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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 




Town of Chelmsford 



Together with the School Report and the 
Report of Trustees of the Adams Library 



Year Ending Feb. 28, 1913 



BUCKLAND PRINTING CO. 



MIDDLE STREET. LOWELL, MASS. 



I 
I 

[OREGON RU. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 



Town Clerk 

Edward J. Robbins 

Selectmen 

D. Frank Small (term expires 1915). 

Walter B. Emerson (term expires 1914). 

A. Heady Park (term expires 1913). 



Overseers of the Poor 

D. Frank Small (term expires 1915). 

Walter B. Emerson (term expires 1914). 

A. Heady Park (term expires 1913). 



Assessors 

James P. Dunigan (term expires 1915). 

Fred L. Fletcher (term expires 1914). 

Herbert C. Sweetser (term expires 1918), 



4 
Town Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 

Erwing W. Sweetser 



Auditors 

Winthrop A. Parkhurst Preston L. Piggott 

Samuel Naylor 



Constable 

Hubert H. Richardson 

School Committee 

William H. Hall (term expires 1915). 

John J. Monahan (term expires 1914). 

John E. Harrington (term expires 1913), 

Trustees of Adams Library 

Albert H. Davis A. Heady Park 

(Terms expire 1915). 
Francis Clark Wilson Waters 

(Terms expire 1914). 
Edwin R. Clark Otis P. Wheeler 

(Terms expire 1913). 



Tmi 



5 
Tree Warden and Superintendent of Moth Work 

Minot A. Bean 

Sinking Fund Commissioners 

William H. Shedd (term expires 1915). 

William J. Quigley (term expires 1914). 

Walter Perham (term expires 1913). 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Charles F. Scribner (term expires 1915). 

Charles A. Holt (term expires 1914). 

William H. Hall (term expires 1913). 

Park Commissioners 

Fred L. Fletcher (term expires 1915). 

George F. Cutler (term expires 1914). 

George B. B. Wright (term expires 1913), 

Fence Viewers 

James P. Daley Leonard Spaulding 

George P. Mansfield 

Appraisers of Personal Property at Town Farm 

Emile E. Paignon, Jr. Walter Perham 

Pliny C. Bliss 



6 

Weighers of Hay 

S. Waldo Tarkhurst Myron A. Queen 

Paul Dutton Frank E. Bickford 

Henry H. Emerson John B. Emerson 

John Holgate 

Measurers of Wood 

S. Waldo Parkhurst Paul Dutton Alvin H." Fletcher 

Daniel A. Reardon Frank E. Bickford Myron A. Queen 

John Marinel, Jr. Melvin Walker Edward^H. Keyes 

Jay B. Plummer John J. Dunn 

Surveyors of Lumber 

R. Wilson Dix Stewart Mackay 

George E. Spaulding E. Hamlin Russell 

Myron A. Queen Melvin Walker 

Herbert C. Sweetser Alvin H. Fletcher 

Jay B. Plummer 

Field Drivers 

R. Wilson Dix E. Hamlin Russell 

Thomas Murphy 

Committee on Appropriations 

Walter B. Emerson George F. Snow 

D. Frank Small A. Heady Park 

William H. Shedd 



7 

APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 

Weighers of Coal 

S. Waldo Parkhurst John B. Emerson 

Paul Dutton James P. Dunigan 

William J. Quigley Frank E. Bickford 

William Kittredge 

Superintendent of Burials 

Walter Perham George F. Cutler 

Fred W. Edwards 

Superintendent of Burial of Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 

Walter Perham 

Agents of the Board of Health 

Arthur G. Scoboria (Precincts 1 and 4) 
Fred E. Varney (Precincts 2 and 3) 

Registrars of Voters 

Patrick H. Haley (term expires 1915) 

George H. Ripley (term expires 1914) 

John F McManomin (term expires 1913) 
Edward J. Robbins, clerk, ex-officio 



8 
Sealer of Weights and fleasures 

Curtis A. Aiken 

Superintendent of Town Farm 

Waldo Hanaford 

Superintendent of floth Work 

Minot A. Bean 

Forest Warden 

Arnold C. Perham 

Fire Wards 

Arthur House Ralph P. Adams 

Arnold C. Perham 

Deputy Fire Ward 

William H. Shedd 

Cattle Inspector 

Emile E. Paignon, Jr. 



Janitors of Public Buildings 

James S. Byam Patrick S. Ward 

Inspector of Heats and Provisions 

Arnold C. Perham 



Special Police Officers 



George C. Moore 
Thomas Brown 
James J. Hackett 
Frank C. Byam 
Patrick S. Ward 
Chas. Kappler 
Thomas W. Daley 
James S. Byam 
Henry Staveley 



William E. Martin 
Fred J. Blodgett 
Frank E. Bickford 
Thomas Jones 
James Buchanan 
Paul A. Robinson 
Norman Leith 
James R. Gookin 
Michael McPhillip 
James A. Peck 



Owen Scollan 
Waldo Hanaford 
Frank G. Foote 
Curtis A. Aiken 
Michael Kinch 
John Dowd 
William Parker 
John Marinel, Jr. 
John J. Quessy 
Fred I. Vinal 



John Holgate 
D.F. Small 



Weighers of Merchandise 



James F. Leahey 
James Long 



James J. Hackett 
William J. Quigley 



EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



10 

DOGS LICENSED FOR THE YEAR 19J2 



Number of dogs licensed 268 

Males 248 

Females 20 

Amount received for licenses $596 00 

Amount of fees (20 cents a license) 53 60 

Paid to the County Treasurer, receipt on file 542 40 

Amount refunded to the Town, 97 per cent 526 12 

Any owner or keeper of a dog not duly licensed which 
becomes three months old after the thirty-first day of March 
in any year shall, whenever it is three months old, cause it to 
be registered, numbered, described and licensed until the first 
day of the ensuing April, as provided in Sections 128 and 129 
of Chapter 102 of the Revised Laws as amended, and shall 
cause it to wear around its neck a collar distinctly marked 
with its owner's name and its registered number. 

ATTENTION IS CALLED TO THE CHANGE IN THE LAW 
REGARDING THE TIME DOG LICENSES SHALL BE PAID ON 
OR BEFORE THE LAST DAY OF MARCH, INSTEAD OF THE 
LAST DAY OF APRIL. 

The Town Clerk is prepared to furnish blanks for births 
and deaths, and calls particular attention to the laws in relation 
to returns within the first five days of each month of all births 
occuring during the preceding month. 

EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



11 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 1912 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant 
to Warrant at the Town Hall, Centre Village, Monday, March 
25, 1912, at 8 o'clock in the forenoon, the following business 
was transacted, to wit : 

The meeting was called to order and the Warrant read by 
the Town Clerk, Edward J. Robbins. 

Under Article 1, to choose a Moderator, J. Adams Bartlett 
was unanimously elected, the check list being used, and the 
oath of office was administered by the Town Clerk, 

Under Article 2, relating to the election of town officers by 
the official ballot, the following Clerks and Tellers previously 
appointed by the Selectmen were sworn by the Town Clerk. 
Ballot Clerks: John P. Scoboria, Arnold C. Perham ; Tellers: 
Daniel E. Haley, James B. McQuaid, William E. Martin, 
William H. Quigley, Ralph P. Adams, Patrick Flynn. The 
ballot box was examined and found to be empty, the register 
indicating zero. The ballots were then delivered to the ballot 
clerks by the Town Clerk, he taking their receipt therefor. 
The polls were opened at 8.20 a m. and the balloting proceeded 
until 1.15 p. m., when the polls were closed. The ballots as 
counted were 465 and the check lists corresponding. During 
the canvass of the ballots the following business was transacted. 

Under Article 3, the following officers were chosen by 
nomination from the floor. Fence Viewers: James P. Daley, 
George P. Mansfield, Leonard Spaulding. Appraisers of Per- 
sonal Property at the Town Farm: Emile E. Paignon, Jr.- 
Pliney C. Eliss, Walter Perham; Weighers of Hay: S. Waldo 
Parkhurst, Paul Dutton, Henry H. Emerson, Myron A. Queen, 



12 

Frank E, Bickford, John B. Emerson, John Holgage; Meas- 
urers of Wood: S. Waldo Parkhurst, Daniel A. Readon, John 
Marinel, Jr., PaufDutton, Frank E. Bickford, Melvin Walker, 
Jay B. Plummer, Alvin H. Fletcher, Myron A. Queen, Edward 
H. Keyes ; Surveyors of Lumber: ,R. Wilson Dix, George E. 
Spaulding, Myron A. Queen, Herbet C. Sweetser, Stuart 
Mackay, E. Hamlin Russell, Melvin Walker, Alvin H. Fletcher, 
Jay B. Plummer; frield Drivers: R. Wilson Dix, E. Hamlin 
Russell, Thomas Murphy ; Committee on Appropriations: 
Walter B. Emerson, George F. Snow, A. Heady Park, William 
H. Shedd, D. Frank Small. 

Under Article 4, voted to accept the Town Report as 
printed after some typographial errors had been called to the 
attention of the meeting. The Selectmen's report upon guide 
posts was accepted and placed on file. The committee ap- 
pointed at the last Annual Town Meeting in regards to the 
best means of providing better fire protection in that part of 
the Town known as Chelmsford Centre, made two recommend- 
ations, one to be known as the report of the majority, and the 
other to be known as the report of the minority of the Com- 
mittee which was as follows : That the matter be laid on the 
table for one year. That the present committee be retained 
for that period with the added power to place an article in a 
warrant calling for the creation of a fire district and the issu- 
ance of town water bonds to cover the cost of constructing a 
complete water plant for same capable of furnishing an abund- 
ant supply of water for fire and domestic purposes. 

Under Article 5, the Committee on Annual Appropriations 
reported the sums necessary in their judgement, which as 
amended, it was voted to raise and appropriate as follows : 

Teaching, care and fuel $22,900 00 

Superintendent 1,500 00 

Also voted to appropriate $100.00 from money 
already in the Town Treasury for School Su- 
perintendent. 



13 

Incidentals 400 00 

Transportation 1,750 00 

Apparatus 50 00 

Furniture and repairs 1,000 00 

Text Books and supplies 1, 700 00 

Medical Inspection 250 00 

Tuition in Industrial School at Lowell 595 00 

Highways 4,000 00 

Also voted to appropriate money received as 
excise tax and the proceeds from the sale of 
the Town teams for highways. 

Support of Poor 3,000 00 

Repairs of Public Buildings 300 00 

Street Lighting : 6,800 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 2,500 00 

Town Officers and Committee 3,000 00 

Moth Work 1,688 17 

Care and Improvement of Cemeteries 600 00 

Indigent soldiers and sailors 450 00 

Cattle Inspector 100 00 

Adams Library 1,200 00 

North Chelmsford Library Association, provided 

the books are for the free use of the inhabitants 

of the town • 600 00 

Village clock 30 00 

Tree Warden , 300 00 

Public Parks 200 00 

Meat Inspection 800 00 

Weights and Measures 100 00 

Abatement of Taxes 200 00 

Also voted to appropriate $536.38 from money 
already in the Town Treasury for abatement 
of taxes. 

Loans and Interest 4,791 76 

Sinking Fund 200 00 

Military Aid 400 00 

Voted to appropriate $428.67 from money al- 
ready in the Town Treasury to be applied on 
construction of the Acton Road. 



14 

Under Article 6, voted to authorize the Town Treasurer 
to borrow, subject to the approval of the Selectmen, such 
sums of money, not to exceed forty-five thousand dollars 
($45,000.00), as may be required for the demands upon him, in 
anticipation of the taxes of the municipal year beginning 
March 1, 1912, and payable therefrom. 

Under Article 7, voted that the Town authorize the Select- 
men to act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise 
during the current year ; also in such other matters which may 
arise requiring, in their judgment, the action of such agent, 
and to employ counsel therefor. 

Under Article 8, voted that the Town raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ($125.00), 
for the purpose of observing Memorial Day. 

Under Article 9, voted that the Town raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00), to be paid 
to the North Chelmford Fire District for hydrant service for 
the current year. 

Under Article 10, voted to change the name of Centre 
Street, running from the centre of the town to North Chelms- 
ford, to the name of the North Road. 

Under Article 11, voted to reimburse Daniel A. Reardon 
from money already in the treasury for taxes amounting to 
$30, paid by him on land sold to Nelson Loucroft since 1899, 
■53 voted in favor and 2 in the negative. 

Under Article 12, voted to accept a continuance of Bridge 
Street from the present point of acceptance to the residence of 
Thomas A. Harmon, as laid out by the Selectmen. 

Under Article 13, voted 1st that the salaries of the Board 
of Selectmen be as follows: For the Chairman of the Board- 
the sum of $250. For the Secretary of the Board the sum of 
$225. For the third member of the Board the sum of $200. 
That these salaries shall also include their expenses as Select- 
men. 2nd, that the salaries of the Board of Overseers of the 
Poor be as follows : For the Chairman of the Board the sum of 



15 

$50, with his expenses additional. For each of the other two 
members of the Board the sum of $25. These salaries also to 
include their expenses as Overseers of the Poor with the 
exception of the Chairman. 3rd, that salaries for the Board 
of Assessors shall be as follows : For the Chairman of the 
Board the sum of $200. For each of the other two members 
of the Board the sum of $175. These salaries to also include 
their expenses as Assessors. 

Under Article 14, voted that the Town abolish the caucus 
and conduct its future election of Town Officers under the 
Australian Ballot System adopted by the town. 83 voted in 
the affirmative and 9 in the negative. 

Under Article 15, voted to instruct the Board of Select- 
men to sell the Town teams. 

Under Article 16, relative to the appointment of a com- 
mittee to draft a set of Town By-Laws, the article was dis- 
missed. 

Under Article 17, relative to instructing- the Board of 
Selectmen to appoint a Superintendent of Streets, the article 
was dismissed. 

Under Article 18, voted to raise and appropriate the sum 
of three hundred dollars ($300) for the purpose of grading the 
grounds and miscellaneous work at School House on High- 
land Ave., at North Chelmsford, the expenditure of this 
money to be in charge of the School Committee. 

Under Article 19, relative to raising and appropriating 
three hundred dollars ($300) for grading at North Chelms- 
ford School on Princeton St., the article was dismissed. 

Under Article 20, relative to raising and appropriating 
three hundred dollars ($300) to settle land, grade and other 
damages sustained by Daniel F. Hartley, the article was 
dismissed. 

Under Article 21, relative to raising and appropriating 
two hundred and fifty dollars ($250) for free band concerts, 
the article was dismissed. 



16 

Under Article 22, relative to the acceptance of a Town 
way in the North Village, the article was dismissed. 

Under Article 23, relative to the acceptance of a Town 
way as Bridge St., the article was dismissed as action has 
been taken upon this street under Article 12 of this warrant. 

Under Article 24, voted to raise and appropriate the sum 
of forty- five dollars ($45) to purchase a new flag and rope at 
the Centre Village. 

Under Article 25, voted to appropriate from money al- 
ready in the treasury, the sum of fifty dollars ($50) for the 
services of a janitor at the North and Centre fire houses. 

Under Article 26. relative to granting permission to the 
Independent Order Bugh-Abraham of Lowell, Mass., to use 
land in Chelmsford for burial purposes, the article was dis- 
missed. 

Under Article 27, relative to raising and appropriating the 
sum of three thousand ($3,000.) for the purpose of continuing 
the Acton Road, the article was dismissed. 

Under Article 28, relative to the use of land on west side 
of the Old Middlesex Canal for the purpose of burial, the 
article was dismissed. 

Under Article 29, voted that the Selectmen be instructed 
to cause the water to be divided from the land of Walter 
Wright in South Street, which enters his premises through the 
cvlvert under said street and to connect said culvert with a 
catch basin a short distance below so that the water will not 
flow upon his land. 

Under Article 30, relative to raising and appropriating the 
sum of twenty dollars ($20.) for the land damages sustained 
by Emeline Haywood by reason of the construction of the 
Littleton Road, the article was dismissed. 

Under Article 31, relative to raising and appropriating the 
sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00), for the purpose of 



17 

constructing a macadam road on Chelmsford Street from Bil- 
lerica to Wilson Street, the Article was indefinitely postponed. 

Following the transaction of the foregoing business, the 
result of the official business was declared as follows : 



For Town Clerk for Three Years 

Edward J. Robbins 402 

Blanks 63 

For Selectman for Three Years 

D. Frank Small 380 

Blanks . . . ' 85 

For Selectman for Two Years 

Walter B. Emerson : 374 

Blanks 91 

For Selectman for One Year 

Charles Lyons 380 

Frank A. Mallory 1 

Blanks , 84 

For Overseer of the Poor for Three Years 

D. Frank Small 366 

Blanks 99 

For Overseer of the Poor for Two Years 

Walter B. Emerson > 362 

Blanks 103 



18 

For Overseer of the Poor for One Year 

Charles Lyons 357 

Blanks .- 108 

For Assessor for Three Years 

James P. Dunigan 250 

Erwin A. Blaisdell 199 

Blanks 16 

For Town Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 

Erwin M. Sweetser 396 

Arthur M. Warren 1 

Blanks 68 

For School Committee for Three Years 

William H. Hall 373 

Blanks 92 

For Two Trustees of Adams Library for Three Years 

Albert H. Davis 325 

A. Heady Park 313 

Blanks 292 

For One Constable 

Herbert H. Richardson 278 

Joseph T. Fallon 165 

Blanks 22 

For Tree Warden 

Minot A. Bean 342 

Blanks 123 



19 

For Cemetery Commissioner for Three Years 

Charles F. Scribner 323 

Blanks 142 

For Sinking Fund Commissioner for Three Years 

William H. Shedd 328 

Blanks 137 

For Park Commissioner for Three Years 

Fred L. Fletcher 321 

Blanks 144 

For Auditors 

Samuel Naylor .-. 324 

Winthrop A. Parkhurst 334 

Preston L. Piggbtt 325 

Blanks , 412 

License Question 

Yes 118 

No 306 

Blanks 41 

At 6.10 p. m. voted to dissolve the meeting. 

J. ADAMS BARTLETT. 
EDWARD J. ROBBINS, Town Clerk. 



20 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY, APRIL 30, 1912 



Delegates at Large 



Charles S. Baxter, Roosevelt, Republican 

George W. Coleman, 

Frederick Fosdick 

Albert Bushnell Hart 

Octave A. La Riviere 

James P. Magenis 

Arthur L. Nason 

Alvin G. Weeks 

Frank Serberlich Taft, Republician 

Winthrop Murry Crane 

John L. Bates 

Lucius Tuttle 

John W. Weeks 

Samuel B. Caper 

Samuel J. Elder 

James F. Cavanagh 

Edmond Cote 

Frank J. Donahue, Unpledged, Democratic 

E. Gerry Brown, Foss, Democratic . . . 

John N. Coughlin 

John F. Fitzgerald 

William P. Hayes 

Charles J. Martell 

Humphrey O' Sullivan 

Charles B. Strecker 

David I. Walsh 

Henry F. Burt, Wilson, Democratic 



159 

149 

152 

152 

149 

151 

152 

148 

6 

84 

88 

82 

72 

96 

78 

81 

79 

22 

18 

32 

33 

30 

23 

34 

21 

27 

6 



21 



Henry T. Schaefer, Unpledged, Democratic 5 

George Fred Williams " '• 6 

John P. Sweeney " " 4 

James H. Vahey, Foss, Democratic 19 

John A. Keliher " ' < , , 11 



Altereate Delegates at Large 



John D. Long Taft, Republican 

Benjamin H. Anthony 

Frank Vogel 

Joseph Monette* 

Charles H. Innes 

Walter Ballantyne 

Isaac L. Roberts 

Ernest G. Adams 

Charles L. Burrill, Roosevelt, Republican 

Thomas F. Doherty " " 

Richard R. Flynn " " 

John Larrabee " " 

John G. Maxfield " " 

Max Mitchell " " 

Cassins A. Ward " " 

Russell A. Wood " " 

James M. Folan, Unpledged, Democratic. . 

Joseph J. Leonard " " 

Andrew A. Badaracco, Foss, Democratic. 

Charles F. Campbell 

Peter J. Flatherty 

James M. Folan 

Daniel H. Maguire 

Luke J. Minahan 

Daniel M. O'Brien 

Joseph F. O'Connell 

John P. Kane Unpledged, 



106 

103 

103 

105 

103 

103 

104 

104 

146 

137 

136 

137 

145 

145 

144 

146 

20 

21 

21 

29 

31 

23 

32 

30 

27 

30 

12 



22 

District Delegates, Fifth District 

Herbert L. Chapman, Roosevelt, Republican 150 

Smith M. Decker " " •••• 148 

Arthur G. Pollard, Taft, Republican 104 

H. Bradford Lewis " " ' 98 

John P. S. Mahoney, Foss, Democratic 22 

J. Joseph O'Connor, Unpledged, Democratic 41 

J. Joseph Hennessy, " " 26 

James E. Donoghue " " 2 

Peter Caddell, Roosevelt, Republican 136 

James R. Berwick " " 133 

George H. Stevens, Taft, Republican 99 

Thorndike D. Howe " " 94 

William J. Collins, Unpledged, Democratic 19 

President of the United States 

Robert M. LeFollette, Republican 

Theodore Roosevelt " 154 

William Howard Taft l * 197 

Champ Clark, Democratic 38 

Woodrow Wilson " 14 

EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



23 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MAY J 8, 1912 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant 
to warrant, at the Town Hall, Centre Village, Saturday, May 
18, 1912, at twelve o'clock, noon, the following business was; 
transacted to wit : The meeting was called to order and the 
Warrant read by the Town Clerk, Edward J. Robbins. 

Under Article 1, to choose a moderator, Joseph E Warren 
was unanimously elected, the check list being used and the 
oath of office administered by the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 2, the following clerks and tellers previously 
appointed by the Selectmen were sworn by the Town Clerk. 
Ballot clerks: William H. Quigley and Frank P. Martin. 
Tellers : Arnold C. Perham, Daniel E. Haley, John P. Sca- 
boria. The ballot box was examined and found to be empty 
the register indicating zero. The ballots were then delivered 
to ballot clubs, and the polls opened at 12.15 P. M. Balloting 
then proceeded until 4 P. M., when the polls were closed. 
The ballots as counted were 266 and the check lists correspond- 
ing. During the canvass of the ballots the following business 
was transacted. 

Under Article 3, voted that the Town appropriate the sum 
of fifty dollars from money now in the treasury for the 
purpose of caring for the Town property at the Chelmsford 
Centre Fire House. 

Under Article 4, relative to appropriating fifty dollars for 
the protection of fish and game, the article was dismissed. 

Under Article 5, voted that the Town raise and appro- 



24 

priate the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars to settle land, 
grade and other damages sustained by Daniel F. Hartley by 
reason of the construction of the Littleton Road. 

Under Article 6, relative to the payment of the Selectmen, 
their reasonable traveling and other expenses in addition to 
their salaries, it was voted to dismiss the article. 

Following the transaction of the foregoing business the 
result of the ballot under Article 2 was declared as follows : 
For Selectman for 1 year (unexpired term) A. Heady Park, 
110; Emile E. Paignon, Jr., 58; Frank A. Bickford, 85. 
For Overseer of the Poor for 1 year (unexpired term) A. 
Heady Park, 109; Emile E. Paignon, Jr., 58; Frank E. 
bickford, 80. 

At 5.40 P. M. voted to dissolve the meeting. 



JOSEPH E. WARREN, 

Moderator. 



EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



25 



JOINT PRIMARY, SEPT. 24, J912 



At a legal meeting, held Sept. 24, 1912, at the four pre- 
cincts of the Town of Chelmsford, in conformity with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 550 of Acts of 1911, the following candi- 
dates for nomination received the number of votes set against 
their respective names: 



Governor 

Everett C. Benton, Republican 70 

Joseph Walker, " 65 

Eugene N. Foss, Democrat 91 

Joseph C. Pelletier, " 22 

Roland D, Sawyer, Socialist , 1 



Lieutenant-Governor 

Robert Luce, Republican 134 

Edward P. Barry, Democrat 26 

David I. Walsh, " 76 

Robert B. Martin, Socialist 1 



Secretary 

Albert P. Lrngtry, Republican 128 

Frank J. Donahue, Democrat 95 

Ellen Hayes, Socialist 1 



26 
Treasurer 



Elmer A. Stevens, Republican • • • 127 

Joseph L. P. St. Coeur, Democrat 82 

Louis F. Weiss, Socialist 1 



Auditor 



John E. White, Republican 126 

James F. Carens, Democrat 82 

Sylvester J. Mc Bride, Socialist 1 



Attorney-General 

James M. Swift, Republican -. 124 

George N. Anderson, Democrat 84 

George E. Rower, Jr. , Socialist ... 1 



Congressman 

William T. S. Bartlett, Republican 37 

James Wilson Grimes, " 3 

John Jacob Rogers, " 85 

James H. Carmichael, Democrat 35 

Humphrey O'Sullivan, " 71 



Councillor 

John J. Hibbs, Republican 38 

George E. Marchand, Republican 47 

G. Frederick Simpson, " 41 

John J. Hogan, Democrat 94 



27 
Sena-tor 

Erson B. Barlow, Republican . . 123 

Henry J. Draper, Democrat 11 

James P. Dunigan, " 92 

Warren P. Riordan, " 8 



Representative in General Court 

Samuel L. Taylor, Republican 126 

John D. Carney, Democrat 85 



County Commissioner 

Chester B. Williams, Republican 122 

County Treasurer 

Joseph O. Hayden, Republican 91 

Thomas F. Royle, Democrat 82 

Member of State Committee 

Humphrey O'Sullivan, Democrat 83 

Delegates to State Convention 

Edward J. Robbins, Republican : 121 

Charles E. Bartlett, " 119 

Royal S. Ripley, " ! 115 

James P. Dunigan, Democrat 5 

Patrick S. Ward, " 2 

John F. McManomin " 2 



28 



Members of Political Town Committees 

Fred A. Fletcher, Republican , 114 

James S. Wotton, " 114 

Frank A. Mallory, " , 116 

Fred Chandler, " Ill 

Edwin C. Perham, ' l 114 

John F. McManomin, Democrat 8 

Patrick H. Haley, " 6 

John J . Dunn, " 5 

John H. Harrington, " 4 

Charles F. Devine, " 3 

James P. Dunigan, " 1 

Karl M. Perham, " 1 



EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



29 



STATE AND PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
Nov. 5, 1912 



Whole number of votes cast 789 



Delegates at Large 

John M. Fisher, Prohibition 8 

Edward Kendall, Prohibition 8 

Fred Tepper, Socialist 12 

Daniel A. White, Socialist 12 

Robert Bateson, Soc. Labor 1 

Moritz E. Ruther, Soc. Labor 1 

James P. Magenis, Progressive 383 

Cassine A. Ward, Progressive 383 

Rufus D. Adams, Republician 162 

David F. Dillon, Republician 162 

John W. Cummings, Democratic 195 

William A. Gaston, Democratic 195 



District Number One 

Thomas A. Frissell, Prohibition 8 

Wilfred Griffin, Socialist 12 

Herman Koepke, Soc. Labor 1 

Cornelius C. Cook, Progressive , , 383 

William A. Burns, Republician 162 

Daniel F. Doherty, Democratic 395 



30 
District Number Two 

Oliver W. Cobb, Prohibition 8 

Charles C. Hitchcock, Socialist 12 

Frederick A. Nagles, Soc. Lobor 1 

J . Frank Drake, Progressive 383 

Walter S. Robinson, Republician 162 

Edward H. Lathrop, Democratic 195 



District Number Three 

Hervey S. Cowell, Prohibition 8 

Robert Lawrence, Socialist 12 

John A. Anderson, Soc. Labor 1 

Frederick Fosdick, Progressive 383 

George R. Wallace, Republican 162 

Frank H. Pope, Democratic 195 



District Number Four 

John Holt, Prohibition 8 

Charles E. Fennes, Socialist 12 

Joseph Jiskra, Social Labor 1 

Frank J. Quist, Progressive 383 

James Legon, Republican 162 

John F. Meaney, Democratic 195 

District Number Five 

John B . Lewis, Prohibition , 8 

William J. Carroll, Socialist 12 

Lars P. Nelson, Soc. Labor 1 

Lewis D. Apsley, Progressive 383 

Harry G. Pollard, Republican 162 

J. Joseph O'Connor, Democratic 195 



31 

District Number Six 

Willard O. Wylie, Prohibition 8 

James F. Carey, Socialist 12 

Thomas F. Brennan. Soc. Labor 1 

Nelson B. Clark, Progressive 383 

Alfred E. Lyons, Republician 162 

Charles A. Russell, Democratic 195 

District Number Seven 

Charles E. McCollery, Prohibition 8 

Ambrose Miles, Socialist . . 12 

Fred E. Oelcher, Sec. Labor 1 

Lynn M. Ranger, Progressive 383 

C. Neal Barney, Republican , 162 

Walter H. Creamer, Democratic 195 

District Number Eight 

Alfred A. Wright, Prohibition 8 

John Tilfenthal, Jr. , Socialist 12 

Peter O. Rourke, Soc. Labor 1 

Lawrence G. Brooks, Progressive 383 

Everett C. Benton, Republican 162 

Thomas E. Dwyer, Democratic 195 

District Number Nine 

Henry G. Russell, Prohibition 8 

John D. Williams, Socialist 12 

Ernest J. B. Gabarino, Soc. Labor 1 

Eugene H. Cox, Progressive 383 

Frank M. Sawtell, Republician .• 162 

James H. Malone, Democratic 195 



32 

District Number Ten 

Aaron L. Woodruff, Prohibition 8 

Fred B. Chase, Socialist 12 

Charles J. Svenson, Soc. Labor 1 

Jerome A. Petitti, Progressive ! 383 

James W. H. Myrick, Republican 162 

John J. Mahoney, Democratic 195 



District Number Eleven 

John Morgan, Prohibition 8 

George Roewer, Sr., Socialist 12 

Henry C. Hess, Soc. Labor 1 

Arthur D. Hill, Progressive. . 383 

Frank Vogle, Republican 162 

Joseph H. O'Neil, Democratic 195 



District Number Twelve 

Solon W. Bingham, Prohibition 8 

Samuel P. Levenberg, Socialist 12 

Ferdinand Houtenbrink. Jr. , Soc. Labor 1 

Elihu D. Stone, Progressive 383 

Moses S. Laurie, Republican 162 

James F. Powers, Democratic 195 

District Number Thirteen 

John A. Nicholls, Prohibition 8 

Adam Langill, Socialist 12 

Joseph P. Foley, Soc. Labor 1 

Norman Marshall, Progressive 383 

J. Henry Gleason, Republican 162 

Charles B. Strecher, Democratic 195 



33 

District Number Fourteen 

Albert J. Orem, Prohibition 8 

Zoel Thebodeau, Socialist ■' 12 

Patrick H. Loftus, Soc. Labor 1 

Charles S. Millet, Progressive 383 

Horace A. Keith, Republican •. . . . 162 

Albion C. Drinkwater, Democratic . . . 195 

District Number Fifteen 

David Morrison, Prohibition 8 

John W. Sawyer, Socialist 12 

George R. Rigby, Soc. Labor 1 

Robert A. Dean, Progressive . 383 

Alfred B. Williams, Republican 162 

Thomas F. Higgins, Democratic 195 

District Number Sixteen 

Edwin S. Paulding, Prohibition 8 

Arthur N. Harriman, Socialist 12 

James W. Holden, Soc. Labor 1 

Frank E. Ramsdell, Progressive 383 

Joseph Walch, Republican 162 

George M Harlow, Democratic 195 

Governor 

Charles S. Bird, Progressive 305 

Eugene N. Foss, Democratic 216 

Patrick Mulligan, Soc. Labor 1 

Frank N. Rand, Prohibition 5 

Roland D. Sawyer, Socialist 10 

Joseph Walker, Republican 206 

Blanks 46 



34 

Lieutenant-Governor 

Daniel Cosgrove, Progressive 263 

Alfred H. Evans, Prohibition 3 

Robert Luce, Republican 240 

Robert B. Martin, Socialist * 14 

Dennis McGoff , Socialist Labor , . 1 

David I. Walsh, Democrat 192 

Blanks 76 

Secretary 

Frank J. Donahue, Democrat 170 

Ellen Hayes, Socialist 15 

Albert P. Langtry, Republican 236 

Karl Lindstrandt, Socialist Labor 1 

William W. Nash, Prohibition 8 

Russell A. Wood, Progressive 244 

Blanks 115 

Treasurer and Receiver General 

Charles A. Chase, Prohibition 10 

David Craig, Socialist Labor 2 

Eldon B. Keith, Progressive 234 

Joseph L. P. St. Coeur, Democrat 155 

Elmer A. Stevens, Republican 255 

Louis F. Weiss, Socialist 14 

Blanks 119 

Auditor 

James F. Carens, Democrat 167 

Herbert B. Griffin, Prohibition ■ 8 

Octave A. La Riviere, Progressive 223 

Sylvester J. McBride, Socialist 14 

Jeremiah P. McNally, Socialist Labor 2 

John E. White, Republican 254 

Blanks 121 



35 

Attoney-General 

George W. Anderson, Democrat 169 

Frank Bohmbach, Socialist Labor 2 

Freeman T. Crommett, Prohibition 7 

H. Heustis Newton, Progressive 227 

George E. Roewer, Jr., Socialist 31 

James M. Swift, Republican 235 

Blanks 118 

Congressman 

William J. Carroll, Socialist 16 

William N. Osgood, Progressive 140 

Humphrey O'Sullivan, Democrat 180 

John Jacob Rogers, Republican 401 

Blanks 52 

Councillor 

Henry G. Burke, Socialist 19 

John J. Hogan, Democrat 201 

Harrie C. Hunter, Progressive 223 

S. Frederick Simpson, Republican 255 

Blanks 9 

Senator 

Erson B. Barlow, Republican 304 

Henry J. Draper, Democrat 168 

Robert William Drawbridge, Progressive 229 

William E. Sproule, Socialist 20 

Blanks 68 

Representative in General Court 

John D. Carney, Democrat 193 

Samuel L. Taylor, Republican 291 

James B. Tuttle, Progressive 218 

Blanks 87 



36 

County Commissioners 

Winthrop H. Fairbanks, Democrat 179 

Robert J. Kelley, Socialist 27 

Chester B. Williams, Republican 407 

Blanks 176 

County Treasurer 

Nicholas H. Flynn, Socialist 21 

Joseph O. Hayden, Republican 380 

Thomas F. Royle, Democrat 149 

Blanks 

Question: — Shall the proposed amendment to the Con- 
stitution, disqualifying from voting persons convicted of cer- 
tain offences be approved and ratified? 

Yes 306 

'No 92 

Blanks, 391 

Question:. .Shall the proposed amendment to the Consti- 
tution, relative to the taxation of wild or forest lands, be 
approved and ratified? 

Yes .' 257 

No 92 

Blanks 440 

Question: — Shall an act passed by the General Court in 
the year nineteen hundred and twelve, entitled "An Act rela- 
tive to pensioning laborers in the employ of cities and towns," 
be accepted? 

Yes 160 

No 276 

Blanks 353 



37 



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38 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JAN. 14, 1913 



At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford qualified to vote at elections and in town affairs, 
held pursuant to Warrant at the Town Hall, Centre Village, 
Tuesday, January 14, 1913, at eight o'clock, p. m. , the follow- 
ing business was transacted. The meeting was called to order 
and the Warrant read by the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 1, to choose a Moderator, J. Adams Bart- 
lett was unanimously elected, the check list being used and 
the oath of office was administered by the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 2, voted that the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the taxes of 
the municipal year beginning March 1, 1912, to an amount 
not exceeding in the aggregate $15,000.00, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor payable within one year, any debt or debts in- 
curred under this vote to be paid from the taxes of said mu- 
nicipal year. 

At 8. 15 p. m. voted to dissolve the meeting. 

J. ADAMS BARTLETT, 

Moderator. 

EDWARD J. ROBBINS, Town Clerk. 



Report of the Town Clerk 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN CHELMSFORD IN 1912 



Date Name of Child Name of Parents 

Jan. 5 Doris Irene Mullen Daniel M. and Phoebe ( } 

6 Joseph Arthur Victor Roberge Alfred and Lucinda (Ayott) 

7 Lillian Gertrude Morton. . . George H. and Rose A. (Alexander) 

7 Amy Houghton Donald M. and Gertrude Francis ( ) 

8 Joseph Richard Beaudett Augustus and Rose (Lecour) 

17 Elmer William Blossom Harris. .Elmer E. and Romaine (Blossom) 

18 Joseph Merrill Raymond Gauthier.Emile and Ernestine (Gagnon) 

23 Harold Roberts Richard and Amy (Rossom) 

23 Everett Walter Lee Walter and Bertha (Stanhope) 

28 Wallace Staveley Joseph and Gertrude (Whitely) 

Feb. 12 John Lawrence McQuaid John J. and Florence E. (Finch) 

16 Raymond Wilber Cole Wilber R. and Clara M. (Buzzell) 

28 Mary Alphonsine Russell Lecour. . William and Marie Annie 

(Lessarde) 

Mar. 22 George Lewis Parkhurst Bertiz E. and Lula V. (Dane) 

29 Isabel Zanchi Dominico and Angela (Montagia) 

Apr. 6 Lillie Elizabeth Kershaw Samuel S. and Mary A. (Holgate) 

12 Edgar Willis Santamour . .Frank Willis and Orena A. (Webster) 

13 Thomas Joseph Long James and Nellie (Dooley) 

14 Joseph Elmer Rodriqua Eugene and Cecelia (Gaudette) 

16 Paul Edmund Johnson John L. and Elin (Lundberg) 

19 Alphonse Roberts Delvenie and Delia (Vallie) 

21 Ruth Arlene McEnaney Sylvester H. and Cora M. (Shattuck) 



40 

Date Name of Child Name of Parents 

May 6 Willis Everett Lowe Nathaniel W. and Annie E. (Emery) 

17 Ruth Billson David and Agnes M. (Clark) 

19 Melina Soucy Napoleon and Exelia (Primeau) 

23 Helen Myrtle Davis. Richard Emerson and Caroline L. (Fletcher) 

24 Joseph Roger Bondet Alexander and Eliza (Vezina) 

28 Alice Patnaude Alfred and Hedwidge (Turcotte) 

28 Bertha Patnaude Alfred and Hedwidge (Turcotte) 

June 6 Harriet Alcorn James E. and Martha M. (Cromwell) 

9 Edith Alice Margaret Headstrom.Gustave and Axelina (Johnson) 

13 Theodore Arthur Lupien Ulysses J. and Eugenia (Gosselin) 

20 Riley John Eastman and Elsie T. (Sheldon) 

25 Arcangelina Locapo Joseph and Caterino (Uitucci) 

26 Edith Lois Perkins Clayton C. and Ruth (Humphris) 

29 Norman Horward Wright Leonard and Adeline (Brooke) 

July 3 Lillian Victoria Pinel Charles and Mary (Rowland) 

8 Wikander Gustaf and Tilla (Sandstrom) 

11 Doris Catherine Kinch John D. and Frances (McEnaney) 

11 Patricia Kinch John D. and Frances (McEnaney) 

23 Ernest Leith Norman and Alice (Stokham) 

26 Leslie Arthur Wetmore Burpee S. and Florence B. (Trueby) 

27 Veronica Welch Patrick J. and Catherine (Welch) 

29 Arthur Tremblay George and Alice (Morin) 

Aug. 1 George Edward Talbot Ovila J. and Regina (Boudreau) 

2 William Hartson Nickles. .Stephen Hartson and Nellie (Linihan) 

3 George Morley George and Gertrude (Jaques) 

12 Antonio DeCosta Joseph and Rosie A (Feireira) 

14 Ernest Edward Brotz Edwin R. and Eva G. (Decatur) 

17 John Carr James B. and Elizabeth (Caine) 

21 Phyllic Muriel Vickery Elmer W. and Agnes (Derby) 

24 Ruth Marjorie Christianson John and Anna (Johnson) 

25 Phelma Feme Paignon , . . . Emile E. and Emma (Roy) 

27 Edward Whitworth John W. and Hattie (Brooks) 

27 Ruby Clara Hutchinson Arthur E. and Clara (Whalley) 

27 Marcus Frederick Hoelzel. Charles F. and Edith M. (Rushworth) 

30 Madeline Powers Francis J. and Margaret F. (Barry) 

Sept. 5 Vera Taisey Leon and Florence (Stewart) 

6 Shirley Gertrude Stevens Homer S. and Ella May (Harriman) 



41 

Date Name of Child Name of Parents 

Sept. 7 Marie Delvina Thibault Francois and Rosi Anna (Genelle) 

8 Ernest Everett Harper Robert and Rose (McNally) 

9 Coburn Mirfield John W. and Martha (Cowbarn) 

10 Vivian Irene Gaudette .Walter G. and Nellie (Soucy) 

12 Russell James McEnaney James E. and Clara E. (Coughlin) 

12 Gordon Leslie Davis Leslie R. aud Pearl F. (Dyar) 

17 Gertrude Reedy Fred J. and Mary (Dixon) 

27 Stillborn 

Oct. 3 Edward Joseph Alphonse Labelle. .Joseph A. and Annie E. 

(Lafranc) 
6 Horace Milton Staveley Henry and Jeannie W. (Beattie) 

13 Helen Barbara Coughlin Daniel and Helen A. (Burke) 

21 Sarah Roberts William E. and Mabel (Jones) 

Nov. 1 Parker Alfred S. and Sarah A. (Hill) 

3 Charles Patrick James William and Annie L. (Miller) 

4 Blanche Vigant Eugene and Rose (Hill) 

4 Ivaldo Palmiotto Nicolo and Grazia (Amoia) 

8 Marion Sevigny Deseri and Olive (Robicheau) 

17 Laurier Gagnon Gedeon and Aline (Sirois) 

18 Erline Genevive Roadman Earl A. and Irma L. (Keene) 

19 Carl Axel Johnson Gustav and Alida (Peterson) 

23 Stazka Ochkowskis John and Mary (Opaliski) 

24 Edna Caton James E. and Aura (Lane) 

25 John Harvey Chandler Bert W. ank Edith G. (Chase) 

26 Marie Antoinette Eugenie Irene Ducharme 

Timothy and Alma (Bedard) 

30 George Lincoln Reis Andrew E. and Hulda C. ( ) 

Dec. 7 Leonard Lewis Gaudette Joseph O. and Justine (Gagnon) 

11 Anna Margaret Lund John and Louise (Larsen) 

18 Edith Muriel Hue Harold A. and Ruth (Gordon) 

19 Stuart Munroe McConnell Howard and Emma M. (Hills) 

19 Kolos Lewis and Costhanou ( ) 

23 Willard Barton Parker Leon H. and Alice E. (Barton) 

23 Louise Sweetser Perham . . .Arnold C. and Harriet M. (Emerson) 

26 Emma Alice Magnant Alphonse J. and Selina (Lemay) 

28 Mildred Priscilla Norton .' Linwood and Jessie (Sargent) 



42 

Date Name of Child Name of Parents 

Dec. 29 Chester J. Simpson James A. and Hattie A. (Emery) 

31 Elizabeth Frothingham Swift 

Howard Potter and Sarah Jane (Hart) 



Whole number recorded 98 

Males 51 

Females 47 

Stillborn 1 



Not Returned in 1910 
June 28 Frances Anna Hoelzel Charles and Edith M. (Rushworth) 

Not Returned in 1911 
July 11 Ruth Elizabeth Bradley Isaac L. and Elizabeth (Sewall) 



43 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1912 



Names 



Charles E. Rose 

Effie Alice Cox 

Josiah E. Marshall 

Emma Gill Holt 

George Franklin Hagerman 
Violet Zenaide Dupont 

Silas P. Welsh 

Emma (Cook) Hibblethwaite 

Alfred S. Parker 

Sara A. Hill 

Ja-per E. Miner 

Gertrude E. Ford 

Abraham Haller 

Katie Bogdonoff ... 

Everett Francis Warnock . . . 
Stella Mabel Carll 

James Byard 

Mary A. Page 

Frederick Wilfred Ballinger. 
Amy Crossland 

Daniel Edward O'Hara 

Grace Veracunda Allen 

William James 

Annie Louise Miller 

Howard P. Swift 

Sara Jane Hart 



Residence 



Birthpl ACE 



Chelmsford . . . 
Lowell, Mass. 



Chelmsford. 
Chelmsford 



Chelmsford 

Somerville, Mass. 



Chelmsford. 
Chelmsford . 



Chelmsford. . 
Lowell, Mass. 



Tyngsboro, Mass.* 
Tyngsboro, MassJ 

Johnstown, Pa. 
So. Chelmsford 



Lowell, Mass. 
Chelmsford . 



Chelmsford .... 
Chester, N. H. .. 

Chelmsford 

Johnston, R. I. . 

Ea. Chelmsford. . 
Lowell, Mass 



Chelmsford . . 
Lowell, Mass. 



Chelmsford . 
Boston, Mass. 



Carlisle, Mass. 
W. nrandon, N.Y. 

Lewiston, Me. 
W. Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 
Peabody, Mass. 

Canada 
England 

Dracut, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Amherst, N. S. 
Nashua, N. H. 

Germany 
Liverpool, Eng. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Chelmsford 

Frankfort, Me. 
Chester, N. H. 

Providence, R. I- 
England 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Ireland 
England 

Boston, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 



44 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1912— Continued 



Date 


Names 


Residence 


Birthplace 


May 11 


Victor Olsen 


W. Chelmsford . . 
Wellesley, Mass. . 

No. Chelmsford. . 
Lowell, Mass 

No. Chelmsford. . 

No. Chelmsford. . 
No. Chelmsford. . 

No. Chelmsford. . 
No. Chelmsford. . 

No. Chelmsford. . 

Chelmsford 

Boston, Mass 
Chelmsford 

Fitchburg, Mass.. 

Chelmsford 

Lowell, Mass 

Lowell, Mass 

No. Chelmsford. . 

W. Chelmsford. . . 
W. Chelmsford . . . 




Ida Augustson 




25 






28 


Walter Hosmer Redman 


Boston, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Reading, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Stanford, Que. 
Stanford, Que. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Chelmsford 
Ireland 

Tewksbury, Mass. 
Ireland 

Braintree, Mass. 
Carlisle, Mass. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Chelmsford 
Clinton, Mass. 

Hudson, Mass. 
Bradford, Eng. 

Sweden 
Sweden 


29 


Albina B. Bereard 


June 3 




Emma Lecours 


12 


George Gaudette 




Alice Lacourse 


12 


John E Harrington 




Sarah A. Malone 


26 


Ernest T. Staveley 






29 


Eugene Sullivan 




Mildred Rose 


July 2 


George Alfred Marshall 

Mary Belle Coburn 


3 


Harold L. Googins 




Vera B. Davis 


3 


Ernest Alexander Brault 
Clara Williams 


4 













45 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN \9 12— Continued 



Date 


Names 


Residence 


BlRHBPLACE 


July 6 




SanbornboreN.H. 
Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Lowell, Mass, . . . 
Ea. Chelmsford . . 

W. Chelmsford . . 
W. Chelmsford . . 

Westford, Mass. . 
No. Chelmsford. . 

Lowell, Mass .... 
No. Chelmsford. . 

Lowell, Mass,. . . . 
No. Chelmsford. . 

Salem, Mass 

Chelmsford 

No. Chelmsford. . 
So. Lowell, Mass. 

Tyngoboro, Mass. 
Chelmsford 

Ea. Chelmsford . . 
Lowell, Mass 


Canada 




Laura A. Sleeper 


Boston, Mass. 


6 


Bertha G. Bartlett 


Westford, Mass. 
Chelmsford 


9 




Tyngsboro, Mass. 
Canada 




Kathryn Patenaude 


13 


Paul Omar Olson 


Norway 
Sweden 




Ingal 0. Johnson 


21 


Eva M. Lawton 


Chelsea, Vt. 
Franklin, Mass. 


23 


Lumina I. Cantin 


Boston, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 


26 


John F. Connors 


Peabody, Mass. 
No. Chelmsford 




Saidee A. Leahey 


27 


Ester M. Wikander 


Sweden 
Sweden 


28 


Joseph Nadwrony 


Russia 


Aug. 1 
28 




Austria 

Lowell, Mass. 
Westford, Mass> 

Ireland 


S,ept. 11 


Margaret E. Connolly 

Edith M Hagerman 


Lowell, Mass. 

Wrentham, Mass. 
Chelmsford 


16 


Percy Elihu Suttle 

Abbie Marrilla Whitney 


Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell. Mass. 



46 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1912— Continued 



Date 


Names 


Residence 


Birthplace 


Sept. 
Oct. 


17 
16 

26 
20 
27 
27 
27 
10 
18 


Raymond Foster Sargent 

Ethel May Watkins 

John W. Shaw . 


Rochester, N. Y. . 
Milford, N. H. .. 

Worcester, Mass.. 
No. Chelmsford. . 

No. Chelmsford. . 

Lowell, Mass 

Lowell, Mass 

No. Chelmsford. . 

Hudson, N. H. 
Hudson, N. H. .. 

Lowell, Mass . . . 
No. Chelmsford. 

W. Chelmsford. . . 
W. Chelmsford.. 

Chelmsford ...... 


Tunbridge Vt. 
Milford, N. H. 

Maxfield, Me. 




Elizabeth N. Morning 

Henry F. Johnson 


No. Grafton, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 




Ethel M. Reno 


No. Chelmsford 


Nov. 


George W. Harris 


Lowell, Mass. 




Anna M. Gray 


Philadelphia, Pa. 

England 
Lowell, Mass. 




Edward P. Murphy 




Bertha C. Tuck 




Benjamin S, Locke 






, Helen A. Russell 


Chelmsford 




Alphonse J. Plante 






Annie M. Boudreau 




Dec. 


David G. Peterson 






Johanna Larson 






Cairo w Ellsworth Stanley .... 
Florence Agnes Chapman 


Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 



EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



47 



DEATHS RECORDED IN 1912 



Date Names Yrs Mos Dys 

Jan. 4 Fanny Fletcher 68 3 5 

9 Howard Brooks Flemings 21 

13 Martha (Jones) Parkhurst 73 10 26 

17 Fred C. Lakin" 1 13 

18 Lillian Leclaire 30 

27 James M. Miner 5 9 21 

31 Wallace Staveley • 4 

Feb. 4 Sarah E. (Day) Bisbee 77 

7 Hugh P. Graham 6 

13 Barbara E. (Harrison) Holgate 47 8 28 

15 Oluf Bruun 83 10 12 

Mar. 7 Mary W. (Moore) Naylor 92 3 21 

9 Mary Johnson 71 11 1 

10 Pauline (Hawes) Glidden 80 10 16 

10 Thomas Sheehan 70 

12 Clarissa (Nutting) Gould 88 7 6 

15 Rose (Lupien) Lavoie 35 1 29 

16 Reuben T. Hunt 66 

21 Herman Lucius Knowlton 69 9 10 

30 Arthur William Johnson 4 23 

30 John Chick Hobbs 75 29 

30 William Hogan 61 

Apr. 2 Charles Lyons 55 1 8 

15 Beatrice Thayer Nichols 15 11 29 

25 Elbridge Wheeler 91 

26 John E. Wesley 1 4 24 

May 5 Alphonse Robert , 16 

21 Melina Soucy 1 

22 Glendon E. Boyd 1 3 



June 



July 



Date 

22 

25 
28 
5 
13 
16 
17 
17 
19 
20 
22 
23 
29 
4 
10 
10 
11 
15 
17 
18 
20 
21 
21 
5 
7 

13 
19 
21 
29 
Sept. 15 
17 
22 
25 
27 
2 
8 



Aug. 



Oct. 



48 

Names Yrs 

Elizabeth (Christie) McConnell 67 

Margaret (Freeman) Hogan 71 

Joseph Roger Beaudett 

Andrew Sheehan 65 

Robert Moore 42 

Virginia Barbour 2 

Josephine F. (McCabe) Quigley 42 

Carrie A. (Rowell) Smith 37 

Millicent Ann Grady 28 

Mary ( Riley) Loucrof t . . . . 39 

Peter Pepin 78 

John Bowden 72 

Eliza Jane (Parkhurst) Fmerson 73 

Anna M. (Neilson) Paasche 89 

Helena Jane Leahey 2 

Mary (Sullivan) Harrington 80 

Patricia E. Kinch 

George H. McClure 30 

Zoe (Lafayette) Leduc 82 

George A. Ingham 19 

Mark McGrath 55 

John E. Arlin , 30 

George H. Cook 38 

Ruth A. McEnaney 

Sven Nelson 72 

Frederick Mallalien 68 

Joseph A. L. Tromblay 

Stillborn 

Edward Francis Parker 73 

Harris Tremblay 1 

Marcus Frederick Hoelzel 

Barbara Averell 2 

George E. Talbot 

Stillborn 

Abraham Allard 82 

Marcus H. Winship 63 



Mos Dys 



2 


25 


1 


21 


3 


3 


11 


10 


1 




7 


11 


4 


2 


2 


24 




24 


•3 


2 


8hrs 


1 




1 


11 


10 


7 


3 


15 


10 


8 




19 




15 


11 


5 


1 


8 




21 


3 


9 


1 


25 



49 

Date Names Yrs Mos Dys 

Oct. 11 James W. Moore 77 

15 Paul Edmond Johnson 6 

29 Thomas Bridgford 80 

31 Amelia Silcox Elliott 67 19 

Nov. 11 Etta (Hadley) Gunston 64 

14 Mary Ellen (Sawyer) Coburn 70 22 

16 Ruth Mildred Scribner 18 6 9 

17 Stillborn 

27 Stillborn 

29 Alice (McCabe) McGrath 75 

Dec. 1 Charles Loucroft 39 

3 John H. McKeon 67 

5 William L. Ferris 43 

6 Sarah J, (Carr) Bowden 78 

9 Margaret (McCon) McCabe 83 

10 Edwin E.Holt 2 

13 Christina (McGee) Ashworth 66 

25 John Conaton . . . , 52 

28 Martha (Wilson) Douglass 47 

30 Susie B. (Whitcomb) Robbins 42 

EDWARD J. ROBBINS, 

Town Clerk. 



9 


4 


4 




9 


24 


9 


28 




21 


2 


3 


4 


20 



Assessors' Report 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 28, 1913 



Buildings exclusive of land $2,193,585 00 

Land exclusive of buildings 990,655 00 



Total valuation of real estate $3,184,140 00 

Total valuation of personal estate. . . 1,125,770 00 



Total valuation of assessed estate. $4,309,910 00 

Rate of taxation $14 20 per $1000,00 

Number of polls 1,337 

Assessed on polls only 692 

Residents assessed on property : 



Individuals. 1,056 

All others 21 



1,077 



Non-residents assessed on property : 

Individuals 373 

All others ... .' 17 390 



Total number assessed 2159 

Number of horses assessed 513 

*" " cows assessed 999 

" " sheep assessed 103 

'■ " other neat cattle assessed 183 

"• l ' swine assessed 246 

" " fowls assessed 13,745 

" ' ' dwellings assessed 1,061 

" "' acres of land assessed 13,679 



52 

Appropriations for Schools : 

Teaching, care and fuel $ 22,900 00 

Superintendent 1,500 00 

Incidentals 400 00 

Apparatus 50 00 

Transportation , 1,750 00 

Furniture and repairs 1,000 00 

Text books and supplies 1,700 00 

Medical inspection 250 00 

Industrial school tuition 595 00 

$30,145 00 

Appropriations for : 

Highways ■ $ 4,000 00 

Support of Poor 3,000 00 

Repairs of public buildings 300 00 

Street lighting 6,800 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 2,500 00 

Town officers and committees 3,000 00 

Moth work 1,688 17 

Care and improvement of ceme- 
teries 600 00 

Indigent soldiers and sailors 450 00 

Cattle inspection 100 00 

Adams Library . . 1,2C0 00 

North Chelmsford Library Ass'n 
provided the books are for the 
free use of all inhabitants of 

the town 600 00 

Village clock 30 00 

Tree Warden 300 00 

Public parks 200 00 

Meat inspection 800 00 

Abatement of taxes 200 00 

Loans and interest 4,791 76 

Sinking fund 200 00 

Military aid 400 00. 



53 



Memorial day 

Hydrant service at No. Chelmsford. 
Grading at Highland Ave. School . . 
Flag and rope at Centre 



$63,374 93 

State tax $7,375 00 

State highway tax 233 50 

County tax 4,059 07 

11,667 57 



125 00 




1,500 00 




300 00 




45 00 




- $33, 


229 93 



$75,042 50 
Overlayings 3,332 22 



$78,374 72 
Estimated receipts 14,500 00 



$63,874 72 

Tax on 1,337 polls $ 2,674 00 

Tax on property " 61,200 72 



63 874 72 



Appropriated from Treasury for : 

Superintendent of Schools ... $ 100 00 

Abatement of taxes 536 38 

Janitors at North and Centre Fire 

Houses , 50 00 

Acton road construction 428 67 

D. A. Reardon reimbursement 30 00 

Highways, excise tax and proceeds 

from sale of town teams 

H. C. SWEETSER, 
JAMES P. DUNIGAN, 
FRED L. FLETCHER, 

Assessors. 



Support of Poor 



EXPENSE AT ALMSHOUSE 



Waldo Hannaford, Superintendent $ 

Sweetser & Day, grain 

Perry D. Thompson, brewery grains . . . 

E. W. Sweetser, provisions 

E. E. Paignon, Jr., 2 cows 

E. T. Adams, groceries 

S. W. Parkhurst, groceries 

C. G. Nickles, ice 

Alvin H. Fletcher, grain 

Clymenia Smith, labor 

Mary H. Ewen, labor 

C. F. Sproule, provisions 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

H.- M. Seeton, labor 

George VV. Perry, labor 

Roy Hannaford, labor 

A. G. Scoboria, medical aid 

E. W. Sweetser, 13 cords wood standing 

Harrison Co 

H. L. Parkhurst, 29,750 lbs. coal 

National Butter Co., butter 

Donovan Harness Co. , supplies 

King Clothing Co. , clothing 

W. E. Adams, pasturing cow 

C. W. Boyd, supplies 

L. W. Hawkes, mattresses 

A. G. Pollard Co., dry goods 



400 00 
493 94 
125 84 
173 84 
170 00 
218 81 
180 04 $ 1,762 47 

56 16 

42 50 

68 00 

72 00 

93 19 

38 49 

29 00 

10 20 

35 00 

68 75 

22 75 

60 64 
11156 708 24 

60 35 

20 70 

15 14 

10 75 

10 50 

10 00 

15 31 



56 

F. A. Russell, supplies 12 15 

Ida Lovering, labor 13 17 

A. H. Fletcher, flour 13 00 

W. B. Emerson, apples 10 50 

Adams Hardware Co., supplies 19 45 

G. A. McMaster, labor and supplies .... 12 65 

Bartlett & Dow, hardware 15 55 

R. Maxwell, fish 2197 

G. Hartley, chickens 14 00 

Daniel Gage Ice Co. , 10 cords wood .... 32 50 

Amasa Howard, M. D., medical aid , . . . 25 50 333 19 

Moth Department, spraying 5 60 

George M. Wright, shoeing 6 80 

Wm. McLarney & Co., supplies 2 82 

Falls & Burkinshaw, medicine 2 13 

H. Staveley, shoeing 2 30 

Dr. E. D. Harris, veterinary 2 00 

Boutwell Bros., supplies 87 

Bennett Bros., supplies 2 10 

J. R. Grant, clothing 1 08 

F. A. P. Coburn, green bone 2 00 

W. A. Derby, supplies 1 00 

J. P. Eaton, one pig 6 00 

E. R. Marshall, supplies 2 00 

A. S. Locke, setting eggs 1 00 

Fred E. Adams, berries 1 40 

William S Heald, labor 3 50 

R. J. Meekin, two pigs 5 00 

Sears, Roebuck Co., supplies 3 25 

E. E. McCausland, potatoes. 3 00 

E. M. Carr, berries 1 35 

I. W. Brown, horseradish 56 

C. M. Foster, honey 90 

E. Chalifoux, clothing 90 

Staples Bros., six bags cement 2 85 

F. A. Hazen, labor 4 00 

Davis & Sargent, lumber 1 64 



57 

C. B. Coburn Co., supplies. ...... 

I. Spaulding, cherries 

Independent Beef Co., provisions 

S. C. Hagerman, setting eggs 1 50 74 15 

I. C. Martel, shoes 

W. Hannaford, expense to Boston 

S. K. Dexter, potatoes 

William Cary. pork 

Chester Roberts, labor 

E. A. Wilson Co., lime 

Jacob Tingley, sawdust 

Curtis A. Aiken, sealing scales . . . 

N. D. Lafleur, supplies 

26 30 



JS 3 45 


40 


2 75 


1 50 


2 40 


2 85 


8 00 


2 99 


3 75 


75 


4 00 


56 


100 



Total $ 2,904 35 



Receipts at Almshouse 



Cash received for: 



Milk $ 1,52 40 

Board .' 134 00 

Cows 65 00 

Eggs 22 75 

Calves 11 25 

Hay 14 63 

Vegetables 15 80 1,315 83 

First premium vegetables, Mid- 
dlesex North Agricultural 

Fair 15 00 

Cucumbers 2 50 

Chickens 1 75 

Use of horse 7 25 



58 

Apples $ ^ 50 

Potatoes 

.Sundries 



2 30 

2 41 40 71 

$ 1,356 54 



Outside Poor 

City of Lowell, aid rendered $ 314 92 

Rutland State Sanatorium, aid rendered 178 40 

E. T. Adams, aid rendered 253 14 887 46 

John Reynolds, aid rendered 141 00 

John P. Quinn, aid rendered 43 00 

D. F. Small, aid rendered 92 02 

Sweetser & Day, aid rendered 22 81 

St. John's Hospital, aid rendered ..... . 46 00 

State Infirmary, aid rendered 82 00 

S. W. Parkhurst, aid rendered 14 33 

J. J. Hoban, M. D., aid rendered 29 50 

John F. McManomin, aid rendered .... 62 83 

A. F. Freeze, aid rendered 30 00 

A. G. Scoboria, M. D. , aid rendered. . . . 69 00 

Mrs. McKinley, aid rendered 40 00 

H. L. Parkhurst, aid rendered ' 36 32 567 81 

City of Boston, aid rendered 61 43 

P. J. Meehan, M. D., aid rendered 14 00 

Walter Perham, aid rendered 40 00 

J. H. Sparks, aid rendered 18 00 

Mrs. E. McKenna, aid rendered 14 00 

Putnam & Son, aid rendered 15 00 

Anna E. Conlin, aid rendered 19 21 

C. F. Sproule, aid rendered 5 99 

J. J. Dunn, aid rendered 18 75 206^38 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., aid rendered 3 00 

Boulger Shoe Store, aid rendered 5 50 



59 

Susan P. Melvin, aid rendered 4 00 

F. E. Varney, M. D., aid rendered 1 00 

A. H. Davis, aid rendered 2 60 

F. A. Hale, aid rendered 1 14 

Moses Wilson, aid rendered 1 68 

A. G. Scoboria, M. D., aid rendered 31 70 

W. B. Emerson, aid rendered 1 50 

W. T. Griffin, aid rendered 1 00 

53 12 

Total $1,714 77 



Inmates at Almshouse 

Number of inmates at Almshouse 9 

A. HEADY PARK, 
WALTER B. EMERSON, 
D. FRANK SMALL, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



Report of Selectmen 



Highways 

March 1, 1912-March 1, 1913 

Days' labor taken from pay roll : 

David Higgins, 275^ $688 75 

Jerry Sherrin, 273^ 498 07 

James Bray, 198^ 347 37 

John McDonough, 155^ 272 10 

David Kelley. 72 y z 114 12 1,920 41 

Porter Merry, 30 93 00 

Dimon Stirk, 68 days, 5 hours - 117 33 

. William Driscoll. 513^ 90 12 

M. McKennedy, 49^ . 108 75 

Dennis Reardon, 55^ 97 56 

Harry Merrill, 31 . 62 00 

Roy Pickard, 25 37 50 

•John O'Neil, 20 35 00 

Nelson Loucraft, 14 24 50 

S. H. Nickles, 7 14 00 

William Foster, 5 8 75 

William Hollis, 2^ 4 37 692 88 

, John Higgins, J4 87 

Alfred Peterson, 2 6 00 

Edwin Davis, labor 1 00 

Fred I. Vinal, labor 1 00 

Patrick Welsh, labor 1 00 



62 



Patrick Cassidy, labor $ 

James Buchanan, labor 

Thomas Jones, labor 

James Potter, labor 

Michael McPhillips, labor 

James McGauvran, labor ... 

Perley Constantino, labor 

Arthur Miner, labor 

William Hafey, labor 

Henry Miner, labor 

George McNulty, labor 

Charles F. Devine, labor 

J. Donovan, labor 

Mr. Nelson, labor 

M. McNulty, labor 

A. B. Devine, labor 

Peter McNulty, labor 

D. Reardon, labor 

Robert Shinkwin, cutting brnsh. . , 
Edward Gaudette, cutting brush. . . . 

John Mullin, cutting brush 

S. Mailloux, setting bounds 

J. Elie, setting bounds 

W. E. Vickery, setting bounds 

F. J. Lupien, setting bounds 

P. Ducharme, setting bounds 

Frank Tolby, setting bounds 

F. Marion, setting bounds 

H. LaJoie, setting bounds 

Frank Holt, 4^ days labor 

Teaming : 

Clarence Nickles, 89 days 1 team 
150 days 2 teams 
8 days 3 teams 1,662 00 

Nelson Loucraf t, 66 days 1 team 297 00 

George Pickard, 27 days 1 team 119 25 

Patrick Flynn, 20 days 1 team 90 50 



1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


7 


90 


5 


50 


2 


00 


1 


30 


4 


85 


1 


75 


1 


40 


16 


30 


6 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


25 


47 


20 


62 


11 


37 


9 


72 


3 


50 


1 


75 


3 


30 




97 


7 


87 



63 



John Marinal, Jr., labor and team 
S. H. Nickles, 11^ days 1 team . . 
Moses Wilson, labor and team .... 
William Tucker, labor and team. . 
F. A. Russell, use of horse 20 days 
George C. Moore, labor and team 
Charles Kappler, 3% days 1 team 

H. Mosley, 3^ days 1 team 

Charles Devine, teaming (1912). 
William Parlee, labor and team . 
Highways : 

James P. Daley, breaking out walks 
Herbert S. Penniman, cleaning gut- 
ters 

P. Henry Harrington, labor and 

lumber 

F. A. Marshall, 10,950 lbs. hay .... 

Sweetser & Day, grain 

Bartlett & Dow, supplies 

Jennie A. Fletcher, rent of barn 1912 
William P. Proctor Co., lumber and 

pipe 

George E. Dillingham, repairing 

harness 

George O. Spaulding, breaking out 

walks 

Herbert S. Penniman, labor 

H. W. Barton, 1,090 lbs. straw 
George M. Wright, blacksmithing. . 
M. J. Ward, repairing snow-plow . . 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 

D. Frank Small, supplies 

Mclntire & Wilson, damage claim 

Mrs. Walsh 

W. A. Sherman, veterinary 

Patrick Flynn, dynamite 

Patrick Flynn, 2 chestnut posts . . . 



63 02 

51 75 
30 00 
27 70 
20 00 
17 00 
15 50 
15 75 

4 13 
1 00 

7 85 

1 20 

13 58 
137 48 
92 80 
24 35 
15 00 

52 40 
3 95 



9 


90 


6 


25 


10 


90 


30 


90 


4 


00 


17 


80 


7 


67 


L25 


00 


4 


00 




28 




30 



752 60 



561 03 



64 

John Marinal. Sr. 258 bounds 123 84 

H. E. Fletcher Co., grout 56 03 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., basin 

covers 15 50 

U. J. Lupien, 2 bags cement 1 00 

H. L. Parkhurst, sewer pipe 118 44 

George W. Day, reimbursement for 

horse 301 00 

Smith & Brooks, survey of Bridge 

Street 120 38 

H. Staveley, scraper 8 75 

E. A. Wilson, brick and cement 14 20 

H. E. Fletcher Co., dynamite 1 64 

Staples Bros., grate and frame .... 8 51 
David Higgins, brick and basin 

covers 6 80 

John J. Sullivan, breaking out walks 

1912-13 9 00 

Philip Donohue, filing saws 1 90 

Smith & Brooks, surveying Middle- 
sex Street 7 00 

George A. Penniman, breaking out 

walks 6 50 

F. J. Whittemore, repairs 7 50 

John Marinel, Jr., breaking out 

walks . 9 38 

William Tucker, lumber 50 

William Tucker, 4 loads loam 1 00 

James P. Daley, cutting brush 6 00 

Martin Robbins & Son, rent of barn. 25 00 

E. R. Marshall, straight edge 35 

E. T. Adams, supplies 2 45 857 25 

Gravel : 

Julia E. Warren, 515 loads 51 50 

Daniel Hartley, 289 loads. 31 80 

C. A. Randlett, 287 loads 28 70 

Thomas Plunkett, 276 loads •. . . 27 60 



65 



George Alexander, 261 loads . 
George Stewart, 416 loads 

Alfred Paasche, 162 loads 

John Newell, 154 loads 

John O'Neil, 151 loads 

Walter Coleman, 135 loads . . . 
Ulysses J. Lupien, 191 loads . 

Belleville & Co. , 82 loads 

Thomas McDonough, 82 loads 
Mrs. Charles Lyons, 75 loads . 

William Adams, 55 loads 

Napoleon Manseau, 43 loads . . 
Mrs. M. Gustavision, 44 loads . 

George F. Snow, 37 loads 

Michael McMahon, 67 loads. . . 

Fred Swain, 35 loads 

Arthur Dutton, 18 loads 

James P. Emerson, 20 loads . . 
George Humphrey, 12 loads . . . 
Charles Shindwin, 89 loads . . . 
Ralph P. Adams, 7 loads 

Total ....". 



26 


10 






41 


60 






26 


20 






15 


40 






15 


10 






13 


50 






19 


50 






8 


20 






8 


20 






7 


50 






5 


50 






4 


30 






4 


40 






3 


70 






6 


70 






3 


50 






1 


80 






2 


00 






1 


20 






8 


90 








70 


353 
$6,960 


60 






21 



D. FRANK SMALL, 
WALTER B. EMERSON, 
A. HEADY PARK, 

Selectmen. 



66 
Safe Guarding of Public Records 

Precautions towards the guarding of public records of the 
town were taken during the past year, upon the orders of the 
State Commissioner of Public Records, Mr. Henry E. Woods, 
who, while on a tour of inspection to this part of the state, 
noted existing conditions in Chelmsford that did not conform 
with State law relative to the safeguarding and protection of 
Public records ; having condemned the safes at the Select- 
men's room, Town Clerk's residence, Town Treasurer's resi- 
dence, and ordered a new door for the vault at the Town Hall, 
also the inside of same to be equipped with non-combustible 
shelves and fittings. Upon request of the Board of Selectmen 
Commissioner Wood allowed this to be deferred until after the 
Annual Town Meeting, so that an appropriation might be 
made for the purpose. But regardless of what action is taken, 
the vault and safes must be renewed and equipped as stated 
above, or the town officials are liable to a penalty under the 
statutes of the commonwealth. 



Report on Street Lights 

The Selectmen submit the following report : 
There are now in the town of Chelmsford electric lights 
located as follows : 

Centre 117 

North 134 

South 36 

West 32 

East . . ' 28 

Lowell Electric Corporation $ 6,749 11 



67 
Military Aid 

Charles Lyon $ 43 00 

D. Frank Small 86 00 

A. Heady Park 387 00 



State Aid 



Charles Lyon $ 88 00 

D. Frank Small 162 00 

A. Heady Park 710 00 



Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 

Paid Indigent Soldiers and Sailors $ 422 00 



Weights and Measures 

Curtis A. Aiken, labor $ 70 01 



$ 516 00 



960 00 



422 00 



70 01 



68 
Care and Improvement on Cemeteries 

Pine Ridge and Forefathers 



Labor 



J. Roland Parkhurst $ 197 42 

John Higgins 12 10 

W. H. Hall 7 90 

Leroy K. Brown 31 20 

Milo Wright 19 25 

A. P. Brown 5 00 

E. R. Marshall 5 00 

$ 278 37 



Riverside Cemetery 
Labor : 

J. S. Wotton $ 277 00 

277 00 



West Cemetery 
Labor : 

A. F. Whidden $ 88 00 

Charles A. Holt 9 00 

97 00 



Hart Pond Cemetery 
Labor : 

C. O. Robbins $ 43 90 

Herbert Penniman 6 12 

A. H. Simpson 8 00 

—- 58 02 

Total $779 19 



69 

The money expended has been drawn from the Trust 
Funds as follows : 



Cemetery Trust Funds 



Care of lots as follows — Forefathers and Pine Ridge 



Adams Emerson 

G. A. & R. P. Coburn, 

I. Kimball. 

Jerusha Shed 

Alfred Day 

Gardner Fletcher. . . . 
Bradley Marshall .... 

Elbridge Smith 

J. S. Shed 

JohnC. Hobbs 

D. C. Perham 

Charles Sweetser 

Alvah H. Richardson. 

Eli P. Parker .. 

J. W. Smith 

H. & S. Parkhurst.. . . 

Burt Emerson 

Susan E. Brown 

Hodges & Green 

G. P. Kittredge 

L. Andrews 

E. F. Webster 

Emily E. Reed 

Wilbur Cheney 

Henry P. Davis 

Jabey Stevens 



$ 7 00 


8 00 


8 00 


10 00 


4 00 


2 00 


5 00 


4 00 


10 00 


5 00 


3 00 


4 00 


4 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


9 00 


5 00 


4 00 


2 00 


5 00 


4 00 


100 


4 00 


4 00 


5 00 



$131 00 



70 

West Cemetery 

A. W. Parkhurst $ 3 00 

E. Kimball 1 50 

Joseph Winn 150 

Filling- graves and sodding 1 50 

J. H. Perry 3 00 

Filling graves and sodding 1 50 

J. B. Longly 3 00 

Filling graves and sodding 1 50 

Emma L. Furlong 3 00 

H. Faller and Butterfield 3 00 

S. Bowery 3 00 

Wm. Clark 3 00 

S. F. Wheeler 3 00 

James Brown 3 00 

Filling two graves and sodding 3 00 

Mrs. Paul Quist 3 00 

J. H. Wheeler 3 00 



$43 50 



Hart Pond Cemetery 

Heywood lot $ 1 50 

Hutchins lot 2 00 

3 50 

Total $ 178 00 



Cattle Inspection 

Emile E. Paignon, Jr $ 100 00 

Extra inspection, 1911. 100 00 



$ 200 00 



71 

Sinking Fund 

Paid Walter Perham, Treasurer $ 200 00 



$ 200 00 



Libraries 

Adams Library 
Paid Wilson Waters, Treasurer $ 1,200 00 

North Village Library 
Paid Stewart MacKay, Treasurer $ 600 00 



$ 1,200 00 



$ 600 00 



Memorial Day 

Chelmsford Band $ 50 00 

Knowlton Press, printing 4 00 

J. R. Parkhurst, plants 9 80 

Nichols & Co , ,. 60 

Knowlton Press, printing 1 00 

Walter Perham, table linen 1 00 



$ 66 40 



Damages on Littleton Road 

Daniel F. Hartley $ 150 00 



$ 150 00 



72 
Hydrant Service 

North Chelmsford Fire District 
Paid C. Frank Butterfield, Treasurer. . . $ 1,500 00 



$ 1,500 00 



Acton Road Construction 

William H. Shedd, expenses $ 3 15 

E. C. Perham, expenses 50 00 

Wm. H. Tarbell, labor 55 31 

H. W. TarbelL labor 46 56 

H. W. Tarbell, balance on account 1912, 

labor 100 00 



$ 255 02 



Meat Inspection 

Charles Lyons, inspection $ 9 60 

Arnold C. Perham, inspection 790 40 



$ 800 00 



Tree Warden 

George B. Wright, maple trees $ 105 00 

Grasselli Chemical Co. , arsenic of lead . . 60 75 

J. Fallon, labor 27 00 

J. Mullin, labor 24 00 

C. D. Worden, labor 17 00 

M. H . Taylor, labor 15 80 



73 

R. P. Shinkwin, labor 

S. Seeton, lobor 

R. Shinkwin, labor 

E. Gaudette, labor 

Wm. Hoyt, labor 

H. Nickles, use of team 

J. W. Stevens, repair of fence .... 
A. C. Hemenway, removing trees. 

J. Marinel, Jr., use of horse 

Bartlett & Dow, rope , 

M. C. Wilson, use of team 

Phillip Donohue, filing saws 

George M. Wright, repairs and supplies. 
Connors Bros. , cement 
E. T. Adams, supplies 

59 21 



$ 14 00 


13 00 


1100 


8 00 


5 63 


10 00 


9 96 


9 65 


7 88 


5 72 


4 00 


3 90 


3 60 


3 00 


1 50 



Collection and Abatement of Taxes 

E. W. Sweetser, abatements 1909 $ 160 93 

1910 377 00 

1911 82 12 

1912 107 60 



Loans and Interest 

Notes and Interest : 

North Schoolhouse loan $ 2,419 38 

McNally lot loan 841 50 

South Schoolhouse loan 810 88 

North Schoolhouse repair loan 510 00 

Stevens lot loan 210 00 



727 65 



$ 4,791 76 



74 
Public Parks 

Samuel Felch, labor $ 98 63 

George F. Cutler, labor 17 30 

John J. Quessy, labor 16 00 

J. R. Parkhurst, labor 6 00 

A. H Simpson, labor 1 00 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 10 52 

Sweetser & Day, supplies 4 15 

Bartlett & Dow, supplies 1 60 

Paul E Vickery, labor 4 00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., freight 8 61 

E. T. Adams, supplies 1 03 

Harvey B. Green, plants at W. C 10 00 

George B. Wright, shrubs 6 60 



$ 185 44 



Moth Work 

M. A. Bean, Superintendent $ 667 50 

Robert R. Shinkwin 406 00 

Edward Gaudette 334 00 

C. D. Worden 185 00 

S. Seeton 194 00 

Joe Fallon 165 39 

J. Mullin 127 00 

R. P. Shinkwin 151 00 

W. Merrill 13§ qq 

William Hoyt 62 75 

R. Meekin 25 00 

J. Wilson 24 00 

J. Clingan 24 05 

M. Cummings 19 00 

William Hollis 12 00 

Napoleon Ayotte 12 00 

G - B y am 800 



7o 

J. McNulty $ 5 00 

Charles Stewart 5 00 

Joe Ayotte 1 00 $ 2,565 64 

M. A. Bean, use of team 239 days 239 00 

Adams Express 2 30 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., freight 7 30 

Moses Wilson, use of team 121 53 

Parkhurst Press, printing 35 25 

H. L, Parkhurst, use of team 21 75 

E. E. Hildreth, use of team 15 00 

R. Meekin, labor 14 25 

Frost Insecticide Co., three nozzles ... 4 80 

Fitzhenry, Guptill Co. , throw cranks ... 41 50 

George M. Wright, supplies 21 68 

M. A. Bean, one-half day with team ... 2 00 

M. A. Bean, fare to Boston 1 10 

527 46 

Total $ 3,093 10 



Repairs of Public Buildings 



Centre Hall 



Wm. McLarney, repairs 
Almon W. Holt, repairs 
I. L. Bradley, labor 
F. G. Pratt, labor ...:.. 



James W. Stevens, repairs $ 48 18 

James F. Burns, repairs 9 58 







■ $ 


22 48 






5 05 






4 74 






3 45 




Hall 




North 







$ 35 72 



57,77 



76 

Adams Library 
J. B. Goodwin, repairs , $ 12 65 

South Chelmsford 



12 65 



I. H. Knight, repairing old school build- 
ing for fire-house purposes 72 49 

Adams Hardware Co. , paint and oil. .... 7 60 

80 09 

Total $ 186 23 



Janitors North and Center Fire House 

Victor L. Parkhurst, Janitor Center. . . . $ 80 00 

Henry O. Miner, Janitor North 25 00 

105 00 



Village Clock 

Paid Harry L. Parkhurst, care $ 30 00 

30 00 



Flag and Rope 

Centre 

S. W. Parkhurst, flag $ 30 00 

E. T. Adams, rope 3 00 



33 00 



77 
Abatement of Taxes 

Paid Daniel A. Reardon $ 30 00 



Lowell Industrial School 

Paid City of Lowell, tuition $ 1,115 00 



30 00 



1,115 00 



Officers and Committees 

E. W. Sweetser, services as Treasurer 

and Collector $ 689 45 

E. W. Sweetser, making census reports 10 00 699 45 

Edward J. Robbins, services and ex- 
penses as Town Clerk 136 60 

Edward J. Robbins, services as Registrar 31 50 

D., Frank Small, services and expenses 

as Selectman , 250 00 

Walter B. Emerson, services and expenses 

as Selectman 200 00 

A. Heady Park, services and expenses 

as Selectman 169 00 809 16 

A. Heady Park, Clerk of Selectman 21 23 

A. Heady Park, services and expenses 

as Overseer of the Poor 42 47 

D. Frank Small, services and expenses 

as Overseer of the Poor 25 00 

Walter B. Emerson, services and ex- 
penses as Overseer of the Poor 25 00 

A. Heady Park, expenses as Chairman 

of Overseers of the Poor 5 25 



78 



F. L. Fletcher, services and expenses as 
Assessor 

H. C. Sweetser, services and expenses as 
Assessor 

James P. Dunigan, services and ex- 
penses as Assessor 

John J. Dunn, services and expenses as 
Selectman (March 1912) 

Charles F. Devine, services and expenses 
as Selectman (March 1912) 

E. T. Adams, services and expenses as 
Selectman (March 1912) 

D. Frank Small, services and expenses 

as Selectman (March 1912) 

E. T. Adams, services and expenses as 

Overseer of the Poor (March 1912) . 
E. T. Adams, services and expenses of 

Board of Health (March 1912) 

D. Frank Small, services and expenses 

Board of Health (March 1912) 

D. Frank Small, services and expenses 

as Overseer of the Poor (Mar. 1912) 
Hubert H. Richardson, services as 

Constable 

James R. Gookin, services as Special 

Police 

Charles F. Scribner, services Cemetery 

Commissioner (March 1912) 

John J. Monahan, services School Com- 
mittee 

John E. Harrington, services School 
Committee. . . 

W. H. Hall, services School Committee. 

John E. Harrington, Purchasing Agent. 

Charles A. Holt, services as Cemetery 
Commissioner 

W. H. Hall, services and expenses as 
Cemetery Commissioner 



215 75 




225 00 






783 47 


245 00 




17 00 




20 00 




5 75 




16 50 




4 35 




6 25 




125 




2 50 




352 30 


569 65 


143 75 




60 00 




75 00 




75 00 




75 00 




50 00 




25 00 


360 00 


36 00 





50 00 


3150 


22 50 


49 00 


35 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 



79 

A. G. Scoboria, M. D. , agent Board of 

Health $ 40 00 

F. E. Varney, M. D., agent Board of 
Health 

Patrick H. Haley, services as Registrar. 

J. F. McManomin, services as Registrar. 

George H. Ripley, services as Registrar 

(19H) 

H. C. Sweetser, abstracts from Probate. 

P. L. Piggott, services as Auditor 10 00 

Winthrop Parkhurst, services as Auditor 
Samuel L. Naylor, services as Auditor. . 
Walter B. Emerson, services Chairman 

Board of Health 15 00 

D. Frank Small, services of Board of 

Health 

John J. Quessy, services as Special 

Police 

Curtis A. Aiken, services as Special 

Police 

Thomas W. Daley, services as Special 

Police 

George Small, services as Special Police. 16 45 182 90 

Patrick S. Ward, services as Special 

Police 

Patrick Welsh, services as Special Police 
Fred I. Vinal, services as Special Police 
James Buchanan, services as Special 

Police 

Thomas Brown, services as Special Police 
John B. Emerson, services as Special 

Police 3 00 

Clarence Nickles, services as Special 

Police 3 00 

Edwin Coburn, services as Special Police 3 00 

Henry Stavely, services as Special Police 3 00 

Patrick Cassidy, services as Special Police 3 00 



14 50 


56 80 


14 50 


59 65 


16 45 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 



80 

James S. By am, services as Special Police $ 9 00 
John Marinel, Jr., services as Special 

Police 27 00 $ 73 00 

Charles Kappler, services as Special 

Police 13 00 

H. C. Sweetser, preparing poll list 12 00 

James S. Byam, auto and court 11 58 

James S. Byam, Truant Officer 1910-11. 8 20 

E. T. Adams, Caucus Committee 5 00 

W. H. Quigley, Caucus Committee 2-50 

J. W. Robinson, killing dog 1 00 

J. W. Robinson, posting notices 1 00 

Joe Fallon, services Constable 1912 19 50 

J. R. Gookin, services Constable 1912.. . 26 50 

Carl N. Perham, services Constable 1912 14 00 

C. G. Nickles, services Constable 1912. . 44 50 119 38 
Fred L. Fletcher, services Park Com- 
missioner 3 60 

Officers for Caucus, Primaries, State Election and 
March Meeting 

Howard S. Adams $ 20 00 

Ralph P. Adams 7 00 

James H. Bowen 9 00 

Edwin F. Coburn 7 00 

D. P. Byam 7 00 

Frank O. Dutton . . 3 00 

George S. Elliott ■ 8 50 

Charles Finnick 7 00 

Patrick Flynn 2 50 

Charles A. Holt 7 00 

Henry E. Howard 5 00 

D. E. Haley , ... 15 

Lewis Jennison 20 00 

Charles Kappler 5 00 

William Keenan 7 00 



81 

Walter N. Marinel , 

Frank P. Martin 

Patrick J. McMahon 

George McNulty 

James B. McQuaid 

Samuel Naylor 

William E. O'Neil 

Arnold C. Perham 

William H. Quigley 

Daniel A. Reardon ? 

A. E. Reed 

F. K. Ripley 

John P. Scoboria 

Stanley Seeton 

George O. Spaulding 

H. C. Sweetser , 

Arthur M. Warren 

Joseph E. Warren 

Patrick S. Ward 

M. H. Winship ... 

M. B. Wright 

Total 



7 00 




16 50 




8 50 




7 00 




15 00 




20 00 




7 00 




15 00 




6 50 




7 00 




8 50 




20 00 




16 00 




7 00 




3 00 




8 50 




4 50 




2 50 




7 00 




4 00 




8 50 




tl 


329 50 


SP 




$ 


4,220 51 



Miscellaneous Expenses 

Buckland Printing Co. , Town Reports . . $ 

Parkhurst Press, printing 

Lowell Gas Co 

North Chelmsford Fire District 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 

Lowell Electric Light Corporation 

Courier-Citizen Co., advertising 



304 60 
95 05 
89 23 
12 47 
3183 
72 77 
69 75 



82 

F. A. Fisher, Town Counsel, 1911 $ 230 48 

E. E. Paignon, Jr., delivering Town re- 
ports 1912 

Charles F. Scribner, stationery 

Lowell Sun, advertising 16 00 $ 970 68 

D. F. Small, delivering Town reports.. 
Edward J. Rob-bins, reporting 79 births, 

54 marriages, 86 deaths 

Ralph P. Adams, care of flag 

Wakefield Daily Item, advertising 

E. T. Adams, delivering Town reports. 

Ralph W. Emerson, stationery 

Ralph P. Emerson, Justice of the Peace. 

John J. Dunn, wood, North Hall 

P. B. Murphy, printing 

B. & M. R. R., pipe rental 

J. J. Hoban, M. D., reporting births, 

1909-10-11 

J. J. Dunn, delivering Town reports. . . 

Joseph Marshall, use of hall 

M. H. Winship, use of hall 

H. C. Kittredge, books 

D. F. Small, team, police service 

Talbot Chemical Co. , acid 

Hobbs & Warren, stationery 

George E. Hutchins, stoppers 

C. B. Coburn Co., fumigating candles.. 
National Mfg. Co., repairing pumps. . . . 

H. L. Parkhurst, wood, Centre Hall 

National Standard Extinguisher Co., 

nozzle coupling 

F. G. Pratt, setting glass 

Ralph P. Adams, grading Centre fire 

house 

D. F. Small, sulphur 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., freight 

E. T. Adams, rakes and shovels 



12 50 


2100 


16 00 


15 00 


67 50 


30 00 


16 00 


10 00 


48 73 


8 25 


29 00 


3 65 


6 00 


7 25 


7 00 


1 00 


8 00 


4 80 


4 50 


5 24 


4 25 


45 


6 00 


30 00 


10 25 


1 75 


3 00 


2 00 


80 


2 21 


7 46 



83 

Henry E. Wright & Sons, 30 cans 

G. C. Prince & Son, stationery 

Lactance Gaudette, cleaning vault 

C. B. Coburn Co. , wax, North Hall .... 
Am. LaFrance Engine Co., chemicals. . 

James S. Byam, Janitor 1911-12 

J. D. Ryan, repairing pump 

R. P. Adams, team 

M. A. Tighe, M. D. , reporting one birth 
Lull & Hartford, one pair handcuffs .... 

H. E. Fletcher Co., rent of pump 

Buckland Printing Co., painting 

Charles L. Sweetsir, M. D., reporting 

one birth 

H. Staveley, repair of well, So. C 

P. S. Ward, Janitor 1911-12 

Thomas Murphy Co., boiler No. C. fire 

house 

No. Chelmsford Supply Co., leather . . . 

City of Lowell, police department 

Emery Record Preserving Co. , rebind- 

ing 

D. F. Small, supplies, North Hall 

E. Seeton, repairs, 1910-11-12 

Adams Hardware Co., wax, Centre Hall 
J. E. Harrington, taking school census. . 
Adams Hardware Co., hBrdware 

F. & E. Bailey, fumigators 

E. T. Adams, food for firemen 

William P. Proctor Co 

S. W. Parkhurst, supplies 

Thomas Murphy Co,, labor 

Orrin B. Wells, M. D., reporting two 

births 50 

G. O. Lavelle. M. D., reporting one 

birth 25 414 33 

D. F. Small, Justice of the Peace 6 50 



22 50 


6 40 


2 00 


2 25 


38 75 


145 90 


4 50 


2 00 


25 


3 50 


1 00 


6 50 


25 


8 30 


200 00 


90 00 


40 


12 75 


8 50 


2 66 


22 20 


5 50 


40 08 


1 95 


12 00 


11 10 


175 


3 69 


100 



84 

Alvin H. Fletcher, supplies S. C. fire- 

house $ 

Sweetser & Day, supplies S. C. firehouse 

E. R. Marshall, key boxes 

Thomas B. Smith, M. D., Board of 

Health • 

E. W. Sweetser, provisions, firemen. . . . 

Carter Ink Co., ink 

Standard Extinguisher Co., two extin- 
guishers 

A. G. Scoboria, M. D., 37 vaccinations. 

F. E. Varney, M. D., 54 vaccinations . . 

Knowlton Press, printing 

W. H. Sherman, M. D., reporting two 

births 

A. G. Pollard, supplies 

Walter Perham, reporting 23 deaths 

F. E. Varney, M. D., reporting 40 births 
A. G. Scoboria, M. D., reporting 22 

births 

Breck Emerson, labor 

Charles Kappler, one cord wood 

E. T. Adams, supplies 6 63 168 19 

Emile E. Paignon, Jr., services and ex- 
penses on account glandered horses. 

F. A. Fisher, Town Counsel, 1912 

C. F. Devine, labor at fire . 

George O. Spaulding, labor at fire 

A. C. Perham, et al, fire warden 

John Marinel, Jr., et al, fire warden. . . . 

W. H. Shedd, et al, fire warden 

V. L. Parkhurst, et al, fire Warden 

James Hackett, et al, fire warden 

Fred L. Fletcher, et al, fire warden 

Ralph P. Adams, labor at fire 

E. G. Byam, labor at fire 

M. A. Bean, labor at fire 



19 55 


7 75 


2 00 


16 00 


1 73 


38 


13 50 


18 50 


27 00 


17 40 


50 


1 50 


5 75 


10 00 


5 50 


100 


7 00 


6 63 


36 00 


193 29 


3 70 


11 50 


120 87 


25 30 


19 10 


278 75 


32 00 


14 90 


8 90 


1 75 


1 65 



85 



D. F. Small, labor at fire 

W. S. Holder, labor at fire 

Sidney Dupee, labor at fire 

J. F. Parker, labor at fire 

J. P. Dunigan, horse 

Walter Lee, services and lights 

Fairbanks Co., supplies No. C. fire dept. 
C. H. Leland, M. D. , reporting one birth 

Andrew E. Reis, tubing 

George F. Snow, appropriations 

A. H. Parks, appropriations , 

William H. Shedd 



190 




6 28 




2 75 




3 20 




2 00 




3 00 




4 44 




25 




3 25 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 






95 27 






$ 


2,906 17 



86 



Sale of Town Teams 

The Town teams were disposed of at public auction 
April 4, 1912, for the sum of $1,421.54. -We commenced 
hiring - teams the 15th of said month and submit the following 
report of the work as carried on during the remainder of the 
municipal year. Comparing the expense of the Town owing 
its teams the year previous, the figures are as follows : 

Cost of hay, grain, straw and rent of 

barn, 1911 $ 981 87 

Repairs on carts and horse shoeing. . ... . 404 14 

$ 1,385 91 

Hiring of teams April 12, 1912, to March 

1, 1913 $2,416 60 

Support of teams April 12, 1912, to March 
1, 1913, would cost at the same ratio 
as 1911 1,212 33 

$ 1,204 77 
Pay for teamsters, April 12, 1912, to 

March 1, 1913 1,151 50 

52 77 

Appropriations 1911 for Highways $6,000 00 and receipts 

Appraisal of Highway property 1912. . 2,780 75 

Appropriations 1912 for Highways . . . 4,000 00 and receipts 

Appraisal of Highway property 1913 . . 859 00 

We changed the system on the woking on the roads from 
last year and hired a superintendent to look after and take 
charge of same, and we consider he has given his services 
with very little complaint. The following is to state where 
the money has been expended since April 15th, 1912: 



87 



East 



Days 
2 
5 


Teams 

2 
2 


Men 
5 
5 


. . .Dyer Hill 
. . . Carlisle Road 


10 


2 


4 


. . .Carlisle Road 


1 


1 


4 


. . .Gorham Street 


6 


2 


3 


. . . Carlisle Street 


1 
1 




1 

2 


. . . Cutting brush 
. . Cutting brush 



8 days cleaning gutters, etc. 



South 



Days 
1 


Teams 
2 


Men 
4 


. . Robbin Hill Road 


2 


2 


4 


. . Locust Road 


3 


2 


4 


. .Parkhill Road 


2 


2 


5 


. . Parkhill Road 


2 


2 


5 


. .Pinehill Road 


3 


2 


5 


. .Carlisle Road 


2 

4 


2 
3 


5 
4 


. . Dupee's Hill 
..Phillip's Road 


1 


3 


4 


. .Robbins Hill 


5 


2 


4 


. .Tad muck Road 



1 day laying culvert 

9 cays cleaning gutters, scraping, etc. 



West 



Days 
3 


Teams 
2 


Men 
4 


. .Strawberry Hill 


4 


2 


4 


. .Graveling 


3 


2 


3 


. . Graveling 


1 


2 


3 


. . Westford Road 


2 


3 


3 


1 1 



88 



2 2 4 

1 3 4 . .. 

14 days on County Road 
7 days scraping, cleaning gutters, etc. 



Centre 



Days 
1 


Teams 
2 


Men 
3 


. . . . Dutton Road 


3 


2 


4 


. . . . Dutton Road 


3 


3 


4 


. . . Carlisle Road 


3 


2 


3 


. . . . Carlisle Road 


3 


2 


4 


. . . . Acton Road 


4 


3 


4 


. . . . Acton Road 


3 

1 


2 
2 


4 
3 


. . . High Street 
High Street 


2 


2 


4 


. . . . Gordon Hill 


6 


2 


5 


. . . Russell Mill Road 


2 


2 


4 


. . . Russell Mill Road 


1 


3 


4 


. . .Bartlett Street 


3 


2 


4 


. . .Bartlett Street 


1 

1 
2 
3 
1 


1 

2 
2 

1 
2 


6 
4 
3 
3 
6 


. . .Bridge Street 
. , . Bridge Street 
. . . Bridge Street 
. v Bridge Street 
. . . South Road 


4 


2 


3 


. . .South Road 


2 


3 


4 


. . . South Road 


2 


2 


3 


. . Westlands 


1 


2 


4 


. . . Steadmaii Street 


1 


2 


4 


. . . Golden Cove Road 


2 


2 


4 


. . . Dalton Road 


3 


3 


4 


. . . Dalton Road 


1 


2 


4 


. . . Boston Road 


1 


1 


4 


. . . Marcott Hill 


2 


3 


4 


. . . Olson Road 


2 


3 


4 


. . . Lowell Road 



89 

1 2 4 Sheehan Road 

1 1 4 L. W. Road 

1 2 6 Davis Road 

18 days scraping, cleaning gutters and picking stones 

10 days repairing washouts (Town). 
6 days laying sewer pipe 



North 



Days 



Teams 



Men 



4 


3 


6 


. . . .Church St. 


1 


2 


6 


Church St. 


2 


2 


4 


. . . . Church St. 


3 


1 Ida. 


6 


. . . . Setting curb G 
Road 


4 


2 


5 


.... Pond Hill 


2 


2 


3 


.... Pond Hill 


1 


2 


5 


.... Groton Road 


1 


2 


4 


. . . .Sidewalks 


1 


1 


4 


. . . .Highland Ave. 


1 


1 


3 


. . . .Dunstable Road 


5 


1 


4 


.... Middlesex St. 


2 




4 


.... Middlesex St. 


8 


2 


4 


. . . .Middlesex St. 



Groton 



17 days scrapings, cleaning gutters, etc. 



Report of Town Treasurer 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 28, 1913 



Your Treasurer charges himself with cash received as 
follows : 

Balance in treasury at last annual settle- 
ment $3,211 41 

Off State Treasurer : 

Corporation Tax 1912 (business) . . . 4,358 37 

Corporation Tax 1912 (public service) 728 55 

Temporary Aid to Paupers 97 09 

Tuition of State Children 134 00 

National Bank Tax 523 67 

Military Aid 255 00 

State Aid 1,036 00 

Street Railway Tax . , 1,826 76 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown 

Tail Moths 586 51 

County Treasurer : 

Dog Licenses 526 12 

Acct. of Repairs on Westford Road. 155 62 

Clerk of Lowell Police Court Fines . 54 58 

Keeper of Lowell Jail Fines 5 00 



92 

Cemetery Commissioners for Sale of 
Burial Lots : 

Pine Ridge $ 30 00 

Hart Pond 25 00 

Riverside 38 00 

Forefathers 5 00 

West 2 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
perpetual care of the Sanford Hazen 
burial lot No. 65 in Forefathers 
Cemetery 100 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
perpetual care of the John H. Clark 
bnrial lot No. 91 in Riverside Cem- 
etery , 300 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
the perpetual care of the Willis 
Adams burial lot No. 58 in Riverside 
Cemetery 100 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
the perpetual care of the Samuel L. 
Dutton burial lot No. 129 in Fore- 
fathers Cemetery 100 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
the perpetual care of the William H. 
Brown burial lot No. 36 in West 
Cemetery 75 00 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
the perpetual care of the Marcus H. 
Winship burial lot No. 66 in West 



100 00 


49 79 


7 50 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


14 50 


3 80 



93 

Cemetery Commissioners as a trust fund 
the income of same to be used for 
the perpetual care of the Francis B. 
and Edward F. Parker burial lot No. 
89 in Forefathers Cemetery 

City of Lowell, aid to paupers 

Town of Carlisle, tuition : 

of Rosco Fadded, 15 weeks at 50c. . . 
of Annie Lahm, 40 weeks at 50c. . . . 
of Elizabeth Coombs, 40 weeks at 50c 
of Evelyn Wilkins, 40 weeks at 50c. 

B. E. Martin, Supt. , tuition of Blanche 
and Harold Hunter 

B. E. Martin, Supt., sale of supplies. . . . 

B. E. Martin, Supt., reimbursement for 

transportation 24 30 

City Institutions for Savings as interest 
on trust funds for perpetual care of 
burial lots 

Selectmen as slaughter house license fees 

Selectmen for sale of stone from gravel 
bank 

Selectmen for sale of street sweeping. . . 

-Selectmen for sale of lumber from High- 
way department 

M. A. Bean, Supt. Moth Dept. for spray- 
ing trees at Town Farm 

M. A. Beau, .Supt. Moth Dept. for spray- 
ing trees for Cemetery Commis- 
sioners 

Curtis A. Aiken, Sealer of Weights and 
Measures, as fees collected for seal- 
ing 

M. A. Bean, Tree Warden, reimburse- 
ment from Lowell Gas Light Co. for 
removing tree at North Chelmsford. 75 00 



187 00 


8 00 


1 15 


5 00 


88 


5 60 



7 45 



54 52 



94 



Waldo Hannaford, Supt. of Town Farm 

as proceeds of farm 1,356 54 

Arnold C. Perham, Forest Fire Warden 

on acct. of reimbursement from Mr. 

Shinkwin for fighting fire 2 00 

M. G. Lallas as reimbursement to town 

for fighting fire set by him 15 55 

W. C. Holder on acct. of overdraft on 

bill 1 20 

H. W. Tarbel as reimbursement for 

fighting fire caused by sparks from 

steam roller 80 

Town of Carlisle as reimbursement for 

fighting fire. 70 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. 

Co. as reimbursement for fighting 

fire caused by sparks from engines. . 13 54 

James S. Byam for rent of Town Hall 

(Centre) 119 05 

P. S. Ward for rent of Town Hall 

(North) 83 00 

Selectmen for sale of highway teams. ... 1,421 93 
Cash borrowed as a temporary loan 57,500 00 

Cash received on account of taxes as 
follows : 

Tax of 1909 3,102 83 

Interest of 1909 473 89 

Moth Tax of 1909 75 42 

Tax of 1910 11,662 74 

Interest of 1910 1,034 44 

Moth Tax of 1910 'l29 18 

Tax of 1911 12,456 54 

Interest of 1911 497 45 

Moth Tax of 1911 196 31 

Tax of 1912 39,760 15 



95 

Interest of 1912 40 70 

Moth Tax of 1912 456 39 

Excise Tax of Bay State Street 

Railway Co. 1912 1,686 01 

Excise Tax of Lowell and Fitchburg 

Street Ry. Co. 1912 147 63 

North Chelmsford Fire District Tax : 

Tax of 1909 180 97 

Interest of 1909 • • • 25 80 

Tax of 1910 - 146 37 

Interest of 1910 17 82 

Tax of 1911 77 50 

Interest of 1911 3 19 

Tax of 1912.. 1,637 69 

Interest of 1912 2 02 

Making a total of $149,303 52 



And is credited as follows : 

By cash paid : 

County Tax $4,059 07 

State Tax 7,375 00 

Repairs of State Highways 233 50 

Cash deposited in City Institution for 
Savings : 

Sanford Hazen Trust Fund 100 00 

John H. Clark Trust Fund 300 00 

Samuel L. Dutton Trust Fund 100 00 

Willie Adams Trust Fund 100 00 

Wm. H. Brown Trust Fund 75 00 

Marcus H. Winship Trust Fund .... 100 00 
Francis B. and Edward F. Parker 

Trust Fund 100 00 

Bureau of Statistics Reg. of Notes 24 00 



96 

Treasurer of North Chelmsford Fire 
District : 

Tax of 1909 180 97 

Interest of 1909 25 80 

Tax of 1910 146 37 

Interest of 1910 17 82 

Tax of 1911 77 50 

Interest of 1911 ... 3 19 

Tax of 1912 1,637 69 

Interest of 1912 2 02 

By cash paid temporary loan in part . . . 55,000 00 

By cash paid interest on same 1,952 96 

By cash paid bills approved by School 

Committee 30,446 49 

By cash paid bills approved by Select- 
men 44,009 31 

Cash on hand ■ 3,236 83 

Making a total of $149,303 52 



E. W. SWEETSER, 

Treasurer. 



Chelmsford, March 1, 1913. 



Report of Tax Collector 



Collector's report for the tax of 1909 : 

Tax on list of 1909 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. ... $ 2,923 84 
Interest on list of 1909 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. 425 15 

Moth tax on list of 1909 uncollected Feb. 28, 

1912.... $121 40 

Less abatements ordered by assessors ... 45 98 

75 42 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 48 74 

Additional tax 178 99 

$ 3,652 14 



Cash entered on Treasurer's book as tax $ 3,102 83 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as interest 473 89 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as moth tax. . . 75 42 



$ 3,652 14 



Collector's report for the tax of 1910: 

Tax on list 1910 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912 $13,252 49 

Interest on list of 1910 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. 1,126 46 

Moth tax on list of 1910 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912 149 50 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 138 49 

$ 14,666 94 



98 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as tax $ 11,662 74 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as interest 1,034 44 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as moth tax. . . 129 18 

Uncollected tax to new account 1,589 75 

Uncollected interest to new account 230 51 

Uncollected moth tax to new account 20 32 



$ 14,666 94 

Collector's report for the tax of 1911 : 

Tax on list of 1911 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912 .... $ 29,194 70 

Interest on list of 1911 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. 729 86 

Moth tax on list of 1911 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912 445 06 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 1,190 33 

$ 31,559 95 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as tax $ 12,456 54 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as interest 497 45 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as moth tax. . . 196 31 

Uncollected tax to new account . . . . 16,738 16 

Uncollected interest to new account 1,422 74 

Uncollected moth tax to new account 248 75 



$ 31,559 95 



Collector's report for the tax of 1912 : 

Tax on list of 1912 $ 63,874 72 

Excise tax of Bay State Street Ry. Co for 1912. . 1,686 01 
Excise tax of Lowell and Fitchburg Street Ry. 

Co. for 1912 147 63 

Moth tax for 1912 1,011 63 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1912 40 70 

Interest accrued since Oct. 1, 1912 602 86 

$ 67,363 55 



99 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as tax $ 39,760 15 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as interest ... 40 70 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as moth tax. . . 456 39 
Cash entered on Treasurer's book as excise tax 

Bay State Street Ry 1,686 01 

Cash entered on Treasurer's book as excise tax 

Lowell and Fitchburg Street Ry 147 63 

Uncollected tax to new account 24,114 57 

Uncollected interest to new account 602 86 

Uncollected moth tax to new account 555 24 



$ 67,363 55 



E. W. SWEETSER, 

Collector. 



Chelmsford, Feb. 28, 1913. 



Collector's Report on Tax of North 
Chelmsford Fire District 



Collector's report for tax of 1909 : 

Tax on list of 1909 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. ... $ 181 89 

Additional tax 49 

$ 182 38 

Less abatements ordered by assessors 1 41 

$ 180 97 



Interest uncollected Feb. 28, 1912 23 64 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 2 16 

$ 206 77 



Cash paid treasurer of North Chelmsford Fire 

District as tax 180 97 

Cash paid treasurer of North Chelmsford Fire 

District as interest 25 80 

$ 206 77 



102 



Collector's report for tax of 1910 : 
Tax on list of 1910 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. . 
Less abatement ordered by assessors 



Interest on list of 1910 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. 
Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 



$ 


348 67 




104 97 


$ 


243 70 




29 63 




2 78 



276 11 



Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
trict as tax 146 37 

Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dic- 

trict as interest 17 82 

Uncollected tax to new account 97 33 

Uncollected interest to new account 14 59 



$ 276 11 



Collector's report for tax of 1911 : 

Tax on list of 1911 uncollected Feb. 28. 1912. ... $ 444 90 

Interest on list of 1911 uncollected Feb. 28, 1912. 11 12 

Interest accrued since Feb. 28, 1912 23 55 



$ 479 57 

Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
trict as tax 74 50 

Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
trict as interest 

Uncollected tax to new account 

Uncollected interest to new account 

$ 479 57 



3 


19 


370 


40 


31 


48 



103 

Collector's report for tax of 1912: 

Tax on list of 1912 $ 2, 111 72 

Additional tax 1 00 

$ 2,112 72 

Interest collected since Oct. 1, 1912 2 02 

Interest accrued since Oct. 1, 1912 11 87 

$ 2,126 61 

Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
trict as tax 1,637 69 

Cash paid treasurer North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
trict as interest : 2 02 

Uncollected tax to new account 475 03 

Uncollected interest to new account 11 87 

$ 2,126 61 



E. W. SWEETSER, 

Collector. 
Chelmsford, Feb. 28, 1913. 



Report of Auditors 



We have examined the accounts of the various Town 
officers for the year ending February 28, 1913, securing the 
following results : 

We find that the Selectmen have approved 1269 bills, 
amounting to $44,009.31, all having been paid by the 
Treasurer. 

We find that the School Committee have approved 798 
bills, amounting to $30,446.49, all having been paid by the 
Treasurer. 

We find the receipts and payments of the Town Clerk on 
account of the Dog Tax properly vouched for. 

We find the receipts and payments of the Town Treasurer 
properly entered and vouched for, and a balance of $3,236.83 
in his hands. 

We find that the total amount of uncollected taxes with 
accumulated interest is $45,522.90, the details of which will 
appear later in the report. 

We find a trust fund in the hands of the Insurance Fund 
Commissioners amounting to $1,075. 36. 

We find the following Cemetery Trust Funds in the hands 
of the Town Treasurer : 

Emerson Improvement Fund $ 59 11 

Emerson fund and interest 782 55 

Kimball fund and interest 125 01 

Silver fund and interest 168 39 

Day fund and interest 104 80 

Carleton fund and interest 201 90 

Marshall fund and interest 109 88 



106 



Edwards interest $ 87 46 

Wood fund and interest 477 07 

Shedd fund and interest 105 58 

Coburn fund and interest 113 13 

Wheeler fund and interest 121 77 

E. G. Smith fund and interest 107 40 

Jaquith fund and interest 199 74 

Fletcher fund and interest 104 87 

Shedd fund and interest 220 2o 

Bowers fund and interest 114 46 

Whittemore fund and interest 122 81 

Asmus fund and interest 265 21 

Haywood fund and interest 56 40 

Huckins fund and interest 129 28 

Isaac Wood fund and interest 112 64 

Pease fund and interest 129 28 

Geo. H. Smith fund and interest 129 28 

Adams fund and interest 259 94 

Hobbs fund and interest ■ 111 71 

Perry fund and interest 109 56 

Perham fund and interest 104 60 

Sweetser fund and interest 105 68 

Parker fund and interest 108 80 

Richardson fund and interest 109 84 

Jos. W. Smith fund and interest 105 90 

H and S. Parkhurst fund and interest. . 107 44 

Burt Emerson fund and interest 104 48 

A. W. Parkhurst fund and interest Ill 16 

J. and E. Longley fund and interest .... 107 04 

Jas. Brown and M.Quist fund and interest 219 42 

Susan E. Brown fund and interest 106 08 

Hodges and Green fund and interest . . . 107 99 

J. C. Butterfield fund and interest 107 19 

Ebert and Weaver fund and interest. . . . 215 78 

Kittredge fund and interest 54 44 

Emily E. Reed fund and interest 53 16 

Wilbur A. Cheney fund and interest 104 28 



107 

William H. Clark fund and interest .... $102 45 

Henry P. Davis fund and interest 104 24 

Marshall Pratt fund and interest 107 18 

Joseph Reed fund and interest 105 08 

Isaac and T. M. Adams fund and interest 86 26 

John Marinel, Sr., fund and interest. . . . 105 08 

Emily L. Furlong fund and interest .... 101 33 

John H. Whidden fund and interest 102 08 

Perley P. Perham fund and interest .... 103 02 

Samuel M. Hutchins fund and interest. 105 18 

Angelina Parker fund and interest 114 91 

Samuel Andrews fund and interest 108 19 

Webster fund and interest 105 52 

Davidson and Ripley fund and interest. 217 44 

Hamblett fund and interest 108 70 

Stevens fund and interest 107 86 

Hazen fund and interest 103 02 

John H. Clark fund and interest 309 06 

Willie Adams fund and interest 100 00 

Samuel L. Dutton fund and interest .... 100 00 

Wm H. Brown fund and interest 75 00 

F. B. and E. F. Parker fund and interest 100 00 

Winship fund and interest. . . 100 00 

Total $8,733 37 

We find Assets : 

Cash in treasury $ 3,236 83 

Tax of 1910 uncollected 1,589 75 

Interest accrued on same 230 51 

Moth tax 1910 20 32 

Tax of 1911 uncollected 16,738 16 

Interest accrued on same 1,422 74 

Moth tax 1911 248 75 

Tax of 1912 uncollected 24,114 57 

Interest on same 622 86 

Mothtax 1912 -J^L 45,522 90 



,759 73 



108 

Due from State : 

State Aid to Jan. 1, 1912 $848 00 

State Aid for Jan.-Feb. , 1912 180 00 

Military Aid to Jan. 1, 1912 415 00 

Military Aid for Jan.-Feb., 1912 86 00 

Account Tuition Industrial School 557 50 

$ 2,086 50 

Deficit 17,253 77 



$68,100 00 

We find Liabilities : 
Note, South Chelmsford School house 

loan $ 3,250 00 

Notes, temporary loan 49,500 00 

Notes, North Chelmsford School-house 

loan 14,000 00 

Interest on above notes 350 00 

$67,100 00 

Unpaid bills, estimated 200 00 

Tax abatement, estimated 800 00 



$68,100 00 



PRESTON L. PIGGOTT, 
WINTHROP A. PARKHURST, 
SAMUEL NAYLOR, 

Auditors. 



March 11, 1913. 



Scaler of Weights and Measures Report 



Total test made 954 

Scales condemned 4 

Total fees collected $ 54 52 

Weights adjusted 19 

Total expenses 74 30 



Respectfully submitted, 



C. A. AIKEN, 

Sealer. 



Report of Inspector of Animals 



My annual report as Inspector of Animals for the year 
ending Feb. 1, 1913, is as follows : 

Number of stables inspected 196 

Number of cattle inspected 1278 

Number of hogs and pigs inspected 578 

Number of sheep inspected 105 

Number of goats inspected 2 

Number of cattle quarantined and killed 26 

Number of horses killed for glanders 4 

Number of horses killed for rabies 1 



EMILE E. PAIGNON, 

Inspector of Animals. 



Report of Inspector of Meats and 
Provisions 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health : 

I herewith submit my annual report as Inspector of Meats 
and Provisions for the year ending February 1, 1913. The 
following meat producing animals have been slaughtered by 
the licensed butchers and farmers through out the town and 
inspected according to the rules and regulations of the State 
Board of Health. 

Inspected Condemned 

Cows ' 2057 55 

Calves 1228 44 

Hogs 1349 17 

Sheep 19 1 

Goats 1 

I have also condemned about 1500 pounds of meat in 
small pieces for various reasons. All animals found infected 
with a contagious disease have been reported to the proper 
State authorities after tracing the animals back to the barn 
they came from as required. 

A. C. PERHAM, 

Inspector. 

Chelmsford, Feb. 1, 1913. 



Report of the Supt, of Moth Work 



The work of this department in the fall was in cutting 
and burning the brush in several parts of the town where 
there were heavy Gypsy colonies. This work was done on 
the Dalton Road, Dunstable Road, Adams and Sheldon Sts., 
River-neck Road, Woodbine St. and Keats St. 

As the State is doing very little of this kind of work I 
would suggest that the town appropriate a small amount of 
money for this special work and a by-law passed that places 
once cleaned, the property owner adjoining such places should 
be made to cut it over at least once a year. This would be 
not only for his benefit but for the betterment of the town at 
large. The government having ceased operating here the 
roads have been thrown back on this department, and not 
having but four men it has been rather slow work. The 
general ideas is to spray, which in woodland districts, can be 
done with less expense. The power sprayer was run through 
the season without a single mishap and done excellent work. 
There were instances, however, where if more time could have 
been given that a smaller outfit would be more desirable. 
The State inspector makes his visit once a week and keeps in 
close touch with the work and anyone having complaints 
or suggestions to make they would be gladly received and 
looked after at once. 

Yours respectfully, 

MINOT A. BEAN. 

Superintendent. 



Report of Tree Warden 



The work of this department has been confined to the 
planting of shade trees in the different villages, spraying for 
the elm-leaf beetle, removal of two large trees at the North 
village which were killed by gas, also the pruning and 
cementing of cavities of several trees. Many of the elms will 
have to be sprayed twice this spring, especially those at the 
North Village as the beetle had a strong hold there last year. 
I would suggest that the amount of money appropriated 
should be used this year in taking care of the old trees instead 
of planting new ones with the exceptions of filling in where a 
few have died. All complaints and suggestions of any kind 
Would be gladly received. 

Yours respectfully, 

MINOT A. BEAN, 

Tree Warden. 



Report of the Forest Warden 



Gentlemen of the Board of Selectmen : 

There has been a great reduction in the cost of fighting 
forest fires during the past year largely through the efforts of 
the fire observer on Robbins Hill : the expense for the past 
year having been 60 per cent, less than the previous year. 

Thirty-six forest fires have been extinguished, also we 
have rendered what help we could at about a dozen building 
and chimney fires where' in most cases the deputy wardens 
were the only ones present with fire -fighting apparatus. It 
would seem to be advisable for the town to purchase some fire 
extinguishers to be placed in the smaller villages in the town 
with a view to protecting buildings, for practically the only 
protection these villages now have is the equipment of the 
deputy forest wardens which is located with a view to protect- 
ing forest areas rather than buildings. 

The eleven deputy wardens scattered through out are 
becoming more familiar with their work and I wish to thank 
them as well as the other town's people for their hearty co- 
operation during the past year. 

About 300 permits were issued between March 1 and 
December 1 which is the time when permits are required for 
setting fires in the open air. All fires have been reported to 
the State Forester upon the blank provided for the purpose. 

Following is a list of the forest fires. 

A. C. PERHAM, 

Forest Warden. 
Chelmsford, March 1, 1913. 



115 



Date 



Mar. 26 

April 1 

7 

9 

12 

25 

25 

25 

26 

29 

May 1 

4 

19 

June 15 

20 

25 

29 

July 1 

1 

3 

4 

5 

8 

10 

14 

18 

24 

28 

28 

28 

Sept. 26 

Oct. 10 

15 

18 

Nov. 5 

5 

Dec. 21 



Land Owned by 



B. Leach 

A. Button 

Simpson etal 

W. Heaney 

A. Olson 

Green 

H. Smith 

Chelmsford Spring Co . 

Hunt Est 

J. Loiselle 

N.Y..N.H &H.R.R. 

Dr. Virgin 

Bailey 

Hemreich 

J. P. Emerson 

P. Parker 

Dutton Bros 

Adams Estate 

J-Fay 

C. Adams 

J. M. G. Parker, heirs . 

E. A. Bartlett 

F. C. Byam 

J. P. Emerson. ... . . . . 

Wm. Proctor 

A. M.Warren 

N. Y., N. H.&H. R.R. 

J. B. Noel 

M. Kolas 

N.Y.,N. H.&H. R.R. 
N.Y., N.H. & H.R. R. 

B. Leach 

Baron Heirs 

Adams 

A. B. Woodworth 

W. P. Proctor 

P. Parker 



No. 
Acres 



10 






V, 



1-16 



1-16 
2 

1-80 
1 
1 
1 

/6 

1-40 

% 

1-30 
1-80 
1-10 
none 
1-80 

1-100 

2 

1 

1-100 

2 
% 



Damage 



#25.00 

35.00 

50.00 

slight 

10.00 

30.00 

slight 

5.00 

5 00 

10 00 

none 

50.00 

none 

5 00 

slight 

25.00 

2.00 

5.00 

slight 

10.00 

10.00 

5 00 

2.00 

1.00 

10.00 

10 00 

none 

1.00 

none 

slight 

1.00 

5.00 

10.00 

none 

10.00 

2.00 

slight 



Cause 



Cost 



Smoking. 



Smoking 

Smoking 

Boy 

Rubbish fire . , 

Smoking , 

R. R. Engine 
Steam roller . , 
House fire . ... 
R. R. Engine 

Smoking , 

Smokina: 



R. R. Engine 

Smoking 

Steam roller . 

Boys 

R. R Engine 
Fire crackers 
Picnic party . 



R. R. Engine 
R. R. Engine 

Smoking 

Smoking. ..-..., 
R. R. Engine 
R. R. Engine 
Rubbish fire . 
R. R. Engine 
R. R. Engine 

Boys 

Smoking 

Smoking 

R. R. Engine 

Smoking 

Smoking 



116 



March 6, 1913 
Mr. D. F. Small, 

No. Chelmsford. 

. 
Dear Sir: 

My books show that the Deputy Forest Wardens and 
Chas. Devine have the following amounts approved by me: 



John Marinel et al Deputy Warden 

F. L. Fletcher et al " 
Geo. Spalding et al " 
R. P. Adams et al " 
W. S. Holder et al " 
J. J. Hackett et al " 
J. F. Parker et al " 
Sidney Dupee et al " 
W. H. Sheddet al 

G. Byam " 
M. A. Bean et al " 

Chas. F. Devine et al 

A. C. Perham et al For6st Warden 



$ 25 


30 


11 


90 


8 


50 


8 9tf 


6 


28 


32 


00 


3 


20 


2 


75 


19 


10 


1 


75 


1 


65 


3 


70 


111 


97 



$ 237 00 



Please note that every Deputy Warden has (et al) after 
his name except G. Byam and that Chas. Devine is not a 
Deputy Warden. 

Yours truly, 

A. C. PERHAM. 



Property Appraisal at Town Farm 



8 cows $545 00 

2 yearlings 45 00 

1 horse.. 175 00 

1 platform scale 5 00 

1 farm harness, 10 00 

1 light harness 10 00 

1 collar and hames 3 00 

Stable tools \ 3 50 

2 tons grain and chest 60 00 

1 square wagon 35 00 

Pulleys, ropes, etc 8 00 

Manure 125 00 

5 hay forks 2 00 

Rakes 1 50 

1 horse hayfork 25 00 

Contents of shed, shovels, etc. 10 00 

1 hay cutter and fork 4 00 

1 grain fan mill 4 00 

12 tons hay 240 00 

2 wheelbarrows 8 00 

2 pigs 50 00 

1 pung 14 00 

1 democrat wagon 18 00 

1 sled 20 00 

1 farm wagon 25 00 

l,cart 60 00 

1 platform wagon 15 00 

2 mowing machines 12 00 



118 

Hayrake and tackle $ 15 00 

1 sulky plow 20 00 

ldrag 5 00 

1 weeder 5 00 

1 spring-tooth harrow 5 00 

1 wheelbarrow 8 00 

2 harrows 2 00 

Neck yokes and whiffletrees 2 00 

3 grindstones 5 00 

5 stanchions 2 00 

7 ladders 17 00 

3 plows 20 00 

2 cultivators 6 00 

1 corn planter 10 00 

1 seed sower 5 00 

70 fowl ....- 42 00 

1 feed boiler , 1 00 

Hen feed 3 00 

1 stone hammer 1 00 

Pruning tools 1 50 

Paint and oil 20 00 

Shingles 2 50 

Saws and axes 5 00 

13 cords wood 45 00 

18 cords prepared wood 40 00 

1 sprayer 4 00 

2 tons coal 16 00 

Canned fruit 15 00 

40 bushels potatoes 35 00 

Beans • 10 00 

Popcorn 2 50 

Milk pails 1 00 

Earrels and bushel boxes 9 00 

Flour 6 00 

Sugar 4 06 

Butter , 7 00 

Lard 1 25 



119 

Food supplies $ 10 00 

Household furniture, bedding, etc 220 00 

Total 

Weights and Measures 

Total value of equipment $100 00 



$2,161 75 



$100 00 



Highway Property Appraisal 



1 two-horse cart $125 00 

1 road roller 100 00 

2 road scrapers 150 00 

1 scoop 4 00 

3 road levelers 40 00 

2 plows 10 00 

3 two-horse sleds 200 00 

6 snow plows 90 00 

2 pumps 10 00 

Lumber 35 00 

Signboards 20 00 

16 new shovels 10 00 

10 old shovels 2 50 

6 snow shovels 2 50 

2 grub hoes 1 00 

Lot of picks 10 00 

5 stone picks 150 

5 iron bars 4 00 

Sewer tools 2 00 

Street hoes 50 

4 stone hammers 4 00 

15 drills 8 00 

2 tamping bars 2 50 

1 paving rammer 1 00 

2 ditch rammers 1 50 

3 wedges 1 00 

,4 big chains 5 00 

4 iron rakes 1 00 



122 



2 axes 

Blasting - powder 
150 feet hose . . . 

Drain pipe 

Lead rod 

Tool chest 

3 saws 

Scraper casting . 

1 hand roller . . . 

2 tires 

1 lot lanterns. . . 
1 ditch derrick . 

1 grind stone . . . 
Canvas 

2 drags 



1 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


12 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


40 00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 



Total $859 00 



Chelmsford Centre Fire Apparatus 



1 combination chemical and hand fire 

engine $500 00 

1 hose and protective wagon 150 00 

1 hook and ladder 150 00 

10 chemical extinguishers 70 00 

650 feet fire hose 200 00 

1 lot chemicals 10 00 

2 single harnesses 70 00 

6 sets rubber suits 30 00 

4 fire axes 2 00 

2 crow bars 2 00 

9 shovels 6 00 

6 forks 2 00 

12 pails 5 00 

20 cans. 5 00 

1 40-f t. extension ladder 40 00 

1 30-ft. extension ladder 10 00 

1 30-ft. ladder 10 00 

1 35-ft. ladder 10 00 

1 20-ft. ladder : 5 00 

2 20-ft. ladders 12 00 

2 ropes and tackle 5 00 

7 pike hooks and poles 5 00 

3 horse blankets 10 00 

6 lanterns 2 00 

Hose nozzles 5 00 

1 hose rack 5 00 



124 



1 lot brooms and sundries 5 00 

1 cabinet 5 00 



Total $1,331 00 



North Chelmsford Fire Apparatus 

1,000 ft. 2^ in. hose $500 00 

1 wagon 150 00 

1 hose reel 30 00 

4 underwriters' chemicals 40 00 

1 steel bar and axe 1 75 

1 dozen Tabor spanners 1 68 

150 ft. |<in. rope . 3 75 

2 nozzles 35 00 

1 40-ft. extension ladder 40 00 

Boiler and fixtures 235 00 

Totals $1,037 18 



South Chelmsford Fire Apparatus 

1 wagon • $50 00 

17 water pails ... 5 00 

1 rope 4 00 

4 ladders 15 00 

Total $74 00 



Property Appraisal of Moth Department 



1 power sprayer and equipment $ 800 00 

1 tool box 5 00 

1 push cart 5 00 

40 ft. extension ladder 5 00 

6 ladders 5 00 

Poles, hooks, brushes, etc 5 00 

6 pairs climbing irons 5 00 

8 hatchets 2 00 

15 axes 7 00 

8 bush hooks 3 00 

18 new bush hooks 4 50 

10 old bush hooks 1 50 

1 dozen bush scythes and swaths 7 00 

2 Johnson pumps 2 50 

Field glass 6 00 

600 ft. hose 25 00 

1 grind stone 3 00 

2 Friend's spray pumps 20 00 

4 pails, 50 

3 hand saws 1 50 

lgrab 1 00 

150 gal. tank.. .; 10 00 

1 gypsy moth burning outfit 8 00 

1 bbl. creosote 5 00 

25 lbs. twine 3 00 

1 pair clyde cutters 1 50 



126 



10 pitch forks $ 2 00 

4 scrapers 2 00 

$ 946 00 



EMILE E. PAIGNON, 
WALTER PE^RHAM, 

Appraisers. 



Property of Town of Chelmsford in Charge of 
Forest Warden 

30 chemical extinguishers $ 210 00 

30 boxes of charges for above 12 00 

30 shovels 22 00 

30 Johnson's pumps 75 00 

30 cans 22 50 

10 badges ... 5 00 

Miscellaneous 5 00 

$ 352 00 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM, 

Forest Warden. 



List of Jurors, 1912 



George Billson , Stone Cutter 

Ervin A. Blaisdell Farmer 

Fliny C. Bliss Farmer 

Frank P. Brown Farmer 

Albert H. Davis Farmer 

Francis Day " Retired 

George W. Day Grain Dealer 

R. Wilson Dix Contractor 

Thomas J. Dunn Farmer 

William Z. Dupee. Farmer 

George S. Elliott Carpenter 

Arthur I . Emerson Farmer 

John Finnegan Iron Worker 

•Patrick Flynn, Jr Farmer 

John E. Harrington Agent 

Charles A. Hoyt Retired 

Isaac H. Knight Plumber 

Edgar B. Lapham . Farmer 

John McTague Barber 

Nelson J. Loucraft Farmer 

George P. Mansfield Farmer 

Walter N. Marinel Mechanic 

John J . Monahan Contractor 

Owen F. McNally Iron Moulder 

George McNulty Farmer 

Michael McNulty • • • Farmer 

James B. McQuade Mechanic 

Samuel N. Naylor Salesman 



128 

George F. O'Neil Overseer 

Edwin C. Perham Butcher 

Walter Perham Undertaker 

Emile C. Paignon, Jr Butcher 

James B. Phillips Farmer 

George W. Pickard Teamster 

H. Sumner Queen Mechanic 

William H. Quigley Engineer 

Dyniel O. Reardon . Coal Dealer 

Arthur E. Reed Wheelwright 

E. Hamlin Russel Sawyer 

Fred A. Russell Farmer 

John P. Scoboria t Carpenter 

Charles F. Scribner Postmaster 

William H. Shedd Farmer 

John Sheehan Farmer 

William J. Sheehan Farmer 

George C. Stetson Machinist 

Joseph E. Warren Farmer 

Charles J. Willsteed Operative 

Arthur O. Wheeler Clerk 

Fred I. Vinal Carpenter 



Report of Board of Health 



Board of Health, Chelmsford, Mass., 
Gentlemen : 

I beg to submit my report, as agent for precinct one and 
two, for the year 1913. Cases occurred as follows : 

Measles 5 

Diphtheria 3 

Scarlet fever 4 

Purulent Conjunctivitis 1 

Tuberculosis 4 

A few cases of chicken pox. 

Quarantine was established and well maintained in the 
cases of scarlet fever, so that no cases arose from the original 
ones. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA, M. D. 
March, 1913. 



130 

Board of Health, Chelmsford, Mass., 

Gentlemen: 

As agent of the Board of Health for precincts two and 
three I respectfully submit the following- report for the year 
ending March 1st, 1913: 

Diphtheria 7 

Scarlet fever 101 

Measles 48 

Typhoid fever 17 

Ophalmia Neonatarium 1 

F. E. VARNEY, M. D. 



Report of the Chairman of Board of Health 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year 
ending Feb. 28, 1913: 

The slaughter houses in the various parts of the town 
have been duly inspected. As heretofore the inspection of 
animals is under the indirect supervision of the State Board 
Health. 

WALTER B. EMERSON. 



Report of Cemetery Commissioners 

1912- 1913 



To the voters of Chelmsford : 

The Cemetery Commissioners present to you their annual 
report. 

Very little new work has been done in the cemeteries 
during the past year owing to the small amount of money 
appropriated at the last annual meeting. 

J. Roland Parkhurst has had charge of the work in Fore- 
fathers and Pine Ridge Cemeteries, and as in years past has 
proved a faithful and enthusiastic worker. 

The time is soon coming when the hedge on the Littleton 
street side of Forefathers Cemetery will need to be replaced 
as it is gradually dying out. Most of the walks and drives in 
the new section need graveling. 

It is the wish of the Commissioners that more interest be 
taken by the lot owners in Pine Ridge Cemetery. The drives 
and walks have been well cared for by the town but many 
adjacant lots have received but little or no attention. 

James S. Wotton has had charge of the work in Riverside 
Cemetery. The main drive in the new section remains in an 
unfinished condition, but will be complete in the early spring. 

The small lot of land on the easterly end of the old section 
has been stumped and an entrance will soon be made at this 
end and several new lots laid out. 

A. F. Whidden has served in the capacity of superinten- 
dent of West Cemetery since the creation of the Board of 



132 

Commissioners, and his work has always been done in a 
satisfactory manner. A few remaining- lots have been put 
into saleable condition and now work on the new part must 
commence. Lot owners are much inconvenienced in this 
cemetery because of lack of water, the supply is very uncer- 
tain. 

Charles O. Robbins was appointed superintendent of Hart 
Pond Cemetery in 1909 and since that time has made great 
changes in the appearance of this cemetery, and it was with 
regret that the Commissioners were recently obliged to accept 
his resignation. 

Many lot owners in this cemetery have done much in the 
care of their individual lots, these improvements, with well 
kept avenues and paths have made this cemetery one of the 
most attractive in the town. 

Alfred S. Simpson has been chosen superintendent to 
succeed Mr. Robbins. We now have 66 trust funds, 9 have 
been added the past year. 

CHARLES F. SCRIBNER, 
CHARLES A. HOLT, 
WILLIAM H. HALL. 



134 







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Annual Report 



of the 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



and the 



Superintendent of Schools 



of the 



TOWN OF CHELM5FORD 



for the 



School Year Ending February 28th, 1913 



SCHOOL COnniTTEE— 1912=1913 

JOHN E. HARRINGTON - - Term expires 1913 

JOHN J. MONAHAN - - - Term expires 1914 

WILLIAM H. HALL - - - Term expires 1915 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



BENJAMIN E. MARTIN 



Report of the School Committee 

1912 1913 



To the Citizens of Chelmsford : 

The report of your School Committee, together with that 
of Superintendent of Schools for the fiscal year 1912-1913, is 
submitted herewith. 

Under the able direction of Superintendent Benj. E. Mar- 
tin, teachers and pupils have completed a year of hard work, 
of the results of which you are the judges. 

Your children, citizens in the making, deserve, and should 
receive the best that we can give them. Upon their shoulders 
must evenually fall the burdens which you now bear, and 
from among them must come the men and women who will 
perpetuate the institutions of this land. Prudence, therefore, 
if no other reason, demands that these children be taught 
first of all in the home, respect for the laws, for constituted 
authority and for the rights of others ; and in the public 
schools such fundamental subjects as will enable them to read 
understandingly, observe correctly, express themselves intelli- 
gently, calculate accurately, and reason logically. 

We believe that reading, writing and arithmetic are the 
fundamental subjects upon which we must erect our educa- 
tional structure, if we are to help you make of your children 
useful and efficient citizens. We believe that other, and to 
our minds lesser important subjects may be taught, but they 
should never be allowed to interfere with thorough instruction 
in these essentials. 

We have endeavored with the aid of the Superintendent, 



140 

to develop your schools along these lines. We believe that 
they are as good in many respects as most public schools, and 
better than many. There is plenty of room for improvement, 
however, as you will see by a further reading of this report, 
and of that of the Superintendent of Schools. 

TEACHERS 

We have an excellent corps of teachers, well educated, 
well trained, hard working, conscientious and enthusiastic, 
anxious to do all in their power to put your schools on a high 
plane and keep them there, and it is to be regretted that you 
do not visit your schools more frequently, so that you might 
become acquainted with the principals and teachers who have 
charge of your children. 



COURSE OF STUDY 

After mature consideration and upon the advice of the 
Superintendent, we have decided upon the following changes, 
which we think will materially increase the efficiency of your 
schools. 

1st. We recommend the establishing of an Industrial course, 
and have had an article inserted in the Town Warrant, to pro- 
vide the necessary money. 

2d. We recommend adding two weeks to the school year 
of grades one to eight inclusive, thus making the school year, 
for all pupils in your schools, forty weeks, and have included 
in our estimate for "Teaching," a sum of money necessary to 
carry this into effect. 

3d. We have decided to abolish the present ninth grade 
and to transfer pupils to the High School upon completion of 
the eighth grade. 



141 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

As expressed in a former report, it is our intention to 
spend each year an amount of money sufficient to keep your 
buildings in good condition, and the grounds presentable. 

Last year we painted several of the buildings, made minor 
repairs on others, and installed drinking fountains at the Cen- 
tre school. During the coming year it will be necessary to 
make extensive repairs at the Centre School and the usual re- 
pair and renovation of the other buildings. 

We recommend an appropriation to continue the grading 
at Princeton-st. buildings, and have had inserted in the Town 
Warrant an article to that effect. 

It will not be possible to postpone for a great while longer 
the erection of a new building at the Centre. The crowded 
condition there has been called to your attention several times, 
and in order that something definite may be accomplished, we 
will introduce a motion at the annual meeting, asking for the 
appointment of a committee to act with the school committee, 
to consider a new building and a site therefor and report, with 
recommendations thereon, not later than the annual town 
meeting of 1914. 

In conclusion : — We urge you fathers and mothers to keep 
your children in school as long as you can, and, if possible, let 
them go through High School. We realize that to do this 
may mean three or four years more of hard work and self- 
denial ; but the boy will be a better man and the girl a better 
woman mentally and physically for having had at the most 
critical periods of their lives, an opportunity for study and 
development in congenial surroundings. From a purely sel- 
fish point of view it is a paying proposition, and your boy will 
have a much greater earuing capacity after going through 
High School than he would have had if he left school at four- 
teen. We request that you read carefully this report as well 
as that of the Superintendent of Schools, and we invite criti- 
cisms, or suggestions, or both. 



142 
APPROPRIATIONS 

We recommend the following sums of money for the fiscal 
year of 1913-1914. 

Text Books and supplies $ 1,700 00 

Furniture and repairs 1,500 00 

Apparatus 50 00 

Transportation 1, 750 00 

Incidentals 400 00 

Superintendent 1,600 00 

Fuel 2,100 00 

Care 2,500 00 

Teaching 19,500 00 

Medical inspection 300 00 

Total $31,400 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN E. HARRINGTON, 
JOHN J, MONAHAN, 
WILLIAM H. HALL, 

School Committee. 



143 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 



TEACHING 



Superintendent 

Benjamin E. Martin $ 1,556 33 

Centre 

Ruth G. Butters, 32 weeks 464 00 

May Farnham, 37 1-5 weeks 476 10 

Ida M. Gardner, 15 weeks 217 50 

Eva M. Godfrey, 38 weeks 524 50 

Charles A. Holbrook, 40 weeks 1,090 00 

Helena B. Lyon, 35 4-5 weeks 476 90 

Susie S. McFarlin, 37 4-5 weeks 578 40 

Eliza Spaulding, 38 weeks 478 70 

Florence M. Stites, 38 weeks 486 50 

Helen J. Coffin, 24 weeks 348 00 

$5,140 60 

North 

Mary W. Cross, 40 weeks $ 612 00 

Laura B. Desmarais, 38 weeks 505 50 

Camille Fitzgerald, 35 weeks 491 00 

Margaret C. Gookin, 37 9-10 weeks 534 55 

Frank E. Holt, 16 weeks 440 00 

Ella A. Hutchinson, 37 9-10 weeks 580 00 

Genevieve E. Jantzen, 37 weeks 455 50 

Gertrude A. Tones, 36 weeks 532 50 



144 

Catherine E. McDermott, 37 3-5 weeks. . $ 556 50 

Katherine M. Quinn, 37 9-10 weeks 504 20 

Martha G. Roark, 38 weeks 448 50 

May D. Sleeper, 38 weeks 533 50 

Mary A. Underwood, 37 2-5 weeks 448 80 

Arthur W. Truby, 24 weeks : 660 00 

Grace M. McCue, 35 4-5 414 60 

$7,717 15 

West 

Catherine E. Dunn, 37 2-5 weeks $ 404 20 

Kathryne E. Howarth, 38 weeks 505 50 

Bertha H. Long, 38 weeks 562 50 

1,472 20 

East 

Rose C. Geary, 15 weeks $ 165 00 

Hannah H. Sleeper, 38 weeks 477 50 

Margaret Shinkwin, 22 weeks 264 00 

906 50 

South 

Ruth D. Crawford, 38 weeks $ 426 00 

Mabel E. Haggerty, 37 4-5 weeks 424 00 

850 00 

Golden Cove 

Ivy E. Kew, 13 4-5 weeks $ 144 90 

Regina B. Frappier, 22 4-5 weeks 273 60 

418 50 

South Row 

Regina B. Frappier, 15 weeks $ 165 00 

Esther A. Reid, 23 weeks 230 00 

395 00 



145 

North Row 

Ruth E. Adams, 37 7-10 weeks $ 399 80 



Drawing 

Bertha G. Bartlett, 16 weeks $ 208 00 

Miriam C. Fearing, 24 weeks 288 00 

Music 

Mar}' B. Raynes, 6 weeks $ 78 00 

M. Marion Adams, 23 weeks 276 00 

Mildred L. Brennon 25 00 

Substitute Teachers 

Bessie A. Gatie, 5 weeks $75 00 

Helen C. Osgood, 1 2-5 weeks 14 00 

Mae Hogan, 1 week 10 00 

Mae Hogan, 1-5 week 1 75 

Ethel Park, 1 4-5 weeks ., 15 75 

Ethel Chalifoux, 1-5 week 1 72 

Hannah McNabb, 1-5 week 1 75 

Mary Garvey, 1-5 week 125 

Mary Dunn, 1-5 week 1 25 

Grace A. Stinson, 3-5 week 6 30 

Ethel Wright 5 00 

Elizabeth M. Flynn, 3 weeks 30 00 

Florence G. Finegan, 1-5 week 2 00 

Blanche Waller, 1 3-5 weeks 20 00 

Margaret Hansberry, 2 2-5 weeks 24 00 

Alice Akers, 3-5 week 7 50 

Gertrude Rideout, 7 weeks 98 00 

Jule Coddington, 1 week 14 00 

Gertrude Quigley, 1-10 week. ., 1 00 

Ruth M. Furbush, 2-5 week 3 50 



$ 399 80 



496*00 



379 00 



333 80 

$18,508 55 



146 

HEDICAL INSPECTION 

Dr. A. G. Scoboria. $125 00 

Dr. F. E. Varney 125 00 

APPARATUS 

L. E. Knott & Co $46 78 



TRANSPORTATION 

E. Paignon, Jr $336 00 

J. C. Sheehan 327 25 

John Sullivan 289 50 

S H. Nickles 366 00 

Mrs. F. W. Merrill 176 00 

Mary B. Raynes *. 4 00 

Bertha G. Bartlett 16 00 

Bay State Street Ry 160 00 

Lowell & Fitchburg St. Ry 70 00 



FUEL 

Harry L. Parkhurst $932 02 

E. A. Wilson 12 00 

F. W. Park 6 00 

Courier-Citizen 14 50 

J. P. Quinn 321 68 

John J . Dunn 25 00 

Lowell Sun 14 40 

James P. Dunigan 812 61 



CARE 

James S. Byam $500 00 

Edward Fallon 341 00 



$250 00 



$46 75 



$1,744 75 



$2,138 21 



147 



Charles House $ 37 50 

Walter Lee 200 00 

A. G. Twiss 330 00 

Oliver Scollan 550 00 

Alfred Simpson 200 00 

Ira Spaulding 38 00 

Ruf us Wood 55 00 

E. A. Howe 59 00 



$2,310 50 



INCIDENTALS 



Boston & Maine R. R 

American Express 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

Lowell Electric Light Co 

North Chelmsford Fire District. 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R..... . 

Frank Holt 

Phillip Donohoe 

James Byam 

John T. McManomin 

Edward Fallon 

Bartlett & Dow 

Harry C. Kittredge 

Lawler Printing Co 

Edwards & Monahan 

C. B. Coburn 

Gilbride Co 

Clark's Orchestra 

Ethel Wright (graduation) .... 

Wm. C. Ward 

Mary B. Raynes 

Knowlton Press 

Catherine Quinn 

Mrs. Henry Pearson 

Geo. E. Hutchins 



1 11 

2 65 
9 35 

11 37 

68 27 
5 06 

1 38 
50 

2 90 
4 65 

15 50 

8 25 

25 

8 25 

3 00 
37 



50 
25 
83 
00 
00 



42 90 

54 



00 
50 



148 



R. C. Wood 

Ira Spaulding 

J. P. Carlson 

Walter Lee 

A. G. Quist 

G.C. Prince 

W. H. Hall 

E. R. Marshall 

W. L. Stearns 

Owen Scollan 

Thompson Hardware 
Charles Stewart 

B. E. Martin 

G. F. Cutler 

D. F. Small 

W. E. Westall 

Ervin Smith 

Beaver Co. . . 

S. W. Parkhurst .... 

A. W. Greely 

L. A. Derby 

Chas. Scribner. ..... 

Wm. P. Proctor 

Nelson & Co 

Wm. C. Hinckley.. . 
Mcintosh Mach. Co . 
Ethel Wotton 



FURNITURE AND REPAIRS 

William Proctor & Co $ 8 13 

D. F. Small 4 61 

James Kiberd 3150 

Masury Young 92 70 

James McMaster, 50 00 



$ 3 


90 


9 


29 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


10 


6 


10 


2 


55 


3 


00 


2 


50 


3 


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5 


74 


3 


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44 


71 


4 00 


1 


78 


36 


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1 


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3 


30 


4 


30 


5 


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72 


1 


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18 


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5 


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1 


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70 


4 


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$ 398 99 



149 

James Burns $ 32 93 

Robert Getchel 4 95 

D. Stark , 3 00 

W. W. Stuart 75 

F. G. Pratt 359 95 

H. H. Wilder 3 75 

N. D. Lafleur 1 00 

Amasa Pratt 2 63 

Chas. E. Parkhurst 218 36 

E. L. Stearns 2 50 

B. C. Beamis 12 75 

Bartlett & Dow 1 25 

C. B. Coburn.. 9 49 

Wm. McLarney 233 52 

I. K. Knight 2 25 

Gookin Bros 18 00 

Adams & Co 27 90 

Thomas Murphy 255 16 

E. T. Adams 26 62 

M. J. Ward 2 25 

A. W. Holt 2 30 

J. B. Emerson 10 66 

E. R. Marshall 51 

J.J. Quigley 3 00 

Walter Lee 50 

E. A. Howe , 2 82 

Welch Bros 23 40 

C. G. Nickles 2 50 

25 75 



$1,477 39 



TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Ginn&Co $154 91 

Silver Burdett 173 36 

Oliver Ditson & Co 10 35 

Edward E. Babb & Co 561 56 



150 



American Book Co 61 56 

G. C. Prince Co 8 74 

Grogs Pub. Co 2 02 

Hammett & Co 185 25 

The Cable Co 7 00 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co 1 40 

Bartlett & Dow 14 55 

Parkhurst Press 8 20 

Knowlton Press •. 2 75 

B. E. Martin 10 40 

Boston & Maine R. R 2 47 

Allyn & Bacon 15 20 

D. C. Heath & Co 50 09 

Milton Bradley 112 94 

E F. Hatch 5 00 

Horace Turner 3 05 

Houghton Mifflin 22 56 

Bigelow & Dowse 20 00 

Kenney Bros 45 30 

Rand McNally 137 60 

J. D. Brown 100 00 

Play ground and Rec' Assoc 1 25 



$1,717 52 



GRADING AT HIGHLAND AVE. SCHOOL 

Minor & O'Neil $ 274 00 

Smith & Brooks 17 00 

Fred E. Fallon 4 50 



295 50 



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SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



154 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1913-1914 



Mrrch 14, 1913- 



March 24, 1913— 



March 31. 

April 18, 

April 19, 

May 23, 

May 30, 

June 13, 

June 19, 

June 20, 

June 20, 



1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 
1913- 



All schools close, first eight grades for two 

weeks, Ninth grades and High Schools 

for one week. 
Ninth grades and High Schools open for 

spring term. 
First eight grades open for spring term. 
Patriotic exercises, one hour. 
Patriots' Day, holiday, Saturday. 
■Emerson exercises, half hour. 
■Memorial Day, holiday. 
Flag Day exercises, half hour. 
Centre High School graduation. 
North High School graduation. 
All schools close for summer vacation, ten 

weeks. 



Sept. 


8, 


1913 


Oct. 


9, 


1913 


Oct. 


10, 


1913 


Oct. 


31, 


1912- 


Nov. 


26, 


1913 


Nov. 


27, 


1913 


Dec. 


1, 


1913 


Dec. 


12, 


1913 


Dec. 


19, 


1913 


Dec. 


29, 


1913- 


Jan. 


5, 


1914 


Feb. 


12, 


1914- 



-All schools open for fall term. 

-Historical exercises, one hour. 

-Columbus Day, holiday. 

-Bryant exercises, half hour. 

-Thanksgiving exercises, one hour. 

-Thanksgiving recess. 

-Schools open. 

-Whittier exercises, half hour, 

-All schools close, grades for two weeks, 

High Schools for one week. 
-High Schools open for winter term. 
-Grades open for winter term. 
-Lincoln exercises, one hour. 



155 

Feb. 20, 1914 — Washington exercises, one hour. 

Feb. 22, 1914— Sunday, Washington's birthday. 

Feb. 23, 1914— Monday, holiday. 

Feb. 24, 1914 — Lowell exercises, half hour. 

Feb. 27, 1914 — Longfellow exercises, half hour. 

March 27, 1914 — Grades close for two weeks' vacation. 

April 3, 1914 — High Schools close for one week's vacation. 

April 13, 1914 — All schools open for spring term. 

April 17, 1914 — Patriotic exercises, one hour. 

April 19, 1914— Patriots' Day, Sunday. 

April 20, 1914— Monday, holiday. 

May 22, 1914 — Emerson evercises, half hour. 

May 29, 1914— Patriotic exercises, half hour. 

May 30, 1914 — Memorial Day, Saturday. 

June 12, 1914 — Flag Day exercises, half hour. 

June 25, 1914 —Centre High School graduation. 

June 26, 19 L4 — North High School graduation. 

June 26, 1914 — All schools close for summer vacation, ten 
weeks. 



Terms for all purposes will be determined by vacations. 

Term lengths for the school year 1913-1914. 

Fall term : 

All schools, 15 weeks. 

Winter term : 

Grades, 12 weeks. 
High Schools, 14 weeks. 

Spring term : 

All schools, 11 weeks. 



156 



STATISTICS 



Population of Chelmsford, 1910 5,010 

Valuation, 1912 $4,220,425 00 

1911—1912 

Number of boys between the ages of five and 

fifteen 524 

Number of girls between the ages of five and 

fifteen 470 

Total 994 

Number of boys between the ages of seven and 

fourteen ... 366 

Number of girls between the ages of seven and 

fourteen ■ 328 

Total 694 

Illiterate minors over fourteen years of age .... 8 

Number of different pupils enrolled 1,002 

Average attendance 813 + 

Teachers employed *35 

Average attendance for 1879-'80 353 

Average attendance for 1889-'90 341 

Average attendance for 1899-'00 556 

Average attendance for 1909-'10 786 

*Two special teachers. 



158 



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163 



To the School Committee of Chelmsford, 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit to you my report for the year 
ending Feb. 28th, 1913. This is the 39th report in the series. 
In this, my third report, I consider it not amiss to bring- to 
your attention some of the things that have been done during 
my administration, and to discuss briefly the present status of 
the school situation. 

On beginning my duties here I found, as in the case in 
many school systems, that some of the subjects had not pro- 
gressed to the point of advancement in the school curriculum 
that I consider desirable. Notably among the subjects were 
arithmetic, geography and language. I do not consider this 
the fault of any person, or persons, but due to the different 
policies of changing administrations. Too frequent changes 
are usually not conducive to the greatest advancement of 
educational projects. They are, however, better than a fixed 
•and unchangeable policy. I found little of the new spirit of 
education in the school system. These two defects, for I 
consider them such, I have endeavored to correct. 

By the introduction of a consistent number system in the 
lower grades and the elimination of useless processes in ad- 
vanced work, I believe that arithmetic has been brought much 
more nearly to a proper standard. There is still some weak- 
ness in the work of the upper grades but I consider that the 
work is being done better in eight grades than in nine pre- 
viously. 

The weakness in language and in geography I have at- 
tempted to correct by removing some of the formalities, 



164 

previously existent, in these subjects, and by attempting to 
make them more vital. I believe that the work in these 
subjects is being done quite satisfactorily at present in eight 
grades. 

In other subjects there is certainly no need of ninth grade 
work. In fact I consider the schools are on a satisfactory 
eight grade basis, with the exception, possibly, of the slight 
weakness it arithmetic referred to above. 

I believe that the time has arrived for the discontinuance 
of the ninth grade as a part of the elementary school system, 
and it certainly has no place between the elementary schools 
and the high school. I advice that the ninth grade be discon- 
tinued. 

I have made a beginning in the removal of the second 
defect alluded to above, namely, the lack of a new spirit of 
education in the school system, by the introduction of industrial 
training in the North High School and by some slight be- 
ginnings in the grades. There is still much need of work in 
the upper grades that will bring the work into closer contact 
with the life of the community and of the home. I do not 
believe it would be wise to offer but very little work of any 
kind different from the work we are now offering in the first 
six grades. The work in these grades is distinctly funda- 
mental and necessary as it now stands and, with the excep- 
tion of making it a little more vital, should not be changed at 
present. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL SITUATION 

Last year in my report I discussed, at some length, the 
problem of our high schools. In that report I outlined what 
I considered to be the best solution of the problem, namely, 
the change of the North High School into a school of an 
industrial nature, the transportation of pupils desiring an 
industrial course to that school, and of those desiring academic 
training to the Centre. Having watched the development of 
the industrial work under Mr. Trubey's direction, since last 



165 

September, I am more firmly convinced than ever that the 
solution was the best one. Moreover, I believe that it can be 
done with our present high school facilities. It seems likely 
that numbers would be equalized fairly by the exchange of 
the academic and industrial pupils. Those who wish a 
business or commercial training, unless the number should be 
too large, also could go to the North School. It might be 
advisable to maintain of commercial department in both 
schools, in such case the department in each school should be 
strengthened so as to make it worthy of the name. A special 
teacher would be desirable and one could take charge of the 
work, easily, in the two schools. 

In passing I wish to express my opinion as to what an 
industrial school, such as I propose at North, should be and 
what it should not be. Its work should be correlated with the 
life of the community. There should be harmony between 
the school and its environment. As fast as it becomes pos- 
sible, with our limited teaching force and equipment the 
fundamental elements necessary to successful entry into 
domestic life, commercial life, and industrial life generally, 
should be furnished. Along with this preparation for the 
work-a-day life a reasonable amount of cultural education 
should be given. We should fit the pupils to become good 
citizens as well as good artisans. A thorough grounding in 
English, in the elements of science, in history and civics, with 
the necessary mathematics and drawing for the ordinary work 
of an industrial course, constitute the fundamentals of a 
liberal education. There is room for these in the course and 
they can be so closely correlated with the industrial side of 
the work that they become a part of it while serving also as 
cultural studies. We want a school of distinctly high school 
grade, not a trade school, nor what amounts to the same 
thing, an industrial school minus the academic training. 
Many of our industrial schools occupy this latter position 
today. The Fitchburg High School, of this State, has found 
the most satisfactory solution of the problem in its co-opera- 
tive industrial or part time course, whereby the pupils spend 



166 

one week in school and the next week in the shops. There 
are few, if any, pupils who have not the ability to perform the 
work necessary for the successful completion of such a course. 
If there should be any such they should be provided for in a 
special course. The part time course gives the opportunity to 
the pupil, often needed, of earning funds to contribute 
towards his support. Whether such an apprenticeship system 
could be carried out here, in co-operation with our local 
industries and those of Lowell, I am unable to state. 

The commercial course ought to furnish competent in- 
struction in shorthand, typewriting, and penmanship, at least, 
in addition to what we are now offering. Our present business 
course amounts to very little. 

The agricultural part of our town deserves some attention. 
Not a few of our boys finally find their way back to the farm 
and put in their life work there. To these pupils we are offer- 
ing nothing definite by way of assistance in their life work. 
We give them the fundamentals of their education in the 
grades and offer to them some cultural training in the high 
school. Many of them seeing no practical use in education 
drop out of school earlier than is best for them. The parents 
are able in many cases to give some practical training, but the 
ever busy farmer finds too little time to dig down deep into the 
difficulties of the problem, and having but little scientific 
training he solves the problem but superficially. The result 
is that the struggle goes on under a handicap. Under a recent 
law an agricultural department may be established in connec- 
tion with a town high school, through the co-operation of the 
State Board of Education officials. A competent instructor 
must be engaged, two-thirds of whose salary shall come from 
the state and one-third from the town. This is the principal 
item of expense. Under this arrangement the pupils work out 
the problem practically, on the farm, under the direction and 
supervision of the instructor during the spring, summer and 
fall, the instructor taking his vacation during the winter. This 
gives opportunity for the pupil to work remuneratively on the 
farm and also gives time for academic work, during the win- 



167 

ter, in addition to that which he takes during other parts of the 
year. I believe, from investigations that I have made, that 
there is a demand for such a department in connection with 
the Centre High School. While it may not be possible to estab- 
lish this department this spring I recommend that immediate 
steps be taken preliminary to the introduction of such study. 

There ought to be a home arts department, at both the 
Centre School and at the North School. Such a department 
should include a course in cookery and in the care of the home. 
Girls of the upper grades and high school, only, should be ad- 
mitted to to this course, except that it might be advisable to 
admit any girl over twelve years of age. The cost of such a 
department at . the Centre would be very slight. I believe 
that the kitchen and its furnishings at the Town Hall could be 
secured and other necessary equipment could be purchased at 
small cost. The cost of the instructor would be nominal as a 
senior from the Framingham Normal School can be secured 
for expenses only. 

At the North School somewhat similar conditions exist. 
The cost of the instructor however might be greater. 

An industrial school should include such a department in 
order that the girls may receive such instruction in practical 
subjects. It does not seem to me to be wise nor just to 
confine this to one school as practically all the girls of the 
grades mentioned should receive this instruction. 

Our high school instructors, in each schools, are teaching 
too many classes and covering too many different subjects to 
achieve the best results and their work is decidedly burden- 
some. It is not wise economy to continue this state of affairs. 

The ninth. grade is not necessary for preparation for the 
high school. It is not serving any useful purpose. Moreover I 
am convinced that it is detrimental to the best interests of all 
concerned. Pupils realize that it has no necessary place in 
the course of study and they lose interest during this period 
of marking time. With the ninth grade abolished our present 
high school force would be relieved of so much teaching and 
could easily and successfully conduct the work of the high 



168 

school alone. If by chance any pupils should need additional 
drill in grammar school subjects it would be much, wiser and 
more economical, as well as conserving the interest of the 
pupils to a far greater degree, to have them receive special 
coaching, in such subjects, by the high school teachers. 

It would also be wise to make some changes in the high 
school course of study to meet this change as well as to 
modernize and adapt the course of study to present day needs. 

I wish to urge upon your attention, once more, the need 
of more room at the Centre School. The high school and ninth 
grade have no adequate quarters. It is necessary to use, for a 
recitation room and for laboratory purposes, a room that is 
hardly suitable for either purpose. It is decidedly unfit for a 
chemical laboratory, since it has no ventilation, except through 
the window and door, and no provision for the escape of gases, 
as well as no water supply. The two rooms next below ninth 
grade have several more pupils than they should accom- 
modate. It is my sincere conviction that steps should be 
taken at once leading toward the erection of a building of four 
rooms or more in the vicinity of the Centre. Such a building 
would furnish suitable quarters for the high school, as at 
present conducted, and would offer opportunity for the in- 
troduction of new departments. It would also relieve conges- 
tion which is bound to occur in the grades, in the near future. 
The Centre and the Westlands district are growing quite 
rapidly and our school population is certain to increase. 



169 



SIGHT AND HEARING TESTS 



Number 
School Enrolled 

Centre 271 

North 294 

Highland 134 

West 87 

East 57 

South 43 

Golden Cove 31 

North Row 17 

South Row . . , 11 

945 







Parents or 


Defective 


Defective 


Guardians 


in Eyesight 


in Hearing 


Notified 


32 


16 


35 


58 


8 


15 


4 





4 


14 


3 


11 


4 . 





4 


5 


1 


5 


2 





2 











8 





2 



127 



28 



78 



The results of the sight and hearing tests show that a still 
greater number of our pupils than last year, are defective in 
either sight or hearing. Many of the children have had this 
trouble attended to. There are still quite a number, however, 
who should have reeeived attention who have had nothing 
done for them. It is the duty of the town to attend to such 
matters if the parents are unable to do so. Had we a school 
nurse, as I have reeommended before, many of these troubles 
would be relieved, much to the benefit of the child. Many 
other troubles would also be avoided and the general health 
and well being of the pupils would be conserved. 



170 



SCHOOL SAVINGS 

The Central Savings Bank, of Lowell, has furnished the 
following data, relative to the school savings of the pupils. 
It will be observed from these figures that the total net depos- 
its for the twelve months ending Dec. 31, 1912, amounted to 
$1,266.90. This added to the balance of Dec. 31, 1911, gives 
a total to the credit of Chelmsford pupils Jan. 1, 1913, of 
$2,518.14. All of which has been collected at the schools by 
the bank officials. 



North School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

30 Collections (93 pupils deposit- 
ing) $330 60 

44 Bank Books issued $312 12 

6 payments on books 4 33 

$307 79 

49 Balances (less than $1.00) $18 48 

7 payments on balances ... $1 23 

6 transfers 2 32 3 55 14 93 

19 total payments 7 88 

330 60 

Average collection $11 02 

" per pupil 3 56 

Largest individual deposit 42 00 

Smallest " " 01 



171 

Centre School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

30 Collections (83 pupils deposit- 
ing) $319 02 

43 Bank Books ifsued $307 33 

4 payments on books 74 

$306 59 

40 Balances (less than $1.09) $11 69 

1 payment on balance 78 

10 91 

5 total payments 1 52 



319 02 



Average collection $10 63 

" per pupil 3 84 

Largest individual deposit 22 85 

Smallest " " 01 



Highland School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

31 Collections (42 pupils deposit- 
ing) $145 43 

25 Bank Books issued $139 72 

3 payments on books $1 80 

4 transfers 4 04 5 84 $133^88 

17 Balances (less than $1.00) $571 

1 payment on balance 45 

5 26 

8 total payments 6 29 



145 43 



Average collection $ 4 69 

" per pupil 3 46 

Largest individual deposit 10 90 

Smallest " " 05 



172 
West School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

31 Collections (46 pupils deposit- 
ing) • 

30 Books issued, Amount cred 
ited to books 

4 payments on books $7 30 

1 transfer 



16 Balances less than $1.00. 
1 " paid 



Total payments 



$7 30 
98 


$228 61 
$223 52 

8 28 


5 09 
45 


$215 24 
4 64 




8 73 228 61 



Average collection 7 37 

' ' per pupil, 4 97 

Largest 'individual deposit 15 35 

Smallest l ' " 05 

East School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

28 Collections, (23 pupils depositing) . $95 43 

12 Books issued ••••,.. 

Amount credited to books $90 25 

1 Payment on book $1 29 

1 Transfer 6 00 7 29 



$82 96 



11 Balance (less than $1.00) 5 18 

1 ' k paid 91 4 27 

Total payments 8 20 95 43 



Average collection : 3 41 

" per pupil 4 15 

Largest individual deposit 11 43 

Smallest " " 29 



173 
South School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

21 Collections, (10 pupils depositing) . $80 77 

9 Bank books issued 

Amount to credit on books $79 91 

No payments on books 

1 Balance less than $1.00 86 

1 Payment on balance 86 

Total payments 86 80 77 



Average collection 3 85 

" per pupil 8 08 

Largest individual deposit 12 00 

Smallest " " 18 



Golden Cove School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

24 Collections (23 pupils depositing) . $28 97 

13 Books issued 

Amount credited to books $26 97 

1 Payment on book 2 40 

$24 57 

10 Balances less than $1.00 $ 2 00 2 00 

No payments on balances .... ..... 

Total payments 2 40 28 97 

Average collection 121 

' ' per pupil 1 26 

Largest individual deposit 3 20 

Smallest '• " 02 



174 
South Row School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

23 Collections (11 scholars depositing) . 

6 Bank books issued 

No payments on books 

5 Balances less than $1.00 

1 Payment on balances 

1 Total payments 



Average collection 

" per pupil 

Largest individual deposit. . . . 
Smallest " " 





$26 30 


$25 08 


25 08 


1 22 




75 






47 




■ 75 




$26 30 


1 14 




2 26 




4 97 




01 





North Row School 

Jan. 1, 1912 to Jan. 1, 1913 

16 Collections (6 pupils depositing). . . $11 77 

4 Bank books issued $11 52 

No payments on books 

2 Balances less than $1.00 25 

11 77 



No payments on balances 

Average collection 74 

' ' per pupil 1 96 

Largest individual deposit 3 13 

Smallest " " 03 



175 
TEXTBOOK CHANGES 

At the beginning of the present school year the old English 
text books in the grades were discarded and the Emerson and 
Benders series of English books were adopted. Samples of 
various English books had been placed in the teachers' hands 
and this series was the choice of a large number of teachers. 
It was also my choice and has proven to be a very satisfactory 
series. 

Our teachers have been taking, during this year, lessons 
in the Palmer system of penmanship at the Lowell Normal 
School, and have been applying the results of their instruction 
to the teaching of writing in their respective class rooms. 
While we have not yet purchased any of the Palmer books I 
believe the time has arrived for us to discard the old ones and 
adopt the Palmer books. School penmanship has usually been 
taught distinct from business penmanship and the results have 
not been complimentary to our work. I know of no reason 
why school children should not be taught business methods of 
penmanship. 



TEACHERS 



Since my last report the following changes in the teaching 
force have occurred. At the close of the school year in June, 
Mr. Holt resigned the principalship of the North High School 
to accept a much better position, of a similar nature, at Whit- 
insville, Mass. His place was taken by Mr. Arthur W. Trubey, 
a resident of the town Mr. Trubey has had much training 
and experience in indutrial school work and was engaged, par- 
ticularly, to strengthen this department. Results have justi- 
fied his selection. 

At the Centre School Mr. Holbrook, who was acting as 
substitute during the latter part of the last school year, was 
engaged as principal for the present year. Miss Gardner's 



176 

place, at the Centre School, was taken by Miss Helen J. Coffin 
of Boston, who had had one year of successful experience. 
Miss Ruth Butters has been out on leave of absence since the 
close of the fall term. Miss Gertrude H. Rideout of Concord, 
Mass., who had had one year of successful experience, is ably 
filling her position. 

Miss Ivy E. Kew, of the Golden Cove School, resigned at 
the close of the last school year and her place was filled by the 
transfer of Miss Regina B. Frappier from the South Row 
School. Miss Frappier's place was taken by Miss Esther Reid 
of West Chelmsford, a graduate of the Lowell Normal School 
last year. 

Our two supervisors, Miss Mary B. Raynes, supervisor of 
music, and Miss Bertha G. Bartlett, supervisor of drawing, re- 
signed at the close of the year. Their places were filled re- 
spectively by Miss M. Marion Adams of this town, and by 
Miss Miriam C. Fearing of South Weymouth, Mass. Miss 
Adams, since her graduation from Lowell Normal School, has 
been teaching in Dracut ; she has specialized in music, having 
taken courses in New York University Summer School. Miss 
Fearing graduated from the Massachusetts Normal Art School 
in 1911 and had taught drawing during the year since her 
graduation in the schools of Millis, Mass. 

There have been no other changes in the teaching force. 



177 
CONCLUSION 

™In concluding, I wish to call your attention to the special 
reports that follow. They are worthy of your careful con- 
sideration and show commendable interest in the work. 
^-;*Our teachers, as a whole, show sympathetic interest in 
the work and in the pupils and evince a willingness and desire 
to improve themselves professionally. They constitute a 
progressive teaching force. 

Again, I wish to express my satisfaction for the pleasant 
relations I have had with you as a committee and to thank you 
for the kindness and courtesy which you have shown me. 
One can do his best work only under such conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENT. E. MARTIN. 



178 



SPECIAL REPORTS 



Chelmsford Centre High School 

Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Superintendent of Schools. 
Dear Sir : 

I herewith respectfully submit a brief report of the 
Chelmsford Centre High School for the year ending March, 
1913. 

From the beginning of the year, your principal, with the 
hearty co-operation of assistants, has undertaken to put in 
force the entire course of study as outlined for our guidance. 
Our constant aim has been to do nothing but thorough, 
earnest work and to be satisfied with nothing less than the 
best efforts on the part of pupils. 

In some instances, it has appeared to your principal that 
the required work has borne too heavily upon pupils while 
the schedule of recitations has been too great for our corps of 
teachers. I would, therefore, respectfully suggest some 
modification of the courses of study as now constituted and, if 
feasible, the employment of a regular teacher for the ninth 
grade, thereby allowing the two assistants to devote their 
entire time to the work of the high school. 

On the whole, the spirit with which our pupils have 
attacked their work has left little ground for complaint and we 
feel confident that a goodly amount of solid results has been 
attained. Real gain in mental power rather than slavish 
adherence to text-book has been our aim. We have also 
constantly sought to give our pupils a wide range of general 
information upon every day topics pertaining to social and 
political life. Rhetoricals, music, drawing, sewing, elementary 



179 

science, and various other devices have served to kindle en- 
thusiasm and widen the mental horizon of our pupils. 

At the close of the fall term, Miss Ruth G. Butters felt 
compelled by ill health to ask for leave of absence for the 
winter term. Her place has been most acceptably filled by 
Miss Gertrude H. Rideout a graduate from Radcliff. 

From daily contact with the teachers of the grades, I am 
convinced, that for thorough conscientious work it would be 
difficult to find a better corps. 

Thanking committee, superintendent and teachers for 
kindly spirit of co-operation 

I remain, yours respectfully, 

C. A. HOLBROOK, 

Prin. Chelmsford Centre. 



Graduation Exercises, the Chelmsford High School, Town 
Hall, Thursday, June 20, at 8 P. H. 

" Whither the Fates Call " 

PROGRAnriE 

Selection. ....... 

Hibbard's Orchestra 
Prayer ....... 

Rev. L. L. Greene 
Song ....... 

School 
Salutatory Essay : Whither the Fates Call 

A. Lua Owen 
Class History . . 

Hazel R. Knowlton 
Piano Duet ...... 

Ethel L. Wright A. Lua Owen 

Class Phophecy ...... 

Arthur N. Carll 



180 



Essay : The Pyramids of Geseh 

Anna V. Harrington 

Song 

School 

Class Will 

James A. Harrington 
Valedictory Essay : The Claim of the Island Empire 

Ruth Emerson 
Singing of the Class Ode .... 

Words by A. Lua Owen 
Presentation of Diplomas .... 

Superintendent Benjamin E. Martin 
Benediction 

Rev. C. H. Ellis 
Selection ....... 

Orchestra 



Class Ode 

Where'er we may wander, whate'er we may see, 
Where'er Life may call us, where'er Fate may lead 
We'll cherish our school days, a mem'ry most dear, 
And always remember the friends we found here. 

Refrain — Farewell, fare thee well, 
We go on Life's journey 
So we say farewell. 

The years we have passed here, we'll prove were not vain, 
Tho' had we the power, we'd live them again, 
And when our paths meet at the end of the road, 
We'll gather once more in our Heav'nly Abode. 

Refrain 



Class Roll 

Arthur N. Carll, Ruth Emerson, Anna V. Harrington, 
James A. Harrington, Hazel R. Knowlton, A. Lua Owen, 
Ethel L. Wright. 



181 
North High School 

Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Superintendent of Schools, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Dear Sir : 

As my duties as principal of the North High School began 
in the fall, my report will be for the time from September to 
the close of the school year, Feb. 28, 1913. 

The problem confronting any High School is a problem 
of adjustment. A town is entitled to that kind of a High 
School which the community itself needs. The pupils who 
attend a High School should find a course of study closely re- 
lated to the life of the community, and revealing to them the 
possibilities for service in the world's work. 

Adjustment 

The abolishment of the Ninth Grade. 

The introduction of Natural Science into the first year of 
the High School. The teaching of Social Science. 

The introduction of a Commercial Course, which shall 
include Typewriting and Shorthand. 

The broadening out of the industrial work so as to give 
each boy and girl real experience drawn from many different 
fields of employment. 

What Has Been Accomplished 

We have not centred our efforts on one or two so called 
bright pupils. We have tried to arouse the interests, to 
awaken the mentality, to quicken the senses of all. 

As a result, the attendance has been higher than it has 
been for years. The school spirit has been all one could ask 
for, and the amount of work accomplished unusual. 



182 
Industrial Work 

The boys have made work benches for the shop, drawing 
tables and book cases for the school room, and have done con- 
siderable repairing about the school building. 

The girls have had opportunity to work out a series of 
projects, working in wood, cardboard, and brass. They have 
done some weaving on hand looms, and considerable work in 
applied design. 

Opportunities 

Dr. Snedden, State Commissioner of Education, says: 
"The High School today is the arena in which our greatest 
educational problems should be worked out." 

There is no better place to work out some of these prob- 
lem bs than right here in the North Village. We have a class 
of pupils well behaved, enthusiastic, eager to work in and out 
of school time, quick to respond to any suggestion, and exhib- 
iting a degree pf intelligence which speaks well for the future 
success of the school. 

Our village is growing. It is the logical and stragetic 
position for that kind of a High School which shall offer a well 
planned course of study adjusted to meet the actual needs of 
the majority of boys and girls who would go to school if the 
opportunity appealed to them. 

In Conclusion 

I appreciate the help and encouragement given by public- 
spirited citizens, the kindly interest of many friends, and the 
loyalty and co-operation of the teachers. 

I thank you and the School Committee for your confidence 
and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. TRDBEY, 

Principal. 



183 



Graduating Exercises North Chelmsford High School, Town 
Hall, Friday Evening, June 21, 1912 



March 
Invocation 



PROQRAnriE 

Orchestra 



Morisort 



Rev. William C. H. Moe 

Chorus: The Commencement Song . 

School 
Salutatory Essay : The History and Present 
Tendencies of Mathematics 

Jennie Ellen Hoole 
Selection . 

Orchestra 
Vocal Solo : Exaltation ..... 
Miss Gertrude Marie Quigley 

Essay: The Progress and Value of the Play- 
ground Movement ..... 
Bernice Mary Brown 

Chorus: Voices of the Woods . . . Rubinstein- Lynes 

School 



Owen 



Valedictory Essay : Picture Painting 

Ethel Louise Richardson 

Chorus : The Beautiful Blue Danube 

School 

Presentation of Diplomas .... 

Superintendent Benjamin E. Martin 

Benediction ....... 

Rev. E. T. Schofield 

Selection 

Orchestra 

Class Motto : binimus Coepturi 

(We finish to begin) 



Strauss 



184 

Class Colors : Dark blue and gold 

Class Flower: Forget-me-not 

Class Roll: Bernice Mary Brown, Jennie Ellen Hoole, Ethel 

Louise Richardson 
Frank E. Holt, Principal. Miss Mary W. Cross, Miss Camille 

Fitz-Gerald, Assistants 
Benjamin E. Martin, Superintendent of Schools 



Report of Supervisor of Music 

Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Superintendent of Schools, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Dear Sir : 

I take pleasure in submitting to you my first report as 
Supervisor of Music in the Chelmsford schools. 

Music plays an important part in the school curriculum. 
It gives many children an opportunity of learning something 
of the art who would never learn about it otherwise. It cre- 
ates a desire for the good, the true and the beautiful, and 
arouses the child's aesthetic nature. It brings joy and cheer- 
fulness to the schoolroom. 

My aim, first of all, is to have the pupils interested, then 
teach thoroughly the fundamentals of music and have them 
able to sing music at sight with good tone and render it under- 
standing^. 

In the first grade we unite voices, match tones, teach the 
scale by means of scale songs and read simple exercises from 
the staff. Much time is given in this grade to rote songs. 
These songs are also taken in grades two, three and four. 
Monotones are found in the low grades, especially in the first. 
These have individual attention. 

Scale relationship is established in grade two. The class 



185 

reads in all the common meters from the Primer. A special 
study is made of certain tones of the scale. In grade three 
we introduce chromatics and have new work in rhythm — the 
evenly divided beat. Grade four has more advanced work in 
chromatics and rhythm. Signature work is started in this 
grade. Two part singing is taken in the third or fourth grade. 
In grade five much time is spent on chromatics. Here also 
two minor scales are studied, a new rhythm introduced and 
some three part work taken. Grade six learns a new form of 
the minor. In this grade and from this grade on, the pupils 
have an advanced study of the previous work. Sight singing 
and oral and written dictation are given in almost every 
grade. 

Chorus work is taken once a week in both High Schools. 

I wish to thank the Superintendent and the teachers for 
the interest they have extended to me and to my work. 

Respactfully submitted, 

M. MARION ADAMS, 

Supervisor of Music. 
February 28, 1913. 



Report of Supervisor of Hanual Arts 

Lowell, Massachusetts, February 24, 1913 

Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Dear Sir : 

As Supervisor of Manual Arts, I submit the following 
report for the school year 1912-1913. 

The course this year is intended not only to develope 
the children's capacity for enjoying beautiful things but to be 



186 

of practical value to them. For that reason it includes much 
constructive work, giving an opportunity for actual making of 
useful articles. In the primary grades this takes the form of 
paper cutting and folding, and simple weaving of twine and 
raffia ; in the grammar grades, elementary book binding. 
Sewing is being taugh to the girls of the High School and of 
the Ninth Grade. 

The drawing of objects and natural forms has its use in 
giving the individual an ability to make drawings quickly and 
easily — an ability which is valuable in any occupation. It is 
with this in view that drawing has been made a required 
subject in the first year of High School as well as in the lower 
grades. In the Centre High, object and nature drawing with 
a little of construction and design, make up the year's work. 
In the Princeton High the drawing class is being used, by the 
study of design, printing, aud object drawing, to supplement 
the constructive work and mechanical drawing taught in its 
other classes. A special class for advanced pupils has been 
studying object drawing. 

To train pupils in the effective working together of hand 
and mind for the making of objects, in the use of drawing as 
a means of accurate expression, and in the appreciation of the 
beautiful through the lessons in design and picture study, is 
•the aim of the whole course. 

I wish to thank the superintendent for his helpful interest 
and the teachers for their efficient co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MIRIAM C. FEARING. 



187 



Reports of the School Physicians 

Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Supt. of the Schools of Chelmsford. 

Sir:— 

Herewith I beg to submit my report as school physician 
of Precincts 1 and 2. The" following diseases were noted: 

1. Adenoids 5 

2. Anaemia 7 

3. Blepharitis . . 1 

4. Congenital Heart Disease 1 

5. Eczaema 1 

6. Enlarged Tonsils 16 

7. Hemiplegia 1 

8. Mental Deficiency 2 

9. Poliomyetitis 2 

10. Scabies 4 

11. Tonsilitis , 1 

12. Severe Strabismus 1 

A large number of permanent teeth are badly decayed. 
A large number are filled and cared for properly. In general 
the health of the pupils and the hygiene of the buildings 
appear to be very good indeed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA. 



188 
Mr. Benjamin E. Martin, 

Superintendent of Schools, Chelmsford. 
Dear Sir : — 

I respectfully submit the following- report of my annual 
inspection of the school children of Precincts 2 and 3. 

Whole number of children inspected 502 

Enlarged tonsils 70 

Adenoids . 52 

Diseased teeth 151 

Adenitis 4 

Anaemia 11 

Condition sub-normal 27 

Disease of eyelids 8 

Pediculosis 37 

Impetigo 5 

Nervous diseases 5 

Cardiac disease 2 

Pulmonary diseases , 1 

Goitre 1 

Infantile Paralysis 1 

Mental Deficiency 8 

During the spring term measles were prevalent. There 
have been a very few cases of diphtheria and scarlet fever. 
The children have pride as to their personal appearance and 
cleanliness. This is in part due to the efforts of the school 
physician, supplemented by the constant instruction and help- 
fulness of the teachers. 

More thorough work has been done in the inspection than 
formerly. The teachers are interested in the health of their 
pupils and willing to co-operate with the physician. 

Very respectfully, 

F. E. VARNEY, M. D. 



Annual Report 



of the 



Trustees of the Adams Library 



and the 



North Chelmsford Library Corporation 



of the 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 



for the 



Year Ending February 28th, 1913 



Report of the Trustees of the Adams 
Library 



The Trustees of the Adams Library beg leave to report 
that the Board met for organization in the Library on 
March 30, 1912, at 2.30 p. m. and chose the following officers 
for the year : 

Chairman - - Mr. Albert H. Davis 

Secretary - - . Mr. Edwin R Clark 

Treasurer - - Rev. Wilson Waters 

Librarian - - Mrs. E. R. Clark 

The usual committees were chosen to carry on the work 
of the Library, which has progressed in a most satisfactory 
manner. The Library has increased in general effectiveness, 
and is now starting upon what seems to be an enlarged field 
of usefulness. This is due in great measure to the larger 
appropriation for its support made by the town in the past 
two years, which has allowed it to begin to be what the 
Library should be, as an element of educational influence. 
One evidence of this is the fact that the circulation has jumped 
from a little over 12,000 to 15,348, more than 25 percent. 
Perhaps no stronger argument could be advanced to prove the 
wisdom of generously providing for the purchase of good 
books. The Town's money could hardly be spent to better 
advantage, even on selfish consideration, than in building up 
a public library of exceptional excellence. In these days, 
there can be no doubt that the public library stands among 
the first of "modern improvements" demanded by the best 



192 

class of new residents. The community which desires an 
intelligent and otherwise desirable influx of people must 
provide ample means of intellectual improvement, as well as 
water- works, electric lighting and good schools. 

During the past year there has been a greater demand for 
standard fiction, and special care has been taken to meet the 
increasing use of the Library by the schools in providing such 
books as are needed in their work by teachers and pupils. 
Valuable books on various subjects have been purchased ; also 
the Cambridge edition of Longfellow, Whittier and Browning, 
and complete editions of some of the minor poets. A high 
standard has been maintained in all the books added this year, 
and taken together they cover a wide field in literature. 

The report of the Treasurer is herewith submitted. 

The circulation for the year has been 15,348, with the per 
cent, in the various classes as follows ; Fiction, 72.3; General, 
11.4; History, 2.7; Travel and description, 3; Literature, 2.2; 
Natural Science, 1.3; Biography, 1.5; Fine Arts, .7; Useful 
Arts, 1.5; Religion and Philosophy, 1.5; Education, 1.9. 

The Library has been open 197 sessions. 

The attendance in the reading room averages about 15. 

NEW BOOKS, ETC. 

Number of volumes purchased 342 

" " " " to replace worn books. .. . 41 

" " " magazines bound 23 

" " volumes worn out and not replaced 27 

" " lost 4 

Donations 

Doubleday & Co 1 vol . 

Francis Blake 1 " 

State of Massachusetts 16 " 

United States 7 " 

Mr. B. Emerson Magazines 

The number of volumes in the Library is 10,278. 



193 

The amount of the "Joseph Warren Fund" is $950.71 ; 
and that of the "Adams Emerson Fund'' is $119.84. No 
money has been drawn from either of these funds. 

ALBERT H. DAVIS, 
A. HEADY PARK, 
OTIS P. WHEELER, 
FRANCES CLARK, 
EDWIN R. CLARK, 
WILSON WATERS, 

Trustees. 



194 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE 
ADAMS LIBRARY 



RECEIPTS 

Balance $ 7 59 

Received from the Town 1,200 00 



EXPENDITURES 

Librarian $ 240 00 

Books 431 66 

Fuel 125 88 

Gas 70 43 

Care of grounds and building, shoveling 

snow, etc 48 12 

Fertilizer, etc 30 50 

Printing 30 00 

Binding 43 24 

Periodicals 98 80 

Transportation of books to South Chelms- 
ford 13 00 

Incidentals 11 22 

Readers' Guide, 2 vols 12 00 

Pamphlet boxes 4 80 

Postage 66 

Curtains 17 30 

Repairs on furnace 1 90 

Balance 28 08 



L,207 59 



$1,207 59 



WILSON WATERS, 

Treasurer. 



Report of the Directors of the North 
Chelmsford Library Corporation 



The Board of Directors of the North Chelmsford Library 
Corporation have the honor to submit to the voters and tax 
payers of Chelmsford, the following as their report of the 
doings of the above Library for the year just closed. 

At the last yearly meeting of the Board of Directors held 
at the Library rooms, the matter of enlarging the building 
was taken up, — in order that the large increasing business 
which has been yearly growing until it was practically im- 
possible to properly transact the business in a safe and sane 
way ; it was decided to appoint a committee of three from the 
membership of the Library to act in relation to the matter. 
The following gentlemen were appointed : Henry T. Ripley, 
Stewart Mackay, Arthur Wheeler, Royal S. Ripley, Exoffico, 
with full power to make such additions as would meet the 
needed requirements for some years to come. 

That your committee did themselves honor in this matter, 
goes without saying. An addition of about fifteen feet in 
length and the full width of the building was added, making 
in this addition shelf room for a number of thousand books 
and the safe placing of many books of science and history, 
which formly had been scattered over the shelves, leaving the 
much needed space for books in daily use. A large heating 
boiler and a proper number of heating radiators placed through- 
out the building gives sufficient heat, for which for many 
years we have suffered, new painting and walls decorated 
were added ; giving this Library a homelike appearence. 



196 

It will perhaps greatly please all tax payers to learn that 
this alteration and great expense incurred has not and will not 
cost them a penny: for a liberal and generous public here in 
North Chelmsford gladly subscribed the amount for this pur- 
pose, some giving fifty dollars and others twenty, ten and five 
as their means allowed. The total cost being over seven 
hundred dollars. 

There is much more to do in outside painting and grading 
around all sides of the grounds to make this Library what it 
should be, but this will come later without extra cost to the 
tax payers. 

Now by reason of the great and ever increasing member- 
ship and consequencly increased number of books put out, 
naturally increases the yearly expense. The six hundred 
dollars allowed in the annual appropriation each year for the 
running expenses is not enough to properly care for the work 
as conditions and demands of the Library are at the present 
time. So an addition of two hundred dollars added to the 
annual appropriation of six hundred dollars which has been 
allowed for some years making a total required of eight 
hundred dollars which sum is absolutly needed to carry on the 
work. For it must be remembered that this Library is the 
only means by which hundreds of poor working girls and boys 
in our large mills and shops have, since they are deprived of 
the attendance of our public schools to receive some education 
from out well stocked store of books. 

The following is the report of the work done this year : 

The Library has been opened 151 sessions during the 
year. 

There are 83 new borrowers making 557 borrowers in all. 

The circulation is 11,654, 

191 new books has been added during the year. There 
have been three books given by the Government, two books by 
Henry T. Ripley, three unbound volumes of McClures Maga- 
zine by Mrs. Ellen Sargent, two unbound volumes of Munsey 
Magazine by Mr. Frank Butterfield. These magazines have 
been bound at the expense of the Library. 



197 

There are now 6,489 books avaiable on the shelves. 
94 books have been sent to the bindry. 

Your Directors cannot close this report without expressing 
their great indebtedness and thanks to this special committee 
for their untiring effort and the good work they done in behalf 
of the Library interests, giving their time and money without 
stint. They also wish to thank Mr. James Kiberd for gift 
of time and stock in decorating the interior of Library, and 
the North Chelmsford Water Commissioners for their kindness 
in installing without charge a complete system of water supply 
from the street pipe for boiler and all other purposes needed. 
Neither do they forget how much they owe our Librarian, 
Miss Anna C. Mackay, for the care and patience she gives in 
caring for her responsible duties, always pleasant, kind and 
accommodating and faithful caring for all under her charge. 
We feel the Library is fortunate in having one in whom the 
utmost confidence is placed and in whose hands the best 
interests of the Library is assured. 

Respectfully yours, 

RO^AL S. RIPLEY, 

MRS. H. ELLEN SARGENT, 

MRS. ARTHUR H. SHELDON. 



198 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

North Chelmsford Library Corporation 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand March 1st, 1912 $ 6 42 

Town appropriation for books and ex- 
penses 600 00 

DeWolfe & Fiske Co 3 19 

Fines 3 15 



PAYMENTS 

Librarian's services $ 200 00 

Assistant librarian and janitor 40 00 

Books 197 73 

Lighting 20 79 

Transporting books to and from West 

Chelmsford 10 00 

Printing 25 95 

Binding and repairing books 58 52 

Fuel 19 25 

Cleaning 7 30 

Expense on account of purchasing books 3 50 

Supplies 12 68 

Balance on hand March 1st, 1913 16 64 



$ 612 76 



$ 612 76 



STEWART MACKAY, 

Treasurer. 



199 



North Chelmsford, Mass. 

March 4th, 1913 

To the Officers 1 of the 
No. Chelmsford Library Corporation: 

I have examined the accounts of the treasurer of the 
North Chelmsford Library Corporation for the year ending 
February 28th, 1913, and I hereby certify that in my opinion 
same are correct. 

C. FRANK BUTTERFIELD, 

Auditor. 



Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 

At Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre 

Monday, March 24, 1913 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford, in said County, 

GREETING. 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are 
hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Chelmsford 
to meet in the Town Hall, at Chelmsford Centre, on Monday, 
the twenty-fourth day of March, current, being the fourth 
Monday of said month, at eight o'clock in the forenoon. The 
polls will be opened at 8.15 A. M., and closed at 1.15 P. M. ; 
and they are then and there to act upon the following articles, 
viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for one Assessor, one 
School Committee, two Trustees of the Adams Library, 
one Cemetery Commissioner, one Sinking Fund Commis- 
sioner, one Park Commissioner, one Selectman, and one 



202 

Overseer of the Poor all for three years ; Town Treasurer 
and Collector of Taxes, three Auditors, one Constable and 
one Tree Warden all for one year. 'Also to vote on the 
following question: "Shall license be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this town?" all on one ballot. 

Article 3. To choose all other Town Officers necesaary to be 
chosen by hand vote, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 4. To hear reports of Town Officers and Committees, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as 
may be required to defray Town charges for the current 
year. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer to 
borrow, subject to the approval of the Selectmen, such 
sums of money as may be required for the demands upon 
him, in anticipation of the taxes of the current year and 
payable therefrom, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during 
the current year ; also in such other matters which may 
arise requiring, in their judgment, the action of such 
agent, and to employ counsel therefor. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125.00) for the 
purpose of observing Memorial Day, and appoint a com- 
mittee to assist the Veteran Association in making the 
necessary arrangements for such observances, or act in 
relation thereto. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00) to be 



203 

paid to the North Chelmsford Fire District for hydrant 
service for the current year, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will accept and allow Wash- 
ington Street as laid out, extended, and altered and Holt 
Street , as laid out on February 27, 1913, as described in 
their report filed in the Town Clerk's office on that day 
and shown on the plan therein referred to ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
residents of that portion of the Town known as Chelms- 
ford Center to petition the Legislature for authority to 
establish and Water District, so called, in that part of the 
Town and act in the relation to the same. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of three hundred dollars ($300.00) for the 
purpore of grading the grounds at North Chelmsford 
Schools on Princeton Street, the expenditure of this money 
to be in charge of the School Committee ; or act in relation 
to the same. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for the 
purpose of establishing an Industrial course in the schools 
under the direction of the Superintendent; this money to 
to be expended under the direction of the School Com- 
mittee ; or act in relation to the same. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to use part of the 
annual appropriation for Highways to purchase a portable 
stone crushing outfit; or act in relation thereto. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of seven hundred dollars ($700.00) to fit up 
the Town Safe with fireproof metal fittings, and purchase 



204 

three new safes, one for the Selectmen's room, one for the 
Treasurer, and one for the Town Clerk ; or do anything in 
relation to the same. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money necessary to remedy the unsatis- 
factory condition of Town Well at South Chelmsford; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of two hundred fifty dollars ($250.00) to be 
paid to the Firemen's Relief Association of Lowell, in 
recognition of the services of the Lowell Fire Department 
in Chelmsford ; or act in relation thereto. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote a sum of money nec- 
essary to defray the expenses of the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen, for the municipal year 1912, or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000.00) for 
the purpose of continuing the gravel road, known as the 
Acton Road, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to provide better 
fire protection in that part of the Town known as South 
Chelmsford, or act in relation thereto. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) to settle land, 
grade and other damages sustained by Emeline Haywood, 
by reason of the construction of Littleton Road ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a commit- 
tee of two to act in conjunction with the School Commit- 



205 

tee to look up and investigate a suitable site on which to 
locate a school building in the Centre village; said com- 
mittee to report to the Town not later than the next An- 
nual Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of six hundred dollars ($600.00) for the 
payment of tuition at the Lowell Industrial School, now 
due ; or act in relation thereto. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of painting the 
Town Hearse at Chelmsford Centre; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of fifteen dollars ($15.00) for the purpose 
of painting the flag pole at the Centre village ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to purchase the 
Russell Mill water power and rights for the purpose of 
establishing an electric lighting plant; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Article 27. To see what action the Town will take in regard 
to placing insurance on school buildings, or act in relation 
thereto. 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant, by posting 
up attested copies thereof at Postoffices in the Centre of the 
Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelms- 
ford, and at the school house, East Chelmsford, seven days at 
least before the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this Warrant with 



206 

your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this thirteenth day of March, in 
the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

D. FRANK SMALL, 
WALTER B. EMERSON, 
A. HEADY PARK, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



I have served the foregoing Warrant by posting up true 
and attested copies of the same at the places above mentioned 
more than seven days before the day of holding said meeting. 

HUBERT H. RICHARDSON, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



Ind 



ex 



Aggregate of Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures . . 134 

Annual Town Meeting, 1912 i 11 

Assessors' Report 51 

Chelmsford Centre Fire Apparatus 123 

North Chelmsford Fire Apparatus 124 

South Chelmsford Fire Apparatus 124 

Collector's Report on Tax of No. Chelmsford Fire District . 101 

Dogs licensed for the year 1912 10 

Highway Property Appraisal 121 

Joint Primary 25 

List of Jurors, 1912 127 

Presidential Primary . 20 

Property Appraisal at Town Farm 117 

Weights and Measures 119 

Property Appraisal of Moth Department 125 

Property of Town of Chelmsford in Charge of Forest 

Warden 126 

Report of Auditors 105 

Report of Board of Health 129 

Report of the Chairman of Board of Health 130 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 131 

Report of the Forest Warden 114 

Report of Inspector of Animals 110 

Report of Inspector of Meats and Provisions Ill 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Report : 109 

Report of Tax Collector 97 

Report of Town Treasurer 91 



210 

Report of the Directors of the North Chelmsford Library- 
Corporation 195 

Treasurer's Report 198 

Report of Selectmen. 61 

Abatement of Taxes 77 

Acton Road Construction 72 

Care and Improvement on Cemeteries 68 

Cattle Inspection 70 

Cemetery Trust. Funds 69 

Collection and Abatement of Taxes 73 

Damages on Littleton Road 71 

Flag and Rope . , 76 

Highways 61 

Hydrant Service 72 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 67 

Janitors North and Centre Fire House 76 

Libraries 71 

Loans and Interest 73 

Lowell Industrial School 77 

Memorial Day 71 

Meat Inspection 72 

Military Aid 67 

Miscellaneous Expenses 81 

Moth Work , 74 

Officers and Committees 77 

Public Parks 74 

Repairs of Public Buildings 75 

Reports on Street Lights 66 

Safe Guarding of Public Records 66 

Sale of Town Teams 86 

Sinking Fund. 71 

State Aid 67 

Tree Warden 72 

Village Clock 76 

Weights and Measures 67 



211 

Report of School Committee, 1912-1913 139 

Apparatus 146 

Appropriations 142 

Buildings and Grounds 141 

Care 146 

Course of Study 140 

Financial Report 143 

Fuel 146 

Furniture and Repairs 148 

Grading at Highland Ave. School 150 

Incidentals 147 

Medical Inspection 146 

Summary of Receipts and Expenditures 151 

Teachers 140 

Teaching ... 143 

Text Books and Supplies 149 

Transportation 146 

Report of Town Clerk 39 

Births Recorded in 1912 39 

Deaths Recorded in 1912 47 

Marriages Recorded in 1912 43 

Report of the Trustees of the Adams Library 191 

Donations 192 

New Books, etc 192 

Report of the Treasurer 194 

Report of the Supt. of Moth Work 112 

Report of Tree Warden 113 

State and Presidential Election 29 

Special Town Meeting, Jan. 14, 1913 38 

Special Town Meeting, May 18, 1912 23 



A 



212 

Superintendent's Report — 

Conclusion , 177 

School Calendar 1913-1914 151 

School Savings , 170 

Sight and Hearing Tests 169 

Special Reports 178 

Statistics 156 

Statistics for the School Year Ending in June, 1912.. . . 158 

Teachers, February 28, 1913 160 

The High School Situation 164 

Teachers 175 

Textbook Changes 175 

Support of Poor 55 

Expense at Almshouse 55 

Inmates at Almshouse 59 

Outside Poor 58 

Receipts at Almshouse. 57 

Town Officers 3 

Warrant for Annual Meeting, 1913 201