(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"



Cover photograph, Forefathers Burying Ground, by Deborah Villano 
1997 Cultural Council Photography Contest 



TO. 
Table of Contents 

— 

General Information 4 

Information 4 

Phone Directory 5 

Elected Officials 6 

Town Meeting Reps 8 

Town Officials 11 

Balance Sheet 12 

Appointed Town Committee Application 14 

Town Offices 15 

Board Of Selectmen 15 

Town Manager 17 

Accounting Department 19 

Board Of Assessors 20 

Board Of Health 21 

Board Of Registrars 24 

Emergency Management 24 

Inspections Department 25 

MIS Department 26 

Personnel Board 26 

Public Library 27 

Recreation Commission 31 

Recycling Committee 32 

Sewer Commission 33 

Town Clerk 36 

Treasurer / Tax Collector 37 

Public Safety 38 

Police Department 38 

Auxiliary Police Report 43 

Auxiliary Police Roster 44 

Fire Department 44 

Fire Department Roster 45 

Fire Department Calls 47 

Dog Officer 47 

Department Of Public Works 49 

Engineering Division 49 

Highway Division 51 

Parks Division 52 

Public Buildings Division 52 

Sewer Division 53 



Chelmsford Public Schools 55 

School Committee 55 

Assistant Superintendent For Curriculum And Instruction 59 

Chelmsford High School 60 

Chelmsford Middle Schools 63 

Chelmsford Elementary Schools 65 

Office Of Student/Community Services 66 

Guidance Department 67 

Director Of Data Processing 67 

Department Head For English (Grades 6 - 8) 68 

Department Head For English (Grades 9-12) 70 

Department Head For Fine Arts 70 

Department Head For Foreign Languages (Grades 7-12) 72 

Curriculum Specialist For Mathematics (Grades K - 8) 73 

Department Head For Mathematics (Grades 9 - 12) 74 

Reading Department Head K-12 Language Arts Coordinator K-5 75 

Department Head For Science (Grades 5-8) 76 

Department Head For Science (Grades 9 - 12) 77 

Department Head For Social Studies (Grades 5-8) 78 

Department Head for Social Studies (Grades 9-12) 79 

Department Head For Health And Physical Education (Grades K-12) 80 

Director of Educational Technology 81 

Program Supervisor For Athletics (Grades 9-12) 82 

Department Head For Practical Arts (Grades 9-12) 82 

Administrator Of Special Education 83 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 84 

Town Committees and Commissions 87 

Board Of Appeals 87 

Celebrations Committee 89 

Cemetery Commission 89 

Chelmsford Arts & Technology Education Fund 91 

Commission On Disabilities 92 

Community Services Council 93 

Conservation Commission 94 

Council On Aging 95 

Cultural Council 96 

Finance Committee 98 

Historic District Commission 99 

Historic Commission 100 

Holiday Decorating Committee 101 

Housing Authority 102 

Planning Board 105 

Veterans' Emergency Fund 106 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 107 

Veterans' Services 107 



Town Meetings and Elections 109 

Warrant For Annual Town Election April 1 , 1 997 (April 11,1 997) . ~T09 

Town Election April 11, 1997 112 

Warrant For Special Town Meeting April 28, 1997 118 

Annual Town Meeting April 28, 1997 119 

Special Town Meeting April 28, 1997 120 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 1, 1997 141 

Warrant For Annual Town Meeting October 20, 1997 158 

Annual Town Meeting October 20, 1997 158 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting October 23, 1997 177 

Special Town Meeting October 23, 1997 180 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting October 27, 1997 197 



General Information 



| Information 


Incorporated 


May, 1655 






Type of Government 


Town Meeting 






Location 


Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsboro 
on the North, Billenca on the East, Carlisle on the South, and 
Westford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles 
from Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 


County 


Middlesex 






Land Area 


22.54 Square Miles 






Population 1995 


32,107 






Tax Rate 


($19.37 Residential - $20.33 Commercial) 




U. S. Senators in Congress. 


5th Congressional District 


Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 






State Senator 


Susan Fargo, Lincoln, MA 






Representative in General Court 


16th Middlesex District 


Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 






Accounting Department 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-5:00 p.m. 


Assessors Office 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. 


-6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-5:00 p.m. 


Board of Health 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-4:30 p.m. 


Building Department 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-4:30 p.m. 


Highway Department 


Office 


Monday thru Friday 


8:00 a.m. 


-4:30 p.m. 


Garage 


Monday thru Friday 


7:00 a.m. 


- 3:30 p.m. 


Public Libraries 


Adams Library 


Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 


9:00 a.m. 


-9:00 p.m. 




Thursday 


1:00 p.m. 


-9:00 p.m. 




Friday & Saturday 


9:00 a.m. 


-5:30 p.m. 


Children's House 


Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 


9:00 a.m. 


-8:00 p.m. 


Thursday - Closed 




Friday & Saturday 


9:00 a.m. 


- 5:30 p.m. 


McKay Library 


Monday & Wednesday 


1:00 p.m. 


-8:00 p.m. 




Tuesday 


1:00 p.m. 


-6:00 p.m. 




Thursday, Friday & Saturday 


9:00 a.m. 


- 1:00 p.m. 


School Superintendent 


Monday thru Friday 


8:00 a.m. 


-4:30 p.m. 


Selectmen's Office 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-5:00 p.m. 


Town Clerk 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. 


-6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


- 5:00 p.m. 


Tax Collector & Treasurer 


Monday 


8:30 a.m. 


-6:30 p.m.* 




Tuesday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-5:00 p.m. 


Veterans' Agent Office 


Monday thru Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


-4:30 p.m. 



Page 4 



1 Meeting 


When 


Where 


Annual Town Election 


First Tuesday in April 


9 Precincts 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


Senior Center 


Annual Town Meeting 


Third Monday in October 


Senior Center 


Selectmen 


7:00 p.m. - Every other Monday 


Town Offices 


School Committee 


7:30 p.m. - Every other Tuesday 


Parker School 


Planning Board 


7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Wednesday 


Town Offices 


Appeals Board 


7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Thursday 


Town Offices 


Conservation Commission 


8:00 p.m. - 1st & 3rd Tuesday 


Town Offices 


Board of Health 


7:00 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 


Town Offices 


Housing Authority 


7:30 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 


10 Wilson Street 



Phone Directory 



Accounting 250-5215 

Assessor 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5267 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: 

Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 



Personnel 250-5288 

Planning Board 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

School Administration 251-5100 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 250-5238 

Water Department 256-2381 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 



Page 5 



Elected Officials 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



(3yrTerm Elected) 



Gerald L. Hardy 


1 1 Meehan Drive 


256-6717 


1998 


James F. Dolan 


106 Middlesex Street 


251-3105 


1999 


Jean R McCaffery 


201 Old Westford Rd. 


256-5333 


2000 



CONSTABLE 



William E. Spence 



91 Billenca Road 



(3yr Term elected) 



256-4581 1998 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



(3yr Term Elected) 



Paul J. Canniff 


8 Westford Street 


CHRM 


256-3261 


1998 


Peter Dulchinos 


17 Spaulding Road 


VCHRM 


256-5256 


1999 


Douglas E. Hausler 


51 Stonegate Road 


CLK 


256-8194 


2000 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 


(5yr Term Elected) 




Scott Johnson* 


25 Samuel Road 




256-3205 


1998 


William P. Keohane 


82 Prescott Drive 


TREAS 


251-8002 


1999 


Mary E. (Lisa) Royce 


30 Chelmsford Street 


VCHRM 


256-0005 


2000 


Lynn M. Marcella 


74 Carlisle Street 


CHRM 


458-6807 


2002 


Pamela Turnbull 


535 Wellman Avenue 


Gov App 


251-4778 


7/98 


*R. Hughes resgnd 12/97 









LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


(3 yr Term Elected) 


Sarah L. Warner 


44 Boston Road 




250-1398 


1998 


John W. Cutter, Jr. 


38 Abbott Lane 


CHRM 


256-6602 


1998 


Kathryn M. Fisher 


2 Kelshill Road 


VCHRM 


251-4835 


1999 


Margaret E. Marshall 


2 Draycoach Drive 


SEC 


251-1296 


1999 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


48 Bartlett Street 


TREAS 


256-6871 


1999 


Jaclyn D. Matzkin 


E24 Scotty Hollow Drive 




251-8974 


2000 


Stephen J. Mallette 


1 3 Wedgewood Drive 




250-0260 


2000 



MODERATOR 



Dennis E. McHugh 



(3yr Term Elected) 



63 Dalton Road 

2 Chelmsford Street (office) 



256-6842 
256-3330 



1999 



Page6 



PLANNING BOARD 


(3yr Term Elected) 


James M Creegan 


17 Clover Hill Road 




256-1838 1998 


Susan E. Carter 


47 Kennedy Drive 




251-4374 1998 


Eugene E. Gilet 


23 Chestnut Hill Road 




256-2146 1999 


Robert C. Morse 


45 Clarissa Road 


CLK 


256-5147 1999 


Kim J. MacKenzie 


101 High Street 


CHRM 


256-4088 2000 


Tracey Wallace Cody 


6 Sharon Avenue 


VCHRM 


251-8847 2000 


James P. Good 


4 Burning Tree Lane 




256-2686 2000 



! SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


(3yr Term Elected) 


Wendy C. Marcks 


13 Dakota Drive 


256-8307 1998 


Angelo J. Taranto 


8 Charlemont Court 


CHRM 251-8205 1998 


Judith B. Mallette 


1 3 Wedgewood Drive 


VCHRM 250-0260 1999 


Mary E. Frantz 


34 Miland Avenue 


256-1612 1999 


Anthony V. Volpe 


144 Warren Avenue 


250-8548 2000 



SELECTMEN 




(3yr Term Elected) 


Peter V. Lawlor 


50 Dalton Road 


CHRM 256-7275 1998 


Susan J. Gates 


7 Trotting Road 


250-1569 1998 


Stuart G. Weisfeldt 


8 Leitrim Lane 


256-7902 1999 


William F. Dalton 


12 Dartmouth Street 


VCHRM 251-3259 2000 


Philip M. Eliopoulos 


26 Arbutus Ave 


CLERK 256-2388 2000 



SEWER COMMISSION 



John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Barry B. Balan 
Thomas E. Moran 
Richard J. Day 
George F. Abely 



8 Loiselle Lane 
54 Boston Road #10 
19 Dennison Road 
6 Merilda Avenue 
87 Swain Road 



(3yr Term Elected) 



CHRM 251-3654 1998 

VCHRM 256-8234 1998 

CLK 251-4173 1999 

251-3382 1999 

251-8472 2000 



Page 7 













c 

CO 

SZ 
























CD 


CO 

o 


—J 


c 
o 
(/) 

c 


L_ 

CD 

SZ 
CO 

u. 


c 
12 


(TJ 

fas 

k_ 
CO 

o 


ID 

E 


c 
CD 


c 

CO 


cd 

E 
o 




c 
IS 

N 


x: 


1— 

- > 

c" 
o 

CO 




E 

CO 


c 

CO 

c 


00 
CD 

cu 
E 


u 




o 
"3 

T 


N 
00 

2 




CO 

_l 

CD 


CO 

O 


3 

o 


-J 

2 


-O 

< 


CD 

2 


g> 

'c 


a> 

E 


£ 


CD 


LU 

o 


0) 

o 
CO 


Li. 


— } 

E 
re 




.c 


C 




11 




U_ 






III 


CD 








a3 
co 

sz 
( 1 


< 

SZ 


c 


■o 
o 


Q. 
O 

.1i2 

'k. 


CO 

ha 

o 

—1 


c 

CO 

co 


a3 

CO 

SZ 

o 


CD 

c 
c 

0) 


CO 

L_ 

o 


Q 

c 
_>» 
o 


—J 

o 

c 


a. 

c 

f- 


Q_ 


o 


c 


LL 

CO 
CD 

F 




£ 


(TJ 


CO 


CO 


.c 




3 




■o 


CD 


CO 


CO 


o 

-J 


o 


CO 


a> 




^ 


O 


* 


X 


CJ 


Q 


CO 


:> 


< 


o 


—) 


z 


a: 


o 


X 


—J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


co 


OO 


oo 


CO 


co 


co 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


co 


CO 


Oi 


Oi 


CO 


o> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o> 


O) 


CD 


CO 


OI 


CO 


O) 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CN 


CNJ 


CM 






























CO 
CO 

CO 



•a 

0) 
CO 
CO 

8 





















CD 

■o 




s 
































kJ 




c 




§ 










CO 

re 












8 

c 

<D 
Q. 
CO 
OJ 

o 

'c 




CO 




mmm 


C/5 




CO 




0) 




"O 






c 








c 

o 

"co 

Q 

LL 
E 


c 
o 

"co 
Q 

X 


c 

O 

Q_ 

E 


o 

v— 

E 

CO 

—J 

< 

CO 


0) 

"co 
o 

LL 

o 


"55 

CO 

i 
b 

CO 


a3 

Q. 
CO 

X 

— j 


CO 

a> 

CO 

CO 
CQ 


1— 
3 

o 

CD 

I 


k_ 
CD 

_J 

OJ 

o 

OJ 

o 


N 

co 

3 

o 
Q 

tr 

CO 


x: 
o 

a) 

o 

-J 


re 
re 
CO 


a> 
CQ 


£ 
to 
o 

LL 

CD 


3 

o 

z 

c 
re 


re 

CD 

sz 
CO 

b 

LL 
CO 






- 

i 


CO 

■a 

c 
_i 


CO 

—> 

2 


CO 

i 


o 

"co 

0. 


CD 

CO 

co 
CD 

-J 


o 

c 

CO 

LO- 


CD 
O 

k. 

CO 


c 
sz 
o 

—> 


o 

CO 

0. 


CD 

E 

CO 

"5 


CO 

2 


CD 
CD 

-J 


re 
CQ 


'c 
c 
o 
CQ 


CD 

E 
re 

-> 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


O0 


CO 


CO 


co 


co 


CO 


co 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 




Oi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


>> 




















co 

uo 
CM 

o 

CD 

c 

CO 
CO 




CO 

LO 

CM 

o 
tfi 

0) 

(1) 

CO 

CD 

L_ 

E 
o 

k_ 
«^- 

Q. 

3 




ho 
o 
o 
O 


O 

o 


Q. 
O 
> 


75 

CO 

3 
O 

Q 
o 

5 


c 
5 


c 
c 


CO 

o 

o 
< 


c 

CO 
Q. 
CO 


c 
.a 

2 


1— 

gj 

3 

o 


CD 

o 

>» 
o 

-5 


c 
J2 

CO 


CD 

o 

c 

CD 
Q. 
CO 


sz 

CO 

3 

o 


2? 
o 

E 

it 


0) 
<0 


CD 

a> 

N 

re 

X 


c 
o 

CO 

5 


N 
CD 

c 
re 

2 


0. 


ct 


> 


1- 


CD 

-J 


3 
Q 

CO 




sz 


—> 


< 


Q 


0. 


CQ 


LU 


CQ 


it 


_1 

5 

re 

■o 

c 


< 


o 


T3 
0) 


CQ 


CO 

CD 

E 

CO 


m 

c 

CO 
CD 


c 
o 

SZ 

"c 


co 

o 

c 

CO 


CO 

CO 

c 


0) 

CO 
N 


CO 

sz 

c 


CO 

■o 

c 

CO 


c 

CO 
CO 


•c 

CD 

o 


CD 

CO 


E 

CO 

i 


c 

sz 
re 


re 

c 
o 


"cu 
re 

sz 
o 


k. 

re 

sz 
o 


> 
o 

E 


re 

TJ 

c 
re 


—i 


—i 


< 


U- 


z 


CL 


LU 


o 


CO 


s 


cr 


m 


^ 


cr 


_l 


2 


or 




CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


co 


co 


co 




CO 




oo 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




Oi 




CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 




CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 
















1^ 








T— 










a; 
o 
en 
co 

0) 



2 

OJ 

*•— 
00 



>» co 
co «/> 



c 
o 
CO 

, oo oj — i 

o^ 

l< 6 -i 

£ r "o 

^ CO Q 



»- co i; 



co 
Q. 



oj 

c 
c 

CO 

'C LU 
en 



^ E 

£ °° 

.a u. 

CO (/> 



n a) 

co 

.c 
O 



o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

(N IN CM N (N M 



O Nj 

I 2 



o 
o 

CO 

-> -Q 
oj - 



"co 

x: 
oo 

co co 



< • a Z> -n « 

> LU O * S — 

oj <S jo w o £ 

CL 2 O CCL X O 



0> O) 
O) Oi 

en en 



OJ O) Cn 

en a> en 
en en en 



x 5 

o (- 

Q- </> 

v -2 

O x a) 

.^ C CO 

<d co c 

C </J CO 

«j 3 > 

T W UJ 



0) 

c 
Q 



0J 

5 

< 

c 
r 

OJ 

2 



o> 

a> to 

O" CO 

re nj 

CL 5 



CO 

■a 
co 

5 

tj 

LU 



00 00 00 00 00 CD 
O) G) O) O) O (J) 
Cn Cn Cn 0> O) OJ 



ao 
o 

CM 



c 

,11 

|co d 

>* 0J 



I co 2? 2 

O <d 

£ a. 



CO 



oj 

> 
ILU 



-Q 

o 

rr 



cb cl o: ^ 
1 S I 5 

^ Q O O 



o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o 

1 CM (N CM CM CM OJ 



0) 

CO 2 OJ 

f c S 

52 o ■§ 

co co -^ 

CJ> Cn Cn OJ OJ 

01 O) CJ) Q CJ) O) 
OJ OJ OJ OJ OJ Cn 



(A 

t: co tj 
O T j| 

CO 



O 



CO 



>» - 

TJ CO 

c -9 

« CO 



CO -SI CO 

* ^ 00 



TJ 

s 

Is 

oj a> 

«- > 
- © 

co CO 

II 

co jS 

I i 

00 

en 
en 



CO 



k. 




S" 


CO 


-^ 




k. 


TJ 






a> 


i— 


CO 




u. 


CO 


CO 






sz 


E 
o 


CO 


CO 


u 


a) 


c 
c 


<z 


1- 


E 


a: 


(T 


c 


CO 


i_ 


TJ 


(1) 


U 


a> 


>— 








TJ 










< 


c 

CO 


c 
c 


C 

o 


~> 


u> 


0) 


<u 


i> 


(J 


"5 


_i 



co oo 
en en 
en en 



oo oo 
en en 
en en 



CO 



E 
o 
</) 

Q. 



.2 x: 

ir co y 

en £ co i 

o o a> 

OJ o 



c 
'tr 

CO 



c 

CO 

*- > 

O ZJ 



CO 



OJ 



<D o x: = oj x: 

O Q CO CO O O 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

CM CM CM CM CM CM 



OJ C 

i= CO 

,_ ro o 

OJ -^ TJ 



CO 



C -»T OJ 

i w a 

CO Q_ 2 

o3 5 ^ 

Ol *- t 

o JS co 

Lt 2 ^ 



en en en en en en 
en en en en en en 
en en en en en en 



OJ 

en 

c 

Q. 

a. 
o 
O 



■S q- b 

c c c 

C (0 r 

oj c 3 

I CD t 



c 

CO 

JO 
CO 

c 

CO 

5 



en 
en 

CM 

a 

LU 

Z 

g 

CO 

LU 

Tj a - 



CO 
A 
-Q 



C 

a) 

© cj 

X -> 

oo oo 

en en 

en en 



N 

CO 



OJ CO 
CO 



c _ 



-O 

o 
o 

CO 

"> 

00 

en 
en 



oo 
en 

*C 
in 

CO 

a, 
a; 



c 
o 

CO CO 



c 

CO 

> 
CO 



to 

Zl 

o 

>» CO - 

■o . . -j 

- CD Q - 

CL fl> 

Q. C C * 

co .c co ^ 

« o o ™ 

« -> -) Q 

oo oo oo 

en en en 

en en en 









TO 




O 

C 












i_ 
CO 














CO 

> 

2 
O 


00 


2 


CD 



X 


00 

C 
O 
O 

\_ 
3 
-C 

< 


00 

TO 

UJ 


TO 

W) 

'CZ 
SZ 
O 
00 


c 


c 

\_ 
TO 


E 

TO 


.C 



a: 


cd 

Q. 

Q_ 


c 
O 

"x 
0) 

CO 


c 
O 

00 

'l_ 
h_ 

TO 

X 


a> 

^ CD 


O) 

c 
3 

> 


O) 

c 

TO 

X 



.a 

< 


CO 

TO 

lD 


CO 


O 


_i 


u 


TO 

E 


X 


X 


LU 


< 

CO 

jD 


CD 

00 


X 


CD 
Q. 


— ) 


£ 


™j 


a 


^ 


c 


tr 


00 


C 


2 





O 


2£ 


00 


— i 


CO 




00 


00 


■e 





CO 


TO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


TO 


-C 


c 



TO 


0) 




CD 





_i 





CD 


CD 


c 




CO 

3 





E 

TO 


> 
0) 


C 
O 


h- 


E 

TO 


TO 


C 

c 


c 

TO 


i 


c 

TO 


E 
TO 


O 


TO 
CD 


-C 


CO 


en 


-J 


co 


Q 


O 


-J 


GQ 


— ) 


O 


< 


lZ 


U_ 


"-» 


a: 


LU 


CL 


CD 





O 








O 


O 


O 


O 


O) 





O 


00 


00 


co 


00 


CO 


CO 


O 





O 








O 


O 





O 


O) 


O 


O 





O 


O 


a> 





CD 


O 





O 








O 





O) 





O 


O) 


O 


O) 


o> 


O 





O 





eg 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 



























00 

TO 

CD 

IO 



o i g c 

CD C o E CD 

TO 3 — 

2 co g 

«■ <*= 0. 



> "5 3 



O) TO 

V .? > 

CD 

l"0 

c 

TO 
X 
CD 



co 2 

c 

JZ 

o 



o 

-Q 
CD 

Q 



CD CD 2 

£1 .a E 

o o TO 

CT CC CO 



000000 
000000 
000000 

CM CM CM CM CM CM 



c 

TO 
>% O 

ITS O 
TO Q 
CD 

IK > 



[5 TO 

-j 

o o 
o o 
o o 

CM CM 



■o 

TO 

t " 

TO B 

x ro 



O) TO 

i 5 

Q co 

o o 

o o 

o o 

CM CM 



CD 
N 
N 
CD 

> 
TO 
O 
CO 



TO 



TO 
CO 



2 < 

TO _ 

-9 2 

TO TO 

CD O 



O 
O 
O 



O 
O 

o 



CM CM 



O 
CM 

O 



o 
o 

CM 



T- O 

•a *"" 

CD 

c 
o 
00 

2> 



CD 
O) 
"O 

3 



< 

"CD 



C 
CD 

> 

O 
< 

CD 
TO 



m *- *- 



2 

TO 

>s £ c 

-"I 



g, CD TO CD LU 
™ ^ 4= = rs 



y to to 

IT SO 



C7> <T> 



CO 

o 
■o 

CD 

c 
g> 
00 

CD 

k_ 

c 
o 

00 



en 






CD 

I- 

CD CD 
*- T3 

ilf 
SI * 

Q- -r -c 
= X CO 

■a -j 

CD "J U. 

cS |c 

E « ■§ 

a> o 
O) 0^ 
Oi CJ> 



"9 E 



LU 



c 
o 
00 

jD 

■_ 

TO 

X 

d 

CD 

C 



CO 

o 

CD 

2 

CD 
00 
CD 

E 
o 



o 

TO 

Q. 
N 



CD 



■o 

TO t= 
CD CD 



9- 00 co 



-5 -o 

00 o .- 

F >S CD 

c "° S 

CD 2 TO 

Q CD * 

C7) O) 

O C7) 



TO 



^ ^ CD T» oo 

^ £ V TOO 

o S -c c c 

E ? « a3 2 

-^ ^ CO LI. 

a> o o) o) 

O <J) O O) 

0)0)0 



c o 

^ c 2 

J o 2 



CD 
CD 

- JZ 



O 

E 

CO 



w o 

3 I 

-) < 



00 

to 
O 
CD 



00 

c 

. < 
9> LU ^ 

cr 



o 
n 
n 
< 



•3 

o r Jl 

TO O ^= 

-) -j o 



co co 00 co 00 00 
000000 
O O O O O O 



>» c 00 

"O o o 

TO 00 c 

(D TO = 

cc ^ -5 

c "- " 

S 3 3 

TO TO CD 

* 0. 0_ 



00 
•« 3 



5 g 

o 

c 
c 

TO 



.a zl 
2 co 

1 O i 



CD 



- o £ 

-I ~) (J 



00 00 co co 00 00 

CJ) CJ) Oi CJ> Gi CJi 
O O O) o o O 



Town Officials 



Town Offices 
50 Billerica Road 
Chelmsford, Ma 01824 

Town Manager 

Town Clerk 

Finance Director/ 
Treasurer 
Tax Collector 

Town Accountant 

Board Of Assessors 



Building Inspector 



DPW Director 



Police Chief 



Fire Chief 



Bernard F. Lynch 
Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Jean D. Sullivan 

Diane M. Phillips 
Bruce Symmes 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 

James E. Pearson 

Armand J. Caron 

John E. Parow 



250-5201 
250-5205 



250-5210 
250-5215 
250-5220 

250-5225 
250-5228 
250-5258 
250-5267 



Finance Committee 

Cornelius J. O'Neill 
Clare L. Jeannotte 
Susan M. Olsen 
William Curry 



Marcia V. Dobroth 
Dwight M. Hayward 
Charles A. Piper 



Page 1 1 




</> 

<D 
Q. 

>N 
I- 

T3 

C 
3 
li- 
ra 

c 

O 

E 
c 

> 
O 

O 



■ 


t tj- co a> t oi r- <n tt rr rf s co r- 


s 




s 


S in (D GO <- (M Ol CM O'N (D CO CM t- 




s 




& 


m t (JD 00 N> OS CM O ifif CO CM CO 




CO 




S 


s" o co" CM co' t- ' 0> i m" i S I co" co" 1 cm" CO T 

y- s co •*»■■«- oi in s oonr ! co to i^ 




CO 




o 


S r^-iT— tJ- CM T j ^-_ 1 -r- j CM 1 ^ 




CO 




co 


o co m" cm co"! 


CO 




o 




0) 


«~ ' 


' 


1 


CO 


l 


,to 




1 


lull 


i 1 

1 I 

I ! i 




frr, 






<A 




■ 


II 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 


1 i 


1 1 i i 1 1 i 


■ 


■ 






T- 


















T** 




T— 




F IA| 






I 




! 






(CO 




CO 




E <=■ 








1 




j j 








-* 


1 


T~ 




<u o ■ 




















hr 






TT 






I 






1 


















!co* 






'J' 

co" 




CD Q)H 


' 




c — ■ 
























CO 






CO 




O -Q ■ 


«/>| 










! 


















i 
























1 




1 


<^ 




>, 


co ! ^r to ! 


■ 


• 






■ 


i 


' 1 




i 


Ol ' 




< 




o 


rr ! jm to : 

s J ^"_ | <o_ 






















ol 






co 
m 








coi 


o 






£, 


: co" ! ; o" i co" ' 


















to" 






o" 








oV 




5? 


(j) i Is 'CO i 


















m | 






CO 








CO 




< 


°J 


M^.i 




























T 








CM 




=>3 


T- 




co in | 




































o" 




~ 












































t- 




1 


f- 




) 
























— 














«/> 






W 




■ ) 






i 


1 






• 


■ 


1 


' 


i 


s 




i 


1 


1 






CO 






^ 






























CM 














s 






ifl 






























CM 














s 






co" 






























in" 














CO' 




M 


CO 






























m 

CM 

co" 














00 

m 
Tt" 






t» 












































v* 






CM 




■ 


■ 






i 


1 






• 


'" • 


"<r 


oo 


s 




i 


1 


1 






,_ 






CO 






















IO>itT 


CO 














T— 






in 
























1° 


*4- 


CM 














CO 






co" 
























Is" 


co" 


oo" 














cm" 




i^EJ 


CO 




























oo 














CO 






-t 






























*"■ 












to 




«%j 


co" 








































co" 




|B*4 


«/» 






























._, 












«/» 






CO 


, , , 


■ 


i 




IO> 


* 




O) It- !CM i ' 


m 


1 




S 


COI ' 






CO 






in 












CO It- 1 




CM O) 


CM 




m 




to 


CM 






""(J- 






s_ 












00 


s j 




OS 


CM 




■<r 






CO 


CM 






■^r 






,— " 












cm" 


co"| 




T-"lCJ)" 


m" 




co" 






cm" 


oo" 








co" 






m 












TT 


T- 




O) in is 


CM 






CO 


oo 








CO 






co 


















CM 


^ 1 










T" 










CO 




"3^H 


-t" 






















cm" 




















oo" 






V* 












































<A 












c 

CO 



















i 
i 












o 
















Q- 




























c 








H 








c 
































2 














































E 
















t3 
































p 
















CO 
































c 
















(/) 
































'■3 
















c 

0) 
































2 
















Q. 




























k. 
















E 










o 


















a 
















ol 


O 








CO 
















tf) 




"O 

03 
















"Ol 


n 








> 


















oe Providi 
bligations 
















£1 

£1 

0)1 

Q! 




CO 

> 
o 

0) 

CC 








*o 
o 

0) 


0) 
(0 

o 

X 

LU 




1 


-»— 
c 

0) 

E 
</) 




75 1 

c 1 




C 
3 
U- 

ol 










j 
j 






i2 

c 

Ol 


.El 

w i 

c ! 

0) 1 






CO 
0) 

>l 


ra 




ccour 

ehicle 


to 




Asses 
lental 


CD 

E 

c ! 
— 

0) 


§ o)l 


Lints to 1 
Term O 




2 

o 

(A 
tf) 




*^B 






E El 


a i c : V 
a £ ! - 




<l 

^ 1 


>i©j 


tell "C 


> 
o 


E|< 




< 






£ 




(/)!(/>! 




0) 1 


oMl 


S> ! o 1 co i 


Ol 


<*>! Ol 


o ? 




<5 






(/> 


1 > i > i 


o ti o 




^ i 


** ' X 


£ 1 0) I Q.I 


to 


i • Lc 


X c 








(0 


E 3 "C 1*5' 


5; coi 


Q) i Q.I 0) l-g 


3 *- C O 




o 






O c c CLIO 10. 1 O! 


S!kI 


c/5 CO Q .E QIO < _l I h- 





E 

3 

CO (TJ >»| 
O O £ 

<u 



Q. 
3 
O 



O 

c 

3 
O 

o 
o 

< 



T3 

c 

3 

"■ «/> 

»■» <—> 
(TJ 



Q. 

■g 

LL 



(/) 

<U 
Q. 

>s 

I- 

-o 

c 

LL 

"co 

c 

CD 

E 

c 

1— 
CD 
> 
O 

O 



CO 

CD 

r*- 
"* 

cd 

! 


to 

CO 
CD 

in 


m 

m 
cd 
m 


CO 
ICO 

!CN 
CO 


cd cd un 
CO CO r^- 

co~ co" en 
co m t- 

t- O r- 

m" J cm" i t-" 
1 


O) 
CO 


CD CD 
O OO 

t- cn 
tt cn" 

r- r- 
m cn 

rficM" 
CO 




CD 
CO 

cd" 
m 




! 


CM 
O 
O 

m 
m 

1 


in 

Tf 

CO 

cm" 

CD 


7.516,236 
3,316,648 


12,179,231 


$60,338,877 




</* 


■ 


■ 


1 




■ 


i i 


O) iCO CD 

r- O 00 

t-" 1 ^-" 1 cd" 

00 |t- TT 




CO 

co" 

CO 




1 












■ 






00 

t" 






rf 100 

CM 








CO 
CO 




|CN 




CM 

m 
m 

r*-" 
r^ 
m 




co 

CD 
CD 

co" 

OO 

in 


• 


i 


i 




1 




o 

CM 

co" 

CO 

o 
co" 










■ 


m 

CO 

cm" 

CD 




CD 
CO 
O 

CD 

•n 

•*■ 

co" 






CM 
•*" 


ico 




co" 

CM 

C/» 


I 


CD 
00 
CM 

o" 
























































If) 
Csl 
CO 

m" 

m 


i 


■ 


1 


■ 


• 


i 


I 


i 


JO 

o 
o 

© 

CO 
CM 




m 

CM 
CO 

in" 

00 
CM 

■<*" 










■ 


1 




CO 

^* 
CO* 

o 

CO 


■ 




oo 

co" 
o 

CO 




CO 

oo" 

00 

m 




co 
in 


■ 


■ 


co 

CO 

CN _ 
CO 


■ 


CD 

o 


■ 


i 


■ 


■ 




in 
o 

CO 

T— 










■ 


1 




co 

CO 
CM 

m 

CO* 


• 




CO 
CO 
CM 

In 
co" 




CO 

cm" 

CO 
CO 

co" 




CO 
00 

CO 

m 


m 

CO 
CD 

m 


CO 
CD 
CD 




i 


m 

CO 

t— 

in 
o 

cm" 


m 
in 


i 


i 


i 




in 

CO 

o" 

CM 

^r" 










CM 
O 
O 

in 
m 


1 




CO 

in 

CM* 
O 
CO 


00 

^r 

CO 

co" 

CO 

co" 




CO 

o 

co" 
r«- 




oo 
■<r 

^r 
co" 

CO 
CO 

oo" 




-Q 
<0 

co 

CLI 

B\ 

CI 
31 
° 

u! 

<l 


</> 

G> 

C 

T3 

o 

JZ 

-C 

o 

>»' 
co 1 

Q. 


a> 
*<s 

5 
co 

u 

k. 

o 

.c 

O 


■o 
c 

3 
LL 

t. 

o 

O 
o 

0) 1 

31 


o 
3 

<0 
(TJ 

Q. 
C 

o 

'•3 
(TJ 
</> 

c 

CD 

a 

E 

o 
o 

CD 

k> 

L. 

CD 

>*- 
CD 

a; 


CD 

3 
C 
CD 
> 
CD 
tt 

"O 
© 

k. 1 
CD 

>♦- i 
CD 

Q 


a 

c 

CD 

El 

CD 1 

*- 1 
(TJ 1 

< 

k. 
o 

'•- 

CD 

£ 
CD 
(/) 
CD 

(El 


CD 

3 

CO 1 

>* 

ID 

0L| 

c 

CD 

E 
CD 
O) 

"O 

3 
-> 

t 
3 
O 

u 


</) 
CD 
O 

C 
CD 
V) 
SI 

< 

CD 

■*-> 
(0 

(/) 

c 

CD 

a 

E 
o 
o 

"O 
CD 

3 
t_ 
O 
O 

< 


CD 

n 

CO 
CO 

</> 

CD 

-*- 

O 

z 

■o 

c 

(TJ 
(A 

■o 
c 
o 

CD 




a 

CD 

■3 

!5 

(TJ 

Zl 

2 
o 

H t 




si 

LUI 

"O 

c 

31 
LL, 


(0 

CD 
U 

c 

(TJI 

(TJ! 
CD 

cl 

31 
LL 


"Ol 

CDI 

CDI 
Ml 
CDI 


U) 

8 

C 1 
(TJ I 

i— . 

-Q ! 

Ei 

3 

u! 

C 1 
LUl 


(0 i 

c 1 

CDI 

E 

o 

T3 1 

c : 

LU 


■di 

CDI 

c^! 

CDI 
OTI 

CDI 
k. I 

c : 
D 


cdI 

®l 
oi 
Z 

■p 

CDI 

-*-* > 

CO I 

C I 
CDI 
(0 i 
CDI 

a 


CO 
CD 

*•* 

o 

z 

•o 

CD 

■*-- 

CO 

c 

CD 
(0 
CD 

■o 

C ' 

D i 


I 


3 
O* 
LU 

T3 
C 
3 
H. 

I 

O 

h- 




3 
tT 
LU 

■a 
c 

3 
LL 

■o 

c 

(0 

(A 

CD 

!5 

(0 

'3 

"co 

*j 

o 



wmfflw. 




I 

|If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please fill out this form and mail to 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MA 01824-3193 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

'GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 



fManager, Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824-3193. 



Office of the Towre 
The filling out of this form in no wav assures 



^appointment. All committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



INAME: 



DATE: 



|HOME PHONE: 

I 
fADDRESS: 

2 



BUSINESS PHONE: [_ 



^AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE: 



flNTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEE: 



\ 




! 


JPRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK: 




! 


i ! 


JBUSINESS EXPERIENCE: 




! 


! ! 


EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING: 




i 


i 


DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD 


TERM EXPIRED 


1 


1 


REMARKS: 




I 


1 


'^/^w^/MmMmmm/s^^ 



Town Offices 



Board Of Selectmen 



The Chelmsford Board of Selectmen completed one of its most ambitious and 
most focused terms over the preceding year - a year which with the benefit of 
hindsight I think will stand out in Town history. 

Following the April 1997 election which brought new member Philip 
Eliopoulos, to the Board, the group met - along with Town Manager Lynch - 
in what has become an annual ritual for its goal-setting session at the 
Chelmsford Country Club. During the meeting the Board hammered our the 
agenda for the upcoming year. Key among the items identified were a repeat 
of the prior year's accomplishment of reducing taxes as well as taking further 
steps to enhance the quality of life here in Town. 

Efforts by the Board and the Manager commenced immediately to work on 
bringing the University of Massachusetts Lowell hockey rink - the Forum - into 
the Town's control. The rink was to be abandoned by the University as its 
team moved to the newly constructed Tsongas Arena in Lowell. Both 
Manager Bernie Lynch and Selectman Vice Chair, William Dalton were 
instrumental in nimbly navigating the cumbersome process of acquiring this 
rink through sticky hurdles - both from neighboring towns as well as from the 
Commonwealth it self. While at this writing the deal is not quite complete, all 
signs point to the overwhelming likelihood that it will soon be in Town hands. 
This is a major achievement for the Town of Chelmsford for generations to 
come. 

In the area of working to get new projects off of the ground, Selectman Stuart 
Weisfeldt pulled the laboring oar on behalf of the Board in shepherding the 
final design and construction for the Center School. With no issued more 
pressing among school parents in Town than overcrowding in classrooms. 
The mission of bringing Center School back on line was of critical importance 
to the Town. As planned, by September of 1999 the school will be once again 
welcoming elementary school students for the first time in many years. 



Page 15 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 





Front Row (1-r) Bill Dalton, Vice Chairman; Peter Lawlor, Chairman; Susan Gates 
Back Row (1-r) Philip Eliopoulos, Clerk: Stuart Weisfeldt 



A second new project in which the Board generally had a strong interest and 
which Selectman Susan Gates in particular played a pivotal role was the 
commencement of construction of the new addition to Adams Library. With 
the Spring of 1998 this is a project which the Board and the Library Trustees 
are proud to help bring to the Town. Selectman Gates has also played a 
critical role - along with Representative Carol Cleven - in bringing the final 
stages of the design and funding for the Freeman Bike Path which will shortly 
come into being. 

With the emphasis which the Board has place on acquiring and preserving 
open space here in Town no accomplishment of the Board is more important 
than the acquisition of 66 acres of undeveloped property in North Chelmsford. 
In an effort initiated and shouldered significantly by Selectman Philip 
Elioploulos working along with Town Manager Bernie Lynch the Board and 
Manager worked out the complex acquisition with a local property owner in an 
exchange which benefited the Town significantly. At a time when other Towns 
have been talking about such preservation Chelmsford has been at the 
forefront locally with an aggressive plan to preserve Chelmsford's unique 
character. 

In the Fall of 1997 the Board learned that its goal of tax reduction had again 
been achieved. Lowering the tax rate for Town residents while at the same 
time increasing our savings and undertaking the large number of projects 
underway in Town is certainly one of the most significant achievements which 
the Board and Town Manager Lynch can look back upon. 

On a personal note, I cannot adequately express the pride I feel or the 
enjoyment which I have experienced from the 6 years I have served on the 
Board. The residents of Town have been very well served by the Board 
members with whom I have served, by our Town Manager and his excellent 
staff and by all of the Departments in Town. We have been truly blessed. 

Thank you. 

Peter V. Lawlor, Chairman 



Town Manager 



I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the Town Manager for calendar 
year 1997. I would describe this past year to be a very positive for the Town of 
Chelmsford as the Town's finances and economy remained strong, and 
significant projects and initiatives moved forward to improve governmental 

Page 17 



service delivery and the quality of life in the Town. The successes and 
positive condition of the Town in 1997 was built upon the decisions and 
direction of the past several years as the Town continues to adhere to a plan 
of conservative financial management and strategic investment in the 
community so as to address identified needs. Assuming continued adherence 
to these goals and the financial plan the future of the Town looks very bright. 

Some of the highlights of the past year are listed below: 

• Certified free cash of $1,897,882 at the close of Fiscal Year 1997. 
Use of these funds included $750,000 in tax relief, and the 
appropriation of $250,000 to the Town's Stabilization fund for future 
capital needs and periods of budgetary stress. 

• Authorization by Town Meeting to acquire 76 acres of open space in 
North Chelmsford through the resolution of approximately $1.1 million 
in back taxes. 

• The development of an agreement with a property owner in the Drum 
Hill area to bring 750,000 yards of fill to the abandoned Glenview 
Sand and Gravel facility to cap a DEP identified landfill site, and 
enable future development. In addition to the positive benefits 
associated with this project the proponent has also been committed to 
$1,000,000 in host community fees payable to the Town. 

• The Town has filed legislation which will result in a long term lease 
with the Commonwealth for the Tully Forum in Chelmsford and 
Billerica. Control of this facility will enable the Town to expand its 
recreation offerings and operate a potentially profitable enterprise. 

• The Central Square revitalization and improvement project moved 
forward with the selection of a traffic engineer to develop the approved 
traffic plans for the Center, dialogue began with area property owners 
to encourage private investments, and a plan of additional publicly 
funded amenities was initiated. 

• The Adams Library Expansion and Improvement project plans were 
finalized, bid and awarded with completion expected in the early 
summer of 1999. During construction the main library has been 
moved to the gym at the Town Offices. 

The Town also experienced substantial economic growth in 1997 with major 
new projects announced or developed at Drum Hill and the Route 129 
corridor. These projects will enable the Town to continue to prosper in the 
upcoming years. In addition, other public projects moved forward during the 
year including a new Police Station, improvements to various recreation areas 
including Southwell Field and the proposed Carl Olsson complex at the 
McCarthy School and another year of growth and improvements at the 
Chelmsford Country Club. 

All trends and information indicate that 1998 will be another healthy and 
positive year for Chelmsford as the Town's finances remain strong and service 

Page 18 



improvements and projects move forward. Our challenge remains utilizing our 
resources to maximum effect without overextending our ability to pay for the 
projects and services that we desire. 

As always, I want to thank the members of the Board of Selectmen for their 
direction and support during 1997 including Bill Dalton, Philip Eliopoulos. 
Susan Gates, Peter Lawlor, and Stuart Weisfeldt. I also want to recognize 
and thank the Department Managers and employees of the Town for their 
hard work and dedication. In particular, I want to thank the staff of the 
Executive Office which has included Judy Carter, John Coderre, Marian 
Currier, Diane Darling and Jeanne Parziale. 

Lastly, I want to once again thank the residents of Chelmsford for the 
opportunity and privilege of serving you as your Town Manager. I continue to 
look forward to working with you in the upcoming year and into the future to 
make Chelmsford an even better community. 



Accounting Department 



Members: 

Jean Sullivan 
Pamela Amalfi 
Patricia Tucker 
Martha Camacho 



Town Accountant 
Assistant Town Accountant 
Principal Clerk 
Payroll Coordinator 



During Fiscal year 1997, Renee Young resigned as Assistant Town 
Accountant to take a position in a neighboring city school system. Pamela 
Amalfi, former Assistant Town Accountant for the Town of Framingham, has 
been hired to fill the position of Assistant Town Accountant. 

A great deal of time and effort on the part of all members of the Accounting 
Department during fiscal year 1997 was given to converting the School 
Department to the MUNIS computer system. Both the Town and the School 
are now utilizing the same computer system. 

As the result of team effort by all members of the Accounting Department, 
once again excellent reviews were received from the Certified Public 
Accounting firm. 

Jean Sullivan 
Town Accountant 



Page 19 



Board Of Assessors 



Members: 

Diane M. Phillips MAA, Chief Assessor 

Bruce A. Symmes CMA, RMA, MAA 

Eric R. Josephson MAA, Assistant Assessor 

Nancy L. Maher Administrative Assistant 

Elaine McBride Principal Clerks 

Elaine Myers Principal Clerks 

This year the Board of Assessors conducted the triennial revaluation of all 
properties in town. After reviewing all the sales data information the town 
adjusted the base rates for all types of properties. The Department of Revenue 
then comes in and reviews a sampling of properties both in the field and in the 
office. The Department of Revenue then certified the values, which allows the 
Assessors to proceed in setting the tax rate. 

The Assessors then compile information to allow the Board of Selectmen to 
make an informed decision as to whether or not to adopt classification for the 
town. This year the Board of Selectmen decreased the shift to 2%. 

Due to the strong economy the values in town are rising at a steady rate, 
especially residential properties. The commercial, industrial properties are 
rising steadily. 

A revaluation year always creates more work for the office staff. The Board 
wishes to thank them for their diligence and dedication. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Phillips, MAA, Chief Assessor 



Page 20 



Board Of Health 



Members: 

Dr Paul Canniff, 
Peter Dulchinos, 
Douglas Hausler, 

Employees: 

Richard J. Day, 
John P. Emerson, 
Diana L. Wright, 
Judith Dunigan, 
Eric P. Kaplan, 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 
Clerk 



Director 

Asst. Director 

Dept. Asst. 

Town Nurse 

M. D., Town Physician 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1997 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program continued its efforts 
to clean up our waterways. The Board of Health, with the advent of a central 
sewer system in Chelmsford is now embarking on enforcement activities to 
insure compliance with local by-laws which will insure a safe water supply. 
Dye testing, water sampling and issuance of septic system permits will 
continue in all the non-sewered areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits was $29,433. During 1997 the 
department made inspections of day care centers, rental housing units, public 
schools, non-profit camps, bathing beaches International Certificates and all 
restaurants and retail food stores. Hazardous Waste and Industrial 
Wastewater Program 

Richard J. Day, Director of Public Health, was re-appointed Hazardous Waste 
Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for 
Chelmsford. The Board of Health held two Household Hazardous Waste 
Collection Days this year which were held on May 10, 1997 and November 1, 
1997. This program has consistently collected significant volumes of 
hazardous waste. 

Rabies Control 

1997 was another productive year in controlling the spread of rabies in the 
Town of Chelmsford. The Board of Health, working with two local veterinarians 
established a program to offer affordable vaccine for the unprotected cat and 
dog population in town. 



Page 21 



Title V 

The Board of Heaith is continuing to work on developing programs to control 
the effects of the new Title V regulation on the residents still on septic 
systems. Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed during 1997 for the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health: 



Amebiasis 


1 


Lyme Disease 


1 


Campylobacter Enteritis 


8 


Pertussis 


4 


Cholera 


1 


Tuberculosis Control Program* 


13 


Cyclospora Enteritis 


1 


Salmonella 


6 


Giardiasis 


2 


Shigella 


3 


Hepatitis B 


4 


Viral Meningitis 


2 


Hepatitis C 


2 


Yersinia 


1 



* Referrals received from Lowell Chest Clinic and Boston Medical Center TB 
Clinic 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those persons whose 
employment require certification of freedom from that disease is another 
responsibility of the Town Nurse. One-hundred Ninety-five Mantoux (TB) tests 
were given to persons as required for pre-employment and college and also to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health regulations. Home visits and telephone calls are 
made to families of active and some inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic 
basis to insure understanding of the illness and that adequate medical follow- 
up is achieved. Numerous medical records are kept and updated on residents 
who have a positive Mantoux (TB) test and are receiving medication 
prophylactically and being followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic. 
When necessary, TB testing is done at places of business if employees are 
exposed to an active case of TB. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this year. One hundred eighty- 
eight persons were immunized with pneumonia vaccine and one-thousand 
two-hundred eighty were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. Additional 
doses were given to nursing homes, Rotenberg School, Lighthouse School, 
Life Links, town employees, physicians offices, nine visits were made to 
handicapped or house-bound residents. A combined total of two-thousand 
three-hundred twenty-nine doses of flu vaccine were administered in town. 

One-hundred ninety-eight immunizations were administered to adults and 
students in compliance with the Massachusetts Immunizations Laws and 
prophlatically to residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 



Page 22 



Hepatitis B vaccine, school based program, was initiated this year and ail sixth 
graders were offered the immunizations free at school. Because the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health supplied this vaccine to Boards of 
Health it was given at no cost. Seventh through twelfth graders were offered 
the Hepatitis B vaccine for a nominal charge of $30.00 for the three doses. 
These programs will continue for the next year. Three-hundred sixty-five 
students in grades 6-12 were immunized through the schools. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first Thursday of every 
month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board of Health, Town Offices. Four-hundred 
seventy-nine residents attended the screenings. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Board of Health offers lead paint testing for children between the ages 

nine months and six years. Residents may call the Board of Health at 250- 

5243 and make an appointment with nurse. Twenty-four children were 

screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Board of Health include cholesterol. Dates of 

these programs will be advertised in advance. 

World AIDS Day Event 

Each year around World AIDS Day, December 1st, an event is held in 
Chelmsford to promote education and generate discussion among family 
members with regards to HIV/AIDS. This year AIDS flags were displayed in 
Chelmsford Center the first week of December. It is the committee's hope to 
encourage compassion, understanding and support for those infected and 
affected by HIV/AIDS. The committee for World AIDS Day in Chelmsford is in 
need of volunteers. If interested, call Judy Dunigan, RN, Board of Health, 250- 
5243. 

Health Fair/Health Screenings 

Either a Health Fair or several Health Screenings will be held in conjunction 
with Westford every other year, finances permitting. Date and location will be 
announced in newspapers. 



Page 23 



Board Of Registrars 



Members: 

Richard F. Burtt Jr 
Judith A. Olsson 
John F Ketcham 
Sandra A. Kilburn 
Mary E. St.Hilaire 



Chairman 

Principal Clerk 
Ex Officio 



Voting Strength as of December 31, 1997 Enrolled Voters: 



Precincts 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


TOTAL 


Democrats 


574 


526 


575 


579 


560 


627 


545 


529 


486 


5001 


Republicans 


412 


257 


300 


303 


360 


383 


362 


325 


371 


3073 


Unenrolled 


1207 


1091 


1378 


1209 


1419 


1317 


1414 


1144 


1340 


11519 


Libertarian 


3 


6 


3 


2 


7 


3 


1 


1 


1 


27 


Inter. 3rd Party 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 








3 





11 


Reform 


1 


2 

















2 





5 


Rainbow 


1 


1 


1 




















3 


Coalition 






















Conservative 


























1 


1 


Natural Law 























1 





1 


Party 






















Socialist 











1 

















1 


Greenparty 
































USA 






















New Alliance 
































New World 
































Cocil. 






















Prohibition 
































We the People 
































TOTAL 


2199 


1885 


2258 


2095 


2349 


2330 


2322 


2005 


2199 


19642 



Emergency Management 



Members: 

Walter R. Hedlund Director 

John E. Abbott 
Walter J. Adley, Jr. 
J. Bradford Cole 
George R. Dixon 

Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency (CEMA) volunteers were very 
active during the year 1997, many volunteer hours were spent at the 
Emergency Operating Center at the Town Offices during MA. and Local State 
of Emergency, April 1st to April 3rd due to a Heavy Wet Snow Storm also 
preparing reports for FEMA and MEMA. 

Page 24 



CEMA personal with to Thank all Department Heads and their Personnel for 
their efforts and assistance, the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen 



Respectfully Submitted 
Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



Inspections Department 



Members: 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Joseph P. Shaw 
Kenneth W. Kleynen 
Dennis P. Kane 
Elaine M. Casey 



Inspector of Bids 
Local Inspector 
PI & Gas Inspector 
Wire Inspector 
Principal Clerk 



There were 86 new single family dwellings, 1 seven unit Town House, 1 Care 
Facility, 1 Private School, and 5 commercial buildings issued in 1997. The 
breakdown also includes commercial tenant fit-ups, additions, alterations, 
renovations, sheds, wood stoves, etc. 

A breakdown of the Inspections Department for FY97 is as follows: 



Type of Permit 


# Of Permits 


Total Fees 


Building 


750 


$196,701.00 


Electrical 


848 


$35,277.00 


Plumb. & Gas 


1,594 


$35,594.00 


Sub Total 


3,195 


$267,572.00 



Other fees for permits issued (not included above) for signs, weights and 
measures, yard sales, and Certificates of Inspection were $10,421.75. The 
total fees collected for the department was $277,993.75 for the year. 



Page 25 



MIS Department 



As I have just taken over the position of Data Processing Coordinator from 
Judy Dunn in September 1997, this report shall be brief. 

A comprehensive computer survey has been completed of all computer 
equipment in the Town Offices. From this survey, a cost analysis for 
upgrading to Windows 95 was done. Most of the town's computers can be 
inexpensively upgraded to support Windows 95. While this option is the least 
expensive approach, this is not to be considered a long term optimal 
technology plan. Upgrading to Windows 95 in this manner will extend the life 
of the existing computers and defray the cost of upgrading over a few years. 
The cost for this upgrade has been submitted as capital outlay for FY98-99. 

We are currently in the process of modernizing and updating our web pages. 
With the upgrade to Windows 95, each department will be able to maintain 
their own web pages. This would allow the public to receive current and 
special event information in a timely manner. 

To further increase the productivity of our staff members, we are researching 
remote access for the off site departments. This would allow these 
departments the increasingly necessary tools of today's business environment 
such as email and Internet access. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Larry Holt 

MIS Coordinator 



Personnel Board 



Members: 

Charles Tewell 

Peter Volonino 

Jean Sparks 

John Sousa, Jr. 

1 Vacant Seat 

Jeanne Parziale, Personnel Coordinator 



Page 26 



The Personnel Board consists of five members (four are appointed by the 
Town Manager, one is elected by non-union employees). During the past year 
John Sousa, Jr. (Cemetery Superintendent) was elected as the non-union 
employee representative, replacing James Sousa (Deputy Fire Chief). A 
special "Thank You" to Joe Dyer who resigned after serving on the Personnel 
Board for several years. 

On June 10, 1997, the Board approved the first revision of the Chelmsford 
Personnel Rules and Regulations. Significant changes include a complete 
Classification and Compensation Plan and a revised Employee Performance 
Evaluation and Development Form. Various administrative updates were 
made throughout the text. The document was distributed to all departments. 



Public Library 



Adams Library and Children's House 

25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

43 Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees: 

John W. Cutter, Jr. Chair 

Kathryn Fisher Vice-Chair 

Elizabeth McCarthy Treasurer 

Margaret Marshall Secretary 

Stephen J. Mallette 
Jaclyn D. Matzkin 
Sarah L. Warner 

Adams Library Renovation and Expansion 

The library's building project proceeded on schedule. A. Anthony Tappe & 
Associates, project architects, worked throughout the year to develop 
construction documents. The project was bid in November 1997 and bids 
were opened on December 9. As a result of the bidding process, the general 
construction contract awarded to Mello Construction of Taunton, MA. 



Page 27 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




Front Row (1-r) Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer; Sarah Warner, Margaret Marshall, Secreta 



Back Row (1-r) Stephen Mallette, Kathryn Fisher, V. Chairman; Jaclyn Matzkin 
(Missing from photo: John W. Cutter, Chairman) 



Library Relocation 

In November, the Library moved to the lower level gymnasium in the Town 
Office building on Billerica Road where it will remain for the duration of 
construction. Library patrons and staff said good-bye to the Library's 
Children's House and Carriage House. The buildings will be removed to clear 
the site before construction. Both buildings were sold and will preserved at 
their new location. 

Circulation 

During 1997, the library circulated 365,900 items including books, magazines, 
videos, audiocassettes, compact disk and museum passes. As a member of 
the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, our patrons requested and received 
5,851 items from other Massachusetts libraries. The Circulation Department 
continued its delivery program to area Retirement and Nursing facilities. 

In 1997, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners voted to 
establish 6 new library systems, which will for the first time link public, 
academic, school and special libraries. The new library systems allow libraries 
to provide greatly expanded access to the nearly 50 million books owned by 
libraries of all types in Massachusetts. Chelmsford is a member of the new 
Northeast Library Region. 

Reference Department 

The Reference Department researched 11,754 questions. Both patrons and 
staff conducted 8,492 searches on the on-line periodical database. Public use 
of the library's internet access continues to increase. 

Staff distributed over 43,000 tax forms and more than 100 people took 
advantage of the library's tax assistance programs. 

Staff authored and maintains the first edition of the Chelmsford Public 
Library's home page. 

Children's Department 

The Children's Library circulated 136,932 items and answered 3,115 
reference questions. There were 96 children's programs including weekly 
storytimes. The summer reading program - Celebrate! Read! - attracted over 
800 participants. Scout troops, daycare providers, and pre-schools booked 
field trips throughout the year. 



Page 29 



Community Service 

The Community Service Department links community groups and residents 
with the library's collections and services. During the year, 2149 people 
attended 57 programs including Job Fairs, Poetry Slams, Adult Learning Fair, 
Young Writers' Club and a summer evening music series. Community 
Services received two grants from Chelmsford's Cultural Council for a 
continuation of the Music on the Lawn series and money to clean and 
preserve the bi-centennial quilt. On the State level, this department brought in 
a public relations award from the Massachusetts Library Association for the 
Library's Intergenerational Poetry Slam. 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

The MacKay Library circulated 46,726 items which represents a 12% increase 
over 1996. Barbara Michaud, Children's Assistant, conducted weekly 
storytimes and special school vacation programs. Rona Call, head librarian 
at MacKay for the past 12 years, retired at the end of December. 

Volunteers 

In 1997 we had over 40 volunteers logging over 2000 hours. Volunteers 
helped to run the French and Italian Conversation Circles, deliver books to 
Retirement and nursing homes, maintain the library scrap book, solve 
computer problems, keep magazines shelves in order, help our patrons with 
genealogy research, maintain our gardens, and helped us with the library 
relocation. 

A volunteer, with funding from the Friends of the Library, coordinated an 
inventory and archival project which organized the library's records and 
historical materials. 

The Friends of the Library 

In June, the Friends held their final booksale before the library relocation. 
With the revenue from the booksale, the Friends will continue to provide 
patrons with museum passes and special programs until another booksale is 
possible after construction. The Friends continued support enhances service 
in all departments and is appreciated by patrons and staff. 

Library Endowment Committee 

The Library Endowment Committee prepared plans to initiate a major capital 
campaign of $500,000. to raise funds to enhance the new library building. 

Statistical Reports 

Circulation : 368,675 

Added Materials: 8,063 

Moneys deposited with the Town Treasurer from the fines, lost materials, and 

fees: $17,294. 

Page 30 



Library Personnel 



Mary E. Mahoney, Director 

Nanette Eichell, Assitant Director 

Linda Robinson, Head of Circulation 

Beth Decristofaro, Head of Reference 

Katherme Cryan-Hicks, Head of Community Services 



Laura Kulik, Head of Technical Services 
Rona Call, MacKay Librarian 
Cheryl Zani, Head of Children's Services 
John Reslow, Maintenance 



Library Endowment Committee 


John W. Cutter, Jr. 


Richard C. Jumpp 


Shirley M. Pearlman 


Richard DeFreitas 


Janet F.Laughlin 


Dennis J. Ready 


Eileen Duffy 


Jean R. McCaffery 


Joseph B Shanahan, Jr. 


William J. Gilet 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy, Chair 


Barbara A. Weisfeldt 


John G. Harrington 


Dennis E. McHugh 


William Whitehouse 


Douglas Hausler 


Kathleen A. O'Brien 


James C. Shannon III 




Mary E. Mahoney, Library Director, ex 


-officio 



Recreation Commission 



Members: 

Robert Hayes, 
Harry Ayotte 
Stephan Dumas 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 
Janice Ruell 
Holly Rice, 
Sandra Hall, 



Chairman 



Recreation Director 
Administrative Clerk 



Meetings: First Monday of each month. 

The Recreation Commission is composed of seven members appointed by the 
Town Manager. The primary reason of the commission is to support and make 
recommendations to continuously improve and expand the recreational 
opportunities offered to the Chelmsford community. 

The Recreation Department offered over 300 self-supporting programs 
throughout the year. Some of the successful programs organized in 1997 
include day trips, ski programs, craft classes, dance lessons, art lessons, 
science programs and much more. The Recreation Department will continue 
to develop programming in response to the growing and changing needs of all 
populations within the Town of Chelmsford. Recreation programs will be 
advertised in the Chelmsford Community Newsletter which is mailed during 
the months of January, May and September. 



Page 31 



Our continued goal for 1998 is to open a Youth Center. The Youth Center will 
provide kids the opportunity to socialize with friends, receive tutoring, play 
pool, ping pong, etc. A student board will also be organized to provide kids the 
chance to become involved in a leadership program. 

In September of 1997 our Administrative Clerk, Agnes Angus passed away 
after a long illness. Agnes was a valuable employee and an exceptional 
person whose smile and laugh easily brightened any room. Her cheerful 
personality brought warmth and comfort to us all. Her generosity, kindness, 
and friendship will be greatly missed. 

The members of the commission regretfully accepted the resignation of Jim 
Young and wish to thank him for his years of dedicated service to the 
Recreation Department. The commission would .also like to welcome Sandra 
Hall who has been hired as the Administrative Clerk for the Recreation 
Department. 

We are most thankful to all residents whose support, dedication and 
involvement contributed to the success of 1997. 



Recycling Committee 



Members: 

Barbara Scavezze, Recycling / Waste Coordinator 

Peter Nelson 

Michael Bell 

Mark Gallagher 

Nancy Paredes 

Norman Eisenmann, resigned June 30, 1997 

Robert McCallum, resigned June 30, 1 997 

The Town of Chelmsford contracted for the following services for residents, 
funded by taxes: weekly collection of solid waste, the biweekly collection of 
recyclables, and three curbside leaf collections held May 10, November 1 and 
December 6. Residents were allowed to dispose of brush at the curb with their 
weekly trash from December 23,1996 - January 18, 1997 (the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection temporarily lifted the ban on the 
disposal of brush as a result of a snowstorm on December 7,1996, which 
produced a large quantity of fallen trees and branches). The Town disposed of 
14,080 tons of solid waste, recycled 3,360 tons, and composted approximately 
1,020 tons of yard waste, for a 23.7 % recycling/composting rate. 



Page 32 



The Chelmsford Recycling Committee held brush drop-offs at Community 
Tree on April 12, June 14 and October 25. The CRC also held a drop-off for 
metal (which was recycled) and furniture and household goods (which were 
donated to the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless) on May 17 and 
September 27; clothing was also accepted at the September drop-off and 
donated to Goodwill Industries. The CRC held the annual Town-Wide Clean- 
up on May 3. Volunteers picked up litter from conservation land, school yards, 
road shoulders, and illegal dump sites, and gathered afterwards for a picnic at 
the Elks Lodge. The Town received a grant from the state for 100 compost 
bins, which were sold at half cost, enabling the Town to purchase and sell an 
additional I 00 compost bins. The Town also fulfilled the requirements for the 
first segment of the Massachusetts Municipal Recycling Incentive Program 
(MRIP), which provides an incentive payment based on the amount of 
recyclables collected in our curbside program. 

The Recycling / Waste Coordinator produced two editions of the Cable 43 
television show, "Chelmsford Recycles." One edition featured charities which 
accept donations of usable items; the second edition featured a presentation 
at the Senior Center for Massachusetts Recycles Day, on how recyclables are 
turned into new products. Each edition was broadcast several times. The 
annual recycling and trash flyer was produced and mailed to all residents. This 
flyer included the recycling schedule, and detailed the proper methods, timing 
and places for disposal of various types of recyclable material and solid waste. 
This type of information was also prepared for inclusion in the Community 
Newsletter and the "Chelmsford Recycles" web page. 

prepared by Barbara Scavezze, 



Sewer Commission 



The Chelmsford Sewer Commission was very busy in 1997. As sewer 
construction and design continued at an aggressive pace, the Commission 
also modified its policy for grinder pump units and embarked on a cooperative 
effort with the Center Water District. In addition, the chairman of the 
Commission received a prestigious award from an organization of New 
England wastewater professionals. 

Sewer construction was completed in the Rainbow Avenue Areas in 1997, and 
began in the Northgate Road and Abbott Lane Areas. Sewer design was 
completed in the Hart Pond Area late in 1997 and was ongoing in East 
Chelmsford. The East Chelmsford area is the last area envisioned under the 
original 1984 Wastewater Facilities Plan. 

Page 33 



SEWER COMMISSION 




Front Row (1-r) Evelyn Newman; John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman; 
Jacqueline Sheehy 



Back Row (1-r) James M. Harrington, Attorney; Robert Goober 
(Weston & Sampson Engineer); Richard J. Day, Vice-Chairman; Barry 
B. Balan; Thomas E. Moran, Clerk; Steven K. Pedersen (Weston & 
Sampson Engineer); Victor Manougian, Attorney; Stephen J.Richard 
(Weston & Sampson Engineer) 



One of the many issues facing the Commission in 1997 received considerable 
publicity. Single family residential grinder pump units and low pressure 
sewers were a topic of considerable public input in 1997 

It is estimated that when the sewer project is complete, approximately 11.700 
sewer connections will be made. All but approximately 200 of these 
connections can be made by gravity. In some isolated neighborhoods, gravity 
connections are either not physically possible or not economically feasible due 
to extreme elevation changes and/or shallow bedrock. Such areas require 
connection to the public sewer using low pressure sewers and grinder pump 
units. 

Impacted neighborhood groups in the Abbott Lane and Northgate Road Areas 
vocalized concern regarding installation, maintenance and operation of the 
units. After numerous public informational meetings and input from the 
impacted residents, the Commission voted to modify its policy regarding the 
installation of the units (the Commission does not have authority over sewer 
system operation and maintenance). The Commission estimated that the 
average installation costs are approximately equivalent to one (1) betterment 
assessment unit. Under the old policy, installations were the homeowner's 
responsibility. When the majority of impacted residents said they preferred to 
pay the betterment and let the town install the grinder pumps, the Commission 
agreed. 

In 1997, the Commission also embarked on a cooperative effort with the 
Chelmsford Center Water District. The Commission recognized the need to 
coordinate needed water system improvements in the Hart Pond Area with the 
sewer construction. Given the lack of public water supply or inadequately 
sized water mains in many of the narrow streets surrounding Hart Pond, it 
made sense to combine the water system improvements and sewer 
installation work under one construction contract. What was significant, was 
the cooperative agreement reached between the private water supplier and 
the public sewer authority for cost reimbursement. 

Lastly, the Chairman of the Commission was the recipient of the 1997 New 
England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) Collection Systems Award. 
The award is given to a NEWEA member each year in recognition of their 
outstanding efforts in the planning, management, design, administration, 
operation or maintenance of wastewater collection systems. The 2,500+ 
member association of environmental professionals recognized the Chairman 
for his 17 years of service on the Commission, and his contributions leading to 
the reduction of ground and surface water pollution in Chelmsford through the 
construction of a municipal sewer system. 



Page 35 



The Commission would like to acknowledge our administrative staff, Evelyn 
Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy, and Irene Oczkowski for their hard work, 
professionalism and patience. The Sewer Division of the Department of 
Public Works shares their multifaceted duties, and they are the individuals 
who interface with the public on a daily basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 
John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
Thomas E. Moran, Clerk 
George F. Abely 
Richard J. Day 



Town Clerk 



Members: 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, CMC.CMMC 


Town Clerk 




Elizabeth L. Delaney 




Ass't Town Clerk 




Janet M. Hart 




Senior Clerk 




Katherine M. Kalicki 




P.T. Senior Clerk 




Sporting Licenses 


788 


Birth (Inc) 


453 


Dog Licenses 


2996 


Deaths 


287 


Kennel Licenses 


9 


Marriages 


220 






Intentions 


220 



On March 6th of 1997, Mary E. St.Hilaire completed 25 years as Town Clerk, 
and is looking forward to many more interesting and challenging years. 

1997 was the election year that will go down in town history. The Annual 
Town Election was scheduled for Tuesday April 1st. and the polls were to 
open at 7AM. On that day Massachusetts was hit with a blizzard. Due to the 
efforts of Town Clerk's Staff, the Precinct Workers, and the personnel of the 
School, Police and Fire, DPW departments and their department heads, the 
polls did in fact open on time at 7AM! Many thanks. Then at 10:30 AM the 
Secretary of State William F. Galvin declared a state of emergency and 
suspended and postponed the election. The election was rescheduled and 
held on Friday April 11th. There were five sessions of Town Meetings held. 
Two in the Spring and three in the fall. 

Page 36 



Treasurer / Tax Collector 



Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, 
Carol R. Lambert, 
Bettie A. Osborne, 
Judith A. Olsson, 
Pat Britton, 
Anna M. Griffin, 



Finance Director/Treasurer/Collector 

Assistant Treasurer 

Departmental Assistant 

Legal Clerk 

Data Processing Clerk 

Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 



Aided by an improved economy and conservative budgeting practices, the 
town's financial position has improved significantly in fiscal year 1997. 
Property taxes provide the majority of revenues and current collections have 
increased in the fiscal year due to a continued aggressive collection 
procedures. In fiscal year 1997, the percent of net tax levy collected was at a 
record 98.7%. 

As of the end of fiscal 1997, the General Fund balance was $4,173,103 
dollars. The General Fund budgetary revenue exceeded estimates by 
$958,855 dollars. The department expenditures where $904,754 less than 
anticipated. This in itself is an indication of very positive economic activity in 
the town of Chelmsford. 

The Town has made significant progress in building up reserves in fiscal 1997. 
Our strengthened financial position enabled the town to transfer $250,000.00 
in fiscal 1997 into the Stabilization Fund for future capital projects. 

The Town has improved its long-term financial position through the 
preparation and adherence to five year fiscal forecasts and strategic plan. This 
plan addresses operating costs, debt, facility needs, and financial reserves. 



Sincerely, 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Finance Director/Treasurer/Tax Collector 



Page 37 



Public Safety 



Police Department 



I herein respectfully submit for your information and review the Annual Report 
of the Police Department for the year 1997. At the present time, the 
Department is made up of 54 permanent Officers. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Armand J. Caron 



Steven A. Burns 
Raymond G. McCusker 



LIEUTENANTS 



James F. Murphy 
Francis X. Roark 



Paul E. Cooper 
J. Ronald Gamache 
Timothy F. O'Connor 



SERGEANTS 



E. Michael Rooney 
Scott R. Ubele 
John O. Walsh 



DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTOR/LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 



James T. Finnegan 
Jared S. Finnegan 



INSPECTORS 



Colin C. Spence 
Brian F. Mullen 



CRIME PREVENTION OFFICER 

Edward F. Smith 

JUVENILE OFFICER 

Kenneth R. Duane 

D.A.R.E. OFFICER 

Todd D. Ahern 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE OFFICER/INSPECTOR 

Roland E. Linstad 



Richard A. Adams 
David M. Leo 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 

Sgt. Francis P. Kelly 



Robert J. Murphy, Jr. 
Paul E. Richardson 



Page 38 



Jeffrey A. Blodgett 



COMMUNITY RESPONSE UNIT 

Russell H. Linstad 

K-9 OFFICER / K-9 DRUG DOG 

Daniel J. Ahem / Cris 



John A. Roark 



PATROL OFFICERS 

Jeffrey J. Bernier 

Bruce A. Darwin 

John J. Donovan 

Patrick W. Daley 

Philip R. Dube, Jr. 

Francis J. Goode, Jr. 

Richard D. Hallion 

Gail F. Hunter 

David M. Leo 

David F. MacKenzie, Jr. 

John C. McGeown 

Peter C. McGeown 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk (Deceased 6/12/97) 



Edward F. Quinn 

John E. Redican 

Chandler J. Robinson 

Anthony Spinazola 

James M. Spinney, Jr. 

Francis P. Teehan 

David R. Tine 

Robert J. Trudel 

George A. Tyros 

William R. Walsh 

Craig E. Walsh 

Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

Timothy B. Bourke 



FULL TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 



William G. Amundson 
Gloria E. Armstrong 
David J. DeFreitas 
Richard Demers 
Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. 



Timothy A. Goode 

Sandra M. Langley 

Kevin R. Proulx 

Michael L. Taplin 

William H. Vaughn 



Marie K. DiRocco 



PART TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Laura B. Raffaelo 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT 

Mary Jane Grant 

PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Donna Fox 

SENIOR CLERK 

Margaret E. Greenhalgh 



Lynne M. Tessier 



Page 39 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

Permits, fines, and fees $97,943.56 

Lowell District Court Restitution 20,590.00 

Registry of Motor Vehicles Disbursements 113,297.50 

Total $231,831.06 



BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS/CRIMES 

Adult Arrests 581 

Juvenile Arrests 43 

Total Arrests 624 

Whites Arrested 501 

Blacks Arrested 23 

Asians Arrested 13 

Unknowns Arrested 87 

Charges Logged Against Those Arrested 1,208 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Pending 601 

Continued 18 

Dismissed 69 

Default 165 

Guilty 107 

Placed on file 2 

Not Guilty 2 

Placed in ASAP 1 

Placed on Probation 14 

Suspended Sentence 84 

Committed to Jail 9 

Continued without Finding 136 

Committed to D.Y.S 

Total Findings 1,208 



Page 40 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 22,270 

Summons Served 505 

Licenses Suspended/Revoked 373/1,134 

Accidents Reported 487 

Fatal Accidents 2 

Personal Injury Accidents 176 

Mileage of Cruisers 518,100 

Station Lockups 624 

Citations Issued 2,632 

Parking Violations Issued 338 

Restraining Orders Served 139 

Protective Custody 31 

False Alarms Responded to by Cruisers 1,607 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

The Chelmsford Police Department has realized impressive achievements in 
the past 12 months and are listed as follows: 

1 . One Patrol Officer attended Basic Police Academy and was appointed 
a permanent full time Officer. 

2. Chelmsford Officers attended a total of fifty two specialized training 
classes. 

3. The Chelmsford Police Department applied for and received the 
following Grants for 1997: 

A. $300,000.00 Universal Hiring Grant 

B. $ 50,000.00 Accreditation Grant 

C. $ 50,000.00 Mapping Consortium Grant 

D. $ 42,000.00 Community Policing Grant 

E. $ 20,536.00 Federal Local Law Enforcement Block Grant 

F. $ 20,000.00 Communications Grant 

G. $ 19,000.00 D.A.R.E. Grant 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The Mission of the Chelmsford Police Department is to enhance the quality of 
life in the Town of Chelmsford by working cooperatively with the public and 
within the framework of the United States Constitution to enforce the laws, 
preserve the peace, reduce fear and provide for a safe environment. 

GOALS 

Establish a D.A.R.E. parent program that will complete the educational link 
between the Police, our youth and their parents. 

Establish a mini Police Sub-Station in the Central Square area of Town 
through the cooperation of our business community. 

Page 41 



Establish a Police Department Home Page that will provide education and 
information to our community 

Expand the relationship between the Police Department and Chelmsford 
Community Television by developing a partnership in a Mobile 
Production/Command Center Vehicle. 

One of the biggest challenges in the year to come is a new Policy Facility that 
will meet the demands of the Police Department and the Town of Chelmsford. 
The first steps have been completed by identifying the needs, establishing a 
building committee and selecting an architectural firm. The next step will be 
the schematic design and to prepare for funding, finalized by full design and 
construction. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen, all 
employees of the Police Department and all Town Departments for their 
cooperation during the past year. 

I would also like to express my appreciation to all the Auxiliary Police for their 
continued dedication and support and to all the Members of the Police 
Department for the professionalism and dedication exhibited during the past 
12 months. Without this support, a lot of worthwhile programs and events 
could not have taken place. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chief Armand J. Caron 



Page 42 



Auxiliary Police Report 



This year the Auxiliary Police Unit completed its 41st year of service to the 
town. The Auxiliary Police force assisted the regular force and town 
organizations at seventeen events over the last year. In addition to assisting 
at planned events, the members of the Auxiliary assisted at numerous motor 
vehicle accidents with traffic and crowd control. The Officers of the Auxiliary 
force donated a total of 9,105 man hours to the town. Operation property 
check was very successful keeping vandalism to a minimum. The statistics 
were: 



Vacant House Checks 
School Property Checks 
Town Property Checks 
Total 



1996 1997 



1,343 
15,730 
17.010 



1,195 
15,326 
17,060 



34,083 33,581 



This preventative patrol by the Auxiliary prevents malicious destruction to town 
property and saves property owners and the town thousands of dollars 
annually. 

Explorer Post 370 was very active during 1997 assisting the Auxiliary with 
crowd control and pedestrian crossings at town events. These young men 
and women are a credit to our community. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary, the Scouts and their 
families for donating so much of their time. Your volunteer assistance 
continues to make Chelmsford a better place to live. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager for their 
support, the Police Chief, the Superior Officers and the Patrol Officers of the 
Police Department for all their assistance and support over the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 



Page 43 



Auxiliary Police Roster 



Bernard J. Battle 
Mark A. Cianci 
Michael DiGiovani 
Michael A. Houston 
Mark Juhola 
Stephen Keins 
Peter D LoPilato 
Melissa Martin 



Robert M. Outwater 

Kevin R. Proulx 

Peter Ravanis 

Ralph Roscoe 

John Stoessel 

Matthew Thomas 

David Tyler 

David W. Walsh 

Joseph Walsh 



Fire Department 



Calendar year 1997 has proven to be a very busy year for the Fire 
Department. Emergency response calls totaled 4, I 64 Medical Aid calls 
increased by 7%, totaling 1,724 calls. This area has shown a consistent 
increase over the past decade. We have addressed the medical aid needs by 
training 46 firefighters to the emergency medical technician level and 
equipping the apparatus to provide this advanced level of service. 

We have continued to improve our Fire Prevention efforts. A part-time 
secretary has been added to the Fire Prevention staff which has allowed us to 
post walk in hours between 8 A.M. and 1 P.M., and enabled the inspectors to 
spend more time out of the office conducting code enforcement inspections. 
Additionally, we have developed a program to utilize the on duty personal to 
conduct in-service inspections, greatly increasing our inspection abilities. 

The departments Student Awareness Fire Education (S.A.F.E.) program 
continues to be a great success in making our children both fire safe and fire 
conscious. Credit for the success of this program revolves around a grant from 
the State, a cooperative effort between this department and the school 
department and our S.A.F.E. instructors, Firefighter Wlliam Cady, Firefighter 
Jesse Foster and Firefighter Leo Manley. 

Diesel exhaust ventilation systems have now been installed in the five (5) 
stations. This will help to provide the firefighters with a clean atmosphere in 
which to work. A new roof and heating system was installed at the East Fire 
Station. Engine 2 and Engine 4 have been refurbished over the past year in an 
effort to extend their longevity. 



Page 44 



Three firefighters retired this past year, Firefighter Dennis Vargeletis, 
Firefighter Emil Magiera and Firefighter Martin Boermeester i would like to 
wish the well in their future endeavors and thank them for their many years of 
dedicated service. Firefighter Dan Funaro, Firefighter Marc Pare, and 
Firefighter Dan Reid, Jr. have been hired to replace the recent retirees and 
started work in October of this year 

The goals for the upcoming year are to complete our water rescue training 
program, to offer first aid and CPR to the community, to receive and put into 
service a new pumping engine and to investigate the feasibility of building a 
fire training tower. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen and all other 
town departments along with the members of the Fire Department and my 
office staff for their help and cooperation over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted 



John E. Parow 
Fire Chief 



Fire Department Roster 



Members: 








John E Parow 


Chief 


James A. Sousa 


Deputy Chief 






Michael F. Curran 


Deputy Chief 


Walter F. Adley 


Captain 


James P. Boermeester 


Captain 


Michael Burke 


Captain 


Charles A. Schramm 


Captain 


James M. Spinney 


Captain 






Boermeester, Martin * 




William V Cady 




Campbell, David 




William Capmbell 




Carroll, Jack 




Cincevich, Anthony 




Clancy, David 




Clarke, Kevin 




Conlin, Mark 




Curran, James 




Curran, William 




Dalton, William 




Depalma, John 




Donoghue, Michael 




Donovan, Bruce 




Drew, Donald 




Durkin, James 




Foster, Jesse 




Funaro, Daniel 




Hadley, David 





Page 45 



Hadley, William 
Houle, Henry 
Johnson, Peter 
Keohane, William 
Leczynski, Cynthia 
Manley, Leo 
McTeague, Michael 
Miller, Richard 
O'Brien, Kevin 
Peterson, Donald 
Reid, Daniel, Jr. 
Reid, John 
Rivard, Rick 
Ryan, George 
Spinazola, Joseph 
Ubele, Daniel 



Hayes, Douglas 
Jamer, William 
Keohane, Dennis 
Kydd, Raymond 
Magiera, Emil * 
Martin, Leo 
Merrill, Leslie 
Nolet, Edward 
Pare, Marc 
Reid, Daniel 
Reid, James 
Ridlon, Michael 
Ryan, Gary 
Sheehy, Kevin 
Stanton, Brian 
Vargeletis, Dennis * 



James Keeley 
Martha A. DeSaulnier 
Margaret Borghetti 



Mechanic 

Department Assistant 
Clerk 



Retired 



Page 46 



Fire Department Calls 



Total calls by type 1988 through 1997. 



YR 


A 


B 





MA 


1 


S 


FA 


M 


TOTAL i 


88 


79 


63 


138 


16 


786 


138 


62 


530 


1812 


89 


78 


60 


112 


10 


559 


95 


343 


652 


1909 


90 


80 


58 


119 


8 


645 


63 


142 


648 


1763 


91 


70 


57 


153 


18 


706 


1128 


76 


771 


2979 


92 


63 


39 


99 


19 


755 


983 


76 


821 


2855 


93 


59 


29 


103 


29 


758 


1193 


128 


885 


3184 


94 


88 


46 


100 


11 


842 


1142 


70 


1127 


3426 


95 


100 


52 


114 


28 


852 


953 


4 


1445 


3548 


96 


67 


66 


74 


14 


973 


1441 


3 


1609 


4247 


97 


56 


36 


97 


17 


828 


1406 





1724 


4164 



YR 


Year 


A 


Auto Fire 


B 


Building Fire 





Outside Fire 


MA 


Mutual Aid 


I 


Investigation 


S 


Service 


FA 


False Alarm 


M 


Medical Aid 



Dog Officer 



Citizen complaints answered 

Dogs picked up and taken to pound 

Dogs returned to owners 

Dogs adopted after 10 days 

Stray dogs disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 

Road kills disposed of at the Lowell Humane Society 

Violation citations issued 

Animal bite reports 

Total miles traveled 

Dogs licensed for 1997 

Value of citation fines 

Other funds turned into the town 



1,182 

98 

83 

2 

13 

155 

9 

25 

13,051 

3,015 

$275.00 

$900.00 



Page 47 



Raccoon rabies has now been documented in 306 towns in Massachusetts. 
At this time, no confirmed cases of rabies have been found in Chelmsford. 
The outbreak has peaked in most areas, but because the disease will always 
remain in the raccoon population, we should always maintain a healthy 
respect and be cautious when dealing with animals. Between September 16, 
1992 and November 9, 1995, 1,815 animals tested positive for raccoon rabies. 
These animals included 1,455 raccoons, 254 skunks, 40 cats, 27 
woodchucks, 22 fox, 9 cattle, 2 coyotes, 1 pig, 3 horses, 1 beaver and 1 
fisher. In 1995 there have been three cases of human deaths caused by 
rabies in the United States. All were caused by the bat strain of rabies and the 
circumstances of exposure were unknown. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Franklin E. Warren 
Animal Control Officer 



Page 48 



Department Of Public Works 

The Department of Public Works, created by the Town Charter is comprised of 
Divisions including the highway, engineering, recreation, public buildings, 
parks, public shade trees and the operation of the sanitary sewer system. 



Engineering Division 



Members: 



James E. Pearson, P.E., 
George LeMasurier, 
Gail A. Loiselle, 
James B. Stanford, 



Director & Town Engineer 
Assistant Town Engineer 
Principal Clerk 
Project Engineer 



The work of the Engineering Division can best be summarized by listing the 
engineering assistance given to other Town boards and departments. This 
year's projects included: 

Planning Board: 

• Reviewed thirty-two (32) subdivisions and/or site plans 

• Inspected new construction on sixteen (16) projects 

• Prepared cost estimates for bonding new roadway construction and 
prepared bond reductions 

• Attended all regular meetings 

Assessors: 

• Regularly updated Assessor Maps 

• Calculated lot areas 

• Assisted in property line determinations 



Page 49 



Town Manager's Office: 

• Inspected streets & reviewed plans & legal descriptions for street 
acceptances of Empire Street. Fisher Road, Meadowcrest Lane and 
Technology Drive 

• Prepared maps for Town Meeting articles 

• Inspected & responded to pole location requests from utility 
companies 

• Provided grades and construction inspection for the reclaiming of a 
portion of Northgate Road, Southgate Road, Montview Road, Village 
View Road and Orchard Lane 

• Updated Street Acceptance List 

• Provided research relative to the status of the railroad crossing on 
Wellman Avenue, worked with the Railroad, Courier, Williamsburg 
Condominiums and the Lighthouse School on coordinating repairs to 
the crossing 

• Inspected & responded to drainage, tree, and other miscellaneous 
complaints 

Highway Division: 

• Inspected and prepared cost estimates for the resurfacing of eleven 
(11) streets and provided drainage analysis for fourteen (14) drainage 
projects 

• Provided layout for safety improvements at the intersection of 
Marshall Street and Carlisle Street 

• Provided layout for new lanes, parking spaces and new islands in 
Central Square 

• Assisted with the snow and ice effort 

• Provided layout and grades for the handicap ramp and layout of 
parking spaces at the Chelmsford Country Club 

• Provided layout, grades and inspections for sidewalk reconstruction 
on North Road and Groton Road 

• Inspected final paving of the sidewalks on Steadman Street and 
Chelmsford Street 

• Prepared revised plow route maps to include new streets 

Project Engineer Jim Stanford has been busy designing roadway, sidewalk 
and drainage improvements in the Westlands, construction inspection and 
management of the Highway Division and Chelmsford Country Club 
maintenance buildings. He also prepared bid documents for irrigation and 
pump system for the Chelmsford Country Club. He represents the DPW 
working with other departments on updating computer mapping and GIS 
implementation. 

Payrolls, expense vouchers and budgeting for all divisions except Highway 
are performed in this office. 



Page 50 



Highway Division 



)ers: 

John Long, 


Superintendent 




Larry Fernera, 


Foreman 




Marie Burns, 


Principal Clerk 




Todd Chase Driver 


Gary Beaulieu 


Operator 


David Irvine Driver 


Audie Boudreau 


Operator 


David Eacrett Driver 


Joseph Eriksen 


Operator 


David Palmer Driver 


Dennis Greenwood 


Operator 


Paul Winegar Driver 


Raymond Maybury 


Operator 


John Ferreira 


Lead Mechanic 




Richard Jenson 


Mechanic 




Kenneth Burroughs 


Laborer 





The Highway Division maintains and improves all the streets, culverts, catch 
basins and manholes, street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for 
approximately 200 miles of roadway. Additionally, the Highway Division clears 
the streets and public lots of snow and ice and assists the other departments 
with the divisions equipment and expertise of the crew. The office maintains all 
financial records needed for the reporting, tracking, payments of all vouchers 
connected with the highway budgets - including General Expenses, Salaries, 
Snow and Ice, Massachusetts Chapter 90 Funding (road reconstruction or 
repair), Street Lighting and Capital Expenditures. 

Streets resurfaced during the year include Cathy Road, Barton Hill Road, 
Douglas Road, Hillside Lane, South Row Street, Roberts Street, Ray Hill 
Road, Moore Street, Pine Hill Road and Wesley Street. All drains on 
resurfaced streets were reconstructed prior to resurfacing. In addition the 
following projects were completed: On North Road, handicapped ramps were 
installed and all drainage repaired prior to resurfacing. Drainage was 
reconstructed in all sewer construction areas prior to pavement overlay. All 
guardrail was replaced, sidewalks made accessible, drainage repaired and 
resurfacing on Groton Road. Culverts were replaced on Old Middlesex Street 
and Dalton Road. 

During the winter the Town received approximately SEVENTY INCHES OF 
SNOW from six different storms which was handled by the highway 
employees together with hired contractors and DPW employees. When 
needed, the crews often work for extended periods without sleep in order to 
maintain open roads. The mechanics kept the equipment in proper operating 
condition with few extended mechanical failures. 



Page 51 



Parks Division 



Members: 

Edward Jamros 
Randy Boisvert 



Groundskeeper 
Laborer 



The Parks Division maintains all the parks, traffic islands, ballfields, 
playgrounds and commons under the control of the Town. The grounds are 
groomed each Spring and prepared for the heavy use each area is subjected 
to during the year. The Division employees perform an exceptional job each 
year preparing the Town Common area for the annual July 4th celebration. 
Equally important is the job of restoring the damaged areas resulting from the 
abundance of activities. 

Special projects this year included: 

Installation of new aluminum benches - Southwell and Roberts Fields 

Constructed backboards for tennis practice - Varney and Southwell 

Fields 

Playground extension and handicap ramp - East Field 

Handicap ramp and stairs - Chelmsford Country Club 

Reconstructed handicap ramp - Old Town Hall 

Sewer tie-in - Varney Field House 

Renovated traffic islands - Park and Proctor Road 

Installed basketball pole and backboard - Highland Field 

Removed rotted trees on North Common to make way for new 

plantings 

Roberts Field - infields reconstructed courtesy of Chelmsford Little 

League 

Memorials - cleaned and repaired 

Special recognition goes to Dick Codling, Dick Burkinshaw, Chelmsford 
Rotary, Chelmsford Garden Club and Stott Landscaping for their continued 
participation in the "Adopt a-Park" program. 



Public Buildings Division 



Members: 

Theodore Godfroy 
Gerald Johnson 
David Grimshaw 



Superintendent 

Custodian 

Custodian 



Page 52 



The Town Offices have undergone extensive changes during this last year in 
order to upgrade and comply with the ever-changing building codes The 
building was also upgraded and renovated to temporarily accommodate the 
Adams Library during their transition. The following renovations and projects 
have been completed: 

• Upgraded electrical and fire alarms in building 

• New rubber treads/risers on stairwells 

• Carpeting installed on main level 

• Ceiling fans installed to aid cooling and heating costs 

• Restrooms renovated 

• Coordinated Board of Selectmen, Committees/Commissions and 
multiple groups for meeting dates, time and space, ensuring no 
conflicts 

• Assisted the Art Society display multiple paintings in the Town Offices 

• The gymnasium was completely renovated and upgraded to 
accommodate the temporary Library relocation. A few of the projects 
completed for the Library are listed as follow: 

• Construct Handicap access 

• Fire retardant paint applied to walls 

• Storage rooms converted to offices 

• Telephone and electrical wiring upgraded and installed for 
offices and computers 

• Heating upgraded 

• Shelving for books installed 

• Floors and stairwells refinished 

Special thanks to the Chelmsford Garden Club for their plantings; landscaping 
both the Town offices and the Old Town Hall grounds. 



Sewer Division 



Members: 

Joseph Witts 
James Casparro 
Evelyn Newman 
Jacqueline Sheehy 
Michael Vosnakis 
Daniel Belkas 
Irene Oczkowski 
John Kobelenz 



Operations Supervisor 
Sewer Inspector 
Departmental Assistant 
Principal Clerk 
Maintenance Technician 
Maintenance Mechanic 
Clerk 
Safety Plumbing Inspector 



Page 53 



The Sewer Division continued to expand again this year with the addition of 
587 new sewer connections, bringing our total of on-line sewer users to 5,317. 
With the completion of the Rainbow Avenue sewer contract the number of 
pump stations has been increased to 18. The Sewer Division staff handles all 
the maintenance and upkeep of the sewer lines as they become available. A 
few of the functions of the Sewer Division are; pump station maintenance, 
sewer mainline inspection and flushing, sewer connection inspections, sewer 
manhole inspection and repair, as well as many other duties that keep the 
entire system functioning properly. The office staff handles all the sewer 
betterments, sewer billing, phone calls, complaints and all other 
correspondence. They also perform the clerical work for the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission. 

We thankfully acknowledge the Water Districts for their ongoing cooperation 
and the Sewer Commission with whom projects are efficiently coordinated. 

I would like to thank the staff members for their flexibility, service-oriented 
attitude and inter-division assistance throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. Director of Public Works 



Page 54 



Chelmsford Public Schools 



School Committee 



The membership of the Chelmsford School Committee at the end of the 1997 
calendar year included Mr. Angelo Taranto, Chair; Mrs. Judith Mallette, Vice 
Chair; Mrs. Mary Frantz, Secretary; Mrs. Wendy Marcks, Member at Large; 
Mr. Anthony Volpe, Member at Large, and Mr. Joseph Ready, Student 
Representative. Central administration for the Chelmsford School Department 
included Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. Karen Mazza, 
Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction; Mr. Robert 
Cruickshank, Business Manager; Mr. Bernard DiNatale, Director of 
Educational Technology, and Ms. Dorinda Toppan, Director for 
Personnel/Labor Relations. 

A major focus of the Chelmsford School Committee during 1997 was the 
opportunity to work cooperatively with the Chelmsford Board of Selectmen on 
an "operational review" of the efficiency and effectiveness of the Chelmsford 
Schools. The review was conducted by KPMG Peat Marwick LLP (KPMG), an 
independent management consulting firm experienced with school district 
evaluation processes. 

A draft of the KPMG final report summarized the achievements of the 
Chelmsford Public Schools: 

"Throughout the course of our study, we found the Chelmsford Public 
Schools has many strengths and achievements for which it should be proud. 
Overall, students appear to be achieving. Additionally, only a small 
percentage of Chelmsford's students drop out (0.5%), and more than 88% of 
high school graduates pursue higher education." 

"In many of the functional areas, Chelmsford has already adopted what 
KPMG considers to be best practices. For example, the maintenance and 
operation function has actively sought out ways to reduce costs by 
performing several large scale construction projects in-house. The curriculum 
and instruction department has established clear and realistic annual 
education improvement goals and implementation plans. Furthermore, the 
School Department has made significant investments in both administrative 
and instructional technology in recent years, and has a demonstrated 
commitment to continue to do so. Its comprehensive long-range technology 
plan, approved by the State, is currently being implemented and is ahead of 
schedule in several areas." 



Page 55 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Front Row (1-r) Judith Mallette, V. Chairman; Angelo Taranto, Chairman; Richard Moser, Su 



Back Row (1-r) Wendy Marcks, Joseph Ready, Student Rep.; Mary Frantz, Secretary; Anthom 
Volpe 



KPMG also feels there are areas of improvement through redesigning the 
organizational structure, establishing appropriate staffing levels, and 
introducing performance-based management practices and state of the art 
technology. The entire study will be reviewed by the Chelmsford School 
Committee through the balance of the 1997-98 school year. A complete copy 
of the KPMG report can be obtained through the Office of the Superintendent. 

A second major focus of the Chelmsford School Committee through 1997 has 
been a response to enrollment increases and corresponding adjustments to 
class size. District-wide enrollment in the Chelmsford Public Schools for 1997- 
98 is 5,409 students. This represents an overall increase of 62 students: 19 at 
the high school level, 65 at the middle school level and a decrease of 22 
students at the elementary level. Enrollment projections for future years 
include 74 additional students for the 1998-99 school year, 117 additional 
students for the 1999-00 school year, and 129 additional students for the 
2000-01 school year. 

As a result of these projections, the Chelmsford School Committee will be 
investing in additional teachers to reduce class size at all levels. Projected 
investments also include a one year lease of two temporary classrooms at 
South Row Elementary School for the 1998-99 school year. A special planning 
committee is monitoring the renovation of Center Elementary School with a 
projected "opening" for September 1999. 

The Chelmsford School Committee continues to commit to the mission of our 
school System "to cultivate the development of students into self-confident, 
lifelong learners and responsible citizens who possess personal integrity and 
the ability to succeed in a global society." The Committee welcomes input from 
our community on school programs and initiatives, and we look forward to 
positive school experiences through 1998. 

IN CONCLUSION: 

The Chelmsford School Committee extends deep appreciation to the following 
1997 retirees for their years of loyal and meritorious service: 



Page 57 



TEACHERS 

Dora Bungard 
Irene Cetaruk 
Eleanor Combs 
Michael Denihan 
Mary Dupuis 
June Gould 
David Graves 
James Harwood 
Nancy Knight 
Mary Matthews 
Ida Privitera 
Virginia Stiles 
Christie Sorli 
Carol Tolpa 



Kindergarten Teacher, Harrington School 

Grade 4 Teacher, Harrington School 

Kindergarten Teacher, Byam School 

Science Teacher, Chelmsford High School 

Grade 5 Teacher, McCarthy School 

Grade 4 Teacher, South Row School 

Math Teacher, Parker School 

Social Studies Teacher, McCarthy School 

Grade 2 Teacher, South Row School 

Grade 1 Teacher, Byam School 

Business Teacher, Chelmsford High School 

Librarian, McCarthy School 

Grade 1 Teacher, South Row School 

Grade 1 Teacher, Westlands School 



SUPPORT PERSONNEL 
Beverly Pouliot 
Adeline Sullivan 
Mary Welch 



Secretary, Special Education Department 
Information Processing Clerk, High School 
InstructionalSupportPersonnel, Harrington 



FOOD SERVICE 

Mary Ann Carelli Manager, Chelmsford High School 
Audrey Channonhouse Cafeteria Worker, Chelmsford High School 

Theresa Daley Cafeteria Worker, McCarthy School 

Carole Johnson Manager, Byam School 

Gail LaRoche Baker, Chelmsford High School 

Pauline Shore Director 

IN MEMORIUM: 

The community and the school department were grieved by the deaths of 
Carole Johnson, Instructional Support Staff member at the Westlands School 
and Melody Michopoulus, Foreign Language Teacher at Chelmsford High 
School. 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



Page 58 



Assistant Superintendent For Curriculum And Instruction 



During 1997, the Chelmsford Public Schools have continued to improve the 
instructional program at all school levels by participation in a variety of 
education reform initiatives focused on curriculum, instruction, assessment 
and school structure. The school department has continued to promote high 
challenge, active learning, and improved capacity to respond to differing 
student needs, a perspective the district has referred to as the learner- 
centered classroom. 

Several grants were awarded to the school district to support reform initiatives. 
Continuing multi-year grants received are the PALMS grant to support active 
learning in math, science and technology; the CESAME grant for the 
integration of math, science and technology in pre-calculus; and the GOALS 
2000 grant to support high school restructuring. The district received new 
grants to initiate a mentor program for new teachers, and a school-to-work 
mini-grant to support the AVID internship for high school students in computer 
graphics, TV production, and business. A third new grant, was the Early 
Childhood Community Partnership Grant which supports financial supports for 
income-eligible families to support pre-school costs and services to support 
the improvement of pre-school education in the community. The fourth new 
grant supports resources for professional development regarding the area of 
gifted and talented education. 

The Education Reform Act of 1993 established a requirement for the 
development of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. These 
frameworks are to be used by all school districts as guidelines for the 
development of local district curriculum and school districts are expected to 
incorporate the state learning standards contained in the frameworks. The 
state's new Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) will 
evaluate student achievement in relation to these learning standards. The 
district has continued extensive curriculum development projects to meet 
these state expectations and update its present programs and this activity will 
continue into the future. The most extensive of these projects has been the 
implementation during 1997 of the Language Arts and Math portfolios in 
grades K-8. 



Page 59 



The district has continued a strong commitment to providing quality 
professional development opportunities. A multi-year commitment to offer the 
skillful teaching course from Research for Better Teaching has continued in 
1997, reaching over 100 teachers from all school levels. A workshop series 
from Tufts University has been offered for all elementary teachers focusing on 
diversifying instruction to meet differing student needs and on the writing 
process. Training was also offered in portfolio assessment. Elementary 
teachers have participated in professional development for gifted and talented 
education. 

The district continues its focus on educational reform and continuous 
improvement and made significant progress in this direction during 1997. 



Chelmsford High School 



This is Chelmsford High School's first year with a modified semester block 
schedule as well as meeting the Massachusetts Time and Learning mandate. 
To assist in this restructuring, Chelmsford High School applied for and won for 
the second year a High School Restructuring Grant from the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. One major change mandated by our 
Commonwealth for this past September is that each high school student must 
be involved in learning activities for 990 hours per year. This meant an 
increase of 40% in instructional time for many of Chelmsford High School 
students compared to students' schedules before 1997. Such an increase in 
instructional time translates into an increase in instructional staff and 
materials. The opening of the 1997-98 academic year necessitated the hiring 
of 11.8 additional teachers at the high school. 



Page 60 



Our School Management Council, whose members by law represent an equal 
number of parents to staff as well as student and community representatives, 
developed a School Improvement Plan which set as its major focus the study 
and development of an alternative schedule which would make the best use of 
this increased instructional time for all students. After two years of researching 
various scheduling plans, the professional teaching staff and the Management 
Council, approved the development of a modified semester block schedule. 
This new schedule allows students to undertake their learning in courses 
offered either in extended or in the more traditional time blocks for a semester 
or for a full year. The resulting lengthened course time in the extended block 
courses for English, Science, Math, Social Studies, and World Languages as 
well as some of the elective courses allows teachers to employ teaching 
strategies which challenge students to become more actively involved in their 
own learning. With the time to use varying learning activities, our educational 
community has made a significant restructuring to address our belief that all 
students can learn, though not in the same manner, and moves us in a 
positive direction toward achieving our school system's mission of creating 
students who are contributing members of a global society. 

To support our high school's restructuring of time, a committee was formed of 
parents, faculty, and students to review our graduation requirements. This 
committee then presented for approval by our School Committee a new set of 
graduation requirements which became effective for the Class of 2001, our 
present freshmen. In addition to our past requirement of four years of English, 
a writing requirement was added which must be satisfied by the completion of 
the student's sophomore year. Under the new requirements, all students will 
have to successfully complete the equivalent of two years of a world language, 
three years of science, math, and social studies, and fifteen credits in fine arts 
and practical arts, a-total of 40 elective credits, or a sum total of 245 credits, 
an increase of 35 credits over our previous graduation requirements. Still 
under study by this committee is the awarding of elective credits for 
community service and school to career internships. 



Page 61 



Our students continue to demonstrate exceptional efforts and achievement in 
classes, activities, and athletics. We have eight students who have qualified 
as Finalists in the 1998 Merit Scholarship Competition with an additional 14 
students honored as Commended Students in the 1998 Merit Scholar 
Program. Our school profile on SAT, AP, and the state administrated Iowa 
Test reflect a high level of achievement further illustrated by the number of 
students achieving Dean's List, Honors, or High Honors. Our Fine Arts 
Department was selected as one of twenty five systems nationally judged to 
be outstanding in its program offerings and support. Our Drama Guild won a 
First Place in the regional competition with four students receiving Actors 
Awards. Our newspaper The Voice won a First Place in the Scholastic Press 
Awards. Our athletic teams competed in state tournaments and MVC titles 
were won by our Boys Cross Country Team, Girls Swim Team, Field Hockey 
Team, Boys Hockey Team, Girls Track Team, Girls Volley ball Team, and our 
Baseball Team. 

This is the first year of our Student Internships with Avid Corporation. The first 
semester involved ten students in a variety of technical and business 
positions. Nine of the ten students were asked to continue from the first 
semester while ten new students began their internships with Avid second 
semester. Chelmsford High won a grant to continue to develop our School To 
Careers initiatives including more job shadowing programs. 

Our professional staff continue to grow professionally through their 
involvement in conferences and workshops on new methodologies. Almost our 
entire high school staff has attended John Saphier's Understanding Teaching 
course through the efforts of our Assistant Superintendent Karen Mazza. 
Members of our Mathematics Department John Mosto, Rebecca Nordengren, 
George Pollard, and Barry Ware are in their second year of a program 
coordinated by the State Department of Education and Northeastern 
University for developing new methodology for teaching calculus with 
technology assistance. Our Science Department Head Mike Tate was chosen 
to work with the UMass Lowell School of Education in developing a two way 
video mentorship for future secondary teachers. The most meaningful 
achievement of our professional staff, however, are the letters of appreciation 
received from graduates and colleges where they are attending, recognizing 
our teachers as educators who made a difference. 



Page 62 



Chelmsford Middle Schools 



Program Description: 

The two middle schools serve 1,650 students attending grades five through 
eight. The middle school program is organized to provide a logical transition 
from the self-contained classroom of the elementary school setting to the 
departmentalized structure of the high school. Moreover, the design of the 
middle school program is to foster healthy academic and personal growth and 
development of students during their early adolescent years. Our middle 
school staff is committed to the belief that the middle school environment 
should reflect a comfortable atmosphere where students feel supported in 
their educational and personal development 

Recent Initiatives 

Many changes at the middle school level have been initiated in response to 
the state wide school reform efforts, particularly related to state curriculum 
frameworks and on the amount of time devoted to learning. Other significant 
transitions at the middle schools have been focused on changes in 
organizational issues designed to meet the developmental needs of young 
adolescents. The following This We Believe (1995) statement by the National 
Middle School Association forms an essential underpinning of the work of our 
middle schools. 

The importance of achieving developmentally responsive middle 
schools cannot be over emphasized. The nature of the educational programs 
young adolescents experience duhng this formative pehod of life will, in large 
measure, determine the future of all of us. 

Budget request over the past few years have been designed to meet the 
above needs. An Arts Block Electives program has been instituted in grades 
seven and eight, not only to enhance the performance music programs, but to 
provide an appropriate alternative to study halls. Study halls or study periods 
are no longer used because they do not meet time on learning mandates. 



Page 63 



The major organizational change at the middle schools, supported by the 
budget, has been the .formation of Teaching Teams at each grade level. The 
teams help create small communities for learning within the large school 
buildings. Through the Arts Block program, which exists at all grade levels, the 
teachers on each team have a common planning time. This common planning 
time allows each team the opportunity to focus on meeting the academic and 
personal needs of a smaller number of students who have been assigned to 
the team. The teaming approach and common planning also allows for 
interdisciplinary teaching. The use of teams and common planning time are 
major distinctions between middle schools of today and departmentalized 
junior high schools of the past. Perhaps it is important to note that the 
movement, nationwide, to restructure middle level education using teaching 
teams and common planning time is strongly supported by a body of solid 
research data. An examination of current literature and research on middle 
school education will disclose that an increasingly clear and firm national 
consensus has emerged concerning the characteristics of the most effective 
middle level schools. Transition efforts being made at the McCarthy and 
Parker middle schools, are supported by budget request, are congruent to 
those characteristics. 

This past year has seen a major increase in the numbers of students involved 
in a performance music program in the Arts Block. The results of these 
programs are shown in the concerts and performances given by these groups. 
During the Arts Block time, each student is involved in either band, orchestra, 
chorus or general music or art program. In grades seven and eight, additional 
electives are offered in technology education, life skills, health education and 
literature. 

At the middle schools, innovative initiatives have been undertaken in the 
classrooms. Two such programs were the unit on Leonardo DaVinci that was 
taught and culminated on a "Leonardo Day" to which the public and parents 
were invited and the James Harwood Commemorative Challenge that brings 
students and teachers together on an afternoon to solve a problem in 
competition with other teams. 

The goal of the middle schools is to provide a rich and varied academic 
environment that is developmentally responsive to the needs of adolescents. 



Page 64 



Chelmsford Elementary Schools 



Program Description: 

The four elementary schools serve 2260 students attending kindergarten 
through grade four. As the young child's first experience in the public schools, 
the elementary schools provide a nurturing environment that meets the 
students' academic, social, emotional, and physical needs. Each classroom is 
designed to address a variety of learning styles and abilities in an atmosphere 
where the learning of the student is central to teacher planning Students 
receive daily instruction in reading, phonics, writing, spelling, math, science, 
social studies and health from their classroom teacher. In addition, students 
receive weekly instruction from specialists in the areas of physical education, 
music, art, library and computer technology. Each school also has a full time 
nurse, guidance counselor, reading specialist, and special education staff 
Part time support is provided by a psychologist, an English as a Second 
Language (ESL) teacher, social worker, librarian, and computer specialist. 

Parents make a significant contribution to the success of the elementary 
school program. Their presence at school functions, volunteering, fundraising 
and involvement in PTOs and School Councils enhance the learning 
experience of their child. 

Recent Initiatives: 

The Education Reform Act of 1993 has spurred many initiatives in the public 
schools. The Time and Learning mandate from the State Department of 
Education required that Chelmsford Elementary Schools increase student 
learning time. As a result, the length of the school day was increased by 
twenty-eight minutes. 

In recent years, the elementary school enrollment has increased significantly. 
One method of addressing this increase when space is not available, is to 
provide a n instructional assistant to the classroom teacher. In Chelmsford, 
this occurred when the enrollment exceeded 26 students in a class. 

Our current program description reflects the recent addition in each school of 
full time guidance counselors, computer aides, computer specialists, and a 
part time school psychologist. These positions have enhanced the schools' 
ability to meet the diverse needs of the student population. 

Every school now has a working Computer Lab equipped with state of the art 
computers for each child in the class. Classroom curriculum has been 
enriched by the coordination with the Computer Lab and the school library 
programs. 

Page 65 



Parents have supported renovations in the library and/or playground in each 
school. These initiatives are funded by parent fundraising efforts, and their 
volunteer time. 

Teachers have been involved in extensive professional development 
opportunities coordinated at the district and school level. They're also involved 
in numerous activities to develop and coordinate Chelmsford curriculum with 
the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. 

New math and language arts portfolios are being piloted this year. This 
assessment process enables teachers to assess student learning and 
understanding through performance tasks. These tasks provide teachers the 
evidence of student learning and focus instruction on students' needs. In 
subsequent years, parents will be able to view their child's portfolio with their 
child and discuss progress with their child's teacher. 



Office Of Student/Community Services 



The Office of Student/Community Services (located next to the Main Office at 
Chelmsford High School, 251-5151) continues to be extremely busy. 
Student/Community Services oversees the Guidance Department K-12, all 
child care programs, Community Education Night School and Summer School. 

Evening Community Programs run Tuesday and Thursday evenings 
throughout the year, offering a variety of academic and special interest 
courses. Watch for our brochures in late August and early January. 

Child care programs are flourishing and we offer preschool for 3 and 4 year 
olds, full-day kindergarten/child care; before- and after-school extended day, 
vacation and snow day programs, as well as a nine-week summer camp. A 
third Extended Day location opened this year at the Byam School. 

Summer School continues to service the Greater Merrimack Valley and offers 
both enrichment and remedial programs to both students and adults during 
July and August. 

All programs run on a self-supporting/tuition basis. Information on all programs 
can be obtained by calling the Office of Student/Community Services at 251- 
5151. 



Page 66 



Guidance Department 



The Chelmsford High School Class of 1997 achieved many honors and 
awards, academically, in athletics, and in their extracurricular activities. The 
community should be proud of them. 

For five years in a row, over 90% of our graduates continued on with higher 
education. Average SAT scores remain above both the state and national 
averages. 

While we are proud of our students' success, we continue to work with all 
students' academic and personal concerns. Our dropout rate is less than 2% 
and we have instituted a variety of programs at both the middle school and 
high school. Student Assistance Programs, Alternative Night School and 
clinical psychologists have become part of our Student Services. Guidance 
has also taken over 504 (Americans with Disabilities) responsibilities for the 
system. 

The Guidance Department, staff and administration continue to support the 
needs of all Chelmsford students . 



Director Of Data Processing 



As required by the Education Reform Law, the school district has developed 
district and individual school administrative technology plans. The technology 
plan has been submitted and accepted by the Massachusetts Department of 
Education. The administrative plan is also incorporated into the district's 
educational technology plan. Simply stated, the technology vision will have 
local area networks (LANs) at each school site with an administrative and an 
academic file server. Security is a major concern in a mixed student Internet 
environment. With the use of firewalls, filters, and other security measures, we 
will be able to monitor the network and ensure security. When the town fiber 
optics link becomes operational, our LANs will communicate on a wider 
information highway called a wide area network (WAN). When the WAN 
becomes operational, citizens and town staff will have more access to town 
and school buildings, policies, procedures and staff members. 

Our past minicomputer centralized computer environment was phased out in 
1997. We have now converted to a client/server site-based platform utilizing 
each school's administrative server running Novell 4.11, Microsoft Office, and 
student and financial applications software. All major administrative 
applications have been converted to our LAN at the High School and Central 
Office. 



Page 67 



A site-based computer environment is functional at each of the middle 
schools. The two middle schools presently have a Windows for Work Group 
environment in each main office. The elementary schools' main offices have 
stand-alone computers with student and office-based database applications. 
In 1998, we plan to set up a Novell 4.1 1 networked environment for the middle 
and elementary schools. These LANs would have a similar "look and feel" as 
the 75 node workstation network at the High School and Central Office. 

In this technologically involved computer environment, it is critical that the staff 
be comfortable with all the tools and utilities of the computer business world. 
This was part of the rationale in planning to phase in the business computer 
automation with a stand-alone environment first; then to a work group 
environment; and, finally, to a full-blown network environment. 

While bringing in networks and computer applications into the schools, 
significant effort has been given to staff training. In the 1996-97 school year, 
approximately 100 participants attended Microsoft Office applications training. 
During the 1997-98 school year, an additional 100 participants received 
computer applications training, and approximately 40 participants attended 
student and financial system software training. 

Most of our telephone systems are old and need to be replaced with more 
state-of-the-art equipment. Presently, we have almost 100 telephones in 9 
separate locations; 369 telephone stations-all serviced by various PBX and 
key systems; and alarm, data, and ISDN lines at each school for academic 
instructional delivery rounds out our communications environment. Telephone 
voice mail is available at the Central Office and will be expanded to staff 
members in FY98. 

Future involvements will revolve around networking and computer telephone 
interface (CTI). The l-Loop implementation promises to bring the town and 
schools into the mainstream of a local business/academic community. 



Department Head For English (Grades 6-8) 



We have continued our summer reading program which encourages our 
students to read for enjoyment over the summer break. Students choose from 
a required list and also select a second book of their own choosing. While the 
reading should be fun, students are held accountable for what they've read. 
We are most appreciative of the parent support the program has received. 



Page 68 



The PTO's of both buildings have been most supportive of our programs 
They have run two book fairs for us and have also funded a presentation by 
the Chamber Theater for all of our seventh and eighth graders This 
professional national touring troupe performed several adapted short stories 
for us all. Staff spent much time in preparation for the presentations and 
conducted several follow-up activities as well to assure students' getting as 
much out of the performance as possible. The whole program was most 
worthwhile; our PTO's have committed to funding it on an every other year 
basis so that all students will benefit at some time during their middle school 
experience. 

We continue to participate in the Word Master program, a national competition 
involving vocabulary and analogies. Our purpose is enrichment and exposure 
to the vocabulary and analogies; however, we are proud of our consistent 
rankings in the top ten in this national competition. 

At the middle school level we are also committed to the Chelmsford Language 
Arts Portfolio Project. Students have been introduced to the various 
procedures and are developing their reading and writing portfolios. Staff 
continue to attend workshops, early release days, etc. to become more 
familiar with the portfolio process. In addition, further workshops are planned 
to provide support for staff. 

We are also exploring the recently released state frameworks for the language 
Arts/English curriculum area in order to see where we correlate with them and 
where we might need change. Also in the equation are new state standards 
based tests at grades 4, 8, and 10. Much of our attention in the near future 
will be focused on the interaction of our curriculum, the frame works, and the 
testing program. 

Finally, department members continue to attend workshops and conferences 
and to take courses in order to keep us up on current practices, to broaden 
our experiences, and to add sparkle to our various curricula. 



Page 69 



Department Head For English (Grades 9-12) 



Following upon the School Committee's acceptance of the Graduation 
Requirements Committee's recommendation that, beginning with the class of 
2001, all students must pass a course in expository writing before advancing 
to their junior year, the English Department opened the first of two writing labs 
needed to implement the course. The focus of this course is upon building 
writing skills needed for success in high school as well as in the MCAS 
assessment which will be administered to 10th graders statewide. 



During this year, the Department welcomed three teachers new to our system. 
Liza Crowley comes to us from the Greater Lawrence Technical High School 
where she was chairman of the English Department as well as teacher of 
junior and senior English. Ms. Crowley is a graduate of Phillips Andover 
Academy and holds a B.S. and a M.R. from the University of Massachusetts, 
Lowell. Christopher Chew is a 1990 graduate of Chelmsford High School. He 
earned a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University with a concentration in 
drama and is a M.R.T. candidate at Fitchburg State College. In addition to 
teaching 10th and 11th grade English, Mr. Chew is advisor to the drama club. 
Jennifer Lenfest comes to us from Methuen High School where she taught 
9th, 10th, and 11th grade English. She is a graduate of Plymouth State 
College and is currently enrolled in a M.Ed, program at the University of New 
Hampshire. 

All members of the class of 2001 participated in the National Language Arts 
Olympiad, a test of achievement in reading, vocabulary, and English usage 
administered to freshmen in high schools from coast to coast. Our team of 22 
high scorers, led by Siobhan Foley, Michael Cruickshank, and William Ho, 
placed second in the nation, maintaining the standard set by the class of 2000. 



Department Head For Fine Arts 



The Fine Arts Department continued its ambitious "Arts Block" at the middle 
schools. This innovative curriculum and schedule in which students in the 
performing groups are no longer pulled-out of other classes, but are scheduled 
into regularly scheduled, daily band, chorus and orchestra rehearsals. This 
"Arts Block" period also provides additional, creative, electives in the arts for 
the entire student population. In September, the new Fine Arts Graduation 
Requirement was implemented for incoming freshmen at Chelmsford High 
School. 



Page 70 



As occurs every year, each of the seven schools performed concerts for 
parents, relatives and friends in May and in December. These concerts 
featured bands, choruses, recorder ensembles, string orchestras and short 
musical and dramatic presentations. The McCarthy Middle School Select 
Choir, under the direction of Betty Hanson, was selected through a rigorous 
audition process to perform at the Massachusetts Music Educators 
Association (MMEA) All-State Conference in March. Their performance was 
outstanding and they were wonderful representatives of the Chelmsford 
schools. Additionally, the Select Choir once again received Superior ratings at 
the ACDA Choral Festival, also held in March, at Westboro High School. A 
new jazz group was started at McCarthy Middle School under the direction of 
Mark Branco. The high school musical, "Camelot," in May, directed by Carl 
Rondina, once again drew "standing room only" crowds to the McCarthy 
Auditorium, and the annual "Pops" Concert at the Chelmsford Senior Center 
was an outstanding display of the culmination of the entire year's work. The 
high school's marching band continued its growth in size and quality, 
performing at ten football games, as well as the annual Memorial Day parades 
in Chelmsford and Tewksbury, and the Fourth of July parade in Chelmsford. 
The culmination of the marching band's 1996-97 school year was a one-week 
trip to London, England to perform in the annual, invitation-only, New Year's 
Day Parade on January 1, 1997. In addition, the band performed in 
Chelmsford, England at a concert attended by the Lord Mayoress, Edna 
Mountain and several other city officials. The band also toured London, 
Windsor, Oxford and Stratford-On-Avon. 

On the visual arts side of the department, the annual "Youth Art Month" 
exhibition at the Page Gallery in the Administration Wing of Chelmsford High 
School had student art work from grades kindergarten through twelve on 
display for the entire month of March and the monthly exhibitions in the gallery 
continued as well. Art students continued to be accepted to the most 
prestigious art schools in the country. 

Additionally, numerous individual arts students were honored through 
selection for various prestigious performing groups or exhibitions. Several 
visual arts students were chosen for the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Show 
and for Art All-State which is sponsored by the Massachusetts Art Educators 
Association. As in the past, many music students were selected through 
rigorous audition processes for the All-State, Senior and Junior District 
Festivals sponsored by the Massachusetts Music Educators Association. That 
so many students from Chelmsford are regularly among those selected for 
these prestigious awards and events speaks highly of the strength of the arts 
education programs in our schools. Through the Arts, students learn self- 
discipline and cooperation, two skills that will transfer to whatever vocation 
they choose to follow after completing their formal education. When leaving 
the Chelmsford schools we hope that they will have become intelligent 
consumers of the arts for the rest of their lives. 

Page 71 



Department Head For Foreign Languages (Grades 7-12) 



The last year was marked by several changes, in the foreign language 
department. Unfortunately, the untimely death of our dear colleague, Melody 
Michopoulos, in January: left a very large void, not only in our department, but 
in the entire CHS community. Staff and students mourned Melody's passing, 
but in June, we also had a wonderful celebration of her life. She continues to 
be in our thoughts, and her contributions to the department and CHS will 
never be forgotten. 

At the middle schools, the year was highlighted by the very successful 
curriculum fairs held in March. Foreign language students and staff presented 
a very impressive international food festival at each school. Mrs. Keefe at 
McCarthy and Mrs. Deschene at Parker again organized very successful trips 
for their French students to Quebec in May. In September, a new text series, 
Paso a paso. was introduced into the seventh grade Spanish classes. The 
implementation will continue with the eighth X grade classes next year. The 
FLEX (Foreign Language Exploration) course was also modified and made 
part of the elective program at each school. Spanish and French were offered 
this year, and we are anticipating offering Latin and Italian next year. 

At the high school, we were pleased to welcome two new people to our 
department. Mia O'Day was hired to replace Ms. Michopoulos, and due to 
increased enrollment and block scheduling, we also hired Kristin Thomas to 
teach Spanish. All teachers in the department were involved during the spring 
semester and summer in preparing for the change to long-block classes. 
Except for Spanish, French and Latin I and 11, all other courses were offered 
in the long-block format. The other very exciting news for the department and 
the foreign language students was the appropriation of funds for a state-of -the 
art language laboratory to be installed in Lecture Hall III. It is designed to 
accommodate up to two classes with a total of 56 students. Through a 
generous donation made by Melody's family in her memory, the lab will also 
include 26 computer stations. The lab installation should be completed by the 
spring of 1998. 



Page 72 



Curriculum Specialist For Mathematics (Grades K - 8) 



The nature of Mathematics is one of diversification in curriculum and aptitude. 
It is the mission of the Math Department to assist each student in achieving his 
/her individual potential .We have incorporated the use of hands-on math 
manipulatives and alternative assessments in the classroom in all grade 
levels. Students have been introduced to open ended and open response 
questions. Half of the students in grades 1-6 and all students in grades 7 & 8 
are keeping Math Portfolios as part of our pilot year for Math and Language 
Arts Portfolios. Chelmsford is participating in The Massachusetts Mathematics 
Portfolio Project a state project which focuses on raising standards for all 
students and Mathematics Portfolios. 

The University of Chicago Mathematics Project, Everyday Mathematics, has 
been fully implemented in grades K-3. Grades 4, 5, and 6 have implemented a 
new Houghton Mifflin mathematics program which addresses the National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards. We are presently working 
toward preparing our students for the new MCAS (Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System) which will take place in May. 

Our teachers, in addition to teaching regular classes, are actively continuing 
their education in the areas of mainstreaming, updating and developing new 
curriculum, and researching new programs through the successful In-Service 
Workshop programs. Many teachers have attended portfolio training 
workshops and participated in the Annenberg Channel Nationwide Interactive 
workshops. Teachers also attend various conferences which focus on using 
math manipulatives, cooperative learning, heterogeneous grouping, 
integration, alternative assessment, and using the Geometers Sketchpad, new 
software that was purchased for both computer labs in the middle schools. 

With the emphasis on problem solving, we have successfully introduced 
several math competition programs at the Middle School level to challenge all 
students. Approximately 1600 students compete in the Continental Math 
League and New England Math League Contests. The success of our 
program is evident in the accomplishments of several students who achieved 
perfect scores and received recognition for their participation in Continental 
Math League and New England Math League. Our McCarthy Middle School 
Math Counts team qualified for the state competition John Kolba finished in 
the top ten in the regional Math Counts competition. 



Page 73 



Our results in National testing reinforces our belief that our goals are 
achievable and that our methods are productive. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Donna L. Foley 



Department Head For Mathematics (Grades 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department continues to achieve 
academic excellence while working to align its curriculum to meet the 
benchmarks addressed in the Massachusetts State Frameworks for 
Mathematics. 



The "Pre-Calculus Through Applications" CESAME Grant has now received 
funding for its second year of implementation (a second $15,000). In June, 
1997 (using funds provided by this grant) John Mosto and Rebecca 
Nordengren conducted a one-week workshop in which five Pre-Calculus 
teachers and one Physics teacher were trained in the techniques of integrating 
Mathematics, Science and Technology. Funding provided by this grant also 
assisted the department's purchase of equipment (TI-83 graphing calculators, 
TI-83 graphing calculator with overhead capabilities and C.B.L. devices) and 
various software and support materials. 

New textbooks were adopted for use in all Geometry and Algebra II classes. 
Discovering Geometry, published by Key Curriculum Press, integrates intuitive 
hands-on Geometry with Geometry Sketchpad, a software developed by Key 
Curriculum Press that enhances a student's understanding of Geometric 
Concepts. This approach to teaching Geometry is consistent with current 
research and State and National recommendation. The Algebra II textbook, 
HRW Advanced Algebra published by Holt, Rinehart & Winston, encourages 
the use of the graphing calculator in the teaching and learning process. 

In order to assist our staff in the implementation of these new texts and 
technologies, two twenty-hour summer workshops were offered. One 
conducted by Ann Swierzbin concentrated on the use of Geometry Sketchpad 
and the other conducted by John Mosto and John Ramalho centered on the 
use of the TI-83 graphing calculator in the Algebra class. All current Geometry 
and Algebra [I teachers attended and completed the appropriate workshop(s). 

Five members of our department have completed the Sketchpad Teacher 
Course. This course, taught by staff members of the Research for Better 
Teaching Organization, instructs teachers in alternative teaching strategies 
that advise the different learning styles of all students. 

Page 74 



All of our extra-curricular teams continue to excel and achieve at the highest 
level of performance. These teams and their coaches (Mr. Olson and Mr. 
Ford) should be commended and congratulated for their outstanding efforts 
and accomplishments 



Reading Department Head K-12 Language Arts Coordinator K-5 



The school year 1996-1997 was a busy year for the Reading Department. 
Beginning in the fall of 1996 through December of 1997 the reading specialists 
were involved in workshops, staff development seminars and curriculum 
development activities concerned with performance assessment. The reading 
specialists attended a number of professional development events outside the 
school. 

We are proud to be able to offer supportive reading services and assessment 
to all of our students from the elementary grades through the high school. We 
know that the characteristics of a good reader include an awareness of the 
factors that allow the construction of meaning, control of the strategies 
necessary for accessing text, and self assessment in the process toward the 
reading goal. We know that children learn to read by reading and they improve 
their reading skills by reading more and more. 

Students who are targeted for assistance receive support in both their 
classroom reading text and on a computer driven literacy program. Our 
program is primarily, but not totally, a pull-out model, determined by student 
needs and time constraints. Responding to what research says constitutes 
best educational practices in reading, good literature is at the heart of the 
program with interactive capabilities of CD-ROM. Books are sent home as part 
of the daily routine as home school connections are vital. 

Realizing that early intervention is the most effective way to prevent problems, 
it is at the early grades that the students are targeted. A pilot project of early 
intervention strategies has been conducted in two first grade classes. It has 
been very successful and is therefore being expanded into all first grades. 

The reading department has also been participating in the development of 
performance tasks contained in the Portfolio Assessment project. This is being 
used in approximately one-half of the classes through grade eight. It is very 
exciting because it allows us to see the kinds and amounts of support that 
allow a student to meet success, rather than reporting what a child cannot do. 



Page 75 



There are many different student support initiatives at all schools Some 
participate in Parents As Reading Partners, in Book Discussion Groups, in 
Book-It or in other programs designed to enhance a students enjoyment in 
reading . At Harrington School a Reading Lab has been established this year 
in order to provide focused, intensive, integrated, language arts support with 
the reading teacher in partnership with the learning center teacher and an 
aide. The students in the lab receive one hour of intense instruction, using the 
grade-level anthology, five days a week. Opportunities for small group 
discussion around plot development and sequencing of events for 
comprehension occur. Immediate feedback along with intensive phonics 
instruction support vocabulary development, fluency, spelling, and written 
language. 

In Mrs.Dator's fifth and sixth grade reading room at Parker Middle School 
students have been participation in the Lowell Sun's "newspaper in Education" 
program. Each Week the students look forward to receiving their own copy of 
The Sun which is provided by local area businesses. Each week one chapter 
of Keep Your Eye on Amanda, a book by children's author Avi, is presented. 
Fridays have become known as "Amanda Day" as we follow Amanda's 
adventures and do the related activities. 

Chelmsford Public School reading department believes that exemplary 
reading instruction provides the students with three keys to successful 
learning, knowledge, strategies and motivation. We have come to know that a 
fully integrated approach to reading, one which includes all the language arts - 
reading, writing, listening, speaking, spelling- allows the student to make the 
connections necessary for strong comprehension. The goal of the Reading 
Department is joyful literacy for all. 



Department Head For Science (Grades 5-8) 



The major goal of the middle school science program is to develop students 
into critical thinkers by the use of hands on curricula. Each grade level 
curriculum is designed to teach the students organizational, listening, note 
taking, experimental, logical thinking and problem solving skills The fifth grade 
general science program consists of the Science and Technology Kits for 
Children on Electric Circuit and Ecosystems and units on oceanography and 
endangered species. In the sixth grade, the General Science kit and text 
program is Macmillan Science In Your World. The Challenge of Discovery, Life 
Science and Earth Science along with activities written by our science staff are 
used respectively, in the seventh and eighth grade. 



Page 76 



State and community resources are used to extend and enrich the curriculum. 
Students are involved in field experience at the Chnsta McAuliffe Space 
Center, Tsongas Center for "The River As A Classroom" program, Museum of 
Science, Plum Island, Whaling Museum Stone Environmental Camp Program 
at Cranes Beach and deer studies at Carlisle State Forest Enrichment 
assemblies and programs for Earth Day-and Science Clubs revolve around 
environmental studies, the WBZ Weathernet, courtyard redevelopment 
activities, rain forests, chemistry demonstrations and electncy. Hewlett 
Packard and 3M Corporation have funded the Weathernet, Earthwatch 
workshops and updated science videos. 

Science teachers have been implementing the new state Science and 
Technology Standards into the curriculum and preparing the students for the 
Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment system tests. In addition, the 
science staff is active in attending conferences, workshops, courses and in 
service programs on current educational topics. 



Department Head For Science (Grades 9-12) 



It is hard to believe that another year has gone by. As indicated in last year's 
report, the first semester of our new large-block schedule was a lot of work. 
All the preparation we did as a school and as a department made the 
transition as smooth as possible. We all anticipated really enjoying the extra 
time for laboratory work, in depth discussions, alternative assessments, and 
cooperative exercises. Well, that all happened. The bonus is the relaxed, but 
productive, atmosphere in the classroom. The time it takes to prepare these 
lessons is much more than we anticipated. I am confident that as we work 
through the initial stages of the implementation of the schedule we will become 
more efficient and proficient in planning our classes. 

All members of the science department again spent a part of their summer at 
workshops preparing themselves and the curriculum for large block 
instruction. Most of the science staff have also participated in off campus 
workshops and conferences that addressed the need of the teacher to adapt 
their teaching styles to be more effective in the longer class period. It is 
exciting to walk into the science prep, room and hear the discussions on these 
new techniques and how they worked or did not work. We all benefit from 
each others experiences in the classroom. 



Page 77 



This year we added two new members to the science staff, Mr. James McKay 
and Mr. Dave Steeves. Mr. McKay comes to us from industry and teaches 
physical science. He has taught in Nebraska and did his student teaching in 
New Zealand. Mr. Steeves comes to us from a teaching position in North 
Reading and teaches physics. Mr. Steeves is not a stranger to us, as he did 
his student teaching at CHS. 

For the first time in three decades school opened in September without Mr. 
Michael Denihan in his classroom eagerly awaiting the arrival of his class. We 
all wish Michael a long and happy retirement. The students at CHS will miss 
Mr. Denihan's expertise in the classroom as well as his stories, but most of all 
his compassion. Mr. Denihan saw the "good" in every student. He was always 
willing to give that second and third chance in order to encourage the student 
to succeed We will indeed miss Mr. Denihan. 

Submitted by: 

Michael F. Tate 

Science Department Chairperson 



Department Head For Social Studies (Grades 5-8) 



The teachers in the department have been very busy. Besides adapting the 
present curriculum to the proposed State frameworks, teachers took part in 
summer workshops to a. choose a text for grades six and seven b. research 
available texts for grades five and eight. 

Two new texts were researched, analyzed, evaluated for content, grade 
appropriateness, readability, student interest, graphics and the adaptability to 
the frameworks. Approved by the School Committee these new texts are now 
being used by students in grades six and seven. 

The curriculum for grade five will now become a study of U.S. History 
beginning with the causes of the American Revolution (1763) through War of 
1812 and the early Industrial Revolution (1815). 

Grade six will now study the Ancient Worlds of Egypt, Mesopatamia, Greece, 
Rome, China and India. 

Grade seven will concentrate on a geographical, economic, government and 
cultural study of Europe, Asia and Latin America Grade Eight will focus on 
reviewing what grade five completed, and concentrate on a social political and 
cultural study of the United States from 1815 through 1875. 

Page 78 



Teachers are continuing to meet, exchange ideas, adopt and adapt to new 
techniques for the teaching of the material suggested by the frameworks. 
Summer workshops will be proposed to continue the update of our curricula so 
they correspond to the state requisites. 



Department Head for Social Studies (Grades 9-12) 



The Social Studies Department at the High School presently consists of fifteen 
members who offer a broad selection of courses. Students may choose from 
Political Science, World History, United States History, American Studies, 
Asian Studies, Legal Rights, Economics, Consumer Economics, International 
Relations, Psychology, Sociology, the Holocaust, and Modern Problems. Also 
offered are advanced placement courses in American History, European 
History, and American Government. 

This year the department is continuing work to implement educational reform. 
All members of the department have participated in professional development 
workshops and courses that include the following topics: learning styles, 
cooperative learning, alternative assessment techniques, the Social Studies 
Frameworks, integration of technology in Social Studies classes, instructional 
techniques for long block classes, and Learning Center Classrooms. 

Donald Benson advised a group of 14 students who successfully participated 
at Model United Nations simulations at Bentley College and Harvard 
University. Denise Coffey advised a group of twenty students who compiled a 
5-1 record and competed in the quarter finals of the State Mock Trial 
Competitions. Dennis McHugh continued to serve as Lawyer Coach. 

Thanks to a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Chelmsford High 
School students in four 10 th grade World History classes have been involved 
in a journey back to Renaissance times. As part of a five month residency 
with professional theater artist John Bay of Studebaker Theater, students, 
teachers, parents, and other members of the local community recreated a 
Renaissance Faire on the grounds of the high school on April Fool's Day, 
1997. This project was coordinated by Anne O'Bryant with the assistance of 
Eric Hoover, Dick O'Donnell, Katy Sullivan, and Janet Veves. 



Page 79 



Social Studies teachers are striving to involve their students with the most 
advanced technology available. Forty students from Janet Veres' Political 
Science Honors classes participated in a pilot program simulating a model 
United Nations over the Internet. These students had the interesting 
assignment of representing North Vietnam at the Paris Peace Talks. Students 
from Denise Coffey's American Government class participated in a national 
model congress over the Internet. Students from over 30 states participated. 
Students in Janet Veres' classes participated in an interactive debate on 
current issues with students in Mike Cerullo's 7 th grade class at Parker Middle 
School utilizing two way television. Students from Janet Veres' class created 
a Web site magazine. In the Magazine, "The Gavel", students analyze various 
Supreme Court decisions. "The Gavel" can be found on the Chelmsford 
Public School's Web page. 



Department Head For Health And Physical Education (Grades K-12) 



During the past year the Health and Physical Education Department, working 
with the high school graduation requirements committee, proposed new 
requirements in both disciplines. Active Lifestyle Development I and II were 
accepted as semester Physical Education requirements for grades 9 and 10. 
Life Management Skills I and II were accepted as semester Health Education 
requirements for grades 9 and 11/12. The upper classmen health component 
will take effect in the 1999-2000 school year. All others took effect this current 
school year. Texts for each course were also adopted. 

Additionally a Phase I Curriculum Review was begun. The purpose of the 
review is to compare the State health curriculum framework "Building 
Resilience" with our current program K-12-a process already completed at 
the high school level. This process is the initial stage of our system wide 
curriculum review and education improvement planning process. 

Supplemental health programs during the year included the AIDS MEMORIAL 
QUILT display, a production of "The Yellow Dress" a play addressing the issue 
of dating violence, peer mediation training, Trinity Trauma mock drunk driving 
accident simulation, and a full day of wellness programs focusing on 
substance abuse, nutrition and eating disorders, dating relationships, the cycle 
of addiction, and self esteem and community service. 



Page 80 



Director of Educational Technology 



The Chelmsford Public School System continues to move forward with the 
implementation of our Long Range Technology Plan, approved by the School 
Committee and certified by the State. The focus continues to be on the 
installation of our network infrastructure in all instructional locations and the 
integration of technology into the instructional process. 

Community Support 

The implementation of the Technology Plan has been assisted by volunteer 
NetDay activities and, to date, the schools have been the beneficiary of more 
than 1200 person hours of service by community members and business 
partners. Through the efforts of concerned Chelmsford citizens many 
business-school partnerships have been developed. 

As a result of grants, donations, NetDay partnerships, community volunteers 
and aggressive competitive bidding the funding request for the implementation 
of the second year of the Technology Plan was able to be reduced by 
$276,000. We are very proud of our community support and thank all for the 
help. 



Academic Technology Projects underway or completed in 1997: 

New computer labs and classroom computers installed in McCarthy and 
Parker Middle Schools. 

TV Studio facilities supporting instruction are operating in both Middle 
Schools and at Chelmsford High School. 

Installation in the Chelmsford High School of a state of the art multi-media 
computer language lab in partnership with Sony Corporation, EBI and 
Insight Corp. 

New writing lab at Chelmsford High School to support revised graduation 
requirements. 

District web server supporting the School System's web site located at 
www.schools.chelmsford.ma.us. The web site contains information for 
students, parents, teachers and community. 

Library automation project, a two year effort, is well under way in providing 
electronic cataloging of print, non-print and educational resources. 

Chelmsford Senior Center, in partnership with the schools, is developing 
an Internet and Computer Technology Cyber Center located at the Senior 
Center to provide Internet access and training. 



Page 81 



Students at Chelmsford High School participated in NetDay Europe by 
new Internet voice technology which allowed them to interact with 
students in Strasbourg, France 

Technology professional development and training programs continue to 
be offered to support teachers and staff. 



Program Supervisor For Athletics (Grades 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department during the 1996-97 school 
year fielded 33 varsity programs, 24 sub-varsity programs and 3 seasonal 
trainer programs. An overall record from 391 varsity contests was 239-136-16 
with 1,090 athletes, 5 team managers, and 10 student trainers competing. 

The varsity Boys and Girls Cross-Country, Girls Swimming and Diving, Girls 
Indoor Track, Boys Ski, and Ice Hockey teams were all Merrimack Valley 
Conference Champions. 



Department Head For Practical Arts (Grades 9-12) 



The Practical Arts Department at CHS consists of three unique areas: 
Business Education, Technology Education, and Family and Consumer 
Education. 

This past year has been very exciting for all three areas with the addition of 
four new instructors, two in Business Education and one in each Technology 
Education and Family and Consumer Education. With the addition of these 
new staff members and their expertise a number of new courses have been 
introduced to Chelmsford students with tremendous success. Student 
Enrollment in courses in Practical Arts have increased greatly this past year, 
indicating that students are excited about the new course offerings. 

In addition, the Distributive Education Club of America, which is run by two 
advisors in the Business Department, once again had tremendous success at 
District, State, and National competitions. District competition was dominated 
by Chelmsford sending 60 plus students to the State's by placing in the top 
eight at District. At State's six students distinguished themselves and qualified 
to go onto National competitions. National competitions saw all students from 
Chelmsford receiving certificates of Accomplishment . 



Page 82 



Administrator Of Special Education 



The Special Education Department currently serves approximately 850 
students ranging from three (3) to twenty-two (22) years of age Approximately 
65 of these students are served in collaborative or private school programs 
and the remaining students are served in the Chelmsford Public Schools It is 
our responsibility as mandated by Massachusetts Special Education Law. 
Chapter 766 and the Federal Government's Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act (IDEA) to assure that each handicapped student receives an 
education designed to meet his or her unique learning needs and to receive 
the services in the least restrictive environment. Currently 15.3% of students 
in Chelmsford have an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) which is below 
the state average. 

In order to serve this special needs population we currently employ 50 
professional staff and 53 support staff. In each building we offer academic 
support services, resource room programs, and Speech services. As related 
treatment services we offer system-wide Occupational Therapy, Physical 
Therapy, Adaptive Physical Education and Social Services. Other specialized 
programs offered are Pre-School Programs, Alternative programs for Middle 
and High School, Life Skills programs for Middle and High School, Language 
Based programs for Elementary and Middle School, and Early Childhood 
programs . We utilize consultants in the areas of Pervasive Development 
Disorder, Augmentative Communication, Vision and Mobility as needed. 

The Special Education Department continues to expand and restructure its 
services in order to better meet the diversified needs of the students. Our 
preschool program has expanded and we are continually training staff in the 
areas of integrated therapies and developmental education. We have 
expanded our Early Childhood Program and have increased support in the 
regular classroom for these students. We have written a grant for the special 
education staff to participate in staff development in order to work with regular 
education staff in modifying the frameworks and developing assessment tools 
in order to better access the curriculum and evaluate learner outcomes. The 
high school staff has worked cooperatively with the regular education staff to 
develop strategies to better support our students with the changes in large 
block scheduling. We have also developed a systematic approach to training 
our Instructional Support Personnel to better meet the needs of our students. 

The Special Education Department, including all staff members, is dedicated 
to meeting the needs of all the students we serve in the most productive and 
efficient manner possible. We continue to expand our knowledge and to 
develop new programs which will better serve our students. We are very 
fortunate to receive the support necessary to continue our work from the 
community, the school committee, the school administration and the school 
community as a whole. 

Page 83 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School 



100 Littleton Road, Westford 
978-692-4711 - 978-448-9687 
FAX 978-392-0570 



Administration: 

Judith L. Klimkiewicz 
Victor Kiloski 
Ralph Dumas 
William Towne 
Barbara Donaghue 
Joseph O Brien 
Wendy Carter 

School Committee: 

Doug Morin 
Augustine Kish 
Peter Bagni 
Charla Boles 
Irene Machemer 
Joan O Brien 
Mary Jo Griffin 
Garry Ricard 
Sharon Shanahan 
Benjamin Wales 
Richard White 



Superintendent-Director 

Assistant Superintendent/Principal 

Director of Operations 

Director of Student Support Services & Messurement 

Director of Curriculum Development 

Dean of Students 

Director of Technology Education 



Westford 

Littleton 

Chelmsford 

Groton 

Townsend 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Pepperell 

Chelmsford 

Pepperell 

Shirley 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Alternates 
Al Buckley 
Leo Dunn 
James Nugent 
Samuel Poulten 
Barbara Sherritt 
Heidi Shultz 



Pepperell 

Westford 

Littleton 

Chelmsford 

Townsend 

Shirley 



School Data: 

Type: Public, regional, four-year vocational technical high school 
opened in September 1969. The first graduating class was in 
June 1972. 

Student Enrollment: As of October 1, 1997 






Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Ayer 

School Choice 



118 

43 

8 

125 
37 
81 
79 
24 
49 



Total Enrollment 



564 
Page 84 






Accreditation: New England Association of Schools and Colleges 

College Board 

Code Number : 222-333 

Faculty: Sixty-five certified teachers Pupil Teacher Ratio 10 1 

Calendar: Three twelve week trimesters. Eight 45 minute 

periods, five days per week. The school schedule 
alternates one week of academic classes with a week 
in a vocational-technical program. 



Vocational-Technical Programs: 


Autobody Technology 


Graphic Arts/Design 


Automotive Repair Technology 


Horticulture/Landscape Design 


Carpentry 


Machine Tool Technology 


Culinary Arts/Hotel/Restaurant Management 


Medical Occupations 


Computer Aided Drafting/Architectural Design 


Metal Fabrications 


Electrical Technology 


Interior Decorating & Design 


Electronics/Robotics 


Plumbing/Heating 


*Child Care Education for 1998/99 school year 


*Dental Assistant for 7998/99 school year 



Special Academic Programs: 

Students receive four years of computer applications. Foreign 
language is offered all four years for interested students. Juniors with 
honor grades may elect to enter the Dual Enrollment Program and 
take their senior year a community college in Massachusetts or New 
Hampshire. Upon completion, they receive their high school diploma 
from Nashoba and one full year of credit from the college. 

Student Activities: 

Nashoba sponsors an extensive program in intra-scholastic sports 
including varsity teams in ten sports with equal opportunities for male 
and female students. Other activities include Student Council, 
National Honor Society, Yearbook, Students Against Drunk Driving, 
Vocational Industrial Clubs of America, peer counseling and many 
special interest clubs. Nashoba has no user fees. 



Page 85 



Continuing & Community Education. 

Approximately fifteen hundred adults attend this evenings run program 
a school year. 

Summer Programs: 

Nashoba Valley's Allstars Summer Program is offered to 5th, 6th, and 
7th graders in the area. Students enjoy outdoor adventures, sports 
programs, computer applications & graphics, and academic 
enrichment. 



Page 86 



Town Committees and Commissions 



Board Of Appeals 



Members: 
Harold Organ 
Eileen M. Duffy 
Gustave Fallgren 
Ronald Pare' 
John Coppinger 
Paul Landry 
John Blake 
Doris McClay 



Chairman 



Alternate 
Alternate 
Senior Clerk 



The Board had 36 petitions for Variances and 29 petitions for Special Permits. 
The statistics are as follows: 





Total 


Granted Denied 


Withdrawn 


Variance* 


36 


29 6 


1 


Special Permit 


29 


20 8 


1 


Section 8 Appeals 


3 


3 





Requested Extensions 


1 


1 





Total 


69 


50 17 


2 



One Variance petition was remanded back to the Board for reconsideration. 



The Board wishes to express its gratitude to the Board of Health, Sign Advisory 
Committee, Conservation Commission, Planning Board and Board of Selectmen 
for their assistance and cooperation. 



Page 87 



BOARD OF APPEALS 




Front Row (1-r) Gustave Fallgren, Harold Organ, Chairman; Eileen Duffy 



Back Row (1-r) Ronald Pare', John Blake, John Coppinger 



Celebrations Committee 



Members: 

Walter R. Hedlund 
James K. Gifford 
Robert J. Kelley 
David J. Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 



Chairman 



The 1997 Annual 4th of July Celebration for the 30th year, was a tremendous 
success, thanks to Chelmsford Lions Club, Chelmsford Lodge of Elks No. 
2310, Chelmsford Art Society, Chelmsford Community Band and many other 
Volunteer Chelmsford Organizations. 

Thanks for the efforts and assistance received from Department Heads and 
their Personnel of the Police, Fire, Highway, Parks and D.P.W., Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen, Special Thanks to members of the 
Chelmsford Auxiliary and Explorers Troop for their many Volunteer Hours. 
Committee now in the process of planning 1998 Annual Celebration for it's 
31st Year. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Walter R. Hedlund 



Cemetery Commission 



Members: 

Gerald L. Hardy Chairman 
James F. Dolan 
Jean R. McCaffery 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report some major accomplishments 
and highlights of 1997 to the citizens of Chelmsford. Many improvement and 
beautification projects were completed during the year including the following: 

At Pine Ridge Cemetery, the existing visitor parking area was enlarged and 
resurfaced. This project doubled the number of available spaces and also 
provided a handicapped accessible parking area. 



Page 89 



An area adjacent to Billerica Road was cleared, stumped, and graded by the 
Department staff to begin preliminary work for future Section J. A buffer 
planting consisting of over fifty arborvitae shrubs was installed to screen 
Section I from traffic on Billerica Road. 

During the Fall, the fence replacement project was completed at Heart Pond 
Cemetery. The existing wooden fence was not repairable due to its age and 
wood decay. After evaluating many alternatives, the Commission selected a 
colonial design that incorporates the original granite fence posts and retains 
the historical character of the cemetery, which dates back to 1774. Over 780 
feet of fencing was replaced along Garrison and Parkerville Roads. 

With the assistance of the Data Processing Department, the cemetery office 
computer system was replaced since the former system was approaching 
obsolescence. This will provide increased data storage capacity, allow us to 
produce higher quality correspondence, and assist us in responding to an 
increasing number of requests for genealogical information. Updated software 
was installed which allows us to research our existing burial and lot record 
database for all six cemeteries more efficiently. 

There were 151 interments during the year including 18 cremation interments 
which accounted for 12% of total interments. There were 122 burial lots sold 
during the year which represents a 42% increase in lot sales over 1996. 

The Cemetery Commission would like to acknowledge the cooperation and 
assistance received throughout the year from all Town Boards and 
Departments. The Commission also commends the following Cemetery 
Department staff members for working diligently to keep Chelmsford's six 
cemeteries well-maintained and attractive burial places. 

Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa Jr. Superintendent 

Jorge Caires Working Foreman 

Kenneth Frazier Backhoe Operator 

Patrick Caires Truck Driver 

Eileen Johnson P.T. Clerk 

Claudio Caires Special Laborer 

Manuel Laurencio Special Laborer 



Respectfully submitted, 
Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman 



Page 90 



Chelmsford Arts & Technology Education Fund 



Members: 

Evelyn S. Thoren 
Sheila Pichette 
Edward Morassi 
Beverly Barrett 
George Ripsom 
Kit Harbison 
Richard Moser 



Chairman 
Secretary 
Financial Liason 



The Spring 1996 Chelmsford Town Meeting approved an amendment to their 
General By-Laws by adding Section 13 to Article VII entitled Chelmsford Arts 
and Technology Education Fund (ATEF). The purpose of this fund is to 
provide supplemental funding to support local educational initiatives and 
projects. Thanks to your generosity and support, the ATEF fund has received 
over $16,000 since its inception in November 1996. The fund received 
corporate donations from Lockheed/Martin ($1000) and from PROSYS Corp. 
($500). The committee is currently working on investment strategies and 
researching other financial resources in order to create a lasting fund. 

Chelmsford is the first town to have a By-Law in place that specifies the 
application process, committee make-up and limitations. In June 1997 a seven 
member committee made awards totally $2500 to Barbara Costello and Jill 
Everleigh from Byam School, Mark Johnson and Bette Gagnon from Parker 
School, and Susan Cushing from Westlands School. These projects are 
currently being implemented. The Spring 1998 Applications and copies of the 
By-Laws were distributed on January 5 to each school. Completed 
applications were received by the committee by March 31, 1998. Teachers 
and School Councils can apply for these funds. Awards will be announced in 
June 1998. 

The concept of using tax check-offs for an alternative funding source for 
education was initiated by Arlington's veteran Town Treasurer, John Bilafer, 
under a Home Rule Petition over eleven years ago. This was filed and 
approved by the State Legislature as Chapter 60. Since this was accepted, 
over fifty towns in Massachusetts have adopted the statute Chapter 60. 
Chelmsford became involved in the process of adopting Chapter 60 through 
the efforts of Anthony Volpe, a member of the Chelmsford School Committee. 
The ATEF Committee is following with great interest the State Senate 
evaluation of Bill # S1475, An Act Establishing a Matching Grant Incentive 
Program for Cities and Towns Establishing Scholarship and Educational 
Funds. 



Page 91 



Chelmsford uses pink inserts in the real estate and excise tax bills as the 
method to elicit voluntary contributions to enhance the education of 
Chelmsford Public School students. The collected money does not become 
part of the school budget. The Town Treasurer disperses the funds under the 
direction of the ATEF Committee. Information sheets are available in the Town 
Offices. 

The contributions* that you give have and will continue to make a difference in 
the education of our children ... our future taxpayers. 

These contributions may be tax deductible. Please contact your tax 
consultant. 



Commission On Disabilities 



In 1997. Chairman. Suzanne Donahue continued to lead the Chelmsford 
Commission on Disabilities. Commission members Matt Caiazza, Jack 
Clancy, Cathy Favreau, Ralph Hickey, Jan Nahabedian, Len Olenchak and 
Mary St. Hilaire joined her. It was with great regret that she accepted the 
resignation of Secretary. Cathy Favreau. In her ten year on the Commission 
Cathy meticulously kept details of meetings and statistical information relating 
to access in Chelmsford which helped all members do their jobs more 
efficiently. The Commission wishes Cathy the best in her future endeavors. 
We appreciate her efforts on behalf of the Commission and will miss her 
greatly. Also resigning from the Commission was Jan Nahabedian, although 
Jan was with the Commission for a short time we appreciate her effort on 
issues which were important to the Commission. 

During 1997, the Commission was instrumental in developing a liaison 
program with Chelmsford High School. Fred Marcks, a senior at the High 
School began his internship by setting up an awareness of issues relating to 
disability and will culminate in a special event at the High School in the spring 
of 1998. 

The Commission is still in the process of setting up a Not-for-profit 
organization and this should be in place by fall of 1998. The sticker decal 
competition was successfully completed and Certificates of Appreciation and 
the Decals will be showing up around Chelmsford businesses in spring of 
1998. 

In addition, the Commission continues to monitor access in town. Several 
access projects were closed as a result of a responsive business community 
present in our town. Steps towards improving access continue. However, 
more work needs to be done. 

Page 92 



Community Services Council 



Members: 

Kathy Cryan-Hicks, 
Susan Carmaris, 
Kit Harbison, 
Holly Rice, 
Matt Scott, 
Marty Walsh, 



Library 

Cultural Council 
Resident 
Recreation 
Cable Television 
Council on Aging 



The Chelmsford Community Services Council was formed by the Town 
Manager, Bernard Lynch to coordinate and expand Chelmsford's recreation 
and cultural opportunities. By improving and expanding the delivery of these 
services we hope to enrich the quality of life in the Town of Chelmsford as well 
as increase our sense of community. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council continues to deliver over 13.000 
copies of the Chelmsford Community Newsletter to Chelmsford residents. The 
Chelmsford Community Newsletter was designed to increase the awareness 
of the programs and services that Chelmsford offers its citizens. Theses 
programs may be educational, cultural recreational or all of the above. In 
addition to being a guide for seasonal activities, the Chelmsford Community 
Newsletter will provide information about the how and why of town services to 
better understand government operations. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council continues to sponsor the annual 
WinterFest event. This extremely successful and fun-filled weekend included 
the chowderfest, ice skating, snowshoeing, tea room, variety show, carving of 
ice sculptures and much more. We will continue to offer a full slate of both 
indoor and outdoor activities for the entire community for future WinterFest 
Weekends. Numerous organizations in town sponsor specific events at 
various locations throughout Chelmsford. 

We would like to thank all who support the Chelmsford Community Newsletter 
and the annual WinterFest event. 



Page 93 



Conservation Commission 



Members: 

Christopher Garrahan 
Lynne Davis 
Andy Sheehan 
David McLachlan 
John Smaldone 
Michael Jasinski 
Bob Greenwood 
Charlene Parlee 



Chairman 

Vice Chairperson 

Community Development Coordinator 



During 1997, the Conservation Commission had a total of 75 filings under the 
Wetlands Protection Act and Wetlands Bylaw. The primary responsibility of the 
Conservation Commission is enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act, MGL 
Ch. 131, s. 40, and the Chelmsford Wetlands Bylaw, Article XI of the General 
Bylaws. The Conservation Commission received 24 Notice of Intent filings. 
The Commission also held public meetings for 51 Requests for Determination, 
which was a significant increase over 1996. The Commission heard 8 cases of 
alleged wetlands violations. In response to the wetlands violations the 
Commission levied two fines and ordered the removal of fill from all altered 
wetlands. 

The Conservation Commission is pleased to report continuing progress in the 
management of its Reservations, Town Forests and conservation lands. The 
volunteer effort this year was remarkable, especially the Eagle Scouts. Mark 
Stuart of Troop 70 constructed a message board at the main entrance of the 
Wright Reservation on Parker Road. Ryan Brown's Eagle Scout project was to 
construct a foot bridge across an intermittent stream at the Lime Quarry 
Reservation. Pat Walsh of Troop 75 rehabilited 800 feet of an abandoned wood 
road/trail from Parker Road into an existing trail in the Wright Reservation. Mike 
Curran constructed a boardwalk across a section of muddy trail and a stone- 
lined drainage trench at the Margaret Mills/Crooked Springs Brook Reservation. 
Keith MacDonald of Troop 74 installed a bench and constructed the first 200 
feet of a handicap accessible trail along Deep Brook at the Southwell Field 
Recreation Area. The Chelmsford Stewardship Committee continued to aid in 
the maintenance and repair of conservation lands, as well. The Commission 
greatly appreciates the work of the volunteers. 



Page 94 



The Commission welcomed its newest member Charlene Parlee and said 
goodbye to Tim Ervin. The Commission hopes for more success in achieving 
its goals in the upcoming year. 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



Requests for Determination 


22 


27 


30 


51 


Notices of Intent 


19 


30 


21 


24 


Total 


41 


57 


51 


75 



Council On Aging 



Members: 



Martin Walsh, 
Elizabeth Marshall, 
Verne Woodward, 
Jean McCaffery, 
Walter Cleven 
Lilla Eaton 



Director 
Chairperson 
Vice Chairperson 
Clerk 



Arline Leman 
Elizabeth McCarthy 
Jackie Matthews 
Robert Monaco 
Donna Pechulis 
Peter Pedulla 



As America and our Community ages, the challenges facing the Council on 
Aging are consistently increasing. Fortunately many of the programs that are 
presently in place are responding with quality care and compassionate 
understanding. Last year our agency provided over thirty programs and 
services in an endeavor to assist and meet the needs of our seniors and 
caregivers. The following statistics are helpful in understanding our efforts. 



Adult Social Day Care 


44 participant, 


Avg. daily: 12 


Congregate Lunch 


45,339 meals 


Avg daily:187 


Elderly Home Repair Service 


39 minor repairs completed 




Friendly Visitor Program 


28 seniors 


1,144 hrs of service 


Meals on Wheels 


116 participants 


17,393 delivered meals 


Outreach 


15-20 weekly visits to seniors over 
70 to assess needs and 
recommend services 




Respite-Companion Care 


22,732 provider hours; 60 clients 




Transportation 


10,749 single trips; 116 riders 





In addition to these social services, the Chelmsford Senior Center offered 
many educational, recreational and physical exercise programs on a daily 
basis. Recreational trips coordinated by Mary Conti and Ruth Czmut, provided 
over forty excursions to interesting destinations. 



Page 95 



1997 was an important year in the growth and development of new programs. 
With the professional support of Mr. Bernard DiNatale, Director of Educational 
Technology for the Town of Chelmsford, we were able to provide introductory 
computer classes at Chelmsford High School. Hewlett Packard donated a new 
personal computer to our new cyberstations at the Center. The NE Foundation 
for the Humanities provided funding for a course entitled, "Family Scrapbooks" 
which combined literature and film as a means to draw seniors into exploring 
family and community in the face of social and economic change. The memory 
of our dear friend, Dr. Howard Moore was maintained by establishing a 
memorial scholarship at the High School. Our gratitude to the "Friends of the 
Senior Center" for their support in helping us to achieve this goal AND for their 
continuous dedication and financial commitment (approximately $90,000 in 
'97) to the Center's upkeep, improvements and social services. Volunteers, 
which actively number over 260 people, donated 35,310 hours of service with 
a conservative dollar value of $256,000. The Council on Aging is very grateful 
for the Community's enthusiastic support, for the progressive 
accomplishments of this past year and for the rewarding challenges of 
developing and improving a service delivery system that will have a positive 
effect on the lives of our seniors and caregivers. 

Submitted by: Martin Walsh, Dir. 



Cultural Council 



Members: 

Susan Carmeris Carol Merriam 

Cathy Clark Kathy O'Brien 

Robin Crane Donna Thoene 

Judy Fichtenbaum 

Meetings: 1st Wednesday of the month, ten meetings per year. 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is a local agency of the Massachusetts 
Cultural Council (MCC), and was established to carry out the mission of the 
state agency by supporting programs that promote access, education, 
diversity, and excellence in the arts, humanities, and interpretive sciences. It 
allocates state funds for these disciplines through the local grant program. The 
primary source of these funds is the Megabucks Lottery game. Grant award 
decisions are subject to final approval by the MCC. These programs improve 
the quality of life for our residents and contribute to the economic vitality of our 
community. The council is comprised of nine residents who are appointed by 
the Town Manager. 

Page 96 



In 1997 the council voted to recommend 26 grants totaling $14,477. Students 
in the Chelmsford Public Schools directly benefited from 13 of these 
programs. 



Accomplishments this year: In addition to granting state funds, LCC's may 
choose to produce other cultural programs for the benefit of the community at 
large. The Chelmsford Cultural Council has taken an active role in town by 
promoting a variety of cultural events. Additional programs presented during 
1997 include: Production of a three-part Performing Arts Series. Contributed to 
Chelmsford's Winterfest Weekend by funding performers, including King 
Ludwig's Bavarian Band during the council's "Hearts for the Arts" silent 
auction. Held Annual Community Input meeting in March. Funded and 
produced a concert of Scottish music and stories featuring "The Bells". 
Funded the newly published Chelmsford "Artisans' Directory". October was 
proclaimed "Cultural Month in Chelmsford" by the Board of Selectmen in 
conjunction with a national proclamation. Presented the third annual "Angel of 
the Arts" award to outgoing chair Pat Fitzpatrick and Ted Godfroy noting their 
support and dedication to cultural programs in Chelmsford. The council also 
occasionally does fund raising of its own. The "Hearts for the Arts" silent 
auction raised over $1,000 and the sale of baskets made by chair Pat 
Fitzpatrick earned the council $500. These funds translated into an additional 
$862 award from the MCC for the 1997-1998 grant cycle through the MCC's 
Incentive Matching program. 

The Council's 15th anniversary was celebrated with a fall folk singing concert 
and the kick-off of a town-wide Photography Contest. A new brochure was 
designed and printed to help publicize the importance of the council's work. 
Outgoing members Pat Fitzpatrick, Jean McCaffery, and Winnie Liakos were 
recognized for their service to the council. 



Page 97 



Finance Committee 



Members: 

Marcia Debroth Chairman 

Sue Olsen Vice-Chairman 

Dwight Hayward 

Chuck Piper 

Cornelius O'Neill 

Clare Jeannotte 

Bill Curry 

The Finance Committee is comprised of seven members who are appointed 
by the Town Moderator to three-year terms. 

The FinCom is the arm of Town Meeting whose primary mission is to study 
and make recommendations on the Town budget and warrant articles to be 
considered by the Town Meeting Representatives. 

There are two Town Meetings each year; the Spring meeting commences on 
the last Monday in April and the Fall meeting is held in October. 

Prior to the Spring Town Meeting, the Town Manager submits his proposed 
budget and capital improvement program for the ensuing fiscal year with 
accompanying budget message and supporting documents to the FinCom. 
The committee confers with the Board of Selectmen and School Committee 
prior to and during the budget process to review the financial condition of the 
town, revenue and expenditure forecasts, and other relevant information in 
order to develop a coordinated balanced budget. 

Each FinCom member acts as a liaison to various town department and 
boards. Prior to a public hearing, the FinCom liaison meets individually with 
the department head to review the department's budget request. Weekly 
hearings are held from December through April to hear, analyze and discuss 
departmental budgets and warrant articles. Each department or independent 
board is given the opportunity to present their budget and respond to 
questions and concerns raised by FinCom members. Based on its 
deliberations, the committee makes a recommendation on each line item of 
the budget and each warrant article. 

Similar to the budget hearings, the Committee also meets with petitioners, 
proponents, and other interested parties, whether in support or opposition, of 
proposed warrant articles that are to be considered at the Spring or Fall Town 
Meetings. After consideration of each warrant article, the Committee votes on 
its recommendation. In certain instances, when the article has no financial 
implication to the Town, the Committee may vote to make "no 
recommendation" on the article. 

Page 98 



The recommendations of the Committee are published in the Spring and Fail 
Report Books which are available to residents and Town Meeting 
Representatives. Additionally, the Report contains financial data specific to 
the Town and other useful information. The FinCom has received several 
awards from the Massachusetts Association of Town Finance Committees 
distinguishing it as one of the best report books in the state within our 
population category. 

In accordance with the Town Charter, "The duty of Town Meeting 
Representatives is to keep abreast of town business and review materials 
forwarded to them by the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. It is 
expected that town meeting members will attend meetings of multiple member 
bodies, attend hearings held by the Finance Committee and actively prepare 
for each session of the town meeting." The Finance Committee both 
encourages and welcomes attendance and participation of town meeting 
members and residents at any of their meetings. 



Historic District Commission 



Members: 

Peggy Dunn, Chairman 
Steve Stowell, Vice Chairman 
Tom Doyle 
Robert LaPorte 
Brenda Lovering 
John Alden, Alternate 
Bruce Foucar, Alternate 
Pat LaHaise, Clerk 

The H.D.C. functions as a regulatory commission for the benefit of the Town. 
A small area of the Town's center section is under the commission's authority. 
The objective of the H.D.C. is to provide an expeditious application and review 
relative to the physical modification to the residences and businesses within 
the District. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of each month at 
Town Offices. 

During the past year the H.D.C. received 15 applications for review; 14 
applications were accepted, 2 public hearings were held and 12 public hearing 
were waived. Thirteen Certificates of Appropriateness and 1 Certificate of 
Non-Applicability were issued. One application for a lighted neon window sign 
was denied. 



Page 99 



Major accomplishments during the year include the awarding of the second 
Preservation Award for signage, designing and obtaining funding for new 
signs to mark the boundaries of the District, designing and obtaining funding 
for new markers for significant structures within the District. We continue to 
review our forms, reorganizing files and computerize records. 



Historic Commission 



Members: 

John Alden 
John Goodwin 
Florence Gullion 
George Merrill 



Linda Prescott (Chairperson) 
Martha Sanders 
Jeffery Stallard 



The members of this commission have continued to inventory the ever 
increasing list of one hundred (100) year old homes and buildings. This is an 
ongoing project of historic documentation of a property that determines the 
qualification of a property to have a historic sign placed on the house by the 
owner. We are also continuing to locate and to reconstruct the files misplaced 
in our town mandated move of 1996 comprising 20% of our current inventory. 

To continue to be current in documentation procedures, we meet with Jane 
Drury for inventory instructions. The Town of Chelmsford has 191 historic 
properties currently registered with the State and has numerous inventories 
being completed. 

The Commission has provided information and documentation for several 
continuing town projects : 

• Old North Town Hall restoration 

• Scorbia House relocation 

• Possible extension of the Center Historic District. 

As always, the Commission is working on the sign program for both historic 
homes and historic sites. 



Page 100 



Holiday Decorating Committee 



Members: 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman 
Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 
Jean Kydd 
Marie Massota 
Iris Larseen 
Ruthann Burkinshaw 



Linda Emerson 
Jacqueline Wenschel 
Carrie Bacon 
Linda Harrington 
Tink Nussbum 
Karen Ready 



Department Mission Statement : The Holiday Decorating Committee is a 
group of volunteers who arrange and implement the Holiday Lighting and 
Prelude Ceremony in Chelmsford Center the first Sunday in December. The 
committee, with the help of several interested individuals and groups, 
physically put up and take down the lights on the shrubs and trees on 
Chelmsford Common, the Old Town Hall and the Chelmsford Business 
District. In addition to the lighting, we also organize musical talent who 
volunteer their time, arrange the hayride and assist "Santa" with the more than 
500 children who come to see him. 

Budget: While the committee is sanctioned by the Town, we receive no town 
funds and work from donations given to us by several groups and individuals. 
We want to thank the Police and Fire Department Unions for jointly donating 
funds for permanent lighting for the beech tree on the Center Common. 

Goals and Objects : Our goal in 1996 is to have continued success with our 
event and draw more and more of the residents to the business district. We 
have received help and cooperation from our Police, Fire and Highway 
Departments and could not hold this event without them. We feel fortunate to 
have so many residents support our efforts and thank all those who give so 
freely of their time and talents to make this once a year event possible. 

Donna A. Johnson 
Chairman 



Page 101 



Housing Authority 



Members: 






Lynn M. Marcella, 


Chairman 


2002 


Mary E. "Lisa" Royce 


Vice Chairman 


2000 


William P. Keohane 


Treasurer 


2001 


Pamela A. Turnbull 


Asst. Treasurer 


1998 


Scott E. Johnson 




1998 



During 1997, the Chelmsford Housing Authority has witnessed a sharp 
increase in the need for affordable housing for families, elderly and disabled 
individuals. The average waiting period for elderly disabled housing has risen 
dramatically with the new preference to local veterans, elimination of the asset 
limits and an increase in the income limits. Currently, the waiting period for 
state aided elderly disabled housing is as follows: Local/Veterans 2 or more 
years, Local Residents 5 to 7 years, Non-residents 10 years or more. Our 
agency is not able to met the current demand for affordable housing. 

The Section 8 Rental Assistance Program has been closed for over a year. 
The Federal Governments has reduced the number of participants our agency 
may assist. Further, the low vacancy rate in Chelmsford has made it quite 
difficult to house low-income families in town. There does not appear to be 
any immediate solution to this problem as rents are continuing to rise and no 
new units are being constructed. 

Over the next few years, the Authority will continue to build stronger relations 
with the Chelmsford Rotary Club, Nashoba Valley Technical School and the 
Greater Lowell Technical High School. All three of these organizations have 
contributed greatly to improving the quality of life for our elderly/disabled 
residents. The Authority is interested in acquiring new land for the future 
construction of additional elderly/disabled units. 



Page 102 



The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as of December 31, 1997 
provided a total of 419 units of low-income housing; 198 elderly, 141 family, 
and 22 handicapped units. The Middlesex Community residence for the mildly 
to moderately retarded was purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. Six, two 
bedroom condominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased in 1981. 
McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981, has 43 regular units, 3 handicapped 
units, and a four bedroom congregate unit, which serves the semi- 
independent elderly. Delaney Terrace, finished in 1990, has 48 units, 3 of 
which are handicapped, and a one, 4 bedroom congregate unit for the frail 
elderly. These developments are funded under Chapter 667. Under the 705 
Family Program 11 units are scattered around Chelmsford. The Chapter 689 
program is able to serve up to 8 individuals in the facility based respite care 
development located on Groton Road. The Section 8 Program serves 
approximately 125 families in the communities of Chelmsford, Tyngsboro, 
Dracut, Westford, Carlisle, Littleton, Pepperell, Groton and Lowell. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, Executive Director, Linda 
Dalton, Administrative Assistant, Nancy Harvey, Leased Housing Coordinator, 
Michelle Hudzik, Program Coordinator, Richard O'Neil, part-time Maintenance 
Mechanic, Michael Harrington, and Manuel Mendonca both 
Grounds/Keeper/Maintenance Laborers. Regular meetings are held at 
McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday each 
month. The Annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. All meetings are 
open to the public. The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners would like to thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town 
Officials for their continued support and cooperation. 



Page 103 



PLANNING BOARD 




, — > ~ — 1 — 1 

"ft'" ^-.;, 

|- ,. $ ^ HB^-i — *— ~|^^B 

y i^l I - — \^f-\ hgtmf 






Front Row (1-r) James Creegan, Kim McKenzie, Chairman; Tracey Wallace-Cody, V. Chairms 
Back Row (1-r) Robert Morse, Clerk; Eugene Gilet, Susan Carter, James Good 



Planning Board 



Members: 
Kim J. MacKenzie 
Tracey Wallace-Cody 
Robert C. Morse 
Susan E. Carter 
James M. Creegan 
Eugene E. Gilet 
James P. Good 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 
Clerk 



During 1997, there were 58 proposals which were brought before the Planning 
Board. The statistics are as follows: 



Total Approved Denied Withdrawn 



Site Plans 


14 


10 





2 


Preliminary Subdivisions 


7 


4 


1 


2 


Subdivisions * 


16 


10 


1 


1 


ANRs ** 


21 


19 


1 


1 



* These subdivision proposals included approximately 38 residential lots. 

** Subdivision Control Law Not Required 

There are 4 Subdivision projects and 2 Site Plans still pending. 

A Master Plan Bylaw Review Sub-Committee was formed to examine and 
create Zoning Bylaws as they pertain to the implementation of the 1996 Master 
Plan. The Committee has embarked upon a Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw 
Review with the aid of a consultant. The result of this effort should be in place 
for the Fall 1998 Town Meeting. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its gratitude to the Board of Health, 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Conservation Commission, 
Water Districts, Fire Department, Sewer Commission, Building Inspector, 
Community Development Coordinator and the public for their assistance and 
cooperation. 



Page 105 



Veterans' Emergency Fund 



Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager 
January 1st, 1997 to December 31st, 1997. 



Balance as of January 1st, 1997: 
Add Receipts: 



The MassBank for Savings, 
Reading, Mass. Regular Savings, 
Interest: 

The MassBank for Savings, 
Reading, MassX Certificate 
Account. Interest. 

Total Interest Received: 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1997 

and Interest Income as of December 31st, 1997 



$467.57 



$380.40 



$847.97 



$21. 726,98 



Assets: 

MassBank for Savings. Account #91 1287909: 
MassBank for Savings, Account #922055696: 

Total Assets: 



$14,623.40 
$7,103.58 

$21,726.98 



Liabilities: 

Total Liabilities: 



$ None 



Total Assets, Less Liabilities as of December 31,1997: 



$21,726 98 



Respectfully yours, 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, 
Treasurer 



Page 106 



Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 



The year 1997 marked the 50th Anniversary since the fund was established It 
was authorized by Town Meeting vote during 1947 and the amount set up was 
$2,929.92 for the benefit of Veterans of World War II. 

Numerous veterans have received financial assistance through these many 
years. The fund now totals $21,726.98. 

Applications for assistance are received from the Veterans Benefits 
Department. Only material grants are authorized. No cash grants have ever 
been approved. During 1997 no requests for assistance were received. 

The present membership of the committee is as follows, one from each voting 
precinct: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Steven E. C. Belkakis, DDS 
Carl J. Lebedzinski, 
John J. Kenney, 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr., 
Frederick H. Reid, 
Alfred H. Coburn, 
Alan E. Greenhalgh, 
Neal C. Stanley,, 
Lloyd C. Greene, Jr., 



The committee extends its appreciation to other town officials who have 
helped the committee during the past year. 

Respectfully yours, 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, 
Treasurer 



veterans' Services 



Members: 
Martin J. Walsh 
Regina B. Jackson 



Director 
Assistant 



Page 107 



The Chelmsford Veterans' Services Office provides short-term financial 
assistance to eligible veterans and their families as mandated by 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. We can assist eligible, needy 
veterans with a monthly allowable grant and some medical coverage. The 
amount of assistance depends on the budget standards set by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Services. The 
State will reimburse Chelmsford for 75% of authorized benefits paid. 

In CY 1997 we averaged $7,300.00 per month in benefits paid out. We had 
about 16 active cases per month. Our reimbursement from the State is paid 
quarterly and runs approximately 10 months behind the authorizations. We 
receive about 25 requests for information/ help per month from citizens 
dealing with a wide range of issues. We help veterans who are not eligible for 
this program (Chapter 115) find alternate means of assistance with other state 
and federal resources. 

Our office is located in the Community Center (Old Town Hall) in Chelmsford 
Center. This office is open M/W/F 8:30 - 4:00 and Monday or Wednesday 
evening 7-9. Our phone number is #250-5238. If you need help when the 
office is closed call Marty Walsh at the Senior Center #251-8692. If you are 
unable to visit our office and need a home visit, please call and we will be 
happy to schedule a convenient time. Thank you. 



Page 108 



Town Meetings and Elections 



Warrant For Annual Town Election April 1, 1997 (April 11, 1997) 



Middlesex, SS 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to 
notify and warn the legal voters of said Chelmsford to meet in their several 
polling places, VIZ 

Precinct 1 Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2 Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3 Harrington Elementery School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4 Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 5 Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6 Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 7 McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 8 McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9 Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the 1st day April, 1997 being the first Tuesday in said month at 
7:00 am until 8:00 pm for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years; 

One School Committee Member for three years; 

Two Library Trustees for three years; 



Page 109 



One Board of Health Member for three years; 

Three Planning Board Members for three years; 

One Planning Board Member for an unexpired one year term; 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years; 

One Housing Authority Member for five years; 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years; 

Fifty-four Representative Town Meeting Members for three years in Precincts 
1 through 9 

One Representative town Meeting Member for an unexpired one year term in 
Precinct 6 

One Representative town Meeting Member for an unexpired two year term in 
Precinct 8 

One Representative town Meeting Member for an unexpired one year term in 
Precinct 8 

One Representative town Meeting Member for an unexpired two year term in 
Precinct 9 

One Representative town Meeting Member for an unexpired one year term in 
Precinct 9 

;and to meet in the Senior Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on 
Monday the twenty-eighth day of April, at 7:30 p.m. in the evening, then and 
there to act upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office. 



Page 110 






TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex April 3, 1997 



In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, I am notifying the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford that: 

THE ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION OF APRIL 1st WHICH WAS SUSPENDED 
AND POSTPONED PER THE GOVERNOR'S DECLARED STATE OF 
EMERGENCY PER SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM GALVIN WILL BE 
HELD ON THE FOLLOWING DATE AND TIME: 

FRIDAY APRIL 11, 1997. THE POLLS WILL BE OPEN FROM 7AM TO 
8PM 

Further they are instructed to meet in their several polling places: 

Precinct 1 Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2 Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3 Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4 Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 5 Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6 Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 7 McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 8 McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9 Town Office Building Gymnasium 

This is to certify that I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford by posting of the attached SUPERIOR COURT ORDER# 97-1730 
at the following places, to wit: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office. 



Page 111 



CM 



CD 
CD 
TO 
0- 



m rt n 

h- IT) CO 

CO CD O 

CM fO TJ 



r- Tf CO 00 

o 1- co 

CD ho 

CM CM 



CD CD if) CO m O CD 

U- co co to o 

CM Tf CO CM CO 



loo ^r cd m o uo co 

t- co t- in h- 

CM CO TT CM CM 



■<- CD CO O CD t- O 

in CD CD <r- o 

I cm ^r ^r co m 



I CD "*f CD CO t- CM CO 

U~> CD CD ^ CD 
I CM ■* TT ^T CD 



ICO CM O CD O O CD 

I co tt "<r cm ■<* 



i- m m o -r- o cm 
m CM CD o t 
CM CO CO CO CM 



i^^f»-moo^ 

CO CD CO r- CD 

cm co in co ■** 







CD 


CD 


00 TJ" T- 


o co 


(/) 




M ~ 


in 


^ ^ 


co 


TO 




P| CM 


CM 


in cm 


CM 


O 




!■ 








O 




B ■ 


h- 


o o o 


O CD 




tft 


co 


O CD 


h» 


TO 
00 




Pi cm 


rr 


m cm 


<<r 




»■, 






< 

O 

h- 


o 

o 
c/> 

LU 

£S 

h- 

5? 

L?5 
CM 


c 










"^». 


o 












■<d- 


o 












CD 


CD 














Q) 


77 










(/> 












13 


i 








CD 




xT 


cr 


| 




o 


CD 




TO 


o 






o 

13 


S i 






0) 

TO 

T3 

C 


2 




O 
Cl 

g 


o 
to c/5 

Q 




3 

en 


■2 




UJ 


Cl- 




o^ 


\ 


C> 




am F 

hew 

3-in 






TO 




c 




— 52 "2* 


o 


CD 


9 


Tr 

2 


CO 

CD 


CL 


ill 


to 

2 


CL 







CO 


ho 


CO CO 


CO 


CD 




m 


CD 


o 




CD 


ITJ 


CM 


1— 


CD 




CO 






co 


CM 




CD 


Kj 














CO 


CO 


CD v- 


o 


CO 




co 


m 


CD 




m 


E 




co 


CM 




CD 


W*M 


CM 


CO 


CD O 


m 


<D 




CM 


CD 


TJ" 




CO 


■ l 




CM 


CO 




CD 


■ rl 














•Q" 


O 


CM CO 


,_ 


o 




CM 


o 


CM 




m 


E 




CO 


**r 




h> 


Bjj 


CO 




CM CM 




CD 




CM 


o 


CM 




"^ 


E 




"^ 


•* 




CO 


t'l 


CD 


00 


T- O 


o 


co 




CM 


h- 


CM 




CM 


■ o 




co 


CO 




r- 


■»■ 














CM 


,_ 


h- o 


T _ 


,_ 


kgl 


CM 


CD 


CO 




CN 


B 




CO 


CM 




CD 


f»^ 














,_ 


oo 


co o 


o 


h~ 




co 


h* 


CO 




■^r 


E 




co 


CO 




h- 


■*j 


00 


h- 


CD O 


o 


t 




CO 


CD 


CO 




t 


E 




CO 


CM 




CD 


■>■ 




CD 


CD CM 


o 


CO 




CO 


CD 


o 




CO 


E 




CO 


CO 




ho 


■tj 










o 

h- 
































s 
























































3 














M 














1 




























jj 










































* 














n 














































4 




























<D 










5 




Q. 


cT 








H 




o 


L_ 








s 




> 


3 

O 










> 


CJ 






I* 
pj 


CO 

-*: 

c 


c 
o 


liam i 
te-ln 


u 






CO 


C 
<_ 


~ '^ 


CO 






CO 


££ 


^ 





CO 



0) 



5277 
3328 


00 

o 


CD 
CM 


23 

12738 


CD CM 
CD CO 

in co 


o 


T_ 


O CD 
O 
CO 


o o 

CO -<3- 

m co 


00 
CO 


CO 


CO 00 
CM 


CM CO 
CD CM 

in ^r 


o 

00 


^r 


<r- o 

o 

in 



O O CO CO CD 

ht O «- «- CD 

O CO CO 

I CM TT CD 



CD CO O 

CO i- 
ICM ^T 



1- CO 

in 

CD 



CD CO CM m CD 
O CM CO 

|CM TT CD 



CM CD in O CM CO 

O) in ^f cd 

cd tj- in co 



o r^- 
o co 

CD CO 


m 

CD 


T 


O 


CD 

in 


CO h~ 
O CO 

in co 


CD 
CO 


T 


*" 


CM 
CM 


T- O 

CO CO 
CD CO 


o 
o 
in 


CO 


o 


CD 


m <«- 
in cd 
m cm 


co 


<tf 


- 


00 

oo 

CM 



Jil 


m 


CD 


OO CO O CD 




o 


CD 


cd r^ 


fe 


CD 


ro 


■** TT 


W*9 






-J 

o 

1- 


! 
































™ 








Li 








1 
















K 








«■ 
















! 








TT 




£ 




~M 




« 


5 




a> 


IS 






"to 


N 


> d 




2 


ro 


* 




—J 


s 


X 




c 




5 


co 

V 


sz 


»« 


C 


Cl 


-^i> o 


• I 


TO 

CD 


CO 


o -c to 

3£i 



CO CM -r- 
TT O 

cm m 




O 

m 


CM Tj- CM 

■<r o 

CM CD 


- 


CD 

oo 


in o ■«- 

Tj- 00 

CM "<J- 


CM 


00 
CM 


CD CM CM 
o ■«- 
CM T 


- 


CM 
CD 


i- CO CO 
CO i- 

cm m 


o 




i- OCM 
O TT 
CM Tt 


T 


^3- 

CD 


^ oro 

CM t- 

cm m 


- 


OO 
CO 



*f 



0) 
10 

3 

ro 

X 

ULJ 

co _ro — 

c ¥£ o 
2 o = 2 



5477 
3129 


ro 


CD 
ro 

CO 


ro 

CO 


oo 


o 

CM 


o 

CD 


lr-» in 

ICO CM 
llO CO 


CD 
ro 


ro 

CM 
CO 


CD 
CM 

ro 


TT 


O 


CD 

m 

CD 


l^ CM 

loo m 

1 T CO 


CM 
00 
CO 


o 
in 

CO 


ro 

CO 


O 


m 


CD 


CO 00 

Im r*- 

CD CO 


00 
"3- 


CM 

o 


CM 
CD 
CO 


*- 


*- 


O 

in 

CM 
CM 


O CD 
CO t- 

co -^ 




CD 
"3- 


CD 


o 


CM 


m 

CM 


CO CM 

co co 




CM 
CD 
CO 


ro 


CD 


O 


00 
CM 


CO CM 

co co 
in cm 


CM 
CO 


CD 
CO 


CM 

ro 


ro 


*- 


CO 
CO 
00 


m cd 

CO o 

co ^r 


CO 


CD 
CO 


CD 

oo 
ro 


«- 


o 


CM 
CM 


m cm 


CD 
CD 
CO 


CD 
CD 
rO 


CD 

ro 
ro 


ro 


*- 


CM 
CO 
CD 


in co 

[CD CO 




CM 

in 

CO 


m 

CD 

ro 


O 


o 


CM 
CM 





5 
































































3 
















w. 
















1 
















I 




































c 
ro 












ft 




sz 




>N 








m 

71 




ro 




■D 








~\ 




ro 




O 92 












O 


* 


N 








• 
ii 

E 




cu 


X3 

o 

o 
O 


allace 
icKen 








r^ 


to 


sz 

Cl 
O 


CO 


si 


c 






71 


2£ 

C 
IX 

CD 


"to 

SZ 


0) 

E 

re 

—} 


Trace 
Kim J 


0) 

i 


o 

(0 



Q) 
CD 

Q_ 



rjcr> r- 
1cm -<r 


in 


r^- 


CD 
CD 
CO 
CD 


|m o 
Icm rr 


o 


cn 


CO 
LO 
CD 


ICM -r- 
ICM Tj- 


- 


CD 


CD 
CO 
CD 


|lO Tj- 
ICO 00 
jcm Ta- 


o 


«- 


O 

in 



II s - CD y- CM CD 
ID N ^t 

CM lO 00 



IO N O ^ 00 
CO Tt CM 

I CM 't I s - 



IT CD 

T- O 

I CM TT 



CM Tj- 

hr o 
cm in 



o «- 



CO N CM CM Tt 
ICT) Tt T 

TT CD 



"*" CM 

hi" oo 

|CM T 



T- 00 

CO 



o 



5 



CU 

tr 

CD 
O 

UJ 



co co 5> 



I|CM 


o 


o 


r*. 


oo 


"1 I s - 


I s - 


1 — 


•< — 


CD 


Jx 


T 






CO 




■<* 






CD 



CD CO r— O CO 

co v- m 

CM rr CD 



II s - O CO CD CD 
I CD CO CO 

TT CD 



CO CD O ■«- O 

cm cm m 

cm m I s - 



cd m CM CO CD 
CMr- Tt 

CM CD 00 



I s - 


CD 


T— 


*— 


00 


CM 


CD 






CM 


CM 


T 






I s - 



CM S T- T- T- 

00 CO CM 

tJ- CD 



cm in o O I s - 
oo co T 

in I s - 



im r«- o cm tj- 

h- CD T 

13- CD 



|0O 00 CM O 00 

T- CO 

I cm in I s - 



cu 

X) 

< 

cu .E _j 
5 § > £ O 



00 CD I s - 00 CD 

h» CD *- CD 

oo Tf co 

U- ^ CD 



oo co «- <r- CO 
co r- in 

I cm ^r CD 



CD Tt t- 00 CD 
00 T CO 

\t- Tf CD 



I CM I s - O <r- O 

co r- in 

cm in h- 



co n o ^ o) 

\f- CM Tf 

CM CD 00 



CO O -r- t- 00 
CM O CM 

cm m h- 



CO CD CM O T- 
h- TT cm 

N- TT CD 



co co o *- r- 

CM CM rj- 

cm in h- 



hr- <r- O CM Tj" 

CD in rr 

\y- Tf CO 



t- in cm o oo 

CD T CO 

*- in h- 



i 



CU 




o 




^ 




CD 




2 




</>S-£ 




c cr 0) 


u 


co £ c 


CO 


miT£ 


^ 



CD CD I s - I s - CD 

CO O t- CD 

CD TT CO 

\v- *f CD 



00 TT t- O CO 

k o m 

|CM T CD 



CO 00 CM CD CD 
CD CO CO 

r- xr co 



«— 


I s - 


T— 


•»— 


o 


co 


T— 






m 


CM 


in 






r*« 



CM m O CM CD 
CO -t- Tf 

CM CD 00 



O CD ■<- 

Kr oo 

CM Tf 



O 00 t- CM •<- 
CD CM CM 

U- tf CD 



O CD O •«- I s - 
N- co T 

cm in I s - 



co oo r- cm t 
co m tj- 

U- TJ- CD 



I CM T O CM 00 
CM CO 

I cm m I s - 



I 



cu 

8= 
co 

O 
o 



co or -r 



c c a> o 

— CD 
CD 



£i 



LO 





00 


CO 


C\l 


ro 


m 


co 


m 


1 ^ ID 


CM 


PWB 


m 


■<t 


TT 


r— 


r^- 


CM 


■<r 


00 


CO 


■^J LO 


CO 


ro 


CO 


rt 


CM 


TT 


ro 


ro 


•^r 


pj 


















_i 
< 

h- 

o 


I 














* 

c 

ro 

x: 




h- 


















ro 


c 
o 




n 




« 


« 


« 


t^S 


* 


— 


ro 




•4 




cd 


c 


x: 


~i 


ro 


ro 


O 
h- 

a> 

x: 

Q. 

o 


c 




• 


c 


x: 
</) 

Ll 

c 
x: 


5 

N 
O 


0> 

1 

ro 

O) 


O 

—5 

E 
ro 


o 

LLJ 
10 

ro 

E 
o 


O 
o 

LL 

"cd 
ro 

x: 
o 


thy A Hutchi 
ite-in 

5C 






TO 


ro 

X 


o 
Q 


i 




i 


x: 
O 


ro ^ ~ 
OSS 




I CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


co 


CM 


■<r 


TT 


^r 


j (O 


CM 


IT) 


in 


CO 


CD 


CD 






CD 


hmI v 


TT 


CO 


CO 


TT 


■*■ 


CO 






00 


i»3 


















CO 

_J 

< 
o 


B 


















h- 
























n 




CD 
O 




(A 




« 










•4 




* 


o 


* 


c 


c 








C 




c 
CD 


a> 


E 


c 
o 


o 


£ 












o 


W) 


ro 




To 


i_ 








| 


(/) 


00 

0) 
O 

'c 


o 
O 


—5 
< 

ro 


"ro 
Q 

X 


Q 
LU 

E 


O 

CL 

E 


_c 






9 


jt 


ro 


CD 


u 


ro 


ro 


ro 


cu 


O 

I 






c 

TO 

00 


- > 

5 


0) 

-5 


ro 
0. 


c 


ill 




I 


o 


o 


CD 


r^- 




CM 


r^- 


t)- r- o 


co 


P^B if 


00 


ro 


a> 


a> 


in 


CM 


CD 


CM 


CM 


klH ^ 


ro 


ro 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


ro 


t 


TT 


Fj 


















"3" 
< 

h- 


f»4| 


















O 


I 










* 








l- 














ro 

CT> 










TT 








« 


« 

c 


3 
O 




a; 

Q. 

o 






•5 




« 


« 


0) 

ro 


o 
l/> 


Q 
o 




* 

■o 
o 








o 
o 


5 


.Q 

< 


< 


-> 


c 
c 


> 


o 
O 




• 


c 
ro 


cr 

c 
ro 


CD 

_l 

00 

ro 

c 


0. 

x: 

Q. 
CD 
I/) 


o 

•D 

ro 

x: 
o 


10 

a> 
o 

c 
ro 


3 

a 

CD 
CD 
0_ 


> 

c 
o 


mes P. 

rite-in 

sc 




1 


Is 


CD 


Z 


O 

- 5 


ir 


LL 


c 

< 


™ £ i 





iguT 


ro 


CO 


m 


CD 


ro 


CM 


CO 


■<T 


■^T 


3m 


O 


CO 


r^ 


r^- 


O 


^r 






CT) 


n4 


in 


■<r 


^3- 


TT 


CD 


in 






O 




















in 

_j 
< 






















h- 


fi4 




















O 


|Ti 


















h- 










« 






















"ro 


« 












TT 




ro 




</> 


</) 




^ 








■ 4 




x: 


x: 


ro 

Xj 

0) 
X) 


0) 


c 


K^ 








r 




o 
ro 

_i 
o 

2 


1 
CO 

u. 


ro 
0_ 

—) 

CD 


o 
(/> 
O 


l/) 

CD 








^A 




—^ 


(/) 


ro 


C 


< 


o 


c 






"• 


JL 

c 
ro 

m 


> 

ro 
Q 


_0J 

ro 

x: 
O 


N 

LU 


c 
ro 

ro 


x: 
- > 


ro 

ZJ 

00 


i 


O 

in 




loo 


a> 


CD 


CM 


r-- 


r-- 


T 


CO 


CD 


^- 00 


t; J cn 


o 


O 


00 


r- 


o 


o 


r^- 




CD 


PUB j 


^r 


, ^' 


CO 


CO 


•<r 


"T 


CO 




CO 




















_1 

< 

O 


B 


















h- 












« 




« 








FT 




* 






ro 




xl 








■ 4 




C 


a> 


* 

c 


E 




O) 






r 




o 

x: 


!5 
"ro 

2 


CD 

o 

x: 
t- 


X 
LL 


« 

"ro 

X 


3 

ro 

-j 
u 


CD 

0. 






5j 




CO 


00 


rr 


c 

CD 


Q 


Q_ 


S 


C 




• 


c 
ro 

CO 


c 

<D 

> 
LU 


x: 
■6 

—i 


c 
c 

CD 
O 


_CD 

x: 
ro 


tr 

CD 
XJ 
O 

on 


> 

ro 
Q 


CD 

x: 
O 


i 


in 

I 


n ~ 






00 


o 


O) 


in 


ro 


in 


CD 


3cn 


f^. 


r- 


■<fr 


h- 


CM 


CO 






CM 


M j 


CO 


co 


ro 


CO 


CO 


CO 






r^ 


■»j 


















CO 

_i 
< 






















h- 


■ 14 




















O 






* 
















1- 






w 


« 






c 
ro 










n 




E 


CD 




CD 


> 














O) 






* 








14 




o 
(/) 

d 
















M 




E 
o 


c 


"CD 

x: 
o 

0_ 
LU 


CO 


x: 
o 
ro 








| 




or 
< 

CD 


00 
ro 


'tr 
ro 
2 


b 


CL 


c 






5 




CD 


_j 


_ro 


">> 


p 








• 


c 


o 


O 


>^ 


CD 


a3 


ro 


0) 


u 

(S) 




■ 


<D 


O 





x: 


x: 


CD 


i 




I 


O 


D 


m 


00 


O 


O 


^ 





CD 
Q) 
CD 
CL 



CO 





r^ 


en 


,_ 


,_ 


CD 


T 


CD 


cd co ^ 


CO 


E •* CD 


CO 


co 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


00 


m 


CM 


^ — 


Mid - 


ro 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CD 


[»H 


















CO 

_J 

O 








« 






> 






h- 










o 

c 






ro 

CO 








n 






r 


ro 






c 








5 




CO 

CD 
> 
TO 


o 

CO 
CD 




* 
CO 

ro 


« 
"O 

ro 


o 
O 

3 


0) 

CO 

o 


CD 

O 




vm 


co 


O 

00 

c 
ro 
to 

CO 


0) 
0- 

or 


U 
co 

ro 

E 
o 

x: 
(- 

O 


LU 

-J 
■D 


O 
< 


x: 

< 

c 


O 

T 


sL Hi 

-in 




• 


c 

CD 

m 


c 
ro 

LL 


ro 
c 
o 
Q 


ro 

"D 

LU 


CM 
> 
0) 

CO 


CD 

-D 
O 


Jame 
Write 
Misc 





O CM 
CO CM 

I cm ^r 



O T- 



co 

CO 
CD 



o 



3 



o 

CO CO t 
CO -s 



CD 
0. 



£ S 







CD 


"<T 


CO 


CO 


CO 


h- 


CO 


CO 




CM CD 


"«T 




O 


lO 


CD 


•* — 


r»- 


r-- 


CO 


CO 


CD 


m 


CO 




CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


co 




CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 
CO 
























—I 

o 


















« 
CO 






K 


* 














« 




CO 








TT 








>> 




h_ 


c 




2 








■» 






* 


CD 




—> 


0) 




CD 


« 






5 






C 


o 


« 

c 


<d" 


3 


CO 

c 


o 


o 

c 














ro 


CD 


CD 


o 


3 


£ 


ro 












~3 


^ 


"5 
o 

0. 
LU 


"D 


0. 


CO 


— 






*- M 




CO 


o 
0. 

"<D 


0_ 


LL 
CO 


LL 
CD 

o 


5 


CD 

c 


> 

x: 
ro 


c 




• 




c 


E 


CD 

XI 


c 
x: 
o 

-5 




CD 

XI 


ro 

X 


o 

X. 


•j; 10 






ro 
CD 


ro 
CO 


o 
cr: 


'ro 
O 


CD 
CO 


o 


CD 
< 


CD 

D 


^ i 




i 


m 


ID 


CD 




CD 


CO 


oo 


CD 


CO 


^r 


o 


3 r^- 


CO 


■<r 


O 


CO 


CD 


CM 


CO 


CO 






o 


piH ~ 


CM 


^r 


CO 


^r 


CO 


TT 


-<r 


CO 






in 


J* 4 






















< 

I- 
O 


a 






















h- 






O 

c 




c 
o 




« 
CD 




* 












o 




CO 


"O 


N 




c 










TT 

14 




X) 
O 

E 
O 


>% 
ro 


Xj 

ro 

X 


ro 
$ 

ro 


N 
CD 

> 

ro 
o 


CO 

0) 


ro 
o 
o 
Q 


« 








s 




^ 


CD 

cr 


o 

CD 


X 
x: 


CO 

—> 


ro 
O 


£ 


ro 
CO 








r-M 


to 


C 

o 


_l 

ro 

c 
c 
o 
Q 


c 

CD 


ro 
ro 


—5 
C 


■D 

ro 


< 


_c 






• 

1 


c 
|CD 


c 

< 


X 

ro 


Q 


ro 

CD 


ro 

CO 

CO 


c 
o 

CD 

_l 


ro 
O 


CD 

I 


o 
co 





CD 


o 


O O 


CD 


CO 


TT 


T— 


CO 


T- 


Tt 




CD 



CD 
CD 
"O 

13 



CD 



ro ro ^ .!5 
CO S ^ 2 



m co co o co r^ 

co CM CO t- 

r>- co 

co 



CD i 

?| 

x: i- 

cd -J 

I s 

o O 



IN C 

c « 

m CO 

CO CO 



O T 

„• ® o 

ro ■= * 

or ^ ^ 



CD 
CD 





,_ 


"3" 


CD 


,_ 


*- ro 




hr 


O 


O 




m 






CO 


CN 




CD 


B«j 










< 

1- 
O 


■n 










H 


























n 






CO 
O 
















T^ 






_* 






c 






ro 






£ 




^ 


_i 






•^ 




CD 


—5 






r-j 




CL 


CO 


_c 






co 




ro 






5? 


c 


_j 


E 


i 


o 


• 


CO 


i 


o 

1- 


i 


co 

i 




CD 


CO 


o 


in 


O) 


^^ 


00 


^r 






CO 






■^r 






CD 


1*3 










_l 
< 

O 


■ l*4l 










1- 














S 




c 








TT 




o 








T* 




CO 








r 




c 

-C 








M 




o 












-> 








•^ 












™ 




s 


c 








co 










^ 




CD 
O 


0) 


u 




• 


TO 

CD 


o 

-3 


i 


CO 

2 





Warrant For Special Town Meeting April 28, 1997 



Middlesex, SS 

To the Constable or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to 
notify and warn the Town Meeting Representatives of said Chelmsford to meet 
in the Senior Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Monday the twenty- 
eighth day of April, at 7:45 p.m. in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following article, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office. 



Page 118 



Annual Town Meeting April 28, 1997 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center at 7:35 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 149 
Town Meeting Representatives present. 

The Moderator pointed out the fire exits, and went over the 
Town Meeting procedures. He then requested a moment of silence in honor 
of two people who served the Town in various capacities Bernard Clark, who 
was a current Town Meeting Representative from Precinct 2, and Dorothy 
Borrows, who had been a Board of Registrar from 1956 to 1972. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved, that the reading of the 
Constable's return of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved, that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator requested that the Body vote to allow non 
residents, Bernie DiNatalie from the School Department and Andy Sheehan, 
Land Use coordinator address the body from time to time. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator made a point of order. He explained that a 
new procedure regarding 2/3's voting had been passed as State law. Town 
Meetings could either pass a by-law or vote at the Town Meeting, to allow the 
Moderator to make a judgment regarding the necessity of conducting actual 
hand counts, for 2/3's votes, when he feels that it is obvious that the vote 
carried. This would save time and move the meeting along. He further 
explained that there was an article within the warrant that would make this 
procedure a by-law for future Town Meetings, however, presently he did have 
a motion before him that if passed would allow the procedure to take effect 
immediately. The motion reads as follows. 

Jonathan A. Stevens moved that the Town vote pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 15, as amended, to permit 
the Moderator to declare a two-thirds majority with the necessity of a count 
throughout this Annual Town Meeting. 

The Moderator asked for any discussion, hearing none he asked for a show of 
hands on the motion, motion carried. 



Page 119 



Under Article 1 Selectman Peter Lawlor moved to hear 
reports of the Town Officers and Committees. 

State Representative Carol Cleven and State Senator Susan 
Fargo came before the body and briefly reported on various bills that had 
come before them and how they affected Chelmsford. 

The Moderator announced that a Special Town Meeting had 
been posted for 7:45 PM. He was going to adjourned the Annual Town 
Meeting at this time and proceed with the Special Town Meeting. When the 
Special Town Meeting was over, the Annual Town Meeting would reconvene 
and further reports will be heard under Article 1. The Meeting adjourned at 
7:50 PM. 



Special Town Meeting April 28, 1997 



The Special Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center at 7:50 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 149 
Town Meeting Representatives present. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved, that the reading of the Constable's 
return of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved, that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously 

Under Article 1. Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to transfer and appropriate $69,322. from free cash, and $25,678. 
from Line Item 18, Interest under Article 2 of the 1996 Annual Town Meeting, 
to be added to the appropriation under Line Item 5, Public Safety Personnel 
Services under Article 2 of the 1996 Annual Town Meeting in order to fund the 
Police Patrolmen's collective bargaining agreement. 

The Town Manager explained that the Patrolmen Union had been 
without a contract since June 30, 1995. After two years of collective 
bargaining a settlement was reached in February of 1997. He said that a 2% 
raise was given for 1996, a split 2% for FY 1997, for a total cost of $95,000. 
There was contractual language, educational incentive, which would increase 
an individual's base salary for the amount of education received. He felt it was 
a good contract and asked for support of the article. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The motion carried, unanimously by a show of hands. 



Page 120 



The Moderator adjourned the Special Town Meeting at 8:00 PM 
The Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 8:00 PM and discussion continued 
under Article 1. 

Under Article 1 (con't) Chairman of the Master Plan Committee, 
James Creegan, requested that all the members of the committee who were 
present to please come forward. Because of all the time and work involved, 
the Planning Board wanted each member to receive a a certificate of 
appreciation: Andy Sheehan, Eileen Duffy, Peter Dulchinos, Kim MacKenzie, 
David McLachlan, Wendy Marcks, Stu Weisfeldt, Tom Moran, Tracy Wallace 
Cody. He explained that the Master Plan Review Committee was formed in 
1994. The Committee met for eight months and concluded that the Master 
Plan of 1986 was in need of review. The Planning Board requested and 
received an appropriation of $50,000. from the October 1995 Town Meeting to 
hire a consultant to assist in the preparation of the new master plan. John 
Brown Associates was hired as the consultant, and the Master Plan 
Committee was formed. The Committee addressed various issues, goals, 
land use, economic development, housing, environment, public facilities, 
utilities, transportation and implementation plan. Copies of the master plan 
are available for a fee at the Town Offices. 

Chairman of the Chelmsford Arts and Technology Fund Committee, 
Evelyn Thoren gave a status report of the newly formed committee. The 
Committee was formed due to the passage of an article at the April 1996 
Annual Town Meeting. Its main purpose is to provide supplement funding for 
initiatives and projects that will enhance the curriculum of the Chelmsford 
Public Schools. Pink information slips are enclosed in the real estate and 
excise bills. From these a voluntary contribution may be made. She thanked 
the Graphics Department at Nashoba Tech for their work, and to the first 
business to make a contribution, which was Frequency Sources a division of 
LockheedWIartin. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, then gave his status report on last 
year's articles. The Community Action Program, which is a program for future 
civic improvement within the neighborhoods. There are a few applications that 
need to be reviewed and decided upon. He discussed the Adams Library 
Expansion Project which had been voted upon at the October 1996 town 
meeting and ratified with a ballot question in December at a special town 
election. The architect was on board, the design work done, now in the 
process of going out for bids. Also plans are being made on housing the 
Library at a temporary location. 

Under Article 2 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved to postpone 
consideration of this article until the second night of the adjourned session of 
the Town Meeting, as the first item of business. 



Page 121 



The Town Manager explained that by Thursday night more 
information may be available from the State regarding certain articles, also 
some of the collective bargaining units that are still negotiating may settle. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 3 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town 
vote to transfer $2000. from Conservation fees under Wetlands Special 
Reserve Fund to reduce the Conservation Commission Budget Fiscal Year 
1998. 

The Town Manager explained that this is the second year of doing 
this. It offsets the Board's operating cost. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 4 Sewer Commissioner John Emerson, moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $1,560,000. from Sewer Betterments, 
Special Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt and interest in the 
Fiscal Year 1998 Budget. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson explained that 
the Commission does this each year to reduce the cost of the on going sewer 
projects. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 5 Sewer Commissioner John Emerson, moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $300,633. from Sewer Rate Relief Funds, 
Special Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt and interest in the 
Fiscal Year 1998 Budget. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson explained that 
this money will be applied to the tax rate. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 



Page 122 



Under Article 6 Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this is a 
standard article. It gives target dollars on what the town can afford to do and 
spend. Projects are decided upon the time and money available and the 
need. He noted that there are major items missing. Road resurfacing for one 
The money is being used from State Funds to do the road work The 
continuation of the sidewalk project is still using funds from last year This is 
why other needs are able to be addressed. Bill Griffin questioned the Police 
vehicles. What is the need for the proposed change in vehicles from the 
Crown Victoria to the two wheel drive, recreational vehicle? Police Chief 
Armand Caron explained that the Town transfers prisoners to jail and he is 
planning on installing computers in the vehicles, which will require more room. 
The new vehicles will provide the additional space needed. Glenn Thoren 
questioned the Academic Tech. line item. Bernie DiNatalie, Director of 
Educational Technology, explained the Schools request. 



Page 123 



This would allow the communicating of all the schools, classrooms, and 
administration office, via networking through the access information and 
institutional network systems. Computers will be replaced and computer labs 
will be installed at the McCarthy and Parker Schools. Each computer lab will 
have 32 units. Work stations will be set up in the elementary schools and 
school libraries. Bill Griffin requested that a full report from the Town Manager 
regarding the purchasing of the Police vehicles be made available at the 
Town Meeting next year. The Town Manager agreed to this. Brian Latina 
questioned what the guidelines are for submitting a request to the Capital 
Planning. The Manager explained that the project/item had to exceed the cost 
of $10,000 and have a life of more than five years. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. Discussion took place. Glenn Thoren said that he 
was not happy with the lack of information when he asked for the plans that 
were to be laid out for the future use of these computers. He felt that there are 
citizens at large that this information should be shown to. Then he could have 
them explain if need be, the proposal in terms that may be easier for a non 
computer person to understand, and verify the information being proposed. 
Judy Mallette, a member of the Technology Committee, said that there had 
been eight major technology companies who came forward and offered their 
support and technical advice. Presently the plan is in committee at the State 
level being reviewed, and if any changes need to be made per their advice 
then it will be done. She asked for support from the body. Paul Gleason 
spoke in favor of the proposal. Chairman of the School Committee, Angelo 
Taranto said there had been ample review of the plan. Glenn Thoren said that 
a vote shouldn't be based on "trust" the information should have been 
available. He moved to amend the article by reducing the line items on capital 
planning for Administrative and Academic Technology to $100,000. until a final 
plan has been made available for review by a Critical Design Review 
Committee. The Finance Committee unanimously opposes the motion to 
amend. The Board of Selectmen polled three members who were currently 
present at their table, and they unanimously oppose the motion. Dennis 
Ready moved the question to stop debate on the motion to amend. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator then attempted a vote on the motion to amend. This left the Chair 
in doubt. He asked the following tellers to come forward and take an hand 
count: 

Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John Maleski. The result: 
Yes, 45 No, 95 the motion to amend was defeated. The Moderator asked for 
a vote on the article. Which left him in doubt. The tellers came forward and 
conducted a hand count. Yes 114, No 24 2/3's is 92 the motion carried and 
reads as follows: 



Page 124 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town vote to 
appropriate the sum of $1 ,288,000. for the following capital projects: 



Department 


Project 


Expenditure 


Cemetery 


Cemetery Truck 


30,000 


Fire 


Roof Repair 


23,000 




Compressor 


35,000 




S. Station Generator 


18,000 




Engine Refurbishment 


10,000 


Police 


Cruiser Replacement 


130,000 


DPW 


Fuel Tanks 


65,000 




Highway Garage Roof 


20,000 




Dump Truck/Sander 


70,000 




Park Tractor 


17,000 




Park Truck 


25,000 


Schools: 


HVAC Upgrade 


36,000 


High School 


Replace Microscopes 






($125 @ 1,238) 


31,000 


McCarthy School 


Floors 


40,000 


Parker School 


Lockers 


40,000 




Generator 


35,000 




Academic Tech. 


563,800 




Admin. Tech. 


100,000 


TOTAL 




1,288.800 



and to transfer the sum of $4,758,57. from unexpended bond proceeds under 
Article 12 of the 1995 Annual Town Meeting, transfer the sum of $463.00 from 
unexpended bond proceeds under Article 28 of the 1993 Annual Town 
Meeting, transfer the sum of $646.51 from unexpended bond proceeds under 
Article 30 of the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, transfer $2,244.00 from 
unexpended bond proceeds under Article 3 of the 1995 Annual Town Meeting, 
transfer $687.92 of unexpended bond proceeds under Article 6 of the 1996 
Annual Town Meeting and to authorized the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectman to borrow $1,280,000.00 under Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44, Sections 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. 

Under Article 7 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate $150,000.00 to be used as a Reserve fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws Chapter 40, 
Section 6. 



Page 125 



The Town Manager explained that this is a yearly article, and asked 
for support. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. George Merrill moved to 
table the article He explained that this should be taken up after the vote on 
the budget. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion defeated to 
table. George Merrill then moved to amend the article to read $250,000.00. 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, Barbara Skaar explained that the funds 
are limited only for emergency items, therefore the Finance Committee is not 
in favor of the increase. The Board of Selectmen unanimously did not 
recommend the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 8 Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa, moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $12,500.00 from the sale of the graves and lots to 
the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa explained that this is an annual 
article. The monies are used for beautification and development of new areas 
for the cemetery. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 9 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $19,000. to engage a private 
accounting firm to prepare an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a yearly article, a 
requirement that must be done in order to be eligible for any state funding. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 10 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate $20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the sand 
lease approved by the Town under Article 12 of the 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

The Town Manager explained that the property is located behind the 
Highway Department on Richardson Rd. The sand is removed from the 
property and put onto the Highway Department's property. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article, motion carried, unanimously. 



Page 126 



Under Article 11 Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa. moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the 
property known as the Forefathers Burying Ground from the Cemetery 
Commission for cemetery purposes to the Cemetery Commission for 
Cemetery purposes and for the purpose of granting a preservation restriction 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, by and through the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission (the "MHC"), and to authorize the Cemetery 
Commission to grant such preservation restriction to the MHC, for a duration 
not to exceed five years, by which the Town will covenant to maintain the 
property in a manner satisfactory to the MHC and not alter the property unless 
the MHC determines that that alteration will not impair the characteristics 
which contribute to historical integrity of the property. 

Cemetery Superintendent John Sousa explained that last year the 
Town became eligible to received a $5,000.00 grant for the forefathers' Burial 
Ground. Before any further action can be taken Town Meeting must approve 
this article because the land is publicly owned. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 12 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate, the sum of $12,500.00 to provide Senior 
Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for services rendered, pursuant to 
an agreement formulated by the Council on Aging and approved by the Town 
Manager. 

The Town Manager explained that there are twenty-five openings 
available. It has been a very successful program. Town Meeting has 
approved the program in the past and he asked for continuing support. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 13 The Moderator explained that there was no signed 
motion by the Town Manager who was withdrawing the article. Therefore he 
proceeded onto the next article. (The article would have read, to see if the 
Town would vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money with which 
to meet bills from previous years.) 



Page 127 



Under Article 14 Sewer Commissioner John Emerson, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or permanent 
easements, and any property in fee simple with buildings and trees thereon by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the property located in the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and shown on a set of 
plans entitled "Plan of Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, Massachusetts Phase 
IIIB Sewers dated December, 1996 prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission by Richard F. Kaminski & Associates, Inc.", a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein by reference, 
for the purpose of constructing and maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and 
all other appurtenances thereto. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson explained that 
this article is necessary in order to continue the ongoing sewer project. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 15 Selectman Peter Lawlor, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General Bylaws, Town of Chelmsford, Article V. Streets and 
Sidewalks, Section 6. Inspector, by inserting the following language into the 
General Bylaws at the end of Section 6.6 (changes are in bold): 

Section 6 Inspector 

6.6 The fee and incidental expenses of the inspector shall be 
borne by the permittee and payable, by check or money order, 
to the Town of Chelmsford. These fees and those included in 
Section 1.7 shall be deposited in a revolving fund 
maintained for the purpose of paying the expenses relative 
to inspections. 

The Town Manager explained that annually there are an estimated 
eight hundred street openings done per year. More construction is being 
done, which result with more road cuts being done. When the road is cut, it 
is not being put back to the Town's satisfaction. This by-law will allow the 
Town to bill the contractor and the contractor will do the work to the Town's 
specification. A discussion took place. John Harrington questioned who was 
going to be charged for this inspection. The Town Manager said that currently 
the Water Departments are not charged and won't be in the future. The 
Finance Committee was not in favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. John Wilder questioned why the 
Finance Committee was against the article. Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, Barbara Skaar, explained that currently the Town is not collecting 
any fee's and providing the service. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article. Motion carried. 

Page 128 



Under Article 16 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to authorize a revolving fund under Massachusetts General Law C. 
44, S. 53E % for the Department of Public Works for Fiscal Year 1998. The 
receipts to be credited to the fund shall be from the collection of fees and 
incidental expenses from the full time inspector assigned to each trench 
opening or excavation site as assigned by the Highway Superintendent. The 
Public Works Department shall be authorized to spend money from the fund 
for the purpose of paying the expenses relative to inspections necessary for 
implementing the full time trench opening or excavation inspection program. 
Expenditures from the trench opening or excavation inspection program shall 
be limited to $25,000. during Fiscal Year 1998. 

The Town Manager explained the article is needed in order to set up 
the revolving account necessary for the implementation of article 15 The 
Finance Committee did not recommend the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked if there was any 
need to hear debate. Hearing none he asked for a show of hands on the 
motion, motion carried. 

Under Article 17 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the General Bylaws, Town of Chelmsford, Article V. Streets and 
Sidewalks, Section 8. Construction Standards, by deleting the following 
phrase from Subsection 8.13. Restoration of Permanent Paving, "Street 
openings shall be maintained by the Permittee for a period of two (2) years 
from the date of completion." and substituting therefore the following phrase: 

"Street openings shall be maintained by the Permittee for a 
period of five (5) years from the date of completion, except for 
work that requires a curb-to-curb overlay in which case the 
maintenance period shall be two (2) years.". 

The Town Manager explained that the smaller road cuts are the cuts 
made by the utility companies that tend to have problems. By making a 
contractor hold a five year bond on a street opening will assure that the 
opening is correctly sealed and if a problem does occur it will be taken care of 
by the contractor and not by the Town. James Pearson, DPW Director 
explained the difference between a curb to curb opening and a trench 
opening. The Representatives expressed concerns of the expense involved 
and the actual need. The road should be able to go through a winter without 
heaving etc. Once this is done then why tie up a contractor's money 9 The 
cost will be more because the money is tied up longer. It was explained that 
there had been roads in the past after two years that the Town had to repair at 
it's own expense because they weren't resealed correctly. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Page 129 



Under Article 18 Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town vote 
to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the property known 
as the North Town Hall from the Board of Selectmen for general municipal 
purposes to the Board of Selectmen for general municipal purposes and for 
the purpose of granting a preservation restriction, and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to grant such preservation restriction to any governmental or 
non-profit entity whose purpose is historic preservation, by which the Town will 
covenant to maintain the property in a manner satisfactory to the grantee and 
not alter the property unless the grantee determines that alteration will not 
impair the characteristics which contribute to the historical integrity of the 
property. 

Selectman Susan Gates explained that this preservation restriction 
clause is needed in order to preserve the outside of the building, regardless in 
the future who ever owns the Building if it is not the Town. This would keep 
the building from being raised or change the outside structure. Any proposed 
work done on the inside will not and can not be effective by this. The only way 
this restriction can be eliminated once voted, is by Town Meeting vote. Jeff 
Stallard questioned if this would apply to a Town Board or Committee. John 
Georgio, Town Counsel said yes it would apply to everyone. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show 
of hands, the Moderator declared that the motion carried by a 2/3's vote. 

Under Article 19 Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that that the Town 
vote to accept the following mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk: 

Meadowcrest Lane 
Technology Drive 
Fisher Road 
Empire Street 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the requirements of the 
Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any remaining bonds 
until such requirements have been met; and to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing traffic 
safety and road improvements, and to raise and appropriate $15.00 to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of 
said land and for paying any damages which may be awarded as a result of 
any such taking; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and 
execute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

Page 130 



The Town Manager explained that these streets had gone through the 
process of completing the Town's specifications and are now ready to become 
public ways. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



Under Article 20 The Town Manager explained that this article had 
been withdrawn by the petitioner according to a letter sent to the Planning 
Board. The Motion was not signed therefore the Moderator declared no action 
to be taken and proceeded onto Article 21. (The Article read as follows: To 
see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, 
Article II. District Regulations, Section 2110 Official zoning map as it pertains 
to a 1.52 acre lot, with residence known as 10 Worthen Street, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, fronting on the west side of Worthen Street, running north 
from Westford Street, more fully described in Plan Book 94, Page 419 
recorded with the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, by changing the 
designation of said lot from RB (Residential) to RM (Residential Multifamily.) 

Under Article 21 Bill Griffin moved that the reading of this article be 
waived. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Town Manager explained that this article pertains to cellar 
antenna's, and a new law is needed to address this issue. Increase need for 
antenna's because of more usage, this will allow the Town to regulate where 
antenna's are to go and how they will be permitted. Andy Sheehan, Land Use 
Coordinator explained that the granting authority will be the Board of Appeals. 
The use of existing structures, water towers, mill buildings, will be allowed. 
They will be limited to the industrial and commercial zones. Selectman Susan 
Gates explained this is to control where poles can go by restricting the zoning 
where new poles are allowed. Without any type of restriction they can go 
anywhere because of federal regulations. This would stop something bad 
before it happens. Marianne Paresky wanted to know where the locations are 
already? Andy Sheehan said so far there are six locations, Parkhurst Rd, 
Turnpike Rd, Doris Dr, Washington St. Oak St, Middlesex St. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. Chairman of the Planning Board, Kim MacKenzie, 
read the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public 
hearing on March 26, 1997 at 8:00 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning By-laws. A legal advertisement was published on March 6, 
1997 and March 13, 1997 in the Chelmsford Independent, a minimum of 14 
days prior to the public hearing. Notices were sent to all abutting towns and 
the appropriate agencies as required in the M.G.L. Chapter 40A Section 5. 



Page 131 



At the meetings of March 26, 1997 and April 9, 1997, the proponents 
residents and the Planning Board discussed the issues of this amendment. 
This amendment proposes to add a new Section 4900 to the Zoning By-law 
entitled "Wireless Communications Facilities". The proposed section would 
establish siting criteria and standards for wireless communications facilities. 
This amendment would also amend Section 2300, Use Regulation Schedule, 
by adding a new category, "Wireless Communication Facilities" under 
Industrial uses. The public hearing was closed on April 9, 1997. At its 
meeting on April 23, 1997, the Planning Board voted 4-0 with Ms. Cody 
abstaining in favor of this amendment. Therefore, the Chelmsford Planning 
Board recommends article #21 . 

William Griffin moved to amend section 4950 paragraph (a) of the 
article by adding section (1) No monopole or attached accessory antenna or a 
monopole, shall exceed 120 feet in height, or three feet in diameter as 
measured from ground level at the base of the pole. 

The Finance Committee claimed no expertise in this area therefore 
felt they could not make any recommendation. John Georgio, Town Counsel 
felt that any amended change to the by-law regarding further restrictions may 
cause problems, he felt section 4920 addresses the concerns of this 
amendment. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend, motion defeated. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article IV. Special Regulations, by 
adding the following proposed zoning by-law after Section 4800 of the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning By-law: 

Sec. 4900 Wireless communication facilities. 



Page 132 



4910. Purpose The purpose of these regulations include: establishing 
siting criteria and standards for communication towers and facilities; 
minimizing the adverse visual impacts of wireless communications 
facilities, satellite dishes and antennas on adjacent properties and 
residential neighborhoods; minimizing the overall number and height of 
such facilities to only what is essential; and promoting shared use of 
existing facilities to reduce the need for new facilities. The by-law is 
intended to establish reasonable regulations while allowing adequate 
service to residents, the traveling public and others within the Town, and 
to accommodate the need for the minimum number of such facilities within 
the Town. This section shall not apply to satellite dishes and antennas for 
residential use which are regulated under Section 4193. For the purposes 
of this section, "wireless communications facilities" shall include 
monopoles, satellite dish(es) over three (3) feet in diameter, antennas, 
and accessory structures which facilitate the provision of wireless 
communication service. "Wireless communication services" shall mean 
the provision of cellular telephone service, personal communication 
service and enhanced mobile radio service. 

4920. General Requirements 

(a) No wireless communications facility shall be erected or installed 
except in compliance with the provisions of this Section. In all 
cases, a Special Permit is required from the Board of Appeals 
(the "Board"). Any proposed extension in the height; addition of 
cells, antenna or panels; or construction of a new or 
replacement facility shall be subject to a new application for a 
Special Permit. Attachment of cells, antenna or panels to 
existing suitable stiuctures shall be subject to application for a 
Special Permit. 

(b) Only freestanding monopoles, with associated antenna and/or 
panels, are allowed. Lattice style towers and similar facilities 
requiring three or more legs and/or guy wires for support are not 
allowed. For the purposes of this section "monopole" shall 
mean a pole consisting of not more than one leg, anchored in 
the ground, which is not supported by guy wires or other 
bracing. Monopoles shall be set back from the property line a 
distance at least equal to the height of the monopoles. 

(c) Erection of new monopoles shall be allowed in any Commercial 
District, Industrial District or Public District, per the Use 
Regulations Schedule, Section 2300 of this Bylaw, and shall be 
located within five hundred (500) feet of a limited access 
highway as defined by State and Federal standards. No new 
monopoles shall be erected within five hundred (500) feet of an 
existing residential structure or within two (2) miles of another 
existing or approved monopole. 

Page 133 



(d) Structures shall be removed within one (1) year of cessation of 
use. If applicable, proof of continued compliance with the 
standards of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the American National 
Standards Institute (ANSI), State building code, and required 
maintenance shall be filed with the Building Inspector by the 
Special Permit holder on an annual basis or as deemed 
necessary by the Building Inspector. 

(e) No more than one monopole shall be located on a lot. 

4930. Application Process. All applications for wireless communications 
facilities, antennas or satellite dishes shall be made and filed on the 
applicable application form in compliance with the Rules and Regulations 
of the Chelmsford Board of Appeals. In addition to the minimum 
requirements of the Board of Appeals, applicants under this section shall 
include the following: 

(a) A locus plan which shall show all property lines, the exact 
location of the proposed structure(s), streets, landscape 
features, residential dwellings, and all buildings within five- 
hundred (500) feet of the facility. 

(b) A color photograph or rendition of the proposed monopole with 
its antenna and/or panels. For satellite dishes or antennas, a 
color photograph or rendition illustrating the dish at the 
proposed location is required. A rendition shall also be prepared 
illustrating a view of the monopole, dish or antenna from the 
nearest street or streets. 

(c) The following information prepared by one or more professional 
engineers: 

• a description of the monopole and the technical, economic 
and other reasons for the proposed location, height and 
design. 

• confirmation that the monopole complies with all applicable 
Federal and State standards. 

• a description of the capacity of the monopole including the 
number and type of panels, antennas and/or transmitter 
receivers that it can accommodate and the basis for these 
calculations. 

(d) If applicable, a written statement that the proposed facility 
complies with, or is exempt from applicable regulations 
administered by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Massachusetts 
Aeronautics Commission and the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health. 



Page 134 



4940. Design Guidelines. The following guidelines shall be used when 
preparing plans for the siting and construction of all wireless 
communications facilities: 

(a) All monopoles shall be designed to be constructed at the 
minimum height necessary to accommodate the anticipated and 
future use. The setback of a monopole from the property line of 
the lot on which it is located shall be at least equal to the height 
of the monopole. 

(1) No monopole, or attached accessory antenna on a 
monopole, shall exceed one hundred twenty (120) 
feet in height as measured from ground level at the 
base of the pole. No monopole shall be constructed 
which requires guy wires. Monopoles shall not be 
located on buildings. 

(2) Antennas or dishes located on nonresidential 
buildings shall not exceed ten (10) feet in height 
above the roof-line of the structure. 

(b) All wireless communications facilities shall be sited in such a 
manner that the view of the facility from adjacent abutters, 
residential neighbors and other areas of Town shall be as 
limited as possible. No monopole shall be visible from any 
location within the Historic District. All monopoles and dishes 
shall be painted or otherwise colored so they will blend in with 
the landscape or the structure on which they are located and 
existing on-site vegetation shall be preserved to the maximum 
extent possible. 

(c) Satellite dishes and/or antennas shall be situated on or attached 
to a structure in such a manner that they are screened, 
preferably not being visible from abutting streets. 

(d) Wireless communications facilities shall be designed to 
accommodate the maximum number of users technologically 
practical. The intent of this requirement is to reduce the number 
of facilities which will be required to be located within the 
community. 

(e) Fencing shall be provided to control access to wireless 
communications facilities and shall be compatible with the 
character of the Town and shall not be of razor wire. The fence 
shall be surrounded by a screen of plantings of sufficient 
density and height so as to shield the fence from view. 

(f) There shall be no signs, except for announcement signs, no 
trespassing signs and a required sign giving a phone number 
where the owner can be reached on a twenty-four (24) hour 
basis. All signs shall conform with Section 3300 of the 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Signs and Outdoor Lighting. 

Page 135 



(g) Night lighting of towers shall be prohibited unless required by 
the Federal Aviation Administration. Lighting shall be limited to 
that needed for emergencies and/or as required by the FAA. 

(h) There shall be a minimum of one (1) parking space for each 
facility, to be used in connection with the maintenance of the 
site, and not to be used for the permanent storage of vehicles or 
other equipment. Traffic associated with any wireless 
communication facility shall not adversely affect abutting ways. 

4950. Special Permit Review. 

(a) Applications for Special Permits shall be approved or approved 
with conditions if the petitioner can fulfill the requirements of 
these regulations to the satisfaction of the Board. 

(b) Applications for Special Permits may be denied if the petitioner 
cannot fulfill or address the requirements of these regulations to 
the satisfaction of the Board. 

(c) When considering an application for a wireless communication 
facility, the Board shall place great emphasis on the proximity of 
the facility to residential neighborhoods and its impact on these 
residences. New facilities shall only be considered after a 
finding that existing (or previously approved) facilities cannot 
accommodate the proposed use(s). 

(d) When considering an application for an antenna or dish 
proposed to be placed on a structure, the Board shall place 
great emphasis on the visual impact of the unit from the abutting 
neighborhoods and street(s). 

; and amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Section 2300 Use 
regulations schedule, by adding a new category under industrial uses 
entitled "Wireless communication facilities" as shown below (changes are in 
bold): 



Page 136 



So oo ooooooooooo 



< < 

boo oooomooooom 



OOO clOOOClOOOOOeO 



boo ooooooooooo 



l< ~ ~ < ^ < < < < 

CD CL O Q.OCLCDQ.OCDCDC00.m 



l< < < 

mcLQ. mOOOQ-Q-OOOOcQ 



boo oooooooooom 



boo oooooooooom 



CD < < < 

OOo. OOmOmOOOOOm 



ooo oooooooooom 



ooo ooooooooooo 



boo ooooooooooo 



ooo ooooooooooo 



poo 


ooooooooooo 






0) 


































Q. 

O 

X. 
(0 








o 






Q. 
















o 
















I— 








o> 






X) 










'ro 
a 








*■ 






(0 


o 








2> 








6 

0) 
















o 








</) 






CD 


T3 
















a> 

a> 






"D 


< 








>N ,ro 








^w 






C 

ro 


ro 








5* c 








CO 

0) 


© 




(0 

CO 
CD 
O 


"O 








ro as 
o «» 








|X5 

o 


o 




o 


-t: o) 








/a T3 «^ 








CM 




ro 


E 2 








j£ c >* 








c 


\*t 




»— 
J5 


a5 £ 








ir ro = 

° — o 








o 






3 
O 


Q. CO 

CO c 

a> a> 








5 JS ro 

o c r 

— a> ro 








"XI 

ro 
o 


a> 




CD 


CO Q. 






CO 


x> c to 
3 .E o 




,_ 





E 


<v 




> 


^ o 




■D 

k_ 

CD 


c 




O 


ro 


3 


to 




T3 


E -o 




o 


blic utility or p 
search, exper 
lid waste disp 


__ 


ro 


c 


E 


ro 

> 
o 

E 

IX. 


"to 

X 


C 

ro 

c 
ro 

to 

CD 


way to and fro 
Warehouse an 


T5 

ro 


CO 

"k— 

o 

o 

ro 

"E 


ro 

I— 

CD 
Q. 
O 

'E 
ro 


c 
_ro 

ro 

E 


CD 

c 
o 

c 

CD 
CO 

=3 


E 

B 

tr 
o 

Cl 

CO 

c 


E 
o 
u 

(A 

CO 
_Q) 

CD 


ro 


O) 


CD 


3 


o 


L_ 


ZJ CD O 


ro 


<ti 


ro 


$ 


UJ 


_J 


CL 


—5 


o O Q. or co 


CO 


cc 


£ 



ro 

<D 

cn 

(T3 
CL 



Under Article 22 Planning Board Member Robert Morse, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article 
V. Definitions, definition of "lot area" in order to change the requirements for 
contiguous dry land area, by deleting "eighty (80)" where it appears and 
replacing it with "ninety (90)" to read as follows (changes are in bold): 

Lot area: The horizontal area of the lot exclusive of any area in a 
street or recorded way open to public use. At least ninety (90) 
percent of the lot area required for zoning compliance shall be 
contiguous land other than that under any water body, bog, 
swamp, wet meadow, marsh, or other wetland, as defined in 
section 40, Chapter 131, G.L., as amended. 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Kim MacKenzie said that the 
current regulation is that 40,000 sq feet which is 80 % dry (32,000 sq feet 
contiguous dry) is a building lot. It was felt that the new regulation would 
provide healthier building lots. He gave the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public 
hearing on March 12, 1997 on the above mentioned article. A legal 
advertisement was published in the Chelmsford independent on February 
20, 1997 and February 27, 1997, a minimum of 14 days prior to the public 
hearing. A copy of this ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, Section 5. At the meetings on March 12, 1997 and March 
26, 1997, the proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the 
merits of this Zoning by-law change. The decision was rendered on April 
9, 1997. At its meeting on April 9, 1997, the Chelmsford Planning Board 
voted unanimously (5-0) in favor of Article 22 which amends Article V. 
Definitions as follows: Lot area: Delete "eighty (80%)" where it appears 
and replace it with "ninety (90%)". Therefore, the Chelmsford Planning 
Board recommends the above mentioned changes to Article V. 
Definitions, Lot area of the zoning by-law. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. A majority of 
the Board of Selectmen did not recommend the article. A discussion 
followed. John Emerson spoke against the article. He felt it was an 
unnecessary increase. It would restrict people who presently own large 
acreage or 2-3 acres of land. Ronald Wetmore said that it is an unfair 
burden on present land owners 80% is fine, it hasn't been abused. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. 



Page 138 



Under Article 23 Planning Board Member Robert Morse, moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, by 
substituting the term "net floor area" for the term "gross floor area" wherever it 
now appears in Section 3100 of the Zoning Bylaw, and by adding the following 
definition of "net floor area" to Article V. Definitions: 

Net floor area: the aggregate horizontal area in 
square feet of all floors of a building or several 
buildings on the same lot, measured from the 
exterior faces of the walls enclosing each 
building; and exclusive of the cellars and attic 
areas used only for storage, bathrooms, 
stairwells, elevators, mechanical rooms, or 
areas for service incidental to the operation or 
maintenance of the building. 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Kim MacKenzie, explained the article. 
He then gave the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public 
hearing on March 12, 1997 on the above mentioned article. A legal 
advertisement was published in the Chelmsford independent on February 
20, 1997 and February 27, 1997, a minimum of 14 days prior to the public 
hearing. A copy of this ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, Section 5. At the meetings on March 12, 1997 and March 
26, 1997, the proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the 
merits of this Zoning by-law change. The decision was rendered on April 
9, 1997. At its meeting on April 9, 1997, the Chelmsford Planning Board 
voted unanimously (5-0) in favor of Article 23 which amends Article V. 
Definitions as follows: Net Floor Area as follows: The aggregate horizontal 
area in square feet of all floors of a building or several buildings on the 
same lot, measured from the exterior faces of the walls enclosing each 
building; and exclusive of the cellars and attic areas used only for storage, 
bathrooms, stairwells, elevators, mechanical rooms or areas for service 
incidental to the operation or maintenance of the building. And; 
substituting the terms "net floor area" for the term "gross floor area" 
wherever it appears in Section 3100. Therefore, the Chelmsford Planning 
Board recommends the above mentioned changes to Article V, 
Definitions, Net Floor Area of the zoning by-law. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, and he declared that the motion carried by 2/3's. 



Page 139 



Under Article 24 Planning Board Member Robert Morse, moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, 
District Regulations, Section 2220 Uses not listed, in order to make any use 
not listed prohibited, by deleting the entire section as follows: 

2220. Uses not listed. If a particular use is not specifically included in 
the use regulations schedule, then the board of appeals may 
determine whether in the district in which an unlisted use is proposed, 
uses having similar externally observable attributes are or may be 
permitted, and if so, the board of appeals may authorize such use or 
uses as a special permit for exception under section 1500. 

and, replacing it with the following new Section 2220. Uses not listed. 
(changes in bold): 

2220 Uses not listed. All uses which are not listed in Section 
2300, Use Regulations Schedule, are prohibited 

Barry Balan questioned if this by-law change was eliminating the Board 
of Appeals decision making process. Kim MacKenzie explained that it was, 
because the Board of Appeals is not allowed to give use permits according to 
the zoning by-laws. Once a permit is granted by the Board of Appeals the 
applicant may not necessarily ever come before the Planning Board and 
therefore, potential issues go unresolved. Questions were asked if there were 
any recent such permits issued by the Board of Appeals. Yes, the two 
assisted living complexes. These are good projects but are major zoning 
changes that affect an area, neighborhood and the Town. These type of 
changes in zoning should come before the Planning Board, then Town 
Meeting for final approval. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
A majority of the Board of Selectmen (3-2) opposed the article. Kim 
MacKenzie gave the Planning Board's recommendation. 



Page 140 



The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public 
hearing on March 12, 1997 on the above mentioned article. A legal 
advertisement was published in the Chelmsford independent on February 
20, 1997 and February 27, 1997, a minimum of 14 days prior to the public 
hearing. A copy of this ad was sent to all abutting towns and the 
appropriate agencies as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40A, Section 5. At the meetings on March 12, 1997 and March 
26, 1997, the proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the 
merits of this Zoning by-law change. The decision was rendered on April 
9, 1997. At its meeting on April 9, 1997, the Chelmsford Planning Board 
voted unanimously (5-0) in favor of Article 24 which amends Article II. 
Section 2220 as follows: 2220. Uses Not Listed. All uses which are not 
listed in Section 2300, Use Regulations Schedule, are prohibited. 
Therefore, in keeping with the general intent of the Zoning ByLaws in the 
development of the community, the Chelmsford Planning Board strongly 
recommends the above mentioned changes to Article II, Section 2220 of 
the zoning by-law. 

A lengthy discussion took place. A number of representatives 
spoke against the article. Wendy Marcks who was a member of the 
Master Plan Committee said that the consultant to the Committee 
recommended that this change in the zoning law be done. Selectman 
Susan Gates spoke against the article and asked that the article be 
defeated. Karen Ready moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a vote on the article. This left the Chair in doubt, the 
tellers came forward and an hand count was taken: Yes 83 No 51, 89 is 
2/3's the motion is defeated. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town Meeting be adjourned 
until Thursday night at 7:30 PM at the Senior Center. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The meeting 
adjourned at 11:25 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 1, 1997 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center at 7:40 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 146 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. 



Page 141 



The Moderator asked that that Town Meeting Representatives 
vote to allow nonresidents Adam Wasylyshyn of the School Department 
and Susan Jamback, Director of the Charter School address the Body if 
necessary under certain articles. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator announced that Marc Pelchat a town resident was 
raising funds in order to participate in the Winter Olympics under the 
speed skating program. If anyone was interested in sending in any type of 
support to please contact his family. 

The Moderator then announced that due to the resignation of 
Precinct 4 Representative Carl Seidel, and with no one on the reserve list 
to move up there was an opening. The remaining 17 Representatives 
were going to meet Monday night and choose a voter from the precinct to 
fill the unexpired one year term. He said if anyone in the precinct was 
interested in filling the position to contact the Representatives. 

The Moderator then reminded the Body that the first order of 
business was going to be Article 2. This had been tabled by the Manager 
on Monday night, and was to be the first order of business acted upon. 



Page 142 



Under Article 2 The Moderator explained that he was going to 
just read the total money summarized under the line items (the gray area 
in the budget book) and ask if there would be any questions. The Town 
Manager explained that there were up to date figures on sheets provided 
at the entrance of the hall. These figures are going to be read as his 
motion. The Moderator read the motion starting with the Municipal 
Administration and read the Personnel Services and Expenses line items, 
through the Cemetery Department, where a discussion took place. 
Superintendent John Sousa said that there was a typo error under the 
expense amount, the figure should be $32,329, not $32,239, the Town 
Manager so noted the correction and explained that he would reflect the 
corrected figure in his motion. He mentioned that the figure given under 
the Public Works personnel services reflects the Highway Union's contract 
settlement. The Moderator read through the rest of the motion. He asked 
for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. A discussion took place. Under the Community 
Services Expenses Jeffrey Stallard moved to amend the Historical 
Commissions budget by requesting an additional $200.00 be added the 
the Expense Line item, to cover the anticipated expenses for the North 
Town Hall Committee. The Manager indicated that he would increase the 
budget figure by $200.00 . The total expense line item will now read 
$151,099. Bill Griffin questioned the Fire Departments Budget. Was the 
level of funding adequate for the current year in order to maintain the 
stations at their current level? Fire Chief Jack Parrow explained that in 
October the overtime line item was set at $220,000, with the anticipation 
of all the stations being opened. When the budget came back from the 
Town Manager and the Finance Committee the line item was cut by 
$20,000. This $20,000. shortfall will be made up with about sixty closings 
of the various stations around the town. George Merrill moved to amend 
under Personnel Services under the Municipal Services by reducing it 
$10,000.00 so the line reads $1,068,300.00 for a total budget of 
$1 ,560,91 1 .00. He felt that the Town Planner position was not necessary. 
The Town had a Planning Board at no cost, that could make decisions 
regarding open space and planning. A number of Representatives spoke 
against the motion. Ronald Wetmore said that the amount of buildable 
space left should be watched now more than ever. The expertise that 
this position provides to the Board's when the time comes for making 
decisions is a great asset. He works very closely with the Town Planner 
as Building Inspector for Bedford. John Emerson spoke in favor and the 
need for the position. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to amend. Motion defeated. The Moderator asked for a vote on 
the article as presented with the Manager's amended figures, motion 
carried and the article reads as follows. 



Page 143 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $57,332,094.00 to defray Town charges for 
the fiscal period July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 according to the following 
line items. 

Municipal Administration 

Personnel Services $1,078,300 

Expenses 500,611 

Chelmsford School Department 30,825,913 

Nashoba Technical High School 

Assessment 655,230 

Public Safety 

Personnel Services 6,024,379 

Expense 602,569 

Public Works 

Personnel Services 1 ,241 ,308 

Expense 3,376,696 

Offset Receipt ($926,961) 

TOTAL 3,691,043 

Sewer Commission 

Expense 17,500 

Cemetery Department 

Personnel Services 192,023 

Expense 32,329 

Community Services 

Personnel Services 386,070 

Expense 151,099 

Library 

Personnel Services 731 ,286 

Expense 234,101 



Undistributed Expenses 5,386,000 

Debt and Interest 

Principal 5,101,965 

Interest 1,721,676 

Page 144 



Under Article 25 The Town Manager explained the purpose of this by- 
law. Currently businesses are not allowed to have any inside lighted window 
signs. Over the years many of the businesses started putting lighted signs in 
their windows as a means of letting the public know that the business is 
indeed open. When it came to the attention of the Board of Selectmen that 
many of the businesses where having these signs, the Building Inspector was 
told to contact the businesses and tell them that they are in violation. It was 
then decided that a moratorium would be issued by the Selectmen saying that 
all businesses were to shut off their lights immediately and that the by-law 
would be studied and voted on at the Town Meeting. The by-law was on the 
books, but never really truly enforced. This would allow the businesses to 
have one sign, and establish rules and regulations regarding the type and 
size of the sign. Businesses that are in the historic district also have a by-law 
against lighted window signs. Ann Marie Roark, President of the Business 
Association addressed the Body. The association voted in favor of this by- 
law. It was felt that a compromise had been made that would be fair to all. An 
amendment that the businesses wanted was incorporated into the wording of 
the article. Dennis Ready questioned if the Board of Selectmen were allowed 
to issue such a moratorium? John Georgio, Town Counsel said that they 
were. Dennis Ready then asked Annmane Roark if a survey had been done 
indicating if businesses had suffered since the moratorium? She replied that 
nothing official had been conducted, however the small business owners did 
confirm that money was lost without the signs being on. Barbara Ward 
questioned who was responsible for the enforcement of this by-law in the past 
and why should anyone feel that this law will be enforced? Selectman Lawlor 
said that it was under the jurisdiction of the Building Inspector to enforce the 
sign by-law. And if voted, this Board as well as the Town Manager would be 
committed on making sure that the by-law is enforced. Numerous questions 
were asked. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. Chairman Barbara Skaar explained that the Board held no 
expertise in this matter and had no recommendation. The Board of Selectmen 
had not made a decision at this time and wanted to hear more debate before 
deciding. The Moderator asked for the Planning Board's recommendation. 
Planning Board Member Robert Morse came forward and first announced that 
fellow board member, Tracy Wallace Cody and husband William were proud 
parents of a baby girl, born yesterday, he then proceeded to read the Board's 
recommendation: 



Page 145 



The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on March 26, 1997 at 7:45 PM to consider amending the Town of Chelmsford 
Zoning Bylaw, Section 3300, Signs and Outdoor Lighting. A legal 
advertisement was published on March 6, 1997 and March 13, 1997 in the 
Chelmsford Independent a minimum of 14 days prior to the public hearing. A 
copy of this ad was mailed to all abutting towns and the appropriate agencies 
as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. At 
the meetings on March 26, 1997 and April 9, 1997, the proponents, residents 
and the Planning Board discussed the proposed by-law changes The 
proposed zoning amendment would change section 3300 of the Zoning By- 
law, Signs and Outdoor Lighting, by adding a section entitled "Lighted Window 
Signs". The amendment would also alter the membership of the Sign 
Advisory Committee. The Public Hearing was closed on April 9, 1997. At the 
meeting on April 9, 1997 the Planning Board voted 3-2 Not to recommend the 
change in the bylaw as written. Therefore, this article is not recommended by 
the Planning Board. 



Page 146 



Barry Balan moved to amend the article under section (a) Lighted 
Window Signs to include businesses within the historic district. He felt that all 
businesses should have the same opportunity, regardless if they are in the 
historic district or not. Town Counsel ruled that if this wording is dropped it 
won't matter because the Town has a separate Historic District By-law and 
according to that by-law businesses can't have lighted inside window signs. 
George Kalos a business man within the Historic District showed where the 
boundaries of the district ran and expressed that his building was built in 1922 
and in the district, yet there are other buildings much older than his that are 
not in the district He felt that the Historic District doesn't have jurisdiction on 
the inside of a building, just the outside. He wanted to know if this was true 
and asked for an opinion. Town Counsel John Georgio said that due to 
George Kalos being involved with a court litigation he couldn't discuss the 
matter at this time. Bill Dalton spoke in favor of the amendment. More 
discussion took place over Barry Balan's motion. Many Representatives spoke 
in favor of the motion to amend. Bernard Ready spoke against lights in the 
Historic District. Bill Dalton said that the Historic District should be reviewed 
by a committee. The present boundaries are unfair to the businesses within 
the district. Upon advise from the Moderator, Barry Balan agreed to change 
the wording of his motion to amend (a) Lighted Window signs to read: 
"exclude the words with the exception of businesses with the historic district". 
Dennis Ready moved the question. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to stop debate, motion carried, unanimously. He asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to amend, motion carried. More discussion took 
place. Jeff Stallard moved to amend the article as amended under (a) Lighted 
Window Signs (3) delete the words at the end of the sentence "or by lights 
changing in intensity." and delete (4) and (6) in their entirety. He felt it had to 
many regulations. Not fair to the businesses. Jim Hickey and Jim Young, 
both spoke about supporting the businesses needs. Peggy Dunn spoke 
against the motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to amend, motion defeated. Dennis Ready then moved the question 
to stop the debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, he declared 
that the motion carried by 2/3's. He then asked for a show of hands on the 
main motion as amended, and declared that the motion carried by 2/3's. The 
article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Town of Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Article III. General Regulations, 
Section 3334 by inserting the following language into the Zoning By-Law at the 
end of Section 3334: 

(a) Lighted Window Signs. Each business shall be allowed one (1) 
lighted window sign. Lighted window signs shall include all types of 
internally illuminated signs, including neon signs. Lighted window 
signs shall conform to the following standards: 



Page 147 



(1) Lighted window signs shall not exceed five (5) square feet in 
area or cover more that 20% of the window in which it is 
erected, whichever is less, and shall only be allowed in 
ground floor windows. 

(2) Lighted window signs shall be equipped with a timer which 
timer shall control illumination of the sign no longer than thirty 
(30) minutes before opening or thirty (30) minutes after 
closing of the business. 

(3) Lighted window signs shall not incorporate or be lighted by 
flashing or blinking lights, or by lights changing in intensity. 

(4) Lighted window signs shall not contain more than three (3) 
different colors. 

(5) Lighted window signs which are illuminated by a neon light 
source shall be composed of primarily single strand glass 
tubing with a maximum outside diameter of one (1 ) inch. 

(6) Any lighted sign within three (3) feet of a window shall be 
considered to be a window sign and shall comply with all 
requirements of the Zoning Bylaw. 

(7) Lighted window signs shall conform to all other regulations in 
Section 3300. 



Under Article 26 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article III. 
General Regulations, Section 3371. Membership [items], in order to change 
the requirements for membership on the Sign Advisory Committee, by deleting 
the following: 

3371. Membership [items] A sign advisory committee 
of five (5) members shall be appointed by the 
selectmen for three-year terms (except so arranged 
initially that no more than two (2) terms expire each 
year). Members shall include at least one (1) retail 
merchant operating in Chelmsford, and one (1) 
registered architect or landscape architect, and one (1) 
professional in visual design. In addition a member of 
the board of appeals shall be designated by the board 
as a nonvoting sixth member of the sign advisory 
committee. 

and substituting therefore the following (changes are in bold): 



Page 148 



3371. Membership [items] A sign advisory committee 
of five (5) members shall be appointed by the 
selectmen for three-year terms (except so arranged 
initially that no more than two (2) terms expire each 
year). Members shall include at least one (1) retail 
merchant operating in Chelmsford, and two (2) others, 
preferably with a strong interest in architecture, 
landscape architecture or visual design In addition 
a member of the board of appeals shall be designated 
by the board as a nonvoting sixth member of the sign 
advisory committee. 

The Town Manager explained the purpose of the change. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for Planning Board's recommendation. The Planning Board did 
not vote on the article. The Moderator asked for show of hands on 
the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 27 The Moderator said that he had a motion 
from Selectman Lawlor to amend Section 2-13 Referendum 
Procedures 

(c) Referendum Election 

"The Polls shall be opened no later than two o'clock in the 
afternoon " 

The Town Manager explained that as a result of the petition 
drive last year to call for a special town election to ratify the Town 
Meeting action concerning the library, flaws were found in the Charter 
concerning the election process. The purpose of this amendment to 
the Charter is to have it conform with the actual state law regarding 
the entire process of ratifying and calling the election. George Ripsom 
questioned the wording of twenty percent of the registered voters shall 
so vote. The wording was clarified and the amendment from 
Selectman Lawlor incorporated the following wording into his motion. 

(and the last sentence) "The questions so submitted... shall 
be reversed unless at least twenty percent of the voters vote on the 
question." 

The Finance Committee was in favor of the article as 
amended. The Board of Selectmen were 4-1 in favor of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a vote on the motion to amend, motion 
carried. George Merrill moved to amend the article with the following 
changes: 

Under Section 2-13 (b) 

Line 1. Change three to five 

Line 2. Delete registered 

Page 149 



Line 3. Delete as they appear on the list of registered voters 

Line 5. Delete of the town at large 

Line 7. Change five days to ten days, exclusive of Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Line 9. Delete at large 

Under Section 2-13 (c) 

Delete and add original Sect 2-13 (c) 

Under Section 2-13 (d) 

Delete and add original Sect 2-1 3 (d) 
He explained that the proposed changes by the Manager were not 
necessary, just extra wording. The Finance Committee recommended 
against the motion to amend. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended against the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. More discussion 
took place. William Dalton moved to amend the article Line 2-13 B, 3 
percent to 5 percent and Line 2-13 C 20 percent to 15 percent. The 
Finance Committee was against the motion to amend. The Board of 
Selectmen (4-1) were against the motion to amend, the Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend, which left the 
Chair in doubt. The following tellers came forward and a hand count 
was taken: 

Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John Maleski. The 
result was Yes 64 No 61 , the motion carried to amend. 

Dennis Ready moved the question to stop any further debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, He declared that the motion 
carried by 2/3's. He then asked for a show of hands on the motion as 
amended, and declared that the motion carried by 2/3's. The article 
reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under Section 2-13, 
Referendum Procedures, by deleting the existing section as follows: 

Section 2-13 Referendum Procedures 

(a) Effective Date of Final Votes 



Page 150 



No final affirmative vote of a town meeting on any 
warrant article, except a vote to adjourn or dissolve, or votes 
appropriating money for the payment of notes or bonds of the 
town and interest thereon becoming due within the then current 
fiscal year, or votes for the temporary borrowing of money in 
anticipation of revenue, or a vote declared by preamble by a 
two-thirds vote of the town meeting to be an emergency 
measure necessary for the immediate preservation of the 
peace, health, safety or convenience of the town, shall be 
operative until after the expiration of ten days from the 
dissolution of the town meeting. If a referendum petition is not 
filed within the said ten days, the vote of the town meeting shall 
become operative. 

(b) Referendum Petition 

If, within said ten days a petition signed by not less 
than five percent of the voters containing their names and 
addresses is filed with the board of selectmen requesting that 
any question, not yet operative as defined in (a) above, be 
submitted to the voters, then the operation of such vote shall be 
further suspended pending its determination as provided below. 
The board of selectmen shall, within fourteen days after the 
filing of such a petition, call a special election that shall be held 
within twenty days after issuing the call, for the purpose of 
presenting to the voters any such question. If, however, a 
regular or special election is to be held not more than thirty 
days following the date the petition is filed, the board of 
selectmen may provide that any such questions be presented to 
the voters at the same election. 

(c) Referendum Election 

All votes upon the question so submitted shall be 
taken by ballot, and the conduct of such election shall be in 
accordance with the provisions of law relating the elections, 
unless otherwise provided in this section. Any question so 
submitted shall be determined by a majority vote of the voters 
voting thereon, but no action of the town meeting shall be 
reversed unless at least ten percent of the voters vote on the 
question. 

(d) Format of Questions 

Any question so submitted shall be stated on the 
ballot in substantially the same language and form in which it 
was stated when presented by the moderator to the town 
meeting, as appears in the records of the clerk of the meeting. 



Page 151 



and, replacing it with the following new Section 2-13, Referendum 
Procedures (changes in bold); 

Section 2-13 Referendum Procedures 

(a) Effective Date of Final Votes 

No final affirmative vote of a town meeting on any 
warrant article, except a vote to adjourn or dissolve, or votes 
appropriating money for the payment of notes or bonds of the 
town and interest thereon becoming due within the then current 
fiscal year, or votes for the temporary borrowing of money in 
anticipation of revenue, or a vote declared by preamble by a 
two-thirds vote of the town meeting to be an emergency 
measure necessary for the immediate preservation of the 
peace, health, safety or convenience of the town, shall be 
operative until after the expiration of seven days, exclusive of 
Sundays and holidays, from the dissolution of the town 
meeting. If a referendum petition is not filed within the said 
seven days, the vote of the town meeting shall become 
operative. 

(b) Referendum Petition 

If, within said seven days a petition signed by not less 
than five percent of the registered voters of the town, 
containing their names and addresses as they appear on the 
list of registered voters, is filed with the board of selectmen 
requesting that any question, not yet operative as defined in (a) 
above, be submitted to the voters of the town at large, then 
the operation of such vote shall be further suspended pending 
its determination as provided below. The board of selectmen 
shall, within five days after the filing of such a petition, call a 
special election in accordance with state election laws, for 
the purpose of presenting to the voters at large the question or 
questions so involved. If, however, a regular or special 
election is to be held not more than thirty days following the 
date the petition is filed, the board of selectmen may provide 
that any such questions be presented to the voters at the same 
election. 

(c) Referendum Election 

The polls shall be opened no later than two 
o'clock in the afternoon and shall be closed not earlier than 
eight o'clock in the evening, and all votes upon the question 
or questions so submitted shall be taken by ballot, and the 
conduct of such election shall be in accordance with the 
provisions of state law relating to elections. The questions so 
submitted shall be determined by a majority vote of the voters 
voting thereon, but no action of the representative town 
meeting shall be reversed unless at least fifteen percent of the 
registered voters vote on the question 

Page 152 



(d) Format of Questions 

Each question so submitted shall be in the form of 
the following question which shall be placed upon the 
official ballot: - "Shall the town vote to approve the action 
of the representative town meeting whereby it was voted 
(brief description of the substance of the vote and by what 
vote thereon if such vote was tabulated) ?" 

The Moderator stepped down from the podium and asked the Town 
Clerk, Mary St.Hilaire to conduct the meeting because he was the proponent 
of the next article. 

Under Article 28 Moderator Dennis McHugh, explained that this 
by-law once voted and approved by the Attorney General would become part 
of the Town Meeting procedures. The Body had been using this provision 
since the beginning of this meeting on April 28th. With this as a by-law it 
would not be necessary to take a vote at each Town Meeting The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Acting Moderator asked for any questions. 
Hearing none she asked for a show of hands on the article Motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Moderator Dennis McHugh moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General Bylaws, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, Town Meeting, Section 4 
Procedures, in order to change the procedure for counting votes during town 
meeting by leaving the calling for a vote to the discretion of the town 
moderator, in addition, seven or more members of town meeting would retain 
the power to force a count on such a vote, by inserting the following language 
into the General Bylaws, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, Town Meeting, 
Section 4 Procedures, at the end of Section 4 (changes are in bold): 

Section 4.13 Voting - Voice votes will not be used. 
All votes will be taken by a raising of hands. The 
Moderator will visually judge the vote and, if in doubt, 
will ask for a specific count. In matters requiring a 
two thirds vote by statute, the moderator may 
declare the vote based upon raising of hands. If 
seven or more members of town meeting 
question the vote, the moderator shall count the 
vote. 

The Moderator returned to the podium and continued the meeting. 

Under Article 29 Kathryn Fisher moved that the Town vote to amend 
the General Bylaws, Town of Chelmsford, Article VI, Police Regulations, in 
order to establish rules for the regulation of newsracks by adding the following 
at the end of Article VI, Police Regulations: 

Page 153 



Section 24 Regulation of Newsracks Within the Public Way 

For the purposes of this section, newsracks shall mean a 
vending machine used for the sale and/or distribution of 
newspapers or similar printed material. It is not the intent of 
the section to prohibit or interfere with the dissemination of 
information protected under the United States of State 
constitutions, but simply to ensure that the location of 
newsracks protects the public safety of the Town of 
Chelmsford. The location of newsracks within a public way 
shall conform to the following regulations: 

(a) No newsrack shall be located within one hundred 
(100) feet of any school bus stop; 

(b) No newsrack shall be located within ten (10) feet of 
any fire hydrant, fire or police alarm box or other 
emergency facility; 

(c) No newsrack shall be located in such a manner to 
obstruct the clear movement of pedestrians on a 
sidewalk; 

(d) No newsrack shall be located on a public way on 
which parking is prohibited; 

(e) Failure to comply within thirty (30) days of 
notification shall be subject to a fine of fifty dollars 
($50) for each offense. Each day that such offense 
persists shall constitute a separate offense. This 
bylaw may be enforced by any police officer 
through the noncriminal disposition procedures of 
Article 1, Section 2 of the Town of Chelmsford 
General By-laws. 

Kathryn Fisher explained that this by-law was basically a public 
safety issue. Especially around school bus stops. A resident had observed 
many times a number of cars pulling up to a newsrack on Groton Rd and 
causing a potentially dangerous situation The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote on the article. 
Motion carried. 



Page 154 



Under Article 30 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to appropriate $100,000. for the purpose of financing the following 
water pollution abatement facility projects: repair, replacement, and/or 
upgrade of septic systems, pursuant to agreements with the Board of Health 
and residential property owners, including without limitation all costs thereof as 
defined in Section 1 of Chapter 29C of the General Laws; that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the board of Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $100,000. and issue bonds and notes therefor under 
G.L. c 111,s. 127B Vz and/or Chapter 29C of the General Laws: that project 
and financing costs shall be repaid by the property owners, in accordance with 
those agreements, but such bonds and notes shall be general obligations of 
the Town; that the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow all or a portion of such amount from the Massachusetts 
Water Pollution Abatement Trust established pursuant to Chapter 29C and in 
connection therewith to enter into a loan agreement and/or security agreement 
with the Trust and otherwise contract with the Trust and the Department of 
Environmental Protection with respect to such loan and for any federal or state 
aid available for the projects or for the financing thereof; and that the Town 
Manager is authorized to enter into project regulatory agreement with the 
Department of Environmental Protection, to expend all funds available for the 
projects and to take any other action necessary to carry out the projects. 

Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson explained that 
this would enable homeowners to receive a low interest 5% loan for the 
purpose of repairing a failing septic system while waiting for sewage hook up. 
A number of septic systems are failing the title 5 regulations, which can cause 
a economic hardship. The loan is paid off once the property is sold. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote on the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked permission from the Body to continue the meeting 
because the time was pass 1 1.00 PM. Motion carried, unanimously. 



Page 155 



Under Article 31 Selectman Peter Lawlor, moved that the Town 
vote to transfer the care, custody, management, and control of the following 
described parcel of land and easement to the Board of Selectmen to be held 
for the purpose of conveyance, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 30B, for 
consideration to be determined, all right, title and interest, if any, held by the 
Town in a portion of a certain parcel of land located adjacent to 20 Jensen 
Avenue in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, shown as Assessor's Map No. 95, 
Parcel No. 94, containing approximately 225 square feet more of less, and an 
access easement on a portion of the same certain parcel of land containing 
approximately 2,109 square feet more or less, as more fully described in a 
deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Book 2328, page 
249, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file a Home Rule Petition 
under Article 97 of the Massachusetts Constitution. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 32 Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and all 
temporary and/or permanent water rights, or any easement or property in fee 
simple, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, relating to the property 
located in the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, known as Freeman Lake, 
for the purpose of constructing and maintaining improvements to the Freeman 
Lake spillway and dam and controlling the level of water in Freeman Lake; and 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $1000. to defray all 
necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
water rights, easements and/or property and for paying any damages which 
may be awarded as a result of any such taking. 

The Town Manager explained that this was needed in order to secure 
the water rights for Freeman Lake. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 33. Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to authorize a revolving fund under Massachusetts General Laws 
C. 44, S. 53E Y2 for the Council on Aging for Fiscal Year 1998. The receipts to 
be credited to the fund shall be from the collection of fees from the 
implementation of a Senior Trip program. The Council on Aging shall be 
authorized to spend money from the fund for the purpose of providing 
transportation necessary for implementing a Senior Trip program. 
Expenditures from the Senior Trip program revolving fund shall be limited to 
$300,000. during Fiscal Year 1998. 



Page 156 



The Town Manager explained that this would allow the Council on 
Aging to run the Senior Citizens Trips Program. The Friends of the Senior 
Center can no longer provide the service due to auditing and insurance 
requirements. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked that the Representatives clear off their tables. 
Seeing that there was no further business at hand, the Moderator declared the 
meeting adjourned and asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 11:10 PM 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 






Page 157 



Warrant For Annual Town Meeting October 20, 1997 



Middlesex, SS 

To the Constable or any other suitable person of the Town of Chelmsford 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are hereby requested to 
notify and warn the Town Meeting Representatives of said Chelmsford to meet 
in the Senior Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Monday the 
twentieth of October, at 7:30 p.m. in the evening, then and there to act upon 
the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original documents on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office. 



Annual Town Meeting October 20, 1997 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior Center by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 7:35 PM, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 148 Town Meeting Representatives present. The 
Moderator asked the Body to rise as the band from the McCarthy Middle 
School played the Star Spangle Banner. He then announced various 
community events that would be happening the upcoming weekend and in the 
future. He pointed out the fire exits located within the hall. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of the Constable's 
return of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, unanimously. Selectman 
Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to hear reports of the Town Officers and Committees. 



Page 158 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch gave a progress report as required by 
town meeting vote, on the different projects that were approved and on going 
throughout the Town. The Community Action program which is a program to 
encourage civic improvement projects throughout the Town. So far, $4,800.00 
has been spent from the appropriated amount of $10,000. This program has 
assisted in leveraging private funds and private efforts to do three projects in 
Town. The Harmony Park in East Chelmsford, tree planting at the Southwell 
Field and an eagle scout project for benches at the McCarthy School The 
Adams Library expansion has starting to move forward. Bids will go out in the 
next couple of months. Construction should began in the late winter early 
spring with a completion date of the summer of 1999. The $100,000.00 which 
was approved for design work for the Police Station resulted in looking at a 
number of different objections which has stalled the project a little. However, 
plans are moving forward with the architectural work which should be ready 
for the Spring Town Meeting. No sale had yet been completed on the Town 
owned land off Kensington Dr due to not being able to reach an agreement 
with the abutter. The traffic signal at Drum Hill has been completed. The 
signal is on the City of Lowell property with the agreement that the Town 
would maintain it. The traffic signal was paid for by the developers in the 
Drum Hill area. Regarding the North Town Hall there has been a committee 
appointed that will later give an update. The sale and marketing has been put 
on hold in agreement with this body. The Town is looking at the feasibility of 
what the building can be used for and the costs of renovating it. The graffiti 
by-law that was passed has been helpful. Haven't actually had to use it to 
enforce anything but the police work with it and with the property owners to 
make sure that graffiti is removed from private property as quickly as possible 
and the property owners have been extremely cooperative. He then explained 
that the North Town Hall Committee along with the Arts and Technology 
Education Committee would give their brief reports, then he would resume 
with a overview of the Town's finances and that would conclude his report. 

Evelyn Thoren of the Arts and Technology Education Committee 
reported that there had been seventeen applications and from those, five 
awards were issued. Barbara Costello at the Byam 1st grade, a science 
center. Mark Johnson a classroom computer for computer interaction program 
at the Parker for grades 5-8. The Westland School Council, a Wireless 
Microphone system at the Westlands School, K to 4th grade. Betty and 
Michelle Gagnon at the Parker had an application for Life in the Middle School. 
A murale that depicts the different aspects that goes on in the Parker School. 
Jill Everleigh, Byam Kindergarten, writing boxes for a kindergarten program. 
Theses projects are not in any school's budgets. The applications for 1998 
will be available the first of the year, and are due March 1st. The awards will 
be made in June. Currently the fund has a balance of $14,000, which is 
invested in CD's. So far this first year, $2,500. in awards had been issued and 
$2000. has been received since those awards were made. 



Page 159 



Jeff Stallard of the North Town Hall Feasibility Committee began his 
report by thanking the Town Manager and his staff for all the assistance that 
they supplied from information to making arrangements for removing the 
various items that were stored in the building. He then thanked Sheriff DiPaola 
who had supplied prisoners from the Middlesex County System. The prisoners 
worked for eight days doing renovation, in return the Town had to supply their 
lunch. There was an open house this past Saturday, October 18th from 9 am 
to 12 noon at which time the work done in the building was viewed. Planning 
on another open house in the Spring. The Committee's mission statement is 
to preserve the integrity of the North Town Hall for service to the residents of 
Chelmsford, as in the past, for the present and with the future. He said that the 
Committee had accomplished phase 1 of cleaning up and cleaning out. 
Phase 2 will be from the winter of 1997 to the summer of 1998. The goal will 
be to assess and make renovation plans, seek community awareness and 
support. Phase 3 will be ongoing from the winter of 1998- winter of 1999 
conduct renovations and encourage community involvement. Grand opening 
and the community occupying is planned for the year 2000. He closed by 
presenting to Selectman Philip Eliopoulos a certificate of appreciation for his 
family, who's generous donations had supplied the required lunches for the 
prisoners for eight days. 

The Town Manager then gave the financial status of the Town. When 
the Town Meeting ended in April there was a estimated deficit of $65,439. 
knowing that there would be additional revenue coming in from State aid and 
Local taxes. He then showed the total revenue amounts that have come in: 

$275,000 in local taxes, $392,000 in state aid from state legislation for 
education reform for the Charter School and $282,527 in miscellaneous 
receipts, which are motor vehicle excise tax and building permits. For a total 
of $950,172. minus a total expense of $94,000 due to being in the process of 
revaluations more abatement money may be needed. The total amount of 
$790,733. will be on hand for tonight's meeting to deal with many of the issues 
that have been the plans and goals of the Selectmen and the body. When 
done there will be a balance of $47,505. in free cash and a budget balance of 
$7,793. 

The Manager said it was a good plan. The Town works hard to live 
within its needs and not to over extend ourselves either now or in the future. 
Act in a planned and careful fashion as we make our investment and financial 
decision. 

The Moderator announced that William Curry was his latest 
appointment to the Finance Committee. Mr Curry was replacing Barbara 
Skarr who had resigned the past summer. 



Page 160 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $250,000 from Free Cash to the Stabilization 
Fund. 

The Town Manager explained that this would amount to $3,000,000 
accumulated in the fund and Bond Counsel looks at this. The future projects 
of the Center School, Library, and Police Station when on line will have an 
impact of the budget. When the time comes money will be transferred in order 
to keep balance of service and revenue for the Town. He asked for support of 
the article. John Wilder questioned how money is invested? The Manager 
explained that the Town Treasurer invests in long term 12-18 months 
deposits. Are they insured? Yes, the funds are invested in various places, not 
all in one place. Glenn Thoren questioned what the possible problems was 
regarding state reimbursements. The Manager explained that the 
reimbursements regarding the Center School project may not come in a timely 
manner, and the Town may have to provide the funding until the 
reimbursements are returned. The Finance Committee was in favor of the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to appropriate the sum of $750,000 from Free Cash to reduce the 
1998 tax rate. 

The Town Manaager explained the purpose of the article. This money 
was to be used to level off taxes, the same as was done last year. This 
amount results as a savings of 35 cents per $1000. on the tax rate. The 
average house is valued at $170,000.00 which amounts to a $50-$60 dollar 
savings. He said since 1981 it has been the budgetary practice of the Town to 
increase the budget by 2 1 / 2 % . The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Peter Dulchinos, Member of the Board of Health, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the revolving fund under 
Massachusetts General law c. 44, sec. 53E 1 / 2 for the Board of Health for 
Fiscal Year 1998. The receipts to be credited to the fund shall be from the 
collection of fees from the implementation of a Hepatitis B program. The 
Board of Health shall be authorized to spend money from the fund for the 
purpose of acquiring supplies and materials necessary for implementing a 
Hepatitis B program. Expenditures from the Hepatitis B Revolving Fund shall 
be limited to $7,500 during Fiscal Year 1998. 



Page 161 



The Town Manager explained that this was the continuation of the 
program that was established at last year's Town Meeting. Each year it must 
be approved. The amount offsets the cost of implementing the program. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate $22,915 with which to pay bills of 
previous fiscal years. 

The Town Manager explained that the fiscal year closes on June 30th. 
This amount represents the total of the various bills received after that date. 
$20,438 for Ma Electric bill from the School Department. $1,180.00 for a 
printing bill from the Finance Committee. $1004.00 for a miscellaneous bill 
and $293.00 for a late medical from Public Safety. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 
41, Section 108L, the Career Incentive Pay Program for Police Officers, (also 
known as the Quinn Bill), which provides for a percentage increase in base 
salary based on the completion of approved courses or degrees by full-time 
police officers. 

The Town Manager said that the Quinn Bill encourages continuing 
education for Police Officers. When an officer receives a degree in criminal 
justice their pay is increased a certain percentage mattering on the degree. 
Currently the patrolmen receive an 5% increase in their base pay for an 
associates degree, 10% increase for a bachelor and 12 Vi % for a master. The 
Quinn bill mandates that the increases in base pay be 10%, 20% and 25% for 
the degrees. The State will reimburse the Town for the increased difference. 
This article is the result of the settlement of the patrolmen's contract 
concerning education benefits. He explained that the figure shown in article 7 
reflects the settlement cost of the contract. Other issues were sick leave, 
fitness program, if Patrolmen become certified EMT's they will receive an 
additional $800.00. Also there was a retro payment for a grievance that had 
been filed. He asked for support of this article and article 7. George Ripsom 
asked what the bottom line increase would be? $90,000. When does the 
Quinn bill go into effect? Next fiscal year. The Finance Committee supported 
the article. A majority of the Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 



Page 162 



UNDER ARTICLE 7. The Town Manager explained that due to 
settlement of the Clerical Union contract, increases in salaries were made in 
the departments shown. Under the Municipal Administration Personnel 
Services and Expenses the Data Processing Department was being upgraded 
in-house,. He estimated the cost of $15,000. for updating of the property maps 
and recodification of town's by-laws. The settlement of the Teacher's 
contract was the reasoning for the increase in the School Department. Glenn 
Thoren asked why there are two articles, the figure listed in this article plus the 
next article. The Manager explained that the figure shown in this article 
represented a one time bonus agreement. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectman recommended the article. 
Kathryn Fisher moved to take Article 7 out of order and move it to immediately 
following the Special Town Meeting of Thursday October 23, 1997. She felt 
that the portable classroom issue of the Special Town Meeting should be 
addressed before any further money is raised and appropriated or transferred. 
The Finance Committee did not recommend the motion to table. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously did not recommend tabling the article. John Wilder 
asked if action from this meeting could be reconsidered at the Special Town 
Meeting. The Moderator explained that once this meeting is adjourned tonight 
nothing can be reconsidered on any of the articles voted. However, an article 
can be brought back for reconsideration any amount of times during the 
meeting it was voted in. He asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
table. Motion defeated. He then asked if there was the need of further 
debate, hearing none he asked for the vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Fiscal Year 1998 operating budget under Article 2 of the Annual Town 
Meeting held on April 28, 1997 as follows: 

Increase Line Item #1, Municipal Administration Personnel Services, by 
$22,200 

Increase Line Item #2, Municipal Administration Expenses, by $50,000 

Increase Line Item #3, Chelmsford School Department, by $557,000 

Increase Line Item #4, Nashoba Technical High School Assessment, by 
$16,285 

Increase Line Item #5, Public Safety Personnel Services, by $97,000 

Increase Line Item #6, Public Safety Expenses, by $10,000 

Increase Line Item #7, Public Works Personnel Services, by $5,300 

Increase Line Item #8, Public Works Expense, by $40,000 

Page 163 



Increase Line Item #10, Cemetery Personnel Services, by $600 

Increase Line Item #12, Community Services Personnel Services, by $20,100 

And that the Town raise and appropriate $759,025, and transfer $60,000 
from Free Cash to defray such changes. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $450,000 for the 
funding of negotiated collective bargaining agreements. 

The Manager explained that this is the settlement of the Teacher's 
Union contract. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate $1,000 for the purpose of acquiring in fee 
simple a certain parcel of land located on Park Place, shown as lot 20 on 
Assessor's Map 164, containing 10,053 square feet more or less and more 
fully described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 01244, Page 0313, and authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire said land by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise. 

The Town Manager explained that this land abuts the Chelmsford 
Country Club. It doesn't have much value due to it being pretty wet because 
of this it has an assessed value $5900. The amount of $1000. was based on 
the legal cost involved to obtain the land plus the fact that the land is wet. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands He declared the vote passed based on the 2/3's rule. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10. John P. Emerson Jr, Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Sewer Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with buildings and trees 
thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the property located in 
the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further described and shown on 
a set of plans entitled "Plan of Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, Hart Pond Area, Phase NIC Sewers dated October, 1997 
prepared by Richard F. Kaminski & Associates, Inc.", a copy of which is on file 
in the office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein by reference, for 
the purpose of constructing and maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all 
other appurtenances thereto; and for paying any damages which may be 
awarded as the result of any such taking. 

Page 164 



John Emerson came forward to answer any questions, hearing none 
the Moderator asked for the recommendations. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of Article 11 be 
waived. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, motion 
carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman William Dalton explained the 
article and said that there are presently 270 double poles in Town. Presently 
the Towns of Wilmington and Maynard have the same by-law. George Ripsom 
didn't feel that there was any real hazard and ineffective. Selectman Dalton 
said that some of these poles have been like this for ten years, and that there 
is no need for this. Bill Curry questioned who would be responsible for the 
enforcement? The Town Manager said that the Police and Building Inspector. 
Questions were asked about future developments being in jeopardy. 
Selectman Dalton said that the utility companies have ignore the Board's 
request to removed the double poles. This by-law would allow the Selectman 
to hold a public hearing process and a time period that would force the utility 
company to act on an order issued by the Selectmen. The Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Board stated that they 
couldn't give one at this time because they didn't have any expertise in this 
matter. The Board of Selectmen enthusiastically recommended unanimously 
the article. A number of Representatives spoke in favor. George Ripsom 
questioned if it would be forcible. Town Counsel John Georgio said once 
approved by the A.G. as an by-law it will be enforceable, by way of the hearing 
process of the Board of Selectmen. The Moderator asked for a vote by a 
show of hands. The motion carried and the article reads as follows: 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article V, Streets and Sidewalks, by adding the following 
Section 22, Regulation of Utility Poles: 

1. No public or private organization or utility company shall place or allow 
more than one pole to exist within five feet of another utility pole on 
any public or private way within the Town of Chelmsford, without the 
permission of the Board of Selectmen, which may contain conditions. 
There is excepted from this provision the temporary emergency 
replacement of a damaged utility pole. 



Page 165 



2. Following a public hearing, the Selectmen may issue an order for the 
removal, relocation or alteration of any utility pole or poles in excess of 
one at any given location, upon the determination that more than one 
utility pole at any given location presents a nuisance, hazard or threat 
to the public safety, welfare or convenience to the inhabitants of the 
Town. 

3. Any organization or utility company which owns or is responsible for a 
utility pole or poles subject to any order issued by the Selectmen shall 
fully comply with the terms and conditions of any such order within 
one hundred and eighty (180) days of the date of its issuance unless 
such period is extended by the Selectmen in its sole and absolute 
discretion. In the event of noncompliance with the terms of any order 
issued by the Selectmen, the Selectmen may take whatever 
enforcement action it deems appropriate, including, without limitation; 
the imposition of a fine of three hundred ($300) dollars per day for 
each day of noncompliance; the application for an injunction 
restraining the continued existence of any such pole or poles subject 
to such order; and any other penalties, impositions or relief as the 
Selectmen may deem necessary. 



UNDER ARTICLE 12 . Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the following 
described parcel of land to the Board of Selectmen to be held for the purpose 
of conveyance and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 30B, for consideration 
to be determined, all right, title, and interest, if any, held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land on Third Avenue/Fourth Avenue, shown as Lot 69 on 
Assessors Map 66, containing 3,240 square feet more or less, and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Book 6218, Page 62. 

The Town Manager explained that the value of the land according to 
the Assessors is $3,400. Through the bidding process abutters will be 
notified. John Wilder questioned what the minimal bid would be? The value 
price. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



Page 166 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 . Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the following 
described parcel of land to the Board of Selectmen to be held for the purpose 
of conveyance and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 30B, for consideration 
to be determined, all right, title, and interest, if any, held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land on Willis Drive, shown as Lot 4 on Assessors Map 66, 
containing 3300 square feet more or less, and more fully described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Book 6218, Page 60. 

The Town Manager said that the value for this piece of land is $3,600, 
based on Assessors appraisal. However, there will be a deed restriction. Will 
there be a set time to go out for the bid? The Manager said probably in 
November. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 14. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to transfer $ 20,000 from Free Cash for the purpose of increasing 
the revolving fund for off-duty special police detail payments as described in 
G.L. c. 44, Section 53C. 

The Town Manager explained that over 13 years ago (prior to him 
being with the Town) this fund was set up. The current yearly appropriation is 
$25,000. It is an inadequate amount with the new cycle of billing. During the 
past summer there was an incident regarding the detail monies payment due 
from UPS. The Police Officers weren't paid in a timely manner, therefor the 
checks couldn't be released. The issue has since be resolved. There is a 
need to bring the account up to a more realistic amount.. Also the auditors feel 
that the present amount is not enough. The current billing system works well 
and it should be continued. George Ripsom questioned if there has been 
problems in the past? The Manager responded Yes, numerous times for a 
short period. Chief Armand Caron recommended the article. This account 
actually started 20 years ago with the amount of $2,000. The Town says that 
the details have to be Police personnel. There is a service charge of 10% so 
the Town makes money for the amount sitting in the account. The Finance 
Committee did not recommend the article. A majority of the Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to accept the provisions of G.L. c. 44, Section 53 F and 1 / 2 for the 
purpose of establishing an Enterprise Fund for the operation of the Tully 
Forum, and to transfer $200,000 from Free Cash to operate the Tully Forum 
for the remainder of fiscal year 1998. 



Page 167 



Selectman Peter Lawlor explained the article. The Commonwealth 
will give the Tully Forum Ice Skating Facility to the Town. This is an outright 
gift. This article would allow the Town seed money to get under way a 
revolving account. Will be used for start up cost, ultimately will be paid back 
through ice time rental.. Will hire a management company to run and operate 
the facility. John Wilder questioned if this would be an appropriate enterprise? 
Selectman Lawlor said the Board of Selectmen unanimously supported the 
article. The recreational use is worthwhile. John Wilder asked about the 
liability issue. The Town Manager said that the standard practice would be 
used. A group provides a certificate of assurance naming the Town and the 
Town will have it's own Certificate at a cost of approximately $3,500. Jim 
Doukszewicz asked if any Town employees would be involved? No, only the 
management company employees. Leonard Richards asked if there would be 
public skating time. Yes, time will be set aside. Roger Sumner wanted to 
know if UPS had expressed interest in the facility for expansion of their 
property, Selectman Lawlor said he wasn't aware of this. Roger Sumner 
wanted to know what would happen if the Town didn't take over the property. 
It was explained that the State would have to declare it as surplus property, 
then it would go out onto the open market and sold. There is a lengthy time 
period for DCPO to do this and the facility would sit there unattended. John 
Wilder asked if the property was in Billerica. Selectmen Lawlor said that the 
building was but the parking lot and acreage is in Chelmsford. This would not 
bar the Town from inquiring ownership. Once done the Manager and the 
Board will discuss moving the Town's boundary line. If this happened then the 
maintenance and fixing of Brick Kiln Road would be taken care of, especially 
since most of the vehicle traffic is connected to the UPS facility in Chelmsford. 
John Wilder asked if the Town would have to pay some kind of fee to 
Billerica? Selectman Lawlor replied that there would be no fee to Billerica. The 
Town Manager said the bill is still in legislation process, but may include the 
equipment as part of the deal. Also the State was aware that Billerica already 
has an ice rink so Chelmsford was the logical choice. . The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $75,377 from Free Cash to the School 
Department, said funding coming from Medicaid reimbursements. 

The Town Manager explained that this had been a done last year. 
The agreement with the School Department is that if they track down the 
Medicare money it is return to the Town then transferred to the School 
Department. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to rescind $232,345 of the authorization to borrow funds under 
Article 8 of the Annual Town Meeting, held on June 20, 1990. 

Page 168 



The Town Manager explained that the money was appropriated to do 
handicap accessibility at the schools. The project was completed without the 
use of this money. This article is to remove it from the books. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Selectman were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to transfer $ 45,000 from Free Cash to supplement the Reserve 
Fund for FY98 to be used at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as 
provided in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 6. 

The Town Manager explained each year the Town appropriates money 
for the Finance Committee use. To be used for transfers of funds for 
emergency unforeseen events. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article 2 
District Regulations, by amending Section 2300, Use regulations schedule, as 
follows: 



Recreational uses 


R 
A 


R 
B 


R 
C 


R 

M 


C 


C 

B 


C 
C 


C 
D 


IA IS 


R 
M 
H 


C 
X 


p 


D 
S 




I Golf course 


B 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


O 


O 


B 
A 







1 


B 


and change it to: 


Recreational uses 


R 
A 


R 

B 


R 
C 


R 
M 


C 


C 

B 


C 
C 


C 
D 


IA 


IS 


R 
M 
H 


c 

X 


p 




s 


Golf course 

> 


B 


B 
A 


B 

A 


B 
A 


B 
A 


B 

A 


B 

A 


B 

A 


O 





B 

A 





p 


B 

\ 



Andrew Sheehan, Community Development Coordinator explained 
that this is basically a housekeeping article to allow the Town's golf course to 
be in a public zone. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of 
the Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2300, Use 
Regulations Schedule. 



Page 169 



A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would change section 2300, Use 
Regulations Schedule to change Golf Courses from a prohibited use to a 
permitted use in the Public (P) District. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) in favor to 
recommend article #19. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Barry Balan moved to waive the reading of the article 20. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20. Robert Morse of the Master Plan Review 
Committee, explained that presently there are no set rules and regulations 
regarding the building of Independent Senior Living facilities. Currently there 
are two assisted living facilities that have been built and another project is 
under construction, there is a need for this type of building. This by-law would 
set the guidelines that the Committee feels is important for any future 
development that would provide less impact on the Town's sources. The 
Moderator asked for the various recommendations. The Finance Committee 
didn't have any recommendation. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. Chairman of the Planning Board Kim MacKenzie read the Board's 
recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article IV, Special Regulations by inserting a new 
Section 5000 to provide for Facilitated and Independent Senior Living. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meeting on September 24, 1997 and 
October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would add a new Section 5000, to provide 
for Facilitated and Independent Senior Living. 

Page 170 



The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) in favor to 
recommend article #20. 

Questions and discussion took place concerning the restrictions of 
age and size of living area. Henrick Johnson spoke against limiting the 
amount of bedrooms and habitable living area. He felt the Town shouldn't limit 
how many bedrooms nor the amount of habitable living area a unit should 
have. He moved to amend the article. Under section 5041. Standards for 
Independent Senior Living deleting (a) Units shall contain no more than two 
bedrooms, and (b) Units shall have a maximum habitable living area of sixteen 
hundred (1600) square, and make (c) (a) A minimum of 33% of the units in a 
project shall comply with ADA accessibility standards to all living areas.. He 
explained that this would keep the proposed bylaw consistent with the current 
zoning by-law of only controlling the lot size, and not the amount of living 
space. Susan McHugh questioned if the information is based on actual senior 
needs? Robert Morse explained that this by-law is similar to a by-law that the 
Town of Lexington has. Barry Balan questioned the age restriction. John 
Emerson moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator then asked for 
a vote on the motion to amend, which left the Chair in doubt. The following 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. Patricia Plank, Lucy 
Simonian, Dorothy Frawley and John Maleski The result of the hand count: 
Yes 69 No 65 a majority is needed, motion carried to amend. More 
discussion followed on the main motion as amended. Susan Gates moved to 
amend the article as amended by: Delete Word "senior" in Section 5010. 
Delete word "elder" in Section 5010 and replace it with "disabled". Delete 
word "elder" and "senior in section 5010 (a) replace with "those". Delete word 
"senior" in section 5010 (b). Delete dif senior or elder in section 5041 (r). 
Delete "elder" in section 5041 (r). Delete "retired or elderly" in section 5041 (r) 
under Independent Living delete word "senior" in section 5000. Delete word 
"senior" wherever phrase "Independent Senior Living" ocurrs. Susan Gates felt 
that if a citizen had a need for assisted living then the facility should be 
available to that person regardless of their age. More discussion followed The 
Finance Committee was not in favor deleting the wording. A majority of the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. Robert Morse spoke against 
deleting. This type of facility is intended for Senior and Elderly citizens. 
Studies show that the age group specified throughout this bylaw are the 
citizens who really need assisted living. There are some younger people who 
do need assistance, however, the much greater need is with the age group 
specified. George Ripsom spoke against the motion to amend and 
commended the Master Plan Review Committee for their efforts. Elizabeth 
Marshall spoke against the motion. Susan Gates moved to withdraw her 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Dennis Ready moved the question to stop further debate. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked for 
a vote on the main motion as amended, which left the Chair in doubt. The 

Page 171 



Tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 88 No 39 , 2/3's is 85 
the motion carried and the article as amended reads as follows: 

Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article IV, Special Regulations, by 
adding the following after Section 4900 of the Town of Chelmsford Zoning 
Bylaw: 

Sec. 5000. Facilitated and Independent Senior Living 

5010. Intent. Facilitated and Independent Senior Living facilities are allowed 
in a variety of zoning districts by special permit from the Board of Appeals. 
The intent of the bylaw is to provide the opportunity for the development of the 
types of multi-family and communal housing most beneficial for the senior and 
elder population of Chelmsford. 

(a) Facilitated Living facilities provide private or communal lodging for 
elders requiring limited medical attention or supervision and who 
ordinarily are ambulatory. These include, but are not limited to 
Assisted Living facilities, Alzheimer's facilities and Congregate Living 
facilities. 

(b) Independent Senior Living facilities are intended to provide a safe, 
suitable dwelling unit for a senior couple or individual who are able to 
live independently. Open Space preservation is an important facet of 
Independent Senior Living projects, and is meant to provide the 
residents of the project with opportunities for active and passive 
recreation. 

5020. Standards. The following dimensional standards shall apply to Section 
5000 projects. 



Minimum Lot Requirements: 


RM CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


IA 


Area (acres) 


5 5 


5 


5 


5 


7 


Width (ft) 


Same as Sec. 


2600 








Depth (ft) 


Same as Sec. 


2600 








Frontage (ft) 


Same as Sec. 


2600 









Minimum Yard Requirements RM CA CB CC CD IA 
Front Sec. 2600 or twice the building height, 

whichever is greater. 

Side (ft) 25 40 40 40 40 40 

Rear (ft) 30 40 40 40 40 40 

Building Separation (ft) 25 25 25 25 25 25 



Page 172 



Maximum Building 


RM 


CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


IA 


Coverage (percent) 


Same as Sec. 


2600 








Height (ft) 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


35 


Open Space Requirements 


RM 


CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


IA 


Facilitated Living (%) 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


Ind. Senior Living (%) 


10 


30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


Maximum # of Units per acre 


RM 


CA 


CB 


CC 


CD 


IA 


Facilitated Living 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


Ind. Senior Living(a) 


7 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 



Footnotes for sec. 5020. 

(a) Exclusive of open space requirement. 

(Tract size minus Open Space Requirement minus 
wetlands/floodplain not included in Open Space Requirement) times 
units per acre equals Maximum number of units per tract. 

5030. Open Space Requirement 

The open space requirement is intended to provide the residents of the facility 
with opportunities to enjoy outdoor passive and active recreation, and to 
promote the conservation of open space. The applicant shall provide the 
Planning Board with a recreational plan which will show how the open space 
will provide passive and/or active recreation. The recreational plan shall 
include a plan for the maintenance of any improvements to the open space 
such as bicycle, equestrian and foot paths. 

5031 . Definition of Open Space 

(a) All land within the tract which is not covered by buildings, roads, 
driveways, parking areas or service areas, or which is not set aside as 
private yards or patios. 

(b) no more than 50% of the minimum required Open Space shall be 
situated within a floodplain and/or wetland. 

(c) The Open Space shall have a shape, dimension, character and 
location suitable to enable its enjoyment and use for recreation, 
conservation or agricultural purposes by the residents of the facility. 

5032. Ownership 

The Open Space shall be held by the owners of the Independent Senior Living 
facility, or otherwise as the Planning Board may direct 

5033. Conservation Restriction. 

Page 173 



Open Space shall be protected against building development and 
environmental damage by conveying to the Town a conservation restriction 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 84, section 31-33 which 
shall be enforceable by the Conservation Commission. The restriction shall 
specifically prohibit the use of Open Space for all-terrain vehicles, 
snowmobiles, motorcycles and similar vehicles, except that motorized wheel 
chairs shall be permitted. It shall prohibit the construction of any above ground 
structures, buildings, roads and paved areas, except for the maintenance and 
construction of bicycle, equestrian and foot paths or similar facilities for the 
benefit of the users, or such other as the Planning Board may permit. Such 
restrictions shall be in such form and substance as the Planning Board shall 
prescribe and may contain additional restrictions on development and the use 
of the Open Space as the Planning Board may deem appropriate. 

5040. General Standards 

(a) The Board of Appeals shall find that the proposed plan of 
development is consistent with section 1500. 

(b) The entire site shall be a size and shape as shall provide a housing 
site that will be in harmony with the natural terrain and other features 
of the site, and will preserve natural vistas and the character of the 
neighborhood. 

(c) No site on a plan for which an approval is granted under this section 
may be subdivided so as to create additional lots. A notation to that 
effect shall be shown on the site plan. 

(d) Section 5000 projects abutting Residentially Zoned land shall provide 
a landscaped buffer strip thirty (30) feet in width to provide adequate 
screening for adjacent properties. No structure, driveway, parking 
area or sidewalk shall be located in the landscaped buffer strip. 

(e) Driveways and sidewalks within the development shall be constructed 
in accordance with the section 1400 requirements under site plan 
review, with such waivers, if any, as the Planning Board deems 
appropriate. 

(f) Sidewalks conforming to the Planning Board Subdivision Rules and 
Regulations shall be required along frontage and both sides of internal 
roads. 

(g) Additional requirements of linking pedestrian circulation systems per 
section 1425 (m) may be required by the Planning Board. 



Page 174 



(h) Buildings shall be designed to be complementary in exterior design 
with each other and with the existing neighborhood in which the facility 
is located. 

(i) Dwellings constructed under this section shall not be eligible for 
subsequent conversion to conventional apartments with the exception 
of projects in the RM district. 

(j) The method(s) of implementing age restrictions of seniors and elders 
(62 years of age or over) must be to the satisfaction of the Board of 
Appeals and the Planning Board. 

(k) The Planning Board may set additional site security and safety 
requirements as deemed necessary to ensure the security and safety 
of the residents of the facility. 

(I) Requirements and criteria of Section 4500 shall be demonstrated. 

5041. Standards for Independent Senior Living 

(a) A minimum of 33% of the units in a project shall comply with ADA 
accessibility standards to all living areas. 

;and amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article I, Administration 
and Procedure, Section 1400, Site plan, by adding the following at the end of 
Section 1423(b): "facilitated living or independent senior living facility." 

;and amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, District 
Regulations, Section 2300 Use regulations schedule, by adding new 
categories under residential uses after "Planned Open Space Residential 
Development" entitled "Facilitated Living" and "Independent Senior Living" as 
shown below: 



RA RB RC RM CA CB CC CD IA IS RMH CX P OS 



Facilitated Living O O O BA BA BA BA BA BA O O OOO 
Independent O O O BA BA BA BA BA BA O O OOO 

Senior Living 



;and amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article III, General 
Regulations, Section 3100, Off-street parking and loading, by adding 
"independent senior living dwelling." after "two family" in Section 3120(p) and 
by adding a new Section after 3120(q) entitled Section 3120(r), as follows: 



Page 175 



(r) Facilitated Living. One space for each employee on the shift having the 
greatest number of employees, plus one (1) space for each visiting staff. 
When on site parking for the facility's residents is permitted, the parking 
requirement is eight tenths (8/10) space per bedroom. When on site parking 
for the facility's residents is not permitted, the parking requirement is one (1) 
space for each three (3) beds. The site must support the potential for meeting 
the parking requirement of (d) Business and professional offices in the event 
of a building conversion, and shall be shown on the site plan as potential 
future parking. 

land amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article I, Administration 
and Procedure, Section 1423 (b), by adding "or facilitated and independent 
living facility." after "multi-family residential development"; 

;and amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article V, Definitions, by 
adding the following definitions: 

Senior or Elder. An individual who is 62 years of age or over. 

Assisted Living facility. A facility providing private multi-family dwellings or 
communal lodging for more than four (4) unrelated elders requiring assistance 
with the activities of daily living, such as aid or assistance with bathing, 
dressing/grooming, ambulation, eating, toileting or other similar tasks. Defined 
by M.G.L. c. 19Ds. 1 

Alzheimer's facility. A facility providing treatment and communal lodging for 
more than four (4) unrelated persons who have been diagnosed by a medical 
doctor as having Alzheimer's disease, but who do not require the skilled 
nursing care typically provided by a nursing home. 

Congregate Living facility: A facility providing communal lodging more than 
four (4) unrelated elders in a non-institutional residential shared living 
environment which integrates shelter and services needed by the functionally 
impaired or socially isolated elder who does not require the constant 
supervision or intensive health care services as provided in a nursing home. 
The shared living environment shall include at least the following: (a) Shared 
kitchen facilities; and (b) Shared dining facilities. Each bedroom shall be 
considered one (1) unit. 

Facilitated Living facility: Shall include assisted, Alzheimer's and congregate 
living facilities. 

Independent Living facility: A facility providing independent dwelling for a 
retired or elderly individual or couple. In addition to bed space, such facilities 
would ordinarily include private toilet, bath, food preparation facilities and a 
private dining area. 

Page 176 



Selectmen Peter Lawlor moved to adjourn the meeting until Thursday 
October 23rd at 7:30 PM at the Senior Center on Groton Road The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously The 
meeting adjourned at 10:55 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Adjourned Annual Town Meeting October 23, 1997 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 7:35 PM, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 151 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. The Moderator asked for permission to allow Andrew Sheehan, 
Community Development Coordinator who was a non resident to be able to 
address the Body from time to time. Motion carried unanimously, by way of 
a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21. Andrew Sheehan, Community Development 
Coordinator, explained the article. Presently the Board of Appeals, may grant 
a special permit for a use not listed in the use regulation schedule of a 
particular zone. This by-law change would not allow this to be done any more. 
If passed, then the use change request must come before Town Meeting for a 
vote. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the 
Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2220, Use 
Regulations Schedule. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 



Page 177 



The proposed amendment would delete section 2220 as it now 
appears and replace it with the following: "2220, Uses Not Listed. All uses 
which are not listed in Section 2300, Use Regulations schedule, are 
prohibited." 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) in favor to 
recommend article #21. 

The Moderator asked for vote by way of a show of hands on the 
article He declared the vote passed by the 2/3's rule The article reads 
as follows: 

Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, District Regulations, 
by deleting Section 2220 as it presently appears: 

"2220. Uses not listed. If a particular use is not specifically included in the use 
regulations schedule, then the board of appeals may determine whether in the 
district in which an unlisted use is proposed, uses having similar externally 
observable attributes are or may be permitted, and if so, the board of appeals 
may authorize such use or uses as a special permit for exception under 
section 1500. 

and replacing it with the following: 

"2220. Uses not listed. All uses which are not listed in Section 2300, Use 
regulations schedule, are prohibited." 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Andrew Sheehan Community Development 
Coordinator explained that this is to correct a zoning change from the 1986 
master plan. It was the intent to change exterior lighting fixtures to be 
mounted no more than 15 feet high to read 20 feet high. Instead a new section 
(e) had been added saying exterior lighting fixture to be mounted no more 
than 20 feet high. Which resulted as being inconsistent. This would eliminate 
the (e) sentence and correct (c) to reflect the 20 feet high, as was the original 
intention of the amendment done in 1986. The Finance Committee did not 
have any recommendation of the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended in favor of the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the 
Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Section 3300, Signs and Outdoor Lighting. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 



Page 178 



The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents. 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would delete "fifteen"(15)" where it appears 
in Section 3351 (c) and substitute "twenty (20)" in its place to read: (c) Exterior 
lighting fixtures other than signs are mounted not more than twenty (20) feet 
high, and: by deleting Section 3351 (e) in its entirety, which reads: (c) Exterior 
lighting fixtures other than signs are mounted not more than twenty (20) feet 
high. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) in favor to 
recommend article #22. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article III, General 
Regulations, Section 3300, Signs and Outdoor Lighting, by deleting "fifteen 
(15) where it appears in Section 3351(c) and substituting "twenty (20)" in its 
place to read: 

(c) Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs are mounted not more 
than twenty (20) feet high. 

and; by deleting Section 3351(e) in its entirety, which reads: 

(e) Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs are mounted not more 
than twenty (20) feet high. 

The Moderator asked the Body to waive the reading of the next article. 
Motion carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Andrew Sheehan, Community Development 
Coordinator explained that the Town was contacted in 1996 by the Dept of 
Environmental Management saying that the current floodplain bylaw and map 
didn't meet the requirements for the National Flood Insurance Program, 
concerning construction in a floodplain area. The new bylaw and map would. 
Marianne Paresky questioned the Black Brook area. Was the Glenview Sand 
and Gravel pit in this area? Yes, the lower portion. Does Black Brook run 
through this portion? Yes. She wanted to know who would be responsible for 
the flooding along the Steadman St and Melody Lane area. Andrew Sheehan 
explained that the change will not alleviate any present problems, but won't 
increase any problems to the area. It won't correct past problems. It is to 
prevent future problems due to further development in the floodplain. 



Page 179 



The Moderator interrupted the speaker in order to make a point of 
order. He announce that there was a Special Town Meeting posted to begin 
at 7:45 PM and where in fact this was the time. Stephen Mallette moved to 
recess the Town Meeting at this time in order to take up the action of the 
Special Town Meeting. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried. The Meeting adjourned at 7:45 PM. 



Special Town Meeting October 23, 1997 



The Special Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior Center by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 7:45 PM, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 151 Town Meeting Representatives present. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of the Constable's 
return of the posting of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the reading of the warrant 
be waived Motion carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Susan Graves moved that the Town vote to 
transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization fund the sum of $360,000. for 
the purpose of purchasing temporary housing in order to address the issue of 
large class size. 

Gary Mathews who was the proponent of the article explained that he 
as well as others wanted to elevate the overcrowded class room situation at 
the South Row School and Westlands elementary schools. This article if 
passed would allow two portable classrooms for the South Row School and 
one for the Westlands. Primarily at the South Row School there are classes 
that contain thirty children per classroom. The feeling was that the School 
Committee was not being responsive to the immediate need, they are waiting 
for the Center School to come on line, which won't happen until 1999. Studies 
have shown that overcrowding has a negative effect on children. In the 
immediate area Westford, Acton, Bedford as well as other cities and towns in 
the state use these classrooms with success. Lesley Mathews spoke about 
the issues. The lack of space, the present classrooms were built for 22-24 
students. The lack of a short term plan, and the fact that the Center School 
coming on line was to little to late. The population bubble would move up 
through the years, and these classrooms could follow them. She then did a 
slide presentation for the body showing the type of modular classrooms that 
they had looked into, and gave a more extensive list of the communities 
presently using the classrooms throughout Massachusetts. A lengthy question 
period took place. Would taxes be raised? No, because the money would 
come from the Stabilization Fund.. Why isn't the School Committee's solution 
of adding a teacher aide to every classroom an answer?. This would not 

Page 180 



solve the short term problem. They aren't certifiable teachers, just aides 
What will the cost of relocating the modular be? It's estimated to be S45.000 
per move, and it can move along with the population. It would only take eight 
weeks once purchased to be ready for occupancy, no architect is needed. Dr 
Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools said that overcrowding has been a 
School Committee issue for the last 4-5 years. The Committee has come up 
with a plan and can't support the portables at the expense of the current 
budget. The Committee did in fact pursued a pot hole grant that would allow 
the Town to obtain portable classrooms, but was not successful School 
Committee Member, Judy Mallette said that this grant was an area where a 
solution could be obtained without the use of Town money The Committee is 
aware of the overcrowding issue and has a short term plan which does not 
meet the approval of the petitioners. 46% of the classrooms are overcrowded 
and there are fire hazards as well as other situations. Is the Center School the 
solution? For the future, but not the present. Douglas Aker asked if the 
problem was basically the lack of classroom space or funds'? It was due to 
lack of space availability in the schools. John Emerson asked exclusive of 
the South Row School what is the average class size? Dr Moser said that 
there are 99 classrooms kindergarten through 4th grade. 17 of those has 13- 
19 students, 47 has 20-23 students, 17 has 24-26 students, 18 has 27-30 
students. It is the 18 classes of 27-30 students where the aide support is 
being focused on. It averages out to be 23 students per classroom. John 
Emerson questioned if this is passed can the money be made to use for 
portable classrooms? Town Counsel explained that this would be a capital 
expenditure and it could not be used to fund the bottom line. Brian Latina 
asked that the School Committee members be polled their vote on the 
following question: If the space was available would you hire teachers or 
aides? All the five members said teachers. Jan Spence asked if these 
classrooms included everything, equipment etc.? Yes it did. Fran McDougall 
suggested that perhaps team teaching could be a solution then, once the 
Center School came on line the teachers would already be hired. The 
petitioners felt that this would not help the immediate overcrowding problem. 
They want to see an immediate solution to the long time problem. They want 
to see smaller class size with a teacher in each class. Not more aides in 
already overcrowded class rooms. Roger Sumner wanted to know how many 
of the four elementary schools have art rooms? Dr Moser replied it was the 
intent in the past to have art rooms but since then they have been turned into 
classrooms, therefore, all the schools except Byam have no art room. And 
how many music rooms are there? None. What about when the Center 
School comes on line. Dr Moser said this will only provide space. In order to 
lower the class size, the Committee will have to ask the Body for more funds 
to provide additional teachers. Roger Sumner, what will happen when the 
Center School comes on board, will there be music and art rooms in each of 
the elementary school? Dr Moser said that when that happens there will be a 
art room, a music room a library and computer space and several classrooms 
left over for the hiring of additional teachers Once those teachers are hired, 
there would still be space for future growth. It was asked if this overcrowding 

Page 181 



would move onto the middle schools. Dr Moser felt that the two middle 
schools could handle the population. What are the aides qualifications. He 
read the qualifications and said that out of the 18 aides hired 60% are 
certificate teachers. It is not necessary to have a certificate to be a teacher's 
aide. Karen Ready asked the proponents how would the teachers hired for 
the portable classrooms be paid for? The proponent said that instead of aides 
being hired the money could be used to hire the teachers. All this article does 
is provided the money for the classrooms, not the salaries. Frank Barre 
wanted to know when the Center School would be on line? It is estimated that 
the goal is for September of 1999. After two hours of questions and answers 
Dennis Ready wanted to go into debate. Roger Sumner asked Town Counsel 
if the money shown in the article had to go strictly for the purchasing of the 
classrooms, or could some of the money be used for salaries and 
classrooms? John Georgio said because of the wording the money could only 
be used to purchase classrooms. What is the amount of vote needed? Due to 
it being a transfer from the stabilization fund a 2/3's vote would be needed to 
pass. John Coppinger asked for the Moderator to enter into debate. He felt 
that the same people where asking questions and by doing so they were 
taking advantage of the Moderator's patience. The Moderator asked is there 
was a need for further questions, hearing none he asked for the various 
recommendations. The Finance Committee was against the article. The 
Board of Selectmen were unanimously recommended against the article. 
Jeffrey Stallard spoke saying that four years ago the Selectmen took back the 
Center School with the anticipation of the need for an additional elementary 
school. He felt that at that time a short range plan should have been 
addressed immediately. After listening to the concerns that he was in favor of 
the article. Bonnie Wilder said that the teachers at the South Row School 
were in favor of the article and read a statement asking for support. Dale 
Schultz, who had a daughter in the kindergarten class at the South Row 
School felt that it wasn't fair that she had to have class on the stage. The 
Principal and Teacher are trying to make the best of a bad situation The Body 
shouldn't spend any more time discussing how it happened or how to address 
it in the future. The space problem exists now, and by obtaining the modular 
classrooms this problem will be addressed now. It will be to late for his 
daughter to have full teacher interaction but it will help next year's 
kindergarten class. Marianne Pareksy spoke in favor and urged for support.. 
Margaret Fudge moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. The following tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken. Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Dorothy 
Frawley and John Maleski The result of the hand count: Yes 99 No 39 2/3's 
is 92, motion carried to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a vote by way 
of a show of hands on the article, motion defeated. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand the Moderator 
declared the Special Town Meeting adjourned at 10:10 PM and returned to the 
adjourned Town Meeting. 

Page 182 



The Adjourned Town Meeting reconvened at 10:11 PM and under 
Article 23 the discussion continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 (con't) Discussion took place Further 
questions were asked about who would enforce the floodplain map? The 
Building Inspector would. Would the proposed widening of Rt 3 have an 
impact on this? No, it would not. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article Kim MacKenzie, 
Chairman of the Planning Board read the Planning Boards recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2700, 
Floodplain District, by deleting the entire Floodplain District as it now reads 
and insert a new Floodplain District. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment will bring the Floodplain District into 
compliance with minimum Federal standards. Changes include required 
computation of base floodplain elevations for certain activities and required 
conformance with State Building, Wetlands and Sanitary Codes. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously (5-0) in favor to 
recommend article #23. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article Motion 
carried, unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, District Regulations, 
Section 2700, Floodplain District, by deleting Section 2700 in its entirety and 
replacing it with the following Section 2700 (*Note: bold print indicates new 
language to be added): 

Sec. 2700. Floodplain District. 

2710. Purposes. The purposes of this district are: 

(a) To provide the lands in the Town of Chelmsford subject to seasonal or 
periodic flooding as described hereinafter shall not be used for 
residence or other purposes in such manner as to endanger the 
health or safety of the occupants thereof. 

Page 183 



(b) To protect, preserve, and maintain the water table and water recharge 
areas within the town so as to preserve present and potential water 
supplies for the public health and safety of the residents of the Town 
of Chelmsford. 

(c) To assure the continuation of the natural flow of the water course(s) 
within the Town of Chelmsford in order to provide adequate and safe 
floodwater storage capacity to protect persons and property against 
the hazards of flood inundation. 

2720. Floodplain district and floodway district boundaries. The floodplain 
district and floodway district is herein established as an overlay district. The 
underlying permitted uses are allowed provided they meet the following 
additional requirements as well as those of the Massachusetts State Building 
Code dealing with construction in floodplains. The floodplain district and 
floodway district includes all special flood hazard areas designated on the 
National Flood Insurance Program, Flood Insurance Rate Map for the 
Town of Chelmsford, prepared by the United States Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, Community Panel Number 250188 
0005B-0015B dated June 4, 1980 on file with the Town Clerk, Planning 
Board, Building Inspector and Conservation Commission. These maps as well 
as the accompanying Chelmsford flood insurance study, dated December, 
1979, are incorporated herein by reference. 

2725. Base Flood Elevation and Floodway Data 

(a) Floodway Data. In Zone A, A1-30, and AE, along watercourses 
that have not had a regulatory floodway designated, the map 
entitled " Chelmsford Floodplain and Floodway District Map, 
1980" prepared by O'Connell and Associates shall be used to 
prohibit encroachments in floodways which would result in any 
increase in flood levels within the community during the 
occurrence of the base flood discharge. This map is 
incorporated herein by reference. 

(b) Base Flood Elevation Data. Base flood elevation data must be 
generated by applicants, based upon a study, for subdivision 
proposals or other developments greater than 50 lots or 5 acres, 
whichever is the lesser, within unnumbered A zones. 

2730. Notification of Watercourse Alteration 

Notify, in a riverine situation, the following of any alteration or relocation 

of a watercourse: 

(a) Adjacent communities 

(b) Bordering States 

Page 184 



(c) NFIP State Coordinator 
Massachusetts Office of Water Resources 
100 Cambridge Street 

Boston, MA 02202 

(d) NFIP Program Specialist 
FEMA Region I, Room 462 

J. W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse 
Boston, MA 02109 

2740. District use regulations. 

2741. The Floodplain District is established as an overlay district to all 
other districts. All development in the district, including structural and 
non-structural activities, whether permitted by right or by special permit 
must be in compliance with Chapter 131, Section 40 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws and with the following: 

(a) Section of the Massachusetts State Building Code which 
addresses floodplain and coastal high hazard areas (currently 
780 CMR 2102.0, "Flood Resistant Construction"); 

(b) Wetlands Protection Regulations, Department of Environmental 
Protection (DEP) (currently 310 CMR 10.00); 

(c) Inland Wetlands Restriction, DEP (currently 302 CMR 6.00); 

(d) Minimum Requirements for the Subsurface Disposal of Sanitary 
Sewage, DEP (currently 310 CMR 15, Title 5); 

Any variances from the provisions and requirements of the above 
referenced state regulations may only be granted in accordance with the 
required variance procedures of these state regulations. 

2742. In the floodplain district no new building shall be erected or constructed, 
and no existing structure shall be altered, enlarged or moved; no dumping, 
filling, or earth transfer or relocation shall be permitted; nor any land, building, 
or structure used for any purposes except: 

(a) Conservation of water, plants, and wildlife. 

(b) Outdoor recreation, including play areas, nature study, boating, fishing 
and hunting, where otherwise legally permitted, but excluding 
buildings and structures. 



Page 185 



(c) Noncommercial signs (as permitted in the residential districts), wildlife 
management areas, foot, bicycle, and/or horse paths and bridges, 
provided that such uses do not affect the natural flow pattern of 
watercourses. 

(d) Grazing and farming, including truck gardening and harvesting of 
crops. 

(e) Forestry and nurseries. 

2742a In the floodway, designated on the Chelmsford floodplain and floodway 
district map, the following provisions shall apply: 

(1) All encroachments including fill, new construction, substantial 
improvements to existing structures, and other development are 
prohibited unless certification by a registered professional engineer is 
provided by the applicant demonstrating that such encroachment shall 
not result in any increase in flood levels during the occurrence of the 
one- hundred-year flood. 

(2) Any encroachment meeting the above standard shall comply with the 
floodplain requirements of the state building code. 

(3) If a property owner questions the location of a floodplain or floodway 
district, the owner may engage at his own cost a registered licensed 
surveyor with the approval of the town engineer to determine if the 
land in question is within the floodplain or floodway district. The 
landowner shall be responsible for the cost for this determination. 
The board of appeals, in consultation with the town engineer, 
shall decide whether or not to accept the surveyor's 
determination. 

(4) No new building or portion thereof located within the Floodplain 
District, shall be allowed to connect to the municipal wastewater 
system or to a private wastewater system which discharges to 
the municipal wastewater system. 

2743. The portion of any lot within the area delineated in subsection 2720 
above may be used to meet the area and yard requirements for the district or 
districts in which the remainder of the lot is situated. 

2750. Exemptions. In the floodplain district, the board of appeals may grant a 
special permit for exception for uses or structures in addition to those allowed 
under section 2740, subject to the following: 



Page 186 



(a) The request has been referred by the applicant to the planning board 
the town engineer, the board of health, and the conservation 
commission for review and recommendation as provided in Section 
11, Chapter 40A, M.G.L; 

(b) The land is shown to be neither subject to flooding nor unsuitable for 
the proposed use because of hydrologic and/or topographic 
conditions; 

(c) The proposed use will not be detrimental to the public health, safety, 
and welfare; and 

(d) The proposed use will comply in all respects to the provisions of the 
underlying district or districts within which the land is located; and, 

(e) Any loss of floodplain or floodway shall be compensated for at a 
similar elevation within the same local watershed. 

The Moderator Dennis McHugh stepped down from the Chair for the 
next article. Before doing so, he appointed Selectman Peter Lawlor to be the 
Acting Moderator for the article. . Selectman William Dalton then moved to 
waive the reading of the article 24 Motion carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 24. Andrew Sheehan Community Development 
Coordinator explained the article. He said that there were amendments to the 
wording of the article since the Finance Book had been printed and went over 
them for the Body. The actual motion included the amended wording. He 
went on to say that this would protect the Town's two aquifer protection 
districts. Its purpose is to keep commercial and industrial facilities from 
contaminating the Town's ground water. It would bring the Town into minimum 
compliance with the State's drinking water protection standards. Questions 
were asked. The Acting Moderator asked for the Board's recommendation. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the Planning Board 
read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article IV, Special Regulations, Section 4800, 
Aquifer Protection District, by deleting Section 4800 as it now reads and 
inserting a new Aquifer Protection District. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws. Chapter 40A, Section 5. 



Page 187 



The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment will bring the Aquifer Protection District into 
compliance to meet minimum Department of Environmental Protection 
requirements. Changes include amending the use and dimensional 
regulations in the District and adopting a revised Aquifer Protection District 
map. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted 3-2 not to recommend the original 
version of article #24. The Planning Board subsequently voted 4-1 to 
recommend article #24 as amended. Therefore the Planning Board 
recommends article #24 as amended. 

Dennis McHugh, representing the Business Men's Association wanted 
to make a motion to accept the map but postpone use regulations until the 
spring. He felt that the wording was to restrictive. Dennis Ready moved to 
delete sections 4860 Use Regulations and 4870 Procedures for issuance of 
Special Permits and insert in its place the following: 

4860: Use Regulations 

The use schedule for all zoning districts shall apply, except as 
modified in this section. In all cases the more stringent provision shall apply. 
Cross references- Use regulations, section 2200; use regulations schedule, 
section 2300 
4861. The following uses are prohibited in the APD 

(a) The manufacture, use, storage, transport, or disposal of toxic or 
hazardous materials as a principal activity. 

(b) Solid waste disposal facility, sanitary landfill, refuse incinerator, 
salvage yard junk yard, storage yard, road salt stockpile. 

(c) Truck/bus terminals and contractor's yards with more than ten (10) 
vehicles, service station and auto repair shops. 

(d) Car washes, or coin-operated and commercial laundries, where not 
connected to public sewers. 

(e) Subsurface storage or toxic or hazardous materials, fuel oil or 
gasoline. 

(f) Solid waste disposal or sewage treatment facilities with onsite 
disposal of the effluent, unless tertiary treatment is used. 

4862. The following uses require a special permit from the Planning Board 
within the APD: 

(a) Above ground storage of more than five hundred (500) gallons of 
toxic or hazardous materials, fuel oil or gasoline. 

(b) Any residential use with lot size less than the intensity use schedule 
required for that particular residential zone. 

(c) Any use except for residential with an estimated sewage disposal 
greater than ten (10) gallons of sewage per day per one thousand 
(1,000) square feet of lot area, based on Title V of the State 
Environmental Code, 310 CMR 15.00. 

Page 188 



(d) Any use which renders impervious more than fifty (50) percent of 
the total lot area. 

4870: Special Permits. Special permits may be granted by the Planning 
Board, if the requirements of the APD are met and if the granting of such a 
permit follows the general intent of the zoning by-law. Prior to granting a 
special permit, the Planning Board shall review the proposed control 
measures and shall determine if these control measures are adequate with 
respect to possible groundwater contamination if a failure occurred If the 
Planning Board denies a special permit, the reason for denial must be state 
After receiving a special permit application, the Planning Board shall 
distribute one (1) copy each to the Board of Health, the Conservation 
Commission and the Building Inspector for their review. If a response is not 
received with thirty-five (35) days by these agencies, the Planning Board will 
assume the agencies approve. A special permit may be granted by the 
Planning Board, if, after review of the applications and comments from the 
Board of Health, the Conservation Commission and the Building Inspector, 
the Planning Board finds that the groundwater quality will not fall below state 
or federal drinking water standards, or if the groundwater quality is below 
these standards no further degradation of the water will occur. 

4871. Special permit application. Eleven (11) copies of the special permit 
application shall be submitted to the Planning Board in accordance with 
section 1250. In addition, the application shall include: 

(a) A complete list of all fuels, chemicals, pesticides, and other potentially 
toxic or hazardous material which are being used or stored on the 
premises in quantities greater than average household use. 

(b) Detailed plans shall be submitted of the storage tank or pipeline being 
used to store or transport the toxic or hazardous materials, fuels, 
chemicals or pesticides. These plans should also show how the storage 
tank or pipeline is protected from corrosion, leaks, spills, and vandalism. 

(c) Evidence of qualified professional supervision of the design and 
installation of above and below ground storage of toxic and hazardous 
materials. 

(d) Evidence of qualified professional supervision of the design and 
installation for any use with an estimated sewage flow greater than one 
thousand (1,000) gpd (other than single family). Impacts of nitrates, 
chlorides, and coliforms on groundwater quality must also be 
addressed. 

Cross reference - Application procedure for special permits or 
variances, section 1250. 



Page 189 



The Acting Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. 
The Finance was against the motion to amend. The Board of Selectmen 
were against the amendment. The Planning Board did not have a vote on 
the motion to amend. Discussion took place. Representatives Ready and 
Latina spoke for the amendment. Robert Morse and Andrew Sheehan spoke 
against the motion to amend. David McLachlan spoke against the motion, 
and urged the Body to defeat the amendment and vote on the article. The 
Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to amend. 
Motion defeated. More discussion took place under the main motion. 
Barry Balan moved to continue the Town Meeting beyond the 11:00 PM 
curfew. The Acting Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. Further discussion took place. The Acting Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the article The Acting Moderator declared that 
the vote passed by the 2/3's rule 

Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article IV, Special 
Regulations, Section 4800, Aquifer Protection District, by deleting Section 
4800 as it presently appears: 

SECTION 4800 AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 

4810. Purpose. The purpose of an aquifer protection district, hereinafter 
known as APD, is to protect the public drinking water supply and the 
public health by preventing the contamination of Chelmsford's 
groundwater. 

4820. Aquifer protection district!; boundaries.] The APD is established as 
an overlay district to the town's zoning map. This APD was defined by 
the surficial geology of the area and groundwater flow (based on a U.S. 
Geological Survey Surficial Geology Map and the Chelmsford Facilities 
Plan by Weston and Sampson Engineers, Inc.). Any area in which 
groundwater flow is directed toward a well and the surficial geology is 
stratified sand and gravel deposits ( soils which yield groundwater to 
wells) is included in the APD. 

If a property owner questions the location of any boundary of an APD, the 
owner may engage at his own cost a professional hydrogeologist or soils 
engineer who must be approved by the planning board of the town, to 
determine if the land in question is in a recharge area. 

4830. Use regulations. The use schedule for all zoning districts shall 
apply, except as modified in this section. In all cases the more stringent 
provision shall apply. 

Cross references- Use regulations, section 2200; use regulations 
schedule, section 2300 

4831 The following uses are prohibited in the APD 

Page 190 






(a) The manufacture, use, storage, transport or disposal of toxic or 
hazardous materials as a principal activity 

(b) Solid waste disposal facility, sanitary landfill, refuse incinerator, 
salvage yard, junk yard, storage yard, road salt stockpile. 

(c) Truck/bus terminals and contractor's yards with more than ten 
(10) vehicles, service station and auto repair shops. 

(d) Car washes, or coin -operated and commercial laundries, where 
not connected to public sewers. 

(e) Subsurface storage of toxic or hazardous materials, fuel oil or 
gasoline. 

(f) Solid waste disposal or sewage treatment facilities with onsite 
disposal of the effluent, unless tertiary treatment is used 

4832. The following uses require a special permit from the planning 
board within the APD: 

(a) Above ground storage of more than five hundred (500) gallons of 
toxic or hazardous materials, fuel oil or gasoline. 

(b) Any residential use with lot size less than the intensity use 
schedule requires for that particular residential zone. 

(c) Any use except for residential with an estimated sewage disposal 
greater than ten (10) gallons of sewage per day per one thousand 
(1,000) square feet of lot area, based on Title V of the State 
Environmental Code, 310 CMR 15.00. 

(d) Any use which renders impervious more than fifty (50) percent of 
the total lot area. 

4840. Special Permits. Special permits may be granted by the planning 
board, if the requirements of the APD are met and if the granting of such 
a permit follows the general intent of the zoning by-law. Prior to granting 
a special permit, the planning board shall review the proposed control 
measures and shall determine if these control measures are adequate 
with respect to possible groundwater contamination if a failure occurred. 
If the planning board denies a special permit, the reason for denial must 
be stated. After receiving a special permit application, the planning board 
shall distribute one (1) copy each to the board of health, the conservation 
commission and the building inspector for their review. If a response is 
not received within thirty-five (35) days by these agencies, the planning 
board will assume the agency approve. A special permit may be granted 
by the planning board, if, after review of the applications and comments 
from the board of health, the conservation commission and the building 
inspector, the planning board finds that the groundwater quality will not fall 
below state or federal drinking water standards, or if the groundwater 
quality is below these standards no further degradation of the water will 
occur. 

Page 191 



4841. Special permit application. Eleven (11) copies of the 
special permit application shall be submitted to the planning board in 
accordance with section 1250. In addition, the application shall include: 

(a) A complete list of all fuels, chemicals, pesticides, and other 
potentially toxic or hazardous materials which are being used or 
stored on the premises in quantities greater than average 
household use. 

(b) Detailed plans shall be submitted of the storage tank or pipeline 
being used to store or transport the toxic or hazardous materials, 
fuels, chemicals or pesticides. These plans should also show how 
the storage tank or pipeline is protected from corrosion, leaks, 
spills, and vandalism. 

(c) Evidence of qualified professional supervision of the design and 
installation of above and below ground storage of toxic and 
hazardous materials. 

(d) Evidence of qualified professional supervision of the design and 
installation for any use with an estimated sewage flow greater 
than one thousand (1,000) gpd (other than single family). 
Impacts of nitrates, chlorides, and coliforms on groundwater 
quality must also be addressed. 

Cross reference- Application procedure for special permits or 
variances, section 1250. 

and replacing it with the following Section 4800: 

SECTION 4800 AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 

4810: Purpose of District 

Groundwater is the sole source of drinking water to the residents, 
businesses and industries of the Town of Chelmsford. The purpose of the 
Aquifer Protection District is to protect the health, safety, and general 
welfare by protecting the Town's limited present and future drinking water 
supply; to ensure a sufficient quantity of potable pure drinking water for 
the present and future residents, institutions, and businesses of the Town 
of Chelmsford; and to limit the adverse effects of use and development of 
land on the quality of the groundwater and surface water resources of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

4820: Scope Of Authority 



Page 192 



The Aquifer Protection District is an overlay district superimposed on the 
zoning districts and whose regulations are in addition to any other 
regulations established by this Bylaw. This overlay district shall apply to all 
new construction, reconstruction or expansion of existing buildings and 
new or expanded uses. Applicable activities or uses in a portion of one of 
the underlying zoning districts which fall within the Aquifer Protection 
District must additionally comply with the requirements of this district. 
Uses that are prohibited in the underlying zoning districts shall not be 
permitted in the Aquifer Protection District. 

4830: Definitions 

For the purposes of this section the following words and phrases shall 

have the following meanings: 

AQUIFER - Geologic formation composed of rock, sand, gravel or other 
geologic material that contains significant amounts of potentially 
recoverable water. 

IMPERVIOUS SURFACE - Material or structure on, above, or below the 
ground that does not allow precipitation or surface water to penetrate 
directly into the soil. 

TOXIC OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL OR WASTE- Any substance or 
mixture of physical, chemical or infectious characteristics posing a 
significant, actual or potential hazard to water supplies or other hazards to 
human health if such substance or mixture were discharged to land or 
water of the Town of Chelmsford. Toxic or hazardous materials include, 
without limitation, synthetic organic chemicals, petroleum products, heavy 
metals, radioactive or infectious wastes, acids and alkalis, and all 
substances defined as Toxic or Hazardous under Massachusetts General 
Laws (MGL) Chapter 21 C and 21 E and 310 CMR 30.00. For the 
purposes of this section, sanitary domestic wastes from residential 
sources shall not be considered toxic or hazardous waste. 

4840: Establishment and Delineation of Aquifer Protection District: 
There is hereby established within the Town of Chelmsford the Aquifer 
Protection District. This area is described on a map entitled Aquifer 
Protection District Town of Chelmsford, dated October, 1997. Said map is 
incorporated herein by reference. 

4850: District Boundary Disputes 



Page 193 



If the location of the district boundary in relation to a particular parcel is in 
doubt, resolution of boundary disputes shall be through a Special Permit 
application to the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA). Any application for a 
special permit for this purpose shall be accompanied by adequate 
documentation according to the normal application requirements of the 
Board of Appeals. If the applicant is able to demonstrate that groundwater 
flows will not be impacted by the activity on the site, or that groundwater 
from the site does not contribute to the aquifer, the Board may grant a 
special permit relieving the applicant of the obligations of the Aquifer 
Protection District. 

The burden of proof shall be upon the owner(s) of the land in question to 
show where the bounds should properly be located. At the request of the 
owner(s), the Town may engage a registered professional engineer, 
hydrologist, geologist, or soil scientist to determine more accurately the 
boundaries of the district with respect to individual parcels of land, and 
may charge the owner(s) for all, or part of the cost of the investigation. 



4860: Use Regulations 

In the Aquifer Protection District, the following regulations shall apply: 

(a) Permitted Uses 

The uses permitted within the Aquifer Protection District shall be the uses 
permitted in the underlying zoning district, and not prohibited by Table 
4860(b) below. In the following Table of Use Regulations "O" indicates the 
use is prohibited, "P" indicates that the use is permitted, and "PB" 
indicates that the use may only be permitted by a Special Permit from the 
Planning Board. 



Page 194 



TABLE 4860 (b) 



USE REGULATIONS WITHIN THE AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 



Sanitary landfill/solid waste disposal site, refuse treatment and disposal facility. O 
landfillmg of sludge and septage, storage of sludge and septage 
Generation, treatment, disposal or storage of Toxic or Hazard Materials or Waste, 
except for the following: 

a) municipal uses associated with the provision of public water and sanitary 
sewer services; 

b) very small quantity generators, as defined by 310 CMR 30.00: 

c) waste oil retention facilities required by MGL Ch. 21 S. 52A; 

d) treatment works approved by DEP designed in accordance with 314 CMR 
5.00 for the treatment of contaminated ground or surface waters: 

e) household hazardous waste collection centers or events operated pursuant to 
310 CMR 30.390 

3. Motor vehicle repair facility PB 

4. Automobile graveyards and junkyards as defined in MGL Ch 140B, s 1 O 

5. Car, truck and equipment washing facility where all wastewater to discharges to the PB 
municipal sewer system or to a private sewer which discharges to the municipal sewer 
system or to an approved disposal facility. 

Commercial laundries not connected to the municipal sewer system or to a private 
sewer which discharges to the municipal sewer system. 

7. Dry cleaners with on-site cleaning facilities PB 

8. Furniture/wood stripping, painting & refinishing PB 

9. Disposal of snow contaminated with deicing chemicals and originating from outside O 
the district 

10. Outdoor storage of fertilizer, animal manure, soil conditioner, pesticide, herbicide and O 
deicing chemicals 

1 1 . Chemical, bacteriological or radiological laboratory or production facility O 

12. Treatment disposal works for non-sanitary wastewater that are subject to 314 CMR O 
5.00. except replacement or repair of existing treatment works that will not result in a 
design capacity greater than the existing treatment works, or treatment works 
approved by Mass. Department of Environmental Protection designed for the 
treatment of contaminated groundwater or surface water, or treatment works for 
pretreatment of industrial discharges to the municipal sewer system 

13. Individual sewage disposal systems designed and/or maintained in accordance with 
the current requirements of Title 5 (310 CMR 15) 

14. Earth removal, consisting of the removal of soil, loam, sand, gravel, or any other earth 
material (including mining activities) within four feet of historical high groundwater as 
determined from monitoring wells and historical water table fluctuation data compiled 
by the United States Geological Survey, except for excavations for building 
foundations, roads or utility works 

15. The enclosed storage of road salt or other deicing chemicals PB 

16. Modification of groundwater flow through use of underdrains or similar devices, except PB 
that a Special Permit shall not be required to maintain, modify or expand single family 
residential structures lawfully in existence on the effective date of this section 
Enlargement or alteration of existing uses that do not conform to the Aquifer PB 
Protection District 



Page 195 



18. Storage of hazardous materials as defined in MGL Ch. 21 E, and/or liquid petroleum O 
products unless such storage is: 

(a) above ground level 

(b) on an impervious surface, and 

(c) either 
(i) in container(s) or above ground tank(s) within a building or 
(ii) outdoors in covered container(s) or above ground tank(s) in an area that 

has containment system designed and operated to hold either 10% of the 
total possible storage capacity of all containers, or 110% of the largest 
container's storage capacity, whichever is greater; however, these 
storage requirements shall not apply to replacement of existing tanks or 
systems for the keeping, dispensing or storing of gasoline provided the 
replacement is performed in a manner consistent with state and local 
requirements 

19. The construction of dams or other water control devices, ponds, or other changes in PB 
water bodies or courses, created for swimming, fishing or other recreational uses, 
agricultural uses, or drainage improvements 

20 Any use that will render impervious more than 15% or 2,500 square feet of any lot, PB 
whichever is greater (see section 4860(c)) 

21 Any discharge to the ground through an interior floor drain. O 



(c) Lot Coverage 

Any use proposed to render impervious more than 15% or 2500 square 
feet of any lot, whichever is greater, shall be subject to a Special Permit 
from the Planning Board. On any such lot a system for groundwater 
recharge must be provided which does not degrade groundwater quality. 
Any project drainage design that satisfies the Stormwater Policy issued by 
the Department of Environmental Protection, dated 11/18/96, and as 
amended, shall be sufficient to satisfy the requirements of this section. 

4870: Procedures for Issuance of Special Permits 

(a) Special Permit Granting Authority 

The Special Permit granting authority under this section of the Zoning 
By-Law shall be the Planning Board, acting under the Site Plan 
Review Process, Section 1400. The Planning Board may issue a 
special permit if it determines that the intent of this by-law, as well as 
its specific criteria, are met. 

(b) Findings 

The Planning Board may grant the Special Permit upon a finding that the 
proposed use meets the following performance standards, those specified 
in Section 4860, and any regulations or guidelines adopted by the 
Planning Board. The proposed use: 

Page 196 



1. shall not, during construction or thereafter, adversely affect the 
existing quality or quantity of water that is available in the Aquifer 
Protection District; 

2. shall be designed to avoid substantial disturbances of the soils, 
topography, drainage, vegetation and other water related natural 
characteristics of the site to be developed which are likely to affect 
existing quality or quantity of water that is available in the Aquifer 
Protection District; 

3. shall be designed to meet State and Federal drinking water standards 
at the property line and 

4. shall utilize the Best Management Practices which are available for 
the proposed use. 

Dennis Ready moved to appoint a committee consisting of one 
representative from each voting precinct to be selected by that precinct's 
representatives before the close of business for this Annual Town Meeting and 
one member from the Planning Board to be selected by the Planning Board, 
and one member from each water district board of commissioners which 
Committee will elect a chairperson, to study the proposed Aquifer Protection 
District By-law and make recommendations at the next Annual Town Meeting. 

The Acting Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended the motion. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The Acting Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion defeated. 

Dennis McHugh returned to the Chair and resumed his position of 
Moderator. Henrick Johnson moved to adjourned the Town Meeting until 
Monday October 27th, at 7:30 PM at the Senior Center on Groton Road. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to adjourn, motion carried 
unanimously. The Meeting adjourned at 11:10 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Adjourned Annual Town Meeting October 27, 1997 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the Senior 
Center by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, at 7:35 PM, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum. There were 124 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. 



Page 197 



UNDER ARTICLE 25. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Town of Chelmsford, Article 
V, Definitions, Lot area, by deleting "eighty (80)" where it currently appears 
and replacing it with "ninety (90)". 

James Creegan, Member of the Master Plan Review Committee 
explained the article. Reduces the impact on existing homes. Reduces the 
impact on wetlands concerns with drainage and erosion and doesn't take 
away grandfathered lots. The current size is 32,000 sq ft. this would be 
increased to 36,000 sq ft. From 1992-1996 there were 174 lots created. If 
this by-law had been in effect 12 would have been eliminated. 9 would have 
been effected, 2 unaffected. There are 1,500 acres of developed lots left. 
This by-law would have a positive impact on any future development. 
Questions were asked. Ronald Wetmore wanted to know why this article was 
back before the Body again. It had just been defeated recently within the last 
year, and he questioned the two year time period. James Creegan said that 
there is a two year wait unless the Planning Board unanimously recommends 
the article, which in this case it did. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee deferred to wait and 
hear further debate. The majority of the Board of Selectmen were against the 
article. Jeffrey Stallard asked that the Selectmen be polled on how they voted: 
Selectman Lawlor was in favor. Selectman Eliopoulos, Dalton and Gates 
were against. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the Planning Board read the 
Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article V, Definitions, Lot Area, by deleting "eighty 
(80)" where it currently appears and replace it with "ninety (90)". 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would change the contiguous dry area 
requirement from 80% to 90%. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#25. 



Page 198 



Robert Morse spoke in favor of the article Ronald Wetmore spoke 
against the article. Selectman Lawlor asked that Town Counsel give a brief 
explanation. Town Counsel Joel Bard explained that this would only effect 
future lots. Any lots that were approved within the last 8 years are 
grandfathered. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, which left the Chair 
in doubt. He asked for the tellers to come forward and conduct a hand count. 
The following tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. Patricia 
Plank, Lucy Simonian, Dorothy Frawley and John Maleski The result of the 
hand count: Yes 63 No 54, the motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, 
District Regulations, Section 2110, Official Zoning Map, by changing the 
following Town-owned parcels from their current zoning classification to P 
Public: 

1) Elm Street and Park Road. Map 234; Lot 5, change from RB Single 
Residence to P Public. 

2) Park Road, Park Place and Farley Brook Road. Map 164; Lots 1 & 16, 
change from RB Single Residence to P Public. 

3) Bartlett Street, Map 170; Lots 19 & 80, change from CD General 
Commercial to P Public; 

4) Boston Road, Map 170; Lot 15, change from RB Single Residence to 
P Public. 

Andrew Sheehan, Community Development Coordinator explained 
that these parcels are Town owned land that should reflect the classification of 
Public. Number 1 is the Cranberry Bog Reservation. Number 2 is the 
Chelmsford Country Club. Numbers 3 & 4 are the Adams Library Land. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the 
Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2110, Official 
Zoning Map by changing the following Town-owned parcels from their current 
zoning classification to P Public. 

1. Elm Street and Park Road, Map 234, Lot 5 change from RB Single 
residence to P Public. 

2. Park Road, Park Place and Farley Brook Road, Map 164, Lots 1 & 16, 
change from RB Single residence to P Public 

3. Bartlett Street, Map 170; Lots 19 & 80, change from CD General 
Commercial to P Public. 

Page 199 



4. Boston Road, Map 170; Lot 15, change from RB Single Residence to P 
Public. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would change the zoning classification of 
these Town-owned parcels from the current classification to P Public. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#26. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Town of Chelmsford, Article 
II, District Regulations, Section 2110, Official Zoning Map, by changing the 
zoning classification of 162A, 162B, 164, 166, 168, 170, 172 & 174 Mill Road, 
Map 137, Lots 20, 21, 22 & 23 from P Public to RC General Residence. 

Andrew Sheehan Community Development Coordinator explained 
that the Fire Department discovered that the above mentioned lots were 
zoned as Public Town owned land and should be listed as General 
Residence. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman 
of the Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2110, Official 
Zoning Map by changing the zoning classification of 162A, 162B, 164, 166, 
170, 172 and 174 Mill Road, Map 137, Lots 20, 21, 22, and 23 from P Public to 
RC General Residence. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would correct an error on the zoning map 
by rezoning these parcels consistent with their current use. 

Page 200 



The public hearing closed on October 8. 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#27. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 28. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, 
District Regulations, Section 2110, Official Zoning Map, by changing the 
zoning classification of 143 and 145 Littleton Road, Map 190; Lots 2 & 4, 
change from P Public to RB Single Residence. 

Andrew Sheehan Community Development Coordinator explained 
that this was another zoning correction. There are two lots of land privately 
owned next to the Lime Quarry that were zoned as Public and should be 
Single Residence. The Moderator asked for the recommendations of the 
various boards. The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended the article. Kim MacKenzie, 
Chairman of the Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2110, Official 
Zoning Map by changing the zoning classification of 143 and 145 Littleton 
Road, Map 190; Lots 2 & 4 from P public to RB Single Residence. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would correct an error on the zoning map 
by rezoning the lots at Littleton Road consistent with their current use. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#28. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 29. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, 
District Regulations, Section 2110, Official Zoning Map, by changing the 
zoning classification of 95 Boston Road & Acton Road, Map 169; Lot 9, from 
RB Single Residence to RA Single Residence. 



Page 201 



Andrew Sheehan Community Development Coordinator explained 
that the Master Plan Review Committee had reviewed this parcel of land and 
felt that the zoning should be changed from RB Single Residence to RA Single 
Residence. The difference in the zones are the requirements regarding 
square feet of buildable land. RB is 40,000 square feet and RA is 60,000 
square feet. This property contains fifty-six acres which includes 28% wetland 
or high land. Under the present RB zone there are twenty buildable lots. 
Under the RA zone requirements there would be 14 buildable lots. Ronald 
Wetmore asked if this was the "Warren Land" in question? Yes it was. Dennis 
Ready wanted to know if the Committee was presenting any more privately 
owned land for rezoning? Yes this article and the next article one will be the 
only two for this meeting. Land in the Pine Hill Road area will be addressed at 
the Spring of 1998 Town Meeting. Numerous questions were asked. Was the 
owner aware of the proposed change. Yes he was. He said that he was not 
planning on developing the land, mainly concern on the effect if any this would 
have on his property taxes. Could the owner challenge the rezoning at a later 
date? Town Counsel Joel Bard said he could challenge the change but may 
not be successful. The Town did as required. Held a public hearing after 
advertising it for two weeks prior. It was the intent of the Master Plan Review 
Committee to identify areas which still had a rural character. A lower density 
would have more effect then a higher one. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. A majority of the Board of Selectmen recommended against the 
article. Kim MacKenzie, Chairman of the Planning Board read the Planning 
Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2110, Official 
Zoning Map by changing the zoning classification of 95 Boston Road and 
Acton Road, Map 169; Lot 9, from RB Single Residence to RA Single 
Residence. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would rezone these lots from medium 
density residential to low density residential. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#29. 



Page 202 






David McLachlan spoke in favor of the article. A discussion took 
place. Peter Dulchinos and Wendy Marcks, members of the Master Plan 
Review Committee spoke in favor of the article They expressed that the 
Committee's purpose was to preserve the Town's open space but not 
discourage future building. Glenn Thoren felt that the Committee should show 
all the land that the Committee wanted to rezone all at once, not parcel by 
parcel. Claire Jeannotte and Liz Marshall spoke in favor. Philip Eliopoulos and 
Kim MacKenzie spoke in favor. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt. He asked for the tellers to come 
forward and conduct a hand count. The following tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken. Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Dorothy Frawley and 
John Maleski The result of the hand count: Yes 91 No 28 2/3's is 79 the 
motion carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 30. Planning Board Member Robert Morse moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Town of Chelmsford, Article II, 
District Regulations, Section 2110, Official Zoning Map, by changing the 
zoning classification of 79 Elm Street, Map 232, Lot 30, from RB Single 
Residence to RA Single Residence. 

Andrew Sheehan Community Development Coordinator explained 
that this article was about thirty acres of land, which included wetland. 
Present zoning would allow 24 lots. If changed then there would be 19 lots. 
Glenn Thoren questioned if the land owner was aware of the proposed 
change? Andrew Sheehan said that he hadn't personally spoken with the land 
owner. The only notification had been the advertisement and the public 
hearing. The Finance Committee recommended approval of the article. A 
majority of the Board of Selectmen were against the article. Kim MacKenzie, 
Chairman of the Planning Board read the Planning Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford held a public hearing 
on September 24, 1997 at 7:15 PM to consider amending the Town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw, Article II District Regulations Section 2110, Official 
Zoning Map by changing the zoning classification of 79 Elm Street, Map 232; 
Lot 30 from RB Single Residence to RA Single Residence. 

A legal advertisement was published in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 4, 1997 and September 11, 1997, a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days prior to the public hearing. A copy of the legal ad was mailed to all 
abutting cities and towns and to the appropriate agencies as required in the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 

The proposed bylaw changes were discussed by the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board at the meetings on September 24, 1997 
and October 8, 1997. 

The proposed amendment would rezone this lot from medium density 
residential to low density residential. 

The public hearing closed on October 8, 1997 and the Board rendered 
its Decision. The Planning Board voted unanimously to recommend article 
#30. 

Page 203 



The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, this left 
the Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and conducted a hand count. 
Yes 67 No 47 2/3's is 76, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31. Selectman Peter Lawlor moved that the Town 
vote to appropriate the sum of $1,100,000 for the purpose of acquiring in fee 
simple a certain parcel of land located on Oak Hill Road, shown as lot 1 on 
Assessor's Map 77, containing 66.37 acres more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book LCD10, Page 5995; and a certain parcel of land located on 
Tyngsborough Road, shown as lot 2 on Assessor's Map 8, containing 10.8 
acres more or less and more fully described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2560, Page 143 and 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said parcels of land by purchase, 
eminent domain, or otherwise; that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
$1,100,000. under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (3), 
and that the Town Manager be authorized to take any other action necessary 
to carry out this project. 

Selectman Peter Lawlor explained that this involved 66.37 acres of land 
off of Ledge Road/ Oak Hill Rd area. Also a 10.8 acreage parcel by the 
Southwell Fields Recreational area. The owner of the land is Raymond Carye 
and related entities. Selectman Lawlor explained that the large acre is zoned 
IA and is before the Planning Board for Development. It would be in the 
Town's best interest to keep the land open and undeveloped. The Town may 
have a future use if necessary for a municipal building or school. A part of the 
land abuts up to residential development. The Town paid for its own appraiser 
to protect the Town's interest. The appraiser said that the land is worth 
between $800,000 to $1,000,000 dollars. The other land would enhance the 
Southwell Recreational Field. Raymond Carye owes the Town back property 
taxes. James Doukszewicz asked how much was owed? The Town 
Manager said $1.3million. He explained that $98,000 is owed on the smaller 
parcel and other properties owed throughout the Town make the up the $1.3 
million. The taxes are paid on the sixty-six acres. The purchase would be 
done by eliminating the tax debt. It is a friendly transaction. A number of 
Representatives spoke in favor of the article. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. The Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended 
the article. Michael McCall said that this was a win win situation, due to the 
persistence of the residents in the area contacting their Town Meeting 
Representatives and Town Officials everyone will benefit. Jeffrey Stallard a 
board member of the North Congregational Church, said that the Church owns 
property that directly abuts this land and that the Church fully supported the 
land remaining as open space. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands. He 
declared that the vote passed by way of the 2/3's rule 

Page 204 



Seeing that there was no further business at hand the Moderator 
declared the meeting closed, and moved to adjourn the meeting. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
meeting adjourned at 9:05 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Moderator Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



Page 205 



. 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

llllllllllll 

3 1480 00809 1396 



For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



"Disabled individuals requiring auxiliary aides to fully benefit from the Town of 

Chelmsford's programs should contact the Personnel Coordinator at 250-5288. 

It is necessary to give the request at least one week in advance."