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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

TOWN 



HELMSFORD 



MASSACHUSETTS 
Annual report 



Chelmsford 

Public 

Library 

Children's Room Mural 
By Artist, Yetti Frenkel 

Dedicated 
September 30, 2007 







Fiscal Year 
2007 



Bommunity Profile & Map 



Quick facts 



Incorporated 
Type of government 



County 

Land Area 
Public Road Miles 



May 1 655 

Board of selectman 

Town manager 

Representative Town Meeting 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 
186.99 



Population 2006 town census 
Median family income 2005 
Tax rate fy 2007 
Median Home Value FY 2007 
Median Tax Bill FY 2007 

Operating Budget FY 2007 
Website 



33,858 

$82,676 

$ 1 2.53 (single rate) 

$396,300 

$4,961.88 

$96,21 1,180 

www.townofchelmsford.us 



Chelmsford, Massachusetts 




%*? 






Table of Contents 



TOWN ADMINISTRATION PP.2 - 8 

Board of Selectmen 2 - 3 

Appointed Officials 3 

Town Manager's Office 4-5 

Finance Department 6-7 

Town Clerk & Registrars 8 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PP.9 -12 

Planning Board 1 

Conservation Commission 1 1 

Community Preservation Committee 1 2 

Board of Appeals 1 2 

PUBLIC EDUCATION PP. 13-14 

Chelmsford Public Schools 1 3 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 1 4 

PUBLIC SAFETY pp. 15- 21 

Police Department 15-17 

Fire Department 1 8-20 

Building Department 21 

PUBLIC WORKS PP. 22 - 28 

Engineering 22 

Highway Division 23 

Sewer Division 23 

Public Buildings 23 

Parks Division 24 

Public Facilities department 24 

Recycling & Solid Waste 25-27 

Sewer Commission 28 

Cemetery Commission 28 

HUMAN SERVICES PP. 29-35 

Council on Aging/Senior Center 29 - 30 

Library 30-31 

Recreation 32 

Veterans' Services 32 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 33 

Health Department 34-35 

BOARDS & COMMITTEES PP. 36 - 38 

Arts & Technology Education Fund 36 

Historical Commission 37 

Historic District Commission 37 

Finance Committee 38 

ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 39 - 40 

TOWN MEETING REPRESENTATIVES 4 1 - 42 

COMMITTEE DESCRIPTIONS 43-46 

TOWN DIRECTORY INSIDE COVER 



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XW0P: 




The mural in the children 's room of the Chelmsford 
Public Library is a gift to our community in memory of 
Steve Maloney. Steve was a Library Trustee who grew 
up in Chelmsford. When he died suddenly in 2006, his 
family commissioned this mural with donations made in 
his name. 

The artist, Yetti Frenkel, designed this mural incorporat- 
ing Steve 's love for New England weather and the sea- 
sons. To view more images from the mural, go to the 
Chelmsford Public Library website at 
www.chelmsfordlibrary.org or visit the main library at 
25 Boston Road. 

Chetasfonl Public Library 

23 Boston Road 

Chdmsfbrd. MA 01824 



Weetlna (pfc/iec/uleb 

Selectmen Every other Monday 

Town Offices - 7:00 pm 

School Committee Every other Tuesday 

Parker School - 7:30 PM 

Planning Board 2nd & 4th Wednesday 

Town Offices - 7:00 PM 

Board of Appeals 2nd & 4th Thursday 

Town Offices - 7:00 PM 

Conservation Comm 1 st & 3rd Tuesday 

Town Offices - 7:30 PM 

Board of Health 1 st Monday 

Town Offices - 7:00 PM 

Housing Authority 1st Tuesday 

1 Wilson Street - 7:00 PM 

Schedules are subject to change. To confirm all meetings, 

please call the Town Clerk's Office at 978-250-5205 or visit 

the Town 's Official Website at www, townofchelmsford.us. 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Board of Selectmen 



cy&ian ri^eu^mment 



Samuel P. Chase 
Chairman 

To the Residents of Chelmsford: 

FY 2007 was a year of change and transition for 
Chelmsford. With the departure of our Town Manager and 
School Superintendent, the Board of Selectmen and School 
Committee wasted no time in putting together effective search 
committees whose efforts resulted in hiring two top-notch pro- 
fessionals. We welcomed Paul Cohen, our new Town Man- 
ager, who "hit the ground running" in November and quickly 
established a proactive management style that we feel will 
serve the town well. Likewise, we enthusiastically look for- 
ward to the perspective that our new Superintendent Dr. Don 
Yeoman will bring to our school system's 'administrative and 
educational programs. We thank our citizen volunteers who 
served on these search committees and are sincerely grateful 
for the many long hours they contributed to ensure a fair, effi- 
cient, and timely selection and hiring process. 

During our fall planning sessions, it quickly became 
obvious that limited revenue increases, rapidly escalating 
health insurance/benefit costs, and reduced education (Chapter 
70) aid packages would contribute to a substantial FY08 oper- 
ating deficit if coordinated action were not taken to reorder 
expenditure priorities and lobby for additional state funding. In 
an unprecedented cooperative effort, municipal and school ad- 
ministrations established a Leadership Group ( 1 representative 
each from our Board, the School and Finance Committees plus 
the Town Manager, School Superintendent and selected staff) 
to address our deteriorating financial situation. In addition, 
many citizens working through the Initiative for Local Aid 
combined with representatives from our Board and the School 
Committee to convince our legislature that an increase in our 
Chapter 70 education aid was long overdue. Those directed and 
sustained efforts helped to bring about action that increased our 
FY08 aid package by $900,000. Working together, our Boards, 
municipal and school administrations, and active citizens 
helped to achieve a FY08 balanced budget that avoids use of 
reserves or overrides to fund increased operating expense. We 
particularly recognize the special efforts of Laura McLaughlin 
and Donna Newcomb (Initiative for Local Aid), and Kathy 
Duffett (School Committee) in helping to raise legislative 
awareness relative to our inadequate Chapter 70 aid package. 
We will continue to rely on the cooperative efforts of all town 
officials and citizens to meet the challenges of increased fiscal 
pressures going forward. 

This past year. Selectmen Mike McCall and Tom 
Newcomb decided not to seek reelection. We are especially 
grateful for Mike's extended 3-term commitment to our Board 
as well as the leadership he demonstrated on other boards and 
committees, and we thank both men for their service to the 
town. The dynamic of two open seats on the Board sparked a 




Chelmsford Board of Selectmen (April 2007 election) Front Row from Left to 
Right: - Vice Chairman, Philip M. Eliopoulos: Chairman Samuel P. Chase; 
and Patricia Wojtas Back Row from Left to Right - William F. Dalton. and 
Clerk Clare L. Jeannotte, 



great deal of interest in the April election. We welcome our 
two new Selectmen Clare Jeannotte and Pat Wojtas to the 
Board, and expect that their desire to contribute together with 
their experience in municipal affairs will serve us well. 
FY07 saw the completion of our $31 million school renovation 
project. The addition of the new auditorium to the High School, 
substantial improvements made to the McCarthy and Parker 
Middle Schools, and continuation of the annual capital im- 
provement funding should keep our school facilities function- 
ing well into this century. This project epitomizes the excel- 
lence that can be achieved when dedicated, honest, capable, 
and hard working citizens pull together for the benefit of the 
whole town. The School Building Committee brought the pro- 
ject in on time and under budget, something that rarely happens 
with public construction projects. We owe a debt of gratitude 
to our citizen-based School Building Committee, and most 
especially to its Chairman Pat Maloney, who kept the welfare 
of students and taxpayers in mind at all times while giving tire- 
lessly and selflessly to ensure project success. 

Throughout the year, we continued to deal with the 
negative aspects of increased 40B development. Because of 
increased publicity, more citizens are aware of the unfair ad- 
vantage the law gives to 40B developers seeking to bypass mu- 
nicipal zoning requirements. We developed and implemented 
policy that defines a 40B developer's obligations to the town 
and neighborhood residents when seeking project approval 
under the Location Initiative Program (LIP) process. By re- 
quiring developers to follow our new LIP application policy, 
we ensure that residents and the Board have sufficient accurate 
and timely information to make informed judgments and re- 
sponses. For the past five years, the Board has consistently, 
publicly, and formally advocated for changing the law to allow 
a greater degree of municipal control over obtrusive projects. 

(Continued on page 3) 



Page 2 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Board of Selectmen 




^/oiipn n^cw&Mi/ment 



Modification or repeal of 40B has been foremost in 
the list of priorities that we deliver to our legislative delega- 
tion annually for their consideration and action, and this past 
year was no exception. In addition to our normal advocacy 
efforts, we met with our delegation several times to deter- 
mine legislative progress, and drive home the point that the 
state has to be more flexible with regard to implementation 
of 40B and allowing municipalities to catalog market- 
affordable units. 

For the past several years, the town has enjoyed the 
financial benefit of a superior bond rating, largely due to 
conservative fiscal management policies mandating annual 
increases to the town's cash reserves (Stabilization Fund). 
This year, however, our bond rating slipped largely as a re- 
sult of the Town's use of its reserves to fund recurring ex- 
penses in FY06 and 07. We recognized that continuing to 
fund current operations from our cash reserves is unsustain- 
able, and as described above, we took measures necessary to 
bring in a balanced budget for FY08. Despite our best ef- 
forts, however, the Town will continue to experience the 
effects of limited local revenue increases and flat state aid, 
and like many other communities, we will have to find ways 
to reduce spending in order to stay within budget. We will 
continue our collaborative efforts with other town boards and 
citizens to work together to examine cost-saving measures 
and alternative ways to increase revenue. We will continue 
our vigorous advocacy for our town by petitioning the Legis- 
lative and Executive Branches for reduced regulation and 
increased aid. We are committed to serving our citizens, and 
we are confident that positive reaction to such measures will 
help to ensure our fiscal strength into the future. 

We sincerely believe that the townspeople acting 
together will make the right decisions when it comes to pre- 
serving the affordability and integrity of services that con- 
tribute to making Chelmsford one of the best places in the 
country in which to live and work. I look forward to working 
with the Board, our Town Manager, our new School Super- 
intendent, the School and Finance Committees, and all citi- 
zens of Chelmsford in the coming year to ensure that our 
vision of an inclusive, affordable, and community-focused 
town can be maintained and strengthened. 

I want to express my thanks to all our municipal and 
school department employees who serve the public every day 
with professionalism and dedication, and I especially want to 
thank the many residents who donate their time and expertise 
to the Town by serving on boards, committees, and by par- 
ticipating in the many special events that help to give our 
town its positive character. 

Sincerely, 

Samuel P. Chase, Chairman 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 



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TOWN MANAGER 
Paul E. Cohen 
978-250-520 1 

TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth L. Delaney 

978-250-5205 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

KERRY A. SPEIDEL 

978-250-52 1 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Darlene R. Lussier 

978-250-52 1 5 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Francis T. Reen 

John J. Duffett 

Kevin S. Sullivan 

978-250-5220 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 

978-250-5225 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR/ 

TOWN ENGINEER 

James E. Pearson 

978-250-5228 

POLICE CHIEF 

James F. Murphy 

978-250-5255 

FIRE CHIEF 
John E. Parow 
978-250-5267 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

David Turocy, Chairman 

Mary E. Frantz 

William D. Fulton 

Dwight M. Hayward 

Jon H. Kurland 

Vincent Villano 

Donald Van Dyne 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 3 



Town Administration 



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Paul E Cohen 
Town Manager 

Fiscal Year 2007 was a year of transition for the man- 
agement of the Town of Chelmsford. After two decades as 
Town Manager, Bemie Lynch departed at the end of July to 
begin his new position as City Manager for the City of Lowell. 
Superintendent of Schools Richard Moser retired at the end of 
the school year, completing 14 years of service to the Town. 
The School Committee hired Donald Yeoman as the new Su- 
perintendent of Schools. 

Finance Director Kerry Speidel served admirably as 
Acting Town Manager from the beginning of August through 
Thanksgiving. She presented a five-year financial forecast to 
Fall Town Meeting and effectively presented on warrant arti- 
cles pertaining to the administration of the community. 

I began my service as Town Manager on the Monday 
following Thanksgiving. Capital planning, the FY08 budget 
preparation, and collective bargaining with the Town's labor 
unions were the paramount issues to be addressed. Kerry Spei- 
del, the Board of Selectmen, other Town Officials, Department 
Heads, and the staff in the Town Manager's Office provided 
invaluable assistance in bringing me up to speed with the issues 
and culture of the community. 

Town Accountant Sheryl Wright departed at the end 
of December when she took a new position as City Auditor for 




the City of Lowell. After a search process, the Board of Select- 
men promoted Assistant Town Accountant Darlene Lussier as 
the new Town Accountant. Darlene has completed a seamless 
transition. 

By the end of the Fiscal Year, Executive Assistant 
Donna Mcintosh left for Lowell to serve in a similar capacity 
for Mr. Lynch and Community Development Director Andy 
Sheehan announced his departure to serve as Assistant to the 
Lowell City Manager. 

Finance dominated the landscape during Fiscal Year 
2007. Due to the declining levels in the Town's financial re- 
serves. Standard & Poor's downgraded the Town's bond rating 
from AA to AA-. The Town is working on a revised multi- 
year capital expenditure plan and expects to increase its Stabili- 
zation Fund balance in the years ahead. 

The continued downturn of the region's housing mar- 
ket and a slow-growth economy constrained Town operations. 
The decline in new growth to the properly tax base from new 
construction, the reduction in building permit fees, and the 
downturn in motor vehicle excise taxes prevented the Town 
from maintaining level services as it struggled to meet the ris- 
ing costs of pensions, health insurance, and employee compen- 
sation. 

This resulted in the adoption of the FY08 budget at 
Spring Town Meeting which reduced Town services by peri- 
odic closing of fire stations, a reduction in police overtime ex- 
penditures, and the layoff of two Highway Department employ- 
ees. The Town also raised revenue by entering into a one-year 
lease agreement for the Old Town Hall to the Innovative Acad- 
emy Charter School and a five-year lease of space at the 
Chelmsford Forum to the Town's new school bus transporta- 
tion provider. The Town also competitively bid municipal 
towing services. Surplus land parcels along Russell Road were 
sold to abutting residents and progress was made towards the 
sale of surplus parcels of Town-owned land located off of 
Bentley Land and Stillwater Drive. 

To help address the fiscal challenges, the Town sought 
to receive its fair portion of State aid. Concerned residents, 
School Committee members, members of the Board of Select- 
men, and other Town officials successfully lobbied the State 
Legislature to increase the Town of Chelmsford's allocation of 
Chapter 70 education funds. The $924,697 increase in Chapter 
70 funds for Fiscal Year 2008 restored the level of funding to 
approximately the amount received by the Town in FY02. Al- 
though this was a major step forward, Chelmsford continues to 
suffer from an inequitable education funding formula. 

(Continued on page 5) 



Page 4 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Town Administration 



el/earn 

(Continued from page 4) 




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The Town was able to reduce the rate of increase in 
health insurance premiums by working with its employee un- 
ions to increase the office visit co-payments from $5 to $15 and 
to increase the fee for visiting an emergency room from $25 to 
$50. The Town successfully addressed the rising cost of post- 
employment health insurance benefits via the adoption of MGL 
Chapter 32B, Section 18 at the 2006 Fall Town Meeting. This 
requires retirees to join an actuarial-equivalent Medicare part B 
health insurance plan; thereby shifting the cost to this federally 
funded program. 

The Town completed the $31 million middle and 
high-school renovation and expansion project. In addition to 
new science labs at the high school and new middle school 
libraries, a new 1 ,000 seat performing arts center at Chelmsford 
High School opened in April. High school students finally 
have an auditorium to accommodate class assemblies and artis- 
tic performances. This community facility also hosted the first 
session of 2007 Spring Town Meeting. The School Building 
Committee did a fantastic job in bringing this complex project 
in on time and on budget. 



^amj-afy'e/ia/ 



Viart 



CITIZENS OF 
CHELMSFORD 



Schiwil Committee 



] r 




Board of 
Selectmen 



] i Lr 



Town Counsel 




Public Facilities 



J 



Public Works 


Community 
Development 






Inspections 


Finance 




The Town continued to plan for future operations. 
The Fire-DPW Facilities Committee was established to identify 
the capital needs for a new fire headquarters and a consolidated 
public works facility. The committee received $17,000 at 
Spring Town Meeting to explore whether the two facilities 
could be combined into one location and to investigate efficien- 
cies in joint operations. 

Challenges will continue in the years ahead. We will 
identify our priorities and present our proposals to the commu- 
nity. We will explore the integration of the General Govern- 
ment and School Department technology operations, investi- 
gate the possibility of consolidating community education and 
recreation programs, and pursue other efficiencies in the deliv- 
ery of municipal services. We will develop a multi-year capital 
expenditure plan. We will continue to make the Town of 
Chelmsford one of the best places to live. 

I thank you for the opportunity to serve you during my 
initial year with the Town. I look forward to working with the 
Board of Selectmen, Town Officials, and residents as we ad- 
dress the future needs of the community. 

Sincerely, 

Paul E. Cohen 
Town Manager 




FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 5 



Town Administration 



cM)ia/nee i20efiaMment 





kerry a. speidel 
Finance Director 
Treasurer-Collector 



The town's financial position 
has weakened following six 
consecutive years of operating 
deficits and drawdown of re- 
serves for operations. Fund 
balance levels, however, re- 
main barley adequate. The 
town closed fiscal year 2006 
with a $1.1 million operating 
deficit, net of transfers. The 
general fund and stabilization 
reserves were reduced a total 
of roughly $2 million, which is 
1 equal to 2% of the town's $97 
million operating budget. Total available reserves, combining 
the unreserved general fund balance and separate stabilization 
fund, were about 4.5% of budget at fiscal year-end. In fiscal 
2003, the town's same reserves were at levels equal to roughly 
12% of budget. The continued use of reserve over this period 
has been necessary to mitigate budget pressure caused by rising 
fixed costs and planned debt service appropriations. The em- 
ployee health and pension benefit costs now consume 16% if 
the town's total budget. In fiscal year 2006, the percentage was 
14% and in fiscal year 2005, this percentage was 1 1%. 

Due to employment opportunities in and outside the town, un- 
employment has been historically below the commonwealth 
and national rates. The town's unemployment rate in 2006 of 
3.8% was again lower than the commonwealth's and the na- 
tion's. Despite the town being nearly built out, Chelmsford's 
property tax base has experienced steady growth. Assessed 
valuation (AV) has increased by an average of 10% annually 
since 2002 to more than $5.3 billion in fiscal 2007, due mostly 
to existing housing appreciation. Market value is also a high 
$158,000 per capita. The tax base is diverse, with the 10 lead- 
ing taxpayers accounting for just 4.1% of total AV. Wealth 
and income levels are also high: Median household effective 
buying income indicators are 139% of the commonwealth's 
average and 174% of the nation's average. 

The town's debt profile is moderate. The overall debt burden 
is a moderate $3,592 per capita but a low 202% if market 
value. Debt service expenditures are manageable; debt service 
accounted for 12% of fiscal 2007 total expenditures. Amorti- 
zation of existing debt is rapid, with 64% of principal to be 
retired over 10 years. 



The town is rated AA-, with a "stable outlook" by Standard & 
Poor's (municipal bond rating agency.) The lowering of the 
rating was assigned in June 2007 based upon the town's recent 
trend of negative financial operations, which has led to its cur- 
rent weak reserve position. The stable outlook reflects the ex- 
pectation that the town's financial operations will be structur- 
ally balanced in the future, with no use of reserves or onetime 
revenue sources for operating needs. 

The town has continued to maintain its solid financial position, 
despite the tough economic times it has faced. A solid finan- 
cial position is the result of preparation and adherence to a five 
year financial forecast and strategic plan. The plans address 
operating cost, facility needs and financial reserves. 



^J36&e66ma Q/)ti'i6i<m 



The Board is responsible for the full and fair market valuation 
of the approximate 13,900 real and personal property parcels 
within the community as of January I s of the fiscal year. Fiscal 
Year 2007 was the tri-annual revaluation year for the Town of 
Chelmsford as mandated by the Department of Revenue. 
Valuations on single family homes increased 6% to 12% while 
condominiums rose slightly less. In recent years it has been the 
policy of the Assessors to review the valuations annually in 
order to maintain accurate and current assessments. The tax 
rate for the fiscal year decreased from $13.12 in FY2006 to 
12.53 for FY2007. The real estate valuations through CY 2005 
still showed signs of appreciation however not as robust as in 
past years. 

In addition, the Board is responsible for the administration and 
abatement of the approximate 30,000 excise bills that are is- 
sued through several commitments annually by the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles. 

The Board wishes to take this opportunity to thank the staff of 
the Assessor's office for all their hard work and dedication 
through the year. As previously mentioned FY07 was a re- 
valuation year for the Town of Chelmsford, requiring addi- 
tional work while still maintaining the excellent service the 
public has come to expect. Particular thanks go to Nancy 
Maher, Elaine McBride, Susan McLaughlin and Kathryn Bian- 
chi, all of whom are invaluable. 



Page 6 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Town Administration 



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The Accounting Division is responsible for record 
keeping of all financial transactions of the Town; processing of 
all bills, warrants, receipts, payroll and ledgers; and supplies 
departments with financial reports and payroll information. 
The Accounting Division ensures the Town is in compliance 
with Generally Accepted Accounting Principals, Federal and 
State Laws, and Town Meeting authorizations. 

In accordance with Section 6-7 of the Town Charter, 
the Board of Selectmen annually designates and independent 
public accountant or firm of accountants to audit the books and 
accounts of the town as allowed by Massachusetts General 
Laws. 



The annual audit requirement was completed in June 
2007 for the Fiscal Year 2006 by Powers and Sullivan of 
Wakefield, Massachusetts. 

Presented here from the annual audit is the Balance 
Sheet for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 2006. For a complete 
explanation of the Town's fund structure and how it differs 
from the "budgetary basis" presented above, readers may refer 
to Appendix C of the annual budget document. 

In the coming year, the Finance Department will con- 
tinue to promote the highest degree of public credibility and 
confidence in its operations by fostering fiscal accountability, 
efficiency, and integrity in all aspects of operations. 





TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 






COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 




JUNE 30, 2006 










NONMAJOR 


TOTALS 




SCHOOL SERWER SEWER 


GOVERNMENTAL 


GOVERNMENTAL 
FUNDS 


ASSETS: 


GENERAL CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION STABILIZATION BETTERMENTS 


FUNDS 



CASH AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS 

INVESTMENTS 

RECEIVABLES, NET OF UNCOLLECTIBLES: 

REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 

REAL ESTATE TAX DEFERRALS 

TAX LIENS 

M OTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 



S 1,186,431 


S 


9,848,789 


$ 


141,838 $ 


6,330,081 


$ 450,692,00 


$ 17,957,831 


2,079,268 




7,655,284 


" 


2,659,904 


- 


7,181,142 


19,575,598 








682,936 








- 




2,337 


685,273 
172,762 


172,762 






- 


- 




- 


601,866 






- | 


- 






601,866 


554,248 






- | 


- 






564,248 



2,862,811 



2,862,811 



DEPARTMENTAL 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL 


2,723 


- 


- 






2,723 


3,121,000 


- 


3,568,413 


- 


1,880,258 


8,569,671 


TAX FORCLOSURE 


141,331 


- 


' 


- | 


- I 


141,331 


DUE FROM OTHER FUNDS 


- 


- 




2,588,027 


- 


2,588,027 


TOTAL ASSETS 


8,552.565 


17,504,073 


3,568,413 2,801,742 


11,780,919 


9,514,429 


53,722,141 


LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES: 














WARRANTS AND ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 


1,353,025 


2,941,155 


694,248 




1,379,889 


6,368,317 


TAX REFUNDS PAYABLE 


40,000 


- 


- 






40,000 


PAYROLL WITHHOLDING 


471,884 


- 


- 






471,884 


ABANDONED PROPERTY 


85,858 


- 


- 






85,858 


OTHER LIABILITIES 


5,350 




- 






5,350 


DEFERRED REVENUE 


5,037,606 


- 


- 


2,862,812 


1,100,161 


9,000,579 


DUE TO OTHER FUNDS 






2,588,027 






2,588,027 


NOTES PAYABLE 




31,000,000 


1,322,829 




2,539,000 


34,861,829 


TOTAL LIABILITIES 


6,993,723 


33,941,155 


4,605.104 


2.862.812 


5.019.050 


53,421.844 



FUND BALANCES: 



FUND BALANCES RESERVED FOR: 

ENCUMBRANCES AND CONTINUING APPROPRATIONS 
PERPETUAL PERM ANENT FUNDS 
UNRESERVED: 
DESIGNATED FOR SUBSEQUENT YRS EXPENDITURES 

UNDESIGNATED REPORTED IN 



238,658 



802,345 



693,864 



238,658 
802,345 



693,864 



GENERAL FUND 


626,319 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


626,319 


SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 


- 


- 




2,801,742 


8,918,108 


3,961,495 


15,681,345 


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS 


- 


(16,437.082) 


(1,036,691) 




" 


(1,551,649) 


(19,025,422) 


PERM ANENT FUNDS 










- 


1,283,188 


1,283,188 


TOTAL FUND BALANCES 


1,558,841 


(16,437,082) 


(1,036,691) 


2,801,742 


8,918,108 


4,495,379 


300,297 


TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES 


8,552,564 


17,504,073 


3,568,413 


2,801,742 


11,780,920 


9,514,429 


53,722,141 





FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 7 




Town Administration 



CSOUPIV 



Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Town Clerk 

I thank my assistant, Raymonde Legrand and 
other staff members Bernadette Gilet, Mary Jane 
Comeau, for assisting this office throughout the year. 
Also, all the election, census workers and the personnel 
of the DPW, Police and School for enabling the election 
process to run smoothly. Three elections were held in 
2006. The first was the Annual Town Election of April 
4 th in which 4,967 voters participated. Then there was 
the September 1 9 th State Primary and the November 7 th 
State Election, which included the Governor's race. The 
Annual Town Meeting began on April 24, 2006 and ran 
for three nights one that included a Special Town Meet- 
ing within the adjourned session of April 26 th . 

The Annual Fall Town Meeting began on Octo- 
ber^, 2006 and ran for four sessions. Some of the high- 
lights were articles that passed which affected the Town's 
Charter. These articles will appear as questions to the 
voters at the April 2007 Annual Town Election. Due to 
limited space and printing cost, copies of the minutes 
from any of these meetings and the election results, are 
available in the Town Clerk's Office. 

Sincerely, 

Elizabeth L. Delaney, Town Clerk 



eatitmM 





Vital Statistics FY '07 



Births 359 

Deaths 384 

Marriages 1 33 

Intentions 1 38 

Sporting Licenses 351 

Dog Licenses 3,109 

Kennel Licenses 5 

Population 33,858 

Registered Voters 22,280 



Board of Registrars 



Judith A. Olsson, Chairman 

Matthew G. Dulchinos 

Shaun F. Saber 

Elizabeth L. Delaney, Ex Officio 



Voting Strength as of December 31, 


2006 Enrolled Voters 


Precinct 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


TOTAL 


Democrats 


562 


639 


566 


555 


560 


667 


613 


699 


566 


5397 


Republicans 


363 


283 


282 


286 


319 


357 


375 


334 


373 


2983 


Unenrolled 


1375 


1 177 


1403 


1304 


1431 


1480 


1577 


1445 


1517 


12709 


Libertarian 


4 


14 


12 


10 


10 


14 


6 


8 


13 


91 


Inter. 3rd Party 


2 


2 


O 


3 


2 


4 


3 


2 


4 


22 


Reform 


O 


O 


O 


O 








O 


2 


1 


3 


Grn/Rainbow 


2 


2 


1 


2 


4 


3 





1 


1 


16 


Socialist 


O 


O 


O 


O 














1 


1 


Green Party USA 


O 


2 


O 


O 


1 





o 





2 


5 


Conservative 





1 


O 

















1 


2 


American Indep. 





1 


1 


2 





2 





1 





7 


TOTAL 


2308 


2121 


2265 


2162 


2327 


2527 


2574 


2473 


2479 


21236 











Page 8 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Community Development 




ommwncfa 



'W 




f ec 



Andrew Sheehan 

Community Development Director 



nwnt 




Fiscal Year 2007 continued to be a busy year in 
the Community Development Department. The three- 
person Department staffs the Planning Board, Conserva- 
tion Commission, Zoning Board of Appeals, and Com- 
munity Preservation Committee, as well as several tem- 
porary committees. The Department is also responsible 
for managing community and economic development 
projects, grant administration, coordinating improve- 
ments to conservation lands, and interfacing with resi- 
dents, developers, and other municipal staff. 

The department continued to develop the Town's 
Geographic Information System (GIS). Specifically, the 
Department has contacted with a consultant to develop an 
improved web based parcel mapping application that will 
allow users to view GIS data, maps and associated prop- 
erty data. The website will also allow users to create and 
print customized maps by turning on/off layers and 
zooming in/out to the desired scale. Users will be able to 
generate abutters lists based upon a specified radius from 
a parcel and print mailing labels directly from the web- 
site. 



The Department also staffed the Affordable 
Housing Implementation Committee. The Committee has 
continued its work to implement the recommendations of 
the Affordable Housing Master Plan. 



Community Development 
Departmental Staff 

Andrew Sheehan 
Community Development Director 

Trillium Levine 
Conservation Agent & GIS Manager 

Janet Murphy 
Principal Clerk II 



The Department continued to provide project 
management for the Central Square Utility Conversion 
Project. The Department has spent significant effort co- 
ordinating the preparation of construction plans and the 
acquisition of easements from private property owners. 
Construction is expected to commence in calendar year 
2007 and will last for several years. 

The Department has continued to serve as the 
point of contact for the Bruce N. Freeman Bike Path. The 
Massachusetts Highway Department has awarded a con- 
tract and construction is expected to commence in 2007. 

The Department provides primary staff support 
to the Board of Appeals for the review of affordable 
housing projects proposed under General Law c. 40B. 
Several 40B projects were approved in FY2007, several 
projects moved into the construction and occupancy 
stages, and several more projects have begun the ap- 
proval process. 




FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 9 



Community Development 




wrmma 




aa 



wd 




The Planning Board is responsible for insuring that 
the development of land in Chelmsford meets the criteria set 
forth in State and local land use regulations. The process in- 
volves the review of lot divisions, definitive and preliminary 
subdivisions, site plans, and special permits. The Planning 
Board strives to maintain the character of Chelmsford and en- 
force the provisions of the 1997 Master Plan. 

In April 2007, Alternate Member Richard Johnson 
was elected Regular Member, and James Lane was elected Al- 
ternate Member. Charles Wojtas retired after serving three full 
terms on the Board. 




9t£mA 



ero 




eefrS 



Susan Carter Sullivan 
Chair 

Pamela Armstrong 
Vice Chair 

George Zaharoolis 
Clerk 

Ann McGuigan 

Robert morse 

Robert Joyce 

Richard Johnson 

James Lane 
alternate 

STAFF: 

Andrew Sheehan 

Community Development Director 

James Pearson, DPW Director 

Janet Murphy. Principal Clerk II 



First row: Pamela Armstrong, Siisan Carter Sullivan. Ann McGuigan 
Second row: Robert Joyce, Robert Morse, James Lane. Richard Johnson. 
George Zaharoolis 




PROJECT REVIEWS 




Site Plans 


8 


Minor Site Plans 


9 


Site Plan Modifications 

Approval Not Required Plans 

Definitive Subdivisions 

Subdivision Modifications 


5 
9 
1 
1 



///// 



Page 1 O 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Community Development 





(mAewatien TDem/mi66lmi 



The Conservation Commission is responsible for 
the maintenance of approximately 800 acres of town con- 
servation land and for the enforcement of the state and 
town's wetland protection laws and regulations. In 2007 
significant progress was made in the maintenance of con- 
servation land by the Chelmsford Open Space Steward- 
ship. This committee consists of volunteers who look 
after the conservation land under the direction of the 
Commission. Their initial effort has been to bring the 
trails of the reservations up to standard. Work was com- 
pleted at the Lime Quarry, Wright Reservation and 
Crooked Spring where trails were cleared, new trails 
built, bridges constructed and parking lots improved. 
New trail maintenance was begun at Deep Brook, 
Thanksgiving Forest, Red Wing Farm, Russell Mill Town 
Forest and the Cranberry Reservation. The Stewards also 
provide weekly maintenance and cleanups. 

Special projects have been funded by the Com- 
munity Preservation Committee at the Lime Quarry, Red 
Wing Farm and the Cranberry Reservation. At the Lime 
Quarry funds were provided for improving the parking 
lot on Littleton Road. At Red Wing Farm, which abuts 
the Bruce Freeman Bike Path, funds have been made 
available to construct new trails and bridges. At the Cran- 
berry Reservation a dam broke and was reconstructed and 
additional parking and landscaping have been added at 
the entrance to the reservation on Elm Street. 

Three Eagle Scout projects were approved by the 
Commission. Scout troops have also assisted the Stew- 
ards in their maintenance effort. The Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency has assisted the Commission and Stew- 
ards in creating accurate trail maps for the reservations 
which will be installed at the entrances. 





David McLachlan, Chairman 

Brian Reidy, Vice Chairman 

William R. (Bob) Greenwood 

William Vines 

Christopher Garrahan 

TonyOmobono 

Ruth Luna 

Staff: 

Trillium Levine 

Conservation Officer 



Wetlands Permits FY'07 



Requests for Determination 38 

Notices of Intent 1 7 

Certificates of Compliance 4 

Notices of Intent Extensions 7 

Total 66 



Photograph by Lee Fortier leefortier@comcast.net 




FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 1 1 



Community Development 




<wvrrumitw 




vef>ewatl(m TDam/mittee 




The Community Preservation Act (CPA) provides a 
source of funding for Open Space Preservation, Historic Pres- 
ervation and Affordable Housing. At the April 2006 Town 
election, the voters enacted an increase in the CPA surcharge; 
the surcharge was increased to 1.5% from 0.5%. Along with 
the increase two additional exemptions were passed; a low- 
income individual and family exemption, and a moderate- 
income senior exemption. To date, every dollar collected in 
Community Preservation surcharge has been matched by the 
State. 

This has been a full year for projects. Work at the 
Conservation Commission Cranberry Bog Reservation in- 
cluded rebuilding the dam that creates the bog, and a new park- 
ing lot was installed. A parking lot and granite sign was in- 
stalled at Red Wing Farm Conservation Commission Property. 
The Cemetery Commission applied for and received $25,000 
funding for Historic Preservation work at Heart Pond, River- 
side and West Chelmsford Cemeteries. The Housing Authority 
received $150,000 for pre-development work that will lead to 
the creation of 37 units of Senior Housing, and 8 units of Spe- 
cial Needs housing. The location is adjacent to existing Senior 
housing in back of the Senior Center. 

The CPC thanks Selectman Michael McCall for his 
many years of membership on the CPC. We also welcome Se- 
lectman Philip Eliopoulos as the new Board of Selectman ap- 
pointee. An application for requesting CPA funding for His- 
toric Preservation, Affordable Housing, and Open Space and 
Recreation projects is available at the Community Develop- 
ment Dept. 

Duly reported, 
Robert Morse 
Chairman of the Community Preservation Committee 



Varney Park Field House- Courtesy of the Community Preservation Committee 




Photograph 

of the Hill 

Jock House 

by Fred 

Merriam 




Community Preservation Committee 



Chairman Robert Morse. Planning Board 

Co-Chairman Michael McCall. Board of Selectmen 

David Hedison, Housing Authority Appointee 

Ruth Luna, Conservation Commission 

Rebecca Markey, Citizen Appointee 

Donna Newcomb, Citizen Appointee 

James Pearson, DPW Director 

Linda Prescott, Clerk-Historic Commission 

Andrew Sheehan, Community Development 




^J&jb/jeafo 




oa 

MEMBERS: 

John Blake, Chairman 

Eileen Duffy, Vice Chairman 

John Coppinger 

Len Richards 

William Gilet 

Joel Luna, Alternate Member 

Jim Begley, Alternate Member 

Judy Tavano, Alternate Member 

STAFF MEMBERS: 

Andrew Sheehan, A1CP, Community Development Director 

Trillium Levine, Zoning Board Administrator 

The Board of Appeals hears petitions for Variances, Special 
Permits, Comprehensive Permits, and appeals of the Building 
Inspector's rulings. The Board in FY2007 granted 13 Variances 
and 8 Special Permits; and denied 1 Variance. 
One Comprehensive Permit application filed under Chapter 40B 
was approved. The development is entitled "Oakford at Main 
Street" and consists of eight single-family homes, two of which 
will be low to moderate income units, located at 8 Main Street in 
North Chelmsford. Monitoring continued on several other Com- 
prehensive Permits projects under construction. The Board con- 
tinues to follow the progress of litigation involving two that 
were appealed to the Courts. 



Page 1 2 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Education 



lAe/m^m f & imle (p/c/ie&/6 



Donald R. Yeoman, Ed.d. 
Superintendent of Schools 

The membership of the Chelmsford School Commit- 
tee in April of 2006 included; Mr. Kevin Porter, Chair; Mrs. 
Kathy Duffett, Vice Chair; Mrs. Christina Walsh, Secretary; 
Mrs. Evelyn Thoren and Mr. Angelo Taranto, Members at 
Large; and Matthew Doiron, Student Representative. Central 
Administration for the Chelmsford School Department in- 
cluded Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. 
Karen Mazza, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum & In- 
struction; Mr. Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager; Mrs. 
Dory Toppan, Director of Personnel; and Mr. Bruce Forster, 
Director of Educational Technology and Information Services. 

This year saw the completion of the secondary schools 
facility project. Both middle schools have larger and more 
effective library facilities. The Parker Middle School has reno- 
vated computer labs and McCarthy Middle School has reno- 
vated performance music rooms. Chelmsford High School has 
new science labs with more effective space and modern safety 
precautions, and, for the first time in the history of the high 
school, a beautiful auditorium for school and community 
events. The auditorium opened in April with a community 
opening ceremony giving recognition to all community mem- 
bers who assisted in the successful completion of this project. 
The Chelmsford Public Schools are very appreciative of the 
community support for providing these needed improvements 
to our secondary school facilities. 

Budget planning has continued to be a large focus for 
the school department as state revenues have been limited. A 
parent group, The Initiative for Local Aid, has continued to 
lobby state legislators for an improvement to more equitable 
educational funding. The School Committee has continued to 
meet with state legislators to help them understand the impact 
of current funding formulas. These efforts have produced a 
moderate increase in state funding for FY08. However, we 
will continue to have financial challenges in the coming years. 
A major focus of School Committee attention in the past year 
was the search process to replace retiring Superintendent Rich- 
ard Moser after 17 years of distinguished service to Chelms- 
ford. Many staff members and local citizens assisted the 
School Committee during the interview and selection process. 
Through their efforts I was selected in January of 2007 as the 
next Superintendent of Schools. 

I began my work in July of 2007. Since then I have 
met nearly three thousand people in the school department and 
the town. Through these conversations I have learned about the 
history, values, and successes of our town over more than three 
hundred fifty years. And I have learned of the community's 
strong commitment to, and support of, the Chelmsford Public 
Schools. 




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School Committee: Top L-R: , Superintendent Richard H. Moser, Ph.D., 
Student Representative Matthew Doiron, Angelo J. Taranto, Evelyn S. Thoren 
Bottom L-R: Christina H. Walsh, Kevin Porter, /Catherine Duffett, 

I am most pleased with the increasing academic suc- 
cess of our students. Strong recruitment, selection, and staff 
development programs have resulted in the cutting-edge 
teacher skill I witness each day as I visit classrooms. And the 
strength of our curricula is a direct result of strategic curricular 
planning. These programs, combined with the diligent efforts 
of our talented teachers and students, have ensured increasing 
student success. 

As a newcomer to our District and community, I espe- 
cially appreciate the dedication of those school committee 
members, teachers, support staff, and administrators who have 
come before us. Their efforts and sacrifice have created the 
strong foundation of programs and quality services on which 
we build today. 

Soon we will begin the design of a strategic plan to 
continue to improve our schools. Although there will be finan- 
cial challenges ahead, we look to the future with optimism as 
we work together with the Town to improve our community 
and our schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Donald R. Yeoman, Ed.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



ENROLLMENT 


School 


FY06 
Actual 


FY07 
Actual 


FY08 
Projected 


Elementary 


2,168 


2130 


2057 


Middle 


1,708 


1675 


1,677 


High School 


1,756 


1690 


1,699 


TOTAL 


5,632 


5495 


5,433 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 1 3 



Public Education 




{ nieal J&iaA (p/ekosl 




Judith L. Klimkiewicz, Ph.D. 
Nashoba Superintendent 



J^^. 




Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School is a regional technical high 
school established in 1969 to serve 
students grades 9-12. It now also 
provides post-graduate programs for 
those between the ages of 18 and 25 
years old. Nashoba has earned an 
impressive reputation for producing 

community leaders as well as providing community service. 

With an enrollment of approximately 63 1 students from seven 

communities, Nashoba Valley Technical High School offers 

career preparation in 1 6 technical programs. 

Administration 

Dr. Judith L. Klimkiewicz 



^^SsS^ 



Mr. Victor Kiloski 
Ms Carol Heidenrich 
Ms Melissa LeRay 
Ms Danya Sclar 
Ms Denise Page 
Mr. Matthew Ricard 
Mr. George Kalarites 
Ms Clare Jeannotte 



Superintendent 
Assistant Superintendent/Principal 
Director of Technology 
Director of Student Services 
Guidance Team Leader 
Director of Curriculum/Grants 
Dean of Students 
Facilities Manager 
Business Manager 



Accreditation: 

New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 
Faculty: 54 certified teachers 
Pupil Teacher Ratio: 20: 1 

Three 12-week trimesters. Eight 45-minute periods set in a 
block schedule, five days per week. The school schedule alter- 
nates one week of academic classes with a week in a career- 
technical area for grades 9 through 12. 

Vocational-Technical Programs 
Post Secondary 

Cosmetology 
Dental Assisting 
Engineering Technology 
Office Technology 
And much more! 
Special Academic Programs 

Advanced Placement and college preparatory courses are avail- 
able in all core subjects. Foreign language and additional edu- 
cational courses are offered for all four years for all interested 
students. 



Dual Enrollment 

Juniors who are eligible may elect to enter the Dual Enrollment 
Program and take courses their junior and senior year at a two- 
or four-year public college or private institution in Massachu- 
setts or New Hampshire. Upon completion, they receive their 
high school diploma from Nashoba and one or two years of 
college credit. Over 20 students in recent years have graduated 
with an Associates degree from college and their high school 
diploma at the same time. Also, individual study programs for 
talented students are directed to their area of excellence. Many 
of our students are accepted at such distinguished institutions 
as MIT, Ithaca College, Emerson College, Boston University, 
and University of Massachusetts, among others. 
Student Activities 

Nashoba sponsors an extensive program in intra-scholastic 
sports including varsity teams in 10 high school sports with 
equal opportunities for both male and female students. Other 
extracurricular activities include Student Council, National 
Honor Society, yearbook. Students Against Destructive Deci- 
sions, Skills USA, Student Leadership, peer mediation, and 
many special interest clubs. No user fees are imposed on any 
sport, school sponsored club or activity. 
Continuing & Community Education 
Approximately 700 adult students a year attend the Continuing 
Community Education Program in late afternoon and evenings 
at Nashoba. 

Community Service Projects 

Nashoba is unique in its approach to community service and its 
relationship to its district communities. Students are expected 
to go out with their instructors to district towns to work on 
community service projects. The students perform necessary 
projects for the district towns. The Community Service Pro- 
gram educates students in a real world setting and allows the 
towns the benefit of viewing Nashoba students at work and 
having a major project completed without expending limited 
town resources for capital improvement. 

The following projects were completed for Chelmsford : 

Cemetery 30' x 50' garage by Carpentry 

Paul Center 18' x 32' building drywall & mud by Carpentry 

Chelmsford Schools Stage Walls by Carpentry 

Town Hall Quilt Frame by Carpentry 

Council on Aging Luncheons by Culinary 

Unitarian Church Luncheons by Culinary 

Summer Crossing Nursing Home Luncheons by Culinary 

Red Hatters Luncheons by Culinary 

Adult Day Support Luncheons by Culinary 

Garrison House wiring by Electrical 

Hill Jock House wiring by Electrical 

Cemetery Install service and wire building by Electrical 

Santa for Seniors Gifts by JDCU/Student Council 



Page 1 4 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Safety 



drfment 





ouee 



James F. Murphy 
Chief of Police 

I respectfully submit the FY2007 Annual Report for 
the Police Department. The year proved to be another busy 
year, with over 28,000 calls for service being handled by a 
sworn complement of 53 Officers. I would like to acknowledge 
the following promotions and achievements that occurred in 
the Department: 

Jeffrey J. Bernier was promoted to the position of Ser- 
geant after serving over 1 1 years as a Patrol Officer 

Gary A. Hannagan was promoted to the position of 
Sergeant after serving 7 years as a Patrol Officer 

The Department reorganized its command structure by assign- 
ing Lieutenants to oversee key functions: 

Lieutenant Daniel Ahern assigned to oversee the Accreditation 
and Training Function. 

Lieutenant John Roark assigned to oversee the Bureau of In- 
vestigative Services Division and Medical Training. 
Lieutenant Edward Smith assigned to oversee all patrol opera- 
tions on the day and early evening shifts. 
Lieutenant Colin Spence assigned to oversee all patrol opera- 
tions on the day shift. 

Lieutenant James M. Spinney, Jr. assigned to oversee all patrol 
operations on the early night shift. 

The department also welcomed four new Officers to 
the force. These Officers completed their 22 week training at 
the Massachusetts Transit Authority Training Academy in 
Quincy, MA: Jason Callahan, Steven Hawkins, Nicholas 
Ziminsky, Jason Poor. 

The department also re-implemented its Bicycle Patrol 
Unit thanks to a generous donation from the Chelmsford Police 
Foundation. The unit is staffed with 5 patrol officers who can 
enhance the community policing concept of the department by 
focusing their efforts on problem areas needing extra attention. 

Sergeant Paul Cooper received the State's highest rec- 
ognition in being awarded the Trooper George Hanna Award 
for Meritorious Conduct. The award was for Sgt. Cooper's 
actions as part of the NEMLEC Swat Team in subduing an 
armed and barricaded individual in Pepperell, MA. 

Finally, the department was able to purchase new 
Honor Guard uniforms for its unit, due to the generous dona- 
tion of Mildred Adams. Mildred's father, Donald Adams, was 
a Chelmsford Police Officer who was shot and killed in the line 
of duty in 1927. The department is grateful for Millie's dona- 
tion, and has honored Donald by wearing a pin on each Honor 
Guard uniform. 





4 




HJ .-■; P0UC E 




GRANTS 

The Police Department received the following Grants for Fiscal 

Year 2007: 

State Community Policing Grant 

$36,000.00 
State Governor's Highway Safety Grant 

$12,000.00 

APPOINTMENTS 

Lisa Desmond was appointed as a Public Safety Dispatcher on 
June 7, 2007. 

RETIREMENTS 

Norberto Melendez retired from his Maintenance Position after 
3 l A years to take a position with Salem State College as a 
Campus Police Officer. 

OBJECTIVE 

To provide the citizens of Chelmsford the safest community 
within the Commonwealth by education, enforcing the laws 
and eliciting community participation and cooperation. 

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of 
Selectmen, Town Manager and other town departments and 
personnel, for the excellent cooperation given to the Police 
Department. 

I would also like to thank and recognize both sworn and non- 
sworn personnel of this Department for outstanding perform- 
ance of duty. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chief James F. Murphy 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 1 5 



Public Safety 





a/lee y/Jejbartment 



CHIEF OF POLICE 

James F. Murphy 

DEPUTY CHIEF 
Scott Ubele 

LIEUTENANTS 

Daniel J. Ahern 

John A. Roark 

Edward F. Smith 

James M. Spinney Jr. 

Colin C. Spence 

SERGEANTS 

Todd D. Ahern 

Paul E. Cooper 

Philip R. Dube 

Ronald Gamache 

Edward F. Quinn 

Jeffrey J. Bernier 

Gary A. Hannagan 

INSPECTORS 
Bureau of Investigative Services 

Gail F. Beaudoin 

Jeffrey A. Blodgett 

George A. Tyros 

Craig E. Walsh 

Juvenile Officer 
Kenneth R. Duane 

Domestic Violence Officer 
Rebecca A. Tyros 

Crime Prevention Officer 
Jennifer L. Bellissimo 

DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTO R 
LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant E. Michael Rooney 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

COMMUNITY RESPONSE UNIT 

MOTORCYCLE UNIT 

Sgt. Francis Kelly 

David R. Tine 

David M. Leo, K-9 

Paul E. Richardson 




PATROL OFFICERS 

Timothy B. Bourke 

Jason Callahan 

Joseph P. Crowley 

Bruce A. Darwin 

Steven J. Doole 

Steven M. Fredericks 

John R. Goffin 

Daniel P. Goguen 

Francis J. Goode, Jr. 

Jason P. Hanscom 

Steven Hawkins 

Andrew N. LoPilato 

David F. Mackenzie 

John J. McGeown 

Peter C. McGeown 

Brian F. Mullen 

Robert J. Murphy. Jr. 

Jason Poor 

Daniel T. Reid. Jr. 

Brian R. Richard 

Anthony Spinazola 

Daniel J. Sullivan 

Sean F. Swift 

Jonathan P. Tays 

Francis P. Teehan 

Gary R. White 

Christopher D. Zaher 

Nicholas Ziminsky 

FULL TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Kathleen A. Bennett 

David J. DeFreitas 

Richard A. Demers 

Lisa M. Desmond 

Timothy A. Goode 

Kevin R. Proulx 

Kim Sandberg 

Christian W. Seminatore 

William H. Vaughn 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT 

Mary Jane Grant 

PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Donna A. Fox 

Sandra A. Hall 

Diane M. Morgan 



MAINTENANCE 

CarlW. Koch 



MECHANIC 

Franklyn R. Fader 



Page 1 6 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Safety 



^J^tXl/iOyM \S/<HW 



] e 



Sergeant Francis P. Kelly 
Auxiliary Police 

For the year 2007 the Auxiliary Police Unit assisted 
the regular force at numerous motor vehicle accidents scenes 
and other traffic control incidents. Overall the Auxiliary Police 
Unit donated 9,960 hours at various assigned duties and events. 
I would like to thank all members of the Auxiliary Unit for 
their great efforts and commitment over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sgt. Francis P. Kelly 

Auxiliary Commander 



AUXILIARY STATISTICS 


House Checks 


126 


School Property Checks 

Town Property Checks 


570 

775 


Total Property Checks 


1471 





^JSnimal TDantm/ 



Erik E. Merrill 

Animal Control Officer 

The Animal Control Officer responds to a variety of 
animal and wildlife calls throughout the community. Those 
calls involving public safety or public welfare will be ad- 
dressed by the Animal Control Officer. The Animal Control 
Officer reminds residents that calls such as removal of animals 
from chimneys, under porches, or inside attics must be handled 
by a private pest control service. 

The Animal Control Officer reminds all pet owners 
that it is their responsibility to insure that their pets are properly 
vaccinated and licensed. Also, all dogs must be leashed or 
under your control at all times, and all waste must be picked up 
from all public and private property. 
I would like to thank all the people who have donated food, 
blankets, towels, etc. for our guests. We are always in need of 
these supplies and welcome all donations. I would like to 
thank all the people who attended our rabies/microchip clinic 
and the seminars we have provided. Please look for informa- 
tion on upcoming events. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, Board of 
Selectmen, Police Department and all other town departments 
for their support and assistance over the last year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Erik E. Merrill 

Animal Control Officer 




POLICE DEPARTMENT RECEIPTS 


Permits, Fines, Tickets and Fees 


...$51 


,878.00 
>, 300.50 
,975.00 
.153.50 


Lowell District Court Revenues 


....$1 : 


RMV Disbursements 


$18E 
$25C 


TOTAL 




I MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 


Calls Answered by Cruisers 




28,405 
322 


Summons Served 




Accidents Reported 

Fatal Accidents 




1,009 
2 


Personal Injury Accidents 

Citations Issued 




120 
....3,744 


Parking Violations Issued 

Restraining Orders Served 

Protective Custody 




282 
68 
31 


Alarm Calls Responded to by Cruisers 

Medical Calls 


1.512 
...2,255 


Suspicious Activity Calls 




....1,572 


Disturbance Calls 




898 


Domestic Calls 




312 


O.U.I 




51 




BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 


Adult Arrests 




472 


Juvenile Arrests 




31 


TOTAL 




503 




DISPOSITION OF CASES 


No Finding 




O 


To be Dismissed 




42 


Nolle Prosecution 




25 


Filed Without Change of Plea 

Continued at Hearing/Dismissed 

Dismissed/Victim's Request 




29 

50 

1 


Forwarded to Superior Court 

Case Closed 




O 

87 


Continued 




59 


Dismissed 




432 


Default 




247 


Guilty 




181 


No Disposition Needed 

Pre-Trial Probation 




190 
65 


Request Denied 




3 


Responsible/ Filed 




197 


Not Responsible 




18 


Not Guilty 




1 1 


Placed in ASAP.... 




1 


No Complaint to Issue 

Continued Without a Finding 

Total Findings 




15 
186 

....2.141 




ANIMAL CONTROL STATISTICS 


Calls for Service.... 




699 


Dogs Licensed in FY07 3,109 

Animals Picked Up and Taken to Pound 48 

Animals Returned to Owners 33 

Animals Adopted After 1 Days 5 

Animals Taken to Lowell Humane Society 1 

Road Kills Disposed at Lowell Humane Society.. 25 1 
Animal Bite Reports - 48 


Citations Issued 




53 


Value of Citation Fines 




$2,106 
$1,580 


Other Funds Collected 





FY 2007 ANNUAL REPORT 



Page 1 7 



Public Safety 







&iwe L2/)e/bartment 



John E. Parow 
Fire Chief 

The Chelmsford Fire Department has been very busy 
this year answering a total of 4,922 emergency calls. Fire calls 
increased this year over last, totaling 205, an increase of 39 fire 
calls. Medical emergency calls also continued to grow and 
now accounted for more than half of our calls. We responded 
to an all time high of 2,506 calls for medical assistants this past 
year. Based on the fact that emergency medical care has be- 
come such a large part of the department's responsibility the 
Chelmsford Fire Department applied for and received a license 
from the state to operate a "Class 5" ambulance. This license 
greatly enhances the ability of the department to provide a 
higher level of medical care and transport patients to the hospi- 
tal in the case of an extreme emergency. In addition, the de- 
partment took the led in writing the "Emergency Medical Ser- 
vice Zone Plan" for the Town of Chelmsford. This plan out- 
lines how emergency medical care will be delivered within the 
Town and sets the standard of care town residents will receive. 
Firefighter John Robinson spent hundreds of hour putting this 
plan together and he is to be commended for his effort. 

The concern of terrorism has forced the department to 
prepare itself as the first line of defense against incidents of this 
type. Specialized equipment has been purchased and put into 
service. In addition, mandatory National Incident Management 
System (NIMS) training has been conducted for all department 
members and we now meet or exceed the national standard in 
this area. 

The Department applied for and received two State 
grants during this fiscal year. One was to continue our Student 
Awareness Fire Education (SAFE) program. This program al- 
lows us to send trained fire department personnel into the 
schools and educate our students on fire safety and the ill ef- 
fects of smoking. The department also received a grant from 
the State for firefighting equipment. 

The department will purchase a new thermal imaging 
camera and a rapid intervention breathing air kit with the 
money from that grant. We owe a great debt of gratitude to our 
state legislators for their help in providing this funding. 





Two seasoned veterans with over 60 years of com- 
bined experience retired during this past year. The department 
wishes Captain Rich Miller and Firefighter Mike Ridlon a long 
and enjoyable retirement. These vacancies were filled by hir- 
ing two town residents Firefighter/EMTs Ryan Houle and Josh 
Abbott. Firefighter Gary Ryan was promoted to Captain. We 
wish them all well in their new positions. In addition, Fire- 
fighter Mike Young was activated by the military and is serv- 
ing our country in Iraq. His deployment is expected to last for 
fifteen months. Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his 
family. 

Structural problems have been identified with the ap- 
paratus floor at the Center Fire Station. Thirteen large support 
columns have been built in the basement to support and stabi- 
lize the floor. Although the floor has been stabilized the engi- 
neer has told us that this is only a temporary fix and will buy us 
a little time until we can build a new station. A building com- 
mittee has been established to look into the feasibility of build- 
ing and locating a new Center Fire Station. Their recommenda- 
tions are expected to be presented at the 2007 October Town 
Meeting. 

Because of budget problems within the Town the Fire 
Department has been forced to cut four firefighter positions and 
a clerk in recent years. Although we do understand the fiscal 
restraints associated with the town budget the cut backs are 
making it very difficult for the department to provide the ser- 
vices the citizens of the town have grown accustomed to ex- 
pect. It is paramount that when the financial picture brightens 
or alternative funding sources are identified that these positions 
are restored. 

I would like to thank all members of the department, 
my staff, the Town Manager, and the Board of Selectmen for 
their support over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
John E. Parow, Fire Chief 



Page 1 8 



FY 2007 ANNUAL REPORT 



Public Safety 



2^ 



Continued from page IS 




epcwtment 




CALLS IN FISCAL YEAR 2007 

Auto Fire 29 

Building Fire 45 

Outside Fire 131 

Mutual Aid 1 6 

Investigation 885 

Service 1310 

False Alarm 

Medical Aid 2,506 

TOTAL FY06 4,922 




Annual Call Volume 


Year: 


Auto 


Building 


Outside 


Mutual Aid 


Investigation 


Service 


False 
Alarm 


Medical Aid 


Totals 


1998 


56 


36 


97 


17 


808 


1406 





1724 


4144 


1999 


50 


53 


1 13 


15 


780 


1399 


2 


1841 


4253 


2000 


47 


40 


127 


23 


842 


1361 





1975 


4415 


2001 


37 


39 


81 


22 


903 


1364 





2134 


4580 


2002 


36 


53 


1 18 


24 


1087 


1434 


2 


2246 


5000 


2003 


31 


44 


80 


12 


855 


1231 





2318 


4571 


2004 


38 


71 


77 


18 


853 


1 135 





2420 


4612 


2005 


41 


59 


66 


23 


809 


955 


1 


2324 


4278 


2006 


31 


50 


1 16 


21 


877 


565 





2539 


4199 


2007 


29 


45 


131 


16 


885 


1310 





2506 


4922 





FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 1 9 



Public Safety 




mcwftm&nt v?Memtlen6 




FIRE CHIEF 

John E. Parow 

DEPUTY CHIEFS 

James Sousa 
Michael Curran 

CAPTAINS 

James Boermeester 

Richard Miller 

James Durkin 

Rick Rivard 

Michael Donoghue 

Gary Ryan 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Joshua Abbott 

William Amundson 

William Bacon 

William Bennett 

Edward Boisseau 

Christopher Brothers 

Michael Brothers 

Thomas Brothers 

William Campbell 

Jeffrey Cancella 

Jack Carroll 

Michael Chiasson 

Kevin Clarke 

F. Mark Conlin 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Daniel Corey 

Bruce Donovan 

Michael Ducharme 

Jesse Foster 

Daniel Funaro 

Robert Gardner 

David Hadley 

Henry Houle 

Ryan Houle 

William Keohane 

John Kivlan 

Daniel Koutsoufis 

Cynthia Leczynski 

David Lefebvre 

Keith Lindsay 



DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT 

Martha DeSaulnier 



MECHANIC 

James F. Keeley, Sr. 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Michael Maher 
Daniel Manley 

Leo Manley 

Leslie Merrill 

Jason Moody 

Michael Nelson 

Kevin O'Brien 

Marc Pare 

Donnie Peterson 

Casey Phelan 

John Reid 

Michael Ridlon 

John Robinson 

George Ryan 

William Schellbach 

Timothy Shanahan 

Kevin Sheehy 

Brian Stanton 

Daniel Ubele 

Michael Young 



Organizational Chart 



Fire Chief 



Dept. Asst. 



Operation Deputy 



Fire Prevention 
Deputy 



G 



Mechanic 



Fire Prevention Captain 





























Arson Invest. Unit 










f 


Emergency 
Management 





















Unit 1 

Captain 



Unit 2 
Captain 



Unit 3 
Captain 



Unit 4 
Captain 



13 Fire Fighters 



12 Fire Fighters 



12 Fire Fighters 



12 Fire Fighters 



Page 20 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Safety 



&SalMl 




] e/>artm&n£ 



Anthony Zagzoug, 
Inspector of Buildings 

I would like to thank my staff for their hard work in 
maintaining timely and professional service. The Inspections 
Department was very active in FY 2007 enforcing state build- 
ing codes and local zoning regulations. 

Department Personnel include: 

• Anthony F. Zagzoug, Inspector of Buildings 

• Scott D. Hammond, Local Inspector 

• Kenneth W. Kleynen, Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

• Dennis P. Kane, Wiring Inspector 

• Amy Baron, Departmental Assistant 

The attached charts show breakdowns of new construction 
permits this year. 

In addition to the fees above, the total fees collected for 
sign permits, yards sales, and Certificates of Inspection 
amounted to $7,493.00 

I would also like to thank the personnel of other Town 
Departments for their cooperation, support, and assistance 
throughout the year. 




PERMIT FEES 


Type of Permit 


No. Issued 


Total Fees 


Building 


901 


$570,838.1 1 


Wiring 


815 


$90,91 1.30 


Plumbing &Gas 


1405 


$67,130.00 


TOTALS 


3121 


$728,879.41 



NEW CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 



Single Family Dwellings 53 

Two Family Dwellings O 

MULTIFAMILY DWELLINGS O 

Institutional O 

Municipal 1 

Commercial 3 

Industrial 1 

Agricultural O 

TOTAL: 58 



(S 



#7 



^ 





FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 2 1 



Public Works 



y/ja^mentof\Q/a6/le Q/jm^d 



James Pearson, Town Engineer 
Public Works Director 



>nauieerin<7 ^zJwiM&n 

The Engineering Division provides technical support to many 
Town departments including the Planning Board, Conservation 
Commission, Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Assessors 
Department, Town Clerk and Sewer Commission. Addition- 
ally, the engineers design several projects for construction by 
the Highway Division. 

The engineers provided layout, grades, technical assistance, 

and inspections for the following projects: 

Garrison Road Drainage Construction 

Boston Road Sidewalk Construction 

Elm Street Drainage Construction 

Dunstable Road Reconstruction 

Smith Street Culvert/Sidewalk Construction 

Warren Avenue Culvert Repairs/Sidewalk Construction 

The engineers provided Planning Board related site plan re- 
views and/or inspections on the following projects: 

• Braden Street — Paper Street Construction 

• Mill Road (278-282) - Site Plan 

• Elizabeth Drive (11)- Minor Site Plan 

• Drum Hill Road (65) - Minor Site Plan 

• Billerica Road: Sunny Acres - Site Plan 

• Maynard Circle - Minor Site Plan 

• Lone Pine Circle/Farley Brook Road - Paper Street 
Construction 





North Road; Church of Christ - Minor Site Plan 

Wellman Road; Lighthouse Sewer Expansion 

Site Plan & Special Permits 

Tracy Road - Minor Site Plan 

Olde North Road (2-4) - Minor Site Plan 

Littleton Road; Hawthorne Place 

Site Plan & Special Permits 

Cranberry Bog Reservation - Minor Site Plan 

Alpha Road ( 14) - Site Plan & Special Permits 

Executive Drive - Site Plan Modification 

& Special Permits 

Kidder Road (5&9) - Site Plan & Special Permits 

Rivemeck Road - Site Plan Review 

Industrial Avenue - Site Plan & Special Permit 

Modification 

Executive Drive (1&2) - Site Plan & Special Permits 

Research Place - Minor Site Plan 

Provided technical assistance on various 40B projects. 




Page 22 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Works 




department 



o/M(6/ie 




Jtzh//i(i>a(/ Q/)f'cA 



nupaa 



'(('wen 



The Highway Division is responsible for the upkeep and im- 
provement of all streets, culverts, catch basins and manholes, 
street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals. There are currently 
approximately 230 miles of roadway under their jurisdiction. 

Major projects included: 

• Dunstable Road Reconstruction (drainage upgrade; curb- 
ing and sidewalk installation; and road regrading. 

• Elizabeth Drive and Scientia Drive repaving. 

• Relocation of the traffic signal control box in Central 
Square. 

• Repair of catch basins: Harold Street; North Road; Old 
Stage Road; Sonora Drive; Freeman Road; Burning Tree 
Lane; Hunt Road; Turnpike Road and Poplar Lane. 

• Basin installation: Merilda Avenue; Queen Street; and 
Proctor Road. 

• Drainage repairs: Lauderdale Road at Warren Avenue; 
Riverneck Road; Richardson Road; Stuart Road; Purcell 
Drive; Lauderdale Road; Smith Street; Nobel Drive; and 
Frank Street. 

• Drainage reconstruction: Elm Street; Brick Kiln Road; 
Riverneck Road. 

• New drainage installation: Garrison Road. 

• Parking lot construction: Cranberry Bog Reservation. 

The office staff maintains all financial records needed for the 
reporting, tracking, and payment of all vouchers connected 
with the highway budgets - including general expenses, sala- 
ries, snow and ice, Massachusetts Chapter 90 funding (road 
construction or repair), street lighting and capita! expenditures. 




} ew€w yPwlti/m 

The Sewer Division continued to expand this year with the 
addition of approximately 247 new sewer connections, bring- 
ing the total of on-line sewer users to 10,323. 
Major projects included: 

• Construction oversight of two new pump stations (Hunt 
Road and Singlefoot Road) 

• SCADA remote monitoring installation at four pump sta- 
tions; 

• Emergency generator upgrade at Mill Road; 

• Pump rebuilding at eight pump stations 

The office staff handles all sewer betterments, sewer billing, 
phone inquiries, concerns and other related correspon- 
dence. They also provide clerical support to the Sewer Com- 
mission. 




&n6/ie &d>(ii/(/inar!> QpwMo&n/ 

The Public Buildings Division staff maintains the Town Of- 
fices and the Old Town Hall. Typical duties include furniture 
and mechanical repair, repair of ceilings, walls, and woodwork. 
General "handy work" around the various buildings may in- 
clude trash removal, cleaning, and painting. The staff also re- 
moves snow during the winter months. 

In February, 2007, the Town hired a private cleaning company 
to perform janitorial duties at the Town Offices and the Old 
Town Hall. We maintain one staff person to assist with various 
building maintenance needs. 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 23 



Public Works 



@?Me Q^fo &aM (Mtiicm 

The Parks Division maintains all traffic islands and commons 
in town. The grounds are groomed each Spring and prepared 
for the heavy use during the year. This Division also prepares 
the Town Common for the annual Fourth of July celebration as 
well as the cleanup and restoration of damaged areas resulting 
from an abundance of activities throughout the year. With the 
official formation of the Public Facilities Department the Parks 
Division no longer handles the maintenance of the Town's rec- 
reational fields. 



The Parks Division acknowledges the many volunteer groups 
and individuals for their time, donations and help. Also, thanks 
to all that participated in the Adopt-a-Park program. 




Gary Persichetti 

Public Facilities Director 

The purpose of the Facilities Department is to manage all 
buildings and grounds of the Town of Chelmsford in a uniform 
and high quality manner. 

Buildings 

The Public Facilities Department provides electrical, plumbing, 
HVAC, carpentry and general maintenance to all Town and 
School buildings. There are presently 28 buildings consisting 
of five elementary schools, two middle schools, Chelmsford 
High School, School Administration building, two Libraries, 
five Fire Stations, Police Station, Old Town Hall and other 
support buildings. 




In fiscal year 2007 the department processed 2479 work order 
requests. 

The department is responsible for managing all major building 
related capital improvements. Capital projects for the year in- 
cluded: 

• Chelmsford High School - New roof 

• Byam, Harrington, South Row and Westlands - Chalk- 
board replacement 

• Byam, South Row and Westlands Schools - Classroom 
furniture 

• South Row School - Floor tile replacement 

• South Row School - Parking lot, curbs and sidewalks 

• North Fire Station - New roof 

• West Fire Station - New roof 

The department participates in the MIIA Rewards Program by 
performing and submitting roof, self and building freeze up 
inspections. 

Roof repairs to the South Fire Station and the Byam School 
have been completed as recommended by the Town-Wide 
Rooftrac Program Inspection Report. 

Grounds 

The Public Facilities Department maintains all Town and 
School parks and athletic fields. Department personnel mow all 
sports fields and turf areas, trim shrubs, collect rubbish at parks 
and playgrounds, weed, edge, and mulch shrub beds. 
The Facilities staff is also responsible for snow removal, the 
preparation and clean up for special events and repair and re- 
placement of small engines. 
Gary J. Persichetti 
Public Facilities Director 



Page 24 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Works 




eaeana 





Jennifer Almeida 
Recycling Coordinator 



The Office of Recycling and Solid Waste (a.k.a. the 
Recycling Office) seeks to insure excellent trash and recycling 
services that fully comply with state waste bans, local bylaws, 
governing contracts and all other pertinent requirements. The 
Recycling Office works to educate residents about the impor- 
tance of waste reduction both for the environment and to save 
municipal funds. The office is staffed by two part time em- 
ployees: Jennifer Almeida, Recycling Coordinator, and Winnie 
Colbert, Recycling Assistant. The office's work is supported 
by the Chelmsford Recycling Committee, which in 2007 was 
comprised of: Bonnie Rankin, chair; Mark Gallagher, clerk; Jo 
Morse; Ron Goodner; Nancy Kaelin; Kathy Brough; Mark 
Grant and Ron Goodner. Members of the recycling committee 
assist in the planning of and volunteer at the recycling events, 
and these events could not happen without their assistance and 
that of other volunteers. 

Solid waste and recycling collection services: 

The Office of Recycling and Solid Waste coordinates 
the weekly collection of trash and bi-weekly collection of recy- 
clables from residential properties as well as the trash and recy- 
cling collection services provided to schools and municipal 
buildings. We communicate on a daily basis with the hauler 
and are available to assist residents with any service problems 
that may arise related to trash or recycling. In FY07 the Recy- 
cling Office continued to work on the implementation of the 
mandatory recycling bylaw. The bylaw, which enforces long- 
standing state waste bans, prohibits the disposal of waste 
banned recyclables in the trash and requires the trash collectors 
to leave any such visible recyclable material at the curb. 




The hauler risks being fined if it collects visible recyclable 
material with the trash. Since the bylaw's implementation in 
late January 2006, Chelmsford has achieved significant re- 
ductions in its trash tonnage and increases in recycling ton- 
nage. The results are even more remarkable in light of the 
fact that through 2005, our trash tonnages were increasing 
while our recycling rate remained flat. In every month under 
the bylaw, the town has generated less trash than the same 
month in the prior year, and our trash tonnage in FY07 was 
the lowest it's been in ten years. 




Drop off events: 

The Recycling Office and the Chelmsford Recycling Com- 
mittee held six recycling drop off events in FY07. These 
events, two for electronics and tires, two for scrap metal and 
usable household goods and two for brush, provide an oppor- 
tunity for residents to recycle materials that cannot be recy- 
cled at the curb, to insure that we keep waste banned materi- 
als (such as appliances, brush and CRTs) out of the trash, 
and to divert usable items from the trash. At these events we 
took in 1280 CRTs, 163 ACs and dehumidifiers, thousands 
of pounds of other small electronics, over 500 tires, 42 tons 
of scrap metal and several truck loads of usable furniture and 
household goods for charity and for Boy Scout Troop 74's 
yard sale. The Recycling Office also publicized alternatives 
to the Town's drop off events in an effort to give residents 
options that did not involve waiting in the long lines that 
frequently characterize our events. 

(Continued on page 26) 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 25 



Public Works 




emcma 





(Continued from page 25) 

Yard waste and composting: 

Leaves and yard waste are banned from the trash by 
state waste bans. The FY2007 budget did not include funds for 
curbside leaf collection. The Recycling Office assisted resi- 
dents in finding other options for their leaves and yard waste. 
In early FY07, Phil Jones of Jones Farm proposed a plan to 
provide fee based curbside leaf collection services to residents. 
The Recycling Office worked with Jones Farm and the Town 
Manager's Office to see this proposal come to fruition. The 
program was successful, albeit lightly used, and was repeated 
in the spring of 2007 and thereafter. In addition, the Recycling 
Office continues to encourage home composting as a means of 
diverting kitchen scraps from the solid waste stream and as a 
way for residents to deal with leaves. In FY07 the Recycling 
Office sold 66 compost bins and 1 6 kitchen compost scrap 
buckets, sponsored a composting talk at the library with Phil 
Jones, and brought in composting expert Virginio Mendonca to 
do composting presentations at the July 4 Country Fair. 

Education and outreach: 



with many local options for recycling materials that cannot 
be recycled at the curb and reuse options for items that 
should be kept out of the trash stream. The Recycling Office 
also worked with the MVRRP to explore the possibility of a 
regional household hazardous waste contract, as well as a 
regional contract for the curbside collection of materials such 
as CRTs and appliances for which Chelmsford currently pro- 
vides only drop off recycling events. Work on these propos- 
als continues. 

In FY07 the Recycling Office also applied for DEP 
recycling grants, filed the Town's annual DEP data sheet, 
and managed the mercury diversion programs and cell phone 
and rechargeable battery recycling programs. With the assis- 
tance of the Recycling Committee and other volunteers, the 
office planned the Town-wide Litter Clean-up; coordinated 
the recycling booth and bottle and can recycling efforts at the 
July 4 th Country Fair, and provided information to the 
Town's Solid Waste/ Recycling Task Force to assist it with 
its research and recommendations. 



The Recycling Office creates the annual "Chelmsford 
Recycles" flyer which is a comprehensive description and 
"how to" guide on recycling and solid waste services in 
Chelmsford. The flyer was mailed to all households in late 
June. The Recycling Office also maintains and updates that 
portion of the Town's website related to recycling and solid 
waste (www.townofchelmsford.us/Recycling-Department.cfm), 
disseminates information through Chelmsford Telemedia's 
bulletin board, maintains and updates a recorded information 
line at 978-250-5299, submits newspaper articles and occa- 
sional paid advertisements to the local newspapers, and drafts 
informational pieces on the Office's programs for publications 
in the Town's Community Newsletters. 

Merrimack Valley Regional Recycling PartnershipThe Re- 
cycling Office was an active participant in the newly created 
Merrimack Valley Regional Recycling Partnership (MVRRP). 
Consisting of the City of Lowell and the towns of Chelmsford, 
Billerica, Tyngsborough, Tewksbury, Dracut and Westford, the 
MVRRP undertakes regional projects aimed at increasing recy- 
cling awareness and participation, and explores ways for these 
communities to work together to improve services to residents 
while keeping down the costs to each municipality. In FY07, 
our work with the MVRRP included the creation of a regional 
"Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" guide which was published by the 
Lowell Sun on Earth Day in April (copies of the guide are 
available at the Recycling Office). The guide provides residents 





-&•<•$£!* -* 



Page 26 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Public Works 



//j 




eeueim/i 




'CU 



a£te 





m 




FY 


Tons: Solid 
waste (trash) 


Per ton tipping fee at 
incinerator 


Tons: Curbside 
Recycling 


Recycling 
Rate 


Annual dis- 
posal cost ** 


1997 


13976 


$43.70 


3216 


18.71% 


$610,737 


1998 


14503 


$45.40 


3344 


18.74% 


$658,447 


1999 


14584 


$47.24 


3485 


19.29% 


$688,952 


2000 


14943 


$49.10 


3867 


20.56% 


$733,718 


2001 


15407 


$51.60 


3534 


18.66% 


$795,004 


,2002 


15687 


$53.14 


3401 


17.82% 


$833,609 


2003 


15661 


$55.77 


3390 


17.79% 


$873,395 


2004 


15813 


$57.98 


3433 


17.84% 


$916,831 


2005 


16061 


$59.78 


3117 


16.25% 


$960,167 


2006* 


15358 


$67.50 


3586 


18.93% 


$1,036,665 


2007 


14170 


$69.50 


4296 


23.27% 


$984,815 


* Bylaw in effect February 2006 through June 2006. 

** Costs shown are the Town's disposal costs only and do not include 

portation of solid waste and recycling. 


the cost of collec 


;tion and trans- 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 27 



Public Works 





emetew TDotmn/M&rv 



->f 




David Boyle, 
Superintendent 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report the following 
accomplishments for fiscal year 2007, to the citizens of 
Chelmsford. 

At Pine Ridge Cemetery, we are in the final phase of redesign- 
ing a small area in Section I and will begin working on opening 
additional areas to make available for future lot sales. 
Construction of the new storage garage at Pine Ridge Cemetery 
has been completed, the Commission would like to thank all 
the students and faculty from Nashoba Valley Technical 
School who were involved in completing this project, it will 
provide much needed storage space the Cemetery for many 
years to come. 

Heart Pond Cemetery has seen a complete renovation, repaving 
of the entire cemetery was completed in the Fall of 2006, and 
beginning this past spring the fence that surrounds the cemetery 
was restored by a town resident who participates in the Senior 
Tax Credit Program, also at Heart Pond Cemetery this year 
with the assistance of the Community Preservation Fund we 
were able to restore the historic monuments that needed atten- 
tion. 

Looking ahead, both West Chelmsford Cemetery and Riverside 
Cemetery will be undergoing restoration work with funds pro- 
vided by the Community Preservation Fund. 
Please visit the Town's web site at www.townofchelmsford.us 
and click on the Public Facilities link; then to the Cemetery 
Department link, here you will find information on the Ceme- 
tery Commission, the six cemeteries in town and directions to 
each of them; current rates, and also a link to the Cemetery 
Archives to search genealogy. 

During Fiscal Year 2007 there were 159 total interments, 1 12 
full burials and 47 cremation interments which accounted for 
nearly 30% of total interments. There were 87 cemetery lots 
sold throughout the town. Twenty- eight residents participated 
in the Prepaid Interment Fee Program. The Cemetery Commis- 
sion appreciates our staffs efforts to keep Chelmsford's six 
public cemeteries well-maintained and attractive burial places. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Peter S. Pedulla, Chairman 



Chelmsford 

Historical 

Commission, 

Photograph 

by Fred 

Merriam 







ewer TDammiM&n 



Barry Balan, 
Chairman 

Construction and site restoration were completed this year 
for Phase 4E (Livery Road & Chestnut Hill Road Area Lateral 
Sewer Projects) and the first segment of Phase 4F (High Street 
Area Lateral Sewer Project). Construction on the second 
segment of Phase 4F (Hunt Road Area Lateral Sewer Project) 
is on schedule, as pipeline installation and paving continues 
through 2006 with an anticipated completion of final paving 
and site restoration during the spring of 2007. 

The next phase (4G) is made up of two contracts, Burning 
Tree Lane Area and Robin Hill Road Area. Design of the 
Phase 4G Lateral Sewer Project was completed during the sum- 
mer of 2006. The Burning Tree Lane Area Lateral Sewer Pro- 
ject (Contract 06-1) will be bid in the fall/winter of 2006 with 
construction anticipated to commence in the spring of 2007. 
The Robin Hill Road Area Lateral Sewer Project (Contract 06- 
2) will be bid in the summer of 2007 with construction to com- 
mence thereafter. 

The CSC would like to acknowledge Trish Kahl for her 
hard work and professionalism. We would also like to welcome 
Mary Calandrella to the Chelmsford Sewer Commission office. 
Both Trish and Mary interface with the public on a daily basis, 
and their multifaceted duties are shared by the Sewer Division of 
the Department of Public Works. The CSC would like to thank 
Amy Baron, who has been promoted to another department, for 
her many years of service. 

Barry B. Balan, Chairman 

Jeffrey A. Miller 

John F. Souza, Vice Chairman 

Richard J. Day 

George F. Abely, Clerk 



Page 28 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Human Services 



owned mi ^JSgina 





fdep (p/ewiceA 





Diana Ryder 

Human Services Director 

The Human Services/Elder Services Department pro- 
vides advocacy and support systems which empower older 
adults to maintain independence, prepare for life changes and 
improve their quality of life. 

American society is evolving, changing and realizing that aging 
is a complicated process not simply defined by a number. Even 
the very definition of "senior" is undergoing analysis and 
change with adjectives such as "seasoned citizens", "Geri- 
Actives" and "Rewired" being used with greater frequency to 
describe older Americans. Tomorrow's challenges will vary a 
great deal in response to the "Boomers" expectations versus the 
expectations of today's mature adult.. 

The variety of Wellness programs and services pro- 
vided by the COA strive to: support frail elders in their homes; 
case management for older adults to age in place; provide in- 
formation and assistance to families making life change deci- 
sions concerning elder family members; provide some suppor- 
tive services for disabled of all ages; empowering consumers; 
and, provide preventive health programming, advocacy, educa- 
tion, social, and leisure opportunities for active adults. Foster- 
ing a sense of community and involvement through shared ex- 
periences guides the COA's activity. Additional programs and 
services include: monthly support groups for Alzheimer's care- 
givers, grief, and a weekly anxiety support group and widows 
group; a monthly newsletter to senior households in Chelms- 
ford and surrounding communities; provide free medical equip- 
ment to frail residents; offered over 50 recreational trips to all 
areas of New England; and offer healthy exercise programs 
such as Tai Chi, Yoga, Pace arthritis exercise, strength training, 
line dancing, and aquacise. More than 200 volunteers provide 
critical services to both community residents and the Senior 
Center. They provided 35,882 hours of service to the commu- 
nity. Expressed in paid equivalent terms, volunteer efforts are 
double the local tax appropriation at $552,224. We are so ap- 
preciative of all the hours provided by these amazing, caring 
people. 



Future Goals: 

The Council on Aging, in conjunction with other com- 
munity organizations, have been meeting to address meeting the 
needs of the coming generations of residents. How to meet the 
needs of a diverse group spanning 40 years of life is extremely 
challenging. It takes input and cooperation from the whole com- 
munity. We are also beginning the long process of having the 
senior center nationally accredited. This too is very challenging 
and is being coordinated by volunteers. 

One other challenge in the coming year will be to 
maintain the current number of people served in our Nutrition 
Program. The state and federal Title III funding continues to be 
cut each year as overhead, food costs and transportation costs 
increase. An additional challenge will be meeting the increasing 
transportation needs with one driver and one vehicle. How do 
we meet the increasing need for transportation in the current 
fiscal climate? 

The Council On Aging is committed to strengthening 
the capacity of our department in Fiscal Year 2008. In the com- 
ing year, we will continue to advocate for older community 
adults: in the areas of health, transportation, taxes and affordable 
housing; gather information from Chelmsford seniors regarding 
'what works well and what changes could be made'; and, con- 
tinue assisting seniors and families in providing services that 
will assist them "Aging in Place" safely in their homes. 

In Genuine Appreciation : 

First and foremost, special thanks to the Department's 
staff. They must be recognized for their dedication, compas- 
sion, and professionalism to all participants of the Center, the 
public, and toward the many volunteers. 

It is the members of the Council on Aging who work 
constantly with the Director to bring about responsive program- 
ming and quality services to the residents of Chelmsford. Coun- 
cil on Aging Members include: Chairperson, Diana Boisvert, 
Vice Chair, Paul Sweeney, Clerk Ann Warburton, John Cody, 
Robert Grippo, Louise Myers, Mary Jane Rainge, Stella Apos- 
tolos. Outgoing Board members: Joan LaTourneau, John 
Clancy and Tom Turner gave 6-7 years of dedicated service to 
the Council. We thank them for their dedication and support on 
behalf of the Chelmsford community. I am most appreciative 
of the assistance they have given me and look forward to their 
assistance and new members assistance in the future. 

Continued on page 30 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 29 



Human Services 



loaned on '^^jguia 



The Chelmsford Human Services Department and 
Council on Aging are challenged to offer service and support to 
a rapidly growing population. We welcome input from the 
community and encourage your comments, suggestions or 
complaints, as well as, participation. 
The Director can be reached at 978-251-0553. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Diana Ryder, Director 
Human Services/Elder Services 




SERVICES & STATISTICS 


Adult Supportive Day Program.... 


.3,436 client days 




39 participants 


Congregate Lunch 


27.31 1 


Home Delivered Meals 


24.179 


Off Site Meals Delivered 


3.221 


Health Benefits Counseling 


1 ,224 SERVICED 


Flu Clinic with Board of Health. 
Blood Pressure Screenings 


642 SERVICED 


...425 PARTICIPANTS 


Home visits, shopping assistance. 


954 


Transportation 4,201 


TRIPS/262 CLIENTS 


Respite Companion Care 84 clients/2 1 . 1 04 hrs 


Tax and Fuel Assistance 


31 R 








Becky Legros Herrmann, 
Library Director 

We make a living by what we do, but we make a life by what we 
give. —Winston Churchill 

Fiscal Year 2007 was a time to laud the greater commu- 
nity of Chelmsford and also to recognize individuals for all that 
they give to the Chelmsford Public Library. This was the first 
year of our "One Book Chelmsford" community-wide reading 
program, funded by a federal LSTA grant program that is admin- 
istered by the MA Board of Library Commissioners. Town resi- 
dents chose Empire Falls, a tender and comic novel of small- 
town life in a mill town in northern New England. Richard Russo, 
author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning novel will visit the library in 
November of 2007 as the culmination to the program. 

But the success story of the One Book program was 
largely due to community participation. Whether it was Chelms- 
ford High using Empire Falls as part of the curriculum — local 
coffee shops, town offices, churches and senior housing hosting 
book discussions — banks and local businesses putting up our 
book displays or the local cable station and newspaper highlight- 
ing our programming - Chelmsford folks got involved. We even 
had a kick-off event called Tastings that combined reading rec- 
ommendations paired with food and wine. Twenty-five local res- 
taurants and businesses participated. Over 30 volunteers helped 
with this program and more than 200 people attended. A warm 
thank you is extended to all who participated. 

Community participation is integral to a public library 
and it is easy to measure our success by statistics (see box) but it 
is the behind-the scenes heroes and heroines that need their 
praises sung. Fortunately, this year provided opportunity for cele- 
brating these individuals. July of 06 started with a 90 lh birthday 
party honoring long-time library volunteer Cliff Choquette. Cliff 
holds a special place in our hearts for his tireless efforts on behalf 
of the Friends of the Library. In his role as membership chair of 
the Friends, Cliff was primarily responsible for our Friends group 
becoming one of the largest groups in the state. 

Chelmsford Public Library FY07 

Circulation 593,661 

Holdings 149,368 

Visits 228,000 

Reference Questions 18,928 

Programs 895 

Program Attendance 14,184 

Website Visits 257,248 

Inter-Library Traffic 132,919 



Page 30 



FY 2007 Annual Report 




Human Services 



Vielmtfevc/ Lgjdmnt 



The celebrating continued when veteran library trustee 
Betty McCarthy was honored by the Massachusetts Library 
Trustee Association as "Outstanding Trustee of the Year." The 
Award cited her work on the endowment fund, her work with 
the Friends of the Library, her participation in community 
groups and on town committees — and her long-time tenure as 
trustee. She has been giving back to the community as a library 
trustee now for 38 years! 

We had the pleasure of surprising Betty with the 
award at our annual volunteer luncheon where we highlighted 
the accomplishments of 1 82 official library volunteers who 
work tirelessly on behalf of the library, donating over 4000 
hours doing everything from working on the book sale to col- 
lating mailings to covering books. Our volunteers are the best! 
As the fiscal year continued, work began on mural for the chil- 
dren's room, conceived in memory of library trustee Steve Ma- 
loney who died suddenly in January of 2006. Over 100 family 
members and friends contributed to make this mural possible. 
Artist Yetti Frankl has created a wonderful tribute to Steve, 
using his work as a meteorologist and his love of nature as a 
starting point. A special thank you goes to all who donated in 
his memory. We will always remember Steve and his deep 
commitment to this community. 

Several former town residents continued to give back 
to the community as they visited Chelmsford this past year. 
Peter Reynolds, author/illustrator of the award-winning chil- 
dren's book "The Dot" proved that you can go home again as 
he spoke at the library to close to 100 people. Lance Wilder, of 
"The Simpsons" fame also shared his talents with us, to close 
out the fiscal year. He spoke to a standing room only audience 
about his work as a background designer for the popular televi- 
sion series and highlighted Chelmsford landmarks that served 
as inspiration for his illustrations in the show. Did you know 
that the Springfield Town Hall in "The Simpsons" show is 
modeled after the original Adams part of the Chelmsford Pub- 
lic Library? 

The Library is also proud to recognize that the Heri- 
tage Garden conceived, installed and maintained by Country 
Lane Garden Club was the recipient of several awards this year 
— including the prestigious 2007 Landscape Design Council 
(LDC) Award Certificate for outstanding accomplishment in 
the field of landscape design. Our congratulations go to the 
Country Lane Garden Club and a special thanks to its members 
for helping make our library grounds so beautiful. 
And let's not forget the more than 1000 members of the 
Chelmsford Friends of the Library whose yearly dues and par- 
ticipation in the annual book sale provide us with the funding 
to offer programs and activities throughout the year. As there is 
no municipal budget for library programming, we are grateful 
that each year the Friends work so hard to make it possible for 
the library to provide a full calendar of cultural, community 
and collaborative programming. 




Programming included a series of 'Hands On Art 
workshops" that was a collaborative venture with the Chelms- 
ford Art Society and the Chelmsford Cultural Council, our 
'World Wide Wednesdays' concert series at the MacKay 
Branch library introducing world music to Chelmsford and our 
monthly art exhibits that have embraced international artists 
such as Zimbabwe artist, Allen Kupeta. We continue to work 
with municipal departments such as the Recycling Dept and the 
Housing Authority. We presented programs on Organic Gar- 
dening, the leaf collection program and Affordable Housing. 
We offered self improvement programs like "Cooking with the 
Starrs" "From Clutter to Clarity" and "Healthy Eating." Other 
cultural offerings included a performance of "Mark Twain," 
"Luisa's Girls" by the Delvena Theatre, Stand-up Poet Jack 
McCarthy, and our annual Poetry Slam. 

We also organized a Volunteer Fair for teens seeking 
volunteer opportunities in the community. The Children's and 
YA departments used this event as a springboard to begin the 
development of a database to match teens with volunteer posi- 
tions. This was also part of an "Equal Access" grant that we 
received from the federal government, administered through 
the MA Board of Library Commissioners. 

In addition to the traditional library programs, our 
youth department offered: family concerts, teen cooking 
classes, a Teddy Bear picnic, a visit from a beekeeper, a work- 
shop on "Myspace.com", an Anime Club, magicians and pup- 
peteers. The MacKay Library hosted the Audubon Ark, a 
Reader's Theater, an Apple Pie contest, and a spooky story 
sing-along. Middle School students had the chance to be part of 
a grant-funded After School Storytelling Club and one of the 
students, Arjun Balaji, was invited to tell at the MA Library 
Association Conference. Middle school students from Parker 
and McCarthy also worked with their art teacher Sarah Kiley to 
design and create a permanent art installation of ceramic tiles 
depicting popular children's books for the library walls. 

Each year, the Chelmsford Public Library is improved by the 
generosity of our community and our volunteers. It's not just 
the tangibles like art in the children's room, new equipment 
from the Friends and community donations that count. The 
intangibles count just as much - bringing readers together as 
they debate the merits of the One Book selection, enjoying the 
smiling faces on a warm summer night at concerts on the lawn, 
the laughter of library users as they see the town manager hug- 
ging a pig - As each year unfolds, we recognize the value of 
giving to each other and giving back. The library grows com- 
munity as well as it grows young readers. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Becky Legros Herrmann, 
Library Director 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 3 1 



Human Services 




ecreatl&n 




wp&ment 




Holly Hamilton 
Recreation Director 



The Recreation Department offered over 400 self- 
supporting programs throughout the year. Some of the success- 
ful programs organized in the year 2006 include day trips, ski 
programs, dance lessons, art lessons, science programs and 
much more. The Recreation Department will continue to de- 
velop programming in response to the growing and changing 
needs of all populations within the Town of Chelmsford. Rec- 
reation programs are advertised in the Chelmsford Community 
Newsletter and www.townofchelmsford.us . We are thankful to 
all residents whose support, dedication and involvement con- 
tributed to the success of the 2006 Recreation program. 




'ewcee& 



Regina Jackson 
Veteran's Agent 



The Chelmsford Veterans' Services Office provides 
short-term financial assistance to eligible veterans and their 
families as mandated by Massachusetts General Law Chapter 
1 15. We can assist eligible, needy veterans with a monthly 
allowable grant and some medical coverage. The amount of 
assistance depends on the budget standards set by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Service. 
The State will reimburse Chelmsford for 75% of authorized 
benefits paid. 

In fiscal year 2007, an average of $4,313 per month in 
benefits was paid out to an average of nine active state cases. 
Reimbursement from the State is paid quarterly, and is approxi- 
mately 10 months behind the authorizations. In FY2007 we 
paid out $51,758 in Chapter 115 benefits. Chelmsford will be 
reimbursed $38,818, which is the maximum 75% allowed. The 
office also processes State annuities for 1 00% disabled veter- 
ans and certain eligible widows. State Chapter 1 15 cases are 
completely separate from VA claims as they only involve State 
and Town funds. 

Federal VA claims have a significant impact on a 
community. The number of veterans eligible for Federal Veter- 
ans Administration benefits is always a small percentage of the 
total number of veterans that are living in the community. 



This office helps 
any Chelmsford veteran 
dealing with the VA 
claims process. The 
claims may be an initial 
filing, reopen a claim for 
increase, appeals on de- 
nied claims, pending hear- 
ings with the Regional 
Office, or Board of Veter- 
ans Appeals. The VA pe- 
riodically takes a 
'snapshot' of the total 
amount of Federal Veter- 
ans benefits that flow into 
a community. The last 
look was in mid 2007. 
The amount of Federal 
VA money that flows an- 




Photograph by Lee Fortier 



nually into Chelmsford is $3,219,468 as distributed to 406 veter- 
ans and 59 widows/surviving family members all in Chelmsford. 
On November 19 th , 2006 the Chelmsford Vietnam Vet- 
erans' Memorial was proudly dedicated in Vinal Square Com- 
mon, North Chelmsford. This memorial honors the ultimate 
sacrifice of the four Chelmsford soldiers killed in Vietnam: John 
F. Bettencourt, Kenneth R. Hughes, Peter V. Blazonis and 
James A. Doughty. The memorial was completely funded by 
community donations raised by a committee consisting of: Bob 
Casper, George Dixon, John Harrington, Regina Jackson, Bob 
Mackey, Dave McAllister and Jim Pearson. We are very thank- 
ful for all the support of the Chelmsford community. This office 
coordinates the Chelmsford Veterans Day Observance, which is 
always held at Veterans' Memorial 
Park on the 1 1" 1 of November at 1 1:00 
AM. (1 1/1 1 at 1 1) ! All are welcome. 

Veterans' Services has relo- 
cated to Town Offices, 50 Billerica 
Road. The office is open Monday 
through Friday 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, 
evening hours are also available. If 
you are unable to visit the office and 
need a home visit, please call and I 
will be happy to schedule a convenient 
time to meet with you. (978) 250- 
5238, E-mail address is 
riackson(a),townofchelmsford.us . 
Thank You. 

Regina Jackson 
Veteran's Agent 




Page 32 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Human Services 




Ck 



^kelm^cwd \j&ou6ma ^J^ut/ierita 



David Hedison, 
Executive Director 



Over the past year, the Chelmsford Housing Authority 
has made progress in meeting the needs of families, seniors and 
the disabled requiring affordable housing. 

Currently, there are over 1 25 applicants on the waiting 
list for senior housing. Our senior housing locations are lo- 
cated at McFarlin Manor - 10 Wilson Street, Chelmsford Arms 
- 1 Smith Street, Delaney Terrace - 8 Sheila Ave and North 
Village - 20 Sheila Ave. The Authority has begun the process 
of developing an additional 37 units of senior housing off 
Sheila Ave to complete our senior campus and provide addi- 
tional supportive services to the residents. We currently offer 
case management, adult day health, beauty parlors, clustered 
home care services, meals programs and, in some locations, 
24/7 staffing. Our goal is to support our seniors as they age in 
place. 

The Section 8 Program continues to assist over 433 
families/elderly/disabled in the area with rental assistance to 
live in a private apartment. We have placed Section 8 Vouch- 
ers into The Kensington, Princeton Commons and The Mead- 
ows to make the rental units truly affordable. The waiting list 
for one of these units is in excess of three years. The waiting 
list for Section 8 is over 7 to 10 years. We continue to provide 
the Family Self Sufficiency Program and help over 30 families 
improve their education and skills with the hopes of moving 
them towards homeownership. 





The Authority serves as the Management Agent to the 
Town for monitoring the Affordable Homeownership Units and 
Affordable Rental Units located in Chelmsford. We have had 
over 12 re-sales over the past year and have sold over 17 new 
affordable units to families and seniors. We continue to play a 
significant role in making sure any proposed 40B projects are 
truly affordable to the residents of Chelmsford. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, Ex- 
ecutive Director, Connie Donahue, Deputy Director, Kristin 
Roberts, Finance Manager, Linda Dalton, Director of Public 
Housing, Kelly Santos, Federal Housing Manager, Richard 
O'Neil, Maintenance Manager and 9 additional support staff. 
Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson 
Street at 4:00 p.m., on the first Tuesday each month. The An- 
nual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. All meetings are 
open to the public. The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board 
of Commissioners would like to thank the residents of Chelms- 
ford and Town Officials for their continued support and coop- 
eration. 

Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commissioners 



NAME 


TITLE 
Chairman 


TERM EXPIRES 


Gail Beaudoin 


2012 


Denise Marcaurelle 


Vice Chairman 


2010 


Georgi Mueller 


Treasurer 


2011 


Mary St. Hilaire 


Asst. Treasurer 


2008 


Andrea White 


EEO Officer 


2008 




FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 33 



Human Services 



Richard Day 
Health Director 




epartment 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 2007 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program con- 
tinued its efforts to clean up our waterways. The Board of 
Health, with the advent of a central sewer system in Chelms- 
ford is now embarking on enforcement activities to insure com- 
pliance with local by-laws which will insure a safe water sup- 
ply. Dye testing, water sampling and issuance of septic system 
permits will continue in all the non-sewered areas until the 
completion of the project. 
Administration and Management 

During FY 2007 income for various services and permits was 
collected for 586 inspections of restaurants, septic systems, 
swimming pools, beaver complaints, day care centers, rental 
housing units, public schools, recreational camps, bathing 
beaches, tanning facilities, massage establishments and all re- 
tail food stores. The Department also responded to emergency 
inspections, nuisance calls and complaints. 
Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater Program 
Richard J. Day, Director of Public Health, was reappointed 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to 
enforce the "Right-To-Know law for Chelmsford. The Board 
of Health held two Household Hazardous Waste Collection 
Days this year which were held on November 4, 2006 and 
April 28, 2007. This program has consistently collected sig- 
nificant volumes of hazardous waste. 
Title V 

The Board or Health is continuing to work on developing pro- 
grams to control the effects of the new Title V regulation on 
the residents still on septic systems until the 100% completion 
of the Town's Sewer Project 

West Nile Virus EEE /Mosquito Surveillance Program 
The Board of Health office is the collection center for three 
towns in the handling of dead birds for the West Nile Virus 
Surveillance Program. The Department received several calls 
for dead birds during mosquito season which were referred to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Nine dead 
birds were submitted to the lab for testing. The state limited 
the type and number of birds collected this year but increased 
the testing of mosquito pools in the area. 
Emergency Preparedness 

• An Educational Program "Home Emergency Preparedness" 
was presented to town residents on three different dates during 
the months of October, November and December 2006. An 
additional program was held at the Chelmsford Senior Center 
in January 2007. A total of 97 residents attended. 

• "Home Emergency Preparedness" program was taped and 
presented on the "Health Styles" Chelmsford cable show in 
October, 2006. 

• The Chelmsford Board of Health sponsored an Emergency 
Dispensing Site Exercise on 1/10/07. The exercise was planned 
and carried out through the Region 3C Coalition and was held 




at the Center School from 5-8 PM. Towns participating were: 
Billerica, Chelmsford, Dracut, Lowell, Tewksbury, Tyngsboro, 
and Westford with Chelmsford being the lead agency. The pur- 
pose of the exercise was to take the written Regional Emer- 
gency Preparedness plan and implement it to evaluate if the 
plan was functional in a true event. We utilized the ICS 
(Incident Command System), the scenario of the SNS 
(Strategic National Stockpile) delivery system, a newly devised 
Communications Plan, the MRC (Medical Reserve Corp) as 
volunteers, as well local Police and the Senior Center transpor- 
tation van to assist us. 

Vaccines Offered were: Influenza, Pneumonia, and Tetanus 
A total of 249 people came through the clinic. 
A total of 340 vaccines were administered: (76) Tetanus 

(50) Pneumococcal 
(204) Influenza 
The exercise was advertised both before and after by the local 
newspapers of each participating city or town in the coalition. 
It was an excellent experience with many lessons learned. 
• A mailing was done to all homes in Chelmsford in March 
2007 to recruit volunteers to join the Upper Merrimack Valley 
Medical Reserve Corp, a volunteer organization that is tapped 
into to obtain volunteers to help out in a disaster situation. A 
presentation was also given at the April Town Meeting to all 
town meeting representatives to recruit them to sign up to be in 
this data base as well. A total of 100 new members signed up 
from Chelmsford 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE: 
Influenza Vaccine Program 

The Board of Health sponsored several flu clinics this 
year: 2,010 flu vaccine doses were administered at clinics and 
60 persons were immunized with pneumonia vaccine. An ad- 
ditional 3,600 doses were dispensed to nursing homes and phy- 
sicians' offices. Thirty-five visits were made to handicapped 
or house-bound residents. A combined total of 5,580 flu doses 
were allocated to the Chelmsford Board of Health by the Mas- 
sachusetts Department of Public Health. 
Immunization Program 

Two hundred and fifty-seven immunizations were administered 
to adults and students in compliance with the Massachusetts 
Immunization Laws and prophylactically to residents traveling 
to underdeveloped countries. 
Meningitis Vaccine Program for CHS Seniors 
Eleven doses of the meningitis vaccine were administered to 
high school seniors entering college. Immunizations and other 
health services offered are listed on Town of Chelmsford web 
page. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screening for residents are held the first Thurs- 
day of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board of Health, 
Town Offices. Five-hundred twenty residents attended the 
screenings this year. 

(Continued on page 35) 



Page 34 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Human Services 



Jriea/tA QDejba/rtm&rit 




(Continued from page 34) 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Board of Health offers lead paint testing for children between the ages of nine months and six years. Residents may call the 
Board of Health at 250-5243 and make an appointment with the nurse. Nine children were screened for lead paint. 
Cholesterol Screening Program 

The Public Health Nurse tries to offer cholesterol screenings throughout the year at the Board of Health office in the Town Hall. 
Appointments are needed and a $10.00 fee is required. These screenings are advertised in the local newspapers, local cable televi- 
sion and the Town of Chelmsford web page at www.townofchelmsford.us . A total of 90 screenings were done in six clinics from 
October 2006 through September 2007. 
Communicable Disease Program 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those persons whose employment require certification of freedom from disease is 
one responsibility of the Public Health Nurse. Fifty-two Mantoux (TB) tests were administered to persons as required for pre- 
employment, college and also to household contacts of active cases in compliance with the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health regulations. Home visits and telephone calls are made to families of active and some inactive cases on a periodic basis to 
insure understanding of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is achieved. Forty-three medical records were kept and up- 
dated on residents who have a positive mantoux (TB) test and are receiving medication prophylactically and being followed ra- 
diologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic and other chest clinics. When necessary, TB testing is done at places of business if employ- 
ees are exposed to an active case of TB. Two active cases have been followed since the summer. 

Communicable Disease Investigation Reports of the following diseases were completed from October 2006 through September 2007 
for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health: 



STATE REQUIRED INVESTIGATIONS ON REPORTED INFECTIOUS DISEASES 


Amebiasis 


1 


Invasive Bacterial Infection 1 


Campylobacter Enteritis 
Chicken Pox 


6 

4 


Influenza 4 
Lyme 23 


Cryptosporidium 
Giardia 


3 
2 


Pertussis 10 
Salmonella 5 


Group A Strep/Strep Pneuno 

Group B Strep 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Erlichiosis 


10 

2 

9 

3 

1 


Shiga-Toxin E-Coli 1 
Toxic Shock Syndrome 1 
Viral Meningitis (Asceptic) 1 
E Coli Meningitis 1 



Health Promotion and Education Programs 

• Campaign for a Healthy Heart 

• Breast Cancer Awareness 

• CPR/AED Certification for Town Employees/ Heart Safe Committee for the Community 

• Cancer Awareness Program for Chelmsford High School Senior Boys and Girls on Testicular Self Exam (168 males) and 

• Breast Self Exam (168 females), Spring 2007 

• Fourth Of July Festivities: Health Education Info on Sun Safety and Diseases of Summer as well as recruitment for the Medical 

Reserve Corp. 

• BOH Inspection of all Summer Camps for Children per State requirements. 

• 10/21/07 Metaphysical Health Fair: Promote CPR/AED Education, MRC Involvement, Provide BP Screenings, and Education 

on Cough Etiquette and Hand washing. 

• Instructor for the "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention" segment of a program for the Local Foundation of Public Health 

group. 

• Did a short segment in an Educational Video Taping done by MHOA about the role of the public health nurse in a 

gastrointestinal outbreak. 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 35 



Boards & Committees 






^SrfA ( W) ^/eeAne/eau (Qdticati/m c^nind 




Glenn doherty 
Chairman 

The 1 996 Spring Town Meeting approved an amendment to 
their General By-Laws be adding Section 13 to Article VII 
entitled Chelmsford Arts and Technology Education Funds 
(ATEF) through the combined efforts of Evelyn Thoren and 
George Ripsom. The purpose of this fund is to provide supple- 
mental funding to support local educational initiatives and pro- 
jects. Thanks to your generosity and support the ATEF has 
received over $70,000 since its inception in November 1996. 
Through investment strategies the committee is currently work- 
ing on investment strategies and researching other financial 
resources in order to create a lasting fund and insure continued 
and consistent awards. 

The ATEF has developed a website that makes all our appli- 
cations and information available at the Town of Chelmsford 
website. Chelmsford is the first town to have a By-Law in 
place that specifies the application process, committee make-up 
and limitations. The Spring 2007 applications and copies of the 
applications along with the By-Law were distributed in January 
2007 to each school through hard copy and email. The commit- 
tee received completed applications by March 31, 2007. 

Teachers and School Councils apply for these funds. Pro- 
ject Summary forms are required from current and previous 
awardees prior to consideration for any additional future new 
projects. Awards were announced at the Board of Selectmen's 
Meeting in June 2007. The next applications will be distributed 
in January 2008 and the deadline for the next academic year is 
March 31, 2008. The concept of using tax check-offs for an 
alternative funding source for education was initiated by Ar- 
lington's veteran Town Treasurer, John Bilafer, under a Home 
Rule Petition many years ago. Since this was accepted, numer- 
ous towns in Massachusetts have adopted the statute Chapter 
60. Chelmsford became involved in the process of adopting 
Chapter 60 through the efforts of Anthony Volpe, a past mem- 
ber of the Chelmsford School Committee. 

Chelmsford uses a separate tear-off sheet in the excise and 
real estate tax bills as the method to elicit voluntary contribu- 
tions to enhance the education of Chelmsford Public School 
students. The collected money does not become part of the 
school budget. The Town Treasurer disperses the funds under 
the direction of the ATEF Committee. Information sheets are 
available in the Town Offices. The contributions that you give 
have and will continue to make a difference in the education of 
our children . . . our future taxpayers. 



2007 
ATEF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 



Glenn Doherty, Chairman 

George Ripsom 

Superintendent of Schools, Richard Moser 

Beverly Barrett, Secretary 

Angelo Taranto 

Evelyn S. Thoren, Financial Liasion 

Patricia Dzuris 

Colleen Stansfield 

Anthony Volpe 



2007 
ATEF GRANT RECIPIENTS 



Sharon Giglio 

McCarthy Middle School 

Lecture Hall Projector 

$750.00 

Nancy Charron, Ed.D. 

Westland's School 

6+ 1 Writing Traits Books 

$750.00 

Megan Errgong-Weider 

Center School 

Stereo for Music Room 

$750.00 

Martha Coolidge 

Harrington School 

Now 1 SEE IT! 

$750.00 



Page 36 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Boards & Committees 



JriiAtaMcal y^&mm/Mimi 



Linda Prescott 
Chair 

During the past year, the Historical Commission has 
continued its Sign Project. This project includes creating 
the historic inventories of structures and sites over 75 
years old and placing a plaque on the structure or site 
identifying the age and original owner. These surveys 
include a site visit, an architectural survey, a footprint 
map, photos and a deed, tax, vital statistics and media 
search. Finished surveys are placed on file in the Town 
and the State Archives. 

The Commission has placed Red Wing Farm on the 
National Register. The Commission continues to work 
with the Middlesex Canal Association National Registra- 
tion Request and with the Community Preservation Com- 
mittee. The Commission is working with the owner of 1 
Academy Street to finalize the Preservation Restriction 
required by Town Meeting. 

The Commission continues to be very involved 
with preservation. We continue to work toward the pres- 
ervation of the North Town Hall and the stabilization of 
headstones in the Hart Pond and West Chelmsford Ceme- 
teries. The Commission is becoming an information re- 
source for contractors and citizens as they rehabilitate 
their homes and places business. The Commission con- 
tinues to administer the Demolition Delay Bylaw, trying 
to educate homeowners about their historic homes. 

The Historical Commission continues to add invento- 
ries to our data base that is available through the Town's 
website at www.townofchemsford.us along with a copy 
of the Demolition Delay By-Law, other articles of inter- 
est and links to other sites of historic interest. 




Jrzittenc i2/)lMnet 




emmtMtan 



Kathleen Howe 
Chair 

Members: 

Kathleen Howe, Chairman 

Richard Burkinshaw, Vice Chairman 

Cynthia Acheson 

Jack Handley 

Brenda Lovering 

Herbert Pitta, Alternate 

Dennis Ready, Alternate 

Debra Belden, Recording Clerk 




Photograph by 
Fred Merriam, 
Courtesy of 
Chelmsford 
Historical Com- 
mission. All 
Dressed up for 
the Scavenger 
Hunt Day at the 
1802 School 
House. 



The Historic District Commission functions as a regu- 
latory commission for the benefit of the Town. A small area of 
the Town's center section is under the Commission's authority. 
The objective of the Historic District Commission is to provide 
an expeditious application and review relative to the physical 
modifications to the residences and businesses within the Dis- 
trict. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of each 
month at the Town Offices. 

During fiscal year 2007, the Commission received 
seventeen (17) applications for review and seventeen (17) ap- 
plications were accepted. Seventeen (17) public hearings were 
waived. Six (6) Certificates of Appropriateness and eleven 
(11) Certificates of Non-Applicability were issued. 



FY 2007 annual Report 



Page 37 



Boards & Committees 



c!njui/nce ^$&mmittee 



David Turocy 
Chairman 

The Finance Committee is comprised of seven mem- 
bers who are appointed by the Town Moderator to staggered 
three-year terms. Primarily, the Finance Committee is responsi- 
ble for filing a proposed budget and reporting recommenda- 
tions to the Town Manager for use in the Town Manager's pro- 
posed budget voted upon at town meeting. 

There are two confirmed Town Meetings each year. 
The Spring meeting begins on the last Monday in April and the 
Fall meeting is at the end of October. Prior to the Spring Town 
Meeting, the Town Manager presents his proposed budget and 
capital improvement program for the upcoming fiscal year to 
the Committee. 

Each Committee member acts as a liaison to one or 
more town departments and boards. Committee liaisons meet 
individually with department heads to review department 
budget requests. As individual reviews are completed, full 
Committee meetings are scheduled December through April to 
review, analyze and discuss departmental budgets and warrant 
articles. Each department or independent board is given the 
opportunity to present its budget and respond to questions and 
concerns raised by Committee members. 

Based on its deliberations, the Committee may make a 
recommendation on each line item of the budget and each war- 
rant article. The Finance Committee also has one or more liai- 
sons assigned to all major capital project committees. Project 
liaisons are responsible for keeping the Finance Committee 
informed about a project's progress and financial status. 





Similar to the budget hearings, the Committee also 
meets with petitioners, proponents and other interested parties, 
whether in support or opposition of proposed warrant articles 
that are to be considered at the Spring or Fall Town Meetings. 
After consideration of each warrant article, the Committee 
votes on its recommendation. If an article has no financial im- 
plications to the Town, the Committee may vote to make no 
recommendation on the article. 

The Finance Committee's report and recommenda- 
tions are published in the Spring and Fall Warrant Book. The 
book contains town financial data as well as other useful infor- 
mation and is available to residents and Town Meeting Repre- 
sentatives. 

In accordance with the Town Charter, the duty of 
Town Meeting Representatives is to keep abreast of town busi- 
ness and review materials forwarded to them by the Board of 
Selectmen and Town Manager. There is an expectation that 
town meeting members attend meetings of multiple member 
bodies, be present at hearings held by the Finance Committee 
and actively prepare for each session of the town meeting. 

The Finance Committee welcomes and encourages attendance 
and participation of town meeting members and residents at all 
meetings. 

David F. Turocy, Chairman 




Finance Committee (April 2007 election) front row L-R: Jon H. Kurland, 
Chairman David F. Turocy; Mary E. Franz back row L-R William D. Ful- 
ton . & Dwight Haywood. Not pictured, Vincent F. Villano & Donald F. 
VanDyne 



Page 38 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Town Government 



ieeted (&mcla/t> 






Town Clerk's Listing 

as of 

April 1 , 2007 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

OyrTerm -elected) 

2008 

Samuel P. Chase 

Chairman 

5 RlVERMEADOW DR 

2009 
Philip M. Eliopoulos 

1 6 1 Proctor Rd 

2009 

William F. Dalton 

Vice Chairman 

1 2 Dartmouth Street 

2010 
Clare Jeannotte, 

Clerk 
3 Hawthorne lane 

2010 
Patricia Wojtas 

24 Elm Street 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

2008 
Peter Dulchinos 

1 7 Spaulding Rd 

2009 

Ann Marie Roark 

9 Natalie Rd 

2010 

Earnest Wu 

Chairman 

255 North Rd #28 




Board of Health from L-R: Chairman Ernest Woo; 
Ann Marie Roarke and Peter Didchinos . 




Board of Selectmen (April 2007 election) front row 
L-R: Vice Chairman Philip M. Eliopoulos Chairman 
Samuel P. Chase; Patricia Wojtas back row L-R 
William F. Dalton. & Clerk Clare L. Jeannotte 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

20 10 

Gerald L. Hardy, Chair 

1 8 1 Littleton Road 

2008 
peter s. pedulla 

3 1 Brentwood Rd 

2009 

Jean R. McCaffery 

255 NORTH RD#215 



CONSTABLE 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

2010 
William E. Spence 

91 BlLLERICA ROAD 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

(5 yr Term - elected) 

2012 
Gail F. Beaudoin 

Chairman 
8 Buckman Dr 

2008 
Mary E. St. Hilaire, 

Treasurer 
2 1 2 Dalton Rd 

2010 

denise marcaurelle, 

Vice Chair 

7 Whippletree Rd 

201 1 
Georgiana C. Mueller 

1 1 4 RlVERNECK RD 

Andrea L. White 

Governor's Appointment 
1 5 LeMay Way 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

2009 
Linda K. Hubbard, 

Vice Chairperson 
7 Ranch Rd 

(Continued on page 40) 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 39 



Town Government 



fleeted 




<%/& 



■A 




2010 
Lisa E. Daigle 

21 Amble Rd 

2008 

Margaret E. Marshall 

2 Draycoach Drive 

2008 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
48 Bartlett Street 

2008 

Eric G. Groves 

C32 Scotty Hollow Drive 

2009 

Carol L. Simeden, 

Secretary 

4 Laredo Dr 

2010 
David M. Braslau 



MODERATOR 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

2008 

Dennis E. McHugh 
63 Dalton Rd 

PLANNING BOARD 

(3 yr Term - elected) 
(Alternate 2 yr term) 

2010 

Susan C. Sullivan 

Chairperson 

1 6 Country Club Drive 

2008 

Robert C. Morse 
45 Clarissa Rd 



2009 

Pamela L. Armstrong 

Vice Chairperson 

1 5 Amble Rd 

2009 
Robert p. Joyce 
103 Turnpike Rd 

2010 

S. George Zaharoolis, 

Clerk 

1 91 Princeton St 

2010 

Richard M. Johnson 
8 Cliff Road 

SEWER COMMISSION 
(3 yr Term - elected) 

2010 
Barry B. Balan 

Chairman 
7 Skyview Dr 

2010 

Jeffrey A. Miller 

1 Loiselle Ln 

2008 

john f. souza, 

Vice Chairman 

1 23 Stedman Street 

2008 

Richard J. Day 

6 Merilda Avenue 

2009 
George F. Abely 

Clerk 
87 Swain Road 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

(3 yr Term - elected) 

2010 

Kevin E. Porter 

Chairman 
48 Abbott Lane 

2010 
Evelyn S. Thoren 
1 8 Pinewood Road 

2008 

kather1ne h. duffett, 

Vice Chairperson 

47 Thomas Dr 

2008 

Angelo J. Taranto 
8 Charlemont Ct 

2009 

Christina H. Walsh, 

Secretary 

1 7 Old Farm Way 




School Committee: Top L-R: , Superintendent 
Richard H. Moser. Ph.D.. 

Student Representative Matthew Doiron,. Angelo J. 
Taranto, Evelyn S. Thoren Bottom L-R: Christina 
H. Walsh. Kevin Porter. /Catherine Duffett.. 



2008 

ann b. mcguigan, clerk 

5 Anns Way 



Page 40 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Town Government 



CS610 



etmi 




*etin 



T 




ebre6entatwe6 




The Legislative Body of the 
Town of Chelmsford is a 
Representative Town Meeting 
consisting of elected represen- 
tatives FROM NINE PRECINCTS 

who are elected for a three- 
year term, 
a more detailed listing of all 
Town Meeting Representatives, 
including term expirations and 
contact information can be 

found on the 

Town's Official Website at 

ww.townofchelmsford.us 

or by contacting the town 

Clerk's Office at 

97&25O5205 

The list is current as ofthe 
April 2007 Election. 



PRECINCT 1 

Kathryn Brough 

Peggy Dunn 

Nancy H. Robinson 

Kathleen A. Tubridy 

Thomas M. DiPasquale 

James Lynch 

Marian D. Currier 

Cynthia J. Kaplan 

Karen I. Kowalski 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy 

Ann B. McGuigan 

William E. Spence 

Samuel P. Chase 

Ralph B. Hickey 

Robert P. Joyce 

Stephanie J. Levell 

Frances T. McDougall 

Laura C. McGuigan 



PRECINCT 2 

Bruce H. Clark 

Jean S. Whiting 

Marta Martin 

Phyllis H. Clark 

Terence M. O'Neil 

M. Janice Spence 

Thomas M Crowe 

Kevin A. Goddu 

Bruce J. Harper, Sr. 

George L. Merrill 

Thomas F. Shea 

Mary Jo Welch 

Linda H. Dalton 

William F. Dalton 

Scott E. Johnson 

Janet E. Murphy 

Stanley W. Norkunas 

(RES. 4/20/07) 

Michael J. Santos 
Vacancy ( 1 ) 



PRECINCT 3 

Steve Flynn 

David W. Hadley 

Nancy J. Knight 

Robert M. Leavitt 

Scott Glidden 

Jason P. Hanscom 

Michael F. Curran 

George R. Dixon, Jr 

D. Lorraine Lambert 

Patricia F. Magnell 

Michael F. McCall 

Thomas E. Moran 

Christopher T. Garrahan 

Jeffrey A Miller 

James P. Spiller 

Judith A. Straeffer 

William A. Nolan 

Linda L. Leavitt 



PRECINCT 4 

James H. Comeau 

Cathleen H. latina 

Raymonde R. Legrand 

Helen A. Manahan 

Daniel J. Sullivan, III 

Francis V. Grynkiewicz 

Marlene Cote 

henry A. Houle 

Joel M Karp 

Brian P. Latina 

Sandra M. Rega 

Linda A. Jones 

Billy L. Martin 

Jennifer E Patenaude 

Sheila E. Pichette 

George A. Ripsom, Sr. 

Dennis P. Sheehan 

Elizabeth Ripson 



PRECINCT 5 

Joseph P Sullivan Jr 

Beverly A. Barrett 

Philip M. Eliopoulos 

Carol A. Kelly-Suleski 

Susan Carter Sullivan 

Charles Wojtas 

Mary C. Amirault 

David P. DiGiovanni 

Jon H. Kurland 

Cheryl M. Perkins 

Evelyn S. Thoren 

Glenn R. Thoren 

Eric C. Andrus 

Edward J. Suleski, Jr. 

Judith A. Tavano 

W. Allen Thomas, Jr. 

Kathryn A. Torres 

Edwin Paul Eriksen 

Patricia Wojtas 
(Resigned 4/5/07) 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



page 41 



Town Government 



cyaco 



6UP12 




*etin 



'if 




e£>pe&entatiit€6 



PRECINCT 6 



Janet G. Dubner 

Nancy W. Kaelin 

Susan Kupor McHugh 

Pamela H. McKenna 

Edmond N. Roux 

Alexander E. Buck 

(Resigned 4/24/07) 

Mary E. Frantz 

Howard J. Hall 

John P. Kivlan 

Ralph M. Nebalski 

Deirdre M. Connolly 

Brian S. Doherty 

Glenn L. Doherty 

Judith A. Olsson 

Marianne J. Paresky 

Colleen A. Stansfield 

James F. Dalton Jr. 

Jeffery A. Hardy 
Stuart G. Weisfeldt 



PRECINCT 7 

JODI O'NEIL 

Leonard W. Doolan, III 

James M. Lane 

Barbara Belanger 

John S. Goffin 

Kevin E. Porter 

Pamela L. Armstrong 

Stratos G. Dukakis 

Peter Dulchinos 

Paul F. Gleason 

Clare L. Jeannotte 

Joyce E. Johnson 

Katherine H. Duffet 

Thomas R. Fall 

Dwight M. Hayward 

Gail F. McCall 

Thomas E. Mills 

Maura L Shield 



PRECINCT 8 

Richard J. Day 

Karen M. Rachael A. Haded 

Ralph J. Hulslander, Jr. 

Christina H. Walsh 

S. George Zaharoolis 

Sean R. Connor 

Walter A. Cleven 

Jennifer C. Connor 

William C. Curry 

Dennis J. Ready 

Angelo J. Taranto 

Gail T. Zaharoolis 

William D Askenburg. Jr 

(Resigned 8/ 1 0/07) 

Carol C. Cleven 

Alexander W. Gervais 

Samuel Poulten 

John E. Abbott 

Richard E. Mahoney 

Mary E. Tiano 

Ct f; ', 

PRECINCT 9 

Francis J. Barre 

Ednah C. Copenhaver 

James W. Young 

Teresa A. Conrad 

Susan B. Graves 

John G. Harrington 

James L. Hickey 

Will L. Perry 

(DESEASED 4/24/07) 

William Griffin 

Leonard E. Westgate 

Doris M. Briggs 

Arthur R. Carmen 

Danielle B. Evans 

Mary A. Gregoire 

Gary A. Mathews 

John M. Shaw. Jr. 

C.Thomas Christiano 

Richard McLaughlin 

Laura McLaughlin 




Photographs by Lee Forlier 




Photographs by Lee Fortier 




Page 42 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Boards & Committees 



ommtttee L2J)e6eM/)tl&n£ 








Arts and Technology Education Fund (A) 

Members: 9 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Terms Begin: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The committee works to provide supplemental funding to support 
educational initiatives and projects that enhance the curriculum 
of the Chelmsford Public Schools. 



Board of Health (E) 

Members: 3 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Board works to protect the public health of the residents. It 
also has administrative, planning, and policy responsibility for 
health functions of the Board of Health Office. 



Board of Registrars (A) 

Members: 3 

Average Meetings: Varies by elections per year 

Term Begins: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Board is in charge of administering the town census, voters ' 
registration, and elections. 



Board of Selectmen (E) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 2 per month 

Term Begins: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Board is the Town 's body of chief elected officials. The 
powers and duties include appointing the Town Manager and 
many committees, issuing certain licenses, enforcing special 
sections of the by-laws, and regulating the public ways. 



LEGEND 

(A) Appointed — Complete an application 
form at www.townofchelmsford.us or from 
the Town Manager's Office, Town Offices, 
50 BlLLERlCA ROAD 978-250-520 1 8:30 AM TO 
5:00 PM Monday - Friday 

(E) Elected — Obtain election information at 
www.townofchelmsford.us or in the town 
Clerk's Office, Town Offices, 50 Billerica 
ROAD 978-250-5205 8:30 AM TO 5:00 PM MON- 
DAY- Friday 



Capital Planning Committee (A) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: July 

Length of Term: 1 Year 

The Committee studies proposed capital outlay, declares rules 
and regulations, makes investigations, and holds public hear- 
ings as it deems appropriate. 



Cemetery Commission (E) 

Members: 3 

Average Meetings: 6 per year 
Term Begins: April 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission plans, operates, and maintains the six Town 
cemeteries as attractive, dignified, and appropriate public bur- 
ial grounds. 



Commission on Disabilities (A) 

Members: 10 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission works to deal with all disability issues and 
provide information, referral, guidance, coordination, and 
technical assistance to other public agencies and private per- 
sons, organizations, and institutions engaged in activities and 
programs intended to eliminate prejudice and discrimination 
against persons with disabilities. 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 43 



Boards & Committees 



<^s 



anvmittee }^e6cwMlan6 





Conservation Commission (A) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: 2 per Month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 



Historic District Commission (A) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 



The commission is responsible for ensuring protection of wet- 
lands and acquiring, managing, and maintaining over 750 
acres of conservation and Town Forest Land. 



Cultural Council (A) 

Members: 9 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 2 Years 

The Council provides public funding for the arts, humanities, 
and interpretive sciences by granting funds to individuals and 
organizations in the community. Its duties also include solicit- 
ing community input and assessing local cultural needs. 



Finance Committee (A) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: 1 per week (Sep to May) 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Committee meets with each Town Department head, con- 
siders the merits of the individual budget in terms of the 
Town 's total needs and the limits of the total monies available, 
and prepares the final budget recommendations for the Annual 
Town Meeting. 



The Commission works to preserve and protect the buildings 
and places within the Chelmsford Center Historic District. 

Housing Authority (E) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: TBD 

Length of Term: 5 Years 

The Housing Authority works to provide an adequate supply of 
low and moderate income housing for Town Residents. 



Middlesex Canal Commission (A) 

Members: 1 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: June 
Length of Term: 2 Years 

The Commission works to maintain the Middlesex Canal Heri- 
tage Park and to inform, inspire, and draw the public to this 
nationally significant landmark. 



Personnel Board (A) 
Members: 5 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: June 
Length of Term: 2 Years 



Historical Commission (A) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission works to promote the preservation, promo- 
tion, and development of the historical assets of the Town. It 
conducts research to identify places of historical value and 
actively urges other alternatives before destroying a histori- 
cally important building or site. 



The Personnel Board works in conjunction with the Town 
Manager in developing Personnel Rules and Regulations and 
the classification and compensation system of the town. 

Planning Board (E) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: 2 per month 

Term Begins: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Board is the regulatory agency most responsible for ensur- 
ing that development occurs in a manner that is beneficial to 
the Town. It enforces several acts and reviews all subdivisions, 
site plans, and the creation of lots on existing ways. 



Page 44 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Boards & Committees 




awvtnittee 




mewMtumA 




Recycling Committee (A) 

Members: 9 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: July 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Committee works to reduce solid waste disposal costs by 
decreasing the quantity of solid waste disposed and increasing 
the quantity of recyclables collected. The committee also works 
to increase the number of recycling participants. 



Telecommunications Advisory Committee (A) 

Members: 4 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: June 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Committee monitors the terms and conditions of the cur- 
rent cable contract. The members also work to assist in the 
licensing of additional cable service providers to enhance the 
service options available to the residents. 



School Committee (E) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 2 per month 

Term Begins: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Committee has general charge of the public schools of the Town The 
powers include appointing a superintenderit and alloiher officers and employ- 
ees of the school and making rules and regulations. 



Town Celebration Committee/ 

4th of July Committee (A) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 1 per month 

Term Begins: July 

Length of Term: 1 Year 

The Committee plans and carries out the annual three-day 
Fourth of July celebration in Chelmsford. 



Sewer Commission (E) 
Members: 5 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: April 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission 's objective is to supervise, manage, and con- 
trol the construction of sewer lines in town. It also works to 
complete the sewering program that the residents of Chelms- 
ford voted for in 1995. 



Sign Advisory Committee (A) 

Members: 7 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: June 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Committee reviews and comments on sign permits and 
applications for other special permits. 



Town Meeting Representatives (E) 

Members: 1 62 

Average Meetings: 2 per Year (Spring & Fall) 

Town Meetings involve Multiple Sessions & 

Special town meetings, as needed 

Terms Begin: April 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The legislative body of the Town is a Representative Town 
Meeting consisting of 162 elected representatives from nine 
voting precincts. Members participate in the Spring and Fall 
Annual Town Meeting and all Special Town Meetings. Mem- 
bers also keep abreast of Town business year-round and attend 
informational sessions as needed in preparation for all Town 
Meeting sessions and votes for all warrant articles. 



Veterans Emergency Fund Committee (A) 

Members: 9 

Average Meetings: As needed. 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 



The Committee works to provide WWII veterans with financial 
need in the form of material grants for food, housing, limited 
medical care and utilities. 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 45 



Boards & Committees 



ommtttee Q/)e&(m/>tkmb 




Water (Chelmsford Center) Commission (E) 

Members: 3 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: April 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission oversees the water takers of the Center Dis- 
trict and regulates the bylaws as it deems necessary. 



Water (North) Commission (E) 
Members: 3 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: April 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission oversees the water takers of North Chelms- 
ford and regulates the bylaws as it deems necessary 



Water (East) Commission (E) 
Members: 3 

Average Meetings: TBD 
Term Begins: April 
Length of Term: 3 Years 

The Commission oversees the water takers of East Chelmsford 
and regulates the bylaws as it deems necessary. 



Zoning Board of Appeals (A) 

Members: 5 

Average Meetings: 2 per month 

Term Begins: June 

Length of Term: 3 Years 

The board hears petitions and applications for variances, spe- 
cial permits, comprehensive permits, and several other ap- 
peals. The Board also decides, upon appeal, the application of 
the zoning, subdivision, sign, and building bylaws. 





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The Annual Report of the Town of Chelmsford is compiled & designed in the Town Manager's Of- 
fice on Behalf of the Board of Selectmen and the citizens of Chelmsford. 
Comments, suggestions & photo submissions may be forwarded to: 

Town Manager's Office 

Attention : Tricia Dzuris 

50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 1 824 

Tele: 978-250-5201 Fax: 978-250-5252 Web: www.townofchelmsford.us 



Page 46 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Notes 




FY 2007 Annual Report 



Page 47 



CONTACTS 




Page 48 



FY 2007 Annual Report 



Town Directory 



Town Departments & Services 



Accounting 

Animal Control 

Assessors 

Appeals, Board of 

Auditor 

Building Inspector 

Cemeteries 

Clerk, Town 

Communtty Development. 

Conservation Commission 

Council on Aging / Senior Center- 
Emergencies (Police, Fire, EMS) 

Engineers, Public Works 

Fire Department. 

Fire Prevention 

Gas Inspector 

Health Department. 

Highway Division, public Works 

Housing Authority, Chelmsford 

Libraries: Adams (Main) 

McKay 

Municipal Facilities 

PERMrrs, Building 

Personnel 

Planning Board 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Department 

Public Buildings 

Public Works 

Purchasing 

Recreation 

Recycling & Solid Waste 

Schools, Chelmsford Public- 
Selectmen, board of 

Senior Center 

Sewer Commission 

Sewer Operations, 

Tax Collector/Treasurer 

Town Clerk & Registrars 

Town Engineer 

Town Manager 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 

Veterans' Agent 

Voter Registration 

Solid Waste/Recycling 



..2505215 

...2560754 

...250-5220 

...2505231 

..2505215 

...2505225 

...2505245 

...2505205 

..250-5231 

...2505247 

...2510533 

9-1-1 

..2505228 

..2505265 

..251-4288 

..250-5225 

..2505241 

...25O5270 

...256-7425 

..2565521 

..251-3212 

...244-3379 

.2505225 



250-5231 

.250-5225 
..256-2521 
.244-3379 
..250-5228 
.250-5289 
.250-5262 
.250-5203 
..251-5100 
..250-5201 
.251-0533 
.250-5233 
.250-5297 
.250-5210 
.250-5205 
.250-5228 
..250-5201 
..250-5210 
..250-5238 
..250-5205 
.250-5203 




UTILITIES & OTHER USEFUL NUMBERS 



Cable Access/Telemedia 978-25 1 -5 1 43 

Cable Television/Comcast 888-663-4266 

Chelmsford Water Districts 

Center District 978-256-238 1 

East District 978-453-0121 

North District 978-25 1 -393 1 

Citizen Information (State) 800-392-6090 

Chelmsford Country Club 978-256-1 8 1 8 

Chelmsford Forum Rink 978-670-3700 

Fuel Assistance (CTI) 1 -877-45 1 -1 082 

Keyspan(Gas) 800-548-8000 

National Grid (Electric) 800-322-3223 

Trinity EMS, Inc 978-441-9999 

Post Office (Center) 978-256-2670 

Post Office (North) 978-25 1 -3 1 46 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 800-858-3926 

Russell Disposal 888-870-8882 

Verizon (Telephone, Internet). ...800-870-9999 

U.S. Sen. John Kerry 6 1 7-223-2724 

U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy 617-223-2826 

U.S. Congress Niki Tsongas 978-459-0 1 1 

State Senator Susan Fargo 6 1 7-722-1 572 

State Representatives: 

Rep. Cory Atkins 6 1 7-722-20 1 3 

(Precincts 1 , 9) 

rep. Thomas A. Golden Jr 6 1 7-722-241 

(Precincts 2, 6, 8) 

Rep. Geoffrey D. Hall 6 1 7-722-2575 

(Precincts 3, 5, 7) 

rep. david nangle 6 1 7-722-2020 

(Precinct 4) 



WEBSITES 



Town of Chelmsford Official Website: 
www.townofchelmsford.us 

Massachusetts State Government: 
www.mass.gov 

United States Government: 
www.firstgov.gov 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



!§05^ 



3 1480 00958 5941 



)WN OF CHELMSFORD 



By Artist, Yetti Frenkel 




Town of Chelmsford 

50 Billerica Road 

Chelmsford, MA 01824 

WWW.TOWNOFCHELMSFORD.US 
(978) 250-520 1