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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire"

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352. Ot 
H24 

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ANNUAL REPORTS 

of the Town of 

HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

For The Year Ending December 31, 1979 

Cover Photo 

Street Fest 
Main Street, Hanover 

By 
Len Matless 



352.0? 

H24 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Town Officers 5 

Warrant r 9 

Finance Committee Report 14 

Report of Selectmen 16 

Scenic Road Policy 19 

Town Activities 20 

Memorandum on Accounting Procedures 
and Internal Controls Relative to 1978 Audit 41 

Budget Discussions and Comparisons - 1979-1980 45 

Budget Summary and Analysis Report - 1979-1980 52 

Capital Outlay and Capital Reserve Expenditures - 1980 71 

Federal Revenue Sharing Allocation 73 

1979 Tax Rates and Assessments 74 

Tax Collector's Reports 76 

Town Clerk's Report 78 

Treasurer's Report 78 

Parking Fund 79 

Hanover Housing Authority Reports 80 

Hanover District Court 82 

Upper Valley Regional Emergency Medical Care Service 83 

Regional Association Reports 

Headrest, Inc 85 

Upper Valley-Lake Sunapee Council 86 

Upper Valley Senior Citizens Council, Inc 87 

Grafton County Commissioners' Report 88 

Town Meeting Minutes - 1979 90 

Annual Report of the Hanover School District 99 

(see separate index on page 100) 

Annual Report of the Dresden School District 127 

(see separate index on page 128) 



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in 2011 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofto1979hano 



TOWN OF HANOVER 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Board of Selectmen * 
James Campion, III, Chairman 

(1981) 
Martha S. Solow (1981) 
Stephen V. F. Waite (1982) 
Sharon Nordgren (1982) 
Benjamin Thompson, Jr. (1980) 

Moderator 

Harry H. Bird, Jr. (1980) 

Town Clerk 
Patricia H. Radway (1980) 

Tax Collector 
Peter J. Gartland 

Treasurer 
Bruce D. McAllister (1980) 

Auditors 
Joseph E. Cardoza (1980) 
Susan M.Walters (1980) 

Health Officers 
Donald N. MacKay, M.D. 
Edward S. Brown 

Supervisors of the Checklist 
Sharon Tucker (1980) 
Dorothy C. King (1982) 
Eleanor B. Rand (1984) 



Library Trustees 
Ann S. Cioffi (1981) 
Alice B. Hayes (1982) 
Edgar T. Mead (1980) 

Trustee of Trust Funds 
Roger C. Ball (1981) 
Frederick T. Bedford, III (1982) 
John T. Schiffman (1980) 

Advisory Assessors 
Roger C. Ball (1980) 
C. Bennett Brown (1982) 
Robert D. McLaughry (1981) 

Park Commissioner 
Carolyn C. Tenney (1980) 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 
Joseph C. Fogg (1980) 
Walker T. Weed (1980) 

Fence Viewers 
Walter S. Coutermarsh (1980) 
Edward Lathem (1980) 
Howard Reed (1980) 

* Also members Board of Health 
( )Date Terms Expire 



Town Manager 

Peter J. Gartland 

Administration 

Jane I. Gosselin 

Assessing Official 

David C. Nutt 

Buildings & Grounds 

Denzil E. Swift 
Code Administrator 
Charlotte B. Ingram 
Fire and Inspection Services 
Stuart C. Corpieri, Chief 
Librarian 
Patricia W. Eckels 
Parks and Recreation Director 
Henry R. Tenney 

Police 
Roland M. Lee, Chief 
Public Works Director 
Richard Hauger 
Sewers and Waste Water Treatment 
Donald W. Chamberlain, Supt. 
Tree Warden 
Robert Thebodo 
Visiting Nurse Service Director 
Linda A. Cullen 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



Building Code Advisory 


Term Expires 


Levi M. Johnston, Chairman 


1981 


Charles Bean 


1982 


Richard Burnham 


1982 


Fred Fellows 


1980 


Karl Eismeier 


1980 


Conservation Commission 




Allen L King, Chairman 


1981 


Ann H. Crow 


1981 


Walter K. MacAdam 


1982 


Robert G. Hagen, Jr. 


1982 


Elizabeth Storrs 


1982 


Thomas A. Linell 


1980 


Ellis Rolette 


1980 


Finance Committee 




Charles E. Widmayer, Chairman 


1980 


William Breed 


1982 


David M. Cioffi 


1980 


Douglas A. Rupert 


1981 


Cary P. Clark 


1981 


Emily Mead 


School Rep. 


Benjamin Thompson, Jr. 


Selectman Rep. 


Health Council 




Charlotte Faulkner, Chairman 


1980 


Frances Gibney 


1982 


Frances Murray 


1982 


Eulalie Stearns 


1981 


Tirzah Sweet 


1980 


Robert Chapman 


1980 


Alice Green 


1982 


BonnellW. Glass 


1981 


Aune Whitehair 


1981 


Larry Cornell 


School Rep. 


Sharon Nordgren 


Selectman Rep. 


Parking and Transportation Board 




Harte C. Crow, Chairman 


1981 


James Coakley 


1982 


Frank M. Logan 


1982 


Emil Rueb 


1980 


Jack H. Nelson 


1981 



Parks and Recreation Board 

Thomas E. Byrne, Chairman 1980 

George Wright 1980 

MarcieWeinbel 1982 

Warren DeMont 1980 

JackDeGange 1981 

James Grant 1981 

Frank J . Stevenson 1 982 
Sharon Nordgren Selectman Rep. 

Planning Board 

Walter L Eaton, Jr., Chairman 1984 

Brian F.Walsh 1980 

Richard McGaw 1982 

Donald deJ Cutter 1982 

Frances Wales 1983 

Peter Runstadler, Jr. 1983 
Martha S. Solow Selectman Rep. 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

David H.Mclntire, Chairman 1981 

David Hoi brook 1984 

DominickJ.Zappala 1982 

Richard F. Winters 1983 

Marcia H.Baldwin 1980 

Betty I. Fanelli Alternate 

Stuart Templeton Alternate 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



GRAFTON, ss TOWN OF HANOVER 

TO THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF HANOVER, NEW 
HAMPSHIRE, who are qualified to vote in Town affairs. 

TAKE NOTICE AND BE WARNED that the Annual Town Meeting 
of the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire will be held in Webster 
Hall, Wentworth Street, Hanover, New Hampshire on Tuesday, 
March 11, 1980 at 8 a.m. to act upon the following subjects: 

(THE MEETING WILL BE FORMALLY CONVENED AT 8 A.M. AT 
WHICH TIME THE POLLS IN WEBSTER HALL WILL OPEN FOR 
VOTING BY BALLOT FOR THE ELECTION OF TOWN OFFICERS 
AND VOTING BY BALLOT ON REFERENDUM QUESTIONS.) 

(ALL OTHER ARTICLES WILL BE PRESENTED, DISCUSSED AND 
ACTED UPON BEGINNING AT 7 P.M. THE POLLS WILL CLOSE AT 
8 P.M. OR ONE QUARTER HOUR AFTER COMPLETION OF 
VOTING ON THE LAST ARTICLE IN THE WARRANT, WHICHEVER 
IS LATER UNLESS THE TOWN VOTES TO KEEP THE POLLS OPEN 
TO A LATER HOUR.) 

ONE: (To vote by non-partisan ballot) for the following Town 
Officers: 

One Selectman to serve for a term of three years. 

One Treasurer to serve for a term of one year. 

One Moderator to serve for a term of two years. 

One Town Clerk to serve for a term of three years. 

One Library Trustee to serve for a term of three years. 

One Trustee of Trust Funds to serve for a term of three years. 

One Supervisor of Checklist to serve for a term of six years. 

And such other Town Officers as may be required by law. 

TWO: (To vote by ballot) to see if the Town will vote to amend 
the existing Town Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning 
Board so as to rezone a strip of land to be used as a trail from 
Single Residence-1 to Natural Preserve and specifically described 
and set forth in the official copy of Amendment No. 1 filed and 
available to the public at the office of the Town Clerk and as on 
display on the date of the meeting. The following question is listed 
on the printed ballots: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of the amendment No. 1 to the 
existing Town Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning 
Board?" 



(This article will be voted on by printed ballot during the time the 
polls are open on the day of the meeting beginning at 8 a.m.) 

THREE: (By Petition) (To vote by ballot) to see if the Town will 
vote to amend the existing Town Zoning Ordinance so as to rezone 
60 acres of land along East Wheelock Street and Trescott Road 
from Rural Residence and Single Residence-1 to Natural Preserve 
and 63 acres of land east of Grasse Road and north of Trescott 
Road from Natural Preserve to Single Residence-1 as proposed by 
petition of Town voters and specifically described and set forth in 
the official copy of Amendment No. 2 filed and available to the 
public at the office of the Town Clerk and as on display on the date 
of the meeting. The following question is listed on the printed 
ballots: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of the amendment No. 2 to the 
existing Town Zoning Ordinance as proposed by Petition of voters 
for the Town of Hanover?" 

The Planning Board is required by law to indicate approval or 
disapproval of this proposed zoning amendment, on the printed 
ballot. New Hampshire RSA 31:63B. The Hanover Planning Board 
approves this amendment. 

(Article Three will be voted on by printed ballot during the time 
the polls are open on the day of the Meeting beginning at 8 a.m.) 

FOUR: (To vote by ballot) to see if the Town will vote to permit 
applications for changes in party affiliation to be made with the 
Town Clerk. The following question will appear on the printed 
ballot: 

"Shall we adopt the provisions of RSA 654:34-a permitting ap- 
plications for changes in party affiliation to be made with the Town 
Clerk?" 

(Article Four will be voted on by printed ballot during the time the 
polls are open on the day of the Meeting beginning at 8:00 a.m.) 

FIVE: To receive reports from the Selectmen, Town Clerk, 
Treasurer, Auditor, Collector of Taxes and other Town Officers and 
to vote on any motion relating to these reports and to receive any 
special resolutions that may be appropriate and to vote thereon. 

SIX: To choose the following Town Officers to be elected by a 
majority vote: 

Two Auditors each for a term of one year. 

One member of the Advisory Assessors Board for a term of 
three years. 

Three Fence Viewers each for a term of one year. 
One Park Commissioner for a term of three years. 



10 



Two Surveyors of Wood and Timber for a term of one year. 

And such other officers as the Town may judge necessary for 
managing its affairs. 

SEVEN: To raise and appropriate such sums of money as the 
Town judges necessary to pay the expenses of the Town during the 
1980 fiscal year for the purposes set forth in the Town Budget and 
further to accept and expend gifts of money and/or personal pro- 
perty for the purposes intended by any donor and in addition, to ap- 
ply, receive and expend any Federal or State Assistance for the 
uses set forth in the Town Budget, not anticipated as of the Annual 
Town Meeting, and to account to the voters of the Town for all such 
additional receipts and expenses. 

EIGHT: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and 
authorize withdrawal from the Revenue Sharing Fund established 
under the provisions of the State and Local Assistance Act of 1972 
as amended for use as setoffs against budget appropriations in the 
amounts indicated, namely General Fund -$54,781; Fire Fund- 
$36,510; Sidewalk -$1,000 and further, to authorize the Selectmen 
to make pro rata reductions in the amounts if estimated entitle- 
ments are reduced or take any other action hereon. 

NINE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum up to $12,000 for the purpose of continuing the Elm Tree 
Maintenance Program begun in 1979 within an area up to a radius 
of 1 /2 mile from the intersection of North and South Main Streets 
and East and West Wheelock Streets and further to authorize the 
Selectmen to apply, negotiate, and do all things necessary to ob- 
tain such Federal, State or other assistance as may be available for 
this project and to receive and expend such assistance for the pur- 
pose of this project. 

TEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $23,000 for the operation of a Community Center at 10 
School Street and further to authorize the Selectmen to accept and 
expend gifts of money and/or personal property for the purposes in- 
tended by any donor. 

ELEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $15,000 to support the Upper Valley Senior Citizens 
Council, Inc. Public Transportation Program and to further author- 
ize the Selectmen to apply $7,500 from the Parking Fund and to 
raise the balance of the appropriation from the General Fund tax 
receipts. 

TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the 
public highway, if any, leading from the Etna/Hanover Center Road 
across Mink Brook to the property of Kenneth M. and Barbara 
Pelton. 



11 



THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to discontinue a por- 
tion of Sanborn Road adjoining land of Hanover Investment Corpor- 
ation as shown on a plan entitled "Hanover Investment Corpora- 
tion, Lebanon Street, Hanover, New Hampshire" dated October 13, 
1978 - revised January 1980 drawn by K. A. LeClair Associates, Inc. 

(The purpose of this Article is to straighten-out the westerly side 
line of Sanborn Road in exchange for the conveyance of an addi- 
tional parcel of land on the corner of Sanborn Road and East South 
Street.) 

FOURTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the 
sum of $1,415 to support the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee Region 
Association. 

FIFTEEN: (By Petition) To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate any funds not expended by the Town under Article 9 of the 
Warrant for the 1979 Town Meeting, and further to raise and ap- 
propriate such additional sum as will be necessary to provide a 
total sum of $10,000 to contribute to the cost of managing, 
operating and maintaining the Oak Hill Ski Area for public skiing 
during the winter of 1980-81 under the supervision of the Ford Sayre 
Memorial Ski Council. 

SIXTEEN: (By Petition) To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purpose of establishing 
a Capital Reserve Fund for financing improvements to the Oak Hill 
Ski Area and the purchase of snow grooming equipment. 

SEVENTEEN: To see what amount the Town will appropriate 
for the design and construction of Park Street including the in- 
stallation of storm drains and underground utilities and to borrow a 
portion of said amount by the issuance of bonds and/or notes 
under the Municipal Finance Act with the balance of the amount to 
be obtained from Federal funds; and, further, to authorize the 
Selectmen to apply, negotiate, and do all things necessary to ob- 
tain federal assistance as may be available for this Project; and/or 
to incur indebtedness in anticipation of the receipt of such 
assistance as provided under the Municipal Finance Act and 
receive and expend such assistance for the purpose of this Project. 

(The Selectmen intend to request that the Meeting vote to 
postpone consideration of this Article 16 to a specific later date at 
an adjourned meeting of the Annual Town Meeting. At that time, 
the Article would be discussed and voted on.) 

EIGHTEEN: To see what amount the Town will appropriate for 
the construction of a multiple story parking facility including the 
purchase of additional land for the facility and to borrow said 
amount by the issuance of bonds and/or notes under the Municipal 



12 



Finance Act and further to authorize the Selectmen to apply, 
negotiate, and do all things necessary to obtain such federal 
and/or state assistance as may be available for this project and/or 
to incur indebtedness in anticipation of the receipt of such 
assistance as provided under the Municipal Finance Act and 
receive and expend such assistance for the purpose of this Project. 

(The Selectmen intend to request that the Meeting vote to post- 
pone consideration of this Article 18 to a specific later date at an 
adjourned meeting of the Annual Town Meeting. At that time, the 
Article would be discussed and voted on.) 

NINETEEN: To transact any other business that may legally 
be brought before this Town Meeting. 

Given under our hands and seals of the Town of Hanover this 
22nd day of February, 1980. 

James W. Campion, III 
Martha S. Solow 
Stephen V.F. Waite 
Benjamin Thompson, Jr. 
Sharon L Nordgren 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

A True Copy, Attest: 

James W. Campion, III 
Martha S. Solow 
Stephen V.F. Waite 
Benjamin Thompson, Jr. 
Sharon L. Nordgren 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



13 



HANOVER FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT 

For some the primary function of the Hanover Finance Commit- 
tee is to be a nay-sayer when it comes to town and school expen- 
ditures. The Committee's own view is somewhat broader. It recog- 
nizes the necessity of maintaining essential services for the public 
and it has the duty of seeing that this is done as prudently and as 
economically as possible. It also endeavors to hold down capital 
expenditures and to consider all such proposals in relation to the 
town's total load of indebtedness. The Committee does not take a 
Proposition 13 approach to town financing, but it does believe that 
the taxpayers' money should be spent on what is essential and not 
on things that are desirable but not really necessary. During the 
past year the Committee has tried to operate within those general 
guidelines. 

Last year the taxpayers of Hanover enjoyed a drop in the total tax 
rate from $26.55 to $26.00 per thousand, thanks to factors that will 
not be repeated in 1980. The Finance Committee feared a wild up- 
ward jump in the 1980 tax rate; indeed, at an early stage of work on 
the town and school budgets it looked as though there might be an 
increase of $3.20 per thousand, before adding the cost of any 
special articles adopted by the voters. The Committee felt that this 
was more of a burden than the Hanover taxpayer should be ex- 
pected to bear, in this time of financial stress for everyone, and it 
therefore made the tax rate the main object of its concern and 
urged that all budgets be reviewed so as to hold the 1980 tax in- 
crease to 10%. The town budget, for example, went back twice for 
review and some $70,000 was deducted from the tax levy, resulting 
(as of February 1) in a projected increase of 76 cents rather than 
$1.26 in the town portion of the tax rate. 

The goal of a 10% limit on the overall tax increase has not been 
fully reached, and it certainly won't be if sizable amounts are added 
to the budgets through the adoption of special articles. But the 
revised budgets have come close, and the Finance Committee 
hopes that an ongoing review will bring the 1980 tax rate down still 
more, if not by the time of the March meetings then by the time the 
tax bills go out next fall. 

The great increase in the cost of heating and utilities has been 
inescapable. In the Hanover School District budget for 1980-81 two 
factors have worked against achieving the desired limit on the tax 
rate. One is that we do not have the benefit of the $69,000 that was 
transferred last year from capital reserve to the general fund for tax 
relief purposes. The other is an increase of $33,700 in the tuition 
that will be paid to the Dresden District because of greater enroll- 
ment in the sixth grade at Richmond School. A projected increase 



14 



from $5.60 to $6.73 per thousand in the Hanover School District tax 
rate has made it difficult to achieve the overall 10% goal. 

The Finance Committee was represented at each of a long series 
of meetings before the adoption of the Hanover town, Hanover 
school, and Dresden school budgets. During the year the Commit- 
tee also made a study of Hanover's total indebtedness and found 
that the totals for both the town and the schools were well below 
the limits mandated by state law. The Committee also looked into 
the short-term and long-term investment of town funds, and was 
satisfied that this is well managed so as to produce the maximum 
return. 

Besides its major concern with budgeting, the Finance Commit- 
tee supported the borrowing of $235,000 to complete the renova- 
tion of Hanover High School. It also supported the proposed 
$2-million reconstruction of Park Street, with 75% of the cost 
covered by federal funds, but the town's voters disagreed and re- 
jected the plan. Most recently, as part of the Dresden Finance Com- 
mittee, it has made recommendations to the Dresden School Board 
about financing the $170,000 reconstruction of high school playing 
fields over a ten-year period. The Committee feels this can be done 
at modest annual cost, especially if, as expected, New Hampshire 
pays 45% of Hanover's share and Vermont pays 30% of Norwich's 
share. 

The Finance Committee recommends that during the coming 
year priority be given to a general review of salary policy and to the 
related question of how much increased productivity accompanies 
steadily rising personnel costs. It would like to see the Selectmen 
also take steps toward adopting a changed fiscal year, so that 
budgets presented and adopted at the Town Meeting in March 
cover a period that begins after the meeting. There would be great 
advantage in having the salary year match the fiscal year, which is 
not the case at present. Such a change would remove the budget 
distortion that arises from having one-half of salary increases that 
begin July 1 carry over into the next budget on top of salary in- 
creases granted in the new year. 



15 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN 

Nineteen seventy-nine has emerged as a year of policy review 
and adoption. 

A major policy change has been in the area of Visiting Nurse Ser- 
vice. The operation of the VNS, for years a Town Agency, was 
studied intensively by a citizens' committee which recommended 
that the Town negotiate to have Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 
assume the functions of the VNS under the joint supervision of the 
Town and the Hospital. The Selectmen endorsed the committee's 
report, and negotiations are now under way. Details follow this 
report in a separate explanation. 

After many meetings with the public and State Highway Depart- 
ment officials, a bond issue to finance the reconstruction of Park 
Street was defeated. Following the vote, a broad-based committee 
was appointed to restudy the designs of Park Street; its recommen- 
dations should be ready for presentation to the voters during 1980. 
The Selectmen hope that reconstruction of Park Street can be coor- 
dinated closely with sewer work now being done in that area. 

The Parks and Recreation Board has enthusiasticlly been carry- 
ing out its mandate. As a result, the Town will vote in March on a 
proposal for Town funding of a Community Center at 10 School 
Street, a building which has been extensively renovated with 
donated funds. The Town also will vote in March on a proposal to 
maintain skiing at Oak Hill and to begin to fund capital improve- 
ments for the facility. These votes will give the Town a chance to in- 
dicate the extent and direction of its support of recreational ac- 
tivities. 

At the urging of several Boards and Commissions, a central 
Resource Center has been established in the Municipal Building to 
store reports, maps, and other documents. These reports are being 
catalogued to increase their accessibility to officials and citizens. 

The Planning Board, in conjunction with subdividers, architects 
and professional planners, and after several public hearings, has 
revised the Subdivision Regulations (which attempt to provide for 
orderly growth of new residential and business development). The 
Selectmen have adopted revised building codes, recommended by 
the Code Advisory Board after two years of examination and 
evaluation. The new codes reflect more accurately the use of newer 
materials and methods of building construction. 

After several years of negotiation, the Conservation Commis- 
sion, with the assistance of the Conservation Council, completed 
the acquisition by the Town of land on the top of Balch Hill. The Na- 



16 



tional Park Service and the Appalachian Trail Conference has been 
working with many Town Boards and individuals to lay out a perma- 
nent route through the Town for the Appalachian Trail. The Select- 
men hope the route will be one which will cause the least disrup- 
tion to Town development and which will be acceptable to as many 
people as possible. 

Reflecting their view that recycling is a municipal responsi- 
bility, the Selectmen have established a Town Recycling Commit- 
tee. The Committee is investigating effective methods for making 
better use of waste materials and reducing disposal costs. A more 
complete report appears elsewhere in this Town Report. 

Energy conservation efforts in other areas have focused on at- 
tempts to counteract the rising costs of heating fuel. Installation of 
a wood-burning furnace at the Sewer Treatment Plant and a 
Trombe Wall for solar heating at the Town Garage are two efforts 
now underway. Other Town Buildings are being studied for ways to 
effect reduction in energy use. 

The Parking and Transportation Board has recommended that 
plans for a parking garage on the Town's parking lot diagonally 
across from Howe Library be updated, and funds for architectural 
designs have been authorized. At the same time, the Selectmen 
have recommended that the Town participate in a regional 
transportation program being initiated by the Upper Valley Senior 
Citizens Council; an initial contribution to the program will be 
voted on at Town Meeting. 

This year saw the completion of the reconstruction of North 
Main Street, including a new sidewalk along the west side of the 
Green, the reconstruction of the intersection at Trescott and Etna 
Roads, the installation of new traffic lights at the three Main Street 
Intersections, and the extension of the sewer line on Route 120 to 
the Hanover/Lebanon townline. The Town's maintenance program 
for elms appears to have been successful in its first year and is be- 
ing continued. 

The Selectmen wish particularly to express their thanks to the 
many citizens who have served countless hours on numerous com- 
mittees covering nearly every aspect of the Town's Government. 
They are also grateful for the dedication of the Town's conscien- 
tious employees, and not least, for that of the Town Manager, Peter 
Gartland. The collective efforts of these citizens and employees 
have made it possible for the Selectmen to devote more attention 
to longer-range issues and policies. 



17 



Selectmen's Report • Hanover Visiting Nurse Service 

The Hanover Visiting Nurse Service has gone through a year of 
study, transition and decision. In May, after the resignation of the 
VNS Director, the Selectmen felt an evaluation process should be 
undertaken by the Town as to the future direction of this municipal 
service. The Health Council was designated as the appropriate 
body to oversee a study process. The charge: "To define and recom- 
mend to the Board of Selectmen the level and extent of service 
delivery to be offered by the Town Visiting Nurse Agency and to in- 
vestigate and analyze alternative directions for the Agency; 
specifically to study the feasibility of developing the Agency into a 
private, not-for-profit local agency or as part of a regional service 
delivery system." Throughout the summer a dedicated core of 
Hanover citizens met, sometimes weekly, consulting and question- 
ing health professionals, regional home health care providers and 
consumers. A final study report was submitted to the Hanover 
Selectmen in September with a recommendation to further study 
two options: "Town Agency with a VNS Council — This option 
would establish a working governing "board" composed of private 
citizens. Hospital-based agency — Mary Hitchcock Memorial 
Hospital has proposed to provide a hospital-based Home Health 
Care Service to citizens of the Town of Hanover. The Hospital 
would create a separate department within the Department of Nur- 
sing to operate a program mutually agreed upon between the 
Hospital and the Town." 

Following the recommendation of the summer study group, the 
Selectmen appointed the Visiting Nurse Service Feasibility Study 
Committee to investigate the two proposed options. After a 
scrupulous two months of further study, the Committee returned to 
the Selectmen with the following recommendations: 

"In order to continue the quality care presently provided and yet 
face present and future administrative and service needs, the com- 
mittee recommends the following: 

1. That the Selectmen adopt the proposal of Mary Hitchcock 
Memorial Hospital to establish a hospital-based Home Health 
Care Department charged with the provision of home health 
services to the citizens of the Town of Hanover 

2. That the Selectmen appoint the Home Health Services Ad- 
visory Board members as described (in the Hospital proposal) 
to conclude negotiations with the hospital and finalize a Memor- 
andum of Agreement for presentation to the Board of Select- 
men." (Copies of the complete report and the summer report are 
available in the Town Hall and the Howe Library.) 



18 



We are now in the process of formation of the Advisory Board. 
Those appointed by the Selectmen to serve on this citizen advisory 
board include a maternal-child R.N., a Hanover attorney, consumer, 
physical therapist and a Selectman. As discussions proceed be- 
tween the Town and Hospital, town patients of the Visiting Nurse 
Service are continuing to receive quality care and that will be an 
ongoing goal as we pass through the transition period of the next 
six months. 

This brief summary does not do justice to all the many hours of 
time concerned citizens have spent to make a responsible decision 
for the future of health care delivery in Hanover. The Selectmen ex- 
press their thanks to them for a job well done. 



SCENIC ROAD POLICY STATEMENT 

In compliance with the request of the 1979 Town Meeting under 
Article 17, the following is the Scenic Road Policy Statement 
adopted by the Board of Selectmen on February 15, 1979 and 
printed in the Selectmen's Position Paper for the 1979 Warrant: 

"If any road is designated by a Town Meeting vote to be a scenic 
road as provided in RSA 253:17 and 18, then the Town of Hanover 
will use its best efforts to make certain that any repair, main- 
tenance, reconstruction or paving work required on such road in 
order to keep the roads suitable for travel as required by State 
Law will be performed in such a manner, to the extent possible, 
to maintain and preserve the esthetic qualities of the scenic 
roads and unique flora and natural and historical landmarks. 
This commitment is made having in mind that the primary pur- 
pose of highways is for vehicular and pedestrian travel under 
conditions to allow such travel to be done safely. Before any 
reconstruction or reworking beyond routine regularly scheduled 
maintenance is undertaken, all abuttors and the general public 
shall have the opportunity to review and comment on plans at 
a public meeting. 

Routine, regularly scheduled maintenance is defined as grad- 
ing, sealing or overlays where applicable; clearing ditches and 
removing brush and tree limbs which impair the sight distance 
in the traveled way or impair the effectiveness of the ditching 
process; and the replacement of culverts and removal of dead 
trees where necessary. 

The original petition regarding Scenic Roads is printed in this 
report under Article 17 of the 1979 Annual Town Meeting Minutes. 



19 



TOWN ACTIVITIES 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS DEPARTMENT 

This department is responsible for the care and maintenance 
of 10 buildings, 10 cemeteries, recreation grounds and the boat 
landing. 

Major projects include rebuilding the Hanover Center Cemetery 
fence and the dispatch office. New furnishings and carpet were 
placed in sections of the Municipal Building. 

There were 37 funerals, 13 cremations and 22 grave sites sold in 
the cemeteries. 

A pickup was purchased this year and next year's budget in- 
cludes a small tractor. 

Code Administration 

Building construction handled by the department, involving 55% 
of the department time, is summarized below relating the activity 
to the previous two years: 





1977 


1978 


1979 




Uof 




it of 




#of 






Permits 


Cost 


Permits 


Cost 


Permits 


Cost 


Totals 


280 


3.5M. 


298 


7.9 M. 


334 


6.7 M. 


Breakdown: 














Institutions 


17 


.5M 


26 


2.4M 


36 


2.0M 


Single Family 














Houses 


26 


1.5M 


35 


2.5M 


32 


2.3M 


Commercial 


24 


.5M 


54 


2.1M 


41 


1.0M 


Residential 














alt. & add. 


213 


1.0M 


181 


1.0M 


225 


1.4M 



Planning Board and Zoning Board work handled by the depart- 
ment, involving 45% of department time include the following: 

9 Site Plan Reviews 42 Zoning Hearings 

7 Regular Subdivisions 122 Zoning Permits 

11 Subdivisions by Waiver 

Included with the above are many preapplication hearings and 
numberous divisions of land not falling under Planning Board 
purview. 

It seems appropriate for future accomplishments to 
acknowledge some of the basic reasons why acceptable code en- 
forcement arrives at a snail's pace. The following comments deal 



20 



with problems inherent in code enforcement beyond the basic 
stumbling block that recognizing the unpredictability of fire and 
other hazards, people generally prefer the calculated risk to the ex- 
penditure of money, particularly since the risk is usually mitigated 
by insurance. 

Since the Code Office is the keystone by which zoning, planning 
and construction are held together, residents continue to confuse 
zoning, subdivision and site plan review regulations with the 
building codes, accentuating their feeling that their rights are con- 
tinually challenged by the building codes and that it is the building 
code that adversely effects the cost of their projects. 

All decisions of the Zoning and Planning Boards are enforced by 
the Code Department. To the unhappiness of some, initiation of en- 
forcement and compliance are not synonymous. It is our depart- 
ment policy, established by the Town Manager, that eventual com- 
pliance, if time is within reason, is a better procedure than legal 
action. 

In building construction the public purpose served is a delicate 
balance between the degree of restrictions placed upon the private 
enjoyment of ownership. Our codes concentrate on matters that 
relate directly to the protection of public health and safety. This is 
not always easy for people to appreciate. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The Conservation Commission continued to oversee town- 
owned natural areas and other open space lands, added to the, laid 
out and maintained public recreational trails, helped governmental 
bodies and private groups in assessing the potentials and limita- 
tions of land use, and carried out its other duties as required by 
state statutes and local ordinances. Much that has been ac- 
complished this year, however, was possible only with the coopera- 
tion of many individual citizens and organizations; the Commission 
is grateful for their assistance. 

During 1979 the Commission initiated a series of reports on 
natural and manmade features of Hanover as an aid toward ap- 
propriate land use and it advised the several town boards regarding 
open space land and the environmental impact of proposed sub- 
divisions. In response to a growing national concern and with the 
help of the Soil Conservation Service the Commission has iden- 
tified most of the prime agricultural lands in Hanover that are of na- 
tional, state and local importance. The Town is being asked to help 
preserve these lands for an anticipated need within a few decades. 



21 



The Town Forest has been surveyed and Forest Management 
Plans are being developed for it and the Gile Tract. The Commis- 
sion expects to implement them in 1980. Management plans for 
other town-owned lands should be developed in the next year or 
two. 

With the help of the Hanover Conservation Council and the 
Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service the Commission 
purchased the summit area of Balch Hill as an important addition 
to Hanover's Greenbelt. It also accepted a conservation deed from 
Mr. and Mrs. Alanson Grant that provides for maintaining a strip of 
their brookside land in its natural condition and for preserving 
Eleazar Wheelock's old mill site. Other landowners who are in- 
terested in protecting open space land, including agricultual land, 
and preserving historic sites are invited to consider the use of this 
versatile tool. 

Townspeople may find the newly laid Piane Trail off Rip Road a 
convenient way to reach the top of Balch Hill. Here and near the 
entrances to other trails within natural areas of Hanover's 
Greenbelt signs have been placed to remind hikers and skiers of 
the character of the areas. The Commission is receptive to sugges- 
tions for trail improvements from users of them. It continued to 
keep informed about the proposed Appalachian Trail corridor and 
sponsored a meeting of town officials and the public with represen- 
tatives of the Appalachian Trail Conference and the National Park 
Service for this purpose. In addition, the Commission made several 
recommendations to improve the safety of the Trail and to protect 
sensitive areas by incorporating them within the proposed corridor. 

During 1979 the Commission was represented by one or more of 
its members at meetings of the N.H. Association of Conservation 
Districts, The Future of the Upper Valley, The National Farm Land 
Study and the Association of Conservation Commissions. At these 
meetings and in its deliberations and decisions Commission 
members strive to balance the need for wise land use and pro- 
tection of sensitive areas against the practical requirements of 
town growth. 



COMMUNITY COUNSELOR 

The work of the Community Counselor is funded equally by the 
Town of Hanover and the Dresden School District. The position 
shares aspects of a Town youth worker, a school outreach person, 
a Town social worker, and a community referral source. The office 
of the Counselor is located at 42 Lebanon Street. 



22 



The duties of the Community Counselor break into three areas: 
youth and family services, welfare services, and community 
services. 

The counseling work with young people and their families 
centers on home difficulties, personal problems and social mal- 
adjustment. In addition the Counselor serves as a link between 
school and various parts of the community: parents, juvenile court, 
police, and social service agencies. This year 52 individuals and 
families received services. 

The Community Counselor serves as local welfare administrator, 
interviewing local welfare applicants, assessing their need, 
overseeing expenditure of welfare funds, and coordinating local 
services with State welfare programs. The past year saw aid being 
rendered to 14 families or individuals, an increase of 27%. Expen- 
ditures for local aid reached over $6,000, an additional $4,000 was 
needed to cover the local share of State welfare programs. 

Community Services showed the sharpest increase in demand in 
1979. The clients served included the senior citizens in the housing 
center, other local seniors, adults of the community needing 
counseling or referral to community agencies. The Community 
Counselor maintains a resource list of social, health, and financial 
assistance services, and functions as an advisor to the Town 
government on human service issues. 

The work of the Community Counselor for 1979 is as follows: 



Youth and Family Services 
Welfare Services 
Community Services 



Clients 
52 
14 
27 



Hours of 
Service 

1,394 
148.5 
219.5 



Average 

hours per 

client 

26.8 

10.6 

8.1 



The year of 1980 brings new objectives in each of the service 
areas. A series of discussion groups are planned for early in the 
year. These discussions will bring teenagers and parents together 
to talk about common concerns. In the welfare area, local eligibility 
standards will be updated to reflect recent increases in the cost of 
living and the effect of inflation. In addition this office will serve as 
a local agent to channel eligible Hanover citizens to the federal 
energy assistance programs. Lastly, it is hoped that 1980 will see 
the introduction of a small number of Section 8, federally subsi- 
dized apartments for low-income local residents. 



23 



EQUIPMENT 

This department is responsible for the care and maintenance of 
most Town-owned vehicles and equipment. The department also 
rebuilds and paints vehicles and equipment where it is economi- 
cally feasible. 

This year three pickup trucks and three dump trucks were re- 
placed. Also, a sidewalk snowblower and a one ton roller were pur- 
chased. 

Next year the 3-yard loader will be traded in for a new one and a 
new employee will be added to the department. Much of this 
employee's time will be charged to the electrical, plumbing and 
maintenance of Town-owned buildings. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The fire loss for 1979 was $47,780 with the department handling 
1038 incidents including the emergency medical. The breakdown is 
as follows: 

Fire Incidents 70 

Emergency Medical 551 

False Alarms 18 

Nonfire Emergency 356 

Special Service 43 

Training included attendance at Heavy Duty Rescue School, 
Operational Risk Analysis, Educational Methodology, Arson 
Seminar and many area Basic Fire Programs. For 1980 the Depart- 
ment will provide the training for the State Certified Fire Fighter 
Program and will take advantage of the New National Fire 
Academy. 

Now that we have had the use of the aerial tower for more than 
one year its benefits in fire fighting and safety to the personnel are 
even more than were anticipated. 

In Fire Prevention this year we worked closely with the schools 
to provide the National Fire Protection Association, "Learn Not to 
Burn Curriculum". 



24 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

The administrative office provides the services that in many 
towns and cities are performed by officials such as town clerks, tax 
collectors, assessors and treasurers in their own individual offices. 
In addition, clerical support is provided by the staff for the 
Manager, department heads and numerous town boards. 

The one office concept was initiated with the merger of the Town 
and the Village Precinct governments in 1964 and continued to ex- 
pand in 1968 to include the tax collector's office and again in 1972 
to include the town clerk's office. With this office structure the 
citizens enjoy a level of service and convenience that is found in 
few communities. 

Citizen participation plays an important role in the Town Govern- 
ment. At year end 20 boards, committees and subcommittees were 
actively assisting the Board of Selectmen and the Manager in the 
governing process. To ensure that work is processed in an orderly 
fashion a procedure was developed to provide guidelines for 
clerical support provided by the staff. This procedure has proven 
very beneficial. 

A 30% turnover in personnel again this year results in many mon- 
ths of continuous training of new employees by the experienced 
members of the staff. In the interest of efficiency and productivity 
it is our policy to try to maintain an attractive employment at- 
mosphere in order to retain good employees. 

State legislative action continues to add to the workload of the 
Towns in the areas of motor vehicle registrations, voter registra- 
tions and assessing records. The staff has been able to take on 
these added responsibilities and keep up with the increased 
volume of work without adding additional people. 

The automated accounting system in its second year of opera- 
tion has been able to produce reports on a timely basis and pro- 
vides department heads and town officials with good financial 
management information. 

A recommendation of the Comprehensive Planning Committee 
that a Resource Center be established to assist the boards and 
commissions was implemented in the fall by Howe Library, Public 
Works and Administration personnel. Initial design work, ordering 
equipment and sorting material was accomplished this year. 
Cataloging the collection is planned for 1980. This reference center 
will be a valuable asset for the Town and will provide the continuity 
necessary in a community that has more than the average influx of 
new residents. 



25 



Goals for 1980 include the following: 

1. Reorganization of the filing system and cataloging the 
Resource Center collection. 

2. Integrating the resident and property tax billing systems 
into the Town's existing automated system. 

3. Planning for a change in the Town fiscal year. 

4. Studying the microfilming needs of the Town. 

HANOVER HEALTH COUNCIL 

The Health Council has continued in its advisory role to assist 
the Selectmen and the Visiting Nurse Service on health related 
issues. Many citizens are to be thanked for their participation both 
in the studies completed, and the committees on which they serve. 
The Council also appreciates the continued interest and participa- 
tion of Selectman Sharon Nordgren. Without her efforts the 
amount of work accomplished this year could not have been 
achieved. 

The "Guide to Health Services" developed by Council members 
was distributed at the March Town Meeting. Additional copies of 
this reference list of health services are available at the Town Of- 
fice and the Visiting Nurse Service Office. The Council wishes to 
express its appreciation to Selectman Stephen Waite for his efforts 
in helping us to complete this task. 

In June the Health Council and the VNS participated in the Street 
Fest as an educational venture to help keep the community in- 
formed about health topics and the Visiting Nurse Service. 

The Council continues to invite resource people to come to its 
meetings to help keep members better informed on health issues 
and services. Included were members of West Central Community 
Health Service, Hospice, and Hanover School Nurses. 

We look forward to continued Community Health Information 
Programs (CHIPS) since the public has responded so favorably to 
these programs in the past. Our 1979 programs included one on 
hearing, and two on exercise. Included in our 1980 schedule will be 
programs on Dental Health, Nutrition and Common Accidents in 
the Home. 

Health Council members participated in the summer VNS Study 
Group formed in response to a charge from the Board of Select- 
men. The Council provided support for the study process, and en- 
dorsement of its report and recommendations. Council members 
participated in the VNS Feasibility Study Committee which was ap- 



26 



pointed by the Board of Selectmen to follow up on the recommen- 
dations of the summer study. In December the Selectmen accepted 
the recommendation of the VNS Feasibility Study Committee to 
create a Hospital Based Home Health Agency for Hanover. An Ad- 
visory Board will serve to provide community input to the agency. 
A task for 1980 will be to redetermine and redefine the role of the 
Health Council. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The Highway Department in 1979 continued with its gravel, seal, 
overlay and reconstruction programs. 

All gravel surfaced roadways had some gravel placed where 
unstable conditions existed. 

The seal program was continued with the use of 25,000 gallons 
of asphalt oil and 1350 tons of chip stone. 500 tons of shim was 
used and minor drainage and ditching was accomplished in con- 
junction with the program. River Road, Hardy Hill Road, Cross 
Road, Trescott Road, Stevens Road and part of Ruddsboro were 
sealed this year. 

Overlays were placed on Main Street from Dorrance Place to 
Wentworth Street, Lebanon Street from Main Street to Crosby 
Street, East and West South Street, Currier Place, Meadow Lane 
and Fox Field Lane. A total of 2560 tons were used. 

New construction included the completion of Ledyard Lane and 
the Ruddsboro Road TRA project. A new intersection was built at 
Occom Ridge and Clement Road, Webster Terrace and part of 
Webster Avenue and the intersection of Trescott and Etna Roads 
was rebuilt. 

Major drainage projects were constructed on Webster Avenue, 
Main Street, an area between West Wheelock Street and Allen 
Street and behind Moose Mountain. Also the Maurer-Pelton bridge 
was built. 

A concrete sidewalk was reconstructed on the East side of North 
Main Street from Wheelock to Wentworth. A new asphalt sidewalk 
was placed on Maynard Street in front of Raven House. 

More winter maintenance materials were used this year due to 
an increase in ice storms. More than 3000 cubic yards of sand and 
800 tons of salt were used. 

In 1980 more emphasis will be placed on the Overlay Program. 
This program is lagging due to the high cost of asphalt. Intensive 
research in recycling of asphalt and the use of other materials is 



27 



now being conducted. Hopefully something can be done to 
alleviate the ever increasing cost of asphalt. 

Road projects planned for next year are the reconstruction of 
Allen Street and Sanborn Road. 

The tree program which included Article seven of the Warrant 
resulted in 530 sprayed, and 112 were fed, and treated with 
pesticide and fungicide. There were 40 takedowns which were all 
elm trees. 56 new trees of various species were planted. 



HOWE LIBRARY 

Howe Library circulation for the year was 134,715, an average of 
20 items per capita, as compared with the statewide average of 6. 
1,662 new borrowers were registered, with total registrations now 
at 6,477. Of this total, 4,834 are adults, 1,069 are middle school or 
high school students, and 574 are children. 400 borrowers paid a 
non-resident fee for library membership. 

With provision in the budget of increased funds for purchase of 
library materials, the library was able to stay ahead of inflation and 
continue its program of carefully evaluating and expanding the 
book collection. 3,131 volumes were added and 1,696 discarded in 
1979, bringing the total book collection to 38,791. Of the volumes 
added, 686 were gifts given either by individuals or by community 
organizations. 107 of these gifts were memorial gifts. Also added to 
the collection were 170 records and 70 items of other audiovisual 
materials, bringing the total collection to 1,613 records and 524 
tapes, filmstrips and slide sets. 

A new service, begun last fall, was the provision of a circulating 
collection of art prints and photographs, available for free loan for 
six-week periods. The collection presently includes 10 framed art 
prints and 10 photographs of New England scenes. It was made 
possible by a gift from the James C. Wicker Fund. 

A gift from the Hanover Lions Club will assist the library in pro- 
viding improved service to the visually handicapped. The Lions 
presented a $1,000 fund in memory of former president Bill Griffith. 
The income from the fund is to be used to purchase Large Type 
books or taped materials. 

Wheelchair access to the library was improved by the installa- 
tion of a keyed doorbell. Keys are available for any person who 
needs help with the heavy doors at the building entrance. 

Special library programs for both adults and children continued 
to be well attended. 57 adult programs were offered, including 



28 



poetry readings, films, lectures, musical events and art exhibits. 
Except for one program funded by a gift from the Elden Murray 
Fund, all of these programs were produced by the volunteer efforts 
of various program planners and participants. Attendance at adult 
programs was 1,751. The 219 children's programs included story 
hours, puppet shows, a mime performance, films and filmstrips 
and seasonal activities. Attendance at these was 4,701. In addition, 
the Children's Librarian made 61 visits to classrooms and worked 
with 41 groups of children (school classes, Scouts, etc.) who came 
to the library. 

The library's meeting rooms were used 434 times during 1979 by 
a total of 99 different educational, cultural or civic organizations. 
Both the Mayer Room and the Elden Murray Room are available 
free of charge for the programs or meetings of such groups 
whenever they are not required for use by the library's own pro- 
grams. 

Town officials and library staff and trustees honored staff 
member Mary Churchill in June for 30 years of outstanding service 
to the Howe Library. During the year six staff members attended 
classes or workshops to increase their knowledge of library 
materials and improve their ability to guide the public in searching 
for information. The efforts of the staff were again ably augmented 
by the work of 38 volunteers who faithfully and generously gave 
2,987 hours of their time and energy to serve the library and the 
community. 



ETNA LIBRARY 

Ha Douple has continued as librarian this year. The library is 
open Tuesdays and Thursdays for a total of eight hours a week. 
During the summer weekly story hours were held, supplemented by 
occasional films. We also had a summer reading club for children. 

Once again we held our annual spring open house to introduce 
new people to the library and so that old friends could get together. 

We have continued to add to our collection of books and records 
throughout the year, with the main emphasis being on children's 
materials. The Etna Ladies Aid has donated a new book rack to 
hold our increased number of children's paperbacks. We have also 
received a set of government pamphlets from the Grafton County 
Extension Service. 

In December new window quilts were installed to help conserve 
heat. 



29 



PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION BOARD 

1979 was a year of frustration for the Parking and Transportation 
Board (PTB) in its efforts to improve parking and decrease traffic in 
the compact area of the town. The Board's recommendation to the 
Selectmen that the Peripheral Parking System be expanded could 
not be implemented because of apparent lack of a suitable site for 
a parking lot to serve the west (Ledyard) entrance to Hanover. 
Because more than 50% of the traffic entering the town comes via 
this route, any peripheral parking system which could not accom- 
modate a sizeable number (200 + ) cars at this entrance seemed 
doomed to failure. For this reason primarily, expansion of the 
Peripheral Parking System was abandoned in favor of a reassess- 
ment of constructing a parking structure on the Baxter Lot site. 
There is clear evidence that the lack of available parking is stifling 
use of real estate in the central business district and affecting 
adversely the tax base as well as preventing land there from being 
put to the most desirable use. A parking structure is seen as a 
means of alleviating this problem. An architect/planner is now be- 
ing sought to advise the Town on the Baxter Lot project and draw 
preliminary plans so that an estimate of costs can be made. 

In response to a request from the Zoning Board of Adjustment 
relayed to the Board by the Selectmen, the PTB also directed a 
review of the parking requirements as set forth in the Zoning Or- 
dinance. This review has been completed, and acting on the find- 
ings the PTB will recommend no changes in the Ordinance. 

Finally, encouraging area-wide developments in public transpor- 
tation led by the Upper Valley Senior Citizen's Center, under the 
direction of Ms. Anna Pluhar, were made public late in 1979. The 
PTB views this project as of paramount importance to the future 
well-being of Hanover and the entire Upper Valley. Acting on the ad- 
vice of the PTB, the Selectmen have endorsed financial support 
from the Town of Hanover for the UVSCC's system of public 
transportation, which proposes Buses to link Hanover with 
Lebanon, West Lebanon, Enfield, Canaan, and probably Lyme; the 
service will be available to anyone. This tentative but real step 
away from the private automobile is seen as a positive move 
towards decreasing commuter traffic and lessening Hanover's 
automobile-generated difficulties. 



30 



PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

During 1979 the Recreation Department continued to pursue the 
objectives of the Five-year Plan, with some shifts in emphasis in 
response to the concerns of the Town. It was a productive year, dur- 
ing which the Board members, augmented by many concerned 
citizens, considered two major issues in depth. 

Oak Hill Skiway 

The recreation survey confirmed that recreational skiing pro- 
grams at Oak Hill, managed by the Ford Sayre Ski Council, are 
among the most successful of all local recreation programs -in 
terms of participation and support. The issue of the continued 
operation of Oak Hill became a major concern to the Board when 
members of the Ford Sayre Council indicated that the organization 
no longer wished to operate the facility. The Recreation Board was 
concerned that the instructional, recreational program might be in 
jeopardy if steps were not taken to improve and operate the facility. 

A study committee chaired by James R. Grant of Etna and com- 
posed of members representing all segments of the skiing com- 
munity, met throughout the year to consider the possibilities for im- 
proving and operating the facility. This review included a full ex- 
ploration of the possibilities of the Town operating the hill, the 
priorities for capital improvements, the availability of federal fund- 
ing and the possibilities of negotiating a long-term (25 year) lease 
with Dartmouth College. In a special public meeting in December, a 
three-year plan was submitted to the Recreation Board, but was not 
endorsed by the skiing community. The plan was returned to com- 
mittee and revised, and resubmitted to the Board in January, with 
the full support of the Ford Sayre Council. This revised plan pro- 
posed that the Town assume responsibility for operating the hill at 
a net expense estimated to be $8-10,000 per year; that snow groom- 
ing equipment costing about $20,000 be acquired by the Town, and 
that over the next "2 to 4 years", the lift equipment be "upgraded". 

This proposal was voted down by the Recreation Board basically 
due to the majority opinion that the Town should not become in- 
volved in operating a skiing facility, but that the impetus should 
come from the private sector which has shown a strong commit- 
ment to skiing in the past, has the expertise necessary and has ac- 
cess to the resources required to insure continued operation and 
improvement of the hill. 

At the same time, the Board confirmed its strong support of the 
recreational skiing programs by voting unanimously to support a 
warrant article up to $10,000 for subsidizing the continued opera- 
tion and maintenance of the facility in 1981. 



31 



The Hanover Community Center 

The second major project undertaken by the Board was the 
establishment of a Community Center, primarily for the youth of 
Hanover. Under the leadership of Marcie Weinbel, the Community 
Center Committee drew up a plan which called for a trial operation 
of the Center during the winter of 1980. The building at 10 School 
Street, owned by the Town, was made available to the Recreation 
Department by the Selectmen and was furnished and renovated us- 
ing private funding, with generous support from AMCA, Incor- 
porated, and scores of private citizens and civic organizations. An 
interim Director, Becky Mazzer, was hired and the Center has been 
operating on a trial basis from mid-January to the present time. 

At the March Town Meeting, a warrant article will be presented 
asking the Town to appropriate approximately $22,000 during 1980 
to continue operation of the Center. 

The Committee was most grateful for the outstanding dedication 
of its student members who devoted much of their free time to 
planning, staffing and operating the Center. They were: Shawn 
Samuelson, Brian Lincoln, Liz Pippin, Jane Elder, Gus DiMaggio 
and Michael Cohen. 

The Future of Public Skating 

The Recreation Department administered the public skating pro- 
gram for the first time under a warrant article which allowed for 
greater flexibility in the use of Town funds. Under the warrant, the 
department was able to give additional support to the Occom Pond 
and Etna skating facilities. 

Special meetings were held early in the year with representatives 
of all skating interests to consider possible courses of action if the 
Davis Rink were to be closed by the College. A decision by the Col- 
lege to refurbish Davis and to continue its operation into the near 
future in order to meet its own needs seemed to assure that pre- 
sent recreational programs would not be in jeopardy, and further 
consideration was deferred. 

In the meantime, the Occom Pond and public skating programs 
have enjoyed a banner year due to the lack of good skiing weather, 
and increased attention to the maintenance of good ice conditions 
out-of-doors. 

Major Accomplishments 

During 1979 the Recreation Department again supported expan- 
sion of the playground facilities in Etna, and contributed toward 
the construction of a shelter at the fire station skating rink. The 
Lyme road playing fields were expanded with volunteer labor to in- 
clude a second soccer field and softball diamond. 



32 



The Fourth Annual Hanover Invitational Basketball Tournament 
was host to 115 teams and over 1000 players from grade three to 
adult. Proceeds from the concession stand run by parents of the 
Hanover participants were used to help acquire a new scoreboard 
for the Hanover High School gymnasium and to install the old 
score board in the Richmond gym. 

During the year, the Board accepted with regret, the resignation 
of Willy Black, the last remaining Charter Member of the Board, 
whose five years of service to the community have had a signifi- 
cant impact upon our recreational programs. 

During the year ahead, the Recreation Board will address two 
major concerns: 

(1) The development of a plan for the acquisition and develop- 
ment of playing fields and athletic facilities which will com- 
plement the plan developed by the Dresden School District 
Athletic Facilities Committee; 

(2) The development of the Hanover Community Center and 
its programs. 



PLANNING BOARD 

The duties of the Planning Board are basically two-fold. 

A. The administration of existing ordinances and regulations, 
i.e. site plan review, and 

B. Long-range planning 

The Board currently meets weekly, reserving at least two 
meetings per month for long-range planning. 

Public hearings have been held on the proposed revision of the 
subdivision regulations. Major changes in the format have resulted 
making the regulations easier to use and to understand. It is an- 
ticipated that the Board will have voted to adopt the regulations 
prior to Town Meeting. 

1979 has seen the first applications for planned residential 
development in Hanover. This type of development allows the 
clustering of multiple units thereby protecting open space, and 
decreasing the Town's cost for maintenance of roads. 

Several ad hoc committees have presented reports to the Plan- 
ning Board. These include a report on the Greensboro Valley, which 
deals with the pressures of the development on Greensboro Road 
and adjacent Mink Brook; and, also a report on the impact of the 



33 



current Hanover zoning ordinance on availability of modern cost 
housing in Hanover. A limited number of copies of these reports 
may still be available in the Town Office. 

The functioning of the Planning Board has been helped this year 
by the appointment of two alternate members, Nina Banwell and 
Fred Swift. In addition, Sue Cohen has volunteered to act as a 
liaison person between the Board and personnel in the Town Of- 
fices. In addition, she has acted as recording secretary for several 
sub-committees of the Board. 

The major work for the Planning Board in 1980 will be the 
development of a comprehensive plan for the Town of Hanover. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The Hanover Police Department Annual Report for the year 1979 
shows that a total of 799 criminal and motor vehicle arrests and 
summonses were issued by the Police Department and prosecuted 
in the Hanover District Court. While there was a decline in motor 
vehicle cases over last year, the number of criminal cases handled 
increased, from 169 in 1978 to 208 in 1979. Our recovery rate on 
stolen property jumped to 69 percent in 1979. This is 5 percent 
higher than last year and much higher than the national average. 

Patrol Officers investigated a total of 260 motor vehicle ac- 
cidents this past year, which was 15 less than the cycle. The Town 
of Hanover has now gone thirty years without a pedestrian fatality, 
a record unmatched by any other City or Town in the State of New 
Hampshire. 

The most fruitful program of the Detective Division has been its 
concentration on the Juvenile crime problem and its prevention. 
Since the establishment of the Richmond School Parents Educa- 
tion Committee last June, thefts, burglaries and other property 
crimes committed by Juveniles has dropped dramatically. Many 
man hours have been devoted to Juvenile crime prevention and the 
program is beginning to pay off. 

There were over 32,000 parking tickets issued in the Town of 
Hanover during the past year. The monetary return for each ticket 
issued amounted to a very high $1.62. The total revenue from park- 
ing meters and fines amounted to $117,457.67. This figure is about 
$10,000 higher than last year's total. 

The Upper Valley Regional Dispatch Center handled over 125,000 
calls and radio transmissions in 1979. This represents an increase 
of over 17,000 calls over last year's figure. During 1979, the 



34 



Dispatch Center handled over 61,000 log entries for the Hanover 
Police Department alone, including telephone calls, parking tickets 
and complaint and service reports. Peddler permits are also issued 
at the Dispatch Center for all vendors who sell and display their 
wares on South Main street. 



ANALYSIS OF MOTOR VEHICLE OFFENSES 

Yellow line violation 37 

Traffic light violation 25 

Operating uninspected vehicle 40 

Operating unregistered vehicle 42 

Operating without license 28 

Operating without lights 12 

Speeding 320 

One-way-street violations 30 

Other miscellaneous offenses 47 

581 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 

Parking tickets issued 31 ,925 

ANALYSIS OF M/V ACCIDENTS 

Fatalities 1 

Pedestrians injured 2 

Personal injury & property damage 31 

Property damage only 226 

260 



ANALYSIS OF COMMITMENTS 

N.H. State Hospital in Concord 13 

N.H. State Industrial School 2 

Grafton County Jail 11 

Grafton County House of Correction 1_ 

27 



35 



Analysis of Auto Thefts & Recoveries 

Number of M/V reported stolen in Hanover 1 1 

Total recovered in Hanover 7 

Recovered by other jurisdictions 2 

Percent of M/V recovered 82% 

Recovered for other jurisdictions 4 



Analysis of Property Value Reported Stolen and Recovered 
(Autos Not Included) 

Property val ue reported stolen $86,406.00 

Property val ue recovered $49,248.00 

Percent of property recovered 57% 



Analysis of Criminal Arrest and Convictions 

Assaults (Aggravated) 3 

Assaults (Not aggravated) 1 

Burglary 7 

Larceny 39 

Autotheft 2 

Simple assaults 2 

Arson 2 

Forgery 17 

Fraud 12 

Possessing stolen property 6 

Vandalism 1 

Narcotic drug laws 19 

D.W.I. 42 

Liquor laws 21 

Drunkenness 5 

Disorderly Conduct 1 

Other Offenses 28 

208 



Analysis of Complaints & Services 

Complaints answered 2570 

Services rendered 4197 

6767 



36 



Analysis of Bikes Stolen & Recovered 

Bikes reported stolen 61 

Bikes recovered 32 

Value of bikes stolen $7784. 

Value of bikes recovered $4654. 



Analysis of Activities 

Assistance to ill persons 2 

Activated alarm answered 321 

Business doors found open 334 

Cruiser mileage 120,440 

Dog complaints 86 

Ambulance escorts 24 

Money escorts 596 

Road escorts 8 

Emergency transportation 10 

Fingerprints 99 

Fire alarms answered 281 

Funeral details 23 

Injured & stray animals 137 

Messages del ivered 1 59 

Missing persons reported 38 

Missing persons located 16 

Prisoners detained for other agency 9 

Prisoners detained for local agency 47 

Blood relays 59 

Road & sidewalk defects reported 12 

Runaways reported 1 

Runaways located 1 

Street lights reported out 95 

Towed vehicles 158 

Try & locate requests 84 

Vacant residences checked 421 

Assists to other departments 359 

ANIMAL CONTROL 



Total Number of Complaints 

Dogs Handled 
In Compact Area 
Outside Compact Area 

37 



1978 


1979 


872 


2304 


675 


934 


544 


870 


131 


64 



Dogs Licensed 


559 


493 




5 Kennel 


8 Kennel 


Dog Bite Cases 


15 


24 


Lost dogs found & 






returned to owner 


47 


62 


Dogs hit by cars 


15 


23 


Dogs destroyed 


5-4 running deer 


3 


Dogs taken to Shelter 


39 


23 


Unclaimed dogs 


14 


2 


Dogs placed in new homes 


14 


5 


Returned to owners 


- 


16 


Other animals handled 


128 


270 


Cats 


69 


31 


Cats taken to shelter 


54 


8 


Cats destroyed 


15 


23 


Raccoons 


10 


35 


Skunks 


45 


136 


Woodchucks 


27 


10 


Deer dog complaints 


18 


5 


Bat Complaints 


11 


10 


Bear Complaints 


- 


3 


Birds, Snakes, Bees, Beaver 


- 


44 



1979 was a very busy sixth year in Animal Control. We dropped 
the Sewer District and adopted the Compact Area, adding Etna and 
the Greensboro road to our patrol area. 

We received Bear and Beaver complaints for the first time and 
worked with the State Fish & Game Department on them. 

For 1980 we intend to give the same good service to our Citizens 
and their Pets. 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

1979 maintenance and construction included the installation of 
a service connection and floor drains at the Etna Fire Station. 
Several house connections were made in exchange for sewer line 
easements. An extension or replacement of the Town's Sewer 
Lines were made off Greensboro Road, School Street, Wheelock 
Street and Webster Avenue. New sewer main extensions were 
made by the Sewer Department, but paid for by the property owners 
along Route 120 and Donna Road. Developers paid for sewer line 
extensions from Ledge Road toward Hemlock Road. 



38 



Other work included the tracing and locating of sewer mains in 
the Occom Pond, West Wheelock and School Street areas. The in- 
stallation of several tees in sewer mains for relocating or adding 
new sewer services to the Town Sewer System were made. Also ap- 
proximately 30 manholes were rebuilt and raised. We assisted 
Hoyle-Tanner, an engineering firm, with the study of inflow and 
infiltration. 

Hoyle-Tanner and Associates completed preliminary plans and 
specifications for the expansion of the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant. State of New Hampshire funding is scheduled for 1982. 

Work at the Treatment Plant included revising the methane gas 
system so that the boiler operated more effectively, this along with 
weather proofing of the building has shown a significant reduction 
in fuel cost. Wood burning equipment is also being installed to fur- 
ther reduce costs. 

Department personnel changes were made. The two plant 
operator's positions were upgraded, one to Chief Operator and the 
other to Maintenance and Construction Foreman. Due to these 
changes one person was added to the staff. 



VISITING NURSE SERVICE 

The Hanover Visiting Nurse Service has been a central focus of 
attention during 1979. Guideline review and revisions, staffing of 
the Agency and comprehensive feasibility studies dealing with the 
goverance issues concerning the Agency have demanded intense 
time of all the Visiting Nurse Service Committees as well as the 
Agency's staff. 

A survey of the Agency was done during the last quarter of 1979 
and it was determined that we have no conditions out of com- 
pliance in the Health Insurance for the Aged Program and we are a 
certified Home Health Agency in the State of New Hampshire. The 
Agency has a contract with Blue Cross, Blue Shield which allows 
persons with this coverage to receive full benefits for skilled home 
health services. A contract with the Lebanon Area Health Council 
is in effect which supplies the Hanover, Etna and Hanover Center 
areas with Homemakers/Home Health Aides. The Agency also has 
an agreement with the Lebanon Area Health Council for the 
Hanover residents to utilize the Well Child Clinic which is held 
monthly in Lebanon. 

The Hanover Visiting Nurse Service has been active this year in 
health promotion and disease detection activities in the communi- 



39 



ty. The Adult Health Screening Clinic which is held approximately 
every six weeks was able to initiate medical referrals for many of 
the persons seen at this clinic. Influenza immunization clinics were 
held and persons ranging in age from 21 to 95 years of age were im- 
munized. The Agency staff assisted with the Well Child Immuniza- 
tion which was sponsored and coordinated by the nurses of the 
Hanover Schools. 

The Hanover Visiting Nurse Service has two full time nurses, one 
part time nurse, two contracted physical therapists and several 
contracted Home Health Aides from the Lebanon Area Health 
Council. 

1979 Statistics 

Nursing visits 1581 

Physical Therapy visits 370 

Home Health Aid visits 490 

Total Visits for the year 2441 

Patients admitted 103 

Patients discharged 92 

Medicare visits 1013 

Full fee visits 617 

Part fee visits 67 

No charge visits 514 

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment held hearings on 42 cases in 
1979 which is five more than the previous year. Many of these 
cases parallel the problems confronting the Town such as housing 
and parking. These issues are complex requiring in some cases 
multiple hearings and much legal advice. 

The resignation of 10-year Board member and Clerk, Barbara 
Morin was regretfully received in September. Barbara's long tenure 
brought to the Board consistency with past boards and her ability 
to apply good old-fashioned common sense to each case will be 
missed. The Selectmen appointed former alternate member, Mar- 
cia Baldwin to the Board and Stuart Templeton as an alternate. 

In January the Board will be changing the date of its hearings to 
the 4th Thursday of the month and the location to the Courtroom of 
the Municipal Building. 

In 1980 the Board expects to work closely with the Planning 
Board in an effort to clarify the language in certain sections of the 
existing zoning ordinance for presentation to a future Town Meeting. 



40 



Note: The 1979 Auditors' Report by Arthur Andersen & Co., is not 
printed in this report. Copies of this report are available at 
the Town Office. 

MEMORANDUM ON ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES 

AND INTERNAL CONTROLS RELATIVE TO 

1978 AUDIT 

Arthur Andersen & Co. 
Boston, Massachusetts 

April, 1979 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Hanover, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

The accompanying memorandum includes suggestions for im- 
provements of accounting procedures and internal accounting con- 
trol measures that came to our attention as a result of our examina- 
tion of the financial statements of the Town of Hanover, New 
Hampshire for the year ended December 31, 1978. The matters 
discussed herein were considered by us during our examination 
and they do not modify the opinion expressed in our auditors' 
report dated February 7, 1979 on such financial statements. 

In accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, we 
performed a review and evaluation of existing internal accounting 
controls for the purpose of providing a basis for reliance thereon in 
determining the nature, timing and extent of the audit tests applied 
in connection with our examination of the Town's 1978 financial 
statements. While certain matters which came to our attention dur- 
ing the review are presented in the accompanying memorandum for 
the consideration of the Town, such a review was not designed for 
the purpose of making detailed recommendations and would not 
necessarily disclose all weaknesses in the existing system. 

The accompanying memorandum also includes comments and 
suggestions with respect to other financial and administrative mat- 
ters which came to our attention during the course of our examina- 
tion of the financial statements. These comments are offered as 
constructive suggestions for the consideration of the Town as part 
of the ongoing process of modifying and improving accounting 
control and other financial and administrative practices and 
procedures. 

Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 



41 



Observation 

Revenue Management 

1. The Town bills its property taxes and sewer charges once each 
year. 

2. User fees for sewer charges are not based upon the cost incur- 
red on a full absorption basis (consideration of all direct and in- 
direct costs). Specifically, depreciation expense is not considered 
in setting user fees. 



Observation 

Purchasing 

1. Expenditures, including capital expenditures, are not always 
properly coded to the correct expense category by department 
heads. 

2. A '1' instead of the invoice number is sometimes used as a 
reference number in the purchase journal. 

3. Documentation (i.e., invoices, check requests) are not cancelled 
in order to prevent reprocessing. Current procedures require that 
the tissue copy of the check be stapled to the voucher package to 
indicate payment. 

4. Manual checks are stored in an unlocked cabinet. 

5. The Town does not join with other local communities in making 
purchases of larger, more expensive items (e.g., tires). 

6. Town bidding procedures are not formalized. 

7. The Town does not have formalized procedures related to pur- 
chasing and receiving of goods and services. 



42 



Observation 

Payroll 

1. "Employee information forms", which are the source 
documents for all payroll additions and changes, are not approved 
in writing by the Town Manager or other responsible Town 
representative. 

2. A listing of additions/changes to the payroll master file is not 
generated. The payroll clerk is the only person to review the payroll 
master file. 

3. Department heads do not always sign time reports as required. 



OTHER MATTERS 
Building Permits 

1. The building inspector does not use prenumbered building 
permits. 

Trust Funds 

2. During our year-end review of the trust funds we noted certain 
relatively minor occurrences which included: 

a. the initial annual statement of trust fund account did not 
balance with total investments held due to an unposed year- 
end transfer 

b. certain transfers which the Town had requested be made 
prior to year-end in order to simplify their bookkeeping, were 
made subsequent to year-end, and 

c. interest income for the year was allocated only to those cap- 
ital reserve funds open at year-end and not on a more sys- 
tematic basis, e.g., the weighted average of month-end 
balances. 



43 



PRIOR YEAR RECOMMENDATIONS 

In connection with our previous examinations, we have made 
certain recommendations to the Town which we continue to 
believe should be considered for implementation. These are: 

1. Fixed Asset Accounting 

2. Capital Projects Accounting 

3. Change in Fiscal Year 

4. Disposition of Old Outstanding Checks 
Implementation of recommendations 1 and 2 would enhance the 

accounting control exercised over certain of the Town's major 
assets in order to help Town management meet is fiduciary respon- 
sibilities. A change in the Town's fiscal year to June 30 would per- 
mit the Town to complete its annual budget and have it approved 
prior to the beginning of the year. Disposition of old outstanding 
checks is a matter of law. The Town should verify that its current 
procedures comply with the applicable state laws. For a more 
detailed explanation of these recommendations, please refer to the 
memoranda issued in prior years. 



44 



BUDGET DISCUSSION 1979 AND 1980 

1980 FINANCIAL PROGRAM 
DISCUSSION OF ALL DEPARTMENTS 

The 1980 financial plan has been developed under extreme infla- 
tionary pressure. As the average householder has attempted to 
cope with these external forces so has your Town government in- 
itiated procedures to compensate for the loss of dollar value. By in- 
itiating conservative measures, priority rankings for projects, pro- 
ductivity improvements, the elimination of non-essential expen- 
ditures, and increased cost analysis technique, we have managed 
once again to absorb a major percentage of inflation as we did in 
1979. 

Energy conservation has been our primary concern while 
developing the 1980 budget and it will continue to be our concern in 
the forseeable future. We have undertaken detailed energy con- 
sumption studies on all of our buildings and have begun imple- 
menting those conservation measures which indicate the best 
return on dollars invested. 

The 1980 budget can best be summarized as a less than normal 
maintenance budget. In the majority of departments, programs 
have been kept at the 1979 level or less which, when one considers 
the affects of inflation, results in decreases in dollars applied to 
maintenance services. Our emphasis has been placed on those ser- 
vices which directly affect the Town's health, safety and welfare. 
However, even in these cases, maintenance has been reduced to 
the minimal essential level. 

The total appropriation being requested at Town Meeting is up 
$297,214 or 9% over the 1979 budget. Over the two year period 
since 1978 the average yearly increase in the appropriation has 
been 5% while inflation has averaged 10%. Therefore in terms of 
1978 dollars, we are proposing to spend less money in 1980 than we 
spent in 1978 or 1979. 

Breaking the total appropriation into its component parts we pro- 
ject that the General Fund, which contains expenditures for all 
departments except Fire, Sidewalks, Parking and Sewer, will in- 
crease about 8.4%, The Fire Fund will increase 11.9%, the Side- 
walk Fund 6.7%, the Parking Fund 17.8%, and the Sewer Fund 
6.1%. 

The controls in expenditures initiated in 1979 have been more 
forcefully utilized in the 1980 budget. Every effort has been made to 
maintain service delivery to the public at prior year levels yet 
decrease the amount of dollars utilized to support these services. 



45 



This has not been an easy task yet we have managed excellent suc- 
cess in this area. 

Governance and Coordination 

District Court 

This budget reflects an increase of about $8400 over 1979 
primarily as a result of wage adjustments as dictated by the State 
legislature for court personnel. 

General Administration 

Total spending for this centralized administrative function is 
down about 6% from 1979. The number of personnel in this depart- 
ment is down by .5 positions, spending for supplies and materials 
are down by 5% and capital outlay and contract services show 
reductions from 1979. 

Legal Service 

This budget contains the cost for legal services utilized by all 
Town departments, boards and commissions. In addition legal ex- 
penses incurred on tax appeal cases are assumed by this budget. 
Legal services are provided through a contractual agreement at an 
hourly rate. The 1980 budget indicates an hourly rate increase from 
sixty to sixty five dollars. 

Planning Board 

The Planning Board's budget is up about $5,400 from 1979 due to 
an increase in the Town's dues from the Upper Valley- Lake 
Sunapee Planning Council and for additional funds for planning 
consultation aimed primarily at updating the Town's master plan. 

Human Services 

Visiting Nurse Service 

During 1979 this department underwent intense study and 
evaluation and conclusions were reached that will result in the 
Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital assuming the role of provider 
for Home Health Care services to the Town beginning in July of 
1980. 

The budget being presented to the Town Meeting assumes a full 
year under Town operation. Even if the service is successfully 
assumed by the hospital the total expenditures as presented will 
change very little since the Town will provide for a cash subsidy to 
the hospital to financially support the service. 

Counseling 

The Counseling budget is split between the Town and the School 
and provides for a community counselor who is involved in 
counseling, crisis intervention, agency referrals, housing needs 



46 



and the administration of our local welfare budget. Expenditures in 
this budget are up only $2000 which reflects adjustments to wages 
and fringe benefits. Expenses for supplies and materials are down 
from the 1979 level. 

Health and Welfare 

This budget contains expenses for the subsidy for the Elderly 
Housing, contributions to the Senior Citizen Center, reim- 
bursements to the State for Old Age Assistance, the per capita 
assessment for the ambulance service, Town Welfare and 
Headrest. The 1980 proposal is $1000 less than the 1979 budget. 

Health Council 

This budget provides funds to the Health Council which has suc- 
cessfully implemented the CHIPS program over the past two years 
in an attempt to publicize relevant health issues to local residents. 
Based upon 1979 actual expenditure activity we were able to 
reduce this budget by about one half without adversely affecting 
program offerings. 

Conservation Commission 

1979 saw the implementation of a forestry management program 
for publicly owned lands. The 1980 budget contains funds to com- 
plete this program and estimates receipts from the sale of timber. 
This budget is a 10% reduction from the 1979 budget. 

Recreation 

This budget shows an $8500 increase over 1979 as a result of 
wage adjustments and increased program costs. Part time person- 
nel have been reduced and adjustments have been made in con- 
tractual services. Revenues show a $3000 increase but contain no 
changes in fee structure but simply reflect increased participation. 

Howe Library 

The Howe Library budget increased about 12 1 /2 percent over 
1979. Inflation on the cost of books and other library materials has 
been in excess of the average inflationary rate. We have included a 
continuation of our program aimed at increasing total volumes by 
4% in 1980. Also, in response to public request for service the 
library will be open for six additional Sundays. Revenues show a 
28% increase and are generated by interest on investments from 
unrestricted funds, fees and fines and a newly introduced charge 
to the Administration Department for Library personnel efforts at 
the Municipal Building's new Resource Center. 

Etna Library 

The Etna Library budget shows a slight decrease from 1979 
although the cost of volumes has increased. The primary decrease 



47 



is in capital outlay since most of the energy conservation im- 
provements to the building have been completed. 

Safety Services 

Code 

The only changes made to the Code department in 1980 were to 
increase the fee structure for Zoning Permits, Subdivision review 
and a modification of the residential building permit fee. These in- 
creases were necessitated in part to continue to attempt to recover 
costs from user fees as well as to reflect the additional time and ef- 
fort required of Code personnel as a result of changes in the sub- 
division regulations and other review requirements. New State 
legislation contributed to increased costs of this department by re- 
quiring energy conservation review of all plans and specifications 
and changes in the public notification laws will require increased 
mailings. 

Police 

The Police Department budget has been most adversely affected 
by increased fuel costs. During 1979 steps were implemented to 
deal with this issue by reducing total mileage traveled by approx- 
imately eight thousand miles from the 1978 mileage. This type of 
mileage reduction will be continued into 1980. 

Traffic control items also rose considerably in cost due to in- 
creases in materials cost for signs and line painting. All other ex- 
pense items are being held at minimal increases or have been 
decreased in an attempt to offset those items beyond our control. 

Revenues are projected to increase about $8000 primarily due to 
the addition of three communities to the regional dispatch service 
operated by this department. 

Fire 

For the first time in a number of years the Fire Department ran a 
deficit at the close of 1979. The reason for the deficit was due to 
our receipt of an incorrect debt repayment schedule which placed 
us over $1 1 ,000 short from the beginning of the year. Therefore the 
1980 expenditure proposal contains this deficit figure which must 
be funded. 

Heating costs for both the Lyme Road and Etna stations are in- 
cluded in this budget and have been budgeted at the supplier's 
recommended level. However, substantial conservation measures 
are being implemented and will be financed by the dollars saved 
from their installation. 

Decreases in the equipment reserve, capital outlay, repairs and 
maintenance help offset the increases in fuel costs. 



48 



Public Works 

Highway 

In spite of extraordinary increases in the cost of petroleum pro- 
ducts, the highway department budget as proposed constitutes on- 
ly a 5.9% increase over the 1979 budget. The primary reason for 
this minimal increase is a result of reductions in the planned work 
program for drainage and bridges, street maintenance and the 
overlay program. In an effort to minimize a tax increase, the 
highway budget was developed in a less than ordinary 
maintenance level with overlay programs being deferred to future 
years. We believe that this can be done through the re-scheduling 
of these projects with minimal detrimental effect on the present 
road network or in the cost of this program in any one year. 

Buildings and Grounds 

This budget contains the costs for maintaining the Municipal 
Building and the Public Works Garage. In addition maintenance ex- 
penses for the Library buildings are also included but charged back 
to those departments. The cost for maintaining all public 
cemeteries is also included. 

Our major emphasis in this budget has been to improve our 
buildings for energy conservation including the construction of a 
passive solar Trumbe wall at the garage facility. Energy audits are 
being conducted in all of our buildings and suggested im- 
provements are being implemented. 

Equipment 

This budget contains the cost of all labor, parts and supplies for 
the repair and operation of all Town equipment with the exception 
of Fire apparatus and sewer vehicles. The department is self sup- 
porting in that it bills other departments for it's services on a user 
fee basis. 

The cost of automotive parts, fuel and oil continue to rise faster 
than other consumer items. One area of success in combating ris- 
ing costs has been our preventive maintenance program. Through 
this program we have been able to successfully extend the cost ef- 
fective operating life of most of our equipment without encounter- 
ing major breakdowns. 



49 



Sewer 

The Sewer department continues to be one of our most efficient 
departments in terms of cost containment. Major success has 
been achieved in the area of reducing energy consumption and 
chemical use for the treatment process. In addition, we have, and 
plan to continue, to phase out small pumping stations where feasi- 
ble. 

In conjunction with our reductions in expenditures we have 
worked diligently at improving our collection process and as a 
result will not require a sewer rate increase in 1980. 



50 



REVENUE 


EXPENDITURE 




COMPARISON 








1978 


1979 


1980 


Revenues 


Budget 


Budget 


Budget 


Property Taxes 


40 


42 


39 


Other Local Taxes 


1 


1 


1 


Licenses and Permits 


5 


6 


5 


Use of Property and Money 


2 


2 


3 


Revenue from Other 








Government Agencies 


24 


24 


25 


Department Revenues 


15 


17 


16 


Sundry Revenues 


7 


4 


3 


Parking 


6 


4 


8 


TOTAL 


100% 


100% 


100% 


Expenditures 








Governance & Coordination 


7 


6 


7 


Safety Services 


13 


14 


14 


Human Services 


35 


34 


35 


Public Works 


45 


46 


44 


TOTAL 


100% 


100% 


100% 



51 



BUDGET SUMMARY 





1979 


1979 


1980 




Budget 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Property Taxes 


$1,364,615 


$1,358,672 


$1,481,266 


Other Local Taxes 


38,850 


52,930 


48,900 


Licenses & Permits 


175,918 


178,991 


195,674 


Use of Property & Money 


61,503 


147,435 


131,854 


Revenue from Other 








Government Agencies 


793,474 


850,335 


942,518 


Department Revenues 


565,810 


667,539 


602,039 


Sundry Revenues 


117,848 


88,588 


110,976 


Parking 


140,206 


280,209 


300,872 


Total Current Revenues 


$3,258,224 


$3,624,699 


$3,814,099 



52 



BUDGET SUMMARY 



Expenditures 

Governance & Coordination 

District Court 

General Administration 

Legal 

Planning Board 

Debt and Interest 

Total 

Human Services 
Visiting Nurse 
Counseling 
Health & Welfare 
Health Council 
Conservation Commission 
Recreation 
Howe Library 
Etna Library 
Total 

Safety Services 
Code 
Police 
Parking 
Fire 
Total 

Public Works 
Highway 

Buildings & Grounds 
Equipment 
Sidewalks 
Sewer 
Total 

Special Articles 

Trescott Road 

Davis Rink 

Oak Hill 

Elm Program 

Total 
Appropriation 



7979 1979 1980 

Budget Actual Budget 



$ 25,016$ 25,119$ 33,513 



101,232 
16,100 
10,833 
48,808 



92,705 

22,975 

9,966 

112,125 



95,179 

17,338 

15,219 

103,404 



$1 202,039 $ 


262,890 $ 


264,653 


$ 78,233 $ 


64,767 $ 


83,547 


19,768 


19,475 


21,700 


85,960 


80,699 


84,957 


1,070 


597 


571 


15,500 


14,973 


13,890 


46,824 


49,810 


55,375 


199,184 


200,595 


224,198 


5,018 


5,341 


4,789 



$ 451,557$ 436,257$ 489,027 



$ 46,883$ 48,549$ 55,406 
394,428 411,919 454,080 
140,206 152,092 164,298 
523,782 537,032 586,564 

$1,105,299 $1,149,592 $1,260,348 



$ 770,670$ 


747,048 $ 


816,765 


164,813 


169,230 


180,070 











24,600 


19,051 


26,250 


540,091 


567,630 


573,386 



$1,500,174 $1,502,959 $1,596,471 







$ 54,216$ 57,123$ 

$3,313,285 $3,408,821 $3,610,499 



26,216 $ 


35,570 


8,000 


6,389 


8,000 


8,000 


12,000 


7,164 



53 



GENERAL REVENUES 



Current Year Levy 
Prior Year Levy 
Interest on Delinquent Taxes 
Land Use Tax 
Property Taxes 

Resident Taxes 
National Bank Stock Taxes 
Yield Tax 

Resident Tax Penalties 
Other Local Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Permits 

Temp. Investment Interest 
Trust Funds 

Hanover Water Works Div. 
Use of Property & Money 

Railroad Tax 

Interest & Dividends Tax 

Savings Bank Tax 

Rooms & Meals Tax 

Business Profits Tax 

Revenue Sharing 

Anti-Recession Funds 

Housing Tax 
Revenue from other 
Government Agencies 

Miscellaneous 
Prior Year Revenue 
Sundry Revenue 

Total Revenues 



7978 7979 7980 
Actual Actual Budget 

$ 637,309 $ 654,751 $ 902,766 

241,994 196,326 

6,263 5,861 4,000 

4,251 7,200 

$ 889,817$ 864,138$ 906,766 

$ 36,351 $ 37,700 $ 36,500 

2,503 2,407 2,400 

4,844 12,410 10,000 

385 413 

$ 44,083$ 52,930$ 48,900 

$ 127,185$ 132,714$ 140,000 

$ 65,634$ 110,014$ 95,000 

4,049 5,838 4,500 

7,321 3,660 3,660 

$ 77,004$ 119,512$ 103,160 



0$ 



130$ 



325,546 


325,545 


325,546 


25,932 


38,292 


38,294 


72,197 


84,106 


84,105 


33,911 


87,795 


86,355 


69,732 


49,496 


54,781 





748 








11,656 


12,000 



$ 527,318$ 597,768$ 601,081 

$ 1,112$ 284$ 

68,615 32,160 56,000 

$ 69,727$ 32,444$ 56,000 

$1,735,117 $1,799,506 $1,855,907 



54 



EXPENDITURES 

Hanover District Court 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








District Court Fines 


$14,995 


$14,097 


$14,000 


Community Contributions 


$14,995 




1,250 


Total Revenue 


$14,097 


$15,250 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$16,961 


$24,173 


$32,593 


Auto Allowance 


$143 


$472 


$500 


Communications 


128 


360 


300 


Training 





50 


50 


Office Supplies 


45 


64 


70 


Total Supplies & 








Materials 


$316 


$946 


$920 


Total Expenses 


$17,277 


$25,119 


$33,513 


Net Department Total 


$2,282 


$11,022 


$18,263 



General Administration 



Revenues 
Tax Sales Redeemed 
Permits, Licenses & Fees 
Crime Commission 
Miscellaneous 
Inter-Dept. Charges 



$16,779 


$11,953 


$5,000 


34,830 


34,028 


30,540 


1,841 


1,692 





1,340 


1,227 





187,808 


198,152 


223,889 



$242,587 $247,052 $259,429 



55 



General Administration 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$201,498 


$186,100 


$212,780 


Communications 


$7,852 


$8,235 


$9,330 


Insurance & Bonding 


1,901 


2,885 


2,410 


Printing & Publications 


7,326 


6,614 


9,900 


Training 


1,462 


1,279 


2,000 


Dues & Subscriptions 


2,164 


2,515 


2,680 


Office Supplies 


4,851 


4,506 


4,900 


Data Processing 








Supplies 


2,159 


1,171 


2,250 


Office Equipment 


2,962 


2,666 


2,700 


Candidate Selection 


50 








Fuel & Lubrication 


78 


380 


300 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


25 


35 





Bond & Debt 








Retirement Tax 


575 


2,008 





Travel 


264 


1,546 


1,400 


Moving Expenses 





429 





Tax Refund 


25,630 


2,741 





Manager's Expense 


370 


186 


400 


Finance Committee 


45 


19 


50 


Peripheral Parking 


420 


60 


100 


Assessing Costs 


332 


139 





Public Relations 


600 


600 


600 


Tax Sale 


21,159 


13,695 


17,000 


Recording Fees 








300 


Resource Center 





1,087 





Codification Ordinances 


2,000 
$82,225 








Supplies & Materials 


$52,800 


$56,320 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


1,339 


714 


7,368 


Capital Outlay 


860 


4,998 


2,500 


Contract Services 


70,482 


47,245 


39,100 


Equipment Reserve 








1,000 


Total Expenses 


$356,407 


$297,857 


$319,068 


Total Less Charges 


168,604 


92,705 


95,179 



Net Dept. Total 



$113,820 



$44,805 



$59,639 



56 



Legal Department 





7975 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


$1,105 


$1,100 


$1,088 


Contract Services 


15,782 


21,875 


16,250 


Total Expenses 


$16,887 


$22,975 


$17,338 


Net Dept. Total 


$16,887 


$22,975 


$17,338 




Planning Board 




Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 917 


$ 940 


$ 1,062 


Communications 


$ 283 


$ 292 


$ 275 


Printing & Publications 


512 


1,365 


500 


Training 


64 


5 


300 


Office Supplies 


217 


383 


350 


Secretarial Services 


25 








Upper Valley-Lake 








Sunapee Council 


4,387 


4,825 


5,307 


Supplies & Materials 


$5,488 


$6,870 


$ 6,732 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


954 


656 


925 


Contract Services 





1,500 


6,500 


Total Expenses 


$7,359 


$9,966 


$15,219 


Net Dept. Total 


$7,359 


$9,966 


$15,219 



Debt and Interest 



Revenue 
Inter-Dept. Charges 

Expenses 

Interest on Tax Notes 

Interest on Debt 

Principal on Debt 

Total Expenses 

Net Dept. Total 



$303,902 

$ 80,928 
89,111 

229,000 
$399,039 

$95,137 



$434,283 $420,687 



$ 92,692 

127,274 

326,442 

$546,408 

$112,125 



$ 90,000 

106,900 

327,191 

$524,091 

$103,404 



57 





Visiting Ni 


urse 






1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Nursing Services 


$ 8,258 


$ 4,591 


$12,784 


Medicare Reimbursement 


13,202 


41,150 


52,400 


Gift Fund 


921 


100 


100 


Accounts Receivable 





3,841 





Total Revenue 


$22,381 


$49,682 


$65,284 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$43,667 


$43,234 


$53,155 


Auto Allowance 


$ 766 


$ 703 


$ 765 


Communications 


716 


928 


1,168 


Insurance & Bonding 


452 


600 


695 


Printing & Publications 


444 


494 


675 


Training 


238 


138 


300 


Dues & Subscriptions 


876 


1,040 


1,490 


Office Supplies 


460 


506 


600 


Fuel & Lubrication 


138 


144 


280 


Repair & Maint. of Equip. 


746 


2 





Clothing 


7 





300 


Chem., Drug & 








Laboratory Supplies 


179 


320 


500 


Operational Equipment 


13 


20 


50 


Supplies & Materials 


$5,035 


$4,895 


$6,823 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


4,673 


6,711 


6,959 


Capital Outlay 


4,617 


198 


460 


Contract Services 


9,616 


8,768 


15,050 


Equipment Reserve 


1,200 


961 


1,100 


Total Expenses 


$68,808 


$64,767 


$83,547 


Net Dept. Total 


$46,427 


$15,085 


$18,263 



58 





Counseling 








1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Dresden School District 


$ 9,126 


$ 9,418 


$10,499 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$18,679 


$18,003 


$20,198 


Auto Allowance 


$ 187 


$ 221 


$ 263 


Communications 


415 


372 


317 


Training 


72 


107 


100 


Office Supplies 


130 


106 


50 


Office Equipment 


66 





20 


Books & Magazines 


23 


26 


50 


Supplies & Materials 


$893 


$832 


$800 


Inter. Dept. Charges 


1,185 


639 


702 


Total Expenses 


$20,757 


$19,475 


$21,700 


Net Dept. Total 


$11,631 


$10,057 


$11,201 


Health and Welfare 




Revenues 








Sawyer Trust Income 


$ 


$ 2,956 


$ 


Expenses 








Housing Deficit 


$29,520 


$26,091 


$32,123 


Senior Citizens Center 


3,000 


3,300 


3,630 


Old Age Assistance 


5,815 


4,994 


3,000 


Ambulance Service 


32,305 


32,648 


32,704 


Town Welfare 


4,526 


6,825 


10,000 


Headrest 


4,545 


3,345 


3,500 


Real Estate Liens 





3,496 





Total Expenses 


$79,711 


$80,699 


$84,957 


Net Dept. Total 


$79,711 


$77,743 


$84,957 



59 





Health Council 






1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Expenses 








Communications 


$101 


$ 74 


$ 75 


Printing & Publications 





68 


60 


Office Supplies 


128 


310 


200 


Travel 








50 


Program Materials 


31 


74 


150 


Supplies & Materials 


260 


526 


535 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


70 


70 


36 


Total Expenses 


$330 


$596 


$571 


Net Dept. Total 


$330 


$596 


$571 


Conservation Commission 




Revenues 








Sale of Property 


$11,401 


$ 


$ 


Sale of Timber 








3,000 


Transfer from Reserve 





1,396 





Total Revenues 


$11,401 


$1,396 


$3,000 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 


$ 


$ 400 


Communications 


$ 33 


$ 52 


$ 50 


Training 


163 


47 


100 


Dues & Subscriptions 


95 





125 


Office Supplies 


191 


169 


115 


Grounds-Materials 


75 


212 


150 


Program Materials 


62 


28 
508 


200 


Supplies & Materials 


619 


740 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


165 


165 


150 


Capital Outlay 


10,000 


12,000 


12,000 


Contract Services 





2,300 


600 


Total Expenses 


$10,784 


$14,973 


$13,890 


Net Dept. Total 


$ (617) 


$13,577 


$10,890 



60 



Recreation 

1978 1979 1980 

Actual Actual Budget 

Revenues 
Recreation Fees $15,556 $17,658 $17,850 

Davis Skating Fees 1,284 1,309 1,200 

Total Revenues 

Expenses 
Personal Services 
Auto Allowance 
Communications 
Insurance & Bonding 
Printing & Publications 
Training 
Office Supplies 
Office Equipment 
Fuel & Lubrication 
Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 
Program Materials 

Supplies and Materials 
Inter-Dept. Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Contract Services 
Equipment Reserve 

Total Expenses $46,845 $49,809 $55,375 

Net Dept. Total $30,005 $30,843 $36,325 



$16,840 


$18,967 


$19,050 


$33,229 


$31,826 


$37,801 


61 


49 


50 


907 


854 


1,050 


432 


462 


500 


572 


762 


750 


182 


359 


250 


654 


660 


625 


15 


41 


100 


436 


1,055 


1,100 


15 


130 


300 


2,168 


3,176 


2,550 


5,442 


7,548 


7,275 


2,390 


3,282 


4,199 





332 


300 


4,584 


5,621 


4,300 


1,200 


1,200 


1,500 



61 





Howe Library 






1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Investment Income 


$16,510 


$21,307 


$25,034 


Fees 


12,940 


14,046 


15,080 


Inter-Dept. Charges 








3,288 


Total Revenues 


$29,450 


$35,353 


$43,402 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 90,330 


$ 97,627 


$117,251 


Communications 


2,187 


2,471 


2,495 


Insurance & Bonding 


4,935 


3,555 


4,010 


Printing & Publication 


564 


453 


500 


Training 


664 


851 


1,050 


Dues & Subscriptions 


173 


180 


210 


Office Supplies 


2,034 


2,253 


2,375 


Office Equipment 


346 


411 


585 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


222 


226 


250 


Utilities 


5,229 


6,559 


6,900 


Heat 


2,390 


3,806 


4,600 


Travel 


183 


185 


185 


Bldgs-Repair & Maint. 


1,571 


1,794 


1,200 


Books & Magazines 


18,760 


22,233 


25,925 


Program Materials 


611 


484 


550 


Supplies & Materials 


39,868 


45,461 


50,835 


Inter Dept. Charges 


11,112 


14,919 


13,962 


Capital Outlay 


1,537 





1,335 


Contract Services 


10,097 


12,071 


13,586 


Debt Service 


36,556 


30,516 


30,517 


Total Expenses 


$190,301 


$200,595 


$227,486 


Total Less Charges 


$190,301 


$200,595 


$224,198 


Net Dept. Total 


$160,854 


$165,242 


$184,084 



62 





Etna Library 








1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$1,479 


$1,566 


$1,731 


Insurance & Bonding 


123 


142 


165 


Training 


9 


9 


10 


Office Supplies 


74 


51 


80 


Utilities 


42 


37 


65 


Heat 


222 


607 


488 


Bldgs. -Repair & Maint. 


218 


320 





Books & Magazines 


964 


989 


975 


Supplies & Materials 


1,652 


2,155 


1,783 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


485 


620 


450 


Capital Outlay 


3,941 


1,000 


825 


Total Expenses 


$7,557 


$5,341 


$4,789 


Net. Dept. Total 


$7,557 
Code 


$5,341 


$4,789 


Revenues 








Permits and Fees 


$28,812 


$26,494 


$30,290 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$35,813 


$40,681 


$45,380 


Communications 


741 


1,621 


2,768 


Insurance & Bonding 


360 


94 


195 


Printing & Publications 


1,453 


1,391 


380 


Training 


408 


20 





Dues & Subscriptions 


120 


148 


140 


Office Supplies 


332 


670 


646 


Office Equipment 


181 


37 


480 


Fuel & Lubrication 


123 


133 


141 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


126 


67 


55 


Recording Fees 





24 


106 


Z. B. A. 


97 
3,941 








Supplies & Materials 


4,205 


4,911 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


2,863 


2,697 


3,674 


Capital Outlay 


4,266 








Contract Services 





601 


551 


Equipment Reserve 





365 
$48,549 


890 


Total Expenses 


$46,885 


$55,406 


Net Dept. Total 


$18,073 


$22,055 


$25,116 



63 



Police Department 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Fees, Licenses & Permits 


$9,255 


$9,836 


$12,200 


Crime Commission 


6,877 


5,379 


960 


Service Charges 


16,800 


24,722 


22,425 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


83,401 


108,158 


130,166 


Total Revenue 


$116,320 


$148,095 


$165,751 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$320,315 


$378,614 


$425,038 


Auto Allowance 


2,988 


3,700 


4,915 


Communications 


10,745 


11,431 


12,494 


Insurance & Bonding 


5,420 


4,478 


4,995 


Printing & Publications 


939 


831 


970 


Training 


7,981 


1,561 


1,435 


Dues & Subscriptions 


224 


250 


459 


Office Supplies 


1,044 


1,270 


1,195 


Office Equipment 


169 


112 


100 


Fuel & Lubrications 


6,372 


8,505 


10,532 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


2,247 


2,454 


2,710 


Clothing 


7,272 


6,285 


7,305 


Operational Equip. 


4,440 


3,927 


3,310 


Traffic Control 


4,537 


7,457 


7,950 


Supplies & Materials 


54,378 


52,261 


58,370 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


61,772 


61,777 


72,964 


Capital Outlay 


1,365 


1,445 


275 


Contract Services 


15,986 


16,759 


18,219 


Equipment Reserve 


14,282 


9,220 


9,380 


Total Expenses 


$468,095 


$520,076 


$584,246 


Total Less Charges 


384,700 


411,919 


454,080 


Net Dept. Total 


$351,775 


$371,981 


$418,495 



64 



Fire Department 



Revenues 
Current Year Levy 
Revenue Sharing 
Fees and Dividends 
Service Charges 
Prior Year Revenue 
Sale of Ladder Truck 
Office Rental 
Ambulance Charge 
Total Revenues 

Expenses 
Personal Services 

Communications 

Insurance & Bonding 

Printing & Publications 

Training 

Medical Insurance 

Dues & Subscriptions 

Office Supplies 

Office Equipment 

Fuel & Lubrication 

Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 

Utilities 

Clothing 

Chem., Drug 

& Lab. Supplies 
Fire Alarm 
Equip. Repair 
Heat 

Deficit-Prior Year 
Bldgs. -Repair & Maint. 
Grounds-Materials 

Supplies & Materials 
Inter-Dept. Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Contract Services 
Equipment Reserve 
Debt Service 

Total Expenses 

Total Less Charges 

Net Dept. Total 



1978 
Actual 

$430,806 

19,968 

12,308 

899 

26,981 

6,001 



22,387 

519,335 

$273,844 

127 

3,990 

443 

2,566 

207 

639 

188 

33 

2,973 

12,538 

4,619 

4,547 

741 

595 

245 

6,308 



1,657 



42,416 
51,111 
7,777 
79,828 
25,000 
35,529 

$515,501 

493,118 

$ 3,834 



1979 
Actual 

$470,424 

33,375 

14,732 

867 

3,834 



1,500 

31,225 

555,957 

$300,431 

10 

3,697 

27 

1,709 

276 

605 

247 

152 

3,929 

6,808 

5,424 

4,198 

331 

649 

5 

6,085 



4,476 

35 

38,665 
57,302 
3,502 
80,599 
22,900 
64,858 

$568,257 

537,032 

$(12,300) 



1980 
Budget 

$534,887 

36,510 

12,167 

1,500 





1,500 

56,768 

643,332 

$363,317 

100 

4,515 

350 

4,095 

260 

850 

350 

100 

5,638 

4,770 

5,745 

4,290 

375 

945 

100 

13,909 

12,300 

3,838 

50 

62,580 
60,295 
6,530 
66,360 
21,205 
63,045 

$643,332 

586,564 

$ 



65 



Buildings And Grounds 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Boat Landing 


$ 1,501 


$ 2,469 


$ 


Cemetery Income 


12,927 


11,061 


11,000 


Solid Waste Permits 


39,489 


49,843 


52,000 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


17,424 


12,869 


16,050 


Total Revenues 


$ 71,325 


$ 76,242 


$ 79,050 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 65,569 


$ 67,801 


$ 79,493 


Communications 


212 


279 


300 


Insurance & Bonding 


1,627 


1,749 


2,070 


Training 








100 


Office Supplies 


27 





25 


Fuel & Lubrications 


582 


2,035 


2,122 


Rep. & Maint. of Equip. 


235 


491 


700 


Utilities 


6,656 


8,120 


8,600 


Clothing 


988 


453 


500 


Heat 


9,454 


17,243 


20,097 


Operational Equip. 


2,939 


1,981 


2,420 


Bldgs. -Repair & Maint. 


12,941 


15,015 


10,000 


Grounds-Materials 


6,073 


2,844 


3,025 


Public Relations 


433 


431 


500 


Resource Center 





2,699 
53,340 





Supplies & Materials 


42,167 


50,459 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


12,978 


16,358 


14,818 


Capital Outlay 


17,048 


6,111 


13,000 


Contract Services 


28,269 


34,989 


34,350 


Equipment Reserve 


4,000 


3,500 


4,000 


Total Expenses 


$170,031 


$182,099 


$196,120 


Total Less Charges 


152,620 


169,230 


180,070 


Net Dept. Total 


$ 98,706 


$105,857 


$117,070 



66 



Highway 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Town Road Aid 


$ 13,269 


$ 


$ 


Highway Subsidy 


69,977 


72,695 


83,316 


Fees & Permits 


2,337 


330 


200 


Service Charges 


4,964 


5,411 


5,000 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


20,744 


40,651 


19,775 


Total Revenues 


$111,279 


$119,087 


$108,291 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$236,662 


$255,044 


$286,006 


Auto Allowance 


85 


53 


100 


Communications 


888 


810 


1,000 


Insurance & Bonding 


9,000 


5,235 


5,436 


Training 


265 


175 


500 


Office Supplies 





430 


200 


Office Equipment 


335 


9 


100 


Utilities 


36,754 


30,876 


35,135 


Clothing 


2,260 


1,938 


2,000 


Street Maint. Materials 


57,809 


58,391 


54,029 


T. R. A. & B. 


6,352 


6,783 


6,645 


Drainage & 








Bridge Materials 


30,239 


37,836 


14,600 


Winter Road Support 


29,081 


32,896 


32,000 


Traffic Support 


724 


893 


800 


Supplies & Materials 


163,792 


176,325 


152,545 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


270,862 


253,394 


288,472 


Capital Outlay 


6,485 


2,198 


5,000 


Contract Services 


78,821 


100,738 


104,517 


Total Expenses 


$756,622 


$787,699 


$836,540 


Total Less Charges 


735,878 


747,048 


816,765 


Net Dept. Total 


$645,343 


668,612 


$728,249 



67 





Equipment 








1978 


7979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Inter-Dept. Charges 


$233,755 


$227,112 


$255,192 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 40,150 


$ 40,651 


$ 55,854 


Communications 


1,506 


1,172 


1,100 


Training 


405 


9 


500 


Fuel & Lubrication 


19,524 


25,559 


34,500 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


70,453 


92,294 


85,800 


Clothing 


624 


337 


500 


Operational Equip. 


900 
93,412 


900 
120,271 





Supplies & Materials 


122,400 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


20,193 


16,190 


21,938 


Equipment Reserve 


80,000 


50,000 


55,000 


Total Expenses 


$233,755 


$227,112 


$255,192 


Net Dept. Total 


$ 
Sidewalks 


$ 


$ 


Revenues 








Current Year Approp. 


$24,077 


$12,157 


$18,112 


Revenue Sharing 


1,067 


978 


1,000 


Dartmouth College 





4,000 





Prior Year Revenue 


3,091 


9,055 


7,138 


Transfer From Reserve 


2,127 
$30,359 








Total Revenues 


$26,190 


$26,250 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 3,177 


$ 2,935 


$ 3,700 


Supplies & Materials 


4,491 


341 


500 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


2,212 


1,302 


1,800 


Capital Outlay 


11,424 


14,474 


20,250 


Total Expenses 


$21,304 


$19,052 


$26,250 


Net Dept. Total 


$ 9,055 


$ 7,138 


$ 



68 



Sewer 

1978 1979 1980 

Actual Actual Budget 

Revenues 
State Aid-Water Pollution $ 92,994 $120,708 $209,152 

Sewer Fees & 



Connections 


351,409 


376,479 


363,867 


Service Charges 


5,467 


1,497 


500 


Prior Year Revenue 


32,435 


28,271 


36,571 


Sale of Property 





500 





Accounts Receivable 





76,747 


6,242 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


4,405 


74 


100 


Total Revenues 


$486,703 


$604,276 


$616,432 


Expenses 








Personal Services 


$ 92,308 


$104,904 


$130,611 


Communications 


1,215 


1,615 


2,000 


Insurance & Bonding 


4,055 


4,249 


4,860 


Printing & Publications 


31 


136 


300 


Training 


1,466 


1,709 


2,000 


Office Supplies 


437 


803 


500 


Office Equipment 


475 


831 


500 


Fuel & Lubrication 


2,014 


3,296 


3,000 


Rep. & Maint. Op. Equip. 


4,895 


6,631 


6,800 


Utilities 


24,342 


27,261 


29,000 


Clothing 


844 


925 


1,100 


Chem., Drug & 








Lab. Supplies 


10,783 


10,380 


12,400 


Heat 


3,377 


3,362 


2,501 


Travel 





137 


200 


Bldgs. -Repair & Maint. 


82 


183 


350 


Grounds-Materials 


757 


445 


200 


Sewer Maint. Materials 


3,144 


9,428 


10,000 


Repair & Maint. 








Plant. Equip. 


4,001 


2,585 


3,500 


Supplies & Materials 


61,918 


73,976 


79,211 


Inter-Dept. Charges 


17,624 


17,115 


24,449 


Capital Outlay 


95,996 


77,017 


55,000 


Contract Services 


274 


640 


300 


Equipment Reserve 


17,000 


12,000 


12,000 


Debt Service 


173,315 


282,053 


271,915 


Total Expenses 


$458,432 


$567,705 


$573,486 


Total Less Charges 


454,027 


567,630 


573,386 


Net Dept. Total 


28,271 


36,571 


42,946 



69 



Lebanon Regional Airport 





1978 
Actual 


i 


1979 
Actual 


1980 
Budget 


Expenses 
Subsidy 
Administration Charge 


$10,000 

670 

$10,670 




$ 



$ 



Total Expenses 




$ 


$ 




Special Articles 






Revenues 
Federal Forestry Program $ 


$ 


1,852 


$ 


Expenses 
Dartmouth-Lake 

Sunapee Reg. Assoc. 
Trescott Road 
Davis Rink 
Oak Hill 
Elm Tree Program 


$ 1,415 



9,067 






$ 
$ 




35,570 

6,389 

8,000 

7,164 

57,123 


$ 






Total Expenses 


$ 10,482 


$ 


Net Dept. Total 


$ 10,482 


$ 


55,271 


$ 


Total Departmental 
Expenditures 

Parking Fund 

Amount to be 
Appropriated 


$3,028,703 
192,766 

$3,221,469 


$3,256,729 
152,092 

$3,408,821 


$3,446,201 
164,298 

$3,610,499 



70 



PROPOSED 1980 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

ALL DEPARTMENTS 

General Administration 

Electronic typewriter $2070 
Storage cabinets (2) 430 



Visiting Nurse Service 

Conference table 100 

Chairs (4) 160 

Storage cabinet (1) 200 



$ 2,500 



460 



Conservation Commission 

Land Acquisition Fund 12,000 

Recreation 
Playground apparatus - Etna 300 

Howe Library 
Electronic typewriter 1,335 

Etna Library 
Window quilts 825 

Police 
Storage cabinet (1) 275 

Highway 
Trees 5,000 

Building & Grounds 
Energy Improvements 13,000 

Fire 

Lyme Station floor repairs 900 

Hose 2100 

Breathing apparatus 1200 

Assorted equipment 2330 

6,530 



71 



Sidewalk 

Sidewalk construction 20,250 

Sewer 

Sewer line improvements & extensions 55,000 

Parking 

Parking lot improvements 1,000 

TOTAL $118,475 



PROPOSED 1980 
CAPITAL RESERVE EXPENDITURES 



Police 
Replace - 2 Patrol Cars 






Fire 
Replace- Car#1 
Replace - Alarm panel 
Repair- Engine #3 




$ 4,700 

12,000 

5,000 


Highway 
Replace- Loader #1 
Purchase - Trench excavation 


box 


70,000 
2,000 



$ 11,270 



21,700 



72,000 



Buildings & Grounds 

Purchase - Tractor 8,000 



Sewer 




Replace - Air compressor 


10,000 


Replace - One radio 


2,700 


Replace - Backhoe and Trailer 


14,500 


Purchase - Transit and level 


2,700 



29,900 
TOTAL $142,870 



72 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING 
1980 



PROPOSED ALLOCATION FOR 1980 



Governance & Coordination 






District Court 


$ 986 




General Administration 


4,191 




Legal 


657 




Planning Board 


411 




Debt and Interest 


1,972 


$ 8,217 


Human Services 






Visiting Nurse 


3,155 




Counseling 


701 




Health and Welfare 


3,506 




Health Council 


175 




Recreation 


1,928 




Howe Library 


7,889 




Etna Library 


176 


17,530 


Safety Services 






Fire 




36,510 


Public Works 






Highway 


24,098 




Buildings and Grounds 


4,936 




Sidewalks 


1,000 


30,034 



TOTAL $92,291 



73 



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74 



SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENTS 
1979 

Real Estate 
Code 

01 Land - Improved and Unimproved $ 47,240,460 

02 Buildings Only 106,676,070 
04 Factory Buildings 1,302,100 
08 Public Utilities (Electric & Water Works) 6,508,600 

$161,727,200 



Exemptions 

Institution - Dining Room 

Dormitory & Kitchen $300,000 
Blind 20,000 

Elderly Persons 350,000 



670,000 



$161,057,230 



Total Number of Residents listed at $10.00 4,033 



75 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
December 31, 1979 





DEBIT 








Prior Years 


1979 


Total 


Property Tax 


$196,627 


$4,067,588 


$4,264,216 


Bank Stock Tax 




2,407 


2,407 


Yield Tax 


908 


11,502 


12,410 


Additions: 








Property Tax 


1,057 


67 


1,124 


Interest 


5,306 


373 


5,679 




$203,900 


$4,081,937 


$4,285,837 




CREDIT 








Prior Years 


1979 


Total 


Property Tax Paid 








Treasurer: 


$196,326 


$3,854,318 


$4,050,644 


Bank Stock Tax Paid 








Treasurer: 




2,407 


2,407 


Yield Tax Paid Treas: 


908 


11,502 


12,410 


Interest Paid Treas: 


5,306 


373 


5,679 


Abatements: 








Property Tax 


1,352 


9,056 


10,408 


Uncollected: 








Property Tax 


7 


204,281 


204,288 



$203,900 $4,081,937 $4,285,837 



76 



SUMMARY OF WARRANT ■ STATE RESIDENT TAX 



December 31, 


1979 






DEBIT 








Prior Years 


1979 


Total 


Original Warrant 




$40,330 


$40,330 


Uncollected as of 1/1/79 


7,470 




4,470 


Added Taxes 


890 


1,440 


$2,330 


Penalties 


367 


46 


413 




$ 8,727 


$41,816 


$50,543 




CREDIT 








Prior Years 


1979 


Total 


Remittance to Treasurer: 








Resident Taxes 


$ 3,680 


$34,020 


$37,700 


Penalties 

A k\o fannAntc • 


367 


46 


413 


ADaiemenxs. 
Resident Taxes 


4,610 


1,000 


5,610 


Uncollected: 








Resident Taxes 


70 


6,750 


6,820 



$ 8,727 



$41,816 



$50,543 



SUMMARY OF TAX SALES ACCOUNTS 
December 31, 1979 

DEBIT 



Taxes Sold to Town 
During Current 
Fiscal Year: 
Balance of Unre- 
deemed Taxes 
January 1, 1979; 
Interest Collected 
After Sale 
Redemption Costs 



7978 



$13,380 



135 
44 



Tax Sale on Levies of: 
Prior Years 



$10,429 

416 
76 





$13,559 


$11,111 




CREDIT 




Remittances to Treasurer 






During Year 


$ 4,866 


$ 6,520 


Unredeemed Taxes 






at close ofYear 


$ 7,696 


$ 4,591 


Abatements During 






Year 


997 





$13,589 



$11,111 



77 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
December 31, 1979 

Motor Vehicle Permits Issued 

1979 5,304 $150,332 

1980 195 5,797 

5,499 $156,129 

Dog Licenses Issued 504 $ 2,730 

Kennel Licenses Issued 8 96 

$ 2,826 

Fees received from Vital Statistics, $ 10,069 
Motor Vehicle Title Applications and Hunting 
and Fishing Licenses 



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

The Treasurer of the Town of Hanover for the year ending 
December 31, 1979 submits the following condensed report of 
receipts and disbursements applicable to calendar 1979 activity. 

Balance per cash book, January 1,1979 $ 8,555 
Receipts from all sources applicable 

to 1979 18,458,783 

18,467,338 
Less Selectmen's Orders Paid Relating 

to 1979 18,222,404 

Balance per cash book, 
December 31, 1979 $ 244,934 

Bruce D. McAllister 
Treasurer 



78 



PARKING SYSTEM 




1979-1980 








Actual 


Budget 
1980 




1979 


Revenues 






Parking - Previous Years 


$118,033 


$128,117 


Metered Parking 


65,828 


66,000 


Parking Fines 


51,786 


50,000 


Permit Parking 


34,035 


48,000 


Use of Property & Money 


10,528 


8,500 


Total Revenues 


$280,210 


$300,617 


Expenses 






Personal Services 


71,146 


69,845 


Communications 


1,195 


1,000 


Insurance & Bonding 


3,070 


2,818 


Printing & Pub. 


209 


150 


Office Supplies 


712 


700 


Office Equipment 


358 


100 


Fuel & Lubrication 


1,841 


2,130 


Rep. & Maint of Equipment 


2,662 


2,600 


Utilities 


2,280 


2,000 


Bldgs. - Repair & Maint. 


95 


3,500 


Grounds - Materials 


6,060 


500 


Parking Meter Supplies 


3,006 


2,000 


Other Charges - Administration 


18,500 


20,000 


Other Charges - Highway 


9,610 


10,000 


Other Charges - Communications 





12,047 


Other Charges - Sewer 


48 


100 


Other Charges - Buildings & Grounds 


3,000 


3,500 


Other Charges - Equipment 


9,476 


6,000 


Capital Outlay 


1,562 


1,000 


Professional Fees 





7,000 


Contracts - Lot Rental 


10,571 


11,308 


Equipment Reserve 


6,692 


6,000 


Total Expenses 


$152,093 


$164,298 



Fund Balance 



$128,117 $136,319 



79 



HANOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
HANOVER SECTION EIGHT 

Balance Sheet -12/31/79 

Assets 

Cash $ 13,222.18 

Savings Account 29,81 8.53 

Development Costs 639,703.77 

Total Assets $682,744.48 



Liabilities, Reserves and Surplus 

Accounts Payable - Town of Hanover $ 12,357.23 

Donations 1,002.60 

Grant - Town of Hanover 639,703.77 

Savings Account 29,818.53 

Fund Balance (137.65) 

Total Liabilities, Reserves and Surplus $682,744.48 



80 



HANOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
1978-1979 





1978 


1979 


1980 




Actual 


Actual 


Budget 


Revenues 








Prior Year Revenue 


$ 9,946 


$ 


$ 


Housing Subsidy 


50,554 


59,752 


55,272 


Rents Housing Authority 


24,018 


24,338 


26,664 


Grants Housing Authority 


4,420 








Gifts Housing Authority 


102 


601 





Miscellaneous 


25 


157 
$ 84,848 





Total Revenues 


$ 89,065 


$ 81,936 


Expenses 








Communications 


$ 148 


$ 148 


$ 175 


Insurance & Bonding 


1,262 


1,361 


1,427 


Office Supplies 





8 


10 


Utilities 


14,588 


16,460 


17,233 


Heat 





616 


551 


Buildings- Repair 








& Maintenance 


5,296 


1,360 


2,200 


Grounds - Materials 


161 


143 


200 


Program Materials 


216 


472 


100 


In Lieu of Taxes 


11,902 


11,656 


12,000 


Interest on Debt 


23,500 


21,855 


20,210 


Principal on Debt 


35,000 


35,000 


35,000 


Other Charges - 








Administration 


4,550 


6,453 


7,287 


Other Charges - Highway 


886 


388 


500 


Other Charges - Sewer 


14 








Other Charges - 








Equipment 


74 


200 


300 


Other Charges - 








Buildings & Grounds 


1,540 


1,373 


1,500 


Capital Outlay 


8,385 


2,053 


1,800 


Legal Services 


370 








Contract Services 


4,693 


5,402 


6,766 


Equipment Reserve 


6,000 


6,000 


6,800 


Total Expenses 


$118,585 


$110,939 


$114,059 


Net Expenses 


$ 29,520 


$ 26,091 


$ 32,123 



81 



HANOVER DISTRICT COURT 



Receipts 

Cash on hand, January 1 , 1979 
Police Academy Fees 
Fines & Forfeits 
Bench Warrants 
Small Claims 
Writs & Annulments 
Restitution Received 



Disbursements 



State of New Hampshire 
Department of Safety 
Fish and Game 

Blood Test (M.H.M.H.) 

Police Academy Fees 

Witness Fees 

Court Expenses 

Town of Hanover: 
Fines 

Small Claims 
Bench Warrants 
Writs & Annulments 



$12,118 

1,457 

500 

63 



& 100 

3,043 

30,097 

500 

1,457 

68 

63 



$13,725 

164 

32 

3,036 

1,245 

2,888 



Cash on hand, December 31 , 1 979 



14,138 
100 



$35,328 



$35,328 



82 



UPPER VALLEY REGIONAL EMERGENCY 
MEDICAL CARE SERVICE 

The Upper Valley Regional Emergency Medical Care Service 
responded to 440 calls for medical aid in 1979 as indicated: 

1976 1977 1978 1979 



Bradford 


51 


67 


50 


71 


Fairlee 


13 


22 


31 


29 


Hanover 


238 


196 


201 


182 


Lyme 


13 


23 


19 


25 


Norwich 


42 


35 


41 


33 


Orford 


21 


15 


19 


21 


Piermont 


10 


15 


19 


13 


Strafford 


13 


5 


14 


15 


Thetford 


27 


34 


39 


39 


West Fairlee 


5 


6 


4 


6 


Other 


18 


9 


4 


6 


Total 


451 


427 


441 


440 



In 1979 most of the goals were met. The crew members donated 
about 800 man hours toward improving the quality of care given. 

In 1980 we have plans for a major piece of equipment replace- 
ment, the 1974 Dodge. Equipment replacement money already in 
the account will be used. 

The administration would like to take this opportunity to thank 
each and everyone who supports the ambulance service and makes 
the system work. 

The 1980 rate schedule will not change. 



83 



UPPER VALLEY REGIONAL EMERGENCY 
MEDICAL CARE SERVICE FUND 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1979 

and Proposed Budget for 1980 





Actual 


Budget 




1979 


1980 


Revenues: 






Prior Years Revenue 


$ 3,112 


$ 4,413 


Service Charges 


17,633 


17,000 


Community Contributions 


68,145 


69,202 


Other 


525 





Accounts Receivable 


5,830 


6,000 




$95,245 


$96,615 


Disbursements: 






Personal Services 


$51,435 


$56,768 


Insurance & Bonding 


2,520 


2,425 


Communications 


570 


500 


Printing & Publications 


61 


75 


Training 


1,618 


2,860 


Dues & Subscriptions 


227 


200 


Office Supplies 


94 


75 


Fuel & Lubrication 


1,386 


1,950 


Repair & Maintenance - 






Operational Equipment 


1,181 


660 


Clothing 


626 


500 


Chemical, Drug & Lab Supplies 


879 


1,200 


Equipment Repair 





410 


Travel 





100 


Operational Equipment 


1,200 


1,225 


Other Charges - Administration 


10,600 


5,925 


Other Charges - Communications 


5,781 


6,487 


Other Charges - Equipment 


654 


1,000 


Equipment Reserve 


12,000 


12,000 




$90,832 


$94,360 


Surplus 


$ 4,413 


$ 2,255 



Capital Reserve Balance $26,444 



84 



HEADREST Inc. 



Headrest, the 24-hour-per-day community resource, information 
and referral, crisis-intervention, and emergency housing center, is 
requesting $3,500 from the Town of Hanover at its 1980 Town 
Meeting. This is an increase of $55 over the allocation approved in 
1979, an increase of less than two per cent. 

This request is based upon usage of our work by Hanover 
residents. In 1979, 317 Hanover residents used our services 547 
times, which is 15 per cent of our total contacts for 1979. Since in- 
dividuals who contact Headrest sometimes have a need for more 
than one service, there were 593 different "situations" in 1979 in- 
volving Hanover residents. 



A breakdown of these is as follows: 



Assault/Abuse, Children. .. .5 
Assault/Abuse, Women. . . .13 

Alcohol 18 

Caring Listener Needed .... 75 

Child Care 3 

Collaboration 71 

Community Calendar 16 

Consumer-related 28 

Counselling Requested. . . .14 

Depression/Anxiety 10 

Drugs 10 

Emergency Lodging 

Needed 26 

(3 lodged at Headrest) 



Family-related 6 

Food Needed 2 

Handicapped 1 

Health-related 36 

Housing 29 

Job-related 22 

Legal 20 

Information and Referral. .135 

Runaway-related 1 

Suicide 5 

Transportation 12 

Volunteer, Resources 

Available 35 

TOTAL SITUATIONS 593 



At the heart of Headrest's work is the information and referral 
program. Headrest maintains extensive up-to-date files with over 
1,000 Upper Valley resources at the fingertips of the trained staff 
and volunteers who answer the telephones. This enables Headrest 
to put callers in touch with community resources including in- 
dividuals and government agencies in Vermont and New Hamp- 
shire. 

One new and important project which will be especially valuable 
to area residents is the new Winter Housing Emergency Network 
(W.H.E.N.), designed to help local people deal with winter emergen- 
cies. This project is being done in conjunction with three other 
human service agencies, including the Upper Valley Senior 
Citizens Center. Headrest's main role in the undertaking is to pro- 



85 



vide 24-hour-per-day, 365-days-per-year telephone availability and 
service, and coordination of help. Allocations from local towns, in- 
cluding Hanover, contribute towards assuring that Headrest's 
24-hour availability will continue, and that people can get help 
whenever they need it. 

Should you want further information about Headrest, please con- 
tact our office, telephone 448-4400. 

Thank you for last year's support, and for your time and con- 
sideration. 



UPPER VALLEY-LAKE SUNAPEE COUNCIL 

The Upper Valley-Lake Sunapee Council is the regional planning 
and development commission serving Hanover and 30 other 
municipalities in the Connecticut River Valley, from Piermont in the 
North to Charlestown, the Southernmost town in Sullivan County. 

Originally founded as an economic development commission in 
1959, the Council has been a regional planning agency since 1970, 
performing a mixture of regional plans and local technical 
assistance for municipalities. 

The theory behind regional planning is that there are some 
things a town cannot do by itself and some things on which it 
should consult with neighbors in the best interests of the region. 

Thus, in the past eight years, the Council, under the policy super- 
vision of an appointed board - Marjorie Boley and Doug Storrs are 
Hanover's Directors - has undertaken regional plans in nine dif- 
ferent programs, from waste water to land use, transportation to 
housing. 

On a more local level, the Council is heavily involved in technical 
assistance programs with Planning Boards on a variety of needs, 
ranging from zoning and subdivision amendments to master plan 
revisions. Council staff has worked with Hanover in the past year 
particularly in reviewing subdivision regulation amendments. 

In the past few years, the Council has become more involved 
with new Federal Programs as an interpreter and helper or buffer 
between the towns and Washington oriented bureaucrats; and with 
local human service organizations who must increasingly use the 
Council's statistics, information and assistance in qualifying for 
the federal funds that keep them in business. 



86 



Regional cooperation has also become important as more 
federally-mandated programs must be implemented on a regional 
basis due to the scope of service necessary to be cost effective. 
The Council has taken a lead role in bringing many municipalities 
together to explore joint operations in many such fields, with cur- 
rent emphasis on solid waste disposal, topsoil removal problems 
and public transportation. 

The Town's membership dues, along with those of Hanover's 
neighbors, total about one-third of its $100,000 operating budget 
with matching grants from the states and federal sources giving 
the Town a 2 to 1 return on its investment. 

There has been much discussion in the past year about a broad- 
ening of regional planing boundaries in which the UV-LSC might 
consolidate with its neighbors to the West to make the resulting 
unit more truly representative of a unified Upper Valley. These 
discussions are continuing into 1980, with Jack Manchester 
representing Hanover and the UV-LSC on the committee. 



UPPER VALLEY SENIOR CITIZENS COUNCIL, INC. 

Statistics for Town of Hanover 
October 1, 1978 - September 30, 1979 

* Total unduplicated Hanover individuals served by all programs: 280 









Total 


Vol. 


#0/ 




Indiv. 


Units of Cost of 


Hanover 


Hanover 


Services 


Served Service Service 


Hours 


Volunteers 


Center Meals 


136 


1,055 


$ 2,764 


89 1 /4 


2 


Meals-on-Wheels 


61 


2,682 


6,544 


229 


17 


Transportation 


59 


903 


1,761 






Good Neighbor Aides 


8 


383% 


2,491 






Friendly Visitors 


8 


89 


52 


102 


1 


Activities 


17 

* 


57 
5,169 1 /4 



$13,612 


291 Va 
711 1 / 2 


11 




* 



Total cost of Services provided to Hanover residents $13,612 

Received from Town of Hanover $ 3,300 

* Cannot be totaled as individuals receive more than one service. 

In addition to the above services, the Upper Valley Senior Citizens 
Council, Inc. mails out a monthly Newsletter to approximately 550 
individuals. 



87 



GRAFTON COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



To the Citizens of Grafton County: 

In an effort to communicate more directly with the taxpaying 
citizens of Grafton County, we, the Grafton County Commis- 
sioners, are writing to you through your individual town or 
municipal reports. 

Last year (1978-79) the total county tax raised was $1,977,142. 
These monies were appropriated by the County Delegation and ad- 
ministered by the Commissioners. Some of the ways this money 
was spent was in maintenance of our courthouse, nursing home, 
county farm, sheriff's department, jail and house of correction, 
social welfare, etc. 

The average number of patients in our nursing home is 140. The 
average daily census of the Jail/House of Correction is 25. We had 
a total of 349 inmates in the Jail and 114 inmates in the House of 
Correction during our fiscal year. 

In addition to providing food for the nursing home complex and 
agricultural services for the community, the farm also continually 
shows a profit. In our fiscal year 1979 the farm profit was $60,654, 
due in part to sales of pigs at $5,500, cows at $27,000, wood at 
$1,800, hay at $2,100, milk at $135,444 and produce at $48,129. 

We have completed Phase ll-Design of the sewage project and 
anticipate beginning construction under Phase III in the spring. The 
total overall cost of the project is approximately $540,000, of which 
$400,000 is federal grant, $110,000 State share and $30,000 County 
share. 

We are making an effort to conserve energy, particularly in the 
courthouse building, and are taking a hard look at any modifica- 
tions in this so called "modern" facility that will make it a less ex- 
pensive consumer of fuel. 

A trial dispatching service was instituted for 16 area fire depart- 
ments and probably will be made a permanent function during the 
latter part of 1979. A yearly fee is charged for this service. 



88 



Grafton County employs 230 people of whom we are very proud. 
It is because of these people that Grafton County continues to 
operate efficiently and within budget. 

There are many other concerns that we, the Commissioners, deal 
with. We invite the citizens of Grafton County to take part in any of 
our regular meetings held each Monday morning at the courthouse 
in North Haverhill. 

Richard L Bradley, Chairman 

Dorothy Campion, Clerk 

Arthur Snell 

GRAFTON COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



89 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 13, 1979 

ARTICLE 1: (To vote by non-partisan ballot) for Town Officers: 
The following were elected: 

For Selectman (three years): 

Sharon Nordgren 

Stephen V.F. Waite 
For Treasurer (one year): 

Bruce McAllister 
For Library Trustee (three years): 

Alice B. Hayes 
For Trustee of Trust Funds (three years): 

Frederick T. Bedford 

ARTICLE 2: (By petition) (To vote by ballot) to see if the Town will 
vote to amend the existing Town Zoning Ordinance so as to 
allow the transfer of a non-conforming use, namely; the use of 
buildings for year-round residential use in the Forestry and 
Recreation District from one lot to another if the original struc- 
ture housing the non-conforming use is destroyed, as proposed 
by petition of town voters and as set forth in the official copy filed 
and available to the public in the Office of the Town Clerk and as 
on display on the day of the Meeting at the place of the Meeting. 
The following question is listed on the printed ballot. 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment Number Two 
as proposed by petition of the voters for this Town?" 

The vote by ballot was as follows: 

YES: 253 NO: 634* 

ARTICLE 3: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the reports of the Selectmen, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Auditor, Collector of Taxes and other Town Officers as printed in 
the Town Report be accepted. 

ARTICLE 4: It was moved, seconded and voted that the following 
persons are hereby nominated for the following offices: 

Auditors for a term of one year: 

Joseph E. Cardoza 

Robert G. Murphy, Jr. 
Member of the Advisory Assessors Board for a term of three 
years: 

C. Bennett Brown 
Member of the Advisory Assessors Board for a term of one year: 

Roger C. Ball 



90 



Fence Viewers for a term of one year: 

Walter S. Coutermarsh 

Edward Lathem 

Howard Reed 
Surveyors of Wood and Timber for one year: 

Joseph C. Fogg 

Walker T. Weed 

They were elected by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of Three Million 
Two Hundred and Fifty-Eight Thousand Two Hundred and 
Twenty-Four Dollars ($3,258,224) which includes One Hundred 
and Forty Thousand Two Hundred and Six Dollars ($140,206) for 
the general operations of the parking system; and including One 
Hundred Thousand One Hundred and Forty-Six Dollars ($100,146) 
to be paid into the following capital reserve funds for the pur- 
pose thereof, namely, fire $22,900, police $9,220, code $365, 
Visiting Nurse Service $961, recreation $1,200, public grounds 
$3,500, highway $50,000, sewer $12,000; together with the 
transfer of $200,056 from such capital reserve funds for the pur- 
poses and in the amounts as set forth on page 92 of the Town 
Report, to pay the expenses of the Town during the 1979 fiscal 
year for the purposes set forth in the Town budget and further 
that the Selectmen are authorized to accept and expend gifts of 
money or personal property for the purposes intended by any 
donor and in addition to apply, receive and expend any federal or 
state assistance for the purposes set forth in the Town budget, 
not anticipated as of the annual Town Meeting, on the condition 
that the Selectmen shall account to the voters of the Town for all 
such additional receipts and expenses. 

ARTICLE 6: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Selectmen be authorized to withdraw from the Revenue 
Sharing Fund established under the provisions of the State and 
Local Assistance Act of 1972 as amended for use as set-offs 
against budget appropriations in the following amounts, 
General Fund— $49,496; Fire Fund— $33,375; Sidewalk— $978 
as detailed on page 93 of the 1978 Town Report and, further to 
authorize the Selectmen to make pro rata reductions in the 
amounts if estimated entitlements are not received or are 
reduced. 

ARTICLE 7: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $12,000 for the 
purpose of developing and conducting an Elm Tree Maintenance 
Program within an area designated by a radius of Vi mile from 



91 



the intersection of North and South Main Streets and East and 
West Wheelock Streets and further to authorize the Selectmen 
to apply, negotiate, and do all things necessary to obtain such 
Federal, State or other assistance as may be available for this 
project and to receive and expend such assistance for the pur- 
pose of this project. 

ARTICLE 8: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to ap- 
propriate $26,216 to reduce the grade of Trescott Road at the in- 
tersection of Etna Road. 

The motion passed by a show of hands vote: 

YES: 184* NO: 162 

ARTICLE 9: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $8,000 to 
contribute to the expense of maintaining the Oak Hill Ski Area 
for public skiing during the winter of 1979-80 and further to 
authorize the Selectmen to join with the Ford Sayre Memorial 
Ski Council and other interested parties in seeking funds, in- 
cluding federal assistance for public recreational facilities, to 
upgrade and improve the facility. 

ARTICLE 10: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $8,000 for 
the purpose of providing ice time for public recreational skating 
under the direction of the Parks and Recreation Board. 

ARTICLE 11: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $845 to 
increase the Town appropriation from $2,500, which is already 
included in the budget, to $3,345 to help support Headrest, Inc. 
in return for services rendered in 1979. 

ARTICLE 12: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,415 to be paid to the 
Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee Regional Association for promotional 
activities. 

The motion was defeated. 

ARTICLE 13: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
discontinue the Public Highway leading from the Etna/Hanover 
Center Road across Mink Brook to the property of Herbert and 
Sandra Maurer on the condition that such discontinuance shall 
not become effective unless and until the Selectmen lay out or 
accept a new highway in substitution of such discontinued 
highway across Mink Brook next to the common boundary of 
Maurer and Pelton. 

It was requested that the mover and seconder withdraw the mo- 
tion because of new information which had come to light. When 



92 



they refused, it was moved to Table the motion. This motion was 
defeated by voice vote. The original motion passed by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to provide Workers' Compensation Coverage 
for eligible employees by participating in the new Hampshire 
Municipal Association of Self-Funded Workers' Compensation 
Program and to authorize the Selectmen to take such action in 
furtherance of this vote as may be necessary. 

ARTICLE 15: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
establish a Capital Reserve Fund for financing payments for 
damage to Town-owned property, including motor vehicles and 
buildings, and, further, for paying claims for unemployment 
compensation billed to the Town by the N.H. Department of 
Employment Security. 

The motion was passed by 2 h voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
transfer funds in the so-called Town Properties Fund to the 
Capital Reserve Fund as established under Article Fifteen. 

The motion was passed by z h voice vote. 

ARTICLE 1 7: It was moved, seconded andadopted (by voice vote) 
that the Town endorse the "Scenic Road" Policy Statement 
adopted by the Board of Selectmen on February 15, 1979, and 
printed in the Selectmen's Position Paper of the Warrant, and re- 
quest that the original petition (Article 17) along with the Select- 
men's Statement be printed in next year's Town Report for use 
as a guideline in implementing the policy. 

PETITION REGARDING SCENIC ROADS 

WHEREAS, the Statutes of the State of New Hampshire (RSA 
253:17, 18) do not adequately define or describe "scenic 
roads"; and 

WHEREAS, there is need for acceptable criteria on which to 
select town roads that may be designated "scenic" by vote of 
the town; and 

WHEREAS, many townspeople would like to see the Selectmen, 
the Highway Department, Planning Board, Conservation Com- 
mission and Historical Society working together to preserve 
the quality of those roads designated "scenic"; 

THEREFORE, the undersigned being registered voters of the 
Town of Hanover, N.H. or landowners thereof, respectfully re 
quest that an article be placed in the Warrant for the Hanover 
Town Meeting on March 13, 1979 as follows: 



93 



"To see if the Town will vote to establish definitions and cri- 
teria for designating Town roads as "scenic" roads and to 
establish conditions for their repair, maintenance or recon- 
struction until such time as the State Statutes RSA 253:17, 18 
are amended to include such provisions." 

PROPOSED DEFINITIONS AND CRITERIA 

I. For a town highway to be designated a scenic road it should 
have one or more prominent visual features such as, but not 
limited to, boulders, ledges, old stone walls, fences, historic 
sites or landmarks, scenic outlooks, or overhanging trees and 
other natural vegetation along its borders. It should have little or 
no commercial or industrial development, and no billboards or 
advertising signs except for modest on-premise signs. Its 
travelway ordinarily should be no wider than necessary for two 
vehicles to pass and should be reasonably molded to the terrain. 

II. Upon recommendations or request of the Planning Board, 
Conservation Commission, or Historical Society of the town, or 
upon the petition of any ten voters, and/or landowners of the 
town who own land which abuts a road mentioned in the peti- 
tion, the voters at any annual or special town meeting may 
designate any road in said town, other than Class I or Class II 
highways, as a "scenic road". 

PROPOSED CONDITIONS FOR REPAIR, MAINTENANCE OR 
RECONSTRUCTION OF DESIGNATED SCENIC ROADS 

I. As used in this subdivision, "tree" means any woody plant 
which has a circumference of fifteen inches or more at a point 
four feet from the ground. 

II. Upon a road being designated a scenic road any repair, 
maintenance or reconstruction done with respect thereto should 
preserve the character and scenic quality of the road. It should 
not involve the tearing down or destruction of historic sites or 
landmarks, stonewalls, rocks or ledges or portions thereof, the 
cutting or removal of trees and other roadside vegetation, or pav- 
ing work, or other major alterations of any kind except with the 
prior consent of the Planning Board after a public hearing duly 
advertised as to time, date, place and purpose, two times in a 
newspaper of general circulation in the area, the last publication 
to occur at least seven days prior to such hearing, and for which 
the abutters along said road have been notified by the Town 
Clerk by mail as to time, date, place and purpose at least ten 
days prior to such hearing, and after advice from the Conserva- 
tion Commission, and if historic sites or landmarks are involved 
after advice from the Historical Society. 



94 



However, the town road agent may remove portions of trees, 
shrubs, vegetation and other natural or manmade obstructions 
from within three feet of the main traveled portion of said road 
which interfere with safe travel upon such road without such 
consent unless it involves an historical site or landmark. Also, 
he may in emergency situations cut and remove trees along the 
right of way with the written consent of the Planning Board after 
advice from the Conservation Commission, without such hear- 
ing. 

ARTICLE 18: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to designate all of Goose Pond Road as 
scenic under the provisions of RSA 253:17, 18, for the purposes 
of protecting and enhancing the scenic beauty of Hanover, and 
further, that the Selectmen shall, regarding such roads 
designated as scenic, file the appropriate request for suspen- 
sion of specifications when making application to the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works and Highways for Town Road Aid Funds 
under RSA 241:7, 1. 

ARTICLE 19: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
discontinue Highways with Goldthwaite-King Numbers #2a, 2c, 
23S, 24a, 34, 36, 49, 51, 64, 84, 108 and 109 as open highways and 
make such highways subject to gates and bars as provided in 
RSA 238:1 and 2. 

The motion was passed by a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
discontinue as an open highway and make subject to gates and 
bars that portion of the Wolfeboro Road from a point 2,650 ± 
feet from the intersection of the Wolfeboro Road and Two Mile 
Road to a point 1,200 ± feet from the intersection of Wolfeboro 
Road and Three Mile Road. 

The motion passed by a show of hands: 

YES: 272* NO: 14 

ARTICLE 21: The following two motions were moved and sec- 
onded separately with respect to each of the following Town 
highways in turn; Highway #12, 27, 30 and 35. (Goldthwaite-King 
Numbers.) 

MOTION #1 — 1 move that the Town discontinue Highway #X as 
described under Article 21 of the Warrant. (An affirmative vote 
on this motion completely wipes out the Town Highway.) 

MOTION #2— I move that the Town release and relinquish any 
interest it may have in the land on which Highway #X was 
located. (The purpose of this motion is to make clear on the 
record that the Town cannot determine whether or not it has any 



95 



ownership interest in the strip of land on which Highway #X was 
located. Due to this circumstance to avoid uncertainty and cost- 
ly litigation, the Town intends to wipe out any claim it may have 
by this formal action and leave the determination as to who 
owns the strip of land to the abutting landowners under State 
Law.) 

With regard to Highway #12, motion #1 and #2 each passed by a 
voice vote. 

With regard to Highway #27, motion #1 and #2 each passed by a 
voice vote. 

With regard to Highway #30, motion #1 passed by voice vote and 
motion #2 passed by a show of hands: 

YES: 151* NO: 141 

With regard to Highway #35, motion #1 and #2 each passed by 
voice vote. 

Motion #1 only was made and seconded with regard to Highway 
#38. It was amended by Mr. Morgan and seconded, explicitly to 
exclude the road from Robert Adams house to Trescott Road if it 
is any part of Road #38. The amendment passed. Mr. Gardner 
amended the amended motion "and further, such discontin- 
uance be limited to that part of Highway #38 located on the pro- 
perty of Putnam Blodgett". Richard Nordgren moved to table the 
motion, which was passed by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22: It was moved, seconded and voted (by voice vote) 
that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to accept a gift of 
a certain parcel of land located off Spencer Road and abutting 
the Pine Knoll Cemetery, donated by Walter C. and Caroline 
Lobitz, to be used for municipal purposes under the direction of 
the Selectmen. (The value of this gift is based on the original 
1977 assessment of $23,400.) 

ARTICLE 23: It was moved and seconded that we request the 
Selectmen to amend their By-law regulating dogs so as to in- 
crease the area of enforcement to include the Greensboro Road 
and Etna Village area. 

The motion passed by a show of hands: 

YES: 173* NO: 48 

ARTICLE 24: No Motion was made under this article. 

ARTICLE 25: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote to 
require that all access roads servicing a residential develop- 
ment of 100 or more dwelling units include a paved fire lane 15 
feet wide. 

A motion to table was defeated. The original motion was 
defeated (by voice vote.) 

96 



ARTICLE 26: It was moved and seconded that the Town vote as 
follows: Where an approved planned residential development in- 
cludes one hundred or more units and where the buildings in the 
planned residential development have less than two-hundred 
feet separating any two buildings then such planned residential 
development shall: 

a. satisfy the most strict requirements for residential con- 
struction under the Hanover Building Code and under the 
Hanover Life Safety Code, and; 

b. have two approved fire exits from each unit, and; 

c. have automatic sprinklers above the first floor. 

The motion was defeated (by voice vote). 

ARTICLE 27: To transact any other business that may legally be 
brought before this Town Meeting. 

It was moved that the Town instruct the Board of Selectmen to 
investigate the legality and the financial impact on the existing 
tax status of the Town of Hanover of substituting income for 
property as the principal basis for levying taxes in the town. The 
motion was ruled out of order by the moderator. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:21 p.m. The polls closed at 
11:36 p.m. The vote was announced on Articles 1 and 2 at 12:40 
a.m., March 14, 1979. 

Total ballots cast 956 

Absentee ballots 49 and 1 spoiled 

Regular ballots 907 

Respectfully submitted, 
s/ Patricia H. Radway 
Town Clerk 



97 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING 
November 1 and 2, 1979 

A special meeting of the Town of Hanover was called to order by 
Moderator Harry H. Bird at 7:30 PM, November 1, 1979 at Webster 
Hall. He read the warrant and return of posting. 

ARTICLE I: To see if the Town will appropriate Two Million 
($2,000,000) dollars for the design and construction of Park 
Street including the installation of storm drains and 
underground utilities and to borrow Five Hundred Thousand 
($500,000) dollars of said sum by the issuance of bonds and/or 
notes under the Municipal Finance Act with the balance of One 
Million Five Hundred Thousand ($1,500,000) dollars to be obtained 
from Federal funds; and, further, as to authorizing the Select- 
men to apply, negotiate, and do all things necessary to obtain 
federal assistance as may be available for this Project; and/or, 
to incur indebtedness in anticipation of the receipt of such 
assistance as provided under the Municipal Finance Act and to 
receive and expend such assistance for the purpose of this 
Project. 

Article I was moved and seconded. 

Balloting began at 9:15 P.M., closed at 10:15 P.M.; reopended at 
8:00 A.M. November 2nd and closed at 6:00 P.M. 

The Moderator read Article II: to transact any other business 
that may legally be brought before this town meeting. There be- 
ing no further business, counting of the ballots commenced. 

Article I: The Voting by ballot was as follows: 

YES: 321 NO: 485 

(announced by the moderator at 6:25 P.M.) The motion was 
defeated and the meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Patricia H. Radway 
Town Clerk 



98 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

HANOVER 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

1979 



99 



1979 HANOVER ANNUAL REPORT 

Table of Contents 

School District Officers 101 

Warrants for Annual Meetings, 1980 102 

Record of Election of Officers, 1979 105 

Minutes of Annual Meeting, 1979 106 

Annual Report of the Hanover School Board 109 

Auditors' Reports, 1978-79 112 

School Administrative Unit 22 
Administrative Salaries, 1979-80 123 

Analysis of Proposed Budget Appropriation 124 

Instructional Staff, 1979-80 125 

Comparative Yearly Enrollments 126 



100 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICERS 



School Board 

Ann D. Bradley Term expires 1982 

John M.Curtis Term expires 1980 

Mary Ann Harris, Chairman Term expires 1980 

Mary Ann Hooper, Vice-Chairman Term expires 1981 

Emily M. Mead Term expires 1981 

Richard E. Nordgren Term expires 1981 

Brian E. Pattison, Secretary Term expires 1982 

Charles T. Wood, Moderator 

Sybil B. Williamson, Clerk 

Sybil B. Williamson, Treasurer 

Errol L Heisser, Auditor 

Hugh Watson, Superintendent of Schools 

Lawrence E. Cornell, Assistant Superintendent 

Jeanette I. Cook, Administrative Assistant 
Stefan Vogel, Principal, Bernice A. Ray School 



101 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT SPECIAL WARRANT 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Grafton, S. S. School District of Hanover 

To the inhabitants of the School District of Hanover, in the Coun- 
ty of Grafton, and State of New Hampshire qualified to vote in 
District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at Webster Hall in Hanover, New 
Hampshire on Tuesday, March 11, 1980, at 8:00 in the morning, to 
act on the following subject: 

To choose by ballot a Moderator, a Clerk, a Treasurer, and an 
Auditor, each to serve one year, and two members of the School 
Board, each to serve three years. (Polls will open at 8:00 a.m. and 
will close at 8:00 p.m. or one-quarter hour after completion of voting 
on the last article in the Town Warrant, whichever is later, unless 
the Town votes to keep the polls open to a later hour.) 

NOTE: ALL OTHER SCHOOL BUSINESS WILL BE CONSIDERED 
AT THE SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING TO BE HELD ON WEDNES- 
DAY, MARCH 19, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. IN WEBSTER HALL. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Hanover this 15th day of 
February, 1980. 



Ann D. Bradley John M. Curtis 



Mary Ann Harris, Chairman Mary Ann Hooper, Vice-Chairman 



Emily M. Mead Richard E. Nordgren 



Brian E. Pattison, Secretary 
School Board, School District of Hanover 



102 



SCHOOL DISTRICT WARRANT 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Grafton, S.S. School District of Hanover 



To the inhabitants of the School District of Hanover in the Coun- 
ty of Grafton, and State of New Hampshire qualified to vote in 
District Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at Webster Hall in Hanover, New 
Hampshire on Wednesday, March 19, 1980, at 7:30 in the evening, 
to act on the following subjects: 

Article 1. To see what sum of money the District will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the support of schools, for the payment of 
salaries for school district officials and agents, and for the pay- 
ment of statutory obligations of the District. 

Article 2. To see if the District will vote to authorize the School 
Board to establish a contingency fund as part of the regular school 
district budget and to raise and appropriate Ten Thousand Dollars 
($10,000.00) for this purpose. 

Article 3. To see if the District will vote to request from the 
New Hampshire State Department of Education a waiver from the 
requirement to provide a school lunch program. 

Article 4. To see if the District will authorize the School Board 
to apply for and accept grants and aid from the United States, the 
State of New Hampshire, and any agency or municipality thereof, 
or from private corporations, and individuals for the construction, 
maintenance, reconstruction, operation, and financing of its 
schools, and to do any and all things necessary in order to avail the 
District of such aid and cooperation, or to take any other ' 
relative thereto. 

Article 5. To see if the District will vote to accept the provi- 
sions of Public Law 89-10, designed to improve educational oppor- 
tunities with particular reference to children of low income 
families, and to appropriate such funds as may be made available 
to the District under said federal act for such particular projects as 
may be determined by the School Board. Further, to see if the 
District will authorize the School Board to make application for 
such funds and to expend the same for such projects as it may 
designate. 



103 



Article 6. To see if the District will vote to accept the provi- 
sions of Public Law 94-142, designed to improve educational oppor- 
tunities with particular reference to handicapped children, and to 
appropriate such funds as may be made available to the District 
under said federal act for such particular projects as may be deter- 
mined by the School Board. Further, to see if the District will 
authorize the School Board to make application for such funds and 
to expend the same for such projects as it may designate. 

Article 7. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before this meeting. 

Note: Election of School District Officers will take place at the 
time of the School District Meeting held in conjunction with the 
Town Meeting to be held on Tuesday, March 11, 1980 at Webster 
Hall. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Hanover this 27th day of 
February, 1980. 



Ann D. Bradley John M. Curtis 



Mary Ann Harris, Chairman Mary Ann Hooper, Vice-Chairman 



Emily M. Mead Richard E. Nordgren 



Brian E. Pattison, Secretary 
School Board, School District of Hanover 



104 



HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 

RECORD OF ELECTION OF 
SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICERS 

March 13, 1979 

The election of officers of the Hanover School District was con- 
ducted by separate ballot at the annual Hanover Town Meeting on 
March 13, 1979. 

The meeting was called to order by the Town Moderator at 8:00 
a.m. in Webster Hall, Hanover, New Hampshire. 

The Hanover School District Warrant, dated February 16, 1979 
and the Return of Posting were read by School District Moderator, 
E. Ronan Campion. 

The polls were declared open at 8:15 a.m. by the Moderator. The 
polls were declared closed at 11:05 p.m. 

At the close of the polls, the town officials turned all School 
District Ballots over to the School District officials who proceeded 
to count the ballots publicly with the assistance of eight (8) legal 
voters of the District. 

The following officers were declared elected for the term in- 
dicated: 

Moderator for one year Charles T. Wood 

Clerk for one year Sybil B. Williamson 

Treasurer for one year Sybil B. Williamson 

Auditor for one year Errol L Heisser 

School Board members for three years . Ann D. Bradley 

Brian E. Pattison 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sybil B. Williamson 

Clerk 

Hanover, N. H. School District 



105 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 
HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Wednesday, March 14, 1979 
7:30 P.M., Webster Hall, Hanover, N. H. 

A legal meeting of the residents of the Hanover School District 
was called to order by the Moderator, E. Ronan Campion, at 7:30 
p.m. As there was no objection, the Moderator dispensed with the 
reading of the warrant. 

ARTICLE I: The motion was made by Edwin A. Willard that the 
District abolish the Capital Reserve Fund established on May 
31, 1977 for the repair of the Bernice A. Ray School roof and to 
transfer those monies to the General Fund to reduce taxes in the 
1979-80 fiscal year. Upon being duly seconded, the motion was 
voted in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE II: The motion was made by Edwin A. Willard that the 
District raise and appropriate the sum of One Million Three 
Hundred Seventy-four Thousand Seventy-one Dollars 
($1,374,071.00) for the support of schools, for the payment of 
salaries for school district officials and agents, and for the pay- 
ment of statutory obligations of the District. Upon being duly 
seconded, the motion was voted in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE III: The motion was made by Mary Ann Hooper that the 
District authorize the School Board to establish a contingency 
fund as part of the regular school district budget and to raise 
and appropriate Ten Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty-one Dollars 
($10,951.00) for this purpose. Upon being duly seconded, the mo- 
tion was voted in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE IV: The motion was made by Mary Ann Harris that the 
District authorize the School Board to apply for and accept 
grants and aid from the United States, the State of New Hamp- 
shire, and any agency or municipality thereof, or from private 
corporations, and individuals for the construction, maintenance, 
reconstruction, operation, and financing of its schools, and to 
do any and all things necessary in order to avail the District of 
such aid and cooperation, or to take any other action relative 
thereto. Upon being duly seconded, it was voted in the affir- 
mative. 

ARTICLE V: The motion was made by Richard E. Nordgren that 
the District vote to accept the provisions of Public Law 89-10, 
designed to improve educational opportunities with particular 
reference to children of low income families, and to appropriate 
such funds as may be made available to the District under said 



106 



federal act for such particular projects as may be determined by 
the school board. He moved further that the District authorize 
the school board to make application for such funds and to ex- 
pend the same for such projects as it may designate. Upon be- 
ing duly seconded, the motion was voted in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE VI: The motion was made by Emily M. Mead that the 
District vote to accept the provisions of Public Law 94-142, 
designed to improve educational opportunities with particular 
reference to handicapped children, and to appropriate such 
funds as may be made available to the District under said 
federal act for such particular projects as may be determined by 
the school board. Further, she moved that the District authorize 
the school board to make application for such funds and to ex- 
pend the same for such projects as it may designate. Upon be- 
ing duly seconded, the motion was voted in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE VII: Under other business, the motion was made that 
the Hanover School District extend its appreciation and special 
thanks to Marilyn Williams Black for the ten years of outstand- 
ing service to the Hanover School District, and a special thank 
you for the recognition she has brought to the Bernice A. Ray 
School and the Town of Hanover as the New Hampshire Teacher 
of the Year, and as one of four finalists for National Teacher of 
the Year. The motion was carried by acclaim. 

Tributes and expressions of appreciation were extended to 
Edwin A. Willard (read by Mary Ann Harris) and Ann D. Bradley 
(read by Edwin A. Willard). 

On motion, duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn the meeting 
at 8:01 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted 

Sybil B. Williamson 
School District Clerk 



107 



EDWIN A. WILLARD 

One member of the Hanover School Board is retiring. Edwin A. 
Willard has been on the Board for three years, and has been chair- 
man for the last two. He was chairman of the negotiations team for 
the Hanover Board during the past year, he has been an active 
member of the Staff Development committee for three years, and 
he is well known as the author of numerous school-related articles 
in the local press. 

We salute, also, Ed's wife, Winnifred Willard, who has organized 
social occasions for the Board and staff on many occasions. 

We will miss you, Ed. You have been a fair-minded friend of this 
school. 

Mary Ann Harris 
ANN D. BRADLEY 

Ann D. Bradley has been an invaluable member of the Hanover 
Board of Education. She has been assiduous in carrying out her 
responsibilities. She, in her activities, has far exceeded the duties 
normally required of a School Director. Mrs. Bradley has a tremen- 
dous knowledge of New Hampshire school law. She is keenly at- 
tuned to School Board policies. She is fair in her judgment, pro- 
found in her knowledge, and indefatiguable in the effort she puts 
forth as a School Director. Her opinions have always been sound 
and thoughtful. 

In addition, Ann D. Bradley has made herself known as a 
judicious and effective member of the New Hampshire School 
Board Association. She is now Second Vice President of the 
Association, and in two years she will become President. She is 
Chairman of the New Hampshire School Board Association's 
Resolutions Committee. She has been sent to both California and 
Washington as a representative worthy of reflecting the sound 
views of our State. 

The association of the Hanover School Board members with Mrs. 
Bradley has been based on deep respect and admiration. The 
Board commends Ann D. Bradley to the Hanover School District 
Meeting as an individual whose interest is based solely on the im- 
provement of education in the Hanover School District. The Board 
salutes her for a job well done. 

I respectfully move that the Hanover School District extend its 
appreciation and thanks to Ann D. Bradley for her first three years 
of outstanding service as a School Director. 

Edwin A. Willard 
108 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
HANOVER SCHOOL BOARD 



The Hanover School Board is composed of seven members with 
an Executive Officer, the Superintendent of Schools. During the 
past year the Board held twelve official meetings, usually on the 
fourth Wednesday of the month. The Hanover Board meets at 7:30 
P.M. in the Bernice A. Ray School. Board members also attended 
meetings of SAU 22 and served on a number of subcommittees of 
the Hanover Board. 

This year the enrollment of the Ray School, which serves Kinder- 
garten through Grade 5, was 449 students on December 1, 1979, a 
decrease of sixteen students from the October 1, 1978 count. The 
staff of the Ray School consists of a Principal, 24.3 certificated 
teachers, 4.8 pupil services personnel (including learning 
specialists, special teachers, school nurse, and speech therapist), 
1 media generalist, and 10.6 educational assistants. 

For the Ray School, one of the highlights of 1979 was the selec- 
tion of art teacher Marilyn "Willy" Black as the National Teacher of 
the Year. This was an honor not only to Willy but to Hanover and 
the Ray School, and to the art teachers of America. The selection 
was announced in Washington by President Carter in April, where 
Willy and several members of the Board, administration and 
teaching staff were treated to a variety of receptions in Willy's 
honor. During the current school year Willy has been temporarily 
assigned to the New Hampshire State Department of Education 
under a Federal grant, and she is spending the year sharing her 
wealth of talent, interest, and enthusiasm with schools across New 
Hampshire and the country. 

In the area of curriculum, Ray School teachers wrote a number of 
new units for science during the summer and this program is being 
implemented and evaluated this year. On the basis of a workshop 
and committee study, a revised social studies curriculum is being 
proposed. Plans are underway for development of skills sequences 
and related units, some of which will be completed in the summer 
of 1980. Finally, under the leadership of third grade teacher Jack 
Wilde, who attended an intensive five week writing institute last 
summer and has been sharing his expertise through teacher work- 
shops, the school has seen a new emphasis on student writing. 
Following a trial period this spring, a staff committee plans to 
revise both the grammar and creative writing portions of the cur- 
riculum. 



109 



In response to the Hanover Finance Committee's suggestion last 
spring that the Board examine its staffing patterns, a subcommit- 
tee of the Board was set up to look at past, present and projected 
future enrollments and their effect on staff size. The result of the 
subcommittee's work was Policy IEC, adopted by the Board in 
November 1979, which directs the administration each year to pre- 
sent "staffing guidelines for budgetary planning on the basis of 
enrollment projections. These guidelines shall specify proposed 
pupil-teacher ratios and support staff levels." As a result of this 
policy and administrative evaluation of projected enrollments, the 
Board is proposing a reduction of two teachers and two assistants 
for the 1980-81 school year. 

This past year saw a major effort on the part of the staff to 
understand better the needs of "developmentally young" children. 
After several lectures to staff and parents by a representative of 
the Gesell Institute, a committee of parents and staff was set up to 
study the advisability of establishing a transition class between 
kindergarten and grade 1 for such "developmentally young" 
children. Its findings will be presented to the Hanover Board in the 
spring of 1980. 

The Ray School's commitment to the performing arts has been 
visible through a number of programs during the past year. The 
Arthur Hall dance team presented a day-long series of workshops 
to the fourth grade during their study of Africa, the Parish Players 
presented a performance of "Middle European Folk Tales," the fifth 
grade produced "Charlotte's Web", directed by music teacher Don- 
na Butler with help from many specialists and teachers, the clown- 
mime Hank Chapin gave a performance, and students were treated 
to an assembly of music on instruments from around the world, 
given by the group "Do A." The year in dramatics culminated with a 
performance of "Scrooge in Tableaux" at the annual winter pro- 
gram, with children and choruses from all grades participating. 

Thanks to the Friends of the Hanover Schools, the Ray School 
continues to enjoy and use its woodworking shop in the basement. 
Last fall the "Colonial Skiff", funded by the Friends, was completed 
by Michael Shoob and the third grade and launched in Storrs Pond. 

On-going, successful annual projects include the Colonial 
House with role-playing in Colonial Days, the Mexican and 
Japanese Festivals, Research Units and the Science Fair, and 
periodical gym demonstrations and string, band, and choral perfor- 
mances. 

The Parent Advisory Council which was established in 1978 
under the requirements of Title I has presented three educational 
discussion sessions for parents this year. The Council plans to 
continue its programs in the year ahead. 

110 



During the past year 160 school volunteers contributed more 
than 2800 hours of their time, interest, and skills to enrich and pro- 
vide extra individual attention to Ray School students. Each 
teacher tapped this valuable resource by planning for and involving 
volunteers in a wide variety of classes and programs. The Board 
and school are appreciative of the spirit of sharing exhibited by 
these volunteers. 

Ray School staff continue to support a variety of teacher-training 
programs, and in the course of the year student teachers from Dart- 
mouth, Keene State, and Plymouth State College have worked at 
the school, along with intern teachers from the Upper Valley 
Teacher Training program. 

The Ray School continues to be a demanding yet cheerful and 
accepting environment for children. This is due primarily to the 
dedication and care of the staff and the leadership of Principal 
Stefan Vogel. The Board applauds their efforts and encourages 
anyone who is interested to visit the school at any time. 

Ann D. Bradley 

John M. Curtis 

Mary Ann Harris, Chairman 

Mary Ann Hooper, Vice-Chairman 

Emily M. Mead 

Richard E. Nordgren 

Brian E. Pattison, Secretary 

HANOVER SCHOOL BOARD 



111 



REPORT OF THE 
HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT AUDITOR 

I have met with the Certified Public Accountants retained by the 
Hanover School District and have reviewed with them the results of 
their audit for the year ended June 30, 1979. 

As elected auditor for the Hanover School District, I find the 
audit of the District's financial statements by Smith, Batchelder & 
Rugg for the year ended June 30, 1979 as represented in their audit 
certificate dated August 10, 1979 to be satisfactory in all respects. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Errol L Heisser 
Auditor 



To the School Board and Voters of Hanover School District: 

We have examined the balance sheets of the Hanover School 
District - General Fund, Capital Reserve Fund and Special Reserve 
Fund as of June 30, 1979 and 1978, and the related statements of 
revenues and expenses - General Fund and changes in fund 
balances for the year ended June 30, 1979. We have also examined 
the statement of general long-term debt as of June 30, 1979. Our ex- 
aminations were made in accordance with generally accepted 
auditing standards and, accordingly, included such tests of the ac- 
counting records and such other auditing procedures as we con- 
sidered necessary in the circumstances. 

The District has not maintained a record of its general fixed 
assets and, accordingly, a statement of general fixed assets, re- 
quired by generally accepted accounting principles, is not included 
in the financial statements. 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present 
fairly the financial position of the Hanover School District as of 
June 30, 1979 and 1978, and the results of its operations and 
changes in fund balances for the year ended June 30, 1979, in con- 
formity with generally accepted accounting principles applies on a 
consistent basis. 



Smith, Batchelder & Rugg 



Hanover, New Hampshire 
August 10, 1979 



112 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Balance Sheets - June 30, 1979 and 1978 

7979 1978 



General Fund 










ASSETS: 










Cash (Note 2) 


$ 


122,400 


$ 


83,856 


Accounts receivable 




2,653 




819 


Due from Supervisory Union #22 




— 




493 


Due from other districts 




— 




1,315 


Due from Capital Reserve Fund 




— 


$ 


707 




$ 


125,053 


87,190 


LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE: 










Accounts payable 


$ 


1,978 


$ 


556 


Encumbrances (Note 6) 




16,328 




71,758 


Due to Capital Reserve Fund 




67,562 




- 


Due to School Administrative Unit #22 




312 




— 


Due to Dresden School District 




189 




- 


Total liabilities 




86,369 




72,314 


Fund balance 




38,684 




14,876 



$ 125,053 $ 87,190 



Capital Reserve Fund 
ASSETS: 
Cash $ 26,159 $ 33,228 

Due from General Fund 67,562 - 



$ 93,721 $ 33,228 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE: 

Due to General Fund $ - $ 707 

Fund balance (Note 5) 93,721 32,521 

$ 93,721 $ 33,228 



113 



Special Reserve Fund 

ASSETS: 

Cash $ 512 $ 373 

United States government securities, 

at cost (market value, 1979 - $75,085; 

1978 -$89,195) 75,847 91,958 

$ 76,359 $ 92,331 

FUND BALANCE (Note 7) 

Income $ 498 $ 373 

Principal 75,861 91,958 

$ 76,359 $ 92,331 

The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of these statements. 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

GENERAL FUND 

For The Year Ended June 30, 1979 



Budgeted Actual 



Revenues 
10 Revenue from Local Sources: 
Current appropriation 
Tuition 

Bridgman Trust Fund 
Special Reserve Fund 
Interest on NOW account 
Rent 
Other 



30 Revenue from State Sources: 
Building aid 

New Hampshire sweepstakes 
Handicapped aid 



114 



$2,621,369 


$2,608,754 


1,885 


1,142 


11,500 


14,148 


23,000 


21,255 


— 


10,243 


100 


10 


100 


3,939 


2,657,954 


2,659,491 


33,184 


33,787 


26,819 


26,819 


1,000 


229 


61,003 


60,835 



40 



Revenue from Federal Sources: 






National Forest Reserve 


1,000 


1,616 


School Milk 


3,000 


3,909 


Public Law 874 


10,000 


— 


ESEA Title IV-B 


— 


639 




14,000 


6,164 



80 Revenue from Other Districts 
in New Hampshire: 



Dresden bond payment 


27,630 


27,630 


Sale of Richmond School (Note 4) 


109,717 


109,717 


Capital Reserve Fund - 






Richmond School (Note 5) 


— 


10,026 


Capital Reserve Fund - Interest 


— 


37 


Tuition 


1,885 


1,886 




139,232 


149,296 


Utilization of fund balance 






at June 30, 1978 


11,128 


— 



Total net revenues 2,883,317 2,875,786 



Expenses 
100 Administration: 

110 Salaries - District officers 
135 Contracted services 
190 Other expenses 

100 Series Total 

200 Instruction: 
210 Salaries 
215 Textbooks 
220 Instruction materials 
230 Teaching supplies 
235 Contracted services 
290 Other expenses 

200 Series Total 

400 Health Services: 
410 Salaries 
490 Other expenses 

400 Series Total 



115 



Budgeted Actual 



2,500 


2,450 


8,525 


6,129 


2,600 


2,938 


13,625 


11,517 


542,070 


541,036 


1,171 


879 


8,427 


7,304 


20,887 


18,632 


4,467 


3,887 


15,121 


14,588 


592,143 


586,326 


10,147 


10,148 


950 


1,116 


11,097 


11,264 



Budgeted Actual 



Expenses (Continued) 

500 Transportation: 
510 Salaries 
535 Contracted services 
500 Series Total 

600 Operation of Plant 
610 Salaries 
630 Supplies 
635 Contracted services 
640 Heat 
645 Utilities 

600 Series Total 

700 Maintenance of Plant: 
710 Salaries 

725 Replacement of equipment 

726 Repairs to equipment 
735 Contracted services 
766 Repairs to buildings 
790 Grounds 

700 Series Total 

800 Fixed Charges: 

850 Retirement and social security 
855 Insurance 

800 Series Total 



505 


550 


61,697 


61,077 


62,202 


61,627 


42,574 


40,259 


4,850 


4,300 


1,200 


1,389 


12,600 


8,456 


20,168 


20,004 


81,392 


74,408 


13,426 


11,844 


2,995 


2,473 


1,150 


1,264 


9,739 


8,312 


6,276 


6,384 


960 


102 


34,546 


30,379 


48,678 


55,331 


38,212 


36,005 


86,890 


91,336 



900 School Lunch and Special 
Milk Programs - 

Series Total 

1100 Community Activities - Series Total 

1200 Capital Outlay: 

1265 Sites 

1266 Buildings 

1267 Equipment 

1200 Series Total 



3,000 



3,909 



100 




1,500 


1,303 


568 


10,456 


2,578 


3,773 


4,646 


15,532 



116 





Budgeted 


Actual 


Expenses (Continued) 






1300 Debt Service: 






1370 Principal of debt 


120,000 


120,000 


1371 Interest on debt 


65,955 


65,955 


1300 Series Total 


185,955 


185,955 


1400 Outgoing Transfer Accounts: 






1477.10 In-state tuition 


136,188 


134,772 


1477.20 Transportation 


720 


533 


1477.30 District share of 






Supervisory Union #22 


45,106 


45,106 


1478.20 Transportation 


1,080 


1,660 


1479.10 Private school tuition 


9,000 


6,479 



1479.20 Transportation to 

private schools 6,220 2,537 

1479.30 District share of Dresden 



School District 


1,597,722 


1,585,107 


1400 Series Total 


1,796,036 


1,776,194 


1700 Contingency Fund - Fencing 


10,685 


1,000 


1900 Other Expenditures: 






National Forest Reserve 


1,000 


1,542 


ESEA Title IV-B 


— 


739 


Other 


— 


250 


1900 Series Total 


1,000 


2,531 


Total net expenses 


2,883,317 


2,851,978 


EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENSES 


$ - 


$ 23,808 



The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of this statement. 



117 



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118 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 

STATEMENT OF GENERAL LONG-TERM DEBT 

June 30, 1979 

Amount Available And To Be Provided 
For The Payment of Long-Term Debt 

Amount to be provided for payment of bonds $1,084,000 

General Long-Term Debt 

Bonds payable (Note 3) $1,084,000 



The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of this statement. 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

June 30, 1979 

1. Summary of significant accounting policies: 

Basis of presentation -The financial statements have been 
prepared on the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with 
generally accepted accounting principle. This method of account- 
ing recognizes revenue and expense in the year in which earned or 
incurred rather than the year in which received or paid. 

Funds -The School District operates three types of funds as 
follows: 

General Fund - This fund is the primary operating fund, with the 
main source of revenue being local taxes. 

Capital Reserve Fund -This fund consists of amounts ap- 
propriated in prior years to provide for renovations to the Rich- 
mond and Bernice A. Ray Schools (Note 5). 

Special Reserve Fund -This fund consists of the balance of the 
payment ($311,700) received by the District from the Norwich 
School District in the creation of the Dresden School District in 
1963. The principal is being transferred to the General Fund in year- 
ly amounts of approximately $16,000 together with interest on the 
remaining principal. 



119 



Pension plans - The School District's employees are covered 
under mandatory state-sponsored, retirement plans which are 
funded on a current basis. Pension expense for the year ended 
June 30, 1979 was $18,242. The excess, if any, of the actuarially 
computed value of vested benefits over the total pension fund 
assets is not available. 

Budget- Budget figures are presented in accordance with total 
appropriations voted and property taxes to be raised as approved 
by the State of New Hampshire. 



2. Cash - General Fund: 

The cash balance at June 30, 1979 is the result of the following 
transactions on the Treasurer's books: 

Cash on hand, July 1,1978 $ 83,856 

Total receipts 3,018,114 

3,101,970 
Less - School board orders paid 2,979,570 

Cash on hand, June 30, 1979 $ 122,400 



3. Bonds payable: 

Bonds payable consisted of the following at June 30, 1979: 

Grade School Serial Bonds, 3.50%, 20-year, dated 
November 1, 1959, interest payable May 1 and 
November 1, principal payable $10,000 each 
November 1 through 1979 $ 10,000 

High School Serial Bonds, 3.25%, 20-year, dated 
October 1, 1964, interest payable June 1 and 
December 1, principal payable $30,000 each 
June 1 through 1979, then $35,000 each June 1 
through 1983 with a final payment of $34,000 
on June 1, 1984. Dresden School District is 
responsible for 100% of the interest on this 
bond and 70% of the principal payments 174,000 

Grade School Serial Bonds, 6.00%, 20-year, dated 
April 1, 1970, interest payable April 1 and 
October 1, principal payable $80,000 each 
April 1 through 1986, then $85,000 each April 1 
through 1990 900,000 

$1,084,000 



120 



Principal payments on this indebtedness over the next five years 
will be as follows: 

1979-80 $125,000 

1980-81 $115,000 

1981-82 $115,000 

1982-83 $115,000 

1983-84 $114,000 

4. Sale of Frances C. Richmond School: 

At a special meeting of the Hanover School District on July 
15, 1974, it was voted to sell the Frances C. Richmond School to the 
Dresden School District. The price of $658,300 is to be paid within a 
period of not more than six years from the date of sale. The pay- 
ment schedule established by the Dresden School District calls for 
payment to be made in six equal installments, beginning with the 
1975-76 fiscal year. The fourth installment of $109,717 was re- 
ceived during the 1978-79 fiscal year. 

5. Capital Reserve Fund: 

At the March 5, 1975 District meeting, it was voted to 
establish a Capital Reserve Fund of not more than $104,500 from 
the proceeds of the sale of the Richmond School (Note 4) for the 
"financing of any future additions to and reconstruction of the Ber- 
nice A. Ray School". 

At the March 3, 1976 District meeting, it was voted to add $41,000 
from the proceeds of the sale of the Richmond School (Note 4) to 
the Capital Reserve Fund for the purpose of defraying Hanover's 
share of the cost of renovating the Richmond School. 

At the May 31, 1977 Special District meeting, it was voted to ap- 
propriate not more than $150,000 for the replacement of the Ber- 
nice A. Ray School roof and the restoration of any damages caused 
by the leaking of the roof. During 1977-78, $130,000 was transferred 
to the General Fund as reimbursement for disbursements and en- 
cumbrances. 

At the July 10, 1978 special meeting of the Hanover School 
Board, it was voted to accept and approve the settlement of the 
civil suit relating to the defective roof at the Bernice A. Ray School 
for the total sum of $95,000. The Chairman was authorized to ex- 
ecute general releases, as well as any other documents necessary 
to effectuate the settlement. It was also voted to transfer the 
Funds received in settlement, less all related expenses, to the 
Capital Reserve Fund. The net settlement amounted to $69,717. 

At the March 14, 1979 District meeting, it was voted to transfer 
the balance of the fund to the General Fund in 1979-80. 



121 



6. Study of Bernice A. Ray School: 

At the Hanover School District meetings of March 5, 1975 and 
March 3, 1976, it was voted to appropriate $5,000 and $7,000, 
respectively, for the study of the Bernice A. Ray School facilities. 
Of the total appropriation of $12,000, $3,877 has been spent in 
previous years. The balance of $8,123 remained encumbered to ab- 
sorb the cost of future studies at June 30, 1978 and 1979. 

7. Contingency: 

As indicated in Note 1 above, the principal of the Special 
Reserve Fund consists of the balance remaining from the 1963 pay- 
ment to the District by the Norwich School District in conjunction 
with the establishment of the Dresden School District. The District 
voted in 1963 to "hold and invest such sums for the purpose of 
creating a capital reserve for the payment of existing debts or for 
such other purposes as the District may hereafter vote". Counsel 
for the District has indicated that they are of the opinion that this 
Special Reserve Fund does not meet the requirements of New 
Hampshire state law pertaining to the establishment of a "capital 
reserve" fund. Therefore, it is possible that it may be necessary that 
the balance of the fund be transferred to the General Fund current- 
ly, rather than over the next seven years, although this fund has 
been operated in accordance with the intentions of the voters, as 
expressed in 1963. 



122 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT 22 

Report of the 1979-80 salaries to be paid 
by the State and Local School Districts 



Superintendent 
Assistant Superintendent 
Business Administrator 

Total 

'Resigned 11/30/79 



State Local 

$1,500.00 $34,885.00 

2,390.00 25,896. 

2,390.00 11,167.00 



$7,280.00 $71,948.00 



Breakdown of Local Contributions 



Dresden 

Hanover 

Lyme 

Orford 

Norwich 

Total 



Percent 


Amount 


45.322 


32,608.00 


24.833 


17,867.00 


9.573 


6,888.00 


8.758 


6,301.00 


11.514 


8,284.00 


100.000 


$71,948.00 



123 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 
ANALYSIS OF PROPOSED BUDGET APPROPRIATION 

1979-1980 1980-1981 



Basic Instruction 


$ 470,587 


$ 457,785 


Instructional Services 


3,292 


4,175 


Curriculum & Staff Development 


8,964 


8,769 


Media Services 


39,046 


42,714 


Field Trips 


1,425 


1,330 


Total For Instruction 


$ 523,314 


$ 514,773 


Special Education 


63,606 


74,280 


Health Services 


11,422 


12,023 


General Control 


68,527 


77,465 


Administration & Supervision 


47,236 


50,437 


Fringe Benefits 


94,021 


107,067 


Pupil Transportation 


75,351 


75,247 


School Milk Program 


3,500 


4,000 


Heat & Utilities 


28,435 


33,425 


Plant Operation & Maintenance 


102,773 


128,235 


Tuition Payment to Dresden 


181,056 


214,737 


Debt Service 


174,830 


168,718 


Contingency 


10,951 


10,000 


Grand Total 


$1,385,022 


$1,470,407 


Tax Impact Summary 






1979-1980 


1980-1981 


Total Expenditures 


$1,385,022 


$1,470,407 


Non-Tax Revenue 


374,112 


307,259 


To Be Raised from Taxes 


$1,010,910 


$1,163,148 


Less Business Profits Tax 


67,150 


67,150 


Property Tax Impact 


$ 943,760 


$1,095,998 



124 



HANOVER SCHOOL DISTRICT 

BERNICE A. RAY SCHOOL 

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, 1979-80 

(Date indicates first year employed by District) 



AnnG.Atwood,Grade5 1963 

Shirleigh L Barnes, Kindergarten 1968 

Marilyn W. Black (Leave of Absence) 1969 

Ruth L.Brown, Grade 2 1955 

Donna G. Butler, Music 1977 

Jenifer M. Decker, Grade 5 1976 

Sara W. DeMont, Kindergarten 1978 

Ruth E.Dennis, Grade 2 1947 

Louise D. Derrick, Grade 1 1974 

Deborah A. Franzoni, Physical Education 1974 

Glenna E. Giveans, Learning Center 1979 

Elaine K. Hawthorne, Grade 3 1965 

Cynthia W. Hayes, Grade 5 1977 

Pamela K.Hunt, Grade 3 1979 

Jean M. Keene, Media Generalist 1970 

Frances W. Kelsey, Grade 4 1969 

Joan S. Kidder, Learning Center 1975 

Susan J. MacNeil, Grade 1 1978 

Nancy H. Miles, Learning Center 1975 

Marc L Moss, Grade 4 1979 

Alice L Nintzel, Grade 2 1979 

Janice M. O'Donnell, Physical Education 1979 

Sharon S.Poulin, Grade 2 1976 

Lois C. Roland, Learning Specialist 1975 

Anne W. Silberfarb, Learning Disabilities Specialist 1975 

Kathleen M. Smith, Art 1979 

Alan G.Symons, Grade 5 1968 

Margaret C.Taylor, Grade 1 1975 

Shirley K.Westhead, Grade 4 1966 

John C.Wilde, Grade 3 1972 

Bertha L. Woodward, Grade 1 1 959 

Medical Staff, 1979-80 

Jane B.Graham, Nurse 1966 

Robert C. Storrs, Doctor 1 968 



125 



COMPARATIVE YEARLY ENROLLMENTS 
FOR OCTOBER FIRST OF EACH YEAR 





K 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Total 


1970 


78 


95 


100 


94 


122 


96 


116 


701 


1971 


94 


88 


90 


94 


98 


115 


91 


670 


1972 


60 


112 


93 


91 


97 


101 


116 


670 


1973 


71 


71 


110 


91 


93 


100 


98 


634 


1974 


91 


78 


69 


107 


97 


91 


104 


637 


1975 


64 


90 


81 


67 


105 


95 


95 


597 


1976 


66 


78 


77 


79 


64 


106 


105 


575 


1977 


59 


78 


89 


77 


83 


66 


106 


558 


1978 


68 


71 


75 


89 


82 


80 


67 


532 


1979 


48 


71 


67 


74 


94 


90 


90 


534 



126 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DRESDEN 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

1979 



127 



1979 DRESDEN ANNUAL REPORT 

Table of Contents 

School District Officers 129 

Warrant for Annual Meeting, 1980 130 

Minutes of Annual Meeting, 1979 132 

Annual Report of the Dresden School Board 138 

Auditors' Reports, 1978-79 141 

School Administrative Unit 22 Administrative Salaries, 1979-80 153 

Analysis of Proposed Budget Appropriation 154 

Instructional Staff, 1979-80 155 

Comparative Yearly Enrollments 157 

Members of the Graduating Class 158 



128 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICERS 



School Board 






Term Expires 


Ann D. Bradley, Chairman 


1982 


John M. Curtis, Secretary 


1980 


John L Dunn, Vice-Chairman 


1980 


Carolyn E. Frye 


1980 


Catherine A. Girard 


1981 


Mary Ann Harris 


1980 


Mary Ann Hooper 


1981 


Emily M. Mead 


1981 


Richard E. Nordgren 


1981 


Brian E. Pattison 


1982 


Susanna C. Reed 


1982 



Jonathan N. Brownell, Moderator 

Shirley K. Griggs, Clerk 

Sybil B. Williamson, Treasurer 

Robert R. Costello, Auditor 

William P. Davis, Auditor 

Errol L. Heisser, Auditor 

Hugh Watson, Superintendent of Schools 

Lawrence E. Cornell, Assistant Superintendent 

Jeanette I. Cook, Administrative Assistant 

Robert B. McCarthy, Principal, Hanover High School 

Linwood H. Bean, Assistant Principal, Hanover High School 

Velma B. Saire, Principal, Frances C. Richmond School 



129 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE 

DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Hanover, New Hampshire Norwich, Vermont 

The legal voters of the Norwich (Vermont) Town School District 
and the legal voters of the Hanover (New Hampshire) School 
District are hereby notified and warned to meet at Webster Hall in 
Hanover, New Hampshire, on Thursday, the thirteenth day of 
March, 1980, at 7:30 in the evening for the purpose of holding the 
Annual Meeting of the Dresden School District and for the purpose 
of transacting the following business: 

Article 1. To elect a moderator, a clerk, and a treasurer, each 
to serve for a term of one year, and one auditor, to serve for a term 
of three years. 

Article 2. To elect by written ballot the at-large member of the 
school board to serve for a term of one year. 

Note: The polls will open at 7:30 p.m. for the purpose of voting 
under this article and will close at 10:30 p.m. or one-quarter hour 
after completion of voting on the last article in the warrant, 
whichever is later, unless the District votes to keep the polls 
open to a later hour. 

Article 3. To see what sum of money the District will ap- 
propriate for the support of its schools and for other lawful ex- 
penses for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1980, and to authorize 
the application against such appropriation of the estimated in- 
come of the District, the balance to be apportioned between and 
raised by the Hanover School District and the Norwich Town 
School District, in accordance with the legislation authorizing the 
District and with the Articles of Agreement. 

Article 4. To see if the District will vote to authorize the board 
to establish a contingency fund as part of the regular school 
district budget and to raise and appropriate Twenty-five thousand 
Dollars ($25,000.00) for this purpose. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the District will ap- 
propriate for the improvement, reconstruction, and alteration of 
athletic fields on the Hanover High School site and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing pursuant 
to the New Hampshire-Vermont Interstate School Compact or 
otherwise and to take any other action relating thereto. 



130 



Article 6. To see if the District will authorize the school board 
to apply for and accept grants and aid from the United States, the 
State of New Hampshire, the State of Vermont, and any agency or 
municipality thereof, or from private corporations and individuals 
for the construction, maintenance, reconstruction, operation, and 
financing of its schools, and to do any and all things necessary in 
order to avail the District of such aid and cooperation, or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Article 7. To see if the School District will vote to accept the 
provisions of Public Law 89-10, designed to improve educational 
opportunities with particular reference to children of low income 
families, and to appropriate such funds as may be made available 
to the District under said federal act for such particular projects as 
may be determined by the School Board. Further, to see if the 
District will authorize the School Board to make application for 
such funds and to expend the same for such projects as it may 
designate. 

Article 8. To see if the School District will vote to accept the 
provisions of Public Law 94-142, designed to improve educational 
opportunities with particular reference to handicapped children, 
and to appropriate such funds as may be made available to the 
District under said federal act for such particular projects as may 
be determined by the School Board. Further, to see if the District 
will authorize the School Board to make application for such funds 
and to expend the same for such projects as it may designate. 

Article 9. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before this meeting. 

Given under our hands and the seal of the District this fifteenth 
day of February, 1980. 



Ann D. Bradley, Chairman John M. Curtis 



John L Dunn, Vice-Chairman Carolyn E. Frye, Secretary 



Catherine A. Girard Mary Ann Harris 



Mary Ann Hooper Emily M. Mead 



Richard E. Nordgren Brian E. Pattison 



Susanna C Reed 



Dresden School Board 



131 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 
Dresden School District 

Thursday, March 8, 1979 
Webster Hall, Hanover, N.H. 



The annual meeting of the Dresden School District was called to 
order at 7:40 p.m. by Moderator Jonathan N. Brownell. The warrant 
was read by the Clerk, proper posting of the warrant in Hanover, 
N.H., and Norwich, Vt., having been confirmed by Edwin A. Willard. 
Present were approximately 200 Dresden School District voters, 
Dresden Board of School Directors Ann D. Bradley, Chairman, John 
M. Curtis, John L. Dunn, George D. Fraser, Catherine A. Girard, 
Mary Ann Harris, Mary Ann Hooper, Emily M. Mead, Richard E. 
Nordgren, Mary B. Russell, and Edwin A. Willard, Supervisory Union 
#22 Superintendent Hugh Watson, who was introduced to the 
assembly by Chairman Bradley, and administrative staff members 
Lawrence E. Cornell, Russell E. Fearon, Jeanette I. Cook, Hanover 
High School Principal Robert B. McCarthy, and Richmond School 
Principal Velma B. Saire. 

The moderator declared the polls open for election of the 
member-at-large at 7:45 p.m. 

ARTICLE I: The following officers were elected for the terms 
listed, the Clerk being directed to cast a single ballot for each of- 
fice after each nomination was moved by Mary Ann Hooper, with 
seconds by John Curtis, the motions being passed by 
unanimous voice vote: 

Moderator, for one year Jonathan N. Brownell 

Clerk, for one year Shirley K.Griggs 

Treasurer, for one year Sybil B. Williamson 

Auditor, for three years Robert R. Costello 

Mary Ann Hooper moved that the meeting be recessed for ten 
minutes in order that balloting might take place. The motion was 
duly seconded by John Curtis, and passed by unanimous voice 
vote, there being no discussion. 

ARTICLE II: Following the recess, Mary B. Russell moved that 
the polls remain open until 10:30 p.m. or one-quarter hour after 
completion of voting on the last article in this warrant, 
whichever is later. The motion being duly seconded, and there 
being no discussion, the motion was passed by unanimous 
voice vote. 



132 



ARTICLE III: Ann Bradley moved that the District appropriate the 
sum of Two Million Nine Hundred Seventy-seven Thousand 
Seven Hundred Forty-two Dollars ($2,977,742.00) for the support 
of its schools and for other lawful expenses for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 1979, and to authorize the application against 
such appropriation of the estimated income of the District, the 
balance to be apportioned between and raised by the Hanover 
School District and the Norwich Town School District, in ac- 
cordance with the legislation authorizing the District and with 
the Articles of Agreement. 

Her motion was duly seconded by Mary Ann Hooper. Edwin 
Willard rose to report on the recent negotiated agreement with 
the Hanover Education Association, mentioning that, under 
Public Law RSA 273, requiring such negotiations to be made in 
good faith, negotiations with HEA started in 1968, dealing prin- 
cipally with salaries until 1976-77, when negotiations for work- 
ing conditions and fringe benefits were added. He further stated 
that negotiations for the coming year began in September, 1978, 
a mediator becoming involved in January, an impasse having 
been reached, with a final agreement being reached on January 
22. Using slides for clarification, he announced a 5.2% raise in 
base salary, with a Track I salary for September, 1979, being set 
at $9,557.00, all salaries to be based on the base salary plus 
track and step increments. He stated that 45% of the faculty is 
now at the highest track and step level, and that, although some 
teachers will receive step increments, the resultant budget im- 
pact will be less than two percent, with the total increase in the 
salary account to be 7.1%. He also announced a total increase 
of 6.95% when fringe benefits are included, suitably within infla- 
tionary guidelines set by President Jimmy Carter, no local con- 
trol over most fringe benefits being possible. 

Mrs. Bradley continued the slide presentation. She mentioned 
particularly that, although a slight decline in student enrollment 
is apparent, and not in any specific area, staffing reductions 
have been necessary to compensate for enrollment decline and 
salary rate increase, emphasis having been on keeping the staff- 
ing of basic required courses intact. She stated that a decision 
had therefore been made to reduce support staff in departments 
with lower student enrollments. 

Samuel Cook moved to amend Article III to increase the ap- 
propriation by $28,295 to a total of $3,006,037, and his amend- 
ment was seconded by Joan Freeman. He declared that the in- 
tent of the amendment was to reinstate a number of support 
staff positions at Hanover High School and the Richmond Mid- 
dle School which had been deleted from the proposed 1979-80 



133 



budget, especially those in home economics, music, business 
education, and art and woodworking departments. The voters 
were advised by the moderator that the stated intention must be 
viewed as advisory only, and could not be construed as an in- 
tegral part of the amendment. Speaking to his amendment, Mr. 
Cook stated that the affected departments had not been con- 
sulted before staffing cuts were made, and that four board 
members had been opposed to the proposed budget. He also 
stated that staff reductions and reduction of supplies are 
limited to the applied skills departments previously mentioned, 
and that the percentage of personnel lost in those departments 
is very high. In ensuing discussion, William Stevens suggested 
the elimination of the Assistant Superintendent of Schools posi- 
tion as an alternative. 

Defending the proposed budget before amendment, Mrs. 
Bradley stated that faculty had not been consulted about aide 
position deletions because the decision was an administrative 
responsibility, and that three of the four dissenting votes among 
board members were principally because of teacher salary in- 
creases, not the deletion of aide positions, although the latter 
may have been a secondary reason. She voiced the opinion that 
aides are less essential in classes of small size, as in many of 
the applied skills classes, and that faculty will still be able to 
function satisfactorily in those classes. Catherine Girard stated 
that, as a board member, she had not wanted to delete the aide 
positions, but could see no reasonable alternative. 

Edward Schlesinger spoke in support of the Cook amendment, 
following a comment from Principal Robert McCarthy that all 
students will be affected by the deletion of aide staff, and not 
just those in applied skill classes. Charles Wood asked for an 
estimate of the effect of staff aide deletions on formal ac- 
creditation of the Richmond School as a middle school. 
Superintendent Watson replied that this was not thought to be 
of great consequence in seeking such accreditation, should the 
board wish to pursue the matter, and that most New Hampshire 
and Vermont middle schools and high schools do not employ 
staff aides. 

George Theriault spoke in favor of the original budget proposal, 
as did Earl Wagner, Chairman of the Dresden Finance Commit- 
tee, who read from the Committee's letter of support. Roger 
Masters, supporting the budget particularly as it provides for 
faculty salary increases, pointed out that, because of inflation, 
faculty salaries are not keeping pace with the cost of living, and 
a morale problem may ensue when faculty members must also 
assume an increased teaching load. William Breed then spoke, 



134 



emphasizing that the finance committee, of which he is a 
member, addressed itself only to total budget figures, not to the 
question of how funds should be allotted. He added that the tax- 
payers should be aware that the cost per pupil of the proposed 
budget without amendment is considerably higher than the 
mean in the State of New Hampshire. 

The moderator honored a request from nine voters to have a writ- 
ten ballot on the amendment, and declared a recess for polling. 

Helen McKenna moved to suspend consideration of Article III 
while ballots for the amendment were being counted, and to pro- 
ceed to consideration of Article VI. Her motion was duly second- 
ed by Mary Ann Hooper, and there being no discussion, the mo- 
tion passed by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE VI George Fraser moved that the District accept the 
report of the committee established at the Annual Meeting of 
the Dresden School District on March 9, 1978 and appointed by 
the Moderator to review recommendations of the Education 
Policy Research Institute relative to alternative methods of 
financing the Dresden School District. The motion was duly 
seconded by John Curtis. Carleton L. Richardson reported that 
no significant benefit would be derived by changing the present 
method of financing the Dresden School District. There being no 
further discussion, Mr. Fraser's motion was passed by unani- 
mous voice vote. 

ARTICLE VII Emily Mead moved that the District authorize the 
school board to apply for and accept grants and aid from the 
United States, the State of New Hampshire, the State of Ver- 
mont, and any agency or municipality thereof, or from private 
corporations and individuals for the construction, maintenance, 
reconstruction, operation, and financing of its schools, and to 
do any and all things necessary in order to avail the District of 
such aid and cooperation, or to take any other action relative 
thereto. Her motion was duly seconded by Edwin Willard, and 
there being no discussion, the motion was passed by unani- 
mous voice vote. 

ARTICLE III (continued) The moderator then announced the 
result of ballot voting on the Cook amendment to Article III and 
declared the amendment defeated by a vote of 145 nay, 79 aye. 
Article III was then passed by voice vote in its original form, with 
fewer than twelve dissenting voice votes. A number of voters 
then left the floor, leaving approximately 120 in attendance. 

ARTICLE IV Catherine Gerard moved that the District authorize 
the Board to establish a contingency fund as part of the regular 
school district budget and to raise and appropriate Twenty-four 



135 



Thousand Six Hundred Ninety-three Dollars ($24,693.00) for this 
purpose. The motion was duly seconded by John Curtis, and the 
motion was passed by voice vote with five dissenting votes, 
without previous discussion. 

ARTICLE V John Curtis moved that the District appropriate the 
sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) for architectural and 
engineering services to develop preliminary plans and specifica- 
tions for upgrading of the athletic fields adjacent to the High 
School and Richmond School. His motion was duly seconded by 
Mary Ann Hooper. Mr. Curtis explained that, since the last perti- 
nent study done in 1971, the athletic program in the schools and 
town have nearly doubled, that the Thompson Terrace fields can 
be used only for practice sessions because of lack of lights and 
parking facilities, and that having a soccer field of non- 
regulation size with trees and fences dangerously close to the 
side lines, other teams in the inter-scholastic league have pro- 
tested, and the Hanover High School soccer team is denied the 
advantage of home-field play at league tournament level. There 
being no discussion from the floor, the motion passed by voice 
vote with approximately twenty dissenting votes. 

ARTICLE VIII Richard Nordgren moved that the District ac- 
cept the provisions of Public Law 89-10, designed to improve 
educational opportunities with particular reference to children 
of low income families, and to appropriate such funds as may be 
made available to the District under said federal act for such 
particular projects as may be determined by the school board. 
Further, he moved that the District authorize the school board to 
make application for such funds and to expend the same for 
such projects as it may designate. His motion was duly second- 
ed by Mary Ann Hooper. There was no discussion, and the mo- 
tion passed by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE IX Mary Ann Harris moved that the District accept the 
provisions of Public Law 94-142, designed to improve educa- 
tional opportunities with particular reference to handicapped 
children, and to appropriate such funds as may be made 
available to the District under said federal act for such par- 
ticular projects as may be determined by the school board. Fur- 
ther, she moved that the District authorize the school board to 
make application for such funds and to expend the same for 
such projects as it may designate. Her motion was duly second- 
ed by John Curtis, and passed by unanimous voice vote, without 
discussion. 

ARTICLE X John Dunn moved that the School District extend its 
thanks to Ann D. Bradley, George D. Fraser, Mary B. Russell and 
Edwin A. Willard for their years of service as school directors. 



136 



His motion was seconded by Mary Ann Hooper. His tribute to 
these individuals reads as follows: 

Ann D. Bradley has served Hanover and Dresden where she 
has been Vice-Chairman and Chairman. She has also been 
active at the State level and in the New Hampshire School 
Boards Association. 

George D. Fraser has served Dresden and Norwich where he 
was Secretary and Chairman. After completing his own term 
last year, he graciously agreed to serve again to fill the term 
of a resigned director. 

Mary B. Russell, the Dresden at-large member, has served as 
Vice-Chairman and participated in the hard work of teacher 
negotiations. 

Edwin A. Willard has served Dresden and Hanover where he 
was Chairman for two years. An erudite, cheerful, tireless 
worker, he served on the vital and time consuming Staff Devel- 
opment Committee and as a negotiator. 

The moderator then declared the motion passed by acclamation. 

John Dunn moved that the meeting be adjourned, and his motion 
was duly seconded by John Curtis. The moderator announced 
the following results of voting for the member-at-large, Dresden 
Board of School Directors: 



Carolyn E. Frye 


152 


Lee Ann Hirsch 


84 


Samuel Cook 


60 


V. LeeShriver 


29 


Jay W. Bliss 


15 


Seaver Peters 


1 


Edwin A. Willard 


1 


Invalid ballots 


4 


Total ballots cast 


346 



346 (including 12 absentee) 

Unused ballots remaining 661 

NOTE: By unofficial tally, Hanover citizens cast 166 votes, Norwich 
citizens cast 120 votes. 

The moderator declared Carolyn E. Frye the winner, and then 
declared the annual meeting adjourned at 10:40 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Shirley K. Griggs 

Clerk, Dresden School District 



137 



REPORT OF THE DRESDEN SCHOOL BOARD 

During 1979, the Dresden Board of School Directors met regu- 
larly on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the 
multi-purpose room of the Frances C. Richmond School. Board 
members met regularly with their respective town boards as well as 
with the School Administrative Unit Board #22, which also includes 
Lyme and Orford. Additionally, members have served on school 
board sub-committees, acted as liaison representatives from the 
Dresden Board to various other community boards and attended 
meetings and workshops held for school board members on the 
state level. 

In March, 1979, work began on the renovation of Hanover High 
School. As in any project of such magnitude, some difficulties have 
been encountered along the way. One of the difficulties involved 
the discovery of asbestos in areas where considerable work would 
be taking place, namely, in the auditorium and in corridor ceilings. 
There has been a great deal written in recent literature linking the 
inhalation of asbestos fibers, which would be released during ex- 
tensive renovation, to serious lung diseases. Therefore, the 
Dresden Board, in two separate votes, authorized the removal of 
the asbestos, utilizing contingency funds in part from the 1978-79 
operating budget and in part from the 1979-80 operating budget. 
Other difficulties encountered related to the age and complexity of 
mechanical and electrical systems at the high school, the cost of 
meeting safety code requirements, the need for equipment not 
budgeted in the original project approved by District voters, and the 
effects of inflation. Therefore, it became evident that an additional 
$235,000 would be necessary to complete the renovation project as 
it was described to the voters in March of 1978. Subsequently, a 
special School District meeting was called in October, 1979 where 
approval for the additional funds was granted. Bonds for the 
renovation project were sold in June, 1979 at the rate of 5.6%. 
Waiting an additional six months when the bond rate was 6.50% 
saved approximately $136,000 in interest payments. 

At the writing of this report, major renovation work is nearing 
completion. The Board extends grateful appreciation to the com- 
munity for its support, to teachers, staff, students, and ad- 
ministrators who worked under difficult and crowded conditions 
during the Spring and Fall. A real spirit of cooperation among all 
allowed education to continue despite the disruption and incon- 
venience. 

In April, an Athletic Facilities Study Committee was appointed, 
as authorized by the March School District meeting. The Commit- 
tee was charged with gathering information on existing usage of 



138 



athletic fields and preparing a projection of future use which would 
include developing statistical data with expert testimony to sup- 
port the committee recommendations. The Committee was 
charged to review past drawings and engineering studies relevant 
to the existing facilities and present recommendations to the 
Dresden School Board in January, 1980 on restructuring existing 
athletic facilities to provide maximum use of such facilities. The 
Committee recommendations were to include site plans, drainage 
recommendations and projected costs and timetable to comple- 
tion. The budget of the committee was $5000, as voted at District 
meeting, to obtain architectural and engineering services to 
develop preliminary plans and specifications. A report of this com- 
mittee's work and recommendations will be made at the School 
District meeting in March, 1980. 

In June, 1979, the community was invited to a special Dresden 
School Board meeting to discuss goals for the School District for 
the coming year before the Board acted on final adoption. The 
Dresden Board has accepted a report from Dr. Velma Saire, prin- 
cipal of the Frances C. Richmond School, outlining a Health Cur- 
riculum for Richmond School students. Untold hours of work and 
deliberation went into the final curriculum and the Board takes 
note of the many people involved and the sensitivity which is evi- 
dent in the final document. The Board also accepted a completed 
Social Studies curriculum for Richmond School students, and is 
pleased to report that criterion-referenced tests have been admin- 
istered to Richmond School students in the areas of mathematics, 
language arts and reading comprehension. These tests have been 
informative not only to the Dresden Board, but also to students, 
teachers and parents as they plan together for future teaching and 
learning needs. All curricula and skill sequences for the schools 
are available to the community in the school libraries. 

In October, a utility easement was granted to the Town of 
Hanover across School District property, pursuant to a vote of the 
Hanover Town Meeting, to construct the Park St. sewer line. For the 
easement, the Town agreed to replace the land associated with the 
easement in accordance with future plans of the School District for 
the improvement of the lower athletic fields. Further, the Town 
stated its intention to prepare the easement in such a way as to 
provide for a suitable walking path to the Thompson Terrace play- 
ing fields. 

In November, the Dresden Board, upon the recommendation of 
the Hanover High School Administration and Social Studies 
Department, approved the extension of the Social Studies require- 
ment from two years to three years. This will become effective with 
the incoming ninth grade class. 



139 



The Dresden Board has ratified a new two-year salary agreement 
with the Dresden Support staff, effective July 1, 1980. Negotiations 
with the AFL-CIO who represent the Service personnel of the 
Dresden School District are currently underway. The present con- 
tract is effective until June 30, 1980. 

In December, the Dresden Board voted to invite the Lyme School 
Board to send a liaison representative to meet with the Dresden 
Board on an on-going basis. The purpose of having a Lyme 
representative attend Dresden School Board meetings is to provide 
better communication to the town of Lyme regarding Dresden pro- 
grams, as well as to allow the Dresden Board to understand con- 
cerns of Lyme parents and students. Currently, 10% of the student 
body at Hanover High School are Lyme tuition students. 

The Dresden School Board appreciates the good working rela- 
tionships it has enjoyed this past year with town officials, with the 
various town boards and with the Dresden Finance Committee. 

The Board extends grateful thanks to the Friends of the Hanover- 
Norwich Schools who continue to fund innovative projects in the 
schools of Hanover and Norwich. 

Appreciation is also extended to Dartmouth College for continu- 
ing to provide enrichment to many students of Hanover High 
School both through use of college facilities and enrollment in 
various courses at the College. 

Finally, the Board wishes to acknowledge with deep gratitude 
the increasing numbers of volunteers who continue to work with 
the students and teachers in ail areas of our school system. 

Ann D. Bradley, Chairman 
John M. Curtis, Secretary 
John L. Dunn, Vice-Chairman 
Carolyn E. Frye 
Catherine A. Girard 
Mary Ann Harris 
Mary Ann Hooper 
Emily M. Mead 
Richard E. Nordgren 
Brian E. Pattison 
Susanna C. Reed 

Dresden School Board 



140 



REPORT OF THE 
DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT AUDITORS 

We have met with the Certified Public Accountants retained by 
the Dresden School District and have reviewed with them the 
results of their audit for the year ended June 30, 1979. 

As elected auditors for the Dresden School District, we find the 
audit of the District's financial statements by Smith, Batchelder & 
Rugg for the year ended June 30, 1979 as represented in their audit 
certificate dated July 25, 1979 to be satisfactory in all respects. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert R. Costello 

William P. Davis 

Errol L Heisser 

AUDITORS 

DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

To the School Board and Voters of Dresden School District: 

We have examined the balance sheets of the Dresden School 
District - General Fund, Donald Walter Bruce Prize Fund, Stringed 
Instrument Fund, Jeremiah Ice Hockey Fund, Frances C. Richmond 
School Building Fund, Thompson Terrace Fund and the Hanover 
High School Building Fund as of June 30, 1979 and 1978, and the 
related statements of revenues and expenses - General Fund and 
changes in fund balances for the year ended June 30, 1979. We 
have also examined the statement of general long-term debt as of 
June 30, 1979. Our examinations were made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards and, accordingly, included 
such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing pro- 
cedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

The District has not maintained a record of its general fixed 
assets and, accordingly, a statement of general fixed assets, re- 
quired by generally accepted accounting principles, is not included 
in the financial statements. 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present 
fairly the financial position of the Dresden School District as of 
June 30, 1979 and 1978, and the results of their operations and 
changes in fund balances for the year ended June 30, 1979, in con- 
formity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a 
consistent basis. 



Smith, Batchelder & Rugg 



Hanover, New Hampshire 
July 25, 1979 



141 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Balance Sheets - June 30, 1979 and 1978 

1979 1978 



General Fund 






ASSETS: 






Cash (Note 2) 


$ 69,197 


$ 80,091 


Accounts receivable 


30,402 


30,453 


Due from Hanover High School 






Building Fund 


6,958 


— 


Due from other districts 


189 


— 




$ 106,746 


$ 110,544 



LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE: 
Accounts payable 
Encumbrances 
Bond premium 
Deferred revenue (Note 4) 
Due to other districts 
Total liabilities 

Commitments and contingencies 
(Note 5) 

Fund balance 



$ 25,194 $ 3,245 

36,732 8,461 
1,891 

17,891 26,836 

1,440 - 



83,148 



23,598 



38,542 



72,002 



$ 106,746 $ 110,544 



Donald Walter Bruce Prize Fund 
Cash 

Fund balance 



$ 1,168 $ 1,158 
$ 1,168 $ 1,158 



Stringed Instrument Fund 
Cash 

Fund balance 



307 $ 



307 $ 



276 



276 



142 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Balance Sheets • June 30, 1979 and 1978 (Continued) 

7979 1978 

Jeremiah Ice Hockey Fund 
Cash $ 2,002 $ 2,036 

Fund balance 



Frances C. Richmond School 
Building Fund 
Cash (Note 1) 

Fund balance 

Thompson Terrace Fund 
Cash 

Liabilities and fund balance: 
Retainage payable 

Fund balance 



Hanover High School 
Building Fund 
Cash (Note 2) 



$ 2,002 


$ 


2,036 


$ - 


$ 


35,082 


$ - 


$ 


35,082 


$ 465 


$ 


4,881 


$ - 


$ 


3,350 


465 




1,531 


$ 465 


$ 


4,881 


$1,378,818 


$ 






Liabilities and Fund balance: 

Accounts payable $ 169,560 $ 

Retainage payable 21,920 

Encumbrances 1,004,179 

Due to General Fund 6,958 

Total liabilities 1,202,617 

Fund balance 176,201 



$1,378,818 $ - 



The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of these statements. 



143 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

GENERAL FUND 

For The Year Ended June 30, 1979 

Budgeted Actual 



Revenues 










10 Revenue from Local Sources: 










Tuition from patrons 


$ 


8,000 


$ 


23,975 


Miscellaneous (Note 1) 




25,200 




36,777 


Rent - Community services 




200 




886 


Driver Education - New Hampshire 




7,000 




6,916 



40,400 68,554 



30 Revenue from State Sources: 
Driver Education 
Building aid 
Vocational student aid 



40 Revenue from Federal Sources: 
School Lunch 
Public Law 874 
Adult Basic Education 
Public Law 94-142 
ESEA Title IV-B 
Vocational Education 



60 Revenue from Other Sources: 
Bond proceeds (Note 3) 
Friends of Hanover Schools 
Jeremiah Hockey Fund 
Donald Walter Bruce Prize Fund 



80 Revenue from Other Districts 
in New Hampshire: 
Tuition 268,523 252,721 

Hanover School District - 
Current appropriation 1,585,107 1,585,107 

Rent 2,000 2,000 

1,855,630 1,839,828 



144 



5,500 


3,950 


34,986 


35,622 


15,000 


10,935 


55,486 


50,507 


4,000 


6,818 


12,000 


14,410 


- 


3,495 


4,700 


- 


— 


17,876 


— 


13,019 


20,700 


55,618 


1,488,937 


1,488,937 


- 


1,700 


— 


139 


— 


50 


1,488,937 


1,490,826 



90 Revenue from School Districts 






in Another State: 






Tuition 


7,378 


15,128 


Norwich School District - 






Current appropriation 


668,872 


668,872 


Driver Education - Vermont 


1,500 


300 


Vermont Building Aid 


13,298 


22,355 




691,048 


706,655 


Utilization of prior years' 






fund balance 


89,713 
4,241,914 


— 


Total net revenues 


4,211,988 



Budgeted Actual 



Expenses 
100 Administration: 

110 Salaries - District officers 
135 Contracted services 
190 Other expenses for 
administration 
100 Series Total 

200 Instruction: 
210 Salaries 
215 Textbooks 
220 Library and audiovisual 
230 Supplies 
235 Contracted services 
290 Other expenses for instruction 
200 Series Total 

400 Health Services: 
410 Salaries 

490 Other expenses for health 
400 Series Total 

500 Transportation: 
510 Salaries 

535 Academic and athletic trips 
500 Series Total 



4,900 


4,675 


10,700 


11,897 


3,050 


4,814 


18,650 


21,386 


1,453,993 


1,433,115 


16,095 


15,353 


20,870 


19,637 


40,562 


39,991 


35,532 


36,185 


42,640 


45,109 


1,609,692 


1,589,390 


10,147 


11,453 


2,131 


1,447 


12,278 


12,900 


572 


572 


19,123 


19,129 


19,695 


19,701 



145 



Budgeted Actual 

Expenses (Continued) 
600 Operation of Plant: 



610 Salaries 


97,646 


87,914 


630 Supplies 


12,350 


11,806 


635 Contracted services 


2,580 


3,853 


640 Heat 


66,240 


78,684 


645 Utilities 


56,961 


55,729 


600 Series Total 


235,777 


237,986 


700 Maintenance of Plant: 






710 Salaries 


44,082 


42,055 


725 Replacement of equipment 


9,698 


11,142 


726 Repairs to equipment 


3,293 


2,728 


735 Contracted services 


17,550 


25,758 


766 Repairs to buildings 


14,230 


10,338 


790 Grounds 


4,610 


2,248 


700 Series Total 


93,463 


94,269 


800 Fixed Charges: 






850 Retirement & social security 


120,628 


121,285 


855 Insurance 


117,142 


112,343 


800 Series Total 


237,770 


233,628 


900 School Lunch and 






Special Milk Programs: 






910 Salaries 


1,000 


1,000 


975 Federal subsidy 


4,000 


6,818 


900 Series Total 


5,000 


7,818 


1000 Student Activities: 






1010 Salaries 


39,416 


39,674 


1075 Expenditures and transfer 






of money 


26,738 


28,877 


1000 Series Total 


66,154 


68,551 


1100 Community Activities: 






1190 Meetings and services - 






Series Total 


775 


— 


1200 Capital Outlay: 




1265 Sites 


— 


145 


1266 Buildings 


1,490,487 


1,500,063 


1267 Equipment 


6,241 


16,112 


1200 Series Total 


1,496,728 


1,516,320 



146 



Budgeted Actual 

Expenses (Continued) 

1300 Debt Service: 

1370 Principal of debt 205,539 205,539 

1371 Interest on debt 71,237 72,304 



1300 Series Total 


276,776 


277,843 


1400 Outgoing Transfer Accounts: 






1477.10 Tuition in State 


1,952 


— 


1477.20 Transportation 


1,952 


- 


1477.30 District share of 






Supervisory Union #22 


77,794 


77,794 


1478.10 Tuition out of State 


28,894 


16,653 


1478.20 Transportation out 






of State 


3,000 


2,976 


1479 Tuition to private schools 


32,929 


21,443 


1400 Series Total 


146,521 


118,866 


1700 Contingency Fund - 






Asbestos Removal 


22,635 


22,635 


1900 Other Expenditures: 






Adult Basic Education 


— 


3,550 


ESEA Title IV-B 


— 


19,803 


Friends of Hanover Schools 


— 


1,997 


Vocational Leadership Training 


— 


1,178 


Vocational Education 


— 


12,571 


1900 Series Total 


— 


39,099 


Total net expenses 


4,241,914 


4,260,392 


Excess of Expenses Over Revenues 


$ - 


$ (48,404) 



The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of this statement. 



147 



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148 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

STATEMENT OF GENERAL LONG-TERM DEBT 

June 30, 1979 

Amount Available And To Be Provided 
For The Payment Of General Long-Term Debt 

Amount to be provided for payment of bonds and notes $2,886,1 29 

General Long-Term Debt 

Notes payable (Note 3) $ 253,032 

Bonds payable (Note 3) 2,633,097 

$2,886,129 

The accompanying notes to financial statements 
are an integral part of this statement. 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

June 30, 1979 

1. Summary of significant accounting policies: 

Basis of presentation - The financial statements have been 
prepared on the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with 
generally accepted accounting principles. This method of account- 
ing recognizes accounts receivable and accounts payable as 
revenue and expense in the year in which earned or incurred rather 
than the year in which received or paid. The School District's books 
of account are maintained on the cash basis in accordance with 
generally accepted public school practices. 

Funds - The School District operates three types of funds as 
follows: 

General Fund -This fund is the primary operating fund, the 
main source of revenue being local taxes from Hanover, New 
Hampshire and Norwich, Vermont. 

Hanover High School Building Fund -This fund has been 
established to record the activity associated with the renovation of 
Hanover High School as approved by the voters on June 7, 1978 at 
the reconvened Dresden School District meeting. 



149 



Frances C. Richmond School Building fund -This fund in- 
cludes activity associated with the renovation, reconstruction and 
alteration of the Frances C. Richmond School and Hanover High 
School. Revenue is received from borrowing authorized under the 
New Hampshire- Vermont Inter-state School Compact, Vermont 
State Building Aid and the General Fund. The project for which this 
fund was established has been completed. The excess cash 
($35,082) has been transferred to the General Fund as 
miscellaneous revenues from local sources. 

Other miscellaneous funds -These funds represent a variety 
of activities wherein the revenues received for specific purposes 
have not been expended for the intended purpose. 

Pension plans -The School District's employees are covered 
under mandatory state-sponsored, retirement plans which are 
funded on a current basis. Pension expense for the year ended 
June 30, 1979 was $24,223. The excess, if any, of the actuarially 
computed value of vested benefits over the total pension fund 
assets is not available. 



Budget - Budget figures are presented in accordance with ap- 
propriations voted and property taxes to be raised as approved by 
the State of New Hampshire. 



2. Cash - General Fund and Hanover High School Building Fund: 
The cash balances at June 30, 1979 are the result of the 
following transactions on the Treasurer's books: 

General High School 

Fund Building Fund 

Cash on hand, July 1, 1978 $ 80,091 $ - 

Total receipts 2,953,196 1,495,912 

3,033,287 1,495,912 

Less- School board orders paid 2,964,091 117,094 

Cash on hand, June 30, 1979 $ 69,196 $1,378,818 



150 



3. Notes and bonds payable: 

Norwich and Hanover School Districts bonds - In accordance 
with the legislation and other agreements setting up the Dresden 
School District, Dresden is responsible for providing the debt ser- 
vice on the following bonded indebtedness: 

Dresden 
Total Share 

Norwich School Serial Bonds, 
3.25%, 20-year, dated October 
1, 1964, interest payable June 1 
and December 1, principal pay- 
able $15,000 each June 1 
through 1983 with a final pay- 
ment of $13,000 on June 1, 
1984. Dresden contributes 
37.48% of the yearly servicing 
of these bonds. $ 73,000 $ 27,360 

Hanover High School Serial 
Bonds, 3.25%, 20-year, dated 
October 1, 1964, interest pay- 
able June 1 and December 1, 
principal payable $30,000 each 
June 1 through 1979, then 
$35,000 each June 1 through 
1983 with a final payment of 
$34,000 on June 1, 1984. Dres- 
den contributes 70% of the 
yearly principal payment with 
the balance paid by the State 
of New Hampshire. 174,000 121,800 



$ 247,000 $ 149,160 



Frances C. Richmond School renovation - At a special 
meeting of the Dresden School District on July 22, 1974, it was 
voted to purchase the Frances C. Richmond School from the 
Hanover School District. The School Board was also authorized to 
borrow $1,257,355 under the New Hampshire - Vermont Inter-state 
School Compact for the renovation, reconstruction and alteration 
of the Frances C. Richmond School and Hanover High School. As a 
result, Dresden is also responsible for the following long-term in- 
debtedness: 



151 



3. Notes and bonds payable (continued): 

Hanover School District, 6 year promissory note, 
payable in equal installments of $109,717 
beginning in the 1975-76 fiscal year with a final 
payment during the 1980-81 fiscal year $ 219,432 

Dresden School District, New Hampshire - 
Vermont Serial Bonds, 6.00%, 20-year, dated 
December 1, 1974, interest payable June 1 
and December 1, principal payable $65,000 each 
December 1 through 1985, then $60,000 

through 1994 995,000 

$1,214,432 

Other notes payable are borrowings used to finance the 
development of the Thompson Terrace property. The Bureau of Out- 
door Recreation has approved federal matching assistance of 
$46,000 for the project. 

Unsecured note due to bank, 5%, dated September 
15, 1976, interest payable March 15 and September 
15, principal payable $4,200 each September 15 
through 1986 $ 33,600 

At the March 9, 1978 Dresden School District meeting, as 
reconvened on June 7, 1978, it was voted to appropriate the sum of 
$1,488,937 for the improvement, reconstruction and alteration of 
the Hanover High School building and for the acquisition of in- 
structional equipment related hereto. It was further voted that such 
appropriation be raised by borrowing through the issuance of notes 
or bonds in accordance with the New Hampshire- Vermont Inter- 
state School Compact. 

Dresden School District General Obligation 
Bonds, 5.40%, 20 year, dated June 1, 1979, 
interest payable December 1 and June 1, principal 
payable $85,000 on June 1, 1980, then $75,000 
each June 1 through 1998, with a final payment 
of $50,000 on June 1, 1999 $1,485,000 

Dresden School District Bond, 5.60%, dated 
June 1, 1979, payable June 1, 1980 3,937 

$1,488,937 
Total Dresden long-term debt, June 30, 1979 $2,886,129 



152 



3. Notes and bonds payable (continued): 

Principal payments on this indebtedness over the next five 
fiscal years will be as follows: 

1978-79 $297,976 

1979-80 284,037 

1980-81 174,322 

1981-82 174,322 

1982-83 172,872 

4. Deferred revenue: 

The School District received $26,836 in 1975 from the State of 
Vermont toward the purchase of the Frances C. Richmond School. 
This payment represents one-half of the total aid of $53,671 to be 
provided by Vermont. This aid is being recognized over a six-year 
period beginning in 1975-76 corresponding to the term of the pro- 
missory note payable to the Hanover School District (Note 3). 

5. Commitments and contingencies: 

Unemployment compensation insurance - The District has 
elected to fund unemployment compensation on a direct reim- 
bursement basis. To date, no claims have been filed relating to the 
fiscal year, and no historical information is available on which to 
base future claims based on employment provided in the year end- 
ed June 30, 1979. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT 22 

Report of the 1979-80 salaries to be paid 
by the State and Local School Districts 





State 


Local 


Superintendent 


$2,500.00 


$34,885.00 


Assistant Superintendent 


2,390.00 


25,896.00 


Business Administrator 


2,390.00 


11,167.00* 


Total 


$7,280.00 


$71,948.00 



•Resigned 11/30/79 

Breakdown of Local Contributions 



Dresden 

Hanover 

Lyme 

Orford 

Norwich 

Total 



Percent 


Amount 


45.322 


32,608.00 


24.833 


17,867.00 


9.573 


6,888.00 


8.758 


6,301.00 


11.514 


8,284.00 


100.000 


$71,948.00 



153 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 
ANALYSIS OF PROPOSED BUDGET APPROPRIATION 



Basic Instruction 
Instructional Services 
Student Activities 
Guidance Services 
Curriculum & Staff Development 
Media Services 
Field Trips & Athletic Trips 
Total For Instruction 

Special Education 
Health Services 
General Control 
Administration & Supervision 
Fringe Benefits 
Liability Insurance 
Pupil Transportation 
School Milk Program 
Heat & Utilities 
Operation & Maintenance 
Capital Outlay - Site 
Debt Service 
Contingency 
Grand Total 

Tax Impact Summary 

Total Expenditures 
Non-Tax Revenue 
To Be Raised from Taxes 
Norwich Tax Impact 

Hanover Tax Impact 

Less Business Profits Tax 
Hanover Tax Impact 



1979-1980 


1980-1981 


$1,233,912 


$1,275,510 


3,585 


5,339 


67,231 


77,578 


78,782 


90,624 


23,321 


21,977 


83,397 


87,812 


18,059 


20,085 


$1,508,287 


$1,578,925 


76,239 


130,746 


12,068 


12,658 


117,660 


138,426 


209,662 


230,580 


245,115 


259,283 


2,856 


1,525 


7,612 


8,157 


4,000 


6,800 


112,015 


155,188 


236,094 


294,777 


5,000 


- 


446,134 


460,478 


24,693 


25,000 


$3,007,435 


$3,302,543 


y 

1979-1980 


1980-1981 


$3,007,435 


$3,302,543 


531,716 


575,916 


$2,475,719 


$2,726,627 


$ 739,102 


$ 822,041 


$1,736,617 


$1,904,586 


119,379 


119,379 


$1,617,238 


$1,785,207 



154 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

HANOVER HIGH SCHOOL 

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, 1979-80 

(Date indicates first year employed by District) 

K. Sandra Anderson, French (Sabbatical) 1969 

Lillian K. Bailey, Reading Specialist 1948 

Deborah B. Boettiger, English 1975 

Cynthia Cook Bognolo, Latin 1972 

Charles W. Bohi, Social Studies Coordinator 1971 

Gary E. Bohrer, Industrial Technology 1975 

Harry H. Braeuler, Foreign Language Coordinator 1965 

Constance E. Carey, Mathematics 1978 

Marilyn A. Cate, Guidance Counselor 1976 

William R. Cogswell, Mathematics 1963 

Hayward B. Crewe, English 1967 

Ford A. Daley, Dresden Plan Director 1964 

Joel B. Dalton, Mathematics 1965 

Cornelis (Keith) J. deLange, German and French 1975 

Warren D. DeMont, Science Coordinator 1968 

Neil C. Duprey, French 1967 

Clarke P. Dustin, Guidance Counselor 1964 

Deborah L Ells, Mathematics 1978 

Martha T. Esersky, Social Studies 1978 

Heddy L. Fantl, German 1973 

Barbara P. Hirai, Science 1976 

Timothy Howell, Mathematics Coordinator 1977 

James F. Hunt, Jr., English 1968 

John E. Hutchins, Science 1966 

Mary H. Hutchins, Mathematics 1967 

Douglas H. Jenisch, Social Studies 1969 

David G. Johnson, Industrial Technology Coordinator 1972 

Bruce M. Koloseike, Science 1971 

James L. Kreinbring, School Youth Counselor 1976 

Patricia J. Lang, Business Education Coordinator 1972 

Peter A. Lange, Art 1 978 

Harold H. Lary, English t956 

Annick Leymarie, French 1979 

Frank Miles, Jr., Social Studies 1969 

J. Richard Murphy, Science 1967 

William N. Murphy, Social Studies 1961 

Deloris H. Netzband, English 1978 

Richard O. Norman, Mathematics 1967 

Margaret A. O'Hagerty, Media Generalist 1975 

Glyn E. Reinders, Athletic Director, Physical Education 1977 



155 



Dale F. Rowe, Science 1961 

Anitra A. Sorensen, Learning Specialist 1976 

George V. Steeves, English 1969 

Valjeane O. Trumpower, English Coordinator 1973 

Reeve C. Williams, Social Studies 1970 

FRANCES C. RICHMOND SCHOOL 
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, 1979-80 

(Date indicates first year employed by District) 

Ronald N. Bailey, South Team Science 1966 

Henry K. Becker, North Team Mathematics 1970 

Scott D. Butchart, French 1977 

Sarah A. Carver, East Team Mathematics 1979 

Laura S. Cecala, French 1978 

Norman F. Chapman, East Team Social Studies 1966 

Bruce A. Curtis-McLane, West Team Social Studies 1975 

Patricia M. Davenport, East Team English 1975 

Mildred J. Hayes, South Team English 1951 

John J. Jestude, Counselor 1976 

Eileen R. Kell, North Team English 1977 

George E. Merrill, Physical Education 1970 

Christine S. Petrosemolo, North Team Science 1978 

Alfred A. Ponce, Jr., South Team Mathematics 1970 

Janet P. Rae, Art 1974 

Virginia A. Rankin, Media Generalist 1977 

Herbert R. Roland, West Team Mathematics 1971 

Kathleen K. Shepherd, Learning Specialist 1979 

Richard L. Starr, Woodworking 1972 

Nancy Martell Stevenson, Learning Specialist 1977 

Terry F. Thompson, East Team Science 1972 

Frank R. Thorns, North Team Social Studies 1962 

Charles L. Townsend, West Team Science 1970 

Sarah B. Wallace, West Team English 1967 

Roger F. Wilson, South Team Social Studies 1959 

SHARED STAFF 

John C. Carter, Music and Director of Bands 1977 

Helen E.Goodwin, Music 1952 

Janice L. Hall, Home Economics 1971 

Charles O. Hunnewell, III, Physical Education 1965 

Constance S. Klefos, Nurse 1970 

Vera S. LaClair, Home Economics 1963 

Dorothy E. Merriman, Physical Education 1955 

Robert C. Storrs, Doctor 1 968 

Margaret E. Thickman, Music 1978 

156 



DRESDEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Comparative Yearly Enrollments 
for October First of Each Year 



Year 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Total 


1970 


143 


161 


155 


155 


130 


133 


877 


1971 


150 


148 


159 


149 


150 


131 


887 


1972 


137 


151 


158 


163 


160 


147 


916 


1973 


161 


142 


170 


155 


170 


148 


946 


1974 


153 


160 


162 


164 


168 


161 


968 


1975 


156 


151 


171 


158 


170 


183 


989 


1976 


125 


153 


168 


173 


165 


173 


957 


1977 


154 


132 


165 


165 


178 


185 


979 


1978 


160 


149 


146 


161 


160 


175 


951 


1979 


115 


164 


171 


152 


167 


157 


926 



HANOVER HIGH SCHOOL 
1979 GRADUATES 



Linus E. Akerman 
Michael William Aldrich 
Jennifer Appleton 
John Kevin Appleton 
David A. Arkowitz 
Mary Isabella Arnold 
Lisa Beth Ault 
Robert Aval lone 
Vicki Lee Bacon 
Douglas G. Balch 
Ellen Parker Baldwin 
Kimberly Clark Ball 
Peter Lewis Banwell 
Mary Bernadette Barr 
Winthrop Martin Bean 
Paul Bergen 
Christine Martha Bilello 
Steven Danforth Bird 
Robert Nathan Blatman 
Cynthia Anne Bliss 
Allen Townsend Briggs 
Nancy Rhetta Brooks 
Elizabeth Otis Brown 
Ian Andrew Brown 



Stephen Forst Brown 
Susan Marion Bueschel 
Lynn-Marie Casey 
K. Cassella 

Eric Todd Chamberlain 
James Erland Chambers 
Andrew N. Cleland 
Deborah Cohen 
Gary Mark Conrad 
Rosanne Cooke 
William E. Corson 
Mark Peter Costello 
Jeffrey Miller Cowan 
Kenneth Daniel Cranston 
Edward Frederick Crory 
Patricia Ann Crowe 
Beverly Dyrone Cureton 
Tracy Ashley Curtis 
Thomas Blake Day 
Angela Claire Dayton 
Robin F. Denman 
Edward C. DeRego 
Ralph Vincent Dorsey 
Kenneth James Dow 



157 



Michael James Elder 
Kay Arden Elliott 
Dorothy Ann Farrell 
Sherry Lynn Faughnan 
Nicole Charlotte Faulkner 
Stephen Anthony Fenner 
Elizabeth Ann Fisk 
Jordan Dean Fitzgerald 
Kenneth Wood Forcier 
Annette Louise Gardner 
Karen Louise Garipay 
R. Andrew Garthwaite 
Katrina Geurkink 
Michael Alan Ginty 
Aida Luz Gonzalez 
Thomas Morgan Goode 
Bronwyn Lynn Goodfellow 
Joann Elaine Graf 
Priscilla Richardson Grant 
Howard B. Green 
Mildred Katherine Grimstad 
Diane Hadlock 
Alexander R. Harbury 
Doug William Hart 
Edward J. Haslam 
Bradley Craig Hastings 
Thomas Bancroft Hebble 
Cecily Marie Heisser 
Mary Catherine Hinsley 
David E. Hood 
Robert Hegner Huggins 
Katrin Margarethe Hyman 
Noah Jacobson 
Peter S. Jenks 
Timothy R. Jupp 
Robin L. Kaiser 
Angelisse Forbes Karol 
Sarah Diane Kendall 
Sarah Elizabeth Kidder 
Susan Amalia Klefos 
Michael Krueger 
Sheldon Eric Lacoss 
Vickie Anne Ladeau 
Kimberly Marie Laro 
Amy Susanne Lloyd 
Barbara Anne Long 



Marion Dee Longley 

Gordon James Fraser MacDonald 

Nancy Miller MacKay 

Dan Leo Margolis 

Deborah Marsh 

William Alan Masters 

Stephen Carlton McGaw 

Geoffrey B. McGean 

Swithin Susan McGrath 

Bonnie Ann Mclntire 

A. Ross Mclntyre 

Raul Mercado 

Jenifer Frances Merchant 

Kurt A. Meyers 

Dean Sturman Miller 

Brooks McLean Mitchell 

Cristina Monacelli 

Sharon Esther Moore 

Susan Ann Moore 

Brett Allen Moses 

Daniel P. Moulton, Jr. 

Stavroula Nanopoulos 

Katja Necker 

Carl Howard Nelson 

James Edwin Orr 

Linda Jean Owen 

Maria Elizabeth Pacillo 

Kathryn Page 

John Eliot Payson 

Scott Douglas Peters 

David Alan Phillips 

Elizabeth Edwards Porter 

Timothy Allan Porter 

Jennifer Claire Protas 

Michael Joseph Quinn 

Athos John Rassias 

Lori Lynn Rathjen 

Katherine Fuller Reed 

Susan Perreyclear Reeves 

Dianna Liegh Rich 

Sara Diane Roos 

Susan W. Rouse 

Pamela Elizabeth Rowe 

Wendy Runstadler 

John Stewart Russell 

John Krist Schell 



158 



Sarah Sears 
Julia Beth Segal 
Becky A. Schneider 
Nancy L Skewes 
Beth Marie Smith 
Cheryl Jean Smith 
Dawn Elizabeth Smith 
Gregory L Smith 
Jeffrey G. Smith 
Karen Elizabeth Smith 
Nelson W. Smith 
Rebecca D. Smith 
Jeffrey B. Snelling 
Katharine Anne Sokoloff 
Robert Andrew Spencer 
James Brewster Sterling 
Gretchen B. Stinson 
Kris Strohbehn 
Karen Marion Strout 



David Allen Sullivan 
Christine Anne Surprenant 
Lea Parker Thompson 
Timothy Edwin Thompson 
Bonnie Ann Thron 
Lori Ellen Trussell 
Linda Jeanne Tucker 
Elizabeth Sprague Udy 
Sherry S. Valley 
Lisa Marie Vogel 
Scott Jeffrey Wallace 
Eric Donald Wendlandt 
Thomas Ronald White 
Darrick Wilberding 
Michael B. Wilmott 
Fritz Peter Woermer 
Doree Marie Wood 
Steven Hadley Wurster 
Nancy Ellen Zappala 



159 



SCHOLASTIC RECOGNITION 



Valedictorian 
Ellen Baldwin 
Bonnie Thron 

Salutatorian 
Robert Blatman 

Robin Kaiser 
William Masters 



High Honors 
David Arkowitz 
Susan Bueschel 
Kenneth Dow 
Nicole Faulkner 
Andrew Garthwaite 
Katrina Geurkink 
Geoffrey McGean 
Jenifer Merchant 
Sharon Moore 
James Orr 
Robert Spencer 
Kris Strohbehn 
Christine Surprenant 
Eric Wendlandt 



Honors 
Vicki Lee Bacon 
Stephen Brown 
Andrew Cleland 
William Corson 
Kenneth Cranston 
Stephen Fenner 
Alexander Harbury 
Cecily Heisser 
Stephen McGaw 
John Payson 
Lori Rathjen 
Susan Reeves 
Susan Rouse 
John Schell 
Julia Segal 
Elizabeth Udy 
Doree Wood 



Senior Council 



Jennifer Appleton 
Paul Bergen 
Stephen Brown 
Patti Crowe 
Kenneth Dow 
Nicole Faulkner 



Percy Grant 
Gordon MacDonald 
John Payson 
Kitty Reed 
Rob Spencer 
Kris Strohbehn 



Class Ushers 



Inde Editors 



Beverly Cureton & Ralph Dorsey Robert Blatman 

John Payson & Julia Segal 



160 






NHamp 
352.07 

1124 
1979