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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SCHOOL REPORT, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING FEB. 28, 1889. 



LOWELL, MASS. : 

VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1889. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 



YEAR ENDING FEB. 28, 4889. 



LOWELL, MASS. : 
VOX POPULI TRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1889. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 

1888. 



Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of the Poor — Lewis K. How- 
ard, Charles W. Flint, John Q. Battles, R. Wilson Dix, 
George F. Snow. 

Town Clerk — George A. Parkhurst. 

Town Treasurer — Edwin H. Warren. 

School Committee — Three years : J. Adams Bartlett, William 
L. Gordon, R. Wilson Dix ; two years : Robert Fletcher, 
Frank C. Byam, Riley Davis ; one year : Edwin E. Dutton, 
Royal S. Ripley, Marcus H. Winship. 

Collector — William L. Gordon. 

Highway Surveyor — Daniel W. Lane. 

Constables — James P. Emerson, Alfred Day, George F. Dyar, 
Sam'l J. Garland, John H. Whidden, Daniel W. Sleeper. 

Fence Viewers — Albion Lamphere, James P. Emerson, Daniel 
P. Byam. 

Appraisers of Personal Property at Town Farm — Elisha H. 
Shaw, James P. Emerson, Daniel P. Byam. 

Auditors — Ziba Gay, Edward F. Richardson, Henry S. Per- 
ham. 

Weighers of Hay — George A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Marcus H. Winship, Eben T. Adams, Elisha H. 
Shaw,, Thomas M. Gerrish. 

Measurers of Wood — George A. Parkhurst, S. Waldo Park- 
hurst, Newell E. Parker, Elisha H. Shaw, James P. Emer- 
son, Marcus H. Winship. 

Surveyors of Lumber R. Wilson Dix, Eli P. Parker, Edwin 

K.. Parkhurst, George E. Spaulding. 

Field Drivers — George Mills, Walter R. Winning, Calvin H. 
Whittemore. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures — True Morton. 

Firewards — Elisha H. Shaw, Charles F. Scribner, John Con- 
nors, Albert H. Davis, Almon W. Holt, Frank C. Byam, 
Daniel P. Byam, Warren Berry. 

Precinct Wardens — Eben T. Adams, Eben R. Marshall, Arthur 
H. Sheldon, Charles H. Dutton, Alfred G. Parkhurst, 
William H. Kiernan. 

Precinct Clerks — Joseph E. Warren, Fred K. Ripley, Marcus 
H. Winship. 

Registrars of Voters — Nathan B. Edwards, Elijah D. Bearce, 
Lewis M. Dutton, George A. Parkhurst. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

For the Tear ending Feb. 28, 1889. 



BIRTHS. 

Males , 21 

Females 18 

Total 39 



Births of native parentage 23 

Births of foreign parentage 9 

Births of native and foreign parentage 7 



Note. — Births occurring late in the year are sometimes returned 
without the Christian name. In all such cases parents should return 
the name to the Town Clerk as soon as selected, as an incomplete- 
ness of the record may involve much trouble in the future. 



MARRIAGES. 



Whole number , 21 

Between natives 18 

Between natives and foreigners 3 

Chelmsford grooms 16 

Chelmsford brides 14 

Solemnized in Chelmsford 16 



4 
DEATHS. 



Jan. 2.. 
Jan. 7 . . 
Feb. 4.. 
Feb. 17. 
Feb. 18. 
Feb. 23. 
Mar. 1.. 
Mar. 2.. 
Mar. 9.. 
Mar. 23. 
Mar. 24. 
Mar. 27. 
Mar. 28. 
Apr. 2.. 
Apr. 3.. 
Apr. 11. 
Apr. 17. 
May 11. 
May 27. 
May 30. 
May 31. 
June 3. . 
June 5 . . 
June 9. . 
June 10. 
June 14. 
June 22. 
July 4.. 
July 16. 
July 24. 
July 31. 
Aug. 1.. 
Aug. 7.. 
Aug. 8.. 
Aug. 12. 
Aug. 18. 
Aug. 23. 
Aug. 24. 
Sept. 1 • 
Sept. 22 
Sept. 22 
Oct. 5.. 
Oct. 9.. 
Nov. 3. . 
Nov. 7.. 
Dec. 6.. 
Dec. 6.. 
Dec. 25. 
Dec. 28. 



Mary A. (Jobnson) Fletcher 

Mary A. McCoy 

Elizabeth A. Mansfield 

Martha Calhoun 

Harrison Hall 

Esther S. Hall 

Owen F. Duffy 

■ Brown 

Cornelia Parker 

Joshua Sargent 

Florence Hart 

Sophronia (Carkin) Grow.. 

Thomas Brennan 

Francis Devioe 

Ez i a Vickery 

Jane Finnick 

Grace E. Parkhurst 

Mary L. Robinson 

Neal Thomas Nelson 

Robert J. Gemmell ; . 

Alson W. Kimball 

Nellie E. Harrington 

Eleutheria W. Perham 

Joseph Warren 

Anna T. Shaw 

Ann (Doyle) Ward 

Peter Sherlock 

Joseph H. McCabe 

James Walker 

Barbara I. Bridgford 

Nelson Alexander 

Mary Reagan 

Norah Sullivan 

Clarissa Boardman 

Charles K Parkhurst 

Lucy C. W. Long 

Timothy D. Butters 

John T. Jones 

Ellen (Lyons) Brady 

Hannah (Pulsifer) Nichols.. 

John Campbell 

Fred Ignatius Tyler , 

William S. Woodward 

Walter J. Fallon 

Lucy A. Emerson .'.... 

Jessie A. Burdett 

Caroline H. Pearl 

John Parkhurst 

Albina M. Allen 





AGE. 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


77 




9 


5 


42 


9 


74 




76 




77 


9 


62 


1 


84 


2 




1 


61 


1 


84 






8 


72 


6 


17 




26 


9 


74 


6 


70 


4 




6 




14 


22 




78 


1 


87 


9 


3 


11 


62 




56 




35 




79 


5 




1 




4 




4 


46 




85 


1 




8 


68 


10 


63 


10 


17 


4 


26 




43 


5 


84 


7 


18 


2 


36 


11 


71 


1 


20 


5 


81 


8 


81 


5 


69 


9 



Days. 
17 

4 

3 
25 
13 

3 

16 
26 

2 

6 



28 

6 
6 

7 



22 
10 



18 
3 
9 

28 



17 
3 
3 

21 

11 



21 
6 
2 

16 
9 

22 

15 



Whole number, 49. 



Males, 23. 



Females, 26. 



DOG LICENSES. 

East Cambridge, Mass., June 4, 1888. 
Received of George A. Parkhurst, Town Clerk of Chelmsford, 
Mass., one hundred and one dollars and forty cents, on account of 
dog licenses as per his return of June 2, 1888. 

$101.40. J. O. Hayden, County Treasurer. 



East Cambridge, Mass'., Dec. 1, 1888. 
Received of George A. Parkhurst, Town Clerk of Chelmsford, 
Mass., two hundred and seventy-nine dollars, on account of dog 
licenses as per his return of Nov. 30, 1888. 

$279.00. J. O. Hayden, County Treasurer. 



Number of dogs licensed 193 

Males 182 

Females 11 

Amount received for licenses $419 00 

Amount of fees (20 cents per license) 38 60 

Paid to the County Treasurer 380 40 

Ninety-four per cent refunded 357 58 

GEO. A. PARKHURST, 

Town Cleric. 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

For the Year ending Feb. 28, 1889. 



Your Treasurer charges himself with balance in treas- 
ury, as found at last annual settlement $ 687 43 

Cash received as follows : 

State Treasurer, as State Aid for 1887 448 50 

Relief to Indigent Soldiers and 

Sailors 42 50 

Corporation Tax for 1887 208 75 

" " 1888 1,312 29 

National bank tax for 1888 1,337 92 

Armory rent 150 00 

Income Massachusetts school fund, 163 36 

Revenue school fund 223 12 

County Ti-easurer, on account of dog licenses for 1888, 357 58 

City of Lowell, on account of aid to pauper 40 86 

Town of Truro, on account of aid to pauper 5 00 

Matthias Hutchins, on account of hospital bills 170 07 

George F. Snow, on account of sale of school books 

and supplies 22 40 

J. Adams Bartlett, on account of tuition of non-resi- 
dent pupils 8 25 

R. S. Ripley, on account of tuition of non-resident 

pupils 

R. S. Ripley, on account of use of school room 

Susie M. Emerson, on account of error in school bill. . 
N. B. Edwards, on account of sale of lots in cemetery 

at North Chelmsford 

Dawson Pollard, on account of sale of lots in cemetery 
at West Chelmsford 

Amount carried forward $5,251 98 



12 

9 


20 
75 
00 


35 


00 


17 


00 



Amount brought forward $5,251 98 

George E. Spalding, on account of use of Town Hall at 

North Chelmsford 38 00 

Albion J. Lamphere, on account of use of Town Hall 

at Center 24 50 

L. K. Howard, as proceeds of sale of Parker wood lot 

(so called) .• 112 00 

Lyman S. Gale, on account of sale of wood 5 00 

A. H. Sheldon, tax of 1886, in full 91 96 

A. H. Sheldon, as interest on same 9 11 

Wm. L. Gordon, on account of tax of 1887 968 06 

Win. L. Gordon, as interest on same 54 73 

Wm. L. Gordon, on account of tax of 1888 12,739 12 

Wm. L. Gordon, as interest on same 75 80 

Overseers of Poor, as cash proceeds of Town Farm . . . 685 14 

Hired for use of Town, as temporary loan 4,500 00 

Making a total of $24,555 40 

And is credited as follows : 

By cash paid State tax for 1888 % 2,070 00 

State Treasurer, on account of pauper. . 40 86 

Outstanding order 36 00 

Orders drawn present year 18,099 56 

Care of Kimball lot, Center cemetery.. . 5 00 

On account of temporary loan 4,000 00 

As interest on'same 105 53 

Balance in treasury, as found on settlement 198 45 



$24,555 40 



E. H. WARREN, Treasurer. 
Chelmsford, March 6, 1889. 



REPORT OF THE ASSESSORS 

For the Tear ending Feb. 28, 1889. 



Valuation Mat 1, 1888. 

Real estate (resident) $1,135,255 00 

Real estate (non-resident) 196,775 00 

$1,332,030 00 

Personal estate (resident) $268,035 00 

Personal estate (non-resident) 2,500 00 

270,535 00 

Total valuation $1,602,565 00 

Number of polls 649 

assessed on polls only, 225 

assessed on property. . . 780 

Total number assessed 1,001 

Number of horses assessed 449 

cows assessed 1,050 

swine assessed 150 

dwellings assessed . . . 577 

acres of land assessed, 14,132 



. Taxes. 

Rate on $1000, $9.00. Polls $2.00 each. 

State tax $2,070 00 

County tax 1,161 54 

$3,231 54 

Amount carried forward $3,231 54 



9 



Amount brought forward $ 3,231, 54 

Appropriation for public schools $5,000 00 

school incidentals.... 400 00 
text- books and sup- 
plies 500 00 

support of the poor. . . 1,800 00 

highways 4,000 00 

repairs of public build- 
ings 300 00 

indigent soldiers and 

sailors 100 00 

town officers and com- 
mittees 850 00 

collection and abate- 
ment of taxes. . . . 300 00 

attorneys' fees 250 00 

enforcement of liquor 

law 150 00 

care cemeteries 300 00 

well and pump, district 

four 50 00 

bank wall and grad- 
ing, district nine, 400 00 
transcribing records, 

etc 100 00 

closets for school 
books, and sinks 
for school-rooms.. 200 00 

changes in Center 

town hall 500 00 

miscellaneous ex- 
penses 300 00 

15,500 00 



$18,731 54 
Overlayings 89 54 

$18,821 08 
Less estimated receipts 3,100 00 

Total tax committed $15,721 08 



Tax on 649 polls $ 1,298 00 

Tax on property 14,423 08 



15,721 08 



10 

Miscellaneous. 

Of the three hundred and fifty-one towns and cities in the state, 
only eighteen had a lower rate of tax than Chelmsford in May, 1888. 

Average rate of tax, $14.68 on $1000. 
Highest rate, $27.00 on $1000, in Savoy. 
Lowest rate, $3.90 on $1000, in Cohasset. 

CHARLES W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
GEORGE F. SNOW, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
L. K. HOWARD, 

Assessors. 



COLLECTORS' REPORTS. 



Collector's report for the year 1886. 

Taxes on list of 1886 uncollected Feb. 29, 

1888 

Interest on same to Feb. 29, 1888 



Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax 

" " " " " interest. 



$91 96 
9 11 


$101 07 




$91 96 
9 11 


$101 07 





Arthur H. Sheldon, Collector, 1886. 



Collector's report for the year 1887. 

Taxes on list 1887 uncollected Feb. 28, 

1887 

Interest on same to Feb. 28, 1887 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1887. . . . 



Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax 

" " " " " interest 

Uncollected to new account 

" interest to new account . . 



$1,029 40 
30 01 
30 79 


$1,090 20 




$968 06 

54 73 

61 34 

6 07 


$1,090 20 





William L. Gordon, Collector, 1887. 



12 



Collector's report for the year 1888. 

Tax list for 1888 $15,721 08 

Additional taxes 32 50 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1888 75 80 

" accrued on uncollected taxes. . 42 44 



Cash paid County Treasurer as County 

tax $ 1,161 54 

Cash paid Town Treasurer as tax 12,739 12 

" " « " " interest . . 75 80 

Uncollected taxes to new account 1,852 92 

Accrued interest to new account 42 44 



$15,871 82 



$15,871 82 



William L. Gordon, Collector, 1888. 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 

For the Year ending Feb. 28, 1889. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 

PAID FOR TEACHING. 

No. 1, Charles H. Bates, 11 weeks 

1, E. F. DeNormandie, 21 weeks. . . 
1, Laura L. Butterfield, 31 weeks. . . 

1, Nellie M. Perhara, 11 weeks 

1, Susie M. Emerson, 21 weeks 

1, Carrie L. Adams, 1 week 

2, Carrie L. Adams, 10 weeks 

2, Mary M. Burnham, 11 weeks .... 

2, M. Elizabeth Ham, 11 weeks 

3, Gertrude W. Byam, 32 weeks . . . 

4, Helen J. Gookin, 22 weeks 

4, Carrie L. Adams, 10 weeks 

5, Nellie Had ley, 20 weeks 

5, Orinda A. Perham, 10 weeks .... 

6, Susie S. McFarlin, 32 weeks 

7, Grace Saunders, 32 weeks 

8, William A. Woodward, 10 weeks, 

8, W. F. Parsons, 22 weeks 

8, Addie M. Taylor, 32 weeks 

8, Laura G. Hoyt, 32 weeks 

8, Kate Sleeper, 10 weeks 

8, Angie Campbell, 22 weeks 

9, Ada M. Sheldon, 29 weeks 

9, Agnes Naylor,29 weeks 

Town of Tyngsboro', tuition 3 scholars, 



$231 00 




430 00 




279 00 




99 00 




189 00 




9 00 


$1,237 00 


80 00 




88 00 




88 00 - 


256 00 


288 00 


288 00 


187 00 




85 00 


272 00 


120 00 




60 00 


180 00 


288 00 


288 00 


256 00 


256 00 


210 00 




462 00 




288 00 




288 00 




90 00 




198 00 


1,536 00 


246 50 




246 50 


493 00 


18 00 


18 00 



$4,824 00 



14 



CARE OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

No. 1, Joseph Elliot 

2, Wm.E. Fowle 

2, Henry W. Smith 

2, Wm. L. Gordon, cleaning 

3, Lyman A. Byam 

4, Herman W. Crooker 

4, Riley Davis 

5, Arthur E. Dutton 

6, Annie Devine, bill of 1887 

6, Annie Devine 

7, Wm. Martin 

7, Elsie Hodson 

7, Fred L. Fletcher 

7, Guy E. Reed 

8, Ripley & Keith 

8, Ripley & Keith, cleaning 

9, John Dunn 

9, Mary Coburn 

9, Mary Coburn, care and cleaning.. 



;69 00 


$ 69 00 


10 50 




5 50 




1 00 


17 00 


16 00 


16 00 


16 00 




50 


16 50 


6 00 


6 00 


6 00 




14 25 


20 25 


5 50 




5 00 




2 00 




3 50 


16 00 


96 00 




2 50 


98 50 


.2 75 




12 75 




7 62 


23 12 



$282 37 



FUEL. 

No. 1, H. L. Parkhurst, 41,850 lbs. coal.. 
2, E. F. Richardson, 4 cords wood. . 

2, Thomas Sheehnn, preparing wood, 

3, Warren Blaisdell, 8 ft. oak wood . 

3, F. C. Byam, preparing kindlings. 

4, Riley Davis, wood and kindlings. 
4, E. L. Russell, prepared oak wood, 

4 cords 

4, E. L. Russell, prepared pine wood, 
2 cords 

4, Herman W. Crooker, piling wood, 

5, E. E. Dutton, wood, 20 ft 

6, B. P. Marshall, prepared wood, 

2 cords 

6, B. P. Marshall, prepared oak 
wood, -J cord 

6, H. H. Hanson, prepared oak wood, 

2 cords 

7, Robert Fletcher, 25 ft. wood 

7, Wm. E. Martin, prepared wood. . 

Amount carried forward 



51 53 


$151 53 


20 25 




5 00 


25 25 


6 00 




-1 00 


10 00 


1 75 




23^64 




7 00 




1 25 


33 64 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 




3 50 




14 00 


27 50 


14 50 




3 00 


17 50 



$275 42 



15 



Amount brought forward 1275 42 

No. 8, S. P. Sampson, wood, 18 cords. . 
8, Ripley & Keith, preparing wood. 

8, Ralph Ripley, housing wood 

9, William C. Edwards, oak wood, 

7 cords 

9, John Dunn, preparing wood 



:90 75 
9 00 
4 50 


104 25. 


35 00 
5 25 


40 25 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



$419 92 



George F. Snow, Superintendent $200 00 $200 00 

William L. Gordon, services as secretary 

school board 10 00 10 00 

U. S. & Canada Express, express on 

book supplies 

No. 1, Adams & Co., school chairs 

1, City of Lowell, repairing black- 
boards 

1, F. G. Pratt, setting glass 

1, Charles E. Parkhurst, labor and 

material, 1887 

1, Bartlett & Dow, hardware 

1, E. S. Peavey, supplies and labor 

for blackboards 

1, James P. Emerson, labor 

1, E. R. Marshall, repairs 

2, City of Lowell, labor and stock 

for blackboard 

2, William L. Gordon, repairs 

3, Lyman A. Byam, curtains, etc . . . 

4, Riley Davis, repairs 

4,*George E. Emerson, setting glass, 

curtains, etc 

4, E. R. Marshall, repairs 

5, E. E. Dutton, repairs .... 

5, George O. Byam, repairs on well, 

5, George H. Holt, pump 

6, T. S. Edmonds, extra services as 

school committee, 1887 

6, Orrin Pierce, labor and supplies. . 

6, Jerry Ryan, labor and supplies . . . 

6, Daniel Green, plastering and tint- 
ing 

6, R. Wilson Dix, supplies 

Amount carried forward $350 59 



12 00 
16 50 


12 00 


9 40 
3 37 




2 05 

3 45 




10 85 
3 00 
1 15 


49 77 


4 38 

3 40 

4 30 
2 23 


7 78 
4 30 


9 00 

25 

7 55 

6 50 

14 00 


11 48 

28 05 


10 00 

3 25 

4 28 




9 00 

68 


27 21 



16 



Amount brought forward $850 59 

No. 7, Robert Fletcher, supplies 

8, Charles E. Adams, cluster 

8, Ripley & Keith, repairs and sup- 
plies 

8, Eugene N. Morrill, shades 

8, L. A. Derby & Co., bells ........ 

8, D. H. Bemis & Co, gymnasium. . 

9, William C. Edwards, repairs. . . . 
9, M. H. Winship, supplies ........ 

9, J. J. Hoyt, whitewashing 

9, George F. Snow, material and 

labor on fence 



3 15 


3 15 


2 75 




4 18 




7 50 




5 00 




7 00 


26 43 


14 19 




1 72 




11 25 




4 00 


31 16 



SCHOOL TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Harper & Bros., books and supplies .... $68 08 

George S. Perry, supplies 36 59 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books and sup- 
plies 36 86 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 5 06 

Lee & Shepard, books 7 69 

Educational Publishing Co., books and 

supplies 3 77 

F. M. Ambrose, books 52 09 

C. F. Stearns, books 1 28 

Boston School Supply Co., books and 

supplies 73 83 

Ginu & Co , books 9 71 

George F. King & Merrill, supplies 20 48 

Warren P. Adams, books 4 17 

A. S. Barnes & Co., books 42 35 

William Ware & Co., books 8 24 

E. H. Butler & Co., books . . . 3 59 

Leach, Sherwell & Sanborn, supplies... 6 60 

Cowperthwait & Co., books 9 35 

William M. Sargent, supplies 34 10 

Eastern Educational Bureau, supplies. . . 12 00 

Prang's Educational Co., books 7 20 

Harry Raynes, clocks 2 50 

Harrison Hume, books 9 46 

J. Merrill & Son, supplies 6 85 

Thomas Hall, supplies 1 80 

Christopher Sower Co., books 7 92 

George F. Snow, services and expenses 

buying and delivering books 50 00 



$411 33 



$521 57 



17 



CLOSETS FOR SCHOOL-BOOKS, AND SINKS FOR SCHOOL-ROOMS. 

Dist. 1, 3 book-cases and one table $59 05 

2, 1 book-case 9 50 

3, 1 book-case 8 50 

4, 1 sink 4 25 

6, 1 book-case 11 00 

7, 1 book-case and sink. s 13 79 

8, 5 book-cases 61 00 

9, 2 book-cases 23 00 

Services of committee 6 00 

$196 09 

BANK "WALL AND GRADING SCHOOL-HOUSE LOT, DISTRICT NINE. 

Herbert E. Fletcher, for material, and 

building wall and grading $350 00 

J. J. Dunn, for teaming 24 00 

George Morton, for loam 5 00 

J. W. Mason, for loam and labor 9 00 

George F. Snow, for labor and expense. . 9 20 

J. G. Rogers & Co., for grass seed 1 80 

Josiah Butman, for fertilizer 1 00 



$400 00 



WELL AND PUMP, SCHOOL DISTRICT POUR. 

George O. Byam, digging well, 13 feet, 

at $2.50 $32 50 

Riley Davis, labor and material 5 75 

Bartlett & Dow, pump 4 30 



^42 55 



SUPPORT OF THE POOR. 

PAID FOR EXPENSES OUTSIDE OF THE ALMSHOUSE. 

Worcester Asylum for Chronic Insane, 

in support of Daniel Gilligan $169 92 $169 92 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in support 

of Ella Hutchins 169 92 169 92 

Northampton Lunatic Hospital in sup- 
port of Laura E. Bailey 178 17 178 17 

Dan vers Lunatic Hospital, in support of 
Catherine McMahon and Robert 
D. Davidson 335 33 335 33 



Amount carried forward. . . $853 34 

2 



18 



Amount brought forward $858 34 

St. John's Hospital, in support of 
Thomas Lawler 

J. L. Chalifoux, clothing, in aid Thomas 
Lawler 

City of Lowell, in aid of children of Eliz- 
abeth Donahoe 

City of Lowell, in aid of Annie Sherlock, 

City of Worcester, in aid of Joseph 
Holland 

City of Boston, in aid of Asenath Clapp 

N. B. Edwards, in aid of Peter Sherlock, 

N. B. Edwards, in aid of Jonathan Hop- 
kins 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Mrs. James 
McEnnis 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Peter Sher- 
lock 

E. Shaw & Son, in aid of Jeremiah 
Crowley 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Mrs. St. 
Amore, bill 1886 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Albert Kemp, 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Chas. E. Perry, 

Amasa Howard, in aid of Jonathan 
Hopkins 

Mrs. Henry Heald, in aid of family of 
Albert Kemp 

Mrs. Eliza Wright, in aid of family of 
Albert Kemp 

Jennie M. Hubbard, in aid of tramps, 
bill 1887 

Jennie M. Hubbard, in aid of tramps, 

George F. Snow, in aid of outside poor, 

L. K. Howard, in aid of Alice Smith. . . 

Charles W. Flint, in aid of Alice Smith, 

Charles W. Flint, in aid of Charles 
Jerow . 



$104 56 




10 00 


114 56 


48 50 




2 75 


51 25 


98 57 


98 57 


81 83 


81 83 


17 50 




5 00 


22 50 


63 02 




39 75 




7 25 


110 02 


13 50 




61 33 




3 50 




4 50 


82 83 


17 00 


17 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 




10 50 


20 50 


2 75 


2 75 


3 17 




2 25 


5 42 


1 30 


1 30 



EXPENSES AT ALMSHOUSE. 



$1,466 87 



N. C. Bean, Superintendent, 1 month. . . $ 33 09 

H. H. Hanson, Superintendent, 11 mos.. 297 16 $330 25 

H. H. Hanson, hens 9 60 

H. H. Hanson, sundries 17 04 26 64 



Amount carried forward $356 89 



19 



Amount brought forward $356 89 

E. N. Wood, grain 

Dutton Bros., grain 

Dutton Bros., ice 

N". C. Bean, hay, 1475 lbs 

M. F. Parkhurst, hay, 4765 lbs 

Miss Winn, hay, 1595 lbs 

J. M. Fletcher, standing grass 

G. A. Coburn, straw 

E. W. Sweetser, meat and provisions. . . . 
Smart & Frost, meat and provisions. . . . 

H. E. Noyes, provisions. 

S. P. Pike, meat and provisions 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 

Phebe Adams, butter 

F. Severance, crackers 

Harry L. Parkhurst, coal, 18,000 lbs 

Wm. L. Gordon, taxes 

L. K. Howard, labor 

Hattie A. Bean, labor 

Eliza Henderson, labor 

T. H. Rowell, labor. 

Martha 'Hall, labor 

John Thompson, labor 

James Howard, labor 

Bartlett & Dow, hardware 

Frederick Taylor & Co., hardware 

C E. Parkhurst, screen doors 

Cook, Taylor & Co., dry goods 

J. E. Shanley, dry goods 

Talbot & Co., clothing 

E. K. Fiske, clothing 

L. H. Boardman, boots ; 

Joseph Morel, boots 

Carl A. Sylvander, boots 

D. C. Perham, bull 

D. C. Perham, balance between cows . . . 

D. C. Perham, balance between cows.. . . 

E. C. Perham, balance between cows. . . . 
E. C. Perham, two pigs and butchering. 

Edward Spaulding, one cow 

A. L. Brooks, lumber for shed 

E. H. Warren, lumber for shed 

John Wozencroft, blacksmithing 

T. B. Chapman, blacksmithing 

Amount carried forward $2,368 63 



; 4 21 




362 17 


366 38 


19 51 


19 51 


6 75 




19 06 




6 38 




25 00 


57 19 


1 50 


1 50 


260 70 




207 94 




38- 70 




17 29 


524 63 


432 71 


432 71 


88 51 '■ 


88 51 


24 85 


24 .85 


54 00 


54 00 


52 02 


52 02 


13 75 




17 16 




69 00 




2 50 




6 00 




70 00 




2 50 


180 91 


7 79 




50 


8 29 


12 71 


12 71 


8 43 




4 15 


12 58 


4 52 




1 50 


6 02 


1 00 




2 50 




2 60 


6 10 


16 00 


16 00 


30 00 




25 00 




10 00 


65 00 


13 75 


13 75 


20 00 


20 00 


17 08 




4 80 


21 88 


26 70 




50 


27 20 



20 



Amount brought forward $2,368 63 

John S. Shedd, repairs 

James Stanley, repairs clocks 

George H. Holt, repairs pump 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., repairs 

T. W. Lane, democrat wagon 

C. H. Hanson, harness 

H. F. Ebert, harness supplies 

E. Nettel, harness oil 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, dog license 

B. & M. Railroad, freight 

Old Colony Railroad, freight 

W. F. Robinson, boiler 

F. & E. Bailey, medicine 

E. H. Chamberlain, medical' aid 

G. P. Wood, medical aid .... 

Mary Robinson, nursing 

A. C. Stevens, nursing-bottle 

J. D. Mason, intelligence office 

C. A. Robinson, fish 

John E. Stevens, vinegar 

P. M. Jefferson, soap 

F. A. Marshall, 1 barrel turnips 

Boston Branch Grocery, feed 

H. Bechard, berries 

French & Puffer, crockery 

John P. Eaton, use of horse 

F. W. Worthen, use of oxen 

F. H. Austin, ladders 

Alfred Gordon, cotton waste 

A. W. Ober, hulled corn 

C. F. Hathaway, tin sign for wagon 

John B. Gates, garget cure ,. . 

Henry S. Perham, wood 

City of Lowell, two pigs 

City of Lowell, swill license 

City of Lowell, swill 

Mrs. Carley, swill 

Mrs. Ward, swill 

A. W. Mack & Co., stove grate 

Wm. Kelley & Son, sash and glass 

N. A. Glidden, 2 ducks 

J. V. Keyes, dry goods 

R. Wilson Dix, services and expenses as 

overseer 



Amounts carried forward $30 00 $2,608 90 



$ 3 30 




3 25 




2 50 




1 00 


10 05 


65 00 


65 00 


20 25 




2 15 




1 25 


23 65 


2 00 


2 00 


2 60 




50 


3 10 


4 00 


4 00 


35 




1 50 




2 00 


3 85 


4 00 




25 


4 25 


1 00 


1 00 


34 91 


34 91 


4 00 


4 00 


2 60 


2 60 


1 00 


1 00 


1 65 


1 65 


75 


75 


1 98 


1 98 


1 50 




2 00 


3 50 


6 30 


6 30 


4 95 


4 95 


42 


42 


50 


50 


3 00 


3 00 


14 16 


14 16 


11 00 


11 00 


5 00 




1 25 




10 00 




9 00 


25 25 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


2 00 


2 00 


2 40 


2 40 


30 00 





21 



Amounts brought forward $30 00 $2,608 90 

Chas. W. Flint, services and expenses as 

overseer 

John Q. Battles, services and expenses as 

overseer 

Geo. F. Snow, services and expenses as 

overseer 

L. K. Howard, services and expenses as 

overseer. . . : 



Proceeds of Town farm 

12,660 lbs. hay'used by road horses and 

charged to highways 

Board of men employed on highways, 

171 weeks, at $3.25 per week 



Total expense of poor at almshouse. 

Paid for aid outside poor 

Received on account outside poor : 
City of Lowell, on account of aid Chas. 

E. Perry $ 40 86 

Town Truro, on account of aid J on a. 

Hopkins 5 00 

Matthias Hutchins, hospital bills 170 07 



30 50 




5 50 




6 00 




16 50 


88 50 


$685 14 


$2,697 40 


106 60 




555 75 


1,347 49 






$1,349 91 




$1,466 87 



Inmates, 10; males, 4; females, 6; tramps, 560. 



215 93 



Expense outside poor $1,250 94 

Expense poor at almshouse 1,349 91 



$2,600 85 



R. Wilson Dix, 
Chas. W. Flint, 
John Q. Battles, 
Geo. F. Snow, 
L. K. Howard, 

Overseers. 

There is an increase in value of stock and hay at the farm of 
$431.77. 



22 



APPRAISAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT ALMS- 
HOUSE, CHELMSFORD, MASS., MARCH 1, 1889. 

6 tons English hay 

6 tons stock hay 

4 tons meadow hay 

21 swine 

20 cords manure 

1 democrat wagon 

1 carriage harness 

1 lap robe 

1 buffalo robe . . , 

1 farmer's boiler 

1 horse sled 

Whiffletrees and yoke 

1 heavy harness 

1 set double harness 

7 cows 

1 bull 

1 black mare 

1 black horse 

2 horse blankets \. 

2 harrows 

2 cultivators 

4 plows 

1 mowing machine 

1 grindstone 

1 wheelbarrow 

1 horse rake 

50 fowls 

Hay wagon 

Square wagon 

Horse cart 

1 cart harness 

1 pung 

1 two-horse cart 

3 ladders 

Lot farming tools 

Household furniture 

Provisions and supplies 





$120 00 






84 00 






36 00 






132 00 






100 00 






75 00 






20 00 






5 00 






10 00 






4 50 






3 00 






5 00 






10 00 






15 00 






243 00 






18 00 






75 00 






150 00 






3 00 






10 00 






6 00 






20 00 






20 00 






2 50 






3 00 






12 00 






25 00 






25 00 






40 00 






25 00 






7 00 






8 00 






20 00 






6 50 






24 80 






250 79 






233 96 


$1,848 05 






J. p. 


Emerson, 


D. P. 


Byam, 




Elisha H. Shaw, 






Appraisers. 



23 



HIGHWAYS. 

Dutton Bros., grain 

E. Shaw & Son, hay and grain 

S. W. Parkhurst, tools and supplies 

Bartlett & Dow, tools and supplies 

Jahn Wozencroft, blacksmithing, axles, 

and wheels 

Durant & Son, blacksmithing 

D. A. Polley, blacksmithing 

C. H. Hanson & Co., difference between 

horses 

C. H. Hanson & Co., one horse 

C. H. Hanson & Co., blankets 

C. H. Hanson & Co., 928 lbs. hay 

L. K. Howard, 2288 lbs. hay 

John Ward, 4130 lbs. hay 

H. F. Ebert, 2 sets double harness 

H. F. Ebert, supplies 

J. M. Hubbard, boarding road-men 

J. M. Hubbard, rent of barn 

Breaking roads : 

H. R. Hodson 

G. F. Wright 

George A. By am 

George Mansfield 

George O. Spaulding 

William Z. Dupee 

B. J. Spaulding 

J. J. Dunn 

E. E. Dutton 

B. O. Robbins , . 

William Redmond 

Walter R. Winning 

Charles H. Cook 

Thomas Harruk 

James H. Hazen 

A. M. Blaisdell.... 

Edward Doherty 

William Russell 

Matthew Dunn 

L. J. Mansfield and others 

John Marinel, Jr 

Theodore Marinel 

David Russell 

O. H. Hale 

George Patch 

G. B. Wright 

Amounts carried forward 



$229 03 




57 92 


$286 95 


26 82 




18 50 


45 32 


131 40 




13 36 




5 75 


150 51 


350 00 




220 00 




22 00 




9 28 


601 28 


22 90 




39 43 


62 33 


150 00 




1 75 


151 75 


130 00 




3 00 


133 00 


10 50 




2 55 




1 80 




10 60 




9 45 




4 95 




2 40 




4 20 




6 50 




21 07 




10 80 




1 80 




1 28 


< 


1 02 




9 50 




1 25 




5 75 




30 




2 25 




31 47 




39 38 




8 62 




3 15 




3 52 




2 85 




6 75 





71 



1,431 14 



24 



Amounts brought forioard $203 71 $1,431 14 

J. P. Emerson 7 00 

E. Shaw & Son 

J. W. Mason 

J. W. Mason, labor 

Joseph P. Winn, labor 

James B. Coburn, labor 

R. Wilson Dix, labor — men and teams. . 

Luther Blodgett, 60 loads gravel 

E. F. Richardson, 160 loads gravel 

Jacob Spaulding, 160 loads gravel 

B. M. Hildreth, 150 loads gravel 

Ann Eliza Hunt, chestnut timber 

W. S. Parker, chestnut timber 

E. H. Warren, lumber for shed 

A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber for shed . . . 

David Perham, plank 

E. Nettel, axle grease 

John S. Shedd, repairs 

M. Robbins, repairs 

James P. Emerson, bridge stone 

Lyman S. Gale, use of horse 8 days 

Lyman S. Gale, 1 cart 

Highway pay-roll, March 

April 

May 

June 

July • • •• 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 



Carried to Account of Poor, for board 

171 weeks, at $3.25 per week 

Carried to Account of Poor, 8960 lbs. hay, 



Less Highway bill — cart and horse for 
town farm 

$3,922 64 

Highway pay-roll includes salary paid highway surveyor, at $2.00 
per day. 



9 76 




22 


220 69 


4 50 




1 00 




2 65 




35 00 


43 15 


4 80 




8 00 




8 00 




7 50 


28 30 


7 00 




3 00 


10 00 


5 16 




11 72 


16 88 


35 00 


35 00 


2 40 


2 40 


3 60 




4 25 


7 85 


3 00 


b 00 


10 00 




42 00 


52 00 


117 15 




164 54 




155 46 




151 77 




132 57 




146 75 




121 73 




129 81 




137 35 




125 00 




129 81 




114 94 


1,626 88 




$3,477 29 


$555 75 




89 60 


645 35 




$4,122 64 




200 00 



25 



APPRAISAL OF HIGHWAY TEAMS AND TOOLS AT 
CHELMSFORD, MASS., MARCH 1, 1889. 



1 one-horse cart . 

2 horses 

2 horses 

2 sets double harnesses 

1 two-horse cart 

1 two-horse cart 

4 horse blankets 

4 feed bags 

1 Spreace chain 

1 Kimball road scraper 

2 two-horse sleds 

5 iron bars 

Powder, can, and fuse 

7 stone hammers 

21 stone drills 

3 whips ... 

14 picks 

7 shovels 

3 steel wedges 

2 bog hoes 

3 horse pails 

3 lanterns 

1 axe 

2 bush hooks 

Hames and chains 

4 halters, $2.00. Feed box, $1.50 

Wrenches, sponges, and brushes 

Lot tools , 

2 heavy chains 

2 ploughs, 2 scrapers 

Drag plank, etc 

1 jigger _ 

Set cart-shafts, yokes, and whiffletrees. 

English hay 

Straw 

Hay cutter 



\ 42 


00 


200 


00 


450 


00 


140 


00 


100 


00 


75 


00 


20 


00 


4 


00 


1 


25 


100 


00 


80 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


15 


00 


2 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


1 


25 


1 


50 




50 


1 


50 




75 


1 


00 


3 


50 


3 


50 


5 


00 



6 75 
3 50 

24 00 
3 50 

50 00 
13 50 

25 00 
5 00 

7 00 



:,416 00 



J. P. Emerson, 
D. P. Btam, 
Elisha H. Shaw, 

Appraisers. 



26 



ALTERATIONS IN CENTER TOWN HALL. 

Almon W. Holt, labor and material $430 00 

Charles E. Parkhurst, plans and specifi- 
cations 5 00 

George H. Holt, pump, pipe, and labor. . 65 00 

$500 00 

REPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Crawford Burnbam, shingles, district 

three $26 80 

A. L. Brooks & Co., fence material, dis- 
trict three 30 41 

Amos B. Adams, chestnut posts, district 

three 3 64 

Amasa Pratt, shingles and lumber, dis- 
trict three .• 31 05 

John Q. Battles, labor and material, dis- 
trict three . 24 80 

N. E. Parker, labor, district three 21 22 $137 92 

C. B. Coburn & Co., paints and oil, town 

hall, North Chelmsford 53 29 

William H. Brown, labor painting town 

hall, North Chelmsford 76 59 

Charles W. Flint, services and expenses, 

town hall, North Chelmsford 3 00 132 88 

GeorQ-e E. Spaulding, repairs, town hall, 

North Chelmsford 4 86 4 86 

A. J. Lamphere, repairs, Center town 

hall 4 10 4 10 



$279 76 

CARE AND IMPROVEMENT OF CEMETERIES. 

Center, R. Wilson Dix, labor $45 80 

L. K. Howard, labor 9 00 

Frank St. Amour, labor 10 00 

John Keats, labor, 4 37 

James P. Burnham, labor 1 50 

David Perham, horse 1 50 

Horace Holt, painting hearse 

house 25 00 $97 17 

North, Arthur H. Sheldon, labor and ex- 
penses 12 21 12 21 



Amount carried forward $109 38 



27 



Amount brought forward $109 38 

South, Daniel P. Byara, labor $ 8 50 8 50 

West, George W. Bussey, labor 3 60 

Dawson Pollard, labor 50 

George F. Snow, labor and ex- 
pense 3 00 7 10 

George H. Richardson, thirty 
standards for graves of sol- 
diers 17 50 17 50 

2. 48 



COLLECTION AND ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Arthur H. Sheldon, collection of balance 

of taxes for 1886 $ 1 49 

Arthur H. Sheldon, abatements for 1886, 23 01 $ 24 50 

William L. Gordon, collecting, 1887-88, 179 43 

William L. Gordon, abatements 1887-88, 104 98 284 41 



STATE AID. 



$308 91 



Paid under chapter 301, statutes of 1879, $546 00 

Paid under chapter 252, statutes of 1879, 60 00 

$606 00 

ENFORCEMENT OF LIQUOR LAW. 
Paid Alfred Day, services and expenses, $54 50 

ATTORNEYS' FEES. 

Paid D. S. & G. F. Richardson, legal 

services to March 21, 1888 $250 00 

TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid E. H. Warren, services and expenses 

as treasurer $75 00 $ 75 00 

George A. Parkhurst, services and 

expenses as town clerk 58 92 58 92 

George A. Parkhurst, services and 

expenses as registrar 12 60 



Amounts carried forward $12 60 $133 92 



28 



Amounts brought forward. $12 60 $133 92 

Paid N. B. Edwards, services and ex- 
penses as registrar 10 50 

L. M. Dutton, services and expenses • 

as registrar 10 50 

N. C. Saunders, services and ex- 
penses as registrar 150 

J. H. Vincent, services and expenses 

as registrar 1 50 36 60 

E. T. Adams, services as warden, 

Precinct 1 3 00 

E. R. Marshall, services as warden, 

Precinct 1 3 00 

J. E. Warren, services as clerk, Pre- 
cinct 1 3 00 

J. P. Emerson, services as constable, 

Precinct 1 3 00 12 00 

Arthur H. Sheldon, services as war- 
den, Precinct 2 3 00 

C. H. Dutton, services as warden, 

Precinct 2 3 00 

Fred K. Ripley, services as clerk, 

Precinct 2 3 00 9 00 

A. G. Parkhurst, services as warden, 

Precinct 3 3 00 

William Kiernan, services as war- 
den, Precinct 3 3 00 

M. H. Winship, services as clerk, 

Precinct 3 3 00 

J. H. Whidden, services as constable, 

Precinct 3 3 00 12 00 

L. K. Howard, services as select- 
man 85 50 

L. K. Howard, expenses as select- 
man 12 80 98 30 

Charles W. Flint, services as select- 
man 58 20 

Charles W. Flint, expenses as select- 
man 21 30 79 50 

R. Wilson Dix, services as selectman, 26 00 

R. Wilson Dix, expenses as select- 
man 12 00 38*00 

John Q. Battles, services as select- 
man 40 00 

John Q. Battles, expenses as select- 
man 15 00 55 00 

Amount carried forward $474 32 



29 



Amount brought forward $474 32 

Paid George F. Snow, services as select- 
man 

George F. Snow, expenses as select- 
man 

Charles W. Flint, services as as- 
sessor 

Charles W. Flint, expenses as as- 
sessor 

R. Wilson Dix, services as assessor, 

R. Wilson Dix, expenses as assessor, 

John Q. Battles, services as as- 
sessor 

John Q. Battles, expenses as as- 
sessor 

George F. Snow, services as as- 
sessor 

George F. Snow, expenses as as- 
sessor 

L. K. Howard, services as assessor.. 

L. K. Howard, expenses as assessor, 

James P. Emerson, services as con- 
stable 

John H. Whidden, services as con- 
stable 

Alfred Day, services, as constable . . . 

Alfred Day, services enforcing dog 
law 

George E. Spaulding, services as 
truant officer ■ . 

James P. Emerson, D. P. Byam, and 
E. H. Shaw, services as ap- 
praisers , 

Ziba Gay, E. F. Richardson, and 
Henry S. Perham, services as 
auditors 

$847 78 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Vox Populi Press, printing 700 of Town 

and School Reports $57 75 

Vox Populi Press, 20 badges for firewards, 5 75 

Vox Populi Press, printing election war- 
rants and posters 6 50 



$45 00 




15 00 


60 00 


90 00 




12 00 


102 00 


25 50 




9 00 


34 50 


25 00 




10 00 


35 00 


30 00 




10 00 


40 00 


38 00 




3 00 


41 00 


14 20 


14 20 


5 00 


5 00 


3 50 




12 76 


16 26 


7 50 


7 50 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 



Amount carried forward $70 00 



30 



Amount brought forward $70 00 

Alvin R. Saunders, printing license ballots, 

Alvin E,. Saunders, paper and printing. . 

Bacheller, Dumas & Co., 15 assessors' in- 
voice books 

Expenses of fire inquest, burning of H. 
C. Barker building 

Geo. A. Parkhurst, posters and making 
deed, sale of Parker wood lot 

O. W. Woodward, pump at West Chelms- 
ford 

Albion J. Lamphere, care Center town 
hall 

Albion J. Lamphere, cleaning Center 
town hall 

Staples Bros., drain pipe, Center town 
hall 

A. W. Holt, building coal-bin, Center 
town hall 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies, Center town 
hall 

L. K. Howard, expense and labor, Cen- 
ter town hall 

Frank St. Amour, labor, Center town 
hall 

W. A. Mack & Co., repairing furnaces, 
Center town hall 

Geo. E. Spaulding, care, warming, and 
lighting armory and town hall at 
North Chelmsford for cavalry, bill 
of 1888 "..... 42 00 42 00 

Geo. E. Spaulding, care, warming, and 
lighting armory and town hall, North 
Chelmsford, for cavalry 49 50 49 50 

Selectmen, perambulating town lines and 
renewing bounds between Chelms- 
ford and Lowell, Carlisle, Westford, 
and Tyngsboro' 38 00 38 00 

Amasa Howard, reporting 6 births, 1886, 1 50 1 50 

Arthur H. Sheldon, reporting 13 deaths. 3 25 

L. K. Howard, reporting 14 deaths 3 50 

Dawson Pollard, reporting 6 deaths 1 50 

Daniel P. Byam, reporting 4 deaths 1 00 9 25 

$370 74 



65 




3 50 




4 50 


$78 65 


97 00 


97 00 


2 25 


2 25 


3 00 


3 00 


25 00 




4 32 




4 10 




7 75 




1 42 




2 50 




2 00 




2 50 


49 59 



AGGREGATE OF APPROPRIATIONS, RECEIPTS, AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Schools, appropriation 

School fund 

School fund revenue.. 

Dog tax 

Tuition non-resident 

pupils 

Use of school-room and 

error in bill 

Teaching 

Care of houses 

Fuel 

School incidentals 

Free text-books, appropriation, 

Free text-books, receipts 

Support of poor, appropriation, 

Support of poor, receipts 

Highway, appropriation 

Highway, receipts 

State aid, receipts 

Repairs of public buildings, ap- 
propriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and 

sailors, appropriation 

Relief of indigent soldiers and 

sailors, receipts 

Town officers and committees, 

appropriation 

Collection and abatement of 

taxes, appropriation 

Miscellaneous expenses, appro- 
priation 

Miscellaneous expenses, re- 
ceipts 

Enforcement of liquor law 

Attorney's fees 

Care of cemeteries 

Well and pump, District 4 

Bank wall and grading, Dis- 
trict 9 

Transcribing records 

Closets for school-books and 

sinks for school-rooms 

Changes in Center town hall... 



Appropria- Expendi- 
tures. 



$5,000 


00 


163 


36 


223 


12 


357 


58 



20 45 
9 75 



400 

500 

22 

1,800 
901 

4,000 
205 
448 

300 

100 

42 

850 

300 

300 

376 
150 
250 
300 
50 

400 
100 

200 
500 



$18,270 23 



$18,270 23 



54,824 00 

282 37 

419 92 

411 33 

521 57. 

3,501 92 

4,139 64 
546 00 

279 76 



60 00 

847 78 
308 91 



370 74 

54 50 

250 00 

142 48 

42 55 

400 00 



196 09 
500 00 



$18,099 56 
170 67 



$18,270 23 



Surplus. 



$247 97 
83 

65 36 
20 24 

82 50 
• 2 22 



305 76 
95 50 

157 52 

7 45 



100 00 
3 91 



$1,089 26 



$1,089 26 



Deficit. 



\ 11 33 

800 85 
97 50 



8 91 



$918 59 
170 67 



$1,089 26 



Appropriations. 
Receipts , 



$15,500 00 
. 2,770 23 

$18,270 23 



Amount of orders $18,099 56 

Surplus 170 67 



5,270 23 



L. K. HOWARD, 
CHARLES W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEORGE F. SNOW, 

Selectmen. 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



We have examined the account of the Treasurer for the year 
ending February 28, 1889, and find his receipts and expenditures 
properly entered and vouched for, and a balance of one hundred and 
ninety-eight dollars and forty-five cents ($198.45) in his hands. 

We have also examined the vouchers in the hands of the Select- 
men, and find bills and receipts amounting to eighteen thousand and 
ninety-nine dollars and fifty-six cents (818,099.56), vouching for the 
orders drawn by them and paid by the Treasurer. 

We find: 

Cash in treasury $ 198 45 

Tax of 1887, uncollected $ 67 41 

Tax of 1888, uncollected 1,895 36 1,962 77 

Books and supplies 146 73 

Due from the State: 

For State aid to January, 1889 526 00 

State aid for January and February, 97 00 

Relief to January, 1889 32 50 

Relief for January and February. . . 5 00 

Armory rent 150 00 810 50 

$3,118 45 

Note $500 00 

Kimball fund. 100 00 

Interest on Kimball fund ... 22 64 

Silver fund 100 00 

Interest on Silver fund 18 00 

Liabilities (estimated) 200 00 

Abatements (estimated) 100 00 1,040 64 

Balance of assets $2,077 81 

ZIBA GAY, ) 

E. F. RICHARDSON, }■ Auditors. 
HENRY S. PERHAM, ) 

Chelmsford, March 6, 1889. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Middlesex ss. 
To either of the Constables of the Town of Chelmsford, in said 
County, GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby re- 
quired to notify the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet at the 
Town Hall, at Chelmsford Center, on Monday, the eighteenth day 
of March current, being the third Monday in said month, at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the following 
articles, viz : — 

Article 1. To choose a moderator. 

Art. 2. To hear reports of town officers and committees, and act thereon. 
To determine the manner of collecting the taxes. 
To determine the manner of repairing the highways, town ways, 

and bridges. 
To choose ail necessary town officers. 

To act in relation to the list of jurors prepared by the selectmen. 
To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be required 
to defray town charges for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize the treasurer to borrow such sums 
of money as may be required for the demands upon him in anti- 
cipation of the taxes of the ensuing year, and payable therefrom. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to grant licenses for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors for the current year. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen to act as their 
agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to repair or rebuild the lower bridge 
over the Stony Brook at North Chelmsford, or act in relation 
thereto. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will, by vote, designate the places to post pre- 
cinct warrants for elections. 

Art. 18. At the request of N. C. Saunders, Henry S. Perham, and George 
A. Parkhurst, to see if the town will vote to combine the two 
High schools, or act in relation thereto. 

3 



Art. 


3. 


Art. 


4. 


Art. 


5. 


Art. 


6. 


Art. 


7. 



34 



Art. 14. At the request of N. C. Saunders, Heury S. Perham, and Geo. A. 
Parkhurst, to see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
money to pay for the transportation of the pupils to the public 
schools, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 15. At the request of the School Committee, to see if the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money not exceeding one 
hundred and fifty dollars ($150.00), to be expended by the School 
Committee for the purpose of furnishing and fitting up the unoc- 
cupied room in the Center school-house, or act in relation 
thereto. 

Art. 16. At the request of the School Committee, to see if the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money not exceeding three 
hundred dollars ($300.00), to be expended under the direction 
of the School Committee for the purpose of purchasing the 
necessary apparatus, maps, globes, etc., for the use of the public 
schools, or act in relation thereto. 

Art. 17. At the request of the School Committee, to see if the town will 
vote to make a chauge in the method of heating the school-house 
at North Chelmsford, and raise and appropriate a sum of money, 
and choose a committee to carry out the provisions of tbis arti- 
cle, or act in relation thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant, by posting up at- 
tested copies thereof at the post-offices in the Center of the town, 
South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, and at the 
school-house at East Chelmsford, ten days at least before the time 
appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this Warrant, with your do- 
ings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this eighth day of March, in the year of 
our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-nine. 

L. K. HOWARD, 
CHARLES W. FLINT, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
JOHN Q. BATTLES, 
GEORGE F. SNOW, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



I have served the foregoing Warrant, by posting up true and 
attested copies of the same at the places above mentioned, more 
than ten days before the day of holding said meeting. 

A true copy. Attest : ALFRED DAY, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD. 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING FEB. 28, 1889. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 

VOX POPULI PRESS: 130 CENTRAL STREET. 

1889. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



In accordance with the laws of the Common- 
wealth your School Committee herewith submit their 
annual report. 

The first meeting of the Committee was held at 
the Selectmen's room at the Center town hall, on 
Wednesday evening, March 21, 1888, and as the 
night was very stormy, only a part of the Board 
was present. At this meeting the newly - elected 
members, Messrs. Wm. L. Gordon, J. A. Bartlett, 
and R. W. Dix, appeared and took seats with the 
Board. The Board organized by the choice of 
J. A. Bartlett as chairman and Wm. L. Gordon 
as secretary. Mr. George F. Snow was elected 
Superintendent of Schools and Book Agent for the 
ensuing year. 

At a meeting held later, various matters pertain- 
ing to the schools were brought up, and after a 
full discussion it was voted " that it was the sense 
of the Board that we endeavor to keep within the 
appropriation of the town," and that the Commit- 
tee as a body fix the salaries of the teachers on 



the basis of the amount of work in the various 
schools. This the Board did, and voted to have 
thirty -two weeks in the school year, instead of 
thirty - four as the year previous, except in school 
No. 5, where thirty weeks was made the limit, by 
the request of Mr. Dutton, the member from that 
section. 

The Committee has held a number of meetings 
during the year, at which various matters concern- 
ing the schools and the general routine work which 
has come before them has been transacted, which 
have no general interest here. There have been 
about the usual number of changes in teachers dur- 
ing the past year. Mr. Charles H. Bates, principal 
of the High School at the Center, resigned to ac- 
cept a similar position at Uxbridge, Mass., at a 
much higher salary than your Committee could pay. 
Miss Nellie M. Perham, who has been a faithful 
teacher in the Center primary department for many 
years, also resigned. Three different teachers have 
been employed in school No. 2, two in No. 5, and 
two in No. 4. Mr. W. F. Parsons has been em- 
ployed in place of Mr. W. N. Woodward, at the 
High School in North Chelmsford. 

The Superintendent's report will give the stand- 
ing of the schools more in detail than it would be 
possible to do here. 

A series of teachers' meetings have been held 
during the past year, attended by all the teachers, 



at which various matters pertaining to the welfare 
of the schools have been discussed. These meet- 
ings we feel will result in good to the various 
schools, by bringing about a more uniform system 
in all, and the Committee hope to continue them' 
during the coming year. 

On account of the prevalence of scarlet fever at 
West Chelmsford, it was thought best to close the 
schools, which was accordingly done. One week 
was also lost in the Grammar School at the Center, 
by reason of the sickness of the teacher. 

The subject of consolidation of the smaller schools 
with the larger ones has been a matter of some 
discussion in the Committee, and it is a question 
which must necessarily force itself soon upon the 
attention of the voters of the town. Whether it is 
sound policy on your part to maintain so many 
small schools, at a relatively greater cost as com- 
pared with the larger ones, and whether the scholars 
would not be benefited by going into the larger 
and more strictly graded schools, is a matter for 
your earnest consideration. If so many schools are 
to be continued, and kept up to the standard at 
which they should be maintained, the expense to 
the town will continue, and grow more and more 
as time goes on. We append to this report tables 
showing the cost of the various schools per scholar 
for the past year, and to which we beg your care- 
ful attention. » 



If the town would adopt a different way of mak- 
ing the appropriation for schools, it would greatly 
facilitate the work of the Committee. If, instead 
of appropriating so much money in a lump for 
schools, as has been the custom (and out of which 
have to be taken the salaries of teachers, care of 
houses, and cost of fuel), they would divide it, and 
appropriate a sum for teachers' salaries and a sum 
for care and fuel, the Committee would not have 
to " guess " how much would be left for teachers' 
salaries after " guessing " about how much would 
be required for care and fuel. 

We would call the attention of the parents to 
another very important matter connected with the 
schools, which is in their power to remedy. It is 
the matter of attendance. In some of our schools 
it has been very bad in the past year. Scholars 
are kept out of school for all sorts of trivial mat- 
ters, many of which are uncalled for. No teacher, 
however good, can do good work in a school where 
the attendance varies from ten to twenty-five per 
cent., and it is impossible for scholars to keep up 
in their studies, to say nothing of the wrong brought 
upon those who continue steadily in attendance, by 
being held back in their classes waiting for the 
ones who have been absent to get up with them. 
The laws of the state hold the School Committee 
to strict account in this matter, and the new laws 
passed at the last session of the legislature are 



more strict than ever before. We hope the parents 
will view this matter in the right light, and en- 
deavor to remedy this evil in the future, or the 
Committee will be obliged to adopt some method 
looking to that end. 

There is an imperative need of a fourth or in- 
termediate school at the Center of the town. The 
town, two years ago, enlarged the school-house in 
the Center, making four rooms in place of two. 
The fourth room was partially fitted up with the 
old desks left after furnishing the other three rooms. 
The scholars in the primary department have in- 
creased so fast that some were obliged to be turned 
away, for want of accommodation, in the past year. 
This room can be fitted up at a small expense, 
and another school established, which would relieve 
both the primary and grammar rooms, and also be 
of advantage to the High School, as scholars would 
not be obliged to be sent forward so fast to the 
higher grades to make room for the new ones 
constantly coming in ; thus giving them more time 
in taking the course, and at the same time receiv- 
ing more attention from their teachers than it is 
possible to give them now, in their overcrowded 
rooms and too numerous classes. We would re- 
spectfully ask for an appropriation of $150, for the 
purpose of fitting up this room in the Center school- 
house. 

Your Committee would again call the attention 



of the voters to the much-needed change in the 
method of heating the school-rooms in the school- 
house at North Chelmsford. As now heated, by 
wood stoves, a part of the scholars are frozen, and 
those nearest the stoves are too warm. This method 
is not conducive to the health or comfort of either 
the scholars or teacher. We would earnestly call 
your attention to this much-needed improvement, 
and ask for a special appropriation for this purpose. 
Your Committee in the past year has endeavored 
to . do its duty by the town to the best of its 
ability ; to spend the money entrusted to them in 
the most economical manner, and has endeavored, 
in every way, with the means at hand, to give the 
greatest amount of good schools possible. But your 
Committee is forced to the conclusion that it is 
bad policy, on the part of the town, to so restrict 
the appropriation for schools that the length of the 
school year has to be shortened, when it was none 
too long before, in order to keep within the limits 
of the appropriation. Our school year should con- 
sist of three terms, of twelve weeks each. No one 
can complain that we are paying too high salaries 
to our teachers. Any one, who will read the re- 
port of the State Board of Education, will see that 
we are not paying to our female teachers the aver- 
age of salaries paid by other towns in the state 
of equal valuation. The salaries of the High-school 
teachers are low, but would be nearer the mark if 



we kept the High Schools the forty weeks required 
by law. This is one of the reasons why we have 
such a constant change of teachers, which is one 
of the greatest sources of detriment to our schools. 
Both teachers and scholars lose much by these 
changes, as they have to learn the ways of each 
other, and it takes valuable time for strange teach- 
ers to find out the ability of their scholars, and as 
much time for the scholars to learn the ways of 
the teacher, and thus much valuable time is lost. 

But this is only one of the matters that call 
for an increased appropriation. There is a general 
lack of maps and globes, and other apparatus 
necessary to the good of the schools. Our High 
Schools have practically no apparatus to illustrate 
the natural sciences, which are required, by law, to 
be taught in them, excepting what may have been 
provided by private subscription. 

Your Committee would respectfully ask for a 
special appropriation for the purpose of purchasing 
the necessary apparatus for use in ■ the schools. 

The appropriation for text -books and supplies 
should also be increased, as the Committee has 
been unable to furnish books really needed by some 
of the schools. 

The statute law of the state requires that the 
Committee, in their annual report, shall lay before 
the town " such statements and suggestions in re- 
lation to the schools as the Committee deem nee- 



10 



essary or proper to promote the interest thereof." 
Your Committee has therefore made the foregoing 
suggestions and statements in regard to the needs 
of the schools, believing that they are actual needs, 
and only such as any . intelligent citizen of the 
town would make if he had the experience of 
your Committee in the past year. There are many 
more suggestions that the Committee could make, 
but those made are made because we see the need 
of these things at once. They are not made in 
the spirit of fault-finding, but because we have had 
to realize the need of what we ask. We make 
them because we know that their adoption by the 
town will result in benefit to our schools. 

We know that the state and town need intelli- 
gent and progressive citizens, and that they can 
be had only through the avenue of a good educa- 
tion. Our public-school system is firmly fixed in 
the hearts of our citizens, and it is their duty to 
see that they are well maintained, and that the 
hands of those to whom you entrust their care are 
not tied so closely that they can not do their 
duty. 

It is a fact patent to the minds of all good 
citizens, that public schools are better for a com- 
munity than reform schools, and that, as the world 
progresses, so must our public schools keep pace. 
We make these suggestions to you no more as 
vour School Committee than as vour fellow-citizens, 



11 



interested with you in all that pertains to the good 
of our town, and to these suggestions we ask your 
candid and careful consideration. 

J. A. BARTLETT, Chairman, 
WM. L. GORDON, Secretary, 
R. WILSON DIX, 
RILEY DAVIS, 
M. H. WINSHIP, 
F. C. BYAM, 
E. E. DUTTON, 
ROBERT FLETCHER, 
R. S. RIPLEY. 

Chelmsford, March 5, 1889. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Chairman and Gentlemen of .the School Com- 
mittee : 

Herewith, in accordance with your rules, I present to 
you the Annual Report of the condition of the public 
schools of this town, for the year ending Feb. 28, 1889, 
it being the twenty-fifth of its series and the second 
which I have had the honor to prepare. 

I wish, at the outset, to thank you individually for the 
courteous treatment you have invariably accorded me, 
and for the many helpful suggestions you have kindly 
proffered, whereby the duties of my position have been 
lightened and our united efforts productive of so satis- 
factory results. 

The year has been one of substantial progress. In 
several respects the quality of the work has been im- 
proved. 

This is due to divers causes. We have some excel- 
lent teachers, who grow wiser with experience. They 
do not rest satisfied with past acquirements, or with 
methods that produced fair results last year. By obser- 
vation, reading, and thought, they seek for better 
methods and more satisfactory results. 

Especially good results have been secured in Ian- 



14 



guage, including in that term reading, spelling, and 
composition, with a certain amount of technical gram- 
mar. Pupils can interpret the printed page with under- 
derstanding, and render the same in natural, well-mod- 
ulated tones, and, in the high and grammar grades, com- 
positions expressed in good English are secured as the 
rule, not the exception. 

In arithmetic considerable time has been given to 
combinations in the fundamental rules, in addition to the 
regular line of work. This has given excellent results 
in this branch. 

In all studies the teachers have striven for the best 
method of instruction, and have labored diligently to 
make their efforts tell effectually. 

The public-school system accomplishes its designed 
purpose in proportion to the interest the citizens mani- 
fest in it, and to their co-operation with officers and 
teachers. 

Teachers can not educate their pupils, in the best 
sense of the term, if they encounter opposition, or even 
indifference, of parents and guardians. 

The best interests of the schools demand measures 
whereby the community, from personal inspection, may 
learn more of what is being accomplished. Strenuous 
efforts should be exerted to enlighten public sentiment 
in all school improvements, which have been adopted 
with success in other places, and which, sooner or later, 
must meet the approval of our own citizens. Thus, we 
should the earlier catch the inspiration and spirit of the 
times, and experience much less difficulty in carrying 
out those methods of instruction approved by the best 
educators. 

Retaining so many teachers for the entire year has 



15 



added greatly to the efficiency of the work. Let a 
proper appreciation of their efforts now be shown, by 
repairing and better furnishing our school-houses, sup- 
plying much-needed apparatus and books of reference, 
and paying sufficient wages to continue their services 
from year to year. 

By such a course there is no reason why all the 
schools should not become what many of them have 
been, first-class. 

Mr. John T. Prince, Agent of the State Board of Ed- 
cation, gave the schools, during the spring term, a faith- 
ful inspection. While he recognized varying degrees 
of efficiency, he, nevertheless, spoke in high terms of 
much that he saw. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES, 

An appropriation of $600 was asked for this depart- 
ment, but only $500 was granted. Considerable time 
was given to the careful purchasing of books and sup- 
plies, and redistributing in order to keep within the ap- 
propriation. 

It is doubtful economy to attempt to run so close, as 
it is impossible to estimate exactly the requirements of 
the year, and in buying just enough to meet expected 
needs, it was found necessary to frequently send for ad- 
ditional supplies at largely increased expense. 

Under the head of text-books and supplies are in- 
cluded not only text-books proper, such as are legalized 
by the Committee, but also all necessary supplies for the 
pupils, such as writing and drawing books, examination, 
composition, and practice paper, ink, pens, slates, slate- 
pencils, lead-pencils, crayons, erasers,. etc. Most of these 
have to be often renewed. 



16 



A separation of the two would give approximately for 
text-books per se fifty-five per cent, and for supplies 
forty-five per cent. 

It has been found that the average length of time a 
book will last is three years ; that is, one-third of the 
books belonging to the town will have to be replaced 
each year. In addition to the books that are placed in 
the hands of each pupil, more books for collateral study 
and reading are necessary. 

Our supply of reference books is very meagre in all of 
the schools ; in some none at all beyond an abridged 
dictionary. Few studies, and especially history and 
geography, can be properly conducted without some- 
thing more than the one text-book for each pupil. 

The book gives only a mere outline, and, that the top- 
ical method may be used, this should be supplemented 
by others. Pupils should be taught how to study, how 
to find out things for themselves. The ability to ac- 
quire knowledge is more valuable than the mere posses- 
sion. The public libraries have rendered great service to 
the scholars in supplying them with nearly all the collat- 
eral reading they have had, but a single book that must 
be accessible to every inhabitant of the town should not 
be made to do the work required in the schools. 

Books to be useful must be in a position to be readily 
used. They should be in the school-room, where they 
may be consulted at any and all times. 

There are mentioned by the teachers, as now espe- 
cially needed to aid them in their work, two unabridged 
dictionaries, a large number of common-school dictiona- 
ries, twelve cyclopaedias, ten gazetteers, ten globes, 
manuals for drawing, maps for eleven schools, and some 
geographical and historical readers. 



$192 86 




261 57 




210 00 






$664 43 





The cost of books and supplies, and the disburse- 
ments to the several schools, are shown by the following 
table : 

Books and supplies on hand March 1, 1888. 

Expended for books 

Expended for supplies 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES FURNISHED. 

High School No. 1 $ 90 50 

Grammar School No. 1 41 30 

Primary School No. 1 38 83 

Mixed School No. 2 20 03 

Mixed Sehool No. 3 44 17 * 

Mixed School No. 4 24 00 

Mixed School No. 5 19 41 

Mixed School No. 6 48 02 

Mixed School No. 7 22 05 

High School No. 8 47 63 

Grammar School No. 8 33 00 

Intermediate School No. 8 34 10 

Primary School No. 8 19 90 

Grammar School No. 9 21 36 

Primary School No. 9 13 40 

Books and supplies on hand 146 73 

$664 43 



MUSIC. 

Singing has been taught to some extent in most of 
the schools, but a special and very successful effort in 
this direction was made in the North Chelmsford schools, 
where Mrs. Emma A. Spaulding was employed as in- 
structress in this department, the expense being borne 
by the pupils. 



18 



One who visited the schools and listened to the beau- 
tiful songs rendered with such accuracy and evident 
enjoyment, could not fail of < being convinced that the 
pleasure given to the scholars through this study is alone 
sufficient to justify its continuance. 

In my judgment this subject hitherto has not received 
that attention which its importance demands, and I would 
suggest that more consideration be given it, because it 
•not only tends to cultivate kind, friendly, and pleasant 
feelings among the scholars, but it is also recreative and 
refining in its influence above every other branch of 
study. It helps to maintain the discipline, and acts as a 
safety-valve, providing means of escape for the child's 
exuberance of spirits. In good songs we have the most 
effective means for teaching truth and cultivating directly 
the moral nature of the pupil. 

If every hour were broken in the primary schools by 
physical exercise or singing, the mental listlessness and 
physical restlessness which so often defeat the purpose 
of the schools would be in a great measure overcome. 

teachers' association. 

This organization was formed in October. Its princi- 
pal object is to discuss methods of teaching, and to make 
them uniform throughout the town. Two meetings have 
been held, and the teachers took a lively interest in them. 
They were a kind of "class meeting," where all gave 
their experience in school work. If any teacher had 
failed to accomplish some desired result, it was brought 
before the meeting and fully and freely discussed, and a 
remedy suggested. Where a teacher had been success- 
ful all were benefited by his advice and counsel. State 
Agent Walton's talk, at our last meeting, on the best 



19 



method of teaching arithmetic, bore fruit during the, 
winter term. 

MIXED SCHOOLS. 

These have been generally very successful, and none 
of them have been failures. At the annual examinations 
parents and friends were present in large numbers, the 
scholars were generally remarkably prompt and self- 
possessed, and the character of the recitations was such 
as to clearly show that thorough work had been done. 
The writing-books were neat and showed good progress, 
and the singing was a great advance on that of last year. 

The ungraded schools have given me considerable 
anxiety during the year, not because of incapacity or 
unfaithfulness on the part of the teachers, but because 
many of them contained advanced scholars, who, I was 
satisfied, were not doing their best work. No teacher 
ought to be required to teach all grades of scholars, from 
the primary school up. The remedy for the difficulty is 
to require scholars who are qualified to enter the High 
Schools to do so. Then the mixed schools would be left 
with scholars of three grades — the primary, interme- 
diate, and grammar. In some instances where scholars 
live at a great distance, it would be inconvenient for 
them, but the advantages derived would largely over- 
balance any inconvenience. 

In the High School the pupils would be better taught. 
They would study more, because there would be greater 
competition. They would have a better opportunity to 
learn from other scholars, one of the greatest benefits 
conferred by our educational system. Some of the 
teachers have labored under great disadvantages, insep- 
arable from few scholars and irregular attendance. 



20 



The most faithful hired man set at work with poor 
tools in a hard, sterile soil ought not to be expected to 
show the same result for his labor as the one having 
good implements and rich soil in which to use them. 

A comfortable house, provided, at least, with globe, 
outline maps, and good blackboards, scholars enough to 
create some enthusiasm amongst themselves, and who 
are not allowed to stay away from school on the slight- 
est pretext, are absolutely essential for the success of any 
school. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

A distinguished writer has said that " education is like 
the grafting of a tree ; one scion put on just above the 
root will become the main stem, and all the branches it 
puts forth will be of the right sort." This quotation 
illustrates well the importance of the first steps in educa- 
tion. There has been only one change of teachers in 
this grade, and there is a good prospect that the success- 
ful work of the past year will be even more successful in 
the year to come. 

A noticeable improvement has been made in writ- 
ing. In these schools nearly every scholar can write, 
and the members of the first class in each can write 
well. At one of the last annual examinations members 
of. the first class were sent to the blackboard and were 
given words to write from the piece they had been read- 
ing. The result would have done credit to a grown 
person. 

Little effort is now made in this grade to commit 
words and rules to memory. On the contrary, the child's 
natural fondness for " doing something " is taken as the 
foundation on which to build. Something to employ his 



21 



hands, and at the same time train his mental powers, is 
given him. With his pencil he copies what his teacher 
writes upon the blackboard ; with blocks, splints, straws, 
and toothpicks he works out problems in arithmetic, 
— the fundamental processes in numbers being thus 
illustrated by objects. With colored cardboard he is 
taught form and color, and on his toys is built an ex- 
tended language lesson. The whole method is based 
upon the principle that the child learns by doing. 

There has been no part of our school system in which 
such educational progress has been made during the last 
few years as in primary work, and it is a satisfaction to 
know that our primary schools have made great progress 
during the past year, and compare very favorably with 
similar grades in other towns. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

At the close of the spring term Miss Kate Sleeper, 
who for a considerable period had quietly, yet steadily 
and wisely, guided the fortunes of our only intermediate 
school, resigned and was succeeded by Miss Angie 
Campbell. Miss Campbell has, I think, been steadily 
winning her way to a secure place at once in the esteem 
of her pupils and in the confidence of all patrons of the 
school. 

A commendable feature of the work done here was 
the way in which she set her pupils to thinking for them- 
selves. If at times some of them seemed a little slow 
in coming to conclusions, far better such slowness than 
that fatal facility of recitation which rattles off words 
parrot-like, with little thought as to their meaning. 

The teacher's care should be to assist her pupils, not 



22 



to do their work for them ; to lead to careful thought, 
not to drive along in ruts. Hence, the true teacher is 
the one rousing thought, leading scholars to discern dif- 
ferences and apply principles they may have in mind. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

These schools have been fortunate in having the same 
teachers as last year, and I can detract nothing from the 
merit with which each was credited in my last year's re- 
port. 

I do not see how these schools could be bettered, as 
far as teachers are concerned. They are familiar with 
their work, and have performed it to the general satis- 
faction of all concerned. 

A generation since, in grammar, only the older schol- 
ars were instructed. Many of them, it is true, could an- 
alyze and parse complicated sentences, but few could 
write an ordinary page of composition with ease and 
grace. The average grammar graduate can now express 
himself with greater freedom and accuracy, the result of 
much practice in placing the product of his thought and 
knowledge in writing, and the correction of such work 
by the teacher. 

The plan, formerly, of memorizing names and places 
in geography, without any definite idea in the mind, was 
largely a waste of time. By far the greater portion of 
the names of towns, rivers, etc., found in our common- 
school geographies, were not remembered beyond the 
school walls. If the pupil is required to draw an accu- 
rate outline of every state and country he studies, to lo- 
cate the important towns, rivers, mountains, etc., and to 
learn a short descriptive lesson of how the people live, 



23 



how they are governed, and what they produce, the mat- 
ter thus becomes impressed upon the mind in a manner 
to be remembered, and much time saved for other 
studies. 

Arithmetic is being taught to better advantage than 
heretofore. It is a general complaint against our com- 
mon-school arithmetics, that the rules" for solution of 
problems are different from the practice of business men. 
Entire reliance upon any text-book is not required. 

Pupils are now taught: the different methods of reck- 
oning interest, and obtaining other results from num- 
bers as practised in counting-rooms, banks, and among 
business men generally. In this way they are better 
prepared for the business concerns of life, and a com- 
mercial course is less called for. 

The practice in penmanship formerly consisted of a 
daily half-hour imitation of a copy. There was almost 
no practice without a copy-book. The result was that 
children were deficient in those elements of good pen- 
manship, ease and rapidity. 

Pupils in the grammar grades of to-day, however, it is 
believed, are generally able to write easily, rapidly, and 
well. This result is due, in a great measure, to repeated 
composition and dictation exercises, where, from the na- 
ture of the case, there can be no copy. 

HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Changes of teachers occurred in both our High 
Schools at the close of the spring term. The loss of an 
efficient teacher who has become thoroughly familiar 
with the workings of a school is always a misfortune. 
Even if his successor is equally competent, some time 



24 



must elapse before he can form a sufficiently close ac- 
quaintance with his pupils to establish that bond of sym- 
pathy which is absolutely essential to produce the best 
results. This was especially true in the loss of Mr. Chas. 
H. Bates, who had so successfully taught the Center 
school during the four previous terms. I congratulate 
the Board, however, that they were so fortunate as to 
secure successors equally competent. 

It is needless to say that the general management of 
the schools continues to be of a high order. The pro- 
gress during the last two terms has been very satisfac- 
tory. The teachers have been thoroughly interested in 
their work and indefatigable in their efforts to advance 
the interests committed to their care. It is the testimony 
of the teachers that as little time is lost on the part of 
the pupils in the school-room as in that of any educa- 
tional institution with which they have ever been con- 
nected. Good, honest, solid, earnest work is the every- 
day habit of a majority of the students in these schools. 

A class of thirteen graduates went from the Center 
High School at the close of the spring term. The exer- 
cises of graduation were attended by an audience which 
completely filled the town hall. The exercises were of 
about the right length, and there was sufficient variety. 
The essays were characterized by more originality than 
is generally shown at such times. Music rendered by 
the Chelmsford Orchestra was a marked feature of the 
evening. Diplomas were presented by J. Adams Bart- 
lett, chairman of the School Committee, with an address 
to the graduates appropriate to the occasion. 



Programme. 



MILITARY MARCH . ' . 

ORCHESTRA. 

PRAYER. 
SALUTATORY ESSAY 

MISS MARSHALL. 



2. ESSAY 

3. ESSAY 

4. ESSAY 

AVE MARIA 

5. ESSAY 

6. CLASS HISTORY 

7. ESSAY 

8. ORATION 
LA FAVORITA 

q. ESSAY 



MISS CROOKER. 

MISS DAVIS. 
MISS FULTON. 

ORCHESTRA. 



Cathn 

" Influence of Poetry.' 

" Empress Josephine.' 

" Music' 

"The Three Caskets.' 

. . Gounod. 



" Power of Early Impressions.' 

MISS LOCKE. 



10. ESSAY 



MISS EMERSON. 

MISS McNUTT. 

MASTER FLETCHER. 

ORCHESTRA. 

MISS ROBINSON. 

MISS WARREN. 



" Value of Character.' 

" Power of Ideas.' 

Donizetti 

"The Fall of Troy.' 

"Joan of Arc' 

"The Authiscope.' 

Verdi. 



11. CLASS PROPHECY .... 

MASTER SAUNDERS. 

SELECTION FROM IL TROVATORE 

ORCHESTRA. 

12. ESSAY . . . . . . " Great Inventions.' 

MISS WILSON. 

13. VALEDICTORY ESSAY . . " The Puritan Character.' 

MISS HUTCHINSON. 

SINGING PARTING ODE. AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS 

BENEDICTION. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 



Etta May Crooker, 
Inez Althea Davis, 
Edith Williams Emerson, 
William Fletcher, 
Jennie Amanda Fulton, 
Ella Augusta Hutchinson, 
Clara Belle Locke, 



Amy Wood Marshall, 
Lillian Augusta McNutt, 
Florence Maud Robinson, 
Lillian Esther Warren, 
Jennie Gertrude Wilson, 
Alvan Rose Saunders. 



26 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



I venture the assertion that of all the school reports 
which have been written in Chelmsford for the past 
twenty years, not one in five can be found which does 
not contain something on the subject of school at- 
tendance. No subject has received more anxious thought 
on the part of your Superintendent during the year, and 
it is a pleasure to report a decided improvement in the 
average attendance of the schools, compared with pre- . 
vious years. The average attendance of pupils has been 
86 per cent, of the average number belonging to the 
schools. 

I consider unnecessary absence the great evil in the 
schools, and the hardest to remedy. If all absences re- 
ported by teachers could be traced to the real delin- 
quents, it would be found to be confined to a few, and 
thus four or five in each school spoil the average of the 
whole. 

NO RECESS. 

The no-recess plan, so generally obtaining elsewhere, 
has been tried to some extent in the schools, and thus 
far has worked admirably. Many years' experience as 
a teacher has led me to favor abolition of the recess. I 
have found that during recess-time most of the mischief 
of school-life finds vent. Besides, clothing is injured, 
school property impaired, accidents precipitated, sickness 
often produced by exposure to extremes of heat and 
cold, and through excitement of violent exercise, school- 
work seriously disturbed ; and most important of all, the 
moral welfare of the scholars often suffers. 

All pupils are allowed individual recesses, when nee- 



27 



essary, at any hour of the day, and as often as required. 
Besides, pupils practise a series of marching and calis- 
thenics each session, for about five minutes, at which 
time, when the weather will permit, the windows are 
opened to admit fresh air. I am a strong advocate of 



the individual-recess plan. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

A careful examination of the condition of the schools, 
and of their work during the year, would doubtless reveal 
defects and imperfect work ; but it would also result in 
the recognition of many features of excellence, and of 
fidelity and untiring zeal on the part of the teachers. I 
again bespeak for them liberal support. Their impor- 
tance is so transcendent that there is no danger of be- 
stowing upon them too much of our care or means. If 
thus far in the history of our country Massachusetts has 
had any commanding influence in the councils of the 
government ; if, by her example, and by the emigration 
of her sons, she has been instrumental in imparting any 
thing of vigorous growth, persistent energy, and success- 
ful enterprise to other states, — it has been chiefly due 
to the influence of her public schools. 

Progress in education requires a wide-awake people, 
and if we would have Chelmsford schools maintain the 
honorable position which they have hitherto enjoyed, 
we must put forth united and earnest efforts. I do 
not believe the citizens of the town will ever suffer the 
character, influence, and usefulness of s our schools to 
decline for want of generous appropriations for their 
support. 



28 



CONCLUSION. 



In closing, I desire to tender most cheerfully my sin- 
cere thanks to the teachers, for their aid and hearty 
co-operation in carrying forward the work of the schools, 
and my grateful acknowledgment to the parents and 
patrons, with whom my relations have been so pleasant, 
and whose sympathy and encouragement I have enjoyed 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE F. SNOW, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Chelmsford, Mass., March 5, 1889. 



ROLL OF HONOR - PUPILS NOT ABSENT. 

Those marked * were tardy. 



HIGH SCHOOL NO. 1, 

Two Terms — Wintie R. Gordon, Grace E. Mansfield, Clara M. 
Hutchinson, Charles H. Dutton. 

One Teem — Clara B. Locke, Ella A. Hutchinson, James A. Em- 
erson. 

GRAMMAR NO. 1. 

Two Teems — Harold H. Davis, Cora E. Hutchinson, Estelle G. 
Hutchinson, Ethel L. Byfield. 

One Term — Tommy Parkhurst, Ralph W. Emerson, Willie H. 
Fulton, Alice M. Stearns, Jessie Holt, Nellie Keefe. 

PRIMARY NO. 1. 

One Term — Harold Davis, Leslie Davis, Charles P. Holt, Ralph 
Stearns, Leon Thurlow, Herbert Whitney, Robert H. Livingstone, 
George French, George P. Jacques,* Merle C. Saunders,* Grace S. 
Parkhurst.* 

MIXED NO. 3. 

One Year — Lyman A. Byam, Nellie A. Byam, Grace G. Garland, 
Ferdie M. Scoboria, John H. Cooper. 

One Term — Alice E. Paignon, Eugenie S. Paignon, Willie J. 
White, John A. Redmond, Maggie Sloan, Carl M. Mansfield, Sarah 
J. George, Frankie H. Mansfield. 



80 



MIXED NO. 4. 

One Teem — Merton Cummings, Frankie Melvin, Walter Red- 
mond. 

MIXED NO. 5. 

One Yeae — Florence Ward, Arthur E. Dutton. 
Two Teems — Harry A. Dutton. 

MIXED NO. 6. 

One Yeae (neither absent nor tardy) — Annie Devine (tardy 
twice), Ellie Devine, Bertha Teabo, Ernest Craven. 

Two Teems (neither absent nor tardy) — Mary Devine, Lizzie 
Devine, Sadie Devine, Walter Devine, Mary J. Dix. 

One Teem (neither absent nor tardy) — Albert Dyar, Harry 
Wilson, Lucy Openshaw, Perle Dyar (tardy once), Arthur Dyar 
(tardy once), Michael McKennedy (tardy twice). 

MIXED NO. 7. 

One Yeae — Charles Martin. 

Two Teems— Frank Martin, Willie Martin. 

One Teem — Almeda Reed, Oscar Hodson, Elsie Hodson, Ella 
Hodson. 

PRIMARY NO. 8. 

One Yeae — Sarah Leahey, Theresa McCabe, Frank Hall, Clar- 
ence Spalding, Stephen Ward. 

Two Teems — Hattie Cook, Alice Shields, Lizzie Larkin, Rosie 
McCabe, John Shields, George Lumber!, Carl Ripley. 

One Teem— Carrie Cook, Edith Merrill, Alice O'Donald, Lena 
O'Donald, Cora Pearson, Delia Shields, Florence Shaw, Maud 
Wright, Arthur Wheeler, Nellie McCabe, Grace Merrill, Eddie 
Hutchins, Susie Newman, John Callaghan, Mary Hatch. 



81 

INTERMEDIATE NO. 8. 

One Year — Viola Green. 

Two Teems — Delia Shields, Charles Hatch, James Leahey, Wal- 
ter Marinel, Frank Pearsons. 

One Term — Gardner Ripley, Willie Chandler, Georgie Spauld- 
ing, Georgie Swain, Mary Dunnigan, Willie Dunnigan, Hannah 
Shields, Hannah Sleeper, Edith Merrill, Grace Wright, Hattie Hall, 
Ida Irish, Minnie Pearson, Mary McMahon, Herman Shaw, Willie 
O'Neil, Carrie Cook, Minnie McManamin, Florence Sampson. 

GRAMMAR NO. 8. 

One Year — Cecelia A. Marinel, Luella G. Merrill. 

Two Terms — Fannie G. Holt, Minnie E. Pearson, Lillie M. 
Sweat, Frank D. Small,'* George B. Holt,* Fred Chandler. 

One Term — S. Mabel Hoole, Blanche L. Sampson, Delia G. 
Sprague, Sadie E. McCoy,* Eliza J. Spaulding, Augustus E. Dun- 
can, G. Walter Monegan, Charles E. Hyde, Albert E. Peterson, E. 
Herman Shaw, C. Hassie Spaulding. 

HIGH NO. 8. 
One Year — Ralph Ripley. 

Two Terms — Delia Sprague, Bertha Swain, Walter Swain, Fan- 
nie Parkhurst. 

One Term — Irving Keith, Rosella Monehan, Charles Davis. 

GRAMMAR NO. 9. 

One Year — Florence M. Winship. 

Two Terms — Emma L. Woodward, Mary D. Doherty, Minnie 
M. Pelsue,* Cora G. Daw, Nina E. D. Dane,* Alfred M. Daw, 
Federick A. Snow, Carl E. Spalding, Charles A. L. Dane,* Lottie 
L.Snow, Bertha V. Parkhurst. 

One Term — Lilla Cunningham, Alma E. Agnew, Almira L, 
Coburn, Louisa F. Pelsue, Helen Knowles,* George Mason,* 
Johnnie E. Dane, George Quessy, George Knowles,* Arthur Mason. 
Oscar N. Naylor. 
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