(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Plymouth, New Hampshire"

Town of Plymouth 




/^U>UJ^ 



>" w 1 



1998 
ANNUAL REPORT 




PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY - CELEBRATING 125 YEARS OF SERVICE 



/ 



\ 




TOWN OF PLYMOUTH OFFICES 

web site: www.ci.plymouth.nh.us/~townhall 



Selectmen's Office: 
Town Hall 

Town Clerk: 
Town Hall 



Monday-Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM 536-1731 

e-mail: townhall@ci.plymouth.nh.us 536-0036 FAX 



Monday-Friday 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM 



536-1732 



Tax Collector: 
Town Hall 



Tues,Wed,Thurs 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 



536-4733 



Police Department 
Administration Office: 
334 North Main Street 

Fire Department 
Administration Office: 
42 Highland 
(Fire Station) 



Monday-Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM 536-1804 

e-mail: info@plymouthpd.com 536-4008 FAX 



Monday-Friday 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM 536-1253 

e-mail: firedept@ci.plymouth.nh.us 536-0035 FAX 



Highway Department/ 

Solid Waste 

Administration Office: Monday-Friday 

Green St., Highway Garage 



7:00 AM -3:30 PM 



536-1623 



Solid Waste/Recycling: Tues,Th,Fri,Sat 
Beech Hill Road Sunday 



8:00 AM -4:00 PM 
8:00 AM -Noon 



536-2378 



Parks & Recreation Monday-Friday 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM 

Administration Office: Summer Hours 7:00 AM - 3:30 PM 

Plymouth Elem. School e-mail: parkrec@nh.ultranet.com 



536-1397 



Pease Public Library: 
Russell Street 



Mon,Tues,Wed 

Friday 

Saturday 



10:00 AM - 8:00 PM 536-2616 

10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 536-2369 FAX 
10:00 AM -2:00 PM 



Public Welfare Office: 
Police Station 



Mon, Tues, Thurs. Hours as posted 



536-2242 



PLYMOUTH EMERGENCY NUMBERS 



FIRE AND AMBULANCE 
911 



POLICE 
911 



1998 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 



TOWN OF 
PLYMOUTH, N.H. 



YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1998 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1998 



f 

n 3 




DEDICATION 



MERELISE O'CONNOR 



After 1 8 years of service to our community, we bid farewell to a dedicated public 
servant. Merelise "Mel" O'Connor began her career in Plymouth in 1981 as Parks 
and Recreation Director. Untold scores of Plymouth's young people benefited from 
her enthusiasm and able leadership of the recreation program. 

Mel became Town Administrator in 1987 and for the next 11 years worked with 
the elected, appointed and volunteer boards of Plymouth to improve our community. 
The measure of a public servant is her ability to remain true to the greater public good 
in face of political storms and competing interests. Mel has exceeded that measure, 
and her dedication to our community is truly noteworthy. 

It is with honor and appreciation that we dedicate this Town Report to Merelise 
O'Connor. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportoftow1998plym 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Airport 57 

Appropriations & Taxes 12 

Auditor's Report 34 

Bonded Indebtedness Statement 25 

Budget of the Town 90 

Capital Improvements Plan 53 

Capital Reserve Accounts 23 

Cemetery Trustee's Report 58 

Channel 3 Committee 64 

Comparative Statement 16 

Conservation Commission 59 

Executive Council Report 61 

Fire and Ambulance Departments 43 

Forest Ranger 63 

Grafton County Senior Citizens 65 

Health Officer 60 

Highway & Solid Waste Departments 45 

Inventory Valuation 20 

Main Street Plymouth, Inc 66 

North Country Council 67 

Parks and Recreation Department 46 

Pemi Baker Home Health 68 

Pemi-Baker Youth and Family Services 69 

Planning Board 56 

Police Department 39 

Pease Public Library 48 

Schedule of Town Owned Property 21 

Selectmen's Report 11 

Statement of Income 30 

Tax Collector's Report 32 

Town Clerk's Report 35 

Town Meeting Minutes - 1998 73 

Town Officers, Boards and Committees '. . .7 

Treasurer's Report 27 

Tri-County Community Action 70 

Trust Funds 26 

UNH Cooperative Grafton County 71 

Vital Statistics 36 

Warrant 1998 84 

Whole Village Resource Center 72 



DATES TO REMEMBER - INSIDE BACK COVER 



MEETING SCHEDULE OF 
TOWN BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Meets on Monday evenings, 6:00 PM, Meeting Room, Town Hall 
(as posted at the Town Hall or call the Selectmen's Office) 



PLANNING BOARD 

Meets on the 3rd Thursday of each month, 7:00 PM, Meeting Room, 

Town Hall 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Contact Chairperson for the location and time 



PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 7:00 PM, Parks & Recreation Office 

Plymouth Elementary School 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Meets on the 1st Tuesday of each month at 7:00 PM 
Town Hall 



All other committees meet at the call of the Chairperson. 
Contact the Chairperson for the location and time. 



OFFICIALS, BOARDS & COMMITTEES 



TERM 

ELECTED BY BALLOT: EXPIRATION 

DATE 

Selectmen: (3 year term) 

John H. Tucker, Chairman 1999 

Timothy M. Daigneault 2000 

Steve S. Panagoulis 2001 

Moderator: (2 year term) 

Robert C. Clay 2000 

Town Treasurer: (3 year term) 

Carol Geraghty 1999 

Town Clerk: (3 year term) 

Kathleen Latuch 2001 

Tax Collector: (3 year term) 

Linda Buffington 2001 

Supervisors of the Checklist: (6 year term) 

Marlene Stuart 2000 

Mary Nelson 2002 

Jane Blaine 2004 

Trustees of the Trust Fund: (3 year term) 

William Crangle 1999 

Leonard Sawyer 2000 

John Noyes 2001 

Library Trustees: (3 year term) 

Catherine Crane 1999 

Michael Carr, Chair 1999 

Elsa Turmelle 2000 

Mary Desfosses 2000 

A. Joan Bowers 2001 

ELECTED BY VOTE AT TOWN MEETING: 

Advisory Budget Committee: (4 year term) 

Quentin Blaine, Chair 1999 

James Mayhew, Jr. 2000 

Thomas Goulart 2001 

Guy Brisson 2002 



BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 



APPOINTED: 

Planning Board: (3 year term) 

Timothy Daigneault, Selectmen's Rep. 1999 

Steve Panagoulis, Selectmen's Rep. Alt 1999 

David Switzer 1999 

James Koermer 1999 

William Houle 2000 

Jane Blaine, Chair 2000 

Carolyn Kent 2001 

Thomas Croasdale, alternate 2001 

Leslie Mclver, alternate 1999 

(vacancy, member) 2001 

(vacancy, alternate) 2000 

Zoning Board of Adjustment: (3 year term) 

Ralph Oliver, Chair 1999 

Thomas McGlauflin 1999 

Keyle Mabin 2000 

Bob Barach 2000 

F. James Welch 2001 

Mike Wheeler, alternate member 2001 

Kathryn Scalzo, alternate member 1999 

Stephen Kaminski, alternate member 2000 

Dean Yeaton, alternate member 2000 

(vacancy, alternate) 1999 

Conservation Commission: (3 year term) 

GiselaEstes 1999 

James Mayhew 1999 

Lea Stewart 1999 

David Switzer 1999 

Robert Pike 2000 

John McCormack, alternate member 2000 

Neil Mclver 2000 

James Lurie 2001 

Parks and Recreation Commission: (3 year term) 

Jim Mayhew, Chair 1999 

Sue Sampson 1999 

Kathy Birkitt 2000 

Norman LeBlanc 2000 

Gloria Sterling 2000 



8 



COMMITTEES 



Airport Committee: 

Kenneth Anderson 
David Cote 
Joyce Messer 



Airport Future Study Committee: 

Dan Dillon 
Fred Gould 
Gary Ladd 
Peter LeBlanc 
Jim Mayhew 
Neil Mclver 



Bridge Design Advisory Committee: 

Richard Gonsalves 

Fred Gould 

Charles McLoud 

Merelise O'Connor 

Richard Piper 

Brian Thibeault, Fire Prevention Advisor 

Susan Tucker, Artistic Advisor 



Capital Improvement Committee: 

Guy Brisson 
Mark Halloran 
James Koermer 
Merelise O'Connor 
John Tucker 
Eldwin Wixson 



Highway and Public Safety Committee: 

Anthony Raymond, Chair 

John Tucker, Selectmen's Rep. 

Thomas Goulart 

Richard Gonsalves 

Jeff Kelly 

Robert MacLeod 

Richard Piper 

Donald Smarsik 

Brian Thibeault 



Municipal Budget Law Review Committee: 

Allen MacNeil, Chairman 
Quentin Blaine 
Barbara Boyle 
Alan Cantor 
Ted Geraghty 
Carol Kenneson 
Lonnie Morse 
Patrice Scott 



Housing Standards Committee: 

Timothy Keefe, PSC Rep. 
Lindley Kirkpatrick 
Jeff Kelly 
Susan McLane 
Brian Thibeault 



Parking Committee: 

Scott Biederman 

Art Christiansen 

Peter Goodwin 

Rich Gonsalves, Safety Com. Rep. 

Anthony Raymond 

Steve Rand 

PSC Rep. 



TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Merelise O'Connor 

COMMUNITY PLANNER 

Lindley S. Kirkpatrick, AICP 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HIGHWAYS 
AND SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Richard J. Gonsalves 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Anthony W. Raymond 

CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Brian Thibeault 

DIRECTOR OF PARKS AND RECREATION 

Larry Gibson 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARY 

Katherine Hillier 

DIRECTOR OF AIRPORT 

Frank Miller - Resigned: Sept. 1998 
Peter LeBlanc - Appointed: Sept. 1998 

HEALTH OFFICER 

Jeffrey Kelly 

DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Brian Thibeault 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Plymouth Police Department 



10 



PLYMOUTH BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



In last year's report, we asked you to be prepared for some inconvenience when 
work began around the town common during the summer. The work and the incon- 
venience came and lasted longer than expected, but the great majority of citizens han- 
dled both with stoic good nature as well as interest, and the results have been gratify- 
ing and widely praised. Aesthetic improvements resulting from putting utilities under 
ground and from adding new stone and brickwork for curbs and walks and new light 
fixtures were only part of the scope of the project, as much needed upgrading of the 
storm drainage system down Highland, Court Street, and around the common were 
completed. We live in the Granite State; so, I guess we should have expected that 
ledge! 

A further project that was completed in town was the boat ramp on the Pemi next 
to the courthouse. Thanks go especially to our State Representative Allen MacNeil 
and the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. 

This summer, if approved at Town Meeting, it will be the turn of those who live 
on or travel Thurlow Street to bear the inconvenience of repairs as we tackle the often 
postponed project to rebuild Thurlow Street from Stonybrook to the top of the hill. 
This is part of our long range plan to restore and maintain our community's infra- 
structure. It requires funding the capital improvement plan. We hope this can be done 
while keeping the tax impact to a minimum and without having to borrow any money. 

Additionally, this summer will probably see the construction of a new Walmart 
super store in Plymouth. Certainly, this is not a project without some controversy, but 
it is one which the Selectmen support and which we think in the long run will be a 
positive addition to our town and a clear benefit to our citizens. A tip of our hat, by 
the way, to the people of Rite Aid, who have just completed a well-designed, attrac- 
tive new store - a visual and commercial asset for our town. 

We are saying goodbye this year to a dedicated and valuable employee. Town 
Administrator Merelise O'Connor is moving on to new opportunities and new chal- 
lenges in state government. These will indeed be difficult shoes to fill. 

Again this year we want to thank all our town employees for their dedicated ser- 
vice to the town. Whether it be repairing the devastation from this past summer's 
flash flooding, dealing with the major ice storm, handling the disturbance on Russell 
Street, or responding to calls for emergency service, their skill and professionalism is 
greatly appreciated. We also owe a large debt of gratitude to the volunteers who spend 
countless hours serving as members of town boards, committees and commissions. 
What would Plymouth, or even the state, be without these responsive citizens? 
Without a doubt, these are exciting times - our town is on the move, and it is these 
same people we will depend on to keep our town the great place it is in which to live 
and to raise a family. 



Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Tucker, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 



11 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND TAXES ASSESSED FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR JULY 1998 - JUNE 1999 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Town Officers' Salaries and Expenses 208.174.00 

Election 70.069.00 

Property Appraisal 25.000.00 

Legal Expenses 42.500.00 

Insurance 484.860.00 

Planning and Zoning 36.965.00 

General Government Buildings 22.200.00 

Cemeteries 27.700.00 

Advertising and Regional Association 9.570.00 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 

Police Department 651,034.00 

Ambulance 47.320.00 

Fire Department 478.125.00 

Emergency Management 5.810.00 

HIGHWAYS AND SANITATION: 

Highway Department 356.959.00 

Street Lighting 65.000.00 

Airport 5.520.00 

Solid Waste Disposal Department 212,522.00 

Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District 1.615.00 

HEALTH AND WELFARE: 

Humane Society Agreement 1,250.00 

Pemi-Baker Home Health Agency 15.500.00 

Speare Memorial Hospital 3.000.00 

Plymouth Regional Free Clinic 1 .000.00 

General Assistance 24.000.00 

Baker-Pemi Senior Citizens 1,575.00 

Grafton County Senior Citizens 5.665.00 

Community Action Outreach 2,470.00 

Plymouth Task Force Against Violence 1.500.00 

Youth and Family Services Council 2.500.00 

CULTURE AND RECREATION: 

Parks and Recreation Department 232.594.00 

Library 118.541.00 

Patriotic Purposes 675.00 

Band Concerts 2.200.00 

Town Common 1.500.00 

Friends of the Arts 100.00 

Conservation 1,400.00 



12 



DEBT SERVICE: 

Principal Long Term Notes & Bond 
Interest Expense Long Term Notes & Bonds 

CAPITAL OUTLAY: 

Fuel Cleanup-Highway 

School Access Study 

Perambulate Town Lines 

Sidewalk Improvements 

Transfer Station Conversion 

Landfill Closure Engineering 

Road Construction 

911 Signage 

Public Safety Vehicle-Police 

Ambulance 

Replace Highway 89 Chevy 1-Ton 

Replace Burned Hwy Truck 

Copy Machine Lease 

Fire Pumper- Tanker 

Loader Backhoe-Highway 

Computer Upgrade 

28% Parks& Recreation Truck 

Highway Air Venting System 

Police Phone System 

Library Automation 

Library Major Maintenance 

CAPITAL RESERVE 
Ambulance Reserve 
Conveyor/Incinerator 
Sidewalks 

Dispatch Equipment 
Highway Heavy Equipment 

TRANSFER TO TRUST 

Exp Trust-Emergency Equip Replace 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



260,000.00 
69,328.00 



4,200.00 

1,665.00 

0.00 

40,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

75,000.00 

5,600.00 

17,845.00 

0.00 

10,385.00 

62,500.00 

2,100.00 

39,110.00 

0.00 

9,000.00 

1,795.00 

0.00 

5,195.00 

0.00 

2,100.00 



20,000.00 
2,500.00 

10,000.00 
6,000.00 

22,000.00 



10.000.00 
3.842.736.00 



LESS ESTIMATED REVENUES AND CREDITS 



TAXES: 

Land Use Change Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Other Taxes 

Interest and Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 



0.00 

20,000.00 

38,000.00 

2,250.00 

170,000.00 



13 



LICENSES PERMITS AND FEES: 

Business Licenses and Permits 
Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 
Land Use Permits 
Other Licenses, Permits and Fees 

TAXES FROM STATE: 

Shared Revenue 

Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution 

Highway Block Grant 

Other Miscellaneous Revenue 

CHARGES FOR SERVICES: 
Income from Departments 
Other Charges 

MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES: 

Sale of Municipal Property 

Interest on Investments 

Other (Rents, BC/BS and Dental reimburse, etc.) 

INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN: 
Sidewalk Improvements 
Replace International Dump Truck 
Library Exterior Painting 
Cypres Reimbursement 

TOTAL REVENUE AND CREDITS 



6,500.00 


400,000.00 


5,000.00 


36,000.00 


59,970.00 


64,499.00 


95,262.00 


12,000.00 


57,000.00 


0.00 


4,700.00 


75,000.00 


77,500.00 


40,000.00 


47,000.00 


2,100.00 


25,000.00 


1.237.781.00 



14 



1998 TAX RATE COMPUTATION 



Total Town Appropriations 
Total Revenues and Credits 
Net Town Appropriations 
New School Appropriations 
County Tax Assessment 

Total Town, School and County 

DEDUCT: Total Business Profits Tax Reimbursement 
ADD: War Service Credits 
ADD: Overlay 

PROPERTY TAXES TO BE RAISED 



3,842,736 
-2,020,661 

1,822,075 

+3,707,580 

230,973 

5,760,628 

-0 
+29,600 
+51,668 

5,841,896 



TAXES COMMITTED TO COLLECTOR: 
Property Taxes 

Precinct Taxes and/or Service Area Taxes 
Less War Service Credits 



5,841,896 



-29,600 



TOTAL TAX COMMITMENT 



5,812,296 



1998 TAX RATE BREAKDOWN PER $1,000.00 



Town 
County 

School District 
MUNICIPAL TAX RATE 



12.91 

1.57 

25.16 

39.64 



Precinct: Plymouth Village Water & Sewer 



PRECINCT VALUATION 

New Appropriations 

Taxes 

Tax Rate 

County 




75,190,605 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



Town of Plymouth 
1998 Tax Rate 



□ "Town 33% 
■ School 63% 

□ County 4% 



15 



H 
Z 

w 

as 

s 

o 
u 



O 73 



so 

I 

On 



o 

Oh 
O 

s- 
Pw 



ON *0 
O^ £ 
v© ^3 

00 g. 

5> o 

^ Oh 

Oh 



T3 ON 

0) ON_ 

O OO 

X) ON 



3 
O 

q 






0) 

o 

q 

i— i 
PQ 



00 "O 
ON U 

Oh 

. X 



03 



ON 



03 

3 



O 
O 

od 

o 



o o 
p p 

OO O 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

d 
o 

in 



o 
o 



o o o o 
p p p p 

d in in" oo 



o o o o 
p p p p 

© so co in 



eoincNeNONCNcoeooo, 
Tj-cNcor-'-HinsooNmin 



o 
o 

d 
o 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



o o o 
o o o 



«n cn in f- 

\D ro G\ O 

O C— ON 



in 



o 
o 

d 

o 
o 



incosomcNoocoooNinoo 



^■t^^DM^miN^ 



so 



so 
in 



in oo cn in in 



o 

o 



o 
o 



<N ON <N 



On 
CO 



SO 
O 

d 



o 
o 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



o o o 
pop 

d in d 
o so o 



o 
o 

d 
o 



o o o o 

p p p p 

d Tt d in 

r- CO (N CN 



in on cn r^ m o co 



CO 



o 
o 

ON 

in 

00 ON 



SO 



in 



CO SO 



O O 
O O 

d d 
o o 
p in 

h in 

CN 






O 
O 

d 



ONin<N*sO(Nr--ON*-H[^ooinv© 
so cn -^ co cn cn in tj- h in 

SO ^1" CO 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 

dddoiinddddd 

OCNCN^HinOOOO 

©_ in in vo cn in ©^ ©^ ©^ 
in in of i-h t-h" in co" r-T ^t 

© r-H r-H CN 

CN 



O 

o 



o 
o 



» CO 

«-h in 


o 
o 


Tt CO 

CN 00 

00 CO 


d 


CN so" 

^t in 

SO 





r-; 


<N 


O 

o 


CO 


o 

1—1 


ON 
OO 


00 
00 


so 


o 
o 


o 

CO 


^ 
r^ 


^ 


00 


ON 
CO 


S© 
in 


00 


CO 

ON 


CN 

00 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


m 

ON 


CN 


CN 


so 

SO 


CN 

1— H 


CN 

ON 


m 


od 
in 


ON 
CN 


d 


ON 

o 
oo 


ON 
CN 

00^ 


ON 

co^ 


? 


<* 

ON 


CO 

00 
CO 


od 

ON 


r— i 


od 
O 
in 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


CN 

CN 

co^ 


^t-" 




cn 


in 

i 


CN 
i 




rf 


©" 




cn 


in 


oo" 




r-~" 


SO* 

in 


















ON 



ON 
CO 



r-H O 

CN O 

t> in 

O ON 

00 CO 



ro 



ooNoooNOO v ooNr-'sf 

^HOOOOCOOr^CNOOOOON 



^h r- CN CN 00 CN o 

© r^ r-n oo so r^ so 

CO^ ON CO^ ON ON 00^ CN 

oo" >n ^ en en ^ rf vo' on cn" 

COVOr-COTfCOCN'-H ON 

t— i in 



ooooooooo 
ppppppppp 

odinoNindin^j-'dcN 
eor-r-inincNsor- 



o co r- 



o in oo cn oo 



o 
o 

d 
o 



in so 

^t co^ 

SO so" 

Tt- in 



o o 

p p 

in r-H 

CN t> 



^H cN 

ON SO 
Tt CN 

CN 

CO 



o 
p 

d od 

On 



r- r- o o o 

00 O 00 o o 

cn so d d 

in o in in 

^ t-^ in CN CN 

cn co" j> 

in o 

CN 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



O m 

o o 

d r^ 

o t^- 

o so 



<— i m co ^h co 

^h CN 



CO CO O 

co in p 

. h rn O 

in in oo o 

Tf in co o 



o 
o 

d 



o 
o 

d 



CN 

SO 

in 



r-H O 



o o 

o o 

d d 

in in 

CN CN 



Ttinooooi— iinor^ONincN'^-'— ioosocncooo 



COSOSOCN'sl-COCNCN 



in so 



so m in 

CO so 



o 

CN 



o o o 

o o o 

odd 

o o o 

B p, o^ o^ 

r-T m" co" r-n" co" 

r^ CO 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



Oh </> 

X o 
PQ '-C 

°f '"3 

<D O 



J3 C 



53 2 

<?3 

.a c2 < 

^ o o 

q m=s q 

> O C3 

o J2 .S 



OX) 

q 

• I-H 

q 
o 
N 



C/3 

00 

q 



q 
PQ 

+^ 
q 

S 



o 

o 

05 

< 

q 

o 

*ob 

0) 



q 



Gfl 



13 ci 

V3 Oh 

•q x 

Oh ^_ 
Oh C3 

4) <U 



> 

q o ^ 

1 S 1 

,2 5) (D 

Cm O U 



4 



OX) 

q 



q 
a) 

s 

53 -s 

Oh H 

.22 Q J 

ft d) a 

s .§ -I 

r* ui r* 

-o 'o q 

< Ch < 



S 4) 

OX) g 

q § 
6 S 

Oh q 

a e? 



00 

-o 

q 

C3 

-q 



0X) 

-o 

• l-H 

C 
PQ 



Ph w ffl 



0X) 

ts q 

CO M 

tfl L_J 
_ H— ' 

PQ co 



H— > 

53 > 

CM \> 

as 



'(j OX) 

o < 

5 «* 



H-J 

11 

< CO 



03 

PQ 

I 

s 

Pm 



q M £ 

o u 8 

13 PQ (u 

S -q 53 

5 O Oh 

< Ph CO 



o 




• 1—1 




C 








i— i 




U 




<D 




0) 




t-H 




Ph 




13 


<u 


q 
o 


o 

q 

03 


'ob 


H— i 

C/3 


<u 




0J 


'cfl 

(73 


J3 


< 


-i— i 




q 


13 


o 


Uh 


S 


q 


>* 


<D 


s 


o 



16 



H 

o 
u 



O T3 

O CD 

NO O 

On £ 



ON TJ 
O^ £ 
VO «J 
00 rL 
ON o 



T3 ON 

<L> On 

s— i — «. 

<U 00 

X> On 

£ >H 

3 Uh 

d o 



o 

d 

ffl 



'S3 

3 



800000000000 
^ppppppppppp 

oinoooo»o»ooooo 
ONoooor-or-oooo 
<x ^o in in in «-* in no cn p *— i «-* 

i-h in of »-h cn *-h no" cn *■* 
o ^t 

co *h 



o o o o 
o o o o 



o 


o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


d 


d d 


d d 


o 


o co 


o 


rt 


on 


<N 


CN 


NO <*t 

cn in 


"fr 



o 
o 

d 



m in o O 

r» no r-» o 

in no^ *fr in 

i-h in of «-* 



o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 
p 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


O 

o 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


d 
o 
in 


On 

m 


in 


in 

NO 


d 
o 


d 
o 
in 


d 
o 


d 
o 

<N 


d 
o 

CN 


d 
o 
o 


00 
CN 


d 


d 
o 


in 

no 
vq 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 
o 
o 


cn 


<N 

CO 
CN 


oo" 

l— H 




cn 


t— ( 






t— i 


o" 

NO 
CN 


ON 

no 




«t 


1— 1 










d 



o 
o 



o 
o 



o 
o 



o 
o 


o 
o 


in 


o 
m 


8 


d 


d 


in 
co 

(N 


d 

ON 


d 
o 
p 






^ 


oo~ 

<N 


r> 



o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


NO 


CO 
CO 


o 
o 


o 
o 


in 

CN 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 




o 
o 


m 

00 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 


o 
m 


o 
o 


8 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 

CO 

o^ 
of 


d 

in 
CN 


d 


d 


On 

(N 

i 


d 


d 
o 
in 


d 


d 


d 


d 


00 

o 

CN 

so* 


d 


d 


<o 
in 


d 

ON 

oo" 

(N 


d 
o 
p. 


d 



00 


13 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^J" 


00 


o 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


o 


o 


NO 


g> 


CD 

d 
1) 


p 


o 


p 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


p 


o 


(-; 


o 


o 


o 


o 


r- 


NO 


in 


d 


in 


d 


d 


d 


CN 


in 


d 


oo 


d 


d 


d 


d 


NO 


1 


i> 


o 


r- 


o 


ON 


NO 


in 


t> 


o 


T-H 


o 




m 


o 


ON 


r~- 


Oh 


in 


in 


co 


CN 


CN 


in 


'sf 


no 


CN 


00 


i-H 




o 


o 


^t 


0\ 




































X 


i— < 


in 


CN 


i-H 


CN 


NO 


co" 




CN 


T-H 






Tt 


o 


NO" 


r~- 


UJ 












CN 
CN 


o 

T-H 














no 

CN 


00 



CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


f- 


o 


ON 


in 


o 


CN 


d 


00 


On 


d 


r- 


o 


00 


O 


o 


o 


t> 


VO 


CN 


in 












CO 


T—H 


ON 


i-H 


CO 



oooooo-hoo^j-ooooo 
ppppppTfppinppppp 

in ; d iri d O-H N-in.Q V '-H.d d 
r^oi>ooNONOc--ocNO 



inincocNcNinr-NDcNin 



U 

i-i 
o 

'3 

oo 
S 

| 

o3 
03 



in cn 



W3 

d 

to 4-h 
•d <3 

oo ,o 
>% o 

&■! 

o r^ 

u -a 

2 6 

w S 

b o 

O U 



CN 00 CO 
CN O 

CN i-h 



CN 



o 
in 

p^ 



00 

in 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


00 
CN 


d 
o 


d 
o 
o^ 


d 

o 
o 


d 
o 
in 


ON 


1-H 


in 

<N 


o" 

CO 


©* 



Q 

d 

o 



1 § 

> o 

*d ^3 D 

w ri b 

Oh c2 

O cd 

^ -c 

at P ... 






o 



CO 

<U 

o 

-, p 

X) Oh 

£.2 

CJ O 

% 'C 

Oh Oh 



u 

s ^ 

c<3 o 

PQ E- 





o 






*(/3 
C/S 

• I-H 






s 


u 


W3 


s 

O 


2h 


<, 


U 


H 


^3 


d 


i 

d 


-4—1 


o 


o 




• i-H 


• l-H 


M-H 


■»-> 


■4— 1 


O 


cd 


«J 


C/3 


£ 


K 


T3 


<u 


<u 


C 


to 


c« 


• Sh 


d 


d 


*Vh 


o 


o 


£ 


U 


U 



d 












00 






^o 










d 


a 














<-H 

Oh 


o 
"S3 

4- 

> 


<D 

d 


on 
CD 

d 


•4— 1 

d 

CD 

a 


d 






>> 


CD 


C 


'5b 


3 






T3 


Oh 

(D 

3 

•4-4 

C3 

*-> 

00 


O 


d 




< 

-o 
d 
o 


>% 


Cm 

D 
i 

d 

CD 

u 

13 


3 

-4—4 

D 

o 


U 

d 
_o 

'•4—4 

cd 

■4—1 


CD 
3 

O 


d 

CD 

•4— > 


CD 
> 

O 

V-4 

a 

a 


X 


p-H 

■4— > 

3 

o 


< 


4-J 

3 
O 
O 


OO 
;-h 


U 


X) 




2h 


4-> 

•i-H 


"o 

O 


OO 

O 


<4-H 

d 


<^H 

"O 

d 


S 

t-H 


CD 

"O 


<u 


Cm 


3 


O 


r tH 


a 


CD 




4-4 

d 


u 


Ph 


OO 


Oh 


H 


J 


Oh 


OO 



17 



sO 
i 

o> 

ON 



T3 
V3 

O 
Q. 






H 

< 

H 

CM 

> 

H 

OS 

§ 

o 
u 



ON W 

sO 2 

ON (-5 



r^ 



D, 

< 



T3 On 

u oc 

_D On 



C 



> 



o 

cd 

CQ 



OC -O 

ON fc> 

Q. 
X 

is pq 



5 s - 






> 

< 



o 


© 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


q 


o 


o 


q 


© 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


«o 


o 


c 




so 


o 




vO 


— 


o 


ON 


^^~ 


in 




r» 


-<t 




— 


i-H 


^j 


l> 






















O 


— 




<N 


o 




cn 


ON 


— 


— 


— 






— 


r-H 






cn 


co 





o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


O 

o 


d 


d 


d 
o 
in 


d 
o 
•n 


d 
o 
o 






vd 


CN 


in' 



O 


o 


t— ^ 


o 


c 


© 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 




q 


q 


q 


q 


q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


q 


o 


Q 


o 


Q 


in 


d 


in 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


in 


d 


© 




o 


*t 




oc 


o 


o 


^™ 




o 


ON 




Q 




sO 


oc 




cn 


in 


— 


i-^ 




o 


t-~ 






























«n 




in 


r* 




O 


(N 


(N 


ON 




ON 


— 




r- 






I-H 




— i 


SO 




cn 











o o o o o o 

© © © © © © 

in" d d d d d 

on o 



<n 



(N 



sd 
o 
m 

oc 

ON 



o 
o 


o 
in 


— 

o 


d 
oc 
«n 


SO~ 


in 



(N O 

ON © 

CN © 
vn 

oc 



^f © 

r- © 



© 
© 



m 



© 
© 



m 



© 

© 



sO © © ^" — OC © 



in 



in 

m" 

in 

<N 



cn 

ON 



sO 

CN] 

cn 

ON 



© 
© 



© 

so" 



CN © 

cn in 

© © 
oc 
in 

in 



© 

© 



© © © © © 

© © © © © 

© © © © © 
© 



© 

© 



© © 
© © 

© © 



sO 
<N 



© 
© 



in 

oc 



in on *— 

in on oc 

oc on cn 

fsf r-J O* 

CN SO — 



in © oc © 

cn © sq in 

SO SO ON ON 

rr oc tj- — 

oc on r^ Tt 

— oc of t> 

o — 



© 
© 

© 



© © © © 

© © © © 

m" © © © 

ON © 

r- cn 



cn cn 

00 ON 

SO CN 

m in 

CN oc 

— ^t 



cn oc © 

oc © © 

sd t> »n 

in cn cn 

cn in oc 

— " CN 



© © © © 

© © © © 

© © © © 



© © © 
© © © 

© © © 



g 


© 


q 


© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 


— ' 


© 

© 


g 


q 


q 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 

© 


Q 


© 


© 
© 


o 
q 


° 


° 


© 

CN 


q 


© 
in 


© 


© 
©. 


© 
in 


© 

q 


^ 


in 

ON 


© 

© 
© 


© 


© 


© 


© 

© 


© 

ON 

cn 


in 

CN 

oc 


g 






(N 


CN 

SO 


d" 


CN 


in 
oc 


CN 


cn 




— 


so" 








©" 


i> 





© © © 
© © © 



CN 



u 

3 



2 > 

3 00 

*2 w 



c 
o 
U 

cd 
O 



00 



o 

Q. 



2 cc 
o 






H -r 



— - X) 

— 3 



U 

u 

3 

3 

-C 

E 



co ^ 3 JH JH 



> 

U £ 

oo OQ 

?3 cd 



d 



00 



£ < ON CU < 



D. D. 



c 

u 

<D 

£ 

3 

a. cj 

c .3 

U tu 



— 

r3 



cd 



u 

c 

-3 

3 
y 

cd 

OQ S 



00 

Q. 



4) 

- 
cd 



cd 
OX) 



cd 



43 
OD 



= K 



2 £ °° ° 



-a g 

o o 
J U 



£* °° 'J? 
Dh CN < 



si 

c 
ox) "7 D 

£ 00 43 



E 

— 

>^ 
00 



cd 

43 
OX) 

S S O 

^ oo £ 
c 



X 

pq 



c 



I 



o 
cd 



3 

.3 u b 

-a o g 

- w ^ ^ 



a- J 



u 

<U "O 
u cd 
C t - 

cd ox) 
c — 

S P 

I & 

o o 

'c? CO 

b E 



O 

00 

6 - 

0) u 

CO £ 

•4— < 

c c 

^ O 

• - cd 

< U 



> 

— 

VI 



D. 

cd 

u 



c 
cd 



18 



H 
Z 

H 

s 

MM 
mm" 

ss 

§ 

o 
u 



o -o 
o <u 

-»^ 1/3 
NO O 

On H 



ON 


T3 


On 


CD 




■4— > 


NO 


.5 


00 


ex 


ON 


o 


r^ 


O, 




O. 




< 



-O ON 

g C^N 

CD 00 

JO On 

c o 

m * 






oo -a 

On CD 

CD 
O, 

. X 






ON 



3 



O 
O 

d 
o 
<*£ 

en 



o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

d d> d> <5 d> d> 

o o o o 

©^ <o ©^ ©, 

©" ©" of i> 



oooooooo o 

oooooooo o 

© © © © © © © © d 

o o o o o 

q «n ©„ q ©^ 

O" of ©* so" CN 

(N i—i CN 



o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


d 


d 


d 


00 




r- 


o 


SO 




r^ 


r-; 


r* 




r-T 


<N 


so' 




CO 


in 


r* 






T-H 


ON 
CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


d 


d 


d 


SO 


o 


so 


o 


CO 


o 


<N 


NO 


l>^ 










o 


SO 


00 


ri 


r— I 


F> 


o 


Tf 






co 


00 

co 



ooooooooooooo»nio 
ooooooooooooococn 

r^ oo 

oo" r-' 



o o o o 

o o o o 

© © © © 
© 



o o o o 
o o o o 

© © © © 

© 
o 



o o o o 

o o o o 

© © © © 

© o 

© cq 

>n so" 

<N 



O 

o 



o 
o 

d 



43 B 



c 
c o 



.B* o c o 
<o b 

45 



*a 

SO _ 



s- 

> 

E 
O 

U 



P3 
S- 

cd 
.5 o 



cj 

c 

O 



l£3 



j— CD w 

E cd 
O O 



CO 

c 



H U 0* 



© © © 
o o o 

odd 
o o 
q ©^ 

u-T so" 



M 

CD 

^ rt c3 
-o .2 & 



cd — i 

+5 rv 



co cn 

SO ON 

^H vo 

O co 

r-l CO 



o o 

o o 

d d 

o o 

to <n 

u-T ON 

CD SO ON 

cd 



'o 



.2 S 



cd ^ 

K so 
.SP & 1 



a> 



oq 

o 

CD C 
00 ^ 

w a? 

.8 

£ S 

On < 



tin 43 



00 

oo 



00 



00 

^ # 

CO 

SO 
00 



CO 
X 

ON 
SO 

CO 



fH 


_- 


© 


© 


q 


© 


as 


— ' 


oo 


*H 


<"H 


© 


SO 


^1" 


cs 


#\ 




9* 


l-H 


ON 


r<i 


CO 


o 


<s 


SO 


r- 


Q\ 


-* 




CO 



OS '■ 

e2 



o 

MM 

cd ft 

^ 2 

fe S: 

c < 

I? 
<3 



v5 rj 

MM 



H 
O 



g 

OX) 

c 
g 

5u g 

o tt 

*rs cd 

cd O 
H <U 
to "O 

B .b 
S rS 

< = 

-h 43 
& ."-3 

1 1 

fi 33 

E g 

<="! 

.2 -55 

■»— » *rt 
" B 

<u .b 

s l 

CD CD 

ijg «d 
O 83 

B 3= 

o .o 

H *♦- 

cd 73 

I 5 

SO £ 

^ g 

^ s 

O to 

<4- ■" 

B 

<D B 

•2 fi 

B 5 

3 O 
E 1> 

^3 . 
« cu 

o o 

^ 33 

°*< 
CD 

D ° 

B .2 

B cd 
cd t>0 

B cd 

II 

CD «C 

.b o 

cd CD 
CD JJ 



19 



SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION 
APRIL 1, 1998 



TOWN PRECINCT 
LAND 

Current Use 1,484,855 137,405 

All Other Taxable 32.449.320 16.101.400 

Total Taxable 33,934,175 16,238,805 

Tax Exempt & Non Taxable 7.799.100 6.366.800 

Total Land Value 41,733,275 22,605,605 

BUILDINGS 
Taxable 109,022,100 59,272,000 

Tax Exempt & Non Taxable 67.097.100 50.775.500 

Total Buildings Value 176,119,200 110,047,500 

PUBLIC UTILITIES 
Electric 4.948.700 214.600 

Total Valuation: 222,801,175 132,867,705 

TOTAL TAXABLE VALUATON: 147,904,975 75,533,805 

EXEMPTIONS 

Blind Exemptions (8) 

Elderly Exemptions (30) 

TOTAL EXEMPTIONS: 

TOTAL EXEMPTIONS TAKEN: 

NET VALUATION ON WHICH 
TAX RATE IS COMPUTED: 



120,000 


90,000 


445.000 


253.200 


565,000 


343,200 


531,200 


343,200 


147,373,775 


75,190,605 



20 



INVENTORY OF TOWN OWNED PROPERTY - As of January 1, 1999 



PROPERTY I.D. NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


ACREAGE 


0001-0007-0006 


Airport 


74.90 ac 


0001-0008-0003 


Airport Terminal and Land 


47.80 ac 


000 1-0008-003 A 


Airport Hanger (building only) 


2000sf 


0003-0002-0004 


Plymouth Solid Waste & 
Recycling Facility 


15.30 ac 


0003-0002-0047 


Plymouth Police Department 


4.18 ac 


0003-0007-0030 


Riverside Cemetery 
Fairgrounds Road 


20.00 ac 


0004-0001-0004 


W/S Interstate 93 


.03 ac 


0004-0004-0001 


E/S I-93/W/S Pemi River 
Sears 


12.00 ac 


0005-0004-0027 


West Plymouth Cemetery 
Mayhew Turnpike 


1.00 ac 


0006-0003-0080 


Reservoir Road Cemetery 
Reservoir Road 


.50 ac 


0006-0004-0035 


Sawmill Cemetery 
Bartlett Road 


1.00 ac 


0007-0001-0008 


Cooksville Road Cemetery 
Cooksville Road 


.10 ac 


0007-0002-0009 


Highland Street 
Teichner gift 


5.70 ac 


0007-0003-0004 


Butterfield Property 

Old Route 25 & Highland St. 


.12 ac 


0007-0006-0003 


Cross Country Lane 


.11 ac 




(land at entrance to Plymouth Hei 


ghts) 


0007-0006-0020 


N/S Texas Hill Road 
Keniston gift 


6.10 ac 



21 



PROPERTY I.D. NUMBER 



DESCRIPTION 



ACREAGE 



0007-0009-0001 

0008-0002-0002 
0011-0001-0009 

0011-0001-0044 

0011-0001-0045 

0012-0003-0034 

0015-0001-0003 



E/S Daniel Webster Highway 
Kruger 

E/S Daniel Webster Highway 

W/S Thurlow Street 
Newton Conservation gift 

W/S Cummings Hill Road 
Walter Conservation gift 

Stearns Cemetery 
Texas Hill Road 

Lower Intervale Cemetery 
Daniel Webster Highway 

Union Cemetery 
Bridgewater Hill Road 



.52 ac 

1.84 ac 
76.00 ac 

87.00 ac 

1.00 ac 

1.00 ac 

.06 ac 



0020-0005-0005 


Right-of-Way MacLean Street 


.37 ac 


0020-0006-0002 


N/S Merrill Street 


.08 ac 


0020-0009-0023 


Plymouth Fire Department 


.54 ac 


0021-0010-0002 


2 Bridge St. - concrete building 


.09 ac 


0021-0014-0008 


Town Hall 


.49 ac 


0021-0014-0009 


Town Common with Gazebo 


.29 ac 


0021-0014-0010 


W/S Main Street 

(in front of Town Hall & Church) 


.03 ac 


0021-0016-0001 


Pease Public Library 


.75 ac 


0022-0004-0006 


Fox Park W/S Langdon Street 


32.10 ac 


0023-0005-017A 


Plymouth Highway Garage 
(onlandofPVW&SD) 


6460 sf 


0023-0007-0014 


W/S Winter Street 
(mini-park) 


.26 ac 



22 



00 <D 


r- ■ 


1 cs £? 


C j3 


vo 


o Q 






• o 


"3 5 


cn 


"* r*5 


c > 


so 


» S 




co 


o^ 




in 


l> 



03 






H 
Z 
P 

O 

< © 
to w "2 

o g a 

Z* 

F* mm 
On 



.a o 

"o3 H/ 

S-H S-H 

3 o 
P c 

O 



H 
P 

O 









00 0) 

« "a 



SO 
CO 


i so cn 


1 en cn 

l> On 


On 


SO 
CO 


© >n 


CN CO 

vq so 


On 


CN 


■^t 


in od 


en 

on 



\/ J 5T7 *3TT vj ^ J *.• J VJ VT VT \^ J X^T >• J 



O en On O 


o> 


' CN © © SO 

r- ^t p cn 


©^ en CN ©^ 


in 

en 


on r^ o in 
q i> q, cn 


© © '-h in 
Tf in «— i 




in ©" ©" *-+ 

rj- t-h 00 Tt 



Z./S. r.^ ro Z./X r^ r^\ 4jEl r,Q r^ r^\ 



XT 3 XTT V7 V; XT J XT J \f j ^/ j \j j \f j \j j 7J 



OjONoqoot^sqov^oo^Noo 

^cocninin'-^r^odoN^doNCN 
sot^r^cNenin©"3-^-<eneNcn 
vo t^ »o -h cn-HinoON't M 

^h ^^ t— i cn en «— i 

XrTT \f J Xr J XTT XT j V7 V7 Xrr XT J Xf? «JT J V7 



o 
o 


i o ' 

o 


1 ' o o 
o o 


d 
o 


d 

o 
o 


d d 
o o 




so" 


in in 

<N 



V5 & 



V5 



VTV XT j Xr J Xr J \f J XTT 



^ h oo in 
r^ ^h in ^h 

d rTd od 
r^ in r> os 



-H O O 

cn ^h cn 



r^ oo so oo 

so r^ en in 

t-h i-H On <n 

en cN i— i in 

^h On cn r^ 

SO" CN O" ^h" 

Tl" ^h CO 



00 ^ On 

q in q 

On in r-H 

CN On O 

en i-H rt 

in o r-" 

HrHtn 



X7T7 *• J - V; V7 VJ s/J ^J t^J Vj *^7 t3TT Vj 





0) 




o 




C 


<u 


03 


C/3 




o 


3 


3 


X) 

S 


Oh 


< 



o 



Q 

00 



s 

J tin 



CD 
O 






c 
o 



c 
o 



w^^ 



o 



43 

03 H 



-^ 2a § 
Q IS £ 



c S 

B lis 

o^ (^ W 

U fl^-3 
^ ^ ° -2 
12 a> ° ° 

jl-s a 



&r 



On 

so 

en 
en 
i> 

en 

oo 

CN 



&r 



O 
CN 

in 

o 

00^ 

en 



& 



O 
O 

d 
o 
q, 
en 
in 



oo 

SO 

in 

00 

00 

o" 

en 



03 

■4— > 

f2 



23 





&X> <0 




c 3 








^3 5 




PQ ~ 




<u 




M 




H 




03 




S 




-o 








kj 




Oh 


H 




2 




U3 




o 




u 




u 




< 




Ifl 


.a o 


> 


real 
r(L 


P* 


c o 


w 


D G 


C/J 00 


cd 


a ^ 


o 


ptf a 




<2 




APIT 

nded 


u 


£ 


o 
o 


U W 




0* « 




£ § 




w 5 




4 S 


e 






I 3 


< 


££ 




© 




< fa 




J 


00 <L> 


J 


.£ -£ 


— 


'£ 5 


> 


.£ > 


X 
H 


Beg 
rket 


2 

O 




§ 




>« 




-J 




Cu 






<u 




n 




O 




e 




3 




CU 



N o O n- ^t in in 

\c qnn nin q 

CM © CN r-* t-h CO On 

00 <3- VO VO VO © 

On VO *-h •— i O O 

n c- r« r. r» r* 

i> omincs m 

V J vj v J W s^T \?j V J 



in 
in 

ON 

vd 



\/ J VJ V7 vj V^ J \^ J \^ J 



\S j v7 VT vy \^v W W 



cn vo co tj- ^t in in 

cn cn t-H co co in p 

cn cn vo »-h «»h co on 

© 00 © VO VO vO 

© »n en *— i i-H 

oo~ 

z - ^ r ^ r ^ r r\ r ^\ r *\ r S\ 

vj v J VJ VT V^J 77 \^7 



o 

o 


© 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


d 
o 
p 


d 
o 
©^ 


d 
o 
©_ 


d 
o 
<p 


d 
o 
p. 


d 
o 
©^ 


in 


in 


in 


cn 


in 


CN 



be 



\Sj w v} v} \/j 



rt (N t-j 

d cS vd 

oo vo m 

ON CO CN 

On vo" in 






O 

d 

ON 

in 



in 
in 



V5- 



V^ 



ON 
00 

in 

00 
(N 

ON 



&r 



&t 



00 
ON 

m 



^5- 



oo co in 

00 VO OO 

in rt in 

(N O CN 

ON O^ 00^ 

vo ri cn f-H 



&$ f& &r &r 



nO 

rf 

00 
CO 

o" 

CO 

&* &* &* &r 



&* V5- *fr &* 



CO rt 

CO \D 



CN 

«n 



V5- V5- V5- -be- 



€^ b<5- -&0- ^5- 



•— ( ^t ON CO 

vq r^ Tf co 

^t cn d oo 

oo vo in r-- 

ro in ^t vo 

o* vd i-T of 

CO »-H 



V5- ^9- V3- WS 



CO 


in 


vd 

CM 
00 

CN 


VO 

ON 


>&r 


V*r 


VO 


CN 


00 
CO 

<D 

CO 


d 

CO 
CO 


^5- 

1 


i 


V5- 


be 


o 

00 


On 
VO 


CO 


d 

CN 

«-H 


V*r 


be 


i 


o 
o 




d 
o 
p, 

CN 

(N 


V* 


be 


x> 


ON 
ON 


vd 

o 

in 


in 
in 
vq 

CN 

(N 


^e- 


be 







c 
















O- 








£ 






13 










<D 


13 










— 
o 










& 


O 


U 

C< 

c 
£ 

<u 




I 2 Redevelopment 
er Pump Station 
ip & Motor Replaci 


c 
£ 

Oh 


— 
_o 

cd 
o 

_o 

13 

OJh 

c 

"c3 


3 

3 
00 


■■A 

4—i 

3 


c 
_o 

3 
jO 

0Q 


0) 

— 
— 

CO 

"o. 


ergency funds 
ter Maint. 


(J 

a 
<u 

0D 

M 

£ 

pj 

>> 


3 
00 




— 


'3 

— 


ID 




C 


5 

— 


cd 


£ | 


C 




C/2 


U 


— i D- H 


00 




X 


4-J 

1 




cd c3 





cd 

t2 



24 



STATEMENT OF BONDED INDEBTEDNESS 6/30/98 

Showing Annual Maturities of 

Outstanding Bonds 





Police 


Town Hall 




Station 


Hi* 


*hway 




FY Change 








5.92% 


5.93% 


MATURITY 


ORIGINAL 


INTEREST 


ORIGINAL 


INTEREST 




AMOUNT 


AMOUNT 


AMOUNT 


AMOUNT 




1,750,000.00 


570,328.00 


840,000.00 


275,389.08 


1999 


175,000.00 


36,444.00 


85,000.00 


32,883.76 


2000 


175,000.00 


26,032.00 


85,000.00 


28,293.76 


2001 


175,000.00 


15,619.00 


85,000.00 


23,703.76 


2002 


175,000.00 


5,206.00 


85,000.00 


19.028.76 


2003 






85,000.00 


14,247.50 


2004 






80,000.00 


9,360.00 


2005 






80,000.00 


4,720.00 


TOTALS 


700,000.00 


83,301.00 


585,000.00 


132,237.54 



Outstanding 7/1/97 



Retired 97/98 



Outstanding 6/30/98 



PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHEDULE OF BONDS AND NOTES 

Building Bond 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 



Asbestos Loan 

92,078.95 

8,008.00 

84,070.95 



25 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Plymouth, New Hampshire 
7/01/97 - 6/30/98 



Beginning Fund Balance: 

Receipts: 

Perpetual Care 

Pease Library 

Interest & Dividend 

Gain on Sales of investments 



Disbursements: 
Payment to the Town 
Pleasant Valley Cemetery 
Charter Trust Company 



Ending Fund Balance 

Unrealized gains (loss) from investments 

Ending Balance - at market value 



$ 331,085.94 



$ 150.00 

$ 35.28 

$ 21,069.66 

$ 11.585.85 



$ 42,381.00 

$ 

$ 1.638.33 



$ 32,840.79 



$ 44,019.33 

$ 319,907.40 

$ 86.103.63 

$ 406.011.03 



The Trustees of the Trust Funds are pleased to report that with the help and guidance 
of the Charter Trust Company, the Town Trust Funds had an excellent return this year. 
The Trustees hold the following trust funds in Common (one account): 



Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Foster Estate General Beautification 



Smith Bridge Restoration 
Pease Library 



These funds are invested and managed in accordance with the laws of the State of 
New Hampshire. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bill Crangle, Chair 
John Noyes, Secretary 
Leonard Sawyer 



26 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 
For 12 Month Period Ending June 30, 1998 



TOWN GENERAL FUND 



GENERAL FUND BEGINNING BALANCE 7/01/97 



1,954,780.68 



INCINERATOR BOND FUND 
CASH RECEIPTS 
INTEREST 
NHPDIP 
REPOS 
TOTAL INTEREST 

POLICE 

BUSINESS LIC 

GRANT 

METER FINES 

PARKING METERS 

PDC FINES 

POLICE MISC 

SEL. MISC 
TOTAL POLICE 

SELECTMEN 
AIRPORT 
AMBULANCE 
AMBULANCE TOWNS 
BC/BS REIMB 
BUSINESS LIC 
CDBG HIGHLAND 
CDBG WHIP O WILL 
CEMETERY 
CHARTER TRUST 
COMMON ACCT 
COURT WITNESS 
DISPATCH 
FEMA 
FIRE 

FUEL CLEAN REIMB 
HIGHWAY GRANT 
LAND USE 
NH REVENUE DIST 
P.I.L.O.T 
PARKS & REC 
PARKS & REC SCH 
PSC CO GEN 



500.00 



33,236.15 
70,783.23 



50.00 
13,356.00 
27,619.00 
21,658.25 
37,452.65 
23,964.08 

25.00 



3,020.22 
77,833.42 
83,060.15 
14,873.23 

1,895.00 
12,000.00 
12,124.95 

9,168.91 

322,231.28 

200.00 

3,352.90 
65,750.75 
26,552.40 

2,059.44 

3,381.55 
93,242,97 

5,547.56 
247,597.01 
11,734.00 
33,295.00 
82,790.00 
19,831.50 



104,019.38 



124,124.98 



27 



PSC FIRE SERV 
REIMBURSEMENTS 
SALE OF PROPERTY 
MISC 

SOLID WASTE 
STATE OF NH 
TAX RELIEF LIEN 
ZONING-PLANNING 
TOTAL SELECTMEN 

TAX COLLECTOR 

1997 PROPERTY A 
1997 PROPERTY B 
1997 YIELD 

1997 YIELD L\T 

1998 PROPERTY A 
1998 PROPERTY B 
1998 YIELD 
PROP TAX INT. 
TAX LIEN INT. 
TAX LIEN REDEMP 

TOTAL SELECTMEN 

TOWN CLERK 

1997-98 MV 
SEL MISC 
TC MISC 
TOTAL TOWN CLERK 



152,785.78 

58.791.04 

4,734.00 

554.25 

56.627.11 

68.960.84 

2,387.45 

2,772.05 



1.629.779.87 

2.706.889.77 

842.60 

128.40 

1.903.118.76 

386.77 

2.755.16 

45.852.42 

96.884.38 

472.889.40 



416.329.00 

500.00 

16.451.38 



1.479.154.76 



6.859.527.53 



433.280.38 



TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS AND BEG BAL 



10.955.387.71 



EXPENSES 

BANK SERV CHG 
PAYMENTS PER SELECTMEN 
TOTAL CASH DISBURSEMENTS 

ENDING BALANCE 6/30/98 



56.00 
8.511.598.45 



8,511,654.45 

2.443.733.26 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS AND END BAL 



10.955.387.71 



28 



Revolving Loan 
7/1/97 through 6/30/98 



BEGINNING BALANCE 7/1/97 



1,284.51 



CASH RECEIPTS 

EARNED INTEREST 

RECEIVABLE 
TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS AND BEG BALANCE 



97.96 

5.175.33 
6.557.80 



ENDING BALANCE 6/30/98 



6.557.80 



BEGINNING BAL 
CASH RECEIPTS 
CDBG 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



CASH DISBURSEMENTS 



ENDING BALANCE 6/30/98 



Whip O Will CDBG 
2/1/98 through 6/30/98 






.00 




27,322.00 




27.322.00 




27,270.99 




51.01 


VND END BAL 


27.322.00 



29 



TOWN OF PLYMOUTH 

STATEMENT OF INCOME 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1998 







General Fund 






Budget 


Actual 


Variance 

Favorable 

(-) Unfavorable 


REVENUES: 








Taxes, Net 


$5,997,453 


$5,938,343 


-$59,110 


Licenses and Permits 


427,500 


459,674 


32,174 


Intergovernmental Revenue 


407,629 


451,027 


43,398 


Charges for Services 


545,000 


570,079 


25,079 


Miscellaneous 


135.000 


190.561 


55,561 




7,512,582 


7,609,684 


97,102 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES: 








Operating Transfers In 


214,000 


326,115 


112,115 


Other Financing Sources 













214,000 


326,115 


112,115 


TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER 








FINANCING SOURCES: 


$7,726,582 


$7,935,799 


$209,217 


EXPENDITURES: 








General Government 


$885,069 


$1,018,417 


-$133,348 


Public Safety 


1,126,676 


1,109,861 


16,815 


Highways and Streets 


401,574 


383,902 


17,672 


Sanitation 


206,726 


207,757 


- 1,031 


Health 


21,450 


21,450 





Welfare 


45,940 


36,617 


9,323 


Culture and Recreation 


335,131 


334,806 


325 


Conservation 


3,100 


4,050 


-950 


Debt Service 


260,000 


260,000 





Debt Service-Interest 


86,497 


86,497 





Capital Outlay 


502.045 


359.616 


142.429 




3,874,208 


3,822,973 


51,235 


OTHER FINANCING USES: 








Operating Transfers Out 


48,000 


48,050 


-50 


Payments to Other Government 


4.109.228 


4.109.228 







4,157,228 


4,157,278 


-50 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND 








OTHER FINANCING USES: 


$8,031,436 


$7,980,251 


$51455 



30 



Budget 



General Fund 
Actual 



Variance 

Favorable 

(-) Unfavorable 



EXCESS OF REVENUES AND 
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 



AND OTHER FINANCING USES 
CHANGE IN RESERVES 

UNRESERVED FUND BALANCE 

CHANGE, NET 
BALANCE- JULY 1, 1997 

BALANCE- JUNE 30, 1998 



-$304,854 


-$44,452 


260,402 


0.00 


-141.778.00 


-141.778 


304,854.00 


-186,230.00 


118,624 


304.854.00 


454.854.00 


150.000 


$0 


$268,624 


$268,624 



31 



PLYMOUTH TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 






Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1998 






TOWN OF PLYMOUTH 




-DR.- 






Uncollected Taxes/Beg.Fiscal Year 




1998 




1997 


YIELD TAXES 






$ 


842.60 


PROPERTY TAXES 






$ 


1,462,536.91 


Taxes Committed to Collector: 










PROPERTY TAXES 


$ 2,937,106.00 


$ 


2,937,703.65 


YIELD TAXES 


$ 


14,889.32 






Prepayments 


$ 


386.77 






Overpayments 


$ 


35.00 


$ 


9,059.75 


Interest Collected on Delinquent: 










PROPERTY TAX 


$ 


0.20 


$ 


45,852.22 


YIELD TAX 






$ 


128.40 


TOTAL DEBITS 


$ 2,952,417.29 


$ 


4,456,123.53 



-CR- 

Remittances to Treasurer: 

PROPERTY TAXES $ 1,903,118.76 $ 4,336,669.64 

YIELD TAXES $ 2,755.16 $ 842.60 

Interest Collected: 

PROPERTY TAXES $ 0.20 $ 45,852.22 

YIELD TAXES $ 128.40 

Prepayment $ 386.77 $ 1,613.00 

Abatements $ 5,082.18 $ 71,017.67 

Uncollected Taxes/End of Fiscal Yr. 

PROPERTY TAXES $ 1,028,940.06 

YIELD TAXES $ 12,134.16 

TOTAL CREDITS $ 2,952,417.29 $ 4,456,123.53 



32 



SUMMARY OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS 
7/1/97-6/30/98 



-DR- 

TAX SALES ON ACCOUNT OF LEVIES OF 
Balance of Unredeemed Taxes 97 96 95 94 93 

Beginning fiscal yr. 

PROPERTY TAXES $389,961.90 $218,767.61 $17,893.22 $1,281.32 

YIELD TAXES $ 677.53 $ 508.74 

Taxes Sold To Town During Yr. $361,323.72 

Interest Collected After Sale: 

PROPERTY TAXES $ 1,312.12 $ 26,684.53 $ 65,037.73 $ 3,283.56 $ 87.90 

YIELD TAXES $ 255.58 $ 222.96 

Overpayments: 

PROPERTY TAXES $ 10,697.87 

TOTAL DEBITS $362,635.84 $427,344.30 $284,738.45 $21,908.48 $1,369.22 

CREDIT 

Remittances to Treasurer 

During Fiscal Year 
Redemptions 

PROPERTYTAX $ 47,373.92 $219,968.91 $197,785.03 $ 6,463.17 $ 112.10 

YIELD TAX $ 677.53 $ 508.74 

Interest & Cost After Sale 

PROPERTYTAX $ 1,312.12 $ 26,684.53 $ 65.037.73 $ 3,283.56 $ 87.90 

YIELD TAX $ 255.58 $ 222.96 

Abatements $ 1,210.50 $ 38,477.33 $ 824.82 $ 749.74 $ 740.34 

Prepayments $ 100.00 

Unredeemed Taxes End Of 

Fiscal Year PROPERTY $312,739.30 $142,113.53 $ 20,157.76 $10,680.31 $ 428.88 

TOTAL CREDITS $362,635.84 $427,344.30 $284,738.45 $21,908.48 $1,369.22 



33 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT 



To the Board 

Town of Plymouth, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying general-purpose financial statements of the Town 
of Plymouth as of and for the year ended June 30,1998, as listed in the table of con- 
tents. These general-purpose financial statements are the responsibility of the Town of 
Plymouth management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these general- 
purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. 
Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assur- 
ance about whether the general-purpose financial statements are free of material mis- 
statement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the 
amounts and disclosures in the general-purpose financial statements. An audit also 
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by 
management, as well as evaluating the overall general-purpose financial statement 
presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

The general-purpose financial statements referred to above do not include the General 
Fixed Assets Account Group, or Long-term Debt Account Group Landfill Closure and 
Post Closure Care Costs, all of which should be included to conform with generally 
accepted accounting principles. The amounts that should be recorded in the Account 
Groups are not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the general-purpose financial statements of the 
omissions described in the preceding paragraph, the general-purpose financial state- 
ments referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position 
of the Town of Plymouth as of June 30, 1998, and the results of its operations and cash 
flows of its non-expendable trust funds for the year then ended in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles. 

Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general-pur- 
pose financial statements taken as a whole. The individual and combining fund finan- 
cial statements and schedules listed in the table of contents are presented for purpos- 
es of additional analysis and are not a required part of the general purpose financial 
statements of Town of Plymouth. Such information has been subjected to the auditing 
procedures applied in the audit of the general-purpose financial statements and, in our 
opinion, is fairly presented in all material respects in relation to the general-purpose 
financial statements taken as a whole. 

GREZELAK AND COMPANY, PC, CPA's 

Laconia, New Hampshire 

July 20, 1998 



34 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 
For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1998 



RECEIPTS 
Auto Permits: 07/01/97 - 06/30/98 

Sticker and Title Fees 
Dog Licenses Issued 07/01/97 - 06/30/98 

Dog Fines and Late Fees 
Marriage Licenses 
UCC Filings 

Certified Copies of Records 
Miscellaneous Filing Fees 
Sub Total 

Selectmen - Recovery Fees 
TOTAL 

PAYMENTS 

Paid to Town Treasurer 



$ 


391,071.00 


$ 


25,258.00 


$ 


3,429.00 


$ 


240.00 


$ 


2,025.00 


$ 


4,091.38 


$ 


6,486.00 


$ 


180.00 


$ 


432,780.38 


$ 


500.00 


$ 


433,280.38 


$ 


433,280.38 



35 



X 

z 

SB 
H 

O 

S 

0- 

O 

z 

o 

H 

H 
Z 



ON 

as 






u 

w 

z 

a 
z 
w 

§ < 



PC 

o 
u 

X 

H 
a* 

SO 



a 

H 

Cfi5 

O 



m 



o 



u 






£ 

73 

Z 



j= 
cd 

Ph 

'■+- 
c 

a> 

E 

z 



PQ 

<+H 

o 

"t3 

Q 



zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 



,'£X 



>, 



,3 73 x JS 



O 

£ 



^> _^* ^^ _^* t 1 _^* ^^ ^> 



x-oxxxxxxxxxxx 



r Qh &h Oh &H 



I § I 

£ -I £ 

^* T ^* ^*> ^> r \ ^> ^ t ^ "> •*> ^- » ^ > ^*^ ^ > ^^ y*y k* 

ex cu cu £ ESS EEEEEEEEEchE 



>. >-, 



CQ 

s 



(-H 




"S* 




3 

73 


C 

<u 

t-H 

H 


£ 




CD 

CQ 


< 


I— » 


? 


£ 


2 


O. 
O 


< 


73 

t-H 


c 
>> 


c 

1) 


'53 


oo 


U 


Oh 


ffi 



(S3 
,3 
W) 

e 

'£ , 

S .2a Q 

c3 ^ h-; 
ffl J£ 

H-l [1h X> 

2 « N 

<** £ -3 

W £ W 



LU 





s 






£ 






oo 






« 




0) 


£ 






-3 


<U 


F 


OJ 








o 


o 
H 


u 


00 

u 

1— 1 


00 

0) 
i— i 


s 
s 


u 

:> 

< 


3 
n 




< 


< 


2 
2 


73 




£ 


<u 


<D 


c 


"53 


43 
00 


73 

Q 


3 

i— j 


3 





(U 

3 



OX) o 

° CQ 0* 



0X) 



2 


3 


o 

OO 


C 


S 


1—1 






73 

s- 
-D 


73 


c 


•L> 



hC 5 <u 3 

• S r=3 O 

?2 oo "o 

73 — ( O 

r3 >-5 



e2 



3 



U < Q S « Z •£ < 



CQ 



£ ^ 

73 C 

D 



(D 



3 00 ^ 

Cm£ C3 

£ ^ « 



< Pi 



73 

0JQ 

3 

's 

3 
3 

u 

J 



oo 



a a 



. 3 

|'S 

O i) 
X 3 



w 



«5 O CD 

Q oo Dh 



oo 73 

'S ^ 

3 U 

Q O 



73 H 



= r CQ = a 



Ph 



£:s 



> 

73 

Q 



e* cud -O 



o o > 

D <U 73 

O O Q 



3 

_73 

'o 
^ Z 

o ^ 
rt 22 <u 



00 

.3° O 



GJ3 



^3 

u 



4 w s S 

S g Q 3 



cc 



Q Ph 



73 O 



OO ^ 

■*— i ^— 

3 r3 

<*> ^ ^ 

C 3 i-i 

o 



Cri Q 



+-> 

■4— < 

JS = >> 

<U D (U 

<U 3 go 

^ oo . 

3 .<U 3 

* *B ^ 

73 O 73 

J3 r ^ X! 

00 O oo 





3 

73 
73 
















•— 
73 






H 
















l- 




<u 


3 


00 


,2 




00 




£ 

.2 




<U 




£ 

73 


73 

X 


£ 


3 


73 




c 
o 

.§ 

CO 


_3 


£ 


3 


z 

00 




< 

73 

3 


3 


— 

73 

00 

O 


73 

X 

U 


-3 


00 

3 
< 
3 


< 

3 
73 


3 
< 

53 


^T- 


73 


3 


<u 


73 


<L) 




73 


73 


H- 1 


j^ 


X 


X 


73 


o 
o 


Ut 


*>> 


3 


O 


>, 


<G 


73 


u 


U 


X 


o 


E^ 


73 

H- 1 


Z 


Oh 


H 





73 

^= 

■<— > 
3 

73 

£ 

73 
00 



3 

^30 

00 C is 

O £ .£ 
Oh I > 

3 Q 3 

£ .22 53 

3^5 

< < £ 



_3 

'C 
<u 

-3 

73 

00 _h K> 
73 (U 



3 73 73 <U 



55 -3 3 
X g C 



OJ 



§ O «<S 

l i ■§ s 

73 O <d K 

J U MH £ 



3 
O 



73 



73 

X ^ 
>> 'o 

33 X J2 S 

53 .y >. o 

PC Z Q Q 



Oh V, 

<U 73 

S O 

= 13 



S 00 



73 



3 
>. 73 

£ ^ 
pq < 



3 

73 
u 



E 
73 

t— » 

t-H 

4) 

3 

3 



^o 00 ^ ^r r: 

-^ <N ^ ^ ^ 



CM CN ON 



CM CO On 



3 3 



X X X X X 



73 73 73 73 



ON 00 _ 1 

**~t ^» ^1 ?*> 

73 73 73 



vO 



On 
CM 



— ' ON ._ _ 



ID 



73 3 



^£^££S^S^^5 



3 — : 
3 3 



3 ^ o- t5 
< 00 00 O 



CM 
CM 

> 

O 

Z 



u 

Q 



36 



<u 

43 



o 
<d 

£ 

03 
Z 



3 



c 

(U 

2 



» "2 « 

31 a 



<U oo 

3 C 



3 

O C g c3 

o o - 

s H 



c 

c 

CD 



t>o * oo ^ c ^ fa 

C 3 W j§ - 



^3-2 
c £ 

_CD >> 



Uj 



_cd 
CO 



Z 



Dh zi dj 43 •£ c3 c fa -a <d c ^ 9 

8 .g < § -a ^ 3 -g ■§ i J 

° £ a fe fa £ < 



o 
<d 

O 



CO 



H 

P 
O 

O 
z 

o 

H 

W 
DC 
H 

Z 

Q 
Q 
O 

u 

X 






c* 

w 

S 

u 

Q 

O 
Z 

Q 
Z 

> 

H 
K 
H 

O 



43 



c3 
Z 



(73 
CD 

Q 



<d 
o 

C3 



T3 

0) 

00 

c3 
CD 
O 
CD 

Q 

o 



C3 

Z 



CD 
O 

o 



T3 C 

§ 2 
k-9 



oo .2 

of^ 

£3 cs 

3 ffl 



s- .3 -5 
03 

43 
o 



i 2 | 
(* D O 5 



3 -5 i I r 
£ 
CO 

£ o3 



3 

44 
o 

'C 

CD 
CD 



3 

O 3 

*-| .3 

Oh T3 

. '— 

£ c« 

*- 3 

03 <+3 
3 



> 
'S 

OO 

,2 o 



00 



CO 



tin CIh U C* < 



o 
-a 
o 

<D 

43 
H 



2 S i - 

3 o <d 

C •- M 
O 33 03 

UWCQ 

J ^ J 

c 
o 



ffl [il t; 
CO 



tS <D 
<D 3 

Ml 4h 

■^ O 



> C O S 

co ffi H U 



1 1 s i i 

c "3 ^ In <L> 

CD -^ 03 ^ .3 

^ ^ U £ H 



00 

£2 ° C £ 

2 § 3 « 

_, (D Ui — 

« * 8 £ 






JS -3 4= 43 -3 



3 

o 



4= 3 

2 § 
E xi 



4= s kij:j:££x:£j:x; 



3 3 

o o 

E £ 



3 3 
O O 

E £ 



42 4= 

3 3 
O O 



43 03 43 



4^4^j> 1 J>,J> > i^'4^ L _: ^£ j ii^i^i^i^j^i^i^i^i^i^/j /j i^ >-J 4^ 



CU Oh Cu Oh Oh CU Dh 



CuCLhDhCLhCIhCIhQhCIhCuDh 



Dh 




3 03 



s4 .» 
CO <D 

go X 



^ ^ U « ^ .2 





5 


CD 
4D 
O 


_3 


CD 





<D 




c* 




— 




4J 




,rj 


1- 


Tl 


cd 






<D 


n 


N 


03 
CD 


3 
^5 


O 




43 


w 


PQ 


a; 


h- 



(D ^ 

E ^ 

W 03 

CD 03 



(D 
43 
O 

— (D 

— •— 
<d on 

J 
C 

TZ 

CD 

1—5 

o3 



W 



O T3 

03 3 

O co 



03 
iD 

Q 

o 

CD 

"03 

Q 



- 2 t- 

i-H CO ^ 



h O ITl t 



m ^ O\o ^ 






(N 



<d d o w J Sr Br 2?£ ^ 



C 43 -O 43 

03 



CN (N 



3 3 3 3 



CN ^ 



(N ^J- OO 
<N 



\0 ro 
CN —i 



GJO OX) „J *J *J > (J 

3 3 CJ O O O <D 

< < O O O Z Q 



37 



0) 

o 

c 

0) 
'to 
ft 



K hH X HH X K MM )^-l t^i *^ 3h X X h-C HH pH ft ft ft X X ft ft X ft ft 



3 K 
03 Z 



■4-" -1— I O 

3 3 S 
O O 3 

e £ o 

>. >>42 



■J—* -J—" •*— • -4—* •*— ' -J— j •*—> -*—t -4— » 

333333333 
000000000 

£ £ £ £ £ S £ 



42 4= S 

2 2 «8 

g d 03 



^^ ^ » ^* * ^ > ^ > ^ > ^ ~> ^ > _^~* _^T* ^^ ^ H 



4242424242424242424242 t 
3 3 333333333 <£ 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 

£££££££££££ 

_— * ^ * ^*> ^> ^> ^> ^ > •^ ^ > _^T* _^T* 



X 

z 

H 

O ON 



On 

o 
z 



o 



H 

Z 

Q 
Q 



CfiJ 

w 

PQ 



u 

So 

X z 



Q 
Z 



OsS 



H 

OH 
O 

fa 



03 
Z 



'C 
ft 



o 

c 

'00 
ft 



o 

03 



03 

z 



o 
o 

— 

a 

<U 
OX) 
03 

"E 

03 



•F O .3 
44 

C 



c 
o 

d -3 



O -7= 



-o 

c 



o 
ft 



J ft 



03 



: c 

ft ft U 



co 

co 
<D 

C 
42 
00 

3 
03 

42 

=> 00 

c 



T3 S 






* 03 73 

w W 



CO 3 

. S PQ 

DC 

. >^ 

ft ~ 

03 .3 

GO ft 



d 
o 

GO 

d <U 

3 Qh 

'E j 

. 03 

_<•§ 

>.H S-c 

03 <P 4= 

ft te u 






c 

42 

2 



42 
O 
— ' 
03 

PQ 



d 
-a 
£ PQ 



to r? ■»-» 



> 



03 

-o 
c 



J J 



<D « 



^33 &^ « -3) 3 « 



-o 
— 

,0 



50 c5 
o pq 



Pi 



PQ 



2r O 
PQ 
. 00 









T3 

£ 

42 
O 
00 
60 



03 
42 
"03 



03 



J H 



T3 .3 

■ s 3 C 

H .03 O 

W c^ U 



S 03 d 

r^ <M H 

C so 03 

d >, N 

J < C/3 



ft 



bO 

> ,- QQ W d 

J> ft w pq Q 

ft jJ3 X <u p_; 

>^.^ d 42 S 

^Z^DJ 



ft ftftftftftftftftftftft^ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft 

ZZZZZZZZZZZZ5ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ 



42 42 



42 T3 42 42 

3 § 3 3 

o -S o o 

£ -^ 



£ £ 



42 42 

4— » -4— I 

3 3 

O O 

£ £ 



13 
C 

I < 

* £ 



42 42 42 tl) 

3 3 3 S 



42 42 



424242T34242424242424242 



PLhOhOh PhQhPuPLi Qh Oh Dh 



>. >. 



AJ J— 4— 1 *- .— < 

3 3 3 3 <U 

J5 O O O is 

3 E E E rS 

^~» ^^» ^> '"^ 



3 3 
O O 

£ £ 



3 3 
o o 

£ £ 



3 3 
o o 

£ £ 



00 



^ i ^ *> ^^ ^^ ^y ^ \ ^y ^ > 

ClhQhPIhDhPIhPLhCLiPh 



00 

d 

•t-H 

Wh 

4^ 

o 



0; 




C 




C 




44 


N 


OO 


0) 


S 


^ 


E 

rrj 


ft 

3 


T) 


42 


< 


O 

—5 



d 
o 

T3 CO 
C to 

03 03 

■§2 
2° 
<^ 

S oo 

£ £ u ^ £ U ft S 



42 

u 

O o 

M C 

(U "^ 

2 ft 

■S c 

42 -E 



3 2 ^ 

5 *; r^ 

03 O 

ft Oh < 

ft ft Ti 



O 

3 

ft 



03 

E 

Q 



22 fa >>.^ 



< ft 



cu 



O ft 



3 
03 
0) 

ft« 

ft ft 

ft C 
T3 03 

> 5 

03 03 

Q Z 



w o 

'd • 

03 ^5 

Z Pm 



P 22 

03 

Q 



3 

03 

4= M 



"-C is 
d 
o 
u 



d ^ 

42 -O 

'd ^ 

3 03 



■< m s s 

ft ft ft ^ 42 



^K 



d ft 

03 22 

E § 

03 00 



3 

03 
ft 



o 

42 

d 



<U 22 

ft § 



3 
4= 
o 



£ 1-1 44 o 

<^> 53 d. d 
S3 "S ft .9 



o 

"03 

Q 



^■ooChino^^^^o^fo 



^H OO 
-H -H (N 



-P-o S3 



O- D. 



^^ ^"~* ^'k ^% ^^» 

cd cd cd c^ cd 



£££<<£ ££££42: 



00 m m ^ i- 
^}-'Nf-H(N(N 

. bObObOOOOOOO^j^j 

^_ t -'3'3'3333333cjO 

1 3 3 ^^4^<<<<<<00 



d d -4 



o CO 



> 
o 
Z 



CN 
fN 

cJ 

Q 



38 



PLYMOUTH POLICE DEPARTMENT 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



1998 was a successful year for the Plymouth Police Department, but also includ- 
ed some enforcement challenges. Some student rebellion in the Spring caused us to 
re-examine our efforts and strengthen our policy and protocols in several ways. Our 
resources have been more efficiently coordinated to further a stronger response to dis- 
turbance and nuisance calls, and this is being done without compromise to our com- 
mitment to provide fair enforcement. 

1998 saw the assignment of Barry Tanner to a Detective position. Barry has been 
with the department for several years and has embraced this new challenge with great 
enthusiasm. Kevin Lincoln was promoted to Dispatch Supervisor, and we believe his 
sensitive approach to callers, visitors, and employees alike will promote a very pro- 
fessional reputation. 

Captain Steve Temperino was selected to attend the FBI National Academy. This 
training is some of the best offered to local law enforcement, and Steve was the first 
officer from Plymouth to ever attend. He graduated in September and we congratulate 
him on this major achievement. 

The police department has a roster of approximately 30 full and part-time posi- 
tions, and it is natural that each year there is some employee turnover. 1998 saw the 
departures of Dispatch Supervisor George Faran and Secretary Sharon Saunders. New 
full-time employees include Dispatcher Erin Gaites and Secretary Pam Mack. We 
appreciate the many years of service to those who have moved on, and we welcome 
our new staff and wish them all the best. 

It comes as no surprise that our once-young officers are getting older and turning 
into more seasoned veterans. While it can be easier to recruit young, single people to 
fill a patrol position in a college town, the real challenge is employee retention... espe- 
cially when employees get married and start families. I am hopeful that through bud- 
get talks and contract discussions, the Board of Selectmen and the local citizens will 
support fair and significant increases so we can keep some of the knowledgeable, 
trained talent now on board, and stop existing as a "short-term" place of employment. 
The approximate cost to the Plymouth taxpayer to equip and train a new officer is 
$19,500. By investing in better wages we strengthen longevity... everybody benefits. 

In closing I must say that it is a pleasure to be Chief in a department where 
employees are both competent and dedicated... and it is only fitting that I close by 
thanking each and every member of the department for all their hard work and ser- 
vice. They are a wonderful group of young professionals and you and I are very lucky 
to have them. 

Sincerely yours, 



Anthony W. Raymond 
Chief of Police 



39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 
Year-End Totals for 1998 

(The below figures represent all activity within the territorial boundaries of 
Plymouth, NH) 



INCIDENTS: 




Police Service 


346 


Police Information Calls 


197 


Alarms 


145 


Lost/Found Property 


114 


Medical Assist 


86 


Motorist Assists 


82 


Animal Complaint 


81 


Disturbance Calls 


67 


M/V Complaints 


38 


Mutual Aid 


37 


Towed Vehicles 


33 


Suspicious Persons 


15 


Missing Person 


14 


Other/Misc. 


113 



TOTAL INCIDENTS 1368 

INVESTIGATIONS: 



Thefts 


188 


Criminal Mischief 


174 


Disorderly Actions 


84 


Simple Assault 


75 


Harassment 


64 


Conduct After Accidents 


41 


Burglary 


39 


Criminal Threatening 


39 


Acts Prohibited (drugs) 


26 


Issuing Bad Checks (Misd) 


23 


Runaway Child 


17 


Criminal Trespass 


14 


Shoplifting 


13 


Theft of Motor Vehicle 


11 


Domestic Disturbance 


10 


Stalking 


10 


Theft of Services 


10 


Sexual Assault 


8 


Forgery 


6 


Aggravated Sexual Assault 


5 



40 



Criminal Threatening (weapon) 5 

Disorderly Conduct 4 

Child Abuse/Neglect 4 

Reckless Operation 3 

Theft by Deception 2 

Assaults 1 

Other/Misc. 208 

TOTAL INVESTIGATIONS 1 084 



ARRESTS/CHARGES: 



Disorderly Actions 


209 


Protective Custody 


86 


Unlawful Possession of Alcohol 


77 


Carrying Open Containers 


58 


Arrest Warrants 


57 


Drugs (all offenses) 


41 


DWI 


31 


Assaults 


23 


Operating After Revocation 


16 


Bench Warrants 


14 


Resisting Arrest 


11 


Thefts 


10 


Shoplifting 


7 


Criminal Mischief 


6 


Criminal Threatening 


5 


Other/Misc. 


80 



TOTAL ARRESTS/CHARGES 73 1 

TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT: 

Total Summonses Issued 393 

Total Warnings Issued 1071 

ACCIDENTS: 

Major Accidents 96 

Minor Accidents 86 

Total Persons Injured 32 

Total Killed 



41 



DISPATCH CENTER ACTIVITY: 

Year-End Total Average Per Dav 

Telephone Calls 101,491 278 

Radio Calls 296,077 811 

Logged Calls For Service 52,154 143 

PARKING ENFORCEMENT: 

Total Tickets Issued 6474 

DEPARTMENT REVENUE: 



Animal Control 


$ 


20.00 


Copier Fees 


$ 


911.00 


Court Reimbursements 


$ 


38,264.00 


Dispatch Reimbursement 


$ 


120,197.01 


Insurance Requests 


$ 


1,052.00 


Meter Revenue 


$ 


19,960.81 


Miscellaneous 


$ 


1,536.55 


Parking Fines 


$ 


38,466.35 


Pistol Permits 


$ 


260.00 


Reimbursement of Special Details 


$ 


26,942.53 


TOTAL 


$ 


247,610.25 



42 



THE PLYMOUTH FIRE AND AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



1998 is again projected to be a record setting year for the Fire and Ambulance 
Departments in the Town of Plymouth. Combined Ambulance and Fire Activity 
increased 4% over 1997. 

In July we took delivery of a new pumper/tanker. The apparatus replaced our 
1975 Mack fire engine. The new apparatus chassis was manufactured by Freightliner® 
and the body was built by Smeal Corporation® in Snyder, Nebraska. The new appa- 
ratus carries 2,500 gallons of water, has a pumping capacity of 1,500 gallons per 
minute and carries up to five fire fighters in a fully enclosed cab. The change from a 
standard pumper to a pumper/tanker enhances the versatility of our fire fighting capa- 
bilities outside the hydrant district. The apparatus cost just under $200,000.00 and we 
believe that we got a lot of equipment for our money. 

The Ice Storm of 1998 continues to plague our community. Working through the 
Governor's Office of Emergency Management the Highway Department was able to 
acquire funds to clean up much of the roadside damage. The damage back in the 
woods has been very hard on the fire service. In July a very small fire on Tenney 
Mountain, that should have taken 3 personnel 15 minutes to contain and extinguish, 
ended up taking 25 personnel two days to mitigate. The fire fighters had to literally 
cut paths through downed trees to get to the fire and then carry all of their equipment 
and water in on their backs. If it wasn't for the storm damaged trees, the fire never 
would have had the fuel to burn so deep and the personnel would have had unimped- 
ed access. The New Hampshire Department of Economic Development, Forest 
Protection Bureau, understands the severity of this damage and has acquired much 
needed wildland fire fighting equipment for communities should the need arise again 
in the future. 

Major construction projects have kept us busy again this year. Final tests of fire 
protection systems and safety inspections on the newly renovated Lamson Library are 
now completed and an ongoing addition to Speare Memorial Hospital is being close- 
ly monitored. We work very closely with architects, engineers, contractors and own- 
ers to assure that these public buildings are safe for those that visit or work in them. 

The facility housing our operation is inadequate and does not afford us the ameni- 
ties to provide good protection for the community. The Board of Selectmen are cur- 
rently working diligently with myself and other agencies to develop a plan to provide 
adequate facilities at a reasonable and affordable cost. 

The department's efforts to provide a higher level of Emergency Medical Service 
to the citizens is paying off. All of the full time personnel and two on call personnel 
are trained to the EMT Intermediate level and we are regularly providing advanced 
care to our patients in need. As the budget continues to provide the training we will 
continue to increase training to other on call personnel in the department. 

Through hard work and diligent negotiations the Board of Selectmen signed an 
agreement in 1997 with Plymouth State College to provide funding for fire services. 
This funding will increase by $15,000.00 this year to $108,000.00. We will all con- 



43 



tinue to work toward a funding mechanism that is equitable and fair for all. 

I would like to commend the citizens, businesses and government officials for the 
support given to us over the past years. It is only with this support that we can pro- 
tect lives and property in the Town of Plymouth. 

If anyone has any questions or if we can assist you in any way, please contact us 
at your convenience. 

ACTIVITY REPORT 
1998 

Fire Alarm System Malfunctions 24 

Undetermined Cause of Alarm 25 

Unintentional False Alarms 28 

False Alarms 9 

Smoke / Odor Investigations 24 

Automatic Response to Other Communities 13 

Fuel Spills/Leaks 17 

Mutual Aid Fires 20 

Hazardous Conditions 1 

Cooking Fires 25 

Chimney Fires 3 

Structure Fires 15 

Motor Vehicle Fires 16 

Brush and/or Debris Fires 32 

Electrical Problem 9 

Problems with Heating Systems 8 

Service Calls 13 

Miscellaneous Calls 54 

Total Fire 336 

Medical Emergencies 854 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 119 

Medical Transfers 56 

Service Calls 9 

Total Ambulance 1038 

Total Fire & Ambulance Calls 1374 

INCOME 

Ambulance Contracts $104,644.88 

Ambulance Calls $64,825.31 

Oil Burner Permits $630.00 

Misc. Fires $519.25 

Misc. Ambulance $160.00 

Plymouth State College $103,000.00 

Total Income $273,779.44 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Brian J. Thibeault 
Fire Chief 



44 



PLYMOUTH HIGHWAY AND SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENTS 

1998 ANNUAL REPORT 

The past year has been marked by numerous events in both departments. In 
January, the ice storm of '98 caused extensive damage across the northeast which 
Plymouth did not escape. Much of the higher elevations were impacted as trees and 
power lines collapsed under the weight of excessive ice. Plymouth's Highway crew 
was vigilant in keeping the roadways open for travel during the second week of 
January and thus began the long methodical clean-up. In June, the already saturated 
water table was subject to excessive rainfall in a 24 hour period resulting in the 
destruction of six miles of road. The long process toward restoration proved to be a 
major setback and put a halt to any planned improvements during 1998. Federal aid 
for reconstruction was approved in August and to date approximately 85% of the 
restoration has been completed. 

Plymouth's downtown received considerable attention this past year. Beneath the 
new sidewalks, crosswalks and lighting, drainage infrastructure received much need- 
ed reconstruction. Total cost for the project was $1,225 million, with a town match- 
ing portion of $142,000. Simultaneously, the town and the Water & Sewer 
Commission joined in a cooperative project in the reconstruction of Maple and 
Broadway. Final landscaping, overlay and sidewalk rebuild will take place during 
1999. Thurlow, New Hebron and Bartlett Roads are scheduled for improvements dur- 
ing 1999 as well. 

The team of Peter Furmanick and Jimmy Boucher captured the Plow Rally State 
Championship this past June. In October, the team of Chris McCormack and Steve 
Taves captured first place in the Lancaster region. 

While prices for recyclables have been down, the volume of recyclables sold, 
along with revenue, have reached new peaks. At this juncture revenue is approxi- 
mately 20% ahead of FY'98, while volume is up 60% over last year's pace. Nobis 
Engineering has been hired to design construction documents for the landfill closure. 

This past year both departments experienced marked turnover in personnel. At 
the solid Waste Department, Paul Freitas was appointed to the position of Foreman; 
Bill Martin, Andy Kimball and Robert Bain were newly appointed to operator posi- 
tions. Members of the department have done a very good job maintaining the conti- 
nuity of service during this transition. In July, Joseph Fagnant was appointed to the 
position of Highway III and Steve Taves was hired to fill the Highway II vacancy. 

On a sad note, this year also marked the passing of Fred Bennett, a long-time 
employee of the Solid Waste Department. Fred's unique character and strong work 
ethic will be sorely missed. 

Finally, I would like to thank residents of the community who have been most 
supportive of our efforts in both departments. 

Respectfully, 

Richard J. Gonsalves 

Superintendent of Highways and Solid Waste Management 



45 



PLYMOUTH PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 

It was another great year of recreation opportunities for the residents of 
Plymouth. The Plymouth Parks and Recreation Department continues to flourish and 
offer a wide variety of programs, classes, special events, and bus trips for all to par- 
ticipate and enjoy. 

New programs this year included: Toddler Camp offered activities to children 
three years of age giving them a pre-camp experience. Without the assistance of the 
Whole Village facility this program would not have been possible. The seven week 
after school adventure program was offered at the Plymouth Elementary School for 
grades 3-5, Whole Village for grades 1-2, and the Star King Unitarian Fellowship 
Church for grades K - 2. 

Other successful programs that we offered in 1998 included Summer Camp at 
Fox Pond Park. Our program provided children with a daily program of games, 
sports, arts and crafts, creative activities and field trips. Tied in with our summer 
camp program is one of our biggest yearly events - the Senior Citizen Picnic. This 
popular event is held at the Plymouth Regional Senior Center and consists of a lunch 
and show performed by our summer camp participants for seniors, parents, and fam- 
ilies. This year's picnic marked our 15th annual event. Our specialty camps includ- 
ed gymnastics, theater, baseball, football, soccer, and tennis. Other camps we would 
like to offer are field hockey and softball. Aquatic activities included swim lessons, 
swim clinic, family open swim and our swim team known as the White Mountain 
Rapids. Our summer swim team is a very successful program that gives children the 
opportunity to expand on their swimming skills. Thanks to our coaches Kate 
Donahue and Barbara McCahan, and all the parents who work together as a team to 
make this program what it is. Our winter wrestling clinic has developed into a suc- 
cessful program thanks to Coach Randy Cleary and members of the PRHS wrestling 
team. Instructor Gary Strong continues to offer a dedicated Tae Kwon Do program 
on a month to month basis through the entire school year. 

In the spring, the Department received a "Field of Dreams" Grant from True 
Value Hardware. The materials supplied were a part of the 1998 True Value Field of 
Dreams Program which is a cooperative effort of Major League Baseball, True Value 
and local True Value dealers. Steve Rand, of Rand's True Value Hardware, provided 
us with $1500 worth of tools, fertilizer, and supplies for the Plymouth Elementary 
School Ball Fields. 

The Skateboard Ramp was completed in early July. This mini ramp was con- 
structed by Parkitects of Waterville Valley and financed by P.L.A.Y. and Plymouth 
State College. Currently, the ramp is located in the parking lot of the Facilities 
Building at PSC across from D&M Park. Our goal is to eventually have this ramp 
relocated to Fox Pond Park. 

The Plymouth segment of the Heritage Trail was dedicated on August 1, 1998. 
Plymouth's portion of the trail, a 5.6 mile long walking loop with sixteen points of 
interest, was completed through a coordinated effort of the Plymouth Chamber of 
Commerce, the Plymouth Regional Senior Center, Plymouth State College, the Town 
of Plymouth, and the Plymouth Parks and Recreation Department. 



46 



The Department once again sponsored nine Keniston Freeman Summer Concerts 
on the Common. With the assistance of Main Street Plymouth Inc., food vendors 
offered affordable family meals at each concert. These vendors included: 
Biederman's Deli, Subway, Plymouth House of Pizza, Bull and Bier Haus, Shop n' 
Save, Puppy Love Hot Dogs, and Jenron's Pizza. We look forward to continuing and 
building upon this successful event in the future. 

As always, the Department owes a special thanks to the Plymouth Schools and 
the School Administrators and staff who open the school doors and create an envi- 
ronment of cooperation so we can offer the programs we do throughout the year. 
Thanks are also extended to the Plymouth State College PE Center, Holderness 
School, and the Plymouth Regional Senior Center for the use of their facilities. 
Thanks also to the hundreds of volunteers who put in endless hours to help us run such 
a complete recreation program. Thanks are also in order to all recreation staff mem- 
bers full and part-time seasonal. Full time members include: Lisa Fahey-Ash, 
Program Coordinator; Jim Blake, Park Foreman; Jennifer Dobbs, Groundskeeper II; 
and Brian Cottrell, Groundskeeper I. Their positive attitudes and willingness to work 
long hours in order that others may enjoy their leisure time is one of the main reasons 
for our success. 

And finally, thanks to the Recreation Commission and P.L.A.Y. members, Town 
Administrator, and Board of Selectmen for realizing the importance recreation plays 
in the health of a community and supporting our efforts to provide a quality program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Larry J. Gibson 

Director of Parks and Recreation 



47 



PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
TOWN REPORT 1998 



125 years ago, in 1873, fourteen young ladies living in the town of Plymouth 
began to organize a circulating library. They conducted many fundraising events, and 
in 1 874 established their library on Main Street. The library was housed in a second 
floor room supplied by John Langdon, and located over his express office. Within 
three years the collection and patronage had increased so rapidly that larger accom- 
modations became necessary. In 1876 Col. Henry W. Blair purchased the old court- 
house, restored it, moved it to a new location on Court Street, and presented it to the 
Young Ladies Library Association. In the succeeding decades the library continued 
to grow and develop, and to evolve in its management and mission. 

Since 1873, despite the many changes in the library, two constants have 
remained. The library has been in continuous operation, and the Young Ladies 
Library Association has maintained its support of the library. This past November, 
two events were held in celebration of the 125 year history of the library, and the 
Young Ladies Library Association. 

The decade of the 1990s has seen the most significant changes in the library since 
its founding. In 1990, thanks to a bequest from Charlotte Pease, the library was 
moved to a new, modern brick facility within a block of both former locations. In 
September of 1998, the installation of an automated circulation system and card cat- 
alog were completed. This dramatically changed procedures that had been virtually 
identical to those used in 1874. A computer cluster now offers patrons instant access 
to information on the library's holdings, to the internet, to word processing programs, 
and to materials in CD-ROM format. The great challenge of the next decade will be 
to keep pace with rapidly developing technology, which is vastly changing the ways 
libraries provide information. 

We continued to offer a variety of programs in 1998. Storytimes for three, four, 
and five year olds drew capacity attendance. Our summer reading program involved 
hundreds of elementary school children in both weekly programs and reading chal- 
lenges. We are grateful to Heidi Mock, Jan Ahern, Jay Moscowitz, Jeremy Sinaikin 
and MacDonald's for their assistance with summer 1998 programming. 

Monthly adult book discussions were also held, with Mary Rotella leading two 
series. Things Fall Apart discussed five books set in varying countries and detailing 
political and social disintegration. Questioning Technology was a six part series, rais- 
ing questions regarding the benefits and liabilities of the technological age. 
Introduction to the Internet classes walked newcomers to this technology through the 
first steps in learning to use the internet. 

There are many organizations and individuals who contribute to the success of 
the library. Our thanks to: the Plymouth Business and Professional Women's 
Association for providing a pass to the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium in Concord; the 
Fleet Bank for providing a pass to the Science Center of New Hampshire, and to the 
Young Ladies Library Association for its varied support, including the purchase of 
materials. Sight Services for Independent Living has provided a closed circuit televi- 



48 



sion. This device magnifies printed material, and projects the image onto a television 
screen. It is available for use by anyone with visual impairment, regardless of place 
of residence. 

Volunteers donated over 1500 hours in 1998, an invaluable source of assistance. 
Special thanks to Jack Ellard who designed and built tables for our computer cluster, 
in addition to volunteering many hours each week. Thanks also to our other able vol- 
unteers: Pat Andrews, Cheryl Beraudo, Sandra Gaudet, Winnie Hohlt, Stephanie 
Kirkpatrick, Rhoda Mitchell, Charlotte Stevens, and to staff Patricia Hanscomb, 
Deborah Perloff, Sandra Pickel, Ann Pierce, Susan Jarosz, Irene Blake, and Jody 
Randall who assisted with the technology project. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katherine Hillier Michael Carr, Chair, Board of Trustees 

Director Joan Bowers 

Catherine Crane 
Mary Desfosses 
Elsa Turmelle 

Library Hours: 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 10 AM - 8 PM 

Friday- 10 AM to 6 PM 

Saturday 10 AM to 2 PM 



49 



PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY 


1998 




Books on hand January 1, 1998 




Adult 


14,264 


Juvenile 


6,731 


Books added by purchase 




Adult 


442 


Juvenile 


400 


Books added by gift 




Adult 


212 


Juvenile 


147 


Books discarded/lost 




Adult 


(139) 


Juvenile 


(110) 


Books on hand December 31, 1998 




Adult 


14,779 


Juvenile 


7,168 


Audiovisual materials added (by gift and purchase) 


Books on tape 




Adult 


75 


Juvenile 


5 


Videotape 




Adult 


57 


Juvenile 


35 


Materials loaned in 1998 




Adult 


18,215 


Juvenile 


16,394 


Periodicals 


3,785 


Audiovisual 


5,772 


Other 


239 


Interlibrary loans 


362 


Reference questions answered 


5,928 


Interlibrary materials received 


718 


Patron registrations: 




Registrations as of January 1, 1998 




New adult 


170 


New juvenile 


44 


PSC students 


78 


Non-resident, 


293 



20,995 

842 

359 

(249) 

21,947 

172 



44,767 



4,417 



temporary 

Total new registrations 1998 585 

Expired registrations (estimate) (441) 

Total registrations as of December 31, 1998 4,561 



50 



PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

YEAR END REPORT OF ACTIVITY 

JUNE 30, 1998 



Pemigewasset National Bank #28568 
Balance 6/30/1997 

Income 
Gifts 
Fines 

Replaced books 
Grants 
Copier 

Non Resident Fees 
Miscellaneous 



Expenses: 
Programs 
Books 

Audio- Visual materials 
Periodicals 
Computer 
Education 
Office supplies 
Miscellaneous 
Copier 



Balance year end (June 30, 1998) 



$ 9,700.26 


$ 4,345.00 


1,079.34 


1,543.30 


38.00 


912.52 


2,163.00 


719.40 


$ 10,800.56 


$ 1,367.60 


1,86466 


87.85 


168.00 


37.00 


544.00 


135.76 


568.03 


1,140.00 


$ 5,912.90 


$14,587.92 



51 



PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
1998 

INVESTMENTS 
June 30, 1997 - June 30, 1998 



Pemigewasset National Bank 

CD. #1104-226-4 

Balance 6/30/97 $ 1,168.06 

Interest 60.65 

Balance 6/30/98 $ 1,228.71 



Pemigewasset National Bank 

CD. #11086873 

Balance 6/30/97 $ 4,742.74 

Interest 306.87 

Balance 6/30/98 $ 5,049.61 



First New Hampshire Bank 

CD. # 3340180452 (new building fund) 
(formerly # 035018106525) 

Closed 11/29/97 

Balance 6/30/97 $ 4,643.47 

Interest 45.28 

Balance at closing 1 1/29/97 $ 4,688.75 



Pemigewasset National Bank 

CD. 11087095 (Opened 11/29/97) 

Opening balance $ 4,688.75 

Interest 210.52 

Balance 6/30/98 $ 4,899.27 

NH Public Deposit Investment Pool 

#NH 01-0461 

Balance 6/30/97 $22,360.22 

Interest 1,290.08 

Balance 6/30/98 $23,650.30 



52 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN 
FOR FY 2000-FY 2005 



New Hampshire Statutes (RSA 674:5-8) place responsibility for capital planning 
with the town's Planning Board, provided that the Planning Board has adopted a 
Master Plan and that the legislative body at town meeting authorizes the Planning 
Board to proceed. For the Town of Plymouth, a Master Plan was in place by 1987 and 
a vote at the 1987 Town Meeting provided the Planning Board with the authorization 
to develop a Capital Improvements Program (CIP). 

The Planning Board established a Capital Planning Committee (CPC) to for- 
mulate a CIP for their review and final approval. The CPC first receives input pro- 
vided by all of the town departments and meets with various department representa- 
tives. The CPC only considers those items classified as a "capital project," a term 
which is defined for CPC purposes as "a physical public betterment involving a facil- 
ity, parcel of land, or a major piece of equipment with a value exceeding $10,000 and 
occurring no more frequently than every five years." In developing the plan, the CPC 
prioritizes projects based on urgency and need for realization and recommends a time 
sequence for implementation (RSA 674:6) with the overall goal of eliminating major 
year-to-year fluctuations in the capital budget by building on the previous year's plan. 
The resulting CIP, once adopted by the Planning Board, is only a recommended course 
of action to be used by the Advisory Budget Committee and the Board of Selectmen. 

The adopted FY 2000-FY2005 plan attempts to recover from major cuts made 
in last year's capital budget and return the plan to a plateau similar to that level main- 
tained during the FY 1996 through FY 1998 budget years. The main changes in the 
plan include a new item for FY 2000 to address potential Y2K problems with Police 
Department software. A "Conveyor" line was also added to the Solid Waste 
Department section and the plan includes funding that was set aside last year. Another 
item, which the CPC put in the plan for FY01 funding consideration, was a "Cushman 
Police Vehicle" for parking enforcement requested by the Police Department. 
Another new line, "Digitize Tax Maps" was inserted as a capital reserve item starting 
in FY01 at the request of the Selectmen's Office. The Planning Board also broke out 
some of the plan's "Highway Department's Roadway & Drainage" line into a new 
"Highland Street Capital Reserve" line starting in FY01. The rest of the plan is sim- 
ilar to last year's plan with a few adjustments and/or shifts in certain lines based on 
updated inputs and priorities. A few items from last year's plan were eliminated based 
on department suggestions or decisions by the CPC. 

The Planning Board adopted the revised CIP on November 5, 1998. 

James Koermer, Chair, CPC Guy Brissom 

Mark Halloran Merelise O'Connor 

John Tucker Eldwin Wixson 



53 





in 

o 
>■ 

LL 






O 

o 
o 
o 










o 
o 
o 
o 












o 












o 








8 

CO 
<N 










o 
o 
o 
o 
o 




o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
^ , 
o 








o 












00 

T- 


LL 






o 
o 
o 
o 










o 
o 
o 
o 










§ 
m 

N. 
CN 


o 
o 
m 

CN 












o 








o 
o 
"» 

CO 

CM 










o 
o 
o 
o 
o 




o 

o 
o 


o 
o 

o 








o 












C 

o 

"5 
re 
o 
CQ 


CO 

O 
> 
LL 






o 
o 
o 
o 










o 
o 
o 
© 

T- 










o 
o 
m 

CN 


O 

o 
m 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

o 


o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 

o 
o 
co 








o 
o 

CO 
CM 










o 

o 
o 
o 
o 




o 
o 
o 


o 
o 

TI- 
CS 

1^ 

T— 








o 












c 
c 
re 

Q_ 



-C 
*•> 


CN 

O 
>- 
LL 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

en 








o 
o 
o 
m 

CN 










O 
O 

en 

CM 


o 
o 
m 












o 
o 
o 
o 












o 
o 
o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 

CO 
CM 


o 
o 
o 
o 






o 
o 
o 


o 

o 
ft 
o 
o 








o 












>» 
n 

■o 

8 

a. 
o 
•u 
re 


O 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 

o 
o 
o 


O 

o 
o 

CO 


o 
o 

CO 




o 
o 

CN 
W 










o 
o 

lO 

s. 

CN 


o 
o 
in 
r- 

CM 












o 










o 

CT> 

co 




o 
o 

CO 
CM 










o 

CN 

co 








o 












(A 

< 

o 
o 

CM 

> 
LL 


o 
o 

>- 

LL 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 
o 






o 
o 

cn 


o 
o 

W 

w 








o 
o 

o 


O 


o 
o 
o 












o 










o 
co 




o 
o 

CO 

CM 






o 
o 
o 
o 

CN 




o 
m 

CN 
00 








o 












O 
O 

o 
cm 

> 

LL 

1 — ' 

X 






CO 

in 


o 
o 
o 

CD 








JO 








C3> 




o 
o 
o 












o 










o 

c5) 

CO 




o 
o 
o 
o 

CN 










o 








o 


■ 










: 










en 
in 








=5 
O 

>- 
-I 
£L 
LL 


00 




o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

CD 










o 
o 
o 

CO 








o 
o 
o 

CO 




o 

o 

o 

« 












o 








o 
o 
o 

CN 

CN 


o 
o 
o 

CO 














§ 

o 
m 

CO 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 
o 


























O 

z 

1 

LU 


>- 

LL 




m 
5 


o 
o 
o 

CD 










O) 






o 
o 
o 
in 


o 
o 
o 

00 




o 
o 
o 
<o 

00 












o 








o 
o 
o 
in 

CN 


o 
o 
o 

CN 














o 

o 
o 

CO 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 
o 






: " 






o 

LL 

Z 

< 

1 


to 












1 




o 






o 
o 
o 
o 
in 






o 
o 
o 

g 












o 






CD 
CO 
CD 

f- 

CO 


o 
o 
o 
m 
















to 

CO 
00 
CM 

to 








o 


















a. 

i- 
z 

LU 

LU 
> 
O 
OH 

a. 

S 

_i 

Q. 

< 




LU 

< 

0. 
LU 
D 
LU 
O 
-1 

o 

0- 


c 

CD 

E 


O 
CO 
Ql 
& 

E 

& 

to 

>s 

CO 



C 

o 

x: 

1 



£ 


CO 


en 

c 



E 

Q. 

'Z2 

cr 
LU 

.c 
o 

re 

CL 
CO 

a 


c 



E 

03 
O 
CO 

CL 

"- 
**- 

o 
o 


c 

CD 

E 
a» 
o 
co 

CL 



o 

o 

T3 

O 

T3 

C 

5 


CD 
O 

CD 
O 

! 

c 

CO 

E 
-c 
co 

3 

o 


ft 

8 

CO 

o 

00 

1 

o 
O 


re 

o 

t- 

0) 

o 
o 

0- 




LU 
O 
LL 
LL 
O 
W 

z 

LU 

o 

LU 

-1 
LU 
W 


c 
o 

re 

co 

> 

CD 


CD 
T3 
CO 

en 

CL 

D 
E 



to 

>» 

CO 

CL 

E 
o 
O 


s- 

X 

CD 
N 

5> 
Q 


5 

o 

1- 

(A 

c 

0) 

E 

CD 
4) 

w 




0. 
LU 

a 
o 

LU 
C/5 

< 

a. 


CO 
CD 

o 

E 
o 
o 

to 

CD 

K 


o 
o 

re 

"53 

CO 

CO 
DO 


10 

g 

o 

CO 

'c 
c 

CD 

h- 


8 
o 

1- 

d 

CD 

a: 
oa 

to 

L. 

re 

CL 




H 
0. 
LU 

a 

LU 

o 

z 

3 

CO 

< 
oa 

LU 

a. 

LL 


o 

CD 

I— 

LL 


CD 

o 

c 

CO 

E 

CO 

r-~ 

9? 
o 
o> 

<v 
o 

CO 
CL 
CD 

ft 


c 

CD 
CD 

o 
co 

^ 

m 
r- 
CD 

o 

CO 
CL 


cr 


CO 

o 
to 

tu 

CD 

o 
a> 

CD 

o 

CO 
CL 
0) 


CD 

o 

c 

CO 
.Q 

E 

CO 

■<t 

CD 


o 

CO 

8- 


T3 

to 

c 
o 

re 
to 
CD 

iZ 


c 
o 

re 
to 



t_ 
i^- 


o 

CO 
CL 


a: 


o 

L— 

CL 

o 

Q- 

r- 

CO 


o 

CO 

CL 


a: 


d> 

c 



o 

CO 
CO 


o 

CO 

CL 



cr 


re 
o 

t- 

o 
c 
re 

3 

E 

< 

2! 

LL 




>- 

CQ 

_l 


c 
o 

to 
E 
o 
"5 

CO 

c^ 

CO 

_1 


3 
o 

t 

2 

.Q 

I] 













54 





o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 
o 


§ 

o 

CM 




o 
o 
o 
id 






§ 








o 

o 
o 




o 
o 
o 




CM 


o 
o 
o 
o 

CM 








o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

00 

co 
co 






§ 












o 
o 
o 
m 
en 








o 
o 

O 
O 
CO 


o 

CM 


o 

CM 

CO 




© 
CM 

© 
© 








o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


o 

o 
o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 
o 
o 

CM 




o 
o 

o 

IO 






o 
o 
o 








o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 
o 

o 


O 

o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 

o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 
o 
m 






o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
m 

co 






§ 

CM 












© 
o 
in 

CM 








o 
o 
o 
a 

CO 


o 

CD 
CO 

cn 


o 

CD 

co 
© 
oo 




© 
© 

© 
© 
© 








o 

o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

o 

CM 


O 
O 
O 

o 

CM 










o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

CM 
CM 






o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 

"3- 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 

LO 

o 


o 
o 
o 

CM 


o 

o 
o 
o 

CM 










o 
o 
m 
o» 

CD 
CM 






o 

o 
o 

IO 
CO 






o 
o 
o 

CM 
CM 




O 

o 

IO 
CM 


o 
© 
m 
<n 

CO 








o 

o 
o 

tti 

00 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 
© 
© 




© 

r- 
© 
© 
© 








o 
o 
o 
o 
oo 


O 
O 
O 
O 
CM 


O 

o 

o 

m 










o 
o 
o 


O 

O 

o 

CM 
CM 




o 
o 

o 


o 
o 
o 
<* 


o 
o 
o 
-3- 


o 
o 

o 


o 
o 

o 














o 
o 
in 

|x- 
T- 

CM 






o 




o 
o 
o 

CM 
CM 




§ 

o 


O 
O 
IO 
CM 


o 
© 
w 
"t 
co 






O 

o 
o 

m 


o 
o 
o 
m 

CO 


m 
co 

CM 

^* 

CM 


m 

CO 
CM 

CO 




© 

co 

© 
© 

© 








o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

T— 


o 

o 
o 
o 

CM 


o 

o 
o 
o 

CM 










o 
o 
o 


§ 

o 

CM 
CM 




o 
o 

o 


o 


o 
o 
o 


















O 
© 

o 
r-- 
o 

CM 






o 
o 
o 

IO 
CO 








o 
o 

Q 
O 


O 
O 
IO 
CM 


o 
o 
m 






O 

c 
o 

s> 

T— 


o 

o 
o 
m 

CO 


co 

CM 

co 
a> 
co 


co 

CM 

<o 
© 
© 

CM 




<o 

CO 

<o 
© 
© 
© 




© 

CJi 

> 




§ 

o 
IO 

CM 




O 

o 
o 
m 








o 
o 
■M- 

o 


o 


O 

O 

o 

CM 
CM 




o 
o 
o 


o 


o 
o 
o 


















O 

o 

CO 

o 

CM 






o 








o 
o 
o 
o 


O 
O 
IO 
CM 


o 
o 
m 

CM 






o 

o 
o 
in 
r- 


o 

o 
o 
m 

00 


CD 
CM 
co 

m 


© 
CM 

CO 

r- 
co 




© 

CO 
CM 

© 

© 
© 




73 
E 
CO 

© 

>- 
LL, 




o 
o 
o 

in 




o 
o 

o 
o 








o 

o 

o 




1 

CM 


o 
o 
m 




o 




















o 
o- 
en 

CM 

CO 






o 

o 

8 

CM 










8 
•O 
CM 


o 
© 
© 
© 

CM 






o 
o 

o 

f> 


o 
o 

o 

00 


CM 
CD 


CM 

© 
CM 




3 

co 




© 

>- 
LL 

©" 
© 

It 










o 
o 
o 

o 

<N 




o 
o 
o 

m 

CM 




o 

IO 
CM 




o 
o 
m 
o 
























o 
o 
o 

CD 






CM 






o 
o 
o 
tn 

CM 


o 

8 










© 
© 

o 
© 

CO 






O 

o 
o 
tn 


o 
o 
o 
«n 

00 


CO 


1 

CO 




N. 
© 




O 

o 












8 

o 
o 
oo 




o 

8 


o 
o 
o 
o 


O 
U> 
1^ 
CM 

T— 










§ 

o 

T- 
























o 
in 

N. 
CM 
f> 






o 
o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 
o 










© 

© 
o 
o 

CM 






o 
o 
o 
m 
f-> 


o 

8 

m 

CO 


§ 

CM 
CO 

,3 


© 

© 

CM 
© 
© 
CO 




r- 
CM 
CM 
© 
© 




w 
>, 

re 

3 

o 

3 




s 

o 
o 






o 
o 
o 
o 


| 

CM 


O 

to 

IN 








1 
























O 

o 

^ 1 
o 

r~ 






o 
o 

o 
o 


o 
o 

I 










© 

© 
o 

CM 




(0 
CO 

UJ 

D 




o 

:.- 
O 

m 

CO 


s 

CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 

© 

CO 




© 
CO 

© 




u 

CO 

i 

c 
















1 


' 


a. 

LU 
Q 

>■ 

1 

X 

o 

X 


> 

e 

E 

CD 

ov 

CO 

c 
co 
■a 

>v 

CD 

73 
CO 
O 


(0 

CD 

tr 

cL. 

CO 

o 
to 

c 

CO 


c 
a> 

E 

CD 
> 

O 

a. 

E 

CO 

CD 
73 

CO 


Cl 

3 

o 
Cl 
o 

to 

CD 
O 
CO 
Q. 
CD 


x: 
o 

i— 

=5 
Q. 

Id 

ca 
a± 

CD 
O 

CO 

m 

CD 
73 
CO 
O 

_J 


CD 
W 
CO 

-C 

o 

CL 

if) 
CO 

a> 

CD 
CL 
CD 
CD 

CD 


c 
o 

>. 

> 

CD 

sz 
O 

O) 

oo 

CD 
O 

co 

CL 
CD 

tr 


p 

o 

Q 
o 

ZJ 

in 

00 
CD 

o 
co 

CL, 
CD 


CO 

o 

Hi 

1 

-c 
o> 


•s 

1 

CD 
O 
CO 

& 

tr 


CD 

o 
o 

6 

c 
CO 
oo 

r-- 

CD 
O 

co 

CL 
CD 

OH 


o 
o 
o 
r- 
.* 
o 

CJ 

O 

O 
r~- 

00 
CD 

o 

CO 
CL 
CD 

tr 


o 

d 

00 
CD 

o 

CO 

CL 
CD 


o 
.o 
to 
w 

CD 

^ 
o 
ro 

C5 
00 
CD 

o 
co 

CL 
CD 


-a 

CD 

.a 

o 

(3 
in 

00 

CD 

o 

co 

Q. 
CD 

tr 


d 

0) 

CD 
w 

CD 

■o 

00 
00 

CD 
O 
CO 
Q_ 

CD 

0. 


O 
O 

o 
co 

> 
o 

LL 

00 
00 

CD 
O 

CO 

CL 

CD 

tr 


o 
o 

CO 

Cl 

c 
o 

CM 

CD 
O 
CO 

Q- 
CD 

tr 


E 
a) 
"w 
>. 

w 

c 
o 

ro 
c 

CD 

> 

L. 
< 


CD 

E 
o 

"O 
73 

C 
CO 

CO 

to 


o 

>v 

CO 

sz 
en 
!c 
>*— 
o 
c 
o 

TO 
O 
O 
CD 

tr 


2 

G 

f- 

*^ 
& 
CD 

a 

CO 

X 




0. 
LU 

a 

UJ 

w 

1 

_i 
O 
CO 


CD 

w 
o 

o 

T3 

c 

CO 

_1 


c 
o 
'w 

CD 

> 
c 
o 
o 
>» 

o 

CO 

c 

CO 


CD 

•a 

CO 

o 

c 

Cl 
CD 

w 
ca 

o 

00 
CD 

o 

CO 
CL 

0) 

tr 


CD 

co 
o 

c 
D 

CD 

Ifl 

CO 

o 

ex. 

00 

CD 

o 

CO 
Cl 
CD 

tr 


c 
o 

o 
o 

CD 
CD 

CD 
O 
CO 
Cl 
CD 

tr 


1 

o 
o 


3 
o 
i- 
■•-» 

CD 

a 
B 

CO 

73 

O 
CO 




Q 

2 

a 
a 

2 
O 
CD 

CD 

2 

h- 

S5 

X 
LU 


c: 
o 

ro 

CO 

CD 

o 

o 
Cl 

0) 
C3> 
iC 
CO 

.c 

o 

>- 

Ll_ 


73 

C 

o 
tn 

~i 

CO 

o 

> 

o 

cz 

CD 

tr 

TO 

X 
c 

o 

I— 


c 
o 

1 

CO 

© 
Q 

c 
o 
CQ 


in" 

o 

J- 

73 

C 

o 

CQ 

£3> 
C 
'** 
(A 

X 
UJ 




Z 

5 

a, 
-j 
< 

a. 

< 
o 
_j 

O 

1- 




© 

© 

> 

LL 
i 

© 

>- 
LL 

73 

B 

CO 

73 

a, 

3 

ili 
o 

2 



55 



PLANNING BOARD 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



1998 has proven to be an exciting year for the Planning Board. Several site plan 
reviews and proposed changes to the Zoning Ordinance have drawn larger than usual 
crowds to our meetings. The Board welcomed Leslie Mclver as an alternate member 
and said goodbye to departing members Carol Kenneson and Kate Coupe. 

After several years of hard work, the Master Plan update has been completed. The 
Master Plan is an advisory document, but its statement of goals for future develop- 
ment plays a major role in determining the direction that growth and development in 
the Town take in the years to come. Several public meetings and hearings were held 
prior to adoption of the Plan, and many citizens turned out to voice their concerns and 
opinions. 

Construction of new sidewalks and drainage improvements in the downtown 
began in the summer and was completed in early December. These improvements 
were funded by federal ISTEA funds, State Aid for Reconstruction funds, and local 
funds. In addition to the sidewalk and drainage improvements, brick crosswalks and 
sidewalk edging were introduced, enhancing the aesthetics of the downtown area. 
Pear trees and attractive lamp posts were added along Main Street. 

The south end of Main Street saw further change with the construction of the new 
Rite Aid. Approval for the project was received in 1997, but construction did not begin 
until this summer. The construction crew was able to continue working into December 
due to the unseasonably mild weather this fall, thus completing the project. The raz- 
ing of the former Rite Aid building has given pedestrians and travelers a new gateway 
as they arrive at south Main Street. Coupled with the landscaping and signage rec- 
ommended by the Planning Board, the new Rite Aid is an attractive anchor for south- 
ern Main Street. 

During the course of the year, the Planning Board reviewed 15 site plans, 3 lot 
line adjustments, 3 subdivisions, and took part in a number of conceptual reviews. 
Most notable among these is the current site plan review of the proposed Wal*Mart 
on Tenney Mountain Highway. The residents of Plymouth and surrounding towns 
have come out in record numbers to voice their concerns or support for this proposal. 
The review of this application will continue into 1999, with everyone eagerly await- 
ing the outcome. It has proven to be both exciting and exhausting for everyone 
involved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane Blaine, Chair Carolyn Kent, Vice-Chairman 

Tim Daigneault Dave Switzer 

Bill Houle Thomas Croasdale 

James Koermer Leslie Mclver, Alternate 

Stuart Wallace, Alternate 



56 



PLYMOUTH MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



On September 1, 1998, 1 assumed the duties of Airport Manager and conducted a 
survey of the facility to assess what actions needed to be accomplished. I established 
a priority list of the things that I had identified as immediate action items. Those items 
were the repair of broken glass in the Terminal Building, clean-up debris around both 
buildings and the perimeter of the airfield. 

A second list of action items was identified that addressed those items that were 
of a longer time frame and these are: 

1 . Developed a plan to remove a fuel storage tank on the property to bring the 
Town into conformance with State regulations regarding aging fuel storage facilities. 

2. Began clearing brush on the right side of the taxiway from the hanger in a west- 
erly direction. This is needed to allow taxing aircraft adequate clearance from aircraft 
landing on runway 30. Brush was removed from the windsock and Segmented Circle 
area to allow better visibility of both from the air. 

3. Inspected the drainage system on the westerly end of the airfield and developed 
a plan to repair it. 

To date, $1837.50 has been collected in fees from hanger rental, tie-downs and 
land rental. I am developing a plan to establish additional user fees for persons using 
the airport property but not permanently based on the property. 

I am optimistic that I will be able to attract more users to the airport. Specifically, 
negotiations are underway with the Franconia Soaring Club to bring them to 
Plymouth Airport. This has the potential to bring 8-10 aircraft to our facility and gen- 
erate upwards of an additional $1500/2000 in fee revenue. 

I am working with the Airport Study Committee in developing a plan to construct 
additional hanger space at the airport. Hanger space is the number one revenue gen- 
erator and attraction at any small airport and the Committee has presented a proposal 
that has the potential to build several hangers at no cost to the taxpayer. 

Given the tax environment we all have to live with in Plymouth I will be empha- 
sizing the use of volunteer labor drawn from the user base to accomplish several other 
tasks. 

Respectfully submitted by: 

Peter C. LeBlanc 

Manager, Plymouth Municipal Airport 



57 



CEMETERY TRUSTEES 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



At the annual Town Meeting in 1997, the voters approved the Board of Selectmen 
stepping down as Trustees of Plymouth's cemeteries. There will be three residents 
on the ballot this year to assume those responsibilities. Each year a new trustee will 
be on the ballot for a period of three years. 

This year at Riverside Cemetery the following was accomplished: 

•A 14'x28' wood frame building was erected from boards salvaged from the 
removal of the old pine trees. The project was designed and erected by the 
PRHS Building Trades students. The building houses the cemetery truck and 
burial equipment. 

• An area in the southeast corner of Riverside was cleared of trees and shrubs to 
be used as Division VI, the last of the expansion program. 

The headstone cleaning program starts May 1999 and will continue under a five 
year program. 

We welcome suggestions in order to improve the appearance of our community 
cemeteries. Please contact the Cemetery Sexton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Board of Selectmen/Cemetery Trustees 



58 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



Since the last report to the Town, Chair Rob Pike has stepped down after putting 
in a lot of time on behalf of the of the Commission and the Town. Thanks to his 
efforts and those of a number of volunteers, the Sutherland Trail up Plymouth 
Mountain is now accessible having been obliterated by "the Great Ice Storm". The 
Commission will also miss other members who have put in time and effort: Lea 
Stewart and Jim Mayhew. With these membership changes in effect, we seek replace- 
ments. Those interested in serving on the Commission should send a letter to the 
Office of the Selectmen. 



Dave Switzer, Acting Chair 

Members: 

Gisela Estes 

Jim Lurie 

Neil Mclver 

Jack McCormack, Alternate 



59 



PLYMOUTH HEALTH OFFICER 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



1998 was my first full year as Health Officer. The basic responsibilities include 
protecting the environment, workplaces, housing, food and water. 

My role as Health Officer has given me great opportunities to work with many- 
levels of town management. From the Selectmen. Town Administrator and Planner to 
the Police and Fire Departments, resources at the State of XH Level have also been 
professional and a pleasure to work with. PSC and the taxpayers of Plymouth have 
been a great pleasure to work with as well. 

In 1998 I spent time participating in a variety of committees and diverse groups. 
In no particular order. I could be found at College/Community Council meetings. 
Highway/Safety Committee meetings. Housing Standards, and State of XH Health 
Officer Team Building meetings. 

I will summarize the Health Officers responsibilities in a list for you and place 
beside it a number reflecting the frequency I responded to such calls in 1998 (through 
Thanksgiving). I strongly encourage you to look at how you handle opportunities 
with you neighbor, tenant, landlord, or even yourself. Then try to deal with issues pro- 
fessionally and respectfully. "THE EARTH MATTERS'". ""Be careful and be safe." I 
strongly encourage you to call me with any questions or concerns that you are unsure 
of or can't handle. 

CEMETERIES (1) 

CHILD DAYCARE LICENSING / HOME INSPECTIONS (6) 

FOSTER CARE HOME INSPECTIONS 1 2 1 
PUBLIC / PRIVATE SCHOOL INSPECTIONS (3) 
TRASH COMPLAINTS - RESIDENCE (12) BUSINESS (3) 
NUISANCE COMPLAINTS (2) 
RESTAURANT COMPLAINTS (3) 
WATER QUALITY (SWIMMING POOL | ( 1 1 
BUILDING STRUCTURE COMPLAINTS (3) 
SEWAGE COMPLAINTS / FAILED SYSTEMS (7) 
GEXERAL PUBLIC SERVICE CORRESPONDENCE (20+) 

Feel free to call about smoking, radon, rabies, noise. Etc. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Jeff Kelly 
Health Officer 



60 



REPORT TO THE CITIZENS OF DISTRICT ONE 
BY RAYMOND S. BURTON, COUNCILOR 

As one of your elected officials, I am honored to report to you as a member of the 
New Hampshire Executive Council. This five member elected body acts much like a 
board of directors of your New Hampshire State Government in the Executive 
Branch. 

In my twentieth year representing this District with 98 towns and four cities, there 
are many changes I've seen and been a part of in the past. My focus in this report to 
you is toward the future and some suggestions on how you as citizens might be 
encouraged to participate in the future. 

The following are some ideas and suggestions. The Governor and Council have 
a constitutional and lawful duty to fill dozens of boards and commissions with volun- 
teer citizens. If you are interested in serving on one or more of these volunteer posts, 
please send me your resume at the State House and I'll see that it is passed on to Kathy 
Goode, Governor Shaheen's liaison to the Executive Council, or you may wish to send 
them directly to the Governor's Office, State House, 107 North Main Street, Concord, 
NH 03301 

Other resources available to your town/city/county include 10 million dollars 
($10,000,000) through the Community Development Block Grant program at the 
Office of State Planning. Call Jeff Taylor at 271-2155 to see if your town or area 
qualifies. 

Annually there is available some 10 million dollars ($10,000,000) available 
through the New Hampshire Attorney General's Office for innovative programs for 
drug and law enforcement, stress programs dealing with youth at risk, assistance to 
victims, and special programs for victims of domestic violence. For information call 
Mark Thompson at 271-3658. 

Communities may request assistance through the NH National Guard Army, 
General John Blair's Office, for services such as a Drug Detection Dog, Community 
Presentations on Drug Demand Education and Career Direction Workshops. 
Telephone number is 225-1200. 

The Office of Emergency Management at telephone number 1-800-852-3792 is 
the proper call when an emergency develops in your area such as floods, high winds, 
oil spills and ice jams. 

State and Federal Surplus items may be purchased at minimum cost. Call Art 
Haeussler at 271-2602 for a list and newsletter. 

In New Hampshire Correctional Industries, there are many products and ser- 
vices of use to towns, cities and counties such as street signs, vehicle decals, printing, 
car repair, furniture and data entry services, including webb page development, call 
Peter McDonald at 271-1875 

People and businesses looking for work - vocational rehabilitation, job training 
programs should call NH Employment Security at 1-800-852-3400 

NH Department of Environmental Services has available 20% grants for 
water/waste water projects and landfill closure projects, revolving loans for 
water/waste water and landfill closure, and also money for Household Waste 
Collection days call 271-2905. State Revolving Loans has available around 35 to 50 



61 



million dollars ($35,000,000 to $50,000,000) per year. For information call 271-3505. 

Oil Funds - There are five petroleum funds which cover: oil spill cleanup and 
emergency response; reimbursement for cleanup by owners of: motor fuel under- 
ground and above ground tanks; heating oil facilities (primary home owners); and, 
motor oil storage facilities (service stations and automobile dealers). For information 
call 271-3644. Further, there is a municipal grant fund for construction of used oil col- 
lection facilities and operator training. For information call 271-2942. 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Days - Annual grants to cities and 
towns for collection of household hazardous waste provide dollar for dollar matching 
funds up to a total of 50% of the costs incurred. For further information call 271-2047. 

NH Health & Human Services Department has numerous divisions, providing 
a variety of services and assistance ... mental health, public health, children and youth, 
etc. All of these may be obtained by calling 1-800-852-3345. 

All of your New Hampshire State Government can be accessed by the 
general phone number at 271-1110 and through the State Webster Internet 
http://www.state.nh.us. Your New Hampshire Government is at your service, 
please call my office anytime I can be of help. (271-3632 and 
e-mail: rburton(a) gov.state.nh.us) 



62 



REPORT OF TOWN FOREST FIRE WARDEN 
AND STATE FOREST RANGER 



To aid your Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department and State Forest Ranger, con- 
tact your local Warden or Fire Department to find out if a permit is required before 
doing ANY outside burning. Violations of RSA 227-L:17, the fire permit law and the 
other burning laws of the State of New Hampshire are misdemeanors punishable by 
fines of up to $2,000 and/or a year in jail. Violators are also liable for all fire sup- 
pression costs. 

There are ten Forest Rangers who work for the New Hampshire Division of 
Forests and Lands, Forest Protection Bureau. State Forest Rangers are available to 
assist communities with forest fire suppression, prevention and training programs as 
well as the enforcement of forest fire and timber harvest laws. If you have any ques- 
tions regarding forest fire or timber harvest laws, please call our office at 271-2217. 

There are 2400 Forest Fire Wardens and Deputy Forest Fire Wardens throughout 
the state. Each town has a Forest Fire Warden and several Deputy Wardens who assist 
the Forest Rangers with forest fire suppression, prevention, and law enforcement. 
Early in 1998 we experienced an ice storm, which caused severe damage to forests of 
New Hampshire. This damage created a greater potential fire hazard as well as safety 
hazards to many areas of the state. Your local fire warden and Forest Rangers need 
your assistance in preventing wildfires in these hard hit areas and throughout the 
State. If you need assistance or information dealing with ice damaged woodlands, 
please call 1-800-444-8978. 

The State of New Hampshire operates 15 fire towers, 2 mobile patrols and 3 con- 
tract aircraft patrols. This early detection and reports from citizens aid in the quick 
response from local fire departments. This is a critical factor in controlling the size of 
wildland fires and keeping the loss of property and suppression costs as low as possible. 

1998 FIRE STATISTICS 

(All Fires Reported thru December 23, 1998) 

FIRES REPORTED BY COUNTY CAUSES OF FIRES REPORTED 



Belknap 


44 


Smoking 


59 


Carroll 


89 


Debris Burning 


38 


Cheshire 


67 


Campfire 


29 


Coos 


18 


Power Line 


14 


Grafton 


43 


Railroad 


9 


Hillsborough 


232 


Equipment Use 


24 


Merrimack 


108 


Lightning 


16 


Rockingham 


121 


Children 


95 


Strafford 


64 


OHRV 


6 


Sullivan 


12 


Miscellaneous 


53 






Unknown 


140 






Fireworks 


6 






Arson/Suspicious 


16 






Illegal 


231 


TOTAL FIRES 


798 


Rekindle 


43 


TOTAL ACRES 


442.86 


Disposal of ashes 


19 



63 



PLYMOUTH COMMUNITY CHANNEL 3 COMMITTEE 
1998 ANNUAL REPORT 

Plymouth Community Channel 3 (PCC3) is the public, educational, and govern- 
mental access channel for Frontier Vision Partners' subscribers in Plymouth and sev- 
eral adjoining towns. The PCC3 Committee, inactive for a number of years, reports to 
the Plymouth Board of Selectmen. PCC3's Cablecasting Center is located at Pease 
Public Library. The Center has an Amiga computer for generating a continuously 
repeating, electronic bulletin board with accompanying radio programming. There is 
equipment for automated airing of prerecorded video programs submitted by mem- 
bers of the Plymouth public, schools/college, and government. The Center also has 
an S-VHS video camcorder and mike for taping governmental and other programming 
for cablecast on Channel 3. The channel has no set operating budget. However, the 
Plymouth Board of Selectmen and FrontierVision Partners did cover the cost of pur- 
chasing some replacement hardware and other miscellaneous items needed by the 
Channel in 1998. PCC3 depends totally on volunteers to create and run its program- 
ming. By stipulation of the franchise agreement with FrontierVision Partners, PCC3 
is non-commercial. 

In calendar 1998 through December 15th, 265 new messages were run on PCC3's 
bulletin board. This is down 22% from the 339 run in 1997. The drop can be attrib- 
uted to the decrease in volunteers to a single person to enter messages into the com- 
puter. Over 450 more messages were received, but were not run. 

In calendar 1998 through December 15th, prerecorded video programming 
totaled 169 shows. This is a 63% increase over 1997's total of 107. The numbers of 
program contributions from each of the 3 categories of access users are: Public — 42, 
Educational — 118, and Governmental — 9. For the third year in a row, the access 
user submitting the greatest number of taped programs was PSC's Meteorology Dept. 
Their 6-minute, PSC PM WEATHER local forecasts ran on 115 evenings. The pro- 
gram producer who submitted the second largest number of programs was Public 
Access User Jerry Larson. Jerry contributed 37 Sunday services of the Plymouth 
Congregational Church. Two consecutive evenings of live programming were pro- 
duced by the Plymouth Chamber of Commerce. These shows were the Chamber's 
TV/radio auction, their major annual fund raiser. 

PCC3 volunteers who deserve many thanks are John B. Bowen, Jr. and Ken 
MacDonald. The staffs of Pease Public Library, Plymouth Selectmen's Office, and 
FrontierVision Partners were always most helpful. 

Submitted by 

Wallace Stuart 
Access Manager 



64 



GRAFTON COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS COUNCIL, INC. 
ANNUAL REPORT 1998 



Grafton County Senior Citizens Council, Inc. works through its local programs to 
support the health and well being of our older citizens and to assist them to remain 
independent in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. Through 
eight locations throughout the County, including Plymouth, Bristol, Canaan, Lebanon, 
Orford, Haverhill, Littleton and Lincoln, older adults and their families are able to 
obtain community based long term care services such as home delivered meals, senior 
dining room programs, transportation, social work services, information and referral, 
health and educational programs, adult day care, recreation and opportunities to be of 
service to the community through volunteering. 

During 1997, 448 older residents of Plymouth were able to make use of one or 
more of GCSCC's services, offered through the Plymouth Regional Senior Center. 
These individuals enjoyed 3,778 balanced meals in the company of friends in a senior 
dining room, received 6,286 hot, nourishing meals delivered to their homes by caring 
volunteers, were transported to health care providers or other community resources on 
2,297 occasions by our lift-equipped buses, were helped through 868 visits by a 
trained social worker and found opportunities to put their talents and skills to work for 
a better community through 4,940 hours of volunteer service, the cost to provide these 
services for Plymouth residents in 1997 was $76,476.00. 

The Plymouth Regional Senior Center celebrated its 5th anniversary in October, 
1988. During the past 5 years, the center has become a resource for community resi- 
dents of all ages, hosting parties, arts and crafts festivals, railroad events, as well as 
many health and human service programs. This year, also, the center initiated a 
chore/home repair program for elders, designed to assist them to maintain their homes 
in a safe and comfortable condition. PRSC volunteers, Bob and Jean Bergeron were 
honored by Governor Shaheen, in September, as recipients of the Vaughan Award for 
Grafton County, and another PRSC volunteer, Mary Ruel, was presented with the 
Ageless Hero award for her many contributions to the community. A woodworking 
shop was established in an auxiliary building, to teach skills to disabled adults and to 
serve as a resource for center participants. 

Community based services provided by GCSCC and its many volunteers for 
older residents of Plymouth were often important to their efforts to remain in their 
own homes and out of institutional care despite chronic health problems and increas- 
ing physical frailty, saving tax dollars and contributing to the quality of life of our 
older friends and neighbors. 

GCSCC very much appreciates the support of the Plymouth community for ser- 
vices which enhance the independence and dignity of our older citizens and assists 
them to meet the challenges of aging in place. 



Carol Dustin 
Executive Director 



65 



MAIN STREET PLYMOUTH, INC. 
1998 TOWN MEETING ANNUAL REPORT 



The Town of Plymouth is now an official Main Street Community! In June of 
1998, Downtown 2000 became Main Street Plymouth, Inc., an independent non-prof- 
it organization dedicated to preserving the unique heart of the community with an 
emphasis on special events, enhanced design, an improved business mix, and the 
coordination and cooperation among local entities. Additionally, Main Street 
Plymouth, Inc., encourages local economic and community development efforts to 
strengthen the educational, cultural, recreational, and business base while retaining a 
friendly, small-town atmosphere. 

The past year has been an extremely busy one with a variety of programs and pro- 
jects established to revitalize downtown and enhance the community. The following 
is a short list of our accomplishments and ongoing projects. 

November 1998 Design Charette - Downtown Master Plan 

Downtown Discovery Tour, Main Street Treasure Hunt 

Arts on Main Street Promotions and arts-based economic development projects 

Monthly Calendar of Events 

Main Street Banners, Flowers, Holiday Decorations, Window Decorations 

"Things To Do In Plymouth" Brochure 

Summer Concert Series Cooperative Promotions & Food Vendors 

Information Kiosk Downtown 

Business Visitation Program 

Consumer and Business Surveys and Student Focus Groups 

Plymouth State College, Holderness School, Plymouth Regional High School, 

and Plymouth Elementary School educational programs and projects 

Welcome Signs on Main Street 

Towers of Plymouth Lighting Design 

Community Renaissance Storefront Rehabilitation Program 

Business Recruitment & Expansion assistance - 11 new businesses on Main 

Street and 36 new jobs, with $2,360,200 in private investment 

School to Work Partnerships 

Local History - Heritage Trail Promotions Display 

Community Event Partnerships- Christmas parade, Art Show, upcoming May 

Day Festival 

Riverfront Park Improvements & Canoe Launch 

Small Business Enhancement Guide 

Over the next year we will continue to work with the New Hampshire DOT to 
design a new Holderness-Plymouth Bridge that reflects the character of the community. 
We will also continue to implement exciting development projects that will strengthen 
the tax base and draw more visitors into the community. Downtown will continue to 
improve and can only benefit from increased commercial activity in the region. 

Main Street Plymouth, Inc., relies on the talents of many to ensure its future suc- 
cess. Please do not hesitate to contact the Main Street office to volunteer or to offer 
your suggestions or comments. Feel the positive changes taking place in the heart of 
our community and be a part of it all! 



66 



NORTH COUNTRY COUNCIL 
1998 PLYMOUTH TOWN REPORT 



In 1998, North Country Council supported Plymouth on several projects. A pro- 
posal has been developed to fund an arts based downtown - economic development ini- 
tiative and cultural resources plan. The proposal was submitted to EDA for funding. 
We secured a foundation grant for the town to pay for a downtown design - visioning 
effort. We began the process of evaluating the fairground site with a local committee. 
NCC worked with the sewer department on sewer line relocation as part of the 
NHDOT downtown road reconstruction. We also provided assistance to the town on 
roadway and drainage issues. We also have been working with the town seeking fund- 
ing for water line extension on Tenney Mountain Highway. The Council also provid- 
ed engineering, planning and traffic review services to the Planning Board for the pro- 
posed WalMart. We also continue to provide support to the Solid Waste District. 

In 25 years of service we recall working with the 279 various boards in the region 
on more than 1300 projects. We have seen extraordinary changes in the last 25 years. 
In 1973, a first class stamp was 8 cents. We had rotary dial phones that required only 
4 digits to make a local call. Our vehicles had CBs, not cell phones. A few of us had 
photocopiers, but a lot of people still typed carbons on typewriters. No one had com- 
puters. A hand held calculator was a $100 marvel. And a fax machine was a futuris- 
tic daydream. Hundreds worked in shoe factories. Employees at the paper mill in 
Lincoln outnumbered workers at Loon Mountain by a factor of five. A job at a bank 
was a job for life, those bank made loans on a handshake. Ski areas prayed for nat- 
ural snow, it was the only way they could operate. From Plymouth to Pittsburg there 
were 5 traffic lights, and forget about gas or coffee north of exit 23 on 1-93 after 9 p.m. 

Since 1973, we have seen legislative and regulatory change in banking, energy, 
trade, environment, labor relations, safety, transportation and health care. The impact 
of these actions on our communities has been drastic. Old jobs vanished and new ones 
emerged. In this environment, the Council helped 40 towns write master plans to 
encourage growth, limit development or just to help them get a hold of their destiny. 

We are not the same organization we were in 1973. As your needs have changed 
we have changed with you. We still fight for our share of road upgrades and improve- 
ments but now we also seek byways that enhance cultural assets and showcase local 
landscapes. We still seek water and sewer improvement but now we also seek 
telecommunication improvement. Changing times summon new responses. 

Twenty-five years has left us with a rich legacy. We have an expert staff. Half our 
staff are North Country natives, the other half have lived here half their lives. We have 
solid connections with agencies in Concord and Washington that can equip the region 
for a changing future. We have learned to seek incremental improvement by educat- 
ing, sharing information, evaluating possibilities, holding forums, providing technical 
assistance and obtaining funds. The last quarter century has also bestowed on us the 
modern technology to accomplish these tasks and serve you more efficiently and effec- 
tively. This legacy is the promise of another 25 years of service and leadership. 



Sincerely, 
Preston S. Gilbert 
Executive Director 



67 



PEMI-BAKER HOME HEALTH 
AN AGENCY REVIEW: 1998 



Home care has been an American tradition for more than a century. Home care 
improves our society's quality of life by enabling individuals to stay in the comfort 
and security of their own homes during times of illness, disability, and recuperation. 
Home care maintains the person's dignity and independence. 

Pemi-Baker Home Health, as your local not-for-profit home care agency, contin- 
ues to reach out to the public by informing and educating our communities through 
our agency newsletter, local news articles, and fundraising efforts. Internally, agency 
employees stay informed about the latest healthcare issues and clinical developments 
through staff development and continuing education. By the end of this year, our 
Clinical Coordinator, Elaine Vieria, will receive her Bachelors in Healthcare 
Administration and our Executive Director, Margaret Terrasi, will receive her 
Master's in Management. 

Pemi-Baker Home Health Agency has had a year of substantial changes in the 
arena of healthcare in general. Perhaps the biggest change, and one that stands to 
jeopardize many agencies and their ability to continue serving the nation's 37 million 
Medicare beneficiaries, is the Interim Payment System. Under IPS, as it is called, per- 
beneficiary cost limits are used (instead of the traditional per visit/fee for service reim- 
bursement)-based on an agency's 1994 cost figures-which are well below today's 
higher actual cost of care. The effects of the new payment system have hit both home 
care providers and patients alike. In a recent study it was revealed that 92% of agen- 
cies have cost well above the cost limits and will have great difficulty in maintaining 
their agencies within the new guidelines. 

Indeed, it has been a challenging year. At a time when agencies are struggling to 
find the perfect "fit" between the newly defined home care benefit, a new reimburse- 
ment system and ongoing patient needs, agencies continue to be restricted by other 
mandates in the form of additional paperwork requirements. In the name of quality 
care, patient satisfaction and outcome based results, agencies are trying very hard to 
balance what little time is left for caring for the patient with bureaucratic requirements 
that force costs to escalate. As reimbursement avenues are cut or restricted, agencies 
must become even more innovative with the services they offer to those in need. 

This agency has been able to maintain its own against forces that seem to be clos- 
ing in on many in the healthcare field. With fortitude, insight, and a proactive 
approach to continuing our home care business, Pemi-Baker Home Health expects to 
ride out the "ups and downs" of the uncertain and unsettled health care environment. 
Our pledge is to take care of our patients in the same community focused manner we 
have achieved for the past thirty-two years. We thank our employees, our board and 
our towns for their support of what we believe in and what we do. 



Deborah R. Reynolds 

Esq, Board of Directors/Plymouth Representative 



68 



PEMI-BAKER YOUTH & FAMILY SERVICES COUNCIL, INC. 

1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



The Council is an organization dedicated to promoting community-wide 
approaches which support the development of healthy youths and their families. The 
Council currently coordinates five programs which are available to people in Eastern 
Grafton County: 

1. Juvenile Court Diversion - a voluntary program for first-time juvenile offend- 
ers which holds them accountable for their actions. Volunteers from the community 
develop a contract with each youth and family. Contracts may include community ser- 
vice, referrals to other agencies and programs, personal development tasks, etc. We 
have found that, of the youths who graduated from Diversion in 1996 and 1997, 92% 
have not committed a subsequent offense since, saving tens of thousands of dollars in 
court-ordered services. 

2. OSS (Opportunities for Suspended Students) - This program works with stu- 
dents and families from Plymouth Regional High School who are at-risk of losing course 
credit due to repeated suspensions. This community -based approach connects families to 
services in the region which help the students and families develop their strengths. 

3. The Challenge Course - a 15-hour early intervention program for teens which 
focuses on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Courses are non-judgmental and confi- 
dential. Teens in the small groups are asked to assess their relationships with these 
substances and learn what they can do to reduce their use or stop using entirely. Of 
all the youths who successfully completed the program in 1996 and 1997, not one, 
0%, has re-offended. 

4. OCTAA (On Campus Talking About Alcohol & Other Drugs) - offered in 
cooperation with local police departments and Plymouth State College, OCTAA pro- 
vides an effective educational opportunity for anyone between the ages of 18-21. This 
is also a lifetime risk-reduction program on the use and abuse of drugs. 

5. Information and Referral - provides area residents with a clearinghouse of 
information on regional human service agencies and programs. People with a variety 
of needs can receive free and confidential assistance on how to access these resources. 
Callers ask how to report child abuse, how to access public assistance or counseling 
services, where to find after-school activities for children, etc. The Council distrib- 
uted nearly 2000 comprehensive Grafton County Resource Guides in 1998 to help 
towns, police, schools and other human service providers find services for the people 
they work with. 

Total service figures for the Council in calendar year 1998 are as follows: 

Juvenile Court Diversion 36 

OSS Program (no summer referrals) 16 

Challenge Course 42 

Information and Referral calls and visits 208 

Grafton County Resource Guides 2000 

OCTAA (no summer course) 96 

Respectfully submitted, 

Steven P. Bradley 
Executive Director 



69 



TRI COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION 
1998 COMMUNITY CONTACT REPORT TO THE TOWN OF PLYMOUTH 

Tri-County Community Action Program is a private, non-profit agency that is 
requesting, at your 1999 Town Meeting, $3,000 in funding to help support its 
Community Contact Program. Community Contact has provided services for 634 of 
Plymouth's citizens, processed 132 fuel assistance applications, 48 being elderly and 
46 being handicapped and 393 other Community Action Programs. 

Tri-County Community Action has spent $43,602.90 on Plymouth citizens 
between July 1, 1997 and July 1, 1998. 

Community Contact provides necessary services for the less fortunate citizens in 
our communities. We are depending upon funding from your town and neighboring 
communities county wide. The local funds are combined with the Community 
Services Block Grant, Fuel Assistance and NH Emergency Shelter Grant, Homeless 
Programs and FEMA. We also are the conduit through which the USDA Surplus Food 
gets distributed to the food pantries throughout Grafton County in order to serve our 
residents. 

We have greatly appreciated your support and cooperation in the past and look 
forward to continuing our partnership to provide essential services to your residents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cecilia Vistica 

Grafton County 

Community Contact Manager 



70 



UNH COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 
GRAFTON COUNTY-1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



UNH Cooperative Extension is a unique partnership among the Federal, State and 
County Governments. They provide the funding and support for this major educa- 
tional outreach component of the University of New Hampshire with an Extension 
Office in each New Hampshire county and campus-based subject matter specialists 
who serve the whole state. 

Here in Grafton County the office is located on Route 10 in North Haverhill in 
the Grafton County Courthouse. We are open from 8 AM until 4 PM Monday through 
Friday. 

Our education programs are designed to respond to the local needs of county res- 
idents through the direction and support of an advisory council from throughout the 
county. We are currently focusing our efforts on: 

► Dairy and Pasture Management 

► Agriculture Profitability and Nutrient Management 

► Forest & Wildlife Habitat Management and Stewardship 

► Nutrition, Food Safety, Parenting and Family Financial Management 

► Positive Youth Development 

► Water Quality Education 

► Improving Community Decision Making 

► After-School Programs 

Here are ways that residents in the town of Plymouth benefited from UNH 
Cooperative Extension during the past year... Received the bi-monthly newsletter 
Extension Connection; parents received the monthly newsletters Cradle Crier and 
Toddler Tales chronicling their child's development; a local dairy /produce farm 
received visits and management information; residents had their home and garden 
soils analyzed with recommendations for productive use; home lawn and consumer 
calls; a multi-week parent education series on adolescence was held; nutrition educa- 
tion classes are ongoing through the EFNEP program housed at the Whole Village 
Family Resource Center; forestry management tours for high school students; finan- 
cial education programs targeting the needs of senior citizens were held; nutrition cur- 
riculum classes were held at the Elementary School; families received home based 
nutrition education; and there were financial workshops at the homeless shelter. 

You can reach us: by phone — 787-6944; fax-787-2009; email: cegrafton@unhce.enh.edu; 
at our office in North Haverhill; or through our UNHCE Web site http://ceinfo.unh.edu. 

We see our job to provide residents of Grafton County with the education and 
information they need to make informed decisions that strengthen youth and families, 
sustain natural resources and improve the economy. 

Respectfully submitted 

Deborah B. Maes, Extension Educator and County Office Administrator 



71 



PLYMOUTH FAMILIES AND CHILDREN SERVED BY 

WHOLE VILLAGE PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM 

OCTOBER 1, 1996-NOVEMBER 1, 1998 

On October 1, 1996 Whole Village Parent-Child Program opened its doors to pro- 
vide programs to families with young children in the 17 towns of the Plymouth 
District Court area, New Hampton, and Sandwich. The program was established in 
response to needs identified by the Plymouth Ad Hoc Committee on Youth At-Risk to 
support families with young children. 

The Whole Village Parent-Child Program works in partnership with families to 
provide support to parents so that they can meet the challenges of raising safe, healthy 
children who will thrive. We are a program of Whole Village Family Resource 
Center, a nonprofit collaborative of 13 health, education, and social service agencies. 
Whole Village is located at 258 Highland Street. Plymouth, NH. 

Of the 275 families served by Whole Village Parent-Child Program between 
October 1996 and November 1998, 74 of the families reside in Plymouth 



Total # of Plymouth 
Families Served (# of 
parents under 21 years old) 


# Children 5 years old 
and under 


# Children over 5 years old 


74 (14) 


81 


32 



Parent-Child Program activities include: 

♦ Weekly Play & Learn Group 

♦ On-site respite child care for children while their parents visit Whole 
Village 

♦ Welcome Baby! newborn home visits 

♦ Monthly Family Fun Events 

♦ Parent Support Groups 

♦ Special topic parenting series 

♦ Information and Referral 

♦ Intensive Support Program for Teen Parents: 

■ GED preparation course for parents (child care and 
transportation provided) 

■ Family support visits for young parents 

■ Transportation to medical appointments 

■ Great Beginnings (nutrition program) through UNH 
Cooperative Extension 

■ Expanded Food and Nutrition Education (EFNEP) 
Program 



72 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MINUTES FOR THE 1998 ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE TOWN OF PLYMOUTH 

A legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Plymouth, NH was held in the 
Plymouth Elementary School on Tuesday, March 10, 1998. The meeting was opened 
at 8:00 o'clock in the forenoon by the Moderator, Robert B. Clay, reading from the 
1998 Town Meeting Warrant. Moderator Clay read Articles 1 through 7 of the 
Warrant which were to be voted upon by printed ballot during the voting hours 8:00 
AM through 7:00 PM. 

It was voted to dispense with the reading of Articles 8 through 32 of the Town 
Warrant until 7:00 o'clock in the afternoon of March 11, 1998, at which time the sec- 
ond session of the annual Town Meeting would be held in the Plymouth Elementary 
School gymnasium. 

The polls were closed to voting on Articles 1 through 7 at 7:00 PM and count- 
ing of the ballots commenced. After the counting of ballots was completed, Mr. Clay 
announced the results of the voting as follows: 

ARTICLE 1. TOWN OFFICES 

Selectman for Three Years - Steve Panagoulis 301 
Moderator for Two Years - Robert B. Clay 626 
Tax Collector for Three Years - Linda Buffington 645 
Town Clerk for Three Years - Kathleen J. Latuch 642 
Supervisor of the Checklist for Six Years - Jane Blaine 622 
Trustee of the Trust Funds for Three Years - John H. Noyes 615 
Library Trustee for Three Years - A. Joan Bowers 606 

ARTICLE 2. Shall we adopt the provisions of RSA 40:13 to allow official ballot 
voting on all issues before the town? This article inserted by petition. 
YES 365 NO 295 

Failed, by ballot vote, to meet the 60% requirement. 

ARTICLE 3. Shall we modify the elderly exemptions from property tax in the Town 
of Plymouth, based on assessed value, for qualified taxpayers, to be as follows: For 
a person 65 years of age up to 75 years, $10,000; for a person 75 years of age up to 
80 years, $15,000; for a person 80 years of age or older, $20,000. To qualify, the per- 
son must have been a New Hampshire resident for at least 5 years, own the real estate 
individually or jointly, or if the real estate is owned by such person's spouse, they 
must have been married for at least five years. In addition, the taxpayer must have a 
net income of not more than $25,000 or, if married, a combined net income of less 
than $30,000; and own net assets not in excess of $35,000 excluding the value of the 
person's residence. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 
YES 537 NO 107 

Passed, by ballot vote, so authorizing such modification. 

PROPOSED ZONING AMENDMENTS 

ARTICLE 4. Adoption of Amendment No. 1 as proposed by the Planning Board 
for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance as follows: 



73 



1) Amend Article II, Section 202 to define "wireless communication facilities" and 
"essential services"; 2) Amend Article III, Section 304, the Table of Uses, to permit 
wireless communication facilities as a Special Exception in specific areas; and 3) 
Amend Article X, Section 1004.3 to create additional standards for granting Special 
Exceptions for wireless communication facilities. 

YES 388 NO 212 

ARTICLE 5. Adoption of Amendment number 2 as proposed by the Planning Board 
for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance as follows: 

Amend Article III, Section 304, the Table of Uses, to permit a "Parking Facility" as 
a Special Exception in the Multi-Family Residential (MFR) district and prohibit a 
"Parking Facility on land other than that of the related use" in the Single Family 
Residential (SFR) district. 

YES 353 NO 261 

ARTICLE 6. Adoption of Amendment number 3 as proposed by the Planning Board, 
for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, as follows: 

Amend Article II, Section 202 to modify the definitions of "accessory structure" and 
"principal structure" and eliminate "minor structure". 

YES 410 NO 259 

ARTICLE 7. Adoption of amendment number 4 as proposed by the Planning Board, 
for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, as follows: 

Amend Article XII, Section 1202.2 and Article XII, Section 1203 to change the dis- 
trict boundary descriptions of the Multi-Family Residential (MFR) and 
Civic/Institutional (CI) zoning districts to rezone an area along School Street and 
Highland Street from MFR to CI. 

YES 326 NO 289 

DELIBERATIVE SESSION 

The second session of a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Plymouth, 
NH was held in the gymnasium of the Plymouth Elementary School on Wednesday, 
March 11, 1998 at 7:00 o'clock in the afternoon. Moderator Robert B. Clay opened 
the 235th Annual Meeting of the Town of Plymouth, NH and introduced retiring 
selectman, Allen MacNeil, who led those present in the Pledge of Allegiance. He also 
thanked voters for their years of support. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, lohn Tucker, presented Mr. MacNeil with 
a plaque honoring him for 30 years of government service and dedication to the com- 
munity. 

ARTICLE 8. BUDGET COMMITTEE MEMBER - GUY BRISSON ELECTED 

To elect (1) member to the Advisory Budget Committee for a four (4) year term. 
Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to elect Guy Brisson to the Budget Committee for 
a four-year term. 

ARTICLE 9. PERAMBULATION OF PLYMOUTH-GROTON TOWN LINES 
- PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote (pursuant to RS A 5 1 :9) to ratify the act of the Legislature 
of the State of New Hampshire relative to the town line between the towns of Groton 



74 



and Plymouth. The recent research and perambulation disclosed discrepancies in the 
distances of lines recorded in 1845. 

Using modern technological equipment, the lines have now been measured accurate- 
ly. The field marks on the ground commonly considered to be the line boundaries will 
remain the same. To complete the perambulation required by law, a two-thirds ballot 
vote of the voters present is needed and voting is required of both towns. Diagram 
provided on page following warrant. 

Moderator Clay informed voters Groton had passed this article with a 56 to 3 bal- 
lot vote. 

Voted, by 2/3 majority ballot vote, to so complete the perambulation. 
YES 134 NO 2 

ARTICLE 10. MUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW - FAILED 

"To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of the Municipal Budget Law". 
This article inserted by petition. Ballot vote required. Polls to be open for one hour. 

A discussion followed which explored the advantages and disadvantages of such 
a change but also underscored the fact that many voters did not understand the work- 
ings of this law. 

Mr. MacNeil suggested that voters wait until a comprehensive report on the 
Municipal Budget Law could be presented. 

Janet Moorhead asked if this article could be amended to include provisions for 
an ad hoc study committee. Moderator Clay explained that the language of this par- 
ticular article was dictated by statute and thus had to be voted up or down without 
change. 

Failed, by ballot vote, to adopt these provisions. Polls were open from 8:45PM 
until 9:45 PM. 

YES 38 NO 112 

ARTICLE 11. BUDGET COMMITTEE - NO ACTION. BASED ON ARTICLE 10 

This article shall be acted on only if the preceding article regarding establishment of 
a budget committee pursuant to RSA 32:14 is adopted. To see if the Town will vote 
to determine the number of at-large members on the budget committee, to determine 
whether they shall be elected or appointed by the moderator, and to fill the initial 
terms by election or appointment, as the Meeting shall determine. 

No action was taken on this article based on the failure of Article 10. 

ARTICLE 12. FUNDING FOR VARIOUS AGENCIES - PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $39,130 for the 
below listed agencies: 

Speare Memorial Hospital 

Community Action Outreach 

Baker Pemi Senior Citizens 

Task Force Against Sexual & Domestic Violence 

Animal Control Agreement with Humane Society 

Pemi-Baker Home Health Agency 

Grafton County Senior Citizen Council 

Plymouth Chamber of Commerce 

Pemi -Baker Youth and Family Services 

North Country Council 



75 



$ 


3,000 


$ 


2,470 


$ 


1,575 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,250 


$ 


15,500 


$ 


5,665 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


2,500 


$ 


3,070 



Plymouth Regional Free Clinic $ 1 .000 

Friends of the Arts $ 100 

The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $39,130 

for the above named agencies. 

ARTICLE 13. REMEDIATION OF GAS LEAK - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,200 for the pur- 
pose of continuing the remediation of the gasoline leak adjacent to the Highway 
Garage. This sum is offset by State Oil Discharge and Disposal Cleanup Fund reim- 
bursements. Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable account 
and will not lapse until the remediation is complete or in three years, whichever is 
less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $4,200 for 
the above named purpose. 

ARTICLE 14. FUNDING OF CAPITAL ITEMS: POLICE - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $23,040 to fund the 

following capital items: 

Public Safety Vehicles $ 17,845 

Phone System for Police Dept. (final payment) $ 5,195 

The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $23,040 

to fund the above named items. 

ARTICLE 15. FUNDING OF CAPITAL ITEMS: TOWN OFFICE - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 11,100 to fund the 

following capital items: 

Computer Improvements $ 9,000 

Copier Lease $ 2,100 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not 

lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 

less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $11,100 

for the above named items. 

ARTICLE 16. FUNDING OF CAPITAL ITEMS PARK & REC - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 1 ,795 to fund the 
following capital item: 
Parks and Recreation Vehicle $ 1.795 

payment 2 of 4 on lease purchase 
The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

John Wood proposed an amendment to place an additional $5,000 in capital 
reserve towards the purchase of a road worthy vehicle for the department. 

Moderator Clay explained that such an increase could not be added without a 
properly worded article asking that money be placed in capital reserve for this pur- 
pose. 

The amendment was withdrawn. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate $1,795 to fund the 



76 



above named item. 

ARTICLE 17. FUNDING OF CAPITAL ITEMS: ROAD CONST.-PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 75,000 to fund the 
following capital item: 

Road Construction $ 75,000 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable account and will not 
lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 
less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000 
for road construction. 

ARTICLE 18. FUNDING OF CAPITAL ITEMS: HIGHWAY-PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $118,485 to fund the 
following capital items: 

One Ton Truck. . .payment 2 of 3 Lease/Purchase $ 10,385 

911 signage $ 5,600 

Sidewalk Improvements $ 40,000 

Replace International dump truck $ 62,500 

and to authorize the withdrawal of: 
$40,000, plus any accumulated interest, for the Sidewalk Improvements 
$47,000, plus any accumulated interest, for the International dump truck 
from the Capital Reserve Funds established for these purposes. The balance to be 
funded through general taxation and other offsetting revenue. Pursuant to RSA 32:7, 
these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not lapse until the respec- 
tive project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is less. The governing 
body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate, and withdraw from 
capital reserve, said sums totaling $118,485 for the above named purposes. 

ARTICLE 19. FUNDING FOR CAPITAL ITEM: FIRE DEPT. - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 39,110 to fund the 
following capital item: 

Pumper-Tanker. .Lease/Purchase $ 39,110 

Payment 2 of 4 
The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $39,110 
to fund the Pumper-Tanker. 

ARTICLE 20. PAINTING PEASE PUBLIC LIBRARY - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $ 2,100 for the pur- 
pose of painting the exterior of Pease Public Library . This sum to be completely off- 
set by a withdrawal of funds from the expendable trust fund established for this pur- 
pose (and would have no tax rate impact). Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a non- 
lapsing, nontransferable account and will not lapse until the project is complete or in 
three years, whichever is less. The governing body recommends passage of this arti- 
cle. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $2,100 for 
the above named purpose. 



77 



ARTICLE 21. FUNDING SCHOOL ACCESS SAFETY STUDY - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,665 for the pur- 
pose of funding one-third of a school access safety study jointly with the two school 
districts. Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable account and 
will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, 
whichever is less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $ 1 ,665 
for the above named purpose. 

ARTICLE 22. CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDING - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to establish or add to existing Capital Reserve Funds 
under the provisions of RSA 35:1 for the following 

purposes and raise and appropriate the respective sums (totaling $60,500) to be placed 
in said funds: 

Ambulance $ 20,000 

Conveyor $ 2,500 

Sidewalk Improvements $ 10,000 

Dispatch $ 6,000 

Highway Heavy Equipment $ 22,000 

Jim Mayhew of the Budget Committee proposed a motion to table Article 22 
pending the outcome of Article 23. He planned to propose an amendment to Article 
23, deleting money for property reappraisal; a sum would then be proposed under 
Article 22 to establish a capital reserve fund for this purpose. Moderator Clay ruled 
that this could not be done as Article 22 did not propose the establishment of a capi- 
tal reserve fund for that specific purpose and, thus, voters were not properly warned. 
Mr. Mayhew withdrew his motion. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so establish or add to existing Capital Reserve 
Funds an amount totaling $60,500. 

ARTICLE 23. GENERAL GOVERNMENT CHARGES - PASSED AS 
AMENDED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,265,936 to defray 
general government charges for FY '99: 

Salaries, Fees and Expenses $ 139,172 

Election, Registration, Vital Statistics $ 70,069 

Financial Administration $ 69,002 

Reappraisal of Property $ 25,000 

Legal/Prosecutor $ 42,500 

Planning and Zoning $ 36,965 

Town Hall Building $ 22,200 

Cemeteries $ 27,700 

Insurance $ 478,600 

General Assistance $ 24,000 

Conservation $ 200 

Care of Trees $ 1,200 

Debt Service $ 329,328 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not 
lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 



78 



less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

The selectmen proposed an amendment to raise the insurance line to $484,860, 
thus increasing the total amount to $1,272,196 because the cost covering union 
employee insurance had been omitted from the original figure. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so amend this article. 

Fran DeLorenzo proposed an amendment to delete $33,265 from the Planning 
and Zoning line by excluding the salary for the Community Planner which he believed 
was an unnecessary position. 

Failed, by negative voice vote, to so delete this line item. 

The budget committee proposed an amendment to reduce the $25,000 for reap- 
praisal to $10,000 to be placed in a capital reserve fund for this purpose. 

Failed, by negative voice vote, to so amend. A standing division was requested. 

Failed, by negative standing vote, to so amend. 

YES 50 NO 67 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,272,196, as originally amended, for above named purposes. 

ARTICLE 24. FUNDING FOR PUBLIC SAFETY - PASSED AS AMENDED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,156,769 for FY '99 
public safety as follows: 

Police Department $ 631,189 

Ambulance Department $ 47,320 

Fire Department $ 472,450 

Emergency Management $ 5,810 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not 
lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 
less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 
Selectmen proposed an amendment to increase the lines for Police and Fire 
Department budgets to $651,034 and $478,125, respectively, to reflect union employ- 
ee raises which had been omitted from the original figure; this would raise the total 
amount to $1,182,289. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so amend. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $1,182,289, 
as amended, for the above named purposes. 

ARTICLE 25. FUNDING FOR HGHWY & SANITATION-PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $636,096 for FY'99 
for highway and sanitation as follows: 

Highway Department $ 356,959 

Street Lighting $ 65,000 

Recycling/Solid Waste Disposal $ 212,522 

Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District Dues $ 1,615 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not 
lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 
less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

John Wood proposed an amendment to raise the figures for Highway to 
$361,959 and Recycling/Solid Waste Disposal to $217,522 in order to give raises to 
non management employees. This would be a $10,000 increase. 



79 



Failed, by negative voice vote, to so amend. A standing division was requested. 
Failed, by a negative standing vote, to so amend. 

YES 36 NO 44 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $636,096 
for the above named purposes. 

ARTICLE 26. FUNDING FOR DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS -PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $361,030 for FY'99 

for departmental operations as follows: 

Parks and Recreation $ 232,594 

Library $ 118,541 

Patriotic Purposes $ 675 

Band Concerts $ 2,200 

Town Common $ 1 ,500 

Airport $ 5,520 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable accounts and will not 

lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or in three years, whichever is 

less. The governing body recommends passage of this article. 

John Wood proposed an amendment to increase the Parks and Recreation line to 

$237,594, in order to provide raises to the groundskeepers, and a $1,000 increase to 

the airport line to provide a raise for the manager. This would increase the total by 

$6,000. 

There was no second and no action was taken on the amendment. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $361,030 

for the above named purposes. 

ARTICLE 27. AIRPORT STUDY - PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a five 
member committee to study the future of the Plymouth Municipal Airport and the fea- 
sibility of making improvements to the buildings and runway. The Committee would 
solicit input from interested parties and conduct a public hearing. The Committee 
would prepare a public, written report to the Board of Selectmen by November 16, 
1998, including recommendations for future expenditures and identification of fund- 
ing sources. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so authorize the Board. 

ARTICLE 28. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT TRUST FUND - PASSED 

To see if the town will vote to create an expendable general fund trust fund under 
the provisions of RSA 31:19-a, to be known as the Emergency Equipment 
Replacement Trust Fund, for the purpose of replacing equipment lost or damaged and 
for which the value is not sufficient to provide actual replacement, and to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $10,000 for this purpose and to designate the Selectmen as 
agents to expend without any further vote of Town Meeting. The governing body rec- 
ommends passage of this article. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to create such a fund and to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $10,000 for said fund, designating Selectmen as agents to expend. 



80 



ARTICLE 29. MAIN STREET PROGRAM - PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for a local 
Main Street Program. (This is anticipated to be a three year request for appropria- 
tions.) The governing body recommends passage of this article 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 
for the above named purpose. 

ARTICLE 30. REINSTATEMENT OF CEMETERY TRUSTEES - PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote to reinstate the elected Board of Cemetery Trustees. 
The duties and responsibilities were delegated to the Board of Selectmen by the 1996 
Town Meeting. The reinstated Board of three Cemetery Trustees would be elected at 
next Town Meeting. The Selectmen would continue to carry out the duties until the 
1999 Town Meeting. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so reinstate said trustees. 

ARTICLE 31. PRIVATE ALARM SYSTEMS ORDINANCE - PASSED 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to adopt a Police 
Ordinance relative to the installation, monitoring and response to private alarm sys- 
tems operating within the Town and to establish fees and requirements for individu- 
als who utilize private alarm systems in order to minimize the diversion of limited 
police resources occasioned by false alarms. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to so authorize the Board. 

ARTICLE 32. ANY OTHER BUSINESS - CHALLENGE TO MODERATOR 

To transact any other business that may legally come before said meeting. 

William Houle, Chairman of the Budget Committee, raised a challenge to Mr. 
Clay's previous ruling on the proposed amendment to Article 22. Town 
Administrator, Merelise O'Connor, stated that based on her experience the 
Department of Revenue Administration would rule the proposed amendment as inap- 
propriate and inadmissible and disallow this appropriation. The law does state that a 
warrant article must distinctly address the purpose for which a reserve is to be estab- 
lished. Mr. Houle was of the opinion that this criteria was met because the following 
article did specify raising and appropriating money for the same purpose and that the 
total amount would not change. 

Voted, by affirmative voice vote, to uphold the Moderator's ruling. 

There was no other business and the meeting was adjourned at 10:10 pm. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen Latuch, 
Plymouth Town Clerk 



81 



Town of Plymouth 

Warrant 

and Budget 



83 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

WARRANT FOR THE 1999 ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE TOWN OF PLYMOUTH 



To the inhabitants of the Town of Plymouth in the County of Grafton and the 
State of New Hampshire qualified to vote in town affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary School in said 
Plymouth on Tuesday, the 9th of March, next, polls to be open for voting on Articles 
1 through 8, at 8:00 o'clock in the forenoon, and to close not earlier than 7:00 o'clock 
in the afternoon, and you are hereby notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary 
School in said Plymouth on Wednesday, the 10th of March, next, at 7:00 o'clock in 
the afternoon for the deliberative session of the Town Meeting at which time action 
will be taken upon the remaining articles of this warrant. 

ARTICLE 1 . To elect all town officers which appear on the official town ballot for 
the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 2. Shall we adopt the provisions of RS A 40: 1 3 to allow official ballot vot- 
ing on all issues before the town? This article inserted by petition. 

ARTICLE 3. Do you favor adoption of the town manager plan as provided in chap- 
ter 37 of the Revised Statutes Annotated? This article inserted by peti- 
tion. 

ARTICLE 4. Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment number 1, as proposed 
by the Planning Board, for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows: 

Amend Article IX, Section 902.1 (J), to require a land use permit for 
both the installation and removal of fuel storage tanks of 1 ,000 gallons 
or more. 

ARTICLE 5. Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment number 2, as proposed 
by the Planning Board, for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows: 

Amend Article IV, Sections 408.4 and 408.5, changing the require- 
ments regarding size, type and location of permitted signs in the 
Civic/Institutional district to the same requirements as those in the res- 
idential districts. 

ARTICLE 6. Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment number 3, as proposed 
by the Planning Board, for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows: 

Amend Article II, Section 202 to modify the definition of a rooming 
house; amend Article IV, Section 411.2(A) to clarify the parking 
requirements for a rooming house; and amend Article X, Section 



84 



1004.3(D) to establish additional Special Exception standards that 
must be satisfied prior to conversion of a dwelling into a rooming 
house. 

ARTICLE 7. Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment number 4, as proposed 
by the Planning Board, for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows: 

Amend Article II, Section 202 and Article IV, Section 411.4 to clarify 
the definition of "parking facility" and add a definition for "off-site 
parking facility"; and amend Article III, Section 304 to: 1) permit park- 
ing facilities in the commercial districts; 2) require a special exception 
for certain large parking facilities in some districts; and 3) prohibit cer- 
tain large parking facilities in some districts. 

ARTICLE 8. Are you in favor of the adoption of amendment number 5, as proposed 
by the Planning Board, for the Town of Plymouth Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows: 

Amend Article IV, Section 411.3 and Article X, Section 1004.3, clari- 
fying the conditions necessary to obtain a special exception for a park- 
ing facility. The conditions will not be changed, but will be relocated 
within the Ordinance. 

DELIBERATIVE SESSION 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to rescind the authority of the Plymouth 
Selectmen to appoint the highway superintendent and return the posi- 
tion to an elected position by the voters of the Town of Plymouth. This 
article inserted by petition. 

ARTICLE 10. To elect one (1) member to the Advisory Budget Committee for a one 
(1) year term. 

ARTICLE 11. To elect one (1) member to the Advisory Budget Committee for a four 
(4) year term. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the town will vote, pursuant to RSA 80:80, to authorize the 
Selectmen to convey real estate tax liens or property acquired in default 
of redemption of tax liens, by sealed bid, public auction or in such 
manner as justice may require. This authority shall continue indefinite- 
ly until rescinded by future action of the Town Meeting. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $44,697 
for the below listed agencies: 

Community Action Outreach $2,500 

Baker Pemi Senior Citizens $1,800 

Task Force Against Sexual & Domestic Violence $1,500 



85 



Animal Control Agreement with Humane Society $3,907 

Pemi-Baker Home Health Agency $16,000 

Grafton County Senior Citizen Council $5,665 

Plymouth Chamber of Commerce $1,500 

Pemi Baker Youth and Family Services $2,500 

North Country Council $3,225 

Plymouth Regional Free Clinic $1,000 

Friends of the Arts $100 

Main Street Program $5,000 

The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,200 
for the purpose of continuing the remediation of the gasoline leak adja- 
cent to the Highway Garage. This sum is offset by State Oil Discharge 
and Disposal Cleanup Fund reimbursements. 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable appro- 
priation and will not lapse until the remediation is complete or in three 
years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
enter into a long term lease of a portion of land at the Plymouth 
Municipal Airport with private investors who would build an airplane 
hangar or hangars which will be assessed property taxes; further, to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500 for a 
center line site survey; further, to see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to establish an Airport Development 
Committee to oversee this project. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $29,260 
to fund the following capital items for public safety purposes: 

Public Safety Vehicles $12,760 

payment 1 of 2 on lease purchase 

Computer Software Improvements $16,500 

The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $33,160 
to fund the following capital items for administration purposes: 

Computer Improvements $31,000 

Copier Lease $2,160 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable 
accounts and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is 
complete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 



86 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,795 
to fund the following capital items for parks and recreation purposes: 

Parks and Recreation Vehicle $1,795 

payment 3 of 4 on lease purchase 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$100,000 to fund the following capital item: 

Road Construction $100,000 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable appro- 
priation and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is com- 
plete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $12,500 
to fund the following capital item: 

Bridge repair $12,500 

This amount will be partially offset by FEMA funding used to repair 
the bridge on Old Hebron Road damaged by flooding in June, 1998. 
Pursuant to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable appro- 
priation and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is com- 
plete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $12,900 
to fund the following capital items for solid waste management pur- 
poses: 

One Ton Truck $10,400 

payment 3 of 3 on lease purchase 

Air Vent System for Solid Waste $2,500 

The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $39, 110 
to fund the following capital items for public safety purposes: 

Pumper-Tanker $39,110 

payment 3 of 4 on lease purchase 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 
for the purposes of restoration of the Revolutionary War Cannon cais- 
son and the wheel to the bell in the Town Hall belfry. This appropria- 
tion is to be offset in so far as possible by private donations. Pursuant 
to RSA 32:7, this will be a nonlapsing, nontransferable appropriation 
and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is complete or 
in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 



87 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the town will vote to establish or add to existing Capital 
Reserve Funds under the provisions of RSA 35: 1 for the following pur- 
poses and raise and appropriate the respective sums (totaling $62,400) 
to be placed in said funds: 

Ambulance $23,400 

Sidewalk Improvements $10,000 

Dispatch $10,000 

Highway Heavy Equipment $12,000 

Replace one ton truck for Transfer Station $7,000 

The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$981,932 to defray general government charges for FY'00: 

Salaries, Fees and Expenses $145,708 

Election, Registration, Vital Statistics $73,847 

Financial Administration $66,071 

Reappraisal of Property $25,000 

Legal/Prosecutor $42,500 

Planning and Zoning $38,431 

Town Hall Building $23,250 

Cemeteries $40,325 

Insurance $184,470 

General Assistance $25,500 

Conservation $100 

Care of Trees $2,400 

Debt Service $314,330 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable 
accounts and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is 
complete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$1,381,287 for FY'00 public safety as follows: 

Police Department $765,198 

Ambulance Department $48,520 

Fire Department $561,636 

Emergency Management $5,933 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable 

accounts and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is 

complete or in three years, whichever is less. 

The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$759,412 for FY'00 for highway and sanitation as follows: 

Highway Department $438,585 

Street Lighting $65,000 

Recycling/Solid Waste Disposal $254,032 



88 



Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District Dues $1,795 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable 
accounts and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is 
complete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$457,115 for FY'OO for departmental operations as follows: 

Parks and Recreation $301,170 

Library $146,505 

Patriotic Purposes $675 

Band Concerts $2,200 

Town Common $1,000 

Airport $5,565 

Pursuant to RSA 32:7, these will be nonlapsing, nontransferable 
accounts and will not lapse until the respective project/purchase is 
complete or in three years, whichever is less. 
The Board of Selectmen recommends passage of this article. 

ARTICLE 29. To transact any other business that may legally come before said meet- 
ing. 

Given under our hands this 8th day of February, 1999. 

John H. Tucker, Chairman 
Timothy M. Daigneault 
Steve S. Panagoulis 
Selectmen, Town of Plymouth 

A True Copy, Attest 

John H. Tucker, Chairman 
Timothy M. Daigneault 
Steve S. Panagoulis 
Selectmen, Town of Plymouth 



89 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

MUNICIPAL SERVICES DrVISION 

P.O. BOX 487, CONCORD, NH 03302-0487 

(603)271-3397 



MS-G 

REVISED 1998 



BUDGET OF THE TOWN 
OF PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Appropriations and Estimates of Revenue for the Ensuing Year January 1, to December 31, 

or Fiscal Year From July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2000 

IMPORTANT: 

Please read RSA 32:5 applicable to all municipalities. 

1. Use this rorm to list the entire budget in the appropriate recommended and not recommended area. This 
means the operating budget and all special and individual warrant articles must be posted. 

2. Hold at least one public bearing on tbis budget. 

3. When completed, a copy or tbe budget must be posted with the warrant. Another copy must be placed on 
rile with the town clerk, and a copy sent to the Department or Revenue Administration at the above address. 



DATE: February 8, 1999 




GOVERNING BODY (SELECTMEN) 

Please sign in ink. 



John H. Tucker, Chairman 

Timothy M. Daiqneault 

Steve Panagoulis 

THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT 



90 



Budget 



ith 



FY OO 



MS-6 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS HARR. 
Acct.# (RSA 32:3,V) ART.# 



Appropriations 

Prior Year As 

Approved by DR 



Actual APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 
Expenditures ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 
Prior Year (recommended) (not recommended) 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



FY*99 
xxxxxxxxx 



FY '98 
XXXXXXXXX 



FY "00 
xxxxxxxxx 



xxxxxxxxx 



4130-4139 


Executive 


25 


137,972 


137,540 


144,208 




4140-4149 


Election, Reg. £ Vital Statisti 


25 


70,069 


65,807 


73,847 




4150-4151 


Financial Administration 


25 


69,002 


71,396 


66,071 




4152 


Revaluation of Property 


25 


25,000 


33,301 


25,000 




4153 


Legal Exponae 


25 


42,500 


43,977 


42,500 




4155-4159 


Personnel Administration 


25 


234,000 


256,861 


81,100 




4191-4193 


Planning £ Zoning 


25 


36,965 


36,313 


38,431 




4194 


General Government Buildings 


25 


22,200 


24,982 


23,250 




4195 


Cemeteries 


25 


27,700 


59,349 


40,325 




4196 


Insurance 


25 


250,860 


234,524 


103,370 




4197 


Advertising £ Regional Assoc. 


13 


9,570 


9,872 


9,725 




4199 


Other General Government 













PUBLIC SAFETY 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4210-4214 


Police 


26 


651,034 


595,077 


765,198 




4215-4219 


Ambulance 


26 


47,320 


46,415 


48,520 




4220-4229 


Fire 


26 


478,125 


456,347 


561,636 




4240-4249 


Building Inspection 












4290-4298 


Emergency Management 


26 


5,810 


1,492 


5,933 




4299 


Other (Including Communications) 










A] 


RPORT/AVIATlON (JENTE 


•R 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 



4301-4309 [Airport Operations 

LllGH^AYS & STREET^ 



28 



5,520 



3,152 



5,565 



XXXXXXXXX xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4311 


Administration 












4312 


Highways £ Streets 


27 


356,959 


321,263 


438,585 




4313 


Bridges 


20 








12,500 




4316 


Street Lighting 


27 


65,000 


52,919 


65,000 




4319 


Other 













xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4321 


Administration 












4323 


Solid Haste Collection 


27 


212,522 


207,507 


254,032 




4324 


Solid Waste Disposal 












4325 


Solid Waste Clean-up 













91 



Budget - Town of Plymouth 



FY 'OO 



MS-6 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION WARR . 
ACCt.# (RSA 32:3,V) ART.# 



Appropriations 

Prior Year As 

Approved by DR 



Actual 
Expenditures 



APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 
ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 
Prior Year (recommended) (not recommended) 



SANITATION cont. 




FY "99 FY "98 FY '00 

XXXXXXXXX xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4326-4329 


Savage Coll. i Disposal t Oth 


1 27 


1,615 


250| 1.795 


I 


WATER DISTRIBUTION & TREATMENT 


xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4331 


Administration 












4332 


Water Services 












4335-4339 


Water Treatment, Conserv.6 Ot 


Her 










ELECTRIC 




xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4351-4352 


Admin, and Generation 












4353 


Purchase Costs 












4354 


Electric Equipment Maintenance 










4359 


Other Electric Costs 












HEALTH 




xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4411 


Admini stration 


25 


1,200 


1,200 


1,500 




4414 


Pest Control 


13 


1,250 


1,250 


3,907 




4415-4419 


Health Agencies £ Hoap. s Oth 


13 


19,500 


19,000 


17,000 




WELFARE 




xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4441-4442 


Administration 6 Direct Assis 


25 


6,000 


7,460 


7,500 




4444 


Intergovernmental Welfare Pym 


13 


13,710 


12,940 


13,965 




4445-4449 


Vendor Payments 6 Other 


25 


18,000 


16,217 


18,000 




CULTURE & RECREATlO> 


xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4520-4529 


Parks 6 Recreation 


28 


232,594 


226,560 


301.170 




4550-4559 


Library 


28 


118,541 


103,452 


146,505 




4583 


Patriotic Purposes 


28 


675 


675 


675 




4589 


Other Culture & Recreation 


28,13 


3,800 


4,119 


3,300 




CONSERVATION 




xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4611-4612 


Admin. S Purch. of Nat. Resour 


25 


200 





100 




4619 


Other Conservation 


25 


1,200 


4,050 


2,400 




4631-4632 


EDEVELOPMNT & HOUSING 












4651-4659 


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 












DEBT SERVICE 




xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 


4711 


Princ . - Long Term Bonds t Not 


25 


260,000 


260,000 


260,000 




4721 


Interest-Long Term Bonds S No 


25 


69,328 


86.497 


54,330 




4723 


Int . on Tax Anticipation Notes 











! 



92 



Budget - Town of Plymouth 



FY OO 



MS-6 



Appropriations Actual 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION " WARR. Prior Year As Expenditures 
Acct.# (RSA 32:3,V) ART .# Approved by DR Prior Year 



APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 
ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 
(RECOMMENDED) (NOT RECOMMENDED) 



DEBT SERVICE cont. 



FY '99 FY '98 

xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



FY '00 
xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4790-479 I Other Debt Service 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4901 


Land 


14,15,19 


261,998 


135,664 


105,700 




4902 


Machinery, Vehicles 6 Equipme 


16,17,18.21. 
22,23 


164,378 


228,127 


121,225 




4903 


Buildings 






825 






4909 


Improvements Other Than Bldgs . 











operating Transfers out 1 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4912 


To Special Revenue Fund 












4913 


To Capital Projects Fund 












4914 


To Enterprise Fund 














Sewer- 














Water - 














Eleetric- 














Airport- 












4915 


To Capital Reserve Fund 


24 


60,500 


48,164 


62,400 




4916 


To Exp. Tr .Fund- except #4917 




10,000 








4917 


To Health Maint. Trust Funds 












4918 


To Nonexpendable Trust Funds 












4919 


To Agency Funds 












SUBTOTAL 1 


$3,992,617 


$3,814,544 


$3,926,268 





If you have a line item of appropriations from more than one warrant article, please use the space below to identify th 
make-up of the the line total for the ensuing year. 



LCCt # 


Art. # 


Amount 


4901 


14 


4,200 


4901 


15 


1,500 


4901 


19 


100,000 


4902 


16 


29,260 


4902 


17 


33,160 


4902 


18 


1,795 


4902 


21 


12,900 


4902 


22 


39,110 


4902 


23 


5,000 


4589 


13 


100 


4589 


28 


3,200 



93 



Budget - Town of Plymouth 



FY 'OO 



IMS-6 



'SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES" 



Special warrant articlas are defined in RSA 32:3, VI, as appropriations 1) in petitioned warrant articles; 2) appropriations 
raised by bonds or notes; 3) appropriation to a separate fund created pursuant to law, such as capital reserve funds or 
trust funds; 4) an appropriation designated on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapsing or nontransferable 
article. 



Appropriations Actual APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 

PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION WARR. Prior Year As Expenditures ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 

Acct. (RSA 32:3,V) ART .# Approved by DR Prior Year (RECO**iended) (not recommended) 







FY*99 


FY '98 


FY "00 


4901 


Fuel Cleanup 


14 


4,200 


3,073 


4,200 




4902 


Computer Improvements 


17 


9,000 


7,420 


31,000 




4902 


Copier Lease 


17 


2,100 


1,846 


2,160 




4901 


Road Construction 


19 


75,000 


106,493 


100,000 




4313 


Bridge Repair 


20 








12,500 




4902 


Cannon & Bell Restoration 


23 








5,000 




4915 


To Capital Reserve Fund 


24 


60,500 


48,164 


62,400 




4130 


Salaries, Fees & Expenses 


25 


137,972 


137,540 


144,208 




4411 


Health Officer 


25 


1,200 


1,200 


1,500 




4140 


Election, Reg., Vital Statistics 


25 


70,069 


65,807 


73,847 




4150 


Financial Administration 


25 


69,002 


71,396 


66,071 




4152 


Revaluation of Property 


25 


25,000 


33,301 


25,000 




4153 


Legal/Prosecutor 


25 


42,500 


43,977 


42,500 




4155 


Personnel Administration 


25 


234,000 


256,861 


81,100 




4196 


Insurance 


25 


250,860 


234,524 


103,370 




4191 


Planning & Zoning 


25 


36,965 


36,313 


38,431 




4194 


General Govt. Buildings 


25 


22,200 


24,982 


23,250 




4195 


Cemeteries 


25 


27,700 


59,349 


40,325 




4441 


Welfare: Administration 


25 


6,000 


7,460 


7,500 




4445 


Welfare: Vendor Payments 


25 


18,000 


16,217 


18,000 




4611 


Conservation Commission 


25 


200 





100 




4619 


Care of Trees 


25 


1,200 


4,050 


2,400 




4711 


Debt Service: Principal 


25 


260,000 


260,000 


260,000 




4721 


Debt Service: Interest 


25 


69,328 


86,497 


54,330 




4210 


Police 


26 


651,034 


595,077 


765,198 




4215 


Ambulance 


26 


47,320 


46,415 


48,520 




4220 


Fire 


26 


478,125 


456,347 


561,636 




4290 


Emergency Managment 


26 


5,810 


1,492 


5,933 




4312 


Highways & Streets 


27 


356,959 


321,263 


438,585 




J xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 




XXXXXXXXX 



94 



Budget 



ith 



FY OO 



MS-6 



•SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES* 

continued 



Special warrant articles are defined in RSA 32: 3, VI, as appropriations 1) in petitioned warrant articles; 2) appropriations 
raised by bonds or notes; 3) appropriation to a separate fund created pursuant to law, such as capital reserve funds or 
trust funds; 4) an appropriation designated on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapsing or nontransferable 
article. 



Acct. 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION WARR. 
(RSA 32:3,V) ART.# 



Appropriations 

Prior Year As 

Approved by DR 



Actual 

Expendi tures 

Prior Year 



APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 



ENSUING FY 
(RECOMMENDED) 



ENSUING FY 
(NOT RECOMMENDED) 





FY '99 


FY "98 


FY '00 


4316 


Street Lighting 


27 


65,000 


52,919 


65,000 




4324 


Solid Waste/Recycling 


27 


212,522 


206,651 


254,032 




4326 


Pemi Baker Solid Waste District 


27 


1,615 


250 


1,795 




4520 


Parks & Recreation 


28 


232,594 


226,560 


301,170 




4530 


Library 


28 


118,541 


103,431 


146,505 




4583 


Patriotic Purposes 


28 


675 


675 


675 




4589 


Other Culture & Recreation 


28 


3,700 


4,019 


3,200 






Airport 


28 


5,520 


3,152 


5,565 




SUBTOTAL 2 RECOMMENDED 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


$3,797,006 


XXXXXXXXX 



"INDIVIDUAL WARRANT ARTICLES" 



Individual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special warrant articles". Individual warrant articles 
might be negotiated cost items for labor agreements or items of a one time nature you wish to address individually. 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION 
Acct. (RSA 32:3,V) 



WARR. 
ART.# 



Appropriations 

Prior Year As 

Approved by DR 



Actual 

Expendi ture s 

Prior Year 



APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 



ENSUING FY 
(RECOMMENDED) 



ENSUING FY 
(NOT RECOMMENDED) 





FY "99 


FY "98 


FY "00 


4444 


Intergovernmental Welfare Pmts 


13 


13,710 


12,940 


13,965 




4415 


Health Agencies & Hospitals 


13 


19,500 


19,000 


17,000 




4197 


Advertising & Regional Assoc. 


13 


9,570 


9,872 


9,725 




4414 


Humane Society 


13 


1,250 


1,250 


3,907 




4589 


Friends of the Arts 


13 


100 


100 


100 




4901 


Airport Site Survey 


15 








1,500 




4902 


Public Safety Vehicle 


16 


17,845 


22,855 


12,760 




4902 


Computer Software/Police 


16 








16,500 




4902 


Parks & Rec Vehicle 


18 


1,795 


1,795 


1,795 




4902 


One Ton Truck: Solid Waste 


21 


10,385 


10,381 


10,400 




4902 


Air Vent System: Solid Waste 


21 








2,500 




4902 


Fire Pumper-Tanker 


22 


45,124 


78,986 


39,110 




SUBTOTAL 3 RECOMMENDED 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


$129,262 


XXXXXXXXX 



95 



Budget - Town of Plymouth 



FY OO 



MS-B 



Acct.# 



SOURCE OF REVENUE 







Actual 


ESTIMATED 


WARR. 


Estimated Revenues 


Revenues 


REVENUES 


ART.# 


Prior Year 


Prior Year 


ENSUING YEAR 



FY "99 

TAXES xxxxxxxxx 


FY '98 
XXXXXXXXX 


FY "00 
XXXXXXXXX 


3120 


Land Use Change Taxes 








8,000 


3180 


Resident Taxes 










3185 


Timber Taxes 




10,000 


14,889 


10,000 


3186 


Payment in Lieu of Taxes 




40,000 


38,176 


40,000 


3189 


Other Taxes 










3190 


Interest S Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 


143,000 


143,408 


110,000 




Inventory Penalties 












Excavation Tax ($.02 cents per cu yd) 












Excavation Activity Tax 










LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


3210 


Business Licenses & Permits 




5,025 


5,025 


5,000 


3220 


Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 




420,000 


415,814 


440,000 


3230 


Building Permits 




"5,000 


4,853 


5,000 


3290 


Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 




36,000 


35,979 


20,000 


3311-331 FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 






25,945 




FROM SYATE xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3351 


Shared Revenues 




59,007 


247,597 


195,000 


3352 


Meals £ Rooms Tax Distribution 




89,193 




90,000 


3353 


Highway Block Grant 




102,161 


93,243 


99,461 


3354 


Water Pollution Grant 






3,381 




3355 


Housing S Community Development 










3356 


State & Federal Forest Land Reimbursement 


1 


1 


1 


3357 


Flood Control Reimbursement 










3359 


Other (Including Railroad Tax) 




126,200 


69,102 


2,400 


3379 FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS 










CHARGES FOR SERVICES xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3401-340 


Income from Departments 




575,000 


570,009 


600,000 


3409 


Other Charges 










MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


3501 


Sale of Municipal Property 




2,500 


5,434 




3502 


Interest on Investments 




84,000 


84,149 


90,000 


3503-350 


Other 




98,000 


116,480 


100,000 



96 



Budget - Town off Plymouth 



FY OO 



MS-6 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


WARR. 
Acct.# SOURCE OF REVENUE ART.# 


Estimated Revenues 
Prior Year 


Actual 
Revenues 

Prior Year 


ESTIMATED 
REVENUES 

ENSUING YEAR 


INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 


FY '99 

xxxxxxxxx 


FY*98 
XXXXXXXXX 


FY'OO 
XXXXXXXXX 


3912 


From Special Revenue Funds 










3913 


From Capital Projects Funds 










3914 


From Enterprise Funds 












Sewer - (Offset) 












Hater - (Offset) 












Electric - (Offset) 












Airport - (Offset) 




2,000 






3915 


From Capital Reserve Funds 




87,000 


283,733 




3916 


From Trust & Agency Funds 




2,100 






OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3934 


Proc . from Long Term Bonds & Notes 










Amts VOTED From F/B ("Surplus") 










Fund Balance ("Surplus") to Reduce Taxes 


62,000 


304,854 


65,000 


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE & CREDITS 


$1,948,187 


$2,462,072 


$1,879,862 



'BUDGET SUMMARY" 



SUBTOTAL 1 Appropriations Recommended (from page 4) 


$3,926,268 


SUBTOTAL 2 Special Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 5) 


included above 


SUBTOTAL 3 "Individual" Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 5 


included above 


TOTAL Appropriations Recommended 


$3,926,268 


Less : Amount of Estimated Revenues & Credits (from above , column 


$1,879,862 


Estimated Amount of Taxes to be Raised 


$2,046,406 



97 



98 



Annual Report 

of the 

Plymouth Village Water 

& 
Sewer District 



Year Ending 

December 31, 1998 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Auditor W-24 

Budget W-31 

Capital Reserve Accounts W-10 

Commissioners' Report W-12 

District Meeting Minutes W-19 

District Officers W-3 

Report of the Treasurer, Sewer Division W-4 

Report of the Treasurer, Water Division W-7 

MFA Accounts W-9 

Statement of Bonded Debt, Sewer Division W-15 

Statement of Bonded Debt, Water Division W-16 

Operations' Report W-13 

Warrant W-28 

Water Quality Test Results W-17 



PLYMOUTH VILLAGE WATER & SEWER DISTRICT OFFICERS 



COMMISSIONERS: 

John J. McCormack, Jr. 
Steven H. Temperino 
Richard A. Flanders, Jr. 

CLERK: 
Carol P. Mabin 

MODERATOR: 

Leonard S. Sawyer 

TREASURER: 
James E. Horan Jr. 

DISTRICT ADMINISTRATOR: 
Carol Kenneson 

AUDITORS: 

Plodzik & Sanderson, PA 



Term expires 1999 
Term expires 2000 
Term expires 2001 



Term expires 1999 
Term expires 1999 
Term expires 2000 



W-3 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

SEWER DIVISION 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1998 

Beginning Balance, January 1, 1998 $ 14,364.90 

Investments 156,466.03 

Petty Cash on Hand, January 1, 1998 50.00 



INCOME: 



Sewer Assessments 




$383,538.37 




Labor & Supplies 


$ 2,839.50 






Applications 


700.00 






Septage Disposal 


73,351.25 






Sludge Disposal 


7,400.00 






Septage Disposal Permits 


1,100.00 






From Capital Project Fund 


78,567.00 






Insurance Reimbursements 


3,480.88 






Miscellaneous Income 


4,332.85 






Clarifier Closeout 


26.945.51 


198.716.99 


582,255.36 


State Aid Grant 






642,573.00 


Loan/Principal Payment 






15,000.00 


Long Term Note 






119,355.00 


Interest 






63.257.56 


TOTAL: 






$1,593,321.85 



EXPENDITURES: 

Wages 

Payroll $129,843.94 

District Officers 3.860.00 $133,703.94 

Administration & Office Expense 

General Office Expense 4,648.14 

Officers Expense 2,455.51 

Legal Fees 1,138.50 

Computer Support 2,115.26 

Election Expense 223.39 

Audit 4,600.00 
FIC A/Retire/Unemployment 1 5 ,480.04 

Printing 643.43 

P/L Insurance 7,433.00 

Workers' Compensation 2,947.48 

Health/Dental Insurance 29,230.29 



W-4 



Life Insurance 


2,185.94 




Bonds 


350.00 




Interest 


395,704.12 


469,155.10 


Treatment Plant 






Supplies/Operating Material 






Safety Equipment 


1,041.29 




Vehicle 


78.38 




General Supplies 


7,343.76 




Electricity 


88,743.58 




Telephone 


1,373.24 




Alarm/Instrumentation 


2,446.93 




Maintenance Supplies 


1,512.19 




Composting Materials 


4,854.00 




Training & Memberships 


928.04 




Gas & Oil 


1,125.13 




Heating Oil 


3,403.68 




Chemicals 


19.616.11 


132,466.33 


Repairs 






General Facility 


2,498.19 




Pump & Machinery 


3,254.45 




Purification Systems 


341.43 




Electrical Services 


46.13 




Vehicles 


194.11 




Heavy Equipment 


711.55 


7,045.86 


Contracted Services 






Lab Tests 


2,995.90 




Uniforms 


552.82 




General Contracted Services 


16.384.54 


19,933.26 


Collection System 






Supplies/Operating Material 






Pump Stations 


413.87 




Electric 


14,291.79 




Alarm/Instrumentation 


1,573.00 




Standby Generators 


1,209.13 




Chemicals 


9,867.00 




Pipe Fittings 


39.88 




Manholes & Pipe 


669.09 




Engineering Support 


3.479.00 


31,542.76 



W-5 



Repairs 






Pumps 


2,097.16 




Electrical Services 


137.68 




Main Sewer/Manholes 


1,216.12 




Buildings 


32.98 




Equipment 


114.36 


3,598.30 


Capital Expense 






Broadway /Maple Sewer Line 


169,705.21 




Court Street Sewer Line 


16,299.50 




Main Street Sewer Line 


19,788.53 




Compost Building Upgrade 


66,607.70 




Clarifier Sprockets/Chains 


4,515.73 




Bio-Filter 


796.85 




Skid Steer Loader 


12,481.60 




Lab Equipment 


3,860.83 




TV Inspections 


1,250.00 




Fairgrounds Road Sewer Desig 


n 204.96 




Capital Reserve/Sewer TV Equipment 2,000.00 




Capital Reserve/Sewer Main 


5,000.00 




Funded Debt 


467.175.38 


769,686.29 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES: 




$1,567,131.84 


1997 Payables 




13,276.18 


Transfer to Payroll Account 




1,035.16 


Bank Charges 




12.00 


Ending Balance, December 31, 


1998 


2,219.47 


Investment 




9,597.20 


Petty Cash on Hand, December 31, 1998 


50.00 


TOTAL 




$1,593,321.85 



W-6 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

WATER DIVISION 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1998 



Beginning Balance, January 1, 


1998 




$ 67,556.88 


Petty Cash on Hand, January 1 


, 1998 




50.00 


INCOME: 








Water Rents 




$435,479.05 




Labor & Supplies 


$ 2,290.06 






Applications 


500.00 






Returned Check Fees 


100.00 






Sale of District Property 


90.08 






Insurance Reimbursement 


3,215.07 






Miscellaneous Income 


3,214.84 






From Expendable Trust 


31.201.53 


40,611.58 


476,090.63 


Long Term Note 






65,689.00 


State Revenue Sharing 
Interest 






2,731.42 
3.273.69 



TOTAL INCOME: 



$615.391.62 



EXPENDITURES: 



Wages 
Payroll 
District Officers 



$111,361.76 
3.860.00 



115,221.76 



Administration & Office Expense 

General Office Expense 4,406.63 

Officers Expense 1,738.80 

Election Expense 187.10 

FICA/Retire/Unemployment 13,348.35 

Dues 278.00 

Legal Fees 1,187.14 

Computer Support 1,649.80 

Printing 867.63 

Training & Memberships 702.00 

P/L Insurance 4,000.00 

Workers' Compensation 2,947.48 

Health Insurance 20,643.15 

Life Insurance 2,057.88 

Bonds 325.00 

Interest 30,910.00 

Note 15.000.00 



100,248.96 



W-7 



Supply/ DistributionATreatment 
Supplies & Equipment 

Distribution Pipe & Fittings 584.77 

Safety Equipment 53.95 

Installation Equipment 619.37 

Meter Replacement 4,242.97 

Pump Stations 3,596.30 

General Operating Supplies 1,295.54 

Electric 47.335.06 

Garage/Shop Supplies 1,539.17 

Vehicle Supplies 193.91 

Vehicle Fuel 1.530.25 

Corrosion Control 12.533.85 

Meter Installation 241.75 

Tools 388.75 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

1997 Payables 

Bank Charges 

Ending Balance. December 31, 1998 

Petty Cash on Hand. December 31. 1998 

TOTAL 



74.155.64 



Contracted Sendees 






Water Tests 


2.704.97 




Valves & Instrumentation 


711.00 




General Contracted Sendees 


4.690.70 




Telemetering Alarms 


707.98 




Uniforms 


232.99 


9.047.64 


Construction & Repairs 






Pump Stations & Storage 


270.14 




Vehicle Repairs 


82.52 




Backhoe Repairs 


47.13 




Sand & Gravel 


306.39 


706.18 


Capital Expense 






Hydrants 


2.621.78 




Maple/Broadway Water Line 


132.088.75 




Smith Street Water Line 


11.580.00 




Vehicle Replacement 


13.050.68 




Court Street 


16.299.50 




Furnace 


2.527.26 




Tenney Mtn Highway Water Line 


10.042.81 




Telemetry Chemical Building 


548.30 




Expendable Trust 


5.000.00 




Capital Reserve Fund 


10.000.00 




Funded Debt 


50.000.00 


253.759.08 



S553.139.26 
3,228.31 

21.00 

58.953.05 

50.00 

S615.391.62 



W-8 



MONEY FUND ACCOUNTS 



Pemigewasset National Bank 



Beginning Balance, January 1, 1998 
Income: 

Deposits 

Interest 
Total Income 



$1,228,171.99 
2.948.98 



$68,001.90 



1,231,120.97 



Disbursements: 

Transfer to General Fund 1 ,267,408.49 

Transfer to Payroll Account 1 ,035 . 1 6 

Pemigewasset National Bank 21.00 

Total Disbursements 

Ending Balance, December 31, 1998 

Community Guaranty Savings Bank 

Beginning Balance, January 1, 1998 

Income: 

Deposits $ 39,710.32 

Interest 864.03 

Total Income 



1.268.464.65 

$ 30.658.22 

$13,729.88 



40,574.35 



Disbursements: 

Transfer to General Fund 25,000.00 
Community Guaranty Savings Bank 12.00 

Total Disbursements 

Ending Balance, December 31, 1998 

Community Guaranty Savings Bank 
WWTF Construction Phase 3 

Beginning Balance, January 1, 1998 
Income: 

Interest 
Disbursements: 

Transfer to General Fund 
Ending Balance, December 31, 1998 

Community Guaranty Savings Bank 
Escrow for J. Parker 

Beginning Balance, January 1, 1998 

Income: 

Deposit $18,863.50 

Interest 175.62 

Disbursement: 

J. Parker & Daughters 

Ending Balance, December 31, 1998 



25.012.00 
$ 29.292.23 



$ 4,442.75 

75.90 

261.86 
$ 4.256.79 

$ 0.00 

19,039.12 

12.088.14 
$ 6.950.98 



W-9 



H 
Z 

P 
O 

u 
< 

H 

H 

PQ 
< 
Q 
Z 

ft* 
X H 

a g 

w 

cm 

a 

— 

<< 

u 



oc 

on 






c 
PQ 



s 

c 



s 
B 

- 
3 
X> 



s 

o 



< 



CJj 


OJ 


3 


tj 




3 


s 


3 


5 


53 


53b 


PQ 



(N 

SO 


o 
o 

© 






<N 

OO 




in 
in 


in 

o 


OS 




en 

SO 

o 


os 
o 
©^ 




in 

On 
CN 


<N 


in 


CN 
CN 


so 
cn 


in 
in 


in 

o 


cn 

o 

o 


<N 

00 


en 

SO 


OS 



00 



o 

O 

© 
o 



O 

o 

d 

o 

in 



PQ 



o 


»n 

CN 


O 

o 


o 
o 


d 

00 


en 

SO 

en 


d 


d 


OS 

CO 


SO" 
CN 







o 
en 

CN 

in 
© 



en 

o 

en 



o 
o 

d 
o 

q 

in 



so 
en 
CN 

in 



en 

so 
in 



en 



o 
o 

d 
o 
©^ 

in 



so 

00 
00 

in 
r- 

©" 



in 

in 

^- 

Os 

SO" 
(N 



in 
m 

CN 

Os" 



© 
© 

© 
© 
©^ 



(N 

OO 

OS 

in 



0) 

(/) 

O 

Br 

3 
PLh 



pq 

w 
in 
PQ 

0* 

— 

pl 
< 
U 



u 

PQ 

3 
4) 

s 

— 

u 



— o — 



— 

u 



3 

cr 

PJ 

> 



c3 



— 
00 



3 

£ 

o 

13 
> 

3 ^ 

.2 e* 
I 



3 
O 

%— > 

M o 

H 3 

Oh O 
Oh (D 



W-10 



C3 
CO 

M 

'•& 3 

(- o 
3 

x> 



en 

(N 



in 
00 

in" 

oq 



en 
in 



en 



cc 

cc 

to 

OS 



^3- 
en 






<N 



en 



(N 

en 



m 
so 



ri- 



ce 






IN 

in 



o^ 



CC 



en 



en 
sO 
en 



en 
CN 



en 



"O 
< 



o 
o 



in 



in 



o 
o 

Q 

of 



1 i 

.= is 

CO 



0» 
<* 


en 
en 


vC 


<* 


d 

in 


od 
r- 
vq 


<* 

CC 

en 


in 


— 


of 


o 


so" 



en 



in 



•n 
•n 
so 

CM 
(N 



<D 

O 
D. 
•— 

3 
PL 











S3 










a. 


. • 








<D 


H 








c* 


ID 




T3 






OC 




3 






H 


o 


3 

PL 


■ . 


5 

CL 


pq 


"o 




3 




CQ 


u 


c 


Cu 


c 


< 


- 


bo 


0) 




Q 


4—> 


!— 


-rf-J 


'— 


cd 


<D 


ed 


CD 


Z 


£ 


£ 


£ 


3 


PL 


2 


PQ 


C/3 


PJ 



pa ^ 



cd 



r3 
C 
0) 

C* 









-o 




■— 








3 







c 




c™ 


3 
PL 


g 


o 


_o 


"53 


o 


Q 


% 




<D 




>> 






3 


H 


3 


U 


3 


' '3 


X) 


4-J 

CO 


JD 


c 


X: 




'C 


"j-j 


CJ 




R] 




D 




bo 






Cfl 




v: 


s— 


v: 


C_ 


5 


Cl- 
od 


S 

•— 


<D 

£ 

PQ 


(5 


>— 

£ 

2_ 














^ 




^ 




C3 




£ 




£ 




£ 





W-ll 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



The Board of Commissioners and staff are striving to prepare the District for the 
21st century in regards to improvements to its water and sewer infrastructure and 
facilities. Expansion of the Tenney Mountain Highway water line from Highland 
Street to Arlyn Farm was approved by voters at the 1991 annual meeting and is antic- 
ipated to be completed in 1999 to provide a potable water supply to existing and 
planned businesses and residences. Expansion of the sewer line on Fairgrounds Road 
from Riverside Cemetery to the District boundary has been delayed for many years. 
Three engineering assessments of alternative alignments have been funded in the 
search for a cost effective solution. This remains a high priority. 

Improvements to existing infrastructure are ongoing, as evidenced by replace- 
ment of the Maple/Broadway and Court Street water and sewer lines in 1998. The lat- 
ter work was done by PSC with minimal cost to the District. 

The District has formalized an agreement with the Town of Bristol to accept its 
sludge for conversion to compost at the Plymouth facility. A similar agreement with 
Woodstock has been ongoing for years. This will reduce operation costs to the 
District and improve the utilization of this facility while maintaining the high compost 
quality. A fee schedule has been adopted to recapture some of the costs for compost 
production. 

The District has amended its septage receiving policy effective September 1st. 
Twenty-one towns have signed a written agreement with the District to provide for 
septage disposal and will be paying an annual fee. 

The District has worked closely with the Downtown 2000 Project in infrastruc- 
ture improvements on Main Street and at Riverfront Park. 

Improvements and system expansion come at a cost. The District voted to 
increase rates in 1998 and must raise rates again in 1999. The District remains in the 
lowest third in the state in regard to rates. This has resulted in some difficulty in 
securing federal assistance for infrastructure improvements! Nevertheless, the 
District expects to service an increasing clientele as we position ourselves for the 
future. The Commissioners and staff are focused on continually improving our prod- 
ucts and services for the benefit of District rate payers. Efficient management of our 
wastewater to protect the Pemigewasset River while producing a viable compost 
byproduct, and providing potable drinking water for an expanding population base 
will remain a challenge in light of increasing state and federal requirements. 

The Commissioners serve you, the rate payers and users, and we value your con- 
tinued support. 

Respectfully, 

John J. McCormack Jr., Chairman 
Steven H. Temperino 
Richard A. Flanders Jr. 



W-12 



OPERATIONS REPORT 



1998 was an exceptionally busy construction year for the District. The following 
water and sewer line replacement projects were completed: 

Broadway and Maple Street 2250+/- lineal feet of 10" class 52 

ductile iron water main 
2250 +/- lineal feet of 8" PVC 
gravity sewer 

Final paving to be completed in 
Spring 1999 

Court Street with PSC 350+/- lineal feet of 6" class 52 

(Replacement) ductile iron water main 

350+/- lineal feet of 8" PVC gravity 
sewer 

Main Street with the Town and DOT 177+/- lineal feet of 8" PVC gravity 

(Replacement) sewer 

Smith Street 160 lineal feet of 10" ductile iron 

(New) water main 

The Smith Street installation was done to facilitate the last phase of the water 
loop from the reservoir to Maple Street. 

Water Division: Compliance with EPA's water quality regulation, the copper and 
lead rule, has been achieved for the fifth consecutive year. The detected level of dis- 
solved lead in special water samples remains at less than 1/2 the allowable EPA limit. 
We would like to thank those homeowners who have participated in this sampling pro- 
gram. 

Positive results were again received through our water usage audit. The audit 
compares the total gallons pumped with all known water uses, such as, customer use, 
fires, flushing, construction, etc. The 1998 unaccounted water percentage is 4.1% of 
the total pumped. The industry standard is <15%, 

Water System Totals: 

142,317,500 gallons pumped at the wellsite 
389,911 gallons per day average 
This represents a 3.7% reduction over 1997 usage. 

Wastewater Division: Several improvements have been made to the wastewater treat- 
ment facility. The most significant were to the soil filter and the compost mixing 
machine. The soil filter that controls the odors from dewatering and septage receiving 
was reconditioned. This project was completed in-house, saving the District $2,200. 
The controls and computer program for the compost mixing machine were updated. 
The mixing machine is the hydraulic powered machine that mixes sludge and amend- 
ment to make the compost. This process is now working more efficiently. 



W-13 



Wastewater Division Totals: 
Flow through plant 
% of design capacity 
Plant performance 
Septage received 
Revenue from septage 
Sludge received 
Revenue from sludge 



146,470,000 gallons 

57.3% 

96.31% removal of impurities 

1,092,520 gallons 

$74,248.75 

203,000 gallons 

$8,120.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

Bill Gilpatric 

Water Superintendent 



W-14 



H 

PQ 

Q 

O 

Q 
Z 

O 
PP 
U. 
O 

H 
Z 

W 



o o 

On On 

00 06 
vo vo 
in in 

vo" vd 



<u 







© 


Oh 
























Z 


c3 
























E 


^ 




















H 




L. 


>. 




















U 




£ 


c3 







O 


O 


O 


O 


O 








H 




£ 




On 


On 


On 


ON 


ON 


o> 


ON 


On 




WD 

s 



T3 
O 


# 


OO 


00 


06 


00 


00 


06 


06 


OO 




in 


VO 


VO 


VO 


vO 


VO 


VO 


VO 


VD 


C/3 




p 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


in 


NH 




PP 


in 


vd 


vd 


vd 


vd 


vd 


vd 


vd 


vd 


P* 




c 

81 

5fi 


-C 


^ 




























■O 


t: 




























s 





in 


<3 


©^ 


<q 


<o 


<q 











z 



PQ 
WD 

■3 

s 


Z 


vd 


in 


in 


in 


»n 


in 


0" 





© 


OS 





en 

-4—1 

=5 




















w 


> 


O 




















H 


HN 


P< 




















< 


Q 


3 






















£ 


P* 






















w 


1 


O 


CO) 


* 











O 












< 


4*- 


_C 























O 
1/3 





on 
vd 


©^ 
in 


©^ 
in 


<q 
in 


<q 
in 


<3 
in 












.- 


u 




















> 




s 


S-h 




















X 




08 


> 

•!-H 




















H 

P 
O 




2 

s 
c 


S-H 




















s 




3 

PQ 




















B 




c 

< 


■a 


© 
in 


O 

























Ch 




WD 

c 


e2 



0" 



0" 



0" 



0" 


O 
0" 












i 






<N 


(N 


<N 


<N 


<N 















^ 


























£ 





















o 
o 

On" 
00 

vq 
in 

VO 



O 
O 
O 

in 

© 



© 
© 
©^ 
in 



© 
© 
© 

©* 
© 



(/3 

"+- > 

•c 

3 



ON©©©©©©©©© 

OnO©©©©©©©© 
-hM(N(N(NM(NM(N(N 



W-15 



as 



y 



^ 
w 






<MK "■• «^ 
— — — 



o 

z 



s 



■o 
c 
cd 

"O 

s 
o 
as 

ex 

# c 

"■5 
s 
sd 



C£* ~ 






5 a 



c« 



c 

Cu 



ca 

s 
c 

c 

< 

c 



- 
00 



^ o 



r3 



I S 

CQ in 



— *■> E- 



— — 



<6 



a^ O 

Cu 

c 



^ IS 

a 

a. 
to 

CO 



o o o 

«o in in 

io iri iri 

en en en 

on o> on 



o 
in 

in 
en 

On 



O "1 

in <n 

en 

£ <*. 

ON — 

_" o - , 

— i n 



in 

in 
en 

ON 



l/~i s — ' 

: m 



in 

en 

ON 



^ oooooooooooo 

nO i/-j v/-i~ in in in o' O O © O O O 

O nC nO nO nO nO nC nO no ^ no \o 
MMM(NM(NfNMN(NMM 



O 

o 
o o 
oooooogooooo 



«o«nooooxro^ o o 

On On On On On On On - ~ s On 



, ttninoovo(n\OMhTi'a)hO\h«hHnoocnh 

NqOOCTfO— ; OC OC O in CN — — X vO O -; ^ in ^ 

oc in in cn in r^ o — i — ' t> cn oc in oc vc cn en — ' on in 
en o m "^ oc m in in on rf <o t-^ en «— < in — — in m m 
in on en t~^ — >0 — no i-H r-^ en on vo en ©^ oc no^ ^t en O 

r-" r-^ oc oc on on o o — — on rSl en ^t «n in <o r> oc o\ 



in 
in 

en 

ON 



in 



en 



ON 



OC 

(N 

On' 
OC 

rN 



ono — tMcn^t«nvor*-ooo\o*-H eNen^inNor-oc 

onoooooooooo — — — — — — — — — 

o^ooooooooooooooooooo 

-(N(N(^^(N(NMNM(N(NM(N(N(N|M(N(N(N 



W-16 



WATER QUALITY TEST RESULTS 

As of 1987, State Law requires that all Community Water Systems must notify its 
customers in writing, on an annual basis, of all factors of water quality for which tests 
have been made. 

Below are those results for tests conducted on typical treated water being deliv- 
ered to District customers. Date of water sampling was August 7, 1997. 



Test Name 


State Standard 


Actual Test Result 






Well #1 


Well#2 


1. Aluminum 


0.2 mgA* 


.05 mgA 


— 


2. Arsenic 


<0.05 mg/1 


<.005 mgA 


<.005 mgA 


3. Barium 


<2.0 mgA 


<.l mgA 


<.l mgA 


4. Beryllium 


<0.004 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


5. Cadmium 


<0.005 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


6. Chromium 


<0.10mgA 


<.01 mgA 


<.01 mgA 


7. Copper 


<1.3 mg/1* 


<.05 mgA 


<.05 mgA 


8. Iron 


<0.30 mgA* 


<.05 mgA 


.884 mgA 


9. Lead 


<0.015 mgA 


<.005 mgA 


<.005 mgA 


10. Mercury 


<0.002 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


11. Nickel 


<0.10 mgA 


<.02 mgA 


<.02 mg/1 


12. Selenium 


<0.05 mgA 


<.010 mgA 


<.010 mg/1 


13. Silver 


<0.10 mgA* 


<.10mgA 


<.10mgA 


14. Sodium 


<250.0 mgA 


54.3 mgA 


69.7 mgA 


15. Thallium 


<.002 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


<.001 mgA 


16. Zinc 


<5.0 mgA« 


<.05 mgA 


<.05 mgA 


17. Alkalinity 


No Standard 


24.1 mgA 


12.7 mgA 


18. Chloride 


<250.0 mgA 


104 mgA 


135 mgA 


19. Fluoride 


4.0 mgA 


.20 mgA 


<.20 mgA 


20. Total Hardness 


No Standard 


57.3 mgA 


65.7 mgA 


21. pH, untreated 




5.9 SU 


5.8 SU 


pH, treated 


6.5 - 8.5 7.4 SU 


7.4 SU 




22. Specific Cond. 


No Standard 


380 uMHO 


440 uMHO 


23. Sulfate 


250 mgA 


10 mgA 


15 mgA 


24. Turbidity 


<1.0NTU 


<1.0NTU 


<1.0NTU 


25. Cyanide 


<0.20 mgA 


<.025 mgA 


<.04 mgA 


26. Manganese 


0.05 mgA* 


.163 mgA 


.29 mgA 


27. Antimony 


<.006 mgA 


<.002 mgA 


<.002 mgA 


28. Calcium Hardness 


No Standard 


49 mgA 


30 mgA 


29. Nitrate 


<10.0 mgA 


.26 mgA 


.59 mgA 


30. Nitrite 


<1.0 mgA 


<.05 mgA 


<.05 mgA 


31. SOC's (synthetic organic chem) Varies 


ND 


ND 


32. VOC's (volatile organic 


chem) Varies 


ND 


ND 



W-17 



33. Radon Gas 

34. Odor Threshold 

35. Corrosivitv 



3000 EPA Proposed 2300 pci/1 2100 pci/1 
3.0 TON ND ND 

No Standard -0.18 -1.5 



Test Result Notes: ND = None Detected 

* = Secondary Standard 

< = less than 
General Note: District personnel test for Total Coliform Bacteria each month at six 
selected sites. Results are acceptable except when noted. The low pH of the raw well 
water is being raised to a range of 7.0 to 8.0 pH units by the use of sodium hydroxide 
solution to lessen corrosion. 



W-18 



ANNUAL DISTRICT MEETING 

Plymouth Village Water & Sewer District 

March 10 and 12, 1998 

MINUTES 



A legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Plymouth Village Water & Sewer 
District, Plymouth, NH was held at the Plymouth Elementary School gymnasium on 
Tuesday, March 10, 1998. Moderator Leonard Sawyer opened the meeting at 8:00 
o'clock in the forenoon and read Article 1 of the Warrant, which was to be voted upon 
by printed ballot during the voting hours of 8:00 AM through 7:00 PM. 

It was voted to dispense with the reading of Articles 2 through 16 until 7:00 
o'clock in the evening of March 12, 1998, at which time the second session of the 
Annual Meeting would be held in the Plymouth Elementary School. 

The polls were closed to voting on Article 1 at 7:00 PM and the counting of the 
ballots commenced. After the counting of the ballots was completed, Mr. Sawyer 
announced the results as follows: 

TOTAL VOTES CAST 479 

Article 1: DISTRICT OFFICERS 

Commissioner for Three Years - Dick Flanders 23 1 

Moderator for One Year - Leonard S. Sawyer 431 

Clerk for One Year - Carol P. Mabin 43 1 

DELIBERATIVE SESSION 

The second session of a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Plymouth Village 
Water & Sewer District was held at the Plymouth Elementary School on Thursday, 
March 12, 1998 at 7:00 o'clock in the evening. Moderator Leonard Sawyer opened 
the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. 

ARTICLE 2: FAIRGROUNDS ROAD SEWER EXTENSION - NOT PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Eight Hundred 
Twenty Five Thousand Dollars ($825,000.00) for the purpose of constructing sewer- 
age and sewage appurtenances in accordance with a plan entitled "Fairgrounds Sewer 
Extension, Proposed Sewer Schematic Prepared for Plymouth Village Water & Sewer 
District"; to be raised by borrowing on the credit of the District through the issuance 
of notes and bonds of the District in compliance with the New Hampshire Municipal 
Finance Act, RSA 33:8, and to authorize the Commissioners to apply for, accept, and 
expend on behalf of the District such state or Federal aid as may be available for such 
purposes. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Two-thirds Vote 
Required) 

Voted by ballot vote not to authorize the appropriation of $825,000.00 for the 
above stated purpose. 

YES 36 NO 29 



W-19 



ARTICLE 3: BROADWAY AND MAPLE STREET SEWER RECONSTRUCTION 
AND EXTENSION - PASSED 

To see if the District will raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Nineteen 
Thousand Three Hundred Fifty Five Dollars ($119,355.00) to be added to the Forty 
Five Thousand Dollars ($45,000.00) previously appropriated for the purpose of recon- 
structing the sewer line on Broadway Street from Highland Street to Maple Street in 
accordance with a plan entitled "Broadway and Maple Street Water and Sewer 
Replacement"; and extend the sewer reconstruction to include Maple Street; said 
appropriation is to be raised by borrowing on the credit of the district in compliance 
with the New Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33:8; and to authorize the 
Commissioners to apply for, accept, and expend on behalf of the District such State 
or Federal aid as may be available for such purposes. The Commissioners recom- 
mend this appropriation. (Two-thirds Vote Required) 

Voted by ballot vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $119,355.00 for the 
above stated purpose. 

YES 55 NO 2 

ARTICLE 4: MAPLE AND BROADWAY STREET WATER RECONSTRUCTION 
AND EXTENSION - PASSED 

To see if the District will raise and appropriate the sum of Sixty Five Thousand 
Six Hundred Eighty Nine Dollars ($65,689.00) to be added to the Sixty Three 
Thousand Dollars ($63,000.00) previously appropriated for the purpose of recon- 
structing the water line on Maple Street; and extend the water reconstruction to 
include Broadway Street to Maple Street in accordance with a plan entitled 
"Broadway and Maple Street Water and Sewer Replacement"; said appropriation is 
to be raised by borrowing on the credit of the District in compliance with the New 
Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33:8; and to authorize the Commissioners to 
apply for , accept, and expend on behalf of the District such State or Federal money 
as may be available for such purposes. The Commissioners recommend this appro- 
priation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by ballot vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $65,689.00 for the above 
stated purpose. 

YES 52 NO 3 

ARTICLE 5: PURCHASE OF TRUCK - WATER DIVISION - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars 
($15,000.00) for the purpose of purchasing a truck for the water division; and autho- 
rize the transfer of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000.00) from the December 31, 
1997 fund balance for this purpose. The Commissioners recommend this appropria- 
tion. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to authorize the appropriation and transfer the 
sum of $15,000.00 from the December 31, 1997 fund balance for the above stated pur- 
pose. 



W-20 



ARTICLE 6: PURCHASE OF SKID STEER LOADER - SEWER DIVISION - 
PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Thirteen Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($13,500.00) for the purpose of purchasing a skid steer loader for the 
sewer division; and authorize the transfer of Thirteen Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
($13,500.00) from the December 31, 1997 fund balance for this purpose. The 
Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to authorize the appropriation and transfer the 
sum of $13,500.00 from the December 31, 1997 fund balance for the above stated pur- 
pose. 

ARTICLE 7: SMITH STREET WATER MAIN EXTENSION - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Twelve Thousand Dollars 
($12,000.00) for the purpose of extending the water main along and perpendicular to 
Smith Street; and to authorize the transfer of Twelve Thousand Dollars ($12,000.00) 
from the December 31, 1997 fund balance for this purpose. The Commissioners rec- 
ommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

John Wood made a motion which was seconded by John Pinker to pass over this 
article. This motion failed to pass. 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to authorize the appropriation and transfer of 
$12,000.00 for the above stated purpose. 

ARTICLE 8: CREATE AN EXPENDABLE TRUST - WATER PUMPS AND 
MOTORS EMERGENCY REPAIR FUND - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to create an Expendable Trust under the provisions 
of RSA 3 1 : 19-a, to be known as the Water Pumps and Motors Emergency Repair Fund 
for the purpose of repairing pumps and motors in the water distribution system; and 
authorize the transfer of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) from the December 31, 
1997 fund balance for this purpose; and designate the Commissioners as agents to 
expend. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote 
Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to create an Expendable Trust for Water Pumps 
and Motors Emergency Repair Fund and to authorize the transfer of $5,000.00 into 
the fund. 

ARTICLE 9: CREATE A CAPITAL RESERVE FUND FOR RECONSTRUCTING 
UPPER PUMP STATION ON RESERVOIR ROAD - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund under the provi- 
sions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of reconstructing the upper pump station on 
Reservoir Road and to appropriate Five Thousand Dollars ( $5,000.00) to be placed 
in this fund; and authorize the transfer of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) from the 
December 31, 1997 fund balance for this purpose. The Commissioners recommend 
this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund for recon- 
structing the Upper Pump Station on Reservoir Road and to authorize the transfer of 
$5,000.00 into the fund. 



W-21 



ARTICLE 10: REDEVELOPMENT OF WELL #2 - PASSED AS AMENDED 

To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.00) to be added to the Redevelopment of Well #2 Capital Reserve Fund pre- 
viously established. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority 
Vote Required) 

Carol Kenneson made a motion to add the words "raise and" before the word 
"appropriate". The motion was seconded by James Horan Jr. and passed by affirma- 
tive vote. 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to raise and appropriate $5,000.00 for the above 
stated purpose as amended. 

ARTICLE 11: CREATE A CAPITAL RESERVE FUND FOR SEWER TV EQUIP- 
MENT - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund under the provi- 
sions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of Sewer TV Equipment and transfer Two 
Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00) from the December 31, 1997 fund balance for this pur- 
pose. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund for Sewer TV 
Equipment and to transfer $2,000.00 into the fund. 

ARTICLE 12: CREATE A CAPITAL RESERVE FUND FOR RECONSTRUCTION 
OF THE SEWER MAIN ON BRIDGE STREET - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund under the provi- 
sions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of reconstruction of the sewer main on Bridge 
Street; and to raise and appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) to 
be placed in this fund. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority 
Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to create a Capital Reserve Fund for 
Reconstruction of the Sewer Main on Bridge Street and to raise and appropriate 
$5,000.00 for this purpose. 

ARTICLE 13: DISCONTINUE WASTEWATER CLARIFIER CAPITAL RESERVE 
FUND - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to discontinue the Wastewater Capital Reserve 
Fund created in 1990. Said funds, with accumulated interest to date of withdrawal, 
are to be transferred to the District's sewer fund. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to discontinue the aforementioned Capital 
Reserve Fund and transfer all related monies to the sewer fund, authorizing the 
Commissioners to expend. 

ARTICLE 14: AUTHORIZATION TO CONVEY DISTRICT PROPERTY - 
PASSED 

To see if the District will authorize the Commissioners to convey property of the 
District, real or personal, by deed, lease, bill of sale or otherwise upon the terms and 
conditions as they may determine to be appropriate. (Majority Vote Required) 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to so authorize. 



W-22 



ARTICLE 15: OPERATING EXPENSES - PASSED 

To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Million 
Nine Hundred Four Thousand Six Hundred Fifty Eight Dollars ($1,904,658.00) for 
the operating budgets of the water and sewer divisions for the year 1998. Said sum 
does not include warrant articles addressed. The Commissioners recommend this 
appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Richard Flanders made a motion which was seconded by John Wood to amend 
the article to reduce the operating budget by the amount of money in Article 13. This 
amendment failed to pass by negative voice vote. 

Voted by affirmative Voice Vote to raise and appropriate $1,904,658.00 for the 
above stated purpose. 

ARTICLE 16: TRANSACTION OF OTHER BUSINESS 

To transact any other business that may legally come before said meeting. 

A motion was made to reconsider the vote on Article 2. This motion failed to 
pass. 

David Kent acknowledged Tom McGlauflin's years of service to the District as a 
Commissioner. A standing ovation followed. 

As there was no other business, the meeting was adjourned at 9:13 PM. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Carol P. Mabin 
District Clerk 



W-23 



Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 

193 North Main Street » Concord « New Hampshire . 03301-5063 » 603-225-6996 • FAX-224-1380 
INDEPENDENT A UDITOR 'S REPORT 



To the Members of the 

Board of Commissioners 
Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District 
Plymouth, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying general purpose financial statements of the Plymouth Village Water 
and Sewer District as of and for the year ended December 31, 1998 as listed in the table of contents. 
These general purpose financial statements are the responsibility of the District's management. Our 
responsibility is to express an opinion on these general purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

Except as discussed in the following paragraph, we conducted our audit in accordance with generally 
accepted auditing standards and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government 
Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that 
we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are 
free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the 
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting 
principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial 
statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

Government Accounting Standards Board Technical Bulletin 98-1, Disclosures about Year 2000 Issues, 
requires disclosure of certain matters regarding the year 2000 issue. The Plymouth Village Water and 
Sewer District has included such disclosures in the Notes to Financial Statements. Because of the 
unprecedented nature of the year 2000 issue, its effects and the success of related remediation efforts 
will not be fully determinable until the year 2000 and thereafter. Accordingly, insufficient audit 
evidence exists to support the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District's disclosures with respect to 
the year 2000 issue. Further we do not provide assurance that the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer 
District is or will be year 2000 ready, that the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District's year 2000 
remediation efforts will be successful in whole or in part, or that parties with which the Plymouth 
Village Water and Sewer District does business will be year 2000 ready. 

The general purpose financial statements referred to above do not include the general fixed assets 
account group which should be included in order to conform with generally accepted accounting 
principles. As is the case with most municipal entities in the State of New Hampshire, the Plymouth 
Village Water and Sewer District has not maintained historical cost records of its fixed assets. The 
amount that should be recorded in the general fixed assets account group is not known. 



W-24 



Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District 
Independent Auditor's Report 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the financial statements of the omission described in the 
preceding paragraph, along with the effects of such adjustments, if any, as might have been determined 
to be necessary had we been able to examine evidence regarding year 2000 disclosures, as noted above, 
the general purpose financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the 
financial position of the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District, as of December 31, 1998, and the 
results of its operations for the year then ended in conformity with generally accepted accounting 
principles. 

In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated January 12, 
1999 on our consideration of the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District's internal control over 
financial reporting and our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts 
and grants. 

Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general purpose financial statements 
of the Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District taken as a whole. The combining and individual fund 
financial statements listed as schedules in the table of contents are presented for purposes of additional 
analysis and are not a required part of the general purpose financial statements of the Plymouth Village 
Water and Sewer District. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in 
the audit of the general purpose financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly presented in all 
material respects in relation to the general purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 



^djtg^Y &- G-tty* °SA 



January 12, 1999 PLODZIK & SANDERSON 

Professional Association 



(This document may be reviewed in its entirety at the business office, during 
regular business hours . ) 



W-25 



Plymouth Village 

Water and Sewer 

District 



Warrant and Budget 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

WARRANT FOR THE 1999 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 

PLYMOUTH VILLAGE WATER & SEWER DISTRICT 

To the inhabitants of the Plymouth Village Water & Sewer District qualified to 
vote in District affairs: 

You are notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary School, on Tuesday, the 9th 
day of March, next, polls to be open for voting on Articles 1 and 2 at 8:00 o'clock in 
the forenoon and to close not earlier than 7:00 o'clock in the evening, and you are 
hereby notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary School on Thursday, the 11th day 
of March, next, at 7:00 o'clock in the evening to act upon the remaining Articles of 
this Warrant. 

Article 1 : To elect all District Officers which will appear on the official District 
ballot. 

Article 2: "Are you in favor of changing the term of the District Clerk from one 
year to 3 years, beginning with the term of the District Clerk to be elected at next 
year's regular District meeting?" 

Deliberative Session 

Article 3: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One 
Million Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($1,015,000.00) for the purpose of constructing 
sewerage and sewage appurtenances in accordance with a plan entitled "Addendum to 
the Preliminary Engineering Report Sewer Extension Alternative for the Fairgrounds 
Road area Plymouth, New Hampshire, Municipal Option 6A", designed by Louis 
Berger & Associates; to be raised by borrowing on the credit of the District through 
the issuance of notes and bonds of the District in compliance with the New 
Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33:8, and to authorize the Commissioners to 
apply for, accept, and expend on behalf of the District such State and Federal aid as 
may be available for such purposes. This will be a non-lapsing account pursuant to 
RSA 32:7(VI) and will not lapse until this project is completed or in five years, 
whichever is less. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Two-thirds 
ballot vote required. Polls to be open for one hour.) 

Article 4: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Sixty 
Thousand Dollars ($60,000.00) to be added to the Four Hundred Seventy Thousand 
Dollars ($470,000.00) previously appropriated for the purpose of extending the water 
line from its terminus on Highland Street along Tenney Mountain Highway in accor- 
dance with a plan entitled "Water Main Extension, Tenney Mountain Highway", 
designed by Louis Berger & Associates, Inc.; to be raised by borrowing on the credit 
of the District through the issuance of notes and bonds of the District in compliance 
with the new Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33:8; and to authorize the 
Commissioners to apply for, accept, and expend on behalf of the District such State 
and Federal aid as may be available for such purposes. This will be a non-lapsing 
account pursuant to RSA 32:7 (VI) and will not lapse until this project is completed 
or in five years, whichever is less. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. 
(Two-thirds ballot vote required) 

Article 5: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Forty 



W-28 



Two Thousand Dollars ($42,000.00) for the purpose of pipelining approximately 
1,187 linear feet of sewer line on Route 3 North. The Commissioners recommend this 
appropriation. (Majority Vote Required). 

Article 6: To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Ten Thousand 
Dollars ($10,000.00) to be added to the Bridge Street Sewer Main Reconstruction 
Capital Reserve Fund previously established; and to authorize the transfer of Ten 
Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) from the December 31, 1998 fund balance for this 
purpose. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote 
Required) 

Article 7: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Forty 
Thousand Dollars ($40,000.00) for the purpose of a groundwater exploration program 
to seek an alternative water supply. The Commissioners recommend this appropria- 
tion. (Majority Vote Required) 

Article 8: To see if the District will appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.00) to be added to the Water Pumps and Motors Emergency Repair 
Expendable Trust Fund previously established; and to authorize the transfer of Five 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) from the December 31, 1998 fund balance for this pur- 
pose. The Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Article 9: To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000.00) to be added to the Redevelopment of Well #2 Capital Reserve 
Fund previously established; and authorize the transfer of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.00) from the December 31, 1998 fund balance for this purpose. The 
Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Article 10: To see if the District will vote to appropriate the sum of Five 
Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) to be added to the Upper Station Upgrade Capital 
Reserve Fund previously established; and to authorize the transfer of Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000.00) from the December 31, 1998 fund balance for this purpose. The 
Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Articlell: To see if the District will raise and appropriate the sum of Four 
Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty Eight Dollars ($4,988.00) to reimburse Richard 
Hanaway for his cost to upgrade 790 feet of water line from 8" to 12". The 
Commissioners recommend this appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 

Article 12: To see if the District will authorize the Commissioners to convey 
property of the District, real or personal, by deed, lease, bill of sale, or otherwise upon 
terms and conditions as they may determine to be appropriate. (Majority Vote 
Required) 

Article 13: Are you in favor of the District establishing an advisory budget com- 
mittee to review the water and sewer budgets and make recommendations to the 
Board of Commissioners? The committee will be made up of three members appoint- 
ed by the Board of Commissioners for three term years; except in the first instance, 
when one member will be appointed to serve for one year, one to serve for two years, 
and one to serve for three years. 

Article 14: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One 
Million Eight Hundred Eight Thousand Two Hundred Three Dollars ($1,808,203.00) 
for the operating budgets of the water and sewer divisions for the year 1999. Said sum 
does not include warrant articles addressed. The Commissioners recommend this 
appropriation. (Majority Vote Required) 



W-29 



Article 15: To transact any other business that may legally come before said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 16th day of February, 1999. 

John J. McCormack Jr. 

Steven H. Temperino 

Richard A. Flanders Jr. 

Commissioners, Plymouth Village Water & Sewer District 

A True Copy Attest: 
Carol P. Mabin 
District Clerk 



W-30 



REVISED 1998 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION 

P.O. BOX 487, CONCORD, NH 03302-0487 

(603)271-3397 




BUDGET FORM FOR VILLAGE DISTRICTS 

DATE OF MEETING: March 11, 1999 

VILLAGE DISTRICT: Plymouth Village Water & Sever DistrictC ounty: Grafton 

In the Town(s) Of: Plymouth 

Mailing Address: ' 227 Old North Main Street 

Plymouth, NH 03264-1624 

Phone #: 536-1733 Fax #: 536-1734 E-Mail: water@coopresources.co m 

IMPORTANT: 

Please read. RSA 32:5 applicable to all municipalities. 

1 . Use this form to list the entire budget in the appropriate recommended and not recommended area. This 
means the operating budget and all special and individual warrant articles must be posted. 

2. Hold at least one public hearing on this budget. 

3. When completed, a copy of the budget must be posted with the warrant. Another copy must be placed on 
file with the village district clerk, and a copy sent to the Department of Revenue Administration at the above 
address. 

This is to certify that this budget was posted with the warrant on the (date) February 19. 1999 

GOVERNING BODY (COMMISSIONERS! 

Please sign in ink. 



W-31 



Budget 



Plymouth Village Water & 
Village District of Sewer District FY 



1999 



MS-36 



<£«. 



& 



Appropriations Actual APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 

PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS WARR. Prior Year As Expenditure* ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 

Acct. # (RSA 32:3,V) ART . # Approved by DRA Prior Year (recommended) (not recommended) 





GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4130-4139 


Executive 


14 


70,122 


68,349 


71,543 




4150-4151 


Financial Administration 


14 


46,991 


45,853 


46,710 




4153 


Legal Expanse. 


14 


4,500 


2,326 


4,500 




4155-4159 


Personnel Administration 


14 


286,627 


249,001 


306,534 




4194 


General Government Buildings 












4196 


Insuranca 


14 


21,650 


18,003 


18,175 




4197 


Advertising £ Regional Assoc. 












4199 


Other General Govarnmant 















PUBLIC SAFETY 




XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4210-4214 


Police 












4215-4219 


Ambulance 












4220-4229 


Fire 












4290-4298 


Emergency Management 












4299 


Other Public Safety 















HIGHWAYS & STREETS 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4311-4312 


Admin. , Highways ft Streets 












4313 


Bridges^_ 












4316 


Street Lighting^__ 












4319 


Other 















SANITATION 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4321-4323 


Admin. C Solid Waste Collection 












4324 


Solid Waste Disposal 












4325 


Solid Waste Clean-up 












4326-4329 


Sewage Coll. t Disposal £ Other 


14 


216,600 


209,949 


229,200 





WATER DISTRIBUTION 6 TREATMENT 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4331 


Administration 












4332 


Water Services 


14 


94,076 


92,244 


96,551 




1335 


Water Treatment 


14 


17,000 


15,038 


19,000 




4331-4 33* 


Water Conservation £ Othar 













HEALTH 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



4411-4414 


Administration £ Pest Control 















CULTURE 6 RECREATION 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4520-4529 


Parks £ Recreation 












4589 


Othar Culture £ Recreation 













W-32 



Budget 



Plymouth Village Water & 
Village District Of Sewer District FY 



1999 



MS-36 



- 



dm 



& 



Appropriations 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS WARR Prior Year As 
AccL# (RSA 32:3. V) ART.tt Approved by DRA 



Actual 

Expenditures 

Prior Year 



APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 
ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 

(RECOMMENDED) (NOT RECOMMENDED) 





DEBT SERVICE 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4711 


Princ . - Lonq Term Bonds £ Notes 




532,176 


532,176 


551,044 




4721 


Interest-Long Tern Bonds £ Notes 




426,616 


426,616 


404,246 




4723 


Int. on Tax Anticipation Notes 












4790-4799 


Other Debt Service 















CAPITAL OUTLAY 




XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


«»01 


Land £ Improvements 












4(02 


Machinery, Vehicles £ Equipment 




188,300 


145,049 


25,700 




4903 


Buildings^^ 












4 909 


Improvements Other Than Bldgs 








35,000 







OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4(13 


To Special Revenue Fund 












4913 


To Capital Proie«ts^Fund^ 












4914 


To Proprietary Fund 












4915 


To Capital Reserve Fund 












IMC 


To Trust and Agency Funds 












SUBTOTAL 1 


1,904,658 


1,804,604 


1,808,203 





If you have a line item of appropriations froa more than one warrant article, please use the space below to identify the 
auLka-up of the the line total for the ensuing year. 



Acct. # 


Varr. 
Art. # 


Amount 


Acct. # 


Varr. 
Art. # 


Amount 













































































W-33 



Budget 



Plymouth Village Water & 
Village District Of Sewer District a-y 



1999 



MS-36 



| -SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES" I 

ffperial warrant iruslti are dafinsd in RSA 32: 3, VI, a* appropriations 1) in petitioned warrant article* ; 2) appropriation* 
raised by bend* or note*; 3) appropriation* to a separate fund created pursuant to lav, ruch a* capital reaarve fund* or 
trust funds; 4) an appropriation designated on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapaing or noatranaf arable 
article. 







1 










Acct# 


PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS WARR. 
(RSA 32:3.V) ART J 


Appropriations 

Prior Year As 

Approved bv DRA 


Actual 

Expenditures 

Prior Year 


APPROPRIATIONS 
ENSUING FY 

(RECOMMENDED) 


APPROPRIATIONS 
ENSUING FY 

(NOT RECOMMENDED) 














4909 


1 Area 
Fairgrounds Rd Sewer 


3 






1,015,000 




4909 


fTenney Mtn Highway Wate 


r 4 






60,000 




4915 


CRF/Bridge St. Sewer 


6 






10,000 




4916 


[Exp /Trust Water Pumps 


8 






5,000 




4915 


pP/Well #2 


9 






5,000 




4915 


IcRF/Upper Station 


10 






5,000 




SUBTOTAL 2 RECOMMENDED 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


1,100,000 


XXXXXXXXX 



•INDIVIDUAL WARRANT ARTICLES* 



Individual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special warrant article*" 
warrant articles sight be negotiated coat items for labor agreements, or item* of a em 
individually. 



Bzaaples of individual 
time nature you wish to address 





2 


-2 


4__. 


___■_, 




1 


Acct# 


Appropriations Actus) APPROPRIATIONS APPROPRIATIONS 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS WARR. —Prior Year As Expenditures ENSUING FY ENSUING FY 

(RSA32:3.V1 ART.* Approved bv DRA Prior Year (RECOMMENDED) (NOT RECOMMENDED) 
















4909 


Route 3 North Pipeline 


5 






42,000 




A2P.2- 


Groundwater Exploratio 


i 7 






40,000 




4130 


Reimbursement 


11 






4,988 














































SUBTOTAL 3 RECOMMENDED 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


86,988 


XXXXXXXXX 



-BUDGET SUMMARY- 



SUBTOTAL 1 Appropriation* Recommended (from page_3)_ 



SUBTOTAL 2 8pecial Warrant Article* Ra e amended (from above) 



SUBTOTAL 3 ■Individual" Warrant Articlea Re LUumn nded (from above) 



TOTALAgsropri^XionaRecosmended 



Ujgms Aaount of Iitinatad Hmwemnes t C redits ( from page 5) 



1.808,203 



1,100,000 



86,988 



2,995,191 



2,995,191 



W-34 



Plymouth Village Water 
Budget - Village District of Sewer District 



FY 



1999 



MS-36 



1 



fc= 



Acct.# 



SOURCE OF REVENUE 



WARR. Estimated Revenues 
ART.# Prior Year 



Actual 
Revenues 
Prior Year 



ESTIMATED 

REVENUES 

ENSUING YEAR 





TAXES 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3190 


Interest C Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 










3311-3319 


FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 













FROM STATE 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3351 


Shared Revenues 




2,731 


2,731 


2,731 


3354 


Watar Pollution Grant 




642,573 


642,573 


621,913 


3359 


Other (Including Railroad Tax) 










3379 


FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS 













CHARGES FOR SERVICES 




XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3401-3404 


Incoaa from Departments 




908,349 


870,757 


984,055 


3409 


Other Charges 




83,850 


82,601 


99,000 





MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3501 


Sale of Villatro District Property 




400 


90 


300 


3502 


Interest on Investments 




67,485 


66,352 


67,500 


3503-3509 


Other 




104,340 


42,678 


41,125 



INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3912 


From Special Revenue Funds 










3913 


From Capital Proiects Funds 




78,567 


78,567 


78,567 


3914 


From Proprietaryl^inds^^ 










3915 


From Capital Reserve Funds 




26,363 


26,946 




3916 


From Trust t Agency Funds 













OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 




xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


3934 


Proc. from Long Term Bonds C Notes 




185,044 


185,044 


1,075,000 


Amta VOTED From F/B ("Surplus") 




52,500 


52,500 


25,000 


Fundi Balance ("Surplus") to Reduce Taxes 




101,363 




TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE & CREDITS 


2,152,202 


2,152,202 


2,995,191 



W-35 



Plymouth School District 
Annual Report 



PLYMOUTH SCHOOL 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRIC REPORT 

Auditor's Report S-ll 

Budget S-18 

Nurse's Report S-7 

Officers S-3 

Principal's Report S-6 

School District Meeting S-8 

Superintendent's Report S-4 

Warrants S-14 



S-2 



OFFICERS OF THE 
PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRICT 



School Board 

Tim Naro 
Chris Mumford 
JoAnne Strickland 
Barbara Boyle 
Mike Bullek 



Term Expires 

1999 
1999 
2000 
2000 
2001 



CLERK 

Kathy Latuch 

TREASURER 

Jane Clay 

MODERATOR 

Robert Clay 

AUDITOR 

Grzelak and Associates 

SUPERINTENDENT 

John W. True, Jr. 

ASSISTANT SUPREINTENDENT 

Mark Halloran 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT 

Donna Marsden 



S-3 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



This is a crucial year for the Rumney School District and the Pemi-Baker 
Regional School District. 

Russell Elementary School is in dire straits regarding its air quality. The carbon 
dioxide levels in the building are high and could only be resolved this year by leaving 
windows open. The result has been fresh air, but children have had to work in low 60 
degree temperatures. High carbon dioxide levels indicate that the ventilation in the 
building is poor. When carbon dioxide levels are high it is likely that other contami- 
nants are high also (dust, mold, viruses, bacteria, chemicals and countless other sub- 
stances). Some contaminants are released from the building, some from cleaning sup- 
plies, some from food preparation, some from office supplies. The sources are virtu- 
ally countless. However, increasing the air exchange rate will reduce concentrations 
of carbon dioxide and the contaminants. The solution of the situation is to install mod- 
ern ventilation systems in each room. This will allow our children and staff to breath 
healthy air free of excess levels of carbon dioxide and contaminants. Rumney's space 
needs study committee has recommended that this ventilation issue be resolved as 
soon as possible and has also recommended renovation and addition to the school. 
The bond for the gymnasium is now paid for and interest rates are at an all time low. 
Please give this problem your most serious consideration. 

Plymouth Regional High School has seen student enrollment move from 550 stu- 
dents in 1992 to our present enrollment of 845 students for 1999. This represents an 
average increase of 50 students per year. We anticipate that the growth will continue 
and then eventually level out somewhere in the range of 900+. The building needs 
study committee has been working diligently and for long hours to develop an pro- 
posal which is a million dollars less than last year's proposal (actually two million 
dollars less than the proposal two years ago). Members of the committee have done 
this by eliminating the theater/music/art complex, foregoing reconstruction of the dri- 
ves and parking areas and eliminating any athletic field construction. The committee 
is recommending that we resolve the crowded conditions in theater/art/music through 
renovation and members have focused the new space on the academic areas, library 
and the cafeteria. Briefly our science classrooms are inadequate as laboratories. They 
do not have enough space and are absent proper and safe storage. Also as many of you 
know, program needs have increased in the areas of special education, computer/tech- 
nology, vocational/technical education and for students at risk which has put addi- 
tional pressure on our space. The library has traffic flow and space utilization prob- 
lems that limit proper viewing areas and adequate use of technology. The heating and 
ventilation systems have reached the limits of their usefulness and considering the 
number of students in the building, must be replaced/upgraded in order to provide the 
air quality necessary for nearly 1000 people (including staff) who are in the building 
at any given time. The building committee's recommendations are sound, well rea- 
soned and fiscally responsible. The proposal addresses the foreseeable future in the 
most appropriate and economical manner. If you study the committee's proposal, I 
think you will be pleased. 

SAU #48 is working hard to coordinate K-12 curriculum between each elemen- 
tary school and with the high school. It is important to do this because all of our stu- 



S-4 



dents eventually go to the high school and we also have a need to align our curricu- 
lum with the State frameworks (NH Assessment). We will have finished K-12 math- 
ematics by the end of this summer. Technology curriculum is being finalized and work 
continues on the K-12 science curriculum. Much of this work is supported by grants 
written in the SAU office. 

As is our practice, we have tried to keep all of our district budgets at a minimal 
increase while still providing a quality education. This has been particularly possible 
because of increased state revenues which hopefully will continue. In addition, our 
teachers and principals have been thoughtful and cautious in their recommendations. 

I am deeply appreciative of the myriad of contributions made by our community 
members, board members, and staff members. The towns within this SAU have 
always been supportive of quality education and I am appreciative of the support I 
have received as we continue to strive. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John True 



S-5 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 



TO THE CITIZENS OF THE PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRICT: 

Plymouth Elementary School opened it's doors in September with an enrollment 
almost identical to that of last year. Although there has been a flurry of movement, 
enrollment is presently at 508 students. We anticipate a larger kindergarten class for 
next year, which will return our enrollment to a number around 530 students. 

Teachers and members of the community continue to work in several curriculum 
areas. This year we are piloting a K-8 Social Studies curriculum which is aligned with 
the New Hampshire State Frameworks. Presently committees are working in the areas 
of science and technology. 

Plymouth Elementary has been nominated as a Blue Ribbon School of Excellence 
by the U.S. Department of Education. The application for this honor was a lengthy 
process that members of the faculty and school board completed in September. We 
anticipate hearing final results this spring. We could not have been considered for this 
award without the continued support of the community and a dedicated faculty. 

This year's Educational Theater Collaborative (ETC) will present Fiddler on the 
Roof. This collaboration with Plymouth Friends of the Arts and Plymouth State 
College continues to provide our students, parents, faculty and community members 
a wonderful opportunity to display their talents. For those of us less talented, it's a 
time to spend an exciting evening watching our friends and family perform. We hope 
everyone will have an opportunity to view this delightful production. 

My thanks go to the volunteers and parents who are involved in making this 
school such a wonderful place, and to the voters of the Plymouth School District who 
continue to support quality education for their children, who are our future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter F. Hutchins 
Principal 



S-6 



PLYMOUTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
NURSE'S REPORT 



The following is the 1998 report of the Health Services at Plymouth Elementary 
School: 

Health Services are provided for approximately 512 students and 85 staff mem- 
bers. These services encompass a variety of offerings. The health office is open daily 
for first aid visits, illnesses, medication dispersal, health counseling, vision and hear- 
ing checks, blood pressure, lice, scoliosis and asthma checks. Also included is com- 
munication and referral to area physicians and agencies. About 70-90 students visit on 
a daily basis. 

My administrative duties consist of fiscal, legal, hot lunch program, monitoring 
daily absences and keeping a complete health file on all students. This file consists of 
immunizations, medical exams by a physician, medications and health histories, 
including chronic illnesses. I am also available as a resource person for health class- 
es, and periodically teach health to various classes. 

Over the course of the year approximately 80 sports physicals were performed by 
Plymouth Pediatrics. In April, a clinic was held here to administer measles, mumps 
and rubella vaccine to incoming seventh graders. This booster is required by state law. 
At this time we also offered a booster of tetanus and diphtheria to eighth graders. This 
was to prepare them for entry into high school. A total of 73 students took advantage 
of this clinic. In November, 40 staff members received the flu vaccine. 

This year we began a new dental program in conjunction with Speare Memorial. 
The program's goal is to provide dental care to children who would otherwise not 
always receive care. The program consists of screening, prevention, and referral to an 
area dentist for restorative care. Barbara Laverack was the dental hygienist. A total of 
231 children were screened; 61 students signed up for cleaning and fluoride, 33 stu- 
dents paid and 28 students were treated for free; 44 referrals to a dentist were made. 

In October, 19 staff members participated in a Personal Wellness Profile spon- 
sored by Blue Cross Blue Shield. The profile was administered by Catholic Medical 
Center. 

SAU # 48 school nurses continue to meet monthly to share information, monitor 
and update policies and programs as needed. 

Please contact me at any time if you have any questions in regards to your child's 
health. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Karen Bourgeois 
School Nurse 



S-7 



PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Minutes of March 2, 1998 School District Meeting 

Plymouth Elementary School 



Present Board: 

Joanne Strickland, Chairperson Tim Naro 

Mary Crane, Vice Chairperson Pat Cantor 

Barbara Boyle 

Administration: 

John W. True, Jr., Superintendent of Schools 
Mark Halloran, Assistant Superintendent 
Peter Hutchins, Principal 
Fran Gonsalves, Assistant Principal 

Moderator, Robert Clay, called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. and led those present 
in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 

Robert Clay went over the rules of the meeting. 

Tom Goulart moved, Tony Raymond seconded, to waive the reading of the warrant in 
its entirety and take each Article one at a time. Voice vote was taken, all present voted 
in the affirmative. 

Article 1: Tim Naro moved, seconded by Joanne Strickland that the District 

accept the reports of agents, auditors, committees and officers. A voice 
vote was taken. All present were in the affirmative. 

Article 2: Barbara Boyle moved, seconded by Joanne Strickland that the District 

vote to authorize the School Board under RSA 198:20-b to apply for, 
accept and expend, without further action of the School District meet- 
ing, money from any source which becomes available during the fiscal 
year provided that such expenditures be made for purposes for which 
a school district may appropriate money and that such expenditures not 
require the spending of other school district funds. A voice vote was 
taken. All present were in the affirmative. 

Article 3: Mary Crane moved, seconded by Joanne Strickland that the District 

vote to establish a contingency fund in accordance with RSA 198:4b, 
such contingency fund to meet the cost of unanticipated expenses that 
may arise during the year and, further, to see if the District will raise 
and appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for such con- 
tingency fund. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) A 
voice vote was taken, to so establish said fund and to raise and appro- 
priate five thousand dollars ($5,000) for establishment of this fund. All 
present were in the affirmative. 



S-8 






Article 4: Pat Cantor moved, seconded by Joanne Strickland, that the District 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
to be placed in the already established Capital Reserve Fund for the 
purpose of school repairs and maintenance. (The School Board recom- 
mends this appropriation.) A voice vote was taken. All present were in 
the affirmative. 

Article 5: Tim Nero moved, seconded by Joanne Strickland, that the District vote 
to approve the cost items included in the collective bargaining agree- 
ment reached between the Plymouth School District and the Plymouth 
Educational Support Personnel Association which calls for the follow- 
ing increases in salaries and benefits: 



Year 
1997-1998 
1998-1999 



Estimated Increase 

$3,294 
$4,118 



and further to raise and appropriate the sum of four thousand one hun- 
dred eighteen dollars ($4,118) for the 1998-1999 fiscal year, such sum 
representing the additional costs to the increase in salaries and benefits 
over those of the appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the 
prior fiscal year. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 
A voice vote was taken. All present were in the affirmative. 

Article 6: Motion was made by Joanne Strickland, seconded by Mary Crane that 

the District vote to raise and appropriate the sum of four million thirty 
nine thousand five hundred sixteen dollars ($4,039,516) for the support 
of schools, for the payment of salaries for the school district officials, 
employees and agents and for the payment of statutory obligations of 
the District which also includes the sums found in Articles 3, 4 and 5 
and includes sums previously approved for salaries. (The School 
Board recommends this appropriation.) 

Discussion ensued regarding foundation aid, computer equipment and 
instructional aides. 

With no further discussion a voice vote was taken. All present were in 
the affirmative. 

Article 7: To discuss Senate Bill 2 which will be voted on by official ballot at the 
polls on March 10, 1998, such ballot question to read: 'Shall we adopt 
the provisions of RS A 40: 13 to allow official ballot voting on all issues 
before the School District?" (Submitted by Petition.) (The School 
Board does not recommend this Article.) (60% majority vote 
required.) 

A member of the public stated that she is not in favor of the SB2. The 



S-9 



way school district meetings are currently held are very effective. 

Dave Moorehead stated that he felt this area is very well informed due 
to the public access channel and the local newspapers. He is in support 
ofSB2. 

Patrice Scott stated that people are very informed in this area and she 
supports SB 2. She feels that some individuals are not able to attend the 
district meetings because of other commitments, therefore, they are not 
able to vote and take part in the discussions. 

Jack Criste also is in support of the SB2. People are informed. 

Mr. Cantor stated that he is not in support of the SB2. This Bill has not 
proven itself in other districts that have voted it in. 

Widge Kent commented that the people in the community elect the 
school board members and they should feel that they are working in 
everyone's best interest. She does not support SB2. 

Article 8: Joanne Strickland paid tribute to Mary Crane for her years of service 

to the Board. She will be greatly missed. 

With no further business to transact, the meeting was adjourned by 
Moderator Robert Clay at 7:23 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Susan Wood 
School District Clerk 



S-10 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT 



To the Board 

Plymouth School District 

Plymouth, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying general-purpose financial statements of the 
Plymouth School District as of and for the year ended June 30, 1998, as listed in the 
table of contents. These general-purpose financial statements are the responsibility of 
the Plymouth School District management. Our responsibility is to express an opin- 
ion on these general-purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing stan- 
dards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reason- 
able assurance about whether the general-purpose financial statements are free if 
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence sup- 
porting the amounts and disclosures in the general-purpose financial statements. An 
audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates 
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall general-purpose financial 
statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our 
opinion. 

The general-purpose financial statements referred to above do not include the 
General Fixed Assets Account Group, which should be included to conform with gen- 
erally accepted accounting principles. The amounts that should be recorded in the 
General Fixed Assets Account Group are not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the general-purpose financial statements 
of the omission described in the preceding paragraph, the general -purpose financial 
statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial posi- 
tion of the Plymouth School District as of June 30, 1998, and the results of its opera- 
tions for the year then ended in conformity with generally accepted accounting prin- 
ciples. 

Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general- 
purpose financial statements taken as a whole. The individual and combining fund 
financial statements and schedules listed in the table of contents are presented for pur- 
poses of additional analysis and are not a required part of the general-purpose finan- 
cial statements of the Plymouth School District. Such information has been subject- 
ed to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the general-purpose financial 
statements and, in our opinion, is fairly presented in all material respects in relation to 
the general-purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 

GRZELAK AND COMPANY, PC., CPA'S 

Laconia, New Hampshire 
September 24, 1998 

A copy of the Audit of the 1997-1998 School District financial transaction may 
be reviewed at the Superintendent of School's Office. 



S-ll 



S-12 



Plymouth 
School District 



Warrant 
and Budget 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Plymouth, in the County of Grafton, 
State of New Hampshire, qualified to vote upon District Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary School on Monday, the eighth 
day of March, 1999 at 7:00 o'clock in the evening to act upon the following subjects: 

Article 1: To see what action the District will take relative to the reports of agents, 
auditors, committees and officers. 

Article 2: Shall the School District accept the provisions of RSA 198:20-b providing that 
any school district at an annual meeting may adopt an article authorizing 
indefinitely, until specific recision of such authority, the School Board to apply 
for. accept and expend, without furthe r action by the School District, 
unanticipated money from a state, federal or other governmental unit or a 
private source which becomes available during the fiscal year? 

Article 3: To see if the District will vote to establish a contingency fund in accordance 
with Revised Statutes Annotated 198:4-b, such contingency fund to meet the 
cost of unanticipated expenses that may arise during the year and, further, to 
see if the District will raise and appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars 
($5,000) for such contingency fund. (The School Board recommends this 
appropriation,) 

Article 4: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of fifty thousand 
dollars ($50,000) to be placed in the already established Capital Reserve Fund 
for the purpose of school repairs and maintenance. (The School Board 
recommends this appropriation,) (Majority vote required.) 

Article 5: To see if the Distnct will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of ten thousand 
dollars ($10,000) to be added to the school district Special Education Capital 
Reserve Fund previously established. (The School Board recommends this 
appropriation.) (Majority vote required.) 



Article 6: To see if the District will vote to approve the cost items included in the 

collective bargaining agreement reached between the Plymouth School District 
and the Plymouth Educational Association which calls for the following 
increases in salaries and benefits: 



Year 

1S98-1999 



Estimated Increase 
$50,597 



This amount will be funded from existing revenues. 



S-14 



Article 7: To see if the District will vote to approve the cost items included in the 

collective bargaining agreement reached between the Plymouth School District 
and the Plymouth Educational Association which calls for the following 
increases in salaries and benefits: 



Year 



Estimated Increase 



Article 8: 



1999-2000 
2000-2001 
2001-2002 



$70,600 
$70,656 
$71,738 



and further to raise and appropriate the sum of seventy thousand six hundred 
dollars ($70,600) for the 1999-2000 fiscal year, such sum representing the 
additional costs to the increase in salaries and benefits over those of the 
appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year. (The School 
Board recommends this appropriation.) 

To see if the District will vote to approve the cost items included in the 
collective bargaining agreement reached between the Plymouth School District 
and the Plymouth Educational Support Personnel Association which calls for 
the following increases in salaries and benefits: 



Year 



Estimated Increase 



1999-2000 
2000-2001 
2001-2002 



$15,166 
$17,111 
$15,778 



and further to raise and appropriate the sum of fifteen thousand one hundred 
sixty six dollars ($15,166) for the 1999-2000 fiscal year, such sum representing 
the additional costs to the increase in salaries and benefits over those of the 
appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year. (The School 
Board recommends this appropriation.) 

Article 9: To see if the District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of four million 
three hundred sixty-one thousand five hundred sixty-six dollars 
($4,361 ,566) for the support of schools, for the payment of salaries for the 
school district officials, employees and agents and for the payment of statutory 
obligations of the District which also includes the sums found in Articles 3, 4, 5, 
6, 7, and 8. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 

Article 10: To discuss Senate Bill 2 which will be voted on by official ballot at the polls on 
March 9, such ballot question to read: "Shall we adopt the provisions of RSA 
40:13 to allow official ballot voting on all issues before the School District?" 
(Submitted by Petition) (The School Board does not recommend this article.) 
(60% vote required) 



S-15 



Article 11: To transact any further business which may legally come before this meeting. 

Given under our hands this 22nd day of February in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred 
and ninety-nine. 



Timothy M. Naro 



JoAnne Strickland 



Barbara Boyle 



Michael Bullek 



Christopher Mumford 
Plymouth School Board 



A true copy of warrant attest: 



Timothy M. Naro 



JoAnne Strickland 



Barbara Boyle 



Michael Bullek 



Christopher Mumford 
Plymouth School Board 



S-16 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Plymouth qualified to vote in 
District Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Plymouth Elementary School in said District on 
the ninth day of March, 1999 at 8:00 in the morning to act upon the following sub- 
jects: 

1 . To elect all School District officers which appear on the official school dis- 
trict ballot for the ensuing year. 

2. Shall we adopt the provisions of RSA 40: 13 to allow official ballot voting on 
all issues before the Plymouth School District? 

Polls will not close before 7:00 p.m. 

Given under our hands at said Plymouth the 22nd day of February, 1999. 

JoAnne Strickland 
Timothy M. Naro 
Christopher Mumford 
Barbara Boyle 
Michael Bullek 

A true copy of warrant attest: 

JoAnne Strickland 
Timothy M. Naro 
Christopher Mumford 
Barbara Boyle 
Michael Bullek 



S-17 



MS-26 

REVISED '99- 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION 

P.O. BOX 487, COSCOTID. NH 03302-0487 

(603)271-3397 




SCHOOL BUDGET FORM 

OF: Plymouth ^tjj 

Appropriation* ana Estimate* or Revenue tor tke Fi*caJ Year From JiiIt 1, " to June 30, _^___ 



IMPORTANT; 

Please read RSA 32:5 applicable to all municipalities. 



l.Uee this form to list ALL APPROPRIATIONS in the appropriate recommended and not recommended area. 
Tnis means the operating budget and all special and individual warrant articles must be posted, 

2. Hold at least one public hearing on this midget. 

3. When completed, a copy or the midget must he posted with the warrant. Another copy must be placed on 
riie with the school clerk, and a copv sent to the Department or Revenue Administration at the above address. 



Certified That Budget Was Posted With Warrant on (Date): 



SCHOOL B OARD MEMBERS 

Please sign m ink. 



THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE SCHOOL WARRANT 



S-18 



Budget School District of Plymouth FY2000 



Acct 
No. 



Purpose of Appropriations 
(RSA3V4) 



Wan- 
Art.* 



Expenditures 

for Year 7/1/97 

to 6/30/88 



Appropriations 

Prior Year as 

Approved by DRA 



Appropriations 

Ensuing Fiscal 

Year (Recommended) 



MS26 

Appropriations Ensuing 

Fiscal Year 

(Not Recommended) 



INSTRUCTION (1000-1999) 




xxxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


1100-1199 


Regular Programs 


6,7,8 


1,598,191.00 


1,684,221.00 


1,816,400.00 




1200-1299 


Special Programs 


6,7,8 


754,186.00 


732,284.00 


759,033.00 




1300-1399 


Vocational Programs 












1400-1499 


Other Programs 




66,848.00 


77.929.00 


81,268.00 




1500-1599 


Non-Public Programs 












1600-1899 


Adult & Community Programs 













SUPPORT 


SERVICES (2000-2999) 




XXXXXXXXXX 




XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


2000-2199 


| Student Support Services 


6.7,8 
6,7,8 


260,965.00 




282,274.00 


281.789.00 


n 


2200-2299 


I Instructional Staff Services 


133,533.00 


128,885.00 


143,005.00 





GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



XXXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXXX 



| 2310-840 



School Board Contingency 



Othar School Board 



XXXXXXXXXX 

5.000.00 



OT HER OUTL AYS (5000-5999) 

5110 Debt Service - Principal 



XXXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXXX 



Debt Service - Interest 



XXXXXXXXXX 



EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATION 




XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


2320-310 
2320-2329 


SAU Management Services 




119.880.00 


114.872.00 


112,590.00 




All Other Executive 












2400-2499 


School Administration Service 




197,974.00 


204,424.00 


220.633.00 




2500-2599 


Business 












2600-2699 


Operation & Maintenance of Plant 




313,395.00 


362.236.00 


357,451.00 




2700-2799 


Student Transportation 




113,524.00 


97,625.00 


94,988.00 




2800-2899 


Other Support Service 












3000-3999 


NON-INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 








7,747.00 




4000-4999 


FACILITIES ACQUISITIONS 1 CONSTRUCTION 




0.00 


1,665.00 


93,000.00 





XXXXXXXXXX 







8,008.00 1 8,008.00 1 8.008.00 










I 





FUND TRANSFERS 




XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


5220-5221 


To Food Service 




30,000.00 


18,500.00 


20,350.00 




5222-5229 


To Other Special Revenue 




0.00 


291,175.00 


262,524.00 




5230-5239 


To Capital Projects 












' 5251 


To Capital Reserves 


4.5 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


60,000.00 




5252 


To Expendable Trust (*see pg.3) 












5253 


To Non-Expendable Trusts 










5254 j To Agency Funds 












5300-5399 | Intergovernmental Agency Alloc. 












SUPPLEMENTAL 












i DEFICIT 












SUBTOTAL 1 9 j 3,649.365 00 


4,039,516.00 


4.361,566.00 





S-19 



Budget School District of Plymouth FY2000 



PLEASE PROVIDE FURTHER DETAIL 

* Amount of line 5252 which is for Health Maintenance Trust $ (see RSA 198:20-c,V> 

Helpl We ask your assistance in the following: If you have a line item of appropriations from more than one warrant article, 
use the space below to identify the make-up of the lin e total fo r the ensuing year. 
Acct. # 



Warr. 



Amount 



Acct# 



Warr. 
Art.# 



MS26 



SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES* 



Special warrant articles are defined in RSA 32:3, VI, as appropriations 1) Petitioned warrant articles; 2) appropriations raised by 
bonds or notes, 3) appropriations to a separate fund created pursuant to law, such as capital reserve funds or trust funds; 
4) an appropriation designated on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapsing or nontransferable article. 

1 2 3 4 5 S 



Acct. 

No. 


Purpose of Appropriations 
(RSA 31:4) 


Warr 
Art.# 


Expenditures 

for Year 7/1/97 

to 6/30/98 


Appropriations 

Prior Year as 

Approved by DRA 


Appropriations 

Ensuing Fiscal 

Year (Recommended) 


Appropriations Ensuing 

Fiscal Year 

(Not Recommended) 












5251 


Capital Reserve for school repairs 


4 






50,000.00 




I 5251 


Capital Reserve for Special Ed 


s 






10,000.00 















' 



































| SUBTOTAL 2 


RECOMMENDED 




xxxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXXX 


60,000.00 


XXXXXXXXXX 






















'" INDIVIDUAL WARRANT ARTICLES" 





"Individual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special warrant articles". Examples of individual warrant 
articles might be negotiated cost items for labor agreements or items of a one time nature you wish to address individually. 
1 2 3 4 5 



Acct. 
No. 



Purpose of Appropriations 
(RSA 31:4) 



Warr 
Art.# 



Expenditures 

for Year 7/1/97 

to 6/30/98 



Appropriations 

Prior Year as 

Approved by DRA 



Appropriations 

Ensuing Fiscal 

Year (Recommended) 



Appropriations Ensuing 

Fiscal Year 

(Not Recommended) 



«.—-.—.« — _—....—. 


. -. . 


- 


- •- 


*- ac — a»s 














11001200.1400 : Teacher Collective Bargaining 

2000-2199.2200-22 


7 






70.600.00 | 










— 


1100.1200.2200-22 Support Staff Collective Bargaining 


8 




15,166.00 




2400-2«9.2SOO-2ai 










I 

2310-840 | Contingency Fund 


3 






5,000.00 




i 










I 


SUBTOTAL 3]RECOMMENDED 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


90.766.00 


XXXXXXXXXX 



S-20 



Budqet School District of Plymouth 

1 2 

Act*. 
No SOURCE OF REVENUE 


FY2000 

3 

Wan- 
Art. # 


4 

Actual 
Revenues 
Prior Year 


5 

Revised 

Revenue 

Current Year 

XXXXXXXXXX 


MS26 

6 

ESTIMATED 

REVENUE For 

Ensuing Fiscal Year 


REVENUE FROM LOCAL SOURCES 






XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


1300-1349 Tuition 




302.684.00 


231,528.00 


261 ,609.00 


1400-1449 


Transportation Fees 
! Earnings on Investments 
| Food Service Sales 





' 


1,039.00 


1,200.00 


I 1 

1 ,200.00 


1500-1599 


1600-1699 




- - 






1700-1799 I Student Activities 










1800-1839 


Community Services Activities 






21,219.00 






1900-1999 


Other Local Sources 




0.00 


23,576.00! 


I ... 










REVENUE FROM STATE SOURCES 




XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 

1,043,472.00 


xxxxxxxxxx 


3110 


j Foundation Aid 






789,789.00 


1,589,000 00 


3120 


Shared Revenue 
School Building Aid 
Kindergarten Aid 











3210 










3220 




24,000.00 


26,250.00 


26,250.00 

20,158.00 

— I 


3230 


Catastropic Aid 






28,460.00 


28,460.00 


3240-3249 


Vocational Aid 





■ — 




3250 


Adult Education 
Child Nutrition 
Driver Education 






3260 










3270 


i 
I 






3290-3299 i Other State Sources 


I 






I I 


i 
I 






REVENUE FROM FEDERAL SOURCES 


xxxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXXX 


4100-4539 


Federal Program Grants 


8,805.00 


7,900.00 


7,060.00 


4S40 


Vocational Education 












4550 


Adult Education 




222,948.00 


275,675.00 




4560 


Child Nutrition 








222,948.00 


4570 


Disabilities Programs 






4580 


Medicaid Distribution 






46.987.00 


46,322.00 


30,000.00 


4590-4999 
4810 


Other Federal Sources (except 4810) 




2,854.00 


7,600.00 
2,441.00 


13,940.00 


Federal Forest Reserve 




0.00 








I 
i 






OTHER FIN 


ANCING SOURCES 








5110-5139 


Sale of Bonds or Notes 


ev Fund 


- - 








S221 


Transfer from Food Service Special R 




I 
I 


S222 


Transfer from Other Special Revenue 


Funds 








| 



S-21 



Budget School District of Plymouth FY2000 



Acct 
No. 



SOURCE OF REVENUE 



Warr 
Art. # 



Actual 
Revenues 
Prior Year 



Revised 

Revenue 

Current Year 



MS26 

6 

ESTIMATED 

REVENUE For 

Ensuing Fiscal Year 



OTH ER FINANCING SOURCES (Cont'd) 

5230 Transfer from Capital Project Funds 



5251 Transfer fro m Capital Reserve Funds 

5252 Transfer from Expendable Trust Funds 



Transfer from Non-Expendable Trust Funds 



5300-5699 Other Financing Sources 



Unreserved Fund Balance 



I THIS SECTION FOR CALCULATION OF RAN's 
(REIMBURSEMENT ANTICIPATION NOTES) 
PER RSA 19820-D FOR CATASTROPHIC 
AID BORROWING 

RAN. Revenue This FY less 

RAN, Revenue Last FY 

U=_NETRAN 
Supplemental Appropriation (Contra) 



Voted from Fund Balance 
Fund Balance to Reduce Taxes 



TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE & CREDITS 



2.195,741.00 



** BUDGET SUMMARY ** 



SUB TOTAL 1 Appr opriations Recommended (from page 2) 

SUBTOTAL 2 Special Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 3) 



SUBTOTAL 3 "Individual" Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 3) 



TOTA L Ap pro priations Recommended 



Less: A mount of Es timated Revenues & Credits (from above) 

Estimated Amount of Taxes To Be Raised for School District Assessment 



4,361.566.00 



included in Subtotal 1 



Included in Subtotal 1 



4,361,566.00 



2,195,741.00 



2,165,625.00 



S-22 



1999 
DATES TO REMEMBER 



March 1 : Last day for veterans to file for permanent tax credit with the 

Selectmen's Office. 

Last day for eligible residents to file for permanent elderly exemption 
and/or blind exemption with the Selectmen's Office. 

March 8: Annual Plymouth School District Meeting — 

Plymouth Elementary School - 7:00 PM 

March 9: Annual Town Meeting - Election Day 

Plymouth Elementary School - 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM 

March 10: Annual Town Meeting - Deliberative Session 
Plymouth Elementary School - 7:00 PM 

March 1 1 : Annual Plymouth Village Water and Sewer District Meeting 
Plymouth Elementary School - 7:00 PM (Music Room) 

March 20: Annual Pemi-Baker Regional School District Meeting — 
Plymouth State College Field House - 1:00 PM 



April 1: 



All real property assessed to owner this date. 



April 15: Last day for property owners to file Inventory with the Selectmen. 
Mandatory requirement under RSA 74-7. 

Last day to file Current Use application with Selectmen's Office. 

April 30: Dog tax due. Licenses available from the Town Clerk with proof of 

rabies vaccination. 



May 1: Bicycle plates due. Licenses available from the Police Department. 

July 1: Fiscal year begins. 



Special Fourth Class Rate - Books