
1—1 


8 


o 

(N 


CO 


CO 


^ 


00 

CO 


O 


g 


^ 


CO 


00 


l-H 


£? 



to 

u 
El 

u 



E-« 

o 



CO 






Eh 
O 

o 



o 
H 



C3 CO 

II 






O O^ u 

►5,.-- O -1-3 



t^o^coo^oo^oo^ajo^coo^coo^ooo^cno^co^ 

COCOCOrtCOCCC500-*0-^_'Ot^_CO(M_00 r- 'if (M o 
C005COOOCOCO»C'*l«3CO'0'-<-*0'*OOCOI>>COCO 



1— 1 


IC 


Tj< 


1—1 


^ 


CO 


lO 


1—1 


y—i 


o 


Tt< 


CO 


IM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1— * 


a> 


00 


t^ 



CN >0 O 
•* C3i CS 
lO "-I 05 



(N (M (N (N 



lO 


o 


o 


^r^ 


CO 


Ttl 


00 


l^ 


lO 


CO 


cx) 


lO 


IM 


("^ 


»o 


1— ^ 


CO 


CS 


r~ 


^H 


lO 


lO 


lO 


>o 


>* 


'^ 


CO 


CO 


(N 


(M 



.3 
'S 



,—1 o 

O 00 

<N CM 

COCOt^iOlOCOCOCOiOOO 
t^i-iCOTtirfii— (OOOt^iO 
(N CS 1-1 l-l rH rH rH 



^ CC —H 

;z;P-. "= 



o3 
O 



CO CO 
O "# 



CS 

CO 



1^ 

o 

CS 



CD 
CO 

OS 



05 



o 

CO 



CD Tf CO 

CS -^ ■* 
CO o o 



COCOCOCOCSC<lCSCS 



CS 



^ v^ --< >^ CO v^ -H v^ (^ j^ 00 jxp lO jsp C» K? O kO Ti^ xO 

i-iTtir^C3^-^iOC^)I>OiOiOCOt^CSCSTt"COCSO 

OOOO— iCSCOfiOcOt^CrsOO'^O-^^t^CSO'* 
CSOOCOOOCOOOCOOOCOOOCOOO^OO-^OS-^CliOCn 









lO 00 

C5 es 
1— ( -^ 



o 


00 


iC 


Oi 


1— * 


lO 


lO 


l> 


CO 



00 C3 1-1 O 1-1 
00 t^ t^ to 1^ 

t^ 00 O CO CO 



CS CS CS CS 



CS 



CS CS CO CO 



CO 



00 

'*- 
cs" 

CS 



05 



00 

I— I 



C^l 

CO 

CS 



■^ 1-H 

CD CO 
O CO 



00 

CO 



CO C^l t^ 

CO 1-1 I> 

Tf CO 1— I 



CO 

CS 



CS 



CS 



OS 
CS 



CO 



CS 

CO 



CO 



CO 

CO 



00 
CO 



en 3 t— Q 
0-3 O o 
Cl^ si <- • — 

" £cli <" 



00 


05 


g 


I— 1 


t^ 


^ 


05 


lO 


00 


CO 


Oi 


■^ 


lO 


r- 


iO 




1—1 


00 


C5 


n^ 


i> 


o 


lO 


o 


rt< 


o 


I> 


'I* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


TlH 


■* 


lO 


lO 


CO 


CO 


I> 


00 



s 



—I CS 

CO CO 



CO 
CO 



O 1-t CS 
CD CO CO 

Oi Oi a 



CO 

CO 
CO 

Oi 



CO 

C35 



CO 

CO 
I 

in 

CO 

OS 



CD 

CD 
CO 
CS 



00 

CO 
OS 



OS 
CO 
t 
00 
CD 

OS 



o 

t 

OS 

CD 
OS 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



185 



o 



o 

CO 



.a 
So 



Qb 
w 



CQ 



o 

OH 
»— I 

^^ 
o;z; 



w 



jq 



fO 

< 



O 





CO 


t* 


o 


o 


«-H 


CO 


ifl 


*-4 


QO 


v-4 


(M 


M -^ 


T-( 


00 


Tt« 


b» 


*«^ 


a> oo 


*H 


^ 




ee 






lO 


CO 




*o 


■^ 


<M 


<N 


o 




•O b- 


r^ 


CI 


Oi 


OS 


T-» 


CO O 


■^ 


to 


C4 


•1^ 




■^ 
















■^ 


CN< 




CO 




TT 


cs 




Oi 








^ 
































CO 












CJ 


CT> 


r^ 


C3 


o 


<N 


oo 


o 


Cft 


r* 


00 


iO 


r- ^ 


o 


r--. 


cn 


oo 


o 


« CO 


o 


CO 


o 


03 




oj 


CO 


r^ 




CO 




oo 


w 










'^ 


(M 


o 




CO 


rp 


CO 


1— 1 


S 




CO 
















CO 


I— 1 




CO 




CO 


(M 




Oi 






































UD 













o g 

•< D 



a 
a 

o 



o 
O 



z 

o 



ft, a. 



lO CO o 

1-t t^ 



pc, 



o 



&H 



t^ Oi C^ O r-I ITS 



CO OO C<» lO C30 r^ 



TT Oi CO C<l 



'^ CO • ^H lO »— C5 



^^ Cs t>- lO 
O C^ ""t* 00 



(OOSr^OSC^OCi^COCDiOCO 

co»-*'«i*'-"t^C5oOioaiooci 

CO T-H U5 C^l ^H CO 



»-(CO«OOO^HCOOOCOCOOC?500 

CO C0»-<t^'T<^»OO3C0I^ 

CO ^^ iO C-1 »-• C4 



lO Oi -^r »0 00 05 



o 
Q 

z 

o 



■o o 
2 O 



o 



CQ 



-art ^ - 

- - 5: 






bO 



1-1 rH 00 .-I t-. C^ 



c- — o 



s 



s g g 

b£ a. ~ 

s a a 



» i = M 



oj o 






5 a :^ -^ -S 9 



'•> M rs o oi c 

on ?^ O r -I — • -r- 



c^^'? o 






0} 



CoSaSaitiiao 



P J2 O 

O G C3 

J J «5 



s s 



CO ■= 5 

^ is 



o 



_ c 

ji a 

g a 



-E3 

O 



O 2 3 

ZOO 



a; rt a 

3 S S 

i^ J: ^ 

■T3 D. D. 

:3 -o o a 

■^ a <a a 

OS oi « 



bO O 

_a) O 



O s 



^ 



186 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

T— 1 

!^^ 

WO 
o I 

COh-J 
C5 

§2 

mW 
HO 

W^ 

xjm 

^W 
(— ) d^ 

Sec 

s^ 

HO 

|g 
I ^ 



9 







eo 


fn 






CO 


t-H 


in 


i-H 






C5 







t^ 


I 






"^ 


*-l 




cQ 


cocQC-3.-'t--coeMOcoao cc 


CO 








CO 




<<^ 


^ »0 »0 •O <M <-< 
































H 




•rr 








■^ 


















QJ 






CTl 






iC 


Tf 


•^ ?; 




C<)CO<MC1C:!CC -'J'OCD 


CO 













S a 


a 


<M CO 1— ' C* 




"^ 






■^ 




," 















0" 


"1 


pi, 



































(M -r-T-HCi cococriooi 


00 






03 


1^ 






.-I • ■OOOO'.fC^lOiOlM 


c^ 






•«^ 






<a 


(M ^H CO ■ ■ 


CO 












:§ 




CO 








CO 




-a 1 








■^ 




•* 












M 

















T— 1 






►a H 


H 




























i « 


fu 








05 

00 ■ 




C73 
00 


































02 h4 
























X5 




»o 




S 








M 




CO 

















<M 




-ia 








r- 





















1— t 


•J J 


H 














z 9 








































cc 




I-- 


H g 


li. 








u: 




"0 


-«1 P 
















a 
Z 






























> h3 






,_, 




■^ 




10 




S 












'- 




C3 


tMOOT-H^MOOOOOC^t^OOi-i 


M 








(M 






-^^ur-oscsiMMC^c^ »« 


W5 

















■^ 








■rp 


1 




H 




(M 








CM 






C-l CO ^ 


CO *-< 


CM 








ca 


b. 


^ •-« -H iO 




»o 












1^ 

5 










^ 








^* 


















»-H 




GO(MOiO<X>'^GOt^ 


















S 






10 I-, CO <M ^ 




CM 








CM 




'(3 


'«ticDM00O"^»0O00»C<M(MC^ 


»c 








UO 






cooit-icoiocr) -!^oco r- 


■<*' 














1— t CO CO Cfl 












S 


H 




crT 








0^ 


















COCD(NeOlOOO(MCOOCO 


<M CM 


CO 








CO 


m 


fa 


CQOa-^i-lCsOO »-tCDiO 




CO 










H m 


(M ^ ^ 














1-1 U 


















g § 






























« 




«-4 




lOldCOCOfMOOlMiM 




OS 








Oi 


P-i 


S 






<M >r3 Cfi CM -rji i-H 




QO 








g 














CO to 








00 








CO 




-S 


















CO 








c<0 


M 




















CO 










H 


























« 






























g 2 










■^ r-H ro 


00 CT) 




















5 s 

is 


fa 








,-« 00 >^ 

1— 1 


l-H (M 








o_ 








; ° 






























« 










■^ -<J1 -rf* 


»o t- 








00 








00 


f^ p^ 


S 








10 ^ 


T-H 
















• 10 






































- 13 


































• 






: § 


: S 








































































K. 
























>> 












■ a 

• b 

• a 


\ 




! c 


3 M 




: ]3 
















i; 








J? 






■• 


■a 












• c 

• c 
' F 


« 

■£ 




is 


> 

i 


03 

a 


• .2 
■ '5 


' a 

! 2 

? M 
a 


■<1 


■ 1 


: § 

m 

■: 1 






■^1 




4 3 

i ^ 

! 1 


« i 
» 1- 


J — 
< 


^9 

sis 

20- 


; 

3 






"^ 2 1 ■§ -a '1 g ■§ 'Ills 




is ' 




to 






































2; 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 187 

TABLE 37— OLD CERTIFICATE AND LICENSE ACTIVITY 
JULY 1, 1969 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1970 

NUMBER 

♦Duplicated 139 

Extended 1,542 

Renewed 3,891 

Revived 232 

Total 5,804 

•Certificates replaced on evidence of loss. 



188 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

EVALUATION AND PLANNING 

The Special Assistant for Evaluation and Planning is responsible for studies of 
school building needs and comprehensive studies involving system wide evalua- 
tion and planning. 

Studies of school building needs are made at the request of division super- 
intendents. These studies usually involve projection of school enrollment, 
assessment of the condition of school buildings, and recommendations concerning 
the need for new buildings and for additions and improvements to buildings. 
These studies are made by committees composed of Department staff members, 
division superintendents, and college personnel. Written reports of the studies 
are distributed to school boards to assist them in planning school building 
programs. 

School plant surveys were made during the year for the following school 
divisions: Amelia, Campbell, Caroline, Carroll, Henry, Lancaster, and Virginia 
Beach. Limited plant studies were made for Colonial Beach, Lee County, Powha- 
tan County, Richmond County, and Washington County. 

The systemwide evaluation and planning program is designed to assist school 
divisions in identifying educational needs and in formulating programs to meet 
these needs. This program was begun during the 1968-69 school year in 19 school 
systems in Southwest Virginia: the counties of Bland, Buchanan, Carroll, Dicken- 
son, Giles, Grayson, Lee, Patrick, Pulaski, Russell, Scott, Smyth, Tazewell, 
Washington, Wise, Wythe, and the cities of Bristol, Galax, and Norton. The 
program was extended to the following systems during the 1969-70 school year: 
Campbell, Charlotte, Gloucester, Halifax-South Boston, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, 
Pittsylvania, and Prince Edward. 

The planning and evaluation studies involve the following steps: 

Identifying Needs 

An evaluation instrument was prepared by the State Department of Education 
to be used as a guide in identifjdng needs related to the local educational programs, 
staff, teaching aids and services, school plant, and pupil transportation. Identi- 
fication of needs involves an in-depth study of the total school system, conducted 
cooperatively by the staffs of the Department of Education and the local school 
division. Eighteen such studies have been completed. 

Classifying Needs 

Needs are classified as either management or directional needs. Manage- 
ment needs are those which must be met to maintain the existing level of efficiency. 
Directional needs are those which must be met to develop a higher level of program 
effectiveness, such as increasing the academic achievement of pupils. 

Selecting Needs to Be Met 

Ideally, it would be desirable to initiate programs to meet all needs im- 
mediately. In most cases, however, priorities must be set. Considerations 
involved in selecting needs to be met include the educational urgency of the 
need, available resources (in terms of personnel, facilities, materials, funds), and 
time. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 189 

Listing Alternative Ways to Meet Each Need 

After determining which needs are to be met, every possible means should 
be considered to meet them. There are usually many ways to attain an objective. 
For example, if the school needs to establish a kindergarten program for five- 
year-old children, the possibilities might include: a summer program for all 
five-year-old children; a summer program for disadvantaged five-year-old chil- 
dren; a full-day program for all five-year-old children; a full-day program for 
disadvantaged five-year-old children; a one-semester program during the regular 
school year for half the children in the fall semester and half in the spring semester. 

Although some of the alternatives may not be feasible, all five are possible. 
It is important to consider all alternatives before deciding upon a course of action. 

Choosing Way(s) to Meet Each Need 

In choosing ways to meet each need, the following criteria should be applied 
to each alternative: relative effectiveness in meeting the identified need; pre- 
liminary cost estimate; personnel, facilities, and materials required; acceptability 
of the program to those who will receive it as well as conduct it; positive and 
negative effects on the total program; and continuation requirements. 

Developing a Program to Meet Need 

After way(s) to meet each need have been determined, a program must be 
developed to accomplish the desired objective. The following aspects of the 
program must be developed: objectives; program content (curriculum, pupil 
experiences); program requirements (staff, facihties, equipment, materials, 
cost); time schedule for implementing program; and provision for evaluation. 

Implementing the Program 

After a program has been developed, it should be presented to the school 
board and, if approved, should be adopted officially by the board as the first step 
toward reaching the objective. Board adoption gives the program official status; 
the administration is responsible for carrying out the approved program. 

Brief descriptions of adopted programs should be kept in looseleaf notebooks 
for board members and other designated persons. The notebook can serve as a 
planning manual for the school system. 

Evaluating the Program 

School boards should review at least semi-annually each need selected and 
the programs that are being conducted to meet the needs. Administrative reviews 
should be more frequent and more thorough than those made by school boards. 
In these evaluations, it is not enough just to say that a particular program is 
"good," or that it is "Uked" by many people. It is necessary to know precisely 
what is being done, why it is being done, what it is producing in measurable 
terms, and how much it costs. When this knowledge is available, it can be deter- 
mined whether or not educational programs are meeting the needs of the 
community. 



190 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

FEDERAL PROGRAMS 

The Special Assistant for Federal Programs administers the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-10) and Public Laws 874 and 815 
which provide federal funds for school operation and construction, respectively, 
in federally impacted areas. 

The organization for the administration of Title I of P. L. 89-10 includes a 
program director and four assistant supervisors with regional headquarters at 
Abingdon, Lynchburg, Warrenton, and Richmond, who assist in developing proj- 
ects at the local level; an assistant supervisor whose principal responsibility is 
the evaluation of Title I projects; an educational grants advisor who reviews 
applications to make certain that they comply with the law and with rviles, regu- 
lations, and guidelines for administration of the program; an accountant; and two 
secretaries. 

The directors of the divisions in the State Department of Education aid the 
Special Assistant in the administration of Title V of P. L. 89-10. The Department's 
Division of Educational Research is the liaison agency for the Title IV programs, 
and the Library and Textbook Service is responsible for the detailed administra- 
tion of Title II. Title III of P. L. 89-10 was administered by the coordinator for 
that program with the assistance of two assistant supervisors one of whom served 
as the evaluator for the projects. Title VI-A provides funds to assist in the edu- 
cation of handicapped children. The Division of Elementary and Special Educa- 
tion is responsible for its detailed administration. A program provided by the 
Education Professions Development Act is administered by the Division of 
Teacher Education. Title VII provides funds for bilingual education. The absence 
of requests from school divisions for Title VII projects seems to indicate that bi- 
lingual education is not a problem in Virginia. Funds for dropout prevention 
programs are provided by Title VIII. Several projects were submitted by school 
divisions during each of the two years since this law became effective but none 
has been approved by the U.S. Office of Education. 

With the exceptions of Titles VII and VIII, a summary of each of the pro- 
grams follows: 

Title I, P. L. 89-10 

Title I provides funds for compensatory education for educationally disad- 
vantaged children whose performance is below the level appropriate for their ages 
and grades. These children must be reached through "target schools" in which 
the percentage of children from low-income families (those with incomes of less 
than $2,000 per year) exceeds the percentage for the county or city as a whole, 
or schools in which the number of children of low-income families is higher than 
the average number of such children per school in the county or city. Title I also 
provides funds for educational programs for children in State-supported schools 
for the handicapped, in State-supported institutions for the neglected and delin- 
quent, and for the children of migrant agricultural workers. 

Title I funds available to the State during 1969-70 totaled $31,760,513.00 and 
included the following allocations: 

For children in low-income families for 245 projects in 136 

divisions $30,013,222 

For children in State-supported schools for the handicapped. . 564,400 

For State-supported schools for the neglected and delinquent . 359 ,832 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 191 

For grants to counties for the children of migrant agricul- 
tural workers $ 508,533 

Administration 314 ,526 

The Title I Program has supplemented and reinforced State and local educa- 
tional programs in many ways. Emphasis has been placed on determining the 
needs of the educationally disadvantaged, training teachers to teach them, and 
providing the media and environment to stimulate learning. The most frequent 
instructional activities were reading and language arts, physical education, cul- 
tural improvement, mathematics, and pre-school programs. The increased use of 
teacher aides and summer instruction for those who were educationally disad- 
vantaged have been major factors in the success of the Title I program. 

There has been a trend toward involving more pre-school and lower elementary 
grade children in Title I projects because evaluations indicate that greater benefits 
can be expected from educational programs at these levels. 

Evaluation reports from school divisions indicate that progress has been made 
in changing attitudes, improving attendance, and accelerating learning by the 
disadvantaged child. 

Title II, P. L. 89-10 

Title II provides funds for textbooks, library books, audio-visual aids, and 
other instructional materials. An average of $.8799 per pupil in average daily 
attendance during 1968-1969 in the public schools, plus the same amount per pupil 
in average daily attendance in eligible private schools, was made available to the 
public schools to be used to purchase library books and other instructional mate- 
rials. This allocation was based on locally taxable wealth per pupil, books per 
pupil, and local expenditures per pupil for library resources. 

The Title II State Plan gives local school divisions much latitude and respon- 
sibility for selecting library materials, and also provides funds for establishing 
demonstration libraries. 

Title II funds also may be used to purchase library resources for schools 
operated by State agencies that provide instruction at the elementary and secon- 
dary school levels. During 1969-70, 11 schools operated by State agencies were 
allocated $1,940 from this program and used $1,707 of this sum. Pupils enrolled 
in eligible private schools may borrow library materials purchased with Title II 
funds. During the school j^ear 38,093 pupils enrolled in 123 private schools located 
in 37 school divisions availed themselves of this opportunity. Virginia's total 
authorization for Title II funds during the year amounted to $909,967, of which 
$881,271 was allocated for 147 projects in eligible schools. The three demonstra- 
tion libraries established the previous year received special grants of $4,000 each. 

Title III, P. L, 89-10 

Title III of P. L. 89-10 provides funds to localities for the purpose of developing 
exemplary education programs or demonstrating innovative approaches to edu- 
cation problems. Project applications submitted by school divisions are evaluated 
on a competitive basis. Cooperative planning by groups of local education agencies 
and participation of civic and cultural groups within the community are encour- 
aged. During the 1969-70 school year, 30 projects were in operation. Forty-four 
new proposals were reviewed and 16 of these were funded, 14 were placed in the 
"hold" category and 14 were not approved. More than 50 divisions with approxi- 



192 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

matelj'^ 65 percent of the State's average daily attendance participated in some 
way in Title III programs. Project activities included in-service education for 
teachers; reading improvement; fine and performing arts; early childhood educa- 
tion; and diagnostic and corrective services for children with educationally hand- 
icapping conditions. More than $2,000,000 was spent in Title III activities in 
Virginia during the year. 

Title IV, P. L. 89-10 

To some extent Title IV, which places major emphasis on the establishment 
of regional educational centers, is a revision of the 1954 Cooperative Research 
Act. The State Department of Education is affiliated with two regional research 
laboratories for which operational funds have been provided. They are: Appalachia 
Educational Laboratory, Inc., Charleston, West Virginia, and the Regional Educa- 
tional Laboratory for the Carolinas and Virginia, Durham, North Carolina. 

Title V, P. L. 89-10 

Title V provides funds for strengthening state departments of education. 
Under the program applications were approved for 41 professional and clerical 
positions in the State Department of Education; for consultants for Department 
seminars and workshops, and for purchasing educational and office equipment. 
The program approved by the U.S. Office of Education for the fiscal year totaled 
$607,400. In accordance with the provisions of Section 503(14) of Title V, $60,740 
of this sum was granted to local educational agencies for 12 projects. These proj- 
ects included various approaches to in-service teacher training, programs to meet 
special needs of certain pupils, instructional planning and curriculum studies, and 
in-service training for the administrative staff. As of June 30, $470,082 had been 
spent from Section 503 funds and $38,504 from Section 503(14) funds. 

Title VI-A, P. L. 89-10 

Virginia's allocation from Title VI-A funds totaled $660,289 and was used to 
finance 16 projects for the "initiation, expansion, or improvement" of services for 
handicapped children. The 16 projects, which involved 31 school divisions, in- 
cluded educational activities and psychological diagnostic services for handi- 
capped children and projects to develop curriculum material and plan strategies 
for regional cooperative programs. 

Education Professions Development Act 

A State Plan was approved for Part B-2 of the Education Professions Develop- 
ment Act (EPDA) which is designed to attract and train teachers and teacher 
aides. The Division of Teacher Education is responsible for the administration 
of this Act. 

The appropriation for the 1970 fiscal year totaled $318,302. Local school 
division projects were approved for the summer of 1970 and for the 1970-71 school 
year. 

Two programs have been added to the Education Professions Development 
Act which involve State participation. The Career Opportunities Program is 
designed to give college-level training to teacher aides in order for them to fulfill 
college degree and State certification requirements for teaching. The role of the 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 193 

State Department of Education in the Career Opportunities Program is that of 
providing technical assistance to the two local school divisions conducting pro- 
grams. The Drug Education Program was financed through a $68,000 grant from 
EPDA. This program began in June 1970 and is expected to provide drug instruc- 
tion for all teachers in the State by June 30, 1971. 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 874, enacted in 1950, provides funds for the operation of schools 
in counties and cities in federally impacted areas. To be eligible to receive these 
funds, federally connected pupils in a local school district must represent a mini- 
mum of three percent of the total average daily attendance for the district, or 
400 pupils. Funds are sent directly to the treasurers of the local school divisions, 
and are not distributed through the State Treasury. Sixty-one counties, cities, 
and towns in Virginia received $38,609,457 under this law during 1969-1970. 

Public Law 815 

Public Law 815, which was enacted in 1950, provides funds for school building 
construction in federally impacted areas. Administrative practices for this legis- 
lation are similar to those for P. L. 874, but additional emphasis is placed on a 
rapid increase in the number of federally connected pupils. Three counties and 
four cities in Virginia received $2,131,115 in P. L. 815 funds during 1969-1970. 



194 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL 

TABLE 38— FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND 

DISBURSEMENTS OF FUNDS UNDER THE CONTROL 

OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— 1969-70 



Receipts 
Administration 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 25,122 21 

Appropriation 416,830 00 

$ 441,952 21 

Basic School Aid Fund 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 1 ,377,783 71 

Appropriation 195 ,397 ,570 00 

196,775,353 71 

Public School Apportionment Fund 

(Constitutional Guarantee) 13,400,000 00 

Public School Apportionment Fund 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 777,540 95 

Income from Literary Fund 2 ,422 ,001 73 

Capitation Taxes 484 ,562 81 

3,684,111 49 

Local Supervision 

Appropriation $ 1 ,545 ,600 00 

Transfer from Elementary and Special Edu- 
cation 41 ,676 00 

1 ,587 ,276 00 

Twelve-Months Principals 

Balance July 1, 1969 S 30 ,336 00 

Appropriation 957 ,600 00 

Transfer from Elementary and Special Edu- 
cation 7 ,572 00 

— 995,508 00 

State Supervision-Secondary Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 56 ,015 44 

Appropriation 648,430 00 

Less Transfer to Production of Motion Pic- 
ture Films 1 ,993 00 

702,452 44 

School Planning, Testing, and Guidance 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 54 ,368 45 

Appropriation 620 , 105 00 

■ 674,533 45 

Guidance Counselors 

Balance July 1, 1969 S 15 ,409 00 

Appropriation 2 , 120 ,000 00 

2,135,409 00 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 195 

TABLE 3S— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 

Receipts — Continued 
General Adult Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 15 

Appropriation 150 ,000 00 

$ 150,000 15 

Aid in the Operation of Summer School Classes 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 814,921 00 

Appropriation 1 ,702 ,575 00 

2,517,496 00 

Educational Television 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 245,392 35 

Appropriation 1 ,000,000 00 

1 ,245 ,392 35 

Advisory Committee on Fire Service Training 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 22,207 22 

Appropriation 25,000 00 

47,207 22 

Contingency Fund 

Appropriation (sum sufficient) 52 ,236 GO 

Directing Educational Research 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 23,520 15 

Appropriation 287 , 125 00 

310,645 15 

Local Administration (Division Superintendents) 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 22,842 36 

Appropriation 477,770 00 

500,612 36 

Elementary and Special Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 1 ,549,526 24 

Appropriation 6 ,485 ,380 00 

Less Transfer to: 

Local Supervision 41 ,076 00 

Twelve-Months Principals 7 ,572 00 

Production of Motion Picture Films. ... 1 ,993 00 

7,983,665 24 

Transportation op Pupils 

Appropriation 9,140,460 00 

Sick Leave with Pay for Teachers 

Appropriation 1 ,068,715 00 

Teacher Education and Teaching Scholarships 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 238,869 21 

Appropriation 2,478,330 00 

2,717,199 21 



196 ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 

TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 

Receipts — Continued 
Distribution to Counties and Cities of a Por- 
tion OF Revenue from State Sales and Use 
Tax 

Appropriation $ 68,174,519 00 

Statewide Rental or Free Textbook System 

Balance July 1, 1969 936,478 00 

Law Enforcement Scholarships 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 31 ,229 20 

Appropriation 50,000 00 

81,229 20 

State Contribution to Local School Boards 

(Social Security) 

Appropriation (sum sufficient) $ 18,525,576 56 

Transfer from Governor's Fund — Supple- 
mental Appropriation 617,590 00 

19,143,166 56 

Increased Retirement for Certain Retired 

Teachers 
Appropriation 325 ,528 00 

State Contribution on Behalf of Teachers to 
THE Retirement Allowance Account 

Appropriation 21 ,792,807 00 

State Contribution for Teachers' Group In- 
surance 

Appropriation (sum sufficient) 1 ,289,614 16 

State Contribution on Behatj" of Teachers 
TO THE Retirement Allowance Account 

Transfer from Literary Fund in Accordance 
with Appropriation Act 1 ,465 ,000 00 

In-Service Training Program 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 94,355 38 

Appropriation 800,000 00 

894,355 38 

Imprest Fund 

Balance July 1, 1969 19,282 89 

Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
Programs 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 2 ,972 33 

Federal Grant 32,947,148 55 

32,950,120 88 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 197 

TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 

Receipts — Continued 
Production of Motion Picture Films 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 915 00 

Appropriation 51 ,730 00 

Transfer from: 

State Supervision-Secondary Education. 1,993 00 

Elementary and Special Education 1 ,993 00 

Proceeds-Sale and Rental of Films 28,377 16 



Basic Adult Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 154,455 71 

Federal Grant 1 ,272,206 00 

Manpower Training Program 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 46,016 53 

Federal Grant 1,486,771 63 

Special Education Assistance 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 634 49 

Federal Grant 100,950 00 



State Surplus Property 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 1,564 55 

Proceeds — Sale of Departmental Property. . 1 ,358 50 

Highway Safety Program 

Balance July I, 1969 $ 3,836 00 

Federal Grant (Transfer from Highway 

Safety Division) 15,400 00 

Veteran's Training Program 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 13,596 05 

Federal Grant 45,644 92 

Education Profession's Development Act 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 4,036 53 

Federal Grant 169,970 83 



85,008 16 



1,426,661 71 



1,532,788 16 



101,584 49 



Special Research Projects 

Balance July 1, 1969 1 ,680 00 

Driver Education Fund 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 1 ,508,454 04 

Transfer from Division of Motor Vehicles . . 1 ,031 ,472 17 



2,539,926 21 



2,923 05 



19,236 OC 



59,240 97 



174,007 36 



198 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 

Receipts — Continued 
Civil Defense Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 4,007 40 

Federal Grant 23,872 92 

■ $ 27,880 32 

National Defense Education Act 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 87,909 42 

Federal Grant 1 ,270,852 00 

1,358,761 42 

School Food Programs 

Balance July 1, 1969: 

Special School Milk Fund $ 27 33 

School Lunch Fund 1 ,588 10 

$ 1,615 43 

Federal Grants: 

Administration $ 13 ,980 00 

Special School Milk Fund 1 ,987 ,557 62 

School Lunch Fund 5,407,353 79 

School Lunch Fund— Section 11 1 ,415 ,206 00 

School Breakfast Program 229 ,093 25 

Section 32 Program 3 ,571 ,988 64 

Equipment 115 ,609 73 

$ 12,740,789 03 

Less Amount Returned to Federal Govern- 
ment—Special School Milk Fund $ 526 30 

12,741,878 16 

Vocational Education 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 116,749 08 

Appropriation 9,434,680 00 

Federal Grants: 

Basic Grant 7,786,154 19 

Consumer and Homemaking 405,780 00 

Work Study 40.000 00 

Applachian Program 1 ,980 ,459 99 

Advisory Council 51 ,732 00 

19,815,555 26 

Libraries and Other Teaching Materials 

Balance July 1, 1969 $ 3 ,608 03 

Appropriation 1 , 145 ,030 00 

Local Contributions 444 ,894 40 

■ — - 1 , 593 , 532 43 

Total Receipts and Balances $434,682.989 75 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



199 



TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 



Disbursements 

Administration $ 415 

Basic School Aid Fund 193,020 

*PubIic School Apportionment (Constitutional Guarantee) 13,400 

*Public School Apportionment Fund 3 ,059 

Local Supervision 1 ,587 

Twelve-Months Principals 964 

State Supervision — Secondary Education 668 

School Planning, Testing, and Guidance 602 

Guidance Counselors 2 , 102 

General Adult Education 149 

Aid in the Operation of Summer School Classes 951 

Educational Television 990 

Advisory Committee on Fire Service Training 20 

Contingency Fund 52 

Directing Educational Piesearch 274 

Local Administration (Division Superintendents) 464 

Elementary and Special Education 5 ,560 

Transportation of Pupils 9 , 139 

Sick Leave with Paj^ for Teachers 1 ,068 

Teacher Education and Teaching Scholarships 2,206 

Distribution to Counties and Cities of a Portion of Revenue 

from State Sales and Use Tax 68 , 174 

Statewide Rental or Free Textbook System 504 

Law Enforcement Scholarships 22 

State Contribution to Local School Boards (Social Security).. . 19,143 

Increased Retirement for Certain Retired Teachers 325 

State Contribution (Appropriation for Teachers' Retirement) . . 21 ,792 

State Contribution for Teachers' Group Insurance 1 ,289 

State Contribution on Behalf of Teachers (Literary Fund 

Transfer) 1 ,465 

In-Service Training Program 739 

Imprest Fund (1 

Elementary and Secondary Education Act Programs 32,940 

Production of Motion Picture Films 74 

Basic Adult Education 1 , 196 

Manpower Training Program 1 ,365 

Special Education Assistance 100 

Special Research Projects 1 

Driver Education Fimd 2 ,057 

Highway Safety Program 19 

Veterans' Training Program 49 

Education Professions Development Act 147 

Civil Defense Education 23 

National Defense Education Act 1 ,078 



035 64 
691 83 
000 00 
090 06 
276 00 
548 00 
Oil 34 
793 57 

997 00 

998 65 
750 09 
569 95 
754 44 
236 00 
298 94 
006 25 
477 70 
113 00 
653 93 
784 52 

519 00 
452 00 
854 20 
166 56 
528 00 
807 00 
614 16 

000 00 
193 55 
499 89) 
629 85 
346 18 
317 16 
109 48 
585 91 
680 00 
620 19 
198 37 
726 8:3 
540 14 
546 39 
929 31 



•Distributed to localities as part of Basic State School Aid Fund. 



200 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 

Disbursements — Continued 
School Food Programs: 

Administration $ 12,812 61 

Special School Milk Fund 1 ,872 ,883 05 

School Lunch Fund 5,175,875 68 

School Lunch Fund— Section 11 1 ,415 ,206 00 

School Breakfast Program 192 ,766 39 

Section 32 Program 3 ,096 ,594 37 

Equipment 115,609 73 

■ $11,881,747 83 

Vocational Education 18,972,608 76 

Libraries and Other Teaching Materials 1 ,569 ,027 89 

Total Disbursements $421 ,633 ,335 78 

Balances as op June 30, 1970 

General Fund 

Reverted to General Fund: 

Administration $ 26,916 57 

Basic School Aid Fund 3 ,754 ,661 88 

Twelve-Months Principals 30 ,960 00 

State Supervision — Secondary Education. . . 34,441 10 

School Planning, Testing, and Guidance. . . . 71,739 88 

Guidance Counselors 32 ,412 00 

General Adult Education 1 50 

Aid in the Operation of Summer School 

Classes 1,565,745 91 

Educational Television 254,822 40 

Advisory Committee on Fire Service Train- 
ing 26 ,452 78 

Directing Educational Research 36,346 21 

Local Administration (Division Superin- 
tendents) 36 ,606 11 

Elementary and Special Education 2 .423 ,187 54 

Transportation of Pupils 1 ,347 00 

Sick Leave with Pay for Teachers 61 07 

Teacher Education and Teaching Scholar- 
ships 510,414 69 

Statewide Rental or Free Textbook System.. 432 ,026 00 

Law Enforcement Scholarships 58,375 00 

In-Service Training Program 155,161 83 

Vocational Education 2 ,634 09 



Net amount reverted to General Fund $ 9,454,313 56 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 201 

TABLE 38— RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— 1969-70— Continued 



Balances as of June 30, 1970 — Continued 

Special Funds (Not Subject to Reversion) 

Imprest Fund $ 20,782 78 

Public School Apportionment Fund 625,021 43 

Elementary and Secondary Education Act 

Programs 9,491 03 

Production of Motion Picture Films 10,661 98 

Basic Adult Education 230 ,344 55 

Manpower Training Program 167 ,678 68 

Special Education Assistance 998 58 

Driver Education Fund 482 ,306 02 

State Surplus Property 2,923 05 

Highwaj' Safety Program 37 63 

Veterans' Training Program 9,514 14 

Education Professions Development Act. . . 26,467 22 

Civil Defense Education 4 ,333 93 

National Defense Education Act 279,832 11 

School Food Programs: 

Administration $ 1 ,167 39 

Special School Milk Fund 114 , 175 60 

School Lunch Fund 233 ,066 21 

School Breakfast Pro- 
gram 36 ,326 86 

Section 32 Program 475 ,394 27 

860,130 33 



Vocational Education 840 ,312 41 

Libraries and Other Teaching Materials.. . . 24,504 54 



Total $ 3,595,340 41 



Total Disbursements and Balances $434 ,682 ,989 75 



202 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 






0OCOOOU5 oo QO 
I>- O C> lO CO O 

c<i o-t i~* -^ (X) CO 
00 o> CO ■^ r- o> 

^- -^ CO CO CO CT> 



OOCO'-HC^OS'— tCC'TTiO 

0(MCO»-<cOcOe-"3CC— to 
coos to -^ CO OO >— " CO lO 

<M C^ Oi CO -^ 05 O O "(t* 
QO (M 1^ CO ■*** C<J 

"^ C^ CO GO 



CO ^ 

i-fCO 
<Ji CO 



Pi 



O '-' Ci C^l t-" »o C-l c^ 
CO -^ CO •— ' -^ (M lO 
OJ -^ t^ '<** t- GO rf 



CO CO h- 1-- >— < -^ 
■<** O CO '«9* CO ^H 
CO CO <— ' CO -^ 



COiO 
OCO 



5 

a 



uO'-tOOcOOO'-iCOt-^COOOS'rfCOCOCOt^COCO'rt* 

cooiooir--*-- "Oicfioiuocoiocoosoi^-— <mco 

Oc0OOMU0Ot--0305l>.i0t--Cv|(MO-^'-<C0t- 



CO O lO 05 lO CO CD 00 t-1 O OS 

.— I O 40 CO CO T-H 1-H -^ C7S O •-* 

OiC-l'^cOCO t^-^ Oco^OicOt^O^JiOOO 

T-ikCiOcOd O-— I Ocn^c^-^fHOGOOOC^i 

iO'^cO'— <*o coco Oi— «'*<:ococO'— 'looco 



QOcoocoaji^ooir^ 

CJS C-l tT "^ C^l ".^ O fM 
•— »t^iOiOCT>t^COO 



»COOO>t--'^00(M<M0i«-HOO(M'^-<t*O0S00C0 

i-HC^lOtOCOCOCOOO-^iOaJC^iOt-COCDCOCOO 
■^O'«**OW3CT)CDC0r-c,-i05 0"- C-l-^iO'-HOCQ 

COCOCO'-' <M tOOSrHCq 



rf T)H C^ COiO 
l^ O C^ ''f csi 
t-tiO 1-H CO 



OiOO 



CO CO -L"^ t^ C71 CO ^ »o 

■^ t^ 05 1— " CO •-( O 



CO i-H 



Cli ,_, ,-1 ,-H 



(M T-l 1-1 



OSCT>r^COOO>— ii^CT> 

,— t-rr-^^cat^cot-co 

■— • o CO as »o 

i-" .-. GO r-H 



C^ICOO'-^COGO'MCOCTsOcO'Mr-COiOiMiOOOOS 
uOiOO'—t^OiOCOOOOiOiOCO'^'-'cOcO'— lOS 

Oicoo-— ''MiO'*»0'^OTrcoc^iMcococO'Tj<r^r-i 



OCO O CO Ci CO CD »— < to Oi O »— I UO O t* CO C<I C<J CO CO CO 

O >-< O CO GO GO 1-4 t- 1— I -* O CM O O CT> CO CO •<** »-H c^ -^ 

OiOOOiCOOO !--*<}< OiO<MOOO'-«CO"^OcOCOCOOl^O'-«OOuor'j 

'-HC-CMCOCM O--* OOOOClOcOOOCOCOCMClCO-^OCOcOr-iOCO 

*0"^C^-- <iO coco OCOC^I.— iOcOt^t^COOiOi'M<MOQOt^OOuOtO 



o 



'— iioo-^t— »oc^3'*rw^Ot— l0^^c■lOOcooco^- 
■^^- ocococjiOt^couO'— '■^'fiO'— 'Oco-^cOr-t 

Tpl--'^t<cO»OC5t'-CD»-H»-i»oCl COiOOS'-'Or-- 



Tf* CO 1— « CO »o 

r- CO CO •* c^ 

i-" Oi t-H CO 



Oi CO 

t^ c^ 



»0-^OiOiOCO(M'— ii— 'OirMOiOi-^r^QO-— lUtiCO 

cooi«-H»oooocoo ct) '->*ot^c^iO'^i-ia> 

■^ OO C7S Tt" »0 «— t lO 1— t COt^GOlft 



CO CO CO 1— • 



t^ en "-I CM 



OS ,-H ,-( ^H 



CM »-l ^^ 



»-i e^i C3i ^H 



OOO'«fc0CMt^»0OOu:iOOc0i0OCnOiJ0O 

COt--OCDt-t^COCOOOr--OOCOOH^COCO.— (CO 
00>00»OC^*-«'^'-'OOiOOOCMr-tt--.-H-rPt-.cO 



P4 



cDt--OcDt-'>OCOOOOiMOiOCMt^I--'^OCOCO 

r-ia>oococo-riic'icMu:300c*3*ooor-.co'^cot— 

■^ CO ■^ Oi »0 05 CD CO i-H -H !>. O (M -»r •**< -— ' O -^ 



(M 1-H ,-t 



CD Oi 1— « (M 



s 


§s§ 


OCO 


OO 
OO 


lO CO O coo - 
to —.OCOO 


CD 
kO 


ocooo 

OCO CM 


CO CO 


oo 


CO coco ■^O 
■^ o>o t^*o 

^ o CM r^ 05 




OCOUO 
lO 'ttH CM 

1-H CO 


CM Oi 
OICO 
t- CM 


-^GO 


t^Tf^CMCOO 

'rfi Gor-ooo 

Oi CM Tji .— ' 












oo 

CO 


Oi 


C^ 


1— t 


CM 1-H 1-1 
CO 



t^O^OlCOCJOCOCOO 
>— tuOOC7>aOOiOl>-i— i'^ 

CMGOO'^OCMCMC-ICOM' 

t^»oO'«s*r'r^iocoocM 

■^CO-^COOiCOOOCMCOOS 



.— I.— iiC«JOC35COOOCOOi 
CO 1— t -^ CO CM r^ "^ Oi CO 

O 1— ' CM r-- CO ic 



rt Sf 1 


CM CO 






O C3 4> 


^t- 


S.9>-| 


lor^ 


^ tiCt^ 


CMt^ 






pqm 


*— 1 



kOCMCMiOiOCO-^O-^-^COCDCOr^OSiOOlCO 

lOCOIr^'-'iO'— 'COGOuOCDCOOicoOO— '-^O 

coc'iaiasrrocDcO'^ioooiooocjicDi-'.cD 




rt 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 203 

TABLE 39— LITERARY FUND OF VIRGINIA 



— ■ 



A. Securities Belonging to the Literary Fund in the Hands of the State 
Treasurer Under the Control of the State Board of Education 

As of June 30, 1970 

Cash in Bank, June 30, 1970 S 1 ,106,808 93 

School Loan Bonds 13 ,951 , 190 00 



$15,057,998 93 



B. Statement of Principal 



Balance July 1, 1969 $16,608,960 55 

Additions 

Fines and Forfeitures $ 6,007,075 98 

Corporation Commission Fines 05,240 00 

Athletic Commission Fines 50 00 

Escheats 31 ,954 83 

Forfeited Property 30 ,567 93 

Penalty from Department of Agriculture 10,385 08 

Unclaimed Property Act 204 ,010 96 

Primary Fees 4 ,268 00 

Virginia Public School Authority (Repay- 
ments)* 3 ,771 ,687 36 

— 10,125,240 14 

$26,734,200 69 

Deductions 

Paid to Virginia Supplemental Retirement 
System $ 1 ,465,000 00 

Loans Transferred to Virginia Public School 
Authority 10,210,990 00 

Cash Transferred to Virginia Public School 

Authority 211 76 

11,676,201 76 



Balance June 30, 1970 $15,057 ,998 93 



•Repayments direct to Literary Fund during 1969-70 amounted to $634,355.00 (Total repaymenU $4,406,042.36). 



204 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 



O 
O 
K 
O 
cc 

>H 

H 

I— I 

O 
Q 

<: 

o 
o 

, o 

P2 

5^ 

MH 

gs 

^< 
09 

w 
o 

Q 



o 
►J 



O5oc^oo»noiooicooc5oeoiooo 

000(MOO(MO(NOfOO'*OOC5iOO 

CCOC^lO(MC0005<CCOCC020GOCOOt> 

oocv3LOCLC-r«D-^t^O'— iixio-^'iOt^oo 

CO to i.C O O lO CI ^ 00 CO CO C2 lO O CO O iC 
00 O O lO --t 'f CD »o >— I o o o o c^ 

00"* 

o 



1^ 



c^ 



C^ 1— < iC >— I 



CD 





o 

iO 



<M t>. N. »C lO CO I> 

CD CN CD CO CI CO t>. 

C5 lO C>0 00 t>. iC -^ 
LO t^ ^ -r t>. r-- -^ 
CO 00 10 I> O 1— I .-I 



00 o o 00 00 -H o 

CD CO CO '^ CC CO o 

O 00 ,-H t- r-H O 



CO 



m 



CO 



03 



u 



00O^OOL0CDi0O00O0Ct~-CDOl>'-H 
-*OCDOOt^^(MO^OOI>Ot>COO 

oC'ib-c^C'— lOiO-^ococsir^^^io^H 
coaiooooo-^cooo(Mooioi>-*io^H 

iOOO<MiOCO-*00-*iO(MCOC5COOOO 



^ 



t^iOl^'^-fl^OCO'-i^OOQOCJlxrsCH^ 
lO 1— iiOOOOOCOI>.C<|i— tO^OOCOCO-H 

<— I 00 >-< r-H 00 (>) lO i-H O ■<*' CO Tt* Tfl >— t 



10 



^ 



l-HCq 



C<1 

Ci 

CO 

Oi 

in 

CO 
CO 

t^ 

00 



000 


-*" 01 lO 
lOiOOt-- 


,183 
039 


CO Oi 
C-1 CO CSl 

a;o5(McD 


cot^ 


'-<COt^CO 
COC0 1>0 



(fb 



1 10 



03 

c 

& 

o 
H 



o 

CD 

10 
CD 
00 

CO 
00 



m 



CO 
to 

CD 
to 



o o o to 

000(M 

O '— I O >— I 
CD 1>" ■— I to 
CO CD -* (M 

(M I— I 1— I 



O (M to O -f to CO 
O <M l> (M IM CO O 

(M CO --H iM CO C5 00 

t>. 1— I T-H 00 CO 10 c^ 

^ 00 (M 00 CO CO Oi 
OGOiOl>-^(NOa 

CO 05 



CO 

■o 

to 

00 

o 



»t 



to 

o 

Co' 

to 



to 
o 

00 
CO 



03 

3 

o 

o 



i-HOtOOOO-^OtOt^OOt^-^ClCO-^ 
OOO'-HOOiOtOOtxOOOiMiOt^ClOOCO 

COCD'-<GOOiOI>C^OO'-H(MtOOOOOiOOO 
C3Ot>-O>O00ClCiOOiM0i0000t^i0'*' 
tOI>-tOCO<MCOiOCD'— lO'-H'-Hi—icOcO'— 100 

t0c0<M00O<MC0CD-^CDO00t^C0-+<0:i(M 
O-^C^TfC-liO^r^'— iCOOS^OiCDCM'*'*' 
00 (M ^ CO to CO O O '^ rfi lO CO to t>- 

C^ i-t 1—1 

CO 



©^ 



t^(M 



00 

CD 


(M -tl t^ ^H -H C^ 

^ CD 00 CO CO 


CO 


CO ^ CO t^ CO to CO 

1> Tt' >— 1 -rf — ^ lO lO 

r-i to t^ 00 CO 


t^ 


Tf 


to CO 03 CO (M CO CD 
00 CD to iM (M 00 
to CJ3 t^ •* -sT 00 


CO 


Oi CO 
1-1 (M 



®^ 





03 

Q 




;z; 


r/3 


t> 


H 


h 


Ph 


1 


h- i 


w 






p^ 


% 









« 




fe 



c 

O S a 

CO >:• j^ 

0) rt a 

«>^ u 

w '- S^ 



02 

CO 

03 

o 

O 
J2 



X 



2 "3 



c3 
cj 

3 
T3 

-a Gr£) 

CD (D C 

o >- « 



c 

3 _ 

OH 



bJD 

S 3 

3 O 






3 
O 

03 o 



03 

-3 

3 
O 



(N 



o 



CJ 

3 

03 



3 2 



O 

O 

i-3 



j2 o) o 

O- ^ * — 

.- <u > 



bc«215 



O oj 

a o 

3-« " 

r '- 

III 

OHHi-5(i<P^cc!a2MHH 



3 

o 

■-2 Ol 

c3 -rt 

3 3 

W 
"3 "^ 



05 

3 

3 



CZ2 
O 

H 



M 
Q 

■< 
K 

Q 

o 



3 

.2 

o 

3 

-o 
W 
>> 

;^ 

-o 

3 



O fe "3 
.- 0-0 

03 QJ b 
0; 



all 

C3 O *J 

o 



3 
3.2 



w 



r S^-J3 OCZ2 



.i;co o c 



c3 



O CJ 



3 O ~ 



O -u 



03 
> 

■^ CO 

'3^5^ 

-O^ O 



CJ 

'55 

m 



c3 

CU 3 03 t-i 

bJ3a O G, 

3 03 

CJ C5 03 
^ c3«-3h^ 

s ^ « « 



StrPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRITCTION 



205 



(N'-H 

00 t>. 
lO ■-* 



o 
o 

of 

CO 



02 



^ 



T— I 10 

coco 
o -^ 



CO 

C2 
I— I 



»% 



CO 

-^ 

§8 

00" 
o 



m 



•<*iiOi.'3COCJOiOt^'-HCOOGO<MOCOiOGOcO 

<— i05C^02'*''^CCTC5^iOCOiCCDCO'— 100 -rti 
Tj<Tj<OiMCi05C^Oi0C0O(MO00t^00>0-* 

00 CD C<l >— I -^ 00 CO CO >— ( -H 00 o CO 00 "^i O -^ (M 
fOr-ioO-* i-H{McOiMCO00t^O0C^l i-HOit^ t^ 



e© 



0^ 

t>00 


T— ( 


CO Tt< 
CO'-i 


00 

a3 






C<J(M 

oco 


CO 






-*IM 


CO 



e^ 



01 <N 
O (N 

10 o 
000 

CO 00 

CO 



^ 



CO 

Co" 
b- 



©a 



C5t^coo5C^ocooio-*>ocDcooiocot~-^^ 

CO'-Ht>->-to>Ot>(N'-Hl>Cs|'— i(MiOCr5-^t>.0 

icc5i-Hoococ50t-.cooooioeoo5(Mcooco 

(NCiiOC/DiOOOCOCOt^(M02GOOO^COC^O'-H 
Tj<iOC32CO'<«"t^'*'«OiO<MCO(NCO'— iCOOiOi-H 

COi-HOOCOCOOOCO'— l->^a5l»lOCO'*t>'i— Ir-lrH 

O CM r-H r^ rt Tfi 01 CO 00 CO 00 (M (M lO "-H 

r— 11— l(Mi— ( 1— i I— I >— tCO COi— I I— (lO 



«l> 



o 

00 

CO 

o 



m 



icoo 

1-H(M 

coi> 
00 

1-H CO 



CO 

m 

o 

o 

CM 



O-H 

-*00 

CM 05 

02 CM 
00 CM 

o"i> 

l>CO 
■<i<CM 



CM 



CM 
CM 



00 

o 



m 



oot^ooo 

OOiOiOO-* 

03 C3 CO CO "^ 
CO t-- CO lO CO 
-^ CO COt> CO 

-^COCM 



■050 


CDCM • 


■ ^0 


■*o • 


•OOCi 


CO ^< • 


■ C5 IC 


-^ • 


•t^ Ttl 


CM ■ 






• rfHCM 


00 • 




^t>. • 




>— ( ■ 



b- O O O O '^i 

i-H O O lO O CO 

00 O OI> ^ CO 
00 lO iO CD CM CO 
^H CM t^ ■<* 

CO* 



CO 
Oi 

00 

00 

cm" 

CM 



Oi-H 

00 lO 
rJH O 

1— ( lO 

cor^ 

COt> 



10" 
10 



00 CO 

coco 

C3^CM 
C^l CO 
CO CO 

O CM 

0-* 

CO T)^ 

1-1 CM 

CM 



«& 



CM 

CO_ 
CM 

CM 



CO 



C5 

co' 
o 

C5 



©5 



OOt^'-HCOOiOaO'*'C5'+iCO'-H-tiOCM-HCMC31 •* 

cx) 00 c^ 1— I 00 lo o C3 C2 CO t^ r>- 00 lO ^ CD T-i o i>. 

■* CO iCi 00 CO l> Oi lO 10 CO lO t^ CM O CO -^ CO O CM 

Tt'-HOi-OCMiOCOTfC5— HCMt>.00CO»OiOt^^ t^ 

10 CM t> 00 "—I -—I O CO O CM CD O^"— I CO CO ■* CO 03 O 

^ CD 10 O CD CD CO lO ^ GO CM CO "* COOO OCO ^ CO 

00 CO O ^ CO CO 00 ■* ^H O CM l> O >— 1 t^ CM lO CO r-i 

CM CO CM 1-1 .-( CM 1—1 CO CD CM 1— I i-H> CM ■* 

1-1 CO ■* lO 



m 



m 

a CO 

•^ c 

far"" 

"o l- 
o <u 



13 



-a 



o 
H 



CO 

Q 



z 
p 
o 
O 



O 
o 



> 
§.2 



.t: a. 



to 

a 

3 



c 

o 
O 



O 



o 



03 

o 

z 



CO 



s 

o 



CO 

O 

z 
i=> 

M 

K 
H 
O 

a 

o 

fa 



cS 

m 

■> 
w 

b 
00 



o 



« 

a 

C 

02 OQ 

03 G 



O 

o3 O m 



CO 
-a 
to a 



CO O 

a> o 

o o 

"3 c3 
WW 



3 3 OJ 

S'o.^ 
?, rf o 



O 

hi 
o 

>i*j CO 

O §'| 

O j_ M 

3 O ii 



o c 



e j3 



0<w 



03 



l§ 



m " oj 

O o rt 

CM ■>-' 

_, OJ D *^ 



§•3 a 

1^ 3 
-^ ■ '"^ 

o u -3 

2^<:-3 



C&. 
O I. 



c 

ar 



wO 
o o 



wHHHOpHaj 



.3 *J sS S3 






CO 

-a 
a 
3 
fa 

(-< 

o 



-1-3 
o 
H 



°3 ^ c ^« 
WWi-hO 



206 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Q 
< 

H 
12; 

o 

O 

>^ 



o 

O 



H ' 

^S 
Wot 

Ceo 

I ^ 

M 
<J 
H 



c3 
O 



LO lO O Ol CD id>- 

o o o TjH CO ■* i> 

CO -*i (M l>. iC 10 CO 
00 t^ "* t^ -^ CD ^H 
(M 00 O --I (M CO t> 

c^rcTco C^CIO O 
ire i> 00 10 1> o 00 
CO oi> CO .-H TjH 

CO 00 'f lO r-H 1— I 



8^ 



CO 

'+3 
O 



ire >re o o t^ o t^ 

t> O 003t^<M CD 

(M 000 ^JXN <-! 
t^ Oi O ■* CD •* 1-H 

cq ire o >— I o oi >-H 

ire t~- o CD ire CD "—I 

CD CD O O t>. •* 
^1> o o 



CO 

o 
H 



CO 

ire 



00 



to 

CD 



o 

o 



o o o t^ 01 ire o 
CO o o >— I ire »— I '—' 

O CD IM CD t~- (N ire 
1-H t- •<t' o 1-- o o 
O C^ O -^ 05 >— I CD 

1> C^f CO 00 CO IM 00 

--) i-i 00 00 ire GO 

ICOIXM O'i^ 
(M CD -* CO <-! 1— I 

CO 1— I rH 



^i 



to 



TO 





H 


2: 


ClH 


< 


h-H 


*. 


W 







s: 


w 





P4 


« 




CO 




2; 




<! 









>A 




3 









« 




^ 



o 

CO 

'^ 
05 



CO 

CO 

o 

CO 

CO 

CO 



ire 

o 

ire 

ire 



CO 

T-H 

»— t 
00 

CD 



ire 

CD_ 

ire 

O 



So 



00 

CO 

CO 

CO 

00 
1— I 

CO 

CO 



CD 

o 

C35 

ire 

OS 
CO 
(M 

CO 



I— I 

ire_ 
co" 
ire 



(O o3 CO 
(U b (U 

3 a> 3 

CQ -U Cf! 

>— (hJi-h 

a " c 
o 2 o 

cs q cs 

o o5 o 
000 



•-1 o 

«-. -d 
o <o 
a, <u 

08 



CO CQ 

ap 

to M 

> 9 

ct a 
o, o 

CO CO 

O) ID 

d) a> 

a a 



CO 

a 
o 

CQ 



o 

O 



OOlM --lOt^CM 
O0I> (N CD CiCO 

(M (M CO ire OS CO 

t>. CO rH 1— 4 1> -^ 

<— I CD CO C3 ■* O 

r-t ■* t~- O (M >— I 
CO <— I 00 O TfH CO 
CD C3i -^ (N ^ CD 

T— I C<| i-H I— I C5 >— I 
I— 1 Tfi 



O 

ire 
ire 

o 

CO 



CO 



005 

OCD 

(Mire 

ire as 

1—1 CO 

o ^ 

t>.00 

ire CO 



CO 00 
^ 00 

TtH CO 

CO -—I 

ire GO 
co'cN 

COC35 



^ 



(M ire ire 

CO 05 05 

CO Tt<l> 
C5 --I CO 
CD '-H O 

^ CD 00 
CO O >-• 

-*i-i cq 

CO 



(M 

CO 



ire 

Oi 

ire 
o 

CO 

ire 



en 

(N 

ire 
i> 

(M 
00 

(M 



^ 



(M ire --H 00 (N (M 
•* T-( (M O ^ 

CD CO CO CO ire Ci 

00 (M "-H ■— I CO -^ 

Tfi --I CO (M CO ire 

t» b- t^ CD CD CD 

c<i CO 00 CD CO ire 

C3i ^ -ct^ t^ CO 00 



COCM--" 



m 



co- 
co 



o 
(M 

CD 

ire 
o 



CO 



02 



m 



ID 

o 

o 
H 



o 
o 

I— I 

o 

pq 

CO ^ 



I:::; fe 



8 






_ -u 

o^ 
o <u 

UOP 



CO 
T3 



o 



'q »^ 

(-■ O f- 
(D O <1^ 

(Box 



CO 

o 

a 

f— ^ 
c3 

pq 
"3 
o 



ire 
ire 



CO 



CO 
GO 
CO 

(m" 

CO 
C5 



€^ 



Cl 
00 

CO 
GO 

o 
(M 

CO 

o 

CD 
CO 
CO 



ire 

CO 

CO 

o 

CO 

(M 

IM 

ire 
CO 



CO 
CO 

00 
i> 

00" 

<M 

GO 

(N 

ire 



3 



J3 

3 

o3 



a. 
a. 

3 
CQ 



> 



CO 

o 

pq ^ 



CO 

"q3 
o 



1 — I (3 

C3 •= 



^ 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



207 



o 
H 



(M t^ m 

Ci CO CO 



o 



O r-^ CO 

<M (M C5 
T^ (M O 

1> Tf CO 

OOIN 



CO >n o »c 
00 CO to -^i 

t^OO rfHCO 
^H -^ lO rfi 
(M 00 ■<*'1> 



ocor^ 






l-H I— I CO 



C0 05t>. 

c:^ -* o 



toco t^t- 
'rf CO •-< 00 

(M lO CO 



o 
o 



CO 



o 

CO 



oo 

lO CO 



»o 

O 



^ 



>o 

CO 



C5 lO 

OiO 



00 05 

coo 
C5 O 

OJ o 
t> lO 



00 Oi 



o 

05 



»o CO 



looo 
00 '^i 

C0 05 



(N 



1— t lO (M 05 



Q 

o 
o 



Q 
D 

o 

o 






o 



CO TfH lo 

CO CO b- 

l^ --H 00 

00 C5 (M 
(M O CO 



lO 

o 

(M 



coco -* 
OO-H 

CD 00 C5 
to (M (N 

00 CO CO 



Ci 05 (M O 

C5 t-- ■—! CT) 

CO to »+ iM 

C5 O C5 Ol 

ocoir^ 00 



CDOOO 
CO o o 

toco 



©5 



C3 05 ^ CD 
CO 00 to CD 
CO t^ IM 



CO IM 02 CO 

O) to (M •*! 

IM IM 



CO 

o 
>o 

CO 
CO 

to 



m 



ns 


^ 


-TfOO 


to CO 
l-H CO 


C5CO 

— 1 -^ 

(M O 


CO 
CO 


■-IIM 
OICO 


ooo 

T-( CO 




o 

o 


.—1 I— ( 
CO-* 

TflOO 





'^l T-H 



4^ 



"* 



OS 

SO 

S^ 
PhO 

gg 
I ^ 

5u 

W 
K^ 
fQ 
<1 
H 



OCO (M 

tOiMCJ 


CO 
CO 


^CO CO 
to '— ' ■— ' 


>— 1 CD O to 
tOQO'-i iM 


IM 

CD 


t-iOCJ 
lO^IM 


to 

CO 
CI 


-5*1 "* to 

i-H r:*< CO 

00 ooo 


OlMt^iO 

CO "*< lOt- 
oj 't' 00 oi 


>o 


lO--! !M 

I—* 


■* 


COIMiM 

i-H 


T-H'i'lM 


iM 

to 



mt 



•rV O 

00 00 

o o 
00 to 

O CO 
CO I—* 

-*co 



6© 



O 

o 



o 
o 



00 



So 

to 



ID 



O 



CO too 

OOiM >-< 


88 


OlM O 
CDOCO 


coo 020 
CO O '—1 CO 


o 

T— ( 


•* ■* 00 

rt t^ (M 

<-iO0t- 


CO 

o 

05 


^GO to 


CO O CO to 
COOOt^ 
IM MOOiO 


o 
o 

02 


CDiOO 
CD CO CO 
CO .-ICO 


CO 
.— 1 


IM r-tOO 

as 02 CO 

CO -*< 


C2CO -^co 

^ O GO ^ 
.-HCOCO 


CO 
1— 1 

02 


1-H 


y-\ 


CO 




00 



€^ 



00'* 

00 CO 



00 



CO O 

00 CO 



CO (M 
to .—I 



CO to CO 05 to 05 CD 
to IM CO 00 ^ .-H .— ( 
C5 O IM IM O O CO 



to 05 
TficO 

cot> 

05IM 



IM 



to O -* ^ 

IM 00 r-H CD 

1>IM toco 



CO 



I to 



m 

CO 

cq 
CO 



. 03 



m' 



O 

< 
K 

CO 
I— < 

a 

Q 



(3 

ii)_i 

9 fl 
'C o 

a, 03 

3 CO 



03 CO 

I- -u 

w a 



o 



l4^ <4^ t4— I *■<-- 

o o o o 



a a 
o o 



-tj ♦J *j *j 



_^ c3 o3 

TS to CO 

>- C C 

c3 u 0) 






m a a a a.^ 

— o o o o -^ 
gUQOO 

u 

CQ 



fl 
o3 

03 

lU 

oj 

fcH 

o 

ID 
CQ 

05 

> 

-H> 
03 

(i 

-4J 

OQ 

a 

a 

< ^ 



o o 

C i- 
O OJ 

CD 03 

C 2 

io 
o 



d 
d 
o 

03 
OJ 



(h 0) 
0) > 

^ 03 
m'S tn 

-3 a_§ 

-73^ OJ 

§oS 

C OJ <- 

n — O 
CO-g OJ(Vl 

M OJ 5^_ 
3 O fcH " 

<5PhH 



w 



1^ • 

o3 OJ 03 

CQ -^ t_ 

OJ M o 

Sj|^ 

;^^ fl 

o3 flj o3 
3 u 03 
"SB Jt» 

CI >.3 
- -^CQ 



O . 

OOJ 

fc, O 3 

•4-' ^ OJ 

OcqO 



a 
.2 

03 
ti 
-fj 

03 

'3 

"a 
<1 



o 



O 
n 

OJ 
CQ 

o 



03' 



o3 

a 

O 

u 

OJ 
02 



o3 



n O o O 

E- PL, J3 h^a 



o3 

a 

• I— < 



to' 



03 
73 
CI 
O 
OJ 
OJ 

CQ 



03 



„ 03 

o a cj 



5"° 

« O c fl 



a o o fl 

-f-* O r^ QJ 

«3 a o^ 



GO 
bi 
O 
03 

•? 

OJ 

a 

3 



c^^ a 

^ ri O 



•-I |>^gWCQO 

o3 a _,^,_^,_^ 

1 iM CO 



5 a og-S 



OJ tJ p: 

-^6 



P" OJ- 

«- a 

o3 o 
OJ 

cm 



a 

o 
O 



o3 

a 

OJ 

a 

i 



20S 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



c3 
O 

H 



CO 



o 

O 



OfO 

O CO 
O CO 

O'-H 



CD CO UO 

1— I C3 »0 

O lO CD 

t^coo 



CO(M 



ccco c^ 

IC ^ CO 
COiM (M 

coc<rc^ 






t^ 

o 



CO 






00 CO (Nt^ 00 
O Tt< C ^1> 

t^ 00(N CO 'ti 
OOOt^iC -^ 
GO OOO coco 



CO ic 00 C5 o CO 
CO lo lO -* o ■* 

(M C5 Ol <M lO 02 
O ■-< O CD '-' CO 
CD CD LO GO CO CO 



O <M Id <M lO 

CM t^ CO O 00 

Tt^ t> r- ( lO T-i 



1— I O lO IC lO CO 

"* lo o o c; CO 

•^ ■<*< Tf lO C5 CO 
J-* IM 01(N CO 



CO 

CO 



CO 
CO 
CO 

o 



m 



y-tccao 

TJ. Tfl t^ 

Cft Tf (M 
CO 05 CO 
(M CO IM 



OOO -^ 

■*! 05C0 



o 

Ed 

z 
o 

o 



Q 
< 

o 
o 

>- 

pq 



Do 
Ko5 

PS 
< I 

DQ 

So 

PiO 

I ^ 
w 



CO 

o 



■^ .—I 



a 



O 



CO >— I lo 

<N -rt< CO 



05 
00 



CO "^i Oi 

1— I T— I Oi 

CO CD C5 
CO >— I lO 






CO 



(M CO 

CO (M 

cr. ^ 

CO CO 



00 --H O 
CO ^ 00 

^ CO lO 

CI CD CD 



^-- o <M ■— I ■— I »— • 

CD CO C5 l>t> O 

C^ lO ^ CD O CO 
CI O t^ '^ ^ t^ 

O r« lO ■* CM C5 



CO '-H 

00 CO 
CO CO 

00 >o 
coco 



CO b* >— I 

ooci> 

-*i Oi 02 



C2 

CM 

o 

CM 

1> 



s© 



00 1> 

lOCO 



^ o 00 

lO ^ T}< 

"^ CO 00 



VC Ol TjH 



C^l O lO 05CDC0 

>— I -—I CO en CD CO 

CD CO 1— I O T-H Tt* 

T-^ Tf< I— I I— ( 



1> 

00 

CO 

CO 



00 
lO 

CM 
CM 



00 coo 

o CO o 

t^ rt 00 

05 C^ T— ( 

0^*0 



l-H Tf lO 

00 lO"-! 



m 

a 

o 
H 



O r-l 

coo 

>— I lO 
I> CO 
t^ CO 

co'"cm'" 

C3i CO 
OOO 



T-( -^ Ci 

CD'*C5 

lO 00t> 
00 CM ^ 
OOO^ CO 

o'oo 



o 

CM 

1-H 

00 

o 

1— t 

cm" 



^ 



CO O --H Tfi lO 
CM IC 00 W05 

o-^oo--* 

GO I-" O ■* 
l— ' CO ■* l> "-H 

CO lO CD --I 00 

•<*< I— I T-4 



^ 



o 
o 

o 



»— ) 1-H t's, T-H 

»-i CM CO CO 

UO t>- lO "-H 
Tf GO >— ' ■* 
rf '^ CM CM 

Ot>0 CM 



CO 
C<l 

Oi 

o 



02 



c 
o 

o 



00 CO "-H 

CM t-CD 

00 CD CO 

o 00 lO 

00 t^ '^i 



CO t-CO 
CO -^ C<1 
O 1^3 Tt< 

•-H 00 o 

CO >— I 



CO lOb- 

CO •* lO 

-* CO ^ 
lO CM r-H 



CI 

o 



CD O CO CM CO 
lO lO lO CO o 

CD lO CM 1-H t>. 

00 CO 00 1> ct 

Ci '— I CO CM lO 



CO ic lO t>- '— I ■* 

CD CM lO iC O ^^ 

CM -* C3 CO 03 CM 

>— I .— ( oo ic »c »o 

T- 1 iC ■* O 00 ■* 



■^ lO "-I 

^ Tt< lO 

Oi CM CM 



^ 



CM 

CO 

CO 
o 



^ 



rtl OS '-' O 00 

CD CO o o o 
lO O OiCO o 



(^ 



t-o o coot> 

CM ■* CO iCi O >— I 

00 1—1 CM CO 00 Ol 

I— I lO >— I ^^ 



CM 

o 



CD 
CM 



«(& 



CO lO 00 
1-H CO -^ 

Tf O -H 

>-H CM CM 



iC ■* -5f 



02 

H 

Pi 

« 



3 



o 



o 

H 

u 

H 
02 



02 

tl 

CJ 

o 
o 

^■^ 
.si 

'■4J O 

c 
§6 

to 03'^ 

c 



CO 
OJ 



03 
"cS 

c 
.2 

3 



o 

o 

02 
>, 

Q 

"3 

Pi 

C 

o 



o 
o 



H 

o 

o 

o 



3 . QJ 
^ • § 

§ : o 

O O^&K 

to "O" 

Ci< 



^.2 5 



? >-:3 



03 

a 
o 






o o 

c 
o 



S S 
o o 

00 



, 03 

S S G C ? 
O O S o 2 

c 

0) 



— CM 



-CM 



3 



O 

Eh 



K 

CO 

Ix] 

a: 
O 



Li 



a > 



o 
O 



a 

o 



t- -w t*- Q 

■ <U MO 

Oh— ( a> CD 
c o g- 

V5 ^3 >— 'jj 

C C.S c 
tu O — ' s 

a&«.2 

SS §- 

O O u 3 



"t^.S oj m 

■ OJ.S 5 03 
C fl c3 « O 
O ^ u, '^ r'\ 

to > C7^ _ 

«^ D..2 « § 



OQ 

o 

'-3 

_o 
'C 

Pi 

c 



CO 

O 
O 

a 
o 



3 
02 



"-S '^ - — .- — ■I—' 

C3 CO o3 JH! ti 
„ OJ^-^-w^ OJ 

OOHHWPh o 



"^ ^ 

to t- 

. <»fe 

— as 

3 . a 

02 to fc- 
o3 C£t< 



03 
O 

H 



> 

S3 
H 

<:. 

W 
o 

a 
o 
2 
<: 

a 
z 
(a 

t 

< 



u 

■> 

4) 

02 



a 



a 
Q 

C 
03 



C3 



0.2 

^ o ca 

OQQ 
t*^ <*-i ti-i 
000 



3 a 
o o 



■«^ -.^ -^ 

cj :3 c3 
00 ryj to 

ceo 
aj oj a> 
O. O. P< 

a ea 
000 

000 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



209 



CO o^ ^ "^ 


O CO i-H o 
OCOi-H 00 




^ OiC5 CO 
iC T-i O •* 


CO T- 1 o o 

05 OCD "^i 


CM 








iC 1— 1 to kO 
■<*< >— 1 CO -* 


CO O ^ <-! 


CM 

CO 



Tf^ 



lOO-^CMOOCMO C5 

O^OOCOOOCO CO 

CM lO CO CO -^ O lO CO 

I> GO GO --t O 1> t> l> 

OOCD t^^Ol^iOO J>r 

C0C0O-^>0'— lO lO 
1— I CD lO n' lO CM 1— t 



€<& 



ocooot^ 

>0 Ci t- CO 

r-H b, CO CI 
-* CM t^ r-C 

O "* lO Ol 

lO CM 00 CO 
CO o t^ 
<-i Ol CM 

CM CM 



CO 

CO 



CO 
o 






CM 



OCM 

CO C^l 

CO CM 

CO CD 
GO CO 



©a 



C5 

•o 

CO 
CD 

co" 

lO 

cT 



9& 



CM 



b- 

CD 

CD 

co' 

CM 



S^ 



CM CO 00 lO 
COCMOOO 


§28^2? 




O—tCMcO 
CI GO lO CO 
CO CO 1> CO 


OOC2COC5 
'1< CO CD GO 
COiOCO ^ 


00 
CO 
CO 


.-HCOOCM 
lO CO '-H CI 
CO OOCM 


CM M^COO 
CMO^CO 


C5 

o 

1-H 



Ci CD lO O t> CM CO lO OCO^OO 

■* ^ C> C2 t^ CD 00 CM lO Ci CO CO 

CO CM CM CO ^ O O O ^ -* r-i lO 

lO t^ CO CO 00 l> CO CM lO -^ O "-I 

'— n>coc^i'— icoo CO cri-— iT-H 

COCMCDt^OCMCO O C^lOOCi 

COOO'-iCOI>CO CM OliOCM 

<-H M< CO CO C<1 



CM 

Ci 



CO 

en 

CO 



^ 



<— I CO 
CO CO 

O Ci 
IQCD 
OOCM 

^ CM 

00 



m 



CD 



00 



^ 



CO 



CM 

C-. 
cm' 



o 

CD 



CD 

00 



lO 



00 00^ 
C5 CM >-H 

t>>CicO 

LO lO C2 

CM i-H C^l 



C5 

CI 
00 

o 



۩ 



oi>oco 

O C3 O CO 

lO i-H o o 
'^ o o t- 

-f CD '^ CI 

CM CO CM CO 
CO 



o 
o 



C5 



O O CO CM 
Ot> O CO 

lOI> ^ "+ 
CM X CO '^i 
t— I ■— I CO 



'^ 



OcD 



lO 



CM 

CO 

c^f 

o 



o 
o 

o 
o 

CO 



^ 



o 
o 

o 
o 

CO 



f^ 






CM 

C2 



CM 



e^ 



>— 1 CO CO 05 
Ci t^ t^ CO 


OOI>t^'-H 

O "* lO CM 


1— ( 


COOCM CM 
C^OiOO 

ooioooo 


O CM CO -fi 
CM-HOD CI 
CO CM l> CD 


CM 

CO 

o 


CO t^ ^ CM 
!>. I— t lO »— * 


1— 1 Tf O ■— 1 

CI lOiO 
CO 


CD 

cm' 



CO '^i CM CM 00 O CD t^ 

■* O O i-H TJH CO T— I 00 

'SH -* Tt( -H lO O 00 O 

COCO-— lOCOCOOl lO 

lO CD kO iC lO CO CO CO 

lO -H t^ O CO CO Tti CO 

OCOiOClt--.TtiT-( CM 
r-H IC t— I >— t ■* 1— I 

OCM 



O CO ■— n>. 
O CO lO GO 

CM iCtvOO 
CD OS O lO 
00 CO CO t^ 

CI ot^ 

o CO CO 

T-H CD O 
CM CM 



^ 



CO 



CM 

o 

CO 

in 

CO 
00 



s© 



COC2 

T-H> 

CO CM 
CM CM 
CM O 

--I 00 
OCM 

CO 

cT 



^ 



en. 

lO 

^^ 

CM 

cT 

CI 

CO 



^ 



00 
rf 
t> 

ci 

or 

CO 

cr 

CM 



€/i 



9 -^^ 

'B a- 
^< 






c3 

e 
2 « 

03 M 
CO " 






C^ 

o S 

00 O 

c a 

-§a 

o 

>.^ 



" Sp. o 



a.—: 



s:3 



c 
o- 



a 



a 
o 



^|i2 

p^ £ ° o oo 

°t!'o'o'o ° 

5 fl fl fl 
S.2.2.2 

cj c3 o3 g3 
<c 00 CO m 

_ c a a c 

(D O O O O) O 
CL-d O. Q. O. CL. 

a^a a a a 

o^ o o o o 
O OOOO 



a) 



03 

w 

□ 

« 

o 

G 
C3 
T3 
C 



a 

3 



aj 
u 

'> 

(4 

02 



c3 
CI 

K 

-a 
c 

c3 

(U 
CJ 

a 



m 

a 
o 

> 

PS 

a 
o 



g W 



X 

c3 



-^ < 



03 

O 



<; 
o 

CO 

« 
Hi; 

S CO 

c 



m 

a; 
o 

"E 

a «= 

o 

CG 



CG 

(P.- 

O CD 



« a § 



DS 

3 

m 

fcO 

a 



> 

o 



3 



o 

■I 

o 



to 

3 3 



t- o 

o 

C 3 

2 « fl 

2 O O 3-^ fcH CD 



a 



oo > fc- 



n_<<_t4_vi_ c3j3JD°' c Q (3 

. ° ° ° °i 3 c'-^.2<l.2 

3 3 C C 
O O O O 



■^ o o 



ii.ii O 03 o 03 



^.2.^ ►:'-ts-t-3-i-J-tJ+j-u 



c3 c3 c3 ^ 

00 CQ 03 00 

3 G a c 

CD <D (D QJ 
O. D< CU D. 



c^ o3 



2 a a a s 3 



03 



+J -U to 
u t-. ^ 

O O G 

0< C CD 

(C 03 rt 

G C 3 
d 03 

c3 



CO O 



CO 

CD 
■& 

a 

3 CO 

o3 fc, 

""■^ 
, CD 3 

OH CD 

t- _ c3 
O (O 

a cD__ 
§H^ 






-a 

ID 



OHS 



-uOOOO_.>-i-.ca 
<D 

O 






M 3 "H to G 

t, o 03 o 
> C_i j3 &. 03 
rt"+3 4) c3 

P^ OP^O 



03 

o 
O 

"oS 
3 

_o 

o3 
(h 

<D 
Oi 

o 



§ 

■*^ 

c3 

O 
D, 

OQ 

G 
c:3 
I-, 

H 

"^ 
o 



CO 
CD 



(13 
> 

a 
o 
•I— < 

o3 



CD 

03 

> 

CD 
O 



>:; ID > 
O CO r 
a3 a3 

(h o o 
E-* +s -u 

U-. 3 G 
O CD CD 

°a a 



G 

.2 

o3 
-u 

(h 

O 
O, 

03 

G 

o3 



-(J 

G 

03 



03 

Cj 



" CD 



o3 03 



C ca 03 

03 0< Oi 
O 03 03 

ft 
03 



CO 

03 
CJ 

> 

03 

a 
o 

-u 
o3 
-u 

(4 

O 

o: 
3 
o3 

(-> 



o 
H 



210 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 
H 



^ 




^ 


00 


COCO 
t>Tt< 


o 








8 


oo 










i-H 


O"-! 


(N 



CD rt< 1> t^ CO t^ 
00 (M (M CO CD 05 




00 
CO 


00 lO lO (M O ^^ 
CD <N t>. (M CD 00 


ifj ^ CD T-i CO 
05C<«CDI>-03 


r-H 


C5 (M <— 1 05 CI Oi 
i-H CO C» O ■— 1 1> 
T-HCOCDIMON 


00 •* -^ CO t^ 
>— 1 -* iC t~- 00 
(M 00 C5 ^ (M 


00 

CO 




C-l lO 





6% 



^ 



CD "— • >— 1 


OCOOi 


CO 


l>COiO 
CD»0 IM 
CDt^CO 


^ ooca 

lOiOOO 


^ 

■* 








i-H 1— ( CD 

l>iO<D 


OcDt^ 
^ lOOO 

eocoi> 


CO 


>— 1 


Tf CO 





^ 



Q 

o 
u 

PQ 



a 
a 

D 

iz; 
O 

O 



CO 
o 



O 



Oi 


(MO 

oco 


^ 




050 
TfCD 


I— 1 

00 








Oi 
CO 


oi>> 

oo> 


CO 




■* 


lO 



05CDt^l>t^(M 

02 '^ 00 •>* ■* 05 

l>. CD 00 CO CO (M 
t^l>00iOcD t^ 

OOOrJH T^ 00 CD 


CD O CD O >— 1 
lO <N CO O Tf< 

O O 05 -+1 >-( 
CO I-H C35 CO I-H 
00 02 CO L(0 lO 


•~D 


O5 05'*'l>030 

005(M ^ '^t- 
CO O CD lO ■* 


oi ^ CO o o 

.— 1 (M t> lO CO 


1> 



as 



05 (M 



m 



CO 



a^ 



i>coo 

Tfl ,-H ^ 


CO ooo 

C5 CO -^ 


1> 


Tj^CO'tl 

CO CO lO 


CO coo 

00 ■* CD 

b- ■* r-4 


r— ( 








CD ■* (M 
t^(NO 

cor^c^ 


CD iM ^ 
00t^(M 

CO ■* 


8 



CO I-H 



m 



c<^ I-H 



05 



m 



gg 

I ^ 
w 
< 



00 

o 
H 



Tj<CO 

1—1 
o 

1—1 



m 



00 
CO 

00 
1— ( 
o_ 

I— I 



m 



1-1 CD ooi> t^ o 

I> '^i O OOClt- 
CO CO CD O 05 lO 
CD CO lO -* O CO 
00 03 lO lO CO o 

(M 1-1 'ti IC -*i -* 
00 CO 



C3 "* -^ CO 

COOOICI 
O M C2 (M 
lO -^ (M CO 

OiOi-t 
(MCO 



05 
00 



00 



o 

C5 



s© 



02 lO 05 


(MOM 

COr-lt^ 


CO 


(NO-* 

cioco 


(M coo 
O >0 Oi 
CO00(M 


•^ 


ICCO 
CO 


Tt<r-IO 

CO CO 


00 
CO 



o t>. ■* 

»0 CD'*' 





-* 


CJiOi 


CO 


(35 


00 CD 




o 


(NOO 


a 

O 


00 


1— t CD 


lO 


(MO 


t^ 


COiO 


o 




CO 



CD 

CO 

(M 

CD 
00 
to 



CD (^^ (M CO Oi lo 
1-1 CO CO o ^^ CO 


^ >:/D »0 (M CD 
^-r< O 1— 1 1— < O 




!>. (M O 00 CO CO 

r— ( 1— * CO O (X) »0 

0(MCO(M ^1-1 


•* (M t> 'ti (N 

CO o n< -*i ic 

O iC CO Oi CD 


I— 1 


CD 1— 1 (M CO lO lO 

(MCO CO 00 COO 
t>t>OCO ^ (M 


(33 <M (M T-i O 
(3i O ^ (M <M 
1-1 00 Oi CO (M 


o 

CO 




1-1 CO 


00 

(r<i 



f^ 



(M ^l> 


iC* Oi 


<M 

Oi 


OCOiC 
■* 1—1 CO 
1-1 00 CO 


■^ Oi 1— 1 

t^ioco 

1>00Q0 


s 








IXXl—i 
CO lO CO 
Ol>-# 


00— 1(^"^ 

OiOOCO 
IQIM CO 


-* 



t^CO 1-i 



m 



(M 



lO 



W 

w 

CO 

CO 



CO 

« 



3 



Kit: (u 
^ -202 

O ra (3 
a> 

O rf c 

Jl 

(See 

(« 

C -^ oo 

tt) 03 Qj 

& *- •- 
o aj °° 



a 



tX) 
CD 
« 

(« 
(U 
CQ 

-a 

i 

CQ 
(U 

"H. 
a 

3 

CO 

-c 
o 
o 



CO 

u 



CQ 

-O 
o 
o 

"o 
o 



o 
H 



If 



l-I 

o 
o 

(J 

CQ 

o 
o 

H 

<: 

(B 

o 



o 

CQ 
PL, 



o 

m 

3 



CO 

(D 

"E 
S 
W 

(U 

-c3 



TS o ^^ 



03 

- o-r 



o 



•^ 0.--rffi 



a 
o 

(-< 

Ph 

'o 
o 

CQ 



a 
o 

'+= 

o3 

CD 

a 
O 

t4 
o 



CO 

. IP 

CO > 
O "I 

(U ^^5^ 



to 



o .^' 



OjCO 



CO C3 



O '^ o 



>Q-a 

(U U CJ 

C dJ !U ->J 

OCQ M cj 
^ *— tn fc^ 

Hl>cflO 



CO 

(U 

»-^ 

a 

3 
CQ 



(o;s 
— o 



iz a 



c3 



^:r Ph 



«^ TO 

QQ .i^ 

^ 3 
c;( c3 

sS 

o o 

"~ D< 
^O 

CO xn 
<- G 

O >< 
o 



a 
o 

'-3 

c3 
u 
(U 
CU 

O . . ,., 



o 



Cl3 CO 
01 

CO cj 

.- (U 
(n2> 

37: QK»- OQ'^ 

^ .W 3 -je > ^ 

01.^5 01 t. 



>-] 

P4 

1-3 
o 



(U S 



(B (U 03 -g 
(U 



t-l 

CD 



&< 3 e 

O g g o o 

00 -is c c 
Iz c <u <u 

^ ro'i s a 03 su 

Z M_, 01 01 ^ 3 

01 t, t- o3 3'^ 

§■■5-5 i £ ^2 
o 01 (u o^ *j 3 



(U 
to" 

. CO I-, 



o 
-£3 
« 
CQ 



o 
d 

3 

a 
■3 



o 
H 



o« 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



211 









lO 05 CO (N 05 m o 
1— 1 CO CO 03 CO >o CO 


CO 

CO 


^^ ic m 05t» CM 

00 o —1 coo to 


§ 


O 00 00 CM lO CM 

CM CO CO t^ O lO 




ts. iC lO -^ 't' 

00 <r> 00 m CO 

lO OOiOiCOO 

COt^O -t< 00 
t^ GO ^ O >— 1 
00 CO lO 03 -f 


CO 


ci CO M o -H CO r^ 
t^ OI> o — < >* o 
00 CO CM CO <M t^ t^ 

COCOt-lO '^ t^(M 
(M 00 C^ O CO -H O 
<M CO >-i (N -^ CO lO 


1—i 

oo__ 


•— 1 c;5 lo CD 03 T-H 
-:*< oi> ^ ooco 
O era CO 05 1^ >-< 

Of CTi^CDCOiO 

CO lo -^ 00 ci f 

CM CM 05CM f 


'^2 
CO 

CO 


t^ O lO t^ f^ CM 

CO f-H LQ CD '-^ *0 

CO O t^ LO lO CO 

^H lO O ^^ '-H t>» 
03 t>. CO t>- '— 1 C3 
CM -^ t^CM T*< 


o 


i-H r-l O 


1— t 


lO 


I> 


CO 


lO 


CM>-l 


iC 


e^ 


^ 


^ 


m 


^ 


^ 


^ 


«^ 


■^ lO lO O ^H 
Ot>iOQOO 




O lO lO O 0> t^ C3 

CO ■— 1 Tti o 00 ■* c<> 


CD 


r-H CM OCM^ f 
lO r-l 03 00 t^ CM 


o 
CO 


COOOCM-HCM 
t>.iOO-^CMOO 


1—) 
CD 


00<NiCO t> 
t- ^ 00 lO lO 

lOOOcOb--^ 

•«f ^H -rt< ^ lO 

ecooocoi> 

t>. I— H> lO "-H 


CO 
CO 
00 


CD lO O (N '-' 00 ^ 
Cn O CO O lO CO o 
CO -<* lO O •* iC C-l 

CO •-• O iC t>. <M O 
CD t^ CO 03 CO >-< l>) 
I— 1 1— I C<1 C^ T-i 


CM 
CM 


OiOCMt>.-*CM 
I> GO CM CD CO O 

I> ^ 00 "* ■* CS 

CO CD »— ' CD CO *-H 

00 00»O '^i oc 

CM i-H 


CM 

cr> 


03'* CM CMOOO 00 

r^ CO --1 -f o o i^ 

-* Ot^OOOCO CD 
"tiiO'T^CO^ '^ 

lOt^cMo loco r^ 

1— I .— 1 Tf I— ( O 


CO 


lO 


<M 


CO 


CM 


CM 


»-( 


I-H 


®& 


s© 


m 


^ 


m 


€0 


©^ 


«# 


CO r-l 


00 CO 

coio 


00 

CO 




CD o om 

CO O (M 00 


^ 








fe 




^ 








s 




o 

o 


eocft 

§28 


f2g 

COiO 


o 


(MiO 

coco 


COOt^^ 

CO CM 00 r-l 
CO T-<-<^ 


CM 

05 








T— 1 




i-H 








o 

CM 




o 

CM 


05C0 


o 

1— f 






s 


CM 








lO 




lO 














©t 




e^ 


^ 




9% 








€0 




^ 








m 




m 


00iO«DiMr^ 

CO Tt« oicco 


§8 


^ ■* OOCOOOOCO 
CO (N 00 iQ 00 GO ■-< 


CO 
00 


O CO CD O CD GiC 
CO 03 >— 1 05 CO cc 


CO 

o 


-^OQOOO-^O 
■*00t^COt>l> 


^ 


lOCOOOO 

<-! CO 03 r-l -^ 

1-H -H oo "-I 00 

C: (M lO !M C^) 


o 
I— 1 


O CO --^ lO C3 o ■-• 
^ 00 "* CD CO (M 00 
1— I lO I> OI>- c ■— • 

o^i-'To'coio c^i^ 

CO ^ lO 00 0> O 00 
CM OOCO '^CO 


C-1 

o 

o 


CM CO CM CO -+' O' 

CO C^l <0 O lO c^ 

CM oio CO COO- 
CO 00 ivioco'cc 

Tf^ f CO CM lOCC 
r-H rHt^CM C^ 


CO 
C-1 

■— 1 
!>. 


t» -^ CM ices- 
coco's- 00 o ir: 

1-1 OlO CM t>t> 

CO C5 lO o t> c^ 

CO O >— 1 t^ lO CO 
C<ICM COt>-CC 


CD 

o 

CO 


i-t CO 


05 


(M 


T}< 


T-H 


CM 


I-H 


CO 


m 


«© 


m 


s^ 


۩ 


m 


^ 


«# 



0) 

CO 

fl 

fl 
o 

c« 

[C 

C 

D. CO 

fl cS 

o^ 
m o 

§ S C3 

= fc c 

to O 53 



a 
« 

to 

.9 



CO 



o 



CO 

iJ 
O 
O 

u 



<0 

c 

CO 



m o 

C OQ 
0) CO Mh 



X a;' 



. ai<3P^ fl 

! — . lU .2'" 



-J wj y 






_ _ CO 

CJ o o fl Q, 

T" 53 -M ^ fl 



C_!3 



o 



O 



c3 
O 

H 



^ O) 

WO 



I ° I I fl 

C C fl fl D 

o c c c •- 

• ^- • V • ■— . ^^ ^^ 
-+^ -*-'■♦-■♦— cj 

03 rt cc 33 -.- 

m y. tf.' CO >- 

fl fl fl fl C VJ 

(L OJ Ci CJ C " 

c. c c. a i£ >- 2 
S c S rt_fl "S 

O O O O fc. ^ g 



CO 

"a 

n. 

03 , 

fl o3 
% fl 

g-.2 



o 

o 

u 

(i 

a 
a 

3 



CQ 

O 

O 

"a 
o 
H 






<B O 

C CO 

-§| 
O CO Ph 



'" ^ _3 ft ^5 

M ai<|PH fl 

^CL, ^_- O 

d :3J3-c w 

Q-^^2 2 

I <= I I 

C fl C fl 

coco 



03 
« 

3 

-a 
W 



2 i 

o 
o 

« 

o 



3 



fl 
— ■ fl 

QJ C 

fl CO 
fl >- 

CO Mh 



O" 



o 

3 



CO — 
., fl 03 

-^j .«j ♦- -^ ij a 

03 c3 j3 o3 Q- O 
K tr, CO CO X • -t; 

c fl fl fla ■g 

tu o a; c " 
CL a C c '- 2 

ass s^^ 

o c o ot: g 
QOOOO^H 



+3 
CO 

C 

o 



o 



co-a 
5-S3.2-;3 

^ 03 J3 -o o 
O " S ^ 2 

~ 4) on *J 

K I ° I I 
H fl fl fl c 

O c c o o 



en 

CD 

a 
a 

CO ,5 

^ </j 

<n _, 

fl 03 
O) fl 

Co 



c3 c3 ^ c3 _ 

CO CO CO CO »< . X 

fl fl fl ca T^ 

4) 0) C « H 

D. a a c <- 2 

ess s^l 



I 

O 



o3 
fl 
O 
• ^^ 

-t-5 
flj 

o 

3 



GO 

O 



03 
O 

H 



a 



212 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 
H 



m 00 o o I— I lo CO CO (M o 

CO O CO O 'f -^ C5 lO M CO 

l-<. LOCOOfMiOT-iUDGOcO 

CO t^ C<) ^ 00 1> CO CO t> o 

CD '^i lO lO O O C<! CO 1> CO 

CO cociot^tot^-t^ooio 

(M OC0(M'-(Tti>O00'-H'-H 



CD 1— I 1-H 



<¥:^ 



ic ^ i-H 00 c^ ■— t 

I— < CD 



CD 

1> 



CO 

CD 



CD 
1 — I 
CO 



o 



>— lC3lO00COa^<MOl 
O CO lO lO Cq t^ 05 o 

O (M O CO (M Ci lO (M 
Ct^'-^iOiOCl'— i(M 

C2co^ooai^oi>> 

CDOOiOOO^O(MO 
-rCDCDCiCD'^-'CDiO 
(M O CO ^ CO (M (N 



lO CO O (M 



iM 



^= 



CD 
lO 

CD 

CO 



o 



00 
CD 



CO 

o 
00 



C5 
CO 

CO 

CO 

00 



ot> 

(M CD 

CO o 
CD (N 

O T— I 

CI oa 

CO C5 

CD of 



S^ 



< 

O 
O 



^CD 

So 
Pw 

< I 

^''^ 
PQ 

><: 

Pg 
§^ 

I ^ 

^5 

m 
<: 

H 



02 



O 



(M 



O 

CD 

CD 

C75 



Cl"^t^CO00^I>'-<l> 
C-'SOCDkOOOCDOirOOO 

ca lo '^ "-I >— t o OJ t^ iM 

Ti^i000'-iOt--c0 0?iC 

ocrTcoa-.'CDOTficDco 

C^ T-i CO lO l-^ ^ O 04 o 

(M .-< C» '^ CO ^ r-t >— 1 



(M 



CO 

00 



on 



«# 



iCOiO'-icDO'— lOi 
OOCOiOC'l'— iiOt>->— ' 

Ci (M CI CO O CJ --1 .-H 
Oib-LOCO00a0iO»O 
(M CO 1-1 (N CI CD CD CD 

COOOOICQOCDCOCO 
T<CDOCOiOCD-*CO 
05 CD CO CO CJ o 



ca 



s^ 



1-Ht^ 



d 



CO 

CD 
CI 

CO 

!>• 

00 



c^ 



^ 



en 
ca 

CD 






00 

o 
CO 



^ 



-* CO 
CO CO 

O C5 

ca "* 

'O- 
C) 00 

lO CO 



CD 



m 



o 
H 



03 

CD 



o 
Q 



02 



o 
o 

o 

CD 
CO 



iy:« 



CO 


o • 


•CO 


CJ • 


•00 


^ ■ 


•lO 


CO • 


• '^ 


CI • 






•lO 


lO ■ 




CO • 



CO C5 o 

coders 

01>C5 
00 Oi "-H 

ooo^ 
cTi^T-i 

CD 



CO 



o 



C5 



m 



CO 
CI 



CD 



ooi>oi>coco-*i-^cq 

OOC^COOOCDOOCOCICD 

T-iOCOClCD'^GOiOf 
iOOCO-^CDCOCJl>C<l 
C0C4CD':ft>O'-iCi'-i 

1— I M^ Ci CD C5 CO O i-H O iC 

CO ■rf<oooooocot>ioio 

C^ OC'C^dC^CJlClCOOO 
■^ 1—1 O C5 '-H> '— 1 



CO 
CO 

o 
"^ 

CO 



CO 
CO 

CO 

CO 

l> 

00 



CO 

00 

CD 

CD 

00 

1— < 
C4 

1— I 
CI 



a 

o 

o 

I 



<u 

^^ 

ice 
^ o ^ 

H'3M 

^"« 

^ QQ 

GQ O) 

<o « 

a a 
o o 



< 



> 

rl '^ O 



a 

ii'3 



OQ 

C 



3 

PQ 

.s 

'■+3 

OQ 



to 

C CO 

O bC 

•^ fl 

'0- = 



CO 

e3 



U 



■3 > 






:':;"0. 






oo 



2 .2 '^ PQ "^ 



(U-; 



OD 09 
OQ CQ 

o o 



fl O t. 
g O « 



^ a, 
3 5S 



00 . 

S9.2^ 



3 

o 



a 

d 
O 

o 
H 



n 

p 



O O O lO O 00 
O O ^ Cl Oi-t 

O O ^ CO ^ t^ 
C32 O LO 00 CO 
TTi O C) C^ lO 

O O r- 1 CO lO 

lO >— I lO CO 



CD 
00 



o 

CO 

00 

CO 
C5 



s% 



C<1 

CD 
CO 
CO 



CO 



€^ 



Olr^l> -* ^ CI 

a CO Oi c:i a t>- 

00 t> t^ -rt^ O CO 
CD "—I "—I CD CO CD 

t> CO ■* --1 00 o 

lO CD O O C^ t- 
T-H »o CD -^ ■— I CD 
CO O O O C^ '-I 

'^ ca CO CI 



I— ( 

00 
c^ 
t^ 

00 

CD 

o 

CO 



00 

00 

CD 
C^ 

cf 

CI 

cT 

cq 



OQ 

o 



'72 

a 



\^ 



a'feb 



a 03 



o3 






3 3 



o 

O -*J o o g 

+3 +5 +3 -tJ 

C C 3 fl -*^ 

(D o (u o SR 

a a a a 2^ 

ci <^ d d 



m 

a 
o 2 



u 

■> 

CO 

-1-3 

p 



O d 

3 3^ 

o o a, 

-iJ -u Q 

(C tc '^ 

£ 2 ^ 

Qj (u ;i; 



3 

a 

m 

00 

;-! 

3 

OQ 



d 



o o 



CO "-H 
CI CO 

oco 
CO LO 
CD a> 

■—I Cl 



CI CO 

>oo 

1-H Ol 

O Cl 

c{co 

1—1 CI 
CD -^ 

ocf^ 



Oi PL, fi; PL, ►S ►5 >S O 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



213 



!>•-* Ot>. 


l> 


>o 


rt<Ot^iO 


lO 


»o 


(M O CO 'fi 


c^ 


CO 


•^ CO 03 O 


o 


r^ 


en 00 CD Oi 


CO 


1 — 1 








rr CDOOO 


oo 


CO 


Ci— 1 -M>. 


00 


nri 


o -^ O O 


■rt* 


CO 








(M^O CO 


oo 


O) 


CD 


o 


CO 




%^ 


<aa 



O O CO 
lO lO 05 

^CDO 

1-H CO CO 

>-< CD CO 
Oi CO -^ 
lOOOlM 



o 

CD 

o 
>o 

GO 

o 

00 



a<^ 



^ 



CO 

o 

CO 



CO 
CO 

o 

CO 

ci 













»— H 


t^"^ OCOiM 


5-j 








^1 


I> '^ CO -H 04 00 


o 








ooon! c^ o 


(-^ 








(M 1-H Ttl ^H 


o 












I-H 










t^ ■* CO CO t-H t>. 


lO 


o 


lO 






t>- CO -!tl -^ t^ t-H 


00 


J> 


lO 






CDOt^OOOOTt* 
CTOiOOOO-rtiO 


lO 


t^ 


CO 






T-H 


to 


1> 




"3 


05 02 (M Oi i-H C^ 


CO 


>o 


1-H 














-u 


'HC3'"r>roo'"i>t>r 


lO 


i>r 


CO 




O 


O O CO O (M CO 


t^ 


o 


CO 




H 


rH t-H Ci O I>. O) 


o 


CO 


CO 






O —1 -^ Ci Tt< 


^ 


1-H 


ci 






»0 C5 >— 1 1— 1 o^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 






(N -^ 


00 




Ci 


p 




&^ 


&^ 


f/^ 


s^ 


^ 




CSI t^ r-l 


• Tt< -rt< 


OD 


1-H 


C3 


<J 




Ci.-IC^ 


•oco 


CO 


(M 


M 


>H 




CO 00 CO 


t^ ^ 


CI 


r>. 


CO 




-*i not^ 


(MCO 


jy-. 


-t< 


s 


fc^ 


03 


CI CO ■* 


(M O 


CO 


1> 


q 


!z; ?. 


1 ^ 


iC^CD 


00 CO 


00 


CO 


Cfl 


P§ 




CO CD lO 


coco 


T-H 


1-H 


CO 


o 


CO "^t^t^ 


oco 


CO 


t^ 


o 


o 2 


t^iTiiM" 


-* "* 


^ 


1-H 


CO 


U H 




ODCOt^ 


CSI 


C^4 


T-H 


CO 


2; 




I— 1 




CO 




CO 


JM o 














wo 




m 




&a 


^ 


m 


URSED 

1969-70- 




t^ CO rH • 


coc-1 


CO 


05 


>o 




t-H (M(N ■ 


Clio 


o 


CM 


CO 




'=2:*£^ • 


ooo 


C5 


•* 


CO 




iOt^(N • 


■* lO 


■^ 


lO 


o 


CO 

c 


ooo'oo ■ 


00^ 

cicT 


C5 




CO 


DISB 
SIGN 


o 


S3?^ • 


•>*i lO 


CO 


GO 


CM 


H 


O iMi> ■ 

1-1 i-H • 


(N 


CO 


(M 


>o 
CO 


AND 

-SES 




m '■ 




%% 


m 


€j% 




00 ■* r-H CO Tt< ^H 


1-H 


o 


1-H 






CD Oi O ■* t^ CO 


1-H 


c^ 


CO 




CO t^ (M 00 <M C5 


1> 


CD 


CO 


H^ 




Ol 


"O 


GO 




'^t^^COO Ot> 


t>^ 


o 


s 


c 


t^ t^ C^ GO CO -^ 


t^ 


1-H 


00 


WO 


3 


O Ci t>. O >— 1 rH 


1-H 


1-H 


c^ 


o 


^'IH^^CI'^00 


»o_ 


CO 


M 


s^ 


O 


•-H in> o LO o 


CO 


o 


of 




CO lO "* >-< o 


-*l 


rr 


o 




.-( <N 


lO 




lO 


cqO 












PW 
20 




^ 


* 1 


«© 


e© 


€# 
















: : : 1 


tjOi 
















• • • 

'ear 

es.. 


^>^ 
















IH 
















: ?H o 


C>^-< 
















*« 9 


^o 
















o ^ 


















:' ^ w 


m 
















: 1 -^ 


< 


M 














C bD '^ 


H 












03 0) on 








02 I 




t^ CQ -tf 
a, ^ D- 




1— ^ 






T3 . 


■ O *^ -*^ '7{ 




w 






a • 


•I S C3 S 
• ■" <U 00 OJ 




o 

w 




^^4 




p^ 


ate Funds, 
deral Fun 
ty-County 
strict Fun 
her Funds 
ans, Bond 

Total 

Balani 

Total 




















aaa a aa 






o o o o o o 


1 




ii4 


Lb 


£ 


rv,r: 


-I tl 











214 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



^T3 
»- c a^ 



03 ITS O 












(M »-H lO CO »-H 



o 00 00 1^ o 

C5 O CO (M ,-H 



IMOO 



O 

o 



o 

o 



k 



<u § w g oj o-g 



(MTt^ot^t^oeoco-^ 






oo(Ni>eo<M 



o 
o 



o 
o 



< 
O 2 

-2 

^^ 

QQ 

^^ 

X 

gg 

I ^ 
w 



o 

H 



ot^eO'-<(N(McofO'^ 

1— li-irt<t>'-*CO'-<000O 
t^l^-^Ot^GOO^COiC 
COcDeO(Nt^OiO-^rf 

-^t>^COC^OOOOt^iO 

otoeocDt^i-iiOoio 
eococooocooooeoTti 

-* ■* cD'^rciOi »o LO ^ 

T-H iC lO C^ 1— I -rf (N 1— I 



C5 



Oi 



00 OS lO CO CD 

00 o ■* t^ lO 

I-H fO O -H O 

^^ CO 00 Ot) lO 
00 '-1 00 CD CO 

■* 00 CO CD ■* 

01 CO 00 --H Ci 
■* (M(MCOO 

iCioicc^ioo 

OCO 



00 

o 

!>. 

00 

00 

00 

oo 

00 



o 

CO 



00 



«^ a^ 






CO 



CO 

00 
CO 

ci 

CO 



'•+3 

o 



C5^l>C2COOOt^t^iO 

00>— iiCOO'-HTtiiOiOCO 
'-HCOCOCOO'— ilMi— i(M 
OC^CDCO-— IOOCD^»CO 

tooit^oiOT-it^ir^oo 

COiMOOOiM'-iOOOOO 
C00210'— 'OiCOt-t^-CO 

iCci(NIM(NiOCD02iO 



^ 



CO 



CO 



"# C5 ^ t^CD 
CD 00 CO t-» lO 

IC (M 00 CO CO 
<M O t^ 00 (M 
lO lO CD lO 00 

c{cD-^I>tC 

l>.iOt^00Q0 
OCDOI>t^ 

CO C^Tt-h C^T-rJ^" 
CO(M 



€^ 



C5 

CO 

CO 



00 

o 

CO 



o 
CO 

o 

iC 
00 

o 
00 



o 

00 

CO 
oo 
o 

CO 

o 

CD 
CO 

CO 



m 



(MOoor>.ioooa>(MGO 

CO-^iC^lOiiCOOOOCDCO 

l>(NOiCirt<0000-*-<ti 
iO'-HiOC35(M'— ii— ICDC^ 
^OOC300C5000COO 

(MrtHI>CO(Ni— iO00»O 
iOOt> C0C^05C0(M 



<N 



o 
o 

00 



m 



CO t^ O GO CO 
OOCO Ot>.00 

1— I -^ Tfi Oi o 
Oi I— I (M >-H oo 

1— I lO lO 00 

<M (MOO 

t-H (M 



IM 

CO 
CO 
CO 



CO 

o 
o 
CO 



^^ ^fi 



CO 

CO 
o 
CO 

(M 

(M 

co" 



0) 



o 

o 



ooO'-Hi-Hi— (.— i(Mcaoo 

1— nO<Nt>^-iCD(MC300 

oi>.cn(Moooot^t^io 

OCN-^CO-^iO-^OO 
0201t>-Ot-~(M'— lO"— I 

CDlMt^CO!NCOO^(M 

1— icocO'Tocoor^t^'* 

CJSCOlOCMCOlOCO-^O 

OOOlt^ciot^OOiOO 
- .(M (M (Mi-H 



S^' 



^ 



CO 

(M 

(M 

Oi 

T-H 

Oi 

CO 



^ 



CO 00 ^ r-l ^ 

OOO X CM ^ 

(M CO -H t>.00 
t^ iM CD lO (M 

OO^ 05 001> 

o >— I .— I oo 00 

O t--. >— I O CD 
'*< lO CO ^ o 

'^iMoocftco 

CO^ 



00 

00 
CO 

(M 



im" 
(M 



00 
00 



CO 

o" 
1> 



^ s^ 



CO 

CO 

00 

l>^ 

00 
CJ 
00 

IM 

c^ 



^ 



H 

02 



o 
o 

m 

o 
CO 

» 
< a 



s 
< 



QQ 

o 

u 

c 

'■+3 

u 

D 

O CO 
3 «- 

|:S 



(U 

(U > 



+3 

a 

o3 



:::i ^ o6&H 



o3 



(U 



Ol.S.O o 



o3 



t" OJ o 

oCdM 
a. , 

- ■ ' o 



^p^^-2 

T3 r^ — »j 

C — O c3 

<!;•« C 

-^ 3 o 



« 



o 
o 
-a 
c;i 

en 

O 73 

a) 

«^ bD 
cj t7 

C 03 

go 

o3 ><! 



a • 
o • 

H 

O 03 
— M 

H 



■0.2 

(-! 03 

«3 Si 

few 
s- 
a 3 



m 

a 

C3 
bl 
bO 
o 

PL, 

fl 
.2 >. 

-oO C 
S3.-*? 
OOQ 



a 

03 
CQ 

ll 

3 

CQ 



03 

o 
Eh 



03 



CQ 

o 

o 



CO 

o 
a 

P3 



g 



(U 



4> 
03 

3 

J2 CQ 
CO <U 

el 

c3 o3 

^« 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



215 



TABLE 41 

FUNDS RECEIVED BY COUNTY AND 
CITY SCHOOL BOARDS-1969-70 

Receipts— $871 , 075 , 616* 




*Not including balances at beginning of year. ($61,307,558) 



216 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 41— Continued 

FUNDS DISBURSED BY COUNTY AND 
CITY SCHOOL BOARDS— 1969-70 

Expenditures— $833 ,894 ,871* 




•Not including balances at close of year. (t98,4S8,303) 



(1) Adult Education .63%— $5,233,163 

(2) Summer Schools .90%— $7,494,811 

(3) Attendance and Health Services. .52%— $4,362,297 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



217 



TABLE 42— CONSOLIDATED AND ADJUSTED STATEMENT OF 

SCHOOL FUNDS— 1969-70 

I. Distribution of Expenditures 



Expended on State Level (Not Including 
Teacher Retirement): 

Administration 

State Supervision — Secondary Education . . . 

State Supervision — Elementary and Spe- 
cial Education 

School Flaniiing, Testing and Guidance 

Local Administration 

Teacher Education and Teaching Scholar- 
ships 

Elementary and Secondary — Education 
Federal Programs 

Educational Research and Pilot Studies .... 

National Defense Education Act 

Vocational Education 

School Food Programs 

Libraries and Other Teaching Materials. . . . 

Special Research Projects 

Production of Films 

Special Education (Scholarships and Fellow- 
ships) 

Highway Safety Program 

Professions Development Program 



Sub-Total (1). 



Adult Basic Education 

Civil Defense Education 

Manpower Training Program 

Veterans Training Program 

Vocational Education (Colleges): 

Operation 

Capital Outlay 

Advisory Committee — Fire Service Training. 
Elementary and Secondary Program — In- 
stitutions (Operation) 

Law Enforcement Scholarships 



Sub-Total(2). 



B. 



*Total Disbursements, Stat*) Level 
Not Including Teacher Retirement. 



Expended on Local Level Throuoh Local 
School Boahdb: 

Regular Day School: 

Instruction 

Transportation 

School Food Services 



State 
Funds 



415,036 
668,011 

433,568 
602,794 
464,006 

2,206,785 



213,806 
1,083,794 



1,569,028 

1,6S0 

74,346 



S 7,732,854 



99,556 
334 

20,754 



22,854 



143,498 



$ 7,876,352 



65.76% 



156,531,114 

9,139,113 



Federal 
Funds 



S 1,089,173 



42,696 
10,311 
12,813 



100, 5S6 

19,108 

9,625 



S 1,284.402 



% 76,990 

23,546 
98,319 
49,727 

1,909,091 
37,820 



621,474 



$ 2,816,967 



{ 4,101,369 



34.24% 



$ 16,414,132 

388,674 

12,763,836 



Local 
Funds 



I 281,722,426 

14,142,987 

155,250 



Total Cost of 
Education 



415,036 
668,011 

433,568 
602,794 
464,006 

2,206,785 

1,089,173 

213,806 

42,696 

1,094,105 

12,813 

1,569,028 

1,680 

74,346 

100,586 

19,198 

9,625 



$ 


9,017,256 


$ 


76,990 




23,546 




98,319 




49,727 




2,008,647 




38,154 




20,754 




621,474"] 




22,854 


1 


2,960,465 


$ 


11,977,721 



$ 454,667,672 
23,670,774 
12,919,086 



♦Does not include Imprest Fund. .j.,,rjtr,»xi 

Does not include Sales Tax sent direct to localities based on school population, considered as local funds by statute. 



218 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 42— CONSOLIDATED AND ADJUSTED STATEMENT 
OF SCHOOL FUNDS— 1969-70— Continued 

I. Distribution of Expenditures — (Continued) 



Administration 

Othw Instructional Costs 

Attendance and Health Services. 

Operation of Sciiooi Plant 

Maintenance of School Plant. . . . 
Fixed Charges 



Total Cost of Operation— Regular 
Day School, Local Level 



Summer Schools 

Adult Education 

Other Educational Programs. 

Capital Outlay 

Debt Service 



Total Expenditures by Local School 
Boards 



C. 8tatb CoNTHiBunoN Toward Tbacher Rb- 
TiBEMSNT Benefits (Not Included Above).. 



D. GRA^a> Total. 



E. Summary of Total ExPENDiruaEs: 

Operation 

Capital Outlay 

Debt Service 



Grand Total. 



State 
Funds 



$ 75,580,438 



$ 241,250,665 



37.38% 



S 951,750 
864,545 



159,633 



I 243,226,593 



29.17% 



I 44,016,116 



100% 



$ 295,119,061 



33.16% 



J 294,959,094 
159,967 



$ 295,119,061 



Federal 
Funds 



$ 45,697,418 



$ 75,264,060 



11.66% 



6,024,557 
3,239,763 
4,451,407 
8,809,936 



% 97,789,723 



11.73% 



$ 101,891,092 



11.45% 



$ 93,043,336 
8,847,756 



{ 101,891,092 



Local 
Funds 



$ 32,933,640 



S 328,954,303 



50,96% 



518,504 
1,128,855 

835,473 
93,347,063 
68,094,357 



% 492,878,555 



59.10% 



$ 492,878,555 



55.39% 



$ 331,437,135 
93,347,063 
68,094,357 



$ 492,878,555 



Total Cost of 
Education 



14,304,371 
50,333,344 
4,362,297 
45,358,593 
25.397,438 
14,455,453 



$ 645,469,028 



7,494,811 

5,233,163 

5,286,880 

102,316,632 

68,094,357 



$ 833,894,871 



$ 44,016,116 



$ 889,888,708 



J 719,439,565 

102,354,786 

68,094,357 



% 889,888,708 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



219 



TABLE 42— CONSOLIDATED AND ADJUSTED STATEMENT OF 
SCHOOL FUNDS— 1969-70— Continued 

II. Percentage Distribution of Costs 



State 



Federal 



Local 



1 . Expenditures on State Level (Not Including Teacher Retirement) 

2. Expenditures on Local Level: 

(a) Total Expenditures on Local Level, Including Capital Outlay and 
Debt Service 

(b) Total Operation Costs— Regular Day School 

(e) Instruction (Salaries)— Regular Day School 

(d) Operation Costs, Other Than Instruction— Regular Day School. . 

(e) Summer Schools 

(f) Adult Education 

(g) Capital Outlay 

(h) Debt Service 

3. Teacher Retirement 

4. Total Expenditures for Operation Only (State and Local Levels) 

5. Grand Total All Expenditures, Including Retirement 



65.76% 



29.17% 
37.38% 
34.43% 
44.40% 
12.70% 
16.52% 
.10% 



100.00% 
41.00% 
33.16% 



34.24% 



11.7.3% 
11.60% 

3.61% 
30.84% 
80.38% 
61.90% 

8.61% 



12.93% 
11.45% 



59.10% 
50.96% 
61.96% 
24.76% 
6.92% 
21.58% 
91.23% 
100.00% 



46.07% 
55.39% 



220 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 42— Continued 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES FOR PUBLIC FREE SCHOOLS 
IN VIRGINIA BY SOURCE— 1969-70 

(State and Local Level) 

$889,888,708 



STATE FINDS 33.16* 
$295,119,061 




LOCAL FUHDS 55-39* 
$1.92,878,555 



222 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

I 

to 






O 
P 

< 

w 

H 

O 

o 

>^ 

cc 

Ph 

»— ( 

w 
o 
w 
pi 
I 

CO 

w 

PQ 
< 



c 



o C _rt 



ei 



g C £ 
B .= >- 



CO Ol OO «— t Oi 
^»< -^ M CO c^ 

U5 l-« 40 .-1 -^ 



O -^ lO O '^ 
OO -H b- CO — . 

c; 05 -rr c-j o 



to CO C^I •-" CO 



•lO OO M C: CO 
Ci (M t— t^ C* 

O -^ O CD (O 



CTi t- OO T-. OO 

a; -^ CO (M »^ 

CO C<l T C^ <M 



1-H -Jr O '— t '^D 



CO r-- 3^ lo <— " 
CO »-- c^ o •*?• 
CO c:5 CO t-- CO 



"<^ CO lO :ji CO 

TT lO c»i ■-^ -^ 

t^ Oi lO CO CO 



C<» (M t^ *-t 



Oi t^ ^r 



CO CO CO -^ 
CO t— Oi c^ 

•rr lO o t^ 



Cl O CO r-t 
CO lO lO o 

»-i CO C3 '^O 



4C C^ >— ' CT) "^ 

lO t- t— CO ac 

-H lO Ci OO <-H 



t^ C^ (M !-■ O 

CO CO O C: "^ 
lO CO CO (M CO 



CO o r» *o i— 

1— C^ Ci CO rj< 
GO CTS C^ CS ■•-< 



O <M CO C5 C5 

»n r^ CTi ^r> -f 

CO -^ *M CO t^ 



CO CO r* CTs t~* 

G:> ,— CO »0 CO 

oo c^ r^ O ci 



CQ r-- CO 

C* C<I CO 

•^ ^ o 

Ci Tt< 01 

CO O '^ 

ITS CO lO 

— CO 
CO 



CO o t^ 
-rp r- o 



1-1 O CI 









O CO CO C^ 




C<I 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


«o 


■^ 


r^ 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


C5 


oo 


o 


rt^ 


N 


!>. 


t- 





CO 










Ci t^ -.s* t^ t- 


i-H C^ CO »o '^ 


oo to 


oo o c^ 


.— I CD Oi lO 


lO 


Ci -^J^ 


1— « CO t^3 




_ -3 




CO d O "^ C-) 


CO O CO «j0 CO 


CO -Ti 


t>- CD t-* 


CO n t-- O 


Ci 


^ c^ 


oo (M CJ 






t— ^5' 1— < CO 05 


C5 CO cr> oo o 


CO '^ 


lO CO ir2 


CO CD O iO 


lO 


1-. !>. 


'M CO 1—1 




"3 .a 




-cji ^H »o a: *o 


O cri ■«** CO crs 


C^ CO 


CO oc -^ 


CD CO t^ IM 


oo 


in -r 


^ r^ W5 


00 






CO ^ CO C:> CO 


CTi t^ 00 tT CD 


CD (N 


'rf -r CO 


CO o" ^' c^ 


lO 


M CO* 


CO CO fM 






CI .— 1 r- -rf lO 


CI »o o CD ira 


O CO 


oo .-. -T 


CD <M CO :0 


o 


CO ^ 


TO <M fM 






00 C5 -^ <N CO_ 


CO O 00 Ci CO 


!>. CO 


-f O CD 


t^ CI O Ci 


"^ 


O <N 


CD CS O 








Co" CO M r^ C^" 


i-< C^ CD »0 


C<l 


<M CO -H 


lO r-« CO 


c^ 


CD ^H 


CI 








«» 























CO O CO Oi O 
l^ O "^ »o o 




»-i CD O t^ 


Cs — 


CO O O 




a> <M 


^ 


<M 


o o o 






, 




O Oi O CO 


Oi t^ 


CI Ci (M 




oc lO 


•^ 


cs 


O CD O 






o 


CO O •— ' W5 O 




'rj* oo ITD lO 


t- CO 


li^ t^ <M 




O CO 


-^ 


CO 


O "<r o 






s 


(^-1 O lO "^ ^ 




CS) CO — ' CD 


CO to 


o o o 




CO CO 


CO 


o 


d »n o 




a s 


lO O GO o o 




lO C^ CO lO 


lO o 


CTi CO r* 




■<T- O 


^ 


'^- ' 


CD O lO 


t» 


£ 1 


CO 


1—1 lO O >^ CO 




CI oo ^ ^^ 


■^ 


(M c; o 




oc tn 


r~- 


Cft 


lO lO 




"S^ 


-a 


CO C5 o oo 




»o -^ C3 r- 


CD 


<N 




^ 3: 


o 


»« 


if3 1—* 




g 




oo CO 1-1 CO 


■»— 1 


1F^ 




CO 


(M 


CO 


'"' 






n 


«» 




CO I-" 






















oo CO C-1 O 05 


I— C5 C5 GO O 


r-. CM 


O lO CO 


CO CO -^ ^ 


"5 


O CO 


CO 05 O 








rji CO Ci CO 00 


CJ (M C5 lO o:! 


oo CO 


O CO O 


CSI CD O ^ 


CO 


T— I 1— I 


CO 00 1— t 








O CO oo QO CO 

lO "^ Ci CO oo 


O »0 »0 (M C-1 


^ o 


— o -*• 


lO lO ^ iC 


t-» 


00 Ci 


^ 2 n! 




a fc 




Tfl ■*:*' C<I en CO 


CJ U3 


o r- »o 


GO .— -rt« (N 




CO CI 


c:) 1— < t^ 




■H 


CO lO Tfi lO o 


CO i-H <M Oi CO 


o_ o 


Xj CI (M 


05 CO O^ c~ 


■"■ 


!-< O 


CO Ci CI 


<s 


£ 5 


C3 
3 


1— < OO Ol CO CO 


lO CO CO (M CO 


Ci o 


CD 00 00 


CO CO CO Ul 


' CO 


O^ CO 


2' :d ^ 




fe o 




c<i c^ '* CO 

CO t-1 


1-1 t— 


o 


i>- ,-1 -rr 1-1 




CO 


1—1 CO 




















CO 










«* 






















c^ • 














o • 


05 



































<M 














o ■ 


CO 






















CO 












OI 














o 


CD 






















CI 








-*A 


















o 
























CO 








i-^ 


•a 


<M 














°°. 


!>. 






















I— 1 






lo 


a 
















00 


r^ 






















£2* 








-a 


^ 














w 


CO 






















TJI 












«» 


















































O <M ^ CD -^ 

CO Crs CO ''J' »-( 


CO O '^ o o 


oo CO 


O lO c 


■^ oo »o c 


t^ 


t^ ir. 


1-^ CO 10 
CD lO 








CD O "O Ol CO 


t^ GO 


^ Oi C 


CO CO iM cr 


lit 


tr^ ■^ 






<M lO -* oo Oi 

o ^ f^ ■* ^ 

-^fi lo cr> 03 CO 


en t^ lO c^ *c 


CO ^ 


O 1^ ^ 


O 'T Cfl C 


>« 


3: ^ 


CD -** 




a 




,_, Q _ ,—1 CD 


lO »c 


'"^ o t^ 


*^ IQ LO t- 


r-- 


'^ "^i^ 


CO 1—" CD 




a § 


•s 


CD T-< .-H CO D- 


CO CO 


CO o_ c^ 


CO t^ CO c 


c 


oo w 


u:? --* CO 


■^ 


a 


CO O CO d »c 

lO CO GO c^ ^ 
•:t* CO 1-* '^ »— 


1—1 en 1^ O C* 


CO 1— 


'TT ^t* or 


TP Ol C> U" 


t^ 


ITS cc 


-^ Ci 




3 


CO CO CO CO c^ 


OO c 


oo M* CO 


r- C5 rr c^ 


cr 


lO '^ 


-rf 'TT' 




f^ >. 


fe 


CD ^ O "^ i-- 


^^ C^ 


0_ O CD 


t^ t^ i-« c- 


cc 


C-1 l> 


1—1 CO CO 




b 




*-r ^*" T- 


O* Co" (N 
04 




' ^ IM* 


c^ >-< 




^ 


1— < 








4A' 
















1 








O^ ^H ^ CO cc 
05 O CO lO -^ 


00 ^ .— . IC ^ 


00 ir: 


o o a- 


CIS irj -^ ^ 


,_ 


CO If 


C: 


1 








t-^ <N 00 CO C: 


OO — 


C^i -^ 1- 


ift O 00 t^ 


• C" 


!>. I> 


CD ■*T' CD 








CO lo -H CO w: 

o CO oo CO ■— 
05 <N -1 ao_ ^ 


ifi" C<l t^ lO <M 


ifi oc 


CO ^ l> 


CO (M CD C 


c 


£2 ?? 


1-* 00 








C5 CO ^- 3C oc 


o -^ 


lO <M -^ 


O - C5 M 


<= 


■rr' oc 


*:: S S 




a s 


-3 


■V lO ^3" Ci CS 


c^ cc 


C^ »0 GC 


■^f oc '<*' -^ 


cc 


■^ -^ 


10 CO c» 


CO 


£■? 


a 

3 


CO ■<*« t^ ^^ c- 

O CO CO CO U" 
l>- '^J* CO »- 


•"*" 00 o o c 
-^ji CO *-• i>- a- 

^ O -^ CM 

CO* 


00* c 
^^ CN 


" ^ CO 1- 
CO CD cc 
CO Oi C^ 


■^ CO -^ ^ 

^H Ca oo C^ 
CO -^ CO 1- 


* c^ 


CO* a 

1-1 u- 
1-t 1- 

1-H 


" ■^ Tt« CD 
) CJ 10 1^ 

1-H 1-1 1-1 








oo C^ CO -^ Cs 
CO O CO *o cs 


O lO 00 TT OC 
lO 00 CO t* »C 


o> cc 


03 O P 


(M -^ CO "<1 

t^ r- CO « 


:> cc 


O 'i 

> Tf4 w 


* -^ 00 CO 

4 10 r- 




il 


-3 


O M CO CO cr 

O) (M O CO 2 
t-^ OO O lO o 


,^ O lO CI t^ 
CO lO CO t- cv 

> i-« CO -V O^ I> 


-^ c 

CJS ^ 

CO cr 


(M CO C^ 


CO CO CO 1- 

Tji r- ■^^ »- 

> oo C5 -V^ C 


5 C 


i i- 


> CO lO ci 
) CO 1^ 00 

* 03 r-l ^H 


M 


a 
a 


lo »c ai" {^ CT 

t- CO —< CO GC 
W3 r^ t^ ■<S* r- 


t-- C^ CS 05 1- 
) OS CO CD oo C 
« lO CD »0 ^H OC 




) 00 CO »r 

(M CO C 
O CD^ cc 


r CO -1 CO oc 

> O Ci lO ■^ 
) CD oo t* W 


f l> 


05 r' 

; s.g 


;' S sf ^' 

) (M 00 -O" 








^ ,-: 


r -^p ci »- 




r -H (M 


<m" f-T 




to" 










«• 


















OS 


























































H 
























































'^ 


8 




c 

f 


_0 

a 

5 


1 s 

11 


1 

! « 

n 


i 1. 

: « 
\ i 


; 1 

1 

3 S 


d c 


i 2 

1 

1 < 




1 

i 


5 -c 

1 ec 


t 

c 

"a 


I 'i 

1 c 

> I 


3 d 


• E 

: -c 

c 

1 'S 

I c 

1 s. 


3 C 


8 a 


il 


> 

'C 
■ i 

li 




i 1 


' a 
. a 


> 


1. 

c 


c 
; J 

"■ E 
) c 


1 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



223 



1-1 ^ OS '^ c 


CO CD «:> c 




h- O OO Cfl CO 1 t^ ^ 


CO CM 


r^ 


»o 




^ 


CO 


OC 


oc 


cc 


c 


o 


t^ 


oc 


in 


-^ 


■-t 


^_l 






oo r^ r— oo w 


•^ O G 


t>- ^ 


o> o c^ cs 


o- 


Oi CS CO G 


cr 


cc 




CC 


T' 




t- — 


CM 


cc 


G 


cc 




QC 


in 


G 




c*3 c; w^ ^^ *" 


to 00 ^- 


c=> a- 


lOC^^iCiCO OOMCa 


■rt 


■^ 




t^ CM 


iC 


CJ 


CD 1-- 


CM 


9£ 


cc 


r^ 


CC 


cc 


CO 




m c> f^ 


-T*l Of 


'S' c^ lO CO oc 


CrSTj<OOOCD t--CTiCOCOCr 


I>. 


G 


cr 


G 


1/3 m ^r 




oc 


■<t 


m 


CC 


in 






§ X 


en un t^ 


Ci c^ cc 


^ G 


oc 


»CcOcDCscD OOC^cDG 


G 


Oi 


CO r^ 


»o 1 CD c:^ -^ 


. *^ 


cc 


-** 


»o r^ 


^" 


o 




C5 ^ 


m rr^ ir 


Tf h- G 


-t 


^ 


CO 0* 'J* -- 


OS I-* »0 OC CO CC 


,-H 




eo' cr 


" cr 


r~ - 


r^ 


CJ 


-rf 


cc 


' oo cr 


" OC 


■^ 




CTi C^ ^■ 


Ift (— 


CTi CO '^ 


CO cc 


CM c^ ^ 


1^ 


u- 


TT to -rr oo cr 


lO 


CM 


G 


cr> 1 CM 


CO G 




•O 1 ^ 


CD CC 


c 


CO 




oo -»r -J* CD oc 


CC! CO — 


<N 


X 


CO cc <- 


i'- 


•— 


m ^ 


CO r^ cc 


l^ 


CO 1^ 


C3i CM 


CO t- 


~ 


t^ 


C*J 


OO -** 


oc 


cO_ 




CO CO '-<•<»' IT 
CO 

*— 1 




l-H Tf 


lO CS 


CM .-<" CsT 


c- 


■^ 


CO -r QO 


1 




" 






1 - 
1 


-^ oc 


2 








-r 




I^ 




f^ «^ 


» G 


o: 








»f3 


CD -rr 'Tj* 




lO CO 05 o> 






CO 




G C4 






oo -^ 




O 




<N CJ 




cc 








C] 




o r^ CO 




00 GO lO O 






G 




00 oo 






c^ 


o 




t* 




CO CO 


(^ CC 








,„ 




■^ ^H CM 




ca o »o '* 






oo 




CO lO 








t^ 




CO 




O »f3 


CO •— 












'Tj' OO t-- 




GO r— t^ CD 






CO 




CM ^ 








G 




Gfi 




(M CO^ 


S c 








iO 


CD 00 ^ 






'^ 


c 


G CO 






*~ 






CD CO 






oo 1- 






r--_ 




^ lO 


CTi *» 








<M 




CO -^ CO 




CO OO CM t-- 






c- 








GO 






oT o 




oT 




OD "O 


c^ 










CS 




CO 1- 


^f 






OO t--. lO 






cc; 








-^ 














'"s^ 




t* 






















CM 






oc 


CO CO 








1—1 






















CO 








o" 


























"^ 




































Tf O C" 


^t« »— 


CC 


cc 


ir 


LO *- 


1-4 CD -^ CS 


c^ 


CM 


oo -rr CO t^ 


lO 


CO CO or 


OO rji c- 


G 


t^ 


G 




■*t 


■^ 


^ 




kO lO ts 


^ cr 


'^ 


G 


G 


^ 


.— 


crs c^ 


CO CJ 


cr 




G 


r- C5 cr 


CO 


lO t^ 




CTi CO CS 


CO G 


c 




cc 


tn 


CO 




t-^ CO u: 


^ 


■n 


ir 


OC 


_ 


c- 


cr 


^ 


O CO C 


cc 


t^ o CO r^ "^ 


'<t 




cr> CM 


ir. 


00 G r^ CM OC 


CM 


G 


c^ 


CO CM 






<3 


cc 


•^ 


cr 


1^ 


CO oc 


lo cc 


CO oc 


cc 


a c^ 


oo CO or 


t>- 


CO o~ 


G 


CM 


■^T" -^ 


C^ OC 


c^ 


»0 CC 


lO CM 




CO TT C- 


_ G 


r^ 


c- 


CJ 


CC 


u: 


OC 


c- 


TT -n* cr 


cc 


CO CO lO ^ 


G 


cr 




■* 


r- 


in 


G CO TT 


CM 


cc 


co^ "^ 


r^ 


^" 


CM 




00*0 0" 


c 


, 


■^ 


^^ 


G 


^. 


^. 


■»*« r-. oo ■.- 


" a- 


-T 


cc 


CO *0 


CC 


^- 




'rj4 cr 


cr 


CO CO r- CM 


■^ 


cc 


oc 


cr 


OC 


■<9< 




1— t CO ^^ 


^ G 


cr 


cc 


•fl 


*i 


CC 


oc 


G 


CO l> 


iC 


CO t-- t^ CM 


cr 


tfZ 




C7i G 


o- 


CM 




G 




in 


G 


IT 


cc 








^ CO TT 


. '^- °^ 


cs 


CC 






oc 


^- 


oc 


oo t^ 


^- 


*0 CM 


C5 lo cc 


t-' 


■^ 


t- 


o- 


C<] 


CM r- Ci !> 


CM 


OO -TT 


GC 


G 




CO CO -- 


" eo" ir 






TT 


«: 


c^ 


C3 


,_ 


,_ 




CM 


'Tt 


lO Oi OO 


CM 




1- 








-T 


OC 


,- 








■^ 




l>^ 








c^ 


























CO 




































ci m c 


•rr 




cr 




•^ 


ir^ c- 


CO G 


^ G 






t^ CM 


!>. 














9 '- 


e 












a> 




c^ o c: 


cs 


t^ 


cc 




CS 


cc 


•«r 




c 


G 


G 






■^ 


t-- cr 
















lO ^ 


G 












t* 




■^ O G 


iO c^ 


M- 




t^ 


c 


tr. 


CO 1- 


^ 


G 






G 


CO TJ- 












G 


CM 


lO cc 


G 












t- 




CO CO c 


co oc 


cr 




C^ 




oc 


cc 


"* 


G 








G 


lO (-^ 












*Q 


oc 


G 


cr 


G 












CD 




CO C5 c 


cc 


. "^ 


C 




cr 


cr 


s ^ 


TT 


Cv 


•rr -^ 






OC 


C>J 


I> 












iC 


oc 


cn U3 


G 












CM 




i-T Oi" i= 


cc 


cc 






a- 


*— 


" o- 


OC 


i>r ^ 


iC 






■^ 


w: 


t- 












cr 


cc 


' G 


CC 


in 












CO 




GO CJ 


IP- 


cc 


w; 






-sj- 


cc 


cc 






Oi CC 






G 


CO cc 












oc 




CM 


cc 


■^ 












JS 




1—1 


CS 


cr 


r^ 






C<1 


c^ 




w 


CM 










CC 


to cc 


















cc 














lO 








o ^ 








^ 


















in 




















CM 














ei 




oc cc 


cs 




cr 




r- 


CC 


'Tf 


cr 


■^ 


IT 


cr 




■* 


cr 


cc 


G 




CM 


lO 




cc 


CM 


cc 


tr. 


m 


r^ 


_ 




cc 




iC 


-T 


CO 




e^ 


^- 


cc 


c~ 


ir: 




cc 


CM 


CM 


GC 


G 


G 


cr 


CM 


cc 


CM 


r^ 


IC 


CC 




cc 


OC 


t- 


cc 




'«' 


cc 


^ 


r- 


t^ 


m 


cr 


'"' 




O l~- '^ 


^" 


cr 


t^ 


cc 


G 


l^ 


OC 


IC 


c 


^_ 


■^ 


"^ 


u? 


cc 


CM 


-rr 


X 


OC 




G 


G 


G: 


cr 




in 


t:: 


cc 




CC 


CM 


<3 


o 




c^ 5^ 


c 


(N 


t^ 




cc 


•* 




CC 


cc 


t^ 


»o cc 


cc 


cc 


IC 


i^ 


CM 


>o 


"^ 




cs 






CM 


G 


a- 


oc 


^ 


r^ 


m 


CI 


cc 


CM 




QC 


c 


cc 


c- 


cr 


'^ 


t-- 


. ^ 


cc 


w: 


■rr 


iC 


cr 


l> 


G 


G 


G 


a- 


■^ 




t^ 


tP 




cc 


C^ 


-^ 


1—1 


CD 


G 


cr 


G 


CM 


•"J^ 




CO "^ 


t<« 


■ ,_ 


cc 


I-- 


cs 


»c 


1-H 


G 


t- 


1^ 


CO -^ 


,_, 


t^ 


' G 


-^ 


CM 


CM 


t^ 




or 


' CD 


t^ 


oc 


•^ 


•^ 




CM 


CM 


-T 


cr 


CC 


" go" 




^ c 




ir: 


5 






cq 




cs 






CN 




c; 


»r: 


CM 


^ 


CM 


CM 






cc 








m 


cc 




■«* 


CM 




"T 




CO 




























G 




























c 
























































































































•^ 




























G 














































G 










































































ui 








































































■^ 




























CO 












































GO 


























CO 




















cs oc 


iC 


G 


^ 




o- 


~ 


cc 


a- 


cr 


G 


CM 


cc 


G 


cc 


CC 


in 


CC 


G 


G 




ir: 


G 


t> 


^ 


G 


cr 


oc 


1—1 


CC 


i^ 


CO 


CM 


^ 




iO a- 


cc 


G 


t^ 






G 




cc 


" 


■^ 


G 




l> 


rr 


'<* 


CM 


^ 


CC 


G 




-* 


CM 




m 


'^ 


CD 


cc 




'^ 


CM 


C75 


CM 


lO 




CO ^^ 


»c 


CC 


^ 1 


cc 


cc 


^ 


« 


•<t 


cs 


CM 


,_ 


G 


OC 


G 


CC 


C~ 


CC 


_i 


cr 




'TT 


C 


c 




oc 


m 


o 


CD 


cr 


in 


,— 1 


1^ 


t^ 




*-1 t^ 


c 


cr 


oc 




cc 


t^ 


"<1 


^ 


c 






»J^ 


cc 


cc 


cc 


OC 


C<1 


-T 


m 




cr 


CC 




r^ 


t^ oc 


m 




cc 


1^ 


IT 


c 


"2 




o cc 


CO 


cc 


■<* 


G 


oc 


CC 




cc 


cc 


G 


lO G 


GC 


^ 


cc 


t^ 


cc 


CM 


G 




•"^ 


- ^ 


a 




CM 


oc 


G 


-<3 


cc 


t^ 


O' 


■^ 


CD 




lO c^ 


tc 


t>- 


^ 


CC 


cc 


G 


t-. 


"^ 


<^ 


■^ 


uO ■* 


C^l 


c; 


' oc 


cc 


CM 


.— 1 


OC 




CM 


cc 


' o 


>c 




I— 


•-*■ 




cc 


t^ 


CC 


,-, 


" CO*" 




-r c 


■*1 


^ 


CJ 


c^ 




iC 




c- 




CC 


I-- !>■ 


cr 




oc 




i-O 


G 


lO 




a- 


t-^ 




a- 


r^ c 


G 


CC 


cr 


cc 


!> 


G 


!>. 




^ fe 


cc 


a- 


ir 


w: 


oc 


iC 


1— 


cc 


c 


cr 


■^ 


CM 


cc 


»r: 


cc 


■^ 


'^ 


CM 


-* 




cc 


CO 


•^ 


cc 


cr 


CM 


t^ 


t> 


»o 


-rr 


!>. 


m 


t^ 




1—1 1— 




cc 


<N 






'"' 


c^ 


■"^ 


"^ 










'^ 


" cs 


cc 


cc 




^^ 














-^ 










^ 




r-t 




1— ' G 


cc 


cr 


cc 


>c 


cc 


cq 


cr 


cc 


»c 


G 


, 1 


'^' 


c- 


G 


CM 


m 


t^ 


t^ 


o 




cc 


•o 


G 


in 


i> 


CM 


cr 


2! 


cc 


SS 


lO 


t: 


•^ 




CO If: 


T 


G 


cc 


■T 




l> 


d 


lo 


■^ 


t^ 


w: 


cc 


t^ 




cr 


CM 


cc 


iC 


■^ 




T— 


^H 


iC 




oc 


l> 


cc 


G 




G 


1—1 


oc 


lO 




t^ QC 


CC 


,_ 


,_ 


O" 


u^ 


•^ 


cr 


G 


cc 


CC 


cc 


-rf 


'Tf 


CC 


t-- 


,_ 


lO 


CO 


c^ 




w: 


■^ 


CC 


CM 


cc 


G 


lo 




c- 




CM 


CM 


•—1 




^t< IT 


c> 


r? 


cc 




cc 


iC 


r^ 


t^ 


G 


^ 


iO cr 






■^ 


t> 




a 


cc 




cr 


''S' 


•*t 


CC 


-r 


CM 


G 


CO 


cc 


§ 


CD 


c- 


lO 




cn f- 


oc 




cr 


^ 


cc 


cr 


oc 


I> 


CS 


o 


o- 


IC 


"rr 


G 


az 


»— ' 


cc 


•-^ 


l> 




CM 


en 


1—1 






iC 


'^ 


CT) 


<^ 


c- 


CD 


CC 


CM 




c^ ^- 


" ^_ 


c 


cr 


c 


IC 


' iC 


c 


^« 


c 


a- 


cr 


" CC 


CO 


,_■ 


w: 


m 


' iC 


CO 


u; 




TP 


" oc 


" cc 


cc 


m 


" CO 


' 'vJ 


on 


G 


CC 


^ 


,—1 


" id 




-er U" 






r- 


cc 


cc 


CC 


cc 


cr 


CM 


ur. 




OC 


cc 


OC 


oc 


■^ 


cc 


lO 






G 


C7- 


cr 


t^ 




CO 


cc 


G 


Tf 


^ 




G 


o 




^ e^ 


1- 


CC 


- " 






cc 




cs 


cc 




CM 




CO 


c^ 


*" 


>C 


cc 




c^ 


>> 


CM 








cr 


lO 


CM 


c^ 






CD 


'"' 


CO 








oc 








































































































O 






























O t^ 


cc 


G 


~ 


G 


-^ 


cc 


•M 


oc 


CC 


^ 


CC 




G 


1- 


cc 


CM 


lO 


OQ 


Q 




C 


Ol 


00 


cc 


C-1 


G 


CM 


CO 


^ 


G 


CO 


^ 


■rH 




o c^ 




CC 


-tr 


CC 






G 


oc 


G 


cc 


UO t^ 


tC 


CM 


oc 


CC 


c- 


CM 


O"' 


3 


»c 


lO 


t^ 


cc 


cc 


G 


CC 


CO 


CC 




"^ 


m 


CO 




CO oc 


cc 


cc 


oc 


c 


cc 


oc 


a- 


cr 


t-- 


cc 


CM 


G 


oc 


ifi 


»— 


»n 


cc 


1— « 


'^ 


-*. 


oo 




cc 


«= 


cs 


,M 


•rr 




t^ 


I-- 


CM 


lO 




CO i/" 


cc 


G 


oc 


c 


cc 


iC 




CC 






c^ 


OC 




if: 


iC 




CM 




G 


£ 


CM 


cc 






cc 


■r- 


or 


C-l 


5 


c 


G 




o* 




CO cc 


c 




«*■ 


G 


G 




■:y 


cr 


cc 


cc 


_ to cc 


■«r 


cc 


■n- 


CC 


t>- 


:C 


t^ 


. « 


Cv 


c: 


. ^ 


c^ 


CM 


o- 


OC 


c< 


cr 


I> 


'^ 


^ 


Oi 




eo u" 


"^ 


cc 


t^ 


CC 


" c 


" en 


" oc 


-^ 


cc 


f— 


t^ Tf 


' OC 


*n 


t>. 


u: 


I-^ 


" r- 


G 


IS 


T 




cc 


CM 


OC 


' o 


" O 




t^ 


' oc 


" »o 


CM 


£: 




O "■ 


C; 




CC 


cc 


ur. 


-* 


-3- 




-r 


cc 


CD t-- 


c 


cr 


t^ 








CC 




iC 


cc 


oc 


-r 




GC 


■^ 


I-' 


■^ 


cc 


!2 


O 


£J 




CO '^ 


■*r 


c^ 


^ c 


iC 


cc 


cr 


kC 


oc 


u: 


■^ 


cr 


CM 




C 


_ c 


C^l 


c< 


T-( 


G 


. is 


lO 


CM 


CM 


cc 


c 


■^ 


OC 


t^ 


^ 


CM 


C3 


C>l 


o 




^H ^ 




cs 








** 


•^ 












*^ 


CM 


CM 


t^ 


' cc 




•" 


1 










CM 


" 










1-H 




cm" 


















































C 


























c 

c 


"i 

c 

C 


1 




c 


' 1 


c 
c 


c 

c 


'C 
a 

1 




q 
a 
a 

C 

C 


c 
ce 

c 




a, 

c 
t a. 

£ 
C 


*> 

er 

C 

t 

c 


IS 


> 
C 

c 
ee 


c 

c 


> 

c 
a 

X 


-T3 

C 
^ s 

t 

ir 


C 
1 « 


1 £■ 
1 


a, 

C 

c 

c 

i2 


a 

D tt 

C 

12 


C 

12 


• J 


J 


c 

c 

J 


.1 

I 

•-3 


2 

i 

c 

a 
a 


1 

c 
c 

1 


CC 

a 

2 


c 
c 


1 

is 


1 

g 

c 

c 


1 





224 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



6 



o 

I 
OS 

to 

05 



I— < 
I— I 

O 

o 

02 

w 

l-H 

H 
^ 

O 
O 

>< 

pq 

CO 

H 

Oh 

o 

w 

I 

CO 

cq 
-1-1 

H 











C<5 


m 


Oi 


irt 


h-. 


t--. 


r:3 


(— ) 


-rt< 


m 


CO 


■n< 


lO 


Oi 


l-H 


CO ^ 


o 


1-1 


CO 1 


to 


o 


»-H 


CO 


^^ 


1 








•a 




CO (M r* CO -^ 


CO oo C^l 00 -rt* 


lO cTi as oo 


CO 


T-l CM CO OS OS 












a 

09 


3 


CO -^ CO oo O 


C<l 1—! oo -^ CT> 


O 1-1 CO o 


o 


O (ZJ •* t-- CO 


OS CM QO 


CO ^ 












O CO ^ -T 


h- 


-t* CO to C^ CD 




CO ^ 












»-< Cq CO Oi 1-- 


CO OS CO 1— • Ci 


oi »o '— < c::i 








































o o. 


CS 






IO CO 00 lO 


Tt" 


lO 1— 1 t~- OS t^ 














-a 

CQ 






-Tt' l-H a- lO 


cc 














CO oo oo C5 CO 


^-H Ol i-H iO I>- 


O •-• CO CO 


to 
















lO ^ — — 


C4 <M <M -Tti oo 


»-H »— t CO "O 
(M 


CO 


—« CM CM to 
CM 


''J*'" CO <M 


rji CM 












«» 
































05 ^ 




-r -^ i>. CI CM 


oo Ml IO 


"2 S3 








■s «, 




C5 


C<1 CO o 


CO CO cn> '^3 -^ 


'^ 


CO t^ 
























Tf< 


ira >o 




CM CO -^ crs -^ 


CM CM Ci 


l-H QO 








ii 


1 




oo CO o 


■riH r^ (M 1-* crs 


CO 


•a o 
















o 


oo -^ c; 


iO ••-O oo CO o 


oo 


CO CO 




CO CO CO t-^ oo 










at 


CO 


C<) CO 


-rjT |>r lO '^ CO 


(M 


Oi 03 




CO O CO -* CJl 


O CI o 


oo l-H 










U^ 






CO CO ^ 


1— t 


CO Ci 




CO !-• -^ CM to 
















CO 


t^ l-l 




(M ^ 
















































■^ 




'^ 




l-H 
















«^ 
































as '^ CO cc 


^ 


e-1 t^ CO OS -^ 


!>. CO CO 


CO C3S 












CO (M »0 (M -^ 


o »o Ol C<I o 


O Oi to -< 
















_ -S 








CO l-H 00 to 


o 


r- CD o oo CM 


t^ OS as 


CM CO 












|>- l-H .O CO cc 


CO CO »0 CO 


r^ 














S c. 




O (M t^ ^ iC 


t- CO lO to GO 


O to t~- CO 


c^ 


CO !>• to to "O 










oo 


o '£ 










'Tt^ 


CO O CO ^rt* t^ 


-tM CO oo 


CD O 










I-- C5 CO <0 -^l 


i-H CO ^ t^ -^ 


CO ^ (M ti3 


c^ 
















lO 00 oo CO CO 


•-J <M i-f r' "^ 


O T-t ■^ oo 


to 


















o ^ — — < 


(N M IM <M CO 


-^ T-H CO CO 
CM 


CO 


l-H l-H CM to 
CM 


'«J^ CO CM 


CO CM 












<» 


























00 






as o o "^ 


^ 




d 


i-M 


t^ O l-H 


OS 


OS 


o 


o 














3 


oo 






-rr O CO (M 


C5 




o 


to 


CM O oo 




















N 












CO 




CO 


to 


OS O CI 


CO 


CO 


to 


o 












w 


























w 












a 

2 S 


■^ 


(M 






CO O (M CO 


to 




CD 


'^ 




















1 


»o 








»-H O O oo 






C<J 


CO 


to oo CM 


s 


■«:t^ 














^3 


o 








,-H C3 l-H kO 

to 






CO 




CM 


l-H 


















pq 


«» 














CM 




00 


























^ t-- O Oi 


^_ 


t^ CO CO -^ oo 


CO l-H ^ 


CO oo 












(M -rr "O wo -rt 


lO »o t^ t- "^ 


'Tt* CO l-H r-' 
























OS t-- iO CO 


D- 


O CO CO o to 


^ CO CO 


t-* to 








a S3 


■3 








cc 














CO C^ Ci OO C 


lO (M -^ CO t^ 


CO O t- t^ 














«> 


2 5 




-r CO CO C CC 


Oi CO CO I— « r- 


,— 1 CO oo oo 


cc 


lO CO to OS as 


CM CO O 


CO t-- 








fc, o 


C^ .r-. *-H Tji 


c^ ,-* oo 


1-1 to 


to 


1—1 












i! 


-3 




. lO - - 

. !:o ■ • 
. CO • • 
















fcO 


a 




• 


















-1 


fa 




■ ■ •» • 
























1 o O r- t-^ ■— ' 


lO »0 ^ 1-1 


c- 


> o r^ CM oo CD 


s ^ '^^ 


oo ■* 












o h^ CO I-- cr 


? O CO t-- o ^ 


GO lO CM 1-H 


I' 














a 






3 t-- ■^T' -rf -^ t— 


oo oo Ci CO 


c*- 


) CO i-^ ^f -r CM 


^ $s -^ 


OS CO 








■§ 








rv 






^ ^ 








a § 


CO O C» C5 C- 


J C- lO CO cc o 


to CM CO ^ 


c^ 












■>(< 


£ c3 


a 

3 
fa 






Oi a:: '-j:> a:> 


a 


s O ;-; CM r^ ;;^ 


oo CD TfH 


to CI 








■^ >. 






















^ t^ Tj< CO l> 


o oi o oo C<I 


to CO CM '^ 
















o 






^ ^ CO 


l-H T-H 


*" 


i CD r^ CM 


^ - 


l-H l-H 
















CM ^- CO CO 


a 


3 l-H CM i—« CM to 


O C<J o 


l-H GO 












1-1 CO o T-H »r 


3 CO lO C^ CD lO 


^I^ oo CO to 


-^ 




















■1 ^-« lo cr; o c/: 


C^l 1— t cs -^ 


cc 


■) lO to OS t^ CD 


t^ CO cc 


CM T-< 








si 


-3 








c- 


1 CO CM CO lO 1—" 












^ O 05 o ^ 


r< CO oo -^ C3 to 


OS 'rt^ CO t^ 


cc 












CO 


2 -o 


^ 






tP CO OS OS 


rf 


3 O O ^ ^ CO 


CO to a- 


■^ ^ 














•r 














fa 


t-- CO '-' 1- 


■4 C<J CM C^ 1-1 o 


l-H l-H lO CM 






















-^ 


CM 




















«» 




























o to r^ CM 


CI 


3 t^ to CO to CM 


CD ^ 1- 


CO OS 












t^ c< i^ oo *r 


5 t-- r^ lO 00 t> 


to CM to !>• 


^ 






















<XJ -rf -rP O-t 


^ 


H CO to t-- CO l-H 


CM t^ CM 


CO CM 










-§ 






















a 5 


cni CTi wo CO a 


:: oi o Oi 00 oc 


CO 00 OS o 


*" 












M 


2 5 

fa M 








CO l-H 1^ CO 


f> 


) lO t^ CM CO O 


-TP oo cc 


O CO 








-7^ to -t^ Ci T- 

io t^ c<i r* r 


-i C-1 Ci C> r- to 

P 0> CD t>- r- ( l-H 


<z> CIS cc oo 

CO CM to CO 


t^ 


i-« CO CM OS CD 


»0 CO ^ 


OS CM 












(M 


T-l Tf 


^ t-- 


_ 


^ to CM 


l-H l-H 1-- 


l-H l-H 












•» 




















m 












T 


3 










































t-H 










'. ■*- 






2 

3 C 

5 2 











r 


dward 
eorge. 
illiam 




i 1 

a 
: 5 "c 
















1 






o 
o 




c 

£ 
a 
a 
c 
a 
2 


j 

< 


9 t> 
u a 

! 2 


i 
2 


3 i 
s : 

n 


; 1 

' c 

■c 


1 

p. 


0- 


1 

•1 


■i 


c 
'i 

n 


a 

J c 

3 C 


3 tS 




e 

d 


a -i i 

3 o- ? 


1 


o 


1 


. -T3 

* c 

; * 

> c 

) c 


a 









SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



225 



05 


■^♦« 


Oi 


■^ 


■-H 


oa 


oo 


OS 


•* 


T-l 


o 


^_^ 


CO 


>o 


t-^ 


, 


■^ 


CD 


O) 


to 


1 


-p <o ■»t< 


o 


t- 


Oi t^ CD »0 '^J* 


05 


CO 


O CO c=> C^ 


CO 


CD 


00 


CO 


0> »-H OO 


CO 


lO 


t— 1 »0 CO OS CO 


M5 


CO 


O CO '^ t^ 


CO 


00 


CI 


£2 


CO C^ CD 


r- 


e^ 


CO CO '-' r- »o 


CJ 


oo 


CO r^ o CO 


crs 


t^ 


OS 





O <^ CO 


CO 


c^ 


CO C3 CO T-" CO 


o_ 




CO CD O GO 


CO 





10 


CO 
























Oi m ir. 


■^ 


on 


CO -^ CO C^ 1^ 


r—t 


CO 


CO CI CO CM 


■^ 


^ 


>o 


CM 


■^ CO t^ 


^r 


CO 


O CD Ci CO O 


OS 


eq 


t~^ ^ ^ ^ 


S 


t-- 


CD 


CM 


lO iO CO 


oo 


"**< 


O t* 00 (-- i-H 


lO 


oc 


CD CM CO CO 


00 


»o 


»o 


10 
























CSl" CO 


^ 


CO 


ci lo T-T w ^' 


t^ 


C3S 


«» 








CO 


CD cr> 


~ 


»ft 


o r-^ r^ 1^ 


t^ 


o 


CO CO CD OS 




in 




OS 


as CO 


CO 


CO 


CO C5 e^ oi 


o 


C4 


1— ' CO GO O 




>n 




CM 


O CO 


^o 


!>. 


.— t t-- O CI 


e^ 


CO 


O ^H CO Cfl 




CD 




-t* 


CO CD 


t-- 


K 


-rr CO »o CO 


c^ 


»o 


CO oo OO CD 




OS 




10 


lO ^^ 


Os 


Oi 


e^ CD cj e^ • 




O 


^^ t-— CO OS 




»— 1 




I'- 


CO CD 


33 


O 


O d CT> 


CO 


,_)' 


ej o t-" -5^' 




l>^ 




CM 


C^ C4 




■^ 


o ej lo 


Ci 




lO to CO CD 




l>- 




CO 






1— 1 


'qi CO 


o 
1— « 


CO_^ 
Os" 


«» 








CI 


CO lO OS 


CO 


CD 


-?> -1 e^ r- ■r-< 


CO 


.^ 


OS ^ CM 


-r 


^ 


OS 


CD 


s t^ ^ 


K 


CO 


CO oo -rf »0 "<f 


00 


'"' 


OS ^ Cq 1-4 


CO 


1—1 


00 





OO ^f GO 


c^ 


t^ 


O b- CO CO CO 


CO 


b- 


OS »o >o 


•XT 


CI 


OS 


OS 


O lO CD 


o 


CO 


^ CO CD -^f lO 


o 


ea 


CI ai eg CM 


cr. 


VD 


OS 


■f 


»0 OO CD 


TT 


e^ 


--< e^ CO cn CO 


oo 


r^ 


ei 00 CD OS 


CO 


CO 


»o 


»o 
























OO QO »0 


■*f 


t^ 


CO -^ ^- "M t-- 


oo 


t— 


-H T-H r- 


'^ 


t-- 


»o 


OS 


V-H u^ t^ 


CO 


e^ 


O '^ t^ t^ O 


OS 




CM CD T-i t^ 


S 


OS 


CD 


£? 


iC -^ CO 


oc 


CO 


O CO CO CO •-* 


■^ 


iO 


CO ^ CO CM 


GC 


•^ 


»o 


CM 


<m' CO 


^^ 


cd' 


e^ »o ^H CO ■<** 


CD 


CO 


«» 








CO 




I'd 




o 


-rj« »o -*< cr> ■»*" 


(-, 


^-4 


CM 












CI 




(M 




o 


oc t>- O »0 CO 


o 


CO 


^ 


M* 









10 




oo 




o 


CD oo t- lO ^ 


^ 


OS 


^^ 00 


1— < 














CO 




c> 


CD Oi O O CC 


ea 




CI 


CM 









»o 




C4 




o 


»>. ^ CO CD Oi 


CD 


t^ 


00 10 


•"• 









■^ 








lO 


t-T OO lO CO « 


CCJ 


-^ 


1-1 !>. 











OS 








c:i 


lO CO CO t^ 

co 


o 


CO 

OS 
CD 


«» 




10 






10 


Ci l>- M* 


(M 


to 


wi CO r^ CD ■--< 


o 


-"^ 


CO 


^ 


OS 




CO 


t^ CO t^ 


t^ 


T" 


ej CO o t^ »c 


CO 


t^ 


'Tl' CD lO 


00 


»c 




crs 


iO Ci "^ 


OO 


t^ 


CO C7> O CO CO 


oo 


e^ 


CD CO -^ 


OS 





t>- 


00 


iO -^ cc 


iO 


CO 


t^ e^ CO »o -n" 


lO 


r- 


OS 10 CI 


a~ 


CC 


Cl 


-^ 


CO 1-. 1-- 


CO 


o 


O CO t^ o t^ 


CO 


o 


00 -^ CD -- 


o~ 


CC 


a- 


00 


r-T oT eg 


(M 


Ci 


O* C:- CO O CT] 


I-, 


CO 


^ 10 


CI 


^ 


CC 


CI 


1-H M 




lO 


'^ .-H fH CO CO 


CO 


■^ 
^ 

«• 


CM 




CD 


t 


-J1 

CM 










^_, 








o 




CO 




























lo 








to 




■^ 




























CS 








t^ 




CT) 




























CO 












GO 




























CC 








r^ 




Oi 




























^ 








■rr 




QO 




































n* 




o 




























•^ 












o 

«» 




















OO CD cr 


r^ 


CD 


ea CD t^ O c^ 


^ 


^ 


CO CO »-^ 


oc 


c 


CC 


^ 


<M <M ■* 




C4 


.-H CJ lO '^i c^ 


e; 


o 


CO »0 CO lO 


■rr 


t^ 


CC 


eg 


OO CO "■ 


CD 


cs 


C5 CO oi ej CC 


,_4 


e^ 


CO ^H CC 


kT 


^. 


9: 


eg 


OO C5 cr 


§ 


«3 


CO »0 '* <M CC 




'^ 


^ 5S 2? ^ 


OC 


1- 


CC 


CM 


Oi CO ^- 




eg 


^ ^ »o o ^ 


c< 


CO 


CO o:> CC 


r- 


CC 


t- 


""l 


CM Oi c^ 


cC 


CD 


CO CO CO o t^ 


eg 


e<r 


10 CM CD 10 


u- 


CC 


»c 


co" 


•^ r- c 


' eg 


t^ 


Oi lO CD ^ C^ 


^ 


r- 


*0 CO "O 


ir 


CC 


CC 





CO »c c^ 


CC 


r^ 


cq o 03 CD -T 


•^ 


-^ 


CO CM 


CC 


C] 


CC 


r- 


rH *-< 




F-( 


f-T e« r-l »- 


•M 


o 

CM 


«» 








fH 


-t" •— ' o* 


> C" 


e>i 


■^ O C^i C5 o- 


CO 


-rt^ 


CM 


iO '^ 


CC 


1^ 


1^ 


CO 


CO Ci c 


1— 




f-H i-< 00 (M •* 


CC 


OS 


•-^ 


GO CC 


c- 





CI 


CM 


»— t lO t^ 


- (■- 


c^ 


d CO CO t^ C" 


CC 


r^ 


»o 


CO »C 





w 


'^ 


-^ 


,— i CO O" 


> .— 


lO 


—« CO -^ »-• o 


o 


lO 


•*1' 


CD d 


I> 


oc 


r- 


t-- 


Oi t- c 


> »r: 


. ^ 


oi i-H o a> I-. 


"T 


»-- 


lO 


C7> C 


c: 


O" 


r^ 


lO 


>o CJ c 


> eg 


CO 


oo e* e^ oo c 


»r; 


t^ 


CO 


cd' -* 


" c: 


CC 


c< 





O CO u" 


5 «: 


c^ 


CO F^ -^ o o 


■^ 


c^ 




CI 1- 


c: 




Cs 


to 


OJ -^ ^ 




C-. 


^H oo ej o c^ 


) c: 


$ 55,4 


«« 










CM 


C^ CD "1 


■* U" 


C-1 


CO ei »o CO »(" 


> CC 


00 


»0 -f CO t- 


r- 


IT 


CC 


t- 


OO Ci Cv 


1 CC 


»o 


CO CO CO O:' "^ 


CC 


CO 


OS CD 





oc 


CC 


t— « 


<M ^- ■- 


H c: 


eg 


'"T CO C^ '^ C 


ea 


CO 


CM CO C^ 


,— 





CC 


^ 


»f5 CO C 


> C*" 


t— « 


•^ -Tf o eq '- 


C 




CD 00 ^- 'TT 


D- 


> ^ 


c 


»2 


S o ^ 


^ Ch 


00 


C5 *f I-- to Cr 


s C 


1* 


1-H Cs OS F- 


u- 


CC 


1— 


»o 
























d t^ c 


i e- 


o 


i>r T-T o o» CC 


S I^ 


I^ 


»0 CD C^ 


»r 





h' 


00 


tn •—• cr 


' c 




^ O '-H ^ CC 


5 C 


o 


M* !>. r- OC 




Cv 


c 


£? 


o -^ ^ 


H oc 


a- 


»0 CO CD O oc 


) CT 


-T- 


CJ 


c 









•"^ 




eg 


C^ CO -- 


4 F- 




«» 








«» 
























s 
















j 
























•T3 
















9 


a 












: c 


• c 
a 


i 






a 
a 
o 




; J 










! 1 


1 

or 




i 


; s 

3 a 




c 
c 

1 


: t 

1 c 

i s 


1 

i s 
:6 


i J 




t 


^ 1 

: > 


13 
: "o 

H 

4 




1 a 

1 c 




c 
. c 

• I 

c 


i 

! i 


11 


1 :« 





226 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



a 



a. _rt 



te 




a 


S^ 




«i 


a 


tM 


M 








cq 





- -3 



O cj 00 

i" o -a 

n 



j3 a 

O (X, 



a I -3 

o ^ a 
it S3 3 



^^1 



a 2 -S 









OS o 


CO 


1« 

CO 


CO 
CO 






CO 


CO 
CO 


o 

CO 


CO 




o 


CVJ 


QO 


S!? 


o 

CO 


CO 


CO 

oo 






(M 


CO 


CO -i** 

CO ^ 


O O 


C5 

QO 


CO 

o 


CO 
CO 


cc 

g 


p 

CO 


CO 
lO 


o 

CO 
CD 


lO 


CO 
CO 


CO 

lo 


CO 

oo 


CO 
CO 


g 


o 


1 


s 


o 


»o 


cO 


CO 

CO 


o 

CM 


CO 00 


CO CO 
CO cc 
lO CI 


05 

to 

OO 


to 


CO 


o 




C5 


CO 

g 






»o 

CO 


co 

CO 


CO 

-r 


CO 


s 

o 


o 




CO 

3 


CO 
lO 


CO 




CO 

o 








CO 


o 




(M 


l-H 


00 


^ 


N 


^^ 


T-^ 


l-i 


CSJ 


(M 


CO 




Cs 


co 




1— 1 


*— < 





1— ' (M C5 a:> CD 
CO r- CO CO 1— 

CS O t>- CO iC 



CO CO Ci O "O 

CO 00 CO cc C:; 

•o oi OO o r-- 

t-- 1-H CO O 



CO CM »-* lO CO 

t~ oo CO CO CM 
O f-" O OC CO 



CO O CO O (M 

^r CO CO »r3 O 

■^ 00 i-< C^ CO 



CI t^ CO o o 
.-H CM t^ CO »0 

-tt CO CO CM t-- 



tO CM oo CO C5 

,— I CO to ^-t *o 

CO Ci t^ oo O 



O CO CO d t^ 

■^ r^ CO i^ oo 

CM CM •-* CM O 



CO 1-- CO *C O 
CM lO CO -^ O^ 

CO CO oo O 00 



r^ lO 35 o CO 

Ci CM -^ O CO 
t-- oo CO «— CM 



CO CO oo o t^ 
O c:^ to CO '— t 
oo C^ 05 CO CO 



■^ 00 cr> CO CM 
o "^ :r= o 05 
t^ TP -^ to oo 



CM ^ oo O 



o o t* 



OO CM 



(M 


CO 




C5 


O 


to 




o 


IM 


to 






o> 


CO 




c^ 




CD 



ti* Oi Ir^ O -*" 
CO CO GO cr> O 
CM to r^ iO CO 



tn to ci o »o 
to CO c^ c-^ o 
to to CC T— t ;3 



CM »-< 1— ■^ 



O lO — 1 o 
O O ■<*' -H 


1^ «> 

CO -t< 


o « t^ t^ 

JO O *-i CO 
^ (M O — 1 


— to 

—I CO 






CO — ■ O 00 
t^ O lO CO 


rt IM 


lO 





CO CO to C-1 

CO CO O O 
CO CM O C: 



y—t • O "^ 



■^ O CO to ■—« 
O 1— I to "^ to 
OS O »0 t— CM 



to O f-* t^ CO 

CO oo r^ 1-H to 
O to t^ c:' t^ 



o 
o 



QC r^ Oi 



i-H t^ CM 



■^rr^ CO to o o 

oo CO tO — » i-^ 

CM »-( O Ci to 



Oi to ^t* oo o 
Tf r- GO 1— » o 
t^ r- o r- oi 



■^ oo CO to -t^ 
rf* to CM 1^ to 

OS c^ c^i -r c-o 



CM I— Cft O". o 

CM -^ tO CO CM 

»-H .-H CM 



oo —I to CO CO 
C-. ■* TP to o 



•^ i-H O CO O 
f-t CM ^-H 00 CO 
■rr a: J: CO CM 



CI ■•-< CO o: to 

T-1 CO CO Ci t^ 
t^ t- »-H CO Ci 



to C5 CM r^ to 

CO CTj t- 1— ( o 

c; t-- ^-H lO '— < 



,-1 lO ^H CM ■--( 

,— I i>. (-^ CO r- 

co o CO -rr to 



■^ t^ to CO oo 
»0 i>- ■^' oo oo 

*-« CO CO 



O Ci to -** t^ 

1— I CO CM O oo 
C5 to CM CM -^ 



■>.*l OO to C5 CO 
■^ to -^ 05 CO 
.-H 1-t oo 



CO to t^ lO oc 

-rr CO C-1 •-« CM 
-^ .-. CO t^ to 



t^ O CM O to 
CM 1" CO '— ' b- 

CM OO -rr CO '— ( 



■iA 






> 

S "o rt ^ 

W DO O CO 

-< ca CQ o o 



o 33 

fa _ 

a .2 

o a 

«t^ o 



O O O Q Cm 



C5 CO O CO o 

CO Ci o »o oo 

to CO C^l O CS 



O CO CO -^ t-- 
CM '— ' to O O 
■^ tO '^ CO l^ 



-a ^ _'o 

b^ [£< Cx:« O CO 



w -^ CO oo CM 
CO CO CO O CM 
CO CO O; O T— I 



00 cn .-H 40 CO 

■.-( CO CO CO CO 
CO CO OS to CM 



to O '-H oo tO 
C^i »0 C> i-H CO 

-t' CJ T £- O 



kO CO Oi to to 

CO Tt' t^ CO o 
CO CM i-< »-i f- 



f t— d -rr CO 

00 CO oo C5 to 
CM CO *-< 



oo t-. CO oo -^ 

»0 CO O CM oo 
to CO to CO ♦-" 



O to CO »-t h- 

t- CO oo .-4 o 

■^ CM f-H r- o 

t-* CM ^H 



to CO CO CM CO 
t-* -^ CO CO t^ 

1— I t-» CO ^ oo 



t-" CO t>- T-f O 

to CO 00 -»< 
--^ i-i CM 



1-1 CM oo CM O 

o CO -^ oo o 

CO CO !>• to oo 



CO t— C^ CO Ci 
C3 t- CO ■«--" CO 
CM CO CM CO to 



to -^ oo 1— I -^ 

r^ r^ o> CO CO 

CO *5' »-H GO CO 



CO CO CO t^ t-- 
to O ■* C5 oo 
t-- t- »-i CO ■"*« 



•^ to ^•^ CM ^ 

CO '-' to CO o 

to CO o o o 



oo to o:p CO en 

t— CM CO CM oo 
O C-J CO CO t-- 



bO 



t* :^ 



s §•■§ g.3 

a 33 kJ J S 



o =2 a 

coo 

** ft s 

O) o o 

Z; Z Z 0- (1, 



_g o 

ll 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



227 







a- 


<-5 


nr 






on 


M 


xn 


o> 


»ra 


t^ 00 


o 


<rj 


w: 


(- 


oo 


CO 












or 




cc 




"t* 




r- 


t^ 


^ 


CO 


^ CO 




ry 










»r 








Tp CO 


iC 


o: 




cc 


as 


CD 


CD 




o 


F-t 


00 -^ 




,_, 


»r 


r^ 


o 


CD 


<N 


o 


<M 


CO 








o- 




^T- 








CO 




■V ^H 


r-. 


<x 


or 


c< 


zr> 


CT 


■^ 


Ci 


o 


CO 
























l-H O 






c; 






C^ 




•- 


CD 


CI 


■^ 










CO 








£1 


«* 




C^ 




on 






<— < 




r^ 


CD 


^ , 


o 








CJ 






o 




'^ 


CO 


<N 


l-^ 




t^ 




ro 






'^ 




CO 


■^ 


t-- 


t^ 








CC 






CO 




or 




■^ 






CO 










r- 




J^ 


C^ 
































(^ 




T-H 






co 




cr 


or 


CO 


t^ 




















Tf 








CO 










CD 








t- 


CO 




CO 










'"' 








«» 


^ 
»» 




CT 


OJ 


or 


(N 




on 


cc 


OS 


OO 


Ift 


t- t^ 


O 


3- 




t^ 


a> 


ec 


CC 


-^ 








or 


O 


cc 


I-- 


Oi 




■^ 


f>1 


JJ 


lo 


^ lO 














r^ 


cc 


CO 




■^ !£) 




oc 




«: 




CD 


X 




CO 




CO CO 




o 


xr 




■^ 


CT 


»c 


cq 


oo 


»o 




cc 




a- 


'I 






o 








■^ 00 


t~- 


or. 


on 


c^ 


CO 




■"a 


oc 


CO 


o 


























cc 




c^ 










»- 


-rf 




'^ 










CO 








Zi. 




CO CO 










o 








tf 


r- 


eq «3 










o 








CO 


"^ 


w -^ 










o 








VJ* 


■^ 


r^ oo 










o 








CO 




O C5 










o 








o 


c^ 












o 








CO 


r^ 


CT> 










oo 
oo 








CO 
























ft» 


«» 



b» CD oo -<** CO 

■^ O O 1^5 Oi 

t^ t- OO r* CO 

O 05 d 05 

oa -n* O *-« 

o «-< 



o o c^ -** -^ 

^-1 CD »0 OO C^ 



o> t^ "^ c^ -^ 

C^ CO »o -^ t— 
CO ::^ lO Ca oo 



C<l ^ 
























CO 




















^rp 




















00 




















OO 




















Oi 




















OO 




















o 




















OS 




















«» 


CO C5 


o 


Oi 


CD 






■n" 


O 


, 


CO 


TT CD 


CO 


CD 


»0 


a^ 


^^ oo 


CO 


O 


cs 


"^ 


OS CD 


(M 


on 


CO 


CO 


■"^ — 


on 


CD 


cc 


t-* 


c<) u: 


cs 


o 


c: 


i>. 


^ CO 




o 


I'- 




Oi CO 


C*4 


t;; 




'— ' 


t^ TT 


ir^ 


O 


'<*■ 


c^ 


O lO 


C5 






Cl 


CO OS 


r^ 


r-* 


cc 


t— 


C4 C^ 


CT 




c^ 


CO 


r- t-- 


CO 


■^ 




CO 


CO iC. 


''f 


'^ 


i^ 


t- 


iO CD 




CM 


t-- 


OS 






















C5 






»- 




(N i-H 


o» 




c 


■* 


d 


*^ 








*-t 








-r 
«» 


t^ »r: 


, 


OS 


<M 


lO 


Ci CO 


o 




t^ 


-^ 


O CD 


O 


CD 


CJ 


CO 


^^ CO 


»o 


OO 




CO 


1-1 -rr 


on 


CD 




r- 


-H CD 


CO 


r- 


OC 


o 






TT 






^ c; 






tr. 




-^ r- 


CD 


-^ 


UU 


Os 


CD oo 


Oi 




cc 


OS 


■«1« oo 


Cv 


CO 


O 


C-J 


"^ oo 


O 


OS 


■^ 


(M 


t^ c^ 


^r 


o 


Cv 




Tf- O 


CO 


CC 


cc 


CO 


^ G 


c 


1— I 






o ^ 


(M 




■^ 






















•^ 


^H 








'a' 






If: 
c* 


OS 


Oi CC 


C^ 


CO 


O 


-rf 


iC -^ 


OO 


fN 


Cs 


t-- 


O) oc 


oc 


o 


OC 


O 


OS CO 


CO 


-^ 


o 


r* 


C<1 ^ 


oc 


o 


<M 


Oi 


CO !>■ 


o 


n 


cc 


CD 


lO t^ 






■rr 


t— 


■f r-l 


OfJ 




■^ 


Ci 


w »c 


oo 


t^ 


o 


■<r 


O 00 


Oi 


o 


o 


OS 


»-l -^t 


CO 


y^ 


t-- 


IM 


c: M 


^M 


Oi 


IT 


,^ 


CO c 


c 


CO 


Cv 


CO 


<N Ci 


Of) 


r^ 


CC 


O 


lO ,- 




CO 


c 


CO 


CD oo 


Oi 


-tj* 


cc 


*— < 






















oc 


•^ 








o 






or 










o 
03 






-a 

is 


£f 






! 1 


T 




^ 


c 
c 

c 

j 


1 




CO 






3 


s 


i: 

1 


1 


1 


Virgin 
Wayo 

Wiilia 

Winch 


b- 


• H 



228 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 
I 

CO 
I— < 

I 



O 

Q 

CO 

W 
I— I 

H 

o 
o 

>^ 
m 

CO 

w 

H 

CO 

Pi 

W 
02 



pq 













c^ 


CO 


^ 


(M 


t^ 


00 


CO 


00 


W3 


C5 


OS 


GO 


(O 


CD 


t^ 


OS 


t* 


»— t 


^^ 


-^ 


1-^ 


CD 


in 


QO 


ol 












t^ (O 


00 


00 


"^ 


t^ 










Cfl 


Cft 


00 


'— " 


'— ' 


co 





CD 


OS 


0; 


CM 


CO 


CD 


'^ 


C<l 'tJ* 








s 




CD 10 


_, 


CO 


_, 





CD 


CO 


CO 


h- 


in 


in 


OS 


I-- 





CI 


00 


■^ 


,_, 


CO 


in 


-^ 


in> 


-^ t^ 






"S 




■^ CO 





OS 


CO 


C7i 


CD 


t^ 







CD 


^ 


■n* 


co 




CD 




CO 


»- 







CO 





'S* CM 






U) 




CO i— " 


(M 


C3 


Oi 


CO 


10 




CO 


r^ 


CO 


•M 


CO 


in 




t* 


in 


oa 


CO 


GC 


t^ 


CO 





CO CO 









.H 


^ 




»-« '^f 


■0 


CO 


<M 


t^ 




00 




<m' 


0' 


in 


CO 


in 


■»*' 


CO 


CO 


co' 


c 


CM 


CO 


-^r 


t^ 


**7 0" 






P4 


ja 




■^ CO 




CO 


CO 




00 


l« 




00 




CO 


CO 


■«t< 




■"i^ 


CM 


■*r 




CM 


-rj^ 






CM ^ 





















CO 




























CO 


















•» 


















































**-! 






*o 10 


C^ 


■^ 


b* 





^rt* 


CO 


c^ 


,_ 


in 


CO 


CM 


OS 


t^ 


OS 


05 


tP 


1-- 


~ 


^ 


CM 


cs 


OS 









■*j 




40 r^ 


CO 


Cs 


r-i 


■^ 


C^ 


t^ 


CO 


m 


CO 





t^ 


00 


CO 





'^ 


in 


CO 


t^ 





t- 




CO i-H 








a 


a 

OS 




1-H t^ 


l^ 


CO 


m 


10 


ir- 


cq 


^»< 


■"Tf 


-^ 


CO 


1— 1 


00 


in 





m 


Cl 


CD 


OS 


CO 


cO 


CM 


rjl •— 1 








-^ 


»o 




C5 


o: 


(M 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CD 


00 


CO 




*-i 


OS 


-rj< 


in 


r- 


in 


CO 


in 


OS CO 






S 




10 ^ 


era 


cc 


01 


0^ 


CO 


00 


^~l. 


00 





OS 


CO 


l~- 


-^ 


CO 


■^ 


1-- 


in 


00 


00 


to 





in in 




Oi 


a 


1 




t>r 0' 


(M 


CO 


OC 


0" 


t^ 


m 


oc 


C/D 


CO 


OS* 





in 


Tf 


CM* 


CO 


05 


a-. 


oc' 


CM 


^f 


cc 


00 CO 








^ T 


-r 


CO 


■Tt* 


<M 


■^ 


cq 




CM 




'^S' 


•^ 


r^ 


•^ 


-rtH 


CO 


CO 




-* 


■^f 


CO 




CO CO 






a 














OJ 






'"' 








1-H 














in 












'3 
13 


.g 




«* 










'"^ 














































^ CO 


CO 


10 


QO 


■^ 


I>- 


CO 


!>. 





1^ 


b- 


CO 


OS 


t- 


t-- 


CO 


^_, 


CD 


in 


I-- 


CD 


CO 


CO CO 






*t5 


•»A 




»o 


CT5 


05 


00 


t^ 







r^ 


•^ 





'J' 


CO 


'-^ 


t'^ 


00 


0- 


CO 


•-H 





t^ 


CO 





in ^ 









a 

as 




CO CO 


CO 


Oi 


C^ 


C5 


00 


oc 





CD 


t^ 


CO 


,_, 


'^ 


r- 


,_, 


00 


00 





a> 


oc 


in 


CO 


■^ CC 






a 




CO -^ 


Oi 


»o 


c 


m 


OS 


CO 


CO 


cq 


in 


•^ 


or 


'■*' 




CO 


t- 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 








.2 


S 




(M <^ 


CO 


•rr 




t^ 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


oc 





CO 


m 


I-- 


0: 


00 







in 


■^ 


t^ 






00 n 




00 


'■3 

2 










■<** 





CJS 


t^ 


C3 





Oi' 


t— 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


^ 


■* 


00 


C-: 


,_, 


CO 





in 





CM 


cm' t^ 










Oi 


CO 


w: 


CO 


10 


10 


'* 


CD 


CO 


CO 





■^ 


CO 


CM 





t'- 


in 


00 


CM 


r- 


CO 


CO CO 






a 




CI CO 










OS 


CO 




CM 








CM 




CO 




1-H 






CO 









































































iC in 


CO 


CO 


r-( 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


,_, 


(-, 


cc 


t— " 


, 


■^ 


CO 


Oi 


t- 


^ 


CM 


in 


in 


C-1 


CM y-* 






1 






CO CO 


QD 


<X) 


05 


■^ 


c^ 


OS 





-«*' 





CO 


TT 


OS 


CO 


CO 


!>. 







CD 


CO 


00 


'=T' 


^H CM 










^ 


•rr 


10 


00 





»o 


CO 


CSJ 





CM 


CM 


*-« 


,_H 


CO 


in 


CO 


00 


00 


CM 


CO 


CO 


in 


CO C<l 






s 




10 r— 


I^ 


CO 





CD 


10 


CO 










oc 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 






t- 


m 




cr. 




OTj CM 






fo 







CO *-i 


10 


CO 


CO 


CO 








ID 


cc 


CO 


'— • 


^sf 


t'- 


00 


CD 








■^ 


OS 


1— 1 


en 




cr- 




t^ 


1 
1 


<2 




1^" 


r- 


tlTi 


00 


^ 


cd' 


CO 


OS 


OS* 


._^ 





in 





CO 


in 





M^ 


t^ 


t^ 


c; 


C-1 


oc 


i-< CO 








QO 


Cl 


»o 


■^ 


CO 


t^ 


00 




CO 






-^ 


CO 


in 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


-^ 


CM 




CO -^ 


















■<»< 










1— I 




-^ 














cc 








































































4» 




















































a 
.2 




i-t t^ 


CS) 


l- 


0; 


iO 


t^ 





t- 


■«s< 


CM 


QO 


CM 


CD 


CD 


CQ 





in 


t^ 


in 


in 




t^ 


OS CM 










(M C^l 


■^ 






CO 


00 


OS 


00 


-* 


1-- 


in 


CM 


00 


CD 


<M 




CM 





CO 




ec 


!>• 


CM t^ 








'■5 




.-H iO 


1-- 





CO 


CO 


CO 





CO 


CD 


t- 


in 


CM 


T-H 


in 


CM 


'rf 




CO 


in 





■^ 


■rt^ 


CM »n 






9 



o. 


V 


lO cc 


10 


r^ 


■^ 





l>- 


CO 


•M 


05 


OD 


'^ 


I-- 





!>. 


CM 


TT 


C 


C5 


in 


00 


t- 


cr 


CO in 




<o 


1 


t^ CO 





^ 


00 

CO 
















in 


CO 
CO 


-*- 

00 


in 


CM 

CD 


CC 


t- 


00 


OS 


in 




OS 

CO 


cc 

CC 


co 


CC 

cr 


CO 00 
CO -* 






Ph 


CO 


cs 


t- 


<n 


Oi 





10 


CO 


OS 


in 


cc 


CO 





^ 


^ 


« 





t'- 


w. 


l> 


": 


•^ 


CO CD 






W CO 






M 




CO 


CO 




CM 






d 


CO 




CO 




CM 






l> 






1-H 


































































e» 
























































Oi 05 


CO 


^_, 




CO 


CD 


CM 





"* 


■00 


in 


m 


■^ 




oc 




CM 


j_, 





1— 


t-- 




C3 CM 













»o -^ 


t- 


t- 




10 


r-. 







OS 


OS 


■^ 


j^ 


cq 




OS 




CC 


CD 





•*■ 


oc 




00 






5 


S 


M 


,_, 


WD 




^ 


!>. 





10 


00 








05 


CO 




■* 






tT 





a- 


oc 


CO 


'V CD 






a 


n 


40 




Oi 






CD 





01 


in 


CI 


r- 


CM 


CO 




0: 




cr 


o- 





cc 


=2 




CO OS 






eS 


w 


Ci C<] 








■f 


C:- 


t- 


cq 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 




c; 




CD 








cc 


cc 




CO i-H 




kO 


a 


■p 


CD -^ 








CD 




Oi 




in 


»n 


cq 




"«J^ 




cc 




a- 


cc 


■^ 


cc 






0" CM 






V 




<s 


»-< C^ 










iC 














CM 








^ 






cc 


e*; 




1-H 






< 


T3 












■^ 














































«» 
























































CO <M 





^_, 


oc 





CSJ 


Cs 


'<1< 




CO 


■^ 


c 


CM 


C] 


r- 


cc 




cc 


t-- 


c 


cr 


■^ 


'•T 








, , 




CO CO 





cq 


oc 


CO 


r^ 


'^ 


10 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


CM 




o- 


oc 


CM 


^ 


'— ' 


'— ' 





CO 


■>*' 


OS 1-H 








CO 

§ 

*-3 




»0 CO 


'^ 


'^ 


c 


00 


Ci 


t- 


<M 


c: 


t-- 


-rt* 





CO 


CC 


cc 


•^ 





,_, 


m 


<T 


■* 


cr 


'^3 £? 






& 




CO t>- 


CO 


oa 


c 


c*; 


OS 


co 


CO 





CO 


m 


l>- 




in 


in 


CC 


cc 


1^- 


r- 


in 


CM 


•rr 


35 *^ 






3 


05 <M 


wi 


00 


oc 




CO 


i>- 


00 


t- 


IC 


CO 


■^ 


•^ 




c 





-^ 




cc 


c 




a- 


00 -^ 




-* 


s 





S 


'^ CC 


^_, 





■^ 


CO 


OS 


10 


"^ 


in 





CO 


in 


CO 


c 


CM 


cc 


' CM 


03 


" 


cr 


cr 


CM 


■ ^' oc 






5 





i^ 


CO 


00 


oc 


c^ 


'<*' 





•M 


■^ 


00 


c^ 


'^ 


00 


l> 


CC 




CC 


■^ 


in 


oc 


m 


in 


CO c^ 






rl (M 










iC 


. ^ 




CM 








cc 




CM 


'— ' 


cq 




l-H 


cs 






•"I 








s 














c^ 




























»H 














»-^ 




«» 
























































10 (M 





oc 


l> 


in 


iC 


'^ 


<M 


CC 


oc 


l> 


CM 


in 


cc 


<j: 


c 


t-'- 


o- 


OC 


^ 


o- 


oc 


-rf in 












CD Cn 


00 


w~ 


cr 


"TT 


o- 


'<?' 


'^ 


cc 


CM 


in 


E'- 


»"" 


t^ 


cc 


CC 


c: 


cc 


cr 


o- 


cc 


cc 


CO in 






a 
^0 










t- iC 


cr 


CC 


Tf 


CO 


oc 


oc 


,^ 


in 


CM 


oc 


er 


00 


cc 


'rr 


u- 


m 


o- 


oc 


c 


CM 


cc 


1— 






"3 


00 


c^ 


oc 


cr 


cr- 


t- 


TT 


IC 


cs 




in 


-^ 




in 


cc 


CC 


cc 


rr 


CM 








CS 


CO cc 








o_ 




cc 


iLf: 


CO 


■<*' 


_ 


'^ 


c^ 


OC 


CO 


oc 


IC 


t^ 


cc 


r- 


. ^ 


. "^ 


t'- 





OC 


cc 


lo oc 




CO 




CO 


t^ t-^ 


GC 


c 


cc 





»r 


OS 


^^ 


in 


-^ 


CO 


t^ 


cr 


cc 


C: 


in 


c- 


0- 


" 0- 


cq 


oc 


" m 


in 








sy 


& 


'rr CO 


CJ 


oc 


cs 


CO 




cq 


»o 


i^ 


cc 


CM 


-«s- 


»n 


cc 


■^ 




cc 


cq 


OC 


cc 


CM 


in 


CO CO 






d 


rt 


-«r TT 





cc 


cc 


oc 


oc 




'<* 


'^ 


CC 


ir; 


in 








in 


ci 


- ^ 


cc 


•" 


CD t^ 


cs 


-rf »n 








Q 


<N CO 


'"' 








!>. 


" CO 




03 




«-H 


1-H 


CO 




cc 


'"' 






'"' 


C^ 

1 "" 






*"* 








g 




1-^ »c 


OC 


0- 


cr 


^ 


c 


•n 


cc 




^_ 


Tt 


l> 


oc 




c: 


CO 


cc 


t: 


m 





c 




OS CD 










CO ^ 


oc 




oc 


cr 




■^ 


I^ 


c^ 


m 


CM 


CO TT 


0- 





c 


cc 


QC 


m 


CO I> 


cs 


CM C 








•s 




»o 1— 1 


oc 


oc 


rt 


oc 


CC 





t^ 


cc 


•^ 


0- 


m 


oc 


ir 


C 


^ 


cc 





c 


^- 


t^ 


c; 


CO I- 








<s 




^ oc 


cc 




CC 




t-- 




cc 


cc 


oc 


CM 


in 


in 




m 


*c 


c^ 







t- cr 


-^r 


00 O- 








■§ 




C^ '-I 


M- 


*n 


l~^ 


c: 





cc 


_^ c 







CC 





•^ 


cc 


in 


1-- 


cc 


c/: 


"^ 


cs 


■^ 


-^ 


in CO 




CI 








10 »M 


cc 


Tf 


C^ 


in 


oc 


' oc 


' o- 


•rr 


cc 


' cc 


' ca 


oc 


cc 


•«^ 


" c 


I> 


' c- 


^ 


"^ 


C" 


cc 


Tf -^ 










00 c 


CC 


10 


'^ 


(N 


c- 


t^ 


<N 


t> 


cc 


■<»■ 


cc 


o- 


cc 




-^ 


t^ 




cc 


■^ 


cc 




'*• CM 








1 














t^ 


















'" 










CJ 














•3 




«» 




















































CQ 




























































w 




























































H 














i i 


















£ 








> 




'C 








T3 

a 




1— t 













> 

c 


.5 

* "a 




1 


) 

1 


of 


1 


-n 
§ 


c 

a 


cr 

C 


c 
rt 


1 


' 1 


a. 

c 

'1 


t 




c 
c 

5s 


5 


a. 


















£ 


1 c 


1. t 




c: 


a 


c 


Z 






a 


<x 


ci 


JZ 


^ 


^ 


t- 


3 3 1 












< 


<. 


< 


< 


< 


: < 


<; 


< 


IX 


X 


ff 


PC 


ff 


ff 


ff 


C 


C 


C 


C 


c 


C 


C 


c 


c 


■ 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



229 





s 




o 


OO 


fM 


o 


iO 


CS 


^ 


OCi 


M 


»o 


CTJ 


CO 


iC 


cq 


CD 


CO 


05 


o 


s? 


r^ 


to 


h- 


o 


o 


".1 






CO 


I-- 


CO 


Oi 


M 




Ci 


o »o 




00 


"^ 


OO 


CO 


CD 


iO 


CO 


(^ 


.— < 


CO 


'^ 


CO 


CO O 




a 


00 


00 


cr; 


OO 


,_, 


C5 


CO 


<y> 


CS Ol 


OO 


OO 


r-- 


OS 


Id 


,_) 


r^ 


Ci 


CS 


,_« 


o 


o 


CS 


GO 


O O: 




Total 

bursemi 

and 


V 


■^ 


■^ 


c^ 


CO 


(M 


C7) 


CS 


r^ t^ 


CS 


OO 




CS 


a> 


-rt' 


CO 


CO 


o 




lO 


to 


t- 


CI 


•rP -^ 


Oi 


o 
a 

J9 


CD 


-t« 


ITS 


o' 


•^ 
'f 




■^ 
r- 


O CD 
CO ^ 


CD 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 

»o 


en 


CD 
CO 


cc 


CO 

o 


CD 


CS 

to' 


CO 


co_ 

CO 


co' 


CS 


CC r- 
cs' r-* 






C/y 




r- 


CO 




Oi 


Tt* 


CD fy\ 


i-O 


■^ 


»o 


CS 


f 


tT" 




CS 


o 


GO 


M« 


en 




CO 


to CO 




C5 


CT- 


■^ 


iM 


O 


CO 


CS 


-^ CS 


CS 


t-- 


OJ 


U7 


CD 


CO 


OC 


Oi 


CS 


CJl 


*-t 


OO 


CS 


r^ 


O en 




.a 


CO 


co 


C3 


^ 


CO 


»-<' 


•^ 


o" ^' 


co' 




cs" 


CS 


!>. 


,-t 


»c 


*-H 


■rr 




CS 


to' 


_« 




-* 




O 




4* 












■^ 


























CO 














M* 




~ 


o 




^ 


o 


lO CO 


CS 


lo 


^^ 


Cfs 


'^ 


'^ 


o 


CS 


to 


o 


^ 


o 


t-- 


CO 


CS CO 








oo 




CO 


lO 




*— t 


CO 


*o -^ 


CO 


cri 


C3i 


Ol 


t— 


»o 


T* 


CS 


to 


o 


CS 


-»r 


t-- 


o 


CO crs 




_ s 




,_, 




o 


CO 




(M 


-t« 


OO CO 


,,_, 


,_, 


t^ 


,_H 


OO 


CJi 


CS 


«— 1 


CS 


TO 


CI 


''J* 


to 


CS 


^^ CS 
















C-. 


o 


r- c^ 


o 


CO 


lO 


r^ 


OO 


o 


o 


Ol 


SS 


OO 


<%? 


-* 


CO 


o 


CD O 




^ s 




■^ 




a! 


o 




•*^ 


CO 


CO lO 


Tf 


t-- 


»n 


OS 


CO 


CD 


t- 


CO 


o 


CS 


CO 


CJi 


CO 


CO 


CO '^ 


00 


43 C3 




















































O C9 




c^ 




'Tf 






OO 


■<*< 


CD O 


CO 


t* 


'Tj' 


d 


»o 




CS 




o 


CO 


r-' 


OS 


to 


Cj 


CO -^ 












t^ 






CO 


CD 


CO '^ 


CO 


co 


OO 


•^ 


'^ 




^. 








CO 


OS 




to 


Ol i-i 






•^ 




r-^ 








C5 


lO ^ 


^^ 




CS 




"* 




T-t 




*"• 






■^ 






t^ 




















d 


,-1 


♦-< 






















Ol 














o« 
















































S 




CD 


OO 


1— 1 


OS 


m 


_, ^ 


1—1 


CO ir^ 


CO 


Tt* 


Cfl 


CD 


00 


CS 


CD 


t^ 


to 


'tt 


CD 


to 


o 


M* 


OO C?l 






rj< 


I^ 


r* 


t^ 


cs 


o 


CD 


W5 O 


lO 


CJ 


lo 


OO 


IO 


»-» 


1— « 


■<f 


»^ 


t-- 


Cl 


OS 


t- 


to 


CO O 




fl 




CD 


C5 


t-- 


(^ 


c^ 


•rt* 


■^ 


CO CD 


CO 


CD 


05 


r- 


CD 


CS 


to 


OO 


o 


co 


o 


to 


CD 


CO 


r- CD 




« 1 




C^ 


■^ 






IM 


o 


CS 


05 OO 


C^l 


C^3 


to 


lO 




CO 


CO 


t- 


■^ 


o 


CS 


o 


CO 


OS 


OO tj- 










t-- 


^■ 


'^ 


CD 


OO 


CD O 


CS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


c: 


o 


CO 


CI 


to 


c^ 


t- 


■-T" 




cr; 


'^ CO 


t^ 


-S K 




















































^1 




OO 


-<} 


o 


a-i 


'^ 


o 


C<1 


T-H y-K 


o 


CD 


Oi 


'^ 


'Tt* 


CO 


CO 


c; 


fc; 


55 


£5 


CO 




r- 


CD CO 






CD 




o 


»o 




CO 


OO 


CO OO 


crs 


O 


CD 


cc 


o 


** 


CO 




OO 


OO 


o 


cr- 




t- 


O CS 






OO 


cr 


r^ 


•ri 


o 


CO 


CS 


o o 


o 


t- 


CD 


•^ 


CS 


CO 


CO 


Ol 




Ol 


'"' 


eo 


CS 


CO 


CS Ol 




.a 




CO 


CO 


^ 


^ 


CO 


1—1 


CO 


OO ■^ 


iO 




cs' 


CS 


CO 


^ 


lO 


,—1 


'^ 




CS 


o 


*-l 




CO 




Q 




«A 












CO 






1 




















CS 














t^ 


OC 


o 


o 


~ 


t— 


OC 


CS CD 


*-H 


O 


Oi 


o 


m 


*o 


o 


CO 


CO 




to 


cc 


■^ 


OC 


to -^ 








lO 


t- 


CO 


o 


cC 


r^ 


t^ 


t^ OO 


o 


o 


lO 


CO 




CO 


iC 


'"' 


cr 




"^ 


to 


CO 


t-^ 


CO OO 








OO 


r^ 


C?: 


OO 


OC 


-^ 


co 


CO CS 


CO 


CO 


t^ 




»o 


m 


'^ 


t- 


to 


CS 


l^ 


y^ 


CO 


■^ 


to CO 




o 




c<» 


o 


o 


CQ 




o 


Ci 


lO r^ 


>o 




CD 


« 


t^ 


CS 


'^ 


t^ 


CO 


"* 


T 


CO 


r- 


t- 


CS to 


CO 


^ t 








o 




cc 


CO 

cc 


OO 


CO CS 
lO CO 


CO 




CO 


CS 


o 
cc 


CS 




CS 

in 




tc 




-^ 


cs 

fC 


tO 


CD CO 

' err r-.* 




Q cJ 




OC 


cc 


o 


<M 


t-- 


■<5< 


o 


-rP irt 


w:i 


■^ 


o 


cc 


-r 


OC 


cs 


c 


■n- 


Tf 


-rp 


'«*• 




OC 


CS CO 




"^ Ol 




6Q 


■^ 






(N 




CS 


t- 


"^ 




CS 




C- 




TT 




CS 






CO 






CO 








o 


iC 


c^ 


~ 


t^ 


lO 


en 


-^ OC 


wt 


1-- 


"^ 


\r. 


w: 


OC 


cc 


__ 


cc 


c 


cr 


CD 


cc 


ilZ 


•^ cc 








t- 


c- 


o 


»-( 


C^ 


Ci 


-^ 


00 CO 


c; 


r^ 


cc 


c; 




cr 




cc 


to 


cc 


cr- 


CS 


»— ' 


t^ 


OO CS 








U^ 


r- 


o 


Oi 


C 


(^ 


r^ 


CD CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cc 


cc 


o 




cc 


cc 


cc 


o 


or 


OC 


^ 


'Tp en 




1 & 




o 


CO 


t-- 


OO 


(X 




Oi 


CS CC 


iC 


r^ 


cc 




cc 




'Tj- 


OC 


OC 


tc 


CO 


cc 


CO 


CD to CS 






o 


■rt- 


"^ 


CO 


I> 


OC 


CO 


CO t- 


l> 


t-- 


OO 


cc 


c< 


c 


CS 


CO 


cc 


cc 


CS 


C=: 


cc 


^ c= 


CD CS 


Ift 






















































65 




c^ 


CO 


o 


t-- 


(M 




o 


CO t- 


' cc 


oc 


l^ 


cc 


cr 




CO 


" a- 


t^ 


' OC 


' o 


OC 




"^ 


CO en 






Oi 


cr 


TT" 


o 


c 


lO 


ko 


»r3 M' 


•^ 




-* 


lie 


CS 


CS 


CO 


CO c- 




'<*' 


OC 


CN 


CO CO 1 








■^ 






-T 




CS 


t^ CO 


a- 




CS 




CD 




cc 




cc 




•"• 


<=; 




*— 


r- 










r- 










CS 


cq 
























tC 














«« 






















































cC 


t^ 


CO 


ir 


^ 


t-- 


^^ 


CD 


OC 


o 






CO 


o 


Er '^ 




tx 


5:: 


OS 




•^ 




•3 

a 

fc4 o 

■S fl 








'^ 




ir 


o: 


OO 


CS 


o 


iC 


CO 






r- 


o 


OC 


to 




t^ 


a- 






CD 




m 




C^ 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


»M 


o 


CS 


o 


05 


to 






,_! 


-* 


w: 


to 




*-H 


OC 






OO * 








c~ 


CD 


cs 


c 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


•^ 


cc 






■^ 






o 




cc 


■^ 


c 




OS 




C3 




c 


t-- 


t-- 


t-- 




CO 


1^ 


cc 




era 






CO 


« 


cc 


cc 




CO 


""^ 


00 




to_ : 


Tf 


& 




OC 


lO 


o 


cc 


■^ 


!>. 


o 


,_^ 




-'T 






l> 


r- 


_- 


CS 




CS 


OC 






o" * 




O § 


£ 




cs 


M 


t^ 






CS 






c; 












CS 


<T 






tC 






•^ 




1^ 


£ 


















































H 






_JW 


* 
















































u^ 


QC 


o 


OG 


I> 


o 


CO 


CO O 


^ 


CO 


IO 


CS 


OC 


o 


CO 




cc 




o 


•t- 


CO 


c: 


^ '=' 








r- 


cc 


o 


00 


I> 


»c 


XJ 


lO o 


o 


t- 


CS 


cc 


CS 


OO 


OO 




o 




o 


o 


cc 


r— 


o '<r 




a 




t>. 


.^ 


CO 


(M 


■^ 


00 


o 


t^ o 


.,_l 


t-- 


CO 


cr 


OC 


r^ 


Ci 




CO 




00 


cc 


to 


r^ 


CS -^ 




11 




c 


cc 


iC 


r- 


cc 


c^ 


o 


U5 o 


CO 


o 










»c 




t-- 




en 


cc 


CO 


t- 


o o 






rr 


ur 


■^ 


_ o 


IT 




•^ 


l-H CO 


o 


■^ 


c< 


c 


c^ 


»-• 


CD 




c: 




1-H 


rr 


o 


t^ 


t-H CO 


CO 






i> 




^ 


•^ 


CS 


OC 


1— r 


o 


CS 


r- 


cc 




00 


OO 




to 




»-< 


■<*" 


" CO 




CO CO 




5^ 






w 










Oi 


CS 


»-H 
















to 






CS 
























CS 




































w 




M 


^ 


















































cC 




o 


■^ 


t^ 


IlC 


r- 


o 


cc 




"o 






Tf 


cc 




CS 


cc 


OC 


CS 


•— 1 


r^ 


o ^ 








cr- 




o 


cq 


CC 




cc 


o 


ir: 




CO 


l^ 




IC 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


■^ 


i> 


to CO 








oc 




CO 


»c 


IT 


CO 


OJ 


lO 


cc 




CO 


CS 


CD 


ir- 


*5 




cc 


cr 


OO 


cc 


CS 


t- 


t^ -^ 






OC 




OO 


cc 


CV 


CO 


cc 


CS 


'^ 






cc 


c: 


es 


cc 




OC 


2: 




£3 


*2 


tC 


CD f— ' 






iC 




!>. 




c 


o 


CS 


o_ 


\r. 




t~- 




c 


O^ 


CO 




cc 




CTi 


o 


CO 


'^ 


CD OS 


(M 


S ja 








■^ 


■rf 


»i- 


ot 


CO 


CS 


w: 




c 


cr 


If: 


' ^ 


a- 




cr 




" *%: 


te. 


c; 


iC 


to I-" 






C" 






C^ 


\c 




a- 




CS 






cc 


cs 


cr 


■^ 






cc 


cc 




I— 1 




CO 






(M 












•^ 


























" 














M 


* 


















































C" 


■-t 


C^) 


c 


C" 


cc 


v^ 


CO cc 


t^ 


cc 


-«*' 


cc 


c: 


CS 


OC 


ec 


Tf 


OC 


t- 


S 


»c 


rt 


to ^ 




« § ^ 


■§ 




c: 

c; 


o 


or 

OC 




1 cc 




CS OC 

CO cc 


OC 

CS 


OC 
CS 


cr 




CD 


Of 

cc 




Of. 


c 

cc 


OC 
OC 


cc 


OC 
CS 


lO 


-T 


CO CO 

cji r^ 




cS| J 


O 




ir 


CO 


CO 


c 


cc 


■^ 


CO '^ 




\tL 




cc 


-T 


c 


CD 


c 


tr: 


c 




OC 


o 


CS 


^ 7X 




^ 


ir 


cc 


> 3C 


CT 


'^ 


c/. 


. "^ 


O I- 


»— 


tr^ 


OC 




r^ 


c^ 


lO 


CD 




c~ 


cr 


t- 


o 


•"■ 


QO to 


^ 


-- K S cn 


c^ 


cr 


t~-. 


OC 


c 


■" t^ 


Tf 


CO ^ 


wt 


•^ 


c; 


" c 


w: 


CS 


l,. 


^ 


S£ 


trt 


c< 


c; 




' CC 


" S" '^' 




cd Q. ^ 




ex 


^ 


C^ 


r- 


cc 


3 CS 


t-- 


C5 h- 


■«T 




c- 


cr 


cr- 


o- 


CO 


»c 


cr 


•c 


cc 




cc 


® ^ 




■S o rt 




c^ 


^ '^ 


•^ 




c^ 


1 c^ 


»c 


CS cc 


cc 


CC 






oc 


cc 


OC 


t- 


_ «-- 


OC 


t- 


tc 




■^ 


^-t OO 




^•o 


c 


rt 






1^ 


l' - 


CS 


" iO 


cc 




CS 


CS 


■^ 


^ 


■* 


— 


<M 




r- 


t- 






CS 








M 


• 














































w 
























































s 
























































H 














\ 1 

3 < 


















E 








> 




-c 








CO 

■^ s 

a 

o 


•—I 


7-, 

O 
O 




c 

E 

c 

c 
< 


j 

< 


> 

! < 




Q 

•4 


■s 

c 
1, .^ 


-2 

) ti 
5 




1 




1 

a 
c 
CC 


c 

cc 


c 
a 

c 

c 


1 

PC 


■ 1 


a 

i 

c 






c 


"a 

1 










230 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

I—) 

H 
O 

o 



o 

I 

o 

03 



m 
W 



O 

Q 

< 

I— I 
O 

o 

PQ 

02 

H 

P 

m 

02 



PQ 
< 







'^^ S2 


CO lO C4 


, 


-t CO O Oi t>. 


O 


t^ 1- 


_, 


OI OO 


Oi 


t^ CO lO -^ 


t* OS 


eo o CO 






<— 1 M 


CO Cq <M 


UO lO ^ lO o 


.— ( 


O lO 


CO Oi 


Oi 


O t^ OI a 


o 


1-" 00 CM 




^1 


CD OO 


'^ -rf CO 


OO O OO rt* lO 


CO 




f CO 


CO "^ 


•^ 


OJ OO CO C£ 


^ CD 


CO t— -^ 




CO O 


S ::^ '^ 


TT O CO '■ 


- CO 


o 


ob o 


OI to 


CO 


CO ^- — « Ci 


3 Ci 


CO CM OI 


o 

1-H 


00 -rp 


CI OO crs 
^^ ^" oo" 


CO -^ <Z) CO '^ 
(M CO Cft CS C-I 


iO 


(M C>1 

Ci '^ 


i-« OI 

co" CO 


to 

to' 


•-I ^H CD O 
Oi O Oi t- 


0_ TT 

CO 


t^ Oi O 

OO i-T CO 




"^6 


CC CO 


i-H r^ lO 


C^ ^ CO iO CO 




r-« (M 


CO 


CO 


•^ t^ OO 


cs 








«» 




































<u a 


s <^ 


O -rf QO 


O ^- OO CO M 


OO 


CO Ci 


O CO 


o 


to r^ CO o 


D O 


CM ^ i-< 




GO -^ 


CO lO M 


C5 CO !>- CI r- 


CO 


CD CS 


t^ CO 


to 


Oi -n< 1-1 tf 


3 ^ 


-n^ OO CO 




CO «s 


CO CTi O 


co ^ 


-" TT t^ CO 


CO 


o ^ 


^ to 


CO 


to -f CO Ci 


5 CM 


1-1 O CO 




c ^r* 


^ CO 


CO O C5 


OS CQ OO CD lO 


CSI 




H lO 


OO GO 


oa 


Ci CM ^ C 


3 t- 


CM CO OI 




S (^ 


O^ (M 


C^_ 0_ 00 


»0 CSJ CO CO CD 


t^ 


'^- *=! 


CO CD 


"I 


•^ OI CO c 


3 to 


CO to CO 


o> 


dj o 


CO r^ 


t^ o (m' 


lO CI -^ ■* O 


■<»* 


Tt* r^ 


o" !>■' 


OI 


CO 1-1 -^ G 


> to 


OI CO •— < 




-S § 


CO lO 


.— < r-- ■^ 


to C^ lO CO <M 


■^ 


CO (M 


o» I>- 


o 


to Oi O T- 


H CO 


OI T-. CI 




.2 -^ 


■'-' 




GO i-< 










'— ' 










OI 




-< CO CM 








s^ 


«ff> 




eo" 
























'^ 










CO CO 


Tf CO CO 


■rTi GO QC lO '— 1 


GO 


C-I CO 


1-4 t--. 


to 


tO to -^ c 


:> CO 


CO CO o 




o a 


O CO 




- C^l CO 


I^- Ci OO GO CO 


CO 


»o ^ 


OO t^ 


yo 


CO -"31 O C 


^ o 


t^ to ^ 




OO -^ 


*C O CO 


o o ^ 


t CO (M 


■**< 


CO O 


b- T-t 


to 


CO -H t^ -^: 


f Ci 


OI CO CO 




5 ;r 


o v^ 


»0 OO iO 


01 lO CO CO (M 


o 


■rf lO 


CO O 


CO 


t 


- O -^ r 


r" o 


Oi r- c. 




.2 ^ 


-^ CO 


OO TP cc 


C^ CS CO T- 


H 1—1 


o 


»o t^ 


CO CO 


CD 


'^ Oi to ^ 


"1 ^^ 


oo^ to -^ 


oo 


rt o 


og' o 


lO O 00 


CO CO CD -^ (TJ 


o 


03 cn 


Ci i-« 


oa' 


O CO -^ c 


3 CD 


CTi O -^ 




*- o 


TT r^ 


'•f ^ t- 


r>. iO CO »o CO 


o 


Ci CO 


W OI 


CO 


I-- 'rp Ci o 


J -rf 


o -^ -^ 




a-S 


»— < »— 1 




y— (M 






i-l (M T-M 








*— 1 


oa 


OI CD CO 








OcS 


«» 




OO 
























^~* 










c^ — 


»o t^ -^ 


ci OO CO lO r^ 


o 


CO lO 


00 to 


o 


Oi -n* CO tr 


i Tji 


-T CO OJ 




'O 


lO C2 


Tjl Oi CS 


OO 1-1 (£5 Cvj C^ 


^r 


o ^ 


to 04 


CD 


Ci O ^ C 


3 CD 


I* CO to 




li 


CO ^ 


CO lO o 


^ 


■; lO <M to CO 


c^ 


't*' GO 


t-- to 


-^ 


CD CO ^ tr 


> '^ 


lO t^ to 




O CO 


1^ O CO 


C^ O (M ■- 


-• CO 


CO 


(M -^ 


OO Ci 


O 


CM OI t^ - 


■" l>. 


CO CO -^ 




o_ o_ 


OO ic ■^ 


UO O^ Cl^ o_ co_ 


Tf 


50_ CO_ 


Oi 00 


CO 


oa OI o o 


) CO 


t-^ O CD 


r* 


1l 


CO CO 


•rr *o -^ 


Oi CO <M O CD 


GO* 




H eo 


CD •<»« 


oo" 


to (T "^ r- 


•< **< 


t^ OO -^ 




O OO 


i-H C5 lO 


CO '<*' CO CD Tp 


<M 


M TJI 


1-t CO 


t^ 


oo to ^H o 


1 to 


n^ O) CM 




t- 


'-' 




c^ 
























C4 t-t 














































«» 




































a 


1— OO 




N c^ *o 


OO i^r CO Oi ^H 


1— 1 


o -^ 


^H CO 


CO 


to eo o cc 


5 CO 


t^ t^ CO 




^ CO 


O OO o 


O OO .- 


H O) Oi 


iO 


t* Ol 


TP 00 


CO 


t^ to OO C^ 


J CO 


r* CO '-" 




_ 'rt S 


CTS CO 


.-M »0 05 


!>. O CO CO CD 


Oi 


<M f* 


-rf to 


OO 


to CD CO Of 


) Ci 


O ^ CO 




c-i r* 


CO CJ t>- 


CO ■.- 


- CD CO OO 


CO 


r- o 


to »o 


CO 


'Tf to 00 c 


> TJi 


CO I-- »o 


CO 


Pupi 
ansport 
Servici 


'TJ' C^ 


-^ -rr -^J* 
(M IC CO 


*0 O ■'T -^^ O^ 
o" oo' ^ lO Qo" 


CO 


CO^ CD 

^ »o 


CO to 

OO* co' 


OI 

to' 


Ci 0_ lO O 

b- CO r^ c^ 


CO' 


TJI OO TP 

to r- oo 




CO lO 


C3 -^f CO 


-^ OO -^ f-H CO 


r-t 


o »o 


■*!t* 1-" 


to 


1^ CO -H c^ 


i CD 


O lO CO 




M (M 




M* 04 


*" 




(N <N »-l 


'~' 


rH 1-1 


t-l 


CO 


OI CO ■^ 




^ 




^ 


«» 




M 


































*— OO 




'. ^ ir^ 


-^ ^ CO oo o 


Oi 




. to 




• CO 


to 


O OI CO 


00 


r^ CO OO 






CO CO 




• CO eo 


■^ (M t^ !>. O 


CO 








■ CD 


Ci 


O CO OI 


CO 


O »0 Ir- 




« J3 








































§1 i 


CO "^ 




• -^ i>. 


1-t OS CO lO O 










- -^ 


o 


O CO -^^4 




CO CM CM 




*»■ Ol 




• Tj« r- 


lO OS 'rfl OO CO 






c^ 




• o 


CD 


r- OJ Tp 


OO 


!>. I>- CM 








• t^ U5 


■^ C^ -^ O CO 


Ci 




; O 




• CO 


O^ 


OO i-t t* 


; CM^ 


1-1 t^ l-H 


U3 


ttend 

DdH( 

Servi 






































■^ i-H 




• CO o 


^ t^ O lO o 


w 




co' 




• *— t 


t^ 




CO OI 


• t^" 


CO i-« CM 




«— « T-H 




• t-. CO 


^H 


1-t i-H Cq 










: '"' 






Oi 1-^ 








< « 


«» 








































iO M 


t- 


• (M (M 


»0 OO ■-- 


■* lO OO 


Ci 


oc 


1-H 


CO OI 


r* 


CO OO OO O- 


CO 


-:P t^ CM 




1 
fe .2 2 




oc 


CO TT 


OS '«*' t- 


. to lO 


»o 


o 


•*;* 


OI -^f 


gO 


■^ '^ -^j^ cc 


OO 


O Oi OO 




■^ CO 


o- 


^H CO 


Oa CD t- 


. 03 -tJ^ 


-^ 


c; 


C-3 


Oi to 


to 


y- 


- CM CD -^ 


1—1 


CD 1-1 Oi 




<M CO 




O O 


OO W5 C> — 


■< Ci 


CO 




lO 


04 -^ 


CO 


■^ to CM C 


CO 


O OO rp 




t^ CO 


a 


»0 'rr 


Tf ■^ c^i r^ 00 


•^ 


cc 




to r* 


t^ 




■< CM -"^ On 


t— 1 


tO_ O^ 1-* 


•O" 


■5 " g 


'^ -^ 


c^ 


OS 1-H 


CO OJ CO t-- CD 


(M 


ir 


o' 


t^ CD 


"^ 


OI CO o "■ 


CM 


OO -^ CO 




o 2 o 


o »o 


t-- 


TJ' OO 


t>- t^ lO ■:jO CO 


-rT" 


cc 




T-l -^ 




CO r- to OS 


Ci 


CD "^ to 




<M f-H 




CO -H 






(N ^ 


< 1—1 


1—1 




CO 


1—1 


CO 


i-» CO CM 








a 






CD 
























^ 








t-H 


«* 






































O "^ 


(X. 


CO ^ 


CO t^ Ci CO lO 


o 


cc 


30 


to -^ 


to 


O '^ to c 


CO 


■^ to 1-1 




ction 

liar 

chool 


^ CO 




*0 Oi 


lO CD 1- 


»o o 


■^ 


■^ 


GO 


Ci OI 


OI 


to 0» Tf ^ 


CM 


O CO O 




o o 


a- 


CD Tt* 


Oi Ci -rP OI O 


CD 


1-^ 


O 


T-H -^r 


eo 


CD O 40 1- 


Ci 


Oi O CD 




*0 (N 


cc 


O O 


<M ^T C:i CO "^ 


lO 


cc 


CO 


t^ CO 


t^ 


r^ cr o oc 


o 


CO r- CO 




to -v 


cc 


. '~l ^. 


t^ OO O CO Tf 




o 


»o 


OO GO 


CO 


00 to t- O] 




to CD CO 


n 




o" t-" 


c; 


lO CO 


^ 


^ -TP 1- 


t- o 


»o 


I> 


CO 


■^ CO 


(>■ 


O Ci OO C 


CM 


co' ^ o" 




■^ »o 


Tf 


c^ t* 




^ Cq lO CO oc 


OO 






CO -rp 


'^ 


Ci t^ -r-l O^ 


Ci 


1-1 CM O 




o ^ 


cc 


CO lO 


I-- ir^ 1-H CO CO 


o^ 


c 


OO 


CO CO 


CO 


*-< '^ CO OI 


CO ^ !>. -^ to 
T-T **^ 




« (N 




l^ c^ 






O) OJ i-H 










oT 


CO "^ '^ 










CO 
























•^ 


a 






«» 






























bO 












■ 




~^~ 




















(- 






g 


CO t-- 




CO o> 


i-t CO ^ 1- 


OO 


o 




Ci 


to o; 


^H 


to CO b- OI 


to 2 c^ 'f' (^^ 




r- CJ 


«: 


CO ^ 


Ci t^ t-- CO -^ 


Ci 




'^ 


-rr 00 


CO 


OI CO c: cc 


O -O OI O OO 




■■s 


r- Tf 


1^ 


CO o 


r^ -M ^ oj ^ 


r^ 


CO 


to 


CO to 


o; 


Oa to CO CM 


•* S ^ ^ r: 




!* 


»0 OO 


r^ 


— ' -rr 


r^ CO c^ — 


t^ 


-^ 


C' 


cc 


o •=r' 


CO 


»-" o CD cr 


CO 3 Cr. t^ CO 




i3 


(M OS 


cs 


M CO 


I-- Ci -T 


^_ o._ 


00 


00 


-* 


OO ■^ 


o 


t- CM CM f- 


co^ S 


CO Oi .-1 1 


D 


.3 


'^ r^ 


o- 


.— . -rf 


O CO CO Oi uO 


Oi 


t^ 


" o" 


co" -^ 


CO 


O ^ '^ -^ 


co" -^ CO OO Oi 




C3 
1 


;D -^t" 




CO CO 
CO 


CO »0 CO 00 lO 


CO 


c^ 


-^ 


1— t "T" 


OO 


OO eo CC' ^ 

CO 


CO ^ CO i-< ^ 




■< 






































*» 
































1 




K! 































































d : 




(xl 






























































g u M 

□ c 

(33 


■"^ 


t3 


C 

s 

c 
c 

Q 




c 








c 
c 


' 


c 


rt 
c 

c3 


a 
rt 


•1 


J 
c 




a 

1 

c 
C 




-a 

o 


c 

1 


1 


a 

1 


c3 




'■i 




> 
a 

a 
c 

w 


o 

CJ 

a; 


> 

g 

K 


-a 


•4^ 

3 


> 

c 


> £ 
2 
c 

ca 

a 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



231 





s 






»— 1 


-t 


Oi 


-^ 


j: 


iO 


CO 


"0 


o 




b- 


O 


cc 


c» 


CO 


r^ 


^^ 


CO 


M 


r- 


to 


^^ 


CD 


<« 








OO 


t^ 


b- 


OO 


If: 


■^ 


o 


o 


1^- 




Oi 


o 


o 


c« 


en 


o 


o 


CO 


O 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


r- 


"^ 




a 




BO 


CO 


c 


m 






»c 


oc 


,_^ 


o 


OS 


UO 


d 


OS 


OS 


CO 


Ol 


o 


Cfl 


CI 


•rr 


■^ 


t: 


S! 


S 




31 




a> 


iC 


o 


o 


f 


30 


Tp 


c* 


\r, 


T> 


00 


<r- 


•^ 




CO 


CD 


b- 


ct: 


CO 


CO 


GO 


t- 


o 


as 


o 


Oi 


■a 


o 


o 




ai 


u^ 


b- 


C5 


<M 


oc 


. ^ 


OO 


Ifi 


> " 


CO 


OS 


CO 


OO 


c; 


CO 


o 


o 


CS 


CO 


t- 


to 




^1 


a 




cr 




a 


QC 


»o 


-*• 


I^ 


" o 


f 




CO 


CI 


-*• 




<r 


t^ 


•^ 


OO 


s? 


cc 




CO 


a: 


S 




03 


;^ 


cr 


c- 




LT 


O 


cr 


CO 


■<»■ 


cc 


CO 


cq 


CI 




t-- 


IC 


TT 


CO 


-^ 


o 


IT 


CJ 


o 


en 






oc 


-«* 


^ 


cc 


or 


CN 


w 




c^ 


oc 


CO 


oc 


_ ^ 


t>. 


^ 


»o 


'-' 


CO 


t- 


CO 


(^ 


CD 


t- 


c: 




.3 






cc 


cc 




■^ 


irt 


^ 


^ 


■^ 


iC 


CI 


C<l 


t-H 


c^ 




Cl 


■^ 


CO 


-r 


oc 




CI 










Q 












c<: 




























■rr 






















ft» 


































, 




















>o 


o\ 




o 






^^ 


»o 


CO 


cc 


cr 


or- 


b- 






cq 


00 


t- 


r- 










o 










oc 


oc 










•— ' 


CO 


OO 


OO 


oc 


CD 








o 


*-H 


1— 1 


■^ 










CJ 






s 




CO 


r^ 




o 






t-- 


c^ 


OO 


lO 


(^ 


CO 


o 






t^ 


o 


o 


CJ 




!2 


o 




■^ 








■^ 


lO 




-* 






CO 


CO 


c^ 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CJ 






CI 


CI 








S 


o 




tr 




S 








t^ 










•^ 




Cv 


GO 




. <^ 


c< 






iC 


c^ 


CO 


CO 




GO 


CO 




Oi 


OO 


a 
















































«-^ 


o 


C9 






CT 




o 








-^ 


" 00 


' CO 


-* 


CJ 


•^ 






00 


ca 


t^ 


C" 




ir 


t^ 




b- 




H 


•3 

PQ 




oc 


Oa 










1—1 


-^ 


(N 


C<l 


c- 


CI 


cc 








CO 


-^ 


IC 










CD 






»c 






c 






'-' 


'-' 










cq 










'"' 


T 




1-H 






















I>- 




























t^ 






















«i9 


















































S 




CD 


(M 


at 


TT 


o 


CO 


iC 


o 


■rr 


CO 


oc 


t-« 


^_^ 


c^ 


CO 


iC 


CO 


CO 


lO 


t^ 


■*P 




cc 


Cl 








Oi 


OS 


b- 


t->. 


*c 


-^r 


Oi 


!>■ 


OO 


c^ 


o 


CO 


1— ' 


CI 


G3 


Cft 


t-* 


'— ' 


un 


c^ 


tC 


CD 


t^ 


OO 






a 




CI 


^_, 


lO 






»o 


o 


.— ( 




CO 


00 


OO 


c: 


CTJ 


CO 


ca 


o 


ca 


Oi 


-*' 


CT3 


t-^ 


CQ 


o 






a 




o 


ir; 


CI 


c 


^ 


•^ 


CO 


C<5 


lO 




oc 


o 


cc 


OO 


CO 


ITS 


t^ 


»o 


lO 


OO 


t: 


o 


cr 


CO 




"3 






CO 


OS 


"^ 


t^ 


en 


00 


CO 


OO 


c 


-* 


o 


CO 


cs 


CO 


c^ 


OS 


c^ 


CD 


o 


o 


CO 


t^ 


to 


t^ 


o 






b* 




O" 


CD 


iLfl 


"^ 


in 


CO 


»o 


CO 


Oi 




O 




o^ 


CD 


CI 


— 


o 


cc 


CD 


cc 


o^ 


" ^ 




H 






c^ 




-t* 


o 


C3 


(M 


cr 


CO 


CO 


CS) 




tn 


t-- 


"0 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


en 


■=2 




o 


55 






« 


. " 


Tj 


CO 


00 


(M 


c< 


c:: 


. '^ 


OO 


c< 


CO 


CO 


I>- 


'-^ 


W3 


"^ 


iC 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cc 


l-^ 


o; 






CQ 




CO 


CO 




1--. 


iC 


,_, 


,_, 


CO 


' WD 


C<) 


cq 


1-1 


,_ 




CI 


"* 


CO 


r^ 


OO 




CJ 












s 










c: 




























cq 






















•» 






















































IM 


*c 


CD 


o 




OO 


OO 


o 


CO 


CO 


cr 


o 


c^ 


o 


1—1 


r^ 


c^ 


cc 


<va 


o 


o 


cr 


c 


CD 










to 




t- 


CO 




t-- 


'<r 




c^ 


a- 


CO 


•c 


oc 


OO 


oc 


CO 


-^r 


CO 


if: 


o 


o 


ic 


CJ 


Oi 










»c 


-f 


(M 


o 


»c 


C<l 


f- 


t^ 


o 


iC 


cc 


Q 


cr 


00 


t-^ 


\n 


CJ 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


OO 


to 


b- 






o 




ec 


c^ 


S 




"^ 


"^ 


CO 


cc 


!>• 




o 






'^ 


oc 


if! 


'*" 




CO 


"2 




CO 




o 


CO 










c 


CO 




h- 




oc 

CO 


<N 




" o 


t> 




I-- 


CD 


w: 


OO 




' o 


iC 


w: 
o 


CD 


cc 

CO 


-* 


to 




Q 


o 




iC 


cr 


■<*■ 


CO 




t^ 


CO 


^ 


o 


»c 


CO 


CO 


cc 


c^ 


t^ 


CO 


o 


oc 


CO 


CO 


CJ 


o 


CO 


■^ 






02 








cr 


. ^ 






C<1 


CO 


cq 


<M 


I— 1 








C3 


»c 


C3i 
C3 


cc 




C4 


CJ 














CO 


^^ 


o 


-f 


CO 


CO 


c^ 


»« 


o 


c 


oc 


3- 


c^ 


b- 


r^ 


cn 


o 


CC 


CO 




CO 


to 




h- 










(M 


^ 


QC 


t~- 


o 


CO 


00 


o 


CI 


CO 


c 


cq 


CO 


oo 


oc 


■•— ' 


CO 


tCl 


t- 


CO 


to 


t^ 




cc 










, 


■^ 


o 


(M 


CO 


■*** 


00 


cc 


cc 


■^ 


a- 


o 


CO 


r- 


cc 


,_ 


W3 


kC 


y^ 


■* 




o 


to 


f— > 




1 


>^ 




d 


o~ 


OC 


CO 


iC 


CO 


m 


cr 


*c 


•T 


c: 


CO 


cc 


tO 


cr 


CO 


CI 


CI 


o 


C<I 


oc 


t-- 


cr 


en 




cS 




^ 


(N 


o 


t^ 


o 


(M 


OO 


CO 


»r: 


oc 


cr 


IC 


"0 


CO 


cr 


CO 


r^ 


-J« 


. " 


b* 




OO 


cr 


r- 


*o 




— ! 






















































a 


o 




O" 




CO 


c 


o 


CO 


o 


t^ 




o 


■^ 


CO 


Tf 


' cr 


CO 


o 


c^ 


" o: 


CO 




OO 


I> 


CO 


CD 




ca 




o 


cc 


o 


cc 


CO 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


s 




oc 


o 


•* 


CO 


CO 


M 


a 




-* 




CO 


to 


CO 


CO 




O 




■^ 




T 


cr 


oc 






cc 


w 


1-H 


C<1 


CO 


CI 


■^ 






*" 


t^ 


r^ 






CQ 




T-l 
















oc 


























tH 


CO 


,-H 












































































«» 
























































•^ 




oi 


CO 


cc 




~ 


•«* 




t^ 








c^ 




o 


^ 


t^ 






b- 










§ 










c= 


cc 


b- 




o 


o 




CO 








■^ 




*^ 


oc 


c 






CQ 










1 




cc 




-«t 




m 




cs 


*c 




c 






C5 


cr 




o 


,—1 


w: 


















cc 




cr 


cr 


CO 




cc 


o 




r^ 




w: 


CO 




■^ 


w: 


m 






c 








CQ 




cc 




oc 


»c 


o 




■rr 


CO 










cr 


cc 




oc 


>c 


cc 






c: 






■^ 


5 


1 


2 




oc 




^* 


CO 


1-- 




■^ 


iC 










O 


«* 






t^ 


tc 






-T 








O 


a 


£ 




t^ 










c^ 




c- 






CO 


c 






CO 


TT 
















-a 


P4 






















































bi 






























































•» 




















































cr 


o 


■x 


c^ 




c 


cr 


CO 1— 


CD G 


^_, 




c 


c^ 


c 


c 


t^ 


CO 


'«t 


c: 


o 










c*- 


o 


■rr 


CM 




if: 


CO ic 


■^ 


CO <N 


tc 




c^ 


tC 


G 


cr 


t-^ 


■^ 




c: 


o 






a 




^. 


o 


o 


cr 




cc 


-^ 


u: 




C 


CO 


cc 




CO 


cr 


t-- 


cc 


OC 




■<* 


^ 


C<1 


CO 




■«a 


.2 




C: 


(3 


-T 






cr 


C: 


cc 


^ 


(M 


cc 


t- 




-^ 


cc 


CC 


w; 


oc 




s 


O CO 






'-3 




"^j 


00 


CO oc 




<N 




CO 


o- 


to CC 


_ '^ 




C3 


oc 


•<* 


. ^ ^ 


cc 


t^ 




CJ 


CO 


"3 


eS 




















































w^ 


•a 


s 




c 






t- c^ 




CQ 


" *M 


" CO 


" w: 


C<] 


" \r. 


' t^ 




CO 


oc 


CO 


' oc 


" c: 




•rr 










< 


1 










CO 




















Ol 


























«i 


^ 
























































o ^ 


t^ c 


or 


C 


OO C 


oc 


CO CO 


oc 




c 


CQ 


t^ 


CO t^ 


■^ 
















c 


c 




CO <= 


cs 


CC 


t-. c= 


l> 


02 *- 


cc 




ir 


CO 


CO 


CJ 


OU 


C" 
















cr 


o o- 


\r 


c: 


o 


»— 


oc 


c 


(Z. 


CQ 


oc 


»i^ 




C3 


■^m 


oc 


cc 


t-- 


-* 










o 


J9 






o cc 


cs 


"^ 


CQ 


c; 


c 


c: 


cr 


CO oc 


\r 




cc 


cc 


CD CQ 


CD 


5^ 










a 


o 




1-^ 


oc 


oc 


CO c^ 


rr 


cc 


„ "^ ^ 


_ c= 


CO t-^ 


cc 




CJ 


oc 


C3 


I> 


C 




c 








c<i 


o 




















































^^ 


s 


jq 




cc 


(M 


cr 


CO i>. 


cc 


w; 


^ 


u: 


CO 


o -^ 


b- 




oc 


w: 


" cr 


" »o 


' CO 


oc 










u 




-t 




w: 


o 




CJ 


cr 


iO 


■^ 




CO 


C<1 






c 




t^ CO 


CO 










CQ 










to 
















































M 


► 






















































OC 


CO 0^ 


CO *— 


oc 


\C 


OO OO a- 


W5 C" 


oc 


\r. 


■^ 


»fl 


-<t 


r^ CD CO 


1 s 


cc 


\r. 


CO 




S .2 


5 


^ 


cc 




00 (M 


c 


cc 


CO O cc 
CO CO c 


eo ■•- 
00 cc 


c^ 


b- 

c 


c^ 


CI 


cc 


cr 
2£ 


iQ CO 


cc 
oc 


oc 


c: 


o 
to 




o s 


o 


vz 


t-- c 


Ci c^ 


oc 


c^ 


Tf 


"*a 


<x 


-^ cr 


oc 


1— 


CJ 


CO 


CJ 


cc 


cr. 




c: 


CC 


»^ 


o 




O OS 


^ 


cC 


OO « 


r- cs 


cr 


c: 


oc 


s 


c 


CD CC 




t- 


c: 


oc 


c 


cc 


. *^- ^ 


1—1 


c 


■^ 


»-i 


3l 


3 
bC 


eg 


t- 


^- c 


lO — 




cv 


' lO c<] 


O" 


CJ 


" c 


CO 


Tf 


c: 


CO 


" 9 


" cr 


" CO IC 


a- 


cc 


cc 


' b-" 




OJ 




CT 


t>. •— 


»f 


es. 


CO 


c 




(y 


c^ 


r- d 


cr 




c- 


oc 


cr 


CD cc? cc 


O" 


eo 


^' 




2° 


M 


& 


w 


ci a- 


I^ cc 




^ c 


- s. '^■ 


■^ 


O CO 


UT 


\r. 


cr 


c 


CQ 


CO 00_^ CO 


c 


^ 


t* 






Q 


CS 


c«" 


C5 


T~ 


*- 


CO CO cs 




"" 


*" 




T- 


■•t 


'^ 


CJ 


lO 


CQ 
















«l 


» 


















































CO 
















































c 


: 






W 
















































1 


e 

a 


*^ 




s 




c 
c 

C 

c 


a 
1 
1 


1 


'5 




' i 


c 

c 


1 


is 

1 




1 


c 

s 

Ic 


c 
> 

c 


0. 

c 
C 


cr 

c 
a 

£ 

c 






c 

c 

c 
a 


a 

cr 


-a 

c 


1 a 


oil 

a = 

►5 he 


c 



232 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 
O 



o 
I 

CD 
05 



in 

I— I 
H 

o 

Q 
O 

o 
;^; 

W 

CO 
P 

CO 



< 









l- 


r-l 





CO 


(M 


CJ 


(M 


10 CD 


« 


00 


CI 


00 


CD 05 


(M 


to 


CD 


co 


00 


!>. 


CO CO CO CO 1 








lO CO 





(M 


CO 


QO 


•^ 05 Oi 05 


UD CO »0 10 CO 1 


CO CI -^ CD 


CO lO to kO ^H 




^ 8 




CO 05 





00 


10 


,_, 


»o ^r* CO 00 


CD -^ ■^ -^ »r3 


CI f CI ^ 


d »0 CO ^ CO 






CO o 


iC 


C<l 


t^ 


CO 


CD C5 l^ 


i— t 05 CO CD 


OS t-- CO ^ 


CO 00 l-H 00 1^ 


o 




O (M 

CO CO 


UO 




CO 




r-- -^ t^ 

GO 10 C5 


C^ -rr <M C5 

05 CO CO 


CO t^ 10 crs 

CO 1-1 -^ ^ -r" 


10 r^ '* CI -^ 

CD i-« 00 CO »0 




(E ja 




^ CO 


t-- 


(M 


C<1 


(N 


iO CO 


00 CO 1-1 i-i -^ 


CI -rj* CO d 


1-1 d CO OS CO 




** O 




«» 
















CI 




t^^ 




O 30 


00 


Oi 








Ci CO 'Tfi 


CO C^ 05 o> 


OS CO '* CO l-H 


r-- ca iO is^ 




o ^ 




— ■ c^ 


•^ 


t- 


iO 


t^ 


(M 05 CO t^ 


-n^ Oi r-l ^?< QO 


CI OS 'TtH 01 


Ir^ (O CO t- l-H 




O c3 




t^ «M 


CO 





l-H 


05 


-rf TJ4 iC t- 


CO CO !>• 05 CO 


iO lO »0 00 GO 


CO QO l-H 0: 






o o 


'Tt* 







CT^ 


QO CD t^ »0 


lO (M C?5 C5 ^H 


■»*i CO CO r~ CO 


CO kO CD d 






t-_ -^^ 




<M^ 


<M 


t^ 


C5 CO r-i Oj 


C5 CO OS Oi c^ 


l-H QO 40 CO ^ 


1^- CO 00 OS CO 


Oa 


£ g 

.S -a 




GO 0> 


t-- 


00 


Oi 


CQ 


'^ — ' •-' 


10 GO 'Tj' -^ IC 


"^ l-H OS 


CfS t^ CO OS '^^ 






CO QO 


co 


LO 


W3 


'^ 


.-H CO CO 00 


QO CO (M »0 CO 


CD CO 00 OS --r 


Tf CO CO CD »0 








(M 








.— < 1—1 


(N ^ 


1— * 


T-l t^ ^- 




1- 




«» 
























Oi Ol 


t^ 


»o 





CO 


CD »0 »0 


»0 Ir^ '^ ^ CD 


CO 00 l-H »0 CO 


^H t- CD 10 l>- 




*t; -^ 




^ »o 


CO 





-<t* 


00 


(M Ci 00 


CO C5 CO CO Oi 


CO -^ CM 


CD '^ CT) CO 




o a 
a « 




lO OO 





^^ 


t^ 





(M f^ CO CO 


ic --r »o CD 00 


CO CO 1^- CO 


OS CO OS l-H OS 






T-H lO 


00 


«:• 


l>. 


05 


C5 -^ 


05 OO Tj" r- 'TtH 


ura CO CD :o OS 


CO OS UD CO 




.2 ^ 




"^. '•^^ 


Ci 


t^ 


t>- 


^ 


CO CO CO <M 


CO !-> CO CO 


t^ ■^ t^ OS CD 


t^ -:J< CO CD 


OO 


II 




I^ CO 


0" 


"^ 


00 


00 


05 »0 


CO C> 00 (M 


CI ■^ t-- CO CO 


CS CD CI QO CO 






■^ -^ 





05 


Oi 


CD 


-TP C2 »0 '^ 


»0 U3 00 t- 


CO t- cri 


r}< io CI CO ':yi 






»— 1 


-^ 








^ (M 


eo !-< 


l-H 1-1 CO 


d -^^ 1-H 




0(S 




«» 
























lO -^ 


Ci 


CD 


'X) 


n^ 


C^ CO (M 


(M CO CD i-t 


CD crs CO CO 


'r*^ oc »0 CD 








CD O 





»o 


(M 


CO 


c^ -T" 


CO CO t' CO 


CD 00 OS t^ -:r 


lo CO CO 






(■— 1—1 


^ 


iC 





»o 


■^ »0 '-I CO 


(M CSI CD ^ 05 


CO r- 'f c- 


CO OS CI CD 




^ 1 




o •— * 




cr- 


CD 




-rfi -rii r^ t^ 


r-- C5 05 'Oi 


CO CD CM 


d l-H CO cj »o 






»0 CD 







CTi 


CO 


r- r-- -?* w:) 


CO CO CO -^ CI 


00 CD 10 CD b- 


C7S -rr" CM CD t^ 


t^ 


1| 
CO 




iM CO 


»o 





CO 


^ 


»0 ^H OS CO 


CO CO (M -r 


— ^ »o CO r* CO 


CO '^ CD CO CO 






<M Oi 





W5 


(M 


CO 


CM t^ 1-t CO 


CO 00 CO t^ IM 


lO CO -^ CI C3 
CI 


1-1 iO '^ OS 
CI 






























C» 




















a 




CD 0:1 


1--. 


GO 


t~- 


CO 


CO t>- CO CD 


C5 t-- CO CI 


b- OS CD 


10 00 ■^ OS 






i-i I-- 





Oi 


»o 


05 


05 CO CO t-^ 


r^ "^ 10 CO 


00 CO "^ t>- "^ 


CM l-H l-H CO CO 








co t^ 





CO 





CO 


CO '^ --t^ CO 


tT 05 -^ CO 05 


O; -^ CO CI 


10 CI CO CO 




c« 


i 


»o cjc 





r— 




b- 


r^ "Tf CO CO 


b, 10 (M -^ 


CO CD CJ CS C^ 


t^ CO r^ 


CO 


s 


Oi CO 


lO 


10 

CO 


CD 
IT— 


co 

CO 


C5 -^ 1-1 »o 

00' »o CO *ra 


CO C5 CO r-- t^ 

CO Oi l^ (M 


1-H 10 GO OS 

cj CO CI CI 


CO CM lO CO CO 
•irr »0 »0 OS CD 




(-• 


f- 1— 1 





OJ 


(N 


CO 


-rr 05 CD lO 


CD 35 CO (M --H 


CO OO 


CO t^ »0 OS Tt^ 




cS 


M 


"^ 








<M C^ 


(M l-H l-H t-H 


,-,,-, ,-1 T-H 10 


C^ -^ l-H 






























«• 
























CO CD 





QO 


-^ 


<M 


-^ 00 


CO 


10 t- 


,^ 


!>• 


OS 




b- cr> CO 








CD -r 


01 


(M 





CJ 


.-H r-< GO 


^ 


-.^ l-H 


10 


t^ 







OS OS t- 




S 5 


s 


C3:> O^ 


10 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Tf CD -H CO 


(M 


t^ ^ 


_l 


00 


CO 




t-- CO to 




ii -a 


»o C<] 


QO 


CO 


CO 


(M 


CD -^ C<l Ol 


05 -^ 


^ CI 


CO 


■^ 


CO 




CO CM QO CO 




C^ lO 


r^ 


s 


-rj* 


t^ 


i-H (M tfS r- 


0^ -H^ 




-r 


■^ 







CD CO OD 


lO 


1 




c^ 


C 




»— 1 


00 


l-H TJ^ i-H 

10 


l-H l-H 


t-' 


Qo" 




M 




l-H to to 

1-H l-H T-4 CO 

l-H 




< c« 




«» 
































^o 


OS 


CD 


r-. 





CO 


»0 CM 00 -^ -f 


t- OS CO CI -r 


IC 10 -H QO CO 








GO 


(M 




(M 


CO 


t^ -rf 00 CO 


oc 1^ OS cr^ CO 


00 CO t^ t^ CC 


C-l lO CS »o t~- 




"3 
a 




fcO CD 


CC 


»o 


t^ 


t— 


(M GO >— ' QO 


CD »0 »0 OS l-H 


<M CO CO CO l-H 


d C3 -r< GO 






cf' C^ 


c^ 







c^ 


l>. C5 Cvj 00 


«o r^ r^ <M c^ 


10 CD lO OS i-t 


t-, r- OS l-H 




53 .2 


s 


CD CD 


(M 


CO 


F- 


I- 


■^ Ir- ■^ CD 


CO -^ CD iC 


CD l-H i^ OS CC 


OS CO CI d CO 


■^ 


■S " 


8 


»0 oc 


^ 


»— ( 





CO 


CO "* ■^ <M 


r-T Q^' CO l-H 


»o -* T-H lO wr: 


CO l-H d U5 




<=>! 


o 


»-l CO 


CO 





c 


00 


CO CO CO 05 

CO T-H 


10 to ^f CO I- 


l-H OS »{; 
l-H r-t l-H kC 


0- ^ lO >0 CD 

l-H l-H CI 




S 




















T-H 




1—4 




«* 


























CJ 


iC 


CC 




l>* CO -* 


»C 0-- l-H d t-' 


■rf »0 00 '^ 1— 


r-- d 








CO -^ 





0- 


cr 


■^ 


lO T-H CO fX 


OS CO -^ ^ '-' 


t^ OS CO CO CI 


-rJH lO 00 00 OS 




a 


'o 


cj^ ■^ 


»c 


■^ 


CC 


ir: 


C<1 *-H l^ IC 


Tt* C-l *0 CO 


CD 00 UO OS CC 


r^ CO OS 00 




o 


■^ cc 




CO 


cr. 


CC 


CD 10 10 CC 


C3S 1— 1 (M l-H C 


CO t- l-H CO CD 


^ OS CI l-H 


CO 


CO 


CO "* 

CD U^ 


!>. 


'^ 


•^ 




(r4 »r5 ic 
CO r-- »o t^ 


OS CO CO l-H 

(M C7S l-H OS »ra 


l-H CD GO CO iC 
tC cT -H i-< CD 


l-H lo r- 

CM CO "rr" OS 






CO cr 


c 


^* 


IC 


-r 


i^j *0 CC 


lO CD CO CO GO 


CO l-H Ci CC 


d »o d 




t-- rH 


-rf 


^H 


_ 


CD 


10 i^ 10 oc 


-"^ '^ t^ 


CO CO CO 1-H u: 


CD CD to CO 




Q 




" CC 








(M <N 


CO l-H l-H 




d d" d 








C^ CD 


cr- 


CC 





t^ 


IM CO CO 11^ 


-t< CD I- 


CO CD t^ 1-H C^ 


CO CM OS crs c^ 




.2 




CO cc 


oc 


cc 


-^ 


t^ 


u:) c^i CO t^ 


^-- ko ^ (N 


CO d QO l-H CC 


■!*• CI OS l-H CM 






CO CO 


^_ 


c 


t-^ 


CD 


00 CO cs oc 


CO r- i-- -H 


QO OS i-« CO CC 


OS 00 t-- t^ -+■ 




03 




r- c^a 


c 




oc 




CD »0 '^ C^ 


iO C^l 1-- C5 


00 CI 


« CO -:« CO 10 








»o l> 


_ c 


•- 


CC 


C 


Tfi lO »— ( c~ 


00 t-- OS t^ CO 


OS OS C^i CD oc 


lO to t^ CO T-H 


<M 


•23 




c^ c< 


CO 




<> 





<M CO QO CC 


i-T r^ GO 10 t^ 


CO i^ "t> 


CO -:j* CO -r OS 




1 




CO c 


cc 


'^ 


"<t 


Jc 


CO "5 i-i t> 


■^ Tji CO -^ CO 

1—1 


-f CO 10 CI c 


d -^ to to CD 
CO 




■3 




e» 






































a 


> 


-c 






• -0 

a S 

s ^ 










p; 




ward 

orge 

Uiam 




55 

O 




1 


c 
c 



c 


c 
a 

c 




1 


0- 

& 

a 


1 s I 

g s g 


1 


ew Kent 
orthanip 
orthumb 


s t 


■ CC 


c 


> 

Kf 


owhatan 
rince Ed 
rince Ge^ 
rince Wi 
ulaski... 










- 


»^ 


:s 


ss 


s 


"^ 


;z 


s^ 


. ^ ^ 


z 


c 


> p- 


0- 


^ 


I ^ 


4 Oh CM PL, CL,| 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PTJBLIC INSTRUCTION 



233 











CT) 


CO 


o- 


o 


,^ 


cc 


iC 


-f 


-r 


.— » 


CI 


cc 


— 


kC 


t-- 


t- 


ca 


o 


M- 


00 


CO 


M* 


iO 


Oi ^ 








r~« 




<M 


CO 


o 


CO 


'— ' 


cc 


lo 


o 


CO 


CI 


p- 


CD 


TT 


co 


CO 


CJ 


00 


■* 


IC 


Oi 


c:5 


OO CO 






s 


<M 


CO 


t^ 


CI 


OO 


CO 


f'- 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


tT 


co 


CO 


O 


Cl 


1-H 


00 


''Jf 


OS 


o 




CO 


o o 




3 i 
^ 1 




»ra 


»o 


■rp 


as 


on 


■n- 


iC 


CO 


^ 




« 


iC 


»o 


lO 


CO 


Cl 


Ci 


t^ 


CO 


t-* 


o 


CO 




-1- t- 


CT> 


T3 

a 

C9 


i 


<c 


c^ 


■* 
t 


CI 


CO 


CD 


oc 




on 


O 


CI 


c 


CO 

h-. 


CO 


t- 




en 


CO 

o 


Cl 


Oi 


Oi 

»o 


cr 


QO 


Oi 1^ 






c^ 


CO 


O 




lO 




CO 


CO 


Ol 


CD 


1—1 




oc 


iC 


•rt* 




r- 


cc 


CO 


«c 


-7- 




O:. 


>0 CO 




■^ J 




P3 


(T: 


CO 


1^ 


O 


r- 


CI 


OO 


•^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


GO 


CXJ 


Ci 


CO 


»- 


Cl 


1—1 


lO 


1^ 


o 




CD 


CO *o 




.3 

Q 








■^ 


OC 


r-t 


._, 


1-H 




Tf 




t- 


iCi 


1—1 






^ 


Cl 


Cl 


Cl 


■* 


OO 






CO 


xn CO 






















































Cl 










«A 
























































O 


o 




o 


CO 


CO 


ira 






CJ 


OO 


Oi 


CO 


r^ 


o 


•o 


'Tf* 


-f 


o 


r^ 


cc 


o 


Oi 


^ rr 










cc 


o 




'-^ 


CO 


CI 


1—1 






o 


CI 


Oi 


cc 


CO 


o 


CO 


1— ( 


CD 


CO 


■* 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


Cl c? 






3 




CO 


□0 




1^ 


c^ 


,,_, 


CO 






o 


-rfi 


CO 


,_ 


Cl 


o 


o 


,_, 


-r 


CD 


o 




■* 


^-. 


TP 








(TJ 


OO 




"^ 


lO 


o 


C 






t^ 


CD 




o 


cq 


o 


CD 


CD 


o 


o 


O) 




iC 




CO 




a 


w> 




CO 


<Z) 




«o 


o 


CI 


t^ 






CD 


OO 




»c 


ev; 


Cl 


WtJ 


OO 


a 


IC 


OS 


•^ 


c 


'I 


CO 


OO 


-*j 


5 






















































o 


_rt 






o 




Oi 


CO 


in 


o 






CTi 


,-H 


1^ 


CI 


c 




CO 


to 


Cl 


00 


c^ 


e^ 


■<*' 


^H 


oo" 




H 


13 




w 








CO 


CO 


CI 






{5 

CI 


t- 






c^ 






CD 


»c 


Cl 

CO 








in 
c« 


Cl 






a 




OO 


o 


CI 


^_, 


^_, 


iC 


o 


■^ 


-T* 


C5 


-r 


r- 


CD 


OO 


t-- 


Cl 


uO 


CD 


Tf 




OO 


■^ 


CO 


iC CO 








Oi 


1—4 


(N 


'-H 


t- 




o 


OO 


iC 


02 


CO 


CI 


03 


I-- 


■^ 


o 


r- 


»C 


w: 


o 




Cl 


Cl 


CD lO 








CD 


CO 


r^ 


lO 


kO 


c^ 


,_, 


CO 


CO 


CD 


OS 


o 


,_, 


lO 


o 


Cl 


O 


CO 


00 


Oi 


05 


t-- 


CD 


CD O 






a 




C^ 


CO 


-:f 


-:f 


CO 


■f 


CO 


CO 


w: 


CO 


CO 


'* 


ir 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


r^ 


r- 


Oi 


CO 


r^ 




O 1- 




5 

O 




o 


OO 


•^ 


t-- 


CO 


CI 


r- 


t^ 




CO 


CI 


1—1 


•— ' 


CD 


kO 


r- 




'<*' 


CO 


Ci 


-^ 


Cl 


CO 


CO r- 


^ 


1 




CO 




t^ 


ca 


,_, 


^ 


r^ 


c^ 


00 


'■^ 


o 


o 


»c 


on 


__r 


C^ 


CD 


h- 


CO 


CO 


Cl 


c-' 


CO 


t^ -^ 




t-< 




■M 


^ 


o 


o 


CI 


cc 


-r 


co 


C5 


o 


-^ 


, — . 


oc 


■rr 


■^ 




O 


c 


CO 


■rr 


CO 


c 


f 


O CO 




'■ 


^ 




o: 




I^ 


CD 


!>. 


1— ( 


oc 


-:r 


00 


Oi 


lO 


ob 


OO 


CO 


. ^_ 


y- 


Cl 




t-- 


t- 


o 




■^ 


1—1 iC 






.a 






^ 


oc 


1— 1 


*— 1 


^ 




-^ 




-^ 


tC 


1— 1 






1—1 


Cl 


CI 


Cl 


Cf. 


00 


^H 




CO 


•O CO 






Q 


















































Cl 










«» 






















































O 


_5 


o 


o 


lO 


o 


r- 


cc 


c- 


o 


o- 


o 


r-- 


-^ 


o 


»o 


^ 


t^ 


cc 




o 


o 


«c 


•c o 










CO 




tT 


o 


»c 


o 


CO 


'— ' 


o 


-^ 


•*" 


o 


•^r 


CO 


-J. 


■* 


t- 


l> 


CO 


CO 


o 


c; 


I-- 


CO OO 










CO 


-^ 


cc 


CO 


h^ 


CO 


iC 


o 


1/2 


,_, 


CO 


m 


d 


a= 


CO 


t^ 


05 


OO 


^ 


»o 


o- 


o 


co 


■^ Oi 






S 




ai 


rri 


CO 


'^ 


t-- 


cr 


»c 


cc 




c^ 


kT 


CO 


CO 


o 


Cl 


CO 


cc 


oc 


vz 




t^ 


(ir 


cc 


OTi -Tt* 


CO 


5 






••T" 


■rP 


o 


OO 


OO 


CI 


cr 


iC 


CD 


CJ 




t^ 


o 




rjl 


c 


CO 


cr 


tr^ 


t^ 


CO 


cc 


o- 


Oi^ o 




Q 






OO 


a- 


CO 


c 


c^ 






»o 


OO 


oc 


OO 




CO 




00 


or 


cr 


■^ 


" CD 


w 


" o 


Cl 


r^ CO 




a> 




CO 


o 


CO 


t^ 




b- 


cq 




CD 


r-- 




''t 


t-- 


oc 


r^ 


o: 


ic 


ic 


Cl 


.— < 




Cl 


-r 


(^ 1-" 






CQ 




e» 


cr 










Cl 




CO 


■* 












CI 




Cl 


CD 


1 






Cl 










CM 




»r: 


lO 


lO 


00 


t^ 


~o 




c:> 


c- 


<M 


cr 


c- 


05 


Cl 


Cl 


CJ 


l> 


»n 


c^ 


u: 


CM 


wo CS| 










»o 


o 


(J- 


CO 


CO 


o 


»c 


o 




CO 


oo 


CD 


cc 




CO 


cr 


CO 


Cl 


'-" 


cc 




•*t 


Cl 


— t^ 










oc 


GC 


t^ 


"rj^ 


o 


cc 


CO 


cr 




CD 


,^ 


1^- 


Cl 


Cl 


CO 


Cl 


•^ 


r^ 


CO 


■^ 


b- 


t^ 


o- 


CO CO 




1 


>, 




Ci 


o 


t>. 


W3 


lO 


oc 


cc 


cr 




I- 


»c 




•*T 


CO 


oj 


o 


CO 




CO 


CD 


CT 


'* 


t-- 


cr- o 




rt 




CD 


t^ 


c: 


'^ 


-rt- 


t- 


Id 


CO 




CO 


o 


oc 


oc 


•*T 


lO 


»c 


cc 




oc 


c- 


o 




-t 


. '-I ^. 


to 




•~5 




















































T-t 


§• 


s 




CD 




cr 


O 


iC 


-* 


cr 


QC 




CO 


o 


cr 


a- 


a- 


1-4 


Cl 


CI 


o 


cr 


Tt 


w: 


" a- 


cr 


" co' —* 




03 




Ci 




CO 


CO 


o 


-^ 


*C 


c 




o 


r' 


Cl 


cc 




'^ 


CO 


l> 




■^ 


CC 


cc 


m 




CO " 




O 








-T 














'^ 
















irl 


oc 








CO 


d »-« 














c 
































- 










»o' 










«« 


























































cc 


oc 




o 


cr 


ir: 




o 




c 


-rt 




CO 




r^ 


M- 


c: 


cc 








OO lO 






t-' 








'Tf 


iC 




c 


CO 


c 




o 




o 


'— 




o 




•— ' 


CC 


c 


cr 








fj< l>. 






e4 

a 
o 


a 






'^ 


CO 




CI 


c 


oc 




o 




c:: 


■^ 




Oi 




cr 


\n 


,__ 










t-- 00 












CI 




CO 




cr 




o 




ir: 


o 




Cfl 




ic 


oc 


QC 










CD OO 




OJ 


cS 






cc 


IC 




CI 


r- 


C 




lO 




r^ 


oc 








c- 


cc 




CO 








OI CO 




J3 


'i 


b 






cr 


" o 






t^ 


■^ 




CI 




CI 


' c 




■^ 




^ 


cc 


ir. 


CO 








^' ^' 




o 




o 






C^ 


■* 








CO 












W3 




CO 


'" 




■^ 








Cl 

CO 






-o 


pm 






















































a 








M 


> 


















































O 




CC 


o 


o 


_ 


c: 


»o 


o 


■^ 


CO 


~ 


cc 


•^ 


^ ^ 


Cl 


>c 




I-- 




c 


"c 


O -H 










c 


s 


■^ 


c 


or: 


cc 


c 


'^ 




Oi 


-tt 


'— ' 


o 


c 


lO 


cc 


cc 


cc 








m 


'^ 


CO CO 






a 
o 






rx: 


CJ 


o 


cc 


C<) 


Cl 


C: 




CO 


c 


c: 


CO 


C: 


o> 


cr 


oc 


CD 






Cl 


Tf 


CD O 








o 


OC 


ir 


tc 


1- 


oc 




lO 


CI 






c: 


cc 


lO 


co 




cc 




CD 




t-' 


t- 


CO ^ 






■^ 




CO 


"^ 


1- 


t^ 


(^ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


lo 


c 


■* 


•^ 


t^ 


o 


»c 


a- 


■rj- 




l-^ 






CO 


lo l-" 


CO 


3 


(4 






















































-o 


CJ 






cc 


c- 




itZ 


CO 




CO 


o 


c< 


' CO 


O 


Cl 


CO 


•^ 


CI 




c- 






^ 


QO r^ 




< 


-§ 




















CI 








cs 




it: 








■^ 








Cl 






w 




M 


■ 






















































o 


c^ 


^ 




c 


"^ 


~ 


O CC 


iC 


C3 


oc 


QO 


o 


t^ 


^_ 


c: 


c^ 


'S 


t^ 




cc 


Cl Ci 










c 


oc 


»r 




CO 


u: 


o 


o ^ 


cc 


o 


d 


*r3 


o 


t^ 


■rf 


c: 


cs 


lo 


CO 




o 


CO CO 










o 


c: 


oc 




cc 


c 


■^ <z> a- 




a- 


CD lO 


o 


CO 


t^ c: 


o- 




t^ 




»c 


■V OO 




a> 


« 




1-': 


r^ 


c 






cr. 


CI CD oc 


■^ 


CO 


c 


Cl 


o 








ir 


t: 






I^ 


"^ ^ 




a 


o 




<::: 


t-^ 








G- 


o — 


C3 


CO 




CD O 




Ol 


CO 


a- 


X 


- ^ 


oc 






C2 


tT' cc 


(M 


o 






















































a 

3 
02 






cc 




c- 




■rr 


'^ 


'^ :d QC 


•o 


'rr 


CC 


r- 


-rr 




CO 


CD C^ 


CO 


CO 




CO 


O Cl 








cr 






CJ 


C^ 






cc 


w: 


»o 1- 








CO 


c^ 


OC 


Cl 






CO ca 




Oi 


















































" 










M 


■ 






















































CC 


l> 


c 


oc 


~ 


t^ r* CD c 


tc 


c: 


'«a< CO I> 


^^ 


t^ 


OO OO cc 


t- 


CT 


cr 


CO 


»C CO 




^ a 




^ 




C 


cc 




i> 


as o 1- 


OC 


cc 


\c 


Cl o ^ 


1— < 


Cl 


"^ 


O l> 




CC 


d 


CJ 


O Cl 




2 .2 


-^ 


o 


"^ 


t-- 


r- 




o 


t^ lo CO oc 


CO 


■^ 




■^ Tf 


Cl 


a- 




lO cc 


■rr 


tr. 


t^ 


tP 


^ Oi 




O \3 


o 


QC 


c: 


I- 


t^ 


■rr 


CD 1- 


CO cc 


t-- 




O 1-" -^ 


t^ 


cc 


oc 


CO w 


cr 


cr 


t~> 


cc 


'*'' s 




O a 


^ 


-^ 


CO 


i^ 




^ 


»o »o «J ^ 


CO 


a- 


oc 




. *^ 


U5 




Cl 


■^ 


oc 


d 


OC 


c 


t^ 


CO 0-. 




(_ 


3 


ej 




















































rS 5^ 


td 


m 


CO 


ly 


cc 


-^ 




UO CO c^ -^ 




■^ 


' oc 


CO w: 


' co" 


oc 


^ 




' <= 


lei 


cc 


o- 


t- 


Cl cc 




c4 :x 


a> 




oc 


cc 


ir 


iT 


-t 


CJ 


■^ ■— 




« 


oc 


-^ 'Tf CO 


CO 


CJ 


c 


CO C3 


cc 


CO 


s 


cC 


.— r- 




a O 


S4 


>. 

■73 

Q 


<= 


CJ 


f~ 


cc 


x: 


o t- o oc 


o 


cr 


^ t- 


t^ »f: 




oc 


u. 


OC 


cc 


cc 


o- 


c 


o- 


CO Cl 




^^ 




M 


c- 


U" 


* ^ 


^ 


■^ 




-^ 


■^ 


Tf 


■^ 




'"' 


"" 


^~ 


^" 


1— 


t> 






d 


r^ CO 






ra 
































13 




















- 




Z 
& 
O 
O 




1 

c_ 
c 




C 

c 

c 

1- 


* 

= 
c 


-C 

c 
c 

1^ 


1 

c 
c 
s: 

1 


er 
El 

a 

-C 


X 

c 
a 

:5 


D 

s 


> 

Ih 

1 

g 
i 


c 
c 

V 

c 


c 

:2 


c 
c 

a 


c 
c 

c 

E 

1 

c 

2: 


1 

a 
:2: 


> 

1 

c 


a 

c 

C 


1 

a 






1 

> 


1 

c 


& 

•3. 

CJ 

1 


c 
a; 
C 

CJ 

c 


B ■ 

O) 1^ 



234 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Is 

O 

O 

I 

o 

I 

Oi 

«D 
05 






o 

Q 

CO 

H 

O 
U 



«2 



pa 









W5 (M t^ iC Ol 


CO Oi CO O CD 


00 CO 


i-( CO CO 


Oi CO O *-• oo 


•^ 


00 








Cvl TT O ^J* ^ 


CD 1-H ^ -^ CQ 


Cq TJI 


O Oi o 


Oi CO -^ -^ CO 


s 


00 




•o 1 




t-- tf^ 1-1 C^ -rt* 


Ca CO ^ »o b- 


t^ 1-t 


CD t>. t- 


O "^ Oi CO CO 


Oi 


lO 






»^ r^ 1^ c^ "^ 


Cl Oi CO CM -— ' 




'rr ^ CM 


O CO t^ lO o 


CO 


o 


o 


.§a 




GO r^ »-« »o t^ 

O i-t OO O CO 


CO ^ CM lO "0 

t^ o »o f t^ 


lO ^ 
O kO 


OO Oi lO 
^ t^ Oi* 


CC no oo CO ^ 
CO CO CO ^^ t"~ 


CM 


CM 




f^ ^ 




^ »-• CO -^ t- 


lO CO CO -<*< CM 


CO CO 


»-t »-« Oi 


CM t'- CM «-« kO 


■^ 


-rt* 




o 




«» 












o 

Oi 








CO o -^ »o c^ 


O CM CO CM O 


CD Tj. 


CM '^ 0-- 


CM r^ CO Ci 1— ' 


CO 


CM 






O to T-< CO cq 


t^ t^ to IC t— 


T-l ■n' 


lO CD -<r 


I-" o eft CD ko 


t^ 


Oi 






^ «^ ^ c^ ^ 


'r* oo *-H t^ -i9< 


CO CO 


CO -O b- 


CO •— " t^ -^ kO 


Tf 


t^ 




ss 




CO CO O CO 1-* 


lO O CO Ol »o 


CO CO 


C-a CO CO 


r- 1— 1 o CO oo 


Oi 


kiO 






^r (TO ■«J' I-- ^^ 


^f t- 1— < lO o 


rH 1^ 


oo b- jr^ 


CM Oi CM kO CO 


t-^ 


o 


Oa 


g ^ 




»0 QO t-^ -t* Crs 


I>» CO >/3 Oi CO 


c<r o" 


CD CO -H 


■^ O OO CO Oi 


CO 


i-H* 




•5 o 




-TT^ Tf lO '-' 


OO t-~. lO OO lO 


CO t^ 


i-< CM CO 


l>- CD t-- CO t>- 


CO 


t^ 




.S -a 




OO i-t 








^ CO 




'^ 




1^ 




«» 












kO 








en CO ira 00 *- 


1-1 b- CO -^ CM 


i~^ "^ 


ir^ t^ 1-1 


b- O i-i 1-1 (M 


•»?< 


CM 




11 
.2 0-, 




<M O lO CM <M 


C3; ^H CO i-H lo 


^ C7i 


O C<I CO 


O ^ t^ CO l>. 


Tji 


CM 






--' t^ -rt^ t-H CD 


t--. CO o Th '^ 


CO '-' 


^ -^ 1^ 


CM O CD -* 1-1 


-^ 


t^ 






'-' CO (O CM O 


■—< CO CO Oi CO 


CM C*! 


»0 kC CO 


b- kO Oi C<1 i-< 


oo 


■f 






OJ kO CD Cl C<) 


CM -^ CO lO 05 


-tt" t^ 


O^ TP t^ 


O CD 1-1 b- 1-f 


o^ 




CO 


"rt "o 




-^ CT> CO .-< O 


CO «-! t^ -tf i:^ 


CTi oo" 


CO CM CM 


C^ CO c^ -^ o 


OG 


o 




!^ O 




CO TT 1-1 CO o:s 


C?l oo CD !>. lO 


lO y-> 


C<» 1-t Oi 


O t~- 00 oo CD 


CO 


r>. 




o. J 




OO f-H (N 


1— t T-H 1— t *— t r- 1 


^ CM 


T-i CM 


»-l CM CM i-< 


CO 


CO 




OtS 




•» 












00* 
CM 








Ol C5 CO ^^ C5 


Oi CM 00 »0 t^ 


CM CM 


-rf CO Oi 


rt^ 1— ' CM CO -^ 


^ 


^ 




•T3 




GO I^ CD "IT »0 


-r-" CD t'- CO Ci 


CO CO 


I-" t^ CO 


'^ 00 O CO CM 


CI 


CO 




1 s 

1 i 




CO Ci CO OO t^ 


r^ -^ CO o I-- 


CD -rt- 


»0 Cr; QO 


O O 1-" kO -^ 


CO 


CO 






C=i lO CO CO CM 


^ O CO C^i CD 




CO CO CM 


-rf CO CM CO r^ 


•*" 


kO 






CD Ci CO O CM 


CD CO CO CD -rf 


lO o 


»o ^^ o 


CD 'rf" CO CM ^H 


CO 


CM 


»>- 




Ci CD CO '^ CO 


CD oo 1— 1 ifS OO 


*0 CM 


CM O CO 


t-, CO r^ CD CM 


CM 


CD 






CM CO CO 05 


C3 OS '<*< !>. !>. 


»0 lO 


CM kO CO 


CM CM kC O kO 


Oi 


OO 




•g «2 




*— 1 


'"' 






i-« CM 




iO 




W 




«» 
















rt 




■^ »r5 CO CM '<*' 


CO CO CM ■*** -* 


T~i CM 


CO ■^ CD 


O Oi Oi CO -^ 


CM 


1—1 




o 




CO C<I O 1^- I^- 


^ -rr OO Oi CM 


CO CD 


O TJ* CM 


Ci CM kC kO CM 


GO 


r-4 




•J3 
P-l m 


m 


--. GO CM Oi "tP 


O c<i ■* CD r- 


CO *^ 


CM O CO 


C<l O t^ 1-" CM 


CO 


OO 




V 


52 !r ^ ^ "^ 


lO t-^ r^ CO CO 


O CO 


CO CO CD 


»-< 1-" CO -^ Oi 


CO 


■^ 


to 




OO Ci t^ CD CO 
CD •-< CO 1— 1 -T" 


c^i CM o:> t-- U3 

oo oo ^'" oo" CO 


OJ o 
CM OO 


CD 0_ IT* 

■Tf CM WO 


t^- CD OO kO O 
kO CO CD Tf O 


kO 

CD 


CM 




lO CO CO OS »c 


■*?*■<-" t- -* Ci 


CD CO 


CO CM O 


kO Oi CO M* (>. 


CO 


OO 






02 


-^y T-« CO 


CM CM '-H -H ^ 


»-t »-H 


-H CO 


CM I-" CM ^ 


CM 


CD 




eg 
















o" 




E- 




c» 












CM 








CM 


C4 ^H t^ 


lO Oi 




I--. 


^ t- 




• Oi O 


OO OO 1-t o r^ 


CO 


,__, 




£ 5 




■«9' 


• -rr »-< CO 


CO t^ 




CO 


lO -n* 




• CD CO 


CD ^ i-< CM O 


t^ 


b- 




03 


li^ 


!>. Oi O 


t^ ^H 




• i^ 


CO o 




t- t-^ 


CD ^ kO kO CO 


CD 


CJ 




II 


V 


CM 


t^ OS CO 


CO t^ 




• to 


b- lO 




^-!* CO 


CD kiO b- CO CM 


CM 


CO 


»« 


u 

> 


O 

cm" 


t* lO CO 
CO lO t^ 


CO ^ 




CO 

1— < 


»0 CO 
CO l^ 




CD CD 
Oi CM 


CM C<i 00 ^^ CD 
Oi CM O OO O 


CO 


CD 






02 




CM 


t>- CM 




C<I 






CO 


CM i-< -^ -^ 


kO 






<; M 




«« 




















CM 








»o CM CO CO r- 


CO O Oi t^ t^ 


CM O 


c: ^ ^ 


kO --^ C^ CM CD 


'^ 


^^ 




,_ 




O C<l CO -^ CO 


^ ^ oo ^ CO 


»0 uO 


T-i o CO 


^ -^ ^ O i-« 


CD 


CM 




c9 




Ol CO ■-1 Ol o 


L'^ ''3' O t-l -rfi 


lO b- 


•rf ko r-- 


CD O CO O ^^i 


CO 


Oi 




S 


^ O ^ CM CM 


■^ CO CD t^ QO 


CO C<J 


CM i-( r^ 


1— OO CD CM CM 


C<l 






O -^ CO CO CO 


CM CO ^O O Oi 


Tf »-l 


CM kO CO 


1-H Oi CO -^ 1-1 


r^ 


t^ 


TT 


5 -8 


S 


o !>. CO crs c<i 


lO GO ^H r* Oi 


Tt**" co" 


CO kO ^ 


O OS Oi kO CO 


CD 


l>- 




o 


Tj< CO ^ '— ' CO 


t3< QO ■^f t>- I-^ 


^ 00 


CO I-* C<J 


CO 00 1-H CM OO 


CO 


CD 






CD 1-H CM 


CM CI 1-1 1-H C<I 




»-. c^ 


i-( CO i-l CO 1-1 


CO 


kC 




3 
















t^ 




1— ) 




«» 












CM 








O lO CO CO c- 


Oi Ci CTi O Oi 


T-. OS 


■<»' ^^l '^ 


CO CM CM e<l Oi 


o 


oo 




a 


^ 


t- !>. 40 lO CO 


t- -rr CO QO C^l 


o »o 


t^ -rj. QO 


t-- '^ CO -* 00 




kO 




o 
o 


CM CO CO t- C<l 


CD »-H CO >o r^ 


Oi CO 


CO t- -^ 


o r- ko uo CO 


CO 


t^ 




lO CD CD -n* CO 


no O «0 '-' CD 


Oi CM 


r- CD Oi 


-«r CD t-^ 00 OS 


-^ 


CM 






C:- CM rr *0 CS 


CO lO lO o -^ 


lO CD 


'^ CO CO 


kO kO^ Oi_ ^_ ^_ 


o_ 


o> 


CO 


EC 


Cl CTi CO <— ' C^ 


TTt W3 '— ' 00 00 


-^'" o" 


Tf" i-T 1— r 


■^r '<J< O CO CO 


1— r 


CM 




& 


CO OO Ol o oo 


"^ 1^ O t^ CD 


O CM 


Oi CO lO 


CD CD i-i d t>- 


<M 


CO 




S Pi 


CO "3 O t^ CD 


1-1 CT- 00 CM lO 


lO -H^ 


CO CM oo 


'l <^_ "^ ^- °^ 


CO 


O 




Q 


CO* ^ CO* 


CM 1-1 1-1 CM ^H 


1-H e^ 


-H CO* 


•-* CO CO 1-^ 


CO 










«* 












CI 




a 
.2 




CO O "^ CO -rf 


O *- CO CO 00 


lO CD 


r-^ .OC oo 


t-* C4 CO 'Tj' CM 


■^ 


Oi 






f— t CO t^ lO »o 


O »0 cq CO Oi 


kO t* 


■<*• kO 00 


-H CM O oo O 


CO 






■5 




0-) t* r^ QO CD 


O CO 1^- iO CM 


lO "^ 


■* t- CO 


t-^ O Oi Ol kO 


''S^ 


O 




es 




t-^ -^ iiO t-- o 


^ o r^ oj t^ 


oo t^ 


CO OS o 


-rj* ,-. CD CM kO 




o 




is 




en CO i-H CO ■^ 


-rr en oo lo CM 


Cfl o 


CO t^ o 


CM_ CM^ CD_ O^ CO^ 


Oi 


Oi 


c« 


•g 




UO 40 CM I-- »J0 


^ Oi" ^' I--" t-T 


TT o" 


C3 -^ •-* 


CD »0 Oi kO t^ 


^ 


cd" 






i-i CM -^ •'T r^ 


t^ 00 »0 -<3< CO 


CO t^ 


CO -^ OO 


CO Oi CO t^ '<3* 








"i 




CM 










T-) 


Oi 




•o 
















CCl 




< 




«» 












«» 




























































.8 




CO 
























































a 




W 




^ • 








































-o 

a 

OS 










3 




t— ( 




S : 

a • 
o -a 
a a 

11 




c 


d 1 






j: 




1 1 


.2 














c 










o 




o 
o 




0. 

c 
c 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


a 

(73 

c 


a 

CO 


c 

1 


, 


c 

1 

tr 

c 


c 
CG 




> 




a. 




c 

t 


c 
■G 
c 


e 
1 


1 
& 


> 


■> 






1 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



235 





43 

a 






CD 1- 


o ^ 


<CD I lO^^^CO-H Os-t<Oa-t 




O 00 Ci ■*>* — 


o 1 - 










CSJCOOOi 0Or*CDGO(M -^CD-^Or* Oit^CDlO-^f 


o> eo 






S 


oo-^r-co 1 ascqooco*- 


cr. ^ 


« GO oo lO ^ 


to CO cs CO WD CO I 




s i 

o 2 




T'c^iocsj'ir) CiiococO'* toojcot^c^ 


CO CO ^ t^ to 1 oj 1 oo 1 


OS 


-g 


a 


o .- 




coco CiOOt^OiCO OOCDCO<M 


CO Ci CD ^ 


oc 


. r=^ M-- 


1-^ 


3 


-fS 


»o ^ 


t^csr- 1 -^looo-^c^j 1 Mioo'^oo I CO -xf <n c<t t— \ — 


oo 




t-< 3 


"cfl 


cs 


(N 


CQCDOO COfMCiiOiO -fCOt^-rfCD OCDCTiCOO CJ 1 C^ 1 




1 




n 


t^ 


O:i0CDt'- 1 COC^CO<MCD | fcOiOcOOOrr 


O b- CO t^ ^ 


.•«.«>. 




.a 










CN 


C^IO '*COCSI-rt*C<) <MCO 


^ 


CD 1 cs 


lO ^^ t- ■* 1 b* 1 M 1 




Q 










c-« 
































OS 

to 










«» 








' 










1 










1 








«» 










<N 


t^ CO CO (^ 


kC CO — 


^ 


Ol o -*^ 


lO r- 


oo O — C^J 


1^ CO 










>o »- 


CD 30 C 


) I^ CSl CO t^ O 1 lO !>• 


co t^ 


■^ O 00 Ci 


CO 00 






S 




»o lO Ci o a 


y- 


CO CO CO CO oo o 


CO cc 


CM eo -^ -^ 


CD -^ 




3 




CO oo c^ ao -rf 


* M Ci CD 01 Ol 1 lO C 


1 


OJ b- 




-^ CM 'J* 


CO -^ 




a 




t- O 1^ r^ <^ 


s_ lOCiMOOilcor* 


CO cc 


O to CO CO 


OS to 


00 












































- - 




,o 


.5 




.1^ CO CO CO ^ 


O t» »0 CO »- 


t^ -^ 


CD -n 


r* ^^ lO CO 


CM CD 




e- 


"sS 




CD CD O 


CC 






o 




Ol 


CO — 


to lO o o 


o to 






CQ 








'ct« 




CO 




CO 




i— t 




cc 




CO CM ^ 




CO to 














t>- 


























CM 




o 
















































r* 










«» 




































«» 






3 

4> 




■^ 


-^ 


'Tf 


CO CT 


Oi>>ocsiC5 1 Oiocicrs-^t 


T-l oo oo CM 1- 


CT 


1 oo 








CO c; 


CT 


O oc 




•^ CO 1-H ^ 


en OS Tf CD o- 


lO I-* CO CO ■«*« G 


M< 










lO -^ 


t^ t^ 


OOCOOOCO 1 OOCO^OC 


05 CM oo M* CO CT 


> oo 




•a 


a 






■*r 


<N 


~^ _ 


r- iO O <- 


■^ — 


O CO lO -^ 


CD CT5 oo CO lO oc 


) CO 








_ c: 


>o lO r^ 


-^ootocsco 1 t^cocooi^: 


oo CO CM oo oo a 


i <N 


t* 


*> 


























- 
















- 






o 


5 




3- 


m 


oc 


O ir 


> -^r-coi— lo l-^oiooocc 


»o CO CO oo r* 1 a 


C4 




H 




^ 


*£; 




CD Cs 


o — 


c:jio»o cocor^ou: 


-rr I-" oo CM o 1 oc 


) t^ 






•1 




cc 


a- 


Tf 


CO I- 


COC^COOSCD [ O-TiCDOO'F- 


ca Tt< CD CO ^ 


_ <=^ 


> 01 






.s 








u^ 


c<r u- 


> ^ CO oi CO cs 


C<l CO 


^ 


cc 




lO ^H lO '<»' 1 cc 


> 03 






Q 










































CM 

to 










«* 




































«» 










-^ 


-t 


»C lO cc 




O O -^ G 


•t^ »c <o o t- 


C5 CO CM lO cs 


-^ 


■^ 










t^ 


(N 


t^ — 


— 


CO o .- 


t- c 


OO CO G 


o cs 


-^ CM cs CM G 


C*" 


) »-H 












CC 


cr 


^ 


■rt 


O C3 r^ lO C 


CD ■^ CO O IT 


CO ■^ O CO C^ 


cc 


> oo 






S 




cs 


(rl 


c: 




CS 


.-1 O CD OJ cc 




t^ CO G> oc 


^- O CO CD C 


I^ 


CM 


ta 


2 

Q 


> 




0-] 


t>. 05 Oi tr 
^ irj t>- »r 


--' o »o t-- oc 
> CO CO r^ i^ (N 


CD CD CD O cc 
b-T t^ — 4 CD cc 


lO lO CO oo G 
-jT ^ lo" CM* CJ 


CT 


r co" 




<u 




I> 


CD I>. OS -^ 


C^ 1- 


C^ Ol t^ 




c^ c^ 


or 


CO ^ O CO CT 




CD 






03 








■^ 


i-H tj 


co 


^ CO 1- 


CO ^?ri 




cc 




■^ T-1 CM 1- 


cs 


o^ 
















































CO 










«» 




































•» 










-^ 


'T 


oc 


OC CT 


03 CO CT. t- C-" 


r^ CO o OS oc 


CO t-" as CD ir 


c^ 


> •-» 










cc 


^ 




cn cc 




^ CS| »0 cc 


CO oi CO cs 


CT 


OS OS Oi t^- G 


c- 


> CM 














cc 


CD r* 


CO o o -sr i> 


o -^ t^ -- 


CT 


oo o h» oo -•■ 


cc 


> t* 




*c3 


>t 




c- 


H 


<r 


t^ cr 


CTi '- 


lO ^rf U- 


CO o GO o cc 


CO ^-H 1-* CO — 


cr 


) »o 




-S 


^ 




cc 


o 




CD t' 


00 OI CSl 


CO O 


r- t^ -^ 


CO oc 


CO -^ b- O t-- 


c 


oo 


lO 


















































'§• 


3 
O 




(N 


•— 


cc 


t^ C^ 


oc -( o* o oc 


-r Ci »o Ci i> 




■^ o to cs 


cc 


> CO* 




CQ 






-rr 


— 


in c** 


> M' oo -*■ CO c*- 


CO CO 


-rr 1- 


CO CO !>. -^ oc 


cc 


> o 




o 








t^ 


CS 


o 




■^ 










-fl- 


cs 


CM CM ^ 


CT 


-rt^ 














cs 






























^ 




oT 

CD 










«» 




































•» 
















CO '^ 


^-^ csi c^ t* 


-^ 'tf OS oo 




to O oo oc 


"^ 


4 -^ 






•^ 










o ^ 


t- t- ^ 


1^ 




O t^ CO 




CM oo O "■ 


cc 


00 






C 

o 


m 








CD r' 




t^ (N 


o 


•rt* .- 


^ 


co 




CO CO CO cs 


cc 


> '^H 














CO cs 


o ^ 


r- b- 


OO oi oc 


m 




CM -^ CO ^ 


CT 


CD 




OJ 










O ur 


•-t CO CO o* 




O) G 








CM^ CO^ ■<** -^ 


cs 


cs 


■^ 




'-3 














































**3 


09 


W) 








O 'S 


ITS 0» CO CO 


CD 


CO o 




oi" CO 00 cc 


a 


■«-H 




o 


3 


o 








CO Cv 


oo «-( T- 


GO 


CO 


■^ 


cs 






CO ^ 




CO 






'^ 


CL| 














































w 










































CO 
















»» 






























«» 










c*: 




CT 


oo oc 


b-. CD 1- 


CD cc 


Oa CO '^ 


CO G 


cc 


CD !>. CM oc 


t^ 


CO 










cc 




c- 


'* '^ 


t* CO r^ lo cc 


rt 


Cq cs 


cs 


ee 


cc 


oo 1-H -tf o 


G 


o 






a 
.2 




l> 




»« 


CO c*- 


-rj< (N CO "S* CT 


^ Oi ^ 


co" ^ 


ir. 


CO ^H GO CT 


l> 


CO 








cr 




*r. 


r- --t 


lO T-t _o oo cc 


CO CD -tT 


-^ r- 


tr 


-rtl oo .- 


cc 


G 


O) 










oc 




'Tf 


'-< -^ 


*o CO CO c^ cc 


lO CO -^ 


CD — 


cc 


CD oo CM CS 


u- 


■^ 


CO 


3 


c4 














































■T3 


u 








1-- 


" iJ3 — 


O ^ lO O I-- 


cs 


" 00 — 


^- 




cs 


CO t* CO oc 


Cs 


<»4 




<; 


3 








CJ 






Tt< CO 


CO 










cc 




CO -t* 


■^ 


r- 




■o 




































CM CM 




tO_ 






W 




M 






































CM 












c 


c 


O C 


oo 'rj^ O O C 


m Ol 




^ 


I> 


to »— 1 1— • iT 


G 


CO 










u: 


o 


^ 


O G 


Oi en iz 


UO oc 




oi 




cc 


m: 


!>. ''T' r* CS 


oc 


00 










cc 


c 




O <= 


lO en c: 


r^ cc 


cs 


c^ 






cc 


to CO t- cc 


tr 


CM 




V 


^ 




•l- 




s 


iC T 


o cc c: 


cs 


■f 


t— CD 




cc 


o 


CM r- CO oc 


or 


r-- 


(M 


a 


§ 






s 




t^ c 


oo CS| CD cs 


a- 




t^ 




cc 


cc 


-^ O cs CT 


IC 


co^ 


»— < 


s 

3 
03 


^ 




t^ 




cc 


<m' oc 


o* o" eo" -t 


t^ 


CO -^ 




oc 


o: 


" ^" ccT 00 cc 


c*- 






u 












CS 


CO CO 








Cfl 






cs 


(N i-< CM "^ 


c<- 






M 








?^ 




























T-1 




■^ 
















































•^ 










M 


» 




































•» 










c 


cc 


(N 


CT> IT 


— 


c^ — 


s 


G 


t^ O cc 


cc 


"<t 


a- 


CO OS o cc 




CO 




-» s 




ja 




cc 


^ 


CO '^ 


<M 


c 


G 






G 


•" 


T- 


r- 


-^ 




CD lO tT cs 


1-- 


"^t* 




S-2 


« 


o 


o 


cc 


a- 


C5 OC 


cs 


CO ^ 


CD Ol 


cc 


CQ ir- 




r^ 


c 


05 00 to cr 


cc 


01 




o 


cc 


■r 


i^ 


x> C^ 


— 


CSJ 


tn lo CT 


t^ O CS 


m 


or: 


r- 


t— CM r^ cc 


D- 


CM 




O cs 


-a 


cc 


■^ 


cc 


Oi ^ 


o en o 


t- X 


■rt 


. *^ ^ 


c- 


cs 


cc 


*-i GO CM ^ 


ir 


OS 






"3 


u 










































.-^ 


ll 


C>0 


M 


■^ 


o 


»^ 


CD CJ 


CO CO O »r 


cc 


t- CI -3- 


G 


a~ 


cc 


CO -^ O ■^ 


c 


to 




OJ 






If: 


c 


»0 or 


•rt 


O ;:r 


CO c^ 


cc 


o c 


cc 


CT 


c^ 


O to CD b- 








o O 


ci 




^ 


oc 




- *^ '^ 


CQ 


O '^ 


_ G 






Oi cc 


l^ 




cc 


tO -^ !>■ cc 


t^ 


o 




^•3 








c 


of -^ 


co" co' Ol 


CO cs 


cs 


C<J 


- 


iC 




■^ r-t -il* cs 


■** 


CT. 

OS 
















































CO 










M 






































*• 






Kl 














































i 

C3 






» 




Jrf 


































1 






3 










CI 

o 

c 








E 






.£: 




c 
o 


.rt 












c 






o 

o 






1 




§ 


a: 
o 

3 




) 

1 


G 

cc 


a 


> 

s 


£ 

i 

o 


1 


>1 

^1 


> 


> 
z 


"a 

ISI 

a 


s 


c 

■s 

c 


i 


4. 


4 

> 


» c 


s 



236 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



O 



o 
en 

CO 






O 
Q 

< 

I— ( 
"^ 

o 
o 

M 

CO 
H 

ID 

M 














ooac»ocOQO coo oo 


-^cort^GOco i--cDr--coo ocoiocool 










I— m -rt" -- 


■> W» CO *0 CO 


»ot--i^»oco o'ocicoc:' '-'CMr^'- 


H CO 






8 




QO-^G^tMCO lOCOl'rr 


OOCOOCOCO r-CMOOCMO O-- 


H M' oo O 




• ■-" 




co«Dcoc^eo CDiol<M 


r^-rrio»ocM corfcDcoo C)iococr:Gr 


o 


BC 




oo tiS CO -^ o to »- 


1 ^. 


'rt<rj<,-.COCO »0>-HCnt--»0 CM»0-*J'-^rJ< 




d 




CO 


CO CO t^ 1 (M TP 1 »0 


OCOr^OilO 1-*COGOCOCM COC^-*fOQO 




tt4 


ja 
















CI 


OSC4.-HOOOO ,_,r-HOO 


CO 


l-H 1-i CO 1 






O 


















cq 


<M 








CO 










«» 












&* 


ft^ 




1 












o 






to O CO Ci n 


>* CO d c^ 


-^CO^CIOO 1 'TflOt-^O 


lO T- 


H cc ^ 


-. CO 




-** 




t-- CD CO cq Of 


: Tj* CO CO 




H -^ CO t^ -^ !>. O CO 


O CM CTi oo C 




9 




CO -^ CO lO c 


5 h- CO -rt* 


lOCOOiCDCM r-CMiOCO 


CO rf< CO •<*' *o 




a 






to ifj r- 'Tf c 


5 »C t^ CO 


CMt--O0COC-i coo»oo 


r^ -^ 


H CT 


C5 o: 




e8 


Oh 




CJ CO <- 


* -^ .- 




O CO 


lOCMCOCCOO ^^'rfcOCr. 


CO -^ »0 GO -"^ 


o> 




"o 




oi" oi" »- 


oo C" 


1 i-H 1-^ 1 CO 


cacooscM"^ coi>.cOr-H 


i-h" oo' O cm" U5 




-«^ 


o 






<* 


c^ 


5 i-H ^ 


CO 


lO'^t— ICDO 1— '1— iiiOeo 


t--- CM rP 1- 


H O 




a 


-a 




















-O 1 








■* 




OJ 










































«» 












^ 


























r- oi oo oo '.- 


^ O t- 


o 


COOi^HCOCM 1 OOCD40 


^ LO T- 


^^-1 






■** 




O CD W5 .-H C 


3 CO W 


) oo 


!■- 


-COCO-^t-- 1 lOO-iOCO 


l^ lO O r- 


H -H 




o 


a 






































rt 




CO ^ CO ^ o 


1 o '- 


UO 


C2*— ("rf<I>.CO OOt-Hi— ICM 


r« CTi -^ CD CO 1 











<M oo T- 


a^ cf 


5 <- 


cc 




CICMCOC/DO lOCOOrr 


CO cr -t^ ^ 


H -rt* 




O 


S 




rr r^ OI Ol C' 


3 <M oc 


oo 


t-rH.-HlO-^ COOt^'-H 


CO O GC^ CTi t^ 


00 


■^ 


"q 




'^ 00 -M O *1 


^ Tt< \C 


> o 


»o '— 


CO ^H CD o\ <^ <:^. \r:i 


CM 00 'rf 'tt' 1^- 




•m 


o 




CO 


C) — 


■^ 


■• CO c< 


) Ci 


"^•^lOrficO 1 -^CMt^CO 


CO 1-- 


- -r Tt^ o 1 




Cl. 


ja 


















Cl 1-H CO oo I »-l CO 


'— ' 






*-* 




o 


eg 




ft» 












&% 














'"' 










o 






_ 




cc 


CO 


CTS O CM CO C^ 


5 CM I-" ^ O 


c^ CO cr 


00 CO 




-a 






cji 


CO 


c 


) 




CO 


O »0 '-I -rt^ cc 


3 CO CM CTs CO 


T-H t^ CT 


CO 00 




o 
o 


s 




._, 


CO 


^ 






oo 


■^ t^ i-« CO ■^ 


1 Tt* lO t^ GO 


t— CO c: 


lO CTi 






lO 


I-- 


cr 








■rt< '^ t^ r- c 


5 ^ CO CO CM 


r^ CO cj 


CTi t^ 




u 




iO 


C^4 


CN 




oc 


o_ 


lO »0 CM oo rj 


f< lO CM t^ CS 


O CO C 


GO OO 


t^ 


"o 


0> 




00 


CO 


ir- 


s 


cv 


rH 




H CM o r^ t' 


O O CO 1-1 


oo CJ T- 


O GO 




o 
















CM 




^ -V CO o « 


— 1 CM 1-1 oc 


CM cc 


1- 


< CO 




J3 
o 
CQ 


ra 


















CM 


"- 










CO 














































«» 












6^ 


«^ 


















§ 




CO C 


c 




es 




c: 


W5 


CD 


CM o ir 


3 CO O »0 




^H oo 


t^ t- 










C-: 




cc 




u~ 


»o 


OO 


CD C3 O- 


5 »0 O t^ 




CO i-H 


'^ »o 






•i3 


s 


r-- \rt 


u: 




cr 




t-- 


'^ 


CO 


oo »o or 


D lO CO CT:. 




CM CM 


y- 


H CO 






s 


O CJ 


w: 




r^ 




ur 


CM 


CTi 


CTJ O <3 


5 CO T-H O 




•^ CM 


C^ rH 1 




c 


o 


co^ — 


G 




cc 




i> 


CT^ 


»o 


•^ \ri y- 


H ^ CM O 




CO GO 


to W5 1 


CO 


1 

01 


































- 1 


3 


^* -tt 


lO 




or 




oc 


cf 


o 


CO C5 c^ 


5 d *-l OS 




CD Cl 


^ on 1 




Oh 


rH 






c- 






CO 


Ci 


-] 






l-H CO 




CO 






i 


ra 




















'^ 












CM 






H 












































t^ 








1 




«« 


«» 






























oc 


CT 






t^ 


QO C 


»— t 1— < O' 


3 -t* 


CO t^ 


CO -t^ — 


O CM 




S 












CT 


a 






crs 


t^ I> 


rt< CM r- 


1 CO 


o o 


C~ UO »c 


t^ »o 




S 








r^ 


i> 






WD 


-rti ir 


OO CM U- 


3 -^ 


CO to 


^ O CO 


»o o 




□ 


s 








ir 


c^ 






Ci 


co t^ 


CO OO »i- 


S 1— t 


CD C^ 


CO CO cc 


to CO 




es 










c 


cc 






GO 


CM I> 


kO Cni C 


) »— ( 


Cfl o 


t~- -- 


^ CM 


»o t^ 


us 


-t3 


w 


1 










«- 






CO 


Co" T- 


CO CD cc 


"■ 


(M CO 


O CM CT 


CM CO 




-«-3 


-o 


















CTi 


TT cc 






»o 




T- 


H o 




<; 


<I3 




















































M 








e* 


«i* 
























o o 


b- 




** 


"<* 


t^ 


CO 


CM t-' 


t- 1-t T- 


< CTl O O r-t C 


•*i< CO CM 


O CO 






^^ 




CTj IC 


l^ 


5 


t> 


c 


cc 


CM 


y~^ \C. 


00 OO w 


S 'Tj* Cfl CM CM »-H 


lO t- CO 


'(f Oi 






a 
.2 




-r r>- 


CC 


CC 


c^ 


oc 


-r 


OS 


CO l> 


QO o a 


S ^ O t^ CO OC 


1-t kO i-i 


oo Oi 






S 


'X) -rr 


"rf 


c/. 


oc 


c 


c 


lO 






lo — • c: 


) CTj CO OO CO cc 


t^ O^p CT- 


CM M^ 




u 


t-o cr 


"^ 


. *^ 




l^ 


oc 


C?5 


^j_ cr 


_ o o c 


) lO C^ CTJ CO o 


O '-' CD 


GO t- 


■^ 


^ 


3 


s 


CO oc 




cr 


c^ 


oc 


*f. 


I>- 


'^ CM 


CO »o C^ 


3 CM O CO lO CM 


CO CO CT^ 


r* CO 




O 


o 


CO 


? 




-^ 




o: 


t^ 


CM CC 


o: -^ i> 


CO i-H -^ rH C 


-H t^ O 


CD CO 




i 
















»— t 






lO ^ 


1-1 CM CM 


CM 






"^ 






S 






















^ 


rf 








rH 






•— t 










































«» 












<y& 


»& 






















Cq CO 


<M 




U" 


CO 


cq 


o 


O CM 


oo lo cc 


> IC CM CM ^^ 


O rH ■»:?« 


c^l 








1 


oo -^ 


OC 




cc 


CO 


CO 


-^ 


CO d 


r-H Oi cc 


) Cn CT) lO t^ 


M- i-H TJH 


(X 


to 




p 
o 


5 


o 

o 


CO ^ 


CT 




c^ 


y-* 


cc 


CM 


i-< CM 


CO CO CC 


> -^ rH O CO 


rH CD CO 


CM CT. 






t-- '^ 


<N 


c 


I-- 


tf; 






Oi I^ 


r^ oo cc 


> CTi CM "-* O 


1— I to -f 


CO kO 




'% 




00 1-H 


. "^ 




cs 


o 


-rr 


oo 


Tt< o 


QO »0 l> 


CD -O O '^ 


OO l>- CO 


CD CTi 


CO 


I 


tD 


\n t- 


CO 


o 


"5 


1^ 


m 


-rt* 


CD ^ 


CM OS l> 


CO CT. O CO 


'rr CO Ci 


t-" ^ 






>t 


cr^ <N 


CT 


a- 


cc 


ri- 


O 


C3 c^ 


CO CO CT 


OO CM OO CM 


CO rf f 


OO CO 




s 


PJ 


tS 


CO --H 






n 


cc 


ce 




o_ Tj- 


iO CO cc 


-rp CO CT> O 


rp Ci CM 


to CT5 




t— < 
















CM 


*— t T-H 


CO CT 


i-H -^J* 




t-H 




CM 














































«* 












6% 


e*^ 


















§ 




-* cc 


t^ 


•^ 


oc 


o 




CM 


'rt* ^ 


t-- -rj* »r 


CO t^ CT: lO i— ' 


CTl »- 


Cl 


oo CO 








T-l 'IJI 


''f 


cc 


oc 


00 


CM 


CD 


CJ 


oo 


CO CM U- 


lO ^ lO *o -^ 


^ cc 


'— ' 


CD t^ 






.3 




C<1 CD 


o 


CD 


CN 


t^ 




h^ 


GO CM 


CM lO r- 


1— 1 OO CT5 lO CO 


r^ CT 


CO 


cs 


Oi 






S' 




Cl ^ 


IC 


CT 


c: 


CM 




*o 


CM IC 


CT- i-H CT 


OO Oi CO t-- O 


CT: d 


CD 




CM 






i 




o_ ^ 




CC 


c. 


1— ( 


C< 


-"r 




en 


Tti O CC 


CTi '^ OO rji t- 


CO T- 


o 


t^ oo 


c^ 




.a 




.-. CD 


00 


kC 


cr 


c; 


Oi 


CM 


00 CO 


r- o CT 


CO '^ CO 00 CD 


CI cc 


lO 


O CO 






a 
















to 


r-. lo 


C<l IlO oc 


CM CO CO CO CO 


CT3 rj- 


CO 


CO t^ 






•T3 


















Tt 














CM 










































<! 










































«» 












«» 


6^ 




































S 










• i 














-H 




OS 

P 




g 


0! 

J 






c 

c 


a 


C 

'o 


1 

1 


00 
< 


* 








<£ 




J3 C 






d 
o 






H 




-a" 

.5 s 


c 


.S 




'? 


Ah 


5 




^ o •= 

" — c' 
Oi c3 a 


o e c S J3 
ii ^ ■? q .ti 


OS 


4> 


c 


■s. 
s 

a 
K 










< 




' "o 


C 

t^ 


c 
A. 


1 






ffi 


O C 


■^ o 


c 
O 


C3 


^ 


OS *: 




c 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



237 





S 

S 




ro »0 I 




-» -^ CO oi to 


r^ o^ CO 06 CD 


CO — 


■toocoo oi-j«--«cmcmI 






OG0O<M':O COOO CO 


CTiOSCMCOOO CDCM<OCMQC 




s 


OCC*ft>-CO QOOl CO 


-H CM Ci CO CD 


oooooo»-t cocncococ) 




Total 

ibursem 
and 


cDt^oocoi r^cft 


CO t^ QO CO 


OcTstoeocJi coeoGoeoac 


oa 




a 


<:OcO<OCOcO OiQ CO 


t-* I-- CM 


oocooicoto — tcr^r^*-' 




a 


COCMCOOJ-rr iCiiC <M 


CO 00 10 *»< 


-rr Tf en KO •V -rtocococo 




"cS 


t^ ^ ^ er t^ «5 C-l 


CO CO CD "^ CO 


or-C50CD coco-r-^t^ 

t^-^i^-^tOt^ COiOOOCM^ 




CQ 


CDWCOCOOC »0*0 »0 


to Cl 00 CM C7i 




OD 










CO 


1^' — 


. CO Ci 


CM --« 00 •- 


^- ^ ^ „- -r 




a 














CI 




- 1 '^1 








<y» 






6^ 


«» 








1 1 








OS CO ^ t' 


.-H 


M* 








■ CO -^ 




• M 




■ w 


5 CO 


■ 00 CO CO 








^ t^ C5 C 


5 CO 


1— < 








• CTi 




; 




■ if 


5 CO 


• to CO 1^ 




- i 




<>» t^ (M r' 


CO 


r- 








• Ci to 




• CO 




■ c 


> 


^ CD CO — 






01 CD 00 C^ 


> CM 


CO 








• CO t^ 




• r^ 




• c 


> -^ 


. ft* to -r 




^ i 




CO CO - 


- uo ^ 


i CO 











. Tt- ^H 




• 01 




• -^ 


1 CO 


• CD CO cr 


oo 


































o j5 




to c:- -- 


- u:) c 


) 00 











. '-' 




• CO 




• c 


>" 0" 


• -- OS CI 




H a 




CO CO "^ Oi c^ 


> t-- 


UO 








• r^ CD 




• t>- 




• T 


' CO 


• t^ CO 




ca 




^^ 






CO 


















9 


. ^ cs 




3 

a 




-r lO »- 


i t- 


uo 


1 


en CO CM 05 


CO QO or CO f 


5 CO -r CO c; CO 






00 CO CO CO cc 


> CO oc 


CM 


1^- CO CH) to 


CTi 00 CM CO CN 


1 CO IM 00 






t~- CO CO -^ or 


CM C- 


CO 


— ' CM c; CO ^^ 


00 t^ CO — 


1 CD OS ^5 0> »— I 




■3 i 




CO r^ CO T 


) "O ~ 


CO 


CO t^ 


■ 00 CO CO 


— « to CO CT 


5 OS CO 'rr -r 






CO CiO lO Cs 


CI If 


CO 


CI t^ CO 


GO -^ OS CD »- 


* t* to '—t OS CO 


t- 


-»^ Si 
























o 2 




cr. CO CO b- -t 


ec nr 




CO 00 Oi -rr CO 


-t* Oi CO 'Tj 


^ CO to CM CO 




H 3 




r- -f^ t^ 


cc 


t^ 


CO GO CO t- 


C71 


1 CO ■"** CO -rf 




J 




CO »— CO <M I> 


Tj- ir 




lO o> 00 00 


t-- Tt* -^ to -^ 


* 00 to t^ '-H CM 




n 










CO 


t-- -- 


CO CO 


CM '-' GO tr 


> CM ^" »-" *-i CO 




15 




« 






«e 


«A 


" 






CI 











to =c 


CO C 


CO 





■ CO 


00 to Cv 


1 -^ c« 


• to 











<M t^ 


CO w 


CO 





to OS CO 


t^ t^ t> 


to OS 


• CO 








CM 


01 Cs 


CO a- 


*-H 


to 


to 1-^ ^^ 


CO 00 CO c 


> CM en 


. t^ or 




^ ff 




r- 


00 1- 


CO oc 





^ 


t^ oc CO 


to CM CM 05 1- 


* CO -^ 


■ CM 


CO 


Jo •- 




co 
10 


<>» CO CC 
t^ (M C 


CO t^ 


co_ 

co" 


CO 


CO CM 

CM -r 


co to to^ CM ir 
»- -rp to 1 


t CO_ OD 

t-T 0" 


• to 

■ CO -n- 






-rf 




ir 


to r- 


CO 


to 


to CO 


F-t CT) CO -^ tf 


S cs cs 


- -^ ^ 




CO 












CM 


CO 


^H CM 


,-. ^ CO '-a 


■> »— « Tl 


l^ 


















^H 


»— « »-l 








; CM 








%«■ 








«© 


«l» 


















-r 


CO <M 


■*f If: 


00 


CO c: 


CO CM CO 


to CJi CM t^ CV 


CO 1-* -^ 00 








-^ 


10 •<* 


CO oc 


t^ 


CO cc 


05 to GO 


CM to ^ -* C 


CM CO CO cs to 








CO 


Ci <z 


CO cc 





CD a- 


Ci CO 


CM CO CI 


<r 


> OS CM M CO 




"rt >• 




■o ^ 


-^ 


cr. oc 


Ol 


00 C^ 


t-- CO CM 


t^ rn ■•-^ en 'Tj 


CM '^ 'Tf crs 10 




i3 <e 




-0 


CM^ (M 


!>. cc 




b- -tt 


CO -^ CO 


CM to CO C^ 


> OS to CD -rP ^ 


»« 


•5r --5 





























(M r* 


tC oc 


oc 


iC 


OS -^ 


to OS 


05 to CT: to -^ 


CM r- ■^ CO 






00 


u- 


»— ( 


CM 


c 


^ CO CO 


^ CO cs 


c^ 


oc 1— ■ cs 0: 
















l-« t^ 


40 «-" to l> 


■^ CM 0: 


















-^ 


cs 




cm' 








»» 






w» 


ei^ 




























C2 








CO 


•* 








-t 








00 OS r^ 




.. 






















00 


CO 


>o 








(N 








»o 




(9 


tn 

s 














^ 








to 


Ci 








r-" 








00 CM CM 




g .2 














-+ 


-f 


t-- 




ca 








^ 








CO CM 0: 




c4 














CI 


CM 


t/j 


to 











o- 








TT -^ cr; 


-^f 


J3 t* 


ta 










































3 c8 

§ 


^ 
£ 














« 


«^ 


CM 


^*" 


10 








CO 

■rr 

(N 








00 CM OS 
t>. CO 








t^ 


c 









t^ 


to *- 


CM to 


■—<'*»« to CO 






t- 








CO 


c 









CO 


OD CM 


CO GO 


CO -^ to cr 






'<*' -^ 




a 
_j. .2 




—1 


c 






CO 


•^ 


■— 1 1— 1 


CO CO 


CO 00 -rj^ 






CO to CO 






CD 


cc 






CM 


TT 


to cc 


^ ^ 


i-H to -^ I-- 






CO -T CM 








c^s 


cr 






00 -^ 




CO '^ 


!>. CM to 


00 CO to 00 






CO "^ CO 


CO 


3 C3 




























*-< 


•a " 




e^ 








t— I 


»o 


CM CM 


^^ CO 
»-i to 


CM CM CM 

c^ 






i-t c<i cr 

r-t to 








OD 




^ lO 


01 


CO 


'rt^ ^ 


CTi Oi to 


t^ CO ^ t* 




C5 


^H CO 












Ca — ( 


CO CM 


00 


CO 


Oi CM to 


to CO to 




l^ CO 











CM 




CO »c 


t^ 1-H 


CM 


00 CO 


CO Oi 


'sj* -t< CM CO 




cc CO 


1^ ^ 




OJ ^ 




CO 




c>» t^ 


t- 




I^ -^^^ 


CM CO CM 


■^ 'T ^ r^ 




-r <-< 


CM t- 




1 § 




CM 




<M ca 


,-<_ CO 


ca 


00 


CD Oi CM 


00 CO OS 00 




t^ 


^ CM 


c^ 
































!>• 




CM 


C-O QO 




^ <o 


t* t^ ^H 


— H Oi to -^ 




CO CM 


CM CD 














CM 


CO 


.-' to CO 


CM ^ "9* 




CO ^H 


»-H t^ 
















CM 


















ft» 








«> 


e^ 


















^ CO 


CO CM 

00 CO 


00 to 


*r 


CO 00 


CO CO 01 


^H to 


^ 


h- -r ^H -r »C 




., a 


JO 


-J* t- 


CO CM 





^ C5 


CO CO 05 


OD '^ ^ 00 


>o 


r-. OS CD to cr. 




CosI 
atio 
lar 





GO CO r- 


r* 


uo 


CO 


Oi 


r^ to r- 


00 05 CO Oi 


.-H 


CO t^ 00 to -r 







CD CO OC 


^ CO 


CM GO 


t- 


CO 


00 -rr CO 


CM CI CO 'ff« 


CO 


cs 00 00 1-1 




xi 


00 '^J' iC 


CM -TT" 


oo ^ 


to 


00 ^ 


CO t^ CD 


t— to -rp OS 


C^ 


t^ t^ to to "^ 




u. 3 


<j 




















r-t 


3^ - 


t» 


W5 CO 


»o '^ 


»o 





CM to 


cj ■^ 


C7S CO ^ to 


W3 


^' C3 ■^ OS to 






CM CO Tl 


CO CO 


CO CO 


00 


CO CO 


CO r— 00 


-*« to --f CM 


CO 


r-- CO ■^ !>• Qc 




■s « 


& 


40 ^^ CM 


CM CO 


TT -^ 


(^ 


CM GO 


t^ t- -^ 


CO CO CM 


(M 


^^ CM «D t* CO 




Q 








CM 


to*" -H 


■^" co" 


^ ^ to 


•rr 


cm' ^ *-H r-.* 








-J» 






«» 


«» 






























a 
















■2 : 






; 










- 







a 




s 


ja 

V 

as 

« 




a 





c 
'5 


» 

^ 

■« 


CO : 

w • 

CI 

c5 
M 




en 

> 








J3 

'S 


0) 






c 


J 


d 






E- 




IS 


Q 




i 




s 

£ 


s 

1 




Oh 
Be 





c 
.2 


a 
at 

Z3 


c 




c 


. 


a 

c 

6 


c 


-0 


a 

"i 


=3 

■p 

a 

cs 

Q 


1 

■3 




1 




c 


M 

c 





238 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Is 

Is 
o 
O 



o 

Gi 






o 

Q 

12; 
< 

I— ( 

H 
O 

o 

>^ 

PQ 
H 

W 

« 
02 

Q 
I 

<: 











CO CO 


Ci 


"<** 


o 


CO 


CO 


cs 


cs 


O 


Oi 


oo 


cs 


oo 


I^ 


■^ 


00 




CO 


b- 


m 


^ 










CO CO 


C5 


CO 


c^ 


cs 


CO 


CO 


'rr 


t^ 




o 


CO 


If; 


cs 


CO 


CO 






o 




■^ 






s 




lO o 


cq 


C3 


CO 


_, 


,_, 


CO 


cs 


oo 


■•Jf 


o 


CO 


CO 


iC 


■^ 


o 


C3 


r* 


CO 


CO 


CO 








-rft CO 


30 




o 


-rl^ 




cs 


'O 


CO 


OC 




o 


CS 


GO 


t~- 


*n 


'ff 


-rf 


oo 


cs 


If; 


o 


bO 




CI Ol 


■^ 


ir. 


-rr 


-^ 


f^ 


o; 


o 




Oi 


r^ 


a- 


CO 


CO 


co 


f5 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<»^ 




« 




■tJh' ci 


"f 


un 






oo 


Oi 




1^3 


IC 


b* 


ir. 




CD 


t^ 


CO 


»f; 




-^ 


oo 


luO 




i^ 


O 




CO CM 






lO 




CO 

o 




CO 


CS 


CS 


oc 


C< 




CJ 


cs 


ir:) 

CO 


Tjf. 


lf5 


-:J< 


GO 

CO 


If^ 




«M 






CO CO 


CO 


Oi 


■^ 


-^ 


oc 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CC 


»fl 


CO 




oc 


o 


CO 


I>. 


CO 


CC 


t^ 


,^ 




o 


•^ 




CO CO 


CO 


*o 


»o 


CO 


.-H 


00 


cr- 


t-- 


cs 


CO 


'— ' 


o 


Oi 


o 


CO 


co 


cs 


■^ 


t^ 


eo 




s 


i 




-t. 1- 


<r 


_H 


oo 


lO 


r-- 


■^ 


oc 


cs 


'Tt 


cr 


c 


Oi 


t^ 


Q 


•^ 


Oi 


cs 


CO 


\n 


oo 




a 


M 




■<1* (M 


o 


cn 


o 


r^ 


CO 




cr: 


CO 


cc 


If: 


r^ 


t- 


■* 




CO 


CS 




t-- 




CO 




a 


cu 




C-1 iC 


CO 


lO 


»Ci 


cs 


CS 


■^ 


cc 


_ o 


If; 


CO 


cc 


co 


C-1 


o- 


cs 


CO 


o 


■^ 


t-- 


-^ 


o> 


o 


g 




ir> to 


CO 


-ri 


c<»" 


■rt^ 


CO 


Oi 


CO 




t^ 


If; 


,^ 


cr 


l> 


,_, 


' cs' 


OG 


" if3 


CO 


r>r 


b- 




a 




CO <N 


<N 


o 


za 


CO 


o 




o 


s 


a- 


CO 


cs 


cs 


t-« 


If; 


a> 


CC 


t>» 


-* 


oo 


Oi 




a 


JS 




T-H 




CO 




Oi 


■^ 




CO 


CO 




cc 


»f; 








r* 








!>. 


co^ 




■« 

s 






^ 










'^ 










■"^ 


















Oi" 


cs 
©9 










(M cn 


CO 


Oi 


-rf 


CO 


CO 


■^ 


'<*' 


U3 


-<t 


cc 


cc 


c 


t-^ 


CO 


oo 


-* 


CO 


cs 


r-* 


CO 




*S 


-fc» 




t^ *-H 




r^ 


Oi 


t>. 


cs 




cs 


r- 


cc 


cs 


c- 


o~ 


TT 


o 


o 


oc 


OO 


o 


cs 


CO 




G 

cs 




(M ^ 


cc 


en 


lO 


o 


■^ 


c 


l> 


o 


oc 


^ 


CI 


cr 




cc 


,_) 


oc 


cs 


'<*' 


»C3 


,_ 




a 






O (M 


GC 


CO 


C~:i 


lO 




CO 


Cr 


tO 


l> 


o 


cc 


i-O 


IC 


'^ 


o 




cr: 


cc 


CS 


OS 




o 


Oh 




CO r^ 


ir: 


T 


CO 


CO 


!>■ 


o 


CO 


!>■ 


I^- 


*f; 


•^ 


cc 


CC 


cc 


cs 


c 


CO 


cc 


CO 


^ 


eo 


c9 


"3 
o 

M 
CO 




co' -^ 


cc 


-* 


ci 


cs" 


CS 


c< 


cc 


CC 


cc 


CO 


cc 


c 


»C 


1— ■ 


CO 


-^ 


OO 


,_, 


t* 


CO 




«: 




l-H »C 


CO 


iC 


'^ 


CO 


o 




•^ 


»c 


c 


o 


c 


CO 


o- 


a- 


cs 


Tf 


OO 


c< 


Oi 


iC 




K 




^ o 




CC 


cs 


■^ 


o 




cc 


o 




CO 










t^ 




1— < 




t^ 


co_ 




o 












1-* 


cs 










cs 










r-t 








co' 












ft^ 






































^ 


6© 










l-H CO 




cs 


CO 


CI 


cs 


M- 


iC 


■^ 


»f: 


cs 


f— 


cc 


If; 


cs 


o 


c 


GO 


cr 


CO 


I^ 




1 






CI oc 


I> 


cr 


CO 


Oi 


CD 


CO 


cs 


l— 1 


cs 




t^ 


r^ 


cc 


cr 


CO 


ur: 


c:> 


cc 


cs 


CS 




S 




•^ CO 


c 


CT 


-^ 


CO 


QC 


cr 


-f- 


c-1 


oc 


cc 


-t 


c 


cs 


c- 


CO 




O 


OC 


'Tfl 


CO 




i£ 




O CO 


>-0 


■^ 


t- 


■TJH 


t^ 


■^ 


■^ 


CO 


c: 




cs 




•^ 


I-- 


o 




CO 


cc 




oo 




w 




Ci_ o 


CO 


iC 


C<l 


lO 


t^ 


CC 


m 


cc 


t^ 




o 


cc 


"^ 


cs 


"^ 


CO 


. *^ 


CO 


oo 


o_ 


t- 


"o 


'> 




•^ (M 


t^ 


cr- 


CO 


C-^3 


-* 


oc 


cr 


c*; 


i> 


c 


cr 


" cs 


oc 


cc 


CO 


»f; 


Oi 


o 


^~ 


CJi 




o 






M iC 




CO 


CO 


■^ 


CC 




cc 




iC 


c: 




cc 


cc 


cc 


CO 


cc 


CO 


cs 








^ 












'TJH 


o 






cs 




cr 


■^ 








CO 








CO 


Oi 




M 






f* 










'^ 




























lf3 








a 
.9 




o c 




o 


o 


CO 


cc 


cc 




»c 




CC 


cs 




o 




Oi 


c 


o 


c 


CD 


CI 








»o o 




c- 


o 


-^ 


cc 


■<*■ 




oc 






"Tf 




CO 




Oi 


c 


'^ 


w; 


if3 


cs 










C^ liZ 




t-^ 


CO 


CJ5 


■rr 


CO 




cs 




cc 


t^ 


c: 




1— t 


c= 


CO 


CD 


^A 


■^ 






rt 


s 


lO -* 




!>■ 


o 




iC 


cc 




"rr 






cc 




cc 




TT 




o 




o 


t^ 




'a 




u 


Ci I> 




iC 


t^ 


o 


oc 


o~ 




iC 




o 


cr 




t^ 




t^ 


c< 


TT" 






t^ 


CO 


1 


■g 












































3 


tet 




ifl 


" oo" 


Oi 


a- 


CO 




cc 




c: 


' cs 




cs 




CO 


cc 


Oi 




xfi 


o 




Pt 


V 

M 


c^ 








^^ 


CO 










cc 


t^ 






cs 




IC 




CS 


t^ 






1 










CO 






















oo 








Oi^ 


CO 






rt 










































CS 


CO* 






H 




ft^ 






































^^ 


cs 










O ij:: 


l> 


cr 


cs 


r^ 


CO 


in 


a- 


CC 


oc 


c 


o 


cr 


cs 


CO 


cs 


■'^J' 


-* 


Ci 


t^ 










CO »c 


or 


t^ 


oo 


cs 


CO 




i> 


cc 




cc 


t- 




cr 


cs 


Tf 




cr 


TP 






O 


J3 
















































CJ 




s 


M^ C 


■^ 


CC 




t^ 


If: 


o- 


cr 


r- 


cc 


c 


Oi 


if 


cr 


'^ 


cr 


cs 


If; 


CO 


t^ 




s 


la 


CO GC 


oc 


C^ 


CO 


o 


cr 




cr 


c 


t^ 




CO 


c: 


-t 


Oi 


-* 


OO 


t^ 


CO 


Oi 




efl 


u 


i-t r- 




cc 


cs 


CO 


oc 


o 


c 


CO 


c 








-^ 


l> 


r> 


GC 


Oi 


rr 


CO 


cs 


U5 


T3 


M 














































O 


> 


ec 




CO 


cs 


cs 


-rj- 


,_ 


cr 


oc 


ir 


cr 


lO 


l> 


CC 


VH 


CC 


r^ 


CO 


Oi" 


cs 




o 




'S 






oc 


cs 


Oi 






iC 


t^ 




■rr 


Oi 






o 




cs 




O 


CO 






a 












^ 










o "- 


















CO 




< 


ta 




fei* 






































CS 


6© 










CO m 


cs 


oc 


cs 


io 


CO 


ir- c: 


u: 


c^ 


r- 


GO cc 


cc 


r- 


ca 


kO t^ 


3; 


t- 


^^ 






a 
o 
'♦3 




CO oc 


cr 


t-- 


CO 


o 


oc 


cc 


u- 


oc 


■^ 


OO if3 cs 


cr 


c: 


GO 




Oi 


oc 


oo 


CO 








OO IC 




^ 


-rt< 


Ir^ 


r^ 


ir; 


CT 


ur: 


c^ 


c 


t^ -^ 




cc 


m 


s 


CO 


cc 


*2 


•<** 






5 


iO i^ 


CO 


CO 


oo 


oo 


o 


-t 


-^ 


C' 


c^ 


CO CO — 


cc 


u~ 


■^ 


cc 


ifS 


cc 


^ 


■^ 




V 


»0 Tf 


cr 


^ 


t-- 


'^_ 


az 


<* 


. *^^ 


t- 


c^ 


_ c 


cs 


cc 


c^ 


u- 


If; 


cc 


-- 


— 


CO 


co_ 


•<»< 


:S 


s 


^- C 


^ 


in 


cs 


CO 


cc 


" cr 


t^ 


cc 


I^ 


h' 


CO oc 


t- 


cs 


f 


c= 


GO 


•«* 


t:r 


CO 




O 


3 


o 


CO cs 


w: 


cc 


CO 


r- 


c 


^ 


cr 


-rr 


cc 


CO CO oc 


cr 


cc 


r^ 


If: 


CO 


cs 


oo 


eo 




i 


•-H CQ 




•^ 




o 


cc 




o- 


o 




a- 


- *-t 






wo 




cs 




iC 


CO^ 






S 












^ 


cs 










cs 


r~ 








*— 1 








cs 


o' 






►— « 




^ 






































cs 


ft* 










O CO 


cc 


r^ 


■^ 


Ci 


"Z 


cc 


cc 


cr 


cc 


■<* 


o t- 


oc 


1 „ 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


cs 




a 
o 




, 


''T -tj- 


'^ 


■^ 


t^ 




GC 


CO ir. 


rr 


cr 


c 


crs ir: 


oc 


c 


lf3 


■«* 


oo 


Tt 


t>- 


r-- 






§ 


CO CO 


cs 


.— 


CO 


CO 


•rr 


cc 


cc 


cc 




cc 


ifj i> 


r^ 


« 


^O 


cc 


^m 


h- 


1— t 


.1 




*•♦* 




c- 


cc 




»o 






C7 


cc 


u- 


cc 


■n- 


uC 


cc 


IM 


■^ 


r^ 


CO 




CO 


f^ 




u 


cr: t^ 


cr 


cs 


s 


co^ 


"7 


■^ 


CC 




c^ 


cs 


cr 


u; 


If: 


t-- 


•^ 


c 


tf; 


cr 


Oi^ 


CD 


M 


1 


OT 


oo" cs 


o 


t^ 


' ^ 


r- 


^_i 


^^ 


^^ 


TT 




If: 


o- 


■^ 


oc 


c 


" ifD 


cc 


t^ 


cs 


o' 


I>- 




■y 


^ 


CO cc 


c^ 


I-- 


oo 




cr 


CO 


rt 


t-- 


cc 




cs 


r- 


c- 


oc 


■Oi 


o- 


o 




cs 


CD 




00 

a 


rt 


CO CO 


w: 


c- 


_ o 


o 


t^ 


TT 


c 


w: 


cc 


cc 


o- 


u: 




oc 


CO 


o- 


. ^^ 


o 


Oi 


CO 






Q 


^H cs 




w: 


cs 


co" 


cc 




-rf 


" c 




c 


" oc 




cs 




CO 




" c^ 


,_l 


cs 


■^ 




















cs 










cs 










■^ 








t^ 


S 










w> 






































f^ 


*>» 






§ 




O CD C- 


'tr 


^s 


CO 


cc 


-!f 


cc 


•*t 




c 


~z 


w; 


cc 


tc 


h- 


cc 


W3 


t'- 


Oi 


o 








t^ c 


cc 


r^ 


o 


CO 


'— 1 


IC 


*— 


cc 


E 


•^ 


CO o- 


cc 


c 


'"J^ 


o 


Oi 


co 


"^ 


o 






'■*3 




■<*< cc 


c- 


cr 


»C5 


Oi 


■^ 


^_ 


cs 


If: 


c: 


cs 


a- 


cc 


cc 


t- 


CO 


CO 


t-- 


CO 


CO 


r-x 










CO cs 


■^ 


CO 


t^ 


o 


cs 




M' 


If: 


o- 


cs 


t^ w: 


cs 


cc 


CD 


cc 




cc 




t^ 






*s 




t^^ ir. 


If; 


c^ 


co^ 






CS 


CC 


»f: 


c-: 




QC 


cc 


rf 


•"■ 


OO 


c 


_ o_ 


cc 


o 


CO 


N 




.3 




CO ^- 




c 


oo' 


T-T 


b- 


■rt 


o- 


Tf 


oc 


cc 


^» 


"^ 


If: 


oc 


CS 


cs 


" o 


cr 


lo 


-?' 






a 




-^ ^ 


cc 


cc 


»o 




co 


cs 


I> 


w: 


w: 


cc 


c 




cc 


cc 




iC 


oo 


u; 


CO 


o 














cs 




CO 


oc 






cs 




r^ 


CO 






'«»< 








CO 


CO 














































irt 


Tl* 






■< 




&» 






































«l» 


»» 
















































i 


v 










bit 






<u 










c 

c 

1 








c 








c 


bc 

1~< 




'■5 


3 

CO 


*— I 








3 

i 1 

■fc £ 

03 C 

cq oc 


c 
c 

c 
^ 'S 


> 
.-9 


> 

CO 


a 


a 


c 
c 

t. 
c 

2: 


b 

a. 

1 




c 
c 
B 

-C 

CJ 


0. 

c 
c 
rt 


CC 
o 

CG 


c 
c 

c 

1 


CG 


'a 
> 


c 

-C 

t 

a 
> 


1^ 


1 


"3 

e2 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



239 







tal 
ements 

ucea 


u^ 


o t^ o 


(M in 




< •* 


CO 


•^ 


rf 


CO 


a> o 


QO CM CM 


00 eo 


to 


Ci 


*o 






COCOOCOO-'S' [ '^J'fMCOcOi-* 


t^ OO O CM 


to !>. 00 CO of — 


OO 


s 






■^ O CO (M »- 


^ CO "0 oc c^ 


CO »- OO rf 


CD r^ -^fi ,-t |s- t^ 


CD 


CO 






OCCiCO^O to^cso-^to 


T-» CO C; CO 


(^ O r- < •— < to t* 


CO 


t~: 




Oi 


Oi^iO'^C^l l:^^C^«5X> 


■^T* CO to Ci 


-M CD Ci CD CO oo 


o^ 








= E 5 « 
H 3 " "3 


»no»-<a?<a3 csirico<Mt>- 


00 -rf CM '^ 


to t^ O CD CM O 


CM 


CO 






ta CT) t^ y-> lO cot^CT'rr^^ 


-^ CM CD to 


CTs -^ -r CO 1— CO 


CO 


CO 






s 


oior^cot^ r^t^ot— -H 


i^_ ^^ r^_ OC 


oo CM Ci Ci ■<J' C7S 


o_ 


CO 






<NCO OcO »Oi-i.-«t^i-« 


.-I Ci CD 


CM — CO CM CO »-i 


to 


m" 








C^ ^ «M 


-^ ^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 
















CO 


a 








W& 








*» 


•* 








CO (N 


• 00 


CD 


CO lO CO 




• CO 


^_ 


^_, 


• CTi 


QC O 


o 


1^ 








03 T-l 


• CO 




lO OS iO 




'. ^ 


■^ 


CD 


• OO 


O cm 


CD 


U3 






- 1 


O O 


• o 


t* 


O — 1 ■* 




• CO 


to 


to 


■ CO 


CM ^^ 


o 


C4 






Cfl I^ 


• o 




lO r^ »ci 




- to 


t^ 


»o 


• Ci 


i-H C7i 


to 


O 




CO 


00_ (M 


• lO 


Ol 


0O_ 0_ (M_ 




■ CO 




o_ 


• o 


Ci o^ 


00 


CO_ 




»-l 


^^ 


iC CI 


• 'S 


o 


CO oo l« 




■ *- < 




lO 


• f— < 


to' V 


o" 


OO 








• m 




oo in •-I 




• -TV 






• CM 


CD CM 


OO 


oo 






ca 


&i& 


■ c^ 


»H 


*-H to l^ 




'. *^ 






■ 00 




«0 
CM 


00 

•• 






g 


<M GO r^ CO CM 


O ^H CO CO ^ 


-jfOCicir^ c^cooototo 


Ci 


00 






■V ^ OO -"cr rf 


C^ <M O CD CD 


t^CDOt^-CT: r-CiCOr-Ci 


CM 


c» 






CO O CO C^ -H 


h- CO cs CD r* 


coccooooci t^t-*^-.toe^ 


CD 


o 






5 § 


CT' —1 iTJ O to 


•«• CD -^ L-^ O 


^r^CiO-H cj— ^ — •«*'oo 


CO 


s 




t~ 


o cft »o en cj 


QO_ ^_ CO »0 CO^ 


TT Ci_ to Ci_ 


"-I CD Ci CD r- r- 


CM^ 


00 






o" o" -h' o" o 


OO io CD '^ e<» 


C0CMCM--^O r-oocccocD 




^* 






CO ac !>. CO >o 


CD r^ o oo o 


^QoaDioci "^r^co^ro 


to 


s 






J3 


O iO 1-* CO !>• 


CO r^ C5 .-H -If 


■^»-tt--.0000 CM — OiCOC:* 


"^ 


00_ 






5 


C^J CO C5 CO 


"0 '^ t^ o 


'-•r-CO CM ^^CMCMCOi-l 


OO 


CO 








(M -^ CM 


CO -^ 


co 


o 

CO 


5? 








ft» 








^^ 


«» 








»0 O <M C^ CO 


O CO ^H O CO 


O Ci 00 t^ 




• C5 «-< 00 O 


CO 


CO 








CO lO C^ -^ C5 


O CD t^ to lO 


O CD O t^ 




• CO to oo to 


to 


to 








O O O CO t^ 


■^ ^H CO Cl 00 


CM CD C^ ^H 




• "^ o r^ CM 


CO 


CO 








CO I^ Cti CO lO 


(M '^ G5 1— O 


O t^ CO CO 




■ to '^ O CO 


C-1 


to 




to 


CO (M O C^ t^ 


CO ^ oo CD to 


O CO OI t^ 




■ ^- to CO o 


CO 


CO 






(M C^ CO no O 


C:i CO CO CD (M 


OS ''I* I^ t- 




• to C^l CD CD 


t^ 


•*» 






O C^ iO CO Oi 


O O CO to Ci 


Tt< CM -^ CO 




• CO CO to oo 


OD 


C5 






CO 


C^ CO t>- OO 


CTi r^ ,-1 -^ CO 


t^ oo 




• to W CM 


t^ 


o_ 










-i CM »-«" 


cm' 




cm" 


CM 


co" 

CD 








*» 










** 


«» 








•*r CO t^ ^ t^ 


00 Ol Ci CO — ' 


— to — 


c 


7i CM t» tO r- — 


r^ 


CD 








»o t— cs uo <ri 


GO CO -^ O CM 


1— t--. r- 




t* to — CD CO CO 


r* 


t^ 








O Ci t* lO CD 


t^ ,-t to OO CO 


to O CM 


^ 


T CO CD t^ CO Ci 


CO 


»— t 






"rt >» 


t— CO lO CO CJ5 


Ci CO Ci -rt< CO 


t^ to o 




-" t— CO '-" o ■^ 


3D 


CO 




Ift 


^ C3 


O CO «o -^ o 


CD !>. 'Tf CM CO 


»H Ci r^ 


I: 


tO_ Ci o ^ o 


tO_ 


CD 






'§■1 


CI I^ Oi T^ CO 


i-H CO r* ^ 00 


<m" c; to" 




f CM 1— ' -^ CO '«t* 


t^ 


CO 






t^ 00 oo »o 


"«»• CI CO r-- CO 


CM O CO 


CI 


D -H CM CO Ci -^ 


oo 








CO 


c^ cc^ o^ co_ 


Ci QO 




•* 


t^ 


co^ 










■V r-t ^H CO 


■^ CM 




co" 


CO 


CM* 
O 








e^ 










6^ 


o» 










CO 




■ CO 




O -^ lO o 


-rr CO CD 


c 





to r^ Ci to 


_ 


to 






■3 « 

t^ o s 




oo 




• CO 




o ■- oo o 


o to ^H 


c 





t^ CO Ci .-* 


CO 


■T 








^ 




■ CO 




CO CO t^ O 


CD Ci r— 


Ci 





O — t^ 00 


to 


o 








CO 




• o 




CO -^ -rr" c^ 


I-^ -^ o 


■a 


3 


t^ O (-- 1^ 


r* 


GO 




^ 


III 




CO 




• irs 




Oi CD l^ C^ 


to cji oo 


c 


D 


O t^ CO »-< 


CD 


CO 






























»— t 




■^ 








^H CC O (M 


CO CO oo 


c 


■4 


O O Ci eo 


Tf 


CD 








^-t 




• CO 




»-< 00 'rj^ ^H 


rj* O GO 


p 


9 


CD CO -^ ^H 


I>. 


QO 
















<N 


CO 1-1 








Ol 


CM 






P4 




^» 


















«» 


to 








r-. CO lO '^ O 


^ CM 


• lO ^ 




CO t^ to « 


D lO CO to Ci t^ 


Ci 


Ci 








iJO Ci <M CO O 


00 -rp 


■ ■»< o 




r» — 4 CD a 


CO .-H to CM CO 


CO 


O 






a 
*. .2 


O CO CO -^ t^ 


Oi »H 


• o o 




to CD O Ci 


? 00 CM C: CO CM 


CM 


CO 






t^ ^-^ r-i O O 


CM Oi 


• QO 05 




CM Ci -'T' C 


3 O O CD to CO 


Ci 


CD 




CO 


•3 13 


O CS O) CO CO 


^ 00 


. ^^ ^^ 




CD oo CM C£ 


3 1^ Ci CO CO CM 


tO_ 








-O o 


00 GO CS| GO 


Ci" CO 


• a Qo" 




b* O CD ^ 


H CM to rt- ^ ■— " 


CD 


CO 






<! ^ 


C<I CO 


CO -rt^ 


• ■* o 




■^ CO ^ 


t CM CD CM »-t CM 


to 


CO 






§ 


W' 


T-i Ci 


t-H 




CO T-l 




CO 

cm" 


to" 








O <=> O c^ O 


'^ r- CO CM t^ 


O Ci — r- c 


5 t^ — O a: O 


^ 1 


CO 








o o o «:> o 


t- O Ci rt< TT 


O -^ 00 ^ c 


> oo TJ« -rr to o 


CD 


CO 






§ -s 


O O O Ci o 


** -^ O OO CO 


■^ Ci CO oo CN 


1 CM Ci O ^- C: 


to 


_ 






CO »0 O t^ CI 


o to CM r* CO 


to -^ O CM Ci 


5 'rr CO CO CD TT 


CM 






CQ 




CM »-« lO 00 ^H 


to t^ oo t^ oo 


rr t^ CO t^ a 


J to Ci CM CD i-< 


tO_ 


oo 






C5 <M c^" »-r co' 


■^f Tf -H CD 00 


o CO CO r^ <- 


^ i>r co" o" oo" oT 


CM 


'J^ 






3 « 


T-H OS 1-^ 


-^ -"^ rH CM GO 


— Tf r» C4 o" 


5 i-H OO CM 


t- 


Ci 






w cQ 


t^ 


CM to ^ 


oo 


^-1 


co" 










C^ CO CO <M ^ 


CD ^H oo o cr> 


Ci — CD O C£ 


^ QO oo o CO CM 


CM 


OS 






^ a =9 


t^ ^H ■<»' CO CD 


CO CO O Ci CO 


to CO — • C3 c^ 


) CD r- c;i CD CO 


CO 


s 






Cos 
ratio 
ular 
choo! 


»-< CO Ci '^ O 


O r- CO CM CM 


CO CO CO t^ c 


r- -^ — t to --< 


Ci 


t^ 






(M ^ OC (M CTi 


CJS CO 00 O to 


O C-J CO o c^ 


Ci CO O CO en 


CM 


c^ 




^ 


0_ *C C5 c=_ oo 


»-" CO to 1^ TJ< 


OJ CO to CM CS 


CO Ol ^- CO o 


to 


o^ 




•-^ 


-3 E ^^ 


— CD -V CD CO 


•^ -^ Ci 00 ^ 


O CO t^ o o- 


to CD 'cf r» CO 


CM 


Ci 






CD ^H O "0 »0 


O t^ Ci -^ -^ 


c; CO CM oo -n 


Oi 1— « CO CM CO 


t- 


CD 






t^^ '"'^ -^ '^i. '^ 


•-' CD to ■<5* t^ 


CI CO CO t^ l^ 


1— 00 to Ci t^ 




•^« 






^ ^ Q 


^ Co" 00* <N 


Ci to to -^ 


— o" cm" CSl 


-h" cm* c^i" CM* i-T 


CO 


to" 










»-i CO -^ 


CO ^ 


c^ 




CD 








0*^ 








«« 


•* 






CO 










































i 

'■i* 


a> 






S 


t^ 












to 
















a 






bA 




3 




•X 


g 
U 




a 
o 


3 '? 






£2 






t: 


OJ 


o 

1 = 




OS O t^ • 
.Cm*: 


•3 


3 








o 


a. 

c 
C 
C 




J3 
C 


c 




a 

z 




1 

o 

z 


a 

0^ 




0^ 


c 

E 

c 


c 

c 

§ 




=3 

o 


c 

c 
5 


o 

3 
CO 


•E S 


a ^ 




1 


** 

^ 



240 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o 

t 

C5 

CD 
05 



Q 
^; 

p^ 

H 
<! 

O 

o 

I— I 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






r^l 






§ 


o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 




o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o • 


o o 






o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 




o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o 


o o 








^ (M OO TJH TJ« 


OO CC CO 


CC O 




r- CD 


CO f£> 






^ s 




o 




CO ^^ CO 


CO CD 




CD t^ 


t^ t^ 


C5 CO oo CO lO 


!>• CO 


CO CO 




ec t^ ^ CO Cfl 


■» oc — . 


^ CM 




C30 oo 


oo oo 












►J s, 


^ r-l ^ 


-^ (M 










<M ■^ 


CO 








s 


c« 
























o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o 




o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o ' 








o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o 




o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o • 






S M 


(M t^ 


—1 -* 


o o -»< 


•^ oo 




CD ^ 


*M CO 


r^ o lo o o 


'^ '* CO o 






■g-i 


CO CO 


lO 00 


oo o «o 


lO 00 






C^ CC 


1— • O ■'f -^ CC 


•^ oo CO CO 






iO so 




-*^ CO t^ 


CC 




■d" t~ 


O (N 


-^ O O Tt* (M 


lO ^H CO <M 






























■it 


CO e^ 


(M 


IM 


CD 




•^ tp 


1-H 1—1 


CO o^ ^ ^ -^ 


"5 (M ^ • 




















1—1 


1— < 








<* 
























o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o <=> 


o o o o o 


O O O "n- o 








o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


CD O 




o o o o o 


CD O O (M CD 






93 C 


o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


o o o o o 










cr. -^ CD «:■ cc 


c:; c^ O 


CC -^ 


QC 


C-, CO 


O CO 


QC' "^ en Vj zc 


CO CO CD CO CC 






§ 1 


^ o ^ o o 


as o o 


CO »r3 


•o 


t^ I^ 


t^ -^ 


cr> !>. CO O t^ 


CO 1— ' CO r-t CC 




CO 


•s a 


O O 00 '■^ (M 


CO c^ -^ 


Tjl IC 


oo 


-H oo 


o oo 


oo (-* (M -^ 00 


O oo ■* Ci -^ 






'3 3 


C4 CS t-H 


o ff^ 






r-« 


(M 


(M f-1 


CO 






O o 


e» 






















o : 










o 




o 


^ 




„ 




„ 






o 




o o 


o ■ 








o • 










lO 




o 


CD 




c-^ 




<-= 






o 




o o 


o • 






a 
■« *^ .2 


o ■ 










CO ■ 




o 


t-- 




■^ 




o 






r>. 




o o 


CD • 






to • 










CO 




■^ 


i^ 




"^ 










-*" 




oc (M 


r^ 








CO 










(M 




w: 
















■^ 




o ^^ 


CM 




















































«• 










U5 
































-S s 












s§ 








































d K m 












CO cq 

CD O 








































Rental 

Free Te 

Syst 
























































o o o 




CD 




c- 




o 






o 


o o 


o 




o ■ 










o c:> o 




o 




c 




■ o 






o 


o o 


o 




o 






(3 




CO C>3 oo 




oo 




CJ 




• *-H 






oo 


^ ^ 


t^ 




CO • 






^ «} OJ 

« a •-• 












c- 










05 


»0 CD 


lO 




cr, 








CD ^H C5 




CD 




c 




•ra 








t- CO 






o • 




U5 


































g O -73 

b Pd .^ 




tC 05 ■* 








t- 




• CD 






CO 


CO CM 


lO 




>« • 


























1— < 














Q 




•» 




































c^ o <= 


O u- 




I o c 


a> (£ 


oo o *-< o c 


C^ <M O O lO 








-H o o o c 


CJi o c 


o c 


ir 


) ^1* c 


»o ^ 


i-H O '^ O cr 


O CD t-' O C^l 






^.2 




•M" o c= 


O cr 


c 


) f~ c 


T-^ oc 


»0 O 04 O '^ 


^ O CO O t^ 


























•E S 


r-H CO r- c^ -^ 


^f oo CT 


C3 C 


CC 


J -rr c- 


CO C 


r^ '^ lO CO c\ 


"Tf oo o:) CD CD 




'^r 


<M CD CO C^ CC 


CD O CC 


CO cz 


Cv 


1 O CC 


1-H ■«* 


■^ T-H -rp -?t 


•t^ ■^ 1-H CO CO 






o-§ 




CD C<J 


03 








ca 1— I 








M 


»» 


































: ; o ; 




















































o rt 














. ^o 






CO 


Contingen 

Fund 
(Discretion 
Fund) 














• (M 
• ■ <M • 










CD o o o c 


> CD (M C 


> o c 


c 


> O I> 


CO C 


J o -^ o o c 


> O O O O CO 






5 


O O O O CC 


> o r~ c= 


- o c 


c 


5 O t-^ 


^ c 


i O CO o o cv 










> —1 CD CC 


O CC 






t^ ^ 


»0 ^ O CO l> 


t— O ii^ (>■ CO 






°? -a 






















« 8^ 


CD CO CS CD W 


) ^^ ^ T- 


CM "" 


c 


i t^ CC 


C5 X 


ca CO c:> O ■'t 








o J3 3 


O ^ CC rf ir 


CD 3i cr 


'C^ ,— 


a 


> CO c^ 


CO c 


CO CTj TT UO CC 


I-" CI CO r- CO 






'i^^ 


■^ O C-l UO »- 


CD ^ W 


CM c^ 


^ 


- CD C^ 


T-. ^ 


oo CO (M -^ cr 










•'7' t^ G 


^- -r 


c 


I CC oc 


O »r 


.-• I- (M "<r «: 




























PQ 


<» 


CO c^ 


" 






<M 


<M f-i 


uo 






CO 
























































W 
























































H 












: g 
















• £ 


3 






• ^ 


: X 


' 






. "O 






2 
O 


ccomack 
bemarle 
leghany 


i 1 

1 = 


a -a -5 

3 o. t: : 


1 
i 

1 n 


ll 


1 

5 S 


3 is « 


: ij 

1 -a -i 


f Is 

1 11 


S R 


1 JS -c 




t 


'. ex a 
: 3 3 








1 < 


: " 


] ^ 


5 " 


1 < 


; -«j 


; ■< 


« 


! PC 


) a: 


) 


3 PC 


) a: 


1 CC 


) CC 


) c 


> L 


) c 


) c 


) L. 


) C " 


<_ 


(. 


) C ' 


> O 1 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



241 











1 o tc C30 ■^ a 


3 OiCOO — ^ IC^-^CO-^C 


> O ■«)<•«< QO CO 1 






03 


<0 O XI lO c- 


1 »o oo CO r- If 


3 05 to c: 


i o CO t^ r^ CO oo cc 


> rr *- 


. « o t- 






CI 






1 o to :n t-- 


rr o r- 1- 


* CM CO CD CO ^ 






< O to U5 CO 1 




■a 










c- 








t^ Qc o »o a 




1 CO -^ cr> I-- 


cooc^coco I jocs-^aic 


trs rr tr. ^ ^^ 1 




































- 
















- - - 


CJ 






lO lO CS CS c 


r- C^ CK C7S ^ 


1 -^ to oo CO to 1 CO — 


1 to OO h- 






H 


■=? 


r^ CO — 


eo o 


i Cri CO CO QO c 


< •- 


rr<Mcoc^ OC5»o^ 


-; 


" e^ o - 


CJ> -H 




»o 1- r>- •<*• ^ 


1 *0 CO iO .-« o 


3 COOOCOCO icoooi^too 


i oD CO e^ OO ■» 1 
























































M 


— 


< »— 1 








■n* <M 


^ 


^ 


« .-1 M 


c^ 


1-^ 




to 












«» 
















































■3 
















































C3J 


.rj 


a 


















































o 


fa 






















































i>. o «? -^ ^ 


CO (M CO -* a 


i lO CO CO 00 Cv 




to r^ c^ 05 c« 1 










<— 


CM 


la — 


t-* »- 


lO ■* CT 


O C^ CO 1-* cr 


OO CD CD Oi tr 


> CO — 


«0 CO CO 




■« 


g 


•^ 00 to o tr 


(M O 't* t^ t^ 


l>. to "* CO C^ 


> CO o to •- 


tc 


to QO — 


to t~ 






OQ CO c: 


CO *1 




-r t^ t-- CS 


1- 


CO o oo cr 


to i-^ — 


O u- 


iO 00 — 






o 


-5 






»r 


'fli o CO ^ cr 


t- Oi «-< crs ^ 




t~ o Tj- tr ::> 1 


00 


























































o oo ir: 


o- 


cc 


CO C^ <M (M C 


to CO CO O C 


to to »0 CO ^ 


o »n Oi o o) 1 




2 




CC. ^ 




«ai c<- 




CM -'5' CO CO cc 


CO to CO c^i cc 


r' CO 


t^ CQ 




e 


"O 




1—1 








C^ IM 










•^ 




CO 














> 


\^ 






















































«» 


















































GO lO 


<- 




»o o o 


cr 




»0 lO c- 


<r 


o o o o c 


»o o o o »r; 




a 




CO <N 




u: 




r- to o 


■^T 




(M (M CO C 


to O O O tr 


to o O O CQ 




o 


o 


CO ^ 




(M 




GO — 


to 


rr 




o — 


r^ <- 


t^ to GC O OJ 


rr t— — 


rr -H 




ro 


CO (M 


c- 




IT} l>- <Z> 


tr- 




OO CO o 


rs 


CO CO r* -^ ^ 


r^ C5 lo o CO 1 


t^ 


a 


> 


W5 O 


CM 




30 to to 


cc 




io o i: 


■<t 


t-- CO t- CO l> 


CO rji CO C3 o 




3 




^- 


o 


e< 




<M Ci O 


^. 




t- '5' 


c^ 


C^l ■'9' oc C<l C'- 


lO 


« to CO 1 




0) 
















C<l 






























^ 


H 






















































•» 


















































OO CO t^ 


to c 


O CO t* s 


<- 


O] 


to o c- 


C*" 


CO 1- 


OO lO — 


1^ lO CO CO 00 






o 


*o CO o- 


c 


CS 




t^ t-. C^ 


C^ 


CC 


CT) T)< CO e< 


t^ l>- t^ CO -^ 


W3 r^ CO c<i to 






























































■^ ^ 




1^ 


CO t— i— t C" 






Ci o t^ — 




lO O CQ to to 






S 


r* QO cc 


tr 


'^ 


CO to a- cc 


.— 


tr; 


to rr c< 


cc 


C«4 '- 


CT o c; 


CO o rr CO cc 






i 




t- c 


r* 


o 


CO C5 Tl* »- 


c 


■<T 


Oi C3i t-^ tC 


■^ CO t^ CO cc 


t^ rr no lO CO 




^ 




t^ r* cj 




•<t 




O CO «- 


h- 




CO IN 00 (M 


Ci C^ Ol 1- 


c^ 


to -< 


CO ^ 




H 
















CO 
























CO 








Oi 






















































«« 


















































o 


c: 


O 


c: 




c 


o o c 


r- 


C 


c- 


c- 


c- 


c 


o o o c 


c 


O c= 


<= 


o o 




''O m 


CQ 


c 


c; 


« 


c- 




c 


c. o c: 


c: 


o 


c 


c 


c: 


c: 


c 


C3 O O C: 


o c 


cool 
























































l.s- 


-4J 




-^ 




ri 


cr 


GC 


oo c^ c< 


ar 


c^ 


c< 


■^ 


cc 


cr 


CO CO CO cv 


c^ 


00 c^ 


1 






a 


c; 




1 




c 


GO -^ - 




tr- 




^ 


GT 




CO tc 






c<i — ira 1 


ta 




iC 






a: 














o to 




tf> - 


to ir 


tc 






r-t 


o c 


s 


oc 




" (M 




" (N 






" o" (M 


" c- 




" to" to" «> 


o- 




" to" CO* (N 




CM 


^^ 




" "5 ■-" 


















CO »-» 
























c< 






























































CQ 
























































«* 


















































c 




O 


rt 




<= 


<r 


o 


^ 






c- 


^ 




„ 




o 


c- 


c 


c- 




CO 








<= 




o 


C5 


CC 


c 


c 


o 


c 






<= 


cc 




■^ 


o 


c 


c 


c; 




CO • 




!r! 


.a 


c 




^ 


n 


cc 


c 


c 


tn 


(- 




i- 


c- 


d 




,_ 




o 


e= 


1= 


c 




CO 




a 




G 




f> 


zc 


»r 


c: 


to <M 






»c 


r- 


tC 




:^ 


o 


c: 


c: 


«: 




r^ 




o 


t^ 


■^ 


c 


or 


CO to C3 










tC 




Oi 


C: 




ir. c< 




>n ■ 




g 


.a 


















































S 






















■^ 


Cs 


r^ 




!>• 


«l 








CO ■ 




M 














''I* 
























CM 














<» 


















































« 


c: 




c 


c: 


c 


to to c 


fV 


c 




c- 


o 


c- 


c 


c 


>o <= 




c: 


c 


<= 


o 






a 


■^ 






TT 


c; 


c 


cr 


o c 


cc 


c^ 


»i: 


a. 


c 


c: 






rJ- 


w: 




oc 


tc 


C- 


o • 




13 


o 


o- 


c^ 


(y 


1- 


c: 






t^ c 


»r 




c; 


or 






l>. 


■n' 


»0 (N 




lO O) 


CO 


o 












c 




c 






ir 
















t£i to 




t- 


C: 




lO ■ 


CO 


o 




ec 


«: 




(n 




oc 


cc 


>o c 


■^ 


c 


ir 


c 


tr 




t^ 


1^ 


€<• 


*r: 




o- 




r] 




























































3 


t^ 


iT 




oc 


o 




cr 




o 




oil 


T_, 


tr 


c< 


cc 


t~ 




CO 


^H 


CO 




CO 


-o 




o- 




































Oi 










M 














CJ 








































*• 
















































s 
c 


c 


<-: 


C-] 


t- 


<" 


G 


<r 


o c 


<~ 








o 




<= 


^ 


<~ 


C~ 


c- 


<= 


o 


<- 


o o 






c: 


c: 


O 


c 


c 


o 


c: 


o c 


c= 








o 




c 


c 


c: 


c 


<= 


c 


o 


c= 


o o 






c 


c- 


rr 


o- 


r- 






C3 r- 


c~ 


tc 




cc 










CO a- 


l~- 


CM 


^H 


c- 










cc 


o 


cc 


r/- 




cr 


■-1 


o ^ 


tr 


Cv 




cr- 


cr 




Cv 


c: 


t^ o- 


o 


c 


CO 


c^ 


lO t^ 






a 

□ 


c< 


^ 




1 


■<i 


c: 


c:: 


<M C^ 


(^ 






r- 


^ 


Gf 


cc 




C5 <y 


r- 


to oc 


r^ 


a> ^ 




ci: 


t~ 


or 


c^ 


»/: 


Tf 


<=; 


to CO cr 


tr 


a- 


" o 


^ 


r- 


' cr 


^ 


c«- 


" oc 


" cr 


CO 




" t-1 


CO 


CO r* 








Cv 


rj 


cc 




'q 


o -^ 1- 


rr 




to 00 c- 


If 


CO cc 


00 c< 


tc 


(= 


cv 




O CO 








»— 










.-1 1—1 


1— 












1—1 










CO 










^ 


«• 




















































Tf 










CO 








1^ 




































CT 










CO 








































1 




Cq 










to 








ST 




























*-H 


■s 




C«4 










to 








5 




























'"' 


a 


3 




^. 










o 








































CQ 




M 


> 
















































OT 
























































w 
















































































































H 

Z 

o 
o 




t 
1 


1 

5 


> 

a 
a 

CM 

5 





< 


1 

i 




1 




1 

CQ 


BO 


1 

03 


M 

c 

'S 

K 

c 

ffl 


c 

C 

cq 
u 

CQ 


E 

ta 

c 

cc 


' 1 


c 

1 


^ 
u 


> 
'C 

s 

J 

o 


1 

t 

1 

c 


1 






6 


B 
CO 

'• a 
5 



242 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



H 
O 

O 



o 

I 

OS 
en 



CO 

Q 

H 
-^ 

02 
O 

o 

I— I 

H 

pq 
(—1 

H 
a3 



1^3 











o o 


c 


o o o c: 


o c 


o 


o o o c: 


o o c 




c; 




o 


iC 


ol 








a 
.2 


c: 


o 


o o c 


c 


c: 


c 


c 


o 


o o o c 


o o c; 




c 




c 


t^ o 








c: 


o 


o o c 


c 


M- 


c: 


c 


^ 


o o o c 


o o c 




c 




C: 


lO CO 










'q 


CO 


CO !>. QO CC t> CO -t 




Tf CT) CO cr 


t^ o — 




lO 


oc 


CO r— 


o 




2 




c 






lo li?: 


CO c 


''I- 


, *" 


CO 


^^ (M_ ^- "5„ ^_ "^ f^ 


c: 




CC 


'<*' »o 








l-l 


CO <- 




OO <M 1 oc 


" I** c 


CO e^ 


■^ 


CO ■'i' OO CC 


r^ oo OS 


CO 


tT 


^H ^H 






1-:) 


s. 




c^ 


•^ •- 






*" 




^ 










F-l r-1 CO 1-t 
















3 

CO 


























































«« 






















































c 


o cr 


c 


c 


c 


c 


= 


cr 


c 


o c 


o o <= 


o 


o o o <= 


o 


c: 


o c> 










c 


o c 


c 


c 


"— 


<= 


<= 


o c 


o o o o c 


o o o o o I o 


c 


o o 






V 


bC 


C<1 


CO CC 


CC 


CC 


c 


cr 


C 


,— 


t^ 


(> 


CO -^ o c: 


oc 


IM (M QO <= 


'*' 


c 


t>- (M 








■a 




— 


CT 


"^ 


"tT 


CO X 


^ 


c^ 


-t 


o oc 


O CD -^ 


t-- t- -^i^ (M CC 


t-- 


oc 


■^ c:> 






> 


cr 


<N 


CC 




ir 


CC 


GC 


o 


iO ^ 


en — 




(M C<" 


CO ■^ CO -<f *0 1 CO 


CO CO c^ 1 


o; 






c^ csT ^ 


CD 01" 


CO 


U3 <M O- 


rt" CO .- 


y^ 


C] 


Ca CD CD C 


^_ 


,_, 




C<1 












CO 


























1—1 11 














a 


H 


























































«« 






















































c; 


^ 


c 


c 


c; 


c 


o c 


o 


c 


o o o o c 


CD O- O O CZ 


o 


o o o 1 










c; 


O O 


o c: 


c 


o c 


o 


c 


o o o o •= 


c 


O O O C 


o 


c 


o o 






«D 


2 


c: 


cz 


c 


c 




c 


c: 


c: 


c: 


c: 


o c 


O O C 


CD O O »0 C 


^ 


(C 


o o 






u 




■rj- 


CO c: 


o 


c 


oc 


t^ 




cr 


c 


CO CO OO Til t^ 


1-- O O Ci OC 




cr 


OD oo 








"« 


iC 


t^ '^ 


o 


oc 


CO CO r- 


c^ 


tc 




■^ 


CO GO ^ 


t-- t^ -^ 'ej* C 


•^ 


CO O CO 


00 




s 


C<] 


oc 


oc 


" c: 


" c- 


'It 


oc 


■TT 


CO c- 


OO Co" •* CO t- 


co' y-^ !>.' oo" -rr 


go" 


CO ^t* -^ 






'3 
O 


3 








TP ^ 


























!>. 1- 
















6 








c^ 
















































«» 
























































^ 




c: 


c: 










c 


o 






c; 


o o o 




o 


c 
















C: 




»c 


c: 










= 


c: 








c 


c 


O O 




o 


o 










a 
.2 




O 




CC 


c= 










<= 


c: 








CC 


ir: 


CO o 




CO 










cQ 






T 




o 












<^ 


CC 








w: 


kO CO CO 




Ol 


E 








1^ 




'■*3 




-^f 




■^ 


ir 












CO 








C<i 


O 05 








»o 




t^ 


O) 


a 


03 




















































a 


TJ 


o 








cv 


























T-4 1—1 
















V 


< 


a 






















































O 


-o 


























































H 






























































«» 


















































■g 
















c: 




c: 




c= 












o 












o o 




S^ 
















<= 




c: 




c: 












o 












o o 




'^ 


o 


1 














oc 




oc 




oc 












o 












CO c^ 




^ 














CO 




''t 




t^ 










CO 












lO ^ 




a 


■s 














o- 




■^ 
















C<I 












o r^ 




CQ 


OJ 


















































CO 




tS 


CO 
>> 














co 




^ 




>o 










oo 












<M CI 




C3 


<I> 


OT 




















































tf 


<D 
















€A 


















































c: 


c 


c: 


c 


^ 




c 




c: 




c 


c: 




C" c 




C= 


o 






















c: 


<= 


cz 


c: 


c= 




<= 




C 




c 


c 




o c 




c 


o 














a 








oc 


c^ 


■^ 


c 


OC 




c 




1% 




o- 


CC 




CO i^ 


c^ 


C<1 


CO 










%-* 










c^ 


CC 


t 


u- 


«: 




1^ 




CC 




c^ 


u- 




I^J t^ 


t^ 


■rr 














■§ 


1 








ir- 




in 


■^ 


CM 




c 




t^ 






ir 




'S" CC 


cr 


i> 


»rt 








^ 




o 










es 


' (N 


cs 


(N 


^ 




^- 




t^ 




C<3 


c 




oT c 


















W 


S 








CN 


























(M tr 






















U 








M 




















































«: 


C 


c: 


<Z 


c 


c: 


C 


c 


I> 


c 


c 


c 


^ 


CS 


CC 


G 


'^ t^ 


O 


If: 


CO 


c 


•^ t^ 










(M 


cz 


c 


CC 


(=■ 


c 




c: 


(N 


c; 


c 


c: 


o 


"^ 


c^ 


CC 


1^ ir 


c 


i> 


CO 


<= 


c^ t^ 








a 


C 


c 


c: 


oc 


c 


o 


C 


c: 


cr 


c: 




c 


c 


cr 


<N 


c- 


CO -t 


c; 


t^ 


CJ 




o 


CO CD 






1^ 


o 




<N 


CC 


CC 


c: 


cq 


c 


-T 


un 


^ 




CO 


■^ 


CC 


•^ 


c*: 


oo c 


(M 


cr 


CC 




oc 


■^ s? 






<u 




M 




CC 


CC 


CC 




o 


CC 




c^ 


c- 


w: 


c: 


c- 


cr 


oc 


CO_ (M 


c- 


cr 


c: 




oc 


»0 <M 


-^ 




Q 




M 


c 


cs 




l> 


CC 


•^ 


o- 


' oc 


" c 


-^ 


cs 


C" 




(M 


c 


CO f; 


(N 




oc 




<M 


1-4 






3 








a- 


























^ CC 


C<1 
















13 
























































w 


€rt 






























































































C 








o 






>) 










































C 








o • 




>> 


Z? 






















































o 


CJ 










































C 








o • 




a 


a 










































c 








<=> 


CO 


OJ -rj 

c3 


o 
a> 

3 














































o 

bD 


co^ • 
















































»B 




fc- 














cc 


c 


c 


c 


c: 


o 


c: 


~ 


cr 


o 


c: 


o 


o 


c: 


": 


t^ 


o <= 


c 


c 


<N 


X 


o 


s s 










»c 


c 


o 


o 


c 


c 


c 


o 


o 


<= 


c 


o 


cs 


c 


cr- 


(M 


o c 


c: 


cr 


*" 




c: 


o o> 




2 






c': 


■^ 


CC 


t^ 


c 


r^ 


c 


C<1 


i> 


t^ 


c 


CC 


□c 


oc 


oc 


CO 


c 


cc 




o 


I— 


M 


CD CO 




« 






c: 


c: 


c 


•^ 


c^ 




t^ 


cq 


•^ 


r- 




'rr 


itz 


q; 




OC 




UC 


c< 


iC 


C^ 






o to 




^ 


o 


-o 


»f: 


o 


'T 


-:r 


CC 


w^ 


oc 


t-- 






IC 


_ O 


CC 




-t 


iC 


5 »^ 




CO 


CC 




CC 


CO c; 




o 


a 


















































e4 


.s 


ja 


3 


oc 


C" 


CC 


c 


c: 


■rr 


c~ 


,_ 


UZ 


cc 


t^ 


■rf 


w: 


" c: 




CO 




oc 


t^ 


1-H 


-^ 


^ 


CO 


CO 1— 




o 


fe 


c~ 


c 


<N 


c^ 


cs 


oc 


TT 


c^ 


CC 


CC 




CC 


CC 


CC 


CC 


CC 




OC 


'^ 


oc 


cr 




CO c^ 




§ 


ai 


o 


c< 


CC 


in 


oc 


•^ 


<N 


tT 


CC 


If: 


■^ 


CC 


CC 


cs 


c- 


t^ 


t^ c 


OC 




oc 


0. 

0. 


CO 


1— < C^l 




m 






«ys 


'^ 




CC 
CM 








'^ 


^^ 














" 


r- 


CC 


(N 






CC 










CZj 


















































a '. 






s 


















































S s 


















































■*i 




O) 


1— t 










3; 






.1 




c 


.5 


i 






13 
G 
c 


c 




*> 




0. 


c 




C3 






c 

til 

c 


1 cy .2 

a t. 






O 

o 




c 
a. 


c 


1 


X 

1 


J 


' 1 




3 


0. 


C 


CL 

c 

c 


o 
o 

C 


1- 
C 


a 

c 

C 


cr 

c 




OJ 


> 

Ih 

C 

K 




"a 


en 

£ 


CQ 

1 u 

c 

3 





SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



243 









O t-- CD O <- 


* f CO tM a 


3 CO r-l 00 — 


■^ c 


5 t--. CO CM 10 00 


cs CI 00 






a 


' O CO .- 


H CO -^ CO 1- 


H ^ or 


:i CO 00 t^ IT 


5 CM 00 CO C5 CI I OS 


US »o t^ 






cccccD'XJoo lococoo^c 


^ t- CO CM c 


J lO i— 10 CO — 


. ^ 


crs 00 »-i 






COIOCDOOO 1 OCClOi- 


- c 


3 t^ »- 


H CO CO »- 


H *0 10 i-H C^l OS 


c<j eo OS 




3 


CO CO o •- 


^ CO 1 ^ c? 


i CO CO *0 CO "^ 


^^ co^ -r CO r- CO 1 t^ 


CM CO CD 


o 














- 
























<M 


"o 




eOtO'^COb- 1 COOClCO-"! 


■« CO '-H r> 


- -n^ cc 


:i kO t- »o t* t-' 





CS »— CO 




H 


i 


o lr^ o - 


■■ fr> Tf 


, io -«f cs ^ 


H rr- CO CD i^ c 


■> OS t^ -^ ^ 1— 1 1 CD 


lO CO f^ 




CO'^'^fMO 1 iCfOCliOC/ 


3 10 rf OS CM -r- 


^^ 0^ CM CO ^ 


^ 


»0 CM Ol 














































w 




^ 










f-H 1— t 








■^ 


■* Cq CM t^ CO 


T-. 










«f» 




































•3 




































Cl 




E=4 






































O 


03 












































C:; CKl OO cc 


> ♦- 


^ 10 o> OS cc 


> -^ '■^ CO ■r-^ C' 


3 CD '-T CO -^ OO 1 -^ 


CM •— i -T 








^ o »o t^ a 


lO IC OS CO c^ 


1 t^ CO CO CO o( 


5 CO --^^ »- 


H CM CO CM 


CM -^ ^ 




"rt 


.2 


O QO ■^ t^ ■-:» 


t^ CO 03 1- 


^ c 


S CO -«# 10 c> 


1 CO CO »o 10 OS 


CC CO 




a 


CO 1-- CO »o c 


os 00 CO CO cc 


5 CM CO C^ CM a 


3 1-1 10 CD QO QO -^ 


00 c: cr. 




o 




C^ lO 00 "^ ^ 


* 00 CO CO -^ cc 


> 10 CO t^ CO '■Tl 


■< CO CD r- CO OS CM 


00 10 


CO 


"^ 


03 








































o 


Ir^ -^ ■n' 1- 


^ oc 


-* CO 10 C 


> OS ^-« CO CO c 


^ iO CM CO »0 t^ 1 CO 


>o ^ 






3 


GO to C<I CO t^ 


C<l <M CO CO C^ 


3 CO CM »- 




"^ 


■* 00 t^ 


-rr" 


CO 1— ' CM 






■^ 
















CO 






CM 




i-l CO i-H 








> 


w 








-' 
































«» 








































lO lO o 


C5 »0 C 


> 10 ^o »f 


5 d 10 




eo 




• »o 




"rt 


C3 




t- CSI O 


10 10 CD C 


> t^ CM <> 


i C) CM 




CO 




• t- 




□ 
o 


O 




CO CO o 


t^ O) CD -- 


- c 


s CO x> Tf cc 


> -:P ^ 10 




-t< 




• 10 rr 






'm 




t^ ^ CD 


00 CD 10 r^ c^ 


> uo OS r- r- r- 













■^ t- 


1^ 


c4 


•p 




u:) (M lO 


t-^ -fi !>. C^ Tj 


■" CO lO iC CD cc 


■> 10 CM 5:) 




OS 




CO CO 




3 


a> 




CD <M O 


CO (M~ ^ ci »f 


> CO C4 CM 1-H 'rj 


^ cs T-« GO 




»o 




,__ ,_ 




'« 








t^ 






1—1 












<-H CO 












§ 


H 
















































«» 










































t^ CT> CO C 


OS -rJ^ 1- 


r^ 


-t* CM '^ 00 ■^ 


»0 'f CM IT 


CO 


r- crs c^i 




"r*. 






to '- 


t^ CJ 


lO -f r- 


CO t- »0 OS -^ 


^ CO 10 CM 00 1- 


CO 


CO t-- ** 




s 


oc 


<M ''J^ <- 


-^ 


GO 1- 


en <— 1 cc 


> CO liO I-- »r 


> OS 00 CO -^ C" 


00 


CO 00 t^ 




OJ 


CP 


CC 


t-^ CO OS C7 


co !>. '^ r- 


CO QO TT" CO 1^ 


00 XO t^ CM cc 


■^ 


-r CM c-1 


CD 

f— 1 


1 


hJ 


cs 


to CD CO ^ 


CO 10 CO o- 


I CO *0 CO CM C 


> 1—1 OS CD Cs 


■^ 


CM 




c4 


,M 


cs 


' »o" 


cr. cc 


C-l T- 


10 »o c 


S -^ CM T- 


^H C^ 


J CD 00 1- 





■^ 


CO »-< *— 












- 


















co ^ 












M 


* 








































o o o c 


0000c 


> c 


> 0000 





• 




^^ 


in 




o o o c 


0000c 


> 0000c 


> 0000 





• 




■3 a 




C^ 


CO CD CO "X 


CD 00 -^ Cfl Cs 


1 CO CD CD cr 


"• CM Tf CO CO 


00 


CO 






a 




■^ t^ 1— « Tf 


OS CO -f u^ (re 


5 cc iC -^ t^ l> 


I^ CO -- 


1^ 


CO 


OS |~-» 


lO 


o 


c^ 


.-H CO lO cc 
" lO ^' cc 


^H 10 CO t^ D- 

ci c^ -^ f-H --a 


) t^ U5 oc GO C^ 
' C<1 cr 


>_ -rf CO CD^ 

> CD OC C7S 'cj^ 


CO 


»o 00 




c^ 








CO 


















IM ^ 












«« 


















1 






















c 


o 


O cc 





00c 








^ 


00000 


o> 
















o 


o c- 





c 








cr 


00000 













§ 


^ 


»^ 


o 


lO C: 





I^ c 


(^ 





>r 


CO CM 


»o 










a 

a 


o 


t-- 


c:* 


t^ ^ 





OS c 




10 


c\ 


^*" iO CO »o 


CS 








■^ 


o 


o- 






o ».': 






cs I-- 




CO 


ir 


CO 00 -rji OS cs 


t^ 










_c: 










































3 


o 


!>. 


»— 1 


lO — 


T-( 


c^ 


CO 


v~( 


c^ 


■* r^ c-1 !>. 


co" 










M 


O) 








Ci 


















■^ 1—4 
















M 












































in 


CO C 


s ■= 





u- 





CO 


c 


t^ CO c<) 














a 


CC 


03 <N 


O (M 


c^ 


C^J T^ OC 


CM 


CM 


oc 


'* OS CO oc 


CM 




•^ 




"cS 


_o 


cc 


cr 


_ 


iO cr 


CO 


to cs .^ 





CM 


IT 


00 '^ lO to 


CO 




QO 








C 


CD cc 


cs cc 


"-tl 


CM CO 


"^ 








^^ ■^ CO l^- ^- 






CO 


CO 


s 




cc 


r- C 


_ *" 


lo 






■^ Ir^ -W 


uo 


lo 


CC 


00 wo CO cc 


CO 








!& 


3 


(N 


o 


c^ 


^- 


lo 






to -^ if 


!>. 


(m' 


oc 


»o -^ »o — 










■T3 




CO 


Ol y 


















1— 1 »-« 00 CM 












w 


«ffi 






t^ 


































a 




o 


c 


O C 








c 








~ 


cs 





000 








c 


c 


o c: 





000 








c 


00c 








000 




„^ 


3 


O 


CD ■-- 


CO cc 


b- <M 


CO o\ 


r- 


kO T- 


CO C- 


If: 


CM CD CO ^- 


»^ 


CM »ra t- 




3 




o 


c/: 


l/- 


CJ5 1— ( 


CO 


00 cc 


"^ 


-f o- 


CO cc 


oc 


CO C>l CO I'* C3 


^ t— CD x: 1 


1—1 


o 


cc 
o 


■ z 


' cc 


OS -(t 


CO -f 




oc 


^ oc 

CD 40 




cc 
0- 


a- 


OC' *r cc 
0" 0" t- 


cs 

10 CM 


- 0-^ 


jo '^. ^ 

cc ?0 '•'T' 






cc 




c: 


CO O 


'rr 


cc 


^ oc 


-<T 


-* 'rr 


»o 1- 


'^ 


10 CM cc 


»0 1—1 


1-- trfl CM C^l CM 1 






c3 








OS 1— < 






•-t 












•"-I '^ CS 












ki 








































E- 


M 






























-i 
















OS 


































a 




















CO 


































_c; 








- 




S 








Cs 

•o 


































i 
























































w 




















<• 












































zn 
























































w 


















































4> 




H 












































^5 


(U 


S s 


»-l 


Z 




c 


a 


















u, t: 






S 












> £f O" .S: 1 




o 
o 




o 

a 

GJ 
-id 


^ 
-^ 
■g 


c 




a 

*5 
a 


^ "5 


e 

c 

c 

■> > 


II 


a. 


3 % 


c: 
c 


a: 

C 


"> 

w 

C 




'E 


> 


_C2 


*« CO 

a 


gGeo 
g and 








O 


c 


? 


■5 


:3 

c3 


c 




2 fc 


s. § 


t 


QJ 


(U 


CQ C3 QJ 




I V E 


.S .5 .S 1 








i:3 


c 


t^ 


U^ 


b^ 


&, 


^ 


U. 


b 


c 





c 


C 


c 


c 


s 


•t 


n:^ 


;^ 


S! 


3 


•-5 


W 


w 


•^\ 



244 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Q 
W 

g 

o 
U 

I 

o 

OS 

05 



02 

Q 
'Z 

H 

<: 

o 
o 

I— I 

H 
H 










o 


o 


o 


: 


o 


o 




o 


: 


o 


o 


o 


; 


o 


; 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


: 


o 


o 


ol 




a 
o 


O O O ; 


o 


o 




O ; 


o 


O O ; 


O ; 


o o o o o 


o • 


o o c 




o o o 


o 


o 




o • 


o 


o o • 


o • 


o o o o o 


<M 


o o o 






o; r- ?o 


OO 


CO 




n< • 


Tt" 


CO Oi 


CO 


CO Cr I^ ■'^ •:}« 


r- 


"^ JO r- 




"3 -S 


c<» lO !>._ ; 


CO 


CO 








■•r — ' 


t^ 


•^ CO CO ^ ^ 


lO • 


^ OS OO 


o 


> 

o ^ 
























Tf CO 00 


■* 


"* 




CO • 


CO 


t^ c« 


00 • 


OO TJ< OO CO CO 


<-H 


CO *rs oi 




►J s. 














^^ 




1— « 1— ( 




1-1 CI *-> 




9 

m 


»» ' 


























o 


o o o 






coo 


o o o o o 


o o o • 


o 


o o o o o 






O ; 


o o o 






o o o 


o o o o o 


O O O ; 


o 


o o o o o 




•E| 

TO M 


C^ • 


•^ CTi OO 






»-0 OO o 


■^ O CO O C3 


CO CO o 


to 


CO O (>> o o 




lO 


lA O CO 






C5 ^ C-3 


-^j* OO (M CO *r 


en CO <M 


OO 


05 CO OO Cl CT' 




o 


s s ^ 






■<>• O (N 


!>. CO Ol O <M 


CO -^ o 


N 


CO t^ Oi o 






















o> 


(N • 


CO cq 






U5 


CO ▼-< ^^ 


CO IM ■«*< . 


»— t 


CO xr -"S* -^ 




5^ 


«(% 






















o o o o o 


(M 


o o o o 


o o o o o 


o -^ o o o 


s s s s s 






o o o o o 


(M 


o o o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o o 




0> 2 


o o o o o 


Oi 


o o o o 


o o o o o 


O CD O O O 


o o o o o 




u o 


CO o ■^f CO to 


CO 


CO "Tf OO r— 


O CO cr^j I-" Oi 


cr:, CO CO t-- *-• 


Ol OO CO CO <N 




11 


t^ O -^ t^ T-" 


'<9' 


O ^^ CO_ CO_ 


TT t^ C^ O -V 


O OS -^ CO t^ 


CQ CO t-* CD en 


00 


OO CQ CO CO CO 


»o 


■^ CD ■**♦ O 


O 00 -^ GO 00 


(N O 00 CO »0 


■^ -^ 00 OS CO 




■ll 


T—t 1— t 




1-H <M 


C<l 


1-1 (M 


CO 1-H 




















«« 
















o o o 






o o 


^ 


O '' 






o 


o 


o • 


o 








o ■ 






o o o 






GO O 


o 


o 






o 


O ; 


O ; 


o 








o 




a 


O 00 C<l 






CO O 


CI 


o • 






« 


o • 


«5 


CO 








•* ■ 




"Sa ^ .2 


Gl Ca Ci 






CQ CO 


lO 


-rf 






t^ 


OO 


03 


CO 








o> 




OJ t- 






''J^ 


•<a^ 


00 * 






o- 


Tj< 


■* • 


CO 








t^ 


l^ 


Gene 

Adu 
Educa 


«<» 






























M • 






. 














o 


o 














o 




o 








o o 




















o 


o 














O ; 




o 








o o 




■ 














OO 


■^ 














M 




00 








OO oc 




-a ^ g 
















to 


'ij* 














C3 • 




T-) 








CO in 


















CO 


iC> 














M' 




1^ 








'''. ° 




OS X aj 














































«o 


Rental 
Free Te 
Syst 
















oo" 


CO 














■* : 












CO -^ 




















o» 


































o o 


c 




o 


o 






o • 






o ■ 




o 


o 


s s ■ 










o o 


c 




o 


o 






o • 






o • 




o 


o 


o o 




Foster 

Home 

Children 






kO OO 


cc 




to 


CO 






o 






OO • 




CO 


lO 


lO CO 








ro ^ 


c 




■^ 


1—1 






OO 






t^ 




CO 


<>> 


(N -^ • 








o -"a* 






CO 


t^ 






N 






CO 




N 


CO 


1-t UD 


us 






oi -a< 


cc 












tH 






o" 




1—1 


(M* 


TT CO 
t— 1 










4^ 


































OO O O O CO 


c: 


o o o -^ 


O CO o o c 


J O <M O <M O 


CD O CO CD O 






c^ o o O cr 


C^ 


O O O CO 


o ^ o o c 


> O CO O C*l o 


o o »o o o 




a 


t^ o o o w 


U" 


O O O OO 


o — o o c 


> O OO O CO O 


O O (M O O 




fc. => 


eO c^ CO O C 


e^ 


CJ (M '^ O 


QO -^ (M CO C 


1 OO C^ C<1 CO CO 


TT" OO »o c: CO 




SI 


»0 !>• C5 CO OC 


c 


CD kC OO CO 


OO 00 lO »0 liT 


3 CO CD lO O OC 


CO CO "^p -rr r^ 


■>)< 


CO oi" CO ui" cc 


Y- 


CO Ci c^ ■<*< 

»— 1 


CO lO Tt* CO 1- 


H !>. CO t^ "^ C 


,-7 i-T o" y^ ^ 

1— ( »0 T-l 




H 


«» 
























































o 










>> 










































o 










»^ C 




















































o a 










































o 










a a _ 










































CO 








CO 


Continge 

Fund 

(Discretio 

Fund) 










































C<1 










1 


































•» • • ■ 






o o o o c 


> c 


3 O C^ (M C 


O O O O t> 


— o o o c: 


o o »o o o 






o OO o o a 


> c 


3 O '-' -^ C 


O O O CO c 


4 «M C O O C 


0*^00 




S 


O M* O O U" 


) 1- 


- o r-- t^ cr 


Ci -rt* Tf Tt" If 


S CD -^J- -rf O a- 


crs o CO OO 1— 




Basic Sta 
School 
Fund 


r^ .— > o CO -^ 


* c 


3 Ci OO CO t— 


CO i-O O M O 


C4 -rr CO 1— ' 3" 


-rr --" CO (N O 




GO CO «5 C5 C 


) r 


- <N t^ O CS 


CO C^l OS t^ C 


3 o CO r* o *^ 


.— ( lO Oi •-' '^ 


« 


C^ t*— Ui to t> 


Tl 


1^' C^ 05 '^ '^ 


(M CTi ^ t^ C 


3 (M* C^J — "" OO h- 


t^ Oi CO -^ M 




»o ^ CO CO c^ 


s c 


5 t^ CO CO ^' 


-tj* ,-( CO OO c 


^ OO <N t^ 00 cc 


C^ 1— < lO Oi t-- 




Cvj CO ^ CO cc 


S CV 


3 1-1 CO C^ t-' 


(N CO »-l CO C* 


5 t^ iC CO (>• ■<? 


<M C^ CO ■*»• UO 




t-! r-* 




■<— 1 1— 


C<l 


c<- 


T-« CO ^ 




1 


«» 














GO 




















; 












3 

<3 












• -c 


i a 


i £ 






















: E? 


; r 


^ -c 






* Cj _ 

: 2 i 


J 








; ct 








8 


a 
c 
c 


i 


; c 

• « 

> < 

3 (- 


5i 


■ e 

* 1 

H 


D 

5 e 

i c 

1 i 


H 

3 = 




: c 

; J 

1 ^ 


5 = 

n 


1 
i 1 


e 

I ° 

1 4 

: 2 


. < 

\ I 

) < 

: 8 


S 1 


! £ 
s : 

3 ^ 

: 1 

3 < 


1 i 

a c 
^ ■♦- 

3 t 
5 2 


? 

: c 


11 


. c 


3e 


1 



? 1 


1 b 

1 ■ 

• 1 

:;5 


3 a 

3 c 

L> a 

J t 

3 C 


3 0. 
} c 
3 C 

id 


1 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



245 









CO M O 


M ?J 


D M O OO »■ 


-1 Tt* 


Tt* <M I^ t^ lO 










IT 


CD CO O 








b- r* U3 oo b. 


to cs 10 r- i9« 






_ s 


CO to =-. 


•— ' • 


r ^ t-» r- <M »f5 


CO t-' *-^ en t^ 


CO CS 00 oa O 












^ »0 Ci O C^ CJ 


O ^ :o O t-- 


OC O -rf 3. ^ 
01 OS Ofc 00 






o 


1^ 


C5 ca C^ 




o Ci r* -^ o 03 


OJ era ID CO oo 


CO :jC OS ^ 




(M » c 


o - 


-1 l^ OO lO c^ t^ 


O C^ O CO iO 


^ CS CO ift CS 














■^ iO -^ Ji «-• 










S 


CO o ■* 




^ C<» O Csi O 


o t>. CS r^ -^ 


3S CO t^ .^ 1-1 


CO cs «D CO t^ 






CO 






1-t c^ 


(N 


11 -^ 


^ t^ 1-. 






at 


















•TJ 
















CS 


Mi 




















o CO a> 


d « 


3 OO m O lO O 


^ ic 1^ CO ca 


OS f CS 10 














-, CO CS CO ^ C<1 


30 -^ CO CO "^ 


I-" CS 00 


OS lO 00 CO 






c .2 


oo r^ CO 


M a 


3 Ci 30 lO •-' »0 


lO oo »-t -* CO 










■«• -r o 






O en* CO b- CO 


CO CO t^ Tf OS 






00 


•2 S 


CO « CO 




5 en O (M CO I>. 


oo ^ "^ 00 CO 


c^ CO ^ 00 02 


CO cs r-- OS 10 




»-^ 


M y 


•^ S 21 


CO C 


> lO lO CO Ol CO 


00 ca Oi (N -^ 


r^ CS 00 CO 








o 3 








i>- <M cq CO 


CO 10 Tji 


CO 1-1 ■^ CO ■<:r 






° p? 










CS 1-1 








> « 


6* 


















m cj CO 


»o 


• o o o o o 


o 1^ o in o 










S a 






O lO o ^ o 




• t^ t-. 


t^ »o 10 






o .2 


oo eo lO 


r— • 


o r^ o c^ ^ 


W3 (M CC| CO O 


»0 • »0 CO 








.S <n 


















ca > 




o 


W O CO t^ (M 


lo -f Tr< 1-1 to 


OS • 00 ^^ CS 


t^ OS CO 10 








<M -"I* 


« 


C^ ^^ OO 1-1 (M 


OS -^ 1-1 CS 


CO • TJ« CO OS 
















■f-i 










«» 


















o t~ o 


\fi c 


> CO lO CO •*** IF-* 


O -^ O CS C3 


00 r— m CO Tt* 


r» t^ cs T-( 00 






2 g 




'^ c- 


1 r- CO CO Tji .-1 


CO C5 oo t.O i>. 


CO OS 1-1 00 ^H 


t^ CO cs ^ 






CO CO X) 


o ^ 


5 O O O CO t^ 


CTJ t— CO !>. '-H 


10 OS 01 -^ Tt< 


lO 00 lO C-l t^ 








t^ CO -^ 


— (> 




oo t^ CO 1— ' t^ 


CO lO 00 r^ 








•g -1 


»0 CO -^ 


<M c: 


5 C<l -30 CO O OO 


rr b- CO OS oo 


ic 00 CO :d CS 


CO CO »o r-. cs 








— >o o 


c^ c^ 


1 1-1 i-H CO 1-H rt^ 


^ CS 1-t e^ i-( 


CS CS CO CS CO 


1— 1 »-i 10 cs u^ 






1— < 






T-l 


T-l 


CO 








«» 


















o o o 


o c 


> o o o o o 


o o o o o 


00000 


00000 










<=> c 


) O O O O C2 


o o o o o 


00000 


00000 






•rV to JO 


oo -^ 


' <M OO CD C^ O 


oo CS -^ -^^ CO 


CO CS ■^ 00 -f 


CO cs f CO 








O »0 CQ 




CO CD lO »o ^ 


CS »o -t' o r^ 


C^l ^P •-* CS CS 






f-H 


Superv 

Princi 

(12 Mo 


lO C^ CO 

co" to m" 




) CO CO cfl t^ r^ 

) *-4 *H lO 1— t OO 


CO !>. CO lo a> 

cj' i-T i-T co' 


':0 CO CO CO 

cs" CO* TjT cs' 10 


CO b* cs 10 CO 

»-• 1-H Tl« t*' 
















cs 








«» 


















o 


• o 




• *^ 


o o o 


• o 




• o 




• o 




• 


• 














o 


• o 




• -^ 


o o o 


• o 




• o 




■ o 




• 


■ 






•000 






fe ^ 


o 


• lO 




• cr 


o o »o 


• to 




• lO 




• o 




. 


• 












a o 


«o 


IM 




• or 




• IM 




• r^ 




• lO 




• 10 


• 






10 t-- Ol 




























• CO 


• CO 
















































= o 


eo 


• CO 




• c 


<>> CO 


• o 




• *-( 




< 1— t 




• cs 


• 












m o3 


^ 
























• o< 






cs 








o o o 




<= 


o o o 


*— 1 


O O O t* C3 


00000 




-rr- 






a 


O CO Oi 




o 


o o oo 


CO 




cs rfi 




CO CO CO 






3S 


02 CO <M 




^ 


o o oo 


CO 


CO CO o CS r- 


10 cs OS 




00 cs CO to 






t^ to CO 






CO O CM 




CO .-H CO CO OS 


CO »o lo CO cs 




t'- CO 








Tn c<i o 




IC 


Xi O CO 


•o 


»0 00 »-i CO CS 


CO r^ CO CO 




































•* (M 00 






CO CO 1-1 


CO 


■^ O !>. 00 












aj T3 


(M 










CS 1-1 


cs 10 




cs CO t-l 






W 


«• 






















a 
o 


C3 O O 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o o 


00000 


00000 






o o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o o o o 


00000 


00000 






_- rt 


OO t^ ITS 


c^ »o 


'JS ?0 O 03 O 


OS oo ca oo o 




























§■ R 




<M ^ 


(M t- O t^ »-< 


1-t CO in CD CO 


00 cs OS CO Tf 


OS -JO 00 cs T-l 








CO o ^ 


to (T 


O -^ C^ lO lO 


CS t^ CO OS CS 


r^ r^ ^ 








CO t^ o 


o ^ 


CO Csi IM C^ t^ 


^^ CO CS -^ ■^ 


Tj* -^r CO »o io 


cs cs — 10 






•"I 




I— 1 




cs 


•-• cs 






H 


•» 






































00 



























































o 


























t^ 








^H 


o| 






















in 





































C 2 






















CO 


























ej 










ro 
































•a 


























« 


H 

8 


a 


: 


c 

J 




i 

h3 


a 
a 


c 
o 

o 


B: 




s 

c 


1 • 

X 
X 


a 
s 

'a 

o 

a 


1 

o 
E 

c 

55 


e 

2; 


c 
o 


c 
c 

o 

E 

C3 

iz: 


a 
p 

i 

o 

J= 




03 





Si 
&< 


•1 


*c 
a 

> 




a 
"a 


ft 

s 

a 

£ 


c 

s 

□ 


s 
g 


■ 

; 

IS 
3 



246 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



O 

O 



o 

o 
o 



CO 

G 

H 
<1 
H 

O 

O 
H 

H 

TO 












G 


> C 


5 00 




•00 00000 »o 






o 


cz> c 


2 c 


J 00 




■00 C50000 r- 




1 


0000c 


5 C 


5 00 




•00 oioc:>oo •**• 






1-S 

3 




5 10 =0 -rt^ CM Cj: 


3 CO ^-i 






o 


1 






t^ 10 




•t^CO OOCitOCMiO 01 1-1 






<M 'rr -^ 00 1- 


1 CO 00 CO t^ a 


i QO cq 




•00 M iOC^-CMh-t^ «- 


; ^ 








c--i t> 


i r—i y- 


^ ' ' 


'"' 






-" 1 "^ j s 1 






ra 




















-^ 








&5> 
















«» 










C 


5 0000c 


5 


oo<r> oooioc 


5 










C 


5 0> C 


3 


oc:o OiOOOC 


> 






g M 




^O -^ U3 -rj 


■* CM CM 10 00 Of 


D -tt^ 


CM»Mt^ T-IOOOCC-^ 


f* -^ 










CM :ri GO -^ 


■* CM 00 CO O 


i CO CO 


COtO-'-H lO*— 1C-10-; 




0-. 




TO 2 




'-«'-' CO T- 


^ t^ 'Tf CM CO Cv- 


5 (M Co" 


t^oco c>'«^oc:>c 
i-tcMf-i co^O'^o-«a 

CM 


3 10 CO 

r* cm" 0" 






►5 ^ 


















CO 










€^ 














«« 








c: 


-t^ c 


> c 


J 




00 c 


5 't' 






V S 




10 c 


> 0000c 


) 




00 o> c 


5 »0 









CM c 


0000c 


) 












"O a 


c^ 


CO CD r^ C 


r^ cr. :c 


3 CO CO 
















"Ttt 10 CO CO r 


^ 1^ CO 




t— CO -^ 05 -^ 1— 1 


3 


00 




c*- 


•* CO C 


to CO CM 1^ a 


> 00 <M 












■3 3 




■vT" I— < c^ 








CO ^ CM C- 


1 CM ^ 






0^ 


&€ 


















in 














c 









J 




c 


5 o> 





■ -r 


> c 


) CO 



























t^ 


3 e? 





■ c 




> »o 






-^ .2 








"■ 


r^ 




c 


C3 




OC Tl 




Ci 










rt 








en c^ 


:^:> CM 







t-- 




CO - 






■ 


3 CC 


00 


t-- 




■3 15 








■^ 


i-i Ci 






Cq ^H 




-^ ir 


5 ^ 


CO 




* c^ 


S CO 


a 


•u " 


































o 


"§ 








«»© 








1 














1 ^ 




o 









■ 








cr 




c- 




^ 






c- 


3 











^ 

















<= 




c 











c 


J 
















n 


^ g 






■ -rf 








tc 




c 




on 






"^ 

































^ 




10 




















CD 


S 2 
H » 






CO 























cr 





I- 








CM 

0" 

CM 







s ^ 


































































































«» 
































to* 













000 





c 











o> 







c 


















00 c: 





^3 



















c 













trz 




0-- t^ c- 





t' 






T-1 CO 




■"f 


Tf CM 








00 




1- 






















-f 


'3- 








C5 


o 


t? 


a^ 






-^ cq oc 


CM 


■^ 






CO 




"*', 


lO Ci 




cc 




CO 
























CM 


■^ 




c^ 




00' 




£ 





^ 







































L'!) 


000 


t^ 





<z 


CD 0» *-" 


c- 


UO 








cc 


CO '* 


000 


a- 





00c 


»0 CO 


c* 








c 
I. .2 


00 


-:f — < (N 


c 


a- 





00c 


■^ CO r-- 


If 


-— < 






c: 


CO ^ to r- 


CO CO CO 


c-o t^ 


QG 


CM 0> C 


uO -f »0 CC 


OC 


r- 








c 


10 t^ I^ 


10 cri r- 


(M ^ 


CO 


lO ?o »— 


CM -^ ■n' CC 


c- 


m 


Tf 




■n 2 


CQ 


c^ cr> 


»o '-- 


»o »n 


CO [-- 


CM (M IT 


CO 00 lo -^ 


CM 


CM 






Q^ 




u^ ,-1 ^ 


'^ '"' ^~ 


•^ 




CS 


r-t CM 1- 


c^ 


CM 

0^1 






W 


«« 
















e* 




>> 


>. 






















CO 


.S 3 


.2 ^ 


















CO 



CO 




^'^ 


















-^ 




























o 


Q 





























0000 


000 








CO 


001-00 





, 




^ 







0000 


000 




Oi 


CM CC Cr 


^ *o 





00 






as 


lO (M »0 !>• 


CM CO Tf 


■<5< (M 


t^ 05 


CO CO cc 


00 c:) t^ t^ 


CO 


CO 




s 


■3 -a 




le^ <lc> CTi Tt 


CI U^ ■^ 








■:/: Oi 1-- ^ 








KJ 




CO TO <M 00 


CO CO 


c^ »o 


wi CM 


C3 


CO 1-1 cri CO T-. 





iC> 


(M 




»o 


Ci CTi (M O'S 


iC Oi 


CO r-^ 


CO ■<?* 


CTi !£) cr 


^ 10 -^ OC' 


CM 


lO 






,;j fc. 


»f: 


r^ :.'. ^ 


CO r- c 


CO Cs 


t^ 05 












^ 






CO CO l^ (M 


CO 05 


cc 


r* r-l 


^ CO IC 


-^ cc -^r -^ 


»o 






ec 




«^ 


•:?« (M 


^^ 


^H 1 1 


1-H 


C-1 


T-H CM ^ 


1-H 


CM 

CO 




















































CO 




















































a; 






OJ 




















































W •. 


-id 










































D 















-c 




R 






J3 




a 



a 












c 













2; 






Q 

a 
=3 


-a 
a 


a 

-a 

c 

s 


a) 


c 
a 






"a 

to 

P3 




S3 

C 
C4 

a 


•J 
> 

B 



£ 

= 



> 

> 
v. 

"o 

Q 






CO 




ca 


c 


2 

tat 

c 


E 

1 


OJ 



> 


.id 








SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



247 











t^ in CO ^nt c 


M CO F-t *■ 


-cof— cMco-^iocM cocMine*3«:> 












-3 

0) 






-" COCOCOCDCO ODCiCiieOlO cocooocs-^ 


CO 


CO 








CO m t^ ?o *■ 


H CMr^C^lCOC*^ CMr^^HOCM TrCOCM*rt*CM 


o\ 










lO OO (M CO 1- 


COI^COCOCO >oc 


O CO ^ 




o 






o 


n 






- O C5 


CM 


Tf 




CM 


o 


W^ 1— C? CO c 


::> -^OOCOOCD CMt^OiCMO h*!- 


1 O (M C^ 


1^ 


t^ 






E-" 




- CM CD I 


C-1Ci«5'rfC> lO^-tCOCMO 


-. o - 






o 














HCr^CM [ OiTt^i-HOCCS 1 W3COOO&0 












































CO 






^ ,—.,-, r 


-t I— I ^ 


-* CM 1 


CM 


CO ^ 


1— < 


,.^ 
































CD 










«» 












1 










«0 








-§ 




























05 


0) 


a 






























O 


1 


































-r cr. o »-« ir 


5 t^ o ^ 




















■i COt'OCOCO C5lO«Ol>-'- 


O rr CO CO T-H 


CD 


-o 






a 


H 


»o ■rf a: c*3 u 


5 ry^cococDO oocM'^cv 
















OCD(MCMC3 COr- 












CO 




a 




H CD 1— 1 CM 'X) c: 


CO 00 CO oo ^ 


lO O C-J rt* CM 


O 


oo 










CO oc t^ »o c 


^ CO o ^ »(■ 


O O CO 1-* c*- 


















» O CO ^ 


-t »D c-- 


■n^ CD CO C^ 


^ CTi CI T-. CO 










o 


"O 




























> 


W 


«»^ 






















o 










O lO 


o c 


5 




o 




o o 


o 


O 


• »o 


O 


o 


CO 






rt 


a 














lO CM 


lO 


o 


• t- 


• o 


»o 


oo 








o 


^9 °2 


c^ - 


M 




-t^ 




!>. r-. 


r^ 


CO 
















w 














O lO 


















a 


•u 


CO cr. 








■- 


1 




CO CM 


en 


CO 


- CM 


■ c» 


t- 










^ 


<M T- 




-^o 


■1 

4 




o> 




lO t^ 


CO 


W3 


• CO 


t^ 


Oi 


en 
»o 










» 


































«o 










CO CO CT; CD I> 


CO '-' CM lO OC 


T-H CM CM o c: 


lO t^ r^ f- c:i 


to 


Oi 






. 


> 


C:> Cvl CO O O' 


D Til rt< en CO C<1 


^ -^ -^ lo a- 




■• O CM ^H lO 


l>- 


o> 






trf 


O ^f CO QC (> 


1 lO CO CO CM C 


CO T-t *-i -rf CC 


o r- <- 


■< CI r— 


UD 


oo 








a> 


*— ' C5 cn ^c ir 


3 UO CM Ci C7J 1 


lO Ci OO C^l t-' 


t'- CO CD CO CD 


C<l 


^■. 








-1 


CD ■^f Tf CO 1 


^ lO t^ I-- c^ 


00 CO CM CO CO 


05 I-^ CO -T' C-1 


GO 


CO 








■^ 


*-• 1- 


H CO CO C£ 


2 »0 W3 CO -^ "^ 


CO »« 1-H CO oc 


CM CD tH lO ■«*< 


Ol 


'«** 






























CM 

CD 










<« 






















«« 










o o o 'rr c 


J O O O lO c 


o o o o o 


o c 












r °1 




O O O o: C 


> O O O O C 


o o c:- o c 


O c< 


o o o 


o 


r^ 






:2 a 


O (M CO Tfi a( 


3 CM OO -:f CO O 


CO O CM CM Tt- 


O cc 


CD -f OO 


CM 


GO 






c 


-rt< CD o cn o 


J t- O O CO CC 


lO CO CO UO t^ 
















o 


^ ^ t^ c- 


CO o CO r- CO 
CO i^ CO r- -H 


O CO CO (M (N 

kft CO '— 1 CO -T 


CM »- 


CO 't^ Ci 
^ O CO 


oo" 


CO 

go" 






(^J 




IN — 
















" 




CO 










w& 






















«» 












a:' o lO c 


3 O 


c^ O O 


o 








C! »C 


O CM O 


o 


i>. 














> o 


t^ o c 


o 










^ CO o 


o 


lO 






fe 


OT 




o o ^ ir 


> o 


CM lO »C 


o 








».* c- 


O 1-* lO 


iC 


lO 






a 
s 


o 






»o 


lO r* c^ 










r- -^ 




!>. 


CO 






o 




:/: CO -^ »!■ 


lO 


Tf O CO 










CJ CO 


OS -r o 


o 














































CJ 






t^ t~. 


iC 


^ 


»« c< 


CM 








CM -n 






in 








CO 
































05 












«^ 


























«« 










o o -rr O C 


o o cr 


^::' o 


o c: 






O 


Ci cc 




o 










a 






o c 








OS 1-H 




O-^ CO 


o 


CM 






:3 


c 


CO O CO o -- 


— « lO O CM O 


O I> 






o 


CO rr 


CD CO •-< 


^H 


CM 










vXj cm — 


c-1 CD CM CD c:: 


>o c-- 






CC 
















?? 






-s^ o oo o -- 










oi» c 




















































O CM cr; eC 


CM *0 CO OO OC 


cc 






•^ 


GO \r. 




t^ 


























"rt 


















W 


««» 


























Tf 
CM 








o 


o e 


o o c 


o o o o o 


o c: 


o o o 


O O 




^ 










o ^ 


o o c 


o o o o o 


o c 


o o <z> 


o o 


o o o 


o 


O 






:73 


lO -^ 


oo o cr 


-"C r* cr 


r^ h- 


^ c: 


o -^ o 




n-i 


O CM GO 




^^ 










uo JO c: 


CM -X; CM CM OO 


OO -q 


O O Tf 
















(5 


o 


-r CO CO -^ ~ 


CO CO C 


<M CO 


CO cr 


t^ ^> CO 


CO O 


»0 t^ CM 


o 








a 


i-H lo o '^ ir 


•rti CO r^ 00 CO 


o ir. 


CO I^ (M 






c 
















O CO C^ 






CM »0 — 


CO — 


»f2 OO »0 


o 


d 










CM ^ 












'— • 








CT! 








H 


»» 










































CD 
























o 


o 


1- 














































-^ 


C-1 










s 












CO 






























oo 






o 






































en 


*r> 








-a 












CO 




























CO 








K 


3 


































































































CO 












•» 






























CO 

«9 
























































g 






CO 


















































c 
O 










CJ 

O 






E 






JZ 




a 
o 


rt 












C 




■ 














o 






■a 

S 


; 
<y 

o 
a 

§ 

PS 


•E 
c 


'1 


) _ 
"a 

3 

a: 


-4J 

o 
03 


c 

c 
rt 

c 
a. 

-C 
CO 


■5 
> 

s 


a 
E 

' 3 

O 
03 


> 

> 

V 

"c 


■* o 
to 

^1 


> 

= 
CO 


3 




c 


o 

& 

c 


o 
1 

t/ 

Is 




> 


■» 






■s 



248 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



H 
O 

O 



o 

Oi 
CD 
05 



Q 

H 
O 

o 

H 

CQ 
























m 


10 















































a 
o 














c* 


c^ 


• 







000 


000 























,_ 


,_, 










000 


C3 

























»c 


10 


CO CO 


-I- CO 




CO CO OC 


30 OC ^J4 




^r 






■3 -p 

> 














c; 


CI 


00 r* 


»o 




r^ r^ oa 


CO CO -^ 









o 




































eg 














w 


69 


U5 00 • 
CO 


00 CO 




00 00 W3 
CO 


•4*4 -^4 CO 




to 

CO 



























0000 


0000 







00 



























0000 


0000 














ll 






c« 






OC 







CO 00 CJ 00 


••94 CO 




-rji CO 


■^ (M 










CO 






^*« 






CO 40 <» 


CO I-" -"T CO 




CO C-3 


M CO 










»-< 






w 


■^ 




00 C5 00_ 


00 CI ^^ 10 




00 


-^ UO 






^ a 






























o 


w "H 


















^H CO CO '-' 


CO 4-4 t^ 




w 


ca r^ 






















4—4 














fl H 
































HH 






«• 








«A 




•» 



















c 











00000 


0000 


000 











• 














00000 


0000 


000 









2 


«— 1 • 











•-* 


00000 


0000 


000 









u 


!>. 


lO 00 




OC CO 


l>- 


C4 40 c/: c^ »o 


r^ or 00 c^ 


-- CO CD 


OQ CO 






D "t;^ 





t^ CO 




CO 


CO 


CO CO CO_ "5 CO 


ir^ M4 CO OS 


— C^ t- 


CO t^ 






C3 M 






















00 


^-t 


CO ■^ 


■^ 


Tj* -"J* 


(M 


co" t-^ ■«< t- -< 


CO CO -54 OS 


TJ4 00 00 


TJI 






§1 










(N 


•w rt t- 


F-4 1—4 




»o 






























«» 








«<» 


•» 


















^ 











00000 










s '=' 





























•^0000 










*o 











_- 9 






^ 











-^ CO 10 (N 


T)4 


»-4 




C<J CO 




in 






•3^.2 






CO 








CO 


C^ CO c^ 


t-- 00 


C3S 




t^ CO 














CO 








CO 


00 CO CO 00 40 


^ -^ 


(5S 




CO l> 









t- 


fe 3 "rt 
































a -^ « 
















e^ e<i 




U3 








CO 












«» 








M 


«» 


































































s -^ 
















































!l§ 


















C<l 




00 Cfl 











CO 




























r>t 




CO 40 




■^ 






CO 




























<J5 




CO t— 




CO 


















es X Qj 










































o 


3^ s; 


















CO 




Tt<" I- 




t-T 






•* 




























CO 




4—1 4—4 






















1 s «^ 












































rtS 






























































«9 


























































































































Foster 

Home 

Children 




















OS 

















CO TJ4 




























CO 




CO 












00 




























•^ 

















CO 40 








>o 




















•"It" 




CO 












^^ 4-H 






























»» 




























C 


c 


"* 


C^ 


CO 


0000 


CO <= 


^^ -^ 








C 


•^ 


c 


ir: 


00 ■<»■ 


■4»4 


t- 


C^ C<1 






a 


•^f c 


c 


— 


ir 


t^ I-' 


CT> 


00c 


'^ ^ 






<- .2 


■^ aD oc 




CO C<] 


cr- 


<M (M -^ 40 ^ 


00 TT CJ 


CO c 


<£ 






oj ^S 


GO 00 -^ C 


c^ 


t^ X- 


CC 


t^ OS ■<*' t^ 


CO CO c^ 10 


OS OS -"f 


*-• 






> C4 




















■«1< 




C4 CS 


■^ 


4 CO »- 


\r 


t^ CO OC 


CO OS 10 


TJ4 ^J4 ■<* 


" '^" *:: 














c^ CO a* 


CO 




CO 




























•» 






« 


> «» 































































>> b 



















































oj 

















































CO 


Contingen 

Fund 
(Discretion 
Fund) 




















































c 


> c 


> c: 


c: 


CO CJ c 


CI c 


> OC c 









^ 


CD C 


> c 


> c 


cc 


^ ^ CO C 


0000c 


s 4Z) cr 









'i* Oi CO -^ 


■< 


> ec 


> IT 


> t^ CO ira cc 


CO 4io CO CO a 


) 00 c 


■*f »— 






«? -i _ 


CO CO c; "^ 


• -rt 


* «5 u- 


> CC 


) ^- kO CO CO t-- 


— — ■ OS cv 


1 CO »o c- 


CO r^ 






Moo 


C^ 30 I^ 


- cc 


>_ to tt 


S OC 


1 *-i t^ 00 CJ 


00 -^ lo »r 


CO CO cc 


^ 10 




c^ 


-^ 3 


^- Ci" ^ 


1 c^ 


■^ w 


Tt 


00 CO c^ 


r^ CO CO t^ w 


> CO CO t^ 








.S £ 

3 °2 


CO 10 cc 


5 ir 


1 03 a 


' s 


> CO CO — ^ C5 OC 


'•T4 r^ CO t^ 


00 ■■14 IT 


CO CO 






CJ 


C- 


1 


) co_ r- CO 00 CJ 


CO t» CO ^ 


4_ CO •4)4 C4- 


<M 






oa 


*% 






M 




CO 1- 


4 


IT^ 






















! e 














• S 




















CO 






'. -a 








: 1 

1 £ 


TO 






• 




J3 












) 






*-^ 


2 



? 








• c 


a 




>■ -H a 




I & 




■ ^ 

: a 

3 
J3 C 


or 




. 






H 


1 

c 








. C 


1 1 


: a 


1 


c 

) cc 


a 
c 
c 


i c 
1 C 


c 




» c 

id 


C 
C 

C 


D — 

. C 
} CC 

C 




c 

! 1 


3 
> c 


a 

1 


c 


■ 0. 
B 

I a) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



249 







Ift -* 


M t^ 


t^ 1 U3 02 


r- 


e<i 


^. 


»rt 


O) 


•^ 


X 


o: 


M 


« 


o 




■o 


rsi 


OC 


m 


uol 




GO 


a- 


CO c: 


c 


c- 


oc 


cc 


*-( 


■q' 


cc 


cs 


»c 


cc 


O" 


^ ^ r^ o 


e^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO QO 




■a 


G 


■M 


CC 


c^ 


1— ( 


a- 


oc 


«*: 


cc 


r- 


cc 


»c 


o 


cc 


lO h- »r5 oo 


ai 


co 


o 


CO O 




■3 J 


cc 


OC 




-^ 


CC 


oc 


cs 


ir^ 


cs 


»« 


cc 


-r 


cc 


n 


CO cs ^ cs 


cc 


cr 


c 


UO -Tj 






c- 


cr 




IC 


CO ^ 


»C 


tc 


. ^ 


oc 


^ o 


QC 




-M CO C- lO 


ifl 


CO 


CJ 


O Ci 


o 


-2 iL, 








































c^ 


o . 


W3 C 


CO M 


w: 


cr 


1-^ 


oc 


t~ 


u- 


" o- 


' o 


cc 


r^ o c<i o »o 


o 


cc 


CO 


•<*« t^ 




''I 


''t 


i>- i>- oc 


cr 


c^ 


cs 


CJ 


cr 


<M 


lo cr 


cc 


cs 


■^ CO ■— " t^ 


C^ 


•— 


m 


o o 




cs 








CS 






o 


t- 


QC 


CO ^ 


> "^ 


Cfl 


00 -^ CO -^ 


^ 


*c 


•^ 


CO t^ 












































ra 
















—■ 


C< 








' cc 




cs •-< 








t^ 






«» 












M 


«» 






















•3 


















































OS 


Mi 


















































f-H 


°1 






















































cr 




M 


cc 


cs 


^ 


cs 


M 


C^ 


CO QO OC 


cC 


CO o oo »-H 




00 CJ 




o o 












cc 


oc 


rr 


U2 


O 


a 


QC 


^- 


cc 


cs 


r- 


t^ CO O 




•«■ 


CO 


?3 


cs o 




*« 9 


ec 






o 


cc 


ic r^ 


OC 


oc 


CC 


CO 'T 


cc 


lO -- CO Ci 




oo — 


crs cs Irt 




a .2 


cc 




t> 


o 


-^ 


»o cc 


(M 


o 


C] 


■^ 




oc 


O cs •-* OS 




CO c: 


CO 1^ GO 




o ^ 


t^ 






_^ c 


t^ 


CO ix; 


c- 


c^ 


tc 


r* cc 




■f 


^ O0_ lO CM_ 




t^ 


cr 


CO TP Ti* 


00 


"^ C3 












































g s 


t^ 




t^ 


" a- 


^ 


cs 


■^ 


<N 


c- 


a- 


iC 


1-^ 


cc 


•^ 


ca CO 05 




CO c 


tr 


t^ d 1 




cs 










cs 


T-l 


CT 


c 


CS 




"*r 


t^ 




cs i-t 00 




en .- 


•» -cr t- 1 




o -o 


























cs 














1-) 




> W 














































M 














M 


«» 


































*JZ 




o 


•n 


CO 




c 


o 




CD »0 •<*< O 




o 


U5 oo O 




"3 a 










cc 




w: 


m 


CO 




c 


^ 




05 t^ CO »o 




CO 


cs 


o oo 




°l 






«f: 




,_! 




(M 


Si 


cq 




cs 


■^ 




oo CO C5 r* 




ai 


CO ra. CO 1 








oc 




IC 




cs 


IC 


CO 




oc 


rt 




•- 


CO b- Oi 




o> 


<= 


CO »o 


t^ 


■^•s 






cc 




o 




cr 


CO 


cc 




oo o- 




oo n* ^ CO 




•n 




oc 


lo cc 














































O V 










»-l 






c; 


o- 




c^ 








-^ CO rH 










cs »o 




^ "S 








































■* 






















































M 










M 


«» 


~ 
























c: 


-* 


c 


~ 


~ 


Tf 


iC 


■^ 


cs 


oc 




o 




o- 


•^ C5 i-H 




t^ 


C^ CO CO t>. 




- s 




cc 


cc 


o 


oc 


cc 


cc 


(M 


oc 




cc 


QC 


X 


cc 


Oi CO CD 




oc 


CO r- »o oo 




2 S 




r- 


"^ 


o 


Oi 


cc 


■^ 


CO 


&c 


cs 


IC 


oc 


cr 


ec 


t^ CO ■^ 




oc 


CJ 


c 


f, -H 






oc 


TT 


r- 


t^ 


l>. 


t>~ 


CO 


o- 


-T 


oc 


c 


cc 


■•T 


QO »0 HO 




s 


cs 


c^ 


t- t~ 


co 


•S-S 






ur: 


cs 


cc 


uz 


»n 


CCJ 


■^ 


IC 




»— 1 


CD 


-^ 


m ^ o 




oc 


cc 


tr^ 


CO CO 


1-H 












































c8 .^ 
















•^ 




■^ 


^ 


" oc 


' CC 




-* CI OS 




es 


" e^ 


' cq 


« es 




r" " 


















cq 








cs 














CO 




^i2 














































M 














M 


«» 


























o 


o 


o 


o 


~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 




o o o 




o 


o 


c 


o o 




ising 
pals 
nths] 


CS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


G3 


(M 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o o o 




o 


c= 


<= 


o o 




o 


CD 


CD 


CD 


o 


cs 


CS 


C^ 


o 


cs 


cs 


o 


cs 


cs 


O 00 Tp 




es 


o 


■^ 


es oo 




t- 


t>- 


t-^ 


oo 


c^ 


cc 


CM 


GO 


CO 


cc 


c 


-cr 


2C 


-^ 


O Ci -^ 




c^ 


lO 


CI 


uo -^ 


irt 


> r: o 


cs 


CSO 


OC 


t>. 


IC 


cc 


OO 


00 


c^ 


■^ 


UC 


cs 


W3 


■^ 


CO CO o 




•o 


^ 


CO 


t^ 00 


1-H 


U ^ N^ 












































m c S 










▼H 


1-H 




r- 


oc 


CO 


cs 


" O: 


" 1-- 


cs 


CO ^ CO 




es 


ec 


CO 


1-1 CO 




a. -c 


















»-H 








CS 




t-t 










CO 




c^^S 














































M 














M 


69 


























iC 






o 




o 


o 


IC 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o o 




o 


o 


a- 


O CB 












KO 




o 


o 


r- 


o 


o 


o 


'JO 


o 


o 


O -T' o 




o 


CJ 


c- 


O "S" 




s ^ 


»fl 






^H 




o 


Ifl 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


cc 


o 


o 


O 00 o 




o 


in 


t- 


o o 




i § 


t^ 






CD 




o 


r- 




o 


»c 


cs 


en 


^ 


»c 


o cr> »o 




fi 


t^ 


CC 


\n y— 


■<** 


CO 






CO 




oc 


CD 


^ 


05 


. ^ 


. W3 


en 


C^ 


c< 


^ cs ^ 




o 


^ 


oc 


es -^ 




l-S 












































^H 










^. 


^^ 


>o 


■^ 


CO 




tx 


" 00 




tH cs CO 




f^ 


" cc 


" es 


^H es 




















cs 








1—i 




*"* 










CO 






«3 














M 


M 




























CS 




c 


o 


o 


o 




C^ 


lO 


-* 


-rt 






c 


o o o 




o 


c 


a 


o o 




a 


cc 




c 


oc 


o 


QC 




(M 


oc 


oc 


TT 


a 




■n- 


00 oo cs 




^H 


CO 


c 


CO t^ 




•5! .2 
.2 -3 


■rt^ 




cs 


o 


o 


^ 




CO 


03 


lO 


o 


o 


CC 


cs 


■^ o r* 




o 


c 




o -* 




C3 




t^ 


<M 


:t 


o 






C3 


oc 


r^ 


»c 


cr 


a- 


eo CM — H 




Ol 


IC 


cr 


CJ5 CO 


CO 


o rt 


t>. 




»« 


IT 


"rf 


»c 




a 


IC 


cc 


cc 


. ^ 


cc 


cc 


r^ CD OS 




cr 


t~ 


. " 


IO t^ 


^i^ 


<u u 












































P. 3 








•^ 


*— ( 






QC 


IC 


cs 


cc 


t- 


" oc 




^ oo --H 




o- 


" o 


c< 


t^ CO 




O) T3 




















cs 




iC 


■^ 




^ iO 






T-H 




05 




w 


















^ 






^-1 


»-H 




















M 














69 


w» 
























g 


o 








c 




a 


O 


Q 








c 






o 








c 






o 




o 


c 








o 




o 


CT 


c 








c 






o 








c 






o 




_ « 


w; 




o 




•f 






C^ 


oe 














t~ 






oc 


cc 






*— 1 




^ *3 


»c 








c 






r^ 


c 














■* 






t^ 


oc 






oo 


<M 


3 O 

c 


oc 








cc 




»f: 


■^ 


c~ 








o 












cr 


c^ 






cs 




«c 












TT 


o 

CO 


p: 










■ 




lo" 






CO 








s 




M 














<A 


«» 














































































lO 




















































t^ 




- 8 
















































CO 


<— 1 


S -B 
















































IO 




*=l 
















































es" 




















V 




















































B 














i2 




















M 






J3 










a 


03 






J 




1 


^ 
M 















1 






2 




_2 










E- 


W 







r; 




) 'S 








X 










*^ 




c 
c 

b 

c 


-C 


<3 

t i 


1 


c 

c 

s 

c 


r *- 


C 

'5 
a. 

1 




< 


c 




* 

> 

ec 

9 


> 




c 

u. 

c 
c 


J -5 1 


*< 
^ 




_cr 


c 


C 

■c 

q 


_c 


c 
o 

1 

a 

•a 










C 




£ 


a: 






ffi 


^ 
o 




c 


c 


c 


oc 

c 


1 




be 








c 



250 



ANNUAL KEPORT OF THE 



o 

D 

H 
O 

o 



o 

I 

a-. 

C5 



CO 

Q 

W 

CO 

O 






H 
CO 



pq 







o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


■ o 


o 


o 


C5 


o 


: t 


o 


o 1 




o 


o o • 


o o 


o o o o o 


j o o o 


• o 


O) o <o o 


o 


o 




o o • 


o o 


o o o o o 


o o o 


• o 


0*00 


o 


CO 




73 -r 


CD -rr 


CO c= 


TT* o CO cc -<r 












o 


■^ ^ 


03 --. 


CD O O CO UO 


CO CM ■^ 


• r- 


t^ r^ O CD 


CC 


CM 




^ h 


GO CO ■ 


ira t~ 


Ci oo CO O (M 


rj< I^ CO 


• 00 






t- 


1 


h5 S. 

9 




(M T-, 


C<l "* CO -^ 


Tf CO 




CO «-^ ; 




0^ 

lO 




ra 


«» ■ 












«* 


c« 








o o o o 


o o 


o o 


o If:) o 


- o 


o o o o o 


lO 


Irt 








o o o o 


o o • 


o o 


O <M O 


• Oi 


o o> o o o 


CM 


CM 








O ITQ O f 


cr^ -^ 


o «o 


O '-' CO 


• CTi 


1— 1 CO c^ t^ o^ 


Ci 


cr: 




•? .3 




m o <M o 


-^ lo . 


t^ '!?' 






CI cr. 00 o oo 


-^ 














oo CO lO 










Oi 


fe .S 




(M ^:t< Tji 


r- t~- 


CO oc 


(M "^ »« 


• CO 


'-I ^^ iM CM CO 


CO 










(M CO 




CM i-i 






CO 






£^ 




e« 










I CM 

i 
1 ^ 


«■ 






o o o o o 


o o o o o 


o o o 


o o 


o o o o o 


CO 


o 






o o -j^ c; o 


(30000 


o o o 


o o 


o o o- o o 


■^ 


o 




8 S 


O O t^ o o 


o o o o o 


o o o 


■^ o 


o o o o o 


,,_ 


o 




s ° 




CO CO :?^ d (>• 






rr .— • CO CM CT' 








° g 


t- C^ O) O eO 


iO i^ CO lO -^ 


CO CO t^ 


O OO 


O CO t^ o> »o 


CO 


iC 




■o a 


CC' -JD ■^ O C^ 


ei CI -^ r^ o^ 


'^ -Ti lO 


CO — ' 


-^ O CO t-- CC 


o 


CO 








lO ■^ 1-^ lO 


o -^ 




GO 


CC 


ca 
















CI 






€^ 










«» 


*© 






O ■ 


O lO o 


o o 


o o 




o o 


• o 


o o o o o 


W3 


lO 






o • 


o oo o 


o o 


o o 




o o 


• o 


CJ o o o o 


t^ 


CM 




a 
■« -^ .2 


CO 


O -H o 


t^ oo 


o o 




<M CO 


• -rr" 


CO "Tf CO CO CO 


o 


CO 




t-- 


CO *— t »f: 


lO CO 


CI CC 




CD CC 


- CC 


o 'ff t-^ CO r^ 


o 


■rf 






CO • 


*-. *^ CI3 


cr> CO 


CO — 




CO ir. 


■ r^ 


CO CD »0 CM CO 


lO 


CM 


h- 
























a -a ^ 


(M 


(N i-t 


CO CR 


■* 03 




CO -^ 




■^ yi 


!>. 


o 




U "^ -a 






1— < 












05 


lO 


























W 


e© 
















€« 


«» 




o o 












i o 






<-5 


o 
















(-, 


lO 














o 






o> 


o 
















o 


O 




and/ 

xtbo 
ems 












(M 






r^ 


o 
















cq 


CM 






































o 


"2 














(M 






o^ 


CM 
















CM 


Tp 




■« E- g, 






































•ffl 














CO 






CO 


















oo 


o 




«l 












6© 
























«© 


*& 






o o 


• O 




o 


o o 




o 






o 






(3 


o 






o o 


• O 




o 


■ o o 




o 






o 






o 


o 






.-H Ci 


■ CO 




rr> 


• y~* .-» 




CO 












r~ 


»ra 






CO ^ 


• I^ 




uo 


• Ci t- 




CM 






CI 






o 


o 


lO 




O CO 


; co_ 




o 


• CO CO 




CO 






CO 






o_ 






• *4^ 




•^ 


• .-c a 




lO 






lO 






■^ 








■ CO 










»o 












W5 


CO 






^f^ 
























«» 


«^ 






o o to o c 


ws r- o M- o 


o o o 


o c: 


o o o o o 


,^ 


<^i 






O <M W5 C3 C: 


CO ^ o o o 


o o o 


'^ o 


o o o o o 








a 
«- .2 


o CO r^ o <= 


kO CO O CO o 


O -rj^ o 


o c: 


O CM O O O 


CM 


cr. 




CO C^ t^ o o 




CO t^ o 


o cr 


CM CO GO C-1 CM 










■rti 1-t OD -rt* ", 


Ol -rji -*" .rji c 


lO t^ -^ 


CO o 


1— t CO O CO 05 




CO 


-•f 


"C ^ 


CO CO CO C-. C 


OC' CO -^ *M "^ 


lO lO C<1 


(M oc 


-^ oc rj< CO t* 


!>. 


\^ 




Q-§ 












1— < 








T-1 








oo 


o 




1 


€»& 










€« 


CM 
















o 


o 




>, & 












o 






ontingenc 

Fund 
iscrctiona 

Fund) 












o 

CO 

lO 


CO 

CO 
CJ 


CO 












lO 


CI 
















lO 




Q Q 






























e^ 


«« 




1 


^ ^ ^ Q (_ 


) O o o c- cr 


o o ^ 


« CO C 


> -^ O O O o 


CO 


o 




State 

ool 

ad 


O O O O O 


i O O O O c^ 


O O cr 


CO c 


ci o oi ai o 


■<*' 






O t^ CO lO l-' 


c^i 'Tt* cr: »o cc 


O CO O 


CO cv 


CO CM CO CI O 


t^ 


co 






1 -r^ r- CN'S O r- 


o oi cr 


. TT CC 




CM 


oc 




CO CO •-< CO cc 


5 »0 i-H CM lO C- 


i^- lO oc 


CM ■^ 


CM »iO lO C3 CO 




iO 


'M 


0-0 3 


-^ <M »- r- cc 


5 O UO GO CO ^ 


1-^ O "Tf 


^ cr 


J O CO o oo t-- 


I>- 


I— 




•^ " pc, 




3 lO UO O ^^ "^ 


CO CO a 


■ o c 




liO 


oc 




jj CQ « 


CO O f-t CO oc 


3 O CO CO I-- cr 


Tfi -rr c 


i CO a 


i C<l CO t- J^- -^ 








« 




CO O -^ XT. 


CO c 


) 


o> 




oo 
o 












































w 


(U 




S 


1 


m 















■ _c 

c 

'1 








. n 








c • 


— 

o 


C3 

i35 




5 


f 
c 

i 

e 


3 
3 _ 

= 1 

3 tr 




J 6 

N 
3 h^ 


1 ~z 

c 


: 2 

! 2 


1. 2 

> c 
2 


c 
c 

> c 


". 6 


c- 


' c 

■ E 

■ -c 

c 

r- 


a 

c 
c 

r 

c 

p= 


« 1 

ja c 

II 


V. 


c 
*5 

> 


1- 

c 

s. 


' E 

1 


1 


e2 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



251 











1 roocrs»ocr> Qr<:ocrsc:;« 


5 oscOdcoo -^lO-^orc^ c<i 


r* 








■S 


t^ CO <r; C: O CO t- 


- m o T 


•* cicccccioo ocTicoco-^ c; 


r* 








ocr-.cccoTf« -^ioco<M- 


-< M -M cr o C^ C 


1 oo h* CS CD CD 


CD 








a 


»(5 CO O (M OO PC '- 


-' ift CO c 


5 »Oi^O^-r h-'T'^^oc— il-r 


Ci 






"rt 


3 


ira CO lO lO '- 


- to CO o o c 


5 c<i«oc>:r--o -^ooocsotcs 


c» 




o 


-4J 


C£< 






- 














- 








- 






CI 


o 




OiOCOi— (^ noiOCTiCOC 


■3 


H-rt^o^^r^ |ocrsc»csio IkO 








H 


0.1 


r^COOOv-HO t--<MC-'3C^O 


cooococi icocjCioor^ ico 


o 






-<riM^i--o O(:^^ccco^ 


lO ^ 


-1 ■r- 


HCOO O'JCOCOCSrt* I^O 












1— 1 (M '- 


-t 1^ <M CM « 


3 


€»•<** ^1 


o 




t^ 


o" 
















■* 
















"" 




oo 


lO 

d 










«» 


























•» 


«» 










































a: 


1- 


a 
^3 




































o 










































O to ^ CO o 


1 T-H r- o r^ ^ 


■" ClC]i-0»OCI COC<JOOCO ^H 


cc 










:D CO Ci ■<-< 1- 


■1 CO "^ O ^S* I> 


t^CDC50-:Il c>ocD-rco o 


CO 






■« 


a 
,2 


C^ CO CO OS c 


s cr^ -rp -^ <:£> ^ 


3 OOOCC^COCO COCOClCDi- 


■* »— ' 


t^ 






a 


C: O 00 t^ ^ 


1 CO o ^ o c 


^ O-^COt^O CflOC^- 


1 o — 


00 






o 




TP o o •« c 


3 oo O CO CO C 


3 C5 -rs CO -^ i-H <- 


- CD -^ c: >o I oc 


«5 




00 


"^ 


c« 




















- 
















u 


»0 lO o o w 


5 ro" - 


^ t^ QC C- 


i" O CD - 


^ c-; -f 1 CI 00 CM CO o I t- 


CO 








3 


CO CS ^ lO If 


3 CD r- iO c: 


- C3 '- 




^<-iCO COCO'^CICO T-^ 


to 














(M to CO C- 


) 


CD C) 




CM 






o 






> 


s 


€« 


























■^ 
«» 


'^ 
«& 










o o o 


c 


o c 




o c 


5 «0 »0 CO CO C 


3 O G 


3 lo o lO r- 


iC 






"5 


d 


o o o 


o* 


S o o 


>o c 


; CQ r- c- o C 


> O CD t-- to »0 CO 


»o 






c 
o 


o 


c o oo 


e- 


] CO CO 


I^ y- 


■t O 00 cc d "^ 


■* 00 iO CD CM CO UD 


o 






'm 


cc o o 


o 


5 t-- -^ 


c^ c 


5 I- CO -rf — C 


■3 r^ 1^ ,-. I 


- r- 


lO 


r- 




t-- 


"i 


■> 


(M O M 


c£ 


3 i-O t^ 


t^ IT 


3 -r- 


H I^- OC' o c 


3_ O Cl^ CO CI O [ O^ 


»o 






3 


a> 


IC CO CJ 


r- 


CO -* 


o' ^ 


" CO oc o o t- 


CO C^l t^ »c — 


^ C: 


o' 






"oj 








CO >Xi 




■» O" 


3 


-f CO 




»c 




oo 


ct; 






t3 


H 


6^ 






























6I» 












CD to f:D r-l c 


; T-t -) 


• T-. rr. 'S. 


> CO t^ CO cr^ c/ 


t^ »o cr^ -': — 


1 =. 


CO 








(U 


1^ (M O^ I>- C 


> CO t> 


. r~ CO o 


1 t^ '"S^ 1- 


- CO c^ 


> CO CX) lO o »o I t^ 


Ci 






"£ 


> 


oo T-H c^ C5 cy 


1 <M O CD CD C 


> lO CO CO »-o r~ 


OO lO «0 C" 


- f, ^ 


oo 






a> 


dj 


'■rf on '-^ c^ c^ 


) ^ !;D <iD lO -^ 


■" CO CM -- 


- m cc 


CO CO CO iO ^^r TJ« 


lO 




«o 


-C3 


U 


O (M CO CO »- 


■< CO CO en CO r- 


^ "^ CO^ I- 


- -*• u- 


> CJ5 C31 d CO CD CO 


CD 






ca 


J^ 


(M CO 1-" CO ^ 


i Tf. Ci CD r- 


•- 


■« CQ »r3 r- 0^ 


) 1-1 OO oo »0 cq Oi 


oo 






c^ 


c 






CO oo 1- 


- c 




Tf ^ 






oo 




00 


CO 






H 


ra 


e^ 




























CO 










O O CO o c 


o o 


o c 


> O O d 




(- 


O CD O O O 1 CO 


o 






S? m 


■m" 


o o o o c 


o o 


o c 


o o c: 




c 


o o o o c: 


o 


o 






^ p-^ 


-a 








































;s a 


-(J 


O O i-H C^ Cv 


"TJ O 


oc CC 


> O CI -T- 




c 


CO CI -rf CO or 


r* 


CO' 






C 


C:^ 00 CO ■•— C^ 


J CO -Tl' 




'J- 




CI o 


IT 


CO CO O CD C 


t^ 


TT 




»o 




o 


(M CO O U5 ■^ 


^ o 


S o- 


> CO r- -r 




c- 


■^ C^ iC T- 


cc 


C5 


lO 






|.i 


s 


■^ ■^ C^ CO zc 


> (M CO 




' Cv 


ci o ^ 


•rt 


CO CD CO iO ■^ 


b* 


■^ 






a -E 








CM lO 




CS 




-^ c^ 






CO 




CO 


CO 






tg*^ 


(M 


^ 






























CO 












o o Lo o c: 


o o o o c 


CO o o o <= 


O -T) O O CD 


t- 


cr; 










o o o o c 


CD O O O C 


CD CD o CD c; 


CD CJ C3 C3 ir 


t^ 


o 






a> 


-=2 


lO o CO »o ir 


CI lo lo lo c: 


— 


»o *c -^ c 


O CI o »o l> 


d 


o 






a 


3 


Ol O I~- !M I^ 


lO c<j d r- »r 


»-< r- r- lO O 


»0 CO >0 C4 d 


»o 


»o 




-«** 


o 


O CD »0 ^ 1- 


CO 'jc cr. CO cs 


oo lO »0 C71 -n- 


CM O O Oi CI 


CO 


t^ 






s 


ja 




































o 


CO »0 C4 Cs '■S 


CI d »-t «:) <N 


CO CO CO oc 


■-^f oo »o d C] 


c; 








M 






iO CD .- 


TT 




~P 1-H 




CO 
















ft^ 


























c» 


•» 










o o 


CD c: 


o lo o ci c: 


O O O CO c 


o o c o c: 


CO 


Cj 








c 


^ o 


(M -^ 


CI O CD CD ^ 


CO C" 


o to c 


■^ 'JO -r oo c: 


OS 


•^ 






^ 


o 


O ^H 


CO cc 


oo CD CD o cr 


oo o ^r -^ C 


o -^ o CI cr 


CO 


OS 






'-5 


■35 CO 


CO en 


CM O X^ oo C7 


l>. CI O CI cr 


lO CO CO CM cc 


CC 


CO 




CO 


*o 


5S 


r-. Ci 


C<l c^ 


'<*■ CO t-- CO cr 


CD CO CO »— < t^ 


t© C^ CO ^^ G- 


d 


cq 






<y 


o 






































C 


3 


CO C<1 


o r- 


CO CO CO oc 


cc 


a; o c^ 


^ ir 


oc UO oo lO CI 


CO 


*o 






CO 


TS 


(M IM 


cr- - 


1^ iO -^ cC 




CO oc 


c 




CD d CO f- 


o 


OS 








H 








»-« CO 


'— 




40 '- 






'— 






CD 


o 






































CI 


\r> 










«» 




























«» 


«© 








C 












o o o 


~ 




t3 








^ 


^ 


^ 


o 








O 












o c: 


o 


C: 




o 








o 


o 


o 


o 








rt 












r- oc 


CO 


CM 




lO 








oo 


CO 


o 


CO 








-u 












CO '^ 


»-< 






(O 








CO 


Oi 


d 






c^ 


D. 


o 












^^ lO 




lO 




c 










»o 


t* 


»o 






















































Oi 


Q. 












o" c- 


■<}< 


»t 




cc 










r^ 


c- 




00 


C7S 








03 












r- 




c 














C2 




ir: 




f-t 


oo 


















CJ 


















■^ 








'— ' 










H 












** 


























«» 












r* 








^ CO 








b- u" 
















oo 


kO 










c^^ 








CD CI 










oc 


t^ 
















"^ 


oo 








?? 


lO 








C5 u: 










,_ 


cc 
















-^ 


oo 








<u 


•^ 








Ci -^ 










-^ c 
















CO 


Cs 






^ 


-^ 








oo_ c 










CD O- 
















"(f 


■<f 








3 














































PH 


*J 










1-H ■^ 










CO T- 
















■^ 


o 








O) 


«» 




































CM 


CD 






M 

H 






1 






0. 










i 








1 








c 


e 


t 


■■5 

o 






*- » 






3 


Dgton. 
chburg 

t.insvili 




1 


t 


1 


1= 
c 
E 

c 


c 


"to 
o - 

05 c 

•a = 




0. 


a « 


1 

CJ 














J 




g 

J 


s 




c 
H 


t-. 
o 

2 


I 


1 






5 
cc 






'5 

> 




e 


c 







262 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 46— ADMINISTRATIVE AND SERVICE PERSONNEL POSITIONS 

(EQUATED FULL TIME) 



1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


COUNTIES 


Assistant 
Superin- 
tendents 


Other 
Profes- 
sional 
Adminis- 
trative 


Secretaries 

and 

Clerical 


Health 
Service 


Compul- 
sory 

Attend- 
ance 


Pupil 
Transpor- 
tation 
Services 


Food 
Service 


Plant 
Operation 


Plant 
Mainte- 
nance 


Accomack 


1.0 
3.0 


1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.6 


20.2 

29.0 

8.1 

6.6 

3.0 


1.0 

1.5 

.0 

.0 

.0 




77.5 
115.4 
31.0 
28.0 
61.0 




28.0 

40.5 

17.9 

6.5 

.0 


2 6 


Albeni&rle 


2.0 




6 


Alleghany 




4 4 


Amelia 








2 5 










2 














Appomattox 






10.5 

243.0 

30.0 

6.0 

26.0 


1.0 

32.5 

.5 

.0 

1.0 




37.5 
73.0 

121.5 
19.5 

106.5 




9.5 

220.0 

46.0 

7.0 
38.0 




Arlinetou 


4.0 
1.0 


8.0 
.5 




7.5 


74 




.5 


16 


Bath 




1 5 


Bedford 




1.0 






6 5 












Bland 




1.0 
1.1 


3.5 
14.5 
11.0 
17.0 

7.0 


.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 




22.0 
50 3 
66.0 
85.0 
46.5 


1.0 
35 


5.5 
18 8 
21.0 
45.0 

7.5 


1 


Botetourt 




.5 


3 3 






2 






3.0 

1.6 


1.0 


1.0 


7 


BuckiDaham 




3 3 












Campbell 


1.0 
.5 


1.0 


33.1 
9.0 

16.0 
5.5 
6.0 


1.0 
.0 

2.0 
.0 

2.0 




117 
52 
77.0 
24.0 
51.0 




52.0 
8.0 

27.0 
7.0 

21.0 


6 






3.0 


Carroll 


4.0 


3.0 
1.0 
1.0 




3 


Charles City 






1 


Charlotte 




1.0 




3.0 










Chesterfield 


2.0 


7.0 
1.0 


95.0 
8.7 
3.0 

11.5 
2.0 


3.5 
1.0 

.0 
1.0 

.0 




238.0 
14.0 
12.0 
45.5 
27.0 


369.5 


288.5 

9.5 

4.0 

18.5 

4.5 


55 


Clarke 




1.0 


Craig 










Culceoer 




1.0 
1.0 






5.0 










.5 












Dickenson 




2.0 

6.0 

.5 

49.0 
.5 


13.0 

17.0 

4.5 

673.0 

20.0 


.0 

1.0 

.0 

27.0 

2.5 


3.0 


56.0 
90.5 
28.5 
653.0 
82.0 


1.0 


13.0 

27.3 

5.0 

1,002.0 

32.0 


3 5 






3.5 


Essex 




1.0 
4.0 
1.0 




1.0 


Fairfax* 


8.0 
1.0 


56.0 
.5 


347 




16.0 






Flnvd 




2.0 
2.0 


6.5 
10.0 
32.0 
22.5 
19.0 


.0 

.1 

2.0 

3.0 

.0 




39.0 
29.0 
95.0 
54.2 
43.0 




8.5 

8.0 

23.0 

33.0 

19.7 


2.0 










3.0 










4.0 






4.0 

1.3 






2.5 


Giles 








14.4 
















1.0 


20.5 
9.0 
7.0 
3.0 

12.5 


.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 


1.0 


43.0 
39.0 
52.0 
16.0 
47 




11.5 
7.5 

13.0 
5.0 

16.5 


3.0 








4.0 






1.0 






















1.0 


1.0 




6.0 










TTfllifaT 




1.5 
2.0 
8.0 


30.0 

23.5 

112.0 

44.0 

4.0 


.0 
.3 
36.0 
.0 
.0 


1.0 


123.0 

91.0 

201.0 

130.5 

10.0 




44.0 

29.0 

226.0 

104.0 

3.0 


15.5 


Hnnnvpr 




1.0 
4.0 


7.0 




3.6 




127.0 






11.0 










6.3 


.8 












Isle of Wisbt 






8.0 


1.0 




67.0 




19.5 


4.0 


















1.0 


7.0 
5.0 
3.0 


2.0 
.0 
.0 


.5 


28.0 
22.0 
24.8 




9.0 
5.0 
4.0 


1.0 


King and Queen 

King William 


1.0 
1.0 












1.0 














.5 
2.0 
2.0 


6.3 
14.0 
40.5 
14.5 
11.0 


.5 
1.0 
3.0 

.5 
1.0 




33.0 
54.0 
109.0 
49.0 
43.0 


17.0 


4.5 
21.0 
43.5 
11.0 
15.0 


1.0 


I.pe 






7.0 




1.0 
1.0 


1.0 
1.0 




21.0 






3.0 


Lunenburg 


i.6 




2.0 



•Includes Fairfax City. 
tSee Williamsburg City. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



9r^ 



53 



TABLE 46— ADMINISTRATIVE AND SERVICE PERSONNEL POSITIONS 
(EQUATED FULL TIME)— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


COUNTIES 


As!)istant 
Superin- 
tendents 


Other 
Profes- 
sional 
Adminis- 
trative 


Secretaries 

and 

Clerical 


Health 
Service 


Compul- 
sory 

Attend- 
ance 


Pupil 

Tran.ipor- 

tation 

Services 


Food 
Service 


Plant 
Operation 


Plant 

Mainte- 
nance 


Madison 






2.0 
2.0 

21.8 
5.5 

20.0 


.0 
.0 
.0 

:S 




25.0 
19.0 
101.5 
23.0 
60.5 


1.5 


6.5 
6.0 

28.8 
.0 

39.0 


.5 






1.0 

1.0 

.5 

.5 




1.0 


Mecklenburg 




1.0 
1.0 




9.3 


Middlpsex 






8.0 


MoDtgoniery 


1.0 




9.0 










2.0 


1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
.8 
2.0 


31.0 
6.5 
4.5 

12.0 
9.0 


5.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 

1.0 




92.0 
56.0 
25.0 
39.5 
40.0 


1.0 


46.5 
16.0 

4.5 
11.0 

9.5 


6.0 






2.0 


New Kent 






1.0 


6.0 








4.0 


Northumberland 








1.0 














1.0 


11.8 
14.0 
10.4 
4.0 
49.2 


.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
2.2 


1.0 


36.0 
40.0 
32.4 
35.5 
200.1 




14.0 
15.0 
16.0 
7.0 
48.0 


3.1 


Orange 






4.0 


Page 




1.2 








Patrick 








3.5 






3.0 






6.1 












Powhatan 






1.0 
4.5 

20.0 
163.0 

22.5 


.0 

2.0 

1.0 

11.0 

.0 




25.0 
25.8 
75,5 
163.0 
48.0 




7.0 
3.0 

38.0 
162.0 

24.0 




Prince Kdward .... 


1.0 






1.0 

37.0 

1.0 


3.0 


Pr'Dce (ieorge 


.5 
3.0 
1.0 


1.0 
1.5 


5.0 


Prince William 

Puiaski 


3.0 
2.0 


41.0 
7.0 










RappahaDDOck .... 






3.8 

6.0 

51.0 

16.3 

22.1 


.2 
.0 
3.5 
.0 
.0 




19.5 
21.0 

143.0 
37.7 

117.0 




4.0 
5.0 

1.32.0 
17.0 
36.8 


.3 












1.0 




4.0 


3.0 
1.0 

2.1 


1.0 




24.0 






2.0 


Rockingham 






.6 


7.3 










Russell 




1.0 
2.0 
1.0 


18.5 
12.0 
15.0 
14.5 
15.5 


9.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 

2.0 


2.5 
1.0 


67.5 
68.0 
56.0 
39.0 
79.5 




29.5 
23.0 
24.0 
23.0 
21.0 


4.0 


Scott 


1.0 




5.0 


Shenandoah 


68.0 


5.0 


Smyth 






3.0 


Southampton 










3.9 














Spotsylvania 






13.3 

17.8 

4.0 

7.0 

23.0 


1.0 
4.0 
.0 
2.0 
2.3 


1.0 


55.0 
51.0 
19.0 
41.6 
86.5 




20.0 
26.0 
4.0 
19.0 
51.5 


3.0 


Stafford 


1.0 


1.0 
1.0 




6.0 


Surry 






1.0 


Sussex 


1.0 








Tazewell 


1.5 


1.0 


1.0 


6.0 








Warren 






10.1 
31.0 
10.0 
20.0 
12.0 


.8 
3.0 
1.0 
3.4 
1.0 




23.5 
82.9 
43.0 
70.1 
46.0 




18.0 
38.7 
9.0 
46.0 
23.0 


3.5 


Washington 




1.9 




.9 


4.0 


Westmoreland 






2.0 


Wise 




.5 


1.0 


7.0 


11.0 


Wythe 




5.0 














York 


1.0 


.8 


36.0 


7.0 




93.0 


83.5 


46.5 


11.0 








Total Counties. 


45.5 


160.4 


2,591.1 


191.3 


36.5 


6,373 3 


703.3 


3,833.5 


1,048.3 


TOWNS 

Abinffdon 




.0 
.2 


3.7 
1.0 
2.0 
1.5 
3.3 


.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
1.0 




3.6 
.0 

2.0 

.0 

16.3 


.1 


4.3 
1.0 
2.5 
1.0 
8.0 




































.2 






12.5 












Baltville 






2.0 
3.0 


.0 
.0 




.0 
.0 




3.5 
4.5 




West Point 


1.0 


















Total Towns... 


1.2 


.8 


16.5 


1.0 


.0 


21.9 


12.6 


24.8 


.0 



254 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 46— ADMINISTRATIVE AND SERVICE PERSONNEL POSITIONS 
(EQUATED FULL TIME)— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


CITIES 


Assistant 
Superin- 
tendents 


Other 
Profes- 
sional 
Adminis- 
trative 


Secretaries 

and 

Clerical 


Health 
Service 


Compul- 
sory 

Attend- 
ance 


Pupil 
Transpor- 
tation 
Services 


Food 
Service 


Plant 
Operation 


Plant 
Mainte- 
nance 


Alexandria 

Bristol 


1.0 


7.0 
2.0 


136.5 

13.0 

6.0 

29.0 

S4.0 


16.0 

.0 

.0 

3.0 

9.0 


2.0 


12.0 

.0 

.0 

.0 

154.0 


15.0 

4:6 


183.0 

22.0 

.0 

45.0 

154.0 


34.0 
1.0 








5.0 


Charlottesville 


2.0 
2.0 


1.0 
1.0 




19.0 


Chesapeake 




19.0 






Clifton Force 






5.0 
11.0 

7.5 
36.5 

1.0 


.0 
.0 
.5 
.0 
.0 




1.0 
.0 

2.0 
.0 
.0 




5.0 

24.5 

16.0 

70.0 

.0 




Colonial Heichts. 








.5 










4.0 










12.0 


Fairfax* 




















Falls Church 


1.0 




15.5 
7.0 

11.0 

6.0 

108.5 


8.5 

1.0 

3.0 

.0 

12.0 


i.O 

1.0 


4.0 

16.0 

.0 

.2 

72.0 




20.0 

12.0 

20.0 

4.1 

197.0 


4.0 




3.0 


i;6 


2.0 


Fredericksburg .... 




3.0 






1.0 
11.0 


.4 


Hamcton 


3.0 




38.5 












1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
4.0 
.2 


14.5 
23.1 
4.5 
63.5 
22.0 


.0 

2.0 

.0 

12.5 
2.0 




.0 
.0 
.0 
.0 
1.0 




15.5 
46.0 
5.0 
98.0 
36.5 


2.5 


Hooewell 








6.0 


Le'^ington 








1.5 




2.0 
1.0 




4.0 
1.0 


10.0 


Martinsville 




.5 








Newport News 

Norfolk 


2.0 
4.0 


6.0 
25.0 


138.5 

203.3 

3.0 

38.0 

141.0 


23.9 

11.1 

.0 

4.0 

23.8 




235.0 

5.0 

2.0 

.0 

28.0 


5.0 
540.0 


221.0 

372.5 

2.0 

65.0 

202.0 


54.0 




59.0 


Norton 




1.0 


Petersburg 


1.0 
3.0 


1.0 
4.0 


4.0 
12.0 


13.0 


18.0 




31.0 








Radford 


1.0 
6.0 


1.0 

15.0 

9.0 


6.0 
189.0 
107.0 

3.0 
21.5 


.0 

48.0 

6.0 

.0 

2.1 


23^0 

13.8 


.0 

16.0 

1.0 

.0 

.0 


19.0 

9.0 

156.0 


11.0 

353.0 

160.0 

3.0 

24.0 


2.0 




176.0 


Roanoke 


58.0 








Staunton 


1.0 


1.0 






6.0 








Suffolk 






8.2 

129.0 

18.5 

25.5 

11.0 


1.0 
15.0 
1.5 
6.0 
2.0 




.0 

273.0 

.0 

51.0 

.0 


1.0 
5.0 


17.0 
249.0 
17.5 
24.0 
15.9 




Virginia Beach 

Waynesboro . . 


3.0 


7.0 
1.0 
2.0 
1.0 




51.0 




3.0 


WiUiamsburgt 

Winchester 






1.0 


2.5 






2.0 












Total Cities.... 


33.0 


106.2 


1,647.6 


213.9 


66.8 


873.2 


774.0 


2,710.5 


626.4 


Total State. . . . 


79.7 


267.4 


4,255.2 


406.2 


93.3 


7,268.4 


1,489.9 


6,568.8 


1,674.7 



*See Fairfax County, 
tlncludes James City County. 



256 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



TABLE 47— TOTAL INSTRUCTIONAL POSITIONS AND 
ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


COUNTIES 


Principal 

Positions 

Elementaet 


Assistant 

Principal 

Positions 

Elementary 


Principal 
Positions 
Secondabt 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Principal 

Positions 

Combined 

High & Elem. 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Combined 
HioB & Elem. 




No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No 

Pes; 
tioDS 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 

tiODB 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tione 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


Accomack 


8 
!3 
5 
10 
9.0 


$10,217 

11,573 

10,548 

10,685 

8,446 






2 
10 
1.0 


$11,008 
16,529 
13.200 


10 
10 

1 


$ 8.900 

11,949 

9,6S0 


6 
3 


$10,614 
13,248 






Albemarle 






2 


$10,600 


Alleghany 






Amelia 






10 11.760 










Amherst 






2 


11,538 


2 


8,050 
























Appomattox 


2.0 
26 
16 

1.0 
11.0 


9.933 
18,263 
10,342 
10,000 
11,187 






1.0 
3 
5 
10 
3 


12,120 
21,728 
12,296 
9,000 
12,073 


10 

16 

5 


8,856 
16,895 
10,477 


1.0 
7.0 
1 
1.0 


10,000 

20.044 

10,974 

9,960 






ArlinstoD 


2.0 


$15,718 


18 


16,701 




Bath 


10 
2 


8,100 
8,303 






Bedford 


4 


10,920 
















Bland 


















2 
1.0 


11,000 
11,000 






Botetourt 


6.0 
7.0 
6.0 
5.0 


9,844 
9,222 
9,735 
9,360 






2 
2 
5.0 
2.0 


11,900 

12,000 

9.943 

10.800 


1.0 
2 
2 


9,7C0 

10,250 

8,595 


1.0 


8,250 


Brunswick 






Buchanan 


2 


8.738 


2 


9,646 


1.0 


8,983 


Burkincham 




















Campbell 


13 
4.0 
5 
3 

9.0 


10,744 

11,179 

10,002 

9,483 

7,921 


1.0 


7,568 


4 
2 
1.0 


12,430 
11,626 
13,435 


5 

1 

2 
1 
15 


10,638 
9,025 

10,799 
9,800 
9,441 


1.0 
10 
4 
10 


10,225 
11,692 
10,855 
10,200 






Caroline 






Carroll 










Charles City 










Charlotte 






2.0 


11,500 




















Chesterfield 


27 
2 
2 
4.0 
1.0 


12,463 
11,114 
9,008 
10,595 
10,145 


9 
10 


10,603 
7,245 


5 
12 


18,0S0 
13,150 


7 
12 


11.141 

8.667 


8 
10 
1 
1.0 


13,740 

9,510 

10,000 

11,000 


7 


9 693 


Clarke 




Craiff 






dilnpDPr 






14 
1 


12,777 
10,145 


1 4 
10 


10,141 

8,425 


10 


6,600 






















"nipkenson 


5 
8.0 
1.0 
120 
8.0 


10,206 
11,333 
8,741 
16,756 
11,092 






4 
2.0 


11.730 
12.810 


3 
3 


8,867 
11,047 










Dinwiddle 














£)ssex 






2 
18 


10,250 
20,970 






Fairfax* 


25.0 


14.246 


18 
3 


22,878 
15,283 


69.0 
2 


17,624 
10,000 


37.0 


13,848 




















ployd 


3 

5 

11.0 

8 
3 


9,967 
8,505 
9,715 
9,983 
11,602 






10 
2 

2 
1 5 

3 


11,600 
10,139 
11,470 
13,640 
12.073 


1.0 


10,100 






























2 

1 5 

2 


8.972 
11,988 
10,980 


10 
2 


10,940 
11,753 


1 

2 


10,100 








10,555 


Giles 
























3 
5 
2 
1.0 
5.0 


9,650 
9.900 
7,870 
9,500 
9,474 






10 
2 


12,000 
11,500 






10 


10,800 












2 


8,288 












3 


9,441 


2 


8,950 








1.0 
2.0 


9,500 
11.250 








Greensville 






2.0 


5,911 











'laclndes Fairfax City. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



257 



AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARIES— PRINCIPALS, 
VISITING TEACHERS, AND TEACHERS 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


Instructional 

sopervisort 

Positions 


Visiting 
Teacher 
Positions 


Element ART 
Teaching 
Positions 


Secondary 
Teaching 
Positions 


All 
Teaching 
Positions 


All 

Ingtructional 

Positions 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


4 

5 
1 


« 9.714 

9,241 

12,500 

10,106 

9,900 


1.0 
2.0 


? 8,508 
10,503 


176 

251 

76 2 

52 

120 


5 6,783 
7,006 
7,063 
7,044 
6,922 


134 

161 

50 4 

37 

85 


% 7,343 
8.432 

7,777 
7,118 
7,202 


310 
412 
126 6 
89 
205 


$ 7,025 
7,564 
7,347 
7,074 
7,038 


332 
439 
134 6 
92 5 
222 


$ 7,233 
7,798 
7,565 


1 5 






7,213 


3 


1.0 


9,000 


7.192 


3 


9,772 
18,291 
10,284 
10,000 
12,425 






55 


7,099 
10,769 
7,102 
7,400 
5,610 


45 
607 5 
212 5 

28 
142 


7,805 
10,917 
7,770 
6,859 
6.630 


100 

1,400 8 

473 5 

56 

359 


7,417 
10,833 
7,402 
7,130 
6,014 


108 

1.512.3 

510 5 

61 

384 


7.609 


30 5 
9.0 
1 


9.0 
10 


14,308 
9,420 


793 

261 

28 

217 


3 





11.337 
7,634 
7,317 


4.0 


10 


12,500 


6,356 










25 5 
112 
110 
233 

74.0 


6,579 
6,797 
7,195 
6,480 
6,463 


25 5 

80 

79 

173 

51.5 


6,697 
7,560 
7,525 
7,519 
7.645 


51 
192 
189 
406 
125 5 


6.638 
7.115 
7.333 
6,923 
6,948 


53.0 
205 
204 
428 
134 5 


6,802 


2 


10,750 

10,083 

9,800 

9,000 






7,314 


4 






7,526 


3 

2 


1.0 


10,200 


7,059 
7,125 










6 
2 5 


11,325 
11,113 
12,413 
9,400 
10,717 


10 


10,000 


254 
85 

118 
47 
89 


6,846 
7,042 
6,491 
6,573 
6,678 


191 
65 

111 
35 
56 


7,305 
7,515 
7,598 
7,082 

7,764 


445 
150 
229 
82 
145 


7,043 
7.247 
7,028 
6,790 
7,098 


476 

160 5 
249 

89 

161 5 


7,296 

7,498 


7 
10 
3 


10 
1 
10 


9.222 

7,750 

11,000 


7,365 
6,993 
7.311 


24 

1 

2 
2 
1.0 


10,322 
13,787 

9.139 
12.250 

9,214 


3 
1.0 

10 
1.0 


10,810 
2,380 

9,460 
8,775 


890 
44 
18 

116 
40 


7,049 
7.273 
5.313 
6,693 
7,105 


636 
38 
14 
71 
30 


7,934 
8,443 
7,830 
7,676 
7,066 


1,526 

82 

32 

187 

70 


7,418 
7,815 
6.414 
7.066 
7,088 


1,616 

90 4 

37 

198 8 

75 


7,660 
7,989 
6,798 
7,281 
7.239 


2 
4.0 


13.826 
12,040 


1 
1.0 


11,500 
10,100 


106 2 

150 

38 

3,414 

179.0 


6,429 
7,698 
7,644 
9,729 
7,084 


99 6 

95 

41 

2,583 

134 


7,508 
8,029 
7,282 
10,607 
7,598 


205 8 

245 

79 

5.597 

313 


6,951 
7,827 
7,456 
10,107 
7.304 


220 8 

263 

82 

6.372 

331 


7.220 
8.081 
7.540 


70 
4 


17,074 
13.100 


18 
10 


13,790 
9,400 


10.506 
7.561 


2 
1 


11,150 

10,937 
10,217 
10.956 
12,530 


1.0 


8,334 


44 

55 

160 5 

185 

109 


6,874 
6.506 
6,553 
6,870 
7,527 


42 

39 

113 

112 

90 


7,599 
7,320 
7,360 
7,715 
7,904 


86 

94 

273 5 

297 

199 


7.228 
6.844 
6,886 
7,189 
7,697 


94 
102 
297 
317 
210 


7.487 
7,030 


4 5 
4 
2 


2 
10 
10 


7,201 

9,870 

10,450 


7,113 
7.418 
7.906 


1 
1 


13.000 

9,500 

9,485 

11,100 

11,675 


10 


8,000 


76 
79 
66 


7.272 
6.357 
6,349 
6,320 
7.062 


63 
43 
38 
18.6 
1 81.0 


7.016 
7.038 
7.271 
6.745 
7,189 


139 
122 
104 
49 
173.0 


7,156 
6.597 
6,686 
6,481 
7.121 


146 
132 
116.0 
53.0 
184 


7.311 
6.844 


5 






6,937 


1.0 
2 


1.0 



9,800 


3C 

62 


6 



6.745 
7,266 



258 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 47— TOTAL INSTRUCTIONAL POSITIONS AND 
ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


COUNTIES 


Principal 

Positions 

Elementaky 


Assistant 

Principal 

Positions 

Elementary 


Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Principal 

Positions 

Combined 

High & Elem. 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Combined 
High <fe Elem. 




No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Averagp 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


Halifax 


14 
13.0 
29 
22 


$ 8,587 
10,705 
12,806 
10,425 






2 
4.0 

3 
4.0 
1.0 


113,250 
11,834 
16,217 
13,082 
11,000 


6 
4.0 
6 
4.0 


J 7,304 
10,975 
12,499 
11,757 










Hanover 














Henrico 


7 
2.0 


310,006 
8,750 


6.0 


115,192 


15.0 


SIO 438 






































Isle of Wight 


4 


10,425 


2,0 


8,250 


1.0 


10,254 


10 


8,250 


1 


12,500 


1.0 


9 200 








10 
2 
10 


12,401 

9,217 

11,200 






1 
10 
1.0 


10,083 
10,500 
11,. 500 


1.0 


10,650 










King and Queen 

King William 
















































T,anrastpr 


2 
6 
20 
4 
4 


9,500 
9,072 
9,854 
9,485 
9,745 






1.0 
3 
3 
2,0 
2 


11,200 
10,748 
15,551 
10,240 
10,6.50 






1.0 
5 


11,000 
11,082 


























6 
1.0 
2 


13,201 
8,016 
9,858 


















































3 
10 
13.0 
2 5 
7.0 


9,193 
7,916 
8,617 
9,097 
11,571 






10 
1.0 
4 
10 
2 


10,800 
11,200 
11,480 
11,000 
13,613 










1.0 


9,500 












10 


9,600 










6.0 


7,754 


























2 


10,815 


2 


12,062 


2 


8,864 












14 
5 
10 
5 
5 


9,726 
8,227 
10,950 
9,755 
9,045 






3 
1.0 
10 
2.0 
2 


12,245 
11,023 
10,960 
10,270 
11,750 


4 
10 
1.0 
2 
1.0 


9,849 
8,230 
10,000 
7,737 
7,273 


10 
1.0 


10,401 
9,923 


10 


9,450 












1,0 


7,640 
















Northumberland 




























4 
6.0 
5.0 
10 
19 


9,084 
10,445 
10,348 

8,670 
11,036 






10 

1 

2 


11,664 
13,588 
12,525 






2 


12,960 












10 
2 
1.0 
9.0 


9,406 

9,989 

8,370 

10,709 




















Patripk 


10 


8,100 


6 
1.0 


9,898 
13,200 








5.0 


13,140 


2 


9,950 












10 
3 
6 

24 
10 


11,000 
8,708 
13,242 
15,650 
10,891 














10 
1.0 


12,500 
0,379 


10 
1.0 


9,068 
















8,000 




10 
10 


12,287 
13,100 


2.0 
4 
2 


14,005 
18,011 
13,496 


4.0 
9 
2 


12,630 
12,124 
11,063 




Prinop William 


7 


17,288 


11 


11,711 


Pulaski 




















1 
3.0 

23 
9.0 

13 


10,700 
9,576 
13,404 
11,556 
11,027 






10 
10 
5 
2 5 
2 


11,000 
10,557 
15,061 
11,348 
11,905 
























1 
5.0 


11,523 
14,315 












8.0 
2.5 
2 


12,486 
11,132 

8,626 


5 


12,137 










Rockingham 






4.0 


12,033 


2 


8,505 



•See Williamsburg City. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



259 



AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARIES— PRINCIPALS, 
VISITING TEACHERS, AND TEACHERS— Continued 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


Instructional 

Supervisory 

Positions 


Visiting 
Teacher 
Positions 


Elementary 
Teaching 
Positions 


Secondary 
Teaching 
Positions 


All 
Teaching 
Positions 


All 

Instructional 
Positions 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 

Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


7 

3 

20 

6 


S 9,437 
12,575 
13,345 
11,204 


1.0 
1.0 

7.0 
13 


$ 8,750 
10.292 
11,055 
10,462 


205 
223 
929 
295 
18.0 


S 6,412 
7,207 
7,736 
7,028 
6,455 


180 
168.0 
705 
223 
14 


$ 6,909 
7,409 
8,323 
7,921 
7,012 


385.0 

391 

1,634 

518 

32 


$ 6,644 
7,320 
7,989 
7,413 
6,699 


415 

416 
1,733 

567.3 
33.0 


•S 6,766 
7,649 
8,247 
7,656 
6,829 












3 


11,423 


1 


9, too 


133.6 


7,012 


80.0 


7,297 


213.6 


7,119 


227.6 


7,307 


1 


14,042 
12,250 
10,500 






64.0 
34 
39.0 


6,664 
6,930 
6,994 


42.0 
19.0 
26.0 


0,970 
7,523 
7,648 


96 

63 

64 


6,798 
7,143 
7,210 


100 
56.8 
66 9 


6,998 


.3 

.4 


.5 
.5 


6,650 
6,650 


7,297 
7,350 


1 


12,500 
11,608 
13,103 
10,017 
11,000 






54 

156 

258.0 

92 

76.3 


7,198 
0,852 
6,245 
6,61-2 
6,735 


40.0 

128.0 

188 

59.0 

60 5 


7,130 
7,137 

6,972 
7,164 
7,136 


94 
284 
446.0 
151 
136.8 


7,169 
6,980 
6,552 
6,877 
6,912 


99 
302 
481 
161 
145 8 


7,350 


3 5 
6 


.5 


9,342 


7,185 
6,910 


3 






7,049 


1 






7,110 










2 


9,5S3 






53 
38.0 

213 5 
39 

205 6 


6,074 
6,218 
6,593 
6,678 
7,024 


34 
29,0 

141.0 
31.0 

145 


7,288 
8,785 
7,274 
7,286 
7,914 


87.0 
67.0 

354 5 
70 

350.6 


6,548 
7,329 
6,864 
6,947 
7,392 


94.0 
70 

380 5 
74 5 

373.6 


6,774 








7,425 


3 


10,9S0 

6,500 

11,186 






7,019 


1 






7,068 


7.0 


1.0 


12,656 


7,640 


8 


11,080 
5,073 






261.0 
77.0 
36.0 
80 
56 


6,990 
6,402 
6,815 
6,785 
6,539 


177.0 
52 
24 
61 5 
46.0 


7,050 
7,376 
6,980 
6,996 
7,260 


438,0 
129.0 
60.0 
141 5 
102.0 


7,014 
6,795 
6,881 
6,876 
6,864 


469 
139 
64 
162 5 
110 


7,235 


1.0 


1.0 


8,623 


6,914 
7,067 


2 


9,438 






7,060 








7,056 












1.0 

2 7 


12,096 
12,528 
10,599 
9,529 
12,015 


1.0 


12,096 


92 
101 
100 

81.0 
389.0 


7,361 
7,041 
6,806 
6,750 
6,969 


72 
62 
64 
59.0 
287.0 


7,623 
7,516 
7,159 
7,310 
7,402 


164 
163.0 
104 
140.0 
676.0 


7,476 
7,222 
6,944 
6,986 
7,153 


173 
173 7 
177 
153.0 
730 


7,664 
7,465 


3.0 

3.0 

16 


10 
10 
2 


11,230 
10,565 
12,210 


7,223 
7,200 
7,475 


1 


6,339 
10,150 
13,282 
14,319 
13,010 






38,0 

46 

142.5 

704 

170 


7,897 
6,795 
7,377 
7,984 
7,035 


35 

33 

98.0 

568.0 

114 6 


7,312 

7,239 
7,782 
8,641 
7,700 


73 
79 

240 5 
1,362.0 

284 5 


7,617 
6,980 
7,542 
8,216 
7,302 


77 
86 

256 5 
1,442 

302.0 


7,726 


10 


1.0 


8,650 


7,102 
7,891 


23.0 
2 5 


10 
10 


14,209 
10,020 


8,667 
7,546 


1.2 
1 


9,745 
11,250 

14,794 
12,650 
12,510 


.3 


8,917 


32.0 

39 

547 

120.0 

283 5 


6,658 
6,868 
7,633 
7,292 
6,717 


18 
33.5 

379 
79.6 

180 5 


7,125 

7,567 
7,844 
7,727 
7,734 


50 

72.6 

926 

199 5 

464 


6,827 
7,191 
7,720 
7,466 
7,113 


63.6 

78.6 
986.0 
216.5 
494.8 


7,065 
7,432 


11.0 
2 
6 


2.0 
1.0 
1.8 


13,781 
7,750 
9,753 


8,075 
7,772 
7,361 



260 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



TABLE 47— TOTAL INSTRUCTIONAL POSITIONS AND 
ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


COUNTIES 


Principal 

Positions 

Elementart 


Assistant 

Principal 

Positions 

Elementary 


Principal 
Positions 
Secondari 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Principal 

Positions 

Combined 

High & Elem. 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Combined 
High & Elem. 




No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 

Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 

Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


Russell 


6.0 
9 

6 
7.0 

7 


$ 9,950 

8,332 

10,550 

10,143 

8,975 






4 

3 

4 
2 
2 


$11,310 
10.492 
12.050 
13.367 
10.550 


2 

3 

4 
2 
2 


$ 8,400 
7.471 
6,550 
8,575 
8,689 


10 
4.0 


.?1 1,580 
11,773 


2 




Scott 


1.0 


$ 6,417 


$ 6,733 


ShenaDdoah 




Smjrtb 






3 


12,100 


10 


11,455 


SoutbamptoD 


10 


8,300 
















6 
6 
10 
7.0 
15 


10,353 
11,876 
10,180 
10,681 
9,262 


10 


9,161 


2 
1.0 


13,084 
13,663 


2 

1.0 


8,795 
11,897 










Stafford 


2 

1 

2 

3 


12,631 

8,920 

10,690 

10,997 


2 


7,791 


Surry 








Sussex 






10 
5 


11,480 
11,259 












10 


6,645 


3 


9,240 












Warren 


3 
13 
4.0 
7.0 
S 


11.200 

10,307 

9,931 

9,976 

10,053 


1.0 


9,692 


10 

4 5 
2 

5 
2 


12,800 
12.902 
9,119 
10,966 
12,150 


10 
4 5 


11,475 
9,429 


10 


12,300 


10 


10,069 


Wafhimrton . ... 




Westmoreland 














Wise 






10 
2 


9,340 
9,736 


2 
2 


10,643 
11,440 






Wythe 






1 


8,970 










York 


7.0 


12,525 






10 


15,210 


2 


11,297 


3 


13,487 


3 


11,184 










Total Counties 


789.5 


$11,838 


63 


$11,513 


206 1 


$13,404 


262 6 


$12,491 


139 


$13,587 


124 


$12,210 


TOWNS 


1.0 


$11,159 






.5 


$11,523 


.5 


$ 8,722 










Cane Charles . . 






1 
1 
10 


$10,000 
13.500 
10,200 






































■ 














10 


12.122 






10 


13,398 


10 


11,427 




















Saltville 


10 
10 


11,100 
11,700 














10 


14,400 












10 


12,200 






























4.0 


Jl 1,520 






2 5 


$12,544 


1.5 


110,525 


4.0 


$12,025 

















SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



261 



AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARIES— PRINCIPALS, 
VISITING TEACHERS, AND TEACHERS— Continxjed 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


Instructional 


Visiting 


Element ART 


Second ART 


All 


All 


Sdpervibory 


Teacher 


Tbachino 


Tbachino 


Teaching 


Instructional 


Posm 


ONB 


POBIT 


IONS 


Positions 


Positions 


Positions 


Positions 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



3 
2 3 
2.0 
3.0 
2 3 



$10,833 

12,435 

11,700 

13,167 

9,913 



3.0 
2.0 



3 
5.0 



2.8 

3 
2 

4 

5 



5 



436 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



11,467 
12,290 



11,828 
9,454 



11,629 
12,433 
10,409 
12,506 
11,406 



13,616 



$12,979 



6.203 



8,750 



S 8,113 






No. 
Posi- 
tions 



1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



1.0 



.7 
10 
10 
2 
1.0 



10 



93 6 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$ 1,724 

10,122 

9,300 

12,500 



8,416 



11,464 
7,225 
9,513 
8,900 

10,740 



10,490 



$11,071 



No. 

Posi- 

tiooa 



175 
156 
127 5 
168 
131.5 



110 

165 

37 

87 

285.5 



90 
231.5 

69 
248 
119 



206 



18,076 2 



29 

7 
13 8 

8 
31.0 



17 
23 

12S 8 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



6,276 
5.676 
6,761 
6,584 
6,961 



7,196 
6,945 
6,604 
7,245 
6,642 



6,907 
6,551 
6,725 
6,101 
6,400 



7,745 



$ 7,665 



$ 7,143 
7,876 
6,181 
6,253 
7,377 



6,573 
6,901 

$ 6,963 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



117.0 
115 
103 
124 
70 



70 

106.0 

19.4 

61.0 

214 5 



55 
170 9 

49 
183 
122.0 



175 



13,260 3 



21 6 
9 
12 2 
18 
27.0 



28.0 
21 

136 8 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



% 7,306 
7,217 
7,344 
7,441 
7,184 



7.751 
7,337 
6,456 
7,348 
7,421 



7,103 
7,146 
7,108 
7,152 
7.362 



8.014 



$ 8,327 



S 7,241 
6,630 
7,540 
7,250 
7,830 



8,056 
7,466 

S 7,646 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



292 
271 
230 5 
292 
201.5 



180 
271 
56.4 
148 
500 



145 
402.4 
118 
431 
241 



381. 



31,336 5 



50 6 
16 
26 
26.0 
58 



45 
44 

265.6 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$ 6,688 
6,330 
7,021 

6,948 
7.038 



7,411 
7,098 
6,553 

7,287 
6,976 



6,981 
6,804 
6,884 
6,547 
6.887 



7.S69 



$ 7.945 



$ 7.185 
7.175 
6.819 
6,943 
7,588 



7.496 
7,171 

i 7.263 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



309 
296.3 
247 5 
311 
215 8 



194 

286 

58.4 

161 

532.0 



156 5 

428.4 
127 
452 
259.0 



403.0 



33,450 3 



52 6 
17 1 
27 
27 
61 



47 
46 3 

278 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



% 6,863 
6,581 
7,227 
7.214 
7.185 



7.647 
7.323 
6.656 

7,588 
7.139 



7.302 
7,042 
7,091 
6,737 
7.156 



8,129 



i 8.227 



7.316 
7,335 
7,066 
7,064 
7,820 



7,720 
7.387 

i 7,459 



262 



ANUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 47— TOTAL INSTRUCTIONAL POSITIONS AND 
ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS, SUPERVISORS, 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


t 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


CITIES 


Principal 

Positions 

Elementary 


Assistant 

phincipal 

Positions 

Elementary 


Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Secondary 


Principal 

Positions 

Combined 

HiQH & Elem. 


Assistant 
Principal 
Positions 
Combined 
High & Elem. 




No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


No. 
Posi- 
tions 


Average 
Annual 
Salary 


Alexandria 


14 
5 
2 
7 

20 


117,532 
10,464 
11,600 
13,427 
12,181 


10 
5 


$15,374 
6,739 


2 
1 
1 
1 
5 


$20,581 
12.400 
11,200 
15,750 
14,380 


10 
15 

1 

2 
5 


$16,2.33 

10,032 

8,250 

12,000 

11,515 


4 
10 


$16,978 
11,018 


4 
1 


$15,496 
8,650 


Bristol 


Buena Vista 


Charlottesville 






3 

8 


13,296 
12,769 


2 
6 


12 056 


Chesapeake 


10 


9,586 


11,450 




Clifton Forge 


2 

3 
3 

11 


9,500 
10,432 
10,967 
10,555 






1 
10 

1 

2 


11.010 
12,0;i6 
13,060 
12,500 


10 
10 
10 
3 


9,450 
10,164 
10,499 
10,367 










Colonial Heights 






10 


10.584 


1 


9 828 


Covington 









Danville 






4 


10,650 






Fairfax* 




































Falls Church 


3 
2 
2 
1 
28-0 


16,548 
10,830 
12,718 
10,800 
13,707 














10 


17,808 


10 


16 044 


I^rankJin 







2 
1 
10 
4 


11,750 
13, SSI 
11,200 
15,350 


2 
1 

1 U 
SO 


9,836 

9,701 

8,168 

10,859 






2 


8,075 


10 


12,708 


10 


7 005 


Galax 




Hampton 






7 


14,703 


13.0 


10,299 










3 
5 
2 
16 
5 


12,144 
11,014 
12,500 
12,722 
12,993 






1 2 
10 

.5 

2 
10 


12,846 
14,820 
13,6.50 
14,853 
15,443 


1 

1,0 

5 

5 

2 


11,214 
11,220 
10,000 
11,751 
13,100 


1 

2 


12,435 
12,740 


1 
1 


9 744 


Hopewell 


11 020 


Lexington 








Lynchburg 


1 


8,221 


4 
1 


13.258 
14.040 


7.0 
1 


11 678 




12 000 










Newport News 


29 
52 


13,727 
13,922 


3 


11,967 


6 
6 
5 
2 
4 


15,116 

17,923 

9,167 

14,111 

15,158 


14 

12 

.5 

4 

7 


13,676 
13,708 
12,333 
12,757 
12,695 










Norfolk 


11 


15,498 


8.0 


13 528 










Petersburg 


9 
24 


13,171 
12,891 


5 
2 


11,721 

8,078 










Portsmouth 


4 


14,706 


7 


9,338 






Radford 


3 
39 
26 

2 

4 


11,033 
13,434 
13,195 
10,125 
11,350 






1 

7 

10 


12,400 
17,416 
14,506 


1 
14 
20 


9,450 
14,004 
12,289 












8 


10,778 


12 


16,045 


13 


12,683 


Roanoke 




South Boston 














Staunton 


1 


10,500 


1 


14,000 


2 


11,550 


2 


12,000 


2 


9,900 






Suffolk 


2 
36 
6 
4.0 
4 


10,150 
12,888 
11,590 
11,795 
11,584 






10 

9 
10 
2 


10,687 
16,497 
14,300 
13,702 






1 
1 
1 


10,850 
13,290 
13,604 






Virginia Beach 

Wavnpsboro 


2 


11,185 


18 
1 
3 


13,409 

12,499 
12,146 


2 
2 


11,333 
12,346 


WiliianiRhurfft 


1 


11,098 






1 


14,120 


10 


12,344 


















Total Cities 


374 


$13,094 


36 5 


$11,833 


79.2 


$15,054 


143 5 


J12,779 


71 


$14,230 


74 


$11,712 


Total State 


1,167.5 


r.2,239 


99 5 


«1 1,630 


287,8 


113,851 


407 6 


$12,585 


214,0 


$13,771 


198 


$12,024 



•See Fairfax County. 
tincludes James City County. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



263 



AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARIES— PRINCIPALS, 
VISITING TEACHERS, AND TEACHERS— Continued 



14 


15 


IG 17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


Instructional 


Visiting 


Elementary 


Secondary 


All 


All 


Supervisory 


Teacher 


Teaching 


Teaching 


Teaching 


Instructional 


Posit 


ONS 


Positions 


Positions 


Positions 


Positions 


Positions 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



23 
1 
10 
1 

21 5 



2 
2 
5 



Average 
Annual 

Salary 



S15,2')l 

12,212 

9,740 

13,100 

13,039 



11,490 
12,590 
12,5S3 



No. 

Posi- 

tioES 



10 
1 



4.0 
4 



10 



3 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$:6,421 
9,224 



6,948 
10,901 



8,480 



8,716 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



579 
109 
39 
225 
624 



33 

89 

07 

269.5 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$ 9,566 
6,774 
6,884 
7,366 

7,772 



7,013 
7,377 
7,924 

7,588 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



398.0 

66 

29.0 

142 

473 



27 

70 

44 

211 5 



Average 
Annual 

Salary 



S10,616 

8,138 
6,993 
9,247 
8,120 



7,373 

7,863 
7,839 
7,709 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



977 

175 

68 

367 

1,097 



60 
159 
111 

481.0 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$ 9,994 
7,288 
6,931 
8,094 
7,922 



7,175 
7,591 
7,890 
7,641 



No. 
Posi- 
tions 



1,045 

187.0 

73 

387 

1,167.5 



64 
169.0 
118 
509.0 



Average 
Annual 
Salary 



$10,401 

7,485 
7,174 
8,297 
8,196 



7,343 

7,766 
8,119 
7,818 



1.6 
3 



11,332 

10,785 



18 5 



12,583 



2 
5 



11,307 

10,822 



10 
7 



14,216 
10,007 



23 
47 
10 
12 
43 



13,974 
14,749 
8,121 
13,381 
11,336 



2 

29 
18 



10,423 
14,712 
12,611 



20 13,100 



3.0 
26 
2.0 
4 
2 



317.6 



754.0 



9,667 
16,770 
11,487 
12,443 
10,688 



$13,479 



$13,187 



1 



10,051 



6 



8,975 



64 
64 
SO 
32 
911 



10,177 
7,289 
7,541 
6,998 
7,536 



64 
49 
62 
42 9 
610 



11,095 

7,848 
7,935 
V,666 
7,855 



128 

113 

142 

74.9 

1,521 



10,636 
7,531 
7,713 
7,381 
7,664 



133.0 

120 6 

154 

77.9 

1,605 5 



1 
1 



10,836 
11,270 



3 
1.0 



11,333 
10,000 



89.0 
140 

37 
359.2 
130 



7,742 
8,023 
7,630 
8,589 
7,869 



64 
116 

24 
263 

99.0 



8,025 
8,555 
7,940 
8,357 
8,287 



153 
256 
61 
622 2 
229.0 



7,860 
8,264 
7,752 
8,491 
8,050 



163 2 
272 
64 
670 2 
247 



10,864 
7,745 
7,939 
7,484 
7,918 

8,096 
8,451 
7,964 
8,795 
8,. 324 



8 
18.0 



9,916 
12,307 



2.0 
6 



10,725 
10,375 



827 
,635 5 
32 
229 
692 



8,112 
8,580 
7,310 
8,319 
7,769 



,577.0 

,091 5 

23 

186 

464 



8,668 
9,044 
7,555 
8,839 
8,345 



19 
6 



1.0 



11 
2 
1.0 



101 



194.6 



9,395 

8,744 



6,283 



6,811 
10,213 
10,400 



% 9,794 



$10,409 



52.0 

1,349 

530 9 

48.0 

137 



63 

1,135 

118 

140 

83 



11,012.1 



29,217.1 



8,019 
8,196 
7,870 
6,902 
7,843 



41 
796 
383.0 



8,870 
8,510 
9,235 



105 



7,057 
7,702 
7,940 
7,667 
7,790 



$ 8,054 



$ 7,808 



48 3 

741 

105 

85 5 

65 



7,565 7 



20,962.8 



8,228 



7,374 
8,512 
8,231 
8,503 

8,242 



$ 8,639 



$ 8,435 



1,404 

2,727 

55 

415 

1,156 



8,341 
8,766 
7,412 
8,552 
8,000 



1,487.0 

2,881 

57 

449 

1,253.0 



8,626 
9,057 
7,483 
8,881 
8,298 



93 

2,145 

913.9 

48.0 
242 



111 3 
1,876 
223 
225.5 
148 



18,577 8 



50,179.9 



8,394 
8,313 
8,442 
6,902 
8,010 



100 

2,2S6 

993.9 

50 

257 



8,565 
8,627 
8,782 
7,030 
8,201 



7,195 
8,022 
8,077 
7,984 
7,989 



i 8,292 



$ 8,070 



118 3 
,981 
238 
240.5 
156 



19,774.6 



53,502.9 



7,368 
8,315 
8,316 
8,244 
8,183 



$ 8,574 



$ 8,351 



264 



ANNUAL REPORT OP THE 



OS 



CO 

Pi 
w 

W 

o 

w 

H 
&, 

o 

Pi 
w 
pa 

I 

00 



00 



CO 



lO 



CO 



(N 



o 

H 

o 

Q 
W 
H 

t> 
Q 



CO 

^A 
O 
O 
K 
u 

Q 

S 



CO 

O 

o 

a 



o 

Pi 



O 

H 



03 o3 



03 

a 

o 



08 

o 



I 

a 
o 
o 

CO 












o 



c 
o 

o 
a> 
02 



03 



a 
E - 



■(J 



W 



OS 

I— I 

H 
O 

o 



cot^c^j coco 



CO CO ■^ <-! 05 
I— t ^H rH 

(M 



COtXN COrH 



COC^ 



i^ 



lO ■* ■^ lO >— ' 



00cO>O 



lO 



(M lOOO 



OCO 






COOOiO 



00(N CO 

o 



CO-*"? 



Tt^ iCiCO 
CI 



CO 



CO 



CO 



'^(M 



CO 



00 -lO 



^ COM ■* 



CO 



<-H>(N UO 



OcO 



C5 

CO 



OiMOOl CO 
^ -<(N00O 
CO '^ --I IM 



O lO lO CO Oi 

o ■5; t^ >o O 

t— t 'T ^ CO 



c^ c^ S 52'=^ 

lOOiOO 0(M 

T— I r— I T^ rH 



^ ^ CI t^ CO 
CO O lO CO 00 



CO -H r^ (M o 

r-l(M rH 



LO "* -^ 00 (M 
CO(M rH 



COOOICOIM 
(M 00 I>1^ 10 



o 



00 



00 



lOCOOO 

T-l r-H CO 



ic -co 



CO(N 

T-HCO 



■^ lOCl 00 •* 

T}< rt d "-I 



»— t lO rH 10 CO 

05 CO >— 1 CO o 



lO -H rH 00 t-- 

10 CI CO iM —I 
OOCl CI 



coo OCO ■* 

d rH rH CO r- 

>— I 1—1 CI 



Tj< 10 00 t^ o> 

LQ 00 --I ■* 00 



c4 



« I- c 

« j3 e3 _ . 

O (U r*' <u J3 



o 

C bO en 

o c 3 ja-^ 

D.-^ bOH>-a 
D. t, 3 ei OJ 



03 



H o^ 

.. §.s 

Jii O S 3 3 
fQPQP5P5rt 



-53 «J 

00 



05 



__ tn •J 
— . 0) O 

u 03 ^ 

ajSJH 

000 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



265 



O 05 (M O lO 
IN •-' 






lO 


lOco-H 

1— t T— 1 I-H 


1>T}<C> 


1-H 


iO-*t^O(N 

cor-ir^iN 




05 


•*IN 




O5e0(NO5eo 


«0(N 


(N 

CO 


lO 


t^coos 
I— 1 


■<ti-*IN 


t^ 


•-lOOt^COiN 
(N ■*>-< 


lO 




(N-* 


i-i 


—KN 


TjHlO 


COt}< 






00 


IN 


CO 


l> 


t> 


rf COO'* 




-<*< 


■* 




00 '-H r-H 1— I 


00^ 


coo 

CO 


o 


IN —1 


(N '^ CO 
I— 1 1—1 1—1 


05 


OS lOIN O 
t^iNOiO 

t— ( 




00 
IN 








00 00 ICO 






88^ 

IN 


CO 


(NiO-* 

T— 1 


05 


CO 


00 


(NOQOO 
rt (NOOCO 




I-H 








1—1 




IN 


00 




§8^ 


l> 


1> 

1— 1 


O 
.— 1 


co-^o 

1—1 1— 1 


I— 1 


^"'g^^ 




I— 1 








CO oj (M r^ o 

(MOOCOOO t^ 

T— 1 


t-- lO 05 l~^ CO 

O ■* t^ C3 -H 
(N (N O^CO 


CO 'f lOt^Ol 

00 C5 t^ O^ Oi 

(NIN --H 


05 (N Tf- O CO 
COIN 0»0t> 

r— i 1— I T— 1 1-H 


lO -H -rf 00 IN 

00 oco ^ CO 
CO CO CO lO 

l-H 


(N 


COCO-* 

C5U5CO 


COGOTf — <0 
COCCr-lt^CO 

CO 


O LO -H CO ■* 

005->* ooco 

I— ( IC r- 1 

IN 


(NOrf (NO 
■* CO '-< --1 Oi 
I— 1 >— 1 


COCOOOO rH 
CO TfiCO—iOO 


OOO iOCOT}< 
00 CO O IN F-* 

r-ll-H-^IN 


g 


^2S 


o-^ 00 coo 

0> T I— 1 i— 1 ■>* 
00 >-H 


I>O00TtiC5 
O lOCC >— it-^ 

1— 1 l-H •<JI 1— 1 

CO 


rf lO — 1 icO 
'^i lOCOOOO 

1-H 1-^ T-H 


COOCO— 1 iM 

i>t>cocoa> 


lOCO 05 lOOO 
OiN <N 02 rt 
IN IN CD (N 


CO 
I— 1 


■»ti -^ o 
lOCOCO 






C 



.a ^ t- 3_p 

ooooo 



c m 



X 

to .— 

CO c3 



<L> 

3 

3 
S3 



^ ^ uj w OS 



C.S.- 






C — ' — 
O 3 53 OJ-i; 



Srl'a 



v 



CO 
3 " 



e3 C 



O O) OT 

E? c a 

oj lU (U 



oooou 



c 



;::; c c 

Oj Sj a; (]j.™ 

|i] t3H cq n K 



a 

^ . « 3 S 

tc >. ^O-.S 
[T.t; Ot3Z2 

" « tc M tc 

« £ c c c 



. 


>. 








o 






S 


Si 




^ 




a 


m 


M 






5 


^ 



266 



ANNUAL REPORTOF/THE 



O 

O 

I 

o 

<j 

H 
O 

I 
00 

hJ 
< 



o 


s 

Q 

s 

Q 


o 




■ CO lO lO 00 


-t< 


• *— 1 

• 1 — 1 


■ CO 

■ i-H 


CO ^ (M CO 00 

r— 1 


1— 1 ^ CO CO lO 
i-HCN CM 


05 


^"3 
o o 




O —1 "0 CO 


-t 


t^ 


• I— ( 


OOC^ (MCO t^ 


i>co loco ■<*< 


00 


"3 
c 

o 




CO^t* 
1 — 1 


(M 






-* 


• < — I 


»0(M 




• >-H 


T}^ lO — ( 


• 1— H 

;CM 


t^ 


►J 

w 

o 

m 

P 

<A 
W 

S 


o 


lOO CO 
(M C-l (N 


00 


cooot^ 


■ CO 


lOOO 

coco —1 


^ 




05 '^OO^ 
CM C-1 Oi 


o 


1 

O ^ 

m 


O O lO 


o 

r— * 


CO cot^ 


• CO 




■OO 




^ 




t^ Tf t^ Oi 


lO 


1 

a 


1 — 1 


1-H 


00 




(M 








lOOlO 

COOl — * 








0^ 

0^ 


^r-l UO 
• I-H O 


rfi 


to 

8 
w 
(J 

<^ 
o 


"3 

O 


^ -rf O — 1 r-H 

O OO CO lO Tt< 

iM lO ■-< ^ 


t>. r^ ic o >— 1 

00 CO icir^io 
CO CO 


00 a; O (M -M 

CO (M CO ># O 


r-H T-H tH r-H CD 


fO 




000 050—1 
»* 'M 00 lO CO 


Ttl Oi >— 1 i-H lO 

COC^^COTti 
—1 t— 1 


r^(N Tfi iM CO 

t^iO<MCO^ 

I-H 


t-- COCOUOOO 
CM 


(N 


1 

e 


"-t^ O t^ C^ O 
O >0 t^ Ol 00 

^H CO 


COOO ^ C5 CO 

lO CO ^ CO o 

(M C^^ 


— 1 1> CO O CO 
CO l^ CO 00 LO 


CM — lO ^05 
OOOOOOO 

— 1 r^ CO 


r— ) 




03 

1— 1 

H 

o 
o 


0) 
CO 

c 
1-3 


h-1 


c 
c 

1^ 


.2 

3 

o 

1-5 


X 

c 
a, 
c 


) 


a 
o 
a 


03 


bi 

3 

c 
o 

1^ 


3 ; 
X 

a; 

a 

-c 
-a 


> 

a 

o 
tJ 

c 
o 


3 


T3 

c 
o 

s 

m 

c 

o3 


c 
c 

a. 


c 


c 
o 
■>-> 

D 

S 

O 

;z; 


-13 
C 

.X 

E 

-►J 
o 

J2; 




o 

O 


a 

bi 

c 
o: 
(- 

C 


bJ 

0H 


03 
Cl, 


"S 

> 

OQ 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



267 



(N 



M(NOO 
CO 



CO ■>* CO IM iC 
^ (M <N 



I— I 1— ( 1— I Ol 



oooo r-i <r> o 



^ CO (M 



o 



iO 

o 



c< 



t^ CO 



CO ic lo 



!>'*< CO 



o 



CD O t^ '^ ■<* 



Tt< O 



CO(M 



<M 00 C<l (M CO 

IM r-t .-H 



lO 



00 

to 
o 



CO 



(M CO 



OOO lOOO 



Tti 00 --H CO -* 






CO 

GO 



OC2 00 



(M O CO CO 



■^ O t^ 00 CO 



t- 



CO 



r-l rH 00 



o 
CO 



o 



rt CO 



(M O CO CO 
lO CM 



^ O t^ 00 CO 
1-1 c^ 



l^ 



CO 



^ 1^ t^ CO lO 

Y— I 1— I CO 



00 



o 

CO 

CO 



o 



o 
CO 



CO 






Ol 



O 



COO --I (M '^ 

!>• t^ -*' CO O 

(N CO C-i 



OCO CO O CO 

lO t^ CD O CO 



C31 I^ CO C3 o 
(M Ol (M (M (M 



O >— I I> 00 ^ 

00 t^ lO rfH o 

T— ( C^l 1— 1 IQ 



lO lOOO ^(M 

TTti o ^ CO 'fi 

i-( rfl i-H Tt< C-l 



00 
CO 



1-H 

CO 



lOCO 00 00 o 

CO CO Oj CO r-l 



00 -+i lO O OQ 

r-< CO C5 00 00 

CO I—* 



t^ lO -H ^ o 
^ — i O !M t- 



OCO O --I lO 
I- O C4 CO — ' 



to CO C2 CO CO 
lo I- ^ 00 c-i 






co_ 
CO 



00 CD CO rf< UO 

I-H t^ -H 



(M 05 — 1 O '+' 

CO CO t^ oi 00 

lO —I CM 



»C CD 00 00 CM 
t^ lO CM CO CO 



O lOt^ t^ CD 

^ CO CO 00 00 

I-H I-H C-1 



o CM c:iooc5 
Ci CO CO -+' ■— 1 

C^ CM ^ 



CO 

o 

CM 



CO 
CO 

00~ 



ii <u c 



c-c 



c c 



ChAhHH 



o 
o 

CT3 



0? M 

fcJD o3 
^ 5 «^ M) 



D."3 rt o o 



a> . 



c 
o 

T3 

22 o <u e 3 
-; o^ c o 



2 

"3 

O eS 



-. ^ s: 

I- to " 

(- Ol 2 

^ ^ C3 



T3 

c 






c c ^ 

OJ-- C 

t, tc t« S *^ 



a 

3 

o 

u 



o 

H 



o 



268 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



H 
O 

O 



H 

W 

o 

H 

O 
Pi 

w 

pa 

I 

00 

pa 
< 

Eh 



o 
1-1 


o 

< 

o 

Q 
W 

< 


^— 1 

o 

H 


(N 


• T-( 




(N-* 


05 


r^coict^ CO 






OS 


1 f-^ 

03 03 
« C 
O O 


(N 


• I— 1 




(Nrf 


05 




•CO(M 


:^ 




jlMrlCO 




00 


g 






















t-C0C01>(M 

CO 


t^<N(M(M 




!>. 


Summer Day Schools 


■4-3 

o 








JC^IM 




1-H 


O »-^ CO (N CO 
Ot-1 CO — I 

l-H 1—1 


lO-^OOCO 
1—1 1—1 1—1 lO 




CO 


4 

O t-( 








• 1—1 


iO«5 




00 'H rt C5iM 

CD I-* c>aoo 


r^^^CO^ 




lo 


a 








T-H(N 




CO 


Oi 


I— ( 


• »OCO Tf< 


i-iCOOiO 
1—1 1—1 




Tj< 


1-1 

8 

a 
m 

Q 
o 

Ed 
P4 


Is 
o 
H 


(MOtOCOOO 
iO'-i(N(NiO 




CO 


t^iooor^ t^ 

r^ i^ CO CD o 
OiT-\ coo 

1— 1 


OO — i(M 

coio ^00 
1— 1 I— I •^•< 




CO 


1 

TO 


cooKMOor^ 


00 -H 




OOcOOiiM CO 

cicoc^ ■* t^ 

CO r-A^ 






(N 




O5I>'*H00^ 

(N -H CO 




C5 

1— I 


OC55 05lO^ 
t^OCOlM C^ 


COOSOO 

CO 00 CO i> 




I— 1 




en 

o 


C 
O 

c 
IS 


in 

c3 
-C 

D 
o3 


A 

o 

03 

'c 
_o 

"o 
O 




C 
O 
m 
O 

a* 
o 
0^ 


■4.:) 

"3 


<l-3 

'o 

-1-9 




03 

a 
& 
o 
H 

-4-3 
O 

H 




CITIES 
Alexandria 


K 

pa 


> 

e3 
C 
c 

3 

pa 


'> 

CO 

_o 

03 


C 
d 
CO 




o 

c 
o 


m 

_ c 
c c 

°"> 

o o 


a 

"> 
c 

o3 

Q 


» 

'3 





SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



269 



r-ICO 



—IIM 



'^(M 






CO C50>-lO5 
(MOO -"ij^ 
CO 



oo<r>oo«ot>. 



00 



■* 

Ol 



CO 



O— I 



T^t^ 



05 lO 



tv. to ^H CO 05 
O CO (M ■* 



COQ 
-H 00 
<N 



05 



CO <M coco-* 



CO 
o 



8 



IC 



(M 
<M 



OOlOr-H (M «0 



o »o 

CO "t! 



0^ lO 



OOOt-HO 



lO^IM 



CO 



00 



CO 



I 05 •— I OS 05 
I (N CO 



00 00 00 lO t^ 

T-H 1— I "tJI r— I 



,JH ^ _ O-, O 

1-H rp I— I 1—1 



COO^t^-* 
--H (N (M —< C^ 
CO >— I 



00 lO lO O5 00 
lMCO(M 



00 
lO 
(M 



05 



t^ 00 CD CO CO 



OOCDCOt^b- 



d tOt-~ 



coos 

>* 00 



lOCO 
(M 



■^ LO— (CiOO 
— I 05(N 



(N 



CO 

CO__ 



Tti t-H lo CO CO 



(M (M OO 



050-* lOO 



CO lO I-H 

CO 



t-H Ttl 



(M 



lO 
<M^ 
IM 



COCO 05 lO— 1 

1—1 1—1 T^ lO 



CO CO r-l (M O 

lO lO CO C-l C-1 
— I !M COIM 



Tf O iC lOCO 

O CO lO -H lO 

i-l(N rH 



CO lO CDQO CS 

03 -^ 1-1 f -^ 
r-l 05 (M 



CO CO CO CO 00 

rH t^(M iM ^ 
T-H 00 04 (M —4 



00 

oo" 



CO 

CO 

o 



■* 05<M CO O 

CO •^ CO •'f 1— * 

CO 



■* CO 't^ CO C5 

CO — I C<1 CO 05 

rH C^ 



IXM CO CO ■* 
t^ 02 (M 00 CO 

lO O rH TJH 



^CO •* 
•* OiOO 

t^co 



CSI ^ lO CO lO 

lO^ OOOCO 

1>. rH 



iM 



o 
(-> 

3 

-a c 



3 

-Q 

to 

o 



^ C-O oj 
C9 fca bi ^ 



a 
o 

s 



u 

3 

c — 
o <u 



.2S s^ 5fS 



3> 



e3 O S 



" t: 



03 



b)o:s 
t; 3 



45 o o aj o 
Iz; ;z; :z; cu Oh 



3 
O 

— 03 



-o „ 



-« its 



c3 



03.2 O o ^ 



0) 






O t- 

t- 3 t- 

0.0 « 

=« s s 



(U 



03X1 






o 



O 



(M 



■*rf OC^ rH 

«OCOOOCO -H 

05 


O50t^050 

00 -^ COiOCC 

rH CO 1-1 


r^ 00 c 05 (M 

c^ CO CO CN. 05 

00 CD C^ CO 

i-l 


(M O5(N00 t^ 

lO '* CO •* CO 

COlO rH 

7-1 


■* >OOOOCO 

COCO rH ^GO 
r-i 1—i i--\ 

7—1 


o 

1—1 
1— ( 


05 

o 



o 



O ra 



o 



a 

9 

o 
O 



is 

^ 8 



270 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 49— SCHOOL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




A0E3 


COUNTIES 




























6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Accomack 


307 


572 


564 


591 


583 


576 


591 


612 


645 


538 


514 


508 


Albemarle 


722 


802 


762 


775 


697 


724 


770 


691 


630 


628 


599 


513 


Alleghany 


25.5 


256 


230 


263 


253 


264 


259 


250 


248 


268 


251 


231 


Amelia 


147 
456 


164 
502 


168 
481 


187 
455 


171 

478 


175 
470 


169 
416 


182 
393 


181 
395 


189 
402 


178 
405 


141 


Amherst 


359 






Appomattox .... 


179 


173 


182 


197 


174 


173 


182 


177 


165 


151 


159 


146 


Arlington 


2.351 


2,3.52 


2,380 


2.317 


2.420 


2,366 


2,338 


2,336 


2.363 


2,400 


2,356 


2,206 


Augusta 


802 


865 


884 


845 


824 


844 


831 


857 


812 


788 


809 


752 


Bath 


105 


102 


107 


96 


118 


99 


77 


89 


89 


63 


66 


76 


Bedford 


558 


615 


620 


637 


610 


638 


653 


614 


599 


542 


541 


506 






Bland 


74 
332 


72 
379 


73 

382 


82 
391 


95 

379 


91 
364 


100 
400 


106 

388 


100 
355 


95 

360 


99 

368 


86 


Botetourt 


321 


Brunswick 


351 


343 


375 


358 


404 


381 


381 


402 


417 


395 


404 


395 


Buchanan 


976 


1.023 


999 


1.063 


1,050 


1,034 


980 


908 


904 


806 


813 


819 


Buckingham 


252 


293 


281 


243 


253 


247 


236 


263 


232 


242 


241 


211 


Campbell 


933 


1.020 


994 


961 


999 


966 


862 


846 


903 


792 


852 


769 


Caroline 


289 
461 
170 


317 
464 
174 


314 
436 
171 


311 
420 
189 


323 
409 
157 


323 

488 
175 


2y.'.- 

466 
184 


334 
473 
158 


287 
498 
158 


283 
467 
143 


275 
489 
165 


260 


Carroll 


476 


Charles City 


161 


Charlotte 


2S0 


279 


289 


251 


295 


269 


312 


291 


276 


29.S 


252 


282 


Chesterfield 


2.571 


2,627 


2,614 


2,530 


2 567 


2.616 


2,513 


2,448 


2,468 


2,320 


2,094 


1,898 


Clarke 


135 

37 

355 


147 

61 

361 


170 

63 

354 


125 

69 
366 


152 

76 

381 


189 

83 

373 


162 

64 

299 


151 

65 

352 


152 

75 

350 


166 

53 

306 


136 

62 

309 


186 


Craig 


67 


Culpeper 


299 


Cumberland 


147 


1.J7 


161 


160 


148 


147 


161 


1.50 


135 


151 


137 


122 


Dickenson 


368 


3S7 


380 


399 


423 


421 


427 


398 


421 


405 


446 


393 


Dinwiddle. 


436 


510 


465 


464 


512 


464 


458 


441 


448 


438 


375 


353 


Essex 


151 


1.56 


136 


174 


143 


136 


109 


166 


149 


134 


135 


131 


Fairfax 


7,990 
5:)3 


8 664 
611 


8,758 
564 


8,875 
588 


9,102 
601 


9,030 
601 


8,847 
578 


8,581 
598 


8,433 
603 


8.129 
523 


7,521 
520 


6.921 


Fauquier. 


477 


Floyd 


162 
159 


182 
181 


159 
162 


168 
179 


175 
191 


184 
195 


174 
174 


183 
160 


211 
173 


182 
163 


193 
IGO 


167 


Fluvanna. 


136 


Franklin 


569 


551 


553 


582 


587 


548 


573 


551 


534 


538 


555 


528 


Frederick 


591 


659 


637 


617 


6.35 


654 


602 


576 


475 


518 


469 


490 


Giles 


339 


304 


286 


317 


293 


330 
291 


320 


323 


311 


315 


319 


305 






Gloucester 


291 


274 


282 


291 


322 


271 


259 


266 


256 


231 


206 


Goochland 


232 


218 


254 


225 


245 


210 


204 


202 


201 


199 


194 


188 


Grayson 


250 


2.^2 


241 


249 


246 


265 


272 


259 


265 


264 


277 


260 


Green" 


127 
207 


1.33 
1S6 


123 
192 


110 
216 


116 
241 


110 

270 


120 

277 


103 

229 


112 

287 


86 
235 


83 
246 


89 


Greensville 


200 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



271 



CENSUS— 1968 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




Whitb 


Neoro 


Other 




18 
Years 


19 
Years 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


7-19 
Years 


6-19 
Years 


457 


293 
426 
173 
117 

299 


1,823 
3,573 
1,652 
537 
1,900 


1,627 
3.315 
1.424 
475 
1,771 


3,450 
6,888 
3,076 
1,012 
3,671 


1,851 

853 

54 

589 
824 


1,743 

818 

41 

558 
849 


3.504 
1,671 
95 
1,147 
1,673 








7.044 

8.572 
3,171 
2 162 
5.403 


7,551 


505 
225 


6 


7 


13 


9,294 
3,426 


140 
348 


2 
23 


1 

36 


3 

59 


2,309 
5 859 


128 


119 

2.156 

504 

31 

327 


747 

13,930 

5,151 

493 

2.936 


741 

13,522 

4.681 

4,S0 
2 655 


1,488 

27,452 

9,832 

973 

5.591 


324 

1,263 

228 

47 

853 


314 

1,336 

220 

38 

818 


638 
2.599 

448 

83 

1.671 








2,126 

30 394 

10,284 

1,056 

7,262 


2,305 


2,342 

669 

03 


172 
3 


171 

1 


343 
4 


32,745 

11,140 

1,161 


360 








7.820 












88 


68 
221 
279 
621 
160 


589 
2.240 

859 
6 034 

779 


559 
1 925 

793 
5,767 

651 


1,148 
4,165 
1,652 
11,801 
1,430 


6 

244 

1.658 


7 

200 

1,004 


13 

444 

3,262 








1 161 

4.612 

4.914 

11.801 

3 114 


1,235 


304 
380 


3 




3 


4 944 

5 265 


781 








12,777 


202 


858 


826 


1,684 








3,363 












692 
228 


463 
132 
33a 
118 
167 


4 638 
807 

3 008 
136 
977 


4.205 
777 

2.771 
128 
869 


8,843 
1,584 

5.779 

264 

1,846 


1.157 

1.028 

25 

801 

839 


1.114 

1.073 

25 

844 

830 


2.271 
2,101 
50 
1,645 
1,669 


2 


3 


5 


11 119 
3.685 
5.829 
2.079 
3.515 


12,052 
3,974 


408 








8,290 


126 
254 


85 


85 


170 


2,249 
3.795 


1,734 

142 


1,375 

127 
36 

172 
61 


14.014 

872 

416 

1,499 

393 


13,218 

771 

403 

1,331 

420 


27.232 

1 643 

819 

2,830 

813 


1,302 

169 

1 

688 
511 


1.239 

193 

1 

655 

513 


2,541 

362 

2 

1.343 

1.024 


14 


17 


31 


17,914 

2 005 

821 

4.173 

1,837 


32,375 
2.140 


47 








858 


251 








4 529 


137 








1.984 












355 


272 
312 

68 
4,922 

296 


2.569 
1.442 

416 
51.994 

2.528 


2.504 
1.263 

389 

49 493 

2.443 


5,073 

2,705 

805 

101,487 

4,971 


23 

1.487 

500 

976 

1.025 


31 

1.403 

509 

1.004 

1.006 


54 

2.890 
1 009 
1,980 
2,031 








5,127 
5,595 
1,817 
103.879 
7,015 


5,495 


355 








6.031 


120 

6.096 

455 


1 

194 

2 


2 

218 

11 


3 

412 

13 


1,968 

111,869 

7,608 


179 


157 
96 
428 
280 
198 


1.147 
589 
2.945 
3.582 
1.972 


1,040 
559 
2,779 
3.260 
1,822 


2.187 
1,148 
5,724 
6,842 
3,794 


62 

486 

643 

46 

59 


68 

453 

623 

72 

58 


130 
939 
I 266 
118 
117 








2 317 
2.0S7 
6,995 
6.960 
3.914 


2 479 


117 








2.246 


464 
348 


4 


1 


5 


7.564 
7 551 


293 


2 


1 


3 


4,253 


187 


149 
149 
201 
41 
163 


1.186 
634 

1.637 
570 
511 


1.123 
551 

1.515 
543 
522 


2.309 
1.135 
3,152 
1 113 
1.033 


504 

778 

77 

118 

970 


472 
697 
105 
77 
927 


976 

1.473 

182 

195 

1,903 








3,285 
2,658 
3,334 
1.308 
2,936 


3,578 


i 253 

82 








2 890 








3 584 






1,435 


Tl88 
SI 










3.143 



272 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 49— SCHOOL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




AOES 


COUNTIES 


6 
Years 


7 
Years 


8 
Years 


9 
Years 


10 
Years 


11 
Years 


12 
Years 


13 
Years 


14 

Years 


15 
Years 


16 
Years 


17 
Years 


Halifax 


711 

743 

2,935 

1,097 

40 


714 

831 

3,101 

1.167 

45 


728 

774 

3,095 

1,081 

51 


736 

754 

3,034 

1,168 

53 


709 

744 

3.124 

1,185 

54 


763 

796 

3,015 

1,111 

48 


786 

780 

3,067 

1,172 

48 


765 

760 

2,868 

1,090 

45 


746 

778 

2,864 

1,008 

52 


749 

649 

2,734 

976 

44 


756 

629 

2,649 

865 

53 


669 
513 

9 Hi 


Hanover 

Henrico 


Henry 


807 


Highland 


40 


Isle of Wight 

James City 

King George 

King and Queen.. 
King William .... 


421 
324 
188 
108 
107 


415 
348 
195 
111 
132 


436 
307 
172 
92 
123 


422 
315 
182 
105 
118 


424 
307 
168 
126 
106 


442 
285 
148 
120 
122 


407 
276 
165 
111 
107 


420 
268 
166 
125 
107 


407 
272 
169 
119 
107 


418 
251 
148 
126 
96 


367 
222 
156 
111 
116 


368 
239 
131 
103 
95 


Lancaster 

Lee 


144 
390 
684 
297 
242 


185 
439 
852 
301 
244 


160 
425 
812 
305 
238 


186 
475 
873 
309 
244 


165 
462 
811 

328 
263 


170 
512 
808 
318 

227 


179 
488 
803 
330 
261 


194 
519 
741 
332 
271 


185 
469 
665 
315 
275 


158 
517 
671 
286 
252 


166 
496 
586 
253 
247 


166 
559 


Loudoun 

Louisa 


593 
221 


Lunenburg 


243 


Madison 


180 
121 
571 
68 
761 


171 

119 
641 
107 
794 


182 
112 
655 
80 
739 


185 
114 

678 

89 

696 


183 
115 
682 
100 
704 


187 
114 
677 
99 
698 


164 
127 
705 
96 
720 


179 
115 
672 
94 
753 


152 
126 
674 
116 
689 


157 

102 

652 

87 

713 


151 
105 
672 
103 
623 


147 


Mathews 

Mecklenburg 

Middlesex 

Montgomery 


105 

606 

99 

630 


Nansemond 

Nelson 


807 
241 
129 
243 
160 


798 
242 
121 
258 
179 


793 
243 
122 
282 
192 


826 
250 
117 
316 
207 


809 
256 
128 
305 
202 


783 
259 
140 
325 
182 


817 
244 
104 
308 
190 


782 
2.55 
126 
292 
217 


791 
240 
104 

277 
186 


738 
250 
117 
290 
167 


695 
223 
97 
290 
211 


663 
241 


New Kent 

Northampton .... 
Northumberland.. 


107 
268 
176 


Nottoway 

Orange 


332 
290 
318 
286 
1,128 


310 
308 
334 
306 
1,219 


312 
309 
304 
296 
1,192 


352 
316 
304 
294 
1,299 


334 
300 
329 
308 
1.232 


396 
294 
306 
284 
1.212 


353 
280 
290 
342 
1.322 


350 
303 
322 
290 
1.256 


354 
318 
347 
285 
1.249 


320 
279 
289 
281 
1,190 


319 
255 
286 
272 
1,291 


300 
227 


Page 


360 


Patrick 


286 


Pittsylvania 


1,085 


Powhatan 

Prince Edward.. . 

Prince George 

Prince William... 
Pulaski 


140 
257 
571 
2,612 
708 


143 
231 
634 
2,595 
652 


140 
238 
493 
2,576 
600 


155 

215 

491 

2,370 

582 


151 
254 
508 
2,285 
609 


156 
232 
499 
2,210 
613 


144 

263 

498 

1.975 

583 


158 
271 
471 
1,879 
575 


136 
249 
420 
1,738 
611 


131 
237 
371 
1,416 
572 


127 
231 
384 
1,254 
563 


119 
228 
322 
1,015 
487 






Rappahannock. . . 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Rockbridge 

Rockingham 


94 

133 

1,285 

315 

888 


119 

131 

1,346 

320 

888 


111 

140 

1,407 

358 

892 


82 

136 

1,315 

343 

855 


116 
144 
1,350 
326 
952 


105 
127 
1,382 
375 
948 


102 

124 

1.365 

340 

887 


111 
136 
1,267 
364 
860 


131 
147 
1,268 
333 
942 


92 

127 

1,313 

355 

791 


97 

124 

1.324 

315 

835 


111 

125 

1,175 

256 

782 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



273 



C KN S US— 1968— CoNTiN ued 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




White 


Neqro 


Other 




18 
Years 


19 
Years 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


7-19 
Years 


6-19 
Years 


665 

520 

2.263 

644 


581 

333 

1.925 

451 

36 


2,289 

3,596 

17,282 

4,711 

330 


2,160 
3,307 

16.417 

4,339 

278 


4,449 

6.903 

33.699 

9,050 

608 


2,527 

958 

1,245 

1,890 


2,380 

989 

1 , 185 

1,785 


4.907 
1,947 
2,430 
3,675 


6 

7 
28 


5 

4 

26 


11 
11 
54 


9,367 

8,861 

36,183 

12,725 

608 


10,078 

9,604 

39,118 

13,822 


39 








648 


















323 


279 

157 

56 

64 

59 


1.109 

1,064 

654 

278 
248 


1,001 
869 
628 
254 
236 


2,110 

1,933 

1,282 

532 

484 


1,490 
782 
365 
456 
419 


1,528 
750 
315 

417 
450 


3,018 

1,532 

680 

873 
869 








5,128 
3,471 
1,962 
1,418 
1,377 


5,549 


224 
106 


4 


2 


6 


3,795 
2,150 


105 
89 


6 
10 


7 
14 


13 
24 


1,526 
1,484 


147 


104 
498 
396 
149 
166 


594 

3,349 

3,974 

928 

809 


545 
3,028 
3,801 

916 

785 


1.139 

6,377 
7,775 
1,844 
1,594 


539 
12 
696 
915 
825 


487 
13 
660 
882 
755 


1,026 
25 
1,356 
1,797 
1,580 








2,165 
6,402 
9,133 
3,641 
3,174 


2,309 


543 








6,792 


522 
194 




2 


2 


9,817 
3,938 


243 








3,416 












138 


147 
96 

384 
56 

485 


872 
507 

1,937 
348 

4,305 


746 
458 

1.879 
288 

4.144 


1,618 
965 

3,816 
636 

8,449 


283 
253 
2,245 
280 
200 


242 
242 

2,241 
284 
151 


525 
495 

4,486 
564 
351 








2,143 
1,460 
8,302 
1,200 
8,805 


2,323 


110 








1.581 


604 








8,873 


74 








1,268 


561 


4 


1 


5 


9,566 


519 


375 
128 
53 
151 
119 


1.738 

1 038 

363 

633 

547 


1,580 
927 
298 
559 
540 


3,318 
1,965 
661 
1,202 
1,087 


3,124 
550 
395 

1,208 
664 


2,947 
501 
355 

1,164 

642 


6,071 
1,051 
750 
2,372 
1,306 








9.389 
3,016 
1,423 
3,574 
2,393 


10,196 


185 








3,257 


87 
212 


8 


4 


12 


1,552 
3,817 


165 








2,553 












263 


156 
186 
221 
228 
647 


1,113 
1,375 
1,937 
1,728 
4,627 


1,070 
1,166 
1,834 
1.571 
4.152 


2,183 
2,541 
3.771 
3,299 
8,779 


979 

544 

91 

244 

3,166 


957 

492 

69 

213 

3,172 


1.936 

1,036 

160 

457 

6,338 








4,119 
3,577 
3,931 
3.756 
15,122 


4,451 


202 








3,867 


239 








4,249 


284 








4.042 


928 


3 


2 


5 


18,250 


75 


73 
174 
178 
569 
385 


568 
663 

2,279 
11,165 

3,526 


548 
619 

2.111 
10,212 

3,252 


1.116 
1,282 
4,390 
21,377 
6,778 


294 
888 
599 
645 
271 


298 
841 
570 
641 
277 


592 
1,729 
1,169 
1,286 

548 








1,708 
3,014 
5,559 
22,699 
7,326 


1,843 


191 
290 


O 


1 


3 


3,271 
6,130 


817 
494 


16 


20 


36 


25,311 
8,034 












103 


94 

99 

688 

135 

548 


622 

518 

8,088 

1,939 

6,643 


506 
443 

7,448 
1,935 
5,164 


1,128 

961 

15,536 

3,874 
10,807 


125 

352 

312 

92 

76 


121 
356 
302 

85 
54 


246 
708 
614 
177 
130 








1,374 
1,669 

16,153 
4,051 

10,939 


1,468 


109 








1,802 


953 
231 


2 


1 


3 


17.438 
4,366 


759 


1 


1 


2 


11,827 



274 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE 



TABLE 49— SCHOOL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




AOBS 


COUNTIES 




























6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Russell 


490 
500 
407 


488 
494 
383 


555 
542 
373 


552 
526 
463 


595 
527 
401 


570 
501 
419 


597 
519 
411 


582 
567 
447 


590 
553 
399 


559 
532 
401 


587 
553 
434 


509 


Scott 


459 


ShenaDdoah 


386 


Smyth 


584 
497 


603 
451 


572 
433 


598 
438 


572 
414 


577 
422 


573 
446 


642 
431 


577 
385 


556 
465 


550 
408 


599 


Southampton. . . . 


385 


Spotsylvania 


414 


390 


409 


357 


397 


402 


381 


393 


375 


356 


371 


297 


Stafford 


450 


522 


528 


509 


473 


497 


497 


443 


467 


398 


411 


358 


Surry 


141 

272 
818 


149 
292 
823 


152 
318 

848 


136 
302 
849 


147 

292 
907 


138 
279 
903 


139 

288 
928 


151 
306 
942 


130 
320 
929 


136 
290 

885 


116 

297 
855 


138 


Sussex 


255 


Tazewell 


879 






Warren 


299 
747 


298 

772 


308 

789 


278 
805 


290 

774 


267 
726 


303 
829 


279 
7S1 


278 
794 


303 
791 


283 
770 


278 


Washmgton 


743 


Wfstmoreland 


201 


197 


236 


222 


214 


221 


191 


222 


227 


241 


212 


177 


Wise 


855 
423 


890 

426 


852 
416 


940 
415 


919 
439 


914 
446 


942 
443 


908 
468 


933 
451 


938 

482 


846 
447 


928 


Wythe 


423 






York 


611 


641 


660 


644 


656 


627 


622 


578 


565 


511 


498 


367 






Total Counties. 


54.748 


57,263 


56.804 


56.931 


57,513 


57.181 


56,608 


55,480 


54.665 


52,187 


50,455 


46,992 


Towns 


























Abingdon 


64 


83 


93 


88 


80 


97 


95 


82 


91 


98 


76 


91 


Cape Charles. . . . 


27 


36 


31 


35 


34 


30 


27 


38 


27 


27 


35 


26 


Colonial Beach . . . 


41 


32 


30 


31 


34 


44 


41 


34 


34 


31 


35 


34 


Fries 


9 

127 


17 
101 


16 
102 


17 
123 


12 
134 


19 
110 


20 
107 


21 
101 


22 
107 


21 
118 


32 
102 


18 


Poquoson 


90 


Saltvilie 


46 
46 


50 
52 


47 
45 


43 
50 


48 
44 


55 
52 


58 
53 


43 
50 


43 
57 


55 
61 


47 
43 


50 


West Point 


47 


Town Totals. . . 


360 


371 


364 


387 


386 


407 


401 


369 


381 


411 


370 


356 


CniEs 


























Alexandria 


1,479 


1,525 


1.514 


1,456 


1,484 


1,506 


1,503 


1,484 


1,457 


1.503 


1,444 


1,390 


Bedford 


113 
273 
103 


92 

238 

96 


112 

246 
116 


108 
277 
127 


116 
239 
120 


103 
274 
131 


127 
284 
106 


123 
275 
121 


102 
255 
105 


110 

279 
97 


101 
263 
118 


94 


Bristol 


267 


Buena Vista 


103 


Charlottesville. . . 


643 


669 


631 


653 


555 


633 


605 


582 


509 


470 


508 


485 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



275 



CENSUS— 1968— Continued 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




White 


Neoro 


Othbb 




18 
Years 


19 
Years 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


7-19 
Years 


6-19 
Years 


508 


388 
260 
266 
585 

275 


3.657 
3,311 
2,583 
3,759 
951 


3,343 
3,093 
2,426 
3,675 
877 


7,000 
6,404 
5,009 
7,434 
1,828 


41 

29 

56 

61 

1.686 


39 
25 
51 

58 
1,778 


80 

54 

107 

119 

3,464 








7,080 
6,458 
5.116 
7,553 
5.292 


7 570 


425 








6 958 


333 








5 523 


549 








8 137 


339 








5,789 










313 

268 


202 
168 
101 
171 
607 


1,701 

2,568 
220 
494 

5,574 


1,618 

2,336 

201 

494 

5,256 


3,319 

4,904 

421 

988 

10,830 


652 
313 
672 
1,358 
173 


668 
322 
645 
1.307 
165 


1,320 

635 

1,317 

2.665 

338 


2 


2 


4 


4.643 
5.539 
1,738 
3,653 
11,176 


5.057 
5.989 
1 879 


105 








243 








3,925 
11,994 


821 


5 


3 


8 


321 


241 
521 
116 
738 
334 


1,695 
4,974 
470 
5,859 
2,786 


1,764 
4,626 
448 
5.466 
2,628 


3,459 

9,600 

918 

11,325 

5,414 


139 
88 
896 
161 
121 


129 

72 
838 
164 
106 


268 

160 

1,734 

325 

227 








3.727 
9.760 
2.652 
11.650 
5,643 


4 026 


665 








10 507 


176 








2 853 


902 








12 505 


453 


1 


1 


2 


6,068 


338 


263 


2,886 


2,650 


5,536 


684 


741 


1,425 


4 


5 


9 


6,970 


7,581 


42.651 


33,407 


286,507 


268,010 


654,517 


62.060 


60,283 


122,343 


622 


655 


1 277 


666,247 


732,885 


78 


54 
20 
12 

27 
69 


520 
126 
184 
120 
703 


480 
103 
172 
128 
657 


1,000 
229 
356 
248 

1,360 


60 

71 

32 

3 


46 

88 

29 

8 


106 

159 

61 

11 








1.106 
38S 
417 
259 

1.360 


1 170 


22 








415 


25 








458 


17 








268 


96 








1 487 


















50 


35 
39 


336 
259 


288 
242 


624 
501 














624 
627 


670 


34 


61 


65 


126 








673 












322 


256 


2,248 


2,070 


4,318 


227 


236 


463 








4,781 


5,141 












1,366 
77 


1.314 
63 

232 
56 

327 


7.567 
526 

1,654 
687 

2,805 


7,947 
474 

1,479 
661 

2,711 


15,514 
1.000 
3,133 
1.348 
5,516 


1,675 

175 

108 

21 

795 


1,640 

153 

106 

42 

736 


3.315 

328 

214 

63 

1,531 


60 


51 


117 


18,946 
1,328 
3,349 
1,414 
7.048 


20,425 
1,441 


220 

88 

421 


1 
1 


1 
3 


2 
3 
1 


3.622 
1,517 
7.691 



276 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 49— SCHOOL 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Ages 


CITIES 


6 
Years 


7 
Years 


8 
Years 


9 

Years 


10 
Years 


11 

Years 


12 

Years 


13 
Years 


14 
Years 


15 

Years 


16 
Years 


17 

Years 


Chesapeake 

Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights. . 

Covington 

Danville 


2,090 
110 

277 
169 
799 


2,174 

94 

313 

203 

905 


2,186 

93 

287 

172 

928 


2,220 

85 

267 

169 

909 


2,234 

93 

324 

153 

957 


2,178 
107 
318 
181 
984 


2,051 

92 

300 

148 

1,056 


2,017 

80 

287 

196 

960 


2,019 

90 

274 

176 

920 


1,844 

88 

265 

156 

922 


1.797 

89 

270 

156 

891 


1,671 

92 

219 

165 

833 






Emporia 

Fairfax 

Falls Church 

Franklin 


92 
474 
183 
166 
194 


111 
474 
163 
159 
215 


99 
489 
164 
149 
226 


102 
499 
175 
153 
199 


94 
536 

189 
148 
204 


110 
506 
201 
167 
233 


105 
510 
202 
147 
202 


122 
512 
189 
147 
223 


117 
483 
205 
154 
199 


104 
499 
214 
152 
169 


96 
445 
190 
146 
168 


113 

459 
185 
135 


Fredericksburg. . . 


146 


Galax 


99 

2,798 

203 

461 

98 


89 

2,847 

203 

529 

105 


91 

2.735 

223 

499 

87 


111 

2,759 

206 

519 

78 


111 

2,736 

197 

457 

82 


130 

2,787 

214 

474 

78 


1.34 

2,669 

208 

475 

99 


128 

2,493 

193 

464 
89 


120 

2,382 

218 

475 

97 


118 

2,233 

209 

431 

99 


103 

2,090 

197 

406 

92 


94 


Hampton 

Harrisonburg .... 

Hopewell 

Lexington 


1,920 
213 
409 
103 


Lynchburg 

Martinsville 

Newport News. . . 
Norfolk 


929 

383 

2,840 

5,608 

96 


929 

444 

3,263 

5,701 

119 


1,032 

412 

3,240 

5,494 

78 


1 026 
436 

3,128 

5,466 

106 


1,041 

430 

3,154 

5,545 

85 


1,040 

429 

3.070 

5.541 

120 


1,000 
423 

2,908 

5,462 

102 


1,055 

427 
2,895 
5,216 

111 


952 

413 

2,954 

4,920 

133 


980 

410 

2,674 

4.734 

105 


919 
352 

2,448 

4,765 

89 


836 

385 

2,358 

4,344 


Norton 


88 






Petersburg 

Portsmouth 

Radford 

Richmond 

Roanoke 


759 
2,143 

171 
3,835 
1,462 


900 
2,181 

170 
3,677 
1,423 


880 
2,292 

177 
3,746 
1,517 


853 
2,266 

159 
3.896 
1,469 


775 
2,172 

168 
3,815 
1,505 


788 
2,1.53 

175 
3,829 
1,616 


821 
2,221 

155 
3,726 
1,561 


813 
2,215 

170 
3,739 
1,522 


745 
2,066 

169 
3,569 
1,517 


722 
2,018 

159 
3,483 
1.605 


726 
2,003 

150 
3,378 
1,501 


663 
1.866 

141 
3,145 
1.406 


Salem 


353 
160 
411 
177 
4,371 


379 
142 
398 
186 
4,351 


404 
158 
379 
227 
4,266 


400 
156 
406 
195 
4,194 


372 
138 
428 
200 
4,303 


437 
145 
440 
188 
3,857 


375 
153 
390 
224 
3,532 


403 
168 
433 
202 
3,431 


374 
144 
399 
179 
3,078 


374 
135 
408 
214 
2,803 


359 
142 
415 
215 
2,543 


329 


South Boston ... 

Staunton 

Suffolk 

Virginia Beach . . 


154 

365 

204 

2,380 


Waynesboro 

Williamsburg .... 
Winchester 


364 

95 

201 


307 

90 

256 


332 

94 

232 


330 

94 

242 


320 

93 

235 


331 
101 
223 


339 
102 

277 


321 

66 

231 


317 

86 

242 


283 
105 
242 


332 

95 

254 


273 

80 

210 


Total Cities.... 


35,182 


36,120 


36,037 


35,894 


35,808 


35,798 


34,794 


34,103 


32,624 


31.417 


30,256 


28,353 


Total State .... 


90,290 


93,754 


93.205 


93,212 


93,707 


93,386 


91,803 


89,952 


87,670 


84,015 


81,081 


75,701 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



27' 



CENSUS— iy(38-CoNTiNUED 



14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




White 


Negro 


Other 




18 
Years 


19 
Years 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


7-19 
Years 


6-19 
Years 


1,459 
76 


931 
65 

214 
86 

597 


9,116 
443 

1,775 
953 

4,231 


8,731 
440 

1,821 

832 

3,861 


17,847 

883 

3,596 

1,785 

8,092 


3,594 
118 


3,317 
143 


6,911 
261 


13 


10 


23 


24,781 
1,144 
3,590 
2,100 

11,640 


26,871 
1 254 


228 








3 873 


139 


158 
1,790 


157 
1,758 


315 
3,648 








2 269 


778 








12 439 












86 


89 
347 
161 

S3 
116 


343 

3,024 

1,243 

406 

832 


373 
3,023 
1,144 

351 

807 


716 
6,047 

2,387 

757 

1,639 


286 

42 

11 

562 

391 


346 

37 

9 

564 

401 


632 

79 

20 

1,126 

792 








1,348 
6,133 
2,420 
1,883 
2,436 


1,440 

6,607 
2,603 
2 049 


374 
182 
133 


2 

7 


5 
6 


7 
13 


136 


4 


1 


5 


2,630 


85 


76 

1,212 

161 

284 
73 


663 

12,066 

1,209 

2,499 

483 


615 

10,999 

1,194 

2,348 

431 


1,278 

23,065 

2,403 

4,847 

914 


60 

3,729 

82 

492 

126 


52 

3,554 

101 

485 

133 


112 

7,283 
183 
977 
259 








1,390 
30,436 
2,596 
5,826 
1,173 


1,489 


1,573 

154 

404 

91 


51 
3 

2 


37 

7 


88 

10 

2 


33,234 
2,799 
6,287 
1 271 












421 


486 

296 

1,581 

4,062 

62 


4,285 

1,753 

11,386 

20,154 

610 


4,028 

1,753 

10,699 

20,458 

575 


8,313 

3,506 

22,085 

40,612 

1,185 


1.707 

857 

6,543 

11,773 

54 


1,697 

866 

6,458 

12,298 

45 


3,404 

1,723 

13,001 

24,071 

99 








11,717 

5,230 

35,816 

65,479 

1,287 


12 646 


373 
2,143 

4,229 
89 


1 
363 

378 
1 


367 

418 

2 


1 
730 
796 

3 


5,613 
38,656 
71,087 

1,383 


719 

2,079 

139 


592 

1,442 

96 

2,152 

975 


1,913 

7,506 

989 

8,003 

7,674 


1,886 
5,989 
866 
7,666 
7,125 


3,799 
13,495 

1,855 
15,669 
14.799 


3,169 

6,015 

81 

14,512 

2,032 


3,011 

6,094 

92 

14,790 

2,049 


6,180 

12,109 

173 

29,302 

4,081 


13 

690 


5 

680 


18 
1,370 


9,997 
26,974 

2,028 
56,938 
18.882 


10,756 

29,117 
2 199 


2,893 
1,205 


50 
1 


27 

1 


77 

2 


48,883 
20,344 


259 
144 
326 


171 
150 
246 
247 
1,323 


2,185 
570 

2,265 

672 

18,768 


2,128 
549 

2,154 

637 

18,189 


4,313 
1,119 
4,419 
1,309 
36,957 


147 
421 
315 
699 
2,177 


155 
388 
300 
724 
1,995 


302 

809 

615 

1,423 

4,172 


9 


12 
1 


21 
1 


4,636 
1,929 
5,034 
2,732 
41,699 


4,989 
2.089 
5,445 
2,909 
46,070 


251 








1,638 


277 


293 


570 


239 


184 

67 

121 


1,949 

423 

1,384 


1,876 

458 

1,166 


3,625 

881 

2,550 


142 
128 
204 


141 
133 

178 


283 
261 
382 








3,908 
1.145 
2,932 


4 272 


72 
167 


2 


1 


3 


1,240 
3,133 










25.515 


20,740 


145.014 


138,244 


283,258 


65,191 


65,148 


130,339 


1,935 


1,928 


3,863 


429,350 


452.642 


68,489 


54,403 


433,769 


408,324 


842,093 


127,478 


125,667 


253,145 


2,557 


2,583 


5,140 


1,100,378 


1,190,668 



278 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 50— COST OF SALARIES PER PUPIL IN AVERAGE DAILY 

ATTENDANCE AND COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL IN 

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE— 1969-70 



1 


2 


3 


4 




Cost of Salaries Per 
Pupil in A. D. A. 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 


COUNTIES 


Elementary 
Salaries 


Secondary 
Salaries 


Per Pupil 

in 
A. D. A.* 


Accomack 

Albemarle 

Alleghany 

Ameli a 

Amherst 


$ 317 
359 
288 
361 
253 


$ 454 
515 
378 
442 
406 


$ 570 
644 
491 
669 
473 


Appomattox 

Arlington 

Augusta 


294 
583 
300 
308 
262 


453 
726 
474 
541 
355 


575 
1,159 

547 


Bath 


657 


Bedford 


500 


Bland 

Botetourt 

Brunswick 

Buchanan 


284 
287 
377 
253 

288 


398 
411 

477 
471 
487 


603 
532 
655 
561 


Buckingham 


564 






Campbell 

Caroline 


286 
282 
247 
266 
327 


401 

438 
488 
428 
449 


499 
542 


Carroll 

Charles City 


564 
515 


Charlotte 


630 


Chesterfield 

Clarke 

Craig 

Culpeper 

Cumberland 


317 
294 
199 
274 

287 


528 
548 
418 
461 
435 


597 
629 
587 
523 
549 


Dickenson 


267 
347 
265 
431 
311 


470 
525 
495 
608 
496 


619 


Dinwiddle 

Essex 


622 
540 


Fairfaxt 

Fauquier 


776 
590 


Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Giles 


245 
284 
261 
275 
359 


396 
514 
377 
410 
491 


569 
602 
484 
496 
647 



•Debt Service and Capital Outlay excluded. 

tincludes cost of classroom teachers' salaries per pupil entries for Fairfax City. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



279 



TABLE 50— COST OF SALARIES PER PUPIL IN AVERAGE DAILY 
ATTENDANCE AND COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL IN 
AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 




Cost of Salaries Per 
Pupil in A. D. A. 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 


COUNTIES 


Elementary 
Salaries 


Secondary 
Salaries 


Per Pupil 

in 
A. D. A.* 


Gloucester 

Goochland 

Grayson 

Greene 


$ 281 
323 
248 
244 
304 


$ 490 
427 
415 
368 
459 


S 549 
584 
521 
456 


Greensville 


566 


Halifaxt 

Hanover 

Henrico 


307 
298 
360 
264 
348 


375 
419 
503 
425 
452 


575 
512 
654 


Henry 

Highland 


489 
664 


Isle of Wight. ... 


334 


411 


543 


James Citvt. . . 




King George 


295 
341 
331 


455 

488 
468 


610 


King and Queen 


648 


King William .... 


609 






Lancaster 

Lee 

Loudoun 

Louisa 


329 
376 
269 
279 

328 


402 
533 
458 
416 
464 


573 
716 
582 
513 


Lunenburg 


619 


Madison 

Mathews 

Mecklenburg 

Middlesex 


246 
292 
345 
315 
297 


435 
533 
444 
465 
418 


547 

578 
628 
621 


Montgomery 


530 


Nansemond 

Nelson 


307 
282 
311 
292 
301 


415 
404 
395 
377 
437 


556 
649 


New Kent 


612 


Northampton 

Northumberland 


512 
589 


Nottoway 


357 
336 
298 
252 
295 


521 
445 
419 
380 
426 


620 


Orange 


570 




542 


Patrick 


490 
537 







•Debt Service and Capital Outlay excluded. 

flncludes cost of classroom teachers' salaries per pupil entries— secondary- 

JSee Williamsburg City. 



-for South Boston. 



280 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 50— COST OF SALARIES PER PUPIL IN AVERAGE DAILY 

ATTENDANCE AND COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL IN 

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 




Cost of Salaries Per 
Pupil in A. D. A. 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 


COUNTIES 


Elementary 
Salaries 


Secondary 
Salaries 


Per Pupil 

in 
A. D. A.* 


PnwViatfin 


S 339 
274 
303 
339 
292 


$ 632 
570 
443 
610 
382 


$ 728 


Prince Edward 

Prince George 

Prince William 


661 
571 
650 


Pulaski 


512 


Rappahannock 

Richmond 

Roanoke 


274 
272 
333 
356 
289 


378 
491 
415 
460 
395 


514 
567 
554 


Rockbridge 

Rockingham 


621 

489 


Russell 

Scott 

Shenandoah 

Smyth 

Southampton 


282 
267 
291 
283 
305 


409 
431 
414 
437 
394 


542 
573 
521 
485 
566 






Sootsvlvania . 


298 
314 
315 
341 
322 


410 
420 
359 
446 
436 


538 


Stafford 

Surrv 


529 
536 


Sussex 


606 


Tazewell 


545 






Warren 


301 
287 
292 
270 
265 


345 
434 
451 
401 
478 


511 


Washington 

Wpst morel and 


557 
616 


Wise ... 


537 


Wythe 


561 






York 


318 


563 


628 


Median for Counties 

Mean for Counties 


$ 295 
339 


$ 438 
497 


$ 567 
632 



*Debt Service and Capital Outlay excluded. 

Note: Cost of all classroom teachers' salaries per pupil based on A. D. A. for counties is S394. 



SUPEKINTENUENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



281 



TABLE 50— COST OF SALARIES PER PUPIL IN AVERAGE DAILY 

ATTENDANCE AND COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL IN 

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE~1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 3 


4 




Cost of Salaries Per 
Pupil in A. D. A. 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 


TOWNS 


Elementary 
Salaries 


Secondary 
Salaries 


Per Pupil 

in 
A. D. A.* 


AbinEclon 


$ 354 
300 
289 
250 
284 


.$ 432 
558 
657 
392 
449 


$ 550 
569 
687 


Cape Charles 

Co onial Beach 


Fries 

Poquoson 


441 
521 


Saltville 


275 

388 


486 
531 


501 


West Point 


654 


Median for Towns. 


$ 289 
311 

$ 524 
365 
316 
374 
331 


$ 486 
475 

$ 757 
474 
399 
607 
471 


$ 550 


Mean for Towns 

CITIES 
Alexandria 


550 

$ 946 


Bristol 


591 


Buena Vista 


575 


Charlottesville 

Chesapeake 


723 
590 


Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights 

Covington 

Danville 

Fairfaxf 


339 
317 
427 
345 


496 
420 
475 
448 


599 
489 
631 
525 
729 










Falls Church 

Franklin 


573 
354 
404 
295 
341 


906 
467 
500 
430 
493 


1,126 
572 


Fredericksburg 


663 


Galax 


511 


Hampton 


582 


Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 


447 
360 
420 
428 
378 


592 
535 
457 
546 
493 


706 
625 
656 


Lynchburg 

Martinsville , 


718 
63] 



•Debt Service and Capital Outlay excluded. 

{Cost of classroom teachers' salaries per pupil entries included in Fairfax County. 
Note: Cost of all classroom teachers' salaries per pupil based on A. D. A. for towns is $382, 



282 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THK 



TABLE 50— COST OF SALARIES PER PUPTL IN AVERAGE DAILY 

ATTENDANCE AND COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL IN 

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 




Cost of Salaries Per 
Pupil in A. D. A. 


Total 

Cost of 

Operation 


CITIES 


Elementary 
Salaries 


Secondary 
Salaries 


Per Pupil 

in 
A. D. A.* 


Newport News 

Norfolk 

Norton 

Petersburg 

Portsmouth 


$ 358 
412 
330 
368 
330 


$ 495 
564 
439 
632 
482 


$ 662 
691 
543 
701 
605 


Radford 

Richmond 


324 
418 
358 
342 
387 


500 
558 
555 

525' 


641 

787 


Roanoke 


700 


South Bostont 


548 


Staunton 


622 


Suffolk 

Virginia Beach 

Waynesboro 


380 
326 
370 
409 
378 


477 
445 
621 
557 
509 


624 
556 
645 


Williamsburet 


745 


Winchester 


628 


Median for Cities 


$ 366.5 
377 


$ 496 
526 


$ 631 


Mean for Cities 


665 






Median for State 


$ 311,0 
353 


$ 455 
507 


$ 675 


Mean for State 


644 







♦Debt Service and Capital Outlay excluded. 

tCost of classroom teachers' salaries per pupil entry— secondary— included in Halifax County, 
jlncludes James City County. 

Note: Cost of all classroom teachers' salaries per pupil based on A. D. A. for cities is $421. 
Cost of all classroom teachers' salaries per pupil based on A. D. A. for State is S404, 



SUMMARY 

Cost of Operation per pupil based on total expenditures for Operation 

through County and City School Boards $ 644 

Cost of Operation per pupil based on State-level expenditures for public 
education (See sub-total, (1), Column 5, Table 42, Page 217) 9 

Cost of Operation per pupil based on State contributions for Teacher Re- 
tirement 44 

Total Cost of Operation per pupil $ 697 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



28 



TABLE 51 

VIRGINIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

ENROLLMENT 1940-41 THROUGH 1969-70 




284 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



Q 
iJ 
O 

1—1 

fin 
Ph 

o 

0:5 
PQ 



H 









CO 


_ 


-* CO '-f 


lO 


r— ( 


T— ^ 


-t I-, 


^H 


t^ 


1 


-* Ci 


1-H 


o 


CO 




00 






.-^ 


-+ C^) I- C-l 'O 


O) 00 C: !M CO 


fM CO -^ CO ^ 


O-^ CD 


^- 






J3 




01 r-H 1-H 


.—1 1— ( 1— I 


Tf Ol rH 


T-H 


o 




-►^ 




- 








*-H 


o 


O 




C5 










H 








1 








S 
& 




CO ^ -t< o i-^ 


ooo 


-+ CO 


1— ( 


t^^ ^ 


t-o 




9S 




L"^ 


•^ Ol t^ GO -fl 


O I— 


Ol -^ 


Ol 


Ol cooo 


CD— 1 




o 




c3 03 


1 — ^ ^H ' — 1 


Ol l- 




?-H 


-H 


CO(M 




r-H 


02 


Q 


o fl 


















H 


o o 




o 


















K* -iJ 




















H 






















































^ 






, , 








cot- 


c»co -H 


'-r' 




t^"* 




^ 


CO 






c3 








-p ^-1 


r-lOO 


(M 




CO —1 


iC 


CO 


CD 








u 










^ 








CO 








00 




a 
O 










CO 






















^ 


cr. r-( o 


0-1 —1 '^0 


O 




3^0^^ 


CO 


t-O-i 






•— « 


— ^ 


o i-o CO 


CD CO CO 


Ol 




lO >— t O 00 


GO 


-H lO'+< 






o3 


,~-< 


0-1 -< 


— < c^ 


■^ 




coco CO CD 


»o 


Ol — 1 CD 






-1-3 


















I"^ 


cc 


O 






^ 








1 






►J 








j 






1 






O 








1 






1 






O 




















w 




^^ 


C2 CO to 


00-^ o 


lO 




<M O Ol ^ 


^ 


t- 


CD 




o 


1 


— H 


uO oco 


00 CD CO 


CO 




t- Ol O lO 


CO 


1— H 


00 




m 


T3 


— < 




^ 


^H 






CO 


Ol 




c^ 










01 


































1 












00 


-rH t- 




»o 




t^o 


t^ 


03 




OiO 




-^ 


1 








GO 


I^CD 




CO 




00C!> 


(M 


-* 




lOiO 




D 


a 








^H 


t--. 




Ol 




^-< .-H 


CO 


Ol 




— H lO 




l/l 


<u >, 




























lO 




Elem 
tar 


































O C3 CM O c: 


i^ c; -H 1- o 


O Ol CO CO c 


t^ CD CD t- CO 








^C". -i^ 'M O t-- 


CD t^ ~. 0-1 00 


iM l-t- OOCM 


o »o-i- o 00 






— • 


1- 'T^ 'M 00 CO 


CO 0-1 lo "_^ -i 


-<_LO)QO_I--OC 


lO CD CO Ci O 






rf^ 










-t^ 




't-> 


O 30 CO -H "C 


Ol 1^ O — < GC 


— 1 -^ CO C2 oi 


o CO >-o — ^ CO 




D 




Ol — 




-H 




m 


H 








































^ 














o 






























00 — 1 Ci CO c: 


00 1- -t r- ic 


CO CO o lO I-- 


00 CD -t t^ CO 




1 


00 I-~ o o — 


t-- 00 CD 00 c": 


r- -+ t^ 00 c 


00 00 Ol CO o 

00 M Cj; CD' q 




>* 


x; 


-f Ci T-. i ^ t - 


00 -t<_ 00 CO c 


-t CD -^ O ~- 














CO 


< 


O) Ol — •- 


o CO CO 


— 1 — ' CO 


CO — — < —1 






0) 












« 


GO 












<; 














J 














t) 














o 




Ol — 1 CO f^ c 


O 'M I- O iC 


t-- o t^ 00 CO 


en o Ol O O 




H 


1 


o 1-^ "O '-0 c:: 


00 ~- •>! T< -f 


-t^ c^i o c; — 


o t— Ol r-- ~ 




P^ 


0) >^ 


CO 't o — < c:; 


-r I- t- t- 


CD Cc CO CD C^ 


t^ CO -cf Ol C: 


CM 






-r i;:' M — CO 


_'-j:;x; ic 


Ol -M CD — ' 


CD Ol CO — — < 






'o 














































w 














































•— t 










































r— 1 




O 
O 


t 
c 

c 


'_a. 

£ 

> a 


> 

'1 


1 


a 


c 

£ 
c 
c 


c 
c 


' z 


i 


.c 




, -1- 

c 

a 


■ ^ 


cc 

c 
cc 


c 

IS 


1 


a. 

c 


c 


c3 cz 








a=;— C C 


C t. 3 rf Q. 


-Ei o ■- s = 


3 c^ ri ^ ^ 1 








< 


<f 


.<:■ 


.<■ 


< 


< 


< 


-<I 


*-/- 


cc 


cc 


a; 


a; 


q: 


CQ 


u 


:^ 


c 


w 


Ol 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



285 



oo 


-rfl 


00 


1^ 


o -^ 


•CO Tt< 


■* 




^^ 


OCO 


Q 


F— < 


o 




CO 


oo 


CO 


-f coco 


CO 


• w 


t^ 


oo\ 


lO O fC O "^i 


Ci lO 


3;t^ 


CO • 


Ol-Ol 


000000 • 


lO 


CM ~ c-l 1^ CO 


I- 


• -^ CO 00 


CO ^ CM 


r— * r-H 


• »— t ^^ 

'■-V 




-f '-I Ol 


-r}i • 


CM 


1^ CO i-H o 






t^ o "* "O r^ 


lOiO 


•^00 


"* • 


-t oco 


o^ o • 


CM 


t^ O O O CO 


CM 




t-oc 


>— 1 CO ro c; "— 1 


lO ■* 


• t- r-* 


CO • 


r-t^o 


^00 c-1 • 


CO 


o CO CO lO CO 


o 




coiX' 


C^ -H 


^-i 




t-H 


CO ^ CM 


-* • 


1 — 1 


Tfi CMl^O 


1-H 






coo ■ 


coo 


^H O 


• ^ CO 






t^ • 


CO 


Ttl • 


95 • 


^ 


T-H CO 00 o ■ 


^ 


•o ■ 




CO t^ • 


-H CO 


'^ o 


•0-1 lO 






1— ( 


CM 


CO ■ 


o ■ 


C-l 


CO coco r-i ■ 


l^ 


■ T 




»-H 




1-H 


•02 

■oo" 






1-H 








T-H 


c-l CO 








t^ C-J O —tlM 


t^iO 


•00 f^ 


C^l • 


Ot^CO 


^ oo ■ 


t- 


CM CO l~~ c-l • 


o 








lO 00 lO t^ O 


t^ rf 


• t--^ 


o ■ 


oo t^ 


CO OOO • 


»— 1 


00 CO o o • 


1-H 








Tf '-I — 1 C^l 


»o 


■00_^^ 


*-H 


•^ C-1 


CM CM CM • 


'-' 


—< CO c-l 00 • 


'^ 








" 




• 1— i 










hh cm 










O CO O >— 1 


iM lO 


■ OOO 


00 ■ 


t^o o 


o 


CO • 


1-H 


o C-l o 'CO ■ 


o 








O^ 1^- lO t"^ 


o -r 


■ coco 


-i< • 


OOOOl 


lO 


r— ( 


o 


'-I CO CO o ■ 


t^ 








O — ' 


"M 


• CM 




1 — 1 


1-H 


— ' 


—' 


c-l CO t- I-- 


c-l 








T— ! 




•a> 






















rv. o 






lO 


•OOO 


'^^ 


CO 00-* 


OOOCM 


o 


o ^ --^ o 


o 








(:0 '-^ 






t^ 


•ti 0^ 


Tfl 


CO -^ 


r^ coi- 


hH 


O iC o o 


^ 








00 ^-1 






CO 


;0_ 


w^ 


01 Ol 


c-1 --1 




O' lO 


T-H 








CO CO (M ■* C^l 


00 ■* 


00 OOO 


cooo -*< lO"* 


CO CO CO o o 


^ CM CM I^ CO 


lO 


■t^i-HOC 


CO O O O — 1 


-r ^ 


oi >o >o 


" O Ol CM o 


O OCO Tt^ — 1 


C-l —1 HH CO CO 


r^ 


t^ C-ll^ 


a; 00 00 lO i^ 


O lO 


O !■- O 


C^l O O -t r-l^ 


CM lOOCM O 


O CO O >— 1 lO 


l^ 


•O HHCO 


















oa — -f — H 


-+ lO 


— t^ t^ 


CM CM O t^ -f 


CO Ol c-1 — ^ CO 


!>. O lO CO 


-+ 


• CM hH 1-H 


CO 




CO 






CO ^ 






T-H 00 lO O C^5 


CO oc 


Oi lO't 


oi CO 00 o o 


o o >ooo o 


^^ t^ C2 O ' — ' 


1-H 


• I- iC I- 


O •* 00 •^ t^ 


00 1~ 


t^ O 1^ 


00 Ol O ^ 00 


-H O TJ^ t-QO 


^1 'J' S "S s^ 


1-H 


■ c-l CO -^ 


I--0!MCO^u:: 


i-i^ 


COO_CO_ 


00 CO lo CO lo 


o (» 1- CO ^_ 


-H co^ ci o_ c-l 


CO 


•l-CO rr 


O — ' 


^H ^- 


-Tci 


CM CM — ' 


— — 1 


CO CO CM ■* 


hH 








lO 












"M lO t^ -f C 


lO -^ 


O CO o 


— > O O --0 'O 


t-- 'ti 00 —< o 


■— ■ lo CO t~^ c-l 


tJ^ 


^oo — 


t^ — 1 — C^l -T 




lO lO t — 


CO -r -^ t^^ 


CO o 00 r- CO 


C O — 00 iC 


o 


■ LO 00 CO 


— Ol >-0 -M — 


^_s 


CMI-i--D 


CO T '•r o^io 


— <_t-.oo_o0'r 


00 o o '^ CO 


hH 


• CO t^ — . 


■M — co- 


'^1 ct 


— CC -+ 


— '— '-fiOCM 


c-1 — — C-l 


■+ iOC-1 00 


CO 


■ HH 


ol 




oc 






c-l 
























































• c 




















































, 


■ 03 . 1 


1 

«: 

^ 






■ «- 




3 

3 C 4 

: St 


3 ■ » 


a 




. c 


.£ 






c 

•/ 


c 


5 C 




;_a. 


e; 


t- 

0. 


c 




c 


Cj 




a 

-*- 
r 

a 


Si 




: c 


^5 

5c 


2 o-r 


3 : >; 

■ o H 
: Ki •- 
- o; 0- 




i 


• c 

3 c 
3 = 


. c 






a 
c 

c 


1 


: c 
3 a 

^^ 
3 !- 


a 

c 

) c 

a 

c 


3 (f 

: c 
; a. 

> 0. 

5C 


> 

c 
c 


c 
'il 

c 
a. 


> 

c 
a 


c: 


c 
b ^ 

I "a 

< H- 


Bt 

4;^ 


: c 


i5i 



— (so 



286 



AJ^NUAL REPORT OF THE 



Cl 

a 



2 

o 
O 

I 

P 
W 

hJ 

O 

cc 

I— ( 

Ph 

t) 

Oh 

o 

Pi 

I 

>C 

W 

iJ 
PQ 
<J 
H 











iC 


,_^ 


r— t 


t^ 


»o 




00 




Q 


Tt<t^ 


lO'^fN 


iCOOCO 


^1 






»— t 




CO ^ "H ^ 


O^ 


^H 


CO 


<M (N -H r-HO 


O t^ t^ 00 CO 






cS 




CO T-H ^ 


T-H 


(M • 


CO 


(N T-H 


0^ .— ( 1— I -H CO 


o 




-fj 
















T— t 


O 


o 




i-H 
































<; 
o 







C5 LO^ OO 


lO 


Oi 


(M 


'-^ (M lO-* ^ 


CO 00 ^ CO CO 




f *— * 




CO —H iM 


c^ 


lO 


CO 


O >— 1 >— 1 ^ 00 


" lOCOOO rj< 




o3 oj 




!>• r— 1 ^H 


T— t 


T--t 


CO 


r-i 


1— I 1-H ^H ^H 


o 


a 


o a 


















o o 


















I-] 




















P 






























" 










_ 




COCO 


c» 






05 


00 


coio 




»-H 


O5 0^ 00 


lO 




iS 




COCO 


T-H 






•o 


Ol 


0-1 ^ 




(M 


00 r-i Tfl 


00 






^1 




lO 












1— i 








01 


00 




0) 

o 

0) 

O 
































2;35S 


iM 


CO— iTf 
^ C^ '^ 


CO 


cool '* 


b- 




»0>00 t^ 






1— t 


t^ 


CO 


iM (M CO 


CO 




05 -:}< Ol -H 






c3 


^ (M CO 


(N 


1-H 1-H 


■* 


lit)-* ^ 






CO (N t^ 


l^ 


05 

>-] 
O 


■4J 
O 
















T-H 




o 






















M 




00 --I '^^ 


Ol 


CO(M "+1 


CO 




rH 




t~- 




C:i0 01 Ol 




o 


1 


o»ooo 


GO 


--HGO Tt< 


CO 




00 




cc 




O^fi t^C5 




in 


73 


C^ (M 


^H 


rH 


'f 












T-H I-H 't' 


CO 


^ 


C L. 
























O cj 
























n 


0) 
























« 


























H 

s 
















































o 


o 


O 




OT 






CO r-l '+I 






CO 


00 LO 




1 


iM 


o 


05 




CO 






oi 't* CO 






00 


•^ Ol 




fi . 


CO 


^H 












ic CO ^ 






Ol 


C-l 




M 


<D !>, 


























lO 




Elem 
tar 
























T-H 








t^ 00 !M o r^ 


lO '^ ^ CO 0-1 


•^ CO ^ ^ O" 


CO Tt< oi CO ~ 








C5 0> O to lO 


'^ 00 CO —1 iC 


^ t^ t^ ^ CO 


CO 1-^ CO Ci O) 






+3 


O-H 02t--C0 


O CO '-<__'*•* 


o^asco^co^— 


CO Tt< t-- lO oo_ 


•^ 




iM lO OiCOC^ 


(M ^ t^^ CC 


O Ol — t CO CM 


CO CO CO CO lO 






o 






1— t 


T^ 




►J 


H 












o 














o 














B 


























CO 




r^ t^ CO CO lO 


CO CO CO 00 o- 


C2 ^ GO O r- 


<M Ol Cti COOO 




1 


O CO lO GO o 


-H -H iM 0-1 cr 


c: CO r^ -+I 't 


O CO Ol lO 05 




t- 


cond 
ary 


OO 0(N_^^_^0 


CO »o co^io c; 


C0_^0_'* CO_0C 


0^_r-H^01 C<t CO 


CO 


.5 


1-H CO »-H 1— f 


(m" cc 


CO *— < T— 1 


^H T-H ^H r^ lO 






O) 












« 


CO 












< 














hj 














t3 


























o 




CD — 1 05 t^ (M 


Ol —H -H lOCO 


lO Ol CO ^ oc 


— H lO CO i~- — 1 




u 


1 


050^001 


CO t^ '^t* 00 »c 


r-H 't^ c; r-o^ 


CO O O CO c: 




« 


lemen 
tary 


C^l iM O lO t^ 


■* 00 lO 00 CO 


COOOOOa CO 


T-H CO lo CO 1"-* 


(M 




^ CO COC^ —1 


^ -^ ir: 


CO -H Ol r- 


(N (M Ol (N O 

T-H 






W 














M 
^ 
































! 














i-( 




























' -J cc 
















H 
















• t>0 


• > 


•i 






■ O — 
O »- 










c3 


T-4 




O 
















* U* 


(- 


^3 




i a 
















1^ 

GO 


£ 


o: 
C 


• bl 

• (_ 


) 

c 






a 
o 


vent 
amp 

llTTlh 


03 

& CL 




^ 


> 






o 


c. 
c 
a 


i 


c 
c 


) C 

> - 


1 


1 

o: 






1 

S 


C 


2; 


a 


-4- 
C 


-4- 
U 

c 
iz 


c 

c 
!z 


bJ 

c 

t 

o 


) 

0. 
bl 


« 

Dh 


a. 

Ph 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



287 



o 


•Ot^if 


3 Tt<T-iTtH00-flf^cD»Ot^'*liO-Ht^»Cl'-i (Nt^CO-Hiolco'cO 1 


S 


•Tt<i^ cr 


3 t^ Tf O t^ 


lO t^ —< iM C^ 


lo (M -H rH a:i 00 00 lO iM CO CO "M 




OlC^ 


1 -HCO ■* Oi '-* 'frtjC^tCO >— i-^l OrHOOCOl"- 


H CO' 






1— t 




1-H 




-f 


o 




OiC 


> CO -H Tf* 


r> 


t^ o; coO'^ 


C. —1 


o 
C5CO coo5co-t<co CO --f 


CO 




O"- 


H (M -t O 


Cv 


1 lO CO 1^ C\ 


C5 CO 


CD--* tPCOCOOO CO o 

Tf< GO COOl -H 






t^c^ 


1 — 1 CO 


c- 


5^ _ cO- 


— < C^J 






















I^ 












i 










(M 






OOOCC 


> ^ 




00 t- 


Q t^ c; i^ 


CDOt^COiO COOOOt^lM CO CO 






TJH CO -^ 


< lO 




-!j 


oo lO 


lOCii-HTflt^ CO -t !M — 1 i-H 


(X 














< ^H 1-H 




CS "C^ I-H 1 


»c 


















( 




t^ 


to 


00 oo 




00 00 C-l c 


> 00 00 ^ CO «: 


) -t^ 






O -* CO-* 000s 

(N cooo rt -*a 


::::! ^ 


7-H 


cooo >r 


j 


CO o CO c^ 


CO i^ CO o o- 


o 






) 05 CO 


^H 


) 


lO C^ 


(N CO '- C^l 


^-^ 






CO (N (M ^ -* 


CO C-. 








(N 










I-H r-^ 




-t- 






00 ooc 


) 


OOCO -M c 


00 00 -H CO iC 


-tl 








) 00 CO -* 01 ^ 


-* 00 






COQO — 




CO 35 CO C^ 


CO 1- CO o c 


o 






s 


) r-t 00 1-H CO 00 1 c^ 


'T 






.-<oocc 




R '" 


(M CO " -M 


1-H 






Tt 


<■ I-H (M 1-H Ci 


-^ 1 R 1 










1-H 
















CO 


lO 




• c- 






lO 
























CO 




CO 


t^ 


OC' 


1-H 




• ot 






T-H 






















IH 


) r-H 




1-H 


cc 


) ^' 


1— t 




•u: 






»-H 






















oc 


) 1-H 




lO 


c\ 


CO 


O '35 'M C5 C 


CO CO CO t^ C 


OOcOOlOiC 


CO OSi-^IMCO 

00 -H -H 05C 


-* CO CO 00 — 


t^ 


<M 


O ■^ CD -^ (X 


CC 05 C^J t~~ tC 


CO c^ —1 c^ -+ 


-+I t^ CO t^ 1— 


CC 


(T- 


io^r>-_^ro^'* '- 


C^j^iO00_^_^C 


COt-C^COt-- 


^ iM CO__(M iM 


lO O CO 0_ CO 


t- 


CO 


-H rt OOI^ 


1— t T-H »-H r^ r— 


COiOiOOTt 


1* CO ^ CO 1- 


CO 0(M C5 IC 


oc 


OC' 


CO 


C^ t- 










o 


O CC '^ o c 


lO C'l 00 O iC 


t^ CO iM '^ t 


coot^ci If: 


0-1 0-1 1^ oi yc. 


CO 


00 


lO O CD ->) OC 


t^ -t -fi CO CO 


-t C5 r-H rt O 


0-1 00 o; CO c 


CO 00 l^ CO c 


95 


i2 


'^ '^ o !M li: 


CC »0 C5 '^ oc 


cqo_o_^co_Tr 


«C O CO r-l 1- 


<M__-Hoocqc 


oc 


00 


(M C5(N 


i> ^ cc 


(M(MC^ 05 1— 


-H(M 1-HTt 


^ CO CO<M 


iM 




O CO CO C5 C 


— 1 ^ OOt^iC 


— 1 O l^ lO CO 


r^O-t< cooc 


O] f O CO CO 


-* 


I* 


lo 00 C3 ?) 2 


CO lo t- C2 oc 


Ci CO o 00 CO 


lO CO •-< (M C 


00C5 lO-t — 


i5 


i5 


0_(M_^lM_fN CC 


CO O 00_ CO r- 


iM CO C<l CI CO 


O i-H C3 1-H C 


(M 00 l-^ CO CS 


oc 


00 
















1— ( 1-H •<* T— 1 •<* 


>— 1 CC C^ t^ 


'^ CO CO-* CO 


(M-* IMI> 


(NiOr-^COCO 


IC 


t^ 


CSl 


1 — I 




























































CO 


















































<o 




• • • 












































■^ 




"2 «^a 


^ 
































•o 






a. 

D 




o 














c 


03 












c 






o 


i 

c 


-c 
c 

e.1 


c 

c 


S — 


o 
c 

c 

c 

Pi 


T 

J 


J:s: 

c 
c 

OJ 

o 


'II 

o 


£ 

D oi 

bi 
_c 

15 

c 
pi 


"a! 
a: 


c 
a: 


03 

o 
t: 
f= 
s 

a 


> 

E 
a; 


c 
c 

s 

■•■^ 
o 

CO 


'c 
d 

_> 

o 
c 
xn 


-0 
03 


> 

u 
u 
3 
02 


^ a; 

3 

cc 


"a 
■i 

0, 

N 

E- 


c 
a 

u 
03 


c 
o 

-4-2 

c 

* — 

d 


o; 

s 




a; 

X, 

■4— 

> 


u 

■> o 

1^ 


Q 

o 



288 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 











3; 


C^) 




lO CO t- i — 


< -*< 00 CO O 1 I- 00 t- lO ■ 1 








1— 1 


00 


•C^5 




; CO O 't 


r- GO CO 00 00 1 t- o — 1 1- ■ 








c3 










c^ 


O rt OO 1 ^ — 1 CO ■ 1 




o 




-u 














- 




1-H 




O 












-<" -1 1 -1 






'4, 


H 










1 




: 






o 












1 










HH 












1 










H 












1 


1 


1 










^ 


fM 




lO CO 1 l^ 1 


• lOt- 


• ^1 1 


■ O C^l t^ 






J»':3 


00 


(M 




ccc 


'^ 




iO!M 


O 1 


• Tt< rt ^ ■ 






k-J 


c3 rt 










c\ 






CO 1 


(M • 




O 


Q 


o C 


















- 1 








W 
H 


o o 
















—1 








1-1 




























& 
















1 - -I 




















1 






Q 
<1 


^^ 


















— iCJ^COOO t-OOiOOO ■ 






o3 


















t- C) —H O) 00 t- CO (M • 








>-i 


















O T^ -* — 1 ■* ■ 




CO 




CI 

O 


















1 — t 




Q 














00 — 


t^cr 


\r. 


— itOCOO iO(M — 1 lO • 


'Z 






r— 4 








coco 


t— ic 


a 


l-ajOlCOiO rf-rtiQOCO 






o3 












CO 


00 ^ TjH rt O-IOIC-^CC ■ 


t^ 




O 














—1 Tji 


S 




m 


H 


















Z 




J 




















o 




O 
o 




















O 












O 


t-r- 


•t 


t-'tcOl'-'* OOCC-t^ • 

0000— HOOco oooit^io • 






u 


1 








(N 


t- cc 


CD 






m 


-TS 












1— 


o ^ CO 00 — 1 — 11^ ■ 


o 


>< 
















—1 csl 






< 


m 


















C 




Pi 




















^ 
^ 




H 
































00- 




23 


^ 


^ 


-:t< CDCi: 


5 lOiM 00 — 1 ■ 


w 




t 








—ICC 




o 


-* 


00 


t- Tt< a 


) CD »0 OOO ■ 


















t--. 


c^ 


1 — H T— 1 


CO 




m 


« >> 






















hJ 


lO 




i^ 


















r- 


< 


hH 






-2 -2 






















&H 






H 






















t3 




























Ph 




















o 








CM ai -H T^ c 


CD iC 


t- 


CO — ^ ^ CTj c^ 


3 lO Ol ^ 00 • 








-f< CO — It- t- 


lO lit 


-t 


lO CD c; CO c 


) t- 00 1^ >o 






O 


OOOiOiO-* 


ot- 


CD 


co^cD'^^ioc;- 


i — it-^_co_ ■ 


Pi 


-tl 




' — 1 T-H 




iC 


Oi CO 1— 1 !>• ir 


5 — ICOIM O ■ 
I— 1 




m 


H 












M 




J 














tjrl 




o 














^ 
P 




o 

a 
u 

CO 




























^ 






CO t- (M 00 cc 


00 IM 


CO 


O C3IM TtH|> 


rfi lOCOOO ■ 




1 


O ^ O lO ■>* 


^H T— 1 


o 


OOO CD CO c 


> CO "OCiiM ■ 








tj 


CO -H ,— 1 CO ic 


loco 


Th 


t-IM >0 lOC 


^^ TfH Tt^^t^ ^_ • 




O'? 


O (-, 
O c3 






(M 


CO —1 c<ta 


> — H Tt^ ■ 


W 




« 


o 












1-:) 




-c 














P 




►J 
o 














<: 

H 






en C^l ~ O l~- 


coco 


"* 


•* -M ~ lO cr 


-<rH lOO ■ 




t^ 


1 


-t"M '^ -H 'M 


rr\ -^ 


Tf< 


-fi t- oi o — 


t CO t- CO ■ 






p:5 




CD (M CO C<1 03 


i-fi ^ 


C^ 


cO_C0_Ci O < 


) t- CO CO lO ■ 




(M 










CO 

1 
i 


'M (N »0 CD 


(M — 1 CO • 
























a 














ra 




























c 














-tJ 
















m 


o . 










CO 






_aj 


aj 














o 


C 
O 
-a 
bl 

C 

3 


53« : 

cj O u 


c 
o 

to 

o 

D 
O 


— 

^ -l-i 


c 
"o 

e-i 


H 
o 


K- 1 

H .2 : 

•—1 u 

o -^^ 


rt > a, 

C ^ tK 
O) e3 Q, 


tt 4) 

oK c 
fe^ q 

o a a 

::2 o o 


a 

)•— 

'> 

c 

03 


'5 










< 


o 


O 


fe 


0^ 


CO 




< 


m 


m 


o 


u 


o 


oo 


Q 


fe 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



289 



CM 00 l^ —I 

-H o ro •-! 

^(M 00 



00 1^ c^i i^ -H 

;0 ^ rt O Ci 

(>1 ■* 00 '^ 



-H Tin lO CD •^ 
iM CC rt (M CO 
00 cn ^ P, 



"M 



(M CO 



CO(M 
l>CO 

CO 



O lO 

Ti^co 



CO CO ic -^ oi 

00 CO — * O Oi 
C3 lO CO CD 

r-H CO l-H 



00 


'^ 


o 


CD 


r-H 


■* 



O5 00 ^ O CO 



lO-H 

CO o 
00 Tt< 

CO 



CD CO 

CO co_^ 



lO Ci -fi -H Ol 
CM lO O CD CO 
1— ( ^ -^ 1 — I O 

CM 



rfH -f CD iC Crj 
CM t^ iC CO Ci 

^ 0-; CM 00 ^ 



CO CO -t^ lor^- 
'ti 00 c^j 'f CD 

O r-H CM C5 »0 



CO t^ 



I CM 



-H Tt^ CM 00 

00 en —I CO 

00^ CO C^l 



Tj> Oi CM CO o 
05 CM C-1 05 00 



CM 

o 

CO 

CO 



00 r^ 
oo 

CO^CM_ 
Tf<CM 



COCM OCDO 

1— ( 00 00 o Tf 



CO 



00 



CO t^CM t^ 

t^ 00 --H CO 

lO^ CM 
CM 



oor^ CO 
t^^co 



1-H O Ot! rH lO 

■^ 00 »0 CD ^ 
CO -—I CD CM '^ 



■* CM -f — I -ti 
■* O lO OJ t-- 

■ri< c^5 C^l ^H ^H 



O 31 O 00 -H 
lO CO CO lO CM 

rHCO '^l 



lO o 'th CO 00 

t^ CM t^ O --I 

1— I CD 



Tf -H 1-^ CO CI 

CM CO O C5 CR 
1-1 CM --ICO ^ 



CO 05CM 

-^ Tt< l-^ 



CD —^ C3 lO CO 
t-^ O -t< CD lO 

CO CO -H 00 00 

CM CO --H 



O Ol lO o -+ 

t^ O) l^ 00 r-l 

CD 00__ O^t^ 
CO ^ 



I CM '^ 

I T— H Ttl 

il>00 



CO 



CD CS IC— < -f< 

c; CO C5 01 1^ 

I-H I^ r-H r^ r— I 



00 

o 



CM 

CD 

o-. 

O 



o 



CO 
CM 



O l^ LQ >— I >— I 

lO r^ — t CD t^ 

r-H -t^ 00 CM 

oo' 



ooco 03 

•^ CD lO 
CM Tt^^ 

CO 



to 

no 
O 



CM 



CD Oi CO O O 
O 00 CM " C2 
^ CO t^ [-■- 'f 



C^J CM CM ^ '^ 
CO 



lOOO O ^ t^ 
C2 00 O CO CD 
CD CD C^l ^ 00 



CM »0 t-HCM '^ 



O CO CO CD CO 
C^l O -+ O O 
00 CM CM r-H 00 



CO r-H "-H C5 l^ 

CO CO CM 



Ol Tfi rfH CM CO 
CM lO r-< 00 t^ 
CM ^ t^ CD 00 



CM ^ Oi 
-* C^l 



Tt< 



00 t^ 00 CO c^i 

LO '^ I^ I- t^ 

^ -H CO lOO 



CMI^^ '* CO 



t^ CO CO 'ti CD 
Q — • t^ -t< CO 
O CiOOOCM 



CM lO t^ lOCO 

lo 00 lO ^H 00 

Oi O 'ti lO 00 



CM 



Tt T-H 



05 CO CO »-H CO 
00 r-H CO Oi Ol 

<— I ^ CO C5 

^CM 



CM ^< CI 1-H CD 
C2 CO Ol 1^ CO 
l^ CO Tti CD 00 

•^ l> r-H 



00 Tt< CO '* Ci 

01 t^ CO lO t^ 

00 -* lO >o >— I 

CO r-H 1-H ^H 



C^l 

00 



^ 



o 



Ci CD Q CD -* 
00 t^ ift CO lO 
CM ^ OOO CM 



CO 
CM 



CO CO CO CO -t 

,-H O Tt< — I 00 

t-- CO !>• Oi 05 



—ICO 1><M 



— I lO O LO l^ 

CO ~ i-H — I 1^ 

00 05 000 ■* 



CM CO 



CO 00 



O CO to — H t^ 

CO Ci 00 ^ CO 

M< I- oa o o 



^-H C5 CO -^ CO 
CM -< 



O CO lO C2 CO 
CO t^ -f — I o 
CO CD 00 O 00 



■— I O CM CO r^ 

CO 






05 

CD 



u 

(h 

D 

-a c 



3 






03 

03 fcH t. « 



o3 



3 
-O. 

O 

03 



c 






og 



J3.S 






o — . 
a o 
? 1- 
<u o 



O (U o 



-T3 

o S o 

-0-5 03 

ci.Z O 



c 
o 

en 
° C 

ca o 
js a 

5 '^ 

o +i 



o 

03 

a 

c3 

ll 

3;- 



bX) 

tn 3 fc- 
O J OJ 

III 



^^^ 



en 



O 



CT> 
I- 









Gi 



CM 

CO 



CO 
CO 
Ol 

CO 



00 

o 



10 

10 



C^J 



00 

CM 



C-. 

CO 
00 

a; 

CO 






c 
1-^ 



-»H> 

02 



o 



w 
CO :=] 

is 

H PL, 

a Q 
^ m 

►J H 



>H 

ca 

H 

CZ3 

Pi 
o 

►J Z 



-r -rji 

rH C5 

I^ CO 



a § 

Beg 



M £0 

c_ CO 

H 3 

►J W3 



CO "5 



I 1 



e2 



a § 





r^ 


'/I 


^ 








m 


TtI 










H 


H 






a= 




< 


■^ 





(£ 


• 


H 


r 1 








^ 


< 










a 


H 


>J 








3 


ro 


Ph 











ei 










>. 















u. 


rn 











H 










8i 


"?■ 


hJ 








a 


u 


' 










S 




> 




"3 


"2 


3 H 

z 




T3 


^ 


CJ 




D 


£ 


n 




a 
• 


z 







OJ 

s 








290 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 53— AGE— GRADE DISTRIBUTION FOR ALL ORIGINAL ENTRY PUPILS 
AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS PROMOTED AND RETAINED-1969-70— 

COUNTIES 



AGES 



g 












GRADES 












S 


1 


e3 






















•a 


a 
























og 


•g 


Im 


























a 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


CO 


1 



Total 



Under 5. 

6 

6 

7 



9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 and over. 



Total.... 
Promoted... 
Retained. . . 
Total* 



4 

15,887 

161 

5 



16,057 



14,647 



97 



3 

429 

54,603 

7,235 

631 

117 

37 

17 



63,087 



54,897 



5,638 



14,744 60,535 58,759 



1,657 

46,916 

10,074 

1,812 

330 

94 

43 

16 

9 

6 



60,959 



55,527 



3,232 



6 

2,231 

44,575 

11.248 

2,689 

646 

208 

49 

19 

12 

1 



61,684 



57,161 



2,526 



59,687 



10 

2,410 

41,690 

11,785 

3,508 

953 

298 

109 

35 

10 

2 

2 



60,812 



56,893 



1,932 



16 

2,649 

39,971 

11,694 

4,111 

1,244 

454 

149 

46 

14 

1 



60,350 



56,608 



1,848 



58,825 58,456 57,771 



42 

3,387 

38,126 

11,578 

4,320 

1,441 

515 

147 

27 

4 



59,587 



56,364 



1,407 



43 

3,129 

38,057 

11,538 

4,953 

1,807 

494 

10 

16 

3 

1 



60,143 



56,035 



2,018 



3 

66 

3,211 

36,534 

11,197 

5,438 

2,520 

664 

140 

21 



59,802 



1 

3 

42 

3,075 

34,240 

10,638 

4,589 

1,499 

378 

81 

30 



54,576 



47,789 



3,589 



58,053 56,537 51,378 



4 

34 

3,125 

33,024 

9,036 

3,359 

1,071 

254 

63 



49,970 



43,970 



2,828 



2 
53 

2,984 

29,753 

7,329 

2,355 

681 

199 



43,356 



38,704 



1,697 



5 

56 

3,063 

27,209 

6,407 

1,926 

518 



39,184 



35,731 



46,798 40,401 



1,637 



8 

99 

296 

541 

777 

860 

842 

796 

763 

661 

528 

333 

210 

77 

21 

20 



6,832 



5,866 



1,193 



37,368 7,059 118 
I 



183 



117 
1 



16,326 
56,526 
56,693 
58,247 
58,335 
59,106 
58,125 
59,011 
57,879 
56,266 
55,194 
49,995 
40,428 
10,527 
3,042 
875 



696,582 



632,080 



34,409 



666,489 



TABLE 53— Continued— AGE— GRADE DISTRIBUTION FOR ALL ORIGINAL 
ENTRY PUPILS AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS PROMOTED AND RETAINED 

—1969-70— TOWNS 



AGES 


a 
Si 

1 


GRADES 


g 

•5T3 
P. 


<1^ 

a 

1 


Total 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




Under 5 ... 


3 

11,160 

449 

19 






























3 


5 


46 

32,048 

4,774 

406 

65 
22 

7 

1 
























8 
72 
227 
401 
549 
699 
833 
833 
850 
760 
729 
526 
282 
128 
49 
16 


18 

10 

3 


11,214 


6 


956 

27,642 

6,488 

860 

131 

21 

5 

1 


1 

1,204 

26,052 

6.844 

1,211 

203 

47 

12 

2 




















33 526 


7 




















33 866 


g 


1,366 

24,524 

7,112 

1,644 

318 

70 

17 

2 


3 

1,598 

23,431 

6,915 

1,888 

403 

81 

16 

2 
















34,716 


g 


2 


8 

1,489 

22,569 

7,224 

2,040 

525 

88 

8 

1 














34 450 


10 


12 

1,562 

22,215 

7,200 

2,468 

703 

166 

27 

2 












34,107 


11 




16 

1,635 

20,919 

7,262 

2,934 

877 

188 

29 

1 

1 










33 770 


12 


16 
1,502 

19,831 

6,328 

2,643 

759 

158 

29 

4 


1 

10 

1,545 

18,600 

5,645 

2,160 

576 

124 

33 






34,183 


13 






33,007 


14 






19 

1,582 

16,641 

4,968 

1,592 

463 

100 


■■■■l8 
1,847 

14,970 

3,978 

1,186 

293 


32,510 


15 








31,000 


16 










28,355 


17 . . 












23,355 


18 














6,481 


19 
















1,862 


20 and over 


















450 






















Total .... 


11,633 


37,369 


36,104 


35,576 


35,053 


34,337 


33,952 


34,355 


33,862 


31,270 


28,694 


25,365 


22,292 


6,962 


31 


406,855 


Promoted.. . 


10,598 


31,251 


31,966 


31,918 


31,988 


31,753 


31,596 


30,554 


29,196 


26,492 


23,526 


21,112 


19,467 


6,182 


15 


357,614 


Retained . . . 


176 


3,545 


1,914 


1,529 


1,116 


972 


744 


1,862 


2,421 


2,285 


2,434 


1,816 


1,270 


725 


2 


22,811 


Total* 


10,774 


34,796 


33,880 


33,447 


33,104 


32,725 


32,340 


32,416 


31,617 


28,777 


25,960 


22,928 


20,737 


6,907 


17 


380,425 



•The total number promoted and retained equals membership at the end of the year but does not necessarily equal enrollment. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



291 



TABLE 53— Continued— AGE— GRADE DISTRIBUTION FOR ALL ORIGINAL 
ENTRY PUPILS AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS PROMOTED AND RETAINED 

—1969-70— CITIES 



AQES 


a 


GRADES 


a 


•■s 

— w 
a 3 

•CT3 

sh 

p. 
en 


=) 

(S 

a, 

"1 

a, 


Total 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




Under 5 


































5 


106 

1 






























106 


6 


413 

29 
2 


7 

356 

44 

7 


























421 


7 


12 

333 

75 

13 

5 
























397 


g 


7 

278 
87 
27 


















3 
2 
2 
4 
3 
3 




389 


9 




5 

293 

94 

27 
8 
















307 


10 






12 

293 
96 
14 

7 
2 

1 














407 


11 








14 
313 
114 

28 

12 

1 

1 












437 


12 






1 


23 

332 

100 

53 

16 

3 










463 


13 










9 
314 
124 

42 
9 

1 
1 








480 


14 . 












14 
314 

92 

25 

7 

3 

1 


3 

34 

340 

63 

24 

5 

1 




466 


15 














"15 

313 

67 

21 

9 


1 




540 


16 














507 


17!.! 














2 




416 


18 
















99 


19 
























30 


























11 






























Total.... 


107 


444 


415 


438 


399 


427 


425 


483 


527 


500 


456 


470 


425 


20 




5,536 


Promoted.. . 


102 


389 


405 


418 


385 


400 


391 


458 


470 


452 


396 


423 


396 


11 




5,096 


Retained . . . 


1 


35 


15 


7 


7 


18 


10 


5 


37 


32 


19 


13 


14 


9 




222 


Total'... 


103 


424 


420 


425 


392 


418 


401 


463 


507 


484 


415 


436 


410 


20 




5,318 



TABLE 53— Continued— AGE— GRADE DISTRIBUTION FOR ALL ORIGINAL 
ENTRY PUPILS AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS PROMOTED AND RETAINED 

—1969-70— STATE 



AGES 



a 












GRADES 












a 


« 


be 






















— « 


3 


■o 


























^;^ 


bfi 


b2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


fi 


7 


8 


fl 


10 


11 


12 


^•^ 


% 


























UJ 


u. 



Total 



Under 5 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 or over 

Total 
Promoted. 
Retained . 

Total*. 



7 

27,153 

611 

24 



27,797 



25,347 



274 



25,621 



3 

475 

87.064 

12,038 

1,039 

182 

59 

24 



100,900 



3,537 



9,218 



95,755 



2 

2,620 

74,914 

16,606 

2,679 

461 

115 

49 

17 

9 

6 



97,478 



87,898 



5,161 



93,059 



7 

3,447 

70,960 

18,167 

3.913 

854 

255 

61 

21 

12 

1 



97,698 



89,497 



4,062 



93,559 



10 

3,783 

66,492 

18,984 

5,179 

1,271 

368 

126 

37 

10 

2 

2 



96,264 



89,266 



3,055 



92,321 



19 

4,252 

63,695 

18,703 

6,026 

1,655 

535 

165 

48 

14 

1 



95,114 



88,761 



2,838 



91,599 



50 

4,888 

60,988 

18,898 

6,374 

1,973 

605 

156 

28 

4 



93,964 



88,351 



2,161 



90,512 



55 

4,705 

60,585 

18,852 

7,449 

2,522 

661 

130 

18 

3 

1 



94,981 



87,047 



3,885 



90,932 



3 

82 

4,869 

57,785 

18,559 

8,425 

3,413 

855 

169 

22 

9 



94,191 



81,437 



7,224 



88,661 



1 
3 

58 

4,586 

54,385 

17,090 

7,274 

2,267 

537 

111 

34 



86,346 



74,733 



5,906 



80,639 



5 

44 

4,684 

51,938 

14,773 

5,544 

1,654 

381 

97 



79,120 



67,892 



5,281 



73,173 



2 

75 

4,600 

46,734 

12,360 

3,971 

1,149 

300 



69,191 



60,239 



3,526 



63,765 



5 

74 

4,925 

42,492 

10,452 

3,133 

820 



61,901 



55,594 



2,921 



58,515 



16 
171 
523 
945 
,328 
,561 
,679 
,632 
,616 
,421 
,258 
859 
494 
205 
70 
36 



13,814 



12,059 



1,927 



13,986 



214 
132 



3 
135 



10 
27,646 
90,473 
90,956 
93,352 
93,152 
93,620 
92,332 
93,657 
91,366 
89,242 
86,734 
78,857 
64,199 
17,107 
4,934 
1,336 



1,108,973 



994,790 



57,442 



1,052,232 



*Tbe total number promoted and retained equals membership at the end of the .vear but does not necessarily equal enrollmeni 



292 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 54— NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGHT; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE; 

AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP; PERCENT ATTENDANCE; AND A. D. A. 

USED TO DETERMINE COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL— 1969-70 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Number 
Tau 


OF Days 

GHT 


Average Daily 
Membership 


Average Daily 
Attendance 


Percent 
Attendance 


So 


COUNTIES 


Elera. 


See. 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


•a o 


Accomack 

Albemarle 

Alleghany 


I'-O 
IM 
ISO 
ISO 
1,^0 


ISO 
IS! 
ISO 
ISO 

ISO 


4,085 
5,142 
1 , 965 
1,005 
3,521 


2,366 

2,s24 

1 , 106 

652 

1,624 


6,451 
7,966 
3,071 
1,747 
5,145 


3,765 
4,892 
1,870 
1,015 
3,289 


2,166 
2,638 
1,036 
596 
1,509 


5,931 
7,5.30 
2,906 
1,611 
4,798 


92 
95 
95 
93 
93 


92 
93 
94 
91 
93 


92 
95 
95 
92 
93 


5,931 
7,530 
2 908 


Amelia 

Amherst 


1,612 

4,798 


Appomattox 

Arlington 

Augusta 

Bath 

Bedford 


!-0 
l.SO 

1V(1 

!--'0 
1-0 


ISO 
186 
1^0 
1-0 
1-11 


1,426 

15,467 

6,477 

707 

4 , »7:'i 


838 
9,845 
3.714 

.376 
2,908 


2,264 
25,312 
10,191 

1,083 

7,881 


1,327 

14,657 

6,188 

672 

4,646 


775 
9,134 
3,480 

355 
2,649 


2,102 
23,791 
9,668 
1,027 
7,295 


93 
95 
96 
95 
93 


93 
93 
94 
94 
91 


93 
94 
95 
95 
93 


2,135 
23,791 
9,678 
1,027 
7,295 


Bland 

Botetourt 

Brunswick 

Buchanan 


ISO 
IMl 
l.M) 
l-O 
1>0 


ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
l.SO 


617 
2,774 
2,295 
6,406 
1,852 


45! 

1,554 
1,375 

2,895 
876 


1,068 
4,328 
3,670 
9,301 

2,728 


590 
2,652 
2,100 
5,964 
1,661 


429 
1,471 
1,246 
2,762 

809 


1,019 
4,123 
3,346 
8,726 
2,470 


96 
96 
91 
93 
90 


95 
95 
91 
95 
92 


95 
95 
91 
94 
91 


1,019 
4,123 
3,346 

8,726 
2,470 


Buckingham 


Campbell 

Caroline 


IMi 
M) 
10 
10 
1-0 


IMl 
IMI 
ISO 
1-0 
IM) 


6 431 
2,267 
3,2-0 
1.246 
1,915 


3,716 
1,205 
1,834 
622 
1,036 


10,150 
3,472 
5,114 
1,868 
2,951 


6,077 
2,121 
3,103 
1,162 
1,816 


3,476 

1,116 

1,727 

579 

968 


9,553 
3,237 
4,830 
1,741 

2,784 


94 
94 
95 
93 
95 


94 
93 
94 
93 
93 


94 
93 
94 
93 
94 


9,691 
3 237 


Carroll 


4 934 


Charles City 

Charlotte 


1,741 

2,784 






Chesterfield 

Clarke 

Craig 

Culpeper 

Cumberland 


HO 
1:0 
1-0 
IMl 
ISO 


1-0 

ISO 
ISO 
ISO 

1--0 


20,9S0 

1,140 

498 

3.033 

1-077 


10,278 

622 

272 

1,261 

531 


31,258 
1,762 

770 
4,204 
1,608 


19,767 
1,089 

481 
2,836 

991 


9,560 
.586 
262 

1,183 

487 


29,327 

1,675 

743 

4,019 

1,478 


94 
96 
97 
93 
92 


93 
94 
96 
94 
92 


94 
95 
97 
94 
92 


29,418 

1,675 

747 

4,019 

1,478 


Dickenson 


ISO 
1-0 
IM) 
182 
ISO 


ISO 

ISO 
ISO 
1.^2 
180 


2,721 
3,570 
1,196 
81,232 
4,413 


1,693 

1,666 

640 

48,695 

2,246 


4,414 
5,236 
1.S36 
129,927 
6,659 


2,560 
3,329 
1,098 
77,010 
4,081 


1,591 

1,454 

603 

45,053 

2,054 


4,151 
4,783 
1,701 
122,063 
6,135 


94 
93 
92 
95 

92 


94 
87 
94 
93 
91 


94 
91 
93 
94 
92 


4,196 


Dinwiddle. 

Essex 


4,787 
1,701 


Fairfax* 


122,063 


Fauquier 


6,135 






Floyd 

Fluvanna. . . 


!^0 
IM 
180 
180 


180 
180 
181 
ISO 
180 


1,295 
1,349 
4,288 
4,829 
2,430 


856 

599 

2,382 

2,232 

1,539 


2,151 

1,948 
6,670 
7,061 
3.969 


1,235 
1,260 
4,023 
4,616 

2,287 


806 

555 

2,204 

2,107 

1,449 


2,041 
1,815 
6,227 
6,723 
3,736 


95 
93 
94 
96 
94 


94 
93 
93 
94 
94 


95 
93 
93 
95 
94 


2,041 
1,815 


Franklin . . 


6,227 


Frederick. 


6,723 


Giles 


3,743 






Gloucester 


1^0 

ISO 

ISO 
ISO 
180 


ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 


2,110 
1,664 
1,790 
838 
2,330 


939 
762 
713 
366 
1,374 


3,049 
2,426 
2,503 
1,204 
3,704 


1,964 
1,554 
1,688 
791 
2,139 


902 
708 
666 
339 
1,268 


2,866 
2,262 
2,354 
1.130 
3,407 


93 
93 
94 
94 
92 


96 
93 
93 
93 
92 


94 
93 
94 
94 
92 


2,866 


Goochland 


2,262 


Grayson 


2,8S6 


Greene 


1,130 


Greensville 


3,407 



'Includes Fairfax City for all items except A. D. A. used to determine cost of operation per pupil. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



293 



TABLE 54— NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGHT; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE; 

AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP; PERCENT ATTENDANCE; AND A. D. A. USED 

TO DETERMINE COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


I 

7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Nhmbe;; 
Taxi 


OF D.^TS 
OHT 


Average Daily 
Membership 


Average Daily 
Attendance 


Percent 
Attendance 


^2 


COUNT IKS 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


n=0 

< 


Halifax 


1^0 
ISO 
l.'O 
I'O 
ISO 


ISO 
ISO 
180 
ISO 
ISO 


4,e35 

5,705 

20,964 

8,230 

346 


2,959 
3,223 

12,493 

4,449 

226 


7,594 

8,928 

,33,4.57 

12,679 

572 


4,276 

5,388 

19,972 

7, S3 9 

334 


2,723 

2,997 

11,654 

4,100 

217 


6,999 

8,385 

31,626 

11,999 

551 


92 
94 
95 
95 
97 


92 
93 
93 
93 
96 


92 

94 
95 
95 
96 


6,999 


Hanover 


8,385 




31,026 




11,999 




551 






Isle of Wight 


t-o 

lf-0 
!.S0 

i^n 

ISO 
ISO 

ISO 

ISO 
180 


ISO 


3.017 


1,520 


4,537 


2,808 


1,422 


4,230 


93 


94 


93 


4,2.32 


King George 

King and Queen 

King William 


IfiO 
ISO 

ISO 


1,202 

754 
Rf.O 


687 
317 
432 


1,979 
1,071 
1,322 


1,218 
692 
823 


644 
293 
403 


1,862 

985 

1,226 


94 
92 
93 


94 
92 
93 


94 
92 
93 


1.862 

985 

1,226 


Lancaster 


IPO 
ISO 
180 
ISO 

180 


1,269 
3,064 
6,2S0 
2,437 
1,714 


706 
1,844 
3,082 
1,118 
1,007 


2,035 
4,908 
9,372 
3,555 
2,721 


1,1S0 

2.845 
5,994 
2,210 
1,568 


710 
1,714 
2,861 
1,016 

931 


1,890 
4,559 
8,855 
3,226 
2,499 


93 

93 
95 
91 
91 


93 

93 
93 
91 
92 


93 
93 
94 
91 
92 


1.8S0 


Lee 


4,559 


Loudoun 


8,859 


Louisa . . .... 


3,226 


Lunenburg 


2,499 




180 
IfO 
1^0 

1-0 

i>n 


ISO 
180 
ISO 
ISO 

ISO 


1,.369 
849 

4,.36S 
862 

5,127 


5"2 
500 

2,487 
508 

2,037 


1,901 
1,349 
6,855 
1.370 
8,064 


1.306 

809 
4,083 

826 
4,859 


570 
478 

2,309 
486 

2,744 


1,876 
1,287 
6,392 
1,312 
7,603 


95 
95 
93 

96 
95 


96 
90 
93 
96 
93 


90 
95 
93 
96 
94 


1,876 




1,287 


Mecklenburg 

Middlesex 


6.392 
1,312 


Montgomery 


7,603 


Nansemond 


I'O 
I.M) 
ISO 
IM) 
I'^O 


180 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


6,375 

1,872 

845 

2,020 

1,304 


3,249 
997 
450 

1,245 
814 


9,624 
2,869 
1,301 
3,265 
2,118 


5,950 

1,745 

790 

1,858 

1,217 


3,008 

949 

424 

1,142 

765 


8,958 
2,694 
1,214 
3,000 
1,982 


93 
93 
94 
92 
93 


93 
95 
93 
92 
94 


93 

94 
93 
92 
94 


8,958 
2,694 




1,214 


Northampton 

Northumberiand . . . 


3,000 
1,982 


Nottoway 


ISO 
ISO 
ISO 

uo 

I'O 


ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


2,027 
2.213 
2,433 
2,270 
9,856 


1,147 
1,109 
1,179 
1,193 
5,429 


3,174 
3,322 
3,612 
3,403 
15,285 


1,897 
2,115 
2,287 
2,171 
9,203 


1,054 
1,048 
1,093 
1,134 

4,987 


2,951 
3,163 
3,380 
3,305 
14,190 


94 
96 
94 
96 
93 


92 
94 
93 
95 
92 


93 
95 
94 
95 
93 


2,951 


Orange 


3,163 


Page 


3,380 


Patrick 


3,305 


Pittsylvania 


14,276 


Powhatan 


!.^0 
ISO 
ISO 
1S3 
ISO 


180 
ISO 
ISO 
183 
180 


972 

1,221 

3,681 

19,686 

4,346 


434 

449 

1,866 

8,603 

2,446 


1,406 
1,670 
5,547 
28,289 
6,792 


885 

1,139 

3,467 

18,681 

4,093 


405 

419 

1,721 

7,949 

2,308 


1,290 
1,558 
5,188 
26,630 
6,401 


91 
93 
94 
95 
94 


93 

93 
92 
92 
94 


92 
93 
94 
94 
94 


1,290 


Prince Edward 

Prince George 

Prince William 

Pulaski 


1,558 

5,195 

26,632 

6,401 






Rappahannock 

Richmond 


ISO 
1^0 
ISO 
ISO 

ISO 


ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 


S21 

1.023 

13,177 

2,584 

6,935 


356 

533 

7,579 

1,415 

3,727 


1,177 
1.501 

20,756 
3,999 

10,662 


779 

9S5 

12,5.30 

2,461 

6.587 


339 

510 

7,161 

1,335 

3.538 


1,118 
1,501 

19,691 
3,796 

10,125 


95 
96 
95 
95 
95 


95 
97 
94 
91 


95 
90 
"5 
95 
95 


1,118 
1,501 


Roanoke 


19,691 


Rockbridge 

Rockingham 


3,796 
10,179 



*See Williamsburg City. 



294 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 54— NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGHT; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE; 

AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP; PERCENT ATTENDANCE; AND A. D. A. USED 

TO DETERMINE COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Number of Days 
Taught 


AvERAOB Daily 
Membership 


AvBRAQE Daily 
Attendance 


Percent 
Attendance 


.1 


COUNTIES 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


||| 
< 


Russell 


180 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


180 
180 
180 
180 
IsO 


4,096 
3,501 
3,096 
4,079 
3,197 


2,235 
2,026 
1,922 
2,226 
1,363 


0,331 
5,527 
5,018 
6,305 

4,5f-;o 


3,895 
3,322 
2,964 
3,902 
3,004 


2,089 
1,927 
1,825 
2,113 
] ,275 


5,984 
5,249 
4,789 
6,015 
4,279 


95 
95 
96 
96 
94 


93 
95 
95 
95 
94 


95 
95 
95 
95 

94 

94 
95 
89 
91 
94 


5 984 


Scott 


5,252 
4,789 
6,265 
4,279 


Shenandoah 

Smyth 


Southampton 


Spotsylvania 

Stafford 


180 
ISO 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


180 

180 
180 
180 
180 


2,805 
3,829 
885 
2,030 
6,233 


1,439 
1,960 
383 
1,124 
3,870 


4,244 
5,789 
1,268 
3,154 
10,103 


2,652 
3,651 

776 
1,848 
5,883 


1,324 
1,853 
349 
1,006 
3,649 


3.976 
5,504 
1,125 
2,854 
9,532 


95 
95 
88 
91 
94 


92 
95 
91 
90 
94 


3,976 
5 504 


Surry 


1 126 


Sussex 


2 854 


Tazewell 


9,532 




Warren 


180 
180 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


ISO 
180 
ISO 
180 
180 


2,177 
5,603 
1,706 
5,965 
3,058 


1,205 

3 031 

844 

3,423 

2,002 


3,382 
8,634 
2,550 
9,38S 
5,060 


2,063 
5,284 
1,589 
5,601 

2,879 


1,133 

2,812 

773 

3,265 

1,879 


3,196 

8,096 
2,362 
8,866 
4,758 


95 
94 
93 
94 
94 


94 
93 
92 
95 

94 


95 

94 
93 
94 
94 


3 196 


Washington 

Westmoreland 

Wise 


8,096 
2,363 
8,866 
4,763 


Wythe 




York 


180 


180 


5,302 


2,655 


7,957 


5,021 


2,490 


7,511 


95 


94 


94 


7 511 






Total Counties. 






433,137 


238,564 


671,701 


408,570 


222,147 


630,717 


94 


93 


94 


632 102 










TOWNS 
Abingdon 


180 
180 
180 
180 
180 


180 
180 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


620 
194 
312 
20 i 
851 


376 
110 

149 
348 
505 


996 
304 
461 
556 
1,356 


585 
184 
295 
200 
804 


362 
107 
140 
333 
471 


947 
291 
435 
533 
1,275 


94 
95 
95 
96 
94 


96 
97 
94 
96 
93 


95 
96 
94 
96 
94 


947 


Cape Charles 

Colonial Beach 

Fries 


291 
435 
533 


Poquoson 


1,275 


Saltville 


180 
180 


180 
180 


429 
427 


495 
309 


924 
736 


406 
409 


464 
295 


870 
704 


95 
96 


94 
96 


94 
96 


870 


West Point 


704 


Total Towns 






3,041 


2,292 


5,333 


2,883 


2,172 


5,055 


95 


95 


95 


5,055 











SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



295 



TABLE 54— NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGHT; AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE; 

AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP; PERCENT ATTENDANCE; AND A. D. A. USED 

TO DETERMINE COST OF OPERATION PER PUPIL— 19G9-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Number 
Tad 


OF Days 

OHT 


Average Daily 
Membership 


Avbraoe Daily 
Attendance 


Percent 

Attendance 


^2 
So 


CITIES 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


Elem. 


Sec. 


Total 


< 




180 
180 
180 
180 
180 


180 
ISO 
180 
ISO 
180 


11,397 

2,176 

892 

4,708 

15,537 


6,189 

1,213 

536 

2,375 

8,787 


17,586 
3,389 
1,428 
7,083 

24,324 


10,564 

2,024 

850 

4,435 

14,674 


5,584 
1,132 
508 
2,163 
8,156 


16,148 
3,156 
1,358 
6,598 

22,830 


93 
93 
95 

94 
94 


90 
93 
95 
91 
93 


92 
93 
95 
93 
94 


16,148 


Bristol 


3,156 


Bueoa Vista 

Charlottesville 

Chesapeake 


1,358 

6,598 

22,837 


Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights. . . 
Covington 


180 
180 
180 
ISO 


180 
180 
180 
180 


716 
2,169 
1,304 
6,248 


419 

1,392 

765 

3,897 


1,135 

3,561 

2,069 

10,145 


683 
2,070 
1,242 
5,926 


401 
1.312 

726 
3,643 


1,084 
3,382 
1,968 
9,569 


95 
95 
95 
95 


96 
94 

95 
93 


95 
95 
95 
94 


1,084 
3,392 
1,968 


Danville 


9,569 


F'airfax* 


5,810 




























Falls Church 

Franklin 


185 
180 
180 
180 
182 


185 
180 
180 
180 
182 


1,196 

1,393 

1,564 

809 

21,268 


846 

874 

1,026 

808 

10,404 


2,042 
2,267 
2,590 
1,617 
31,672 


1,136 

1,318 

1,495 

759 

20,152 


784 
823 
9S3 
765 
9,710 


1.920 
2,141 
2,478 
1,524 
29,862 


95 
95 
96 
94 
95 


93 
94 
96 
95 
93 


94 
94 
96 
94 
94 


1,929 
2,168 


Fredericksburg 

Galax 


2,479 
1,524 




29,862 






Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 


ISO 
182 
ISO 
182 

180 


180 
182 
180 
182 
180 


1,624 
3,300 
710 
7,620 
2,853 


908 
1,991 

440 
4,290 
1,782 


2.532 
5,291 
1,150 
11,910 
4,635 


1,541 
3,123 
672 
7,203 
2,709 


867 
1,855 

417 
4,023 
1,664 


2,408 
4,978 
1,089 
11,226 
4,373 


95 
95 
95 
95 
95 


95 
93 
95 
94 
93 


95 
94 
95 
94 
94 


2,494 
4,984 




1,089 


Lynchburg 

Martiusville 


11,226 
4,373 


Newport News 

Norfolk 


181 
ISO 
ISO 
181 
180 


181 
180 
ISO 
181 
180 


19,879 

36,450 

746 

5,627 

17,421 


11,137 

19,560 

410 

2,821 

8,797 


31,016 

56,010 
1,156 
8,448 

26,218 


18,763 

34,076 

709 

5,172 

16,271 


10,113 

17,505 

396 

2.603 

8,026 


28,876 

51,581 

1,105 

7,775 
24,297 


94 
93 
95 
92 
93 


91 

89 
97 
92 
91 


93 

92 
96 
92 
93 


28,876 
51,600 


Norton 


1,105 


Petersburg 

Portsmouth 


7,775 

24,297 


Radford 


ISO 
180 
180 
180 
180 


180 
180 
180 
180 
180 


1,345 

28,560 

12,499 

966 

2,910 


759 

13,707 

7,035 

632 
1,744 


2,104 

42,267 

19,534 

1,598 

4.654 


1,286 

26,458 

11,658 

916 

2,777 


728 

12,137 

6,369 

592 
1,646 


2,014 

38,595 

18,027 

1,508 

4,423 


96 
93 
93 

95 
95 


96 
89 
91 
94 
94 


96 
91 
92 
94 
95 


2,014 


Richmond 


38,595 


Roanoke 


18,027 


South Boston 

Staunton 


1,608 
4,423 






Suffolk 


180 
180 
ISO 
ISO 
180 


180 
180 
180 
ISO 
180 


1,254 
28,127 
2,662 
2,796 
1,784 


793 

15,348 

1,464 

1,437 

1,114 


2,047 

43,475 

4,126 

4,233 

2,898 


1,169 
26,819 
2,535 
2,626 
1,709 


746 

14,i61 

1,392 

l,.30o 

1,053 


1,915 
40,980 

3,927 
3,931 
2,762 


93 

95 
95 
94 
96 


94 
92 
95 
91 
94 


94 
94 
95 
93 
95 


1,915 


Virginia Beach 

Waynesboro 

Williamsburgf 

Winchester 


41,001 
3,927 
3,931 
2,762 


Total Cities 






250,510 


135,700 


386,210 


235,520 


124,288 


359,808 


94 


92 


93 


365,804 










Total State. . 






686,688 


376,556 


1,063,244 


646,973 


348,607 


995,580 


94 


93 


94 


1,002,961 











•See Fairfax County for all items except A. D. A. used to determine cost of operation per pupil, 
tlncludes James City County. 



29G 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 55A— NUMBER OF HIGH SCHOOLS ACCORDING TO 

AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP AND NUMBER OF 

TEACHING POSITIONS— 1969-1970 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


Average 
Daily 

Membership 


1-9 
Tchrs. 


10-19 
Tchrs. 


20-29 
Tchrs. 


30-39 
Tchrs. 


40-49 
Tchrs. 


50-59 
Tchrs. 


60-69 
Tchrs. 


70-79 
Tchrs. 


80-89 
Tchrs. 


90-99 
Tchrs. 


100 or 
More 
Tchrs. 


Total 


1-99 


1 
1 


1 


1 


















3 


100-199 


















1 


200-299 


6 
6 


2 
46 

1 


















8 


300-599 


1 


16 
33 
















69 


600-899 


29 
9 


6 
21 












69 


900-1199 






12 
12 










42 


1200-1499 










14 
4 


7 
8 
3 


2 

8 
7 


i 

8 
7 
5 


35 


1500-1799... . 














24 


1800-2099 
















18 


2100-2399 


















7 


2400 or more 






















5 



























Total 


3 


13 


50 


49 


38 


27 


24 


18 


18 


17 


24 


281 



TABLE 55B— NUMBER OF COMBINED SCHOOLS ACCORDING 

TO AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP AND NUxMBER OF 

TEACHING POSITIONS— 1969-1970 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Average Daily 
Membership 


One 
Tchr. 


Two 
Tchrs. 


Three 
Tchrs. 


Four 
Tchrs. 


5-9 
Tchrs. 


10-19 
Tchrs. 


20-29 
Tchrs. 


30-89 
Tchrs. 


40-49 
Tchrs. 


50 or 
More 
Tchrs. 


Total 


1-49 

50 -')*} 


1 
2 




1 




1 












3 


1 
1 
7 
7 
12 
1 










3 


100 149 


















1 


150-199 










1 
3 










8 


W!) 2QQ 


















10 


300 399 










3 

24 
7 








15 


400-599 












7 
25 

7 


3 

7 

23 

6 

1 


"lb 
21 
34 


35 


600-799 












39 


800 "99 














45 


10(10 ipqQ 
















27 


1 200 or more 


















35 






















Total 


3 




1 




5 


29 


34 


39 


40 


70 


221 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



29( 



TABLE 55C— NUMBER OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ACCORDING 

TO AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP AND NUMBER 

OF TEACHING POSITIONS— 1969-1970 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


AvEHAOE Daily 
Membership 


One 
Tchr. 


Two 
Tchrs. 


Three 
Tchrs. 


Four 
Tchrs. 


5-9 
Tchrs. 


10-19 
Tchrs. 


20-29 
Tchrs. 


30-39 
Tchrs. 


40-49 
Tchrs. 


50 or 

More 

Tchrs. 


Total 


1 24 


3 


2 


3 

1 
17 


r 

24 
15 


1 
1 

10 
35 
75 
53 
2 
1 












I 


25-49 












14 


50-99 














53 


100-149 




4 

10 

130 

160 

163 

11 










54 


150-199 
















85 


200-299 










1 

8 

172 

181 

27 

1 








184 


300-399 
















170 


400-599 










7 

57 
68 
18 






343 


600-799 














249 


800-999 












8 

12 

5 


r 

2 

1 


103 


1000-1199 














32 


1200-1399 














7 


1400 or more 


















1 
























Total 


3 


13 


21 


40 


178 


478 


390 


150 


25 


4 


1,302 



TABLE 55D— NUMBER OF ONE-TEACHER ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS BY AVERAGE DAILY MEMBERSHIP AND 
GRADES TAUGHT— 1969-1970 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Average Daily Membership 


Number of One-Teacher Elementary Schools With 




One 
Grade 


Two 
Grades 


Three 
Grades 


Four 
Grades 


Five 
Grades 


Six 
Grades 


Seven 
Grades 


Total 


1-9 


















10 14 


1 




1 










2 


lo-li) 












20-24 






1 










1 


25-''9 
















30-34 


















35-39 






















































Total 


1 




2 










3 















298 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 56— VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY— 1969-70 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


COUNTIES 


Value of 
Sites and 
Buildings 


Value of 

Furniture and 

Equipment 


Value of 

School Buses 

Publicly 

Owned 


Total Value 
of School 
Property 


Aco.omaok 


$ 4,491,550 

11,696,498 

2,688,000 

1,473,000 

5,368,397 


$ 657,500 

1,450,000 

278,400 

226,700 

460,947 


$ 291 ,827 

268,057 

84,601 

94,540 

182,598 


$ 5 440 877 


Albemarle 


13,414,555 


Alleghany 


3,051,001 


Amelia 


1,794,240 


Amherst 


6,011,942 






Appomattox 

Arlington 


2,248,900 

50,058,320 

10,166,256 

1,863,500 

9,617,318 


316,000 
5,018,838 
1 ,031 ,868 

268,500 
1,259,354 


76,620 
224,535 
434,947 

63 ,528 
294,519 


2,641,520 
55,301,693 


Augusta 


11,633,071 


Bath 


2,195,528 


Bedford 


11,171,191 






Bland 


1,388.000 
4,336,265 
4,098,918 
8,590,348 
2,826,500 


126,100 
544,787 
404,272 
794,996 
407 ,461 


62,306 
142,651 
241,373 
290,932 
149,180 


1,576,406 


Botetourt 


5,023,703 


Brunswick 


4,744,563 


Buchanan 


9,676,276 


Buckingham 


3,383,141 


Campbell 


11,262,016 
2,879,845 
7,982,900 
1,803,419 
3,187,370 


1,095,116 
227,700 

1,262,670 
153,706 
333,600 


238,464 
155,760 
171,421 
63,175 
114,919 


12,595,596 


Caroline 


3,263,305 


Carroll 


9,416,991 


Charles City 

Charlotte 


2,020,300 
3,635,889 






Chesterfield 

Clarke 


45,710,416 
2.500,000 
1,200,000 
5,510,597 
2,900,000 


4,047,300 

150 ,000 

70,000 

541,600 

750 ,000 


740,881 
49,500 
330,045 
141,718 
145,000 


50,498,597 
2,699,500 


Craig 


1,600,045 


Culoeoer 


6,193,915 


Cumberland 


3,795,000 


Dickenson 


4,000,578 
6,188,587 
1,197,000 
204,677,238 
9,900,000 


532,720 
451 ,200 
140 ,000 
21,202,900 
842,650 


202 ,007 

249,298 

75,000 

2,022,602 

276,436 


4,735,305 


Dinwiddle 


6,889,085 


Essex 

Fairfax 


1,412,000 
227,902,740 


Fauquier 


11,019,086 






Floyd 


2,889,600 
3,290,000 
5,660,000 
7,675,300 
6,247,200 


275,000 
218,000 
663,205 
1,086,343 
732,600 


140,787 
57,267 
374,588 
223,580 
144,595 


3.305,387 


Fluvanna 


3,565,267 


Franklin 


6,697,793 


Frederick 


8,985,223 


Giles 


7,124,395 






Gloucester 


3,250,000 
3,624,010 
2,477,585 
959,450 
4,324,340 


525 ,000 

348,400 

300,596 

85 ,570 

555,600 


200,000 
89,200 

197 ,000 
32,346 

122,324 


3,975,000 


Goochland 


4,061,610 


Grayson 


2,975,181 


Greene 


1,077,366 


Greensville 


5,002,264 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



299 



TABLE 56— VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


COUNTIES 


Value of 
Sites and 
Buildings 


Value of 

Furniture and 

Equipment 


Value of 

School Buses 

Publicly 

Owned 


Total Value 
of School 
Property 


Halifax 


$ 6,903,320 

10,425,384 

42,060,862 

17,130,600 

800 ,000 


$ 640,050 

699,427 

7,663,016 

1,943,700 

90,000 


$ 319,627 

242 ,427 

764,662 

333,321 

23,166 


$ 7,862,997 
11,367,238 
50 488 540 


Hanover 


Henrico 


Henry 


19,407,621 
913 166 


Highland 






Isle of Wight 

James City* 


5,328,550 


272,500 


179,615 


5,780,665 


King George 

King and Queen 

King William 


3,421,000 
1,100 000 
1,929,750 


366,000 

75,000 

125,700 


74,953 
58,000 
65,000 


3,861,953 
1,233.000 
2,120,450 


Lancaster 


2,122,200 

5,750 000 

11.878,666 

3,561,400 

2,823,885 


215,200 
700 000 
1,185,766 
155,710 
314,650 


88,821 
170,000 
216,790 
124,775 
112,412 


2,426,221 
6,620 000 
13,281.222 
3,841,885 
3,250,947 


Lee 

Loudoun 

Louisa 

Lunenburg 


Madison 


1,971,650 
972,161 
7,973.319 
1,427.300 
9,248,000 


118,500 
120 567 

1.067,585 
117,000 

1,455,500 


164,000 
85,189 

221,730 
55,500 

285,000 


2 254 150 


Mathews 


1 177 917 


Mecklenburg 

Middlesex 


9,262,634 
1 599 800 


Montgomery 


10,988,500 


Nansemond 

Nelson 

New Kent 

Northampton 

Northumberland. . . 


9,974,300 
2,596,906 
1,716,200 
3,722,537 
3,121,800 


792,700 
278,271 
143.501 
250 000 
148,200 


451,798 
162,242 

54,900 
125 ,000 

90,420 


11,218,798 
3,037,419 
1,914,601 
4,097,537 
3,360,420 


Nottoway 

Orange 

Page 


3,707,300 
2,679,795 
5,047,625 
2,225 000 
14,785,913 


501,419 
275,205 
373,986 
300 000 
1,572,648 


124,406 
125,433 
72 022 
210,500 
609,762 


4.333,125 
3,080,433 
5,493,633 


Patrick 

Pittsylvania 


2,735.500 
16,968,323 


Powhatan 


953.688 

2,300.600 

4,250 000 

36,422,598 

9,442,200 


60,500 

345,169 

500.000 

4,814,619 

840,000 


45.000 
102,515 
320,000 
700,879 
159,068 


1,059,188 


Prince Edward 

Prince George 

Prince William 

Pulaski 


2,748,284 

5,070.000 

41,938,096 

10,441,268 






Rappahannock 

Richmond 


1 ,400 000 
2.375,760 

22,242,825 
4,995,150 

10,712,000 


240,000 
171 .800 

3,697.234 
400 000 

1,068,200 


60,300 

53 , 190 

443 ,443 

143,000 

470,120 


1.700.300 
2.600,750 


Roanoke 


26,383.502 


Rockbridge 

Rockingham 


5,538.150 
12,250,320 



•See Williamaburg City. 



:J00 



ANNUAL REPORT OP" THE 



TABLE 56— VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


COUNTIES 


Value of 
Sites and 
Buildings 


Value of 

Furniture and 

Equipment 


Value of 

School Buses 

Publicly 

Owned 


Total Value 
of School 
Property 


Russell 


$ 8,145,102 
7,952,110 
6,821,130 
6,660,000 
5,551,140 


$ 704,189 
920,000 
560,000 
550,000 
416,800 


$ 207,083 
225,000 
160,000 
167.474 
160,000 


$ 9,056,374 
9,097,110 
7,541,130 
7,377,474 
6,127,940 


Scott 


Shenandoah 

Sm^'th 


Southampton 


Spotsylvania 

Stafford 


5,625,000 
6,441,685 
970,000 
2,811,600 
6,959,381 


472,500 
514,000 
62 ,000 
272,200 
380,193 


165,000 
200 .010 
47.315 
115.376 
206,832 


6,262.500 
7,155,695 
1,079.315 
3 19Q 17rt 


Surrv 


Sussex 


Tazewell 


7,546,406 




Warren 


4.000,000 
9,130,000 
2,459,780 
12,695,000 
9,100,000 


600,000 
1,500,000 

174,900 
1,600,000 

720,000 


80,000 
288,000 
140,699 
410,000 
127 ,000 


4,680,000 

10,918,000 

2,775,379 

14 705 ono 


Washington 

Westmoreland 

Wise 


Wythe 


9,947,000 




York 


11,197,057 


818,400 


169,800 


12,185,257 




Total Counties. 


$ 860,228,450 


$ 94,201,704 


$ 20,438,702 


$ 974,868,856 


TOWNS 
Abingdon 


$ 1 ,401 ,000 

365 ,000 

450,000 

1,145,000 

1,247,011 


$ 114,500 

20,000 

60,000 

130,000 

104,200 


$ 29,440 


$ 1,544,940 
385 ,000 


Caoe Charles 


Colonial Beach 

Fries 


4,300 


514,000 
1,275,000 
1,389,727 


Poquoson 


38,516 


Saltville 


900,000 
1,200,000 


75,000 
95,000 




975 000 


West Point 


13,500 


1,308,500 


Total Towns. . . 


$ 6,708,011 


$ 598,700 


$ 85,756 


$ 7,392,467 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



301 



TABLE 56— VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY— 1969-70— Continued 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


CITIES 


Value of 
Sites and 
Buildings 


Value of 

Furniture and 

Equipment 


Value of 

School Buses 

Publicly 

Owned 


Total Value 
of School 
Property 


Alexandria 


$ 30,645,900 

6,044,000 

2,017,400 

13,781,222 

29,832,176 


$ 2,790,000 

600.000 

114,000 

938 , 100 

2,769,925 


$ 56,879 


$ 33,492,779 
6,644,000 


Bristol 


Buena Vista 




2,131,400 


Charlottesville 




14,719,322 


Chesapeake 


245.224 


32,847,325 


Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights. . . 


1,810,700 
5,230,000 
2,654,148 
14,184,452 
2.111,177 


203.000 

615,000 

193,583 

1,369,556 

95,025 


4,180 


2,018,480 
5,845 000 


Covington 

Danville 


7,568 


2.855,299 
15,554,008 


Fairfax 




2,206.202 








Falls Church 

Franklin 


5,102,320 
2,949 500 
4.431,311 
2 345,300 
56,707,069 


610,000 
283,500 
421,000 
333,000 
3,231,500 


13,838 
44,500 


5,726,158 
3,277,500 


Fredericksburg 


4,852,311 


Galax .... 


5,400 
254,273 


2 683,700 


Hampton 


60.192,842 






Harrisonburg 


5,443,000 

6,201,671 

1,298.633 

22 .553 ,300 

10,472,155 


800,300 

688,500 

133,260 

2,446,600 

1,540,441 




6.243,300 


Hopewell 




6.890,171 


Lexington 

Lvnchburg 




1 ,431 ,893 
24,999,900 


Martinsville 




12,012,596 








Newport News 

Norfolk 


33,340,945 

64,139,774 

1,188,751 

8.047,588 

37,718,220 


3,037,066 
5.976,191 
121 .038 
1,417,000 
3,227,000 


470,753 

28.266 
7,860 


36,848,764 
70,144,231 


Norton 


1 ,317,649 


Petersburg 


9,464,588 


Portsmouth 


105,500 


41,050,720 


Radford 


2.750,000 

53,928,016 

23,700,892 

1,255,863 

7,410,000 


275,000 

11,361,181 

2,914,483 

110,100 

500,000 


7.000 
62,314 
23,707 


3,032,000 


Richmond 


65,351,511 


Roanoke 


26,639,082 


South Boston 

Staunton 


1,371,963 
7,910,000 








Suffolk 


2,935,700 
47,595.000 
6,294,860 
6,048,107 
6,332,000 


823.933 

5,708,000 

658,637 

478,800 

1,445,000 




3,759,633 


Virginia Beach 

Wavnesboro 


712,500 


54,015,500 
6,953,497 


Williamsburg* 

Winchester 


157,466 


6,684,373 
7,777,000 








Total Cities... 


$ 528,501,150 


.15 58,236,319 


$ 2,207,228 


$ 588,944,697 


Total State... 


.$ 1,395,437,611 


$ 153,036,723 


$ 22,731,686 


$ 1,571,206,020 



'Includes Jamfls City County. 



302 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



TABLE 57— COMPARATIVE DATA 
The tabulations below represent certain fundamental statistical comparisons 



Fiscal Year Ending 


1930 


1935 


1940 


1945 


1950 


Receipts* 
From State 


$ 6,209,168 


$ 6,966,946 


$ 8,718,763 


$ 15,336,119 


S 32,227,037 






From counties 


7,037,574 
2,222,479 
6,884,183 
3,104,331 

1,704,159 


7,143,953 
1,420,150 
5,636,531 
2,348,171 

1,463,051 


8,358,197 

832,802 

6,744,035 

3,076,078 

6,412,021 


13,065,757 

1,047,081 

9,174,591 

379,480 

8,069,999 


25.970,908 




1,301,252 


From cities 


18.639.607 


From loans and bonds 


18.375,385 


From other sources, including 
balances from previous year — 


19,568,402 


Total Receipts and Balances. 


$ 27,161,894 


124,978,802 


$ 34,141,896 


$ 47,073,027 


$ 116,082,591 


DiSBDBSEMBNTS* 

Administration 


$ 605,292 

14,917,064 

398,828 

121,093 

1,445,677 


$ 555,838 

13,721,587 

393,645 

114,513 

1,647,019 


1 652,144 

16,883,626 

992,191 

157,754 

2,244,394 


$ 913,788 

26,821,696 

1,256,855 

258,522 

4,150,414 


$ 1,519,504 
50,476,178 


Other instructional costs .... 


3,301,533 


Attendance and health services. . . 
Auxiliary agencies 


375,432 
7,073,519 














Operation of school plant 

Maintenance of school plant 

Fixed charges 


1,361,347 
607,636 
616,998 


1,266 5!8 
565,281 
319,616 


1,713,748 
722.985 
334,787 


2,651,353 

1,250,146 

345,353 


5,087,151 

3.501.938 

753,978 






Total Cost of Operation— 




























































Capital outlay 


$ 2,737,689 
2,501,882 


% 2,253,226 
1,940,055 


$ 5,366,567 
2,398,203 


% 2,305,847 

1,878,497 


$ 21,347.215 
4,045,291 






Total Disbursements 

Balances Close of Year 


$ 25,313,507 
1,848,387 


S 22,777,328 
2,201,474 


$ 31,466,399 
2,675,497 


$ 41,832,471 
5,240,556 


$ 97,481.739 
18,600,852 






Total Disbursements and 


$ 27,161,894 


$ 24,978,802 


$ 34,141,896 


S 47,073,027 


S 116,082,591 






Valuation of School Property 

Cities 

Counties 


$ 31,667,050 
36,786,675 


$ 30,739,256 
37,400,795 


$ 34,988,581 
63,500,287 


$ 37,146,522 
64,723,176 


J 84,206,435 
120,513,666 


















Total 


$ 68,453,725 


S 68,140.051 


i 88,488,868 


$ 101,869.698 


$ 204,720,101 



•Received and expended by local school boards. 
tSeparate data not available prior to 1967-68, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



303 



VIRGINIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS— 1969-70 

indicative of educational expansion and development in Virginia. 



1955 


1960 


1965 


1969 


1970 


$ 58,785,235 
20,260,023 
43,324,534 
1,603,190 
31,206,688 
18,277,516 

42,430,408 


S 82,238,896 
21,383,893 
72,613,337 
1,777,425 
47,072,893 
28,232,101 

53,126,588 


$ 138,601,380 

28,158,833 

115,643,205 

2,083,822 

77,025,259 

42,596,948 

62,446,377 


$ 224,059,475 

79,655,615 

219,258,990 

1,723,164 

145,282,430 

67,117 843 

75,660,615 


$ 250,101,997 

91,102,990 

240,472,692 

2,617,110 

172,756,474 

94,237 204 

81,034,707 


t 215,887,594 


$ 306,445,133 


$ 466,555,824 


$ 812,758 132 


$ 932,3S3,174 


S 2,574,241 

87,364,199 

6,778,585 

555,265 

9,643,434 


$ 3,850,638 

142,754,287 

9,465,276 

803,554 

14,312,464 


$ 6,331,089 

239,674.147 

19,345,256 

1,201,568 

19,152,821 


S 12,606,774 
396,037 177 

45,167,792 
3,338,166 
I 
21,950,619 
10,331,269 
39,811,988 
22,374,415 
11.013,496 


i 14,304.371 

454,667 672 

50,333,344 

4,362,297 

23.670,774 








12,919,086 


9,663,440 
5,286,586 
1,385,201 


15,531,824 
7,571,447 
2,124,544 


24,887,013 

12,338,041 

3,429.094 


45,358,592 
25,397,438 
14,455,454 








J 562,631,696 


$ 045,409,028 
















$ 8,536,467 

4,626,064 

5,500,159 

106,456.172 

60,737,623 


$ 7,494,811 








5,233,163 








5,286,880 


t 51,801,592 
8,084,138 


$ 52,731,269 
18,883,259 


$ 66,455,644 
30,324,813 


102.316,032 
68,094,357 


$ 183,126,681 
32,750,913 


S 268,028,562 
38,416,571 


S 423,139,486 
43,416,338 


$ 748,488.181 
64,269,951 


S 833,894 871 
98,488,303 


$ 215,887,594 


$ 300,445,133 


$ 466,555,824 


« 812,758,132 


% 932,383,174 


$ 173,912,218 
292,875,365 


$ 265,704,161 
442,093,643 


$ 400,437,880 
618,113,267 


1 555,356,784 

875,496,313 

7,320,682 


$ 588,944,697 

974,868,856 

7,392,467 










S 466,787,583 


$ 707,797,804 


$ 1,018,551,147 


$ 1,438,173,779 


« 1.571,206,020 



tClaasification changed July 1, 1967. 



;-504 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



o r- «— 

CO CO oo 
t^ GO Tf^ 



lO C^ CO 

lO <V3 CO 
CC lO *o 



O .-1 lO 



lO 


CO 




CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


<M 


cr> 


CD 


C^ 


(M 


•^ 










»o 


on 


tn 


O 






CO 


CO 





^ o 




t^ o 


UD I-- 




o yj 


CO o 


CD 


CO ^ 



.—I cr^ X) 



O I— »-< 

CO CO oo 

-«j* ,-1 r* 

r- oo •»»< 



»o Tt* -^j* 

CO »0 C5 
O CM »0 



,—1 CD CO GO 


o 


o o 


O I--. (M 


o 


O oo 


OO »r5 CO 







.-I t-- t>- t^ 



i-« cr. 



■^ cr. t^ 

^ Oi d 



CO oo 

oo C4 



Tp t- lO 

CO "^ oo 

t-" CO CO 



lO oo CO 

CO IlO 
CO W5 



00 05 0"^ 

t>. lo t^ ^ 



»o Oi o 

Oi CO O 
t^ lO CO 



on 


oo 


on 


in 


00 


c^ 


■»• 


lO 


oo 




e^ 


CO 


1^ 


U1 


to 




>o 


O 


M 


■>r 


CO 


•^ 


a 


•o 



§ 



1-1 C^ CO 
■«t* «-< lO 
CS| CO ^ 



«l» «» 



W3 M 

OO oo 



■^ 55 CO 

oo o c^ 

■^t* C^ r-< 

eo CO 



8 



as Oi 
«-« o 



»0 "^f CD 

00 O CO 

01 (."O C^l 



t-- ^*< GO 
Tt* -^ CO 



»-i »-< •-< CO 



1-. •»*« 
OS Oi 



00 



C^ CO 

CO "* 
Ol OS 



CO CO OJ (M 
^- C^l W3 OS 

OS CS OS OO 



CO O 
CS) OO 



C3 00 

UD CO 



OO CS 

O 'S' 

»0 CO 

CO kO 

*-» CO 



C^ CD b- O 

O •-• OS CO 
O W5 t^ I>- 









o 



o 

o 

o 
n 



o 
o 
n 
u 



Q 

Ed 

O 

a 



o 



tn ja 



= ^ s,^ 



o 



z 

o 
n 

a 
a 

J 
-< 

z 
o 



O O H 



.■ago 
o o E- 



.■a o o 

O O H 



S B 



H H 



, 


, 


a 


c. 


k. 




o 


O 


o 


y 


r.. 


>, 


>, 


o 


1 1 1 


c 


> 






o 
o 


"o 


1^ 


VJ 








Cj 




c> 


, 


Vi 


o 


o 




bn 










m 


efl 








-r> 








o 














rt 


> 


> 


o 




o 


< 


<; 


O 




H 





1^ a 



CS 

u 
n 
S 
P 



o 



.t; o o 
O O H