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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

l oo. 



A own of V^helmslord 
J\_nnual J\^eport^> 




For Year Ending 
December 31 

1930 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Town of Chelmsford 




Receipts and Expenditures 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



School Report, State Audit and 
Water Committee Report 



Year Ending December 31 

1930 



Courier-Citizen Co., Printers 
Lowell, Mass. 






Town Clerk's Report 



OFFICERS ELECTED 

Moderator 

WALTER PERHAM 
(Term Expires 1931) 

Town Clerk 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON 
(Term Expires 1933) 

Selectmen and Board of Public Welfare 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN Term Expires 1931 

FRANK J. LUPIEN Term Expires 1932 

ROYAL SHAWCROSS Term Expires 1933 

Treasurer and Tax Collector 

ERVIN W. SWEETSER 
Resigned August 30, 1930 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON 
Temporary Until February 2, 1931 

Assessors 

HERBERT C. SWEETSER Term Expires 1931 

WARREN WRIGHT Term Expires 1932 

JOHN E. HARRINGTON Term Expires 1933 

Tree Warden 

WILLIAM SHANKS 
(Term Expires 1931) 

Board of Health 

GEORGE A. McNULTY Term Expires 1931 

J. CLARK OSTERHOUT Term Expires 1932 

FREDERIC A. MacELROY Term Expires 1933 

3 



School Committee 

J. EARLE WOTTON Term Expires 1931 

JOHN A. McADAMS Term Expires 1932 

EDWARD B. RUSSELL Term Expires 1933 

Park Commissioners 

WALTER MERRILL Term Expires 1931 

MICHAEL J. WELSH Term Expires 1932 

FRED L. FLETCHER Term Expires 1933 

Cemetery Commissioners 

C. WESLEY LYONS Term Expires 1931 

BAYARD C DEAN ^ Term Expires 1932 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER Term Expires 1933 

Trustees of Adams Library 

LUELLA H. S. CLARK Term Expires 1931 LOTTIE L. SNOW 

FRANCES CLARK Term Expires 1932 WILSON WATERS 

ALBERT H. DAVIS Term Expires 1933 FRED W. PARK 

Insurance Fund Commissioners 

WALTER PERHAM Term Expires 1931 

ALFRED F. FREEZE Term Expires 1932 

MILDRED G. RUSSELL Term Expires 1933 

Constable 

HAROLD C. KING 
(Term Expires 1931) 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

HAROLD C PETTERSON 
(On leave of absence from Aug. 30, 1930) 

EMMA DANE 
(From Aug. 30, 1930) 

Finance Committee 

JOHN C. MONAHAN GEORGE E. GAGNON 

BIRGER PETTERSON EMILE E. PAIGNON 

GEORGE W. DAY JAMES A. GRANT 



Superintendent of Streets 

WILLIAM SHANKS 

Inspector of Animals 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM 

Fire Engineers 

ARCHIBALD COOKE HARRY SHEDD JOHN DIXON 

Moth Superintendent 

WILLIAM SHANKS 

Registrars of Voters 

JAMES F. LEAHEY. , Term Expires 1931 

G. CARLTON BROWN. , . Term Expires 1932 

KARL M. PERHAM. Term Expires 1933 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON. Ex-Officio 

Town Counsel 

JOHN H. VALENTINE 

Janitors of Public Halls 

JOHN B. WRIGLEY Centre Hall, Chelmsford Centre 

JUSTIN J. POTTER............ .North Hall, North Chelmsford 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

CURTIS A. AIKEN 

Forest Fire Warden 

SIDNEY E. DUPEE 

Superintendent of Infirmary 

FRANK HANNAFORD 

Superintendent of Burials of Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 

WALTER PERHAM 

Chief of Police 

HAROLD C. KING 
(To Dec. 9, 1930) 

BERNARD McGOVERN 

Acting Chief 

5 



Regular Police Officers 

BERNARD McGOVERN ARTHUR COOKE 

Special Police for General Work 

BENJAMIN HEALD RALPH HULSANDER 

WILLIAM REID EDWARD DRYDEN 



Special Police Officers for General Work without pay 

JAMES H. GILMORE GERALD LORMAN 

JOHN F. TRAINOR ALBERT McSWEENEY 

CHARLES KOHLER GEORGE DUFF 

JOHN SULLIVAN 

Special Police for Protection of School Children 

CHARLES CAMPBELL GEORGE SHEPHERD 

GEORGE MARINEL JAMES DRIVER GEORGE LOVETT 

Measurers of Sawdust 

WILLIAM CLEMENT CARL DUNNING RICHARD E. DAVIS 



Weighers of Coal and Coke 

HAROLD D. MACDONALD JOHN A. HEALY 

ARTHUR HEALY JOHN J. DUNIGAN 

SARAH DUNIGAN MARY C. HEALY 

EDWARD T. HEALY BURTON GOULD 

JAMES LONG ZOILLE TOUSSIGNANT 

Weighers of Hay 

HAROLD D. MACDONALD MYRON A. QUEEN 

RICHARD E. DAVIS SIXAI SIMARD 



Measurers of Lumber 

MYRON A. QUEEN JOSEPH ERWIN 

RICHARD E. DAVIS ALFRED RENO 

OSCAR PALM CARL DUNNING 

WALTER EDWARDS ARTHUR LaPRISE 

LOUIS LOVERING FRANCIS O. DUTTON 

PEARL T. DURRELL EDWARD B. RUSSELL 

JAMES A. BURTON RAYMOND DORSEY 

HARRY L. PARKHURST ARNOLD MARSHALL 
WILLIAM CLEMENT 
6 



Measurers of Wood 

MYRON A. QUEEN ERVIN W. SWEETSER 

RICHARD E. DAVIS WILLIAM CLEMENT 

HARRY L. PARKHURST CARL DUNNING 

PEARL T. DURRELL HOSMER W. SWEETSER 

JAMES F. DUNIGAN 

Measurers of Logs 

JAMES A. BURTON ARTHUR LaPRISE 

Fence Viewers 

WILLIAM REID GEORGE McNULTY 

Weighers of Merchandise 

JAMES F. LEAHEY JAMES P. WALKER 

MARY C. HEALY JAMES F. DUNIGAN 

WALTER PERHAM BURTON GOULD 

JAMES H. LONG SINAI SIMARD 

JOSEPH HEHIR EDWARD T. HEALY 

HAROLD D. MACDONALD HERBERT S. RUSSELL 

WILLIAM BROWN CLARENCE LEAVITT 

Memorial Day Committee 

GEORGE W. PETERSON (S. W. V.), ARTHUR COOKE (W. W. V.) 
FRED WIGGIN (S. of A. R.) 

Weighers of Sand and Gravel 

ROY BUNTEL VICTOR BUNTEL 

Special Police for Road Work 

CHARLES FLAVELL CHARLES H. WILDER 

Meat Inspector 

ALBERT S. PARK 

Superintendent of Schools 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT 

School Nurse 

MAE S. LEWIS 

Agent Board of Health 

MAE S. LEWIS 

7 



Warrant for Annual Town Meetin; 

FEBRUARY 3, 1930, AND FEBRUARY 10, 1930 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Middlesex, ss. 

To John E. Johnson, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby requested 
to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in their 
several polling places, viz. : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Center. 

Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct 3, Historical Hall, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct 4, School House, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct 5, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct 6, Golden Cove School, Westlands. 
on Monday, the Third Day of February, 1930, being the first Monday in 
said month, at 12.00 o'clock noon, for the following purpose : 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 

One Town Clerk for three years. 

One Selectman for three years. 

One member of the Board of Public Welfare for three years. 

One Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year. 

One Assessor for three years. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One School Committeeman for three years. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees for Adams Library for three years. 

One Insurance Fund Commissioner for three years. 

One Constable for one year. 

All on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12.00 Noon to 8.00 P. M. and to meet in the 
Town Hall of Chelmsford Center on the following Monday, the Tenth Day 
of February, 1930, at 9.30 o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act on 
the following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town officers and committees; or act in 
relation thereto. 

8 



ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be 
required to defray Town charges for the current year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to act as 
its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the current year; 
also in such other matters as may arise requiring in their judgment the 
action of such agent and to employ counsel therefor. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the 
revenues of the current financial year. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from money 
already in the hands of the Treasurer, a sum of money not exceeding 
Two Thousand Dollars ($2000) to be used as a reserve fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee as provided in the General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Hundred ($400) or what other sum, for State Aid; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from money 
already in the hands of the Treasurer, a sufficient sum with which to 
pay bills of 1929, or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to contract 
with the Lowell Electric Light Corporation for the purpose of installing 
additional lights at the location hereinafter designated, and to raise and 
appropriate sufficient money to pay the expenses thereof, viz. : 

Four lights on Westford Road. 
One light on Boston Road. 
Four lights on Lowell Road. 
One light on Pine Hill Road. 
Six lights on Mill Road. 
One light on Billerica Road. 
Five lights on Parker Village Road. 
Four lights on Proctor Road. 
Five lights on Richardson Road. 
Two lights on Grand View Road. 
Three lights on Park Road. 
Three lights on Dunstable Road. 
Or act in relation thereto. ^ 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from what is 
called "The Cushing Mill Pond Appropriation" the sum of Three Hun- 
dred Dollars ($300) to the Excess and Deficiency Account; or to- act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
called "Improving Vinal Square Appropriation" the sum of Twelve 
Hundred Dollars ($1200) to the Excess and Deficiency Account; or 
act in relation thereto. 

9 



ARTICLE 11. To. see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
called "New Grammar School Building Fund", Thirty-seven Dollars 
and Forty-five Cents ($37.45) to Excess and Deficiency Account; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($150) or some other sum, 
for the purpose of purchasing a power lawn mower; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One hundred and Seventy-five Dollars ($175) for the purpose 
of repairing the Flag Pole located in the Center Village: or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($350) or some other sum 
for the purpose of purchasing and erecting a flag pole on the Common 
at South Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Hundred Dollars ($200) or some other sum for the pur- 
pose of locating a stone with a tablet affixed to it on the Common in 
the Center of the village as a memorial to the Chelmsford soldiers who 
served in the Civil War ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of printing a report of the revaluation of 
real estate in Chelmsford ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Hundred Dollars ($300) or some other amount and 
elect a director to serve in cooperation with the Middlesex County 
Trustees for County Aid to Agriculture in the Middlesex County 
Extension Service, under the provision of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 
128, General Laws of Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) or some other sum for the pur- 
pose oi purchasing fire hose for the Fire Department; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5000) or some other amount for the 
reconstruction of the Acton Road; two-thirds of the expense to be 
borne equally by the County and the Commonwealth; or act in relation 
thereto. , 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5000) or some other amount for the 
purpose of reconstructing Central Square, in the Center Village; two- 
thirds of the expense to be borne equally by the County and the Com- 
monwealth; or act in relation thereto. 

10 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Thousand Dollars ($3000) or some other amount for 
the purpose of reconstructing the Old Westf ord Road ; two-thirds of 
the expense to be borne equally by the County and Commonwealth ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) or some amount for the purpose 
of reconstructing the Carlisle-Concord Road ; two-thirds of the expense 
to be borne equally by the County and Commonwealth; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) or some other amount for the 
purpose of reconstructing the Riverneck Road; two-thirds of the 
expense to be borne by the County and Commonwealth ; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2000) or some other amount for the 
purpose of reconstructing a portion of Newfield Street; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to 
widen and relocate Central Square and to appropriate and use a portion 
of Central Park, so-called, for the purpose ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Seventy-two Hundred Dollars ($7200) or some other sum for 
the purpose of purchasing an automobile truck for the Highway Depart- 
ment ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to 
lay out Wildwood Street from its termination on the Dalton Road 
through Perham Park to Chelmsford Street; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a committee to 
investigate the advisability of establishing municipal water systems in 
different sections of the Town, said committee to make its report and 
recommendations at the next Town meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 28, to 
see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
be expended by the committee created under Article 28 for the purpose 
of employing a hydraulic engineer to make a survey and estimate the 
cost of establishing municipal systems ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Two 
Thousand Dollars ($2000) or some other sum for the purpose of pur- 
chasing from Loren J. Ellinwood, a tract of land containing about 5300 
square feet, more or less, with the buildings thereon, and the contents 
therein, situated on the westerly side of Main Street, in that part of 
Chelmsford called West Chelmsford. Said property to be used as a 
fire station. The transaction to be under the supervision of the Board 
of Fire Engineers ; or act in relation thereto. 

11 



ARTICLE 31. In event of an affirmative vote under Article 30, to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty Dollars 
($50) for the purpose of making a survey of said property and legal 
expenses incident to the ultimate consumption of said transaction ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from money 
already in the hands of the Treasurer the sum of One Thousand Dollars 
($1000) or some other amount for the purpose of painting and decorat- 
ing the old portion of the Adams Library ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money to pay the expenses incurred in the search for victims 
drowned in the Merrimack River ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of purchasing grappling irons and equipment 
incident thereto ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2000) or some other amount for the 
purpose of improving the Varney Playgrounds at North Chelmsford; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept Sunset Avenue as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the town will vote to accept Sylvan Avenue as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept B Street as laid out 
by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept McMahon Street 
as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept from Fred E. 
Varney, title to certain land in that part of Chelmsford called North 
Chelmsford ; the first portion of which is situated on the Northeasterly 
side of Grant Street ; and is lot numbered one hundred and fifty-eight 
on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in North Chelmsford, Mass., belong- 
ing to the Thomas J. Adams Estate and Charles W. S. Adams, sur- 
veyed July and September 1892, Melvin B. Smith, Civil Engineer." 
The second portion of which is situated on the northerly side of Adams 
Street and is lots numbered one hundred and fifty-six and one hundred 
fifty-seven on Plan of Land in North Chelmsford, Mass., belonging to 
Thomas J. Adams Estate and Charles W. S. Adams, July and Sep- 
tember 1892, Melvin B. Smith, C. E., with additions to November 1902, 
by Smith and Brocks, C. E. S., and additions to August 1919. Said 
property to be forever used as a playground under the provisions of 
Chapter 45, Section 14, of the General Laws, and to be part of "The 
Varney Playgrounds." Or act in relation thereto. 

12 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept from the J. Cushing 
Company a lease of the property known as the Russell Mill Pond and 
an approach thereto ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 42. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 41, to 
see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One 
Thousand Dollars ($1000) or some other amount, for the purpose of 
constructing a dam and gate at the Russell Mill Pond and to clean the 
bed of said pond ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 43. In the event of a negative vote under Article 41, to see if 
the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to seize by right of 
eminent domain the property known as the Russell Mill Pond, and 
raise and appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5000) or 
some other amount to accomplish this purpose; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a committee of 
four to work in conjunction with the School Committee in making a 
survey of the congested conditions in the schools. The Committee 
appointed to make a report and recommendations at the next Annual 
Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to name the Centre Gram- 
mar School, so-called, the Susan S. McFarlin School; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 46. In event of an affirmative vote under Article 45, to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
and Fifty Dollars ($150) for the purpose of suitably marking said 
Grammar School in accordance with the vote under Article 45. The 
expenditure to be made under the direction of the School Committee; 
or act in relation thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office in the Center of the Town, South Chelmsford, 
North Chelmsford and West Chelmsford and at the School House, West- 
lands, and at the School House, East Chelmsford, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the first meeting aforesaid. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant, with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk at the time and place of holding the first meet- 
ing aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-third day of January, in the year of 
our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty. 

GEORGE RIGBY, 
ELIPHALET G. BROWN, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 
13 



Middlesex, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Chelmsford, by posting up attested copies of the same 
at Precinct 1, Post Office, Chelmsford Center; Precinct 2, Post Office, North 
Chelmsford; Precinct 3, Post Office, West Chelmsford; Precinct 4, School 
House, East Chelmsford; Precinct 5, Post Office, South Chelmsford; Pre- 
cinct 6, Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven days at least before 
the date hereof as within directed. 

JOHN E. JOHNSON, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



H 



ELECTION OF OFFICERS 
February 3, 1930 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, 
qualified to vote on Town affairs, held pursuant to Warrant duly posted, 
said meeting held February 3, 1930, in the six precincts of the Town of 
Chelmsford, the following persons received the number of votes set against 
their respective names for Town offices, as follows : 

P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 
Moderator for One Year — 

Walter Perham, Westford St. 537 485 83 128 49 217 1499 

Blanks 107 300 32 100 12 48 599 

Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

Selectman for Three Years — 
Milton G. Haire, 

Dunstable Rd 11 72 4 4 1 12 104 

Frederic W. Merrill, 

Old Westford Rd 21 22 3 2 8 56 

George Rigby, Dartmouth St. 122 176 28 97 23 75 521 
Michael J. Scollan, 

Mt. Pleasant St 11 182 5 5 2 7 212 

Royal Shawcross, Newfield St. 471 321 76 111 32 160 1171 
Blanks 8 12 2 8 1 3 34 

Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 



Board of Public Welfare Mem- 
ber for Three Years — 

Milton G. Haire, Dunstable Rd. ' 12 82 

Frederic W. Merrill, 

Old Westford Rd 26 25 

George Rigby, Dartmouth St. 100 169 

Michael J. Scollan, 

Mt. Pleasant St 12 170 

Royal Shawcross, Newfield St. 466 287 

Blanks 28 52 

Total 644 785 

Town Clerk for Three Years — 

Harold C. Petterson, Groton Rd. 576 592 

Blanks 68 193 

Total 644 785 

Board of Health for Three Years — 
Frederic A. MacElroy, 

Billerica St 501 210 

George A. Mcintosh, 

Subway Ave 119 139 

Irving C. Reno, Dunstable Rd. 12 340 

Blanks 12 96 

Total 644 785 

15 



1 
26 

4 

68 
11 



3 

92 

6 
100 

22 



2 

22 

2 

29 
4 



95 
20 



161 
67 



14 120 



16 

70 



40 
17 
18 



90 
3 

20 



73 

479 



10 204 

138 1088 

17 134 



115 228 61 265 2098 



221 1699 
44 399 



115 228 61 265 2098 



40 106 54 114 1025 



5 127 529 
10 382 
2 14 162 



115 228 61 265 2098 



Town Treasurer and 

Tax Collector — 
Ervin W. Sweetser, 

Chelmsford St 549 564 95 164 51 219 1642 

Blanks 95 221 20 64 10 46 456 



Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

Assessor for Three Years — 
John E. Harrington, 

Highland Ave 463 624 91 147 45 187 1557 

Blanks 181 161 24 81 16 78 541 

Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

Constable for One Year — 

Abbott L. Emery, Holt St.... 22 247 4 21 2 23 319 

John E. Johnson, Boston Rd.. 118 238 44 52 14 47 513 

Harold C. King, Perham St... 486 234 61 139 43 184 1147 

Blanks 18 66 6 16 2 11 119 



Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

School Committee for Three 
Years — 

Edward B. Russel, North Rd. 529 183 54 157 47 193 1163 

Cyril C. Trubey, Dunstable Rd. 82 503 48 38 6 41 718 

Blanks 33 99 13 • 33 8 31 217 



Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

Trustees for Adams Library for 
Three Years — 

Albert H. Davis, North Rd... 480 329 65 109 37 160 1180 

Fred W. Park, Park Ave 435 327 67 96 39 160 1124 

Blanks 373 914 '98 251 46 210 1892 



Total 1288 1570 230 456 122 530 4196 

Tree Warden for One Year — 
William Shanks, 

Chelmsford St 564 541 96 168 52 232 ^653 

Blanks 80 244 19 60 9 33 445 



Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

Cemetery Commissioners for 
Three Years — 
Arthur O. Wheeler, 

Washington St 492 556 85 125 46 200 . 1 504 

Blanks 152 229 30 103 15 65 594 



Total 644 785 115 223 61 265 2098 

Park Commissioner for 

Three Years — 
Fred L. Fletcher, 

Old Westford Rd 531 506 96 138 51 213 1535 

Blanks 113 279 19 90 10 52 563 

Total 644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 

16 



Insurance Fund Commissioner 
for Three Years — 



P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 



Arnold Perham 2 — 

Mildred G. Russell 14 — 

Roy Clough 1 1 

Ralph Berg 2 — 

Charles E. Bartlett 2 — 

Leroy Parkhurst 1 — 

Wilbur Lapham 7 — 

Sidney Perham 1 — 

Walter Perham 1 — 

Eustace Fiske — — 

Fred Fletcher — — 

John C. Monahan — — 

Alfred Freeze — 5 

Ed. Swain — 

James Tansey — 

George Rigby — 

David Sullivan — 

Al Sullivan — 

Charles De La Haye — 

Arthur Shattuck — 

Leo Larkin — 

J. P. Dunnigan — 

Charles Finnick — 

John Murphy — 

Ernest Ferron — 14 

Blanks 613 74 






115 226 60 257 



2 

15 
2 
2 
2 

1 
10 

2 

3 

1 
1 
1 

5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
14 
2018 



Total 



644 785 115 228 61 265 2098 



17 



BUSINESS MEETING 
February 10, 1930 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote on Town affairs held pursuant to Warrant duly posted, 
said meeting held at the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Center on Feb- 
ruary 10, 1930, at 9 :30 A. M. Moderator Walter Perham called the meeting 
to order and requested Town Clerk, Harold C. Petterson, to read the 
Warrant. After the Warrant was partly read, Selectman Eliphalet G. 
Brown moved that the further reading of the Warrant be waived and it 
was so voted. 

Under Article 1. To hear reports of Officers and Committees. Select- 
man E. G. Brown reported for the Committee appointed to investigate the 
advisability of relocating Central Square. Mr. Brown said that the Com- 
mittee had held a meeting and that said Committee had not any definite 
plans to submit. The Town report was accepted with the corrections of any 
typographical errors, and it was voted. 

Selectman Brown reported that the Selectmen had no report to make 
on surveying street lighting system. 

In the matter of taking over a part of the North and Boston Roads, by 
the State, Selectman Brown reported that the Selectmen and the Superin- 
tendent of Streets attended a hearing on this matter at the State House on 
January 28, 1930, before the Commissioner of Public Works and that the 
Commissioner agreed that the State would take over these roads as State 
Roads as soon as they were able to do so. This report was accepted and 
placed on file. 

Dr. Waters reported for the Committee appointed for the purpose of 
bringing in plans and recommendations for a celebration of the Town of 
Chelmsford's 275th Anniversary, as follows : The Committee has held a 
number of pleasant meetings and formulated plans, but owing to the fact 
that no money can be appropriated for such a celebration unless the number 
of years is exactly divisible by fifty, if the voters wish, this Committee will 
continue in office, otherwise we wish to be discharged. This report was 
accepted and placed on file. 

The next matter to be taken up was action on Article 33 of the War- 
rant for the annual Town Meeting held in 1929, the said article having been 
laid on the table until this time. In regard to the purchase of 15 acres of 
land on Fish Road so-called to be used for a Public Dump, on a motion 
made by Harold C. Petterson it was voted to dismiss this article. 

Under Article 2. On a motion made by John C. Monahan, it was 
voted to take this article up immediately after the noon recess at 1 P. M. 

Under Article 3. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
that the Town authorize the Selectmen to act as its agent on any suit or 
suits which may arise during the current year; also in such other matters 
as may arise requiring in their judgment the action of such agent, and to 
employ counsel therefor. 

At this point of the meeting on a motion made by Fred L. Fletcher, it 
was voted to again take up Article 1. 

18 



Fred L. Fletcher reported for the committee on improving the Varney 
Playgrounds at North Chelmsford, the following report was read by Mr. 
Fletcher, the report being made by Mr. Shanks, Superintendent of Streets, 
who had charge of the work done. 

To the Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Gentlemen : 

I, acting as Chairman of the Varney Playground Committee, not having 
filed a report on doings there for the annual Town Report, I take pleasure 
in handing your Board, the report to read at the annual Town Meeting, 
February 10, 1930. 

The Highway Department started work Saturday, June 29, 1929, to 
do rough grading on the plot that was filled the year before. It took helper 
and fifteen men two and one-half days before we could get to hauling fill 
from North side and placing same on South side and West end. We hauled 
3891 yards of filling and graded some, making a playground of 160 feet 
wide by 330 feet long without loaming. My suggestion would be that, if 
we got $2000 to finish filling rest of lot and loaming some, that the Town 
would have a very nice place for recreation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM SHANKS, 

Supt. of Streets, Chelmsford, Mass. 

On a motion made by J. C. Monahan, it was voted to accept this report 
as a report of progress and the committee to continue in office. 

Mr. Fletcher reported for the Committee on Improving the Common 
at Chelmsford Centre, as follows : 

The committee appointed for the purpose of "Improving the Common 
at Chelmsford Centre" herewith render their report on same : This com- 
mittee beg to report that the work is completed and they have expended the 
following amounts of money for the following purposes : 

For cement and stone work $1,525.00 

For grading, grassing and shrubbing 3,576.18 

For engineering fees 440.78 

For gravel and labor on outside sidewalk 106.90 

Installing water pipes and meter 170.10 

For two markers for trees 40.00 



$5,858.96 



The two markers which have just been referred to are in the hands of 
the committee and will be placed, one in front of each tree, the tree on the 
Unitarian Church side of the Common was a gift from the Chelmsford 
Grange and the tree on the Town Hall side of the Common was a gift from 
the Chelmsford Centre Village Improvement Association. 

We respectfully request that the voters assembled here today give a 
rising vote of "Thanks" to the Chelmsford Grange and the Chelmsford 

19 



Centre Village Improvement Association for the splendid spirit shown by 
these associations making these gifts to add to the beauty of this plot of land 
so centrally situated. 

We also will say that a balance of $141.04 was turned back to the Town 
out of the appropriation made of $6000.00. 

As this committee has completed their work, we beg that their report 
be accepted and this committee discharged. 

ROY A. CLOUGH, 

Chairman. 

Report made by Fred L. Fletcher. 
The Chelmsford Grange and the Chelmsford Centre Village Improve- 
ment Association were given a voice vote of thanks for the two trees given 
and planted on the Common at Chelmsford Centre and it was voted to 
accept this report and to discharge this committee. 

Under Article 4. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted, 
that the Treasurer be and he is hereby authorized and empowered to borrow 
money with the approval of the Board of Selectmen from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1930, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor payable within one year, any debt or 
debts incurred under this vote to be paid from revenue of such financial 
year. 

Under Article 5. On a motion made by John C. Monahan, it was 
voted, to raise and appropriate the sum of $2000.00 as a Finance Committee 
Reserve Fund in accordance with the provisions of General Laws. Chapter 
40, Section 6, to be expended under the direction of the Finance Committee. 

• Under Article 6. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $400.00 for State Aid. 

Under Article 7. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $1151.56 with which to pay 
unpaid bills for this year 1929. 

Under Article 8. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $314.00 for the purpose of installing 
fifteen additional street lights and that the Selectmen be authorized to 
contract with the Lowell Electric Light Corporation for the same, the loca- 
tions of these lights to be designated by the Board of Selectmen. 

Under Article 9. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to transfer the sum of $300.00 from the Cushing Mill Pond appro- 
priation to the Excess and Deficiency Account. 

Under Article 10. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to transfer $1200.00 from the account called Improving Vinal Square 
to the Excess and Deficiency Account. 

Under Article 11. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to transfer the sum of $37.45 from the account called the "New 
Grammar School Account" to the Excess and Deficiency Account. 

20 



Under Article 12. On a motion made by Fred L. Fletcher, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $150.00 to purchase a power lawn 
mower for use of Park Department. 

Under Article 13. On a motion made by Fred L. Fletcher, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $175.00 for the purpose of re- 
pairing the flag pole located at the Centre Village. 

Under Article 14. On a motion made by John C. Monahan, it was 
voted that a committee of three be appointed by the Moderator regarding 
erecting a flag pole at South Chelmsford and said Committee to report at 
a future meeting. The Moderator appointed Emile E. Paignon, Sidney E. 
Dupee and Wilbur Lapham, as this committee. 

Under Article 15. On a motion made by John C. Monahan it was 
voted that the Moderator appoint a committee of three, consisting of one 
member of the Veteran's Association, one member of Spanish War Vet- 
erans, and one member of World War Veterans to report on erecting a 
suitable memorial to be located on the Common at Chelmsford Centre, said 
Committee to report at a future Town Meeting. The Moderator appointed 
Frank A. P. Coburn, George W. Peterson and Wilhelm T. Johnson as this 
Committee. 

Under Article 16. In regard to the printing of a report of revalua- 
tions, it was voted to dismiss this article. This motion was made by John 
C. Monahan. 

Under Article 18. On a motion made by Sidney E. Dupee, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate $500.00 for the purpose of purchasing fire 
hose for the Fire Department, this money to be spent under the supervision 
of the Board of Fire Engineers. 

Under Article 17. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate for Aid to Agriculture and Home Economics 
the sum of $300.00, and Perley Kimball was elected Director. 

Under Article 19. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Dollars for the 
purpose of reconstructing Acton Road. Two-thirds of the expense of said 
reconstruction to be borne equally by the County and Commonwealth. 

At this point of the meeting it was voted to adjourn until 1 P. M. 

As voted under Article 2 before the noon recess, the next article in 
order to be taken up is Article 2. ^ 

Under Article 2. It was voted to raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money to defray Town charges for the current year. 



21 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Moderator's Salary $ 10.00 

Selectmen's Salary 750.00 

Selectmen's Expense 200.00 

Town Clerk and Accountant's Salary 2,000.00 

Town Clerk and Accountant's Expense 200.00 

Collector and Treasurer's Salary 2,000.00 

Collector and Treasurer's Expense 400.00 

Collector and 1 reasurer's Bond 535.70 

Assessors' Salaries 2,000.00 

Assessors' Expense 350.00 

Town Counsel Salary 300.00 

Election and Registration 900.00 

Finance Committee Expense 25.00 

Public Buildings, Janitor Salary 950.00 

Public Buildings, Fuel, Light, Water 725.00 

Public Buildings, Other Expense 65.00 

Total for General Government $11,410.70 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY: 

Police Department (as amended) $ 7,200.00 

Fire Department, Administration 3,800.00 

Fire Department, Maintenance 3,800.00 

Fire Department, Labor and Expenses at Fires 600.00 

Hydrant Service, Centre 750.00 

Hydrant Service, North Chelmsford 750.00 

Hydrant Service, West Chelmsford 20.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 250.00 

Moth Department 2,400.00 

Tree Warden 400.00 

Forest Fire Department 1,000.00 

Total for Protection of Persons and Property $20,970.00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION : 

Board of Health, Salaries (as amended) $ 500.00-^ 

Board of Health, Agent's Salary 350.00 

Board of Health, Aid 650.00 

Board of Health, Maintenance 200.00 

Board of Health, Meat Inspector's Salary 600.00 

Board of Health, Milk Inspector's Salary 350.00 

Board of Health, Care of Warren Avenue Dump 150.00 

Board of Health, Physician's Salary 100.00 

Total for Health and Sanitation $ 2,900.00 

HIGHWAYS : 

Superintendent's Salary $ 2,500.00 

General Highway 21,000.00 

Truck Maintenance 2,200.00 

Oil 8,000.00 

Cutting Brush 600.00 

Street Signs 150.00 

Street Lighting (as amended) 15,657.36 

Total for Highzvays $50,107.36 

22 



PUBLIC WELFARE: 

Board of Public Welfare, Salaries $ 325.00 

Board of Public Welfare, Maintenance 20.00 

Outside Poor 10,000.00 

Infirmary, Superintendent's Salary 900.00 

Infirmary, Expense 2,400.00 

Infirmary, Repairs 150.00 

Soldiers' Relief 500.00 

Total for Public Welfare $14,295.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 

Administration $ 4,500.00 

Instruction 69,230.00 

New Equipment 1,000.00 

Operation and Maintenance 18,400.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,325.00 

Total for School Department $104,455.00 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL: 

Tuition plus Dog Tax $ 2,000.00 

Total $ 2,000.00 

LIBRARIES : 

Adams Library $ 2,350.00 

North Chelmsford Library 1,200.00 

Total for Libraries $ 3,550.00 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED : 

Parks $ 1,000.00 

Memorial Day 500.00 

Town Clock i 30.00 

Public Buildings, Insurance . . .' 545.00 ! 

Band Concerts 400.00 

Insurance Sinking Fund 3,500.00 

Bond, Treasurer Ins. Sinking Fund 40.00 

Animal Inspector 200.00 

Town Reports (as amended) 630.55 

Total for Recreation and Unclassified , $ 6,845.55 

CEMETERIES : 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

Forefathers Cemeteries 500.00 

Hart Pond Cemetery 500.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery ^ 500.00 

Riverside Cemetery 500.00 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 500.00 

Fairview Cemetery 250.00 

Total for Cemeteries $ 2,855.00 

Under Article 20. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Four Thousand Dollars for the 
purpose of reconstructing Central Square, in the Centre Village. Two- 
thirds of the expense of said reconstruction to be borne equally by the 
County and Commonwealth. 

23 



Under Article 21. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars for the purpose of recon- 
structing the Old West ford Road. Two-thirds of the expense to be borne 
equally by the County and Commonwealth, this motion was amended by 
raising the sum to Two Thousand Dollars, the amendment was made by 
Fred L. Fletcher, the amendment was lost and the original motion was 
carried. 

Under Article 22. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars for the 
purpose of reconstructing the Carlisle-Concord Road. Two-thirds of the 
expense to be borne equally by the County and Commonwealth. 

Under Article 2-3. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars for the 
purpose of reconstructing the Riverneck Road. Two-thirds of the expense 
to be borne equally by the County and Commonwealth. 

Mr. James P. Dunigan moved as an amendment that this Article be 
laid on the table until after Articles 28 and 29 be disposed of, the amend- 
ment was defeated. 

Under Article 24. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to raise and appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars for the purpose 
of reconstructing portion of Newfield Street. 

Under Article 25. Regarding instructing the Selectmen to relocate 
Central Square and to appropriate and use a portion of Central Park, it was 
voted to dismiss this Article; this motion was made by Eliphalet G. Brown. 

Under Article 26. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Seventy-two Hundred Dollars for 
the purpose of purchasing an automobile truck to be used by the Highway 
Department. Said purchase to be made by and in behalf of the Town by 
the Selectmen and they be and hereby authorized to consummate said 
transaction. 

Under Article 27. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to instruct the Selectmen to lay out Wildwood Street from its termination 
on the Dalton Road through Perham Park to Chelmsford Street. 

Under Article 28. On a motion made by J. Dark Osterhout, it was 
voted to appoint a committee consisting of J. C. Monahan, Harold Petter- 
son, George Gagnon, Harry L. Shedd, Emile Paignon, R. W. Barris to 
investigate fully the best and proper means of establishing a water supply 
for the Town of Chelmsford and to study ways, means and costs of supply- 
ing water to the more thickly settled parts of East, West and South Villages 
and other sections of the Town, and that this committee bring their report 
and recommendations at the next annual Town Meeting. 

Under Article 29. On a motion made by Mr. J. C. Osterhout, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $1500.00 for the purpose of inves- 
tigating the matter under Article 28 and employing a Water Engineer 
therefor. 

24 



Under Article 30. Mr. Willis MacComb reported for the committee 
to investigate the subject matter of this article as follows: The committee 
appointed to investigate the advisability of purchasing Historical Hall for 
fire house purposes submit the following report: 

After considering the Fire Department needs at West Chelmsford and 
after making a thorough inspection of the building, we recommend that the 
Town purchase from Loren J. Ellinwood for the sum of $2000.00 Historical 
Hall in West Chelmsford with land and contents for Fire Department 
purposes. 

ARCHIBALD COOKE, 
SIDNEY E. DUPEE, 
J. A. GRANT, 
ROGER W. BOYD, 
WILLIS L. MacCOMB. 

On a motion made by Willis L. MacComb, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars for the purpose of purchas- 
ing from Loren J. Ellinwood a tract of land containing about 5300 square 
feet of land more or less, with the buildings thereon, and the contents 
therein situated on the westerly side of Main Street in that part of Chelms- 
ford called West Chelmsford, the said property to be used as a fire station. 
The transaction to be under the supervision of the Board of Engineers who 
shall have power and authority to accept a good and sufficient deed from 
the owner in behalf of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Under Article 31. On a motion made by Archibald Cooke, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty Dollars for the purpose of 
making a survey and legal expenses incident to the real and personal prop- 
erty purchase under Article 30. 

Under Article 32. On a motion made by Albert H. Davis, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate $750.00 for the purpose of painting and 
decorating the old portion of the Adams Library. 

Under Article 33. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $268.32 to reimburse the Police Depart- 
ment for the cost of searching for victims drowned in the Merrimack River 
in Chelmsford. 

Under Article 34. On a motion made by Archibald Cooke, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $225.00 for the purpose of pur- 
chasing grappling irons and equipment incident thereto. 

Under Article 35. On a motion made by George Gagnon, it was voted, 
to raise and appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars for the purpose 
of improving the Varney Playgrounds at North Chelmsford. The money to 
be expended by the committee created to improve said Varney Playgrounds. 

Under Article 36. In regard to the acceptance of Sunset Avenue 
Extension, it was voted to dismiss the Article. 

25 



Under Article 37. On a motion made by Eliphalet G. Brown, it was 
voted to accept Sylvan Avenue Extension as laid out by the Selectmen as 
shown in their report duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 38. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to postpone the acceptance of B Street, so-called, be deferred until the next 
annual Town Meeting. 

Under Article 39. On a motion made by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted 
to accept McMahon Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown in their 
report duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 40. On a motion made by George E. Gagnon and sec- 
onded by Frank J. Lupien, it was voted to accept the land as described in 
Article 40 of the Warrant for this meeting, said land to be used for play- 
ground purpose. 

Under Article 41. It was ruled by the Moderator that no action could 
be taken under this Article. 

Under Article 42. It was ruled by the Moderator that no action could 
be taken under this Article. 

Under Article 43. It was ruled by the Moderator that no action could 
be taken under this Article. 

Under Article 44. On a motion made by Edward B. Russell, it was 
voted to appoint a committee of four, namely, Loren Ellinwood, Mrs. Wil- 
liam P. Picken, Mr. Warren Wright and Mr. Harry Shedd, to work in 
conjunction with the School Committee in making a survey of the congested 
conditions in the schools, and that this committee be instructed to report to 
the Town and make recommendations at a special meeting called for that 
purpose or at the next annual Town Meeting. 

Under Article 45. On a motion made by John A. McAdams, it was 
voted to designate the Centre Grammar School, so-called, as the Susan S._ 
McFarlin School. 

Under Article 46. On a motion made by John A. McAdams, it was 
voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred and Fifty Dollars 
for the purpose of suitably marking the Susan S. McFarlin School, the 
expenditure of this money to be made under the direction of the School 
Committee. 

Voted to adjourn the meeting at 4.40 P. M. 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, Clerk. 
WALTER PERHAM, Moderator. 



26 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

At Upper Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre, Tuesday Evening, 
September 2, 1930 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To Harold C. King, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in the 
Upper Town Hall, at Chelmsford Centre, on Tuesday, the Second day of 
September, 1930, at eight o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon 
the following Articles : 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
entitled "Fund for the Purchase of a Highway Truck" to an account 
to be entitled "Fund for the Fire Alarm System", Six Hundred Dollars 
or some other sum ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
entitled "Fund for the Purchase of a Highway Truck" to an account 
to be entitled "Fund to be used for the purpose of painting the Town 
Hall at North Chelmsford", Six Hundred Dollars, or some other sum; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to give the control and super- 
vision to the Board of Selectmen of a garage and the land necessarily 
incident thereto belonging to the Town, located on Washington Street 
in that part of Chelmsford called North Chelmsford; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
entitled "Riverneck Road Fund" to the account entitled "General High- 
way Fund", One Thousand Dollars or some other amount; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account 
entitled "Fund for the purchase of a highway truck" to the Park 
Department Account, Three Hundred and Fifty Dollars, or some other 
sum, for the purpose of grading the park at Central Square ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept Sleeper Street as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown in their report duly filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept an extension of 
Sunset Avenue as laid out by the Selectmen as shown in their report 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer Two Hundred and 
Twenty-four Dollars from the account entitled "Fund for the purchase 
of a Highway Truck" to the Town Treasurer and Collector expense 
account; or act in relation thereto. 

27 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will appropriate from the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund, Seven Hundred and One Dollars, or some other sum, 
to the Town Treasurer and Collector expense account ; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will appropriate from the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund, One Hundred and Forty-five Dollars, or some other 
sum, to be used for the care and maintenance of public buildings; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will appropriate Two Hundred and 
Eighty Dollars and Thirty-eight Cents from the Excess and Deficiency 
Fund and transfer same to the Vocational School Account; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate Seventy-seven 
Dollars and Fifty Cents from the Excess and Deficiency Fund account, 
to pay Unpaid bills of 1928 and 1929; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate One 
Thousand Dollars or some other sum for the purpose of grading the 
grounds at the Adams Library. The expenditure to be under the 
direction of the Board of Trustees of said Library; or act in relation 
thereto. 

AND YOU ARE directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town ; South Chelms- 
ford ; School House, East Chelmsford, and at the Golden Cove School 
House, Westlands ; seven days at least before the time appointed for holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings therein, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this twenty-second day of August, 
in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty. 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN, 
FRANK J. LUPIEX, 
ROYAL SHAWCROSS, 
Selectmen of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested copies of the same 
at the post offices in the Centre of the Town, South Chelmsford, North 
Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, at the School House, East Chelmsford, and 
at the Golden Cove School House at the Westland, seven days before the 
date hereof as within directed. 

HAROLD C. KING, 
Constable of Chelmsford. 

28 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

September 2, 1930 

At a special Meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant to warrant duly posted, 
said meeting held at the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre Septem- 
ber 2, 1930, at 8 P.M. The meeting was called to order by Moderator 
Walter Perham and by order of the Moderator the warrant was partly read, 
when Selectman Brown made a motion to waive the further reading of the 
Warrant and it was so voted. 

Under Article 1. On a motion made by Archie Cooke, it was voted to 
transfer from the account entitled "Fund for the purchase of a highway 
truck" to the account entitled "Fund for the fire alarm system," six hundred 
dollars. 

Under Article 2. On a motion made by Selectman Brown, it was voted 
to transfer and appropriate from the fund entitled "Fund for the purchase of 
a highway truck" $540.00 to be used for the purpose of painting the Town 
Hall at North Chelmsford. 

Under Article 3. Frank J. Lupien made a motion that the Town vote 
to give the control and supervision of the garage and the land necessarily 
incident thereto, located on Washington Street in North Chelmsford to the 
Board of Selectmen. This motion was defeated. The vote was questioned 
and the Moderator asked that seven voters rise, not a single voter arose, and 
the original result stood. 

Under Article 4. On a motion made by Selectman Brown, it was voted 
to transfer one thousand dollars from the Riverneck Road Fund to the 
Highway General account. 

Under Article 5. On a motion made by Park Commissioner Fletcher 
it was voted to transfer three hundred-fifty dollars from the fund entitled 
"Fund for the purchase of a highway truck" to the Park department account. 

Under Article 6. On a motion made by Selectman Lupien, it was voted 
to accept Sleeper Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown in their report 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 7. On a motion made by Selectman Brown, it was voted 
to accept an extension of Sunset Avenue, as laid out by the Selectmen as 
shown in their report duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under Article 8. On a motion made by Selectman Lupien, it was voted 
to transfer two hundred and twenty-four dollars from the Fund for the 
purchase of a highway truck to the Town Treasurer and Collectors expense 
account. 

Under Article 9. On a motion made by Selectman Lupien it was voted 
to transfer seven hundred and one dollars from the Excess and deficiency 
fund to the Town Treasurer and Collectors expense account. 

29 



Under Article 10. On a motion made by Selectman Brown, it was 
voted to appropriate from the Excess and Deficiency Fund, one hundred and 
forty-five dollars to be used for the Care and Maintenance of public 
buildings. 

Under Article 11. On a motion made by Selectman Lupien, it was 
voted to appropriate two hundred-eighty dollars and thirty-eight cents from 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund and transfer same to the Vocational School 
account. 

Under Article 12. On a motion made by Selectman Brown, it was 
voted to appropriate seventy-seven dollars and fifty cents from the Excess 
and Deficiency fund to pay unpaid bills of 1928 and 1929. 

Under Article 13. On a motion made by Selectman Brown it was 
voted to appropriate from the Excess and Deficiency account to an account 
called Grading the Grounds at the Adams Library the sum of $1000.00 and 
that the expenditure of money be made under the supervision of the Adams 
Library Trustees. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 9:25 P.M. 

WALTER PERHAM, Moderator. 
HAROLD PETTERSON, Clerk. 



30 



WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

To Harold C. King, Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in their several polling places : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 
Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 
Precinct 3, Historical Hall, West Chelmsford. 
Precinct 4, School House, East Chelmsford. 
Precinct 5, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 
Precinct 6, Golden Cove School House, Westlands. 

Tuesday, the sixteenth day of September, 1930, at Twelve o'clock Noon 
for the following purposes : To bring in their votes to the Primary 
Officers for nomination of candidates of Political Parties for the following 
offices : 

Governor for this Commonwealth. 
Lieutenant Governor for this Commonwealth. 
Secretary of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth. 
Treasurer and Receiver-General for this Commonwealth. 
Auditor of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth. 
Attorney General for this Commonwealth. 
Senator in Congress for this Commonwealth. 
Representative in Congress for Fifth Congressional District. 
Councillor — Sixth Councillor District. 
Senator — Eighteenth Senatorial District. 

One Representative in General Court — 11th Representative District. 
District Attorney — Middlesex County. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Middlesex County. 
County Commissioner — Middlesex County. 
Associate County Commissioner (2) — Middlesex County. 
County Treasurer — Middlesex County 
and for the election of the following officers : 

District number of State Committee for each political party for the 
8th Senatorial District. 

Thirty members of the Republican Town Committee. 
Ten members of the Democratic Town Committee. 
Six Delegates to State Conventions of the Republican Party. 
Ten Delegates to State Convention of the Republican Party. 

All of the above Candidates and officers are to be voted for upon one 
ballot. 

31 



The polls will be open from twelve o'clock Noon to eight o'clock P.M. 
And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South Chelmsford, 
North Chelmsford, and West Chelmsford, at the School House at East 
Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven days at 
least before the time of said meeting as directed by vote of the Town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of the Warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meetings. 

Given under my hands this eighth day of September, A.M., 1930. 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested copies of the same 
at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South Chelmsford, North 
Chelmsford, West Chelmsford and at the School House, East Chelmsford 
and at the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven days before the 
date hereof as within directed. 

HAROLD C. KING, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 
Chelmsford, Monday, September 8, 1930. 



32 



STATE PRIMARIES 

September 16th, 1930 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford qualified 
to vote in State Primaries, said meeting held pursuant to Warrant duly posted 
in the six precincts in the Town of Chelmsford, the following candidates 
received number of votes set against their respective names, as follows: 



P. 1 


P. 2 


P. 3 


P. 4 


P. 5 


P. 6 Total 


Governor 












Frank G. Allen, 289 Walpole 












St., Norwood, R 475 


186 


49 


52 


31 


159 952 


John D. Devir, 319 Pearl St., 












Maiden, R 25 


12 


4 


1 





5 47 


Blanks 13 


19 





5 


2 


7 46 



Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Lieutenant-Governor 

William Sterling Youngman, 

10 Orkney Rd, Boston, R... 466 188 49 50 31 157 941 
Blanks 47 29 4 8 2 14 104 



Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Secretary 

Frederic W. Cook, 75 Benton 

Rd., Somerville, R 447 184 46 50 28 126 881 

Blanks 66 33 7 8 5 45 164 



Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Treasurer 

James William Bean, 5 Ells- 
worth PL, Cambridge 

Fred Jefferson Burrell, 7 Re 
vere PL, Medford 

Charles Lawrence Burrill, 
27 Pinckney St., Boston... 

Russell D. Chase, 78 Farming 
ton Ave., Longmeadow 211 

Ezra D. Whitaker, 40 Quincy 
St., North Adams 

George B. Willard, 1911 Bea- 
con St., Brookline 

John K. Withington, 349 Mt. 
Vernon St., Dedham 

Russell Abner Wood, 9 Whit- 
tier St., Cambridge 

Blanks 

Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Auditor 

Joseph N. Carriere, 111 Law- 
rence St., Fitchburg 221 68 23 7 11 52 382 

Alonzo B. Cook, 28 Wales St., 
Boston 220 128 24 43 17 93 525 

Blanks 72 21 6 8 5 26 138 



39 


23 


5 


10 


6 


18 


101 


63 


32 


7 


18 


4 


27 


151 


54 


32 


2 


6 


4 


20 


118 


ill 


62 


20 


3 


5 


59 


360 


3 


6 


3 


1 


2 


2 


17 


28 


11 


4 


5 


3 


1 


52 


4 


4 


1 





1 


6 


16 


23 
88 


17 
30 


3 
8 


9 
6 


3 

5 


8 
30 


63 
167 



Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

33 



p. 1 


P. 2 


P. 3 


P. 4 


P. 5 


P. 6 Total 


430 
83 


177 
40 


46 
7 


50 
8 


30 
3 


138 871 
33 174 


513 


217 


53 


58 


33 


171 1045 



110 


27 


29 


18 


95 


59^ 


92 


23 


26 


12 


66 


371 


10 

5 


1 
2 


2 
1 


1 
2 


3 

7 


33 
42 


217 


53 


58 


33 


171 


1045 



Attorney-General 

Joseph E. Warner, 52 Church 

St., Taunton 

Blanks 

Total 



Senator in Congress 

William M. Butler, 231 Com- 
monwealth Ave., Boston.... 320 

Eben S. Draper, Adin St., 
Hopedale 152 

Andrew Joseph Gillis, 5 Green- 
leaf St., Newburyport 16 

Blanks 25 

Total 513 



Congressman, Fifth District 

Edith Nourse Rogers, 444 An- 

dover St., Lowell 479 191 51 52 33 163 969 

Blanks 34 26 2 6 8 76 

Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 



Councillor, Sixth District 

Joseph O. Knox, 25 Sagamore 

St., Medford 28 

George E. Marchand, 396 Pine 

St., Lowell 49 

Walter Perham, Westford St., 

Chelmsford 394 

George W. Pratt, 35 Clark St., 

Somerville 14 

Blanks 28 

Total 513 



Senator, Eighth Middlesex 
District 

Edward Gaston Campbell, 15 

Fred St., Lowell 62 20 4 5 7 12 110 

John H. Preston, 19 Bertram 

St.. Lowell 121 61 6 15 8 54 265 

Charles A. Stevens, 377 Wilder 

St., Lowell 216 69 35 33 16 63 432 

William T. White, Jr., 291 

Wilder St., Lowell 56 56 6 5 2 31 156 

Blanks 58 11 2 11 82 

Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

34 



41 


4 


3 


3 


9 


88 


35 


3 


10 


5 


26 


128 


130 


41 


40 


23 


126 


754 


4 

7 


2 

3 


1 
4 


2 



1 
9 


24 

51 


217 


53 


58 


33 


171 


1045 



76 


7 


14 
13 


41 
4 



P. 5 


P. 6 Total 


2 


7 66 


12 


71 330 


19 



79 577 
14 72 


33 


171 1045 



Representative in General P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 

Court, Eleventh Middle- 
sex District 

George E. Ford, Whitcomb 
Ave., Littleton 40 

Louis Pfeiffer, South Rd., 
Bedford 161 

Edward J. Robbins, Westford 

St., Chelmsford 276 114 41 49 

Blanks 37 13 4 4 

Total 513 217 53 58 

District Attorney, Northern 
District 

Warren L. Bishop, 80 Main 

St., Wayland 316 117 31 37 21 103 625 

Kenneth C. Dunlop, 371 High- 
land, Newton 36 18 11 11 3 16 95 

George Stanley Harvey, 92 

Maple St., Maiden 84 56 7 5 7 29 188 

Blanks 77 26 4 5 2 23 137 

Total ' 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Register of Probate and Insol- 
vency, Middlesex County 
Loring P. Jordon, 12 Church 

St., Wakefield 388 

Blanks 125 

Total 513 

County Commissioner, Middlesex 

Erson B. Barlow, 85 Sanders 
Ave., Lowell 373 160 41 46 25 138 783 

John Ernest Quigley, 153 Jef- 
ferson St., Everett 

Blanks 

Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Associate Commissioners, 

Middlesex County 
Daniel J. Gorman, 55 Simpson 

Ave., Somerville 51 39 9 12 25 21 157 

John M. Keyes,. 33 Monument 

St., Concord 240 78 26 23 17 73 457 

Melvin G. Rogers, Whipple * 

Rd., Tewksbury 359 139 42 43 23 136 742 

Blanks 376 178 29 38 1 112 734 

Total 1026 434 106 116 66 342 2090 

County Treasurer 
Charles E. Hatfield, 108 Cherry 

St., Newton 390 164 39 47 29 132 801 

Blanks 123 53 14 11 4 39 244 



67 


42 


46 


29 


131 


803 


50 


11 


12 


4 


40 


242 


117 


53 


58 


33 


171 


1045 



38 


27 


3 


4 


4 


11 


87 


102 


30 


9 


8 


4 


22 


175 



Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

35 



State Committee P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 3 P. 6 Total 
Joseph F. Montminy, 723 

Moody St., Lowell 327 141 34 41 23 104 670 

Blanks 186 76 19 17 10 67 375 

Total 513 217 53 58 33 171 1045 

Delegates to State Convention 

Royal Shawcross 380 164 43 44 17 129 777 

Sidney Dupee 366 154 38 43 16 122 739 

Harold C. Petterson 367 153 42 49 15 125 751 

Nellie R. Picken 346 150 39 43 16 117 711 

Roy A. dough 363 149 38 44 15 122 731 

Grace Craig Perham 364 150 40 43 16 127 740 

Blanks 1114 382 78 136 454 2164 

Total 3300 1302 318 266 231 1196 6613 

Town Committee 

George A. Mcintosh 321 121 36 42 26 120 666 

Sidney E. Dupee 338 134 36 39 28 114 689 

Caroline Wright 332 131 36 39 27 116 681 

Walter Perham 345 130 38 42 29 119 703 

Robert W\ Barris 328 128 36 46 26 113 677 

Jennie S. Brown 323 129 36 39 26 114 667 

Royal Shawcross 338 145 38 42 26 116 705 

John H. Valentine 324 137 37 41 25 108 672 

Harold C. Petterson 338 137 38 44 26 118 701 

Edna E. Briggs 321 132 36 39 26 117 671 

Nellie R. Picken 323 137 36 38 25 112 671 

Roy A. Cough 339 135 36 40 25 116 691 

Clarence Audoin 320 135 37 38 25 1 10 665 

Grace Craig Perham 329 128 36 39 27 112 671 

Bessie A. Perham 338 129 36 39 27 102 670 

Edward J. Robbins 366 132 38 41 27 113 717 

Emma A. Dane 326 127 36 39 26 117 671 

George W. Petterson 330 126 36 39 25 109 665 

Annie C. Davis 329 129 36 39 26 110 669 

Roger W.Boyd 339 126 36 40 26 115 682 

Sinai Simard 325 128 36 38 25 110 662^ 

George F. Cutler 323 134 37 39 25 109 667 

Ernest A. Ferron ' 320 134 36 38 25 109 662 

Ella M. Nath 321 137 38 39 26 10S 669 

John J. Carr 320 132 37 38 25 109 661 

Octave L. Herault .321 135 37 39 25 109 666 

G. Carlton Brown 322 127 37 40 25 110 661 

Elmer Trull 322 130 38 40 25 109 664 

James A. Grant 332 127 38 41 25 121 684 

John G. Parker 335 137 37 40 25 121 695 

Blanks 6942 2692 489 215 1738 12076 

Governor 
John T. Cummings, 433 Adams 

St., Boston 1 2 3 

Joseph B. Ely, 66 Broad St., 

Westfield 8 33 1 30 1 5 78 

John F. Fitzgerald, 39 Welles 

Ave., Boston 5 7 1 2 1 2 18. 

Blanks 1 4 3 1 9 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

36 



Lieutenant-Governor P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 

Strabo V. Claggett, 1820 
Washington St., Newton... 3 10 11 1 25 

John F. Malley, 188 Common- 
wealth Ave., Newton 1 11 1 2 1 4 20 

Charles S. Murphy, 330 Com- 
modore Rd., Worcester 5 9 1 9 24 

Michael C. O'Neil, 40 Summer 

St., Everett 3 7 8 1 2 21 

Blanks 3 7 3 4 1 18 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Secretary 

Arthur G. Flynn, 17 Lancaster 

Ave., Revere 8 9 2 8 1 3 31 

Chester J. O'Brien, 127 Wash- 
ington St., Boston 4 17 14 1 1 37 

Joseph Santosuosso, 60 School 

St., Boston 1 5 6 2 14 

Blanks 2 13 3 6 2 26 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Treasurer 

John H. Dorsey, 23 Melville 

Ave., Boston 14 2 7 

Charles F. Hnrlev, 57 Fresh 

Pond Lane, Cambridge 1 5 6 12 

Fred H. Rourke, 423 Steavens 

St., Lowell 13 25 2 22 2 7 71 

Blanks 10 3 4 1 18 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Auditor 

Francis T. Hurley, 106 Inman 
St., Cambridge 6 17 1 11 2 37 

Francis J. O'Gorman, 39 Cosh- 
man Rd., Boston 1 7 1 6 1 16 

Jerome J. Shea, 8 Osgood St., 
Greenfield 3 5 9 2 1 20 

Blanks 5 15 3 8 4 35 

Total 15- 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Attorney-General 

Henry P. Fielding, 15 Mon- 
tague St, Boston 2 4 3 1 1 11 

William R. Sharton, Reading. 1 4 2 4 11 

Harold W. Sullivan, 100 Lan- 

mark Rd, Boston 8 21 19 1 5 54 

Blanks 4 15 3 8 2 32 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

37 



Senator in Congress P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 

Marcus A. Coolidge, 164 Blos- 
som St., Fitchhurg 5 23 21 5 54 

Eugene N. Foss, 11 Revere St., 

• Boston 2- 1 1 4 

Peter J. Joyce, 100 Charles St., 
Boston 2 2 

Thomas C. O'Brien, 76 Maple- 
ton St., Boston 2 9 1 1 1 14 

Joseph F. O'Connell, 155 Kil- 
syth St., Boston 8 3 2 9 1 2 25 

Blanks 5 2 2 9 



Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Congressman, Fifth District 

Joseph M. Halloran, 317 

Chelmsford St., Lowell 7 21 2 23 2 4 59 

Blanks 8 23 3 11 4 49 



11 


27 


2 


22 


1 


4 


67 


1 


1 





3 


1 


1 


7 











2 








? 


1 

2 


4 

12 




3 



7 







3 


5 
27 



Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



Councillor, Sixth District 

John H. Connor, 106 Pleasant 
St., Lowell 

Edward J. Coughlin, 54 Dane 
St., Somerville 

Perina J. Delory, 27 Welling- 
ton Ave., Everett 

Jeremiah F. McGrath, 31 Lin- 
den St., Somerville 

' Blanks 

Total 15 



Senator, Eighth Middlesex District 

Edward F. Purcell, 15 Gar- 

wett St., Lowell 3 14 

Robert R. Thomas, 24 Loring 

St., Lowell 11 18 

Blanks 1 12 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 



Representative, Eleventh 
Middlesex District 

Karl M. Perham, Dalton Rd. 

Chelmsford 

Blanks 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

38 



1 


13 


2 


2 


35 


1 


17 





4 


51 


3 


4 





2 


22 



15 


32 


2 


26 


2 


5 


82 





12 


3 


8 





3 


26 



p. ] 


I\2 


P. 3 


P. 4 


P. 5 


p 


. 6 Total 


9 


32 


2 


27 


1 




4 75 


3 


2 








1 




1 7 


2 
1 


4 
6 



3 


3 
4 








1 10 

2 16 



10 


23 


2 


18 


2 


4 


59 


5 


21 


3 


16 





4 


49 



District Attorney, 

Northern District 

James J. Bruin, 161 School St., 

Lowell 

John F. Daley, 1492 Cambridge 

St., Cambridge 

Charles H. McGlue, 140 

Brattle St., Cambridge 

Blanks 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

John J. Botler, 6 Bratley St., 

Wakefield 

Blanks 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

Commissioner, Middlesex County 

Robert F. Donovan, 82 Wallace 
St., Somerville 2 

Joshua T. Nowell, 64 Nowell 
St., Melrr.sc- 2 

John Ernest Quigley, 153 Jef- 
ferson Ave., Everett 4 

Blanks 7 

Total 15 5 34 2 8 108 



Associate Commissioner, 
Middlesex County 

E. Perry Johnson, 16 West St., 

Arlington 7 20 2 17 2 4 52 

John J. Noreau, Jr., 14 Dell 

St., Somerville 6 15 1 7 2 3 34 

Blanks 17 53 7 44 9 130 



\7 


2 


18 


1 


2 


42 


1 





2 


1 





6 


11 





6 





3 


24 


15 


3 


8 





3 


36 



Total 30 88 10 68 4 16 216 

County Treasurer 

J. Frank Facey, 54 Pemberton 

St., Cambridge 6 21 1 13 2 2 45 

Charles E. Hatfield, 108 Cherry 

St., Newton 2, 4 1 8 1 16 

Blanks 7 19 3 13 5 47 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

State Committee, 

l:i(jhth Middlesex District 

Cornelius F. Cronin, 344 Var- 

num Ave., Lowell 11 25 1 20 1 3 61 

Blanks 4 19 4 14 1 5 47 

Total 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 

39 



Delegates to State Convention P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 

John E. Harrington 12 35 4 24 2 5 82 

William H. Quigley 12 34 2 21 2 5 76 

Frank J. Garvey 12 35 2 22 2 5 78 

John P. Quirk 11 32 4 20 2 5 74 

Daniel E. Haley 12 33 2 19 2 5 73 

John J. Meagher 11 32 2 25 1 5 76 

George A. McNulty 11 31 4 23 2 5 76 

James T. Savage 11 32 2 20 1 5 71 

Karl M. Perham 12 31 2 25 2 5 77 

John Conaton 11 30 2 20 1 5 69 

Blanks 385 119 24 3 30 

Tozvn Committee 

John E. Harrington 12 31 

William H. Quigley 12 32 

Frank J. Garvey 13 32 

John P. Quirk 12 30 

Daniel E. Haley 12 30 

John J. Meagher 12 29 

George A. McNulty 12 31 

James J. Savage 12 30 

Carl M. Perham 14 29 

Tohn Conaton 12 29 

Blanks 377 137 30 3 30 

Total Democratic Votes 15 44 5 34 2 8 108 



2 


20 


2 


5 


72 


2 


17 


2 


5 


70 


2 


18 


2 


5 


72 


2 


17 


2 


5 


68 


2 


17 


2 


5 


68 


2 


21 


1 


5 


70 


2 


21 


2 


5 


73 


2 


18 


1 


5 


68 


2 


19 


2 


5 


71 


2 


17 


1 


5 


66 



40 



WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION 

November 4, 1930 

Middlesex, ss. 

To Harold C. King, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Elec- 
tions to meet in their several polling places, viz. : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre 
Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford 
Precinct 3, Historical Hall, West Chelmsford 
Precinct 4, School House. East Chelmsford 
Precinct 5, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford 
Precinct 6, Golden Cove School House, Westlands 

On Tuesday, the Fourth day of November, 1930, being the first Tuesday 
after the first Monday in said month, at Twelve o'clock noon for the fol- 
lowing officers : ■ 

Governor for this Commonwealth 

Lieutenant Governor for this Commonwealth 

Secretary for this Commonwealth 

Treasurer for this Commonwealth 

Auditor for this Commonwealth 

Attorney General for this Commonwealth 

Senator in Congress for this Commonwealth . . 

Congressman for the Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor for the Sixth Councillor District 

Senator in the Eighth Senatorial District 

One Representative for the General Court in the 11th Representative 
District 

District Attorney for Middlesex County 

Register of Probate and Insolvency for Middlesex County 

One County Commissioner for the County of Middlesex 

Two Associate County Commissioners for the County of Middlesex 

Treasurer for the County of Middlesex 
and to act upon the following matters : 

Acceptance of the following, "Proposed Amendment to the Constitu- 
tion?" 

QUESTION NO. 1 

ARTICLE XXI of the articles of amendment is hereby annulled and 
the following is adopted in place thereof : 

ARTICLE XXI. In the year nineteen hundred and thirty-five and 
every tenth year thereafter a census of the inhabitants of each city and town 
shall be taken and a special enumeration shall be made of the legal voters 
therein. Said special enumeration shall also specify the number of legal 

41 



voters residing in each precinct of each town containing twelve thousand 
or more inhabitants according to said census and in each ward of each city. 
Each special enumeration shall be the basis for determining the representa- 
tive districts for the ten-year period, beginning with the first Wednesday 
in the fourth January following said special enumeration, provided, that 
such districts as established in the year nineteen hundred and twenty-six 
shall continue in effect until the first Wednesday in January in the year 
nineteen hundred and thirty-nine. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hundred and forty 
members, which shall be apportioned by the general court, at its first regular 
session after the return of each special enumeration, to the several counties 
of the commonwealth, equally, as nearly as may be, according to their 
relative numbers of legal voters, as ascertained by said special enumerations ; 
and the town of Cohasset, in the county of Norfolk shall, for this purpose, 
as well as in the formation of districts as hereinafter provided, be considered 
a part of the county of Plymouth ; and it shall be the duty of the secretary 
of the commonwealth to certify, as soon as may be after it is determined by 
the general court, the number of representatives to which each county, shall 
be entitled, to the board authorized to divide such county into representative 
districts. The county commissioners or other body acting as such or, in 
lieu thereof, such board by law, shall, within thirty days after such certifi- 
cations by the secretary of the commonwealth or within such other periods 
as the general court may by law provide, assemble at a shire town of their 
respective counties, and of contiguous territory and assignes representatives 
thereto, so that each representative in such county will represent an equal 
number of legal voters as nearly as may be ; and such districts shall be so 
formed that no town and no ward of a city shall be divided therefor nor 
shall any district be made which shall be entitled to elect more than three 
representatives. The general court may by law limit the time within which 
judicial proceedings may be instituted calling in question any such apportion- 
ment division or assignment. Every representative, for one year at least 
immediately preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of the 
district for which he is chosen and shall cease to represent such district- 
when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the commonwealth. The district 
in each county shall be numbered by the board creating the same, and a 
description of each, with the numbers thereof and the number of legal 
voters therein, shall be returned by the board, to the secretary of the com- 
monwealth, the county treasurer of such county, and to the clerk of every 
city or town in such county, to be filed and kept in their respective offices. 
The manner of calling and conducting the elections for their choice of 
representatives, and of ascertaining their election, shall be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE XXII of the articles of amendment if hereby annulled and 
the following is adopted in place thereof : 

ARTICLE XXII. Each special enumeration of legal voters required 
in the preceding article of amendment shall likewise be the basis for deter- 
mining the senatorial districts and also the councillor districts for the ten- 
year period beginning with the first Wednesday in the fourth January 
following such enumerations; provided, that such districts as established in 

42 



the year nineteen hundred and twenty-six shall continue in effect until the 
first Wednesday in January and thirty-nine. The senate shall consist of 
forty members. The general court shall, at its first regular session after the 
return of each special enumeration, divide the commonwealth territory, each 
district to contain, as nearly as may be, an equal number of legal voters 
according to said special enumeration ; provided, however, that no town or 
ward of a city shall be divided therefor; and such districts shall be formed 
as nearly as may be, without uniting two counties or parts of two or more 
counties, into one district. The general court may, by law, limit the time 
within which judicial proceedings may be instituted calling in question such 
divisions. Each district shall elect one senator, who shall have been an 
inhabitant of this commonwealth five years at least immediately preceding 
his election and at the time of his election shall be an inhabitant of the 
district for which he is chosen ; and he shall cease to represent such sena- 
torial district when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the commonwealth. 
Acceptance of the following Laws Proposed by Initiate Petition. 

QUESTION NO. 3 

"An act to amend chapter one hundred and thirty-one of the General 
Laws." 

The polls will be open from twelve o'clock noon to eight o'clock P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies 
thereof seven days at least before the time of said meeting as directed by 
vote of the Town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of the Warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. Given under our hands this 
twenty-fifth day of October, A.D. 1930. 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN, 
FRANK J. LUPIEN, 
ROYAL SHAWCROSS, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



A true copy, attest : 
Harold C. King, Constable. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested copies of the same at 
the Post Office in the center of the Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelms- 
ford, West Chelmsford, and at the School House, East Chelmsford, and at 
the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven days before the date hereof 
as within directed. 

HAROLD C. KING, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, October 25, 1930. 

43 



STATE ELECTION 



November 4, 1930 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, 
qualified to vote in State Election, said meeting held pursuant to Warrant 
duly posted in the six precincts of the Town, the following candidates 
received the following votes set against their respective names and also the 
following is the vote on the questions as were set forth in the said Warrant, 
as follows : 

P. 1 
Governor 
Aiken, S. L. P 10 



P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 



Allen, Rep 
Cantor, C. P 
Ely, Dem.. . 
Lewis, Soc. 
Blanks .... 



633 
2 

148 

1 

15 



5 

352 

1 

362 

11 

15 



1 



32 
2 
1 



3 
100 


119 

6 

2 





72 
3 
3 



25 



52 260 1476 



3 

757 
24 
38 



Total 809 746 

Lieutenant Governor 

Claggett, Dem 157 323 

Correia, C. P 3 1 

Surridge, S. L. P 1 6 

Williams, S. P 4 7 

Youngman, Rep 610 362 

Blanks 34 

Total 809 746 

Secretary 

Blessington, S. L. P 3 3 

Cook, Rep 621 353 

Coolidge, S. P 13 24 

Dawson, C. P 2 2 

O'Brien, Dem 124 316 

Blanks 46 48 

Total 809 746 

Treasurer 

Burrell, Rep 441 312 

Hoffman, C. P 4 2 

Hurley, Dem. 277 355 

Hutchins, S. P 10 10 

Oram, S. L. P 2 4 

Blanks 75 63 

Total 809 746 

Auditor 

Cook, Rep 499 346 

Fieldman, S. P 4 10 

Hurley, Dem 227 332 

Oddie, C. P 3 2 

Oelcher, S. L. P 8 3 

Blanks 68 53 

Total 809 746 

44 



115 230 80 343 2323 



26 






1 

83 

2 

1 

20 



62 


37 
2 
1 

13 



106 

1 



03 
1 
? 



78 106 
9 10 



1 

100 

10 

1 

104 
14 



1 

59 





16 
4 



85 



113 

10 


22 



1 

101 

3 

2 
39 



70 

2 

31 





12 



91 

8 

105 





26 



53 



20 



1 

6 



4 

76 





28 



697 

5 

11 

24 



55 262 1473 
2 11 113 



115 230 80 343 2323 



2 11 

263 1479 

8 57 



6 
634 
136 



115 230 80 343 232X 



48 206 1154 



9 

909 

35 

9 
207 



115 230 80 343 2323 



235 1294 



28 

791 

5 

12 
193 



115 230 80 343 2323 



1 


3 

55 

258 

26 



13 

5 

29 

630 

1483 

163 



250 1419 



83 
1 

4 
5 



813 

5 

1 

21 

64 



80 343 2323 



11 32 467 
67 304 1791 

2 7 65 



Attorney General P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 

Becker, S. L. P 3 6 1 2 

Tanhonen, C. P 2 3 

Sherman, S. P 3 9 3 11 

Sullivan, Dem 120 315 23 101 16 

Warner, Rep 628 362 79 98 58 

Blanks 53 51 10 19 4 

Total 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Senator in Congress 

Butler, Rep 615 340 74 90 50 

Coolidge, Dem 172 377 35 120 26 

Kinsalas, S. L. P 1 2 1 

Lerner, C P 1 

McBride, S. P 2 5 271 

Blanks 19 23 4 11 2 

Total 809 746 115 230 

Congressman, Fifth District 

Halloran, Dem 77 249 14 84 

Rogers, Rep 716 473 96 135 

Blanks 16 24 5 11 

Total 809 746 115 230 

Councillor, Sixth District 

Connor, Dem 148 335 25 116 

Knox, Rep 592 346 74 92 

Blanks 69 65 16 22 

Total 809 746 115 230 

Senator, Eighth Middlesex District 

Steven, Rep 622 380 87 110 

Thomas, Dem 145 318 22 105 

Blanks 42 48 6 15 

Total 809 746 115 230 

Representative in General Court 
Eleventh Middlesex District 

Perham, Dem 438 446 54 149 

Pfeiffer, Rep 330" 260 49 65 

Blanks 41 40 12 16 

Total 809 746 115 230 

District Attorney 

Bishop, Rep 626 364 80 102 

Daly, Dem 114 297 18 102 

Blanks 69 85 17 26 

Total - 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

45 



80 343 2323 



21 61 706 

52 252 1408 

7 30 209 



80 343 2323 



56 267 1522 

21 61 672 

3 15 129 



80 343 2323 



52 147 1286 

26 178 908 

2 18 129 

80 343 2323 



55 263 1490 

16 50 597 

9 30 236 



P. 1 P. 2 P. 3 P. 4 P. 5 P. 6 Total 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

Butler, Dem 130 302 18 102 17 60 629 

Jordan, Rep 597 354 75 96 53 241 1416 

Blanks 82 90 22 32 10 42 278 

Total 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Middlesex County Commissioner 

Barlow, Rep 624 397 78 103 55 265 1522 

Donovan, Dem 103 271 17 91 15 46 543 

Blanks 82 78 20 36 10 32 258 

Total 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Associate County Commissioner 
( Tzvo ) 

Johnson, Dem 98 235 16 80 16 45 490 

Keres, Rep 495 295 57 69 46 214 1176 

Noreau, Jr., Dem 81 224 10 67 11 33 426 

Rogers, Rep 513 293 63 93 48 218 1228 

Blanks 431 445 84 151 39 176 1326 

Total 1618 1492 230 460 160 686 4646 

County Treasurer 

Facey, Dem 104 280 16 91 17 48 556 

Hatfield, Rep 577 341 76 89 50 240 1373 

Blanks 128 125 23 50 13 55 394 

Total 80? 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Question No. 1 — 

Apportioning Districts 

Yes 292 254 40 70 22 113 791 

No 120 106 11 30 17 63 3TT 

Blanks 397 386 64 130 41 167 1185 

Total , 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Question No. 2 — 

Repeal Baby Volstead Act 

Yes 279 411 39 133 35 123 1020 

No 423 206 56 50 36 174 944 

Blanks 107 130 20 47 9 46 359 

Total 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

Question No. 3 — 

Regarding Steel Traps 

Yes 419 387 60 127 36 184 1213 

No 248 169 24 42 32 99 * 614 

Blanks 142 190 31 61 12 60 496 

Total 809 746 115 230 80 343 2323 

46 



MEETING OF TOWN CLERKS 

in the 11th Middlesex Representative District, November 12, 1930 

In accordance with Section 125, Chapter 54 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a legal meeting of the Town Clerks in the 
Eleventh Middlesex Representative District was held on November 12, 1930, at 
3 P.M. at the Town Clerk's Office, Chelmsford, Mass., for the purpose of 
declaring the elected Representative to the General Court at the State Election 
held on November 4, 1930 ; the result was as follows : 

Bed- Chelms- Little- West- 

Acton ford Carlisle ford ton ford Total 
Karl Perham, Dem., 

Chelmsford, Mass 166 156 62 1286 113 384 2167 

Louis Pfeiffer, Rep., 

Bedford, Mass 637 436 107 908 329 446 2863 

Blanks 101 59 17 129 39 85 430 

Total 904 651 186 2323 481 915 5460 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, Chelmsford. 

ALBERT J. BERRY, Bedford. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, Acton. 

RUTH C. WILKINS, Carlisle. 

CHARLES L. HILDRETH, Westford. 
Recorded bv Harold C. Petterson. Town Clerk, Chelmsford, Mass. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

At upper Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre, Monday Evening, 
December 15, 1930 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To Harold C. King, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in the Upper 
Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on Monday, the fifteenth day of Decem- 
ber, 1930, at eight o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept a legacy of Ten 
Thousand Dollars under the will of the late Amos F. Adams, formerly of 
Newton, Massachusetts ; the income to be used for the care and preservation 
of the buildings and grounds of the Adams Library, and the balance of said 
income and interest to be used for the purchase of books for said library ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer Seventeen 
Hundred Dollars from the Over-lay and Reserve Fund to the Charity 
Account; or act in relation thereto. 

47 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vole to transfer One Hundred 
and Seventy-five Dollars from the "Fund for the purchase of a Highway 
Truck" to the Assesssor's Salary Account ; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereto at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, and West Chelmsford, and at the School 
House, East Chelmsford, and at the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, 
seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the meeting afore- 
said. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this sixth day of December, in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and thirty. 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN, 
FRANK J. LUPIEX. 
ROYAL SHAWCROSS, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 

Middlesex, ss. 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested 
copies of the same at the post offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford, and at the School House, 
East Chelmsford, and at the Golden Cove School House. Westlands, seven 
days before the date hereof, as within directed. 

HAROLD C. KING, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 15, 1930 

At a special meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town Affairs, held pursuant to Warrant dulv posted, 
said meeting, held in the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre, Decem- 
ber 15, 1930, at 8 P.M. The meeting was called to order by Moderator 
Walter Perham and the Warrant read by Town Clerk Harold C. Petterson ; 
the following business was transacted : 

UNDER ARTICLE ONE— 

On a motion made by Selectman E. G. Brown, it was voted: That the 
Town of Chelmsford accept a legacy of Ten Thousand Dollars under the 
will of the late Amos F. Adams, formerly of Newton, Mass., the income to 
be used for the care and preservation of the buildings and grounds of the 
Adams Library and the balance of said income and interest to be used for 
the purchase of books for said library; and that the before mentioned sum 
of Ten Thousand Dollars be intrusted to the care of the Adams Library 
Trustees. 

48 



UNDER ARTICLE TWO— 

On a motion made by Selectman Frank Lupien, it was voted to transfer 
the sum of $1700.00 from the Overlay Reserve Fund to the account called 
Outside Poor. 

UNDER ARTICLE THREE— 

On a motion made by H. C. Sweetser, it was voted to transfer the sum 
of $160.00 from the account called Fund for Purchase of Highway Truck 
to the Assessors Salary account. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 8.15 P.M. 

WALTER PERHAM, Moderator. 
HAROLD C. PETTERSON, Clerk. 



40 



VITAL STATISTICS 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1930 

Attention is called to the following vital statistics. It is important that 
these records shall be correct. If any errors are discovered the Town clerk 
will deem it a favor to have them reported at once so that corrections may be 
made. 

As required by Chapter 16, Section 15, General Laws of Massachusetts, 
notice is hereby given that the Town Clerk will furnish blanks for returns of 
births to parents, householders, physicians and registered hospital officers 
applying therefor. 



BIRTHS RECORDED 
JAN. 

2 Ephraim William Ayotte Henry and Elsie (Manseau) 

5 Watt Charles E. and Lois (Braden) 

11 Thelma Minerva Burton Harry and Doris (Luke) 

15 Ruth Elaine Pearson Fritz and Rose (Paignon) 

16 John Campbell Charles and Mary (Tansey) 

19 Armand Leon Gerard Pinardi Leon and Helene (Tremblay) 

24 Christopher David Bartlett Robert and Margaret (Hetherington) 

FEB. 

1 Florence McNulty George and Ellen (Roark) 

8 Florence Grace Morrell Edward and Nellie (Stuart) 

8 Lillian Roach Thomas and Lillian (Greeley) 

11 Jane Anne Percival John C. and Madeline (Roche) 

13 Margaret Agnes Trainor Dominick and Margaret (Borden) 

15 Joseph Gideon Arthur Fortin Jos. Alfred and Mary Anne (Lacomb) 

23 (Stillborn) 

24 Marion Zaher George and Romia (Hadadly) 

25 Ronald George Haberman Carl and Lena (Parkhurst) 

25 Ruth Mary Hilton Luther and Mary Louise (Owens) 

26 William James Campbell William N. and Mabel (Mullen) 

27 Emanuel Steve and Theodora (Katsika) 

MAR. 

1 Evelyn Lois Flavell Chester and Corrinne (House) 

4 Mary Jane Kinch Raymond G. and Mary Jane (Smith) 

7 Illegitimate 

14 Eleanor Ruth Brown George O. and Lucy (Weatherbee) 

18 Kenneth Allen Foster Edward Lincoln and Myrtle (Buckley) 

19 Joan Eva McEnany Leo Henry and Adella (Parkhurst) 

22 Russo Jimie and Anna (Esposito) 

24 Frances Melia John and Josephine (Enwright) 

26 Frances Ellen Ouellette Fred O. and Fannie C. (Hedlund) 

28 Robert James Desmarais George R. and Elsie May (Brooks) 

29 Sousa Manuel J. and Isabella (Ferreira) 

30 Joyce Eillen Haley Allan R. and Vivian (Stuart) 

50 



APR. 

2 Robert Paul Emerson John Joseph and Annie (Dyke) 

3 Kenneth Walter Saunders Walter and Ophelia (Vasselin) 

4 Theresa Vennard Frank and Theresa (Bell) 

6 John Kerrigan Thomas J. and Ellen (O' Sullivan) 

9 Eleanor Mary Caswell Alfred L. and Lena L. (Lyman) 

16 Premature 

18 Maurice Joseph Lambert, 3rd Maurice Jos., 2nd, and Isabel (Boot) 

19 Stillborn 

19 Raymond George Pomerleau Joseph and Irma (Maheu) 

20 George Richard Welch George R. and Mary A. (Corkery) 

22 Robert Charles Dinnigan Charles F. and Alice (Whitworth) 

22 Stidstone Elmer and Grace (Houston) 

23 Arthur Edward Norton Edward and Wilma (Perkins) 

28 Erving Andrew Blaisdell Andrew I. and Grace (Switzer) 

29 Frank Gordon Turner Frank and Lucy (Armitage) 

MAY 

3 Arthur Allan Adams Robert M. and Marion F. (Phelps) 

3 Margaret Mary Larkin John and Anna (Walsh) 

4 Patricia Ellen Lyons Walter Joseph and Mildred Margaret 

(Herbert) 

7 Alary Rita Sears Louis and Mary (Raposa) 

9 Marie Phyllis Hayes Phillip and Etta (Magnant) 

24 Daniel William Dexter, Jr Daniel W. and Lilla M. (Pattison) 

25 Patricia Marie Clancy (Twin) . . James A. and Marion R. (Quinn) 

25 Joseph Gerard Clancy (Twin) . . James A. and Marion R. (Quinn) 

26 Nikolai Cinczavicz Tony and Stephania (Brudawka) 

26 Walter Ridgeway Wilkins, Jr. . . . Walter Ridgeway and Mildred Helen 

(Ny strom) 

JUNE 

3 Marshall Neil White Arthur and Dorothy (Dixon) 

8 Ernest Harold LeBrun Emile and Alice (Fraser) 

20 Bessie Suzzane Blackie Harold and Annette (Gaudette) 

23 Clarence Milton Hefler, Jr Clarence M. and Alberta V. (Richard- 
son) 

25 Theodore Alvard Ollson, Jr Theodore A. and Gertrude A. (Blake) 

25 Nelson Linwood Brake Nelson Henry and Thelma Evangeline 

(Williams) 

30 Theresa Quinn Timothy F. and Mary L. (Lepine) 

30 Guy Charles Staveley, Jr Guy Charles and Ada Mary (Coldwell) 

30 Eva Gosselin Hormidos and Laudia (Pomerleau) 

JULY 

2 William Mills Wallace Lawrence A. and Fern E. (Hayes) 

4 Natalie Virginia Ramin Benedick and Elizabeth (Dixon) 

5 Alice May Heald Roland and Marguerite (Nickerson) 

5 Marie Juliet Rioux Charles Eugene and May (Boudreau) 

19 Elizabeth Ann Byam Ernest and Luella (Adams) 

22 Illegitimate 

30 Myles Alan Kiberd James and Marjorie ( McGonagle) 

51 



AUG. 

2 Bernard McArdle Bernard and Mary (McKay) 

3 Pierre Camille Boucher Camille and Paulette (Moreau) 

4 Deamicis Victor and Rancea (Launcia) 

5 Martha Anne Quinn Martin and Martha (Kivlin) 

6 Lorraine Elizabeth Buchanan John James and Harriet (Stewart) 

1 1 Eugene Gagnon George Edward and Margaret 

(Conley) 

16 Douglas Leonard McElroy Leonard and Jennie (Pearson) 

18 Robert Hatfield White Harold G. and Frances (White) 

21 Theresa Marie Alice Villemaire. .Arthur and Amanda (Gauthier) 

23 Stillborn 

25 Paul Belida Demit and Vera (Behnski) 

26 Betty Ellen Stewart Harold W. and Ruth H. (Johnson ) 

28 Phyllis Lena Bourroughs Hobart and Edith (Brown) 

29 — Ziemba Vatenty and Bromislaua (Mikula) 

31 Marilyn Estelle Bennett Miles N. and Mary Elizabeth (Jones) 

SEPT. 

5 Dora Elda Locapo Joseph and Catcrina (Vitucci) 

15 Marie Dblores Lemay Alexandre and Lea (Peltier) 

16 Forrest Lewis A. and Marjorie L. (Bond) 

OCT. 

1 Burndrette Joseph H. and Letitia (Lairdieson) 

1 Richard Thomas Roberts Howard S. and Natalie ( Bellows) 

2 Ferreira Joseph and Maria A. (Goes) 

4 Marjorie Jean Harvey Clifford R. and Gladys (Drain) 

7 Richard Francis Meagher John J. and Mary R. (Lyons) 

5 Helen Carol Sawyer William Warren and Helen Gertrude 

(Carkin) 
9 Phyllis Beatrice Hale Albert L. and Cecilia (Tint) 

18 Stillborn 

28 John Crage Burns Lucian H. and Helen (Bailey) 

29 Melvin Francis Paquette Melvin A. and Lillian M. (Cocoran) 

29 Frederick Elton Silk Elton Louis Frederick and Mildred 

(Hoar) 
NOV. 

9 Thomas Stewart Shedd Henry Carleton and Anna Elizabeth 

(Stewart) 
9 Simpson James and Katherine (Clark) 

10 Norma May Melendy Norman and Edith (Robinson) 

11 Stillborn 

16 Joseph Desire Omer Poulin Amedee and Selina (Sevignv) 

19 Charles Belida Mike and Olka (Kostichko) 

29 Fay Louise Valentine John and Anna (Burrows) 

30 Doris Roberta Johnson Robert A. and Anna F. (Renstrom) 

DEC. 

1 Eddy Lawriston Delong .'. Edward and Jennie (Crowley) 

2 Shirley Mae Stokham Burton and Mary (O'Neil) 

9 Roger Allen Lewis. Harry and Lillian F. (Ryan) 

11 Donald Douglas Dearth Freeman and Abbie (Chamberlin) 

11 : Pickard. . ._ Ray H. and Effie (Adams) 

22 Marie Azema Therese Lavoie 

(Twin) Leo and Jeannette (Marchand) 

22 Marie Eugenie Beatrice Lavoie 

(Twin) Leo and Jeannette (Marchand) 

24 Enis Martin and Alma (Bergsten) 

27 Wilfred Lambert Thomas and Georgianna (Goudreault) 

29 — — Pope Harry and Blanch (Hayes) 

52 



MARRIAGES 

Date Name Residence Birthplace 

JAN. 

1 Elmer F. Peverill Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Ethel F. Hornbrook Westford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

3 Almon Irving Caswell Chelmsford, Mass Dover, N. H. 

Margaret Mary Tighe Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

11 Jonathan Cyril Craven Lowell, Mass Dracut, Mass. 

Berenice Broadbent Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

19 Milton Earl Hadley Lowell, Mass Chelmsford, Mass. 

Ida J. Wikander Chelmsford, Mass.. .Chelmsford, Mass. 

23 Harvey T. Parlee Chelmsford, Mass. . . Chelmsford, Mass. 

Harriet M. (Metcalf) Cornwall. .Chelmsford, Mass. ...New Brunswick 

FEB. 

1 1 Manuel J. Avila Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Capitolina Sousa Ribeiro Somerville, Mass.. St. Michael, Azores 

16 William Joseph Tobin Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Elizabeth Hartnett Chelmsford, Mass Ireland 

27 Ernest Leroy Parsons Ashland, Mass. Worcester, Mass. 

Hulda Viola Wadsworth Ashland, Mass Chelmsford, Mass. 

MAR. 

3 Francis O'Neill, Jr Boston, Mass .' . New York N Y 

Willella DeLampe (Rornheld) 

Stephenson . : Newton, Mass Chicago, 111. 

29 Norman Melendy Chelmsford, Mass Milford, N. H. 

Edith M. Robinson Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

APR. 

16 Remi Edgar Lassonde Westford, Mass Woonsocket, R. I. 

Harriet Carolyn Cornwall Chelmsford, Mass Nova Scotia 

19 Walter Joseph Lindsay Manchester, N. H.. Manchester, N. H. 

Evangeline Couture Manchester, N. H. . Manchester, N. H. 

20 Joseph G. Cabral Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Lucy G. Abreu Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

28 Carll Thomas Gleason Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Thelma Marie Luke Chelmsford, Mass. . Chelmsford, Mass. 

MAY 

3 Oscar Norman Olsen Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Georgina Adeline Thomson Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

5 A. Patrick Hill Manchester, N. H.. . W r oodsville, N. H. 

Frances Thomas Maysville, Ky Maysville, Ky. 

7 Harry A. Howland Concord, N. H. . No. Woodstock, N. H. 

Priscilla H. Barton Concord, N. H Concord, N. H. 

10 Arthur Lincoln Hardy Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Ruth Virginia Stirk Chelmsford, Mass Lowell. Mass. 

11 Howard F. Davis Manchester, N. H.. . .Lyndonville, Vt. 

Madeline K. Sawyer Manchester, N. H Patten, Me. 

18 Tames Collier Chelmsford, Mass Canada 

Bernadette Welch Chelmsford, Mass. . . Chelmsford, Ma^. 

21 Vincent Aidala Providence, R. I Italy 

Helena Cecilia Mitchell Chelmsford, Mass England 

28 George Albert Beane Boston. Mass Cambridge, Ma=s. 

Barbara Gorman Cambridge, Mass Brooklyn, N. Y. 

53 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

JUNE 

5 Edward W. Boutwell W. Andover, Mass..W. Andover, Mass. 

Ida F. (Brooks) Whiteley Chelmsford, A I ass Lowell, Mass. 

11 Leslie N. Hannaford Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Lillian MacLean Chelmsford, Mass. . Chelmsford, Mass. 

21 William Stirk Lowell, Mass San ford, Me. 

Marian L. Brennan Chelmsford, Alass. . . . Waltham, Mass. 

11 Albert E. Gaudette Chelmsford, Mass. . Chelmsford, Alass. 

Laura B. Gendreau Lowell, Alass Lowell, Alass. 

11 Herbert J. Neuman Chelmsford, Alass Seattle, Wash. 

Lucy Ai. Potter Chelmsford, Mass. . Chelmsford, Alass. 

28 Adams Bartlett J )utton Chelmsford, Alass. .Chelmsford, Alass. 

Ethel Marie Loss Cambridge. Mass. . . ( ambridge, Alass. 

28 John Joseph Mahoney Charlestown, Mass. Charlestown, Mass. 

Alary Frances Harrington Chelmsford, Alass. .Chelmsford, Alass. 

28 George Winthrop Paaschc Woburn, Alass Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gertrude Emma A -lac Donald Kezar Falls, Me Everett, Mass. 

28 Robert P. Shinkwin Chelmsford, Alass. .Chelmsford, Alass. 

'Mildred F. Colloty Lowell, Alass Waterbury, Conn. 

30 Gerard Provost ... Westford, Mass Canada 

Pierritte Moreau Chelmsford, Mass Canada 

JULY 

2 Roy Edward Blanchard Westford, Alass Tewksbury, Alass. 

Mildred Idella Stevens Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

10 Joseph Staveley . ... Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Alass. 

Elizabeth Chadbourn Lowell, Alass . .Lowell, Mass. 

12 Andrew J. Buckus Hampton, A r a Haverhill, Alass. 

Eliza Spaulding Chelmsford, Alass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

15 Edwin A. Lynde Lowell, Alass Alelrose, Alass. 

Isabella McDonald Chelmsford, Alass Canada 

16 Glenn A. Staveley Chelmsford, Alass Lowell, Alass. 

Hazel R. Thompson Lowell, Alass . . Lowell, Alass. 

21 George Castonguay * Chelmsford, Alass Van Buren, ATe. 

Albertine Sirois Nashua, N. H Canada 

21 Burton I. Stokham Chelmsford, Alass. . . St. Stephen, N. B. 

Alary D. O'Neil Chelmsford, Alass Lowell, Mass. 

22 James M. Stearns Chelmsford, Alass. Chelmsford, Alass. 

Marion Putnam S. Lyndboro, N. H. S. Lyndboro, N. H. 

27 Harvey John Gosselin Chelmsford, Alass Lowell, Alass. 

Lavinia B. (Potter) Hughes Tyngsboro. Mass. . .Tyngsboro, Mass. 

29 George Eugene St. Onge Westford, Alass Westford, Alass. 

Laura Maude Lavigne Westford, Alass Lowell, Mass. 

30 Joseph Couture Chelmsford, Alass Holyoke. Mass. 

Sarah (MorrilO Clough Chelmsford. Alass. Lake Village, N. H. 

AUG. 

1 Octave S. Foster Chelmsford, Alass Boston, Alass. 

Evelyn Walker Billerica, Alass South Carolina 

3 Leo James AlcGlinchey Chelmsford, Alass. . . .Westford, Alass. 

Blanche Emma Gauthier Chelmsford, Alass. Chelmsford, Alass. 

9 Andrew Bremmer Dobbie Manchester, N. H.. . Alanchester, N H. 

Marion Pattee White Alanchester, N. H. . . Alanchester, N. H. 

9 Richard Riddle Winchester, Alass Nashville, Tenn. 

Mildred Arabella Rodgers Cambridge. Alass Cambridge, Mass. 

24 Toseph De Costa Chelmsford. Alass. Alatanonsett. Mass. 

Mildred Perry Reed Chelmsford, Alass Lowell, Alass. 

25 William Henry Brady Somerville, Mass.. . .Cambridge. Alass. 

Aldora M. Decelle Chelmsford, Alass Canada 

54 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

SEPT. 

1 Francis W. Warren Stow, Mass Stow, Mass. 

Mary F. Coburn Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

2 Frederick Burne Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Dorothy Caroline Pevey Chelmsford, Mass Boston, Mass. 

6 Oscar Rodrigues Chelmsford, Mass Portugal 

Estelle Blanche Porter Billerica, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

11 James Simpson Chelmsford, Mass. . . . Medford, Mass. 

Katherine Clark Chelmsford, Mass Carlisle, Mass. 

16 Frank Sousa Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Myrtle Hodson Stoneham, Mass East Boston, Mass. 

20 Oscar F. Palmgren Lowell, Mass Sweden 

Alice M. Tongberg Chelmsford, Mass. . . . Pawtucket, R. I. 

20 Harold R. Swett Chelmsford, Mass. . . Woodsville, N. H. 

Shirley R. McGray Ayer, Mass Knox, Me. 

28 Joseph C. Tamkun Chelmsford, Mass Poland 

Frances C. Szylvian Westford, Mass Westford,, Mass. 

OCT. 

4 Charles Hatch Lowell, Mass Lowell, M ass. 

Antonia Sousa Chelmsford, Mass Portugal 

9 Harold Blodgett Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Marion Galloway Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

11 Alpin Anderson Carlisle, Mass Acton, Mass. 

Emma Plummer Lowell, Mass Manchester, N. H. 

21 Joseph Henry Smith Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Estelle Monette Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

NOV. 

1 Harold E. Hunter Chelmsford, Mass. . . Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Ethel A. Cunningham Chelmsford, Mass St. George, N. B,' 

8 Thorloaf Erikson Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford,' Alass." 

Tillie Octavia Peterson iVlaynard, Mass St. Louis, Mo. 

9 John P. Tansey Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Eva Marie LeBlanc Dracut, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

12 Frederick Latuch Nashua, N. H Nashua,' N. H. 

Hazel Harwood Nashua, N. H Nashua', N. H. 

15 George Champaguy Tyngsboro, Mass. . . Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Beatrice Bellows Barre, Mass Barre, Mass. 

17 Earl C. Wyman Tyngsboro, Mass. . . Tyngsboro', Mass' 

Antoinette Morrell Tyngsboro, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

21 Paul H. De Carteret Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford,' Mass. 

Lillian Frances Ryan Lowell, Mass Brockton, Mass. 

25 Gaetano Spano Lowell, Mass Glen Falls,' N. Y. 

Lena Locapo Chelmsford, A/[ass. Chelmsford, Mass' 

27 Hollis F. Moore Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Mabel Fay Russon Tyngsboro, Mass Westford,' Mass 

27 Elmer D. Stuart Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford', Mass. 

Ida Cayer Lowell, Mass Westfield, Mass. 

29 Benard Navickas Lowell, Mass Boston, Mass. 

Jenny Bomal Chelmsford, Mass Lowell Mass. 

DEC. 

7 Charles E. Moister Medford, Mass Somerville, Mass. 

Ethel A. Pigeon Lowell, Mass Boston, Mass. 

12 John J. Raskob, Jr Chelmsford, Mass. . . Wilmington, Del. 

Minerva E. Aaronson New Haven, Conn Ansonia, Conn. 

20 Clifford L. Lloyd Nova Scotia Nova Scotia 

Gertrude I. Daley Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

21 Raymond Earl Cahill Lowell, Mass. Lowell, Mass. 

Blanche Louise Ayotte Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

55 



DEATHS 
Date Name Year Mos. Days 

JAN. 

1 George Blanchard Bushee 79 8 29 

(Husband of Ann A. Malloy) 

7 Laukad Valentine 8 4 26 

8 Mary Louise Sargent 64 10 3 

(Widow of 
Warner Bartlett Sargent) 

20 Thomas F. Curry 71 

(Husband of Mary McMahon) 

21 A. Heady Park 73 4 10 

(Husband of Celia Butters) 

25 Charles Franklin Fellows 80 5 14 

(Widower of Maria Callahan) 

FEB. 

3 Ludger Cote 32 3 26 

(Husband of Delia La Rochelle) 
12 Victor E. Svenson 35 

(Husband of Mabel Wilson) 

14 John Joseph Sullivan 72 

16 Florence Lucy Burton 46 9 17 

(Wife of George E. Burton) 

18 Elise Bonneau 78 6 26 

(W T ife of Toussant Bonneau) 

23 (Stillborn) Fantozzi 

23 Raymond Laj eunnesse 2 22 

26 Frances S. Kenneson 78 1 3 

(Wife of William T. Kenneson) 
26 Mary Zaher 1 

MAR. 

14 John Leslie 57 3 

(Husband of Elizabeth Elliott) 

20 Moses Leroux 48 tt. . 

26 Herbert Leroy Bishop 63 2 

(Husband of Emily F. Wilson) 

26 Deborah Williams 49 6 12 

APR. 

6 William Joseph Brooks 29 

(Husband of Mary O'Rourke) 

6 John Kerrigan 0.2 hrs., 30 min. 

14 Ernest K. Hefler 1 5 11 

14 Charles H. Saunders 29 

17 Hastey V 2 hr. 

19 (Stillborn) Craven '. . . . 

21 Mary Ann Holt 86 17 

(Wife of George H. Holt) 
23 Catherine Lacourse 56 

(Wife of George Lacourse) 
30 Michael H. McKennedy 53 

(Husband of Catherine Harrington) 

JAN. 

8 Mary Kerins 8 10 5 

56 



11 


2 


: 2 


21 


10 

i l 


2 
'.'.'.'.'.'.28 


n 


5 


: 4 

i 6 


1 




1 


21 


i 4 

; o 


19 




1 8 


26 



Date Name Year Mos. Days 
MAY 

1 Aldina Santos 54, 

(Wife of Albert Santos) 

3 John Trubey 91 

(Husband of Emily Spurr) 

11 Agnes M. Wright 72, 

(Wife of William Wright) 

19 Evelyn May Bartlett 1 

22 James Griffiths Birtwell 86 

(Husband of Mary Ramsbottom) 

28 Edith Louise Trubey 4, 

JUNE 

3 Frances McCarthy 72 

5 Henrietta M. Clarke 53 

(Wife of Samuel J. Clarke) 

11 Charles Whitcomb 75 

(Husband of Lita Astell) 

13 Christopher D. Bartlett 

25 Daniel A. Reardon 65 

(Husband of Mary J. Garvey) 

25 Hattie A. Smith 75 

(Wife of Edward W. Smith) 

JULY 

9 Emma Ducharme 73 

(Wife of Thadde Ducharme) 

12 Emma C. Mattson 73 1 22 

(Wife of John Mattson) 

AUG. 

4 Florence I. Rawling 18 10 10 

15 Amy E. Stanley 53 10 

16 Ruth Shirlev Martel 2 10 10 

18 Adeline E. Carll 61 7 29 

19 Thomas Arthur Harmon 74 1 2 

23 (Stillborn) White 

25 Agnes V. Brown 24 6 21 

25 George Marchildon 64 3 30 

29 (Infant) Ziemba 0. .. 2 min. 

SEPT. 

4 Deamicis 1 

24 Rita A. Brennan 6 6 

27 Nellie Perham Parker 71 5 3 

OCT. 

2 Eugene A. Gagnon 1 29 

17 Robert M. Sullivan 1 23 

19 ( Stillbcrn) Landry 

21 George Crosby Libbee 62 10 6 

NOV. . 

1 Boleslaw Balkum 41 2 7 

5 Ednamae Cormick 21 11 10 

11 (Stillborn) Olson 

19 Robert M. Hill 74 3 19 

23 James McGovern 57 0. 

29 Louise May Greenwood 1 24 

57 



Date Name Year Days 

DEC. 

2 John J. Sylvia 50. 

(Husband of Marie S. Grant) 
6 Susan F. Clark 75 

(Widow of Rueben) 

26 Felix Proulx 

(Husband of Victoria L.) 

27 David Edward Scoble 41 

( 1 f usband of Helen Richardson ) 

29 Ferdinand A. Vasselin 85, 

(Husband of Harriett S.) 












12 


3 


6 


9 


18 


9 


27 



58 



JURY LIST FOR THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASS. 
Revised August 1, 1929 

Austin, Arthur W., Carpenter, Gay St., North Chelmsford. 

Adams, George C, Machinist, Wightman St., North Chelmsford. 

Alcorn, James, Farmer, Hunt Rd., South Chelmsford. 

Xo. 1. Brown, Eliphalet G., Printer, Chelmsford St., Westlands. 

No. 2. Burbeck, Eli T., Foreman, Chelmsford St., Westlands. 

Blomgren, Sigurd, Salesman, Beaulieu St., East Chelmsford. 

Beaulieu, William E., Carpenter, Amherst St., North Chelmsford. 

Connors, John E., Furniture Maker, Dartmouth St., North Chelmsford. 

No. 4. Cooke, Archibald, Brick Mason, Alain St., West Chelmsford. 

Daughraty, Charles, Box Maker, Mallock Rd., East Chelmsford. 

Dow, John C, Machinist, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 

No. 3. Ducharme, Timothy, Carpenter, Westford St., Chelmsford Centre. 

Edwards, A. Franklin, Moulder, Alain St., West Chelmsford. 

Emerson, Ralph, Auto Dealer, North Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Finnick, Charles, Farmer, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 

Fletcher, Fred L., Farmer, Westford Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

George, David B., Carpenter, Boston Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Grant, James R., Retired, Chelmsford St., Westlands. 

Grant, James A., Insurance, Chelmsford St., Westlands. 

Gray, Earl M., Banker, Warren Ave., Chelmsford Centre. 

Gustafson, A. Samuel, Electrician, Riverneck Rd., East Chelmsford. 

No. 5. Hamilton, Thomas L., Salesman, Westford St., Chelmsford Centre. 

No. 6. Haley, Daniel E., Manager, Bridge St., Chelmsford Centre. 

Hoezel, Charles E., Operator, Ripley St., North Chelmsford. 

Harrington, John E., Insurance, Highland Ave., North Chelmsford. 

Ingham, David, Retired, Chelmsford St.. Westlands. 

Jennison, Lewis H., Salesman, Gorham St., East Chelmsford. 

No. 7. Johnston, William J., Candy Maker, Dalton Rd., Westlands. 

Johnson, Wilhelm T., Tailor, North Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Johnson, John G., Tailor, North Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Kilburn, William J., Printer, Golden Cove Rd., Westlands. 

Kiberd, James, Sr., Painter, Newfield St., North Chelmsford. 

No. 8. Kimball, Perley J.. Farmer, Crosby St., Chelmsford Centre. 

No. 9. Lapham, Wilbur E., Farmer, Maple Rd., South Chelmsford. 

Lupien, Frank J., Machinist, Westford St., Chelmsford Centre. 

Mc Adams, John A., Draftsman, Stedman St., Westlands. 

Mcintosh, George A., Machinist, Subway Ave., Westlands. 

McGlinchev. Peter, Stonecutter, Main St., West Chelmsford. 

No. 10. Monahan, J. Carroll, Contractor, Main St., West Chelmsford. 

Meagher, John J.. Superintendent, Gorham St.. East Chelmsford. 

Paignon. Emile E., Grain Dealer. Proctor Rd.. South Chelmsford. 

Park, Albert S., Inspector. Boston Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Parker, John F.. Real Estate. Acton Rd., South Chelmsford. 

Perham. Karl M., Farmer, Dalton Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Parkhurst, Winthrop, Treasurer. Acton Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Picken. William T.. Office Manager, Middlesex St., North Chelmsford. 

Queen. Clifford, Laborer. Newfield St.. North Chelmsford. 

Quiglev. William H.. Engineer. Princeton St.. North Carolina. 

Reid. George S., Blacksmith, Alain St., West Chelmsford. 

Russell, Herbert S., Caretaker, Aliddlesex St.. North Chelmsford. 

Russell. Edward. Lumberman, North Rd., Chelmsford Centre. 

Rigby, Georcre. Operative. Dartmouth St.. North Chelmsford. 

Stearns. Edwin L.. Carpenter. Stedman St.. Westlands. 

Sullivan. Daniel W., Farmer, Riverneck Rd.. Chelmsford Centre. 

Sweetser. Hosmer W., Clerk. Chelmsford St., Westlands. 

Tncke. Edward, Sr.. Retired. Grosvenor St.. North Chelmsford. 

Yinal. John W., Retired, Groton Rd.. North Chelmsford. 

59 



No. 11. Waite, George L., Farmer, Acton Rd., South Chelmsford. 

Wheeler, Arthur O., Agent, Wright St., North Chelmsford. 

No. 12. Murphy, Edward P., Barber, Yale St., North Chelmsford. 



No. 1 drawn Sept. 16, 1929. 
No. 2 drawn Sept. 15, 1930. 
No. 3 drawn Oct. 24, 1930. 
No. 4 drawn Sept. 15, 1930. 
No. 5 drawn Nov. 1, 1930. 
No. 6 drawn Nov. 27, 1929. 



No. 7 drawn March 15, 1930 
No. 8 drawn March 15, 1930. 
No. 9 drawn Sept. 15, 1930. 
No. 10 drawn Nov. 1, 1930. 
No. 11 drawn Jan. 13, 1930. 
No. 12 drawn Sept. 16, 1929. 

HAROLD C PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk. 



60 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

DOG LICENSES 
(December 1 to December 1) 

Male Dogs 397 

Female 67 

464 
RECEIPTS 

Marriage Licenses $ 64.00 

Recording Fees 57.15 

Auto Dealer's License 15.00 

Sporting Licenses 755.50 

Birth Certificates 2.00 

Gasoline Licenses 4.20 

Certificates of Registration 5.00 

Sunday Licenses 48.00 

Concert and Dance License 5.00 

Common Victuallers' Licenses 40.00 

Auctioneers' Licenses 4.00 

Garage Licenses 2.00 

Bottling License 10.00 

Alcohol Licenses (denatured) 12.00 

Junk Licenses > 10.00 

Slaughter House License 1.00 

Ice Cream License 1.00 

Death Certificate .25 

Dynamite License 5.00 

Dog Licenses 1,129.00 



$2,170.10 

PAID OUT 

Marriage Licenses $ 64.00 

Recording Fees 57.15 

Auto Dealer's License 15.00 

Sporting Licenses 669.00 

Sporting License Fees 86.50 

Birth Certificates 2.00 

Gasoline Licenses 4.20 

Certificates of Registration 5.00 

Sunday Licenses 48.00 

Concert and Dance License 5.00 

Common Victuallers' Licenses 40.00 

Auctioneers' Licenses 4.00 

Garage Licenses 2.00 

Bottling License 10.00 

Alcohol Licenses (denatured) 12.00 

Junk Licenses ;". 10.00 

Slaughter House License 1 .00 

Ice Cream License 1.00 

Death Certificate .25 

Dynamite License 5.00 

Dog Licenses 1 ,036.20 

Dog License Fees 92.80 



$2,170.10 



HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk. 

61 



Report of Town Accountant 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and to the Citizens of Chelmsford: 

I herewith present the annual report of the Town Accountant in 
accordance with Chapter 624, Section 7 of Revised Laws. I have also 
presented all such financial matters as may be of general interest. 

I wish to remind the general public that all books of accounts are open 
to the public for their inspection at any time and the Accountant will be 
pleased to assist any person who wishes to examine the same. 

If there is any part of this report which is not clear to the reader the 
Accountant will explain the same upon request. 

All transfers made and shown in this report were authorized by vote of 
the Finance Committee or by vote in Town Meeting. 



RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 
TAXES 

CURRENT YEAR: 

Poll $ 2,090.00 

Personal Estate 29,212.20 

Real Estate 118,359.72 

Auto Excise Tax 11,046.78 



$160,708.70 



PREVIOUS YEARS : 

Poll $ 1,270.00 

Personal Estate 1,666.96 

Real Estate 43,860.61 

Auto Excise Tax 2,455.48 



$ 49,253.05 



FROM THE STATE: 

National Bank Tax 1926 $ .58 

National Bank Tax 1927 .26 

National Bank Tax 1929 3.20 

National Bank Tax 1930 39.71 

Veterans' Exemption 1930 83.70 

Corporation Tax 1930 1,988.28 

Corporation Tax 1929 1,483.79 

Corporation Tax 1929, Interest 4.47 

Income Tax 1929 1,703.00 

Income Tax 1930, Business 16,682.04 

Income Tax 1930, Corporation .... 31,440.00 

Income Tax 1930, Educational .... 9,020.00 



$ 62,449.03 



Total from Taxes $272,410.78 

62 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 

FROM COUNTY: 

Dog Licenses $ 951.13 

Acton Road 3,995.52 

Central Square 3,983.83 

Old Westford Road 1,000.00 



$ 9,930.48 



FROM STATE: 

Acton Road $ 3,994.42 

Old Westford Road 1,000.00 

Central Square 3,983.83 



$ 8,978.25 
Total from Grants and Gifts $ 18,908.73 

FINES AND FORFEITS 

Court Fines $ 2,282.05 



2,282.05 

$ 2,282.05 



LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Marriage Licenses $ 64.00 

Auto Dealers 15.00 

Sunday Licenses 48.00 

Common Victuallers' Licenses 40.00 

Auctioneers' Licenses 4.00 

Certificates of Registration 5.00 

Gasoline Licenses 4.20 

Slaughter House License 1.00 

Bottling License 10.00 

Pedlars' Licenses 84.00 

Milk Licenses 47.00 

All Other Fees 105.65 



427.85 



Total from Licenses and Permits ... $ 427.85 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

TOWN HALLS : 

Rent from Chelmsford Centre Town 

Hall $ 213.00 

Rent from Town Hall, North 

Chelmsford 234.00 



447.00 



Total from General Government .... $ 447.00 

63 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES: 
Sealing and Testing $ 131.67 

$ 131.67 

FORESTRY : 
Extermination of Moths $ 71.93 

$ 71.93 
Total from Protection of Persons 

and Property $ 203.60 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Reimbursement for T. B. Patients $ 580.00 

All Other 3.75 

$ 583.75 
Total from Health Department $ 583.75 

HIGHWAYS 

Removal of Snow $ 60.00 

Sale of Pipe 45.00 

Oil 5.50 

All Other 86.75 

$ 197.25 

Total from Highway Department.. $ 197.25 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

INFIRMARY : 
Sale of Produce $ 461.17 

$ 461.17 

REIMBURSEMENT FOR OUT- 
SIDE POOR: 

Cities and Towns $ 2,548.59 

State Temporary Aid 847.60 

Mothers' Aid 456.67 

All Other 5.00 

$ 3,857.86 

Soldiers' Benefits: 

State Aid $ 216.00 

Military Aid 67.50 

$ 283.50 

Total from Public Welfare and 

Soldiers' Benefits $ 4,602.53 

64 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Tuition $ 4,377.63 

Rent 165.00 

Sale of Waste Paper 16.31 

$ 4,558.94 
Total from Schools $ 4,558.94 

LIBRARIES 

Sale of History $ 18.75 

$ 18.75 
Total from Libraries $ 18.75 

CEMETERIES 

Sale of Lots and Graves $ 252.50 

$ 252.50 
Total from Cemeteries $ 252.50 

INTEREST 

On Deposits $ 661.23 

On Taxes 3,435.35 

On Trust Fund Perpetual Care 635.71 

$ 4,732.29 

Total from Interest $ 4,732.29 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Anticipation of Revenue $170,000.00 

$170,000.00 
Total from Municipal Indebtedness $170,000.00 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Chelmsford Water District : Tax and 

Interest $ 483.00 

North Chelmsford Fire District: Tax 

and Interest 1,744.65 

$ 2,227.65 
Cemeterv Perpetual Care Donations : 

Gifts $ 500.00 

$ 500.00 

Total from Agency Trust and In- 
vestment $ 2,727.65 

65 



REFUNDS 

Police Department $ 42.36 

Checks taken in on Sundry Persons.. 307.34 

Public Buildings Insurance 90.40 

Board of Health 4.00 

E. W. Sweetser Discrepancy Account 10,000.00. 

Town Treas. and Collector Expense.. .65 



$ 10,444.75 
Total from Refunds $ 10,444.75 

UNPAID ORDERS 

Coupons not cashed $ 40.00 



40.00 



Total for Unpaid Orders $ 40.00 



Total Receipts for 1930 $492,838.42 

Cash on hand January 1, 1930 12,469.65 



$505,308.07 
Less Discrepancy in Treas. Cash July 7, 1930 6,694.98 



Total Receipts for 1930 and Cash on Hand January 1, 1930 $498,613.09 

Less Payments made in 1930 483,884.59 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1931 $ 14,728.50 



PAYMENTS 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

MODERATOR: 
Salary $ 10.00 

SELECTMEN : 

Salaries $ 750.00 



10.00 



$ 750.00 



OTHER EXPENSES: 

Stationery and Postage $ 24.49 

Printing and Advertising 68.50 

Telephone 106.22 



66 



$ 199.21 



TOWN CLERK AND ACCOUNTANT : 

Salary $ 2,000.00 



Other Expenses : 

Clerk Hire $ 123.90 

Bond 5.00 

Stationery and Postage 9.31 

Printing and Advertising 35.20 

Supplies 19.43 

Binding 37.50 

All Other 28.21 



TOWN TREASURER AND 
TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary $ 2,000.00 



OTHER EXPENSES: 

Clerk Hire $ 56.00 

Stationery and Postage 286.33 

Printing and Advertising 182.50 

Car Fares .' 8.00 

Telephone 16.20 

All Other 238.97 



BOND: 

For Collector and Temporary Col- 
lector ■ $ 1,071.40 



ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT: 

Wages $ 2,159.45 

OTHER EXPENSES: 

Stationery and Postage $ 31.75 

Printing and Advertising 135.05 

Car Fares 59.32 

Supplies ^ 15.28 

All Other 70.35 

TOWN COUNSEL: 

Salary $ 300.00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Advertising $ 6.00 



67 



2,000.00 



258.55 



$ 2,000.00 



$ 788.00 



1,071.40 



$ 2,159.45 



311.75 



300.00 



6.00 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION: 

Registrars' Salaries $ 155.40 

Election Officers 683.50 

Stationer) and Postage .54 

Printing and Advertising 276.40 

Transportation 19.25 

Kent 19.00 

$ 1,154.09 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS (TOWN HALLS) : 

Janitors' Salaries $ 950.00 

$ 950.00 

FUEL, LIGHT AND WATER: 

Fuel $ 611.90 

Light 234.12 

Water 20.00 

$ 866.02 

REPAIRS: 

Painting, etc $ 627.39 

$ 627.39 

ALL OTHER EXPENSE: 
Brooms, Wax, Floor Cleaner, etc... $ 53.53 

$ 53.53 

Total for General Government $ 13,505.39 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries — 

Chief $ 1,959.13 

Patrolmen $,804.23 

Special Police 207.50 

Investigations 201.20 

Constable 54.00 

Transportation 19.50 

Keeping Prisoners 4 ( ).25 

Gas and Oil 410.80 

Equipment for Men 307.11 

Motor Cycles 70.81 

Printing, Stationery and Postage 33.37 

Telephone 111.24 

All Others 3.72 



$ 7,231.86 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries — 

Engineers $ 349.97 

Firemen 2,837.48 

Janitors 435.00 



$ 3,622.45 
68 



ENGINEER'S EXPENSE: 

Transportation $ 160.00 

All Other 17.54 



FIRES : 
Labor and Expenses $ 662.77 



MAINTENANCE: 

Garage Rent $ 311.24 

Repairs and Apparatus 641.76 

Gas and Oil 179.00 

Fuel 204.50 

Light 209.25 

Repairs on Buildings 455.47 

Stationery and Postage 23.50 

Telephones and Alarm System 963.01 

Apparatus 136.94 

Hose 493.92 

Equipment for Men 178.45 

Water 2.00 



NEW HOSE: 

Special Appropriation $ 488.04 

FIRE ALARM SYSTEM 

(SPEC. APP.) 
New System $ 596.11 



HYDRANT SERVICE: 

North Chelmsford $ 750.00 

Chelmsford Centre 750.00 

West Chelmsford 20.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

Wages $ 166.00 

Seals and Dies ^ 7.32 



MOTH DEPARTMENT: 

Supt. Salary $ 499.92 

Labor 1,024.46 

Stationery and Postage 4.00 

Insecticides 438.21 

Hardware and Tools 2.25 

Repairs 132.97 

Gas and Oil 65.53 



69 



$ 177.54 



$ 662.77 



$ 3,799.04 



488.04 



$ 596.11 



$ 1.520.00 



$ ]73.32 



$ 2,167.34 



TREE WARDEN : 

Labor $ 344.14 

All Other .55 

Tools 21.02 

Printing 5.75 



FOREST FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Warden $ 60.00 

Fighting Fires 1,196.40 

Apparatus 81.84 

All Other 8.47 



$ 371.46 



$ 1,346.71 



PURCHASE OF FIRE HOUSE: 

At West Chelmsford $ 2,000.00 

Legal Expenses 50.00 

$ 2,050.00 

Total for Protection of Personal Property $ 24,206.64 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Salaries : 
Board of Health $ 513.67 

$ 513.67 
Agent $ 350.00 

$ 350.00 
Meat Inspector $ 600.00 

$ 600.00 
Milk Inspector $ 350.00 

$ 350.00 
Animal Inspector $ 200.00 

$ 200.00 
Physicians' Salaries $ 100.00 

$ 100.00 

Maintenance : 

Stationery and Postage $ 12.10 

Printing and Advertising 74.13 

Burying Dogs 24.00 

Drugs and Medicines 12.64 

Return of Births 4.25 

Traveling 10.00 

Medical Attendance 15.00 

$ 152.12 
70 



AID: 

Sundry Persons $ 78.23 

$ 78.23 
CARE OF WARREN AVE. DUMP : 
Labor and Expense $ 75.27 

$ 75.27 

Total for Health and Sanitation $ 2,419.29 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Supt. Salary $ 2,500.00 

$ 2,500.00 
HIGHWAY GENERAL: 

Labor $ 11,664.90 

Teams 2,000.78 

Stone, Gravel, Sand 1,892.84 

Equipment and Repairs 4,732.21 

Gas and Oil 646.17 

Removal of Snow 917.36 

All Other 144.29 

$ 21,998.55 
TRUCK MAINTENANCE: 

International Truck (Town owned) $ 531.38 

Federal Truck (Town owned) 1,198.80 

Mack Truck (State owned) 113.99 

International (new truck) 338.11 

$ 2,182.28 
ROAD BINDER: 

Oil and Cold Patch $ 7,877.22 

$ 7,877.22 
CUTTING BRUSH : 
Labor and Tools $ 586.15 

$ 586.15 
STREET SIGNS: 
Painting and Signs "$ 117.40 

$ 117.40 
ACTON ROAD: 

Labor, Binder, Stone, Gravel $ 11,841.31 

$ 11,841.31 
CENTRAL SQUARE: 

Labor, Binder, Stone, Gravel, Pipe $ 11,918.52 

$ 11,918.52 
71 



OLD WESTFORD ROAD : 
Labor, Binder, Gravel and Pipe. ... $ 2,939.91 

$ 2,939.91 
CARLISLE CONCORD ROAD : 
Labor, Binder, Gravel, Pipe $ 2,992.93 

$ 2,992.93 
NEWFIELD STREET: 

Labor, Binder, Stone, Gravel, Pipe. $ 1,996.27 

$ 1,996.27 
NEW TRUCK FOR HIGHWAY DEPT. : 
Purchase Price $ 5,271.25 

$ 5,271.25 
STREET LIGHTS : 
Lighting $ 15,806.64 

$ 15,806.64 

Total for Highway Dept $ 88,028.43 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Salaries $ 325.00 

$ 325.00 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE : 

Maintenance $ 7.25 

$ 7.25 

OUTSIDE RELIEF: 

Groceries and Provisions $ 4,124.03 

Coal, Wood 901.96 

Rent 621.64 

Medicine and Attendance 310.40 

State Institutions 607.82 

Other Expense 64.38 

Town Cash 211.00 

$ 6,841.23 

RELIEF FOR OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS: 

Lowell $ 937.65 

Taunton 360.00 

Westford 751.04 

$ 2,048.69 
State Case $ 897.60 

$ 897.60 
72 



MOTHERS' AID: 
Town $ 2,380.00 

$ 2,380.00 
RELIEF BY OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS : 

Cities $ 169.19 

Towns 184.85 

$ 354.04 
AMBULANCE : 

Service $ 37.00 

$ 37.00 
INFIRMARY : 
Supt. Salary $ 900.00 

$ 900.00 
OTHER EXPENSES : 

Other Employees $ 106.10 

Groceries and Provisions 942.86 

Clothing and Drv Goods 51.97 

Fuel and Light 250.24 

Water 27.00 

Hay and Grain 295.05 

Supplies 59.76 

Medicine and Medical Attendance. . . 420.88 

Telephone 38.88 

Blacksmith 7.50 

Tools 11.58 

All Other 18.52 

$ 2,230.34 
REPAIRS : 

Buildings $ 77.80 

$ 77.80 

Total for Dept. of Public Welfare. . $ 16,098.95 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

State Aid $ 252.00 

$ 252.00 
Military Aid -$ 198.52 

$ 198.52 
SOLDIERS' RELIEF: 

Fuel $ 75.20 

Groceries 82.30 

Rent 23.00 

Medicine .45 

Cash 30.00 

$ 210.95 

Total for Soldiers' Benefits $ 661.47 

73 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

ADMINISTRATION: 

Supt. Salary $ 3,766.68 

Traveling Expenses 40674 

Truant Officer 23.50 

Stationery, Printing and Postage... 55.39 

Telephone 21.83 



INSTRUCTION: 

Teachers' Salaries — 

High $ 17,157.80 

Elementary 44,131.00 

Evening 60.00 

Supervisors 3,080.00 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES: 

High— Text and Reference Books.. $ 1,080.76 
Elementary — Text Books and Ref- 
erence 1,697.78 

High— Supplies 810.94 

Elementary — Supplies 1,147.21 

Evening — Text Books 13.14 



TRAVELING EXPENSE: 

Car Fares $ 21.50 



NEW EQUIPMENT: 
Typewriters, etc $ 919.30 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE: 

Janitors' Salaries — 

High $ 1,778.00 

Elementary 6,592.76 

Evening 3.00 



FUEL: 

High $ 463.44 

Elementary 3,254.78 



Light, Water and Power $ 1,470.74 



REPAIRS : 

High $ 1,119.41 

Elementary 3,277.82 



74 



$ 4,274.14 



$ 64,428.80 



$ 4,749.83 



$ 21.50 



$ 919.30 



$ 8,373.76 

$ 3,718.22 

$ 1,470.74 

$ 4,397.23 



JANITORS' SUPPLIES: 

High $ 109.60 

Elementary 312.22 

$ 421.82 
All Other $ 9.00 

$ 9.00 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES : 

Transportation — 

High $ 4,500.00 

Elementary 4,510.00 

$ 9,010.00 

NURSE: 

Salary $ 1,583.28 

Expense 1 14.92 

$ 1,698.20 
Physicians' Salaries $ 600.00 

$ 600.00 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL: 
Tuition $ 3,231.51 

$ 3,231.51 
MARKING McFARLIN SCHOOL: 
Tablet $ 143.00 

$ 143.00 

Total for Schools $107,467.05 

LIBRARIES 

ADAMS LIBRARY: 

Paid Treasurer of Adams Library 

in Cash $ 1,600.00 

Librarian 100.00 

Janitor and Other Help 62.35 

• Repairs 296.60 

Books 279.71 

Light T1.34 

$ 2,350.00 

ADAMS LIBRARY, Painting and Decorating: 
Labor and Supervising $ 750.00 

$ 750.00 

ADAMS LIBRARY, Grading Grounds : 

Labor and Supervising $ 1,000.00 

$ 1,000.00 
75 



NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY: 

Annual Appropriation $ 1,200.00 

$ 1,200.00 



Total for Libraries $ 5,300.00 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

PARKS : 

Labor $ 630.18 

Equipment 105.96 

Loam and Fertilizer 31.00 

Flowers, Trees, etc 97.20 

Care of Flag 40.98 

Water 45.15 

Tools 3.75 

Labor at Central Park 367.19 



IMPROVING VARNEY PLAYGROUNDS : 
Labor and Teams $ 1,922.54 



PURCHASE OF LAWN MOWER (POWER) 
Part of Purchase Price $ 150.00 



REPAIRING FLAG POLE 

AT CHELMSFORD CENTRE: 

Labor $ 175.00 



UNCLASSIFIED: 

Memorial Day: 

Flowers $ 3.00 

Transportation 30.00 

Markers 32.13 

Dinners 118.00 

Costumes 34.00 

Music 90.50 

Instruction 50.00 

Printing- 28.75 

Flai?s 25.00 



MISCELLANEOUS : 

Town Clock $ 30.00 

Band Concerts 400.00 

Town Reports 630.55 

Agriculture and Home Economics . . 300.00 

Purchase of Grappling Irons 205.00 

Merrimack River Victims 268.01 

Ins. Sinking Fund Treas. Bond 40.00 



$ 1,321.41 



$ 1,922.54 



$ 150.00 



$ 175.00 



$ 411.38 



$ 1,873.56 



76 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS INSURANCE: 
Policies $ 635.40 

$ 635.40 

UNPAID BILLS, 1929: 

Town Treasurer and Collector $ 87.94 

Town Counsel 27.40 

Public Buildings 73.95 

Police 308.82 

Highways 16.80 

Outside Poor 508.24 

Infirmary 38.55 

Election and Registration 15.00 

Finance Committee 60.00 

State Tax 68.77 

$ 1,205.47 

INVESTIGATING MUNICIPAL WATER SYSTEM: 
Engineers' and Counsel Fees $ 1,275.00 



INSURANCE SINKING FUND: 

Annual Appropriation $ 3,500.00 

UNPAID ORDER: 
Union National Bank $ 40.00 



TAILINGS : 

Check taken in and later cashed $ 2.50 



$ 1,275.00 



$ 3,500.00 



$ 40.00 



$ 2.50 

Totalfor Recreation and Unclassified! $ 12,512.26 

CEMETERIES 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 



$ 105.00 



FOREFATHER'S CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 460.45 

Tools 19.05 

Paint 5.05 

Seed 2.00 

Transportation 5.00 

Water 8.00 



$ 498.55 



77 



HART POND CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 430.00 

Fertilizer 18.00 

Tools 13.00 

$ 461.00 

PINE RIDGE CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 486.75 

Tools 3.15 

$ 489.90 

RIVERSIDE CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 475.00 

Water 15.00 

Plan 10.00 

$ 500.00 
WEST CHELMSFORD CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 355.01 

Teams 32.00 

Tools 28.89 

Water 8.00 

Gravel 5.85 

Fertilizer 8.25 

Cement 5.87 

Paint and Oil 37.95 

$ 481.82 

Total for Cemeteries $ 2,536.27 



INTEREST AND MATURING DEBT 

INTEREST: 

Addition to East Chelmsford School $ 190.00 

Westland School 300.00 

New Grade School 3,813.04 

High School 845.00 

Anticipation of Revenue 4,544.97 

$ 9,693.01 

MATURING DEBT: 

Addition to East Chelmsford School $ 2,000.00 

Westland School 5,000.00 

Grade School 8,666.00 

High School 3,250.00 



$ 18,916.00 



ANTICIPATION OF REVENUE: 
Loans $148,000.00 



$148,000.00 

Total for Interest and Maturing Debt $176,609.01 

78 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

AGENCY : 

State Tax $ 9,170.00 

State Highway Tax 2,473.26 

State Highway Tax, Snow and Ice 343.91 

State Audit 270.49 

$ 12,257.66 
COUNTY TAX: 
Tax $ 16,402.02 

$ 16,402.02 
North Chelmsford Fire District... 1,744.65 

Chelmsford Water District 483.00 

$ 2,227.65 
TRUST: 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Donations $ 500.00 

$ 500.00 

INTEREST ON PERPETUAL 
CARE DONATIONS: 

Forefather's Cemetery $ 275.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery 26.50 

Hart Pond Cemetery 77.00 

Riverside Cemetery 127.50 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 129.09 

$ 635.09 
Total for Agency Trust and Invest- 
ment $ 32,022.42 

REFUNDS 

1930 Taxes $ 769.08 

Motor Excise Tax, 1929 64.19 

Motor Excise Tax, 1930 571.91 

1929 Taxes 999.94 

1928 Taxes 108.56 

1927 Taxes 3.73 

$ 2,517.41 

Total for Refunds $ 2,517.41 

Total Payments for 1930 $483,884.59 



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Town Treasurer's Report 

From July 7, 1930, to January 1, 1931 
RECEIPTS 

Balance July 7, 1930 . $ 1,765.81 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Taxes, 1930 $149,661.92 

Taxes, Previous Years 21,622.87 

Taxes, Auto Excise, 1930 11,046.78 

Taxes, Auto Excise, Previous Years 677.95 

Taxes from State 60,746.03 

Licenses and Permits 256.45 

Fines and Forfeits 1,519.48 

Grants and Gifts 17,157.60 

$262,689.08 
COMMERCIAL REVENUE 

General Government $ 139.00 

Protection of Persons and Propertv 203.60 

Highways ". 50.50 

Charities 1,059.62 

Soldiers' Benefits 283.50 

Schools 4,209.98 

Cemeteries ' 75.00 

Interest 3,135.20 

Temporary Loans 55,000.00 

Agency and Trust 2,111.82 

Refunds 10,004.65 



76,272.87 
$340,727.76 



PAYMENTS 

Bank Overdraft, July 7, 1930 $ 5,663.97 

Paid out on 66 Warrants containing items author- 
ized by the Selectmen and Accountant 320,335.29 

Balance on Hand Dec. 31, 1930 14,728.50 



$340,727.76 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Bank Balance, Dec. 31, 1930 $ 19,740.15 

(As per Bank Statement on following page) 
Outstanding Checks, Dec. 31, 1930 5,061.65 

Check Register Balance $ 14,678.50 

Cash in Office 50.00 

Balance on Hand Dec. 31, 1930 $ 14,728.50 

The large amount of outstanding checks is caused by reason of a War- 
rant being issued on Dec. 31, 1930, and consequently the checks issued for 
payments of items on this Warrant could not be cancelled in December. 1930. 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Treasurer. 
December 31, 1930. 

100 



Date 



UNION OLD LOWELL NATIONAL BANK 

Lowell, Mass. 

STATEMENT OF YOUR ACCOUNT 
TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
H. C. PETTERSON, Treas. 
W. B. Chelmsford, Mass. 



e 




Checks in 


Detail 


Deposits 


Date 


Balance 










Balance Brought Forward^' 












Dec. 1/30 


$154,839.05 


1,'30 


$ 185.13lst 








Dec. 1/30 


154,653.92* 


2, '30 


25,000.00— 


$3.00— 


$4.50— 








2, '30 


6.50— 


.50— 


25,000.00— 




Dec. 2/30 


104,639.42* 


3, '30 


2,975.54lst 






$1,423.42 

778.46 


Nov. 3, '30 


103,865.76* 


5, '30 


4,059.81lst 








Nov. 5, '30 


99,805.95* 


5, '30 


4,122.83lst 






532.95 

381.36 
525.60 


Dec. 5, '30 
Dec. 6, '30 


96,597.43* 
97,123.03* 


6, '30 


1,192.18lst 








Dec. 6, '30 


95,930.85* 


8, '30 


1,138.62lst 






1,037.84 


Dec. 8. '30 


95,830.07* 


9, '30 


774.28lst 






506.01 


Dec. 9, '30 


95,561.80* 


0, '30 


15,245.48lst 








Dec. 10, '30 


80,316.32* 


1/30 


140.00— 


• 50.00— 




1,847.45 
750.01 


Dec. 11/30 


82,723.78* 


2, '30 


1,109.62lst 






226.60 


Dec. 12, '30 


81,840.76* 


3, '30 


67.50— 


63.00— 


.89— 




Dec. 13, '30 


81,709.37* 


5, '30 


.30— 


25,000.00— 


.50— 








5, '30 


1.50— 






312.4=; 
444.46 


Dec. 15, '30 


57,463.98* 


6, '30 


20,183.29lst 






151.04 


Dec. 16, '30 


37,431.73* 


7, '30 


2,074.01lst 






527.74 


Dec. 17, '30 


35,885.46* 


8, '30 


3,836.87lst 






118.05 


Dec. 18, '30 


32,166.64* 


9, '30 








72.55 


Dec. 19, '30 


32 239 19* 


9, '30 


5,806.58lst 








Dec. 19, '30 


26,432".61* 


0, '30 


1,455.96lst 








Dec. 20, '30 


24,976.65* 


2, '30 


7,303.05lst 






69.75 
490.73 


Dec. 22, '30 


18,234.08* 


!3, '30 


1,086.76lst 






1,018.32 


Dec. 23, '30 


18,165.64* 


»4, '30 


1,785.47lst 






88.43 


Dec. 24, '30 


16,468.60* 


16, '30 


467.70lst 






37.62 


Dec. 26, '30 


16,038.52* 


7. '30 


488.08lst 








Dec. 27, '30 


15,550.44* 


1,'30 


374.81lst 






76.16 
70.90 


Dec. 21/30 


15,322.69* 


0,'30 


449.46lst 




" 


1.264.9Q 
168.98 


Dec. 30, '30 
Dec. 30, In. 


16,138.22* 
16,307.20* 


1, '30 


20.85— 


25.00— 


20.00— 








1,'30 


10.00— 


2.00— 


8.50— 




Dec. 31/30 


16,220.85* 


1,'30 


15.00 — 


73.50— 


44.56— 








1/30 


223.88— 


59.00— 




3.570.30 
364.94 


Dec. 31/30 


19,740.15* 



KEY 
LST— List. In.— Interest. RT— Return. 00*— Closed account. OD— Overdraft. 

DN — Service charge. 

PLEASE EXAMINE AT ONCE 

If no errors are reported in ten days the account will be considered correct. 

Notify of any permanent change in address. 

The Last Amount in the Column is your Balance. 

101 



Report of Tax Collector 

From July 7, 1930, to January 1, 1931 

I herewith submit my report as Tax Collector from July 7, 1930, to 
Jan. 1, 1931. The Assessors' commitment of taxes, Town, state, county and 
auto excise for 1930, is made up as follows : 

State Tax $ 9,170.00 

State Highway Tax 2,473.26 

State Removal of Ice and Snow 343.91 

State Audit, 1929 270.49 

County Tax 13,843.13 

County Tuberculosis Tax 2,558.89 

Poll Tax 4,102.00 

Town Tax 189,189.12 

Overlay 1,965.75 

$223,916.55 
Refunds after Payment 104.55 

$224,021.10 

Cash Paid Treasurer $149,661.92 

Abatements 776.5? 

Uncollected Taxes Jan. 1, 1931 73,582.66 

$224,021.10 
AUTO EXCISE TAX, 1930 

Commitment by Assessors, July 22, 1930 $ 11,616.83 

Commitment by Assessors, Nov. 10, 1930 1,122.10 

Commitment by Assessors, Dec. 31, 1930 242.67 

$ 12.981.60 
Refunds after Payment 571.91 

$ 13,553.51 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 11,046.78 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 1,934.82 

$ 12,981.60 
Refunds after Payment ' 571.91 

$ 13,553.51 
AUTO EXCISE TAX, 1929 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 J $ 2,227.68 

$ 2,227.68 

Cash ,Paid Treasurer $ 677.95 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 1,549.73 

$ 2.227.68 

TAXES, 1926 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 4,739.15 

$ 4,739.15 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 386.50 

Abatements 2.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 4,350.65 

$ 4,739.15 

102 



TAXES, 1927 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 7,624.68 

$ 7,624.68 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 793.81 

Abatements 2.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 6,828.87 

$ 7.624.6S 



TAXES, 1928 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 14,541.49 

$ 14,541.49 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 3,074.49 

Abatements 42.30 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 11,424.70 

$ 14,541.49 

TAXES, 1929 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 43,049.78 

$ 43,049.78 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 17,368.07 

Abatements 30.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 25,651.71 

$ 43,049.78 

MOTH TAX, 1926 
Recommitted Sept. 30, 1930 $ 7.88 

d» y oo 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 $ 7.88 

$ 7.88 

INTEREST AND COSTS 
Interest and Costs on Taxes $ 1,906.51 

$ 1,906.51 
Cash paid Treasurer $ 1,906.51 

$ 1,906.51 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON. 

Tax Collector. 

December 31, 1930. 

103 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

From July 7, 1930, to January 1, 1931 

TAXES, 1926 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 405.83 

$ 405.83 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 98.33 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 307.50 

$ 405.83 

TAXES, 1927 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 185.34 

$ 185.34 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 55.18 

Uncollected J_an. 1, 1931 130.16 

$ 185.34 

TAXES, 1928 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 266.48 

$ 266.48 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 104.83 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 161.65 

$ 266.48 

INTEREST AND COSTS 
Interest and Costs $ 50.23 

$ 50.23 
Cash paid Treasurer $ 50.23 

$ 50.23 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector. 



104 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

From July 7, 1930, to Jan. 1, 1931 
TAXES, 1926 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 110.89 

$ 110.89 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 24.35 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 86.54 

$ 110.89 
TAXES, 1927 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 46.00 

$ 46.00 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 12.84 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 33.16 

$ 46.00 
TAXES, 1928 
Recommitment Sept. 30, 1930 $ 83.98 

$ 83.98 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 29.91 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 54.07 

$ 83.98 
TAXES, 1929 
Recommitment Jan. 1, 1931 $ 358.10 

$ 358.10 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 199.88 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 158.22 

$ 358.10 

TAXES, 1930 

Commitment by Assessors $ 1,696.04 

$ 1,696.04 

Refund after Payment 13.16 

$ 1,709.20 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 1,295.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1931 401.04 

$ 1,696.04 
Refund after Payment 13.16 



$ 1,709.20 
INTEREST AND COSTS 
Interest and Costs $ 28.11 

$ 28.11 
Cash paid Treasurer $ 28.1 1 

$ 28.11 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector. 
105 



Report of Assessors 

Value of Buildings $4,272,735.00 

Value of Land 1,563,340.00 

Value of Personal Estate 1,254,540.00 

Value of Assessed Estate $7,090,615.00 

Rate $31 per $1000. 
TAX LEVY FOR 1930: 

Town Appropriations $251,523.49 

Loans and Interest 29,720.84 

State Tax 9,170.00 

State Highway Tax 2,473.26 

State Snow and Ice Tax 343.91 

State Audit 270.49 

County Tax 13,843.13 

County Tuberculosis Tax 2,558.89 

Overlay 1,965.75 

Amount to be Raised $311,869.76 

Estimated Receipts (Town) $41,200.00 

Estimated Receipts (Income Tax) 37,453.21 

Estimated Receipts (Excise Tax) 9,300.00 

2,051 Polls at $2.00 each 4,102.00 

Tax on Property 219,814.55 

$311,869.76 

Number of Horses Assessed 203 

Number of Cows Assessed 700 

Number of Sheep Assessed 7 

Number of Neat Cattle other than Cows Assessed 103 

Number of Swine Assessed 126 

Number of Fowl Assessed 15,075 

Number of Dwellings Assessed . . . • 1,673 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed ~T3~,324 

DECEMBER ASSESSMENT 

Real Estate Tax $7.75 

Personal Estate Tax 28.68 

17 Polls at $2.00 each .- 34.00 

Total Tax Assessed 70.43 

MOTOR EXCISE TAX 

Value of Automobiles Assessed 368,510.00 

Value of Trucks Assessed 88,110.00 

Total Value of Motor Vehicles Assessed 456,620.00 

Tax Committed on Motor Vehicles 12,982.20 

Respectfully submitted, 

" HERBERT C. SWEETSER. 
WARREN WRIGHT, 
JOHN E. HARRINGTON, 

Assessors. 
December 31, 1930. 

106 



REPORT OF INSURANCE FUND COMMISSIONERS 

December 31, 1930 

On deposit in: 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank $ 5,405.67 

The Central Savings Bank 3,078.84 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 5,348.64 

The City Institution for Savings Bank 8,070.72 

The Merrimack River Savings Bank 4,706.53 

The Lowell Institution for Savings Bank 4,310.48 

$30,920.88 
WALTER PERHAM, Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE ADAMS LIBRARY 

The Trustees met in special session on January 26, 1930, and elected 
Fred W. Park a member of the Board to fill the vacancy caused by the 
death of A. Heady Park. Dr. Waters was requested to draw up resolutions 
on the death of the latter gentleman. 

On February 15, the Trustees met for organization and chose the same 
officers and committees which served last year as follows : 

Chairman : Albert H. Davis. 

Secretary : Mrs. E. R. Clark. 

Treasurer : Rev. Wilson Waters. 

Librarian : Mrs. Ida A. Jefts. 

Assistant Librarian : Mrs. G. W. Peterson. 

Purchasing Committee: Mrs. E. R. Clark. 

Committee to Approve Bills : Albert H. Davis, Mrs. E. R. Clark. 

Prudential Committee : A. H. Davis, Rev. Wilson Waters. 
Committee on Periodicals and Reading Room: Miss Francis Clark, 
Miss Lottie L. Snow, Rev. Wilson Waters. 

Edwin R. Clark was given charge of the work of redecorating the old 
part of the Library Building, provided for by the Town. The work has been 
done in a most satisfactory manner. It was voted that the necessary outside 
painting, etc., be paid for out of funds already in the hands of the Treasurer. 
The Library was closed while the work was going on. 

The Trustees have voted that the George Memorial Hall, which is a 
most attractive place of meeting, may be used by literary, educational and 
cultural organizations, a fee of from $2 to $5 to be paid for its use. Transient 
borrowers from this Library are required to make a deposit of $1 for a card, 
the dollar to be returned when the card is surrendered. 

Books needed for reference or study may be kept out one month without 
recharging unless called for, at the discretion of the Librarian. 

Dr. Waters was requested to send a letter of acceptance and thanks to 
Mr. F. A. P. Fiske and Mr. John M. Fiske for the handsome lamp posts 
donated by them for the new entrance to the Library. 

107 



A ruling sent down from the State House in Boston reversed a former 
ruling and instructs the Town Treasurer to pay all bills of the Library to be 
paid out of appropriations by the Town for the benefit of the Library, but 
the Treasurer of the Trustees may administer all Trust Funds. This tends 
to complicate the work of the Library Treasurer. In his account, here 
rendered, the amount paid to the Librarian stands $400. The salary is $500. 
The other $100 has been paid by the Town Treasurer out of the annual 
appropriation to the Library. He also paid bills of over $200 for books. The 
annual appropriation by the Town for the Library was $2,350, of which the 
Library Treasurer received (as per his account) $1,600 before the ruling 
took effect. The Town Treasurer has paid Library bills to the amount of 
the difference — $750. A bill of $10 for conveying books to South Chelmsford 
must be held over, as it came in after the end of the year. 

ALBERT H. DAVIS, 
FRANCES CLARK, 
WILSON WATERS, 
LUELLA H. S. CLARK, 
LOTTIE L. SNOW, 
FRED W. PARK, 

Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE ADAMS LIBRARY 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand Januarv 1, 1930 $ 64.34 

From the Town 1,600.00 

From the Librarian .86 

Refund from Periodicals 3.50 

From the George Building Fund 8t389.00 

Balance of the Building Fund 243.57 

From the Joseph Warren Fund 699.98 

For use of the George Memorial Hall 14.00 

Refund, Bartlett & Dow 7.08 

Interest, George Book Fund 200.00 

George Cemetery Fund (care) , 35.00 

George Cemetery Fund, bal. of int. for books 21.47 

$ 11,278.80 

EXPENDITURES 

Librarian $ 400.00 

Fuel 544.00 

Light 120.78 

Books 218.19 

Janitor 208.15 

Periodicals 86.95 

Furnishings 687.28 

Balance on Building Addition 8,389.00 

Water 14.50 

Binding 98.45 

Books to South Chelmsford 30.00 

Care of Grounds 38.00 

108 



Books to West Chelmsford 40.00 

Paid on Account of New Approaches to Library 360.50 

Treasurer's Bond 2.50 

Expressage !!!!!!!!!! 5*50 

Paid for Care of George Family Lot in Cemetery 35.00 



$ 11,278.80 
No money has been drawn from the L. G. Richardson Fund. 
No money has been drawn from the Adams Emerson Fund. 

WILSON WATERS, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN TO THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE ADAMS LIBRARY 

Circulation for 1930 14,165 

Magazines 833 

Fiction 10,656 

Non-Fiction 2,676 

New Books Purchased 196 

Books sent to South Chelmsford 544 

Books sent to West Chelmsford 1,255 

New Borrowers 164 

Received for Fines $70.61 

Paid Assistant 41.52 

De3k Supplies 20.36 

Money Stolen in October 4.88* 

Balance Handed Treasurer 3.85 

GIFTS 

Mediterranean Picture Lands — Emelene A. Dunn. 
The Romance and Rise of the American Tropics — United Fruit Co. 
Historical Markers of Mass. Bay State Colony } Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts on the Sea, 1630-1930 J Massachusetts. 

Pathways of the Puritans — His Excellency Frank G. Allen. 
10 Vols, of the Works of Maria Edgeworth } Mrs. Henry 

New Worlds to Conquer, by Richard Haliburton ] Bartlett. 
21 Vols, of Children's Books — Mrs. Ross Hatch. 

Independent Chronicle, Feb. 21, 1824 — First Baptist Church, South 
Chelmsford. 

Two iron Lamp Posts, which have been placed at the entrance to the recent 
addition to the Library Building, were donated by Mr. F. A. P. Fiske of 
Chelmsford and Somerville and Mr. John Minot Fiske of New York. 

Miss Olive Bockes has given much of her time to work in the Children's 
Room. 



*The Library was entered at night, presumably through a window, and the Librarian's 
desk was rifled. 

IDA A. JEFTS, 

Librarian. 

109 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE NORTH CHELMSFORD 
LIBRARY CORPORATION 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1930 $ 45.86 

Town Appropriation 1,200.00 

Librarian's Account Fine Receipts 6.00 



$1,251.86 



EXPENDITURES 

Librarian's Salary $ 300.00 

Assistant Librarian and Janitor 115.92 

Books 186.48 

Magazines 29.00 

Lighting 23.72 

Fuel 112.00 

Binding 178.51 

Printing 18.13 

Repairs 51.08 

Miscellaneous Supplies and Expenses 21.78 

Balance on Hand December 31, 1930 215.24 



$1,251.86 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDNA I. BALLINGER, Treasurer. 



110 



REPORT OF ACTING CHIEF OF POLICE 

Chelmsford, Mass., December 31, 1930. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Chelmsford : 

The following is my report of the Police Department from December 8, 
1930, to December 31, 1930. inclusive: 

3 Stores found open. 

4 Calls on stolen cars, Lowell. 

2 Calls from Billerica on stolen cars. 
Stolen property recovered ($25.00). 
Collected $20.00 for property damage in 1929. 

1 Call from Lowell on Hit and Run driver. 
9 Accident calls. 

5 Dogs and 1 Cat killed by automobiles removed by police. 

2 Calls answered for Lowell policewomen. 

6 Fire calls answered. 
68 Complaints answered. 

1 Arrest for drunk in car. 

1 Arrest for driving under influence of liquor. 

$20.00 returned to town in fines. 

In conclusion, I express my thanks and appreciation for the assistance 
and co-operation extended to me by the Honorable Board of Selectmen. I 
also am extremely grateful to the Officers of the Lowell District Court. I 
commend my comrades for their loyalty and co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BERNARD F. McGOVERN, 

Acting Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

We herewith submit our Annual Report of the Fire Department. 

The Board of Fire Engineers appointed annually by the Board of 
Selectmen, organized this year with Archibald Cooke as Chief of the 
Department, Harry L. Shedd and John W. Dixon as assistant engineers, 
and John W. Dixon as clerk of the Board. 

The District Chiefs appointed by the Board of Engineers are : 

Wilhelm T. Johnson District No. 1 

Percy T. Robinson (May lst-Nov. 30) District No. 2 

Joseph D. Ryan (Dec. 1) District No. 2 

Norman Edwards District No. 3 

Henry Quinn District No. 4 

Arthur W. House District No. 5 

111 



We feel that all Companies are well organized. 

We justly give deserved praise to the men of the Department of the 
Town for their loyal, prompt and efficient work that they have accomplished. 

W r e have also had the men insured as last year ; we feel it is a great 
benefit for the men and the Town. 

The Center Fire House has been sheaved with plaster board; the 
Maxim truck was sent away to be repaired and the pump brought up to 
pumping capacity. 

In the North Village a new Alarm System has been installed. 

In the West Village the men of the Department have remodeled their 
Fire House and made it a credit to the Town. The firemen are worthy of 
a lot of credit for the amount of work which they have accomplished in the 
last few months. 

The roof on the East Village Fire House has been repaired. 

We have had a new siren installed in the South Village which will 
greatly improve the service in that part of the Town. 

In the Westlands a new Gamew T ell Alarm Box has been installed and 
we feel that one or two more boxes would be a great benefit to that part of 
the Village. 

The Board recommends that a new pumping engine be purchased of at 
least 500 gallon capacity this coming year for the North Village. 

The Department the past year has responded to 77 calls for fires within 
the Town area, and 8 calls for fires in adjoining towns. 

District No. 1 — 36 fires 
District No. 2—33 fires 
District No. 3 — 5 fires 
District No. 4 — 7 fires 
District No. 5 — 5 fires 

The building property in Town actually endangered by fires amounted 
to $142,875 and the total loss caused by these fires amounted to $14,772. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the Police Department for its 
hearty co-operation with our Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARCHIBALD COOKE, 

HARRY L. SHEDD, 

JOHN W. DIXON, 

Board of Fire Engineers. 

112 



REPORT OF FOREST WARDEN 

Dec. 31, 1930. 
Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Selectmen : 

There have been 179 forest and grass fires reported in Town during the 
past year. In the majority of cases they have been extinguished before 
gaining much headway, thanks to the good work of Observer Blood in 
quickly locating and reporting them. 

The principal cause of fires has been careless smokers. Railroad fires 
have been the lowest for years, only six having been reported. 

The most serious fires occurred at North Chelmsford in May where 
much property on the Dunstable Road was endangered and help was called 
from Westford and Lowell. 

Many serious fires would be prevented if the owners of land would 
burn the grass along the highways in the early spring. 

There have been two changes in the State fire laws which are of 
interest to the Town. Permits are now required throughout the year except 
when the ground is covered with snow. The second law requires the towns 
to maintain a fire patrol on the highways during such periods of drouth as 
the State Forester considers a fire hazard. 

It will be necessary to replace the Forestry truck this year. The 
present truck is 10 years old and is so badly worn as to be unfit for forest 
fire work. 

Beside the District Chiefs of the Fire Department, the following 
Deputy Forest Wardens have been appointed : Charles A. House, Allan 
Adams, Raymond E. Sargent, Fred W. Merrill, Walter H. Merrill and 
Robert Henderson. 

SIDNEY E. DUPEE, 

Forest Warden. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 

Submitted to the Citizens of Chelmsford 

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR PLUMBING 
FOR THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Registration 

Section 1. After acceptance of the following plumbing regulations, all 
persons who desire to engage in, carry on, or work at the business of 
plumbing within this jurisdiction shall be registered by the State Examiners, 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 142, General Laws. 

Section 2. Upon application of a registered Master Plumber only, on 
form furnished by the Board of Llealth, said Board shall grant written 
permit to do certain plumbing described therein, when in conformity with 

113 



the Law. Drawings of proposed work shall be filed if required. Permits may 
be recalled by the Board of Health if conditions are violated. Permits for all 
plumbing, except repair or leaks, must be in the hands of the plumber before 
beginning work. 

Approved by the Department of Public Health Nov. 19, 1930. 

George H. Bigelow, M.D., 
Commissioner. 

Adopted by the Chelmsford Board of Health, Aug. 22nd, 1930. 

GEORGE A. McNULTY, 
J. C. OSTERHOUT, 
F. A. MacELROY. 

Arrangements were made with the owners of land at the North A^illage 
and also at the Westlands to secure land to establish a dump at each village. 
The residents of both villages are badly in need of land to be used for dump- 
ing purposes, as the Board was obliged to close up several dumping grounds 
last year due to complaints and petitions signed by residents of North 
Village on account of decayed vegetables and garbage, as it became a 
nuisance. Therefore the Board felt justified in taking the step they did, 
although it caused inconvenience to the residents of that section. However, 
at the Annual Town Meeting there will be an Article inserted in the 
Warrant to provide suitable land for such purposes for both villages. We 
hope the residents of both villages will support the above Articles on 
Town meeting day. 

Also there will be an Article inserted in the Warrant to give the resi- 
dents and voters of the Town to decide what action they may take in regard 
to accepting the Cushing Pond (or so-called Mill Pond) at Center Village. 
The Board feels quite anxious to have this question decided, as it has been 
discussed for some time. 

In the Milk Inspector's report, which we hope you will read carefully, 
you will see a great improvement. The average of all samples is very good, 
both as to solids, fat and bacteria count: It is only fair to say the improve- 
ments in the past few years are very satisfactory. 

The Board feels that many of the citizens are beginning to see the real 
effect of co-operation with the local Board of Health. For instance, those 
who keep swine are learning to keep them as they ought to be kept. By 
feeding the garbage on platforms certainly put a stop to the conditions 
which existed for a long time and are much improved. 

The report of Mrs. Mae S. Lewis, R.N., Agent of the Board of Health, 
is very well worth reading carefully. Contagious and infectious diseases are 
decreasing quite rapidly. Houses visited by the nurse for the Board of 
Health (408) during the past twelve months evidently shows the interest 
Mrs. Lewis has taken in health work. The Board accepted and approved 
her report and respectfully submits the same to the citizens of Chelmsford. 

The Board wishes to thank Doctors Scoboria and Varney, also the 

114 



Agent and School Nurse, Mrs. Mae S. Lewis, for the excellent work they 
have done during the past year, ready at all times to serve when called by 
the local Board of Health. 

G. A. McNULTY, Chairman, 
J. C. OSTERHOUT, 
F. MacELROY. 



REPORT OF AGENT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 

Mr. G. A. McNulty, 
Chairman of Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

I submit the following report for the year beginning January 1st, 1930, to 
December 31st, 1930: 

Contagious and Infectious Diseases — 

Scarlet Fever 15 

Typhoid Fever 1 

Erysipelas 1 

Chicken Pox 12 

Whooping Cough 36 

Measles 1 

Diphtheria 1 

Mumps 9 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 3 

Dog Bite and other Diseases 7 

Homes visited by nurse for Board of Health 408 

Houses Carded 16 

Cards removed 16 

Some of our school children were victims of scarlet fever. All precau- 
tions were taken. All throats in school were inspected by nurse for at least 
seven days and every suspicious case taken home. Desks were taken care of. 
and books destroyed. We had one case in High School. All precautions were 
taken and we did not have a second case. We had one case of diphtheria in 
town — a grown-up person who had been visiting out of town, going to 
dances, and so on. However, there wal, not another case in town. This 
proves what our Schick test and immunization clinics have done for our 
children. Hoping we can keep up the good work. Pupils Schicked in May 
who were immunized in October, 1929: 

Negative 247 

Positive 59 

Absent 34 

Some of our children moved out of town with parents, cause of absentees. 

Children who were positive were immunized in October, 1930, with our first 
grade and pre-school children. One hundred and fifty-three attended this 
clinic; we had a follow-up clinic in May, which was conducted by Depart- 
ment of Public Health : 

115 



Examined 10 

Improved 8 

Unimproved 1 

Discharged Well 1 

We have two dentists working in our schools at present. Dr. Ritter has 
taken care of Highland Avenue and Princeton School and is now in West- 
land School. Dr. Coughlin has taken care of East and is now in McFarlin 
School in Center. 

Dental work finished to date: 

Teeth Treated 711 

Filled, Permanent 3St 

Filled, Deciduous 341 

Teeth Cleaned 643 

Extractions, Permanent 82 

Extractions, Deciduous 27$ 

Examined by Dentists 525 

Our rating with the State Department Dental Hygiene was 63 per cent 
in June. We must do better or die in the attempt. We were fortunate in 
securing a second dental chair. The East Chelmsford Fire Department and 
Alumni boys from the east part of town and the East P. T. A. made this 
possible for me. 

Dr. Paul Wakefield, chief of Chadwick clinics, gave talks in regards to 
the clinics which were held here November 11, 1930; 1063 took the test, 255 
were given X-ray, a good many by request of their parents. Fifty-five pupils 
will be given physical examination by State doctors. Many of this group 
are underweight. Nurse made 107 visits on this (the tuberculosis) clinic to 
parents who did not understand what it meant to their children. By doing 
so we had a great many more take the test, also a number of pre=school 
children. 

The parent-teachers in all sections of the town provide milk for any 
child who is unable to buy it for morning recess. Anyone who does not go 
home at noon can have hot soup or cocoa. We have hot lunches in all our 
schools. The New England Food and Dairy Council spent three days with 
us, gave illustrated lectures in all schools, and stressed hot lunches at noon 
and milk at recess in the morning. Dr. Wellington visited us during the 
year. Dr. Archibald and Dr. Knowlton also visited many times, all from 
State Department of Public Health. I wish to thank each and every one for 
their excellent co-operation during the year 1930. 

Very respectfully, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R.N. 
Agent of Board of Health. 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts, December 31, 1930. 



116 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR 

December 31, 1930. 
To the Chelmsford Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present the report of the Milk Inspection Division 
for the year beginning January 1, 1930. 

There were 17 distributors licensed to deliver milk from wagons; 37 
stores were licensed to sell milk; six stores were registered to sell oleo- 
margarine ; two milk plants were issued pasteurization licenses. 

Fifty dollars, collected for licenses, were paid to the Town Treasurer. 

The average daily consumption of milk was 2,104 quarts. Two hundred 
and seventy-five dairy farms supply milk to Chelmsford. Nine distributors 
sell pasteurized milk, eleven sell raw milk, most of it from tuberculin tested 
cows. Three distributors sell both pasteurized and raw. 

There were 362 chemical, 326 bacterial, and 192 sediment samples 
examined from distributors. The highest bacterial sample was 360,030 ; the 
lowest was none per cubic centimeter. 

There were 414 chemical, 556 bacterial, 329 sediment, and 807 tempera- 
ture samples examined from producers. 

There were 204 milk plant inspections and 584 dairy farm inspections. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. F. MASTER, 

BS. in Che in. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 

January 1, 1931. 

To the Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

Following is report of animals slaughtered by licensed butchers or by 
owners on their own premises and inspected by me during the year 1930: 

Cattle 459 Hogs 653 

Calves 575 Sheep 5 

Of these were condemned : 

Cattle 27 Hogs 1 

Calves 14 

and 500 lbs. of meat, more or less. 
All inspections have been reported to the State authorities. 

Respectfully submitted, 
ALBERT S. PARK, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 

117 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF MARKETS 

Tanuarv 1, 1931. 
To the Board of Health, 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

During the year 1930 I have made 121 calls on markets and butcher 
carts throughout the town. 

Conditions generally have been very good, although some poultry, meat 
and sausage had to be destroyed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT S. PARK, 

Inspector of Markets. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

December 31, 1930. 
Board of Selectmen: 

In accordance with Section 19 of Chapter 129 of the General Laws, an 
inspection of all neat cattle, sheep and swine within this town was ordered 
by the State Division of Animal Industry to be completed before March 1, 
1930. 

There were 194 stables in which were kept 815 cows, 21 bulls, 216 
young cattle, 266 swine, 6 sheep and 8 goats. Four cows were quarantined, 
suspected of having tuberculosis, one was killed, one died in quarantine and 
the others were released. 

As shown by the above report the total number of neat cattle is 1,052. 
This shows the decrease to be slight, as the average for the past 12 years 
was 1.090. 

The number of swine shows a decrease from last year. No cases of~ 
hog cholera were reported during the year. 

Reported dog bites necessitated the inspection of 36 dogs, 17 of which 
were quarantined for a period of two weeks and then released, no cases of 
rabies having developed. 

Another dog, which fortunately had bitten no one, developed a positive 
case of rabies and was killed. 

Many cattle owners have had their herds tested, thereby co-operating in 
the campaign of tuberculosis eradication. Twenty-four herds have received 
the first test during the year. These contained 208 head, of which number 
190 reacted and were slaughtered. 

There are at the present time 39 herds under state and federal super- 
vision. This represents about 41 per cent of the cattle in town. 

Any cattle owner who is interested in having this test applied to his 
herd can secure the necessary papers and information from his inspector. 

Under permit, 30 cows and one bull have been shipped from other states 

to Chelmsford for dairy and breeding purposes. All have been identified and 

released on arrival. 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM, 

Inspector of Animals. 
118 



COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE REPORT 

The following is a report of the work of the Middlesex County Exten- 
sion Service as developed in the Town of Chelmsford for the year 1930. 

Considerable interest was manifested by the farmers this year in the 
Extension Service work. Among the dairymen two meetings were held, one 
on dairy regulations and the production of quality milk and another on 
pasture improvement and the dairy outlook. For the fruit growers three 
meetings were held, largely on pruning and spraying methods and disease 
control. Forty-five farm visits were made on request to assist with individual 
problems. Judges were furnished at the local Grange fair. 

Among the homemakers two groups were interested, one in the Center 
and one in West Chelmsford. A series of meetings on vegetable preparation 
were carried on and in addition to those attending the information was 
passed on to over 200 other homemakers. In West Chelmsford the ladies 
were also interested in the improvement of home grounds and held a series 
of meetings for the development of this work. Home visits were made by 
specialists from the Market Garden Field Station and suggestions given on 
the care and development of lawns, shrubs and flowers. 

In Boys' and Girls' 4-H club work 140 were enrolled in the garden, food, 
clothing and poultry clubs. In addition, 49 boys were enrolled at the Train- 
ing School in North Chelmsford. Fred Holt, Stacy Kresnecki, Mrs. Ernest 
Ferron, Mrs. Joshua Machon, Julia Joulas, Mrs. Lucia Norton, Mrs. Harry 
Welch, Mrs. Eva Dobson, Air. Louis Forest, Airs. Charles Fielding, and 
Airs. E. Dyer Harris served as local leaders. Julia Koulas won third prize 
in the garden contest conducted by the Middlesex North Agricultural 
Society and was condidate for state garden championship. Ralph House, 
Frank Benton, Rosa Santos, Mary Miskell and John Dean were awarded a 
two-day trip to the Massachusetts Agricultural College for outstanding 
club work. Two local clubs won ribbons for 100 per cent attendance at the 
Lowell 4-H Club rally. The Thimble Club also won a special prize for 
winning first in the song contest and the Highland School Clothing Club 
won a special ribbon for putting on the best stunt. These were won in 
competition with 32 other clubs. 

Eight educational motion picture shows were given to a total audience 
of 2,721. 

A campaign to eradicate rats from farm and home buildings was 
carried on on a country-wide basis and a great many of the poison baits 
were distributed in Chelmsford. 

Many local people took part in the several country-wide meetings held 
during the year, such as the county picnic at Wayside Inn. Sudbury, and the 
Homemakers' Dav at Lexington. 

PERLEY \V. KIMBALL, 

Town Director. 
January 5, 1931. 

119 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

December 31, 1930. 

To the Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

The Cemetery Commissioners beg to submit the following report for 
year ending December 31, 1930: 

Forefathers, the Town's oldest cemetery, has received its usual good 
care. The gates have been painted, also the slate slabs in section near 
church have been straightened up during the past season. A number of 
perpetual care lets have been regraded and rounded into first class shape. 

Pine Ridge each year shows a marked improvement. For a few years 
a newly laid out cemetery fails to show any progress as far as beautifying 
is concerned, but this cemetery has passed that period now and we feel 
that Pine Ridge, in coming years, is going to become Chelmsford's most 
beautiful and best located cemetery. 

Hart Pond, all old section, which, after a number of years, was all 
regraded and seeded, has been kept mowed with lawn mower all the season. 
By old section we are referring to that part that was first used as a 
church yard, where there are no records as to lot owners. New sections, 
the paths are being filled in with loam as fast as possible and seeded. Our 
object is to get park system so there will be only drives and walks that are 
needed, which will make a much neater appearance and more work will be 
accomplished. 

Riverside, at north village, has received its usual good care this season. 
This is one of the Town's larger cemeteries; the greater part of it "HT 
located on a hill side which of course makes it attractive but more difficult 
to care for. We have a new 7 set of blue prints of this cemetery drawn up 
this year. 

West Cemetery, as usual, has been most attractively kept this year and 
the appearance is always remarkably good. There have been a number of 
large shade trees, also shrub and evergreens set out by some of the lot 
owners, all which lead to make it a spot of beauty. The fence has also 
been repaired and painted. 

Fairview we were not allowed to do anything in this year (1930) as it 
is a state law that no money be spent in any town cemetery having less 
than ten occupied lots and this cemetery has but six. The money which 
was appropriated at the Annual Town Meeting for this cemetery is turned 
back into the Town Treasury and not used for work or material in any 
other cemetery. 

Interments for 1930 as follows : Forefathers 7, Pine Ridge 4, Hart 
Pond 4, West 8, Riverside 12, Fairview 1, making a total of 26. 

120 



At this time we wish to thank the superintendents of our cemeteries 
for the interest they take and the effort put into their work to make our 
cemeteries as good in appearance and efficient as any of our surrounding- 
towns, also the lot owners who come and take care of their lots or have 
the superintendent give them annual care, as all these lines of cooperation 
lead to make the cemeteries of Chelmsford places of beauty. We the 
Cemetery Commissioners see each year many improvements in all the 



cemeteries. 



Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR O. WHEELER, 
BAYARD C. DEAN, 
C. WESLEY LYONS, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FLAG POLE AT SO.-CHELMSFORD 

The Committee elected at the Annual Town Meeting to investigate the 
question of a new flag pole to be erected at South Chelmsford. Recommend 
that a steel pole be purchased and that the sum of $500.00 be appropriated 
for that purpose. 

SIDNEY E. DUPEE, 
WILBER E. LAPHAM, 
EMILE E. PAIGNON. 



REPORT OF WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 



To the Citizens of Chelmsford, Massachusetts : 

Your Committee appointed by the Moderator of the Annual Town 
Meeting held February 10, 1930, at which time under Article 15 of the 
Town Warrant it was voted to appoint a committee to recommend to the 
voters the manner of erecting a suitable Soldiers Monument for the Vet- 
erans of Chelmsford, hereby make the following report : 

First — To Whom Dedicated ^ 

Your Committee voted to ask the citizens to erect a monument and 
dedicate it to the Citizens of Chelmsford who were engaged in the Civil 
War, the Spanish American War, and the W r orld War. 

Second — Kind of Monument to be erected 

It was unanimously voted by your Committee to recommend the erec- 
tion of a Memorial Flag Pole with a base constructed of granite, with 
bronze ornamentation and three bronze tablets, one for each of the above 
named Wars. The flag pole to be made of steel and so constructed thai it 
can be raised and lowered at will or the so-called collapsible type, the 
foundation to be cement protected by a metal curb bar. 

121 



Third — Location 

Your Committee recommend that the Memorial Flag Pole he erected 
at the easterly end of the Common in the Center of Chelmsford in the 
place of, and on the site of the present wooden flag pole. 

Fourth — Summary 

Your Committee being without funds were unable to cause any plans 
to be made from which they could arrive at the actual cost of the proposed 
.Monument but being aided by a sketch hastily made for which no expense 
was involved they were able to determine that it would be necessary to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5000 to properly carry out the intent of 
Article 15 in the Town Warrant of February 10, 1930. 

Therefore your Committee recommend that the articles contained in 
the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of. 1930 be adopted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. A. P. COBURN, 
GEORGE W. PETERSON, ' 
WILHELM T. JOHNSON. 



REPORT OF MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

To the Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts : 

Under the date of February 18, 1930, the Town Clerk of the Town of 
Chelmsford issued notices to George W. Peterson, Fred F. Wiggin, and 
Arthur Cooke, that at a recent meeting of the Board of Selectmen they had 
been appointed members of the Memorial Day Committee. 

At the annual Town Meeting the sum of Five Hundred Dol lars 
($500.00) was appropriated for the observance of Memorial Day, May 30, 
1930 ; this amount being an increase of Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) 
over the appropriations of previous years. 

Inasmuch as the Town of Chelmsford had been incorporated two hun- 
dred and seventy-five years and had throughout the history of the three 
hundred years since the incorporation of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts as a separate State, the citizens of Chelmsford had taken an honorable 
part in all the wars of this United States of America and had also been 
distinguished in their relationships with the Indians in this section of the 
Colony, your Committee considered it fitting that the celebration of 
Memorial Day be one of simple recognition of the part Chelmsford soldiers 
had taken to defend the rights and traditions of the citizenship of the United 
States of America and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

An effort was made not to depart from the customary befitting exer- 
cises that have become almost a tradition in themselves, but by adding a 
series of tableaux on the Common in the center of the Town to the memory 
of Chelmsford soldiers who have given so much to the Town and its 
citizens, would become more lasting in the minds of Chelmsford people 
both old and young. 

122 



In order to carry out our plans it was necessary to ask both individuals 
and organizations to give much time and effort to the successful conclusion 
of the exercises, which met with a hearty response and to each one who 
took part the Committee and we believe the townspeople are very grateful. 

The expenses in some ways were larger than they would be under 
ordinary conditions and in some respects the cost was not as much as we 
had appropriated, the total expense amounting to Four Hundred and Eleven 
Dollars and Thirty-eight Cents ($411.38). The celebration of Memorial 
Day this year developed the necessity for an increased appropriation in the 
years to come even though there is but little change if any in the programme 
of past years, and we believe the citizens will gladly grant such a request. 

Signed 

GEORGE W. PETERSON, Chairman, 
FRED F. WIGGIN, 
ARTHUR COOKE, 

Members of the Committee. 



123 



c 7?eport of Committee on Investigating 
Water Supply 

To the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford 

Pursuant to Article 28 at the last Annual Town Meeting a com- 
mittee appointed consisting of R. W. Barris, J. C. Monahan, Emile Paignon, 
Harold Petterson, Harry L. Shedd and George Gagnon herewith submit 
their report. 

Your Committee have made extensive investigations into the problems 
of supplying water to the other parts of the Town, such as East Chelmsford, 
West Chelmsford, South Chelmsford and MiH Road, in fact all parts of the 
Town not now supplied. Our finding in these places showed a very desired 
demand for some sort of a supply. It was very distinct that a careful study 
should be made of the present and the future for the best welfare of the 
Town and your Committee felt that in order to make their report complete, 
insofar as engineering experts were concerned, secured the services of 
Metcalf & Eddy, outstanding engineers in water supplies, they to make 
careful study of existing conditions, probable supplies, and estimate costs. 
Their report is published in the annual report and follows the report of this 
Committee. We sincerely wish the citizens will carefully read their 
findings. 

INVESTIGATION OF THE SEVERAL DISTRICTS 

Centre District. This district is fortunate in having a very fine supply 
for a great many years to come. It is in good financial standing, having 
been able to find revenue in its sales of water to meet all current expenses 
for the years of 1929 and 1930 without assessment of a water tax. There 
is still some question as the New England Fire Underwriters test on 
hydrants, but we understand that the District has requested this Board to 
make another test correcting any error, that is questioned in their previous 
test. 

North District. Our findings are that this system is good, meeting all 
the requirements of the Underwriters in hydrant tests. The quality of the 
water is not as good as others. This water by analysis of the State Board 
of Health and of Metcalf & Eddy show that the supply is deteriorating and 
to be approaching the quality of water to be found in Newfield Pond. That 
the capacity of the wells has been reached and any greater demand on the 
supply will have to be undertaken elsewhere. Inasmuch as the water is not 
of the best quality the feeling among the majority of this district is. that 
they are willing to associate with what they possess. 

124 



East District. From information given this is the largest community in 
the State without a source of water supply. This district is approximately 
one square mile containing 185 homes, in places quite compact. The density 
of the families relying on their own wells has overtaxed their supply, per- 
haps to the extent of pollution. There are now at the present time several 
families relying on their neighbors. This district is fast developing, ap- 
proaching the Westlands district in its rapid growth. The supply at the 
East Grade School is far from satisfactory, both in quality and quantity. 
In 1920 the Town spent a large sum of money in a driven well which has 
proved unsatisfactory and shows there is no desirable supply. With a com- 
munity as thickly settled as East, with a mere fire protection, the citizens are 
justified in their demands for hydrant protection. 

South District. Investigations here find the water in and around the 
Square of inferior quality. In 1927 considerable confusion was placed on 
the residents of this district by the Board of Health condemning several 
wells, resulting in a demand on the Town for a new public well. By analysis 
the water found in this new well was found passable, still not of good 
quality. There are at this time several families using this water for 
domestic purpose. There was a great demand here for hydrant service. 

West District. This district like the others feels the periods of drought. 
A few of the residents obtain their supply from Brookside. There is a 
demand here for hydrant service. 

Mill Road District. There seems to be a sufficient supply of water here, 
and the demand is mostly for hydrant service. 



ADVISABILITY OF A MUNICIPAL SYSTEM AND 
RECOMMENDATIONS 

Your Committee, not able to complete a full report, ask for further 
time, and that this report be accepted as a work of progress. 

R. W. BARRIS 
GEORGE E. GAGNON 
J. C. MONAHAN 
HAROLD C. PETTERSON 
EMILE PAIGNON 



HARRY L. SHEDD 



125 



Engineer's 7?eport 



Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
Committee on Advisability of Installing 
Municipal Water Plant 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen : 

In accordance with your authorization of April 7, 1930, we have made 
an investigation of the water problems of the Town of Chelmsford, with 
special reference to the advisability of installing a municipal water plant, and 
present herewith our report, containing our findings and recommendations 
including the estimated cost of construction. 

In preparing this report we have given consideration to the existing and 
available sources of water and to the distribution mains required to make 
this water available, together with an examination and study of storage 
facilities required. Our investigation has also included a study of existing 
reports, records of water consumption and driven well pumping tests. We 
have examined also the data on flow tests made by the New England Insur- 
ance Exchange and have made use of analyses made by the State Depart- 
ment of Health. 



POPULATION 



Future requirements for water supply are dependent, among other 
factors, upon the number of persons creating the demand. A forecast of 
future population is therefore, essential to the determination of the future 
rate of demand. Table 1 shows the figures for the population of Chelmsford 
as determined by the several federal and state censuses since 1765, together 
with the rate of growth for each 5-year period after 1850. 



126 



TABLE 1. Population of Chelmsford from 
Federal and State Censuses 







Increase 


in 5 Years 


Year 


Population 


Number 


Per Cent 


1765 


1,012 







1776 


1,341 







1790 


1,144 








1800 


1,290 







1810 


1,396 







1820 


1,535 







1830 


1,387 







1840 


1,697 







1850 


2,097 


. 





1855 


2,140 


43 


2.1 


1860 


2,291 


151 


7.1 


1865 


2,291 








1870 


2,374 


83 


3.6 


1875 


2,372 


2 


0.8 


1880 


2,553 


181 


7.6 


1885 


2,304 


249 


9.8 


1890 


2,695 


391 


17.0 


1895 


3,162 


467 


17.3 


1900 


3,984 


822 


26.0 


1905 


4,254 


270 


6.8 


1910 


5,010 


756 


17.8 


1915 


5,182 


172 


3.4 


1920 


5,682 


500 


9.7 


1925 


6,573 


891 


15.7 



Fig. 1 is a graphical representation of these figures and also shows a 
forecast of the future growth of the Town. As a guide to judgment 
certain other Massachusetts cities and towns, now somewhat larger than 
Chelmsford, have been selected and their population data plotted. The 
curves are drawn through a common point at 7300 population, the estimated 
present population of Chelmsford, so that the trend of growth of these 
cities and towns can be compared with the past growth of Chelmsford, both 
before and after they reached 7300, as an aid in determining future 
tendencies. 

The growth of Chelmsford in the past corresponds to about the average 
rate of the other communities studied. Communities which lie adjacent to 
large cities enjoy a corresponding increase in population, and the percentage 
rate of growth may well exceed thaf of the city itself, due to a general 
movement of the population toward the suburbs where conditions are more 
favorable to residential development. The trend of growth of Chelmsford 
within the last ten years, would appear to indicate a somewhat slower rate 
of growth than that of Arlington, Norwood and West Springfield. The 
rapid growth of Arlington was doubtless due to the construction of 
the Cambridge subway from Boston, with the attendant advantages of 
rapid transit. Certain parts of Chelmsford, especially Easl Chelmsford 
and the Westlands district, have experienced a recent rapid growth due to 
the formation of a new residential district convenient to both Lowell and 
Chelmsford Center. Other parts of the Town have only slightly increased 
in population. 

127 



FIG. 1 



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128 



The curve shown in heavy dashes has been determined upon as the 
forecast of the future growth of Chelmsford. 

Table 2 shows the predicted future population in tabular form as taken 
from the curve, together with the corresponding increase for each 5-year 
period. 

TABLE 2— Forecast of Future Population of Chelmsford 







Increase 


in 5 Years 


Year 


Population 


Number 


Per Cent 


1930 


7,300 


700 


10.6 


1935 


8,000 


700 


9:6 


1940 


8,800 


800 


10.0 


1945 


9,650 


850 


9.7 


1950 


10,500 


850 


8.8 


1955 


11,250 


750 


7.1 


1960 


12,000 


750 


6.7 



WATER CONSUMPTION AND FUTURE DEMAND 

The quantity of water required to supply the estimated future population 
can best be determined by the study of existing records of past requirements 
in Chelmsford. Such data are available in the North Chelmsford Fire 
District and in Chelmsford Center but not in other parts of the Town- 
where water is obtained from individual private wells. It is necessary 
therefore that allowances for future water consumption be fixed largely by 
judgment. 

Consumption in North Chelmsford Fire District. Table 3 indicates the 
average quantity of water pumped per day during the period from 1925 to 
1929, inclusive. The records do not show the population served by this 
district, but it has been estimated as lying at present between 2,000 and 
2,500 persons. The indicated 1929 average per capita consumption of water 
in the district would therefore vary between 31 and 39 g. p. d. (gallons per 
day). 

Consumption in Chelmsford Water District. Table 4 indicates the 
quantity of water pumped from 1914 to 1929, inclusive, in the Chelmsford 
Water District. The population of Chelmsford Center and Westlands 
served in 1929 was 2,140 persons with an indicated per capita consumption 
of 54.2 g. p. d. The average consumption for the last five years has been 
about 49 gal. per capita per day, representing a steady increase from 26.3 
gal. in 1916. 

TABLE 3. Quantity of Water Pumped in the 
North Chelmsford Fire District 



Period 
June 1924 through May 1925 
June 1925 " May 1926 
June 1926 " May 1927 
June 1927 " May 1928 
June 1928 " May 1929 



Total 


gal. per 


Average 


gal. per year 


month 


g.p.d. 


26,276,496 


2,189,708 


72,677 


27,863,454 


2,321,954 


76,330 


30,050,995 


2,504,249 


82,304 


27,472,458 


2,289,371 


75,061 


28,823,945 


2,401,995 


78,969 



129 



TABLE 4. Quantity of Water Pumped in 
Chemsford Water District 
Total Average Average 

Year gal. per vear gal. per month g-P-d. 

1914 11,247,000 938,000 30,800 

1915 9,708,000 808,000 26,600 

1916 10,259,000 854,000 28,100 

1917 12,450,000 1,037,000 34,100 

1918 15,547,000 1,295,000 42,600 

1919 16,465,000 1,370,000 45,100 

1920 20,509,000 1,709,000 56,200 

1921 22,897,000 1,908,000 62,700 

1922 24,734,000 2,060,000 67,800 

1923 29,101,000 2,425.000 79,800 

1924 30,660,000 2,555*,000 84,100 

1925 32,664,000 2,684.000 89,500 ' 
1920 36,945,000 3,080,000 101,300 

1927 34,102,000 2,841,000 93,300 

1928 35,024,000 2,920,000 96,000 

1929 42,378,000 3,530,000 116,000 
future Per Capita Consumption. It is seldom that a community is 

able to maintain the total quantity of water used for all purposes at as low 
a figure as 30 to 35 g.p.d. per capita. Should an ample town supply be in- 
stalled, it is probable that the per capita consumption would increase ma- 
terially. For this reason, a future per capita consumption of 50 g.p.d. for 
the whole Town in 1960 has been assumed as a basis for these studies. The 
year 1960 has been adopted in this report as the limit for which construction 
should be planned. It is uneconomical to provide facilities for water supply 
whose capacity will be exceeded before the bonds used in payment shall 
have been retired. At the same time money should not be invested in works 
which will not be called into service for many years to come. 

Future Water Consumption in Various Districts. Since the Town of 
Chelmsford is divided into villages which are of more or less dissimilar 
characteristics, it is essential that some idea be gained of the consumptiomin 
each of these districts. The 1925 distribution of population in the six 
precincts of the Town is shown in Table 5. The future distribution of 
population probably will vary widely from these figures as some parts of the 
Town are growing faster than others. As a basis for estimate the distribu- 
tion for 1960 has been forecasted as shown in this table, taking into account 
the various factors affecting growth. 

TABLE 5. Forecast of Future Water Consumption 
in Various Districts 

Distribu- Forecast Forecast of 

Pre- tion of of distri- water 

District cinct popula- bution of consumption* 

No. tion population I960 

1925 1960 g.p.d. 

Chelmsford Center 1 1,816 3,200 160,000 

North Chelmsford 2 2,696 4,200 210,000 

East Chelmsford 4 688 1,500 75,000 

South Chelmsford 5 336 500 25,000 

West Chelmsford 3 347 600 30,000 

Westlands 6 690 2,000 100,000 

Total 6,573 12.000 600,000 

* Based on 50 gal. per capita per day. 

130 



EXISTING WATER WORKS SYSTEMS 

North Chelmsford Fire District. The North Chelmsford Fire District 
was formed in about 1907 for the purpose of furnishing fire protection and 
water supply to North Chelmsford village. The source of the water supply 
is a group of thirty tubular wells, located along the edge of Crystal Lake. 
In a brick pumping station nearby are installed two Ramsay triplex single- 
acting pumps, each having a rated capacity of 316,800 g.p.d. These pumps, 
driven by General Electric 25-hp., 550-volt motors raise the water to a stand- 
pipe on the hill a few hundred feet distant. About 66 lb. per sq. in. pressure 
is developed at the pumps with an 8-in. vacuum. The pumps are run from 
5 to 6 hours per day. 

The standpipe has a height of 125 ft. with a diameter of 22 ft. and a 
capacity of about 350,000 gal. The top of the standpipe is at about 285 ft. 
above mean sea level. The principal distribution pipe of the Town is 12 in., 
extending along Washington Street and Gay Street. Other pipes are 10 in. 
and 8 in. with short branches of 6-in. pipe. 

Chelmsford Water District. The Chelmsford Water District was 
formed in about 1914. The source of the supply is a group of fifteen 
tubular wells driven along River Meadow Brook near the end of Warren 
Avenue. A brick pumping station, containing two Goulds triplex double- 
acting pumps, is situated adjacent to Warren Avenue. These pumps, each 
having a rated capacity of 460,000 g.p.d., are driven by 25-hp. gas engines, 
and raise the water to the standpipe. Gas for the engines is supplied from 
a main from the City of Lowell. The average pressure developed at the 
pumps is about 101 lb., while the vacuum varies from 4 to 6 in. In general 
the pumping station is operated about 6 hours per day, although in the 
summer water may be pumped for 12 hours in order to meet the increase in 
demand. 

The standpipe or reservoir which is situated on a hill southwest of the 
center of the village, is of reinforced concrete with dome roof 20 ft. high, 
40 ft. in diameter, buried about 6 ft. in the ground with a capacity of about 
190,000 gal. The top of the reservoir is at about elevation 325 above mean 
sea level or 40 ft. above the top of the North Chelmsford standpipe as 
computed from pressures at points of known elevation in the villages. The 
reservoir appears to be in good condition, except for spalling of the concrete 
in one spot and seepage through the walls over a considerable area. 

The distribution system consists of a 10-in. force main from the pump 
station along South Street and High Street to the standpipe. A 8-in. main 
has been laid in Billerica Road and Golden Cove Road to Westlands and 
extending beyond the intersection of Lowell Street and Evergreen Street. 
The remainder of the distribution system is mostly of 6-in. pipe. 

Fire Protection. In Table 6 are shown in parallel columns the fire flow 
requirements of the New England Insurance Exchange and a summary of 
results of actual fire flow tests made by the Exchange at various points 
within the territory served by each of the existing water systems. 

Comparison of the figures in the table indicates an excess over the re- 
quirements of the Exchange at each of the points selected for test in North 
Chelmsford. It is understood that it is customary to keep the water level 

131 



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in the standpipe within 5 to 10 ft. of the top, with the result that at all times 
there is a considerable quantity of water available under excellent pressure 
to serve all parts of the district. Should this system be extended to serve 
West Chelmsford, the requirements of the latter village would be too great 
to enable the existing standpipe to serve both villages, and a new standpipe 
should be built in West Chelmsford. 

Comparison of the figures in Table 6 for Chelmsford Center indicates 
a deficiency in pressure below the requirements in the Exchange at two 
points, although at all points reported the initial pressure at the hydrants was 
good. 

Quality. It is understood that analyses made from year to year show the 
quality of the water drawn from the North Chelmsford wells to be approach- 
ing the quality of the water in Crystal Lake. Apparently, therefore, the 
water obtained from these wells is largely pond water drawn from the lake 
and filtered through a rather thin layer of sand. The most recent analyses 
from this source are shown in Table 7. 

The analyses made in August, 1930, indicate an unattractive colored 
water, high in organic matter and iron with evidence indicating past pollu- 
tion. The State Department of Health has repeatedly called attention to 
these conditions. Although the filtering layer still prevents the entrance of 
harmful bacteria, on account of the camps and cottages along the shores the 
lake must be regarded as a hazardous source of supply and one which may 
at any time become contaminated. Furthermore, there is some population on 
the bluff above the wells. 

Consequently the safety of the well supply depends upon the complete- 
ness of purification brought about by the process of infiltration to the wells. 
The analyses shows a considerably higher organic content than the Chelms- 
ford Center supply and it is problematical as to how much reliance can be 
placed on the natural processes of purification. As a matter of precaution 
we have assumed in the studies herein reported that the existing North 
Chelmsford wells and pumping equipment should be held in reserve for 
emergency use only or that chlorination equipment will be provided. 

The quality of the Chelmsford Center water is excellent, as indicated 
by the analyses in Table 7. The drainage area of the River Meadow Brook 
at the well field is approximately 10 sq. mi. The stream itself is underlain 
by a rather thick layer of hard pan which is pierced by the tubular wells, 
and the water is drawn from a coarse sand stratum below. 



AVAILABLE SOURCES OF SUPPLY 

As previously mentioned, the existing North Chelmsford well system is 
assumed to be held in reserve for emergency use only or to be chlorinated. 

Certain test wells were driven in 1927 by the City of Lowell on the flats 
bordering the Merrimac River near the Southwell Wool Combing Company's 
mill in North Chelmsford. Although there was not sufficient water for the 
City of Lowell, the Town of Chelmsford could be served adequately from 
this area. The quality of the water from this source is good, as is indicated 
by analyses made during the tests and reported in Table 7. To utilize this 

133 



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source it would be necessary to drive new wells, construct a new pumping 
station and lay suction and discharge mains. 

The so-called "hydraulic well system" at Lowell has not been used 
actively since 1919 on account of troubles experienced with iron and the 
corrosive quality of the water. Analyses of this water are given in Table 7. 
When these wells were new, the water was of acceptable quality but analyses 
indicate that the quality gradually deteriorated over a period of years, pre- 
sumably due to pumping at too high a rate. 

WATER SUPPLY FOR ENTIRE TOWN 

In determining the most economical and satisfactory means for providing 
water supply for the entire Town, it has been necessary to study several 
projects involving different combinations of supply works, distribution pipe 
lines and storage facilities because of the distance separating the various 
villages. A discussion of these projects follows. 

It is probable that a new well field located in the vicinity of the junction 
of Golden Cove Brook and River Meadow Brook, would yield for many 
years the requisite quantity of water for the entire Town's use. The drain- 
age area at this location is somewhat larger than that at the existing Chelms- 
ford Center well field. To utilize this source it would be necessary to drive 
new w T ells, construct a pumping station and lay suction and discharge piping. 

The Chelmsford Center well field presents an excellent opportunity for 
developing a supply adequate for the entire Town. The quality of the water 
is excellent and the drainage area of 10 sq. mi. appears adequate to furnish 
all the water required by the entire Town for many years. At present these 
wells are pumped about six hours daily during most of the year and about 
twelve hours during the summer. By pumping on a 24-hour basis this 
system as now developed, without the addition of any new wells or pumps, 
probably would serve the entire Town for about ten years. In the future, as 
consumption increases, the field should be extended from time to time by 
drilling new wells in the same locality and connecting them with the present 
suction main. 

PROJECT I. 

SEVERAL SEPARATE SUPPLIES 

This project includes the development of several separate supplies and 
the installation of such mains and branch feeders as are required to bring 
the water to the central point of distribution in each village, together with 
the construction of storage reservoirs or tanks where required. The location 
of the villages is shown on Fig. 2 and the method of serving each village is 
described in the following paragraphs : 

North Chelmsford. North Chelmsford would be supplied from a new 
well field and pumping station to be located on the fiats bordering the 
Merrimac River near the mill of the Southwell Wool Combing Company. 
Fifteen or more 2 Vz -in. tubular wells would be required. The capacity 
of the pumps would be 290 g.p.m. (gallons per minute) each, at which rate 
twelve hours pumping' daily from one pump should suffice until about I960. 
The second pump would be held in reserve. The pumps should be of the 

135 



FIC 




PROPOSED MUNICIPAL WATER 
SUPPLY SYSTEM 



SCALE., APPROX. I MILE TO I INCH 

JUNE, 1930 

MET CALF O EDDY 
EN©1NE£R8 
BOSTON ,MA68. 



136 



triplex type and, for dependability, one should be driven by an electric motor 
and the other by a gasoline engine. The station in which the pumps are 
housed should be a simple brick structure approximately 20 ft. by 30 ft. in 
plan. An 8-in. force main would be laid from the pumping station to con- 
nect with the 8-in. pipe on Middlesex Street or preferably, by special 
arrangement, with the Southwell Wool Combing Company's 8-in. pipe near 
their mill. 

The present standpipe, with a capacity of 350,000 gal., is adequate for 
fire protection for this district. Furthermore, the distribution system is 
well laid out, so that no additional expense is involved in supplying the 
consumers in this territory. 

East Chelmsford. The village of East Chelmsford lies in the extreme 
easterly portion of the Town, east of the Old Middlesex Canal and south of 
the City of Lowell. The principal development is along Gorham Street (the 
State Highway) and Carlisle Street, Carleton and Sprague Avenues, 
Marshall Street and Riverneck Road. 

A supply of water for this village probably could be obtained from new 
wells in the vicinity of the old "hydraulic" well field of the City of Lowell. 
Because of the experience with corrosive water from this field, it would 
perhaps be preferable to locate the wells farther upstream in the meadow, 
say near the" junction of Golden Cove Brook and River Meadow Brook. 
Eight or more 2% -in. tubular wells would be required. The capacity of 
the pumps would be 150 g.p.m. each, at which rate eight hours pumping 
daily from one pump would suffice until 1960. The pumps should be of the 
triplex type, one driven by an electric motor and the other by a gasoline 
engine, and the pumping station should be about 20 by 25 ft. in plan. 

A 6-in. force main would be laid along the Chelmsford Center Road, 
connecting the pumping station with the pipe line in Marshall Street. An 
8-in. pipe would be laid in Marshall Street, increasing to a 10-in. in Carlisle 
Street, which would connect with a standpipe lying to the southwest, as 
shown in Fig. 2. The 10-in. pipe would be extended in Carlisle Street, to 
the junction with the State Road, and an 8-in. pipe line laid in the State 
Road from the Lowell City line to Sprague Avenue. 

The standpipe would have a capacity of 250,000 gal. and would be pro- 
vided with a concrete foundation, blowoff chamber and gate valves. The 
elevation of the high water in the standpipe would be 210 ft. above mean sea 
level, which is 115 ft. below the level of the Chelmsford Center reservoir. 
This standpipe would be 25 ft. in diameter and approximately 70 ft. high. 
Additional pipes may be laid on the remaining streets, as required, and as 
the finances of the Town permit. 

Tt would appear possible for the village of East Chelmsford to obtain 
water at slight initial cost from the City of Lowell, since a 12-in. pipe 
extends from the heart of the city out to the intersection of Anderson and 
Gorham Streets, reducing to a 10-in. and then to a 6-in. pipe to the city line. 
The pressure at or near the line is about 52 lb. per square inch. Moreover, 
the City of Lowell by acts of legislature in 1902 and 1913 was authorized to 
supply parts of Chelmsford with water. Lowell, however, is hardly in a 
position at present to furnish water to adjacent communities, having barely 

137 



enough for its own needs. It has been necessary during the past year for 
Lowell to supplement the "Boulevard" well supply with water of inferior 
quality drawn from the "Cook" system of wells and to look for an addi- 
tional supply elsewhere. For the above reason it is doubtful if East Chelms- 
ford can secure water from Lowell. 

South Chelmsford. The village of South Chelmsford is so situated that 
the chances of a rapid increase in population appear slight ; in fact, only one 
or two new houses have been built within the last five years. 

A convenient local source of supply for the village is lacking, unless a 
well field could be developed in the vicinity of Hart Pond. There is some 
danger of contamination from the pond, as in the case of Crystal Lake at 
North Chelmsford, and there is no particularly suitable site for a standpipe. 
Fortunately the Chelmsford Center reservoir is only about IMj miles from 
the center of South Chelmsford, and the difference in cost of developing a 
local supply and extending the Chelmsford Center supply is so small that the 
local supply does not appear justifiable. 

A 10-in. pipe line should be laid from the standpipe along Robbins Hill 
Road to the village. This will provide fire protection in the village without 
construction of additional storage facilities. In addition, an 8-in. pipe should 
be laid in Proctor Road from the junction with Lowell Road, to the school 
house, with a 6-in. pipe extending about 1,000 ft. beyond to furnish water to 
several dwellings in this district. An 8-in. pipe should be laid along Maple 
Road as far as the railroad station, in order to afford protection to the 
church and the railroad station. 

West Chelmsford. Under this project it is assumed that West Chelms- 
ford could develop a new supply at some point along Stony Brook or its 
branches, similar to that obtained by the Abbot Worsted Company of 
Brookside. The well field would consist of four or more 2% -in. tubular 
wells. The pumping station w r ould be about 20 ft. by 18 ft. in plan, con- 
taining two triplex pumps, one driven by an electric motor and the other^lry 
a gasolene engine. The pumps would have a capacity of 60 g.p.m. each, at 
which rate eight hours pumping daily from one pump should suffice until 
about 1960. 

A discharge pipe about 1,000 ft. long would connect this source with 
the 10-in. pipe to be laid in School Street. The remainder of the distribu- 
tion system would include a 10-in. pipe in High Street, connecting with a 
proposed standpipe on the high land between High Street and the Stony 
Brook branch railroad. In addition, an 8-in. pipe would be laid on Main 
Street and would extend in a southwesterly direction to the Westford Town 
line. 

The proposed standpipe would be 25 ft. in diameter and 70 ft. high, 
having a capacity of about 250,000 gal. The standpipe would be set on a 
suitable concrete foundation and would be provided with a bio woff chamber 
and necessary gate valves. 

An alternate solution of the water supply problem for West Chelmsford 
lies in combining with Brookside, to form a fire district similar to the two 
now existing in Chelmsford. Such a district could obtain a supply from 
Gilson's Brook at the location now used by the Brookside Mill of the Abbot 

138 



Worsted Company. Storage could be provided by a standpipe erected on 
Francis Hill near the Chelmsford town line southwest of Brookside Village, 
at such an elevation that water under sufficient pressure would be available 
in all parts of West Chelmsford. Such a procedure involves joint action 
between portions of two villages. It might have a slight tendency toward 
upsetting civic bonds, whereas the construction of a common municipal 
supply for all the Chelmsford villages might tend to unify the community 
spirit. 

While the Abbot Worsted Company furnishes water to a few houses in 
West Chelmsford, it does not seem prudent to expect this company to go 
into the water distribution business on such a scale as to serve the entire 
village. 

Chelmsford Center. The village of Chelmsford Center has an excel- 
lent supply of water at the present time, with sufficient storage in the stand- 
pipe to care for ordinary fire protection requirements, and no radical change 
need be made in any part of the Chelmsford Center distribution system. 
An 8-in. pipe should be laid in Mill Road from the end of the existing pipe 
in South Street at Putnam Street to a point near the Ice House on River 
Meadow Brook, a distance of about 6000 ft. The practice of looping up 
dead ends, in order to secure a better flow, should be continued. 

Westlands. The village of Westlands, corresponding with Precinct No. 
6, is probably the most rapidly growing part of the town. It lies on the 
main road between Chelmsford Center and Lowell and offers excellent 
facilities for the development of a residential district. New streets are being- 
laid out and additional land cleared so that it appears probable that a com- 
munity of some size may eventually be built up in this locality. Westlands 
is now included in the Chelmsford Center Water District. Fire flow tests 
made by the New England Insurance Exchange indicate good pressure in 
the vicinity of the Lowell Road near Evergreen Street. It is probable that 
at some future date elevated storage should be provided in this district to 
improve fire protection. 



PROJECT II. 

MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY 

This project includes the development of a single municipal supply to 
serve all villages utilizing the present facilities of the Chelmsford Center 
Water District, installing connecting piping in the various parts of the town 
and providing local storage where such is needed. An outline of the project 
is shown on Fig. 2, and the method of serving each village is described in the 
following paragraphs : 

North Chemsford. North Chelmsford would be served from Chelms- 
ford Center through an 8-in. pipe line to be constructed in North Street. 
The present supply at Crystal Lake would be maintained as an emergency 
supply as previously discussed. The standpipe is of sufficient size to furnish 
domestic water to the village for several days, so that a break in the main 
pipe line should cause no serious interruption in service. 

13') 



East Chelmsford. East Chelmsford would be served from Chelmsford 
Center through a 6-in. pipe line to be laid from Billerica Road at Golden 
Cove Road to the new standpipe to be erected as previously described on the 
high land west of Carlisle Street. Branches as shown on Fig. 2 would 
connect the standpipe with houses lying along the State Highway, Marshall 
Street and Carlisle Street. 

South Chelmsford. South Chelmsford would be supplied by a 10-in. 
pipe leading from the Chelmsford Center standpipe as in Project I. Other 
pipes are as described under Project I. 

West Chelmsford. West Chelmsford would be supplied from Chelms- 
ford Center through North Chelmsford. 

The North Chelmsford standpipe is sufficient for both local fire pro- 
tection and local domestic supply, but the distance to West Chelmsford is 
such that additional local storage should be provided in the latter village. 
The proper location for this standpipe would be on the high land between 
High Street and the Stony Brook Branch railroad, as shown on Fig. 2. The 
standpipe with top at elevation 260 and a capacity of 250,000 gal., 25 ft. in 
diameter and 70 ft. high, would give sufficient pressure to adequately protect 
the George Quessy School and the Church on Maple Street. The Kalix 
Cup Company has its own system of fire protection including a 50,000-gal. 
elevated tank. 

It would readily be possible but not equally advantageous to place the 
standpipe on the hill northwest of the Town, which rises to elevation 220. 

In case of a serious fire, however, the location near High Street would 
afford a better flow, due to feeding from two directions at once, a part of 
the supply coming from North Chelmsford and a part from the standpipe. 

Chelmsford Center. This district would be supplied in the same man- 
ner as at present. The existing pumps would be operated on a 24-hour 
basis. In the future, say ten years hence, additional wells would be driven 
from time to time as required to meet the increasing yearly demand. 

Westlands. No change would be made in this district at present. When 
the increase in building is sufficient, a 250,000-gal. standpipe should be 
erected in the highest part of the district. 



PROJECT III. 

ENLARGEMENT OF EXISTING FIRE DISTRICTS 

This project is a modification of the two preceding and includes the 
enlargement of both the North Chelmsford Fire District and the Chelmsford 
Center Water District. The village of West Chelmsford would be supplied 
from a new source at North Chelmsford and the villages of East Chelms- 
ford and South Chelmsford connected with the Chelmsford Center District. 
In other respects the connecting piping and storage provided would be the 
same as for Project II. 

North Chelmsford. This project would involve the construction of a 
new source of supply at or near the Lowell test well field as previously 

140 



described under Project I except that the new motor-driven triplex pump 
and gasoline engine standby unit each would have a capacity of 330 g.p.m. 

East Chelmsford. A 6-in. pipe line would be laid from the East 
Chelmsford system at Billerica Road, to a new standpipe to be erected near 
Carlisle Street, as shown on Fig. 2. In addition, pipes as previously de- 
scribed under Project II would be laid connecting the standpipe with the 
various parts of the village. 

South Chelmsford. Under this project the village would be supplied 
by a 10-in. pipe leading from the Chelmsford Center standpipe, as in 
Projects I and II. 

West Chelmsford. The supply for West Chelmsford would be 
obtained from North Chelmsford, a new 6-in. supply pipe leading from the 
distribution system at Newfield Street and Groton Road, passing along Main 
Street to the edge of the village, where the size would be increased to 8 in. 
in diameter, and a 10-in. pipe carried along School Street and up High Street 
to the proposed 250,000-gal. standpipe. In addition, an 8-in. pipe will be 
laid on Main Street, leading to the Westford town line as in Project II. 

Chelmsford Center. This district would be supplied in the same manner 
as at present. Based on a 12-hour schedule of operation, the existing pumps 
are of sufficient capacity to furnish a supply for the enlarged district for 
many years to come. In the future additional wells may be driven as 
required, to meet the increasing demand for water from this source. 

Westlands. No change would be made in this district at present. When 
the increase in building is sufficient to warrant the expense, a 250,000 gal. 
standpipe should be erected in the highest part of the district. 

ESTIMATES OF COSTS 

The estimates of cost included herewith are based upon current prices 
for labor and materials representing average 1929-1930 construction con- 
ditions. Estimates of the extent of rock excavation are based on field in- 
spection only. Estimates are based on the use of cement or bituminous 
enamel-lined cast iron pipe. No allowance has been made in the estimates 
for the purchase of land for the well fields and standpipes or for rights of 
way from the street to the Well fields and standpipes. A reasonable allow- 
ance has been made to cover contingencies and the cost of engineering. A 
summary of the estimated cost of the various projects is given in Table 8. 

The cost of Project III is the lowest at $229,000; that of Project I is 
next at $231,000, while that of Project II is highest at $235,000. 

COMPARISON OF PROJECTS 

The difference in cost between the highest and the lowest estimates is 
seen to be $6,000, or less than 3 per cent. Such a small variation is within 
the limits of error of a preliminary estimate of this sort, so that decision 
between the projects should be made on the merits of the case and not on 
the basis of such a slight saving in cost. 

141 



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In the case of Projects I and III there are four and two pumping 
stations, respectively, which require daily attention, while in the case of 
Project II there is only one station. Thus the operation problems are some- 
what simpler in Project II. Further advantages of a single, municipally 
owned supply, in addition to the simplicity of operation just mentioned, are 
several : The maintenance of the distribution system, installation of new 
services and reading of meters can be carried on under the direction of one 
superintendent; the reservoirs or standpipes in all parts of the Town are 
interconnected and are therefore available at all times to serve all other 
parts for fire protection and by equalizing the pressure ; isolated property 
adjacent to the long connecting pipe lines has both water service and fire 
protection ; the fire departments may be consolidated and the operation 
simplified and made more effective under municipal management ; it will be 
possible to charge the same rates for water in all parts of the Town ; the 
problem of financing the water works for the entire Town will be some- 
what simpler than that for several small fire districts. The Town is 
fortunate in having an abundant supply of excellent portable water in the 
Chelmsford Center Water District. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

As a result of these studies we are of the opinion that the most ad- 
vantageous method of securing a water supply for the various villages of 
Chelmsford is by the adoption of Project II, which is a project for a 
unified system for the entire Town derived from a single source. 

The estimated cost for construction of new main pipe lines, standpipes 
and hydrants is $235,000. 



PROGRAM FOR CONSTRUCTION 

Construction can be carried out all at one time or can be spread over a 
period of years as finances and demand for service dictate. The cost of 
each item can be found in Table 8. To the figures in the table must be 
added the allowance of 20 per cent for contingencies and engineering. 

The principal items of construction for Project II are summarized 
briefly as follows : 

1. Erection of new standpipes, having a capacity of 250,000 gals, each, 
in East Chelmsford and West Chelmsford. 

2. Connecting the various parts of the Town with the Chelmsford 
Center supply by laying mains as follows : 



From 

Chelmsford Center 
Chelmsford Center 
Chelmsford Center 
North Chelmsford 



To 


Length 
ft. 


Diameter 
in. 


North Chelmsford 
East Chelmsford 
South Chelmsford 
West Chelmsford 


10,700 

11,400 

8,500 

7,100 


8 

6 

10 

6 



143 



3. Laying the following pipes as a part of the distribution system in 
each of the villages. These may be constructed as finances permit. 



Length — ft. 



Street 


From 


To 


East Chelmsford 






Carlisle St. 


Gorham St. 


Riverneck 
Rd. 


Gorham St. 


Sprague Ave. 


Lowell 
city line 


South Chelmsford 






Proctor Rd. 


Lowell Rd. 


2,000 ft. 
east 


Maple Rd. 


Proctor Rd. 


R.R. Sta 


West Chelmsford 






Main St. 


W est ford Line 


5,200 ft. 
north 


School St. 


Main 


Crooked 
Spring Rd 


High St. 


School St. 


Standpipe 


Center Chelmsford 






South St. and 


Putnam St. 


6,000 ft. 


Mill Rd. 




east 



6-in. 



L0 in. 

3,400 



1,000 



1,000 



5.000 

1,000 
1,000 

5.200 
1,000 

6.000 



800 
1,000 



A Temporary Expedient. If finances necessitate, it would be practicable 
to defer the expenditure of $33,800 by adopting Project II but continuing 
the North Chelmsford wells and pumps in service and postponing for a few 
years the construction of the connecting pipe line between North Chelms- 
ford and the Center. Under this plan the West Chelmsford construction 
would be identical with that of Project II and the North Chelmsford daily 
pumping would continue a few hours longer than at present. Thus the 
initial expenditure to provide water in all parts of Town would be reduced 
to about $201,000. 

In any event as long as these wells are continued in service, the water 
therefrom should be disinfected continuously by means of chlorination 
apparatus. Such apparatus can be purchased and installed at a cost of $600 
to $1,200, depending upon the type of equipment selected. Liquified chlorine 
gas can be purchased in steel cylinders of about 100-lb. capacity. The cost 
of chlorine will approximate 30c to 50c per million gallons treated. 



GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS 

Insurance Rates. An official examination of the fire protection facili- 
ties with hydrant flow tests has not been made in the two districts for some 
time. It is therefore suggested that your Committee request the New 
England Insurance Exchange by letter to make another examination of the 
districts, with flow tests together with a statement of their requirements 
without deficiencies for the systems. This examination and rating, together 
with the program of construction outlined in this report will give a good 
idea of the probable future rating of the Town after the construction is 
completed. 

Payment for Existing Works. The estimates in this report are for the 
cost of new construction only and do not include any allowance for taking 

144 






over any part of the works of the North Chelmsford Fire District or of the 
Chelmsford Center Water District. It is our understanding that each of 
the districts has retired a substantial part of the bonds originally issued for 
the construction of their systems. 

If Project II is adopted, presumably the Town will take over all out- 
standing obligations of the two districts and assume the operation of the 
plant and maintenance of the distribution system. 

While compensating the fire districts for their property is a legal rather 
than an engineering question, there appears to be no equitable method of 
distribution among the individual residents of the districts. A portion, at 
least, of the retired bonds has been paid off from revenue received from 
water rates and to this extent the participants have received value in water 
service for their investment to date. Furthermore, for years their property 
has enjoyed a higher value due both to the benefits of running water and 
fire protection. 

The Determination of Water Rates to Insure Maintenance of the System 
and to Finance Necessary Extensions. To meet the cost of the construction 
considered in this report it will be necessary to raise, either through water 
rates or by taxation, considerably larger sums of money than has been 
customary recently in the water districts. Money obtained from taxes for 
the benefit of the water works should be appropriated either as hydrant 
rental or as direct appropriations for construction. The former is pre- 
ferable as a general rule, but in either case it should be borne in mind that 
the greater valuations which the assessors will unquestionably find for 
property benefited by the water works will generally result in obtaining the 
full amount of money so appropriated, if not more, from the parties 
benefited and not from those in outlying sections of the Town not served 
by the water works. In order that the properties benefited shall be the 
ones to pay for the water works, their owners must be content to pay not 
only the water rates but also, through the medium of their taxes, larger 
sums than other citizens not directly benefited by the water works. 

For hydrant rental $50 per hydrant per year is customary, including not 
only public hydrants but also those on mill property, the private hydrant 
rental being paid by the owners of the property. 

As was suggested by your Water Committee of 1922, the whole cost of 
construction may be met by direct taxation, an expenditure of $200,000 at 
that time necessitating an increase in the tax rate of $3.25 per thousand. 
Such a burden on the tax payers is too great, especially when the direct 
benefit cannot be shared by all. A more equitable plan would be for the 
Town to appropriate only such amounts as may be needed to help retire 
bonds for a few years until the increase in number of water takers is suffi- 
cient to allow such retirement by water receipts and hydrant rental. 

The Extension of Main Pipes After the Initial Construction is Com- 
pleted. In many towns it is customary for the town to refuse to make ex- 
tensions of main pipes unless the party desiring such extension will guar- 
antee to the town 10 per cent of the cost annually for a period of ten 
years, or otherwise contribute substantially to the cost. We believe this 

145 



policy may well be adopted by Chelmsford with the understanding that such 
guaranty shall be based on the cost of a 6-in. pipe and that if a larger pipe is 
required in accordance with the general plan adopted by the Town for ex- 
pansion of the works, the whole of the additional cost should be met by the 
Town. It would also be well for the Town to make extensions of main 
pipes at its discretion, without guaranty and wholly at the expense of the 
Town in cases where it is necessary for the benefit of the system as a whole. 
This policy would apply to minor cross-connections and loops in the system. 

Frequently extensions of main pipes are requested either by one or a 
few individuals who have been or are building houses at some distance be- 
yond the end of the existing mains or by real estate promoters developing a 
subdivision. In the former case a guaranty of revenue for ten years will 
generally be found to meet the situation most advantageously. In the 
latter case the immediate payment of a sum equivalent to the present worth 
of the construction cost might prove more advantageous. The method of 
financing extensions is often restricted by the By-laws of the Town. Any 
petitioner for an extension should be privileged to make a single payment 
rather than ten, if he prefers, and the Town should be entitled to demand it 
if it appears necessary. 

Any such requirement is bound to result in conditions which are not 
altogether equitable as between original petitioners and later water takers in 
the same extension. The only practicable way to administer such a require- 
ment is to consider that the original petitioners guarantee certain annual 
amounts and to credit against them any revenue received at regular rates 
from subsequent water takers on the same extension, but this credit should 
not be carried so far as to let any water taker have water at less than the 
established rates. 

Capacity of Standpipcs. The amount of storage required in the various 
parts of the Town is based upon the requirements of the New England In- 
surance Exchange for similar districts. In general, in the villages it should 
be possible to concentrate 1,000 g.p.m. at any point in the thickly settled 
areas, while 750 g.p.m. is the least desirable quantity which should be avail- 
able in any part of the village. A 250,000-gal. standpipe would maintain a 
1,000-g.p.m. flow for about 4 hours. It would be possible to reduce the size 
of these individual standpipes to 180,000 gal. as a minimum, but this pro- 
cedure is not recomjmended. The saving in the construction of the smaller 
standpipes would probably not exceed $2,000. 

Acknowledgments. In closing this report we wish to acknowledge the 
service rendered by Superintendent McMahon and Superintendent Wright 
in furnishing data on the water works systems of North and Center 
Chelmsford. We are also indebted to the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health and to the New England Insurance Exchange for such in- 
formation as they had available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRISON C. EDDY 
METCALF & EDDY 



146 



T^eport of State Audit 

As of July 7, 1930 



Board of Selectmen 



December 31, 1930 



To the Citizens of Chelmsford, Mass. — 

The following is a report of an audit as submitted by the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division of Accounts, 
made as of July 7, 1930. 

Very truly yours, 

Eliphalet G. Brown 
Frank J. Ltjpien 
Royal Shawcross 

Selectmen of Chelmsford, Mass. 



August 29, 1930 
To the Board of Selectmen : 

Mr. Eliphalet G. Brown, Chairman, 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : — 

1 submit herewith my report of an audit of the accounts of 
the Town of Chelmsford for the period from January 1, 1929 to 
July 7, 1930, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
44 of the General Laws. This report is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Accountant of this 
Division. 

Very truly yours, 

Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts. 



147 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and accounts of 
the Town of Chelmsford for the period from January 1, 1929 to July 7, 1930, 
the following report being submitted thereon : 

The financial transactions of the Town, as recorded on the books of the 
several departments collecting or disbursing money for the Town or com- 
mitting bills for collection, were examined and checked with the records of 
the Town Accountant. 

In checking the accounts of the Town Treasurer and Tax Collector, 
cash discrepancies were disclosed aggregating $9,206.12. In addition claims 
have been made that taxes have been paid, which, when substantiated by 
proof of payment, will increase the shortage correspondingly. 

The books and accounts of the Treasurer and Tax Collector, as Treas- 
urer, were examined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were 
analyzed and compared with the records of the departments making pay- 
ments to the Treasurer, with the other sources from which money is paid 
into the Town treasury, and with the reports and records in the Town 
Accountant's office, while the payments were compared with the Selectmen's 
warrants authorizing the Treasurer to disburse Town funds and with the 
original vouchers and pay-rolls on file. 

As noted in the course of the previous audits, it is apparent that the 
Treasurer made no effort to effect an accurate reconciliation of the cash 
book balance with the amount of cash actually on hand and on deposit in 
the bank. The check book records were found to be incomplete, it being 
evident "that the Treasurer did not reconcile the bank account with state- 
ments furnished by the bank in which Town funds are deposited. 

A reconciliation of the bank account on July 7, 1930, was made, and it 
was found that although the balance on deposit in the bank on the above 
date was $3,163.13, there were outstanding checks against it in the amount 
of $8,827.10, showing an overdraft in the bank account of $5,663.97. The 
actual cash and checks in the Treasurer's possession on July 7, 1930, aggre- 
gated $1,765.81, which sum, applied against the overdraft in the bank, would 
reduce the Treasurer's bank overdraft to $3,898.16. However, the Treasurer's 
cash book on July 7, 1930, called for a cash balance of $2,796.82, which 
amount, added to the overdraft of $3,898.16 in the bank account, disclosed 
a total discrepancy in the accounts of the Treasurer and Collector, as 
Treasurer, aggregating $6,694.98. 

Appended to this report are tables showing a reconciliation of the 
Treasurer's cash. 

The books and accounts of the Treasurer and Tax Collector, as Tax 
Collector, were examined and checked in detail. The commitments of poll 
and property taxes for the levies of 1926 to 1929, inclusive, and of motor 
vehicle excise taxes of 1929, were added and reconciled with the Assessors' 
warrants committing the taxes and assessments for collection. The col- 

148 



lections, as recorded on the cash books, were checked to the postings on the 
commitment books and it was found that numerous items were posted on 
the commitment books as paid which were not entered on the Collector's 
cash books. The collection of these items was verified by sending letters to 
the tax-payers whose accounts were marked on the commitment books as 
paid, and the Collector was charged with the amounts thus collected which 
were not entered on the cash book and hence not paid over to the Treasurer. 
The abatements, as recorded on the commitment books, were checked with 
the Assessors' records of abatements granted, and the outstanding accounts 
were listed. 

A verification of the outstanding accounts as shown on the commit- 
ment books was made by mailing notices to all persons whose names 
appeared on the books as owing money to the Town, and replies were 
received from a large number of taxpayers who made claim that their taxes 
had been paid. These claims were investigated personally and proof of 
payment was obtained and collections charged to the Collector as follows : 
Levy of 1926, $868.10; levy of 1927, $1,171.04; levy of 1928, $492.18; and 
levy of 1929, $423.58. In addition, as previously stated, a number of claims 
of payment have been made which have not been substantiated by presenta- 
tion of receipted tax bills or cancelled checks and which were included in 
the list of outstanding taxes. 

The outstanding lists of taxes were subsequently corrected, and after the 
necessary adjustments of the numerous errors and omissions of the Collector 
had been made, the levies charged to him were reconciled, with the result 
that a net discrepancy of $2,511.14 was found in the accounts of the 
Treasurer and Collector, as Collector. 

Toward the completion of the audit, the Treasurer and Collector was 
informed of the discrepancies in his accounts, and on August 23, 1930, he 
deposited in the Town Treasury the sum of $10,000 to cover the total cash 
discrepancy of $9,206.12 existing as of July 7, 1930, leaving a balance of 
$793.88 to his credit. This amount, however, should be reserved pending 
the investigation of additional claims made by tax-payers that their taxes 
have been paid and not credited by the Collector, said claims being in excess 
of $500. 

The accounts of the Collector and Treasurer were kept in an extremely 
careless and unbusinesslike manner, necessitating an enormous amount of 
detailed checking, which materially increased the length and cost of the 
audit. 

The accounts of the Collector, as Collector of taxes for the North 
Chelmsford Fire District and the Chelmsford Water District were examined 
and checked in detail. Overpayments of $11.94 to the Treasurer of the 
North Chelmsford Fire District and of $216.28 to the Chelmsford Water 
District are apparently due to collections made and not entered on the cash 
books or commitment books. Claims of payment by tax-payers, when 
substantiated by presentation of receipted bills or cancelled checks, should 
be charged to the amounts so overpaid to the district treasurers.. 

Appended herewith are tables showing a summary of the several tax 
levies and a reconciliation of the cash accounts. 

The books and accounts in the Town Accountant's office were examined 

149 



and checked. The recorded receipts were compared with the Treasurer's 
records, and the disbursements, as recorded, were checked with the warrants 
and with the books of the Treasurer. The appropriation accounts were 
checked with the Town meeting records of appropriations and transfers 
voted, the ledger accounts were analyzed, the necessary adjusting entries 
were made, and a balance sheet, showing the financial condition of the Town 
on July 7, 1930, was prepared and is appended to this report. 

This balance sheet shows that while the surplus revenue of the Town 
is of a substantial amount, it is, nevertheless, not available, since it is 
represented entirely by uncollected taxes of 1929 and prior years. It is 
therefore recommended that immediate action be taken toward the collection 
of these taxes. 

It was noted that the library appropriation has been turned over to the 
Treasurer of the library trustees for disbursement by him. It is recom- 
mended that the library trustees present to the Town Accountant approved, 
detailed vouchers properly chargeable to the library appropriation, and that 
these vouchers be placed on a warrant for payment by the Town Treasurer. 
Attention in this connection is called to Sections 35 and 56, Chapter 41, 
General Laws. 

It was also found that the library fines have been used to defray 
miscellaneous library expenses. It is recommended that the fines be paid 
into the Town Treasury as required by Section 53, Chapter 44, General 
Laws. 

The appended balance sheet shows an overdraft in the maturing debt 
and interest account, due to the fact that no appropriations are apparently 
being voted by the Town for debt or for interest on maturing debt and on 
temporary loans, the Assessors including the required amounts in fixing the 
tax levy. It is recommended that the proper debt and interest requirements 
be voted by the Town. 

The records of tax titles were found to be inadequate and incomplete. 
It is recommended that the validity of the tax titles held by the Townl5e 
investigated, that those found invalid be written off the books, and that 
action be taken toward proceedings for foreclosure of rights of redemption 
as required by Section 50, Chapter 60, as amended by Section 2, Chapter 
126, Acts of 1927. 

The Town Clerk's records of sporting and dog licenses issued were 
examined, and the recorded payments to the Division of Fisheries and Game 
and to the County Treasurer, respectively, were verified. 

The savings bank books representing the investment of the trust and 
investment funds held by the Treasurer, library trustees, and insurance 
fund commissioners were personally examined. The income was proved 
and the disbursements were verified. Appended herewith are tables showing 
the trust fund transactions. 

In addition to the departments mentioned, the books and accounts of all 
other departments collecting money for the Town were examined and 
checked. 

For the co-operation received from the several Town officials during 
the progress of the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and far myself, 
to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDW. H. FENTON, 

Chief Accountant. 



150 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 



Balance January 1, 1929 $ 15,484.83 

Receipts 478,901.18 

$494,386.01 

Payments $481,916.36 

Balance December 31, 1929 12,469.65 

$494,386.01 

Balance January 1, 1930 $ 12,469.65 

Receipts January 1, to Julv 7, 1930 153,836.47 

Unpaid order 40.00 

$166,346.12 

Payments January 1 to July 7, 1930 $163,509.30 

Order drawn and unpaid 40.00 

Balance July 7, 1930, per cash book 2,796.82 

$166,346.12 

Balance July 7, 1930, per cash book $ 2,796.82 

Bank overdraft July 7, 1930, per check book 5,663.97 

$ 8,460.79 

Cash in office July 7, 1930, verified $ 1,765.81 

Cash discrepancy July 7, 1930 6,694.98 

$ 8,460.79 



The Union Old Lowell National Bank 



Balance July 7, 1930, per statement $ 3,163.13 

Bank overdraft July 7, 1930, per check book 5,663.97 

$ 8,827.10 

Outstanding checks July 7, 1930, per list $ 8,827.10 



151 



SUMMARY OF CASH 



E. W. Sweetser, Treasurer and Tax Collector 



Cash discrepancy in Treasurer's accounts, $ 6,694.98 

Cash discrepancy in Collector's accounts : 

Taxes 1927 $ 513.41 

Taxes 1928 694.12 

Taxes 1929 2,596.28 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 1929 744.90 

Interest— taxes 1926 12.06 

Interest— taxes 1927 127.05 

Interest— taxes 1928 42.13 

Interest— taxes 1929 95.34 

Interest — motor vehicle excise taxes 1929 11.99 



$ 4,837.28 

$ 11,532.26 



Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer : 

Taxes 1926 $2,321.87 

Moth assessments 1926 4.27 



$2,326.14 

Net discrepancy in Treasurer's and 

Collector's accounts July 7, 1930 $9,206.12 



$ 11,532.26 

Deposited into Town treasury August 23, 1930 $ 10,000.00 

Due Town treasury August 23, 1930 $9,206.12 

Balance to the credit of E. W. Sweetser, 
August 23, 1930 793.88 



$ 10,000.00 



152 



TAXES— 1926 



Commitment per warrant i. . . $230,856.15 

Additional commitment 93.15 



$230,949.30 



Payments to Treasurer : 

1926 $175,167.39 

1927 39,236.96 

1928 9,676.70 

1929 3,318.02 



$227,399.07 

Abatements : 

1926 $ 398.15 

1927 .' 200.70 

1929 2.00 

$ 600.85 

Outstanding December 31, 1929 2.949.38 



$230,949.30 



Outstanding January 1, 1930 $ 2,949.38 

Commitment list in excess of warrant.. 6.20 

Collections not committed 37.00 

Interest reported as taxes 25.00 

Abatement after payment, adjusted .90 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer : 

Overentries $ 1,056.56 

Error in addition of cash book 2,482.41 

Refund by Collector 30.00 



$ 3,568.97 



Deduct : 

Collection per cash 
book not paid over 
to Treasurer $ 1.50 

Collections per com- 
mitment book not on 
cash book 377.50 

Collections not credited 
per receipts examined 868.10 



$ 1,247.10 

$ 2,321.87 

$ 5,340.35 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

July 7, 1930 , $ 462.70 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930. . 138.50 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 4,739.15 



153 



$ 5,340.35 



TAXES— 1927 



Commitment per warrant 

Additional commitment 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1927 $172,701.68 

1928 , 37,242.81 

1929 14,947.78 

Abatements : 

1927 $ 404.12 

1928 30.58 

1929 155.24 

Outstanding December 31, 1929 

Outstanding January 1, 1930 

Commitment list in excess of warrant.. 

Collections not committed 

Payment after abatement, to be re- 
funded 

Error in reporting abatements 



$234,078.41 
270.68 



$224,892.27 



589.94 
8,866.88 



8,866.88 

45.08 

109.35 

3.73 
2.04 



$234,349.09 



$234,349.09 



$ 9,027.( 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

July 7, 1930 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930 . . 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 
Collections per cash book not paid 

over to Treasurer $ 99.00 

Collections per commitment book 

not entered on cash book 274.62 

Collections not credited, per re- 
ceipts examined 1,171.04 

$ 1,544.66 

Less Collector's overpayments to 
Treasurer 1,031.25 



706.43 

182.56 

7,624.68 



$ 513.41 



$ 9,027.08 



154 



TAXES— 1928 



Commitment per warrant $219,911.99 

Additional commitment 1,213.44 



$221,125.43 



Payments to Treasurer: 

1928 $159,511.87 

1929 35,004.68 



$194,516.55 
Abatements : 

1928 $ 1,015.88 

1929 173.66 



$ 1,189.54 
Outstanding December 31, 1929 25,419.34 



$221,125.43 



Outstanding January 1, 1930 $ 25,419.34 

Collections not committed 81.86 

Commitment list in excess of warrant.. 88.02 
Abatements after payment, to be 

refunded 108.56 

Interest credited as taxes .05 

Error in reporting abatements .02 



$ 25,697.85 



Payments to Treasurer Tanuary 1 to 

July 7, 1930 $ 10,241.63 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930.. 195.61 

Taxes 1928 reported as taxes 1929 25.00 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 14,541.49 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930: 
Collections per cash book not paid 
over to Treasurer — errors in 

addition $ 64.95 

Collections per cornmitment book 

not entered on cash book ,*- 596.05 

Collections not credited, per receipts 
examined 492.18 



$ 1,153.18 
Less Collector's overpayments to 
Treasurer 459.06 



$ 694.12 

$25,697.85 



155 



TAXES— 1929 



Commitment per warrant $216,621.76 

Additional commitment 22.60 



Payments to Treasurer $156,299.16 

Abatements 1,279.74 

Outstanding December 31, 1929 59,065.46 



Outstanding January 1, 1930 $ 59,065.46 

Commitment list in excess of warrant. . 2.00 
Abatements after payment, refunded... 285.60 
Abatements after payment, to be re- 
funded 714.34 

Taxes 1928 reported as taxes 1929 25.00 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

July 7, 1930 $ 13,763.94 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930. . 682.40 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 43,049.78 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book $ 2,869.15 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined 423.58 



$ 3,292.73 



Less Collector's overpayments to 

Treasurer 696.45 



$ 2,596.28 



$216,644.36 



$216,644.36 



$ 60,092.40 



$ 60,092.40 



156 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1929 



Commitment per warrants $ 16,092.35 

Payments to Treasurer $ 10,346.26 

Abatements 1,042.74 

Outstanding- December 31, 1929 4,703.35 



$ 16,092.35 



Outstanding January 1, 1930 $ 4,703.35 

Commitment January 1 to July 7, 1930 35.10 
Abatements after payment, refunded... 664.53 
Abatements after payments, to be re- 
funded 64.19 

Overpayment to be refunded 2.00 

Error in reporting abatements . . 1.00 



$ 5,470.17 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 to 

July 7, 1930 $ 1,777.53 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930.. 720.06 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 2,227.68 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930: 

Collections per cash book not paid 

over to Treasurer $ 459.50 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 303.12 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined ■ 8.15 

$ 770.77 

Less Collector's overpayments to 

Treasurer 25.87 



744.90 



$ 5,470.17 - 



157 



MOTH ASSESSMENTS— 1926 

Commitment per warrant $ 297.70 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1926 $ 172.40 

1927 92.12 

1928 20.87 

1929 8.70 

? 294.09 
Outstanding December 31, 1929 3.61 



297.70 



Outstanding January 1, 1930.. $ 3.61 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer : 

Duplicate entry in cash book $ 6.00 

Less collection not credited, per 

receipt examined 1.73 



4.27 



$ 7 1 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list $ 71 



INTEREST— TAXES 1926 

Collections per cash book : 

1926 $ 330.29 

1927 1,818.05 

1928 907.35 

1929 513.44 

1930 to July 7 25.78 

$ 3,594.91 
Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 54.39 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined 27.34 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1926 $ 330.29 

1927 1,820.03 

1928 920.31 

1929 516.32 

1930 to July 7 52.63 

$ 3,639.58 

Interest reported as taxes 1926 25.00 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book $ 4.54 

Collections not credited, per receipts 
examined 27.34 



$ 3,676.64 



■ $ 31.88 
Less Collector's overpayments to 

Treasurer 19.82 



158 



12.06 

$ 3,676.64 



INTEREST— TAXES 1927 



Collections per cash book : 

1927 $ 194.19 

1928 1,563.04 

1929 1,624.66 

1930 to July 7 56.86 



$ 3,438.75 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 91.08 

Collections not credited, per receipts 17.98 

examined 17.97 



Payments to Treasurer : 

1927 $ 194.19 

1928 1,498.71 

1929 1,624.66 

1930 to July 7 103.19 



Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book $ 44.75 

Collections per cash book not paid 

over to Treasurer 67.08 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined * 17.97 

$ 129.80 

Less Collector's overpayment to 
Treasurer 2.75 



3,547.80 



$ 3,420.75 



$ 127.05 

$ 3,547.80 



159 



INTEREST — TAXES 1928 

Collections per cash book : 

1928 $ 584.72 

1929 1,440.35 

1930 to July 7 925.06 

$ 2,950.13 
Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 36.72 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined 5.-7 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1928 $ 584.72 

1929 1,440.31 

1930 to July 7 924.91 

$ 2,949.94 

Interest credited as taxes 1928 .05 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per cash book not paid over 

to Treasurer $ .14 

Collections per commitment book 

not entered on cash book 36.72 

Collections not credited, per receipts 
examined 5.27 

$ 42.13 

INTEREST— TAXES 1929 

Collections per cash book : 

1929 $ 276.43 

January 1 to July 7, 1930. 398.03 

$ 674.46 
Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 85.28 

Collections not credited, per receipts 

examined 9.60 

Payments to Treasurer : 

1929 $ 275.97 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 398.03 

$ 674.00 
Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per cash book not paid 

over to Treasurer $ .46 

Collections per commitment book not 

entered on cash book 85.28 

Collections not credited, per receipts 
examined 9.60 

$ 95.34 



2,992.12 



$ 2,992.12 



769.34 



769.34 



160 



INTEREST ON MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1929 



Collections per cash book: 

1929 $ 4.88 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 53.95 

$ 58.83 



Collections per commitment book not 
entered on cash book 4.27 



Payments to Treasurer : 

1929 ..$ 4.88 

January 1 to July 7, 1930. ., 46.23 



Due from Collector July 7, 1930 : 

Collections per cash book not paid 

over to Treasurer $ 7.72 

Collections per commitment book not 
not entered on cash book 4.27 



63.10 



51.11 



$ 11.99 

$ 63.10 



161 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1926 



Commitment per warrant 

Commitment list in excess of war- 
rant 

Interest collections 

Payments to District Treasurer : 

June 1, 1926 to May 31, 1927 $ 3,099.66 

June 1, 1927 to May 31, 1928 203.16 

June 1, 1928 to May 31, 1929 83.33 

June 1, 1929 to July 7, 1930 39.36 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 



$ 3,546.37 

.07 
30.18 



3,425.51 

110.89 

40.22 



$ 3,576.62 



$ 3,576.62 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1927 



Commitment per warrant 

Commitment list in excess of war- 
rant 

Interest collections 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer 



$ 1,718.00 

1.25 
16.97 
48.40 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

June 1, 1927 to May 31, 1928. $ 1,512.35 

Tune 1, 1928 to May 31, 1929 129.12 

June 1, 1929 to July 7, 1930 97.08 

Abatements 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 



$ 1.784.62 



1,738.55 

.07 

46.00 



$ 1,784.62 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 192J* 



Commitment per warrant 

Commitment list in excess of warrant.. 

Interest collections 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

Tune 1, 1928 to May 31, 1929 $ 1,150.78 

June 1, 1929 to May 31, 1930 147.92 

Abatements 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 



1,356.50 

.06 

10.22 

27.80 



1,298.70 
11.90 
83.98 






1,394.58 



$ 1,394.58 



162 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT— TAXES 1929 



Commitment per warrant $ 2,555.40 

Interest collections 5.97 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

June 1, 1929 to May 31, 1930 $ 2,158.53 

Abatements June 1, 1929 to May 

31, 1930 4.40 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 358.10 

Cash in Town treasury July 7, 1930... 16.30 

Due from Collector July 7, 1930 24.04 



NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

Reconciliation of Collector's Cash 



Overpayments by Collector to District 
Treasurer : 

Levy of 1927 $ 48.40 

Levy of 1928 '. 27.80 



Underpayments by Collector to District 
Treasurer : 

Levy of 1926 $ 40.22 

Levy of 1929 24.04 



$ 64.26 



Due Collector July 7, 1930 11.94 



163 



$ 2,561.37 



2,561.37 



76.20 



76.20 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT— TAXES 1926 



Commitment per warrant $ 7,137.10 

Additional commitment 22.47 

Commitment list in excess of warrant.. 1.78 

Interest collections 103.70 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer 123.54 



7,388.59 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

1926 , $ 4,822.63 

1927 1,815.96 

1928 226.32 

1929 28.63 

1930 to July 7 90.12 



$ 6,982.76 
Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 405.83 



$ 7,388.59 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT— TAXES 1927 

Commitment per warrant $ 3,254.16 

Commitment list in excess of warrant. . 1.66 

Interest collections 41.13 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer 82.31 



3,379.26 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

1927 $ 2,344.07 

1928 668.15 

1929 38.85 

1930 to July 7 142.38 



Abatements 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 



$ 


3,193.45 

.47 

185.34 


$ 








3,379.26 



164 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT— TAXES 1928 

Commitment per warrant $ 3,416.91 

Additional commitment 6.21 

Interest collections 35.44 

Overpayment by Collector to Treasurer 10.43 



$ 3,468.99 



Payments to District Treasurer : 

1928 $ 2,490.32 

1929 376.45 

1930 to July 7 161.31 



$ 3,028.08 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list 266.48 

Cash in Town treasury July 7, 1930. . . . 174.43 



$ 3,468.99 



CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 
Reconciliation of Collector's Cash 



Overpayment by Collector to 
District Treasurer : 

Levy of 1926 $ 123.54 

Levy of 1927 82.31 

Levy of 1928 f 10.43 



$ 216 28 
Due Collector July 7, 1930 $ 216^28 



165 



DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 



Outstanding January 1, 1929 $ 3,463.15 

Commitment 4,197.90 



Payments to Treasurer $ 2,937.33 

Outstanding December 31, 1929 4,723.72 



Outstanding January 1, 1930 $ 4,723.72 

Commitment January 1 to July 7, 1930. 3.75 



$ 7,661.05 



$ 7,661.05 



4,727.47 



Payments to Treasurer January 1 
to July 7, 1930 $ 1,285.40 

Abatements January 1 to July 7, 1930. . 504.00 

Adjustment per audit 1,561.03 

Outstanding July 7, 1930, per list : 

Tree Warden $ 12.00 

Board of Health 652.83 

Highways 101.57 

Public Welfare 585.64 

Schools 25.00 



$ 1,377.04 



$ 4,727.47 



166 



ADAMS LIBRARY 



Balance January 1, 1929 

Town appropriation 

Refund 

Transfers : 

George Fund $ 767.85 

George Memorial Building Fund 15,000.00 

Expenditures 

Balance December 31, 1929 

Balance January 1, 1930 

Town appropriation 

Miscellaneous receipts January 1 to 
August 20, 1930 

Transfers January 1 to August 20, 1930: 

Joseph Warren Fund $ 368.13 

George Memorial Building Fund 8,632.57 

Expenditures January 1 to August 
20, 1930 

Balance Old Lowell National Bank 
August 30, 1930, per statement 



41.21 

1,400.00 

3.50 



$ 15,767.85 



$ 17,148.22 
64.34 



64.34 
1,600.00 

19.44 



$ 9,000.70 

$ 10,583.25 
101.23 



$ 17,212.56 



$ 17,212.56 



$ 10,684.48 



ADAMS EMERSON LIBRARY FUND 



$ 10,684.48 



Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 , $243.10 $243.10 

On hand at end of year 1929 «- 254.15 254.15 

On hand July 7, 1930 254.15 254.15 

On hand August 20, 1930 265.70 265.70 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Income $11.05 Deposited in savings bank. . .$11.05 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 
no transactions 

July 8 to August 20, 1930 

Income $11.55 Deposited in savings bank. . .$11.55 

167 



THE GEORGE MEMORIAL HALL FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 $22,604.02 $22.6<)4.02 

On hand at end of year 1929 8,632.57 8,632.57 

On hand July 7, 1930 ■ 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Withdrawn from savings Deposited in savings 

bank $ 15,000.00 bank $ 1,028.55 

Income 1,028.55 Transferred to library 

Treasurer 15,000.00 



$ 16,028.55 $ 16,028.55 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 

Withdrawn from savings Transferred to librarv 

bank $8,632.57 Treasurer ". $8,632.57 



JOSEPH WARREN LIBRARY FUND 

Savings 

Deposits To tal 

On hand at beginning of vear 1929 $1,772.79 $1,772.79 

On hand at end- of year 1929 1,853.43 1,853.43 

On hand July 7, 1930 '. . 1,853.43 1,853.43 

On hand August 20, 1930 1,569.63 1,569.63 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Income $80.64 Deposited in savings bank $80.64 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 
no transactions 

July 8 to August 20, 1930 

Withdrawn from savings Deposited in savings bank..$ 84.33 

bank $ 368.13 Transferred to library 

Income 84.33 Treasurer 368.13 

$452.46 $452.46 



168 



S. G. RICHARDSON LIBRARY FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929. , $357.08 $357.08 

On hand at end of year 1929 373.32 373.32 

On hand July 7, 1930 373.32 373.32 

On hand August 20, 1930 390.28 390.28 

1929 

Income $16.24 Deposited in savings bank $16.24 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 
no transactions 

July 8 to August 20, 1930 

Income $16.96 Deposited in savings bank $16.96 



GEORGE LIBRARY FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 $2,767.85 $2,767.85 

On hand at end of year 1929 2,106.72 2,106.72 

On hand July 7, 1930 2,106.72 2,106.72 

On hand August 20, 1930 2,202.58 2,202.58 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Withdrawn from savings Deposited in savings bank. .. .$106.72 

bank $767.85 ^Transferred to library 

Income 106.72 Treasurer 767.85 

$874.57 $874.57 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 
no transactions 

July 8 to August 20, 1930 

Income $95.86 Deposited in savings bank $95.86 



169 



CEMETERY CARE AND IMPROVEMENT FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 $119.75 $119.75 

On hand at end of year 1929 125.18 125.18 

On hand July 7, 1930 125.18 125.18 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Income $5.43 Deposited in savings bank $5.43 



AARON GEORGE CEMETERY FUND 

Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

On hand at end of year 1929 1,010.50 1,01050 

On hand July 7, 1930 1,010.50 1,010.50 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Withdrawn from savings Deposited in savings bank $45.50 

bank $35.00 Expenditures 35.00 

Income 45.50 

$80.50 $80.50 

January 1 to July_7, 1930 
no transactions 



170 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 

Cash in Savings 

Treasury Deposits Total 

On hand at beinning of year 1929. . . . $20,311.24 $20,311.24 

On hand at end of year 1929 21,31570 21,315.70 

On hand July 7, 1930 $300.00 21,315.70 21,615.70 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Withdrawn from savings Deposited in savings bank. $1,645.85 

bank 641.39 Transferred to Town 641.39 

Income 906.40 

Bequest 739.45 

$2,287.24 $2,287.24 

January 1 to July 7, 1930 

Bequests $300.00 Cash in treasurv 

July 7, 1930.." $300.00 



MUNICIPAL INSURANCE FUND 



Savings 

Deposits Total 

On hand at beginning of year 1929 $21,889.08 $21,889.08 

On hand at end of year 1929 26,304.52 26,304.52 

On hand July 7, 1930 26,304.52 26,304.52 

Receipts Payments 

1929 

Income $ 915.44 Deposited in savings bank. .$4,415.44 

Town appropriation 3,500.00 



$4,415.44 $4,415.44 



171 





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173 



Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 

February 2, 1931 and February 9, 1931 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To Harold C. King, Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby 
requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to 
meet in their several Polling Places, viz : 

Precinct 1, Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 
Precinct 2, Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 
Precinct 3, Fire House, West Chelmsford. 
Precinct 4, School House, East Chelmsford. 
Precinct 5, Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 
Precinct 6, Golden Cove School House, Westlands, 

on Monday the SECOND DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1931, being 
the first Monday in said month, at 12 o'clock noon, for the follow- 
ing purposes ; 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 

One Selectman for three years. 

One Member of the Board of Public Welfare for three years. 

Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year. 

One Assessor for three yearsT 

Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One School Committeeman for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees of Adams Library for three years. 

One Insurance Fund Commissioner for three years. 

One Constable for one year. 

All on one ballot. 

175 



The polls will be open from 12 noon to 8 P. M. and to meet 
in the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on the following MON- 
DAY, THE NINTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, at 9.30 o'clock in 
the forenoon, then and there to act upon the following articles, viz : 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town officers and committees; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as 
may be required to defray Town charges for the current year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during the 
current year ; also in such other matters as may arise requir- 
ing in their judgment the action of such agent, and to employ 
counsel therefor ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in 
anticipation of the revenues of the current financial year. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum not exceeding Two Thousand Dollars to be used as 
a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee,, 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6 ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Four Hundred Dollars, or what other sum, 
for State Aid ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sufficient sum with which to meet unpaid bills of 1930; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to contract with the Lowell Electric Light Corpora- 
tion for the following additional lights, and raise and appro- 
priate sufficient money to defray the expense thereof, viz : 

176 



Five lights on Parker Village Road. 

Two lights on Sunset Avenue. 

Two lights on the Old Westford Road. 

Three lights on the Groton Road. 

Two lights on Manahan Street. 

Six lights on the Littleton Road. 

Two lights on Middlesex Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of Fifteen Dollars for the purpose of defraying 
the expense of services rendered in the matter of a tax sale of 
property on Stedman Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Fifty Dollars, or some other amount, and 
elect a director, the money to be expended by and the director 
to serve in cooperation with the Middlesex County Trustees 
for County Aid to Agriculture in the work of the Middlesex 
County Extension Service, under the provisions of Section 
40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws of Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Six Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of purchasing a truck for the Forest Warden's De- 
partment ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing land for the 
purpose of establishing a municipal dump at the Westlands; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will raise and appropri- 
ate Two Thousand Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of purchasing the property known as the Cushing 
Mill Pond, and three other lots of land adjoining thereto ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 
13, to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for 
the purpose of putting the said Cushing Mill Pond property 
and the adjoining lots of land in suitable condition ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

177 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate Three Hundred Dollars, or some other amount for the 
purpose of purchasing land for the purpose of establishing a 
municipal dump at North Chelmsford; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept from 
Fred E. Varney, M.D., the gift of a certain lot of land sit- 
uated in Chelmsford, in that part called North Chelmsford, 
being lot numbered 155 on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in 
North Chelmsford belonging to the Thomas J. Adams Estate 
and Charles W. S. Adams, surveyed July and September 1892, 
Melvin B. Smith Civil Engineer." Said plan is recorded in 
the registry of deeds for the Northern District of Middlesex 
County, Book of Plans 44, Plan 7. Subject however, to the 
express reservation and condition that said land is to be 
forever kept open as and for a public playground or recreation 
center under the provisions of Chapter 45, Section 14 of the 
General Laws ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars, or some other 
amount, the same to be expended on the Varney Playground ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Four Hundred Dollars, or some other 
amount, for the purpose of erecting a flagpole on the Common 
in the South Village; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 
18, to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Twenty-five Dollars for the purpose of purchasing a 
flag for the pole at the South Village; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will amend its by-laws by 
adding to same the following section. Section 11. "The fol- 
lowing streets and parts of streets are hereby declared to con- 
stitute through streets for the purpose of this section ; 

Boston Road from the Billerica line to Central Square. 
North Road from its intersection with West ford Street 
to Princeton Street ;" or act in relation thereto. 

178 



ARTICLE 21. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 
20 to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand and Fifty Dollars, or some other 
amount, for the purpose of posting through ways as set forth 
in Article 20 ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote that its Selectmen be 
instructed to formulate and adopt by-laws for the regulation 
of traffic in the Town of Chelmsford under the authority of 
Chapter 357, Acts of 1928 of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Three Thousand Dollars, or some other 
amount for the purpose of extending the width of a portion of 
the Groton Road. The County and Commonwealth each to 
contribute a similar amount ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of One Thousand Dollars, or some other 
amount for the purpose of improving curves on the Riverneck 
Road. The County and Commonwealth each to contribute a 
similar amount ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Seventy-five Hundred Dollars, or some other 
amount, for the purpose of purchasing a triple combination 
fire pump or pumper, so-called, for the use of the fire depart- 
ment in the North Village ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 26. In the event of a negative vote under Article 25 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of Two Thousand Dollars, or some other amount for the 
purpose of repairing the fire truck located at the North 
Village ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of One Hundred and Fifty- four Dollars and 
Seventy-five Cents for the purpose of reimbursing Harold L. 
Crosby for the loss of an out-board motor loaned to the 
Chelmsford Police Department; or act in relation thereto. 

179 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Seventeen Hundred and Fifty Dollars, or 
some other amount, for the purpose of providing the Adams 
Library property with edgestones on Adams Avenue, and 
building sidewalks on South Street and Adams Avenue, and 
completing the cement drip apron around the older portion of 
the building ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Seventy-five Dollars for the purchase of office equip- 
ment for the Police Department; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Hundred and Twenty-five Dollars, or some other 
amount, for the purpose of purchasing an automobile for the 
Police Department ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept C Street 
as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed 
in the office of the Town Clerk ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept B Street as 
laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report duly filed in 
the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept Stearns 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept Twist 
Road as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of establishing a Memorial Flag pole in the Centre 
Village; to be dedicated to the Citizens of Chelmsford who 
served in the Civil War, Spanish American War, and the 
World War, as recommended by the committee appointed 
under Article 15 in the Town Warrant, February 15, 1930; 
or act in relation thereto. 

180 






ARTICLE 36. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 
20, to see if the Town will vote to appoint a committee to 
cause plans to be made and grant authority to said committee 
to award contracts and expend the money appropriated under 
the aforesaid Article 20; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Three Thousand Dollars, or some other 
amount for the purpose of reconstructing the Westford Road. 
The County and Commonwealth each to contribute a similar 
amount ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars, or some other 
amount, for the purpose of paying land damages and defray- 
ing the cost of relocating a portion of the Carlisle-Concord 
Road ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend its by- 
laws by adding to same the following section. Section 12 : 
"The offices of the Town Treasurer and Tax Collector and 
the records and books incident thereto, shall be located in the 
Town Hall at the Centre Village" ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend its by- 
laws by adding to the same the following section. Section 13 : 
"The Board of fire engineers may furnish on such occasions 
and to such extent as they deem advisable, the assistance of the 
Chelmsford fire department to another city, town, or fire 
district in extinguishing fire therein ; or act in relaton thereto. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $78.09 to care for a deficit in the Election 
and Registration Department in the year 1930; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $13.67 for the purpose of caring for a deficit 
in the Board of Health salaries appropriation in the year 1930; 
or act in relation thereto. 

181 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vole to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Thirty Dollars, or some other amount, for 
the purpose of purchasing a fire alarm tapper for the Police 
Department ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote and appropriate the 
sum of $100 or some other amount, for the purpose of de- 
fraying the legal expenses and engineer's expenses incident to 
any purchase of real estate authorized under Articles 12, 13, 
and 15, of the within Warrant; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warrant, by posting 
attested copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the 
Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford, and West 
Chelmsford and at the schoolhouse, East Chelmsford and the 
Golden Cove schoolhouse, Westlands, seven days at least be- 
fore the time appointed for holding the first meeting 
aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of this Warrant, with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at the time and place 
of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 12th day of January in the year 
of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-one. 

ELIPHALET G. BROWN 
FRANK J. LUPIEN 
ROYAL SHAWCROSS 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



A true copy : Attest 
HAROLD C. KING, 
Constable. 



182 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Feb. 9, 1931. 
To the Voters of the Town of Chelmsford : — 

The Finance Committee submits herewith its recommendations for the 
year 1931. 

In making appropriations for the current year, the voters should bear in 
mind that we have lost approximately five hundred thousand dollars in 
valuation, mostly on account of decreases in the valuations of the mill 
property at North Chelmsford, and there is no immediate prospect of any 
considerable amount of new property to offset the loss. 

The Finance Committee have recommended cuts in the appropriations 
wherever possible, but an increase in the tax rate in the near future is 
inevitable even with the utmost economy. 

The total appropriations recommended this year amount to $240,775.00, 
as compared to $248,473.00 recommended last year. This amount does not 
include state and county taxes, interest on outstanding debts and retirement 
of outstanding loans. 

The Finance Committee estimate that if the amounts recommended are 
appropriated the tax rate will be about $31.00 per thousand. 
ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be 

required to defray Town charges for the current year. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the following sums be raised 
and appropriated for the purposes of Article 2. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Moderator's Salary $ 10.00 

Selectmen's Salaries as follows : 

Chairman 280.00 

Members 470.00 

Selectmen's Expenses 200.00 

Town Clerk and Accountant Salary 2,000.00 

Town Clerk and Accountant Expenses % 200.00 

Collector and Treasurer's Salary 2,000.00 

Collector and Treasurer's Expenses .1 300.00 

Treasurer's Bond 535.70 

Assessor's Salaries as follows : 

Chairman and Clerk 1,300.00 

Members 700.00 

Assessors' Expenses 350.00 

Town Counsel Salary 300.00 

Election and Registration 600.00 

Finance Committee Expenses 20.00 

Public Buildings— Janitors' Salaries 950.00 

Public Buildings— Fuel, Light and Water 725.00 

Public Buildings— Other Expense 500.00 

Total General Government $ 1 1 ,440.70 

183 



PROTECTION— PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police Department $ 7,200.00 

Fire Department Administration 3,800.00 

Fire Department Maintainance 3,800.00 

Fire Department Labor & Expense at Fires 600.00 

Hydrant Service, Center 750.00 

Hydrant Service, No. Chelmsford 750.00 

Hydrant Service, West Chelmsford 20.00 

Sealer Weights & Measures 200.00 

Moth Department 2,000.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Forest Fire Department 1,000.00 

Total Protection Persons and Property $ 20,320.00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Board of Health Salaries $ 500.00 

Board of Health— Agent's Salary 350.00 

Board of Health— Aid 300.00 

Board of Health— Maintenance 200.00 

Board of Health — Meat Inspector's Salary 675.00 

Board of Health— Milk Inspector's Salary 350.00 

Board of Health— Care Warren Ave. Dump 100.00 

Board of Health— Physicians' Salaries 100.00 

Total Health and Sanitation $ 2,575.00 

HIGHWAYS 

Superintendent's Salary $ 2,500.00 

General Highway 19,000.00 

Truck Maintenance 2,100.00 

Oil 8,000.00 

Cutting Brush 1,000.00 

Street Signs 150.00 

Street Lighting 16,1 17.96 

Total Highways $ 48,867.96 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Overseers' Salaries as follows : 

Chairman $ 125.00 

Members 200.00 

Overseers' Maintenance 20.00 

Outside Poor ' 12,500.00 

Infirmary Superintendent's Salary 900.00 

Infirmary Expenses 2,400.00 

Infirmary Repairs 200.00 

Soldiers' Relief 500.00 

Total Public Welfare $ 16,845.00 

184 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Administration $ 4,450.00 

Instruction „ 70,600.00 

New Equipment 500.00 

Operation & Maintenance 17,600.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,400.00 

Total School Department $104,550.00 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

Tuition, Dog Tax plus $ 3,000.00 

LIBRARIES 

Adams Library $ 2,350.00 

North Chelmsford Library 1,200.00 

Total for Libraries $ 3,550.00 

RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

Parks $ 1,000.00 

Memorial Day 300.00 

Town Clock 30.00 

Public Buildings Insurance 545.00 

Band Concerts 400.00 

Insurance Sinking Fund 3,500.00 

Bond Treasurer Sinking Fund 40.00 

Animal Inspector 200.00 

Town Reports i 

Total Recreation and Unclassified " $ 6,015.00 

CEMETERIES 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

Forefathers' Cemetery 550.00 

Hart Pond Cemetery 500.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery 500.00 

Riverside Cemetery 500.00 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 500.00 

Fairview Cemetery 50.00 

Total Cemeteries $ 2,705.00 

Total amount recommended under Article 2 $217,868.00 

Total amount recommended under Article 2, 1930 $218,832.21 

185 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
not exceeding Two Thousand Dollars to be used as a Reserve Fund at 
the discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6 ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Tzvo Thousand 
Dollars ($2000) be raised and appropriated for the purposes of this 
Article. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Four Hundred Dollars, or what other sum, for State Aid ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Four Hundred Dol- 
lars ($400) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sufficient sum with which to meet unpaid bills of 1930 ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that a sufficient sum be raised to 
pay all legitimate unpaid bills, and that all over-runs of appropriations 
be explained by the various Boards. The Committee has not at hand the 
detail of these bills. 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
contract with the Lowell Electric Light Corporation for the following 
additional lights, and raise and appropriate sufficient money to defray 
the expense thereof, viz : 

Five lights on Parker Village Road. 

Two lights on Sunset Avenue. 

Two lights on the Old West ford Road. 

Three lights on the Groton Road. 

Two lights on Manahan Street. 

Six lights on the Littleton Road. 

Two lights on Middlesex Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $315.00 be raised 
and appropriated to provide fifteen additional lights at locations to be 
designated by the Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifteen Dollars for the purpose of defraying the expense of 
services rendered in the matter of a tax sale of property on Stedman 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Fifteen Dollars be 
so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifty Dollars, or some other amount, and elect a director, the 
money to be expended by and the director to serve in cooperation with 
the Middlesex County Trustees for County Aid in Agriculture in the 

186 






work of the Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions 
of Section 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws of Massachusetts. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Fifty Dollars be so 
raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Six Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of 
purchasing a truck for the Forest Warden's Department ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that no money be raised, but that 
the truck now in the possession of the West Chelmsford Fire Depart- 
ment be transferred to the Forestry Department. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of purchasing land for the purpose of establish- 
ing a municipal dump at the Westlands ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars ($500) be raised and appropriated- for the purposes of this 
Article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate Two 
Thousand Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of purchasing 
the property known as the Cushing Mill Pond, and three other lots of 
land adjoining thereto; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that this Article be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 14. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 13, to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifteen Hun- 
dred Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of putting the said 
Cushing Mill Pond property and the adjoining lots of land in suitable 
condition ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that this Article be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
Three Hundred Dollars, or some other amount for the purpose of 
purchasing land for the purpose of establishing a municipal dump at 
North Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Three Hundred 
Dollars ($300) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Thousand Dollars, or some other amount, the same to be 
expended on the Varney Playground ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Tivo Thousand 
Dollars be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate tin- 
sum of Four Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose 
of erecting a flag pole on the Common in the South Village; or act in 
relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Four Hundred Hol- 
lars ($400) be so raised and appropriated. 

187 



ARTICLE 19. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 18, to sde 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Twenty-five 
Dollars for the purpose of purchasing a flag for the pole at the South 
Village; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Twenty-five 
Dollars ($25) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 21. In the event of an affirmative vote under Article 20 to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand 
and Fifty Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of posting 
through ways as set forth in Article 20; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of One Thousand 
and Fifty Dollars be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Thousand Dollars, or some other amount for the purpose 
of extending the width of a portion of the Groton Road. The County 
and Commonwealth each to contribute a similar amount ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Three Thousand 
Dollars ($3000) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars, or some other amount for the purpose 
of improving curves on the Riverneck Road. The County and Common- 
wealth each to contribute a similar amount ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of One Thousand 
Dollars ($1000) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the - 
sum of Seventy-five Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of purchasing a triple combination fire pump or pumper, so- 
called, for the use of the fire department in the North Village ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Seven Thousand 
Five Hundred Dollars be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 26. In the event of a negative vote under Article 25 to see if 
the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Two Thousand 
Dollars, or some other amount for the purpose of repairing the fire 
truck located at the North Village ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that this Article be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of One Hundred and Fifty-four Dollars and Seventy-five cents for 
the purpose of reimbursing Harold L. Crosby for the loss of an out- 
board motor loaned to the Chelmsford Police Department; or act in 
relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $154.75 be so raised 
and appropriated. 

188 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Seventeen Hundred and Fifty Dollars, or some other amount, 
for the purpose of providing the Adams Library property with edge 
stones on Adams Avenue, and building sidewalks on South Street and 
Adams Avenue, and completing the cement drip apron around the older 
portion of the building ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that this Article be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of 
Seventy-five Dollars for the purchase of office equipment for the police 
department; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Seventy-five 
Dollars ($75) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of 
Five Hundred and Twenty-five Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of purchasing an automobile for the police department; or act 
in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that this Article be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of 
Five Thousand Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of 
establishing a Memorial Flagpole in the Centre Village ; to be dedicated 
to the Citizens of Chelmsford who served in the Civil War, Spanish- 
American War, and the World War, as recommended by the commit- 
tee appointed under Article 15 in the Town Warrant, February 15, 
1930; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee feel that this Article be referred back to the 
Committee for further consideration, and feel that some different form of 
memorial might be adopted. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Three Thousand Dollars, or some other amount for the purpose 
of reconstructing the Westford Road. The County and Commonwealth 
each to contribute a similar amount ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of One Thousand 
Dollars be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars, or some other amount, for the 
purpose of paying land damages and defraying the cost of relocating a 
portion of the .Carlisle-Concord Road ; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $1500 be so raised 
and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend its by-laws by add- 
ing to same the following section. Section 12 : "The offices of the Town 
Treasurer and Tax Collector and the records and books incident thereto, 
shall be located in the Town Hall at the Centre Village" ; or act in 
relation thereto. 
The Finance Committee heartily endorse this Article. 

189 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $78.09 to care for a deficit in the Election and Registration 
Department in the year 1930; or act in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $78.09 be so raised 
and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $13.67 for the purpose of caring for a deficit in the Board of 
Health salaries appropriation in the year 1930; or act in relation 
thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $13.67 be so raised 
and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Thirty Dollars, or some other amount, for the purpose of 
purchasing a fire alarm tapper for the police department ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of Thirty Dollars 
($30) be so raised and appropriated. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote and appropriate the sum of 
$100 or some other amount, for the purpose of defraying the legal ex- 
penses and engineer's expenses incident to any purchase of real estate 
authorized under Articles 12, 13 and 15, of the within warrant ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

The Finance Committee recommend that the sum of $100 be so raised 
and appropriated. 

GEO. W. DAY 
GEO. E. GAGNON 
JAMES A. GRANT 
J. C. MONAHAN 
EMILE PAIGNON 
BIRGER PETTERSON 

Finance Committee. 



190 



INDEX 

Page 

Accountant's Report — 

Appropriations and Transfers 89 

Balance She'et 96 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds , 82 

Payments 66 

Payments of Interest , 99 

Payments of Principal 98 

Receipts 62 

Trust Funds 81 

Reports of — 

Assessors 106 

Board of Fire Engineers : Ill 

Board of Health 113 

Agent of Board of Health , 115 

Cemetery Commissioners 120 

Committee on Flag Pole at So. Chelmsford 121 

Committee on Investigating Water Supply 124 

Finance Committee 183 

Forest Warden 113 

Inspector of Animals ; 118 

Inspector of Markets 118 

Inspector of Slaughtering 117 

Insurance Fund Commissioners 107 

Memorial Day Committee 122 

Middlesex Co. Extension Service 1 19 

Milk Inspector 117 

North Chelmsford Library Corporation 110 

Police Department Ill 

State Audit 147 

Tax Collector 102 

Tax Collector for North Chelmsford Fire District 105 

Tax Collector of Chelmsford Water District 104 

Town Treasurer 100 

Trustees of the Adams Library ' 107 

War Memorial Committee 121 

Town Clerk's Report — 

Births Recorded , 50 

Business Meeting, February 10, 1930 18 

Deaths Recorded 56 

Election of Officers 15 

Financial Report 61 

List of Jurors * 59 

Vital Statistics 50 

Marriages Recorded 53 

Meeting of Town Clerks 47 

Officers Elected and Appointed 3 

State Election, November 4, 1930 44 

State Primary, September 16, 1930 33 

Special Town Meeting, September 2, 1930 29 

Special Town Meeting, December 15, 1930 48 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 175 

191 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE 

Superintendent of Schools 

OF CHELMSFORD, MASS. 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1930 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. EARL WOTTON, Chairman Term Expires 1931 

North Chelmsford. 
JOHN A. McADAMS, Financial-Secretary Term Expires 1932 

Westlands. 
EDWARD B. RUSSELL, Secretary Term Expires 1933 

Chelmsford. 



SUPERINTENDENT 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT, A.B Office in McFarlin School 

Chelmsford. 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA, M.D.. . .' Chelmsford 

FRED E. VARNEY, M.D North Chelmsford 



SCHOOL NURSE 
(AIRS.) MAE S. LEWIS, R.N Office in McFarlin School 

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS 

HAROLD C. KING Chelmsford 

BERNARD McGOVERN. . North Chelmsford 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

The school year is divided into a fall term ending at the Christmas 
vacation, and three terms after the holidays. 

Fall term from September 2, 1930 to December 23, 1930. 

Second term from January 5, 1931 to February 20, 1931. 

Third term from March 2, 1931 to April 17, 1931. 

Fourth term from April 27, 1931 to June 26, 1931. 

The school year of 1931-1932 will open on Tuesday, September 8. 

NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In case of extremely bad storms or of roads dangerous because of ice, a 
signal for no school is given on the fire alarms at the Center, North, West, 
South, and East, three blasts, repeated three times. When given at 7.15 there 
are no sessions for the day. The signal at 11.15 indicates no afternoon session 
for the grades. 

2 



TEACHERS 

The table shows the teachers at the beginning of the school year 1930-31, 
the position held, the date when service in Chelmsford began, and the institu- 
tions in which they prepared. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Lucian H. Burns, A.M., Principal. Sept., 1930. University of New Hampshire, 

Columbia. 
C. Edith McCarthy, Vice-Principal, Commercial, Sept., 1923, Salem Normal. 
F. Christine Booth. B.A, Latin, Math., Sept., 1927, Colby. 
Edith M. Donahoe, A.B., English, History, Sept., 1927, Smith. 
Hilda B. Dunigan, B.S.E., Commercial, Sept., 1928, Salem Normal. 
Anna B. Monahan, B.S.S., English, Sept., 1928, Boston University. 
Daisy B. MacBrayne, English, Sept., 1929, Boston University. 
Procter P. Wilson, B.S., Science, Feb., 1930, M.I.T. 
George R. Knightly, A.B., Social Science, Sept., 1930, Aurora. 
Helen R. Walter, B.A., French, Sept., 1930, Middlebury, Sorbonne. 
Morris L. Burdick, A.B., Math., Science, Sept., 1930, Tufts. 



McFARLIN 

Louis O. Forrest, Principal, VIII, Sept., 1926, Gorham Normal. 
(Mrs.) Eva L. Dobson, VII, Nov., 1919, Plymouth Normal. 
M. Beryl Rafuse. VI, Sept, 1920, Truro Normal. 
Helena B. Lyons, A', Sept, 1920, North Adams Normal. 
Emily Hehir, IV, Sept, 1928, Lowell Normal. 
Estelle M. Buckley, III, Sept, 1926, Lowell Normal. 
(Mrs.) Esther R. Xystrom, II, Dec, 1911, Lowell Normal. 
Eva M. Large, I, Sept, 1917, Lowell Normal. 



EAST 

Harry Y. Hilyard, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept, 1930, Gorham Normal. 
(Mrs.) Jessie F. Brown, V-VI, April, 1930, Boston University. 
Ruth J. Harris, III-IV, Sept, 1930, Lowell Normal. 
Elna L. Reis, I-II, Sept, 1930, Lowell Normal. 



HIGHLAND AVENUE 

Harry J. Kane, B.S, in Education, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept, 1929, Bridge- 
water Normal. 
Ella Bailey, V-VI, Sept, 1925, Farmington Normal. 
Lottie M. Agnew, III-IV, Sept, 1923, Lowell Normal. 
Kathcrine G. Dewire, I-II, Jan, 1921, Lowell Normal. 

3 



PRINCETON STREET 

Gertrude A. Jones, Principal, VIII, Sept., 1899, Salem Normal. 

Ella A. Hutchinson, VII, Sept., 1905, Framingham Normal. 

(Mrs.) Elsa Reid, VI, Sept., 1922, Lowell Normal. 

May D. Sleeper, V, March, 1907, Chelmsford High and Extension Course. 

(Mrs.) Lilla B. McPherson, IV, Sept., 1920, Framingham Normal. 

Genevieve E. Jantzen, III, Sept., 1911, Lowell Normal. 

Helen C. Osgood, II, Sept.. 1921, Lowell Normal. 

Catherine J. McTeague, I, Sept., 1927, Lowell Normal. 

QUESSY 

V. John Rikkola, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept., 1930, Salem Normal. 
Bertha H. Long, V-VI, April, 1896, Salem Normal. 
Edith M. Grant. III-IV, April. 1925, Salem Normal. 
Jane E. McEnaney, I-II, Sept., 1926, Lowell Normal. 

SOUTLI 

Myrtle Greene, III-IV-V, Sept., 1928, Lowell Normal. 
Hazel R. Young, I-II, Sept., 1930, Lowell Normal. 

SOUTH ROW 
Mary D. McEnaney, I-II-III-IV, Sept., 1928, Lowell Normal. 

WESTLANDS 

H. Jean Rafuse, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept., 1920, Martin's Point. N. S., 

High School. 
Vera G. Rafuse, V-VI, Sept., 1921, Truro Normal. 
Mayme G. Trefry, III-IV, Sept., 1921, Truro Normal. 
(Mrs.) Marion S. Adams, I-II, Jan., 1928, Lowell Normal. 
Alary H. Ryan, Bldg. Asst., Sept., 1930, Lowell Normal. 

SUPERVISORS 

Charlotte L. Hyde, Music, Oct., 1927, Lowell Normal. 

Robert A. LaFountain, Physical Education, Sept.. 1929, Springfield College. 

TRANSPORTATION 
George W. Marinel, North Chelmsford. 

JANITORS 

High School, C. O. Robbins, Chelmsford Center. 
McFarlin, Otis Brown, South Chelmsford. 
East, Bernard McLoughlin, East Chelmsford. 
Highland Avenue, Edward Fallon, North Chelmsford. 
Princeton Street, John Matson, North Chelmsford. 
Quessy, John Boutilier, West Chelmsford. 
South, E. Dyer Harris, South Chelmsford. 
South Row, Mrs. Hildur Smith, Chelmsford Center. 
Westlands, Charles Stearns, Chelmsford Center. 









REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE— 1930 

To the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford: 

We herewith submit the report of the School Committee for the year 1930. 

We sincerely urge the citizens to read carefully the extensive Report of 
the Superintendent of Schools and to study the figures of costs which he 
presents. We believe a report of this type once in five years would be very 
valuable. 

The most important matter before the voters, so far as the School 
Department is concerned, is the report of a special committee covering the 
subject of an addition to the High School. The matter is fully discussed by 
the Superintendent and Principal in their reports and some action will be 
necessary in the near future. We do not consider it feasible to use the vacant 
rooms in the McFarlin School for High School classes. Such an arrangement 
would require both pupils and teachers to travel back and forth between the 
buildings. It would also necessitate the installation of a clock and bell system 
in the two schools, so that classes could be called simultaneously. There will 
not be room in the McFarlin School for one entire High School class, since 
one or more of the rooms now vacant must be used for Elementary pupils. 
We believe the cost of maintaining the High School in two buildings would 
be excessive as well as extremely inconvenient. At best, it would be only a 
temporary procedure. 

We are half way through the contract for transportation, and thus far, 
we believe the change in system has fully justified itself. The increase in 
number of pupils has been surprising, and apparently the number will be 
larger in the future. We have escaped serious accidents, but in carrying 500 
pupils daily, accidents might occur in any system used. 

The McFarlin School was dedicated with simple exercises by school 
pupils early in the fall. Many of Miss McFarlin's friends and former pupils 
were present. 

We express appreciation for the co-operation of the Parent-Teachers 
Association. Especially in the promotion of health, their services are 
invaluable. Their relations with the School Department have been friendly 
and harmonious. 

We feel that the town has been exceedingly fortunate in having a man 
at the head of the School Department with the ability, high character, and 
personality of Mr. George S. Wright. Under his administration, the School 
Department has steadily climbed to a point of high efficiency, and we trust it 
will be our good fortune to keep him for many years to come. 

The teaching staff is, we believe, of a high order of merit. We have 
accepted, with regret, the resignations of a number of teachers, and the filling 
of their positions has been a very difficult task. We are of the opinion that 
the standard of teaching in the department, as a whole, is improving. 



The janitors are rendering faithful and efficient service. The skill with 
which most of them make small repairs during the year and their work in the 
summer vacation, save considerable on repair bills. 

A summary of the major repairs during the year will be found in the 
Superintendent's Report. 

We have endeavored, at all time, to give the taxpayers of Chelmsford a 
business-like and economical administration of their Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. EARL WOTTON, 

JOHN A. McADAMS, 

EDWARD B. RUSSELL, 

School Committee. 






REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the School Committee : 

Herewith is submitted my third annual report, the 57th in the series, 
together with reports made to me by the Principal of the High School, the 
supervisors, and the nurse. These I endorse as a part of my report. 

Included in the School Department section of this Town Report is given, 
also, the report of the committee appointed at the last annual meeting, with 
their recommendations. In this connection I would call attention to pages 94-97 
of last year's report, dealing with the crowded conditions in certain buildings. 
The special committee has given careful consideration to all phases of the 
problem involved, and recommends that the four-year type of high school be 
maintained, following the present elementary course of eight years, and that 
the High School be enlarged to remedy the present overcrowded condition 
and to provide for the future. This report and the recommendations I endorse. 
The High School is practically of the same size as last year's school. We have 
crowded into the Westlands building 20 pupils more than we had last year. 
That section is growing every year. It is almost a certainty that at least one 
grade must be brought from that school to the McFarlin next September, 
and possibly two. The Town is faced by the immediate necessity of providing 
additional accommodations in some way, and in the opinion of the special 
committee, in which I fully concur, the most satisfactory way. and in the 
long run the most economical, is by adding to the present High School. Citi- 
zens who can find opportunity to do so before the date for the annual meeting- 
are urged to visit the High School and the Westlands while the schools are 
in session, in order that they may judge conditions for themselves. 

Following my custom of emphasizing one or two features of school 
administration each year, I am in this report presenting a study of school 
costs, comparing expenditures in Chelmsford with those in other places, and 
also discussing in detail how our school money is used. 

COMPARATIVE SCHOOL COSTS 

The Department of Education publishes annually the financial and 
statistical returns made by the towns and cities of the Commonwealth, 
divided into four groups : cities, towns over 5,000 in population, towns under 
5,000 which maintain high schools, and towns under 5,000 without high 
schools. The comparison below is based on the report of November 30, 1930, 
for the school year ending June 30, 1930. Chelmsford is in Group II, which 
contains 79 towns. The towns of the group differ so much, especially in 
wealth, that a comparison of the entire 79 towns has little weight. To show 
the difference, Brookline, first in the group in population, has approximately" 
six and one-half times the people of Chelmsford, four times as many children 
in school, and over twenty-one times the wealth. 

In order to present data from places that can reasonably be considered 
in the same class, I have selected 20 towns, 18 from Group II, and Billerica 
and Westford from Group III. These towns are all under 8,000 in population 
by the state census of 1925; have less than $9,000,000 valuation as of April 1, 
1929, except Billerica; have a school membership over 1,000, except Westford; 
and have a valuation per pupil under $7400. All wealthier towns under 8,000 

7 



in population are omitted, and also towns having less than 1,000 pupils, except 
the neighboring town of West ford. Statistics for these towns are given on 
page 74, and should be read as follows, using our own town as an illustration : 
Chelmsford had a population of 6,573 in 1925 ; its valuation in 1929 was 
$7,591,870; the number of pupils in net average membership was 1,382; the 
valuation per pupil (valuation divided by number of pupils) was $5,493; the 
expenditure for administration, or general control, was $4,397.59 ; for instruc- 
tion, including salaries of teachers and supervisors, books and supplies, school 
libraries, and tuition, was $68,365.11 ; for operation of the school plant and 
maintenance of buildings and grounds, $18,002.82 ; for promotion of health, 
$2,282.51 ; for transportation $9,230.10; for miscellaneous purposes, $1,018.74; 
making the total for school support, exclusive of capital outlay, $103,269.87. 
Dividing this last amount by the number of pupils gives the cost of support 
per pupil, $74.74. 

Study of the statistics for these twenty towns shows that Chelmsford is 

9th in population ; 

8th in valuation ; 

6th or 7th in membership, being tied with Ipswich ; 
10th in valuation per pupil ; 
11th in expenditures for administration; 
15th in expenditures for instruction; 

8th in expenditures for operation and maintenance ; 

8th in expenditures for health ; 

4th in cost of transportation ; 
12th in miscellaneous items ; 
11th in total for support; 
15th in cost per pupil for support. 

Consider for a moment the cost per pupil for support, $74.74. For ttus_ 
amount the school buildings are heated and kept in good condition ; teachers, 
books, and supplies are furnished ; the child's health is given attention by a 
school nurse and physicians, and over a third of the pupils are carried to and 
from school. This is done for 180 days and the child is in school five hours. 
That is, reduced to a per pupil per hour basis, the cost is well under ten cents. 
Do the schools cost too much? Can you better understand the fact that the 
amount paid by the American people for such luxuries as tobacco, chewing 
gum, soft drinks, etc., largely exceeds the whole cost of the public school 
system ? 



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EXPENDITURES FOR 1930 

Although the comparison of school costs with those of other towns is 
interesting, a matter of more importance is a discussion of how Chelmsford 
expended $107,467.05 in 1930. In the discussion below a somewhat more 
detailed analysis is made than is given in the statement of the Town 
Accountant on page . Per pupil costs are shown, and are compared with 
the last figures published by the state, which were for the year ending June 30, 
1928, and are for the entire state. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Administration, or general control, is the overhead cost of running the 
schools. The salary paid the Superintendent for the year was $3,766.68 ; 
expenses of the School Committee, $350; travelling expenses out of town, 
$56.74 ; truant officers, $23.50 ; stationery, postage, and office expense, $55.39 ; 
and telephone, $21.83; amounting to $4,274.14. This gives a per pupil cost of 
$3.09. In 1928 the state-wide cost of administration was $3.62. 

It will be noted that the telephone charge is low. For the last three years 
the school has had one of the free telephones given the town. A charge of 
$1.00 a month is made for the extension running from the High School to the 
Superintendent's office in the McFarlin School, and the balance is the cost 
of tolls. 

For three years the school census, taken annually in October, has been 
handled by the building. principals, assisted by the older pupils. This is a 
method approved by. the State. It means little more than that the older pupils 
secure the names with date of birth of children who are five years old on 
October 1st, but are not in school. The students in the business practice 
course in the High School aid in clerical work in the offices of both the High- 
School Principal and the Superintendent. Acknowledgment is made for the 
assistance rendered by the pupils in the matter of the census and by the students 
who assist in clerical work. 

INSTRUCTION 

This is the largest element in school costs, and by far the most impor- 
tant. All other expenditures are made in order that the work of the teachers 
may be more efficient. By commonly accepted standards the cost of instruction 
should be not less than two-thirds of the cost of support, and it is often three- 
fourths. The total in Chelnisford, exclusive of the evening school for adults, 
was $69,126.99, or 64%, somewhat less than the accepted minimum. The 
salaries of the supervisors are included in the table below showing the division 
of costs. 

High School Elementary Schools Total 

Salaries $18,191.63 $46,198.67 $64,390.30 

Books 1,080.76 1,697.78 2,778.54 

Supplies 810.94 1,147.21 1,958.15 

Total $20,083.33 $49,043.66 $69,126.99 

10 



Dividing the amounts in the first column by 286, net membership of the 
High School, those in the second column by 1,096, and in the last by 1382 gives 
per pupil costs. 

High School Elementary Schools All Schools 

Salaries $ 63.61 $ 42.15 $ 46.59 

Books 3.78 1.55 2.01 

Supplies 2.84 1.05 1.42 

Total $ 70.23 $ 44.75 $ 50.02 

For all day schools in the state in 1928 the cost per pupil for salaries was 
$67.53; for books, $1.60; and for supplies, $3.01, a total for instruction of 
$72.14. 

Since salaries make up about 93% of the cost of instruction, it is easily 
seen from the above, and also from the comparison of school costs in the 
twenty towns, that the teachers in Chelmsford are by no means overpaid. We 
cannot expect to be able to compete with city salaries, but it may well be 
questioned whether -in some instances our scale should not be increased. 

Since the last report was issued these teachers have gone to better paid 
positions : C. Owen Greene to Framingham in February, Mary F. Robinson 
to Lowell in April ; and at the end of the year, Principal H. E. Hobbs to 
Warwick, R. I., Walter D. Hayes to Cranston, R. I., Ellen F. Devine to 
Hartford, Conn., William H. McLin to Yarmouth, Mary E. Mooney and 
Grace G. Sheehan to Lowell, and Earle C. Suitor to Dartmouth. Jeanne M. 
Low declined reappointment in order to study at the Sorbonne in Paris. 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 

Under this heading are included all the costs of keeping the buildings 
clean and heated, in repair, and furnished with water, lights, toilet room 
supplies, etc. It is clearly evident that the expense of maintaining ten 
separate school buildings for 1,382 children is greater than would be the cost 
of housing them in three or four large buildings, with a saving in janitor 
service, coal, number of roofs to keep up, etc. 

There are eight janitors on the payroll, Mr. Robbins being paid for the 
care of both buildings at the Center. ^Salaries amounted to %8>,373.76, and 
supplies, such as brooms, brushes, paper towels and toilet paper, tools, etc., 
cost $421.82. Fuel cost $3,718.22. Lights and power cost $1,132.74. The High 
School and the McFarlin School have separate meters for measuring the 
current used for power, as each of these buildings has a heating and venti- 
lating system requiring several motors. The power bill at the High School 
was $492.68, and at the McFarlin School $162. It should be explained that this 
use of power is to save coal. If the fans are stopped in the High School for 
any reason the temperature of the rooms immediately begins to fall, necessi- 
tating heavier fires. In the McFarlin School pumps are used in connection 
with the boilers to cause a partial vacuum in the radiators. The cost of lights 
ran from an average of about $40 in the four-room buildings to $164.85 in the 
High School. All buildings now have electric lights. 

Water cost $338, running from a minimum of $12.03 at Highland Avenue 

11 



to $62.70 at the High School, with an unusually large charge of $147.85 at 
Princeton Street. The two Fire Districts render bills only once a year for 
excess of water used. When the bills came in from North Chelmsford Fire 
District last June it was seen at once that there was a bad leak somewhere. 
This was immediately located in the plumbing of the new building and 
stopped, but the bill for water wasted had to be paid. On a per pupil basis 
the water used at South Row has been most expensive. Since the time when 
action by the Board of Health caused the use of the well on the school 
premises to be discontinued, water for drinking purposes has been furnished 
in carboys. It has cost for the year $33.50, or over $1.25 a pupil. 

Repairs and replacements cost $4,406.23. Under the latter heading is 
included the cost of replacing items of furniture and equipment. For 1930 
this consisted of nine typewriters, $285. Typewriters are bought for school 
use at $70 each, and the trade-in allowance at the end of three years runs 
from $30 to $40. By trading in one-third of the machines each year we are 
enabled to keep the equipment in first class condition at almost no cost for 
repairs or adjustments. 

The major items of repair work for 1930 included: painting, gutters, and 
roof repairs on the Highland Avenue School, $640; plumbing and pump at 
East, $210; roof and painting two rooms at East, $216; new pump and motor 
and changes in return pipes to boiler at South, $325 ; new motor for heating- 
system at McFarlin, $40; changes and extensions of plumbing at the same 
school so as to provide outside drinking fountains, $225 ; steps, grading, and 
walks at Quessy, $187; an emergency job on the sewer system at Quessy, in 
which 4-in. tile were replaced with 6-in., $254; electric lights at South and 
South Row, $116; floors and flag-pole at McFarlin, $112. 

The janitors are engaged on the understanding that they do all minor 
repair work during the summer. Paints, varnish, etc., for their use cost about 
$150. The generally fine condition of the interior of the buildings is due in 
large part to the work they are doing each year. Necessary small repair bills 
average about $125 a month throughout the year. Everybody realizes that 
school buildings are subjected to hard usage. Construction needs to be of 
the best if it is to be economical. The value of school buildings and equipment, 
as estimated by the Board of Assessors, is $553,000. The town is paying less 
than one per cent for keeping them in condition. 

The total expenditure for Operation and Maintenance, $18,390.70, divided 
by the number of pupils gives for a per pupil cost $13.31, as compared with 
$15.48 for the entire state. 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES 

The large item under this heading is transportation, $9,000 under the 
contract, and $10 for an emergency case. In 1928 454 pupils were carried to 
and from school; in 1929, the number increased to 480; and this year it is 
increased again to 535. The routes have not been changed materially. The 
total daily mileage for the four busses is about 175 miles. Two years ago the 
three large busses brought all the high school students from West and North 
Chelmsford. Now all four are required for this purpose, and they are badly 
crowded. If the number entitled to transportation continues to increase, a 

12 



fifth bus will be necessary in the near future. The per pupil cost for the 
number actually carried is $16.82, and on the basis of the entire membership, 
$6.51. In the entire state in 1928 the cost per pupil based on membership 
was $2.48. 

For promotion of health the expenditure was $2,298.20, of which $600 
was the salary of the two school physicians, $1,583.28 salary of the nurse, and 
$104.92 for nurse's supplies. Per pupil cost, $1.81, against a cost for the state 
of $1.36. The report of the nurse gives some details, but no mere table of 
statistics can adequately describe the energy with which she takes up her 
daily tasks, the skill with which she handles the many duties she assumes, 
and the spirit of service which is embodied in all her work. Chelmsford is 
indeed fortunate in the agents who are looking after the health of the school 
children, the nurse and all the doctors who have done work in the schools. 

NEW EQUIPMENT 

Expenditures under this heading are capital costs, and are not included 
in the items of cost making up school support. During 1930, two typewriters 
were added to the equipment, one with a special extension carriage, $161.75 ; 
filing cabinet section, $19; furniture for an additional room at the High School 
and other new items, $511.47; two duplicating devices, a Multistamp for the 
Superintendent's office, $25, and a Ditto machine for North Chelmsford, 
$96.48 ; a portable phonograph, $24.50 ; and two large gymnasium mats, 
$81.10, making a total of $919.30. The lettering on the McFarlin School 
cost $143. 

Tuition has been paid to Lowell Vocational School and the Evening 
Vocational School, amounting to $3,231.51. Such items are not included in 
the costs used for purposes of comparison. 

The state reports to which reference is made in the foregoing, and also 
other data relating to comparative school costs, are on file in the Superin- 
tendent's office and may be consulted by anyone who is interested. 

TEACHERS 

The table on page 3 gives the names of the teachers, with the dates on 
which they began service and the institutions in which they prepared. We 
were able to secure teachers of one or two years' experience for the vacant 
elementary positions. In the High School, Mr. Burns had had eleven years in 
High School administration besides other teaching experience, and Mr. Wilson 
was experienced. The other three new teachers in the High School were 
without experience. I am pleased to be able to report that without exception 
the new teachers are rendering satisfactory service. 

The work of the teachers who have been serving Chelmsford for periods 
running from a year or two to over twenty is excellent, and the spirit they 
show is most commendable. Their desire to improve professionally is 
marked. Last summer Miss MacBrayne and Air. Forrest took courses at 
Boston University; Mr. Wilson at M.I.T. ; Mr. Knightly at Harvard; 
Mrs. Adams and Miss Vera Rafuse at Hyannis Normal. At present Misses 
Jean, Beryl, and Vera Rafuse, Miss Greene, Miss McTea.mu'. Mrs. Dobson, 

13 



Miss Monahan, Miss MacBrayne, and Miss Dunigan are taking either 
Saturday morning or afternoon courses at B. U. ; Miss McCarthy at Harvard ; 
and Miss Donahoe, Mrs. Brown, Miss Hehir, Miss Long, Miss Grant, 
Miss Jane McEnaney, and probably others, are taking University Extension 
courses in Lowell, or work at Lowell Normal. All this means a better grade 
of service for Chelmsford school pupils. It speaks well for our teachers that 
they are willing and eager to spend both time and money in professional 
growth. 

Last spring Principal Weed of Lowell Normal School suggested the 
possibility of using certain Chelmsford schools for giving third-year students 
practice in teaching. The first grade room at Princeton Street and the first 
and second grade room at East Chelmsford were approved for this purpose, 
and Miss McTeague and Miss Reis have had the assistance of cadet teachers 
in their large rooms of approximately fifty pupils. These students serve for 
a period of twelve weeks, and then are replaced by others. The service has 
proved very valuable to us. The cadet teachers actually take a section of the 
class and do the teaching, and also assist in playground supervision and in 
other ways. It is to be hoped that this arrangement with the Normal School 
may be continued indefinitely. At the Westlands, where two of the rooms 
were entirely too large for teachers to handle efficiently, a building assistant 
was engaged, who takes small groups into the teachers' room for instruction. 
It will be necessary to continue such an arrangement until the crowded 
condition there is permanently remedied. 

I wish to express appreciation for the valuable services rendered some of 
our boys and girls by persons outside the school department, the 4-H Club 
leaders and the scout masters. In a very vital way their w T ork supplements 
the work of the schools, and we are justified in doing all in our power to give 
them support. The six parent-teacher associations are all doing most excellent 
work, especially in the line of more closely linking up school with home anct~ 
community. If one of them were to be singled out for special mention it 
would be the North Chelmsford Association, which has successfully promoted 
the matter of an adult evening class for aliens. There is an enrollment of 30, 
with an average attendance of 24. Most of the members are fathers and 
mothers of pupils in school. The North Chelmsford Association, the evening 
school teachers, and the members of the classes are all to be congratulated 
on the fine start that has been made. The State reimburses the Town to the 
amount of one-half the expense of the evening school. 

To all who have worked with me in the Chelmsford schools during 1930, 
especially to you who have been charged with the administration, I wish to 
express thanks for most loyal support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT. 



14 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Air. George S. Wright, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

My dear Mr. Wright: 

As principal of Chelmsford High School I herewith submit this annual 
report. I sincerely hope that it will answer many questions now in the 
mmds of parents and voters and that it will stimulate the people of Chelms- 
ford to visit our school and see for themselves what we are trying to do. 

The enrollment so far this year has reached 310. Of this number 12 
have left. One has left because of ill health ; 2 have gone to work ; 3 have 
moved out of town and 6 have left because we had no course to offer them 
in which they were interested. 

Besides the principal there are 10 full-time teachers. These teachers 
are all working the entire day. Not a single teacher has a regular free 
period that he can use as he pleases. One of our beginning teachers has a 
class of 48 pupils. Thirty-five is considered, by the educational authorities, 
to be the maximum number for any one class, while the pupils in classes 
of 15 or 20 get a far better education than in the larger classes. Any teacher 
can do only about so much, so it the classes are twice as large as they 
should be, it stands to reason that each pupil will get only about half as 
much individual attention as he should. Because of the limited number of 
classrooms we are greatly handicapped. Our boys and girls of Chelmsford 
have just as much ability as any children in the country. Yet they are not 
getting as good training as many because of the limited curriculums and 
small number of class rooms in our High School. 

We are trying to make Chelmsford High School a place where each 
boy and girl who comes can, as he goes home each night, conscientiously 
say to himself, "I have learned something today. I have worked hard and 
I am happy that I have the privilege of attending Chelmsford High School." 
There are misfits in every school. We have some in our school. We all 
know that every boy and girl is not interested in the same type of work. 
The more limited the courses taught in any school the more misfits and 
the more children of high school age there are who do not go to high 
school. I believe that with vocational courses offered in Chelmsford High 
School many pupils who are now failures because they have no interest in 
any of our narrow curriculums would become successful and many more 
of the children who do not enter would do so and receive the type of 
education the}'- are interested in. If the time ever was, it is not now that we 
should try to send every boy and girl to college. But every normal boy and 
girl who is graduated from our eighth grade is entitled to four years' 
successful high school education, with a diploma to show what he has done. 
In times like these it is more important that we furnish as many different 
courses as possible, in order to interest and keep those boys and girls who 
in normal times would be working. If a person cannot obtain work it is 
good business for the state to send him to school so that he will be better- 
able to care for himself and not become dependent upon society for the 
necessities and comforts of life. 

Health education is oT great importance if we would teach our young 
people to be good citizens. We arc trying to educate the pupils to take 
care of their physical wants and thus develop into strong, healthy men and 
women. With our present equipment we often have to break the very laws 
of health we are trying to teach. Athletic teams are an asset to any school. 
Many boys have stayed in school and become good citizens just because of 
some one athletic sport. We are trying to do our best for our boys and 
girls along this line. We need a gymnasium with shower baths in order t<> 
do safely what we are trying to do now. Pupils should have an opportunity 

15 



to dress for physical education so as not only to protect their clothes, but to 
get the full benefit of the exercises. Showers should be taken by an pupils 
after exercising, in order to wash off the poisons given out through the pores 
of the skin and then to close those pores, that the pupil will not take cold 
after exercising. 

It is impossible to have the entire student body meet in assembly at one 
time in our present building. Because of this condition each pupil goes to 
an assembly but once in two weeks, and then with only a part of the school. 
Much time is thus lost by duplicated programs, and many times only one-half 
of the school has an opportunity to hear some good speech by a speaker 
from out of town. We need an assembly room that will seat our entire 
student body at the same time. 

At the close of the football season, the Parent-Teacher Associations of 
Chelmsford, with the help of Mrs. Lewis, our school nurse, put on a 
banquet for the football players. This was very much worth while for the 
boys, and I hope that other town organizations will feel like helping our 
basketball and baseball teams in a like manner when the time comes. 

I believe the time has come when every pupil who comes to High School 
should try to do his best with the lessons assigned to him. If he does this, 
he is entitled to as much credit as any other pupil who makes the same 
effort, regardless of the achievement. On the other hand, a pupil who 'does 
not try to do his best and thereby fails to make passing grades should be 
eliminated from High School, and either put to work or into some other 
school where he will have to try because of the nature of the school, or will 
want to do his best because the school has something to offer him in which 
he is interested. It is not right to the taxpayers to spend their money on 
pupils who make very little or no effort. Neither is it right to the pupil to 
be allowed to develop the habits of carelessness and laziness. Pupils should 
study on an average of one hour a day for each classroom recitation. 
Children who tell their parents that they have no homework to do are 
making a serious mistake somewhere, and parents will be helping their 
children if they will inquire of the school authorities and find out just what 
the situation is. Pupils are indeed fortunate whose parents take an active 
interest and co-operate with the teachers in their school problems. Many 
times pupils have been turned from a downward path onto the road of - 
success by the mother or father visiting the school and lending "a helping 
hand. Children deserve the help and encouragement of their parents. We 
are always glad to welcome parents at the school and hope that more will 
make an effort to see us in the future. 

I wish every parent and voter would visit our school, see us at work, 
and see the excellent condition the building is in. We are indeed fortunate 
in having Mr. Robbins and his assistant, Mr. Stuart, who, with the aid of 
pupils and teachers, keep the building in such an excellent condition. 

Following is a tabulated report of the number of pupils in each class : 



16 



Subject 
Freshman English 
Sophomore English 
Junior English . , 
Senior English . 
Freshman Latin 
Sophomore Latin 
Junior Latin . . . 
Senior Latin . . 
Sophomore French 
Junior French 
Senior French 
American History 
Early European History 

World History 

Occupations 

Commercial Geography . 
Sophomore Typewriting 
Junior Typewriting 
Senior Typewriting 
Junior Stenography .... 
Senior Stenography 
Sophomore Bookkeeping 
Junior Bookkeeping 
Introductory Business . . 
General Science 

Physics 

Physics Lab. . . 

Chemistry 

Chemistry Lab. 
Freshman Algebra .... 
Sophomore Algebra . . 

Geometry 

Freshman Mathematics 

Biology 

Mechanical Drawing . . 

Music 

Physical Education . . . 
Advanced Mathematics 
Office Practice 



Number of 
students 
First Second 
Year Year 



Number of 
students 
Third Fourth 
Year Year Total 



89 

5 



18 



18 
1 

19 
1 
2 



53 
80 



9 
91 



77 



1 
23 



57 
1 

7 

40 

32 

3$ 
3 

3 

40 



1 

1 
15 

1 
20 

1 
18 

3 
S2 
84 



71 
14 



1 
46 

3 
49 

3 



21 

7 

27 

28 
1 
2 

28 



25 

25 

25 



5 

8 

S3 

76 



13 

36 

2 

5 

3 
2 

io 

3 

10 
2 



27 
10 
10 



89 
82 
79 

51 
19 

23 
5 
2 

58 
47 
16 
92 
23 
54 
19 
57 
49 
30 
10 
34 
11 
47 
28 
53 
81 
9 
8 
27 
29 
34 
27 
29 
76 
24 
22 
234 
275 
10 
11 



Periods 
per 
Week 

5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
1 
3 
3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 
2 
2 
5 
5 



Our financial condition is shown in the following report made by 
Miss McCarthy, our Vice-Principal, who has charge of this department : 

ANNUAL REPORT OF CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL FUNDS 

I. GENERAL FUND 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1930 $302.95 

Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 138.47 

$441.42 
Less : Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 49.60 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $391.82 

17 



II. MUSIC FUND 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1930 $221 68 

Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 204^85 

$426.53 
Less : Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 207.43 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $219.10 

III. CLASS OF 1930 

Balance on hand Tan. 1, 1930 $ 59 55 

*Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 792.15 

$851.70 
*Less : Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 846.75 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $ 4.95 

*Includes money received and paid out for pupil's individual pictures. 

IV. CLASS OF 1931 

Balance Jan. 1, 1930 $ 19.81 

*Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 91.58 

$111.39 
Less: Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 5.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $106.39 

^Includes $67.83 profit on 1930 Year Book. 

V. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Balance on hand Tan. 1, 1930 $685.78 

Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 759.83 

$1,445.61 
Less : Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 857.09 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930. . . '. $588.52^ 

VI. BLUE MOON (School Paper) 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1930 $185.60 

Receipts Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 86.15 

$271.75 
Less : Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930. ...?... 53.29 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $218.46 

VII. CLASS OF 1932 

^Receipts Jan. 1. 1930— Dec. 31. 1930 $501.23 

*Payments Jan. 1, 1930— Dec. 31, 1930 485.08 

Balance Dec. 31, 1930 $ 16.15 

*Tncludes money received and paid out for individual pupil's class rings. 

*Total in all the funds $1,545.39 

*$1,000 is kept on interest. 

I am in the middle of my first year as the principal of your High School. 
I appreciate very much the kind assistance and hearty co-operation that I 
have received from you, Mr. Wright, the school committee, the faculty, 
parents, and entire student body and sincerely hope that I may warrant the 
continuance of this help and co-operation. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

L. H. BURNS. 
18 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

January 2, 1931. 
Mr. George S. Wright, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir: 

The music in the schools makes little change from year to year, as the 
fundamentals remain the same. The children learn to sing with a clear, light 
tone and this is carried through the entire school experience. In the second 
grade staff notation from the board is introduced, and in the third grade, 
book reading is started. 

We try to have as much appreciation as possible. We endeavor to teach 
the children the different moods in music, the louds and softs, sad and joyous 
music, slow and fast music, etc. Also the different rhythms such as march- 
ing, skipping, running, etc. 

In many rooms we have been seriously handicapped by the lack of 
books. Many of the books were in such a dilapidated condition that it was 
impossible to use them, and some rooms had no books at all. In such cases 
the interest is bound to relax just a bit, but several of the rooms will start 
the new year with new books, as books were purchased in December and I 
know that both teachers and pupils can start the new year with renewed 
zest and vigor. 

One of the Parent-Teacher Associations in the town contributed the 
sum of fifty dollars for musical equipment in their school. We have already 
purchased a portable victrola, instruments for a rhythm band, and a few 
records. We will use the remainder of this sum for records, as we feel the 
need of them. The Parent-Teacher Associations are doing a wonderful 
work, and their contributions are surely appreciated by the various depart- 
ments in the school system. 

In the High School there are two classes that meet twice a week for 
community singing, chorus singing, and music appreciation. In appreciation 
we have studied the folk music of various countries, and we are now at work 
on the various types of vocal music. Later we intend to study the various 
forms of music. Mr. and Mrs. Wright have loaned their victrola for our use 
in the High School, and by this generous act our work is greatly facilitated. 

Glee Clubs have been started, and the High School orchestra is small, 
but does excellent work for assemblies, school parties, etc. 

In two sections of our town grammar school orchestras are in the first 
stages of operation, and have high hopes of expanding and doing excellent 
work. One of the orchestras, after three rehearsals, rendered two selections 
for a Parent-Teacher Association and we feel quite encouraged. 

I wish to thank every teacher for his or her most excellent co-operation. 

Yours truly, 

CHARLOTTE L. HYDE, 

Supervisor of Music. 



19 



REPORT OF PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts, January 9, 1931. 

Mr. George S. Wright, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir: 

It is with pleasure that I submit to you my second annual report as 
Supervisor of Physical Education. 

During January, February and March, a basketball tournament was 
held for the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grade boys from the different 
sections. These games were played every Saturday morning, at the McFarlin 
School Gym, with an attendance of about one hundred every week. During 
this same period gym classes were held, one night a week, for the men and 
women of the community, and the average attendance was fifteen men and 
twenty-five women per week. These classes were run without any expense 
to the people other than a small fee used to pay the janitor and piano player. 
The largest amount paid was seventeen cents a person. 

Starting in February, the children began practising their drills to be 
used Field Day. The Field Day drills were competitive in nature, each 
grade striving to win the award for their grade. The awards were in the 
form of large shields and were won as follows: 1st and 2nd Grades, West- 
lands ; 3rd and 4th Grades, Princeton Street ; 5th and 6th Grades, McFarlin ; 
7th and 8th Grades, Princeton Street ; and the school championship was 
won by Princeton Street. The judges were four students from the Lowell 
Normal School, and this department wishes to thank the Lowell Normal 
.School for its co-operation, and all other people, who in any way rendered 
any assistance. The regular routine work of the department was carried out 
until the close of school in June. 

Starting the present school year, a few changes were made in schedule 
and mode of teaching, which it is believed will work out very satisfactorily.^ 
Two new classes have been created in High School and the schedule has 
been rearranged so that much less time is spent in travelling between 
schools. Beginning this fall, the boys and girls in the grades from the fifth 
through the eighth have been separated in their drills, this making it possible 
to have many more activities than with a mixed group. This change is 
working out very well from all angles and the children are especially 
pleased with it. All High School classes have been divided in two parts, the 
first of which is taken up by the study of Hygiene, in an effort to have 
the pupils know more about their body and its upkeep. This fall, the Athletic 
Field at the rear of the High School was used, for the first time, as the 
regular football field and with a few improvements, it can be made into as 
nice a field as any of our opponents have. 

Some new equipment has been purchased and is already in use. 

The Department of Physical Education wishes to thank the people of 
Chelmsford for their hearty co-operation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. A. LaFOUNTAIN. 



20 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 

Mr. George S. Wright, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

The following is a general summary of work in school from Tanuarv 
1930, to December 31, 1930: 

Number of pupils examined 1 480 

Defects found '^22 

Defective teeth 222 

Defective tonsils 234 

Defective heart 20 

Cervical glands J 2 

Thyroid glands 4 

Pediculosis 7 

Acne 74 

Posture 102 

Defective eyes 29 

Pupils inspected in school 3,092 

Taken home by nurse for illness 84 

Absentees visited in home 627 

Excluded from school for suspected illness 192 

Excluded from school for ringworm, impetigo, and poison ivy 24 

Individual instruction 618 

Accidents to hospital t 3 

First aid 36 

Dressings 720 

Investigations 21 

Instructive and advisory home visits 88 

Personal hygiene and health talks to pupils 166 

Pupils sent or taken to family physician 49 

Pupils sent or taken to school physician 212 

All pupils weighed and measured by nurse, assisted by school physician, 
with physical examination of all pupils ; also a complete physical examination 
of all bovs who were candidates for our football team. 



CORRECTIONS 

Tonsils and adenoids 75 

Glasses and lens 104 

Teeth treated 711 

Filled, permanent f 356 

Filled, deciduous 341 

Teeth cleaned 648 

Extractions, permanent 82 

Extractions, deciduous 27.8 

Examined by dentists 525 

Our rating on dental work by State Department Dental Hygiene was 
63% in June, 1930. We certainly must have a higher per cent in June, 193.1. 
Dr. Ritter has been working in Highland Avenue and Princeton School 
since September and is now working in Westland School. 

Dr. Coughlin has been working in East School since October and at 
present is working in Centre at McFarlin School. We have 256 pupils on 
dental honor roll in High School, which proves we arc going to have a very 
high per cent in 1931. A new dental chair was bought by East Fire Depart- 
ment Alumni boys and P. T. A. of East Chelmsford for East School. 

21 



May health proved a great success, also our pre-school clinic, which 
was held in May. In one of our schools every child, who was to enter 
school in September, registered, and was examined by school physician, 
defects found and corrected before child entered in September. Also, vaccina- 
tions were well taken care of in this particular school. Not a child had to 
be sent home for vaccination, which proves to you the value of pre-school 
clinics. In all our schools we had only four certificates, which is a very 
small number compared with 1929. 

Let us co-operate and not have any certificates in September, 1931. I 
want to see them all enter school physically fit. 

Here is a list of our pupils as they are today, perfect and all, defects 
corrected : 

High School 210 

McFarlin 255 

Princeton 160 

Westlands 128 

Highland Avenue 62 

East 83 

Quessy 39 

South Chelmsford 35 

South Row 11 

Follow-up clinic held, also X-rays by St. Dept. Tuberculosis. 

Pupils examined 10 

Pupils absent 1 

Pupils improved 8 

Pupils well 1 

Schick test given in May to children who were immunized October, 1929. 

Negative 247 

Positive 52 

Absent 34 

A number of children left town with their parents, hence our absentees. 

All children who proved positive were re-immunized in October, when 
we held our Immunization Clinic for our first grades and pre-school children. 
We had 153 children who attended the clinic. 

New England Food and Dairy Council gave our school children illus- 
trated lectures, spending three days visiting all schools, which seemed to be 
enjoyed by both pupils and teachers. 

In December Dr. Paul Wakefield, Chief of Chadwick Clinics, gave 
talks in the High School and in all seventh and, eighth grades in regards to 
a clinic which was held here December 11th. There were 1,063 children and 
teachers who took the test ; 255 were X-rayed, a great many by request of 
their parents. 

It was a very interesting clinic. There were five doctors, four typists, 
two X-ray experts and two X-ray machines. About 55 pupils will be given 
a physical examination, which is a very low percentage compared with 
other towns. Nurse made 107 home visits in order to explain to parents who 
did not fully understand the value of this particular clinic. After talking 
with the parents, a number of pre-school children took the test. 

During the year a number of doctors visited our schools. Dr. Welling- 
ton, Department of Mental Hygiene, Dr. Knowlton and Dr. Archibald, all 
from State Department Public Health, and Miss Anna M. Martin, R.N., 
State Consultant. 

I wish to thank the P.T.A. in all sections of the town for their generous 
help and co-operation in every respect. I certainly have had wonderful 
co-operation from everyone. 

Very respectfully, 



MAE S. LEW r IS. P.N. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 



December 31, 1930. 

22 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL HOUSE CONDITIONS 

To the Citizens of Chelmsford: 

Your committee appointed at the last annual town meeting to investigate 
the crowded conditions in school buildings and to make recommendations 
submits the following report: 

1. Two school buildings are badly overcrowded, the Westlands and the 
High School. 

2. The situation at the High School should be met first. If it becomes 
necessary, upper grade pupils from the Westlands can be transported to the 
McFarlin School until the Town is ready to enlarge the Westlands School. 

3. In considering the situation at the High School these facts should 
be kept in mind : 

(a) The building was erected in 1916-17 and was first occupied 
in the fall of 1917, when the enrollment was 161. It was designed to 
accommodate 225. With the present enrollment of 305 it is crowded to 
its utmost capacity, and in some cases far beyond the limit of safety. 
The building is of first class construction throughout and is in a very 
fine state of repair. Besides the overcrowded condition, it is now inade- 
quate in that it has no room large enough for school assemblies, no 
gymnasium with the necessary dressing and wash rooms, and no room 
of adequate size for the noon lunch hour. 

(b) At the present time the playroom in the McFarlin School is 
used by the High School classes in physical education and for basket 
ball games. This means that the students, both boys and girls, must go 
from the High School to the McFarlin School in all sorts of weather, 
and in their heated condition after 40 minutes of exercise return to the 
High School. The danger to their health from such exposure should 
be removed at the earliest possible date. Moreover^ the playroom is very 
unsatisfactory as a gymnasium for the reason that two iron posts, 
supporting the main girders of the building, stand in the center of the 
floor. In basket ball games these posts are a positive danger of an 
extreme type. 

(c) The sanitary arrangements of the High School are not adapted 
to a modern school. The boys' and the girls' locker rooms are in the 
basement, but there are no toilets in the basement, nor any place for 
students to wash. The lack of these facilities after physical exercises 
and after games is seriously felt. 

(e) Lack of room prevents making such improvements in the High 
School courses as all progressive towns are making. The courses of 
study have not been materially changed since the school was opened. 
There is a college preparatory course, a commercial course, and a 
general course. The first two meet the needs of students who have 
either higher education in mind, or office work, but less than half of the 
graduates of the college course go on to college or other institutions, 
and less than half of the commercial course graduates secure office 
positions. The general course is too narrow to meet the varying needs 
and capacities of other students. Modern high schools everywhere have 
courses in practical arts. 

4. The present crowded condition of the High School, the lack of a 
room in which the entire school can be seated for general exercises, the 
lack of a gymnasium with the necessary facilities, the impossibility of 

23 



improving the courses in the present building, together with the dangers 
attending the use of the playroom in the McFarlin School, are urgent 
reasons for making an addition to the building. 

5. It is merely a matter of good business judgment when this is done 
to build for the future by providing rooms both for a larger school and for 
improved courses. 

We therefore recommend that the Town at the earliest possible date 
provide an addition to the High School to include : 

(a) Six additional classrooms. 

(b) A lunch room of adequate size. 

(c) An assembly room. 

(d) A gymnasium with the necessary dressing and wash rooms. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NELLIE R. PICKEN. 
LOREN J. ELLINWOOD. 
WARREN WRIGHT. 
JOHN A. McADAMS. 
J. EARL WOTTON. 
EDWARD B. RUSSELL. 
HENRY C. SHEDD. 






24 



ENROLLMENT— OCTOBER 1, 1930 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS I II III IV V VI VII VIII Tot. 



McFarlin 



37 30 41 43 40 41 34 39 305 



East 23 

Highland Avenue 19 

Princeton Street 42 

Quessv 16 

South" 8 

South Row 6 

Westlands 25 



17 


20 


15 


13 


20 


15 


10 


133 


17 


14 


25 


11 


18 


16 


14 


134 


38 


31 


32 


31 


36 


35 


27 


272 


18 


12 


18 


16 


9 


11 


10 


110 


10 


9 


13 


9 








49 


5 


8 


5 










24 


19 


16 


23 


17 


23 


11 


21 


155 



Total 176 154 151 174 137 147 122 121 1182 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Freshmen 100 

Sophomores 85 

Juniors 83 

Seniors • 37 

Total 

Total Enrollment 



305 
1,487 



ENROLLMENT FOR TEN YEARS 

Elementary 

1921, Fall Term 1,007 

1923, April 1 1,090 

1923, Fall Term 1,064 

1924, October 30 1,128 

1925, October 30 1,122 

1926, October 1 1,166 

1927, October 1 1,162 

1928, October 1 1,148 

1929, October 1 1,179 

1930, October 1 1,182 



High 



Total 



181 


1,188 


184 


1,274 


203 


1,267 


221 


1,394 


194 


1,316 


216 


1,382 


224 


1,386 


266 


1,414 


306 


1,485 


305 


1,487 



SCHOOL CENSUS— October 1, 1930 

REGISTRATION OF MINORS: 5-7 yr. 7-14 yr. 

Boys 144 520 

Girls 125 469 

Total 269 989 

DISTRIBUTION OF MINORS: 

In Public Schools 207 966 

In Vocational School 

In Private Schools 18 

Not in School 62 5 

Total 269 989 

25 



14-16 yr. 

125 
134 

259 



214 

6 

4 

35 

259 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 

Total costs of schools for 1930, including expendi- 
tures by school committee from regular and 
special appropriations, and tuition to Lowell 
Vocational School, as itemized by Town 
Accountant on pages , $107,467.05 

RECEIPTS OF THE TOWN ON SCHOOL ACCOUNT 

From State for teachers' salaries $ 9,020.00 

From State, tuition of state wards 2,003.72 

From State, Lowell Vocational School 1,632.25 

Tuition from other towns 741.66 

Rent of school garage 180.00 

Sale of old books, waste paper, etc 16.31 

Total receipts on accounts of schools $ 13,593.94 

Net cost of schools to Town for 1930 $ 93,873.11 



SCHOOL BUDGET 

Appropriation Proposed 

for 1930 Expenditures for 1931 

Administration $ 4,500.00 $ 4,274.14 $ 4,450.00 

Instruction 69,230.00 69,200.13 70,600.00 

Operation and Maintenance 18,400.00 18,390.77 18,200.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,325.00 11,308.20 11,400.00 

New Equipment 1,000.00 919.30 500.00 

Total $104,455.00 $104,092.54 $105,150.00 

Special Appropriation 150.00 143.00 

Lowell Vocational School 3,231.51 



$107,467.05 



26 



GRADUATES OF HIGH SCHOOL 

June 25, 1930 



Abigail Scott Beattie 
Grace Elizabeth Bridgeford 
Ernest Edward Brotz 
Anna Louisa Calder 
Katherine Delia Clark 
Alice Agnes Clarke 
Clara Wonson Dexter 
Mary Gertrude Doherty 
William Wright Edge 
Charles Clarence Emery 
Alice Mae Fisher 
Harriet Frances Flemings 
Madeline Cleveland Freeman 
Raymond Merrill Ganthier 
Maurice Henry Joseph 

Cornellier di Grandchamp 
Barbara Catherine Greene 
Aime Bernard Hamel 
Ralph AJbert Harmon 
Dorothy Helen Harrington 
Edna Hoyt 

Ruby Clara Hutchinson 
Rachel Elsie Jones 
Olga Tosephine Kempe 
Allan Kidder 

Veronica 



Eleanor Louise Kilburn 
Martha Ethel Linstad 
Anna Margaret Lund 
Elizabeth Antoinette Lyman 
John Joseph McEnaney 
Russell James McEnaney 
Marie Doris McMullen 
Edward Francis Miner 
Thelma Feme Paignon 
Edna Maria Palm 
Donald Alonzo Parker 
Alice Mary Patenaude 
Bertha Mary Patenaude 
Esther Elizabeth A. Petterson" 
Lillian Mary Pinel 
Irene May Pratt 
Harry Brendan Quinn 
George Lincoln Reis 
Bernice Loretta Rutner 
Francis Joseph Safford 
Wendell Kimball Simpson 
Donald Eugene Smith 
Josephine Helen Smith 
Alice Mary St. Onge 
William Henry Thayer 
Arlene Welch 



GRADUATES OF EIGHTH GRADE 

June 19, 1930, at Chelmsford Center 
McFARLIN SCHOOL 



Evelyn Beckvold 
Evelyn Barbara Bliss 
Ronald Roadman Boyd 
Helen Mildred Brotz 
Frank Arthur Burton 
Dorothy Mae Butters 
Donald Charles Calder 
Roger Thomas Calder 
Phyllis Capone 
] Toward Carter 
Blanch Evelvn Clough 
Delphina Lillian DeCosta 
Evelyn Louise Flemings 
Allan Grant Fletcher 
John Bernard Gallagher 
Marguerite Lee Hannaford 
Harold Raymond Hansen 

WESTLANDS 
Mary Annie Angus 
Priscilla Wintie Burdick 
Edith Virginia Dickinson 
James Francis Fagan 
Louise Fitzpatrick 
TTarvev Fuller 
Lena Marv Jacob 
Allston Warren Lemey 

27 



Ralph Earnest House 
Laurence Joseph Judge 
Fred Emil Kemp 
Ralph Jean L'Heureux 
Russell Hendrick Linstad 
Henry Arthur Loiselle 
Ellen Marie Lundstrom 
Helen Vivian MacNeill 
Dorothy Elizabeth Murphy 
Catherine Helen Niemaszyk 
Herbert Page 
John Pierro 

Mildred Lauretta Purcell 
George Edmund Rondeau 
Adaline Amelia Simpson 
Gertrude Marie Tremblay 
Elizabeth Waite 

SCHOOL 

Raymond Marchand 
Barbara Varetta Olsson 
Hazel Frances Royce 
Gertrude Sofia Sargent 
Marjorie Viola Slade 
Louis Waite Stearns 
Anthony Albert Such 
Monica Todd 



Thure Harold Bloomgren 
Mary Louise Dow 
Mary Louise Gustafsou 
Albert Robert Hedlund 
Sarah Millicent Hill 
Lena Beatrice Medeiros 



EAST SCHOOL 

Peter John Pavelka 

Eliot Birtwell Quinn 

Rosa Santos 

Mary Lea Scobie 

Albert Sousa 

Napoleon Joseph Valentine 



PRINCETON STREET SCHOOL 
June 20, 1930, at North Chelmsford 



Walter Belida 
Cecile Cornellier Big-field 
Margaret Rita Christoun 
Many Dorothy De Amicis 
George Richard Dixon 
Robert Elliot Donaldson 
Myrtle Yvonne Ferron 
Alma Grace Gaudette 
Raymond Oliver Gaudette 
Rosanne Flora Gosselin 
Mary Louise Guyette 
Milton Weldon Haire 



Winfield Hersey Howard 
Ernest Janulis 
Earl John Lee 
Joshua Le Masurier 
Roland Marcel McEnaney 
Hazel Rita McMullen 
Julia Roberta Mikulis 
Bernice Arlene Mills 
Mary Elizabeth Miskell 
Marion Janet Plein 
Matthew William Plein 
James Arthur Potter 
Helen Grace Stephens 



Blanche Deputat 
Emile P. Gauthier 
Bruno J. Greska 
Rita M. Hines 



HIGHLAND AVENUE SCHOOL 

Alfred F. McSheehy 
Beatrice R. Mercier 
Claire Molloy 
Barbara J. Nath 
Antony W. Shacka 



QUESSY SCHOOL 
Phyllis Marjorie Berubee George Ezerskey 



Walter Edgar Bill 
Kenneth Clifford Clement 
Peter De Rubbo 
Raymond Ducharme 



George Roland Leedberg 
Elizabeth Agnes Leslie 
Helen Louise Pevey 
Halvar Peterson 



Eunice Moore Richardson 






2S 



INDEX OF SCHOOL REPORT 



Enrollment by Grades, Fall Term, 1930 25 

Graduates of High School, 1930 27 

Graduates of Eighth Grade, 1930 27 

Reports of : 

Committee on School House Conditions 23 

Financial Summary 26 

High School Funds 17 

High School Principal 15 

School Budget 26 

School Census 25 

School Committee 5 

School Nurse 21 

Superintendent , 7 

Supervisor of Music 19 

Supervisor of Physical Education 20 

School Calendar 2 

School Officials 2 

Signal for No School 2 

Teachers 3 



29 



Memorandum 



30 



Memorandum 



31 



Memorandum 



32