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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Goffstown, New Hampshire"



GOFFSTOWN, NH 
ANNUAL 
REPORT 
1999 




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LINKING THE PAST TO THE FUTURE 

Dedication of the Town Common: October 24, 1999 
by Steve Monier 

If you have lived here for any amount of time, you know this place as the Town 
Common. Nearly every New England community has one. A Town Common 's origin 
is no mystery; it was a "commonplace" to meet - near the center of town, a place to 
gather, to greet, to hold ceremony. For some, these "common places" became the 
very hub of activity; for all, they are a symbol of our heritage; part of the roots and 
origins of our community. 

Today, in Colonel Goffe 's Town, it takes on new meaning. 

We stand on what is now honored ground. Before us lie bricks with the names of 
loved ones, past and present; with those from our community who have sacrificed; so 
that those of us who remain here, can enjoy that which we have created here. 

In these past few weeks, this park grew from the labor and love of a community 
- come together to do good works. Public and private gestures, money, and sweat 
equity; all are represented here. There are so many who have made this possible. 
They know who they are, and we thank them. 

Stop and listen for a moment. ..Almost, softly, you can discern the aspirations 
and dreams of our ancestors. ... 

We cannot ignore those, who long ago set in motion this very event. Our fore- 
fathers and foremothers recognized the value and necessity of a "common place".... 
where families, friends, and colleagues could gather, where the public met the pri- 
vate, and the past could be made present. This was their legacy, and now, it is ours. 

As we are each apart of the continent of humankind, we are inextricably linked 
to those who once dreamed.... of a place in the future renewed by hope for yet another 
beginning, and as we stand on the threshold of a new millennium, it is now our turn to 
chart a course for the future - to say to our children, and to their children... On this 
day, in this month, in the last year, of the last decade of the 20"' century, we renewed 
our faith in each other, in our town, and in our country, by adding anew a "common 
place". 

We ask only that as we march toward the future that you share our vision with us 
.... of a place where neighbor helps neighbor, where the community comes together, 
where freedom and liberty enjoin our responsibilities, so that we may all enjoy the 
fruits of our labor. 

To those who may say that civility is declining, that we no longer care, that our 
greatness is past, I say this. Turn off the TV. Come here to this place, walk with me 
along these bricks, and plants and trees, and share in the kindred spirit of this com- 
munity; renew your faith and hopes and dreams. 

The place we collectively seek is not far. It is here. It is in each one of us, and 
each one of our towns and cities. 

Civility will not die, but it must be carefully nurtured; it requires work, and 
sacrifice, and symbolism. If you look and you see all of this, then you too, will help 
sail our ship towards the horizon of yet another bright dawn. 

And where better to proclaim all of this, than in this beautiful, unique, and 
uncommonly good, "common place. " 



Cover Photos by Charles Freiburger 
Printed by Q.P.S. Enterprises, Goffstown, NH 






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Dedication 

Lakry Brown 



Born and raised in Goffstown, Larry Brown is a true native son. He 
attended local schools and married his high school sweetheart Sandy. They 
have been married 28 years and have two children Chrisinda Bowden and 
Karen Brown, a son-in-law Craig Bowden, future son-in-law Aaron 
Henderson and two grandchildren, Courtney and Collin. Larry and Sandy 
are well known to residents who visit the family owned local hardware store. 

Larry Brown's leadership as a Rotarian led to the construction of a beau- 
tiful park referred to as "Rotary Park" near the bridge on Main Street. He 
not only spent countless Saturdays physically working at this park but also 
recruited volunteers and convinced local businesses to support this worth- 
while beautification project with materials and financial contributions. 

Larry's civic responsibility didn't end with the construction of Rotary 
Park. His next undertaking was to stimulate the interest of the downtown 
Merchants Association in the Main Street USA Program. Larry studied 
the requirements of the program and organized volunteers who assisted in 
the application process which included a truly professional presentation of 
the project. The application and presentation were so good and so com- 
plete that Goffstown was one of only three communities designated as a 
Main Street community in New Hampshire during 1999. 

These two projects would have proved exhausting to the average per- 
son but Larry is an5d:hing but average. He organized volunteers once 
again and they prepared a redesign of the Town Common once known as 
Monument Square. His enthusiasm for the project spread throughout the 
community and into all corners of our town. The people of Goffstown worked 
shoulder to shoulder providing labor, refreshments, support, and what- 
ever else was needed to keep the project moving and on track. His major 
fundraiser was the selling of bricks and granite slabs engraved with names 
of veterans, residents, businesses, and loved ones. Larry's leadership and 
spirit of volunteerism sparked the transformation of the Town Common. 

The Board of Selectmen dedicate the 1999 Annual Report to Larry 
Brown in recognition of his civic projects but mostly for his ability to bring 
out the best in people and the best in a community. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofto1999goff 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Table of Contents 



Dedication 

Table of Contents 1 

Information About Our Town 2-3 

Meeting Schedule 4 

People Serving Goffstown 5-8 

TOWN 

Executive Reports 

Selectmen's Report 9-11 

1999 Town Ballot Determination 
Meeting Minutes (2/3/99) 12-19 

Election Results / 1999 20-22 

2000 Warrant for Town Ballot 
Determination Meeting 

(2/9/00) 23-25 

Financial Reports 

Auditor's Management Letter.. 26-27 

Selectmen's Response 

to Auditor's Letter 28-29 

Budget: Comparative & Current 

Expenditures 30-31 

Revenues 32 

Debt Schedule 33 

Balance Sheet 34 

Treasurer's Report 35 

Trustees of Trust Funds 36-37 

Tax Collector's Report 38-39 

Town Clerk's Report 39-40 

1999 Tax Rate Calculation 41 

1999 Inventory Valuation 42 

Schedule of Town Property 43-45 

Department & Committee Reports 

Budget Committee 46 

Planning Office 47-48 

Planning Board 48 

Capital Improvement Prog 49-54 

So. N.H. Planning Commission 55 

Economic Develop. Council 56-57 

Bldg./Zoning/Health Office 58-59 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 60 

Public Works Department 61 

Solid Waste Commission 62 

Police Department 63-67 

Fire Department 68-70 

Parks & Recreation 72-74 

Forest Fire Warden & Ranger 71 



Conservation Commission 75 

Piscataquog Advisory Report 76 

General Assistance 77 

Office of Youth & Family Svs 78 

Public Library 79-80 

Historic District Commission... 81-82 

Cable TV Franchise Renewal 82 

Cable TV Community Access ... 83-84 
Town Clerk Vital Statistics 

Marriages 85-89 

Births 89-94 

Deaths 95-97 

Interments 97 

Sewer Commission & Water 
Precinct Reports 

Sewer Commission 98-99 

Goffstown Village Water 100-103 

Grasmere Village Water 104-105 

Notes (blank page) 106 

OFFICIAL BALLOTS 

Town Ballot colored pages 

School Ballot colored pages 

SCHOOL 
Executive Reports 

School Board Report 107-109 

Superintendent's Report 110-114 

1998 School District Ballot 
Determination Meeting 

Minutes (2/1/99) 115-124 

Election Results / 1999 125 

2000 Warrant for School District 
Ballot Determination 

Meeting (2/7/00) 126-128 

Pupil Enrollment 129 

Financial Reports 

Auditor's Management Letter.. 130- 131 

Budget 132 

Revenues 133 

Debt Schedule 134 

Principals' Reports 

Bartlett School 135-137 

Maple Ave. School 137-138 

Mountain View Middle .... 139-140 
Goffstown High School 140-141 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Information About Our Town 

During King Phillip's War in 1734 Goffstown and West Manchester 
were designated as Narragansett No. 4, and used as shelter for officers and 
soldiers. The Town of Goffstown, incorporated 1761, is named for Colonel 
John Goffe, an early settler, soldier, and civic leader. Goffstown was origi- 
nally a farming community. As the town was settled during the 1760's, the 
timber that was cleared was used in building ships. The wood was drawn 
by oxen to the village of Piscataquog and from there it was floated by raft 
to Newburyport, Massachusetts. The oxen route became known as Mast 
Road, now the main road through Goffstown. 

Goffstown is located at 43N and 71, 36W in Hillsborough County nine 
miles west of Manchester on NH Route 114; north of Bedford on Route 114; 
east of New Boston on Route 13; south of Weare on Route 114. It is 16 
miles to Concord, state capital of New Hampshire. 

The Town has a population of approximately 15,950 (Office of State 
Planning) and occupies approximately 36.9 square miles. Town Hall el- 
evation is 306 feet above sea level, and the top of Mt. Uncanoonuc is 1321 
feet above sea level. 

GOVERNMENT: Goffstown is governed by a Board of five Select- 
men. Legislative policy, including passage of the Town Budget, is deter- 
mined by the annual Town Meeting. The Town provides a full array of 
governmental services, library and recreational services. At the 1996 An- 
nual Meeting the residents passed RSA 40:13 changing the traditional town 
meeting to a ballot determination meeting followed by an official ballot. 

The Town Hall is located at 16 Main Street. Town office hours are 8:30 
am to 4:30 pm on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday; 8:30 am to noon on Wednes- 
day; and 8:30 am to 6:00 pm on Thursday. 

TOWN CLERK: Voter registration is with the Supervisors of the 
Checklist or Town Clerk. To register to vote, one must be 18 years of age, 
a U.S. citizen and resident of Goffstown. New voter registrations for local, 
state and federal elections can be done at the polls on election day. In 
order to eligible to vote at the Ballot Determination Meeting you must 
register 10 days prior to the date of the meeting. Absentee ballots are 
available to qualified voters for town and state primaries and general elec- 
tions. 

Dog licenses, which expire on April 30 of each year, are available at the 
Town Clerk's office. A dog must be licensed at three months of age; rabies 
certificate required. Fees are $6.50 for neutered animals; $9.00 if unal- 
tered. A penalty of $1.00 per month is assessed as of June 1 for unlicensed 
dogs. 

Automobile registration is initiated at the office of the Town Clerk. 
Registration is due and renewable in the birth month of the resident owner. 
Reregistration decals are available from the Town Clerk for an additional 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



fee of $2.50. In 1999 plates for passenger vehicles motorcycles, trailers 
and tractors were made available in this office. 

PROPERTY TAXES: Goffstown collects property taxes semi-annu- 
ally; payments are due at the Tax Collector's Office July 1 and December 1. 
Property is assessed as of April 1. A town- wide revaluation was completed 
in 1998. In 1999 a new statewide education property tax reduced the local 
tax burden on property owners by approximately 23.5%. The tax rate for 
1999 was $27.03 per thousand dollars of assessed valuation. 

ZONING: A Town Zoning Ordinance controls land uses in Commer- 
cial, Industrial, Residential Small Business Office District (RSBOD), Resi- 
dential, Agricultural, Flood Plain and Conservancy Open Space Zones. 

POLICE: The Goffstown Police Department is located on Route 114 
across from the State Prison for Women and adjacent to the Hillsborough 
County Nursing Home. 

PUBLIC WORKS: The Public Works Department is located at the 
west end of Depot Street in Goffstown Village. The Public Works facility 
will transition to a new facility sometime during the year 2000 and be 
located at 404 Elm Street adjacient to the Transfer Station facility. Curbside 
solid waste and recycling pickups are once a week. The Transfer Station 
for solid wastes and recyclables is located at 404 Elm Street, and is open to 
the public Tuesday through Saturday from 7:30 am to 3:00 pm. 

LIBRARY: The Goffstown Public Library is located on Route 114, 
between High Street and Elm Street and is open from 12 am to 8 pm on 
Monday; 10 am to 8 pm on Tuesday and Wednesday; 10 am to 6 pm on 
Thursday; 10 am to 5 pm on Friday; and 10 am to 3 pm on Saturday. 

PARKS & RECREATION DEPT.: The Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment, with an office at 155 Mast Street provides two supervised playgrounds 
with excellent programs, two public swimming pools, seven public tennis 
courts, athletic fields, a running track, and an outdoor ice skating area, 
with supervised year-round programs for youth and adults. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT: The Goffstown School District is governed by 
an elected nine-member School Board; its budget is determined by the 
Annual School District Meeting. At the 1996 Annual Meeting the residents 
passed RSA 40:13 changing the traditional school meeting to a ballot de- 
termination meeting followed by an official ballot. School Department of- 
fices are located in the White Building at the end of School Street in Goff- 
stown Village. The Superintendent of Schools serves the school districts of 
Goffstown, Dunbarton and New Boston. In Goffstown, the public schools 
consist of two elementary schools, grades 1-3, Maple Avenue School in the 
Village and Bartlett School in Pinardville; one middle school, grades 4-8, 
Mountain View Middle School, 41 Lauren Lane in Grasmere; and one high 
school, grades 9 - 12, Goffstown Area High School, 27 Wallace Road in the 
Village, which accepts Dunbarton and New Boston tuition students. 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Meeting Schedule 

Board of Selectmen 

First Monday of the month 9:00 AM. Second, Third and 

Fourth Monday of the month 6:00 PM. Meetings held at 

Goffstown Town Hall. 
Budget Committee 

Third Tuesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Goffstown 

Town Hall. 
Community Access Cable TV Committee 

Second Monday of the month at 7:00 PM at the GTV studio 

in Goffstown High School. 
C.I.P. Committee 

May through November Wednesdays at 7:00 PM as needed. 
Conservation Commission 

First Wednesday of the month at 7:00 PM at Goffstown 

Town Hall. 
Economic Development Council 

Second Tuesday of the month at 5:00 PM at the Goffstown 

Town Hall. 
Highway Safety Committee 

As needed 
Historic District Commission 

First and third Wednesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the 

Grasmere Town Hall/School House #9. 
Library Trustess 

Third Wednesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Library. 
Parks & Recreation Committee 

Third Wednesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Parks & 

Recreation building. 
Planning Board 

Second and fourth Thursday of the month at 7:00 PM at 

Goffstown Town Hall. 
School Board 

First and third Monday of the month at 7:00 PM at the 

Goffstown Area High School. 
Sewer Commission 

First Wednesday of the month at 6:30 PM at the Goffstown 

Town Hall. 
Solid Waste Commission 

Second Wednesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Goffs- 
town Town Hall. 
Zoning Board of Adjustment 

First Tuesday of the month at 7:00 PM at the Goffstown 

Town Hall. 



PEOPLE SERVING GOFFSTOWN 



People Servevg Goffstown 



Governor 

Jeanne Shaheen 

United States Senators 

Judd Gregg 
Robert C. Smith 

Representatives in Congress 

John E. Sununu 

Executive Councilor 

Bernard A. Streeter, Jr. 

State Senator 

Lou D'Allesandro 

Representatives to 
General Court 

Lawrence A. Emerton, Sr. 
Richard E. Fletcher 
Bruce F. Hunter 
Karen K. McRae 
John C. Sarette 

Board of Selectmen 

Robert L. Wheeler, Chair 2000 

Bruce F. Hunter, Vice-Chair 2000 

Henry C. Boyle 2001 

Philip A. DAvanza 2002 

Barbara J. Griffin 2001 



Town Moderator 

Rodney L. Stark 

Town Clerk 

Donna A. Bergeron 

Tow^n Treasurer 

Jean C. Mayberry 



2000 



2002 



2002 



Administrative Officers 

Sue Desruisseaux, 

Town Administrator 
Michael French, Police Chief 
Edward Hunter, Fire Chief and 

Forest Fire Warden 
Carl L.Quiram, Public Works Dir. 
David L. French, Recreation Dir. 
Dianne Hathaway, Library Dir. 



Janice O'Connell, Administrator of 

Support Services / Welfare 
Vacant, Planning & Economic 

Development Coordinator 
Ron Mace, Assessor 
Susan Porter, Finance Director 
Edmond Neveu, Building Inspector, 

Zoning & Health Official 
Gail Lavallee, Tax Collector 
Kerry P. Steckowych, Prosecutor 
Michael Ryan, Paul Fitzgerald, 

Wm. Drescher, Town Counselors 

ADA Compliance Committee 

Jack Fletcher, Chairman 

Jean Mayberry 

Sue Desruisseaux/Jan O'Connell 

Vacant, School Bd. Rep. 

Vacant - Secretary 

Vacant 

Budget Committee 

Peter Georgantas, Chair 2002 

Ezra P. Beck 2000 

John S. Davis 2001 

George FuUerton 2000 

Carmen J. Gangi 2000 

Timothy Hanson 2001 

Pamela V. Manney 2002 

Gossett Chris McRae 2000 

Dennis Rechcgl 2002 

Garret Seevers 2000 

Suzanne Tremblay 2002 

Bill Tucker 2001 
Craig S. Hieber, School Board Rep. 
Barbara J. Griffin, Sel. Rep. 
Richard Fletcher, Goffstown 

Village Water Rep. 
Alice Rohr,Grasmere Village 

Precinct Rep. 

Building Board of Appeals 

Arthur Rose, Sr. Chair 2002 

Norman Chauvette 2002 

Daniel Dugrenier 2002 

Darron Pierson 2001 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



David White 2000 

Paul Lebrun, Alternate 2002 

Cable TV Community Access 
Committee 

James Pingree, Chair 2001 

Donald Gagnon, Vice-Chr. 2002 

Craig Battey 2001 

Marie Boyle 2000 

James Fadden 2001 

Doug Gove 2000 

Patrick Tucker 2000 

Rosemary Garretson, Alt. 2001 
Janice O'Connell, Gov't. Adv. 
Richard Gagnon, PEG Coordin. 
Richard Finkelson, Educ. Adv. 

Cable TV Franchise Renewal 
Committee 

Anthony Marts, Chair 2001 

Sue Desruisseaux 2001 

Richard Gamache 2001 

Gossett McRae 2001 

Suzanne Tremblay 2001 

Marie Boyle, Alt. 2001 

Jim Cook, Alt. 2001 

Cemetery Trustees 

Timothy P. Kenney, Chair 2001 

Ezra Beck 2002 

Anthony Marts 2000 

C.I.P. Committee 

JoAnn DAvanza, Chair 2000 

John A. Caprio, 2000 

Community Rep. 

Earl S. Carrel, 2000 

Community Rep. 

Frederick P. Cass 2000 

Community Rep. 

John Davis, Budget Rep. 2000 

Vacant, Planning Adv. 2000 

Peter Georgantas, 2000 

Community Rep. 

Karl MacGibbon, 2000 

School Board Rep. 

Susan Porter, Finance Dir. 2000 

Patrick Tucker, 2000 

Community Rep. 



Barbara J. Griffin, 2000 

Sel. Rep. 

Conservation Commission 

Evelyn Miller, Vice Chair 2002 

Charles Freiburger 2001 

Julie Grandgeorge 2001 

Karen McRae 2000 

Jane Raymond 2002 

Wilham Scimone 2002 

Susan Tucker 2000 

CoUis Adams, Alt. 2002 

Timothy Hanson, Alt. 2002 

Jean Walker, Alt. 2002 
Robert Wheeler, Sel. Rep. 
Barbara Griffin, Alt. Sel. Rep. 

Economic Development Council 

William Jabjiniak, Chair 2000 

WilHam L. Hamilton, Jr., 2000 

Vice-Chair 
Margaret Dolbow, Sec. 2001 

Marie Boyle 2000 

Judith DesMeules 2001 

Henry Grady 2002 

Richard Stanley 2002 

Matthew Peterson 2002 

Richard Stanley 2002 

Philip Tatro 2001 

Bruce Hunter, Sel. Rep. 
Robert Wheeler, Sel. Rep. 
Barbara Griffin, Alt. Sel. Rep. 
Vacant, 

Town Administrator's Rep. 
Gossett McRae, 

Planning Board Rep. 

Goffstown Common 
Oversight Committee 

Robert Wheeler, Sel. Board Chr. 
Dave French, Parks & Rec. Dir. 
Carl Quiram, Public Works Dir. 
Larry Brown, Community Rep. 
Michael Rynearson, 
Community Rep. 



PEOPLE SERVING GOFFSTOWN 



Goffstown Village Water 
Precinct 

Allen D. Gamans, Chair 2000 

Henry C. Boyle 2003 

Richard Coughlin 2002 

Richard Fletcher 2004 

Raymond Taber 2001 

Linda R. Naughton, Clerk 

Grasmere Village Water 
Precinct 

Theodore Rohr, Chair 2000 

Arthur Rose, Jr. 2001 

William Swanson 2002 

Diane Rand, Clerk 
Alice Rohr, Treasurer 

Highway Safety Committee 

Vacant, Planning & Economic 

Dev. Coordinator, Chair 
Henry C. Boyle, Sel. Rep. 
Michael French, Police Dept. 
Carl Quiram, Public Works Dir. 
Gerard Nadeau, Community Rep. 

Historic District Commission 

Philip D'Avanza, Chair 2000 

Eleanor Porritt, Vice Chair 2000 
Barbara Mace, Sec./Treas. 2002 



Robert Gagnon 


2000 


Doug Gove 


2001 


Roberta Perkins 


2001 


Annie Vincent 


2000 


Terri August, Alt. 


2000 


Ehzabeth Merrill, Alt. 


2001 


David White, Alt. 


2002 


Vacant, Alt. 


2001 


Vacant, Alt. 


2002 


Landfill Reuse Committee 




David French 




Henry Grady 




Barbara Griffin 




Fred Hicks 




William Jabjiniak 




Carl Quiram 




Libert Sousa 





Library Trustees 

Carolyn Benthien, Chair 2001 

Mark P. Choquette 2002 

Wilham E. Exner 2000 

Theresa Pare 2002 

Barbara J. Griffin 2000 

Kenneth Rose 2001 

Russ Vanderhorst 2002 
Barbara J. Griffin, Sel. Rep. 

Paper Roads Committee 

Howard Leonard, Chair 

JoAnn D'Avanza 

George Hebert 

Jane Raymond 

Sue Desruisseaux, Sel. Rep. 

Susan Tucker, Alt. 

Vacant 

Vacant, Alt. 

Parks & Recreation Comm. 

Susan Tucker, Chair 2002 

Paul Smith, Vice-Chair 2001 

Lionel G. Cullerot 2001 

Robert P. Draper 2001 

J. Claude LaRoche 2002 

D. Michael McKinnon 2000 

Philip C. Tatro 2002 

Bruce Hunter, Sel. Rep. 
Richard Fletcher, Budget Rep. 

Piscataquog River 

Local Advisory Committee 

Alfred P. Bertagnoll (Dr.) 1999 

Vivian T. Blondeau 2000 

Charles Freiburger 2001 

Planning Board 

Gossett McRae, Chair 2001 
James Raymond, Vice Chr 2001 

JoAnn D'Avanza, Sec. 2000 

Collis Adams 2002 

Richard Georgantas 2000 

Miles J. Phillips 2002 

Mark Choquette, Alt. 2002 

Milton Meyers, Alt. 2001 

Lowell VonRuden, Alt. 2002 



8 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Henry C. Boyle, Sel. Rep. 
Robert L. Wheeler, Alt. Sel. Rep. 

School Board 

Michael York, Chair 2000 

Craig Heiber, Vice Chair 2001 

Karl R. MacGibbon 2001 

Virginia McKinnon 2000 

Paul O'Reilly 2002 

Albert Packard 2002 

Jane E. Raymond 2000 

John G. Stafford 2002 

Ellen Vermokowitz 2001 
Ryan Levesque, Student Rep. 

School Moderator 

Lawrence A. Emerton, Sr. 2000 



School Clerk 

JoAnn D'Avanza 

School Treasurer 

Helen Skoglund 



2000 



2000 



School District Administration 

Darrell Lockwood, Ph.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 
Frank Scala, 

Asst. Superintendent 
Mary Heath, 

Asst. Superintendent 
Barbara Potvin, 

Dir. of Special Education 
Michele Croteau, 

Business Manager 
Bartlett Elementary School 
David Bousquet , Principal 
Goffstown Area High School 
Christopher Mosca, Principal 
Pamela Miller, Asst. Principal for 

Curriculum & Student Services 
Frank McBride, Asst. Principal of 

Student Affairs 
Maple Ave. Elementary 
Marc A. Boyd, Principal 
Leslie Doster, Ass^. Principal/ 

Special Ed. Coordinator 
Mountain View Middle 



Rose L. Colby, Principal 
James L Doig, Assoc. Principal 
Sandra Davis, Assoc. Principal 

Sewer Commission 

Stephen R. Crean, Chair 2002 
James A. Bouchard 2000 

Paul LaPerle 2001 

Bruce F. Hunter, Sel. Rep. 

Solid Waste Commission 

Christopher Conroy, Chr. 2000 

Kilton Barnard 2001 

Barbara Barbour 2000 

Eugene Haselton 2001 

Paul LaPerle 1999 

Vincent C. LoPresti 2000 

L Richard Schaffner, Jr. 2002 
Philip A. DAvanza, Sel. Rep. 
Russ Lauriat, Advisor 

So. NH Planning Commission 

Milton Meyers 2002 

Arthur Rose, Sr. 2000 

Robert L. Wheeler 2001 

Barbara J. Griffin, Alt. 2001 

Supervisors of the Checklist 

Helen Skoglund,C/iaJr 2004 

Donna Kelly 2000 

Denise Lemay 2000 

Trustees of the Trust Funds 

Andrew Szerlog, Chair 2000 

Steven N. Murphy 2001 

WiUiam J. Schubert 2002 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Henry Grady, Chair 2000 

Anthony Marts, Vice-Chr 2002 

William Jabjiniak, Clerk 2001 

Paul Lambert 2000 

Edward Dial, Jr. 2002 

Cynthia Boisvert, Alt. 2000 

James Kibby, Alt. 2001 

Vacant, Alternate 2001 

Vacant, Alternate 2002 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



Selectmen's Report 




GOFFSTOWN BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

L-R: Bruce Hunter (Vice Chair), Barbara Griffin, Robert Wheeler (Chair), 
Henry Boyle, Philip D'Avanza 

A new millennium is an appropriate time for the Board of Selectmen to 
review the achievements and the plans for Goffstown's future. The volun- 
teer spirit is alive and well in Goffstown as evidenced by several projects 
and programs during the past year. 

The renovation of the Goffstown Common, formerly known as Monu- 
ment Square, epitomized Goffstown's community spirit as volunteers from 
all walks of life gathered to work and raise funds for the project. It must be 
noted that this project was totally self-sufficient, no property tax dollars 
were used in this renovation. The climax of the project was the Dedication 
of the Common on October 24*^^, which was attended by hundreds of resi- 
dents who enjoyed the entertainment and food. 

A Community of Giving can truly describe Goffstown as it reached out 
to help Evan Ravenelle, a ten year old resident with an inoperable brain 
tumor who required treatment not covered by his family's health insur- 
ance. The goal was to raise $160,000 for this life saving treatment and 
Goffstown through the efforts of residents, merchants, associations and 
civic groups exceeded the goal by raising $200,000. We are happy to report 
that Evan is doing well and we wish him and his family the best. 



_10 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

The Goffstown Main Street program has been busy organizing, gather- 
ing information, and planning. The program hosted Christmas in the Vil- 
lage on December 4* and provided entertainment by the Goffstown Area 
High School band. Hayrides, in lieu of sleigh rides since snow has been a 
scarce commodity this year, were enjoyed on Main Street. Hundreds of 
residents enjoyed the festivities. The New Hampshire Main Street Re- 
source Team has submitted their report to the Goffstown Main Street Board 
of Directors and this report will serve as a guide for future development of 
our Main Street program. 

The Board of Selectmen recognizes and thanks the many volunteers of 
town committees, commissions and boards. Your countless hours and ef- 
forts assist us in meeting the ever-increasing demands on municipal gov- 
ernment. The activities of committees are incorporated in their reports 
throughout this publication. At this time the Board of Selectmen remem- 
bers the dedication of the late Norm Batchelder who generously donated 
his professional services in town mediation cases. 

During 1999 the Board of Selectmen established the following nine 
goals for the year: 

1. A consistent tax rate with the previous year 

2. A smooth implementation of the Statewide School Property Tax 

3. Establishment of a long term supply of sand and gravel 

4. Continued development of the plan for closure of the landfill 

5. A smooth transition of the relocation of the Department of Public 
Works functions to the Transfer Station 

6. More effective communication with citizens 

7. Enhancing employee wellness 

8. Increasing recycling 

9. Review, revise and compile town ordinances 

The Board is pleased to report that the first goal was achieved and 
improved upon by reducing the municipal portion of the tax rate by ten 
cents. The second goal was the smooth implementation of the Statewide 
School Property Tax, which was achieved but will need additional work 
next year with the new state requirement to itemize the statewide prop- 
erty tax on the property tax bill. We plan on meeting this requirement 
with the implementation of new finance and tax collection software. Goals 
three, four, five and eight are directly connected with the Department of 
Public Works. The town's need for a long-term supply of sand and gravel is 
being addressed by researching all alternatives and bringing forward the 
most cost-effective plan to the citizens. The landfill closure and reuse will 
begin in the year 2000 and should be completed in 2001. A smooth transi- 
tion of the relocation of the Department of Public Works functions to the 
Transfer Station is a goal, which continues to be worked upon with a comple- 
tion date in 2000. The need to increase recycling amongst the citizens of 
Goffstown continues to be addressed through the media - newspapers, 
GTV16 and newsletters. The goal is to reduce our waste stream and there- 
fore reduce costs. Efforts to meet the sixth goal of effective communication 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



11 



with the residents of Goffstown have included the taping and broadcasting 
of weekly Selectmen meetings on GTV16 as well as a community wide 
newsletter. The seventh goal of enhancing town employee wellness is based 
upon the fact the employees who practice wellness have fewer sick days 
and fewer injuries resulting in lower insurance costs for the town. Our 
Wellness Committee has been busy creating and implementing employee 
wellness programs. A final goal of the Board of Selectmen is to review, 
revise and compile town ordinances. This process has begun and will con- 
tinue into year 2000. 

The Board of Selectmen thanks the dedicated hardworking team of 
town employees who have helped in carrying out the Board of Selectmen 
goals and the mission given by the voters. The Board bids farewell to town 
retirees Town Clerk Marlene Gamans, Deputy Tax Collector Muriel Lively, 
and Communications Supervisor Pam O'Neil. Their years of dedicated 
service are truly appreciated. 

This year's many accomplishments are attributed to the efforts of many 
dedicated volunteers and employees. We thank you all for your support 
and invite your suggestions for the new millennium. 

GOFFSTOWN BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Robert L. Wheeler, Chairman 
Bruce F. Hunter, Vice-Chairman 
Henry C. Boyle 
Philip A. D'Avanza 
Barbara J. Griffin 




Reception for Goffstown' s sister city Kunitachi, Japan hosted by the 
Board of Selectmen, August 1999. 



12 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

1999 Town Ballot 
Determination Meeting 

Minutes of February 3, 1999 

(This is an abbreviated version of the minutes of this meeting. The 
original, complete m.inutes are on file in the Town Clerk's Office). 

Moderator Rodney Stark called the meeting to order at 7:15 P.M. There 
were 148 people present. 

The presentation of and salute to the flag were led by Boy Scouts Seth 
Desilets, Joel Desilets, Sam Ducharme, Scott Hastings and Steven Szumiecz 
of Troop 99, led by Scoutmaster Bill Connor. 

The moderator introduced the head tables - to his left, Selectmen Hank 
Boyle, Barbara Griffin, Phil D'Avanza, Bruce Hunter and Robert Wheeler; 
Town Administrator John Scruton, Finance Director Maureen McLean; 
and to his right. Assistant Moderator Gossett McRae, Town Clerk Marlene 
Gamans and "Scribe" Marie Boyle. 

He also recognized the budget committee members. 

Moderator Stark called upon Parks and Recreation Director Dave 
French who explained that this is the tenth annual presentation of the 
Clint Robinson/Lionel Cullerot Volunteer Award, which recognizes out- 
standing recreation volunteers in the community. He asked Mr. Cullerot 
and Mrs. Barbara Robinson, as well as Susan Tucker, Chairman of the 
Parks and Recreation Commission to help present the awards. 

There were six nominees for this year: Bob Corson, Gene Plana, Phil 
Tatro, Pam Manney, Bill Connor and Bill Sullivan. Mr. French gave a 
short explanation of the reasons for their being chosen, and then announced 
that this year's winner of the Robinson/Cullerot Award was Bill Sullivan. 

Mr. Sullivan accepted the award and thanked the commission for their 
great programs on behalf of Goffstown youth. He also thanked the com- 
munity for building the addition to the parks and recreation building last 
year. 

The moderator then called upon Selectman Chairman Hank Boyle, who 
asked Town Clerk Marlene Gamans to step forward. He noted that this is 
Mrs. Gamans last meeting as town clerk, and he presented her with a 
bouquet of roses and thanked her on behalf of the board of selectmen for 
her dedicated service to the town. Mrs. Gamans received a standing ova- 
tion from all in attendance. 

Moderator Stark gave a brief summary of the rules and regulations to 
be used for the conduct of this meeting, and explained that we will not be 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 13^ 

voting on any of the articles this evening, merely discussing them and 
determining how they'll appear on the warrant for the March 9 elections. 
The reading and posting of the warrant were dispensed with. 

Article 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $200,000 
for the Capital Reserve Fund established in 1997 under the provi- 
sions of RSA 35:1, for the purpose of closure of the landfill. (This 
appropriation is in addition to that in Article 12) (The Board of 
Selectmen recommends this appropriation) (The Budget Commit- 
tee recommends this appropriation). 

Moderator read the article - it was moved to the floor by Sel. Griffin 
and seconded by Sel. Boyle. 

Sel. Griffin spoke to the motion, noting that this is the third year for 
this to appear on the warrant. She explained the money can only be used 
for landfill closure, and will require a ballot vote to remove the money from 
the fund. She also explained the cost estimates for the closure and said 
that plans to reuse it are presently at the Dept. of Environmental Services 
in Concord for review. 

F. Plett asked if the closure could be pushed further into the future to 
save more money - Ms. Griffin replied no, we are now under federal regu- 
lations, and the state expects us to begin work there next year. 

There being no further comments, the moderator directed the town 
clerk to enter Article 9 on the official town ballot as it appears on the war- 
rant. 

Article 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $15,000 
for the purpose of funding the nonprofit group Goffstown Main 
Street Program, Inc. upon the conditions that the group be ac- 
cepted into the NH Main Street Program and the group raises 
$30,000 in donations for 1999. This is the first year of a three-year 
program. (This appropriation is in addition to that in Article 
12) (The Board of Selectmen recommends this appropriation) (The 
Budget Committee recommends this appropriation) 

Moderator read the article- Sel. Hunter moved it to the floor, seconded 
by Sel. DAvanza. 

Larry Brown spoke to the article - he explained what the Main Street 
program is, gave some information about the program itself and how a 
community becomes a member of that program. He said the $45,000 per 
year ($15,000 from the taxpayers, $30,000 in donations) is a minimum 
amount; most participating communities find they spend more than that. 
A portion of that money is to pay a facilitator or administrator to oversee 
the program. This person will not be a town employee, he/she will be em- 



_14 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

ployed by the private organization, Goffstown Main Street, Inc. 

P. Lawrance asked what would happen to the money if they didn't get 
accepted into the program; Sel. Boyle said it would not be spent. 

There being no further comments, the moderator instructed the town 
clerk to include Article 10 on the official town ballot as it appears on the 
warrant. 

Moderator Stark recognized State Senator Lou D'Allesandro who was 
present at the meeting tonight. 

Article 11 

To see if the Town of Goffstown will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate $15,677.56 for six months' salary and benefits for a police of- 
ficer, whose primary responsibility will be working with young 
people in the schools and community, to promote a safe and drug- 
free environment. This appropriation, and the salary and ben- 
efits over three years, w^ill be 99% reimbursed by a grant from the 
U.S. Department of Justice. (By petition) (This appropriation is in 
addition to that in Article 12) (The Board of Selectmen does not 
recommend this article) (The Budget Committee does not recom- 
mend this article). 

Moderator read the article and recognized Steve Monier who moved 
the article to the floor, seconded by Sel. D Avanza. 

Mr. Monier explained that he was one of the petitioners of this article, 
which would enable the town to accept a grant from the Dept. of Justice to 
hire a police officer who would be working with young people in the schools 
and the community. It will provide a three-year period of funding with 
99% reimbursement. Over the three-year period, he said, the police officer 
will cost the taxpayers $1,000 with no impact on the tax rate. He gave a 
history of the calls for service experienced by the department over the years. 

F. Plett said he wished he had signed the petition - explained his expe- 
rience with his son while he was in high school. 

T. Stratton asked that someone from the selectmen or budget commit- 
tee speak about why they didn't recommend the article. 

Sel. D'Avanza explained that the "not recommended" by the selectmen 
was a vote of process - originally the selectmen were in favor of it, but the 
budget committee had taken the article out since the selectmen had agreed 
to go along with the budget committee, the process won out. 

D. Gagnon asked if they're afraid that after three years the police bud- 
get will go up to support this officer. He said we can worry about that in 
three years. 

P. Georgantas, budget committee member explained that the budget 
committee took its stand because nobody has ever been let go after three 
years under similar programs; and because the budget committee felt the 
same work can be done by people we have now. 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 15_ 

Mr. Monier responded that the poHce department has never asked for 
anything that it didn't need, and we have a history of pursuing grants 
aggressively in this community. 

B. Tucker, budget committee member said the committee was given 
different views of what this officer would do. He said we already have 
people working in the schools - the DARE program, the family and youth 
services officer, Officer Friendly, etc. 

Sel. Wheeler reiterated what Sel. D'Avanza has said - the selectmen 
decided to not recommend it, in order to get the total budget approved. 

Several other people spoke pro and con the article before F. Plett moved 
the previous question. It was seconded and passed, and debate on this 
article ceased. 

Moderator instructed the town clerk to put Article 11 on the official 
town ballot as it appears on the warrant. 

Article 12 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for the 
operation, expenses and commitments of the Town Government, 
the budget approved by the Board of Selectmen in the amount of 
eleven million ninety-five thousand, six hundred seventy-five dol- 
lars ($11,095,675). Separate articles 12A and 12B are included in 
this amount. Special Articles 9, 10 and 11 are not included. 

This budget will be predicated by estimated revenues in the 
amount of five million, three hundred thirty-nine dollars 
($5,000,339). 

The sewer enterprise fund of one million, six hundred forty- 
eight thousand, eight hundred forty-four dollars ($1,648,844) is 
included in this revenue amount and in the appropriation request 
in this article. 

The motion on the operating budget shall be the following, with 
only the appropriation amount subject to amendment: "Shall the 
Town of Goffstown raise and appropriate as an operating budget, 
not including appropriations by special warrant articles, the 
amounts set forth on the budget posted with the warrant, for the 
purposes set forth therein, totaling $11,095,675? Should this ar- 
ticle be defeated, the operating budget shall be $10,834,839, which 
is the same as last year, with certain adjustments required by pre- 
vious action of the Town of Goffstown or by law, or the governing 
body may hold one special meeting in accordance with RSA 40:13X 
and XVI to take up the issue of a revised operating budget only." 
(The Board of Selectmen recommends this appropriation) (The 
Budget Committee recommends $10,960,675). 



16 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Moderator explained that he would have the main article moved to the 
floor - then deal with articles 12A and 12B and then return to the main 
article. He read the article. 

Sel. Boyle moved the article to the floor, seconded by Sel. D'Avanza. 

Moderator then went on to Article 12A. 



Article 12A 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $19,900 
for the purpose of continuing the program for youth and family 
services through a subcontract with the YMCA. (The Board of Se- 
lectmen recommends this article) (The Budget Committee recom- 
mends this article). 

Moderator read the article, moved to the floor by Sel. DAvanza, sec- 
onded by P. Georgantas. 

Sel. DAvanza explained that this has been voted on each year for the 
past three years. The program has been working well, and the money is in 
the budget. 

M. Pothier asked if these two separate articles are approved, does the 
money get rolled into the default budget for next year? 

Sel. Boyle explained that it does. 

There was no further discussion on Article 12A. 

Article 12B 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $240,000 
for the purpose of continuing the purpose of constructing at the 
Transfer Station, new salt storage facilities to hold about 800 tons 
of salt, and beginning work upon a replacement for the Depart- 
ment of Public Works' garage facility. The replacement facility 
will be 100 by 125 feet for the garage, and 30 by 40 feet for the 
offices. Thw total cost will be about $507,000. The Selectmen will 
be requesting the additional funds next year to complete the facil- 
ity. (The Board of Selectmen recommends this appropriation) (The 
Budget Committee recommends $105,000). 

Moderator read the article, moved to the floor by Sel. Wheeler, sec- 
onded by M. Boyle. 

Moderator announced that he had received a written motion to amend 
the article - 'To reduce the $240,000 to $105,000, the amount recom- 
mended by the Budget Committee," submitted by members of the bud- 
get committee. 

Bill Tucker, budget committee member said both the budget commit- 
tee and the selectmen agree that the department needs a new facility, but 
the budget committee feels there should be a full rendering of what's going 
to be done and a specific price before it's approved. The EPA has been 
looking at facilities - they'll be here soon and someting needs to be done. 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 17 

but the budget committee feels we should do the engineering, get a bid, 
and have a more definitive building proposal. 

Sel. Wheeler spoke, sa5ring that we didn't have any quotes for either 
the police station, the library or the parks and recreation buildings before 
they were approved. Selectmen are apprehensive that EPA may make 
them spend a lot of money on the old facility, because a drawing of a build- 
ing you might erect won't be satisfactory to the federal authorities. 

P. Georgantas said this came before the CIP committeee, it was a 
$975,000 project - nearly a million dollars. CIP members cut it to $425,000, 
the selectmen put it back up to $507,000 and it came before the budget 
committee. He said the budget committee also feels we should start the 
project this year - build the salt shed - but wait for the garage until we 
have plans and quotes. 

S. Crean asked what the cost of closing out the landfill at the current 
DPW site was - Sel. Wheeler said he's not sure it's required in the statute. 

D. Gagnon said people should remember that there's a $10,000,000 
project that wasn't brought forth this year that will be next year. He feels 
it's more sensible to vote the $240,000 this year. 

P. Lawrance expressed his dissatisfaction with this being a separate 
article - said he feels it should have been a special article. 

Several more residents spoke on this article until the previous ques- 
tion was moved, seconded and passed. 

The moderator then announced that he had received a request for a 
written secret ballot on this article, and asked assistant moderator McRae 
to give instructions on the voting procedure. 

McRae explained that the vote would be on the amendment - a yes 
would be to approve the amendment, a no would be to defeat the amend- 
ment. 

Voters went through the checklist and voted on the amendment - when 
the votes were counted the amendment had been defeated 88-31. 

Moderator announced that he had received another amendment, mak- 
ing article 12B a special article. He said he would not accept the amend- 
ment since it would be a change in the warrant as it was noticed to the 
public prior to the meeting. 

F. Plett said he accepted the moderator's decision, but he felt it was 
wrong for the selectmen to put a new project like that into a separate rather 
than a special article. 

P. Lawrance asked if town counsel was present. He was not. 

Resident Jim Raymond is an attorney and he said he felt he had to side 
with the moderator, because in his experience of members of his law firm, 
the DRA has adopted a very tight interpretation of these articles. 

Ezra Beck said he challenged the moderator's ruling because he feels 
that the people can do anjrthing they want here. 

Moderator turned the meeting over to Asst. Moderator McRae to deal 



J8 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

with the challenge. Mr. McRae asked the people to vote yes if they sup- 
ported Mr. Beck's position; no to support the moderator. The noes were 
loud and clear and the moderator's position stood. 

K. MacGibbon asked if the ballot will show the two disparate numbers 
recommended by the selectmen and the budget committee; the moderator 
explained that neither article 12A nor 12B will appear on the ballot - they 
were just brought out here by the selectmen for separate discussion. 

S. Monier moved the previous question, seconded by M. French, mo- 
tion passed. 

Article 12 

Moderator reread the article. 

Sel. Boyle moved the article to the floor, seconded by Sel. Wheeler. 

Moderator Stark explained that the budget number does not include 
the appropriations for the special articles 9, 10 and 11; however, it does 
contain the numbers in the separate articles, 12A and 12B. If articles 9, 10 
and 11 pass at the polls, then their amounts will be added into the budget 
number. 

P. Lawrance asked what the projected tax rate would be, based on the 
selectmen's recommended budget. 

Sel. Wheeler said that question comes up every year and the same 
answer is given every year - there's no way to tell, since the assessments 
aren't in until after April 1. Nobody can predict that number. 

P. Lawrance asked how come the school board and the budget commit- 
tee can give it each year. 

Sel. Wheeler said they can only give estimates - nobody knows what 
the number will be until after April 1. 

P. Lawrance said he didn't accept that answer. He talked about the 
present assessed valuation and the amount we're paying now, and said by 
his calculations, the tax rate would go up once again this year. 

Sel. Wheeler said Mr. Lawrance didn't consider the revenues in his 
numbers. 

P. Lawrance said the taxes went up this year when they were told they 
wouldn't. 

Sel. Wheeler explained that due to the revaluation of the town, the 
overlay account had to be increased substantially, in order to cover any 
abatements connected with the revaluation. It went from $40,000 to 
$238,000. He also attributed some of the tax increase to the changes at the 
transfer station. 

P. Lawrance amended the article to reduce the town's operating 
budget to $10,658,665, down $437,010 from the Selectmen's proposed 
budget - seconded by J. Stafford. 

Mr. Lawrence explained he wants to get the tax rate back to where it 
was and make up for the increase we had last year. 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 19_ 

Sel. Wheeler explained that the way to lower the cost of government is 
for people to accept individual responsibility, to take their own trash to the 
transfer station, or not call the police station when there's a minor neigh- 
borhood disagreement. We have a budget committee, school board and 
board of selectmen and they all work very hard putting budgets together, 
and he feels it's unfair for someone to come here and cut a percentage or a 
flat rate out of a budget without knowing what those cuts could effect. 

R. Johonnett said he feels the people aren't being given responsible 
answers. 

The previous question was moved, seconded and passed, and discus- 
sion stopped. 

Vote was taken on the amendment to reduce the town's operating bud- 
get - motion was defeated by voice vote. 

Back to the main article - the previous question was moved, seconded 
and passed. 

Moderator Stark reread the article. 

Motion to approve the main motion passed. 

Moderator Stark instructed the Town Clerk to put Article 12 on the 
official town ballot as he had read it. 

There were no further reports, nor any other business to come before 
the meeting. 

Motion was made to adjourn, seconded and passed. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10 p.m. until March 9 when the election 
will take place. 



Respectfully submitted, ATTEST: A True Copy 

Marie Boyle, Scribe Marlene M. Gamans 

Goffstown Town Clerk 



20 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



GoFFSTOWN Town Meeting 
Election Results (3/9/99) 



SEWER COMMISSION 

1 for 3 Years Vote for ONE 

STEPHEN R. CREAN 1717 

SEWER COMMISSION 

1 for 2 Years Vote for ONE 

PAUL E. LaPERLE 1709 

TRUSTEE OF TRUST FUNDS 

1 for 3 Years Vote for ONE 

WILLIAM J. SCHUBERT 1701 



ARTICLE 2 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 1 as proposed by petition of the voters of 
Goffstown: 

Shall the Town vote to amend the zoning dis- 
trict by changing the zoning of Map 5 Lot 59 
from Agricultural (AG) District to Residen- 
tial Small Office and Business District 
(RSBOD)? 

The property address is 48 Mast Road. Lo- 
cated next to the Villa Augustina's little league 
baseball fields. 

(Submitted by Petition) 

(Recommended by the Planning Board) 

YES -1348 NO -509 

ARTICLE 3 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 2 as proposed by petition of the voters of 
Goffstown: 

Shall the Town amend the zoning district by 

changing the zoning of Map 7 Lot 111 A-2 from 

Residential 1 (R-1 ) to Agricultural (AG)? This 

lot is located at the end of Maple Avenue. 

(Submitted by Petition) 

(Not Recommended by the Planning 

Board) 

YES-773 NO-1190 



SELECTMEN 




1 for 3 Years 


Vote for ONE 


PHILLIP D'AVANZA 


1117 


JOHN S. DAVIS 


909 


TOWN CLERK 




1 for 3 Years 


Vote for ONE 


DONNA A. BERGERON 


1823 


TREASURER 




1 for 3 Years 


Vote for ONE 


JEAN C. MAYBERRY 


1773 


BUDGET COMMIHEE 


4 for 3 Years 


Vote for FOUR 


PETER GEORGANTAS 


1627 


PAMELA VMANNEY 


1538 


DENNIS RECHCYGL 


1485 


SUZANNE TREMBLAY 


1475 


BUDGET 




1 for 1 Year 


Vote for ONE 


GARRET SEEVERS 


1642 



CEMETERY TRUSTEE 

1 for 3 Years Vote for ONE 
EZRA P BECK 711 
JAMES GAGE 585 
ROBERT T PARE" 530 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

3 for 3 Years Vote for THREE 

MARK CHOQUETTE 1452 

THERESA PARE' 1585 

RUSS VANDERHORST 42 

PLANNING BOARD 

2 for 3 Years Vote for TWO 
COLLIS G. ADAMS 1231 
MILES J. PHILLIPS 1138 
LOWELL S. VON RUDEN 716 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



21 



ARTICLE 4 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 3 as proposed by petition of the voters of 
Goffstown: 

Shall the Town amend the zoning ordinance by 
amending Article V, Section C,4.A-1,f, mini- 
mum lot frontage for 1 - family dwellings 
2,3,4,5 acres 200'; 6,7,8,9 acres 1 50'; 10,11,12 
acres 100'; 13+ acres 50'? All other require- 
ments remain the same. 

(Submitted by Petition) 

(Not Recommended by the Planning 

Board) 

YES -452 NO -1484 

ARTICLE 5 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 4 as proposed by the Planning Board of 
Goffstown: 

Shall the Town amend the zoning district by 
changing the zoning of Map 5 Lot 38-1 from a 
split zone of Residential I/Agricultural to resi- 
dential I ? This parcel is located on Juniper 
Drive and Center Street. 
(Recommended by the Planning Board) 
YES -1404 NO -510 

ARTICLE 6 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 5 as proposed by the Planning Board of 
Goffstown: 

Amend Article IV, Section "Floodplain Or- 
dinance" by adding the following: a. This or- 
dinance, adopted pursuant to the authority 
of R.S.A. 674:16, shall be known as the Town 
of Goffstown Floodplain Development Or- 
dinance; and b. Item IX Variances and Ap- 
peals: I) The Zoning Board of Adjustment shall 
notify the applicant in writing that: (I) the issu- 
ance of a variance to construct below the base 
flood level will result in increase premium rates 
for flood insurance up to amounts as high as 
$25 for $1 00 of insurance coverage and (ii) 
such construction below the base flood level 



increases to life and property. Such notifica- 
tion shall be maintained with a record of all vari- 
ances. The National Flood Insurance Program 
recommends that these amendments be added 
to the current floodplain ordinance. 

(Recommended by the Planning Board) 
YES -1594 NO -328 

ARTICLE 7 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 6 as proposed by the Planning Board of 
Goffstown: 

Amend Article VI, "Open Space Development 
Ordinance" by deleting all references to "Soil 
Base Lot Sizing Regulations" and inserting 
"Site Specific Soil Mapping Standards" 
where applicable. The Soil Based Lot Sizing 
Standards are being phased out by the National 
Cooperative Soil Survey in favor of the new Site 
Specific Soil Mapping Standards. 

(Recommended by the Planning Board) 
YES -1634 NO -298 

ARTICLE 8 

Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment 
No. 7 as proposed by the Planning Board of 
Goffstown: 

Amend Article V, Section F, by inserting a new 
"Village Commercial District" section and re- 
numbering therefafter. Lots proposed to be re- 
zoned from either Residential 1 , Residential 1/ 
Commercial or Commercial Districts to the pro- 
posed Village Commercial District are as fol- 
lows: 

Map 34, Lot(s) 63,64,65,66,67,68,69, 
70,78,78B,79,80,81,82,82A,83,84,86,87,88, 
89,90,91,92,93,97,98,99,100,101,102,103,105, 
106,107,108,109,110,125,126,127,128,129,138, 
138-1,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147, 
149,149-1,150,151,152,153,154,156,157,158, 
159,160,161,162,164,164A,165,166,167,168,169,170, 
171,172, 173; and 

Map 38, Lot(s) 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12, 
1 3,23,24,36,76,77,78,78-1 ,1 01 ,1 02,1 03,1 03A, 
and 104. 
The Village Commercial District (VCD) is es- 



22 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



tablished to allow for the development of the 
Village section of Goffstown with a harmoni- 
ous mix of commercial, residential, civic and 
recreational uses with an emphasis on the pro- 
motion of pedestrian movement and the pres- 
ervation of historic structures. The intent of 
this ordinance is to adopt reasonable standards 
that will preserve the Village area as a focal 
point for the personal, business, religious and 
civic needs of the community while at the same 
time allowing the area to accomodate growth 
at a scale and intensity consistent with a vil- 
lage setting. 
(Recommended by the Planning Board) 
YES -1577 NO -393 

ARTICLE 9 

Shall the Town raise and appropriate $200,000 

for the Capital Reserve Fund established in 

1 997 under the provisions of RSA 35:1 for the 

purpose of the closure of the landfill? 

(This appropriation is in addition to that in 

Article 12) 

(The Board of Selectmen recommends this 

appropriation) 

(The Budget Committee recommends this 

appropriation) 

YES-1588 NO-417 

ARTICLE 10 

Shall the Town raise and appropriate $15,000 

for the purpose of funding the nonprofit group 

Goffstown Main Street Program, Inc. upon the 

conditions that the group be accepted into the 

NH Main Street Program and the group raises 

$30,000 in donations for 1 999? This is the first 

year of a three-year program. 

(This appropriation is in addition to that in 

Article 12) 

(The Board of Selectmen recommends this 

appropriation) 

(The Budget Committee recommends this 

appropriation) 

YES -1430 NO -581 



ARTICLE 11 

Shall the Town raise and appropriate 
$1 5,677.56 for six months salary and benefits 
for a police officer, whose primary responsibil- 
ity will be working with young people in the 
schools and community, to promote a safe and 
drug free environment? This appropriation, and 
the salary and benefits over three years, will 
be 99% reimbursed by a grant from the U.S. 
Department of Justice. 

(By Petition)(This appropriation is in addi- 
tion to that in Article 12) 
(The Board of Selectmen recommends this 
appropriation) 

(The Budget Committee does not recom- 
mend this appropriation) 
YES-1154 NO-855 

ARTICLE 12 

Shall the Town of Goffstown raise and appro- 
priate as an operating budget, not including 
appropriations by special warrant articles, the 
amounts set forth on the budget posted with 
the warrant, for the purposes set forth therein, 
totaling $1 1 ,095,675? Should this article be de- 
feated, the operating budget shall be 
$10,834,839, which is the same as last year, 
with certain adjustments required by previous 
action of the Town of Goffstown or by law or 
the governing body may hold one special meet- 
ing, in accordance with RSA 40:1 3, X and XVI, 
to take up the issue of a revised operating bud- 
get only. 

(The Board of Selectmen recommends this 
appropriation) 

(The Budget Committee recommends this 
appropriation) 
YES-1085 NO-919 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 23 

2000 \^?arrant for 

Town Ballot 

Determination Meeting 

February 9, 2000 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Goffstown in the county of 
Hillsborough qualified to vote in Town affairs, and to the inhabitants of 
the School District in the Town of Goffstown, qualified to vote in School 
District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet on the ninth day of February, 2000 at 
seven o'clock in the evening at the Goffstown High School in said Town for 
the first portion of Town Meeting, also known as the deliberative session, 
to act on the following subjects and determine matters which will then be 
voted upon by the official ballot on March 14, 2000. 

You are further notified to meet March 14, 2000 to vote on all matters 
by official ballot. The polls will open on March 14, 2000 at 7:00 a.m. and 
close at 7:00 p.m. at the Central polling district at the Goffstown High 
School and will open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 p.m. in the Fifth District 
at the Bartlett Elementary School. 

Article 1 

To choose all Town Officers, Trustees, Commissioners, and School Dis- 
trict Officers for the ensuing year. 

Article 2 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of three 
million six hundred thirty seven thousand and one dollars ($3,637,701) for 
the purpose of financing the Landfill Closure/Reuse, and to authorize the 
issuance of not more than $2,837,701 of bonds or notes in accordance with 
the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act (RSA 33) as amended and to 
authorize the selectmen to issue and negotiate such bonds or notes and to 
determine the rate of interest thereon, the maturity and the other terms 
and provisions thereof, as may be in the best interest of the town; further- 
more, to authorize the selectmen to withdraw $600,000 from the Landfill 
Closure Capital Reserve Fund created for this with the balance of $200,000 
to be raised by taxation. It is anticipated that twenty percent (20%) of 
eligible costs will be reimbursed by state grants. (This appropriation is in 
addition to Article 7.) (A 3/5 ballot vote is required.) 
(The Board of Selectmen and Budget Committee recommend this article.) 



24 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Articles 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $225,000 
to purchase a parcel of land approximately 12.73 acres identified as Parcel 
A on a Subdivision Plan of Map 5 Lot 37. The intended use of this land is 
to meet the town's long term need for sand. (This appropriation is in addi- 
tion to Article 7.) 
(The Board of Selectmen and Budget Committee recommend this article.) 

Article 4 

To see if the Town shall vote to establish a charter commission for the 
purpose of revising the municipal charter or establishing a new municipal 
charter (RSA 49-B). 

Articles 

We the undersigned petition the Town of Goffstown, NH to place on 
the year 2000 ballot a warrant to go to a town vote for the installation of 
traffic lights at the Main St., Elm St., Mast Rd., High St., intersection. 

(Submitted by petition.) 

Articles 

To see if the Town will vote to deposit 30% (thirty percent) of the rev- 
enues collected pursuant to RSA 79-A (the land use change tax) in the 
conservation fund in accordance with RSA 36-A:5 III as authorized by RSA 
79-A:25 II. (Submitted by petition.) (The Board of Selectmen does not rec- 
ommend this article.) (The Budget Committee recommends this article.) 

Article 7 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate for the operation, 
expenses, and commitments of the Town Government, the budget approved 
by the Board of Selectmen in the amount of eleven million seven hundred 
ninety two thousand eight hundred and twenty five dollars ($11,792,825). 

This budget will be predicated by estimated revenues in the amount of 
five million five hundred and nine thousand twenty seven dollars 
($5,509,027). 

The sewer enterprise fund of one million three hundred and seventy 
thousand five hundred and twenty seven dollars ($1,370,527) is included 
in this revenue amount and in the appropriations request in this Article. 

The motion on the operating budget shall be the following, with only 
the appropriation amount subject to amendment: "Shall the Town of Goff- 
stown raise and appropriate as an operating budget, not including appro- 
priations by special warrant articles and other appropriations voted sepa- 
rately, the amounts set forth on the budget posted with the warrant, or as 
amended by vote of the first session, for the purposes set forth therein, 
totaling eleven million seven hundred ninety two thousand eight hundred 
and twenty five dollars ($11,792,825)? Should this article be defeated, the 
operating budget shall be ten million nine hundred and eighty seven thou- 



TOWN - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 25_ 

sand nine hundred and two dollars ($10,987,902), which is the same as last 
year, with certain adjustments required by previous action of the Town of 
Goffstown or by law or the governing body may hold one special meeting in 
accordance with RSA 40:13 X and XVI, to take up the issue of a revised 
operating budget only." NOTE: This article (operating budget) does not 
include appropriations in any other warrant article. 
(The Board of Selectmen and Budget Committee recommend this article.) 

Articles 

To hear the reports of Town Officers, Auditors and Committees and to 
pass any vote relating thereto. 

Article 9 

To transact any business that may legally come before said meeting. 

Given under our Hands and Seal this thirteenth day of January, 2000, 

GOFFSTOWN BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert L. Wheeler, Chairman 

Henry C. Boyle Barbara J. Griffin 

Philip A. DAvanza Bruce F. Hunter 

Then personally appeared the above names Robert L. Wheeler, Henry C. 
Boyle, Philip A. DAvanza, Barbara J. Griffin and under oath that the above 
certificate by them is true. 

Donna A. Bergeron, Town Clerk 



26 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Auditor's Management Letter 

Patrick J. Kelly 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

713 Chestnut Street 

Manchester, New Hampshire 03104 

669-6088 

September 27, 1999 
Board of Selectmen 
Town of Goffstown 
Goffstown, New Hampshire 

As part of my examination of the financial statements of the Town of 
Goffstown, New Hampshire for the year ended December 31, 1998, 1 made 
a study and evaluation of the Town's system of internal control to the ex- 
tent I considered necessary to evaluate the system as required by gener- 
ally accepted auditing standards. Under these standards, the purpose of 
such evaluation is to establish a basis for reliance on the system of internal 
accounting control in determining the nature, timing, and extent of other 
auditing procedures that are necessary for the expression of an opinion on 
the financial statements, and to assist me in planning and performing my 
examination of the financial statements. It should be noted that this letter 
is intended to criticize only the system of internal accounting control, and 
is not directed at any individual or group of individuals. 

My examination of the financial statements made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards, including the study and evaluation 
of the Town's system of internal accounting controls for the year ended 
December 31, 1998, would not necessarily disclose all weaknesses in the 
system because it was based upon selected tests of the accounting records 
and related data. Accordingly, I do not express an opinion on the Town's 
system of internal control taken as a whole. However, such study disclosed 
the following weaknesses, upon which I am presenting my comments and 
recommendations for your consideration. 

Accounting System 

Timely financial reporting depends upon maintaining records on a cur- 
rent basis in order to minimize year end adjustments. Detail subsidiary 
records for cash, accounts receivable and payable, and property taxes should 
be reconciled and any adjustments posted to the general ledger on a monthly 
basis. Interfund transfers should be recorded and interfund account bal- 
ances reconciled monthly. 

The Town should reduce its reliance on separately maintained spread- 
sheets for internal reports and instead utilize the reporting capabilities of 
its general ledger system. This will compel timely posting of activities and 
allow analysis of financial operations as a whole, not individual compo- 
nents. 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 27^ 

Investments 

The Town's current investment policy for operating cash consists of 
unitizing "sweep" accounts from the operating fund. This vehicle for in- 
vestment should be compared to other methods to confirm that the Town's 
investment 3rields are maximized, while maintaining the limited risk lev- 
els allowed to government funds. Cash accounts may be consolidated to 
increase investment 5delds, with internal restrictions maintained using 
accounting methods rather than physical separation. 

Fixed Asset Accounting 

The Town has acquired, but not maintained, software to account for 
the fixed assets. Generally accepted accounting principles will require fixed 
asset reporting in the future, and the Town should begin now to accumu- 
late the required data. Current accounting policy properly records acqui- 
sitions as expenditures, but does not record the creation of an asset in the 
Fixed Asset Account Group. 

Property Tax Revenue 

Generally accepted accounting principles require that property taxes 
not collected within sixty days of year end be reported as deferred income. 
The Town currently reports income as property taxes are assessed and col- 
lectable. The change in accounting policy would result in a deficit in the 
General Fund Balance when presented in the financial statements, but would 
have no effect when used by the State to determine the property tax rate. 

The objective of internal accounting control is to provide reasonable, 
but not absolute, assurance of the safeguarding of assets against loss from 
unauthorized use or disposition, and the reliability of financial records for 
preparing financial statements and maintaining accountability for assets. 
The concept of reasonable assurance recognizes that the cost of a system of 
internal accounting control should not exceed the benefits derived and also 
recognizes that the evaluation of these factors necessarily requires esti- 
mates and judgments by management. 

There are inherent limitations that should be recognized in consider- 
ing the potential effectiveness of any system of internal accounting con- 
trol. In the performance of most control procedures, there may be mis- 
takes of judgment, carelessness, or other personal factors. Control proce- 
dures whose effectiveness depends upon segregation of duties can be cir- 
cumvented by collusion. Similarly, control procedures can be circumvented 
intentionally by management either with respect to the execution and re- 
cording of transactions or with respect to the estimates and judgments 
required in the preparation of financial statements. Further, projection of 
any evaluation of internal accounting control to future periods is subject to 
the risk that the procedures may become inadequate due to changes in 
conditions, and the degree of compliance with the procedures may deterio- 
rate. 

Very truly yours, 
Patrick J. Kelly, CPA 



^8 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Selectmen's Response 
TO Auditor 

December 3, 1999 



Patrick J. Kelly 
713 Chestnut Street 
Manchester, NH 03104 

Dear Mr. Kelly: 

We appreciate your thorough examination of our records and welcome 
your opinions for improvements. After receiving your comments and rec- 
ommendations we offer the following: 

Your management letter for the year ended December 31, 1998 was 
received on November 22, 1999. While many of your comments could typi- 
cally be addressed in this year, the delivery of the audit and management 
letter so late in the year will make some of the comments difficult to ad- 
dress until fiscal year 2000. The following are responses to the comments 
made in your management letter: 
Accounting System 

The town recognizes that timely financial reporting relies on main- 
taining current, accurate records within the general ledger. Reconciling 
procedures are being implemented for other subsidiary records such as 
accounts receivable, property tax receivables and accounts payable. Cash 
has been reconciled through October 1999. Interfund transfers are cur- 
rently being recorded monthly and reconciled. 

Reports contained within the current financial software are being re- 
viewed for their usefulness in hopes that the preparation of duplicate spread- 
sheets will be minimized or eliminated. 
Investments 

The practice of investing available cash is currently being reviewed. 
The Finance Director will be preparing a cashflow statement to determine 
amounts available for possible investment. In addition, when funds are 
available to invest, all opportunities will be explored while considering both 
interest rate and security. 
Fixed Asset Accounting 

Fixed asset records were kept up to date until recently. Procedures 
will be put in place to record fixed assets properly in the year 2000. Any 
past assets that have not been accounted for will be researched and re- 
corded in the year 2000 as well. 
Property Tax Revenue 

There is a disagreement between the national group which sets stan- 
dards for accounting practices and the New Hampshire Department of 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



29 



Revenue Administration on the way to account for unpaid taxes. The town 
will continue to use a modified accrual practice as required by the New 
Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration. 
Conclusion 

The Board will continue to be vigilant in its fiduciary responsibilities. 
The Board of Selectmen will continue to update and implement appropri- 
ate changes to insure better accounting principles. 
Respectfully Submitted, 
GOFFSTOWN BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert L. Wheeler, Chairman Bruce F. Hunter, Vice Chairman 

Henry C. Boyle Barbara J. Griffin 

Philip A. DAvanza 



GoFFSTOWN Tax Rate 




6.86 



1999 Tax Rate $27.03 

1.92 



9.61 




8.64 



Blown 

■ School Local 
D School State 
n County 



30 


1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


Comparative & Current Town Budget 


- kxpendiiures 


- 






1999 


1999 


2000 




APPROVED 


UNAUDITED 


SELECTMEN & 




BUDGET 


EXPENDED 


BUDGET 
COMMIHEE 


ADMINISTRATION 








Executive/Elected 


$85,135 


$79,502 


$76,271 


Election/Registration 


11,273 


11,519 


17,929 


Administration/Finance 


528,797 


500,035 


541,792 


Valuation of Property 


121,752 


110,842 


113,575 


Planning Department 


148,502 


137,614 


177,081 


Zoning/Building 


74,893 


135,243 


85,086 


Administration Facility 


61,175 


55,972 


61,964 


Cable TV 


43,646 


42,903 


45,165 


Other General Government 


17,035 


12,194 


15,035 


General Assistance 


73,283 


46,516 


72,419 


Civic Ceremonies 


1,600 


923 


1,600 


Historic District 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


Conservation 


4,712 


3,254 


4,712 


Interest on Notes 


1 





1 


TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 


$1,172,804 


$1,137,517 


$1,213,630 


POLICE 








Police Administration 


1,753,797 


1,632,665 


1,853,581 


Police Facility 


115,120 


97,806 


108,258 


Crime Investigation 


28,055 


22,782 


29,805 


Police Vehicles 


31,000 


25,869 


29,000 


Communications 


467,886 


444,934 


494,183 


Emergency Management 


3,576 


3,246 


4,001 


TOTAL POLICE 


$2,399,434 


$2,227,302 


$2,518,828 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 








Fire Administration 


1,192,983 


1,114,822 


1,259,428 


Fire Facility 


49,601 


43,377 


51,001 


Fire Vehicles 


31,300 


25,948 


30,300 


TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT 


$1,273,884 


$1,184,147 


$1,340,729 


PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 








Public Works Division 


1,256,468 


1,191,626 


1,303,049 


Public Works Facility 


43,546 


45,467 


56,119 


Public Roads and Bridges 


307,817 


281,497 


323,986 


Cemetery Division 


55,384 


57,284 


54,253 


Equipment Maintenance 


196,686 


194,673 


217,970 


Solid Waste Division 


710,319 


721,447 


795,717 


Solid Waste Facility 


23,000 


20,583 


18,500 


TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


$2,593,220 


$2,51 2,b// 


$2,769,594 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 






31 




1999 


1999 


2000 




APPROVED 


UNAUDITED 


SELECTMEN & 




BUDGET 


EXPENDED 


BUDGET 
COMMIHEE 


PARKS AND RECREATION 








Parks & Rec. Administration 


$180,505 


$172,173 


$197,756 


Parks & Rec. Facility 


37,292 


35,699 


33,869 


Parks & Rec. Vehicles 


2,450 


2,193 


2,300 


TOTAL PARKS & RECREATION 


$ 220,247 


$210,065 


$ 233,925 


LIBRARY 








Library Administration 


266,053 


241,761 


324,510 


Library Facility 


43,443 


42,694 


34,419 


TOTAL LIBRARY 


$ 309,496 


$284,455 


$ 358,929 


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 








Debt Service/Principal 


203,601 


203,601 


1 


Debt Service/Interest 


8,990 


9,047 


1 


Capital Improvements 


1,005,255 


989,675 


1,566,661 


Separate Articles 


259,900 


243,317 


420,000 


TOTAL CAP. IMPROVEMENTS 


$ 1,477,746 


$1,445,640 


$1,986,663 


SEWER 








Sewer Budget 


1,648,844 


1,519,787 


1,370,527 


TOTAL SEWER 


$ 1,648,844 


$1,519,787 


$ 1,370,527 



SUBTOTAL MAIN BUDGET 



$11,095,675 $10,521,490 



$11,792,825 



SPECIAL ARTICLES 








Landfill Closure 


200,000 


200,000 


3,637,701 


Main Street USA 


15,000 


15,000 


- 


Land Purchase 


- 


- 


225,000 


TOTAL SPECIAL ARTICLES 


$215,000 


$215,000 


$3,862,701 


TOTAL BUDGET 


$11,310,675 


$10,736,490 


$15,655,526 



PETITIONED SPECIAL ARTICLE 

Police Officer 



$15,678 



* Included in Police Dept. Admin. Salary line. 



32 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Comparative & Current Town Budget 

- REVENUES - 



ACCT. SOURCE OF REVENUE 


1999 USED TO SET UNAUDITED 


2000 


# 


BUDGET 


TAX RATE 1999 ACTUAL 


BUDGET 


3120 Land Use Change Taxes 


$15,000 


$44,578 


$52,078 


$45,915 


3185 Yield Taxes 


5,000 


13,593 


13,593 


14,001 


3186 Payment in Lieu of Taxes 


44,000 


52,760 


52,760 


52,760 


3189 Other Taxes 








60 





3190 Interest & Penalties 


185,000 


185,000 


198,312 


190,550 


LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES 










3210 Business Licenses & Permits 


1,400 


1,400 


1,195 


1,442 


3220 Motor Vehicles Permit Fees 


1,565,000 


1,711,500 


1,737,833 


1,762,845 


3230 Building Permits 


70,000 


70,000 


75,841 


72,100 


3290 Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 


58,500 


58,500 


58,508 


59,672 


331 1 -1 9 FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 


18,300 





27 


36,954 


FROM STATE 










3351 Shared Revenues 


339,181 


105,427 


533,894 


105,427 


3352 Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution* 


* 


301,866 


* 


301,866 


3353 Highway Block Grant 


260,918 


260,918 


260,918 


260,918 


3354 Water Pollution Grant 


284,775 


302,278 


302,278 


302,278 


3359 Other 


36,576 


9,000 


18,541 


318,500 


CHARGES FOR SERVICES 










3401-06 Income from Departments 


81,120 


1,350 


105,846 


93,185 


3409 Other Charges 


130,300 


246,270 


147,760 


143,065 


MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 










3501 Sale of Municipal Property 


2,500 


2,806 


2,806 


22,500 


3502 Interest on investments 


140,000 


240,000 


252,234 


247,200 


3503-09 Other 


307,700 


236,800 


276,902 


254,167 


INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 








3912 Special Revenue Funds 


78,000 


75,000 


74,823 


155,434 


391 4 Sewer Enterprise Fund 


1,364,069 


1,364,069 


1,364,069 


1,068,249 


391 6 Trust & Agency Funds 


13,000 


38,000 


5,300 





SUBTOTAL OF REVENUES 


$5,000,339 


$5,321,115 


S5,535,578 


55,509,028 




GENERAL FUND BALANCE 








Unreserved Fund Balance 


... $2,760,674 








Voted from Surplus 











Fund Balance 


- Retained 


... $2,440,674 








Fund Balance 


■ Reduce Taxes 


$320,000 







* Note: Meals & Rooms Tax is included in Shared Revenues. 



TOWN 


- FINANCIAL REPORTS 








33 


Outstanding Debt Schedule"^ 


Year 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


Year 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


1986 General Obligation 


Bonds - Sewer 


1994 General Obligation 


Bonds - Sewer 


2000 


125,000 


19,938 


144,938 


2000 


30,000 


17,426 


47,426 


2001 


125,000 


16,063 


141,063 


2001 


30,000 


15,790 


45,790 


2002 


125,000 


12,125 


137,125 


2002 


30,000 


14,123 


44,123 


2003 


125,000 


8,125 


133,125 


2003 


30,000 


12,416 


42,416 


2004 


125,000 


4,063 


129,063 


2004 


30,000 


10,684 


40,684 










2005 


30,000 


8,929 


38,929 


1989 General Obligation 


Bonds - Sewer 


2006 


30,000 


7,144 


37,144 


2000 


100,000 


52,350 


152,350 


2007 


25,000 


5,478 


30,478 


2001 


100,000 


45,450 


145,450 


2008 


25,000 


3,931 


28,931 


2002 


100,000 


38,500 


138,500 


2009 


25,000 


2,363 


27,363 


2003 


100,000 


31,500 


131,500 


2010 


25,000 


788 


25,788 


2004 


100,000 


24,500 


124,500 










2005 


100,000 


17,500 


117,500 


1998 General Obligation 


Bonds - Sewer 


2006 


100,000 


10,500 


110,500 


2000 


55,000 


35,569 


90,569 


2007 


100,000 


3,500 


103,500 


2001 


55,000 


33,369 


88,369 










2002 


55,000 


31,100 


86,100 


1990 General Obligation 


Bonds - Sewer 


2003 


55,000 


28,763 


83,763 


2000 


105,000 


81,218 


186,218 


2004 


55,000 


26,288 


81,288 


2001 


105,000 


74,183 


179,183 


2005 


55,000 


23,813 


78,813 


2002 


105,000 


67,148 


172,148 


2006 


55,000 


21,200 


76,200 


2003 


105,000 


60,113 


165,113 


2007 


55,000 


18,588 


73,588 


2004 


105,000 


53,078 


158,078 


2008 


55,000 


15,975 


70,975 


2005 


105,000 


46,043 


151,043 


2009 


55,000 


13,363 


68,363 


2006 


105,000 


38,981 


143,981 


2010 


55,000 


10,765 


65,750 


2007 


105,000 


31,894 


136,894 


2011 


55,000 


8,000 


63,000 


2008 


105,000 


24,806 


129,806 


2012 


55,000 


5,250 


60,250 


2009 


105,000 


17,719 


122,719 


2013 


50,000 


2,500 


52,500 


2010 


105,000 
105,000 


10,631 
3,544 


115,631 
108,544 










2011 


TOTAL SEWER BONDS 


) 














$3,760,000 $1,167,072 $4,927,072 



'Does not include Water Precinct Bonds 



34 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Balance Sheet 

(UNAUDITED FOR YEAR ENDING 12/31/99) 

ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS 

Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 4,587,451 

Investments 1,163,550 

Taxes Receivables 1,880,958 

Accounts Receivable 2,757 

Due from other Government 314,074 

Other Assets 11,465 

Total Assets and Other Debits $ 7,960,255 



LIABILITIES, EQUITY AND OTHER CREDITS 

Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable $ 667,918 

Due to School District 3,402,063 

Other Liabilities and Accrued Expense (65,935) 



Total Liabilities $ 4,004,046 

Equity and Other Credits: 
Fund Balances: 

Reserved for Endowments 

Reserved for Encumbrances $ 905,530 

Unreserved - Undesignated 3,050,679 

Total Equity and Other Credits 3,956,209 



Total Liabilities, Equity and Other Credits $ 7,960,255 




TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



35 



Treasurer 

. 1999 

Subject to Audit 



Cash on Hand - January 1, 1999 




$ 8,806,285 


1999 Receipts 




20,709,209 


Total Cash 




29,515,494 


Disbursements & Adjustments 




23,764,493 


Cash on Hand - December 31, 1999 




$ 5,751,001 


Citizens Bank 


$ 5,587,451 




N.H. Investment Pool 


35,458 




Fleet Bank 


128,092 
$ 5,751,001 





Respectfully submitted, 
Jean C. Mayberry, Treasurer 




Administration and Finance Offices - Seated L-R: Sue Desruisseaux (Town 
Administrator), Janice O'Connell (Support Svs. Admin.) 
L-R: Karen Mullaney (Sel. Sec), Gail Lavallee (Tax Collector), Debbie Ash 
(Bookkeeper), Susan Porter (Finance Director), Linda Moody (Bookkeeper), 
Renee Millson (Dep. Tax Collector) Missing: Jean Mayberry (Treasurer) 



^6 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

TfeUSTEES OF THE TkuST FUNDS 



During 1999 the Trustees of the Trust Funds received the following 
gifts: 

a.) A gift of stock by Mrs. Elizabeth P. Merrill to the Grasmere Town Hall 
Restoration Fund 

b.) A gift of stock by Mrs. Elizabeth P. Merrill to the Goffstown Common 
Preservation Trust 

c.) A gift of stock by Mrs. Ehzabeth P. Merrill to the Goffstown Main Street 
Program, Inc. 

d.) A monetary gift by Ms. Dorothy Byrne to the Grasmere Town Hall 
Restoration Fund 

These gifts should not go unrecognized nor should the generosity of 
past benefactors of our Town. Their generosities have made our lives and 
those of future generations that much richer. The Trustees of the Trust 
Funds wish to thank this year's benefactors for their kindness and thought- 
fulness. 

During 1999 the State Street Bank and Trust Company of New Hamp- 
shire, N.A. continued to provide financial planning services, as Agents for 
the Trustees of the Trust Funds per an agreement dated April 30, 1992. 

The Trustees believe that the agents at State Street Bank and Trust 
have positioned our current investment portfolio so that it will continue to 
generate a positive yield now and into the future. 

The Report of the Common Trust Fund Investments of The Town of 
Goffstown, NH that follows, represents only a summary of the material 
that is available for review. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Andrew J. Szerlog 
William J. Schubert 
Steve Murphy 



CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS FOR THE TOWN OF GOFFSTOWN 


Purpose Date Investment 




Amount 


Interest 


of Fund Established Type 






Rate 


Landfill closure 3/2/98 US Treasury Note 




$100,000 


5.38% 


Landfill closure 2/26/98 CD New London Trust 




$100,000 


5.63% 


Landfill closure 1/11/99 N.H. Public Deposit Invest. 


Pool 


$200,000 


5.40% 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



37 





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38 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Tax Collector 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1999 

- DEBIT - 

Levies of: 

1998 

$1,436,036 



1999 



Uncollected Taxes - 
Beginning of Fiscal Year 
Property Taxes 
Land Use Change 
Yield Taxes 

Taxes Committed this Year: 
Property Taxes 
Land Use Change 
Yield Taxes 

Overpayment: 

Property Taxes 
Yield Tax 



$16,255,900 
44,000 
15,563 



86,282 
354 



Interest Collected on Delinquent Tax 16,128 



18,052 
30,356 



TOTAL DEBITS 


$16,418,227 

- CREDIT - 


$1,484,444 


Remittance to Treasurer 








1999 


1998 


• Property Taxes 


$15,311,903 


$761,831 


Land Use Change 


44,000 




Yield Taxes 


13,948 




Interest 


16,128 


30,356 


Conversion to Lien 




672,034 


Abatements Made: 






Property Taxes 


5,792 


20,223 


Yield Taxes 


1,281 




Uncollected Taxes - 






End of Fiscal Year 






Property Taxes 


1,024,487 




Yield Taxes 


688 





1997 



1997 



TOTAL CREDITS 



$16,418,227 $1,484,444 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



39 



Tax Collector 

Summary of Tax Lien Accounts 
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1999 

- DEBIT - 

on levies OF: 



1998 


1997 


1996 




$387,344 


$225,464 


672,034 






16,102 


36,034 


61,307 


141,188 


7,872 
$431,250 


272 


$829,324 


$287,043 


- CREDIT - 






1998 


1997 


1996 


$249,647 


$172,146 


$216,805 


16,102 


36,034 


61,307 


Taxes 154,937 


12,449 


1,056 


ofYr. 408,638 


210,621 


7,875 


$829,324 


$431,250 


$287,043 




Submitted £ 


subject to audit: 

Gail Lavallee, 

Tax Collector 



Unredeemed Liens Balance 
at Beginning of Fiscal Year 
Liens Executed during 
Fiscal Year 

Interest & Costs Collected 
(After Lien Execution) 
Refunds of Deeded Property 

TOTAL DEBITS 



Remittance to Treasurer 

Redemptions: 

Interest/Costs 

(After Lien Execution) 

Abatements of Unredeemed Taxes 

Unredeemed Liens Bal. End of Yr. 

TOTAL CREDITS 



Town Clerk's Report 

The voter tally for the Ballot Determination Meeting held on February 
3, 1999 was as follows: 10,377 registered voters, 151 attended the meeting. 
The voter tally for the town election held on March 9, 1999 was as 
follows: 10,372 total registered voters, 2,106 votes casted. The total voter 
turnout represented 20.3% of registered voters. District 1 had 1,503 vot- 
ers cast ballots and District 5 had 603 voters cast ballots. 

The total number of registered voters as of December 28, 1999 was: 
2,777 Democrats; 4,200 Republicans; and 3,499 Independents. 

As of December 28, 1999, the following is a list of meetings and 
elections scheduled for the year 2000: 

February 1st Presidential Primary 

February 7th School Ballot Determination Meeting 

February 9th Town Ballot Determination Meeting 



40 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



March 14th Town Election 

September 12th State Primary Election 

November 7th General Election 

Residents may register to vote at the Town Clerk's office during regu- 
lar office hours. Proof of residency must be presented at the time of regis- 
tration. Residents may also register to vote when the Checklist Supervisor's 
are in session. These sessions are posted and notice given in the Union 
Leader. Residents may also register to vote on election day at the appro- 
priate polling district. 

Goffstown has two voting districts. District 1 (votes at the Goffstown 
Area High School, 27 Wallace Road, Goffstown) includes those residents 
living in the Goffstown Village area and the Grasmere area (from Route 
114/114A intersection westerly to the Weare, New Boston and Dunbarton 
town lines including residents on the east side of the Piscataquog River. 
District 5 (votes at the Bartlett Elementary School, 689 Mast Road, 
Pinardville) includes those residents from the Route 114/114A intersec- 
tion to the Piscataquog River and easterly to the Manchester line. 

The total number of dogs registered for 1999 was 1,174. All dogs must 
be registered during the month of April. Failure to comply will make a 
resident liable to a penalty of $1.00 per month after May 31st and are also 
subject to a $25.00 unlicensed dog fine. Residents must present a rabies 
certificate and certificate of neutering in order for the Town Clerk to pro- 
cess a dog license. 

The Town Clerk's office registered 13,130 motor vehicles in 1999. We 
also issued 96 marriage licenses, 357 copies of death certificates, 155 cop- 
ies of birth certificates and 53 copies of marriage certificates. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Donna A. Bergeron, Town Clerk 




Town Clerk 's Office L-R: Felice Dandurand, Catherine Willmott (Dep. 
Town Clerk), Donna Bergeron (Town Clerk) 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



41 



1999 Tax Rate Calculation 



Town/City of: GOFFSTOWN 



Tax Rates 



Town Portion 



Appropriations 


$11,326,353 


Less: Revenues 


5,641,115 


Less: Shared Revenues 


111,651 


Add: Overlay 


183,436 


War Service Credits 


112,800 


Net Town Appropriations 




Approved Town/City Tax Effort 




Municipal Tax Rate 





$5,869,823 



$5,869,823 



Scriool Portion 



Net Local School Budget 

Less: Adequacy Education Grant 

State Education Taxes 
Approved School(s) Tax Effort 
Local Education Tax Rate 
State Education Taxes 
Equalizied Valuation (no utilities) x $6.60 

$612,264,275 
Divide by Local Assessed Valuation (no utilities) 

$589,437,700 



$14,373,489 
(5,059,337) 
(4,040,944) 



$5,273,208 



$4,040,944 



County Portion 



Due to County 




$1,187,336 




Less: Shared Revenues 




(15,195) 




Approved County Tax Effort 






$1,172,141 


County Tax Rate 








Combined Tax Rate 








Total Property Taxes Assessed 






$16,356,116 


Less: War Service Credits 






(112,800) 


Total Property Tax Commitment 




$16,243,316 


Proof of Rate 


Net Assessed Valuation 




Tax Rate 


Assessment 


State Education Tax 


$589,437,700 


$6.86 


$4,040,944 


All Other Taxes 


$610,439,900 


$20.17 


$12,315,172 
$16,356,116 



$9.61 



$8.64 



$6.86 



$1.92 



$27.03 



42 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



1999 Summary Inventory of 
Valuation 



LAND: 

Current Use (incl. Conser. Restr.) 

Residential 

Commercial / Industrial 

Total Taxable Land 

Tax Exempt and Non-Taxable (est. 

BUILDINGS: 

Residential 

Manufactured Housing 
Commercial / Industrial 
Total of Taxable Buildings 
Tax Exempt and Non-Taxable 

PUBLIC UTILITIES: 

Electric 

Gas 

Total Public Utilities 



ASSESSED VALUATION 
TAXABLE 

$997,600 

$151,529,900 

$24,236,500 

$176,764,000 



$349,750,900 
$15,329,400 
$50,098,500 

$415,178,800 



$20,173,800 

$828,400 

$21,002,200 



TOTAL 



$176,764,000 
$20,000,000 



$415,178,800 
$25,000,000 



$21,002,200 



TOTAL VALUATION BEFORE EXEMPTIONS 



$612,945,000 



EXEMPTIONS: NUMBER 

Improvements to Assist Disabled 3 

School Dining / Dormotory / Kitchen 1 

Blind 14 

Elderly 121 

Total Exemptions 139 

NET VALUATION ON WHICH TAX RATE 
FOR MUNICIPAL, COUNTY & LOCAL 
EDUCATION RATE IS COMPUTED 



$300,100 

$150,000 

$210,000 

$1,845,000 

$2,505,100 



$610,439,900 



NET VALUATION WITHOUT UTILITIES ON 
WHICH TAX RATE FOR STATE EDUCATION 
TAX IS COMPUTED 



$589,437,700 



Respectfully submitted, 
Ron Mace, Assessor 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



43 



Schedule of Town Property 



Map/Lot 


Location 


SCHOOL 




4/103 


Maple Avenue 


5/97 


Wallace Road - GAHS 


5/98 


Wallace Road - GAHS 


8/74 


Tibbetts Hill Rd. 




MVMS 


17/182 


Mast Road - Bartlett 


34/138 


Reed Street - SAU 


8/74/A 


Lauren Lane - MVMS 


TOWN 




1/35 


Back Mountain Road 


2/39/4 


Off Back Mountain Rd 


2/64/28 


Shirley Hill Road 


3/9 


Off School House Road 


4/61 


OffNew Boston Road 


5/14 


Goffstown Back Road 


5/24 


Elm Street 


5/89 


Off Wallace Road 


6/39/1/A 


Mast Road 


7/3 


Off Mast Road 


7/72 


Mast/Autumn Street 


9/29/1 


Tirrell Hill Road 


10/11 


Tenney Road 


15/57/A 


Woodbine Avenue 


15/58 


King Street 


15/59 


King Street 


15/73/A 


King Street 


17/37 


Plummer St./Mast Rd. 


17/238 


Off Louis Street 


19/15 


Channel Lane 


21/64/A 


Riverside Drive 


21/85 


Cove Street 


21/120/A 


Moose Club 


23/11 


Chatel Road 


24/44 


Rem Drive 


24/44/R-6 


Rem Drive 


24/59/A 


Jolly Seven Avenue 


26/13/A 


Mast Rd./Henry Bridge 


27/23 


Henry Bridge Road 


27/25 


Center Street 


28/28 


Goffstown Back Road 



Map/Lot Location 



30/25/A 


Pineridge Road 


30/29/A 


Highland Avenue 


30/81 


Barnard Lane 


31/19 


Off Mast Road 


31/22 


Off Mast Road 


32/26/E-18 Hermsdorf Avenue 


32/26/E-22 Hermsdorf Avenue 


32//26/E-30 Janice Drive 


32/26/E-55 Thomas Drive 


34/83 


Main Street 


34/96 


Church Street 


34/99 


Church Street 


34/107 


High Street 


34/129 


Mill Street 


34/148 


Main Street 


34/152 


Main Street 


32/26/E-19 Hermsdorf Avenue 


34/177 


East Union Street 


35/48 


Island on Glen Lake 


37/1 


Depot Street 


37/9 


North Mast Road 


38/13 


Church Street 


40/14 


Crescent Lane 


40/15 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/16 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/17 


Cresent Lane 


40/18 


Cresent Lane 


40/19 


Cresent Lane 


40/20 


Cresent Lane 


40/21 


Cresent Lane 


40/22 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/23 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/24 


Cresent Lane 


40/25 


Cresent Lane 


40/27 


Perimeter Road 


40/29 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/34 


Summit Road 


40/35 


Summit Road 


40/42 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn 


40/47/A 


Off Perimeter Road 


40/50 


Off Perimeter Road 


40/50/A 


Off Perimeter Road 



44 



1997 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Schedule of Town Property 



Map/Lot Location 

40/53 Beech Lane 

40/54 Summit Avenue 

40/56 Maple Lane 

40/57 Maple Lane 

40/58 Summit Road 

40/59 Maple Lane 

40/61 Chestnut Lane 

40/63 Chestnut Lane 

40/64 Chestnut Ln/Summit 

40/65 Beech Lane 

40/66 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/67 Beech Lane 

40/68 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/69 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/70 Chestnut Lane 

40/71 Chestnut Lane 

40/72 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/73 Off Perimeter Road 

40/74 Chestnut Lane 

40/76 Birch Lane 

40/77 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/78 Birch Lane 

40/79 Uncanoonuc Mountain 

40/80 Birch Lane 

40/81 Uncanoonuc Mountain 

40/82 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/83 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/85 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/86 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/87 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/88 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/89 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/90 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/91 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/92 Uncanoonuc Mountain 

40/93 Cedar Lane 

40/94 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/95 Uncanoonuc Mountain 

40/97 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/98 So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 

40/99 Pine Lane 

40/101 Pine Lane 



Map/Lot 


. Location 


40/103 


Off Perimeter Road 


40/104 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 


40/105 


Summit Ave. 


40/106 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 


40/107 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 


40/113 


Perimeter Road 


40/115 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 


41/6 


Forest Avenue 


41/7 


Incline Avenue 


41/9 


Incline Avenue 


41/14 


Mountain/Park Ave. 


41/16 


Mountain Avenue 


41/17 


Mountain Avenue 


41/19 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


41/21 


Park Avenue 


41/22 


Crown Avenue 


41/23 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


41/24 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


41/29 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


41/30 


Incline Avenue 


41/31 


South Mountain Base 


41/32 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/33 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/34 


Chocura Avenue 


41/35 


Wonolancet Avenue 


41/36 


Wonolancet Avenue 


41/37 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/38 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/39 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/40 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/41 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/42 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/43 


Chocorua Avenue 


41/45 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/46 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/47 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/48 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/49 


Kaoka Avenue 


41/50 


Koaka Avenue 


41/51 


Mascoma Avenue 


41/56 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


41/59 


Mascoma Avenue 



TOWN - FINANCIAL REPORTS 



45 



Schedule of Town Property 



Map/Lot Location 



41/61 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


42/29 


Chestnut Slope 


41/62 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


42/31 


Chestnut Slope 


41/64/A 


Uncanoonuc Avenue 


42/32 


Chestnut Slope 


41/69 


Incline Avenue 


42/35 


Chestnut Slope 


41/75 


So Mtn. Base/RR Ave. 


42/36 


Chestnut Slope 


41/76 


Railroad Avenue 


42/37 


Chestnut Slope 


41/77 


Railroad Avenue 


42/40 


Off Mtn. Base Road 


41/78 


Railroad Avenue 


42/41 


Chestnut Slope 


41/79 


Mascoma Avenue 


42/42 


Chestnut Slope 


41/80 


So. Mtn. Base Road 


42/45 


Lake Uncanoonuc 


42/2 


Railroad Avenue 


42/51 


Railroad Avenue 


42/4 


Railroad Avenue 


5/38/39 


Juniper Drive 


42/5 


Off Railroad Avenue 


8/16 


OffPaige Hill Road 


42/12 


Incline Avenue 


9/11/1-3 


Hollyhock Lane 


42/15 


Mountain Avenue 


40/1 


Crescent Lane 


42/18 


Mountain Avenue 


40/4/A 


Uncanoonuc Mountain 


42/19 


Orr Street 


40/8 


Perimeter Road 


42/22 


Park Ave 


40/11 


So. Uncanoonuc Mtn. 


42/23 


Crown Avenue 






42/24 


Chestnut Slope 






42/25 


Chestnut Slope 






42/28 


Mountain Base Road 







Map/Lot Location 




L-R: Patricia Gale (Planning Sec), Ed Neveu (Bldg. Insp., Health & Code 
Enforcement), Melissa Bruce (Bldg. sec), Ron Mace (Assessor), Mary 
Lavallee (Assessing Clerk) 



_46 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Budget Commtttee Report 

The Goffstown Budget Committee consists of a total of 16 members. 
Twelve members are elected for a three-year term. Four members are 
appointed: one from the Board of Selectmen, one from the School Board, 
one from the Village Water Precinct and one from the Grasmere Water 
Precinct. 

The Budget Committee meets on the third Tuesday of each month and 
reviews monthly expenditures in order to prepare the following year's bud- 
get. 

The Committee divides into two sub-committees during the course of 
the year. Suzanne Tremblay chaired the town sub-committee this year. 
Tim Hanson chaired the school sub-committee. 

Some of the major items considered this year were the landfill closure, 
the high school renovation project, and land acquisition for a new elemen- 
tary school. 

Budgets were formulated and public hearings were held during the 
first two weeks of January and forwarded on to the Deliberative Session 
held in February. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Peter Georgantas, Chair 




Seated L-R: Garret Seevers, Suzanne Tremblay, Peter Georgantas 
(Chairman), Bill Tucker, Barbara Griffin (Sel. Rep.); Standing L-R: Richard 
Fletcher (Goffs. Village Water Rep.), Pamela Manney, Ezra Beck, Dennis 
Rechcgl, Timothy Hanson, Craig Hieber (Sch. Board Rep.), George Fullerton, 
Alice Rohr (Grasmere Village Water Rep.); Missing: John Davis, Carmen 
Gangi, Gossett McRae 



TOWN - DEPARTMENT & COMMITTEES 



47 



Planning Office 



1999 was a very busy year in the Planning Office. Development activity 
increased in 1999. The table shows the number of subdivision and site plan 
applications submitted to the Planning Board for review last year. 



Type/Year 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 


1998 


1999 


Subdivision 


35 


20 


20 


20 


22 


8 


16 


23 


Site Plan 


14 


10 


5 


8 


11 


9 


12 


14 


Conceptual 


18 


17 


11 


10 


16 


7 


13 


19 


Total 


67 


47 


36 


38 


49 


24 


41 


56 


% Change 


13.56 


-29.85 


-23.40 


5.56 


28.95 


-51.02 


70.83 


36.58 



As you can see, there was an increase in the number of applications 
reviewed last year. In an atmosphere of low interest rates and a robust 
economy, it is not surprising to see increased development activity. 

In 1999, the Planning Board worked diligently on the proposed ordi- 
nance re-write with the aid of a consultant. Goffstown's original zoning 
ordinance was created in 1961. The town amended the ordinance after the 
adoption of its first Master Plan in 1967. The Zoning Ordinance has been 
amended 33 times since 1967. The ordinance is confusing, complicated and 
lacks cohesion. The proposal is to recodify the ordinance, which will be 
different in form, but in substance is the same as the existing ordinance. 




Seated L-R Planning Board Members: Richard Georgantas, Jim Raymond 
(Vice Chair), Henry Boyle (Sel Rep.), Patty Gale (Planning Sec); 
Standing L-R: Miles Phillips, Lowell VonRuden (Alt.), Milton Meyers (Alt.); 
Missing: Gossett McRae (Chair), JoAnn DAvanza (Sec), Collis Adams, 
Mark Choquette (Alt.), Robert Wheeler (Alt. Sel. Rep.) 



_48 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

In May of 1999, Goffstown was selected as one of three new communi- 
ties to join the New Hampshire Main Street Program, Inc. The Main Street 
Program Steering Committee worked vigorously throughout the applica- 
tion process and demonstrated great enthusiasm and commitment on be- 
half of the town. With 1999 being the first year of the implementation of 
the Village Commercial District, we hope this will aid the Main Street 
Program, Inc. in their goals of revitalizing the downtown area. 

The Planning Office was sad to see the departure of Andre Garron who 
was the Planning and Economic Development Coordinator in Goffstown 
for eleven years. We wish him the best in his new position with a nearby 
community. 

The Planning Office serves as an advisor to several boards and com- 
mittees such as the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Adjustment, Board of 
Selectmen, CIP Committee, Economic Development Council, Technical 
Review Committee, and the Goffstown Main Street Program, Inc. 

Most of the boards and/or committees shown above have submitted 
articles for this town report. Therefore, I won't duplicate or reiterate what 
these groups have already reported. I do want to thank all of the boards, 
committees and department heads for their time, effort and commitment 
made on behalf of the community. The Planning Office looks forwards to 
making the year 2000 another productive and exciting year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Patricia A. Gale 
Planning Board Secretary 



Planning Board 

The Planning Board is working on a recodification of the entire zoning 
ordinance. The ordinance was originally drafted in the 1960's and has 
been continually amended since then. The result is an ordinance which is 
somewhat difficult to read and is generally not "user friendly". The Board 
expects to have the redrafted ordinance ready for the ballot in March 2001. 
We will have informational meetings on this new ordinance later in the 
year and encourage all interested to attend. 

The Planning Board would like to thank the people of Goffstown for 
their continued support of the Board and its activities. We welcome inter- 
ested citizens to attend our meetings which are typically held on the sec- 
ond and the fourth Thursday of each month, at 7:00 PM, at the Town Hall. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gossett McRae 
Chairman 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 49 

2000 - 2005 CIP Report 

The Capital Improvements Program Committee is a sub-committee of 
the Planning Board. This year the committee consisted of the following 
individuals: 

Jo Ann D'Avanza Chair/Planning Board Representative 

John Caprio Community Representative 

Earl Carrel Community Representative 

Fred Cass Community Representative 

John Davis Budget Committee Representative 

Peter Georgantas Community Representative 

Barbara Griffin Selectmen's Representative 

Karl MacGibbon School Board Representative 

Patrick Tucker Community Representative 

In 1999 the committee met ten times from May through September. 
The department heads and the school department presented their CIP re- 
quests to the committee and we conducted deliberations during the last 
three meetings. 

The committee members are to be commended for their excellent at- 
tendance and their participation in this arduous task over the summer 
months. I would strongly encourage the Goffstown Planning Board to ap- 
point these same people next year, as they all had an incredible amount of 
expertise to lend to this committee. 

The Capital Improvements Program is a valuable part of the commu- 
nity planning process. The program links local infrastructure investments 
with Master Plan goals, land use ordinance and economic development. 

The CIP Committee made the following recommendations to the Plan- 
ning Board: 

1. Increase the CIP amount from $10,000 to $25,000, excluding 
vehicles. 

2. Eliminate maintenance items from the CIP such as road re- 
surfacing, crack sealing, sidewalk repairs and bridge repairs. 

The committee also established a sub-committee, consisting of John 
Caprio, Fred Cass and Pat Tucker. This sub-committee will outline and 
recommend a revised scope for the committee based on the needs for Goff- 
stown. Once this report is completed, we will present it to the Planning 
Board for their review and comments. 

The CIP Committee presented their report to the Planning Board on 
September 30, 1999. This plan serves as an advisory document to the 
Board of Selectmen and the Budget Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JoAnn D'Avanza, Chair 



50 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM FY 2000 - 2005 



VEHICLES 


DEPARTMENT 


FYOO 


FY01 


FY02 


FY03 


FY04 


FY05 


POLICE: 














Cruisers 


78,000 


80,000 


55,000 


57,000 


117,000 


121,000 


SUBTOTAL: 


$78,000 


$80,000 


$55,000 


$57,000 


$117,000 


$121,000 


FIRE: 














Refurbish Ladder 6 






90,000 








Replace Forestry Truck 1 


12,000 












Replace Engine 5 












200,000 


Replace AMB-2 






80,000 








(funded by GEMSA) 














Replace Utility 1 








20,000 






Tanker 5 - Replace Tank 


11,000 












Car 1 Replacement 


30,000 












Car 2 Replacement 




20,000 










SUBTOTAL: 


$53,000 


$20,000 


$170,000 


$20,000 




$200,000 


PUBLIC WORKS DEPT.: 














New Sidewalk Plow, 


80,000 












Sander & Mower 














Replace 92 MACK #22 






85,000 








Replace 92 MACK #21 








95,000 






Replace 92 MACK #23 










90,000 




Replace 92 MACK #24 












90,000 


Replace 1988 Pickup #70 




35,000 










Replace 1989 Pickup"#90w/1 




47,000 










Ton Dump Body 














Replace 1991 Pickup #60 






35,000 








Replace 1992 Pickup #51 








32,000 






'Replace 1992 Pickup #50 










32,000 




Replace 1995 Pickup #20 












33,000 


Replace 1 982 Vactor Truck #41 


210,000 












Replace 1988 Caterpillar Loader #14 








130,000 






Replace 1990 Caterpillar Backhoe #12 






90,000 








Asphalt Hot Box/Pavement Recycler 










18,000 




Street Sweeper 








115,000 






SUBTOTAL 


$290,000 


$82,000 


$210,000 


$372,000 


$140,000 


$123,000 


PARKS & RECREATION 














Truck 1991 


20,000 












SUBTOTAL: 


$20,000 












TOTAL: 


$441,000 


$182,000 


$435,000 


$449,000 


$257,000 


$444,000 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



51 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM FY 2000 - 2005 




CAPITAL PROJECTS 


DEPARTMENT 


FYOO 


FY01 


FY02 


FY03 


FY04 


FY05 


ADMINISTRATION 














Replace Tax, Voter & Acct. Software 


79,000 












Geographical Information System 


15,000 


40,500 


40,500 








Town Hall Parking Lot Repaving 






34,000 








SUBTOTAL: 


$94,000 


$40,500 


$74,500 








CONSERVATION COMMISSION 














Prime Wetlands Mapping 


25,000 












Land Survey 


5,000 












SUBTOTAL: 


$30,000 












HISTORIC COMMISSION 














Grasmere Town Hall Renovation 


43,000 


30,000 


236,000 








(Contigent upon grant) 














SUBTOTAL: 


$43,000 


$30,000 


$236,000 








POLICE 














Drainage, Parking Lot & Lighting 




28,000 










Rooftop Heating Unit Replacement 






45,000 








SUBTOTAL: 




$28,000 


$45,000 








FIRE 














Protective Clothing 


30,000 


15,000 










Central Facility Study 










25,000 




Church Street Station Renovations 




32,000 










Municipal Alarm Upgrade 








20,000 






SUBTOTAL: 


$30,000 


$47,000 




$20,000 


$25,000 




PUBLIC WORKS 














Resurfacing Roads 


255,256 


268,019 


281,420 


295,491 


310,266 


325,760 


Reclamation 


165,830 


174,12 


182,828 


191,969 


201,567 


216,646 


Main Street Bridge Construction 


345,000 












Harry Brook Bridge 










150,000 




Crack Sealing 


20,000 


20,000 


20,000 


20,000 


20,000 


20,000 


Corridor 1 - Wallace & Mast Road 


30,000 


500,000 










St. Anselm/Rt.114 Intersection 




365,000 










Sidewalk - Danis Park to 






750,000 








Moose Club Park Road 














Sidewalk - Center Street 




33,000 










Upgrade and Paving Snook Road 












232,000 


Sidewalk Repairs 


20,920 


40,000 


42,000 


44,100 


46,305 


48,620 


Bridge Repairs 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


Drainage Projects 


24,000 


75,000 


25,222 


26,483 


27,807 


29,198 


Guardrail Installation 


12,155 


12,763 


13,401 


14,071 


14,774 


15,513 


Public Works Facility 


420,000 












North Mast Road Drainage 






55,000 


350,000 


350,000 




Clean-Up of Existing DPW Facility 




15,000 










Shirley Hill Rd. Cemetery Stonewall 










40,000 




SUBTOTAL: 


51,318,161 


M ,527,904 


51,394,871 


$967,114 


51,185,719 


$912,737 


PAGE SUBTOTAL: 


51,515,161 


51,673,404 


51,750,371 


$987,114 


51,210,719 


$912,737 



52 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM FY 2000-2005 



CAPITAL PROJECTS 


DEPARTMENT 


FYOO 


FY01 


FY02 


FY03 


FY04 


FY05 


SOLID WASTE: 














Landfill Closure (20% state funded) 


200,000 












Capital Reserve Funds 














Landfill Closure (see note) 




199,357 


199,357 


199,357 


199,357 


199,357 


Landfill Closure Design 


60,000 


30,000 


30,000 


30,000 


30,000 


30,000 


& Monitoring 














Trash Trailer #78 Replacement 










55,000 


55,000 


Replace 1987 Evo Lodal Packer #72 




165,000 










Landfill Reuse 




68,367 


68,367 


68,367 


68,367 


68,367 


Demo Shredder 






36,000 








SUBTOTAL: 


$260,000 


$462,724 


$333,724 


$297,724 


$352,724 


$352,724 


PARKS & RECREATION: 














Tennis Courts - Roy & Barnard Park 


12,000 












Overlay - Barnard Tennis Courts 












36,720 


Replace Water Line at Barnard Pool 


16,500 












Install Irrigation System Barnard Park 






16,732 








SUBTOTAL: 


$28,500 




$16,732 






$36,720 


PLANNING DEPARTMENT/BOARD: 














Master Plan Update 








35,000 






Corridor Study Update 




40,000 










Rails to Trails Project (TEA 21 Grant) 




390,000 










Industrial Land Acquisition 






125,000 








SUBTOTAL: 




$430,000 


$125,000 


35,000 






LIBRARY: 














Pinardville Branch Facility 












420,000 


SUBTOTAL: 












$420,000 


PAGE SUBTOTAL: 


$288,500 


$892,724 


$475,456 


$332,724 


$352,724 


$809,444 


COMBINED TOTAL: 


2,244,661 


2,748,128 


2,660,827 


1,768,838 


1,820,443 


2,166,181 


OFFSETTING REVENUE: 


469,500 


663,461 


846,371 


68,371 


186,371 


66,371 


NET COST: 


1,775,161 


2,084,667 


1,814,456 


1,700,467 


1,634,072 


2,099,810 


% INCREASE/DECREASE 














FROM PREVIOUS YEAR: 


-3% 


17% 


-13% 


-6% 


-4% 


29% 



Offsetting Revenue: 

00- Bridge Main Street Brdg-$276,000 02- 

00- Wallace&Mast offsite fees - $30,000 02- 

00- Vactor trade - $72,500, 25% of cost ($52,500) 02- 

from Sewer Comm. 02- 

00 -GIS - $5,000 02- 
00- Historic Society Grant - $21 ,500 03- 

00- Landfill Closure Aid -$12,000 03- 

01- St.Anselm/Rt.114- State Aid - $243,090 04- 
01- Landfill Closure Aid -$45,871 04- 

01 - Samos Park Offsite Improvements - $1 5,000 04- 
01 - Rail to Trails TEA21 grant - $31 2,000 05- 
01 - Center Street Sidewalk - $1 6,000 05- 
01- Vehicle Trades -$31,500 

Note: The cost to close the landfill is estimated to be $3M. 
fund and by $554,154 from a state grant. 



TEA-21 Sidewalk Project - $600,000 

State Landfill Grant - $45,871 

Vehicle trade - $2,500 

Amb-2 -Gemsa - $80,000 

Historic Society Grant -$118,000 

Landfill Grant - $45,871 

Vehicle Trade - $22,500 

Landfill Grant - $45,871 

Vehicle Trade - $20,500 

State Bridge Aid - Harry Brook - $120,00 

Vehicle Trade - $20,500 

Landfill Grant - $45,871 

This amount will be reduced by $800K capital reserve 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



53 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM FY 2000 - 2005 



CAPITAL PROJECTS 


DEPARTMENT 


FYOO 


FY01 


FY02 


FY03 


FY04 


FY05 


SEWER COMMISSION 














Piscataquog River 


$152,000 


$145,000 


$139,000 


$132,000 


$125,000 


$118,000 


Interceptor $1.5M 














West Side Pump Sta., 


165,000 


157,000 


149,000 


141,000 


133,000 




1A-1C&3A 














MWWTP Upgrade/Capacity 


186,000 


179,000 


172,000 


165,000 


158,000 


151,000 


Lyncliville Park System 








113,000 


364,000 


354,000 


Moose Club Parl< System 


90,000 


88,000 


86,000 


84,000 


81,000 


79,000 


Knollcrest 




75,000 


71,000 


69,000 


67,000 


65,000 


River Crossing 






44,000 


42,000 


40,000 


39,000 


Hermsdorf System 










77,000 


249,000 


Inflow & Infiltration Project 


185,000 


185,000 


185,000 


185,000 


185,000 


185,000 


Riverview Park (430,000 Bond) 


47,000 


46,000 


44,000 


42,000 


41,000 


39,000 


(Paid by Residents) 














SUB-TOTAL: 


$825,000 


$875,000 


$890,000 


$973,000 


51,271,000 


$1,279,000 


State's Share: 


286,000 


274,000 


261,000 


249,000 


236,000 


224,000 


User's Share: 


492,000 


555,000 


585,000 


682,000 


994,000 


1,016,000 


Riverview Park Share: 


47,000 


46,000 


44,000 


42,000 


41,000 


39,000 


VILLAGE WATER PRECINCT 














Well System Improvement 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 






Upgrade to Water System 












975,000 


Truck 3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


Pipework (LOOP) 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


TOTAL: 


$88,000 


$88,000 


$88,000 


$88,000 


$63,000 


M ,038,000 




Sewer Commissioner's: James Bouchard, Stephen Crean (Chair), Paul 
LaPerle; Marilyn Hozeny(Admin. Asst.); Missing: Bruce Hunter (Set. Rep.) 



54 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM FY 2000 - 2005 



SCHOOLS' CAPITAL PROJECTS 


DEPARTMENT 


FYOO 


FY01 


FY02 


FY03 


FY04 


FY05 


BARTLETT 














Boiler Replacement 


96,111 












SUBTOTAL: 


$96,111 












MAPLE AVE. 














Replace Playground Blacktop 


30,000 












SUBTOTAL: 


$30,000 












NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 














7.1 M 1 5 Year Bond Proposed 


202,580 


820,047 


800,513 


777,950 


754,200 


730,450 


SUBTOTAL: 


$202,580 


$820,047 


$800,513 


$777,950 


$754,200 


$730,450 


Ml. VIEW 














7.9M and $5M Bond* 


1,136,011 


1,088,694 


1,046,260 


998,455 


955,820 


908,229 


SUBTOTAL: 


^1,136,011 


M ,088,694 


;i, 046,260 


$998,455 


$955,820 


$908,229 


G.A.H.S. 














GAHS Expansion $10.86M Bond 


294,652 


1,232,673 


1,202,041 


1,170,504 


1,138,061 


1,104,711 


SUBTOTAL: 


$294,652 


;i, 232,673 


i1, 202,041 


51,170,504 


;i, 138,061 


51,104,711 


DISTRICT WIDE 














Repaving 


16,540 


16,540 


16,540 


16,540 


16,540 


16,540 


Technology Advances 


50,000 


75,000 


75,000 


75,000 


75,000 


75,000 


Carpet & Tile Replacement 


32,000 


32,000 


32,000 


32,000 


32,000 


32,000 


Double Wide Portable Classrooms 


80,000 


80,000 










Student Desk/Chair Replacement 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


30,000 


30,000 


Technology Plan 


50,000 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 


Classroom Wiring (Video, Data, Phones 








22,500 


26,750 


22,000 


SUBTOTAL: 


$253,540 


$328,540 


$248,540 


$271,040 


$280,290 


$275,540 


Includes the Maple Ave. Bond 














SCHOOL SUB-TOTAL: 


52,012,894 


53,469,954 


53,297,354 


;3,21 7,949 


53,128,371 


53,018,930 


OFFSETTING REVENUES: 


235,333 


703,533 


704,083 


704,083 


704,083 


704,083 


SCHOOL TOTAL: 


1,777,561 


2,766,421 


2,593,271 


2,513,866 


2,424,288 


2,314,847 


% INCREASE/DECREASE 














FROM PREVIOUS YEAR: 


29% 


56% 


-6% 


-3% 


-7% 


-8% 


COMBINED TOWN & 














SCHOOL TOTAL: 


53,552,722 


54,851,088 


54,407,727 


54,214,333 


54,058,360 


54,414,657 


% INCREASE/DECREASE 














FROM PREVIOUS YEAR: 


11% 


37% 


-9% 


-4% 


-8% 


5% 


Offsetting Revenue: 















The 7.1 mil. bond will include $300K for land acquisition 

School Aid for Maple Ave & Mt. View Bond - $235,333 

School Aid for High School Expansion - $326,250 

School Aid for Elementary School Expansion - $1 41 ,950-FYOI and $1 42,500-FY02 toFY 05 



Includes the Maple Ave. Bond 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 55_ 

Southern New Hampshire 

Planning Commission 

The Southern New Hampshire Planning Commission has a wide range 
of services and resources available to help with a variety of municipal is- 
sues. Technical assistance is provided by a professional staff whose exper- 
tise is, when necessary, supplemented by consultants who are selected for 
their specialized skills or services. Each year, with the approval of your 
appointed representatives, the Commission staff designs and carries out 
programs of area-wide significance that are mandated under New Hamp- 
shire and federal laws or regulations, and local or site-specific projects 

Technical assistance is provided in a professional and timely manner. 
The Commission conducts planning studies and carries out projects that 
are of common interest and benefit to all member communities, keeps your 
officials apprised of changes in planning and land use regulation and, in 
conjunction with the New Hampshire Municipal Association, offers train- 
ing workshops for Planning and Zoning Board members on an annual ba- 
sis. 

Services that were performed for the town during the past year are: 

• Co-sponsored the Municipal Law Lecture series. 

• Conducted traffic counts at forty-nine locations in Goffstown and for- 
warded data to the Chairman of the Planning Board. 

• Provided town and library with a copy of the "Land Use Plan 2015 for 
the Southern New Hampshire Planning Commission Sub-Region." 

• Provided a "Tools and Techniques" video for Planning Board use. 

• Provided a handbook on "Stormwater Management for New Hampshire 
Communities" prepared by the Southern New Hampshire Planning Com- 
mission, and a handbook on "The Law (RSA 155-E) Governing Earth 
Excavations," prepared by the Southwest Region Planing Commission. 

• Provided a copy of "Impact Fee Development, a Handbook for New Hamp- 
shire Communities," prepared by the Southern New Hampshire Plan- 
ning Commission. 

• Provided the Planning Coordinator with a disk containing the town's 
road base map in AutoCAD 14 format. 

• Provided graphics support (3 maps) for the Mast Road Sidewalk Con- 
struction project for the Transportation Enhancement application. 

• Reviewed and offered comments on the Traffic impact report for the 
Malloy Ford Automobile Sales and Service Dealership expansion. 

• All of the town's large-scale tax maps were digitized and one set of these 
maps was forwarded to the town. Additionally, one set of maps (in smaller 
scale) measuring 11" x 17" was also forwarded to the town. 

• Provided comments on the Traffic Impact report on the subdivision on 
Kennedy Hill Road and an interim solution for the traffic bottleneck at 
the Goffstown Exxon Station. 

Goffstown's Representatives to the Commission are: 

Robert L. Wheeler 

Arthur W. Rose, Milton Meyers, Barbara J. Griffin, Alternate 

Executive Committee Member: Robert L. Wheeler 



56 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Economic Development Council 



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L-i? Front Row: Judith DesMueles, Margaret Dolbow (Sec), William Jabjiniak 
(Chair), William Hamilton (Vice-Chair). 

L-R Back Row: Henry Grady, Philip Tatro, Richard Stanley, Sel. Bruce Hunter, 
Missing: Marie Boyle, Matthew Peterson, Robert Wheeler (Sel. Rep.) Barbara Griffin 
(Alt. Sel. Rep.), Gossett McRae (Planning Board Rep.), Vacant (TA's designee). 



In 1999 the Goffstown Economic Development Council (GEDC) contin- 
ued to contribute to the economic vitality of the community. New priori- 
ties were set and plans instituted to accomplish our goals. It was also a 
year that, with sincere regret, we saw the resignation of Andre Garron, 
Director of Planning and Economic Development. He did a terrific job and 
we will miss the skills and strong support he gave the council. 

Building on our past successes of establishing the Halloween and Christ- 
mas events, a strategic planning session was organized. Over 20 individu- 
als, representing a wide variety of backgrounds, met to develop a list of 
potential projects that would benefit Goffstown and have a positive eco- 
nomic impact. The list was then narrowed to three priorities. 

First, was active support of the Main Street Program, second was at- 
tracting new niche businesses and third was support and expansion of ex- 
isting business. 

In March of 1999 funding for the Main Street Program was approved at 
the town meeting. Soon after receiving this approval, the New Hampshire 
Main Street Program accepted Goffstown's application as one of three new 
Main Street communities for 1999. The newly organized Board of Directors 
of the Main Street Program will be making plans for improvements in the 
village area. The GEDC will work closely with the Main Street Program on 
issues and events affecting the village area. 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



57 



Subcommittees were organized to address the other two priorities. The 
subcommittee on expansion and retention of local businesses felt it needed 
to compliment the Main Street Program and successfully organized the 
Pinardville Business Association. Working with the businesses and hav- 
ing representation on our council will help the Pinardville area of Goffs- 
town. 

The subcommittee on attracting new businesses to the community met 
with the Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI) of the Manches- 
ter Chamber of Commerce. When businesses contact the REDI about pos- 
sible relocation, information will be forwarded to us inquiring if we have a 
suitable location. 

We also actively supported several businesses as they went through 
the planning and zoning process. Watch for these exciting commercial/ 
industrial ventures in 2000 and beyond. 

We will continue to pursue our existing priorities while considering 
other options and new input on where our efforts can make the greatest 
impact. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William Jabjiniak, Chairman 
William L. Hamilton, Vice Chair 
Margaret Dalbow, Secretary 




PROGRAM, rNC 



_58 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Building, Zoning & 
Health Office 

The Building, Zoning and Health Office is located at 16 Main Street on 
the second floor of town hall. Our office hours are 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Monday, Tuesday, Friday, 8:30 AM to Noon on Wednesday, and 8:30 AM 
to 6:00 PM on Thursday. The department staff includes the building in- 
spector, who also enforces the zoning ordinance and health regulations, 
and a building, zoning and health secretary, who works 22 hours each 
week. 

In 1999 the town experienced a decrease in the number of permits 
issued for single family homes. There were 21 fewer new homes built in 
1999 as compared to the previous year. Saint Anselm College is continu- 
ing to expand. They have added a new sports stadium and five new hous- 
ing units that are providing 40 new student units with accommodations for 
160 students. The temporary mobile home housing has been completely 
removed. Our statistical graph indicates the types of building related ac- 
tivities that have taken place throughout 1999. 

The questions most often asked by homeowners pertains to roofing, 
replacement of windows, repairs, building sheds and swimming pools. 
Therefore, we would like to point out that: 

1. Permits are not required to re-roof a house. However, only 
two layers of roofing are allowed by code. 

2. Permits are not required to install replacement windows pro- 
vided the structure, or opening, is not enlarged to 

accommodate a larger window. 

3. Minor repairs that are part of maintenance do not require a 
permit. 

4. A permit is required when building or placing a shed on a 
property. 

Keep in mind that zoning regulations and setbacks must be 
observed. 

If you have any questions concerning building, zoning or health issues, 
please feel free to contact us at 497-3612 during regular business hours. 
We are here to help you. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmond J. Neveu 

Building Inspector, 

Code Enforcement & Health Officer 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



59 



Building Permit Report 





1997 


1998 


1999 


TYPE OF 


No. of 


Permit 


No. of 


Permit 


No. of 


Permit 


PERMIT 


Permits 


Fees 


Permits 


Fees 


Permits 


Fees 


Single Families & 














2 Families 


75 


$ 37,503 


100 


$ 51,558 


79 


$ 42,583 


New Commercial 


7 


15,379 


2 


6,480 


3 


10,483 


Misc. Commercial 


18 


4,974 


5 


1,416 


5 


1,984 


Misc. Buildings 


140 


6,120 


189 


9,787 


213 


13,089 


Misc. Electrical 


91 


2,020 


90 


3,529 


74 


1,890 


Misc. Plumbing 


39 


838 


15 


375 


14 


365 


Misc. Mechanical 


80 


1,836 


74 


2,025 


78 


2,040 


ZBA Appeals 


54 


2,334 


63 


2,937 


48 


2,445 


Signs 


33 


690 


40 


680 


22 


530 


Child Inspection 


2 


770 


6 





9 


50 


Assembly Insp. 








1 


50 








Health Inspection 


13 


45 


13 





9 





Junkyard Insp. 


2 


50 


2 





2 


50 


Mobile Home Insp 


2 


200 


4 


400 








Misc. 





171 





569 





1,297 


TOTALS 


556 


$72,930 


604 


$79,806 


556 


$76,806 



97 
□ 99 




60 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Appeals heard by the Zoning Board in 1999 = 47 
Appeals Approved = 40 

Appeals Denied = 6 

Withdrawals = 1 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment (ZBA) has the authority, after public 
hearing and notice to: 

1. Decide appeals from the administrative decisions of the municipal offi- 
cials or boards responsible for issuing permits or enforcing the zoning 
ordinance; 

2. Approve special exceptions as provided for in the zoning ordinance; 

3. Grant variances from terms of the ordinance. 

Regularly scheduled meetings are held on the first Tuesday of each 
month at 7:00 pm and are followed by hearings which begin at 7:30 pm. 
Additional special public hearings and meetings are held as required. 

Notices of meetings are posted in the Town Hall and advertised in the 
Goffstown News. Applicants and abutters are notified by certified mail. 

All meetings are open to the public and everyone is invited to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Henry Grady, Chairman 




L-R Front Row: Anthony Marts (Vice Chair), Henry Grady (Chair), James Kibby 
(Alt.), Marie Boyle (ZBA Sec). L-R Back Row: Paul Lambert, Edward Dial, Jr., 
William Jabjiniak(Clerk); Missing: Cynthia Boisvert (Alt), 2 - Vacant (Alt.). 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 61 



PuBuc Works 



It is once again time to reflect on our 1999 accomplishments and our 
goals for the coming year. 

The Department of Public Works accomplished many of its goals for 
the year. The Mast Road Corridor Project was completed within budget. 
The corridor was widened and sidewalks were constructed from Shop 'N 
Save to College Road. Next summer the final coat of asphalt will be put in 
place, landscaping completed, and the project finished. Some of the major 
projects conducted this past year included work on Goffstown Back Road, 
Center Street and New Boston Road. The East Union Street Drainage 
Project began and will be completed over the winter. 

Once again, thanks to the countless volunteers and particularily the 
efforts of Larry Brown for the beautiful improvements that were made to 
the village common. 

The construction of the Parker Road Bridge began and will continue 
through the winter months. This particular project will be completed by 
spring. The design of the rehabilitation of the Main Street Bridge was 
completed and construction has been scheduled for next summer. 

The design of the landfill closure has been completed and the final 
design submitted to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental 
Services. The construction of the final closure plan will begin in the spring. 
The athletic fields that were contemplated for a reuse plan have been in- 
corporated into the final design. 

Last year the curbside recycling contract was put out to bid. The bid 
resulted in drastic increases in curbside recycling costs. We averted a 
major price increase for last year by negotiating an extension of the exist- 
ing contract. Industry wide, however, solid waste costs have risen drasti- 
cally in the past year. We will be following these trends closely as they 
could potentially impact next year's solid waste costs. 

Construction of the new public works facility has been ongoing this 
year. The salt shed was completed and the office building is underway. 
We completed much of the site work this past season. Next summer we 
hope to complete the maintenance building and the remaining site work. 

We have several projects planned for next season. We will be complet- 
ing the Parker Road Bridge and the East Union Street Drain. If all goes 
well, the Main Street Bridge Project will be completed. The department 
will begin the re-construction of Tibbetts Hill Road. The landfill closure 
project and our facility construction will also keep us very busy. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Carl L. Quiram, PE 
Director of Public Works 



62 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Solid W\ste Commission 

1999 was another successful year for the Goffstown Sohd Waste Com- 
mission (GSWC). The Treasure Trailer (formerly known as the "Swap Shop") 
continued to be a popular destination for people stopping at the Transfer 
Station. The Treasure Trailer returned over $461.90 to the town's general 
fund in 1999. The trailer also kept many items from being hauled to the 
landfill and taking up valuable landfill space. 

Goffstown's Earth Day celebration was another success. GSWC Mem- 
bers Barbara Barbour and Barbara Perkins initiated the program and pulled 
it off with the help of many other volunteers. 

There has been some changes this year. Several members left the 
board and we brought on a few new members. We welcome Richard 
Schaffner, Vin LoPresti, and Gene Haselton. We thank Bobbie Perkins 
and Ezra Beck for their hard work and thoughtful consideration. 

Education has been a prime focus of the GSWC. We've spoken to people 
at the Transfer Station, and submitted press releases and newspaper ar- 
ticles to the Goffstown News. The feedback has been overwhelmingly posi- 
tive. We will continue to try to educate the public about solid waste issues 
in Goffstown. 

Solid waste disposal costs continue to climb. We will continue to moni- 
tor the changes and are examining several options for trash disposal recy- 
cling. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Christopher Conroy, Chair 




L-R: Philip D'Avanza (Sel. Rep.), Eugene Haselton, Kilton Barnard, Richard 
Schaffner, Russ Lauriet (Adv.), Vincent LoPresti; Missing: Christopher 
Conroy (Chair), Barbara Barbour, Paul LaPerle 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



63 



PoocE Department 

The Goffstown Police Department provides 24-hour coverage to the 
community, and is the initial response in most emergency situations. The 
department handled 16,322 calls for service during 1999, versus 17,130 in 
1998, a decrease of 4%. There were 3,192 criminal and motor vehicle ar- 
rests during 1999, an average of 8.7 per day. You will find a statistical 
summary of complaints and arrests at the end of this report, however sev- 
eral categories are noteworthy. 

In crimes against persons, several areas showed a decrease in reported 
incidents. Assaults continued downward from 344 in 1997 to 206 in 1999. 
Domestic violence decreased 6% from 231 in 1998 to 212 in 1999. However, 
criminal threats increased from 81 in 1998 to 94 in 1999. 

Most disturbing is a 52% increase in reported child abuse cases from 30 
in 1998 to 46 in 1999. These cases are very labor intensive, much more 
costly to investigate, and have a greater continuing impact on already 
strained resources. 

Motor vehicle crashes increased by 6% from 633 in 1998 to 673 in 1999. 
The number of crashes involving personal injury remained the same at 81. 
Tragically, again this year, there was one fatal accident that resulted in 
the death of one pedestrian. 

Reported property crimes such as burglary and criminal mischief 
showed a decrease from 1998 figures. Burglary decreased 27% and crimi- 
nal mischief decreased 5%. These positive numbers can be attributed to 
agency and community crime prevention efforts, aggressive investigation 
and prosecution of offenders. More needs to be done, however as theft by 
unauthorized taking rose by 8%. We encourage citizens to report things 
that are unusual or out of the ordinary in their neighborhoods. 

Officers began wearing new badges and shoulder patches in the spring 
thanks to a generous 
donation from the 
Goffstown Police As- 
sociation and the tal- 
ents of two local art- 
ists, Diane Ryan and 
Peter Steckowych. 
Both the badge and 
the patch feature the 
Grasmere Town 
Hall. Association 
members are thank- 
ed for their generous 
donation to the de- 
partment, the second 
such donation in less 
than 4 years. 




GPA President Christopher Connelly presents 

Police Department's new badge and patch to 

Selectmen Robert Wheeler and Philip D'Avanza. 



64 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



PROGRAMS 

The department continued its community policing initiatives through- 
out the year utihzing a problem solving model in a collaborative effort work- 
ing with individuals, neighborhoods, and community groups to prevent 
and deter incidents before they occur. During the warm months, the bi- 
cycle and motorcycle patrols are out whenever possible. These types of 
patrols provide for a unique interaction between officers and citizens and 
have been well received by the business community and individual neigh- 
borhoods. 

DARE Officers Pierre Pouliot and Keith Chauvette teach the drug and 
violence prevention DARE curriculum in the sixth grades at Mountain 
View Middle School and the Villa Augustina during the school year. 

In August, Officer Dave Moloney was appointed as the specializied 
assignment of School/Community Resource Officer, working primarily at 
the high school. This position, funded by a 3-year federal grant from the 
COPS in School Office, has already demonstrated its effectiveness as the 
number of Safe School Act mandatory reports has dropped significantly. 
The officer's presence helps the school and community in providing a safe 
and orderly learning environment for our children. Officer Moloney is 
available to meet with parents or students and can be reached at the Goff- 
stown High School or Police Department. 

Members of Investigative Services, under the direction of Sgt. Jeffrey 
Nelson, along with the department's volunteers and the high school ad- 
ministration, will introduce a truancy tracking program in January 2000. 

The investigators continue to work closely with the Diversion Commit- 
tee, courts, youth forums, and other community and state organizations to 
provide quality assistance to the youth in our community. 

The Volunteer Program, now in the second full year of operation, has 
seen much success in enhancing the services the department is able to 
provide. The core 
group of 12 dedicated 
volunteers provided 
over 1,200 hours 
helping the prosecu- 
tor with witnesses in 
court, assisting in 
crime prevention 
programs, such as 
the Halloween Safety 
Day, bike rodeos, and 
fingerprinting pro- 
grams, performing 
clerical work, an- 
swering the business 
phones, and other 
projects. We appre- 




Volunteers: Seated L-R- Mary Crockett, Thelma Langdon, 
Jan Levasseur, Mary Goss; Standing L-R - Fred Cass, 
Judy Patrick, Pat Patrick, Debbie Little; Missing: Beth 
Tibbetts, Jean Mayberry, Gigi Clement, Marlene 
Latulippe, Sgt. Jeffrey Nelson andAtty. Kerry Steckowych 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 65^ 

ciate and thank all of our volunteers, including our law enforcement Ex- 
plorers, for the real and significant commitment they have made to the 
communtiy. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

The Communications Center serves as a Police, Fire and Emergency 
Medical Dispatch for the town. In addition, we provide contractual ser- 
vices to the New Boston Police and Fire/EMS Service and the Weare Police 
and Fire/EMS. Goffstown derives approximately $37,632 in annual in- 
come from these contracts. 

The Communications Center operates 24-hours per day and handles 
over 550,000 radio transmissions; 88,000 phone calls and 195,000 teletype 
and computer messages, which generates in excess of 20,000 calls for ser- 
vice each year. 

Assistant Communications Supervisor Pam O'Neil retired after 26 years 
of dedicated service to the town and Dispatcher Ed Jimenez retired in De- 
cember after almost 12 years of service. Both will be missed and, we offer 
our thanks and best wishes. 

The town- wide communications system came on line in the spring with 
the exception of one radio frequency. This has been a very long process. 
However, the tower and electronics hut on the mountain, and the console 
equipment at headquarters are functioning properly. The replacement of 
the fourth frequency, expected in the year 2000, will allow the system to 
operate at peak efficiency. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The police department also handles the emergency management func- 
tion. Our mission is to coordinate the town's emergency readiness capa- 
bilities, in case of a natural or manmade disaster. 

During the year we continued to work with the school district to up- 
date their emergency and school safety plans. A full scale drill was con- 
ducted at the Mountain View Middle School in June. This drill allowed 
emergency service providers and school officials the opportunity to take a 
critical look at the plan and make revisions where necessary. 

Thanks to the efforts of Steve Monier, Emergency Management Direc- 
tor, and Deputy Director, Captain Shawn Murray of the Fire Department, 
the entire Emergency Operations Plan was completely updated and reis- 
sued. Copies of the plan are available at the town hall and the town li- 
brary. The police department and the town owe Steve our gratitude for all 
his efforts to make our community prepared for any emergency situation. 

On behalf of the members of the Goffstown Police Department, allow 
me to express our appreciation for your continuing support and coopera- 
tion. Preserving Goffstown as a great place to live and work is everyone's 
responsibility. The men and women of the department, have and will, 
continue to put forth tremendous efforts to help keep our community as 
safe as possible. With your help we will continue to meet future oportunities 
and challenges in a positive manner. 



66 


1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


Complaint Category: 


1998 


1999 


% Change +/- 


MOTOR VEHICLE CRASHES: 








Crashes w/ Injury 


61 


67 




Bike w/ Injury 




8 




OHRV w/ Injury 




1 




Pedestrian 




4 




Fatalities 


1 







Fatal w/ Pedestrian 





1 




Hit & Run 


64 


63 




Investigated 


459 







No Injury 





529 




Reported - Not Investigated 


153 







Total Crashes: 




673 


6% 


CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS: 








Abuse/Neglect 


30 


46 


53% 


Assaults 


288 


206 


-28% 


Criminal Threat 


81 


94 


16% 


Domestic Violence 


231 


212 


-8% 


Harassment 


136 


146 


9% 


Indecent Exposure 


3 


3 


0% 


Juvenile Offenses 


285 


337 


18% 


Narcotics 


168 


106 


-10% 


Possession Tobacco 


66 


83 


26% 


Robbery 


2 


6 


200% 


Sexual Assault 


18 


22 


22% 


Total Crimes Against Persons: 




1,263 




CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY/OTHER: 






Alarms 


831 


787 


-5% 


Animal 


514 


453 


-12% 


Burglary 


49 


36 


-27% 


Courtesy Calls 


1,762 


1,758 


-0.2% 


Crime Prevention 


405 


411 


1% 


Criminal Mischief 


337 


320 


-5% 


Disorderly Conduct 


144 


110 


31% 


Larceny 


412 


445 


8% 


Liquor Law 


138 


170 


23% 


Motor Vehicle Complaints 


576 


546 


-5% 


Motor Vehicle Thefts 


12 


15 


25% 


Noise 


279 


212 


-24% 


Suicide (includes attempts) 


24 


30 


25% 


Suspicious Persons 


200 


152 


-24% 


Suspicious Vehicles 


226 


169 


-25% 


All Other Complaints 


4,497 


5,029 


11% 


Total Crimes Against Property: 




10,643 





TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 








67 


ARRESTS & SUMMONSES 






Motor Vehicle Arrests: 


1998 




1999 


% Change +/- 


Speed 


889 




870 




-2% 


DWI 


60 




72 




20% 


Oper. After Revo. 


48 




89 




85% 


Reckless Operation 


3 




14 




367% 


Non-Inspection 


219 




378 




73% 


Other MV Offenses 


523 




778 




49% 


Total Motor Vehicle Arrests: 


1,742 




2,201 




26% 


Written Warnings(not arrests): 


3,100 




3,877 




25% 


Combined Total MV Activity: 


4,842 




6,078 




28% 


Criminal Arrests: 


1998 


Juv. 


1999 


Juv. % 


Change 

+/- 
-100% 


Homicide & Attempted Homicide 1 











Negligent Homicide 














0% 


Kidnapping 


3 





1 





-67% 


Assault 


132 


37 


122 


21 


-8% 


Arson 














0% 


Escape 














0% 


Larceny 


60 


20 


78 


10 


30% 


Burglary 


13 


12 


13 





0% 


Disorderly Conduct 


4 





25 


5 


525% 


Criminal Mischief 


23 


7 


35 


10 


52% 


Narcotics 


60 


23 


91 


26 


52% 


Forgery 








3 





300% 


Resisting Arrest 


2 


2 


20 


10 


900% 


Criminal Liability 


1 


1 


4 


2 


300% 


Other Criminal Offenses 


760 


59 


599 


35 


-21% 


Total Criminal Arrests: 






991 


119 




Total Enforcement Activity 


5,900 




7,069 




20% 


Total Activity Combined: 






19,648 




10%) 



Respectfully submitted, 
Michael T. French 
Chief of Police 



68 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Fire Department 

A 6% overall increase in emergency calls were handled by the GFD in 
1999. The fulltime and call firefighters along with ambulance volunteers 
did an excellent job assuring Goffstown citizens of the best emergency ser- 
vice possible. 

During the year several important projects were completed. A replace- 
ment fire apparatus was purchased for the Pinardville Station. This ve- 
hicle was designed to provide capability we have not had in the past. We 
can carry more personnel, fill air bottles at the scene and provide enhanced 
scene lighting. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 'flH^H|lB .^^L|^h^^^^^^w|u^^^^hh^^j^^^^^^^^^^b^h 


v. 








i '. i SJi 




i - 

1 


1 


■ 





















A replacement for Hose 1 in the Village has been ordered. The current 
Hose 1 is a 1979 International and has exceeded it's twenty year life. The 
new vehicle will be similar to the current vehicle. It will be built by Dingee 
Machine Company in Cornish NH, and is due for completion this summer. 

The East Goffstown Station now has an automatic standby generator. 
Should there be a power outage in that area of Town we will have electrical 
power at that facility. All three fire stations now have this back-up power 
available. 

We were able to start replacing the firefighter's protective clothing this 
year. Twenty emergency personnel received new, state of the art, coats 
and pants. This is the first installment of a replacement program sched- 
uled to purchase 80 sets of gear. 

Promotions have been made within the call force. The following were 
promoted during the year: Lt. Dennis Pinard was promoted to Capt. at the 
Pinardville Station along with Firefighter Mark Lemay to Lieutenant. At 
the Church Street Station, Firefighter's Helen L'Heureux and Gary 
Chapdelaine were promoted to Lieutenant. We now have a full slate of 
officers. The promotions were made based on a high sense of commitment 
as a call firefighter, emergency service education and experience. 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 69 

Recruitment 

Several new firefighters started with us during the year. These new 
personnel volunteer to take a GFD recruit class. Upon successful comple- 
tion, we assign recruits at the station nearest their residence. This main- 
tains our roster of call firefighters. Anyone 18 years old and in excellent 
health interested in applying to the department may pick-up an applica- 
tion at the Church Street Station, Monday - Friday, SAM to 4PM. 

Anyone interested in becoming an EMT and volunteer with our ambu- 
lance service, should give our EMS Co-ordinator a call. He will provide 
information regarding available courses which are refundable after a year 
of service. 

Emergency Medical Services 

The ambulance activity continues to grow. This year the ambulance on 
Church Street was replaced. The Goffstown Emergency Medical Services 
Association was able to fund this replacement in a very cost effective way. 
The 1988 ambulance was traded for a refurbished ambulance that had a 
new 1999 chassis. We expect to get nearly ten years of service from this 
emergency vehicle. 

The Fire Dept. and GEMSA are looking at some new challenges in the 
months ahead. The call for service increased approximately 7% over 1998. 
Emergency medical calls make up 56% of the emergencies we respond to. 
All indications are that this growth will continue. 

In addition, the hospitals are changing their restocking policy. For us, 
this means increased expenses as more supplies will be needed. The 
Pinardville ambulance will also need to be replaced in 2002. GEMSA an- 
ticipates becoming more aggressive and creative with how it raises funds. 
With escalating requests for service and increased expenses we have sig- 
nificantly increased this year's Emergency Medical Services budget. 

Training 

In recent times, N.H. Fire Standards & Training has made a signifi- 
cant curriculum change to certification programs. Our department has made 
a good adjustment to these changes. Our personnel have been working at 
all levels to become certified, and in many cases to an advanced level. We 
have made use of the fire academy for regular structured programs as well 
as specific training objectives. 

For the first time we utilized the breathing apparatus trailer from the 
academy. This training prop was on loan to us over a weeks time and staffed 
by State instructors. This helped many of our firefighters gain confidence. 
It also evaluated each individual and helped to set some training objec- 
tives. 

A total of 7982 hours were spent training in 1999. This includes all in 
house and outside training. Most training is paid but many individuals 
attend programs and courses without compensation. 



70 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Prevention 

We believe that the best way to fight fire is with good codes, code en- 
forcement, and fire safety education. Our fire prevention officer works 
fulltime to provide these services and protection for the Goffstown commu- 
nity. If you as a business owner or resident have a question regarding fire 
codes or fire safety, please call Lt. Bill Connor for information. 

Some 988 calls for service were taken by the GFD Fire Prevention 
Officer. This included inspections, station tours, school visits and other 
informational contacts. 

Teaching young children about being safe with fire is a priority. As 
children develop we want to take the opportunity to establish safe prac- 
tices when using fire and other potentially dangerous devices. We also are 
prepared to help with children who have experienced problems with matches 
or lighters. With a one on one program we can educate a child effectively 
and we can get a sense if professional counseling is needed. 



In order toprovide services we are charged with, emergency personnel 
often leave family, work and leisure activities. I want each to know that 
those sacrifices do not go unnoticed. Without understanding family, and 
others close to us, we would not have such a remarkable organization. 
Thanks to everyone for this past year and keep up the great work. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Edward Hunter, Fire Chief 



Number of Calls By Type 



Fire/Explosion 


1 


Structure 


40 


Outside of Structure 


4 


Vehicle 


8 


Brush 


27 


Refuse 


3 


Not classified 


2 


Overpressure 


2 


Emergency Medical 


834 


Hazardous Condition 


81 


Service Calls 


164 


Good Intent Calls 


122 


Bomb Scare 


2 


False Calls 


188 



Total 1478 

(Of these 62 were Mutual Aid) 




Steve Miller in new protective 
clothing 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 71_ 

Town Forest Fiee Warden and 
State Forest Ranger 

To aid your Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department and State Forest 
Ranger, contact your local Warden or Fire Department to find out if a 
permit is required before doing ANY outside burning. Fire permits are 
required for any open burning unless the ground is completely covered 
with snow where the burning will be done. Violations of RSA 227-L:17, the 
fire permit law and other burning laws of the State of New Hampshire are 
misdemeanors punishable by fines of up to $2,000 and/or a year in jail. 
Violators are also liable for all fire suppression costs. 

There are eleven Forest Rangers who work for the New Hampshire 
Division of Forests and Lands, Forest Protection Bureau. During the 1999 
season, Forest Rangers were busy assisting communities with suppression 
of difficult and remote multi-day fires. If you have any questions regard- 
ing forest fire or timber harvest laws, please call our office at 271-2217. 

There are 2400 Forest Fire Wardens and Deputy Forest Fire Wardens 
throughout the state. Each town has a Forest Fire Warden and several 
Deputy Wardens who assist the Forest Rangers with forest fire suppres- 
sion, prevention, and law enforcement. The 1999 fire season was a chal- 
lenging but safe year for wildland firefighters in New Hampshire. The 
severe drought conditions throughout the spring and summer months com- 
bined with residual effects of the 1998 Ice Storm, resulted in a dramatic 
increase in wildland fires. In addition to burning in excess of 452 acres, 35 
structures were also impacted by wildfire. Homeowners can help protect 
their structures by maintaining adequate green space around them. 

The State of New Hampshire operates 15 fire towers, 2 mobile patrols 
and 3 contract aircraft patrols. Early detection and reports from citizens 
aid in the quick response from local fire departments. 

Contact your local fire department before doing ANY outside burning. 

1999 FIRE STATISTICS 

(All Fires Reported thru December 10, 1999) 

CAUSES OF FIRES REPORTED 

Debris Burning 352 

Miscellaneous * 279 

Smoking 188 

Children 176 

Campfire 161 

Arson/Suspicious 54 

Equipment Use 43 

Lightning 42 

Railroad 6 

* Miscellaneous (powerlines, fire 
TOTAL 1301 451 works, structures, OHRV) 



TOTALS BY COUNTY 




Numbers 


Acres 


Hillsborough 


271 


50 


Rockingham 


218 


111 


Merrimack 


213 


115 


Belknap 


139 


66 


Cheshire 


131 


28 


Strafford 


98 


26 


Carroll 


81 


17 


Grafton 


70 


18 


Sullivan 


62 


17 


Coos 


18 


3 



72 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



Parks & Recreation 




Seated L-R: Sue Tucker (Chair), Dave French (Dir.); Standing L-R: Mike 

McKinnon, Phil Tatro, Claude LaRoche, Lionel Cullerot, Bruce Hunter 

(Sel. Rep.),Richard Fletcher(Budg Rep.),Bob Draper; MissingiPaul Smith 

As 1999 ends, and we look forward and beyond, I want to take this 
opportunity to express my appreciation to the people of Goffstown for their 
continued support of the Parks & Recreation Department. 

This past year our overall program participation increased by 4% over 
1998. The use of the addition to the Recreation Center is increasing and 
we encourage more people to make use of this facility. Our summer play- 
ground program continues to grow as does many of our youth programs 
such as girls and boys basketball, and girls softball. 

In 1999 we hosted our 20th Annual Goffstown Gallop Road Race. The 
race drew a great crowd and we are looking forward to hosting the 21st 
Annual Gallop in the year 2000. The Parks and Recreation Department is 
also looking forward to working with the Goffstown Rotary Club to help 
insure another successful "GALLOP WEEKEND," cookout, and concert in 
the year 2000. 

I want to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Parks & 
Recreation Commission for their continued support, encouragement and 
dedication to this department. Thanks should also be extended to the Board 
of Selectmen, John Scruton, Sue Desruisseaux, and the Town Hall staff for 
their support and cooperation. 

On behalf of the town, I would like to express my appreciation to sev- 
eral organizations that have contributed to the success of our programs: 
The Odd Fellows, Goffstown Lions Club, Tri-Town Soccer, Goffstown Jr. 
Baseball, Mt. Uncanoonuc Mountaineers Snowmobile Club, Goffstown Ro- 
tary Club and the Tae Kwon Do Karate Program. 

Thanks also to the DPW, Police, Fire, Library, Water Departments as 
well as department heads and staff for their support and cooperation. 

I would also like to express my appreciation to the CLP. Committee, 
Planning Board, and Budget Committee members for their support. 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 73_ 

Many thanks to our summer staff and Kim McCann as well as, Brad 
Parkhurst, Rick French, Heidi Leighton, Dave Turner, and Ken Perkins for 
their efforts. 

During the past year we were frequently allowed to use the school's 
facilities. I would like to thank Supt. Dr. Darrell Lockwood for his contin- 
ued support and cooperation and the Goffstown School Board, principals, 
and staff for their cooperation. 

And finally, thanks to my family for their support throughout the year. 
The Parks & Recreation Department is looking forward to serving the people 
of Goffstown in the upcoming year. 

Programs & Participation Levels 



PROGRAM 


1997 


1998 


1999 


Activity Period 


210 


115 


105 


Activity Period, Summer 


63 


65 


57 


Aerobics, Morning 


50 


50 


15 


Aerobics, Evening 


135 


75 


48 


Arts & Crafts 


125 


210 


227 


Awards Night (4 times/yr.) 


810 


815 


841 


Ballet (3 times per week) 


175 


190 


192 


Ballet Recital 


295 


300 


400 


Basketball, Boys 


288 


292 


307 


Basketball, Boys Travel Team 


12 


24 


24 


Basketball, Girls 


61 


91 


103 


Basketball, Girls Travel Team 


— 


13 


26 


Basketball, Instructional 


70 


72 


81 


Basketball, Mens 


45 


45 


45 


Basketball, Mens 30 & up 


60 


65 


68 


Basketball, Summer 


40 


32 


31 


Cheerleading 


100 


70 


71 


Christmas in August 


103 


85 


42 


Clown Day 


100 


75 


72 


Concert in the Park/Rotary Club Cookout 


175 


260 


275 


Cookout Program 


190 


195 


115 


Easter in July 


285 


150 


171 


Family Skating Nights 


85 


200 


205 


Field Trips 


210 


210 


210 


Fishing Day 


55 


40 


42 


Field Day at Barnard Park 


150 


150 


160 


Field Day at Roy Park 


150 


150 


150 


Foul Shooting Contest Boys/Girls 


148 


148 


119 


Goffstown Gallop 


235 


238 


237 


Great Pumpkin Hunt 


200 


200 


225 


Gymnastics 


145 


155 


150 


Halloween in July 


92 


94 


106 


Hiking, Fall 


15 


12 


— 


International Day 


— 


— 


41 


Jazz Dancing 


10 


18 


6 


Karate 


— 


70 


98 


Mystery Trip 


40 


40 


40 


Open Gjnn 


80 


85 


98 


Photography Classes 


— 


— 


6 


Pickle Ball Tourney 


65 


60 


52 



74 


1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


PROGRAM 


1997 


1998 


1999 


Recycling Day 


175 


— 


— 


Scavenger Hunts 


150 


— 


116 


Senior Citizen Day 


100 


100 


110 


Senior Citizen Trip (2) 


80 


80 


80 


Soccer, Jr. 


150 


152 


146 


Softball, Girls (Majors) 


90 


98 


111 


Softball, Girls (Minors) 


125 


158 


170 


Softball, Instructional 


60 


75 


82 


Softball, Summer 


170 


185 


189 


Special Events, Summer 


— 


367 


365 


Special Night 


— 


50 


— 


Staff Day 


50 


50 


— 


Summer Youth Track Nites 


— 


148 


172 


Swimming Lessons 


603 


628 


597 


Tennis Tournament 


— 


12 


15 


Tennis, Youth 


57 


108 


125 


Tie Dye Shirt Day 


— 


— 


68 


Track & Field, Hershey 


29 


38 


39 


UNH Red Wagon 


— 


— 


185 


Volleyball, Adult 


50 


58 


62 


Water Polo 


35 


45 


41 


Whiffle Ball Tourney 


60 


81 


81 


Yoga 


— 


— 


8 



TOTAL 7,934 7,822 8,153 

FACiLrnES 

RECREATION CENTER 

Groups using French Community Room: Karate, Gymnastics, Ballet, 
Adult Jazz Dancing, Girls Basketball, Cheerleading, Summer Programs, Spe- 
cial Events, Youth Sports registration. Library Ski & Skate Sale 

Groups using the Commissioners' Meeting Room: Mt. Uncanoonuc 
Mountaineer Snowmobilers, Goffstown Junior Baseball, Goffstown Babe 
Ruth Baseball, Goffstown Youth Football, Cub Scout Pack 283 

BARNARD PARK ROY PARK 



John Brown Track & Field 


Tennis Courts (3) 


Tennis Courts (4) 


Softball/Baseball Field 


Stark Memorial Swimming Pool 


Basketball Court 


Playground Area 


Playground Area 


Basketball Courts 


Roy Memorial Swimming Pool 


Outdoor Volleyball Area 






1997 1998 1999 


Pool Attendance: Barnard Pool 


10,979 11,018 11,458 


Roy Pool 


7,428 7,480 7,554 



Total 18,407 18,498 19,012 

SKATEBOARD PARK 

Located on Church Street; open dawn to dusk for skateboarders. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Dave French, Director 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



75 



Conservation Commission 





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L-i?; Karen McRae, Susan Tucker, Jean Walker (Alt.), Robert Wheeler (Sel. Rep.), 
William Scimone, Charles Freiburger. Missing: Evelyn Miller (Vice Chair), Julie 
Grandgeorge, Jane Raymond, Collis Adams (Alt), Timothy Hanson (Alt), Barbara 
Griffin (Alt. Sel. Rep.). 



The Conservation Commission has had an active year. The Commis- 
sioners continue to review wetland issues on subdivision plans for the Plan- 
ning Board. The CIP survey project is continuing on Uncanoonuc Moun- 
tain. Some permanent markers have been set and we are looking forward 
to finalizing the rest of the property lines. In addition, we are working on 
developing a forest management plan for South Uncanoonuc Mountain. 
This plan will include improvements to Mt. Base Beach, trail head parking 
and the creation of scenic vistas on the mountain. To further enhance the 
mountain, an Eagle Scout has replaced the bridge and cleared the Incline 
Trail. 

Robert Wheeler is our representative from the Board of Selectmen. Our 
meetings are held on the first Wednesday of the month, at Town Hall, 
unless otherwise posted. Please feel free to attend these meetings and 
become involved in your community. 



Respectfully submitted. 
Conservation Commission 
Members 



76 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

PiSCATAQUOG RiVER 

Local Advisory CoMMnrEE Report 

In 1988, the N.H. General Court passed the Rivers Management and 
Protection Act. This was in recognition of the value of these natural re- 
sources and that the protection of these shorelands was essential to main- 
tain the integrity of the public waters. This program allows any New Hamp- 
shire organization, or resident, to nominate a river for protection. In 1993, 
the Piscataquog Watershed Association (PWA) submitted the required nomi- 
nation papers to the state that resulted in the incorporation of the upper, 
middle and lower branches of the Piscataquog River into the program. 

RSA 483 also calls for the appointment of a local river management 
advisory committee for each designated river. Members are nominated by 
the local governing bodies (Board of Selectmen for Goffstown) and approved 
by DES. Each municipality along the designated river must have at least 
one member on the committee. Goffstown's members are Vivian Blondeau 
and Charles Freiburger. In addition to Goffstown, the communities that 
make up the PRLAC are Deering, Francestown, Lyndeborough, Manches- 
ter, New Boston, and Weare. 

The four major duties outlined in RSA 483 are: to advise DES and the 
municipalities, through which the river flows, on matters pertaining to the 
management of the river; to comment on any project that would alter the 
resource values and characteristics of the river; to develop and assist in 
the adoption of a local river corridor management plan; and to report an- 
nually to the state advisory committee and DES. 

River corridor management plans must address the following: permit- 
ted recreational uses and activities; permitted non-recreational uses and 
activities; existing land uses; protection of flood plains, wetlands, wildlife, 
fish habitat and other significant open space and natural areas; dams, 
bridges, and other water structure; access by foot and vehicles; setbacks 
and other location requirements; dredging, filling, mining and earth mov- 
ing; and prohibited uses. 

A draft plan was published during the summer of 1999 and presented 
to the communities in the PRLAC as well as the PWA. Comments were 
received and a final document was published in September 1999. Copies 
are available for review at the library. The plan now needs to be presented 
to the Planning Board in each of the affected communities. In the case of 
Goffstown, it is recommended that the plan become part of the Master 
Plan either by incorporation as an appendix or by reference. The PRLAC 
meets the first Thursday of each month in the Weare Public Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Charles Freiburger 
PRLAC Member 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 77^ 

General Assistance 

General Assistance is financial assistance provided by the town on a 
short term basis to eligible households. Assistance with basic necessities 
such as food, shelter, utilities, medical or employment related expenses is 
issued through a voucher system. Eligibility is based on both financial and 
non-financial factors. General Assistance Guidelines are reviewed and 
updated annually. 

The town is fortunate to have so many active community organizations 
which assist households in times of need. Food programs provided by Goff- 
stown Network Food Pantry, SHARE, Salvation Army, Southern N.H. Ser- 
vices, St. Joseph Community Center, and Food Stamps contributed to a 
low food expenditure by the town. Clothing and household items were 
provided by the Clothes Vestree and Salvation Army while transportation 
was provided by the Goffstown Outreach Program. Fuel Assistance was 
available through Southern N.H. Services, Neighbor Helping Neighbor Pro- 
gram, Salvation Army, and the Clergy Association. The New Hampshire 
Housing Finance Authority and Greater Manchester Housing Authority 
provided housing assistance. The Manchester Community Health Center, 
Child Health Services, and Optima Health provided health services to un- 
insured and underinsured residents. The Lions Club assisted needy resi- 
dents with eyeglasses and other medical needs. St. Matthew's Outreach 
Program and area churches continue to assist residents with a variety of 
financial needs. The Pinardville Booster Club generously assisted with 
dental care for the needy. 

During 1999 the Town of Goffstown assisted 47 households and ex- 
pended approximately $29,920 (unaudited). This was an increase of 4 
households from 1998. Goffstown was reimbursed approximately $8,083 
by other agencies and recipients. 

A sincere thank you to all the individuals and organizations who assist 
residents in need. Goffstown is truly a community of caring! 

Respectfully submitted, 

Janice O'Connell 

Welfare / Support Services Administrator 



DIRECT ASSISTANCE 


1997 


1998 


1999 


Employment Related 


140 


1,820 


1,153 


Food 


379 


415 


204 


Fuel 


3,904 


2,440 


4,236 


Medical 


2,287 


1,867 


1,112 


Rent 


24,037 


18,572 


22,715 


Funeral 








500 


TOTAL 


$30,747 


$25,114 


$29,920 


REIMBURSEMENTS 


$23,097 


$15,925 


$8,083 



J78 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Office of Youth & Family 

The statistics from the Office of Youth and Family Services are based 
on a six month period for 1999 (January through June). During this six 
month period 51 famihes were served. The famihes that were served came 
from all areas of Goffstown. During this time period the coordinator saw 
13 single mothers with children, 5 single fathers with children, 20 intact 
families, 10 step-parent, natural parent and child families, 2 grandparents 
with children, and 1 legal guardian with children. Of the total number of 
families served, 7 resided in the Pinardville area, 17 came from the village 
area, 5 from the mountain area, and 22 from the east side of the river. 

The ages of the individuals served were quite diverse. The caseload 
consisted of 7 youths between the ages of 11-12, 16 between 13-14, 20 be- 
tween 15-16, 8 between 17-18. 

Referrals came from several community services. This year, 2 referrals 
came from lawyers, 3 from the police department, 2 from the Goffstown 
Area Diversion, 16 from the Juvenile Service Officer, 13 from the schools, 
7 from work opportunities, 7 came in on their own and 1 from the Welfare 
Director. These cases came to the Youth and Family Services for a variety 
of presenting issues such as violent behavior, drug or alcohol issues, family 
problems, mentoring/self-esteem issues, runaway situations and a history 
of thefts. 

The time of the coordinator was spent doing short term mentoring, 
crisis intervention, case management, acting as a referral service, youth/ 
teen programming, supervising and locating projects for court ordered com- 
munity service. Time was also spent attending various training work- 
shops and conferences, coordinating service delivery, developing new pro- 
grams and becoming involved with the schools. 

As far as programs are concerned, the coordinator was directly respon- 
sible for Open Gym which was attended by approximately 50 different 
youths, adventure programs with the Middle School alternative education 
classroom, and a group adventure-based after school program for referred 
middle school youths. 

In closing, I would like to thank the town for the support that was 
made available in 1999. I have since moved on to become the full-time 
Teen Director at the YMCA Allard Center. If I can be of any assistance, 
please feel free to call me at 497-4663. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Ben Clapp 
Youth and Family 
Services Coordinator 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



79 



PuBUC Library 




L-R: Kenneth Rose, Theresa Pare, Mark Choquette, Dianne Hathaway 
(Library Director), Carolyn Benthien (Chair), Russ Vanderhorst. Missing: 
William Exner, Barbara Griffin (Trustee & Sel. Rep.). 

I am pleased to submit my first report as Director of the Goffstown 
Public Library. The year 1999 brought many changes not only in personnel 
but also in our strengthened focus to provide quality library service to the 
Goffstown community. 1999 was a banner year as the Board of Trustees 
approved the vision, mission statement, and goals for the library that will 
be the first step on our long-range planning process. Also, in 1999 we 
surpassed a record 7,000 cardholders, well on the way to half the popula- 
tion of Goffstown. 

Staff Training: Staff members were sent to workshops and confer- 
ences during the year to strengthen their library skills and to learn new 
ones. Each staff member has also undergone additional training on Dynix, 
our automated circulation and card catalog system, as well as the Internet 
and other library related skills. Staff training is an integral part of the 
provision of quality customer service. 

Technology: In 1999 the Board of Trustees made a large investment 
in new computers to replace old "dumb terminals". The money for this 
upgrade came from library trust funds and an LSTA grant from the New 
Hampshire State Library. These new computers have given us the ability 
to offer Internet access to patrons and plan for a graphic Dynix interface 
and web based magazine indexing with full text access. 

Circulation: For most of 1999 patrons had requested a lengthening of 
our circulation time from two weeks to three weeks both in person and in 
writing. The trustees approved a change to a three week circulation for 
books, magazines and books-on-tape while magazines circulate for one week. 
The trustees also approved the removal of many limitations to the number 
of items that a patron could check out. 



80 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

GMILCS and the Common Borrower Card: Our membership in 
GMILCS (Greater Manchester Integrated Library Cooperative System) con- 
tinues to give us a dependable, efficient automated circulation and card 
catalog system. The Commen Borrower Card is a major advantage of our 
membership giving Goffstown card holders the ability to circulate materi- 
als at ten other area libraries. In fact, 4,785 items were checked out by our 
patrons at other GMILCS libraries in 1999. 

Programming: In 1999 the Goffstown Public Library offered program- 
ming for all age groups with mixed results. Our story time attendance for 
all ages was lower this year reflecting a statewide trend. Book discussions, 
middle school aged programming, and exciting programs like "Goffstown in 
Gingerbread" were popular while some special programming received little 
or no attendance. We will continue to offer a variety of creative program- 
ming while trying to gauge what the public is looking for from their public 
library. 

World Wide Web: Not only did we begin to offer Internet access to the 
public but our web page became functional in 1999. Produced by library 
staff, the public can access the web-based Dynix system (even renew books 
and place holds from home), see our monthly calendar of events, use our list 
of recommended Internet resources, contact us by email, and much more. 
Take a look at: www.goffstown.lib.nh.us 

Goffstown Bookends: Since early in 1999 the Goffstown News has 
graciously printed this weekly column to help keep the public informed of 
programming, new materials, changes and improvements, and other news 
we want to distribute to the community. The readership of this column has 
grown and we look forward to continuing this public service into the new 
millennium. 

I wish to thank the community for supporting the Goffstown Public 
Library in 1999 through your use of our facilities and materials, and atten- 
dance at our programs. Thanks are also extended to the Friends of the 
Goffstown Public Library as they strengthen and continue to advocate and 
support the public library, as well as those volunteers who give tirelessly of 
their time. I look forward to the year 2000 as we continue to provide im- 
proved and expanded services to the Goffstown community. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Dianne G Hathaway, Director 



GOFFSTOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
JANUARY 1, 1999 - DECEMBER 31, 1999 



REVENUE 




EXPENSES 




Grants 


175 


Programs 


244 


Gifts/Donations 


200 


Automation 


3,487 


Programs - Literacy 


30 


Books 


3,332 


Fines 


3,358 


Periodicals 


474 


Books 





Fundraising 


277 


Fundraising 


1,658 


Miscellaneous 


191 


Interest 


150 






Dividends 


5,432 






Miscellaneous 


849 






TOTAL REVENUE 


$11,852 


TOTAL EXPENSES 


$8,005 






NET PROFIT (LOSS) 


$3,847 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



81 



Historic District Commission 
Heritage Commission 




L-R Seated: Philip D'Avanza (Chair), Barbara Mace (Sec I Treasurer), Eleanor 
Porritt (Vice Chair), Roberta Perkins, Elizabeth Merrill (Alt.). Standing: Doug 
Gove. Missing: Robert Gagnon, Annie Vincent, Terri August (Alt), David White 
(Alt), 2 Vacant (Alt). 

Preservation and restoration will continue as a top prioroty of the Goffs- 
town Historic District Commission. Fund raising efforts are well under 
way to restore the second floor auditorium of the Grasmere Town Hall, 
thereby increasing its capacity for use and making this space code compli- 
ant. This undertaking has necessitated the efforts and initiatives of many 
concerned and interested individuals. 

The Goffstown Historic District Commissioners would like to acknowl- 
edge and thank those individuals, businesses and organizations who are 
assisting us in our fundraising efforts. We extend our sincere appreciation 
to Goffstown True Value Hardware, Howe's Pharmacy and the Goffstown 
Public Library and Town Clerk's Office. These businesses and public places 
all graciously have the sun catcher medallions for sale. 

We are proud to report that the town and the commission were awarded 
two matching grants from the New Hampshire Division of Historical Re- 
sources. These grants will be used to offset the costs of insulation, a sprin- 
kler system, an electrical system upgrade, ceiling restoration and an ADA 
compliant bathroom for the Grasmere Town Hall. 

In 1999 the Historic District Commission was the fortunate recipient of 
two gifts made in memory of Marcel Boisvert, and a transfer of stock from 
commission member Elizabeth P. Merrill. Through the efforts of commis- 
sion member Barbara Perkins, we also received a $2,000 grant from the 
Byrne Foundation. 



82 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Using diverse sources, including the countless efforts made by many 
individuals, our restoration project slowly moves forward. When the time 
comes, and it will, the Grasmere Town Hall will once again play host to 
activities that are capable of drawing crowds of several hundred people. 
There will be numerous people to thank and many well-deserved bows to be 
taken - not the least of them to be the taxpayers of Goffstown, the Board of 
Selectmen, the Historic District Commission and the people who will per- 
meate throughout the building. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Eleanor Porritt, Vice Chairman 



Cable FRANcmsE Renewal 

COMMTITEE 

This committee was appointed by the Board of Selectmen in 1998 to act 
as a work group in the investigation, negotiation and recommendation of 
renewal or non-renewal of a franchise to MediaOne for cable communica- 
tion services in Goffstown. This cable franchise renewal proceeding is gov- 
erned by federal law and provides the existing cable franchisee with the 
opportunity to seek renewal of its franchise prior to expiration of the exist- 
ing contract in December 2000. This process has been on-going since March 
1998. 

The committee conducted a number of public hearings in late 1998 in 
order to begin to assess the town's needs for cable communication services 
and determine its satisfaction with MediaOne as a service provider. In 
February 1999 MediaOne presented a proposed renewal contract which led 
to further negotiations and the development by the committee of a revised 
renewal contract proposal which, as of January 2000, is still under consid- 
eration by MediaOne. 

The committee and MediaOne have identified a number of issues, con- 
cerns, and opportunities that remain to be solved before the committee can 
recommend renewal or non-renewal of MediaOne's contract to the Board of 
Selectmen. With the purchase of MediaOne by AT&T and rapidly changing 
technology and business dynamics in the area of cable communication ser- 
vices, the committee is faced with a challenge in completing its work. 

For more information or to participate in the important work of the 
committee, please contact town hall or any committee member. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Anthony Marts, Chairman 



TOWN - DEPARTMENTS & COMMITTEES 



83 



Cable Television 
Community Access Commtttee 

Another year has come and gone and we can be proud of what we have 
seen happen at GTV16. Local programming and our base of volunteers 
have increased. Our committee has seen the addition of the following new 
faces: Craig Battey, Rosemary Garretson, Educational Advisor Richard 
Finkelson and newly appointed Governmental Advisor Janice O'Connell. 
We have also been fortunate to have members Jim Pingree (Chairman), 
Don Gagnon (Vice Chair), Doug Gove, Marie Boyle, and former member 
Sue Desruisseaux help steer the Cable Television Community Access Com- 
mittee. The committee worked hard this year to revise and update our 
policy and procedures so it reflects a better representation of the needs of 
today's community television. 

This May will mark the 2nd anniversary of "What's Happening in Goff- 
stown", a weekly news show hosted by Marie Boyle. Marie's dedication to 
this ongoing effort is truly deserving of recognition and praise. To gather, 
write and report the news every week for almost 100 weeks is above and 
beyond what is expected from our volunteers. We saw the continuation of 
the "Around Town" series that informed viewers of the different functions 




L-R Front Row: Marie Boyle, Doug Gove, Janice O'Connell (Government Advisor) 
L-R Back Row: Donald Gagnon (Vice Chair), James Fadden, Patrick Tucker, 
Rosemary Garretson (Alt.), James Pingree (Chair), Dick Gagnon (Station 
Coordinator). Missing: Craig Battey, Richard Finkelson (Educational Advisor). 



_84 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

of town departments. "Positive Spin", "Talking With...", "Grizzly Den" all 
returned for another season with plans to continue. "Thinking With Spirit" 
hosted by Erika Duffy, and "It's Your Health" hosted by Marie Boyle, de- 
buted this past year with plans for monthly shows this year. 

The most noticable change this past year was the development of "GBN" 
the Grizzly Broadcasting Network. Under the leadership of Rich Finkelson, 
a group of 15 students have been producing shows to air on GTV. They 
have done soccer, basketball, field hockey, and ice hockey games. They 
immersed themselves in the political scene and conducted interviews with 
Al Gore and George Bush. They were also heavily involved with the Presi- 
dential Youth Forum held at St. Anselm College. They worked very hard 
to write, film and edit a documentary about the need for the high school 
renovation project proposed by the administration. The fact that we now 
have students producing shows to air on GTV will prove beneficial in more 
ways than one. Most of all it will give people a chance to see what happens 
in our schools and the potential of our students. In addition, the caliper of 
work that the students are doing will push our adult patrons to improve 
their productions. A little friendly competition never hurts! The GTV16 
viewers will be the winners. 

With the addition of volunteer Craig Battey, we saw our bulletin board 
develop into something that is looking very professional and exciting to 
watch. Craig created the new logo design you now see on GTV. Our weekly 
schedule is being developed each week with the help of Rosemary Garretson 
who comes in every Thursday evening for 4 to 5 hours. After the schedule 
is completed, Andrea Card then puts it into an email format to send to 
those viewers whose email address we have. If you have email and you are 
not on our list, let us know via emailing. Robin Dixon also volunteered to 
put the schedule on the bulletin board. To these people I say thanks from 
all of our viewers. 

The studio operates Monday through Thursday, 7 to 10 PM. We are 
located in the rear of the high school. If you have an idea for a show or are 
interested in learning how you can help just stop in and talk. If you only 
want to see what goes on, pop in and we'll give you a tour. Maybe we can 
hook you into running a camera - no experience necessary! We will train 
and work with you to develop the skills you will need to produce or assist 
with programming. 

We can be reached by calling us at 497-5707, faxing us at 372-2152, 
emailing us at gtvl6@goffstown.kl2.nh.us , or by mailing us at GTV16, c/o 
GAHS, 27 Wallace Road, Goffstown, N.H. 03045. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Dick Gagnon 

Public Assess Coordinator 



TOWN- VITAL STATISTICS 



85 



1999 Vital Statistics 
marriages 



DATE 


NAMES 


RESIDENCE PLACE MARRIED 


Jan. 


9 


Robert A. Lecomte 


GrofFstown Manchester 






Lee K^ane 


Londonderry 




23 


Raymond A. Reynolds-Naughton 


GoflFstown Goffstown 






Linda J. Burns 


GrofiFstown 




23 


Mark S. Oliver 


Goffstown Dunbarton 






Jennifer Anne W. Van De Car 


Goffstown 




24 


John R. Mackenzie 


Goffstown Goffstown 






Karen L. Boyer 


Goffstown 


Feb. 


14 


Jeffrey A. Duval 


Goffstown Dixville 






Nicole B. Seavey 


Goffstown 




20 


Edward J. Engebretson 


Goffstown Manchester 






Kathleen M. Murray-Rivard 


Goffstown 


Mar. 


05 


David W. Martin 


Groffstown Dunbarton 






Christina Piccione 


Goffstown 




17 


Joseph M. Mullaney 


Goffstown Bedford 






Karen M. Drew 


Goffstown 




20 


James J. Gianitsis 


Goffstown Manchester 






Heidi L. Gallagher 


Goffstown 




20 


Timothy R. Perozzi 


Goffstown Manchester 






Kimberly D. Cote 


Goffstown 




30 


IvanE.Beliveau 


Goffstown Manchester 






Joann L. Eames 


Groffstown 


Apr. 


17 


Alexander S. Rohe 


Goffstown Manchester 






Amy L. Guy 


Goffstown 




24 


Quentin Rutherford-Smith 


Goffstown Hollis 






Tracy A. Desmarais 


Rochester 




24 


Alan P. Poitras 


Goffstown Manchester 






Tammy L. Collins 


Groffstown 




24 


David M. Pothier 


Goffstown Manchester 






Misty L. Beauchamp 


Goffstown 




25 


Merton Rumrill 


Manchester Manchester 






Joanne M. Leeds 


Goffstown 




30 


John A. Burton 


Groffstown Goffstown 






Lynn Hamill 


Goffstown 


May 


01 


Karl J. Schwab 


Goffstown Goffstown 






GailA.Bartlett 


Goffstown 




01 


Chad W. Cox 


GoflTstown Manchester 






Angela M. Lafreniere 


Goffstown 




01 


Randall G. Riley 


Goffstown Bedford 






Pamela J. Baker 


Goffstown 




01 


Daniel R.Chabot 


Groffstown Kingston 






Sheri A. Brooks 


Goffstown 



86 




1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAMES 


RESIDENCE PLACE MARRIED 


May 08 


Wade Bergeron 


Goflfstown Manchester 




Heather S. Ackerman 


Goflfstown 


08 


Robert E. L'Heureux 


Gofifstown Gofifstown 




Helen L. Martineau 


Gofifstown 


09 


Paul D. Lewis 


Manchester Auburn 




Paula J. Dugan 


Gofifstown 


15 


Scott W. Berry 


Goflfstown Manchester 




Pauline C. Coulombe 


Goflfstown 


15 


Stephen M. Dicostanzo 


Goflfstown Manchester 




Joy K. VanVranken 


Gofifstown 


22 


Laurence S. Gilligan 


Gofifstown Manchester 




Tina L. Leach 


Gofifstown 


22 


Christopher R. Allard 


Gofifstown Bedford 




Jennifer L. Shephard 


Manchester 


29 


Shawn A. Jalbert 


Alfred, ME Manchester 




Patricia J. Chaput 


Gofifstown 


29 


Louis A. Lapointe 


Groflfstown Manchester 




Tina M. Pomerleau 


Groflfstown 


29 


Joseph C. McCarthy 


Goflfstown Gofifstown 




Dian J. Mellor 


Gofifstown 


Jun. 01 


Michael C. Jones 


MEinchester Goffstown 




Katrina M. Kos 


Gofifstown 


05 


Michel M. Gorman 


Goffstown Manchester 




JeanE. Landry 


Gofifstown 


05 


Brian S. Burnham 


Groflfstown Nashua 




Cjmthia L. Vanderhoof 


Gofifstown 


07 


Michael S. Dubois 


Groffstown Manchester 




Corrinne L. Lizotte 


Goffstown 


12 


Shawn D. Muzeroll 


Goflfstown Epsom 




Becky L. Blackey 


Goflfstown 


12 


Michael P. Paris 


Groflfstown Goflfstown 




Jennifer R. Jefferson 


Groflfstown 


13 


Fernand R. Prenoveau 


Gofifstown Goffstown 




Marie E. Duperon 


Goflfstown 


19 


Lawrence T. Loomis 


Goflfstown Gofifstown 




Jolyn M. Barnes 


Gofifstown 


19 


Ernest R. Gagnon 


Manchester Rindge 




Christine M. LaPierre 


Goflfstown 


25 


Parker J. Crossley 


Goffstown Meredith 




Valeria A. Huot 


Goflfstown 


25 


George W. Cookinham 


Groffstown Gofifstown 




Cynthia M. Perkins 


Gofifstown 


26 


DavidA.Yutzler 


Concord Concord 




Margaret L. Bresnahan 


Goflfstown 



TOWN- 


VITAL STATISTICS 


87 


DATE 


NAMES 


RESIDENCE PLACE MARRIED 


Jun. 26 


Jason T. Georgantas 


Goffstown Manchester 




Gail A. Jenkins 


Goffstown 


26 


Michael J. Champagne 


GoflFstown Goffstown 




Naomi J. Kelley 


Goffstown 


26 


Michael D. Poisson 


GoflFstown Manchester 




Beth M. Lettre 


Goflfstown 


26 


Jason Dubois 


Salem Salem 




Justine K. Hoyle 


GoflFstown 


26 


Steven M. Coumoyer 


Goffstown Epsom 




Nancy A. Sirois 


Goffstown 


Jul. 10 


Daniel M. Richardson 


Hooksett Auburn 




Diane L. Buckley 


GoflFstown 


10 


Andreas C. Pfahnl 


GoflFstown Groffstown 




Brenda J. Latvala 


GoflFstown 


10 


Richard D. Knee 


GoflFstown New Boston 




Sandra L. Bentley 


Goffstown 


17 


Eric W. Frost 


GoflFstown Henniker 




Susan E. Tingley 


GoflFstown 


23 


Peter S. Bergeron 


Raymond Manchester 




Caroline R. Beaulieu 


GoflFstown 


30 


Michael R. Venus 


GoflFstown Merrimack 




Lauralin L. Peterson 


GoflFstown 


31 


John L. Dillon 


GoflFstown Manchester 




Jean E. Plotas 


Brighton,MA. 


31 


Richard L. Sperry 


GoflFstown Windham 




Dana R. Waterman 


GoflFstown 


Aug. 02 


Roy K. Reed 


GoflFstown Concord 




Lynda J. McLaughlin 


GoflFstown 


07 


Timothy M. Vance 


Goffstown Gilford 




Kelley A. Martin 


GoflFstown 


07 


Gerald J. Beaulieu 


Goffstown Hudson 




Christina L. Lally 


Bennington 


08 


Joseph E. Scannell 


Goffstown Groffstown 




Ellen E.Tracy 


Weare 


14 


Jay S. Hislop 


Goffstown Goffstown 




Cheryl A. Boucher 


Goffstown 


20 


David J. lovanna 


Goffstown Bedford 




Amanda R. Janus 


Goffstown 


21 


Robert J. Fiore 


Goffstown Manchester 




JillM.Hebert 


Groffstown 


28 


Jonathan T. Clegg 


Goffstown Brookline 




Erin M. Foley 


Goffstown 


28 


James M. Byers 


Goffstown Groffstown 




Antoinette T. Carver 


Goffstown 


28 


W. A. Swasey 


Goffstown Manchester 




Brenda J. Desmond 


Goffstown 



88 




1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAMES 


RESIDENCE PLACE MARRIED 


Sep. 03 


Howard R. Witherspoon 


Gofifstown Manchester 




Ruth E. Schunemann 


Gofifstown 


04 


Andrew T. Locke 


Goffstown Gofifstown 




Jessica N. Butt 


Gofifstown 


11 


Christopher R. Biron 


Gofifstown Bedford 




Linda M. Bonyman 


Goffstown 


11 


Mark H. Tobin 


Goffstown Hudson 




Brenda L. Braw 


Goffstown 


18 


Gregory D. Welch 


Goffstown Auburn 




Lorraine D. Tremblay 


Manchester 


25 


Gilbert M. Robinson 


Groffstown Manchester 




Corinne M. Bilodeau 


Goffstown 


25 


Kristopher F. Kuchinski 


Goffstown Manchester 




Judith A. Robinson 


Goffstown 


25 


Philip A. Estabrook 


Goffstown Manchester 




Leeca M. Brown 


Goffstown 


Oct. 01 


Roland White 


Goffstown Manchester 




Anneliese M. Crosby 


Manchester 


02 


Paul F. Salerno 


Goffstown Amherst 




Susan M. Monnelly 


Goffstown 


02 


Wayne T. Lambert 


Goffstown Henniker 




Louise Y. Massey 


Goffstown 


10 


Richard E. Fletcher 


Goffstown Goffstown 




Dianne Dubois-Yamall 


Goffstown 


10 


Steven C. Umstead 


Goffstown Henniker 




Adrienne M. Salyards 


Goffstown 


16 


Luther G. Cooper 


Goffstown Goffstown 




Shirley A. Letendre 


Goffstown 


16 


Michael S. Powell 


Goffstown Manchester 




Michelle M. Foss 


Goffstown 


16 


Timothy J. Talbot 


Bow Nashua 




Karen E. Marcek 


Goffstown 


27 


Mark A. LaFreniere 


Goffstown Manchester 




Melissa D. Winer 


Goffstown 


28 


Nigel T. Payne 


Goffstown Manchester 




Kendall Singleton 


Goffstown 


30 


Dennis M. Mounce 


Goffstown Manchester 




Brittanie M. Dupont 


Goffstown 


Nov. 06 


Andre R. Biron 


Manchester Manchester 




Lisa A. Coolidge 


Goffstown 


13 


Chad M. Burpee 


Hooksett Bedford 




Deborah A. Lemay 


Goffstown 


14 


Michael L. Herman 


Manchester Manchester 




Carolynn M. McGrath 


Goffstown 



TOWN- 


VITAL STATISTICS 




89 


DATE 


NAMES 


RESIDENCE 


PLACE MARRIED 


Dec. 


11 


Timothy C. King 
Monica J. Griggs 


GoflFstown 
GoflFstown 


GoflFstown 




22 


William A. Gordon 
Donna M. L'Ecuyer 


GofiFstown 
GoflFstowri 


GoflFstown 

L 




26 


Lawrence F. Hubbard 
Donna J. Nault 


GrofFstown 
GoflFstown 


Manchester 


TOTALS: 92 










BIRTHS 1999 




DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PIACE 


Jan. 


1 


Emilie Kate Veilleux 

Joseph and EHzabeth Veilleux 




Manchester 




08 


Hannah Kathleen Scanlan 
Donald and Kathleen Scanlan 




Manchester 




19 


Tyler Gaetan Riendeau 
Marc and Josee Riendeau 




Manchester 




21 


OHvia Renee Gagne 
Paul and Robin Gagne 




Manchester 




24 


Miranda Faye Dandurand 

Daniel and Coreen Dandurand 




Manchester 




25 


Jaron Cameron Gagnon 

Roderick and Darlene Gagnon 




Manchester 




25 


Taylor Zuri Gagnon 

Roderick and Darlene Gagnon 




Manchester 




26 


Haley Ann Decotis 

Gregory and Susan Decotis 




Manchester 


Feb. 


03 


Rome Joseph Poto 

Mario and Christy Poto 




Manchester 




04 


Jennifer Anne Quigley 

Donald and Dianne Quigley 




Manchester 




10 


Jenna Catherine Ryan 
Philip and Anna Ryan 




Manchester 




13 


Rebekah Marion Chabot 
David and Carla Chabot 




Manchester 




13 


Madeline Cheryl Kew 
Ronald and Paula Kew 




Manchester 




14 


Samantha Lynne Cragan 

Donald and Marybeth Cragan 




Manchester 




16 


Bailey Rose Lord 

Raymond and Helen Lord 




Manchester 




19 


Samuel James Wise 

Bradford and Kristen Wise 




Manchester 




20 


Jacob Michael Schaffner 
Ivan and Elaine Schaffner 




Manchester 




20 


Jackson Alexander Webster 
Scott and Camille Webster 




Manchester 



90 


1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PLACE 


Feb. 28 


Kylah Rose Chase 

David and Amy Chase 


Manchester 


Mar. 04 


Justin Sousa Chaves 
Luis and Maria Chaves 


Nashua 


05 


Alisha Devon Anderson 

Michael and Kristina Anderson 


Concord 


24 


Maeve Ann Grant 

Douglas and Debra Grant 


Manchester 


31 


Kayley Margaret Noterman 
Kevin and Karyn Noterman 


Manchester 


Apr. 01 


Glenn Lee Rogers 

Frank Rogers and Jennifer Freemantle 


Manchester 


05 


Asia Marie Hazeltine 

Rick and Tanya Hazeltine 


Manchester 


07 


Joshua Ryan Bouvier 

Matthew and Michelle Bouvier 


Methuen, MA 


09 


Aubrey Renee Lavigne 

Denis and Lianne Lavigne 


Manchester 


10 


Anna Louise Duval 
Mark and Nina Duval 


Manchester 


14 


Elizabeth EUeen Cronin 
Mark and Meoghan Cronin 


Manchester 


17 


Camden Daniel Gagnon 
Daniel and Tina Gagnon 


Manchester 


18 


Hannah Elizabeth Gagnon 
Robert and Heidi Gagnon 


Manchester 


19 


Joshua Torey Gaspie 

Torey and Chantal Gaspie 


Manchester 


21 


Nickolas Michael Nault 

Thomas and Christy-Lee Nault 


Manchester 


25 


Maggie Elizabeth Perrin 
Gary and Laura Perrin 


Manchester 


27 


Mason Michael Foley 
Carl and Jennifer Foley 


Manchester 


30 


Ryan Olin Wilmot 

Daniel and Donna Wilmot 


Concord 


30 


Corey Katherine Siegfried 

Christopher and Sylvie Siegfried 


Manchester 


May 02 


Griffin Michael St Onge 

Michael and Candace St Onge 


Derry 


04 


Madeline Rose Carlson 

Andrew and Kathy Carlson 


Manchester 


04 


Emily Elizabeth Clickner 
Bryan and Melissa Clinkner 


Manchester 



TOWN- 


VITAL STATISTICS 


91 


DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PLACE 


May 08 


Colby Richard Jennings 

Malcolm and Shannon Jennings 


Manchester 


11 


Colin William Beck 

Craig and Michelle Craig 


Manchester 


12 


Sarah Allie Tracy 

Gregory and Kathryn 


Manchester 


14 


Rachel Marie Foss 
John and Sara Foss 


Manchester 


14 


Cameron Nicholas Nault 
Paul and Sharon Nault 


Manchester 


21 


Molly Christine Garrett 
Patrick and Lori Garrett 


Manchester 


23 


Jared David Simard 

David and Amy Simard 


Manchester 


25 


Phoebe Jeanne Socha 
Timothy and Kim Socha 


Concord 


27 


Carabeth Norklun 

Mark and Margaret Norklun 


Manchester 


29 


Lydia Jude Martin 

Richard and Julia Martin 


Manchester 


29 


Ian Robert Losee 

John Losee and Lucy Noepel-Losee 


Memchester 


30 


Lauren Ruth Anderson 
Blake and Carol Anderson 


Manchester 


Jun. 02 


Ryan Michael Hayes 
Robert and Jodi Hayes 


Manchester 


04 


Veronica Claire North 

Thomas and Colleen North 


Manchester 


04 


Alyssa Erin Bourque 

Daniel and Nancy Bourque 


Manchester 


05 


Mia Callahan Morin 
Scott and Terry Morin 


Manchester 


08 


Brian Keith Mclnnis 
Biran and Ann Mclnnis 


Manchester 


10 


Courtney Ljoin Wjniands 
Kenneth and Tara Wynands 


Manchester 


10 


Cassandra May Stockton 
John and Laura Stockton 


Manchester 


13 


Sarah Nicole King 

Daniel and Sheri King 


Manchester 


15 


Abigail Elise Bono 

James and Melanie Bono 


Manchester 


17 


Hannah Elizabeth Reisman 
Mark and Carlene Reisman 


Manchester 



92 


7999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PLACE 


Jun. 18 


Abigail Marie Moreton 

Richard and Joan Moreton 


Manchester 


20 


Cody Kenneth Morel 

Kenneth and Jodi Morel 


Manchester 


21 


Ashley Sara Wike 

David and Jacqueline Wike 


Manchester 


30 


Amber Jade Davis 

Anthony and Jill Davis 


Manchester 


Jul. 03 


Kali Emma Randlett 

Mark and Tricia Randlett 


Manchester 


06 


Ashly Marie LaChance 

Michael LaChance and Roberta Lemieux 


Manchester 


07 


Timothy Michael Essig 
Donald and Lisa Essig 


Nashua 


13 


Maddison Rose Behveau 

Michael and Michelle Beliveau 


Manchester 


14 


Ethan Richard Skinner 

Sean and Katherine Skinner 


Manchester 


15 


Jacob Lee Martin 

Daniel and Loren Martin 


Manchester 


15 


Nicholas Joseph Lawrence 
Jay and Barbara Lawrence 


Manchester 


17 


Joseph Patrick Coskren 
John and Dawn Coskren 


Manchester 


23 


Thomas Michael Fran Pellerin 

Francois Pellerin and Holly Simard 


Manchester 


24 


Meaghan Elizabeth Allard 
Keith and Mikaela Allard 


Manchester 


25 


Sasha Rose Neefe 

James and Holly Neefe 


Manchester 


26 


Evan Alexander Beauclair 

Derrick Beauclair and Sara Wesley 


Manchester 


27 


Kailee Sumer Paquette 

Bruce Madore and Lorie Paquette 


Manchester 


27 


Casey Rene Cupples 

Scott and Lynne Cupples 


Manchester 


31 


Alexia Rae Devinney 
Erik and Ann Devinney 


Manchester 


Aug. 02 


Matthew Robert Judge 
Brian and Lisa Judge 


Manchester 


05 


Cameron Max-Arthu Bergeron 
Wade and Heather Bergeron 


Manchester 


08 


Jenna Elizabeth McNeil 
John and Doreen McNeil 


Derry 



TOWN- 


VITAL STATISTICS 


93 


DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PLACE 


Aug. 17 


Ryan Nash Currier 

Marc Currier and Roberta 


Manchester 


19 


Casey Jennifer Dalton 

Robert and Laurie Dalton 


Manchester 


20 


Patrick Anthony Crotty 

Sean Crotty and AnnMarie Calascibetta 


Manchester 


21 


Peyton Michaela Colegrove 
Mark and Ellen Colegrove 


Manchester 


21 


Austin Martin Turner 
John and Michele Turner 


Manchester 


23 


Brian Joseph Thibeault 

Brian and Iwona Thibeault 


Manchester 


25 


Hunter Daniel McLaughlin 

Kenneth and Linda McLaughlin 


Manchester 


26 


Abigail Marie Flegal 

Gregg and Kathleen Flegal 


Manchester 


Sep. 01 


Joseph Emmett Jackson 

Kevin and Maureen Jackson 


Manchester 


09 


John Mitchell Scacchi 
John and Lisa Scacchi 


Manchester 


16 


Jack Robert Compos 

Mark and Heidi Compos 


Manchester 


16 


Erin Ljmn McAndrew 

Thomas and Karen McAndrew 


Nashua 


16 


Kaylee Anne Chouinard 

Gregg and Anne Chouinard 


Manchester 


19 


Morgan Rae Chase 

Gary and Mollie Chase 


Manchester 


20 


Anthony Philip Pilotte 
Steven and Elena Pilotte 


Manchester 


22 


Hannah Reagan Godbout Lindh 
Steven and Aimee Lindh 


Manchester 


25 


Isaac Nathaniel Dubois 

Christopher and Lolita Dubois 


Manchester 


26 


Michael Robert Fortin 
Robert and Kim Fortin 


Manchester 


Oct. 04 


Abigail Jennifer Noonan 
James and Nicole Noonan 


Manchester 


06 


Michael Alan Stan- 
Michael and Amy Stan- 


Manchester 


07 


Emma Victoria Dee 
Kevin and Amy Dee 


Manchester 


12 


Madison Amy Morrissette 
Keith and Karen Morrissette 


Manchester 


14 


Sophia Thanner Guena 

David and Megan Ann Guena 


Manchester 



94 


1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAMES OF NEWBORN/NAME OF PARENTS 


PLACE 


Oct. 14 


Kate Olivia Duval 

Gregory and Kimberly Duval 


Manchester 


20 


Rose Lena Gelberman Gibney 
Timothy and Kathrine Gibney 


Goffstown 


21 


Liam Patrick McNamara 

Michael and Carolyn McNamara 


Manchester 


22 


Christopher George Francis 
Steven and Kathleen Francis 


Deny 


23 


Carter Robert Chouinard 

Jonathan and Amy Chouinard 


Manchester 


29 


Ryan Michael Doucet 
David and Kelly Doucet 


Manchester 


Nov. 03 


Adam Christopher Moses 
Adam and Dina Moses 


Manchester 


04 


Zachary Joseph Vignola 
Joseph and Allyson Vignola 


Concord 


04 


Cameron Jerome Brodeur 

Jeffrey and Lori-Jean Brodeur 


Manchester 


08 


Kyle Andrew Bill 
Jason and Lori Bill 


Manchester 


09 


Sean Ryan Smith 

John and Lisa Smith 


Manchester 


14 


Harrison Ray Blondeau 

Raymond and Michele Blondeau 


Manchester 


14 


Devin Pierre Pouliot 

Pierre and Colleen Pouliot 


Manchester 


16 


Christopher Arthur Romero 
Francisco and Andrea Romero 


Manchester 


19 


Joshua Ly Dang 
Ly and Ellen Dang 


Manchester 


22 


Ian Michael Winrow 

Michael and Lissa Winrow 


Manchester 


30 


Raegan Elizabeth Jacob 
Kaleb and Amy Jacob 


Manchester 


Dec. 01 


Jack Christopher Culberson 
Tracy and Amy Culberson 


Concord 


08 


Allison Claire Buckless 

James and Jennifer Buckless 


Manchester 


08 


Kacey Rose Paquette 

Ronnie and Kelly Paquette 


Manchester 


14 


William Thomas Peterson 
Paul and Linnae Peterson 


Manchester 


26 


Noah Michael Charron 
Leo and Karen Charron 


Manchester 


TOTALS 


:129 





TOWN- 


VITAL STATISTICS 




95 




DEATHS 1999 




DATE 


NAME 


PLACE OF DEATH 




Jan. 07 


Violet A. Carrier 


Goffstown 




08 


Irene C. Chamberlain 


Laconia 




10 


Bella E. Bourgoine 


Goffstown 




15 


Kenneth P. St. Laurent 


Groffstown 




17 


Bernice M. Holz 


Manchester 




26 


Cjmthia J. Whalon 


GoflFstown 




31 


Richard E. Harrington 


Manchester 




Feb. 17 


Sophie M. Laughlin 


Hillsboro 




18 


Marie C. St. Onge 


Goffstown 




19 


Aime H. Desmarais 


Hernando, FL 




22 


PhylhsA.Nolan 


Manchester 




Mar. 01 


Harry N. Cusson 


Goffstown 




07 


Dorothy P. Parker 


Manchester 




09 


LenaValade 


Goffstown 




09 


Marc R. L'Esperance 


Goffstown 




13 


Eugene A. Gibeault 


Goffstown 




17 


Elsie A. Gagnon 


Manchester 




17 


Marlene Bibeau 


Goffstown 




17 


Susan J. Leslie 


Goffstown 




26 


Francis P. Hynes 


Goffstown 




29 


Laura P. Pierson 


Goffstown 




Apr. 03 


Pauline R. Drolet 


Manchester 




05 


Vincent Dellechiaie 


Goffstown 




07 


Virginia M. Fuller 


Goffstown 




09 


Arthur J. Lagasse 


Msinchester 




12 


Katherine M. Roy 


Manchester 




13 


Robert E. Craigen 


Manchester 




23 


Olympia Kokkinos 


Groffstown 




26 


Louise E. Cate 


Goffstown 




27 


Hazel W.Blixt 


Manchester 




May 04 


Vieno I. Kolehmainen 


Manchester 




05 


Anita M. St. Germain 


Manchester 




05 


Rose LaPete 


Goffstown 




06 


Beatrice D. Plante 


Goffstown 




09 


Gloria P. Heafield 


Goffstown 




11 


Grace L. Zurbruegg 


Manchester 




13 


Gerard A. Spenard 


Goffstown 




13 


Harold J. Becker 


Manchester 




19 


Marcelle G. LeMieux 


Goffstown 




25 


Theresa Stencavage 


Manchester 




29 


Arthur M. Mitchell 


Manchester 




Jun. 01 


Victoria Malinski 


Goffstown 




05 


Travis Wright 


Manchester 





96 




1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


DATE 


NAME 


PLACE OF DEATH 


Jun. 06 


Olivette I. Levesque 


Manchester 


11 


Paula E. Provencher 


GoflFstown 


14 


Louis G. Valliere 


Manchester 


15 


Walter Kritzon 


Roseville, CA. 


17 


Lillian Dube 


Goflfstown 


Jul. 04 


Sophie Borovick 


GofiFstown 


06 


Michael A. Zarnowski 


Manchester 


13 


Laura M. Sheldon 


GoflFstown 


14 


Phillip J. Poulicakos 


GoflFstown 


19 


Erma St. Vrain 


GoflFstown 


19 


Leopold A. Sarette 


GoflFstown 


21 


Maurice J. Valley 


Manchester 


26 


Genevieve E. Tilton 


Manchester 


Aug. 07 


George S. Grant 


Manchester 


08 


Mildred L. Wedge 


GoflFstown 


12 


Josie B. Beebe 


GoflFstown 


Sep. 01 


Angelina D. Berlinguette 


Manchester 


08 


William J. Chaplic 


Manchester 


11 


Earle Libby 


GoflFstown 


15 


Eugenie Dion 


GoflFstown 


20 


Evelyn P. Foote 


GoflFstown 


21 


Helen L.Wilke 


Manchester 


21 


Walter R. Dionne 


Manchester 


22 


Germaine R. Richards 


Manchester 


26 


Michael A. Ferrara 


GoflFstown 


29 


Norman C. Batchelder 


Concord 


Oct. 01 


Frederick L. Stamatelos 


GoflFstown 


03 


Arline K. O'Connor 


GoflFstown 


04 


Dana F. Kelley 


Manchester 


07 


VasilToh 


GoflFstown 


08 


Martha M. Dodge 


GoflFstown 


08 


Ernest A. Beliveau 


GoflFstown 


08 


MarcE.Breen 


GrofFstown 


17 


Ruth A. Sopala 


GoflFstown 


21 


Avis R. Duckworth 


Bedford 


22 


Alice N. Martin 


GofiFstown 


24 


Margaret J. Colclough 


GofiFstown 


26 


Raymond G. Andersen 


GofiFstown 


31 


Wilham E. Worthen 


Bedford 


Nov. 01 


George A. Wunderlee 


Franklin 


05 


Edmond Marceau 


GofiFstown 


10 


Walter S. Williams 


Concord 


13 


Gertrude E. Dionne 


GofiFstown 


15 


Theresa Cote 


Manchester 


20 


Diane L. Gariepy 


Manchester 



TOWN- VITAL STATISTICS 



97 



DATE NAME 




PLACE OF DEATH 


Nov. 21 Beatrice Yergeau 


Goffstown 


27 Louise Belanger 


GroflFstown 


27 Marcel J. Boisvert 


Manchester 


Dec. 02 Harry S. 


Pickard 


Concord 


09 Curtis W. Schricker 


Goffstown 


11 Roland D 


. Vigneault 


Gofifstown 


16 Elaine M. Chandler 


Goffstown 


18 Auriol L. 


Sharp 


Manchester 


24 VilmaKlar 


Goffstown 


27 Julia E.Alger 


Bedford 


30 Barbara M, Guimont 


Groffstown 


TOTALS: 99 










INTERMENTS 








Date of 


Burial 


Name 


Age 


Death 


Date 




Shirley Hill Cemetery 




Richard Beauchemin 


54 


11/02/98 


06/14/99 


Marguerite Crean (Relocation from Massachussetts) 


07/18/99 


Roland St. Onge 


62 


10/14/99 


10/18/99 


Marion Dancause 


84 


10/16/99 


10/19/99 




Hillside 


Cemetery 




Greorge Callahan 


90 


03/27/99 


03/29/99 


Laurie Pierson 


54 


03/29/99 


04/02/99 


Eleanor Keith 


83 


06/29/99 


07/22/99 


Norma Ogle Oxley 


68 


12/20/99 


12/23/99 




Westlawn Cemetery 




Carroll Smith 


89 


01/09/99 


01/15/99 


Despou Kokulis 


99 


04/15/99 


04/23/99 


Gloria Heafield 


68 


05/09/99 


05/14/99 


Anthony Poltrack 


81 


05/09/99 


05/14/99 


Harold Becker 


85 


05/13/99 


05/17/99 


Robert Brooks 


N/A 


05/30/99 


06/03/99 


Mary Morse 


84 


08/08/99 


08/12/99 


George Bimton 


71 


12/24/98 


09/21/99 


Richard Williams 


87 


02/05/99 


09/25/99 


JoAnn Morrill 


52 


09/17/99 


09/20/99 


Marion Piacentini 


60 


10/03/99 


10/07/99 


Martha Dodge 


87 


10/08/99 


10/18/99 


Avis Duckworth 


73 


10/21/99 


10/25/99 


Marcel J. Boisvert 


76 


11/27/99 


12/03/99 


H. Stuart Pickard 


70 


12/02/99 


12/06/99 


C. Willard Schricker 


87 


12/09/99 


12/11/99 


TOTALS: 23 









J8 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

GoFFSTOWN Sewer Commission 

Throughout the year the Sewer Commission awarded several mainte- 
nance contracts. Eastern Pipe Services, Inc., Merrimack, NH, was awarded 
two separate contracts. One was for the rehning of the wastewater Hne on 
East Union Street and the other was for the rehning of wastewater hnes 
throughout the Village area. 

A Capacity Evaluation Task was awarded to Underwood Engineering, 
Inc., Portsmouth, NH. This task evaluated the wastewater lines within 
the Village area for possible overcapacity. The commission will use this 
report as a guideline when any future development(s) is proposed within 
those areas of concern. 

The Maple Avenue / Cottage Street/ Mill Street / Elm Street project 
was awarded to Superior Excavating, Inc. To keep the impact of this project 
at a minimum the project was delayed a year. Construction began the day 
after school ended for summer vacation and was completed before the be- 
ginning of the next school year. This project upgraded the line between 
Maple Avenue and Elm Street with a new line installed on Cottage Street. 

The extension of municipal wastwater service into the Moose Club Park 
area was completed in September 1999. This project consisted of approxi- 
mately 3,750 linear feet of pipe, and a pumping station. During the con- 
struction period the Piscataquog River was kept lowered to assist the con- 
tractor. Construction began late December 1998 and if not for materials 
being on backorder the project would have been completed on time. The 
project was not completed nor accepted by the commission until Septem- 
ber. Shortly thereafter the residents began connecting and all connetions 
within that area must be completed by August 2001 unless the commission 
approves a waiver. 

Construction for the year 2000 will be minimal. Other than regular 
maintenance of the wastewater lines the commission has not scheduled 
any major project. The following year the commission will be looking to 
extend the wastewater line again into another critical area of the town. 
This project, like all other past major projects, will be subject to a bond 
issue being approved by the voters of the town. The user, state grant 
money, if available, and an accessibility fee will pay for all sewer bonds 
that are approved. 

The Sewer Commission was created in 1956 and is comprised of a three 
member elected board. Ttheir function is to administer and maintain the 
municipal wastewater system. Public meetings are held the second Wednes- 
day of each month at 6:30 PM at the town hall. Individuals requesting to 
be on the agenda should contact the Sewer Commissioners' Office at 603- 
497-8992 to schedule an appointment. 

Sincerely, 

Stephen R. Crean, Chairman 

James Bouchard 

Paul LaPerle 



SEWER & WATER 



99 



GOFFSTOWN SEWER COMMISSION 
DETAILED BUDGET (unaudited) 



ADMINISTRATION 1999 

BUDGET 

SALARIES/BENEFITS $ 47,150 

CONTRACTED SVCS 6,500 

INTEREST 254,501 

SUPPLIES 2,936 

TELEPHONE 800 

POSTAGE 3,500 

LEGAL EXPENSE 10,000 

OFFICE EQUIP REPAIR 4,000 

BAD DEBT EXPENSE 2,000 

DEPRECIATION 240,000 

AUDIT 2,200 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT 3,000 

TRAINING 1,000 

INSURANCE 2,500 

CLAIM 5,000 

GIS (NEEDS STUDY) 

SUBTOTAL $585,087 
EQUIPMENT 

EQUIPMENT 2,000 

MAINTENANCE & LABOR 5,000 

SUBTOTAL $7,000 
OPERATING EXPENSES 

CONTRACTED SVCS 40,000 

SUBTOTAL $40,000 
SEWERAGE/PUMP STATION 

SUPPLIES 10,000 

TELEPHONE 2,500 

ELECTRICITY 20,000 

FUEL FOR GENERATOR 4,000 

REPAIRS 10,000 

WATER 500 

CHEMICALS 1,000 

CONTRACTED SVCS 6,000 

SUBTOTAL $54,000 
SEWER COMMISSION 

PAYMENT TO MANCHESTER 426,640 
SEWER REPAIRS/MAINTENANCE 205,000 

NEW SEWER CONSTRUCTION 264,931 

ODOR CONTROL 66,186 85,364 

SUBTOTAL $962,757 

TOTAL $1,648,844 $1,519,787 



1999 


2000 


ACTUAL 


BUDGET 


$47,662 


$49,775 


4,791 


8,530 


254,262 


226,838 


864 


3,136 


800 


800 


3,157 


3,500 


1,138 


10,000 


2,737 


5,692 


2,152 


2,000 


240,000 


242,000 


2,200 


2,300 





10,000 


120 


1,000 


1,319 


1,318 





5,000 




5,000 


$561,202 


$576,889 





2,000 


4,224 


55,000 


$4,224 


$57,000 


26,856 


35,000 


$26,856 


$35,000 


4,260 


10,000 


1,421 


2,800 


14,637 


20,000 


1,175 


4,000 


4,258 


10,000 


359 


500 


156 


500 


4,241 


4,500 


$30,507 


$52,300 


302,667 


424,338 


324,422 


205,000 


184,545 


20,000 



$649,388 


$896,998 



$1,370527 



100 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

GoFFSTOWN Village Precinct 

Two major water main projects involved two thousand feet of twelve 
inch pipe on South Mast Street starting at the Exxon Station and four 
hundred feet of eight inch pipe on Cottage Street. The Cottage Street work 
was done in cooperation with town work on the road. Two hydrants were 
replaced this year, other potential projects were studied and scheduled 
line flushing was done. 

Average monthly water usage varies from eight to twelve million gal- 
lons. June 1999 involved nineteen million gallons. The various facilities 
including the wells, the High Street tank and the filtration plant performed 
well. 

Four service pipe and three water main leaks were corrected and twelve 
new services were connected along with three that were upgraded. 

The first yearly edition of our consumer confidence report was issued 
and will be updated by July 2000. We invite input from our subscribers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Allen D. Gamans, Jr., Chairman 

WARRANT 

To the inhabitants of the Goffstown Village Precinct qualified to vote 
on precinct affairs. 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Goffstown Town Hall in said 
Goffstown, in said Precinct, on Monday, March 20, 2000, at 7:00 PM in the 
evening to act upon the following articles: 

Article I 

To choose all necessary officers for the ensuing year, including a Modera- 
tor and Clerk. 

Article II 

To elect one (1) member to the Board of Water Commissioners for a term of 
five (5) years. 

Article III 

To see if the Precinct will vote to accept the report of the Board of Water 
Commissioners to appropriate the sum of Five Hundred and Fifty-Eight 
Thousand, Eight Hundred Ninety-Three Dollars for the ensuing year. 

Article IV 

To see if the Precinct will vote to allow the Board of Water Commissioners 
the right to borrow in excess of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) due to 
any emergency that may arise. 

Article V 

To hear the reports of the various officers of the Precinct and to pass any 
vote relative thereto. 



SEWER & WATER 



101 



mg. 



Article VI 

To transact any other business that may lawfully come before the meet- 
Given under our hand and seal this 11th day of January 2000. 



Richard Fletcher, 2004 


Allen D. Gamans, 2000 


Raymond Taber, 2001 
Richard Coughhn, 2003 


Henry Boyle, 2002 




REVENUE 








(UNAUD 


ited) 










1999 


1999 


2000 


3402 


WATER CHARGES 


Budget 


Actual 


Budget 




Metered Water 
Flat Rate 
Hydrant Rental 


303,000 

112,000 

46,035 


304,104 

113,054 

46,035 


303,000 

112,000 

46,035 




SUBTOTAL 


$461,035 


$463,193 


$461,035 


3409 


OTHER CHARGES 










Booster Station 
Thawing 
Forestry 
Hydrant Repairs 
New Services 
Turn On/Off 


1,200 





2,944 

5,000 

200 


2,326 



26,283 

424 

4,734 

460 


5,000 





2,944 

5,000 

200 




Service Repair 
Meter Repair 
Ins. Refund 


2,000 



220 




20 




2,000 



220 




Vehicle Repair 
Water Test 
















Sewer Dept. 













Misc. 
Pools 


1,000 
200 



365 


1,000 
200 




Supplies 


250 





250 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 13,014 


$ 34,612 


$ 16,814 


3502 
3351 


SAVINGS INTEREST 
SHARED REVENUE 


7,500 
34,000 


12,079 
33,988 


7,500 
33,044 




SUBTOTAL 


$515,549 


$543,872 


$518,393 




Transfer Funds from Savings 
Capital Reserve Vehicle Fund 


21,700 







30,000 
10,500 



TOTAL REVENUES $537,249 $543,872 $558,893 



102 




1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 


GOFFSTOWN Vn.T AGE WaTER PrECINCT EXPENDITURES 




(unaudhed) 










1999 


1999 


2000 






Budget 


Actual 


Budget 


4130 


EXECUTIVE 










Salaries 


83,287 


80,699 


88,000 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 83,287 


$ 80,699 


$ 88,000 


4150 


FINANCIAL ADMIN. 










Audit 


1,100 


1,150 


1,150 




Business Supplies 


3,200 


1,125 


1,500 




Office Equipment 





506 


1,536 




Personnel Supp. 





326 


640 




Safe Box 





55 


60 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 4,300 


$ 3,162 


$ 4,886 


4153 


LEGAL 


1,500 





1,500 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 1,500 





$ 1,500 


4155 


PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 








FICA 


6,495 


6,254 


6,432 




Health Ins. 


20784 


19,269 


23,285 




W/C Insurance 


2,500 


1,682 


2,000 




Retirement Fund 


2,500 


2,613 


3,300 




Unemployment Ins. 


150 


67 


150 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 32,429 


$ 29,885 


$ 35,467 


4194 


BUILDING MAINTENANCE 








Office Repairs 


1,000 





1,000 




Filter Plant 





212 







Well Buildings 













Tank 













SUBTOTAL 


$ 1,000 


$ 212 


$ 1,000 


4196 


INSURANCE 










Liability, Property 


3,100 


1,958 


3,100 




Bond 





200 







SUBTOTAL 


$ 3,100 


$ 2,158 


$ 3,100 


4197 


ADVER/REG ASSNS. 










Advertise 


2,000 


294 


2,000 




Assns. Fees 





110 







License Fees 





450 







Meeting Exp. 













SUBTOTAL 


$ 2,000 


$ 854 


$ 2,000 


4199 


OTHER GENERAL GOVT. 










Vehicle Expense 


2,500 


2,021 


2,100 




Rent 


6,000 


6,000 


6,000 




Telephone/Beeper 


4,000 


3,407 


4,000 




Postage 


2,000 


1,727 


2,000 




Computer Support 


500 


495 


500 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 15,000 


$ 13,650 


$ 14,600 



SEWER & WATER 






103 


GoFFSTOWN Vn J AGE Water Precinct Expenditures 






1999 


1999 


2000 






Budget 


Actual 


Budget 


4332 


WATER SERVICES 










Contract Labor 


4,000 


3,050 


4,000 




Hydrant Repairs 


3,000 





3,000 




Dam Repairs 


1,000 





1,000 




Service Repairs 


5,000 


1,704 


5,000 




Main Repairs 


10,000 


4,637 


10,000 




Meter Repairs 


200 





200 




Pump Repairs 


1,000 


2,809 


1,000 




Equipment Repairs 


250 


90 


250 




Road Repairs 


500 





500 




Thawing 













SUBTOTAL 


$ 24,950 


$ 12,290 


$ 24,950 


4335 


WATER TREATMENT 










Chemical/Chlorine 


7,050 


2,470 


7,050 




Electric/Filtration 


15,000 


10,265 


15,000 




Heat/Filtration 


1,600 


931 


1,600 




Glenview Expenses 


1200 


1209 


4,000 




Electric PowerAVells 


8,000 


7,633 


8,000 




Supplies 


3,000 


1,222 


3,000 




Water Tests 


2,500 


959 


2,500 




Engineering/Filtration 













New Services 


1,000 





2,000 




Forestry 





4,422 







Glenview Conting. Fund 








1,000 




Maple Ave. Eng. 





219 







SUBTOTAL 


$ 39,350 


$ 29,330 


$ 44,150 


Debt Service 








4711 


#1 Bond - Principal 


55,000 


55,000 


50,000 




#2 Bond - Principal 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


4721 


#1 Bond - Interest 


20,963 


20,962 


17,020 




#2 Bond - Interest 


_ 54,870 


54,870 


51,720 




SUBTOTAL 


$190,833 


$190,832 


$178,740 


Capital Outlay 








4901 


LAND & IMPROVEMENTS 










Contingency Fund 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 




Capital Replacement 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 




Upgrading Mains/System 100,000 


141,988 


100,000 




New Vehicle 








25,500 




SUBTOTAL 


$120,000 


$161,988 


$145,500 


4902 


MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT 








Household Meters 


1,000 


153 


1,000 




New Equipment 


4,000 


6,936 


4,000 




New Hydrants 


10,000 


799 


10,000 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 15,000 


$ 7,888 


$ 15,000 


4903 


BUILDINGS 










Buildings 


3,000 





3,000 




SUBTOTAL 


$ 3,000 


$ 


$ 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



$535,749 $532,948 $558,893 



1 04 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Grasmere Village Water Prece^ct 

The Precinct has had an uneventful year. We have had no major breaks 
or disruptions in 1999. The system's extension up Juniper Drive has been 
completed and is operational. A few, small changes will be made by the 
developer prior to acceptance by our Precinct. We anticipate that the 
changes will be made in the very near future. 

The Precinct has been operating in the black for the past several years. 
This is due, in large part, to our expanding preventative maintenance pro- 
gram. We plan on continuing this particular program. 

There are two new, potential projects that are in the planning stage 
within the Precinct: a new elementary school and a commercial park situ- 
ated near the Manchester line on Goffstown Back Road. If these projects 
should come to fruition, the load on our precinct will increase but will not 
exceed our capabilities. 

The commissioners and officers of the Grasmere Village Water Pre- 
cinct are proud to be serving the customers of our small but productive 
Precinct. We look forward to continuing our work into a new year. 

Commissioners of the Precinct 
Theodore J. Rohr, Chairman Arthur W. Rose, Jr. William C. Swanson 

2000 WARRANT 

To the inhabitants of the Grasmere Village Water Precinct qualified to 
vote on precinct affairs. You are hereby notified to meet in the Grasmere 
Town Hall/School House #9 in said Goffstown, in said precinct, on March 
25, 2000 at 7:00 PM in the evening to act upon the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1 
To choose a Moderator for the years 2000 and 2001. 

ARTICLE 2 
To choose a Clerk for the years 2000 and 2001. 

ARTICLE 3 
To choose a Treasurer for the years 2000 and 2001. 

ARTICLE 4 
To choose a Commmissioner for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. 

ARTICLE 5 
To see if the Precinct will vote to approve the budget as proposed by the 
Commissioners and approved by the town's Budget Committee. 

ARTICLE 6 
To hear the reports of the Treasurer and the Clerk for the year 1999. 

ARTICLE 7 
To act upon any unfinished business from the previous meetings. 

ARTICLE 8 
To discuss and act upon any other business which may rightfully come 
before said meeting. 

This is the Precinct's Annual Meeting and it is hoped that all residents of 
the Grasmere Village Water Precinct will attend and support the Precinct. 
Given this TWENTY THIRD day of January 2000, under our hands. 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE GRASMERE VILLAGE WATER PRECINCT 
Arthur W. Rose, Jr. Theodore Rohr William Swanson 



SEWER & WATER 






105 


Grasmere Vni age Water Precinct 




REVENUE 








1999 


1999 


2000 




Budget 


Actual 


Budget 


Water Rents 


82,000 


100,908 


90,000 


Hydrant Rentals 


9,320 


9,320 


9,320 


New Installations 


3,210 


4,469 


5,000 


Contract Medford Farms 


4,800 


2,400 


4,800 


Interest 


1,000 


87 


80 


Misc. Water Sales 


300 


292 


300 


Void Checks 





206 





SUBTOTALS 


$100,630 


$117,682 


$109,500 


Transferred from Capital Reserve 


10,000 








TOTAL REVENUE 


$110,630 


$117,682 


$109,500 


EXPENDITURES 






Cost of Water 


60,000 


52,025 


54,000 


Salaries 


5,000 


4,650 


5,000 


Contract Labor 


16,000 


17,203 


25,000 


Maintenance Supplies 


3,000 


2,936 


5,000 


Office Supplies 


1,500 


1,715 


2,000 


Telephone & Electricity 


3,000 


2,570 


3,000 


Miscellaneous & Training 


1,200 


891 


2,000 


Trans, to Capital Fund 


5,000 


27,138 





Snow Plowing 


800 





800 


Meter & Water Testing 


600 





600 


Auditing Books 


500 





500 


Manchester Water Contract 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


Insurance 


1,000 





1,000 


TOTAL EXPENSES 


$107,600 


$119,128 


$108,900 



INCOME OVER EXPENSES $ 3,030 ($ 1,445) $ 600 



BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 

Cash on hand (General Fund Check Book) 
On Dep. NHDPIP Cap. Res. 
Int. Earned on Cap. Reserve for Mo. 
Total Cash Available as of 12/31/99 

LIABILITIES 

Bills Owed by Precinct (Contract Labor) 
Manchester Water Works (Water Contract Renew) 



$19,538 
$70,410 
$ 3,090 
$93,038 

$0 
$80,000 



106 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

NOTES 



TOWN OFFICIAL BALLOT 



Official Ballot 

Non-Partisan Town Election 

GoFFSTOWN, New Hampshire 

March 14, 2000 



SELECTMEN 

2 for 3 years Vote for 2 

Hunter, Bruce F. 
Raimondi, Lawrence A. 
Wheeler, Robert 
Witherspoon, Howard R. 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

4 for 3 years Vote for 4 

FuUerton, George 
McRae, Gossett C. 
Seevers, Garret 



Donna Bergeron, Town Clerk 
CHECKLIST SUPERVISOR 

1 for 6 years Vote for 1 

Lemay, Denise E. 

CHECKLIST SUPERVISOR 

1 for 2 years Vote for 1 

Wynne, Tricia 



TRUSTEES OF 
TRUST FUNDS 



1 for 3 years 

Szerlog, Andrew J. 



Vote for 1 



BUDGET COMMITTEE TOWN MODERATOR 

1 for 1 year Vote for 1 1 for 2 years Vote fori 

Raimondi, Lawrence A. 



Stark, Rodney L. 



CEMETERY TRUSTEE 

1 for 3 years Vote for 1 
Harding, Mary E. 

Marts, Anthony 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

2 for 3 years Vote for 2 
Griffin, Barbara J. 

Totherow, Barbara S. 

PLANNING BOARD 

2 for 3 years Vote for 2 

DAvanza, Jo Ann 
Georgantas, Richard 
Raimondi, Lawrence A. 
Von Ruden, Lowell S. 

SEWER COMMISSION 

1 for 3 years Vote for 1 

Bouchard, James A. 
Raimondi, Lawrence A. 



ARTICLE 2 



Shall the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of three million 
six hundred thirty seven thousand 
seven hundred and one dollars 
($3,637,701) for the purpose of 
financing the Landfill Closure/ 
Reuse, and to authorize the 
issuance of not more than 
$2,837,701 of bonds or notes in 
accordance with the provisions of 
the Municipal Finance Act (RSA 33) 
as amended and to authorize the 
selectmen to issue and negotiate 
such bonds or notes and to 
determine the rate of interest 
thereon, the maturity and the other 
terms and provisions thereof, as 
may be in the best interest of the 
town; furthermore, to authorize the 



TOWN OFFICIAL BALLOT 



selectmen to withdraw $600,000 
from the Landfill Closure Capital 
Reserve Fund created for this with 
the balance of $200,000 to be raised 
by taxation? It is anticipated that 
twenty percent (20%) of eligible 
costs will be reimbursed by state 
grants. (This appropriation is in 
addition to Article 7) (A 3/5 ballot 
vote is required.) 
(The Board of Selectmen and 
Budget Committee recommend 
this article.) 

ARTICLE 3 

Shall the Town raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $225,000 to purchase 
a parcel of land approximately 12.73 
acres identified as Parcel A on a 
Subdivision Plan of Map 5 Lot 37? 
The intended use of this land is to 
meet the town's long term need for 
sand. (This appropriation is in ad- 
dition to Article 7) 
(The Board of Selectmen and 
Budget Committee recommend 
this article.) 

ARTICLE 4 

Shall the Town establish a charter 
commission for the purpose of 
revising the municipal charter or 
establishing a new municipal 
charter (RSA 49-B)? 

ARTICLE 5 

Shall the Town install traffic lights 
at the Main St., Elm St., Mast Rd., 
& High St. intersection? 
(Submitted by petition) 



ARTICLE 6 

Shall the Town deposit 30% (thirty 
percent) of the revenues collected 
pursuant to RSA 79-A (the land use 
change tax) in the conservation fund 
in accordance with RSA 36-A:5 III 
as authorized by RSA 79-A:25II? i 
(Submitted by petition) 
(The Board of Selectmen does 
not recommend this article.) 
(The Budget Committee recom- 
mends this article.) 

ARTICLE 7 

Shall the Town of Goffstown raise 
and appropriate as an operating 
budget, not including appropri- 
ations by special warrant articles 
and other appropriations voted 
separately, the amounts set forth on 
the budget posted with the warrant, 
or as amended by vote of the first 
session, for the purposes set forth 
therein, totaling eleven million 
seven hundred ninety two thousand 
eight hundred and twenty five 
dollars ($11,792,825)? Should this 
article be defeated, the operating 
budget shall be ten million nine 
hundred and eighty seven thousand 
nine hundred and two dollars 
($10,987,902), which is the same as 
last year, with certain adjustments 
required by previous action of the 
Town of Goffstown or by law or the 
governing body may hold one 
special meeting, in accordance with 
RSA 40:13 X and XVI, to take up 
the issue of a revised operating 
budget only. 

NOTE: This article (operating 
budget) does not include appropri- 
ations in any other warrant article. 
(The Board of Selectmen and 
Budget Committee recommend 
this article.) 



SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICIAL BALLOT 



III 



Official Ballot 

School District Election 

GoFFSTOWN, New Hampshire 

March 14, 2000 



Jo Ann D'Avanza, School District Clerk 



SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER 

For Three (3) Year Vote for THREE (3) 
Al Desruisseaux 
Jane Raymond 
Kerry Steckowych 
Michael York 

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER 

For One (1) Year Vote for ONE (1) 

Scott Gross 

SCHOOL DISTRICT MODERATOR 

For Three (3) Years Vote for ONE (1) 

Lawrence Emerton, Sr. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER 

For Three (3) Years Vote for ONE (1) 

Helen Skoglund 

SCHOOL DISTRICT CLERK 

For Three (3) Years Vote for ONE (1) 

Jo Ann D Avanza 



ARTICLE 2 

Shall the School District raise and 
appropriate the sum of TEN MIL- 
LION EIGHT HUNDRED FIFTY 
THOUSAND DOLLARS 

($10,850,000.00) for (1) The con- 
struction of additions to the Goffs- 
town AREA High School, for reno- 
vations to the existing building, for 
the payment of furnishings, equip- 
ment, architectural and other fees, 
site development and related inci- 
dental and necessary costs for such 



construction and existing school 
renovation pursuant to the plans 
and specifications as may be ap- 
proved by the School Board, copies 
of which shall be on file with the 
School Administrative Unit #19 Of- 
fice in Goffstown, New Hampshire; 
and to raise such sum by the issu- 
ance of bonds or notes of the District 
in an amount not to exceed TEN 
MILLION EIGHT HUNDRED 
FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS 
($10,850,000.00) in accordance with 
the provisions of the New Hamp- 
shire Revised Statutes Annotated, 
the form and terms of said bonds or 
notes including the time and place 
for the payment of interest, the rate 
of interest and provisions for the sale 
of said bonds, or notes and all other 
matters in connection therewith to 
be left to the discretion of the School 
Board; (2) and further to authorize 
the expenditure of up to TWO HUN- 
DRED THOUSAND DOLLARS 
($200,000.00) from money to be 
gained from the short-term invest- 
ing of the proceeds from the bond 
sales for the purpose of equipping 
the building; and (3) to further raise 
and appropriate through taxation a 
sum of THREE HUNDRED THIR- 
TEEN THOUSAND AND NINETY- 
EIGHT DOLLARS ($313,098.00) for 
the initial interest payment on said 
bonds or notes? This appropriation 



IV 



SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICIAL BALLOT 



is in addition to Warrant Article #5, 
the Operating Budget Article. Note: 
The total amount raised and appro- 
priated in this Article is 
$11,363,098.00. A sixty percent vote 
required. 

(The School Board 

recommends this article.) 
(The Budget Committee 

recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 3 

Shall the School District authorize 
the Goffstown School Board to pro- 
ceed with the purchase of land and 
development of architectural plans 
for an elementary school and to raise 
and appropriate the sum of THREE 
HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOU- 
SAND DOLLARS ($350,000.00) for 
this purpose? The property is ap- 
proximately 26 acres and is located 
on Jason Drive (Map 6 Lot 23). This 
appropriation is in addition to War- 
rant Article #5, the Operating Bud- 
get Article. 

(The School Board 

recom,mends this article.) 

(The Budget Committee does 

not recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 4 

Shall the School District vote to pur- 
chase a new boiler to include a 
burner, heating pump, expansion 
tank, and all necessary piping to 
replace the existing Weil McLain 
boiler at Bartlett Elementary 
School, which was installed in 1965, 
and to raise and appropriate the 
sum of NINETY-SIX THOUSAND 
DOLLARS ($96,000.00) for this pur- 
pose? This appropriation is in addi- 
tion to Warrant Article #5, the Op- 
erating Budget Article. 



(The School Board 

recommends this article.) 

(The Budget Committee 

recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 5 1 

Shall the Goffstown School District 
raise and appropriate as an Operat- « 
ing Budget, not including appropria- I 
tions by special warrant articles and 1 
other appropriations voted sepa- 
rately, the amounts set forth on the 
budget, posted with the warrant or 
as amended by vote of the first ses- 
sion, for the purposes set forth 
therein totaling TWENTY MIL- 
LION ONE HUNDRED FIFTY- 
ONE THOUSAND ONE HUN- 
DRED AND SEVENTY-EIGHT 
DOLLARS ($20,151,178.00). Should 
this Article be defeated, the Oper- 
ating Budget shall be NINETEEN 
MILLION SEVEN HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN THOUSAND NINE 
HUNDRED AND ONE DOLLARS 
($19,714,901.00), which is the same 
as last year, with certain adjust- 
ments required by previous action 
of the Goffstown School District or 
by law; or the governing body may 
hold one special meeting, in accor- 
dance with RSA 40:13, X and XVI, 
to take up the issue of a revised 
Operating Budget only. 

(The School Board , 

recommends this article.) \ 

(The Budget Committee does 
not recommend this article.) 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



107 



School Board Report 

SCHOOL BOARD YEAR IN REVIEW 




L-R Front Row: Ryan Levesque (Student Member), Virginia McKinnon, 
Michael York (Chair), Ellen Vermokowitz. L-R Back Row: Karl MacGibbon, 
Paul O'Reilly, Albert Packard, Jane Raymond, John Stafford. Missing: 
Craig Hieber (Vice-Chair). 

In coordination with the SAU #19 administration, the Goffstown School 
Board has set high expectations for their work. A dehberate effort was 
made to ascertain the community's expectations for education in Goffs- 
town. This information served as a starting point to structure a plan for 
school improvement and a Board subcommittee workgroup structure. Each 
subcommittee meets monthly and reports its work and recommendations 
to the full committee. The subcommittees are Curriculum and Education; 
Human Resources; Finance and Administration; and Communication and 
Planning. The Building Needs Study Committee facilitated by Dr. Lockwood 
also reports to the Board. The subcommittee structure creates an efficient 
use of time that is decision and action oriented. The Board, in response to 
issues and concerns raised by community members, established a series of 
long-range goals that will guide the Board and the administration into the 
next school year and beyond and will be the basis for reporting school 
progress. 

School Board Goals are divided into four specific areas: 
Facilities 

1. To establish a long- and short-term building proposal that will pro- 
vide a plan for the increase in student growth over the next ten years. 

2. To develop a long-term building maintenance program. 



108 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

High Standards 

1. To adopt curricula in all content areas to include music, physical 
education, art, technology education, international languages, consumer 
sciences, and information/technology. 

2. To implement the revised curricula in the four core content areas. 

3. To establish an assessment procedure to determine progress to- 
ward meeting the benchmarks identified for each grade level in English/ 
Language Arts and Mathematics. 

4. To set high standards for teacher performance and to design a 
method of clinical supervision that supports education improvement. 

5. To maintain and recruit high quality professional staff. 

6. To develop a local education plan that includes a design for teacher 
recertification, professional development, clinical supervision and evalua- 
tion, and defines clear expectations for student achievement. 

7. To achieve and maintain full NEASC accreditation at Goffstown 
Area High School. 

8. To establish clear and consistent guidelines for discipline across 
the district. 

Communication 

1. To keep the Goffstown Community fully informed and involved in 
school activities and efforts that support the school program. 
School Board 

1 . To improve overall working performance of Goffstown School Board. 

2. To support decisions made by the Board and implemented by the 
administration. 

3. To negotiate smoother relationships with the Town Administra- 
tion, the School Board and the Administration. 

1998 and 1999 have been challenging for all New Hampshire school 
districts. After years of uncertainly and court debate about school funding, 
a decision was finally made. The New Hampshire Supreme Court deter- 
mined that the use of local property taxes, as the only source for funding 
schools, was unconstitutional. The New Hampshire Legislature specified 
dollars for a State Adequate Education Fund and further stipulated that a 
statewide property tax would be collected to supplement local property 
taxes to provide an adequacy funding level of at least $3,200 per student. 
As a receiving town, Goffstown will receive a State Education Grant of 
$5,059,337 in 1999-2000. In addition, $4,040,944 will be collected in State 
Education Taxes from the Goffstown taxpayer (this amount is raised from 
the $6.86 that was included in the most recent tax bill). The School Board 
voted to not spend any of the additional revenues and therefore the school 
tax rate for 1999 dropped from $23.69 in 1998 to $15.50 in 1999. 

This year the School Board has been concentrating on a long-range 
building initiative that looked at the needs of the school district through 
2010. The Board, in cooperation with the Building Needs Study Commit- 
tee, has worked for over 18 months planning, reviewing past building plans, 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 109 

evaluating student enrollment projections, and assessing the need for 
present and future building needs. The School Board delayed bringing its 
plan for renovation of the Goffstown Area High School before the voters in 
1999 because of the uncertainty of school funding. This year the Building 
Committee expanded its planning to develop a comprehensive approach, 
working on the planning for a new elementary school as well as the exten- 
sive renovations of the Goffstown Area High School. The Building Com- 
mittee examined a number of pieces of property in Goffstown as possible 
sites for a new elementary school. The Committee has made a recommen- 
dation to the School Board that will bring the elementary building pro- 
posal to the voters on the March 2001 warrant as a separate article. 

In addition to our work on facilities and funding, the Board moved 
toward accomplishing our goals in many other ways. The School Board 
reviewed and approved several core curriculum documents. We autho- 
rized the purchase of new elementary English/Language Arts materials, 
implemented an Alternative to External School Suspension Program, ne- 
gotiated and supported new teacher and support staff contracts, worked 
with the administration to secure several professional development grants, 
and developed and supported a reasonable and responsible budget. Im- 
proved communication has been accomplished through the use of GTV16 
to air Board meetings and through periodic letters printed in the local 
paper. We have established strong ties with the media and publish as 
much information as possible. Our Human Resource subcommittee has 
taken on the enormous task of reviewing and updating our School District 
Policy Manual. Finally, to improve the overall performance of the Board 
we have instituted a Board Self-Evaluation procedure. 

There have been important changes to the SAU administrative team 
this year with the addition of Michelle Croteau as Business Manager and 
Frank Scala as Assistant Superintendent. At the school level, Mr. Bousquet 
is the new Principal of the Bartlett Elementary School joining us for the 
start to the 1999 school year. Chuck Gaides left the SAU in June to become 
the Principal of the Dunbarton Elementary School. The Board continues to 
enjoy working with Dr. Darrell Lockwood, his vision and energy provide a 
solid foundation for growth of the Goffstown schools. The School Board has 
great confidence in Dr. Lockwood because he combines a true understand- 
ing of education and the financial acumen to run a 20 million-dollar enter- 
prise. The superintendent's open style has made him a very easy person to 
work with. His vision for improving the schools is making Goffstown a 
better place in which to raise children. 

As I conclude my comments, I particularly want to thank those 
members of the School Board whose terms ended in 1999, namely Randy 
Benthien, Pam Manney, and Bill Totherow for their contribution to the 
Goffstown School Board. We sincerely appreciate their time, effort, and 
ideas. 

Michael York, 
School Board Chair 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 110_ 

Report of the 
Superintendent of Schools 

DaRRELL J. LOCKWOOD, Ed.D. 




L-R: Frank Scala (Asst. Supt.), Dr. Darrell J. Lockwood (Supt.), Mary Heath 
(Asst. Supt.), Barbara Potvin (Dir. of Spec. Ed.). Missing: Michele Croteau 
Bus. Mgr.) 

Advancing Student Learning: The mission of School Administra- 
tive Unit #19 is to develop and support an educational community that 
advances rigorous standards for learning for all students resulting in high 
student achievement. The year 1999 brought many changes and chal- 
lenges to the school districts of School Administrative Unit #19 as we worked 
toward accomplishing our mission. We continue to appreciate the support 
provided by our communities on behalf of our growing student population. 

Curriculum Development: Curricula have been developed in the 
four core content areas, English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and 
Social Studies, which are aligned with the NH Curriculum Frameworks 
and nationally developed content standards. The School Boards have given 
full approval for English/Language Arts and Mathematics and prelimi- 
nary approval for Social Studies and Science. Curriculum have also been 
approved for the Preschool Program and Career Guidance and Counsel- 
ing. As part of the curriculum documents, curriculum committee members 
established K-12 grade level benchmarks for each core content area. Bench- 
marks for learning signal important learning areas that children should 
have as a result of their experiences at each grade level. Locally developed 
assessments will focus on the achievement of the benchmarks at each grade 
level. Benchmarks have also been developed within the core content areas 
for technologies that are called "techmarks." Information Specialists from 
each school studied each curriculum document to identify what children 
should know and be able to do using technology in each content area. Chil- 
dren and teachers will employ these techniques through various techno- 
logical methods that include computers, television, the Internet, and other 
technological tools. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 111 

The intent of the curriculum work was to present teachers, parents, 
and community members with a clear and consistent description of what 
students should know and be able to do as a result of their experiences in 
our schools. Another aspect of this overall process is to design learning 
experiences within each classroom aligned with the New Hampshire Cur- 
riculum Frameworks to better support students in their participation in 
the New Hampshire State Assessments. Additional curriculum work is in 
process for: the Fine Arts (which includes music and art); physical educa- 
tion; international languages; industrial technology; business education; 
consumer and family sciences; and health education. The true work of cur- 
riculum development is in the implementation. Teachers are hard at work 
examining the new curricula and designing units of study to create new 
opportunities for student learning within the learning environment. 

Student Assessment: A K-12 Assessment Plan is being developed 
that will measure student progress for the purpose of supporting students 
in their participation in the NHEIAP (New Hampshire Education Improve- 
ment and Assessment Program), reporting to the community student 
progress toward the mastery of identified benchmarks, informing curricu- 
lum development, and improving instructional practice. Students are cur- 
rently participating in the New Hampshire State Assessments at Grades 
3, 6, and 10, and all students in Grades 2 through 6 participate twice each 
year in the Houghton Mifflin Benchmark Assessment in English/ Language 
Arts. The latter assessment provides information about how well students 
are reading and comprehending. Writing samples are also administered at 
every grade level to monitor students' ability to write based on the NH 
Holistic Scoring Guide for Student Writing. Literacy folders are kept for 
each child to assess growth and learning. 

During the 1999-2000 school year, students in Grade 8 will be assessed 
using the New Standards Reference Examination. This assessment will 
measure student achievement in the areas of Mathematics and English/ 
Language Arts. Harcourt Brace publishes this reference examination that 
is aligned to our curricula and the New Hampshire Frameworks. Eighth 
grade parents and students will receive a description at the end of the year 
that describes the degree to which students have provided evidence of a 
clear understanding of the test items administered. This information will 
help educators determine programming as the 8* graders enter high school. 
Additionally, local (teacher-made) assessments are being developed for stu- 
dents in Grades 1-12 in each of the core content areas. These assessments 
will include performance events that show students have accumulated 
knowledge and can apply their learning. 

School Safety: School safety is a priority in our schools. The New 
Hampshire Emergency Management Division provided a two-day work- 
shop for each school in preparation of the development of required school 
safety plans. Each school is required to have a School Safety Plan in place 
that covers a variety of circumstances that could compromise the safety of 
children. Children participate in safety drills to acquaint them to the nec- 
essary steps to take in case of an impending threat that might come from 



112 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

fire, hazardous weather, intruders, environmental factors, and other events 
that may endanger our children. The intent of these drills is to prepare 
students so that they will quickly move to a safe location within the school 
or to an assigned alternate site. Every school has a safety committee that 
meets regularly. Police and Fire Departments in all of our communities 
support these efforts and participate in development. 

Mountain View Middle School, in cooperation with the New Hamp- 
shire Emergency Management Division, has worked to create a model plan 
that has been used by our schools and other schools across the state. We 
have been pleased to share our experiences and learning. 

The focus of each plan is the safety of every child within the school. As 
part of each school safety process, the following safety precautions are taken: 
all school doors are locked except for the main entrance; visitors report to 
the Main Office to obtain a Visitor's Pass (This has been a challenge during 
construction in New Boston. It is also a test to deal with traffic from our 
portable classrooms at New Boston Central School and Mountain View 
Middle School.); and communication devices are in use within every school. 
Staff meetings and every day procedures are in place to familiarize each 
staff member and substitute teacher with action steps to be taken in case 
of an emergency. The goal of the School Safety Plans is to develop safe 
school strategies that make our schools welcoming and safe environments 
for all children. 

School Facilities: Schools continue to be utilized for multiple uses. 
Recreation programs are active in all of our schools. Self-funding After 
School Programs exist at each elementary school in the SAU. Summer 
School programs were held at Mountain View Middle School for elemen- 
tary and intermediate students and a Special Education Pre-School Sum- 
mer Program ran in New Boston. Capital improvements to the Goffstown 
schools with a major focus on the high school are underway. Projects have 
. included carpet and tile replacement, interior painting, wiring for technol- 
ogy, parking and playground improvements. We encourage you to come 
and take a look at our progress. 

An addition and renovations were approved in March 1999 for the New 
Boston Central School. The addition is nearing completion as of this writ- 
ing and the renovations will take place during the sumer of 2000. 

Phases Two and Three (playground and completion of three classrooms) 
of the Dunbarton Elementary School Project were also approved in March 
and completed during the summer of 1999. Volunteer spirit and energy 
has been a benefit to both the school and community. 

The Goffstown Building Needs Study Committee recommended a 
$10,000,000. plan for renovation and additions to the Goffstown Area High 
School and the development of plans for an additional elementary school 
(allowing for the addition of kindergarten and the transferring of Grade 4 
students to an elementary environment). Due to the uncertain tax impact 
of the Claremont law suit, the Goffstown School Board decided to refrain 
from bringing this question to the voters for one year. A comprehensive 
plan will be brought forth in March 2000. This plan ($10,850,000) will 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 113 

request the approval of the GAHS renovation and addition at the March 
2000 meeting. Another warrant article in March will request funds to 
purchase land and develop specific plans for a new elementary school. Ap- 
proval for the new elementary school building will not be requested until 
March 2001. 

Volunteer Recognition: New Hampshire Partners in Education again 
bestowed the Blue Ribbon Award for volunteerism on the Dunbarton El- 
ementary School, and two Goffstown Schools, namely: Mountain View 
Middle School, Maple Avenue Elementary. New Boston Central School 
also became an award winner this year. Whether in classrooms, board- 
rooms, or committee rooms, we appreciate ALL school volunteers in each 
of our school buildings. 

School Structure: The School Districts of SAU #19 are among the 
few left in New Hampshire without public kindergarten. Over the past 
year, the Goffstown School District has completed a study of the need for 
such a program. The committee comprised of Goffstown citizens, private 
kindergarten providers, and school staff provided a thorough presentation 
of findings to the School Board. Based on these findings, the School Board 
directed the Goffstown Building Needs Study Committee to include half- 
time kindergarten in the Comprehensive Facilities Plan. Dunbarton has 
begun a study of opening public kindergarten for the 2000-2001 school 
year and the New Boston School Board will present a warrant article in 
March 2000 to garner input and support for creating a local Kindergarten 
Committee. 

Governance/Management Review: Legislation passed by the New 
Hampshire Legislature created an expiration date of 2008 for all existing 
Authorized Regional Enrollment Area (AREA) Agreements. This will re- 
quire Dunbarton, Goffstown and New Boston to review the Grade 7-12 
agreement in order to develop a successor agreement or to determine other 
directions. It is anticipated that this review will involve members of the 
communities and will be completed one or two years prior to the agree- 
ment expiration date. 

The Dunbarton School Board has decided to request a local review of 
SAU membership and existing or possible alternatives. They will present 
a warrant article in March 2000 in order to receive community input on 
the notion of forming a study committee. 

Technology: Technology is being appropriately infused into our in- 
structional process. Students work in the television studio, GAHS CAD 
Lab, and graphic arts. Students at all schools use research tools, email, 
presentation software, and the Internet. Students do much of the work on 
our web site. See for yourself by visiting http://www.goffstown.kl2.nh.us/ 
sau/sau.html. 

In 1999 Goffstown School District completed a number of computer 
upgrades to student computers, including installation of 80 CD-ROMs at 
MVMS and 43 upgraded hard drives at Maple Avenue and Bartlett. GAHS 
added 12 new classroom computers replacing older systems. The adminis- 
trative offices at GAHS and Maple Ave received computer upgrades. GAHS 



114 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

had a large increase in student use of computers this year; many courses 
are now requiring students to do computer-generated presentations and 
on-line research projects. GAHS information center added several new on- 
line resources that give students access to the latest research tools. 

Both New Boston and Dunbarton schools are wired for the Internet. 
Free 56K lines from Bell Atlantic have allowed the New Boston and 
Dunbarton schools to connect to GAHS for Internet service. E-mail has 
been provided through this same connection. 

Staffing: Finding and retaining qualified staff will be the issue for the 
new millennium. Administrators worked diligently this past summer to 
recruit new professional staff. Of greatest concern are the areas of Special 
Education, Foreign Language, Science and Mathematics. It was noted 
that long term contracts in each of our districts assisted in attracting new 
personnel. For this we thank our School Boards for their work and our 
communities for the ongoing support. The effects of the economy and full 
employment have not been entirely relegated to the professional staff. Sup- 
port staff hiring also has proven difficult. Educational assistants, custodi- 
ans, food service staff and substitute teachers are in high demand. We 
must be diligent in tackling the need to provide quality work environments 
where employees are appreciated for their efforts. 

The School Administrative Office has experienced changes in staffing 
as well. Paula Juthe joined the team as Administrative Assistant to the 
Superintendent in the fall of 1998. A new Business Manager, Michele 
Croteau also began employment in the fall. Barbara Potvin was hired as 
Special Education Director during the summer of 1999. Also this past 
summer, Chuck Gaides became the Principal of Dunbarton Elementary 
School and Frank Scala was hired as the new Assistant Superintendent. 
Karen Lessard and Robin Thomforde joined the business office in the fall 
of 1999. 

Recognition: Several staff members retired from our schools during 
1998-99 school year. We send best wished to carol Harris and William 
Zeller - Dunbarton Elementary School; James FuUam - Goffstown Area 
High School. We are forever indebted for their many years of service to 
our students. 

I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the passing of Mary Statt, 
Librarian at New Boston Central School this fall after a long illness. She 
touched the lives of many students and staff over the years. She chal- 
lenged our thoughts, and gained our respect and love. She will be forever 
missed. 

In closing, we continue to give thanks to our school boards, employees, 
school volunteers, parents and citizens who have contributed to the past 
and present accomplishments of our students. Your continued support 
and cooperation is essential to our students' success. 

Darrell J. Lockwood, Ed.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 11£ 

GoFFSTOWN School District 

Annual Meeting Minutes 

Deliberative Session 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1999 

Moderator, Larry Emerton, called the 1999 School District Delibera- 
tive Session to order at 7:18 p.m. There were 215 registered voters and 14 
unregistered in attendance at 7:36 p.m. There were 234 registered voters 
in attendance at the final check in. 

L. Emerton: I'd like to go through a few things tonight that have not 
happened in 200 years in our state. The educational system in New Hamp- 
shire is in a difficult position. I thought I would read to you the Bill of 
Rights from the New Hampshire Constitution. 

We have passed two bills into law this year, which enable school dis- 
tricts to borrow and guarantee bonds. Since September, there have been 
over 40 bills, both Senate and House, introduced regarding the Claremont 
issue. Several have been killed or put aside for final vote. For Goffstown, 
in my opinion, we are going to come out in good shape. We are a property 
poor town as far as taxes. Many of the bills have a common thread - it is 
real estate taxes. This would reduce our taxes down because our tax rate 
is much higher than the average. We hope we can get this done by April 1. 

Jess Benthien, President of the Goffstown Area High School Senior 
Class, led those assembled in the Pledge of Allegiance. 

Mr. Emerton introduced School Board members; Chair Michael York, 
Vice Chair Ellen Vermokowitz, Randy Benthien, Pamela Manney, Virginia 
(Ginny) McKinnon, Bill Totherow, Jane Raymond, Craig Hieber. Mr. 
Emerton also introduced Superintendent Darrell Lockwood; Assistant Su- 
perintendents Mary Heath and Chuck Gaides; Business Manager Michelle 
Croteau; Special Education Director Brian Blake; Principals Chris Mosca, 
Rose Colby and Kathy Dodwell and Assistant Principals, Sandy Davis and 
Jim Doig. 

Moderator Emerson also introduced Budget Committee Chairman Chris 
McRae, School District Clerk Jo Ann DAvanza and Assistant Moderator 
Fred Plett. 

C. McRae: We are a 16-member committee that divides into two sub- 
committees. John Stafford is the Chair of the school sub-committee. 

The Counters were: Claude Laroche, Bill Glenn, Donna Kelly and 
Jane Exner. 

L. Emerton: Most of you have been to SB2 meetings now. They are a 
little different from the old school district meetings. We have to put every- 
thing on the ballot that comes before us. The amendments will be read to 
you, so you know what will go on the ballot. The amendment must deal 



116 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

only with the same subject. Secret ballots are requested by you giving me a 
written statement signed by five registered voters of the Town beforehand. 
After the article is passed, we need seven signatures. 

I am now going to read the posting of the warrant. 

"To the Inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Goffstown 
qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet on Monday, the first day of February 
1999, in the theater at Goffstown Area High School, at 7:00 p.m. for the 
first session of the School District Annual Meeting, also known as the first 
Deliberative Session, to act on the following subjects and determine mat- 
ters which will then be voted upon by the official ballot on Tuesday, March 
9, 1999. 

You are further notified to meet on Tuesday, the ninth day of March 
1999, also known as the second session, to vote on all matters by official 
ballot. The polls are open on March 9, 1999, at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 
p.m. at the Central polling district at the Goffstown Area High School and 
will open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 p.m. in the Fifth District at the 
Bartlett Elementary School." 

ARTICLE 1 

To choose three members of the School Board for the ensuing three 
years. 

ARTICLE 2 

Shall the District affirm and be bound by the financial provisions of a 
four year Collective Bargaining Agreement entered into by and between 
the Goffstown School Board and the Goffstown Educational Support Staff, 
NEA-New Hampshire covering the years 1999-2003, which calls for the 
following increases in salaries and benefits: 

Year Estimated 

Increase 
1999-2000 $127,600 

2000-2001 $109,361 

2001-2002 $101,228 

2002-2003 $103,066 

and further to raise and appropriate the sum of One HUNDRED TWENTY- 
SEVEN THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED DOLLARS ($127,600.00) for the 
purpose of funding the 1999-2000 year of said collective bargaining agree- 
ment and to take FIFTEEN THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED SIXTY- 
EIGHT DOLLARS ($15,368.00) from the Food Service Revenue Accounts 
with the remaining ONE HUNDRED TWELVE THOUSAND TWO HUN- 
DRED THIRTY-TWO DOLLARS ($112,232.00) to come from the bargain- 
ing agreement, or to take any other action in relation thereto. This appro- 
priation is in addition to Warrant Article #4, the operating budget article. 
(The School Board recommends this article.) (The Budget Committee rec- 
ommends this article.) 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 117 

MOTION ; Moved by Pam Manney, seconded by Ellen 
Vermokowitz to place Article 2 on the ballot as presented. 

P. Manney: GESS members have been without a contract for two years. 
Their salaries have been frozen at a 1996-97 wage base. GESS wages are 
below that of Goffstown Municipal agreements and surrounding school 
district comparable positions. The contract, as presented and ratified by 
both sides, represents a four-year average annual increase of 6.8% (inclu- 
sive of all costs - FICA, etc). It incorporates a performance appraisal in 
year three of the four-year contract, whereas a step increase may be with- 
held for unsatisfactory work performance. 

There was no discussion on Article 2. 

ARTICLE 2 WILL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT AS PRESENTED. 

ARTICLE 3 

Shall the District affirm and be bound by the financial provisions of a 
five-year Collective Bargaining Agreement entered into by and between 
the Goffstown School Board and the Goffstown Education Association cov- 
ering the years 1999-2004, which calls for the following increases in sala- 
ries and benefits: 

Year Estimated 

Increase 
1999-2000 $310,824 

2000-2001 $369,425 

2001-2002 $325,074 

2002-2003 $404,436 

2003-2004 $347,027 

and further to raise and appropriate the sum of THREE HUNDRED TEN 
THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR DOLLARS 
($310,824.00) for the 1999-2000 fiscal year, such sum representing the ad- 
ditional costs attributable to the increase in salaries and benefits over those 
of the appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year. 
This appropriation is in addition to Warrant Article #4, the operating bud- 
get article. (The School Board recommends this article.) (The Budget Com- 
mittee recommends this article.) 

MOTION ; Michael York moved, seconded by Ellen Vermokowitz 
to place Article 3 on the ballot as presented. 

M. York: GEA members have been without a contract for a year. Their 
salaries have been frozen at a 1997-98 wage base. The contract, as pre- 
sented and ratified by both sides, represents a five-year average annual 
increase of 4% (inclusive of all costs - FICA, Retirement, etc.). Insurance 
benefits are maintained at the levels of the previous contract. 
C. Gangi: You said it is a 4% increase. Is that per year? 
M. York: Yes. 

C. Gangi: Over five years, is that a 20 percent increase, and the Board 
feels that is not in excess? 



118 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

M. York: Both the School Board and the Budget Committee feels this is 
a reasonable contract. 

Ray Joahanette: What towns are they comparing it to? We have some 
of the highest paid teachers here in Goffstown. Where are these figures 
coming from? 

M. York: That was the previous article for the support staff. There are 
two contracts. What we are looking at now is Article 3. 

R. Joahanette: We have some of the highest paid teachers in the state. 

M. York: I don't believe so. 

R. Joahanette: Where does the information come from that they are 
not equal to the surrounding towns? 

M. York: I don't see where it says that. 

Dick Georgantas: I would like to ask the Board what they think the 
economy will be in three to five years from now. I don't know how we can 
commit on a five-year plan. Five years is quite a stretch. I don't know if I 
can afford my taxes five years from now. 

M. York: I certainly can't tell you what the economy will be in five 
years. We need stability in our schools and our teachers. We are losing 
teachers to other schools. If we don't have a contract, it will be more diffi- 
cult to do that. 

C. Gangi: Would someone be able to make a motion to reduce this? 

L. Emerton: This is an agreed contract with the teachers education 
union and the School Board. Any change in that I would call out of order 
because they would have to go back to a negotiation session. You can try it 
if you want to, but in my opinion, I think it would abrogate the contract. 
Certainly, you can vote it down on March 9. 

Bob Wheeler: I would like to clarify your ruling. The purpose of this 
meeting is to form the ballot. If somebody wants to amend what is before 
us, I believe they have the right to do that. 

L. Emerton: In my opinion, it would start the contract over again. I 
was told by the School Board that they have made a contract with the 
teachers. 

B. Wheeler: If the School Board took a contrary position, that would be 
valid, but nobody has agreed with the School District. There is a bargain- 
ing agreement between the School Board and their employees, but I don't 
see any threat to that. If somebody from the floor wanted to amend it, I 
would not agree with it, but I don't want them to feel they do not have the 
right to do that here because that is the very purpose of this meeting. 

L. Emerton: If Carmen Gangi wants to make a motion to that effect, 
he is more than welcomed to. 

There were no changes made to Article 3. 

ARTICLE 3 WILL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT AS PRESENTED. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 119 

ARTICLE 4 

Shall the Goffstown School District raise and appropriate as an Operat- 
ing Budget, not including appropriations by special warrant articles, the 
amounts set forth on the budget posted with the warrant or as amended by 
vote of the first session, for the purposes set forth therein totaling EIGH- 
TEEN MILLION THREE HUNDRED FIFTY SEVEN THOUSAND FORTY- 
SIX DOLLARS ($18,357,046.00.) Should this article be defeated, the Oper- 
ating Budget shall be EIGHTEEN MILLION FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY 
THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT DOLLARS 
($18,420,368.00), which is the same as last year, with certain adjustments 
required by previous action of the Goffstown School District or by law; or 
the governing body may hold one special meeting, in accordance with RSA 
40:13, X and XVI, to take up the issue of a revised operating budget only. 

MOTION ; Moved by Chris McRae, seconded by John Davis. 

John Stafford: The Budget Committee's school sub-committee and the 
entire committee came up with a budget that we thought was fair and 
equitable. The number we are proposing is $18,357,046. 

The major difference between that and the budget proposed by the 
School Board is $130,000. Most of the difference consists of money for the 
International Language program at the Middle School and the Assistant 
Principal at Maple Avenue School. We did not feel we could justify in- 
creasing the budget this year. We are not to the point that we need a 
second person at Maple Avenue School, and we had problems getting teach- 
ers last year at Mt. View. We feel it will be a problem this year as well. 

MOTION ; Moved by Michael York, seconded by Ellen 
Vermokowitz to amend Article 4 to read $18,500,368 as the operat- 
ing budget for the Goffstown School District. 

M. York: As John Stafford indicated, there are two items that have 
caused difficulty between our budget and the Budget Committee's budget - 
the foreign language teachers and the assistant principal at Maple Av- 
enue. The difference here is less than 1%. That means that the Goffstown 
School Board and the Budget Committee are 99% in agreement on this 
budget. We feel we need to try and get two foreign language teachers. 
Maple Avenue School has about 450 students. We feel it is necessary to 
have a second administrator and to deal with special education issues that 
are present at Maple Avenue School. I think the issue here is that the 
Budget Committee and the School Board, which have looked at these bud- 
gets more than anyone else, are in close agreement. 

C. Gangi: What is the difference, 1%? 

M. York: Less than 1%. 

C. Gangi: I have heard discussion in the past that the School Board 
and the Budget Committee that they believe there has been some rifts 
between the Town and the school. They would like to do away with that. I 
think that is a great idea that the Town, school and the Budget Committee 
works together with the community. If you believe that, then you should 
go on the side of the Budget Committee. 



120 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

M. York: I think the difference is the foreign language teachers. We 
are trying to fill those positions because we received a lot of complaints 
about not being able to continue that program. 

C. Gangi: Last year you had a meeting and you were talking about 
making cuts that were being forced on the School Board because you had to 
go with the default budget last year. Shortly after, there was a meeting 
when the School Board said they needed to make some cuts. The money 
was there last year for the foreign language program. You cut it because 
you could not find anybody to fill that job. Why did you have it last year, 
but you want to add it now? 

M. York: There are other things built into the budget. 

C. Gangi: That is where we have a problem, when we have other things. 
I would like this settled once and for all. 

M. York: We had the funds. We did not fill them because we could not 
find qualified people. 

C. Gangi: A lot of people thought it was because of a lack of funds. 

M. York: We sent letters to all the foreign language students at the 
Middle School, and put an article in the newspaper stating that these posi- 
tions were not being filled because we could not find people to fill them. 

Jim Raymond: Point of order. In the past, you allowed people to make 
comments in the audience, not engage in a long debate. 

L. Emerton: Tonight, we are only discussing one article. I think it is 
up to these folks to have a dialogue back and forth. 

C. Gangi: If the money was in the budget, why do we have to increase 
the budget this year for the money you had last year? 

M. York: It was not there. The additional money we are asking for is 
for all of the things we need. 

Jane Exner: I was at several of the meetings on this last year. My 
understanding from listening to those meetings was there were cuts that 
were needed to be made. Foreign language was cut because we were hav- 
ing a difficult time finding those teachers. There was funding in the bud- 
get initially for the international language program. Would there have 
had to be other cuts made? 

M. York: Yes. 

Ellen Vermokowitz: The School Board's budget request is an attempt 
to meet the challenges of the School District. Priorities are to maintain 
appropriate class sizes. Approval of the GEA and GESS contracts and the 
School Board's budget of $18.5 million represents a .78% increase over this 
year's budget. The total increase is 3.09%, including the contracts. The 
District anticipates additional revenues of over $700,000 this year. This is 
a 4.8% decrease or 90 cents per thousand. Enrollment has increased 4%, 
and we anticipate another 4% by September. 

Doreen Olson: How much per pupil do you spend in tuition costs? 

E. Vermokowitz: There are different calculations. Goffstown's aver- 
age is about $500 less per pupil than the state average. It is about $4,500. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 121 

D. Olson: I recently applied to Derrjrfield School for my son. Their cost 
is $13,500 per year. My point is, for $4,500 per year to give a child a decent 
education, that is not very much money. 

Angle Battey: Prior to last year, was there an international program in 
effect? 

M. York: Yes. There were three teachers. We had a difficulty with 
illness and people who left the district. 

A. Battey: Do you think we lost those teachers because we did not 
take care of them? 

M. York: It is difficult getting foreign language teachers. 

A. Battey: By adding two teachers we do not bring it up to where it 
was two years ago. 

M. York: We are rearranging the program. The School Board needs to 
make an attempt to get teachers to teach this to the seventh and eighth 
grade. 

D. Georgantas: In the event that you get this money and you can't find 
the teachers, what happens to the money? 

M. York: We have discussed this a great deal. At this point, we expect 
that money would go back to the Town eventually. 

D. Georgantas: Will you ask us to earmark money that you will even- 
tually spend on something else? 

M. York: This is a bottom line budget. The School Board is charged 
with dispersing those funds. 

D. Georgantas: The School Board could use the foreign language issue 
to accrue those funds, and then not hire the people and spend the money. 

M. York: If you believe that is what our goal is, I would tell you that is 
not the case. The School Board is most anxious to fill those two positions. 
That is our goal. 

E. Vermokowitz: The $18.5 million is not just for the foreign language 
teachers. It is inclusive of other items. We are renting two portable class- 
rooms next year. We need the teachers to put in those classrooms. We 
need the reading/writing position at Mt. View and the primary/special ed 
position at Maple Avenue. This saved us money in the SAU line. The total 
budget helps us move forward. 

Bob Wheeler: Question to Mike York and John Stafford. Both of you, 
I believe, share the concept that you have appropriated this as a bottom 
line budget. 

If that is accurate, and in each of your presentation's it was stated that 
it is anticipated you will have $150,000 surplus at the end of that period, 
can you give us your individual opinions as to why we are discussing any- 
thing less than $150,000? If the budget anticipates that surplus, then 
there is not a difference in this $130,000, and no matter how many times 
you say you are going to spend it, that is confusing. 



122 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

J. Stafford: The $150,000 was for this year's budget. It is anticipated 
that all things being equal, we hope to have that much to give back. That is 
not cast in stone. That is a small percentage of an $18.5 million budget. 
Traditionally, in the past, the money has been given back because it was 
not expended. 

M.York: We cannot anticipate all ofthe things that can happen. Court 
ordered placements are extremely expensive. We are dealing with last year's 
budget, and we are anticipating $150,000. This year there was $3,000 given 
back. 

Marie Morgan: I have two students at Mt. View. If you get children 
who take a language in eighth grade, they don't have to take the third year 
in high school. They can use their junior or senior year to take other 
subjects. Even if we could not get two teachers, I think many of the par- 
ents would accept having one language being taught. 

Neil Singer: I would like to hear the Budget Committee's side of why 
the foreign language teachers were a place where they could cut. 

J. Stafford: First of all, it is a fact that in the middle school it is not a 
requirement to have foreign language. We understand the problems that 
were involved in trying to find qualified teachers for foreign language. 
Part of the problem was we had to move people from the middle school to 
the high school. Since we had such a large increase in taxes this year, and 
because of the inability to find qualified teachers, we don't feel it will be 
any easier this year to find qualified teachers. 

Pete Georgantas: The Budget Committee thought that the $80,000 
and those positions were not warranted. It is not that we don't want to 
offer that class. There is a two-edge sword. When you add two teachers 
they need classrooms. We hear of overcrowding. This is one program that 
is not a necessity at this time. With all of the mandated programs, it is 
difficult to put in extra programming when you don't have the room. The 
Budget Committee has supported both contracts. They supported a large 
portion ofthe School Board's budget this year. There is a $130,000 differ- 
ence. That is not a lot of money. I think it is time that somebody has to 
tighten their belts. There were some huge tax increases this year. Some 
people had has much as a $1,600 increase. Neighbors of mine are com- 
plaining about their taxes. 

D. Georgantas: Is the $18,357,000 recommended by the Budget Com- 
mittee, and if the amendment goes through, does that mean the article will 
say not recommended by the Budget Committee? 

J. Stafford: We would vote at the end of this meeting tonight as to 
whether we recommend that figure. As it stands now, we are recommend- 
ing $18,357,000. 

Carmen Gangi: If the School Board gets their budget on the ballot, can 
you tell us what the default budget will be? 

M. York: $18,420,368. Mike Pothier questioned the default budget 
number and why it includes the $166,000 for the boilers. M. York: We 
checked with the DRA, and they said this was legal. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 123 



MOTION ; P. Georgantas moved, seconded by B. Wheeler to move 
the question. 

ALL IN FAVOR BY VOICE VOTE. MOTION CARRIED. 

L. Emerton: I have received a request for a secret ballot by six people. 
We will vote on Article 4 by secret ballot. 

THE WRITTEN VOTE ON THE AMENDMENT AS PRESENTED WAS 
177 IN FAVOR AND 52 OPPOSED. MOTION CARRIED. 

MOTION ; Ed Linde moved, seconded by Carmen Gangi to 
amend the budget amount to $16,600,000. This represents a ten- 
percent reduction and tax relief to the taxpayers of this Town. 

P. Georgantas: As a member of the Budget Committee, but not speak- 
ing for the Budget Committee, I have to speak against this motion. A ten- 
percent cut would not work for this Town or the School District. I suggest 
the people making this motion spend more time showing dollar for dollar 
where the cuts should be made at an earlier date, instead of coming to the 
meeting hoping this will pass. I hope everybody will vote against this 
amendment. 

Rip Holden: I have knocked on doors and talked to people while cam- 
paigning. I had the misfortune of talking to people when they got their tax 
bill. I am in favor of Ed's proposal because we need to tighten our belts. 

J. Stafford: I would like to speak against this amendment. We put 
numerous hours and time and sweat into this. We came up with what we 
thought was a reasonable budget. Ten percent will not allow it. We would 
have to cut so many things we would not be able to meet the mandated 
things. It is not responsible to come in with a ten percent cut. 

Preston Lawrance: I urge you to support this amendment. If you buy 
into the proposed School Board budget, the tax rate is $22.16. The pro- 
posed amendment would lower your tax rate by $3.21 per thousand. We 
had a 14% increase. I got a lot of calls from people very upset with the tax 
rate increase. I urge the voters to consider this amendment. 

B. Wheeler: I rise in opposition to this amendment. I would hope that 
people get to the point in recognizing what want to bless. We changed the 
annual School District meeting. We are in the middle of the SB2 process. 
That process demands we have a Budget Committee, School Board, that 
we form a budget and come here and present it and have these discussions. 
I am not opposed to someone making that ten percent cut. I would be 
opposed to supporting it. Now you come back in a year when there is not 
an increase in taxes. Last year we had an increase because we were not 
aware of what was happening on the revenue side of the ledger. This year 
we already know what is happening, and it is a huge increase of dollars 
coming from a source other than direct taxation on us. Here it is a de- 
crease. Please honor that. 

MOTION : P. Georgantas moved, seconded by B. Wheeler to move the 
question. 



124 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



ALL IN FAVOR BY VOICE VOTE. MOTION CARRIED. 

THE VOICE VOTE ON THE AMENDMENT AS PRESENTED BY ED 
LINDE WAS DEFEATED. 

ARTICLE 4 WILL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT AS AMENDED BY THE 
MOTION BY MICHAEL YORK AND SECONDED BY ELLEN 
VERMOKOWITZ - BUDGET AMOUNT TO APPEAR AS $18,500,368. 

MOTION : John Davis moved, seconded by J. Stafford to adjourn the 
meeting at 9:09 p.m. So voted. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jo Ann DAvanza 

Goffstown School District Clerk 




Maple Ave. Elementary School 
1999 Halloween Parade 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 125^ 

School District 
Election Results (3/9/99) 

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS YEAR ESTIMATED INCREASE 

For Three (3) Years Vote for Three (3) 1999.20OO $310,824 

PAUL "JODY" O'REILLY 1574 2000-2001 $369,425 

ALBERT PACKARD 1531 2001-2002 $325,074 

JOHN G. STAFFORD 1535 2002-2003 $404,436 

ARTICLE 2 2003-2004 $347,027 

Shall the District affirm and be bound by the fi- and further to raise and appropriate the sum of 

nancial provisions of a four year Collective Bar- THREE HUNDRED TEN THOUSAND EIGHT 

gaining Agreement entered into by and between HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR DOLLARS 

the Goffstown School Board and the Goffstown ($3 10,824.00) for the 1999-2000 fiscal year, such 

Educational Support Staff, NEA-New Hampshire, sum representing the additional costs attributable 

covering the years 1 999-2003, which calls for the to the increase in salaries and benefits over those 

following increases in salaries and benefits: of the appropriation at current staffing levels paid 

YEAR ESTIMATED INCREASE in the prior fiscal year. This appropriation is in 

1 999-2000 $1 27,600 addition to Warrant Article #4, the operating ar- 

2000-2001 $109,361 tide. 

2001 -2002 $1 01 ,228 (The School Board recommends this article) 

2002-2003 $1 03,066 (The Budget Committee recommends this article) 

and further to raise and appropriate the sum of YES- 1199 NO -835 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN THOU- ARTICLE4 

SAND SIX HUNDRED DOLLARS ($127,600.00) Shall the Goffstown School District raise and 

for the purpose of funding the 1 999-2000 year of appropriate as an Operating Budget, not includ- 

said collective bargaining agreement and to take ing appropriations by special warrant articles, the 

FIFTEEN THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED amounts set forth on the budget posted with the 

SIXTY-EIGHT DOLLARS ($1 5,368.00) from the warrant or as amended by vote of the first ses- 

Food Service Revenue Accounts with the remain- sion, for the purposes set forth therein totaling 

ing ONE HUNDRED TWELVE THOUSAND EIGHTEEN MILLION FIVE HUNDRED THOU- 

TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO DOLLARS SAND THREE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT DOL- 

($11 2,232.00) to come from the bargaining agree- LARS ($18,500,368.00). Should this article be 

ment, or to take any other action in relation thereto, defeated, the Operating Budget shall be EIGH- 

This appropriation is in addition to Warrant Ar- TEEN MILLION FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY 

tide #4, the operating budget article. (The School THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 

Board and Budget Committee recommends this DOLLARS ($1 8,420,368.00), which is the same 

artide) as last year, with certain adjustments required by 

YES - 1 329 NO - 700 previous action of the Goffstown School District 

ARTICLE 3 or by law; or the governing body may hold one 

Shall the District affirm and be bound by the fi- special meeting, in accordance with RSA 40:1 3, 

nancial provisions of a five-year Collective Bar- X and XVI, to take up the issue of a revised oper- 

gaining Agreement entered into by and between ating budget only, 

the Goffstown School Board and the Goffstown (The School Board recommends this article) 

Education Association covering the years 1 999 (The Budget Committee recommends this artide) 

2004, which calls for the following increases in YES -1237 NO -798 
salaries and benefits: 



126 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

GoFFSTOWN School District 
2000 WARRANT 

School Deliberative Ballot Determination Meeting 

February 7, 2000 
THE State of New Hampshire 

To the Inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Goffstown 
quahfied to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet on Monday, the seventh day of Febru- 
ary 2000, in the Gymnasium at Goffstown Area High School, at 7:00 P.M. 
for the first session of the School District Annual Meeting, also known as 
the first Deliberative Session, to act on the following subjects and deter- 
mine matters which will then be voted upon by the official ballot on Tues- 
day, March 14, 2000. 

You are further notified to meet on Tuesday, the fourteenth day of 
March 2000, also known as the second session, to vote on all matters by 
official ballot. The polls are open on March 14, 2000, at 7:00 A.M. and 
close at 7:00 P.M. at the Central polling district at the Goffstown Area 
High School and will open at 7:00 A.M. and close at 7:00 P.M. in the Fifth 
District at the Bartlett Elementary School. 

ARTICLE 1 

To choose all School District officers for the ensuing years. 

To choose three members of the School Board for the ensuing three 

years. 
To choose one member of the School Board for a remaining one-year 

term. 
To choose three School District Officials for the ensuing three years, 

namely: School District Moderator, School District Treasurer, and 

School District Clerk. 

ARTICLE 2 

Shall the School District raise and appropriate the sum of TEN MIL- 
LION EIGHT HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($10,850,000) 
for (1) The construction of additions to the Goffstown Area High School, for 
renovations to the existing building, for the payment of furnishings, equip- 
ment costs for such construction and existing school renovation pursuant 
to the plans and specifications as may be approved by the School Board, 
copies of which shall be on file with the School Administrative Unit #19 
Office in Goffstown, New Hampshire; and to raise such sum by the issu- 
ance of bonds or notes of the District in an amount not to exceed TEN 
MILLION EIGHT HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 127 

($10,850,000) in accordance with the provisions of the New Hampshire 
Revised Statutes Annotated, the form and terms of said bonds or notes 
including the time and place for the payment of interest, the rate of inter- 
est, and provisions for the sale of said bonds, or notes and all other matters 
in connection therewith to be left to the discretion of the School Board; 
(2) and further to authorize the expenditures of up to TWO HUNDRED 
THOUSAND DOLLARS ($200,000) from money to be gained from the short- 
term investing of the proceeds from the bond sales for the purpose of equip- 
ping the building; and (3) to further raise and appropriate through taxa- 
tion a sum of THREE HUNDRED THIRTEEN THOUSAND AND NINETY 
EIGHT DOLLARS ($313,098) for the initial interest payment on said bonds 
or notes. This appropriation is in addition to Warrant Article #5, the Oper- 
ating Budget Article. Note: The total amount raised and appropriated in 
this Article is $11,363,098 (Sixty percent vote required.) (The School Board 
recommends this article.) (The Budget Committee recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 3 

Shall the School District vote to authorize the Goffstown School Board 
to proceed with the purchase of land and development of architectural plans 
for an elementary school and to raise and appropriate the sum of $350,000 
for this purpose. The property is approximately 26 acres and is located on 
Jason Drive (Map 6 Lot 23). This appropriation is in addition to Warrant 
Article #5, the Operating Budget Article. (Majority vote required.) (The 
School Board recommends this article.) (The Budget Committee does not 
recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 4 

Shall the School District vote to purchase a new boiler to include a 
burner, heating pump, expansion tank, and all necessary piping to replace 
the existing Weil-McLain boiler at Bartlett Elementary School which was 
installed in 1965 and to raise and appropriate the sum of $96,000 for this 
purpose. This appropriation is in addition to Warrant Article #5, the Oper- 
ating Budget Article. (Majority vote required.) (The School Board recom- 
mends this article.) (The Budget Committee recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 5 

Shall the Goffstown School District raise and appropriate as an Oper- 
ating Budget, not including appropriations by special warrant articles and 
other appropriations voted separately, the amounts set forth on the budget 
posted with the warrant or as amended by vote of the first session, for the 
purposes set forth therein totaling NINETEEN MILLION EIGHT HUN- 
DRED TWENTY-EIGHT THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED EIGHTY- 
THREE DOLLARS ($19,828,383). Should this article be defeated, the 
Operating Budget shall be NINETEEN MILLION SEVEN HUNDRED 
FOURTEEN THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND ONE DOLLARS 
($19,714,901), which is the same as last year, with certain adjustments 
required by previous action of the Goffstown School District or by law; or 



128 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

the governing body may hold one special meeting, in accordance with RSA 
40:13, X and XVI, to take up the issue of a revised Operating Budget only. 
(The School Board recommends $20,151,178 as an Operating Budget for 
Article #5.) 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS AT SAID GOFFSTOWN ON THIS 
TWENTY-FIRST DAY OF JANUARY 2000. 

Michael York, Chair 
Craig Hieber, Vice Chair 
Karl MacGibbon 
Virginia McKinnon 
Paul O'Reilly 
Albert Packard 
Jane Raymond 
John Stafford 
Ellen Vermokowitz 
SCHOOL BOARD 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



129 



October 1st Pupil 
Enrollment 1995 - 1999 



School 



Grade 



1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 



Bartlett 


Pre-School 


_ 




13 


17 


29 




Multi- 


■age (1,2,3) 


40 


39 


42 


42 


42 




1 




39 


39 


40 


47 


32 




2 




36 


40 


38 


37 


47 




3 




46 


46 


41 


42 


36 


Total - Bartlett 






161 


164 


174 


185 


186 


Maple Avenue 


Pre-School 


21 


32 


23 


18 






Multi- 


■age (1,2,3) 


66 


67 


68 


69 


68 




1 




101 


138 


86 


117 


115 




2 




107 


106 


147 


97 


120 




3 




119 


106 


116 


152 


108 




4 




— 


— 


— 


— 


25 


Total - Maple Avenue 




414 


449 


440 


453 


436 


Mountain View 4 




214 


201 


199 


191 


214 




5 




175 


204 


207 


203 


200 




6 




183 


179 


217 


208 


220 




7 




277 


257 


261 


286 


305 




8 




283 


281 


255 


257 


301 


Total - MVMS 






1,132 


1,122 


1,139 


1,145 


1,240 


High School 


9 




244 


262 


262 


225 


240 




10 




213 


233 


254 


245 


224 




11 




235 


233 


235 


273 


257 




12 




206 


194 


172 


181 


219 




PG 




3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total - High School 




901 


922 


923 


924 


940 




GRAND TOTAL 1995-1997 


2,608 


2,657 


2,676 


2,707 


2,802 



130 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Auditor's Management Letter 

Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 

193 North Main St. Concord, NH 03301-5063 603-225-6996 FAX 224-1380 
August 13, 1999 
To the Members of the School Board: 

In planning and performing our audit of the Goffstown School District 
for the school year ended June 30, 1999, we considered the School District's 
internal control structure in order to determine the scope of our auditing 
procedures for the purpose of expressing our opinion on the general pur- 
pose financial statements. Our review of these systems was not intended 
to provide assurance on the internal control structure and should not be 
relied on for that purpose. 

Under the standards established by the American Institute of Certi- 
fied Public Accountants, reportable conditions involve matters coming to 
our attention relating to significant deficiencies in the design or operation 
of the internal control structure that, in our judgment, could adversely 
affect the School District's ability to record, process, summarize, and re- 
port financial data consistent with the assertions of management in the 
general purpose financial statements. A material weakness is a reportable 
condition in which the design or operation of one or more of the internal 
control structure elements does not reduce to a relatively low level the risk 
that errors or irregularities, in amounts that would be material in relation 
to the financial statements being audited, may occur and not be detected 
within a timely period by employees in the normal course of performing 
their assigned functions. Our consideration of the internal control struc- 
ture would not necessarily disclose all matters in the internal control struc- 
ture that might constitute reportable conditions and, accordingly, would 
not necessarily disclose all reportable conditions that are also considered 
to be material weaknesses as defined above 

The following reportable conditions were noted that we do not consider 
to be material weaknesses: 
GENERAL ACCOUNTING RECORDS 

Previous audit reports have detailed findings that are critical of the 
District's general accounting records and have offered recommendations 
for improvement. We again noted improvement in 1998-99 over the previ- 
ous year, but add that continued improvement is still necessary. Due to 
the turnover of financial personnel, additional time was spent by the audi- 
tors assisting the District in closing out the financial records at year-end. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 131 

We continue to suggest a periodic monitoring of the District's account- 
ing records, including the internal financial reports and the overall perfor- 
mance of the system to help prevent errors and to ensure that the objec- 
tives of proper internal control systems are met. 
VENDOR AND PAYROLL MANIFESTS (Repeat Comment) 

When examining the vendor and payroll manifests for the year, the 
following were noted: a) Actual manifests are not approved. Instead, a 
monthly "Approval Cover Sheet" usually is approved and maintained sepa- 
rately from the manifests; b) Manifests are not always listed on the "Ap- 
proval Cover Sheet."; c) The District Treasurer is not keeping a copy of the 
"Approval Cover Sheet" and is retaining only copies of the unapproved 
manifests. 

We again recommend that the majority of the School Board and the 
Superintendent sign each pa3rroll and vendor manifest independently to 
ensure that all disbursements are properly authorized. 
STUDENT ACTIVITY FUNDS (Repeat Comment) 

Student activity funds are established to account for the monies of each 
of the various student groups within the schools. The District is acting in 
a custodial capacity in administering these funds. For this reason, it is 
extremely important that accurate and detailed records be maintained. 
Periodic monitoring of each system should be completed by the District 
office to provide ongoing guidance and training of individuals involved with 
the day-to-day record keeping functions. During our audit of these ac- 
counts, we noted the following areas where improvements can be made: a) 
Activity in these accounts should be limited to student-related items only. 
Administrative items such as conference registrations, travel, postage and 
supplies should be accounted for through the General Fund; b) It appears 
in some instances that one person is responsible for all duties related to 
these accounts. To ensure proper internal controls, approval and review of 
all recordkeeping should be done by the Principals; c) Monthly and annual 
reports of activity should be made for financial reporting purposes. These 
reports should be submitted to the District office for review; d) Proper and 
complete invoice documentation should be obtained prior to the processing 
of any check. This should include approval of the respective advisor and 
principal; e) Accounting for these funds is being performed manually in 
many instances. Consideration should be given to the use of a standard- 
ized software package to assist in completion of the recordkeeping. 

We suggest a review of the internal accounting controls covering the 
various student activity funds that would encompass the areas mentioned 
above. We would be available to meet with District personnel to help rein- 
force and institute proper internal accounting control procedures to en- 
sure the proper use and recording of these funds. 

This report is intended solely for the information and use of manage- 
ment and others within the administration. This restriction is not intended 
to limit distribution of this report, which is a matter of public record. 

Plodzik & Sanderson Professional Association 



132 



1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 



GoFFSTOWN School Budget 



1998-1999 
Actual 

1100 Regular Education 8,078,368 

1200 Special Education 2,204,617 

1410 & 1420 Co-Curricular & Athletics 235,869 

1490 Other Pupil Services 

1810 Field Rental 1,500 

2112 Attendance Services 

2120 Guidance 534,483 

2130 Health Services 150,610 

2150 Speech Pathology and Audio 

2212 Curriculum Development 1,682 

2213 Staff Development 58,905 
2222 & 2223 Information Center Services 280,987 
2224 Educational TV 2,106 
2290 Technical Support Services 82,926 

2311 School Board 27,917 

2312 Census 

2313 Treasurer 2,470 

2314 District Meeting 2,057 

2317 Audit Services 4,400 

2318 Legal Services 13,814 
2321 SAU Services 768,430 
2410 Administration 916,100 
2490 Other Student Support Services 35,836 
2620 Building Operations 1,443,893 
2630 Care and Upkeep of Grounds 67,959 
2640 Equipment Maintenance 23,807 

2721 Transportation 698,699 

2722 Special Needs Transportation 232,530 

2723 Skills Center Transportation 23,106 

2724 Athletic Program Transportation 36,705 

2725 & 2790 Field Trip Transportation 15,202 
2834 GESS Course Reimbursement 4,041 
4200 Site Improvement 
4400 Building Evaluation 
4500 GAHS Building Survey 22,500 
5100 Debt Service 1,225,850 

Federal Grants 87,845 
Food Service 611.213 



1999-2000 2000-2001 2000-2001 

Appro- Proposed Proposed 

priation School Bd Budg Com 

8,555,579 9,449,035 9,325,146 

2,372,115 2,551,022 2,551,022 

267,577 281,768 240,168 

9,804 17,700 10,700 

2.000 2,000 2,000 
2 

595,839 635,016 635,016 

169,232 192,748 192,748 

167,139 198,554 198,554 

2.001 2,965 2,000 
66,001 66,000 40,000 

341,122 336,664 329,214 

7,600 6,800 6,800 

83.499 89,000 89,000 
30,320 30,719 29,219 

1 

2,624 2,624 2,624 

3,445 3,445 3,445 

4,000 4,500 4,500 

25,000 25,000 25,000 

787,652 777,714 777,714 

1,130,469 1,143,798 1,115,242 

146,878 154,310 151,260 

1,253,275 1,242,041 1,212,256 

60,791 51,115 12,115 

27,724 16,004 6,004 

702,832 718,600 718,600 

285,204 294,515 294,515 

25,922 26,570 26,570 

36.500 42,500 38,500 
19,503 19,724 19,724 

6,000 6,000 6,000 

4 33,165 33,165 

25,000 



1,181,910 1,136,012 1,136,012 

50,000 50,000 50,000 

543.550 543.550 543.550 



Total Goffstown School District: 



17,896,427 18,988,064 20,151,178 19,828,383 



NOTE: FY 2000-01 figures are for Warrant Art. #5 only and do not include figures for proposed 

const., land, purchase, or boiler purchase listed in Art. #2 & #4. 

Dept. of Ed. adopted a new coding system which was implemented for the 1 999-2000 school year. 



SCHOOL - EXECUTIVE REPORTS 



133 



GoFFSTOWN School Revenues 





1998-1999 


1999-2000 


2000-2001 


2000-2001 




Approved 


Approved 


Proposed 
School Board 


Proposed 

Budget 

Committee 


Revenue From State Sources 










Foundation Aid / Adeq. Grant 


$674,928 


$5,059,337 


$5,059,337 


$5,059,337 


School Building Aid 


226,651 


240,560 


235,303 


235,303 


Area Vocational School 


14,400 


14,400 


14,400 


14,400 


Catastrophic Aid 


172,984 


213,832 


172,984 


172,984 


Child Nutrition 


12,850 


12,850 


12,850 


12,850 


Revenue From Federal Sources 










lASA, Chapter 1 and II 


50,000 


50,000 


50,000 


50,000 


Child Nutrition Programs 


108,000 


80,700 


80,700 


80,700 


Local Revenue Other Than Taxes 










Tuition 


2,200,000 


2,387,000 


2,500,000 


2,500,000 


Driver Ed. Program Receipts 






10,000 


10,000 


Earnings on Investments 


15,000 


25,000 


25,000 


25,000 


Food Service 


450,000 


465,368 


450,000 


450,000 


Medicaid Reimbursement 


10,000 


50,000 


50,000 


50,000 


Reimbursement Spec. Ed. 


50,000 


50,000 


75,000 


75,000 


Subtotal Revenues & Credits 


$3,984,813 


$8,649,047 


$8,735,574 


$8,735,574 


General Fund Balance 


$2,683 


$975,593 


$200,000 


$200,000 


Total Revenues and Credits 


$3,987,496 


$9,624,640 


$8,935,574 


$8,935,574 


District Assessment 


14,369,550 


5,273,208 


7,174,660 


6,851,865 


State Assessment 


N/A 


4,040,944 


4,040,944 


4,040,944 


Total Appropriations * 


$18,357,046 


$18,938,792 


$20,151,178 


$19,828,383 


Less Shared Revenues 


175,218 












* NOTE: FY 2000 -01 figures do not include proceeds from the bond sale of $10,850,000 and 
$200,000 in projected interest income from short term investments of the proceeds. 



134 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

Debt Schedule 

Years remaining on Goffstown Scliool District General Obligation Bonds 



YEAR 

1999-00 
2000-01 
2001-02 
2002-03 
2003-04 
2004-05 
2005-06 
2006-07 
2007-08 
2008-09 
2009-10 
2010-11 
2011-12 



PRINCIPAL 


INTEREST 


AMOUNT DUE 


765,000.00 


$ 416,910.00 


$1,181,910.00 


765,000.00 


$ 371,011.25 


$1,136,011.25 


755,000.00 


$ 333,693.75 


$1,088,693.75 


745,000.00 


$301,260.00 


$1,046,260.00 


730,000.00 


$ 268,445.00 


$ 


998,445.00 


720,000.00 


$ 235,820.00 


$ 


955,820.00 


705,000.00 


$ 203,228.75 


$ 


908,228.75 


695,000.00 


$ 170,331.25 


$ 


865,331.25 


685,000.00 


$ 135,843.75 


$ 


820,843.75 


675,000.00 


$ 100,143.75 


$ 


775,143.75 


665,000.00 


$ 64,968.75 


$ 


729,968.75 


605,000.00 


$ 31,631.25 


$ 


636,631.25 


300,000.00 


$ 7,875.00 


$ 


307,875.00 



SCHOOL - PRINCIPAL'S REPORTS 135_ 

Principals' Reports 

BARTLETT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

David A. Bousquet, Principal 

Since beginning my position as principal of Bartlett Elementary School, 
many exciting and important things have taken place. Our school year 
began on September 2nd with an enrollment of 189 students. The enroll- 
ment by the end of December rose slightly to 194. Because of its small size 
and grade range (Preschool to grade 3), Bartlett is an ideal school for aca- 
demic and social growth and a source of community pride. 

This fall the following people joined our dedicated staff: teachers Linda 
Beloin, James Paul, Mary Starvish, and Brenda White; educational assis- 
tants Louella Hajrfe, SueEllen Medeiros, Suzanne Turgeon, Linda Vesey, 
and Sherri Wilkinson; and custodian Loyd Cargill. 

Academic growth and student learning have been the focus at Bartlett 
this year. The District has developed and is using new curricula in lan- 
guage arts, math, guidance, science and social studies. Many staff mem- 
bers have participated on the Integrated Model for Instructional Improve- 
ment Committee, which developed the Professional Practice Profile, a model 
for improving student learning through the enhancement of teaching. This 
year we are using new Rigby and Scholastic Literacy Place programs. These 
fully integrated language arts programs are designed to provide every child 
with the means and materials needed to learn to read and write with a 
purpose and will provide more structure in our literacy program. To fur- 
ther enhance literacy in our school, we have participated in numerous pro- 
fessional development and student activities. Students are called to the 
office on their birthday and receive a Bartlett PTA Birthday Book, chosen 
especially for them. The in-school mail program. Wee Deliver, continued 
this year to help students develop writing skills. Betty Ward coordinated 
this program in cooperation with the Goffstown Post Office. 

On September 23'^'^, we had an Open House at the Bartlett Elementary 
School. Visitors had the opportunity to visit the classrooms, meet the staff 
and tour the building. While at the Open House, many people went into 
the gym to visit the information booths of local organizations including the 
PTA, Boy Scouts, Optimist Club and the Pinardville Branch of the Goffs- 
town Library. The Goffstown Police fingerprinted numerous children. On 
display in the lobby and in the gym were pamphlets, charts and plans 
concerning the building projects for the Goffstown School District. 

On October 7*^, six students from Mountain View Middle School visited 
Bartlett to present their "No Taunting Pledge" project. This is a national 
program, which arose from the incident at Columbine High School, to stop 
students from making fun of people who are different as a way of curbing 
violence in schools. They explained the pledge before the whole school and 
then went to individual classrooms for further discussion. The students 



136 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

were then given the opportunity to take the pledge on a volunteer basis. 

Bartlett Elementary celebrated Red Ribbon Week in October. Activi- 
ties during the week stressed the importance of making appropriate choices 
concerning drugs. Students took an antidrug pledge, had a visit from Of- 
ficer Friendly and participated in many other activities including a perfor- 
mance by magician Steve Thomas. Mr. Thomas did many breathtaking 
magical tricks while discussing the dangers of drugs. 

The students at Bartlett Elementary School were treated to a number 
of assemblies and programs this year. The Goffstown Fire Department vis- 
ited each classroom during Fire Prevention Week in October to discuss fire 
safety. During November the Mountain View Drama Company from Moun- 
tain View Middle School presented, ''Lion and Mouse Stories" and the 
Hampstead Players presented "Aladdin". The New Hampshire Department 
of Safety visited Bartlett Elementary School with their blue robotic pup- 
pet, Captain Smyle. He discussed many safety issues concerning bicycle 
riding, crossing streets, getting on and off buses, etc. All of these perfor- 
mances help provide experiences as a foundation for learning and rein- 
force student learning in an enjoyable and motivating manner. 

In November, several teachers participated in the Northeast Early Lit- 
eracy Conference in Boston. Consultants Rita Georgeou, Mary Johnson, 
and Karen Schuster have worked with the staff on the new language arts 
programs, literacy instructional strategies, and evaluating writing. By 
utilizing these educational consultants, the staff at Bartlett has been imple- 
menting current instructional strategies and best teaching practices to 
improve student learning. 

There are four teams participating in the Destination Imagination pro- 
gram this year. Lisa Burrows coordinated this program which helps foster 
creativity and problem solving skills in children. The teams met through- 
out the fall and winter to prepare for the regional competition in March. 

McDonald's Restaurant has continued its Student of the Month pro- 
gram. Each month, teachers submit names of students who did outstand- 
ing work in the area of academics, behavior, social interaction and im- 
provement and they are recognized with a certificate from McDonald's. 
Also, every other week a student is chosen from each class to have lunch in 
the office with the principal. The students can discuss things that interest 
them, listen to a book and talk about the story. Students have enjoyed this 
time with the principal and learn that the office isn't such a bad place! 

The Bartlett community was involved in many community service ac- 
tivities this year. Bartlett Elementary School held a successful Grandpar- 
ent Lunch on October S**". Over 80 grandparents joined their grandchil- 
dren for a delicious lasagna dinner. Food was collected during Thanksgiv- 
ing and Christmas for the Network Food Drive and distributed to area 
families during the holidays. Over 75 pairs of black socks were collected to 
support the Adopt-a-Platoon Soldier Support Effort to be distributed to our 
troops in Kosovo. Students also participated in a Read-A-Thon and helped 
raise over $760.00 to help Evan Ravanelle's family with medical expenses. 



SCHOOL - PRINCIPAL'S REPORTS 137 

Twenty-one third grade students participated in the newly developed 
strings program. The students received violin lessons from Chris Shimkus, 
music teacher at GAHS. The program helps foster a love of music, pro- 
vides an early exposure to instrumental music, helps build responsibility 
and makes students see the importance of practice. 

A Safety Committee consisting of staff members and parents has been 
meeting throughout the year. This committee reviews the policies of the 
school and looks at ways to ensure that Bartlett Elementary School is a 
safe environment for everyone. The goal of this group is to develop an 
overall plan for school safety, to keep everyone informed of the plan and to 
revise the plan as necessary to meet the needs of the school 

Finally, I would like to thank the many people I have met this year and 
for their support in my first year as principal at Bartlett Elementary School. 
I am looking forward to many more years working with the students, staff, 
parents and community of Goffstown. Our school can be whatever we 
make it. Together let us make it outstanding! 

MAPLE AVENUE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Marc Boyd, Principal 

The major emphasis of the Maple Avenue Elementary School over the 
past year has been the advancement of student learning. This has been 
done by the implementation of the revised Reading and Language Arts 
curriculum. The teachers organized instruction based on the standards 
that have been established in these curriculum areas. The New Hamp- 
shire Curriculum Frameworks guided local curriculum revisions. These 
frameworks also serve as the catalyst for determining the skills that New 
Hampshire students in grades 3, 6, and 10 are assessed on in the New 
Hampshire Educational Improvement Program each May. 

During this year the staff researched reading series with a number of 
teachers actually piloting various programs with their students for the 
year. In May it was decided to implement the Scholastic series for the 
single grade classes and the Rigby series for the Multi-Age classes. The 
students and their families raised $10,000 for the new reading series through 
a number of events, which included The Great Maple Avenue Read-A-Thon. 
In May we celebrated the success of the program with the students and 
staff coming to school dressed as their favorite literary character. I was 
fortunate to have my attire selected by the top fundraiser and spent the 
day dressed as Cinderella! 

Each grade level is special at the school and I would like to share with 
you at least one activity from each of the grade levels. The first grade 
students embarked on a world tour in the month of December that joined 
the study of geography and culture with the traditions of the winter holi- 
day season. The students visited countries all over the world during a 
two- week period. In order to travel, the children first had to complete an 
application for a passport. They prepared for the trip by decorating their 



138 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

own personal luggage. The suitcase was used to carry all-important docu- 
ments such as their passport, a world map (in case they got lost), and any 
other papers collected from the various countries. 

Each classroom became a country and the teacher a "native". During 
the two-week period the students visited six countries (classrooms). In the 
countries they used their maps to locate that country and learned about 
the geography, culture, life styles, holidays and traditions. The children 
enjoyed their trip and learned the world is really quite small when it comes 
to holiday time. 

The second grade students studied cultural diversity and customs. Each 
class selected a country and immersed themselves into the culture, art, 
music and dance. The children, with the help of their families, made this 
unit not only a school-related activity but also a family project. The "grand 
finale" of the unit was a packed evening performance by the second grade 
at their "Harmony Cultural Concert". 

The Multi-Age program, in its fourth year, continued to flourish and 
provide an alternate academic program for students in grades one through 
three. Over the course of the year, the students explored a variety of eco- 
systems that included islands, oceans and mountains. These topics were 
integrated throughout all curriculum areas. Their culminating activity 
was yet another capacity-filled evening musical concert by the students 
highlighting the information learned in the unit. A live adult orchestra 
comprised of Multi-Age parents and friends accompanied the children. 

The third grade continued to enrich their curriculum with historical 
visits and visiting guests. During the course of the school year they toured 
the Kearsarge Native American Museum in Warner, visited the U.S.S. 
Constitution and Museum in Boston and had Revolutionary War authori- 
tarian, William Coker, a Goffstown resident, speak to the students as a 
culminating activity to their study of the Revolutionary war. 

Thanks to the generous financial support of the PFT and the dedicated 
support of the staff and numerous volunteers, the students were afforded 
the opportunity to spend time with noted puppeteer, Dan Grady, as our 
Artist in Residence. Dan was at the school for seven days sharing the 
world of puppetry with all the children. The culminating event of the 
residency was a spectacular puppet show put on by the children entitled 
"The World of Knarftac" with special effects and all. This was not your 
everyday puppet show! Just ask any of the fortunate standing room only 
audience who attended. 

This is a but a mere glimpse of the many activities that took place 
during the course of the 1998/1999 school year. As in the past, I must 
recognize the incredible support we receive from the parents/guardians, 
community and especially the Parent Faculty Together organization and 
all the volunteers they provide for the school. This, coupled with the pro- 
fessional, caring and nurturing staff who are devoted to your children, 
creates the fond memories that your child takes from the Maple Avenue 
Elementary School. 



SCHOOL- PRINCIPALS REPORTS 139 

MOUNTAIN VIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Rose LaRochelle-Colby, Principal 
Sandra Davis and James Doig, Associate Principals 

In September 1998, Mountain View Middle School opened its doors in 
its eighth year of operation with a student body of 1162 students. The 
school year was marked with many successes. As teachers embraced the 
new curriculum in the core content areas, students showed gains in per- 
formance on the New Hampshire Individual Educational Assessment Pro- 
gram in May 1999. Student activities such as sports, O.M., Band, Chorus, 
the Enrichment Program, and the school newspaper broadened our aca- 
demic programs. The continued support of Mountain View Partnership in 
sponsoring grade level parent roundtable evenings was greatly appreci- 
ated. M.V.P.'s magazine drive provided support for many team activities 
as well as the Artist in Residence program on weaving; the Parent/Kid 
Connection at St. Anselm College, and the Career Fair. The Career Fair 
this year was highlighted by Lunchtime Theatre starring performers from 
the world of opera, musical drama, and a band. M.V.M.S. celebrated Mu- 
sic in Our Schools month with a month long music trivia contest and fea- 
tured guest artists performing during the month. 

While events around the country focused attention on issues of school 
safety. Mountain View Middle School was on the cutting edge of safety 
programming. In its second year of work, our Safety Committee, chaired 
by James Doig, our Associate Principal, began its work of implementing an 
emergency response plan for the school. The committee membership of 
parents, teachers, transportation personnel, police, fire, custodial, secre- 
tarial and medical personnel designed a series of drills for the school to 
practice in the event of short term evacuation, long term evacuation, ex- 
plosion, weather emergency, and gunfire. All participants debriefed each 
drill. The committee also sponsored several information sessions for par- 
ents. All of this preparation led to a mock disaster drill in June. In coop- 
eration with the N.H. Office of Emergency Management, Mountain View 
Middle School opened its doors to observers from the police, fire, and edu- 
cation sector from around the state as observers to the drill. Because of the 
timing of the drill and the events happening around the country, we were 
called often by schools locally and nationally for our safety plan. 

We hope that an emergency response is never needed but if it is, we 
feel confident that we would be able to make the best decisions possible in 
the interests or our students and staff. As the year closed, our student 
population had increased by 22 students, up to 1184 students. The sum- 
mer brought an additional seventy-six student enrollments. The additional 
modular classroom space for two classes and teachers was ready for the 
beginning of the 1999-2000 school year. 



140 1999 GOFFSTOWN ANNUAL REPORT 

The 1998-99 school year was a year of continued growth for Mountain 
View Middle School. But far more important, the students and staff cel- 
ebrated our academics, the arts, and our multi-faceted programs designed 
for the middle level students. We look positively to the 21^*^ century as a 
continued time of challenge, growth, and change for Mountain View Middle 
School. 

GOFFSTOWN AREA HIGH SCHOOL 

Chris Mosca, Principal 

Francis McBride and Pamela Miller 
Assistant Principals 

The past year at Goffstown Area High School has been one of excite- 
ment and activity. Perhaps no other event helped to energize our school 
and community more than the Boys Basketball Class I championship in 
March. It was a truly wonderful tournament, which sjnnbolized the grow- 
ing partnership between our school and the Greater Goffstown Commu- 
nity. Special thanks go to Coach Dave Michaud, his staff and players for 
providing us the thrills and pride of a championship season. 

Perhaps the most significant honor for our high school was our selec- 
tion as one of twenty schools/districts in the state to participate in the New 
Hampshire Best Schools Leadership Institute. As a result of our involve- 
ment in this initiative, a team of teachers, administrators and community 
members began work this summer at an intensive week-long retreat in 
Bartlett, NH with the aim of restructuring the high school over the next 
three years. 

The team's intent is to make GAHS a school that ensures that all stu- 
dents achieve at high standards in a supportive climate that will prepare 
them for life in the new millennium. To do this, we have established 12 
goals designed to support our mission statement - namely, the need to 
develop "impassioned, independent, life-long learners." Our expectation is 
that this mission becomes a reality for everyone through our restructuring 
efforts. If you would like to learn more about Best Schools and what it 
means for our students, feel free to contact us at the high school. 

Aside from our participation in Best Schools, we have made significant 
progress in meeting the recommendations of the NEASC evaluation re- 
port. Our work in this area reflects the commitment of a dedicated follow- 
up committee and staff. It is our expectation that the warning status of 
GAHS in the area of assessment will be removed as a result of our efforts 
chronicled in the 2-year evaluation report submitted in October. Most im- 
portantly, with the approval in March of our proposed building renovation 
project, we will ensure that our students will thrive in an upgraded facility 
that will meet their educational needs for years to come. 



SCHOOL- PRINCIPALS REPORTS 141 

In the area of personnel, two new assistant principals were hired this 
summer. Pamela Miller has assumed the duties of leading curriculum de- 
velopment and student services while former social studies teacher Frank 
McBride, has assumed the role of athletic director and assistant principal 
for student affairs. Our students and faculty have been very responsive to 
these two administrators who have made a smooth transition to their new 
positions. Additionally, School Resource Officer Dave Moloney and eigh- 
teen new faculty members joined us in September. 

In June, our school and community celebrated the career of former 
assistant principal Jim Fullam whose devotion and love for our students 
and school will never be replaced. We wish Jim all the best in his retire- 
ment. Sadly, we also mourned the loss of math teacher Steve Gionet who 
died tragically in February. 

Our partnership with the community continues to flourish. In Janu- 
ary, a highly successful Tolerance and Diversity Day was held at GAHS. 
Reverend William Exner, Lt. Kerry Steckowych from the Gofffstown police 
department and Andre Garron from the Goffstown Office of Planning joined 
us in our school wide effort to promote an environment that upholds the 
value of treating people with respect and dignity regardless of their indi- 
vidual differences. I would also like to thank the YMCA in Goffstown for 
working with us to successfully implement a Conflict Resolution program 
in our physical education classes. In our increasingly turbulent society, 
the need to teach students ways to solve problems without resorting to 
verbal or physical aggression is fundamental to our growth as a school and 
community. In keeping with this spirit, an Interact Club sponsored by the 
Goffstown Rotary was established at the high school to enhance our com- 
mitment to community service. 

Finally, as I reflect upon the events of the past year it is clear that 
GAHS, in partnership with the residents of Goffstown, Dunbarton and 
New Boston have much in which to be proud. Our children are our most 
precious gift and it is our privilege to serve them each day. All of us at the 
high school thank you for your continued support in ensuring the bright- 
est of futures for all our young people. 



Goffstown's Transfer Station 

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE 



MEMORIAL DAY 

CLOSED Saturday, May 27, 2000 
(Trash & Recycling on schedule.) 

INDEPENDENCE DAY 

CLOSED Tuesday, July 4, 2000 
(Trash & Recycling on schedule) 

LABOR DAY 

CLOSED Saturday, September 2, 2000 
(Trash on schedule. Recycling one day late.) 

COLUMBUS DAY 

CLOSED Saturday, October 7, 2000 
(Trash on schedule. Recycling one day late.) 

VETERANS DAY 

CLOSED Saturday, November 11, 2000 
(Trash & Recycling on schedule) 

THANKSGIVING DAY 

CLOSING AT NOON on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 

CLOSED Thursday, November 23, 2000 

(Trash & Recycling one day late.) 

CHRISTMAS DAY 

CLOSED Saturday, December 23, 2000 
(Trash on schedule. Recycling one day late.) 



Goffstown's Recycling Program 

CuRBSiDE Recycling Program 

GLASS* clear, brown or green glass is accepted. 

ALUMINUM CANS* 

TIN & STEEL CANS* 

PLASTIC* #1 PETE and #2 HDPE plastic is accepted, however, bags or 
containers that held petroleum products such as motor oil are excluded. 
Look for recycling symbol and # on bottom. 

ASEPTIC PACKAGING* such as juice boxes and milk cartons. 

CORRUGATED CARDBOARD should be flattened and cut down to no 
larger than 21" x 32". Corrugated cardboard consists of three layers of 
cardboard, where the center layer consists of ridges. 

NEWSPAPER should be placed in a brown paper bag or tied in bundles. 

MAGAZINES should be placed in a brown paper bag or tied in bundles. 

MIXED PAPER such as junk mail and cereal boxes, should be placed in a 
paper bag. Packages partially comprised of foil, blueprint paper, car- 
bon paper and food soiled paper, such as napkins and paper plates are 
excluded. 

*Please rinse clean. 

Drop Off Program 

All of the items accepted at the curb as well as the following items are 

accepted in our Drop Off Program at the Transfer Station. 

TEXTILES should be clean, dry and bagged. 

WOOD consisting of lumber, building materials, furniture and roofing, 
which is painted, stained, or pressure treated, is accepted. Nails do not 
have to be removed. 

LEAVES must be removed from plastic bags. Paper bags accepted. 

BRUSH is limited to no larger than 5" diameter. No stumps accepted. 

SCRAP METAL such as appliances, bikes, etc. are accepted. Car, truck, 
boat, motorcycle parts (fenders, doors, etc.) not accepted. Freon-based 
appliances, refrigerators, air conditioners, dehumidifiers are accepted. 

WET-CELL BATTERIES such as automotive batteries are accepted pro- 
vided the cases are not broken. 

AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES are wet cell batteries; no broken cases. 

TIRES are accepted. 

New Operation of Transfer Station 

Solid Waste Ordinance became effective June 1, 1998 
All vehicles using the Transfer Station must cross the scalehouse and be 
weighed in and out. All vehicles using the Transfer Station must have a 
valid permit, affixed to the vehicle and clearly visible to the scalehouse 
operator. Fees will be charged for the following items: 
OBW (Oversized Bulky Waste)/Deinolition: 5^ per pound. Building ma- 
terial, roofing, sheetrock, wood products, fences, furniture, console 
TVs/stereos, couches, stuffed chairs, carpeting, toilets, siding, pallets. 
Mattresses & Box Springs: $10 each 

Refrigerators & Freezers (doors removed)/Air Conditioners: $15 ea. 
Tires: Car $1 each; Truck $5 each; Heavy Equipment $25 each. 
Commercial Vehicles: 5^ per pound for everything 



IAIN sTReei 



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(V., ^/.A^' 



Dedication of Town Common 



PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLES FREIBURGER 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 



EMERGENCY 

FIRE & AMBULANCE SERVICE 

POLICE 

POISON CENTER 



911 or 497-3311 

911 or 497-2232 

800-562-8236 



Assessor 

Building Inspector 
District Court 
Finance Dept. 
Fire Dept. (Church St) 
Fire Dept. (E. Goffs.) 
Fire Dept. (PinardviUe) 
Goffstown Village 

Water Precinct 
Grasmere Village 

Water Precinct 



Bartlett Elementary 
Goffs. High School 
Maple Ave. Elem. 



TOWN OFFICES 

497-3611 Parks & Recreation 
497-3612 Planning Dept. 
497-2597 Police Dept. 
497-3615 Pubhc Library 
497-3537 Public Works Dept. 
497-4655 Selectmen's Office 
622-6713 Sewer Commission 

Support Services 
497-3621 Tax Collector 

Town Clerk 
497-8346 Transfer Station 

SCHOOLS 

623-8088 Mountain View Middle 
497-4841 S.A.U. #19 
497-3330 



497-3003 
497-8991 
497-4858 
497-2102 
497-3617 
497-8990 
497-8992 
497-3616 
497-3614 
497-3613 
497-4824 

497-8288 
497-4818