(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"



•» * 



^» *%«yt 






- 




Town of Chelmsford • 1 996 Town Report 



IN MEMORIAM 



1996 



THOMAS J. WELCH 

Selectmen 



JOSEPH M. GUTWEIN 

Sewer Commissioner 



GEORGE R. DUPEE 

Planning Board 



Cover photograph by John Coppinger 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area 

Population 1995 

Assessed Valuation Rate for 1996 



Tax Rate 



United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District .... 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Building Department . 
Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library . . . 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 
Veterans' Agent Office. . . 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 

on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles 

from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 

from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

32.107 

$1,918,462,000 (Real Estate) 

$48,315,961 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $19.84 

($19.66 Residential - $20.67 Commercial) 

Martin Meehan. Lowell. MA 
Susan Fargo. Lincoln, MA 

Carol C. Cleven. Chelmsford. MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

Monday. Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Thursday i : oo p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. • 8:00 p.m. 
Thursday - Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday i : oo p.m. - 6.00 p.m. 

Thursday. Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 1 :00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Mon day 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

'[Except June. July & AugustJ 



MEETINGS 

First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
Third Monday in October 
7.00 p.m. - Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. - Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m. - 1st & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 
Senior Center 
Senior Center 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



doll 

Mi 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

Accounting 250-5215 

Assessor 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5267 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Personnel 250-5288 

Planning Board 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

School Administration 251-5100 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 250-5238 

Water Department 256-2381 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1 : Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: By am School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

315 Russell Senate Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1-202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

421 Russell Senate Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
202-224-2742 

I Bowden Square, 10th Floor 
Boston, MA 02114 
617-565-8519 

Congressman Martin T. Meehan 

3 1 8 Cannon 
Washington, DC 20515 

I I Kearney Square 
Lowell, MA 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 1 67 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2692 

Home: 4 Arbutus Avenue 

Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Susan Fargo 

Room 413F State House 
Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-1572 

Middlesex County Commission 

Superior Courthouse 

East Cambridge, MA 02141 

617-494-4100 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
ELECTED OFFICIALS 

CEMETERY COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Jean R. McCaffery, CHMN 

1998 Gerald L. Hardy 

1999 James F. Dolan 

CONSTABLE - 3 Yr Term 
1998 William E. Spence 

BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Paul F. McCarthy, VCHRM 

1998 Paul J. Canniff, CLK 

1999 Peter Dulchinos, CHRM 

HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 Yr Term 

1997 Lynn M. Marcella, CHRM 

1998 Robert L. Hughes, VCHRM 

1999 William P. Keohane, TREAS 

2000 Mary E. (Lisa) Royce 
7/98 Pamela Turnbull 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES - 3 Yr Term 
1997 Nancy Knight 

1997 Jaclyn Dolan Matzkin, CHRM 

1998 Sarah L. Warner 

1998 John W. Cutter, Jr., VCHRM 

1999 Kathryn M. Fisher, SEC 
1999 Margaret E. Marshall 

1999 Elizabeth A. McCarthy, TREAS 

MODERATOR - 3 Yr Term 
1999 Dennis E. McHugh 



PLANNING BOARD - 3 Yr Term 
1997 Kim J. MacKenzie, CHRM 

1997 Tracey Wallace Cody, CLK 

1997 James P. Good 

1998 James M. Creegan, VCHRM 
1997 Susan Carter** 

1999 Eugene E. Gilet 
1999 Robert C. Morse 

**Kevin Clark resigned 9/96 term to 1998 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 Yr Term 



1997 


Anthony V. Volpe, CLK 


1998 


Wendy C. Marcks 


1998 


Angelo J. Taranto, VCHRM 


1999 


Judith B. Mallette 


1999 


Mary E. Frantz, CHRM 




SELECTMEN - 3 Yr Term 


1997 


William F. Dalton 


1997 


* 


1998 


Peter V. Lawlor, CHRM 


1998 


Susan J. Gates, VCHRM 


1999 


Stuart G. Weisfeldt, CLK 




*Thomas J. Welch deceased 8/2/96 




SEWER COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 


1997 


George Abely 


1998 


John P. Emerson, Jr., CHRM 


1998 


Barry B. Balan, VCHRM 


1999 


Thomas E. Moran, CLK 


1999 


Richard J. Day 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Jean B. Sullivan 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips 
Bruce Symmes 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 

TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

DPW DIRECTOR 

James E. Pearson 

FIRE CHIEF 

John E. Parow 

POLICE CHIEF 

Armand J. Caron 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Cornelius J. O'Neill 

Marica V. Dobroth 

Clare L. Jeannotte 

Dwight M. Hay ward 

Susan M. Olsen 

Charles A. Piper 

Barbara A. Skaar, CHRM 

Harold Matzkin, Resigned 6/96 

Beverly Koltookian, Resigned 6/96 

John Morrison, Resigned 8/96 



r*> 


u 


















H 


s 


















u 


< 


















7 


£. 


c 






<U 








, ' 


U 




X) 




§ 


b 
o 


>, 


c 




— * 


UJ 

as 
a. 




-J 
c 


c 

1/1 

o 


3 

u. 


S 


JO 
< 


2 


=0 
'E 
2 


o 
(/) 

S 
E 






m 
E 
o 




u 


U. 


Q 

c 

u 




LLI 






C 

i 


■1 

o 


B 
C 

3 


O 


o 

s 


c 

-C 






a 


E/J 


<£ 


< 


O 


—1 


z 





III 

V fc UJ 






E o n > .2 H 

03 uj ^ -J 2 ■& 

i? 1 I g l|! 

*» 5 -c w o <o jr 



o> o> 00 00 

O O^ Q^ 

O"* O"* O"* &< 0"* o^ V s 



o c3 
a: U 

qpooopqor»r»i-»r~r~i-- 

* C> ^ O 1 

O* & Q\ Q> 



& OS 



g 



c/5 

UJ 



< 
H 
Z 

uj 
c/3 

u 

as 

u 
as 

U 
z 

H 

uj 

UJ 



21 

O 

H 



r^ u 



U 

UJ 

as 

a. 



§ 

Ji i. la - 

l/> u w — 

5 CU V 



id 



a 



> CD 3 3 



« 1 °° 



O 'w 

E 



1 a J 

BO </> 






wjf n 2 c 
£ o ^ "5 £ 

<a "• £ o u. a 

H « >,«*• E I 



S § 

c E 

^ c 

^ C »* 

v- t: aj 



ts o 



5 a -c 



u. -= f ; a. 



O 






u.CQCQJ<»a.O™-4J5;cQ0DtflJ?^-jJ;u. 






0> (> 



00 00 00 00 B0 0© 
s 0\ ^\ Ov Os Os 
C^ v* s C^ O"* s 



r- i— r~ 



UJ 



U 

UJ 

as 
a. 



* c 

^ J i 

^ Q. J3 

- « < 

a si 

uj O oo 



V O 

& uj co > 

00 i £^ 



Js « "2 u = c 






QQ . 



on 



Q ^ i» 



at H O _j 



2 oi 



t = •£ c 

S ir <o o .E 

03 ^ U CC _J 

s OO OO OO OO 



5 J « « 8 a «2 -g. 



UJ 



00 00 00 00 



g 



g 



8 



>r> — 



z * 



= "O 



N Q « _ 

c — » 



= 5 g S J -S 



& _ 



t ST c £• * 

a. 2 U aS X 



-, - a 



*2 



2 * 

ho 6 - 



o- « C' J2 S 



s* 



X 3 



E 



« j2 

E-5 



yj 



4i *T3 



c.3 



09 



U -5 



u 2 Z u </i 



> w - fe 
S - s J 

4U1U 



Q. — Ll_ — v 

■a _, oc c 

> ^ « s 

r a a 2 






s ^ s ^ s s 
s ^ O* CT* ^ ^ 



UJ 



z 
u 
c/5 

w 
£ 
a. 

a 

z 

P 
u 

z 

o 



w 
cu 



b J 



u ^ -* o 

w -^ « c .. 

<u >• j= « .y 

.£ C .£ Q. £ 

« « $3 « o 

U. •$■ CQ co CO 

«■• s s O* 1 s ^ 



■a 2 (Ji o "u 

> to <3 « 
.- (0 "*. 



^ o. 






t-SzS 

" <5 so £ 

u. j= 3 J= 

C C a? -J X 

E as oi 

is ill 

4> C u (Q (Q 

Q i{ J Q 2 



2 u. h- 



t/3 _ Q 



■g 8 v .y -g 

O UJ 2 OS 



Ooooooooooooor~r- 
s ^ Q* 1 5 s ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



S g^ 



r- i— r- r- 
j o> 2 1 ff> 
o^ o ct» o^ 



§ 



Si o 



Z E 



« j? # a « s § 



!?= i 



c JS « o 

E I « £ 

o *- oS -S 

■ V) o 



t/5 9- O. «i 



|^-S||-o0. <«. 

5 J - 1 



I- OS 



• S us x 



EC c/3 _ 

"" " ' § 

I |J|^ MIS Si -gal 

■ ■*■ ■> i»„ „ p J:> 



23 



»^ — — v 

■5 1 is 



w t u 



O O 



.2 "a 5 = «3 

o .5 u l— 



« o .2 u vr j: u 

a q _i o ^ u a 




s ^ ^ ^ 0^ s & O^ ^ s ^ ^ 



o> o> f 

C^ 0> fr 




CQ ^ 



IW W> IW U- Q V 

£ 2 UU «? C* UJ 



u 

H 



r~ i~- r~ i— r» 



UJ 



< 

z: 

UJ 

uj 
OS 

a. 
uj 
£ 

H 

u 

«- 
«< 

O 



(J < 
z z 

u 

UJ 

of 

EL 



8 5 

. en J2 



a sr 



3 <o o 



X 

s -» 

■&■§■ 



l/l CO 



• 5 I 

U w 

§c • • 
■coo 

- » Z. « 

1,1 aS — 

cu < 



00 c 
a 



<iO\o\o v o^o^O'0\0\ 

i^^O^(>0^0\ONO\Ov 



00 jo 



< 



Z 

< 



§ « S 



^ o 



< ■« -.3 ^ . - -3 ■= a. ^ 



> o o 

a. CL 



ai ( 1 1 — hi r^ «j 



V "5 



■S I -a § - 

QtflOCD< 



J? J= U UJ 

oooooot-~t^i~t~r-t"- 

0\ O^ O^ O^ O^ O** O^ s * C* 
O^ O* O^ o^ o^ o> o* o^ C* 



u 



u 


< 




c 




O 






















= 








z 

u 


z 


-0 

(0 

3 

E 
c 
u 
Q 






E 




a 




1J 
-C 


>^ 


c 


wi 




JO 


1^ 

3 


e 






•0 

i 


§ 

O 
O 


1 

> 




c 


CL 




UJ 

O 
-a 

■s 


00 

X 


to 

c 

V 

1) 


< 

<5 


.2 

—1 



"a 

Q 

c 



O 




c 

u 

3 

Q 


C3 

O 

a 


s 


c 

S 


_i 

is 



a> 
O 

c 


X 

a 


a 

-0 

is 


S3 
O 

to 

i 


< 


1 

U 

< 
•0 






-a 
en 

CO 


"5 

3 


s2 


E 

CO 


c 
2 




"5 

(0 

a. 


s 

0. 


T3 

C 


c5 

c 



1 

3 
in 


C 
O 

5 


X) 

5 

CO 


"0 

c3 
U 


(5 

a 




>— 


a 


O- 


O- 


0- 


OS 


ON 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


t~~ 


r- 


r- 


r~ 


r- 


i~- 




*5 


a 


0- 


o- 


0- 


& 


& 


8! 


» 


cr 


a- 


» 


On 


0- 


Q> 


O- 


a 


O 


S 




OS 


0* 





5> 


ON 





a- 


0- 


0- 


Ch 


a- 


& 


On 


O- 


o- 


ON 


ON 




UJ 








































H 







































10 



- 1 5 > 
29o 



o 


1 


r*i 


vO 


LU 


Ov 




o. 







•— — «-> 



cu 
O 

u 

H 
Z 

o 

c/j Q 
S Z 

K < 

< s? 

C/3 > 

Q § 1 
05 £ 2 

^ d s 

M -J z 

2 ^ => 

* ul ^ 

O u 
z u 

Q 
U 
Z 

x 

s 

o 
u 



D Q 
Q Z 





*5 Z 


O 


ERAL 
-TER* 
IATIO 


£* 


zoo 


o 


UZj 




O O oq 




•J o 



* > 


H 


U 


c/5 


z 


D 


UJ 


pei 


O 


H 


< 






u £ 

£ > 



r- oo oo r- o^ » 
r- >o f) oo oo ^r 
■y-i t— — — — — 



v\ </-> so in r^ Tt 



o^ 


rj 


IN 


r- 


°*. 


*°. 


-r 


00 


i- 


f> 


o 


OO 






fi' 


(N 


ri 


TT 




(«0 



On 


a- 


rj 


(n 


o~ 


Ov 






■* 


T 


■t 


Tf 


O 


© 


f> 


m 


ri 


<N 




fc«» 



2 g 



r-~ oo oo 
i~- vo r»> 
wi i^ — 



5 



oo 



< 




*-£ 

LU f- 

S6 
£ z 

2 o 

ft. u. 

uj o 

CQ 



LU 
00 
00 


2* 

h- UJ 
00 S 


z 

o 
p 


< 

tt! 


h- 


| 


< 

o 


LU 


5j 


P 


Zj 


X 


o 
2 


s 


CQ 

O 



Q O < 



< 

f- 
O 
(- 



11 



>r*i \© r» f- O ri C^ O ri 
r«i O fN O* ""> © ^ r*"> s 
ri ^O ©' C\ *t ^ O"* 



o o 



r-i o 

© — 



r- 


ri 


n 


r» 


■ — 


^j 


so 


00 


© 


n 


© 


oo 1 


ri 


r-i 




rfl 




li 



o 

Df5 

O 

H 
Z 

o 

3 Z 

E < 

U c/5 

< W 

t/j Qu 

2 J* 
^ H so 

as". 
as E S 
o , ^ 

ta. H " 
V3 -j Z 

**? 3 

-r- bu 

o£ 

O u 

z u 

QQ 

Q 
W 

z 



'O 


IN 


ri 


O^ 


© 


ri 


0" 


r-i 


ri 


OS 


© 


& 


— ' 


01' 


O 


-9 






r*l 


rr 


ri 




00 


© 






ri 


ri' 






ri 


»N 



© 



OS 


© 


© 


00 










ri 


o-> 


vO 





ri 


°° 


ri' 


r-* 




*/> 



ri 


00 


•/-> 


ri 


ri 


°. 


r»" 


ri 


T 


r- 




q 


sd 


r-" 







r- 




>n 


00 


O 





ri 


o< 




v-1 


© 


T 


©' 


<•> 







-r 


00 


•n 




00 


■» 


O 


— ' 


<n 




O 


fN 


ri 


ri 




1 



00 sO r O r 
00" so' so* 






-* 


ri 


O 


00 


■■• 


0"*' 


ri 


5> 




ri 


ri 






ri 


00 




to 



o 
u 



S= ryj < 

Q Don 



O a: 

u < 
< a. 



LU 




LU 


H 


u_ 


0- 




LU 


<£ 


_j 


O 


CQ 


X 


O 


< 


r- 


a 


_j 


O 


UJ 


as 

LU 


O 

r- 


OrS 

a: 

UJ 


X 


UJ 


u. 


r- 


3 


UJ 


O 


O 


a 



W UJ< 
LU o£ *= 

Q ^ 9 

LU LU :=? 

* > £ 

a: as t 

uj uj S^ 

u. to 2 

uj uj O 

q2u 



C/5 

LU 

D -J 
UJ 03 
Q Q 



LU 

(J £ 

°- — m 

uj -^ < a: 

> D O LU 

uj Z Z w 

1/5 LU LU 9£ 

UJ Z 



Q r- 

z° 

O LU 

j?5 a 
uj z 

a 5 



> 

r- 

5 Q 

oz 

LU < 
Q to 
Z "J 

2E 



H < O 

O j uj 

H _jQ 

«< z 



12 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Front Row (1-r) Susan Gates, Vice-Chairman; 
Peter Lawlor, Chairman 

Back Row (1-r) William Dalton; Stuart Weisfeldt, Clerk 



13 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

This past year was distinguished by signficant achievement 
on the part of the Board contrasted starkly and significantly with 
unusual sorrow. Early into what was to prove to be an ambitious and 
bold year, Board member Tom Welch was diagnosed in February of 
1996 with the return of a blood disorder which would eventually take 
his life the following August. The loss which his passing represents 
was evident Town-wide, though perhaps known most accutely to his 
colleagues. He brought clarity, courage and intelligence to an office 
which too often suffers from a lack of all three ingredients. From the 
remaining members of the Board, Tom, you are deeply missed, our 
friend. 

Before his health took him completely out of the action, 
however, Tom was deeply involved, along with the rest of the Board, 
in bringing about a goal which had previously only existed in the 
empty world of campaign promises. The Board, working at its work 
session at the newly acquired Chelmsford Country Club, voted 
unanimously to make it a major priority - both for the Board and for 
the Town Manager, to actually lower the tax rate during this fiscal 
year. Working together and prudently tightening where it could be 
done, together we delivered that decrease of 290 per thousand. This 
was achieved while at the same time solidfying the Board's 
commitment to annually contributing to the Stabilization Fund (the 
Town's "savings account" for future seen and unseen capital needs) 
towards our goal of $2.5 Million. 

Not all achievements, however, were limited to the dry world 
of ledger sheets. The Board was proud to deliver to the Town the 
first year's return on its investment in purchasing the former Apple 
Country Club. As soon as the snow melted in the spring of 1996, the 
Town, together with newly-appointed Sterling Golf Management, 
opened the recently christened "Chelmsford Country Club" and 
immediately embarked on a series of improvements at the Club, the 
goal of which is to make it a recreational and meeting facility which 
the Town can be proud of for generations to come. The Club 
enjoyed a busy season of play and received wide praise from local 



14 



players who appreciated the dedication to making a variety of 
upgrades to this Town jewel. 

Further in its broad goal of achieving quality of life 
improvements throughout the Town, the Board of Selectmen turned 
its focus to the waterfront along the Merrimack River. Starting with 
a survey of our riverfront along the Merrimack River led by Police 
Chief Armand Caron, the Board quickly recognized the potential 
which lay with improvements at the property which the Town 
already owned at Southwell Field. In conjunction with neighbors in 
the area, recreation interests in the Town and the Town Manager and 
his staff, the Board is advancing plans to improve this picturesque 
and underutilized asset with walking paths and other amenities to 
draw even more of the Town's residents to this area. 

These efforts occurred in tandem with initiatives of 
Selectman Susan Gates to revitalize the buildings at Varney 
Playground and Selectment William Dalton's efforts to enlist local 
support and monies to make other improvements to the Varney 
Playground area. 

All of these planned improvements in North Chelmsford 
provided some balance (some might say not enough) to the bumpy 
road which was encountered in installing significant traffic lights and 
traffic flow changes in Vinal Square. While the Commonwealth 
deserved much of the heat which was generated from this change, the 
Board and the Manager were the local officials on the scene to listen 
to and attempt to effectuate some of the changes which needed to be 
made in that area. That continues to be an area of Board concern. 

Newly elected Selectman, Stuart Weisfeldt, falling back upon 
a long history of involvement with the Chelmsford Public Schools, 
guided the Board strongly in bringing about a stronger Board of 
Selectmen - School Committee relationship. Closer working 
relationships between the Town Manager and the Superintendent of 
Schools have led to closer workings between the two boards. This 
relationship gave rise to a proposal from the Board of Selectmen this 
year that there be performed by an outside accountant and 
operational audit of the School Department. The goal of such an 

15 



audit would be to probe the operating efficiency of every component 
of the school system and to explore whether there are areas in which 
signficiant savings can be achieved. The Board eagerly awaits the 
results of this audit. 

Much work remains to be accomplished in the upcoming 
year. In addition to working with the Town Manager in embarking 
upon a new round of contract talks, the Board's attention will 
undoubtedly include sheparding the library, police station 
renovations and Center School renovation projects which are 
imminently before us. 

The last year has been the most productive year which I have 
experienced in the five years which I have served on the Board. The 
privilege of being chairman of this most talented and vibrant group 
has made the year even more special. For that I am deeply 
appreciative. 

Sincerely, 

Peter V. Lawlor, 
Chairman 



16 



THIS PAGE DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF 



THOMAS J. WELCH 




Board of Selectmen - October 17, 1995-August 2, 1996 

Board of Appeals: Alternate 1982; 
Regular Member 1983-1984 

Fiscal Policy Advisory Committee: 1989-1990 

Town Manager Screening Committee: 1989 

Town Meeting Representative: 1989-1996 



17 



TOWN MANAGER 

In July of 1 993 the Chelmsford Board of Selectmen adopted a 
Vision Statement to guide itself and the Town administration. This 
vision statement is used to develop our long term plans, our annual 
budgets, our annual work plan and goals, and to manage the daily 
affairs of the Town. The Vision Statement is as follows: 

11 The Town of Chelmsford strives to be a fiscally stable 
suburban community providing the residents and businesses with a 
clean environment and a high quality of living. The Town will plan, 
construct and maintain all public facilities or public works 
infrastructure to provide for the health, safety, and welfare of all 
persons. The Town seeks to provide the least amount of taxes as 
necessary to residents and businesses alike. The Town places a high 
value on educational curriculum. The Town will foster an 
atmosphere conducive to the development and promotion of cultural, 
recreational, and educational opportunities to all the residents of the 
community. " 

In providing my annual report for 1996 I am pleased to state 
that we are adhering to this vision of the community that Chelmsford 
should be now and in the future. I am particularly pleased to report 
that the Town continues to move forward with important projects and 
programs that will improve the Town and it's quality of life. During 
this year we moved to address key issues which have been the focus 
of attention for many years. In addition, over the past twelve months 
we improved our overall financial condition and provided tax relief 
to our property owners. I believe our progress on all of these fronts 
reflects the commitment and planning that we have had over the past 
decade. We are now realizing the fruits of these efforts. 

The following are some of the past year's highlights for the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

□ Closed Fiscal Year 1996 with a healthy $1.3 million in 
budget surplus reflecting improved receipts and operational 
savings. 



18 



□ Utilized $750,000 of the budget surplus to reduce property 
taxes thereby holding taxes for existing properties at 
approximately their FY95 levels. 

□ Added $250,000 from the budget surplus and $500,000 from 
the FY97 operational budget to the Town's "rainy day" 
reserve fund which will be used to help pay for various 
capital projects and be available for future fiscal emergencies. 
On December 31, 1996 this fund had a balance of 
approximately $2.5 million, the highest level in the Town's 
history and close to the established financial policy goal of 
5% of operating budget. 

□ The final phase of the Town's sewer project was 
overwhelmingly passed by the voters meaning that the entire 
Town will be sewered by 2009. The project is planned to 
have minimal tax impact through its completion by utilizing 
state financial assistance and sewer betterments to manage 
any impact on property tax levels. This project puts the Town 
in the enviable position of avoiding the burdens of 
increasingly tighter septic regulations. 

□ After 25 years of efforts to expand the Adams Library a plan 
was adopted and funded to enlarge and improve this historic 
building to meet demands for more space and resources, and 
handicapped accessibility. The project was made possible in 
large part by an award of $1.8 million in a state library grant. 
The project was supported by the Town through a referendum 
vote in December of 1996. Expected completion of the 
project is early to mid 1999. 

□ After 70 years of trying to find a solution to the traffic 
problems of Central Square a plan was brought forward by a 
special committee to make a number of traffic improvements 
to make the Center safer and more workable for traffic. This 
plan was adopted by the Selectmen in April of 1996 and state 
funding is being sought for the $1 million cost. 



19 



□ In October of 1996 the "Old" Town Hall was converted from 
mixed office/public use to exclusive utilization as a 
Community Center to house the wide range of recreation and 
cultural offerings that have grown over the last three to four 
years. 

□ During 1996 a needs assessment was completed for the Police 
Station which details the deficiencies of a building that has 
been recognized as inadequate. With the information from 
the needs assessment we have begun to develop plans for an 
expansion which will meet our needs well into the next 
century. 

□ In September of 1996 the North Chelmsford police substation 
was opened to serve that section of our Town and enlarge our 
efforts in the area of community policing. 

□ In March of 1996 the "new" Chelmsford Country Club 
opened as a municipal course after its purchase in 1995. The 
course received a number of improvements during the year 
including three new tees, tree plantings, clubhouse 
improvements, and expanded programs particularly for youth. 
Future improvements in 1997 will build upon the early 
success of this public venture which currently generates 
approximately $70,000 in revenue to the Town. 

□ In October of 1996 the Town of Chelmsford Home Page was 
unveiled with much success. This technological effort 
dovetails with the relatively new Community Newsletter 
which seeks to expand citizen information about the Town 
and it's programs. Both programs have proven to be popular 
and will be the focus of continued improvement efforts in the 
future. 

In summary, 1996 was an extremely positive and productive 
year for the Town as great progress and substantial achievements 
were realized in areas of the Chelmsford government and 
community. 

20 



However, in 1996 Chelmsford also experienced the sad and 
unfortunate loss of Selectman Tom Welch who passed away after a 
brave struggle. In his brief time on the Board Tom was a true leader 
and teacher. His intelligence, common sense, good humor and warm 
personality allowed him to play and intergral part in all of our 
achievements in 1996 and many beyond. On many difficult issues 
Tom was the Board member to reach the central questions that led all 
of us to the right answers. His presence was missed tremendously 
during the last half of 1996 and he truly left a void that will be 
impossible to fill. 

As I look forward to 1997 I see continued financial stability 
for the Town with a positive local economy that is growing. We will 
be moving ahead on many of the projects of 1996 to bring them to 
completion and conclusion. In addition, we will be dealing with 
many issues of education as we meet the demands of increasing 
enrollments, bringing the Center School back on-line, and complying 
with the state Education Reform law. The task which we face will be 
achieving all of this along with all other municipal services while 
recognizing our finite financial resources. 

As always, I want to thank the members of the Board of 
Selectmen for their direction and support during 1996 including Bill 
Dalton, Susan Gates, Peter Lawlor, Stuart Weisfeldt and Tom Welch. 
I also want to recognize and thank the Department Managers and 
employees of the Town for their hard work and dedication. In 
particular, I want to thank the staff of the Executive Office including 
Judy Carter, Marian Currier, Diane Darling and Jeanne Parziale. 

Lastly, I want to once again thank the residents of Chelmsford 
for the opportunity and privilege of serving you as your Town 
Manager. I continue to look forward to working with you in the 
upcoming year and into the future to make Chelmsford an even better 
community. 

Sincerely, 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Town Manager 

21 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 

Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Assistant Town Clerk 

Janet M. Hart 
Senior Clerk 

Katherine M. Kalicki 
Part-Time Senior Clerk 



Licenses: 





Sporting 

Dog 

Kennel 


785 

3,013 

9 




Birth Inc. 

423 


Deaths 
262 




Marriages 
221 


Intentions 









221 

1996 was a busy election year for the Town Clerk's Office. 
There were two primary elections, the Annual Town Election, the 
Presidential Election and a Special Town Election. The staff worked 
hard on maintaining the voting lists, processing voter registration and 
absentee ballots. Many thanks to the precinct workers who worked at 
the polls on election days and to the Police Officers, School 
Custodians and Highway workers. 

The State of Massachusetts has mandated the implementation of 
the Motor Voter Bill. This required the Town Clerk's Office and 
Board of Registrars to work on converting the present registered 
voters/residents data file that is on line with the School Department 
onto the State wide system. Due to complications, the first time the 
new system was used was during the Special Town Election in 
December. Four out of the nine precincts had used the new system and 
it was successful. All the precincts will use the new system at the 
Town Election in April of 1997. 



22 



s 

ea 

-c 
o 

u. 

c 

JC 

o 



C/3 

as: 

3 

u 

0- 
u. 

O 

Q 

O 

x 



c 
o 

o I 

< w 

-o 



CS3 



eg 

-s o 

X 'o 

ea 
2 



«-> 
o 

> 

■o 



c 

UJ 

NO 
OS 

ON 



4> 

X> 

E 
1> 
u 

Q 

o 



00 

c 

<U 

1- 

■—< 

CO 

GO 

c 
o 

> 



3 

CO 



co 
o 

2 



E 




3 




-O 


^ 






U 




< 


"e3 


ea 


o. 


1_ 




-a 


o 


e 


e 


ea 


c: 


go 


Q- 



-J 


ON 


r-4 


^ 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


_ 


r-j 





_ 


< 


On 


^r 


<n 






— 








r^ 




"^l- 


H 


"■J, 


CNj 


OS 


















■<r 


o 


•O 


rn 


— 





















H 






"— 


















(N 




NO 


r- 


On 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 





CN| 




ON 


ON 


ITi 


















»o 


ON 


"<* 


m 


rn 






















OO 


__ 


rr 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


o 


o< 





00 




m 


^f 


o 


















OO 


oo 


*/-> 


m 


°i 


















O 




oo 


r^ 


irj 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


__ 





M 




NO 


r» 


NO 


















»— 


r» 


»/*> 


m 


^t 


















cN 




■<r 


_ 


_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


m 





ON 


go 


NO 


O 


</"> 


















— 


h- no 


NO 


^r 


rn 


















^t 


U 






— 


















(N 


R 


























u 


oo 


ON 


ON 


o 


o 


CN 


o 


o 


o 


ON 





OO 


2 «n 


t~» 


r- 


NO 


















f> 


•o 


m 


"<t 


















■^r 


a. 






~~" 


















<N 




o 


ON 


On 


o 


o 


_ 


o 


o 


^ 


m 





m 




•— < 


<— 


CN 


















NO 


■«* 


NO 


rn 


M 


















cN 




W> 


cm 


fN 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


t 





»r> 




00 


— 


NO 


















NO 


m 


v> 


m 


rr 


















rn 




ON 


NO 


yr\ 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


o 


r- 





O 




VN 


i-» 


NO 


















M 


<N 


V» 


fN 


-' 


















O 

<N 




_* 


O 


o 


o 


o 


_ 


o 


o 


o 


m 





•O 




O 


TT 


m 


















ON 




NO 


■* 


CnJ 








'o 










(N 


2 










T3 

c 




c 

3 

o 

u 

-a 

O 

> 


< 










12 

o 
> 


{3 

ea 

Em 

o 
B 

a 


CO 

C 
03 

a 

a 


-a 

1 

c 
u 

c 


u 

u 

c 
.2 

< 

> 


ca 
00 

a> 

-a 
u 

c 


| 

CO 

a. 


D 

>\ 

XL 
rz 
OU 

c 

E 


en 

."2 

O 
00 


c 

CO 

ea 
C 
u 
is 


on 

C 

_o 
2 

On 


UJ 
H 
O 
> 







es 


D 


Z 


D 


c 


Z 


o 


I] 


< 




ea 


ea 


to 


CO 


CO 


ea 


ca 


CO 


CO 


2 


CO 








«-^ 


■«-* 


-j 


■*— » 




•— 


w 






O 




O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 













H 


f- 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


r- 



23 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Board of Health Members: 

Paul F. McCarthy, Chairman 
Dr. Paul Canniff, Vice Chairman 
Peter Dulchinos, Clerk 

Board of Health Employees: 

Richard J. Day, Director 

John P. Emerson, Assistant Director 

Diana L. Wright, Department Assistant 

Judith Dunigan, Town Nurse 

Eric P. Kaplan, M.D., Town Physician 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1996 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 
continued its efforts to clean up our waterways. The Board of 
Health, with the advent of a central sewer system in Chelmsford is 
now embarking on enforcement activities to insure compliance with 
local by-laws which will insure a safe water supply. Dye testing, 
water sampling and issuance of septic system permits will continue 
in all the non-sewered areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits was $23,707. 
During 1 996 the department made inspections of day care centers, 
rental housing units, public schools, non-profit camps, bathing 
beaches International Certificates and all restaurants and retail food 
stores. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater Program 

Richard J. Day, Director of Public Health, was reappointed 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to enforce 
the "Right-to-Know" law for Chelmsford. The Board of Health held 
two Household Hazardous Waste Collection Days this year which 



24 



were held on May 6, 1996 and November 2, 1996. This program has 
consistently collected significant volumes of hazardous waste. 

Rabies Control 

1996 was another productive year in controlling the spread of 
rabies in the Town of Chelmsford. The Board of Health, working 
with two local veterinarians established a program to offer affordable 
vaccine for the unprotected cat and dog population in town. 

Title V 

The Board of Health is continuing to work on developing 
programs to control the effects of the new Title V regulation on the 
residents still on septic systems. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed during 
1996 for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health: 



Bacterial Meningitis 


1 


Hepatitis A 


1 


Campylobacter Enteritis 


10 


Hepatitis B 


6 


Cryptosporidiosis 


2 


Hepatitis C 


3 


Cyclospora Enteritis 


2 


Lyme Disease 


1 


E-Coli 


4 


Salmonella 


5 


Giardiasis 


4 


Mumps 


1 


Tuberculosis- Active 


1 


Viral Meningitis 


3 



Tuberculosis Control Prgm* 26 

*Referrals received from Lowell Chest Clinic and Boston Medical 
Center TB Clinic 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom from 
that disease is another responsibility of the Town Nurse. 
One-hundred seventy-one Mantoux (TB) tests were given to persons 
as required for pre-employment and college and also to household 
contacts of active cases in compliance with the Massachusetts 

25 



Department of Public Health regulations. Home visits and telephone 
calls are made to families of active and some inactive tuberculosis 
cases on a periodic basis to insure understanding of the illness and 
that adequate medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous medical 
records are kept and updated on residents who have a positive 
Mantoux (TB) test and are receiving medication prophylactically and 
being followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic. When 
necessary, TB testing is done at places of business if employees are 
exposed to an active case of TB. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this year. 
One-hundred three persons where immunized with pneumonia 
vaccine and one-thousand two-hundred forty-four were immunized 
with flu vaccine at clinics. Additional doses were given to nursing 
homes, Rotenberg School, Lighthouse School, Adult Retarded 
Citizens, town employees, physicians offices, six visits were made to 
handicapped or house-bound residents. A combined total of two- 
thousand four-hundred fifty-six doses of flu vaccine were 
administered in town. 

Two-hundred four immunizations were administered to 
adults and students in compliance with the Massachusetts 
Immunizations Laws and prophylactically to residents traveling to 
underdeveloped countries. 

Hepatitis B vaccine, school based program, was initiated this 
year and all sixth graders were offered the immunizations free at 
school. Because the Department of Public Health supplied this 
vaccine to Boards of Health it was given at no cost. Seventh thru 
twelfth graders were offered the Hepatitis B vaccine for a nominal 
charge of $30.00 for the three doses. These programs will continue 
for the next year. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board of Health, 

26 



Town Offices. Four-hundred forty-eight residents attended the 
screenings. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Board of Health offers lead paint testing for children 
between the ages nine months and six years. Residents may call the 
Board of Health at 250-5243 and make an appointment with the 
nurse. Twenty-three children were screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Board of Health include 
cholesterol. Dates of these programs will be advertised in advance. 

World AIDS Day Event 

Each year around World AIDS Day, December 1st, an event 
is held in Chelmsford to promote education and generate discussion 
among family members with regards to HIV/ AIDS. It is the 
committee's hope to encourage compassion, understanding and 
support for those infected and affected by HIV/ AIDS. The 
committee for World AIDS Day in Chelmsford is in need of 
volunteers. If interested, call Judy Dunigan, RN, Board of Health, 
250-5243. 

Health Fair/Health Screenings 

Either a Health Fair or several Health Screenings will be held 
in conjunction with Westford every other year, finances permitting. 
Date and location will be announced in newspapers. 



27 



CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project (CMMCP) 
currently provides its services to 28 cities and towns throughout 
Middlesex and Worcester Counties. 

The project's headquarters is located at 111 Otis Street, 
Northboro, MA. Tours of the headquarters or visits to field work sites 
may be arranged by calling the office in advance. 

The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito Management 
(IMM), blending state of the art methods and techniques with 
expertise, experience, and scientific research to provide our member 
communities with modern, environmentally sound, cost effective 
mosquito control. 

The Mosquito Awareness program which we offer to elementary 
schools in our district has become very popular. Project staff meet 
with students and teachers to discuss mosquito biology, mosquito 
habitat, and control procedures. Much of the presentation is directed 
towards what the children and their families can do to prevent 
mosquitoes from breeding around their homes. Live samples of 
mosquito larvae are included with the presentation, and are left in the 
classrooms so that students can watch them develop. Slides, videos, 
handouts, and coloring books help to make this an interesting program. 

As part of our effort to reduce the need for pesticides we 
continue to expand our water management program. By cleaning 
clogged and overgrown waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, 
wetlands are restored, and water quality is improved. 

BTi mosquito larvacide is used to treat areas where mosquito 
larvae are found. We routinely check known breeding sites, but also 
encourage the public to notify us of any areas they suspect could breed 
mosquitoes. Our fields crews will investigate all such sites and treat if 
needed. 



28 



Our goals is to handle all mosquito problems with water 
management or larviciding but we recognize that here are times when 
adult mosquito spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases 
residential and recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or 
pickup mounted sprayers. 

The project's surveillance program monitors adult mosquito and 
larval population density and is the backbone for prescribing various 
control techniques. Rain gauges are set out and data collected by our 
surveillance crews in an effort to predict when mosquito breeding will 
occur. 

The project's video "Working for You" is available to anyone 
interested in learning about mosquito control and the services provided 
by the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 



29 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Department of Public Works, created by the Town 
Charter is comprised of Divisions including the highway, 
engineering, recreation, public buildings, parks, public shade trees 
and the operation of the sanitary sewer system. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

Department Members: 

James E. Pearson, P.E., Director & Town Engineer 
George LeMasurier, Assistant Town Engineer 
Gail Loiselle, Principal Clerk 
James B. Stanford, Project Engineer 

The work of the Engineering Division can best be 
summarized by listing the engineering assistance given to other 
Town boards and departments. This year's projects included: 

PLANNING BOARD: 

• Reviewed seventeen (17) subdivisions and Twelve (12) 
site plans 

• Inspected new construction on twenty three (23) streets 
Prepared cost estimates for bonding new roadway construction 
and prepared bond reductions 

• Attended all regular meetings 

ASSESSORS: 

Regularly updated Assessor Maps 

• Calculated lot areas 

• Assisted in property line determinations 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE: 

• Inspected streets & reviewed plans & legal descriptions for 
street acceptances of Somerset Place, Moore Street, Old Farm 
Way, Brittany Lane, and Moccasin Lane. 

• Inspected streets & prepared plans & legal descriptions for 
street acceptances of Lori Lane, Dobson Lane, Marguerite 



30 



Road, McCormack Lane, Alcorn Lane, Grady Drive, Deana 
Lane, Courthouse Lane, Kristin Dr. Ext., and Fairmount Street. 

• Prepared maps for Town Meeting articles 

• Inspected & responded to pole location requests from utility 
companies 

• Provided grades and construction inspection for Middlesex St. 
Railroad Crossing improvements and traffic management plan. 

• Prepared description for renaming of Hillside Lane 

• Central Square - worked with the Central Square Traffic 
Committee on the proposed improvements in the Center. 

• Inspected & responded to drainage, tree, and other 
miscellaneous complaints. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION: 

• Inspected and prepared cost estimates for the resurfacing of 
seven (7) streets and drainage analysis for fourteen (14) 
drainage projects 

• Provided layout for safety improvements at Westford/Pine Hill 
Road intersection and Hunt/ High Street intersection. 

• Provided layout for construction expansion of Municipal 
Parking Lot in Vinal Square. 

• Assisted with the snow and ice effort 

Provided layout and grades for septic system repair at 
Chelmsford Country club. 

• Provided layout and grades for the reconstruction of Davis 
Road. 

Project Engineer Jim Stanford has been busy designing the 
sidewalk and roadway improvements on Dalton Road, preparing the 
easement documents, preparing bid documents, designing the 
buildings for the Highway maintenance shop and the Chelmsford 
Country Club maintenance shed. Design and construction inspection 
of the Old Westford Road culvert headwall/ retaining wall and 
preparation of the floor plans for the Town Offices renovations were 
also completed by this division. 

Payrolls, expense vouchers and budgeting for all divisions 
except Highway are performed in this office. 



31 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Department Members: 

John Long, Superintendent of Streets 
Lawrence Ferreira, Foreman 
Marie Burns, Principal Clerk 

Drivers Operators 

Todd Chase Gary Beaulieu 

David Irvine Audie Boudreau 

David Eacrett Joseph Eriksen 

David Palmer Dennis Greenwood 

Paul Winegar Raymond Maybury 

Mechanics Laborer 

John Ferreira, Lead Mechanic Kenneth Burroughs 

Richard Jensen 

The Highway Division maintains and improves all the streets, 
culverts, catch basins and manholes, street signs, traffic signs and 
traffic signals for approximately 200 miles of roadway. Additionally, 
the Highway Division clears the streets and public lots of snow and 
ice, and assists other departments with the division's equipment and 
expertise of the crew. The office maintains all financial records 
needed for the reporting, tracking and payment of all vouchers 
connected with the highway budgets - including, general expenses, 
salaries, snow & ice, road reconstruction or repair, streetlighting, and 
Capital expenditures. 

Streets re-surfaced this year include : 

Parker Road Bartlett Street 

Pilgrim Road Spaulding Road 

Winslow Road Livery Road 

Fay Street Davis Road 

Cliff Road Barry Drive 

Steadman Street (Dalton Rd. to Rt.l 10) 

" (Lowell Line to Clinton Ave.) 
Dalton Road (North Rd. to Priscilla Ave.) 

32 



All drains on the re-surfaced streets were reconstructed prior to 
the resurfacing. In addition the following drainage projects were 
completed: 

East Putnam Avenue - rebuilt catch basins and installed 100' - 12" 

pipe. 

Proctor Road - installed two manholes - three catch basins - 550' - 

15" pipe. 

Ripley Street - rebuilt catch basins and manholes - installed 200' - 

15 M pipe. 

Elm Street & Natalie Road - installed 955' - 12" pipe, six catch 

basins and two manholes. 

Hunt Road & High Street - redesigned and rebuilt - Added two catch 

basins, installed 100"- 12" pipe - grass and curbing. 

Pinehill Road & Westford Street - redesigned. 

Vinal Square - Parking Lot- enlarged and paved. 

During the winter, the town received approximately ONE 
HUNDRED THIRTY FIVE INCHES OF SNOW from 17 different 
storms. 

This was the most snowfall in one season since record-keeping 
began. Each storm was handled by the Highway Division employees 
with assistance from Engineering, Parks and Sewer Division 
Personnel and hired contractors, often working for extended periods 
without sleep in order to maintain safe roads. The mechanics kept 
the equipment in proper operating condition, with few extended 
mechanical failures. 



33 



PARKS DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Edward Jamros, Groundskeeper 
Randy Boisvert, Laborer 

The Parks Division maintains all the parks, traffic islands, 
ballfields, playgrounds, and commons under the control of the Town. 
The grounds are groomed each Spring and prepared for the heavy use 
each area is subjected to during the year. The Division employees 
perform an exceptional job each year preparing the Town Common 
area for the annual July 4th celebration. Equally important is the job 
of restoring the damaged areas resulting from the abundance of 
activities. 

Special projects this year included the construction and 
installation of benches at the East Playground, new fencing and a 
new playground at Roberts Field, and reconstruction of the 
basketball equipment at the South Row School. The Parks Division 
also follows up on all tree complaints; determining ownership, 
pruning, chipping and the hiring of a private tree company for the 
cutting down and removal of problem trees. 

Special recognition goes to Dick Codling, Red Wagon 
Landscaping, Dick Burkinshaw, Chelmsford Rotary, Chelmsford 
Garden Club, and Stott Landscaping for their continued participation 
in the "Adopt-a-Park" program. 



34 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Theodore Godfroy, Superintendent 
Gerald Johnson, Custodian 
David Grimshaw, Custodian 

Regular custodial duties, the updating of buildings to meet 
the ever-changing codes, and removal of snow during the winter 
months keep the staff very busy. 

This year's special projects at the Town Offices included: 

• The Chelmsford Country Club was winterized, repairs made 
and routine checks done until Sterling Management was 
awarded the contract. 

• Record breaking snowfall during the season kept the staff busy 
keeping the Public Buildings grounds safe. 

• To better utilize Town Offices space, four offices were 
relocated. 

• Various work was done throughout the buildings to comply 
with A.D.A. requirements 

• Storage shelving was built in various offices utilizing the Parks 
Division staff during the winter months. 

• Eight offices were also painted. 

Common areas at the Old Town Hall and Town Offices were 
painted utilizing the Senior Citizen Program administered by Marty 
Walsh of the Senior Center. 



35 



SEWER DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Joseph Witts, Operations Super. Evelyn Newman, Dept. Assistant 

Jacqueline Sheehy, Prin. Clerk James Casparro, Inspector 

Michael Vosnakis, Maint. Tech. Daniel Belkas, Maint. Mechanic 

Irene Oczkowski, Clerk John Kobelenz, Safety Plumb Inspect. 

The Sewer Division continued to expand again this year with 
the addition of 570 new sewer connections, bringing the total number 
of on-line sewer users to 4,730. The total number of sewer pump 
stations remains at 17. New sewer construction has been completed 
in North Chelmsford around Freeman Lake, and construction has 
begun on North Road and the surrounding streets. The office staff 
keeps extremely busy preparing and processing the sewer betterment 
assessments, sewer user bills, safety plumbing permits, construction 
permits, the Sewer Commission agendas, meeting minutes, contracts, 
and general correspondence. 

As we continue to expand, personnel requirements are also 
expanding. Dan Belkas was added as full time Maintenance 
Mechanic. Dan comes to us from the MWRA's Deer Island facility. 
Irene Oczkowski was added as a part time clerk. Both Dan and Irene 
are residents of Chelmsford. 

Again, we would like to thank the three Water Districts for 
their cooperation and assistance during the past year. Thanks go to 
the Fire and Police Departments for monitoring the pumping stations 
alarm system. With their help we were able to keep the system 
running smoothly throughout the year. Special thanks go to the 
Sewer Commission for their cooperation throughout the year. 

I would like to thank the entire staff for their cooperation, 
dedication, and flexibility. It is clearly evident that the Public Works 
employees are committed to providing top quality services. 

Respectfully submitted, 



James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Director of Public Works 



36 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Jean R. McCaffery, Chairman 
Gerald L. Hardy 
James F. Dolan 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report some major 
accomplishments and highlights of 1996 to the citizens of Chelmsford. 
The Cemetery Department completed a number of beautification 
projects throughout the year including the following: 

At Forefathers Burying Ground, the exterior of the 1802 
Schoolhouse was completely repainted. In addition, a large area 
adjacent to the Bridge Street gate area was regraded, loamed and 
reseeded. 

The diligent efforts of the Commission in seeking grant funding 
for the restoration of Forefathers were rewarded. In November the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission announced that Forefathers 
Burying Ground was selected as one of 75 statewide restoration 
projects to receive a matching grant of $5,000 from the Massachusetts 
Preservation Projects Fund. 

At Pine Ridge Cemetery, the staff planted Spring tulip beds near 
the main entrance which resulted in many positive public comments. 
The staff has planted tulips near the main entrance of Fairview 
Cemetery for the 1997 Spring season. 

At Riverside Cemetery, over 160 feet of fencing was replaced 
along the west boundary line. Special thanks to Jane Drury, Linda 
Prescott, Ellen Green, and Connie Frank for volunteering their time to 
develop an accurate inventory of historical gravestones in Riverside. 

The Commission wishes to acknowledge Mrs. Brenda Lovering, 
members of the Chelmsford Garden Club and members of the Junior 
Garden Club for planting daffodil bulbs near the main entrance of 
Fairview Cemetery and the historical section of Heart Pond. 



37 



The Commission wishes to thank Jackie Brodie for volunteering 
to produce over thirty rubbings of historically significant gravestones 
from Forefathers Burying Ground. These rubbings will preserve these 
unique images for future generations long after they have become 
illegible. 

In December, heavy, water-laden snow from two winter storms 
caused an estimated $9,000 in damage from fallen trees and broken 
limbs. The Department staff worked tirelessly during a two-week 
period to remove over 47 truck loads of tree limbs from all six 
cemeteries. 

The number of interments reached an all-time high of 156. 
Cremation interments totaled 29 for the year and accounted for 19% of 
total interments. There were 86 lots sold during the year and two 
incidents of vandalism. 

The Cemetery Commission commends the Department staff for 
their professionalism and for striving to make the Town cemeteries 
attractive burial places that our citizens can be proud of. 

Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa, Jr., Superintendent 
Jorge Caires, Working Foreman 
Kenneth Frazier, Backhoe Operator 
Eileen Johnson, P.T. Clerk 
Jose Teixeira, Special Laborer 
Claudio Caires, Special Laborer 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jean R. McCaffery, Chairman 



38 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Department Members: 

Jean Sullivan, Town Accountant 
Renee Young, Assistant Town Accountant 
Patricia Tucker, Principal Clerk 
Martha Camacho, Payroll Coordinator 

During fiscal year 1996, Christine Dowd resigned as Payroll 
Coordinator to take a position in the private sector. Martha Camacho 
has been hired to fill the Payroll Coordinator position. 

Although we had expected in fiscal year 1996 to convert the 
school to the Munis system currently in use in the Accounting 
Department, timing problems did not allow this to happen. The 
School will be live on the Munis computer system as of July 1, 1996. 

The Accounting Department was successful in moving the 
normally scheduled date for year-end audits by the independent 
accounting firm from December back to August. This resulted in 
publishing timely certified statements in September! 1996 instead of 
January/February 1997. This could not have been accomplished 
without the entire Accounting Department working together to meet 
regularly scheduled weekly due dates paying Town employees and 
Town/School vendors. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jean Sullivan 
Town Accountant 



39 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Board Members: 

Diane M. Phillips, MAA, Chief Assessor 
Bruce A. Symmes, CMA, RMA, MAA 

Eric R. Josephson, MAA, Assistant Assessor 
Nancy L. Maher, Administrative Assistant 
Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 
Elaine Myers, Principal Clerk 

This year the Board of Assessors conducted a preliminary 
assessment sales ratio study based on all sales in calendar year 1995. 
(Assessed values for fiscal year 1997 as of January 1, 1996.) 

After reviewing all the sales data information the Board 
concluded that the majority of the residential class was not within the 
range required by the Department of Revenue. 

As a result within the residential class, the following styles of 
homes increased in value: ranches, raised ranches, split-levels, multi- 
family and townhouse condominiums. Even though our tax rates 
decreased (residential from $19.66 to $19.37 and commercial from 
$20.64 to $20.23) the changed styles showed an increase in taxes. 

The Town is seeking a marked decrease in vacancy, especially in 
the industrial areas. Values are rising in the residential market. 

The office will be gearing up for FY98 when by law we will be 
doing a revaluation of the entire Town. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Diane M. Phillips, MAA, Chief Assessor 



40 



DATA PROCESSING 

During the year 1996 the Data Processing Department was 
involved with major upgrades to four departments in the installation of 
Windows and Lotus SmartSuite. Every machine in these departments 
were replaced with hard drives and Windows. Now this enables the 
department employees to access their own department's software as 
well as the Town's networked software with just a click of the mouse. 

Internet access was installed in October. At this time the email 
and web server was offsite, and updates were performed at another 
server. This email and web server are now in-house and all 
applications are done in the Data Processing Department. The 
Chelmsford Recycling Committee at this time is updating their own 
web page which is on the town's web server. Approximately 75% of 
the townhall employees have access to the Internet. The goal of this 
department is to have 100% access by the end of 1997. 

Continued support, upgrade and maintenance to the departments 
and networks were administered throughout the year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Judy Dunn 

Data Processing Coordinator 



41 



TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 

Department Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, Finance Director/Treasurer/Collector 

Carol R. Lambert, Assistant Treasurer 

Bertie A. Osborne, Departmental Assistant 

Judith A. Olsson, Part-Time, Legal Clerk 

Pat Britton, Data Processing Clerk 

Anna M. Griffin, Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 

Aided by an improved economy and conservative budgeting 
practices, the Town's financial position has improved significantly in 
fiscal year 1996. Property taxes provide the majority of revenues 
and current collections have increased in the fiscal year due to a 
continued aggressive collection procedures. In fiscal year 1996, the 
percent of net tax levy collected was at a record 98.6%. 

As of the end of fiscal 1996, the General Fund balance was 
$3,299,821. The General Fund budgetary revenue exceeded 
estimates by $870,421. The department expenditures where 
$533,340 less than anticipated. This in itself is an indication of very 
positive economic activity in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town has made significant progress in building up 
reserves in fiscal 1996. Our strengthened financial position enabled 
the Town to transfer $431,097 in fiscal 1996, and $750,000 in fiscal 
1997 into the Stabilization Fund for future capital projects. 

The Town has improved its long-term financial position 
through the preparation and adherence to five year fiscal forecasts 
and strategic plan. This plan addresses operating costs, debt, facility 
needs, and financial reserves. 

Sincerely, 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Finance Director/Treasurer/Tax Collector 



42 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The primary mission of the Chelmsford Fire Department is to 
protect lives and property from the adverse effects of fires, sudden 
medical emergencies or exposure to dangerous conditions created by 
either man or nature, within the community. To accomplish our 
mission, the Chelmsford Fire Department controls and extinguishes 
injurious or dangerous fires, protects life and property from fire risks 
by inspecting buildings for fire hazards and enforcing laws relating to 
fire prevention; carries on a fire education program, investigates 
suspected cases of arson; and provides rescue service, salvage service, 
hazardous material response and emergency medical care. 

The year 1996 was an extremely busy year for the Chelmsford 
Fire Department. Emergency responses increased by 699 calls or 20%. 
The occurrence of structure fires increased by 14 responses, a 26% 
increase, and included one civilian fire death. Emergency medical aid 
calls increased again this past year by 164 responses or 17%. 

The largest increase in emergency responses was in the area of 
service calls. Calls in this area increased by 488 calls or 47%. This 
increase seems to follow a nationwide demand, by the citizenry, for the 
fire department to provide more or additional services such as 
pumping flooded basements, responding to electrical problems, 
heating appliances problems, etc. 

Captain Michael Curran was promoted to Deputy Fire Chief in 
October and has been assigned the responsibility for day-to-day shift 
operations. Fire fighter/EMT Walter Adley was also promoted in 
October to the rank of Captain and has been assigned to the Fire 
Prevention Office. 

The Fire Prevention Office was reorganized towards the end of 
1996 because of an increase in number of fire prevention inspectors 
from 1 to 2. Deputy Chief James Sousa was reassigned to Fire 
Prevention and will manage the office and coordinate the inservice 
inspections program. 



43 



Firefighter Bill Cady was assigned as the departments first 
Student Awareness Fire Education (S.A.F.E.) Officer. This program 
was funded through a state grant and allowed for the S.A.F.E. Officer 
to spend his working hours educating our school children and the 
elderly about fire safety. This program was a great success and will 
continue this coming year. 

The departments emergency medical response program 
continued to develop this year with the purchase of new and more 
technically advanced medical equipment supported by a high level of 
inservice medical training. Sixteen (16) department members received 
heart saver certificates signifying a life that they helped save through 
either C.P.R. or early defibrillation. 

Goals for the upcoming year are to increase our fire prevention 
efforts through inservice inspections, develop and institute a 
comprehensive water rescue program for the Merrimack River, to 
install diesel exhaust removal systems in all five fire stations and to 
expand the S.A.F.E. program. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen 
and all other Town Departments, along with the members of the 
Chelmsford Fire Department and my office staff for their help and 
cooperation over the past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

John E. Parow 
Fire Chief 



44 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 

John E. Parow* 

Deputy Chief 

James A. Sousa* 
Michael F. Curran* 



Captains 



James M. Spinney 
James P. Boermeester* 



W. Michael Burke 
Charles A. Schramm* 



Walter F. Adley, Jr. 



Martin Boermeester* 
William V. Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
John Carroll* 
Anthony Cincevich* 
David Clancy* 
Kevin Clarke* 
Mark F. Conlin* 
James F. Curran* 
William Curran* 
William Dalton 
John Depalma* 
Michael Donoghue* 
Bruce Donovan* 
Donald A. Drew* 
James J. Durkin* 
Jesse Foster* 
David Hadley* 
William Hadley* 
Paul D. Hayes 
Henry A. Houle* 
William Jamer 
Peter Johnson* 
Dennis Keohane 

♦DENOTES EMT 



Firefighters 

William Keohane* 
Raymond R. Kydd 
Cynthia Leczynski* 
Emil Magiera 
Leo F. Man ley* 
Leo Martin 
Michael McTeague* 
Leslie Merrill* 
Richard Miller* 
Edward J. Nolet* 
Kevin O'Brien* 
Donald E. Peterson* 
Daniel T. Reid 
James F. Reid 
John E. Reid* 
Michael Ridlon* 
Arthur Rivard* 
John Robinson* 
Gary Ryan* 
George E. Ryan* 
Kevin M. Sheehy* 
Joseph Spinazola 
Brian Stanton* 
J. Daniel Ubele* 
Dennis Vargeletis 
Emergency Medical Technician 



Department Assistant 

Martha A. DeSaulnier 

Mechanic 

James Keeley 



45 



NO 

on 
on 



00 
ON 

C/3 

u 

H 
Z 

w 

H 

CL 

u 

Q 
w 

ss 

E 
a 

o 

00 

s 

-J 
w 
DC 



N© 

<?\ 
ON 


NO 


NO 

vo 




rf 


CO 

ON 




CO 


ON 

O 
VO^ 


ON 
ON 


o 
o 


CN 


Tf 


OO 
CN 


CN 

OO 


co 

ON 


TT 




ON 

ON 

7—1 


OO 
OO 


NO 


o 
o 


-* 


CN 

00 


CN 


O 


CN 


ON 
On 


On 


ON 


co 
o 


On 
CN 


OO 


CO 

ON 


OO 
CN 


OO 
OO 


On 
On 


co 

NO 


ON 

co 


ON 

ON 


ON 




CO 

OO 

On 


NO 


CN 

OO 


On 

On 


o 






00 


NO 

o 


OO 
CN 


NO 




O 
On 

ON 


o 

OO 


00 


ON 


OO 


NO 


CO 

NO 


CN 


OO 
NO 


ON 
00 
ON 


OO 


o 

NO 


CN 


O 


ON 


ON 


CO 

co 


CN 

NO 


00 

00 
On 


On 


co 

NO 


OO 

co 


VO 


NO 
OO 


OO 
CO 


CN 

NO 


o 
co 


00 
ON 


On 


NO 


OO 


co 


ON 


ON 








O 

D 
< 


2 

i— i 

a 

S 
a 

5 

OQ 


1 

w 
Q 

H 
D 
O 


Q 

< 

< 

D 
H 
D 


O 
< 

o 

H 

GO 
> 


U 

> 

w 

&0 


< 

< 
W 

00 

< 


< 
< 

U 

5 
w 

2 



<N 



00 



NO 

en 



oo 



oo 



On 
On 



NO 



ON 
O 
ON 



00 



00 



U 

o 



46 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information 
and review the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1 996. At the present time, the Department is made up 
of 53 permanent Officers. 



CHIEF OF POLICE 

Armand J. Caron 

LIEUTENANTS 

Steven A. Burns James F. Murphy 

Raymond G. McCusker Francis X. Roark 

SERGEANTS 

Paul E. Cooper E. Michael Rooney 

J. Ronald Gamache Scott R. Ubele 

Timothy F. O'Connor John O. Walsh 

DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTOR 
LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

INSPECTORS 

James T. Finnegan Colin C. Spence 

Jared S. Finnegan Brian F. Mullen 

CRIME PREVENTION OFFICER 

Edward F. Smith 

D.A.R.E. OFFICER 

Todd D. Ahern 

JUVENILE OFFICER 

Kenneth R. Duane 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE OFFICER 

Roland E. Linstad 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

Sgt. Francis P. Kelly 
Richard A. Adams Edward F. Quinn 

Robert J. Murphy, Jr. Paul E. Richardson 



47 



COMMUNITY RESPONSE UNIT 

Jeffrey A. Blodgett Russell H. Linstad 

John A. Roark 

K-9 OFFICER/K-9 DRUG DOG 

Daniel Ahern / Cris 

PATROL OFFICERS 

Jeffrey J. Bernier Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

Bruce A. Darwin John E. Redican 

John J. Donovan Chandler J. Robinson 

Patrick W. Daley Anthony Spinazola 

Philip R. Dube, Jr. James M. Spinney, Jr. 

Francis J. Goode, Jr. Francis P. Teehan 

Richard D. Hallion David R. Tine 

Gail F. Hunter Robert J. Trudel 

David M. Leo George A. Tyros 

David F. MacKenzie, Jr. William R. Walsh 

John C. McGeown Craig E. Walsh 

Peter C. McGeown Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

FULL-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

William G. Amundson Timothy Goode 

Gloria Armstrong Sandra M. Langley 

David DeFreitas Michael L. Taplin 

Richard Demers William Vaughn 

Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. 

PART-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Laura B. Raffaelo Wendy C. Sullivan 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT 

Mary Jane Grant 

PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Marie K. DiRocco Donna Fox 

Lynne Tessier 

SENIOR CLERK 

Margaret E. Greenhalgh 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

Permits, Fines, and Fees $92,425.39 

Lowell District Court Restitution $18,175.00 

Registry of Motor Vehicles Disbursements $195,134.00 

TOTAL 48 $305,734.39 



BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS/CRIMES 

Adult Arrests 786 

Juvenile Arrests 54 



TOTAL 840 

Whites Arrested 624 

Blacks Arrested 37 

Asians Arrested 26 

Unknown Arrests 153 

Charges Logged Against Those Arrested 1510 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Pending 638 

Continued 4 

Dismissed 108 

Default 228 

Guilty 249 

Placed on file 5 

Not Guilty 3 

Placed in ASAP 12 

Placed on Probation 2 1 

Suspended Sentence 5 

Committed to Jail 6 

Continued without Finding 229 

Committed to DYS 2 



TOTAL FINDINGS 1,510 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 25,940 

Summons Served 524 

Licenses Suspended/Revoked 1 , 1 60 

Accidents Reported 541 

Fatal Accidents 

Personal Injury Accidents 1 86 

Mileage of Cruisers 525,500 

Station Lockups 840 

Citations Issued 4,482 

Parking Violations Issued 4 1 3 

Restraining Orders Served 1 2 1 

Protective Custody 54 

False Alarms Responded by Cruisers 1 ,742 



ACHIEVEMENTS 

The Chelmsford Police Department has realized impressive 
achievements in the past 12 months and are listed as follows: 

1. Two Patrol Officers attended Basic Police Academy and were 

appointed permanent full time Officers. 

2. Chelmsford Officers attended a total of fifty-nine specialized 
training classes. 

3. The North Precinct Sub Station opened on September 21, 1996. 

4. The Chelmsford Police Department applied for and received the 

following Grants for 1996: 

a) Governor's Highway Safety Bureau Community 
Policing Grant - $14,820.00. 

b) Governor's Highway Safety Bureau Selective 
Enforcement Grant - $5,000.00. 

c) D.A.R.E. Grant - $20,000.00. 

5. Established a full time Domestic Violence Program and assigned 

one Domestic Violence Officer full time. 

6. Through the efforts of the local Anheuser-Busch distributor D.J. 

Reardon, a Billerica based beer distributor donated 
approximately $8,000.00 to start the Drug Dog Program. This 
donation included the drug dog (Cris), the cost of training K-9 
Officer Daniel Ahern to handle Cris, the costs associated with 
outfitting a vehicle, and the cost of building a kennel for the dog. 

7. The Chelmsford Police Department conducted its first Citizen 

Police Academy, which was very well received by all those 
involved. 



50 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Mission of the Chelmsford Police Department is to enchance 
the quality of life in the Town of Chelmsford by working 
cooperatively with the public and within the framework of the United 
States Constitution to enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear 
and provide for a safe environment. 

GOALS 

1. The Chelmsford Police Department's main goal is to make 

Chelmsford one of the safest communities in the 
Commonwealth by working with residents and merchants to 
identify the needs of the community. 

2. Expand the D.A.R.E. Program into the High School, thus 

reducing the drug problem and strengthening the program given 
to youngsters in the 5th grade. This, coupled with strong 
enforcement of drug laws, should bring us closer to a drug free 
community. 

3. Expand the Citizen Police Academy by conducting classes for 

interested students in the High School. 

4. One of the biggest challenges in the year to come is the police 

facility and it's addition and renovation. The first steps have 
been completed by identifying the needs and establishing a 
building committee. This committee, with the help of town 
residents, can select an architectural firm to design a building 
that will not only work well as a police facility but also fit into 
the historical character of Chelmsford. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all employees of the Police Department and all Town 
Departments for their cooperation during the past year. 



51 



I would also like to express my appreciation to all the Auxiliary 
Police for their continued dedication and support and to all the 
Members of the Police Department for the professionalism and 
dedication exhibited during the past 12 months. Without this 
support, a lot of worthwhile programs and events could not have 
taken place. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Chief Armand J. Caron 



52 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

This year the Auxiliary Police Unit completed its 40th year of 
service to the Town. The Auxiliary Police force assisted the regular 
force and town organizations at fourteen events over the last year. In 
addition to assisting at planned events, the members of the Auxiliary 
assisted at numerous motor vehicle accidents with traffic and crowd 
control. The Officers of the Auxiliary force donated a total of 9,363 
man hours to the Town. Operation property check was very successful 
keeping vandalism to a minimum. The statistics were: 

1995 1996 

Vacation House Checks 1 ,200 1 ,343 

School Property Checks 1 5,265 1 5,730 

Town Property Checks 16,750 17,010 

TOTAL 33,552 34,083 

This preventative patrol by the Auxiliary prevents malicious 
destruction to Town property and saves property owners and the Town 
thousands of dollars annually. 

Explorer Post 370 was very active during 1996 assisting the 
Auxiliary with crowd control and pedestrian crossings at Town events. 
These young men and women are a credit to our community. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary, the Scouts 
and their families for donating so much of their time. Your volunteer 
assistance continues to make Chelmsford a better place to live. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and the Town 
Manager for their support, the Police Chief, the Superior Officers and 
the Patrol Officers of the Police Department for all their assistance and 
support over the past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 



53 



AUXILIARY ROSTER 

Bernard J. Battle Melissa Martin 

Mark A. Cianci Robert M. Outwater 

Michael DiGiovani Kevin R. Proulx 

Eric Gordon Peter Ravanis 

Michael A. Houston Ralph Roscoe 

Mark Juhola John Stoessel 

Stephen Keins Matthew Thomas 

Vincent Kraft David Tyler 

David M. Leo Craig E. Walsh 

Peter D. LoPilato David W. Walsh 



54 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 
REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER FOR 1996 



Citizen Complaints 682 

Dogs Picked up and taken to pound 1 05 

Dogs returned to owners 72 

Dogs adopted after 10 days 6 

Stray dogs disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 27 

Road kills disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 153 

Violation citations issued 9 

Animal bite reports 39 

Total miles traveled 1 2,578 

Dog licensed for 1 996 3 ,0 1 1 

Value of citation fines $225 

Other funds turned into the Town $668 

The Town of Chelmsford has seen a dramatic increase in the deer 
population, resulting in a lot of these animals being struck and killed 
on our roadways. Residents should be cautious while operating their 
motor vehicle at night. If you experience one of these animals in the 
roadway at night, the deer may appear to be frozen in your headlights. 
Flash your headlights or shut them off momentarily. This will enable 
the deer to safely exit the roadway and leave the area. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Franklin Warren 
Animal Control Officer 



55 



INSPECTIONS DEPARTMENT 

Department Personnel: 

Anthony F. Zagzoug, Inspector of Buildings 

Joseph P. Shaw, Local Inspector 

Kenneth W. Kleynen, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Dennis P. Kane, Wire Inspector 

Elaine M. Casey, Principal Clerk 

There were 71 new single family dwellings, 2 assisted living 
units, and 3 new commercial building permits issued. The breakdown 
also includes commercial tenant fit-ups, additions, alterations, 
renovations, sheds, woodstoves, etc. 

A breakdown of the Inspections Department for FY96 is as 
follows: 



Type of Permit 


# of Permits 


Total Fees 


Building 


657 


$223,722.50 


Electrical 


846 


$ 31,164.00 


Plumb. & Gas 


1,593 


$ 33,281.00 


Sub Total 


3,096 


$296,167.50 



Other fees for permits issued (not included above) for signs, 
weights and measures, yard sales, and Certificates of Inspection were 
$10,287.50. 

The total fees collected for the department was $305,445.00. for 
the year. 



56 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




Front Row (1-r) Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer; Jaclyn Matzkin, 
Chairman; Kathryn M. Fisher, Secretary 

Back Row (1-r) Sara L. Warner, John W. Cutter, Vice-Chairman; 
Nancy Knight. (Missing from photo: Margaret E. Marshall) 



57 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library arcd Children's House 
25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees: 

Jaclyn Matzkin, Chair 
John Cutter, Vice-Chair 
Kathryn Fisher, Secretary 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Nancy Knight 
Margaret Marshall 
Sarah Warner 

Adams Library Renovation and Expansion Approved 

Throughout 1996, the Trustees and Library Facility Advisory 
Committee worked to develop plans to resolve the, access and space 
needs of the century old Adams Library. This work was rewarded in 
September when the State granted the library 1.8 million dollars from 
the MA Public Library Construction Program. Subsequently, Town 
Meeting Representatives and residents voted to appropriate the 
remaining 3 million dollars. The total project cost is 4.8 million. The 
expanded library will provide space for users, collections, and new 
technologies. Most importantly, for the first time in its 101 year 
history, the library will be fully accessible to all. The project will be 
completed in 1999 -just in time for the new century! 

Circulation 

During 1996, our patrons bor"owed 378,384 items including 
books, magazines, videos, audiocassettes, compact disks and museum 
passes. In conjunction with the Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium, 9,591 items were borrowed and loaned through 
interlibrary loan. The Chelmsford Library has the second highest 
circulation of the 28 libraries in the Merrimack Valley. In addition to 

58 



area nursing homes, the Circulation Department has added McFarlin 
Manor and Summer Place, to its delivery route. 

Reference Department 

In 1996, 18,627 people visited the reference department, and the 
staff assisted 12,915 patrons with their information needs. Over 1,000 
people came in to surf the Internet. 

Reference offered many new services and programs throughout 
the year. The tax assistance program distributed 32,000 tax forms and 
a tax volunteer served 51 people. Reference sponsored a Technology 
Open House and training sessions to assist patrons with the 
computerized catalog. 

Children's Library 

The Children's Library, which serves children from infancy 
through the sixth grade, circulated 141,225 items in all and answered 
4,614 reference questions. The department ran story time 3 times a 
week with attendance of 1,890 children and adults. Special programs 
were offered during school breaks. Scout troops, preschools, and 
daycares booked field trips twice-monthly. 

The summer reading program saw its most successful year with 
900 participants. The department coordinated with the school 
department in promoting this very successful program.. 

Community Services 

The Community Services Department links community groups 
and residents with the library's collections and services. To this end, 
the Department ran close to 30 programs and coordinated publicity for 
at least 20 programs run by other departments. It published the 
Organization Handbook, a book of community poetry, and numerous 
brochures and bibliographies. Community Services also coordinated 
the volunteer-run and wildly successful French and Italian 



59 



Conversation Circles and sponsored the Young Writers' Program. 
During 1996, 1,462 adults and young adults attended a library 
program. 

Community Service maintains membership on several town 
groups including the Community Service Council, Council of Schools, 
Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities. The department 
participated in the Health Fair and Activities Night and received a 
grant from the Chelmsford Cultural Council for the Music on the Law 
series which was enjoyed by 480 people during summer evenings at 
the MacKay Branch Library. 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

The MacKay Library circulated 41,847 items and continued 
weekly story times, monthly book discussions, children's school 
vacation programs, and hosted the summer's Music on the Lawn 
series. MacKay welcomed Barbara Michaud to the library staff. 
Barbara will conduct and coordinate children's activities at the 
MacKay Library. 

Volunteers 

In 1996, we had over 40 volunteers work with the Library 
logging in over 1,500 hours. With their help we were able to run the 
popular French and Italian Conversation Circles; deliver books to 
Summer Place; maintain bulletin boards, do data entry; assist with 
brochures and mailings. We even had a volunteer who did art work for 
the Library's Home Page. 

Our volunteers help keep our computers and other equipment in 
top shape, our reference magazine shelves in order, help our patrons 
with genealogy research, maintain our gardens and decorate our 
buildings with wreaths and flower arrangements. 

The Friends of the Library work and support the library 
throughout the year. The annual book sale continues to be extremely 
successful and a model for other libraries in the State. The Friends 
continued to purchase museum passes, books-on-tape, and computer 

60 



equipment. Their contributions provide funding for library programs, 
support staff, and enhance services in all departments. 

Library Trustees 

In April, the Board of Trustees said good-bye to D. Lorraine 
Lambert and Lynda Reed Warren, who collectively gave the library 18 
years of work and dedication. At the same time, the Board welcomed 
Margaret Marshall and Kathryn Fisher. 

Finally, acknowledgment and special thanks is given to all the 
Trustees, the Library Staff, the Library Facility Advisory Committee, 
the Friends of the Library and all our volunteers and patrons for 
making 1996 the most successful year ever! 

Respectfully Submitted 

Mary E. Mahoney, Library Director 

Statistical Reports 

Moneys deposited with the Town Treasurer from fines, lost 
materials, and fees: $17,101. 

Circulation: 387,975 

Added Materials: 9,355 

Library Personnel 

Mary E. Mahoney, Director 

Nanette Eichell, Assistant Director 

Linda Robinson, Head of Circulation 

Cheryl Zani, Children's Librarian 

Katherine Cryan-Hicks, Head of Community Services 

Laura Kulik, Head of Technical Services 

Rona Call, MacKay Branch Librarian 

Beth Decristofaro, Head of Reference 

John Reslow, Maintenance 



61 



Library Facility Advisory Committee 

Nancy Knight, Chair, Board of Library Trustees 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Trustee, Chair of Library Endowment Committee 

Susan Gates, Selectmen's Liason 

James Pearson, Director of Public Works 

Marian Currier, Support Services Coordinator 

Andy Sheehan, Land Use Coordinator 

Mary Mahoney, Library Director 

Nanette Eichell, Library Assistant Director 

Library Architects: A. Anthony Tappe Associates 



62 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Front Row (1-r) Angelo Taranto; Mary E. Frantz; Dr. Richard H. 
Moser, Superintendent of Schools 

Back Row (1-r) Wendy Marcks; Anthony V. Volpe; Judith B. 
Mallette; Fred Marcks, Student Representative 



63 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Chelmsford School Committee at the end of the 1996 
calendar year consisted of Mrs. Mary Frantz, Chair; Mr. Angelo 
Taranto, Vice-Chair; Mr. Tony Volpe, Secretary; Mrs. Judy Mallette, 
Member at Large; Mrs. Wendy Marcks, Member at Large; and Mr. 
Fred Marcks, Student Representative. Central administration for the 
school department included Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent of 
Schools; Dr. Karen Mazza, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum 
and Instruction; Mr. Bernie DiNatale, Director of Educational 
Technology; and Mr. Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager. 

The work of the Chelmsford School Committee during 1996 
focused primarily on the completion of the Chelmsford Citizens' 
Committee Report, restructuring of the School Department Policy 
Manual, and management of school system finances. 

The Chelmsford Citizens' Committee identified seven 
"indicators of success" designed to serve as benchmarks for school 
improvement over the next several years. The indicators of success 
include students': 

• success in continuing formal education beyond high school 

• ability to function in the work place following completion of 

their formal education 

• commitment to a well rounded education 

• positive attitudes toward school work and high risk behaviors 

• commitment to high academic performance 

• capacity with technology 

• ability to succeed in a global society 

Numerous goals have been established for each indicator of 
success. Graduation requirements are currently being reviewed and 
updated to correspond to current expectations for a quality education. 
Our high school has been restructuring an alternative "block" schedule 
to facilitate a positive learning environment. A comprehensive 
technology plan has been developed to introduce students to skills 
required by the technological society of the future. Other goals are 

64 



currently being implemented or planned for implementation following 
the establishment of a school budget for the 1997-98 school year. 

A major goal of the Chelmsford School Committee, separate 
from the goals of the Citizens' Committee, has been to revise the 
School Department Policy Manual. A consultant from the Merrimack 
Education Center has facilitated the process. Manual completion is 
expected by the beginning of the 1997-98 school year. 

The Chelmsford School Committee is considering alternatives to 
meet a "time and learning" mandate by the Department of Education 
for the 1997-98 school year, (i.e. a requirement that all high school 
students spend no less than 990 annual hours in classroom instruction). 
Current standards fall significantly short of this goal, and it is expected 
that fifteen additional teachers will be required in 1997-98 to meet 
State expectations. 

Student enrollment in the Chelmsford Public Schools continues 
to climb. Enrollment during the 1996-97 school year has been 5,551 
students, including 142 students attending the Chelmsford Public 
Charter School. The projected enrollment for 1997-98 is 5,625. The 
long range projection reflects an expected enrollment in excess of 
6,200 students by the year 2001-2002. 

The Chelmsford Public Schools continues to enjoy support from 
the Chelmsford community. Parents and community members have 
been very active on the Chelmsford Citizens' Committee and School 
Councils. Parent and community volunteers participate in many 
aspects of school life at all schools, and there is broad participation at 
all school events and activities. 

The Chelmsford School Committee continues to commit to the 

mission of our school system "to cultivate the development of 

students into self-confident, lifelong learners and responsible citizens 
who possess personal integrity and the ability to succeed in a global 
society". The Committee invites our entire community to share in the 
implementation of this important goal. 



65 



IN CONCLUSION: 

The Chelmsford School Committee wishes to extend deep 
appreciation to the following staff members for their years of loyal and 
meritorious service and who have retired this past year: 



TEACHERS 
Margarent E. Ahern 
Patricia Brazee 
Donna Haines 
Agnes Yankopoulos 



Grade 3 Teacher, McCarthy School 
Reading Teacher, Westlands School 
Grade 3 Teacher, Harrington School 
Grade 1 Teacher, Harrington School 



SECRETARY 
Theresa McCaul 



Budget Coordinator 



SUPPORT PERSONNEL 

Marion Laurin Instructional Support Personnel, 

Special Ed. Dept. CHS 
Barbara Rothwell Instructional Support Personnel, 

Science Lab, CHS 

IN MEMORIAM: 

The community and the school department were grieved by the 
deaths of Francis Nocivelli, Custodian at Chelmsford High School and 
Janice Silva, English Teacher at Chelmsford High School. They will 
long be remembered for their devotion to the citizens of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



66 



FROM THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR 
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

During 1996 The Chelmsford Public School Department has 
continued to vigorously engage in education reform initiatives to 
improve instructional programs at all school levels. Reform strategies 
have been focused on curriculum improvement, professional 
development, portfolio assessment, and school restructuring. The goal 
of these change efforts is to promote instruction that is characterized 
by high challenge, active learning, and improved capacity to respond 
to differing student needs, a perspective the district has referred to as 
the learning-centered classroom. 

The school department received several grants to support these 
reform initiatives. The competitive grants awarded to the district were 
the PALMS grant to advance active learning in math, science and 
technology; a portfolio assessment grant which the district is using to 
develop portfolio's for student evaluation in math and language arts; 
and a high school restructuring grant. Additionally, a team of 
principals was selected by the State Department of Education as an 
educational leadership team to promote better understanding of the 
curriculum frameworks and school change. Similarly, a team of nine 
teachers was selected by the State Department of Education as Teacher 
Fellows to engage in study and leadership on education reform and 
school change. 

A grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council to support a 
multi-site artist-in-residence experience to integrate the arts into the 
curriculum was another major achievement. This grant sponsored 
residencies at each of the seven schools and was made possible by 
matching funds from the Chelmsford Council of Schools, the Friends 
of Music, the school department and other donations. 

The school department sponsored many professional 
development workshops. A highlight of the professional program this 
year was the November 5 professional day focused on the theme of the 
learning centered classroom, on which multiple workshops were 
conducted by the teachers for teachers. While teachers continue to 
present workshops for their colleagues, the district also develops 

67 



consulting relationships with local universities and educational 
consultants. In conjunction with the Eliot-Pearson Child Development 
Department at Tufts University, the district has offered a three day 
institute focused on diversifying instruction to support success for 
students in the early grades. The district is also offering a course 
focusing on skillful teaching practices from the consultant 
organization, Research for Better Teaching. All of these professional 
activities will support teacher use of the new "Chelmsford Public 
Schools Principles of Effective Teaching" a document developed in 
1996 to be used as the new performance indicators for teacher 
evaluation. 

The district will continue its focus on educational reform and 
continuous improvement and recognizes the achievements of staff in 
moving forward in this direction during the 1 996 school year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Karen Mazza, Ed. D. 
Assistant Superintendent for 
Curriculum and Instruction 



68 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

The staff and students of Chelmsford High School, with the 
assitance of parents and community members, have undertaken the 
exciting task of restructuring our high school to provide curricula that 
will prepare our students for the ever changing world. Beginning with 
the Educational Reform Act of 1993, many of the "givens" of public 
education were challenged and new expectations for student learning 
were established for all levels of education. I am proud to announce 
that our high school was awarded a very competitive $7,500 High 
School Restructuring Grant from the Massachusetts Department of 
Education to help support our new intitiatives. 

One major change mandated by our Commonwealth is that each 
high school student must be involved in learning activities for 990 
hours per year beginning in September of 1997. Our School 
Management Council developed a School Improvement Plan which set 
as its major focus the development of a new schedule which would 
make better use of students; learning time. After over two years of 
researching various scheduling plans, we have developed an 
alternative schedule that allows students to undertake their learning in 
courses offered either in extended or in more traditional time blocks 
for a semester or for the full year. The resulting lengthened course 
time allows teachers to employ teaching strategies which challenge 
students to become more actively involved in their own learning. With 
the time to use varying teaching activities, our learning community 
more accurately reflects our belief that all students can learn, though 
not in the same manner, and moves us in a positive direction toward 
achieving our school system's mission of creating students who are 
contributing members of a global society. 

Our students continue to demonstrate exceptional efforts and 
achievement in classes, activities, and athletics. We have six students 
named as semifinalists in the 1997 Merit Scholarship Competition 
with an additional 16 students honored as Commended Students in the 
1 997 Merit Scholar Program. As part of a five month residence with 
professional theatre artist John Bay of the Studebaker Theatre, students 
in our World History classes are working on creating a Renaissance 

69 



Faire on the grounds of our school in April of 1997. Our student 
athletes and teams have performed competiteively in a variety of boys 
and girls sports in a manner that displays the best of sportmanship. 
Our school profile on SAT, AP, Metropolitan Achievement and the 
state MEAP tests reflect a high level of achievement further illustrated 
by the number of students achieving Dean's List, Honors or High 
Honors each term. 

Our faculty has been involved in a variety of professional 
development activities. Several members of our staff have published 
articles in professional journals. John Mosto, a member of our science 
department, along with Rebecca Nordengren and Barry Ware, 
members of our mathematics department, were awarded a grant to 
develop a new methodology for teaching calculus with graphing 
calculators. Cyrus Cominos of our guidance department and Tom 
Sousa, director of our Alternative Night School program, have been 
awarded grants to develop School to Work initiatives for our students. 
Marc Kiroack, Department head of Fine Arts, was selected to work on 
the State Frameworks for the Arts. Ralph Sherwood, in conjunction 
with Middlesex Community College, developed an Environmental 
Instrumentation Course after school for students. The most 
meaningful achievements of our professional staff, however, are the 
letters of appreciation received from graduates and the colleges where 
they are attending, recognizing them as educators who made a 
difference. 



70 



FROM THE PRINCIPALS OF THE 
CHELMSFORD MIDDLE SCHOOLS 

In their 1994 book, New Evidence for the Middle School, Paul S. 
George and Kathy Shewey offered that, "As the 21st century looms on 
the horizon, the middle school movement remains the largest and most 
comprehensive effort at organizational and curricular change in the 
history of American schooling". The faculties at the McCarthy and 
Parker Middle Schools are enthusiastically involved in this dynamic 
movement. Organizational changes have centered on the belief that 
middle school students need a supportive and enabling environment. 
This requires, in part, creating smaller educational enviornments. This 
has been accomplished by "teaming". That is, smaller learning 
communities have been constructed within each school. The use of 
common planning time among each teaching team with Team 
Facilitators has been an important aspect of the organizational changes. 

Curriculum transformation has focused on the implementation of 
the new State Curriculum Frameworks and employment of more 
curriculum integration, making the experiences in the various 
disciplines more interdisciplinary. There is strong evidence that 
moving along a continuum of curriculum implementation from that of 
a disciplined-based curriculum to one that is more interdisciplinary and 
integrated through such means as interdisciplinary projects and 
activities, helps make learning more meaningful and more coherent. 
The faculities of the middle schools are guided by an instructional 
philosophy that inculcates the organization of learning-centered 
classrooms where all students are held to high expectations and 
standards and where curriculum is based on inquiry, problem-solving, 
and the application of key issues and concepts. 

The middle schools have been very fortunate to receive 
exceptional parent and community support, particularly through the 
PTO groups and the school councils. This participation and 
involvement has truly contributed to the success and well-being of the 
middle schools. The support of the Chelmsford Police Department 
through the Drug Abuse Resistance Educational (D. A. R. E.) Program 
has been greatly appreciated. Our students continue to exemplify the 3 
R's of respect, responsibility and resourcefulness and, as a student 
body, they energetically embrace learning opportunities. 

71 



FROM THE CHELMSFORD 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 

This past school year all Chelmsford Elementary Schools were 
significantly reorganized to make room for new computer laboratories. 
Each lab facility features up to thirty new Macintosh computers and 
supporting education software. Training for students is now provided 
by a computer technology specialist assigned to each school. Students 
at the elementary level, grades one through four, currently receive 
computer training per week in the new lab. The computer lab also 
enables the teaching staff to prepare lessons and curriculum support 
materials both before and after school. The technological skills taught 
to elementary students will help them be better prepared for both 
middle and high school. The labs are welcome upgrades for each 
elementary school. 

Improvements have also occurred in all four elementary school 
libraries this year. Our school system librarian worked with a team of 
parents and each school's assistant librarian to "weed" old, outdated 
books from each library. They were replaced with hundreds of new 
books. Encyclopedias, Atlases, Dictionaries, Professional Resources, 
media and software that support our existing curriculum. In some 
schools, computer laboratories were relocated from the library to other 
rooms thus freeing up more library space for book shelves and 
research areas. The Library budgets for various elementary schools 
has been augmented by donations from individuals as well as Parent 
Teacher Organizations. 

The 1996-1997 school year saw the return of full time guidance 
counselors to each elementary school. Elementary guidance 
counselors provide counseling for students, both individually or in 
groups. The counselors also serve well as a valued resource for 
parents. Guidance counselors teach conflict resolution skills on all 
elementary grade levels as part of the Kelso's Choice Program. 
Finally, guidance counselors serve on the special education evaluation 
team at each elementary school. 

Each of the four elementary schools teach and promote conflict 
resolution skills to all students. The program adopted at each school is 

72 



called Kelso's Choice, Conflict Management for Children. The 
philosophy of this program is simple: "each child is smart enough and 
strong enough to resolve conflict". Students are taught to use various 
techniques to defuse conflictual situations and they are taught to seek 
appropriate help when necessary. The Kelso program outlines clear 
expectations for student behavior and provides consistent rules and 
discipline on a school wide basis. Students are provided with an 
important conflict resolution tool they can use both in and outside of 
school when adults are not readily available. Children are taught skills 
that empower them to determine and control their own behavior. 



73 



FROM THE OFFICE OF 
STUDENT/COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Office of Student/Community Services (now located next to 
the Main Office at Chelmsford High School, 251-5151) continues to 
be extremely busy. Student/Community Services oversees the 
Guidance Department K-12, all child care programs, Community 
Education Night School and Summer School. 

Evening Community Programs run Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings three semesters per year, offering a variety of academic and 
special interest courses. Watch for our Fall brochure in late August 
and our Winter/Spring brochure in early January. 

Child care programs are flourishing and we offer preschool for 3 
and 4 year olds, full-day kindergarten/child care; before- and after- 
school extended day, vacation and snow day programs, as well as a 
nine-week summer camp. 

Summer School continues to service the Greater Merrimack 
Valley and offers both enrichment and remedial programs to both 
students and adults during July and August. 

All programs run on a self-supporting/tuition basis. Information 
on all programs can be obtained by calling the Office of Student/ 
Community Services at 25 1 -5 1 5 1 . 



74 



FROM THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

The Chelmsford High School Class of 1996 achieved many 
honors and awards, academically, in athletics, and in their 
extracurricular activities. The community should be proud of them. 

For four years in a row, over 90% of our graduates continued on 
with higher education. Average SAT scores remain above both the 
state and national averages. 

While we are proud of our students' success, we continue to 
work with all students' academic and personal concerns. Our dropout 
rate is less than 2% and we have instituted a variety of programs at 
both the middle school and high school. Student Assistance Programs, 
Alternative Night School and clinical psychologists have become part 
of our Student Services. 

The Guidance Department, staff and administration continue to 
support the needs of all Chelmsford students. 



75 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

As required by the Education Reform Law of 1993, the school 
district has developed a district and individual school administrative 
technology plans. The administrative plan is also incorporated into the 
district's educational technology plan. In the short run, the technology 
vision will have local area networks (LANs) at each school site with an 
administrative and an academic file server. In the long run, the fiber 
optics link, which is being installed in town, should enable our LANs 
to communicate on a wider information highway called a wide area 
network (WAN). When the WAN becomes operational, citizens and 
town staff will have more access to town and school buildings, 
policies, procedures and staff members. 

Both of our old minicomputer systems (DEC Vax and PDP 1 1 ) 
will be phased out in 1997. These systems have been running almost 
24 hours per day since the install date of 1981 for the PDP 11 and 
1985 for the Vax. For many years both systems supported data base 
applications in the area of student records, accounting, personnel, 
scheduling, report cards, attendance, town/school census, 
transportation/busing, special education, inventory and other pertinent 
data bases. Although these minicomputers are out of date now, both 
systems were very reliable and became the main repository of all 
student and financial data. The investment in these minicomputers has 
been critical to the school computer automation effort because it 
provided the first tools and systems for the collection, cataloging and 
organization of all pertinent student and financial data. New network 
site-based hardware and software are being installed to maintain a 
student data base with integrated components in the attendance, report 
card and scheduling area. The present high school and middle schools 
scheduling systems are in a transition mode due to the new state 
defined "time and learning" mandates. New site based student 
software will provide better tools for analyzing student course 
requests, teacher and room utilization in a more difficult and stringent 
scheduling scenario. 

In addition, the Town Clerk's Office and the school computer 
collaboration of maintaining a voter/census data base will be coming 

76 



to a close in 1997. Since 1985, the Town Clerk Office has dedicated 
their staff to update and maintain the citizen/student data, while the 
school computer department provided the computer resources and 
programming expertise. The town/school census, men and women 
book, voter lists, precinct reports, address labels, candidates labels, 
dog reports and jury tape were all processed on the school computer. 
With the advent of the new state mandated voter data base, town voter 
information will be maintained at a central state site. 

This past school/town collaboration is an excellent example of 
mutual cooperation for the benefit of a lower cost for the taxpayers of 
Chelmsford. I applaud the past efforts and support of the Town Clerk 
and staff, the Board of Registrars, and the School Committee for 
cultivating this cooperative endeavor. The school system will continue 
to work on future collaboration with the town, especially in the area of 
financial applications. 



77 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 6-8) 

Last spring the Lanugage Arts Department instituted a summer 
reading program to encourage and reward independent reading. Each 
child was to choose one title from among four required and then to 
select another title of his/her own choosing although we did offer some 
guidance by offering some suggested titles. In the required list for 
each grade level we included classics as well as more contemporary 
titles and also made sure to include mysteries, science fiction, etc. so 
that students tastes could be satisfied. We tested youngsters on their 
required reading and assigned projects for the optional title. We were 
most pleased with the reception the program received and expect to 
develop it further in the future. 

We were most pleased and appreciative of the efforts of our 
PTO's to support our programs. Each building sponsored book fairs 
and also financially supported various assembly programs. 

One program that was run for the first first time was a visit with 
Louisa May Alcott (Jan Tournquist). Louisa spoke with our sixth 
graders about her life but more especially about her writing and the 
various techniques and procedures she went through before one of her 
works was published. While the program ran this year at McCarthy, 
we hope to include Parker in the future as we make Louisa's visit an 
annual activity for our sixth graders. 

Again we participated in the WordMaster program and did 
exceptionally well by consistently appearing in the top ten and often in 
first place. While the purpose of the program is to make students 
become more aware of words and their shades of meaning as seen in 
analogies, scoring well against other systems nation-wide certainly 
makes us all proud. 

A subcommittee of the department has been working on the 
Chelmsford Portfolio Project for Writing. We hope to have a formal 
portfolio program in place by September 1997. We will be running 
some pilot experiences during the winter and spring of 1997. 



78 



Finally, department members continue to attend workshops and 
conferences and to take courses in order to keep us up on current 
practices, to broaden our experiences, and to add sparkle to our various 
curricula. 



79 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH (GRADES 9-12) 

Continuing in what appears to be something of a tradition, 
another CHS student was honored as a recipient of the National 
Council of Teachers of English Achievement in Writing Award. Sam 
Arnold, a member of the class of 1997, was selected from more than 
3,000 students nominated as outstanding writers by high school 
English departments in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Canada, 
and American Schools. Sam's work in both prepared and impromptu 
writing won him the distinction of being one of only 13% of nominees 
who receive an award. 

All members of the class of 2000 participated in the National 
Language Arts Olympiad, a test of achievement in reading, 
vocabulary, and English usage administered to high school freshmen 
in high schools from coast to coast. Our team of ten high scorers, led 
by Deborah Bishov, Jeffrey Dubner and Mark Kolba, placed second in 
the nation, improving signficantly on last year's twelfth place finish. 



80 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FINE ARTS 

The Fine Arts Department embarked upon an ambitious 
reorganization of the middle school curriculum through the efforts of a 
committee composed of administrators, Fine Arts staff members and 
classroom teachers. The cooperative efforts of all parties involved, 
with the support of the Central Administration and School Committee, 
created an innovative curriculum and schedule in which students in the 
performing groups were no longer pulled-out of other classes, but were 
scheduled into regularly scheduled, daily band, chorus and orchestra 
rehearsals. This "Arts Block" period provided additional, creative, 
electives in the arts for the entire student population. 

In the music area of the Fine Arts Department, each of the seven 
schools performed concerts for parents, relatives and friends in May 
and in December. These concerts featured bands, choruses, recorder 
ensembles, string orchestras and short musical and dramatic 
presentations. The McCarthy Middle School Select Chorus, under the 
direction of Betty Hanson, once again received Superior ratings at the 
ACDA Choral Festival in March at Westboro High School. A new 
jazz group was started at Parker Middle School under the direction of 
Bob Thurlow. The innovative high school musical, 'The Mystery of 
Edwin Drood", in May, directed by Carl Rondina, once again drew 
"standing room only" crowds to the McCarthy Auditorium and the 
annual "Pops" Concert at the Chelmsford Elks Hall was an outstanding 
display of the culmination of the entire year's work. The high school's 
marching band, under the leadership of Fine Arts Department Head 
and CHS Band Director Marc Keroack continued its growth in size 
and quality, performing at ten football games, as well as the annual 
Memorial Day parades in Chelmsford and Tewksbury, and the Fourth 
of July parade in Chelmsford. The culmination of the Marching 
Band's year was a one-week trip to London, England to perform in the 
annual, invitation-only, New Year's Day Parade on January 1, 1997. 
In addition, the band performed in Chelmsford, England at a concert 
attended by the Lord Mayoress, Edna Mountain and several other city 
officials. The band also toured London, Windsor, Oxford and 
Stratford-On-Avon. 



81 



On the visual arts side of the department the annual "Youth Art 
Month" exhibition at the Page Gallery in the Administration Wing of 
Chelmsford High School had student art work from grades one 
through twelve on display for the entire month of March and the 
monthly exhibitions in the gallery continued as well. Art students 
continued to be accepted to the most prestigious art schools in the 
country. 

Additionally, numerous individual arts students were honored 
through selection for various prestigious performing groups or 
exhibitions. Several visual arts students were chosen for the Boston 
Globe Scholastic Art Show and for Art All-State which is sponsored 
by the Massachusetts Art Educators Association. As in the past, many 
music students were selected through rigorous audition processes for 
the All-State, Senior and Junior District Festivals sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Music Educators Association. That so many students 
from Chelmsford are regularly among those selected for these 
prestigious awards and events speaks highly of the strength of the arts 
education programs in our schools. Through the Arts, students learn 
self-discipline and cooperation, two skills that will transfer to whatever 
vocation they choose to follow after completing their formal 
education. 



82 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(GRADES 7-12) 

A committee of ten foreign language teachers from the middle 
schools and the high school met from January through May to begin 
the process of reviewing the foreign language curriculum. The first 
task for the committee was to discuss the State Framework and review 
our current curriculum in light of the recommendations made in the 
Framework. The Framework is predicated on a language program 
which begins in kindergarten and extends through grade 12, so our 
curriculum does not match up exactly with the expectations outlined in 
this document, but the committee was able to determine that we are 
already working to develop student proficiency in most of the 
standards adopted by the State. Our curriculum will need to be 
revised, but we will wait until a decision is made whether or not to 
expand our program to the lower grades. It is the recommendation of 
the department that we consider beginning foreign language in the fifth 
grade, and this is a possible consideration for the year 1998-99, or 
thereafter, depending on financial constraints and the implementation 
of the state assessment exam. 

In addition to reviewing the State Framework, the committee 
also discussed the feasibility of adding another foreign language at the 
high school, since Italian has been dropped. There is interest in 
offering one of the less-commonly taught languages, such as Japanese; 
and we are considering a variety of ways to approach this direction. 
This is a topic for continued discussion. 

The importance of technology was the third major topic 
considered by the Curriculum Review Committee. We continue to 
work toward the installation of a multi-media language laboratory at 
the high school and the integration of the computer into the curriculum 
at all schools. A workshop held during the summer to preview a 
variety of computer software and CD ROM programs was a step in 
achieving this goal. 



83 



FROM THE CURRICULUM SPECIALIST 
FOR MATHEMATICS (GRADES K-8) 

The nature of Mathematics is one of diversification in curriculum 
and aptitude. It is the mission of the Math Department to assist each 
student in achieving his/her individual potential. We have 
incorporated the use of hands-on math manipulatives and alternative 
assessments in the classroom in all grade levels. Students have been 
introduced to open ended and open response questions. Many students 
are keeping Math Portfolios. Chelmsford is participating in The 
Massachusetts Mathematics Portfolio Project , a state pilot which 
focuses on raising standards for all students and Mathematics 
Portfolios. Many of our student's portfolio pieces are being used as 
models by a national project. The New Standards Project (Dept. of 
Education and the Economy) as exemplar work. Rachel 
Fichtenbaum's complete portfolio was chosen as an exemplar portfolio 
and is being shown throughout the country. Two pieces of work, 
Rachel's logic puzzle and Chiragg Bain's Locker Lunacy were 
published in the New Standards Performance Standards documents. 

The University of Chicago Mathematics Project, Everyday 
Mathematics, has been fully implemented in grades K-3. Grades 4, 5, 
and 6 have implemented a new Houghton Mifflin mathematics 
program which addresses the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics Standards. 

Our teachers, in addition to teaching regular classes, are actively 
continuing their education in the areas of mainstreaming, updating 
curriculum, and researching new programs through the successful 
In-Service Workshop programs. Many teachers are attending portfolio 
training and workshops using the Geometer's Sketchpad software. 
Teachers also attend various conferences including the National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Conference, and 
conferences using math manipulatives, cooperative learning, 
heterogeneous grouping, integration, and alternative assessment. 

With the emphasis on problem solving, we have successfully 
introduced several math competition programs at the Middle School 
level to challenge all students. Approximately 1 ,600 students compete 

84 



in the Continental Math League and New England Math League 
Contests. The success of our program is evident in the 

accomplishments of several students who achieved perfect scores and 
received recognition for their participation in Continental Math League 
and New England Math League. Our Math Counts team (a national 
competitor) qualified for the state competition. 

Our results in National testing reinforces our belief that our goals 
are achievable and that our methods are productive. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Donna L. Foley 



85 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
MATHEMATICS (GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department was 
awarded a $15,000 CESAME Grant in May of 1996. The competitive 
grant, renewable for up to four years, was co-authored by Dr. Karen 
Mazza, John Mosto, John Ramalho, Rebecca Nordengren and Barry 
Ware. The purpose of this grant, entitled "Contemporary Pre-Calculus 
through Applications" is to integrate technology and science into the 
pre-calculus program at Chelmsford High School. The four teachers 
involved in the project completed a four-day training session at 
Northeastern University in June of 1996. This workshop prepared the 
teachers to implement the curriculum changes and the teaching 
techniques recommended not only by this project, but also by 
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and National Council of 
Mathematics Standards. This grant has also provided revenue which 
assisted in the purchase of new textbooks designed specifically for this 
program, 70 Ti-83 graphing calculators (6 with overhead capabilities) 
for use in classroom instruction, 12 C.B.L. units used in conjunction 
with investigative experiments and data analyses and various pieces of 
software and other supportive materials. We are looking toward 
implementing these techniques and capabilities into all other areas of 
our curriculum. 

Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department is in the 
process of preparing ourselves for the exciting challenges dictated by 
the recommendations of Educational Reform and Alternative 
Scheduling. Five subcommittees have been established to investigate 
our current curriculum offerings and recommend changes, revisions or 
new courses to meet the needs of our students. Also, all members of 
our department have attended various workshops including Geometric 
Sketchpad, C ++ Programming, the use of the Ti-83 calculator in the 
classroom, Portfolio and Alternative Assessment, Learning Centered 
Classroom, Skillful Teacher, Cooperative Learning and Alternative 
Scheduling. 

All of our extracurricular teams (Computer League, Mathematics 
League and Calculus League) continue to excel and achieve. Coaches 
Richard Olsen and Joseph Ford are to be commended for their efforts. 



86 



FROM THE READING DEPARTMENT HEAD K-12 
LANGUAGE ARTS COORDINATOR K-5 

Chelmsford Public Schools Reading Department believes that 
exemplary reading instruction provides the students with three keys to 
successful learning: knowledge, strategies and motivation. We have 
come to know that a fully integrated approach to reading, one which 
includes all the language arts - reading, writing, listening, speaking, 
spelling - allows the student to make the connections necessary for 
strong comprehension. The goal of the Reading Department is joyful 
literacy for all. 

The school year 1995-96 was a busy year for the Reading 
Department. Beginning in the fall of 1995 through 1996 the reading 
specialists and Title 1 specialists were involved in workshops, staff 
development seminars and curriculum development activities 
revolving around clinical and performance assessment. Additionally, 
the elementary schools participated in a variety of motivational 
outside-school-reading-programs such as "Parents as Reading 
Partners" or "Book-It". Middle and high school students were 
immersed in reading and responding to the literature. The reading 
specialists were able to attend a number of events outside the school 
such as the annual conference sponsored by the Massachusetts 
Reading Association where they had the opportunity to listen to and 
meet the authors of the literature that their children are experiencing as 
well as the professionals who were reporting on the current 
developments in literacy research. Classroom teachers and specialists 
have had the opportunity to visit other classes and other communities. 

A nationally acclaimed consultant in reading/language arts Dr. 
Jeanne Paratore, continued to work the staff in Chelmsford around 
issues and beliefs of good literacy instruction and assessment. Dr. 
William Harp was also a guest speaker. 

We are proud to be able to offer supportive reading services and 
assessment to all of our students from the elementary grades through 
the high school. We know that the characteristics of a good reader 
include an awareness of the factors that allow the construction of 
meaning, control of the strategies necessary for accessing text, and self 

87 



assessment in the process toward the reading goal. We know that 
children learn to read by reading. They improve their reading skills by 
reading more and more. Students who are targeted for assistance 
receive support in both their classroom reading text and on a computer 
driven literacy program. Our program is primarily, but not totally, a 
pull-out model, determined by student needs and time constraints. 
Responding to what research says constitutes best educational 
practices in reading, good literature is at the heart of the program with 
interactive capabilities of CD-ROM. Books are sent home as part of 
the daily routine as home-school connections are vital. Realizing that 
early intervention is the most effective way to prevent problems, it is at 
the early grades that the students are targeted. 

Depending on the school, grade level and needs of the students, 
the reading teacher or specialist can be involved in 'in-class' support, 
'pull-out' programs, literacy or book discussion groups, tutorials, 
testing, special projects, consulting with classroom teachers and the 
SPED team and conducting in-service meetings with their schools. 

Unfortunately Chelmsford did not qualify for a Title I grant for 
the school year of 1996-1997 as the entitlement is based on poverty 
level. It remains a challenge to provide services to all those who could 
benefit. 



88 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
SCIENCE (GRADES 5-8) 

The major goal of the middle school science program is to use 
hands-on curricula to teach the students how to think critically. In 
order to do this, each curriculum is designed to develop organizational, 
listening, note-taking, experimental, logical thinking and problem 
solving skills. The science program consists of General Science in 
grade five using the Smithsonian Science and Technology for Children 
Kits on Electric Circuits and Ecosystems and a unit on Oceanography. 
The sixth grade General Science curriculum uses the Macmillian 
Science In Your World science kit and text program. Both Life 
Science, in grade seven, and Earth Science, in grade eight, use the D.C. 
Heath programs which involve activities written by our science staff 
and D.C. Heath. 

Outside resources are used to enrich the science curriculum. 
Trips are taken to various science sites such as Framingham State's 
Christa McAuliffe Space Center, Tsongas Center for the "River As A 
Classroom", Museum of Science, Plum Island, Owascoag Trail, the 
Whaling Museum, and the Stone Environment Camp Program at 
Cranes Beach. The science clubs are involved in the Merrimack Water 
Testing Program through the University of Massachusetts, Lowell and 
an environmental project in the McCarthy courtyard. The PTO has 
organized assemblies from many different scientific resources on such 
topics as the rain forest, electricity and chemistry. Community input 
has come from Hewlett-Packard who has provided some funding for 
the installation of the WBZ Weathernet Computer Internet Equipment 
and for Science Screen Report videos. 

Science teachers have been implementing the new state Science 
and Technology Curriculum Frameworks. To support the new state 
guidelines, Merrimack Education Center training is being provided to 
middle school science teachers in the PALMS, GEMS and Science 
and Technology Kit programs. In addition, science teachers are 
participating in conferences/workshops, courses and in service 
programs on such topics as cooperative learning, inclusion, national 
and state standards, assessment and new science curriculum incentives. 



89 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
SCIENCE (GRADES 9-12) 

Another year has gone by and I am proud to say that the Science 
Department is better prepared to begin teaching in a large block 
schedule that it was this time last year. Every science department staff 
member participated in at least one curriculum workshop this past 
summer. The purpose of these workshops was to redesign the science 
curricula in anticipation of the changes in the school day at CHS. This 
process will continue throughout this school year and will terminate at 
the end of next summer. When September arrives, every science 
course will have been redesigned for the large block schedule. 

Most of the science staff have also participated in off campus 
workshops and conferences that addressed the need for the teacher to 
adapt their teaching styles to be more effective in the longer class 
period. As a result most of our classrooms are not the same as they 
were last year. As we are exposed to new techniques and strategies of 
teaching we immediately try them out in, or is it on, our classes. The 
results are gratifying. We envision the first semester to be a 
tremendous amount of work, but we look forward to having a very 
successful initiation into teaching in a vastly more flexible school day. 
These old science dogs are looking forward to learning a few new 
tricks. 

The science curriculum committee for grades 6 through 12 is still 
an active group. We instituted a second curriculum strand, energy, 
throughout the middle and high school classes. A series of laboratory 
exercises, study guides and activity sheets were created to tie all the 
sciences together with this common thread. The first strand, the 
environment, was instituted last year. Our next strand has not yet been 
determined. 

A long time member of the science department, Andy Sorenson, 
has moved on to become a member of the educational technology 
support staff for the school district. We will miss Andy's daily 
contributions to the department; we depended on Andy's expertise as 
a teacher and computer whiz kid. We also welcome Mrs. Katie 



90 



Burhnam to the department. She teaches two sections of physical 
science. 

We will also miss Mrs. Barbara Rothwell who has retired after 
working with the department for almost two decades as our laboratory 
aide. We wish the best for her and her husband during their 
retirements. Mrs. Claire Urban has been hired to replace Mrs. 
Rothwell. She is quickly becoming as valued as her predecessor. 

In closing I would again like to thank you for your continued 
support and look forward to seeing you at the various open houses. 

Submitted By: 

Michael F. Tate 

Science Department Chairperson 



91 



FROM THE SOCIAL STUDIES 
DEPARTMENT (GRADES 5-8) 

The Social Studies Department was very active for the 1995- 
1996 school year. All students became involved with "Election 96". 
The background, history and process of how officials are elected in the 
United States were studied, researched and reported on by our 
students. Students took part in their own mock election as they had to 
register to vote, were classified by homeroom precincts, received the 
same ballots as their parents, were given election pencils, voted and 
placed their choices in an actual ballot box donated by Mr. Simorellis 
by the Town Clerk. 

Our National Geography Bee was a success. Eighth grade 
classes at McCarthy were visted by Louisa May Alcott who spoke to 
the students about nursing during the Civil War. Students in both 
schools participated in interdisciplinary activities that were on view 
during our first ever Activities Fair which was held in March. 

The Social Studies Frameworks Committee continued to meet 
frequently during the year to research, discuss and offer suggestions 
for change. Teachers from grades 5-8 attended a summer workshop in 
order to evaluate the research and consider the changes that will 
probably take place in the fall of 1997. These changes have been 
mandated by the state. 

Teachers in grades 5-8 attended a conference in Hartford, CT and 
most attended the Massachusetts council for the Social Studies 
Conference in Boston. Teachers continue to attend conferences, 
workshops and seminars in order to keep updated and look for more 
effective ways to help their students learn. 



92 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
SOCIAL SCIENCES (GRADES 9-12) 

The Social Studies Department at the High School presently 
consists of fifteen members who offer a broad selection of courses. 
Students may choose from Political Science, World History, United 
States History, American Studies, Asian Studies, Legal Rights, 
Consumer Electronics, International Relations, Psychology, Sociology, 
the Holocaust, and Modern Problems. Also offered are advanced 
placement courses in American History, European History, and 
American Government. 

This year the department is continuing work to implement 
educational reform. All members of the department have participated 
in professional development workshops and courses that include the 
following topics: learning styles, cooperative learning, alternative 
assessment techniques, the Social Studies Frameworks, integration of 
technology in Social Studies classes, instructional techniques for long 
block classes, and Learning Centered Classrooms, Donald Benson, 
Denise Coffey, Robert Lemire, and Richard O'Donnell continue 
working on the Social Studies Review Committee. They have 
completed a review and revision of the Chelmsford Social Studies 
Curriculum, but they cannot complete a final revision until the 
Massachusetts Board of Education approves the Social Studies 
Frameworks. 

Donald Benson advised a group of 10 students who successfully 
participated at Model United Nations simulations at Bentley College 
and Harvard University. Denise Coffey advised a group of twenty-five 
students who compiled a 3-1 record in Mock trial Competitions. 
Dennis McHugh and Brian Sullivan continued to serve as Lawyer 
Coaches. 

Thanks to a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, 
Chelmsford High School students in four 10th grade World History 
classes have been involved in a journey back to Renaissance times. As 
part of a five month residency with professional theatre artist John Bay 
of Studebaker Theatre, students, teachers, parents, and other members 
of the local community will recreate a Renaissance Faire on the 
grounds of the high school, to be held on April Fool's Day, 1997. 

93 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(K-12) 

During the past year the Health and Physical Education 
Department has focused on prevention and wellness. At the 
elementary level, students' conflict resolution skills were reinforced 
through an educational pupped show called "The Peaceable 
Kingdom". Further programs will take place this year. 

Peer mediation training continued in the middle schools as well 
as programs on tobacco use prevention which were coordinated with 
the local Tobacco Control Office for the "Great American Smokeout" 
and "World No Tobacco Day". Bob Bigelow, a former NBA player, 
spoke to students on the dangers of smokeless tobacco. "Ben's 
Grille", an interactive computer program, educated students about the 
influence of alcohol and drugs on wise decision making. A production 
called "This Is Your Life" provided students with information on 
nutrition and making healthy choices. A spinal cord injury prevention 
program is being planned. 

At the high school level, students produced a series of public 
service announcements on tobacoo use prevention which were aired on 
Cable 41. As part of a World AIDS Day program, students viewed 
panels from the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. Programs 
emphasizing drug/alcohol prevention education included speaker Bob 
Wiggins from NARCONON and Trinity Trauma (a mock drunk 
driving accident simulation). Plans are currently being made for staff 
development workshops presented by NARCONON and a student 
presentation of "The Yellow Dress" which addresses the issue of 
dating violence. 

A system wide emphasis has been to provide a variety of 
parenting resources for families including a collaborative effort of the 
schools and the public library in the purchase and distribution of 
parenting books and videos; to air parenting programs on cable; and to 
collaborate with the high school and public libraries in increasing teen 
health information in both libraries. 



94 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned 
find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no 

longer exists. " -Mass Ed On-Line Volume I-Eric Hoffer 

The strength and success of the Agricultural Age was on the 
backs of the work force. The strength and success of the Industrial 
Age was in the hands of the work force. The strength and success of 
the Information/Knowledge Age will be in the minds of the work 
force. 

Unlike previous Socio/Technical Ages, the Information/ 
Knowledge Age is based on global perspective where constant change 
is a fundamental fact of life. In such a changing environment, life long 
learning is a survival skill. We all, now and especially in the future, 
will need to: 

• learn more about everything and anything 

• learn everything better in terms of quality, relevance and value 

• learn information faster with less waste of precious time 

• develop products, services and methods for learning whose 
cost, in terms of resources both financial and human, is 
continuously declining because of increased productivity. 

Student Achievement is the primary focus of the application of 
technology in the Chelmsford Public Schools. 

The intiatives in the area of educational technology continue to 
move forward in support of our teachers and students. The following 
is a summary of some of the completed and/or ongoing projects: 

• Implemented formal instruction of computing technology to all 
students in grades 1-4 with the installation of four new 30 station 
computer labs in the elementary schools. The elementary technology 
team provides instruction to students and staff as well as support for 
the curriculum and instructional process. 



95 



• NetDay 96 resulted in the ability to provide Internet ISDN access to 
the High School, McCarthy and Parker Middle Schools. A thank you 
goes to the 102 volunteers and 12 NetDay Partner companies. As a 
result of NetDay 96 Partnership grants, we have received the 
following: 

Internet Web Server - Sun Micro Systems 

Curriculum Alpha Server - Digital Equipment 

Communication Routers - Cisco Systems of Chelmsford 

Internet Access - Chelmsford On-Line 

Network wiring, testing, and support - Insinc of Chelmsford 

• NetDay 97 (April 97) resulted in the ability to provide Internet ISDN 
access to the four elementary school computer labs and libraries. 

• The networking of our schools continues with the support of FY97 
capital planning funds. The assistance received on Mass NetDay has 
accelerated the installation process. The network will bring voice, 
video and data to all instructional locations and is designed to connect 
to the Municipal Institutional Network being built as a result of the 
renewal of the Cable Contract. 

• The typing labs at the high school are now history thanks to FY97 
capital planning funds. Each of the two labs are equipped with 32 
multimedia computer workstations, connected to the academic 
network with Internet access. In addition to the word processing 
program, the labs support other business applications, the Computer 
Aided Design (CAD) technical/architectural drawing curriculum and 
the foreign language curriculum. 

• The library automation program is completed at the high school and 
is now directed toward the Middle Schools. Our school libraries 
continue to be updated and wired to make available both print and non 
-print materials in support of our curriculum and instructional process. 

• The instructional technology staff is providing regularly scheduled 
professional development opportunities to our teachers. 



96 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
FOR ATHLETICS (GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department during the 
1995-96 school year fielded 33 Varsity programs, 24 sub- Varsity 
programs and 3 seasonal Trainer programs. An overall record from 
378 Varsity contests was 219-139-20 with 1,069 athletes, 8 team 
managers, and 6 student traines competing. 

The Varsity Field Hockey, Girls' Swimming & Diving, Girls' 
Volleyball, Boys' Ski, Boys' Swimming & Diving, Girls' Indoor 
Track, and the Wrestling Teams were all Merrimack Valley 
Conference Champions. 



97 



FROM THE FACILITATOR FOR 
PRACTICAL ARTS (GRADES 9-12) 

The Practical Arts Department at CHS consists of three unique 
areas: Business Education, Technology Education, and Family 
Consumer Education. 

In the area of Business Education a number of exciting events 
took place this past year. 

The Business Education Department opened two new Computer 
Labs for teaching Keyboarding, Word Processing, Marketing as well 
as other new business courses in Financial Planning in the 21st 
century, Hospitality and Tourism and Office Simulation. 

In addition, the Distribution Education Club of America at CHS 
distinguished itself at District competitions by monopolizing District 
Five by winning nine of the 14 marketing categories. At the State 
Competition eight students from CHS qualified for National 
Competitions by finishing in the top three in their categories. At 
National Competition one CHS student finished in the top 10 in the 
nation. 

In the Industrial Technology Program several new courses will 
be offered for next school year including Power-Transportation 
Technology, Construction Technology, and a Home Maintenance - 
Home Improvement Course. 

In the Family and Consumer Technology Department several 
new courses will also be offered for next school year including Sports 
Nutrition, Food and Fitness, and On Your Own. 



98 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts Special Education Law, Chapter 766, and the 
Federal Government's Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
(IDEA), Chapter 94-142, were enacted to assure that all handicapped 
children have a free and appropriate public education (FAPE). 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is responsible 
for providing effective programs and services for children, ages three 
(3) through twenty-two (22), who are found to have special needs 
through the TEAM Evaluation process. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each handicapped 
student receives an education designed to meet his or her unique 
learning needs and to receive the services in the least restrictive 
environment. 

As of December 1, 1996, the Special Education Department had 
837 students registered to receive special education services, which 
represents 15.6 percent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of 48 professional and 48 support special education 
personnel develop and implement the individual educational plans for 
these students. For those students with severe learning and/or 
emotional needs, Chelmsford provides for placement in private day or 
residential schools as approved by the State Department of Education. 

The department continues to expand and restructure its services 
in order to meet the diversified needs of the students. This year, we 
have focused on our preschool program and have expanded classes as 
well as services in the areas of speech/language and social services. 
Also, we brought in consultants in the areas of PDD (Pervasive 
Development Disorder) and Augmentative Communication to work 
with staff. 

We have expanded our middle school language-based program 
and have a consultant from New England Medical Center working 
with us on this project. 

99 



The high school staff is working on restructuring services in 
order to compliment the New Large Block Scheduling format at 
Chelmsford High for the 1997-1998 school year. 

We continue to support, both in philosophy and staffing patterns, 
the inclusionary model for the district while maintaining students' 
needs, which are determined on an individual basis. 

The staff has been meeting on a quarterly basis to review 
evaluation procedures and test batteries in order for us to become more 
consistent in our evaluation and service delivery. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department has a budget of 
$4,667,098, of which $315,710 is provided through grants by the 
federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue its quest to 
provide effective and cost efficient programs and services for the 
children we serve. 



100 



NASHOBA VALLEY 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The NVTHS district serves the towns of Chelmsford, Groton, 
Littleton, Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend, and Westford. 

District School Committee 



Stratos Dukakis 




Chelmsford 


Charla Boles 




Groton 


Irene Machemer 




Townsend 


Doug Morin, Chairman 


Westford 


Mary Jo Griffin 




Chelmsford 


Sharon Shanahan 




Chelmsford 


Hajo Keoster 




Westford 


Augustine Kish, Vice-Chairman 


Littleton 


Joan O'Brien, Secretary 


Westford 


Garry Ricard 




Pepperell 


Benjamin Wales 




Pepperell 


Richard White 


Alternates 


Shirley 


Samuel Poulten 




Chelmsford 


Leo Dunn 




Westford 


James Nugent 




Littleton 


Al Buckley 




Pepperell 


Heidi Schultz 




Shirley 


Barbara Sherritt 


School Council 


Townsend 


Elizabeth Cain 




Parent 


Shirley Dupont 




Parent 


Joseph Goldstein 




Teacher 


William Lekas 




Teacher 


Victor Kiloski 




Administration 


Len Olenchak 




Business 


Patrick Miele 




Teacher 


Sharon Shanahan 




Parent 


Jeanette Reed 




Parent 



101 



Daniel Toombs Community 

Katherine Hafner Student 

Barbara Whitney Teacher 

Administration 

Judith L. Klimkiewicz Superintendent-Director 

Victor Kiloski Assistant Director/Principal (interim) 

Thomas Ryan Vocational-Technical Coord, (interim) 

Robert O'Meara Learning Support Services Coordinator 

Ralph Dumas Accounting Manager 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of Nashoba Valley Technical High School is to 
provide the highest quality academic and technical education possible 
to our students for their future success in a technical world. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School was founded in 1965 by 
the towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, and Westford to provide 
an opportunity for vocational education for the students of this area. 
The school opened in 1969 with nine vocational areas (shops) and an 
enrollment of 255 students. By 1979, the Nashoba District expanded 
to incorporate the three additional towns of Shirley, Pepperell, and 
Townsend. Having outgrown the original facility, Nashoba expanded 
as well, and opened in 1980 with an enrollment of 771 students. 



The Nashoba Valley Technical Hi 


gh School enrollment, as of 


October 1, 1996, is as follows: 




Chelmsford 


119 


Groton 


49 


Littleton 


14 


Pepperell 


128 


Shirley 


45 


Townsend 


80 


Westford 


70 


Tuitioned 


34 


School Choice 


59 


TOTAL 


588 



102 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. and provides its 
students with on-the-job training, high level technical skills, a high 
school diploma, a technical certificate, an opportunity for further 
education, and job placement. 

Each year, qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our 
Work Based Training Program which allows senior students to work in 
industry or business and receive valuable training in their chosen fields 
as well as wages. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School: 

Technical Programs 
Automotive Body Repair Graphic Arts/Design 

Automotive Technology Horticulture/Landscape Design 

House Bldg/Cabinet Making Machine Tool Technology 

Hotel/Rest. Mgmt/Culinary Arts Medical Occupations 

Office Tech./Telecommunications Metal Fabrication & Welding 
Computer Aided Drafting Design Interior Decorating/Design 

Electrical Technology Plumb & Heat/* Ventilation 

Electronics/Robotics Cooling & Refrigeration 

*To be introduced in 1997/98 

Freshmen explore all fifteen vocational areas before making a 
final vocational selection midway through their first year. This 
exploratory program enables students to make realistic choices, 
reflecting their needs, interests, and abilities. Students who remain in 
their selected shops for their remaining three years at Nashoba Tech 
and complete required core competencies receive a technical certificate 
in addition to their high school diploma. 



103 



Instruction time is divided between the vocational and the 
academic areas. The academic areas consist of the following: 

Academic Programs 



MATHEMATICS 

Algebra I & II 
Applied Math I & II 
Plane Geometry 
Calculus 
Business Math 
Trigonometry 
Statistics 



ENGLISH 

Composition I,II,III,IV 
Literature IJIJIIJV 
College Prep English 
Tech/Creative Writing 

WORLD LANGUAGES 

Spanish 1A& IB 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

Civics 
Geography 
U.S. History, I, II 
Entrepreneurship 

COMPUTER APPS 

Keyboard Skills 
Computer Basics 
Computers Apps and 
Programming I,II,III 



SCIENCE 

Biology 

Applied Bio/Chem. 1,11 

Princ. of Technology I, II 

Chemistry 

Environmental Science 

Physical Science 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



SCHOOL TO WORK TRANSITION 

Supportive services are provided for those students entering 
Nashoba Tech with special needs. Remediation is also available for 
those who require learning on a more individual basis. 



104 



To qualify for a diploma from Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School all students must complete: 



Four Years of 

English Composition 
English Literature 
Mathematics 
Physical Education 
Health Vocational 
Vocational Program 



Three Years of 

Social Studies 
Science 

Four Years Elective 

Computer Applications OR 
World Languages 



College/Tech Prep 



College/Tech Prep Programs prepare students with the necessary 
academic and advanced technical skills to successfully advance in a 
globally competitive workplace. With 80% of the jobs of the next 
decade demanding an advanced degree beyond high school, College/ 
Tech Prep provides a defined educational pathway that links secondary 
and post-secondary studies. College/Tech Prep Programs integrate 
academic and "real life learning" which according to educational 
research is the means by which the majority of students learn. 

Athletics 

Athletics, as part of the overall high school program, includes the 
following: 



Baseball 
Cross Country 
Golf 
Softball 
Weight Training 



Basketball 
Volleyball 
Ice Hockey 
Track & Field 



Cheerleading 
Football 
Soccer 
Wrestling 



Varsity, junior varsity, and some freshmen teams are available 
for students participation. There are NO USER FEES required for 
any sport, thus insuring that cost does not exclude any student. 
Nashoba also has a no cut policy giving more students the opportunity 
to participate. 



105 



Nashoba provides an array of extra curricular activities in 
addition to our athletic program: 

Class Activities Open House 

Dances Senior Trip 

Field Trips Senior Banquet 

Music Club Yearbook 

Math Club Student Council 

Epicurean Club Drama Club 

Homecoming StudentAgainstDrunk Driving (SADD) 

Junior/Senior Prom Student Mentor Program 

National Honor Society Student of the Month Recognition 

National Voc. Honor Society State Outstanding Student Program 

World Language/Cultural Club Internet Club 

Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VIC A) 

Community/Continuing Education 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Community/ 
Continuing Education Program is open to anyone of high school age or 
over during the school year. A variety of evening classes in technical, 
academic, and special interest courses are offered. This year 
approximately 1,500 students will have enrolled in our Adult 
Education Programs. During the off school periods, enrichment 
programs for young students will be offered. 

Originally founded as a vocational education facility, Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School continues to provide the residents of the 
district an opportunity for technical training and educational 
advancement. 

Philosophy 

The philosophy of Nashoba Valley Technical High School is to 
provide an educational facility for residents of the district, where they 
will receive occupational training, academic education and cultural 
enrichment which will assist them in developing their potential and 
contribute to their becoming productive members of society. 



106 



Our basic objective is to provide an education for all students 
with skills suitable for employment and further education. It is the aim 
of the school that students become self-reliant, responsible citizens, 
having pride in their technical areas, showing concern for others and 
an awareness of the world in which they live. 

The school provides the students with academic skills necessary 
for success in pursuing continuing and higher education. Students are 
encouraged to enroll in courses necessary for success in higher 
education. 

Our philosophy provides educational opportunities for area 
adults seeking to change their careers, to upgrade skills in their current 
field, and/or to pursue higher education or recreational activities. 

Nashoba Tech provides for the individual concerns, abilities, and 
capabilities of all students by using various instructional methods, 
material, and programs. 

Administration, staff, district residents, advisory committees, and 
students are involved both formally and informally in identifying the 
challenges and changes within the industrial technology field. 



107 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members: 

Ronald Pare', Chairman 

Harold Organ, Jr., Vice-Chairman 

Eileen M. Duffy 

Gustave Fallgren 

Karen Wharton 

Leonard Richards, Alternate 

John Coppinger, Alternate 

Philip Eliopolous, Alternate 

The Board of Appeals in 1996 saw an increase in the number of 
applications compared to previous years. The Board had 46 petitions 
for Variances and 37 petitions for Special Permits. The statistics are as 
follows: 





Total 


Granted 


Denied 


Withdrawn 


Variance 


46 


34 


19 


2 


Special Permit 


37 


33 


3 


1 


Comprehensive Permit 


1 


1 








Section 8 Appeals* 


3 


1 


2 





Requested Extensions 


2 


2 








TOTAL 


89 


71 


15 


3 



*One Section 8 appeal was remanded back to the Board for 
reconsideration. 

The Board wishes to express its gratitude to the Board of Health, 
Sign Advisory Committee, Conservation Commission, Planning Board 
and Board of Selectmen for their assistance and cooperation. 



108 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
James K. Gifford 
Robert Kelley 
David Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 

The Committee was active coordinating the 1996 Annual 4th of 
July Celebration. Many thanks to Chelmsford Lodge of Elks No. 
2310, for funding and organizing the annual parade, Chelmsford Art 
Society for the Art's Festival Fair, Chelmsford Community Band, and 
many other Town Volunteer Groups. Special thanks for the efforts 
and assistance received from Department heads and their personnel of 
Police, Fire, Highway, Parks and Public Works, Town Manager and 
the Board of Selectmen. 

Thanks for many volunteer hours by members of the Chelmsford 
Auxiliary Police and the Explorers Troop. 

The Committee now is in the process of planning for the 30th 
Annual Celebration for 1997. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 



109 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

In 1996, Chairman, Suzanne Donahue continued to lead the 
Chelmsford Commission on Disabilities. She was joined by 
commission members Matt Caiazza, Cathy Favreau, Ralph Hickey, 
Len Olenchak and Mary St. Hilaire. It was with great regret that she 
accepted the resignation of founding member and former Chairman, 
Paul Logan. In his ten years on the Commission Paul's efforts helped 
to make the Commission one of the most active and most respected 
disability Commissions in the State. The Commission wishes Paul the 
best in his future endeavors. Jack Clancy and Jan Nahabedian became 
new Commission members in 1996. Their enthusiasm and expertise 
are welcomed additions to the Commission. 

During 1996 the Commission was instrumental in matching 
persons who need ramps with persons who were willing to provide the 
funding and labor to build a ramp. The Commission combined with 
the Fire Department and Knights of Columbus to build ramps for two 
Chelmsford households. A special thanks to commission member Len 
Olenchak and his son for donating their labor while the Fire 
Department provided funds. The Commission would like to continue 
helping disabled residents. In order to raise the funds necessary for 
such projects the Commission is starting a group called the Friends of 
the Disabled. The Commission hopes to get this project off the ground 
in 1997. Other projects in 1996 were a sticker decal competition at the 
High School. The Commission will use the winning student's artwork 
to make a decal that will be given to all businesses that are fully 
accessible. The Commission also sponsored a regional seminar that 
was very well received. 

In addition, the Commission continues to monitor access in town. 
The Commission began 1996 with 25 ongoing access projects. 20 new 
access projects were begun in 1996. Out of the 45 access projects 
worked on during 1996, 22 were closed. The necessary access 
modifications were made. 23 were progressing. Steps have been 
taken towards improving access. More work, however, needs to be 
done. 



110 



COMMUNITY SERVICES COUNCIL 

Members: 

Kathy Cryan-Hicks, Library 
Pat Fitzpatrick, Cultural Council 
Kit Harbison, Resident 
Holly Rice, Recreation 
Matt Scott, Cable Television 
Jeff Stallard, Historic Commission 
Marty Walsh, Council on Aging 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council was formed by 
the Town Manager, Bernard Lynch to coordinate and expand 
Chelmsford's recreational and cultural opportunities. By improving 
and expanding the delivery of these services we hope to enrich the 
quality of life in the Town of Chelmsford as well as increase our sense 
of community. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council continues to 
deliver over 13,000 copies of the Chelmsford Community Newsletter to 
Chelmsford residents. The Chelmsford Community Newsletter was 
designed to increase the awareness of the programs and services that 
Chelmsford offers its citizens. These programs may be educational, 
cultural, recreational or all of the above. In addition, to being a guide 
for seasonal activities, the Chelmsford Community Newsletter will 
provide information about the how and why of town services to better 
understand government operations. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council continues to 
sponsor the annual WinterFest events. This extremely successful and 
fun-filled weekend included the chowderfest, ice skating, 
snowshoeing, silent auction, tea room, entertainment, socials, carving 
of ice sculptures and much more. We will continue to offer a full slate 
of both indoor and outdoor activities for the entire community for 
WinterFest 1997. Numerous organizations in town sponsor specific 
events at various locations throughout Chelmsford. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council also organized the 
Grand Opening of the Community Center on October 5, 1996. Over 

111 



three hundred people strolled through the building enjoying live 
entertainment provided by the Come Back Kids and refreshments 
donated by Cafe' Aroma and Domino's Pizza. Local artists 
demonstrated and displayed art work on the front lawn while listening 
to the tunes of piano player John Mansfield. Program instructors 
answered questions and displayed class projects. This exciting event 
enhance community spirit and provided residents the opportunity to 
explore the community services available in Chelmsford. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council would like to 
thank all who supported the Community Newsletter, WinterFest '96 
and the Community Center Grand Opening. 



112 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Members: 

Michael Jasinski, Chairman 

David McLachlan, Vice-Chairperson 

John Smaldone 

Christopher Garrahan 

Bob Greenwood 

Lynne Davis 

Timothy Ervin 

Nineteen-ninety-six saw a slight slowdown for the Conservation 
Commission compared to a busy 1995. There were a total of 51 filings 
under the Wetlands Protection Act and Wetlands Bylaw. The 
Commission also continued to make improvements to its Reservations, 
Town Forests and other conservation areas. 

The primary responsibility of the Conservation Commission is 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act, MGL Ch. 131, s. 40, and 
the Chelmsford Wetlands bylaw, Article XI of the General Bylaws. 
The Conservation Commission received 21 Notice of Intent filings. 
The Notices of Intent ranged from single family home projects to a 
large assisted living facility. The Commission also held public 
meetings for 30 low impact projects or requests to determine if the 
Commission has jurisdiction over the project. The Commission also 
promulgated Regulations pursuant to the Wetlands Bylaw establishing 
uniform administrative procedures. 

The Conservation Commission is also pleased to report 
continuing progress in the management of its Reservations, Town 
Forests and conservation lands. Due in large part to volunteer efforts, 
significant improvements were made. Two residents, Tom & Tara 
Sileo, prepared a trail map for the Lime Quarry Reservation. Carolyn 
Bleck is a Girl Scout Gold Award candidate who prepared a trail map 
and sign for the George B.B. Wright Reservation, off Parker and 
Acton roads. Geoff Jaok, and Howard Fiddy, two Eagle Scout 
candidates, prepared trail maps and marked trails at Russell Mill Pond 
& Town Forest, and Thanksgiving Forest, respectively. These maps 
are available to the public at the Commission Office and are posted at 

113 



the parking lots of the areas. Matt Keegan's Eagle Scout project 
consisted of relocating a trail and constructing a bridge over a stream 
at the Lime Quarry Reservation, allowing for earlier year-round access 
to the trails. Another Eagle Scout project the Commission endorsed 
was the construction of a skaters' pavilion at Roberts Field by Joe 
Ready. This pavilion will provide a place for skaters to sit while 
putting on or taking off their skates. 

Another important land management activity in 1996 was the 
creation of the Chelmsford Stewardship Committee. The Committee 
is a loose affiliation of residents who live near the various 
Reservations, Town Forest and conservation areas. The intent was to 
enlist their help in keeping an eye on lending assistance to the upkeep 
of the areas. In November the Stewardship Committee published the 
first of what is hoped will be a quarterly Stewardship Committee 
Newsletter. The Newsletter will highlight recent improvements to the 
areas and update the progress being made in land management 
activities. The Newsletter is sent to all stewards and is available at the 
Town Offices. 

The Commission also had a change in membership in 1996. 
Lynn LeMaire and Susan Carter both resigned their seats on the 
Commission, with Susan moving to the Planning Board. The two new 
members are Lynne Davis and Timothy Ervin, both of whom come 
with technical and legal experience in wetlands protection. With this 
added experience, the Commission looks forward to 1997 with great 
expectations. 



114 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Your Council on Aging is committed to the ideal of providing 
the best services possible in meeting the ever-increasing needs of the 
Chelmsford Senior Community. During the course of this past year, 
over thirty programs and services were in place in an endeavor to 
accomplish this goal. Some programs, e.g., Meals-on-Wheels, 
Outreach, and Friendly Visitors, are designed specifically to assist 
those elders who are homebound. Other programs, which usually take 
place at the Center, are provided to fulfill the social, educational and 
nutritional needs of our mobile seniors. Several new programs have 
been added this year, including a support group for those dealing with 
Parkinson's Disease and one for Grandparents as Parents; we also have 
a Roundtable Discussion Group, as well as a Mentor Program, which 
provides help at the Parker School. 

Our Adult Social Day Care emphasizes individual care; but, like 
our Respite Care Program, it greatly aids the caregivers who are 
frequently overburdened in taking care of an aging parent or relative. 
The following statistics give testimony to the level of program 
participation and the comprehensiveness of service delivery. 

Adult Social Day Care —53 Participants— A vg. Daily: 12 
Congregate Lunch Program —45,074 Total Meals- Avg Daily: 1 87 
Elderly Home Repair Svs —Avg. 3/month 

Friendly Visitor Prgm —25 seniors (22 women, 3 men)— 25 volunteers 
Outreach — 15-20/week visits to seniors over 70 to asses needs & 

recommend resources. 
Meals on Wheels -17,577-Avg. Daily: 73 
Respite Care -19,598 Provider Hrs.-53 Clients 
Sr. Tzx Rebate Prgm -23 Participants- 1 1 Municipal Depts. 
Volunteers —250 active participants in all programs and services — 

total value: $360,000 
Transportation -1,446 (Soc. Day Care out-of-town) 

7,666 (Single pax. trips)— Avg: 37.8 daily 

9,112 
Senior Recreational Seniors Trips —40 throughout year 
Tax Assistance —96 
Fuel Assistance —68 

115 



The Senior Center is only able to function at such a quality level 
because of the generosity and support of 'The Friends of the Senior 
Center", who contributed over $100,000 in 1996 towards the building 
upkeep and the implementation of social services. 

Your Senior Center is one of the most active in the 
Commonwealth, and it consistently receives high praise for quality 
programming and the level of caring for its older citizens. The 
Community also benefits from the use of the Center for special 
functions such as Chowderfest/ Winterfest, Town Meetings and 
numerous other events that take place throughout the year. It is indeed 
a source of pride and we are most thankful to Town residents for their 
continuing support, dedication and involvement. 

Submitted By: 

Martin J. Walsh 
Director of Elder Services 

Council on Aging Members 1996-1997 

Arline Leman, Chairperson 

Elizabeth Marshall, Vice-Chairperson 

Lilla Eaton, Clerk 

Martin Boermeester 

Walter Cleven 

Jean McCaffery 

Elizabeth McCarthy 

Jackie Matthews 

Robert Monaco 

Peter Pedulla 

Verne Woodward 



116 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members: 

Susan Carmeris 
Cathy Clark 
Judy Fichtenbaum 
Pat Fitzpatrick 
Kit Harbison 
Winnie Liakos 
Jean McCaffery 
Pat Pestana 
Nancy Vinkels 

Meetings: 1st Monday of the month, twice a month during Arts 
Lottery Review. 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is comprised of interested 
residents appointed to inform the public, qualify applicants and 
dispense funds allocated by the Massachusetts Cultural Council 
(MCC), a state agency. The budget of the MCC is determined on an 
annual basis by the state legislature. The Local Cultural Council's 
(LCC) primary purpose is to regrant state funds for local, community- 
based programs in the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences. Grant 
award decisions are subject to final approval by the MCC. 

In 1996 the Chelmsford Cultural Council funded 20 grants 
totalling $14,070. Students in the Chelmsford Public Schools directly 
benefited from 7 of these programs. 

Accomplishments this year: In addition to granting state funds, 
LCC's may choose to produce other cultural programs for the benefit 
of the community at large. The Chelmsford Cultural Council has 
taken an active role in enhancing the quality of life in the Town by 
promoting a variety of cultural events. Additional programs presented 
during 1996 include: Produced Performing Arts Series. Represented 
Cultural Council on Community Services Council. Held Annual 
Community Input Meeting in March. Represented at LCC regional 
meeting in Lowell. Created the Chelmsford "Artisans' Directory". 
Hosted "Arts on the Common", weekly demonstrations by local artists, 

117 



during July and August. Established a cultural office at Old Town 
Hall. Displayed "Robin's Hill Quilt", commissioned during Common 
Threads, in newly installed frame box. October was proclaimed 
"Cultural Month in Chelmsford" by the Board of Selectmen in 
conjunction with a national proclamation. Presented the second annual 
"Angel for the Arts' award to Peggy Dunn and David Allen for their 
support and initiation of cultural programs in Chelmsford. 

Kit Harbison and Nancy Vinkels were recognized for their 
service to the Council. New members Nanda Salvitti and Robin Crane 
were welcomed. 

Plans for 1997 include: Funding two performances for WinterFest. 
"Hearts for the Arts" silent auction fundraiser. Funding expanded 
version of Chelmsford "Artisans' Directory". Continuation of 
Performing Arts Series. Celebration of 15th anniversary. Ongoing 
efforts to maximize cultural resources and opportunities available to 
Chelmsford residents. 



118 



OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 
John Abbott 
Walter J. Adley, Jr. 
J. Bradford Cole 
George R. Dixon 

Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency (CEMA) 
volunteers have been very active during the year 1996. 

Many volunteer hours were spent during the MA State of 
Emergency, October 20th to October 31st 1996 due to heavy rain and 
flooding, also preparing reports for FEMA and MEMA. 

Emergency Operating Center at the Town Office and Shelter at 
the Harrington School, was opened by volunteer personnel during the 
heavy snow and power outage December 8-10, 1996. 

CEMA personnel wish to thank the Town Manager, Board of 
Selectmen, all Department heads and their personnel for their 
continuing cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



119 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Members: 

Barbara Skaar, Chairman 

Marcia Dobroth, Vice-Chairman 

D wight Hay ward 

Clare Jeannotte 

Sue Olsen 

Corneilius O'Neill 

Chuck Piper 

Michele Sperry, Clerk 

The Finance Committee has seven members who are each 
appointed by the Town Moderator to three year terms. The FinCom 
is the arm of the Town Meeting whose primary mission is to study 
and make recommendations on articles considered at Town Meeting. 
The process for Fall Town meeting is limited to consideration of 
proposed warrant articles. In preparation for the Spring Town 
Meeting, the focus of the FinCom is the review of the town budget, 
as well as proposed warrant articles. 

Each FinCom member acts as a liaison to various town 
departments and boards. Prior to the public hearing, the FinCom 
liaison meetsindividually with the department head to review the 
department's budget. Weekly hearings are held from December 
through March to hear, analyze and discuss departmental budgets 
and warrant articles. Each department or independent board is given 
the opportunity to present their budget and respond to questions and 
concerns raised by FinCom members. Based on its deliberations, the 
committee makes a recommendation on each line item of the budget 
and each warrant article. 

Similar to the budget hearings, the Committee also meets 
with petitioners, proponents, and other interested parties, whether in 
support or opposition, of proposed warrant articles that are to be 
considered in the Spring or Fall Town Meetings. After consideration 
of each warrant article, the Committee votes on its recommendation. 
In certain instances, when the article has no financial implication to 

120 



the Town, the Committee may vote to make "no recommendation" 
on the article. 

The recommendations of the Committee are published in the 
Spring and Fall warrant books. Additionally, the book contains 
financial data specific to the Town and other useful information for 
Town Meeting Representatives and residents. The FinCom has 
received several awards from the Massachusetts Association of 
Town Finance Committees distinguishing it as one of the best 
warrant books in the state. This year the Committee's new clerk, 
Michele Sperry, has worked closely with Sue Olsen, current member 
and former clerk, to maintain this level of excellence. 

In October, all members of the Committee attended the 
Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Association of Town Finance 
Committees in Boxboro. A heavily-attended panel discussion 
concerning Charter Schools included Chuck Piper, Mary Frantz of 
the Chelmsford School Committee, and Bob Cruikshank of the 
Chelmsford School Department. In addition, members attended 
seminars concerning various issues such as current tax issues, 
proposed changes in Education Reform and the use of audits as a 
tool in fiscal management. 

Throughout the year the Committee has meet in joint session 
with the Board of Selectmen and School Committee to discuss the 
very serious fiscal challenges facing the School Department. 



121 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The H.D.C. functions as a regulatory commission for the 
benefit of the Town. A small area of the Town's center section is 
under the Commission's authority. The objective of the H.D.C. is to 
provide an expeditious application and review relative to the physical 
modification to the residences and businesses within the District. 
Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of each month at the 
Town Offices. 

During the past year, the H.D.C. accepted 19 applications for 
review; held 3 public hearings and waived 16 public hearings. 
Seventeen Certificates of Appropriateness were issued and two 
Certificates of Non- Applicability were issued. No applications were 
denied. 

Major accomplishments during the year include the 
establishment of two Historic Preservation Awards; one for structure 
and setting and one for signage. These awards will be made on an 
annual or as merited basis. We also acted as the sponsoring agent for 
an Eagle Scout project by Jeffery Needles to restore the Middlesex 
Canal Toll House located on the Center Common. We continue to 
redesign application forms and computerize records. 

Members: 

Peggy Dunn, Chairman 
Steve Stowell, Vice Chairman 
Robert LaPorte 
Brenda Lovering 
Joseph Marcotte 
John Alden, Alternate 
Bruce Foucar, Alternate 
Pat LaHaise, Clerk 



122 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Progress on the signs for hundred-year-old houses has slowed 
down due to the cost of producing the signs and the lack of interest by 
the sign painters. Currently we are looking into other materials than 
painted wood. Also, some of the earlier signs are in need of 
renovation. 

The 1802 Schoolhouse has been made available to the public 
from time to time. It was open to the public during the fesitivities on 
the Common on December 8th when the Christmas lights were turned 
on. Thirty-four people visited the building, many for the first time. 
Earlier the third grade students from the Westlands School were 
welcome during their lunch hour and u old-time classroom" was 
explained to them. This was in conjunction with a field trip through 
the Forefathers Cemetery that followed a classroom presentation at the 
school. 

This Commission, with the cooperation of the Planning Board, 
arrived at a tentative agreement with the developer to place a suitable 
marker at the site of the first town meeting off Crosby Lane. Some of 
this Commission's work has been hampered by the temporary location 
of its files. It is hoped to resolve this problem early in 1997. 

A map of North Chelmsford area that shows the location of 
hundred year old buildings is being developed. 

All positions on this Commission have been filled with the 
reappointment of George Merrill and John Goodwin. 



123 



HOLIDAY DECORATING COMMITTEE 

Committee Members: 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman Linda Emerson 

Ellen Donovan, Treasurer Jacqueline Wenschel 

Jean Kydd Carrie Bacon 

Marie Massota Gloria Shoen 

Iris Larssen Tink Nussbum 

Ruthann Burkinshaw Karen Ready 

Departmental Mission Statement: The Holiday Decorating 
Committee is a group of volunteers who arrange and implement the 
Holiday Lighting and Prelude Ceremony in Chelmsford Center the 
first Sunday in December. The committee, with the help of several 
interested individuals and groups, physically put up and take down 
all the lights on the shrubs and trees on Chelmsford Common, the 
Old Town Hall and the Chelmsford Business District. In addition to 
the lighting, we also organize musical talent who volunteer their 
time, arrange the hayride and assist "Santa" with the more than 500 
children who come to see him. 

Budget: While the Committee is sanctioned by the Town, we 
receive no funds and work from donations given to us by several 
groups and individuals. This year our fund raising chairman, 
Jacqueline Wenschel, did an outstanding job and raised enough 
money to purchase additional lighting, add a second hayride and pay 
all our lighting and electrical bills. We sincerely thank all those who 
gave so generously. 

Goals and Objectives: Our goal in 1996 is to have continued 
success with out event and draw more and more of our residents to 
the business district. We have received help and cooperation from 
our Police, Fire and Highway Departments and could not hold this 
event without them. We feel fortunate to have so many residents 
support our efforts and thank all those who give so freely of their 
time and talents to make this once a year event possible. 



Donna A. Johnson 

124 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

During 1996, the Chelmsford Housing Authority made the 
transition from low income housing to a mixed income population that 
will ensure the financial integrity of our programs. In August, the 
Division of Housing and Community Development notified the 
Authority that there were no longer any asset limits for State Aided 
Public Housing and that the income limits for eligibility had increased. 
For many years, individuals gifted their assets away or turned their 
homes over to their children. Under the current regulations, applicants 
could retain their assets and still be eligible for housing. This has 
resulted in an increase in the number of Chelmsford residents housed 
in the community in which they have lived for so many years. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as of December 
31, 1996 provided a total of 419 units of low income housing: 198 
elderly, 199 family, and 22 handicapped. Four of these programs are 
funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Division 
of Housing and Community Development under Chapter 667, Chapter 
705, Chapter 689, and the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program. 
Chelmsford Arms completed in 1974, has 56 regular units and 8 
handicapped units. The Middlesex Community residence for the 
mildly to moderately retarded was purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. 
Six, two bedroom condominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased 
in 1981. McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981, has 43 regular units, 3 
handicapped units, and a four bedroom congregate unit which serves 
the semi-independent elderly. Delaney Terrace, finished in 1990, has 
48 units, 3 of which are handicapped and a one, 4 bedroom congregate 
unit for the frail elderly. These developments are funded under 
Chapter 667. Under the 705 Family Program, 1 1 units are scattered 
around Chelmsford. The Chapter 689 program is able to serve up to 8 
individuals in the facility based respite care development located on 
Groton Road. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, Executive 
Director, Linda Dalton, Adminstrative Assistant, Nancy Harvey, 
Leased Housing Coordinator, Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Maintenance 
Laborer, Michael Harrington, Full-Time Grounds Keeper and Manuel 
Mendonca, Full-Time Grounds Keeper. Regular Meetings are held at 

125 



McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday 
each month. The annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. All 
meetings are open to the public. The Chelmsford Housing Authority 
Board of Commissioners would like to thank the residents of 
Chelmsford and Town Officials for their continued support and 
cooperation. 

Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners: 

Lynn M. Marcell, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice-Chairman 

William P. Keohane, Treasurer 

Pamela A. Turnbull, Assistant Treasurer 

Mary E. "Lisa" Royce, Equal Opportunity Officer 



126 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members: 

Joe Dyer 

Charles Tewell 

Jean Sparks 

Peter Volonino 

James Sousa 

Jeanne Parziale, Personnel Coordinator 

The Personnel Board meets on the second Tuesday of the 
month at Town Offices. Special work sessions are scheduled as 
necessary. The Board consists of five members (four are appointed 
by the Town Manager and one is elected by non-union employees). 
During the past year Will Perry, the former chairman, resigned and 
was replaced by Peter Volonino. Also, Angela Cosgrove declined 
reappointment and was replaced by Jean Sparks. 

The Board wishes to thank Will Perry for all his hard work 
while serving many years as former chairman and member of the 
Personnel Board. 



127 



PLANNING BOARD 




Front Row (1-r) Tracey Wallace-Cody, Clerk; Kim MacKenzie, 
Chairman; Susan E. Carter 

Back Row (1-r) Robert C. Morse; James Creegan, Vice- 
Chairman; Eugene Gilet (Missing from photo: James P. Good) 



128 



PLANNING BOARD 

Committee Members: 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Chairman 

James M. Creegan, Vice-Chairman 

Tracey Wallace-Cody, Clerk 

Eugene E. Gilet 

James P. Good 

Robert C. Morse 

Susan E. Carter 

Patricia A. Jamros, Senior Clerk 

The Planning Board is responsible for insuring that the 
development of land in Chelmsford meets the criteria set forth in the 
State and Local Zoning By-Laws. This process involves the review of 
subdivision and site plans at a public hearing. The Planning Board is 
committed to protecting and maintaining the residential character and 
integrity of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Planning Board has had a busy year. A total of 24 Planning 
Board meetings were held. There were 5 Site Walks and 31 Public 
Hearings resulting in the Approval of 19 Subdivisions, 14 Site Plans 
and 1 1 Subdivision Control Law Not Required plans in 1996. 

There were significant increases in the number of commercial 
development approvals being sought in Chelmsford. The emergence 
of specialized forms of Senior and Elderly residential housing has 
resulted in the view of several Assisted Living complexes and an 
Alzheimer's facility. A Special Needs School was approved to build 
at a location in North Chelmsford. 

The Planning Board strives to insure that much of the cost of 
commercial development is not borne by the taxpayers. The cost of 
design, construction and installation of several sets of traffic signals 
(Parkhurst and Drum Hill; North and Technology) have been assumed 
by the applicants who desire to develop in these areas. Existing 
signalization improvements and studies for future traffic lights were 
also absorbed by applicants in other locations. 



129 



In addition to its normal activities, the Planning Board continued 
participation in several other committees: 

The Master Plan Committee met regularly throughout 1996. The 
Committee held several public input meetings and received a 
tremendous amount of public comment that has influenced the updated 
Master Plan. John Brown Associates, the Planning Consultant 
selected to create the Master Plan and associated maps, presented 
several "build out" scenarios at a Fall public input meeting which was 
very well received. The Master Plan is anticipated to be presented at 
the Spring 1997 Town Meeting. 

The Adult Entertainment Committee modified Section 4600 of 
the Zoning Bylaw. These changes serve to strengthen controls on any 
potential Adult Entertainment establishments. 

The Parking Committee modified Section 3100 to increase 
parking requirements at restaurants. 

The Sewer Escrow subcommittee was formed to modify the 
subdivision regulations to insure that developers would be responsible 
for the future cost of sewering to subdivisions that are currently being 
developed in areas where sewers are not currently available. 

The Road Bond subcommittee continued to oversee and maintain 
all current road bonds and periodically reviewed those that are either 
ineffective or inactive. 

During 1996, the Planning Board experienced several changes. 
Tom Firth retired after 33 years of capable public service. Tom was 
the longest serving member on this Board and was succeeded by 
Robert Morse, an Electrical Engineer who was elected to fill his seat. 
Kevin Clark, who was elected to the Board in 1995, resigned his 
position due to job relocation. Susan Carter, former chairwoman of 
the Conservation Commission and a Civil Engineer was appointed to 
replace him. Eugene Gilet was reelected for his 10th term. Rayann 
Miethe, Principal Clerk for the past five years, resigned to pursue her 
education and Patricia Jamros, a lifelong resident of the Town was 
hired in July as Senior Clerk. 

130 



At the reorganization meeting of 1996, the Board elected their 
new officers: Kim MacKenzie, Chairman; James Creegan, 
Vice-Chairman; and Tracey Wallace-Cody, Clerk. James Good was 
voted to continue as the Board's representative to the Northern 
Middlesex Council of Governments; Kim MacKenzie continues to 
represent the Board on the Affordable Housing Committee; James 
Creegan chairs the Master Plan Committee and Robert Morse is the 
Board's representative to both the Traffic and Safety Committee and 
the Sewer Escrow Committee. 



131 



CHELMSFORD RECREATION 

Members: 

Robert Hayes, Chairman 
Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
Mary Jo Griffin 
Paul Murphy 
James Young 

Holly Rice, Recreation Coordinator 
Agnes Angus, Administrative Clerk 
Ryan Murphy, Summer Director 

Meetings: 1 st Monday of each month. 

The Recreation Commission is composed of seven members 
appointed by the Town Manager. The primary reason of the 
commission is to support and make recommendations to continuously 
improve and expand the recreational opportunities offered to the 
Chelmsford community. 

Like all Town Departments, Recreation again was challenged by 
the budget crunch. Our goal to maintain our recreation programs on a 
self-supporting basis in 1996 was realized. The Recreation 
Department offered over 300 self-supporting programs throughout the 
year. Some of the successful programs organized in 1 996 include ski 
programs, Boston duck tour, craft classes, yoga, acting, tea parties, 
music lessons, dance classes, health and safety programs, Santa is 
calling, supernatural ghost tours, Halloween happenings, sport 
programs, Fall foliage cruises, science programs, golf lessons, and 
much more. 

The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another successful 
project for 1996. Thanks to the continued financial support from 
Sully's Ice Cream, personnel supplied by The Courthouse, and help 
from local runners, we were able to preserve a long standing 
Chelmsford tradition. 



132 



Our workreation volunteer program was implemented in 1996 
and again was a great success. These young volunteers assisted with 
beach maintenance, and also helped with children in the day camp and 
many of the other summer programs. They did an exceptional job and 
should be commended for their dedication. 

The Recreation Department is now located in the new 
Community Center, 1A North Road, Chelmsford. Our goal for 1997 is 
to open a Youth Center for grades 5-12. The Youth Center will be 
located in the Community Center and will provide kids with the 
opportunity to socialize with friends, receive tutoring, play pool, ping 
pong, etc. A student board will also be organized to provide kids the 
chance to become involved in a leadership program. The student 
board will be responsible to create, initiate, and implement programs. 

The Recreation Department will continue to develop 
programming in response to the growing and changing needs of all 
populations within the Town of Chelmsford. Programs organized by 
the Recreation Department will be advertised in the Chelmsford 
Community Newsletter which will be delivered three times per year 
during the months of January, May and September. 

The members of the commission regretfully accepted the 
resignation of Mike Ablove and wish to thank him for his eight years 
of dedicated service to the Recreation Department. The commission 
would also like to welcome Agnes Angus who has been hired as the 
Administrative Clerk for the Recreation Department. 

The Recreation Commission would like to thank all who helped 
to make 1996 such a great success. 



133 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Members: 

Norman Eisenmann, Chairperson 

Barbara Scavezze, Recycling/Waste Coordinator 

Robert McCallum 

Peter Nelson 

John Coppinger 

The Town of Chelmsford contracted for the following services 
for residents, funded by taxes: weekly collection of solid waste, the 
biweekly collection of recyclables, and three curbside leaf collections 
held May 11, November 1 and December 7. Residents were allowed 
to dispose of brush at the curb with their weekly trash from December 
23-January 18 (the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection temporarily lifted the ban on the disposal of brush as a 
result of a snowstorm on December 7, which produced a large quantity 
of fallen trees and branches). The Town disposed of 13,864 tons of 
solid waste, recycled 3,211 tons, and composted approximately 1,020 
tones of yard waste, for a 23% recycling/composting rate. 

The Chelmsford Recycling Committee (formerly the Solid Waste 
Advisory Committee) held a brush drop-off at Community Tree on 
May 18 and October 19. The CRC also held a drop-off for metal 
(which was recycled) and furniture and household goods (which were 
donated to the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless) on May 4 
and September 28. The CRC held the annual Town- Wide Clean-Up 
on April 27 - volunteers picked up litter from conservation land, 
school yards, road shoulders, and illegal dump sites, and gathered 
afterwards for a picnic at the Elks Lodge. The Town received a grant 
from the state for 100 compost bins, which were sold at half cost, 
enabling the Town to purchase and sell an additional 100 compost 
bins. 

The CRC produced two editions of its new Cable 43 television 
show, "Chelmsford Recycles," detailing the expanded recycling 
program, and the collections and drop-offs occurring in the fall. Each 
edition was broadcast several times. The CRC produced a 
"Chelmsford Recycles" web page for the Internet. The CRC also 

134 



produced and mailed a yearly informational flyer to all residents. This 
flyer included the recycling schedule, and detailed the proper methods, 
timing and places for disposal of various types of recyclable material 
and solid waste. This type of information was also prepared for 
inclusion in the Community Newsletter. 



135 



SEWER COMMISSION 




Front Row (1-r) Evelyn Newman; John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman; 
Jacqueline Sheehy 

Back Row (1-r) James M. Harrington, Attorney; Robert Goober 
(Weston & Sampson Engineer); Richard J. Day, Vice-Chairman; Barry 
B. Balan; Thomas E. Moran, Clerk; Steven K. Pedersen (Weston & 
Sampson Engineer); Victor Manougian, Attorney; Stephen J.Richard 
(Weston & Sampson Engineer) 



136 



In 1996, Chelmsford accomplished something that Dracut and 
Billerica could not. A ballot question referendum and town meeting 
article passed that insured that 100% of the Town will be sewered. 

The ballot question referendum exempting $49,000,000 
additional to sewer the remaining 32% of Chelmsford passed by a 4 to 
1 margin. This "voter mandate" paved the way for subsequent 
representative town meeting approval by a vote of 147 to 2. What was 
most important was that those of us with sewers, (68% of the Town 
had already been approved for sewers) did not turn our backs on our 
neighbors without sewers. It is sad to watch some of our partially 
sewered neighbors, like Dracut and Billerica, struggle with town 
meeting opposition to continued sewer construction. Dracut is now 
faced with state imposed fines, and has been subsequently forced to 
fund their state mandated project entirely through users rates. 

In Chelmsford we recognize the enormous benefits of municipal 
sewers. These benefits include: 

• Drinking water protection. ..Failing and inadequate septic 
systems allow partially or untreated wastewater to reach our 
groundwater which is the source of 100% of our drinking 
water. 

• Surface water protection. ..Those same failing and 
inadequate septic systems pollute our streams and ponds and 
contribute nutrients that choke ponds and lakes with weeds. 

• Relief from Title 5 Septic System Repairs. ..The March 
1995 changes to the State Sanitary code require each 
homeowner to have his/her septic system inspected when 
they sell their house. In 1995, the Chelmsford septic system 
inspection failure rate was 35% and the average septic system 
repair cost was $12,000. 

• Sustained Property Values... Any Chelmsford Realtor will 
verify that your home is worth more and is easier to sell if it 
has the availability of public sewers. 



137 



• Incentive for economic growth. ..In the 1990's multiple 
businesses relocated to Chelmsford and the 
commerical/industrial vacancy rate has steadily declined to 
below 10%. Many of these industries were attracted by the 
availability of public sewers. The resulting economic and tax 
benefits for the Town, although difficult to quantify, have 
been significant. 

• Higher bond ratings... The sewer project's substantial, yet 
stable debt retirement schedule, combined with an efficient 
betterment assessment revenue program, has made 
Chelmsford municipal bonds attractive to investors. As a 
result, Chelmsford has benefitted from excellent bond ratings 
and lower borrowing costs. 

With the success of the spring 1996 ballot question and town 
meeting behind us, the Sewer Commission must now turn its attention 
to the task of maximizing state and federal financial assistance, so as to 
accelerate the project schedule without increasing the impact on the tax 
rate above $2.10 per thousand (our commitment to the voters). The 
state's June 1996 authorization of "Zero Interest Loans" for Fiscal 
Year 1997 has already helped us accelerate the schedule and reduce 
betterments. Continued increased state financial assistance beyond 
F Y97 is the primary goal of our lobbying efforts. 

During 1996 we also experienced sewer construction in one of 
the most heavily traveled roadways in Town, North Road. Thanks to 
early planning, an intense public information campaign, and heavy 
police details, traffic management was successful, and all main line 
sewer was installed from Dalton Road to the Route 3 Rotary in the 
1996 construction season. 1996 also marked the completion of sewer 
construction on Groton Road and in the Freeman Lake Area. 

The Commission would like to acknowledge our administrative 
staff, Evelyn Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy, and Irene Oczkowski for 
their hard work, professionalism and patience. Their multifaceted 
duties are shared by the Sewer Division of the Department of Public 
Works, and they are the individuals who interface with the public on a 
daily basis. 

138 



Respectfully Submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 
John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
Thomas E. Moran, Clerk 
George F. Abely 
Richard J. Day 



139 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Director: Martin J. Walsh 

Deputy Director: Regina B. Jackson 

The Chelmsford Veterans' Services Office provides short-term 
financial assistance to eligible veterans and their dependents as 
mandated by Chapter 115 of Massachusetts General Law. The 
assistance we provide to eligible, needy veterans is in the form of 
monthly ordinary benefits, a fuel allowance, and some medical 
coverage. 

In CY1996 the cost of benefits was $82,642.00. The total 
monthly costs averaged $4,915.00 for ordinary benefits and fuel 
allowances, and $1,972.00 for medical costs. The monthly caseloads 
averaged between 15-20 veterans. The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts will reimburse Chelmsford for 75% of our total costs. 

Our office is located in the Community Center (Old Town Hall) 
in Chelmsford Center. We are available Monday - Friday, 8:30 to 
4:30. Our phone number is 250-5238. Please call or come by if you 
are in need of assistance or would like more information. Thank You. 



140 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The year of 1 996 was a quiet one for the committee inasmuch as 
no applications were received for assistance from Veterans of World 
War II. Applications are usually received by the Veterans' Agent of 
the Veterans' Benefits Department. In the past numerous Veterans 
have been assisted in the form of material grants. No cash payments 
have been made in the past. 

The fund was established in 1947 and now totals $20,879.01. 
The year 1997 marks the Fiftieth year that the fund has been in 
operation. Income is received from interest on bank deposits from a 
savings account and a certificate of deposit. 

During the past year our representative from Precinct 4, Mr. 
James J. McNulty, passed on. He had been a faithful member of the 
committee for many years. We now acknowledge his service and his 
interest in the past work of the committee. 

Present members, one from each voting precinct, are listed as follows: 

Precinct 1 : Steven E. C. Belkakis, DDS 
Precinct 2: Carl J. Lebedzinski 
Precinct 3: John J. Kenney 
Precinct 4: Thomas M. Firth, Jr. 
Precinct 5: Frederick H. Reid 
Precinct 6: Alfred H. Coburn 
Precinct 7: Alan E. Greenhalgh 
Precinct 8: Neal C. Stanley 
Precinct 9: Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 

The committee extends it sincere appreciation to the various 
town officials who have assisted the committee for many years. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, Chairman 

141 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager 

January 1 , 1 996 through December 31,1 996 



Balance on Hand as of 1/1/1996: 
Add Receipts: 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Savings-Interest $452.59 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Certificate-Interest $413.56 



$20,012.86 



Total Interest Received: 
Balance on Hand as of 12/31/1995: 



$866.15 



$20,879.0 



ASSETS 



MassBank for Savings, Acct. #91 1287909 
MassBank for Savings, Acct. #922055696 
Total Assets 



$14,155.83 

$6,723.18 

$20,879.01 



LIABILITIES 



Total Liabilities 



$ None 



Total Assets, less Liabilities, as of 
December 31, 1996 



$20,879.01 



Respectfully Sumitted: 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



142 



WARRANT FOR 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES 

MARCH 5, 1996 

William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town or City of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to vote at: 

Precinct 1 : 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 5th day of March 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 
for the following purposes: 



143 



To cast their votes to the Primary Officers for the election of 
candidates of political parties for the following office: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE 
(one man and one woman) for each Political party for the 
5th Middlesex Senatorial District. 

35 Members of the Democratic Town Committee 

35 Members of the Republican Town Committee 

3 Members of the Libertarian Town Committee 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



144 



«- O) <r- CO »- *— 00 



Ifl r- O N »- O) 

*- r«- oo 

cm in r- 



(onooommo) 



O 



o 



00 

o 
J? 

a 



oo>T-m»-cooo» 

00 O) 






O CO O O O CO 
CO (O O) 



I 
o 
a: 
< 

5 

>- 
a: 
< 

S 

a. 



coto^-oo^-T-oto 
o cm 



8 



U> O O O (O 
<3> CM 



h-T-r-«f-o*-co<o 

CO CM t- >* CM 



0. 



O'-n^O'-oo) 

00 CO 



i- oo o o o o> 

CM (O OO 



OifiOllDOOOO) 



z 

IU 

9 ro 

0) O 

UJ 

E * 

o 

< CM 

a o 

o « 

o t 

UJ 

a 



CO CO o o o to 
i- ■*■ in 



co »- m cm m o r- 
O) o 



T-i-»-(MOf rN 
CO CM t- •<*■ o 



UJ 

o 

z 

UJ 

a: 

UJ 

u. 

UJ 

a: 

0- 



O 

l- 



3 
O 

a: <u 

co o 

_i c 

^ 2? c 

JU CO 

c C „, 

— o C 8 

JS 5 5. o 1 | | 



</> t: 



"5 §•? 



I 

o ~> 

UJ (A CO 

h- JS .c 
(/> CD I- 



K 

z 

JZ 
— 

•9 



I 

UJ 
UJ 



2 
o 



c 
CO 



€8 

$2 



uj „ .2 * > £ 

< I §, 2 2 | 8 

H 3 .fc 3 10 ^ ~ 

C/> OQ > C/) o > 5 



145 



o eg 
o CO 



soO'-'-0)0'-iocMfloc)Mnnoos'*ON(<)iflm(o<-o(NO)ooeoiooo)i-oooin 
^cMNOXMOtnoooo^inooi-ooom^MioiononooNOKnoomflom *- 



CO CO 

o> 



»-00^0)(D(J)0)0)CO(C(M^flOO)(J)(DO)i-<D(NCN»-(Dri|0)'-0(T)^(0000(NT-0000 

o 



r-- co 
o co 
co 



np40)oomocomooo(on<oo)Na)0^(0(ON(ooo)T- ! -(Moo)0)0)nc\m)oooin 
inmiD^min^^invmin^t^Trmtnininmiflin^ininininiD^TrmiDin co 



OMOi^scMsmioOT-owinNinomciiT-NcnoicDi-ooxnNncNcoinNT-ooom 
i^in^cD^uj^^^inioioio^-'^-'^-'^-'^-ir)vninin'*'^-ioiO'*'^-'<a-cDiO'*ir)inco in 



cm o 
cm co 
co 



(OiDinT-innoinT-i-T-^^i-ois^mmNinnionnoNCMflotooooifitNOOOo 
comr^mminmininmcocoinco^tmincoincococomcomcocomcomcocoh-co *- 



a. 


CO 


< 


o 


5 


oo 


, 


m 


> 


o 

CD 


ac 


u. 


< 


a. 


s 


o 



N'-wtiotoo^oiMnonuio^oifloofloooioiiDOiint-Mnoiomo^ooooo 



_tooo)*toooco^(omi-'-cj(0(0^0)incg(Or-oN(0'-inw'-Nooo(oinM , )oooin 
cocommcomminmminmcocominmmmcoincocomincomcocommcDmcococo r- 

o r- 



2 
UJ 

a 
co 

iu 
<r 

Q. 

o 

< 

a: 
o 
O 

£ 

a 



CO ■* t- 

>«- in in 



ntoooKomnoco'-O'-mnTfr-srorgnconfflMiD'KNaiifTrTir-Tfooom 
inin»*^r'*'*^inco»nin^'4-Tr^Tr^^inin'(r"*TrTr'*Trrr'«t'«tx4-^inTt x* 

o 
co 



(MT-T-cgi/)Ncoo)(j)0(DinoiO(00eo(00)rgsno)nsr-ooT-(C(0(\i(0(0'>-(NNOOOO 

*»COCOCOCOCNJC\ICNJCNCOCNCNJCOCS|C\JCOC\IC>JC\ICOC\ICOCNCOCSICOCMCOCNCNCOC\|C^ CO 



■* co ■«* m 



NcocoioinNioxtcotooNT-ooxnoJOOicooiT-T-fflinootocDoooooin 



< 
O 



o 

< 
on 
o 
o 

2 
UJ 

Q 



m 



3 J 2 

co 3 co 

cr o a3 

co cu — > 

Hi 

cu co a> 

O c/3 J= 



* 2 

£ ® 

o to 

(fl (J u 

aJ -S c 

5= a x 

-» Q. < 



0) 

2 E 

0) o 

7 cu 



if 

< a: 



c 
o 

c w 
c c 

« Z 

° o 



c «- - 
a5 S c 

-H cu co 

3 Q. > 

o to ro 

0. • 0- 

~> w l_ 
= .32 £ 

10 fe £ 

CMP 
<D -C m - 

m O ™ en O j O 



o <u 

11 

■ CO 

UJ o 



— - a V III 



E 

Q 3 

. o 
Q. Q- 
a> 



O) 






cu -= 

a) 

1 2 

CD O 



O i « 

2 c ■«= 

<o ro £ 

0- ^ CO 

-> "5 > 



h 

co _ 

I oj 

_: CD 



5 

o 

CO 3 
W Q 



01 

o .^ 

CU CO 3 



3 

oj co 

« co •- c Q -5- < 

oEt'S^ci 
£§(o5«r no 



= cu 

< 5 



IS 

_) Q. 



c 
° c 

CU m 

* i cu 

° S •- 

5t E « 19 3 

>■ 2 <u £?> 2 
a: Jj >- 5 -3 co 






146 



Ot-<OOU')(0^-'-N^(J)0(Ot-0 

cm to oo en m cm cm cm t- rsi 

I s - i- co cm i-. 



OlOOOt^O 


O'-'-toomr-o 


CO CO CO CM 


CM ^r m O) CM 


C> tO O r— 


f- CM tO O 1*"- 



o 



NinoO'-ncjiono 



O CO O CO 
CO 
CO 



•* to o o «- co 


(NOSOOO'-OOO 


O) IT) tO 


s^inoi to 


t- CO 


t- CO 



CO 

o 

E 

Q- 



to m to cm en 



■r-coi-o^-inocoo»-oo 

cd co m cm to 

T- CO 



moimoo<-o 

r(OU) to 

t- f- CO 



toontoo<-o 

Ol CM O CO tO 

*- f- CO 





CD 




l_ 




a 


to 




0> 
at 


to 


^ 


u 




<u 


«n 


I— 

a. 


X 




o 




a: 




< 


in 
o 




<D 




*_ 


>- 


a 


a: 




< 




5 








a. 


•<r 


Ol 


o 


-i 


cu 


< 


a 


i- 




z 




UJ 




Q 


CO 






(0 


o 


UJ 


cu 


a. 


ct 


a. 




z 




< 




o 


CM 


-i 


O 


CO 


CO 


3 


Q. 



OMOOt(OWO(Ni-r-0 

cn ■* ■* <o t- 



o co 
3 



o 5- to O CO O CO 

CO O) <r- ■»»• 


CMt-CO^OCOOCO 


O) CO f- -<f tj- 


T" T- CO 


t- CO 



N00i-O<0n^(0OONOCMOS 

O) CO TT CM r- 

t- CO 



o o o r- 



(OSt-OOOOS 
O CM tO CM t- 

f- t- CO 



CO CO to O O O I s - 

oomoo cm 

CM 



cMto^-ocninr-.tocMCMcoo 

CO i- CO CM 



o m 

CO 
CM 



t -* (C 

(OS t- 



3 



m cm to o o o r- 

T- Tt CO I s - 



o •* •* rt 



o 
a 



UJ 

o 

z 

UJ 

a: 

UJ 

u. 

UJ 

oc 
a. 



UJ 

Q 

(/) .* 
UJ c 

a. oq 



< 

»- 
O 



CO 
O) 

3 



« ct 

E-»- 

co >» 

si 



c 

CO 

c 

CO 

5 

O o 

' >- <-> > 

co 



< 
»- 
O 



■e 

co o 
o u. 
Q a> 



CO 



c 

CO 

E a> 
o y 



— is si 



-C CO 

a. a 



m « . c 

< a) ■*■ «S: 

i_ <• t- 0) 

E S -Q °- 

3 i5 o o 

co c/> J < a: z 



CO 

cc a> 



o £ 



ii 



o 
o 

<lig is 

l- iS co o -fe ~ 

wmQh 55 



r! 9 




UJ x: 

uj S 




P 5 «» 




E <* -§> 




OMM 

adley 
ypret 
A. Fu 




u coO-5 
[" w « _i co 




c 


*~ •* -c ^ 3» 
< c t >• E 4 

P CO CO ° CO 


Ii 



147 



NNO)(MCO(00(Om'-^Mm^lD(0(N'l , inSflOCgNOOOO(J)NSMOOfO(0^ , CMtO 

mO(N(0(om'<tioo)Nrgio«io(0(N(DirtNNmifisu5(MO( , i(D'-(nfOT<ns(oo) 
noa)ooooooa)co(NOcotooia)coooio)i-o)O0io(oo)7ioi(7iGoooo(Da)floo(o 



w 



0)^-(DCOr-OOT-(0'-<DOOCOCO(MSO)'-NmT-00<DSfMCMmSO)00'-lflT-^ 

0^cocN^^OC\ir^vnc\icacocgc\jcorgroinr\i(OvO'^-'^-c\ic\icocO'»-^t , '>9-Tj-c\irNi 

^" *— ^-*— ▼— T— T— T— ^^^-*— T— ^— t— V^-V-T— T— T— f— ^- T— ^- ^- ^- ^ *— *— *— T— ^"^ 

co 



OOl0'-O0)( , )(DS0)00{0(N«)inO<0N(M(Diri'-O«H0^SV'-(0't«)Mn(00g 

oonr-^r-oN»-mnOT-i-^(M(\it-oj(Ortn'-'-0'-'-'-(M'-(MOO'-T-^'- 



(MoofoooflO'-^iDS<j)minmt-o)t-flO(j)mn^T(0'-0(Nom(DNO«) 
0)ir>'^ , Tj-cM(N<0'^-0)f^-CM<M'^-'^-'^-if)CD(Dr~-<oif)'^'ror r )^'^-'^-mcMr^c\icNjrr 



III 
g 
w 

UJ 

a: 

a. 



m 


h- 


,- 


T_ 








u 


(O 












4) 




























u. 
















s 




ro 


ro 


ro 


r~- 




r~- 


to 


to 


in 


in 


^- 


i-~ 












o 


CO 












a> 




























a. 
















o 


r- 


(^ 


on 


■>*■ 


(T> 




o 


h- 


(D 


(O 


in 


in 


(•> 


o 












u 


CO 












a> 















in m to to id to m 



T->-(nfl)(M(ooino)NON'-pnoN'-^flowfl)T-rT-ifioo)m'-flo 
MD<-ooinmMoinooo(OOsooio(omiou)(oooinootniniO(00)U] 



< 

O 

_i 
CD 

0. 
UJ 

cc 



nooooniONOflooxflflotDftONomNON^NfflOONS^nmmm^ioo 
to 

CO 



- 3 



0)OlOCl^S(MN^(0inO00ONnr-inr-»-l0(0(0CJ'-0)mM0(O(NOON0000 



UJ 
UJ 



si <-> 

s i 

ui o 






fiEiss^iifais 



0) 

c 



> e 5. 2> 



?£■ 



CD a; 
< CO 



O nf.O 






a -2 (jj <2 y o to co c as 



CO 



_i a: z z z _i o 



6 o 

o o 

CD CO _ 

f£4 






5l 



o ° 

O Q 

E </> 

CO CD 

= CO 



5 

a> 

N 
W 

_* (A 

3 O 

O £ 

°S 

Q D 

co Q 

.C i_ 

r aj 

CO <D 

Set 



0) <U 

d u- 

£ c 
2 ■= 

CO UJ 



CD • 

":« 

CD . . 

CO w co 
O) c c 

5 O O 






.c <u 

Q. C 

(A CO 

O CD 



Sco 



c .c 
■5 2 



c 
c 

CO 

c O 

CO o 
c?2 



0) 

N 

_ c 

■D 0) 

CO ^ * 

~ ^ & 

<-" "^ ro 
4> 



cc * cc cc cc 



T3 

o u 

5 i£ < 3: 

o . c 



co u 

c c 

c c 

O CO 

Q I 



i * 5 M £ | I 

5 3 SZ O O 2 JZ 

55000WI- 



148 



CO CM CM O) TT tO O 

r«~ to m m tf co co 



cNtocMtocMT-^-incMin 



^- *r t -3- m ^r ■* 



O 5T 

^r v ^ 



t- m a> o cm c\i 
^r ro ^r Tf to 



m 



ooion^tn^snooiONmiomiouiooiuKomi/iaioooooooo 
mmr^mmtommmmtototommtomtotomTrtomcom oo 

oo 



^inifiin^rr^ifi^io^-in'C^^iflin^-t^^t^nnniflv 



O O O O O r- 



a)0)^-tot^-^CMin»-oomoooromfOOooh~toinorooioror^-nooooooooo 

to 





a> 








a. 


<o 






to 


*— 


u 




a> 


Iff 


E 
Q. 


X 




o 




a 




< 

5 


m 
o 




0) 






> 


a 


a. 




< 




5 








<r 


■* 


Q- 


o 


-1 


co 


< 


IX 


»- 




z 




LU 




Q 


CO 


(/) 


u 


LLt 


£ 


a: 


a 


a. 




z 




< 




o 


CM 


-1 


U 


m 


0) 


Z3 


a 


Q. 




UJ 




Ct 






•- 




o 




0) 

t— 



tO O tO CD f 

tocor-iotointotototototommmtotn 



a>n(Ot-(ON^o)(0(oin<oofl)(ooi(OMno)(j)ifioo'-ooooooMn 

mmmmtoininmr^m 



8 

CM 



r-ooooooom 



totototototototo 



mco^o>*-o>o>commooootoinooooooo 

(0(DStO(0(CIOCO(OSN(0 



*U)(<)ou)Noo)(oinNtNr)in(OcomN(MNinoi(ooM , )'HOOOOOOoom 
smtoifl^^mio^io^inint^co^inf^intto^^^sior- h- 



TT t- r- *- 



otOf^-r-^-incotDOr-ocMOd^rcoT-m^r^.or^-'Vf^tovncoomoooooooin 

«- CM 



< 

O 



z 
< 

m a. 

28 

uj oc 





c 


c 


0) 


o 


O) 


(A 


£ 


<D 


o 






aj 


m 


a. 






< 


a 


(A 


Lb 


CO 


CO 


£ 


> 


o 


co 


0) 


x a 



c 

CO 

I s 

o c t 

oq a cj 

£ "o .c 

*3 3 O 



</l r- 
tt> § 
CO .3 

if 

to CO 

CO o 



CO 



£ 



o 

i! 

CO X 

5 X 

Q 
o 

"o £ 
c « 






= 1 



CO 

X 



o g in o s 
£ o 

Z UL 




co co a> o 

UJlIl5QiLUJ00llJai05SS$5$$5 



149 



0(000'«-000'* 



•tOOO^ ^•OOO'* CXOOOOOCN 



ooooooooo 



ooooo ooooo ooooooo 



OCNOOOOOOCM 



(NOOOCN CMOOOIM (OOOOOOCO 



ooooooooo 



ooooo ooooo ooooooo 



<o 




at 
at 


(o 


T~ 


o 




0) 


m 


11 


X 




o 




cc 




< 




s 


m 




o 




<D 




c 


>■ 


Q. 


a. 




< 




5 








K 


■* 


Q. 


o 


_l 


0) 


< 


Q. 






h- 




Z 




UJ 




Q 


CO 


(0 


o 


UJ 


£ 


a. 


a 


Q. 




z 




< 








cc 


OJ 


< 


o 


\- 


V 


a. 


CL 


UJ 




m 





OOOO^-OOOt- 



ooooooooo 



ooooooooo 



ooooooooo 



ooooooooo 



o^-oooooo*- 



O O O ■•- t-000»- (OOOOOOCO 



ooooo ooooo ooooooo 



ooooo ooooo ooooooo 



ooooo ooooo ooooooo 



ooooo 



t- O O O r- 



ooooo 



t- o o o 



ooooooo 



CO O O O O O CO 



UJ 

o 

z 

UJ 

a. 

UJ 
U. 
UJ 
DC 
Q. 



< 

o 



UJ 
UJ 



< 

o 



< 
o 



UJ 
UJ 



z 

Ul 

Q 

7Z "> 

V) j* 

uj c 
a. cd 



a, S 3 

fieife 

« .2 % o 

i a: j= z 





O 




O 




O 




O 


c 


UJ y> 


c 


UJ M 


II 


h- J2 


* (J 

II 


1- J 


</> CD 


(0 CQ 



SI 



o 
o 

Z <3 

II 

O i2 

H 03 



c 

ii 



150 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN ELECTION APRIL 2, 1996 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of 
Chelmsford: 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby 
requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to 
meet in their several polling places, VIZ: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 2nd day of April 1996 being the first Tuesday in 
said month at 8:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

One Moderator for three years; 

151 



One Selectman for three years; 

Two School Committee Members for three years; 

Three Members of Public Library Trustees for three years; 

One Board of Health Member for three years; 

Two Members of Planning Board for three years; 

Two Sewer Commissioners for three years; 

One Member of the Housing Authority for five years; 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years; 

and to vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION 1 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford approve the Town Charter 
amendment proposed by the May 8, 1995 (Article 17) Annual Town 
Meeting? 

Yes/No 

QUESTION 2 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford approve the Town Charter 
amendment proposed by October 19, 1995 (Article 2) Annual Town 
Meeting? 

Yes/No 

QUESTION 3 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of Proposition two and one-half (2 1/2), so called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in order to design 
and construct sewers, pump stations, and force mains and for related 
legal, administrative, and other pertinent expenses, to complete the 

152 



Town's Sewering Project by providing sewers to the remainder of 
the Town? 

Yes/No 

and to bring in their votes for the following: 

Fifty-four Representative Town Meeting members; six 
representatives per precinct for a three year term. 

One Representative Town Meeting Member for an unexpired 
two year term in Precinct 5. 

The polls will be open from 8:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m.; and 
will meet in the Senior Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford on 
Monday, the twenty-ninth day of April, at 7:30 p.m. in the evening, 
then and there to act upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



153 



o 



m h~ O) o t- 

oo «- cm »- ^r 

CO 00 CM 



m <* eo «o to i- 
co m cm *- ^r 
r- r- h- cm 



(OOOIOUKDM 
CM O ID N- t- 00 

CO ID O t- ^ 

CN CO O CO CM 



o cm en t- o» cm ro 

NO SO) r i-N 

CO CM O) «- |"- 

oo co co co oo 



o o m 

*- M- 



o m 
to 



m to o co t- m 

O) m o ^- 

T- co to 



t- 0> 00 O CM O O 
N- "^" CO CO <T> 
CM CO CO CO CM 



ID 


o 


m 


o 


in 


o 


m 


o 


CNJ 


CO 


i — 






CO 


O) 


co 


00 


CO 






en 



oo 


T- 


m 


to 


0- 








r«- 


CM 


•«- to 
oo 


CO 

o 


O 

0. 






*— 


to 


M" 

CO 


•r- •+ 
00 

m 


r- O 
CM 


0. 









00 T~ h~ T" T- 00 


00 CO CM Y- t- t- to 


to •* r- oo 


r-~ cm t- to r» 


r- i- to 


cm ^- CO CO CO 



U5 If O) * t- r- n- 

cm "fr co m to 

Oi to ^ CO o 

CM 



co n ^ ^ o O) 


cm m r- co 


t- o oo 


o oo oo oo co o r- 


CM CM 00 CO 


T- Tt Tf h. 


f- 


t (MSB T- 


t- CM tO O 


■* to ^ m 


o 


co m to m r- 


T— 




CM 


*- CO 



co cm m o o o 


(Or NTf NOO 


S03MD i- i- o 


tO CO CM CM 


tJ> CM ■<»■ h- ■* 


msmu) to 


cm ^r r-~ 


CM ^r CO CO <«■ 


CJ> CO *$■ CO T" 



lO 


lO 


en 


o 


o> 


CO 


T- 




„ 


IX 


CN 




-1 








C£ 




0. 

< 


u 


z 
O 


0) 
0. 






r- 




O 




UJ 




_l 




UJ 


CO 


z 


o 
0) 


5 


a. 



CM CO CO CM O 
O) CM CM 

T- tO 0O 



r- m cm cm to 
t- m h- 

t- ^f to 



P)r r r (O 
00 CO t- 
i- to 00 



o 


M- 


N" 


CM 


O 


O 


■*r 


CNI 


m 






CM 




CM 


m- 






oo 



^ U) CO r- CO 03 

(Offlr |^ 

t- CO Hi 



OOtr 

CO N m 

CM ■«*• 



O CO CO O O T- O 

CO o o o ■* 
co m ^- ^- to 



m to CM «n CM CM CM 

tows m 

CM CO CO CM «- 



m oo co o 

00 CM CM O 

co <«■ ■«»• CO 



oo m o> r-. o i- o 

CO O t- o CO 

t- co m m- ^r 

t- CM 



fN * OlO ^ 00 

m o r*. o cm 
r-. CM CO CM h- 



i-. to «n m »- <* oo 

oo ^- O) t- ■<* 

O ■* XT Tf Tfr 

t- CN 



CN 

S 

Ql 



CM 


m 


T— 


CN 


O 


h- 


CM 






CM 
CO 



r- a> o o o o 

CO CN tO CM 

t- i- CO 



1- co r»- r>- t- *- o 
o. to CO CO ^ > 

T- T- T- T- CO 



m s ■* •* o o o 

•q- to a> m co 

^J" T- T- T— O 



rf oo m o r>- 

CN 00 t- 

i- ■* to 



(OO ^IO 

m co r- 

t- CO 



o o> o o 
M- m o co 
cm co co co 



O) S CO OO CO i- t- 
CO CM CN t- m 
h» CO ^ CO 00 



o 
0. 



o 



is 
Pi 






o 

0) 

OJ 
I 
CD 

or 



0) 
CO 

■g 

X3 

c 

CO 

o 



a> 


« 


> 


£ 




o> 


<o 


3 


tc 


X 


O 

r- 


O 

2 


2 


^ «= 


UJ 


52 ^T 



9 c c •» ° 
O co 5 j= .52 

S m Q ^ S 



x: 

Q. 
tfl o 



CO O 



2 

1 
d c 

CO 1Z 

II 



OJ 

s « 

« CO ^ 

I'll 

^ JIL 

GO 



co 

CO 



UJ 
UJ 

H 
(O 

3 

>- 



1 « 

>- w « 

cu O 52 

-c o co 

^ < uj 

* ^ -k 



O a ' 2 fe r » CD _co ^ W co ^ «2 
r/»m-=im!5<! J CQ i UJ 2 > 2 



W CO 



154 



< £ 



oo oo m o *- 

y- <J> r- r- ■*■ 
00 CO CM 



mcMtomooincM 

(D N ^ OO O 00 

t- ^r oo <<r m ^- 

CO CM CM t- CM CM 



O) CO S N i- 

00 CM i- ■* 

O) CM CM 

t- TT tO 



m oo cm o m 


TTOr-Oh-CMOO 


N * 00 (O OO 


t- CM ^ , 


ONO) f S O) 


0O O CD O) 


CM ^- tO 


CO CM CO t- t- CM 


•t ^- CO CM 



t 0)(MO IO 
CO o ^ > 

CM •«* tO 



CM 00 
00 
(O 



OMOOIOt-O 

^r s co ^ >- 

CO CM CM t- CO 



N O ^ CM CO (O 

co to h- r-~ 

■^ •*■ ■* co 



r- 


to O CO 
CM h- 


O O) 
CO 
O 


u 

a 






to 


CM ID CM 
O t- 
CM IO 


«- o 

CM 



CNCMIOSO'-OCO 


00 00 O) CO 


ncMioois h- 


CO CO O) 


m •>«■ ^- t- ^- o 


to to to 


CM 





CMOtO»-»-000 
CO CO r- N r- ^> 

CO CM CO t- CO ^" 



ss i-ntNO 
oo to oo t 



*r co cm o o> 

(O S CO 

CO to o 



to co to *— o 

CM 0> CM 

cm ■* h- 



o 

s 

a 



i-OOO 

in to 
CM lf> 



co t- n ^ n o »- 
i- co s to w 

•*■ CO CO CM CM 



o 


CM f- 00 O CO O 


tO CM r- T- O 


■* 


to CO CO ^- 


tO if) CM 


co 


in in m to 


CM If) 00 



a. 

< 

z 

g 

i- 
o 
ai 

_i 

UJ 

z 
O 



>«■ 


00 to *- t- to 
to o r>- 
i- ^ «f> 


tOr— CO * (O O r (M 
S CO (O U) r- If) 
CM CM CM t- CM r- 


CM »f) CO "i- t- CM 

N CO CT> If) 

co co co t— 


CO 00 CO CM IO 

i- o) r*. 

T~ CO If) 


o 

0) 

l_ 

Q_ 











co 
o 

0. 



SCO on to 

CO S t- 

CM If) 00 



to * co o m 
r->- oo o o> r-~ 
^- cm co ^- co 



CO CM 
CO 
CO 



CO CO O CO CO CM 
O N- If) CO 

If) If) If) to 



CO V- T- T- tO 

•* h- r- 

CM If) 00 



CM 

o 

CO 

I— 

0. 



CO If) O CM O 

O) CM CM 

CM CO 



cooo^tocnooo 


m to cm o o o 


r» co ■* oo ■* ■*■ 


t- O CM <*■ 


T- 1- T- to 


CM CM CM tO 



SOCMi-O 

r- ■* cm 

CM CO 



lf> tO tO O N- 

If) If) «- 

r- •* tO 



(OCOCO^^^O* 
S CO O (O (O CO 

CM CM CO r- CM CM 



cm r*~ oo to r- ^r 

t- O) <r- CO 

V (O ^ CM 



00 to CO O h~ 

O) T- t- 

T~ «* tO 



c 
g 

o 
_co 

i 

oj 



CD 

-g 

c 

CO 

o 



CO 

<u 



X 

-I 

< 

UJ 

I 



o 

a 

* = 

O J2 
CD 00 



o 

c 

JC 

o 

as 

co £ u 
Q. S 2 



co a> 

«i "5 c 

5 o ^ 

uj 2 re 

5 d 

» at 



O 

LU 
CO 

c 



-J JS x: o co n •£ ~ 
Q.coa-tt:i<:uj>S 






-j 
< 



o 

i- 



2 . 

° 2r 

•5 TO 

2 Q 



u 



s 
s 
o 
a 
a: «2 ts c 

m w re l. — 

3 = i-S.4 a 



ro 



a: 
O 

< 

z 



co 

c 

CO 

o 

CO 



a. 
5 "c: J 2 o 



° - 5 > £ 
X co £ $ 2 



155 



oo cm r-- ^- «- 


to om »- 


n m t ?- 


tOOOr- 


co -»r *r 


ID (O ^ V 


^r ■* m -fl- 


m s t- * 


r^- ■* cm 


o> ^r oo cm 


ic co o cm 


CO CD CM CM 


»- ■* co 


•* co 


t i- ID 


■fl- t- ID 





co t- t- o m 


co oo ^ m 


CO CM O if) 


■fl O) CM If) 




CM CM ■* 


r- * CO ^ 


id in n ^ 


n tt io v 


at 


CM TT CO 


T- Tt CO 


■«»■ ■«- CO 


TT f CO 


o 










?> 











00 


o> 


CD 
CD 


o 


"" 


oo 

CO 
CO 


CO 

CM 


CD 
00 


a> 


oo 

00 
CO 


CO 


o 
in 


,— 


00 
00 
CO 


CO 


co 
in 


CO 00 
o 00 

T- CO 


0. 


































r>- 


CM 
CM 
CO 


CD 


- 


O 


CO 

o 


O 
CO 


CD 
CD 


CO 
CM 


O) 
CO 

o 




oo 
oo 


CD 


o> 

CO 

o 


If) 

CO 


oo 

00 


co O) 

CM CO 

i- O 


o 










^ 








^ 








*~ 






^ 




































CO 


00 

o 


O 
CM 

in 


CM 


o 


o 

CM 


o> 
o> 


en 
m 


CD 

o 


o 

CM 


CO 
CO 


CM 

in 


CO 
CO 


o 

CM 


00 


a> 

00 


CO o 
00 CM 


o 
a) 



































co 
en 
en 



O 0> O r- © 

co m cm 

cm m oo 



O) *- o o 

CM 00 t- CM 

i- m i- oo 



T~ fl" If) O 

00 t- CM CM 

CO r- 00 



co m cm o 

V f) T (M 
CO i- 00 



{£ 




00 


CD 


o 


CM CO 


o> 


O) 


00 


CO 


CO 


T- 


CM 


CO 


T 


CD 


CO CO 


0. 

< 




■* 


CM 




r-*. 


h» 


O 


oo 


r- 


m 


o 


CM 


f- 


in 


r~~ 


fl- r- 




*™ 


■<r 




m 




"T 




lf> 




T 


,— 


Cf) 




ro 


r- m 


z 


<D 
































o 


a! 
































1- 


































o 


































UJ 




CO 


o 


o 


O CO 


CM 


•q- 


o 


CO 


CM 


o 


-«r 


CO 


if) 


CO 


00 CO 


_j 




oo 


CO 




*— 


^ 


00 


CM 


T— 


CO 


■"*■ 


i — 


1 — 


CO 


in 


CM r- 


Ul 


co 


T— 


CD 




oo 


*■■ 


if) 


T- 


00 




CO 


*~ 


oo 




CD 


r- 00 


z 


O 

a> 
































£ 


0. 
































o 


































h- 






































m 


■t 


T— 


o o 


f- 


■<r 


CD 


o 


O 


CM 


oo 


o 


O 


r- 


CO o 






CO 


m 




CM 


If) 




T 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CD 


CM 


CO 


o 


00 CM 




CM 




CM 




CO 




CM 




CO 




CM 




co 




CM 


CO 




O 

































,_ 


WOCNON 
O) CM r- 

r- *t CO 


* N CO S 

0) CO 00 r- 

*t CO 


O « U) N 
•<*■ co co t- 

*t v- CO 


m NO N 

«Cf CO •* T- 
T »- CO 


u 

CD 













CD 












>- 












«o 












Z 










c 
o 


o 










!S 


(0 










o 

CD 


(0 










a> 


S 










a> 


s 










OH 


o 




« 
C 






o 


o 




co 








>. 




O 






£ 


a: 




Q 






CB 


UJ 




u. 






T3 


i- 




c 




C 
CO 

O 


UJ 

S 

HI 


c 
co 
m 


CD 

E 

CO 




o 

10 

«5 






e 



2 
o 



z 
o 

w J2 

UJ c 

3|8o 

O co >- z 



CM 








z 








O 
















i- 








</) 








UJ 


c 






D 


co 


CD 


O 


a co > z 



z 
g 

^ i « 

2 -2 CD O 
O CD >- Z 



156 



CO 






LU 






> 












h- 






< 






h- 






z 




CO 


UJ 




s 


CO 


CO 


a: 


UJ 

oc 


O 


UJ 


UJ 


z oc 


oc 

o 

Z 


o 

UJ 

oc 


< 
UJ 

> 


a. 


co 






UJ 

5 

Z 

I 

r- 



X 

co 



co 



8 I 

it _ 

s S -^ o is 

n 

< Q 



3>-c8 2 

N O 4) W != 

„;ltJ . tt) LL 

ra Ow3cn5£s 



co 

UJ 

> 



oo cm o o o 

*~ O CM 

co in oo 



S 
a: 

UJ 

Z Q 

UJ uj 

w u> OC 

UJ — 

a: h a. 
Sox 

uj z uj 

oco* 

2- DC tt 
£0. < 
r* uj 
UJ £ 
UJ "^ 

5 N 

— UJ 



O 



< 
O 



<d 

t 
a> 

ti- 
ro 

c 
c 

<D 

QC 



z t: <* 

O (A « f 

<6 «= 



CD -> 



^5 



to 

UJ 



coo>coco<om*-oocOT-o 

*0)00)0'-(M'-'- CM 

oo «- cm «- cm cm co 



(O 


> 


0T> 




cn 


t- 


*- 


< 




»- 


€M 


Z 


_l 


UJ 


OC 
Q. 


CO 

UJ 


< 


oc 

Q. 


z 


UJ 


o 


oc 






*- 


o 


u 


z 


IU 




_l 


r- 


UJ 


UJ 




UJ 


z 
o 


s 

z 
> 



co 

5 

DC 
UJ 



OC 






< 






UJ 






>- 




c 


CO 

X 






CO 




O Si 




l/> 


■* != 




J£ 


o co 




c 


1 e 

co <u 




m 


Q. CO 



k. $s 



v> = 



E «> 

0) Q. 

5 co 

a> -> 

o S> 

O m 



W i? 2 

.* .y -^ 

"5 0) > 

CD J2 « 

<i> 3 ro 

.52 O CO 

H Q c 

<" E 



i/> o ^r *- 
r-~ ro co ^ 



nONIO (M 


CM 


^- CO 'fr CO ^ 


o> 




T 



co 



.<- E o 



c ■£ w 



$5 



m 


oc 






o 


UJ 






z oc 






o 

UJ 

cn 


< 

UJ 

>- 






a. 


co 
X 








CO 




CO 

CO 






</) 


52 






a 


c 






c 


c 






CO 


<u 






m o 



< 

o 



tt) 

</> 22 

c tt) 

1 75 

. — > 

5 c 

_ a) 

a) °- 

O CO 



Ji 

6 CD 

>» 0) 

?I 

S CO 



a) .5 
2 ^ 



S ro- 

-» co > 2 



tt) 
c3 
■g 

c 

CO 

O 



0) 

UJ 

> 

< 

I- 
z 

UJ 

Ui T" 
oc *~ 

UJ z 

*o 

UJ 
UJ 



z 
o 



0)IOU)IOi-0>^U)0)0(N 
(OOt^WlNO) o 

^•COCOCOCNJCOCOCNJ N- 

t- CO 



UJ 

> 



t- o •* 3 o r- •«»■ . 

lOOlOOSOOOGDOO) 



CM 00 CM CO CO 

— <j> o> m 

OCO^-COCMCMCMCMCMCM ^t 



Ui 

5 
OC 
UJ 

h- 

QC 
U^ 

> 

CO 
X 

cn 



52 



■j- CO 
tt) -o 
■S c 

O CO 

QC co 



c. 

■c 

• CO « 

.2 c a) c co S 

O < UJ 5 od S 5 



Z 
UJ 
CO 
LU 
OC 
0. 
UJ 

cn 

o 

z 

r- 
UJ 
UJ 

5 

z 

$ 

O 



CO 

S 
* oc 

o K 
z cn 

o < 
uj£ 
cn > 
a. 



< 

t- 
o 



2 c 



X 

CO 



il 

. o 

a. co 

w ! d 

-*: J^ CO 

c c c 
ra co tt) 

co 2 uj 



m <- *> 
J2 tt) o) 

8i"|s 

l^cS^ 

c tt) ^ c= 
j DC 



c 
a> 
tt> 
-x a> 



c «) co ^ 



157 



CO 
HI 

> 



ONSNionoomoioo 

O ^ O F) ^ (O »- 



z 

UJ 

a- 

UJ z 
QCq 

I* 

UJ 
UJ 

5 

z 

$ 

O 



CO 

<X 
UJ 

r- 
< 

UJ 

> 

co 

X 

CO 



2 

o 



i= c 



* -S 75 2 > £ 

c C »- Q) ^ 

0) S <D *- * >> o 

gi£gS8§ 



CO 



ML." — „CU_0 



CO 
UJ 

> 



ON(0(D«-0)Tf^(M CO 

cNincocoinio^-mco cm 

cm to 



O 

UJ 

_i 
UJ 

z 
O 



2£ 

UJ 
UJ 

5 

z 
o 



CO 

S 

CK 
UJ 

»- 

a 
< 

UJ 

>- 

CO 

X 

CO 



< 
o 



§ I* 

E "a 2J E £ 2 => 

•= co <u m a) it -c 

•* -5 £ * • i w 



qJ </> 



lJ5§5§22rac 



c 





CO 






Ui 






> 












r- 






< 






1- 






z 


co 




UI 


5 


c 
o 


CO 

UJ 

a. 




o 
a> 
a> 
a> 


UJ 

cc 

O 

z 


z cc 

UJ \" 


a: 


a. «"> 


i— 


r- 


X 


o 


Ui 






UJ 


CO 


0) 


S 




"(5 


z 




•o 


£ 




c 

CO 


o 




O 


t- 





COOOOONONOOOtO 

0)0inio»-ojinoo»- cm 

iOlOCOCOiJ-COCOCO CO 

T- ^ 



< 
o 



o> 



o = 5 a c 
-^ co -o -a fc 



CO 
SS (A 



CO . Z v_ • "^ 0) 



i" 3-S.2-? 



</> -^ «- _ 

is ai o (0 ™ r c 
co a. x a: 5 o o 






CO 

UJ 

> 



z 

UJ 
CO 
UI 

go 

UJ z 

* o 

I* 

Ui 
UJ 

s 

z 

$ 

o 



mocomcooo'f'-coo 
Trcor-rgcocMiDT- r- 

l"»- CO CO CO CO CO CO oo 

i- CO 



5 










_i 
< 


a 










h- 


UJ 










O 


t- 










*- 


oc 












< 




ij 








UJ 




CO 








>- 




• S K * 








CO 




^ O Q c « 








X 

CO 




e.J 

ngt 

rris 

ill 

xtoi 

per 










Fudg 
Harri 
X. Ha 
Ham 
se Se 
A. Pi| 




















t/> 


co O .9 * -i & 


c 








c 

CO 

m 


iiiiii 

O O 51 CO C .C 
° ° U_ CO < O 


0) 


O 

2 





158 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 29, 1996 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center by the Moderator, Dennis E. McHugh at 7:35 PM, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 155 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. He went over the various 
procedures and pointed out the fire exits. 

The Moderator then asked for a moment of silence in honor 
of two individuals who have passed away since the October meeting. 
Carl A. Olsson , who died on November 5, 1995. He had served for 
twelve years on the School Committee from 1983-1995, been a 
member of the Board of Registrars and Personnel Board. Margaret 
Johnson, Town Meeting Representative from precinct 6, who died 
on March 13, of this year. She had attended Town Meeting for 
many years prior to it becoming representative style in 1989, then as 
a Town Meeting Representative. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. Motion carried, unanimously, by a show of hands. 
Selectman Lawlor moved to waive the reading of the warrant. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator then asked for permission to allow 
non-residents Bernie DiNatale, and Karen Mazza, from the School 
Department to address the Body if need be concerning any budget or 
article questions. Motion carried, unanimously, by a show of hands. 

Under Article 1.. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved to hear 
reports of the Town Officers and Committees. 

The Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch explained that an 
article was passed last year which requires the Manager to report on 
any non-zoning or budget articles that were passed the previous year. 
The actual report is on file with the original Town Meeting minutes 
in the Town Clerk's Office. He spoke about the following articles 
from the April 1995 Annual Town Meeting: 

159 



Articles 8,10,11,13,15,16,17,18,19,20 and 23. From the Special 
Town Meeting of May 4th. Articles 1,3,4,9,10,11 and 12. 

The Town Manager then addressed the Town Meeting Body 
giving the Financial Condition of the Town for FY 1996. He went 
over the Town Accountant's quarterly report. So far the Town has 
received 75% of the estimated revenues. He gave a status report of 
expenditures for the various Town Departments. He then gave a 
report of the five year financial plan that he developed along with 
the Board of Selectmen and other departments. The goal is to allow 
the Town to maintain services and improve facilities and allow to 
generate tax relief for the residents while maintaining and improving 
the financial condition. He touched upon the highlights of the plan. 
To increase capital investment. Put more money towards sidewalks 
and parks and road improvements. Continue with the vehicle 
replacement program. Make building improvements. And to get the 
Stabilization Fund to grow at the end of five years to $3.2 million 
dollars. The goal is to get the Fund to an appropriate level, which is 
5% of the operating budget. It has been anticipated that by the year 
2001 the operating budget will be close to $60 million dollars, so the 
Stabilization Fund should be at $3.2 million dollars. He went over 
the planned facility projects. The Community Center at the Old 
Town Hall. An addition to the Adams Library and Police Station. It 
is the intent to implement the Central Square Traffic plan and 
Community Action programs. All of this is to been accomplished 
without any increase in taxes, beyond that which is provided for 
under the law. And most importantly to move ahead with tax 
reductions with utilizing surplus monies to give back to taxpayers a 
form of dividends. 

He then showed a list of Revenue Assumption. These are 
projects that will draw from the Stabilization Fund in certain years. 
In 1999 the Center School project will draw $220,000.00. In 2000, 
$700,000.00 and in 2001 $450,000.00. All this is to be done while 
still maintaining a $3.2 million dollar level of Stabilization. This 
dollar amount is essential for a Town the size of Chelmsford. The 
current Stabilization balance is $1.8 million dollars. He is proposing 
to add $550,000.00 to the fund and with the anticipated interest of 
$108,000.00, the account will have a balance of $2.4 million dollars. 

160 



Then each year after with the certification of free cash $250,000.00 
will be added to the fund. 

He then showed a list of Expenditure Assumption. The 
average personnel cost is to be 2.5% per year, which is the estimated 
cost of living increase. This amount could fluctuate it is not set. 
The Health Insurance increase is 4% per year, Expenses are 
estimated to be 4%, Capital Improvement projects $1.2 million 
dollars, $3 million dollars for the Library addition to begin in FY 
1997 and $2 million dollars for the Police Station addition to begin 
in 1998. This is a positive plan, revenue estimates are realistic yet 
conservative and the proposed improvement projects are essential. 

The Moderator asked for a vote to accept the Town 
Manager's report. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator then announced that today was Student 
Government Day at the High School and that a number of students 
had participated. For the record he read the names and ask each 
student to stand. 



Selectmen 
Scott Johnson 
Khara Campbell 
Kevin Ready 
Mike Costa 
Chris Wu 

Cemetery Superintendent 
Kyle Kydd 
Katie Dube 
Erin Wojtowicz 
Stephen Woodbury 



Board of Health 
Helena Safran 
Margaret Feeney 
Vlad Shamritsky 

Sewer Commission 
Garen Boghosian 
Paul Langworthy 
Will Woods 

School Superintendent 
Fred Marcks 



Housing Authority Director 
Kristen Learson 
Holly Driscoll 
Colleen Mullen 



Ass't Superintendent 
Janelle Rockett 



161 



School Committee 
Kristen Higgins 
Jacob Silva 
Jen Hardy 
Carolyn Bleck 



Planning Board 
Matt Sager 
Andy Cline 
Tom Peal 



State Senator 
Allison Govoni 



State Representative 
Jonathan Quimby 



Library Director 
Melissa Eisenman 
Luke Chao 



Town Accountant 
Lynne Tanner 



Police Chief 
Zbigniew Butkiewicz 



Ass't Police Chief 
Rachel Terrace 



Fire Chief 
Sean Davis 



Asst't Fire Chief 
Mike Muise 



DPW Director/Engineer 
Jason Soo Hoo 



Building Inspector 
Jason Allberg 



Superintendent of Streets 
David MacPhail 



Wiring Inspector 
Peter Cormier 



Town Manager 
Chris Steiling 



Town Clerk 
Annamarie Hawking 



Council on Aging Director 
Lora McCormack 



Town Moderator 
Patrick Walsh 



Finance Director/Treasurer 
Joseph Rogers 
Dave Dickieson 



Chief Assessor 
Melissa Bator 



Ass't Assessors 
Jim Fraser 
Deborah Sheehan 
Eva Price 



Veteran's Agent 
Geno Villare 



162 



Land Use Coordinator Town Constable 

David Walsh Jessica Hill 

Recreation Coordinator 
Jessica Hill 

The Town Meeting Representatives gave the students a 
round of applause. The Town Moderator proceeded onto Article 2. 
In the middle of the discussion of this article, he noted that State 
Representative Carol Cleven and State Senator Lucile Hicks were 
present and requested them to come forward and give their reports 
to the Body. He apologized that this hadn't been done under Article 
1.** Representative Cleven spoke about pending bills relating with 
local aid and tax relief for title 5 and charter school reimbursements. 
Senator Hicks explained that she was not seeking another term as 
State Senator and took this opportunity to said good-bye to all her 
constituents. She expressed how much she enjoyed serving as the 
State Senator and that she would miss doing so. She went over the 
pending bills in the Senate. 

Under Article 2. The Moderator read the motion which 
listed the eleven budget categories citing the total amount of 
Personnel Services and Expenses under each. He then explained that 
he would again announce each category and their amounts 
individually and list the various departments that fell under each 
category. If there were to be any questions or discussion it will be 
addressed within the category. Under Municipal Administration 
with a total budget of $1,507,153.00 a question was asked by John 
O'Connell concerning the Town Manager's budget process and his 
salary. He wanted to know who decides the total budget for each 
department and if the Body wanted to increase the Town Manager's 
salary are they allowed to do so. The Town Manager explained that 
he is responsible for determining the what the final budget figure 
will be for each department. His salary is determined by a contract 
with the Board of Selectmen. Even if the Body were to decide to 
increase his salary, they could only increase personnel line item in 
his budget, because he has a contract, he will not receive the 
increase. 



163 



The Moderator read the School Department Category with a 
total budget of $29,516,635.00, Mary Frantz, Chairman of the 
School Committee said that the budget increased by $1.3 million 
dollars. $860,000.00 of it is the 3.5 % increase by the Town which 
is in line with what the Educational Reform Law expects the Town 
to increase. 12% will come from State Aid which is almost a half a 
million dollars. She noted that the Committee had made significant 
reduction in expenses which freed up $1.9 million dollars for 
funding additional programs. The School Committee supports the 
$29.5 figure and she asked School Committee Member, Angelo 
Taranto to come forward and explain the new programs. He 
explained that there are much needed programs and staff and 
supplies that are being added to the budget. Some of these programs 
and staff had been cut in the past due to budget constraints and were 
now being reinstated. He give a complete list of areas effected. 
Clare Jeannotte questioned what was the Town's Education Reform 
Act mandated spending level? Mary Frantz explained that 
Chelmsford is slightly above the required level, but below 
"foundation budget", the minimal level which is where the State 
feels at the end of seven years the Town should be at. Clare 
Jeannotte questioned why the Charter School Budget didn't appear 
separate like the Nashoba Technical High budget did? The Town 
Manager explained that the way the State Law statute reads is that 
the Towns are assessed an amount to the member communities based 
on enrollment and population at the time. The Charter School is a 
creation of the Education Reform Act, which allows the State to 
charter certain schools and the money is based on amount of students 
enrolled, multiplied by average cost per pupil. The money will then 
be deducted off the State Aid when the Cherry sheet comes in. At 
that time if there are adjustments to be made the Body must decide 
what expenditures will be reduced in order to balance the budget. 
Clare Jeannotte questioned under which budget would the reduction 
take place? The Town Manager explained that the intent of the 
Reform Act was that this would occur under the School area, 
however that would be up to discussion. 

The Moderator noted that he had inadvertently not 
recognized State Representative Carol eleven's and State Senator 
Hicks under Article 1 and asked them to come forward and address 

164 



the Body at this time. (See ** Under Article 1 for further 
information regarding this matter) 

The Moderator then read the Nashoba Tech High School 
category with a total budget of $627,117.00. Cheryl Warshafsky 
questioned why there was 26% increase in the budget if there was 
only a 18% increase in enrollment? Mary Jo Griffin came forth and 
explained that she had just been newly appointed to the NTHS 
Committee as a regular member and had just attended one meeting, 
she asked the Business Manager Ralph Dumais to answer the 
question. He explained that the vast majority contribution 
assessment of Chelmsford is the minimal contribution mandated by 
the State Education Reform Act. Although Chelmsford makes up a 
little under 26% of total enrollment, Chelmsford's assessment only 
represents under 25% of total assessment. This is a case that the 
Education Reform Act is applied fairly. When there is an increase in 
students to a vocational school the funds are shifted to the regional 
school, the funds follow the students. 

The Moderator read the Public Safety category with a total 
budget of $6,314,289.00. Cheryl Warshafsky then moved to 
increase the Fire Department's budget line item 5 by $200,000.00. to 
fund East and West Fire Stations to be taken from the Stabilization 
Fund to be used directly for the purpose of manning the East and 
West Fire Station. She felt that the East and West Fire stations were 
not opened continuously nor fully manned and expressed her 
concern for the people in the immediate area. The Moderator 
explained that this would require a majority vote to amend the 
budget figure, then a 2/3's vote would have to be taken at the end of 
the budget in order to use the money from the Stabilization Fund. 
The Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion to transfer. 
The Board of Selectmen were four against and one in favor in 
transferring the money. The Town Manager was not in favor and 
expressed his reason. He felt that the occasional closing of these 
stations were not jeopardizing the public safety, and that there were 
no indications otherwise. A discussion followed. Ronald Wetmore 
asked if the Fire Chief could explain just what he needed to keep the 
stations opened. Fire Chief John Parow explained that currently in 
the budget there is an additional $40,000.00 which will be used for 

165 



overtime in order to keep these two stations opened more hours. In 
order to fully maintain all the stations through out the Town, he 
would need a budget figure of $280,000.00. Matthew St. Hilaire 
questioned if the figures reflected were prior to any contract 
settlements, then how much additional money would be needed once 
the contract was settled, and where would it come from? The Town 
Manager explained that these figures are based on the present rates 
and if and when the contract is settled then most likely additional 
money will be required over and above the proposed transfer. He 
explained that the Stabilization Fund can only be used for this 
purpose once so the additional money will have to be added by a 
Town Meeting vote. Henrick Johnson moved the question to stop 
debate. The Chair attempted a show of hands, which left him in 
doubt, the following tellers were asked to come forward and take an 
hand count: 

Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John Maleski. 
The result: Yes 129 No 6 2/3's is 90, motion carried. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend, motion defeated. 

The Moderator then read the Public Works Budget, Sewer 
Commission Budget, Cemetery Department Budget and Community 
Services Budget. Under the Library Budget with a total figure of 
$910,802.00. John O'Connell questioned who decides what the 
Library Budget will be. Is it the Elected Library Trustee's or the 
Town Manager? The Town Manager explained that he has the final 
decision on what the budget will be. The Moderator continue to 
read the Undistributed Expenses Budget and the Debt and Interest 
Budget. He asked for a vote of a show of hands on the total budget 
of $54,713,999.00, motion carried, unanimously. The article reads 
as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $54,713,999.00 to defray Town 
charges for the fiscal period July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 according 
to the following line items: 



166 



Municipal Administration 

Personnel Services 1 ,005,883 .00 

Expenses 501,270.00 

Chelmsford School Department 29,516,635.00 
Nashoba Technical High School 

Assessment 627,117.00 

Public Safety 

Personnel Services 5,744,879.00 

Expenses 569,410.00 

Public Works 

Personnel Services 1,187,664.00 

Expenses 3,172,787.00 

Offset Receipt ( 738,643.00) 

TOTAL 3,621,808.00 

Sewer Commission 

Expenses 17,500.00 

Cemetery Department 

Personnel Services 180,512.00 

Expenses 16,375.00 

Community Services 

Personnel Services 375,752.00 

Expenses 147,617.00 

Library 

Personnel Services 690,733.00 

Expenses 220,069.00 

Undistributed Expense 5,291,000.00 

Debt and Interest 

Principal 4,368,434.00 

Interest 1,819,005.00 



167 



Under Article 3. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $2,000.00 from Conservation 
fees under Wetlands Special Reserve Fund to reduce the 
Conservation Commission budget Fiscal Year 1997. 

The Town Manager explained that this is from the Wetlands 
Protection Act account, the money is used to offset the Conservation 
Budget. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 4. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $1,250,000.00 from Sewer Betterment's, 
to reduce the exempt portion of debt and interest in the Fiscal Year 
1997 budget. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 5. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $338,628.00 from Sewer Rate 
Relief Funds, to reduce the exempt portion of debt and interest in the 
Fiscal Year 1997 budget. 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the article. The Moderator asked for 
a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 6. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $1,285,000.00 for the 
following capital projects: 

Department Project Expenditure 

Fire Pumping Engine 230,000.00 

Staff Vehicle 21,000.00 

Police Cruiser Replacement 100,000.00 

Dog Officer Vehicle 1 5,000.00 

168 



DPW Drainage 75,000.00 

One (1) One-Ton Truck 30,000.00 

Truck/Highway Div Foreman 24,000.00 

Parks Improvement 25,000.00 

DPW/School 

Sidewalk Design&Construct 250,000.00 
Recreation/School 

Multi-Purpose Facility 100,000.00 

Schools 
High School 

Upgrade Heat & A/C Systems 36,000.00 
Replace Microscopes 

(25@$1,238.00) 31,000.00 

Cafeteria Tables 3 1,000.00 

McCarthy School 

Roof Work - Gym Apron 25,000.00 
Road Repaying 20,000.00 

Lecture Hall Seats 10,000.00 

All Buildings 

Clock System 60,000.00 

Technology 

Network School System 100,000.00 

Workstations 102,000.00 

TOTAL 1,285,000.00 

and to transfer the sum of $1,038.16 from unexpended bond 
proceeds under Article 13 of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting, 
transfer the sum of $7,079.16 from unexpended bond proceeds under 
Article 8 of the 1990 Annual Town Meeting, transfer the sum of 
$18,113.85 from unexpended bond proceeds under Article 16 of the 
1992 Annual Town Meeting, transfer $12,184.63 from unexpended 
bond proceeds under Article 28 of the 1993 Annual Town Meeting, 
transfer $5,719.20 of unexpended bond proceeds under Article 30 of 
the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, transfer $10,865.00 of the 
unexpended bond proceeds under Article 3 of the 1995 Town 
Meeting, and to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow $1,230,000.00 under Massachusetts 



169 



General Laws Chapter 44, Sections 7 and 8 or any other enabling 
authority. 

George Merrill questioned who decides what parks will be 
improved and how much money is spent to do so. The Town 
Manager explained that this comes under the jurisdiction of the 
DPW Director. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 7. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of appropriate the 
sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of 
the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws Chapter 40, 
Section 6. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 8. Superintendent John Sousa moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $12,500.00 from the sale of the 
Graves and Lots to the Cemetery Improvement and Development 
Fund. 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 9. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $19,000.00 to 
engage a private accounting firm to prepare an audit of all accounts 
in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

170 



Under Article 10, Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 
for the purpose of funding the sand lease approved by the Town 
Under Article 12 of the 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a housekeeping 
article. It is used to pay for the lease of land behind the Highway 
garage where sand is removed from. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 11. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $500,000.00 
to the Stabilization Fund. 

The Town Manager explained that this is the money he 
wanted to put aside in the Stabilization Fund in order to build up this 
fund to be 5% of the operating budget. This is recommended by the 
Banking Commission and the Financial Advisory. It doesn't make 
sense to apply it to the operating budget, it should be saved and used 
towards future projects. Wendy Marcks wanted to know if this could 
wait and be done in October at the fall meeting? The Town 
Manager explained that the commitment should be made now. The 
money could be transfer if need be to be used at a later date, 
however the plan is to use it for the projects mentioned. Wendy 
Marcks felt that perhaps this money could be used if there was a 
shortfall as the result of the State Aid being less than anticipated. He 
felt that it was the intention of the School Reform Act that any type 
of reduction if need be would come from the school budget because 
the amount of money from State Aid is based on the per student cost. 
However, the final decision whatever or wherever the reduction need 
be made will be done by Town Meeting vote. Ed Cady asked where 
the Charter School is going to get its money from to pay for teachers 
and budget. The Town Manager explained that this will come from 
the State, from the monies taken from the reduction in State Aid on 
the Cherry Sheet. Cheryl Boss said in the past that the Stabilization 
Fund could not be used for salaries or budget items, and wasn't it 

171 



better for the Town's bond rating to have the money put aside? The 
Town Manager explained that the law has changed a few years ago 
and now the money can be used for these items. And it would be in 
the Town's benefit to have money in the Stabilization Fund. This is 
essential to achieve and maintain the Town's good bond rating The 
Finance Committee supported the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of 
a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 12. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to 
establish a Community Action Program to be administered by a 
committee of citizens established and appointed by the Town 
Manager in order to provide matching funds to community 
improvement projects by individuals and/or organizations within the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a successful 
program in operation in Colorado. At different times neighborhood 
groups, civic groups approach the Town seeking funds to do small 
projects that will improve the quality of life in the Town. This 
would give added incentive to these groups. He'd like to try it for 
two years then possibly increasing it up to $40,000.00 if need be. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 13. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $12,500.00 to 
provide Senior Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for 
services rendered, pursuant to an agreement formulated by the 
Council on Aging and approved by the Town Manager. 

The Town Manager explained that this is the fourth year of 
this program. It has been extremely successful. There have been 
thirty communities in Massachusetts and surrounding communities 
throughout the United States that have copied this program. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen enthusiastically recommended the article. The Moderator 

172 



asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 14. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $103.38 to 
meet bills from previous years. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a left over bill from 
Nashua School Bus Company. It was for transferring the High 
School Band to the Memorial Day Parade. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 15. Chairman of the Sewer Commission, 
John P. Emerson Jr. moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $49,000,000.00 as the local share of the cost 
for designing and constructing sewers, pump stations, and force 
mains to complete the Town's Sewering Project by providing sewers 
to the remainder of the Town, including related legal, administrative, 
and other pertinent expenses and the acquisition by purchase, 
eminent domain, or otherwise of all necessary easements and rights 
in land; that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $49,000,000.00 
under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8(15); that 
the Sewer Commission is authorized to contract for and expend any 
federal, state or other aid available for the project, and is further 
authorized to execute all contracts deemed necessary and appropriate 
to complete the Town Sewering Project as set forth above; that 
betterments shall be assessed based on sewer construction in 
accordance with the applicable provisions of the Massachusetts 
General Laws; and that the Sewer Commission is authorized to take 
any other action necessary to carry out this project. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission John P. Emerson Jr. 
explained the article. On April 2 of this year, there was a ballot 
question in which 79.5% of the people who voted, voted in favor of 
continuing the Sewer project. This Town Meeting vote is the next 
step necessary for authorization of spending the money for the 

173 



project. Presently there is activity going on at the State level to 
allow a zero point interest bill, which would give those betterment 
payers of $7,500.00 an automatic reduction in their cost of 
betterment's in the vicinity of about $3,100.00. Also future relief is 
coming for the sewer project. It will lift the limit on contracts which 
would allow escalated construction projects and pay back the debt 
more quickly then done in the past. As of July 1st of this year there 
will be $10,546,000.00 in retired construction debt, which was the 
entire amount of the N. Chelmsford project. The results of the April 
2nd ballot question indicates to the Sewer Commissioners that they 
are doing a good job and that the homeowners and taxpayers have 
set their priority for the community and asked for support of the 
article. 

John O'Connell question the exempt tax funds. He wanted to 
know if the funding isn't used how does the money get returned to 
the taxpayer? John Emerson explained that the money is controlled 
by a State Revolving Fund. When a project goes out for contracted 
bids the Town borrows only the amount needed to fund the contract, 
so there is no money to return. A discussion took place. C. Fred 
Mansfield the Financial Director, verified the bonding process. Paul 
Gleason asked questions concerning the increased betterment fee 
costs when this phase is started. John Emerson explained that the 
price of Sewering has gone up over the years since the project first 
started. He explained that in order to proceed with this future plan 
the fee will most likely be increased to $7,500.00. When the project 
first started the betterment was $1,250.00. At that time there were 
State grants available that provided 70% of the cost, that the Town 
took advantage of. The money has since dried up. Now when the 
work is done on North Road the fee may be about $2,000.00, when 
the project gets to the Hart Pond area its likely to be $3,000.00. The 
Commission has been upfront with the higher betterment fees from 
the very beginning when discussing this future plan. They are 
continually working towards reducing this cost. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
Bradford Emerson moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. George 
Merrill said that the voters should take a look of what has been 
accomplished up to this point before proceeding any further. 

174 



Perhaps an Independent Engineering audit should be hired. It would 
verify that everything that has been accomplished and is planned for 
the future is done properly. The present system is not a gravity 
system, it is pumped with electricity, with the present cost being 
budgeted at $98,000.00. What will the cost be when the project is 
completely done? He felt that an area on Dunstable Road wasn't 
repaved correctly and said that problems occurred. He also wanted 
the voters to think about twenty years down the road. The Town 
may be responsible for any additional fees that might occur if the 
Sewerage Treatment plant in Lowell is in need of repairs due to 
changes in the Federal Regulations. John Wilder urged the body to 
support the article. He felt his property value will increase, 
eventually his twenty year old septic system will have to be replaced 
and the ground water is plentiful and of excellent quality, it should 
be maintained because it may be sellable. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands 
on the article, which left the Chair in doubt, a 2/3's vote is required. 
He asked the tellers to come forward and conduct a hand count. At 
this time John Emerson asked for a roll call vote. He felt that the 
voters who went to the polls on April 2nd and voted five to one in 
favor, should see where their Representatives stood on the issue. The 
Moderator explained that in order to do this, forty Representatives 
had to be in favor of the motion therefore he asked the tellers to 
conduct a hand count. The result was 56 Representatives in favor. A 
roll call vote was conducted. The Moderator explained the process. 
Town Clerk Mary E. St. Hilaire, read the Representatives names 
alphabetically in Precinct order, and recorded the vote of each as 
Yes, No or absent. The Moderator then asked by Precinct order if 
any Representative wished to record his/her vote or to change their 
vote if already recorded. Precincts 1 through 3 nothing changed, 
Under Precinct 4 Matthew St. Hilaire, who was not present in the 
room when the vote was recorded, changed from absent to Yes. The 
Moderator then asked if any Representative from Precinct 5 through 
9 wished to record his/her vote or to change their vote if already 
recorded. Hearing none he declared the polling closed, and the votes 
were tallied. Results Yes 147 No 2 2/3's is 99 the motion carried. 
(The actual result of the individual Representatives can be viewed in 
the Town Clerk's Office.) 

175 



At this time Janet Dubner moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday May 6th. She explained the purpose of requesting the 
Monday vs Thursday adjournment. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were not in favor of adjourning until Monday 
evening. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
adjourn, motion defeated. George Ripsom then moved to adjourn 
the meeting until Thursday, May 2nd at 7:30 PM at the Senior 
Citizen Center on Groton Road. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 10:50 
PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



176 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 2, 1996 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center by the Moderator, Dennis E. McHugh at 7:40 PM, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 157 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. Selectman Thomas Welch 
requested a moment to addressed the Town Meeting Body. On May 
1st a Bone Marrow Drive was held in his name. As a result, there 
were 1,158 donors added to the national register. He expressed his 
thanks to the workers and everyone who participated in the event. 
The Town Meeting Body responded with a round of applause. 

Under Article 16. Library Trustee Chairman Jaclyn D. 
Matzkin moved that the Town vote to authorize the design, 
construction, and original equipping of a new library facility to be 
constructed as an addition to the existing Adams Library and 
appurtenant Town owned properties, and further to authorize the 
Board of Library Trustees, Board of Selectmen, and/or Town 
Manager to apply for any State and/or Federal funds which might be 
available to defray all or part of the cost of the design, construction 
and original equipping of the addition to the Adams Library and to 
authorize the Board of Library Trustees to accept and expend any 
such funds when received without further appropriation under the 
supervision of the Town Manager. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. 
This is the same article that appeared before the Body a year ago. 
The Library Trustees had applied to the State for a grant, which was 
denied. In October of 1995, a question was put on a Special 
Election ballot to override Proposition 2 1/2 , which failed. This 
article is to keep the Town's option opened. If it passes, it will allow 
the Library Trustees to petition the State again for funding. If the 
Town receives the grant, the Library will not be automatically built. 
The Town Meeting Body must vote to appropriate the money. The 
Manager explained that this new plan has addressed all the concern's 
that the voter's had with the previous plan presented in the fall. 
There will be an additional 100 parking spaces, no flat roof, the 

177 



Pink house will stay, no increase in staff, taxes will not go up. The 
money will come from the retired debt. Clare Jeannotte asked how 
much money will be used from the Stabilization Fund. The Town 
Manager explained that $220,000.00 will be drawn for the Center 
School project and the Library addition. There will be $700,000.00 
and $450,000.00 drawn for future projects at another time. The 
Finance Committee is in favor of the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. 

A discussion took place. Jeffrey Stallard said that the people 
voted no against the Library addition. Felt it was still the same. The 
Manager further explained that the Library is presently not 
handicapped accessible, and is in violation of the American 
Disability Act. The Town has been able to waive accessibility 
pending the addition issue, however time is now running out and it 
must be dealt with. Regardless if the grant is received, the Town 
will have to spend at least $500,000.00 to achieve the required 
accessibility. If this is done the only area where the entrance must 
be put will take away 35% of space that the Library cannot afford 
to loose. He would not be doing his job if he allows the money to be 
spent without informing the voters of the results. Instead of 
improving the Library, in reality this will be cutting it back. Janet 
Dubner and Michael Sockol spoke in favor. Ronald Wetmore spoke 
against the location. He felt that the people weren't against the total 
concept it was the location. He suggested that it be built on Town 
Land by the High School entrance on Richardson Road. Some 
comments were made saying that the voters should be able to vote 
on this again. Edward Cady wanted to know how the Internet will 
effect the Library's future. The Town Manager said that the Library 
will be on the cutting edge of technology. Dennis Ready spoke in 
favor. Daniel Frantz said that other long range plans that are not 
override items are not ballot questions, this shouldn't be one. Karen 
Ready said that not all researching can be done on the Internet. 
Books are still needed. More Representatives spoke in favor of the 
article. Thomas Moran felt that a non-binding referendum question 
should be put on the next annual Town Election ballot. He moved 
that the following motion be voted. "Town Meeting request that the 
Selectman place a non-binding referendum at the next regular annual 
election following the state grant approval asking the voters if they 

178 



approve the library project?" The Finance Committee was against 
the motion. The majority of the Selectmen were against the motion. 
David McLachlan spoke against the motion. He felt that this went 
against the purpose of Representative Style Town Meeting. Jeffrey 
Stallard asked that the Board of Selectman be polled on their 
recommendation. Selectmen Gates, Lawlor and Welch were against 
the motion. Selectmen Dalton and Weisfeldt were in favor. The 
Town Manager spoke against the motion. He explained that the 
grant deadline was by March 1st of 1997. If any wording is added, 
it may be sending a message that the Town isn't behind the project. 
Michael Sockol moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. The 
following tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. Dorothy 
Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John Maleski. The result 
was Yes 103 No 42, 2/3's is 97, the motion carried. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend. The motion was 
defeated. 

More discussion took place under the main motion. Ronald 
Wetmore felt that Representatives must vote the way the people 
want, not how a Representative feels. John Emerson questioned 
about dropping the first paragraph, would this be restricting. The 
Town Manager said yes it would. George Merrill said that this 
article is saying that the Town is going to build the library. The 
Town Manager explained that the Town must have plans in place to 
show that the Town is sincere. We cannot build if there is no money 
appropriated. More discussion took place regarding the wording. 
William Griffin moved to amend the article by inserting "To see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the presentation of the State of Mass 
existing plans by Tappe' Associates for the design, 

construction equiping of the addition to the Adams 

Library, (and delete the rest the wording)" The Finance Committee 
did not recommend the motion to amend. Board of Selectmen 
unanimously did not recommend the motion. Town Counsel John 
Georgio, expressed concern about changing the language. He 
recommended that the language not be changed. This is the 
language recommended by the State. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Clare 
Jeannotte said that she felt the voter's were actually against 

179 



overriding Proposition 2 1/2 and not against the Library's need to 
expand. John Coppinger felt that the Representatives should honor 
the October vote. William Griffin spoke in favor. He said all the 
issues from October's election have been addressed, and the Town 
couldn't afford to do this due to possible litigation because of 
accessibility. Karen Ready moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. He then asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands on the article. Motion carried. 
John Coppinger requested a roll call vote. The Moderator explained 
the time factor involved and the procedure necessary. He asked the 
tellers to come forward and conduct a hand count. There were 34 
Representatives were in favor of the motion. The by-law states 40 
Representatives must be in favor, the motion is denied. 

John Wilder expressed a point of order. He felt that the 
Moderator had discouraged a roll call vote by the way the issue was 
addressed. He hopes that this would not happen in the future. The 
Moderator so noted the comment. 

Under Article 17. Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
and all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any property in 
fee simple with the trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, for the property located in the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, and further described and shown on Exhibits 
showing sidewalk maintenance and construction easements, Dalton 
Road and Steadman Street, Chelmsford, MA prepared for the Town 
of Chelmsford, April 1996, by Town of Chelmsford, Engineering 
Division, said Exhibits to be presented at Town Meeting, for the 
purpose of constructing and maintaining sidewalks and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 

The Town Manager explained the article and the location of 
the takings. Some money will come from Chapter 90 for the takings 
along Dalton Road. Steve Hadley question the location along 
Dalton Road. Why was this being done if there all ready sidewalks 
along the Street. The Traffic and Safety Committee recommended 
that even though there is an existing sidewalk on portions of Dalton 
Road, a new one should be installed and the present one brought up 

180 



to code. Fran McDougall questioned when a sidewalk will be done 
on Golden Cove Road. DPW Director and Town Engineer Jim 
Pearson, said that the need is there, however, other immediate areas 
must be done first. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. Steven Hadley asked that the 
article be defeated. Ralph Nebalski said that the neighbors who have 
school children have been expressing concern about the safety issue 
of the area for years. He asked the Body to support the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried. 

Under Article 18. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the 
reading of the article be waived. Motion carried, unanimously be a 
show of hands. George Ripsom explained the article. Evelyn Thoren 
stressed that this is not a tax, it is a voluntary contribution. A slip of 
paper will be inserted with each and every real-estate and excise bill. 
The person indicates the amount they wish to contribute. The 
Treasurer said he would support the process. Michael Sockol wanted 
to know if a certain amount will be disbursed or just the interest. The 
Committee will keep a certain amount and invest the rest in high 
interest accounts. Questions were asked concerning if the Charter 
School could apply. Town Counsel John Georgio said that they 
could. The Finance Committee did not recommend the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
explained that there is a proposed amendment to correct some typo 
errors and added wording to the original. The Finance Committee 
was not in favor of the motion to amend. The Board of Selectmen 
supported the motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend, motion carried, unanimously. 
Michael Sockol moved to limit debate to thirty minutes. Motion was 
defeated. Steven Mallette spoke against the article. He said it would 
effect any PTA fund raising events that are held throughout the year. 
Jeffrey Stallard spoke in favor. Bonnie Wilder said this would be a 
great benefit to the teachers. Brian Latina spoke in favor of the 
article. Barry Balan said that it's not a hard decision to make. If 
someone didn't want to make a contribution then they throw the slip 
out or they can send it back with their contribution, the body should 
move on to other articles. Karen Ready moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion carried, unanimously by a show of hands. The 

181 



Moderator then asked for a vote on the main motion as amended. 
Motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that the Town vote to 
accept the Provisions of General Laws Chapter 60, Section 3C, 
authorizing the establishment the Chelmsford Arts and Technology 
Education Fund, and to amend the General By-Laws by adding a 
new Section 13 to Article VII, to read as follows: 

Section 13: Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education Fund 

A. PURPOSE 

The Town of Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education 
Fund is established in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws. Chapter 60, Section 3C, as amended 
by the Acts of 1993 to provide supplemental educational funding for 
local educational needs. 

B. DEFINITIONS 

1 . Local educational needs will be defined as the needs of those 
schools and students that are under the jurisdiction of the Local 
Educational Agency (LEA) which is the Chelmsford Public Schools. 

2. Supplemental educational funding shall be defined as that 
which adds to, enhances, or continues the educational opportunities 
provided by the Local Educational Agency and funded by the Town 
of Chelmsford. Supplemental funding will not take the place of 
funds requested in the Chelmsford School Committee's annual 
budget request which support the essential curriculum and programs 
of the Chelmsford Public Schools or be used to create new, ongoing 
programs or reinstitute cancelled programs that a future annual 
budget of the Chelmsford Public Schools might be expected to 
support. 

3. The Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education Fund will 
include the subject areas concerning the liberal and fine arts and 



182 



technology. Applications will be made for funding of programs, 
events, supplies, and/or equipment. 

4. The Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education Fund will 

be known hereafter and referred to as the Chelmsford ATEF. 

C. THE CHELMSFORD ATEF COMMITTEE 

1. There will be established a Chelmsford ATEF Committee to 
administer the Chelmsford ATEF and to authorize the expenditure of 
its funds. 

2. Members of the Chelmsford ATEF Committee will include 
the Superintendent of Schools or his/her designee thereof, six 
residents of the Town of Chelmsford that will include at least three 
parents who presently have children in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools, a member of the business community, a senior citizen, and 
a member-at-large. 

3. Appointment to three year terms will be made in accordance 
with the statute. Upon initial formation of the ATEF Committee, 
terms of members will be arranged so that the terms of as nearly an 
equal number of members as is possible shall expire each year. 

D. MEETINGS 

1. The Chelmsford ATEF Committee shall meet at least 
quarterly and as many times as deemed necessary and appropriate 
for the conduct of ATEF Committee business. 

2. Attendance at meetings of the Chelmsford ATEF Committee 
is strongly encouraged. Absence from 50% of more of its meetings 
in a given year will result in the dismissal of said appointment and 
there will be a new appointment for the remainder of the term. 

3. A quorum for purposes of transacting business shall consist 
of five members. Decisions will be based upon a vote of the 
majority of the members present. 



183 



4. A secretary will be elected by the ATEF Committee to keep 
records. 

5. The Town Treasurer shall provide the ATEF Committee with 
quarterly financial reports on the status of the Chelmsford ATEF. 



E. PROCEDURES 

1. Written proposals presented in the format specified by the 
Committee requesting funding from the Chelmsford ATEF shall be 
submitted to the ATEF Committee at least two weeks prior to a 
posted meeting. 

2. Application for such funds may be made by a School Council 
(as established under M.G.L. Chapter 71, Section 59C) and by 
members of the professional teaching staff employed by the 
Chelmsford Public Schools. The School Committee may make 
application through the Superintendent of Schools who is a member 
of the ATEF Committee. 

3. The funds will be dispersed through the Town Treasurer after 
the application, presentation, and decision process have been 
completed. All requests for supplemental funding must support the 
mission and beliefs of the Chelmsford Public Schools and be in 
accordance with Chelmsford School Committee policy. 

The Moderator proceeded with Article 19. Chairman of the 
Planning Board Kim MacKenzie read the Board's recommendation. 
A discussion took place concerning the wording of Residential 
Cluster Development vs Planned Open Space. Henrick Johnson 
made a point of order. He stated that due to the lateness of the hour, 
at this time he felt that the meeting should adjourn and return on 
Monday, May 6th at 7:30 PM at the Senior Citizen Center on Groton 
Road. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 10:55 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 

184 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 6, 1996 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center by the Moderator, Dennis E. McHugh at 7:40 PM, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 144 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. 

Under Article 19. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, 
Town of Chelmsford, Section 4700, Residential Cluster 
Development by deleting the existing name of "Residential Cluster 
Development" or the abbreviation to "RCD" and substituting the 
following new name "Planned Open Space Residential 
Development" or the abbreviation "POS" wherever applicable in 
sections 2300, 4700, 4710, 4711, 4712, 4713, 4714, 4720, 4730, 
4740, 4760, 4770, and 4780 of the Zoning By-Laws. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 

Hearing on March 13, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 22nd and 29, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At the meeting of March 13, 1996, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
the this zoning by-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning 
Board that by deleting the existing name of Residential Cluster and 
substituting Planned Open Space Development, that it is more 
representative with the purpose and intention of this type of 
development. Therefore, in keeping consistent with the general 
intent of the Zoning By-Laws in the development of the community, 
the Planning Board voted (6-0) (one member was not in attendance) 
to recommend, an amendment to delete the existing name of 
"Residential Cluster Development" to "Planned Open Space" as 
stated in he attached legal ad. 



185 



Kim MacKenzie explained that the only change in the zoning 
By-law is the name not the use. The Board is not changing the 
intent of the By-law. If anything it is to clear up the misconception 
of the term "Cluster". A developer is still going to have to have ten 
acres of buildable land to develop under this category. He asked 
Planning Board Member Tracy Wallace Cody, to further explain. 
She said that Cluster doesn't mean more houses will be built on the 
ten acres. Instead of building the ten houses on one acre lots each, 
the developer can build the ten houses on half acre lots and the rest 
of the land will remain as open space within the development. This 
would allow the houses to be closer together which would make it 
less expensive for the developer when building a road, and running 
the utility lines. No structure will be allowed on the open space. It 
could be used as bike paths, or a park, as long as the space is left 
open. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. A number of Representatives 
expressed their concerns about the changed wording, felt it could be 
a misconception. It won't make a difference in the interpretation. 
Chris Garrahan of the Conservation Commission spoke in favor. All 
this By-law does is controls growth. Robert Morse, Planning Board 
Member and member of the Open Space Committee spoke in favor 
of the article. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
He then attempted vote by way of a show of hands on the motion. 
This left the Chair in doubt, a unanimous or 2/3 's vote is needed. 
He asked the following tellers to come forward and conduct a hand 
count. Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John 
Maleski. The result: Yes 90 No 38 2/3's is 85, motion carried. 

Under Article 20. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, 
Town of Chelmsford, Article V. Definitions, by substituting the 
term "net floor area" for the terms "gross floor area" wherever it now 
appears in the By-Law, and by adding the following definition of 
"net floor area": 

Net floor area: The aggregate horizontal area in 
square feet of all floors of a building or several 
buildings on the same lot, measured from the exterior 

186 



faces of the walls enclosing each building; and 
exclusive of the cellars and attic area used only for 
storage, bathrooms, stairwells, elevators, mechanical 
rooms, or areas for service incidental to the operation 
or maintenance of the building. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 
Hearing on February 28, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 1st and 8th, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, Section 5. At The Meeting of February 28, 1996, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
the this zoning By-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning 
Board that substituting the term "net floor area" for the terms "gross 
floor area" will provide a more accurate measurement for related 
construction. Therefore, in keeping consistent with the general 
intent of the Zoning By-Laws in the development of the community, 
the Planning Board voted (6-0) (Mr. James Good was absent) to 
recommend, an amendment to amend the existing Zoning By-Law, 
Town of Chelmsford regarding Floor Areas as stated in the above 
attached legal ad. 

Kim MacKenzie explained that this article changes the 
wording under the definition section of the By-law. Article 22 will 
address the actual section in the By-law which will be effected. 
Dennis Ready questioned why there are a lot of zoning changes on 
this warrant. He felt that the Fall meeting was where zoning issues 
should be addressed. Kim MacKenzie explained that the Planning 
Board wanted to address these problem areas now and not wait until 
the Master Plan or the Fall meeting. John Wilder wanted to know if 
this would effect the assessed value of the buildings? No it would 
not. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were against the article. James Doukszewicz asked if 
there would be any type of grandfather clause for the present 
businesses. Yes any of the businesses now in operation are 
grandfathered, this is intended for future business. John Wilder 

187 



wanted to know the reasoning behind the Selectmen's 
recommendation. Chairman Lawlor explained that money has been 
appropriated for a Master Plan study and felt that is when any issues 
should be changed. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article. Motion defeated. 

Under Article 21. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend Article 3, Section 3120 
(f) of the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law in order to change the number 
of parking spaces required for restaurants, lounges, and function 
rooms, by deleting the phrase, "One (1) space per three (3) seats 
based on the legal seating capacity of the facility" and substituting 
therefore the following phrase: 

One (1) space per employee and one (1) space 
per two and one-half (2.5) seats based on the 
maximum-rated legal seating capacity of the facility. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 
Hearing on February 28, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 1st and 8th, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At The Meeting of February 28, 1996, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
the this zoning by-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning 
Board that there is a need to increase the required parking spaces for 
restaurants, lounges and function rooms. Therefore, in keeping 
consistent with the general intention of the Zoning By-laws in the 
development of the community, the Planning Board voted (6-0) (Mr. 
James Good absent) to recommend, an amendment to change the 
existing Zoning By-law, Town of Chelmsford regarding the number 
of parking spaces for restaurants, lounges and function rooms as 
stated in the attached legal ad. 

Kim MacKenzie explained that this change would only apply 
to new businesses or if any grandfathered business changes it's use, 

188 



like putting on an addition which would increase it's seating 
capacity. If a business was to sell then wouldn't the business become 
non-conforming? Town Counsel John Georgio said the buyer would 
need a use variance under Chapter 40 Section 6 from the Board of 
Appeals. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. 
When businesses come before them for the various licenses, the 
parking issue is always a concern. A lengthy discussion took place 
over the employee parking being part of the seating capacity 
restriction. John Harrington expressed the concerns of the business 
community of this being very limited and restrictive. Kim 
MacKenzie said this would not effect any present business operation. 
After listening to the discussion, The Board of Selectmen felt that 
Article 23 was the better article to consider. The Finance Committee 
preferred Article 23 also and asked that this article be rescinded. 
Henrick Johnson moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands on the article, motion defeated. 

Under Article 22. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to see if the Town will vote to 
amend Article 3, Section 3120(d), of the Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Law in order to change the ratio of parking spaces required for 
businesses and professional offices, office buildings, and office of a 
wholesale establishment including sales space, by substituting the 
term "net floor area" for the term "gross floor area". 

The Moderator explained that because Article 20 was 
defeated, this article was being withdrawn by the Planning Board. 
He asked for a show of hands on the motion to withdraw, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 23. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend Article 3, Section 
3120(f) of the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law in order to change the 
ratio of parking spaces required for restaurants, lounges and function 
rooms, by deleting the Section 3120(f) in its entirety and substituting 
therefore the following new Section 3120(f): 



189 



Section 3120(f). Restaurants, lounges, and function 
rooms. One (1) space per employee on the largest 
shift and one (1) space per two and one-half (2.5) 
seats, based upon the maximum-rated, legal seating 
capacity of the facility. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 
Hearing on February 28, 1996 on the above mentioned article 
after advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 1st and 8th, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At The Meeting of February 28, 
1996, the proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed 
the merits of the this zoning By-law change. It is the opinion of 
the Planning Board that there is a need to increase the required 
parking spaces for restaurants, lounges and function rooms. 
Therefore, in keeping consistent with the general intent of the 
Zoning By-laws in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted (6-0) (Mr. James Good was absent) to 
recommend, an amendment to change the existing Zoning 
By-Law, Town of Chelmsford regarding the number of parking 
spaces for restaurants, lounges and function rooms as stated in the 
attached legal ad. 

Kim MacKenzie explained the purpose of the article. The 
basic reasoning was the same as those expressed in Article 21. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of this article. John Harrington said this amendment is still 
restrictive for the business community. James Creegan member 
of the Planning Board who was Chairman when these articles 
were drawn up, stated that the Planning Board is trying to be 
pro-active on the different issues addressing the Town now. The 
members on the Planning Board and the Open Space Committee 
put a lot of time into researching these issues. Now is the time to 
have these regulations changed and in place, rather then waiting 
for the future completion of the Master Plan. He asked support 
from the Body. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. 

190 



The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously He asked for a show of hands on the motion, which 
left the Chair in doubt. A 2/3's vote is required. He asked the 
tellers to come forward and take a hand count. The result was 
Yes 107 No 25 2/3's is 88, motion carried. 

Under Article 24. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend Article 3, Section 3140 
of the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law in order to establish location and 
minimum size requirements for off-street loading areas, by 1) adding 
a new subsection 3 147 to read as follows: 

3147. Location and Off-Street loading bay required 
under Section 3130 shall be no less that twelve (12) 
feet in width, forty (40) feet in length, and fourteen 
(14) feet in height, exclusive of driveway and 
maneuvering space. And; 2) adding a new 
subsection 3148 to read as follows: 

3148. Required Off-Street loading bays and their 
associated maneuvering space shall be located 
entirely on the same lot as the building being served. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 
Hearing on February 28, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 1st and 8th, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, Section 5. At The Meeting of February 28, 1996, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
the this zoning by-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning 
Board that there is a need to establish location and minimum size 
requirements for off street loading areas. Therefore, in keeping 
consistent with the general intent of the Zoning By-laws in the 
development of the community, the Planning Board voted (6-0) (Mr. 
James Good was absent) to recommend, an amendment to change 



191 



the existing Zoning By-Law, Town of Chelmsford regarding the 
off-street loading areas as stated in the attached legal ad. 

Kim MacKenzie said that the By-laws do not presently have 
any criteria for loading zones, and there is a need to have one. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands on the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 25. Planning Board Member Robert C. 
Morse, moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning 
By raw, Article V, Definitions, by deleting the existing definition of 
"Lot, frontage of: and substituting, therefore, the following new 
definition: 

Lot, frontage of: A lot line coinciding with the 
sideline of a street which provides both legal rights of 
vehicular access and physical, vehicular access to the 
lot, said line to be measured continuously along a 
single street or along two (2) intersecting streets if 
their angle of intersection is greater than one hundred 
and twenty (120) degrees. Vehicular access to a 
building site on the lot shall be exclusively through 
the frontage of the lot. 

Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie, read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a Public 
Hearing on February 28, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
February 1st and 8th, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the 
hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At The Meeting of February 28, 1996, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
the this zoning By-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning 
Board that the current definition of lot frontage needed as a clearer 
and more accurate description of the Board's interpretation of lot 
frontage. Therefore, in keeping consistent with the general intent of 

192 



the Zoning By-laws in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted (6-0) (Mr. James Good was absent) to 
recommend, an amendment to change the existing Zoning By-Law, 
Town of Chelmsford regarding "Lot, Frontage of:" and attached the 
new definition.. 

Kim MacKenzie explained that the way the By-law reads 
now, people and developers are able to skirt the legal requirements 
of frontage in order to build on property. This would require that 
the property must have frontage access off a street in order to 
develop property. He gave an example of what is happening now. 
Long driveways are being developed to go around a problem area on 
a lot or to obtain access due to a existing structure all ready being in 
place. This avoids the need of having 150 foot frontage access. 
This restriction would prevent what is now really inaccessible land 
being considered a buildable lot. And the possible unbuildable land 
from being built on in the future once sewage is completed. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article. A majority of the 
Board of Selectmen were against the article. A discussion took 
place. Planning Board Member James Creegan said that this 
prevents people building on marginal lots. A question was asked 
concerning the frontage access. In order for the house to have 
acceptable frontage access, does the driveway of the structure have 
to come in off the front of the structure? Town Counsel John 
Georgio said that in his opinion frontage means that the driveway 
must be located on the front unless a variance from the Board of 
Appeals is obtained. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands on the article. This left the Chair in doubt. The 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. Yes 102 No 36 92 
is 2/3's the article passes. 

Robert Joyce made a motion to reconsider Article 20 at this 
time. The Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion. The 
Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the motion. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion, motion defeated. 

Under Article 26. Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
and all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any property in 

193 



fee simple with the trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, for the property located in the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, and further described and shown on Exhibit A 
showing drainage easement on land of Charles G. Mackey at 157 
Middlesex Street, North Chelmsford, Massachusetts, dated March, 
1996. Said Exhibit to be presented at Town Meeting, for the 
purpose of constructing and maintaining a drainage system and all 
other appurtenances thereto; and to raise and appropriate $1,000.00 
(subject to appraisal) to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses 
in connection with the acquisition of said land and for paying any 
damages which may be awarded as the result of any such taking. 

The Town Manager explained the article. Twelve years ago 
a drain line was put in behind this property. The owner of the land 
brought it the DPW's attention saying that the Town didn't have a 
legal easement across his property in order to maintain the line. The 
Manager said that the property owner had been receiving a tax break 
of 8% per year for the last twelve years because of the easement, 
which is why it had gone unnoticed as not being a legal easement. 
This article would allow the Town opportunity to gain the legal right 
of easement. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Hank McEnany said 
that he spoke to the property owner Mr. Mackey. Mr. Mackey 
wasn't aware of this article, and doesn't want to grant the easement. 
He felt by granting the easement he will be unable to build a garage 
on the property. The Town Manager said that Mr. Mackey was the 
person who brought this issue to his attention. Showing the plot 
plan layout of the property it indicates that building a garage would 
not effect the easement location. Selectman Dalton said Mr. Mackey 
had been informed of the pending article. It is in the best interest for 
Mr. Mackey to agree to this because if and when he ever goes to sell 
his house or goes to refinance the property he needs to have a clear 
title. A discussion took place. Some Representatives felt that further 
discussion should take place with the property owner and once an 
agreement is made bring the article back in the Fall. Dennis Ready 
moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the motion, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator attempted a vote by way of a show of hands, which left 
the Chair in doubt, the tellers were called to come and conduct a 

194 



hand count. The result Yes 105 and No 23 2/3's 85, the motion 
carried. 

Under Article 27. Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to amend the 
Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under Part III, Section 3-2(c), Board 
of Selectmen Appointment Powers by adding the following 
sentence at the end of the section: 

"The Board of Selectmen may appoint policy advisory 
committees to assist their decision making process". 

Selectman William Dalton explained the article. There has 
been three Town Meeting articles, then a non-binding ballot question 
in April of 1995, which had received over five hundred votes in 
favor of the question which is why the article has come back again. 
The Finance Committee was against the article. The Board of 
Selectmen did not have a recommendation. Glenn Thoren spoke in 
favor of the article. He felt that the Board should be able to appoint 
there own committee when addressing a policy issue. Selectman 
Susan Gates asked for permission to read Selectman Thomas 
Welch's statement on why he was against the article to the Body. 
Permission was granted. The statement listed his reasons and ask 
that the Body defeat the article. John O'Connell spoke in favor of 
the article. He cited an incident when he was on a committee to 
view the use of computers in the Town Offices. He felt that because 
the Committee wasn't going in the same direction as the Manager, 
that Committee was disbanded. Selectman Gates said that the 
Charter now allows the Board to decide who can be on a Committee 
that they want to establish because when the Town Manager makes 
his recommendation of a committee appointment they as a Board can 
veto the recommendation. Donald Elias spoke against the article. 
Robert Joyce, who was a former Selectman said that the Board can 
only veto the appointments they can't make the actual appointments. 
Dennis Ready spoke in favor of the article. He felt that the 
Selectmen should be able to vote for the actual people that they want 
to have on a committee. Jeffrey Stallard, William Griffin spoke in 
favor. Cheryl Boss said that the majority of the Selectmen feel that 
the present system is working. Barbara Scavezze moved the 

195 



question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article. Motion defeated. 

Thomas Christiano attempted to discuss adjourning the 
meeting due to the lateness of the hour. The Representatives did not 
even want to hear any discussion, they wanted the meeting to 
continue. 

Under Article 28 Petitioner Jonathan Stubbs moved to 
withdraw the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion, motion carried, unanimously. 
The article read as follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VI, Section 20 
of the General By-Laws by adding Paragraph 10, to read as follows: 

A civilian unit be established within the Police 
Department to patrol the handicap parking spaces 
within the Town. This unit will have the authority to 
issue citations for handicap parking violations. Any 
moneys generated by this unit will be designated for 
handicap access projects in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Under Article 29. Jonathan Stubbs moved that the Town 
vote to amend Article II, Section 4.14 of the General By-Laws by 
adding Paragraph (h) to read as follows: 

The subject matter of a Town Meeting Article may not be 
brought before future Town Meeting for three years, except where 
governed by state law. 

Jonthan Stubbs moved to amend the article to read as 
follows: The substance of any article defeated at a Town meeting 
shall not again be placed on the warrant for a period of one year 
without specific approval of the Board of Selectmen. 

Jonathan Stubbs explained that he had been advised by Town 
Counsel that State statue says an article is allowed to come back 

196 



after one year, so the By-law should be the same as the State statue. 
The Finance Committee was against the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were against the article. Thomas Moran felt that this 
would effect petitioned articles. The Moderator asked for a vote on 
the motion to amend by way of a show of hands, motion defeated. 
He then asked for a vote on the main motion by way of a show of 
hands, motion defeated. 

Under Article 30. Jonathan Stubbs moved that the Town 
vote to amend Article II, Section 4.14, Paragraph (g) of the General 
By-Laws, by deleting the existing Paragraph (g) which reads "The 
Moderator will allow a question-and-answer period of the sponsor of 
an article to gather factual information or understanding of the 
article. Debate of the article is not allowed during this period." and 
substituting, therefore, the following new Paragraph (g): 

The Town Moderator will allow a thirty (30) minute 
question and answer period of the sponsor of an 
article to gather factual information or understanding 
of the article. Debate of the article is not allowed 
during this time. The Town Moderator will keep 
track of the time remaining. 

Jonathan Stubbs explained the purpose of the article. 
Selectman Dalton asked that the Body consider combining the 
debate and question time, this would speed up the process. A 
number of representatives spoke against putting any time limit on an 
article. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, motion carried 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article, motion defeated. 

The Moderator then recognized the motion that Selectman 
Lawlor had given him allowing the Body to extend the Town 
Meeting action to proceed beyond the 11:00 PM By-law requirement. 
He asked that Selectman Lawlor actually indicate on the motion 
what articles are to be taken up during this extended time. 
Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town Meeting go beyond 



197 



1 1:00 PM to address Articles 31, 32, and 33. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 31. Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that 
the Town vote to accept the following mentioned streets, as laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports duly filed in 
the office of the Town Clerk: 

Lori Lane Marguerite Road 

Dobson Road Deana Lane 

McCormick Lane Alcorn Road 

Courthouse Lane Grady Drive 

Kristin Drive Extension Brittany Lane 

Old Farm Way Moccasin Lane 

Somerset Place Fairmount Street 
Moore Street (0+0 to 16+82) 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such requirements have 
been met; and to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing 
traffic safety and road improvements, and to raise and appropriate 
$15.00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection 
with the acquisition of said land and for paying any damages which 
may be awarded as a result of any such taking; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the Planning 
Board and the DPW Departments have gone over the accepted street 
listing and noticed that most of the Streets shown never had been 
accepted officially by the Town. 99% of them had been built 
according to the Town's requirements and their bonds have been 
released. There were a few that aren't fully completed yet. There is 
one more step that the Selectmen must take after the Town Meeting 
votes acceptance. They are required to sign off the streets as 

198 



officially accepted, and until any street in question meets all the 
requirements they will not be signed off. John O'Connell 
questioned if the streets that are not fully completed what guarantee 
does the Town have that the Sewer Project won't end up doing the 
finish work. That way the developer won't have to spend the money 
and the Town will. James Pearson of the DPW said that the Streets 
in questioned already have the sewer lines going down them, in fact 
the developer did the work which meant that the Town wasn't 
responsible for providing the lines. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman William Dalton moved that Article 30 be 
reconsidered at this time. The Finance Committee was not in favor 
of the motion. The Board of Selectmen were not in favor of 
reconsideration. Selectman Dalton explained that his intent is to 
bring the article back so he could amend it. He wanted to delete all 
the wording of the section mentioned in the article, which would 
ultimately result in no question and answer period or debate period 
being observed. Everything and anything could be addressed at one 
time. John Coppinger expressed concern of this being done due to 
the fact that the intent of the article was to amend the by-law by 
adding to it, not eliminating anything. Town Counsel John Georgio 
said that the motion to delete could be done because it would be 
addressing an area cited in the warrant. Dennis Ready moved the 
question to stop debate, motion carried. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to reconsider article 30. Motion 
defeated. 

Under Article 32. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that this article by withdrawn. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried. The article read as follows: 

To see if the Town would vote pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 82, Section 21, that public conveyance and 
necessity require that the "Paper Road" known as Canal Street, North 
Chelmsford, as hereinafter described shall be discontinued and all 
public rights in any and all portions of said streets, and/or town ways 
relative to said street shall be henceforth discontinued and 

199 



abandoned; said street is more particularly described as follows: 
That portion of Canal Street on a plan entitled "Proposed 
Discontinuous Parcel 'A', Town Meeting, 1996 M , prepared by the 
Town Engineer's Office, Town of Chelmsford, copies of such are on 
file in the Town Engineer's Office. And to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey and 
transfer all rights, title, and interest, if any, held by the Town in the 
above parcel of land located on the discontinued portion of said 
way /road, to the abutters of said property. 

Under Article 33 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to amend Article 2 of the 1995 Spring Town 
Meeting by transferring $63,000 from Line Item 1, General 
Government Personnel Services, to Line Item 2, General 
Government Expenses. 

The Town Manager explained that Town Counsel is handle 
as an hourly expense, not as a personnel line item as in the past, 
therefore the money should be transferred to the expense section 
within the budget. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, the 
Moderator declared the Town Meeting adjourned sine die. Motion 
carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 1 1:20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



200 



WARRANT FOR 

STATE PRIMARIES 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1996 

William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town or City of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to vote at: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3 : 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 17th day of September 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 
p.m. for the following purpose: 



201 



To cast their votes to the State Primary for the Candidates of 
Political parties for the following offices: 

US SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
COUNCILLOR THIRD COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT FIFTH MIDDLESEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

SIXTEENTH MIDDLESEX REPRESENTATIVE 
DISTRICT 
REGISTER OF PROBATE MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY TREASURER MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

SHERIFF (to fill vacancy) MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



202 



o 



cm o co tt cm 


Tf O) S i- t- N 


O) T- 


(M (O (N r- 


m ^- co t- 


CD -<* 


CM h- O 


oo *- o 


CO CO 



MOM 



CO 

o> 



lu 

CD 

2 

UJ 

l- 
0. 
LU 

co 



o 
<D 

Q. 



CO 
o 

CD 

I— 

Q_ 



o 
2> 

Q. 



Or-Mon 

CM CO CO 



CM CO CO -r- CD 

co o> co 



O CO Tt o o 

(N N O 



Slf) O r- on 

co t- co 



h- co m o t- co 

T- T- CO 



I s - t- CM O O O 

co t- o 



O CO O O CO 
CO CO CO 



CO CO O O CO 
CO CO CO 



o> O t- o o 
co co o 



> CO 

0. 

UJ 

\- 
< 

H 
CO 

o 

\- 

2 

O 

o 

s 

LU 

Q CO 

O 

Q. 



CO i- 



CM 



o co 



CO 

o 
<u 



o 

at 



^ no i-oo 



CO CO CO CM ■«— 
(MO) CM 



CO "t h- 

CM r- 



CO CO tf 



o o co 



o o co 



CO Tf •»- O O ■*- 
O) CM CM 



CO *- 
CM CO 



■^ O t- 



m co oo o 
co f- 



o <*- 



CO O O O CO 

■^ o ^t 



0)0)0 00 
CO CO O) 



KXOOOt- 
^r r- CM 



CO CO O O 

co r»- 



CM 

u 
<D 



CO 1^- CM 



O TT 

O) 



M(00)00^ 

co O) 



tJ- o O O Tt 
CO CO O) 



CM h- 

co oo 



O CO 

CM 



<D 



O) co •*— o o co 

O) CM (M 



o 

h- 



o 

< 

z 

</) <2 u- — 

• c «= a) . 



I 

CO 
CO 

UJ 

or 
o 

z 
o 
o 

UJ 

I i 



o 



UJ 
CO 
UJ 

a: 



CO 



T3 

c 
o 



sS^ 



O CM *- O CO 
CO h- CM 



< 

I- +- 

O « 

I- is 

M 



CO 
I 

or 
o 



o 



- "C j= .4! y 



ui J2 

or co 



CO 



. CO 

co •£; — 

Q. S 2 



</) 



E 

CD 

a 

a) 

c 
o 

CO 

eg £ 



o 

Z zi i 

o « >. £ ^ 



203 



o 



CM |v. CM t- CM 

00 CM t- 
CN S O 



O CO CO CO CM 

CO TJ" T- 

co co o 



o O) en s w o) ^r 
m (M r- s ^ (o ^ 



<J> 00 CO CM CM 

CM Tj- t- 

CM O 






UJ 
CO 

5 



o 

Q. 



00 

o 

0) 



CI) 

0. 



CM 
O 

2> 

0. 



|v. CO O O CO 

cm m oo 



co o o o co 

CO If) oo 



in i- 

Tt O) 



o o 



0)^-0 

co co 



CM CM 

m oo 



co 

CO 



ooin^ococMincoooco 

t- CO 00 



CO'^'COCOCOCOCOmcOCM'r-CO 

(\| t- t- i- (N r- CM CO 



I— 
0. 


o 

a> 








UJ 


i_ 








0) 


Q. 








1 

>- 
q: 




I s - 


00 T- 


o co 


CO 


CM 


t— 


* 










< 


o 

CD 








5 


Q. 








a: 

0. 












"*■ 


CO o 


*- oo 


UJ 


m 


CM 


rv. 


O) 


i- 


o 








< 


a> 










a. 








o 




CO 


oo o 


O r- 


Tt 


CO 


oo 


CM 


< 
o: 


o 
a) 






*~ 


o 
o 


ct 








5 










UJ 




oo 


co o 


O t- 


Q 


CO 


CM 


00 


*~ 



CM 00 O O O 

t m o 



co co o o co 



m cm o ▼- oo 

CO CO O) 



O) |v. CO 00 CM ^ , 



O) t- O rr O t- 

i- CM CM t- CM r- 



CO 



CM O O O 
CO O 



^r o o co 

CO Tf 



O) CM O 
CO 00 



o *- 

CM 



O O i- o *- 
CO 00 «- 



co «- co co co m m 



mrv-oooO'»-cocooT- 

■«- CM ^~ ^- r- -r- CM 



incocococMCMcocoT-o 

t- i- CM t- t- CM 



00 
O) 



CM 



O v- 



o ^ o o 
co co 



5 



CO 



O CO t- 

<<r m 



o ^ 

a> 



OCT* 

CM T- T- 



n ^t rv. iv. cm co 



o o -<*■ 



oo m o o 
r- x co co 



D 

o 
o 

_J 

UJ 

z 

UJ 

o 

a: 
O 

z £ 
UJ JS 

(/> CO 



o 



co j- co co o 

CM Q£ Tf N- 

O 
O 



p UJ 



UJ </) 

> * 
< c/> 



<d 



Ul 
0) 

UJ 

or 

UJ 

a: 



c 

CO 

or 
o 



c «* 



CO 

0. 



T- CO 


* 


"t 


T-- 


CM 


CM 


T— 




c 

3 
O 

o 

X 

(/) 






-I 


■o 






< 


2 






o 


UJ 

< 

CD 

O 








or 




•-= 




0. 




CD 




U. 




c 
o 




o 








on 




< 




UJ 








i- 




CQ 




</) 


CO 


tr 


o 


O 


c 


cu 
.a 


c/) 


UJ 


CO 


o 


i 


CL 


CO 


o: 



mmrv-ooocM-'-ooco 

r- r- r- CO CM 



O 

»- 



CD 



2 
co 

c 

C m ° 

CD -E " L " CD CD O ~ 

"2 i5 «) $ — ro ~ 

3 3 X X . • 

ODXO < 2 

^.coO-LUW^c 

c g g -g 8 g "5 



£ o 



CO CO CO >» o CO C W 



204 



O O) O r- CM (N 
Tf 00 00 





< 


CM ■*■ CM 






o 




H 








T— 




o 












J- 














CM CM O) 


o 


o 


CO 




o> 


CM CO CM 






co 




o 












o 












Q. 










o> 












T" 




^ in m 


,- 


r- 


CD 


isT 


00 


rr m co 






co 




o 








*~ 


a: 












LU 


Q. 










m 












5 




00 oo rr 


o 


o 


o 


LU 


h~ 


CM CO CO 






o 


Q. 


o 

0) 










LU 


l_ 










</) 


£L 










i 

> 
IT 




o O CO 


o 


o 


CO 


to 


CO 00 CO 






-<«■ 


< 


o 

0) 










5 


La 

0. 










or 

Q. 














0O (M S 


o 


,_ 


00 


LU 


m 


r- in cm 






o> 



OOh-OOlOOiT-CMCM 

co in O) ^t o> in co 

(O (M t- (O (M r- r- 



CM 
O 
CM 



0)CMt-OOOtTOOCO 
m CM CM CM CO «- CO 



^ONt-S00N(N 
O CO CM Tt CM ^- CM 



CM 
h- 
CM 



^-o>cMoor-^ro)ooo 

(^ CM t- CM CM CM O 

CM 



ococo^j-OicoooocM 
o>cocMincocMco a> 

CM 



CM-'-COTfOOOOOOOCO 

incocMcocMT-T- o> 



co^roocMO)CMT-rM 

r- S (D OO CD r- 

v- CO CO o 



rococooiNOon 

t- CM CM 00 



CM N CN N Ifi (N 

cm co t- in 



CO 
CO 



coh-coincoooo 
f- co co o 



O 00 CO 00 

i- in m 



"*• O O CO 



oo>h-mr^oooo 

r— CO CO CJ> 



< 








1- 


a. 






o 








K 




tNSCMO 


O T- 


^ 


CM CO CO 


CM 


2 


o 

0) 




T— 


O 
O 


0. 






s 








LU 




*- 0O CM O 


O T- 


a 


CO 

o 

s> 

CL 


cm m co 








CM O CM O 


o *«■ 




CM 


cm m CM 


CD 




O 








9> 







T-OfCOTfOJOlOON 


CO^-CMCOOiOO-«- 


1^ CO CM ^ ^ t- Tf 


m t- tt cm 


CM 


r— 



r-T-inoocococMOOCM 
m co cm ^ co *- ■«- cm 

CM 



s 



CMcommcMi^oooo 

CM CM CO CO *- 00 



CM CO 00 h- 00 o o 
■^ CO ^fr 



CO O CO o 



CM 



O O Tf 
O) 



co r»- co o o co 
co in co cm 



u 
a 

•o 



O O) CO 00 CO t- o> 
00 CM CM CO CO CM r- 



CM 
X 

J2 

•a 



< 
o 



on 

LU 

§ Jig 

2 5? 

iliiio 
8*4*11 



<0 LU 

en Z 

£2 </) 

o 2 



c 

o 
o 
a> 

a: 

0) 

si 
< 



O O CO 
CM 



■o co 



c O (0 r (B 

I »o| > 

« « Si £ -i 1 

- 1 •§ ^ ^ 5 (0 

-> X ^ < £ - 



e^-oomoo-i-ooco 

(q CM Tt CO t- CM 

o *"" 

CO 

> 



c 

3 

o 
o 

X 
0) 

o 

•a 
-a 




CO Q) 

o 2 

co o 

CL (J 

b • 



a> 

c 
c 
<u 



< 

O 



LL _* 

LU c 

X i2 

00 CD 



"O "O J= 



jB O 
■C CO 



LU LU S 2 



205 



■«- in o cn oo 

CN o> t- cn 



o t- I s - CO 
<T> *- CM CN 
CO -t 



M- CO t- oo 
O CN CN 



O) CN CO Tt 00 

O i- CN 

■«- co ^r 



co to in t co 

t- O CN 

r- CO Tf 



en 
o 

CD 



i- r^ o o oo 



CO CN 



o oo 



S t-OOO 



"3- 



o oo 



O 00 O O 00 

t- CO Tf 



00 

o 

CD 



CO CO O O O) 
CO CO 



Tf CN CO O) 
CO CO 



SO(MO) 
CO CO 



00 t- O O O) 
r- CN CO 



CN r-~ O O <Ji 

r- CN CO 



o 

CD 



co cn o o m 



CN r- CN m 



Ttot- m 



oi co o o m 
co rr 



*- ■*■ o o m 

•«- CO TT 



CO 
CJ 

cd 



T~ O T- 



CN 






CO 



1- Tf 
T- h- 



co 

CO 



o oo 



00 N O t f 



O t- T- 

cn m 



CN 



in 
o 

S> 

CO " 
O) 

t- CD 

OC Ql 

111 

CO 

?. CO 

0- A- 

C0 



I Q - 

UJ o 

?a 
co 



< 
o 

CO 

D 
Q. 
Ill 



co oo o 
co 



o <«- 



co 



CO x- 



CN CO 
CO 



^ O CM 



*- O y- CN 



co ^r 



CN O O CN 

<<* "ST 



m co o 

t- CN 



O T- 



00 CN O t- t- 
CO ^ 



O O CN 



CO CM r- 

*- CN 



CN 



CN 



■«- T- O 



CO O ■*- 



CN CO CO O 00 
CN CN 



CN 



O 00 
CN 



CO 



CN 



"t 

TT 



o oo 

CN 



O "fr O O TJ- 

-t- CO Tfr 



O Tt O O tJ- 
*- CO ■*■ 



CO O) t- o 



X 

— T - T - 



Tt CN 
CO 



O 1^- 
CO 



O) CM ID N 

m co 



T- o co 

co 



CD 



UJ 

I- 
< 

z 

UJ 

co ; 

CO jj = 
3 CO ^ 



CD o 
c co 



x2 

to 

■o 



CN t- 

m 



i 

(0 
(0 

UJ 
DC 
O 

z 
O 
o 

UJ 

> 

< 
i- 
z 

UJ 
CO 

a c.| <2 

ui js iE - 
a: cd «> ^ 



< 
i- 
O 



CO 

5 

"O 

k. 

CO 

I 

QC 
O 



O 

z 

o 
o 



c 

CO -r 

co c .S2 
m £ 2 



-•2 

H O 
O 

UI 

z 

UJ 
CD 

or 
O 



o 



< ^: 

z s 
co m 



to 

c 

CtJ 

> 

UJ C 
£> CD 

to t; 



co 

T- 
I 

CO Q< 

Z) 

O 
o 

-J 

< UJ 

h o 

z 

UJ 

> 



CO CO t- 

■»- m 



oo 

CN 



to 



2 

O 



c 

CD 

> 

O 



a c o | o 

UJ JS CD ^ ^ 

or co o ^ 2 



206 



r- ^r t- cm oo 

-J T- T- CN 

< «- CO <«■ 

o 



CO Tj" CO CO 
O) CNJ CN 

CO ^r 



co cn ^r co «- co 
co ^ h~ m 

Tj- CN *- 00 



h- CO CO CN CO 

a> CN CN 

CO ""fr 



o> 
o 
2> 

0. 



O) o> O O CO 
CO Tf 



CO O O CO 



CN CO CO o o 
CO CO CN 



CO CN O O CO 



CO 

o 
2> 

Q. 



CO CO O O O) 

t- CN CO 



m t- co o> 


O) r^ cn o o co 


■«- CO o o o> 


CO CO 


Tfr «- r- h- 


<r- CN CO 



o 

Cl- 



in o o o in 
t- co ^- 



co t- co m 

CO ^T 



o> m in •«- o o 
Tf cn ^- o> 



o m o o m 
t- co ^t 



to 
o 
d) 



in co o i- 



co 

CO 



O CO 



^f 


t-OIOOt-cO 


0> CN t- CN Tj- 


1^ 


00 "»t CN ^fr 


t- m h- 



m 
o 



s^ro 

t- CN 



O t- 



O O 



O O CN O O CN 

in cn *- oo 



•<* h- O O T- 

t- CN Tf 



<o 



o 



cr 

UJ 
CO 

5 

LU 
H- 
0. 
LU 
CO 

>- 

< 
2 
on 

Q. 
UJ 

I- 
< 

C0 

Z 
< 

o 

-I 

CD 

Q. 
UJ 



CO 

o 



CN 
O 



0> CN O ■«- CN 
CO Tf 



o>Tf t- o ^r 
co ^r 



oo o o o 00 

CN CN 



T-ot-cN oinojoo^r 

^- -<t ^- CN »- 00 



CN v- ■«- Tt 



>»CO Tf o o 

,- x? t- in 



c 

3 

o 
o 

X 
(0 



t- O CO h- 
CO CO 



co m o o o oo 

^ CN CN 00 



NrOCO MOCO »- O ID 

CN CN CN t- ▼- in 



m o) o) t- o ^ 

CO CO CN CO 



UJ 

I- 
< 

CO 

o 
tc 

QL 

U- 

o 
vc 

UJ 

•- * c 
w (o co -r 

UJ J5 o IE - 

ltCQQ$S 



< 

o 



d) 

£ 

CO 



X 

0) 

(/) 

■o 



a: 

UJ 

IT 
Z) 
CO 

< 

UJ 



<N 
X 

w 

■D 



h- m o o cn 

CO Tf 



oo m ■»- o ^* 
co ^r 



CO (J) t- CD CO 
t- CN 



Tf CO O O 



< 
I- 

O 



z " "I 

O i2 £■ - 
O co £ 5 



cr 

UJ 

z 
g 

(0 

CO 

2 

O 
o 



z 

O 

o 



o 

c 



X 

a> 

(0 

© 

■a 



O 



^ o 



>% 0) c 



u. M 

u. CO c 

E ^ CO T 

1-225 
co co m s 



207 



o n r- •«- o m moom ^ t- o m ^ •«- o m ^-T-om 



O 



o> 
o 

0) 



OOt-OOt- •«-OOt- Ot-Ot- O -r- O •«- Oi-O 



00 

o 



O O O *- O •«- •t-OOt- t-OO-r- t-OOt- *- O O •«- 



oooooo oooo oooo oooo oooo 



CO 

o 

a> 

Q. 



oooooo oooo oooo oooo oooo 



m 
o 

toQ- 

o> 

o> 

HI 
CO 

uj a. 
CO 

>• ™ 

< £ 
I °- 

a: 

Q. 
HI T ~ 

I- Q- 

CO 

z 
< 

< 

UJ 
CD 



oooooo oooo oooo oooo oooo 



Ot-OOOt- t-OOt- t-OO^- i-OOt- ^-OOt- 



O^-OOOv- -t-OOt- t-OO^- t-OO*- t-OOt- 



OOOOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO-ftOOOO 



O i- O O O ■«- t-OOt- 



•5 
CO 

-J CO 

< UJ 

o o 

H Z 

o 
o 

UJ 

> 



o o 



X 

w 



o o 



< o 

"J „ c 



TJ 

o 
o 



TJ C 

a) .25 
c c 



z 

UJ 
CO 

Ml C 



I — ** 

o " 

M 

5 

■o 

i- 

I 

cc 
o 



o 



x: 
H O 

o 



CO 



D 

o 
o 



O O i- 



< uj 

o jg 



z jg-f 



UJ 

z 

UJ 

o 
cc 

1.* 



o 

z 

UJ 

> 

z 

UJ 

CO 

UJ 

g CO - 



< 
I- 

o 



^iiiio ct^io Dlio llio it ^ i o 

jo c u r ,<2 mi 55 S .2 O S2 S - UJ iS £ - UJ J2 ^ - 

co^^^S ctmsS ocnsS co co s 2 orcosS 



=> m ^ 



208 



o 



rr t- o m 



m o o m 



o o o o o 



co cm o m 



o 

CL 



O T- O T- 



O O iT- 



CM O O O CM 



CO 
O 
2> 

CL 



T- O O *~ 



^- O O T- 



cm o o o cm 



o «- o *- 



o 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o o 



o o o o 



CO 

o 
CL 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o o 



o o o o 



oooo oooo ooooo oooo 
m 
o 

2> 

5 t-OOt- ^-OOx- CM O O O CM i-OO^- 

h- o 

*CL 
LU 

CD 

2*- O O •«- t-OOt- mooom *- o o *- 

So 

£ s> 

LU CL 
0) 

• oooo oooo ooooo oooo 

> CM 

CE o 
< 2> 

5 CL 



ct 






CL 




£**" 


LU 




C 


K 


o 

CD 


3 


< 


o 


H 


Q. 


o 


0) 




X 


z 
< 




CO 

■o 


a: 




5 

1 


< 
i- 

LU 

m 




LU 

1- 
< 
CD 

o 


^ 




REGISTER OF PR 

Blanks 



t- O O 



X 

a> 
to 

J l 

ct 

LU 

a: 

0) 

< 
LU 
K 

I- 



t-OOt-G-CMOOOCM *- O O t- 

X 
0) 
CO 

a> 



LU 

Z 

o 

CO 
CO 



- 1 ^ 
< c 

o i 

X 

(A 
© 

T3 
"O 



< 
I- 

O 



B o 
■c to 

£2E 



DciSo 
O J5 £ - 
O CD S 5 



O 

o 
>■ 

*~ ~ c c 
Z «5 T t 

z> H B B o 

O JS I £ J 



it «= 

I iS ^ 

CO CD S 



209 



WARRANT FOR 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 21, 1996 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby 
requested to notify and warn the Town Meeting Representatives of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior Center, Groton Road, North 
Chelmsford, on Monday, the twenty-first day of October, at 7:30 
p.m. o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the following 
articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



210 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
October 21, 1996 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center, at 7:30 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 150 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. The Moderator then announced 
that the Chelmsford Middle School Band, directed by Robert 
Thurlow and Evan Williams, which consisted of the Parker and 
McCarthy Schools grades 7 and 8 would play the Star Spangle 
Banner. This was followed with the Body saluting the flag. The 
Moderator went over the rules and regulations and pointed out the 
locations of the fire exits within the hall. He made further 
announcements regarding the date and time scheduled for celebrating 
Halloween, and that absentee ballots were available at the Town 
Clerk's Office for the November 5th election. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence in honor of 
Selectman and Town Meeting Representative, Thomas J. Welch who 
passed away on August 2. And for Walter Lewis who had just died 
last Friday October 18, who was a former member of the Finance 
Committee during the 70's. 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of the 
warrant as posted be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked permission from the Body to allow non resident Stu 
Roberts, Architect for the Library project under Article 6 to address 
the meeting when the time came. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 1 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved to hear 
reports of the Town Officers and Committees. 

James Creegan, Chairman of the Master Plan Committee, 
gave a brief progress report of the Committee. He said that the 
Committee has successfully completed inventory, analysis and vision 
statements (input from three public meetings). Completed a draft of 
means for attaining the vision. Currently in process of defining an 

211 



implementation plan. The next step is to finalize a Master Plan 
Report and Implementation Plan, which will be brought forward to 
the Representatives at the Spring 1997 Town Meeting for approval. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch gave a report regarding the 
status of the articles that were approved at the Spring Town Meeting. 
He went over his plans for the use of free cash that he would be 
presenting in the upcoming articles. He presented a five year 
comprehensive implementation plan. 

The Moderator then announced that Hal Matzkin, Beverly 
Koltookian, and John Morrison had resigned as members of the 
Finance Committee. He thanked them for their years of dedication 
and welcomed to the Board new members Sue Olsen, Claire 
Jeannotte, and Connie O'Neil. 

Under Article 2 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to rescind a portion of the Golf Course Authorization 
to borrow funds under Article 12 of the Special Town Meeting held 
on May 4, 1995, in the amount of $1,190,000.00. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the Town paid 
cash for the purchase of the course so there presently isn't any need 
to borrow the funds. Jim Doukszewicz questioned if there was still 
pending litigation. The Town Manager said that there was, but it 
was felt that fair purchase price had been made. The article to 
borrow should be remove for bonding purposes, it does not make 
good financial sense to carry it. If more money is needed then he 
would bring it back to the body or raise it as a court settlement if 
necessary. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 3 Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John 
Emerson Jr, moved that the Town vote to rescind the appropriation 
and borrowing authority under Article 16 of the Annual Spring Town 
Meeting in June of 1990 for the purpose of designing and 
constructing sewers in certain designated areas. 



212 



Chairman of the Sewer Commission John Emerson explained 
that now that the Town voted last Spring to Sewer the whole Town, 
this article is not necessary. The monies needed are now included in 
the amount requested at the Spring Town Meeting. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 4 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $250,000 from Free Cash to the 
Stabilization Fund. 

The Town Manager explained that this is part of his ongoing 
goal to raise the Stabilization fund to be 5% of the operating budget. 
If passed the account will have $2.5 million dollars set aside which 
can be drawn on in the future. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

Glenn Thoren moved to take Article 8 out of order in order. 
His purpose was to amend the figure requested by increasing it and 
to fund the requested increase with monies from Article 5, which if 
passed would then reduce the requested amount for Article 5. The 
Finance Committee does not recommend taking the article out of 
order. The majority of the Board of Selectmen do not recommend 
taking the article out of order. Dennis Ready made a point of order. 
He felt that Article 5 should be tabled until a certain time rather then 
taking any articles out of order. The Moderator agreed to this 
solution, as did Glenn Thoren. Therefore the Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to take Article 8 out of order. Motion 
defeated. 

The Moderator then advised Dennis Ready to recommend a 
certain time to table Article 5 to. Dennis Ready moved to table 
Article 5 to be heard at the conclusion of Article 24 before the start 
of Article 25. The Finance Committee supported the motion to table. 
The Board of Selectmen did not. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

213 



NOTE: SEE THE OCTOBER 24TH MEETING FOR 
ARTICLE 5 

Under Article 6 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $4,832,843, this 
amount to be reduced by approximately $1,832,843 of state Library 
grant assistance, for the purpose of constructing, an addition to and 
remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to the 
Adams Library, including original equipment and furnishings related 
thereto; that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
$3,000,000 under General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7; that the 
Board of Selectmen is authorized to contract for and expend any 
federal or state aid available for the project; and that the Town 
Manager is authorized to take any other action to carry out this 
project. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. He 
explained that at the Spring Town Meeting the Representatives had 
voted to authorize the Board of Library Trustees to pursue the 
avenue necessary for obtaining a state grant for the purpose of 
putting an addition onto the present Adams Library. If awarded then 
the Trustees would return to the Fall Town Meeting requesting the 
additional funds necessary to complete the project. The State 
awarded the grant to the Town, it was one of the largest amounts 
awarded. Construction must begin in March of 1997 or the Town 
will lose the grant. The next step is to authorize the borrowing of the 
money needed to complete the project, which is the figure of 
$3,000,000. He asked the Chairman of the Library Trustees Jaci 
Matzkin to come forward and further explain. Jaci Matzkin gave a 
slide presentation to the Body which showed the present condition of 
the Adams Library. And the areas needed for improvement. One 
major issue is the need to comply with the ADA Act. For the past 
few years, the Town was able to obtain a waiver, however the grace 
period has run out and the Town will soon be forced to comply. In 
order to do this the Town would need to spend $750,000 which will 
result in eliminating much needed space and the lost of books. The 
new addition will address the required entrance specifications. In the 

214 



Fall of 1995 a $6.5 million dollar project had been designed and 
presented to the Town's people. A Special Election was held and a 
question was put forth requesting that the funding for this project be 
done through an override expenditure. The question was defeated 
and the project dropped. In the Spring of 1996 after the 
Representatives agreed to let the Trustee's pursue another grant. A 
new design was submitted. All the concerns from the previous 
project were addressed and considered in the new project. Stu 
Roberts the Architect for this project from the firm of A. Anthony 
Tappe' and Associates, came forward and explained the project. He 
showed a compact, efficient design that blended well with the 
present building. The parking issue was addressed by adding 103 
additional spaces, and the Pink house would stay. The Town 
Manager explained that the cost would be $30.00 per household for 
ten years. The Town can pay for the project without an override. 
Questions were asked by the Representatives. John Wilder wanted 
to know if there was going to be an increase in maintenance and 
utility cost. The Manager explained that because it will basically 
become a new facility the maintenance cost will be reduced but the 
utility costs will increase because of the increase in size and usage of 
lights, computers. The Traffic issue was brought up and the Town 
Manager explained that the DPW Director looked over the plans 
presented and felt that this would improve the present flow of traffic. 
There will be no entrance off of Adams Ave as there is presently. 
This will be eliminated and entrance and exiting will be done in front 
of the Library on Boston Road. What will the pink house be used 
for. Presently it will be used for storage possible rental space in the 
future. The intent is to keep it in the Town's hands for control of the 
area. Questions were asked concerning the handicap accessibility 
issue. Town Counsel John Georgio explained that the Town could be 
opened for law suits if it doesn't soon comply. Richard Allison 
wanted to conduct a role call vote. The Moderator explained that at 
this time the Body was in the question and answer mode. When the 
time came for a vote, then the request should be made. Kit Harbison 
wanted to know what the results would be if this wasn't voted. Jaci 
Matzkin explained that the Trustee's would have to start all over 
again. The Town would lose the grant money, it would go to another 
town and Chelmsford would go to the bottom of the list. George 
Merrill wanted to know why the handicap issue wasn't address in the 

215 



past. He felt that this was being used as a excuse to force the 
spending of the monies for this project even after the Towns people 
had voted no on the project last year. It was explained that because 
of the expense the Trustee's felt it made more sense to combine the 
need for more room plus accessibility all at once. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the article. The majority of the 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. Selectmen Peter Lawlor 
explained the Boards recommendation. They felt that there is a 
definite need, it's affordable, and the public support is there. 
Selectman William Dalton expressed the fact that the people voted 
on the issue last year to spend $6.7 million dollars, they should have 
the opportunity to vote again on whether or not to spend any money 
for this project. More discussion took place. John Coppinger 
expressed concerns of the present site. He then moved to amend the 
article by adding the following wording to the end of the main 
motion. "Provided that this vote shall not take effect until the voters 
approve a debt exclusion for this project pursuant to general laws 
Chapter 59, Section 21C(M)". The Finance Committee did not 
recommend the amendment. The majority of the Board of Selectmen 
did not recommend the amendment. Barbara Scavezze spoke against 
the amendment and read a letter to the Body from a person unable to 
get inside the library. Glenn Thoren read a quote from the Federalist 
papers as to why he felt that the issue should go back to the people 
for a vote. The Town Manager then read to the Body information 
from the Federalist papers stating examples on why the Town 
Meeting Representatives are responsible for making the decision. 
Dennis King and Judy Olsson, non Town Meeting Representatives 
spoke in favor of the library expansion, both stating personal 
reasons. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop further debate on 
the motion to amend, motion carried. The Moderator then asked for 
show of hands on the motion to amend, motion defeated. More 
discussion. Ralph Hickey the ADA Coordinator for the Town said it 
is against the law not to have a public building fully accessible for 
the public use. Brad Emerson moved the question. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. Brian Latina spoke 
against the article. Bob Joyce spoke against the article, he felt it 
should go back to the ballot. John Emerson spoke in favor and asked 
that the Body support the article. Dennis Ready moved the question. 

216 



The Moderator attempt a show of hands, which left the Chair in 
doubt, the following tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Dorothy Frawley, John Maleski, Patricia Plank, Lucy 
Simonian. Result: Yes 121 No 18 2/3 's 93 motion carried to stop 
debate. The Moderator acknowledged Richard Allison's request for 
a roll call vote on the article. Forty Representatives in favor is 
needed in order to conduct a roll call vote. He asked for a show of 
hands and instructed the tellers to take a hand count. The result was 
129 Representatives in favor. The Moderator explained that the 
Town Clerk would read in Precinct order each Representative 
alphabetically by last name. They are to respond Yes, No or present. 
If there is no response the Representative will be marked absent. At 
the end of the reading The Clerk will repeat the precinct number and 
ask if any Representative wishes to change their vote, they will be 
allowed to do so then. The Town Clerk proceeded to read the 
names. 

The final result was Yes 126 No 24 and 1 present, the motion 
passes. NOTE: (The actual roll call vote is on file in the Town 
Clerk's Office) 

Under Article 7 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $100,000, for the cost of 
architectural services for plans and specifications for an addition to 
the existing Police Station at 230 North Road, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts: that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow 
$100,000 under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 
(21); and that the Town Manager be authorized to take any other 
action necessary to carry out this project. 

The Town Manager explained the article. This is only for 
designing plans. The present Police Station is in need for more 
room. He asked the Police Chief to come forward and explain what 
the anticipated space would be used for. Police Chief Armand Caron 
said that the needs are for more training space, interrogating space, 
witness space, storage space, and appropriate jail cells. He cited that 
the previous week a rape victim had to be interview in the garage 
because there isn't an appropriate private area where this type of 
interviewing can be done. He said surrounding towns are now 

217 



starting to expand their Police Stations. One Town is building a 
brand new station. Our station is over thirty years old. Repairs are 
ongoing. There is a definite need for improvements. A discussion 
followed. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator attempted a vote by a show of hands. A 2/3 's vote is 
required. The tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 
125 No 13, 92 is 2/3' s the motion carried. 

Barry Balan moved to adjourn the Town Meeting until 
Thursday October 24th, 1996, at 7:30 PM to be held at the Senior 
Center. The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommended the motion to adjourn. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Meeting 
adjourned at 10:50 PM 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



218 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
October 24, 1996 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center, at 7:35 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 128 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. 

The Moderator explained that the Town Nurse, Judy Dunigan 
was available for answering any questions concerning Article 8, 
however a vote would be needed from the Body in order to allow her 
to address the meeting. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 8 The Town Manager explained that this was 
a joint article between the himself and the Board of Health. It was to 
allow the Board of Health to set up a revolving account in order to 
administer a Hepatitis B program to a certain population within the 
Town. A revolving account is allowed through the State Law, 
however authorization must be voted on. A limit as to how much 
money can be in the account must also be voted. He stressed that 
there is not any expenditure of any town money, the amount shown 
is the limit to the amount of funds allowed. He asked Judy Dunigan 
the Town Nurse to come forward and further explain the purpose of 
the program. Judy Dunigan explained that Hepatitis B is on the 
increase throughout the country. The Chelmsford Board of Health 
would offer these shots at a nominal cost of $10.00 per shot, $30.00 
for the series. The series could cost anywhere from $120.00 to 
$150.00 if done outside the Board of jurisdiction. This would be 
offered for the students in grades 7th through 12th. The State 
Department of Public Health says that 6th grade students or ages 1 1 - 
12 must be given the shots free of charge. It was felt that a age limit 
had to be set and the 6th grade was pre-puberty that is why that age 
group will be given the shot free. The State has also required that all 
children born after January 1st of 1992 be given the shot at birth, and 
that all children entering kindergarten in September of 1996 must 
have had the shot. The School Department Nurses and the Principal 
of the High School have all been extremely cooperative with this 

219 



situation. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. 
Jeffrey Stallard asked if the Town's public safety personnel have had 
the shots? The Town Manager explained that the Police, Fire, DPW, 
and Sewer personnel all have had the shots. Glenn Thoren moved to 
amend the article by amending the second sentence "to provide 
Hepatitis B vaccination to all students grades 7 through 1 2 at no cost 
to any family and requesting a voluntary donation of $30.00 per 
vaccination to help defray the costs and to provide sufficient funding 
limited to $60,000 to provide the vaccination series. Replace $7,500. 
in the last sentence with $60,000." He felt even though the cost of 
$30.00 isn't that much, for a family with financial constraints it may 
be a problem. Everyone should be allowed to receive the series of 
shots even if they are not being able to pay for them. Judy Dunigan 
explained that there is a built in mechanism in the price offered, 
which would allow her to waive the fee when necessary. The 
Moderator asked for the Town Counsel's opinion on the motion to 
amend. Town Counsel John Georgio said that the motion doesn't 
state where the required funding of $60,000 is going to come from. 
The Finance Committee did not recommend the amendment. The 
majority of the Board of Selectmen did not recommend the motion to 
amend. Town Counsel also noted certain times the warrant article 
does differ from the motion, however as long as the scope of the 
content is the same this is fine, but in this case it was never 
mentioned that any money was going to be raised or transferred so 
the amendment could be considered out of order. Based on Town 
Counsel's comments, Glen Thoren withdrew his amendment. 

The Moderator asked for further discussion, hearing none he 
asked for a show of hands on the article as presented, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Peter Dulchinos, member of the Board of Health, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the revolving fund Massachusetts 
General Law Chapter 44, Section 53E 54 for the Board of Health for 
Fiscal Year 1997, the receipts to be credited to the fund shall be 
from the collection of fees from the implementation of a Hepatitis 
program. The Board of Health shall be authorized to spend money 

220 



from the fund for the purpose of acquiring supplies and materials 
necessary for implementing a Hepatitis B program. Expenditures 
from the Hepatitis B Revolving Fund shall be limited to $7,500 
during Fiscal Year 1997. 

Under Article 9 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $17,271 from Free Cash to pay 
bills of previous fiscal years. 

The Town Manager presented a list of the departments and 
the amounts required to pay. 
Personnel Department 

$1,692.49 Injured on Duty - Police 

$8,644.51 Injured on Duty - Fire 
Public Works Department 

$5,528.00 - Tree Work 
Veteran's Benefits 

$1,406.00 Medical 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 10 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $134,152 from free cash to 
the School Department, said funding coming from Medicaid 
reimbursements. 

The Town Manager explained that this is money that the 
School Department collects from the Federal Government for 
Medicaid reimbursements for certain Special Education costs. The 
agreement has been that they go after the money and once received it 
is to go towards the operation of the School Budget. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 11 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Fiscal Year 1997 operating budget as 

221 



voted under Article 2 of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 29, 
1996 by making the following changes: 

Decrease Line Item #3, Chelmsford School Department, by $284,1 13 
to $29,232,522. 

Increase Line Item #5, Public Safety Personnel, by $12,000 to 
$5,756,879. 

Increase Line Item #8, Public Works Expenses, by $100,000 to 
$3,272,787. 

Decrease Line Items #16, Undistributed Expenses, by $55,000 to 
$5,236,000. 

Decrease Line Item #18, Debt Interest, by $44,270. 

And that the Town transfer and appropriate $100,000 from free cash 
to defray such changes. 

The Town Manager explained the article. He presented a 
budget analysis which showed the original revenue and expenditure 
figures along with the above mentioned amended figures. He said 
that the his goal was to use free cash for areas that there was a public 
need for, and to reduce the debt and interest and undistributed 
expense. However, most importantly apply a certain sum of money 
to reduce the tax rate. He explained to the School Department that he 
would work with them on the amount of money they would receive 
from the Town for the final funding of their budget. They would be 
given a certain amount. It was up to them to work out staying within 
that final budget figure. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the 
article. Mary Frantz, Chairman of the School Committee moved to 
amend the article. She explained that the members of the School 
Committee had different views on whether to submit an amendment 
to this article, a majority of the membership felt that an amendment 
should be submitted and it is as follows. Under Paragraph 2 decrease 
line item #3. Chelmsford School Department, by $102,710 to 
$29,413,925. and under Paragraph 7 "And that the Town transfer 

222 



and appropriate $281,403 from free cash to defray such changes." 
She explained that the figures in this article and the previous article 
are less then the budget article approved at the Spring Town 
Meeting. She asked Dr. Richard Moser the School Superintendent to 
explain further. Dr. Moser explained that when planning the budget 
in order for the School year to begin in September, budget figures are 
put together and quesstimations are made in the amount of actual 
money needed. These figures are approved with the anticipation of 
funding from the State when the cherry sheet figures are available. 
The requested amount of $181,403 would still leave a difference of 
$43,558 from the original approved figure from the Spring Town 
Meeting. He presented a list of the 1996-97 Unfunded needs. There 
were five items that totaled $181,403. $20,848. Budget imbalance, 
$33,000 Negotiations, $15,555 - Reading teacher, $16,000 
Technology Staff and $96,000 Classroom aides. If this proposed 
amendment isn't voted, then the Budget imbalance and the 
Negotiations figures were items that are a necessity. Cuts would be 
made within the final budget to meet these items. The other three 
items listed had been put on hold even after the Spring Town 
Meeting had approved them, therefore no additional staff had been 
hired, so no cuts will have to be made. He asked the Representatives 
to support the amendment, the School system has real needs and 
they're not being met. Questions were asked. James Doukszewicz 
asked where the additional money would come from if passed? The 
Town Manager explained from the money that was going to be used 
to reduced the tax rate. More questions and discussion took place. 
The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation 
on the motion to amend. The Finance Committee including one 
abstention did not support the motion to amend. The Board of 
Selectmen did not recommend the amendment. School Committee 
Member, Judy Mallette, spoke in favor of the amendment citing that 
this was a one time commitment. The present budget doesn't meet 
the basic educational values. Fred Marcks, the Student 
Representative to the School Committee urged the Representatives to 
support the amendment. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
amendment to the motion, motion defeated. He asked if there was a 



223 



need for further debate, hearing none, he asked for a show of hands 
on the article as presented by the Town Manager, motion carried. 

Under Article 12 The Moderator said that this article had 
been withdrawn. The wording in the warrant was: To see if the Town 
would vote to appropriate from Free Cash for the funding of 
negotiated collective bargaining agreements. 

Under Article 13 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor, moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control 
of the following described parcel of land to the Board of Selectmen 
to be held for the purpose of conveyance and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to convey in accordance ith Massachusetts General 
Law, Chapter 3 OB, for consideration to be determined, all right, title, 
and interest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land on 
Kensington Drive, shown as Lot 79 shown on Assessors Map 138, 
containing 3,600 square feet more or less, and more fully described 
in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Book 04811, Page 0148. 

The Town Manager explained that this is Town owned 
property at the end of Gail Street, with an assessed value of 
$1,200.00. The abutters have indicated an interested in purchasing 
the land. The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The 
Board of Selectmen unanimously supported the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried unanimously. 

Under Article 14 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control 
of the following described parcel of land to the Board of Selectmen 
to held for the purpose of conveyance, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title 
and interest, if any, held by the Town in a portion of a certain parcel 
of land located adjacent to 144 Littleton Road in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, shown as Assessor's Map No. 176, Parcel No. 15, 
containing 2,63 1 square feet more or less, as more fully described in 
a deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Book 
2223, Page 140, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a 

224 



Home Rule Petition under Article 97 of the Massachusetts 
Constitution, if necessary. 

The Town Manager explained that this was land that was 
originally given to the Town, this is a piece of a piece of property 
that is under the control of the Conservation Commission. A 
driveway goes across a portion of this land and this action is 
necessary in order to obtain a clear title. The Conservation 
Commission was in favor of the article. The property is valued at 
$400.00 and the Board of Selectmen will petition the Legislation for 
final approval. The Finance Committee recommended that article. 
The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 15 The Moderator explained that the motion 
wasn't signed therefore not action will be taken on the article. The 
wording in the warrant was: To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the care, custody, management and control of the following 
described parcel of land and easement to the Board of Selectmen to 
be held for the purpose of conveyance, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title 
and interest, if any, held by the Town in a portion of a certain parcel 
of land located adjacent to 20 Jensen Avenue in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, shown as Assessor's Map No. 95, Parcel No. 94, 
containing approximately 225 square feet more or less, and an access 
easement on a portion of the same certain parcel of land containing 
approximately 2,109 square feet more or less, as more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds in Book 2328, Page 249, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to file a Home Rule Petition under Article 97 of the 
Massachusetts Constitution, if necessary. 

Under Article 16 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Town Manager to execute an inter 
municipal agreement between the Town of Chelmsford and the City 
of Lowell pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40 
Section 4A for the purpose of operating and maintaining a traffic 
signal at the intersection of Drum Hill Road and Parkhurst Road. 

225 



The Town Manager explained that this is needed in order to 
comply with the newly installed traffic signal at the corner of Drum 
Hill and Parkhurst Rd. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 17 John Harrington moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Town of Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Section 
2110 Official Zoning Map as it pertains to a 1.394 acre portion of 
Parcel C, Meetinghouse Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
containing 4.69 acres in total land, more or less, east of Crosby Lane 
and south of Interstate 495, said Parcel C being more fully described 
in Plan Book 165, Page 148 recorded with the Middlesex County 
North District Registry of Deeds, by changing the designation of said 
1.394 acre portion of Parcel C from RB to CD - General Commercial 
District. 

Attorney Douglas Hausler, explained that he represented J.C. 
Management Corp, which is the Parlee family here in Town. His 
client is constructing office buildings on Meetinghouse Rd. The land 
on which his project is being constructed has a zoning line of 
Residential Zone running through a portion of the project. Back in 
1979 a note was made in the zoning to run the residential (RB) zone 
in that area back 600 feet from North Road When he appeared 
before the Planning Board with his current project, it was realized 
that a portion of the building would be in the RB zone which has 
different requirements, and couldn't be built in a residential zone. 
This change would keep the entire project under one zone. He felt 
that this was the actual intent of the zoning By-law, to use property 
lines as zoning lines. By setting a actual amount of feet you can and 
did cut a property in half with two different zones. He asked Kathy 
Howe, the Engineer for the project, from Howe surveying to come 
forward and show the project. She showed the building and the 
present zoning and how the proposed building would look once 
completed. Attorney Hausler said that the Conservation 
Commission approved the change, as did the Planning Board. 
George Merrill, member of the Historic Commission, questioned if 

226 



this was near the Historic Site of the first Town Meeting? Attorney 
Hausler said it was explained to him that the site had been moved to 
the Greenwood property, however, his client would be willing to 
acknowledge this if it becomes an issue. Bob Joyce questioned why 
this was coming before the Representatives now, shouldn't it wait for 
the Master Plan? It was felt that it was better to deal with this now, 
then the proposed project could continue. The Master Plan may not 
be completed at the estimated time. The Moderator asked for the 
Planning Board's recommendation. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of 
the Planning Board came forth and read the Boards' 
recommendation. 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a Public 
Hearing on October 9, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 19, 1996 and September 26, 1996, a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns 
and the appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. 

At the meeting on October 9, 1996 the proponents, residents 
and the Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning By-law 
change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that changing the 
zoning designation from RB to CD (General Commercial District) 
will maximize the use of the entire parcel and would result in a tax 
benefit to the Town . Therefore, in keeping with the general intent of 
the zoning by-laws in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) (Mr. Gilet not voting) to 
recommend this zoning change from RB to CD (General 
Commercial District) for a 1.394 acre portion of Parcel C at 
Meetinghouse Road. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the 
article. More discussion took place. David McLachlan spoke 
against the article. Concerns about traffic were discussed. Kathy 
Howe explained that traffic surveys had been taken and there would 
be no unnecessary effects on the level of service. The Moderator 

227 



asked if there was any need for further debate, hearing none he asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 18 Robert Joyce moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-law, Section 2110 Official Zoning 
Map as it pertains to certain parcels of land located northerly of 
Riverneck Road, easterly of Carter Drive and Cove Street, and 
southerly of Route 495, and being parcels of land shown on 
Assessors Map 107, Parcel 54, Map 108 Parcels 14 and 40 a portion 
of Map 109 Parcel 50, Map 109, parcels 53 and 54, and Map 110 
Parcels 13 and 14, by changing the designation of those lots from I A 
toRB. 

Attorney Joseph Johnson, representing the petitioner 
explained that the land in question is 36 acres surrounded on three 
sides by residential zone. Out of the 36 acres three acres are zoned 
residential and he would like to have the opportunity to develop this 
land as residential that is why he had petitioned for the change in 
zoning. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the Planning Board, gave the 
Board's recommendation. 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a Public 
Hearing on October 9, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Lowell Sun on September 25, 1996 
and October 2, 1996, a minimum of 14 days before the hearing. A 
copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns and the appropriate 
agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
40 A, Section 5. 

At the meeting on October 9, 1 996, the proponents, residents 
and the Planning Board discussed the merits of amending this zoning 
By-law. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that the change in 
zoning designation from IA to RB for certain parcels of land located 
northerly of Riverneck Road, easterly of Carter Drive and Cove 
Street and southerly of Route 495 would not be beneficial to the 
Town of Chelmsford. Therefore, in keeping with the general intent 
of the zoning by-laws in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted unanimously (6-0) Not to recommend the 
re-zoning of these parcels of land. 

228 



Kim MacKenzie went further on to say that the petitioner 
when he appeared before the Planning Board was not prepared, he 
did not have any plans or description of his intentions. The Finance 
Committee was against the article. The Board of Selectmen were 
against the article. Chris Garrahan of the Conservation Commission 
said that the Commission was not in favor, they had concerns. John 
Harrington of the Center Water District said that the Commissioners 
were concern about the water wells that are located next to the area 
in question and were against the article to rezone. The Moderator 
asked for further discussion, hearing none he asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands, motion defeated. 

Dennis Ready moved that the reading of Article 19 be 
waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 19 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Town of Chelmsford, 
Section 2420, by inserting the following sentence at the end of the 
section (Note: Language in bold print is new; all normal print 
presently appears in the Zoning Bylaw) 

2420. Extension or Alteration. As provided in Section 6 of Chapter 
40A, G.L., a nonconforming single-or two-family dwelling may be 
altered or extended provided that doing so does not increase the 
nonconforming nature of said structure and other pre-existing 
nonconforming structures or uses may be extended, altered, or 
changed in use on special permits from the Board of Appeals if the 
Board of Appeals finds that such extension, alteration, or change will 
not be substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood than the 
existing nonconforming use. Extension or alteration of 
nonconforming single-or two-family structures shall be allowed 
as of right, so long as such extension or alteration is within the 
existing footprint. 

Andrew Sheehan Land Use Co-ordinator representing the 
Board of Appeals explained that this was primarily a housekeeping 
article which resulted from a 1993 court case. The court ruled that 
extension of a nonconforming structure required a Special Permit by 

229 



the Board of Appeals. Prior to this court case extensions of 
nonconforming structures were granted as a right. It is the intent of 
the article to return the procedure to the situation that it was prior to 
the court case. Which is to allow the Building Inspector to issue 
building permits for extensions of nonconforming structures without 
going to the Board of Appeals. 

The Moderator asked for Kim MacKenzie to give the 
Planning Board's recommendation. Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Kim MacKenzie read the Board's recommendation to the 
body. The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a Public 
Hearing on September 25, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 5, 1996, and September 12, 1996, a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns 
and the appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. 

At the meeting on September 25, 1996 the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning 
By-law change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that the 
addition of the following wording at the end of 2420: "Extensions or 
alterations of non-conforming single or two family structures shall be 
allowed as of right, so long as such extension or alteration is within 
the existing footprint" will clarify the By-law and alleviate 
unnecessary Board of Appeals applications and allow building 
permits to be issued by the building Department. Therefore, in 
keeping with the general intent of the zoning by-laws in the 
development of the community, the Planning Board voted 
unanimously (6-0) to recommend the addition of the above 
mentioned language to the end of Section 2420 of the Chelmsford 
Zoning By-law. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Dennis Ready moved that the reading of Article 20 be 
waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

230 






Under Article 20 Robert Morse of the Planning Board, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Town of 
Chelmsford, Section 4600, Adult Entertainment Establishment, by 
inserting the following and deleting Section 4600 as it presently 
appears (NOTE: Language in bold print is new; all normal print 
presently appears in the Zoning By-Law): 

"4600 Adult Entertainment Establishments 

4610 PURPOSE It is the intent and purpose of this By-law to 
regulate adult entertainment establishments to promote the 
health, safety and general welfare of the citizens of Chelmsford 
and to guard against adverse secondary effects on the youth of 
the Town. Furthermore it is the intent and purpose to establish 
reasonable and uniform regulations to prevent any deleterious 
location and concentration of adult entertainment establishments 
within the town, thereby reducing the adverse secondary effects 
from such adult entertainment establishments. The provisions of 
this By-law have neither the purpose nor effect of imposing 
limitations or restriction on the content of any communicative 
materials. Similarly, it is not the intent nor effect of this By-law 
to restrict or deny access by adults to sexually oriented materials 
protected by the First Amendment, or to deny access by the 
distributors and exhibitors of sexually oriented entertainment to 
their intended market. Neither is it the intent nor effect of this 
By-law to condone or legitimize the distribution of obscene 
material. 

4620 Adult Entertainment Overlay District Boundaries. The 
Adult Entertainment Overlay District is established in addition 
to the Adult Entertainment (CX) District. The Adult 
Entertainment Overlay District Use Regulations shall be as 
herein described in the Adult Entertainment District. 

4630 No adult entertainment establishment shall commence 
operations without first applying for and receiving a Special 
Permit from the Board of Appeals. Special Permits shall not be 



231 



granted for an adult entertainment establishment if it is to be located 
less than one-thousand (1000) feet from: 

(a) Another adult entertainment establishment; 

(b) Residential uses; 

(c) Public or private nursery schools, 

(d) Public or private daycare centers; 

(e) Public or private kindergartens; 

(f) Public or private elementary schools; 

(g) Public or private secondary schools; 

(h) Playgrounds, parks and public or private open 

space areas; 
(i) Religious institutions; 

4640 The Board of Appeals may waive the one-thousand foot 
restrictions contained in section 4630 by special permit if it finds: 

(a) That the proposed use will not be contrary to the public 
interest or injurious to nearby properties and that the spirit of 
this By-law will be observed; 

(b) That the proposed use will not enlarge or encourage the 
development of a "skid row" area: 

(c) That the establishment of an additional regulated use in that 
area will not be contrary to any program of neighborhood 
conservation nor will it interfere with any program or urban 
renewal; 

(d) That all applicable regulations of this By-law will be 
observed; 

(e) That no portion of the establishment shall be located on the 
ground level of any building. 

The Board of Appeals shall not, under any circumstances, grant 
a special permit for an Adult Entertainment Establishment 
which shall be closed that seven-hundred-fifty (750) feet to any of 
the uses listed in section 4630. 

4650 Measurement of distances shall be from the lot line of any 
of the uses described in Section 4630. 



232 



4660 conditions for Granting a Special Permit for Adult 
Entertainment Establishments: 

(a) Adult Entertainment Establishments shall not be allowed 
within a building containing other retail, consumer or 
residential uses; 

(b) No Adult Entertainment Establishment shall be located 
within sixty (60) feet of a public or private way; 

(c) A material condition to every special permit issued with 
respect to any Adult Entertainment Establishment shall 
be that such establishment must cease its operations 
between the hours of 1:00 AM and 10:00 AM each day; 

(d) No Adult Entertainment Establishment may have visible 
from the exterior of the premises any flashing lights; 

(e) Each applicant for an Adult Entertainment 
Establishment must provide a plan submitted with its 
application showing adequate parking on the same lot as 
said establishment in the following ratio: one (1) parking 
space for each 1.25 persons allowed for said 
establishment's seating capacity; 

(f) At all times when an adult entertainment establishment is 
open for business, the entire area of the premises must be 
continually illuminated to the degree of not less than one 
(1) foot candle (measured thirty (30) inches form the 
floor) except those portions of the room covered by 
furniture. 

(g) No special permit for an adult use shall be issued to any 
person convicted of violating Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 119, Section 63, or Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 272, Section 28." 

Kim MacKenzie explained the purpose of the article. Last 
Fall the Adult Entertainment By-law was adopted. Due to the 
number of concerns, the Planning Board said that a subcommittee 
would be formed to further study the By-law and make any 
recommended changes necessary and bring them back to this body 
for a vote. The subcommittee was formed and the members have 
been meeting for the past eight months. They have study other 
towns Adult Entertainment by-laws and when possible attended 

233 



seminars. The areas in the article which are printed in bold are the 
results of the subcommittee's findings. These are their 
recommendations that should be added to the existing By-law in 
order to maintain uniform regulations. He then read the Planning 
Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a Public 
Hearing on October 9, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 19, 1996 and September 26, 1996, a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns 
and the appropriate agencies, as required in the Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. 

At the meeting on October 9, 1996 the proponents, residents 
and the Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning By-law 
change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that the insertion of 
the new Section 4600 and the deletion of the existing Section 4600, 
will further clarify this By-law to regulate adult entertainment 
establishments and promote the health, safety and general welfare of 
the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford and further protect the 
integrity of the Town. 

Therefore, in keeping with the general intent of the zoning 
bylaws in the development of the community, the Planning Board 
voted unanimously (6-0) to strongly recommend the above 
mentioned changes to Section 4600 of the Zoning By-law. 

The Town Manager wanted it noted that Section G which 
appears in the original motion was also additional wording, and he 
asked Town Counsel to explain. John Georgio Town Counsel 
explained that this wording is a requirement of Section 40A Sec 9A. 
Any Adult Entertainment By-law must contain this wording. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked if there was any further discussion, hearing none he 



234 



asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Dennis Ready moved that the reading of this article be 
waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 21 Robert Morse of the Planning Board 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Article V. 
Definitions, by inserting the following definition of Adult Book 
Store and deleting the definition of Adult Book Store as it presently 
appears (NOTE: language in bold print is new; all normal print 
presently appears in the Zoning By-law): 

Adult book store: An establishment having as a substantial or 
significant portion of its stock in trade printed matter, books, 
magazines, picture periodicals, motion picture films, video cassettes, 
computer compact disks, computer disks or diskettes, or coin 
operated motion picture machines for sale, barter or rental which are 
distinguished or characterized by their emphasis on matter depicting, 
describing or relating to "sexual conduct" as that term is defined in 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 272, Section 31, "sexual 
devices" or an establishment having for sale sexual devices which 
shall mean any artificial human penis, vagina or anus or other device 
primarily designated, promoted or marketed to physically stimulate 
or manipulate the human genitals, pubic area or anal area, including 
dildos, penisators, vibrators, penis rings, erection enlargement or 
prolonging creams or other preparations or an establishment with a 
segment or section devoted to the sale or display or such materials. 

Substantial or significant portion shall mean at least that portion 

of: 

(i) retail sales accounting for at least twenty-five percent of 

gross sales, or; 
(ii) merchandise accounting for at least twenty-five percent of 

total merchandise available for sales, or; 
(iii) shelf space and display space which when combined is in 

excess of eighty (80) square feet. 



235 



Kim MacKenzie explained the article, stating that these 
changes were the result of the same reasoning mentioned in Article 
20. He then read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public 
hearing on October 9, 1996 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 19, 1996 and September 26, 1996, a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all abutting towns 
and the appropriated agencies, as required in the Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40 A Section 5. 

At the meeting on October 9, 1996 the proponents, residents 
and the Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning By-law 
change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that the insertion of 
the new definition of Adult Book Store into Article V of the Zoning 
By-law, will further clarify definitions, promote the health, safety 
and general welfare of the Citizens of the Town of Chelmsford and 
further protect the integrity of the Town. 

Therefore, in keeping with the general intent of the Zoning 
By-Laws in the development of the community, the Planning Board 
voted unanimously (6-0) to strongly recommend the above 
mentioned changes to Article V of the Zoning By-law. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen unanimously recommened the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 22 Jeffrey Stallard moved to withdraw the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. The article as posted read as 
follows: That the Town vote to raise and appropriate, transfer and 
appropriate from available funds, transfer and appropriate from the 
stabilization funds, and or borrow to fund the repair and 
refurbishment of the property known as "The Old North Town Hall". 



236 



Under Article 23 Jeffrey Stallard explained the article. The 
building known as the Old North Town Hall, could provide much 
needed additional meeting space for town organizations. It is not a 
neighborhood issue but a community issue. He felt that by having a 
definite time on record, then perhaps a grass root effort could take 
place to raise the funding necessary for repairs. Perhaps people 
would take a chance to work towards obtaining funding knowing that 
it couldn't be sold at just any time. At the end of the two years, the 
Selectmen could then do what ever they felt necessary for the good 
of the Town. Robert Hawking moved to amend the article by 
changing the two year stay to read three year. He explained that he 
is presently a member of the Community Exchange Program, which 
has just been granted an extension of their space at the Old Center 
Town Hall to be until March of 1997. So he knows how important 
space is for Town organizations. Three years may seem like a lot of 
time, but by changing the time period it would enable enough time to 
obtain grants and outside funding one - two years, plus construction. 
The Finance Committee was against the motion to amend. The 
Board of Selectmen were against the motion to amend. Mark 
Conners spoke in favor of the article. Any type of improvements 
would be an investment, not just for the neighborhood but for a 
Town owned building. Selectman Lawlor explained that the Town is 
not currently intending to sell the property. Further discussion took 
place, concerning the liability and maintance of the property. The 
Town is and would be responsible for any liability and maintenance 
of the property. Leonard Richards moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend 
the article to read from two to three year stay, motion carried. The 
Moderator asked for the need of further discussion, hearing none he 
asked for a show of hands on the article as amended. Motion carried. 
The article reads as follows: 

Jeffrey Stallard moved that the Town vote to place a three 
year stay on the previous town meeting decision to sell or transfer 
the property known as "The Old North Town Hall". The three year 
time period would start at the close of the fall annual Town Meeting. 



237 



Under Article 24 Jeffrey Stallard explained that he had sign 
the motion to bring the article forward. Wanda Dunn who was the 
proponent had asked him to withdraw the article due to the monies 
being voted in a previous article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. The article as posted read as 
follows: To see if the Town would vote to raise and appropriate, 
transfer and appropriate from available fund, transfer and appropriate 
from the stabilization fund, and/or borrow a certain sum of money to 
fund the repair and refurbishment of the Freeman Lake dam and 
spillway. 

The Moderator made a point of order that Article 5 had been 
tabled to the conclusion of Article 24, therefore this was the next 
article to be acted upon. 

Under Article 5 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that 
the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $750,000 from free cash to 
reduce the FY97 tax rate. 

The Town Manager explained that this would represent a 
reduced tax rate of $19.40 per $1,000. in valuation. The savings 
would be 26 cents a $1,000 per household. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for vote by way of 
a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 25 The Moderator declared that this was a 
petitioned article and that the motion was not signed. This is 
necessary in order to bring the article to the floor, therefore no action 
can be taken. The Manager explained that he had spoken to the 
petitioner and that there were some concerns that needed to be 
addressed and may come back on a future warrant. The article as 
posted read as follows: To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VII, Miscellaneous by adding the 
following Section 15 Prohibition of Feeding Waterfowl: 

1 It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any person to feed 

waterfowl in a residential zone. 



238 



2. The Health Department shall be authorized to enforce this 
By-law pursuant to Article 1 of the Town of Chelmsford 
By-laws. 

3. The fine for each violation of this section shall be $5.00. 
Each day such violation is committed, or permitted to 
continue, shall constitute a separate offense and shall be 
punishable as provided in Article 1 of the Town of 
Chelmsford By-laws. 

Under Article 26 Michael Sockol moved to waive the 
reading of this article. Motion carried, unanimously. The Town 
Manager explained this article was brought forth as the result of 
concerns from the Business Community and neighborhood residents 
in certain areas of the Town regarding graffiti. He researched other 
area Towns and drew up this By-law. The areas were in the Drum 
Hill and Center sections of the Town. He asked the Police Chief to 
further explain. Chief Caron said that this graffiti is known as 
tagging. A group or gang marks their territory, if not removed right 
away, then more tagging is added. This is a common type of 
destruction to public property however, it is a new feature to 
Chelmsford. It is felt that now is the time to have something on the 
books so when these people are caught then action can be taken. A 
discussion took place. It was felt that the owner of property is the 
one being penalized, because if the person isn't caught then the 
owner is responsible to pay the expense and clean up building etc. all 
within a set time period. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee was against 
the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously supported the 
article. John Harrington of the Business Community spoke in favor 
of the article. Samuel Poulten spoke against. Michael Sockol moved 
the question. The Moderator asked for any need to hear further 
debate, hearing none he asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. 
Motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter V. Lawlor moved to amend the General 
By-laws, Article VI Police Regulations, by adding the following 
Section 24, Graffiti: 



239 



1. Removal required; duty to maintain premises. 

Graffiti is hereby determined to constitute a public nuisance 
and injurious to neighborhood property, and the public 
health, safety, and welfare. It shall be unlawful for any 
person, partnership, or corporation, owning any premises to 
permit, allow to remain, or fail to remove any unsightly 
condition commonly referred to as graffiti. The definition of 
graffiti being: "Any unauthorized defacing, marring, or 
damaging by the spraying of paint, marking by paint, chalk, 
dye, or similar substance, on any building, motor vehicle, 
bridge, rock, culvert, pole, sign, playground which is in 
public view." 

2. Notice to remove. 

Whenever the Chelmsford Police Department becomes aware 
of graffiti on any structure or improvement within the Town, 
they shall give notice to remove any such graffiti therefrom. 
Such notice shall be sent registered mail, return receipt 
requested, to the owner of record in the Assessor's Office and 
have substantially the following form: 

Notice to Remove Graffiti From 

Structure or Improvements 

To the Owner Hereinafter Described 

YOUR ATTENTION IS HEREBY DIRECTED to the 
provisions of Article VI, Section 24, of the General By-laws 
of the Police Regulations of the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, on file in the office of the Town Clerk in 
Town Offices. 

Pursuant to the provisions of said sections, you are hereby 
notified that graffiti exists on premises specifically described 

at 

which injures neighboring property and the pubic health, 
safety, and welfare. You are therefore notified at once, and in 
any such event within thirty (30) days from the date of this 

240 



notice, to remove said unsightly conditions from the property 
and thereafter to keep the said property free therefrom. 

3. Penalty. 

The penalty for failure, neglect, or refusal to repair or abate 
the nuisance within thirty (30) days period shall be $50.00 for 
each offense. Each day that such violation continues shall 
constitute a separate offense. 

Michael Sockol moved to waive the reading of the next three 
articles. Articles 27, 28, and 29. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator explained that he was going to address the 
following three articles all at once and then each article would be 
voted on individually. He asked Town Clerk Mary St. Hilaire, to 
Chair the meeting at this point. Mary St. Hilaire explained that all 
that was needed to happen with the next three articles was to go from 
two yes's to two no's and to get rid of an asterisk, then the 
Representatives could leave, she then asked Dennis McHugh to 
briefly explain. 

Under Article 27 Dennis McHugh explained that as 
Moderator it has come to his attention that the rules of order are not 
consistent with Town Meeting Time and Roberts Rules of Order, 
which are the two references that are used if an issue is not addressed 
within our own rules of order By-law. The sections marked in the 
bold print were the sections that were being amended under each 
article. Under Article 27 he felt adjourning to a certain time should 
not be reconsidered, there is no purpose to reconsider. Under Article 
28 he felt that a speaker shouldn't be interrupted as in a point of 
order way, to reconsider something that has already been voted on 
previously. Presently an article can be reconsidered by interupting a 
speaker during the discussion of another article. With this change, 
anyone who wants to reconsider would have to wait to speak. Under 
Article 29 there is no purpose to amend the limit or extend debate. 
Currently the Town's rules and order permit an amendment, but then 



241 



no debate can take place. This would keep the ruling the same as it 
appears in Town Meeting Time. 

The Acting Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The 
Acting Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Dennis E. McHugh, Town Moderator moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article II, Town Meeting, 
Section 4, Procedures, 4.1 Order of Procedure of Motions by the 
rules considering a Motion to Adjourn to a Certain Time, in order to 
restrict reconsideration of that motion as follows): 

Current By-law: 

Article II Town Meeting 



.Section 4 Procedures 



4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion- At All sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 

Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No No 



No 



Majority 



b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 

Yes Yes Yes Yes 



Majority 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



Majority 



242 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 



Yes* No 


No 


No 


None 


e) Take Out of Order 








Yes Yes 


No 


No 


Majority 


f) Reconsider 








Yes* Yes 


No 


Yes 


Majority 


g) Lay on or Take from the table 


No 




No No 


No 


Majority 


h) Previous Question 








No No 


No 


No 


2/3 


i) Limit or Extend Debate 








No No 


Yes 


Yes 


2/3 


j) Postpone to a Certain Time 


No 




No Yes 


Yes 


Majority 


k) Commit, Recommit, or 


Refer 


Yes 




No Yes 


Yes 


Majority 


1) Amend 








No Yes 


Once 


Yes 


Majority 


m) Main Motion 








No Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Majority 



* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 

Propose By-law 

Article II Town Meeting 
Section 4 Procedures 



243 



4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion - At all sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 

Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No No 



No 



Majority 



b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 
Yes Yes Yes 



No 



Majority 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



Majority 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 

Yes* No No No 



None 



e) Take Out of Order 
Yes Yes 



No 



No 



Majority 



f) Reconsider 

Yes* Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



g) Lay on or Take from the table 

No No No 



No 



Majority 



h) Previous Question 

No No 



No 



No 



2/3 



i) Limit or Extend Debate 

No No Yes 



Yes 



2/3 



j) Postpone to a Certain Time 
No Yes Yes 



No 



Majority 



244 



k) Commit, Recommit, or Refer 

No Yes Yes Yes Majority 

1) Amend 

No Yes Once Yes Majority 

m) Main Motion 

No Yes Yes Yes Majority 

* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 

Under Article 28 The Acting Moderator explained that the 
explanation for this article was already heard and asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance Commitee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
the article. The Acting Moderator asked for any discussion, hearing 
none, she asked for vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Dennis E. McHugh, Town Moderator moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article II, Town Meeting, 
Section 4, Procedures, 4. 1 Order of Procedure of Motions by the 
rules considering a Motion to Reconsider, in order to restrict 
reconsideration of that motion as follows): 

Current By-law: 

Article II Town Meeting 

Section 4 Procedures 

4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion- At All sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 



245 



Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No No 



No 



Majority 



b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 
Yes Yes Yes 



Yes 



Majority 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No Majority 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 

Yes* No No No None 



e) Take Out of Order 
Yes Yes 



No 



No Majority 



f) Reconsider 

Yes* Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



g) Lay on or Take from the table 

No No No 



No Majority 



h) Previous Question 

No No 



No 



No 



2/3 



i) Limit or Extend Debate 

No No Yes 



Yes 



2/3 



j) Postpone to a Certain Time 
No Yes Yes 



No Majority 



k) Commit, Recommit, or Refer 
No Yes Yes 



Yes Majority 



1) Amend 

No 



Yes 



Once 



Yes Majority 



246 



m) Main Motion 
No Yes 



Yes 



Yes Majority 



* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 

Propose By-law 

Article II Town Meeting 
Section 4 Procedures 



4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion - At all sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 



Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No 



No 



b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 
Yes Yes Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



Majority 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 
Yes* No No No 



Majority 



None 



e) Take Out of Order 

Yes Yes 

f) Reconsider 

Yes Yes 



No 



No 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



Majority 



247 



g) Lay on or Take from the table 

No No No 



No 



Majority 



h) Previous Question 




No 


No 


No 


i) Limit or 


Extend Debate 


No 


No 


Yes 


j) Postpone 


to a Certain Time 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


k) Commit, 


Recommit, 


or Refer 



No Yes Yes 



1) Amend 

No 



Yes 



m) Main Motion 
No Yes 



Once 



Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



Yes 



Yes 



Yes 



2/3 



2/3 



Majority 



Majority 



Majority 



Majority 



* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 

Under Article 29 The Acting Moderator explained again 
that the explanation for this article was already heard under Article 
27, and asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Commitee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Acting 
Moderator asked for any discussion, hearing none, she asked for vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The article 
reads as follows: 

Dennis E. McHugh, Town Moderator moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article II, Town Meeting, 
Section 4, Procedures, 4.1 Order of Procedure of Motions by the 
rules considering a Motion to Limit or Extend Debate, in order to 
restrict reconsideration of that motion as follows): 



248 



Current By-law: 
Article II Town Meeting 



Section 4 Procedures 



4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion- At all sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 

Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No No 



No 



Majority 



b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 
Yes Yes Yes 



Yes 



Majority 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



Majority 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 
Yes* No No No 



None 



e) Take Out of Order 
Yes Yes 



No 



No 



Majority 



f) Reconsider 

Yes* Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



g) Lay on or Take from the table 

No No No 



No 



Majority 



h) Previous Question 
No No 



No 
249 



No 



2/3 



i) Limit or Extend Debate 

No No Yes 



Yes 



2/3 



j) Postpone to a Certain Time 
No Yes Yes 

k) Commit, Recommit, or Refer 
No Yes Yes 



1) Amend 

No 



Yes 



m) Main Motion 

No Yes 



Once 



Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



Majority 



Yes Majority 



Yes Majority 



* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 

Propose By-law 

Article II Town Meeting 
Section 4 Procedures 



4.1 Order of Precedence of Motion - At all sessions of Town 
Meeting, the following motions shall be recognized and shall have 
precedence in the order in which they are arranged in this section: 

Order of Precedence of Motions 



Can be Can be Vote 

Privileged Debatable Amended Reconsidered Required 



a) Adjourn (unqualified) 

Yes No No 

b) Adjourn at or to a certain time 

Yes Yes Yes 



No 



Yes 



Majority 



Majority 



250 



c) Recess 
Yes 



No 



Yes 



No 



Majority 



d) Question of Privilege, Order of Information 
Yes* No No No 



None 



e) Take Out of Order 

Yes Yes 

f) Reconsider 

Yes* Yes 



No 



No 



No 



Majority 



Yes Majority 



g) Lay on or Take from the table 


No 


No 


No 


h) Previous 


Question 




No 


No 


No 


i) Limit or 


Extend Debate 




No 


No 


No 


j) Postpone to a Certain Time 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


k) Commit, Recommit, or Refer 



No Majority 



No 



Yes 



2/3 



2/3 



No Yes Yes 



No Majority 



Yes Majority 



1) Amend 

No 



Yes 



Once Yes Majority 



m) Main Motion 

No Yes 



Yes 



Yes Majority 



* Note : The privileged motions marked by an asterisk may interrupt 
the speaker. 



251 



Dennis McHugh returned to the Chair as Moderator. Barry 
Balan moved to adjourn the Town Meeting seeing that there was no 
further business at hand. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 1 1 :05 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



252 



WARRANT FOR 
STATE ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 5, 1996 

William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town or City of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections to vote at: 

Precinct 1 : 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3 : 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 5th day of November 1996 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 
p.m. for the following purpose: 



253 



To cast their votes to the State Election for the Candidates of 
Political parties for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

US SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR THIRD COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT FIFTH MIDDLESEX SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

SIXTEENTH MIDDLESEX REPRESENTATIVE 
DISTRICT 

REGISTER OF PROBATE MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY TREASURER MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

SHERIFF (to till vacancy) MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



Questions: 

#1 Changing the Trapping and Hunting Laws 

#2 Limits spending on Political Campaigns (NON-BINDING) 



For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



254 





co 


in 


o 


CD 


CD 


in 


CM 


in 


CD 


OO 


CM 


in 


T— 


oo 


CO 


M- 


in 


o 


CM 


"«r 


CD 


in 


M" CM 


1 


a> 


CD 


in 


co 


CM 


^ — 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


in 


CO 






CO 


"«* 


^ — 


CO 


CO CO 


< 


^ 


^ — 


o 


h- 






co 








CO 


▼— 


T — 


^ — 


tt 








CO 


V 


CD 


T— 


CO 


1- 






CD 


in 














CO 




r— 


CO 










CO 


-<fr 


CM 




CO 


o 






















T— 
















T— 




■<— 




^* 


h- 


















































,_ 


T _ 


in 


r- 


"fr 


ro 


CO 


CM 


^r 


,_ 


^t 


oo 


CD 


in 


CO 


in 


o 


o 


•* 


CM 


CO 


CD 


o "<r 


CD 


(N 


ro 


in 


o 






CO 








oo 


T— 


h- 


5t 


M- 








CO 


s 


CO 


T- 


CD 


Q 






a> 


r- 






T— 








00 




h- 


o 










CO 


CO 




oo 


03 






















*~ 






,_ 










T ~ 




T — 




T ~ 


I— 

Q. 


















































CO 


h- 


en 


m 


CO 


M- 


m 


CO 


m 


o 


r-- 


in 


T _ 


CM 


co 


in 


,_ 


o 


h- 


OO 


K 


CO 


■t r- 


oo 


^ 


t— 


C\l 


m 






m 








co 


T - 


CM 


O 


■<*■ 








00 


CO 


CM 


T — 


oo 


Q 






CD 


CD 






^ 








h- 




h~ 


o 










1^. 


T 


CO 




h- 


CU 






















T— 






T— 










*" 




T— 




T- 



co 

CO u 

co cu 



CMCOIOCMIOOCOCOCOOCM 

CM t- Tt 00 CO -<T 

O 1^- t- O 

*- CM 


O't'tf'^OOOCM 
CM O 0O CO -"fr 

00 T- O 

*- CM 


"^ CD CO 

T- CO f- 


CO CM 
CM 


OOOCOOOOOCMCO'«-t- 

co m tn s oo h» 

T- CO T~ O 

▼- CM 


cooioi-cnjoo*- 
cm t- r>- co h- 

0)0 o 

t- CM 


t- co "<r 

00 CO r- 


CO r- 

o 

CM 



m 

m 

a o 

UJ OJ 

CD Q. 

S 

LU 

g o 

z s 

■ Q. 



COOCOCOCOCMCMOO^rT-Tr 

r- CN OO if) CO CD 

O CO r- CO 



NO)0)lf)Tj-00^ 

CM O O ^ CO 

00 r- CO 



S if) CO O) ^ 
CDNr- CO 

^ TT CD 



0(OOOSOO)(MN*m 


r^ocooinoom 


o o tj- t- m 


CM t- t- 00 CD ^t 


t- Tf CM CO "** 


CM O t- t- ^f 


cd in r- r- 


1^- CD h- 


"^ CO h- 



o * 

_ co 

H o 
O cu 
uj X- 



LU 



Z C 
LU Q. 

q 

(0 

LU *- 
CtL O 

a. co 
Q. 



CM 

o 

CU 



c 

O 

o 
cu 



13 

o 
m 

0) 

c 

o 
o 

CO 



00 m CM CD o 
O CD 



CM 



r- TT 

o 

CM 



■<r o m 

CD 



00 CD * 
r- r- Tj- 

oo o 



h~ in cm 
in 



o in 
■«fr 

CD 



00 00 h~ 00 CM CO O 

t- t- co co r^ 

CD "<fr t- 



CM T O 



OWCOCOCNt-i-O) 
CM t- CO if) CD 

CD CO r- 



m 



■o 
cu 

u. 



LU 

o 

CO 

LU 

a: 
a. 

CD O 

!i 

o y- 

2 Z 

■O LU 
CD Q 

15 

CO LU 

E ? 
co Ol 



CM 
CD 
00 



O 



CDCOCO'i-IOt-OCM 

t- oo co m oo 

h- o oo 



CD 00 CO 

*- O t- 

^ m 



"St 

CD 



CM 


O-CDCOCDCO^-OCM 


00 CO t- o CM 


CD 


co oo m oo 


CM Tt CM CD 


m 


r^ r- m 


co cm in 



in t- r^ 
o h- 
m co 



c 
cu 
co 
c 
cu 

CD CU 

o o 
^ O 

CO ^ c 

« IS 

mm o 



^ > 

Q. ro 
£-_J CU 

°- o ^ S 

EL. (0 O 

Secy 



a: 
o 



cu 



cu 

n 
CO cu 

« $ 

"co 2 



< -c 

O ' 

I- 05 
</) 
LU 

o 

z 
o 

O 
LU 

> 



CD CM 
CD 
00 



O 



c -^ 



ffi J^ o 92 « 

CD o 2 -o .« 

CO o cu co ^ s 

X 2 Q_ Z S S 



LU 
CO 



co 



CO LL E 

■g c.S 
ra -c = 

3 CO -3 



(JO 



CO 



C t: 

co cu 

co -Q 

3 O 



CU 



ii o 






z 

LU 

(0 

LU 

n< w 
OL ^ 

a. c 

LU J2 
QC CD 



c 
co 

cu 
cu 



•E d) 

IS 



255 



t- -«r in CM CN 

CD CO CO -<fr CO 

o n- cd 

N CD CO 



O CO lO CO in CN 

^r CD y- CO 

tO CM r- CD 

t- N CO CO 



oo on n ^ 



t- CO CN 
r- -r- rt 



t CO N 
CO CN r- 
00 O 



CD 
00 



OO O CO 

m cn *- 

▼- CD CO 



o o Ti- 
en 

00 



■^r oo 
■<r cn 
co ^r 



CD 

oo 



CO 

o 

cu 



CO CO 

in cn 
r- o 



■<r tt 



N 


t- O if) y- O h- 


noo t MON 


oo 


in N- CO CO 


t- 5}- CM CO 


N 


f- N 00 h~ 


r- C\| TT h- 



o 

cu 

I— 

a. 



cd t- m n cm 

CO CD *st 

CD O o 

t- CN 



t- If) CO O O CN 

00 if) O Tf 

t- CD CD O 

CN 



O CD r- CN 
y- if) Tt 



O CN 

o 

CN 



CO 
(O o 
o cu 



SOOOSi- 
CN CN N 

00 CN O 

t- CN 



00 if) 00 O O r- 

00 If) CN h- 

t- CD CD O 

CN 



<r- CO ^- i- CM y- 

CO CN t- h- 

t- Tf If) O 

i- CM 



CO 

K o 

LU <[) 
CD Q_ 

LU 

9 u 

Z cu 

l_ 

. a. 

z 
o ^ 

— CO 

I- o 
O cu 

"£ 

LU 

LU CL 

a 
to 

LU *- 

a: o 

a. a) 

0. 



m o) n n 't 

CM If) CD 

COr- CD 



O CO f 
CD CN h- 
t- OO CD 



CD 
CD 



CO I s - CD 
CO CO x- 
t- CO if) 



■«- <<* 

CD 
CD 



t- If) h- CM If) 


TT CO ^t CM CM if) 


OrOi-Oin 


t- CM "* 


co ^r co ^r 


co h~ tt <* 


no r- 


*- n oo n 


^- T- ^ I s - 



CON (MOOlfl 


cm cd cm •»-•*- m 


co t- o r- o m 


"t 00 Tj" 


OO CN CO ^r 


oo^f "<r 


N r- CD 


t- N O CD 


y- CO in CD 



CD CD 
00 CO 

m cd 



CN CD 
Tt CO 

00 o 



^r o 



"<r n 



co -r- oo o o 
•<r co oo 
t- in oo 



•«* ><»■ 



CM CM 
CO Tt 
O TT 



CN 

CD 

in 



co in cm t- 

CO CO N 
t- CO CO 



X 
(A 

t-(M*OC1(0010 
CD j; CO CO CD 



in 






Q 






"D 




E 


L. 




CU 


CO 
I 




cu 

1— 

O 


o 




cu 

c 


-I 




o 


-I 




oo 


o 




CD 


z 


CO 


£Z 


Z> 


c 


C 


o 


CO 


>s 


OCQO 



t= cu 



2i o 

■c co 



(/> 

_l T3 

21 

a: 

o 
o 



LU 

z 

LU 
O 

o 

< 



oo «-• ■«— 

t- CD 



o 
o 



CN "^ 



o 



LU 

Z 
LU 

o 



< 

O 



Z C 
LU iS 
CO CD 



CO 

c 
co 
> 
HI 

X? 

CO 
CO 

X 



o 

CD 



> 






< 




c 

CU 


h- 




> 


Z 




0) 


LU 




O 


CO 






LU 


to 


O 


a. 


c 


o 


LU 


co 


CO 


amo 



CO 

co 

Q. 



c 

CO 

>> 

a: 

o 



SS.-2 



CO 

CL 



256 



CM Oi LO t- in CM 



n oocn t- 


CO 


N 00 CO 


Oi 


CM CO lO 


CO 



O CO O CO CM 

CM "* CO CO CO 

CO CM Oi 

CO O CO 



nioO'-coooot 

00 O) 0> G> CO CM CM 

CO h- CM CM <r- a> 

CO h* m ^ CO CO 

r- CO 



o 

0) 



co •*■ co •*■ o -<t 

O ID CM 0> 

co o m oo 



rS(DO* 
'-(Or- Q> 
CO O 00 



P)^r-^r-OlflOO 
Tf Tj- CO CM y- 00 

^ 00 CO ^" -^ h- 
t- CO 



00 

o 

CD 



oocN ^ no N 
oo in ■*- oo 

cm Oi in r- 



oo o co co r^ 
o h- oo 



0>NCM(OeONO^ 

o oi to m ^- h- 

■^- h- m ^ co m 

*- CO 



h- O Tf T- 

m r~ t- 
co ■«- m 



o CM 

o 

CM 



00 CO ^ 

co CO 

0O T- 



CM 

"<* 

O 
CM 



m oo t r- ^ o 

^- Tt CO CO CM 

(O 00 N Tf t 



CM 



CO 




-<!- 


r- 


in 






r- 


CO o 
Oi <u 




CO 


o 


CO 






o 

CM 


?£ 
















in 




T 


CO 


CO 


o 


,_ 


<*■ 


m 




m 


T — 


CM 






CD 


a: o 

uj £ 




CO 


o 

T — 


CO 






Oi 

T— 


m a. 
















5 
















UJ 




T— 


T- 


T— 


CM 


o 


in 




CO 


co 


o 






-* 


O 

Z O 




CM 


00 


CO 






h. 














t— 


E 
















• 0. 
















z 

Qco 




CM 


CM 


CO 


,_ 


CM 


in 




CO 


Oi 


co 






<<r 


»- o 




CM 


Oi 


CO 






en 


O o 














r— 


*$£. 
















UJ 




















r-- 


Oi 


m 


o 


T- 


CM 




CM 


r- 


CO 






a> 




CM 


r- 


m 






in 

r— 


UJ Q. 
















Q 
































(ft 




in 


i^ 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


UJ t- 




CO 


r- 


CO 






CD 


a o 

a £ 




CO 


O) 


in 






CO 


a. 


c 

3 
O 

o 

X 
(0 
"O 












< 

o 

1- 



*- <*■ Oi r^ t- 

r^ oo h- 

h~ cm o 

t- CM 



in ^ T- *t 
h- CM 



Oi o co co m 
m oo ^- 
co o h- 



o ^ co oo m 
com "t 

CO CM O) 



▼- Oi CM O CM 

m cm t- o) 
in o in 



r» in co 
o> oo 
r- o 



CM 
Oi 

oo 



NcOT-inmoT-cN 
^ co *- co w ^ 

CO Oi CO lO CO t- 

1- <«• 



NMr-(OCMOOCO 
OO CO CO CO ^ 00 

co o> in ^- co Oi 

r- CO 



0)MlOr-0)MCMO 
CO CM CM 00 00 Oi 

co oo in ^r cm •*■ 

y- CO 



^■CNr-lOt-CNlOO 

in co o cm -^ o> 

^ oi co m co oo 

x- co 



t ^ ^ CM N r- CN 
CO O CM S t 
CM CO Tf 5f CM 



CO 



in^-^-T-co-r-co^- 

OXNr- N S 00 

■^ 00 CO ^- CO h- 

T- CO 



X 

o 

(0 

o 

"O 



-J™ 

< X 



O 

l- 



UJ 

r- 
< 
CO 

o 

0. 



r = 

0) CD 

xi c 



o 




fc 

05 








tc 




-J 


< 






UJ 




2 CD 


C 




Cft 


co 


CD 


tr 






O 


c 


C 


CU 


0) 


o 


UJ CD o O 

kodqq: 





a: 

UJ 

S 

z> 
(ft 

< 

UJ 

K 

H 

fc 

Z 

3 "E 15 J2 o 

O «» s 'Jc •- 

o5^5 



>» 

CD 

JC 
CO 



"J c 
« | * 



a: 

UJ 

z 

g 

Cft 

(ft 

s 

5 
O 

o 

fc 

z 



c E co 
£ col 



CO 



CO 

to CO 



31 

. O) 

-> c 



CD 



omi-<iu "$2 



257 



CO O i- O CO CM 
O CO 00 CO 

00 h- CO CD 

r- CO CO CO 



lO SOCM 
CD CO CO CO 

OOtOO) 
i- CD CD CO 



CM m CO CM 

cd co co co 

CO CO CO CD 

*- CO t- CO 





t-OCMt-O^ 


co 


o> r-- co Oi 


o 
cu 


r- O CO 00 


*" *" 



I s - I s - o ■<»■ 

n co oo o> 

ONCO 



OOOCO < 

m co o O) 

t- m cn co 



(O^t t COON 

oo co co oo 

i- cn co I s - 



ocMins 

CO -^ OO 00 

■«- cd co I s - 



CO r- CO I s - 

cm t- in oo 
cm rr t- r- 







CO O 00 O t- CM 




in o I s - cm 




CD I s - CO CM 


I s - 




CO t- CD ^ 




o) cd m •'* 




mosit 


o 




CM ▼- CO O 




O CO o 




▼- I s - T- O 




t- CN 




t- CM 




r- CM 


0. 




CM t- I s - O t- r- 




t-COCMt- 




«- Tf CO r- 


co 




t- CM CO I s - 




m r- O I s - 




t- *t r- I s - 


CD U 

o> cu 




CM O 00 O 




T- T- CO O 




CM CO CM O 




t- CM 




i- CM 




r- CM 


?i 














in 




t- CO o o o ■**■ 




I s - CO T- <<* 




CD I s - CO -<!■ 


m 




in co co o> 




CO CO O) CD 




CO Tf O CD 


CC o 




CM <J> I s - CD 




i-OSO) 




CM m CM O) 














uj £ 














CQ Q. 














s 














UJ 




m I s - t- ■«- *- m 




OllOr-lO 




cm oo in m 


s? <* 




CO CO Tf "<*■ 




o co m tj- 




r«- cd I s - "*r 


O o 

Z CU 




t- CD CO I s - 




T- CO I s - I s - 




T- CO T- I s - 




f- 




T ~ 




T - V 


L_ 














■ 0. 














z 

Qco 




omoori-io 




co cm m in 




oo cm in m 




oo co O) ^- 




n r- m ^ 




cm ■*■ I s - «*■ 


1- o 

O cu 




x- CD I s - (J> 




o oo o> 




t- CO «- CD 




' r ~ 




*~ ' r_ 




T ~ T ~ 


at 














LU 














3~ 




co co m t- o cm 




Tt 0O O CM 




o m r>- cm 




in oj co o> 




O Nt- O) 




co I s - m o) 




t- I s - co m 




t- oo co m 




tNt-IO 




^— 




^— 




"^" ^" 


z £ 














UJ Q. 














q 














(/) 




O CM CO CM CM CM 




■^ O) CJ> CM 




CM t- CD CM 


UJ *~ 




CO COO) CD 




co o O) a> 




5t CO COO) 


OH o 




CM CD CO 00 




t- O CO 00 




CM "tf" T- CO 




T~ 










a. cu 


>» 












0. 


o 

c 

(0 














o 

> 


_l 




_J 




_J 




< 




< 




< 






1- 




1- 




h- 




~ 


o 




O 




o 




*^» 


h- 




\- 




»- 




& 














c 














3 














o 














o 














X 














CD 














CO 














o 




























T3 


co 












T3 


o 












s 

1 


CO 

CL 

>>b 


z 




CM 

z 






u. 


(0 


o 




o 






u_ 


CO > c 


h* 




1- 






UJ 


Blanks 
Brad B 
James 
Write-I 
Misc 


0) 

UJ 


C C/3 ^ 


co 
UJ 






x 


3 


co uj O 


3 


co Qj O 




CO 


O 


CO >- Z 


o 


CO >- Z 



258 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

DECEMBER 17, 1996 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town or City of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in their several 
polling places, VIZ: 

Precinct 1 : 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5 : 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 17th day of December 1996 from 12:00 noon to 
8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 



259 



To vote on the following referendum question: 

QUESTION 1 

Shall the Town ratify the October 21, 1996 Town Meeting vote on 
warrant article six to appropriate the sum of $4,832,843, this amount 
to be reduced by $1,832,843 of state library grant assistance, for the 
purpose of constructing an addition to and remodeling, 
reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to the Adams Library, 
including original equipment and furnishings related thereto: that to 
meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $3,000,000 under General Law 
Chapter 44, Section 7; that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to 
contract for and expend any federal or state aid available for the 
project and that the Town Manager is authorized to take any other 
action to carry out this project? 

Yes/No 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 



260 



o 



CM 00 ^J- ^- 
OION 
O CO CO 

co t- ■^■ 



o h- co m 
i^- oo to 



CD 


co 


*- m 


(J 

£ 

Q. 






00 


CM 
CO 


CD CO 
CM •* 

cm m 


£ 

CL 






h- 


O T- 

00 


00 tO 

i- to 





<o 


u> 


o 


en 


OJ 


en 


k. 




CL 






r* 




^ 




cd 




UJ 


lO 


CD 


o 


S 


a> 


UJ 


0. 


o 




UJ 




Q 




Z 


■* 


O 


o 


o 


Q. 


UJ 




-i 




UJ 




z 




s 


CO 


o 


a> 


t- 


*— 

Q. 


-J 




< 








o 




UJ 




0. 


CM 


CO 


O 



o to cm in 

CM CO O 

VMS 



o n to O) 
t- m to 

CO T- ^- 



t- * fO CO 

io in o 

CM *- <»r 



O d> O o> 
r- O) to 
cm cm m 



O >» 00 CM 

mom 

T- 1- CO 



o to i*- to 
o oo o> 

*r t- m 



£ § 

CM 
O 



(O 

H 

a 

< 
>- 
a: 

2 



I 



.« qj o 
co >- z 



261 



NOTES: 



262 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

SO BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MA 01824-3193 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"COOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU* 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please fill out this form and mail to: Office of the Town 
Manager. Town Office*, 50 Billerica Road. Chelmsford, MA 01824-3 193. The filling out of this form in no way assures 
appointment. All committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



HOME PHONE: 
ADDRESS: 




NAME: 



DATE: 



i I 



BUSINESS PHONE: (_ 



AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE: 



INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEE: 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK: 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE: 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING: 



DATE APPOINTED 



TOWN OFFICES HELD 



TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS: 



FORM AVAILABLE IN TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 



263 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to Town Committees 263 

Appointed Town Officials 6 

Balance Sheet 11 

Board of Appeals 108 

Board of Health 24 

Board of Registrars 23 

Board of Selectmen 13 

Celebrations Committee 109 

Cemetery Commission 37 

Central Mass. Mosquito Control District 28 

Commission on Disabilities 110 

Community Service Council Ill 

Conservation Commission 113 

Council on Aging 115 

Cultural Council 117 

Department of Public Works 

- Engineering 30 

- Highway Division 32 

- Parks Division 34 

- Public Buildings Division 35 

- Sewer Division 36 

Dog Officer 55 

Elected Officials 4 

Emergency Management 119 

Finance Committee 120 

Finance Department 

- Accounting 39 

- Assessors 40 

- Data Processing 41 

- Treasurer 42 

Fire Department 43 

General Information 1 

Historic District Commission 122 

Historical Commission 123 

Holiday Decorating Committee 124 

Housing Authority 125 



INDEX 

Page 

Inspections Department 56 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 101 

Personnel Board 127 

Planning Board 128 

Police Department 47 

Police Auxiliary 53 

Public Libraries 57 

Recreation Commission 132 

Recycling Committee 134 

Sewer Commission 136 

School Committee 63 

- Ass't Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction 67 

- Principal - High School 69 

- Principal - Middle Schools 71 

- Principal - Elementary Schools 72 

- Student/Community Services 74 

- Guidance Department 75 

- Data Processing 76 

- English Department - 6-8 78 

- English Department - 9-12 80 

- Fine Arts Department 81 

- Foreign Language Department - 7-12 83 

- Mathematics Department - K-8 84 

- Mathematics Department -9-12 86 

- Reading Department - K-12 87 

- Science Department - 5-8 89 

- Science Department - 9-12 90 

- Social Studies Department - 5-8 92 

- Social Studies Department - 9-12 93 

- Health & Physical Education 94 

- Director of Education Technology 95 

- Athletics 97 

- Practical Arts - 9-12 98 

- Special Education 99 

Town Clerk 22 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Meetings and Elections 

-Warrant for Presidential Primaries-March 5, 1996 143 

-Results of Presidential Primary-March 5, 1996 145 

-Warrant for Annual Town Election- April 2, 1996 151 

-Results of Annual Town Election-April 2, 1996 154 

-Annual Town Meeting Minutes-April 29, 1996 159 

-Adjourned Annual Town Meeting Minutes-May 2, 1996 177 

-Adjourned Annual Town Meeting Minutes-May 6, 1996 185 

-Warrant for State Primaries -September 17, 1996 201 

-Results of State Primary-September 17, 1996 203 

-Warrant for Annual Town Meeting-October 21, 1996 210 

-Annual Town Meeting Minutes-October 21, 1996 211 

-Adjourned Annual Town Meeting Minutes-October 24, 1996 . . 219 

-Warrant for State Election-November 5, 1996 253 

-Results of State Election-November 5, 1996 255 

-Warrant for Special Town Election-December 17, 1996 259 

-Results of Special Town Election-December 17, 1996 261 

Town Directory 2 

Town Manager 18 

Town Meeting Representative Members 8 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 141 

Veterans' Services 140 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1480 00791 4499 



For Reference 



Not to be taken 



from this library 



"Disabled individuals requiring auxilliary aides to fully benefit from the Town of 

Chelmsford's programs should contact the Personnel Coordinator at 250-5288. 

It is necessary to give the request at least one week in advance."