Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"


Report 



EMERGENCY 



FIRE — 256-2541 



POLICE — 256-2521 



gggggggggsgggssssgssssesssssssssgsssssssasssssgssgsgssssssgsgsgsssssssgsgsgssgss; 



For Answers On: 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts 

Bills and Accounts 

Birth Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Civil Defense 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Elections 

Education 

Fire (Report a fire) 

Fire (For all other business) 

Garbage & Rubbish Collection 

Gas 

Health Matters 

Highways 

Licenses 

Marriage Certificates 

Notary Public 

Nursing (Town) 
Oil Burner Permits 
Permits for Burning 
Fishing & Hunting Licenses 
Dumping Permits 
Personnel 
Plumbing Permits 
Public Libraries 

Sanitary Inspections 

Schools 

Selectmen-Administrative Asst. 

State Welfare-Service Office 

Taxes 

Tree and Moth 

Veterans' Services 

Voting & Registrations 

Water 



Wiring 
Zoning 



Call The: 

Assessors' Office 

Accounting 

Treasurer 

Town Clerk 

Building Inspector 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Town Hall 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk 

Dog Officer 

Town Clerk 

Superintendent of Schools 

Fire Department 

Fire Department 

Highway Department 

Gas Inspector 

Board of Health 

Highway Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk and 

Selectmen's Office 

Board of Health 

Fire Department 

Fire Department 

Town Clerk 

Board of Health 

Town Accountant 

Board of Health 

Adams Library 

MacKay Library 

Board of Health 

Superintendent of Schools 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Hall 

Tax Collector 

Tree Warden 

Town Hall 

Town Clerk 

Town Hall (Center District) 

North District 

South District & East District 

Wiring Inspector 

Building Inspector 



Phone Number Is: 

256-2031 
256-3621 
256-2122 
256-4104 
256-9101 
256-8671 
256-6151 
256-4104 
256-4104 
256-0754 
256-4104 
251-4961 
256-2541 
256-2543 
256-2161 
256-5717 
256-2061 
256-2161 
256-2441 
256-4104 
256-4104 
256-2441 
256-2061 
256-2541 
256-2541 
256-4104 
256-2061 
256-3621 
256-2061 
256-5521 
251-3212 
256-2061 
251-4961 
256-2441 
256-2731 
256-2122 
256-4450 
256-8713 
256-4104 
256-2381 
251-3931 
No Phone 
256-5453 
256-9101 



ANNUAL REPORT 

or the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDIN6 DECEMBER 31, 



1973 



Printed by 

Picken Printing, North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Photographs - Marty Merluzzi 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Incorporated: May, 1655 

Type of Government: Town Meeting 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngs- 

borough on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 
on the South, and Wesford on the West. It is 24 miles 
from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 
from New York City. 

County: Middlesex 

Land Area: 22.54 Square Miles 

Population, 1970: 31,032 

Density, 1970: 1,394 persons per square mile 

Assessed Valuation, 1973: $244,444,990.00 (Real Estate) 

$9,204,955.00 (Personal Property) 

Tax Rate: $44.00 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke, Newton 

Edward M. Kennedy, Boston 

Representatives in Congress: 

5th Congressional District Paul W. Cronin, Andover 

State Senator: 

7th Middlesex District Ronald C. McKenzie, Burlington 

Representative in General Court: 

32nd Middlesex District Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford 

OFFICE HOURS 

Accounting Department Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Assessors Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

(exc Monday Evenings 7:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. 

(except June, July & August) 

Building Inspector Tuesday 9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. 

Thursday 5:00 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. 

Board of Health Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Highway Department 

Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Garage Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library Monday thru Friday 10:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. 

Saturdays 10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. 

MacKay Library Monday thru Friday 2:30 P.M.- 9:00 P.M. 

Saturdays 2:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M. 

School Superintendent Monday thru Friday 8:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. 

Selectmen's Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. 

(except June, July & August) .. 

Tax Collector & Treasurer Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. 

(except June, July & August) 

Veterans Agent Monday thru Friday 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

MEETINGS 

Annual Election First Monday in April 12 Precincts 

Annual Town Meeting First Monday in May High School 

Selectmen Monday - 7:30 P.M. Town Hall 

School Committee Tuesday - 8:00 P.M. High School 

Planning Board 7:30 P.M., 1st & 3rd Wed. every month Town Hall 

Appeals Board 7:30 P.M., 4th Thurs. every month Town Hall 

Conservation Commission 8:00 P.M., 1st & 3rd Tues. every month Town Hall 

Board of Health 7:30 P.M., 2nd Tues. every month Town Hall 
Housing Authority 7:30 P.M., 1st Tues. every month 34 Chelmsford Street 



<3ln JUtattorram 




PETER J. McHUGH, SR. 



Died May 23. 1973 



Member of Personnel Board 
1965-1973 



In grateful remembrance of his friendship, his devoted and dedicated service to 
the Town and for his understanding of the needs of our community, this tribute is 
offered by the Officials of the Town of Chelmsford, in behalf of the Citizens 
of the Town. 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 



Eugene J. Doody 
Howard E. Humphrey 
Thomas F. Markham, Jr. 
Paul C. Hart 
Gerald J. Lannan 
Arnold J. Lovering 
William R. Murphy 



Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 

(Term expires 1975) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 
(Term expires 1975) 

Board of Selectmen 



Term expired 
Term expired 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 



1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1976 



Richard L. Monahan 
Charles A. House 
Claude A. Harvey 



Treasurer and Tax Collector 
Philip J. McCormack 
(Term expires 1975) 

Board of Assessors 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Frank H. Hardy 
Arthur J. Colmer 
Arne R. Olson 



Claude A. Harvey 
Ruth K. Delaney 
Richard L. Monahan 
Roger W. Boyd 
Robert L. Hughes 



Cemetery Commissioners 



Chelmsford Housing Authority 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Board of Health 



Robert A. Finnie, Jr. 
Byron D. Roseman, M.D. 
Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 



Resigned 2-5-73 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational School District 

Thomas F. Markham, Jr. Term expired 1973 

Eugene E. Keller (Resigned) Term expires 1974 

Thomas A. St. Germain Term expires 1974 

Joseph E. Lemieux Term expires 1974 

Stratos Dukakis Term expires 1975 

Louis E. Kelly Term expires 1976 



Ralph E. House 

Jo-Ann Schenk 

Arthur L. Bennett 

David P. Ramsay (Resigned) 



Park Commissioners 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Planning Board 



John Kenney 
Timothy J. Hehir 
Thomas A. Ennis 
Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Eugene E. Gilet 
Stephen D. Wojcik 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 



James M. Geary, Jr. 
Martin Ames 
Robert D. Hall 
Jean B. Callahan 
Carol C. Cleven 
George A. Ripsom 



Joseph B. Greenwood 
Kenton P. Wells 
Eustace B. Fiske 
Francis J. Goode 



Joseph M. Gutwein 
James J. McKeown 
Matthew J. Doyle, Jr. 



Robert A. Noy 
Paul F. Jahn 
Jean R. Mansfield 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Thomas C. Thorstensen 
James M. Harrington 
Roger P. Welch 



William E. Spence 
Myles F. Hogan 



School Committee 



Sinking Fund Commissioners 



Sewer Commissioners 



Trustees of Public Libraries 



Constable 

Tree Warden 

Varney Playground Commissioners 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 1974 
expires 1975 
expires 1976 
expires 1976 
expires 1977 
expires 1977 
expires 1978 



Henry J. Tucker, Jr. 
Harry J. Ayotte 
Robert C. McManimon 



Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1974 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 
Arnaud R. Blackadar Term expires 1975 

Board of Selectmen, Administrative Assistant 



Evelyn M. Haines 
Clement McCarthy 



Town Counsel 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 



Chief of Police 
Robert E. Germann 



George E. Baxendale 



Thomas W. Morris 



Benjamin J. Blechman, M.D. 



Cemetery Superintendent 
Director of Public Health 
Board of Health Physician 
Superintendent of Streets 



Louis R. Rondeau 



Frank J. Wojtas 



Dr. Martin A. Gruber 



Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 



Neal C. Stanley 

Plumbing Inspector 
William H. Shedd 



Dog Officer 

Cheryl L. Constatine, Assistant 

Special Constable 

Joseph D. Nyhen 

Inspector of Animals 

Building Inspector 

Gas Inspector 



Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 



Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 
Richard M. Kelly 



Myles F. Hogan 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide, Council on Aging 

Mary McAuliffe 

Assistant Town Clerk 
Mildred C. Kershaw 



Moth Superintendent 



George E. Baxendale 



Planning Board Clerk 

Nancy D. Maynard 

Veterans' Grave Officer 



Wiring Inspector 
Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 



Term expires 1974 

Slaughtering Inspector 
Hubert R. Scoble 

Assistant Assessor 

Evelyn M. Philbrook 

Assistant Treasurer 
Florence M. Ramsay 



Term expires 1974 



Custodians of Public Buildings 

Elsworth J. Baldwin (Resigned 7-21-73) Center Town Hall 

Albert R. Reed 
Leroy K. Fielding (Terms expire 1974) Police Station 



Finance Committee 



Ralph Casale 

Gerald R. Wallace 

Marvin W. Schenk, Chairman 

Peter J. Curran 

William W. Edge 

James Frame 

Walter Lewis (Resigned) 

Richard T. McDermott 



Term expired 1973 
Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 



Zoning Appeal Board 



Carol J. diCiero (Resigned) 
John B. Hickey (Resigned) 
S. Robert Monaco 
Marshall J. Arkin 
John Kelly 
Charles J. Higgins 
Robert L. Kydd 



Carolyn Bennett 



Alternates 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1978 



Marguerite Waldron 



Mary C. Bradley 
Richard Codling 
Peter Dulchinos 



Committee to Study Liquid Waste Disposal 



Joseph M. Gutwein 
Reginald Larkin 
Albert Robitaille 



Committee to Study the Present Dog Leash Law 
William L. Ary Roanne Center 

Elizabeth S. Bartlett Carl Seidel 

Beatrice E, Beaubien Howard D. Woon 

Joseph R. Burns Frank J: Wojtas 



Wilfred Davidson 
Richard Lahue 
Barbara Nowacki 



Committee to Select Colors for Town Seal 



Leo Panas 
Edward Quinn 



Committee to Study Memorials for Korean and Vietnam Veterans 
Arthur L. Bennett Joan E. Jones 

Harold F. Campbell Edith M. Marr 

Thelma J. Calawa Joan M. Plummer 

Donald T. Davis Herman L. Purcell, Jr. 

Josephine M. Fisher Carol B. Reid 

Manuel G. Garcia Beverly A. Taylor 

Carolyn B. Temmallo 

Alternate Members 
Carole A. DeCarolis Raymond C. Dozois 



Council on Aging 



Joan Arcand 
Louise Bishop 
William H. Clarke 
Clarence Dane 



Lillian E. Gould 

George Marchand, Jr. 

Mary K. McAuliffe 



Peter Dulchinos 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Paul C. Hart" 
James S. Kasilowski 



Eugene Bernstein 
Donald J. Butler 
Thomas Doyle 
J. Halldor Helgason 



Richard Arcand 
Ford Cavallari 
Harold Krivan 



Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 



Drug Abuse Study Committee 



John J. Kenney 

Gerald J. Lannan 

Robert C. McManimon 

Haworth C. Neild 

Edmund Polubinski 



Thomas Morris 

William R. Murphy 

Jack Schnorr 

Paul J. Royte 



Cable Television Advisory Committee 



Mary McNally 

J. Allan Moyer 

Robert P. Sullivan 

Philip Swissler 



Preliminary Executive Committee to plan a celebration of the 

Revolutionary Bicentennial in Chelmsford in 1975 and 1976 

John C. Alden J. Perry Richardson 

Walter R. Hedlund George A. Parkhurst 

Vincent J. R. Kehoe 



Mary Donovan 
Joseph B. Hagopian 
Kazar L. Hedison 
Arthur D. Osborne 



Sidewalk/Highway Advisory Committee 



Robert A. Raab 

Louis Rondeau 

Richard Sullivan 



Youth Center Study Committee 



Ray Adams 
Everett Brown 
Linda Cahill 
Thomas Cobery 
John Curley 
Joseph Dappal 
Norman H. Douglas 
Pennryn D. Fitts 



Robert Hall 

Mitchell A. Korbey, Jr. 

Chris Pettee 

Anne E. Stratos 

Jo Anne Weinert 

William R. Murphy 
(Selectmen's Representative) 



Chelmsford Youth Center 
Eleanor E. Patterson Mary Ann Plunkett 

Denise M. Quinn Maura A. Sullivan 

Harry Foster (Resigned \ Gary F. Wolcott 

Michael Anderson (Resigned) 



Emergency Employment Act 

Employment Project Director John R. Clark 

Training Coordinator John C. Alden 

Purchasing Agent Robert E. Olsen 
Administrative Assistant to 

Drug Abuse Committee Russell W. Kerr, Jr. 

Liason Officer Gerald J. Lannan 



Representative to the Northern Area Commission 
Thomas F. Markham, Jr. Alternate John J. Kelly 

Ration Board 

Charles Koulas 

Thomas F. Markham, Jr. 

Paul I. MacMillan 



Four C's Committee 

Mary McAuliffe 

Historical Commission 



Robert E. Picken 
Vincent J. R. Kehoe 
Bertha Trubey 
George A. Parkhurst 
Robert C. Spaulding 
James Wolfgang (Resigned) 
John C. Alden 
Richard Lahue 



Dr. Howard K. Moore 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Grace W. Pettee 



Library Needs Committee 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 1974 
expires 1974 
expires 1974 
expires 1975 
expires 1975 
expires 1975 
expires 1976 
expires 1976 



Thomas C. Thorstensen 
Thomas A. St. Germain 



Representatives from Post 212 
Representatives from Post 313 
Representatives from Post 366 



Memorial Day Committee tor the Year 1 973 

Harold Woodman 
Herman Purcell 
Raymond Dozois 
James Fantozzi 
Manuel Sousa 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
Selectmen's Representative: James Lannan 

Fence Viewers 

Reginald Furness 
Richard D. Harper 

Veterans' Agent 

Terrence E. O'Rourke (Deceased 5-11-73) 

John Dowd (Interim Agent) 

Mary McAuliffe 

Director Veterans Services 
Thomas Markham, Jr. 

Honor Roll Committee 

George R. Dixon 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

Robert M. Hood 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 



George Archer 
Edward Baron 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Kenneth A. Cooke 
Thomas A. Ennis 
Donald A. House 
Herbert T. Knutson 



John J. McNulty 

Victor Fetro 

Peter J. Saulis 

George F. Waite 

James Walker 

Gerard A. Vayo 



10 



Personnel Board 



William J. Hardy 

Peter J. McHugh (Deceased) 



George Roy 
Peter R. Vennard 



Recreation Commission 



Sherburne Appleton 
Harry J. Ayotte 
William A. Dempster, Jr. 

Robert Charpentier 



John Balco 
Thomas Dougherty 
John J. Griffin 
Charles Mitsakos 



Director: Edward J. Quinn 
Home Rule Advisory Committee 



Paul W. Murphy 
Haworth C. Neild 
Alfred M. Woods 



Gerald Silver 

Robert Stallard 

Carol Stark 



Industrial Development Commission 
Allan D. Davidson (Resigned) 
James M. Harrington 
Harold B. Higgins 
Philip Stratos 
Walter S. Dronzek 
Forrest E. Dupee 
Robert Geary 
Richard Lynch 
James Emanouil 
David McLachlan 
Robert Sayers 
Richard F. Scott 
Philip Currier 



Term expires 1976 
Term expired 1973 
Term expired 1973 
Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 



John Bomal 
Alex F. Coluchi, Jr. 
Leo Gendron 
George Ingalls 
Ted Magiera 
Peter F. McEnaney 
Lillian Cabana 



Weighers of Merchandise 



Charles Hacking 

Francis J. Sakalinski 

Frederick Simpson 

Edward Whitworth 

Paul Westwood 

George Fournier 

Ovila Sirois 



Anti Litter Committee 



Paula D. Blagg 
Diane L. Boisvert 
Nancy L. Bue 
Janet Carmosino 
Richard E. Codling 
George Dombroski 
Eva Dukakis 
Paula A. Hamer 
Janet E. Knight 



David W. Lewis 

Lois E. Manty 

Anna Meeker 

Anna Paradis 

Lorraine A. Shea 

Myra Silver 

Elizabeth A. Twombly 

F. Clinton Vincent 

Evelyn Wiszt 



Environmental Advisory Council Steering Committee 

(Term expire 3-1974) 
Dr. Ethel N. Kamien, Chairman Diane H. Lewis 

Ina B. Greenblatt, Co-Chairman Dr. Clara M. Refson 

Dr. George Carr (Resigned) Mary Wadman 

Priscilla Hinckley Richard B. Codling 



11 



Myles Hogan 
Thomas F. Markham 



Town Tree Department 



Robert Olson 
Louis Rondeau 



Arnaud Blackadar 
Gerald J. Lannan 



Town Hall Site Committee 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Philip J. McCormack 



Robert E. Germann 
Barnard L. George 
John H. Kelly, Jr. 



Police Station Addition Committee 



Paul V. LaHaise 
Peter McHugh, Jr. 



Merrill E. Anderson 
Mary C. Bradley 
Richard B. Codling 
Peter Dulchinos 



Liquid Waste Disposal Problems 



Joseph M. Gutwein 

Reginald M. Larkin 

Richard Madden 

Albert Robitaille 



Raymond Day 
William F. Fitzpatrick 
James K. Gifford 



Town Celebration Committee 

Terms expire 3-1974 



Walter Hedlund 

Donald A. House 

Richard Lahue, Sr. 



Board of Registrars 



Edward H. Hilliard 

Robert J. Noble 

Michael J. Devine 

Benedetto J. Varano 

John P. Emerson (Resigned 2-73) 



Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expired 1973 
Term expired 1973 



Capital Planning and Budgeting Committee 

Arnaud Blackadar Edward Krasnecki 

William Fitzpatrick Samuel Parks 

Edgar P. George Marvin Schenk 



George J. Brown 
George R. Dixon 
William W. Edge 
Walter Edwards 



Civil Defense 

(Terms Expire 1974) 



Walter Hedlund 
Charles Koulas 

Robert E. Olson 
Frederick Reid 



Conservation Commission 



Robert E. Howe 
John E. McCormack 
Janet Lombard 
Jane S. McKersie 
John J. Balco 
Florence Gullion 
Donald A. House 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 1974 
expires 1974 
expires 1975 
expires 1975 
expires 1976 
expires 1976 
expires 1976 



Community Teamwork 
Arnaud Blackadar 



12 



Community Action Advisory Committee 

Jane Cryan Thelma Stallard 

John Cryan Theresa McCaul 

Rev. Harry A. Foster Arnold Lovering 

Virginia Foster Bernice O'Neil 

Rita Geoffroy H. Francis Wiggin 
Mary McAuliffe 

Committee to Up-Date Town History 
Frederick Burne Robert Spaulding 

Charlotte P. DeWolf Charles E. Watt, Sr. 

Julia Fogg 



Committee to Study Lighting of Certain Playground Areas 



Thomas W. Eck 
Robert D. Hall 
Paul C. Hart 
Paul Krenitsky 



Robert C. McManimon 
Paul W. Murphy 
Richard M. Ring 



Robert T. Clough 
Bruce S. Gullion 
Martin K. Bovey 



Town Forest Committee 



Term expired 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 



Beatrice Beaubien 

Peter Green 

Dr. Martin Gruber 



Kennel Building Committee 



Carl Seidel 

Frank Wojtas 

Charles Feeney 



Road Truck Exclusion Sub-Committee 
Leslie Adams Gerald J. Lannan 

Robert Germann Thomas F. Markham, Jr. 

Special Town Counsel for East Sate Plaza Violations 

Charles Zaroulis, Esq. 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Celebration Commission 
John C. Alden George A. Parkhurst 

Walter R. Hedlund J. Perry Richardson 

Vincent J. R. Kehoe 

East Chelmsford Fire Station Building Committee 
George Dixon Edward G. Quinn 

Walter Hedlund Frederick Reid 

Edward Hoyt 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 

Gerald Lannan Term expired 1973 

John J. Kelly Term expires 1974 

Thomas Markham, Jr. Term expires 1974 



Myles Hogan 
Robert Olson 



Implementing Town Tree Department 



Louis Rondeau 
Jo-Ann Schenk 



U.N. Day Chairman 

Elizabeth M. Marshall 



13 



Snowmobile/Trailmobile Committee 

John J. Bell Stephen Gross 

William Dempster Donald House 

Bruce Gullion William H. Palmer, Jr. 

Kenneth Greeno Geraldine Scully 

Emergency Employment Act 

Employment project Director John R. Clark 

Purchasing Agent Robert E. Olson 
Administrative Assistant to 

Drug Abuse Committee Russell W. Kerr, Jr. 

Youth Center 

Coordinator Gary Wolnik 



14 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Standing, left to right: Arnold J. Lovering, William R. Murphy, 
Gerald J. Lannan; sitting: Thomas F. Marlcham, Jr., Paul C. Hart 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On March 6, 1973, the Board of Selectmen reorganized, welcoming Arnold J. Lovering and William R. 
Murphy as its newest members. The Board elected Thomas F. Markham, Jr., Chairman; Arnold J. Lovering, 
Vice-Chairman; William R. Murphy, Clerk. The other two members are Paul C. Hart and Gerald J. Lannan. 
The Boards' first action was the reappointment of Clement McCarthy to his third one-year term as Town 
Counsel, and the reappointment of Evelyn M. Haines to her second one-year term as Administrative Assistant 
to the Selectmen. 

In 1973 the Selectmen adopted comprehensive procedures for meetings which have aided in their efficiency 
in conducting their regular and special meetings, as well as public hearings. 

Highlights of the year's activities are included in the following paragraphs . . . 

As the Licensing Authority, the Board held its usual hearings on the issuance of various licenses and also 
renewed licenses which come under their jurisdiction. 

The proposed Charter change appeared on the 1973 ballot and was narrowly defeated. The Home Rule 
Advisory Committee has, however, furnished steps which could be adopted either through a vote of the Board 
of Selectmen or by Town Meeting action to implement some phases of this Charter. 

The 1973 Annual Town Meeting was completed in nine sessions, which was the longest recorded session 
of Town Meeting. Among the many issues considered, the Annual Town Meeting authorized funds for: 

A Police Station Addition; restoration of Crystal Lake; the acquisition of land in East Chelmsford for a Fire 
Station in East Chelmsford; recreational equipment and material for children, which was constructed at the 
Robert's Property on Old Westford Road; an Assistant Dog Officer, 'Insurance coverage to indemnify the Se- 
lectmen in law suits brought against them while acting in good faith and persuance of their duties ; installation 
of flashing yellow light with sign attached to read "School Buses Entering Ahead" at ten School locations; 
Bylaw to change the Annual Town Meeting and Town Elections — Town Elections to be the first Monday in 
April and Town Meeting the first Monday in May; Amendment for zoning bylaws to include Flood Plain Dis- 
trict; longevity benefits to all permanent employees of the Police and Fire Departments; Revenue Sharing Funds 
were applied to the Police and Fire Department salaries and Article 48, a sidewalk on the southerly side of 
Acton Road. 

The Board of Selectmen called a Special Town Meeting for October 1, 1973 for the purposes of allowing 
the Towns' people to vote on some seventeen articles of the warrent; however, only the first three articles of 
this warrant were voted on, as a quorum could not be secured to vote on the remainder of the articles. There- 
fore, the majority of these articles will appear in the 1974 Warrant. 



15 



Both the Chelmsford and Westford Selectmen have signed an agreement favoring the establishment of the 
Chelmsford /Westford Town Line, as currently described by roadstones. The Middlesex County Commissioners 
have been requested to survey the entire boundaries from Tyngsboro to Carlisle, in order to provide both 
Towns with a plan for study and a possible change in the existing line. The Selectmen perambulated these 
boundaries as prescribed by the Massachusetts General Laws during the month of July. 

In accordance with recommendations received from the Crystal Lake Restoration Committee, the Board of 
Selectmen signed an agreement with the firm of Fay, Spofford & Thorndike, Inc., to cover Phase One for the 
restoration of Crystal Lake, which are as follows: 

Dam constructed, emergency spilling, and Crystal Lake bottom; all of which have been approved by the 
State Flood Relief Board for reimbursement. The following items are under review by the Crystal Lake Com- 
mittee and are reimbursable by the State: 

Reconstruction of Inlet Control StrucQre, repairs to inlet canal, dike, and cleaning inlet canal; repairs 
to masonry walls and reconstruction of control structures in Mill Canal; construction of trash rack in Stony 
Brook and cleaning a portion of Stony Brook; Excavating and regrading Lake bottom to a nine foot depth. 

Articles will appear in the next special or annual Town Meeting for the above items and also the authori- 
zation to take the small island in Crystal Lake by eminent domain. 

Application for Spot Improvements to Central Square in the amount of $80,000 was approved by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works and as a result the Selectmen selected Storch Engineering to per- 
form the Engineering work on this project. This project is 100% state reimbursable and will require Town 
Meeting action to authorize short term borrowing. As a temporary measure, the Selectmen implemented the 
Summer Street Bypass in hopes that it would curtail some of the traffic congestion in the Central Square area. 

In view of the fact that the Middlesex County Training School was closed this year, the Selectmen ex- 
pressed their desire to obtain these facilities for municipal purposes. The Selectmen, with Middlesex County Per- 
sonnel, conducted tours of the facilities with Town Departments and Committees to find that there is a defi- 
nite need to use these facilities Sot municipal purposes. The Selectmen requested Representative Bruce Freeman 
to file legislation on behalf of the Town of Chelmsford for the purpose of acquiring this facility for the future de- 
velopment of the Town. 

The Governor signed into law Chapter 326 of the Acts of 1973, Redistricting of the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives, which split Chelmsford into three districts. The Selectmen filed an Amendment to this redis- 
tricting bill; however, this Amendment was never brought before the Legislature for a vote. This new law will 
take effect in 1974. 

The Selectmen have continued with the recycling project this year and publicly endorsed this project. 

This year, William R. Murphy, Clerk of the Board of Selectmen, was elected as a member of the Board of 
Directors of the Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns. The League represents some 23 cities and 128 towns 
of the Commonwealth; maintaining a central bureau of information and research on municipal topics, fostering 
conferences of municipal officials and actively encouraging/opposing legislation which affects the cities and 
towns of the Commonwealth. 

As the Town Meeting voted funds for a Labor Relations Advisor, the Selectmen advertised the position 
and appointed the firm of Murphy, Lamere and Murphy, of 540 Granite Street, Braintree, Massachusetts, to 
negotiate the Police, Fire and Highway Department Contracts. 

As the Town continues to grow, problems become more complex and a need for full-time employees be- 
comes necessary. To this end, we have gone on record as indicating that the Town needs and demands a full- 
time Building Inspector, Town Engineer, and Purchasing Agent; funds for which will have to be voted at the 
1974 Town Meeting. As our times change, the needs of the Community change, and it is the responsibility of 
a Board, such as §>urs, to develop and proceed forward to keep up with the present and future times. One of 
the most important duties of the Board of Selectmen is to appoint members to various Town Committees. With 
ever increasing demands being made upon our time, whether it be regular work or volunteer work, it becomes 
more difficult to find dedicated people who are willing and able to serve. The Town has been very fortunate 
that many interested and reliable Town's people are now serving as members of these Committees. New Com- 
mittees established are: Water Consolidation Study Committee, Tree Department Study Committee, Goals Com- 
mittee, Selectmen's Sub-Committee on the Energy Crisis, Cable Television Advisory Committee, and the Side- 
walk Study Committee. 

A great deal of thanks goes to all Town Employees, Officials, and Committees for their untiring efforts to 
make our Government work effectively. We believe that through their efforts, Chelmsford has established a good 
sound basis by which we can expect a continued growth in our Town. We urge all citizens of the Community 
to review the Town Reports and above all, vote and attend Town Meetings. 

16 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FOR THE YEAR 1973 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Mildred C. Kershaw, Ass't Town Clerk 



LICENSES and VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 
Licenses 


Kennel 
Licenses 


Marriage 
Intensions 


Recorded 
Mortgages, etc. 


1,421 


2,602 


10 


278 


510 


Births 

(Incomplete) 




Marriages 




Deaths 


364 




328 




220 



JURORS DRAWN 1973 



11 


1-26-73 


15 


1-26-73 


1 


1-26-73 


*5 


1-26-73 


24 


1-26-73 


73 


2-26-73 


76 


2-26-73 


59 


2-26-73 


2 


3-28-73 


82 


3-28-73 


51 


3-28-73 


35 


4-27-73 


78 


4-27-73 


16 


4-27-73 


13 


5-18-73 


55 


7-24-73 


28 


7-24-73 


37 


7-24-73 



39 


8-27-73 


49 


8-27-73 


37 


9-10-73 


34 


9-10-73 


80 


9-10-73 


98 


10- 3-73 


92 


10- 3-73 


94 


10- 3-73 


42 


10- 3-73 


97 


10-26-73 


24 


10-26-73 


36 


10-26-73 


21 


11-26-73 


66 


11-26-73 


67 


11-26-73 


48 


11-26-73 



Above names drawn from the 1972 Jurors list *Name taken from Subsidiary Jury List 



1972 JURY LIST 



Name 



Address 



No. 

1. Avila, Frederick, 8 Buckman Drive 

2. Barber, David J., 1 Muriel Road 

3. Bernacki, Henry, 31 Carlisle Street 

4. Bouisvert, Raymond J., 2 Butthinge Road 

5. Brigham, Donald H., 11 Bentley Lane 

6. Brothers, William F., 17 Wilson Street 

7. Burke, John P., 12 Sycamore Street 

8. Butler, Marjorie, 1 1 Douglas Road • 

9. Cady, Alan E., 5 Cortland Drive 

10. Caliandro, Pamela R., 16 Winslow Road 

11. Coconis, James, 21 Donna Road 

12. Cole, Margaret W., 122 Westford Street 

1 3. Cook, Edith T., 95 Westford Street 

14. Crocker, Anne B., 9 Mansur Street 

15. Dabilis, George, 104 Locke Road 



Occupation 

Packer 

Superintendent of Golf Course 

Welder 

V.P. of Union Bank 

Design Checker 

Account Manager 

Computer Programmer 

Retired 

V.P. Operations & Treasurer 

Assistant Director 

Budget Analyst 

Housewife 

Hybrid Specialist 

Secretary 

Owner of R. L. Co'te Ptg. Corp. 



17 



16. DeAngelis, Lawrence F., 7 George Street 

1 7. Dean, Joyce B., 1 2 Hall Road 

18. DiBenedetto, Evelyn M., 14 Scott Drive 

19. Dinneen, William F., 14 Sylvan Avenue 

20. Donaldson, Barry R., 43 Warren Avenue 

21. Dubreuil, Marie L., 108 Warren Avenue 

22. Elden, Claude F., 78 Gorham Street 

23. Ferreira, John J., 72 Riverneck Road 

24. Fiske, Frank H., 3 1 Boston Road 

25. Freker, II, Albert E., 20 Harold Street 

26. Gagnon, Kevin J., 17 Arbor Road 

27. Garnick, Paul H, 6 Lauderdale Road 

28. Goyette, Robert J., 9 East Sheppard Lane 

29. Hamlin, Roger H., 19 1 Robin Hill Road 

30. Harvey, David G, 30 Concord Road 

3 1 . Jewell, Jr., Ralph L., 1 42 Westford Street 

32. Johnson, Ernest S. J., 162 Proctor Road 

33. Joyner, Diane, 55 Riverneck Road 

34. Kelly, Jr., Louis M., 23 Berkeley Drive 

35. King, Wayne A., 16 South Row Street 

36. Knight, Curtis C, 15 Stonehill Road 

37. Lane, Jr., David P., 145 Warren Avenue 

38. Leary, Harriet C, 5 1 Manning Road 

39. Lessard, Ruth E, 38 Smith Street 

40. Lewis, William J., 12 Longview Drive 

41. Lombardi, Doris I., 12 Lancaster Avenue 

42. Lundgren, Phyllis A., 206 Princeton Blvd. 

43. Mackey, Robert P., 1 18 Princeton Blvd. 

44. Marchand, Mary L., 91 Stedman Street 

45. Masaoy, Selma E., 8 Erlin Road 

46. Matthews, Thomas G., 47 Swain Road 

47. McDermott, Marjorie A., 10 Abbott Lane 

48. McKee, Arthur W, 1 University Lane 

49. Menno, Louis R., 1 Chestnut Hill Road 

50. Morin, Clarence, 7 Priscilla Avenue 

51. Murphy, Edward J., 34 Garrison Road 

52. Murray, George M, 46 Locke Road 

53. O'Brien, Edward E., 25 Priscilla Avenue 

54. O'Connor, Thomas J., 6 Gelding Road 

55. Parker, Lester R., 29 Rainbow Avenue 

56. Pattison, David H, 15 Oak Knoll Avenue 

57. Peterson, George J., 1 1 Bridge Street 

58. Phelps, Madeline C, 15 Hornbeam Hill Road 

59. Popolizio, Michael J., 226 Riverneck Road 

60. Prescott, Robert D., 43 Highland Avenue 

61. Reedy, Carl F., 356 North Road 

62. Reilly, Paul H, 6 John Street 

63. Saliga, Thomas E., 20 Judith Road 

64. Schuetz, Ralph E., 244 Graniteville Road 

65. Shanahan, Shirley E., 6 Cove Street 

66. Shea, Robert V, 2 1 3 Concord Road 

67. Silver, Gerald, 95 Acton Road 

68. Sims, Dorothy E., 13 Balsam Drive 

69. Slayton, Barbara J., 50 Pine Hill Road 

70. Soderman, Donald A., 10 Cliff Road 

71. St. Germain, Joan C, 17 Wilson Street 

72. Stanley, Carl T., 27 Wright Street 

73. Stumpf, Kenneth D., 56 Old Stage Road 

74. Sullivan, Karen E., 26 Westland Avenue 

75. Swiderski, William J., 39 Abbott Lane 

76. Taylor, Robert, 10 Courtland Drive 

77. Vennard, Thomas H, 48 Washington Street 

78. Weed, John H, 22 Kinsington Drive 

79. Wiggin, Donald F., 175 Mill Road 



Salesman 

Work in Bank 

Housewife 

School Teacher (Sub) 

Technician 

Housewife 

Bookkeeper 

Ash & Waste 

Tax Supervisor 

Shop Owner 

Plumber 

Manager 

Engineer 

Shipper 

Engineer 

Manager 

Supervisor 

Check-typist 

Baker 

Hardware & Lumber 

Technician 

Comptroller 

Retired 

Stitcher 

Director 

Retired 

Secretary 

Representative 

Bookkeeper 

Secretary 

Rehab. Specialist Vet. Adm. 

Teacher 

Account Manager 

Production Manager 

Garageman 

Custodian 

Mechanic 

Retired 

Engineer 

Assembler 

Welder 

Ambulance Driver 

Clerk of Store 

Paper Cutter 

Grocerv Manager 

Unemployed 

Salesman of Cars, etc. 

Owner of Cleaning Co. 

Manager TV station 

Housewife 

Civil Engineer 

Admin, for Social Security Adm. 

Estimator 

Coordinator (Budget) 

Engineer 

Secretary 

Lab Technician 

Optical Engineer 

Teacher 

Logistics Support Leader 

Foreman 

Bookbinder 

Nurseryman 

Research Technician 



18 



80. Wojcik, Mitchell A., 6 Cliff Road 

8 1 . Woods, Jr., William J., 1 1 Wightman Street 

82. Zuis, John, 30 Ripley Street 



No. 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 



SUBSIDIARY JURY LIST 



Name 



Address 



Baxendale, Pauline E., 215 Graniteville Road 

Brown, Herbert R, 218 Mill Road 

Chernis, Robert J., 181 Concord Road 

Davis, Charles Wilbur, 222 Princeton Street 

Denike, James Harold, #56 Chelmsford Trailer Park 

Feeley, John E., 25 Rack Road 

Flanagan, Richard J., 10 Miland Avenue 

Harmon, Robert B., 113 Park Road 

Kiefer, Walter E., 14 Fenwick Drive 

Lambert, Frank J., 318 Billerica Road 

Lawrence, Alfred T., 4 Berkshire Road 

Leonard, Bertha S., 20 Algonquin Road 

Mahoney, Gertrude A., 4 Dennison Road 

Mitchell, John J., 17 Bentley Lane 



Procurement Specialist 
Assembly Inspector 
Maintenance Man 



Occupation 

Clerk 

Truck Shiver & Rigger 

Manager of Data Processing 

Custodian 

Project Engineer 

Mechanical Engineer 

Accountant 

Manager of Bowling Lane 

Electrical Engineer 

Construction Supt. 

Technical Writer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Manager 



1973 JURY LIST 



Name 



Address 



No. 

1. Alden, Constance L., 20 Spaulding Road 

2. Adamian, Harry G., 44 Ruthellen Road 

3. Barber, David J., 1 Muriel Road 

4. Biggs, Richard M., 136 Old Westford Road 

5. Bonsignor, Joseph L., 28 Westford Street 

6. Britt, Bonnie R., 26 Newfield Street 

7. Brunelle, Victor W., 8 Columbus Avenue 

8. Brown, Everett W., 17 Wilson Street 

9. Burrow, Walter D., 17 Montview Road 

10. Cambria, Charles J., 17 Kensington Drive 

11. Caraganis, Evan L., 15 Bradford Road 

12. Carstens, George R., 52 Ansie Road 

13. Chase, Joel N., 10 Lauderdale Road 

14. Clarke, George J., 2 1 1 Riverneck Road 

15. Conley, Helen M., 10 Sherman Street 

16. Cook, Steven P., 7 Princeton Drive 

1 7. Cummings, Doris Y., 145 Old Westford Road 

19. Dean, Jr., Donald F., 22 Erlin Road 

20. Devine, Michael J., 88 Brick Kiln Road 

2 1 . DiNicola, Louis P., 43 Ansie Road 

22. Donovan, Virginia, 15 Wilson Street 

23. Doyle, Jr., Thomas G, 27 Bradford Road 

24. Ducharme, Raymond G, 63 Chelmsford Street 

25. Dumais, Dorothy L., 1 1 Spaulding Road 

26. Edwards, George F., 28 First Street 

27. Ely, Frank E., 4 Murray Hill Road 

28. Evans, Frank D., 57 Sleigh Road 

29. Finn, Lawrence J., 18 Algonquin Road 

30. Flynn, Francis E., 3 Arbutus Avenue 

3 1 . Frediani, Albert R., 37 Manning Road 

32. Gale, Alan S., 21 Arbor Road 

33. Garner, Ruth, 1 3 Dakota Road 

34. Goodwill, Robert J., 5 Galloway Road 

35. Grady, George A., 1 2 Hidden Way 

36. Haight, Earl K, 8 Thornton Lane 

37. Hauze, Albert W., 6 Cortland Drive 

38. Higgins, Deborah M., 134 Tyngsboro Road 



Occupation 

Executive Secretary 

Account Executive Salesman 

Golf Course Superintendent 

Manufacturer Representative 

Lounge Owner, manager 

Laboratory Technician 

Senior Stock Clerk 

Bus & Truck Driver 

Journeyman, Electrician 

Owner, Retail Sales Gasoline & Tires 

Aircraft Refueling Driver Foreman 

Manager, Assurance Engineering 

Hospital Service Director 

Tool Crib Keeper 

Makes Books 

Truck Mechanic 

R&D Processor 

Electrician 

Mechanical Technician 

Claim Representative 

Clerk 

Business Manager 

Meat Ordering Specialist 

Electronic Assembler 

Security Police 

Sales Manager 

Vice-President of Manufacture of Computer Equip. 

Instrumentation Engineer 

Supervisor 

Assistant Superintendent 

Production Planner 

Secretary 

Sales Representative 

Assistant Manager of Sales 

Marketing Specialist 

Technician 



19 



39. 
40. 
42. 
43. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
45. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
51. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 



Howard, Allan M., 21 Oak Knoll Avenue 
Hulslander, Jr., Ralph J., 74 Smith Street 
Johnson, B. George, 8 Lynn Avenue 
Johnson, William P., 26 Buckman Drive 
Katz, Arnold S., 199 Old Westford Road 
Kennedy, Andrew J., 1 1 Domenic Drive 
Kowalskie, Bryan J., 11 Dakota Drive 
LaCourse, John H., 7 Wilson Lane 
LaPorte, Arlene R., 44 Westford Street 
LaValle, Frederick L., 6 Surrey Lane 
Levine, Gerald I., 4 Westchester Drive 
Loiselle, Ronald J., 1 Barry Drive 
Leech, John, 9 Berkshire Road 
Maciak, Elaine T., 333 Boston Road 
Malatesta, Jr., Alfred G., 9 Charlemont Court 
Marotta, Louis A., 41 Abbott Lane 
May, Franklin D., 32 Sheppard Lane 
McCoy, Elizabeth A., 126 Park Road 
McEnnis, Charles L., 20 Wright Street 
McHenry, Robert B., 8 Monument Hill Road 
McLean, John F., 73 Billerica Road 
Moore, Loretta A., 23 Bartlett Avenue 
Moyer, J. Alan, 69 Thomas Drive 
Muzi, Angel o, 12 Baldwin Road 
Nobrega, Marjorie T., 57 Brick Kiln Road 
O'Connor, Thomas J., 6 Gelding Road 
Osborne, Arthur D., 6 Meehan Drive 
Pattison, David H., 40 Elm Street 
Pierce, Donald A., 5 Varney Avenue 
Raby, Teresa C, 30 Worthen Street 
Rebbert, Richard G., 35 Dalton Road 
Rotelli, Richard L., 4 Wagontrail Road 
Russell, Richard J„ 3 Mansfield Drive 
Savage, Jr., Edward F., 7 St. Nicholas Avenue 
Simpson, Mary K, 70 Boston Road 
Soucier, Richard J., 225 Groton Road 
Spicer, Joseph C, 8 Brentwood Road 
Stagone, Francis J., 48 Brentwood Road 
Steel, Glennadean, 18 Marina Road 
Swimm, Owen C, 44 Boston Road 
Theriault, Diane M., 79 Richardson Road 
Tougas, Thomas, 16 Swain Road 
Trudel, Edmond C, 3 Marinel Avenue 
Viola, John P., 20 Cloverhill Drive 
Warren, Frederick C, 182 Concord Road 
Weilbrenner, Donald A., 14 Gay Street 
Whitney, Phyllis M., 350 Old Westford Road 
Woods. Alfred M., 1 1 Radcliffe Road 
Yankopoulos, Menelaos, 9 Dayton Street 
Zymaris, Michael, 7 Bonanza Road 
Abrahamson, Frederick, 177 Groton Road 
Alterio, Anthony V., 34 Chestnut Hill Road 
Archambault, Robert J., 19 Mission Road 
Athas, Theodore S., 1 76 A Main Street 
McDermott, Claire J., 7 Dunshire Drive 
I' Anson, Harold N., 1 1 Robin Hill Road 
Carroll, John L., 19 Pleasant Street 
Curry, William C., 15 Overlook Drive 



Letter Carrier 

Sales Manager 

Architect Representative 

Accountant 

President, Katz Carpets 

Accountant 

Engineer 

Plate Maker 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Owner of Eastern Video Systems 

Equipment Operator 

Writer 

Staff Assistant 

Personnel Administrator 

Engineer 

Boiler Plant Operator 

Laboratory Technician 

Foreman 

Engineer 

Supervisor 

Office Manager 

Engineer 

Scientist 

Electronic Machinery 

Engineer 

Computer Repair 

Cable Splicer 

Foreman 

Counter Girl 

Superintendent 

Engineer 

Manager 

Engineer 

Secretary 

Operator 

Computer Programmer 

Distributor 

Housewife 

Engineer Assistant 

Supervisor 

Lift Operator 

Machinist 

Analyst 

Engineer 

Toll Testman 

Salesclerk 

President, A&A Construction 

Price Analyst 

Engineer 

Film Operator 

Engineer 

Manufacture of Generators Specialist 

Engineer 

Clerk 

Foreman 

Telephone Co. Assigner 

Manager, Military Data Systems 



20 




L to R: Mildred Kershaw, Lillian Judge, Mary St. Hilaire, Eliza- 
beth Delaney, Sandra Kilburn — Town Clerk's Office 



JBfel 


J |; 


BKft*^. '-^ 




^"~^^r~[~~~jMi§gM| 


iw . *■■ 



Evelyn M. Haines, Administrative Assistant 




L to R: Marion E. McCready, Bonita Towle, Joan E. Jangraw 
Selectmen's Department 



21 



Precinct 


1. 


Precinct 


2. 


Precinct 


3. 


Precinct 


4. 


Precinct 


5. 


Precinct 


6. 


Precinct 


7. 


Precinct 


8. 


Precinct 


9. 


Precinct 


10. 


Precinct 


11. 


Precinct 


12. 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

March 5, 1973 and March 12, 1973 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, viz: 

McFarlin School — All Purpose Room 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Junior High School Band Room 

East Chelmsford School 

Byam School, Cafetorium 

Westlands School, Cafeteria 

North Elementary School, Auditorium 

Senior High School, Small Gymnasium 

South Row School Auditorium 

South Row School Auditorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

Fire House — Old Westford Road 

On Monday, the fifth day of March, 1973, being the first Monday in said month, at 8:00 a.m., for the fol- 
lowing purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years. 

One Assessor for three years. 

One Member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Member of the School Committee for three years. 

One Member of the Nashoba Valley Technical High. 

School District Committee for three years. 

One Park Commissioner for three years. 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years. 

Two Trustees of Public Libraries for three years. 

One Member of the Planning Board for five years. 

One Member of the Sewer Commission for one year. 

One Member of the Chelmsford Housing Authority for five years. 

And to vote upon the following question: 
QUESTION: 

Shall this town approve the new Charter recommended by the Charter Commission, summarized below? 

YES □ NO D 

BALLOT SUMMARY: 

Upon approval by the voters, this Charter will become effective on July 1, 1973. The proposed Charter 
retains Chelmsford's Selectmen-Open Town Meeting form of government. The Open Town Meeting is divided 
into two sessions: One in April to concentrate on financial matters and one in October to concentrate on by-laws 
and zoning matters. The Charter changes the positions of Tree Warden, Cemetery Commissioners, Park Com- 
missioners, Library Trustees, Constable, and Varney Playground Commissioners to appointive offices. It pro- 
vides the Selectmen with an Executive Assistant whose basic duties are specified in the Charter. A Long- 

22 



Range Planning Committee is established and a provision is made for centralized purchasing for all town de- 
partments. 

The polls will be open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and to meet in the Chelmsford High School Gymna- 
sium on the following Monday, the twelfth day of March, 1973 at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and Committees: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to further amend Section 24, subtitled, "Job Titles and Stand- 
ard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law" by creating the following new 
positions: 

Assistant Treasurer 

Landscaper 

Librarian MLS (Assistant): 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2 A. To see if the Town will vote to further amend Section 24, subtitled, "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of 
pay negotiated by the Town and certain labor organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 
178 G through 178 N: or act in relation thereto. 

Recommended, 1973 

A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Veterans' Agent $ 3,185.00 p.a. 

2. Clerk, Senior $ 6,308.00 p.a. 

3. Clerk $ 5,340.00 p.a. 

4. Town Accountant $10,376.00 p.a. 

5. Town Clerk $ 4,563.00 p.a. 

6. Treasurer & Tax Collector $ 7,248.00 p.a. 

7. Assistant $ 6,308.00 p.a. 

8. Town Counsel $ 500.00 p.a. 

9. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant $ 9,015.00 p.a. 

10. Personnel Board's Recording Clerk $ 2.70 hr. 

11. Board of Registrar's Clerk $ 250.00 p.a. 

12. Clerk $ 2.70 hr. 

13. Planning Board Clerk $ 2.70 hr. 

14. Board of Registrars, Three members $ 275.00 p.a. 

B. CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent $10,333.00 p.a. 

2. Cemetery Foreman $ 3.95 hr. 

3. Moth Superintendent $ 450.00 p.a. 

4. Landscaper $ 3.63 hr. 

5. Laborer, Park & Cemetery $ 3.24 hr. 

6. Unskilled Laborer $ 2.00 hr. 

7. Park Superintendent $ 9,465.00 p.a. 

8. Skilled Forest Workman $ 2.65 hr. 

9. Cemetery Equipment Operator $ 3.82 hr. 

C. CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian (Center Hall) $ 2.99 hr. 

2. Custodian (Library) $ 2.99 hr. 

3. Custodian (Police Department) $ 2.99 hr. 

4. Custodian (Fire Department) $ 160.00 p.a. 

D. LIBRARY 

1. Librarian MLS $12,132.00 p.a. 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) $ 8,500.00 p.a. 

3. Branch Librarian $ 7,219.00 p.a. 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian $ 3.00 hr. 



23 



5. Junior Assistant Librarian $ 2.57 hr. 

6. Clerk $ 2.70 hr. 

7. Aids $ 2.00 hr. 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT* 

1. Highway Superintendent $15,025.00 p.a. 

2. Highway Foreman $ 4.72 hr. 

* The remaining classifications in this department are subject to collective bargaining. 

F. TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT* 

1. Chief $15,025.00 p.a. 

2. Deputy Chief $13,022.00 p.a. 

* The remaining classifications in this department are subject to collective bargaining. 

G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT* 

1. Chief $15,025.00 p.a. 

2. Captain $13,022.00 p.a. 

3. Matron $ 3.53 hr. 

4. Special Police $ 4.00 hr. 

5. School Traffic Supervisor $ 3.25 hr. 

* The remaining classifications in this department are subject to collective bargaining. 

H. RECREATION 

1. Director $ 2,500.00 p.a. 

(Transportation) $ 250.00 p.a. 

Min Max 

2. Swimming Director $80.00 $ 100.00 wk 

3. Swimming Instructor $56.00 $ 80.00 wk 

4. Playground Director $80.00 $ 100.00 wk 

5. Playground Supervisor $45.00 $ 66.00 wk 

6. Playground Instructor $56.00 $ 80.00 wk 

7. Sports Instructor $ 3.00 $ 5.00 hr 

I. MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector $ 800.00 p.a. 

2. Building Inspector $ 2,000.00 p.a. 

3. Gas Inspector $ 4.00 visit 

4. Electric Inspector $ 4.00 visit 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures $ 1,000.00 p.a. 

6. Dog Officer $ 6,240.00 p.a. 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer $ 2.50 hr. 

7. Clock Winder $ 100.00 p.a. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate such sums of money as may be re- 
quired to defray town charges for the current fiscal period retroactive to January 1, 1973; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

"The Selectmen are authorized to act as agents of the Town in any suit or suits which may arise during 
the current year: with authority to settle and adjust claims or demands for or against the Town: and to 
employ counsel whenever in their judgment it is necessary": or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow in anticipation of the revenue for the eighteen month period beginning January 1, 1973 in 
accordance with General Laws, Chap. 44, Sec. 4, and acts in amendment thereof, and including in addition 
thereto, Chap. 849 of the Acts of 1969, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chap. 44, Sec. 17: or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

24 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to request the Department of Corporations and Taxation, 
Division of Accounts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of all accounts in all depart- 
ments in the Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money with which 
to meet bills for previous years: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $264,764.00 or some other 
sum of money to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County Retirement System, the. said amount being the town's 
share of the pension, expense, and military service funds: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $125,000.00, or some 
other sum of money, to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6: or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Commission 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to accept the following mentioned streets, as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, and shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and to 
raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money for the purpose of reconstruct- 
ing the following mentioned streets: 

PERCHERON ROAD THOMAS DRIVE 

GREEN WAY SLEIGH ROAD (Extension) 

OVERLOOK DRIVE 

Providing all construction of same meets with the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such requirements have been met: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the 
sum of $25,000 to reimburse the North Chelmsford Water Department for the installation of a twelve inch 
water main from the stand-pipe to the Wellman North Industrial Park on Tyngsboro Road: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the 
present police station located on North Road on land owned by the Town, and to authorize the Board of Se- 
lectmen to reappoint the existing Police Building Committee and authorize it to proceed with the construction 
of said project and to enter into all necessary and proper contracts and agreements in respect thereto and to 
perform all other acts necessary for the construction of said project: or act in relation thereto. 

Police Station Building Committee 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple 
by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, as the site for a proposed new fire station the following de- 
scribed land which is bounded as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Riverneck Road, the southeasterly corner of land now or 
formerly of Stephen H. & Louise M. Farley: thence westerly two hundred fifty (250) feet: thence north- 
erly about four hundred (400) feet to Black Brook Channel: thence easterly two hundred fifty (250) feet 
to corner of land now or formerly of Helen Lemire: thence running southerly approximately four hundred 
fifty (450) feet to point of beginning. Said land being part of Lot #405 now or formerly owned by Frank- 
lin N. Prescott. Plan Book 35, Plan 28: 

and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of 
money to defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land and for 
paying any damages which may be awarded as the result of any such taking, said purchase to be made only 
if said land passes state sanitary requirements: or act in relation thereto. 

Fire Station Building Committee 

25 



ARTICLE 14. In the event of an affirmative vote under the preceding article, to see if the Town will 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a committee consisting of not more than five (5) members 
for the purpose of proceeding with the preparation of plans and specifications for the construction of a fire- 
house on the said described premises, and to transfer from the West Chelmsford Fire Station Building funds 
the sum of $2,500.00 for the use of said committee: or act in relation thereto. 

Fire Station Building Committee 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the purchase of a 1973 four-door sedan type vehicle for the Fire Department, said pur- 
chase to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen: and to authorize the Selectmen to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale the 1969 four-door sedan type vehicle now being used by the Fire Department: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds in 
the Treasury the sum of $57,400.00 for Chapter 90 construction: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for purchases of equipment for the Highway Department, such purchases to be made un- 
der the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize said Board of Selectmen to dispose of equip- 
ment presently being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

a. To purchase one pickup truck for the Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one pickup truck presently being used by the Highway Department: 

b. To purchase one low bed trailer for the Highway Department: 

c. To purchase one reversible snowplow for the Highway Department: 

d. To purchase two snowplows for the Highway Department: 

e. To purchase one truck chassis (for waste collections) for the Highway Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one waste collection truck presently being used by the Highway Depart- 
ment: 

f. To purchase one packer body (for waste collections) for the Highway Department: 

g. To purchase one truck cab and chassis for the Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient 
bill of sale one truck cab and chassis presently being used by the Highway Department: 

h. To purchase one dump truck for the Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one dump truck presently being used by the Highway Department: 

i. To purchase one dump truck for the Highway Department: 

j. To sell to the Historical Commission for the Town of Chelmsford by good and sufficient bill of sale for 
the consideration of One ($1.00) Dollar the old wooden sprayer now located at the far end of the town 
parking lot: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the purchase of a truck cab chassis to mount an hydraulic aerial device and chip body 
for the Highway Department, such purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen: or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. In the event of an affirmative vote on the foregoing article, to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money for the purchase of an hy- 
draulic aerial device and chip body for the Highway Department, such purchase to be under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money to reimburse the members of the permanent police force for vacation benefits due them 



26 



since January 1, 1970 because of the acceptance by the Town of the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 111 D: or act in relation thereto: 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into and nego- 
tiate with a transportation company for bus service for the Town of Chelmsford and Lowell areas if it is con- 
cluded by the Board of Selectmen that such service would be to the best interest of the town, and to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money, said sum to 
be utilized by the Board of Selectmen as the towns' assessment for bus service for the period from May 14, 1973 
through June 30, 1974; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money for the con- 
struction of dikes at Crystal Lake for the protection of property to determine whether such appropriation shall 
be raised by borrowing or otherwise, and to take any other action relative thereto: or act in relation thereto. 

Crystal Lake Restoration Committee and 
Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate certain sums of money to provide for 
complete site work in preparation for establishing a family recreation site at (A) the Robert's property on Old 
Westford Road and Westford Street and (B) on the school property lying south of the present South Row 
School: or act in relation thereto. 

Recreation Commission 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept a gift from the Parents' Association for Recreation 
for Children (PARC) of recreational equipment and recreational material for children, such equipment and 
material to be installed and used in a play area to be constructed at the Roberts property on Old Westford 
Road: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 25. To sse if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee sim- 
ple by purchase, by eminent domain, or otherwise, for recreation purposes the following described parcel of 
land situated on the southerly side of Westford Road near the intersection of School Street and Westford Road 
and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the northeasterly corner of the premises on the southerly side of the Westford Road and at 
land now or supposed to belong to one Roberts (land now owned by the Town of Chelmsford): thence 
running in a straight line in a southwesterly direction about one hundred thirty (130) feet to a brook: 
thence turning and running in a northerly direction by land of Gilmore about forty-three (43) feet to a 
stake: thence turning and running in a northwesterly direction along other land of Gilmore about fifty 
(50) feet to a stake at the southerly side of Westford Road: thence turning and running in an easterly di- 
rection by the southerly line of Westford Road one hundred fifty (150) feet more or less to the point of 
beginning. 

These being the same premises conveyed to Royal L. Larson and Catherine C. Larson by deed dated August 29, 
1945, Middlesex N. District Registry of Deeds, recorded August 31, 1945, 1:20 p.m., Bk. 1028, Plan 880, PP. 
412-413, and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of 
money to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land and for 
paying any damages which may be awarded as the result of any such action: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition and Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
sum of One ($1.00) Dollar to the Conservation Fund to be used for conservation and passive recreation purposes 
in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 132 A, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40 as 
amended, said sum to be used to purchase land, under the provision that should this land be used for purposes 
other than conservation and passive recreation the land will revert to the present owner, Campanelli Corpora- 
tion, the land bounded and described as follows: 



Land containing 22 acres, more or less, located on the southerly side of George B.B. Wright Reservation 
in Chelmsford, lot numbers as taken from Composite Plan, Hickory Hills and Country Club Estates, 
Chelmsford, by Bradford Saivety and Associates, Inc., Quincy, Mass., Lots numbered 219 220 221 222 
223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 252. 253, 254, 265, 266, 267, also land where 
the following roads were to be but not completed, DEWOLFE DRIVE, GREEN VALLEY DRIVE, 
COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, also New England Power Company Easement from the rear of Lots 232 and 



27 



234 to the rear of Lots 204 and 205 being 250 feet wide and being land now or formerly owned by Cam- 
panelli Company, Inc.: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum to be transferred to the Conservation Fund to be used for purposes in accordance with the Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 132 A, and Chapter 40, as amended, said sum to be used to purchase land de- 
scribed as follows: 

Southerly and southwesterly by Swan Drive, two hundred eighty- two and 10/100 (282.10) feet: North- 
westerly by land or formerly of Eveline L'herault, two hundred thirty-three and 60/100 (233.60) feet: and 
northeasterly by Lot 38, ninety-two and 57/100 (92.57) feet: and another parcel described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Swan Drive, by several lines measuring together one hundred ninety-five and 45/100 
(195.45) feet: Northerly by said Swan Drive, two hundred twelve and 8/100 (212.08) feet: Southeasterly 
by Lot 46, by several lines measuring together two hundred sixty-three and 45/100 (263.45) feet: South- 
westerly by Lot 48, by several lines measuring together, five hundred twenty-eight and 85/100 (528.85) 
feet and northwesterly by land now or formerly of Eveline L'herault, one hundred sixty-eight and 82/100 
(168.82) feet: 

said land now or formerly owned by San-Vel Concrete Corp.: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum to be transferred to the Conservation Fund to be used for purposes in accordance with the Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 132 A, and Chapter 40, as amended, said sum to be used to purchase land de- 
scribed as follows: 

Northeasterly by Dunstable Road, twenty-four and 41/100 (24.41) feet: 

Southeasterly by Lots Bl, B2 and B3, by two lines measuring together two hundred eighty-seven and 31/ 
100 (287.31) feet: 

Northeasterly by Lot B2, four and 79/100 (4.79) feet: 

Southerly by Lots B14 and B18 one hundred ninety-six and 1/100 (196.01) feet: 

Southwesterly by B13, seven hundred eighty-three and 89/100 (783.89) feet: 

Northwesterly by land now or formerly of Eveline L'herault, three hundred sixteen and 74/100 (316.74) 
feet: 

Northeasterly by Lots 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47, by several lines measuring together five hundred sixty- 
eight and 85/100 (568.85) feet: 

Northwesterly by Lot 47 and Dunstable Road by several lines measuring together three hundred twenty 
(320) feet: 

Said land now or formerly owned by Mrs. K. A. Cooke (Katherine A. McGoff ) : 

or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money to be used for the reconstruction of a dam located on the Crooked Spring Brook Reserva- 
tion: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the 
sum of $33,000 for application to the Conservation Fund: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will assume liability in the manner provided by Section 29 of Chapter 
91 of the General Laws, as most recently amended by Chapter 5, Acts of 1955, for all damages that may be in- 
curred by work to be performed by the Department of Public Works of Massachusetts for the improvement, 
development, maintenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, tidewater, fore- 

28 



shores and shores along a public beach, including the Merrimack and Connecticut Rivers, in accordance with 
Section 11 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, and authorize the Selectmen to execute and deliver a bond of 
indemnity therefor to the Commonwealth: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 24 of the Personnel and Salary Classifica- 
tion By-Law, subtitled 'Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries:, by adding thereto the follow- 
ing: 

Assistant Dog Officer $2.50/hr. 

and to vote to see if the Town will raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of 
money to be used by the Dog Officer Department to employ one or more part-time assistant Dog Officers to 
work under the direction of the Dog Officer: or act in relation thereto. 

Dog Leash Law Study Commission and 
Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money for the 
purpose of purchasing and installing one ( 1 ) new or used two-way radio to be used by the Dog Officer, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen: or act in relation thereto. 

Dog Leash Law Study Commission and 
Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money to be used for the procurement of plans and specifications for a proposed new Dog Ken- 
nel and to authorize the Selectmen in connection therewith to appoint a Chelmsford Kennel Building Com- 
mittee and authorize it to procure said plans and specifications and also to make a study of available facilities for 
purchase or lease within the town for the keeping of dogs in the custody of the Dog Officer: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Dog Leash Law Study Commission and 
Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to continue to participate in a Regional Drug Abuse Con- 
trol Program, and to negotiate with the Greater Lowell Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Program, Inc., 
d/b/a Share, concerning this program, in conjunction with the City of Lowell and other Greater-Lowell towns, 
and in connection thereto, to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or transfer from available funds, 
the sum of $28,290.00 or a lesser sum to be used for this purpose: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & 
Task Force on Drug Abuse Committee 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $7,826.23 to be paid to 
the Lowell Mental Health Association of Greater Lowell, Inc. to support the various programs of the associa- 
tion: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from the Sinking Fund the sum of $2,000 to 
reimburse the town for deduction under the fire insurance policy for losses sustained at the town garage and 
on school department property: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $10,000 from the perpetual care in- 
terest (account) to the general labor account of the Cemetery Commission and to transfer the sum of $6,700 
from the sale of graves and lots account for hot topping roads in Pine Ridge or other cemeteries: or act in re- 
lation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
sum of money to be used by the School Building Committee for the purpose of securing the design, specifica- 
tions, plans and cost for the construction of a 250 pupil capacity auditorium addition to the new high school: 
or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
sum of money to be used by the School Building Committee for the purpose of securing the design, specifica- 

29 



tions, plans and cost for the construction of a regulation size swimming pool addition to the new high school: 
or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to rescind Section 25 (compensation for academic achieve- 
ment) of the Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-Law and substitute the following therefor: 

Proposed Amendment By-Law Section 25, Compensation for Academic Achievement 

(a) Any full time, permanent member of the Police Department who has earned and received an As- 
sociate of Science certificate in law enforcement from an accredited college or university shall be paid $300 
additional salary per year in his grade. 

(b) Any full time, permanent member of the Fire Department who has earned and received an Associate 
of Science certificate in Fire Science from an accredited college or university shall be paid $300 additional 
salary per year in his grade. 

(c) Any full time, permanent member of the Police Department who has earned and received a Bache- 
lor of Science degree in law enforcement from an accredited college shall receive $500 additional salary per 
year in his grade. In the event, however, that the said member is already receiving additional compensa- 
tion by virtue of having obtained an Associate of Science certificate, then he shall be entitled only to an 
additional $200, so that his total additional salary shall not be excess of $500 per year. 

(d) No member of the Police or Fire Department shall be entitled to any of the above additional salary 
without the prior review and determination of the eligibility of the applicant by the Personnel Board: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money for the 
purpose of purchasing five (5) new 1973 four-door sedans to be used by the Police Department, said purchase 
to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen: and to authorize the Selectmen to transfer by a 
good and sufficient bill of sale, title to one (1) 1971 and three (3) 1972 cruisers now being used by the Police 
Department: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the 
sum of Ten Thousand (10,000) Dollars for the payment of the first phase of a two-year program for up-dating 
the current Master Plan: or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
the sum of $1950.00 for the purpose of purchasing insurance coverage to indemnify the Selectmen against law 
suits brought against them while acting in good faith in pursuance of their duties, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 41, Section' 100 E of the General Laws and amendments thereto: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500 to be used for 
the purpose of erecting a suitable memorial in all the cemeteries of the Town dedicated to all those of the 
Town who have given their lives for their country in all wars: or act in relation thereto. 

Veterans Memorial Committee 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
the sum of $994.00 to alter the time mechanism of the Tower Town Clock, Unitarian Church: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds in 
the Treasury a certain sum of money for the installation of a flashing yellow light with sign attached to read 
"School Buses Entering Ahead: to be installed in the vicinity of the following school locations: 

1. Graniteville Road new High School entrance 

2. North Road near the High School 

3. School Street near the Quessy School 

4. Boston Road near the South Row School 



30 



5. Graniteville Road near the Junior High School 

6. Billerica Road near the McFarlin School 

7. Groton Road near the North School 

8. Richardson Road near the Harrington School and entrance to new High School 

9. Billerica Road near the Center School 
10. Dalton Road near the Westlands School: 

or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the construction of a sidewalk on the southerly side of Acton Road between Proctor 
Road and Sleigh Road: or act in relation therto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the development of a plan for installation of sidewalks specifically for the elimination 
of safety hazards. Such plan is to be developed under the direction of the Selectmen and available for vote at 
the 1974 Annual Town Meeting: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money to be used 
for the laying out and construction of sidewalks on both sides of North Road from Route 495 north to the 
Route 3 rotary, said laying out and construction to be done under the supervision of the Superintendent of the 
Highway Department: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money to be used for the laying out and construction of sidewalks along the easterly side of 
School Street and the intersection of Old Westford Road and Graniteville Road: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to ratify the action of the Chelmsford Housing Authority in 
establishing a rental assistance program within the community under the authority of Chapter 121B, Sections 
42-44 of the M.G.L.A. or take any action in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

Disposal of Personal Property by Selectmen 

"The Board of Selectmen are authorized to dispose of equipment, material, and personal property owned 
by the Town of Chelmsford by sale or otherwise. 

If said equipment, material or personal property has a value of $200 or more, in the opinion of three or 
more Selectmen, the following procedures for disposal of said personal property shall be followed: 

One advertisement for bids shall be inserted, at least seven (7) days preceding the sale, in on or more 
newspapers published in the Town and a copy of said call for bids shall be posted in a conspicuous place at the 
Town Hall for seven (7) days preceding the sale. All bids shall be delivered to the Town Clerk who shall hold 
and publicly open all said bids on the advertised date. Said equipment, material or personal property shall be 
sold to the highest bidder. If there are no bids received, then the Selectmen may dispose of said property as 
they think best:" or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

No water shall be discharged from private property onto or into any public ways or sidewalks of the Town 
so as to cause a dangerous and/or defective condition: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to rescind present By-Laws pertaining to Annual Town 
Meetings and Annual Elections and substitute therefor the following: 

31 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (ELECTION) 

The Annual Election shall be held on the first Monday of April and the Annual Town Meeting shall be 
held on the first Monday of May: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the present Town By-Law pertaining to loud 
speakers and substitute the following therefor: 

LOUD SPEAKER BY-LAW 

(A.) Definitions 

(1) "Sound - Truck" as used herein shall mean any motor vehicle, horse - drawn vehicle or other ve- 
hicle having mounted thereon, or attached thereto any sound amplifying equipment. 

(2) "Sound amplifying equipment" as used herein shall mean any machine or device for the amplifica- 
cation of the human voice, music, or any other sound. 

(3) "Sound amplifying equipment" as used herein shall not be construed as including standard automobile 
radios, nor phonographs played in the home, nor any warning devices used on motor vehicles for the prevention 
of theft or devices used for traffic safety purposes, nor the equipment used in the operation of a drive in motion 
picture theatre. 

(4) "Outdoor loudspeaker or public address systems" as used herein shall mean not only that sound 
amplifying equipment located outdoors but also that equipment located indoors or attached to buildings which 
is directed to persons outdoors. 

(B.) Use of Outdoor Sound Amplifying Equipment 

(1) Registration Statement 

No person shall use, or cause to be used, a sound truck with its sound amplifying equipment in operation 
or other loudspeaker or public address system in the Town before filing a registration statement with the Town 
Clerk in writing. This registration statement shall be filed in duplicate and shall state the following: 

a. Name, home address of applicant. 

b. Address of place of business of applicant. 

c. License number and motor number of the sound truck to be used by applicant (if a sound truck is 
used.) 

d. Name and address of person who owns the sound truck (if one is used). 

e. Name and address of persons having direct charge of the sound amplification system. 

f. The purpose for which the sound amplification system will be used. 

g. A general description of the sound amplification equipment to be used. 

h. The approximate maximum distance for which sound will be emitted from the sound truck. 

(2.) Registration and Identification 

The Town Clerk shall return to each applicant one (1) copy of said registration statement duly certified 
by the Town Clerk as a correct copy of said application. Said certified copy shall be in the possession of any per- 
son operating the sound amplifying equipment and such copy shall be promptly displayed and shown to any 
policeman of the Town upon request. 

(3) Regulations for Use 

a. The only sounds permitted are music and human speech. 

b. Sound shall not be emitted within one hundred (100) yards of hospitals, schools or churches. 

c. Sound amplifying equipment must be operated by a person other than the driver of the sound truck 
while it is in motion. 

d. The human speech and music amplified shall not be profane, lewd, indecent or slanderous. 

32 



e. The volume of sound shall be controlled so that it will not be audible for a distance in excess of two 
hundred (200) feet from the sound amplifying equipment and so that said volume is not unreasonably loud, 
raucous, jarring, disturbing, or a nuisance to persons within the area of audibility." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

DISTRIBUTION OF HANDBILLS 

No person shall throw, deposit, or distribute any commercial or non-commercial handbill or flyer upon any 
private, industrial, commercial, fraternal or religious premises without the express permission of the owner 
or person in charg'e of said premises. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 16 of the Personnel and Salary Classifica- 
tion Plan by deleting therefrom present Section 16 A and substituting therefor the following: 

All permanent employees of the Town regardless of their length of service will earn fifteen (15) days sick 
leave per year. At the end of the calendar year each employee may carry over any unused sick leave bal- 
ance so that 120 days may be accrued: 

And to amend said Section 16 of the Personnel and Salary Classification Plan by adding thereto the following 
new section: 

16 C. All accrued sick leave will be paid at the time of retirement to the maximum extent allowable by 
law. This amendment shall be applicable to all employees covered by this By-Law including those employees 
represented by a labor organization: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article seven (VII) of the Traffic Rules and Or- 
ders Regulating Traffic by adding Section 34 B which shall read as follows: 

1. No through traffic vehicle weighing over two and one half tons {2 l /i) shall be operated on Dal ton Road: 

2. No through traffic vehicle weighing over five (5) tons shall be operated on Steadman Stret and to vote 
on an alternate route for vehicles using Steadman Street which alternate route will be prepared under the 
supervision of the Superintendent of the Highway Department: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 
5.5 Intensity of Use Schedule 

Amend the Minimum Yard Requirement for a CA District by adding footnote "d" to Rear Yard re- 
quirement of 20 feet and to revise footnote "d" to read as follows: 

"d" — Increase to 60 feet when abutting a residential district or use. Required side and rear yards to be 
landscaped open space.": 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to establish a Capital Planning and Budgeting Comittee con- 
sisting of seven (7) members: the Town Accountant, a member of the Finance Committee, a member of the 
Planning Board, and four (4) public members, said Committee members each to be appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen for a three (3) year term. The function of the Committee will be to study the Capital improvement 
needs of the Town, report to the Town at annual town meetings its findings as to capital needs, suggest priori- 
ties therefor and recommend budgeting methods i.e. through the use of the general tax levy or borrowing to de- 
fray the costs of said capital improvement needs: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



33 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to establish an Ambulance Review Committee whose function 
will be to review the present ambulance service provided to the Town and report back at the next Town Meet- 
ing or sooner if said review report is available when a special town meeting is called. The committee will be 
made up of seven (7) members: the Police Chief, the Fire Chief, one Selectman, one member of the Finance 
Committee/member of the Capital Planning Committee, and three public members who are to be appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following section of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: Chapter 41, Section 1081 

"In any city or town which accepts the provisions of this section, a member of the police department as- 
signed to photographic or fingerprint identification work in said department shall, after completion of one 
year's service in such assignment, receive in addition to his annual salary as a police officer a salary increase 
of six hundred dollars a year, to be paid him so long as he is assigned to said photographic or fingerprint 
identification work:" 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to transfer as a gift by 
good and sufficient deed a certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon located on Gorham Street, Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts, to the American Legion of the United States, Post 366, East Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
such transfer to be made only after such land is no longer used as the East Chelmsford Fire Station. Such land 
and buildings to revert to the Town upon dissolution of American Legion of the United States, Post 366, East 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, or upon abandonment of such property by said American Legion of the United 
States, Post 366, East Chelmsford, Massachusetts, whichever should occur first. A description of said property is 
as follows: 

Said land in that part of said Chelmsford known as East Chelmsford situated on the easterly side of Gor- 
ham Street, containing twenty-five hundred and thirty-four square feet and shown on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. belonging to Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Loucraft", by Henry O. 
Brooks, C.E., dated Feb. 21, 1922, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the northwesterly corner thereof at an iron stake on the easterly line of said Gorham Street 
situated forty-two feet southerly from a stone bound on the easterly side of said street, and thence running 
easterly on a straight line on land now or formerly of Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Loucraft forty- 
eight feet to an iron stake, thence at a right angle southerly in a straight line still on land now or formerly 
of Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Loucraft fifty-two and 50/100 feet to an iron stake, thence at a right 
angle westerly on a straight line still on land now or formerly of Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Lou- 
craft forty-eight feet to an iron stake in the easterly side of said street, thence northerly on the easterly side 
of said street fifty- two and 50/100 feet to the point of the beginning. Such land is also known as the East 
Chelmsford Fire Station, and is recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 661, 
Page 478: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 65. The duly elected officers of the legally chartered Post #5990 Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
Mill Road, Chelmsford, Mass., enter an article to the Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford, to inquire if the 
Town would be willing to vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of $500.00 to 
provide utilities and up-keep for the Chelmsford Post #5990 Veterans of Foreign Wars, under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 9: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will grant to NEW ENGLAND POWER COMPANY, a Massachu- 
setts corporation, certain rights and easements for the construction, maintenance, and operation of electric tran- 
smission lines over, across and upon certain strip of land 100 feet in width in said Town of Chelmsford, Mid- 
dlesex County, Massachusetts, owned by said Town — situated off the easterly side of Hunt Road, said strip to 
commence at land now or formerly of Frederick W. Macone and extend to land now or formerly of Claude J. 
Harvey, said strip is adjacent to an existing New England Power Company right of way: and to see if the Town 
will authorize, empower and direct the Selectmen to execute, acknowledge, deliver or accept in the name of 
and on behalf of said Town such deeds or other instruments as may be necessary or proper in connection there- 

34 



with: such deeds or other instruments to be in such form and upon terms as the Selectmen may deem proper: or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

All persons 65 years or over shall be exempt from paying more than 10% of their income on real property 
taxes due the Town of Chelmsford on property owned and occupied by him as his domicile or of a person who 
owns the same jointly with his spouse either of whom is 65 years of age or over and occupied by them as their 
domicile provided that person has domiciled in the same property in Chelmsford for the preceeding 10 years. 

That such person had in the preceeding year gross receipts from all sources whatsoever of less than six 
thousand dollars or if married combined gross receipts with his spouse of less than seven thousand dollars pro- 
vided that such person had a whole estate real and personal not in excess of thirty-five thousand dollars or if 
married a combined total estate real and personal not in excess of 45 thousand dollars exclusive of household 
furnishings and property already exempt under the twelfth, twentieth, twenty-first, and thirty-fifth clauses of 
Chapter 456 of the state law. In the case of real estate owned by a person jointly no exemption shall be granted 
to any joint tenant in common unless receipts from all sources whatsoever of each joint tenant in common is 
less than six thousand dollars and unless the combined whole estate real and personal of each joint tenant in 
common and his spouse does not exceed 45 thousand dollars. Where a portion of the real property occupied as 
a domicile of an applicant is located with a municipality other than Chelmsford and where the value of said 
property or taxes assessed by Chelmsford would result in recovering less than the maximum exemption that part 
of the property of such applicant within such other municipality shall be exempt to a value or to an amount of 
tax sufficient to grant the applicant the total maximum exemption. Any person who receives an exemption un- 
der this by-law shall not receive an exemption on the same property under any other provision, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the town will vote to adopt the following by-law: 

REVOCATION OF APPOINTMENT 

Whenever an appointment to an uncompensated town office is revoked, the Board of Selectmen or other 
appointing authority shall cause written notice of that action, along with a statement of the specific reason or 
reasons therefor, to be sent within 48 hours by registered mail to the affected individual at his last known ad- 
dress. 

This requirement shall apply to revocation only, and not to a decision against reappointment at the expira- 
tion of a fixed term.: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to change the zoning by-law and zoning map from the pres- 
ent RB District to RC District, the following described property: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Mill Road two hundred (200) feet easterly of a stone bound 
on the northerly side of the said Mill Road: thence proceeding in an 

EASTERLY direction along the northerly side of Mill Road three hundred (300) feet to a point at the 
land of the South Chelmsford Gun & Rod Club, Inc.: thence turning at a right angle and running in a 

NORTHERLY direction by other land of the South Chelmsford Gun & Rod Club, Inc. six hundred 
(600) feet, more or less, to land now or formerly of Minot J. and Ruth M. Anderson: thence turning 
and running in a 

WESTERLY direction by land of said Anderson: three hundred (300) feet, more or less, to a point at the 
other land of said Gun & Rod Club: thence turning and running in a 

SOUTHERLY direction about six hundred (600) feet to the point on the northerly side of Mill Road at 
the point of beginning. 

Containing 4 acres, more or less: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and maps as follows: to 
amend the Zoning By-Law by adding thereto, Section 15 entitled — Flood Plain District. The Section shall de- 
fine lands located within said Districts by attached map. 



35 



Section VI — General Regulation 
Section 15 — Flood Plain District 

15.1 Purposes 

The purposes of this District are: 

A. To provide that lands in the Town of Chelmsford subject to seasonal or periodic flooding as described 
hereinafter shall not be used for residence or other purposes in such a manner as to endanger the health 
or safety of the occupants thereof. 

B. To protect, preserve and maintain the water table and water recharge areas within the Town so as to 
preserve present and potential water supplies for the public health and safety of the residents of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

C. To assure the continuation of the natural flow pattern of the water course (s) within the Town of 
Chelmsford in order to provide adequate and safe floodwater storage capacity to protect persons and 
property against the hazards of flood inundation. 

15.2 District Delineation 

The Flood Plain District is defined as all areas within the areas designated on the attached map, which is 
incorporated herein by reference. 

A. Whose elevation above mean sea level based on the U.S. Coast and Geodedic Datum is at or below the 
elevation specified. 

B. Whose distance from the thread of the indicated waterbody or waterway is equal to or less than that 
specified. 

15.3 Use Regulations 

A. The Flood Plain District shall be considered as overlying other Districts. Any uses permitted in the 
portions of the Districts so overlaid shall be permitted subject to all the provisions of this section. 

B. In the Flood Plain District no new building shall be erected or constructed, and no existing structure 
shall be altered, enlarged or moved: no dumping, filling or earth transfer or~7elocation shall be per- 
mitted: nor shall any land, building or structure be used for any purposes except: 

1. Conservation of water, plants and wildlife. 

2. Outdoor recreation, including play areas, nature study, boating, fishing and hunting where other- 
wise legally permitted, but excluding building and structures. (Optional) 

3. Non-commercial signs (as permitted in the residential district), wildlife management areas, foot, 
bicycle, and/or horse paths and bridges, provided such uses do not affect the natural flow pattern 
on any water course. 

4. Grazing and farming, including truck gardening and harvesting of crops. 

5. Forestry and nurseries. 

6. Any of the following uses, if permission is in each case obtained, from the Board of Appeals: 

a. Commercial golf course. 

b. Private rifle clubs. 

c. Temporary stands for the sale of produce grown on the premises. 

but not including any permanent structures and subject to all other applicable Town By-Laws and 
regulations. 

C. The portion of any lot within the area delineated in Sub-Section 15.2 above may be used to meet the 
area and yard requirements for the District or Districts in which the remainder of the lot is situated 
(Optional) 

IV Board of Appeals 

In the Flood Plain District, the Board of Appeals may grant a special permit for any use and/or struc- 
ture, subject to the following: 

A. The request has been referred to the Planning Board, the Board of Health, and the Conservation 
Commission and reported upon by all three Boards or thirty days shall have elapsed following such 
referral without receipt of such reports: 



36 



B. The land is shown to be neither subject to flooding nor unsuitable for the proposed use because of hy- 
drological and/or topographic conditions: 

C. The proposed use will not be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare: and 

D. the proposed use will comply in all respects to the provisions of the underlying District or Districts 
within which the land is located: and to vote to delete Section 6.9 (Lowland Regulations) in its entirety: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to change the Zoning Classification of the following de- 
scribed parcel of land from IB (General Industrial) District to RM (Apartment Residence) District: 

That certain parcel of land situated in Chelmsford, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the most southwesterly corner of the premises on the northerly side of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road and at land, now or formerly of Carrigan: thence N. 47° 13' 46" E., by said Carrigan land, 145 feet, more 
or less, to the southerly side of the Merrimack River: thence in an easterly and southeasterly direction: by said 
Merrimack River, to a point at land of the Town of Chelmsford, 4700 feet, more or less: thence S. 15° 48' 50" 
W., 612 feet, more or less, to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W., by other land of the Wellman Realty Company, 
1249.69 feet to a point: thence S. 28° 35' 50" W., 500.00 feet to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W., by the north- 
erly sideline of the proposed Wellman Avenue Extension, 1320.00 feet to a point: thence S. 28° 35' 50" W., by 
the Westerly sideline of Wellman Avenue, 650.12 feet to a point on the northerly sideline of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W., by the northerly sideline of said Railroad, 56.28 feet to a point: 
thence S. 28° 35' 50" W., 6.00 feet to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W., 605.01 feet to a point: thence, on a 
curve of 3571.20 feet radius, bearing to the right, 164.13 feet to a point: thence, on a curve of 2831.93 foot ra- 
dius still bearing to the right by the northerly sideline of said Railroad, 790.69 feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing 83 acres, more or less, all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
showing Proposed Rezoning, as submitted by the Wellman Realty Company" by Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, 
Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, Billerica, Massachusetts.: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by-law and zoning map by removing 
from the present general residence district (RC) and changing to a general commercial district (CD) the 
whole or any part of land owned by Parish of All Saints, and bounded as follows: 

Southerly by Billerica Road, 130 feet: 

Westerly by a curved line forming the intersection of said Billerica Road with Chelmsford Street, 34.68 feet: 

Northwesterly by said Chelmsford Street, 127.52 feet: 

Northeasterly by land now or formerly of one Riney, 63.70 feet: 

Northwesterly again, still by said Riney land, 52 feet: 

Northeasterly by other land of Parish of All Saints, 38 feet; and 

Southeasterly, still by said other land of Parish of All Saints, 141.07 feet: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map 
to change from Single Residence District (RB) to Apartment Residence District (RM) the property bounded 
by North Road, land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chelmsford House Realty Trust and Chelmsford 
Development Associates, bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot IB, Parcel A and land of Benjamin & Esther F. Blechman, 1,007.52 feet: 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Chelmsford House Realty Trust, 935.68 feet: 

NORTHERLY by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 447.80 feet: 

NORTHWESTERLY by a curve forming the intersection of the relocation of North Road and the ramp 
to Route 3, 154.78 feet: 

WESTERLY by North Road (shown on plan hereinafter mentioned as ramp to Route 3), 991.37 feet: 

NORTHWESTERLY by North Road, 15.00 feet; and 

SOUTHWESTERLY by North Road, 372.05 feet: 

37 



Containing approximately 22 Acres of Land and being shown as Lot 1C, Parcel B and Lot 2 on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass.: Prepared for John D. Arenstam, Dec. 1969, Emmons, Fleming & Bien- 
venu, Inc., Billerica, Mass., Engineers & Surveyors", which plan is recorded with Middlesex North District Reg- 
istry of Deeds in Book of Plans 109, Plan 165.: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map by changing 
from a Single Residence (RB) District to General Residence (RC) District the following described parcel of 
land: 

Begining at a point on Littleton Road by a stone wall: thence running: 

NORTHEASTERLY Two hundred five and thirty-four one hundredths (205.34) feet by the southeast- 
erly side of Littleton Road to the westerly side of Garrison Road: thence 

SOUTHEASTERLY three hundred sixty-three and fifty one hundredths (363.50) feet by the stone wall 
on the westerly side of Garrison Road to a point at the corner in the stone wall: thence 

SOUTHWESTERLY six hundred sixty-six (666) feet by a stone wall to a point: thence 

NORTHERLY one hundred forty-five and fifteen one hundredths (145.15) feet to a stone wall: thence 

NORTHEASTERLY 

and NORTHERLY four hundred fifty-six and twenty one hundredths (456.20) feet, more or less, to the 
southeasterly sideline of Littleton Road and the point of beginning: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to prepare a proposal 
and obtain cost estimates for the installation of lighting facilities at the town playgrounds: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 32B, Section 7A as amen- 
ded "Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of firty per cent of a premium for contributory group life and 
health insurance for employees in the service of the Town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional 
rate?" 

A Fair and Concise Summary Appears Below: 

Acceptance of the provisions of Chapter 32B, Section 7A permits the Town to pay more than 50% of the pre- 
miums for contributory group life and health insurance for Town employees. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 77. In the event of an affirmative vote on the foregoing article to see if the Town will vote to 
pay 75% or some lessor percentage of the premiums for contributory group life and health insurance for Town 
employees, or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to grant longevity benefits to all permanent employees of the 
Police Department and Fire Department in accordance with the following schedule: 

a. Upon completion of five years of employment said employee shall receive a three per cent (3%) in- 
crease. 

b. Upon completion of ten years of employment said employee shall receive a six per cent (6%) increase. 

c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment said employee shall receive a nine per cent (9%) in- 
crease. 

d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment said employee shall receive a twelve per cent (12%) 
increase. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

38 



ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of $300,000 
or some lessor sum from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the current fiscal period: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the McFarlin 
School — All Purpose Room, North Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High School Band Room, East 
Chelmsford School, Byam School, Cafetorium, Westlands School, Cafeteria, North Elementary School, Auditor- 
ium, Senior High School, Small Gymnasium, South Row School Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, 
Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the 
time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS THIS 21st day of February, 1973. 

GERALD J. LANNAN 
EUGENE J. DOODY 
PAUL C. HART 
HOWARD E. HUMPHREY 
THOMAS F. MARKHAM, JR. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. Chelmsford February 22, 1973 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at the following places, wit: McFarlin School All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford School, Byam School, Cafe- 
torium, Westlands School, Cafeteria, North Elementary School, Auditorium, Senior High School, Small Gym- 
nasium, South Row School Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire 
House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

WILLIAM E. S PENCE 
Constable of Chemlsford 

A True Copy Attest 

WILLIAM E. SPENCE 
Constable of Chelmsford 



39 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 5, 1973 

Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Totals 
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

SELECTMAN FOR 3 YRS. 



Timothy J. Hehir 


150 


246 


223 


69 


155 


126 


256 


173 


102 


143 


117 


151 


1,911 


Arnold J. Lovering 


349 


179 


364 


174 


270 


357 


153 


299 


178 


300 


294 


297 


3,214 


William R. Murphy 


257 


70 


335 


84 


264 


255 


55 


222 


200 


273 


214 


391 


2,620 


Timothy F. O'Connor 


23 


15 


28 


107 


20 


22 


31 


15 


17 


28 


36 


21 


363 


Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 


213 


316 


247 


112 


96 


207 


327 


128 


93 


133 


165 


138 


2,175 


Douglas A. Shealy 


4 


8 


16 


2 


10 


5 


7 


12 


9 


14 


27 


16 


130 


Theodore Anthony Tasis 


40 


11 


29 


27 


24 


29 


16 


37 


31 


85 


33 


44 


406 


Blanks 


82 
1,118 


63 
908 


94 
1,336 


43 
618 


71 
910 


73 
1,074 


75 
920 


78 
964 


34 
664 


86 
1,062 


62 
948 


106 
1,164 


867 


TOTALS 


11,686 


ASSESSOR FOR 3 YRS. 




























Claude A. Harvey 


456 


384 


533 


281 


369 


453 


397 


392 


271 


416 


412 


446 


4,810 


Blanks 


103 
559 


70 
454 


135 
668 


28 
309 


86 
455 


84 
537 


63 
460 


90 
482 


61 
332 


115 
531 


62 

474 


136 
582 


1,033 


TOTALS 


5,843 


BOARD OF HEALTH FOR ! 


5 YRS. 
























Alan V. Liguori 


75 


122 


143 


57 


81 


82 


122 


58 


26 


84 


73 


68 


991 


Paul F. McCarthy 


291 


235 


291 


156 


212 


252 


239 


247 


124 


198 


243 


267 


2,755 


James J. McKeown 


153 


74 


169 


67 


137 


170 


67 


148 


164 


212 


113 


211 


1,685 


Blanks 


40 
559 


23 
454 


65 
668 


29 
309 


25 
455 


33 
537 


32 
460 


29 
482 


18 
332 


37 
531 


45 
474 


36 
582 


412 


TOTALS 


5,843 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE FOR 3 YRS. 






















Francis J. Earley 


94 


119 


113 


77 


116 


99 


112 


64 


35 


71 


104 


98 


1,102 


Allan Goldman 


80 


82 


105 


56 


49 


67 


70 


72 


25 


42 


58 


90 


796 


George A. Ripsom 


223 


97 


237 


93 


160 


191 


114 


173 


153 


237 


139 


229 


2,046 


Robert A. Sheridan 


102 


111 


123 


54 


82 


124 


103 


96 


100 


130 


103 


73 


1,201 


Blanks 


60 
559 


45 
454 


90 
668 


29 
309 


48 
455 


56 
537 


61 
460 


77 
482 


19 
332 


51 
531 


70 
474 


92 
582 


698 


TOTALS 


5,843 



NASHOBA TECH HIGH SCHOOL FOR 3 YRS. 
DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Louis E. Kelly 313 254 
Joseph H. Lemieux 201 142 
Blanks 45 58 


296 

281 

91 

668 


164 
95 
50 

309 


129 
282 

44 

455 


273 

194 

70 

537 


242 
156 
62 

460 


233 
189 
60 

482 


155 
138 
39 

332 


234 
226 

71 

531 


272 
130 
72 

474 


205 

284 

93 

582 


2,770 

2,318 

755 


TOTALS 559 454 


5,843 


CEMETERY COMMISSIONER FOR 3 YRS. 




















Ame R. Olsen 472 391 
Blanks 87 63 


540 
128 


272 

37 


377 
78 


458 
79 


414 
46 


397 
85 


273 
59 


425 
106 


406 
68 


446 
136 


4,871 
972 


TOTALS 559 454 


668 


309 


455 


537 


460 


482 


332 


531 


474 


582 


5,843 


HOUSING AUTHORITY FOR 5 YRS. 






















Robert L. Hughes 458 378 
Blanks 101 76 


532 

136 

668 


262 

47 

309 


363 
92 

455 


436 
101 

537 


395 
65 

460 


388 

94 

482 


264 
68 

332 


408 
123 

531 


388 
86 

474 


435 

' 147 

582 


4,707 
1,136 


TOTALS 559 454 


5,843 



41 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES FOR 3 YRS. 

Roger P. Welch 437 377 526 230 345 413 393 371 251 381 363 409 4,496 

James M. Harrington 398 299 451 210 313 386 313 329 221 352 342 380 3,994 

Blanks 283 232 359 178 252 275 214 264 192 329 243 375 3,196 



TOTALS 1,118 908 1,336 


618 


910 


1,074 


920 


964 


664 


1,062 


948 


1,164 


11,686 


PARK COMMISSIONER FOR 3 YRS. 






















David P. Ramsay 457 375 547 


262 


376 


450 


402 


393 


267 


412 


403 


443 


4,787 


Blanks 102 79 121 


47 
309 


79 
455 


87 
537 


58 
460 


89 
482 


65 
332 


119 
531 


71 
474 


139 
582 


1,056 


TOTALS 559 454 668 


5,843 


PLANNING BOARD MEMBER FOR 5 YRS 






















Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 457 375 518 


228 


366 


443 


392 


381 


256 


405 


399 


423 


4,643 


Blanks 102 79 150 


81 
309 


89 
455 


94 
537 


68 

460 


101 
482 


76 
332 


126 
531 


75 
474 


159 
582 


1,200 


TOTALS 559 454 668 


5,843 


SEWER COMMISSION FOR 3 YRS. 






















Matthew J. Doyle, Jr. 462 378 526 


255 


366 


449 


392 


384 


266 


419 


397 


432 


4,726 


Blanks 97 76 142 


54 
309 


89 

455 


88 
537 


68 

460 


98 
482 


66 

332 


112 
531 


77 
474 


150 
582 


1,117 


TOTALS 559 454 668 


5,843 


SINKING FUND COMMISSIONER FOR 3 YRS. 


















Francis J. Goode 110 303 


1 


3 


1 


2 





4 


2 


5 





431 


Blanks 449 454 365 


308 
309 


452 

455 


536 
537 


458 
460 


482 
482 


328 
332 


529 
531 


469 

474 


582 

582 


5,412 


TOTALS 559 454 668 


5,843 


QUESTION (CHARTER) 






















Yes 224 162 357 


101 


180 


211 


156 


223 


174 


252 


180 


321 


2,541 


No 271 236 244 


163 


220 


257 


239 


213 


135 


225 


238 


206 


2,647 


Blanks 64 56 67 


45 


55 


69 


65 


46 


23 


54 


56 


55 


655 



TOTALS 559 454 668 309 455 537 460 482 332 531 474 582 5,843 



42 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 12, 1973 



Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. called the meeting to order at 7 : 50 P.M., recognizing the presence of a 
quorum. The following tellers were appointed: 



Arnaud Blackadar 
Philip Swissler 
Eugene Gilet 



Ruth Delaney 
Mary Long 
Alfred Coburn 



Selectman Thomas Markham waived the reading of the sheriffs return of the warrant. The reading of the en- 
tire warrant was also waived. There were 599 voters present. 

Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin introduced the two new Selectmen, Mr. Arnold J. Lovering and Mr. William R. 
Murphy. 

Selectman William R. Murphy read the following tribute to Mr. Alfred H. Coburn, retired Selectmen's Adminis- 
trative Assistant: 

"WHEREAS, Alfred H. Coburn has served the Town of Chelmsford faithfully and well over the years 1947-1972, 
years of great change and development, as recording clerk of the Board of Selectmen for 25 years, as Ad- 
ministrative Assistant to the Selectmen for six years, as assistant and then Town Accountant for 9 years, as 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Veterans Emergency Fund for 25 years, as Clerk of the Board of Appeals for 4 
years and as Library Trustee for 3 years. 

WHEREAS, Mr. Coburn has quietly and effectively guided many Town Officials in the proper performance of 
their duties. 

WHEREAS, Mr. Coburn has efficiently and patiently assisted citizens in their business before the town and for 
many other kindnesses. 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Citizens of Chelmsford take this opportunity and occasion to properly express our 
debt of gratitude to Alfred H. Coburn for his years of dedicated service to Chelmsford." 

It was voted that the above tribute be written in the minutes of the meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Mr. Robert C. McManimon was re-elected to the Varney Playground commission for 
three years. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to further amend Section 24, 
subtitled, "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law" 
by creating the following new positions: 

Administrative Assistant, Highway 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Assistant Treasurer 

Landscaper 

Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A Mr. Peter McHugh, Chairman of the Personnel Board moved the Town vote to fur- 
ther amend Section 24, subtitled, "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law', to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain labor organizations, pur- 
suant to General Laws, Chapter 149 Section 178 G through 178 N. 



A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk, Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Town Clerk 

6. Treasurer & Tax Collector 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Town Counsel 

9. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 
10. Personnel Board's Recording Clerk 



1973 

$ 8,500.00 p.a. 

6,728.00 p.a. 

5,340.00 p.a. 

12,500.00 p.a. 

8,500.00 p.a. 

14,000.00 p.a. 

7,228.00 p.a. 

500.00 p.a. 

9,015.00 p.a. 

2.70 hr. 



1974 

$ 8,787.00 p.a. 

6,963.00 p.a. 

5,527.00 p.a. 

12,500.00 p.a. 

8,500.00 p.a. 

14,000.00 p.a. 

7,481.00 p.a. 

500.00 p.a. 

9,331.00 p.a. 

2.79 hr. 



43 



1973 



1974 



1 1 . Board of Registrar's Clerk 

12. Clerk 

13. Planning Board Clerk 

14. Board of Registrars, Three members 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

B. CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Cemetery Foreman 

3. Moth Superintendent 

4. Landscaper 

5. Laborer, Park and Cemetery 

6. Unskilled Laborer 

7. Park Superintendent 

8. Skilled Forest Workman 

9. Cemetery Equipment Operator 

It was so voted, unanimously 

C. CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian (Center Hall) 

2. Custodian (Library) 

3. Custodian ( Police Department) 

It was so voted, unanimously 

D. LIBRARY 

1. Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aids 

It was so voted 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 



Highway Superintendent 

Administrative Ass't, Highway 

Highway Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Grader Operator 

Class I — Engineer Equip. Oper 

(Tractor & Broom Oper.) 
Class II — Engineer Equip. Oper 

(Catch Basin Cleaner Oper) 
Class III — Special Equip. Oper 

(Truck Driver, Highway & Waste) 
Laborer (Ashes & Waste) 
Laborer (General) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Mechanic 

Mechanic — Heavy Equipment 
Custodian (Laborer — General) 
Painting Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 
Sewer Rodder Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 



850.00 p.a. 


850.00 p.a. 


2.70 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.7-9 hr. 


275.00 ea. 


275.00 ea. 


1973 


1974 


$10,333.00 p.a. 


$10,695.00 p.a. 


3.96 hr. 


4.10 hr. 


450.00 p.a. 


450.00 p.a. 


3.63 hr. 


3.76 hr. 


3.24 hr. 


3.35 hr. 


2.00 hr. 


2.07 hr. 


9,465.00 p.a. 


9,796.00 p.a. 


2.65 hr. 


2.74 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.95 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$ 2.99 hr. 


$ 3.09 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.09 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.09 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$12,132.00 p.a. 


$12,557.00 p.a. 


8,500.00 p.a. 


8.797.00 p.a. 


7,218.00 p.a. 


7,471.00 p.a. 


3.00 hr. 


3.10 hr. 


2.57 hr. 


2.66 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.79 hr. 


2.00 hr. 


2.07 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$17,500.00 p.a. 


$18,113.00 p.a. 


7,228.00 p.a. 


7,481.00 p.a. 


5.19 hr. 


5.37 hr. 


4.63 hr. 


4.79 hr. 


4.58 hr. 


4.74 hr. 


4.39 hr. 


4.54 hr. 


4.05 hr. 


4.19 hr. 


4.05 hr. 


4.19 hr. 


3.51 hr. 


3.63 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.36 hr. 


3.51 hr. 


3.63 hr. 


4.13 hr. 


4.27 hr. 


4.48 hr. 


4.64 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.36 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.95 hr. 



F. 



It was so voted. 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 



3.82 hr. 



1973 

$21,018.00 p.a. 

17,340.00 p.a. 



3.95 hr. 



1974 
$21,018.00 p.a. 
17,340.00 p.a. 



44 



3. Officers 

Regular Fire Fighters: 
Base Pay 
1st Step 
2nd Step 
3rd Step 

It was so voted. 

G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Captain 

3. Sergeants 

4. Patrolmen — Base Pay 

5. Patrolmen — After 1 year 

6. Patrolmen — After 2 years 

7. Patrolmen — After 3 years 

8. Matron 

9. Special Police 

10. School Traffic Supervisor 

It was so voted. 

H. RECREATION 

1 . Director 

( Transportation ) 

2. Swimming Director 

3. Swimming Instructor 

4. Playground Director 

5. Playground Supervisor 

6. Playground Instructor 

7. Sports Instructor 

It was so voted 



MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Clock Winder 





1973 


1974 




12,091.00 p.a. 


12,091.00 p.a. 




9,138.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 




9,596.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 




10,051.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 




10,509.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 




1973 


1974 




$21,018.00 p.a. 


$21,018.00 p.a. 




17,340.00 p.a. 


17,340.00 p.a. 




12,091.00 p.a. 


12,091.00 p.a. 




9,138.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 




9,596.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 




10,051.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 




10,509.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 




3.53 hr. 


3.65 hr. 




4.01 hr. 


4.15 hr. 




3.25 hr. 


3.36 hr. 




1973 


1974 




$ 2,500.00 p.a. 


$ 2,500.00 p.a. 


Min. 


Max. 




>80.00 wk. 


100.00 wk. Same 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. Same 


80.00 wk. 


100.00 wk. Same 


45.00 wk. 


66.00 wk. Same 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. Same 


3.00 hr. 


5.00 hr. Same 




1973 


1974 




$1,000.00 


Same 




2,000.00 


Same 




4.00 visit 


: Same 




4.00 visit 


Same 




1,000.00 p.a. 


Same 




6,240.00 p.a. 


6,458.00 p.a. 




2.50 hr. 


2.59 hr. 




100.00 p.a. 


100.00 p.a. 



It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moved that the Town raise and appropriate the following 
sums of money to defray Town charges for the current fiscal period retroactive to January 1, 1973. 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

1. Accountant 

2. Senior Clerk (2) 

3. Additional Clerk Hire 

Expenses 

4. Expenses 

5. Outlays 

Total Accounting Department 
It was so voted 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 Months 

$ 18,750.00 

20,418.00 

3,410.00 



4,390.00 
.00 



$ 46,968.00 



45 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

6. Inspector's Salary $ 1,500.00 

7. Expense 75.00 

Total Animal Inspector's Department $ 1,575.00 

It was so voted 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

8. Clerk Hire $ 1,200.00 

9. Expense 2,250.00 

Total Board of Appeals $ 3,450.00 

It was so voted 

A lengthy discussion about the budget increase developed at this point. 

Mr. Jeanpaul Gravelle moved for reconsideration of Article 3 items, specifically the accountant's salary, animal in- 
spector's salaries, Board of Appeal salaries until next session of Town meeting. 

Mr. Martin Ames moved to amend the above to exclude the school budget. This motion was defeated. 

On the motion to table Article 3 until the next meeting, motion carried. 

Mr. Thomas Markham moved that the next session of Town meeting be Monday night, March 19, 1973 at 7:30 
P.M. in the High School Gymnasium. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Thomas Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

"The Selectmen are authorized to act as agents of the Town in any suit or suits which may arise with author- 
ity to settle and adjust claims or demands for or against the Town: and to employ counsel whenever in their 
judgment it is necessary". 

It was so voted. 

Mr. George A. Ripsom moved to reconsider Article 2A. It was so voted. 

A motion to take up Article 2A prior to Article 3 at next meeting passed. 

Mr. Richard Sullivan's motion to reconsider the school budget at this meeting was declared out of order. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moved that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow in anticipation of the revenue for the eighteen-month period beginning 
January 1, 1973 in accordance with General Laws, Chap. 44, Sec. 4, and acts in amendment thereof, and includ- 
ing in addition thereto, Chap. 849 of the Acts of 1969, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chap. 44, Sec. 17. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moved that the Town vote to request the Department of 
Corporations and Taxation, Division of Accounts, of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of 
all accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $12,- 
512.31 with which to meet bills for previous years. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $12,- 
sum of $264,764.00 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County Retirement System, the said amount being the 
town's share of the pension, expense and military service funds. 

Mr. Richard Codling moved to amend the above figure to $200,000.00. This was defeated. 

The main motion passed. 

46 



UNDER ARTICLE 9. Mr. Richard T. McDermott moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $125,000.00 to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, section 6. 

It was so voted, 

UNDER ARTICLE 10. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to accept the following men- 
tioned streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk, and to raise and appropriate $950.00 for the purpose of reconstructing the following men- 
tioned streets: 

PERCHERON ROAD 
GREEN WAY 
OVERLOOK DRIVE 
THOMAS DRIVE 
SLEIGH ROAD (Extension) 

Providing all construction of same meets with the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such requirements have been met. 
It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. and Mr. Richard T. McDermott moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate $25,000.00 to reimburse the North Chelmsford Water Department for the 
installation of a twelve-inch water main from the stand-pipe to the Wellman North Industrial Park on Tyngs- 
boro Road. 

A motion to amend the above to keep the top amount $25,000.00, and on no account will the Town's share ex- 
ceed 50% of the costs. 
It was so voted. 

The main motion as amended "that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 to reimburse 
the North Chelmsford Water Department for the installation of a twelve-inch water main from the stand-pipe 
to the Wellman North Industrial Park on Tyngsboro Road. The Town to be committed to no more than $25,000 
and on no account no greater than one-half the cost." 
It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12. Mr. Peter J. McHugh, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $149,500.00 for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the 
present Police Station located on North Road on land owned by the Town, and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to reappoint the existing Police Building Committee and authorize it to proceed with the construction of 
said project and to enter into all necessary and proper contracts and agreements in respect thereto and to per- 
form all other acts necessary for the construction of said project. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13. Mr. Frederick H. Reid moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire in fee simple by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, as the site for a proposed new fire 
station the following described land which is bounded as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Riverneck Road, the southeasterly corner of land now or 
formerly of Stephen H. and Louise M. Farley: thence westerly two hundred fifty (250) feet: thence 
northerly about four hundred (400) feet to Black Brook Channel: thence easterly two hundred fifty 
(250) feet to corner of land now or formerly of Helen Lemire: thence running southerly approxi- 
mately four hundred fifty (450) feet to the point of beginning. Said land being part of Lot #405 now 
or formerly owned by Franklin N. Prescott, Plan Book 35, Plan 28: 

and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $20,000 to defray all necessary costs, fees, and ex- 
penses in connection with the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as the result of any such taking, said purchase to be made only if said land passes state sanitary require- 
ments. 

A motion to amend to delete the words "eminent domain" from the above motion was defeated. 

The vote on the main motion was unanimous. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14. Mr. Frederick H. Reid moved that in the event of an affirmative vote under the 
preceding article, that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a committee consisting of 
not more than five (5) members for the purpose of proceeding with the preparation of plans and specifications 

47 



for the construction of a fire-house on the said described premises, and to transfer from the West Chelmsford 
Fire Station Building funds the sum of $2,500.00 for the use of said committee. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$2,849.00 for the purchase of a 1973 four-door sedan type vehicle for the Fire Department, said purchase to be 
made under the supervision of the said Board of Selectmen : and to authorize the Selectmen to sell by good and 
sufficient bill of sale the 1969 four-door sedan type vehicle now being used by the Fire Department. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to transfer from available 
funds in the Treasury the sum of $57,400.00 for Chapter 90 construction. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to transfer $45,000 from the 
stabilization fund and to raise and appropriate $7,454.10 for purchases of equipment for the Highway Depart- 
ment, such purchases to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize said Board of 
Selectmen to dispose of equipment presently being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

a. To purchase one pickup truck for the Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one pickup truck presently being used by the Highway Department. 

b. To purchase one low bed trailer for the Highway Department: 

c. To purchase one reversible snowplow for the Highway Department: 

d. To purchase two snowplows for the Highway Department : 

e. To purchase one truck chassis (for waste collections) for the Highway Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one waste collection truck presently being used by the Highway Depart- 
ment: 

f. To purchase one packer body (for waste collections) for the Highway Department: 

g. To purchase one truck cab and chassis for the Highway Department and to sell by good and suffi- 
cient bill of sale one truck cab and chassis presently being used by the Highway Department: 

h. To purchase one dump truck for the Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one dump truck presently being used by the Highway Department: 

i. To purchase one dump truck for the Highway Department : 

j. To sell to the Historical Commission for the Town of Chelmsford by good and sufficient bill of sale 
for the consideration of One ($1.00) Dollar the old wooden sprayer now located at the far end of the 
town parking lot. 

It was so voted. The vote for transfer of funds should have been 2/3. Since a hand count was not taken the 
transfer was ineffective. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and apppropriate 
$8,722.00 for the purchase of a truck cab chassis to mount an hydraulic aerial device and chip body for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19. In the event of an affirmative vote on the foregoing article, Mr. Thomas F. Mark- 
ham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $19,980.00 for the purchase of an hy- 
draulic aerial device and chip body for the Highway Department, such purchase to be under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen. 

A hand count was taken: YES 220 NO 155 

It was so voted. 

A motion to reconsider Article 18 was defeated. 



48 



UNDER ARTICLE 20. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$24,897.28 to reimburse the members of the permanent police force for vacation benefits due them since January 
1, 1970 because of the acceptance by the Town of the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 41, Sec- 
tion 1 1 D. 

It was so voted. 

Mr. Jeanpaul Gravelle moved for reconsideration of Article 12. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into and negotiate with a transportation company for bus service for the Town of Chelmsford 
and Lowell areas if it is concluded by the Board of Selectmen that such service would be to the best interest of 
the town, and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $31,700, said sum to be utilized by the Board 
of Selectmen as the town's assessment for bus service for the period from May 14, 1973 through June 30, 1974. 

A motion to amend the above to include "all of Chelmsford" failed. 

The main motion passed by a voice vote. 

Mr. Paul Villare made a motion to adjourn. Motion defeated. 

Mr. Robert Sexton questioned the vote on Article 2 1 . A hand vote was taken. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Mr. Edmund Polubinski moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$1,000,000.00 for the construction of dikes at Crystal Lake for the protection of property, that to raise this ap- 
propriation the sum of $50,000 shall be included in the 1973 tax levy, and the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow the sum of $950,000.00 under GL C44 Sec 7, and that the Crystal Lake Res- 
toration Committee be authorized to carry out the project. 

Mr. Polubinski, chairman of the Crystal Lake Restoration Committee reviewed the plans authorized at a pre- 
vious Town Meeting and said that Fay, Spofford and Thorndike, engineers for the project had presented plans 
to rebuild the dams so that Crystal Lake would again serve as a recreation area. A discussion about this article 
resulted. The chief concern was whether the town would be reimbursed by the state for this expenditure. Repre- 
sentative Bruce Freeman assured the Townspeople that the money is available, and that the appropriation is an 
indication of town interest. The Legislature has already voted reimbursement. Selectman Paul Hart stated the 
Selectmen went on record not to spend any money for this project which will not be reimbursed. 

Motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The main motion passed unanimously. 

Mr. Markham moved to adjourn until March 19, 1973 at 7:30 P.M. in the High School gymnasium. Meet- 
ing closed at 11:00 P.M. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 19, 1973 

Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., called the adjourned annual Town Meeting to order at 7:40 P.M., recogniz- 
ing the presence of a quorum. There were 787 voters present: 

The following tellers were appointed : 

Alfred Coburn Charles Fairburn 

Eugene Gilet Paul Bienvenu 

Ruth Delaney Robert Griffin 

The Moderator explained the responsibilities of the Selectmen, school committee, personnel board, and finance 
committee as well as the order of motions for Town Meeting. 

Mr. Richard McDermott, Chairman of the Finance Committee elaborated upon the Finance Board's jus- 
tification of the pay scale presented in Article 2A. He explained that the state legislature has passed a bill which 
requires the Town to pay the Police and Fire Chiefs twice the pay of the highest patrolman or firefighter. Agree- 
ments have been reached with departments which are unionized. These changes are all included in Article 2A. 

Mr. Jean-Paul Gravelle moved to amend Article 2 A by using pay scales he itemized on sheets which he dis- 
tributed. He stated that he suggests increases of 5.5% for 1973 and 2.7% increase for 1974. He had added a po- 

49 



1973 


1974 


$3.00 


$3.15 


3.00 


3.15 


3.00 


3.15 



sition for student laborer under the Conservation and Cemetery for $1.50 per hour. This addition was ruled out 
of order by the Town Moderator and stricken from the amendment. Positions of Assistant Treasurer, Moth Super- 
intendent, and Administrative Assistant for the Highway Department listed $1.00 per annum salary to discourage 
anyone from wanting them. 

Mr. Raymond Palas moved to amend Item A7, Assistant Treasurer, to read $6,519, same as Item A2, Clerk. 
Senior. Amendment defeated on a voice vote. 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee explained that Item Al, Veterans' Agent is now re- 
quired by state law to be a full time position and therefore should be alloted full time pay. 

Mr. Stanley Keturakis moved to amend Items A10, A12, A13 (Clerks) to 

A10 — Personnel Board's Recording Clerk 

A12^Clerk 

A13 — Planning Board Clerk 

Motion to amend A10, A12, & A13 defeated by voice vote. 

Mr. Charles House moved to amend Item A5, Town Clerk ■ 
lector — $14,000.00 per annum. 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee and Mr. Marvin Schenk of the Personnel Board pre- 
sented recommendations to justify the increase in salary for Town Clerk and Treasurer-Tax Collector. Mr. 
Richard Codling moved to grant the raise under A5 and A6 of the Finance Committee budget, and to cut 5% 
out of the budget under Article 3. Motion defeated. 

The motion to amend Item A5 and Item A6 was defeated by a voice vote. The chair was in doubt. A hand vote 
was taken: 

YES - 227 NO - 384 Amendment defeated. 

A motion was made to stop debate on Article 2A. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The vote on Mr. Gravelle's main motion to amend Section 2A was defeated by a voice vote. The Moderator 
was questioned on this vote. A hand vote was taken: 

YES - 394 NO - 274 Motion passed. 

Mr. Richard McDermott moved that instead of voting Section to Section under 2A, Sections B through I be 
voted on at the same time. It was so voted. 



1,500.00 and Item A6, Treasurer-Tax Col- 



A motion was made to reconsider Item 2A. 
ARTICLE 2A: 

A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk, Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Town Clerk 

6. Treasurer and Tax Collector 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Town Counsel 

9. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 

10. Personnel Board's Recording Clerk 

1 1 . Board of Registrar's Clerk 

12. Clerk 

13. Planning Board Clerk 

14. Board of Registrars, Three Members 

B. CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Cemetery Foreman 

3. Moth Superintendent 

4. Landscaper 

5. Laborer, Park & Cemeterv 



1973 



Motion defeated. 



1974 



$ 3,185.00 p.a. $ 3,270.00 p.a. 



6,519.00 p.a. 


6,695.00 p.a. 


5,340.00 p.a. 


5,484.00 p.a. 


9,901.00 p.a. 


10,168.00 p.a. 


4,563.00 p.a. 


4,686.00 p.a. 


7,248.00 p.a. 


7,443.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


500.00 p.a. 


500.00 p.a. 


9,015.00 p.a. 


9,258.00 p.a. 


2.70 hr. 


2.77 hr. 


263.00 p.a. 


270.00 p.a. 


2.70 hr. 


2.77 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.77 hr. 


275.00 ea. p.a. 


275.00 ea. p.a. 


1973 


1974 


$10,058.00 p.a. 


$10,329.00 p.a. 


3.85 hr. 


3.95 hr. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.75 hr. 


1.75 hr. 


3.24 hr. 


3.32 hr. 



50 



6. Unskilled Laborer 

7. Park Superintendent 

8. Skilled Forest Workman 

9. Cemetery Equipment Operator 

C. CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian (Center Hall) 

2. Custodian (Library) 

3. Custodian (Police Department) 

D. LIBRARY 

1. Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

Originally $1.00 per annum* 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aids 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Administrative Assistant, Highway 

3. Highway Foreman 

4. Assistant Foreman 

5. Grader Operator 

6. Class I - Engineer Equipment Operator 

7. Class II - Engineer Equipment Operator 

8. Class III - Special Equipment Operator 

9. Laborer (Ashes & Waste) 

10. Laborer (General) 

11. Laborer (Skilled) 

12. Mechanic 

13. Mechanic (Heavy Equipment) 

14. Custodian (Laborer General) 

15. Painting Machine Operator 

16. Sewer Rodder Machine Operator 

F. TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Officers 

Regular Firefighters: 
Base Pay 

1st Step 

2nd Step 

3rd Step 

G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Captain 

3. Sergeants 

4. Patrolmen — Base Pay 

5. Patrolmen — After One Year 

6. Patrolmen — After Two Years 

7. Patrolmen — After Three Years 

8. Matron 

9. Special Police 

10. School Traffic Supervisor 

H. RECREATION 

1 . Director 

Min. Max. 

2. Swimming Director $80.00 wk. $100.00 wk. 

3. Swimming Instructor 56.00 wk. 80.00 wk. 



1973 


1974 


2.00 hr. 


2.05 hr. 


9,465.00 p.a. 


9,720.00 p.a. 


2.65 hr. 


2.72 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.92 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$ 2.99 hr. 


$ 3.07 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.07 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.07 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$12,132.00 p.a. 


$12,459.00 p.a. 


8,500.00 p.a. 


8,797.00 p.a. 


7,218.00 p.a. 


7,412.00 p.a. 


3.00 hr. 


3.08 hr. 


2.57 hr. 


2.63 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.77 hr. 


1.50 hr. 


1.54 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$15,025.00 p.a. 


$15,431.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


4.71 hr. 


4.84 hr. 


4.12 hr. 


4.23 hr. 


4.58 hr. 


4.70 hr. 


4.39 hr. 


4.51 hr. 


4.05 hr. 


4.16 hr. 


4.05 hr. 


4.16 hr. 


3.51 hr. 


3.60 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.34 hr. 


3.51 hr. 


3.60 hr. 


4.13 hr. 


4.24 hr. 


4.48 hr. 


4.60 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.34 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.92 hr. 



3.82 hr. 



3.92 hr. 



1973 1974 

$15,025.00 p.a. $15,431.00 p.a. 

13,229.00 p.a. 13,586.00 p.a. 

12,091.00 p.a. 12,417.00 p.a. 



9,138.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


1973 


1974 


$15,025.00 p.a. 


$15,431.00 p.a. 


13,229.00 p.a. 


13,586.00 p.a. 


12,091.00 p.a. 


12,417.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


3.53 hr. 


3.62 hr. 


4.01 hr. 


4.12 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.33 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$ 2,500.00 p.a. 


$ 2,500.00 p.a. 




Same 




Same 



51 





Min 


Max 


4. 


Playground Director 80.00 wk. 


100.00 wk. 


5. 

6. 
7.' 


Playground Supvsr. 45.00 wk. 
Playground Instrct. 56.00 wk. 
Sports Instructor 3.00 hr. 


66.00 wk. 

80.00 wk. 

5.00 hr. 


MISCELLANEOUS 




1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 


Animal Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector — visit 
Electric Inspector — visit 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 




6. 

6a. 


Dog Officer 
Assistant Dog Officer 




7. 


Clock Winder 







Same 




Same 




Same 




Same 


1973 


1974 


1,000.00 p.a. 


$ 1,000.00 p.a. 


2,000.00 p.a. 


2,000.00 p.a. 


4.00 hr. 


4.00 hr. 


4.00 hr. 


4.00 hr. 


1,000.00 p.a. 


1,000.00 p.a. 


5,460.00 p.a. 


5,607.00 p.a. 


1.50 hr. 


2.59 hr. 


100.00 p.a. 


100.00 p.a. 



*Mr. Thomas Thorstensen moved to amend Section 2 A, Section D, Item No. 2 to read: Librarian MLS (As- 
sistant) 1973 — $8,500.00 1974 — $8,797.00 

Mr. Roger Welch, Library Trustee, spoke in favor of the above amendment. 

Mr. Richard Sullivan stated that the main motion would violate state law and the town's contract obligations. 
He stated that righting of pay inequities would not be accomplished, and asked the Town to consider quick cal- 
culations for a corporation of $31,000,000 carefully. 

Town Librarian David Panciera requested permission to speak, even though he is not a registered voter of the 
Town. This was granted. He urged the Townspeople to vote for Mr. Thorstensen's amendment. 

Upon a voice vote the amendment for Section 2A, Section D, Item No. 2 passed. Vote questioned — A hand 
vote was taken: YES — 289 NO — 265 It was so voted. 

Mr. Gravelle moved to stop debate. Mr. McDermott asked to be heard before debate was closed. Mr. Gravelle 
changed his motion to stop debate until after Mr. McDermott spoke. Mr. McDermott stated that no salaries 
could be raised by action on Article 3 if this motion as amended was passed. 

A vote to stop debate was taken, 2/3 vote required. YES — 397 NO — 190 It was so voted. 

A vote was taken on the main motion under Article 2A, as amended. It was so voted, by voice. 

Mr. Markham moved for reconsideration of Section E of Article 2A. Motion declared out of order. 
Mr. McDermott moved that we take Article 78 out of order. 

Mr. Stanley Keturakis moved that the next session of Town meeting be held Monday, March 26, 1973 at 7:30 
P.M. It was so voted. 

A check with Town Clerk showed that the main motion had not been reconsidered; therefore Mr. Markham's 
motion for reconsideration of Section E of Article 2A was acceptable. After considerable discussion about guide- 
lines for salary increases Mr. Hilliard asked Mr. Markham to withdraw his motion, so that he (Hilliard) could 
move for reconsideration of the entire Article. Mr. Markham did not withdraw his motion. On a voice vote the 
motion to reconsider Section E of Article 2A was defeated. 

Mr. Markham moved for reconsideration of Section F & G of Article 2 A (Police & Fire Department wages) . 
Town Counsel was asked for his opinion. He stated that no matter what was voted at this meeting we must pay 
the Police and Fire Chief the salaries recommended by the Finance Committee and computed on the basis of 
the legislation cited as soon as he received an affirmative reply from the Cost of Living Council. These increases 
will be granted either through town meeting action or court litigation. 

Reconsideration of Sections F & G of Article 2A was defeated by a voice vote. 

Mr. Lovering moved for adjournment at 10:40 P.M., until Monday, March 26, 1973 at 7:30 P.M. in the High 
School Gymnasium. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1973 

Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. called the adjourned annual Town Meeting to order at 7:45 P.M., rec- 
ognizing the presence of a quorum. There were 833 voters present. 



52 



The following tellers were appointed : 

Charles Fairburn Paul Bienvenu 

Alfred Coburn Ruth Delaney 

S. Anthony Diciero Robert Griffin 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee explained the impact on the tax rate if the budget of 
the Finance Committee was accepted. He moved that we take the School Budget and the Nashoba Valley Tech- 
nical High School budgets out of order since these two departments constitute 81% of the entire budget. Before 
this motion could be placed before the townspeople, Mr. Denis Valdinocci moved that we take Article 24 out 
of order. It was so voted, by voice. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to accept a gift from the 
Parents' Association for Recreation for Children (PARC) of recreational equipment and recreational material 
for children, such equipment and material to be installed and used in a play area to be constructed at the Ro- 
berts property on Old Westford Road. 

It was so voted. 

The Moderator reinstated Mr. McDermott' s motion to take the school committee budgets out of order. Mr. 
Jean-Paul Gravelle objected to this motion suggesting that we take action on Article 3 with an amendment 
which he had prepared. A voice vote was taken on Mr. McDermott's motion to take the School Committee 
budgets out of order. Motion defeated. The decision was doubted. A hand vote was taken : 

YES — 353 NO — 363 Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Mr. Philip McCormack moved the Town vote to raise and appropriate such sums 
of money as may be needed to defray town charges for the current fiscal period retroactive to January 1, 1973. 
The Moderator explained that he would try to complete Article 3 one department at a time. 

Mr. Philip Anderson moved that we lay the school department budget on the table until we have completed all 
of Article 3. It was so voted, voice vote. 

Mr. Jean-Paul Gravelle moved to amend Article 3, according to figures he had listed on an eight page booklet 
which was distributed to the people present. Mr. Edward Quinn, Mr. Edward Marshall, Mr. Edward McKeon, 
and Mr. Richard Lynch spoke in favor of the Finance Committee's budget. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. of the 
Board of Selectmen requested defeat of Mr. Gravelle's amendment. Mr. Gravelle defended his amendment,ad- 
mitting minor errors. Mr. John Balco spoke in favor of Mr. Markham's request for defeat of the amendment. Mr. 
Philip Anderson asked if Mr. Gravelle's amendment and the finance committee's recommendations could be 
considered against each other, department by department. 

Mr. Arnaud Blackadar spoke in defense of his budget. A motion was made to cut off debate on the Account- 
ing Department budget only. It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Gravelle's amendment to the accounting department's budget was defeated by a voice vote. 

The Finance Committee's recommended budget for the accounting department was voted, unanimously. 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-1974 

SALARIES 

1. Accountant $15,703 

2. Senior Clerk (2) 19,733 

3. Additional Clerk Hire 3,398 

EXPENSES 

4. Expenses $ 4,390 

5. Outlays 00 

Total Accounting Department $43,224 

A motion was made to stop debate on Mr. Gravelle's amendment. It was so voted, unanimously. 

A vote was taken on the total of Mr. Gravelle's amendment to Article 3. It was defeated by voice vote. Vote 
was questioned. A hand vote was taken: 

YES — 330 NO — 425 Amendment defeated. 

Main Motion Under Article 3 



53 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-1974 

6. Inspector's Salary $ 1,500 

7. Expenses 75 

Total $ 1,575 

Motion made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. Finance Committee's recommended budget for Ani- 
mal Inspector's Department passed, voice vote. 

BOARD OF APPEALS Recommended 1973-1974 

8. Clerk Hire $ 2,700 

9. Expense 2,325 

Total $ 5,025 

Board of Appeals Budget passed on a voice vote. 

Mr. Charles House defended the Finance Committee's figures on his budget. Mr. Gravelle moved to amend 
Item 12 (Board Member-Part Time) on this budget to $3,272. Part-time assessor Mr. Richard Monahan elabo- 
rated on the number of hours he spent on part time assessor's duties. The motion to amend Item 12 was de- 
feated by a voice vote. 

ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-1974 

SALARIES 

10. Assessor (Full Time) $16,511 

11. Board Member 00 

12. Board Member (Part Time) (2) 9,338 

13. Senior Clerk (3) 28,920 

14. Clerk (Part Time) 3,991 

Total $58,760 

EXPENSES 

15. Office Expenses $ 5,452 

16. Transportation 1,500 

17. Outlays 1,000 

18. Data Processing (Tax Billing) 9,600 

Total $76,312 

Motion to accept Assessor's budget according to the Finance Committee's recommendations passed by a voice 
vote. 

Motion made to adjourn at 10:50 P.M., next meeting to be held Monday, April 2, 1973 at 7:30 P.M. in the 
High School Gymnasium. 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Moderator 
Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

April 9. 1973 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford. 



54 



GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, viz: 



Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 

Precinct 10. 

Precinct 11. 

Precinct 12. 



McFarlin School — All Purpose Room 
North Elementary School Auditorium 
Junior High School Band Room 
East Chelmsford School 
Byam School, Cafetorium 
Westlands School, Cafeteria 
North Elementary School, Auditorium 
Senior High School, Small Gymnasium 
South Row School Auditorium 
South Row School Auditorium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Fire House — Old Westford Road 



On Monday, the ninth day of April, 1973, being the second Monday in said month, at 7:35 p.m., then and 
there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken with respect to Article 2 A of the 
warrant for the Annual Town Meting, March 5 & 12, 1973 in its adjourned session of March 19, 1973 amending 
Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
By-Law": or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. In the event of an affirmative vote on the foregoing article, to see if the Town will vote to 
further amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law" to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain labor organizations, 
pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 178 G through 178 N as follows: 



A. ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 

1. Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk, Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Assistant Treasurer 

6. Town Counsel 

7. Selectmen's Administrative Ass't 

8. Personnel Board's Recording Clerk 

9. Board of Registrar's Clerk 

10. Clerk 

11. Planning Board Clerk 

12. Board of Registrars, Three Members 



1973 



1974 



B. 



CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Cemetery Foreman 

3. Moth Superintendent 

4. Landscaper 

5. Laborer, Park & Cemetery 

6. Unskilled Laborer 

7. Park Superintendent 

8. Skilled Forest Workman 

9. Cemetery Equipment Operator 

CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian (Center Hall) 

2. Custodian (Library) 

3. Custodian (Police Department) 



$ 8,500.00 p.a. 
6,728.00 p.a. 


$ 8,797.00 p.a. 
6,963.00 p.a. 


5,340.00 p.a. 


5,527.00 p.a. 


12,500.00 p.a. 

7,228.00 p.a. 

500.00 p.a. 


12,500.00 p.a. 

7,481.00 p.a. 

500.00 p.a. 


9,015.00 p.a. 
2.70 hr. 


9,331.00 p.a. 
2.79 hr. 


850.00 p.a. 


850.00 p.a. 


2.70 hr. 


2.79 hr. 


2.70 hr. 


2.79 hr. 


275.00 ea. 


275.00 ea. 


1973 


1974 


$10,333.00 p.a. 
3.96 hr. 


$10,695.00 p.a. 
4.10 hr. 


450.00 p.a. 


450.00 p.a. 


3.63 hr. 


3.76 hr. 


3.24 hr. 


3.35 hr. 


2.00 hr. 


2.07 hr. 


9,465.00 p.a. 


9,796.00 p.a. 


2.65 hr. 


2.74 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.95 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.09 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.09 hr. 


2.99 hr. 


3.09 hr. 



55 



D. LIBRARY 

1. Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aids 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 



Highway Superintendent 

Administrative Assistant, Highway 

Highway Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Grader Operator 

Class I — Engineer Equip. Operator 

(Tractor & Broom Operator) 
Class II — Engineer Equip. Operator 

(Catch Basin Cleaner Operator) 
Class III — Special Equip. Operator 

(Truck Driver, Highway & Waste) 
Laborer (Ashes & Waste) 
Laborer (General) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Mechanic 

Mechanic (Heavy Equip.) 
Custodian (Laborer - General) 
Painting Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 
Sewer Rodder Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 



F. TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Officers 

4. Regular Fire Fighters: 

Base Pay 
1st Step 
2nd Step 
3rd Step 

G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Captain 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Patrolmen 

Patrolmen 



Base Pay 
After 1 yr. 
After 2 yrs. 



Patrolmen - After 3 yrs. 

Matron 

Special Police 

School Traffic Supervisor 



H. RECREATION 

1. Director 

( Transportation ) 

2. Swimming Director 

3. Swimming Instructor 

4. Playground Director 

5. Playground Supervisor 

6. Playground Instructor 

7. Sports Instructor 



1973 
$12,132.00 p.a. 
8,500.00 p.a. 
7,218.00 p.a. 
3.00 hr. 
2.57 hr. 
2.70 hr. 
2.00 hr. 



$17,500.00 p.a. 

7,228.00 p.a. 

5.19 hr. 

4.63 hr. 

4.58 hr. 

4.39 hr. 

4.05 hr. 



1974 

$12,557.00 p.a. 

8,797.00 p.a. 

7,471.00 p.a. 

3.10 hr. 

2.66 hr. 

2.79 hr. 

2.07 hr. 



$18,113.00 p.a. 

7,481.00 p.a. 

5.37 hr. 

4.74 hr. 

4.74 hr. 

4.54 hr. 

4.19 hr. 



4.05 


hr. 


4.19 hr. 


3.51 


hr. 


3.63 hr. 


3.25 


hr. 


3.63 hr. 


3.51 


hr. 


3.63 hr. 


4.13 


hr. 


4.27 hr. 


4.48 


hr. 


4.64 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.36 hr. 


3.82 


hr. 


3.95 hr. 


3.82 


hr. 


3.95 hr. 


1973 




1974 


$21,018.00 


p.a. 


$21,018.00 p.a. 


17,340.00 


p.a. 


17,340.00 p.a. 


12,091.00 


p.a. 


12,091.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 


p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 


p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 


p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 


p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


1973 




1974 


$21,018.00 


p.a. 


$21,018.00 p.a. 


17,340.00 


p.a. 


17,340.00 p.a. 


12,091.00 


p.a. 


12,091.00 p.a. 


9,138.00 


p.a. 


9,138.00 p.a. 


9,596.00 


p.a. 


9,596.00 p.a. 


10,051.00 


p.a. 


10,051.00 p.a. 


10,509.00 


p.a. 


10,509.00 p.a. 


3.53 


hr. 


3.65 hr. 


4.01 


hr. 


4.15 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.36 hr. 


$ 2,500.00 


p.a. 


2,500.00 p.a. 


200.00 


p.a. 


200.00 p.a. 


Minimum 


M; 


aximum 


$80.00 wk. 


$100.00 wk. Same 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. Same 


80.00 wk. 


100.00 wk. Same 


45.00 wk. 


66.00 wk. Same 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. Same 


3.00 hr. 




5.00 hr. Same 



56 



I. MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Clock Winder 

or act in relation thereto. 



1973 
$1,000.00 p.a. 
2,000.00 p.a. 
4.00 visit 
4.00 visit 
1,000.00 p.a. 
6,240.00 p.a. 
2.50 hr. 
100.00 p.a. 



1974 
$1,000.00 p.a. 
2,000.00 p.a. 
Same 
Same 
Same 
6,458.00 p.a. 
2.59 hr. 
100.00 p.a. 



AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the McFarlin 
School — All Purpose Room: North Elementary School Auditorium: Junior High School Band Room: East 
Chelmsford School: Byam School, Cafetorium: Westlands School, Cafeteria: North Elementary School, Audito- 
rium: Junior High School, Small Gymnasium: South Row School Auditorium: South Row School Auditorium: 
Westlands School Cafeteria: and Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the 
time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 



GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 29th day of March, 1973. 



THOMAS F. MARKHAM, JR. 
GERALD J. LANNAN 
PAUL C. HART 
ARNOLD J. LOVERING 
WILLIAM R. MURPHY 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CHELMSFORD, 



MARCH 30, 1973 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam School, Cafe- 
torium; Westlands School, Cafeteria; North Elementary School, Auditorium; Senior High School, Small Gym- 
nasium; South Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; and Fire 
House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



WILLIAM E. SPENCE 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy Attest 

WILLIAM E. SPENCE 

Constable of Chelmsford 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 2, 1973 

The adjourned annual town meeting was called to order at 7:40 P.M., by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 661 voters present. 



Tellers appointed were: 

Charles Fairburn 
Paul Bienvenu 



S. Anthony Diciero 
Robert Griffin 



Ruth Delaney 
Philip Swissler 



Mr. Richard McDermott, Chairman of the Finance Committee, moved to take the budget items on the 
Varney Playground out of order. It was so voted. 



57 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND Recommended 1973-74 (18 months) 

232. Labor $5,000.00 

233. Expenses 3,500.00 

234. Outlays 8,150.00 



TOTAL $16,650.00 

Mr. Robert G. McManimon of the Varney Playground Commission explained the budget. The 
vote on the budget was a voice one, unanimous. 

BI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMMITTEE Recommended 1973-74 (18 months) 

19. Expenses: Annual Operation $450.00 

20. Accumulation Fund (1975-76) 00 



$450.00 



Mr. George Parkhurst moved to amend Item 20 to read $5,000. After a discussion about this 
amendment, it was defeated by a voice vote. 

Vote on main motion was carried, voice vote. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-1974 (18 months) 

21. Inspector's Salary $3,000.00 

22. Inspector's Fees 6,000.00 

23. Inspector's Expenses 750.00 



TOTAL $9,750.00 

It was so voted, by voice. 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

24. Commissioner's (3) 

25. Superintendent 

26. General Labor 

27. Special Labor for Lot Owners 

TOTAL 

28. Interments 

29. Transportation Superintendent 

30. Expenses 
Outlays 

3 1 . Town Clerk Salary 

32. Town Clerk Expenses 

33. Beautification — Perpetual Care Area 

34. Out of State Expenses 

35. Restore Forefather's and Hart Pond Cemetery 

TOTAL $63,840.00 

Mr. Arne Olsen moved to amend Item 25 to read $ 15,680 and Item 26 to read $27,430. It was 
so voted. 

Vote on Cemetery Budget as amended, passed. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

36. Expenses $ 1,730.00 

37. Outlays 6,050.00 



immended 1973-1974 (18 months) 




Amended 


$ 450.00 




15,639.00 


15,680.00 


26,320.00 


27,430.00 


1,500.00 




$ 43,090.00 


$ 45,060.00 




$ 5,700.00 




450.00 




8,885.00 




2,545.00 




00.00 




00.00 




00.00 




200.00 




1,000.00 



TOTAL $ 7,780.00 

Mr. Richard McDermott explained the use of Civilian Defense money — to buy uniforms for 
the auxiliary police who serve without pay. Two way radios are needed by this unit so that they 
may operate with greater efficiency in emergencies. 



58 



Recommended 1973-74 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 18 months 

38. Expenses $17,550.00 

Mr. John Balco, Chairman of the Conservation Commission elaborated upon the purpose of 
the Conservation Commission and the expenses involved. Mr. Chester Russell moved to amend 
Item 38 to read $3,726.00. Mr. William Dempster urged the people to take advantage of the op- 
portunity to keep land in town unspoiled by housing developments. The vote on Mr. Russell's mo- 
tion to amend — motion defeated. Mr. Stanley Keturakis moved to amend Item 38 to read $10,- 
000.00 This amendment was defeated by voice vote. 

Vote on the main motion by Mr. Balco — passed by voice vote. 

CONSTABLE Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

39. Constable's Salary $ 175.00 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

COUNCIL ON AGING Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

40. Expenses $ 3,050.00 
40a. Salaries 7,000.00 



TOTAL $10,050.00 

After a lengthy discussion about Mary McAuliffe's position and her assistance to the elderly in 
the the community a vote was taken on this budget item. It was so voted, voice. 

DEBT AND INTEREST Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 
Maturing Debt: 

41. North School Loan $ 00 ' 

42. High School Loan No. 1 100,000.00 

43. High School Loan No. 2 170,000.00 

44. Highway Garage Loan 10,000.00 

45. South Row Elementary School Loan 90,000.00 

46. Addition to High School 00 

47. Junior High School Loan 220,000.00 

48. Pine Ridge Equipment 00.00 

49. Westland Elementary School Loan and 

50. Harrington Elementary School Loan 320,000.00 

51. Byam Elementary School Loan 105,000.00 

52. High School — 1972 850,000.00 



TOTAL DEBT $1,865,000.00 

Interest 

53. North School Loan 00 

54. High School Loan No. 1 1 1,375.00 

55. High School Loan No. 2 21,760.00 

56. Highway Garage Loan 595.00 

57. Anticipation of Revenue & Reimbursement Loans 150,225.00 

58. South Row Elementary School Loan 19,688.00 

59. Addition to High School 00 

60. Junior High School 59,557.00 

61. Pine Ridge Equipment 

62. Westland Elementary School Loan and Harrington Elementary School Loan 151,790.00 

63. Byam Elementary School Loan 155,250.00 

64. High School — 1972 542,300.00 
Total Interest $1,112,540.00 



TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $2,977,540.00 

It was so voted, by voice. 



59 



DOG OFFICER Recommended 1973-74 

Salaries: 18 months 

65. Dog Officer $ 8,263.00 

65a. Assistant Dog Officer 3,120.00 

65b. Expenses 100.00 

TOTAL $ 1 1,483.00 

Mr. Carl Seidel explained the dog officer budget. A vote was taken. Motion carried, voice vote. 

DUTCH ELM CONTROL 

Salaries: 

Amended 

66. Superintendent $1,200 $ $1.00 

67. Expenses 6,000 1.00 

$7,200 $ 2.00 

Dr. Ethel Kamien moved to amend Item 66 to read $1.00 & Item 67 to $1.00. It was so voted. 
Motion as amended passed by voice vote. 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

68. Labor $ 00.00 

69. Expenses 800.00 

70. Outlay 00.00 



TOTAL $ 800.00 

It was so voted by voice. 

ELECTIONS 

71. Wages and Expenses $ 18,900.00 

It was so voted, by voice. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

72. Expenses $ 350.00 

It was so voted, by voice. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

73. Officers and Administration $ 144,127.00 

74. Regular and Substitute Account 826,919.00 



$ 971,046.00 

Expenses: 

75. Maintenance and Equipment $ 42,700.00 

76. Outlays 8,050.00 

77. Out of State 600.00 

78. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 10,000.00 



TOTAL $1,032,396.00 

Mr. Robert Sexton moved to amend Line 74 to $743,99, Line 75 to $34,651, Line 76 to $2,250, Line 78 to 
$8,000, making total Fire Department budget $933,027. Chief Reid defended his budget. After considerable dis- 
cussion a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. The motion to amend the budget was 
defeated, by voice vote. The vote on the main motion carried. 

Mr. Richard McDermott moved that $444,296 of the Federal Revenue Sharing funds be used to reduce the 
Fire Department budget by applying this sum to salaries. 

Mr. ArnaudBlackadar moved for reconsideration of the Fire Department budget only for the purpose of 
inserting $444,296 (Federal Revenue Sharing money) as stated by Mr. McDermott. It was so voted. After addi- 



60 



tional discussion about revenue sharing Mr. McDermott's motion to apply revenue sharing funds to Fire Depart- 
ment Salaries was passed by a voice vote. 

GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

79. Fees $ 3,000.00 

80. Expenses 110.00 

$ 3,110.00 
It was so voted. 

HEALTH AND SANITATION DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

SALARIES: 

81. Board Members $ 1,242.00 



Director of Public Health 21,855.00 

Senior Clerk 10,005.00 

Slaughtering Inspector 00.00 

Plumbing Inspector — Fees & Transfers 6,000.00 

Physicians 1,500.00 

Vacation and Sickness 1,500.00 



TOTAL $ 42,102.00 

EXPENSES: 

Health & Professional Services $ 7,050.00 

Collection of Garbage 00.00 

Mosquito Control Study 150.00 

Transportation, Directors 1,500.00 

Other Expenses 3,150.00 

Out of State Expenses 375.00 



TOTAL $ 54,327.00 



Dr. Ethel Kamien asked about $150.00 alloted to the Mosquito Control Study, and stated she would like to 
see item deleted. Dr. Byron Roseman responded he had no objection to this. No motion to amend was made. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

SALARIES: 18 months 

94. Superintendent $ 22,740.00 

95. Adm. Ass't Highway 2.00 
95a. Senior Clerk 9,866.00 

96. Engineer's Fees 6,500.00 

97. Clerk Hire 825.00 



TOTAL $ 39,933.00 

EXPENSES: 

98. Utilities & Misc. Expenses $ 29,500.00 

99. Street Signs 3,200.00 

100. Waste Collection 412,960.00 

101. Annual Waste Clean up Days 17,200.00 

102. Maint. & Repair to Garage 1,900.00 

103. Outlays 1,000.00 

HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES AND DRAINAGE: 

104. Highway Materials $ 63,000.00 

105. Misc. Equipment & Small Tools 2,250.00 

106. Stabilization Fund Equipment 10,000.00 

107. Machinery Hire — Other 1,500.00 

108. Labor — Men 279,066.00 

109. Vacations and Sickness 35,000.00 



61 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

110. Labor — Overtime 8,000.00 

111. Radio Outlay and Equipment 850.00 

112. Radio Repairs and Services 810.00 

ROAD MACHINERY ACCOUNT 

113. Repairs $ 30,000.00 

1 14. Snow and Ice Removal 334,000.00 

115. Highway, Bridges & Drainage Const. 36,000.00 

116. Chapter 90, Maintenance 12,000.00 

117. Sidewalks 11,000.00 



TOTAL $1,329,169.00 

Mr. Philip Anderson moved to amend Line 101, Annual Waste Clean up Days to read $10,000 and Item 
114, Snow and Ice Removal to $255,000. This amendment was defeated. A motion was made to stop debate on 
the main motion. It was voted, unanimously. 

The Highway Department budget passed on a voice vote. 

Motion was made to adjourn at 11:05 P.M., until Monday, April 9, 1973 at 7:30 in the High School Gym- 
nasium. 

DANIEL J. COUGHLIN, Moderator MARY E. ST. HILAIRE, Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 9, 1973 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 5 66 voters present. 

The following tellers were appointed : 

S. Anthony DiCiero Ruth Delaney 

Paul Bienvenu Robert Griffin 

Philip Swissler 

Mr. Thomas Markham moved to recess the annual town meeting until completion of the special Town 
Meeting called for April 9, 1973. The reading of the sheriffs return of the warrant was waived. The Moderator 
recognized the presence of a quorum of 300 for the special town meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Mr. Peter J. McHugh, Sr. moved that the Town vote to rescind the action taken with 
respect to Article 2A of the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, March 5 & 12, 1973 in its adjourned session 
of March 19, 1973 amending Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law." 

Mrs. Ina Greenblatt moved that "because both employees and employers are here I feel it necessary that a 
secret ballot be used on this article, so no one will feel bound by his position in town." 

After a discussion about the reasons for calling the special town meeting, a vote was taken on Mrs. Green- 
blatt's motion. Motion defeated by voice vote. Vote questioned. A hand vote was taken : 

YES — 142 NO — 266 Motion defeated for secret ballot. 

Town Counsel Clement McCarthy explained his ruling on Article 2A stating that under Chapter 41, Section 
108A personnel of the town do not include elected officials, namely assessor, town clerk, and treasurer-tax col- 
lector. 

Mr. Richard McDermott moved to amend Article 2 A as follows: 

1973 1974 

2A 4. Town Accountant $10,376.00 p.a. $10,656.00 p.a. 

11. Board of Registrar's Clerk 850.00 p.a. 850.00 p.a. 

B 1. Cemetery Superintendent $10,333.00 p.a. $10,617.00 p.a. 

2. Cemetery Foreman 3.96 hr. 4.06 hr. 

62 



D 7. Aids 

E 3. Highway Foreman 

4. Assistant Foreman 

I 1. Animal Inspector 



1973 




1974 


2.00 hr. 
4.71 hr. 
4.12 hr. 


$ 
$ 


2.05 hr. 
4.84 hr. 
4.23 hr. 



$ 1,000.00 p.a. $ 1,000.00 p.a. 



The Finance Committee felt that the above changes would rectify errors made in Article 2A passed at the March 
19th session of town meeting. 

After considerable discussion Mr. Edward Hilliard moved to stop debate under Article I. 

YES — 397 NO — 86 It was so voted. 



The vote under Article 1 to rescind Article 2 A was: 
YES — 314 NO — 201 



It was so voted. 



Mr. Robert Sexton moved for reconsideration of Article 1 by secret ballot. He was ruled out of order by the 
Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Mr. McHugh moved that the Town, in the event of an affirmative vote on the fore- 
going article, vote to further amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and Sala- 
ries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law" to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain 
labor organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 178 G through 178 N as follows: 

SEE PAY SCHEDULE LISTED IN WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 
9, 1973. 

Mr. Richard McDermott moved to amend Article 2 to conform to the pay scale voted at the adjourned annual 
town meeting held March 19, 1973, with the exception of the eight corrections listed above. Mr. McDermott 
moved to amend Section A, Line 1 as follows: 

1973 1974 

1. Veteran's Agent $ 3,185.00 p.a. $ 3,270.00 p.a. 

Motion was made to stop debate on Line 1 . It was so voted, unanimously, by voice. The motion to amend 
passed by voice vote. The vote on the main motion as amended passed. 
Mr. Richard McDermott moved to amend line 2 A as follows: 



2. Clerk, Senior 



1973 
$ 6,519.00 p.a. 



1974 
$ 6,695.00 p.a. 



This amendment passed on voice vote. Main motion passed on voice vote. 

The Finance Committee moved that the Administrative and Clerical Section of the article be amended to re- 
flect Article 2A as passed, with the exception of the Town Accountant's salary which is now $10,376.00 for 1973 
and $10,656.00 for 1974, and Board of Registrar's Clerk which is now $850.00 for 1973 and $850.00 for 1974; 
also to strike out Line 5, Town Clerk and Line 6 — Treasurer & Tax Collector. 

The motion to amend was passed by a voice vote. 

A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 1973 

1. Veteran's Agent $ 3,185.00 p.a. 

2. Clerk, Senior 6,519.00 p.a. 

3. Clerk 5,340.00 p.a. 

4. Town Accountant 10,376.00 p.a. 

5. Deleted (Town Clerk) 

6. Deleted (Treasurer & Tax Collector) 

7. Assistant Treasurer 1.00 p.a. 

8. Town Counsel 500.00 p.a. 

9. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 9,015.00 p.a. 

10. Personnel Board's Recording Clerk 2.70 hr. 

11. Board of Registrar's Clerk 850.00 p.a. 

12. Clerk 2.70 hr. 

13. Planning Board Clerk 2.70 hr. 

14. Board of Registrars, (3 members). 275.00 ea. 

The main motion passed on a voice vote. 



1974 

$ 3,270.00 p.a. 

6,695.00 p.a. 

5,484.00 p.a. 

10,656.00 p.a. 

1.00 p.a. 

500.00 p.a. 

9,258.00 p.a. 

2.77 hr. 
850.00 p.a. 

2.77 hr. 

2.77 hr. 
275.00 ea. 



63 



Mr. McDermott moved to amend B. Conservation and Cemetery, as follows: 

B. 1. Cemetery Superintendent 
2. Cemetery Foreman 

Amendment carried by voice vote. 

B. CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Cemetery Foreman 

3. Moth Superintendent 

4. Landscaper 

5. Laborer, Park & Cemetery 

6. Unskilled Laborer 

7. Park Superintendent 

8. Skilled Forest Workman 

9. Cemetery Equipment Operator 

Items 1-9 with two amendments then passed, voice vote. 

Mr. McDermott moved to amend the Custodial section of Article 2 to reflect the original Article 2A as passed. 
Amendment passed. 

C. CUSTODIAL: 

1. Custodian (Center Hall) 

2. Custodian (Library) 

3. Custodian (Police Department) 

Main motion as amended passed by voice vote. 
Mr. McDermott moved to amend Section D. Library as follows: 

D. 7 Aids 



1973 


1974 


$10,333.00 p.a. 


$10,617.00 p.a. 


3.96 hr. 


4.06 hr. 


1973 


1974 


$10,333.00 p.a. 


$10,617.00 p.a. 


3.96 hr. 


4.06 hr. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.00 p.a. 


1.75 hr. 


1.75 hr. 


3.24 hr. 


3.32 hr. 


2.00 hr. 


2.05 hr. 


9,465.00 p.a. 


9,720.00 p.a. 


2.65 hr. 


2.72 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.92 hr. 



1973 




1974 


2.99 hr. 


$ 


3.07 hr. 


2.99 hr. 




3.07 hr. 


2.99 hr. 




3.07 hr. 



1973 
2.00 hr. 



1974 
2.05 hr. 



The assistant librarian's (MLS) salary had been voted under Article 2A to be $8500 for 1973 and $8797 for 
1974. 



D. LIBRARY 

1. • Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aids 



1973 

$12,132.00 p.a. 

8,500.00 p.a. 

7,218.00 p.a. 

3.00 hr. 

2.57 hr. 

2.70 hr. 

2.00 hr. 



1974 

$12,459.00 p.a. 
8,797.00 p.a. 
7,412.00 p.a. 

3.08 hr. 

2.63 hr. 

2.77 hr. 

2.05 hr. 



Items 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (except 2) as amended passed by voice vote. Vote on main motion under Libraries passed 
by voice vote. 



E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. Mr. McDermott moved to amend all figures for the Highway Depart- 
ment to that which had been passed under Article 2 A except: 



E. 



Highway Foreman 
Assistant Foreman 



1973 
4.71 hr. 
4.12 hr. 



1974 
4.84 hr. 
4.23 hr. 



Selectman Thomas Markham asked that this amendment for Item 3 & 4 be defeated since these positions are 
negotiated wages. After discussion a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously, by voice. 
The amendment on 3 & 4 passed, by voice. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT: 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Administrative Assistant, Highway 



1973 
$15,025.00 p.a. 
1.00 p.a. 



1974 
$15,431.00 p.a. 
1.00 p.a. 



64 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 



Highway Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Grader Operator 

Class I — Engineer Equipment Operator 

(Tractor & Broom Oper.) 
Class II - — Engineer Equipment Operator 

(Catch Basin Cleaner Op.) 
Class III — Special Equipment Operator 

(Truck Driver, Highway & Waste) 
Laborer (Ashes & Waste) 
Laborer (General) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Mechanic 

Mechanic — Heavy Equipment 
Custodian (Laborer — General) 
Painting Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 
Sewer Rodder Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 



1973 


1974 


4.71 hr. 


4.84 hr. 


4.12 hr. 


4.23 hr. 


4.58 hr. 


4.70 hr. 


4.39 hr. 


4.51 hr. 



4.05 hr. 
4.05 hr. 



3.82 hr. 



4.16 hr. 
4.16 hr. 



3.51 hr. 


3.60 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.34 hr. 


3.51 hr. 


3.60 hr. 


4.13 hr. 


4.24 hr. 


4.48 hr. 


4.60 hr. 


3.25 hr. 


3.34 hr. 


3.82 hr. 


3.92 hr. 



3.92 hr. 



The vote on the main motion as amended passed by voice vote unanimously. 

Mr. McDermott moved to amend F. Town Fire Department, to the pay scale which passed under Article 
2A with the exception of the 1974 salary of the Fire Department Officers which would be $12,091 — the same 
as for 1973. Mr. William Thompson questioned the pay of the Fire Chief which he understood should be twice 
that of the highest paid firefighter. Mr. McDermott explained that there is a bill in the state senate under con- 
sideration which would allow option on the salaries of Fire Chief and Police Chief. 

The amendment passed. 



TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Officers 

Regular Fire Fighters: 
Base Pay 
1st Step 
2nd Step 
3rd Step 

Main motion as amended passed, by Voice. 



1973 1974 

$15,025.00 p.a. $15,431.00 p.a. 

13,229.00 p.a. 13,586.00 p.a. 

12,091.00 p.a. 12,091.00 p.a. 



9.138.00 p.a. 

9,596.00 p.a. 

10.051.00 p.a. 

10,509.00 p.a. 



9,138.00 p.a. 

9.596.00 p.a. 

10,051.00 p.a. 

10,509.00 p.a. 



Under G. Town Police Department, Mr. McDermott moved to amend the article to the figures passed under Ar- 
ticle 2A with the exception of the Sergeants' 1974 salary which would be $12,091 — the same as for 1973. 

After a discussion about the figures in question, a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimous- 
ly. The vote on the amendment passed by voice. 



G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

1. Chief 

2. Captain 

3. Sergeants 

4. Patrolmen — Base Pay 

5. Patrolmen — After 1 year 

6. Patrolmen — After 2 years 

7. Patrolmen — After 3 years 

8. Matron 

9. Special Police 

10. School Traffic Supervisor 



The vote on the main motion as amended, Items 1-10, passed, voice vote. 
Mr. McDermott moved that Recreation Items 1-7 be passed. It was so voted. 



1973 

$15,025.00 p.a. 

13,229.00 p.a. 

12,091.00 p.a. 

9,138.00 p.a. 

9,596.00 p.a. 

10,051.00 p.a. 

10,509.00 p.a. 

3.53 hr. 

4.01 hr. 

3.25 hr. 



1974 

$15,431.00 p.a. 

13,586.00 p.a. 

12,091.00 p.a. 

9,138.00 p.a. 

9,596.00 p.a. 

10,051.00 p.a. 

10,509.00 p.a. 

3.62 hr. 

4.12 hr. 

3.33 hr. 



65 



H. RECREATION: 1973 1974 

$ 2,500.00 p.a. $ 2,500.00 p.a. 
250.00 p.a. 250.00 p.a. 

Same 
Same 
Same 
Same 
Same 
Same 

Mr. McDermott explained that the Animal Inspector's salary had been voted in under 2A as $1,000. Mr. Mark- 
ham requested that the town approve the following for dog officer. 



IE< 
1. 


CREATION: 
Director 
( Transportation ) 










Maximum 


Minimum 


2. 


Swimming Director 


$80.00 wk. 


$100.00 wk. 


3. 


Swimming Instructor 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. 


4. 


Playground Director 


80.00 wk. 


100.00 wk. 


5. 


Playground Supvsr. 


45.00 wk. 


66.00 wk. 


6. 


Playground Instructor 


56.00 wk. 


80.00 wk. 


7. 


Sports Instructor 


3.00 hr. 


5.00 hr. 



6. Dog Officer 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 



1973 
$ 6,240.00 p.a. 
2.50 hr. 



After discussion a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. 



1974 
$ 6,458.00 p.a. 
2.59 hr. 



I. MISCELLANEOUS: 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Clock Winder 

Vote taken on the main motion. It was so voted. 



1973 

$ 1,000.00 p.a. 

2,000.00 p.a. 

4.00 visit 

4.00 visit 

1,000.00 p.a. 

6,240.00 p.a. 

2.50 hr. 

100.00 p.a. 



1974 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

6,458.00 p.a. 

2.59 hr. 

100.00 p.a. 



Mr. Thomas Markham moved to adjourn the special town meeting at 10: 15 P.M. The adjourned annual 
town meeting then took place. 

Mr. Balco moved to take Article 26 out of order. It Was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 26. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of One ($1.00) 
Dollar to be used for conservation and passive recreation purposes in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 132A, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40 as amended, said sum to be used to purchase 
land, under the provision that should this land be used for purposes other than conservation and passive rec- 
reation the land will revert to the present owner, Campanelli Corporation, the land bounded and described as 
follows: 

Land containing 22 acres, more or less, located on the southerly side of George B. B. Wright Reserva- 
tion in Chelmsford, lot numbers as taken from Composite Plan, Hickory Hills and Country Club Es- 
tates, Chelmsford, by Bradford Saiverty and Associate, Inc., Quincy, Mass., Lots numbered 219, 220, 
221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 252, 253, 254, 265, 266, 267, also 
land where the following roads were to be but not completed; DEWOLFE DRIVE, GREEN VAL- 
LEY DRIVE, COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, also New England Power Company Easement from the 
rear of Lots 232 and 234 to the rear of Lots 204 and 205 being 250 feet wide and being land now or 
formerly owned by Campanelli Company, Inc. 

After a discussion a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The vote on the main motion passed. 

Mr. Gordon Reed moved to take Article 78 out of order. The Finance Committee objected to his motion. Mo- 
tion to take Article 78 out of order defeated. 



ARTICLE 3 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

118. Expenses 
It was so voted 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 
$ 825.00 



66 



Recommended 1973-74 
HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 18 months 

119. Expenses $ 745.00 

It was so voted 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Mr. McDermott moved to amend Line 121 to read $12,600. It was so voted. 

Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

120. Center District $ 48,900.00 

121. North District 37,600 12,600.00 

122. East District 6,450.00 

123. South District 5,700.00 



TOTAL $ 73,650.00 
Vote on main motion as amended. It was so voted. 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

124. Prop., Liab., & All types of Insurance $221,320.00 

125. Chapter 32B Insurance - Employees 224,500.00 

126. Police Professional Liability 00 



TOTAL $445,820.00 
It was so voted, unanimously 

LAW DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 
Salaries: 

127. Town Counsel $ 750.00 

Expenses : 

128. Legal Services $ 19,500.00 

129. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 1,500.00 



TOTAL $ 21,750.00 

It was so voted, unanimously 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Mr. McDermott moved that the total budget for the Library Department be lowered from $218,569 to 
$202,937. He explained the Town has received $15,632 in library funds from the state to make up the differ- 
ence. Mr. Philip Anderson moved to amend the salaries of the two librarians from $31,308 to $18,362. He felt 
one full time MLS librarian was sufficient for the town. After a discussion about the fact that the town had 
already voted to have two librarians, supported by the Finance Committee's recommendations and the needs of 
the town, Mr. Anderson withdrew his amendment. 

Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 
Salaries: 

130. Librarians (2) $ 31,308.00 

131. Branch Librarian 10,953.00 

132. Asst. Librarians & Library Clerks 88,346.00 

133. Library Aides 5,250.00 

134. Custodian & Security 11,171.00 

135. Vacation and Sickness 3,000.00 



TOTAL $150,028.00 



67 



Recommended 1973-74 

Expenses: 18 months 

136. Repair & Maintenance of Buildings $ 2,000.00 

137. Fuel, Light and Water 8,800.00 

138. Books and Periodicals 43,291.00 

139. Other Expenses 8,950.00 

140. Oudays 5,500.00 



TOTAL $218,569.00 

Less 15,632.00 



TOTAL VOTED $202,937.00 

LIBRARY NEEDS COMMITTEE 

141. Expenses $ 00 

MODERATOR Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

142. Moderator's Salary $ 375.00 

It was so voted . 

MOTH DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Ethel Kamien suggested the various pest control departments appoint a pest control superintendent. She 
also stated there are no gypsie moths in town. 

Salaries 

143. Superintendent $ 25.00 

Expenses 

144. Expenses 25.00 



TOTAL $ 50.00 

It was so voted . 

Mr. Thomas Markham moved for adjournment at 11 .00 P.M., until Monday, April 23, 1973 at the High School 
Gymnasium. The two week space is due to Patriots' day and the Christian and Jewish holidays. 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Moderator Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 23, 1973 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 P.M. by moderator Daniel J. Coughlin who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 666 voters present. The following tellers were appointed. 

Robert Griffin Edward McCaffrey 

Robert McAdams Ruth K. Delaney 

Arnaud Blackadar 

Mr. McDermott made a correction to the Park Department Outlay account reducing the figure from $1,800 to 
$1,500. 

PARK DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

145. Labor $ 15,208.00 

146. Expenses 4,175.00 

147. Outlays 1,500.00 



68 



148. Recreation Field Maintenance Labor 

149. Recreation Field Maintenance Expense 



It was so voted. 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 



700.00 
450.00 



$ 22,033.00 



PERSONNEL BOARD 
150. Expenses 

It was so voted. 



$ 500.00 



PLANNING BOARD 

151. Planning Board — Clerk Hire 

152. Planning Board — Expenses 

153. Outlay 

154. Planning Board — Consultant 

155. Planning Board — Greater Lowell 

Planning Fee 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 
It was so voted. 



$ 2,500.00 

2,000.00 

00.00 

1,000.00 

12,456.00 

$ 17,956.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

156. Officers and Administration 

157. Regular and Special Account 

Totals 

EXPENSES: 

158. Maintenance and Equipment 

159. Chiefs Out of State Expense 

160. Outlays 

161. Special and Education, Out of State 

162. Regional Tactical unit, Expenses 

TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 



$166,688.00 
755,749.00 



$922,437.00 



$ 75,992.00 

300.00 

2,660.00 

1,800.00 

1,500.00 

$1,004,689.00 



It was so voted. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

163. Salaries of Janitors 

164. Vacation and Sickness 

Total 

EXPENSES: 

165. Fuel, Light and Water 

166. Repairs, Equipment and Expenses 

167. Outlays 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPT. 
It was so voted . 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 



$ 9,412.00 
500.00 



$ 9,912.00 



$ 7,500.00 

11,142.00 

2,400.00 

$ 30,954.00 



69 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

168. Salaries, Directors & Asst. Youth 

169. Expenses, Youth 

170. Out of State Expenses 

171. Outlay 

TOTAL Recreation Department 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

$ 13,813.00 

89,740.00 

.00 

3,500.00 



$107,053.00 



Mr. William Drury questioned the amount of recreation expenditure, asking why the budget had doubled. 
Mr. William Dempster, Chairman of the Recreation Department explained the budget completely. A vote 
was taken on the budget — passed by voice vote. 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee moved for reconsideration of the Police Department budget in 
order to apply $444,296.00 of Federal Revenue sharing money to be applied to the salary account. 

The motion for reconsideration passed. 

The vote on applying the $444,296.00 to the Police Department budget passed. 

Mr. Edward Hilliard moved to amend Item 174 (Clerk) in Registrars' Department from $1,275.00 to $3,175.00; 
Item 175 (Printing) from $2,400 to $2,000; Item 178 (Data processing) from $4,500 to $3,000. The total $17,- 
312 would remain the same. 



The vote on the amendment passed by voice. 
REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

172. Registrars (3) 

173. Ass't Registrars: Wages & Mileage 

174. Clerk 

Total 

EXPENSES 

175. Printing: Men-Women Directory 

176. Printing: Voters' Lists 

177. Other Expenses 

178. Data Processing 

TOTAL, Registrars Department 
It was so voted, as amended. 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

$ 1,237.00 
6,600.00 
3,175.00 



$ 9,112.00 

$ 2,000.00 

.00 

1,300.00 

3,000.00 

$ 17,312.00 



Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

$ 1,500.00 

.00 

500.00 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

179. Clerk 

180. Out-of-State Travel 

181. School Building Committee Expenses 

TOTAL School Building Committee 

It was so voted. 

Mr. McDermott moved to amend Item 182 (Salary) of Sealer of Weights & Measures from $2,500.00 to $1,500.00. 
It was so voted. 



$ 2,000.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

182. Salary 

183. Expenses 

TOTAL Sealer of Weights & Measures 
It was so voted, as amended. 



$ 1,500.00 
50.00 

$ 1,550.00 



70 



Mr. Richard McDermott moved to amend Selectmen's Department by adding Item 196A - Appraisals $2,475.00, 
making the total $86,049.00. Motion to amend passed. 

After considerable discussion about various items on the Selectmen's budget, Mr. Robert Sexton moved to amend 
as follows: 



187. 


Labor Relations Advisor 


from 


188. 


Clerk (2) (Part Time) 


from 


189. 


Senior Clerk (Full Time) 


from 




Total 


from 


190. 


Expenses 


from 


191. 


Conference Expenses 


from 


192. 


Outlays 


from 


193. 


Out of State Expenses 


from 


195. 


Purchasing Agent 


from 


196. 


Youth Center 


from 




Total 


from 



$ 10,000.00 

8,518.00 

9,866.00 

50,278.00 

6,500.00 

2,250.00 

500.00 

400.00 

375.00 

19,520.00 

83,573.00 



to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 



$ 3,000.00 

4,050.00 

.00 

28,944.00 

5,190.00 

1,500.00 

450.00 

.00 

.00 

5,700.00 

45,534.00 



plus Mr. McDermott's amendment of 196A Appraisals $2,475.00 which had already been voted on. 
The above Items were voted on individually: 

Item 187 — Defeated 

Item 188 — Defeated. A recount on this item — motion to amend defeated. 
Item 189 — Defeated 
Item 190 — Defeated 
Item 191 — Defeated 
Item 192 — Defeated 
Item 193 — Defeated 

Item 195 — Mr. Sexton moved to withdraw this amendment. It was so voted. 

Item 196 — Mr. Sexton requested an explanation why the Youth Center is included in the Selectmens' bud- 
get. After an explanation of this by Mr. Dempster, Mr. Sexton withdrew this amendment. It was so voted. 



SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

184. Chairman 

185. Board Members 

186. Selectmen Adm. Asst. 

187. Labor Relations Advisor 

188. Clerk (2) (Part Time) 

189. Senior Clerk (Full Time) 

Total 

EXPENSES 

190. Expenses 

191. Conference Expenses 

192. Outlays 

193. Out of State Expenses 

194. Emergency Employment 

195. Purchasing Agent 

196. Youth Center 
196A. Appraisals 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

$ 2,250.00 

6,000.00 
13,644.00 
10,000.00 

8,518.00 

9,866.00 



$ 50,278.00 



6,500.00 

2,250.00 
500.00 
400.00 

3,750.00 

375.00 

19,520.00 

2,475.00 



TOTAL Selectmen's Department $ 86,048.00 

A vote was taken on the main motion of the Selectmen's budget as amended. 
It was so voted. 

Mr. James McKeown explained the necessity of Chelmsford having a sewage treatment plant. After a discussion 
about the professional fee under Item 197, Mr. Reginald Larkin moved to amend the figure of $14,000 to $1.00. 
This motion was defeated. 



71 



SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 

197. Professional Fee 

198. Expenses 

TOTAL Sewer Commission Department 
It was so voted. 

STREET LIGHTING 

199. Street Lighting 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

200. Expenses 

It was so voted. 
TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

201. Town Clerk 

202. Senior Clerk (2) 

203. Clerk (Part Time) 

TOTAL 

EXPENSES: 

204. Expenses 

205. Board Appeals — Variance Rec. Fees 

206. Printing By-Laws Books 

207. Outlays 

TOTAL Town Clerk Department 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 
$ 14,000.00 
1,500.00 



$ 15,500.00 



$ 69,500.00 



$ 5,000.00 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

$ 12,750.00 

19,733.00 

4,500.00 



$ 36,983.00 



$ 4,500.00 

50.00 

500.00 

1,800.00 

$ 43,833.00 



It was so voted, by voice. Mr. Chester Davis questioned the vote on the Town Clerk's Department. Seven 
other voters questioned it as well. A hand count was taken: 



YES 204 



NO 99 



It was so voted 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

208. Expenses 

It was so voted. 



$ 975.00 



Mr. Richard McDermott made two corrections to Treasurer & Collector Department, Line 210, Senior Clerk (6) 
from $59,199.00 to $49,333.00; Line 211, Clerk (Part-time) from $4,050.00 to $7,896.00. 



TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

209. Treasurer and Collector 

Assistant Treasurer 

210. Senior Clerk (6) 

211. Clerk 

212. Vacation and Sickness 

TOTAL 

EXPENSES: 

213. Postage 

214. Printing, Advertising, Binding & Stationery 

215. Bonds 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

$ 21,000.00 

2.00 

49,333.00 

7,896.00 

2,100.00 



$ 80,331.00 



$ 7,531.00 
3,750.00 
1,424.00 



72 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

216. Expenses 7,695.00 

217. Outlays 1,806.00 

218. Machine Hire 1,560.00 

219. Data Process, Payroll 7,350.00 

220. Purchase NCR 400 Acct. Machine 17,965.00 



TOTAL Treasurer & Collector Department $129,412.00 

Mr. Philip McCormack, Treasurer-Collector gave a thorough explanation of his budget, after which a voice vote 
was taken. It was so voted. 

The Tree Warden's Department budget was held for a brief discussion with the selectmen by Mrs. Kamien. 

Mr. Arthur Osborne moved for reconsideration of Line 209, Assistant Treasurer. His motion to reconsider was 
withdrawn. 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 

Mr. McDermott corrected Line 231, Veteran Pension Claims from $6,110.00 to 8,466.00. 

Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

225. Town & Finance Committee Reports $ 15,970.00 

226. Workmen's Compensation Claims .00 

227. Expenses for Memorial Day 3,000.00 

228. Expenses for Town Clock 500.00 

229. Development & Industrial Commission 1,500.00 

230. Ambulance Service 12,500.00 

231. Veteran Pension Claims 8,466.00 



TOTAL Unclassified Departments $ 41,936.00 

It was so voted, as corrected. 

TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Motion to amend Line 223, Other Expenses from from $9,000 to $1.00, and Line 224, Outlay from $450.00 
to $1.00. It was so voted. 

Recommended 1973-74 
SALARIES 18 months 

221. Tree Warden $ 1,200.00 

222. Fees 6,000.00 



Total $ 7,200.00 

EXPENSES: 

223. Other Expenses $ 1.00 

224. Outlay 1.00 

TOTAL Tree Warden's Department $ 7,202.00 
It was so voted, as amended. 

VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

235. Salary of Veteran's Agent $ 4,820.00 

236. Expenses 400.00 

237. Outlay .00 

238. Cash and Material Grants 112,000.00 



TOTAL Veteran's Benefit Department $1 17,220.00 

It was so voted. 



73 



Recommended 1973-74 
WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 18 months 

239. Inspector's Fees $ 4,000.00 

240. Expenses 100.00 

TOTAL WIRING INSPECTOR'S Department $4,100.00 

It was so voted. 

Mr. Thomas Markham moved to take Article 42 out of order. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 42. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $15,966.00 for the purpose of purchasing five (5) new 1973 four-door sedans to be used by the Police De- 
partment, said purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen : and to authorize the Select- 
men to transfer by good and sufficient bill of sale, title to one (1) 1971 and three (3) 1972 cruisers now being 
used by the Police Department. 

It was so voted. 
Mr. Philip Dube moved to take Article 78 out of order. Motion defeated. 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Chelmsford 43.28% Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 
OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE BUDGET, assessment to Chelmsford. $630,749.00 

It was so voted. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT Recommended 1973-74 

18 months 

1. School Committee $ 26,450.00 

2. Superintendent's Office 295,537.00 

3. Supervision 270,326.00 

4. Principals 667,463.00 

5. Teaching 9,396,396.00 

6. Textbooks 144,121.00 

7. Library 213,687.00 

8. Audio- Visual 188,440.00 

9. Guidance 419,365.00 

10. Work Study 26,124.00 

11. Psychological Services 18,500.00 

12. School Attendance 19,100.00 

13. Health Services 99,416.00 

14. Transportation 1,451,837.00 

15. Food Services 64,555.00 

16. Athletics 109,209.00 

17. Other School Activities 50,500.00 

18. Driver Education 3^200.00 

19. Health Education 78,094.00 

20. Maintenance - Custodial 596'332.00 

21. Utilities 356,630.00 

22. Maintenance of Grounds 20,627.00 

23. Maintenance of Buildings 140,394.00 

24. Maintenance of Equipment 51,339.00 

25. Acquisition of Equipment 00 

26. Community Services: Adult Education 23,120.00 

27. Community Services: Civic Activities 23,850.00 

28. Programs with Other Schools 12,500.00 

29. High School Evaluation 00 



TOTAL $14,767,112.00 

Minus Federal Funds 417,000.00 (1) 



TOTAL TOWN FUNDS $14,350,112.00 



74 



Recommended 1973-74 
18 months 

30. State Education Aid Law $ 3,914,895.00 

3 1 . Tuition & Transportation of State Wards 1 0,000.00 

32. School Transportation 714,320.00 

33. Rental of Auditoriums 1,000.00 

34. Custodial Services 13,000.00 

35. Special Education 175,000.00 

36. Dog Licenses 4,000.00 

37. Miscellaneous 5,000.00 

38. Adult Evening Education 10,000.00 

39. Federal Funds 417,000.00 (1) 



Total Receipts $ 5,264,215.00 

Net Cost to Chelmsford $ 9,502,897.00 

( 1 ) Includes $204,000 not expended in 1972. 

Mr. Martin Ames presented a clear justification of the school budget. Mr. Richard Swift also defended 
the budget. 

Mr. Philip Anderson amended the School Budget to a figure of $13,333,0O0.O0.After considerable discus- 
sion Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to stop debate. A hand vote was taken: YES — 198 NO — 32 

Motion passes 

A vote was taken on Mr. Anderson's motion to amend. Motion defeated. 

Mr. Robert Jost moved to amend Line 19, Health & Education from $78,094 to $19,727.00. A motion 
was made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. A vote was taken on Mr. Jost's motion to amend. 
Amendment defeated. 

A motion was made to move the entire school budget. The vote on this motion to stop debate was : 

YES — 172 NO — 27 It was so voted. 

Dr. William Thompson questioned the presence of a quorum. A hand count was taken indicating that 
there were 245 voters present after a number of voters had departed. Mr. Martin Ames moved for acceptance 
of the School Budget of $14,767,112.00 to be reduced by Federal Funds of $417,000.00 to the sum of $14,350,- 
112.00. It was so voted. 

A motion was made to adjourn at 11:30 P.M. Next meeting will be held on Monday, April 30, 1973 at 
7 : 30 P.M. in the High School Gymnasium. 

TOTAL BUDGET . . . $22,243,652.00 

Daniel J. Coughlin Mary E. St. Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 30, 1973 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Cough- 
lin, Jr. who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 387 voters present. 

The tellers for the evening were: 

Ruth Delaney Philip Swissler 

Robert Griffin Jane McKersie 

Arnaud Blackadar 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Mr. William A. Dempster, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$24,000.00 to provide for complete site work in preparation for establishing a family recreation site at (A) the 



75 



Robert's property on Old Westford Road and Westford Street and (B) on the school property lying south of 
the present South Row School. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25. Mrs. Dorothy Brown moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire in fee simple by purchase, by eminent domain, or otherwise, for recreation purposes the following 
described parcel of land situated on the southerly side of Westford Road near the intersection of School Street 
and Westford Road and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the northeasterly corner of the premises on the southerly side of the Westford Road and 
at land now or supposed to belong to one Roberts (land now owned by the Town of Chelmsford) : 
thence running in a straight line in a southwesterly direction about one hundred thirty (130) feet to 
a brook: thence turning and running in a northerly direction by land of Gilmore about forty-three (43) 
feet to a stake: thence turning and running in a northwesterly direction along other land of Gilmore 
about fifty (50) feet to a stake at the southerly side of Westford Road: thence turning and running 
in an easterly direction by the southerly line of Westford Road one hundred fifty (150) feet more or 
less to the point of beginning. 

These being the same premises conveyed to Royal L. Larson and Catherine C. Larson by deed dated Au- 
gust 29, 1945, Middlesex No. District Registry of Deeds, recorded Aug. 31, 1945, 1:30 p.m. Bk. 1028, 
Plan 880, PP 412-413: 

and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $42,500.00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as the result of any such action. 

Mr. James Brown moved to amend the figure of $42,500.00 to $28,000.00 in view of recent sale of the 
property. After a lengthy discussion a vote was taken on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Mr. Philip 
Anderson moved to amend by striking out the words "eminent domain." This amendment ruled out of order by 
Moderator. Attorney James Geary representing Hicks stated the owner would not accept $42,000 for the prop- 
erty. Additional discussion resulted in a motion to stop debate. It was so voted unanimously. 

The vote on the main motion was a hand count. YES — 21 NO — 260 Defeated 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000.00 to be transferred to the Conservation Fund to be used for purposes in accordance with the Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 132A, and Chapter 40, as amended, said sum to be used to purchase land des- 
cribed as follows: 

Southerly and southwesterly by Swan Drive, two hundred eighty-two and 10/100 (282.10) feet: North- 
westerly by land now or formerly of Eveline L'herault, two hundred thirty-three and 60/100 (233.60) 
feet: and northeasterly by Lot 38, ninety-two and 57/100 (92.57) feet: 

and another parcel described as follows : 

Northeasterly by Swan Drive, by several lines measuring together one hundred ninety-five and 45/100 
(195.45) feet: Northerly by said Swan Drive, two hundred twelve and 8/100 (212.08) feet: South- 
easterly by Lot 46, by several lines measuring together two hundred sixty-three and 45/100 (263.45) 
feet: Southwesterly by Lot 48, by several lines measuring together, five hundred twenty-eight and 85/100 
(528.85) feet and northwesterly by land now or formerly of Eveline L'herault, one hundred sixty- 
eight and 82/100 (168.82) feet: 

said land now or formely owned by San-Vel Concrete Corp. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,000.00 to be transferred to the Conservation Fund to be used for purposes in accordance with the Massa- 
chusetts General Laws, Chapter 132 A, and Chapter 40, as amended, said sum to be used to purchase land 
described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Dunstable Road, twenty-four and 41/100 (24.41) feet: Southeasterly by Lots Bl, 
B2 and B3, by two lines measuring together two hundred eighty-seven and 31/100 (287.31) feet: 
Northeasterly by Lot B2, four and 79/100 (4.79) feet: Southerly by Lots B14 and B18 one hundred 
ninety-six and 1/100 (196.01) feet: Southwesterly by B 13, seven hundred eighty-three and 89/100 (783.- 
89) feet: Northwesterly by land now or formerly of Eveline L'herault, three hundred sixteen and 



76 



/'4/100 (316.74) feet: Northeasterly by Lots 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47, by several lines measur- 
ing together five hundred sixty-eight and 85/100 (568.85) feet: Northwesterly by Lot 47 and Dunstable 
Road by several lines measuring together three hundred twenty (320) feet: said land now or formerly 
owned by Mrs. K. A. Cooke (Katherine A. McGoff). 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $18,- 
000.00 to be used for the reconstruction of a dam located on the Crooked Spring Brook Reservation. 

Mr. Balco moved to amend the above to read "said construction not to exceed $18,000.00". It was so 
voted, unanimously. 

The vote on the main motion as amended passed, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $33,- 
000.00 for application to the Conservation Fund. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31. Mr. John Balco moved that the Town assume liability in the manner provided by Sec- 
tion 29 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, as most recently amended by Chapter 5, Acts of 1955, for all dam- 
ages that may be incurred by work to be performed by the Department of Public Works of Massachusetts for 
the improvement, development, maintenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, 
tidewater, foreshores and shores along a public beach, including the Merrimack and Connecticut Rivers, in ac- 
cordance with Section 11 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, and authorize the Selectmen to execute and deliver 
a bond of indemnity therefor to the Commonwealth. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Mr. Carl Seidel and Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr., moved that the Town vote to 
amend Section 24 of the Personnel and Salary Classification by-law, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates 
for Wages and Salaries:, by adding threto the following: 

Assistant Dog Officer 2.50 hr. 

and vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of $ ... to be used by the Dog Offi- 
cer Department to employ one or more part-time assistant Dog Officers to work under the direction of the Dog 
Officer. 

Mr. Markham moved to dismiss the article. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33. Mr. Carl Seidel and Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $760.00 for the purpose of purchasing and installing one ( 1 ) new or used 
two-way radio to be used by the Dog Officer, said purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34. Mr. Carl Seidel and Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 to be used for the procurement of plans and specifications for a pro- 
posed new Dog Kennel and to authorize the Selectmen in connection therewith to appoint a Chelmsford 
Kennel Building Committee and authorize it to procure said plans and specifications and also to make a study 
of available facilities for purchase or lease within the town for the keeping of dogs in the custody of the Dog 
Officer. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. and Mr. Donald J. Butler moved that the Town vote 
to continue to participate in a Regional Drug Abuse Control Program, and to negotiate with the Greater Lo- 
well Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Program, Inc., d/b/a SHARE, concerning this program, in conjunc- 
tion with the City of Lowell and other Greater-Lowell towns, and in connection thereto, to vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $28,290.00 to be used for this purpose. 

It was so voted. 



77 



UNDER ARTICLE 36. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $7,826.23 to be paid to the Lowell Mental Health Association of Greater Lowell, Inc. to support the 
various programs of the Association. 

The Finance Committee and Selectmen spoke at length on the above article, supporting it — Dr. Rose- 
man and Dr. Thompson spoke in opposition of it suggesting the Town should not support only one part of 
United Fund. After debate on the issue, Mr. Charles House moved to stop debate, and then withdrew this mo- 
tion to allow further discussion. A motion to stop debate was again made. It was so voted, unanimously. The 
Moderator was in doubt as to the vote on the main motion. A hand count was taken: 

YES — 155 NO — 131 It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to apppropriate from the 
Sinking Fund the sum of $4,400.00 to reimbuse the town for deduction under the fire insurance policy for 
losses sustained at the town garage and on school department property. 

There was a correction on the above figure from $2,000.00 to $4,400.00. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 38. Mr. Arne R. Olsen moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $10,000.00 
from the perpetual care interest (account) to the general labor account of the Cemetery Commission and to 
transfer the sum of $6,700.00 from the sale of graves and lots account for hot topping roads in Pine Ridge or 
other cemeteries. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39. Mr. Martin Ames moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$12,000.00 to be used by the School Building Committee for the purpose of securing the design, specifications, 
plans and cost for the construction of a 250 pupil capacity auditorium addition to the new high school. 

After a lengthy debate on the above, a motion was made to stop debate. It was so voted unanimously. A 
vote was taken on the main motion. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 40. Mr. Martin Ames moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $16,000.00 to 
be used by the School Building Committee for the purpose of securing the design, specifications, plans and cost 
for the construction of a regulation size swimming pool addition to the new high school. 

After debate on the above Mr. Philip Anderson moved to stop debate. A hand vote was taken. YES — 287 
NO — 33 It was so voted. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. Motion defeated. 

Dr. Ethel Kamien moved for reconsideration of Article 40. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to rescind Section 25 (com- 
pensation for academic achievement) of the Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-Law and substi- 
tute the following therefor : 

Proposed Amendment By-Law Section 25, Compensation for Academic Achievement 

(a) Any full time, permanent member of the Police Department who has earned and received an As- 
sociate of Science certificate in law enforcement from an accredited college or university shall be paid 
$300 additional salary per year in his grade. 

(b) Any full time, permanent member of the Fire Department who has earned and received an As- 
sociate of Science certificate in Fire Science from an accredited college or university shall be paid $300 
additional salary per year in his grade. 

(c) Any full time, permanent member of the Police Department who has earned and received a 
Bachelor of Science degree in law enforcement from an accredited college shall receive $500 additional 
salary per year in his grade. In the event, however, that the said member is already receiving addi- 
tional compensation by virtue of having obtained an associate of Science certificate, then he shall be 
entitled only to an additional $200, so that his total additional salary shall not be in excess of $500 per 
year. 

(d) No member of the Police or Fire Department shall be entitled to any of the above additional 



78 



salary without the prior review and determination of the eligibility of the applicant by the Personnel 
Board. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 43. Mr. Timothy J. Hehir moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $10,- 
000.00 for the. payment of the first phase of a two-year program for up-dating the currertf Master Plan. 

Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to amend the $10,000.00 to $21,000.00. A hand count was taken. YES — 80 
NO — 133 Motion to amend defeated. After a discussion a vote was taken on the main motion. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 44. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,950.00 for the purpose of purchasing insurance coverage to indemnify the Selectmen against law 
suits brought against them while acting in good faith in pursuance of their duties, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 41, Section 100 E of the General Laws and amendments thereto. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 45. Mr. Timothy F. O'Connor moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $2,- 
500.00 to be used for the purpose of erecting a suitable memorial in all the cemeteries of the Town dedicated 
to all those of the Town who have given their lives for their country in all wars. 

After a discussion on the above Mr. Gerald Lannan moved to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. 
The vote on the main motion was then taken. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 46. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $994.00 to alter the time mechanism of the Tower Town Clock, Unitarian Church. 

Motion defeated after discussion. 

Mr. Markham moved to amend Article 47 Line 6. Billerica Road near the McFarlin School to "Billerica Road 
and Chelmsford Street near the McFarlin School" and to add Line 11. "Carlisle Street, near East School." The 
sum of $49,300 would then be increased to $54,600. The amendment passed by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to transfer from surplus 
funds in the Treasury the sum of $54,600.00 for the installation of a flashing yellow light with sign attached to 
read "School Buses Entering Ahead" to be installed in the vicinity of the following school locations: 



Graniteville Road new High School entrance. 

North Road near the High School. 

School Street near the Quessy School. 

Boston Road near the South Row School. 

Graniteville Road near the Junior High School. 

Billerica Road and Chelmsford Street near the McFarlin School. 

Grot on Road near the North School. 

Richardson Road near the Harrington School and entrance to new High School. 

Billerica Road near the Center School. 

Dalton Road near the Westlands School. 

Carlisle Street near the East School. 



The vote on the main motion, as amended, carried by voice vote. 

Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved for adjournment at 11 :00 P.M. Next session will be held May 7, 1973 
at 7:30 P.M .in the High School Auditorium. It; was so voted. 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., Moderator 
Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 

79 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 7, 1973 

Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. called the adjourned annual Town meeting to order at 7:45 P.M., rec- 
ognizing the presence of a quorum. There were 432 voters present. 

The following tellers were appointed: 

Arnaud Blackadar Ruth Delaney 

Charles House Robert Giffin 

Mr. Thomas F. Markham read the following proclamation to be entered into the minutes of the Annual 
Town Meeting: 

"We, the Board of Selectmen for the Town of Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, do hereby recognize and honor the presence of Norie Ikeda of Japan and Knut Berge of Norway, as 
being in attendance at this 8th session of the Annual Town Meeting of the Town of Chelmsford, on this 7th day 
of May, in year of the Lord 1973." 

DANIEL J. COUGHLIN, JR., Town Moderator THOMAS F. MARKHAM, JR. 

MARY E. ST. HILAIRE, Town Clerk Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

ARNOLD J. LOVERING, Vice-Chairman 
WILLIAM R. MURPHY, Clerk 
PAUL C. HART, Member 
GERALD J. LANNAN, Member 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Mr. John E. Jackson moved that the Town vote that the sum of $52,800.00 of the Fed- 
eral Revenue Sharing Funds be used for the construction of a sidewalk on the southerly side of Acton Road be- 
tween Proctor Road and Sleigh Road. 

After discussion Mr. Edward Hilliard moved to table Article 48 pending action on Article 49. A hand vote 
was taken YES 84 NO 125 Motion defeated. 

A vote was taken on the main modon. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 49. Ms. Joan M. Wall moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000 for the development of a plan for installation of sidewalks specifically for the elimination of safety hazards. 
Such plan is to be developed under the direcdon of the Selectmen and available for vote at the 1974 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 50. Ms. Elizabeth McMahon moved that the sum of $100,000 of the Federal Revenue 
Sharing Funds be used for the laying out and construction of sidewalks on both sides of North Road from Route 
495 north to the Route 3 rotary, said laying out and construcdon to be done under the supervision of the Super- 
intendent of the Highway Department. 

Mr. Markham moved to amend the above figure to $123,750; $42,200 to come from Federal Revenue Shar- 
ing Funds and the balance from raise and appropriate to be used for the laying out and construction of sidewalks 
on the westerly side of North Road from Dalton Road to the High School. 

The motion to amend passed. 

After a discussion Mr. Philip Anderson moved to table Article 50 and then withdrew his motion to table Ar- 
ticle 50. He then moved to refer to a committee which committee has been enacted under the previous article to 
study sidewalks. The motion to refer to a committee carried. Mr. Robert Hall questioned the vote. A hand vote 
was taken: YES 193 NO 134 It was so voted. 

Mr. Philip Anderson moved to reconsider Article 48 and send it to a committee for study. Motion for recon- 
sideration defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 51. Ms. Carol Genthe moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds the sum of $80,000 to be used for the laying out and construction of sidewalks along the easterly 
side of School Street and the intersection of Old Westford Road and Graniteville Road. 

Mr. Philip Anderson moved to refer Article 51 to a study committee. It was so voted. 



80 



Mr. Charles House moved to take Article 79 out of order. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 52. Mr. Claude A. Harvey moved that the Town vote to ratify the action of the Chelms- 
ford Housing Authority in establishing a rental assistance program within the community under the authority of 
Chapter 121 B, Sections 42 - 44 of the M. G. L. A. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 53. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By- 
Law: 

Disposal of Personal Property by Selectmen 

"The Board of Selectmen are authorized to dispose of equipment, material, and personal property owned 
by the Town of Chelmsford by sale or otherwise. 

If said equipment, material or personal properly has a value of $200 or more, in the opinion of three or more 
Selectmen, the following procedures for disposal of said personal property shall be followed: 

One advertisement for bids shall be inserted, at least seven (7) days preceding the sale, in one or more news- 
papers published in the Town and a copy of said call for bids shall be posted in a conspicuous place at the Town 
Hall for seven (7) days preceding the sale. All bids shall be delivered to the Town Clerk who shall hold and 
publicly open all said bids on the advertised date. Said equipment, material or personal property shall be sold to 
the highest bidder. If there are no bids received, then the Selectmen may dispose of said property as they think 
best." 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 54. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By- 
Law: 

"No water shall be discharged from private proper ty onto or into any public ways or sidewalks of the Town 
so as to cause a dangerous and/or defective condition." 

Mr. McCarthy moved to amend the above by inserting no water shall be intentionally discharged. The mo- 
tion to amend carried. 

The main motion was amended passed. Mr. William Scalia questioned the count. A hand vote was taken: 
YES 227 NO 104 It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 55. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to rescind present By-Laws 
pertaining to Annual Town Meetings and Annual Elections and substitute therefor the following: 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (ELECTION) 

The Annual Election shall be held on the first Monday of April and the Annual Town Meeting shall be 
held on the first Monday of May. 

Motion defeated by voice vote. Mr. McDermott asked for reconsideration. 

It was so voted, by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 56. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to rescind the present Town 
By-Law pertaining to loud speakers and substitute the following therefor: 

LOUD SPEAKER BY-LAW 

Definitions 

(1) "Sound-Truck" as used herein shall mean any motor vehicle, horse-drawn vehicle or other vehicle having 
mounted thereon or attached thereto any sound amplifying equipment. 

(2) "Sound amplifying equipment" as used herein shall mean any machine or device for the amplification of 
the human voice, music, or any other sound. 

(3) "Sound amplifying equipment" as used herein shall not be construed as including standard automobile 
radios, nor phonographs played in the home, nor any warning devices used on motor vehicles for the pre- 
vention of theft or devices used for traffic safety purposes, nor the equipment used in the operation of a 
drive-in motion picture theatre. 



81 



(4) "Outdoor loudspeaker or public address systems" as used herein shall mean not only that sound amplifying 
equipment located outdoors but also that equipment located indoors or attached to buildings which is 
directed to persons outdoors. 

Use of Outdoor Sound Amplifying Equipment 

( 1 ) Registration Statement 

No person shall use, or cause to be used, a sound truck with its sound amplifying equipment in operation or 
other loudspeaker or public address system in the Town before filing a registration statement with the Town 
Clerk in writing. This registration statement shall be filed in duplicate and shall state the following: 

(a) Name, home address of applicant. 

(b) Address of place of business of applicant. 

(c) License number and motor number of the sound truck to be used by applicant (if a sound truck is 
used). 

(d) Name and address of person who owns the sound truck (if one is used). 

(e) Name and address of persons having direct charge of the sound amplification system. 

(f) The purpose for which the sound amplification system will be used. 

(g) A general description of the sound amplification equipment to be used. 

(h) The approximate maximum distance for which sound will be emitted from the sound truck, 
(h) The approximate maximum distance for which sound will be emitted from the sound truck. 

Registration and Identification 

The Town Clerk shall return to each applicant one (1) copy of said registration statement duly certified 
by the Town Clerk as a correct copy of said application. Said certified copy shall be in the possession of any per- 
son operating the sound amplifying equipment and such copy shall be promptly displayed and shown to any 
policemen of the Town upon request. 

Regulations for Use 

(a) The only sounds permitted are music and human speech. 

(b) Sound shall not be emitted within one hundred (100) yards of hospitals, schools or churches. (See 
amendment) 

(c) Sound amplifying equipment must be operated by a person other than the driver of the sound truck 
while it is in motion. 

(d) The human speech and music amplified shall not be profane, lewd, indecent or slanderous. 

(e) The volume of sound shall be controlled so that it will not be audible for a distance in excess of two 
hundred (200) feet from the sound amplifying equipment and so that said volume is not unreasonably loud, 
raucous, jarring, disturbing, or a nuisance to persons within the area of audibility. 

Mrs. Ruth Delaney moved to amend Article 56, (B), 3, b to read 

"b. Sound shall not be emitted within one hundred (100) yards of hospitals, nursing homes, public hous- 
ing for the elderly, schools, and churches." 

Motion to amend carried. 

The motion as amended, carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 57 Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By- 
Law: 

DISTRIBUTION OF HANDBILLS 

No person shall throw, deposit, or distribute any commercial or non-commercial handbill or flyer upon any 
private, industrial, commercial, fraternal or religious premises without the express permission of the owner or 
person in charge of the premises. 



82 



Mr. William Murphy moved to amend the above as follows: 

"No person shall throw, deposit, or distribute any commercial or non-commercial handbill or flyer upon any 
industrial, commercial, fraternal or religious premises or any commercial handbill or flyer upon any private 
premises without the express permission of the owner or person in charge of said premises. 

The motion to amend passed. The main motion as amended passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 58. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to amend Section 16 of the 
Personnel and Salary Classification Plan by deleting therefrom present Secdon 16 A and substituting therefor the 
following: 

All permanent employees of the Town regardless of their length of service will earn fifteen (15) days sick 
leave per year. At the end of the calendar year eachi employee imay carry over any unused sick leave balance so 
that 120 days may be accrued. 

I further move that the Town vote to amend Section 16 of the Personnel and Salary Classification Plan by 
adding thereto the following new section: 

16 C. All accrued sick leave will be paid at the time of retirement to the maximum extent allowable by law. 
This amendment shall be applicable to all employees covered by this By-Law including those employees repre- 
sented by a labor organization. 

After discussion Mr. Arthur Osborne moved for dismissal of this article; further discussion resulted in Mr. 
Osborne withdrawing his motion to dismiss. A vote was taken on the motion. Motion passed. The count was ques- 
tioned, so a hand vote was taken: YES 195 NO 149 It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 59. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to amend Article seven 
(VII) of the Traffic Rules and Orders Regulating Traffic by adding Section 34 B which shall read as follows: 

1. No through traffic vehicle weighing over two and one half tons (2^4) shall be operated on Dalton 
Road: 

2. No through traffic vehicle weighing over five (5) tons shall be operated on Steadman Street and to vote 
on an alternate route for vehicles using Steadman Street, which alternate route will be prepared under the su- 
pervision of the Superintendent of the Highway Department. 

Mr. Richard Foley moved to amend the above to include Graniteville Road. Motion to amend was ruled out 
of order by the Moderator. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 60. Mr. Timothy J. Hehir moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Law as follows: 

5.5 Intensity of Use Schedule 

Amend the Minimum Yard Requirement for a CA District by adding footnote "d" to Rear Yard require- 
ment of 20 feet and to revise footnote "d" to read as follows: 

"d" — Increase to 60 feet when abutting a residential district or use. Required side and rear yards to be 
landscaped open space." 

Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved for dismissal of this article. After a discussion the motion for dismissal passed. 

Mr. Richard Codling moved for reconsideration of Article 58. After a lengthy discussion a motion was 
made to stop debate. It was so voted, unanimously. The motion to reconsider was defeated. 

Mr. Markham moved for adjournment at 10:50 P.M. Next meeting will be held Monday, May 14, 1973 
at 7:30 P.M. in the High School Auditorium. Motion carried. 

DANIEL J. COUGHLIN, Moderator MARY E. ST. HILAIRE, Town Clerk 



83 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 14. 1973 

The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 599 registered voters present. The following tellers were 
appointed. 

Robert Griffin Carl Olsson 

Arnaud Blackadar Dorothy Lerer 

The Moderator requested a moment of silence in memory of Veterans' Agent Terrence O'Rourke who died 
on May 11, 1973. 

UNDER ARTICLE 61. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to establish a Capital Plan- 
ning and Budgeting Committee consisting of seven (7) members: the Town Accountant, a member of the 
Finance Committee, a member of the Planning Board, and four (4) public members, said Committee members 
each to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen for a three (3) year term. The function of the Committee will 
be to study the capital improvement needs of the Town, report to the Town at annual town meetings its find- 
ings as to capital needs, suggest priorities therefor and recommend budgeting methods, ie. through the use of 
the general tax levy or borrowing to defray the costs of said capital improvement needs. 

Mr. Markham moved to amend Article 61 by adding after sentence 1 the following sentence. 

"Initially, the Selectmen shall appoint two public members for three year terms, one public member 
for a two year term, and one public member for a one year term to stagger openings on the committee." 

It was so voted. The vote on the main motion as amended passed, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 62. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved for dismissal of Article 62, pertaining to the 
establishment of an Ambulance Review Committee. 

It was so voted. Article 62 dismissed, by unanimous voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 63. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved for dismissal of Article 63 pertaining to addi- 
tional pay for police officers assigned to photographic or fingerprint identification work. 

Article 63 was dismissed by voice vote, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 64. Mr. Manuel F. Sousa moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to transfer as a gift by good and sufficient deed a certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon located 
on Gorham Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts to the American Legion of the United States, Post 366, East 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, such transfer to be made only after such land is no longer used as the East Chelms- 
ford Fire Station. Such land and building to revert to the Town upon dissolution of American Legion of the 
United States, Post 366, East Chelmsford, Massachusetts, or upon the abandonment' of such property by said 
American Legion of the United States, Post 366, East Chelmsford, Massachusetts, whichever should occur first. 
A description of said property is as follows: 

Said land in that part of said Chelmsford known as East Chelmsford situated on the easterly side of 
Gorham Street, containing twenty-five hundred and thirty-four square feet and shown on a plan en- 
titled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. belonging to Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Loucraft", 
by Henry O. Brooks, C.E., dated February 21, 1922, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at the northwesterly corner thereof at an iron stake on the easterly line of said Gorham 
Street situated forty-two feet southerly from a stone bound on the easterly side of said street, and thence 
running easterly on a straight line on land now or formerly of Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Lou- 
craft forty-eight feet to an iron stake, thence at a right angle southerly in a straight line still on land 
now or formerly of Francis J. Loucraft and Catherine Loucraft fifty-two and 50/100 feet to an iron 
stake, thence at a right angle westerly on a straight line still on land now or formerly of Francis J. Lou- 
craft and Catherine Loucraft forty-eight feet. to an iron stake in the easterly side of said street, thence 
northerly on the easterly side of said street fifty- two and 50/100 feet to the point of the beginning. 
Such land is also known as the East Chelmsford Fire Station, and is recorded with Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 661, Page 478. 

It was so voted. 



84 



UNDER ARTICLE 65. Mr. Charles Cormier moved that the duly elected officers of the legally chartered 
Post #5990 Veterans of Foreign Wars, Mill Road, Chelmsford, Mass., enter an article to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Chelmsford to inquire if the Town would be willing to vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 
to provide utilities and up-keep for the Chelmsford Post #5990 Veterans of Foreign Wars, under the provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 9. 

Town Counsel Clement McCarthy stated that this article is illegal, and should be dismissed or voted down. 
The motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 66. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town grant to NEW ENGLAND 
POWER COMPANY, a Massachusetts corporation, certain rights and easements for the construction, mainte- 
nance and operation of electric transmission lines over, across and upon certain strip of land 100 feet in width in 
said Town of Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, owned by said Town — situated off the easterly 
side of Hunt Road, said strip to commence at land now or formerly of Frederick W. Macone and extend to 
land now or formerly of Claude J. Harvey, said strip is adjacent to an existing New England Power Company 
right of way: and that the Town authorize, empower and direct the Selectmen to execute, acknowledge, deliver 
or accept in the name of and on behalf of said Town such deeds or other instruments as may be necessary or 
proper in connection therewith, such deeds or other instruments to be in such form and upon terms as the Selec- 
men may deem proper. 

Dr. Byron Roseman warned the people that the New England Power Company is using a material harmful to 
unborn children. Mr. Thomas Markham stated the Board of Selectmen will request that the Company not use 
chemicals' which may be harmful to unborn children. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. It was so voted, by voice. 

UNDER ARTICLE 67. Mr. Edward Baron moved that the Town vote to adopt the following: 

All persons 65 years or over shall be exempt from paying more than 10% of their income on real prop- 
erty taxes due the Town of Chelmsford on property owned and occupied by him as his domicile or of 
a person who owns the same jointly with his spouse either of whom is 65 years of age or over and occu- 
pied by them as their domicile provided that person has domiciled in the same property in Chelms- 
ford for the preceeding 10 years. That such person had in the preceding year gross receipt from all sources 
whatsoever of less than six thousand dollars, or if married, combined gross receipts with his spouse of less 
than seven thousand dollars, provided that such person had a whole estate real and personal not in ex- 
cess of thirty-five thousand dollars or, if married, a combined total estate real and personal not in excess 
of forty-five thousand dollars exclusive of household furnishings and property already exempt under the 
twelfth, twentieth, twenty-first, and thirty-fifth clauses of Chapter 456 of the state law. In the case of 
real estate owned by a person jointly no exemption shall be granted to any joint tenant in common unless 
receipts from all sources whatsoever of each joint tenant in common is less than six thousand dollars 
and unless the combined whole estate real and personal of each joint tenant in common and his spouse 
does not exceed 45 thousand dollars. Where a portion of the real property occupied as a domicile of an 
applicant is located with a municipality other than Chelmsford and where the value of said property or 
taxes assessed by Chelmsford would result in recovering less than the maximum exemption that part of 
the property of such applicant within such other municipality shall be exempt to a value or to an 
amount of tax sufficient to grant the applicant the total maximum exemption. Any person who re- 
ceives an exemption under this by-law shall not receive an exemption on the same property under any 
other provision. 

Town Counsel Clement McCarthy stated that this Article is illegal and suggested dismissal or a vote against 
it. A voice vote was taken. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 68. Ms. Claire F. Hibbard moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By-Law: 

REVOCATION OF APPOINTMENT 

Whenever an appointment to an uncompensated town office is revoked, the Board of Selectmen or other ap- 
pointing authority shall cause written notice of that action, along with a statement of the specific reason or 
reasons therefor, to be sent within 48 hours by registered mail to the affected individual at his last known ad- 
dress. 

This requirement shall apply to revocation only, and not to a decision against reappointment at the expiration 
of a fixed term. 

After discussion a vote was taken on this motion. It was so voted by voice. 



85 



UNDER ARTICLE 69. Mr. John J. Ruby moved that the Town vote to change the zoning by law and zon- 
ing map from the present RB District to RC District, the following described property: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Mill Road two hundred (200) feet easterly of a stone bound 
on the northerly side of the said Mill Road : thence proceeding in an 

EASTERLY direction along the northerly side of Mill Road three hundred (300) feet to a point 

at the land of the South Chelmsford Gun & Rod Club, Inc. : thence turning at a 
right angle and running in a 

NORTHERLY direction by other land of the South Chelmsford Gun & Rod Club, Inc. six hun- 

dred (600) feet, more or less, to land now or formerly of Minot J. and Ruth M. 
Anderson: thence turning and running in a 

WESTERLY direction by land of said Anderson, three hundred (300) feet, more or less, to a 

point at the other land of said Gun & Rod Club: thence turning and running in 
a 

SOUTHERLY direction about six hundred (600) feet to the point on the northerly side of Mill 

Road at the point of beginning. 

Containing 4 acres, more or less. 

Mr. Timothty Hehir of the Planning Board and Mr. McDermott of the Finance Committee recommended the 
passage of this Article. A 2/3 vote was required. It was so voted, unanimously, by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 70. Mr. Stephen J. Wojcik moved to amend Article 70 as follows: 
After Section 15.2 Paragraph B — Add 15.2.1 Flood Plain Designations Insert: 

A. 13 — Blood Brook, A.K.A. Hales Brook, 100 Feet M.S.L. South of Lowell Chelmsford Line to Rte 495. 

B. Delete the Word — Optional (in quotes) after paragraph C of the 15.3 USE REGULATIONS 
These amendments were voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 70 (as amended) Mr. Timothy J. Hehir moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By- 

Laws and maps as follows : 

To amend the Zoning By-Law by adding thereto Section 15 entitled — Flood Plain District. The Section 
shall define lands located within said Districts by attached map. 

Section VI — General Regulation 

Section 15 — Flood Plain District 

15.1 Purposes 
The purposes of this District are: 

A. To provide that lands in the Town of Chelmsford subject to seasonal or periodic flooding as described 
hereinafter shall not be used for residence or other purposes in such a manner as to endanger the health 
or safety of the occupants thereof. 

B. To protect preserve and maintain the water table and water recharge areas within the Town so as to 
preserve present and potential water supplies for the public health and safety of the residents of the Town 
of Chelmsford. 

C. To assure the continuation of the natural flow pattern of the water course (s) within the Town of 
Chelmsford in order to provide adequate and safe f loodwater storage capacity to protect persons and proper- 
ty against the hazards of flood inundation. 

15.2 DISTRICT DELINEATION 

The Flood Plain District Boundaries are defined as all areas within the areas designated on the attached 
map entitled Flood Plain District Map, Town of Chelmsford, 1973, which is incorporated herein by reference. 

A. Whose elevation above mean sea level based on the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Datum and specified on U.S. 
Geologic Survey Quadrants is at or below the elevation specified. 

B. Whose distance from the thread of the indicated waterbody or waterway is equal to or less than that speci- 
fied. 



86 



15.2.1 Flood Plain District Designations (Refers to Areas Correspondingly Numbered on Flood Plain Zoning 
Map) . 

1. Swains Pond (Deep Brook, Scotty Hollow), 120.00 feet MSL, South of Dunstable Road. 

2, 3, 4, 5. Stony Brook, 100 feet MSL, southwest of Boston & Maine Railroad right-of-way which runs 

northwest - southeast. 

6. Crooked Spring Brook, 130.00 feet MSL southeast of Crooked Spring Road and north of Graniteville 
Road. 

7. Route 3 Interchange, 140.00 feet MSL, west of Drum Hill Rotary and between Old Westford Road 
and Route 3. 

8. Black Brook, 120.00 feet MSL, south of Smith Street, west of Stedman Street. 

9. Brook running to Middlesex Canal, 110 feet MSL Arlington Street to eastern Chelmsford - Lowell Town 
Line. 

10, 11, 12. River Meadow, 110.00 feet MSL, Chelmsford - Lowell Town Line to Mill Dam south of Mill 
Road. 

13. Blood Brook A.K.A. Hales Brook, 100 feet M.S.L. South of Lowell-Chelmsford Line to Rte. 495. 

14. Blood Brook, A.K.A. Hales Brook, 110.00 feet MSL, south of Route 495 to southeastern Chelmsford - 
Billerica Town Line. 

15. Concord River, 107.00 feet MSL, east of Gorham Street to the eastern Chelmsford-Billerica Town Line. 

16. 17. Russell Millpond, 130.00 feet MSL, Mill Dam south of Mill Road to Chelmsford-Carlisle Town Line. 

18. Putnam Brook and Farley Brook, 170.00 feet MSL south of Parker Road, and Acton Road, east of Burn- 
ing Tree Lane, north of Sierra Drive, and west of Old Stage Road. 

19. Putnam Brook, 180.00 feet MSL, east of Park Road and south of Acton Road. 

20. Pond, 197.00 feet MSL, north of the Chelmsford-Carlisle Town Line, west of Park Road, southeasterly 
of Acton Road. 

21. South Inlet to Heart Pond, 200 feet MSL, east of the Chelmsford-Westford Town Line, southeast of Ac- 
ton Road, and north and west of Sleigh Road. 

22. 23. Heart Pond, 197.00 feet MSL, south of Parkerville Road, of Maple Road, and north of Acton Road. 

24. Beaver Brook, (West) 200.00 feet, MSL, east of the Chelmsford-Westford Town Line, North of Parker- 
ville Road, southeast of Littleton Road, and West of Garrison Road. 

25. Beaver Brook, (East), 190.00 feet MSL, south of Littleton Road, west of the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroad (NY, NH, & H RR) right-of-way, northeasterly of Garrison Road. 

26. Beaver Brook, 180.00 feet MSL, east of NY, NH, H RR right-of-way, south of High Street, and west of 
Locust Road. 

27. Beaver Brook, 170.00 feet MSL, north of the NY, NH, H RR right-of-way, south of Interstate 495, and 
west of the first bridge on Littleton Road. 

15.3 USE REGULATIONS 

A. The Flood Plain District shall be considered as overlying other Districts. Any uses permitted in the por- 

tions of the Districts so overlaid shall be permitted subject to all the provisions of this section. 

B. In the Flood Plain District no new building shall be erected or constructed, and no existing structure 

shall be altered, enlarged or moved : no dumping, filling or earth transfer or relocation shall be permitted ; 
nor shall any land, building or structure be used for any purposes except: 

1. Conservation of water, plants and wildlife. 

2. Outdoor recreation, including play areas, nature study, boating, fishing and hunting where other- 
wise legally permitted, but excluding buildings and structures. 

3. Non-commercial signs (as permitted in the residential districts), wildlife management areas, foot, bi- 
cycle, and/or horse paths and bridges, provided such uses do not affect the natural flow pattern on any 
water course. 



87 



4. Grazing and farming, including truck gardening and harvesting of crops. 

5. Forestry and nurseries. 

6. Any of the following uses, if permission is in each case obtained, from the Board of Appeals. 

a. Commercial golf courses. 

b. Private rifle clubs. 

c. Temporary stands for the sale of produce grown on the premises, but not including any permanent 
structures and subject to all other applicable Town By-Laws and regulations. 

C. The portion of any lot within the area delineated in Sub-Section 15.2 above may be used to meet the 
area and yard requirements for the District or Districts in which the remainder of the lot is situated. 

IV BOARD OF APPEALS 

In the Flood Plain District, the Board of Appeals may grant a special permit for any use and/or struc- 
ture, subject to the following: 

A. The request has been referred to the Planning Board, the Board of Health, and the Conservation Com- 

mission and reported upon by all three Boards or thirty days shall have elapsed following such referral 
without receipt of such reports: 

B. The land is shown to be neither subject to flooding nor unsuitable for the proposed use because of hy- 

drological and/or topographic conditions : 

C. The proposed use will not be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare: and 

D. The proposed use will comply in all respects to the provisions of the underlying District or Districts with- 

in which the land is located: 

and to vote to delete Section 6.9 (Lowland Regulations) in its entirety. 

After a lengthy discussion on the above, Mr. Leslie Adams moved to stop debate. 

A hand vote was taken: YES 367 NO 4 2/3 vote required. It was so voted. 

A vote was taken on the main motion, as amended. A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unani- 
mously, by voice. 

UNDER ARTICLE 71. Mr. Timothy J. Hehir moved that the Town vote to change the Zoning Classifica- 
tion of the following described parcel of land from IB (General Industrial) District to RM (Apartment Resi- 
dence) District: 

That certain parcel of land situated in Chelmsford, bounded and described as follows : 

Beginning at the most southwesterly corner of the premises on the northerly side of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad and at land, now or formerly of Carrigan: thence N. 47° 13' 46" E. by said Carrigan land, 
145 feet, more or less, to the southerly side of the Merrimack River: thence in an easterly and south- 
easterly direction, by said Merrimack River, to a point at land of the Town of Chelmsford 4700 feet, 
more or less: thence S. 15° 48' 50" W. 612 feet, more or less, to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W. by 
other land of the Wellman Realty Company, 1249.69 feet to a point: thence S. 28° 35' 50" W. 500.00 
feet to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W. by the northerly sideline of the proposed Wellman Avenue 
Extension, 1320.00 feet to a point: thence S. 28° 35' 50" W. by the westerly sideline of Wellman Ave- 
nue, 650.12 feet to a point on the northerly sideline of the Boston & Maine Railroad: thence N. 61° 
24' 10" W. by; the northerly sideline of said Railroad, 56.28 feet to a point: thence S. 28° 35' 50" 
W. 6.00 feet to a point: thence N. 61° 24' 10" W. 605.01 feet to a point: thence on a curve of 3571.20 
foot radius, bearing to the right, 164.13 feet to a point: thence, on a curve of 2831.93 foot radius still 
bearing to the right by the northerly sideline of said Railroad, 790.69 feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing 83 acres, more or less, all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts showing Proposed Rezoning, as submitted by the Wellman Realty Company" by Em- 
mons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, Billerica, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Timothy Hehir of the Planning Board spoke in favor of his by-law change. A discussion followed. A voice 
vote was taken which was questioned. A hand vote was then taken : 

YES 394 NO 21 2/3 vote required. It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 72. Mr. Edgar P. George moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and 
zoning map by removing from the present general residence district (RC) and changing to a general com- 
mercial district (CD) the whole or any part of land owned by Parish of All Saints, and bounded as follows: 

Southerly by Billerica Road, 130 feet: Westerly by a curved line forming the intersection of said Bille- 
rica Road with Chelmsford Street, 34.68 feet: Northwesterly by said Chelmsford Street, 127.52 feet: 
Northeasterly by land now or formerly of one Riney, 63.70 feet: Northwesterly again, till by said Ri- 
ney land, 52 feet: Northeasterly by other land of Parish of All Saints, 38 feet: and Southeasterly, still 
by said other land of Parish of all Saints, 141.07 feet. 

Mr. Edgar George explained the reasons for the request for rezoning. 

A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously, by voice. 

UNDER ARTICLE 73. Mr. Timothy J. Hehir moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Laws and Zoning Map to change from Single Residence District (RB) to Apartment Residence District 
(RM) the property bounded by North Road, land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chelmsford House 
Realty Trust and Chelmsford Development Associates, bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot IB, Parcel A and land of Benjamin & Esther F. Blechman, 1,007.52 feet: 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Chelmsford House Realty Trust, 935.68 feet: 

NORTHERLY by land of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 447.80 feet: 

NORTHWESTERLY by a curve forming the intersection of the relocation of North Road and the ramp 
to Route 3, 154.78 feet: 

WESTERLY by North Road (shown on plan hereinafter mentioned as ramp to Route 3), 

991.37 feet: 

NORTHWESTERLY by North Road, 15.00 feet: and 

SOUTHWESTERLY by North Road, 372.05 feet: 

Containing approximately 22 Acres of land and being shown as Lot 1C, Parcel B and Lot 2 on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass.: prepared for John D. Arenstam, Dec. 1969, Emmons. Fleming & Bien- 
venu Inc., Billerica, Mass., Engineers & Surveyors" which plan is recorded with Middlesex North District Re- 
gistry of Deeds in Book of Plans 109, Plan 165. 

Since this property is a choice piece of open land in Town a discussion developed to determine whether the 
Townspeople are in favor of condominium apartments which have been proposed by the developer of the area. 
A hand vote was taken : 

YES 312 NO 128 A 2/3 vote required for passage. 

It was so voted. 

Since there had been no recommendation by the Planning Board under Article 72, a motion was made for 
reconsideration. It was so voted. Mr. Timothy Hehir, Chairman of the Planning Board stated that the Planning 
Board is in favor of Article 72. Motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 74. Pertaining to re-zoning land on Littleton & Garrison Roads, a motion was made 
to dismiss this article. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 75. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to prepare a proposal and obtain cost estimates for the installation of lighting facilities at the 
town playgrounds. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 76. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr., moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 32B, Section 7A as amended "Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of fifty per cent of a premium 
for contributory group life and health insurance for employees in the service of the Town and their dependents, 
pay a subsidiary or additional rate?" 

A Fair and concise Summary appears below: 

Acceptance of the provisions of Chapter 32B. Section 7A permits the Town to pay more than 50% of the pre- 
miums for contributory group life and health insurance for Town employees. 



89 



The Finance Committee Chairman, Mr. McDermott spoke against this article. Mr. Thomas F. Markham 
moved for dismissal. A voice vote was taken. It was so voted. The voice vote was questioned, therefore a 
hand vote was taken : 

YES 190 NO 188 Motion to dismiss carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 77. Mr. Markham moved for dismissal. It was so voted. 

Mrs. Delia Loiselle moved for reconsideration of Article 73. A discussion followed. The motion was defeated by 
voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 78. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to grant longevity benefits 
to all permanent employees of the Police Department and Fire Department in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

a. Upon completaion of five years of employment said employee shall receive a three per cent (3%) 
increase. 

b. Upon completion of ten years of employment said employee shall receive a six'per cent (6%) 
increase. 

c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment said employee shall receive a nine per cent 
(9%) increase. 

d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment said employee shall receive a twelve per cent 
(12%) increase. 

A discussion took place. Mr. Gerald Lannan of the Board of Selectmen stated that the Selectmen are unani- 
mously in favor of this article. Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee spoke in opposition to it, 
but stated he wished to go on record that the Finance Committee considers the firefighters and policemen first 
class citizens. A motion was made to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. 
A vote was taken on the main motion. It was so voted. The voice vote was questioned. 

A hand count was taken: YES 271 NO 147 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 79. Mr. Richard T. McDermott moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of Assess- 
ors to issue the sum of $300,000 from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the current 
fiscal period. 

It was so voted, unanimously, by voice. 

A motion was made to adjourn at 1 1 : 00 P.M. It was so voted, unanimously. 

TOTAL RAISE & APPROP. $23,156,273.82 BUDGET APPROP. $22,243,652.00 

TOTAL TRANSFERS $ 1,376,992.00 ARTICLE APPROP. $ 912,621.82 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. Mary E. St. Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 1, 1973 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of the Town of Chelmsford to meet in the Chelmsford High School Auditorium on the 1st day of October, 1973 
at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act upon the following articles, viz: 



90 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple 
by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, as the site for municipal facilities, the following described land 
which is bounded as follows: 

Southeasterly by Lot IB, parcel A and land of Benjamin and Esther Blechman, 1,007.52 feet; 

Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Chelmsford House Realty Trust, 935.68 fet; 

Northerly by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusets, 447.80 feet; 

Northwesterly by a curve forming the intersection of the relocation of North Road and the ramp to Route 3, 

154.78 feet; 

Westerly by North Road (shown on plan hereinafter mentioned as ramp to Route 3) 991.37 feet; 

Northwesterly by North Road, 15.00 feet; 

and Southwesterly by North Road, 372.05 feet; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a certain sum of money for 
the purpose of funding the Cable Television Advisory Committee for the current fiscal year; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the penalties provision of the Town By-Laws and 
substitute therefor the following: 

PENALTIES 

Any violation of these By-Laws shall be punished by a fine of not less than Five Dollars or more than Fifty 
Dollars unless otherwise specified. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following Alcoholic Beverage By-Law: 

No person shall drink any alcoholic beverage, as defined in Chapter 138, Section 1 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, while upon any public way or upon any way to which the public has a right of access or any 
place to which members of the public have access as invitees or licensees, any park, playground, conserva- 
tion, school, or other property owned by the town, or private land or place without the consent of the owner 
or person in control thereof. As used in this By-Law, the word 'drink" shall be defined as: to consume, or 
to have any opened or partially filled container of alcoholic beverage, on his person or under his immediate 
control. 

Any person found in the act of violating any provision of this By-Law, may be arrested by a police officer 
without a warrant and shall be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. All alcoholic beverages be- 
ing used in violation of this By-Law shall be seized and safely held until final adjudication of the charge 
against the person or persons arrested or summoned before the court, at which time they shall be returned 
to the person entitled to lawful possession. 

If any part or portion of this By-Law is found to be invalid, the remainder of this By-Law shall not be af- 
fected thereby; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & Police Chief 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws by deleting the following chap- 
ter entitled "Powers of Selectmen" and adding the following entitled "Streets and Sidewalks." 

Section 1 — Permit 

1.1 No person or individual, corporation or other type of entity shall open a trench in, or disturb the 
surface, of, any existing street or way, or any proposed way or street in a proposed subdivision, for any of 
the following purposes, but not restricted thereto, of installing, repairing, and/or maintaining any duct, con- 
duit, sleeve, pipe or other structure to be used for the distribution or transmission of wastewater or sewage, 

91 



surface or storm water, potable water, brook or water course, gas, oil or any of its by-products in any form, 
electrical power or service, telephone or telegraph service, until a permit therefor is granted by the Board of 
Selectmen and Highway Superintendent except in an emergency as determined by the Highway Superin- 
tendent. This By-Law does not apply to the placing or replacing of poles. 

1.2 Permits will be issued only in accordance with this By-Law to the owners of the Utility or the 
Utility Company by whom the utility installation is wanted, or others as described in Paragraph 1.1, or to 
their duly authorized agents only; no permit shall be issued to the contractor. All work covered by permit 
shall commence within one ( 1 ) month of date of issuance of permit and be pursued diligently until com- 
pleted. Time of completion shall be stated in permit and upon expiration of said time a new permit will have 
to be issued under conditions and terms as required by this By-Law and its amendments in effect at the 
renewal date. For the purpose of this By-Law a CATV company or corporation shall be considered a 
Utility. 

1.3 The owners of the Utility and/or Utility Company or others, as described in Paragraph 1.1, shall 
exercise this permit subject to all the rules and regulations made from time to time by the State Department 
Public Safety, Department of Public Works, and Department of Public Utilities, and nothing in this permit 
shall be construed as authorizing any installations or maintenance thereof except in strict conformity with 
all federal, state, and municipal laws, ordinances, by-laws, and regulations. 

1.4 No work shall begin or continue in any street or way unless the permit, legally and duly issued, or 
a duplicate copy, be on the site of the work and shall be shown to any police officer or other authorized 
municipal person upon request thereby. A legally and duly issued permit shall be a permit which states the 
name and business address of the applicant, a specific date of issuance, a specific date of completion, and a 
general description of the work to be done that is signed by not less than three (3) Selectmen and the High- 
way Superintendent. 

1.5 All applications for any permit shall be in quadruplicate. All applications and work to be done 
under any permit issued must meet with the approval of the Selectmen Majority and Highway Superinten- 
dent or a Unanimous vote of the Selectmen. 

1.6 If, during the progress of the work to be done, under the initial permit, any existing duct, con- 
duit, sleeve, pipe or other structure used for the distribution or transmission of wastewater or sewage, sur- 
face or storm water, potable water, brook or water course, gas, oil or any of its by-products in any form, 
electrical power or service, telephone or telegraph service, is encountered and must be relocated and/or 
modified in any way so that the work will function properly and as intended upon completion, a separate 
legally and duly issued permit must be obtained for each proposed relocation and/or modification. 

1.7 All applications for any permit shall be accompanied by a certified check payable to the Town 
of Chelmsford in the amount of $3.00 per lineal foot. If work is to be done on more than one (1) way or 
street, a separate legally and duly issued permit must be obtained for each way or street. Permits required 
under Paragraph 1.6 and the first renewal of any legally and duly issued permit are not subject to the ap- 
plication fee as provided for in this Paragraph. Failure of work to commence within one ( 1 ) month of the 
date of issuance automatically voids the permit and will result in forfeiture of ten percent (10%) of the 
application fee to the Town of Chelmsford. 

1.8 All outstanding permits, issued by the Board of Selectmen, Highway Superintendent, or any 
other town governmental board, committee, or body which had and/or had authorization to issue permits 
to open a trench in, or disturb the surface of, any existing and/or proposed way or street, that have not 
been exercised, either in whole or in part, prior to this By-Law being adopted by the Town and filed with 
the Secretary of State and/or Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to be effective, 
shall be void. 

Section 2 — Plans, Surveys, Measurements, and Control 

2.1 ^ Prior to the issuance of a permit all of the following requirements must be rigidly observed. Any 
application for a permit under this By-Law shall be accompanied with the following: 

2.1.1 A separate sheet, 24" x 36" in size, for each street or way to be included within the proposed 
work, said sheet to show a plan view, with north point, and profile of the street or way at a horizontal 
scale of forty (40) feet to an inch and a vertical scale of four (4) feet to an inch, with existing center line 
grades, in fine solid lines with existing elevations, derived from actual field survey, at fifty (50) foot sta- 
tions shown by figures. Said plan view of the proposed work and installation shall show location of the 
work in reference to existing utilities and structures, i.e., sanitary sewers, storm sewers and drains, water 
mams, any beatable utility installations, and their appurtenances, easements property and street right of 
way lines, bounds, and/or property markers, and other necessary physical features such as curb lines, side- 
walks, water gates, gas gates, utility poles, and trees of diameter greater than six (6) inches. Said profile 



92 



of the proposed work and installation shall show location of the work in reference to existing utilities and 
structures, i.e., sanitary sewers, storm sewers and drains, water mains, any locatable utility installations, and 
their appurtenances. Both plan view and profile shall extend at least two hundred fifty (250) feet beyond 
the end limits of the proposed work and installation. All information pertaining to existing lines and utili- 
ties to be shown in fine lines, all proposed work to be shown in heavy lines. The plan view shall be on the 
upper portion of the sheet and the profile on the lower portion of the sheet. 

2.1.2 Offset lines and/or ties from locatable or relocatable points must be shown, e.g., bound points 
and property lines. 

2.1.3 Cross sections and/or details of proposed conduits, structures, etc., must be shown. Details and 
dimensions of outsized structures including manholes and vaults must be shown. All outsized structures 
including manholes and vaults must be shown. All cross sections and details must be drawn to scale on a 
separate sheet, 24" x 36" in size. 

2.1.4 All vertical control shall be based on the Town of Chelmsford Datum. 

2.1.5 All horizontal control shall be based on the Town of Chelmsford Coordinate System. 

2.1.6 Construction standards as hereinafter detailed must be visually detailed and/or enscribed on the 
plan view and/or profile. 

2.1.7 Each sheet shall be a one and one half (1^4) inch border on the left and a one half (/ 2 ) inch 
border along the remainder of the sheet. The lower right hand corner of each sheet shall contain the name 
of the street or way, type of proposed utility installation, name and address of applicant for permit, date, 
scale, name and address of surveyor, name and address of engineer, and sheet number in a block 4" x 6" 
in size. If the proposed work and installation involves more than five thousand (5000) linear feet of street 
or way, a title sheet, 24" x 36" in size, shall be the first sheet of the plans with a locus plan of the work at 
a scale of two thousand (2000) feet to an inch. 

2.1.8 Names of all abutters to the street or way proposed for the work shall be shown on each plan 
as they appear in the most recent tax list. 

2.1.9 Each sheet of the plans shall be signed and stamped by a Registered Land Surveyor and Regis- 
tered Professional Engineer with seals of registration for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Those por- 
tions of the plan representing engineering design shall be prepared by a Registered Professional Engineer. 

2.1.10 A letter size locus plan of the work at a scale of two thousand (2000) to an inch, in quadrupli- 
cate, must accompany the permit application. 

2.1.11 Eight (8) prints, dark line on white background, of sheets shall be submitted with the applica 
tion. 

2.2 If deemed necessary by the Selectmen, Highway Superintendent, or their duly authorized repre- 
sentative, a baseline or centerline of construction for both vertical and horizontal control of the work will 
be established prior to construction by a Registered Land Surveyor. This baseline or centerline will be 
shown on final construction plans. No variation from the baseline or centerline of construction to be made 
unless written permission is given by the Selectmen, Highway Superintendent, or their duly authorized 
representative. All plans are to be submitted to the Selectmen and Highway Superintendent for review 
prior to issuance of permit. 

2.3 When proposed location of installation is in the sidewalk area or in any other location where ac- 
curacy of bounds, bound points, property markers, etc., may be jeopardized, the Highway Superintendent 
shall require that a Registered Land Surveyor locate and properly reference tie all such points prior to con- 
struction. Upon completion of all construction, the bounds, bound points, property markers, etc., will then 
be checked against the reference ties and any variation of said points will be duly recorded by the Regis- 
tered Land Surveyor. A legible copy of all field notes and ties recorded by the Registered Land Surveyor, 
upon completion of his work, become the property of the Highway Superintendent. Original Field notes 
are to be available for examination by duly authorized representatives of the Highway Superintendent upon 
request. 

Section 3 — Notification of Commencement 

Written notification of one ( 1 ) week prior to commencing construction will be required. This notifica- 
tion shall be sent to the Highway Superintendent and Police Chief, and shall contain the name, address, 
and telephone number of the contractor or party which is to perform the work as well as the telephone num- 
ber for emergency calls which may arise when the contractor is absent from the work site. 



93 



Section 4 — Work Hours 

4.1 All work to be performed hereunder shall be done between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 
provided, however, that different work hours for the performance of such work may be agreed upon or re- 
quired for good cause by the Highway Superintendent and said requirement shall be stated in writing at the 
time of issuance of the permit. 

4.2 No Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday work will be allowed unless an emergency or accommoda- 
tion arises, and permission is given by the Highway Superintendent. Said permission may be granted orally; 
however, a written confirmation that such permission has been granted shall be made by the Highway 
Superintendent as soon as practicable thereafter. 

4.3 In regard to Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday work the Highway Superintendent shall determine 
whether an emergency or accommodation situation exists. Emergency is an unforeseen combination of cir- 
cumstances which calls for immediate action, a pressing necessity. 

4.4 No excavation, trenching, etc., shall be allowed in any street or way, accepted or unaccepted or 
proposed way or street, between November 15 and April 1, except in the case of an emergency, which shall 
be determined by the Highway Supt. 

Section 5 — Photographs 

5.1 If required by the Selectmen and/or Highway Supt. a sufficient number of photographs must be 
taken prior to the excavation to serve as reference to insure restoration of designated areas to their former 
condition. 

5.2 The required photographs within the work limits shall be taken prior to the commencement of the 
work, and shall be of size, type, quality and number as determined by the Highway Superintendent. 

5.3 All expenses incurred by the requirements of this Section shall be borne by the permittee. 

Section 6 — Inspector 

6.1 A full time inspector shall be assigned to each trench opening or excavation site in any way or 
street, accepted or unaccepted, or proposed way or street, by the Highway Supt. 

6.2 The inspector's duties will be as determined by the Highway Supt. In general, the inspector will 
be the Town's agent who will ensure compliance of the work with the provisions of this By-Law. 

6.3 The inspector will file daily written reports with the Highway Supt. and a copy to the Selectmen 
and will be responsible for reporting any violations of the provisions of this By-Law in said daily written re- 
ports. 

6.4 Safety and the use of proper construction methods and/or techniques are not the responsibility 
of the inspector. 

6.5 Failure of the Highway Supt. to assign an inspector to a trench opening or excavation site, in any 
way or street, accepted or unaccepted, or proposed way or street, does not, in any way relievethe permittee 
of responsibility of full compliance with the provisions of this By-Law. 

6.6 The fee and incidental expenses of the inspector shall be borne by the permittee and payable, by 
check or money order, to the Town of Chelmsford. 

_ 6.7 The permittee is solely responsible for notifying the Highway Supt. in writing of any scheduled 
testing of any work under permit at least forty-eight (48) continuous hours prior to the time of the sched- 
uled test. Failure of the permittee to do so could result, if deemed necessary by the Highway Supt. in the 
retesting of those portions of the work for which the testing was unobserved by the Highway Supt. or his 
duly authorized representative. 

Section 7 — Safety 

7.1 The permittee shall so prosecute his work that traffic, both pedestrian and vehicular, will be 
maintained over and through the work with a maximum of safety and convenience. 

7.2 Every opening made in a street or .way, accepted or unaccepted, or proposed street or way, shall 
tLZu w ^ th + sufficient barriers, sufficiently lighted at night, and posted with necessary signs to guard 
maintaii'in^"?; * all accidents, from the beginning to the completion of the work. The Tesp § onsibilfty of 

^ps^^s^r* the work is solely that of the permittee ' and in n ° w ^ the 



94 



7.3 Uniformed police shall be present to maintain two-way traffic in the roadway during the hours 
which work is being done under permit. 

7.3.1 At least one (1) week prior to commencing construction the permittee shall give written notifi- 
cation with all pertinent information regarding the work to the Police Chief so that the Police Chief may 
prepare a roster of police offecers assigned to the excavation site. 

7.3.2 If, in his opinion and judgment, the Police Chief deems necessary the assigning of more than 
one (1) police officer to the excavation site, he may do so in the best interest of public safety. 

7.3.3 The permittee may request a waiver, of the requirement for uniformed police at the excava- 
tion site, in writing to the Police Chief, who must evaluate the request for a waiver and reply to the per- 
mittee in writing within five (5) days of receipt of request for waiver. 

7.3.3.1 If the Police Chief grants the waiver, and at some future time during the progress of the work 
the Police Chief visits the excavation site and deems necessary that a uniformed police officer be present to 
maintain two-way traffic in the roadway, the Police Chief may immediately rescind, suspend or modify this 
waiver. 

7.3.3.2 A request for a waiver does not relieve the permittee in any way of the responsibility of having 
uniformed police at the excavation site until said waiver has been granted in writing by the Police Chief. 

7.3.4 The fee and incidental expenses of the uniformed police assigned to the excavation site shall be 
borne by the permittee and payable by check or money order, to the Town of Chelmsford. 

7.4 Pavement, fire hydrants, catch basins, and sidewalk areas shall be kept reasonably clear of exca- 
vated materials. Pedestrians must be able to walk by or a boardwalk must be constructed over any excava- 
tion authorized hereunder. 

7.5 Proper access at all times should be maintained to both public and private property, with all 
driveways and streets to be opened at night. In cases where necessity deems a roadway trench be kept open 
overnight, express written permission from the Highway Supt. and written notification to the Police and 
Fire Departments will be necessary. 

7.6 Any snow or ice condition that may occur during construction must be properly controlled 
through sanding and/or salting or plowing to points two hundred fifty (250) feet beyond either end limits 
of the construction area, unless otherwise decided by the Highway Supt. or his duly authorized representa- 
tive. 

7.7 The permittee shall be responsible for instructing all employees in the principles of First aid and 
safety and in the specific operational procedure necessary to prevent accidents. The permittee shall provide 
for the availability and maintenance of adequate first aid supplies at the excavation site at all times. 

Section 8 — Construction Standards 

8.1 Grassed Areas. Any grassed areas, where entered and disturbed, either public or private, shall be 
properly compacted as hereinafter described and Ioamed to a minimum depth of six (6) inches, seeded and 
fertilized. The permittee is responsible for maintaining these areas until a satisfactory crop of grass has been 
grown to the satisfaction of the Highway Supt. The seed shall be sown only between the periods from April 
15 to June 1 and from August 15 to October 15 or as directed by the Highway Supt. 

8.2 Trees. The issuance of the permit does not authorize the trimming or removal of any trees or 
shrubs. The necessary removal of any tree shall be under the supervision of the Tree Warden or his duly au- 
thorized representative. Hand digging shall be required around the roots of trees and shrubs. 

8.3 Fences. Any fence requiring removal for satisfactory prosecution of the work shall be removed and 
then reset by the permittee. The materials removed shall be utilized in the fence reset except, where nec- 
essary, new posts and bases shall be furnished by the permittee. Any materials damaged or lost during or 
subsequent to the removal shall be replaced by the permittee at his own expense. All new materials re- 
quired shall be equal in quality and design to the materials in the present fences. 

8.4 Saw cutting of Pavement. Where required by the Highway Supt. the roadway and/or sidewalk 
pavement are to be saw cut to neat, true lines as directed. All newly resurfaced roadways shall be saw cut. 
Such cutting shall be to a depth below the pavement as to prevent tearing of the surface when the excava- 
tion is begun. 

8.5 Maximum Trench Opening. The excavation is to be kept as neat as existing conditions permit and 
not more than one hundred fifty (150) feet to be left open at any time during working hours, or more than 

95 



twenty (20) feet of trench to be left open overnight without written permission of the Highway Superin- 
tendent. 

8.6 Roadway Dust Control. The permittee shall furnish and apply calcium chloride as a dust control 
material at all locations where directed by the Highway Supt. or his duly authorized representative. Cal- 
cium chloride shall be uniformly applied either by hand methods or by approved spreading devices at a 
rate of no more than one (1) pound per square yard. 

8.7 Unsuitable material. All excavated material is to be discarded unless otherwise suitable, and if not 
suitable, to be replaced with the following material acceptable to the Highway Supt. or equivalent; namely, 
J/i" to %" crushed processed gravel for the bed and also above the item placed in the excavation, for a 
depth not less than six (6) inches below the bottom most portion of the item and for a depth not less than 
six (6) inches above the top most portion of the item, to be standard. Any excavated materials not required 
or not suitable for backfilling shall be removed from the site of the work and disposed of by the permittee. 
The permittee will not be allowed to store excess excavated material on the public highways. All excavated 
material which is not to be used in a reasonable amount of time, as determined by the Highway Supt. or his 
duly authorized representative, for backfilling, shall be hauled away and stored, until such time as the 
material is to be used for backfilling, by the permittee. 

8.8 Disposal of Discarded Materials. The permittee shall be held responsible for all discarded mate- 
rials, rubbish and debris that are dumped or fall within the limits of the project. Such materials shall be re- 
moved from the site and disposed of at the permittee's expense. 

8.9 Backfill Material. The backfill material used shall be of a quality satisfactory to the Highway 
Supt. and shall be free from large or frozen lumps, wood, organic matter and other extraneous material and 
shall contain no boulders or broken ledge larger than one half (J/2) cubic yard. All stones, boulders, or 
broken ledge greater than one (1) cubic foot in size must be a minimum of one and one half (1J4) feet 
above the topmost portion of the item placed in the excavation and a minimum of two (2) feet below the 
pavement surface grade. 

8.10 Sheeting. Lumber sheeting shall be installed where trench excavation would cause failure to 
adjacent pavement. Unless otherwise directed, sheeting shall be driven to such depth as to be two (2) feet 
below normal excavation. The sheeting shall be securely and satisfactorily braced to withstand all pressures 
to which it may be subjected and shall be sufficiently tight to prevent any flow of water or material into 
the work space. Upon completion of the work, sheeting shall be driven down or cut off eighteen (18) 
incjies below pavement grade and left in place, or as directed by the Highway Supt. No sheeting may be left 
so as to create a possible hazard to the safety of the public, obstruction to flow of water, or a hindrance to 
traffic of any kind. 

8.11 Compaction of Backfill. Backfill shall be uniformly distributed in successive layers, each layer 
being thoroughly compacted before the succeeding layer is placed. The entire width of the trench shall be 
mechanically or hand tamped in six (6) inch lifts, a minimum of two (2) feet above the utility installation, 
and mechanically tamped the remainder of the fill in lift depths not greater than two (2) feet. 

8.12 Grading, Rolling and Finishing. The areas required to be graded shall be raked or machine 
graded to remove all stones and other unsatisfactory material and shall then be machine rolled. Any de- 
pressions which may occur during the rolling shall then be filled with additional suitable material and the 
surface then regraded and rolled until true to the required lines and grades. All ruts shall be eliminated but 
imprint of tire tracks will be permitted. The fine grading of the subgrade for the area on which roadway 
pavement is to be laid shall be finished at the required depth below and parallel to the proposed pavement 
surface. 

8.13 Bituminous Concrete Pavement Replacement. 

8.13.1 Class A Roadways. Class A Roadways shall be considered as main arteries within the Town, 
State Routes, roadways which fall under Chapter 90 jurisdiction, any newly resurfaced roadway and any 
other roadway considered in Class A condition by the Highway Supt. 

8.13.2 Class A Roadways, Summer. In the pavement area, the trench shall be backfilled with proc- 
essed gravel from a depth of twenty (20) inches to four (4) inches below the pavement grade and four (4) 
inch bituminous concrete temporary patch laid and maintained by the permittee for a minimum period of 
sixty (60) days and a maximum period of seventy-five (75) days. At this time the trench shall be excavated 
to a depth of eight (8) inches. The pavement shall then be cut in a neat, true line at all vertical plane limits 
of the trench within the roadway and a six (6) inch slab of 3.500 PSI, high early strength reinforced con- 
crete constructed in the trench areas. Reinforcing shall be #5 bars at six (6) inches on center running in 
the direction of the trench. The bars shall be set a minimum of two (2) inches above the lower limit of the 
concrete and no more than three (3) inches above the same plane. The concrete is to set for a minimum 



96 



of twenty-four (24) hours, at which time the pavement shall be restored with two (2) inches of Bitu- 
minous Concrete Type I, consisting of a one ( 1 ) inch base course and a one ( 1 ) inch top course graded to 
meet the existing pavement. 

8.13.3 Class A. Roadways, Winter. In the pavement area, the trench shall be filled with suitable un- 
frozen material to a point twenty (20) inches below roadway grade. Sixteen (16) inches of processed 
gravel shall then be placed over the compacted fill and four (4) inches of temoprary patch shall be placed 
and maintained by the permittee for the remainder of the winter months. In the spring, or as directed by 
the Highway Supt, when the ground is frost free, the trench shall be excavated to a depth of eight (8) 
inches. The pavement shall be cut in a neat true line at all vertical plane limits of the trench within the 
roadway, and a six (6) inch reinforced concrete slab constructed and the pavement shall be restored with 
two (2) inches of Bituminous Concrete Type I as described in Subparagraph 8.13.2. 

8.14 Reinforced concrete Pavement Replacement. If reinforced concrete pavement is encountered 
during the work, it shall be replaced in accordance with acceptable construction standards or as directed 
by the Highway Supt. 

8.15 Bituminous Concrete Sidewalk Replacement. When work is performed in sidewalk areas, the en- 
tire sidewalk shall be replaced as follows. The entire trench area shall be thoroughly compacted to a point 
nine (9) inches below the finish grade. Six (6) inches of compacted processed gravel sub-base shall then 
be placed. Forms shall be installed where deemed necessary to assist in securing proper alignment and ade- 
quate comp action of the base and surface courses. Bituminous Concrete Type I shall then be laid in two 
(2) courses to a depth of three (3) niches, each course consisting of one and one half (lj/i) inches. The 
walk shall have a pitch of three sixteenths (3/16) of an inch per foot of width to provide for proper drain- 
age toward the gutter. The surface of each course shall be rolled with a self-propelled tandem roller weigh- 
ing not less than one and one half (IJ/2) tons and not more than five (5) tons. In places not accessible to a 
power roller, compaction shall be obtained by means of hand tampers weighing not less than fifty (50) 
pounds and having a tamping face not exceeding one hundred ( 100) square inches. 

8.16 Concrete Sidewalk Replacement. When work is performed in concrete sidewalk areas, the en- 
tire sidewalk shall be replaced in accordance with acceptable construction standards or as directed by the 
Highway Supt. 

8.17 Bituminous Concrete Berm. The construction requirements, dimensions and cross-section of bitu- 
minous concrete berm shall be as directed by the Highway Supt. 

8.18 Curb. When work is performed adjacent to granite curbing, extreme care is to be taken to in- 
sure that curbing remains undisturbed both horizontally and vertically. Curbing which has been chipped, 
marred or cracked during construction shall be replaced when so directed by the Highway Supt. Disturbed 
curbing shall be reset to line and grade by accepted methods. The permittee shall be held responsible for any 
settlement or horizontal movement of granite curb due to washout or trench settlement after completion of 
construction for a period of time acceptable to the Highway Supt. 

8.19 Time Limit for Sidewalk Paving. Sidewalk repaving and/or replacement must follow as close 
behind installation as conditions permit. Excessive lineal footage of sidewalk left unrepaired will not be al- 
lowed. 

8.20 Disturbing Existing Utilities. The permittee shall exercise special care during excavation to 
avoid injury to underground structures such as water or gas mains, pipes, conduits, manholes, catch basins, 
etc. When necessary the permittee shall cooperate with representatives of public service companies in order 
to avoid damage to their structures by furnishing and erecting suitable supports, props, shoring or other 
means of protection. The permittee shall be liable for repair of any damage to such utilities, either public or 
private, to the satisfaction of the Highway Supt. The construction and/or reconstruction of any Town of 
Chelmsford catch basin or manhole shall be in accordance with the Town of Chelmsford standards. 

Section 9 — Private Property 

Liability for damage to private property abutting the construction and caused by the permittee, his 
agents or servants, shall be borne solely by the permittee performing the work. 

Section 10 — Liability 

The issuance of the permit to an individual Utility or .the Utility Company and/or its agents, or others 
as described in Section 1, Paragraph 1.1 of this By-Law, shall constitute an agreement with the Town of 
Chelmsford, whereby the Utility or Utility and/or its agent, an individual, or others shall indemnify and 
save harmless the Town of Chelmsford against all claims for damages for injuries to persons or property, 
and against all costs, suits, and expenses and losses occasioned by or arising from entering streets and/or 

97 



ways and from occupancy and use of said streets and/or ways, and further agree to pay all costs and dam- 
ages which may be recovered against the Town of Chelmsford, by reason of entering said streets and/or 
ways on account of occupancy of said premises, and shall further be required to provide insurance therefor 
unless otherwise determined by the Selectmen and Highway Supt. 

Section 11 — Enforcement Provisions; orders. 

11.1 If an examination of the work reveals that it does not comply with or violates the provisions of 
this By-Law, the Selectmen and/or Highway Supt. shall notify and order in writing, the permittee and its 
duly authorized supervisor at the work site who shall take such appropriate measures as necessary to assure 
compliance with the provisions of this By-Law. 

11.2 If a further examination of the work, not less than forty-eight (48) continuous hours after the 
issuance of orders, reveals that no positive action and/or appropriate measures are or were being taken by 
the permitee or its duly authorized supervisor at the work site to assure compliance with the provisions of 
this By-law, the Selectmen and/or Highway Supt. may rescind, suspend or modify, through the imposition of 
conditions, the permit. 

11.3 Every order issued to enforce the provisions of this By-law shall be in writing and shall be served 
on the permittee and its duly authorized supervisor at the work site and /or all persons responsible for the 
violation of this By-law. 

11.4 Every order issued to enforce the provisions of this By-law shall include a statement of the viola- 
tion or defect, shall allot a reasonable time for any action necessary to effect compliance, and may suggest 
action which, if taken, will effect compliance with this By-law. 

Section 12 — Hearings 

12.1 Any person to whom any order to comply with the provisions of this By-law is issued or any per- 
son who objects to the issuance of a variance may request a hearing before the Selectmen and Highway 
Supt. or their designee by filing a written application within ten (10) days of the receipt of the order or 
within ten (10)days of the filing of notice of the granting of the variance. 

12.2 Upon receipt of written application, the Selectmen, Highway Supt.. or their design shall estab- 
lish a time and place for such hearing and inform the petitioner thereof in writing. The hearing shall be 
commenced not later than thirty (30) days after the day on which the application was filed. 

12.3 At the hearing the petitioner shall be given an opportunity to be heard and to show why the 
order or variance should be modified or withdrawn. 

12.4 After the hearing, the Selectmen and Highway Supt. shall sustain, modify, or withdraw the order 
or variance, and may rescind, suspend or modify, through the imposition of conditions, the permit, and 
shall inform the petitioner in writing of the decision. 

12.5 Every notice, order and other record prepared by the Selectmen and/or Highway Supt. or their 
designee in connection with the hearing shall be entered as a matter of public record in the office of the 
Highway Supt. 

Section 13 — Penalty 

13.1 Any permittee who violates or refuses to comply with any provision of this By-law and orders 
hereunder promulgated shall forfeit and pay to the use of the Town of Chelmsford a sum of Fifty Dollars 
($50.00) for each violation. 

13.2 Each day, or portion of a day, that any violation is allowed to continue shall constitute a sep- 
arate violation of this By-Law. 

Section 14 — Variances 

. ,. Jj- 1 The Selectmen and Highway Supt. upon their own initiative or upon application to them by any 
individual. Utility or others as described in Section 1, paragraph 1.1, after due notice and public hearing, 
may vary any provision of this By-law as they deem necessary with respect to any particular case when, in 
their opinion, the enforcement thereof would do manifest injustice or cause due hardship, provided that their 
decision shall not conflict with the spirit of this By-law. The burden of proof of the manifest injustice or 
causes of hardship shall be the responsibility of the applicant. 



98 



14.2 Variances, when granted, shall be in writing and shall be effective for not more than one (1) 
year. Notice of the grant of variance shall be filed with the Town Clerk within ten ( 10) days after the vari- 
ance has been granted. 

Section 15 — Severability 

Each of these sections shall be construed as separate to the end that if any section or paragraph, sen- 
tence, clause or phrase thereof shall be held invalid for any reason, the remainder of that section and all 
other sections of this By-law shall continue in full force. 

Section 16 — Municipal Department 

Municipal departments of the Town of Chelmsford will be excluded from the provisions of this By- 
Law, by mutual consent of the governing authorities of Section 1.4 and 1.5 of this By-Law. 

Section 17 — Inconsistencies 

All provisions of the By-Laws of the Town of Chelmsford, as amended, which are not inconsistent 
with this By-Law, shall continue in effect but all provisions of said By-Laws inconsistent are repealed; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to declare that an Industrial Development Financing Author- 
ity is needed in Chelmsford; that security against future unemployment and lack of business opportunity is re- 
quired and can be provided, by attracting new industry to the Town or substantially expanding existing indus- 
try within the Town, through an industrial development project or projects financed under the provisions of 
Chapter 40D of the Massachusetts General Laws; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & 
Chelms. Industrial Development Commission 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to accept the following mentioned street, as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, and shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to 
raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money for the purpose of reconstructing 
the following-mentioned street: 

WELLMAN AVENUE 

Providing all construction of same meets with the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such requirements have been met; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to designate Byam Road from Robin Hill Road to Acton 
Road, Garrison Road from Littleton Road to Hunt Road and Crooked Spring Road from School Street to Twiss 
Road as scenic roads under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 15C of the General Laws; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a certain sum of money from available funds to be 
used for the installation of gasoline storage tanks for the use of the various municipal departments at the loca- 
tion of the highway garage on Richardson Road; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following section of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 40 § 8 (g) — A city or town which accepts this section may enter into an agree- 
ment with another city or town, or other cities and towns, to provide mutual aid programs for police depart- 
ments to increase the capability of such departments to protect the lives, safety and property of the people in 
the area designated in the agreement. Said agreement may include the furnishing of personal services, supplies, 
materials, contractual services, and equipment when the resources normally available to any municipality in the 
agreement are not sufficient to cope with a situation which requires police action; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & Police Chief 



99 



ARTICLE 11. In the event the Town enters into an agreement with another city or town, or other cities 
or towns, to provide mutual aid programs for police departments pursuant to the provisions of Mass. Gen. 
Laws Ch. 80 §8G, to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the necessary expenses of implementing any such agreement; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & Police Chief 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vofe to transfer from available funds or borrow a certain sum of 
money to hire an engineering firm to develop plans for the correction of Central Square traffic problems, the 
expenditure of said funds to be conditional upon state approval of the town's Central Square "Spot" Improve- 
ment Application; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a certain sum of money from available funds from 
an appropriation entitled "Purchase of Hydraulic Aerial Device", Article 19 Annual Town Meeting 1973 to an 
account entitled, 'Highway Department Tree Work" account, said account to be used for tree work in the 
Town, said transfer to be accomplished in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 33B; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent 
domain the following described tract of land so that said tract may be excavated to provide for better circula- 
tion in conformance with the overall plans and specifications for the restoration of Crystal Lake, said tract of 
land being bounded and described as follows: 

a certain piece or parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, situated in Chelmsford in said County, near that 
part called North Chelmsford, consisting of one and one-fourth acres, more or less, and being the piece called 
"The Island" shown on a plan entitled "Plan of building lots on Crystal Lake Grove, North Chelmsford, Mass. 
surveyed by Smith & Brooks, C. E. 1891", said island being separated from the mainland by an artificial chan- 
nel about twenty-five feet wide and comprising all the land lying northeast from said channel and no more, and 
subject to rights of record to take ice on or about said premises. 

Being the same premises conveyed to Philias Rochette, by deed of Rosilda Rheault dated November 16, 
1939, and recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 938, Page 135. 

Said property presently standing in the names of Clifford McGee and Bruce Colin McGee: and further to 
see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a certain sum of money for the purpose of paying in 
whole, or in part, any damages for which the Town may be liable for the reason of taking said land by 
eminent domain; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen & 
Crystal Lake Restoration Comm. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to expend funds voted in Article 
22 of the Annual Town Meeting called for March 12, 1973 for the procurement of plans and specifications for 
the following items: 

4. Reconstruction of inlet control structure repairs to inlet canal, dike, and cleaning inlet canal; 

5. Repairs to masonry walls and reconstruction of control structures in mill canal; 

6. Construction of trash rack in Stony Brook and cleaning a portion of Stony Brook; 

7. Excavating and regrading lake bottom to a nine foot minimum depth; 

the expenditure of money for said plans and specifications not being reimbursable items; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $9,450 from an appropriation entitled 
"Purchase of Hydraulic Aerial Device", Article 19, Annual Town Meeting called for March 12, 1973 to an 
account entitled "Highway Department — Tree Work"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $80,000 from Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) to an 
account entitled "Fire Department — Regular and Substitute Salary Account"; and to transfer $49,576 from 
Surplus Revenue, $3,598.06 from the balance of the Charter Commission account, $1,664.25 from the balance 

100 



of the West Chelmsford Fire Station account, $12,000 from the New Library Commission account, and $14,548.- 
90 from an account entitled "Pine Hill Road School — Sitework" a total of $81,387.21 to an account entitled 
"Police Department-Regular and Special Salary Account"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the McFarlin 
School — All Purpose Room, North Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High School Band Room, East 
Chelmsford School, Byam School, Cafetorium, Westlands School, Cafeteria, North Elementary School, Audi- 
torium, Senior High School, Small Gymnasium, South Row School Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, 
Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the Warrant with your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS THIS 17th day of September, 1973. 

THOMAS F. MARKHAM, JR. 
ARNOLD J. LOVERING 
WILLIAM R. MURPHY 
PAUL C. HART 
GERALD J. LANNAN 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. September 21, 1973 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at following places, wit: McFarlin School All Purpose Room, Chelmsford 
Center; North Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; Senior High School 
Gym; South Row Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House, Old 
Westford Road seven days at least before the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

WILLIAM E. SPENCE 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy, Attest: 

WILLIAM E. SPENCE 

Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 1, 1973 

The special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who rec- 
ognized the presence of a quorum. 

The following tellers were appointed: 

Philip Swissler Ruth Delaney 

Dorothy Lerer Arnaud Blackadar 

Charles House 

A motion was made to waive the reading of the constable's return of the warrant. It was so voted, unani- 
mously. Motion made to waive the reading of the entire warrant. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin asked petitioner Patricia A. Gabriel to speak on Article. 
She was not present. Town Counsel Clement McCarthy stated that in his opinion this article is illegal since we 

101 



have no provision for funds for this purpose. He recommended we vote no on this article. Mr. John Malone 
spoke against article, and Mr. Richard McDermott of Finance Committee recommended that voters defeat ar- 
ticle. A voice was taken — NO, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Mr. William Murphy moved for dismissal of this article. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to rescind the penalties pro- 
vision of the Town By-Laws and substitute therefor the following: 

PENALTIES 

Any violation of these By-Laws shall be punished by a fine of not less than Five Dollars or more than Fifty 
Dollars unless otherwise specified. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Thomas F. Markham, Jr. moved that the Town vote to adopt the following Alco- 
holic Beverage By-Law: 

No person shall drink any alcoholic beverage, as defined in Chapter 138. Section 1 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, while upon any public way or upon any way to which the public has a right of access or any 
place to which members of the public have access as invitees or licensees, any park, playground, conservation, 
school, or other property owned by the town, or private land or place without the consent of the owner or per- 
son in control thereof. As used in this By-Law, the word "drink" shall be defined as: to consume, or to have 
any opened or partially filled container of alcoholic beverage, on his person or under his immediate control. 

Any person found in the act of violating any provision of this By-Law, may be arrested by a police officer 
without a warrant and shall be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. All alcoholic beverages being 
used in violation of this By-Law shall be seized and safely held until final adjudication of the charge against the 
person or persons arrested or summoned before the court, at which time they shall be returned to the person 
entitled to lawful possession. 

If any part or portion of this By-Law is found to be invalid, the remainder of this By-Law shall not be af- 
fected thereby. 

Selectman Gerald J. Lannan spoke in favor of this By-Law. 

Mr. Jean-PaulGravelle questioned the presence of a quorum. A hand count was taken. There were 246 vot- 
ers present. 

Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., called a fifteen minute recess. Another hand count was taken showing 
247 voters present. The number of voters for the special Town meeting should have been 300. Moderator Daniel 
J. Coughlin stated, that the motions already passed before the question of a quorum are valid up to the question 
of quorum. 

Mr. Thomas Markham moved for adjournment at 8:45 P.M., until Tuesday, October 9, 1973 at 7:30 P.M. 
in the High School Auditorium. The motion on Article 4 should be read at this meeting. It was so voted. 

DANIEL J. COUGHLIN, JR., Moderator MARY E. ST. HILAIRE, Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 9. 1973 

The adjourned Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 P.M. by Moderator Daniel T Couo-h- 
hn, Jr. ' j s 

The following tellers were appointed: 

Dorothy Lerer Arnaud Blackadar 

Charles House Alfred Coburn 

Ruth Delaney 

Selectman William Murphy presented a certificate of award for meritorious achievement as outstanding 
""ears ' employee t0 Mr CharIes House who has served as assessor of the Town of Chelmsford for thirteen 



102 



Selectman Thomas F. Markham. Jr. requested a count of voters to determine if there was a quorum. There 
were 238 voters present, not sufficient for a quorum for special Town Meeting. Mr. Markham on behalf of the 
Board of Selectmen thanked the voters for coming out this evening, and also those who attended the adjourned 
meeting last week. 

Selectman Gerald J. Lannan and Mr. Richard McDermott, Chairman of the Finance Committee explained 
the alternatives for transferring funds for the Police & Fire Departments in order to assure these departments 
that they would be paid for services rendered. 

Mr. Thomas Markham made a motion due to lack of quorum this special Town Meeting be dissolved at 
8:05 P.M. Motion carried. 

DANIEL J. COUGHLIN, Moderator MARY E. ST. HILAIRE, Town Clerk 



103 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Carol C. Cleven, Chairman 

Robert D. Hall, Vice Chairman Martin Ames 

Jean B. Callahan, Secretary George A. Ripsom 

Jane E. Loiselle, High School Student Member 

Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 

THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1973: DESIGNED TO HIGHLIGHT THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



Year 


Teachers 


Non-Teachers 1 


Budget 2 


Expenditures 2 


Enrollment 


1968 


406 


117 


$ 4,432,420.00 


$4,189,625.00 


7,806 


1969 


441 


240 


5,437,988.00 


5,242,026.00 


8,296 


1970 


474 


256 


6,416,116.00 


6,200,184.00 


8,755 


1971 


486 


260 


7,296,850.00 


7,070,708.00 


9,002 


1972 


497 


273 


8,305,023.00 


8,090,812.00 


8,990 


1973-74 


512 


296 


14,767,112.00 


3 


9,059 


(18 months) 













includes Part Time Personnel 
2 Includes Federal Funds 
3 Not Finalized until 6-1-74 

Nineteen hundred and seventy-three was a year of varied learning activities. It was a year of active, enthu- 
siastic participation by all for the improvement of education for the children of Chelmsford. 

Conducting a wide variety of instructional programs for over 9,000 pupils, working with the system's 512 
professional and 296 non-professional staff members, operating its 13 buildings ~ these are the obvious and rou- 
tine tasks of the school system. In themselves these activities constitute a substantial challenge, but it is the care- 
ful attention to both routine and more demanding tasks that distinguishes Chelmsford as one of the outstanding 
school systems in the area. By and large these activities may be classified as those which help the students and staff 
to meet the constant challenge of finding new and better ways of doing things in the face of a changing society 
that poses new educational demands. To move apace with rapid changes in the educational field means a vast 
number of different things. It means first, helping teachers who have been trained for the educational tasks of 
the past to develop new understandings, attitudes, and skills. It also means developing and utilizing the many 
new instructional materials and techniques that are based on research in child development and the psychology 
of learning. Finally it means helping parents to understand and accept educational programs and techniques 
that may seem unfamiliar because they do not always match those which parents remember from their own edu- 
cational experience. 



104 



Out of the awareness that every child has different needs has arisen an emphasis on realizing the goal of 
individualized instruction. True individualization occurs only when the real needs of students — emotional and 
social as. well as educational — become the concern of the educator. The old policy of a "shotgun" approach to 
education — one which aimed at the "average child" and hoped to hit a few on either side of the mean — is no 
longer sufficient or philosophically sound; nor is it congruent with society's present emphasis on individual 
rights. 

Planning teaching strategies and materials to permit students to progress according to their needs is no easy 
task. Planning for and teaching individual students requires a commitment of effort and time far in excess of 
the "normal school day." Perhaps the following excerpts which are taken from reports written by school per- 
sonnel will help readers of this report to better understand some of the learning experiences their children are 
having in our schools today. 

(From the Coordinator of Language Arts) 

The primary concern of Chelmsford's language arts program is to develop and refine student command of that 
uniquely human communication tool known as language. For this reason, the language arts program seeks to 
develop in students an appreciation of their communications heritage, an awareness of the role which mass me- 
dia plays in contemporary communications , and some insights concerning the probable communications pat- 
terns and media of the future. The pervasive role of mass media in today's world demands that both visual and 
verbal languages receive attention in the developmental English program. Verbal language (i.e. oral and writ- 
ten communication) remains, however, the special province and concern of the English program. The Chelms- 
ford language arts program is, therefore, committed to developing in students an understanding of the nature of 
verbal communication; an appreciation of language and of its specialized applications in literature and in con- 
temporary media; an awareness of various usage levels and their appropriate application; a respect for language 
and for its role as a vehicle of persuasion and evaluation; and an ability to communicate ideas, opinions, and 
feelings with precision and clarity. 

Recent years have witnessed the evolution of a grades 1-12 Scope and Sequence chart for the coverage of lan- 
guage arts skills, the adoption of a contemporary language arts text series in grades 3-6, and a multi-level spell- 
ing program with options for intensive individualization in grades 1-6; the development of teacher-prepared 
text replacement materials for grades 1 and 2; and the preparation of extensive supplementary units in sen- 
tence building, dictionary skills, composition, advertising, mythology, etymology, and poetry for the elementa- 
ry grades. Many of the latter units have been selected for inclusion in the appendix of the Massachusetts En- 
glish Advisory Report in which guidelines for the teaching of English in the state of Massachusetts will be set 
forth. 

A brief elementary workshop, conducted during the summer of 1973, updated the Skills Scope and Sequence 
Manuals and cross referenced all available visual and print media for the coverage of skills in grades 1-6. In 
addition, the grade 5 Advertising Unit was expanded, and detailed guidelines for its implementation were pre- 
pared. 

Writing program guidelines and objectives are utilized in grades 3-9 to provide intensive coverage of develop- 
mental writing skills and numerous opportunities for creating writing projects. Highlights of the program in- 
clude: weekly student writing and /or editing activities in a classroom-as-workshop setting; a variety of teacher 
responses in the form of class editing sheets, written comments, taped comments, individual conferences, and 
personalized spelling sheets; increased emphasis on student responsibility for careful editing of final drafts and 
expanded opportunities for student "publication" of successful, well edited work. Through the cooperation of the 
" Sentinel," a local newspaper, selected student writing is published on a weekly basis during the school year. 

Steps toward increased individualization in grades 7-9 have taken several forms. Classroom laboratory materials 
designed in summer workshops held in 1971 and 1972, and augmented during 1973, provide reinforcement and 
remediation of language skills and are used in conjunction with the writing program. Learning activities pack- 
ages are also in use to provide increased individualization in skills areas. In addition, teacher-developed units 
in writing, communications, and the short story are in use in grades 7 and 8. 

Multi-media kits, developed primarily through Title III NDEA funding, are used in connection with ninth 
grade units on mythology, the Bible as literature, and Shakespeare. These kits have proved invaluable as re- 
sources for contract approaches to student learning. Workshops held in the summer of 1973 reorganized grade 
9 curriculum components into sequential units to facilitate effective sequencing of developmental skills. Dur- 
ing this workshop the Mythology and Bible as Literature units were completely rewritten to incorporate develop- 
mental writing and vocabulary development activities. In addition, diagnostic testing materials were extended 
to include grades 8 and 9. 

The effective use at the Junior High School of innovative approaches such as team teaching, pupil contracts, 
visual composing, small group discussion, and role playing and drama activities has been incorporated into a 
sound instructional program that continues to attract the attention and interest of many visitors to the school 



105 



system. As a result, Chelmsford Junior High School has, for the second year, been selected as a model site for a 
conference on teaching English in the junior high school grades. 

In the Senior High School, reorganization has taken the form of a -wide variety of semester length courses in 
which developmental language, writing, and speaking skills are organized under thematic, genre, or literary era 
course structures, whose objectives have been specified in terms of various ability and interest levels. These 
courses constitute an attempt to organize the curriculum into more effective units in preparation for movement 
into an elective English program in 1974-75. Notable among the units are those in individualized reading, which 
were expanded again this year. Options for student involvement in videotape and slide tape composing activi- 
ties have been provided in many courses. In addition the sophomore year program provides students with oppor- 
tunities to analyze the specialized visual and verbal language of mass media and engage in the planning and 
execution of videotape productions. 

An interdisciplinary project involving grade 11 students in a joint English-Social Studies American Studies 
Course, now in its fourth year, has been expanded to six classes, and several elective offerings in creative writ- 
ing and drama permit interested students in grades 10 through 12 to work together in areas of common inter- 
est. Five year plans call for increased attention to interdepartmental projects, considerable expansion of elective 
offerings, and increased attention to individualizing strategies. 

At all grade levels, increased use has been made of visual media including film, videotape, transparencies, and 
filmstrips. In addition, tape recorders are being used in many classrooms, grades 3-12, to create classroom 
listening centers, to prepare taped evaluation of student writing, to develop remediating materials for students 
wih usage difficulties, and to record student discussions for subsequent evaluation. 

Current research into the problems of English instruction, the effects of the media revolution, and increasing 
emphasis on greater individualization of instruction have created the demand for a more vital and varied En- 
glish program than schools have known in the past. In Chelmsford, every attempt is being made to meet this 
demand through the development of a relevant and contemporary program at all grade levels. 

(From the Coordinator of Reading) 

The goal of providing all pupils with the skill and desire necessary to read to the full limit of their capabilities 
has been set as a target for the "Right to Read" program and continues to be the primary concern of the 
Chelmsford School System. 

In an attempt to accomplish this goal the reading department continues to employ a balanced program of in- 
struction which regards the child as a teaching unit and recommends that classroom teachers use a variety of 
materials and methods to effectively meet the needs of each child. 

In September of 1973 approximately eight hundred first graders entered the Chelmsford schools. A very small 
percentage of these children were already reading and received reading instruction at their particular level. 
Approximately two thirds of the students were ready for formal reading instruction and entered into a develop- 
mental reading program at a pre-primer level. The remaining third of entering first graders were deficient in the 
pre-school perceptual skills and received the necessary readiness instruction before entering into the formal 
reading act. A multi-basal approach with a strong supplementary phonics program is currently employed in all 
first grades. Individual skill materials and a variety of trade books for independent reading are provided to meet 
the widely differentiated reading needs of beginning readers. 

In grades two and three a multi-basal system is the core of the reading program and from that core the teacher 
provides individualized readme; instruction through the use of skill materials and a wide variety of trade books. 
This is the strengthening period of the primary level when the skills of decoding, vocabulary and comprehen- 
sion are stressed. Pupils are taught to use sight vocabulary, phonics and contextual clues simultaneously to get 
meaning from the printed page. 

The individualized reading approach is currently empoyed in the intermediate grades in an effort to improve 
individual reading practices. This program stresses self-selecting and self-pacing on the part of the pupils along 
with teacher prescribed skill instruction for each program participant in individual, group and whole class set- 
tings. 

This is not a panacea program but an approach which should vary from system to system, school to school and 
room to room. If the success or failure of any approach depends upon the classroom teachers ,and research indi- 
cates that this is true, then individual teaching styles must be respected if the goals of the program are to be ac- 
complished. All. teachers cannot and should not be expected to manage this approach in the same way. Indi- 
vidual teaching styles dictate management in the following areas: 

1. Organizational Plan — Individual instruction can be successfully implemented in any type of organiza- 
tional plan. 

106 



2. Class Size — It is easier for teachers to work with small groups in any program; but many teachers re- 
port success with large groups. 

3. Time — Ample time must be alloted for reading instruction. 

4. Materials — A variety of materials must be made available. 

5. Record Keeping — Individual records noting pupil weaknesses and strengths are kept by teachers. They 
develop their own methods of record keeping. 

6. Group Instruction — Small group instruction may be carried on for specific purposes. Whole class in- 
struction also has a place in the program. Individual instruction is stressed at all times. 

7. Conferences — Pupil-teacher conferences are scheduled throughout the year. The number and kinds 
of conferences should meet pupil and teacher needs. 

8. Basic Textbooks ■ — Basal instruction is definitely a part of this approach especially for the average read- 
ers who thrive on an orderly, sequential presentation of skills. A variety of basals at various levels should 
be made available to each teacher involved in the program. 

The elementary teachers have long been committed to the philosophy of individualization and continue to tailor 
instruction to individual pupil and teacher needs. This is not a rite or a ritual which must be followed by all 
teachers; but merely an approach to individual instruction. 

The Junior High School provides a developmental reading program for seventh, eighth and ninth grade students 
who are reading at an average or slightly below average level. Reluctant readers also participate in this pro- 
gram which is designed to increase reading competencies and interests of pupils who are about to enter second- 
ary education. Formal and informal diagnostic testing is used as a blueprint for instruction and a variety of ma- 
terials and methods are employed to increase individual reading performances. 

A completely individualized reading program continues to operate at the High School level. This program is reme- 
dial in nature; but also services students who wish to improve their reading competencies . 

Chelmsford's reading program is one of gradual and continuous growth, is balanced and designed to meet the 
needs of the above average, average and below average readers. In spite of this there are some pupils who fail to 
benefit from regular classroom instruction because of some physical, mental, emotional or neurological reason. 
Such pupils are serviced by remedial teachers and learning disability specialists. 

Concern for these students who learn in a different way from most children led to the establishment of a sum- 
mer school in 1973. The coordinators of mathematics and reading planned this project to care for special needs 
children who very often exhibit problems in one or both skill areas. The project took the form of an institute 
designed to up-grade pupil performance and to provide intensive instruction for classroom teachers who work 
with these children during the school year. 

One hundred and sixty-six pupils from grade one through nine attended classes. Thirty teachers participated 
in the institute and received graduate credit from Lowell State College. 

The Chelmsford Chapter of the Massachusetts Association for Children with Learning Disabilities provided 
assistance in the form of volunteer parent aides and furnished a full time nurse for the institute. Six students 
from the senior high school also volunteered their services during the six week period. This cooperative effort 
was successful and most rewarding to all participants. 

The reading department continues to strive to provide a program of instruction which effectively and efficiently 
services all students in the system. A program with such characteristics should comply with the national goal 
of the 70's - The Right to Read. 

(From the Coordinator of Social Studies) 

1973 will certainly be a year we will all remember. It was a year that was filled with crises both at home and 
abroad: Crises relating to governmental leadership and credibility that led to the resignation of the vice-presi- 
dent and the public's growing lack of confidence in the leadership and credibility of the president. Crises relating 
to energy resources and the use of these resources which led to the lowering of thermostats, long lines at gasoline 
pumps, spiraling prices, and unemployment. Crises relating to conflict resolution that resulted in still no peace 
in the Far East, the outbreak of another war in the Middle East, and terrorist activity in the British Isles as well 
as in other countries throughout the world. Coupled with all of these problems were the dire predictions of fu- 
turists who warn us to develop models of international law, expand and use wisely our energy and food resources, 
and to plan now for the twenty-first century. 

How does one prepare young people to become intelligent participants in a society that is filled with the prob- 
lems facing our high school seniors who have reached the age of majority, are voting, and are about to become 

107 



wage earners and taxpayers, and at the same time prepare six year olds for the world they will face in the 
twenty-first century? 

This is the tremendous challenge facing the Chelmsford schools in general and the social studies program in par- 
ticular. For it is the responsibility of the social studies program to develop informed citizens fully aware of the 
need for insuring the dignity and worth of the individual, for personal involvement in improving the society they 
have inherited, and for recognizing the interdependence of all peoples. It is the social studies program in the 
Chelmsford Public Schools that helps students analyze what makes man human, how humans interact with one 
another and with their natural resources, and what affects the decisions people make whether related to the 
use of technology and the environment or with the kinds of people they select to represent them in government. 

In order to deal with this educational challenge, social studies draws much of its content from the social science 
disciplines. Major ideas or concepts from anthropology, sociology, political science, and economics, as well as 
history and geography are introduced and developed in the social studies program. This is done in a carefully ar- 
ticulated and continuous program from the primary grades through high school. The program also develops 
analytical thinking skills that assist students in studying current issues and value dilemmas. 

There were many indicators that the program was effective in 1973. Three Chelmsford High School students 
took politics out of the classroom and into the community as they campaigned for positions as selectmen and 
school committee members. Although unsuccessful the students dealt with the issues and were willing to share 
in the responsibility of our democracy. Many other high school students did field study in the community while 
others offered assistance to service agencies in our town. A small group of Chelmsford High School students 
planned to study and film a day in the life of their representative in Congress. Junior high school students, 
eager to develop a better understanding of the problems facing the early New England farmer, cultivated, plant- 
ed, and harvested a small plot of land adjacent to the Garrison House. Other junior high school students visited 
the State House and discussed issues with their state representative and state senator. Many fifth grade students 
followed up a case study on whaling with letters to the International Whaling Commission as well as the local 
press and then studied the use of the environment and technology in their own community. Elementary school 
students raised over $3000.00 to provide "a future for every child" as part of the UNICEF trick or treat pro- 
gram and students in all grades raised over $1200.00 to help purchase the muster field at the Old Chelmsford 
Garrison House thus keeping it from becoming another housing development and in effect "guarding what their 
sires had won." 

Some of the above activities may seem a bit unorthodox to those of us who went to school at an earlier time. 
But then the world that the six year old will face in the twenty-first century is quite different than the world 
we faced. In education and in the preparation for life of that six year old, the twenty-first century is now. It 
demands a different, more dynamic approach in the classroom. 

Interestingly, however, while students participate in this "new" social studies program, their achievement, ac- 
cording to standardized tests that are not designed to specifically measure these approaches or programs, con- 
tinues to increase. Chelmsford students score significantly above the national norms on such tests. They also have 
scored well above state average percentages in tests designed to measure citizenship goals. Most of this is possi- 
ble because Chelmsford has a group of exceptional teachers who teach social studies and who are sensitive to 
the needs, interests, and abilities of their students. They are sincere and dedicated in their efforts to provide 
Chelmsford's young people with a program that will prepare them to become intelligent participants in a free 
society. 

In examining where mankind is today, one can only hope that Chelmsford's youth will succeed where we have 
failed. 

(Coordinator of Mathematics) 

The primary focus of the Mathematics program in the Chelmsford School System is on making mathematics in- 
tellectually exciting and challenging. Our program regards mathematics as a system which encourages each 
student to think for himself, to understand mathematical concepts and to master the skills necessary to apply 
their understanding to problem solving situations. 

The major objective of our program is to assist children in developing power to deal with mathematical ideas. 
The mathematics teacher's role is to help students develop several dimensions of thought: comprehension, re- 
call, production, and evaluation. 

Comprehension of the ideas presented is basic to success in mathematics. The content to which students are ex- 
posed, either orally or in writing, must be made meaningful to the child. He must be able to fit the concepts dis- 
cussed into the framework of his existing knowledge. This involves grasping similarities and differences or noting 
other relationships. 

The student is also required to have many ideas available for immediate recall. He must remember the subject 
matter in order to use it at another time. Complex ideas are fashioned from fundamental notions that are un- 



108 



derstood and retained. Memory plays an especially significant role, because mathematics is a sequential discipline. 
Mastery. of a topic makes further advance possible. The learner's future study is jeopardized if he does not 
understand and remember concepts. 

The student of mathematics also must produce — to find solutions to mathematical problems. He must be able 
to generate ideas. Logical processes of deductive reasoning usually are appropriate when seeking solutions. How- 
ever, some people use other processes of production. These include intuition, induction, analogy, trial and error, 
diagramatic representation, and combinations of these. In all of these situations, individuals engage in thought 
processes directed toward reaching solutions or creating patterns of ideas new to them. 

The evaluative thought process is basic to comprehension, recall, and production. Thinking individuals are on 
guard for instances of confusion, inaccuracy, unreasonableness, or illogical sequences of thought in material 
studied or in answers generated. Appraisal is crucial for clear thought. 

Throughout the Chelmsford Mathematics Program there are carefully planned activities that help the pupil to 
maintain skill and understanding as well as to review earlier work. Many unusual mathematical topics are pre- 
sented to stimulate interest and to serve as enrichment. Drill of basic facts is presented in various ways that make 
it more palatable to the children as well as to the teachers. Our program contains many unusual topics and de- 
vices that clarify the standard material; broaden children's knowledge of mathematics; and stimulate interest, 
creativity, and discovery. Planned exposure to the ideas involved helps children see mathematics as an ever- 
growing structure which releases new ideas from basic concepts and principles. 

Chelmsford's program coordinates proven teaching techniques and the latest developments in learning theory 
with the precise concepts of modern mathematics. Our texts are written in a way that communicates the creative 
aspect of mathematics. At every stage children are encouraged to discover ideas for themselves, to look for in- 
teresting patterns and relationships, and to develop their own generalizations. New topics of interest to children 
are explored both because of their mathematical value and because they encourage children to put forth their 
best efforts. 

Our program utilizes materials which are written from a modern point of view. Concepts are approached 
through an understanding of the over-all structure of mathematics, and their introduction is appropriately fol- 
lowed up by adequate drill for the mastery of skills. At each stage in the presentation of new concepts, attention 
is focused on how these concepts unfold from the basic principles presented earlier. Attention is also directed to 
ward certain fundamental principles which later serve to unify the study of advanced mathematics. The inter- 
relationships and structure within the system as well as the routine facts and algorithms are stressed throughout 
the program. 

A coordinated effort has been made in the elementary schools to individualize the teaching of mathematics to 
students. Supplemental materials, manipulative devices, and skill building materials are being utilized in order 
to provide for different levels of ability. . The child emerging from the elementary program should have a tho- 
rough grounding in both arithmetic and intuitive geometry. 

The elementary mathematics program in Chelmsford reflects the following beliefs: 

There are fundamental concepts of mathematics which, when isolated and presented clearly, provide 
the learner with helpful tools for furthering his knowledge. 

At every level children are encouraged to think, to question, and to understand. 

Although every generation should benefit from the learning of past generations, the creativity of each 
new generation must not be hampered by forcing, upon our pupils, patterns of thought which have 
served us well but which may be inadequate in the future. 

Mathematics can be taught as it really is: A dynamic subject that holds extreme fascination for children. 
In our continuing endeavor to meet the needs of individual students, the elementary mathematics program has 
made progress toward individualizing its instruction. Although this aspect has been monitored very closely, the 
progress, enthusiasm and observations, to date, have been most encouraging. Individualizing instruction is cur- 
rently going on, in varying degrees, in every elementary school. 

Traditional education has long been criticized for forcing pupils to learn everything in the same way, at the 
same time. Individualized instruction provides a way for pupils to learn at their own rate, work at their own 
level, and use the method of learning best suited to their needs. 

Two ideas of major importance in the teaching of elementary mathematics in the Chelmsford Public Schools 
are: 

1. The classroom should be child-centered rather than teacher-centered. Since the ultimate source of all 
learning is experience, students learn most effectively by "doing" rather than by being told, by explor- 
ing and applying rather than by merely listening. Children should be actively involved. 

109 



2. Children at all levels of the elementary school should begin to learn mathematics from experience with 
physical objects. They should be given opportunity to explore with concrete objects and to discover pat- 
terns before going on to the abstract symbolic stages of mathematics. 

At the secondary level there is a wide variety of mathematics courses offered. Some of these topics have become 
the foundations upon which applications to the sciences, engineering, and mathematics itself are built. Most 
of the topics covered in our secondary mathematics curriculum have become part of what every person should 
know in order to understand the complex world in which he lives. Many new materials, methods, and grouping 
practices are employed in the math program to best meet the needs of individuals. 

The mathematics program at the junior high school level continued to provide the variety and type of courses 
and high caliber of teaching necessary to meet the individual needs of the student. Individualized learning pack- 
ages continue to be developed and utilized. Teaching units constructed by staff members are also being intro- 
duced into the classrooms. Team teaching this year as in previous years is used for the benefit of the student. 
Various educational supplies and materials such as games, puzzles, and math lab equipment are being used to 
enhance the enrichment and remedial programs. The acceleration program continues on successfully. 

This academic year the sequence of courses is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, a change from previous years 
when it was Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry. The comprehensive examination program in the 8th and 9th 
grades still proves to be of great value to both teachers and students. 

In the fall of 1973 four calculators were purchased for use in the classroom.- These calculators will be used at 
all class levels. Their purpose is to strengthen fundamental arithmetic calculations and improve student ac- 
curacy. They also create greater interest and heighten student motivation in mathematical computation. 

The Junior High Mathematics League improved upon its impressive record of the previous year. It was first in its 
division and second best school district in the states. A Chelmsford student was high ninth-grade scorer in the 
state. 

The Mathematics Department at the high school has completed several innovations this past year. Students con- 
cluded the first year of an Advanced Calculus course which provided them with two years of Calculus. A third 
level of first year Calculus was started due to the interest of students who have completed the regular four year 
mathematics program. The college Geometry course which has been enhanced by including transformational 
Geometry has proved very successful. The individualized general mathematics program was expanded. Con- 
tinued use of the computer is being performed by students through the terminal tie-in with Nashoba Tech. 
The computer is used as a means to complement the existing mathematics curriculum. The important goals are 
for him to learn the effective use of a computer as a problem - solving tool and to gain an appreciation of the 
relationship between mathematics, computers, and problem solving. These objectives can be achieved by pro- 
viding an efficient means for processing programs written by students. 

The high schoool mathematics team finished first in its division and was invited to compete at the state level (fin- 
ishing 5th) and New England competition (finishing 7th). For the second straight year, a student at Chelms- 
ford High finished in the top twenty in math competition taken by over 5000 students throughout the state. 

Mathematics is presented as a way of thinking. In the very process of learning the concepts, skills and uses of 
mathematics, the student will have had a valuable experience. What is valuable about the mathematics program 
in Chelmsford is not that it is new, but rather that it offers an opportunity to children of all abilities to learn 
mathematics in a more meaningful way than had heretofore been possible. 

(From the Coordinator of Physical Education and Athletics) 

The Department of Physical Education and Athletics provides four special programs within the structure of the 
entire curriculum. They include the Instructional Program, the Intramural Program, the Interscholastic Pro- 
gram, and the School Recreational Program. 

The Instructional Program services the various grade levels of one through twelve. They include the activities of 
rhythmics, gymnastics, individual and dual activities and team sports. The depth and emphasis of the pursuit in 
each case is determined by the activity to be taught; the sex involved; the age level to be served; the skill or lack of 
skill demonstrated by groups ; and the ability and experience of the instructor. 

The various intramural programs provide an opportunity in a laboratory setting for the students to apply pre- 
viously trained skills. The students are encouraged to participate in games, sports, and activities geared to their 
respective levels of abilities. Previously this program was concentrated at the secondary level. During the past 
year it has included schools from the upper elementary levels in basketball and Softball. 

The Interscholastic Program is identified with a greater enrichment opportunity. There is a strong identifica- 
tion with both the instructional and intramural programs. In most cases programs are offered at the varsity, 
junior varsity, and freshman levels. The boys' interscholastic program offers a total of nine teams and schedules. 

110 



It should be noted that with the opening of the new high school in September, greater emphasis can be placed 
on girls' activities through the inclusion of a gymnastics and track and field program. 

The School Recreational Program is designed to provide worthwhile leisure time activity for students and hope- 
fully, at a later date, for residents of the community. In this setting the students have the opportunity to apply 
knowledge acquired in the formal classroom. The student has the opportunity to see science, art, music, physical 
education, and other curricular areas in a new dimension. 

Recreation, therefore, becomes an integral part of education as it fosters attitudes and develops skill beneficial 
to youth and adults alike. 

(From the Program Supervisor of Art) 

The Art Department is actively committed at all levels to assist students in becoming aware of their world and 
themselves, and in understanding the relationship between the two. Being really aware of oneself and one's world 
involves multiple concerns affecting all one's senses and involving total living experience. 

The very term "Art" has long ago outgrown its restricted definition of "good taste" or "beautiful things for the 
few beautiful people." Art is now sensory education. The art program attempts to give students a total experience 
that is just as concerned with the texture and strength of a concrete block as it is with little painted flowers. 
What does all this mean? It means that we are trying to create for our students a program that will make them 
more responsive to both the world of nature and the man-made world. 

Our total program has been carried out to provide for each student the greatest variety of Art and non-Art me- 
dia, in order to pace mental and physical growth with individual skills, interests, and concerns. We work on 
a skeletal framework which allows the specialists great flexibility to follow the needs and concerns of their stu- 
dents while at the same time assuring that certain basic skills be taught at each growth level. 

We encourage our staff to find new avenues for inter-disciplinary learning. We actively attempt, in every way, 
to make all our methods of learning sensually satisfying. We have a flexible program that makes every at- 
tempt to serve the needs of the students and the classroom teachers. Due to fiscal restrictions and space limita- 
tions, we have not progressed as rapidly as expected in our projected five year plans. We are trying very hard to 
overcome these barriers and to find new ways to serve our students. 

This past year, we produced a school-wide Festival of the Arts, an involvement which demonstrated to the com- 
munity the many experiences which we offer our students. We plan another festival this year and hope that all 
interested members of the community will come and share this great experience with the students and the staff. 
Our department has been hit very hard with the shortages in the area of all types of paper and plastics and 
with the increase of almost 200% in the cost of some basic items. We have attempted to assess the situation as 
a challenge and find for our classes new forms of media that will be educationally sound and will still permit 
us to stay within our budget. 

(From the Program Supervisor of Music) 

The Music Department has two programs in each school - vocal specialists and instrumental instructors. 

A general music education program is required through grade eigh and elective in nine through twelve. 

Elementary classes are visited by specialists each week. Grade seven meets twice a week for half a year while grade 
eight meets once each week for the entire year. 

Musical concepts are developed through listening, singing, playing, moving, creating, and reading. The depth 
of any activity varies with the musical level within the class. 

The elective music program for grade nine includes choral class, theory, group guitar and /or piano, and pop- 
rock. At the high school, students may elect music appreciation and theory. 

All schools have performing vocal ensembles that meet regularly and perform for school and civic programs. 

The instrumental program is elective at all levels. Instruction on orchestral string instruments is available starting 
in grade four while wind and percussion instruments are offered in grade five. 

Small group instruction is scheduled within each building and most schools have both orchestral and band en- 
sembles that rehearse regularly and perform for school and civic programs. 

(From the Program Supervisor of Instructional Media) 

The Chelmsford school library program continues to grow; in the collection of materials, usage by students, 
and instruction in library science. The school year, 1972-1973 has seen the completion of plans to centralize all 



111 



cataloging and processing at the Instructional Media Center. The elementary school libraries have been serviced 
by centralization for two years; now the McFarlin, Junior High, and High Schools receive their materials ready 
for circulation to students and teachers. 

A total of 5,435 books has been added to the various collections: 3,689 at the elementary level, 798 at the Junior 
High, 948 at the High School. Since September, 1973, 798 items of audio-visual software have been cataloged. 
These figures do not represent the total number of books and audio-visual software items that have been pur- 
chased during the year, for there is a sizeable backlog of material waiting to be cataloged and processed. Some of 
the films, filmstrips, recordings, etc. are distributed to the various schools. Many are stored at the Media Center 
and distributed to schools upon request by teachers. 

All the large elementary schools have libraries staffed with trained library aides. The Harrington, Byam and West- 
lands libraries are open during the complete school day, while the North, Center and South Row offer only three 
hours of library service per day, due to the fact that these three schools do not have true library facilities. It is hoped 
that in September, 1974 these three schools will join the others in having libraries and full-time aides. As in past 
years, the elementary library programs have been aided in their operation by the efforts of many volunteer moth- 
ers, and their time and energy is invaluable to the aides, students, and teachers in each school. The three small 
schools, the East, Quessy and Highlands have active libraries. 

An average of 110 books, periodicals, and A/V materials are checked out of the large elementary schools each 
day: a total of 135,000 items was checked out during the year. In addition to the circulating of library materials 
and maintaining the collections, the aides at each library offer story hours, help the students with reference ser- 
vices, and assist the two elementary librarians in instruction in library science. The Junior High library circulates 
an average of 30 books and periodicals a day. Teachers bring their classes to the library for reference work and li- 
brary instruction. One hundred and eighty-four such sessions were held during the year. The School had an aver- 
age daily circulation of 52 books and periodicals. 

One of the greatest needs felt to exist in the Chelmsford Public School library system is in the area of instruction 
in library skills. Up until this year, formal structured instruction had been given only at the Westlands School, 
with informal orientations conducted at the Byam and Harrington schools. 

In February, 1973, a pilot project in library science was inaugurated in the North School ligrary/cafetorium. It 
was decided to begin this project at the third grade level since it is at this point in their school career that students 
have developed adequate skills in reading comprehension, alphabetization and mathematical knowledge to prop- 
erly understand and work with the library tools. At the third grade the student is introduced to the basic rules of fil- 
ing in the card catalog, how to locate fiction and non-fiction books, the principles of the Dewey Decimal system 
and the parts of the card catalog. Twenty half-hour sessions were needed to cover this material. 

The purpose of the program is tojnake all students in the elementary schools familiar with methods of access to 
information so that they will be competent in using school , public, and university libraries. A curriculum for grades 
one through six has been developed, though at present this program can only be offered in grades one through 
three, due to lack of staff. The curriculum has been developed so that certain specific skills will be taught at each 
grade level, each new skill building on the one preceding it. 

In September 1973, formal classes were begun at the Westlands, Center, Byam and North schools. Orientation 
and principles of good book care have been formally taught to the first and second grades at Center, Byam, West- 
lands and North schools. 

This year Title II funds were assigned to the elementary library program with the intent of bringing all reference 
collections in these schools up to standards. Some of the Title II funds were used to purchase A/V materials to be 
held at the Westlands and Byam school libraries in an effort to continue the development of these two facilities as 
media centers. 

A special purpose Title II grant was awarded the graphic artist /production specialist. This was used to purchase 
a collection of silent films, old comic strips, and classic radio plays, tracing the history and grammatical conven- 
tions of "cultural media." 

During this year, the Media Center also expanded its capacity for bringing active media production directly into 
the classroom. Both the full-time graphic artist/production specialist and the media aide spent many hours in the 
schools, helping teachers and students to make animated films, live-action films, video-tapes, slide-tapes, and ra- 
dio-play recordings. These productions were usually conceived by the teachers with a particular curriculum goal 
in mind. The animated cartoons, for instance, involved subject-matter content from eighth ; grade English, fifth 
grade social studies, sixth grade science, and seventh grade mathematics. 

With the acquisition of two new "porta-pack" video-systems, television became a medium for students at all 
grade levels to get their hands on, as opposed to past emphasis on the kind of "instructional television" which 
places the learner in a more passive role. The Media Center staff itself produced several "semi-professional" docu- 
mentaries for classroom use including "A Visit to an Algonquin Wigwam," taped at the Children's Museum: 



112 



"The Making of Sasqua," how a feature film company works; and "Thanksgiving Madness," about the Garrison 
House. 

The High School television studio has always been a student-run, production-oriented facility capable of most of 
the services of a professional station. This concept had reached a height by the end of the school year, 1972-73, 
when Channel 5 in Boston filmed a ten minute documentary there, which was later aired on their "Five at Large" 
program. The following year, a change in faculty supervisor, and in class scheduling brought a slight change of 
focus, with more effort directed toward tying student television production into the academic curriculum. Many 
students and teachers utilized television as a means of doing research and presenting reports in a variety of subject 
areas. Under the direction of the production specialist, students also continued to tape shows off the air for later 
closed-circuit broadcast in the classroom, to maintain a large collection of local and commercial productions on 
half-inch tape, to replay specific reels on request, and to produce "specials" for viewing by the whole school on 
Veterans' Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. In addition, a substantial number of sophomore students regularly 
utilize television facilities in connection with their English course in Language and Mass Media Communications. 
The inventory of audio-visual equipmment in the schools has been completed, each item has been etched with an 
accession number. It is now possible to determine where each item is located, what repair services and parts it has 
needed, and the date the repair was made. The media technician has repaired over three-hundred and ninety 
pieces of equipment during the school year. 

The staff of the Media Center and the school libraries throughout the town of Chelmsford are attempting to fol- 
low the guidelines as established in the Philosophy of the Instructional Media Center. In the light of the state- 
ment pertaining to communication, and the need-to-eommunicate not only within the system, but with the public 
library as well, a series of meetings has been held among the public library and school library administrators. These 
meetings have proved to be helpful and very worth-while. The chief result has been the establishment of a town 
union catalog which permits citizens to locate any school library/Media Center materials as well as materials held 
in the town libraries. 

(From the Director of Special Education) 

Chelmsford's program for Special Education is a comprehensive one. The objectives and philosophy of the pro- 
gram for exceptional children are not different from those established for all children by the Educational Poli- 
cies Commission of the National Education Association in four principles that apply to all children. In essence, 
they are: 1. the need for self-realization, which involves development of the child's capacities to use basic educa- 
tional (or academic) "tools", and promotion of his health, cultural, and recreational interests; 2. development of 
a full awareness of human relationships, which involves an appreciation by the child of his role as a member of so- 
ciety; 3. education for economic sufficiency, which involves vocational training, placement, and follow-up; and 
4. education for an assumption of as high a degree of civic responsibility as the child is able to attain. 

The Chelmsford Public Schools' Special Education department has been growing steadily in order to provide the 
services necessary to fulfill our educational goals for special needs students. To best provide these services, ten spe- 
cial needs classes have been established at the elementary and junior high levels. In September of 1974, with the 
opening of the Learning Resource Center at the new High School, our program will take another step forward, 
thus bridging the gap between the junior high and high school special needs program. 

A special needs student, as defined by the State Department of Education, is one who exhibits difficulty in one 
or any combination of the following areas: Vision, Audition, Speech, Cerebral or Perceptual Functions, Physical 
Mobility, Condition or Function; Behavior, Mental Development or Maturation. Special needs students require 
special help and services. These services are provided by Resource Class teachers, Speech Pathologists, Learning 
Disability Teachers, Guidance Counselors, School Adjustment Counselors, Consulting Psychiatrists, Psychologists, 
and Teachers of the Deaf and Visually Handicapped. 

In September of 1974, the State's new Law, Chapter 766, will become effective in the Commonwealth. This law 
is the state's comprehensive special education law which calls for a flexible and non-discriminatory system to iden- 
tify, evaluate and provide for the individual needs of all children with special needs, regardless of disability. Fea- 
tures of the law include an emphasis on community programs and de-emphasis on the labelling of children. 

According to the proposed guidelines, every school committee must provide the State Department of Education 
with a plan for educating each child with special needs. A description of programs within and outside the school 
system must accompany each plan, as well as a description of services that are anticipated but are not presently 
available. 

A Core Evaluation Team will assess each child referred and recommend an educational program best geared to the 
child's needs. The child's parents will have the right to reject the educational plan if they believe that it is not in 
the best interest of the child. The amount of time a child will spend in the regular classroom will vary. The child 
may also attend special education classes only or work at home and/or at a treatment center. 

Under the new law, compliance by every community is mandated. All school committees are obligated to provide 

113 



a special education program. It is apparent by the passage of Chapter 766 that Special Education is considered a 
priority in Masachusetts. We, in Chelmsford, subscribe to this law and will continue to improve and expand our 
services in order to meet the needs of children who have special needs. 

Guidance services, an area of commitment to pupils in need of special help, carried out its objectives quite effec- 
tively in 1973. Because of the great importance of guidance as catalytic agent between the child and the process 
of education, and because of the many changes in the scope and emphasis of guidance services over the past sev- 
eral years, especially at the elementary level, the School Committee authorized a study of the guidance program. 
The School Guidance Study Committee was appointed in the spring of 1973 and began its task immediately. Its 
membership was composed of representatives from the School Committe, administration, guidance counselors, 
teachers, pupils and parents. The Committee's report of its findings and recommendation will be presented to the 
School Committee in January, 1974. 

It is hoped that this study of the guidance program will produce a better understanding of problems confronting 
the school community as well as more appropriate methods for dealing with these problems. 

A study of the Class of 1973 reveals the following post-secondary educational and vocational plans of the gradu- 
ates. 



4 yr. degree granting colleges 

4 yr. Mass. State colleges 

2 yr. Junior Colleges 

2 yr. Mass. Community Colleges 


19.0% 

25.3% 

2.5%- 

12.0% 


SPECIALIZED 




R. N. Hospital Training 
Licensed Practical Nurses Training 
Technical Schools 


.5% 

.6% 

1.8% 


Business Schools 


1.6% 


Prep Schools 

Nashoba Regional (P.G.) 


.6% 
.9% 




64.8% 


SUB-TOTALS 




Employment 
Armed Services 


27.0% 
.8% 


Marriage 
Undecided 


1.4% 
6.0% 



TOTALS 100.0% 

1973 was another eventful year at Chelmsford High School. Mr. George Simonian was appointed Principal after 
having served the school system for sixteen years as science Department Chairman, Science Coordinator, and 
more recently as the Director of Curriculum. He replaced Mr. John T. Conrad who retired after serving with 
great distinction for twenty-two years. 

The first major decision of the year was to prepare the High School for double sessions in September. The en- 
rollment of the school had increased to the point at which programs and the quality of education would have suf- 
fered had single sessions been maintained. Because of some of the disadvantages of double sessions, plans were 
made to divide the school community into two sessions, at the same time attempting not to disrupt the usual rou- 
tine of the school in the areas of interscholastic athletics and intra-school activities. 

School opened in September on double sessions with a minimum number of problems. Sound planning, staff and 
student cooperation, and parental and community understanding made it all possible. Also the fact that the new 
high school would be ready in September, 1974, made double sessions more bearable. 

In preparation for the move to the new high school, a series of in-service sessions was planned for all staff mem- 
bers. Each week a two-hour session was held in order to prepare the faculty for the substantial changes and ad- 
justments that the new school would bring. 

The new high school is to be comprised of four houses. Each house is a school within a school. A house is an ad- 
ministrative sub-division composed of approximately 600 students, 30 teachers, counselors, and a dean. The house 
concept attempts to promote closer relationships among student and staff. It preserves some of the advantages of 
a small school while offering large school facilities and programs. 

1973 must be viewed as a transitional year that presented many new features: a new principal, adjustment to 
double sessions, and preparations for a new high school. 



114 



The Junior High School began its second and last year on double sessions. An Industrial Arts and Home Econom- 
ics program was incorporated into the eighth grade curriculum. These new learning experiences will provide our 
students with an awareness of career clusters and avocational areas that focus on manual dexterity and practical 
arts. It is anticipated that the program will be introduced into the seventh grade in September, 1974, thus com- 
pleting the secondary Career Education Program. 

In September, with the occupancy of the new Senior High School, the present high school will become the second 
Junior High School. Each of the two Junior High Schools will house grades 7, 8 and 9 (approximately 1400 pu- 
pils in the present high school building and 1000 pupils in the present junior high school building) . The McFarlin 
School, which presently houses seventh grade pupils, willl be used for elementary school purposes. 

Kindergartens will be established in the Chelmsford Public Schools in September, 1974. In accordance with the 
recent research findings in the rapidly developing field of early childhood education, the kindergarten will have 
a balanced program of structured and unstructured activities, planned to support firmly the young child's need for 
intellectual content as well as for experiences which will help him develop socially, physically and emotionally. A 
kindergarten day of two and one-half hours will be established; there will be both a morning and afternoon ses- 
sion. 

The School Lunch Program continued to expand during the 1973 school year. The total number of meals served 
to students was 829,039. Cafeteria receipts for the school year ending June 30, 1973, were $322,186. State and 
federal aid for the same period totaled $145,924. The total expenditures for the same period were $491,230. The 
primary factors in the program's operating at a deficit were the rise in labor and food cost and a decrease in the 
allocation of federal commodities. 

The adult education program offers all citizens, regardless of age or previous experience, the opportunity to grow 
in knowledge and understanding, and to acquire technical and professional skill. This year 587 adults enrolled in 
22 courses. 

Although there inevitably remain unmet needs and areas of concern, the accomplishments of our schools, through 
the cooperative efforts of community members and town departments, have been many and significant. The town's 
unanimity of purpose in striving to provide quality education for all students, and the willingness of our towns- 
people and our families to work unstintingly toward this goal are most gratifying to the School Committee and 
school staff. Parents' response to the schools' invitation to perform volunteer services and to serve on study com- 
mittees has been particularly gratifying. 

The school enrollment on October first was 9,059. As compared to the enrollment of the previous year, the num- 
ber reflects an increase of only 69 students. The elementary grades' enrollment decreased slightly and, as was pre- 
dicted, the secondary enrollment continued to increase. 

In grateful recognition for long years of dedicated, valuable service to the youth and citizens of the town, the 
School Committee, administration, colleagues, and citizens honored the retirement of the following employees. 

Mrs. Abbie Arrants Teacher, South Row School 

Mrs. Doris Irvin Teacher, Center School 

Mrs. Ann Sides Teacher, South Row School 

Mrs. Gladys Dunigan Teacher, Westlands School 

Mr. Earl Shaw Custodian 

Mr. Frederick A. Hildreth Custodian 

Mr. Raymond A. Eno Custodian 

Mrs. R. Ilene Davidson Secretary, South Row School 

Mrs. Kathleen M. McMillan Secretary, High School 

It is the sincere wish of the School Committee and Administration that the retirees may find the years ahead 
satisfying and rewarding. To them goes our deep appreciation for having contributed so much to so many. 



IN MEMORIAM 

With the passing of Mrs. Jeanne White on May 1, 1973, Chelmsford Tost a much loved and 
respected teacher. Mrs. White at the time of her death was a teacher for children with Learn- 
ing Disabilities at the Harrington School. 

***** 
Mrs. Violet Hopkins, Administrative Assistant at the Harrington School, passed away on 
December 12, 1973. The words left unsaid would have described an enthusiastic, generous, 
vibrant person whose capabilities were recognized by all who knew her. 



115 



Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town officials and boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent- 
Teacher Organizations, to the Educational Advisory Committee, and to the Citizens of Chelmsford for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The proposed budget for the 1974-75 school year reflects the opening of the new high school, the introduction 
of the kindergarten program into the school system and the expansion of the services needed to meet the re- 
quirements of children with special needs as mandated by Chapter 766 which becomes effective on September 1, 
1974. 

The School Committee shares the taxpayer's concern over the fact that adequate support of our public school 
system appears to involve the imposition of an increasingly heavy burden on our local tax structure. This con- 
cern has prompted us to attempt every possible economy, short of those which might threaten to impair our 
present educational standards or facilities, We still consider it our duty, however, to work for the continued 
maintenance and improvement of our standards. 

The budget recommended for the 1974-75 school year is contained in the Finance Committee's Annual Report 
and Recommendations. 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT STUDENT ENROLLMENT — OCTOBER 1, 1973 

GRADES 
SCHOOL 
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Sp.Cl. Total 



North 


141 


136 


122 


142 


134 


31 


Harrington 


135 


136 


152 


151 


159 




Westlands 


138 


128 


139 


137 


153 


175 


Center 


108 


116 


124 


133 


117 


125 


South Row 


106 


128 


107 


129 


122 




Byam 


145 


132 


146 


149 


149 


121 


East 












123 


Highland 












132 


Quessy 












124 


McFarlin 














Jr. High 














High 














Stedman St. 















799 



842 699 



707 581 529 





706 




733 




870 


10 


733 


18 


610 




842 




123 




132 




124 


4 


803 


16 


1557 




1817 


9 


9 



TOTALS 



773 776 790 841 834 831 799 842 699 707 581 529 57 9059 



116 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

REPORT OF DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

During 1973 Nashoba Valley Technical High School has continued to grow in its ability and desire to serve the 
people of our district in the field of technical and occupational education. 

The main force of our education effort is, of course, directed to the needs of our regular, day-school program. 
However, we have continued to diversify and update existing programs in adult education, special needs (our 
VIP program), Project MODEL, and Computer Assisted Instruction at all levels. 

In our four year span our enrollment has increased to the point where we are now providing for the education of 
634 pupils. Since our school was designed for only 490 students, we have provided for the additional students by 
leasing temporary facilities about three miles away from the main school building. This figure includes 8 post-Sen- 
iors and 21 VIP students, well above our original estimates and plans. 

The School Committee recognizing the growing need for both immediate and long range growth has begun re- 
search into methods whereby our services mav be expanded to provide the maximum in educational services to 
the district in the most economical manner. Planning committees have been formed to study all possible alterna- 
tives, while experts in education planning and concerned local citizens are being consulted. At the close of the 
year 1973, a questionnaire was distributed to every household in the district asking for input concerning a modified 
45/15 plan — the extended school year — one possible direction in which we may move. 

In 1972-73 our graduating class numbered 98. The 1973-74 school year will produce (at present figures) a grad- 
uating class of 126 seniors. 

DAY SCHOOL OFFERINGS 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Commercial Art & Industrial Photography 

Community Service Aide 

Data Processing and Business Machines 

Drafting 

Electrical 



Electronics 

Graphic Arts 

Machine 

Metal Fabrication 

Mill & House Carpentry 

Plumbing & Heating 



ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The evening adult education program at Nashoba continues to be a great drawing card to the citizens of our dis- 
trict. October 1973 applications numbered over 1700 with about 1400 being squeezed into the school. 



ADULT EDUCATION COURSE OFFERINGS 



Advanced Sewing 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Auto Body 

Antique Auto Body 

Antique Restoration 

Automotive — Men 

Automotive — Women 

Beginners Sewing 

Bus Driving 

Carpentry Related 

Creative Crewel 

Data Processing 

Electrical Code 

Electrical Technology 

Electronics 

Fly Tying 

Gourmet Cooking 

Health Services 



Introduction to Law Enforcement 

Kindergarten Aide 

Machine Technology 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Ornamental Sheet Metal 

Photography 

Plumbing-Heating & Steam Fitting 

Physical Fitness — Men 

Physical Fitness — Women 

Printing & Graphic Arts 

Radio & TV Repair 

Secretarial Sciences 

Small Gasoline Engine Repair 

Typing 

Upholstery 

Welding 

Woodworking 



GUIDANCE 



The Guidance services at Nashoba Valley Technical School are administered by a Director of Guidance, two full 
time Counselors and a Secretary. Guidance provides individual and group counseling, case conferences, voca- 



117 



tional and education guidance, school and job placement, career education, recruitment of new pupils, orienta- 
tion of new pupils at the school; testing for intelligence, achievement, aptitude, and interest follow-up studies of all 
graduates, and referrals to outside agencies for help with emotional and physical problems. Guidance is also re- 
sponsible, in part, for public relations for the school. 

LIBRARY 

One area in which the school's growth has become most apparent is our library, which is serving as an efficient and 
economical means for coordinating the instructional materials and equipment for our school program. Academic 
and trade instructors bring their students in for library research. 

Circulation statistics for the months of September and October 1973 has more than doubled those of the same 
months in the previous year. 

VIP 

The Vocational Interest Process Program provides a much needed specialized form of career education for pupils 
whose special needs would make it difficult for them to enter the standard day-school program. The program 
serves a duel purpose which is to provide the educational instruction necessary for these students and also to pro- 
vide skilled training in their designated shop areas to enable them to become useful and self-sufficient citizens 
within their communities. 

ACADEMIC/ENGLISH 

The English department has added two new elective areas: creative writing and the study of modern media. 
These electives are for juniors and seniors, and it is hoped that more electives will become available as the school 
continues to grow. 

The school's Computer Assisted Curriculum has also been expanded. Over four hundred students are enrolled in 
CAI programs in English, reading, mathematics and social studies in levels of difficulty ranging from remedial to 
advanced high school. 

In the remedial area individualized testing has begun and will continue throughout the school year to determine 
grade levels and progress achieved by students in special programs. 

ACADEMIC MATH/SCIENCE 

The Academic Math/Science department continues to expand and to refine its curriculum to meet the needs of 
the students, and to provide the necessary support functions for the technical shop areas. 

SCHOOL NURSE (NURSING SERVICES) 

This year our school nurse has been able to take throat cultures for our students to find "strep" throats. This im- 
portant test has been made possible through the Massachusetts Heart Association and the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health who have provided the necessary culture kits and the laboratory services. 

This fall the Nashoba Boards of Health provided the materials and womanpower to give Tetanus booster innocu- 
lations to all pupils in our school who had not been innoculated in the past ten years. This clinic is generally of- 
fered in the spring but our school nurse prevailed upon them to provide the service at the beginning of the year 
since this protection is so vital in a vocational school. 

DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

We consider Driver Education a Necessary part of the curriculum in our school since our graduates would be very 
handicapped going into industry without the ability and the legal right to operate a motor vehicle. Along with the 
day school Driver Education program, Nashoba has become known throughout New England for its innovative 
School Bus Driver Training Course. 

The course was developed by two Nashoba instructors at the request of the Superintendent-Director who felt the 
great need for such a program. Instructors have worked with the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau to prepare a 
School Bus Driver Training Program for the State of Massachusetts conforming to federal standards. 

During 1973 both instructors appeared as guest speakers before the Massachusetts Pupil Transportation Confer- 
ence, the Massachusetts Safety Conference, and the New Hampshire Safety Conference. 

They also serve on the board of directors of the Massachusetts Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association. 



118 



AUTO BODY - PLUMBING & HEATING DEPARTMENTS 

This year, the one-year old Auto Body and Plumbing & Heating Departments were placed in full capacity status 
by the appointment of an additional instructor in each department, with a corresponding increase to the depart- 
ments student enrollment. 

DATA PROCESSING 

The Data Processing Department, a late starter, has developed into a full and meaningful career training pro- 
gram that is currently available at Nashoba Valley Technical High School. Students learn how to communicate 
effectively with machines. They learn to speak and learn the language of automation. The aims of this course 
are to: 

1. To prepare students for jobs in which they need to know how data is processed automatically, 
even though they may not be directly concerned with an electronic computer. 

2. To develop, through the logic required by the computer, experience and skill in analyzing prob- 
lems and laying out logical, step-by-step plans to solve them. 

3. To acquaint students with the kinds of job openings in Data Processing and the qualifications 
needed to fill them. 

A computer assisted instruction program is also available to all students of Nashoba Tech, through the Data 
Processing Department. We are currently using it in the academic areas such as arithmetic, English, and reme- 
dial reading. The computer is providing the diagnostic tool for determining what is known and unknown. It 
automatically selects the next appropriate learning sequence or suggests appropriate alternatives for each and 
every individual student. Educationally, the Data Processing Center at Nashoba Tech is truly unique. The com- 
puter assisted instruction program, guidance program and others are available and used by the school systems in 
the districts' towns by terminals connected between the towns' schools and the computer center. 

"By-products" of our center are school and municipal government administrative services that are providing for 
thousands of dollars worth of savings presently and in the future, to our four district towns. 

CO-OP 

One of the most successful phases of our school is the Co-op Program where qualified Seniors are permitted to 
work in their respective occupations in properly approved firms on an alternate week basis. 

The co-op program has proved to be a rewarding experience for our students and their employers; and the on- 
the-job productive work opportunity with bi-weekly renumeration tends to highly motivate the student and of- 
fer many valuable work experiences. 

All of our departments have shown good growth and expansion, and in the process of proper occupational train- 
ing through productive projects and jobs, have provided for many meaningful jobs done in our four towns with 
an emphasis on municipal and school department jobs ; as well as, for private citizens. Space does not permit to 
identify the diversification and production of each departments work. 



119 




Robert Germann, Chief of Police 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Robert E. Germann, Chief 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I herein respectfully submit, for your information and review, the Annual Report of the Police Department 
for the Fiscal year 1973. 

At the present time the department is made up of 42 permanent men. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Robert E. Germann 

CAPTAIN 

Richard E. Campbell 

SERGEANTS 



Leslie H. Adams, Jr. 
Armand J. Caron 



Edgar L. Auger 
Robert I. Auger 
John J. Bell 

Mark L. Burlamachi, Jr. 
John P. Campbell 
Patrick Daley 
Frederick C. Dillon 
Blair J. Finnegan 
Raymond J. Francisco 
Barnard L. George 
James C. Greska 
Charles H. Hadley 



Walter E. Edwards, Jr. 
Pennryn D. Fitts 

PATROLMEN 

Edwin P. Hodgson 
Robert C. Howe 
Lewis Hunter 
James J. Kerrigan 
Ronald A. Leach 
Russell H. Linstad 
John Mack 
Henry R. McEnany 
Mario A. Merluzzi 
James F. Midgley 
Philip N. Molleur 



William R. McAllister 
Raymond P. McKeon 



John E. Redican, Jr. 
Edward C. Rooney 
Richard A. Simpson 
John B. Sousa 
Robert Trudel 
Howard R. Ubele 
Daniel J. Walsh 
Eugene W. Walsh 
John O. Walsh 
William R. Walsh 
Norman L. Wellington 



120 



INTERMITTENT POLICEWOMAN 

Christina N. Park 

POLICE MATRONS 

Grace Auger Mary Long Emily Peake Nora Clifford 

SCHOOL TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 

Joan Dillon Karen Flynn Francis Deangelis George Marinel 

SECRETARY 

Louise A. Pigeon 

CLERK 

Nora F Clifford 

Chelmsford Auxiliary Police Department, Chelmsford, Mass. — 1973 

The Auxiliary Police were called upon on several occasions during 1973. Total number of man hours on 
callouts amounted to 583. 

During the vacation months the Auxiliary put in a total of 514 hours checking houses of town residents that 
were on vacation. The total number of man hours given to the town was 1097. 

The Auxiliary Police meet every Monday evening. This time is devoted to several projects, such as the 
proper handling of firearms: mob control; law and how an officer should conduct himself. The unit is pro- 
gressing in the remodeling and equipping of a Civilian Defense Rescue Truck. Total number of man hours at 
these meetings is up to 2160. This brings the grand total of man hours to 3257 for the year 1973. 



Director 

Sgt. Walter Edwards, Jr. 



Coordinator 

Sgt. Basil Larkin (Retired) 



Emil J. Aberizk 
Robert Abreu 
Lloyd Anstey 
John A. Breen 
George Brown 
Roger Clermont 
Lance Cunningham 
John Daughraty 
Paul Dean 
Douglas R. Drobnis 
Leroy K. Fielding 
Leo Flanagan 



ROSTER 

Roger A. Gregoire 
John F. Hartnet, Jr. 
Paul W. Hines 
William J. Keenan, Jr. 
Leland B. Kelly 
Amedee Little 
Robert Loyd 
Frederic Mehan, Sr. 
Manuel Mello, Jr. 
Charles W. Miller 
Vernon Morris 
Edward Norton 



Bruce C. Pemberton 
Thomas E. Peterson 
James K. Quinn 
David P. Ramsay 
George Roscoe 
Herbert L. Schofield 
Nicholas A. Stratis 
Jeffrey Taylor 
Alphe L. Tremblay 
Raymond A. Tremblay 
Clifford H. Varnum 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



Calls answered by cruisers 
Summonses served 
Licenses suspended 
Accidents reported 

Personal injuries claimed 

Fatal accidents 
Mileage of cruisers 



1972 


1973 


11,298 


10,601 


1,290 


1,604 


144 


126 


934 


925 


383 


376 


7 


8 


401,793 


372,437 



121 



Special property checks 2,546 2,757 

Station lockups 883 839 

Citations issued 1,081 1,688 

Parking Violations 398 477 

Doors and windows found open 344 215 

Detoxification Unit 145 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1972 1973 

Photocopying machine $1,601.00 $2,144.50 

Firearm permits 1,554.00 2,953.00 

Bicycle registrations 120.25 — 

Firearm identification cards 404.00 354.00 

Court fines 4,183.00 3,782.55 

Photographs 511.00 460.00 

Auctioned property 358.00 105.00 

Education and training are still foremost within the department. At this time we have men now attending Lo- 
well Technical College, Northeastern and Northern Essex College. 

Other training courses that our personnel have attended in 1973: 

State Crime Commission 1 Man 

Mass. Heart Assoc. CPR School 4 Men 

Mass. State Police Academy Crime Scene School 2 Men 

ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 
Crimes Against Property 
Crimes Against Public Order 



1972 


1973 


44 


36 


89 


61 


1481 


1530 



1614 1627 

DISPOSITION OF CASES — 1973 

Released 107 

Fined 929 

Placed on Probation 41 

Suspended Sentence 28 

Filed 64 

Not Guilty 44 

Dismissed 18 

Sentenced to House of Correction 7 

Committed to Youth Service Board 6 

Ordered to Pay 9 

Turned Over to Out of Town Police Depts. and Courts 120 

Cases Continued Without a Finding 34 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 220 



122 




On August 21st of this year all the plans and specifica'tions for the new addition to the Police Station were 
in the hands of General contractors bidding for the building. On October 4, 1973 the contract was awarded for 
the construction and completion of the addition to the present building. This contract was awarded to the lowest 
bidder as per state statute. The low bidder was the Able Construction Company, Box 395, Plaistow, New 
Hampshire. Ground breaking took place on October 15, 1973. Construction is underway on the addition, but 
some difficulty did arise in attempting to get the steel bracing, as steel shipments are slow and difficult to obtain. 



This year we lost one man from our department. Charles Hillman transferred from our department to the 
Lowell Police Department. 

While patrolling the highways and roads of our town this year, the mobile units have covered over 372,437 
miles. 

We would like to extend our sincere thanks to the Bournival Chrysler Co. of Lowell for donating our 
safety car. 

We have eight mobile units on the road. Five units are marked and three are unmarked. 

In conclusion I offer my sincere appreciation and thanks to the various officials and department heads, the 
Captain, Sergeants, Patrolmen and the citizens of the town for their continued help and co-operation. Because 
of their combined efforts I am sure Chelmsford is a better and safer place in which to work and to live. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT E. GERMANN 
Chief of Police 



123 



Billllli 

I 




Chief Frederick H. Reid 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Frederick H. Reid, Chief 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1973. 

Although the Fire Department hit a record high in calls in 1973, actual overall fire loss was much lower than 
in years past due to the increase in manpower, modern fire fighting techniques and our fire prevention program. 

On March 23, 1973 the town was notified of a change in the insurance rating schedule. Specifically rated 
buildings were changed from 5th class to 4th class. This would include mercantile and industrial properties. Dwell- 
ings were changed from Grade "C" to "B". This has resulted in savings to both business enterprises and private 
homeowners. 

This change in rating resulted from a survey of the fire defenses of Chelmsford conducted by the Insurance 
Service Organization. We feel this change was brought about primarily through the efforts of the fire department 
in effecting modern training methods and especially its system of pre-fire planning of major buildings and com- 
plexes throughout the town. 

Training of personnel continues to be a prime consideration of the fire department. It is continuous through- 
out the year consisting of both indoor and outdoor drills as well as classroom instructions. 

Undoubtedly the energy crisis will play a major part in the fire service. We are beginning to feel the affect. 
Several fires have occurred due to the reactivating of fireplaces after several years of idleness. We cannot stress too 
strongly the importance of having old fire places checked by a competent person. 

A major concern to the fire department involves the transport, handling and storage of gasoline. Gas should 
be transported in approved safety cans and never stored in any building or part of any building being used for 
habitation. 

However, gasoline may be used, kept, or stored in any building not used for habitation nor frequented by 
the public, without a permit, provided the total quantity shall not exceed seven gallons and provided the gasoline is 
stored in one or more metal or plastic containers which have been approved by the marshal. Such containers shall 
be kept away from all heating devices and shall not be opened in any area where there is an open flame or an 
electric or mechanical device that might cause a spark. If a container is used in an enclosed area, such area shall 
be suitably ventilated. 



124 



Precaution should also be used with portable electrical heaters. All electric heaters should be kept away from 
flammable materials. 

The 1972 fire prevention car has been replaced by a 1973 model through the continuing courtesy of Bourni- 
val-Chrysler-Plymouth, Inc. 

The 1969 Ford 4-door sedan used by the Fire Chief has been replaced by a 1973 Chevrolet. 

I am recommending, and have made provisions in my budget for 1974, the up-dating of our rescue equipment 
as we are responding to an increasing number of accidents on Route #495 and Route #3. 

I would again like to congratulate and thank the men of the department for continuing to maintain the high 
standard of courage and ability that has been shown in the past. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and employees for the excellent cooperation given to the fire 
department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK H. REID 
Fire Chief 

FIRE CHIEF 
Frederick H. Reid 

DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF 
Edward G. Quinn 



William H. Thayer 
Allen C. Mello 



CAPTAINS 
Robert C. Spaulding 

Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 
James M. Spinney 



PRIVATES 



Thomas P. Miskell 
Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Edward J. McGovern 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
Jack D. Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert A. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
Thomas J. Curran 



James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil R. Magiera 
Philip Dube 
Ronald J. Sawicki 
Joseph E. Staveley 
John P. DePalma 
Walter F. Adley, Jr. 
Dennis Vargeletis 
Michael A. Blazonis 
Richard L. Grenon 
Ronald L. Johnson 
Wallace V. Maybury, Jr. 
William V. Cady, Jr. 
Ronald O. Wikander 
James A. Sousa 
William F. Curran 
Daniel T. Reid 



125 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE IN 1973 
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Total 



Accidents 




2 





3 


2 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


1 


25 


Brush 




1 


6 


13 


35 


17 


8 


6 


3 


12 


23 


29 


2 


155 


Building 




11 


10 


10 


10 


9 


14 


6 


11 


10 


13 


16 


13 


133 


Dump 







1 























1 








2 


False Alarm - 


Malicious 





2 


1 


5 


4 


7 


1 


8 


2 


5 


8 


6 


49 


False Alarm - 


Accidental 


4 


2 


2 


3 


4 


1 


6 


4 


2 


7 


2 


3 


40 


Misc. 




16 


14 


20 


25 


17 


16 


23 


21 


15 


20 


15 


18 


220 


Lock Outs 




2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 





2 





1 


4 


22 


First Aid 




2 


2 


3 


2 





2 


2 


4 


5 


4 


4 





30 


Mutual Aid 




2 








1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 





11 


Rescuscitator 




8 


6 


9 


8 


9 


8 


7 


11 


12 


5 


9 


11 


103 


Vehicle 




10 


6 


2 


11 


2 


7 


7 


9 


7 


7 


7 


6 


81 


Drowning 











































TOTALS 




58 


53 


65 


104 


66 


66 


64 


75 


71 


90 


95 


64 


871 



THE EAST CHELMSFORD FIRE STATION BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



Frederick H. Reid 
George R. Dixon 



Edward G. Quinn 
Edward Hoyt 



The above committee held its first regular meeting immediately following the acquisition of the land for the 
station on December 17th. At this meeting the possibility of incorporating a civilian defense Emergency Operat- 
ing Center in the plans for the building were discussed. 

The committee instructed the Chairman to ask the Assistant Director of Civil Defense of Sector 1 to be pre- 
sent at our next regular meeting to advise us of the requirements for such an operating center. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER R. HEDLUND 
Chairman 



126 




Louis Rondeau, Pearl Koulas — Highway Dept. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Louis Rondeau 
Superintendent of Streets 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

The following is a report of the Highway Department for the year 1973: 

Year No. of Regular H'way Employees 

1955 21 

1965 27 

1973 37 

The above figures do not include waste collection employees. The following is a breakdown for Waste Col- 
lections. 



Year 

1954 
1966 
1973 



No. of Regular Waste 

Collection Employees 

3 

13 

16 



Labor Expended 

$ 8,104.30 
61,712.32 
153,323.94 



The paper recycling program was implemented by the Highway Department in January, and was included in 
the waste collection department. Paper for the recycling program is collected on a monthly basis. 

Five new streets were accepted this year. 

Two Clean-Up Days were conducted during the year. The Spring Clean-Up Days were conducted during 
the week of April 30 through May 4 and the Fall Clean-up Days were conducted the Week of October 15 through 
October 19. 

The Chapter 90 Construction project was resumed on Acton Road. The final course of bituminous concrete 
top was placed over the base course from the Westford - Chelmsford Town line to Sleigh Road. This work also in- 
cluded the fine grading of the shoulders, and grading, loaming and seeding of the slopes. The catch basins and 
manholes were adjusted to grade. The project was extended by the construction of the drainage trunk line be- 
tween Sleigh Road and Elm Street. In the Spring, the area between Sleigh Road and Elm Street will be recon- 
structed. 



127 



Drainage projects included the following 
Mission Road 
Grove Street 

Boston Rd. at Mill Rd. 

Oak Street 
Davis Road 
Horseshoe Road 
Locke Road 



Johnson Road 
Fletcher Street 

Castlewood & Crooked Spring 
Reservation 

Bridge Street 

Riverneck Rd. at Lillian Ave. 

Riverneck Road 

Concord Road 

Parker Road 

Frank Street 

Parkhurst Road 



— 964 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, 6 catch basins installed. 

— 204 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, 37 feet asphalt coated pipe, 4 catch basins 
installed. 

— 114 feet 30" aluminum pipe, 16 feet 30" concrete pipe installed. 
(Replacement of deteriorated pipe that had caved.) 

— 40 feet 15" R.C. Pipe installed. 

— 28 feet 12" R.C. Pipe installed. 

— 20 feet 12" R.C. Pipe installed. 

— 40 feet 28x42" Pipe Arch installed, 1 manhole and 1 catch basin 
installed. 

— 296 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, 1 manhole, 2 catch basins installed. 

— 75 feet 21" pipe removed, cleaned and replaced. One catch basin 
installed. 

— 100 feet 15" aluminum pipe, 1 manhole installed. 



— One catch basin installed. 

— 33 feet 10" metal pipe, one catch basin installed. 

— 135 feet 12" asphalt coated pipe installed. 
— ■ 26 feet 10" metal pipe, one catch basin installed. 

— 128 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, 1 manhole, 1 catch basin installed. 

— 24 feet 12" R.C. Pipe installed. 

— 210 feet 10" asphalt coated pipe, two catch basins installed. 

New equipment purchased for the Highway Department include the following: One Pickup Truck; One 
Low Bed Trailer; Three Snow Plows; One Waste Collection Truck; Two Dump Trucks and One Truck Cab and 

Chassis. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, brush cutting, replacing and installing and making of 
street signs, painting of traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, drainage and general maintenance was performed throughout the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind consideration and cooperation and the Police Department for 
notifying the department of dangerous conditions on the roads during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS RONDEAU 

Superintendent of Streets 



128 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Peter Dulchinos Byron D. Roseman, M.D., Chairman Paul F. McCarthy 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL 

Board of Health Physician Permanent Intermittent Plumbing Inspector, Civil Senior Clerk 

Benjamin Blechman, M.D. Service, Richard M. Kelly Barbara A. Murphy 

Plumbing Inspector, Civil Service Director of Public Health Public Health Nurse 

William H. Shedd Thomas W. Morris, R.S. Joyce Casey, R.N. 

Water Pollution Control 

In 1973 the Water Pollution Abatement Program continued to progress as five (5) apartment complexes, 
three (3) eating establishments, and one (1) large shopping center made long needed septic system repairs. 

The status of the towns laundromats is in a state of flux, due to the uncertainty of State Water Pollution 
Control requirements which are in the process of changing. Therefore, no system approvals have been obtained 
from the state. Also repaired were one-hundred eight (108) individual residential systems. 

The Board of Health issued eighty-nine (89) Sewage Disposal Construction Permits for new homes. 

Administration and Management 

On August 29, 1973 a policy of charging a $15.00 fee for percolation tests was adopted. 

The sum raised by fees for percolation tests ($930.00) and Sewage Disposal Construction Permits ($2,654.- 
00) totaled $3,584.00. 

Additional income is listed as follows : 

Plumbing Permits (148) — $ 1,420.00 
Miscellaneous Permits & Trailer Park Fees 9,516.00 



Total $10,936.00 
The total of $14,520.00 was realized. 

Restaurant and Food Handlers Sanitation Program 

The inspection program was set on a regular schedule and the effectiveness of this was evident. All food 
handlers were required to be tested for Tuberculosis and show evidence of such test by being issued a card from 
the Board of Health. 

Fluoridation 

The Board of Health ordered fluoridation of the community water supply at the September 11, 1973 meeting. 

Public Health 

During 1973 the Board of Health Nurse has been involved in following up cases of Tuberculosis and other 
communicable diseases and in visiting premature infants. 

With assistance and cooperation of the School Nurses and Dr. Blechman, Board of Health Physician, im- 
munization clinics were held for pre-school and school age children. Three-hundred forty-four (344) children in 
1st and 12th grades were given DT Boosters. One-hundred (100) 9th graders received mumps vaccine. One- 
hundred seventy-five (175) 1st graders received Rubella. Five-hundred sixty-four (564) students received tine 
tests. Three series of pre-school clinics were held in the spring. A total of 53 children attended and received 111 
immunizations. 

The Nurse also began doing Mantoux (TB) testing of Chelmsford resident foodhandlers. Previously, Lowell 
Health Department had been doing this. A total of 211 were .tested. Some 112 School Bus Drivers were also given 
the test. 

Since the state is interested in learning the effectiveness of the more recent vaccines, epidmiologic investiga- 
tions of 87 Mumps cases and 22 Measles cases were investigated. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Byron D. Roseman, M.D. 
Chairman, Board of Health 

129 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Charles House, Chairman 

Richard L. Monahan Claude A. Harvey 



•1 ■ 



M 










Assessors Dept. 
L to R: Gail Minns, Evelyn Philbrook, Diane Phillips 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

The following report of the Assessors Department for the year 1973 is hereby submitted. 



Number Issued 
Number Granted 
Assessments 
Assessments 
Assessments 

Parcels 



NUMBER 

269 
513 
109 

193 
RECAPITULATION 



20,250 

5,917 

9,598 

20 

688 

209 
8,525 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Excise Tax Abatements 

Real Estate Tax 

Real Estate Tax (Dec. Assess.) 

Personal Property Tax 

Non-Taxable Property 

( Municipal-Churches, etc. ) 

Number of Dwellings 

Statutory Exemptions: 

TYPE 

Clause No. 41 (Elderly) 
Clause No. 22 (A B C D Veterans) 
Clause 17, 18, 37 etc. (Blind, Widow) 
Real Estate Tax Abatements: 

Overvalue, Erroneous Tax, etc. 



Town Appropriations and Charges 
State Assessments 

County Tax and Hospital Assessments 
Overlay Account 

Gross Amount to be raised 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Town — All Revenue derived from excise tax and all departmental receipts 
Total amount from State including Sales Tax estimate 
Transfers Voted from Available Funds 
Overestimates 

Total Estimated Receipts and Transfers 

Total to be raised by Taxation 



Total Tax $ 1,077,253.14 
Amt. Abated 197,847.64 
Value 244,444,990.00 

Value 208,450.00 

Value 9,204,955.00 



Value 



VALUATION 

$2,108,500 
2,100,500 
1,245,000 

1,280,000 



$24,608,752.91 
102,132.35 
310,754.32 
460,431.78 



1,197,13442 

6,058,885.67 

1,468,792.00 

16,362.92 



31,062,300.00 



TAX 

$92,774.20 
92,424.80 
54,673.50 

56,321.25 



$25,482,071.36 



8,741,175.01 



16,740,896.35 



130 



1-1-73 Rate $44.00 2/3 to be raised 1 1,160,597.57 

1-1-74 Six month Rate Not yet announced 1/3 to be raised 5,580,298.78 

16,740,896.35 

Previous years Tax Rates: 1972 $ 33.00/$1000 valuation 

1971 $159.00/$1000 valuation 

1970 $152.00/$1000 valuation 

1969 $136.00/$1000 valuation 

The most important occurrence in 1973 was the Town Meeting appropriations for the 18-month transition 
period. This, along with increases in various departments, caused an $11.00 increase in the tax rate. 

It is hoped that with the first half years' money already appropriated, and with judicious spending at the 
Town Meeting, this rate can be reduced. 

The year 1974 marks the first time in the history of the town that the taxpayers will receive two tax bills. 
It is the year that we change from the traditional January 1 to December 31 year to the new fiscal year of July 
1 to June 30, putting us in line with the Federal and State fiscal years. 

This will probably require double work for the various departments, including the Assessors, but the town 
will benefit in that we will not have to borrow money in anticipation of taxes; and the new town meeting date 
will allow us to borrow in advance of the new federal, state and local fiscal year, instead of borrowing in arrears. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Board of Assessors 

CHARLES A. HOUSE, C.M.A. Chairman 
CLAUDE A. HARVEY 
RICHARD L. MONAHAN 

DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 
Chelmsford, MA 

Gentlemen: 

During 1973, this Department assisted scores of Veterans and their dependents in filing for VA and State 
Benefits. 

The fiscal year ending December 31, 1973, monetary and medical assistance was provided to 236 cases. 

Cash and Material Grants Account 

Year Expended 

1972 $51,215.00 

1973 $76,120.79 

The following is the breakdown for 1973: 

January 8 cases $ 1,375.00 

February 20 cases 5,032.09 

March 21 cases 5,756.63 

April 20 cases 5,100.05 

May 10 cases 1,881.75 

June 24 cases 6,158.01 

July 12 cases 2,530.00 

August 12 cases 3,230.30 

September 17 cases 4,589.06 



131 



October 

November 

December 



33 


cases 


21 


cases 


38 


cases 


236 


cases 



17,090.03 
4,632.83 
18,745.04 

$76,120.79 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY K. McAULIFFE 
Veteran's Agent 



IN MEMORIAM 

Terrance E. O'Rourke, Veteran's Agent 1958-1973 
In grateful remembrance of his years of faithful service. 




APPEALS BOARD 



L to R, back row: Robert Kydd, John Kelly, Jr., S. Robert Monaco, 
Marshall Arkin. Front row: Marguerite Waldron, Carolyn Bennett. 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Charles Higgins, Chairman 



S. Robert Monaco 
Robert Kydd 

Carolyn Bennett 



ALTERNATES 



John Kelley, Jr. 
Marshall Arkin 



Marguerite Waldron 



During the past year the Board of Appeals conducted public hearings on petitions for 53 variances and/or 
special permits. 



Disposition of the petitions as follows: 

Variances and special permits granted 
Variances and special permits denied 
Variances and special permits withdrawn 
Variances and special permits pending 



27 

22 

4 





132 



The Board takes this opportunity to thank all town officials and townspeople for their co-operation during 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHARLES HIGGINS, Chairman 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Roger P. Welch, Chairman 
Paul Jahn 
Jean Mansfield 
Elizabeth McCarthy 
James Harrington 
Thomas Thorstensen 

1973 was a fine year for the libraries in several respects: the number of new card holders increased 22% 
over 1972, circulation figures were 16% over the per capita Massachusetts average, despite our standard four 
week loan period, and we had an average of 4348 patrons per week. On other fronts, important contributions 
first by Fran Raab and Carol Good and later by new Assistant Librarian Susan Schleigh provided the impetus 
for both varied programs and much needed updating of our card catalog. Of much significance too was the 
creation of a public file at the Adams Library listing all material acquired by the school libraries. 

ADULT AND YOUNG ADULT DEPARTMENTS Circulation — 110,673 

Physical changes in this department in 1973 included the addition of three comfortable modern chairs to 
the Reference Area and the completion, by the Friends of the Library, of the new periodical alcove which can 
now seat four commodiously as well as display most of the library's 300 + subscriptions. MacKay also bene- 
fited from Friends' generosity, adding two new chairs to the reading area. The downstairs stacks at Adams were 
rearranged to admit more light and seating. 

CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENTS Circulation — 86,363 

Bea Beaubien assumed charge of the Children's department at Adams in 1973, a year in which paperbacks, 
puzzles, games, and several new magazines were added to the traditional holdings there. In addition, children's 
records were transferred to that department in order to consolidate as much as possible all library materials of in- 
terest to young people. 

ARTS AND MUSIC DEPARTMENT Circulation — 29,085 

Linda Webb formerly of the Children's Room assumed direction of this department in 1973. The collec- 
tion was broadened to include all crafts and hobby books as well as periodicals. A group of original works by 
area artists was added to the circulation collection of prints and posters; the Room was also the site of 18 ex- 
hibits including pottery, photography, painting and children's art. MacKay Library began, in 1973, a record 
collection of its own which has received strong patronage. 

PROGRAMS AND SPECIAL SERVICES 

This year saw the continuation and expansion of programs in response to the support we have received for 
them. Weekly story hours for 3-5 year olds and twice weekly mothers' mornings were the on-going efforts which 
combined with Creativity Programs, Nature Workshops, Thursday Thing, Reading Club, Junior Book Reviews 
and Chess Classes to give Adams and MacKay program enrollments of 4830 people. In addition MacKay 
hosted over 750 school children on special tours, and Maggi Ainslie's 180 + visits to nursing homes and home- 
bound circulated over 2000 books. We were able to fill 120 interlibrary loans for our patrons and 200 copies of 
the library's first publication, HANDBOOK OF CHELMSFORD ORGANIZATIONS, were distributed. 

133 



PRAISE AND THANKSGIVING 

* Foremost, to a staff that grows daily in wisdom and grace and who continues to be the libraries' single 
greatest asset 

* To Audrey Carragher and the entire Friends of the Library organization whose work may not get all the 
public recognition due it but whose efforts, most notably the annual booksale, are inevitably enormously 
successful for the Library and its interests 

* To our 29 mothers' morning volunteers who keep a good thing going and all the people who gave their 
time and talent to our various young people's programs 

* To the Chelmsford Garden Club who both donated a lovely terrarium and gave the libraries superb 
Christmas decoration 

* To Betsy Bohl and the IMC for their cooperation and coordination in all things pertaining to increased 
or improved library services for Chelmsford 

* To our Girl Scout volunteers in general and to Liz Clarkowski in particular. 



Statistical Report 

Fines deposited with Town Treasurer 

State Grant deposited with Town Treasurer 

Books acquired 

Records acquired 

8 & Super 8 mm films purchased 

Pictures acquired 

Periodical subscriptions 

Employees (full time) 

Employees (part time) 

Hours open per week for service (both libraries) 



$ 5,342.12 

$11,787.00 

3,333 

695 

76 

21 

305 

8 

17 

98 



Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID J. PANCIERA 

Library Director 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Arthur J. Colmer, Chairman 
Frank Hardy Arne Olsen 

George E. Baxendale, Superintendent 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen 

The following activities report is submitted by the Cemetery Commissioners for the year 1973. 

The last of the unfinished roads in Pine Ridge Cemetery have been surfaced. The Cemetery Department 
has done extensive reloaming and seeding to complete the task of landscaping the entrance to Pine Ridge. 



134 



Riverside Cemetery has had an additional three roads hottopped. Lots have been upgraded and seeded to 
improve the appearance of this cemetery. 

Hart Pond Cemetery has had additional four-grave and single-grave lots made available. 

The remaining town cemeteries were limed, fertilized and subjected to general repair. 

This year has been an extremely busy one for the Cemetery Department. The exceptionally high humidity 
during summer was a deterent, and trying to keep lawns cut and well-groomed was a problem. 

The Cemetery Department regrets to announce the retirement of Mr. F. Hildreth Hardy, a member of the 
Cemetery Commission for the past twenty-five years. Mr. Hardy's expertise in stocks and securities, coupled with 
his diligence and extensive knowledge of town affairs made Mr. Hardy much valued as both an outstanding in- 
dividual contributor and excellent labor relations arbitrator. His contributions have been very much appre- 
ciated and will be missed. We wish Mr. Hardy continued success in his retirement. 

Due to the influx of new families to Chelmsford, the number of interments in our cemeteries has risen. Dur- 
ing the year, we have had a total of 103 funerals, listed as follows. 

Pine Ridge 59 

Riverside 8 

West Chelmsford 5 

Fairview 20 

Forefathers 3 

Hart Pond 8 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur J. Colmer, Chairman 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Park Superintendent: Donald P. Gray 

Ralph E. House, Chairman Arthur L. Bennett 

David P. Ramsay (resigned) Mrs. JoAnne Schenk (new member) 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts: 

The Park Commissioners met to discuss and review the recommendations and operations for the 18 month 
period ahead. Donald P. Gray was re-appointed Superintendent. 

David P. Ramsay resigned during the year and Mrs. JoAnne Schenk was appointed to fill the unexpired 
term by the Board of Selectmen and the Park Commissioners. 

Flags in the Center were raised daily by the Fire Department. The flag at North Road and Worthen Street 
was raised by Captain William Thayer. The flag at Winship Square in West Chelmsford was cared for by Mrs. 
Mark and her son, and the flag at Gallagher Square by the Kiwanis Club. 

The Park Department has been requested to find new quarters, so that their present quarters "the little 
brick schoolhouse", may be restored as a historic landmark. 

The Recreation Commission has requested that the Park Department take over all their area maintenance 
responsibilities. 

The Park Commissioners and Superintendent wish to thank the many Garden Clubs, Town Departments 
and other organizations for their cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph E. House, Chairman 



135 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Paul Murphy, Chairman 
William A. Dempster, Jr. Harry Ayot+e 

Haworth Neild Alfred Woods 

Sherburne C. Appleton Robert Charpentier 

Edward Quinn, Director 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Several important recreation facilities were completed in 1973 as the initial stages in our long-range plans 
for creating much needed facilities reached maturity. 

At the South Row School we completed both rough and finished grading operations for the entire site. 
Seeding was completed and the old back stop was moved within the property as a complete softball field was 
installed. The field will be ready for the 1974 season. 

The second phase of the project, the construction of tennis courts, will hopefully commence later this year. 
What had been a useless sand pit will become a recreational facility for an area of the community that previ- 
ously had none. 

At the Robert's property several projects were completed. Most of the rough and finished grading was com- 
pleted. The parking area was prepared for the finished material. Seeding was completed over a substantial 
area. Upon completion of the grading work, the P.A.R.C. group installed their pre-school playground equip- 
ment and the area was fenced and lighted. The community can be proud of the efforts of P.A.R.C. 

Through the efforts of the Chelmsford Jaycees the Army Corps of Engineers opened a skating area that 
presently can provide a safe area for family skating. 

The second stage of the Robert's property project to be proposed in 1974 will involve completion of the 
grading and seeding, as well as the parking area. The skating area will be enlarged and improved. 

Our regular recreation programs for boys and girls continued to grow. Youth baseball and softball, basket- 
ball, hockey and skating and Pop Warner Football were successful in providing good programs for many hun- 
dreds of our children. Because of the continued support of the community Chelmsford enjoys the very rare po- 
sition of not having to turn away any one who desired to participate. 

Our summer programs included a community tennis tournament, tennis instructions, July 4th road races, 
junior Olympics in cooperation with the Chelmsford Kiwanis, as well as specialized programs at 5 playgrounds. 

It is again important to stress that we must expand our recreation facilities based on the growing demand 
from all residents. This is an area so long sadly neglected. 

We are grateful for the assistance from all town boards and community volunteers. Such cooperative efforts 
will insure success in the years ahead. 

Sincerely , 

Paul Murphy 
Chairman 



136 




Building Inspector — Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen, 

The following is a report of the Building Inspection Department for the year 1973: 

There were 369 permits issued. 

The types of permits issued are listed below: 

No. of Estimated 

Permits Type Issued Value 

79 Dwellings valued at $1,760,200.00 

141 Additions valued at 711,644.00 

61 Pools valued at 142,095.00 

23 Remodelings valued at 89,462.00 

18 Signs valued at 14,200.00 

8 Utility Sheds valued at 2,750.00 

3 Industrial valued at 95,000.00 

3 Barns valued at 5,930.00 

1 Housing for Elderly valued at 1,075,000.00 

2 Retail Stores valued at 66,000.00 

2 Sidings valued at 4,700.00 

3 Office Buildings 23,800.00 

1 Garage valued at 40,000.00 

1 Motion Picture Screen 8,000.00 

1 Church valued at 25,000.00 

2 Greenhouses valued at 25,500.00 

3 Manufacturing Plant & Office 450,000.00 

1 Bank valued at 100,000.00 

6 Warehouse and Storage 128,000.00 

1 Temporary Building 1,000.00 

1 Projection Booth 4,000.00 

2 Shopping Centers valued at 250,000.00 

6 Demolitions — 

369 Permits with estimated value of $5,022,281.00 



137 



Amount of Salary Appropriation for Zoning By-law Officer $2,000,00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford for Building Permits $5,736.00 

Amount of Fees paid to Inspector for Inspections , 1,812.00 

Amount disbursed from office expense 350.00 

Number of Zoning Violations inspected 50 

Number of Business Establishments inspected 28 

Total Inspector's and Zoning By-law Officer's Salary for 1973 $3,812.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Building Inspector 

WIRE INSPECTORS REPORT 

The wire inspector made 910 inspections in 1973. 

366 in the Commercial Industrial category, 272 new houses or old homes rewired and 272 for minor in- 
stallations. 

Total Wire Inspectors Salary $3,640.00 

Total fees collected $3,619.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD TUCKE 

Wire Inspector 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The following is the Animal Inspector's report for the year 1973. 

Number of dog bites 63 

Number of cattle 201 

Number of horses 51 

Number of sheep 22 

Number of swine 352 

Number of Cases of Rabies 

Number of Cases of bovine tuberculosis 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTIN A. GRUBER, D.V.M. 



138 



REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER 




Left to right: Frank Wojtas, Dog Officer and Cheryl Constantine, 
Assistant Dog Officer. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The following is a report of my services as Dog Officer for the year 1973: 

Stray dogs sold to individuals 
Stray dogs sent medical schools 
Stray dogs disposed of 

Total stray dogs picked up 

Complaints investigated 

Miscellaneous calls 

Dead animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Lost dogs returned to owners 



50 
114 
37 



201 

791 
2503 

317 

15476 

75 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK WOJTAS 
Dog Officer 



139 



REPORT OF THE DOG KENNEL STUDY COMMITTEE - 1973 

Carl W. Seidel Frank Wojtas (Dog Officer) 

Peter Green Dr. M. Sruber 

Mr. Charles Feeney (appointed November 1973) 

During the year we assisted in the implementation of the recommendations of the Dog Leash Law Study 
Committee. A new assistant dog officer, Cheryl Constantine, was hired on a part time basis (to be full time be- 
ginning July, 1974) to patrol every morning in a newly acquired dog officers truck. A new dog officers phone 
number, 256-0754, now connects the caller with the police station where the complaint is recorded on a daily 
log. A new two way radio was purchased and will shortly be installed so the police can immediately communi- 
cate with the patrolling dog officer or his assistant. The dog officers' log will list the action taken on each com- 
plaint and will be submitted to the selectmen monthly. 

We have set specifications for a new town dog kennel. The facility should have 20 pens, simple cement block 
construction, a small office - storage area, a lavatory and a garage for the truck (optional) as well as the nor- 
mal utilities. We did not find any facilities in town that could be leased for such a function and decided that lo- 
cations outside town were not feasible. 

The committee looked into possible locations for the proposed kennel. We recommended an area that might 
have the security of other nearby town facilities but so far no decision or location has been made. It is planned 
that our recommendations will be formalized for the 1974 Town Meeting. 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

L to R, standing: John McCormack, Donald House. Sitting: Rob- 
ert Howe, Florence Sullion, John Balco, Jane McKersie, Janet 
Lombard. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Donald House 

Robert E. Howe 

Janet Lombard (appointed February 1973) 



John J. Balco, Chairman 

Florence H. Gullion, Clerk 

John McCormack 

Jane S. McKersie 

Lorraine A. Shea (resigned February 1973] 



140 



The Conservation Commission had a very active program during 1973. Major progress was made in all 
areas of Commission responsibilities, which have grown considerably. This year the increased workload re- 
quired the Commission to increase the number of regular meetings held to two each month. The Commission 
normally meets on the first and third Tuesdays of the month. 

Mrs. LoTaine Shea resigned from the Commission in early 1973 because of increasing family responsibi- 
lities. In her tenure as a member of the Commission she made major contributions to the Commission's object- 
ives. The Commission welcomed Miss Janet Lombard as a member. She is well qualified to serve on the Com- 
mission. She is Vice-Chairman of the Chelmsford Land Conservation Trust and President of the Massachu- 
setts Wildlife Federation. 

The following is a brief summary of the major areas of Commission involvement during the year. 

OPEN SPACE ACQUISITION 

During 1973 the Conservation Commission made use of methods other than outright purchase to ac- 
quire rights in open space. Seeking and securing gifts of land or nominal purchases featured prominently 
in additions to town open spaces during the year. The following areas came under the Commission's juris- 
diction : 

Swains Pond: The 1973 Town Meeting approved the purchase of Swains Pond, located in North 
Chelmsford, and properties allowing access to the pond. Although the area itself comprises only 5-6 acres, 
its natural beauty and proximity to the Commission's Deep Brook Reservation make the property a significant 
addition. The Commission plans to explore alternatives to provide access between each reservation. 

Wright Reservation Expansion : Approximately 20 acres of land was accepted as a gift from a land de- 
velopment corporation. The land is mostly wetland and is a natural adjunct to the George B.B. Wright Res- 
ervation. The Commission is grateful for the assistance of the members of the Board of Assessors for identify- 
ing the opportunity and establishing sound communication channels with the company involved, and to the 
Planning Board for speedy resolution of issues related to the development plans to allow the transaction to 
take place. This acquisition is an excellent example of cooperation between town boards for the benefit of 
the whole community. 

Concord River Access: An agreement was reached during the year for a parcel of land adjacent to the 
Concord River in East Chelmsford to be given to the town. Although the parcel is quite small, it provides ac- 
cess to the Concord River in Chelmsford and will increase opportunities for water-based recreation. Final 
legal reviews were in process at the end of the year and the transaction with the company has not been for- 
mally completed. 




Wright Reservation 



Swain's Pond 



141 



RESERVATION MANAGEMENT 

Crooked Spring Brook Reservation 

Crooked Spring Brook Reservation was the focus of activity on conservation land during 1973. Funding for 
the reconstruction of a dam on the reservation was approved at the 1973 Annual Town Meeting. The Commi- 
sion has been working with the USDA Soil Conservation Service to design a structure which will meet state 
requirements at minimum cost. Although it has required considerable time, the Commission believes the re- 
sulting cost savings worth the additional time required. 

Some of the major areas of activity during the year were as follows : 

— Several bird walks were conducted by Miss Phyllis Huff. 

— A demonstration soil building program was begun with leaves deposited by residents and used to create 
a compost pile. The effort was inspired and led by members of the Golden Chain Garden Club. 

— A temporary sandbag dam was constructed to provide a local skating area by volunteers from the 
Jaycees, Boy Scouts, particularly troops 8 and 212, individuals living in the neighborhood, and with the assist- 
ance of the Highway Department. 

George B.B. Wright Reservation 

Reservation activity continued during the year. Over three miles of trails were marked and cut including 
the newly acquired areas previously mentioned. Two rustic bridges were constructed across Putnam Brook 
which runs through the reservation. A skating area was provided by clearing brush in the low wet area and 
trees damaged during the hurricane were trimmed or removed. 

Deep Brook Reservation 

A trail was marked during the year which will facilitate access to the reservation and minimize the possi- 
bility of misuse of the adjacent privately-owned land. Consideration was given to alternative ways of integrating 
Deep Brook Reservation with the recently acquired Swains Pond area, and steps were taken to expand the res- 
ervation through a no-cost addition of an adjacent parcel of land. 

Lime Quarry Reservation 

No major development took place during 1973. The one mile trail, with its moderately difficult but re- 
warding view of the old quarry sites, continues to draw frequent weekend hikers. 

WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT 

During 1973, the implementation of the Wetlands Protection Act continued to occupy a considerable 
amount of the Commission's energies. The primary concern has been to protect the public interest by im- 
proving the tools for reviewing applications. Some of the major activities were: 

— Thirteen hearings were conducted during 1973. 

— Guidelines were developed, revised and published which set forth the standards by which applications 
will be acted upon and which assist applicants in supplying the information needed to insure the protection of 
the public interest. 

— Materials such as aerial photographs and surfacial geology maps were obtained to assist the Commission 
in determining the significance of proposed wetland alterations. 

— Members of the Commission attended a course offered by North Shore Community College which 
covered basic technical skills in hydrology and water pollution detection. 

— The Commission continued work with the USDA Soil Conservation Service and State Division of 
Water Resources on the Water Watch program. This long-term program involves measurement of water levels 
of major waterways in Chelmsford on a continuing basis. 

During 1973 it became clear that professional expertise was necessary to enforce the statute when the 
town was faced with possible legal action. The Commission thus moved to obtain proposals from a wide range 
of engineering consulting firms on the cost of obtaining adequate technical data to insure that the town will 
be prepared with adequate technical support for any legal action. The Commission is currently using one of 
the consultants to prepare supporting evidence for pending court action. 

The members of the Commission would like to thank the members of the Board of Selectmen for their co- 
operation and support as the Commission continues to deal with the problems arising out of this recent legis- 
lation. 



142 



OTHER COMMISSION ACTIVITIES 

Tree Planting Program 

Again this year the annual tree planting program was a tremendous success with the fifth graders from the 
Center School assisting in bagging and distributing a tree to each first grader. 

Natural Resources Inventory 

Planning activities continued during the year with the completion of a "Natural Resources Inventory". 
The inventory identifies key areas in the town as potential conservation and /or recreation sites, and specifies 
various ways the land could be used. It was prepared by the USDA Soil Conservation Service at no cost to the 
town and was distributed to town agencies concerned with land use and recreation. A copy is on file at both 
Adams and McKay libraries for public use. 

Flood Plain Zoning 

The Commission worked actively on the Flood Plain Zoning Subcommittee formed by the Planning Board 
to bring before the 1973 Annual Town Meeting a Flood Plain Zoning article which was acceptable to va- 
rious interests of the community. The passage of this zoning article is a major step in controlling development 
in flood-prone areas which invariably become a public burden in the event of a flood. This action also quali- 
fied the town to participate in the Federal Flood Insurance Program. Chelmsford's application was approved 
late this year. Mr. Robert E. Howe of the Conservation Commission chaired the subcommittee. 

The Conservation Commission relies heavily on volunteer assistance from townspeople in achieving many 
of its objectives. Our expectations were exceeded during 1973 with volunteers filling sandbags, planning de- 
velopment alternatives, marking trails, clearing, cleaning and removing fallen trees. Limited space precludes 
thanking each group but the Commission is grateful for their continuing efforts to make Chelmsford a better 
place to live. 

John J. Balco 

Chairman 

Conservation Commission 



143 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

#4; 




1802 School House 



The Historical Commission continued its research on historical buildings and sites during 1973. The commis- 
sion wishes to thank Mrs. Jane Drury, Mr. Henry Pontefarct, Ms. Carol Grezeszak, Miss Janet Lombard, Ms. 
Norma Thompson, Mrs. Barbara Morse, Mrs. Deborah S. Hinchiffe, and Mr. Alan Moyer who have, as friends 
of the commission, conducted almost all the historical research. As reported last year we have confined our 
efforts to houses dating prior to 1831 in accordance with the desires of the State Historical Commission. The 
commission would like to invite anyone with information pertaining to historical buildings or sites within the 
town, to share their knowledge by contacting the commission or Mrs. Drury. 

With the many zoning change and variances being sought which effect historical buildings in our town, 
the commission has decided to make a determined effort to make the townspeople aware of the historical sig- 
nificance of such buildings and sites prior to any final determination. An example of our efforts in this area is 
the Parsonage belonging to the All Saints church on 1 Billerica Road, where the Commission ran a lengthy ar- 
ticle in the local newspaper and then notified the new owners of the history of the building. We are pleased to 
report that the new owners felt moved to preserve the building and feel that they are to be commended for their 
efforts in its restoration. In order to encourage efforts by private parties in preserving our local heritage, the 
Commission has designed a handsome certificate to be given to citizens for efforts in preservation and restora- 
tion of Historical Buildings in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Commission wishes to commend the Garrison House Association for getting that house listed in the 
National Register of Historical Sites and offers to help any other person or organization in listing their histori- 
cal buildings as we did with the Garrison House. 

This Commission feels strongly that town organizations should work closely together towards mutual goals. 
For this reason we are pleased to have the opportunity to co-sponsor the scenic roads article in this years Town 
Meeting Warrant in conjunction with the Conservation Commission. We hope that there will be many more 
joint ventures in the near future. 

Commission plans for the future include: Restoration of the 1802 School House, filing application for Na- 
tional listing of the school house, and Forefathers Burying Ground, Continuation of State listings and photo- 
graphing of historic buildings, and continuation of our microfilming efforts. In addition the Commission is investi- 
gating the feasability of establishing an historic district to cover the Town Common, the Unitarian Church, 
Forefathers Burying Ground, The Middlesex Toll House and The 1802 School House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN ALDEN, Chairman 
Historical Commission 



144 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Members: 

Joan M. Arcand Clarence H. Dane 

Louise A. Bishop, Chairman Lillian E. Gould 

William H. Clarke George Marchand, Jr. 

Mary K. McAuliffe, Secretary 

Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 
Chelmsford, MA 

Gentlemen: 

On behalf of the Chelmsford Council on Aging I wish to report the activities of our Senior Citizens for 1973. 

Monday — Arts & Crafts Unitarian Church 

Tuesday — Luncheon — Games Elks Hall 

Nashoba Tech host a luncheon every month. 

Wednesday — Luncheon McFarlin School 

Thursday — Drop in Center St. John's 

The School Department continues to be extremely cooperative. Currently serving 100 or more lunches at 
McFarlin School. 

We are planning to increase meals on wheels on a regular basis. Presently serving same at holiday time only. 

Headstart children received hats & mittens made by Senior Citizens. Over 20,000 volunteer hours have been 
given by our seniors. 

Council has been very active contacting Barbers, Drug Stores, Hairdressers, food stores, Merchants, etc. for 
a 10% discount and have had excellent luck. Progress report will be in local papers. 

Flu shots were given to our Senior Citizens this year on a no-cost basis. Serum given by Board of Health. 

Council is presently compiling figures for a mini-bus. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE AL BISHOP, Chairman 
Chelmsford Council on Aging 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Gerald Silver, Chairman 
Robert L. Stallard John J. Griffin 

John J. Balco Charles L. Mitsakos 

Thomas M. Dougherty Carol Stark 

Janet Snyder, Secretary 

The Chelmsford Home Rule Advisory Committee is appointed by the Board of Selectmen for the following 
purposes: 



1. Report on pending legislation that would have an effect upon the town. 

2. Suggest language for response by the Selectmen to pending legislation. 

3. Distribute pertinent bills to Town bodies. 



145 



4. Inform town boards of enacted legislation that effects them. 

5. Suggest legislation to be filed on behalf of the Selectmen. 

6. Upon request, advise Selectmen on town policies and by-laws, recommending changes where appropri- 
ate. 

7. Conduct special studies at the request or approval of the Selectmen. 

In fulfilling its responsibilities during 1973 committee members reviewed 9765 bills that had been filed for 
action in the Massachusetts General Court. Of these 120 were analyzed by the Committee and forwarded for 
review to the appropriate town agency such as the planning board, board of health, housing authority, police 
department, highway department, building inspector, school committee, and board of selectmen. 

Upon enactment of legislation by the General Court, 1 167 acts and resolves were reviewed by committee 
members in order to determine the impact of these new laws on the town of Chelmsford. Forty-nine pieces of 
legislation that seemed to have particular relevance to Chelmsford were forwarded to the appropriate town 
agency. 

The Committee made an extensive analysis of the implications of the zoning enabling act and the local high- 
way aid program. This review was followed up by a series of recommendations to the Board of Selectmen. 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee was disappointed by the action taken on legislation it had filed regard- 
ing the assessment of taxable property in the cities and towns of Massachusetts. The bill would have required 
equalized valuations throughout the Commonwealth which in turn would have significantly increased the state 
aid received by Chelmsford. Two versions of the bill had been filed; one in each of the legislative branches. 
House Bill 2215 was killed and Senate Bill 1264 was merged with the other tax legislation and sent to commit- 
tee and thus in effect killing the measure. Determined to equalize the valuation procedures in the Common- 
wealth and change the distribution of state aid, the Home Rule Advisory Committee has filed the bills for 
consideration during 1974 and is planning to lobby more actively for their enactment. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, the Committee reviewed the proposed town charter which had 
been turned down by the voters in March. The Committee has recommended and the Selectmen have supported 
warrant articles relating to the holding of two sessions of town meeting, the wider distribution of the town meet- 
ing warrant, and the public announcement of openings for appointive offices. The Committee was unable to 
detect any strong public sentiment to place the charter question on the ballot again. However, the Committee has 
recommended making a professional study of the existing bylaws in order to index all present laws and legisla- 
tive acts and in effect form a charter. 

The Committee investigated the term of office for planning board members and recommended the peti- 
tioning of the General Court to reduce the present five year term in Chelmsford to three years. 

During 1973 the Committee distributed 300 copies of the Appointed Committee Handbook through the se- 
lectmen's office. The publication which details standard operating procedures for town committees has been 
revised and is being reprinted. 

With the continuing growth of Chelmsford and its related needs and with the increasing impact of state leg- 
islation on town government and town finances, the work of the Home Rule Advisory Committee has become 
most critical. Committee members have accepted this challenge and have appreciated the cooperation and en- 
couragement of town agencies. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHARLES L. MITSAKOS 
Vice-Chairman 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 
Roger W. Boyd Robert L. Hughes 

Ruth K. Delaney Richard L. Monahan 

During 1973 the authority moved from the planning phase to the construction phase of the housing for the 
elderly at the corner of Smith and Steadman Streets. Ground breaking ceremonies were held May 29th and com- 
pletion is expected in the early spring of 1974. There will be 64 units and a community building. 



146 




Housing -for Elderly 



Applications for this housing were made available at the end of August and during the first two weeks 90 
applications were returned, indicating the enthusiasm and need for this type of housing in the community. Dur- 
ing the year 127 applications were received. These werenumberedas they were received, each applicant scheduled 
for a personal interview to determine eligibility under the existing regulations, then each applicant was notified 
of his standing in the tenant selection process, taken in the order their application was received. The first 64 eli- 
gible applicants were assigned units, the next 30 eligible applicants have been assigned in order on the waiting 
list, and 33 were declared to be ineligible for various reasons, usually because they were not yet 65 years of age 
or were over the allowable income. Because of the large number of applicants having to be assigned to a waiting 
list — close to 50% of the number of units built — and the anticipated increasing need in the next few years 
as more people achieve the age of 65 in a time of great increase in the cost of living, the members of the author- 
ity are requesting approval of the townspeople at the Annual Town Meeting to proceed with the construction of 
additional elderly housing. 

In June of 1973 the authority completed negotiations and acquired the property at 34 Middlesex Street in 
North Chelmsford. This was leased to the Greater Lowell Association for Retarded Citizens for the continuation 
of their program of providing a residence for Adult Retardates. A remodeling program for this property is pres- 
ently underway. Working drawings have been reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Community Af- 
fairs and work is expected to begin shortly. This concept of providing housing is new in Massachusetts and the 
Chelmsford program is being used as a pilot and model by the Department of Community Affairs for other such 
programs throughout the state. 

The 1973 Annual Town Meeting ratified the establishment of a Rental Assistance program. Since funding 
for this is scarce we were allowed only 1 unit this year as a means for establishing Chelmsford in the budgeting 
of these funds. It is hoped that with more work in the coming year this program will be activated and will be 
especially useful for those people who have limited incomes but have not yet reached 65 years of age. 

We are grateful to the people of the Town and the Town officials for their support and interest in our 
work. We meet the first Tuesday of each month at 34 Chelmsford Street and all meetings are open to the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH K. DELANEY 

Secretary 



147 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

Gentlemen: 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures, I wish to submit my report for the year 1973. 
In performing my duty I have sealed the following: 

155 Gasoline Meters 
34 Scales 100 lbs. to 5,000 lbs. 
57 Under 100 lbs. 
17 Under 10 lbs. 
128 Weights 
Money received from seals, the sum of $625.80, has been turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANTHONY C. FERREIRA 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 




L to R: Joseph M. Gutwein, Matthew J. Doyle, Jr. — Sewer Com- 
mission 



SEWER COMMISSION 

The Sewer Commission, during this past year, conducted several in-depth evaluations of alternative meth- 
ods for abating pollution of the streams, wetlands and water resources in Chelmsford and the bordering Merri- 
mack and Concord Rivers. The primary objective is to reduce pollution from the present level which is reputedly 
in violation of Federal and State pollution requirements. Any pollution control measures will have a significant 
economic impact on the town, and accordingly the Sewer Commission has devoted its efforts and committed 
town resources to consideration of effective approaches which promise to result in compliance with Federal and 
State requirements, but with minimum cost impact and hardship to the town. 



148 



The Sewer Commission, working in close coordination with the Chelmsford Liquid Waste Study Committee 
(CLWSC) formed as a result of Town Meeting action in 1972 and appointed by the Selectmen, received recom- 
mendations for a study of alternate approaches (relative to a central collection sewer system) to abating 
pollution in town. The recommendation by the CLWSC included a statement of work and the name of a con- 
sulting firm selected by the CLWSC to pursue such a study. The firm is that of Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade 
and Douglas, Inc. of New York City with a branch office in Boston, which was selected from a field of approx- 
imately 25 firms submitting detailed technical and cost proposals in response to a nationally advertised request 
for proposal. The Sewer Commission awarded a contract not to exceed $50,000 and 8 months duration in 
April, 1973 to Parsons to pursue the studies of alternate approaches. The Sewer Commission has been monitor- 
ing this study contract with support provided by the Chairman of the CLWSC. The final report for this 
study will be available on or about March, 1974. 

The alternative study carried out by Parsons is basically a two part study. The first study consideration 
was to determine the extent of pollution levels in the streams and wetlands interior to the town. According to 
Parsons these were found to be in excess of tolerable levels dictated by the Federal and State standards. As part 
of assessing the pollution problems Parsons also considered potential future problems from the point of view of 
septic tank failures. According to Parsons over 60% of the town has conditions unsuitable for septic tank sys- 
tems and as the town's population increases a greater incident of septic tank failures may be expected and this 
could lead to further increases in pollution of the streams. 

The second part of the Parsons study dealt with technical and cost considerations of other pollution control 
measures, as alternatives to the central sewer system presented to the town in 1972 by the Sewer Commission. 
Parsons examined several methods for control of pollution in specific problem areas of the town. The approaches 
considered by Parsons were collection systems, but each involved much smaller capacity processing facilities. 
The results of these studies are nearing completion and not available for this annual report, but will be pub- 
lished in a final report due on or about March 1, 1974. 

In addition to its direct involvement with monitoring of the Parsons' alternative study, the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission continued engineering studies dealing with the proposed sewer system previously presented 
to the town in 1972, but for which funds for implementation were not made available by the town at that time. 
Subsequent studies were made of alternative sewer systems proposed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
with the urging of the Federal Government Protection Agency (EPA). 

Early in 1973 the Commonwealth developed a new River Basin Plan (known as Alternate *3) that would 
provide Chelmsford with limited capacity in the Duck Island plant now being constructed in Lowell. A broad 
scope River Basin Plan is necessary in order for the Federal Government to be able to underwrite 75% of the 
cost of the treatment plant and the major intercepting sewers. The proposal had an intuitive appeal. Your Sewer 
Commission attempted to analyze the impact of this development on the long range needs of the town and con- 
cluded however, that sufficient planning had not been undertaken to allow for a rational decision supporting 
Alternate # 3. Thus, we petitioned the State and EPA to more closely consider the needs of Chelmsford in the 
next 20 years and to develop a cost effective plan to satisfy those needs. This appeal was presented to represen- 
tatives of the Commonwealth in July 1973. The Sewer Commission also informed the Congressional Repre- 
sentative, Chelmsford's State Representative and the Senator to the State. 

In order to document our concern that regional planning, as embodied in Alternate #3, might not be cost 
effective, we underwrote an economic analysis of the plan in comparison with the previous regional system (Al- 
ternate #2) which we updated to include more advanced waste treatment practices. This study cost $10,000 
and, as a result of our intervention, was contained in the Northern Middlesex Area Commission's tentative en- 
dorsement of Alternate #3 which allowed for Chelmsford to proceed along the least costly route that would sat- 
isfy regional needs. The study was completed in November and used the new federal guidelines for determining 
cost effectiveness for the first time in this region. 

This study shows that for the towns of Chelmsford, Westford and Tyngsboro to subscribe to Alternate #3 
it would cost an additional $5,774,000 over an updated Alternate #2 and concludes that Alternate #2 is the 
most cost effective for Chelmsford and the Chelmsford region. Your Sewer Commission has therefore advised 
federal, state, regional and local agencies of the existence of a fully developed, more economical regional plan 
for our town which also has, in our opinion, a greater potential for encompassing sound environmental planning 
for Chelmsford. Recent impoundments of Federal grant monies make arbitrary assumption of large amounts 
of Federal funding risky. We are now awaiting the decision by the United States EPA on the River Basin Plan 
submitted by the Commonwealth. 

In view of recent completion of various alternative studies, an in-depth digest must be made by the 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission. Following this, the most cost effective approach will be presented to the towns- 
people. As long as the pollution problems persist or continue to worsen with time, Federal and State pressure will 
be maintained. It is almost a certainty that this pressure will take the form of directives for the town to cease 
and desist polluting the streams, wetlands and rivers. Renewed directives will probably be backed up by the 
threat of court action and a timetable for implementation. In view of this, it is anticipated that the Sewer Com- 

149 



mission, in the next year, may be requesting substantial amounts of funds to proceed with pollution abatement 
implementations, notably sewers. For the moment the Sewer Commission is not taking any direct action nor 
requesting funds from the town necessary to implement any system. The Sewer Commission is however request- 
ing $14,000 to be supplemented with $21,000 carryover from previously unused professional fee appropriations. 
These funds will be used to perform engineering analyses related to specific details of the various alternative 
approaches under consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH M. GUTWEIN, Chairman 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE REPORT 

To the Selectmen: 

Bruce Gullion and the Chairman of your Committee regret very much that Robert Clough, who for years 
served with us as the third member of the Committee, found it necessary to ask the Selectmen that he not be 
re-appointed for 1973. However, we are fortunate to have as a replacement for Bob, John Schnorr, who lives 
at 14 Gary Road, and, hence, has the Thanksgiving Ground Forest as his backyard. John is intelligent, ener- 
getic and enthusiastic and will, we are sure, serve the Committee with dedication. 

The year 1973 saw very little done in either the Thanksgiving Ground Forest or the Mill Road Forest. 
This was due in part to the fact that your Chairman underwent three highly successful eye operations. It is 
with regret that he feels that, since he is approaching the age of seventy-five, a younger man can bring new 
enthusiasm and vitality to your Committee. Consequently, after fourteen (14) years on the Committee, he has 
asked the Selectmen that he not be re-appointed. He feels sure that Bruce Gullion, John Schnorr and whoever 
the Selectmen appoint as the third member of the Committee will carry out plans to make the forests more at- 
tractive to wildlife without an any way detracting from their natural beauty. 

Sincerely, 

MARTIN K. BOVEY, Chairman 
BRUCE S. GULLION 
JOHN P. SCHNORR 



VETERAN'S EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

January 1st, 1973 to December 31st, 1973 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1973: $5,799.62 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. — Interest $ 173.82 

The First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. — Dividends 139.34 



Total Receipts $ 313.16 



Total of Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1973 and Receipts $6,112.78 

Deduct Disbursements None 



Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1973: $6,112.78 



150 



ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 128790 $3,512.78 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass., formerly Middlesex Cooper- 
ative Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Ten (10) Paid-Up Shares, Certificate Number 3025 $2,000.00 

Three (3) Matured Shares, Certificate Number 2380 600.00 



Total value of bank shares $2,600.00 



Total Assets: $6,112.78 



LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities None 

MEMORANDUM 

The balance of the Town of Chelmsford Veterans' Emergency Fund, in the General Treasury, in amount 
of $136.38, was closed out during 1973 and the sum was transferred to the Central Savings Bank, Book Num- 
ber 128790, for further investment purposes. This transfer was approved by majority of the members of the 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee. 

Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford, 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

ALFRED M. COBURN, Treasurer 



REPORT OF THE CHELMSFORD YOUTH CENTER 

Advisory Board 

Ray Adams Norman Douglas 

Everett Brown Pennyrn Fitts 

Linda Cahill Robert Hall 

John Curley Mitchell Korbey 

Joseph Dappal Anne Stratos 

Harry Foster, Jr. Jo Ann Weinert 
William Murphy 

Gary F. Wolcott, Youth Center Coordinator 

The Chelmsford Youth Center, operating at the McFarlin School on Monday, Wednesday and Friday eve- 
nings, has evolved from an experiment to a viable public service for the youth of Chelmsford. The Center is 
now well staffed and has grown from serving a handful of youth each night to attendance ranging from 100 to 
250 per night. More importantly, the Center has become more than just a place to hang around, the majority of 
the kids can be accounted for as participants in some organized program. The programs at the Center have 
been restructured and expanded. Advance program planning in the arts and crafts, coffeehouses and films, con- 
certs, and field trips is allowing for increasing numbers of kids to be involved in these activities as well as making 
more efficient use of town funds and staff time. 

Two new staff members have been hired to fill vacancies of resigning supervisors. These individuals have 
strong backgrounds in athletics which has served to make a more well rounded youth center staff. The athletic 
program is presently undergoing revision with the assistance of these new supervisors. 

151 



The past year has been spent by the committee in solidifying rules to be followed and, with the staff, at- 
tempting to broaden and. strengthen the programs offered. It is very gratifying to report that these efforts have 
been rewarded with an increase in attendance and activity by the kids. 

The plans for the coming year are to further broaden the scope of operation both in terms of the age group 
served and the type of activities offered. Plans have already been made to significantly extend the number of 
hours the Center will be open beginning in mid June of 1974. This expansion will be accomplished with a very 
modest increase in budget. 

We look to the coming year to be as productive and growthful for the Chelmsford Youth Center and its 
participants as the last. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Norman Douglas 
Chairman, Youth Center 
Advisory Committee 



CRYSTAL LAKE RESTORATION COMMITTEE 

Edmund Polubinski, Chairman 

James Kasilowski, Clerk 

Peter Dulchinos John J. Kenney 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Gerald J. Lannon 

Robert G. Gagnon Robert C. McManimon 

Paul C. Hart Haworth C. Nield 

At the last Annual Town Meeting it was voted to accept the preliminary report prepared for us by the 
Engineering Firm of Fay, Spofford and Thorndike. It was also voted that the Selectmen be authorized to bor- 
row one million dollars for the preparation of contract documents, the solicitation of bids for the reconstruction, 
and the construction itself. 

The Committe interviewed several firms that had expressed a desire to become a part of the planning and 
rebuilding phase of the project and after careful consideration, we recommended the firm of Fay, Spofford and 
Thorndike to prepare the final working plans and specifications to the Selectmen, who in turn awarded them 
the contract for said work. 

A Subcommittee has been appointed and charged with the responsibility of making recommendations on the 
recreational phase of the project. This would not be reimbursable under the legislation sponsored by Repre- 
sentative Bruce Freeman. However, monies could be available from the Housing and Urban Development De- 
partments "Open Space Program." The Department of the Interior Bureau of Outdoor Recreation also funds 
projects for recreational facilities, and Massachusetts Department of Public Works, Division of Waterways, ad- 
ministers funds for construction of boat launching facilities and access to waterways. These and other agencies 
will be contacted for technical and financial assistance. 

Before any of the authorized funds are expended, the reviewing agencies (State Flood Relief Board; Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Works, Division of Waterways; Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, 
and Local Conservation Commissions) must review reports, plans and other available data to ascertain the ex- 
tent of participation and suitability of the construction proposed. 



Hopefully, actual construction of the dam will begin in the spring. 



Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND POLUBINSKI 

Chairman 



152 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
REVOLUTIONARY WAR BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS COMMISSION 



George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 



John C. Alden 
Walter R. Hedlund 



Vincent J. R. Kehoe 
J. Perry Richardson 



With Bicentennial programs rapidly taking shape, perhaps the most important job of the Commission is to 
clarify, in the minds of Chelmsford residents, the meaning of "Bicentennial Celebration." It is NOT, as some 
have assumed, a few parades, carnivals, or public spectacles. But rather it IS a series of programs and projects 
to: (1) publicize the many facets of Chelmsford's unusually rich historical heritage and the part we have 
played in the development of this great country; (2) to restore, or at least save from irretrievable loss, our 
historic sites and buildings; (3) and most important of all, to make our town, and thus our state and nation, a 
better place in which to live. 

It is this third objective that has the greatest potential for meaningful expression. The field is unlimited 
and includes, among others, youth, the elderly, the community in general, all ethnic and religious back- 
grounds, the environment, and local government. 

The Commission is anxious to hear from groups or individuals who wish to undertake any worthwhile, 
non-commercial projects that are not in conflict with the spirit of the Bicentennial. Programs should be of last- 
ing value and designed to leave a permanent legacy after the Bicentennial has come and gone. 

The first Commission-sponsored event took place on April 16, 1973 when several hundred Boy and Girl 
Scouts and adults from Chelmsford and the surrounding towns walked "The Chelmsford Trail to Concord" 
over the route taken by the Minutemen in April of 1775. This event will be held annually as part of the Pa- 
triots' Day celebration and is expected to attract over 1000 walkers by 1975. 



The guide post for our Bicentennial Celebration should be: 
fore iby whatftve make of it today and tomorrow." 



"We can best memorialize what has gone be- 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE ADAMS PARKHURST 

Chairman 



Michael J. Devine 



Total 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Edward H. Hilliard, Chairman 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, Ex-Officio 



Robert J. Noble 



Voting Strength as of December 31, 1973 



;cinct 


Democrats 


Republicans 


Independents 


Total Voters 


1 


365 


388 


675 


1,428 


2 


449 


219 


429 


1,029 


3 


559 


235 


807 


1,601 


4 


317 


124 


257 


698 


5 


356 


253 


846 


1,456 


6 


451 


278 


551 


1,280 


7 


359 


259 


541 


1,159 


8 


277 


280 


543 


1,100 


9 


345 


119 


552 


1,025 


10 


500 


223 


950 


1,673 


11 


383 


316 


455 


1,154 


12 


450 


206 


798 


1,448 



4,820 



2,894 



7,407 



15,119 



153 



TREE DEPARTMENT 

Myles J. Hogan, Tree Warden 

During the past year, this dept. has received 56 requests. Most of the requests were for pruning or tree and 
stump removal. 

The most hazardous of these requests, plus a left over work load from the previous year were reported to 
the Board of Selectmen, informing the board of a constantly growing work load. 

Due to budget cuts of the previous 3 years followed by a complete lack of funds in 1973, this dept. was un- 
able to respond to most of the requests we received this past year. 

As 1973 progressed, I felt many of these requests were becoming a serious liability to the town. At this time, 
the Board of Selectmen requested a detailed report on all trees demanding immediate attention. 

After a complete survey of all street trees, it was reported that 109 trees were in hazardous conditions. 

Also, an estimate of cost was supplied with the report. A figure of $15,000 (similar to the depts. 1973 bud- 
get request) was quoted. 

At present, the fate of the 109 hazardous trees rests with the Finance Committee. 

Presently a committee has been formed to study the feasibility of establishing a tree dept. 'vith equipment 
of its own. I am convinced after viewing other towns with full time depts, that Chelmsford does not need the 
expensive overhead that a dept. of this kind would require. 

I would like to thank all depts. who have assisted the Tree Dept. in its year of austerity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYLES F. HOGAN 
Tree Warden 



MOTH DEPARTMENT 

Many reports of Gypsy Moths were received throughout Summer and early Fall. 

In most cases fortunately, this insect was not the problem, instead an invasion of the Fall Webb Worm 
was viewed throughout the New England area. 

This insect does not damage most trees the first year. However, if successive defoliation occurs, the trees 
will slowly decline, causing death to some species. 

In the near future, a responsible program must be initiated. Not too far south of Chelmsford, many are ex- 
periencing what problems the Gypsy Moth and other insects can cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYLES F. HOGAN 

Moth Superintendent 



154 



DUTCH ELM DEPARTMENT 

Since we have stopped our spray program, many of our Elms are rapidly declining. 

In the past year, Elms of large size could sometimes be saved by the removing of any visibly diseased wood. 
However, in 1973 with no funds available it was impossible to continue this method. Many Elms we could have 
saved are now dead, presenting a more costly program consisting of their complete removal. 

There are presently 48 diseased Elms throughout town. 

When funds are available the diseased Elms will be removed immediately. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M f LES F. HOGAN 
Dutch Elm Dept. 



INSURANCE SINKING FUND COMMISSION 



Central Svgs #147159 
Central Svgs #174894 
Central Svgs 7% Certificate 
Charles town Svgs 6% 

Certificate 
10 M Pub Serv N H 
10M N W Bell Tell 
10M Hartford Electric 
10M Michigan Bell Tel 
10M So Calir" Edison 



Balance 


Certificate 


12/31/72 


Interest Interest Bond Int. 


$22,281.89 


$1,049.52 


17,362.11 


909.29 


3,000.00 


$190.32 


10,312.50 


$612.50 


9,787.50 


625.00 


9,950.00 


650.00 


9,987.50 


637.50 


9,987.50 


637.50 



Transferred Withdrawn 

$20,000.00 $20,000.00 
3,352.82 4,400.00* 



Balance 

12/31/73 

$ 3,331.41 
17,224.22 
20,000.00 

3,000.00 
10,312.50 
9,878.50 
9,950.00 
9,987.50 
9,987.50 



$92,669.00 $1,958.81 $190.32 $3,162.50 $23,352.82 $24,400.00 $93,580.63 



*Town Meeting voted to transfer this amount to pay insurance loss under the deductible clause of fire insurance 
policies on Town Property. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUSTACE B. FISKE, Treasurer 
KENTON P. WELLS 
FRANCIS J. GOODE 



EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT ACT 

The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 
Chelmsford, MA 

Gentlemen: 

The Emergency Employment Act Office for the Northern Middlesex Consortium of Towns was established 
in the Center Town Hall on October 19, 1971 to service thirteen (13) Towns. The Town of Chelmsford is the 
Sub-Agent to the Program Agent, The Executive Office of Manpower Affairs. 

The purpose of the Federal Emergency Employment Act of 1971 was to employ the unemployed and un- 
deremployed according to Federal and State guidelines to fulfill unmet public service needs. 

During 1973 $311,000.00 in Federal Funds were received to be allocated for Wages, Salaries, Fringe Bene- 
fits, Training, Supportive Services and Administration. Fifty-nine (59) participants were employed during 1973. 



155 



Eleven (11) of these were residents of the Town of Chelmsford, 159 individuals were employed since the begin- 
ning of the Program and many who applied and found to be ineligible were placed in unsubsidized employment 
in the private sector. 

At the present time the Program is. being phased-out and will terminate June 30, 1974. 

It is estimated that $1,200,000.00 of Federal Funds will have been expended during the 32 months of oper- 
ation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John R. Clark 
Project Director 



ANNUAL REPORT - DRUG ABUSE TASK FORCE 

In March 1970, the Board of Selectmen voted to establish a Task Force on Drug Abuse for the Town of 
Chelmsford. The direct result was that Chelmsford became the first community in the Merrimack Valley to 
become a member of SHARE Inc. - A comprehensive program of Human Services. 
SHARE'S involvement in the Town of Chelmsford is as follows: 

1) Financial Summary: 

SHARE'S total income (Jan. thru Dec. 1973) - $587,257. of this total Chelmsford contributed $18,860 or 
3.2%. SHARE expended $35,495 or 6% of the total income in service to residents of the Town of 
Chelmsford. Thus for every $1.00 paid by Chelmsford, SHARE obtained $23.52 in State and Federal 
Funding. 

2) Service Summary (Jan. thru Dec. 1973): 

Anabasis House Facility — a 24 hour residential treatment facility which is based on the family model. 
It is a drug free program which functions as a therapeutic community that welcomes people with emo- 
tional problems as well as drug related problems. The house is licensed by the Department of Mental 
Health and has a staff of 7, 2 of whom have Master's degrees. Three (3) residents of Chelmsford were 
clients at the house during 1973. 

The Outpatient Clinic (Methadone) — The clinic offers a broad range of programs including methadone 
maintenance, methadone detoxification, and drug free therapy. SHARE does not believe in permanent 
methadone maintenance but rather a protracted withdrawal where the client is slowly weaned from 
medication in conjunction with intensive counseling and group therapy. All clients of the clinic are also 
offered the following services: vocational testing and counseling, job placement, medical examination 
and follow-up work as indicated, family therapy, marital counseling and educational services. The 
Methadone program follows Federal rules and regulations on admissions and program controls. Dr. Ray 
S. Gilmore, who holds the Federal license for Methadone, is the program's Medical Director. Eleven (11) 
residents of Chelmsford were clients at the clinic during 1973. 

The Adolescent Counseling Center (Morningstar) — The center concentrates on adolescents and their 
problems at home, in school, and outside of school. Services offered include individual, group and family 
counseling, programs in schools with teachers, students, administrators, and counselors. The Morningstar 
staff also is actively engaged in community outreach - that is meeting the adolescent in his local environ- 
ment and helping to resolve some of the problems faced by the adolescent. Forty (40) residents of 
Chelmsford were clients at the center during 1973. 

Cambios — a drug free outpatient treatment center providing group and individual counseling, educa- 
tional services, and job training and development. One resident of Chelmsford was a client at the center 
during 1973. 

SHARE also provided Chelmsford with the following: 

Rent-A-Kid program for part-time jobs. 

Hotline services available on a 24 hour a day basis. 

Social seminar 

Parent's Workshop 

156 



Coffee House 

Outreach and in-school counselors. 

The Task Force wishes to express its appreciation for support given by the Board of Selectmen. 

Russell W. Kerr, Jr. 
Administrative Assistant, 
Drug Abuse Committee 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 




Robert Olson, Purchasing Agent 

The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town Hall 
Chelmsford, MA 

Gentlemen: 

The second year of operation of the Purchasing Department again resulted in savings for the Town. Work- 
ing closely with department heads, committee chairmen, and elected officials, this department was able to ac- 
complish 

— a reduction in invoice for "1972 Annual Town Report" from $4360. to $2500. because of vendor discrep- 
ancies. 

— a savings of $4.45 per ton of road salt compared to the previous years price and a potential use of 5500 
tons. 

— by negotiating the cancellation of contracts for the cherry picker and truck returned $30,000 for other 
town use. 

— researched and recomended the installation of gasoline storage tanks, long before Town owned facilities 
become a condition of supply. By negotiating an open ended let tercon tract before the energy crisis we 
are reasonably assured a supplier for gasoline. 

Additional accomplishments not. listed reflect about $100,000 dollar savings. 

This department operates primarily to save money and to obtain a quality product at a fair price deliv- 
ered on time. 

Respectfully submited, 

Robert E. Olson 
Purchasing Agent 

157 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 
Town of Chelmsford 

Ina B. Greenblatt, Chairman 

Richard B. Codling Dr. Ethel N. Kamien 

Diane H. Lewis Priscilla B. Hinckley 

Dr. Clara M. Refson Mary M. Wadman 

The Chelmsford Environmental Advisory Council continued its efforts to increase public support for the 
recycling program. The world-wide energy and paper shortages emphasized the importance and profitability of 
the Town's recycling activities. The September newspaper pick-up demonstrated that with sufficient public sup- 
port the Town could make money on recycling. A study was initiated of the feasibility of .expanding the recy- 
cling program to include bottles, cans, and other recyclable wastes with collection to be performed by private 
vendors on a contract basis. 

The Council's study of mosquito control continue'! in anticipation of Chelmsford's mandatory one year 
participation in the newly established Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control District beginning in 1974. The 
preparation of a comprehensive report on environmental issues involved in mosquito control programs was ini- 
tiated and will be submitted to the Board of Selectmen early in 1974. 

The CEAC also continued its study of insect diseases affecting Chelmsford's trees and made recommendations 
on the environmental aspects of programs for their control. A survey of recent Massachusetts snowmobile legis- 
lation was initiated with recommendations submitted to the recently established committee on snowmobile op- 
erations. Liaison was established with the Bicentennial Committee for the purpose of introducing environmental 
considerations into the committee's planning. CEAC hopes to increase its contributions to this committee dur- 
ing the coming year. 

Finally, the Council intensified its efforts to bring accurate and timely environmental information to the 
people of Chelmsford. For this purpose, contact was made and maintained with a wide variety of individuals 
and groups throughout the country concerned with environmental matters. The result has ben a steady flow of 
current environmental information into the Town. Members of the Council have disseminated this information 
through newspaper articles, speeches for civic organizations and personal contact with members of social groups 
in the community. 

Much of our progress during the past year could not have been made without the cooperation and support 
of many townspeople and Town officials. Thanks should be given to Mr. Charles Mitsakos, Social Studies Co- 
ordinator for the Chelmsford School Department for increasing the awareness of both teachers and students of 
the Town's environmental problems. Thanks is also due to Mr. Robert Olson, Town Purchasing Agent, for his 
assistance in improving Chelmsford's recycling program. Appreciation is also due the editors and staffs of the 
Chelmsford Newsweekly, The Chelmsford Sentinel and the Lowell Sun for their cooperation in printing materials 
on environmental subjects. Finally, a special vote of thanks should be given to Chelmsford's Senior Citizens 
whose active support of environmental programs is an example for us all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

INA B. GREENBLATT 

Chairman 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The Planning Board organized for the year 1973 with Timothy J. Hehir as Chairman, Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 
as Vice Chairman, Peter J. McHugh, Jr. as Clerk and Stephen D. Wojcik as delegate to the Northern Middlesex 
Area Commission. 1973 was a good year for the Planning Board in a legislative sense will all articles submitted 
to Town Meeting being approved that were recommended by the Planning Board. Amongst these articles was 
monies appropriated for the Phase I updating of the Chelmsford Master Plan. This Phase I updating js now 
nearing completion including a land use map, updated subdivision and zoning by-laws and suggested zoning 
categories and areas. A report of Phase I will be submitted to the proper boards and committees and will then 
be presented to the general public through hearings and a warrant will be prepared to be submitted at a town 
meeting for approval. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY J. HEHIR, Chairman 



158 



REPORT OF THE 
COMMUNITY ACTION COMMITTEE 

Local Community Action Committees were originally liaisons between the Towns and Community Team- 
work Inc. of Lowell, which organizes anti-poverty programs with Federal Agencies and funds. 

In 1973, after cutbacks in many Federal Programs, the Chelmsford CAC voted to work independently of 
CTI in order to continue the programs in which it was currently involved. 

HEADSTART, which is a Federally sponsored program of pre-school education for limited income fami- 
lies. Once again a site was obtained for our present Headstart class — this is being held at the West Methodist 
Church, West Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORP, which provides in-Town work for Limited income teens. 

CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM, which re-trains currently unemployed adults for new 
careers. 

In addition, funding for the position of Town Aide was withdrawn by Community Teamwork Inc. Town 
funds were approved at Town Meeting for a Town Aide. 

Once again, the Headstart youngsters enjoyed a Christmas party . . . this time sponsored by the Chelmsford 
Police. Hats and mittens were made for youngsters by our senior citizens. 

The town aide can continue to make Chelmsford residents aware of programs available to them through fed- 
eral agencies. 

The Community Action Committee met with members of Community Teamwork, Inc. to discuss the feasi- 
bility of food stamps in lieu of the food commodity program. Food stamp program looks very promising. 

Officers of the Chelmsford Community Action Committee are as follows: 

John P. Cryan, Chairman 
Rev. Harry A. Foster, Vice Chairman 
Thelma C. Stallard, Recording Secretary 
Bernice H. O'Neil, Corresponding Secretary 
Thelma C. Stallard, Treasurer (pro-tem) 
Jane Cryan 
Theresa McCaul 
H. Francis Wiggin 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Cryan, Chairman 

Chelmsford Community Action Committee 



159 



REPORT OF THE CIVIL DEFENSE COMMISSION 

Charles Koulas, Director 
Walter Hedlund, Deputy Director 

MEMBERS 

George Brown Walter Edwards 

George Dixon Robert Olson 

William Edge Frederick Reid 

The Civil Defense Commission was increased from seven members to eight members. Each member was as- 
signed special duties to work with the various departments in the town. 

The necessary program papers were completed and accepted by State and Federal Civil Defense agencies, 
which made the town eligible for Surplus Property and matching funds. Some Surplus Property was purchased 
from the Taunton Surplus Property Supplies Department at substantial savings to the town. 

The Communications Center participated in the monthly drills with Area I in Tewksbury and other towns, 
and we are grateful to our Communications Officer Mel Dejager for the time and effort he has put into the Com- 
munications Center. 

The Auxiliary Police has been very active this past year. The members have spent many hours training in 
First Aid, Riot Control, Rescue work, etc. They maintained and repaired the Auxiliary Building and are repair- 
ing the Surplus Property generators which will be used for auxiliary power in any emergency. The Police Auxili- 
ary Rescue Truck will be ready to be put into emergency operation in the near future. 

The On Site Assistance Project for Chelmsford was completed by the State and Federal Civil Defense 
Agencies and their report has been forwarded for future action. An excerpt from the report reads as follows, 
"As an overview, the public officials within the community have reacted extremely professionally and responsi- 
bly in each of the two disasters that have occured. The interview conducted as a part of this program revealed 
an extensive responsibility and mutual cooperation of all departments in combatting the effects." 

This speaks well of the fine cooperation that we have had from the Board of Selectmen and the Heads of 
all the various Departments in the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles Koulas 
Director 



NORTHERN MIDDLESEX AREA COMMISSION 

To the Citizens of Chelmsford: 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission serves the comprehensive regional planning agency for nine 
communities in the Northern Middlesex Area including Billerica, Chelmsford, Dracut, Dunstable, Lowell, 
Pepperell, Tewksbury, Tyngsborough, and Westford. 

The Commission carries out its work under a locally representative Commission, and as such serves as a 
forum for local officials. The future of regional planning as a locally directed effort depends in great part on 
continued and increased intermunicipal cooperation. To this end, the Commission has, in conjunction with 
other regional agencies in the Commonwealth, petitioned for a revised regional planning law to enable a more 
decisive role for the Commission in developments of regional impact. The Commission believes that the enact- 
ment of these revisions will improve the ability of local government to solve regional problems. 

The Commission activities reported below are representative of the comprehensive nature of the Commis- 
sion's work. That is, there are clear inter-relationships between housing and water quality and transportation 
and land use. It is the comprehensive areawide role which is unique to the Commission and thus enables it 
to serve as a "Metropolitan Clearinghouse" for State and Federal projects. 

160 



Organization: 

The towns are represented by a selectman, a planning board member, and an alternate named by the se- 
lectmen. A city councilor, a planning board member and an alternate named by the city manager represent 
the city. Together these delegates form the Commission which usually meets monthly at its offices at 144 Mer- 
rimack Street, Lowell (phone 454-8021). 

Last year's Annual Report describes the general organization and functions of the Commission and its role 
in town affairs. Included is a discussion of the special relationship of area wide planning to certain state and 
federal funding programs. 

In this Annual Report the focus is on particular plans and policies being developed by the Commission and 
its staff. Many citizens and town officials have reviewed these at "workshops" held in each Town and the City 
during this past November and December. 

1. LAND USE: The area-wide land use plan has been detailed within the framework of the "Proposals for 
the Future Growth and Development of the Northern Middlesex Area" prepared in 1972. The plan calls for a 
return to the traditional New England Village concept characterized by clustering residential and commercial 
uses in compact centers while outlying areas, especially those physically less suitable for development, are sub- 
ject to very sparse development. The plan has been designed to accommodate about the same amount of resi- 
dential population as permitted by the current zoning, but it calls for more efficient use of land in housing the 
new population. The plan argues for less dependence on the automobile, for revitalization of existing Town 
Centers, and encouragement of new neighborhood centers. The plan seeks to minimize the cost of municipal 
utilities and services and to maximize the preservation of open space and wetland areas. To transcribe the plan 
into reality, there will have to be adjustments in current land use regulations, especially zoning. In 1974 the 
Commission expects to make specific zoning recommendations to its members which will "phase in" the regional 
land use plan. 

2. WATER QUALITY: Very much related to the wise use of land are the Federal Water Quality Amend- 
ments of 1972. Congress has required that there be no "waste loading" of our rivers and streams by 1985. This 
means that the currently acceptable secondary level sewage treatment plant is no longer enough. It also means 
that the in-ground septic tank may not be up to standard if it amounts to a "non point" source of waste load- 
ing. The Commission is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in a water quality management study 
of the Merrimack River Basin. The study, scheduled for completion in mid 1974, should proyide a solid basis 
for the state and local water quality decisions which must be made in response to the 1972 Act. These decisions 
will involve area-wide facilities, and the financial and institutional arrangements necessary to insure maintenance 
of the water quality standard. Land use must be regarded as an essential element of the regulatory scheme in 
order to channel growth to areas where the treatment system will not be overloaded. 

3. SOLID WASTE: Although prepared in 1971, the Comission's solid waste management plan is still cur- 
rent and applicable. The 1972 Water Quality Amendments point up the close relationship between liquid waste 
treatment and the domestic refuse problem. A combined facility is a likely possibility. The Commission peti- 
tioned the General Court for authorization to serve as a solid waste planning board for the region. With this 
authority, the Commission would be better able to package its solid waste ideas and bring them to Town Meet- 
ing. 

4. HOUSING: Major advances were made in 1973 toward adoption of a "fair share" housing plan for the 
region. A report on "Deficits and Deficiencies in the Housing Supply" documents the extent of the housing 
problem in the Northern Middlesex Area. A summary "Housing Plan for the 70's" has been widely distributed 
for local discussion prior to adoption by the Commission. The plan indicates the need for new construction, 
rehabilitation, and income supplements to overcome current deficiencies in the region's housing supply. An allo- 
cation is made to each community for the region's total based upon a fair share formula which considers vacant 
land, income levels, and jobs. 

To assist in implementing the plan, the Commission has asked the General Court to substitute an adopted 
"fair share" plan for the rather arbitrary housing allocations in the so-called "anti-snob zoning law", (Chapter 
774 of the Acts of 1969), and has petitioned for a regional housing authority, and a housing court for the 
County. 

5. TRANSPORTATION: The Commission, in conjunction with its Transportation Coordinating Com- 
mittee and under a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Public Works and the Secretary of 
Transportation and Construction, is playing an active role in transportation development in the area. Major 
projects considered in 1973 were the proposed Route 213 over the Merrimack, Lowell's downtown traffic prob- 
lems, and the recently enacted Transit District Act (Chapter 1141 of the Acts of 1973). In 1974 the Commission 
will be working closely with local officials to implement this Act, and to provide technical support for the Se- 
lectmen and City Manager who would serve as the Transit Advisory Board. 



161 



BUDGET: 

The Commission expended approximately $137,125 during 1973. Of this about $114,000 was for salaries, 
$7,900 for consultants, and $15,200 for other office and support costs. The necessary dollars were paid to the 
Commission as follows: Member Communities $58,000; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 
$40,000; State Department of Public Works $24,000; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers $14,000; State Depart- 
ment of Community Affairs $1,774; sale of reports $102. Chelmsford was assessed $12,455.95 on the eighteen 
month budget which amounted to $8,303.97 for the twelve month period . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chelmsford Representatives 
THOMAS F. MARKHAM, JR., Selectmen 
STEPHEN WOJCIK, Planning Board 
JOHN KELLY, Alternate 



GAS INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen: 

There were 400 Inspections. 

New Dwellings 

Commercial 

Miscellaneous 

Total Collected 
Salary Paid 



$ 50.00 
100.00 
200.00 

$ 350.00 
$1,400.00 
$1,400.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

NEAL STANLEY 
Gas Inspector 



162 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 




L to R, standing: Lillian McEnnis, Florence Ramsay, Lorraine 
Parkhurst, Frances Morris, Corcetta Zanoni, Joyce Parkhurst. 
Seated: Philip J. McCormack, Treasurer's Office. 



Balance Dec. 31, 1972 
Receipts to Dec. 31, 1973 

Paid Out on 205 Warrants 
Balance Dec. 31, 1973 



$ 2,073,106.83 
48,528,836.74 

50,601,943.57 
50,201,084.34 

$ 400,859.23 



REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR 



Levy of 1971 
Personal Property 
Excise 

Total Outstanding 1971 

Levy of 1972 
Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Excise 

Total Outstanding 1972 

Levy of 1973 
Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Excise 

Total Outstanding 1973 



1,911.99 
20,565.49 



$ 22,477.48 



$ 4,874.10 

45,595.79 

$ 50,469.72 



$ 18,668.10 
365,882.24 
160,211.21 

$ 544,761.55 



163 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
1973 REPORT 

Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

Robert E. Sayers, Vice-Chairman 

Forrest E. Dupee,, Secretary 

Robert Geary James M. Harrington 

Richard F. Scott James Emanouil 

Harold B. Higgins Philip Stratos 

David McLachlan Richard Lynch 

This year resignations were received from Allan D. Davidson and Walter S. Dronzek. Mr. Dronzek served as 
chairman in 1972 and part of 1973. We sincerely thank both men for their service to the commission and the 
town. 

The Commission worked on the Industrial Financing Authority Article for the Annual Town Meeting. 
Much research and discussion was necessary. If passed this authority will be able to assist new businesses, to 
Chelmsford, receive financing through municipal bond funding. 

We also updated the list of business employers of the town. An updated zoning map was secured and pre- 
pared for distribution to Commissioners and Industrial Developers. 

An addition to this annual report is currently being prepared. This will contain information of interest to 
Iridustrial Developers who might be interested in locating in Chelmsford. Employment, tax and demographic 
data will be included. 

Again we would like to thank those town employees and elected officials who helped us this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip L. Currier 
Chairman 



CATV ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT - 1973 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Chelmsford Massachusetts 

Cable television, or CATV, is to some the harbinger of a "communications revolution" which offers the 
good life by bringing a vast array of entertainment, educational materials, and expanded communications (e.g. 
computer access) into each house in our community To others, CATV is the harbinger of the subjugation de- 
scribed by Orwell in "1984". The debate rages with participants drawn from universities, broadcasters, think- 
tanks, CATV operators and others; all are articulate, vocal and persuasive with their arguments. What does 
CATV offer Chelmsford? Should CATV be implemented now, later, or never? Are there educational 
applications for our schools or in our homes? What about considerations of privacy and rights of access? Who 
decides who has access to the cable and what programming is permissible? Who should own the cable system? 
Private enterprise? — The town? — Or some mix of the two? Who has the answers to these questions? Experts 
from the universities? — Think-tanks? Perhaps some of the experts are able to shed some light on possible an- 
swers, but definitive answers that deal with the issues in Chelmsford can best be answered by those familiar 
with the needs of the town — YOU! ! ! 

With this realization and a concern with recent state CATV regulations, the Board of Selectmen formed 
an advisory committee on CATV in May of this year. The efforts of the committee during the past half-year 
have been spent in developing an approach to provide answers to some of the previous questions, and in self- 
education in order that the committee can serve as a catalyst for the town in addressing some of these ques- 
tions. With the approval of the 1974-1975 budget request, we plan to initiate a program oriented towards 



164 



providing a forum in which the town can understand the implications and alternatives posed by the introduc- 
tion of CATV in Chelmsford. Such a forum will result in the town addressing and answering: Do we want 
CATV ? If yes, what shape should it take ? 

For the Chairman 

RICHARD E. ARCAND, Vice-Chairman 



SNOWMOBILE COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 

To the Board of Selectmen 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

The committee was convened on December 6, 1973, officers elected were Mr. Stephen Gross as Chairman, 
and Mrs. Gay Scully as secretary. 

The committee will not submit any articles for the 1974 warrant due to the short time available. 

Tne committees present activities are researching laws applicable to recreational vehicles and evaluating 
properties which may be suitable for use by these vehicles. 

Respectively submitted, 
STEPHEN L. GROSS 



165 





L to R: Edna Durkee, Mary Villare, Arnaud R. Blackadar — 
Accounting Department 

RECEIPTS 



GENERAL REVENUE: 

Personal Property Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 
Farm Animal Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Tax Title Redemptions 

Total Taxes 



1972 



$ 8,693,477.09 



1973 



293,482.75 


$ 385,306.42 


7,625,328.87 


10,385,374.51 


475.84 


306.38 


766,237.41 


1,318,584.06 


7,952.22 


20,783.41 



$12,110,354.78 



FROM STATE: 

Tax Apportionment Basis 
Corporation Tax 
School — Ch 69, 70 
Regional School Aid 
Transportation Aid Ch. 1 140 

Total Taxes From State 



$ 28,134.04 

16,790.08 

2,850,852.39 

285,507.41 

.00 

$ 3,181,283.92 



$ .00 

$ 18,299.42 

1,647,244.45 

.00 

114,512.00 

$ 1,780,055.87 



Court Fines 

Permits, Fees and Licenses 

Alcoholic Licenses 

Total Fines and Permits 



$ 4,183.40 

39,093.95 
17,805.50 

$ 61,082.85 



3,782.55 
36,058.70 
14,800.00 



$ 54,641.25 



GRANTS AND GIFTS: 

County : 

Dog Licenses 

Chapter 90 — Highway Funds 

Total Grants and Gifts from County 



$ 4,071.48 

14,349.75 

$ 18,421.23 



3,927.55 
8,913.93 



$ 12,841.48 



166 



FEDERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Under Public Law No. 874 

Under Public Law No. 89-864 Title III 

M.E.C. Revolving Fund 

Under Public Law No. 89-10 Title II 

Total Grants & Gifts From 
Federal Government 

STATE: 

Reimbursement — Construction, 
furnishing, equipping new schools 

Chapter 90— Highway Funds 

Aid to Industrial Schools 

Tuition and Transportation 
State Wards 

School Aid to Transportation 

School Cafeteria — Reimbursement from State 

Aid to Public Libraries 

Highway Fund — Ch. 81 

Lottery Distribution 

Veterans Benefits 

Total Grants and Gifts from State 



$ 228,323.58 

105,985.00 

143,191.57 

12,253.07 

$ 489,753.22 



$ 318,262.51 
28,699.49 

15,040.00 

11,608.65 
458,508.92 
106,794.10 

11,787.00 
189,105.96 
118,498.10 

35,899.28 

$ 1,294,204.01 



$ 88,920.83 

145.100.00 

216,671.67 

13,447.37 

$ 464,139.87 



$ 1,079,283.10 

15,828.15 

.00 

.00 

467,838.00 

134,180.60 

11,787.00 

.00 

.00 

15,871.81 

$ 1,724,788.66 



DEPARTMENTAL RECEIPTS: 

Selectmen 

Treasurer and Collector 

Town Clerk 

Assessors 

Police Dept. 

Public Buildings 

Highway 

Dog Officer 

Park Department 

SCHOOL: 

Lunch — Cafeteria Cash from Sales 
Tuition-Rents and Miscellaneous Receipts 
Athletic Program 



2,015.16 


$ 7.00 


.00 

1,003.45 

117.00 


3,450.00 

1,003.50 

59.00 


.00 


2,644.94 


1,483.60 

3,950.28 

745.00 


2,686.00 

3,127.03 

782.00 


344.40 


.00 


324,728.31 
15,135.62 
12,725.65 


366,463.04 
24,715.88 
11,284.36 



LIBRARY: 

Fines: 



5,315.19 



6,231.29 



CEMETERY: 

Sale of Lots and Graves 

Interrments, Labor, Materials & Use of Equipment 

Reimbursement to Town for Care of Lots and Graves 

Total Departmental Receipts 

REVENUE INVESTMENT: 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS: 

Temporary Loans 
Anticipation of Revenue from Taxes 



3,655.00 
8,066.82 
5,000.00 


3,250.00 

9,532.86 

.00 


! 384,285.48 


$ 435,236.90 




! 141,507.97 
6,000,000.00 


$ 3,750,000.00 
5,000,000.00 



167 



INTEREST AND DEMANDS: 

Taxes: 
Deposits : 

Totals from Loans and Interest 



16,105.58 
38,356.89 

$ 6,195,970.44 



30,032.95 
460,795.92 

$ 9,240,828.87 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS: 

Deductions and Agency Accounts 
Withheld from Employees 
Federal Taxes 
State Taxes 
County Retirement 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield P.I.C. 
Group Life Insurance 
Teachers' Retirement 
Tax Sheltered Annuity 
Washington National Insurance 
Teachers Association Dues 
School Custodian Dues 
Highway Department Dues 
Firefighters Dues 
Savings Bonds 
Police Department Dues 
Fire Department — Credit Union 
United Fund 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Bequests 
Dog Licenses for County 

State's Share — Sunday Entertainment Licenses 
Cash in lieu of Bonds 
Barris Cemetery Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Douglas Cemetery Fund 
Registration Fee for State 
Library Trust Funds 
Barris Varney Playground Fund 

Total Deductions & Agency Accounts 



Total Receipts 

Cash on Hand — Jan. 1st 

Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 
As of Jan. 1st 

NON REVENUE ACCOUNT 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Refund From Architect 
1972 High School Bond Issue 

Total Receipts 
CASH ON HAND JAN. 1st 

Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 



$ 84,762.57 


$ 160,242.01 


$ 1,290,721.31 


$ 1,422,343.77 


313.554.94 


377.438.97 


124,280.24 


137,389.83 


138,867.10 


136,389.29 


6,056.13 


6,154.39 


265,750.22 


286,644.88 


67,061,05 


93,356.98 


14,574.74 


13,697.51 


24,687.17 


31,340.50 


2,344.00 


2,545.00 


2,242.00 


2,661.00 


1,614.00 


1,907.55 


10,378.12 


12,647.01 


1,111.50 


2,283.48 


33,910.00 


43,846.50 




437.40 


8,250.00 


8,865.00 


7,565.90 


7,792.90 


700.00 


500.00 


1,570.00 


8,650.00 


1,346.00 


1,250.00 


450.00 


380.00 


2,616.91 


3,398.61 


252.00 


352.00 


644.35 


1,087.48 


250.00 





REVENUE SHARING RECEIPTS 
Interest Added 



$ 2,320,797.68 

$22,870,332.49 
1,221,167.75 

$24,091,500.24 

$ 900,000.00 

47,215.00 

8,500,000.00 

$ 9,447,215.00 

88,222.95 

$ 9,535,437.95 

$ 146,494.00 

$ 146,494.00 



$ 2,603,360.05 

$28,586,489.74 
1,349,144.52 

$29,935,634.26 

.00 
.00 
.00 

.00 

.00 
.00 



$ 384,947.00 
18,974.21 

$ 403,921.21 



168 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 




L to R, standing: Donald McGillvray, William Edge, Richard 
McDermott. Sitting: Richard Swift, Marvin Schenk, Peter Curran. 



DISBURSEMENTS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Moderator 

Selectmen 

Accounting 

Treasurer and Collector 



1972 

150.00 
30,671.47 
25,535.90 
58,525.09 



1973 

250.00 
35,135.45 
29,158.08 
89,463.21 



169 



Assessors 

Town Clerk 

Public Buildings 

Law 

Elections 

Registrars 

Finance Committee 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Personnel Board 

Development & Industrial Commission 

Town Forest Committee 

Conservation Commission 

Historical Commission 

Constable 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

Council on Aging 

Bus Subsidy 

Purchase Land — Town Dump & Conservation 

Youth Center 

Total General Government 



44,671.20 

16,478.50 

17,336.15 

20,635.73 

18,194.41 

8,262.89 

74.00 

10.674.13 

2,179.84 

288.21 

104.70 

211.85 

2,254.28 

284.16 

192.00 

82.00 

1,091.28 

19,999.92 

12,372.00 

.00 

$ 290,269.71 



47,787.91 

28,170.49 

17,164.84 

5,931.98 

8,257.75 

8,545.08 

164.00 

15,541.91 

3,043.45 

64.00 

52.35 

56.00 

3,594.45 

140.68 

72.00 

310.03 

4,170.11 

18,333.26 

22,000.00 

5,301.20 

$ 342,708.23 



PUBLIC SAFETY 
Police Department 
Salaries 

Expenses & Outlays 
Purchase Cruisers (5) 



Total Police Department 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 

Expenses and Outlays 
Construction West Station 
Purchase — Pumper 

Truck Motor 
Pick Up Truck 
Purchase Land — East Station 
Purchase Chiefs Sedan 



Total Fire Department 



MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION 

Hydrant Service 

Tree Warden 

Building Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Gas Inspector 

Dog Officer 

Animal Inspector 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Civilian Defense 



5 538,702.54 


$ 


629,288.13 


41,338.99 




45,595.07 


9,584.00 


$ 


15,966.00 


5 589,625.53 


690,849.20 


5 556,273.48 


$ 


628,092.14 


25,851.69 




33,493.34 


1,653.75 




.00 


47,200.00 




.00 


5,873.00 




.00 


3,988.00 




.00 


.00 




20,000.00 


.00 


$ 


2,849.00 


5 640,839.92 


684,434.48 


! 48,380.00 


$ 


45,008.15 


13,083.80 




3,688.30 


4,724.38 




3,857.46 


2,796.00 




3.396.00 


1,408.00 




1,600.00 


5,195.00 




5,696.26 


850.00 




1,050.00 


1,049.03 




1,050.00 


3,561.03 




1,078.04 


! 81,047.24 


$ 


66,424.21 





170 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

Salaries & Expense 
Landfill 



Total Health Dept. 



SEWER COMMISSION: 

Expense 

Engineering Service 
Planning Grant (Fed. & State) 

Total Sewer Commission 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 

Utilities 

Street Signs 

Materials 

Miscellaneous Equipment 

Machinery Hire 

Waste Collection 

Machinery Repairs 

Snow and Ice 

Construction 

Chapter 90 — Maintenance and Construction 

Sidewalks 

Reconstruction — Various Streets 

Equipment Purchases 

Maintenance of Garage & Radio 

Outlays — Radio 

Clean-up Program 

Engineer Fees 

Total Highway Department 
STREET LIGHTING 



27,686.50 
50,829.65 



30,245.95 
.00 



! 78,516.15 


$ 30,245.95 


» 448.62 


$ 776.27 


.00 


18,165.70 


70,535.00 


.00 


5 70,983.62 


$ 18,941.97 


1 218,126.62 


$ 235,404.54 


16,977.37 


16,334.82 


2,563.10 


1,985.47 


39,747.96 


39,480.76 


1,285.39 


921.48 


147.00 


252.00 


234,792.47 


260,856.49 


16,980.37 


14,867.55 


217,382.21 


74,663.29 


19,792.89 


18,141.66 


61,856.90 


20,696.54 


6,370.00 


.00 


.00 


950.00 


82,284.00 


44,876.00 


' 820.53 


1,182.74 


1,627.30 


844.40 


4,608.10 


9,650.28 


4,325.00 


3,210.00 



$ 929,687.21 
$ 39,071.51 



$ 744,318.02 
$ 45,263.51 



VETERANS' BENEFITS: 

Salaries & Expenses 
Cash & Material Grants 

Total Veterans' Benefits Dept. 



SCHOOLS: 

School Committee 

Supt. Office 

Coordinators 

Principals 

Teachers 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio Visuals 

Guidance 

Physchological Service 



J 3,368.36 


$ 3,324.21 


51,346.80 


77,776.43 


5 54,715.16 


$ 81,100.64 


5 12,068.97 


$ 8,358.98 


175,201.68 


183,694.03 


165,920.02 


190,635.84 


403,199.75 


407,121.67 


4,889,692.92 


5,352,542.70 


133,084.80 


109,648.74 


109,748.61 


110,828.30 


127,111.21 


89,505.81 


239,051.99 


246,488.90 


6,000.00 


5,835.00 



171 



School Attendance 

Health Service 

Transportation 

Food Service 

Athletic Program 

Student Activities 

Driver Education 

Health Education 

Custodial 

Utilities 

Maintenance of Grounds 

Maintenance of Buildings 

Maintenance of Equipment 

Adult Education 

Civic Activities 

Programs with Other Schools 

Work Study Program 

High School Evaluation 

Total School Department 



11,897.12 

56,775.57 

745,616.90 

26,060.92 

55,798.30 

22,318.09 

1,050.50 

57,501.37 

371,617.68 

248,280.24 

4,588.09 

121,954.55 

49,720.41 

10,334.01 

9,753.55 

5,134.35 

12,201.47 

2,357.23 

$ 8,074,040.30 



12,612.79 

61,420.13 

840,024.28 

28,666.06 

58,104.97 

10,124.99 

1,501.50 

40,057.93 

391,269.35 

194,842.94 

15,446.39 

92,892.13 

17,389.71 

9,578.22 

9,410.96 

4,019.00 

15,156.66 

.00 

$ 8,507,177.98 



SCHOOL REVOLVING FUNDS: 

. Cafeteria 
Athletic 

Public Law 89-10 III 
M.E.C. Fund 
Title II 

Total Revolving Fund 



$ 440,246.60 

13,651.87 

135,610.02 

144,396.67 

9,448.40 

$ 743,353.56 



498,632.89 
10,653.83 
98,560.87 

196,903.56 
11,280.22 

$ 816,031.37 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Regional Vocational School 



487.97 
324,838.00 



719.06 
420,499.32 



LIBRARIES: 

Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Fuel Light and Water 

Books & Periodicals 

Other Expense 

Outlays 

Trust Expenditure 

Total Libraries 



! 82,605.30 


$ 


92,031.88 


930.53 




958.78 


4,118.22 




4,188.52 


25,043.34 




28,975.17 


5,453.63 




6,789.83 


1,617.45 




1,300.22 


644.35 




1,087.48 


! 120,412.82 


$ 


135,331.88 





RECREATION: 

Parks 

Varney Playground 
Edwards Beach 
Recreation Commission 

Total Recreation 



$ 13,805.71 

4,529.90 

423.77 

53,530.33 

$ 72,289.71 



14,287.14 

7,767.56 

693.53 

86,020.25 



$ 108,768.48 



172 



INSURANCE: 

Property and Liability 
Group Insurance 

Total Insurance 



$ 98,580.41 
141,718.51 

$ 240,298.92 



$ 106,599.34 
117,857.84 

$ 224,457.18 



UNCLASSIFIED: 

Memorial Day 

Town Clock 

Ambulance Service 

Town and Finance Reports 

Unpaid Bills — Previous Years 

Regional Drug Program 

Celebrations Committee 

Crystal Lake Engineering 

Tax Appraisal 

Housing Authority 

Mental Health Program 

Revolutionary War Bi-Cent. Comm. 

Liquid Waste Disposal 

Tornado Emergency Fund 

Charter Commission 

Land Appraisal 

Police Station Addition 

North Chelmsford Water Main 

Site Work — Roberts Playground 

Re-Construct Crooked Spring Dam. 

Master Plan Revision 



1,381.56 


$ 1,536.00 


224.53 


271.99 


5,916.65 


7,083.31 


6,011.06 


5,491.00 


3,009.38 


12,512.31 


18,000.00 


15,716.70 


3,682.96 


3,589.96 


.00 


5,888.46 


31,912.86 


.00 


65.75 


.00 


4,551.15 


5,217.49 


209.15 


159.09 


88.00 


43,978.61 


49,508.87 


.00 


842.72 


2,049.22 


300.00 


.00 


.00 


26,126.36 


.00 


18,700.00 


.00 


20,611.50 


.00 


900.00 


.00 


4,140.00 



$ 125,704.64 



$ 173,972.00 



CEMETERIES: 

Salaries 

Interrments 

Labor for Lot Owners 

Repairs, Expense and Outlays 

Beautification 

Hot Top Roads 

Restore Old Cemeteries 

Total Cemetery Department 



28,211.42 


$ 33,958.84 


4,000.00 


3,879.06 


700.00 


570.92 


10,352.22 


8,135.48 


5,000.00 


.00 


.00 


4,696.75 


968.88 


325.00 



$ 49,232.52 



$ 51,566.05 



NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS: 

State and County Share — Fees Licenses 
Payroll Deductions 
Retirement — Pension Expense 
State and County Assessments 
Cemetery Care Bequests and Interest 
Tax Levy Refunds 
Performance Bonds 
Miscellaneous Refunds 
Trust Funds Invested 
Tornado Damage to Contractor 
Retroactive School Payroll 1971 
From Misc. Trust Accounts 



12,856.15 


$ 8,706.70 


2,303,710.46 


2,387,931.63 


164,179.24 


264,764.00 


275,882.07 


329,961.51 


21,481.43 


16,049.97 


63,859.46 


92,597.13 


9,287.50 


7,750.00 


9,320.24 


224.72 


42,972.82 


20,205.66 


1,200.00 


.00 


75,648.32 


.00 


857.55 


10,312.36 



173 



From N.E. Law Enforcement Council 
Land Damages 

Total Non Revenue Accounts 



REVENUE CASH INVESTMENT 



INTEREST AND MATURING DEBT: 

Interest — Anticipation of Revenue 
Interest — Bonded Debt 

Total Interest 



ANTICIPATION OF REVENUE LOANS 
MATURING DEBT 

Total Debt 

Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand Dec. 31st 
Total 

NON REVENUE ACCOUNT: 

Non Revenue Cash Investment 
School Construction 

Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance Dec. 31st 



Revenue Sharing Cash Investment 



1,105.60 
.00 


155.46 
105,038.17 


$ 2,982,360.84 


$ 3,243,696.71 




$ .00 


$ 6,356,875.00 


$ 93,599.41 
309,107.50 


$ 108,459.69 
658,887.50 


$ 402,706.91 


$ 767,347.19 






$ 6,000,000.00 


$ 5,000,000.00 


620,000.00 


1,410,000.00 


$ 6,620,000.00 


$ 6,410,000.00 






$22,676,776.24 


$29,920,728.18 


$ 1,349,100.92 


$ 14,906.08 


$24,025,877.16 


$29,935,634.26 


$ 7,688,196.25 
1,188,858.70 


$ 2,738,817.84 
3,824,271.88 


$ 8,877,054.95 


$ 6.563,089.72 


658,383.00 


419,727.77 


$ 9,535,437.95 


$ 6,982,817.49 






$ 146,294.00 


$ 403,921.21 



174 



INDEX 

Appointed Town Officials 6 

Board of Appeals 132 

Board of Assessors 130 

Board of Health 129 

Board of Registrars 153 

Board of Selectmen 15 

Building Inspector 137 

CATV Advisory Committee Report 164 

Cemetery Commission 134 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 146 

Chelmsford Youth Center 151 

Civil Defense Commission ~ 160 

Community Action Committee 159 

Conservation Commission 140 

Council on Aging 145 

Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 152 

Department of Veterans' Services 131 

Dog Kennel Study 140 

Dog Officer 139 

Drug Abuse Task Force 156 

Dutch Elm Department 155 

Elected Town Officials 5 

Emergency Employment Act 155 

Environmental Advisory Council 158 

Finance Committee 169 

Fire Department 124 

Fire Station Building Committee 126 

Gas Inspector 162 

General Information 2 

Highway Department 127 

Historical Commission 144 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 145 

Industrial Development Commission 164 

Inspector of Animals 138 

Insurance Sinking Fund Commission 155 

Moth Department 154 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School - District Commission 117 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 160 

Park Commission , 135 

Planning Board 158 

Police Department 120 

Public Libraries 133 



175 



Purchasing Department 157 

Recreation Commission 136 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Celebrations Commission 153 

School Committee 104 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 148 

Sewer Commission 148 

Snowmobile Committee 165 

Town Accountant 166 

Town Clerk 17 

Warrant (3-5-73 & 3-12-73) 22 

Annual Town Election 41 

Annual Town Meeting (3-12-73) 43 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (3-19-73) 49 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (3-26-73) 52 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting (4-9-73) 54 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (4-2-73) 57 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (4-9-73) 62 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (4-23-73) 68 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (4-30-73) 75 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (5-7-73) 80 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (5-14-73) 84 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting (10-1-73) 90 

Special Town Meeting (10-1-73) 101 

Adjourned Special Town Meeting (10-9-73) 102 

Town Forest Committee 150 

Treasurer and Tax Collector 163 

Tree Department 154 

Veterans' Emergency Fund 150 

Wire Inspector 138 



176 



1st Hon. Mention 

Joseph Clark 
22 Bridge St. 
Chelmsford, MA 



^ - — '^ 



ff 







^ V «--N> c-^ 



T 



m\ 



ANNUAL 
REPORT 



1373 



THE TOWN OF 

CHELMSFORD 
ANNUAL REPOFf 



1973 




2nd Hon. Mention 

Mauri J. Wirtanen 
29 Whippletree Rd. 
Chelmsford, MA 



CHELMSFORD 
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



HISTORY 

This religious society was first gathered in Wenham in 1644. In 1655, the 
Church with its minister, John Fiske, removed to Chelmsford. 

The first meeting house was built upon this present site. 

In 1710 a new meeting house was erected and later a belfry was added in 
which to place a bell purchased in 1680. 

It was not until 1830 that the separation of town and parish took place 
and the following year the parish elected its own officers distinct from town 
officials and became self supporting. The basement of the church building how- 
ever was still used as the Town Hall until 1879. 

The present meeting house was erected in 1842 after a fire had destroyed 
the old Meeting House. 

On Sunday morning, December 18, 1955 a ground breaking ceremony was 
held and construction of our present addition began. A year later this addition 
was completed and dedicated to the glory of God and to the service of man on 
Sunday, September 23, 1956. 



First Prize Cover Design 

by 

PATRICIA ROY 

30 Quigley Ave. 
No. Chelmsford, Mass.