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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

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Annual 

REPORT 




Town of 

CHELMSFORD 

MASSACHUSETTS 



For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER iQ^J 
THIRTY-ONE 1 JO I 






ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 




RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

TOGETHER WITH THE 

SCHOOL REPORT 




Year Ending December 31 
1937 



BUCKLAND PRINTING CO. 
67 MIDDLE STREET, LOWELL 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



OFFICERS ELECTED 

MODERATOR 

WALTER PERHAM 
(Term expires 1938) 

TOWN CLERK 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON 
(Term expires 1939) 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

KARL M. PERHAM Term Expires 1938 

STEWART MacKAY Term Expires 1939 

JAMES A. GRANT Term Expires 1940 

TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON 
(Term Expires 1938) 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WARREN WRIGHT Term Expires 1938 

CARL A. E. PETERSON Term Expires 1939 

HERBERT C. SWEETSER (Deceased Oct. 17, 1937) Term Expires 1940 
WALTER JEWETT appointed to fill vacancy Dec. 27, 1937 until next 
annual election. 

TREE WARDEN 

VINCENT P. GARVEY 
(Term Expires 1938) 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

JAMES KIBERD, JR Term Expires 1938 

RAYMOND H. GREENWOOD Term Expires 1939 

GEORGE A. McNULTY Term Expires 1940 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

JOHN A. McADAMS Term Expires 1938 

WENDELL P. HARVEY Term Expires 1939 

JAMES P. CASSIDY Term Expires 1940 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

MICHAEL J. WELSH Term Expires 1938 

FRED L. FLETCHER Term Expires 1939 

WALTER MERRILL Term Expires 1940 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

BAYARD C. DEAN Term Expires 1938 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER Term Expires 1939 

ARTHUR W. HOUSE Term Expires 1940 

TRUSTEES OF ADAMS LIBRARY 

FRANCES H. CLARK, (Term expires 1938) FREDERICK A. P. FISKE 

ALBERT H. DAVIS, (Term expires 1939) FRED W. PARK 

MIRIAM E. WARREN. . . . (Term expires 1940) . . . LOTTIE L. SNOW 

SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

FRITZ H. PEARSON Term Expires 1938 

ROYAL SHAWCROSS Term Expires 1939 

WALTER PERHAM Term Expires 1940 

PLANNING BOARD 

WILLIAM BELLWOOD Term Expires 1938 

ERNEST SOULIS (Resigned) Term Expires 1939 

ARNOLD C PERHAM (Appointed) Term Expires 1938 

BAYARD C. DEAN Term Expires 1940 

LESTER W. BALL Term Expires 1941 

HOWARD D. SMITH Term Expires 1942 

JOHN J. MEAGHER Term Expires 1942 

SIDNEY E. DUPEE Term Expires i942 

CONSTABLE 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN 
(Term Expires 1938) 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICERS 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

WINTHROP A. PARKHURST 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

BIRGER PETTERSON CLARENCE WOODWARD 

EDWARD L. MONAHAN, Chairman CLARENCE AUDOIN 

SIDNEY E. DUPEE HOWARD D. SMITH 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

ANCEL E. TAYLOR 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM 

FIRE ENGINEERS 

JOHN KEMPE HARRY SHEDD JOHN DIXON 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

JOHN J. CARR Term Expires 1938 

DANIEL E. HALEY Term Expires 1939 

JAMES F. LEAHEY Term Expires 1940 

HAROLD C PETTERSON Ex-Officio 

TOWN COUNSEL 

JOHN H. VALENTINE 

JANITORS OF PUBLIC HALLS 

JOHN B. WRIGLEY Centre Hall— Chelmsford 

HELEN POTTER North Hall, North Chelmsford 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

LESLIE J. REID , 

FOREST WARDEN 

GILBERT H. PERHAM 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INFIRMARY 

SINAI SIMARD 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS OF INDIGENT 
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS 

WALTER PERHAM 

5 



CHIEF OF POLICE 

ARTHUR COOKE 

REGULAR POLICE 

WINSLOW P. GEORGE RALPH J. HULSLANDER 

SPECIAL POLICE 

ALLEN H. ADAMS LEO A. BOUCHER 

ROBERT C. DELONG ALLAN KIDDER 

JOSEPH M. DECOSTA RAYMOND A. REID 

POLICE WOMAN 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N. 

SPECIAL POLICE ELECTION 

ELMER TRULL 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR SCHOOL WORK 

CHARLES CAMPBELL JOSEPH KIERSTEAD 

ZEPHIN RIBERDY GEORGE MARINEL 

JOHN B. WRIGLEY KENNETH BILLINGS 

CLARK GRAY SILAS GAUTHIER 
PERCY ROBINSON 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR ADAMS LIBRARY 

SAMUEL FELCH 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR TOWN INFIRMARY 

SINAI SIMARD 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

ANCEL E. TAYLOR 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

MORTON B. WRIGHT JOHN ANDREWS 

MEASURERS OF SAWDUST 

PEARL T. DURRELL RICHARD E. DAVIS 

WILLIAM BATCHELDER 



WEIGHERS OF COAL AND COKE 

EDWARD T. HEALY BOYD McCRADY 

ARTHUR HEALY SARAH DUNIGAN 

JOHN J. DUNIGAN MARY C. HEALY 

JOHN H. HEALY HERBERT ELLIOT 

HAROLD D. MACDONALD 



WEIGHERS OF HAY 

HAROLD D. MACDONALD HERBERT E. ELLIOT 

JOHN J. DUNIGAN 

MEASURERS OF LUMBER 

HARRY F. PARKHURST PEARL T. DURRELL 
ARTHUR GAUTHIER RANSOM GRANT 
JOHN T. O'CONNELL CARROLL CRAFT 
WILLIAM BATCHELDER RICHARD E. DAVIS 

MYRON A. QUEEN 

MEASURERS OF WOOD 

HOSMER W. SWEETSER WILLIAM BATCHELDER 

RICHARD E. DAVIS PEARL T. DURRELL 

MEASURERS OF LOGS 

WILLIAM BATCHELDER RANSOM GRANT 

FENCE VIEWERS 

WILLIAM REID GEORGE McNULTY 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

GEORGE PETERSON FRED WIGGIN 

GEORGE SWALLOW EDWIN L. BURNE 

WILLIAM BELL WOOD 

WEIGHERS OF SAND AND GRAVEL 

ROY BUNTEL JAMES F. DUNIGAN 

VICTOR BUNTEL 

SPECIAL POLICE FOR MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
TRAINING SCHOOL 

DANIEL PLUMMER 



WEIGHERS OF MERCHANDISE 



JOHN J. HEHIR 
WALTER PERHAM 
JOHN CARTER 
JAMES WALKER 
HAROLD C. KING 
RAY GILMORE 
HAROLD D. MACDONALD 
EMIL HABERMAN 
WILLIAM BROWN 
ARTHUR L. HEALY 
JAMES LEAHEY 
WARREN MANSUR 



HERBERT C. ELLIOT 
EDWARD WHITWORTH 
BERTRAND BEAN 
E. CLARK DIXON 
PAUL WESTWOOD 
MARY C. HEALY 
ELMER PEVERILL 
JOSEPH FOLEY 
EARL GORTON 
JAMES COUGHLIN 
EDWARD HEALY 
DANIEL NICKLES 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTIGATOR 

LEONARD S. MacELROY 

MEAT INSPECTORS 

WINTON C. GALE ROY PAIGNON, Ass't 

AGENT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

MAE S. LEWIS 

SCHOOL NURSE 

MAE S. LEWIS 

MILK INSPECTOR 

MELVIN MASTERS 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

CHARLES MIDWOOD WALTER JEWETT, Substitute 

BOARD OF HEALTH PHYSICIAN 

DR. GEORGE E. CARRIEL DR. ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 

VINCENT P. GARVEY 



8 



ELECTION OFFICERS 



Precinct One, 
Chelmsford Centre, 

Peter McHugh, Warden 
LaForest Fields, Clerk 
Walter L. Ferguson, Dep. Warden 
Eva McMaster, Dep. Clerk 
Anna Stanley, Inspector 
John F. Buckley, Inspector 
Esther Beardsley, Inspector 
Vincent P. Garvey, Inspector 

Precinct Two, 
North Chelmsford 

Edmund Welch, Warden 
Kathleen Audoin, Clerk 
Ruth Conlin, Dep. Warden 
Edna Ballinger, Dep. Clerk 
Margaret B. L. Yeomans, Insp. 
Harriet Buchanan, Inspector 
Laura Shugrue, Inspector 
Gertrude Fallon, Inspector 

Precinct Three, 
West Chelmsford 

Bayard C. Dean, Warden 
Catherine Riney, Clerk 
Jennie Brown, Dep. Warden 
Rita Anderson, Dep. Clerk 
Rose Doherty, Inspector 
Hiram Richardson, Inspector 



Precinct Four 
East Chelmsford 

Charles Finnick, Warden 
Birger Petterson, Clerk 
Charles Devine, Dep. Warden 
Lydia Barris, Dep. Clerk 
Lillian Fielding, Inspector 
George A. McNulty, Inspector 

Precinct Five, 
South Chelmsford 

John Scoboria, Warden 
Everett D. Lyons, Clerk 

George L. Waite, Dep. Warden 
Caroline Wright, Dep. Clerk 
Ethel Wright, Inspector 

Precinct Six, 
Westlands 

Lawrence Marage, Warden 
Eleanor Parker, Clerk 
Robert Henderson, Dep. Warden 
Florrie Walton, Dep. Clerk 
Raymond Osborn, Inspector 
Henrietta Conaton, Inspector 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 1, 1937 and MARCH 8, 1937 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To John J. Buchanan, Constable, or any suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are hereby re- 
quested to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet 
in their several polling places, viz: 

Precinct One — Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct Two — Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct Three — Fire House, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct Four — School House, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct Five — Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct Six — Golden Cove School House, Westlands 

on Monday, the first day of March, 1937, being the first Monday in 
said month, at 12 o'clock noon, for the following purposes : 

To bring their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 
One Selectman for three years. 

One member of the Board of Public Welfare for three years. 
Treasurer and Collector of Taxes for one year. 
One Assessor for three years. 
Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 
One member of the Board of Health for two years to fill an un- 
expired term. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees for Adams Library for three years. 

One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years. 

One Constable for one year. 

One School Committeeman for three years. 

And to vote on the following question : 

10 



Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 1937 en- 
titled "An act placing the Chief of Police and the members of the 
regular or permanent police force of the Town of Chelmsford under 
Civil Service Laws," be accepted? 

All on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 noon to 8 P. M. and to meet in the 
Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on the following Monday, the eighth 
day of March, 1937, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, viz : 

ARTICLE ONE: To hear the reports of Town Officers and Com- 
mittees; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWO : To raise and appropriate such sums of money as 
may be required to defray Town charges for the current year; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THREE: To see if the Town will vote to establish a 
planning Board under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 81A and 81F to 81J inclusive, with amendments that have 
been made to these sections of said chapter ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE FOUR: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Fifty ($50.00) dollars for the preparation of a 
zoning scheme under the direction of the Planning Board ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FIVE: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Se- 
lectmen to act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise 
during the current year, with the authority to settle and adjust any 
claims or demands for or against the Town ; and to employ coun- 
sel therefor whenever in their judgment it is necessary; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE SIX : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treas- 
urer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money in anti- 
cipation of the revenues of the current financial year; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 



ARTICLE SEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money not exceeding Two Thousand ($2,000.00) dol- 
lars to be used as a Reserve Fund at the descretion of the Finance 
Committee, as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or 
act in relation thereto. 

11 



ARTICLE EIGHT : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sufficient sum of money with which to pay unpaid bills of 
1936; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE NINE : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a certain sum of money to purchase a typewriter, supplies 
and other equipment, for the purpose of installing a new system in 
the Assessors' Department ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TEN : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Select- 
men to sell in behalf of the Inhabitants of the Town any or all of the 
land devised to the Town by the late Martina Gage, and to give 
a good and sufficient deed thereto; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE ELEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to accept title to 
certain land located between Fairmount and Holt Streets in North 
Chelmsford, Mass., from the North Chelmsford Fire District; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to accept Fair- 
mount Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Twenty-five ($25.00) dollars or some other 
sum, for the purpose of reconstructing Fairmount Street ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FOURTEEN : To see if the Town will vote to accept Spring 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and 
plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE FIFTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred ($100.00) dollars or some other 
sum for the purpose of reconstructing Spring Street ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE SIXTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Fairmount Street extension as laid out by the Selectmen as shown 
by their report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE SEVENTEEN : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Seventy-five ($175.00) dollars 
or some other sum for the purpose of extending Fairmount Street ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

12 



ARTICLE EIGHTEEN : To see if the Town will vote to accept Sun- 
set Ave. extension to Oriole Street as laid out by the Selectmen as 
shown by their report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE NINETEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars or some other 
sum for the purpose of extending Sunset Ave. to Oriole Street ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY: To see if the Town will vote to accept Naylor 
Ave., as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of reconstructing Naylor Ave. ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-TWO: To see if the Town will vote to accept 

Elliott Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their 

report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act 
inrelation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-THREE : To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Two Hundred $(200.00) dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of reconstructing Elliott Street ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR : To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Hildreth Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their 
report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-FIVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars or some other 
sum for the purpose of reconstructing Hildreth Street; or act in 
realtion thereto. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-SIX: To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Sixth Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE-TWENTY-SEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Four Hundred Fifty ($450.00) dollars or 
some other for the purpose of reconstructing Sixth Ave. ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

13 



ARTICLE TWENTY-EIGHT : To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Waverly Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-NINE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Four Hundred ($400.00) dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of reconstructing Waverly Ave.; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY: To see if the Town will vote to accept Ledge 
Road as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and 
plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200) dollars or some other 
sum for the purpose of reconstructing the Ledge Road; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-TWO: To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Gilwood Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-THREE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Seventy-five ($75.00) dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of reconstructing Gilwood Ave.; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-FOUR: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred Fifty ($850.00) dollars for 
the purpose of defraying the expense of foreclosing tax titles ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-FIVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Three Hundred Twenty-five ($325.00) 
dollars or some other sum for the purpose of purchasing an auto- 
mobile for the Police Dept., said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-SIX: In the event of an affirmative vote under 
article 35 to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen 
to transfer title to the Ford automobile now used by the Police 
Dept., or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-SEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of One Thousand ($1000.00) dollars or some 
other sum for the purpose of purchasing an automobile truck ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

14 



ARTICLE THIRTY-EIGHT : To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Eight Thousand Two Hundred Ninety- 
five ($8,295.00) dollars or some other sum for the purpose of carry- 
ing on Federal or State projects the cost of administration ana the 
costs of materials and supplies for the same; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE THIRTY-NINE : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Sixty-five ($265.00) dollars for 
the purpose of settling land damage claims on the Riverneck and 
Dunstable Roads ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY: To see if the Town will vote to accept title to a 
certain land called "The Harrington Sandbank;" or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Overlay Reserve Account to the Emergency Flood Relief 
Account the sum of Four Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight 
and 65-100 ($4,738.65) dollars; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-TWO : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Thirty-five Hundred ($3,500.00) dollars for 
the reconstruction of the North Road, contingent upon the State and 
County contributing a similar amount for said purpose ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-THREE : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand ($1,000.00) dollars for the 
reconstruction of the Lowell Road, contingent upon the State and 
County contributing a similar amount for said purpose ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-FOUR : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Six Hundred Twelve and 86-100 ($612.86) 
dollars for the purpose of covering a deficit in the Outside Aid and 
Old Age Assistance Account; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-FIVE : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred $(500.00) dollars to be used 
by the Moth Department for the purpose of exterminating and con- 
trolling the elm leaf beetle ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-SIX: To see if the Town will vote to construct 
and addition to the Town hall in Chelmsford Centre and make cer- 
tain alterations thereon ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-SEVEN: In the event of affirmative vote under 
Article 46 to see if the Town will vote to transfer from the accounts 

15 



entitled "Sale of Real Estate and Surplus War Bonus Fund," certain 
sums contained in these accounts for the purpose of defraying the ex- 
pense of an addition to the Town Hall as set forth in article 46; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-EIGHT: To see if the Town will vote to accept 
from George C. Moore, Jr., title to certain lands in that part of 
Chelmsford called North Chelmsford, particular description of which 
may be seen in the Town Clerk's Office ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FORTY-NINE: To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to appoint a Committee of three persons 
for the purpose of considering the advisibility of enacting building 
laws and regulation for the Town ; said Committee to make their 
report at the next annual town meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FIFTY: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of Twelve Hundred Eighty-four and 24-100 ($1,284.24) 
dollars to pay the County of Middlesex as required by law the 
Town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair 
of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General Laws; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FIFTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Assessors to use a sum of money in the amount such 
as the Tax Commissioner may approve, as free cash, said sum to 
be applied in computing the tax rate for the year 1937; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FIFTY-TWO : To see if the Town will vote to oil the Twiss 
Road from the junction of the Twiss Road and Main Street so-called 
to the Stony Brook R. R. tracks on Twiss Road, and that the ex- 
pense of this oiling be taken from the appropriation of "Road 
Binder" so-called or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE FIFTY-THREE: To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate from the fund entitled "Sales of Cemetery Lots" a certain 
sum of money for the care, improvement and embellishment of some 
or all of the Cemeteries in the Town ; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Center of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford and West Chelmsford and at the School 
House in East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove School House 
Westlands seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
first meeting aforesaid. 

16 



HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the Time and place of holding this 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this Twentieth day of February in the year 
of our Lord, nineteen hundred thirty-seven. 

JAMES A. GRANT, 
STEWART MacKAY, 
KARL M. PERHAM, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



RETURN 

MIDDLESEX, SS. February 21, 1937 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, by posting up attested copies 
of the same at the Post Offices in the Center of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford and West Chelmsford and at the School 
House in East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove School House in the 
Westlands, seven days at least before the time of holding the meeting 
as within directed. 

JAMES J. BUCHANAN, 

Constable of Chelmsford. 



17 



TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 1, 1937 

Office and Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 

Moderator 

Walter Perham, Westford St. . . 656 400 82 198 87 291 1714 
Blanks 132 167 14 81 9 64 467 



Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Selectman 

James A. Grant, Chelmsford St. 646 387 81 202 78 299 1693 

Blanks 142 180 15 77 18 56 488 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Public Welfare 

James A. Grant, Chelmsford St. 613 361 76 176 74 289 1589 

Blanks 175 206 20 103 22 66 592 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Board of Health for 3 years 

James A. Ahearn, Dalton Road 77 105 20 12 9 96 319 

Henry E. Ayotte, Hall Road . . 123 26 2 5 3 11 170 

Lester W. Ball, Acton Road ... 255 20 5 4 39 39 362 

Robert S. Fay, CypressStreet 33 10 4 3 2 28 80 

Edward G. Haines, Sunset Ave. 11 17 2 2 90 122 

Bernard F. McLaughlin, E. Ch. 28 35 7 95 2 3 170 
George A. McNulty, Brick 

K'l Road 76 236 18 141 5 42 518 

Fritz H. Pearson, Littleton Rd... 144 59 33 5 32 34 307 

Blanks 41 59 5 14 2 12 133 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Board of Health for 2 Years 

Raymond H. Greenwood, Fl'r St. 388 297 58 125 44 188 1100 

Walter H. Jewett, Bill. St. ... 361 160 30 97 48 133 829 

Blanks 39 110 8 57 4 34 252 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

18 



Office and Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 

Treasurer and Collector for 1 

year 
Harold C. Petterson, Groton Rd. 678 441 88 206 89 311 1813 
Blanks 110 126 8 73 7 44 368 



Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Assessor for 3 years 

George W. Peterson, Bridge St. 224 224 47 123 25 119 762 
Herbert W. Sweetser, Boston 

Rd 532 274 44 125 66 212 1253 

Blanks 32 69 5 31 5 24 166 



Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Constable for 1 year 

John J. Buchanan, Groton Rd. 646 371 82 190 82 304 1675 

Blanks 142 196 14 89 14 51 506 



Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

School Committeeman for 
3 years 

James P. Cassidy, Washington 

Street 617 427 

Blanks 171 140 



Total 788 567 

Trustees Adams Library 
for 3 years 

Lottie L. Snow, School St. 551 335 

Miriam E. Warren, Boston Rd. . 566 222 

Blanks 459 577 



74 


205 


83 


285 


1691 


22 


74 


13 


70 


490 


96 


279 


96 


355 


2181 


88 


156 


74 


258 


1462 


53 


118 


71 


227 


1257 


51 


284 


47 


225 


1643 



Total 1576 1134 192 558 192 710 4362 

Tree Warden for 1 year 

Vincent P. Garvey, Locke Rd... 662 447 85 196 81 293 1764 

Blanks 126 120 11 83 15 62 417 



Total 788 

Cemetery Commissioner for 
3 years 

Arthur W. House, Acton Rd. . . 381 
C. Wesley Lyons, Elm Rd. . . 331 
Blanks 76 



567 


96 


279 


96 


355 


2181 


241 


39 


116 


27 


198 


1002 


173 


42 


86 


67 


116 


815 


153 


15 


77 


2 


41 


364 



Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

19 



Office and Candidate P-l P-2 P-3 P-4 P-5 P-6 Total 
Park Commissioner for 3 years 

Walter B. Belleville, Robin Rd. 242 212 44 96 43 135 772 

Walter H. Merrill, Concord Rd. 484 223 39 106 51 188 1091 

Blanks 62 132 13 77 2 32 318 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Sinking Fund Commissioner 
for 3 Years 

Walter Perham, Westford St. . 614 347 76 180 85 278 1580 

Blanks 174 220 20 99 11 77 601 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

Question : Civil Service 
Police Department 

Yes 258 188 46 118 23 175 808 

No 489 357 46 126 67 167 1252 

Blanks 41 22 4 35 6 13 121 

Total 788 567 96 279 96 355 2181 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Town Clerk. 
March 3, 1937 



20 



ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING 

MARCH 8, 1937 



A legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant to Warrant duly posted 
said meeting held in the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on 
March 8, 1937 at 10 A. M. Walter Perham called the meeting to order 
and requested Town Clerk, Harold C. Petterson to read the Warrant, 
after the Warrant was partly read a motion to waive the further reading 
of the Warrant was made by Arthur Dutton and it was so voted. 

Under article One : 

It was voted to accept the Town report as printed with the cor- 
rection of an error under the list of "Officers Elected" in place of 
Raymond Reid as Sinking Fund Commissioner, this should read, Fritz 
H. Pearson. The correction was made by Town Clerk, Harold C. 
Petterson. 

Under article Two : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to lay this 
article on the table until after the noon recess. 

Under article Three : 

Mr. Howard Smith reported for the zoning committee his report 
was as follows : 

At the Annual Town Meeting a year ago the Selectmen were 
authorized to appoint a committee to look into the question of the ad- 
visability of zoning the Town. A committee of seventeen was .appointed. 
Early in the fall a meeting was held for the purpose of acquainting the 
members with the subject of zoning. We had a speaker from the 
State Department of Public Welfare, Division of Housing and Planning, 
and this was followed by an open meeting for all interested, the speaker 
this time was Mr. Edward T. Hartman, State Consultant on Town and 
City Planning. From the two speakers I think that the members of the 
temporary committee obtained a fairly good idea of what zoning means 
to a town. 

Zoning has for its bases the protection of residential districts. All 
planners and citizens interested in protected home areas recognize that 
every element of protection must be provided if an investment in a 

21 



home is to be safe. The greatest element of competition between towns 
is a protection they offer to homeseekers and business alike. 

Your committee believe that zoning would be a distinct and lasting 
benefit to the Town and we recommend that the necessary action be 
taken at this meeting to lay the foundation for doing this. The first step 
is to adopt certain State Laws which have to do with Town planning and 
zoning and secondly to elect a planning board to do this work. We 
recommend that the members of the planning board serve without pay. 
(Town zoning is often done by professional zoners who receive from 
$500 to $1000 for the work they do) if the recommendations of the com- 
mittee are followed it is not proposed to have any extra cost to the 
Town of Chelmsford except the cost of printing the final report. 

Zoning is a method of regulating community growth along the 
right lines, with special reference to health, comfort, safety and general 
welfare. 

HOWARD D. SMITH 
Chairman of the Temporary Zoning Committee. 

On a motion made by James A. Grant the following members were 
elected to the planning board, as follows : 

Sidney E. Dupee Five year term 

John J. Meagher Five year term 

Howard D. Smith Five year term 

Lester W. Ball Four year term 

Bayard C. Dean Three year term, 

Ernest C. Soulis Two year term 

William Bellwood One year term 

On a motion made by Howard D. Smith it was voted to establish 
a Planning Board under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41 
Section 81A and 81F to 81J inclusive and to accept the provisions of 
these sections, and that the voters elect a planning Board consisting 
of seven members and that the terms of office of the seven members 
be as follows : 

One for a period of one year. 
One for a period of two years. 
One for a period of three years. 
One for a period of four years. 
Three for a period of five years. 

Under article four: 

On a motion made by Howard D. Smith it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifty ($50.00) Dollars for the purpose of defray- 
ing the cost of establishing a Zoning Scheme under the direction of the 
Planning Board elected in pursuance of Article 3. 

22 



Under article Five : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted, to authorize the 
Selectmen to act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise during 
the current year, with authority to settle and adjust any claims or 
demands for or against the Town ; and to employ counsel whenever in 
their judgment it is necessary. 

Under article Six: 

It was voted on a motion made by Harold C. Patterson, that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is author- 
ized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of revenue of 
the financial year beginning January 1, 1937 and to issue a note or notes 
therefor payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44 of the General Laws. 

Under article Seven : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Two Thousand ($2000.00) Dollars to be used by the 
Finance Committee as a Reserve Fund at their descretion as provided 
by General Laws Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Under article Eight : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,906.23 to pay unpaid bills of 1936. 

Under article Nine : 

On a motion made by Carl A. E. Peterson, it was voted to raise 
and appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Seventy-five ($275.00) dollars 
for the purpose of purchasing a typewritter, supplies and other equip- 
ment to be used in the Assessors Department. 

Under article Ten : 

On a motion made by John H. Valentine, it was voted to authorize 
the Selectmen to sell the property devised to the Town by the late Mar- 
tina Gage and to give a good and sufficient deed to same. 

Under article Eleven : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay it was voted to accept title 
to certain land located in Chelmsford in that part of Chelmsford called 
North Chelmsford, located near Holt Street and Fairmount Streets 
from the North Chelmsford Fire District, said land being bounded and 
described as follows : 

23 



Beginning at a point on the Southwesterly side of Holt Street (as 
designated on a plan on file in the Town Clerk's office) at the North- 
easterly corner of land of one Moore and at the Southeasterly corner 
of the premises now being described; thence running southwesterly by 
said Moore land and by land of the North Chelmsford Fire District 170 
feet; thence turning at an angle of 90 degrees and running Southeasterly 
by land of North Chelmsford Fire District, Robert Moore, Alex Mika- 
leski. Joseph Gagnon and William Quigley, now or formerly about 315 
feet to a point ; thence turning at an angle of 90 degrees and running 
southwesterly 40 feet more or less to the southwesterly line of Spring 
Street ; thence turning in an angle of 90 degrees and running about 355 
feet by land of one Gaudette, now or formerly to a point ; thence turn- 
ing at an angle of 90 degrees and running in a northeasterly direction 
about 210 feet to the westerly side of Holt Street ; thence turning at an 
angle of 90 degrees and running by the westerly line of Holt Street to 
the point of beginning. 

Under article Twelve : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to accept 
Fairmount Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report 
and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under article Thirteen : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay to appropriate $200.00 for the 
purpose of reconstructing Fairmount Street, it was voted not to appro- 
priate this sum. 

Under article Fourteen : 

It was voted to accept Spring Street as laid out by the Selectmen as 
shown by their report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk. 

Under article Fifteen : 

It was voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
($100.00) dollars for the purpose of reconstructing Spring Street. 

Under article Sixteen : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to dismiss 
this article. 

Under article Seventeen : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to dismiss 
this article. 

24 



Under article Eighteen : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Sunset 
Ave. Extension to Oriole Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown 
by their report and plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under article Nineteen : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars for the purpose 
of extending Sunset Ave. to Oriole Street. 

Under article Twenty : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to accept Naylor 
Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan 
duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under article Twenty-one : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars for the purpose 
of reconstructing Naylor Ave. 

Under article Twenty-two : 

In regard to the acceptance of Elliott Street, it was voted not to ac- 
cept this street. 

Under article Twenty-three : 

It was voted to dismiss this article. 

Under article Twenty-four : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham to accept Hildreth Street, 
this motion was lost. 

Under article Twenty-five : 

It was voted to dismiss this article. 

Under article Twenty-six: 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to accept Sixth 
Ave. as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and plan duly 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

25 



Under article Twenty-seven : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Hundred Fifty ($450.00) dollars for the 
purpose of reconstructing Sixth Ave. 

At this point of the meeting it was voted to recess from 12:15 P. M. 
to 1 :15 P. M. 

Under article Two: 

It was voted to raise and appropriate the following amounts of 
money to defray Town charges for the current year : 

General Government : 

Moderator's Salary $ 10.00 

Selectmen's Salary 750.00 

Selectmen's Expense 200.00 

Town Clerk's Salary 200.00 

Town Clerk's Expense 125.00 

Town Accountant's Salary 1,800.00 

Town Accountant's Expense 75.00 

Collector and Treasurer Salary 2,000.00 

Collector and Treasurer Expense 1,500.00 

Collector and Treasurer Bond 483.00 

Assessor's Salary 2,200.00 

Assessors' Expense 400.00 

Town Counsel Salary 280.00 

Finance Committee Expense 20.00 

Registrars Salary and Expense 156.00 

Election Salary and Expense 265.00 

Public Bldgs. Janitors Salary 972.00 

Public Bldgs Fuel, light, water 1,050.00 

Public Bldgs Other Expense 400.00 

Total for General Government $ 12,886.00 

Protection of Persons and Property: 

Police Dept. Chief's Salary $ 2,000.00 

Police Dept. Patrolmen 3,600.00 

Police Dept. Special and School Police 630.00 

Police Dept. other expense 1,120.00 

Fire Dept. Administration 4,300.00 

Fire Dept. Maintenance 3,700.00 

Fire Dept. labor and expense at fires 600.00 

Hydrant service Center 500.00 

Hydrant service North 500.00 

Hydrant service East 1,500.00 

26 



Hydrant service South 1,000.00 

Hydrant service West 20.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 175.00 

Moth Dept 1,200.00 

Tree Warden 150.00 

Forest Fire Warden 900.00 

Fish and Game Warden 100.00 



Total for Protection of Persons and Property $ 21,995.00 

Health and Sanitation : 

Board of Health Salaries $ 630.00 

Board of Health Agent Salary 315.00 

Board of Health Maintenance 100.00 

Board of Health Aid 1,200.00 

Board of Health Meat Inspector 650.00 

Board of Health Milk Inspector 315.00 

Board of Health Physician Salaries 90.00 

Board of Health Plumbing Inspector 350.00 

Board of Health Vaccine Treatment 400.00 

Board of Health care of dumps 150.00 

Total for Health and Sanitation $ 4,200.00 

Highways : 

Supt. Salary $ 1,900.00 

Highway General 13,000.00 

Machinery account 1,200.00 

Road Binder 9,000.00 

Snow Removal 1,500.00 

Chapt. 90 work 3,000.00 

Street Lights 9,700.00 

Total for Highways $ 39,300.00 

Public Welfare : 

Overseers Salaries $ 325.00 

Overseers Maintenance 1,209.00 

Investigators Salary 1,300.00 

Outside Relief, including Mothers' Aid 

and Old Age Ass't 40,600.00 

Infirmary Supt. Salary 900.00 

Infirmary expense 2,750.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,100.00 

Military Aid 100.00 

State Aid 250.00 

Total for Public Welfare $ 48,534.00 

27 



School Dept. 

Administration $ 3,950.00 

Instruction 71,000.00 

Operation and Maintenance 16,000.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,750.00 

New Equipment 250.00 

Total for School Dept $102,950.00 

Vocational School $ 1,700.00 



$ 1,700.00 



Libraries 



North Chelmsford Library $ 2,200.00 

Adams Library 1,200.00 

Total for Libraries $ 3,400.00 

Cemeteries : 

Commissioners Salaries $ 105.00 

Forefathers Cemetery 300.00 

Hart Pond Cemetery 300.00 

Pine Ridge Cemetery 300.00 

Riverside Cemetery 300.00 

West Chelmsford Cemetery 300.00 

Fairview Cemetery 300.00 

Total for Cemeteries $ 1,905.00 

Recreation and Unclassified: 

Parks $ 1,000.00 

Memorial Day Chelmsford Centre 150.00 

Memorial Day North Chelmsford 150.00 

Town Clock 30.00 

Public Bldgs Insurance 1,500.00 

Bond Treas. Ins. Sinking Fund 50.00 

Constable 30.00 

Rent Am. Legion Quarters 300.00 

Animal Inspector salary 200.00 

Town Reports 767.60 

Varney Playgrounds 300.00 

Federal Commissary 150.00 

Keeping Dogs 75.00 

Total for Recreation and Unclassified.. $ 4,702.60 

Total under article two $241,572.60 

28 



Under article Twenty-eight : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to dismiss this 
article. 

Under article Twenty-nine : 

It was voted to dismiss this article. 
Under article Thirty : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to accept 
Ledge Road as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their report and 
plan duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

Under article Thirty-one: 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKey to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $200.00 for the purpose of reconstructing Ledge Road, this 
motion was lost. 

Under article Thirty-two : 

In regard to the acceptance of Gilwood Ave. it was voted to dismiss 
this article. 

Under article Thirty-three : 

In regard to appropriating $75.00 for the purpose of reconstructing 
Gilwood Ave. it was voted to dismiss this article. 

Under article Thirty-four : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson it was voted to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $850.00 for the purpose of defraying the ex- 
pense of foreclosing Tax Titles. 

Under article Thirty-five : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three hundred and twenty-five ($325.00) dollars 
to purchase an automobile for the Police Department, said purchase 
to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

Under article Thirty-six: 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to authorize the 
Selectmen to transfer title to a Ford automobile now used by the Police 
Department and be further authorized to give a good and sufficient bill 
of sale of same. 

29 



Under article Thirty-seven: 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand ($1,000.00) dollars for the pur- 
chase of an automobile truck, said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

Under article Thirty-eight : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Eight Thousand two hundred ninety-five 
($8,295.00) dollars for the purpose of carrying on Federal or State pro- 
jects, the costs of administration and the costs of materials and supplies 
for the same. 

Under article Thirty-nine : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred sixty-five ($265.00) for the pur- 
pose of settling land damage claims on the Riverneck and Dunstable 
Roads. 

Under article Forty : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham, it was voted to dismiss this 
article. 

Under article Forty-one : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to transfer from 
the Overlay Reserve account to the Emergency Flood Relief account 
the sum of Four Thousand Seven Hundred thirty-eight and 65-100 
($4,738.65) dollars. 

Under article Forty-two: 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Thirty-five Hundred ($3,500.00) dollars for the 
reconstructing of the North Road, contingent upon the State and 
County each contributing a similar amount for said purpose. 

Under article Forty-three : 

In regard to the appropriation of $1,000.00 for the Lowell Road, this 
motion was lost. 

Under article Forty-four: 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Six Hundred Twelve and 86-100 ($612.86) dollars 

30 



for the purpose of covering a deficit in the outside aid and old age assist- 
ance account. 

Under article Forty-five : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham, it was voted to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred ($500.00) dollars to be used by the 
Moth Dept. for the purpose of exterminating and controlling the Elm 
Leaf Beetle under the provisions of Chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

Under article Forty-six: 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to construe* 
and addition and make certain alterations to the Town Hall in Chelms- 
ford Centre, said construction and alteration to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen and a committee of three com- 
posed of the following, J. Carroll Monahan, George E. King and Wil- 
liam T. Picken. 

Under article forty-seven : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to transfer from 
the accounts entitled "Sale of Real Estate" and "Surplus War Bonus 
Fund" $4,979.85 for the purpose of defraying the expense of an addi- 
tion and certain alterations to the Town Hall in Chelmsford Centre in 
accordance with the vote taken under article 46. 

Under article Forty-eight : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted to accept 
from George C. Moore, Jr., title to certain lands in that part of Chelms- 
ford called North Chelmsford, a particular description may be seen in 
the Town Clerk's office, this acceptance subject to the approval of title 
by the Collector of Taxes. 

Under article Forty-nine : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to appoint a Committee of three persons for the 
purpose of considering the advisabillity of enacting building laws for 
the Town, said committee to make their report at the next annual town 
meeting. 

Under article Fifty: 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Twelve Hundred Eighty-four and 24-100 ($1,284.24) 
dollars to pay the County of Middlesex as required by law, the Town's 
share of the net cost of the care, maintenance and repair of the Mid- 
31 



dlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 111, of the General Laws. 

Under article Fifty-one : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted to authorize 
the Board of Assessors to use the sum of $10,000.00 as free cash said 
sum or any other sum as may be approved by the Tax Commissioner 
to be applied in computing the tax rate for the year 1937. 

Under article Fifty-two : 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted that the 
Twiss Road be oiled from Main Street to the Stony Brook R. R. tracks 
on Twiss Road, in the year 1937 and that the expense therefor be taken 
from the "Road Binder Account." 

Under article Fifty-three : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to transfer 
from the account entitled "Sales of Cemetery Lots" $500.00 for the 
purpose of defraying the cost of the care, improvement and embellish- 
ment of the following cemeteries : 

Forefathers Cemetery $100.00; Hart Pond Cemetery $100.00; Pine 
Ridge Cemetery $100.00; Riverside Cemetery $100.00; West Chelmsford 
Cemetery $100.00. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 3:15 P. M. 

WALTER PERHAM, HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Moderator. Town Clerk. 



32 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Upper Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre 

THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 7, 1937 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

To John J. Buchanan, a Constable of the Town of Chelmsford, 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth as aforesaid, you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the legal voters of the Town of Chelmsford 
to meet in the Upper Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on Thursday, 
the seventh dajr of October 1937, then and there to act upon the follow- 
ing articles, viz: 

Article One : 

To see if the Town will vote to give, grant and convey to Harry 
Lampert, in consideration of the property that said Lampert has already 
deeded to the Town, a certain parcel of land situated in that part of 
Chelmsford known as the Westlands, located on the southerly side of 
Oriole Street and westerly side of Sunset Ave.; or act in relation thereto. 

Article Two : 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the account known 
as the "Sale, of Real Estate Fund" the sum of $1,825.00 to the account 
called "Addition and Alteration of the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre ;" 
or act in relation thereto. 

Article Three : 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the "Excess and 
Deficiency Account" the sum of $7,055.64 to the account called "Addi- 
tion and Alteration to the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre ;" or act 
in relation thereto. 

Article Four : 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum, of 
$500.00 or some other sum, for the purpose of installing a fire alarm 

33 



system and tapper system in the Centre Village ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Article Five : 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Fire En- 
gineers to sell on behalf of the Town, the air tanks, motors, whistle and 
all other equipment which is a part of the fire alarm system located 
in the Centre Town Hall and to authorize the Board of Fire Engineers 
to dispose of said above described property in any method that in their 
descretion deems best, and to execute a bill of sale or any other in- 
strument that is necessary to transfer a proper title ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Article Six: 

To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to sell on behalf 
of the Town, and give a good and sufficient deed, the following parcels 
of land; or act in relation thereto. 

First : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon if any there be, 
formerly owned by John T. Conroy as described in a deed recorded in 
the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 817, Page 350 
and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector of 
Taxes in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

Second : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon if any there be. 
formerly owned by William J. Keenan as described in a deed recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 817, Page 355 
and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector of 
Taxes for the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

Third : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon if any there he. 
formerly owned by Joseph and Cornelia LeCuyer as described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 832, 
Page 324 and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the 
Collector of Taxes for the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

Fourth : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon if any there be, 
formerly owned by Roderick H. MacKinnon as described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 832, 
Page 326 and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the 
Collector of Taxes for the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

34 



Fifth : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon if any there be 
formerly owned by John Meehan as described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex District Registry of Deeds Book 817, Page 359 and as shown 
on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector of Taxes for the 
Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

Sixth : 

A certain parcel or parcels of land with buildings thereon if any 
there be formerly owned by George C. Moore which was accepted by 
the Town of Chelmsford at the Annual Town Meeting held on March 
8, 1937, as described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds Book 898, Page 413. 

Article Seven : 

To see if the Town will vote to establish a Road Machinery Fund, 
to which shall be credited all receipts received for the use or rental of 
road machinery, the proceeds to be appropriated as voted by the Town 
for road machinery purposes ; or act in relation thereto. 

Article Eight: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1500.00 or some other sum and to establish a Road Machinery Account 
and said money to be used from said account for the purpose of repair- 
ing and operating road machinery; or take any action in relation thereto. 

And You Are Directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof at the Post Offices in the Centre of the Town, South 
Chelmsford, North Chelmsford and at the Post Office West Chelmsford 
and at the School House East Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove School 
House Westlands seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

Hereof Fail Not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of holding said meet- 
ing. 

Given under our hands this thirtieth day of September in the year 
of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-seven. 

KARL M. PERHAM, 

STEWART MacKAY, 

JAMES A. GRANT, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



35 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Middlesex, ss. September 30, 1937 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by posting up attested copies 
of the same at the Post Offices in the Center of the Town, South Chelms- 
ford, North Chelmsford, West Chelmsford and at the Schoolhouse, East 
Chelmsford and at the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven 
days at least before the date hereof as within directed. 

JOHN J. BUCHANAN, 
Constable of the Town of Chelmsford. 



36 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 7, 1937 

At a legal meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
qualified to vote in Town affairs, held pursuant to Warrant duly posted, 
said meeting held in the Upper Town Hall Chelmsford Centre at 8 P. 
M., October 7, 1937. Moderator Perham called the meeting to order and 
the Warrant was read by Town Clerk Harold C. Petterson, the following 
business was transacted, to wit : 

Under article One : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to authorize 
the Selectmen to convey on behalf of the Town by good and sufficient 
deed to Harry Lampert, a certain parcel of land situated on the South- 
erly side of Oriole Street and the Westerly side of Sunset Ave. and 
bounded and described as follows : 

Beginning at the intersection of the Southerly line of Oriole Street 
and the Westerly line of Sunset Ave. ; thence running Southerly by the 
Westerly line of said Sunset Ave. one hundred nineteen and 5-100 
(119.5) feet to a point; thence turning and running in a northwesterly 
direction in a straight line crossing a portion of lot 7 and lot 6 on a 
plan of land entitled "Sunset Ave. Extension, Westlands, scale 30 feet 
equals one inch, April 11, 1937, W. L. Flagg Surveyor, to the Southerly 
line of Oriole Street ; thence turning in an angle of 92 degrees 14 minutes 
and running in a Northeasterly direction thirty-four and 26-100 (34.26) 
feet to the point of beginning. 

Under article Two : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham, it was voted to transfer from 
the account known as the "Sale of Real Estate Fund" the sum of 
$1,825.00 to the account called "Addition and Alteration of the Town 
Hall at Chelmsford Centre." 

Under article Three : 

On a motion made by James A. Grant, it was voted to transfer from 
the Excess and Deficiency Account the sum of $7055.64 to the account 
called "Addition and Alteration of the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre." 

Under article Four : 

Regard the sum of $500.00 for the purpose of installing a fire alarm 
system and tapper system at the Center Village on a motion made by 
Harry Shedd this motion was lost, and on a motion made by James A. 

37 



Grant, it was voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $300.00 for the 
purpose of re-installing the present fire alarm system. 

Under article Five : 

Regard to the selling of tanks, motors, whistle, etc., a part of the 
present fire alarm system at the centre village, it was voted to dismiss 
this article. 

Under article Six: 

On a motion made by Harold C. Petterson, it was voted to authorize 
the Selectmen to sell, if in their judgment they deem it for the best inter- 
est of the Town, the following parcels of real estate : 

A certain parcel of land with buildings thereon, if any there be, 
formerly owned by John T. Conroy, as described in a deed recorded in 
the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 817, Page 350 
and as shown- on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector of 
Taxes in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

A certain parcel of land with buildings thereon, if any there be, 
formerly owned by William J. Keenan, as described in a deed recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 817, Page 355 
and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector 
of Taxes in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

A certain parcel of land with buildings thereon, if any there be, 
formerly owned by Joseph and Cornelia Lecuyer as described in a 
deed recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 
832 Page 324 and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the 
Collector of Taxes in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

A certain parcel of land with buildings thereon, if any there be, 
formerly owned by Roderick H. MacKinnon as described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 832 
Page 326 and as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the Col- 
lector of Taxes in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

A certain parcel of land with buildings thereon, if any there be, 
formerly owned by John Meehan as described in a deed recorded in 
the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 817, Page 359 and 
as shown on a plan of land on file in the office of the Collector of Taxes 
for the Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

A certain parcel or parcels of land with the buildings thereon if any 
there be, formerly owned by George C. Moore which was accepted at 
the Annual Town Meeting held on March 8, 1937, as described in a 
deed from George C. Moore to the Town of Chelmsford and recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 898, Page 413. 

38 



And the Board of Selectmen are authorized to sell any or all of the 
before mentioned parcels of land either by private sale or public auction, 
or by sealed bids and to execute any or all instruments necessary to 
transfer legal title. 

Under article Seven : 

On a motion made by Karl M. Perham, it was voted to establish a 
Road Machinery Fund, to which shall be credited all receipts received 
for the use or rental of Road Machinery, the proceeds to be appropriated 
as voted by the Town for road machinery purposes. 

Under article Eight : 

On a motion made by Stewart MacKay, it was voted to establish a 
Road Machinery Account, and that there be transferred from the Road 
Machinery Fund the sum of $2000.00 to the Road Machinery Account, 
and the said sum of $2000.00 is to be used for the purpose of repairing 
and operating road machinery. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting at 9:10 P. M. 

WALTER PERHAM, HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Moderator. Town Clerk. 



39 



VITAL STATISTICS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1937 

Attention is called to the following vital statistics. It is important 
that these records shall be correct. If any errors are discovered the 
Town Clerk will deem it a favor to have them reported at once so that 
corrections may be made. 

As required by Chapter 16, Section 15, General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, notice is hereby given that the Town Clerk will furnish blanks for 
returns of births, to parents, householders, physicians and registered 
hospital officers applying therefor. 

BIRTHS RECORDED 

Date 

1937 Name Parents 

JAN. 

8 Robert Middleton McEvoy Albert W. and Callie (Middleton) 

8 Carole Ann Simpson James E. and Katherine (Clark) 

21 Agnes Josephine Brule Edward J. and Elizabeth L. (Wring) 

29 Lennart W. Leedberg Lennart and Lorraine (Nolin) 

29 Arline Fay Miller Ellswood S. and Margaret (Brown) 

FEB. 

10 David Joseph Jourdian David Joseph and Anna (Veil) 

15 Wendell Denton Luke, Jr Wendell Denton and Grace E. 

(Bridgford) 

21 Nancy Jean Kinney Alden H. and Nellie G. (Snow) 

22 Carl Leslie Mills Leslie and Lorraine (Read) 

23 Joseph Leger Marcotte Alfred and Mary (Gervais) 

25 Frederic Stanton Lawrence, Jr. Frederic S. and Gertrude (Wilson) 

MAR. 

2 Arsenault Edward J. and Jeanette (Tremblay) 

4 Walter Thomas Reil Douglas and Clara (Mills) 

5 Donald Ralph Wyman Earl Curtis and Antoinette (Morrell) 

8 Dorothy Arnold Thomas J. and Lena (Higgins) 

10 Vivian Eva Leo Angelo and Angelina (Zanchi) 

20 Tassios Xenophon and Elizabeth (Bogalis) 

24 Sewell Everett Bowers, Jr Sewell E. and Alice M. (Fisher) 

25 Richard Francis Bell Lester and Lillian (Barnette) 

25 Harold Joseph Verge Harold and Bertha (Robichaud) 

40 



27 Beverley Ann Newman Earl Raymond and Dorothy A. 

(Frye) 
31 Gerald Libby Hardy Frank and Mildred (Libby) 

APR. 

5 Stillborn 

7 Louise Gallagher Charles and Louise (Kennedy) 

8 William Bevan Dunsford, Jr. .. William B. and Doris Y. (Cook) 
11 Rachael Marzette Snow Ralph and Gladys (Brotz) 

15 Marie Jeanne Maureen Chartier Joseph V. and Marie L. J. (Poirier) 

15 Judith Louise Walker Wilfred C. and Marion( Miner) 

15 Edwin Harry Whitney Harry G. and Ellen M. (Lundstrom) 

23 Carole Marie Molloy Richard A. and Mary G. (McCoy) 

23 Glenice Audrey Staveley Glenn A. and Hazel R. (Thompson) 

26 June Elaine Traverse Alfred and Alice (Mclsaac) 

29 Ethel Marlene Clayton Thomas and Mary Alice (Kinney) 

30 Judith Carole Bomil Charles and Rose (Mercier) 

May 

3 Marcia Ethel White Harold and Nilda Vera (Clarry) 

13 Marylyn Menta Bourque Edward F. and Dorothy (Christie) 

19 Mary Elizabeth Blaisdell Andrew I. and Grace E. (Switzer) 

19 Edward McKinley Blood, Jr. ..Edw. M. and Helena (McLaughlin) 

19 Gregory Caron Joseph A. and Veronica (Welch) 

24 Henry James Bishop Fred and Mary L. (McKennedy) 

JUNE 

6 Joyce Charlton Lawrence and Elizabeth (Barnes) 

6 Juanita Charlton Lawrence and Elizabeth (Barnes) 

9 Ronald Joseph Hebert Henry and Myrtle (Freeman) 

9 Nancy Prescott Wright Prescott and Ruth (Dickey) 

14 Joseph William Sullivan William M. and Myrtle (Haywood) 

15 George Herbert Pomerleau ...Joseph and Irma (Mahew) 

30 Walter Fenick, Jr Walter and Evon (Piche) 

JULY 

3 Margaret Mary O'Neil Thomas and Mary (Lavellee) 

3 Patricia Joan Vaipan William and Victoria (OczKowski) 

4 Vincent Paul Marchildon Arthur and Laura (Gendreau) 

7 Deborah McCarty William F. and Katherine (Coughlin) 

14 Ruth Mary Dunigan John and Sara (McGrath) 

29 Omer Leo Desmarais Theophile and Cecile (Marchand) 

31 Stillborn 

AUG. 

13 David Henry Paige Howard E. and Geraldine L. 

(Malloon) 

13 William Jay Vennard Raymond and Mary (McSheehy) 

14 David Anderson Reid Raymond A. and Mildred E. 

(Anderson) 

41 



SEPT. 

8 Joseph William Collopy Joseph and Mary (DeCosta) 

10 Walter Franklin Brown, Jr Walter F. and Priscilla (Barrell) 

12 David Calnan Scobie Harvey and Mary ( ) 

22 Rose Marie Louise Eno Raymond and Emilia (Deschesne) 

OCT. 

5 Beverly Ann Bovill William and Dorothy L. (Humphrey) 

11 Dorothy Gail Baldwin Thomas and Alice (Tilton) 

13 Diana Baron Haberman Emile and Mary (Baron) 

16 William Francis Bisnette William F. and Florence A. (Kreas) 

19 Elizabeth Agnes Fleury Richard E. and Ethel C. (Leslie) 

20 Stillborn 

26 Maureen Margaret McGeown ..Charles and Margaret (McBrearty) 

30 Roger Eugene Pelletier Antoine and Irene M. (Auger) 

NOV. 

4 Rita Marie Ann LaCoy Ernest A. and Marion Ann 

(Sevigny) 

13 Evelyn True Mills William F. and (Gen ) 

14 Randall Charles Hoyle Frank and Catherine (Coffins) 

16 Janet Marie Maybury Orin E. and Alma O. (Manseau) 

19 Zaroulis George and Gloria (Vrouhas) 

22 Stillborn 

DEC. 

1 Nancy Carrie Mellon Theodore and Thelma (Urquhart) 

6 Beatrice Rodrigues Oscar C. and Estelle B. (Porter) 

11 Mary Lucy Curran William and Bertha (Nadeau) 

11 Elaine Kukulski Stanley and Blanche I. (Jabcon) 

13 Paul Joseph Monleon Joseph and Doris Isabelle (LaCoy) 

24 Alice Aldea Patenaude Alfred J. and Mildred Mary 

(Roberts) 



MARRIAGES 

Date Name Residence Birthplace 

JAN. 

1 Armand O. LaHaise Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Elsie J. Bishop Chelmsford, Mass. . . Milford, N. H. 

1 Raymond G. Wright Chelmsford, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

Florence Frances Sousa Chelmsford, Mass. Fall River, Mass. 

3 Walter Brooks Tyngsboro, Mass Lisbon, N. H. 

Pearl C. Wyman Tyngsboro, Mass. Tyngsboro, Mass. 

10 Ernest A. Rawnsley Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Lillian Bilodeau Lawrence, Mass Dracut, Mass. 

42 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

25 Corbet J. Button Nashua, N. H Newfoundland 

Hattie E. (Stark) Salter Nashua, N. H Pepperell, Mass. 

30 Louis B. Bastarache Westford, Mass Canada 

Yvonne L. Betty Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

30 Romeo Cantara Westford, Mass Canada 

Mabel Ora Gagnon Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

30 Frederick W. Cole Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Julia F. Elam Hartford, Conn (Not Given) 

30 Graham A. Giffin Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Barbara L. Putnam Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

FEB. 

4 Joseph John Kelley Watertown, Mass. .. Boston, Mass. 

Cynthia Augusta Curran Chelmsford, Mass. Somerville, Mass. 

6 John Aloysius Kenney Chelmsford New Britian, Conn. 

Mary Loretta Welsh Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

6 Elden S. Morrell Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Florence B. Philbrick Billerica, Mass Plymouth, N. H. 

7 Roger W. McManus Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Rachel E. McAlpine Chelmsford, Mass. . . Concord, N. H. 

11 William J. Caddell Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Eugenia S. Zaberiek Chelmsford, Mass... Dracut, Mass. 

14 Clifton E. MacGregor Dover, N. H Newport, N. H. 

Winnifred M. Gould Dover, N. H Stratford, Vt. 

MAR. 

5 John H. Matteson Chelmsford, .. E. Greenwich, R. I. 

Ruth Emogene Collins Chelmsford, Mass Portland, Me. 

9 Walter E. Jones Chelmsford, Mass.. Concord, Mass. 

Florence W. Stellas Arlington, Mass Canada 

21 Herbert A. Sturtevant Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Helen Elizabeth Knutson Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

APRIL 

7 Currie L. M. DeBow Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Edith Estey Lowell, Mass Washburn, Me. 

10 Anthony Pozinck Chelmsford, Mass Poland 

Ellen (Cenevich) Storkevik . . . Lowell, Mass Poland 

24 Havar P. Peterson Chelmsford, Mass.. Westford, Mass. 

Joyce E. Marinel Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

MAY 

2 Arthur Larkin Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Helen Welch Chelmsford, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

6 Paul Cornwall Chelmsford, Mass. . Brighton, N. S. 

Adelaide Garthe Carlisle, Mass. . . Bernardson, Mass. 

9 Conrad R. Rondeau Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Annette M. Loiselle Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

43 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

15 Sam Houpis Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

Eunice Irene Salter Nashua, N. H Pepperell, Mass. 

16 Edward J. Deputat Chelmsford, Mass. Westford, Mass. 

Jadwiga M. Kondratowicz Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

23 Charles Morton Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Rena L. Shaffar Chelmsford, Mass Elgin, N. B. 

26 Harry F. Parkhurst Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Helen E. Taylor Acton, Mass Acton, Mass. 

28 Howard C. Potter Concord, N. H Concord, N. H. 

Edith C. Potter Concord, N. H Concord, N. H. 

Edith May Ballou Concord, N. H Ware, Mass. 

29 Wilbur B. Cole Amesbury, Mass.. Amesbury, Mass. 

Gabrielle G. Pinette Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

29 Edmond Lagasse Chelmsford, Mass Canada 

Marie Jeanne LaFortune Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

JUNE ' 

3 Chandler Wotton Robinson . . . .Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 
Marion Ruth Dooley Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

5 Willrose J. Donovan Brookline, Mass. .. Marlboro, Mass. 

Ellen Cochrane Brookline, Mass. . . Holyoke, Mass. 

6 Arthur J. DeForge Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Eva A. Johnson .....Chelmsford, Mass.. Westford, Mass. 

12 James P. Cassidy Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Ada P. Mooney Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

16 Andrew Ludger Peterson . ...Chelmsford, Mass. ..Lowell, Mass. 

Frances Marion Ross Melrose, Mass Moncton, N. B. 

19 John Abbott, Jr Chelmsford, Mass Clifton, N. J. 

Elinor Madeline Trask Chelmsford, Mass. Neponsett, Mass. 

19 Russell A. Beauchemin Chelmsford, Mass. . Laconia, N. H. 

Helene M. LaPointe Dracut, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

20 Chester Joseph Chwiecko Chelmsford, Mass. Westford, Mass. 

Stella M. Oczkowski Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

26 George C. Dickey Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Eunice A. Mulgrave Lowell, Mass Boston, Mass. 

26 Robert Elliot Donaldson Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Blanche Evelyn Clough Chelmsford, Mass.. . Wilmont, N. H. 

27 Edward F. Murphy Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Alice Lillian Lantagne Chelmsford, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

27 John Joseph Walsh Watertown, Mass. Watertown, Mass. 

Martha Ethel Linstad ^Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

27 Edward Vincent Whalon Chelmsford ...No. Abington, Mass. 

Elizabeth Anna Waite Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowe4|, Mass. 

27 Adam Zabierek Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Mildred P. Norton Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

29 Henry J. Bugold Nashua, N. H Carleton, P. Q. 

Graciette Duquette Nashua, N. H Canada 

44 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

29 Ernest J. Soucy Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

Irene (Bonefant) Rheaume . . . Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

JULY 

2 Hadley Rhoades Chelmsford, Mass Patten, Me. 

Gladys Crombie Hanover, Conn Dedham, Mass. 

3 Elbert Arthur Haley Tyngsboro, Mass. .. Melrose, Mass. 

Dorothy Frances Putnam Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

3 Raymond E. Ilg Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Florence S. Drake Pielmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

3 Earle G. Page Chelmsford, Mass Groton, Vt. 

Mildred L. Purcell (Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

10 Frederick H. Bell Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Vera M. MacLan £helmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

10 Wilfred Roderick Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Anna (Silva) Reardon Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

11 Raymond A. Chandler Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Marietta McNulty Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

16 Earl J. Watt Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Clara W. Dexter Chelmsford, Mass.. . Woburn, Mass. 

19 Patrick James Cushing Lowell, Mass Ireland 

Gertrude Loretta McTeague . .Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

24 Anthony Zaker Lowell, Mass Boston, Mass. 

Anelia Jascanin Chelmsford, Mass. . Lowell, Mass. 

31 Foster Braga Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Hilda C. Jesus Chelmsford, Mass. ..Lowell, Mass. 

AUG. 

6 Joseph Arpin Chelmsford, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

Pearl Gorton Chelmsford, Mass. . . Hineburg, Vt. 

7 Carl James Holt Andover, Mass Andover, Mass. 

Alice Mary Devan Andover, Mass. . . Weymouth, N. S. 

7 Peter F. McEnaney Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Anna Dougherty Lowell, Mass Oneida, N. Y. 

9 Harry G. Jones Chelmsford, Mass England 

Margaret Elizabeth Carroll ...Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

11 Ernest Hargraves Latham Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Anna Maclvor Lowell, Mass Baddeck, N. S. 

14 James Angus MacGillivray ...Lowell, Mass. . Edinburg, Scotland 

Helen Gertrude Larson Chelmsford .... Manchester, N. H. 

14 Michael Pieslak Chelmsford .... Sioux City, Iowa 

Viola J. Rychwa Tewksbury, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

14 Joseph John Tandus Chelmsford . . . Indian Orch., Mass. 

Rochelle Bellemore Chelmsford St. Pauline, P.Q. 

15 Frank S. Mungovan £helmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Margaret Kelly Lowell, Mass Ireland 

17 William W. Leyden Framingham, Mass. Maynard, Mass. 

Virginia F. Hines Chelmsford, Mass.. Rockland, Mass. 

45 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

23 Edward J. Harrington Stoughton, Mass.. .Stoughton, Mass. 

Marguerite Anastasia Stoughton, Mass. .. Berger, N. J. 

25 Robert Francis Buckley Chelmsford, Mass. . . Lowell, Mass. 

Grace Margaret Madden Springfield, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

SEPT. 

1 Bertram J. Needham New York City Lowell, Mass. 

Myrtle J. Greene Chelmsford, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

4 Chester Stephen Aubrey Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Helen Frances Christoun Chelmsford, Mass. ..Lowell, Mass. 

4 Leo Joseph Shiebler Watertown, Mass. Lawrence, Mass. 

Mary Letitia Wark Watertown, Mass. . Andover, Mass. 

4 Howard Alexander Young Andover, Mass Burlington, Vt. 

Gwendolen Charlotte Bradden. Andover, Mass Boston, Mass. 

5 Charles Vrouhas Chelmsford, Mass. . Lowell, Mass. 

Mary Constantpolous Dracut, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

8 Chester J. Fraser Chelmsford, Mass. Lexington, Mass, 

Marion I. Yeomans Chelmsford, Mass. . . Everett, Mass 

12 Ignatius Greska Chelmsford, Mass. Lawrence, Mass 

Ethel Kotarba Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

12 Eugene Frank Sousa Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Virginia Silva Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass 

26 Charles H. Blaney Nashua, N. H Roxbury, Mass. 

Frances B. (Frink) Boucher ...Nashua, N. H. .. Chelmsford, Mass. 

26 Raymond Merrill Gauthier Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Irene Donovan Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

OCT. 

2 Carl Axel Johnson Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford Mass. 

Rita Hayden Dill West Groton, Mass. . Shelburne, N.H. 

5 Lionel Bushway Chelmsford, Mass... Grand Isle, Vt. 

Ella (Constant) Langlois Chelmsford, Mass.. Holyoke, Mass. 

5 Paul N. Finnegan Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Angele Mary Vercontaire Leominster, Mass. Lowell, Mass. 

10 Gerard J. Grenier Dracut, Mass Dracut, Mass. 

Beatrice M. Ducharme Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford Mass. 

12 Harvey E. Fuller Chelmsford, Mass. ..Lowell, Mass. 

Thelma C. LaRock Lowell, Mass Lowell ,Mass. 

12 Neal J. McGurn Chelmsford, Mass. .. Lowell, Mass. 

Agnes B. Foley Chelmsford, Mass. . So. Boston, Mass. 

23 Edward B. Patrick Nashua, N. H Vilna, Poland 

Helen L. Crowley Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

27 Claude Arthur Harvey Chelmsford, Mass, Dracut, Mass. 

Esther Louise Smith Chelmsford, Mass. . Lowell, Mass. 

27 Lloyd H. Morey Chelmsford, Mass. E. Boston, Mass. 

Mary C. Small Arlington, Mass. ...Caribou, Me. 

31 Roland McEnaney Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford Mass. 

Estelle Miron Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 



46 



Date Name Residence Birthplace 

NOV. 

6 James Henry Meade Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Bertha M. Patenaude Chelmsford, Mass. Chelmsford Mass. 

10 Malcolm MacLeod Tyngsboro, Mass Scotland 

Charlotte L. Hyde Chelmsford, Mass Mattoon, 111. 

11 Vincent Murphy Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Loretta Archibald Chelmsford, Mass. ..Lowell, Mass. 

15 Walter F. Peabody Nashua, N. H Rowley, Mass. 

Irene Latuch Nashua, N. H Nashua, N. H. 

24 Herbert F. Bowen Lowell, Mass Lowell, Mass. 

Sallie Foote Chelmsford, Mass. Haverhill, Mass. 

25 Soter Zaharoolis Somerville, Mass. . . Smyra, Greece 

Mary Theodorakos Chelmsford, Mass Greece 

DEC. 

7 Cyril M. Cronin Chelmsford, Mass.. . Roxbury, Mass. 

Helen G. Mahoney Chelmsford, Mass. Cambridge, Mass. 

16 Charles F. Dalton Andover, Mass... Amesbury, Mass. 

Jean L. Scannell Andover, Mass. .. Andover, Mass. 



DEATHS 



Date Name Years Months Days 

JAN. 

3 George William Day 70 4 

(Husband of Daisy Peavy Day) 

7 Clara Nickles 60 2 

(Wife of Levi H. Nickles) 

9 Tennyson Wendell Simpson 55 7 

(Husband of Bertha Kimball) 

1 1 Nellie Saunders 74 

(Wife of Charles H. Saunders) 

15 Grace E. Whiting 51 5 8 

(Wife of Ralph L. Whiting) 

18 Henry Allard Cormier 7 5 

24 Martha M. Emslie 45 3 23 

(Wife of James C. Emslie) 

27 Prescott Wright 34 7 29 

(Husband of Ruth Dickey) 

28 Ruth Williams 83 14 

(Widow of Thomas P. Williams) 

FEB. 

1 Julia Seymour 88 11 

(Widow of Edward Seymour) 

47 



Date Name Years Months Days 

3 Freda McCann 37 9 11 

(Wife of Joseph McCann) 

4 Eliphalet G. Brown 67 4 14 

(Husband of Emma L. Webster) 

10 Walter E. Goodwin 59 4 18 

(Husband of Mary Helen Ramsay) 

14 John Burne 75 9 1U 

(Husband of Elizabeth E. Bath) 

15 Frank A. Drew 80 

(Husband of Clara J. Curtice) 

17 Josiah Reginald Smith 50 6 17 

(Husband of Elizabeth Newbold) 

18 George F. Fortner 57 

24 Lucia Victoria Harvey 66 11 5 

(Wife of Arthur Warren Harvey) 
27 Louise Annie Lund 63 10 16 

(Widow of John Lund) 



MARCH 

2 Arthur Hindman 54 

(Husband of Lizzie Claffield) 

2 Muriel R. Bartlett 5 5 18 

6 William Driscoll 78 

9 Addie Goodridge .64 

(Wife of Eben Goodridge) 

14 Seldon Elwin Cass 65 11 24 

(Husband of Mary E. Gilmon) 

15 Frank M. MacKay 68 3 23 

(Husband of Elizabeth Nowlin) 

21 Jane Moorehouse 52 9 4 

(Wife of Thomas Moorehouse) 

26 Edward Sidney Yeomans 62 2 2 

(Husband of Margaret Lewis) 

27 Frederick R. Mayo 70 

(Husband of Etta Cryan) 

APR. 

4 Wawrzyn Konicki 79 

(Husband of Franciska Szczepanik) 

5 Stillborn 

13 Rose Hebert 75 

(Wife of Henry B. Hebert) 

14 Eben Goodrige 66 1 4 

(Widower of Addie Upton) 

15 Emma M. Bartlett Dutton 64 7 22 

(Wife of Paul Dutton) 

48 



Date Name Years Months Days 

16 Frank Wade Trask 76 2 17 

(Husband of Chasie Duren) 
23 Frank F. Hindle 92 11 27 

(Husband of Ella Mann) 

26 Rose Carrie Parker 68 9 10 

(Widow of Willard S. Parker) 

MAY 

7 Alexander A. Bengsten 67 

(Husband of (Cannot be learned) 
7 Carole M. Molloy .. 13 

11 Arthur Irving Emerson 77 1 11 

12 Vincent Zabierek 52 1 13 

(Husband of Victoria Konicki) 
16 Emily E. Mann 22 11 5 

(Wife of George W. Mann) 
16 Minnie G. Cruff 72 8 25 

(Widow of Frank Cruff) 

19 Cora Susan Smith 72 6 8 

23 Spiros Vrouhas 48 5 22 

(Husband of Theodora Perlongas) 

27 Benjamin M. White 55 9 3 

JUNE 

5 Harold B. Stewart 45 3 

(Husband of Jessie Atwood) 
7 Albert H. Adams 84 11 13 

(Widower of Julia Perkins) 

7 Bridget Fay 65 

(Widow of William Fay) 

8 Annie Kilburn 85 7 9 

(Widow of James W. Kilburn) 

9 George E. Burns 66 4 21 

(Husband of Blanche Libby) 
9 Charles A. Norton 63 9 29 

(Husband of Effie Fulton) 
10 Belle P. MacLean 58 11 9 

(Wife of Neil MacLean) 
10 Georgia May Queen 71 9 2 

(Widow of Henry Queen) 
18 Ruth B. Bachelder 44 4 9 

(Wife of Henry Bachelder) 
23 Charles E. Guthrie 79 9 1 

(Widower of Hattie F. Conger) 
27 Joseph H. Bridgford 69 1 7 

(Husband of Elizabeth P. Miller) 



49 



Date Name Years Months Days 

JULY 

3 Edmund A. Gaudet 43 4 18 

(Husband of Unable to learn) 

4 Mary Damato 47 

(Wife of Frank Damato) 

4 Emma C. Francis 70 

(Wife of Charles H. Francis) 

9 Melvin A. Paquette 35 9 3 

(Husband of Lillian Corcoran) 

16 Daniel W. Dexter 49 9 23 

(Husband of Lilla M. Pattison) 

19 Mary Ann Dix 86 7 3 

(Wife of R. Wilson Dix) 

22 Nicklas Swanson 75 2 28 

(Husband of Hannah Nelson) 

25 Sarah H. Donovan 73 

(Widow of Frank J. Donovan) 

27 Donald J. Monette 2 6 

31 Stillborn 



AUG. 

3 John Walsh ..72 

(Widow of Bridget Sheridan) 

4 Henri Pierre Hebert 82 2 

(Widower of Rose Chatee) 
4 Napoleon Lavalle 74 7 11 

(Widower of Josephine Provencher) 
16 Margaret Elizabeth Howard 27 5 9 

(Wife of Arthur Wilson Howard Jr.) 
20 Elizabeth Sartosuosso 56 

(Wife of Fred Sartosuosso) 
31 May Belle L. Rhodes 43 4 



SEPT. 

7 Joseph P. Houle 78 

(Widower of Hermina LaRose) 
10 Mark Ingham 71 10 5 

(Husband of Emily Hoyle) 
28 Ida Rebekah Bliss 78 11 27 

(Wife of Royce W. Bliss) 
30 William Smith Hall 84 5 22 

(Widower of Julia Perham) 

50 



Date Name Years 

30 Lucian H. Hauver 72 

(Widower of Lucy H. Marstellone) 

30 Albert B. Puffer 75 

(Widower of Mary A. Harris) 

OCT. 

6 Royal Wilson Dix 87 

(Widower of Mary Marshall) 
6 Joseph Fleming 80 

(Widower of Sarah Rutherford) 
8 William Pearce Bennett 12 

8 Adam F. MacElroy 77 

(Widower of Mary A. MacLean) 
10 Marquis D. Johonson 82 

(Husband of Minnie E. Smith) 
17 Jean Brown 63 

(Wife of William Brown) 

17 Herbert Clifton Sweetser 81 

19 Beverly Ann Bovill 

28 Horace Edmund Clough 20 

30 Pender 

NOV. 

2 Mina Snyder 80 

(Widow of David D. Snyder) 

9 Alfred H. Knapp 72 

(Husband of Zoe Bradley) 

16 Edward C. Wilkins 69 

(Husband of Grace Church) 

18 Helena Louisa Brake) 71 

(Wife of Walter John Brake) 

20 Doris N. Barrows 25 

(Wife of Loring D. Barrows) 
20 Frank L. Chadbourne 82 

(Widower of Elizabeth M. Laughton) 

20 Joseph Maroney 56 

22 Stillborn 

26 Mildred J. Flynn 40 

(Wife of Joseph A. Flynn) 

29 Eli Patenaude 82 

(Widower of Mary Pepin) 

DEC. 

1 Emil R. Lind 47 

(Husband of Annie Johnson) 
8 Ann Elliott 58 

(Wife of William Elliott) 

51 



Months Days 



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1- 17 

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5 24 



Date Name Years Months Days 

10 Isabella M. McAulay 53 1 11 

14 Napoleon Manseau 65 

(Widower of Rosalie Manseau) 
21 Harriet Ann Simpson 55 3 18 

(Widow of James Albert Simpson) 

23 Anthony Neves 51 

(Husband of Laura Prada) 

24 Ada Reedy 27 

(Wife of Albert Reedy) 

25 Helen M. Larkin 3 8 

27 Mary J. Degnan 67 

(Widow of Michael Degnan) 

30 Angela L. McCabe 70 

31 George F. Cutler 79 4 12 

(Widower of Ellen M. Conroy) 



52 



JURY LIST FOR THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

Adams, George C, Machinst, Wightman St., N. Chelmsford. 
Alcorn, James, Farmer, Hunt Road, S. Chelmsford. 
Ballinger, William, Retired, Cottage Row, N. Chelmsford. 
Barron, William, Foreman, Highland Ave., N. Chelmsford. 
Bartlett, Charles E., Retired, Bartlett St. Chelmsford. 
Blomgren, Sigurd, Salesman, Mallock Rd., E. Chelmsford. 

(1) Bean, Minot A., Real Estate, Stedman St., Chelmsford. 

(2) Brown, William, Clerk, Newfield St., N. Chelmsford. 
Brooks, John O., Laborer, Evergreen St., Chelmsford. 
Coburn, Frank A. P., Merchant, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 

(3) Coalter, Samuel, Laborer, Quigley Ave., N. Chelmsford. 
Dow, John C, Machinist, Gorham St., E. Chelmsford. 
Doyle, Michael, Fireman, Mt. Pleasant St., N. Chelmsford. 
Devine, Charles F., Farmer, Carlisle St., E. Chelmsford. 
Clark, John T., Student, Riverneck Rd., E. Chelmsford. 
Edwards, A. Franklin, Foreman, Main St., W. Chelmsford. 
Fields, LaForest, Common Victualler, Boston Rd., Chelmsford. 
Fallon, Joseph T., Laborer, North Rd., No. Chelmsford. 
Finnick, Charles, Farmer, Gorham Street, E. Chelmsford. 
Fletcher, Fred L., Farmer, Westford Rd., Chelmsford. 
Flynn, Patrick J., Farmer, Westford Rd., Chelmsford. 
Gorham, Alfred E., Mechanic, Bridge St., Chelmsford. 
Hoelzel, Charles E., Operator, Washington St., N. Chelmsford. 
Fairburn, Edmund, Farmer, Gorham St., E. Chelmsford. 
Johnson, John G., Tailor, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Kiberd, James Sr., Painter, Newfield St., No. Chelmsford. 

(4) Kirkeby, Martin L., Poultryman, North Rd., Chelmsford. 
Lupien, Frank J., Adm., Westford Rd., Chelmsford. 
Machon, Josiah, Laborer, Dunstable Rd., N. Chelmsford. 
Mcintosh, George A., Mechanic, Subway Ave., Chelmsford. 

(5) McElroy, Grant, Filling Sta., Billerica St., Chelmsford. 

(6) Osborn, Viranus C, Retired, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Petterson, Birger, Poultryman, Carlisle St., E. Chelmsford. 
Parker, John F., Retired, Proctor Rd., S. Chelmsford. 
Picken, William T., Printer, Middlesex St., No. Chelmsford. 
Perham, Walter, Manufacturer, Westford St., Chelmsford. 
Queen, Clifford, Laborer, Newfield St., No. Chelmsford. 

(7) Quinn, Henry G., Retired, Gorham St., E. Chelmsford. 
Riney, M. Edward, Real Estate, School St., W. Chelmsford. 
Scobie, Herbert, Chauffeur, Riverneck Rd., E. Chelmsford. 
Shaw, Harry, Laborer, Westland Ave., Chelmsford. 
Shedd, Harry, Sr., Retired, Boston Rd., Chelmsford. 
Stopherd, Albert, Retired, Middlesex St., N. Chelmsford. 
Stewart, Harold W., Moulder, Sherman St., N. Chelmsford. 

53 



Symmes, Willard, Merchant, High St., Chelmsford. 

(8) Sweetser, Hosmer W., Merchant, Chelmsford St., Chelmsford. 
Tucke, Edward, Retired, Grosvenor St., N. Chelmsford. 

Vinal, Fred I., Carpenter, Wright St., No. Chelmsford. 
Waite, George L., Farmer, Proctor Rd., S. Chelmsford. 
Whitney, Frank H., Retired, Maple Rd., S. Chelmsford. 
Whitton, Fred, Laborer, Westford Rd., Chelmsford. 
Wright, Warren, Assessor, Robin Hill Rd., S. Chelmsford. 

(9) L'Herault, Octave, Retired, Dunstable Rd., N. Chelmsford. 

Jurors drawn (1) Dec. 17, 1937 

Jurors drawn (2) Mar. 15, 1937 

Jurors drawn (3) Sept. 15, 1937 

Jurors drawn (4) Aug. 16, 1937 

Jurors drawn (5) Oct. 11, 1937 

Jurors drawn (6) Mar. 31, 1937 

Jurors drawn (7) Mar. 15, 1937 

Jurors drawn (8) Apr. 15, 1937 

Jurors drawn (9) Dec. 15, 1937 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 
Town Clerk, Chelmsford, Mass. 



54 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FOR THE YEAR 1937 



On monies handled for Town, State and County) 

DOG LINCENSES 
(Dec. 1 to Dec 1) 

Male dogs 430 

Female 84 

Female spayed 70 



584 



RECEIPTS 



Birth certificates $ .50 

Marriage licenses 158.00 

Recording fees 213.35 

Certificates of registration (gasoline) 11.00 

Death certificates 1.00 

Junk licenses 52.50 

Auctioneers licenses 4.00 

Fish and Game Licenses (Sporting) 819.00 

Dog Licenses 1,420.00 



$2,679.35 

PAID OUT 

Birth certificates $ .50 

Marriage licenses 158.00 

Recording Fees 213.35 

Certificates of registration (gasoline) 11.00 

Death certificates 1.00 

Junk licenses 52.50 

Auctioneers licenses 4.00 

Fish and Game licenses (Sporting) 728.75 

Fish and Game licenses feets 90.25 

Dog licenses 1,303.20 

Dog license fees 116.80 



$2,679.35 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 
Dec. 31, 1937 Town Clerk. 

55 



TOWN TREASURER'S REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31st, 1937 

Balance on hand January 1, 1937 $ 331.12 

Receipts for the year 1937 435,905.86 

$436,236.98 
Payments on 78 warrants as approved by the 

Board of Selectmen and Town Account $435,976.64 

Balance on hand December 31, 1937 260.34 

$436,236.98 

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance on hand December 31, 1937: 

Appleton National Bank, Lowell, Mass $ 7,901.56 

Union Old Lowell Ntional Bank, Lowell, Mass 100.00 

The Second National Bank, Boston, Mass 100.00 

Cash in office 2,403.86 

$ 10,505.42 

Checks outstanding December 31, 1937 $ 10,245.08 

Balance on hand December 31, 1937 260.34 



$ 10,505.42 

The large amount of outstanding checks is caused by reason of a 
warrant being issued on December 31, 1937, and consequently the checks 
issued for payment of these accounts could not be cancelled in Decem- 
ber, 1937. 

The Treasurer's books of accounts are always open for public in- 
spection to any citizen of Chelmsford, if any information is desired the 
Treasurer will be glad to assist any person in the matter. 

The classification of the receipts and expenditures will be found un- 
der the Town Accountant's report. 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 
Dec. 31, 1937 Town Treasurer. 



56 






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REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR 

For the Year Ending December 31st, 1937 

I herewith submit my annual report as Tax Collector for the Town 
of Chelmsford for the year ending December 31st, 1937. 

Any question regard the assessment of taxes should be presented 
to the local Board of Assessors, who hold their regular meeting the first 
Wednesday of each month at their office in the Chelmsford Centre 
Town Hall. 

TAXES OF 1937 

As committed by the Board of Assessors : 

Poll taxes . .■ $ 4,504.00 

Poll taxes committed in December 1937 42.00 

$ 4,546.00 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 3,858.00 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 110.00 

Uncollected January 1st, 1938 578.00 

$ 4,546.00 
As committed by the Board of Assessors : 

Personal taxes $ 17,212.78 

Personal taxes committed in December 1937 278.55 

$ 17,491.33 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 15,452.37 

Abated bythe Board of Assessors 6.75 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 2,032.21 

$ 17,491.33 
As committeed by the Board of Assessors : 

Real Estate taxes $181,729.25 

Real Estate taxes committed in December 168.87 

Abated after payment 446.70 

$182,344.82 

Cash paid Treasurer $120,475.24 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 1,054.26 

Payment to be refunded 27.63 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 60,787.69 

$182,344.82 
70 



Total 1937 taxes committed $203,935.45 

Total abatements after payment 446.70 



Total cash paid Treasurer $139,785.61 

Total abatements by Assessors 1,171.01 

Total to be refunded after payment 27.63 

Total uncollected January 1, 1938 63,397.90 



TAXES OF 1936 

Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 75,183.69 

December 1936, commitment made in 1937 193.27 

Refunds after payment 8.38 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 49,931.61 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 501.41 

Added to tax title account 5,140.48 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 19,811.84 



TAXES OF 1935 

Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 25,705.08 

Refund after payment 2.00 

Overpaid 17.57 



Cash paid Treasurer $ 19,756.64 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 395.17 

Tax titles 5,529.65 

Adjustment of error in 1936 report 43.19 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 
TAX OF 1937 

As committed by the Board of Assessors : 

April 23 1937 $ 4,398.61 

May 20, 1937 3,178.99 

July 31, 1937 6,480.50 

Sept. 21, 1937 1,109.46 



71 



$204,382.15 



$204,382.15 



$ 75,385.34 



$ 75,385.34 



$ 25,724.65 



$ 25,724.65 



December 22, 1937 927.28 

Refunds after payment 824.30 



Cash paid Treasurer $ 13,407.39 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 862.57 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 2,649.18 



$ 16,919.14 



$ 16,919.14 



TAX OF 1936 

Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 2,067.50 

Committed by the Board of Assessors Feb. 8, 1937 281.38 

Refunds after payment 101.76 



Cash paid Treasurer $ 1,871.93 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 293.84 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 284.87 



$ 2,450.64 



$ 2,450.64 



TAX OF 1935 

Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 192.04 

Refunds after payment 11.03 

Overpaid 12.58 



$ 215.65 



Cash paid Treasurer $ 136.94 

Abated by the Board of Assessors 78.71 



$ 215.65 



INTEREST AND COSTS 
Interest and Costs $ 3,874.47 



Interest: 

Levy of 1937 $ 66.96 

Levy of 1936 1,709.18 

Levy of 1935 1,647.48 

Excise tax, levy of 1937 80.53 

Excise tax, levy of 1936 59.64 

Excise tax, levy of 1935 15.93 



$ 3,874.47 



$ 3,579.72 
72 



Costs : 

Levy of 1937 102.90 

Levy of 1936 112.35 

Levy of 1935 79.50 

$ 294.75 $ 3,874.47 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 
Dec. 31, 1937 Collector. 

NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

TAXES OF 1937 

As committed by the Assessors : 

Personal tax $ 129.75 

Real Estate tax 1,463.35 

$ 1,593.10 

Cash, paid Treasurer $ 961.80 

Nov. and Dec. collections due Treasurer 228.84 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 402.46 

$ 1,593.10 

TAXES 1936 
Uncollected Jan. 1937 $ 411.48 

$ 411.48 

Cash paid Treasurer $ 236.95 

Collected and due Treas. Nov. & Dec 39.46 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 135.07 

$ 411.48 
Dec. 1937 collections due Treasurer $ 51.67 

$ 51.67 
Dec. 1937 collections paid treasurer $ 51.67 

$ 51.67 

TAXES 1935 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $ 140.49 

Overpaid 9.09 

$ 149.58 

73 



Cash paid Treasurer $ 132.31 

Dec. collections due Treasurer 2.72 

Abated by Assessors 14.55 

$ 149.58 
Dec. 1937 collections due Treasurer $ 6.46 

$ 6.46 

Dec. 1937 collections paid Treasurer $ 6.46 

$ 6.46 

TAXES 1934 

Dec. 1936 collections due Treasurer $ 6.38 

$ 6.38 

Dec. 1936 collections paid Treasurer $ 6.38 

$ 6.38 

Interest $ 21.48 

$ 21.48 

Interest paid Treasurer $ 19.40 

Dec. 1937 collections due Treasurer 2.08 

$ 21.48 
1936 Dec. collections due Treasurer $ 1.84 

$ 1.84 

1936 Dec. collections paid treasurer $ 1.84 

$ 1.84 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Collector. 

EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

TAXES OF 1937 

As committed by Assessors : 

Personal taxes $ 121.01 

Real Estate taxes 2,269.86 

$ 2,390.87 

74 



Paid Treasurer cash $ 1,306.54 

Nov. and Dec collections due Treasurer 328.65 

Abated by Assessors 3.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1938 752.68 

$ 2,390.87 

TAXES OF 1936 
Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 827.95 

$ 827.95 

Paid Treasurer cash $ 558.95 

Nov. and Dec. collections due Treasurer 36.37 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 232.63 

$ 827.95 
Dec. 1936 collections due Treasurer $ 181.97 

$ 181.97 
Dec. 1936 collections paid Treasurer $ 181.97 

$ 181.97 
TAXES OF 1935 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1937 $ 274.19 

Overpaid 1.00 

$ 275.19 

Paid Treasurer cash $ 225.37 

Abated by Assessors 49.82 

$ 275.19 
Dec. 1936 collections due Treasurer $ 10.31 

$ 10.31 
Dec. 1936 collections paid Treasurer $ 10.31 

$ 10.31 

INTEREST 

Interest $ 42.95 

$ 42.95 

Paid Treasurer cash $ 39.81 

Nov. and Dec. collections due Treasurer 3.14 

$ 42.95 

75 



Dec. 1936 interest due Treasurer 2.33 

$ 2.33 

Dec. 1936 interest collections paid Treasurer ... $ 2.33 

$ 2.33 

HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 
Dec. 31, 1937 Collector. 

SOUTH CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

TAXES 1937 

As committed by Assessors : 

Personal taxes $ 124.64 

Real Estate taxes 833.10 

$ 957.74 

Paid Treasurer cash $ 402.48 

Nov. and Dec. collections due Treasurer 192.62 

Uncollected January 1, 1938 362.64 

$ 957.74 
TAXES 1936 
Uncollected January 1, 1937 $ 319.19 

$ 319.19 
Paid Treasurer cash $ 319.19 

$ 319.19 
INTEREST 

Interest $ 12.39 

$ 12.39 

Paid Treasurer cash 12.26 

Nov. and Dec. collections due Treasurer .13 

— i 1 

$ 12.39 
HAROLD C. PETTERSON, 

Dec. 31, 1937 Collector. 



76 



REPORT OF THE CHELMSFORD W. P. A. FOR 1937 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford Massachusetts 

Honorable Sirs : 

As Sponsor's Agent for the Town of Chelmsford I hereby submit 
my report to you and the citizens of Chelmsford showing projects un- 
dertaken by the W. P. A. during the year 1937. 

The number of persons employed under the W. P. A. during the 
year varied to a very great extent. 

In the month of February 1937 we had on the W. P. A. payrolls 217 
persons 186 males and 31 females on the sewing project. 

At the approach of the spring and summer months that number 

was decreased to 117 due to the fact that industry and other forms of 

seasonal employment absorbed 100 persons bringing our total number 
down to 117. 

During the month of June came the great curtailment in the num- 
ber of persons to be employed on the W. P. A., and during that month 
our quota was reduced to 35 males and 15 females on the sewing pro- 
ject. 

That number remained the same until Dec. 1937, and during that 
month our quota started to increase and at the present time we have 
on the W. P. A. payrolls 63 on manual project 13 on the sewing project 
1 on the historical survey project and 5 on our town survey project a 
total of 82 persons. 

The projects started in 1937 were as follows, some were completed 
and others are still under the process of construction. 

OUR TOWN SURVEY PROJECT was completed as far as the town 
roads, bodies of water, railroads, cemeteries, public buildings and parks 
are concerned. In December a new survey was started, and the scope 
of this project will be to make a general survey of private property 
which will include registering of deeds and indexing public records which 
will be of great assistance to the Assessors in determining the tax rate. 

77 



OUR TOWN INFIRMARY PROJECT included repairing and 
painting of cattle barn and tool shed, which included taking off old 
clapboards and replacing with new. 

Repairing cupola, milk shed, replacing old wooden gutters with metal 
gutters, re-shingling of south side of barn and painting the new work 
3 coats and the old 2 coats. 

OUR WESTLANDS SCHOOL PLAYGROUND PROJECT was 
one of our outstanding project. 

This project consisted of building a regulation infield one of the 
best in New England. A water pipe was laid from the school building 
to the bleachers on the first base line so that the diamond can be 
watered at anytime. 

Four 16 ft. sections of bleachers were erected. The material being 
donated by the P. T. A. of the Westland and many thanks to therm 

A regulation backstop was erected. The tennis court rebuilt, and 
the entire field was loamed to the depth of 4 in. rolled and seeded. This 
playground is greatly appreciated by the people who live in that com- 
munity as they are very loyal to their baseball team. 

OUR SEWING PROJECT is at present furnishing employment 
to 13 women. Their temporary quarters are at the American Legion 
quarters. It is giving employment to women who might encounter great 
difficulty in securing employment elsewhere. The fruits of their labor 
are enjoyed by the many needy in our town as well as other towns. 

OUR PROJECT for repairing the fire houses in East Chelmsford, 
South Chelmsford and the Center consisted of tearing up of old wooden 
floor in Center fire house and replacing with cement floor, building a 
wooden partition between house where fire truck is housed and where 
the old ladder truck was kept. New electric wiring was installed and 
building was painted inside and out. 

At South Chelmsford 25 broken and cracked lights of glass were 
replaced. Windows were painted 2 coats inside and out and the doors 
were also painted 2 coats. A 2 way switch was installed in the engine 
room. 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND PROJECT consisted of erecting over 
backstop frame 480 L. F. erected the year before 2880 sq. ft. of wire and 
painting the same. 44 cu. yds. of clay were spread to finish the tennis 
courts. 200 cu. yds. of loam were spread 4 inches deep along first and 
third base line, rolled and seeded. Undesirable trees were cut down 
along Adams St. the grade cut down in an area 60x13 ft., seeded and 
rolled. 

78 



FARM TO MARKET ROADS SCHEDULE A. 

Approximately one and one-sixth miles of road was widened, 
straightened, graveled and oiled on the Riverneck Rd. The grade of the 
road was raised to an average of 18 inches along the meadow on both 
sides of this road. The old wooden bridge and culvert were replaced 
by 2 lines of 4 ft. x 24 ft. culvert pipe laid side by side to take care of 
the flow of water that formerly went under the old bridge. 

On the Locke Rd. approximately 2000 feet of road was widened, 
graveled and oiled. 

We also have a group of Farm to Market Roads under schedule B. 
that takes in the Graniteville Rd., Fairview Rd., upper end of Locke Rd , 
Twiss Rd. and Ledge Rd. operated as a local Farm to Market Rds. 
Work has already begun on the Fairview Rd. 

OUR MOTH PROJECT was started in the spring of 1937. It in- 
cluded an infected area along the Boston Rd., Littleton St. to Westford 
Rd. bordering along town lines of Billerica, Carlisle, and Westford. This 
area was heavily infested with brown tail and gypsy moths that were 
rapidly destroying the trees in those respective areas. The brown tails 
were cut and burned and the gypsies creasoted and destroyed. 

We are now operating a new moth project which includes approx- 
imately 100 miles of roads including Fairview Rd., Smith Ave., Steadman 
St., Westford St., Boston Rd. to Billerica line, and northeasterly to 
Lowell City line. The tent caterpillars are to be cut and burned and also 
the brush along those highways. The gypsies to be cresoted and the 
brown tail and tent caterpillars to be sprayed at the proper time. 

THE EAST CHELMSFORD SCHOOL PLAYGROUND PRO- 
JECT is by far the hardest project that we have yet undertaken. Ap- 
proximately 7000 cu. yds. of earth an rock have been moved. Up to the 
present time approximately 300 cu. yds. of rock and boulders have been 
blasted and moved to fill in the low areas on this field. 

To make this field level it necessitated filling a depression 15 ft. 
deep for a distance of about 125 ft. Trees had to be cut and removed 
and brush cut and burned to make room, for the playing field. 

Approximately 1400 cu yds. of loam was saved from top of field put 
in piles to be used in grading field when completed. 

The field is to be sloped down to edge of the hard surface of Carlisle 
Street. 

There are approximately 4000 cu. yds. of rock and earth to move 
before the field is brought down to the desired level. 

79 



When the excavating is completed the entire field loamed fertilized, 
seeded and rolled. A fence along Carlisle St. erected, regulation back 
stop erected it will be one of the finest playgrounds in the Town of 
Chelmsford. It comprizes about 2^ acres. 

This project has been temporarily suspended until the new sup- 
plementary project has been approved for the completion of the project. 

THE NORTH CHELMSFORD WATER DIST. PROJECT con- 
sisted in setting out 3000 pine seedlings, arbor vetal trees and general 
beautification of property belonging to the North Chelmsford Fire Dis- 
The Fire Dist. furnished and paid for all the material used in operating 
the project. 

THE LOCUST RD. PROJECT consisted of widening, straightening 
and draining from Byam Rd. down to High St. In order to eliminate 
a bad curve in the road Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Dutton deeded to the Town 
a strip of land so that a wall could be pushed back for a distance of ap- 
proximately 120 ft. and about 15 ft. back at the narrowest point. 

OUR TOWN HALL PROJECT is one of the outstanding projects 
undertaken by the town since the work relief programs started. The 
hall is being completely remodeled. A new automatic heating system, 
and, new electric wiring throughout the building. 

Space will not permit my going into all the details, but the hall will 
soon be open for inspection to all the citizens of the town, and they will 
have every reason to be proud of their Town Hall. 

I wish at this time to present to you and the citizens of Chelmsford 
some very significant figures pertaining to the amount of money that the 
Federal Government contributed to the Town of Chelmsford in wages. 

The amount of money earned by the people who live in the Town of 
Chelmsford and employed on the local town project received in wages 
the sum of $51548.57. On the State wide Projects which included side- 
walks and general road beautification they received approximately 
$24402.43 making a total of $75950.00 that the people in the Town of 
Chelmsford received in wages during the year 1937. 

Had it not been for general curtailment that took place during the 
month of June, the W. P. A. workers in Chelmsford would have received 
in wages approximately $100,000.00. 

The Town of Chelmsford appropriated for W. P. A. activities for the 
year 1937 the sum of $8295.00. That sum was originally intended to 
carry on until Sept. 1, 1938 but the number of workers left on the pay- 
rolls after August was so small that we could not open up any new r 
projects so that that sum appropriated carried us through the entire 
year. 

80 



In figuring out the percentage of money spent by the town compared 
to the amount contributed by the Federal Government one can readily 
see that it is relatively small. In other words the town's share was 
approximately 11 per cent and the government 89 per cent. 

At the present time we have 9 different projects that have already 
been approved and can be put into operation during 1938 providing the 
town will raise the money for the material. The Board of Selectmen 
have already chosen several worth while projects to be started during 
the ensuing year. 

I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, department heads, and 
Town Officials who co-operated so willingly to make the operation of 
our projects a success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. J. LUPIEN, 

Sponsor's Agent. 



81 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Citizens oi the Town of Chelmsford : 

We submit, herewith, our report for the year ending January 31, 
1937: 

Our regular meeting time takes place on the first Wednesday of each 
month between 2 :00 and 4 :00 P. M. 

VALUE OF ASSESSED PROPERTY BEFORE 
DECEMBER ASSESSMENTS 

Value of buildings, excluding land $4,375,370.00 

Value of land, excluding buildings 1,544,015.00 

Total value of Real Estate $5,919,385.00 

Value of Tangible Personal Estate 560,670.00 

Total value of Real and Personal Estate 

before December Assessments $6,480,055.00 

VALUE OF ASSESSED PROPERTY, DECEMBER ASSESSMENTS 

Value of buildings, excluding land $ 2,950.00 

Value of land, excluding buildings 2,550.00 

Total value of Real Estate $ 5,500.00 

Value of Tangible Personal Estate 9,075.00 

Total value of Real and Personal Estate 

December Assessments $ 14,575.00 

VALUE OF ALL ASSESSED PROPERTY, EXCEPTING 
AUTOMIBILES, IN THE YEAR OF 1937 

Value of buildings, excluding land $4,378,320.00 

Value of land, excluding buildings 1,546,565.00 

Total value of Real Estate $5,924,885.00 

Value of Tangible Personal Estate 569,745.00 

Total value of all Assessed Property in 

the year of 1937 $6,494,630 00 

82 



TAXES COMMITTED TO COLLECTOR OF 1937, 
BEFORE DECEMBER ASSESSMENTS 

Tax on Real Estate $181,729.25 

Tax on Personal Estate 17,212.78 

Tax on Polls, 2252 @ $2.00 4,504.00 

Total $203,446.03 

TAXES COMMITTED TO COLLECTOR, LEVY OF 1937, 
DECEMBER ASSESSMENTS 

Tax on Real Estate 168.87 

Tax on Personal Estate 278.55 

Tax on Polls, 21 @ $2.00 each 42.00 

Total $ 489.42 

ALL TAXES, EXCEPTING AUTOMOBILE EXCISE, 
TO COLLECTOR, LEVY OF 1937 

Tax on Real Estate $181,898.12 

Tax on Personal Estate 17,491.33 

Tax on Polls, 2273 @ $2.00 each 4,546.00 



Total of all Real Estate, Personal, and Poll 

Taxes committed to Collector in 1937 .... $203,935.45 

1937 RECAPITULATION 

Tax Rate $30.70 per $1,000.00 

Town Appropriations 

(a) to be raised by taxation $267,385.93 

(b) to be taken from available funds 10,218.60 

Overlay deficit 1932 45.79 

Overlay deficit 1933 35.20 

Overlay deficit 1934 33.00 

State Assessments of 1937 

(a) State Tax 12,765.00 

(b) Auditing Municipal Accounts 702.09 

(c) Hospital or Home Care for Civil War 

Veterans 360.00 

(d) State Parks and Reservations 152.84 

Maturing Debt 11,166.00 

Interest on Debt 1,738.24 

Interest on Temporary Loans 500.00 

County Assessments for 1937, County Tax 11,280.89 

Overlay of Current Year 1,726.68 

Total $318,110.26 

83 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income Tax $ 27,718.06 

Corporation Taxes 18,046.91 

Motor Vehicle Excise 12,689.00 

Licenses 3,151.00 

Fines 325.00 

General Government 2,218.00 

Protection of Persons and Property 242.00 

Health and Sanitation 165.00 

Highways 55.00 

Charities 9,835.00 

Old Age Assistance 8,127.00 

Soldiers Benefits 284.00 

Schools 4,660.00 

Libraries 100.00 

Hospital or Home Care for Civil War Veterans, 

1936 Overestimated 24.60 

State Parks arid Reservations, 1936 Overestimated 29.06 

Interest on Taxes and Assessments 5,244.00 

Aid to Industrial Schools 1,397.00 

Veterans Exemptions 135.00 

Total Estimated Receipts $ 94,445.63 

Available Funds Voted by Town Meeting From 

Overlay Reserve for Emergency 4,738.65 

Flood Relief 

From Surplus War Bonus Fund 3,104.95 

From Sales of Real Estate 1,875.00 

From Sale of Cemetery Lots 500.00 

Free Cash as Approved by Tax 

Commissioner 10,000.00 

Total $ 20,218.60 

Total Deductions $114,664.23 



Net Amount to be raised on Polls and Property . . $203,446.03 

Number of Polls 2252 @ $2.00 each 4,504.00 

Total valuation $6,480,055.00 Tax Rate $30.70, 

Property Tax 198,937.69 

Gain through fractional divisions of tax rate 4.34 



Total amount of all taxes in the Collector's com- 
mitment list for the year of 1937 $203,446.03 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE, TAX OF 1937, COMMITTED 
TO COLLECTOR IN 1937 

Number of vehicles assessed 2591 

Total value of vehicles assessed $561,720.00 

84 



Tax committed to Collector 16,094.84 

Excise rate, $34.62 in year 1937 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE, TAX OF 1936, COMMITTED 
TO COLLECTOR IN 1937 

Number of vehicles assessed 118 

Total value of vehicles assessed $ 37,950.00 

Tax committed to Collector 281.38 

Excise rate, $33.38 per $1000.00, in year of 1936 

Number of persons, partnerships, and corporations 

assessed on Real Estate 2,317 

Number of persons, partnership, and corporations 

assessed on Personal Estate 471 

Number of Polls assessed 2,273 

Number of Horses assessed 133 

Number of Cows assessed 679 

Number of Sheep assessed 13 

Number of Neat Cattle other than cows assessed 144 

Number of Swine assessed 161 

Number of Fowl assessed 32,280 

Number of Dwelling Houses assessed 1,949 

Number of Acres of Land assessed 13,465 

FIRE AND WATER DISTRICT TAXES 

EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

Value of Real Estate $453,885.00 

Value of Personal Estate 24,185.00 

Total value of assessed Estate $478,070.00 

Tax on Real Estate 2,269.86 

Tax on Personal Estate 121.01 

Total Tax committed to Collector, Levy of 1937 2,390.87 

Amount to be raised as notified by Clerk of East 

Chelmsford Water District 2,367.817 

Overlay of current year 23.00 

Total 2,390.87 

Tax Rate $5.00 per $1,000.00 

NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT 

Value of Real Estate $1,720,865.00 

Value of Personal Estate 152,545.00 

Total Value of Assessed Estate $1,873,410.00 

85 



Tax on Real Estate 1,463.35 

Tax on Personal Estate 129.75 

Total tax for the year of 1937 1,593.10 

Amount to be raised as notified by Clerk of 

North Chelmsford Fire District 1,500.00 

Overlay of current year 93.10 

Total 1,593.10 

Tax Rate, $0.85 per $1,000.00 

SOUTH CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

Value of Real Estate $166,595.00 

Value of Personal Estate 24,920.00 

Total value of Assessed Estate $191,515.00 

Tax on Real Estate 833.10 

Tax on Personal Estate 124.64 

Total tax for the year of 1937 957.74 

Amount to be raised as notified by Clerk of South 

Chelmsford Water District 900.00 

Overlay of current year 57.74 

Total 957.74 

Tax Rate, $5.00 per $1,000.00 

WARREN WRIGHT, Chairman 

CARL A. E. PETERSON, 

WALTER JEWETT, 

Assessors for the Town of Chelmsford. 



86 



REPORT OF WELFARE AGENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the report of the Department of Public Welfare 
for the year 1937. 

During the past year the cost of relief soared to a new high mark. 
This was not looked for,in fact a reduction was expected at the begin- 
ning of the year and the appropriation was reduced with this in mind. 

The first half of the year proved to be fairly normal and the cost 
was running close to expectations; but on July 1, 1937 THE W. P. A. 
CUT THE WORKING QUOTA OF THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
OVER ONE-HALF OR EXACTLY 59 per cent. Included in this 
reduction were all aliens, men who were over 65 years of age and non- 
producers such as semi-crippled and disabled men who were employed 
as water-boys and timekeepers. 

As a result of this tremendous lay-off our relief rolls were greatly 
increased from July to the end of the year. In addition to this came the 
overwhelming slump in private industry which included our two major 
textile factories, also the quarries with the exception of one. 

It is a matter of opinion as to the relative merit or demerit of the 
Federal WPA, but this much is certain — unless the town receives liberal 
consideration from this work relief program it means an increase in 
welfare costs which is an increase on our tax rate. 

The following account for the year 1937 is given month by month 
on Outside Relief, Old Age Assistance and Aid for Dependent Children : 

WELFARE 

No. of No. of No. of 

Families Persons Single Cases 

January 65 293 10 

February 66 309 8 

March 57 246 7 

April .....47 194 7 

May 37 173 7 

June 37 173 6 

July 44 193 6 

August 55 216 6 

September 51 198 5 

October 57 236 6 

87 



November 77 

December 93 



318 
385 



10 
12 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 



No. of Cases added 
from Prev. Mos. 

Jaunary 6 

February 8 

March 4 

April 7 

May 1 

June 6 

July 7 

August 6 

September 7 

October . . . .' 1 

November 8 

December 7 



No. of Cases 


Net No. of 


Closed during 


Cases Rec. 


Month 


During Mo 


3 


118 


3 


123 


1 


126 


2 


131 


4 


128 


5 


129 


2 


134 


2 


138 


3 


142 


3 


140 


3 


145 


2 


150 



68 



33 



AID FOR DEPENDENT CHILDREN 



No. of Cases added 
from Prev. Mos. 

January 1 

February 

March 2 

April 1 

May 

June 1 

July 

August 

September 1 

October 

November 

December 1 



No. of Cases 


Net No. of 


Closed during 


Cases 


Rec. 


Month 


During Mo 







4 







4 







6 







7 


1 




6 







7 







7 







7 







8 







8 







8 







9 



The total cost of relief INCLUDING all Federal Grants was as fol- 
lows : 

Outside Relief $ 25,363.88 

Old Age Assistance $ 21,842.28 

Fed. Grants OAA 18,187.58 40,029.86 



88 



Aid for Dep. Children 3,703.49 

Fed. Grants A. D. C 1,034.00 4,737.49 



$ 70,131.23 

The reimbursements which the Town Treasurer received during 
1937 are as follows : 

Relief $ 13,934.94 

Old Age Assist 8,883.51 

A. D. C 152.35 

Totals $ 22,970.80 

This total represents what goes into the general treasury of the 
town and which can be applied as part of the estimated receipts for the 
coming year. 

Insofar as the outlook for 1938 regarding welfare costs, who can tell ? 
When all indications pointed to a new era of business recovery at the 
beginning of last year and the last half proved to be anything but that, 
it is difficult to forecast what the future has in store. 

I wish to thank the citizens of the town for their whole hearted co- 
operation which they gave me during the past year. I wish to especially 
commend the Board of Public Welfare who worked so diligently and 
unselffishly many times into the small hours of the morning in the proper 
discharge of their duties. We also received a tremendous amount of 
assistance from the various agencies of the Lowell Community Chest, 
viz : the Catholic Charitable Bureau, the Lowell Social Service League, 
and the Red Cross. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEONARD S. MacELROY, 

Agent. 



89 



BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Board of Fire Engineers is respectfully 
submitted: 

The Board is organized as follows : 

Harry L. Shedd Chief 

John W. Dixon Ass't. Chief 

John M. Kemp Ass't Chief 

with the latter serving as Clerk of the Board. 

The Board appointed the following : 

District Chiefs : 

Wilhelm T. Johnson District No. 1 

Joseph D. Ryan District No. 2 

Walter Edwards District No. 3 

Henry G. Quinn District No. 4 

Charles House District No. 5 

The morale and efficiency of the Department has been maintained 
at the high standard of past years and the Men of the Department have 
responded to every suggestions with loyal co-operation this making an 
organization able to cope with any emergency. 

The apparatus Equipment and quarters have been kepf in first class 
condition. 

The fire Houses at the East and South villages have had extensive 
needed repairs with the aid of W. P. A. labor and are in splendid con- 
dition. Water has been put in at the South Village and the Fire House 
now is equipped with running water. 

In the collapse of a sand bank off the Mill Road in which three men 
were trapped the men of the Centre Company rendered valiant service. 

There were 68 alarms to which the Department responded and in 
addition rendered aid at brush fires and assistance to Lowell and neigh- 
boring towns. 

90 



We have endeavored to keep well within our appropriation and by 
careful planning have effected economy without destroying efficiency. 

Our own excellent Police Department as well as the State Troopers 
have when occasion required given us splendid aid and co-operation ar.d 
to them we express our appreciation and thanks. 

HARRY L. SHEDD, 

JOHN W. DIXON, 

JOHN M. KEMP, 

Board of Fire Engineers. 



91 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1937 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen : 

I respectfully submit the annual report of the Chelmsford Police 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1937. 

DEPARTMENT ROSTER 

Chief : Arthur Cooke. 

Patrolmen : .Ralph J. Hulslander, Winslow P. George. 

Special Police : Allen H. Adams, Leo A. Boucher, Robert C. DeLong, 

Allan Kidder, Joseph M. DeCosta, Raymond A. Reid. 
Special Police (School Duty) : John B. Wrigley, Silas Gauthier. 
Policewoman : Mrs. Mae S. Lewis. 

OFFENCES FOR WHICH ARRESTS WERE MADE 

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS 

Assault and Battery 1 

Manslaughter 3 

Attempt to Rape 2 

6 

CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny 2 

Larceny 3 

Larceny of Auto 2 

Using Car Without Authority 1 

8 

CRIMES AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER 

Accosting Opposite Sex 1 

Escape 3 

Arrest on Capias 3 

Arrest on Warrant 7 

Drunkenness 22 

92 



Vagrant 1 

Driving So as to Endanger 2 

Lewdness 1 

Driving under Influence 7 

Motor Violations 256 

Non Support 3 



306 



PERSONS ARRESTED 
DISPOSITIONS 

Committed to Concord Reformatory 2 

Committed to Worcester State Hospital 3 

Committed to Westboro State Hospital 2 

Committed to House of Correction 2 

Committed to Shirley School 2 

Probation • 3 

Released 7 

Fined IS 

Not Guilty 4 

Cases Filed 1 

Cases Pending 



44 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Accidents Investigated 68 

Total Mileage Covered by Police 29,405 Miles 

Total Gallons of Gasoline Used 2010 

I wish at this time to thank the Selectmen and my Brother Officers 
for their co-operation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR COOKE; 

Chief of Police. 



93 



REPORT OF POLICE WOMAN 

Mr. Arthur Cooke, Chief of Police 

Dear Sir : 

I hereby submit a report of my duties as policewoman without re- 
numeration for the year ending December, 1937 : 

Cases investigated by request of Police 10 

Cases investigated by request of S. P. C. C. 6 

Cases investigated on account of complaints to Policewoman 28 

Clinic Cases 7 

Mothers reporting stealing by daughters 2 

Wives reporting trouble with husband 11 

Husbands reporting trouble with wife 5 

Girls warned against solicting auto rides 14 

Stubborn girls given advice, warning, and taken home 7 

Visits to homes in interest of women and children 21 

Parents advised about neglected children 5 

Stayed with attempted suicide at hospital overnight, assisted 

officers with patients, taking her to Worcester following day . . 1 

Assisted officers with patient to Westboro . 1 

Assisted in accident cases — rendered first aid 2 

I wish at this time to thank the department for its co-operation dur- 
ing the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N. 
Policewoman. 



94 



REPORT OF ACTIVITIES OF CEMETERIES IN 
CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 



1937 

To the Board of Selectmen : 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

The Cemetery Commissioners wish to submit the following report 
for the year ending December 31, 1937: 

Forefathers' Cemetery: This Cemetery is in very good condition. 
The slates have been properly adjusted and perpetual care lots have 
been regraded and seeded. There have been ten burials. 

Pine Ridge Cemetery: There have been twenty-one burials and six 
lots sold. General condition of the Cemetery in very good shape. New 
lots have been laid out, roads have been graveled, and are now in ex- 
cellent condition. 

Hart Pond Cemetery : There have been seven burials. New lots 
have been laid out, some graded, and hope to have more in another 
year. The fence posts have been eaten by termites and if this keeps 
on they will have to be replaced by iron posts. The trees have been 
trimmed. Several perpetual care lots have been reseeded. 

Riverside Cemetery: The shade trees have been trimmed and a 
general cleaning has been made. Special care has been given to the per- 
petual care lots. 

Fairview Cemetery : The front of this cemetery has been resur- 
veyed and staked off, making an addition of thirty lots. The grass has 
been cut often and the usual good care been given it. 

West Cemetery: A general cleaning has been performed through- 
out the cemetery and lot owners have taken great interest in keeping 
the new section in good condition. 

The Cemetery Commissioners and Superintendents take great pride 
in the upkep of the cemeteries and would like to have lot owners visit 
them more often. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER, 
BAYARD C. DEAN, 
ARTHUR W. HOUSE, 
Cemetery Commissioners, Town of Chelmsford 

95 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 
NORTH CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

North Chelmsford, Mass. 
December 15, 1937. 

The Board of Directors of the North Chelmsford Public Library, 
submit the following report for the year ending December 15, 1937. 

The Library has been opened 150 sessions 
Circulation for the year was 12952. 
New books added 358. 

The room which has been recently opened for the children's room, 
has made quite a change in the appearance of our Library and is great- 
ly appreciated by our patrons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR O. WHEELER, 

NELLIE L. SHAWCROSS, 

BERTHA A. SWAIN. 



NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY CORPORATION 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

December 15, 1937. 
RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1937 $ 23.04 

Town appropriation 1,200.00 

Librarian's fines 5.00 



$ 1,228.04 
EXPENDITURES 

Librarian's salary $ 300.00 

Assistant librarian and janitor 115.92 

Assistant 50.22 

Books 500.16 

Magazines 18.00 

96 



Binding Books 31.10 

Fuel 97.00 

Lighting 15.96 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 59.47 



$ 1,187.83 
Balance in treasury 40,21 



$ 1,228.01 

BERTHA M. WHITWORTH, 

Treasurer 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE ADAMS 

LIBRARY 

The Board organized with Albert H. Davis as chairman, with 
Miriam E. Warren as secretary succeeding Mrs. Luella H. S. Clark 
and Frederick A. P. Fiske as treasurer. Mrs. Ida A. Jefts was re-ap- 
pointed librarian and Mrs. Aldegonde Peterson as assistant librarian. 
Edith Alcorn was appointed as assistant in the children's department. 
The Board held its meeting at the usual intervals. 

ALBERT H. DAVIS, 
LOTTIE L. SNOW, 
FRED W. PARK, 
FRANCES CLARK, 
MIRIAM E. WARREN, 
FREDERICK A. P. FISKE. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES OF ADAMS LIBRARY 

Jaunary 1, 1937 to December 31, 1937 

Balance from last year 73.14 

Rents from George Memorial Hall 20.00 

Fines 10.83 

Amount withdrawn from Trust Funds 225.00 

$ 328.97 
97 



EXPENDITURES 

Janitor $ 29.17 

Magazines 56.85 

Books 138.03 

Rent of Safe Deposit Box 5.50 

Town of C — d for fines and rentals 30.83 

Miscellaneous 5.75 



$ 266.13 $ 266.13 



Balance on hand $ 62.84 

F. A. P. FISKE, 
Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of Adams Library. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT OF ADAMS LIBRARY 

Circulation for 1937 : 

Magazines 914 

Non-Fiction 3,241 

Fiction 13,119 

Total 17,274 

Books sent to West Chelmsford 1,362 

Magazines sent to West Chelmsford 14 

Books sent to South Chelmsford 890 

Magazines sent to South Chelmsford 17 

Books sent to East Chelmsford 1,924 

Magazines sent to East Chelmsford 7 

New Borrowers 218 

Books borrowed from Division of Public Libraries 45 

State Reading Certificates 114 

New Books Purchased 454 

Received for fines $ 59.73 

Received from transient borrower .- 4.00 

Received for books destroyed 1.80 

Desk Supplies $ 53.70 

Refunded transient borrower 1.00 

Balance handed Treasurer 10.83 



$ 65.53 $ 65.53 
Respectfully submitted, 

IDA A. JEFTS, 

Librarian. 



98 



REPORT OF FOREST WARDEN 

December 31, 1937 
Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Forest Warden is respectfully submitted 
herewith. 

Besides the District Chiefs of the Fire Department, the following 
were appointed Deputy Forest Wardens : 

Herbert M. Sturtevant 

Walter H. Merrill 

Fred W. Merrill 

Fred L. Fletcher 

Spencer W. Chamberlin 

Adam C. Zabierek 

Ernest C. Soulis, (resigned) 

Mark Norton (to fill vacancy) 

Robert Henderson 

During the past year we were called to extinguish one hundred and 
twenty-eight (128) forest and grass fires. 

About three hundred (300 acres of land were burned over; most of 
this was scrub and grass land of no merchantable value. 

Two small building were burned by fires caused from sparks from 
incinerators. 

Several fires were of incendiary origin; others were caused by 
abandoned camp fires and careless discarded cigarettes. 

Several small children were apprehended for starting fires, but no 
court action was taken. It was deemed' advisable to allow their par- 
ents to administer punishment. 

It was estimated that about fifteen hundred (1500) permits were 
issued by this department during 1937. 

Next year (1938) it will be necessary to have a permit to burn rub- 
bish and debries in an incinerator. Each incinerator will be inspected 
by the Forest Warden before a permit is issued. 

99 



All equipment, both in the care of deputies and at our headquarters 
was carefully tested and necessary repairs made. 

Fine assistance and co-operation were rendered to this town b} r 
State Fire Warden Stone during the past year. 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation to the Police De- 
partment, Fire Department and my Deputies for the fine co-operation 
they have extended me during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GILBERT H. PERHAM, 

Forest Warden. 



100 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION 

The following is a report of the work of the Middlesex County Ex- 
tension Service for the town of Chelmsford, during 1937. 

Very active interest has been taken by the farmers of the town dur- 
ing the year in the work of the Extension Service. Among the poultry- 
men, forty-three farm visits were made upon request. These had to do 
largely with poultry diseases and management. 

A culling and vaccination demonstration was held at the McHugh 
Farm. General information on marketing and poultry management was 
sent to seventy-seven different poultrymen. 

A soil testing clinic was held at the Emerson Farm at which time 
Professor Ralph Donaldson from the State College was present. 

In the State 300 Bushel Potato Contest, Mr. A. M. Blackie had a 
measured yield of 334 bushels per acre. 

Individual farmers were assisted on dairy farm accounts, milk mar- 
keting, and rotation pastures. 

Meetings held for Chelmsford fruit growers included an exhibit of 
apple scab by Doctor Boyd of the Massachusetts State College, and two 
mouse control demonstrations by the Biological Survey. 

A farm meeting on market garden pests was held in July at the A. 
M. Blackie farm. 

Specialists from the State College visited Chelmsford farms to ad- 
vise on fruit growing, market garden problems, and storage construc- 
tion. Timely information on pest control of fruits and vegetables was 
sent to all Chelmsford farmers from the Extension Service office. 

Two groups of homemakers were enrolled in the Food Buying pro- 
ject and the Coat project. Representatives from, these groups parti- 
cipated in the planning meetings held in the late Fall on the Conserva- 
tion of the Home program. A large number of women received the 
monthly Mothers' Service letters. 

4-H Club work for the year was carried on under the chairman- 
ship of Perley Kimball and the following committee members : Mrs. 
Edward Fox, Mrs. Albert Riney, Mrs. Edward Norton, Mrs. Ernest 
Ferron, Mrs. Joshua Machon, Harry Hilyard, and Ralph E. House. The 
boys and girls were quite evenly enrolled in the clubs with forty-six girls 

101 



and forty-nine boys participating in the clothing, food, home furnish- 
ing, craft, handicraft, garden and poultry clubs. 

Ten clubs had most excellent exhibits at a program held in the Town 
Hall. At this time pins were awarded to club members who had com- 
pleted their projects. 

Poultry club boys, members of Teddy Zaberick's club, put on a 
demonstration at the Boston Poultry Show in January. 

Chelmsford clubs were well represented at the mid-year 4-H Rally 
held in Lowell. 

Peter McHugh, Stewart Bickford, Stephen, George and James Giras, 
Robert Riley, Stanley Winters, Robert Whitton, Dorothy Stewart and 
Edward Parlee won prizes in the Middlesex North Agricultural Society 
Contest. 

PERLEY KIMBALL. 



102 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS REPORT 

Board of Selectmen 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my twenty-third annual report of the work done 
by this department during the year 1937 under the direction of the Di- 
vision of Livestock Disease Control, State Department of Agriculture. 

The annual inspection of cattle, sheep, and swine was ordered during 
the latter part of the year and is now completed and a detailed report 
has been sent to the above Department. 

There are 191 stables, 9 less than last year, in which are kept 771 
dairy cows, 162 young cattle and 24 bulls a total of 957 head which is 14 
less than last year. There is a decrease of 25 dairy cows an increase of 
10 young cattle and one bull. 

There are also 26 sheep, 27 goats and 711 swine. 

Cattle and swine are distributed in the various precincts as follows : 

Precinct 12 3 4 5 6 Total 

Cows 401 125 25 75 116 29 771 

Young cattle 85 34 3 14 18 8 162 

Swine 296 90 6 222 27 70 711 

All cattle in town are regularly tested by State and Federal in- 
spectors. Three cows in two different stables reacted to the test for 
tuberculosis, they were slaughtered and the stables were thoroughly 
cleaned and disinfected. , 

There were 78 cows and one bull shipped into town from outside the 
State upon 33 permits issued by the State authorities, all were' identified 
by description and tag numbers and released upon proof of satisfactory 
test charts and certificates showing that they came from accredited herds 
free from tuberculosis and also free from Bangs disease during the year 
previous to entry into this State. 

One rabid dog came into town from a border town and killed a 
dog and a pig and then savagely attacked a man, this man and one other 
received the Pasteur treatment. 

Thirteen dogs were quarantined as possible contact cases with this 
dog, none of these dogs developed rabies with the possible exception of 
one which escaped and was never seen again. 

103 



Thirty-five dog bite cases were reported and the dogs were re- 
strained for a period of observation but as no rabies developed all were 
released. 

The heads of three dogs were taken to Boston for examination and 
only one was a positive case of rabies. 

Persons desiring to ship cattle into town from outside this state 
should procure a permit to accompany the shipment and upon arrival 
should notify the Inspector of Animals. 

ARNOLD C. PERHAM, 

Inspector of Animals. 



104 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
OF CHELMSFORD 

Year Ending December 31, 1937 

Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford : 

The following is a report of the work done by this Board during the 
past year, with comment as to the reports of the various departments of 
this Board, namely, the Agent of the Board of Health, Plumbing In- 
spector, Inspector of Milk and Inspector of Meat and Slaughtering. 

We feel that these branches function most efficiently, and ask the 
earnest co-operation of every citizen, property owner and householder 
in maintaining the high standard of Health in this community which 
exists today and which is the result of the untiring service of the exe- 
cutives of these departments. 

In reading the report of our Agent, Mrs. Mae Lewis, kindly note the 
fact that Chelmsford rates second among Massachusetts towns in Dental 
Work Survey for perfect teeth for the year 1936. This enviable record 
is due to the unceasing vigilence of Mrs. Lewis and the capable work 
of Dr. Bernard Ritter, school dentist for the town. 

To the Parent-Teacher Association through whose generous finan- 
cial assistance much of the dental work is made possible, this Board 
is deeply grateful. 

One other matter which calls for consideration by parents of pre- 
school age children is the matter of the free clinics conducted for the 
prevention of communicable diseases. It is the earnest desire of this 
Board that parents avail themselves of the services of this clinic. They 
are held each spring for immunization against diphtheria, the announce- 
ment of the time and place is m,ade in the local newspapers a clinic is 
held for all schools and free transportation is provided for those de- 
siring it. 

Due to the increase of communicable diseases, we particularly stress 
the importance of taking advantage of this service. Our appropriation 
for "Aid," which is applicable to those afflicted with communicable 
disease has been greatly exceeded by demands for assistance. This is a 
matter over which this Board has no control. However, it would seem 
that preventative measures would lessen these demands. 

To our Health Physicians, Dr. Arthur G. Scroborie and Dr. George 
E. Carriel, who have served the citizens of this community most effi- 

105 



ciently and generously, we are deeply grateful. Their work among the 
school children and in the various clinics is invaluable. 

Before closing our report, the Board wishes to call your attention 
to a few pertinent rules taken from the Regulations of the Board of 
Health, and urge that every individual take upon himself the responsi- 
bility of observing these regulations. 

By so doing, much money, time and civic pride will be saved the 
taxpayers of Chelmsford. 

We quote in part, as follows from the Regulations of the Board of 
Health : 

"No person shalll allow any sink or waste water to be turned into 
or upon any street, lane, gutter or sidewalk of the Town. Brooks, open 
drains, sluiceways upon premises within certain defined limits in the 
Town shall be kept free from such obstructions as permit the accumula- 
tion of stagnant water. 

"No person shall deposit any tin cans or rubbish of any discription 
in any place within the Town, other than in a public dumping ground, 
or on premises owned or occupied by him, without a permit from the 
Board of Health. 

"No person shall suffer any waste or stagnant water which is likely 
to become a nuisance, or offensive or dangerous to public health or re- 
main in any cellar or on any lot of land owned by him. 

"No person shall deposit the contents of any cesspool or privy vault 
upon the surface of the ground unless the same is plowed under or 
otherwise covered within twenty-four hours. 

"No person shall remove the contents of any cesspool, privy vault or 
drain from any premises between certain dates if desired without a per- 
mit from the Board of Health. 

The Board is continuously being called for nuisance caused by im- 
proper sewage disposal. For the protection of our citizens and for the 
good of public health in our several communities the Board has adopted 
"Rules and regulations" for the proper disposal of house sewage. Per- 
mits are issued for installations of this nature and the Regulations may 
be obtained from the Town Accountant who is the clerk of the Board 
of Health. The authority vested in us is taken from Section 3 
of the "Rules and Regulations for Plumbing," adopted by the Town 
and the Board of Health in the year 1930. 

"Section 3, the last sentence reads as follows : If a sewer is not 
available, the sewage shall be discharged into cesspool or septic tank and 

106 



cesspool or subsurface distribution system, THE PLANS OF WHICH 
MUST BE APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH BEFORE 
CONNECTIONS IS MADE." 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES KIBERD, Jr., Chairman. 
RAYMOND GREENWOOD, 
GEORGE McNULTY. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH AGENT 

Mr. James Kiberd 

Chairman of Board of Health 

Dear Sir : 

The following is a report for the year ending December, 1937 : 

As always, your agent endeavors to give the best in Public Health 
service, which includes nursing advice for control of communicable 
diseases of school and pre-school children. We try very hard to en- 
force quarantine, but it is sometimes difficult to check disease when 
parents will not co-operate by having a doctor diagnose an illness. On 
the day after school opened, two children were found to be in the 
disquamation period of Scarlet Fever ! When contagion is reported 
by the doctor every child in the school to which the patient belongs 
is examined once a week for several weeks. 

As is the custom, free clinics were held in early spring for im- 
munization against Diphtheria. Parents must realize more than ever 
the need of such treatment, for only recently three deaths resulted 
from not taking advantage of the opportunity to escape this dread 
disease. Announcement of time and place of clinics is made in local 
newspapers, and in all the schools ; free transportation is provided by 
buses. 

With parents' permission immunization is carried out as follows : 

Diphtheria toxoid is given to children over six months and under 
twelve years of age; the older ones receive toxin anti-toxin. The 
former group does not require the Schick test, nevertheless plans are 
being made to give it to every child in early spring to determine 
whether immunity prevails. In spite of the extra work entailed, we 
think it is worthwhile, for our aim is to OBLITERATE DIPHTHERIA. 
I cannot urge parents too strongly to help us protect their children's 

107 



health. In October, 1937, toxoid was given to 189 children; toxin anti- 
toxin, to 9; 7 were reimunized. 

Dr. Martin, the County school clinic doctor, was here in October 
to give the tuberculin test to the high school students and to contact 
children whose parents are either confined to a sanitorium or home. 
Fifty-four calls were made by your agent to obtain parents' consent to 
have the test made. 

The report is as follows : 

Children Tuberculin Tested : 

School population — High school 466 

Children tested for first time 222 

Children previously tested 44 266 

% Tested 59.6 

Children reacting to test : 

New Group 96 

Previously tested group 37 133 

% Reacting 50.0 

Children X-Rayed: 

Children X-Rayed for first time 95 

Re-X-Ray Group 11 106 

Children recommended for Examination 16 

Children Examined 15 

Observation cases 10 

Negative cases (discharge) 6 16 

X-Ray is given in the McFarlin Gym, but your agent made several 
trips to Waltham with pupils who were absent. Several children mostly 
underweights who have been examined by the State in previous years, 
are carried over for further examination. The children are given exam- 
ination by a State doctor and are discharged with instructions in regards 
to rest and diet, providing they are up to standard. 

Following is a list of contagious diseases reported by physicians : 

Scarlet Fever 15 

German Measles 

Measles 3 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 8 

Chicken Pox 3 

Lobar Pneumonia 4 

108 



Mumps 6 

Diphtheria 3 

Whooping Cough 31 

Dogbite 9 

Home visits — nursing instruction 286 

Sanitary visits 62 

Investigations 84 

Pre-natal instructions 18 

Several trips were made by your agent to Middlesex Sanitorium, 
North Reading, Tewksbury, and G. U. Clinics. 

For the eighth consecutive year Dr. Ritter has continued his ex- 
cellent service as school dentist ; he is in some school every Wednes- 
day from 9 until 3 during the entire school year. It is with his help 
and contributions from various Parent-Teacher Associations that 
Chelmsford is second among Massachusetts towns with a record of 93% 
of its children having perfect teeth. 

Following is a report of dental work : 

Examined by dentist 1144 

High School 104 

Estimates of dental work sent home 941 

Children not needing care 382 

Pre-school examined 40 

Teeth treated 386 

Teeth filled — permanent 945 

Teeth filled — temporary 604 

Teeth extracted — permanent 35 

Teeth extracted — temporary 408 

Teeth cleaned 964 

Your agent is at present taking a course in Public Health Nursing 
given by Prof. Brase. I take every opportunity to attend whatever 
evening lectures possible. Dr. Archibald, the State Health Officer and 
Miss Martin, State Consultant were here many times. 

I wish sincerely to thank the Board of Health and all others for 
their fine co-operation throughout the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N. 

Agent. 



109 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 

January 1, 1938 
To the Board of Health 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report of animals slaughtered by licensed 
butchers and owners at their premises. From January 1, 1937 to January 
1, 1938, have been inspected by me. 

Cattle 507 

Calves 445 

Hogs 198 

Sheep 2781 

Goats 5 

Of these were condemned: 

Cattle 7 

Calves 14 

Hogs 5 

Sheep 8 

All inspections have been reported to the State authorities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GALE, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 



REPORT OF MEAT INSPECTOR 

January 1, 1938 
To the Board of Health, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report on markets, butcher and fish carts. 

I have found them in good condition, although I have condemned 
300 lbs. of meat and 60 pounds of fowl that had to be destroyed. 

W. C. GALE, 
Inspector of Meats 

110 



ANNUAL REPORT OF PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Chelmsford, Mass., January 3, 1938 

Board of Health 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The following is a report of the plumbing work done for the year 
ending December 31, 1937. 

Whole number of applications for Permits to do Plumbing 79 

New Houses 26 

Old Houses 53 

Total 79 

Inspections 167 

Tests 70 

Total Visits 237 

The following is a list of the various plumbing fixtures installed : 

Water Closets 105 

Lavatories 92 

Bath Tubs 76 

Wash Trays 52 

Sinks 77 

Range Boilers 30 

Urinals 2 

Soda Fountain 1 

Bar Drainer 1 

Tumbler Washer 1 

Grease Trap 1 

Total 438 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES N. MIDWOOD, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



Ill 



MILK INSPECTOR'S REPORT 

December 31, 1937. 
To the Honorable Board of Health 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present the report of the Milk Inspection Divi- 
sion for the year ending December 31, 1937. 

Thirty-nine stores and twenty-six dealers were licensed to sell milk; 
three milk plants to pateurize milk; eight stores were registered to sell 
Oleomargarine. 

Sxty-six dollars and fifty cents, received from license fees, were paid 
to the Town Treasurer. 

There were four hundred eleven dairy farms listed by dealers as 
sources of supply. Five hundred two dairy farms were inspected, ninety 
one being reinspections. 

The average daily consumption of milk was two thousand seven 
hundred sixty quarts; seventeen quarts of buttermilk; eight quarts of 
skimmed milk ; eighty-three quarts of cream. 

The numerical average of the Total Solids and the Fats, and the 
median average of the bacterial samples follows : 



Total Solids ( /c 

Pasteurized 12.86 

Milk Raw 13.18 

Cream 

The Total Solids and the Fats were determined on five hundred 
sixty-five samples of milk; and the Fats on twelve samples of cream. 
Two hundred sixty-two samples of milk were examined for the bacterial 
content ; the Sediment was determined on two hundred forty-two 
samples of milk seized from dealers. Two hundred forty-one samples 
of milk from Producers were tested for Total Solids and Fats, and four 
hundred sixty-one samples for the bacterial content, one hundred thirty- 
six for sediment. 

Seventy-four and eight-nine hundreth per cent of the milk is 
sold at retail; Twenty-five and eleven hundreth at wholesale. 

112 





Median average 


Fats % 


Colonies per c. c 


3.92 


12,000. 


4.20 


11,000. 


38.04 


26,000. 



Twenty-four and forty-two hundredth per cent is sold as raw milk; 
seventy-five and fifty-eight hundredth per cent as pasteurized. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MELVIN F. MASTER, 

Inspector of Milk. 



113 



REPORT OF THE FISH AND GAME WARDEN 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my second annual report of my duties as Fish 
and Game Warden for the year ending December 31, 1937. 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Inspected 72 

Trapping Licenses Inspected 6 

Complaints Received and Investigated 10 

Warnings to Juveniles 8 

Injured Game disposed of 3 

Injured Deer Killed and Distributed to town Welfare 1 

With the co-operation of the State Department of Conservation and 
the restocking committee of the South Chelmsford Gun and Rod Club 
the following amount of fish and game has been liberated for propa- 
gation in the town during the past year. 

Pheasants 16 

Rabbits (White) 5 

Rabbits (Cottontail) 48 

Brook Trout . . .• 500 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation to the sportsmen 
of the town, Police Department, members of the South Chelmsford Gun 
and Rod Club, and District Deputy warden Harold Crosby, for the 
splendid co-operation I have received from them in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLEN KIDDER, 
Fish and Game Warden. 



114 



REPORT OF TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Herewith is submitted the annual report of the Town Accountant 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 624, Section 7 of the Re- 
vised Laws. 

All transfers made and shown in this report were authorized by vote 
of the Finance Committee or by vote in Town Meeting. 

RECEIPTS 
GENERAL REVENUE 

TAXES 

CURRENT YEAR: 

Poll $ 3,858.00 

Personal Estate 15,452.37 

Real Estate 120,475.24 

$139,785.61 
PREVIOUS YEARS: 

Poll $ 1,646.00 

Personal Estate 1,389.84 

Real Estate 66,652.41 

$ 69,688.25 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX: 

Motor Excise Tax, 1937 $ 13,407.39 

Motor Excise Tax, Previous Year 2,009.07 

$ 15,416.46 

TAX TITLE REDEMPTION: 

Tax Title Redemption $ 6,715.45 

FROM THE STATE: 

Veteran's Exemption $ 75.65 

Income Tax, 1937 23,804.05 

115 



Income Tax, Educational 7,787.50 

Corporation Tax 16,790.08 

Corporation Tax, Gas and Electric Co.'s 2,218.03 

Total from State $ 50,675.31 

GRANTS AND GIFTS 

FROM COUNTY: 

Dog Licenses $ 981.53 

Various Roads, Chapter 90 1,666.58 

North Road, Chapter 90 3,100.00 



$ 5,748.11 
FROM STATE: 

North Road, Chapter 90 $ 3,750.00 

Various. Roads, Chapter 90 1,166.85 

Aid to Industrial Schools 1,492.37 

$ 6,409.22 
FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Old Age Assistance, Administration $ 606.20 

Old Age Assistance, Relief 18,187.58 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,034.00 

$ 19,827.78 
SALE OF PROPERTY: 

Sale of Land $ 2,325.00 

FINES AND FORFEITS 

Court Fines $ 81.80 

LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Plumbing Permits $ 372.50 

Automobile Dealers 90.00 

Sunday Licenses 80.00 

Common Victualer's Licenses 60.00 

Gasoline Licenses 3.50 

Bottling Licenses 20.00 

Liquor Licenses 2,851.00 

Pedler's Licenses 91.00 

Milk Licenses 20.50 

Garage Licenses 2.00 

Manufacture of Ice Cream 5.00 

Entertainment License 17.50 

116 



Slaughtering License 2.00 

Wood Alcohol License 8.00 

Funeral Director's License 2.00 

Garbarge Licenses 4.00 

Oil Burner Permits 15.50 

All Other Fees 9.50 



$ 3,654.00 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

SELECTMEN: 

Telephone Tolls $ -50 

Advertising 33.57 



$ 34.C7 
TAX COLLECTOR: 

Tax Title Redemption Cost $ 69.65 

Tax Collection Costs 374.43 



$ 407.08 

TOWN CLERK: 

Auctioneers' Licenses $ 4.00 

Junk Dealers' Licenses 52.50 

Certificate of Registration 11.00 

Dog Licenses 1,416.60 

All Other 3.00 



$ 1,487.10 

ASSESSORS: 

Telephone Toll $ .25 

TOWN HALLS: 

Rent from Chelmsford Center Town Hall $ 141.56 

Rent from North Chelmsford Town Hall 47.00 

$ 188.56 

117 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Claims for Damages $ 10.00 

Revolver Permits 9.60 



$ 19.60 

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Telephone Tolls $ 3.35 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: 

Sealing and Testing $ 103.17 

FORESTRY: 

Extermination of Moths $ 104.53 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Reimbursement for Hospital Care $ 100.00 

Reimbursement for Rabies Treatment ... 207.50 

State T. B. Subsidy 202.14 

Milk Inspection 46.00 

$ 555.64 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Damage Claims $ 9.00 

Sale of Old Materials 17.20 

Trucking 12.00 

Machinery Fund 2,935.45 

All Other 22.00 

$ 2,995.65 
INFIRMARY: 

Sale of Produce $ 1,524.56 

SALE OF COMMISSARY GROCERIES 40.43 

REIMBURSEMENT FOR OUTSIDE RELIEF: 

Cities and Towns $ 1,946.70 

118 



From Individuals 122.76 

State Temporary Aid 12,138.83 

$ 14,208.29 

REIMBURSEMENT FOR AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN: 

State $ 152.35 

REIMBURSEMENT FOR OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Cities and Towns $ 376.98 

State 8,433.53 

From Individuals 33.00 

$ 8,843.51 

SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 

State Aid $ 246.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Tuition, State Wards $ 3,036.05 

Tuition, State, Trade Schools 75.85 

Tuition, Other Towns 483.84 

Sale of Old Materials 30.00 

$ 3,625.74 

ADAMS' LIBRARY 

Fines $ 10.83 

Rent 20.00 

$ 30.83 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Sale of Town History $ 5.00 

Telephone Toll .25 

$ 5.25 

W. P. A. 

Rental of Transit $ 58.33 

Sale of Maps 6.34 

119 



Sale of Junk 5.00 

Telephone Tolls 1-60 

$ 71.27 
CEMETERIES 

Sale of Lots and Graves $ 460.00 

INTEREST 

On Taxes : . •$ 4,067.46 

On Trust Fund Perpetual Care 633.94 

$ 4,701.40 
MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Anticipation of Revenue $ 70,000.00 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

EAST CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT: 

Tax and interest $ 2,498.83 

SOUTH CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT: 

Tax and Interest $ 926.68 

NORTH CHELMSFORD FIRE DISTRICT: 

Tax and Interest $ 1,623.56 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE DONATIONS: 

Gifts $ 500.00 

STATE: 

Bottling Permits $ 20.00 

REFUNDS 

Tax Title Foreclosure $ 35.24 

Health Department 7.50 

Public Welfare Department 68.05 

Accounting Department 8.08 

W. P. A 3.00 

120 



Fire Department 3.17 

Park Department 1-50 

Old Age Assistance 40.00 

Highway Department 7.63 



$ 174.17 

Total Receipts for 1937 $435,905.86 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1937 331.1? 



Total Receipts for 1937 and Cash on Hand Jaunary 1, 1937 $436,236.98 



PAYMENTS 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

MODERATOR: 

Salary $ 10.00 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries $ 750.00 

Stationery and Postage 17.4S 

Printing and Advertising 104.50 

Telephone 75.70 

All Other 28.80 

$ 976.48 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT: 

Salary . .$ 1,800.00 

Stationery and Postage 75.86 

Clerk Hire 7.15 

$ 1,883.01 

TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary $ 200.00 

Stationery and Postage 70 42 

Printing and Advertising 23.85 

Supplies 10.00 

Clerk Hire 20.00 



$ 324.27 
121 



TOWN TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR : 

Salary $ 2,000.00 

Clerk Hire 158.64 

Stationery and Postage 524.32 

Printing and Advertising 375.90 

Insurance — Robbery 87.93 

Certification of Notes 10.00 

Foreclosing Tax Titles and Drawing and Recording Tax 

Deeds 1,394.50 

Treasurer and Collector's Bond 483.00 

Traveling Expense 18.20 

Deputy Collector's Bond 30.00 

All Other 25.23 



$ 5,107.72 

ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT: 

Wages $ 2,200.00 

Stationery and Postage 118.07 

Printing and Advertising 113.77 

Transportation 73.55 

Clerk Hire 95.15 

Telephone 56.87 

Desk 42.00 



$ 2,699.41 

LAW DEPARTMENT: 
TOWN COUNSEL: 

Salary $ 280.00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Advertising and Printing $ 11.50 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION: 

Registrars' Salaries $ 57.50 

Election Officers 186.09 

Printing and Advertising 77.93 

Clerk Hire 36.00 

Traveling Expense 21.00 

Fuel 5.75 

Janitor Service 1.00 

$ 385.27 
122 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS (TOWN HALLS) : 

Janitors' Salaries $ 972,00 

Fuel 357.54 

Labor 24.50 

Light 424.71 

Water 95.92 

Repairs — Material and Labor 432.03 

Brooms, Wax, Floor Cleaner, Etc 44.16 

Care of Shrubs 2.00 

All Other 29.25 

$ 2,382.11 

Total for General Government $ 14,059.77 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries : 

Chief $ 2,000.00 

Patrolmen 3,600.00 

Special Police 506.23 

School Police 105.50 

Keeping Prisoners 61.00 

Gas and Oil 330.10 

Equipment for Men 38.96 

Printing Stationery and Postage 25.54 

Telephone 303.63 

Auto and Motorcycle Repairs 102.32 

Telephone Operator 96.00 

All Other 1.85 

Insurance 160.00 



$ 7,331.13 

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries : 

Engineers $ 350.00 

Firemen 3,431.00 

Janitors 465.00 



$ 4,246.00 

ENGINEER'S EXPENSE: 

Transportation $ 90.90 

Clerk 20.00 

$ 110.90 

123 



FIRES : 

Labor $ 367 36 

MAINTENANCE : 

Garage Rent $ 280.00 

Apparatus 36.59 

Repairs of Apparatus 322.56 

Gas and Oil 88.55 

Fuel ' 304.00 

Light 161.41 

Alarm System 153.16 

Hose 510.94 

Water 23.00 

Telephones 519.12 

Equipment for Men 24.00 

Repairs of Buildings 884.84 

Insurance 287.50 

Tools 22.90 

All Other 3.50 



$ 3,622.07 

HYDRANT SERVICE: 

East Chelmsford $ 1,500.00 

North Chelmsford 500.00 

Chelmsford Center 500.00 

West Chelmsford 20.00 

South Chelmsford 1,000.00 

$ 3,520.00 

Total for Fire Department $ 11,866.33 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: 

Wages $ 159.00 

Apparatus 4.30 

Printing 11.50 



$ 174.80 

MOTH DEPARTMENT: 

Superintendent's Salary $ 250.00 

Labor 372.35 

Insecticides 307.54 

Repairs 14 09 

124 



Gas and Oil 22.49 

Truck Hire 204.62 

Advertising 15.39 

Elm Leaf Bettle extermination 138.35 

All Other 13.50 



$ 1,338.33 
TREE WARDEN: 

Labor $ 144.00 

Tools and Repairs 5.89 



$ 60.00 


578.82 


5.80 


80.19 


46.38 


48.00 


40.84 


16.22 


10.00 


9.65 


$ 895.90 



$ 149.89 

FOREST FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Warden $ 

Fighting Fires 

Investigations and Use of Automobile 

Repairs and Equipment 

Advertising and Printing 

Garage Rent 

Truck Maintenance 

Chemicals 

Clerical Work 

Telephone 



FISH AND GAME WARDEN: 

Salary $ 100.00 

Total for Protection of Persons and Property $ 21,856.38 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

SALARIES : 

Board of Health $ 630.00 

Agent 315.00 

Meat Inspector 650.00 

Milk Inspector 315.00 

Animal Inspector 200.00 

Plumbing Inspector, Fees 350.00 

Physicians' Salaries 90.00 

$ 2,550.00 

125 



MAINTENANCE: 

Stationery and Postage $ 23.30 

Printing and Advertising 21.94 

Burying Dogs and Cats 32.00 

Agent, Use of Automobile 56.90 

Medical Supplies 34.00 

All Other 3.95 



$ 172.09 

AID: 

Sundry Persons $ 1,198.29 

VACCINE TREATMENT : $ 122.43 

CARE OF PUBLIC DUMPS: 

Labor 82.50 



Total for Health and Sanitation $ 4,125.31 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

SUPERINTENDENT: 

Salary $ 1,900.00 

SNOW REMOVAL: 

Labor $ 906.28 

Calcium Chloride 31.00 

Sand 274.60 



$ 1,211.88 
GENERAL MAINTENANCE: 

Labor $ 7,218.88 

Stone, Gravel, Sand 904.69 

Equipment and Repairs 1,371.95 

Gasoline and Oil 674.89 

Cold Patch and Tar 2 129.38 

Coal and Cement 161.00 

Telephone 85.80 

Pipe and Culverts 350.93 

Traffic Light 27.50 

All Other 70*99 

$ 12,998.55 
126 



MACHINERY ACCOUNT : 

Repairs $ 1,741.40 

Gas and Oil 811.96 

Insurance 270.8o 

Coal 8679 

Truck 285.00 

Registration 4.00 



$ 3,200.00 

ROAD BINDER: 

Oil and Cold Patch $ 9,000.00 

CHAPTER 90, MAINTENANCE: 

Labor $ 3,612.72 

Taric, Asphalt, etc 2,213.73 

Sand 620.50 

Paint and Lumber 91.84 

Rental of Machinery 1,131.20 

Concrete Pipe 333.98 

Brick 36.00 

Catch basins 60.00 



$ 8,099.97 

CHAPTER 90, NORTH ROAD : 

Labor $ 4,575.98 

Asphalt and Concrete 3,000.06 

Crushed stone 484.62 

Brick and Cement 71.52 

Gravel 96.00 

Pipe ■ 619.50 

Catch Basins 120.00 

Hardware and Explosives 45.07 

Cable 46,80 

Rental of Machinery 2,140.40 

$ 11,199.95 
SPRING STREET : 

Labor $ 100.00 



127 



SUNSET AVENUE: 

Labor $ 195.60 

Survey and Recording 4.00 



$ 199.60 

NAYLOR AVENUE: 

Labor $ 199.40 

SIXTH AVENUE: 

Labor $ 268.00 

Gravel 30.00 

Tarbo 147.11 



$ 445.11 

Total for Highway Department $ 48,554.46 

STREET LIGHTING: 

Lighting $ 9,550.35 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

ADMINISTRATION: 

Salaries of Board $ 325.00 

Investigator 1,300.00 

Clerk 624.00 

Printing and Postage 240.32 

Gasoline and Oil 152.18 

Typewriter 30.00 

Telephone 78.97 

Legal Expense 10.00 

Bags and Paper 3.84 

All Other 38.00 



$ 2,802.31 



OUTSIDE RELIEF : 

Groceries and Provisions $ 12,424.96 

Fuel 2,552.84 

Rent and Board 3,640.23 

Medicine and Attendance 3,076.36 

State Institutions 434.50 

Clothing and Shoes 381.96 

Cash Grants to Individuals 1,995.00 

128 



Light and Water 174 - 02 

Burials 19000 

Household Supplies and Repairs 15.68 

Car-fare 33 - 75 

Trucking and Transportation 58.25 

$ 24,977.55 

RELIEF BY OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS: 

Cities $ 176 - 83 

Towns 209.50 

$ 386.33 

Total Outside Relief $ 25,363.88 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN : 

Town $ 3,703.49 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Cash Grants 20,752.62 

Clothing and Shoes 3.11 

Medical 49.50 

Burials 175.00 

Board and Care 902.05 

$ 21,882.28 

INFIRMARY: 

Superintendent, Salary 900.00 

OTHER EXPENSES: 

Other Employees $ 293.00 

Groceries and Provisions 561.77 

Clothing and Dry Goods 93.00 

Fuel and Light 289.35 

Water 38.27 

Hay and Grain 766.68 

Tools, Hardware and Paint 67.22 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 43.86 

Telephone 48.70 

vSeeds, Plants and Fertilizer 167.83 

Chickens 10.00 

Household Supplies 28.73 

Building Repairs 49.74 

129 



Horse Shoeing and Veterinary Services 50.50 

Horse 100.00 

Automobile Maintenance 88.19 

Gas and Oil 30.11 

All Other 23.00 

Total for Infirmary Department $ 3,649.95 

Total Charities $ 57,401.91 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

STATE AID : 

Cash $ 30.00 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF: 

Groceries - $ 418.50 

Cash 1,144.25 

Medicine and Medical Attendance 220.50 

Fuel and Light 72.76 

Shoes and Clothing 10.57 

Rent 135.50 

Transportation 7.50 

Total for Soldiers' Benefits $ 2,039.58 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

ADMINISTRATION: 

Supt. Salary $ 3,400.00 

Committee Expenses 350.00 

Attendance Officers 30.00 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 62.60 

Telephone 92.40 

Travel Expense 7.40 

$ 3,942.40 

INSTRUCTION : 

Teachers' Salaries : 

High $ 22,041.50 

Elementary 42,965.25 

Supervisor 1,155.00 

$ 66,161.75 

130 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES: 

High— Text and Reference Books $ 1,094.43 

Elementary — Text and Reference Books 1,571.02 

High— Supplies 1,121.71 

Elementary Supplies 1,039.64 

$ 4,826.80 

Total Instruction $ 70,988.55 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE: 

Janitors' Salaries : 

High $ 2,100.00 

Elementary 6,302.00 

$ 8,402.00 
FUEL: 

Elementary $ 2,739.73 

High 688.43 

$ 3,428.16 

Light, Water and Power $ 1,558.32 

REPAIRS : 

High $ 595.40 

Elementary 1,676.77 

$ 2,272.17 

JANITORS' SUPPLIES: 

High $ 120.75 

Elementary 217.03 

$ 337.7S 

Total Operation and Maintenance $15,998.43 

AUXILIARY AGENCIES: 

Transportation : 

High $ 4,818.05 

131 



Elementary 4,584.00 

$ 9,402.05 

NURSE: 

Salary $ 1,650.00 

Supplies 86.56 

$ 1,736.56 

Physicians' Salaries 600.00 

Total Auxiliary Agencies $ 11,738.61 

NEW EQUIPMENT: 

Furniture $ 145.65 

VOCATIONAL AND CONTINUATION SCHOOLS: 

Tuition $ 3,014.27 

Total for Schools $105,827.91 

LIBRARIES 

ADAMS LIBRARY: 

Librarian $ 500.00 

Assistants 146.18 

Janitors 415.24 

Repairs 96.34 

Books and Periodicals 238.22 

Light, Fuel and Water 444.09 

Insurance 100.32 

Transporting Books 71.00 

Telephone 51.00 

Binding 41.09 

Post Cards 2.25 

Care of Grounds 43.56 

$ 2,149.29 
NORTH CHELMSFORD LIBRARY: 

Annual Appropriation $ 1,200.00 

132 



RECREATION AND UNCLASSIFIED 

PARKS : 

Labor $ 782.75 

Fertilizer 35.25 

Plants, Trees, Etc 114.22 

Care Flags and Poles 22.40 

Water 20.44 

Tools 12.05 

Repairs 33.50 

Gas and Oil 3.61 

$ 1,024.22 

Care of Varney Playground $ 325.00 

UNCLASSIFIED: 

Memorial Day : 

Dinners $ 121.39 

Music and Other Expenses 178.61 

Workmen's Compensation 363.30 

Zoning Committee 49.97 

W. P. A. Dept., Automobile Truck 965.00 

Assessors' Dept., Typewriter, Supplies and Equipment... 270.18 

American Legion Rental 300.00 

Dog Officer's Fees 63.00 

Town Clock 30.00 

Town Reports, Printing and Delivery 767.60 

Ins. Sinking Fund Treas. Bond 50.00 

Constable 12.00 

Land Damages, Riverneck and Dunstable Roads 265.00 

Damages, Persons and Property 920 00 

Public Buildings, Insurance 1,436.40 

Middlesex County T. B. Sanatorium 1,284.24 

Police Department, New Automobile 318.00 



$ 7,394,69 

ALTERATIONS AT CENTER TOWN HALL: 

Architect $ 600.00 

Lumber and Building supplies 3,187.58 

Electrical Supplies 284.80 

Heating Plant and piping 1,182.72 

Truck Hire and Driver 244.51 

Vault Doors 200.00 

Moving Safes 50.00 

133 



Tools 107.03 

Advertising 17.80 



$ 5,874.44 
RELOCATING FIRE ALARM SYSTEM AT CENTER: 

Labor $ 299.18 

W. P. A. PROJECTS: 

Administration : 

Salaries $ 2,236.00 

State Administration Expense, Surplus Community Div. . .$ 142.93 

Office Supplies and Telephone 212.84 

Gasoline 97.60 

Truck Insurance 62.10 

Playgrounds 417.08 

Transportation 662.95 

Truck Hire 1,736.18 

Gravel 296.70 

Building Supplies and Lumber 984.25 

Coal Pocket 48.83 

Tools and Repairs 77 89 

Moth Project 66.45 

Sewing Project 1,080.00 

Survey Project 168.60 

Federal Commissary 149.33 



$ 8,439.73 
UNPAID BILLS, 1936: 

Elections $ 17.75 

Public Buildings Department 110.89 

Welfare Department 2,273.03 

Health Department 1,562.54 

Park Department 44.75 

Legal Expense 75.00 

Vocational Tuition 1,635.55 

Dog Officers 84.00 

City of Newburyport, Clam Purification 102.72 



$ 5,906.23 
TAILINGS : 

Checks Taken and Later Cashed $ 4.50 



Total Recreation and Unclassified $ 29,267 99 

134 



CEMETERIES 

Commissioners' Salaries $ 105.00 

FOREFATHERS' CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 383.35 

Tools and Repairs 3.17 

Transportation 1.00 

Water 8 00 

Seed 2.20 

$ 397.72 

FAIRVIEW CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 297.40 

HEART POND CEMETRY: 

Labor $ 353.40 

Fertilizer and Seed 16.30 

Survey 6.00 

Tools and Repairs 21.32 

Transportation 1.00 

$ 398.02 

PINE RIDGE CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 386.25 

Transportation 1.00 

Tools 6.00 

$ 39325 

RIVERSIDE CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 392.20 

Transportation 1.00 

$ 393.20 
WEST CHELMSFORD CEMETERY: 

Labor $ 341.30 

Tools and Repairs 43.43 

Seed and Fertilizer 4.70 

135 



Transportation 1.00 

Water 8.00 

$ 398.43 
Total for Cemeteries $ 2,383.02 

INTEREST AND MATURING DEBT 

INTEREST : 

New Grade School $ 1,213.24 

Anticipation of Revenue 283.00 

Middlesex County Sanatorium 525.00 

$ 2,021.24 
MATURING DEBT : 

Grade School $ 8,666.00 

Middlesex County Sanatorium 2,500.00 

$ 11,166.00 

ANTICIPATION OF REVENUE: 

Loans $ 70,000.00 

AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

AGENCY: 

State Tax $ 14,824.15 

County Tax 11,410.20 

County, Dog License Fees 1,416.60 

North Chelmsford Fire District 1,416.81 

East Chelmsford Water District 2,325.28 

State Board of Health— Beverage Permit 20.00 

. South Chelmsford Water District 733.93 

$ 32,146.97 

FEDERAL GRANT : 

Old Age Assistance, Administration $ 606.20 

Old Age Assistance, Relief 18,187.58 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,034.00 

$ 19,827.78 
136 



TRUST 



Cemetery Perpetual Care Donations $ 400.00 

Interest on Perpetaul Care Donations 632.14 



$ 1,032.14 
REFUNDS 

1935 Taxes $ 2.00 

1936 Taxes 8.38 

1937 Taxes 419.07 

Motor Excise Tax, 1935 11.03 

Motor Excise Tax, 1936 101.76 

Motor Excise Tax, 1937 824.30 

$ 1,366.54 

Total Payments for 1937 $435,976.64 

Cash on Hand, December 31, 1937 260.34 

Grand Total $436,236.98 



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Warrant For Annual Town Meeting 

MARCH 7, 1938 AND MARCH 14, 1938 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To John J. Buchanan, Constable, or any suitable person of 
the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several Polling Places, viz : 

Precinct 1. Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre. 

Precinct 2. Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

Precinct 3. Fire House, West Chelmsford. 

Precinct 4. School House, East Chelmsford. 

Precinct 5. Liberty Hall, South Chelmsford. 

Precinct 6. Golden Cove School House, Westlands. 

on Monday, the Seventh day of March, 1938, being the first 
Monday in said month, at 12 o'clock noon, for the following 
purposes : 

To bring in their votes for the following officers : 

Moderator for one year. 
One Selectman for three years. 

One Member of the Board of Public Welfare for three 
years. 

Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year. 
One Assessor for three years. 

153 



One Assessor for two years to fill an unexpired term. 
Tree Warden for one year. 

One Member of the Board of Health for three years. 
One School Committee Member for three years: 
One Park Commissioner for three years. 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 
Two Trustees of Adams Library for three years. 
One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years. 
One Constable for one year. 

And to vote on the following question: 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the 
year 1938 entitled, "An Act placing the Office of Chief 
of Police of the Town of Chelmsford under Civil 
Service Laws," be accepted? 

All on one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 noon to 8 P. M., and to 
meet in the Town Hall at Chelmsford Centre on the following 
Monday, the fourteenth day of March, 1938 at 10 o'clock in 
the forenoon, then and there to act upon the following arti- 
cles, viz : 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and Com- 
mittees ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To raise and appropriate such sums of money 
as may be required to defray Town charges for the 
current year; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to act as its agent in any suit or suits which may arise 
during the current year, with authority to settle and ad- 
just claims or demands for or against the Town; and to 
employ counsel whenever in their judgment it is neces- 
sary; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 

154 



money in anticipation of the revenue of the current finan- 
cial year; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
the Overlay Reserve Account a sum not exceeding Two 
Thousand ($2,000) to be used as a Reserve Fund at the 
descretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in Gen- 
eral Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sufficient sum with which to meet unpaid bills 
of previous years ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Sections 81B, 81C, 81D, and 81E of Chapter 41 
of the General Laws ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to elect two mem- 
bers to the Planning Board, one for a term of five years 
and one for a term of one year; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Section 3 to 12 inclusive of Chapter 143 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a code 
of Zoning By-Laws as recommended by the Planning 
Board; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifteen Dollars ($15), or some 
other sum, to be used for the Board of Appeals for 
stationery, postage, printing and other miscellaneous ex- 
penses ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a code 
of Building By-Laws as recommended by a special com- 
mittee appointed by the Board of Selectmen in accordance 

155 



with Article 49 that was passed at the Annual Town 
Meeting on March 8, 1937; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two hundred Fifty Dollars ($250), 
or some other sum, for the purpose of defraying the ex- 
pense of the compensation or the salary of an Inspector 
of Buildings ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifteen Dollars ($15), or some 
other sum, for the purpose of defraying the cost of print- 
ing, postage and miscellaneous expenses to be used by the 
Inspector of Buildings ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Twenty-eight Hundred Fifty-five 
and 11-100 Dollars ($2855.11), as its proportion of the 
net cost of making alterations and constructing additions 
in and to the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, 
pursuant to Chapter 417 of the Acts of 1935 ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTTCLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Eighteen Hundred Seventy-one 
and 36-100 Dollars ($1871.36), to pay the County of Mid- 
dlesex, as required by law, the Town's share of the net 
cost of the care, maintenance and repair of the Middlesex 
County Tuberculosis Hospital, as assessed in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 111 of the General Laws; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Thirty-five Hundred Dollars 
($3500) for the reconstruction of the North Road, contin- 
gent upon the State and the County contributing a similar 
amount for said purpose ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1000) for 
the reconstruction of the Lowell Road, contingent upon 

156 



the State and County contributing a similar amount for 
said purpose; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($350), or some other sum, for the purpose of purchasing 
an automobile for the Police Department; said purchase 
to be made under the supervision of the Board of Select- 
men ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 20. In the event of an affirmative vote under Ar- 
ticle 19, to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Se- 
lectmen to transfer title to the Chevrolet Automobile now 
used by the Police Department ; or act in relation thereto. 

i 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Hundred Dollars ($300), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing C 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars ($200) to 
be used by the Moth Department for the purpose of exter- 
minating and controlling the elm leaf beetle ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Three Hundred Dollars, ($300), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of widening Carlisle 
Street between the Water Tower and Brick Kiln Road; 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of Seven Hundred Dollars ($700), for 
the purpose of defraying the expense of foreclosing tax 
titles ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division of 
Accounts, to make an audit of the Town of Chelmsford 
accounts ; or act in relation thereto. 

157 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money not exceeding Seven Hun- 
dred and Fifty Dollars ($750) for the purpose of equipping 
the new vaults in the Centre Town Hall and other office 
equipment ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
the fund called "Sales of Cemetery Lots and Graves", a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of the care, im- 
provement and embellishment of some or all of the ceme- 
teries in the Town ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred Twenty Dollars 
($920), or some other sum, to defray moneys paid to 
claimants for personal injuries and consequential dam- 
ages therefrom by reason of being injured on the high- 
ways ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing an automobile to be used by the agent of the 
Board of Health; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to allow home 
owners and property owners the right to work out their 
assessed taxation on the Board of Public Works Depart- 
ment providing they are not able to pay them ; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Five Hundred Seven and 80-100 
Dollars ($507.80) for the purpose of settling the claims 
of the City of Worcester for aid rendered to persons 
having a settlement in Chelmsford, under Chapter 117 
of the General Laws ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Ten Thousand Two Hundred 
Seventy-nine and 65-100 Dollars ($10,279.65), or some 
other sum, for the purpose of covering overdrafts in the 

158 



accounts entitled "Old Age Assistance", "Outside Relief", 
and "Aid to Dependent Children" ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Six Hundred Fifty-nine and 58-100 
Dollars ($659.58), or some other sum, for the purpose of 
covering an overdraft in the account entitled "Soldiers' 
Relief"; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
the account entitled "Road Machinery Fund Account" the 
sum of Nine Hundred Dollars (900), or some other sum, 
to the account entitled "Road Machinery Account" ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Fourteen and 50-100 
Dollars ($214.50), or some other sum, for the purpose 
of purchasing a power mower to be used by the Park 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept West- 
land Avenue Extension as laid out by the Selectmen as 
shown by their report and plan duly filed in the Office of 
Town Clerk ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars $(200), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing West- 
land Avenue; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept Aspin 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their re- 
port and plan duly filed in the Office of Town Clerk ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Dollars ($700), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing Aspin 
Street ; or act in relation thereto. 

159 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept Francis 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their 
report and plan duly filed in the Office of Town Clerk ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifty Dollars ($50), or some other 
sum, for the purpose of reconstructing Francis Street, or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept Warren 
Avenue Extension as laid out by the Selectmen as shown 
by their report and plan duly filed in the Office of Town 
Clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars ($200), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing War- 
ren Avenue ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to accept Hil- 
dreth Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by 
their report and plan duly filed in the Office of Town 
Clerk ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Two Hundred Dollars ($200), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing Hil- 
dreth Street, or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to accept Clinton 
Avenue as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their 
report and plan duly filed in the office of Town Clerk ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of reconstructing Clin- 
ton Avenue ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to accept Lillian 
Avenue as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their 

160 



report and plan duly filed in the Office of Town Clerk ; Or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept Grant 
Street as laid out by the Selectmen as shown by their re- 
port and plan duly filed in the Office of Town Clerk ; or 
act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Selectmen to appoint a committee to inquire into the ad- 
visability of purchasing a triangular piece of land located 
at the intersection of Stedman and Chelmsford Streets 
for Park purposes ; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100), or 
some other sum, for the purpose of purchasing a radio 
for the Police Department automobile ; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Sixty-five Hundred Dollars 
($6500), or some other sum, for the purpose of carrying 
on Federal or State projects, the costs of administration, 
and the costs of materials and supplies for same ; or act 
in relation thereto. 

ARTCLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Assessors to use a sum of money in the amount, 
such as the Tax Commissioner may approve as free cash, 
said sum of money to be applied in computing the tax rate 
for the year 1938; or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED to serve this Warrant by 
posting attested copies thereof at the Post Offices in the 
Center of the Town, South Chelmsford, North Chelmsford and 
West Chelmsford, and at the School House in East Chelms- 
ford and the Golden Cove School House, Westlands, seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the first 
meeting aforesaid. 

161 



HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make return of the Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and 
place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-first day of February 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and thirty-eight. 

A true copy 
Attest : 



Constable. 

KARL M. PERHAM, 

JAMES A. GRANT, 

STEWART MacKAY, 

Selectmen of Chelmsford. 



162 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND THE 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF CHELMSFORD, MASS. 




FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1937 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

JOHN A. McADAMS, Chairman Term Expires 1938 

Westlands 
WENDELL P. HARVEY Term Expires 1939 

Chelmsford 
JAMES P. CASSIDY, Secretary Term Expires 1940 

North Chelmsford 

SUPERINTENDENT 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT, A. B Office in McFarlin School 

Chelmsford 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

ARTHUR G. SCOBORIA, M. D Chelmsford 

GEORGE E. CARRIEL, M. D North Chelmsford 

SCHOOL NURSE 

(MRS.) MAE S. LEWIS, R. N Office in McFarlin School 

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS 

WINSLOW P. GEORGE Westlands 

RALPH G. HULSLANDER North Chelmsford 

NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In case of extremely bad storms or of roads dangerous because of 
ice, a signal for no school all day is given at 7:15 on the fire alarms, 
three blasts repeated three times. Notice is also broadcast by Station 
WLLH. 

TEACHERS 

The table shows the teachers at the beginning of the school year 
1937-38, the position held, the date when service in Chelmsford began, 
and the institutions in which they prepared. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Lucian H. Burns, A. M., Principal, Sept. 1930. University of New Hamp- 
shire, Columbia. 

C. Edith McCarthy, B. S. E., Vice-Principal, Commerical, Sept. 1923, 
Salem. 

F. Christine Booth, B. A., Latin, Math., Sept. 1927, Colby. 

2 



Daisey B. MacBrayne, A. M., English, Sept. 1929, Boston University. 

Procter P. Wilson, B. S., Science, Feb. 1930, M. I. T. 

George R. Knightly, A. B., Social Science, Sept. 1930, Aurora. 

Morris L. Budnick, A. B., Math., Science, Sept. 1930, Tufts. 

John I. MasLaughlan, A. M., History, Nov. 1933, Holy Cross. 

Warren C. Dean, A. B., Mathematics, Sept. 1934, Boston University. 

Ernestine E. Maynard, B. S. E., Commercial, Sept. 1934, Salem. 

Earl J. Watt, A. M., French, Nov. 1934, Harvard. 

Beth R. Hoffman, A. B., English, April 1935, Boston University. 

Catherine W. Mooney, B. S. E., Commercial, Sept. 1936, Salem. 

M. Rita Ryan, A. B., English, Jan. 1936, Emmanuel. 

McFARLIN 

Louis O. Forrest, B. S. E., Principal, VIII, Sept. 1926, Fitchburg. 

(Mrs.) Eva L. Dobson, VII, Nov. 1919, Plymouth Normal. 

Esther M. Thayer, VII-VIII, Jan. 1936, Keene Normal. 

M. Beryl Rafuse, VI, Sept. 1920, Truro Normal. 

Helena B. Lyon, V. Oct. 1911, North Adams Normal. 

Emily Hehir, IV, Sept. 1928, Lowell Normal. 

Edna Hoyt, B. S. E., IV-VI, Sept. 1937, Lowell. 

Mayne G. Trefry, III, Sept. 1921, Truro Normal 

Charlotte L. Lyons, II, Sept. 1935, Plymouth Normal. 

B. Muriel Bridges, B. S. E., Sept. 1937, Lowell. 

EAST 

Harry Y. Hilyard, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1930, Gorham Normal. 
(Mrs.) Jessie F. Brown, V-VI, April 1930, Boston University. 
Mildred G. Perry, B. S. E., III-IV, Sept. 1931, Lowell and Fitchburg. 
Jane E. McEnaney, I-II, Sept. 1926, Lowell Normal. 

HIGHLAND AVENUE 

Gerald A. Ivers, B. Chem., Sept. 1936, Lowell Textile Institute. 
Mary H. Ryan, V.-VI, Sept. 1930, Lowell Normal. 
Lottie M. Agnew, III-IV, Sept. 1923, Lowell Normal. 
Gertrude P. Henderson, I-II, Sept. 1932, Lowell Normal. 

PRINCETON STREET 

Genevieve E. Jantzen, Principal, III, Sept. 1911, Lowell Normal. 

Sally T. Conlon, B. S. E., VIII, Sept. 1937, Lowell. 

(Mrs.) Elsa Reid, VII, Sept. 1922, Lowell Normal. 

Roberta M. Small, B. S. E., VI, Sept. 1935, Lowell. 

Gladys Harrington, V, Sept. 1931, Lowell Normal. 

(Mrs.) Lilla B. McPherson, IV, Sept. 1920, Framingham Normal. 

Helen C. Osgood II, Sept. 1921, Lowell Normal. 



Ann E. Hehir, B. S. E., I, Sept. 1935, Lowell. 

QUESSY 

V. John Rikkola, B. S. E., Principal, VII-VIII, Salem. 
Isabell M. Doyle, B. S., V-VI, Sept. 1936, Boston University. 
Josephine M. Quigley, B. S. E., III-1V, Sept. 1934, Lowell. 
Alice P. McEnaney, I-II, Jan. 1936, Lowell Normal. 

SOUTH 

Nora E. Miskell, B. S. E., IV-VI, Sept. 1937, Lowell. 
Veronica M. McTeague, B. S. E., I-III, Jan. 1936, Lowell. 

WESTLANDS 

H. Jean Rafuse, Principal, VII-VIII, Sept. 1920, Martin's Point, N. S. 

High School. 
Vera G. Rafuse, V-VI, Sept. 1921, Truro Normal. 
(Mrs.) Charlotte K. Duffy, III-IV, Sept. 1932, Lowell Normal. 
(Mrs.) Marion S. Adams, I-II, Jan. 1928, Lowell Normal. 

SUPERVISOR 

Charlotte L. Hyde, Music, Oct. 1927, Lowell Normal. 

TRANSPORTATION 

George W. Marinel, North Chelmsford. 

JANITORS 

High School, C. O. Robbins, Chelmsford Centre. 
McFarlin, Otis Brown, South Chelmsford. 
East, Bernard McLaughlin, East Chelmsford. 
Highland Avenue, Edward Fallon, North Chelmsford. 
Princeton Street, Patrick Cassidy, North Chelmsford. 
Quessy, John Boutilier, West Chelmsford. 
South, George Burton, South Chelmsford. 
Westlands, E. Berg, Westlands. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford: 

We herewith submit the report of the School Committee for the 
year 1937. 

May we again call your attention to conditions in the High School. 
This is an old story and has been mentioned in the report of every Com- 
mittee since 1928, when the enrollment was 200. This figure has been in- 
creased every year, and on Oct. 1, 1937 we had an enrollment of 445 
pupils. 

The Senior Class going out in June 1938 has 83 members. The 
Eighth grade pupils who will graduate in June and thus become eligible 
to enter High School, number 156. 

If the parents of these 156 boys and girls decide to send them to 
High School, the enrollment at the opening of school in September will 
be 518. 

On the other hand, if only two-thirds of this number enter we will 
have 466 students to care for. 

Under these conditions the faculty is badly handicapped, not only 
in teaching but in trying to safeguard the health of your children. We 
are using rooms in the McFarlin School for High School work, and the 
changing between buildings for classes involves difficulties for the teach- 
ers and pupils concerned. 

Your Committee commends the teachers of the High School for 
their loyalty and willingness to help in the problems we have had to face. 

This is a plain statement of facts given for the serious consideration 
of the Citizens of Chelmsford. 



FINANCES 

The annual school reports for the past several years have included 
statements which showed in detail the manner in which the school ap- 
propriation is expended each year. It has been the effort of this com- 
mittee, and committees which have preceded it, to keep the school bud- 
get within the means of the inhabitants of the town. 



Our school costs in Chelmsford are very low. There are eighty- 
two Massachusetts towns of over 5000 population maintaining high 
schools. Only two of these towns run their school departments at a less 
cost per pupil than Chelmsford does. The cost in the remaining towns 
is higher than in Chelmsford, in some cases being more than double the 
amount spent here. The annual school budget of Chelmsford accounts 
for less than $12.00 of the tax rate. 

The bonds on all school buildings, except the McFarlin School, are 
completely paid off; the last payment on the McFarlin School bonds 
will be made in 1940. 

These facts are stated here briefly in order to remind you that your 
school costs are low and have been low for many years. If the Town 
could afford greater expenditures for schools, it would probably be wise 
to make them, but we feel that present industrial and financial condi- 
tions require us to keep school costs down where they are. 

TRANSPORTATION 

We are at present transporting 619 pupils to and from the various 
school buildings each day throughout the school year. 

The contract between the Town of Chelmsford and George W. Mar- 
inel of North Chelmsford runs out in June, 1938, a new contract will be 
drawn up and bids called for, the details of which will be worked out at 
that time. 

The service given by Mr. Marinel has been very satisfactory, he 
having cheerfully co-operated with the Committee at all times. 

The teachers in the elementary schools are to be commended for 
the loyalty and attention to detail displayed by them in the training of 
the children entrusted to their care. 

The Committee also thanks the teachers and Principals for the ex- 
tra work performed over and above actual requirements. 

The Janitor service for 1937 has been excellent, the money saved the 
town by these men in the way of repairs amounts to a considerable sum 
in the course of a year. 

Edward Fallon, Janitor at the Highland Ave. School resigned from 
service this year. Mr. Fallon was appointed Janitor when the school 
was built and has given many years of good faithful service. We wish 
our friend years of happiness and contentment in his retirement. 



The work of the Parent-Teacher Associations in Chelmsford during 
the past year has been very helpful and the School Committee wishes 
them success in their efforts for the betterment of our School system 
during 1938. 



We recommend that the Citizens read carefully the report of the 
Superintendent of Schools, in which will be found information of value. 

JOHN A. McADAMS. 

WENDELL P. HARVEY. 

JAMES P. CASSIDY. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 



To the School Committee : 

My tenth annual report is hereby submitted through you to the cit- 
izens of Chelmsford. 

FINANCIAL 

The reports of 1930 and 1934 analyzed in detail school costs in 
Chelmsford, and compared them, item by item, with costs in other towns. 
Since these change little from year to year such a study is not given in 
this report. The report of the Town Accountant shows how the ex- 
penditure in 1937 of $102,813.64 was distributed in salaries, fuel, repairs, 
transportation," etc. The Town received the following sums in 1937, paid 
directly into the treasury, which should be deducted from the total ex- 
penditure to find the net cost of the schools to taxpayers. 

The largest item was $16,040, received as a credit from the State 
Part 1, Chapter 70, General Laws, provides for reimbursement from the 
income tax for salaries paid teachers. The rate of reimbursement de- 
pends on several factors, such as training and length of experience of 
the teacher and salary received, the average membership of the schools, 
and a figure furnished by the State as indicating the proportionate 
amount of the state tax paid by the town. The aim of the law is to aid 
the less wealthy towns by giving them a larger part of the proceeds of 
the income tax. 

The State paid tuition for 72 state wards amounting to $3,111.90, 
and tuition paid by (or due from) towns amounted to $524.80. 

A total of $30.00 was received for sales by the School Department. 

Deducting from these receipts on school account the cost of the 
schools raised by local taxes was as shown below : 

Total Expenditure by School Committee $102,213.64 

Receipts and Credits 

Reimbursement for salaries $16,040.00 

Tuition of state wards 3,111.90 

Tuition from towns 524.80 

Sales 30.00 

Total receipts on school account 19,706.70 

Net cost from local taxation $83,106.94 

8 



To raise this amount a tax of $12.83 was required on the valuation 
of 1937. That is, the net cost of the schools in 1937 represented $12.83 
out of the total tax rate of $30.70. 

The Annual Report of the Department of Education for 1937, Part 
II, gives full details concerning school enrollment, tax rate, expendi- 
ture, number of teachers, etc. for each of the 355 cities and towns of the 
Commonwealth. These are divided into four groups, cities in group I, 
towns over 5000 population in group II, towns under 5000 and maintain- 
ing high schools in group III, and the remaining small towns in group 
IV. Costs are given on a unit basis, the cost per pupil, which is the only 
way in which a fair comparison can be made. 

Chelmsford is the 58th in population of the 83 towns in group II, 
which is headed by Brookline with 47,490 and ends with Easton, 52 ( H 
Chelmsford had 7,022. (Census of 1930.) 

In wealth per pupil, valuation of 1936, Chelmsford is 75th with $4,379. 
Brookline leads with $25,564 for each pupil, the average in the 83 towns 
is $8,306, and the lowest is $2,918. 

In total town tax rate (1936) Chelmsford is 46th with $33.80. The 
highest was $53.40 and the lowest, Somerset, was $21.50. 

In the total expenditure per pupil for the year ending Dec. 31, 1936, 
Chelmsford was 81st of the 83 towns with $65.57. Brookline expended 
the largest amount,, $149.62 for each child in school, and the lowest was 
$63.15. In the other two groups of towns there were six which expended 
less than Chelmsford. All the cities w r ere higher. 

In expenditure from local taxation, after receipts from the State and 
other sources were deducted from the total expenditures, Chelmsford 
was 25th in 1936, with a rate of $11.97. The highest was $18.62, and 
Brookline, the lowest, required only $5.46. 

Put in another way, Chelmsford has less wealth for each child in 
school than most towns in her clcass, 74 of the 83 having more ; the total 
tax rate is near the medium, 45 towns having a higher rate and 37 low- 
er; 80 towns expend more per pupil than Chelmsford and only two ex- 
pend less ; 24 towns need a higher tax rate for the cost which is borne 
locally, and 58 require less. 

The low cost per pupil in Chelmsford is due largely to these fac- 
tors : salaries below the average, a ratio of number of pupils to the to- 
tal number of principals, teachers, and supervisors that is higher than 
the average (31 pupils to a teacher in Chelmsford, very few towns hav- 
ing so high a ratio) ; and the absence of special departments such as 
drawing, physical education, household arts, etc. 



Tuition to Lowell Vocational School for 1937 amounted to $3,014.27, 
and the rebate from the State was $1,492.37. 



TEACHERS 

The report of last year noted the retirement of Miss Bertha H. 
Long, after a service of forty years in the schools at West Chelmsford. 
This year another faithful and honored teacher of long service has given 
up active work in the classroom. After teaching primary grades in West 
Chelmsford and in Dunstable for several years, Miss Ella A. Hutchinson 
in 1905 began her service to the children of North Chelmsford in the 
Princeton St. School, and became Principal of the school in November, 
1933. During these years, both by her classroom teaching and by her 
life in the community, she has been a powerful agent in molding the 
lives and characters of hundreds of pupils. Her influence will persist 
long after these years of faithful service. Her colleagues, her former 
pupils, and the community at large wish for her many happy years. 

In the High School Miss Catherine Coughlan, and in the McFarlin 
Miss Myrtle Greene and Miss Clara Dexter resigned in June, as they 
were to be married, and in November Miss Charlotte Hyde, music su- 
pervisor, resigned for the same reason. 

On Miss Long's retirement, Miss Isabell M. Doyle was transferred 
from Princeton St. to the Quessy School, and Miss Rita Ryan of North 
Chelmsford was engaged as substitute teacher for the Princeton St. 8th 
grade. In September Miss Ryan was transferred to the vacant position 
in the High School. She is a graduate of Emmanuel College in 1936. 

At Princeton St. Miss Genevieve E. Jantzen, a teacher in the same 
school since 1911, was made Principal. Mrs. Reid was transferred from 
6th grade to 7th, Miss Hutchinson's grade, and Miss Roberta Small from 
South Chelmsford to the 6th grade. For the 8th grade position Miss 
Sally T. Conlon of Lowell was engaged. She had had two years ex- 
perience in the Greek Parochial School, and had served several weeks 
as substitute in our upper grades. 

For the two positions in the McFarlin School Miss Muriel Bridges 
and Miss Edna Hoyt were engaged, and for the South Chelmsford pos- 
ition Miss Nora Miskell. These young ladies are residents of Chelms- 
ford and all are graduates, with degrees, of Lowell Teachers College. 
Miss Hoyt had one year of experience in Vermont and one year in Sut- 
ton, Mass., and Miss Bridges had one year in Vermont. 

For the music supervisorship Miss M. Marion Adams of Chelmsford 
was engaged to begin work in January. She formerly held this position 
in the schools, and for the last ten years has served as music teacher in 
Townsend and Ashby, and for five years in Tewksbury. 

10 



ENROLLMENT 

A table at the end of this report shows the enrollment by buildings 
and by grades on October 1, 1937, and also total enrollment for the last 
ten years. As is the case generally with towns and cities which are not 
growing in population, the enrollment in the primary grades has fallen 
off. From an elementary enrollment of 1265 in 1933 the number dropped 
to 1158 in 1937, but the enrollment in the High School reached a new 
high point, 445. With one exception the present 8th grade of 156 is the 
largest recorded; in 1934 that grade had 162. We may expect an in- 
crease in the High School for at least one more year. Whether the 
elementary enrollment will again increase probably depends on the num- 
ber of new families which may enter the town. The Westlands offered 
the most serious problem in seating pupils this year. The 7th and 8th 
grade room could not possibly accomodate all who were entitled to at - 
tend that school. Five pupils volunteered to go a greater distance to 
the McFarlin school, which relieved the situation for the time being 
There is considerable home building in the Westlands, which indicates 
that a permanent solution has not been found. 

The Quessy School has been small for several years, while the en- 
rollment at McFarlin has steadily increased. By changing transporta- 
tion routes about 25 pupils could be shifted to the Quessy School. This 
would be done by requiring pupils living on Smith St., Parkhurst Road. 
Davis Road, and beyond, who now are transported to the Center, to 
take busses which would leave them at the Quessy School. I recommend 
that you give this matter early consideration, and that if any change be 
made it become effective in September. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

The report of 1936 gave a brief description, with dates of construc- 
tion, of the buildings now in use. Advantage has been taken of Federal 
work relief agencies in securing certain repairs to all the buildings ex- 
cept the High School and the McFarlin. These repairs have, included 
carpenter work, painting, and cement work, but have not included any 
work on the heating systems or in plumbing. The reports from 1933 to 
1936 indicate what was done in each building. In 1937 no work was done 
inside the buildings under Federal grants. 

By special appropriation in 1929 the Old Building at Princeton St. 
was given modern, sanitary toilets. In 1935 PWA labor was used in re- 
modeling the basement of the New Building, providing two new, well- 
lighted rooms for toilets. Out of the regular appropriation that year 
new toilet fixtures were installed. One building is left which needs sim- 
ilar attention, Highland Ave. The toilet fixtures are in poor condition, 
they have been in use over 25 years, and are of a type which cannot now 

11 



be matched for repair parts. If WPA labor should be available next 
summer for work in that building, it would be advisable to make changes 
in tb'. boiler room in the interests of convenience and safety, in addition 
to renovating the toilet rooms. 

SCHOOL GROUNDS 

The WPA project back of the Westlands School has been completed 
this year. The lot back of this building was of no use till 1929, when a 
special appropriation was used for grubbing up the bushes, plowing, 
smoothing and seeding. The seeding was a failure, owing to the poor 
soil. At that time the ground in front of the building was covered with 
the coarse gravel that had been used for filling. One of the first Fed- 
ral school projects was to remove the stones, spread a layer of loam, 
and seed these grounds. This project was favored by a wet summer, the 
grass made a good start, and a good lawn has resulted. The last project 
was confined to the grounds in the rear of the building. The area was 
leveled, a standard baseball diamond laid out and built, and the field 
seeded. The Parent-Teacher Association furnished material for bleach- 
ers, and had previously provided a volley ball court and a tennis court. 
The school deportment paid the wages of the driver of a town truck, 
amounting to $217.80. This part of the town now has a good athletic 
field for the use both of the school and of the community. The Town 
should make adequate provision for its continued maintenance. 

The two and one-half acre field adjacent to the school at East 
Chelmsford has been of very little use because of the uneven surface 
and many boulders. This field is now being leveled as a WPA project, 
and it is planned to provide a standard baseball diamond. 

It is not possible to make use of WPA labor on the land back of the 
Highland Ave. and the Quessy schools, since these fields are privately 
owned. 

Work was done on the school grounds at the Center three years 
ago, consisting of leveling the field and removing a sand bank to make 
the field longer. If a Federal project is desired for another season there 
is opportunity here for a comprehensive development which would ben- 
efit the entire town by improving the facilities of the school which is at- 
tended by all the older pupils. Such a project might include : 

1. Providing an adequate sewage disposal system for the two schools 
Previous reports have emphasized this need in pointing out the cost of 
maintaining the present unsatisfactory systems. No trouble was exper- 
ienced in 1937, but at any time, without warning, sewage may again bark 
up into the McFarlin School, or break out on the surface back of either 
school. 

2. Fencing the grounds. The lack of a fence, especially along Lowell 
Road, is a constant source of danger to the children at play. This is 
probably the most dangerous playground. 

12 



3. Rebuilding and hard-surfacing the tennis courts. These were 
originally provided, I understand, by the V. I. A. They have not received 
care for years and are useless in their present condition. 

4. Building a standard baseball diamond and back-stop. 

5. Providing a field house for athletic teams, which would obviate 
present very unsatisfactory conditions in the McFarlin School. 



TRANSPORTATION 

On October 1, 1937, a total of 619 pupils were being carried to and 
from school, 297 to the High School, 157 to McFarlin, 70 to Princeton 
St., 60 to Quessy, and 35 to South. The average number carried for the 
last five years is 608. This is the last year of the third three-year con- 
tract which the Town has had with George W. Marinel. His service 
during these nine years has been extremely satisfactory. The systm 
used is the so-called multiple-trip, which has the advantage of being less 
expensive than a system under which each section of the town would 
have its own bus, and the disadvantage of bringing pupils to the schools 
in some instances long before the hour when school work begins. At 
the present time one bus leaves West Chelmsford at the Post Office 
at 7.25 A. M. and takes a load of students from West and North to the 
High School; then goes down Boston Road and back to McFarlin; then 
over Littleton Road and Garrison Road to South Chelmsford, to the 
High Schol ; then back to North Chelmsford over Groton Road to near 
the Westford line and to the Quessy School ; then back over Groton 
Road to Princeton St. at 8.55. It has carried five loads. 

Another bus leaves North Chelmsford at 7.15, picks up students on 
Tyngsboro and Dunstable roads, and goes to High School ; then over 
Turnpike, Mill Road and Billerica Road to High School; then over 
Westford Road to Quessy; then over Old Westford Road and North 
Road to High School at 8.25. It has carried four loads. 

A third bus leaves North Chelmsford at 7.30 for the High School ; 
then goes to East Chelmsford and back to High School ; then goes 
about a mile over Billerica Road and back to High School ; then over 
Carlisle and Proctor roads to South Chelmsford; then to High School 
at 8.20. It has carried four loads besides relieving an over-crowded bus 
on Billerica Road. 

A fourth bus leaves Princeton St. School at 7.30 for the High 
School; then goes to East Chelmsford and back to High School; then to 
North Chelmsford and back to High School ; then over Dunstable and 
Tyngsboro roads to Princeton St. at 8.50. It has carried four loads. 

13 



A fifth bus is held in reserve in case any of the regular ones is dis- 
abled or unduly delayed. Generally the busses run very close to the 
scheduled time when the roads are dry; in bad weather they run be- 
hind. 

Since the present contract expires in June, a careful study should 
be made of the present routes, the probable school enrollment in each 
building next September, and possible changes for the improvement of 
the system. 

1 call attention to the reports of the Principal of the High School 
and of the School Nurse. 

Mr. Burns quotes ten principles drawn up by the National Associa 
tion for guidance in planning courses and administering high schools 
These are worded in professional terms, hard for the layman to under- 
stand. In effect, they mean that education in high school should aim 
at the harmonious and continuous development of the personality of 
each individual student, fitting him for a useful place in society, which 
will be within the scope of his powers and which will satisfy his ambi- 
tions. To this end there should be an offering of many different kinds, 
so that so far as possible each student may find work which will appeal 
strongly to his interests and which he will gladly pursue with enthusiasm 
through school and beyond. When the school can no longer hold his 
interest he is better off somewhere else, either in another type of school 
or at work. 

Applying these principles to Chelmsford High School, we find we 
have but few courses, consisting almost wholly of languages, mathe- 
matics, natural science, and history. We are not meeting the needs of 
young men and women who are hand-minded, rather than book-minded. 
For many students a shop, a household arts laboratory, or a practical 
project outside the school building is more vitally necessary than ordin- 
ary classrooms. These needs cannot be met till the voters of Chelms- 
ford provide more adequate quarters and facilities. 

Lowell Teachers College continues to use some of our classrooms 
for the training of cadet teachers. Three or four students in the 3d 
year of their course work for periods of twelve weeks with teachers 
who are selected for that purpose by the College. They have the benefit 
of observation in the classroom and practice under a successful teach- 
er, and the teacher gets considerable help from them, especially during 
the last part of their three months training period. 

Our schools are truly a community enterprise. Outside those who 
are employed by the Town many citizens are rendering service to our 



14 



boys and girls, through the Parent-Teacher Association, the Boy and 
Girl Scouts, the Four-H Clubs, and other groups. To all these, and es- 
pecially to you, the members of the School Committee, I express ap- 
preciation in behalf of the teachers and school pupils of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE S. WRIGHT. 



15 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 



January 17, 1938. 

Mr. George S. Wright 
Superintendent of Schools 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

My dear Mr. Wright : 

In this, my eighth annual report as principal of Chelmsford High 
School, I hope to tell, besides the usual statistics, of some of the trends 
in secondary education. 

There were 216 boys and 216 girls enrolled September 8, 1937. On 
January 3, there were 223 boys and 214 girls. The total enrollment for 
the present school year up to January 1 is 454. This is eight more than 
were enrolled January 1, 1937. 

The commercial enrollment continues to increase. Because of this 
fact it is more and more difficult to satisfy the requests of pupils, en- 
rolled in the other curriculums, to elect typewriting and stenography. 
It has seemed wise by the school authorities to require each pupil to 
meet the requirements of one of the three curriculums, this we have 
tried to follow. Pupils may elect into other curriculums, after they have 
met the requirements of the one curriculum chosen, if there is room, 
and if they can do so without conflicting with the required courses. This 
regulation, although not perfect, was made because of the physical im- 
possibility of doing otherwise. 

May I emphasize, again this year, that each member of the faculty 
stays for at least two afternoon sessions (2.30 to 3.45) each week to help 
pupils who, for any reason, need extra assistance in their work. This 
is not a punishment but rather an opportunity for those pupils, by extra 
effort and help, to complete their work satisfactorily. Many pupils take 
advantage of this privilege. More should do so. 

We belong to the Massachusetts High School Athletic Association 
and are governed by its rules and regulations in all athletic contests. It 
is our policy to play only those schools which are governed by the same 
regulations- 
Through athletics we aim to "train in citizenship" those pupils who 
are physically able and wish to participate. 



16 



While we like to win (and do win our share of the games in which 
we play,) we emphasize good sportsmanship at all times to be of great- 
er importance in all contests. We believe the health and safety of our 
boys and girls to be of the first importance whether on the playground 
or in the classroom. This is our duty and we try to do it regardless of 
any temporary personal disfavor that we may incur because of it 

Following are the functions of secondary education as given in a 
Report of the Committee on Orientation of the Department of Second- 
ary School Principals of the National Education Association. The 
"Functions of Secondary Education" is Bulletin 64, January, 1937. 

1. To continue by a definite program, though in a diminishing de- 
gree, the integration of students. This should be on an increasing- 
ly intellectual level until the desired common knowledge, appreci- 
ations, ideals, attitudes, and practices are firmly fixed. 

2. To satisfy the important, immediate, and probable future need? 
of the students insofar as the maturity of the learner permits, guid- 
ing the behavior of youth in the light of increasingly remote, but 
always clearly perceived and appreciated, social and personal values. 

3. To reveal higher activities of an increasingly differential type in 
the major fields of the racial heritage of experience and culture, 
their significant values for social living, the problems in them of 
contemporary life, the privileges and duties of each person as an in- 
dividual and as a member of social groups ; to make these fields sat- 
isfying and desired by those gifted for successful achievement and 
to give information as to requirements for success in these fields and 
information as to where further training may be secured. 

4. To explore higher and increasingly specialized interests, aptitudes, 
and capacities of students, looking toward the direction of them into 
avenues of study and of work for which they have manifested 
peculiar fitness. 

5. To systematize knowledge previously acquired or being acquired 
in course in such ways as to show the significance both of this 
knowledge and especially of the laws and principles, with under- 
standing of wider ranges of application than would otherwise be 
perceived. 

6. To establish and to develop interests in the major fields of human 
activity as means to happiness, to social progress, and to continued 
growth. 

7. To guide pupils, on the basis of exploratory and revealing courses 
and of other information gathered from personnel studies, as wisely 

17 



as possible into wholesome and worthwhile social relationships, max- 
imum personality adjustment, and advanced study or vocations in 
which they are most likely to be successful and happy. 

8. To use in all courses as largely as possible methods that demand 
independent thought, involve the elementary principles of research, 
and provide intelligent and somewhat self-directed practice, in- 
dividual and cooperative, in the appropriate desirable activities of 
the educated person. 

9. To begin and gradually to increase differentiated education on the 
evidence of capacities, aptitudes, and interests demonstrated in earli- 
er years. Care must be taken to provide previous to and along with 
differentiation as balanced and extended a general education as is 
possible and profitable. 

10. To retain each student until the law of diminishing returns be- 
gins to operate, or until he is ready for more independent study in a 
higher institution ; and when it is manifest that he cannot or will not 
materially profit from further study of what can be offered, to elim- 
inate him promptly, if possible directing him into some other school 
or into work for which he seems most fit. 

A few parents have visited the school in the interests of their chil 
dren. It seems to me that these pupils are benefited by these visits. It 
is a pleasure to us here to have you visit school and see for yourselves 
what we are trying to do for your boys and girls. 

* 

The report of the Chelmsford High School Students' Fund as tab- 
ulated by our vice-principal, Miss C. Edith McCarthy, is as follows : 



CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' FUNDS 

1. GENERAL FUND 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 444.52 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 205.35 

649.87 
Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 195.27 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 454.60 

2. MUSIC FUND 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 $ 116.09 

Less : Deficit, Jan. 1, 1937 30.36 



18 



85.73 
Less Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 73.65 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 12.08 

3. Blue MOON 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 175.76 

4. HEALTH CLUB 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 $ 5.80 

Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 5.80 

5. CHEMISTRY CLUB 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 11.06 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 3.25 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 14.31 

6. MAGAZINE FUND— (Gift of Class of 1934) 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 50.95 

Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 3.00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 47.95 

7. FENCE FUND— (Gift of Class of 1935) 

Receipts— June 1935 $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

8. PROJECTOR FUND— (Gift of Class of 1936) 

Receipts, June 1936 $ 40.00 $ 40.00 

9. DUNIGAN AND GAY MEMORIAL FUND— (Gift of Class of 1937) 

Receipts, June 1937 $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

10 DEBATING SOCIETY 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 1.08 $ 1.08 

11. DRAMATIC CLUB 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ .45 $ .45 

12. LATIN CLUB 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ .50 $ .50 

19 



13. CLASS OF 1937 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 $ 326.58 

Less : Deficit, Jan. 1, 1937 17.36 

309.22 

Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 309.22 

14. CLASS OF 1938 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 4.18 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 544.10 

548.28 
Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 522.19 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 26.09 

15. CLASS OF 1939 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 5.76 $ 5.76 

16. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 328.23 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 $ 1190.31 

1518.54 
Less Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 1417.26 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1937 $ 101.28 

17. YEAR BOOK OF 1937 

Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 $ 634.44 

Less : Payments, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 634.44 

TOTAL BALANCES $ 979.86 

18. CLASS OF 1940 

Deficit, Jan. 1, 1937 $ 6.05 

Less : Receipts, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 3.15 

Balance, Deficit, Dec. 31, 1937 2.90 

NET BALANCE IN ALL FUNDS $ 976.96 

20 



Distribution of Money — Dec. 31, 1937 

In checking account — Union Old Lowell 

National Bank $ 422.43 

Less : Outstanding checks 7.50 

414.93 
On Interest — Lowell Institution for Savings 499.36 

914.29 

Cash on hand 62.67 

TOTAL CASH $ 976.96 

I sincerely acknowledge with many thanks the kind help and hearty 
cooperation that I have received from you, Mr. Wright, the School 
Committee, the faculty, parents, and the entire student body, in trying to 
make Chelmsford High School fit the needs of the boys and girls of 
Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUCIAN H. BURNS. 



21 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Georgs S. Wright 
Superintendent of Schools 

Dear Sir: 

Following is a summary of my activities as school nurse for the year 
ending December, 1937 : — 

Number of visits to classrooms 496 

Personal hygiene and health talks to pupils 221 

Sanitary inspection in schools 68 

Individual instruction in schools 321 

Consultation with parents 284 

Consultation with pupils 310 

Consultation with teachers 94 

Consultation with others 86 

Pupils sent or taken to school physician 243 

Pupils advised to see family physician 182 

First aid 51 

Dressings 804 

Transported to hospital 101 

Absentees visited at home — instruction given 310 

Excluded from school for suspected illnesses 341 

Excluded from school for impetigo, ringworm, 

pediculosis 94 

Pupils with illness taken home by nurse 194 

Assisted by the nurse the school physician, Dr. Arthur Scoboria and 
Dr. George Carriel completed the physical examinations of high school 
and grammar school pupils in November. Candidates for athletic teams 
were given thorough examinations before the sport season opened. All 
pupils have been weighed and measured, underweights checked, and milk 
suggested or given to those not able to pay for it. 

Number of pupils examined by physicians 1886 

Number of pupils examined by dentist 1289 

Estimates of dental work sent home 941 

Children not needing dntal care 382 

Defects found — notices sent to parents when necessary: 

Teeth 941 

Tonsils and adenoids 260 

22 



Defective heart 18 

Defective eyes °' 

Defective ears 6 

Cerrical glands 134 

Thyroid glands 3 

Anemia 2 

Acne 22 

Poor posture 43 

Bronchitis 2 

Nasal obstruction 4 

Spinal curvature 1 

Pediculosis 12 

Underweight 60 

Corrections : 

Glasses 48 

Lenses changed 23 

Tonsils and adenoids removed 86 

Teeth treated 386 

Teeth filled— permanent 945 

Teeth filled— temporary 604 

Teeth extracted — permanent 35 

Teeth extracted — temporary 408 

Teeth cleaned 964 

For the eighth consecutive year Dr. Ritter has continued his excel- 
lent service as school dentist ; he is in some school every Wednesday 
from 9 until 3 during the entire school year. It is with his help and con- 
tributions from various Parent-Teacher Associations that Chelmsford is 
rated second among Massachusetts towns with a record of 93% of its 
children having all the work that necessarily had to be done at that 
time. 

As is customary, free clinics were held in the spring for immuniza- 
tion against Diphtheria. Parents must realize more than ever the need 
of such treatment, for only recently three deaths resulted from not tak- 
ing advantage of the opportunity to escape this dread disease. An- 
nouncement of time and place of clinics is made in local newspapers 
and in all schools ; free transportation is provided by buses. 

With parents' permission, immunization is carried out as follows : 
Diphtheria toxoid is given to children over six months and under twelve 
years of age ; the older ones receive toxin anti-toxin. The formr group 
does not require the Schick test, nevertheless plans are being made to 
give it to every child in early spring to determine whether immunity pre- 
vails. In spite of the extra work entailed, we think it is worthwhile, 
for our aim is to obliterate Diphtheria. I cannot urge parents too strong- 
ly to help us protect their children's health. In October, 1937 toxoid 
was given to 189 children; toxin anti-toxin, to 9; 7 were reimmunized. 

23 



Dr Martin, the County school clinic doctor, was here in October to 
give the tuberculin test to the high school students and to contact pupils 
whose parents are either confined to a sanitorium or home. Fifty-four 
calls were made by your nurse to obtain parents' consent to have the 
test made. 

The report is as follows : 

Children Tuberculin Tested : 

School population — High 466 

Children tested for first time 222 

Children previously tested 44 266 

% tested 59.6 

Children reacting to test : 

New Group 96 

Previously tested group 37 133 

% Reacting 50.0 

Children X-Rayed: 

Children X-Rayed for first time 95 

Re-X-Ray Group 11 106 

Children recommended for examination 16 

Children examined 15 

Observation cases 10 

Negative cases (discharged) 6 16 

X-Ray is given in the McFarlin Gym., but your nurse made sev- 
eral trips to Waltham with pupils who were absent. Several children, 
mostly underweights who have been examined by the State in previous 
years, are carried over for further examination. These were given 
examination by a State doctor and were discharged with instructions in 
regards to rest and diet, provided they were up to standard. 

As always the pre-school clinic in May was well attended. This clinic 
gives the parents time to correct defects found, before the child enters 
school in the fall. 

Few people realize that a nurse is not allowed to diagnose a case- 
diagnosis must come from a physician. If a parent sees that a child has 
a cold he or she should keep the pupil home and in bed, calling the 
physician if no improvement is seen within a day or two. So many 
diseases start with "just a simple cold," while not only the ill child but 

24 



all others with whom he is in contact are in danger of becoming sick. 
The family physician must give the child a certificate to return to 
school after an absence of more than five days. Children with con- 
tagious diseases are excluded from school immediately, being advised 
to consult a physician. After diagnosis the house is carded; instruction 
given about care of the patient, and fumigation of books is carried on. 
In severe cases, books are destroyed. Children exposed to contagion 
are excluded from school for at least seven days and must continue to 
live away from home if they wish to return after being examined by the 
family physician. The school doctors immediately examine all pupils 
in a room where a contagion disease has been found, and exclude any 
child about whom there is a question. 

I am at present taking a course in Public Health Nursing given by 
Prof. Brase ; I take every opportunity to attend whatever evening lec- 
tures possible. Dr. Archibald, State Health Officer, Miss Martin, State 
Consultant, and Dr. Wellington, doctor of mental diseases, were here 
several times. 

I wish to thank the School Committee, School Physicians, Parents, 
Teachers, Parent-Teacher Associations, and you, Mr. Wright, for such 
wonderful co-operation and support during the school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAE S. LEWIS, R. N., 

School Nurse. 



25 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 

As itemized statment of school department expenditures is given in 
the report of the Town Accountant. 



Appropriation 
for 1937 

Administration $ 3,950.00 

Instruction 71,000.00 

Operation and Maintenance.. 16,000.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 11,750.00 

New Equipment 250.00 

Total $102,950.00 





Budget 


Expended 


for 1938 


$ 3,942.40 


$ 3,950.00 


70,988.55 


71,930.00 


15,998.43 


16,500.00 


11,738.61 


11,350.00 


145.65 


250.00 


$102,813.64 


$103,980.00 



SCHOOL CENSUS— October 1, 1937 

Registration of Minors : 5-7 Years 7-14 Years 

Boys 146 512 

Girls 98 475 

Total 244 987 

Distribution of Minors : 

In Public Schools 199 960 

In Vocational School 

In Private Schools 1 20 

Not in School 44 7 

Total 244 987 



14-16 Years 
150 
131 



281 



259 
9 
6 
7 

281 



ENROLLMENT— October 1, 1937 

I II III IV V VI VII VIII Total 

McFarlin 45 41 39 36) 33 36) 36) 38) 346 

8) 10) 10) 14) 

East 17 21 18 15 17 22 17 19 146 

Highland Ave. . 16 10 13 12 17 13 16 23 120 

Princeton St.... 33 23 34 25 29 35 37 27 243 

Quessy 7 10 15 14 18 11 13 16 104 

South 10 5 4 8 9 9 45 

Westlands 25 20 17 21 20 13 19 19 154 

Total 153 130 140 139 143 149 148 156 1158 



26 



HIGH SCHOOL 

IX 131 

X 119 

XI 110 

XII 83 

P. G 2 445 



Total enrollment, all schools 1603 

ENROLLMENT FOR LAST TEN YEARS 
(Taken on October 1st of each year) 

Elementary High Total 

1928 1148 266 1414 

1929 1179 306 1485 

1930 1182 305 1487 

1931 1227 345 1572 

1932 1258 376 1634 

1933 1265 382 1647 

1934 1242 408 1650 

1935 1203 436 1639 

1936 1193 434 1627 

1937 1158 445 1603 



27 



GRADUATES OF EIGHTH GRADE 

Chelmsford, June 16, 1937 
McFARLIN SCHOOL 



Robert McNair Angus 

Sheppard Bartlett 

Herbert Beaubien 

Ruth Irene Butters 

Gordon Sullivan Cochrane 

Constance Beverly Dane 

James Edward Doole, Jr. 

Norman Frances Dows 

Paul Carl Fazel 

Jane Gertrude Garrow 

George Giras 

James Giras 

Steve Giras 

Arthur Clegg Greenwood 

Eileen Kathryn Greenwood 

Raymond Joseph Greenwood, Jr. 

Emile Raymond Halentic, Jr. 

Catherine Claire Hazeltine 

Arthur Karafelis 

Mabel Karafelis 

Arthur James Kinney 

Herbert William Lane 

Frances May Leslie 

Randolph Parker Leslie 

Karl Edward Linstad 

Charles 



Wolfram George Locher 
Robert Sawyer Ludwig 
Avis Gwendolyn Marshall 
Peter Joseph McHugh, Jr. 
Dorothy Elizabeth Moorehouse 
Thomas Francis Morrissey 
Virginia Eleanor Mortham 
Arthur Richard Palm 
Edward Gordon Parlee 
Ralph Joseph Pedersen, Jr. 
Marion McKinnon Pickles 
Dorothy Pond 
Charlotte Irma Rediker 
David Ernest Rooney 
Chester Cambridge Russell 
Shirley Barbara Smith 
William James Spaulding 
Frances Alvona Stanton 
Marie Jeannette Straughan 
John Arthur Swenson 
Alan Willard Symmes 
Janet Symmes 
Annabelle Taintor 
Evelyn Mae Taintor 
Alfred Edward Woodman 
Zouzas 



WESTLANDS SCHOOL 



Mildred Estelle Adams 
Roger P. Angers 
Fred Hollis Barton, Jr. 
Virginia Marie Benoit 
Gertrude May Bicknell 
Doris Anne Bowen 
Robert Earl DeKalb 
Winslow Parker George, Jr. 



Constance Louise Hill 
Shirley Wheeler Lawson 
Ruth Patricia McLellan 
Mary Theresa Messier 
Arlene Esther Smith 
Francis John Sullivan 
Edward Joseph Taff 
Edmund Roy Zabierek 



North Chelmsford, June 17, 1937 



28 



HIGHLAND AVENUE SCHOOL 



Mary Theresa Barron 
Charles Joseph Campbell, Jr. 
Charlotte Louise Duffy 
John Joseph Dunigan, Jr. 
Ellen Mary Jeanette Gauthier 
Melvin William Jones 
Mary Louise Kinch 



Frank Victor McEnaney 
Anna Alica McGeown 
James Francis O'Donnell 
Elizabeth Annie Palmer 
George Sereduk 
Harold Mathew Tucke, Jr. 



GEORGE R. QUESSY SCHOOL 



Robert Manfred Abrahamson 
Rodney Alfred Berubee 
Waynq Roland Berubee 
Stuart Chandler Bickford 
Lucille Farrington Bill 
Mary Thompson Boutilier 
George Arthur Ducharme 



John Ezerskey 

Robert Reginald Gorton 

Astrid Viola Johnson 

Natalie Vivian Johnson 

Alice Virginia Miller 

Frances Trull 

Stanley Gilbert Winters 



PRINCETON STREET SCHOOL 



Paul Francis Adle 
Betty Lucille Armitage 
Ada Babcock 
Eric Marinel Babcock 
Raymond Arthur Beauregard 
Frederick Carl Blodgett 
Vera Butko 
Walter Lea Davidson 
Leland Arthur DeBow 
Gloria Estelle Donovan 
James Eugene Fantozzi 
Marion Ruth Foster 
Virginia Elaine Foster 
Ethel Louise Fremeau 
Shirley Mabel Gale 
Lucille Louise Gaudette 
Silas Lawrence Gauthier, Jr. 
Francis Andrew Greska 



Ernest Alexander Hoey 
Frederick Jamros 
Barbara Marporie Kiberd 
Corine Ann Knox 
Charles Francis LeCourt 
Mary Josephine Miner 
Mary Mozol 

Eleanor Florence Quimby 
Shirley Ann Reeves 
Raymond Roderick 
Ruth Slater 

Pauline Ethel Stephens 
Alton Clay Trubey 
Marshall Quentin Trubey 
Helen Olive Tsagaris 
Mary Luenna Vondal 
Estella May Wright 



East Chelmsford, June 18, 1937 



John Joseph Arnold 
Harold Everett Barelle 
Rufus Edward Carlsen 
William Henry Dickey 



Armand Wilfred LeBourdais 
Florence Mae Moss 
Lona Rose Mueller 
Mildred Rita Silva 



29 



Bernard Francis Hunt 
Agnes Stella Hydusko 
Gerald Leon Lantagne 



Norman Stanley Smith 
Anthony Lawrence Sousa 
Emma Florence Young 



GRADUATES OF HIGH SCHOOL 



Alcorn, Edith Celia 
Angus, Esther MacNair 
Archibald, Loretta Z. T. 
Bachelder, Donald 
Batchelder, Robert M. 
Belleville, Walter Brown, Jr. 
Bickford, Norman Everett 
Birtwell, James William 
Borrows, Brendan Murtaugh 
Boyd, Charlton Philips 
Bray, William James 
Brennan, Josephine Frances 
Brotz, John H. 

Brown, Carl James 
Burns, Rachel Margaret 
Burton, Mildred 
Butterfield, Shirley Louise 
Calder, John Edward 
Capuano, Nicholas Phillip 
Clough, Roy Farrar, Jr. 
Corr, Clara Elizabeth 
Corr, Thelma Gertrude 
Davis, Hazel Rita 
Fadden, Helen May 
Ferron, Wilbur Lawrence 
Fielding, Hope Eleanor 
Foote, Doris 
Forgays, Lorraine Marie 
George, Edgar Parker 
Golubisky, William Joseph 
Goodwin, Barbara Virginia 
Gorham, Althea Marie 
Hill, John A., Jr. 
Hill, William John 
Hines, William Leo, Jr. 
House, Eunice Louise 
Hulick, Archie George 
Johnson, Betty Louise 
Johnson, Eric Herbert 
Jones, Dorothy Irene 

Kelley, Florence Marie 
Kelly, Jeanette Frances 
Kisley, Eugenia 



Krasnecki, Magan Samuel 
Kropp, Dagny Louise 
Laferriere, Paul Alfred 
Lantagne, Raymond Paul 
LeClair, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Lewis, Dorothy Elaine 
Lundberg, Edith Pauline 
MacLean, Shirley Louise 
Makey, Peter Antonio 
Marinel, Alix Isabelle 
McNulty, Gertrude Rita 
Mello, Anna Espinola 
Millman, Chester John 

Mills, Helen Louise 
Murphy, Pheobe Frances 
O'Brien, William Francis 
Olsen, Alberton Vinal 
Olsson, Betty Virginia 
O'Neil, Edward James 
O'Neil, Joseph Francis 
Pearson, Richard Paignon 
Pelton, Mills Cecil 
Peterson, Evelyn Emma 
Pettazoni, Gene Victoria 
Polley, Walter Ervin, Jr. 
Pope, Mildred Esther 
Putnam, Clarissa Marian 
Rich, Lillian Genevieve 
Santos, Emily Clara 
Saunders, Arnold E. 
Scollan, Mary Margaret 
Sheehan, Timothy Francis 
Shepherd, Gertrude Lillian 
Shugrue, Leon Theodore 
Sleeper, Nedra Lorraine 
Smith, Esther Louise 
Sousa, Aurellia Jeanne 
Stanchfield, Anna Gorden 
Swanson, Barbara Elizabeth 
Trubey, Katherine Ellen 

Woodhead, Frank A., Jr. 
Wright, Norman O. 
Zabierek, Stephanie S. 



30 



INDEX 



Accountant's Report Page 

Appropriations and Transfers 139 

Balance Sheet 148 

Payments 121 

Payments of Interest 152 

Payments of Principal 151 

Receipts 115 

Trust Funds 138 

Reports of — 

Agent of Board of Health 107 

Assessors 82 

Board of Fire Engineers 90 

Board of Health 105 

Cemetery Commissioners 95 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 57 

Fish and Game Warden 114 

Forest Warden 99 

Inspector of Animals 103 

Inspector of Meat 110 

Inspector of Slaughtering 110 

Inspector of Plumbing Ill 

Librarian Adams Library 98 

Middlesex County Extension Service 101 

Milk Inspector •. . . . 112 

North Chelmsford Library Corporation 96 

Police Department 92 

Police Woman 94 

Tax Collector 70 

Tax Collector of East Chelmsford Water District 74 

Tax Collector of North Chelmsford Fire District 73 

Town Treasurer 56 

Treasurer of Adams Library 97 

Trustees of Adams Library 97 

Welfare Agent 87 

W. P. A. for 1937 77 



Town Clerk's Report — 

Births Recorded 40 

Business Meeting, March 8, 1937 21 

Deaths Recorded 47 

Election of Officers 18 

Financial Report 55 

List of Jurors 53 

Marriages Recorded 42 

Officers Elected and Appointed 3 

Special Town Meeting Oct. 7, 1937 37 

Vital Statistics 40 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, 1937 10 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, 1938 153 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting Oct. 7, 1937 33 



INDEX OF SCHOOL REPORT 

Enrollment by Grades, Fall Term, 1937 26 

Graduates of High School, 1937 30 

Graduates of Eighth Grade, 1937 28 

Reports of — 

Enrollment for Last 10 Years 27 

Financial Summary 26 

High School Funds 18 

High School Principal 16 

School Census 26 

School Committee 5 

School Nurse 22 

Superintendent 8 

School Officials 2 

Signal for No School 2 

Teachers * 2 



Memorandum