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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD. 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



School Report, 



Year Ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 
VOX POPUJLI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1886. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



own of Chelmsford 



Year ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



LOWELL, MASS. : 
VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1885. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 

1885. 



Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the Poor — Henry S. 
Perham, Charles W. Flint, John Q. Battles, R. Wilson 
Dix, Geo. F. Snow. 

Town Clerk — Geo. A. Parkhurst. 

Town Treasurer — Edwin H. Warren. 

School Committee — Three years, Nathan C. Saunders, T. S. 
Edmands, John C. Hobbs ; two years, Samuel J. Garland, 
James H. Hazen, Geo. F. Locke ; one year, Edwin E. Dutton, 
Geo. F. Snow, Geo. Hyde. 

Collector of Taxes — Arthur H. Sheldon. 

Constables — Edward E. Laph am, James P. Emerson, Alfred 
Day, Geo. E. Spaulding, Daniel W. Sleeper, John H. Whid- 
den. 

Fence Viewers — Albion J. Lamphere, Daniel P. Byam, Ed- 
ward B. Hatch. 

Highway Surveyor — Lyman S. Gale. 

Appraisers of Personal Property at Town Farm — "Elisha H. 
Shaw, Daniel P. Byam, James P. Emerson. 

Auditors — Ziba Gay, Edward F. Richardson, J. Adams 
Bartlett. 

Weighers of Hay — Geo. A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Geo. W. Perry, Eben T. Adams, Elisha H. Shaw, 
Thomas M. Gerrish. 

Weighers of Coal — Geo. A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Elisha H. Shaw, Myron A. Queen, Geo. W. Perry, 
Thomas M. Gerrish. 

Measurers of Wood — Geo. A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Eli P. Parker, Elisha H. Shaw, James P. Emerson, 
John N. Perry. 

Surveyors of Lumber — Dawson Pollard, R. Wilson Dix, 
Geo. E. Spaulding, Edwin K. Parkhurst, Eli P. Parker. 

Field Driver — Edward B. Hatch. ■ 

Sealer of Weights and Measures — True Morton. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

For the Tear Ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



Births recorded — Males, 27 ; 
Births of native parentage. . . . 


Females, 


16. 


Total 


43 
29 


Births of foreign parentage . . . 








5 


Births of native and foreign parentage 
Marriages recorded . 




9 

26 


Marriages between natives . . 
Marriages between natives ant 


I foreigne 
Females, 


il'S . . 




19 

7 


Deaths recorded — Males, 22 ; 
Number under 5 years of age . 
Between 5 and 10 


16. 


Total 


38 

7 











« 10 " 20 








1 


» 20 " 30 






% 


3 


" 30 "■ 40 








»"> 


" 40 " 50 








4 


« 50 " 60 








3 


" 60 " 70 








6 


" 70 " 80 








5 


" 80 " 90 








6 



Causes of death: consumption, 8; pneumonia, 6; old age, 8 ; 
cerebro-spinal meningitis, 3 ; infantile, 3 ; other causes, 10. 



REPORT ON DOG LICENSES. 

Middlesex ss., Dec. 1, 1885. 
George A. Parkhurst, Esq, Clerk of the Town of Chelmsford, has 
paid into the treasury of said Middlesex County, three hundred and 
forty-two dollars and sixty cents ($342.60) for dog licenses, for the 
year eighteen hundred and eighty-five, as per his account of 30th 
ult. . AMOS STONE, 

County Treasurer. 

Number of dogs licensed 172 

Males 161 

Females 11 

Amount received for licenses $377 00 

Amount of fees — 20 cents per license. 34 40 

Paid to the County Treasurer, as per above receipt 342 60 

97 per cent, refunded 332 32 

GEO. A. PARKHURST, 

Town Cleric. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

For the Year Ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



Your Treasurer charges himself with cash balance in treasury, as 

found at last annual settlement $2,549 16 

Cash received of — 

State Treasurer, as State Aid for 1884 419 00 

Relief to indigent soldiers and sailors, 96 00 

Corporation tax for 1885 1,188 64 

National Bank tax for 1885 1,420 87 

Armory rent 75 00 

Income Massachusetts school fund . . 171 25 

On account of State paupers 22 00 

County Treasurer, on account of dog licenses for 1885. . 332 32 

C. W. Flint, on account of support of Sylvia Mansfield.. 100 00 

Town of Truro, on account of support of J. C. Hopkins, 92 10 

Town of Methuen, on account of support of lunatic 3 00 

A. J. Lamjmere, on account of use of Town Hall at Cen- 
tre 32 40 

C. W. Flint, on account of sale of old stock from school- 

house at North Chelmsford 7 44 

Lyman S. Gale, on account of sale of drag plank 5 75 

Rev. J. H. Vincent, on account of sale of books and 

school supplies 21 82 

Rev. N. C. Saunders, on account of tuition of non-resi- 
dent pupil 2 00 

Geo. L. Hubbard, on account of auctioneer's license. ... 2 00 

D. P. Byarn, on account of sale of lots in cemetery at 

South Chelmsford 4 00 

Dawson Pollard, on account of sale of lots in cemetery 

at West Chelmsford 6 00 

Timothy Adams, on account of sale of lots and locust 

posts in Centre cemetery 72 50 

Jeremiah Clark, in trust for care of lot of the late Amos 

H. Silver, in cemetery at North Chelmsford 100 00 

Overseers of Poor, as proceeds of Town Farm 747 48 

Amount carried forward $7,470 73 



Amount brought forward $7,470 73 

Geo. F. Snow, tax of 1883, in full 152 08 

Interest on same 17 20 

On account of tax of 1884 865 05 

On account of interest on same 44 15 

A. H. Sheldon, on account of tax of 1885 11,937 14 

On account of interest on same 103 49 

City of Lowell, on account of pauper 7 34 

Hired for use of Town, as temporary loan 3,500 00 

Making a total of $24,097 18 

And is credited as follows : — 
By cash paid — 

State tax for 1885 $1,455 00 

Outstanding orders of 1884, in full 69 50 

On account of orders drawn present year 19,224 51 

On account of temporary loan 3,000 00 

On account of interest on same 34 58 

On account of care of Kimball lot in Centre cemetery. . 5 00 

Balance in treasury, as found on settlement 308 59 

$24,097 18 

E. II. WARREN, 

Treasurer. 
Chelmsford, March 3, 1886. 



REPORT OF THE ASSESSORS 

For the Year Ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



Valuation Mat 1, 1885. 

Real estate (resident) 11,095,700 00 

" " (non-resident) 202,180 00 

11,297,880 00 

Personal estate (resident) #250,925 00 

" " (non-resident) 2,945 00 



253,870 00 



Total valuation $1,551,750 00 



Number of polls. . : 659 

" horses 418 

" cows i . 779 

" sheep 00 

" swine 255 

" dwellings 564 

" acres of land taxed, 14,132 

Taxes. 

Rate on $1,000, $8.00. Polls, $2.00 each. 

State tax $1,455 00 

County tax 1,233 14 

Appropriation for public schools 

" " school incidentals.... 

" " free text books 

" " support of the poor. . 

" " highways 

" . " repairs of public build- 
ings 

" " relief of indigent sol- 

diers and sailors .... 



$5,000 00 


500 


00 


300 


00 


2,300 


00 


3,500 


00 


350 


00 


100 


00 



$2,688 14 



Amounts carried forward $12,050 00 $2,688 14 



Amounts brought forward $12,050 00 $2,688 14 

Appropriation for town officers and com- 
mittees 700 00 

" " collection and abate- 
ment of taxes 400 00 

" " barn at town farm. . . 500 00 

" hall at N. Chelmsford, 500 00 

" " well at Chelmsford 

Centre 150 00 

" " cemetery at West 

Chelmsford 100 00 

" " miscellaneous expen- 
ses 50 00 



Overlayings 

Less estimated receipts 

Less taken from treasury .... 

Total tax committed 

Tax on 659 polls $ 1,318 00 

Tax on property 12,414 00 



14,450 


00 


$17,138 
43 


14 

86 


$17,182 00 
3,200 00 


$13,982 00 
250 00 


$13,732 


00 


$13,732 


00 



CHAS. W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
HENRY S. PERHAM, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Assessors. 



COLLECTORS' REPORTS. 



Collector's report for the year 1883. 
Taxes on list of 1883, uncollected Feb. 28, 

1885 $152 08 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1885 15 07 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1885 2 13 

$169 28 

Cash paid Treasurer as tax $152 08 

" " " « interest 17 20 

$169 28 

Geo. F. Snow, Collector, 1888. 

Collector's report for the year 1884. 
Taxes on list of 1884, uncollected Feb. 28, 

1885 $970 49 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1885 28 30 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1885 26 31 

$1,025 10 



Cash paid Treasurer as tax $865 05 

" " " " interest 44 15 

Uncollected taxes to new account 105 44 

" interest to new account 10 46 

$1,025 10 



Geo. F. Snow, Collector, 1884. 

Collector's report for the year 1885. 

Tax list for 1885 $13,732 00 

Additional taxes 9 60 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1885 103 49 

Interest accrued since on uncollected taxes. . 16 66 

$13,861 75 



Cash paid County Treasurer as County tax. . $ 1,233 14 

" " Town Treasurer as tax 11,937 14 

" " " " « interest 103 49 

Uncollected taxes to new account 571 32 

Interest accrued to new account 16 66 

$13,861 75 



Arthur H. Sheldon, Collector, 1885. 
Estimated abatements, $80.00 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 

For the Tear Ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

PAID FOE TEACHING. 

No. 1, Frances V. Doane, 34 weeks $476 00 

1, Carrie A. Jockow, 11 weeks 88 00 

1, Nellie M. Perham, 34 weeks 272 00 

1, Mary Howard, 13 weeks „ 130 00 

1, Emma L. Pierce, 10 weeks 100 00 11,066 00 

2, Carrie E. White, 22 weeks 176 00 

2, Onie M. Hobbs, 11 weeks 88 00 264 00 

3, Araminta V. Paasche, 34 weeks 272 00 272 00 

4, Leonora K. Battles, 11 weeks 88 00 

4, Gertrude Byam, 23 weeks 173 00 261 00 

5, Ida E. Byam, 30 weeks 180 00 180 00 

6, Susie S. McFarlin, 34 weeks 289 00 289 00 

7, Etta G. Locke, 32 weeks 256 00 256 00 

8, Daniel Phillips, 34 weeks 765 00 

8, Laura G. Hoyt, 34 weeks 272 00 

8, Minnie A. Worden, 34 weeks 272 00 

8, Addie M. Taylor, 34 weeks 272 00 1,581 00 

9, Laura G. Butterfield, 11 weeks 88 00 

9, Agnes Naylor, 34 weeks 272 00 

9, Carrie M. Robbins, 23 weeks 172 50 532 50 

$4,701 50 

PAID FOB CARE OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

No. 1, Alvin Saunders, care $45 00 

1, Willie C. Ward, care 12 00 

1, Mrs. Charlesworth, cleaning ......... 5 64 

1, Mrs. Hills, cleaning 113 

1, Mrs. Nason, cleaning 1 10 $64 87 

2, Willie E. Fowle, care 16 50 16 50 

3, Lizzie P. Garland, care 17 00 17 00 



Amount carried forward $98 37 



10 



Amount brought forward 

No. 4, J. H. Hazen, care and cleaning. 

5, Chas. H. Dutton,,care 

6, Thos. T. French, care 

7, Geo. F. Locke, care 

7, Guy Reed, care 

8, Henry T. Ripley, care 

8, Willie H. Hall, care 

8, Willie H. Hall, cleaning 

9, John Dunn, care 



No. 1, 
1, 
1, 
1, 
2, 
2, 
2, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
5, 
6, 

6, 
6, 

6, 

6, 



T, 



PAID FOR FUEL. 

Wm. Redmond, 110^ feet oak wood.. . 
Wm. Redmond, 33-^ feet pine wood . . 
Wm. Redmond, surveying lumber .... 

C. H. C. Hall, preparing wood 

E. F. Richardson, 32 feet oak wood. . . 
E. F. Richardson, 12 feet pine wood.. 
Thos. Sheehan, preparing 3 cords wood, 

Alvin Blaisdell, 25 feet oak wood 

Warren Berry, 4^ feet oak wood 

J. Q. Battles, 8 feet oak wood 

W. L. Smith, preparing 3 cords wood, 

S. G. Garland, preparing wood 

J. H. Hazen, 24£ feet oak wood 

J. H. Hazen, 6 feet pine wood 

J. H. Hazen, 6 feet mixed wood 

E. E. Dutton, 20 feet wood 

P. D. & T. S. Edmands, 12 feet oak 

wood 

P. D. & T. S. Edmands, 4 ft, pine wood, 
P. D. & T. S. Edmands, 4 feet mixed 

wood 

P. D. & T. S. Edmands, 8 feet prepared 

wood 

P. D. & T. S. Edmands, preparing 

wood 

Wm. C. Edwards, 8 feet oak, 16£ feet 

pine 

Wm. Martin, preparing wood 

Seth P. Sampson, 144 feet wood 

Henry T. Ripley, preparing wood .... 
Wm. C. Edwards, 48 feet oak wood. . 
Joseph Dunn, preparing 4 cords wood, 
Joseph P. Winn, preparing 2 cords 

wood 





$98 37 


:19 00 


19 00 


6 00 


6 00 


20 50 


20 50 


5 00 




11 00 


16 00 


22 00 




46 00 




4 45 


72 45 


25 00 


25 00 



S68 


90 


16 


63 


1 


05 


14 


58 


22 


00 


5 


25 


3 


75 


15 


77 



5 00 
3 50 
2 00 



$257 32 



$101 16 



;i oo 



1*9 15 



20 75 




3 18 




4 68 


28 61 


10 00 


10 00 


9 75 




2 50 




2 25 




5 00 




1 32 


20 82 


13 75 




3 00 


16 75 


88 50 




13 50 


102 00 


30 00 




3 00 




1 50 


34 50 



$373 99 



1 00 




45 




2 05 


3 50 


15 95 


15 95 


10 74 


10 74 


10 00 


10 00 



11 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 

J. H. Vincent, Superintendent $200 00 $200 00 

J. H. Vincent, ink and blocks 

J. H. Vincent, stationery 

J. H. Vincent, supplies 

Parmenter's Crayon Co., crayons 

Boston School Supply Co., supplies 

J. Merrill & Son, 20 qts. ink 

N. C. Saunders, services as Secretary School 

Committee 10 00 10 00 

No. 1, S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 9 70 

1, G. H. Johnson, setting glass 

1, B. S. Adams, repairs 

1, A. H. Davis, repairs 

1, John Sullivan, grading yard 1884. . . . 

1, F. C. Ward, setting glass 

1, James P. Emerson, cleaning vault. . . . 

2, John C. Hobbs, repairs 

3, L. H. Paasche, labor on school-room . . 
3, S. J. Garland, repairs and supplies. . . 
3, C. B. Coburn & Co., paint and oil. . . . 
3, E. P. Parker, book-case and repairs. . . 

5, D. W. Bickford, supplies 

6, P. D. & T. S. Edmands, supplies 

6, T. S. Edmands, repairs 

6, Orrin Pierce, chart stand 

7, George F. Locke, repairs 

8, Geo. Hyde, expense attending Com- 

mittee meetings 

8, Geo. Hyde, stock and repairs ....... 

8, F. K. Ripley, labor on school-house . . 
8, Silver & Gav, paints 

8, Willie S. Hall, padlock 

9, Geo. F. Snow, repairs 

9, Geo. F. Snow, supplies 

9, Mrs. Ann O'Farrell, cleaning 



1 50 




75 




1 85 




1 50 




1 00 




1 00 


17 30 


5 00 


5 00 


12 12 




2 42 




8 00 




7 63 


30 17 


80 


80 


45 




4 50 




1 50 


6 45 


3 00 


3 00 


2 25 




10 78 




17 00 




1 87 




15 


32 05 


7 50 




1 80 




8 00 


17 30 



SCHOOL TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Cowperthwait & Co., books $138 08 

Harper & Brothers, books 63 82 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books 57 26 

Harrison Hume, books 24 32 

F. M. Ambrose, books 8 25 

D. Appleton & Co., books 25 60 

C. W. Clark, books 9 38 

Amount carried forward $326 71 



$362 26 



12 



Amount brought forward 

Ivison, Blakernan & Taylor, books 

Boston School Supply Co., supplies 

A. C. Stockin, supplies 

Geo. T. King & Merrill, supplies 

Marden & Rowell 

J. H. Vincent, expense and services buying 

and delivering books and supplies 



;326 71 




18 10 


$344 81 


107 39 




8 10 




4 60 




5 00 


125 01 




76 61 



$546 43 



SUPPORT OF THE POOR. 

PAID FOR EXPENSES OUTSIDE THE ALMSHOUSE. 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, support of Sam- 
uel L. Blood $ 52 49 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, support of Eph- 

raim Buttrick 54 94 $107 43 

Worcester Asylum for Chronic Insane, sup- 
port of Daniel Gilligan 175 86 175 86 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital, support of 

Michael McKeon 190 31 190 31 

Dan vers Lunatic Hospital, support of Laura 

E. Bailey and Catherine McMahon ..... 369 98 369 98 

St. John's Hospital, support of Thomas Law- 

ler Ill 31 111 31 

City of Worcester, aid of Timothy Holland, 3 00 

Worcester City Hospital, aid of Timothy 

Holland ,. 48 00 5100 

City of Lowell, aid of Elizabeth Donohoe ... 48 00 

City of Lowell, aid of Mrs. Damas La Due. . 31 50 

City of Lowell, aid of F. E. Russell 29 21 108 71 

City of Lynn, aid of Frank W. Wood 30 00 30 00 

Town of Shirley, aid of Mary A. Burke 41 40 41 40 

S. W. Parkhurst, aid of Jonathan C. Hop- 
kins 63 00 

Amasa Howard, aid Jonathan C. Hopkins. . . 6 60 

Hapgood Wright, aid of Jonathan C. Hop- 
kins 5 50 75 10 

Sarah L. Webber, aid of Darius Hall 100 00 100 00 

E. Shaw & Son, aid of Mrs. James McEnnis, 142 63 

Marinel & Willsteed, aid of Mrs. Jas. McEn- 
nis 2 07 

Estate of Levi Howard, aid of Mrs. James 

McEnnis 14 00 159 30 

Edward F. Parker, aid of Katie Call 12 00 

Estate of Levi Howard, aid of Katie Call. . . 10 00 22 00 

Amount carried forward $1,542 40 



lo 



Amount brought forward 

Eggie Russ, board of Willie Holland 

Estate of Levi Howard, aid of Geo. E. Hall, 

Amasa Howard, aid of Geo. E. Hall 

Amasa Howard, aid of Mrs. St. Amore 

William McClure, aid of 63 tramps 

William McClure, aid of Edward Kelly 

Chas. W. Flint, aid of State pauper 

Chas. W. Flint, aid of outside poor 

Geo. F. Snow, aid of outside poor 



EXPENSES AT ALMSHOUSE. 

N. C. Bean, Superintendent 

N. C. Bean, sundries 

D. W. Bickford, grain 

Dutton Bros., grain 

N. C. Bean, 4,560 lbs. meadow hay 

N. C. Bean, 1,215 lbs. English hay 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 

J. H. Redman, meat and provisions 

Geo. F. Foss, meat and provisions 

D. C. Perham, meat and provisions 

O. Taylor, meat and provisions 

L. J. Mansfield, meat and provisions 

B. M. Hildreth, labor chopping wood 

John Keats, labor 

Lewis Smith, labor 

Hannah McEnnis, labor 

Susan O. Loughlin, labor 

Charles Lovett, labor 

Leonard Barclay, labor 

Hannah Kelley, labor 

E. K. Parkhurst, 16,560 lbs. coal 

Dutton Bros., ice 

Dutton Bros., lumber 

Arthur H. Sheldon, taxes 

David A. Polley, blacksmithing ............... 

B. S. Adams, blacksmithing 

Timothy Adams, mowing machine 

Timothy Adams, burial expenses of S. S. Dut- 
ton and Mary Burke 

A. J. Robinson, legal services, in Mrs. Mans- 
field case 

N. B. Edwards, medical attendance 

Levi Howard estate, medical attendance. . . t . 
Amasa Howard, medical attendance 

Amount carried forward 





$1,542 40 


$12 00 


12 00 


32 00 




15 50 


47 50 


1 50 


1 50 


47 25 


47 25 


10 75 


10 75 


2 00 




5 50 


7 50 


3 40 


3 40 




$1,672 30 


$350 00 


$350 00 


8 60 


8 60 


283 50 




24 15 


307 65 


23 09 


23 09 


12 25 


12 25 


382 68 


382 68 


102 26 




97 64 




21 14 




12 30 




3 06 


236 40 


6 25 




6 75 




27 05 




53 23 




24 25 




48 90 




13 80 




72 00 


252 23 


47 61 


47 61 


12 90 


12 90 


3 50 


3 50 


44 80 


44 80 


7 95 




6 15 


14 10 


37 50 


37 50 


34 00 


34 00 


20 00 


20 00 


3 00 




5 25 




13 65 


21 90 



$1,829 21 



14 



Amount brought forward 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, dog license 

F. Severance, crackers 

Harry Green, crackers 

Pearson Baking Co., crackers 

Pearson Baking Co., swill 

William Manning, corn dust 

J. W. Cassidy, dry goods 

Oswald & Co., dry goods 

Abels & Son, clothing 

D. H. Sherman, pain paint 

Stiles, Rogers & Co., bedding 

Lowell Rubber Co., rubber sheet 

B. T. Babbitts, box soap 

H. H. Wilder & Co., tin ware 

E. Preston, extracts 

Geo. H. Westgate, extracts 

D. W. Clement, fruit trees 

J. P. Eaton, tomato plants 

H. S. Perham, Adnegar 

Puffer & Son, furniture 

Joseph Miller, tin-ware 

N. C. Bean, apples 

N. C. Bean, pasturing cows 

Chas. E. Parkhurst, repairs 

Geo. H. Holt, repairs pump 

James Stanley, repairs clock 

S. G. Mack & Co., repairs stove 

Baird Bros., repairs 

Aaron C. Sawyer, repairs harnesses 

Boston & Lowell Clothing Co 

L. H. Boardman, shoes 

Fiske & Spalding, paper and oil 

J. L. Loiselle, blankets 

John S. Shedd, filing saws 

G. F. Wright, watering trough 

Chas. W. Wilder, curing hams 

Turner & Jones, fish 

B. Smithson, fish 

E. P. Bosworth, fish 

Baldwin Place Home for Little Wanderers, 

for Josephine Clark 

R. Wilson Dix, services and expenses as Over- 
seer 

Henry S. Perham, services and expenses as 
Overseer 

Chas. W. Flint, services and expenses as Over- 
seer 

Amount carried forward 





$1,829 21 


2 00 


2 00 


10 48 




1 50 




25 82 


37 80 


20 00 




11 25 


31 25 


4 77 




5 04 


9 81 


3 85 


3 85 


1 66 


1 66 


2 95 


2 95 


1 50 


1 50 


9 60 


9 60 


1 25 


1 25 


3 20 




95 


4 15 


7 20 


7 20 


60 


60 


4 50 


4 50 


10 10 


10 10 


6 30 


6 30 


10 00 


10 00 


8 40 


8 40 


9 42 




5 75 




75 




5 15 




2 00 




6 00 


29 07 


2 00 


2 00 


5 45 


5 45 


5 17 


5 17 


2 76 


2 76 


1 3t 


1 34 


9 87 


9 87 


3 36 


3 36 


24 99 




11 18 




1 15 


37 32 


25 00 


25 00 


20 00 


20 00 


12 00 


12 00 


25 80 


25 80 



^2,151 27 



15 



Amount brought forward $2,151 27 

John Q. Battles, services and expenses as 

Overseer $ 4 50 4 50 

Geo. F. Snow, services and expenses as Over- 
seer 6 00 6 00 

Carried to account of highway, chopping 21 

cords market wood, at 80 cents per cord, 16 80 16 80 

$2,168 57 
Less highwav board bill, 174 weeks at $3.25. $565 50 
Less highway hay bill, 17,000 lbs . . 170 00 735 50 

$1,433 07 
Expenses outside of almshouse 1,672 30 

$3,105 37 

Proceeds of Town Farm 747 48 

Received of Town of Truro, for aid rendered 

Jonathan Hopkins 92 10 

Received on account support of Svlvia Mans- 
field \ * 100 00 

Received of City of Lowell, support of Mrs. 

Boynton 7 34 

Received of Town of Methuen, support of 

Henry Flagg 3 00 

Received for State paupers 22 00 971 92 

$2,133 45 
Inmates, 5. Females, 4 ; Males, 1 ; Tramps, 558. 

R. WILSON DLX, 
CHAS. W. FLINT, 
HENRY S. PERHAM, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Overseers. 

APPRAISAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMS- 
HOUSE, MARCH 1, 1886. 

Household furniture and bedding $307 62 

Provisions and supplies 285 69 

Farm implements 70 75 

1 horse 125 00 

5 cows 228 00 

1 sled * 6 00 

1 farm wagon 30 00 

1 market wagon 40 00 

Amount carried forward $1,093 06 



16 



Amount brought forward $1,093 06 

1 pung 9 00 

1 hay rake 23 00 

1 horse cart 25 00 

1 cart harness 7 00 

1 heavy harness 14 00 

21 fowls 10 ,50 

3 fat hogs 42 00 

2 sows 25 00 

6 tons English hay 120 00 

2 tons run hay 24 00 

10 cords manure , . . 50 00 

1 buffalo robe 10 00 

2 blankets 5 00 

1 mowing machine . 30 00 

1 Newfoundland dog. . 5 00 

$1,492 56 

JAMES P. EMERSON, 

D. P. BYAM, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 

Appraisers. 
HIGHWAYS. 

Dutton Bros., grain $282 36 $282 36 

Dutton Bros., lumber 5 38 

A. P. Bateman, lumber 23 75 

David Perham, lumber 36 83 65 96 

J. M. Fletcher, standing timber 13 00 13 00 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 21 94 21 94 

Bartlett & Dow, tools 28 97 28 97 

F.'E. Richardson, blacksmithing 37 31 

John Wozencroft, blacksmithing 13 35 

Durant & Son, blacksmithing 17 73 

David A. Polley, blacksmithing 19 41 

B. S. Adams, blacksmithing 32 62 120 42 

Wm. L. Draper, repairs of carts and tools. . . 5 80 

Warren Johnson, repairs of carts and tools. . 3 75 

J. A. Walkden, repairs of carts and tools. ... 11 25 

John S. Shedd, repairs of carts and tools. ... 7 20 

Kimball Bros., repairs of road-machine 8 00 

H. Hall, repairs of harness 7 62 43 62 

Clement Upham, 40 posts 4 00 4 00 

II. R. Barker, 1 axle-nut 50 50 

Timothv Adams, rent of barn 8 weeks • 8 00 8 00 

Geo. A." Byam, 2,955 lbs. hay 28 07 28 07 

W. E. Livingston, straw 8 15 

Lyman S. Gale, 1,665 lbs. bedding 5 82 

Amounts carried forward $630 81 $616 84 



IT 



Amounts brought forward $630 81 $616 84 

K C. Bean, bedding 7 20 21 17 

E. Shaw & Son, 5 days' teaming 22 50 22 50 

E. Shaw & Son, sundries 2 32 2 32 

Solomon Spaulding, breaking roads, 1884. . . 8 50 

Samuel Putney, breaking roads, 1884 2 50 

Charles Shinkwin, breaking roads, 1884 2 50 

John Marinel, breaking roads, 1884 7 80 21 30 

Geo. F. Snow, labor 4 50 

John Dunn, labor 3 00 

Ira Atwood, labor 2 00 

John J. Sullivan, labor 3 50 

Joseph P. Winn 2 25 15 25 

Solomon Spaulding, gravel, 306 loads 24 48 

Solomon Spaulding, gravel, 45 loads, 1884.. . 4 50 

E. F. Richardson, 451 loads 22 55 

E. F. Richardson, 471 loads, 1884 23 55 

St. Anne's Parish, gravel, 282 loads 14 10 

John Marinel, gravel, 65 loads 6 50 

F. W. Blodgett, gravel, 25 loads 2 00 

S. S. Sleeper, gravel, 250 loads . . . . 25 70 

Jas. P. Emerson, gravel, 15 loads 75 

B. P. Marshall, gravel, 50 loads 2 50 

L. Blodgett, gravel, 37 loads 2 96 129 59 

Lyman S. Gale, use of horse 49 days 61 25 

Lyman S. Gale, board of men 32 50 93 75 

Highway pay-roll, March 131 90 

April 138 88 

May 182 50 

June 185 96 

July 186 57 

August 176 88 

September 171 98 

October 182 06 

November 146 10 

December 106 00 

January 104 00 

February 103 50 1,816 33 



$2,739 05 



Carried to account of Poor, for board 174 

weeks, at $3.25 per week 565 50 

Carried to account of Poor, 17,000 lbs.-hay. . 170 00 735 50 



$3,474 55 
Less highway bill, chopping wood 16 80 



$3,457 75 

Highway pay-roll includes salary paid highway surveyor, $2.00 
per day for eight months ; $1.75 per day for four months. 



18 



APPRAISAL OF HIGHWAY TEAMS AND TOOLS, 
MARCH 1, 1886. 

4 horses $650 00 

2 two-horse sleds 20 00 

3 two-horse carts 150 00 

1 drag 5 00 

1 jigger 48 00 

1 Kimball scraper 165 00 

Eveners and whiffletrees 10 80 

4 road scrapers 15 00 

1 plow 6 00 

Rocker and cart spear 2 00 

2 pairs double harness 75 00 

10 shovels • 7 00 

7 picks 7 00 

4 grub hoes 4 00 

7 stone hammers 7 00 

Drills and wedges 17 00 

Hames and chains 3 50 

Axes and bush-hooks 6 00 

3 scythes and snaths 3 50 

5 iron bars 7 50 

5 horse blankets 4 50 

4 feed bags 3 50 

2 steel rakes and large saw 3 00 

Powder-can and fuse 75 

Pole-straps and reins 1 50 

Brushes, sponges, wrenches 5 00 

3 lanterns 2 25 

Pails, jug 75 

3 chains 3 50 

Bridge and drag plank 40 00 

Bedding 2 00 

Grain 7 00 

Old junk 1 90 

4 halters 2 00 

Feed trough 1 50 

2 pick handles 50 



$1,288 95 

JAMES P. EMERSON, 
D. P. BY AM, 
ELISHA H. SHAW, 

Appraisers. 



19 



REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

T. Costello & Co., repairing furnace Centre 

Town Hall (bill of 1884) $ 33 45 

Wm. H. Brown, painting school-house and 

shed, No. 9 39 00 

A. G. Whitcomb, furniture, school No. 8 138 00 

Geo. Hyde, repairs school-house No. 8 59 65 

Howe Bros. & Co., lumber for repairs school- 
house No. 8 78 63 

Chas. E. Parkhurst, shingling almshouse 74 23 



$33 


45 


39 


00 


276 


28 


74 


23 



$422 96 



STATE AID. 

Paid under Chapter 301, statutes of 1879. .. 
Paid under Chapter 252, statutes of 1879. . 



$444 00 
144 00 



$444 00 
144 00 

$588 00 



COLLECTION AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



Paid Geo. F. Snow, collection 1883.. . 
Geo. F. Snow, collection 1884. . . 
A. H. Sheldon, collection 1885. . 
A. H. Sheldon, abatements 1885. 
Geo. F. Snow, abatements 1883. 
Geo. F. Snow, abatements 1884 . 



$ 2 


70 


10 


00 


225 


65 


54 


20 


15 


02 


72 


22 



$379 79 



REPAIRS OF BARN AT TOWN FARM. 

Paid Chas. E. Parkhurst, for labor and ma- 
terial $473 50 $473 50 

R. Wilson Dix, laying wing wall 6 00 

R. Wilson Dix, priming and pointing 

cellar wall 10 00 16 00 

H. S. Perham, services as committee.. . 5 25 

Geo. F. Snow, services as committee. . . 3 00 8 25 



$497 75 



20 



TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid E. II. Warren, services as town treasurer, 

" " expenses as town treasurer, 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, services as town clerk, 

• " " expenses as town clerk, 

Henry S. Perham, services as selectman, 

" " expenses as selectman, 

Chas. W. Flint, services as selectman. . . 

" " expenses as selectman.. . 

R. Wilson Dix, services as selectman. . . 

" " expenses as selectman.. . 

Geo. F. Snow, services as selectman 

" " expenses as selectman.. . . 

John Q. Battles, services as selectman.. . 

" " expenses as selectman . . 

Chas. W. Flint, services as assessor 

" " expenses as assessor 

Henry S. Perham, services as assessor. . . 
" " expenses as assesser. . 

R. Wilson Dix, services as assessor 

" " expenses as assessor 

Geo. F. Snow, services as assessor 

" " expenses as assessor 

John Q. Battles, services as assessor .... 
" " expenses as assessor.. . . 

Nathan B. Edwards, services as com- 
mittee on discontinuing highways 

(bill of 1883) 

Nathan B. Edwards, services and expen- 
ses as registrar of voters, 1884. . . . 
N. B. Edwards, services and expenses as 

registrar of voters 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, services and expenses 

as registrar of voters 

L. M. Dutton, services and expenses as 

registrar of voters 

Timothy Adams, services as constable, 

1884 

Alfred Day, services as constable 

" " killing dogs 

" " copying and posting warrant, 

Jas. P. Emerson, notifying town officers, 

" " exjDenses notifying town 

officers 

John H. Whidden, services as constable, 

Amount carried forward $809 36 



i 50 00 




10 00 


$ 60 00 


43 10 




6 74 


49 84 


70 00 




3 81 


73 81 


59 70 




17 94 


77^64 


42 00 




14 00 


56 00 


36 00 




14 00 


50 00 


35 00 




15 00 


50 00 


103 50 




14 37 


117 87 


40 50 




3 00 


43 50 


27 00 




9 00 


36 00 


45 00 




14 00 


59 00 


25 00 




5 00 


30 00 


3 00 


3 00 


14 25 




8 25 


22 50 


14 15 


14 15 


9 00 


9 00 


21 00 


21 00 


13 05 




2 00 




4 00 


19 05 


9 00 




3 00 


12 00 


5 00 


5 00 



WEST CHELMSFORD CEMETERY. 

Asa Clement, 11 maple trees $ 5 50 

Geo. W. Buzzy, breaking stone 80 

Wm. H. Brown, painting fence 42 70 

Geo. F. Snow, 11 days' labor 16 50 

Geo. F. Snow, expenses as committee 5 00 

John Dunn, 5^ days' labor 8 00 

Dawson Pollard, labor and materials 19 50 

George Buzzy, repairs of gate 50 

John Jeffroy, 1 day's labor 1 50 



HALL AT NORTH CHELMSFORD. 

Paid Cyrus P. Barclay, material and labor.. . 13,100 23 



WELL AT CENTRE TOWN HOUSE. 

Willard D. Stone, labor $ 9 75 

F. E. Ward, 1L& days' labor 19 50 

James Wozencroft, 15-J days' labor. 21 08 

Francis H. Rowell, 9f days' labor 14 62 

Wm. S. Pierce, 81 hours' labor 12 15 

H. S. Perham, horse and driver 4^ days ... 11 62 

John Higgins, labor and tools 59 58 

David Perham, lumber ... 1777 

A. L. Brooks & Co., 810 ft. plank . 13 77 

S. W. Parkhurst, sundries 99 



21 



Amount brought foricard 

Paid Jas. P. Emerson, E. H. Shaw and Daniel 

P. By am, services as appraisers at 

almshouse $8 00 8 00 

Ziba Gay, E. F. Richardson, and J. A. 

Bartlett, services as auditors 8 00 8 00 



525 36 



$100 00 



&3,100 23 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Huse, Goodwin & Co. printing 600 Town 

Reports $31 20 

Huse, Goodwin & Co., stationery 74 $31 94 

Marden & Rowell, printing 550 school re- 
ports 24 00 



Amounts carried forward $55 94 $31 94 



22 



Amounts brought forward 

Marden & Rowell, printing ballots on consti- 
tutional amendment 

Sargent & Gay, printing 2,000 license ballots, 
Sargent & Gay, printing 800 State Aid 

blanks 

Sargent & Gay, stationery and printing 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., 15 invoice books. . . 
Armory for use of cavalry at hall North 

Chelmsford : — 

Chas. W. Flint, labor and materials 

James B. Coburn, six days' labor 

Geo. H. Smith, labor and paint-stock 

Silver & Gay, lumber and labor 

Davis & Sargent, lumber 

F. D. Beede, stove 

S. G. Mack & Co., stove pipe, etc 

E. F. Parkhurst, guide post 

Chas. H. Dutton, hammered granite posts for 

common at North Chelmsford 

Geo. H. Smith, painting and sanding common 

fence at North Chelmsford ....'. 

E. M. Tucke, insurance permit 

Geo. H. Holt, pump at central square 

H. H. Wilder & Co , repairs on furnace at 

Centre Town Hall 

A. J. Lamphere, repairs on furnace 

A. J. Lamphere, janitor's service 

N. J. Duncan, janitor's service 

N. J. Duncan, warming and lighting hall for 

cavalry 25 times 

Wallace A. Josselyn, painting and varnishing 

Centre hearse and bier 

Timothy Adams, 21^ days' labor on Centre 

cemetery, bill 1884 

Timothy Adams, 9 days' labor on Centre 

cemetery 

Timothy Adams, return of 10 deaths 

N. B. Edwards, reporting 14 births, bill 1884, 

N. B. Edwards, reporting 12 births 

Dawson Pollard, reporting 2 deaths 

A. H. Sheldon, reporting 10 deaths 

Daniel P. Byam, labor on cemetery, South 

Chelmsford 

James D. Dunn, labor on cemetery, North 

Chelmsford 

George G. Stetson, labor on cemetery, North 

Chelmsford 



$55 94 


$31 94 


1 25 


25 25 


2 75 




2 75 




2 00 


7 50 


4 50 


4 50 


14 83 




9 00 




4 85 




10 92 




3 80 




7 00 




■4 48 


54 88 


2 50 


2 50 


26 00 


26 00 


14 50 


14 50 


1 50 


1 50 


12 00 


12 00 


1 25 




4 35 




13 95 


19 55 


2 00 




31 25 


33 25 


22 00 


22 00 


43 00 




18 00 




2 50 


63 50 


3 50 




3 00 


6 50 


50 


50 


2 50 


2 50 


5 00 


5 00 


4 00 




6 45 


10 45 



$343 82 



AGGREGATE OE APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS, AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Schools, appropriation .... 

School fund 

Dog tax 

Tuition from non-resident 

pupils 

Teaching 

Care of houses .... 
Fuel 

School incidentals 

Free text-books, appropriation . 

Free text-books, receipts . . . 

Support of poor, appropriation . 

Support of poor, receipts . . . 

Highway, appropriation .... 

Highway, receipts 

Repairs of public buildings, appro- 
priation . 

Repairs of public buildings, re- 
ceipts 

State aid, receipts 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sail- 
ors, appropriation .... 

Relief of indigent soldiers and sail- 
ors, receipts 

Town officers and committees, ap- 
propriation 

Collection and abatement of taxes, 
appropriation 

Miscellaneous expenses, approp'n, 

Miscellaneous expenses, receipts. 

West Chelmsford cemetery, appro- 
priation 

Repairs of barn at Town Farm, ap- 
propriation 

Town Hall at North Chelmsford, 
appropriation 

Well at Centre village, appropria- 
tion 



Appropria- 
tions. 



85.000 00 
171 25 
332 32 

2 00 



500 00 

300 00 

21 82 

2,300 00 

971 92 

3,500 00 

5 75 

350 00 

7 44 
419 00 

100 00 

96 00 

700 00 

400 00 
50 00 

291 90 

100 00 

500 00 

3,000 00 

150 00 



$19,269 40 



$19,269 40 



Expendi- 
tures. 



4,701 50 
257 32 
373 99 
362 26 
546 43 



3,105 37 

3,457 75 



422 96 
444 00 



144 00 
825 36 
379 79 
343 82 
100 00 
497 75 
3,100 23 
180 83 



),243 36 
26 04 



$19,269 40 



Excess. 



172 76 
137 74 



166 55 
48 00 



52 00 



20 21 



2 25 



$599 51 



51 



Defi- 
ciency. 



224 61 



65 52 
25 00 



125 36 



1 92 



100 23 
30 83 



$573 47 
26 04 



$599 51 



Appropriations 
Receipts . . . 



$16,950 00 
. 2,319 40 



$19,269 40 



Amount of orders 
Surplus . . . . 



$19,243 36 
26 04 

$19,269 40 



HENRY S. PERHAM, 
CHAS. W. FLINT, 
R. W. DIX, 
J. Q. BATTLES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Selectmen. 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



Having examined the account of the Treasurer for the year ending 
Feb. 27, 1886, we find his receipts and payments properly entered 
and vouched, and a balance of $308.59 in his hands. 

We find bills and receipts in the hands of the Selectmen vouching 
for orders amounting to 819,243.36, of which those amounting to 
$19,224.51 have been paid by the Treasurer, leaving $18.85 out- 
standing. 

We find — 

Cash in the treasury $308 59 

Tax of 1884, uncollected $105 44 

Interest on tax of 1884 10 46 

Tax of 1885, uncollected 571 32 

Interest on tax of 1885 16 66 703 88 

School-books and supplies on hand 500 00 

Due from the State — 

State aid to Jan. 1, 1886 $443 00 

State aid for February and March, 1886 72 00 

Relief to Jan. 1, 1886 72 00 

Relief for February and March, 1886 12 00 

Armory rent 75 00 674 00 

$2,186 47 

Outstanding note $500 00 

Outstanding orders 18 85 

Kimball Fund 100 00 

Interest on Kimball Fund ■. 22 64 

Silver Fund 100 00 

Interest on Silver Fund 3 00 

Estimated liabilities 150 00 

Estimated abatements 125 00 1,019 49 

Balance assets over liabilities $1,166 98 

ZIBA GAY, 

E. F. RICHARDSON, 

J. ADAMS BARTLETT, 

Auditing Committee. 
Chei.msforp, March 3, 1886. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Middlesex, ss. 
To either of the Constables of the town of Chelmsford, in said 
County, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforseaid, you are hereby re- 
quired to notify the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet at the 
Town Hall, at Chelmsford Centre, on Monday, the fifteenth day of 
March current, being the third Monday in said month, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz : — 

Article 1. To choose a moderator. 

To hear report of town officers and committees, and act thereon. 

To determine the manner of collecting the taxes. 

To determine the manner of repairing the highways, townways, 
and bridges. 

To choose all necessary town officers. 

To act in relation to the list of jurors prepared by the Selectmen. 

To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be necessary 
to defray town charges for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize the treasurer to borrow such 
sums of money as may be required for the payment of the de- 
mands upon him in anticipation of the taxes of the ensuing 
year, and payable therefrom. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to grant licenses for the sale of intox- 
icating liquors for the current year. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to renew the insurance on the public 
buildings, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 11. At the request of E. H. Warren, David Perham, and others, to see 
if the town will vote to choose a committee to investigate the 
necessities of the cemetery at centre of the town, and report at 
the next March meeting, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 12. At the request of S. J. Garland, Artemus Parker, Warren Berry, 
E. P. Parker, and others, to see if the town will vote to dig a 
well at the school-house at South Chelmsford, put a pump in the 
same, make an appropriation therefor, or act in relation thereto. 



Art. 


2. 


Art. 


3. 


Art. 


4. 


Art. 


5. 


Art. 


6. 


Art. 


7. 



26 



Art. 13. At the request of J. A. Bartlett, Geo. A. Parkhurst, C. S. Reed, 
N. C. Saunders, and others, to see if the town will vote to build 
an addition to the school building at the centre of the town, and 
provide furniture therefor, and make an appropriation for the 
same, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 14. At the request of C. Roby, J. J. Hoyt, A. Gardner, G. F. Locke, 
and others, to see if the town will appropriate the sum of 
four hundred dollars, or any other amount which may be thought 
necessary, to straighten and widen the street near the railroad 
station at West Chelmsford, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 15. At the request of L. M. Dutton, to see if the town will vote to 
appropriate money to obtain means to extinguish fires, or act in 
relation thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant, by posting up at- 
tested copies thei'eof at the Post-Offices in the centre of the town, 
South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, and at the 
School-house at East Chelmsford, ten days at least before the time 
appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this fifth day of March, in the year of our 
Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-six. 

HENRY S. PERHAM, 
CHAS. W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DLX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEO. F. SNOW, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



I have served the foregoing Warrant, by posting up true and at- 
tested copies of the same at the places above mentioned, more than 
ten days before the day of holding said meeting. 

JAMES P. EMERSON, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



School Committee 



Town of Chelmsford 



Year ending Feb. 27, 1886. 



LOWELL, MASS. : 
VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1886. 



COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The School Committee in submitting their An- 
nual Report to the citizens of the Town, respect- 
fully represent that the interests of education in 
Chelmsford have in no wise diminished during the 
year ; while in some respects, it is believed they 
have made decided advances. 

By invitation of the Committee, the Secretary of 
the State Board of Education, Hon. John W. 
Dickinson, and Messrs. Prince and Martin, agents 
of the Board, visited our town early in Septem- 
ber, and spent some time examining into the con- 
dition of our schools. At -the close of their visit, 
they held a meeting at the Centre School-house, 
at which were present all of our teachers, the 
Superintendent, and several of the Committee. 

At this meeting they detailed the result of their 
observations, and suggested such changes as seemed 
desirable and possible for the teachers to make, 
and in giving the assembled teachers illustrations 
of normal methods, — the teachers being treated as 
pupils, while the Secretary and Agents divided the 



time in suggesting improved methods for the work 
of the school-room. 

The counsel given was excellent, and well pleas- 
ing to those present ; and we have seen good re- 
sulting therefrom. 

A good deal of complaint has reached us dur- 
ing the year, from some of our neighboring cities 
and towns, in regard to a great defect in our 
present system of education ; that we try to do too 
much and to go over too much ground in the 
limited time devoted to school-life ; thereby neglect- 
ing the elementary branches and the foundation of 
a good education. 

The ornamental and higher branches of study, 
as they are called, have a peculiar charm for both 
teacher and pupil, and the child's progress is some- 
times measured not by his thorough knowledge of 
elementary principals, but by the number of ad- 
vanced studies he has pursued. 

Our public schools are not intended to supply 
the place of universities, but rather to provide for 
the people those elements of knowledge every- 
where essential in the journey of life. 

When a young man can read, spell, write, and 
reckon well, he has a good educational foundation, 
and it would be difficult to find any more useful 
attainments in the whole realm of study; without 
these any great proficiency in learning is impossi- 
ble ; with them, the way is open to the broadest 
and most comprehensive acquirements. This should 



be made the first and great aim through the en- 
tire course of school education. 

There has been more than the usual number of 
changes in our corps of teachers ; this is to be 
regretted. It requires at least one term to ac- 
quaint scholars and teachers with each other. Each 
teacher has his or her peculiarities of instruction. 
One is inclined to urge by force or fear ; 
another by hope of reward. One believes the 
teacher to be monarch of the school-room ; another 
is more republican in his views of school govern- 
ment. This teacher counts progress by the number 
of pages learned ; another succeeds who goes slowly 
but surely. After a term or two of trial and 
acquaintance with each other's ways, the school 
and teacher move on with less friction and greater 
efficiency. The parents also become acquainted 
with the teacher and are more apt to add their 
aid in advancing the school's interest, and thus a 
new impetus is given to progress. It is not in 
the power of even a good teacher to accomplish 
much for a school in a single term. The second 
term is worth nearly double the first. But change 
your teachers often and it is impossible for any 
school to make a steady progress and arrive at a 
high grade, to fulfill the just expectations of the 
parents or friends of education. 

Although there are still imperfections in our 
school system, we think we may safely conclude 
that the standard is at least as high as in any of 



6 



the adjoining towns. With every thing to encour- 
age and inspire us for redoubled effort, let us labor 
more earnestly in the future than we have done 
in the past, to improve our public schools in 
which we are all so deeply interested: 

GEO. F. SNOW, 

J. C. HOBBS, 

S. J. GARLAND, 

J. H. HAZEN, 

E. E. DUTTON, 

T. S. EDMANDS, 

GEO. F. LOCKE, 

GEO. HYDE, 

N. C. SAUNDERS, 

School Committee. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the School Committee of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Gentlemen, — The time has -again arrived when a 
detailed report of the schools of the town must be pre- 
sented to you, and through you to the citizens of the 
town and the school officers of the Commonwealth. I 
do not know that I have much new to add to the reports 
of former years, only that I think the tendency of the 
schools, as a whole, is to more thorough and progressive 
work, especially in arithmetic, and I am of the opinion 
that if the classes do well in arithmetic, we need have 
no fear about the other studies. 

As you are all aware, Mr. John T. Prince and Mr. 
Martin, agents of the State Board of Education, visited 
the schools at the beginning of the fall term, although I 
do not think it was the best time, so soon after the long 
summer vacation and before some of the schools were 
fairly organized, to fairly judge of what we are doing ; 
yet they paid us the compliment of saying that they were 
above the average. I was thankful to hear that, and 
from it took courage. 

ORAL AND WRITTEN SPELLING. 

There is now some discussion of the comparative 
merits of oral and written spelling, and some teachers 
seem to give preference to the written and somewhat 

3 



neglect the oral. I have noticed that the best work is 
done in spelling where the two methods are combined, 
and preference given to the oral method in the class. 
The stimulus that comes to scholars from taking places 
in the spelling-classes, and the advantage of pronounc- 
ing the words in the hearing of the teacher, for the sake 
of correct pronunciation we can not afford to dispense 
with in our schools, so the teachers who have followed 
the suggestions of the Superintendent the past year have 
followed both methods. 

SCHOLARS DO THE RECITING. 

I have also suggested to the teachers to, as far as 
possible, allow the scholars to do their own reciting, in- 
dependent of the teacher's aid, and to allow the scholars 
in the class to read their own examples in arithmetic, and 
where this has been followed more thorough work is the 
result. 

SCHOOL LIFE MORE PLEASANT THAN FORMERLY. 

I think, by the methods now pursued in the schools, 
school life is more pleasant to the average scholar than 
formerly. We teach the children now the whys and the 
therefores, and when they make a statement we ask them 
how they know it is true. By this method their recita- 
tions are not merely a matter of memory, but they un- 
derstand their work better, and their understanding aids 
the memory, and they do not have to fear that they shall 
be punished or be cut down in their rank if they forget 
a word in the text-book. 

TEMPERANCE INSTRUCTION. 

Temperance instruction has also received attention in 
the schools during the year, and I think the result will 



9 



be of infinite value to the rising generation, as I think 
many form the intemperate habit because not warned of 
the danger of drinking a little. 

MORAL ATMOSPHERE. 

I think also that, taking the schools as a whole, there 
is a good healthy moral influence surrounding them, and 
the tendency is to help the scholars to be good as well 
as to be educated. 

RECITING ARITHMETIC TABLES IN CONCERT. 

There seems to be a difference of opinion as to the 
advantage of reciting the arithmetic tables in concert in 
the classes. In schools where the children did not know 
the arithmetical tables and had been taught by the indi- 
vidual method, I suggested that for the sake of getting 
over the hesitancy contracted by the individual method 
which was noticeable in all their recitations, that they 
adopt the concert method, and great was the improve- 
ment. There is also a saving of time by the concert 
method, and in some of the schools time is an item of 
considerable importance. 

PROGRESSIVE TEACHERS. 

As Superintendent for the past four years I have seen 
thirty-seven different teachers at work in the schools of 
this town. It is not to be supposed that they were all 
equally progressive, but during that time there have al- 
ways been teachers that were progressive. Those who 
have been in the habit of visiting schools in the cities 
of Lowell and Boston and of reading educational jour- 
nals, — these teachers have been of great advantage to 
me as Superintendent in getting a variety of methods, 
and of seeing those methods in practice before suggest- 



10 

ing them to non-progressive teachers ; and as variety is 
the spice of life, so variety of methods is the spice of 
the intellectual life of children. 

The following is a brief detailed report of each 
school : — 

No. i. — Centre of the Town. 

Grammar and High School. — The principal through 
the year here was Miss F. V. Doane. Miss Doane pos- 
sesses a great deal of energy and some excellent quali- 
ties as a teacher, and in some of her classes good results 
were noticeable ; but the school is too large and takes 
too much of the principal's time and energy to manage 
the school to secure the best results in teaching, but 
Miss Doane's classes were well prepared for the annual 
examination at the close of the year. 

The assistant here for the spring term was Miss Carrie 
E. Jockow, of Lowell. This was Miss Jocko w's first ex- 
perience at teaching, but she exhibited qualities that ex- 
perience in teaching will make her a successful teacher. 
She resigned at the close of the term to go West, and 
was succeeded by Miss Mary Howard, who taught here 
some years ago. Miss Howard's reputation as a teacher 
is too well known in this town to need comment. She 
took great pains to have scholars get their lessons and 
the drawing-books of her scholars were about perfect, as 
far as I saw them. She asked to be released at the be- 
ginning of the winter term, and was succeeded by Miss 
Pierce, of Royalston, Mass. Miss Pierce has had con- 
siderable experience as a teacher ; she is a good disci- 
plinarian, and her classes took great pains to do their 
work well and were very much interested in their lessons. 

Primary School. — Miss Nellie M. Perham was the 
teacher here through the year, and good work was done. 



11 



There has been great improvement in this school since 
I first became acquainted with it. Arithmetic classes 
here are doing well, Reading, for the most part, is nat- 
ural and expressive, and the scholars are taught to get 
the meaning of the pieces read. The examination here 
was good. 

No. 2. — MIXED. North Row. 

Miss Carrie E. White taught this school the spring 
and fall terms, and kept her scholars wide awake, studi- 
ous, and advancing, and the order was all that could be 
desired. The winter term was taught by Miss Onie 
Hobbs. Miss Hobbs possesses many qualities of a good 
teacher, such as enthusiasm and a love for her work and 
her term's work will compare favorably with the first 
term's work of some of our most successful teachers. 

No. 3. — MIXED. South Chelmsford. 

Miss Araminta V. Paasche was in charge of this 
school, and the progress in all the studies taught was 
all that could be desired. As I visited the school and 
called up classes out of their turn to recite, they seemed 
so well prepared, and did their work so understandingly 
from the lowest to highest grades, that I felt convinced 
that Miss Passche was advancing her scholars as fast as 
they ought to be advanced. Her examination at the 
close of the year was perfectly satisfactory to all con- 
cerned, I think. 

No 4.— MIXED. South Row. 

Miss Lenora Battles taught here the spring term, and 
kept up the interest she had awakened last year, and 
resigned at the close of the spring term, to accept a posi- 
tion as teacher in Sudbury, Mass. Miss Gertrude W. 
Byam, of South Chelmsford, taught the school the rest 



12 



of the year. Miss Byam is a faithful, diligent, con- 
scientious teacher, and kept her scholars at work and 
advancing. There are some bright, wide-awake scholars 
in this school. 

No. 5. — MIXED. Esquire Byam's Neighborhood. 

Miss Ida E. Byam taught this school, and I am safe in 
saying that no more thorough work was done any 
where than here, and the advacement of the scholars 
was as rapid as the advancement of scholars of their 
ages ought to be 

No. 6. — MIXED. East Chelmsford. 

Miss Susie McFarlin taught this school the past year, 
and good results have been accomplished. Mental 
arithmetic with the younger classes received careful 
attention from the teacher, and teacher and scholars 
seem to work in harmony. This school is doing well. 

No. 7. — MIXED. Spaulding's Neighborhood. 

This school had for its teacher the past year Miss 
Etta Locke. Miss Locke took great interest in her 
scholars, kept them interested in their work, encouraged 
those that were slow, and visited other schools for the 
sake of getting a variety of methods. This school 
always seemed in good working condition. The exam- 
ination at the close of the year showed that careful and 
thorough work had been done. 

No. 8. — North Chelmsford. 

The schools here are now well graded, and so ar- 
ranged that scholars and teachers can do their best 
work. 

High School. — Rev. D. Phillips was the principal in 
this department. It was very pleasant to go into this 



LB 



room and hear scholars recite independent of the teach- 
er's questions from five to ten minutes. It seemed 
more like persons making speeches, than like boys and 
girls reciting. A class of fourteen was graduated from 
here last June, who in their essays and declamations 
appeared more like college graduates, than like high 
school boys and girls fifteen and sixteen years old. 

Grammar School. — Miss Addie M. Taylor was in 
charge here through the year. Every thing in this 
room is done in a prompt, wide-awake manner. Each 
one striving to do his or her best, as it appeared to me. 
The examination at the close of the fall term was ex- 
cellent, and gave the impression that a large fund of in- 
formation and a large amount of mental discipline were 
in circulation in this school. The declamations were 
very fine. 

Intermediate School. — This school was in charge of 
Miss Minnie A. Worden ; on account of the absences of 
the scholars, no public examination was held in this 
school the past year. Considerable attention has been 
given here to composition the past year with good effect. 
There are many very interesting scholars in this school. 

Primary School — Miss Laura G. Hoyt still contin- 
ues to do good work in this school. All departments 
receive careful attention from the teacher. Something 
new may be seen in this school nearly every term. Miss 
Hoyt has a table on which she keeps a lot of wooden 
blocks, to which she allows her scholars to go for rest 
and amusement when they have their lessons. Physi- 
ology taught orally in this school is remarkable. 

No. 9. — West Chelmsford. 

Grammar School. — Miss Laura L. Butterfield taught 
here the spring term, and did good work. Every thing 



14 



was done in a thorough manner, and scholars gave 
signs of being interested in their work. Miss Butter- 
field resigned at the close of the term to accept a posi- 
tion as teacher at Hampton Falls, N. H. The re- 
mainder of the year the school was taught by Miss 
Carrie M. Robbins, of Carlise, who took up the work 
where her predecessor left it, and carried it through the 
year very successfully. Miss Robbins is an excellent 
scholar, and her work was very thorough. 

Primary School. — The same teacher that has been 
in charge here for a number of years was in charge the 
past year, Miss Agnes Naylor. Miss Naylor is one of 
our most progressive teachers, and has been of great 
help to me as Superintendent, in proving what can be 
done by little people. When I have made suggestions 
she never objected, saying " They have not ability to do 
such work," but always said " I will try," and her scholars 
have exceeded my expectations as well as her own. 

One of the visitors of the State Board of Education 
who heard her classes in arithmetic only suggested that 
perhaps she had neglected other studies in advancing 
her scholars so far ahead in arithmetic. I assured him 
that she had not, but that her classes in reading, writing, 
spelling (oral and written), and geography were equally 
as good as her arithmetic classes. In this school, to 
me, every thing is done in a satisfactory manner. The 
phonetic method in reading, as well as others, is taught 
to good advantage here. 

This, then, is a brief report of the schools. Many 
other good things might be put on paper as well as more 
defects, but criticism on paper, I do not think, will do 
much good. It has been my custom, as Superintendent, 
when a new teacher was put in the schools, to visit that 



15 



school quite often and make suggestions to the teacher, 
and not wait until the end of the year and then put the 
teacher's defects on paper. 

I have, also, tried to encourage the teachers in their 
work, except, perhaps, in cases where teachers were old- 
fashioned in their methods and dead-set in ruts. As 
every one knows who has studied the subject, there has 
been great inprovement in the methods of instruction 
within the last ten or twelve years, and unless the older 
teachers visit other schools, and find out what is actually 
being done in them, they are likely to follow the methods 
of their own teachers and so be ten or twelve years be- 
hind the times. 

1 close thanking you, gentlemen, for having entrusted 
me with the care of the schools the past year ; and I 
close this, my fourth yearly report, realizing the advan- 
tage that a Superintendent can be to the schools, and 
also the delicate position in which the Superintendent is 
placed, being really the servant of nine men, constituting 
the School Committee, fifteen teachers, and nearly five 
hundred scholars, besides a large number of parents and 
friends of the scholars. To get books and supplies for 
all these is not a small matter ; besides, the Superinten- 
dent, to be of any advantage to the schools, must 
study the educational problems, and visit schools outside 
to learn what is actually being done in them ; but it is a 
work I love, because of the service I can render to the 
youth of the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. VINCENT, 

Supet •intenden t. 

March 6, 1886. 



ROLL OF HONOR- PUPILS NOT ABSENT. 

Those marked * were tardy. 



PRIMARY No. 1. 



Two Terms — Est elle Hutchinson, Karl Perharn. 

One Teem — Ralph Emerson, John Hale}, Dannie Haley, Haw- 
thorne Howard, Harold Davis, Carlton Wilson, David Perham, 
Gertie Keniston, Cora Hutchinson. 

GRAMMAR No. 1. 

One Year — Ella Hutchinson, Clara Hutchinson.* 
One Term — James Emerson, Edward Lapham, William Lap- 
ham, Ena Bickford, Edith Emerson, Annie Howard, James Mooney, 
Frank A. Brown, John Haley, George Davis, George Carter,* Ger- 
trude Keniston,* Sarah Thurlow.* 

MIXED No. 2. 

Two Terms — H. Gertrude Fulton, Bridget Driscoll, Thomas 
Sheehan. 

One Term — Jennie Fulton, Gertie L. Hall, Willie E. Foule, 
Geo. W . Upham, Dennie Sheehan. 

MIXED No. 3. 

One Year — Lyman Byam, Nettie Byam, Grace Garland, Ferdi- 
nand Scoboria. 

Two Terms — Peter Scoboria, Fred Park, Grace Mansfield. 

One Term — Cora Pearson, Elbridge Mansfield, Lizzie Garland, 
Carl Mansfield, Emma Parker, John Redmond, Sadie Redmond, 
Willie Redmond, Ernest Mansfield. 



17 



MIXED No. 4. 
Two Terms — Eddie Robbins.* 

One Teem — Winton Gale, Etta M. Crooker, Annie R. Adams, 
Maude Cummings, Herman Crooker,* Florence Cuinmings,* Alvin 

Sweetser.* 

MIXED No. 5. 

One Year — Charles H. Dutton, Arthur E. Dutton.. 
Two Terms — Stella M. Byam. 
One Term — Clara E. Newhall. 

MIXED No. 6. 

One Year — • Thomas T. French,* Michael McKennedy.* 
Two Terms — Michael Finnick, Joseph Devine.* 
One Term — Bertha Teabo, Willie Finnick. 

MIXED No. 7. 

One Year — Gussie Furlong, Elsie Hodson, Frank Martin, Wil- 
lie Martin, Guy Reed. 

Two Terms — Ella Hodson. 
One Term — John Boynton. 

HIGH No. 8. 

Two Terms — Eoyal C. Reed, Walter E. Swain,* Belle E. Smith * 
One Term — Alice M. Ackroyd, Nellie W. Harrington, Minnie 

A. Hyde,* Abby F. Sleeper,* Everett P. Bond,* Frank Naylor,* 
Henry T. Ripley* William H. Hall, Bertha A. Swain. 

GRAMMAR No. 8. 

One Year — Ralph L. Ripley. 

Two Terms — Laura I. Lumbert, Blanche L. Sampson, Amelia 

B. Marinel 

One Term — James H. Connors, Irving L. Keith, Eva M. Cor- 
nell, John S. Spurr. 

PRIMARY No. 8. 

Two Terms — Willie Chandler, Gardner Ripley, Delia Shields, 
Florence Sampson. 



18 



One Term — Fred Chandler, Augustus Duncan,* Charles Dane, 
Joseph McGrath,* Mary Dunigan, Eddie McEnnis, Walter Mar- 
inel, John McEnally, George Lumbert, Edith Merrill, Viola Green, 
Grace Wright, Hattie Cook, Georgia McEnnis,* Lizzie Smith, Mary 
McMahon, Geo. W. Swain, Arthur Wheeler. 

GRAMMAR No. 9. 

One Year — Berta V. Parkhurst. 
Two Terms — Lizzie Dunn, Mattie A. Jarvis. 
One Term — Lottie L. Snow, Alice G. Ferris, Herbert Ferris, 
Goldie Gardner, Willie Hale, Lulu G. Spaulding, Clara E. Parker. 

PRIMAPvY No. 9. 

One Year — Myra L. Coburn, Lottie Hale, John Cunningham, 
Oscar Naylor, Freddie A. Snow, George Mason. 

Two Terms — Florence M. Winship, L. Maud Jarvis, Louisa F. 
Pelsue, Lilla Cunningham, Nettie S. Harrington, Eddie Mason, 
Freddie Daw, Carl E. Spaulding, Walter Mason, Clarence L. Har- 
rington. 

One Term — Gertie W. Pelsue, Arthur Mason, Freddie Hale, 
Charles Jordan,* Harry G. Jones, James Doherty, Daniel Doherty, 
Charles Dane,* John Dane.* 



COURSE OF STUDY, 

Adopted Nov. 25, 1882. 



FIRST TEAK. 



Reading. — Monroe's Chart. Teachers write words from the Chart 
in script letters on the black-board, and teach scholars to read the 
same ; also, write short names of familiar objects in the school-room 
and Monroe's First Reader. 

Writing. — Commence with the letters i and o, figure 1, and Roman 
letter I, and progress in these directions as fast as scholars are capa- 
ble ; also, copy short sentences from the board. 

Spelling. — Words from Reading Chart. Days of week, own 
names, town and village in which they live, names of familiar ob- 
jects in the room and at home. 

Arithmetic. — Count from one to ten, and so on to a hundred, with 
and without numeral frame. Add and subtract small numbers with 
and without numeral frame. 

Singing and Physical Exercises daily. These things are to be 
taught, and teacher must use discretion about other things. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Reading. — Monroe's Second Reader. 

Writing. — No. 1 Tracing Book, and write sentences on slate and 
black-board. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Primer, first half. 
Arithmetic. — Eaton's Primary, first half. 
Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Reading. — Swinton's Supplementary to Second Reader. Teach 
the meaning of words in the lesson. 

Writing. — No. 2 Tracing Book. Copy sentences from black-board. 



20 



Spelling. — S win ton's Word Primer, last half. 
Arithmetic. — Eaton's Primary, last half. 
Outlines of History and Geography. — Taught orally. 
Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

FOURTH TEAE. 

Reading. — Monroe's Third Reader. 

Writing. — No. 1 Writing Book. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book. 

Arithmetic. — First half of Eaton's, part second. 

Geography. — Harper's Primary, first half. 

Drawing. — Smith's No. 1 Drawing Book. 

History. — Taught orally. Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

FIFTH TEAR. 

Reading. — Swinton's Supplementary to Third Reader. 
Writing — Book No. 2. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book continued. 
Arithmetic. — Last half of Eaton's, part second. 
Geography. — Last half of Harper's Primary. 
Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

Grammar and History. — Taught orally. Singing and Physical 
Exercises daily. 

SIXTH TEAR. 

Reading. — Monroe's Fourth Reader, also Child's History (Good- 
rich's). 

Writing. — Book No. 3. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book continued. 

Arithmetic. — First half of Eaton's Intellectual, with examples on 
board from Eaton's Practical. 

Geography. — Harper's Common School, first half. 

Drawing. — Book No. 3. 

Grammar and History. — Taught orally. Singing and Physical 
Exercises daily. 

SEVENTH TEAR. 

Reading. — Swinton's Supplementary to Fourth Reader. 
Writing. — Book No. 4. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book continued. 

Arithmetic. — Eaton's Intellectual, last half. Examples on board 
from Eaton's Practical. 



21 



Geography. — Last half of Harper's Common School. 

Grammar. — Swinton's Language Primer. 

Drawing. — No. 4. Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Monroe's Fifth Reader. 
Writing. — ■ Book No. 5. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book continued. 
Arithmetic. — First half of Eaton's Practical. 

History of U. S. — Berard's, first half, and Geography reviewed 
with it. 

Grammar. — Swinton's Language Lessons. 

Drawing. — No. 3. Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

NINTH YEAR. 

Heading. — Monroe's Fifth Reader, and other supplementary read- 
ing, as U. S. History. 
Writing. — Book No. 6. 

Spelling. — Swinton's Word Book continued, and other words 
from lessons. 

Arithmetic. — Last half of Eaton's Practical. 

History. — Berard's, second half. 

Grammar. — Swinton's Progressive. 

Draicing. — Book No. 6. Singing and Physical Exercises daily. 

TENTH YEAR. HIGH. 

Algebra, English Composition (Swinton's), Physics, Physiology, 
Monroe's Sixth Reader. Spelling from lessons studied. 

ELEVENTH YEAR. 

Geometry to follow Algebra. 

Book-keeping. — Meservey's. 

Latin Grammar and Reader.— Harkness'. 

Physical Geography . 

Reading. — Monroe's Sixth Reader. 

TWELFTH YEAR. 

Chemistry. — Steel' s. 

Latin (optional), Botany. 

PJnglis h L iterature . — Swinton's. 

Review Practical, or Eaton's High School Arithmetic. 

Review and study desired. 



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