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Full text of "Annual report of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools"

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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF 



Char 



'2 0/-SJ, 



HARLESTOWN T REE OCHOOLS. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OE THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OE 1873. 




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OHARDiSTCWN : 

LMilNTED BY CALEB RAND 

1874. 




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NOTICE. 



With two exceptions, the Charlestown School Reports were not 
printed previously to the yeur 1838. 

At the meeting of the School Committee, Dec. 18, 1873, an 
order was passed authorizing the printing of such Annual Reports 
of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools as exist in manu- 
script, but have never been printed. 

The following comprise ail that can be found in manuscript. 
It will be observed that the reports from 1802 to 1813 are 

WILLIAM H. FINNEY, 

Treasurer Trustees of CharlestoKjn Free ^Schools. 



• * • k 



B E P O R T S . 



15*S01. 

The Trustees of Chaiiestown Free Schools conceive it their 
duty to lay before the town a summary account of their proceed- 
ings since they have been in office, of their receipts and expend- 
itures, and of the present state of the school funds, and to suggest 
what further supplies will be necessary for the support of the 
schools the present year. 

The records of the board of trustees, which have been read by 
their secretary, liave exhibited to the town the detail of their pro- 
ceedings the year past. 

In addition, the trustees think it proper to state that, immediately 
on the resignation of Mr. Payson, in the manner recited, they made 
inquiry for a suitable person to succeed him. Mr. Tillotson, be- 
ing respectably recommended, was engaged for a few months on 
trial. Unfortunately, the day after he entered the school he was 
taken sick ; and in expectation of his speedy recovery, the school 
was temporarily supplied by Messrs. Sewell and Rockwood, for six 
or seven weeks, and afterwards, for about the same time, by Mr. 
James Pike, who was employed upon such recommendations as the 
trustees conceived they might safely rely upon. But on finding 
him unequal to the duties of the office, they, as early as possible, 
engaged Mr. Ashur Adams to take his place, and he returned to 
his friends. 

The frequent changes which took place during the three first 
months in this year were a source of much regret, anxiety, and 
trouble to the trustees, but were rendered unavoidable by an un- 
fortunate concurrence of circumstances which it is not necessary 
here particularly to mention. 

The time suitable for opening the school for young misses having 
arrived, the trustees have engaged Mr. Blood to take charge of the 
reading school, and to instruct in English grammar, geography. 



and the Latin and Greek languages. The schools are now organ- 
ized for the season and furnished with masters, who, in their re" 
spective branches (if a judgment may be formed from their 
recommendations, and a short experience of their talents and 
quaUfications), the trustees flatter themselves will give reasonable 
satisfaction to the town. 

In respect to the receipts, expenditures, and present state of the 
funds, the trustees inform that it will appear from the treasurers 
book that they have received, in the course of the year past, 
$4,124.81, including due bills, parish notes, and cash, to the 
amount of $1,310.78, transferred from the former treasurer, and 
also $1,000 toward the building of a new school-house. They 
have paid for sundry purposes, $3,035.10, leaving a balance in the 
treasurer's hands of $1,089.71. 

Of the moneys paid the last year, $1,000 were towards the 
school-house now erecting, and $539.95 for arrearages due to sun- 
dry persons when the present board of trustees came into office. 

The trustees have settled and paid all their accounts to this day, 
and owe not a dollar, to their knowledge, to any individual. The 
balance in the treasurer's hands consists of due bills given by the 
town treasurer, amounting to $588.66 ; two parish notes, principal 
and interest, $475.35; cash, $25.70; total, $1,089.71. 

In respect to the supplies for the ensuing year, the trustees 
think it their duty to state, for the information of the town, that 
they have been at the pains to number the children, of both sexes, 
between the ages of seven and fourteen, and find in this class three 
hundred and forty-seven, exclusive of those belonging to the schools 
without the Neck, — sixty-six of these are above the house of Cap- 
tain Richard Frothingham. On supposition that three quarters of 
these only attend, it will easily be conceived that two masters 
could not afford them all the instruction which parents have a right 
to expect for their children. As, therefore, there is a sufficient 
number of children above Mr. Richard Frothingham's to constitute 
one school, and below to constitute two others — as it would be a 
great and a reasonable accommodation of the parents and children 
at and above tae Neck, and as gentlemen have offered to loan the 
money for building a school house, the trustees have been induced 



to submit to the consideration of the town, whether it would not 
be expedient, and tend greatly to the advancement of the numerous 
rising generation in useful knowledge and moral improvement, to 
make provision for building a school-house near the Neck, and for 
supporting another master? Should the town see fit to accommo- 
date the people of this district in the manner suggested, their grant 
will of course be competent to meet the increased expenses. Ex- 
clusive, however, of any provision of this kind, the current ex- 
penses of the ensuing year wiil be considerably increased in conse- 
quence of the establishment of another permanent master. 

The sum granted for five years past, when but one master within 
the Neck has been employed, has been $1,166.66. The following 
estimate of probable expenditures for the year ensuing will enable 
the town to judge about what sum may be expedient for them to 
grant to promote the important purposes of education : — 

For the support of two masters within the Neck . . $1,091 67 
Wood to supply two schools, and sawing .... 50 00 

For the education of poor children, and for supplying 

them with books, etc 125 00 

Rent of school-room, purchasing stove and funnel, and 
contingencies ....... 

For school without the Neck, No. 2 . 

do do No. 3 . . 

do do No. 4 . 

Deduct the income from the school funds 
Balance to be provided for by the town is . 

This is only $340 more than has been voted by the town for 
five years past, when one instructor only was employed within the 
Neck. 

At the conclusion of their report, the trustees take leave to 
observe that the establishment of another school, and the arrange- 
ments rendered necessary in consequence of it, the unexpected 
resignation of Mr. Payson, and the great difficulty of procuring a 
successor in the dead of winter, together with the arduous and 



100 


00 


287 


00 


145 


50 


145 


50 


$1,944 67 


437 


85 


. $1,506 


82 



6 



difficult business of planning, contracting for, and superintending 
the erection of a school-house and town-hall, have thrown an 
uncommon share of labor and responsibilit}'" upon the present 
board of trustees. They are conscious of having discharged the 
important duties devolved on them by the town with integrity, 
impartiality, and an undeviating and disinterested regard to the 
best interests of the town, and the improvement of its numerous 
youth. 

By order of the board of trustees. 

BENJ. HURD, Jr., 

Sec'etary. 



ISOQ. 

The Trustees of the Chailestown Free Schools beg leave to lay 
before the town the following statement and report : — 

From the treasurer's books it will appear thdt there has been 
expended the last year for the various purposes stated in his 
account, the sum of $4,540.62, and that the sum of $5,501.27 has 
been received, including the balance on hand at the commence- 
ment of the year. The balance now in the treasury is $716.44. 

From the best estimates which the trustees are enabled to make 
of the probable expenses of the current year, there will be required 
the sum of $1,650. This sum, with the income of the school's 
funds, will enable the trustees to afford the usual support to the 
three schools without the Neck, to maintain two masters the year 
round within the Neck, to expend one hundred and fifty dollars in 
supporting a school for the accommodation of the inhabitants on 
and in the neighborhood of the Neck, and one hundred dollars for 
the education of the children of the poor. The above were the 
sums granted to carry into effect the arrangements of the last year. 

The trustees think it their duty to suggest some alteration in the 
arrangement of the schools, which, in their opinion, will conduce 
greatly to the advantage of our numerous youth, particularly the 
more indigent class, and also to the lessening the burdens of a very 
considerable and deserving portion of the citizens. 

The plan they propose is this, — that all the schools taught by 
the women, as well as the others, be free schools, and supported at 
the expense of the town, aud under the superintendence of the 
board of trustees. On this plan, the expense of these schools will 
not probably be increased ; more scholars can be instructed, and 
with more uniformity and advantage ; the expense of supporting 
them will fall on those who are the best able to bear it, and the sum 
annually voted for educating poor children (the expenditure of 
which creates for the trustees much trouble) will be saved. The 
additional sum necessary to carry this plan into effect, and to sup- 
port four or five free schools for little children, to be taught by 
women, from the best calculation the trustees have been enabled to 
make, is $1,000. 



8 



From this may be deducted the one hundred dollars usually voted 
to educate poor children. More than this sum is now annually 
expended in educating a less number of children than would be 
accommodated on the new plan, and the greater part is paid by a 
class of people who can illy spare it- from the support of their 
families. 

The whole sum necessary to carry into effect the arrangement 
now proposed, and to have all the schools in town free schools, is 
$2,550. 

The advantages of this arrangement, the trustees persuade them- 
selves, will appear greater and more numerous the more it is 
considered. 

With these brief remarks, they submit it to the town, that they 
may act thereon as they think proper. 

The trustees beg leave further to report, that they have received 
in behalf of the trustees of Mr. Raynard, a handsome 
to decorate the school-house, which he presents to the town ; and 
of Z. B. Adams, Esq., as a gift to the trustees, a lot of land for a 
school house, in a very commodious situation near the Neck ; and 
that there is a sufficient number of scholars in that vicinity to 
constitute one school, and enough below to fill the two public 
schools by the meeting-house. They would therefore earnestly 
recommend it to the consideration of the town, whether it would 
not be expedient to erect a school-house on the lot presented by 
Mr. Adams, provision being made in the foregoing estimation for 
the support of another instructor for three months, which is suffi- 
cient for the present year. As an inducement to the town to 
comply with this suggestion, a gentleman offers to loan the town 
for two years a sum sufficient to erect a school-ho ise. 

The trustees have only to add, that notwithstandi 'g some 
unavoidable interruptions, the instructors appear to have faithfully 
and successfully discharged their duties ; the schools have been 
well attended, and the proficiency of the children, in the various 
branches of education, laudable. 

All which is submitted. 

BENJAMIN HURD, Jr., 

Secretary, 

May 10, 1802. 



1S13. 

The Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools, in obedience to a 
clause in the act of incorporation, respectfully submit to their 
fellow-citizens the following report of the particulars of their pro- 
ceedings, to which is annexed a statement of their funds. On the 
fourth of May, 1812, the trustees were chosen, and on the eighth 
the board was organized, the Rev. Wm. Collier was chosen presi- 
dent, and Abm. R. Thompson, secretary. Nehemiah Wyman was 
chosen treasurer, and has given bonds for ten thousand dollars for 
the faithful discharge of his duties ; a committee was chosen to 
audit the treasurer's accounts, and a vote was passed that an ac- 
curate enumeration of all the children in town from four to seven 
years old, and from seven to fourteen years old should be taken, in 
order to ascertain not only the number to be provided for in the 
public schools, viz., of children from seven to fourteen years old, 
but also the fountain from whence the public schools were to be 
supplied, — of children from four to seven years old ; thus present- 
ing at once an accurate view of the actual and relative state of 
the public schools. On the fifteenth of May the different members 
of the board reported the number of children in the various sec- 
tions of the town, and found the number 

From 4 to 7 to be . . . . . 457 

From 7 to 14 " . . . . . 710 



1,167 

As the money appropriated for the schools is paid by all, for the 
common benefit of all, it seemed just and equitable that it should 
be apportioned, not by mere fluctuating opinion, but by some rule, 
in itself fair and reasonable ; the trustees, after many meetings ex- 
pressly for this purpose, and after full discussion and mature 
consideration of the subject in all its parts, in September voted to 
distribute the money by the following rule, viz. : To the schools 
within the Neck, according to the number of children from seven 
to fourteen years of age ; and to the schools without the Neck, 
according to the whole number of children from four to fourteen 
years of age. Thus, for example. District No. 4 contains but 
2 



10 



thirty- four scholars of that age, viz., from seven to fourteen, which 
is provided for withm the Neck (for children are not allowed to go 
into the town school within the Neck under seven, nor over four- 
teen years of age) ; yet this same district receives for thirty-four 
scholars as much money as is expended within the Neck for fifty- 
one scholars. This distinction in favor of the schools without the 
Neck is, in the opinion of the trustees, an ample indemnification 
for all inconveniences arising from their local situation ; besides, the 
money appropriated without the Neck is abundantly sufficient to 
defray the expenses of their schools through that part of the year 
when the inhabitants send their children to them, from seven years 
old and upward ; and the expense of educating their children under 
seven years of age, it seems as just and reasonable for them to 
pay out of their own pockets as it is for the inhabitants within the 
Neck to do it. When, therefore, it is considered that of 1,167 
children in town, only one hundred and thirty-three are without 
the Neck ; and yet these one hundred and thirty-three children, be- 
ing actually less than one-eighth part of the whole number, expend 
more than one-fourth part of the money (contingencies excepted), 
it cannot for a moment be denied that this rule is not only favor- 
able, but generous to the people without the Neck. 

The trustees, after a faithful examination of the school kept by 
Mr. Alger, were unanimously of opinion that it was necessary to 
divide that school, and to establish another somewhere near the 
training-field, so as at once to relieve Mr. Alger's school and to 
accommodate the inhabitants in the eastern and northern sections 
of the town. In order to carry this project into execution it was 
necessary to consult the town, and a petition was accordingly pre- 
sented to the selectmen, requesting them to call a town meeting ; 
but as they declined doing this, the only expedient which the trus- 
tees could resort to was to employ an assistant with Mr. Alger, and 
they accordingly engaged Mr. 01. Jaquith. This arrangement has 
been highly beneficial to this important school, especially as the 
number of children who attended it has nearly doubled within the 
past year. As a necessary and valuable auxiliary in teaching 
geography, the trustees have furnished a pair of globes and a 
map for the use of this school. The past year the applications for 



11 



the privilege of sending small cliilrlren to the women's schools at 
the town's expense have been unusually numerous, and a consider- 
able sum has been expended in this way, as appears by the state- 
ment of the expenses of the board. Application was made for a 
school for the black children, and one was established by the trus- 
tees and kept from June until November, and the amount espended 
for it will be found on the statement. 

Early in the year, a code of elementary rules and regulations for 
the government of the schools was adopted by the board, officially 
introduced into the schools, enjoined upon masters and scholars' 
and a copy placed on the records. 

The attention of the trustees during the year past has been re- 
peatedly called to some mischievous boys detected in petty theft, 
etc. Those who belonged to the school were brought before the 
board, admonished, reproved, and exhorted, and their parents ac- 
quainted with their behavior. 

The trustees have had two public examinations of the school^ 
under the care of Messrs. Alger and Jaquith, Messrs. Fuller and 
Stickney, besides frequent informal visits as a board. 

These schools, though much crowded, are generally in good order 
and in a state of increasing and gratifying improvement, but 
reforms are necessary in some branches, and steps have been taken 
to effect them. The three schools without the Neck have all been 
visited in the course of the spring, and the trustees can, with 
sincere pleasure, bestow the most unqualified approbation on them. 
The state of the funds is accurately exhibited by the statement of 
our treasurer, distributed among our fellow-citizens in conformity 
to a vote passed by the town, July 3, 1812. The only difference 
between that statement and the actual state of the funds at this 
date is, that two bills unknown to the present board of trustees, 
and contracted defore they were elected, have come in, viz : — 

D. and S. Dennis $17 87 

Hovey ....... 75 

And Mr. Etheridge's bill for 800 statements . 8 00 



So that deduct $26 62 

these bills from the amount credited on hand in our statement, 
will leave a balance in the hands of the treasurer of $336.14, 



12 



and the accounts of the board completely settled, as the trustees 

have no knowledge of any demand whatever, and are sure that 

none exists of their own contracting ; as an otfset against this 

balance on hand, it must be remembered that the current salaries 

of the masters are going on, and, though not regularly due, will 

amount in reality to about the sum now on hand ; it must also 

be remembered that the permanent funds will not yield so much 

income for this year as for last, so that on the whole the trustees 

are of opinion that the support of the schools upon the present 

establishment will require for the current year the same sum as 

last year, viz : $3,000. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

By order of the board of trustees, 

A. R. THOMPSON, Secretary, 
May 3, 1813. 



13 



The trustees of the schools, in conformity with their duty, re- 
spectfully submit to their fellow-citizens the following report of 
their proceedings, to which is annexed a statement of their funds. 
The money raised for the support of the schools has been appor- 
tioned agreeably to the rule adopted by the board, and reported to 
the town the last May meeting. The Writing School, kept by Mr. 
D. Fuller, was vacated by his removal on the 20th of May, and 
kept until the 8th of June by Mr. Jaquith, when the present 
teacher, Mr. David Dodge, was employed and took the charge of 
it. On the I8th of July Mr. Israel Alger suddenly resigned his 
place as principal teacher of the Grammar School, on account of 
ill health, and Mr. Jaquith kept it alone until the 9th of August, 
when Mr. Abraham Andrews was enojasfed and instated in the 
school as the successor of Mr. Alger, 

In the winter, the trustees thought the interest of the school 
at the Neck required the removal of Mr. Stickney, and he was, on 
the 15th of January, notified that he would not be employed any 
longer than the 17th of March. Mr. Stickney left the school im- 
mediately, and Mr. Jaquith was placed in it, till February 22d, 
when the present teacher, Mr. John Bennett, was engaged and 
introduced. 

February 25th, the trustees, visited the school in District No. 5, 
which contained twenty-eight scholars, under the care of Mr. 
Nath. Green ; and also the school in District No. 4, which con- 
tained fifty-eight scholars, under the care of Mr. Pierce ; both the 
schools were in good order. April 12th, the board visited the 
school in Milk Row, District No. 3, containing sixty-nine scholars, 
under the care of Mr. Moses Hall; the 19th, the school at the 
Neck, No. 2, containing ninety scholars, under care of Mr. Bennett ; 
and the 26th and 29th, the school under the care of Messrs. An- 
drews and Jaquith, and Mr. Dodge, and were perfectly satisfied 
with the good order and improvement of them all. 

Although the trustees are sensible that such of their fellow- 
citizens as have children at school can best judge for themselves of 
the situation of the schools, yet it may be proper to state in this 



14 



place one or two facts interesting to fill. In May, 1812, the 
number of children at and without the Neck, from seven to four- 
teen years of age, was 220 ; the school at the Neck has generally 
averaged from 80 to 100 scholars in the winter; in summer it is 
lessened. The schools without the Neck being kept only part of 
the year, and not confined to any age, the number that attend 
tliem usually exceeds the whole number of children from four to 
fourteen that belong to them ; thus, for example : The number 
of children who have actually attended these schools the past 
season (as appears from returns from the masters, made at the 
time of visiting them) has been one hundred and fift3^-three, a 
number actually exceeding the number of children returned as 
belonging to them. These facts exhibit the general state of the 
schools in that quarter of the town, as to numbers, and it gives 
the trustees the highest pleasure to bear witness in this public 
manner to tlieir good order and improvement. The number of 
children from seven to fourteen years of age belonging to Dis- 
trict No. 1, taken in May, 1812, was four hundred and ninety-six ; 
in October of the same year the highest number of children who 
came to this school, according to returns made by Messrs. Alger 
and Fuller, amounted to two hundred and sixty-two, but little more 
than one-half the number that belonged to the district ; at the 
examination held at that time, the number that actually attended 
fell considerably below two hundred. 

According to returns made in April, 1814, by Mr. Dodge, of the 
Writing School, and Messrs. Andrews and Jaquith, of the Reading 
School, the number who came to this school is now four hundred 
and seventy -four, and the number who actually attended the public 
examinations exceeded three hundred. By this statement, it will 
be seen that this school has increased almost one half within the 
last year. 

When to this interesting fact of the extraordinary increase of 
this school we add that not a single complaint of disorderly be- 
havior of any of its members has the last year been made to the 
trustees ; and, at the late examinations, we found the school under 
the most perfect government and in the highest state of improve- 
ment, we cannot refrain from congratulating our fellow-citizens 



15 



on a situation of their public schools so auspicious to the best in . 
terests of the town, — so gratifying to the dearest hopes of pa. 
rents, — and bearing such honorable testimony to the eminent 
ability and fidelity of the instructors. 

It will be seen by the public statement of our treasurer, that the 
trustees have expended the past year $4,137.06 ; of this sum, 
$872.48 has been expended for the education of small children. 
The sum, therefore, of $3,264.58 has been expended for the estab- 
lished schools and contingent charges. The board have made 
some special grants, as in their opinion they were richly merited 
and perfectly consistent with a wise and just economy. The 
necessity of some extra repairs will probably swell the contingent 
charges the ensuing year ; some quarter bills will speedily become 
due, and there is no money in the treasury to pay them, so that 
the regular schools, with probable contingencies, will require the 
sum of $3,500 for the current year ; and if the town see fit to as- 
sign to the trustees the care of educating the children from four 
to fourteen years old, the additional sum of $1,000 will be required 
for this object ; so that to carry the whole plan into complete oper- 
ation will require the sum of $4,500. The state of the trustees* 
funds will be seen by the public statement of the treasurer. 

All which is respectfully submitted, by order of the trustees. 

ABM. R. THOMPSON, 
Mat 2, 1814. Secretary. 



16 



The trustees of the schools, in conformity with their duty, re- 
s pectfully report the following particulars of their proceedings the 
past year, and for the state of their funds and current expenses 
they refer to the printed statement of their treasurer. The town, 
at the last May meeting, instructed the trustees to take charge of 
the education of the small children, and voted the necessary funds 
for this purpose. Accordingly, every possible method was taken, by 
giving notice in the houses of public worship, and by the individual 
and combined exertions of the trustees and others, to have every 
child in town from four to seven years of age sent to school. Each 
school-mistress was required to make out an accurate return of all 
the children by name of this description who came to her school. 
These returns were made to the trustees, who required a monthly 
report from each mistress of any addition or diminution of her 
scholars. These schools were opened the first of May, and up- 
ward of five hundred children (whose names are all on file among 
the trustees' papers) were educated in them at the expense of the 
town. It was the earnest endeavor of the trustees to inculcate on 
the school-mistresses not only a due regard to the tuition of the 
children, but also a strict attention to order and cleanliness in 
their schools, believing that these rules were not only important 
to the children, but in some instances might have a salutary effect 
on those parents who are criminally negligent of these cardinal 
virtues ; notwithstanding the unavoidable embarassments and 
difficulties attendant on a novel system, and the peculiar agitation 
of the town, which made it impossible for the trustees to watch 
over these schools with the same care they might and would have 
exercised in a more tranquil season, yet they are of opinion that 
the town has gained a material advantage by this plan, and in 
providing for the instruction of little children from four to seven 
years old, they do in fact prepare the soil aud sow the seed on 
which essentially depends the future crop of education. 

The importance of these primary schools must be obvious to all 
who consider that they are the elements of those great public 
schools which are the pride and the bulwark of our country, and 



17 



which the liberal spirit and enlightened policy of our own town has 
carried to a degree of improvement and excellence probably une- 
qualled, certainly not surpassed, in the known world. These schools 
were all visited and examined in the course of the season, and were 
closed the last of October ; and, by vote of the town passed at April 
meeting, they are to be continued on the same plan the present 
year. A school for the benefit of the black children was opened in 
May, and kept through the summer months, to the approbation of 
the board, by Mrs. Ellenanor Jackson. 

In June, Mr. Robert Gordon was engaged as assistant in the 
Grammar School in place of Mr. Oliver Jaquith. 

The first of November, Messrs. Dodge and Andrews' school was 
visited ; a large number of respectable inhabitants attended the 
examination, and, in their opinion, and also in the opinion of the 
trustees, this school was in perfect order, and in a high state of 
improvement, notwithstanding the confusion of the previous sum- 
mer, — a fact whicii reflects the highest credit on the instruators. 

The 15th of November, the school at the Neck, under the care of 
Mr. Bennett, was visited, and exliibited gratifying improvement in 
some branches, and was respectable in all. 

The 16th of Februarj^, the school in District No. 5, under the care 
of Mr. N. Green, and the school in District No. 4, under the care 
of Mr. Jacob Pierce, were examined and found in good order. 

The 12th of April, the school in Milk Row, District No. 3, under 
the care of Mr. P. T. Gray, and the 21st instant, the school at the 
Neck, No. 2, under the care of Mr. Bennett, were visited and found 
in a situation satisfactory to the trustees. 

On the 27th instant, Messrs. Dodge and Andrews held their ex 
amination at the town-hall, and furnished the inhabitants with an 
opportunity of witnessing the uncommon excellence of their great 
and flourishing school. It was in truth a delightful sight to behold 
three hundred and thirty children, all clean and decent in their ap- 
parel, all prompt in their exercises, all animated with jouthful 
emulation and hope and joy, assembled on the floor of an invalua^ 
ble common privilege. The trustees will not conceal their joy and 
gratification in view of the interesting scene. 
3 



18 



On the 21st instant, a letter was received from Mr. Abraham 
Andrews, resignini^ his place as teacher of the Grammar School. 
It is due to the eminent ability and fidelity of this gentleman to 
declare, in this public manner, that he has filled his station entirely 
to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

He is succeeded by Mr. Jesse Smith, who took charge of the 
school this day. This gentleman is a graduate from Dartmouth 
College, has produced ample recommendations of his character and 
qualifications, and has for a year past been the preceptor of New 
Ipswich Academy. 

The trustees, for two years past, have kept a summer school at 
"Winter Hill, and the inhabitants living in that vicinity have repeat- 
edly requested that a school-house might be erected for their accom- 
modation. But although the board are sensible that a school-house 
in that neighborhood would be a great convenience and, all things 
being favorable, they would recommend the building of one, yet 
the necessity does not appear so urgent at present as to justify a 
call for additional grants at a time when our fellow-citizens are 
struggling with great and accumulated burthens. For the same 
reason, viz., — an unwillingness to ask for more money at the pres- 
ent moment, the trustees forbear to propose any plan for the relief 
of the great school which is kept in this building. But, although 
they will endeavor to continue this school on its present estab- 
lishment another year, they are sensible that the time is not far 
distant when a division of it must be made, and they indulge the 
pleasing hope that with the joyful return of peace, our fellow- 
citizens will be restored to their wonted occupations, and blessed 
with such returning prosperity as shall furnish them with the 
ability, as they have always possessed the disposition, to support 
with ch'^erfulness and liberality such additional means of educa- 
tion as the increasing population of the town may require. 

The money for the support of the different schools was divided 
and appropriated in May. The income of the funds was assigned 
for contingencies. The sum of $1,000 was reserved exclusively for 
the women's schools within the Neck, and $3,500 was divided by 
the rule of apportionment adopted by the board in 1812. By a 



19 



reference to the public statement of our treasurer, it will be seen 

that the trustees' funds have but just enabled them to meet their 

current expenses ; several bills will soon be due, and of course in 

order to meet them, and to carry on the same plan of education 

this year, it will be necessary for the town to grant the sum of 

$4,800. 

All which is respectfully submitted by order of the trustees of 

Charlestown free schools. 

A. R. THOMPSON, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, May 1, 1815. 



20 



The trustees of the schools respectfully submit the following 
particulars of their proceedings the past year, and for the state of 
their funds and expenses they refer to the printed statement of 
their treasurer. 

Immediately after the May meeting, the schools for the instruc- 
tion of the small children were opened ; regular returns (now on 
file) were received from the school-mistresses, and about five hun- 
dred children received the benefit of this provision. The schools 
were well conducted, and were closed on the 1st of November. 

The policy of this mode of education having occupied much 
attention, and a contrariety of opinion prevailing on the subject, 
it seems to be in order for the trustees to give a statement of facts 
respecting these schools, that their fellow-citizens may be able to 
judge for themselves as to the expediency of continuing them. 
The pli^i of free schools for the small children was adopted par- 
tially in 1813, and fully in 1814. If we consider the situation Of 
the people at that time, and recollect that many of them were 
straightened in their circumstances in consequence of being cut off" 
from their regular business ; that some were leaving the town from 
necessity, and more from apprehension ; that others, not able to send 
their children to school at their own expense, were too high spir- 
ited to receive the privilege in direct charity : if we consider these 
liings, we shall at once perceive that these schools presented a 
powerful inducement to many to remain in town, and by making 
the privilege free to all has preserved the chain of education, un- 
broken by the distresses of the people, in the shock of war. 

But happily the scene is now changed ; our citizens, restored to 
thei^ occupations, are generally able to educate their children at 
their own expense, and instead of devising methods to prevent 
people from removing out, we know that the town is filling u^) with 
strangers and new families, who have borne no part of our burdens 
in the days of our distress, but who will now have the full benefit 
of these schools, and will be likely to increase the expenses of them 
vastly beyond the amount they will contribute to the support of 
them. Upon the whole, the trustees are of opinion, that these 



21 



schools were well adapted to promote important purposes at the 
time they were adopted, that much good has been done by them, 
and that much good might be expected from continuing them, but 
that they must in future be carried on under greater difiiculties and 
at greater expense, and that the same public necessity for them 
does not now exist. 

In May, in consequence of a representation from Mr. Dodge of 
the excessive labor of his school, the trustees employed his son, 
Horace, for a small salary, as his assistant in the Writing School. 
At the same time permission was given to the instructors of the 
Reading School to make some gradual alterations in the books 
used in the school. On the 2.5th of May, the board held a sepa- 
rate examination of Mr. Dodge's school, and were highly gratified. 
On the fifteenth of June, the money voted by the town and accru- 
ing from the fund was divided equally according to the number 
of scholars in the different districts. Some special grants, how- 
ever, will vary this apportionment in a slight degree. On the 8th 
of August, Mr, Jno. Bennett resigned his place as teacher of 
the school at the Neck, and Mr. Isaac Gates was employed 
on the tenth of the same month to succeed him. Public examina- 
tions were held on the 6th of November of Messrs. Smith and 
Gordon's school ; on the thirteenth, of Mr. Dodge's department 
of the same school ; and on the twenty-ninth, of Mr. Gates' 
schoo' at the Neck, — all of which were found in a situation highly 
gratifying to the trustees. 

On the 6th of April, Mr. D. Dodge resigned his place as 
writing-master. The trustees feel it equally a duty and a pleasure 
publicly to declare their entire approbation of Mr. Dodge, and 
their grateful sense of his valuable services in the important sta- 
tion he has filled. Mr. Robt. Gordon, formerly assistant in the 
reading school, having the entire confidence of the trustees, is 
appointed successor to Mr. Dodge, and Mr. Samuel Campbell, a 
gentleman well recommended and of much experience in the 
business, succeeds to the place of Mr. Gordon. 

On the 17th of April, the school in Milk Row, No. 3, under the 
care of Mr. Yorick S. Gordon, was visited, and notwithstandino: 
it has suffered from some peculiar diflSculties the past winter, it 



22 



made a respectable appearance. The schools in districts No. 4 and 
5, have been kept the past winter to the satisfaction of the board. 

On the 1st of Ma}^, the second examination of Messrs. Smith 
and Campbell's school was attended by the trustees, who were 
gratified by the faithfulness of the teachers, and the good be- 
havior and proficiency of the scholars. 

On the 2d, the school at the Neck was examined, and the trus- 
tees can now declare that their utmost wishes for this school are 
completely realized in the judicious and successful labors of the 
present teacher, Mr. Gates. The schools within the Neck are all 
crowded, and it might be useful to divide them, but the trustees 
have not matuied any plan for this purpose. 

The task of the regular teachers is laborious, and the stations 
they fill of the highest concern to the community. The influence 
of knowledge on the happiness of society is of incalculable impor- 
tance. Our common schools are the nurseries of education, and 
are among the most precious privileges we inherit from our ances- 
tors ; they are the bulwark of our safety and glory. 

Deeply impressed with these sentiments, the trustees earnestly 
recommend such an elevated and liberal policy with regard to the 
instructorsas shall always aflbrd them a generous support, and 
shall secure to the schools the services of gentlemen of talents and 
character. 

By reference to the printed statement of our treasurer, it will 
be seen that the expenses of the trustees the past year (including 
an error against them in last year's statement) have exceeded their 
funds. In order, therefore, to meet the deficiency, and to provide 
for the schools the ensuing year, the sum of $4,000 will be wanted 
for the established schools ; and if free schools for the smal^ 
children are to be continued, the additional sum of $1,500 will be 
necessary for that purpose. Otherwise, the sum of $200, to be 
expended at the discretion of the trustees for the education of poor 
children. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Per order of the trustees. 

A. R. THOMPSON, 

Secretary, 
[ay 6, 1816. 



23 



The trustees of the schools respectfully report the following 
particulars of their proceedings the past year, and for the state of 
their funds and current expenses they refer to the printed state- 
ment of their treasurer. 

The naoney voted by the town, with the income of the school 
funds, making together a very large appropriation for the current 
year, the trustees thought it equitable to divide the sum equally 
among the children in the respective districts ; and accordingly, at 
their first meeting, May 9th, voted unanimously so to divide it, — 
reserving, however, the right to make special grants. 

This has been done the past year to District No. 3, which for 
several years past has kept two summer schools, viz. : one at Milk 
Row and one at Winter Hill ; and also to No. 5, which has always 
received more than its proportion. In addition to these special 
grants, the districts without the Neck have drawn their full pro- 
portion of the whole sum appropriated for the year, while it will be 
seen, lr»y reference to the treasurer's statement, that there remains 
in the treasury an unexpended balance of five hundred dollars. 

The first of June, Capt. Wyman resigned his office as treasurer 
of the trustees, and Mr. G. Bartlett was chosen to succeed him, 
and having executed a bond for $10,000 for the faithful discharge 
of the duties of the office, all the papers belonging to it were de- 
livered into his hands. The accounts of the former treasurer were 
audited by a committee of the board, and found correct ; and the 
trustees voted their unanimous and hearty thanks to Capt. Wymau 
for his faithful services. In February, Capt. Wyman made known 
the wishes of a number of the inhabitants at the Neck to have a 
bell, at their own expense, placed on the school-house. This 
request was granted, on conditions that no expense should be 
incurred by the board. The schools without the Neck have been 
kept on the usual establishment, and so far as is known to the 
board, the teachers have been capable and faithful, and have given 
satisfaction to the inhabitants generiilly of the several districts. 

The school at the Neck remains and flourishes under the care of 
Mr. Gates. Two public examinations of it have been held th 



24 



past year, and at the last (April 28th) seventy-four children were 
present, and made the best exhibition ever witnessed in this school, 
either by the trustees or a oumerous company of respectable visit- 
ors, who attended on this interesting occasion. 

In June, Mr. Jesse Smith resigned his place as teacher of the 
Grammar School. While the trustees sincerely regret the causes 
which induced him to resign, they cannot refrain from expressing 
their high sense of his talents, uprightness, and fidelity. Mr. Smith 
is succeeded by Mr. J. M, K. Wilkins, under whose able and inde- 
fatigable administration, assisted by the faithful labors of Mr. 
Campbell, the great Reading and Grammar School maintains its 
distinguished reputation. 

The associate branch of this great school, in the department of 
writing and arithmetic, has been under the sole guidance of Mr. 
R. Gordon, whose industry and ability are conspicuously proved 
by the flourishing state of the school under his care. Two public 
examinations of these united schools have been held the past year 
and at the last (April 22d) three hundred and forty children were 
present, a greater number than were ever before assembled in the 
same school on a like occasion. The conduct and appearance of 
the children, as well as their evident improvement, gave high satis- 
faction to the respectable visitors, and reflected great honor on their 
teachers. The trustees will not conceal their delightful sensations 
in view of this interesting spectacle. 

It will be perceived, by reference to our treasurer's statement, that 
the trustees have made some special grants. In this particular, 
they have acted on the principles set forth in their report of last 
year. These principles were generously sanctioned by their con- 
stituents in the liberal provision made for the education of their 
children. An enlightened people, who know how to appreciate the 
value of instruction to the rising generation in a free country, will 
know how to estimate the worth of talents and faithfulness in their 
public teachers, and will never grudge the bread of him who feeds 
their offspring with the enduring food of knowledge and under- 
standing. 

The women's schools have been conducted in the same manner 
as the last year ; about five hundred children have been educated 



25 



in them, and the expense is noted particularly in the statement of 
the treasurer. The trustees are aware that this department of the 
schools is a subject of much conversation, and probably some may 
expect it to be particularly noticed in this report. There can be 
no doubt that a great benefit has been derived from this plan ; but 
while the trustees rejoice in all the goad it has done, they are sen- 
sible that so long as it stands on its present precarious tenure, it 
must be imperfect. It is subject to the ^annual determination of 
the town. It may be the wisdom of the town one year to provide 
for it ; the next, to refuse such provision. As long as this uncer- 
tainty continues, no permanent arrangements can be made. If the 
provision was settled, then the town might be districted, suitable 
houses provided, and eight capable women might be hired who 
would teach the whole five hundred children at a much less ex- 
pense, and probably in a much better manner, than they are now 
taught by more than twenty mistresses, some of whom are not 
properly qualified for the task. Upon the whole, the trustees are 
of opinion that all the benefit derived from these schools might be 
obtained by a different and more economical plan. 

The trustees are conscious that although the present system of 
education is excellent in many respects, it is, however, liable to 
material objections on the ground of expense, especially at a time 
when the weight of the public burdens makes it a duty to abridge 
every expenditure which the public good will permit. In order 
therefore to preserve the privileges of the children, the trustees 
have felt their minds drawn to the contemplation of some method 
of education consistent with a wise economy. In this view, the 
Lancastrian plan presents itself as eminently suited to the situa- 
tion and circumstances of this town. 

This plan proposes to teach a great number of children, at a 
small expense, and has been in successful operation in Europe, and 
in many parts of our own country. The trustees have not been 
able to obtain sufficient information to give a minute view of the 
sj^stem. The}^ have held one meeting expressly for the purpose of 
considering the subject, and have decided to recommend to the 
town a full investigation of it, and are of opinion that it would 
4 



26 



be true wisdom and economy to adopt this system, at least in part, 
in the town of Charlestown. 

This is more especially necessary, as the schools already estab- 
lished, expensive as they are, arc OTcrrunning with children, and 
cannot be continued much longer within the limits of their present 
number. On our present plan, more schools must be set up, and 
consequently more money will be wanted. 

Such being the facts, the trustees beg leave to read some letters 
showing the operation of the Lancaster plan, and earnestly recom- 
mend it to the consideration of their fellow-citizens. 

The regular schools within and without the Neck, on the present 
establishment, will require for their support the current year the 
sum of $3,800, exclusive of the balance remaining in the treasury. 
The women's schools, on the present plan, $1,300; and if the 
womens' schools are given up, the sum of $200 will be needed for 
the education of children absolutely indigent. So that, with the 
women's schools, the sum of $5,100 will be wanted. Without these 
the sum of $4,000 will be sufficient for the present year. 

All which is respectfully submitted by order of the Trustees of 

Charlestown Free Schools. 

ABM. K. THOMPSON, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, May 5, 1817. 



27 



The Trustees of the Schools respectfully report the following 
particulars of their proceedings this past year, and for the state of 
their funds and current expenses they refer to the public statement 
of their Treasurer. 

Mr. George Bartlett, the former treasurer of the board, resigned 
his office as trustee last year, and Elias Phinney, Esq., being chosen 
to fill the vacancy, was at the first meeting of the board elected 
treasurer. The accounts of Mr. Bartlett being examined and found 
correct, the papers were delivered over to his successor, Mr. Phin- 
ney, who has given bonds in the sum of $10,000 for the discharge 
of the duties of said office. 

A bell and clock purchased by subscription were presented by 
Captain Wyman, in behalf of the subscribers, on condition that 
they should be for the exclusive use of the school at the Neck, and 
were accepted by the trustees agreeable to the wishes of the donors. 

The schools without the Neck have been kept the usual terms, 
and 80 far as appeared at the examinations, or is known to the 
trustees, the teachers have been capable and faithful, and have 
given satisfaction to the inhabitants of the respective districts. 

The school at the Neck, under the care of Mr. Gates, is in a 
flourishing state ; the examination in November last was highly 
gratifying, and at the last examination, April 28th, all the one 
hundred and five scholars attended, — a number greater than were 
ever present before on a like occasion, — yet the exhibition, in 
point of order and improvement, was never equalled in this school 
before. 

The school under the care of Messrs. Wilkins and Gordon, was 
examined in November last. Three hundred children attended, 
and their conduct and performances reflected honor on their in- 
structors. At the last examination, April 29th, the number of 
scholars present was three hundred and ninety-five, exceeding any 
former number on a like occasion. Notwithstanding the increase 
of numbers in this school, and the consequent augmentation of the 
labors of its teachers, yet improvement was evident in some 



28 



branches of education, and the character of the school was honor- 
ably sustained in all. 

The sura of $445.43 has been expended for the education of 
indigent children, as will be seen by the statement of the treasurer. 

Early in the year the trustees took up the subject of Lancastrian 
Schools, and in the course of their inquiries received important 
information from a Mr. Dixon, a gentleman practically acquainted 
with the system, and as a consideration for his trouble presented 
him with $20, as appears in the Treasurer's statement. After 
thorough investigation, it is the opinion of the trustees that the 
Lancaster plan, though admirably suited to teach a great number 
of small children in the simplest rudiments of education, at a cheap 
rate, cannot be profitably adopted, because it is deficient in some 
important advantages in our present system, and cannot be so in- 
corporated with it as to unite the benefits of both. 

From facts stated in this report it appears that the children within 
the Neck have increased to a degree that seems now absolutely 
to require some alteration in the schools. The trustees submit to 
the consideration of the town the propriety of so far changing the 
present mode as to establish a separate school for the girls. The 
education of females, not being exclusively literary, it is the prac- 
tice of parents to devote a part of each year to the instruction of 
their daugh ters in needle-work and other useful acquirements. The 
time required for the acquisition of these branches, might as well be 
uniform and stated, leaving the remainder of the year to be em- 
ployed in a public school ; and it is confidently believed that a 
school opened early in the spring, and continued till winter, under 
proper regulations, would for the females be in many respects pref- 
erable to the present mode. By this method the separation of the 
sexes, an object much to be desired, would be accomplished, the 
school thus divided, would be lessened, and of course relieved to 
the precise amount of female population taken out. Conscious of 
the importance of female education already visible in its beneficial 
influence upon society, the trustees would not willingly abridge the 
privileges of the females ; the plan proposed it is thought will give 
them additional advantages. The expenses of the schools, as will 



29 



be seen by the treasurer's statement, fall short of the income the 
past year ; the balance on hand, however, will be reduced by some 
additional grants and items not included in the statement. The 
trustees have made no local division of the money this year, but 
have endeavored to provide for every part of the town, according 
to its wants ; the districts without the Neck, have received liberal 
allowance, and No. 5, in particular, has expended more money than 
for many years before. In fact, the policy which has been uni- 
formly recommended by the trustees, and generously sanctioned 
by the town, has been pursued. This liberal policy, the legitimate 
offspring of the fathers of New England, is founded in the wisdom 
of Providence, of large and exalted minds, of minds not contented 
with dispensing happiness during the contracted period of their 
own age, but laboring with benevolent assiduity to extend the 
dominion of their usefulness beyond the limits of nature, and to 
perpetuate themselves in their institutions, the guardians and nour- 
ishers of generations to come. 

It is not to be denied that our schools are expensive ; that the 
money pf the rich is primarily taken to educate the children of the 
poor ; but this apparent inequality between burden and privilege 
vanishes at once when we reflect that the rich man receives not 
only a present and an abundant remuneration in the increased 
security of his riches from the augmented strength and improved 
condition of that society which his money has contributed to en- 
lighten and to establish. But those very institutions which have 
been founded by his wealth and supported by his munificence now 
in the course of three generations, in the care and instruction of 
his descendants reduced by the vicissitudes of society and the 
mutations of poverty, will return back to his own loins the same 
money that he now advances for the poor of his own age and time. 
Besides, the rich and benevolent shall always remember that they 
are responsible for our charitable foundations, and every man has 
something for which he is interested in all our institutions. Let 
us then not be unmindful of the influence of our present views and 
actions upon future generations. Above all, let us never forget 
the vast importance of our establishments for education, and the 
intimate connection which exists between the dissemination of 



30 



knowledge and the best hopes and most durable felicity of man • 
kind. 

The schools in the present establishment will require for thjii 
support S4,000, and a separate school for the females the additional 
sum of $500, so that in the opinion of the trustees the sum of 
$4,500 will be wanted for the current year. 
All which is respectfully submitted by the 

** Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools." 

ABRAM R. THOMPSON, 

Secretary, 



31 



The trustees of the schools respectfully report the following 
particulars of their proceedings the past year, and for the state of 
their funds and current expenses they refer to the printed state- 
ment of their treasurer. In the annual report of last year, the 
board recommended the new organization of the schools, in such a 
manner as to establish a separate branch for the instruction of the 
females. This report was accepted by the town, and the trustees 
at their first meeting took up the subject, and appointed a com- 
mittee of the Board to make inquiry. This committee, after a 
thorough, but unsuccessful search, for some commodious building, 
reported in favor of accepting the proposals of the Rev. W. 
Collier, who offered to erect a suitable building, provided the 
trustees would take a lease of said buildinor for a term of time 
long enough at a stipulated rent per annum, to cover the expense 
of the building. The trustees accepted the report of the com- 
mittee, and acceded to the proposals of Mr. Collier, and have 
taken a lease of this building for the term of eight years, at one 
hundred and thirty dollars per annum. The new school-house is 
divided into two apartments ; it is pleasantly situated in a central 
part of the town adjacent to the Rev. Mr. Collier's meeting-house, 
and will answer the purpose for many years. Being ready for 
occupation on the 14th of September the school was opened with 
religious solemnities, and organized in two distinct departments by 
the respective teachers according to a previous plan and under the 
direction of the trustees. The introductory school was committed 
to the care of Miss S. Carlisle, and provides (with some exceptions) 
for the Misses from seven to eleven years of age, and is confined 
to the rudiments of instruction. The trustees were of opinion 
that an intelligent mistress would fill this place as well as a master. 
This expectation has been realized, for Miss Carlisle has carried 
the scheme into complete execution, and conducted her school in a 
manner honorable to herself and satisfactory to the board. The 
upper branch of the school receives the Misses from the lower and 
completes the course of education contemplated in the plan of the 
schools. This department has been filled by Mr. I, Prentiss, whose 



32 



able and successful labors have raised his school to a high degree 
of reputation. 

Agreeable to the plan proposed by the trustees in the report of 
last year, this school was closed the fifteenth of November, with 
the intention of suspending it as a public school, till March or 
April. But many of our citizens expressing a strong desire to 
have the school continued, and proposing to have a town-meeting 
called on the subject, it was thought expedient to open the school 
again on the first of December and it has been continued ever 
since. The trustees in this instance yielded to the force of cir- 
cumstances, without altering their own opinion, which remains still 
in favor of a limited term of the female schools. It equally cor- 
responds with fact and reasoning, that a school for one half the 
year would be more profitable to learners, than one continued for 
the whole term. This is equally true with regard to boys as girls, 
but not equally practicable, because in populous towns the great 
mass of boys from seven to fourteen years of age cannot be em- 
ployed, it is therefore necessary to keep them constantly at school 
as a measure of restraint and order, but the school for girls may 
be suspended with perfect safety, because they ought to be and 
generally would be kept at home during the intermission of the 
school, assisting in domestic duties, and thereby acquiring a knowl- 
edge of this important branch of female education. The subject 
is with the town and for their wisdom to decide. In September 
Mr. S. Campbell was discharged — his services being no longer 
needed in consequence of the new arrangements of the schools. 

The schools without the Neck have been kept the past year on 
the usual plan. In District No. 5, the state of the school not 
being satisfactory to the board, it was closed earlier in conse- 
quence. In No. 3 the school went on very well under the care of 
Mr. Russell, until the school-house was destroyed b}^ fire, in con- 
sequence of which misfortune no regular examination of this school 
could be made. The school in District No. 4 was publicly ex- 
amined, March 18th. The gentleman who kept it, Mr. Hayward, 
is an excellent schoolmaster, and gave a tine exhibition. The 
trustees could not but notice the uncommon attainments in educa- 
tion of some, and the respectable standing of all the children in 



33 



this school. As a proof of the principle already suggested in this 
report, viz. that a part of the year devoted to learning and the 
remainder to some other employment, will make, in the result, 
quite as good scholars as spending the whole year in education, 
Messrs. Wilkins and Gordon's school was examined publicly the 
6th of November and the 22d of April, and exhibited gratifying 
proofs of the unremitted fidelity and ability of the instructors. 
Two hundred and seven boys attended the last examination. 

Mr. Gates' school was publicly examined November 12th and 
again April 23d. Nearly one hundred children attended the last 
examination, and gave renewed evidences of the deserved reputa- 
tion of this celebrated school. 

Mr. Prentiss' and Miss Carlisle's schools were examined Nov. 
13th and April 23d. Two hundred and forty-one misses attend 
these schools, and the trustees were perfectly satisfied with the 
exhibition of them. During the past year more than five hundred 
children have attended at the examinations of the schools within 
the Neck, and more than six hundred belong to them. This fact 
presents in a strong light the importance of our establishments for 
education on the prosperity and happiness of future generations, 
and will amply remunerate every expense created b}'' them. The 
present is the age of institutions — of institutions glowing with 
the mild lustre of benevolence and truth. Those whom heaven 
has blessed with wealth will be willing to contribute generously 
towards every good foundation, being mindful of the mighty in- 
fluence which knowledge especially holds over the best hopes and 
dearest interests of mankind. Wealth and knowledge are connected 
by indissoluble chains — they support or oppose, and ultimately 
uphold or destro}^ each other. The security and stability of 
wealth, as well as its peaceable enjoyment, depend on the social 
compact, the constitution, the laws and the institutions of any 
people, and these depend on knowledge. Education is the grand 
instrument of knowledge — wealth, therefore, is always in its 
proper place when it affords to every class of society the means of 
knowledge, and diffuses instruction and wisdom through every 
rank, thereby communicating to all, in every condition, a better 
understanding of their own true interests and a better disposition 
5 



34 



to perform every individual, domestic, and social duty. Tims 
knowledge exercises a reaction upon wealth, and imparts to it a 
power which rules alike individuals, associations, and empires. 

The first of March, the school-house in District No. 3 was burnt 
down. It may be proper to state, that this district commences in 
Cambridge road, sweeps round the Cambridge line, runs across 
Milk Row by Mr. Isaac Tufts' to Winter Hill, by the house of Jos. 
Adams, Esq., to Mystic River, and down to the cluster of houses 
near the entrance of Three-jDoll Lane, and over to the place of begin- 
ning. It contains sixty-one families and one hundred and six 
children, from four to fourteen years of age ; of these about one 
third are below seven years old — the remaining sevent3^-three 
would, therefore, be, at a fair calculation, the highest number to be 
provided for ; of these the largest proportion live on the Milk Row 
side. The trustees state the foregoing facts as a guide in any dis- 
cussion which may come before the town on this subject. 

The trustees are of opinion that the expenses of the schools for 
the year to come, may be somewhat lessened ; some contingencies, 
unavoidably incidental to the establishment of the new school, etc., 
will not occur again the present year. It is also hoped that the orig- 
inal plan of the female school will be adhered to, and a consequent 
retrenchment be made in that department ; so that, in the opinion 
of the board, the sum of $4,000, independent of any extra object, 
may be sufficient for the support of schools the year ensuing. 

All which is respectfully submitted, by order of the Trustees of 

Charlestown Free Schools. 

ABM. R. THOMPSON, 

Secretary, 
Charlestow^n, May 3, 1819. 



35 



The Trustees of Chfirlestown Free Schools respectfully present 
their fellow-citizens the following general statement of their pro- 
ceedings for the past year : — 

Agreeably to the vote of the town, expressed b}^ their acceptance 
of our last annual report, the school for female children was kept 
for six months, and was closed on the first of November. The 
services of Mr, Prentiss and Miss Carlisle, in this school, were 
highly creditable to themselves and worthy our expressions of 
approbation. 

A new school-house has been erected in Milk Row, and was 
finished in October last, on the spot where the former one stood. 
The building is of wood, the sides filled in with brick, and finished 
in a plain, neat style, with two coats of paint on the outside, and 
cost by contract $675. 

Tlie schools for poor children were commenced in May and 
closed in November. Three Instructresses were employed in dif- 
ferent sections of the town, at which schools ninety-six children 
attended. 

In June last Mr. Isaac Gates resigned his place as Instructor of 
School No. 2 ; and it may not be improper in this public manner 
again to express the high opinion which we entertain of him as a 
teacher of youth, and sincerely regret his leaving the school, where 
his talents had been so successfully employed. 

Mr. Charles Fisk was emploj'ed as his successor in that school, 
and entered on the duties of the station June 14th, and continued 
until December 11th. 

On his leaving the school, the Rev. Wm. Collier was engaged 
as his successor, and was introduced to the charge of the school 
December 20th. 

In September the lower part of the school-house No. 2 was 
finished suitably for a school-room, and is now occupied by a 
school of small children under a female instructress. 

In October, M. J. M. Wilkins, the reading and grammar master 
in school No. 1, suddenly resigned the school under his care, 
which he had kept with credit to himself and profit to his pupils. 



3(3 



He was succeeded by Mr. Edward Sawyer, who was introduced to 
the school November 1st, and entered on the duties assigned hira. 

The fall and spring examinations of the schools have been at- 
tended the past year as usual, and were generally very satisfactory, 
and, in some instances, the proficiency made by the scholars and 
their discipline was such as to excite our admiration, particularly 
in the school under the instruction of Messrs. Sawyer and Gordon. 

The whole number of scholars on the rolls of the schools is six 
hundred and eighty-five, and the numbers who attended at the last 
examinations were as follows: — 



School No. 1 , kept by Messrs. Sawyer & Gordon 
Female school, kept b}^ Mr. Prentiss and Miss Carlisle 
School No. 2, kept by Rev. Mr. Collier 
School No. 3, kept by Mr. Daniel Russell . 
School No. 4, kept by Mr. Simeon Booker . 
School No. 5, kept by Mr. Charles Wymau . 



200 
101 
90 
61 
33 
26 



511 

Making the number of five hundred and eleven children of both 
sexes, who attended the last examinations. 

For a statement of our funds and current expenses we refer to 
the printed statement of our treasurer. 

On consultation with the committee of Finance and the muni- 
cipal authorities of the Town, a reduction in the salaries paid to 
the instructors of the schools has been agreed upon, in consequence 
of which the sum of thirty-one hundred dollars may be sufficient 
for the expenses of the schools the ensuing year. The school- 
house No. 5, needs some repairs and the addition of a wood-shed, 
which will require an appropriation for that object ; the expense 
will probably not exceed seventy-five dollars. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

By order of the trustees of *' Charlestown Free Schools." 

JAMES K. FROTHINGHAM, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, May 1, 1820. 



37 



The trustees of " Charlestown Free Schools " woukl respectfully 
present their fellow-citizens the following " piirticuhirs of their 
proceedings " for the past year, and for the state of their funds and 
current expenses refer to the printed statement of their treasurer. 

Agreeably to the plan established for the instruction of the 
female children, that school was opened on the first of May, under 
the care of Mr. Whitney and Miss Carlisle, and continued for six 
months. 

In June, the Rev. Mr. Collier resigned the office of instructor in 
School No. 2, and, after a short vacation in that school, Mr. Wil- 
iam Gragg was appointed to the care of it, and entered on his 
labors July 7th, and continnes to this time. 

The schools for poor children have been kept the usual time of 
six months, by Mrs. Rea, Mrs. Thompson, and Miss Jefferds, and 
at which sixty-eight scholars have attended. 

Immediately after the last annual town meeting, in May, the 
salaries of the instructors of the schools (except that of Mr. Saw 
yer) were reduced to six hundred dollars per annum. At the time 
Mr. Sawyer was engaged to keep the reading-school, the estab- 
lished salary of our principal instructors was £200 per annum, in 
addition to which a grant had been usually made them which aug- 
mented their compensation to $800. At that time, in consequence 
of the sudden manner in which Mr. Wilkins left the school, it was 
considered by the board of importance to engage a person who 
might be likely to continue in the employment of school-keeping 
for years ; and accordingly Mr. Sawyer, having been highly recom 
mended to us, was engaged on condition that if he continued in 
that school two j'ears or more, he should receive at the rate of 
$800 per annum. And here we feel it our duty and pleasure to 
bear testimony to the eminent services of Mr. Sawyer as an in- 
structor of youth, and do not hesitate to say, that although we pay 
him $800 per annum, the town receives a full equivalent in the 
superior attainments of the children under his care ; nor are the 
services of Mr. Gordon less important in his department of the 
school. 



38 



The usual examinations of the schools have been attended, and 
the general appearance of the scholars and their improvement in 
the various branches of education to which they have attended, 
give an earnest of their future usefulness ; and, while it exhibits to 
us the inestimable advantages of our liberal establishments for 
education, and the talents and fidelity of the instructors, cannot 
fail to produce in the hearts of parents the most pleasing anticipa- 
tions. 

The whole number of children of both sexes, belonging to the 
different schools, is seven hundred and seventy-nine. 

And the number who attended the last examinations were as 
follows : — 



School No. 1, kept by Messrs. Sawyer & Gordon 
Female School, kept by Mr. Whitney and Miss Carlisle 
School No. 2, kept b}^ Mr. Gragg .... 
School No. 3, kept by Mr. Parker .... 
School No. 4, kept by Mr. Colburn . . . . 
School No. 5, kept by Mr. Wyman .... 



203 
122 
65 
67 
37 
26 

520 



Making a total of five hundred and twenty children of both 
sexes, who have attended the last examinations. 

It will be perceived by the printed statement of our treasurer, 
that our expenditures have exceeded the sum voted by the town, 
three hundred and eighty-five dollars ; this has been caused mostly 
by contingencies, for which no estimate, and, of course, no appro- 
priation, was made at the last May meeting. It was found neces- 
sary, last fall, to shingle the roof of school-house No. 1, and make 
some other repairs about the roof and cellar, the expense of which 
amounted to $111 ; and in January last the same school-house was 
considerably injured by fire, the expense of repairing which was 
S60 ; and $45 was expended for repairs on the school-houses in the 
upper part of the town ; this last item was noticed in our last re- 
port, but no money raised particularly for that object. 

School House No. 5 is a small old building, considerably out of 
repair, and quite uncomfortable for the winter season, at which 
time its occupation is of the most importance ; and it is not worth 



39 



repairing. At the solicitation of the inhabitants of that district, 
we recommend that two hundred and filty dollars be raised for the 
erection of a new school-house, which, with what the inhabitants 
propose to add to it, may be sufficient for that object. 

The School for female children has been commenced for the 
season under the care of Mr. Henry Bartlett and Miss Ann D* 
Sprague. 

Calculating the salaries of the schoolmasters at the present 
rates, and the ordinary contingent expenses, the sum of thirty-four 
hundred dollars will be required for the support of the schools the 
ensuing year, and two hundred dollars for the deficiency of last 
year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, by order of the Board of 

Trustees. 

JAMES K. FROTOINGFIAM, 

Secretary, 
Charlestown, May 7, 1821. 



40 



The trustees of Charlestown Free Schools respectfully present 
their fellow-citizens the following " particulars of their proceed- 
ings " for the past year, and for the " state of their funds " and 
expenditures refer to the printed statement of their treasurer. 

At the last annual town noeeting in May, an appropriation of 
two hundred' and fifty dollars was made for the erection of a school- 
house in district No. 5. Said school-house has been erected and 
finished in a plain and substantial manner, the expenses of which 
(including a new stove for the same) have exceeded the appropri- 
ation one hundred forty two-dollars and fourteen cents, and this 
sum has been drawn from the town treasury. 

On a proposal being made by Mr. Samuel Gardner, for an ex- 
change of land, the new school-house has been located a few rods 
south of where the old one stood, the old lot having been conveyed 
to Mr. Gardner and a deed taken from him of the lot on which the 
new house now stands. 

Mr. Gragg's term of employment in the school ward No. 2 ex- 
piring in July last, Mr. Samuel Moody was placed in that school 
on the seventh of that month, at which time the school was in a 
state of bad discipline and sufiering for want of instruction ; but 
we have the satisfaction to state that it is now under excellent 
discipline and making good progress in the various branches of 
education. In effecting this renovation in that school, the trus- 
tees have been obliged to incur some trifling expense in order to 
support and uphold the authority of the instructor against the 
opposition of certain individuals. 

The schools for poor children have been kept the past season by 
Mrs. Rea, Mrs. Thompson, and Miss Jefl'erds to the full satisfac- 
tion of the board. One hundred children have attended these 
schools, and their improvement has been as good as could be ex- 
pected from children in their situation ; for it is with regret we 
are under the necessity of saying that there is a great want of 
attention in the parents of these children in not seting that their 
children, who are entitled to this privilege, regularly attend the 
schools established for their advantage and improvement. 



41 



The schools for female children, under the instructions of Mr. 
Bartlett and Miss Sprague, were closed for the season on the last 
of October, and we have the pleasure of stating that Miss Sprague 
is again engaged for that school the ensuing season. 

A temporary suspension of the labors of INIr Sawyer in the 
principal grammar school took place in February last, he declining 
to continue in the school for that compensation, to which, by vote 
of the town, the trustees felt themselves limited; he resumed his 
labors on the twenty-fifth of February, with an understanding that 
he should receive at the rate of six hundred dollars per annum, 
and an assurance that the trustees would, at the annual meeting 
in May, recommend to the town to grant him an additional sum of 
one hundred dollars, which wg cheerfully do at this time ; and the 
considerations which induce us to it are, in our opinion, of some 
weight. Mr. Saw3'er's talents as an instructor and disciplinarian 
have been fully exhibited to us, and such of our fellow-citizens as 
have attended the examinations of his school, and we may say all 
parents whose children have been under his instruction, can give 
the same testimony ; add to this the probabilit}^ of his continuing 
in the profession of a public instructor, which should give him a 
preference to one who only takes a school for a short term, and we 
do not hesitate to say the sum here proposed is not too much for a 
man of his talents and experience lo receive ; and while we make 
this recommendation in favor of Mr. Sawyer, we make a similar 
claim in favor of Mi-. Gordon, who has been in that school for six 
years past, and whose services in teaching the branches of writino* 
and arithmetic are not less laborious or important, and the same 
considerations of talents and permanency of employment require 
that we should ask for him the like grant of one hundred dollars. 

The usual examinations of the schools have been attended the 
last fall and the present spring, the order and discipline of the 
schools, their improvement in the various branches of education, 
to which they have attended, and their general attention and 
appearance have excited within us the most pleasing sensations 
while attending to this agreeable part of our duty. 

The number of children belonging to the different public schools 
6 



42 



in town, is about seven hundred and fifty, and the numbers who 
attended the last examinations were — in school 



Ward No. 1 . . . 


. . .215 


Female School . . . . . 


. 147 


Ward No. 2 . . . . 


69 


Ward No. 3 


72 


Ward No. 4 


. . 49 


Ward No. 5 ' 


34 



586 

Making a total of five hundred and eighty-six children who at- 
tended the last examinations ; being sixty-six more than attended 
the year preceding. 

On the present establishment of the schools, if the additional 
grant be made to Messrs. Sawyer and Gordon, the sum of three 
thousand four hundred dollars will be necessary for the expend i 
tures of the ensuing year. 

All which is respectfully submitted, by direction of the Board. 

JAMES K. FROTHINGHAM, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, May 6, 1822. 



43 



1823. 

The trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools respectfully 
*' present their fellow-citizens the following particulars " of their 
proceedings for the past year, and for the state of their funds and 
current expenses refer to the statement of their treasurer. 

At the last annual meeting in May the town passed a vote 
allowing the trustees to purchase the land with the building, now 
occupied for the female school, could it be done for the interest of 
the town ; a committee from the board waited on Mr. Collier, and 
be declines disposing of it at present. The schools for the 
instruction of females was opened on the first of May, under tbe 
care of Mr. Josiah Moody and Miss Sprague. In July Mr. Moody 
was discharged, and ^Ir. Melzer Flagg engaged as his successor. 
These schools were examined on the last of October, and gave full 
satisfaction to the trustees of the diligence and faithful attention 
of their teachers. The school was then closed for six months. 
It opens again on Monday, the 5th May this day, under the charge 
of Mr. Luther S. Gushing and Miss Sprague. 

In June Mr. Sawyer, Principal of the Grammar School, declined 
his station on account of insufficiency of the compensation allowed 
him. A committee from the Board attended this duty, and Mr. 
Sawyer agreed to continue, with an understanding that the trustees, 
at the annual meeting in May, would recommend to the town that 
his compensation, by salary and grant, be increased to eight hun- 
dred dollars per annum, commencing with his year, on the first of 
November, 1822. 

Mr. Sawyer's talents as an instructor, his diligence and uniform 
attention to this large and increasing school for the last four years, 
induces us cheerfully to recommend this sum, believing it to be no 
more than he ought to receive. Nor are the services of Mr. Gor- 
don of less importance, who, for the last seven years, has faith- 
fully attended to the writing and arithmetic department ; we would 
recommend the same sum to him. 

In July, Ward No. 2, at the Neck, under the instruction of Mr. 
Samuel Moodj^, was vacated, and Mr. Joseph Reynolds appointed 
to the charge of this school, who now is the instructor. At the 



44 



examination of this school it was found under a good degree of 
improvement. 

Tlie schools for poor children have been kept for six months 
in diffecent sections of the town, under the care of Mrs. Rea, 
Mrs. Thompson, and Miss Jefferds, examined and approved by 
the trustees, about one hundred children having had this privilege. 

The School No. 3, Milk Bow, instructed by Mr. Blanchard, 
was examined in April, and found in a good state of improvement. 
The Schools No 4 and 5, at the upper part of the town, as far 
as returns have been made, have been satisfactorily kept. 

The number of children belonging to the different free schools 
in this towif is about seven hundred and sixty; and the number 
found at the examinations, as far as could be ascertained, was, — 

Ward No. 1 191 

Female School, Ward No. 1 . . • . 197 

Ward No. 2 School . 66 

Ward No. 3 '' 44 

Wards No. 4 and 5 Schools, about ... 83 

Making a total of 581 chiklren who attended the last examinations. 
On the present establishment of tlie schools, if the additional sal- 
ary be allowed Messrs. Sawyer and Gordon, the sum of S3, 500 will 
be necessary for the expenditures of the ensuing 3'ear. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

By direction of the Board of Trustees. 

JOSEPH PHIPPS, Secretary, 
Charlestown, May 5, 1823. 

May 5, 1823. 
Voted, That the within Report be accepted. 



45 



The trustees of the schools in conformity to their duty, respect- 
fully report the following particulars of their proceedings the past 
year, and for the state of their funds and current expenses, refer 
to the public statement of their treasurer. 

At a meeting of the board in May, for organization, a vote 
passed, " that there should be but one public examination of the 
schools within the Neck, in a year, to take place sometime between 
the loth and end of October, and that tne several masters be in- 
structed to make this examination, rather an exhibition of the 
scholars in the higher classes, than a regular recitation of the 
whole school, and means be used to induce the parents of the 
children and others interested, to attend the examination, — also, 
that at the first meeting in May, after tiie election, a committee, of 
one, be appointed for each school, within the Neck, whose special 
duty it shall be, either alone, or in compau}^ with one or more of 
the board, to visit the particular school assigned him, at least once 
in every quarter, without giving any notice whatever of his coming, 
and to examine all the classes thoroughly, and to take notice of 
the proficiency, discipline, and general appearance of the school ; 
and be prepared to report verbally, at any meeting of the board ; 
and at the last meeting in April, to present a written report of the 
condition of the school, and what he may think to require particu- 
lar attention." 

The foregoing regulations have principally been adopted the last 
season, and with satisfaction to the trustees. 

In July, Ward No. 2 was vacated by Mr. Joseph Reynolds, and 
Mr. Thomas Thompson was engaged to August — on the first 
September, Mr. Henry Adams was engaged, who continues to in- 
struct this school, which at its examination was found under good 
government, and in a state of proficiency. 

In October, Ward No. 1, under the instruction of Messrs. 
Sawyer and Gordon, was examined and gave general satisfaction. 
Mr. Sawyer then left this school, and Mr. Cornelius Walker was 
engaged as his successor, and has given good satisfaction. 



46 



The female school has been kept, six months under the care of 
Mr. Luther S. Gushing and Miss Sprague, and at the examination 
the board were highly gratified with the order and proficiency in all 
the branches taught in this school, particularly that of Miss 
Sprague; this school will commence again on Monday, 3d May 
(this day), under the instruction of Mr. Samuel Barrett and Miss 
Sprague. The schools for poor children have been kept in differ- 
ent sections of the town, faithful teachers employed, for six months, 
examined, and approved by the trustees. 

The schools in Milk Row and at the upper part of the town, 
at their examinations, were found under good government, and im- 
provement. A petition from the inhabitants, on the Winter Hill 
road, for a new school-house^ having been considered, it was sub- 
mitted to the town, and the report accepted ;* we have to state that 



* The trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools, to whom was 
leferred the petition of John Tufts and others, praying for the 
erection of a school-house, *"' at some convenient place, on or near 
the road leading from the neck of land to the Powder House," 
have attended to the duty assigned them, and ask leave respect- 
fully to report : — 

That the whole number of scholars belonging to the Milk Row 
school is about one hundred and thirty ; the distance of travel 
for those living on the Winter Hill road to the school-house, fol- 
lowing the Cambridge road, is over a mile and a huif, and going 
across lots, one mile. The distance is so great either way, and 
the travelling so bad across lots, especially during the winter, that 
a large portion of those living on that road cannot attend school. 

The number of scholars living on the Winter Hill road, who 
will be accommodated by the erection of a new school-house, is 
about filty-five, which will leave for the present Milk Row school 
about seventy-five. 

The school at the Neck is now large and constantly increasing, 
and it would be very advantageous to lessen the number by taking 
therefrom all those living beyond the Canal Bridge, amounting to 
about twenty, and annexing them to the contemplated new scliool. 
The number of scholars that would then compose the contemplated 
new school would be about seventy-five. 

In addition to the foregoing facts, the trustees would also state 
that for several years past it has been deemed necessary to employ 
a school-mistress, for .the accommodation of those living on the 
Winter Hill road, and the rent of a room for this purpose has been 
about twenty -five dollars a year, which is not far from the interest 



47 



a school-house, thirty feet long by twenty-four feet wide, to be built 
of wood, has been contracted for, for the sum of five hundred dol 
lars, and is expected to be completed in a faithful manner in about 
twenty days. 

The number of children belonging to the different schools in 
this town is about seven hundred and eighty, and the number found 
at the examinations, as nearly as could be ascertained, was — 

Ward No. 1 179 

Female School, Ward No 1 . . . . 156 

Ward No. 2 66 

Ward No. 3 56 

Wards Nos. 4 and 5 87 



Making a total of 



544 children 



who attended the examinations. 

On the present establishment of the schools the sum of $3,700 
for the ordinary expenses, and the new school-house will 
cost 500 



Making the sum of 



$4,200 

for the necessary expenditures for the ensuing year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by direction of the Board 

of Trustees. 

JOSEPH PHIPPS, 

Secretary, 
Charlestown, May 3, 1824. 

May 3, 1824, Voted, that the within report be accepted. 



of such a sum as would be requisite for the erection of a new 
school-house. 

It may furthermore be stated that the recent establishment of 
factories at Milk Row will much tend to increase the scholars of 
that school, which, together with the "ordinary growth of the town 
and increase of population, will render the formation of a new 
district, and the erection of a new school-house, if not at this 
moment, within a short period, absolutely necessary. On the whole, 
the trustees are of the opinion, and do recommend, that a school- 
house be erected agreeably to the prayer of the petitioners. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. For the Board of 
Trustees. 

EDWARD TURNER, 
L. M. PARKER, 



Committee, 



48 



1825, 

The trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools respectfully sub- 
mit to the town their annual report on the state of the schools, 
referring for the state of their funds and expenditures to the 
printed statement of their treasurer. 

In Ward No. 1, the vacancy in the writing school occasioned by 
the lamented death of Mr. Gordon was supplied in November last 
by engaging Mr. Peter Conant as a permanent master. Both the 
schools in this ward have been found at the public examinations, 
and at other times, when visited by the trustees, in the best state 
of discipline and improvement. 

At the annual meeting in May last the town voted that the 
Female School in Austin Street should be kept through the year ; 
and the trustees have taken care that this vote shovdd be carried 
into effect, though no provision was made for the additional ex- 
pense incurred thereby. Mr. Barrett and Miss Sprague have con- 
tinued this school tlirough the season, a;id have given general and 
great satisfaction, 

A vacancy occurred in the school at the Neck, Ward No. 2, in 

» May last ; and in June Mr. Samuel Bigelow was engaged to fill it, 

who has done much in the course of the year to raise the character 

of this school, and is spoken of in the highest terms by the parents 

of the children. 

By direction of the town a new school-house lias been luiilt, on 
the road leading to W^inter Hill, and a school of more than eighty 
children gathered. The trustees conceived it to be their duty to 
provide a master for four months for this school, though no pro- 
vision ht.s been made for it in the estimated expenditures of the 
year. 

The schools in Wards No. 3, 4 and 5 have been kept for the 
usual time, and, it is believed, to general acceptance. 

The trustees give notice to the town that the lease by which 
they hold the house, now occupied by the female school, will 
expire in a year from next October ; and they would suggest the 
expediency of taking some immediate step towards purchasing 



49 

this situation, or another more eligible, on which to build for a 
permanent establishment. 

The trustees have the pleasure to be able to say, that the con- 
dition of the schools generally was never better or more promising 
than at the present moment. 

The number of children belonging to the common schools at 

this time is ........ 790 

Instructed at the four primary schools for poor children . 139 

Making the whole number of children instructed at the 

public expense in this town to be . . . . 929 

The estimated expenditures of the current year are as fol, 
lows : — 

For the schools as heretofore established, and supposing 
it to be the intention of the town that the female 
school shall be kept the year round . . . $4,500 00 

For deficiencies the past year, occasioned by keeping 
the female school the year round, and the Winter 
Hill school, for which no provision had been made, 
as mentioned above ...... 675 00 

* For the seven primary schools, as voted at the last 
town meeting, in addition to the sum required for 
the schools as heretofore established, which sum 
includes the expense of the primary schools for 
poor children, as at present conducted . . 1,300 00 



The whole amount required .... $6,475 00 



* The subject of districting the town, for the purpose of establish- 
ing primary schools for children, from four to seven years of age, 
having been referred to the trustees, they would respectfully re- 
port : That upon due consideration, they are induced to believe, 
that it would be inexpedient to establish such districts, in the first 
instance, by territorial limits, and that the method, which promises 
the greatest utility, is that of locating such schools with a general 
reference to the population and convenience of the inhabitants ; and 
that the children be admitted to the privileges of these, in the same 
manner that they are admitted into the other public sciiools of the 
town. It is thought that seven schools would be necessary to 
7 



50 



All which is respectfully submitted by direction of the Board of 

Trustees. 

JOSEPH PHIPPS, 

• Secretary, 

May 2, 1825. 
Town meeting, 2d May, 1825. 

Accepted. 



commence the proposed course of instruction, and that they may 
be advantageously established at, or near the junction of Wapping 
Street witli the Salem Turnpike, on Town Hill, in Union Street, 
Cordis Street, Salem Street, at the Neck, and at Chelsea Point. 
It may be found that six schools will answer the object intended ; 
but this must depend upon the number, that may still be taught in 
private schools ; and should the inhabitants within the Neck gen- 
erally avail themselves of the proposed Public Schools, it may be 
found necessary to add another to the number first proposed. 

It is estimated, that fifty children present in each school may be 
taught to advantage, and allowing for absences, perhaps sixty may 
be permitted to attend. The salary of an instructress, through the 
year, together with room, rent and fuel, it is estimated will amount 
to two hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

The trustees forbear to express any opinion of the expediency, 
or the inexpediency, of establishing the proposed schools, not 
deeming it to have been a part of their commission. 

Which is respectfully submitted for the Board of Trustees. 

JAMES WALKER, 

President, 
March 7, 1825. 



51 



The trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools respectfully sub- 
mit their annual report. For the statement of their funds and of 
their expenditures the past year they refer to the printed state- 
ment of their treasurer. 

No change of instructors has been made during the last year in 
the reading, writing, and grammar schools within the Neck. A 
spirit of more than ordinary emulation is apparent in all these 
schools. 

The rules and regulations which have been introduced within a 
few months, intended to promote a regular and systematic course 
of instruction, have proved highl}^ beneficial. The rolls of these 
schools amount to six hundred and four scholars. Present at the 
last examinations, 472. 

The four schools, without the Neck, have been provided with 
male and female instructors from nine to ten months, who have 
given general satisfaction. 

The vote of the town for the establishment of primary schools 
has been carried into effect. Seven of these schools were put in 
operation on the sixteenth of May last, under the charge of Mrs. 
Polly Jaquith, Mrs. Mary Thompson, Mrs. Hannah Rea, Miss 
Mary Walker, Miss Lucy Wyman, Miss Adeline Hyde and Miss 
Roxanna Jones. Miss Wyman relinquished her school at the end 
of the last quarter and was succeeded by Miss Rebecca French ; all 
the other teachers continue in the schools to which they were at 
first appointed. 

The whole number of children belonging to these schools is four 
hundred and forty-five. Present at the recent examinations, three 
hundred and eighty-eight. 

Different opinions having been entertained respecting the utility 
of primary schools, the trustees have felt it their duty to notice 
their progress with particular attention, thinking that some ex- 
pression of their views respecting them might be expected by the 
town, and they are free to declare their belief, that the benefit of 
these institutions will fully meet the most sanguine anticipations of 
their friends. The children are put upon a regular course of in- 



52 

struotion, alike in all the schools, and kept in good order. The 
trustees are fully satisfied that a school of fifty children of 
ordinary capacity, from four to seven years of age, who shall give 
their general attendance, would be far better prepared to enter the 
higher schools than the same number have heretofore been, when 
promiscuously admitted from private schools. 

The estimated expenditures for the ensuing year, under the 
present system, amount to six thousand dollars. 

Respectfully submitted by order of the trustees. 

CHESTER ADAMS, 

For the Secretary, 
Charlestown, May 1, 1826. 



53 



The trustees of the schools in presenting their annual report to 
the town, would refer to the printed statement of their treasurer, 
for the expenditures of the year, and for the present state of their 
money concerns. The sj^stem of public school instruction some 
time since adopted, has been pursued the past year with much 
success, and the trustees have the pleasure to say that the schools 
generally exhibited a state of order and improvement highly credit- 
able to the instructors, and affording great encouragement of in- 
creasing benefit to the community. The schools without the Neck 
have been provided with instructors from eight to ten months each. 
The number of scholars belono;ino; to these schools is two hundred 
and twenty five. 

Mr. Cornelius Walker resigned his charge in the reading and 
grammar school in Ward No. 1, in October last, and was succeeded 
by Mr. Charles Pierce. The school was at that time in the best 
order, which has not for a moment been interrupted by the ex- 
change of masters. 

Mr. Josiah Fairbanks was appointed to the school in Austin 
Street in July last, upon the resignation of Mr. Barrett. Miss 
Ann D. Sprague relinquished the charge of her department in the 
same school about two months since, when a department for writing 
and arithmetic was established under the instruction of Mr. John 
Holroyd. The trustees cannot forbear to call the attention of the 
town particularly, to this most interesting school, composed as it 
is of two hundred and fifty females, whose character and habits are 
rapidly forming, and who are soon to exert a silent, but powerful 
influence upon the manners and morals of the community around 
them. Considering the inconvenience to which this school is ex- 
posed from thew^ant of proper accommodations, the progress of the 
scholars has exceeded the highest expectations of the trustees ; but 
the building which they occupy is badly constructed and much 
crowded, and it is hoped that no time will be lost in preparing a 
place for their reception. The primary schools are considered by 
the trustees as deserving the liberal patronage of the town. Tlie 
standard of public school education is undoubtedly rising in conse- 



C4 

qnence of their establishment. The number of scholars belonging 
to the grammar and writing schools, within the Neck, is 632. The 
number in primary schools 476, ranking an aggregate of 1,108. 
The estimated expense of all the schools for the ensuing year is 
$6,500. The great labor and attention required of the trustees 
within the Neck, augmented as it has been by the establishment of 
the primary school, will, it is feared, deter some who may be chosen 
to the office from accepting the appointment, unless some mode of 



Note. — The committee appointed by the town on the 7tli day of 
May, 1827, to erect a school-house on the Training Field, ask leave 
to report : That, on referring to their instructions contained in the 
report of the trustees of the schools, the committee perceived that 
the vortlierly corner of the Tiaining Held was therein named as an 
eligible site for the school-house ; but, on drawing the lines for the 
building, several objections presented themselves to this particular 
spot, which probably had not before been considered; when, after 
mature deliberation, the committee were of opinion that the westerly 
Corner was entitled to the preference, and thiy decision appeared to 
meet with the views and feelings of the citizens generally, particu- 
larly of those in that vicinity. For the greater accommodation of 
the school it was deemed expedient to add one foot to the length 
of the building, beyond what was expressed in the plan, which 
makes its dimensions jifty-six b}'' thirty-two feet, and a well (con- 
taining an abundant supply of water) with a pump has been sunk 
in the yard of the school-house ; this was considered to be a neces- 
sary and important appendage, both for the convenience of the 
school, and also as a security against fire. In enclosing the lot 
for the school-house, the committee have gone on the presumption 
that the town would cause the street on the southwest side of the 
Training Field to be widened to thirty feet ; this is required both 
for public accommodation and the safety of the scholars, and, 
accordingly, they have run the fence so as to make the enclosure 
measure as follows, viz. : beginning at llie west corner of the lot, 
and running north-easterly, on Training Field Street, ninety-one 
feet ; then turning atjd running south-easterly one hundred feet ; 
then turning and running bouth-westerly ninety-one feet nine 
inches, to the street on the south-west side of the Training Field, 
this line forming a ri'^iht-angle with the street; thence north-west- 
erly ninety-one feet to the west corner, the point begun at. And 
they would r« commend, that the land thus described be set off and 
appropriated for a school-house lot. It will be perceived that the 
whole expense of the school-house, with its appendages, consider- 
ably exceeds the estimate made by the trustees, but this difference 
between the estimate and the actual expense will be, in a great 



55 

relief shall be adopted. It is therefore respectfully suggested 
whether it may not be expedient to authorize the trustees to appoint 
a superintendent of the public schools to act under such instruc- 
tions as the}^ nia}^, from time to time, receive from the board ; or 
that the Legislature should be petitioned to augment the number 
of trustees to be appointed by the town. 

Respectfully submitted by order of the board. 

BENJAMIN WHIPPLE, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, Ma}' 7, 1827. 

measure, accounted for, when it is considered that the house is 
some larger than what was reported by the trustees, and that they 
made no calculations for tlie well and pump, for fences, out-houses, 
stoves, funnels, etc., which are all necessary, if not essential for 
the school. 

The bills of the whole concern amount to $5,859.92 ; the appro- 
priation made by the town was $4,500, which leaves a deficiency 
of $1,359.92. As the contracts for the materials and work were 
made for the lowest cash prices, it became necessary for the com- 
mittee to provide for the payment of this balance, viz., $1,359.92, 
for which sum, and the interest which shall have accrued on the 
same, they request of the town a remuneration 

In the result of their labors, the committee indulge the hope 
that the just expectations of the town will not be disappointed ; 
while it has been their object to avoid any costly and useless ex- 
penditure, it has still been their endeavor (by tlie selection of good 
and suitable materials, and the employment of competent work- 
men) to present to the town a building of respectable appearance, 
and one that, for permanence and convenience, might compare with 
any in the vicinity. How far this has been accomplished, must be 
left to the judgment of the town and to experience to determine. 

All which is respectfully submitted by 

THOMAS HOOPER,) 

JOSIAH HARRIS, V Committee, 

LOT POOL, ) 

Charlestown, December, 1827. 



56 



The trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools respectfully submit 
then- annual report. For the state of their funds, and of their 
expenditures they refer to the printed statement of their treasurer. 
During the past year the schools without the peninsula have 
been kept their usual time, and, on examination, they generally 
exhibited a degree of improvement satisfactory to the trustees. 
For the better regulation and improvement of these schools it was 
deemed expedient to exclude all children under the age of four, 
considering the time of teachers, in schools of their description, as 
misapplied in regulating scholars under the above age. The num- 
ber of scholars in these schools is from thirty-five to seventy 
each. 

On the completion of the new school-house on the Training Field, 
the trustees thought proper to remove the Female Grammar School 
fiom its location in Austin Street to the same. Mr. Holroyd, of 
the writing department in this school, having resigned his situation, 
Mr. Gulliver was chosen his successor. No change of instructors 
has been made during the past year in the other grammar schools 
within the Neck. All these schools, at the recent examination, 
evinced a spirit of emulation honorable to themselves and highly 
creditable to their teachers. The higher classes in the Female 
Grammar School gave evidence of a cultivation of mind rarely to 
be met with in misses of their age. 

The primary schools remain under the same teachers as last 
year, with the exception of No. 2, vacated by the death of Miss 
French, whose place has been supplied by the appointment of Miss 
Brown. The high expectations of these schools have been real- 
ized in the exhibition of their improvement, and the almost uniform 
preparation of the children for the studies they are to pursue in the 
grammar schools. The trustees have considered it expedient to 
continue the children in the primary schools until they are eight 
years old, as their studies at that age can be attended to by female 
teachers equally well and at less expense. This measure is also 
intended to prevent for a time the necessity of establishing another 
grammar school, — the number of children in these schools being 



57 

alread)'' as great as can well be instructed by the present number 
of masters. The number of scholars belonging to the schools 
within the Neck at the recent examination was as follows : In the 
eight primary schools 533, and in the three grammar schools 691, 
making a total of 1,224. 

Three hundred dollars of the permanent funds have been applied 
to the building of a primary school-house in the yard of the female 
school. The necessity of this measure arose from the impossibility 
of renting a suitable place for the school kept in that vicinity. 
The room is spacious and convenient, and it is believed the invest- 
ment will prove more productive than any other property of the 
same amount in the hands of the board. 

The trustees would beg leave to call the attention of the town to 
the condition of the rooms in the school-house on Town Hill, and 
to request that measures may be taken to put them into a proper 
state for the accommodation of the numerous scholars who attend 
there. The arrangement of the interior of this building was origin- 
ally intended to mei.'t the purposes of a school-house, and to accom- 
modate the town with a place of meeting to transact their public 
business, for which purpose it was used for many years.. The forms 
and desks were always inconvenient, and are now, many of them, 
so much worn as to be entirely unfit for the use of a school. The 
floors and stairs are also in a bad condition, and it is considered 
necessary that the whole inside of the building should be thoroughly 
repaired and tilted up with new forms and desks, the estimated 
expense of which is $500. 

The ordinary expenditure for the ensuing year is estimated at 
$6,500. 

Respectfully submitted, by order of the trustees. 

J. STEARNS HURD, 

Secretary, 
Accepted, May 5, 1828. 

8 



58 



Report of the trustees of the schools for the year ending May, 
1829,— 

The schools without the week have been taught from 9 to 10 1-2 
months each, and the summer term for the present year has already 
commenced. 'About 200 scholars usually belong to these schools. 

The course of instruction adopted several years since for the 
schools within the week, has been pursued, and the teachers have 
generally discharged their duties with great fidelity and success. 
At the recent examination, 1,053 scholars were present, and the rolls 
exhibited an aggregate of 1,235. 

In the early part of the year, two additional primary schools 
were established, increasing the whole number to ten, and one more 
may be found necessary the ensuing year. 

Acting under the instructions of the town, to provide schools for 
all the children from 4 to 14 years of age, who may apply for the 
privilege, and failing in their endeavors in several instances to 
obtain rooms in any other way, the trustees have now two primary 
school-houses on the training field lot, for the building or purchase 
of which, appropriations have been made from their permanent 
funds, amounting to $490.68 and they are rented for S60.00 per 
3'ear. As these buildings are on the town's land, and connected 
with their larger school establishment, it is suggested whether 
it may not be expedient, for the town to grant an appropriation to 
make good the trustees' fund, and receive a transfer of the buildings- 
It has been found difficult and laborious in many cases, to procure 
suitable school rooms for an uncertain period, and the trustees 
would ask for instructions from the town, as to the expediency of 
taking long leases, such rooms or buildings as may be calculated for 
their purpose. 

The repairs of the school-house on Town Hill have exceeded the 
estimate and appropriation SI 80. 00. The decay of the building 
and appurtenances was found greater than had been anticipated, 
and the trustees have felt justified in this expenditure, from the 
known policy of the town to do thoroughlj^ whatever is thought 
necessary to be done at all. 



59 • 

It is believed that apprenticeships are not generally commenced 
as early now as they formerly were, and it sometimes happens that 
boys are discharged from school six months or a year before they 
can obtain any regular employment. This is a season of danger 
to them, and of concern to their friends, and in a town like this it 
would not be strange, that some of them should acquire habits that 
must seriously affect their character and conduct through life. To 
guard against this evil, and to render as extensively useful as 
possible our valuable institutions for the discipline and instruction 
of the numerous and promising children of the town, is it not 
worthy of consideration, whether all of them should not be per- 
mitted to remain in school till the age of 15, and that they be 
required during the last year to render such assistance to the teach- 
ers, as may be required under the advice and direction of the 
trustees . 

The schools are generally well taught and well governed, and it 
is a pleasure to remark, for the satisfaction and encouragement of 
parents, that tlie children have never appeared to the trustees so 
deserving of commendation as at the present time.- 

The sum necessary to pursue the present course of instruction, 
the ensuing year, is estimated at $7,000. 

By order of the trustees. ^ 

CHESTER ADAMS, 

Secretary^ 



60 



The schools without the peninsula have been taught from nine 
to eleven months each, and the summer term for the present year 
commenced the 19th instant. Two hundred and thirteen scholars 
have attended the past year, one hundred and sixty-two of whom 
were present at the late examinations. 

At the recent examinations of the primary schools, fonr hun- 
dred and eighty-six children were present, and the lists" contain 
the names of five hundred and eighty. Two new teachers have 
been appointed to supply vacancies occasioned by the resignation 
of former instrctors. 

The grammar and writing schools have been examined repeat- 
edly in their respective rooms ; and by the special vote of the 
trustees, the first two classes were publicly examined on the 22d 
instant, in the Town Hall. Many of the citizens who were present 
expressed their high gratification with the improvement of tlie 
scholars, and with the promptness and accuracy for which their 
recitations were distinguished. This was a successful experiment, 
and it is believed an annual examination of this general character 
would be exceedingly beneficial, and excite in no small degree a 
deeper interest in public schools. On this occasion four hundred 
and seventy-eight scholars were present, and the rolls exhibit an 
aggregate of six hundred and forty-one. 

Ten primary and five grammar and writing schools are now 
taught within, and four common schools beyond the peninsula, 
making nineteen schools supported at the public expense, and 
comprising fourteen hundred and thirty-four children. And it 
gives the trustees pleasure to remark, that in general they have 
sustained their usual character for improvement, and in very many 
instances deserved the particular commendation of the trustees. 

The trustees regret that this liberal provision for the education 
of the rising generation is in any measure lost. The catalogues 
of the several schools exhibit a fearful list of absences. Nearly 
one quarter of the whole time is thus suflfered to pass awa}^ ; and 
the influence that this fact necessarily exerts on the whole schools, 
and upon the habits and future prospects of delinquents, is suffi- 



61 

cient to excite a general interest among the citizens, and to con- 
strain them to make personal exertion till every child of suitable 
age who does not attend private, shall be brought within the reach 
of constant public instruction. This may be done. It requires 
nothing more than the vigorous co-operation of the community. 

Tiie manner in which the last appropriation of the town for 
public schools has been expended has been stated by the treasurer, 
and printed among the current expenses of the town. The sum 
necessary to continue the present course of instruction the ensuing 
year is estimated at seven thousand dollars. 

The brick school-house at the Neck is suffering for the want of 
immediate repairs. The interior of the room may be altered at 
the same time, to promote the convenience and improvement of 
the scholars and facilitate the duties of the instructor. The trus- 
tees request the attention of the town to this subject, and ask that 
measures may be adopted to make such repairs and improvements ; 
the expense of which will be from three to four hundred dollars. 

Several citizens residing in the village beyond the Canal bridge, 
have desired that the school boundaries in that part of the town 
may be so far altered as to admit their children to attend the 
school in Ward No. 3. It will be recollected that the present 
boundaries were established several years since, at the time when 
the Winter Hill school-house was built, in consequence of their 
special applicMion. The trustees submit the consideration of this 
subject to the town. 

Respecting the two school-houses erected by the trustees on the 
Training-field street, referred to them by the town to report at a 
future meeting, the trustees have concluded to retain them as a 
part of the school fund. They have procured insurance upon each 
of the buildings, that, in case of fire, the fund may not be lessened 
by their injury. 

The subject of retaining the children in the public schools till 
fifteen 3^ears of age, referred to the trustees by the town in May 
last, has been attentively considered, and, for the reasons assigned 
in their report, they have voted to grant them this privilege 

By order of the Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools 

HENRY JACKSON, 

Secretary, 
Charlestown, April 29, 1830. 



62 



1^31. 

The trustees of the schools would respectfully present to the 
town their annual report, and would beg leave to refer to the 
statement of their treasurer for the particulars of receipts and 
payments during the year, and also for the poverty of their treas- 
ury at the present time. 

The subject of permitting the children immediately beyond the 
canal bridge to attend the school at the Neck, having been sub- 
mitted to the trustees, they have to report that nothing has been 
done definitely respecting it. It is, however, believed that about 
sixty children would be better accommodated if allowed to attend 
that school agreeably to the wishes of their parents. Should the 
permission be granted, it is thought that an additional teacher 
would be required, and that it would also render necessar}'' the 
removal of the Winter Hill school-house to a diflf^erent location. 
With the inadequate means appropriated by the town for the sup- 
port of the present establishment, it would not have been deemed 
proper to incur this additional expense, even if the utility of the 
measure in other respects had appeared unquestionable. 

It will be perceived that the repairs of the school-house at the 
Neck exceed the appropriation about one hundred and fifty dollars. 
Unexpectedly all the window frames were found unfit for further 
use, and, as is often the case in repairing old buildings, many 
things were found necessary to be done which could not be discov- 
ered but in the progress ol the work. 

The schools without the Neck have been kept from nine to 
twelve months each, and the teachers have in most cases proved 
themselves faithful and successful. 

The Winter Hill and Milk Row schools are now allowed to be 
kept through the year, which will increase the amount heretofore 
appUed annually for their benefit. 

Within the Ne k are ten primary schools of children, from four 
to eight years of age, averaging sixty-three scholars each. At the 
recent examination, all of them were found in a good state of 
order and improvement, and in several instances the teachers 
proved their ability and fidelity in a manner deserving the highest 



63 

commendaiion. The teachers remain the same as at the last re- 
port, with the exception of one resignation and appointment. 

The writing and grammar schools are now under ike charge of 
Messrs. Fairbank, Bigelow, Peirce, Swan and Baker, — the two 
last named having been recently appointed to supply the places of 
Messrs. Conant and Gulliver, resigned. These schools number 
six hundred and twenty-seven scholars, from eight to fifteen 3^ears 
of age ; and from evidence recently afforded, the trustees are well 
satisfied with all the teachers, and they feel it incumbent on them 
especially to express their high approbation of the three gentle- 
men first named, who have faithfully and successfully served the 
town for a course of years. 

The course of instruction and discipline in all the schools re_ 
mains the same that has been pursued for several years, having 
for its objects to improve the manners and morals of the children, 
to form habits of industry and perseverance, and to prepare them 
for the useful occupations of life, and for the duties devolving 
upon the individuals of a liberal and intelligent community. And 
it is believed that but few instances occur in which these objects 
are not attained in an important degree, excepting cases where 
parents are negligent of their duty, and permit their children fre- 
quently to absent themselves from school and trifle with the priv- 
ileges offered them at the public expense. 

By order of the Board. 

CHESTER ADAMS, 

President. 
May 11, 1831. 



64 



* 

The printed statement of the expenses of the town for the past 
municipal year having already been presented, in the detailed 
report of the treasurer of this board, the financial concerns of the 
school department to the citizens, the trustees have only to add on 
this point, that an amount equal to the appropriation of last year 
will be required to sustain the schools in their present establir^h- 
ment. 

The school department, as now established, comprises ten pri- 
mary and five upper schools within the Neck, enrolling about 1,200 
pupils ; and four district schools, enrolling about two hundred and 
fifty pupils, without the Neck. All these schools are annual, ex- 
cepting the two upper districts known as the Russell and Gardner 
districts, these being kept ten months each. 

During the past year there have been two resignations among 
the teachers of the primary schools, viz.. Miss Gates and Mrs. 
Jaquith ; the former having already left, her place has been sup- 
plied ; the latter not leaving until the end of the present quarter, 
16th instant, her place remains to be filled by the successors of the 
present board. 

The grammar and writing schools for boys continue under the 
direction of Messrs. Peirce and Baker, and seem to have received 
a new impulse in the pursuit of knowledge, by the increased exer- 
tions of their apt and faithful instructors. 

The grammar school for the girls is still under the direction of 
Mr. Fairbank, whose long and faithful services have very much 
contributed to its present elevated rank. The writing department 
of this school has been recently subjected to some changes, occa- 
sioned by the resignation of Mr. Reuben Swan, for another 
avocation. Mr. Swan was succeeded by Mr. Stephenson, who 
resigned the situation after two months, finding the duties too 
arduous for delicate health, and has been succeeded by Mr. James 
Swan, and it is hoped and believed by the trustees, that the last 
arrangement will prove satisfactory and more permanent. 

It affords the trustees pleasure to be able to say, with reference 
to this school, that notwithstanding these interruptions, it appears 



65 

at the last examination not only satisfactory, 'but highly gratifying 
to them 

The school at the Neck, has been, during the past year, vacated 
by the resignation of Mr. Bigelow, who has been succeeded by Mr. 
Walker. In this case, also, the trustees feel a strong confidence 
that the present high standing of this school, which has been raised 
from a very low ebb, by the ability and fidelity of Mr. Bigelow, 
will be fully sustained by his successor. 

The schools outside the Neck have been necessarily under 
various teachers, but they have, generally, given entire satisfac- 
tion ; and for the ensuing summer term, the trustees are happy to 
find that they have been enabled to meet the wishes of the inhab- 
itants of the several districts, by the re-appointment to every school 
of former highly acceptable and competent teachers. 

The school at Milk Row is to be under the charge of a male 
teacher the ensuing year. This departure from the accustomed 
arrangement has been made in consequence of a greater number of 
pupils attending this school than in any of the other districts, and 
the great satisfaction given by Mr. Sherman, and it being found 
practicable so to do at the additional expense of but seventy-two 
dollars. 

The trustees, aware that too great a diversity in the manner of 
writing has existed in the schools, have recently introduced the 
" Boston Slip" system and made it the rule for all of them. 

The recent examinations, taken together, were highly satis- 
factory and evidenced great fidelity and ability on the part of the 
teachers generally. In an establishment like ours, embracing 
nineteen distinct schools, collecting every variety of mental ca- 
pacity, and placed under as many/listinct teachers, necessarily 
more or less qualified and adapted to their situations by that pe- 
culiar tact and patient application which the responsible and 
arduous duties of a teacher require, there will be a diff"erence in 
the appearance of the schools, as the teachers may more or less 
possess this tact and are more or less willing to apply themselves 
to their tasks. But, notwithstanding this, the trustees are grati- 
fied in being able to bear their testimony to the good condition of 
the schools generally, and to the fortunate adaption of the teachers 
to their places which is so generally apparent. They are confident, 



66 

too, that the manner of examining the schools, collectively and by 
comparison with each other, by bringing both teachers and pupils 
to contend for the mastery, face to face with their competitors, 
has had a great and good influence on both, exciting in them a 
useful feeling of emulation to excel in the honorable conflict. 

Under the existing regulations of our schools all children are 
admitted between the ages of four and fifteen, and such is the 
course of instruction and moral discipline, that they can be and 
are fitted for all the common pursuits of life, and can rise, and do 
rise, to a point of mental culture which would reflect honor on any 
academical institution. 

It will be seen by the foregoing report that our school depart- 
ment numbers about 1,450 pupils, and that the schools are en 
dowed with privileges which would be fitting to higher seminaries 
than ours make any pretensions to ; yet it is true that these priv- 
ileges do exist, and are open to all ; and it is deemed worthy of 
remark by the trustees, that the annual cost of educating a pupil 
in these public seminaries is but about five dollars, making a 
quarter term bill but one dollar and twenty-five cents, and this 
paid by property and not by individuals. 

Under our free institutions, which open to all the avenues to 
distinction and influence, a general diff'usion of useful knowledge 
and an early inculcation of the principles of virtue and morality, 
become immensely important, and, in view of which, the trustees 
feel authorized in expressing the opinion that there should be no 
relaxation on the part of the citizens in their provisions for the 
promotion of these high objects which have been bestowed hereto- 
fore with a liberality which speaks honorably of their generosit}^ 
and foresight, as, in their opinion, any such relaxation of efforts 
would operate very unfavorably to the present elevated standing 
of our schools, which the best interests of parents and children — 
of social order, mental improvement and domestic happiness mu- 
tually require to be sustained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

By order of the trustees. 

BENJ. THOMPSON, 

Secretary 

Charlestown, May, 1832. 



67 



SPECIAL EEPORT OF TRUSTEES. 1332. 

The trustees would respectfully represent that the recent cases 
of the small-pox and the apprehended exposure of many of the 
children of the town to the contagion of that fatal malad}^ seri- 
ously affected the attendance and progress of our public schools, 
and that several of them have hardly regained the standing which 
they held previous to the alarm produced by the a-ppearance of the 
disease. 

It having been ascertained that many of the scholars had been 
exposed by associating in school with children from the infected 
families, the trustees proceeded to suspend from attendance all 
such children as should not furnish evidence of having been vacci- 
nated, or otherwise secured against the contagion. 

In one case a scholar who has suffered severely from the small- 
pox was in school but two days previous to her being sent to the 
hospital. 

It can never be certainly known that any of the children thus 
exposed have been saved to their parents and friends by means of 
the mild form of disease produced by vaccination, but is it not 
reasonable to believe that some of them have been thus preserved? 

The number of children liable to the contagion of the small-pox 
was surprisingly great, considering the importance of the pre- 
ventive and the small expense of obtaining it. 

The emergency which required the interposition of the trustees 
having ceased, they do not feel authorized to refuse admittance to 
the public schools of such children as have not been secured 
against the contagion of the small-pox, but they deem it highly 
desirable that this community should be guarded as far as possible 
against its visitations. 

The children of strangers are frequently presenting themselves 
for admission to our schools, and sometimes from places where 
the small-pox is no uncommon disease. 

It is the opinion of the trustees that to require the vaccination 
of all children before their entering our pu})lic schools, would be 
the most effectual method of securing the community against the 
smali-pox, and that the present time is most favorable fur the 



68 

introduction of such a measure, as a great proportion of the in- 
habitants, and especially of the young, are now secure from its 
contagion. 

By order of the trustees, 

CHESTER ADAMS, 

President, 
March 5, 1832. 

Read by the moderator to the town, under the consideration of 
tenth article of the warrant, for the meeting of March 5, 1832. 



69 



1S33. 

The school department of this town, as at present established, 
comprises ten primary and five grammar and writing schools 
within, and four District Schools without the peninsula, making in 
all nineteen distinct schools, all of which are annual, excepting the 
two upper districts, known as the Russell and Gardner schools, 
each of which is kept open ten months in the year. 

At the last semi-annual examination, which took place during 
the latter part of April last past, there were enrolled in the ten 
primaries six hundred and ten pupils, and of this number five hun- 
dred and thirty-eight were present ; in the five grammar and writ- 
ing schools there were enrolled six hundred and thirtj'-nine, and 
four hundred and fifty-seven present ; in the four schools without 
the peninsula, there were enrolled two lumdred and eighty, and 
two hundred and six ^present. Total enrolled, 1,529; examined, 
1,201. 

The appearance and condition of the several schools, at the re- 
cent examination of them, were, generally, highly satisfsictory, and 
the proficiency apparent in most of them commended their teachers 
to the favorable notice of the trustees, both for the ability and 
fidelity with which they had discharged their highly responsible 
trusts. 

In so extensive a department as ours, embracing nineteen dis 
tinct schools, under as many distinct teachers, all of them possess- 
ing, more or less, those qualifications adapted to the difficult office 
of a teacher of youth, it cannot be expected that they all will 
possess, in the same degree and to the extent desired, such quali- 
fications, without combining with them more or less peculiarities, 
incompatible with that full and entire discharge of all those duties, 
both in and out of school, which are so important in the character 
and general deportment of a teacher, and so much to be desired in 
those, more especially, who have the immediate oversight and 
direction of the young. 

The trustees believe it to be incumbent on them to allude to an 
evil which exists to a very great extent in our schools, and exerts 
a great and pernicious influence upon them. They allude to the 



70 

great and lamentable account of absences which the records of our 
schools exhibit. The trustees and teachers have done everythin«j, 
which has been in their power to do, to remedy this evil, but it still 
exists. These absentees hang like a dead weight about the school. 
The course of instruction is greatly interrupted by them, and those 
who are punctual and constant at school are retarded in their prog- 
ress. It is indeed difficult to estimate the extent of the per- 
nicious effects produced by the great amount of absences. 

The remedy is alone with the parents ; and it is on this account 
that the trustees allude to it thus publicly, and also to remark, 
that those parents who countenance and permit unnecessary ab- 
sences from the excellent and liberal provisions now existing in 
our public schools, owe it to their children, to themselves, and to 
the enlightened and generous spirit of the community in which 
they live, to see to it without delay, that their children are con- 
stant in their attendance at school, assured, as they may be, that 
by allowing their children to absent themselves from school, they 
are doing much to injure others, that they are neglecting the valu- 
able privileges which the public muniticence presents to them, and 
worse than all, are entailing upon their children the evils of ignor- 
ance and deep degradation. 

The trustees, however, feel a pleasure in assuring their fellow 
citizens that the present condition of the schools, generally, is 
such as fully to sustain the high standing they have heretofore 
possessed, and such as to reflect honor on that enlightened liber- 
ality which the citizens of this town have alwa^'s exercised towards 
their free public schools. 

The annual cost of the school department, under its present 
organization, will be found in the report of the Treasurer of the 
Board of Trustees, to which reference is made for the sources and 
account of receipts, and for the salary of each teacher, and the 
more minute details of the necessary contingent expenditures. 

" Under our free institutions, which open to all the avenues to 
distinction and influence in society, a general diffusion of useful 
knowledge and of sound moral principles is immensely important ; 
in view of which the trustees feel called upon to express their 
opinion that there should be no relaxation on the part of their 



71 

fellow citizens in their provisions for the support of their public 
schools, as, in their opinion, any such relaxation of appropriations 
would operate unfavorably to their present elevated character, 
which the best interests of parents and children — of social order, 
mental improvement and domestic happiness require to be sus- 
tained." 

Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Board of Trustees, 

BENJ. THOMPSON, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, March 6, 1833. 



72 



In presenting to the town their annual report, the trustees feel 
deeply impressed with the importance and relative position of that 
department in our municipal affairs, over which it has been their 
province to preside during the past year, whether viewed in the 
greatness of its extent, the cost of its maintenance, or with refer- 
ence to the influences it exerts, either for good or for evil, as it 
may be well or ill conducted, on the highest and most sacred 
interests of the community. They are also fully aware that the 
responsibilities under which the members of the board of trustees 
are placed are great, and that to the faithful performance of their 
duties they are prompted by that jealous watchfulness with which 
their fellow-citizens look towards this most important branch of 
thtir public affairs, and by the more imperative obligations grow- 
ing out of a regard to the morality, improvement and happiness 
of the community. 

It has been with such views and feelings and objects that the 
members of the board have endeavored to discharge their duties 
during the past year, and to them it is a source of great satisfac- 
tion, and an ample reward for arduous labors, that they are jus- 
tified in reporting to their fellow-citizens at this time, that after 
several changes of teachers necessarily occasioned by resignations 
and other causes, imposing upon them increased and very respon- 
sible duties, and exposing the schools to all the unfavorable effects 
consequent to such changes, — the schools are at this time in as 
high a condition of order, discipline and progression, and under as 
competent, faithful and successful teachers, taken together, as they 
have ever known them to be, and that no examinations have been 
more satisfactory and promising than the last semi-annual recently 
attended. 

The extent of our school department is of no ordinary magni- 
tude, and it presents to those who engage in its supervision a field 
of duties of no ordinary limits, either in variety or importance ; 
and when unaided by the earnest co-operation, or embarrassed by 
the unwarrantable jealousies of parents, is very fur from being 
either a desirable or a promising undertaking. 



73 

The Cbarlestown free school department comprises ten 
primary schools, each under the direction of a female 
teacher, and averaging seventy pupils, from four to eight 
years ot age . . . . . . . . . 700 

The female school on Town Hill, divided into grammar 
and writing departments, under two male teachers, in 
which are enrolled two hundred and forty pupils, from 
eight to fifteen years of age 240 

The male school, Trainingfield, divided into grammar and 
writing departments, under two male teachers, enrolling 
two hundred and forty-seven, from eight to fifteen years 
of age 247 

The school at the Neok, comprising both males and females, 
under one male teacher, in which are enrolled one hun- 
dred and sixteen, from seven to fifteen years of age . 116 

The foregoing schools are located within the peninsula. 
On the territory beyond the peninsula there are the follow- 
ing schools : — 

The school at Winder Hill, under the direction of a male 
teacher six months, and a female six months, enrolling 
seventy-five pupils, from four to sixteen years of age . 75 

The school in Russell District, male teacher four months, 

female six months . . . . . . . . 41 

The school in Gardiner's District, male teacher f©ur months, 

female six months ........ 85 

The school in Milk Row, male teacher six months, female 

six months, do. ........ 127 



Total number of pupils enrolled . 



1,581 



From this view of our school department it will be seen that it 
embraces no less than nineteen distinct schools, under as many 
teachers, and fifteen hundred and eighty-one pupils, from four 
to sixteen j^ears of age. 

The supervision and control of a department, so important in 
itself, and so extensive as that of the Charlestown free schools, 
presents to those who undertake it, a task requiring no ordinary 
10 



7i 

sacrifice of time to the public good, no ordinary degree of industry, 
patience, impartiality and fidelity in the discbarge of their various 
and oftentimes perplexing and unpleasant duties, and alluring to 
their performance only by the gratification of tbat ambition vvbich 
finds its exercise and reward in promoting thj public good. We 
may appeal to the experience of parents in relation to this subject, 
— for it should be borne in mind that parents, children, teachers 
and triislees are but parts of one great system, designed to pro- 
mote the best interests of all, and demanding most imperatively 
the utmost attainable degree of harmonious action. 

To govern a family of children of the ordinary number is quite 
enough, and too frequently much more than the heads of it find it 
easy or practicable to do well or even to their own satisfaction, 
much less to those around them. Consider then a family of chil- 
dren, swelled to the number of sixteen hundred, taken under the 
public care and placed under its constituted authorities, — taken 
as it were from chaos, to be reduced to order, constituted as they 
must be, with every variety of temperament, and drawn from every 
condition of society, — taken up ignorant to be inducted into the 
mysteries of knowledge by that slow and tedious process, through 
which alone they can be admitted, — to be early taught and con- 
stantly advanced in the principles and habits of virtue and reli- 
gion, — to be guarded from the seducing temptations of the world 
into which they are just entering, ignorant of the results and too 
weak to resist the fascinations of vicious habits, — and to be 
trained up in the way they should go. 

Nor is this all. The unpleasant but urgent duty has quite too 
frequently to be performed, to go between the delicate and lively 
sensibilities of parents and the unfortunate perversities of their 
children, and to reconcile the importance of good order as tli3 first 
step to all improvement, and the necessity of rigid discipline in 
peculiar cases to effect it, with those tender parental feelings? 
which, in Iheir two abundant exercise, very often mislead our 
judgment and blind us to the best interests of those for whom we 
feel the strongest regard. 

Surely all this is no ordinary task, if performed with any good 
degree of fidelity, whether it be in the capacity of trustees, or in 



75 

the responsible, arduous and honorable office of teachers — and it 
is a point of duty peculiarly binding on all parents, to estimate 
justly the important relation in which they stand to our school 
department, not merely and solely us the parents of certain 
children and interested in them alone, but also with reference to 
the community at large, to the great objects of general improve- 
ment and progress in knowledge and virtue, to the more elevated 
and perfect condition of the social state ; and to this department 
in our public affairs, through all its branches, above all others, as 
the great moral machitie, which, as it may be well or ill conducted, 
moves the whole fabric of human society forward or backward, in 
its attempts towards a more perfect condition. 

In relation to the financial concerns of the school department, 
it appears from the report of the treasurer, that the sum total of 
receipts, for the year ending May, 1834, is . . $8,023 14 

And that the amount of expenditures is . . , 7,462 01 



Presenting a balance on hand of .... $561 13 

The trustees would remark, that the appearance of a balance in 
the treasury of their board, should not be viewed as indicating any 
room for retrenchment in the appropriation by the town to this 
department, for the ensuing year, as a quarter's salary to all the 
teachers, amounting to about $1,600, will fall due on the 16th 
inst., and that the present crowded state of our primary schools 
renders it probable, if not indeed certain, that a new school of this 
class will have to be established during the current year. 

With these statements, the trustees indulge the hope that the 
same appropriation as last year, will be made for the support of 
the schools, believing that any retrenchment upon the present es- 
tablishment would be very far from judicious economy, and would 
prove very prejudicial to the best interests of our community. 
For a more detailed account of the financial concerns of the 
department, reference is made to the statement of the treasurer, 
which has been printed and circulated. 

The trustees, impelled by a sense of duty to themselves, to the 
community at large, to that most interesting class among us, the 
rising generation, and to those whose duty it is to remedy the 



76 

evil, feel bound, thus publicly, to complain of the conduct of those 
parents, who so frequently, and so reckless of the consequences to 
their children, to themselves, and to the community, neglect the 
liberal and abundant privileges provided in this town for the edu- 
cation of their children, by allowing them to be absent in many 
instances more than one half of the time from school, thereby 
greatly reducing the value of the other portion of the time, and 
greatly retarding the progress of those who are constant in their 
attendance. 

This is an alarming evil, and demands of those who are verily 
guilty in this point, a speedy remedy ; for in its operation it is 
unjust to the community, filling it with an idle and vicious popu- 
lation ; unjust in parents to themselves, and, in the highest degree, 
unjust to their children. How many there are among us, which 
the utmost exertions of trustees and teachers, unaided by the 
serious and hearty co operation of parents, have not been able to 
draw and retain within the healthful influences of our public 
schools, who are now wasting away their most valuable time, — 
either through an excessive indulgence, or for the want of that 
government over their children on the part of parents, which it is 
one great object so desirable but oftentimes so diiSicult to effect in 
our schools, — indulging in habits of idleness, or, perhaps, still 
further advanced on the high road to ruin, and who will, erelong, 
reap the bitter fruits of their neglect, vex society with their out- 
rages, and bring down the gray hairs of their too kind and too 
indulgent parents in sorrow to the grave. 

The trustees dwell on this point with earnestness, for the records 
of our schools and daily observation bear startling evidence to the 
fact, and because it is a truth, fully borne out by the experience 
of all who have the management of schools, that the pupil who is 
constant in his attendance at school is seldom, if ever, the subject 
of severe discipline ; but more particularly for the purpose of 
directing to this point a share of that jealous vigilance, ever 
watchful over this department in some particulars, as it should be 
in^every particular, but which is too often satisfied that the priv- 
ileges of free schools should exist, without a corresponding vigi- 
lance that they should be improved. 



77 

In concluding their report, the trustees call, and call earnestly, 
upon their fellow-citizens to feel as deeply as they can feel the 
importance of their relative position to our schools, and of the 
influences which an extensive and well endowed and conducted 
school department exerts upon society ; if faithfully improved, 
how salutary ; if neglected, how prejudicial, to watch, with untir- 
ing but well-intended vigilance, the conduct of all those, whoever 
they may be, whether trustees or teachers, who may be placed 
over it ; but they call on them also, and with undiminished earn- 
estness, to estimate justly the important duties which devolve on 
them to perform ; to make common cause with trustees and teach- 
ers, in every well-intended effort to effect the great common object, 
— the improvement and right training up of the rising generation ; 
to consider the difiSculties that must be met and overcome ; rightly 
to appreciate the motives which lead to rigid discipline, and not 
only to be earnest in their desires that there should be good free 
schools, but that they should be well sustained, and, above all, 
constantly attended by their children. With such views, and such 
a spirit pervading our community, with such a system of harmoni- 
ous action enlisting all, our school department would rise to an 
unequalled elevation, and like a pure and living fountain continu- 
ally send forth streams that would fertilize and adorn our whole 
population. Society would be purified and elevated. Parents 
would have occasion to rejoice in the midst of a virtuous and im- 
proving offspring, and our children would rise up and call us 
blessed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the board of trustees. 

BENJ. THOMPSON, 

Secretary. 
Charlestown, May 5, 1834. 



78 



The absence of the Secretary of the Board devolves upon the 
undersigned the dnty of adverting to other than the pecuniary 
concerns of the department. It is believed this can not be done 
more acceptably than by referring to the secretary's report of last 
year, which was ordered to be printed and distributed to every 
family in town. It is hoped that the true exposition of the state 
of the schools, and the faithful appeal to the good sense of this 
community therein contained, have not yet been lost or forgotten. 
All the views, principles and reasonings of that document are 
important and applicable at the present time. 

At the recent semi-annual examinations satisfactory evidence 
was given that the schools generally are in as good condition as 
they have heretofore been. It would be unjust to withhold an 
expression of the belief that the three high schools within the 
Neck, under the care of five masters, have reached a standing not 
before attained by them. 

By order of the board of trustees, 

PAUL WILLARD, 

Treasurer* 

Charlestown, May 1, 1835. 



'9 



The Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools ask leave to 
offer the following report : — 

Trusting the discharge of their arduous and responsible duties 
imposed upon them may meet with approbation ; feeling that they 
have been actuated alone by a desire for the public welfare and a 
sincere wish to promote the moral and intellectual condition of the 
youth of this town, it is for the rising generation to support those 
laws and religious institutions which our venerated forefathers 
framed and put into execution as the best and only means of pre- 
serving us an enlightened and independent people. Hence we see 
the A^ast importance of cultivating and giving a right direction to 
the minds of the young. 

The schools are in a very flourishing^ condition, and we venture 
to affirm, have in no way deteriorated from the high character which 
they have sustained during the preceding years. 

There have been mau}^ changes, both with i-egard to teachers 
and scholars, and many inconveniences incident thereto. They are 
now settled and under as competent teachers and as good manage- 
ment as they were ever known to have been. 

The examinations generally were entirel}^ satisfactor}^, and gave 
convincing proof of the faithfulness of the instructors and the 
application of the scholars. In conformity to a vote of the town, 
two primaries have been added, making in all twelve schools for 
instruction of children between the ages of four and eight years ; 
averaging ^^{2 P^ipils for each school, each under the direction of 
a female teacher ........ 802 

The male school in the Training-field, divided into grammar 
and writing departments, enrolls 228 pupils between the 
ages of eight and fifteen years, under the direction of two 
male teachers . . , . . . . . 228 

The female school on the Town Hill, enrolls 211 as an aver- 
age number, divided into grammar and writing depart- 
ments, being under the direction of two male teachers. 211 



Carried forward 1,241 



80 

Brought forward ....... 1,241 

The school at the Neck comprises both male and female 
pupils, under one teacher, and enrolls 129 scholars from 
seven to fifteen years of age , . . . . 129 

The following schools are situated beyond the Peninsula : 

The Winter Hill school, under the direction of a male teacher 
six months, and a female teacher for the remaining half of 
the year, enrolls 80 pupils between the ages of four and 
sixteen years ........ 80 

The school in Gardner's district — male teacher four months, 
female six months — enrolls 30 pupils from four to sixteen 
years of age ........ 30 

The school in Russell district — male teacher four months, 
female six months — enrolls 29 pupils /rom the ages of 
four to sixteen years ....... 29 

The school in Milk Row — male and female teacher, each 
six months — enrolls 116 pupils between the ages of four 
and sixteen years . . . . . . . 116 



Total number of pupils in twenty-one schools, male and 
female .......... 1,625 

Miss Ann E. Whipple has been employed, by the request of the 
inhabitants, to teach the Milk Row school during the winter term, 
in place of a master who generally instructs during this part of the 
year. She conducts the school with efficiency, giving entire satis- 
faction to the parents and trustees ; indeed, under no former in- 
structor has the school been better regulated or have the scholars 
more visibly improved. 

The financial concerns in relation to the schools will be seen by 
the report of the treasurer to be in a flourishing condition. 

We would acknowledge from the school fund of the State the 
receipt of $359.68. This, with other receipts in addition to the 
sum appropriated by the town, increases our fund to the sum 

of $8,691 53 

The amount of expenditures being . . . 8,251 38 



Presenting a balance on hand of . . , • 440 15 



81 

It is unnecessary to enlarge on this point, as the financial affairs 
may be perused in detail by reference to the statement of the 
treasurer now before the town. 

Notwithstanding the balance remaining in the hands of the 
treasurer, the trustees would in no wise recommend less liberality 
in their appropriation for the year ensuing. 

The law relating to the Massachusetts school fund having under- 
gone some alteration, will reduce the receipts from the State treasury 
about one third of the sum received from that quarter the present year. 

During the past year Mr. Nathan Morrill, of the Town Hill 
school, and Mr. William D. Swan, of the Neck school, petitioned 
the trustees for an increase of salary, it w^as voted to give one 
hundred dollars in addition to the seven hundred dollars which 
they then received. The primary teachers likewise presented a 
petition for increase of salary, stating as a cause the high rate of 
living ; the additional quantity of fuel which has been needed is in 
consequence of the unusual degree of cold and inclement weather 
which we have experienced during the past winter. The trustees 
not being authorized by the town, and being unaware of the public 
will in relation to it, thought best not to comply with their request 
in full, but granted them the sum of ten dollars each, choosing to 
defer the subject until the May meeting, when, if the town should 
think it advisable, their remuneration could be increased. 

In relation to tiie petition of Edwin Munroe and others, inhab- 
itants of the Milk Row district, the trustees would recommend the 
expediency of favoring another school. Tiie district is very ex- 
tensive and the growth of the population rapid, consequentl}^, in a 
few 3^ears, if not at present, it would be unavoidable. 

A petition has been presented to the board by Oliver Holden 
and others, requesting the removal of the cupola and bell from the 
Town Hill to the Training-field school, the cupola obstructing the 
view of the north dial on Rev. Di-. Fay's church from the inhabi- 
tants in the northern section of the town. Its present situation is 
inconvenient in many respects, tlie boy who rings it having to go 
some distance. He is consequently unable to return in time to 
commence his studies with the rest of his class. Jt is also au 
interruption to the female department. 
11 



82 

The present state of public education in this town has nearly 
approximated to all we could hope or wish. The importance and 
necessity of a good education, and the wisdom of the means which 
are employed in relation to our free schools, are becoming every 
day more apparent. Here every one, however indigent, may 
obtain, by application and industry, the basis of that knowledge 
which will be able to render them respected, influential and afflu- 
ent in after life. If to the schools already in successful operation, 
the town see fit to add another for the instruction of youth in the 
higher branches of knowledge, and thereby tit them to take a more 
exalted part in the duties of life — which the trustees would most 
earnestly recommend, — then indeed our system and means of 
instruction would be complete. 

We regret exceedingly to say that parents are often very delin- 
quent with regard to the attendance of their children. By the 
absences and irregularities of a few, the others are materially 
retarded in the pursuance of their studies. The order of the 
school is disturbed and the example very prejudicial. Let the 
parents insist on a regular attendance, and we venture to affirm 
that children will take more interest, will advance more rapidly, 
and be more tractable and obedient, both at school and at home. 
If parents will only unite their earnest cooperation with that of 
the teachers and trustees in endeavoring to impress upon their 
minds the importance of improving to the utmost their many 
advantages, and to leave no means unimproved which contribute 
to render them enlightened and useful members of society. Thus 
may we confidently hope in the increasing prosperity of our happy 
land ; and our forefathers, when they look from their repose in 
heaven, may feel satisfied with the manner in which we have kept 
their ordinances, and that we are in reality, as well as in name, a 
free people. 

Kespectfully submitted to the town, 

By order of the trustees, 

LARKIN TUliNP:R, 

Attest : President, 

PAUL WILLARD, 

Secretary. 

Charlestown, May 2, 1836. 



S3 



The trustees of the free schools respectfully present the follow- 
ing report : — 

All the schools under their supervision have received careful 
attention daring the past year. It has been our aim to sustain 
their present high character, to improve their condition, and in- 
crease their advantages for the children and youth of the town. 
We are happy in being able to say so much that is satisfactory 
with reference to the present condition of the schools ; and in sug- 
gesting any farther alterations and improvements, as well as in 
what has been done we hope the town will feel that the board is 
actuated only by a conviction of the necessity of such changes, 
arising from a careful consideration of the whole subject and a 
desire that the best interests of the town may be promoted. 

The recent examinations of the schools have proved very satis- 
factory to the trustees. The improvements made the past year 
have equalled their expectations ; still they are not yet in the con- 
dition we wish to see them. Many improvements are necessary 
and appear to be called for by the spirit of the age. A very gen- 
eral interest seems to be felt for the prosperity of the schools, and 
in the cause of education generally — an interest which reflects 
much credit upon the town, and is the best guaranty for the im- 
provement of common schools. The cooperation of the parents 
with the trustees and teachers will tend much to remove those 
evils which are felt in all our schools. One of those, and a very 
serious one, that tends very much to impede their progress, and 
must continue to do so as long as it exists, is the great number of 
daily absences from school and the irregularity in the attendance 
of the scholars. This evil, we think, is in a good degree charge- 
able to the parents, in allowing their children to be absent for 
trivial causes, or to gratify a desire on their part to indulge chil- 
dren, without reflecting upon the consequences of such indulgence 
to them or those who are constant in their attendance. Were the 
evil consequences resulting from this source confined wholly to 
those who are allowed to practise it, the trustees would refi ain 
from bringing it before the town ; but as it affects, in a greater or 



84 

less degree, all the schools, a sense of dnty impels thera to advert 
to it, with the hope that it mny awaken attention in the minds of 
parents to the subject, feeling assured that it only needs be known 
to produce a partial, if not entire correction. The records of the 
different schools show that an average of eleven per cent of all 
the schools — being over two hundred of the scholars — have 
been absent from school the past year ; thus the town will see 
this is an evil of no small magnitude. It is also the cause of 
most of the corporal punishment which is inflicted in the schools. 
Those ^lio are irregular in attendance, or absent a considerable 
portion of the time, acquire habits which are altogether incompat- 
ible with that order and discipline so necessary in a well regulated 
school. Those habits must be overcome by gentle or severe 
means ; hence it often becomes necessary to inflict severe punish- 
ments to such scholars before they can be brought to a state of 
subjection to the wholesome regulations of the school. These, 
and many other nnhapi)y consequences, flow from this evil ; but we 
forbear to mention them. 

The immber of scholars in the several schools in town, as ap- 
pears by the last returns, is as follows : — 

Training-field school, between the ages of eight and fif- 
teen years . . . . . . . . . 249 

Female school, between the ages of eight and fifteen years, 223 

School at the Neck, between the ages of eight and fifteen, 122 

Twelve primary schools, between the ages of four and eight, 893 

Five district schools, without the peninsula . . . 294 



Making 1,781 

the whole number of scholars in the public schools in town, being 
an increase of over one hundred in the past year. 

During the past year, in accordance with the direction of the 
town, the cupola has been removed from the school-house on Tinvn 
Hill and a new one erected on the house in the Training-field. A 
new district has been created and a school-house built in the vicinity 
of Prospect Kill, and the number of scholars in attendance there 
suflSciently proves that a necessity existed therefor. 



85 

The state of the treasury, and the manner in which the funds 
placed at the command of the trustees have been disposed of, are 
fully shown by the accompanying report of the treasurer of the 
board, and the appropriation represented as being necessary for 
the coming year we doubt not will be cheerfully made. 

By the statement of the number attending the primary schools 
it will be seen that some of them must be in a very crowded con- 
dition. This is particularly the case with the school at Morton's 
Point. This is so much felt in that district that a petition, signed 
by a number of the citizens of that part of the town, asking for 
the immediate establishment of another primary school in their 
vicinity, has been recently presented to the board. We, therefore, 
recommend the town to authorize the establishment of such a 
school, considering the measure as imperiously called for. The 
school situated in centre district is also in a crowded condition, 
and as the number requiring the instruction of a primary school in 
this vicinity is so great as to render it necessary, the trustees also 
recommend the establishment of one additional school in that 
district. 

In accordance with their convictions of its necessity, and we 
doubt not with the wishes of the town, assistant teachers have 
been appointed in all the grammar schools. This measure, we 
believe will contribute much to the excellence of the schools, en- 
abling the masters to dispense altogether with monitors, and to see 
that the younger members of the school receive a proper share of 
attention ; while the higher branches of study will be so much 
better attended to as to render the advantages of these schools 
equal to those of most high schools. In order, however, to render 
them what they ought to be, it will be necessary to alter the 
present buildings so as to accommodate comfortably the large 
number in attendance upon them. The number in all the grammar 
schools is very large and- has much increased since the examina. 
tion. From these facts it is evident that another school must be 
established and a building erected for its accommodation, or the 
present school-houses so much enlarged as to enable the teachers 
to do justice to the schools. The latter course the trustees think 
decidedly preferable at present. By the preposed alterations, as 



86 

the citizens may see b}^ reference to the accompanying plans, the 
additional number who ma}^ be accommodated is considerable, and 
this measure will doubtless obviate the necessity of erecting an. 
other house for an additional school for several years. Estimates 
of the cost of the proposed improvements have been obtained, by 
which we learn that they can all be done for a sum not exceeding 
twenty-six hundred dollars. The trustees therefore recommend 
that this sum be appropriated for that purpose. 

By reference to the report of the treasurer of the board it will be 
seen that the trustees recognize two primary school-houses as part 
of their permanent funds. They have heretofore received rent for 
said houses from the teachers equal to the interest on the amount 
expended in their erection. They have the last year found it 
necessary to make an alteration in the terms upon which those 
teachers are employed, and furnish the school-rooms for them ; 
hence those buildings have ceased to yield any income to the 
board, consequently their funds are diminished the amount of the 
cost of said school-houses, although they remain the property of 
the town. They therefore request the town to authorize the treas- 
urer to give to the board of trustees a town note for six hundred 
dollars, at six per cent interest, which will restore that amount to 
the funds of the board, agreeably to the terms of the donations by 
which said fund was created. 
Respectfully presented, 

Per order of the board of trustees, 

CHAS. THOMPSON, 

President, 

THO. BROWNE, Jr., 

Secretary. 



87 



The board of trustees of the Chaiiestown free schools, in con- 
formity with the law and vote of the town, herewith make their 
annual report of the character and condition of the schools the 
past year. 

Having, at the annual meeting in March last, presented to the 
town their report concerning the alterations and repairs of school- 
houses which they have made in obedience to the instructions of 
the town, they, therefore, need only refer to that report, and to the 
printed report of the treasurer, now in the hands of the inhabi- 
tants, for information in relation to that subject ; also, to the 
current expenses of the board they need only add, that these 
alterations and the establishment of the two new primary schools 
could not have been dispensed with without doing great injury to 
the interests of the scholars. Notwithstanding, by this improve- 
ment, nearly five hundred new seats have been furnished, besides 
affording better accommodation to all who attend the grammar 
school, yet no sooner were tbey completed than all were required. 

If we may estimate the increase of scholars for the future by the 
aapid rate in which they have filled our schools for the last two 
years, it will not be more than two years before the town will be 
called upon to establish another grammar school, and perhaps one 
or more primary schools. By the result of the examinations 
during the last month, it appeared that there were on the lists 
of the fourteen primary schools 957 scholars, or an average of 
about 70 to each school ; of the three grammar schools, 830 ; of 
the five district schools without the Peninsula, 276 — making in 
all, 2,063. 

The cause of the great increase of the attendance upon our 
schools which has lately taken place, may be readily given. Within 
eighteen months a very few of the children of our Irish popula- 
tion attended our schools, they having a separate establishment ; 
but, for some reason, they have given up their own and have sent 
their children to the public schools. It was also an old regulation 
of the board that no scholar should be allowed the privilege of 
public instruction beyond the age of fifteen years; but, by the 



S8 

Revised Statutes, towns are requirerl to provide the means of in- 
struction for all children between the ages of four and sixteen 
years. This extended privilege has been gladly embraced by 
many, who, in these embarrassed times, not being able to find 
any lucrative employment for their children, have kept them at 
school, that they may be better prepared for their future duties. 
Our population, too, is steadil}^ and surely increasing, and such is 
the exalted character of our schools, that the disposition of parents 
to send their children abroad to private schools or academies has 
been considerably checked. The board have had applications to 
receive children from the country, and even from the city, which 
of course the^^ have rejected. But if the town were desirous to 
furnish inducements to strangers to take up their residence with 
us, and to help bear our burdens, they could furnish no greater 
than our well-regulated schools, under the charge, as they now are, 
of excellent teachers, and liberally furnished by the town, as, we 
trust, they ever will be, with all the necessary accommodations and 
all the means of mental improvement. 

That the free schools in this town are now in a good state, bolh 
as to discipline and order of the scholars, and the fidelity of the 
teachers, is an assertion which the board do not hesitate to make, 
without qualification or fear of contradiction. The examinations, 
both in the fall and during the last month, gave general satisfac- 
tion to the board, and, we doubt not, to the great number of 
parents who attended them. There has been a uniform and steady 
progress which has kept pace with, and done justice to, the liber- 
ality of the town in their appropriations in aid of public in- 
struction. 

There has also been a decided improvement in the method of 
discipline. The board have used their utmost efforts to procure 
the abolishment of corporal punishment. They have privately 
Impressed upon all the teachers their obligation to dispense with 
its use as far as in their power, and have adopted regulations 
requiring the teachers to keep an account of such punishments, 
and to give detailed information of each instance to one of the 
board. It is evident, however, that some discretion musj be left 
with the teachers ; for were this revolting form of punishment 



89 

wholly prohibited to them, the scholars, knowing the fact, as they 
would, would be strongly tempted to take advantage of the teacher 
and abuse a restriction placed upon him for their protection. It is 
gratifying to find that these efforts have not failed of success. In 
the female grammar school this punishment has been wholly aban- 
doned by the teachers, and in all the others the resort to it has 
been far less frequent than formerly. This attempt to influence 
the scholars by moral means, and by a laudable spirit of emulation, 
has not been lost upon them. Under the influence of a worthy 
spirit, the large boys in the grammar schools have of their own 
accord formed themselves into societies for the prevention of pro- 
fanity among themselves and for mutual moral improvement. 
They have made interest among many parents, who have aided 
them in collecting a library of well-selected books for their use. 
Such undertakings cannot but add a stimulus to the formation of 
a good character and to the desire of gaining useful knowledge. 

The exercise of singing has also been pretty generally introduced 
into the schools and to great advantage. It is proved to have a 
salutary influence upon the character and to afford agreeable 
mental relaxation. The willingness of the teachers to devote 
an extra portion of time for the purpose of giving instruction in 
this exercise, is one of the proofs of their enthusiastic devotion 
to the best fulfilment of the important trust committed to them. 
This, as well as all other new means of improvement, should be 
introduced into our public schools, after they have been tested by 
experience and proved to be serviceable. That many new facilities 
and advantages for instruction will be erelong discovered is un- 
questionable, and when discovered and attested, they will be 
adopted in every community where the zeal for mental improve- 
ment keeps pace with increased means for promoting it. For this 
purpose a board of education has been established by the authority 
of the State, whose province it is to collect and compare the dif- 
ferent means of instruction in all the various methods, and to 
recomraenr] the best to all the schools for their adoption ; thus 
raising a high standard for free school instruction and creating a 
zeal and rivalry among the different towns each to exhibit the 
12 



90 

best. The influence of their efforts will be felt, we doubt not, 
among the first, by the town of Charlestown. 

From the estimate which the board have made of the probable 
expenses for the ensuing year, they are convinced that as large an 
appropriation as was made last year, for the ordinary expenses, 
will be needed — say $10,000. The amount of the salaries to 
teachers last year was $9,415, but as some of the teachers were 
not appointed until after the commencement of the year, the 
amount will be, for the coming year, $9,962 ; thus the whole 
amount of the appropriation asked for will, within a few dollars, 
be taken up by salaries, leaving the contingencies, as rent of 
primary school-rooms, fuel for all the schools, books, care of 
rooms, etc., to be paid from the income of the surplus revenue 
and of the funds of the board. This may seem to many a large 
demand, but when it is considered that there are employed twenty- 
nine different teachers who have each, on an average, seventy 
children assigned to their care, and whose average pay would 
amount only to $340 per annum, every one will allow that there 
are neither too many teachers, nor do they receive too high com- 
pensation for their arduous duties. The whole amount paid by the 
town for schools amounts to five dollars to each scholar. 

In addition to the above the board feel compelled by a sense of 
duty to ask an additional appropriation of two hundred dollars for 
the repair of the school-house in Russell district This building 
has not been repaired since its erection. The seats and benches 
are in bad condition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Per order of the board of trustees, 

CHARLES THOMPSON, 

President. 

THOMAS BRO^yNE, Jr., 

Secretary. 

Charlestown, May 7, 1838. 



OF THE EXPENSES AND FUNDS OF 

THE 

CHARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS, FOR 1823. 






EXPENDITURES, 

Paid Robert Gordon, salary for one year $ 600 

" do. grant - - 200 

" do. balance of last year's grant 87 40 

^^ do. contingencies - - 4 25 

'' Edward Sawyer, salary from May 1st to October 20th, 

including grant for same period - 377 77 

" do. balance of last year's grant - 100 

do. contmgencies - .70 

Jos. Reynolds, instructing school, Ward No. J*, from 

April 7th to July 15th - - 162 

" L. S. Gushing, instructing female school, six months 300 
" do. contingencies - - - SI 

" Thos. H Thompson, instructing school. Ward No. 2, 

from July 16th to August 26th - 66 33 

" Henry Adams, two quarter's salary in Ward No. 2 300 
" do. contingencies - - - 3 54 

" Cornelius Walker, one quarter's salary in Ward No. 1 150 
*' do. contingencies _ - . 92 

*^ Nathan Blanchard, instructing school, Ward No. 3, 

half a month - - - 16 

*^ Saml. Barrett do. No. 3, from Nov. 24th 

to April 18th - - - 168 

'^ Benja. Munroe do. Ward No. 4, five months 80 

" Nathl. H. Henchman, board of master 61 52 

" Emery Bemis, instructing school, Ward No. 5, four 

and a half months - - 72 

'' Saml. Gardner, board of master - - 56 82 

Miss Sprague, instructing female school six months 150 

Miss Wayne, instructing summer school in Ward No. 3 92 
Miss Perry, do. Ward No. 4 - - 48 

Miss Adams, do. Ward No. 5 - 48 

Miss Hobbs, do. at Winter Hill - 9ft 

John Thorning, rent of room for said school 24 

Moses Grant, rent of house for female school 130 



6e 

6i 
<i 

ii 
(C 
(i 
i( 



Carried forward, $ 3396 06 






Brought forward, ^. $ 3396 06 

Schooling Poor Children, " 

Paid Mrs. Thompson - - ^ 105 56 

/' Mrs. Rea - - - 5Q 14 

'^ Miss Jefferds - - 78 58 

'' Miss Elliot - - - 14 56 

^54 84 

" Joseph White, for printing - - 3 •SS 

" David Stetson, wood - - 10 

'^ Saml. Kidder, ink - - - 16 50 

Jos. Phipps, repairs and sundries - 24 51 

Wm. M. Edmands, cleaning stove funnel - 1 

" Maria Lane, care of female school house - 4 

" Jotham Johnson, wood - - - 21 

*^ Isaac Pratt, repairs - * - 2 93 

'^ County Register, recording deed - - 50 

'^ Benjamin Edmands, repairs - - 6 67 

^^ Samuel Gardner, repairs and wood - 20 65 

'^ James Ayer, repairs - - - 11 84 

" David Stetson, wood - - - 52 

" Devens & Thompson, stove and sundries - 24 25 

" Samuel Cutter, repairs - - - 13 50 

'^ James Russell, wood - - - 13 

'^ Do. repairs - - - 1 50 

" Joseph Phipps, do. and sundries - - l^"^ ^^ 

<• Nathan Tufts, 2d, wood and sundries - ' >13 89 

Balance in hands of the Treasurer - - 7 17 



3,913 65 



Receipts and Income. 

Balance received of E. Phinney, Esq. late Treasurer ^116 09 

Amount voted by the Town, 1823 - - 3500 

Three quarter's interest on six per cent. Stock - 13 56 

Interest on Town note - - - 90 

Dividend received at Union Bank - - 176 

Received of Mrs. Walker for one and a half years' rent 

of room, in school house, Ward No. 2 - - IS 

^3913 G^ 



Funds of the Gharlestown Free Schools. 

Certificate of exchanged six per cent. Stock of 1812 $ 301 50 

do. Union Bstok Stock - - - 3200 

Town Note - - - - 1500 



5001 50 



All which is respect^lly submitted by the Trustees of the Charles- 
town Free Schools. 

L. M. PARKER, Treasurer. 
Charlestown, April, 1824. 



Statement 

Of the Expenses and Funds of the Charlestoivn Free Schools 

for- 1825. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Cornelius Walker, allowance for 5 q'rs, up to January 

20, 1825. Making his con:ipensation ^800 per year ^250 

Q^ It having been understood, at the time of his engagement that this 
allowance would be made provided his services should I'ully meet the 
approbation of the trustees. 

'-' Cornelius Walker, instructing Reading and Grammar 

dcp't, Ward No. 1. one year, ending Jan. 20, 1826. 800 
" Peter Conant, instructing Writing department, Ward 
" No. 1. one year, ending Feb, 1 Uh, 800 

Contingencies 8 68 

^' Sam'l Barrett, instructing female school 1 year, ending 

Feb. 3d 600 

Contingencies 87 

''^ Samuel Bigelow, instructing school. Ward No. 2. one. 

year, ending March 8th 600 

Contingencies 1 50 

'-^ Miss Ann D. Sprague, instructing Female school 1 year, 

ending Feb. 1st 300 

" Miss Charlotte Wayne, do. Ward No. 3. 21 weeks 84 
" J. O. Coburn, do. do. 5 . months 150 

'^ Miss Sarah Perrv, do. Ward No. 4. 21 weeks 63 

" Philemon R. Russell, jr. do. No. 4. five months 137 50 
'' Miss Eliza Ann Cutter, do. No. 5. do. do. 60 

'• Bowen A. Tufts, do. do. 4| months 117 

'■'' Miss Eliza Wayne do. Ward No. 6. *22 weeks 88 
'• Miss Jane Hobbs do. do. 1 month 16 

•' John Parker do. do. 4 months 131 

'• Mrs. Polly Jaquith, do. primary school. No. 1. three 
qr's,, ending Feb. 16th, including room rent and 
other expenses 168 75 

'• Miss Lucy Wyman do. primary school No. 2. 
'•' Mrs. Mary Thompson do. do. No. 3. 

•' Miss Roxana Jones do. do. No. 4. 

"' Miss Adeline Hyde do. do. No. 5. 

' Miss Mary Walker do. do. No. 6. 

•^ Mrs. Hannah Rea do. do. No. 7. 

• Betsey Putnam, care of Female school house 
'- Howe & Norton, paper and printing 
'' Alfred Carleton, wood 

• Benjamin Loring, blank books 

• Walter Balfour, repairs 
'• David Stone, clearing vaults 
■• Tufts & Cole, lumber 

Josiah Harris, painting and glazing 



168 


75 


162 


50 


168 


75 


168 


75 


162 


50 


162 


50 


8 




15 


50 


16 




3 


06 


2 


83 


10 




13 


62 


9 


30 



Carried forw^ard |5,448 36 



10 

Bro't forward 
'- J. Averj, repairs 
" John Caldwell, wood 
" Walter Russell, wood 
" Interest on money borrowed 
" Lot Pool, fitting up Trustees' room in the school house 

on Town hill, and sundry repairs 
" Jotham Johnson, wood 
" Benjamin Haynes, inkstands, funnel, &c, 
" John D. Edmands, repairs 
" John Adams, sundries 
" Benjamin Edmands, glazing 
^' Isaac Pratt, do. 

" James Deblois, repairs 

" S. G. Williams & Co., for $300 U. Bank Stock 5| adv. 
$301,50 of which being a re-investment of U. S. S, 
paid off 

Luke Wyman, w^ood 

Moses Grant, books and cards 

Crocker and Brewster, books 

James Russell, repairs, 

Moses Grant, rent of Female school house for 1 year 130 

Wm M. Edmands, water-pot 1 

" Samuel Kidde;, for ink 23 25 

Balance on hand 950 16 



$5,448 


36 


2 


42 


6 


87 


6 


06 


20 


55 


46 


40 


42 


75 


13 


11 


4 


88 


4 


97 


6 


63 


5 


18 


4 


75 


• 

316 


87 


10 


82 


2 


96 


7 




3 


38 



$7,058 37 

Receipts and Income* 
Received of L. M. Parker, late Treasurer, balance of his 

account 8 37 
Also for U. S. Stock recently paid off and to be reinvested 301 50 
Amount voted by the town 6475 

Dividend on Union bank stock 183 50 

Interest on town note 90 



',058 37 



Funds of the Charlestown Free Schools. 
Union bank stock 3500 

Town Note 1500 



$5000 



All which is respectfully submitted by the Trustees of the 
Charlestown Free Schools. 

CHESTER ADAMS, Trea^'u 
Charlestown, April 1826. 



• STATEMENT 

Of Expenses and Funds of the Charlestoimir Free Schools for 

the year 1826. 



u 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Peter Conant, instructing Writing department, Ward 
No. 1. one year, ending Feb. 11, 1827 
•' Do. contingencies - - _ 

" Cornelius Walker, instructing Grammar department, 

Ward No. 1. three quarters and five days 
" Do. contingencies - . . . 

" Charles Pierce, instructing Grammar department, 
Ward No. 1. one quarter _ - , 

Samuel Bigelow, instructing school in W^ard No. 2. 
one year, ending March 8 , . , 

Samuel Barrett, instructing Female school from Feb. 
4, to July 7, inclusive . _ . - 

Do. contingencies - . . 

Josiah Fairbank, instructing Female school 2 quarters 
Do. contingencies - - - - 

Ann D. Sprague, instructing Female school 1 year, 
ending Feb. 1. - - - - . - 

Do. contingencies . - . 

Polly Jaquith, instructing Primary School No. 1. 
Sarah French do. No. 2. 

Mary Thompson do. No. 3. 

Roxanna Jones do. No. 4. 

Adeline Hj^dc do. No. 5. 

Mary Walker do. No. 6. 

Hannah Rea do. No. 7. 

Elizabeth G. Whitin do. No. 8. 

Contingencies 
Mary Flanders, instruct'g school Ward No. 3. 20 weeks 



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^800 

6 77 

611 12 

7 63 

200 

675 

256 66 
1 88 

300 
5 04 



Hersina Knight 
Martha Frost 

Ann E. Whipple 
E. D. Dyer 
P. R. Russell 

Charles Tidd 



Andrew Wallis 



do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 



do. 



No. 4. 20 
No. 5. 20 " 

Contingencies 

No. 6. 22 " 
No. 3. 5 mo. 
No. 4. 4 " 

Contingencies 
No. 5. 

15 weeks & 4 days 

Contingencies 



No. 6. 5 months 
Contingencies 
Lincoln & Edmands, for school books 
Crocker & Brewster do. 

Thomas Greenleaf, repairs - - 

Jesse Hall, wood . - . 

Joel Locke, mason work 
Joseph Ingalls, repairing windows 
John D. Edmands, rent, &:c. 



300 
1 

225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
168 

75 
65 

60 

2 



37 



37 



30 



83 
150 
112 

2 77 

101 83 

25 
160 



2 
311 

241 
4 



9:> 

87 
30 
42 
5 76 
3 46 
2 40 
8 14 



Carried forward 



$6,30^ 04 



10 

Bro't forward <^6 
Paid John Ireland, siindries 

'' Benjamin Russell, printing - - 

'•^ Fosdick & While, repairs 

" Joshua MixLei", sawing wood - - 

'' Betsey Fiitnam, care of school house in Austin street 

" Alfred Carleton, wood - - - - 

*' Thomas B. Wait 8l son, "Journal of Education" 

'' Ballard & Wright, advertising 

" Jehiel Smith, repairs on school house, Ward No. 1. 

'-' Daniel Major, blinds for do. No. 3. 

Benjamin VVhipple, advertising 

Samuel Cutter, blinds for school house, W^ard No. 6. 

William S. Phipps, sundries - - 
•' Hall J. Kelley, wood and sundries 
" David Stetson, wood in 1825 
^' Do. do. 1826, and sawing 

" Cyrus Johnson, sawing wood - - - 

'' Silas Farrar, setting glass . - - 

'-' Jotham Johnson, wood - . . 

"' George Davidson, printing Rules and Regulations 
" Josiah Harris, setting glass - - . 

*•' Abijah Munroe, repairing globes 
•' Samuel Kidder & Co. ink . - . 

" Cheney Richardson, rep's on school house Ward No. 1 . 
'' Walter Russel, wood . - - - 

*' Bunker Hill bank, interest on money borrowed 



i; 



L( 



,302 


04 




52 




75 




75 


4 


50 


8 


00 


20 




. 4 






75 


17 


58 


25 


33 


3 




19 


25 


8 


57 


35 


98 


49 




50 


25 


1 




4 


16 


21 


50 


10 




10 


50 


1 


58 


11 


86 


12 


99 


9 




13 


44 



$6,646 31 
On hand - - 786 53 



$7,432 84 



RECEIPTS AND INCOME. 

Rec'd of Chester Adams, late treas'r, balance of hi? acc't $ 950 16 
" Amount voted by the town ... 6,000 

" Dividend on Union bank stock - 157 50 



a 



Interest on town Note - - - - 90 



" For Books ... - - 235 1 



^432 84 



Funds of the Charlestown Free Schools. 

Union bank stock - - - $3500 

Town note - - - 1500 



$5000 



All which is respectfully submitted by the Trustees of the Charles- 
town Free Schools. 

BENJAMIN WHIPPLE, Treas'r. 
CHARLEST0W:K, April 1827. 



SCHOOLS. 

. EXPENDITURES from April 1827, io April 16, 1828, 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 
Peter Conf^nt, in Writing department town hill 

school, one year, to Feb. 11 - $800 
Charles Peirce, Grammar do. one year 

to Jan. 25 - - - - 800 

Samuel Bigelow, Neck school, one year to Mch 8 700 
Josiah Fairbank, Female school, Grammar 

department, six months 300 

Do. six months, to Jan. 19 350 

John Holroyd, Writing dep't nine months 375 

Lemuel Gulliver do. three do. to Feb. 8 125 
Polly Jaquith, Primary School No. 1, one 

year to Feb. 16 225 

Ann Brown & others No. 2 do. do. 225 

Mary Thompson No. 3 do. do. 225 

Roxanna Jones No. 4 do. do. 225 

Adeline Hyde No. 5 do. do. 225 

Mary Walker No. 6 do. do. 225 

Hannah Rea No. 7 do. do. 225 

Elizabeth G. Whitin No. 8 11 mo. 22 days 220 

Eliza. D. Gardner, Gardner sch'l, summer term 63 40 

Bowen A. Tufts do. winter term 98 

E. Gerrish&A. Brown, Russell do. summer do. 63 40 

P. R. Russell, Jr. do. winter do. 124 

Ann E. Whipple, Milk Row school, summer do. 80 

A. G. Hoit do. winter do. 137 60 

Susan A. Warren Winter Hill do. summer do. 80 

J. Stickney & C. G. King do. winter do. 162 14 



WOOD. 

Benj. Whipple, for Town hill S. H. 

John Newell, sawing . - - 

P. R. Russell, jr. Russell S. H. 

J. Johnson, Neck, Milk Row&Wint. Hill S. H. 

Jesse Hall, Milk Row 

H. J. Kelley, paid sawing - - 

Nathan Tufts &: Co. Female S. H. 

Samuel Rugg, sawing _ . - 

Luke Wyman, Gardner S. H. 



29 


75 


3 




20 


29 


43 


87 


5 


25 


1 


50 


22 


37 


2 


25 


11 


12 



6053 54 



139 40 



Carried forward, $6192 94 



16 



Bro't forward, 
REPAIRS. 
Samuel Rugg, white -washing T/Dwn hill S. H. 
Benj, Edmands, glazing 

Andrew Wallis, sundries Wint. hill sch. house 
Fitch Cutter, for tan - - - 

Thomas Greenleaf, carpenter's work 
Stephen Symmes, sundries Gardner sch. house 
Silas Farrar, setting glass Milk Row do. 
Curtis Rice, carpenters work do. 

Devens & Thompson, nails for do. 
Hall J. Kelley, sundries do. 

Jesse Hall, lumber do. 

Goodridge &l Fletcher, lumber. Female old S. H. 
Alexis Pool, carpenter's work on do. 

John D. Edmands do do. 

Savage & Cross teaming for do. 

John Adams, sundries. Female new sch. house 
Lot Pool, paid sweeping do. 

E. P. Mackintire, curtains do. 

Jones & Wardell, stoves do. 

H. H. & F. H. Stimson, stove, Neck do. 



$6192 94 



Deduct amount rec'd for old stoves 

CONTINGENCIES. 

Samuel Abbot, sundries 
Josiah Fairbank do. 
P. Conant do. - - 

J. Holroyd do. - - 

Samuel Bigelow do. - - 

Benj. Haynes do. 

Wm. M. Edmands do. 

Moses Grant, rent of Female old school house 
Do. do. omitted in last Statement 

Elias Crafts, teaming sundries 
George Davidson, printing blank forms 
Alexis Pool, boxes for books 
Young & Minns, advertising 
C C. King, sundries - - - 

Betsey Putnam, care of Female old sch. house 
T. B. Wait &L Son, 'Journal of Education' 
S. Kidder & Co. Ink - - - 

Thomas Pike, chaise hire 1825 
Joseph Thompson, insurance Primary S. H. 
Cash for v.rapping paper 



Carried forward 



$7 




7 


10 


2 


95 


1 


50 


18 


08 


2 


35 


1 




53 


25 




46 


4 


78 


21 


49 


5 


25 


Q 

Ml 


62 


38 


74 


1 




1 


53 


1 


25 


6 


15 


24 




13 


95 



214 45 
23 59 



190 86 



4 10 




6 70 




3 30 




3 01 




1 36 




24 18 




17 75 




116 67 




65 




1 27 




5 




2 




1 50 




94 




8 




4 




5 75 




2 




2 50 




30 






275 33 






i 


6659 13 



i 



IT 

Bro't forward, $6659 13 
Books of Lincoln & Edmands and Crocker Sl 

Brewster - - - 565 84 

Deduct amount rec'd for books 5 1 3 



52 84 

Maps of Alston Mygatt " " . ■ ^^ 

Primary school hou^e built on Training-field, cost 298 59 

PMIIMI.IIIII ■ ^ 

$7,049 be 
Balance cash on hand 813 96 



$7863 52 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance per last year's Statement $ 786 53 
Amount voted by the town *^ - - 6500 

Dividend on Union bank stock - 1 75 

Interest on town Note -' - - 90 

Error in book account, last Statement 3 79 
Amount of Andrew Wallis' bill, charged in do. 

paid this year - - - 2 95 
Rec'd in part of town note, to pay for Primary 

school house - - - 300 

Do. interest on do. -- - 5 25 



63 52 



Funds of the, Charlestown Free Schools, 



Union bank Stock 35 shares - - $3500 

Town Note - - - 1200 

Primary school house rents for $36 per year 300 



$5000 



For the Board of Trustees, 

HENRY JAQUES, Trcas, 
Ckarlc'fftown^ April 17, 1828. 

3 



Dr, Town of Chartestoivn, in accH with T, /. Goodwin, 

1827 
May 12, To cash paid N. Sirovich, for paving stones $174 

27, " Bryant Newcomb, edge do 220 32 

" '' Nchem. Knowlton do 150 80 

30, " Aaron Locke, for grain 30 76 

Aug. 13, '^ Gooclridge & Fletcher 5 47 

" " N. Sirovich, for paving stones 62 25 

" " John Mitchell do 47 25 

17, " Nehem. Knowlton, edge stone 138 
24, " Enoch Pattfrson, paving do 2 97 
29, '-' John Mitchell do. 96 

" '^ Nehem. Knowlton, flag stone 115 80 

Oct. 9, " David Devens, wharfae^e 25 35 

" " Do lumber &: sand 11 88 

"- '' Nathan Trull, hay 28 44 

Nov. 1, " Caleb Harrington, carting 14 

5, '' Nathan Je*vett, labor 31 48 

6, '' Nehem. Knowlton, edge stone 195 20 
9, '•'- Samuel Ferrili, bricks 5 

" " Savage & Cross, wharfage 12 30 

20, " Aaron Locke, grain 30 68 

Dec. 1, " Bryant Newcomb, edge stone 75 50 

4, " Laban Turner, trucking 66 42 

6, " Thomas O. Nichols do 2 27 

13, " Jona. Teel, carting slate stones 9 

18, " Devens & Thompson 1 92 
20, '' David Richardson, horse hire 16 
22, " Elisha Cattcc, paving stones 12 
29, '' P. R.Russell, ploughing 4 50 

" " Thomas Pike, horse hire 1 50 

" '• Edward Nichols, paving 262 13 

Feb. 7,1828, '' Ambrose Cole, lumber 21 27 

" " Amos Tufts, shoeing horses 15 35 

" " Newell & Goodwin, for spirit 58 23 

26, " Jesse Hall, cedar posts 14 25 

'^ " John Runey, bricks 20 

March 3, '*' James Runey, wharfage 8 40 

'^ " David P. Winning, labor 355 

*' " Do stones, &c. 30 67 

4, " Wm. Whittemore, clearing snow 12 

8, ^' Andrew Roulstone, bill 13 

Carried forward $2397 3G 



Treasurer of the Surveyors of Highways, 



Cr. 



1827. 
June 11, By cash received of the town treasurer ^ 500 

July 21, " of do 500 

Nov'r 19, " of do 1000 

^j cash rec'd of sundry persons for edge 
stone, &c. viz. 

San:iuel Abbot, edge stone 

William Fernald do 

Jonathan Bridge do 

B. & S. Raymond do 

Kendall Bailey do 

William H. Bacon do 

Martin Bates do 

William Austin do 

Isaac Svvectser do 

Richard Sullivan do 

Job Richardson do - 

David Devens do 

William Fernald, drain - - . 

Lemuel Newcomb do - - 

Edmund Hawes do - - - 

Timothy Thompson, Sen. edge stone 

David Smith do 

Benjamin Gleason do 

Thomas Pike do 

Thomas Boylston do 

Timothy Walker ^ do 

Simeon Flint do 

John Skinner do 

Skinner, Hurd & Co. do 

John Cofran do 

John Breed do 

Joseph Hurd do 

David P. Winning, stones, gravel, &c. 

Samuel Stickney, labor and gravel 

Isaac Blanchard stones 

Henry Van Voorhis do - - 

Thomas J. Goodwin do - - 

Ward N. Boylston do 

Charles Emmerson do - - 

David Stetson do - - 23 16 



20 
15 
7 
18 
14 
13 
20 
i 

6 

7 

6 

44 

3 

5 

5 

39 

14 

8 

31 

33 

15 

5 

16 

13 

12 

13 

26 

4 

9 
22 

9 
23 

3 



30 
73 
93 
47 
41 
65 
76 
14 
64 
54 
63 
50 
40 
10 
10 

5e 

71 

S2 
09 
21 
85 
12 
92 
98 
32 
85 
63 
67 
25 
80 
10 
75 
bQ 



Carried forward $2581 ^b 



Dr. Town of Charlesioivn, in accH with T. /. Goodwin, 

1828. Bro't forward 

March 13, To cash paid Skinner,. Hurd & Co. shovels 
14, " Nathan Lamson, iron work 

24, " Aaron Locke, grain 

" " Josiah Harris, cash paid 

" " Benj. Loring, blank book 

26, " Charles Forster, horse hire 

31, " Joshua Grover, gravel 

April 5, " Nathan Lynde do 

« « Nathan Tufts 2d, labor 

8, " Bernard Tufts, slate stones 

Daniel Dodge, yoke of oxen 
Jonas L. Jennison, labor 



u u 



$2397 


36 


5 


75 


4 




39 


55 


5 


75 


1 


50 


8 


75 


7 


36 


5 


12 


103 


17 


14 


46 


80 




10 


50 



2683 27 
Cash paid Treas'r of Surveyors 1 9 60 

$2702 87 



Treasurer of the Surveyors of Highways, Cr, 

1827. Bro't forward ^2581 Q5 

By cash received of School house committee for dig- 
ging cellar 
" George Bartlett, edge stone 

*' Josiah Harris do 

" Isaac Mead, quarry stones 

" Jonas L. Jennison, drain stones 

" Timothy Thompson, jr. do. 



Errors excepted. 

THOMAS J. GOODWIN. 
QHARLESfOWN, April 8, 1828. 



27 


72 


11 


18 


21 


32 


22 


50 


19 




19 


50 


$2702 


87 



REPORT ON TAXES. 



The committee, chosen February 4, 1828, to examine the town 
records and ascertain the whole amount of taxes paid by that sec- 
tion of the town called the ''Outside of the Neck" for the seven 
years last past, and also the amount expended there the same years, 
and report at a future meeting, have attended to the duty assigned 
them, and ask leave to present the result of their investigations in 
the following Report. 

The committee take the liberty to premise, that the duty assign- 
ed them has been performed at the expense of much time and pa- 
tience; that they entered upon, and have completed the task im- 
posed on them, so far as in their power so to do, with but one ob- 
ject, which was, to present the town with as accurate and as impar- 
tial an exhibition of the subject as the data aiforded them would 
give. With this view, and this alone, they have gone through all 
the books and papers relative to the subject which could afford 
them any information. From the very nature of the case, howev- 
er, it cannot be expected that the committee will, nor do they pre- 
tend to present a stateoient perfectly accurate in every particular. 
The records, though correctly, have not been so specifically kept, 
in any of the departments, as to define m every instance, where the 
various ex})enditures have been made. Under these circumstan- 
ces, the great and only object of the committee has been to make 
their report as substantially correct, from the data presented them, 
as it was in their power to do; and as such, they with confidence 
submit it to the town. 

In order to ascertain the proportion paid by the " Outside of the 
Neck," the committee have found the whole town taxes for the last 
seven years to be (as near as could be ascertained) 

$145,789 66 
Abatements 9,983 62 



135,806 4 



Am't assessed on residents outside Neck 18,443 38 
on property of non-resi- 
dents, as near as could be ascertained 2,603 35 



21,046 73 
Abatements 945 16 
Whole am't paid by " Outside the Neck" 20,101 57 

Which is equal to one sixth and -//y of the town taxes. 



23 

Expenditures ^' Outside the Neck,"^^ 
In School department, for 7 years last past, ' 

as appears on records of Trustees J6863 75 

Added by committee for contingencies not 

specified, $20 per annum - - 140 

, 7003 lb 

On highwaj^s, as appears from bills on file, &c.last 7 yrs 4041 88 

The above expenditure on highways is exclusive of 
pauper labor. 

The expense of Poor belonging to "Outside of the 
Neck," estimated by a statement received by the com- 
mittee from Chairman of Overseers, at J257 1 5 per year 1800 05 

Amounts raised for general objects, last 7 years, r/z. 
State and county taxes $12,136 94 Gyy'^of which is $1798 
Sinking Fund 15,000 " 2222 22 

Salaries of Town Officers 5,960 " 882 96 

Necessary contingent exp's 2,111 09 " 312 60 

Interest on Town^Debt 19,051 " 2822 37 

From a statement w^hich the committee have received from the 
chairman of Overseers, it appears that the paupers have performed 
during the last seven years 16,528 days labor on the highways, 
which he estimates at 50 cts per day, amounting to $8,264. For 
board of men and horses, and repairs of tools and carts, $5,160, 
making the aggregate amount of $13,424; but as there are no 
means by which the committee can correctly apportion this labor, 
&:c. they decline the attempt. 

In the above list of general objects the committee have included 
the whole amount raised for sinking fund and interest on town debt ; 
and offer the following explanation : — I'he amount of tov. n debt in 
1821, the year with which the investio^ations of the committee com- 
mence, was $50,063 : e//^ of which the '-Outside of the Neck"* 
were obligated to pay. This debt has been gradually diminishing 
by the aid of the sinking fund, &c. from 1821, excepting the fol- 
lowing additions, viz, in June 1824, $10,000 for paving Main street ; 
in Sept. 1826, $2,000 for Fire department, and in July 1827, $4,500 
for school house, Training-field, all which, with the interest there- 
on, amount to about $19,900 : 6^y^ of this, which is $2,948 the 
"Outside of the Neck" are obligated to pay. In the annexed ac- 
count, the committee, having charged the "Outside" with a full pro- 
portion of sinking fund and interest on town debt, have passed this 
additional amount, viz. $2,948 to their credit. 

In arder to reduce to a more condensed form the general state- 
ments above made, and to present at one view the state of the case 
for 7 years last past, the following account current is subjoined. 



24 



Dr. " Outside of the Neck^^'' in acc^t with Town of Charles town CV. 



To 


am't expended on school 






department 


^7003 75 


C( 


On highways, exclusive of 






pauper \»bor 


4041 88 




Expetise of Poor 


1800 05 




State k county tax 


1798 




Sinking Fund 


22^22 22 




Saliries of town officers 


882 96 




('oiitingetit town expenses 


312 60 




Interest on town debt 

s 


2822 37 




20,883 83 



By 7 years taxes 
'• Additions to town debt 
*• Probable deficiency* 
" School Fund 



§20,101 57 
2,948 
100 
- 280 

g23,429 57 



* This Report was made up before the committee for building School house, Train- 
ing-field presented their report. 

From this account there appears a balance against the town of 
^2,545. If, however, but ^ part of the paupers' labor, &c. men- 
tioned above, which would be $2,685, should be charged to the 
*' Outside of the Neck" which, in the opinion of your committee, 
founded upon all the information they could obtain, is much less 
than they have received, the account will then present a balance 
of $140 against that section of the town. And it will also be seen 
from this statement (charging them with the pauper labor) that the 
" Outside of the Neck" have not paid any thing towards the paving 
Main street — Fire department — lighting lamps — night v/atch — new 
school house, or any other expense incurred within the Neck dur- 
ing the seven years last past. 

The committee have thought it unnecessary to present a more 
detailed report than the foregoing. The details, however, from 
which these results have followed, are with the committee and will 
be placed on file with the report. 



Respectfully submitted by 

THOMAS J. GOODWIN,*) 



JOSIAH HARRIS, 
JOHN HARRIS, 
BENJ. THOMPSON, 



yCommittcc. 



J 



Gharlestown, March 3, 1820. 



G. DAVIDSON, /»rmr. 



22 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL, 1829. 



PAY 


OF TEACHERS, 


Josiah Fairbanks 


700 


Lemuel Gulliver 


500 


Samuel Bigelow 


700 


Charles Pierce 


800 


Peter Conant 


800 


Mary Walker 


225 


Ann Brown 


225 


Adeline Hyde 


225 


Polly Jaquith 


225 


Hannah Rea 


225 


Elizabeth G. Whitin 


225 


Roxanna Jones , 


225 


Abigail G. Twycross 


150 


Margaret W. Locke 


157 93 


Emeline G. Whitia 


168 12 


Mary Thompson 


73 67 


Eliza D. Ward 


88 


Joseph W. Jenks 


138 67 


M. Whittemore 


71 50 


P. R. Russell, Jr. 


120 


Maria H. Stearns 


65 


Samuel Pitts 


98 


Elizabeth Gerrish 


88 


C. C. King 


160 



g6,453 89 



Carried forward, $ 6,453 89 



21 



Bro't forward, $57 08 $1,373 U 

Albert Richardson, repairing cart 5 20 

William Jackson, teaming 37 50 

Aaron Locke, grain 60 10 



159 88 



David P. Winning, balance of year's la- 
bour 143 22 
A. Babcock's bill 25 
Josiah Harris' bill 105 44 
Overseers, for am't borrowed Jan. 1829 200 
Balance paid William Gordon, Treasur- 
er, 1829 25 17 



Balance per last year's statement 19 60 

Amount voted by the town 

Thomas Rice, for stone 

J. B. Phipps, for Paving Committee 

Borrowed of Overseers 

Jonas L. Jennison, stone 

Eben Breed do 

Francis Hyde do 

John Murray do 

Samuel Etheridge do 

Caleb &Edw'd Pratt do 

Edward Cutter, sand 

Larkin Turner, stone 

D. P. Winning, sales stone to sundry 

persons 
Borrowed to supply deficiency 



1,000 




14 


87 


57 


36 


200 




9 


06 


9 


90 


10 




8 


10 


1 


25 


35 


81 


20 




1 


80 


44 


10 


600 





498 8i 



§2,031 85 



2,031 85 



BENJAMIN THOBIPSON, Treasurer, 
Charlestown, April 12, 1829. 



23 



Bro't forward, $6,453 89 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOL HOUSE ON TOWN HILL. 

Jeremy Wilson, carpenter's work 392 39 

Josiah Harris, painting and glazing 64 06 

Ralph Pratt, mason's work 28 79 

John Tapley, lumber 132 05 

Timothy Fletcher, do. 1160 

John Adams, nails and hard ware 42 07 

Samuel Rugg, white washing, &c. 9 75 

680 71 



PRIMARY SCHOOL HOUSE. 




David Smith, for building bought of him 


100 




Joseph Wilson, building addition and repairs 


77 




Benjamin Haynes, stove, funnel, &c. 


13 


68 


BOOKS. 






Crocker & Brewster 


381 


58 


Josiah Fairbanks 


54 


62 



SUNDRIES. 

Jotham Johnson, wood 40 49 

John Morrill, repairs 8 64 

Nehemiah Holden, setting glass 3 53 

Thomas Greenleaf, repairs 10 10 

Luke Wyman, wood, 8tc. 19 75 
J. Fairbank, desks, charge of female School 

House, &c. 33 GS 

E. L. Phelps, pails 50 

Ballard & Wright, advertising 2 50 

Benjamin Russell, do. 75 

G. V. H. Forbes, do. 75 

Wheildon & Raymond, do. 1 50 

William Tufts, cloth for curtains 3 30 

John Adams, hard ware 6 38 

Ralph Pratt, mason's work 5 90 

Harrison Wingate, carpenter's work 7 05 

Samuel Rugg, sawing wood, 4*c. 10 25 

Joshua Mixter, do. 4 20 



190 68 



436 2a 



Carried forward, §159 25 p,iei 48 



24 



Bro't forward, $159 25 $7,761 48 

Alfred Carleton, wood 20 62 

Benjamin Haynes, funnel, &c. 25 08 

Jeremy Wilson, carpenter's work and lumber 32 19 

Benjamin Edmands, setting glass 4 80 

John Tapley, lumber 4 37 

Lemuel Gulliver 8 20 

Bunker-Hill Bank, disc't on money borrowed 35 58 



290 09 



$8,051 57 
Balance, . . 908 63 



g8,960 20 

To this balance should be added $190 68, due from the perma- 
nent fund, in payment for Primary School House. 

Balance per last year's statement $813 96 

Amount voted bv the town 7,500 

Interest on Town Note 72 

Dividend on Union Bank Stock 192 50 

Rent of Primary School House 36 

Books sold 345 74 

8,960 20 



FUNDS OF THE CIIARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS. 

Union Bank Stock 3,500 

Town Note 1,200 

Two Primary School Houses, rented at $60 per year 490 68 



$5,190 68 
Deduct, appropriated as above, 190 68 

$ 5,000 

In the absence of the Treasurer the above statement has been 
prepared from his vouchers, and is submitted in his behalf 

CHESTER ADAMS. 

Charlestown, April 20, 1829. 



WHEIJ-.DON AND RXYMOXr — AURORA PRESa. 



24 

Bro't forward, $159 25 $7,761 48 

Alfred Carleton, wood 20 62 

Benjamin Haynes, funnel, Slc. 25 08 

Jeremy Wilson, carpenter's work and lumber 32 19 

Benjamin Edmands, setting glass 4 80 

John Tapley, lumber 4 37 

Lemuel Gulliver 8 20 

Bunker-Hill Bank, disc't on money borrowed 35 58 

290 09 



'r 



,051 57 
Balance, . . 908 63 



§8,960 20 

To this balance should be added $190 68, due from the perma- 
nent fund, in payment for Primary School House. 

Balance per last year's statement $ 813 96 

Amount voted by the town 7,500 

Interest on Town Note 72 

Dividend on Union Bank Stock 192 50 

Rent of Primary School House 36 

Books sold 345 74 

8,960 20 



FUNDS OF THE CHARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS. 

Union Bank Stock 3,500 

Town Note 1,200 

Two Primary School Houses, rented at $60 per year 490 68 



$5,190 68 
Deduct, appropriated as above, 190 68 



$ 5,000 

In the absence of the Treasurer the above statement has been 
prepared from his vouchers, and is submitted in his behalf. 

CHESTEPv ADAMS. 

Charlestown, April 20, 1829. 



WWEIJ^DON AND BAYMOXD — AURORA PREafl. 









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Charle$town^ 



M 



183 






Admit 
I of the School under your mstruction 



fQm 



?vv^ vvv vvv vvv vvvvx^'v^/VNT^^'v^/vvxA' vv^'vv%^/v^vvvv>/v vA/vx/v>/\x \ v-vv vv\ « 



to the privileges 



Trustee. 



i$ 



Statement 

Of the receipts and expenditures of the Charlestown Free Schools^ 
from May 1831, /o ^pril 2\st 1832. 

Receipts. 

Balance per last year's statement $242 70 

Appropriation by the town 7000 

Dividend on Union Bank Stock 175 

Interest on Town note 72 

Rent of Primary School Houses GO 

Cash of R. G. Tenney for books 7 46 

$7557 16 



Expenditures. 

Salaries of Grammar and Writing masters within the neck, viz 

Charles Pierce from March Uth 1831 $754 

Josiah Fairbank " Feb. 16. " 700 

Amos Baker *' March 24. '' 619 23 

Samuel B-gelow ** Feb. 16. '' 729 17 

Reuben Swan '' March 7. '^ 471 15 

Thomas Stephenson, Feb. 16. 1832 83 53 

Swan 4' Gulliver * 4 19 



-$3361 27 



Salaries of Primary School Teachers to Feb. 16, 1832 viz. 

Emeline G. Whiiing $225 

Lusanna R. Whiting 225 

Mary Walker 225 

Hannnh Rea 225 

Margaret W. Locke 225 

Ann Brown 225 

Hannah I. Gates to April 21. 266 67 

Polly Jaqueth 225 

Abagail G. Twycross 225 

Eliza A. Cutler 225 



$229167 

Amount carried forward, $5,652 94 



19 



STATEMENT 

of the Expenditures for the Support of the Poor (Sf Repairs of the 
Highways in the Town of Char testown, from March 1831 to March 

1832. 
RECEIPTS. 

Cash recM of Benj. Thompson 2 81 

Sum raised by the Town for Overseers of 

Poor and Surveyors of Highways Dep't 3500 

Cash hired of Bunker Hill Bank 8000 

*' " Merchants Bank 600 

" RecM of the State Treasurer for 

support of State Paupers 2235 10 

" by note in favor of Robert Winning 607 

" rec'd for Labor of Paupers on Sa- 
lem Turnpike 397 25 

« ^* of Warren Bridge Corp'n for Stone 184 14 

Canal Bridge Corp'n do 176 - 

Bishop Burns do 166 97 

Jonas L» Jennerson do 31 72 

0. W. Preston do 72 85 
James Runey do 57 75 
E. E. Bradshaw for Oakum 44 06 
Thacher Magoun do 75 20 

Caswell do 95 12 

Daniel Sampson do 31 50 

Benjamin Brintnall do 8 

Sam). D. Hunt do 24 38 
James Adams Jr for Iron work 8 Q6 

R. K. Blanchard, one ox 43 02 

'' <* Vegetables 23 97 

1. Wetherbee & Co. do 10 39 
John Wright do 9 92 



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Amount carried forward, Jl6,605 80 



statement or the Keceipts and £ipenditures 
or the Charlestown Free s$choo£§, from 
may, l^S2 to March, 183S. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the Treasury, May 8th, 1832, 505 65, 

Appropriation by the Town, annual, 7000 

Dividend on Union Bank Stock, 37 50, 

Interest on Town Note, 12 

Rent of Primary School Hauses^ 9,1 50 



§7,756 65 



EXPENDITURES. 
Salaries of Masters within the TVeck, viz: 

Charles Pierce, 800 

Josiah Fairbank, 700 

Arnos Baker, 700 

James Swan, 403 84 

Moses W. Walker, 290 

Warren Draper, 40 80 

Aaron Davis Capen, 88 76 

3023 40 

Salaries of Primary School Teachers, viz: 
Emeline G. Whitin, 225 

Lusannah R. Whitin, ^5 

Mary Walker, 225 

Hannah Rea, 225 

Margaret W^ Locke, ' 225 



Amount carried up, JJ1125 3,023 40 



'21 



Amount brought up, ^1125 3,023 4fr 

Ann Brown, 225 

Abigail G. Twycross, 225 

Eliza A. Cutter, 225 

Susan L. Sawyer, 133 ',13 

Polly Jaquith, 56 25 

ilannuli Andrews, 168 75 

2208 33 



Salaries oC Teachers ©wtssde the IVeck, viz: 

Milk Row, John N. Sherman, 477 

Gardner's Row, Mary W. jGfiei-cLs, 106 50 

Miici T. Gardner, 83 08 

U' inter lliil, Abigail Mead, 96 

Elliot Valentine, 64 

Russell District, Miranda Whittemore, 78 

Joseph S. Hastings, 60 62 



Coistiifi^eMcies. 

John D. Edmands, repairs 

Lemuel Gulliver, desk 

Amos Baker, writing copies 

Alfred Carleton, wood 

Amos Baker, slates and inkstands 

Jonathan Teel, sawing wood 

Moses W. Walker, writing copies 

Jeremy Wilson, repairs 

John Runey, sundries 

John J. Stowell, cleaning clock 

Emeline G. Whitin, allowance for rent 

Amos Baker, sundries 

Stephen Wiley, horse and chaise hire 

Edmund Matson, white-washing 



965 20 



2 63 




4 53 




24 o; 


* 


2 25 




16 50 




1 25 




3 08 




4 21 




2 47 




I 50 




8 00 




25 71 




2 25 




13 00 





Amount carried up, $111 45 6,196 93 



\,o 



Amounts brought up, 
Jacob Forster, rent of Primary school room 
Oliver A. Shaw, visible numerator 
Nathan Hale, advertising 
J. T. Buckingham, do 
Waitt S)' Dow, copy book 
Miranda Whittemore, cloth and brooms 
Harrison Wingatc, repairs 
Abigail Mead, sundries 
W. W. Wheildon, arithmetical cards &lc. 
Wm. H. Bacon, repairs 
Caleb Symmes, Jr. cleaning cellar 
Adams & Hudson, advertising 
Frederick A. Kendall, repairs 
Benja. Thompson, wood St sundries 
Benj. C. Teel, repairs 
John Peak, labor 
Charles Johnson, wood 
James T. Floyd, bricks and labor 
Josiah H. Russell, labor and materials 
Jacob Pratt, repairs 

Josiah Fairbank, makng fires S^ sundries 
Benj. C. Teel, labor 
Joseph Brown, labor 
Isaac C. Frothingham, repairs 
Guy C. Hawkins, wood <§r repairs 
Waitt 4' Dow, Books 
James Adams, brushes 
Enoch Pearson, repairs 
Samuel Kidder, <Sr Co. ink 

Balance, 



$111 45 


6196 


93 


27 00 






5 00 






1 50 






1 75 






63 






1 74 






16 77 






2 40 






20 25 






1 16 






4 00 






75 






13 63 






68 94 


* 




3 64 






16. 36 






30 02 






7 00 






8 77 






1 50 






19 05 






3 03 






2 25 






1 25 






18 81 






34 83 






3 17 






1 50 






10 09 


438 






24 


1, 


121 


48 


P. 

m 


756 


65 



Funds of the Charlestotvn Free Schools 

Union Bank Stock, 3,500 

Town Note, 1,200 

Two Primary School Houses 600 

Legacy of the late Deac. Thos. Miller, deceased, 100 



65,400 



Note. The Act incorporating the Board of Trustees of the 
Charlestovvn Free Schools, requires that a statement of their re- 
ceipts and expenditures shall be laid before the Town, in Ike 
month ofMay^ antiually, at which time, the Treasurer's accounts 
are audited by a Committee of the Board. This statement ne- 
cessarily embraces a period of ten months only. 

PAUL WILLARD, Treasurer 
March 4th, 1833 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THK 



TRUSTEES OF THE 



CHAHIiESTOWN FKEE §CH©OL§, 



SV^^Y, 1BZ%. 



«* r »# j ^ H »i 



PRINTED AT THE AURORA OFFICE. 

13 CBAltLXSTOWK SQUARE. 



TOWN MEETING IN CHARLESTOWN, 

May 5th, 1834. 

VOTID, Tbat the foregoing Report be accepted. 

VoTiD, That the same be printed, and a copy thereof distributed to crery 

Ftmily in Town. 

Att«»t, DAVID DODGE, Town Chrk^ 



HEPORT. 



In presenting to the Town, their Annual Re- 
port, the Trustees feel deeply impressed with the 
importance and relative position of that department 
in our municipal affairs, over which it has been 
their province to preside during the past year, 
whether viewed in the greatness of its extent, the 
cost of its maintenance, or with reference to the in- 
fluences it exerts, either for good or for evil, as it 
may be well or ill conducted, on the highest and 
most sacred interests of the community. They 
are also fully aware that the responsibilities tinder 
w^hich the members of the Board of Trustees are 
placed are great, and that to the faithful perform- 
ance of their duties they are prompted by that 
jealous watchfulness with which their fellow-citi- 
zens look towards this most important branch of 
their public affairs, and by the more imperative ob- 
ligations growing out of a regard to the morality, 
improvement and happiness of the community. 

It has been with such views and feelings and ob- 
jects that the members of the Board have endeav- 
ored to discharge their duties during the past year, 
and to them it is a source of great satisfaction, and 
an ample reward for arduous labors, that they are 
justified in re^jorting to their fellow-citizens at this 
time, that after several changes of teachers nece«- 



4 

sarily occasioned by resignations and other cause s, 
imposing npon them increased and very responsible 
dutiesj and exposing tlic schools to all the unfavor- 
able effects conseqi'.ent to such changes, — the 
schools are at this time in as high a condition of 
order, disciph'ne and progression, and under as com- 
petent, faithfiil and successful teachers, taken to- 
gether, as they have ever known them to be, and 
that no examinations have been more satisfactory 
and promising, than the last semi- annual, recently 
attended. 

1 he extent of our School Department is of no 
ordinary magnitude, and it presents to those who 
engage in its supervision a field of duties, of no or- 
dinary limits, either in variety or importance, and 
when unaided by the earnest cooperation, or em- 
barrassed by the unwarrantable jealousies of pa- 
rents, is very far from being either a desirable or a 
promising undertaking. 

The Charlestown Free School Department, 
comprises 10 Primary Schools, each under the di- 
rection of a female teacher, and averaging 70 pu- 
pils, from 4 to 8 years of age, 700 

Tiie Female School on Town Hill, divid- 
ed into Grammar and Writing Departments, 
under two male teachers, in which are enrol- 
led 210 pupils, from 8 to 15 years of age, 240 

The Male School, Trainingfield, divided 
into Grammar and Writing Departments, un- 
der two male teachers^ enrolhng 247, from 8 
to 15 years of age, 247 



The School at the Neck, comprising both 
males and females, nnder one male teacher, in 
which are enrolled 116 from 7 to 15 years of 
age, 113 

The foregoing schools are located within the 
Peninsula. On the territory beyond the 
Peninsula, t!iere are the following schools — 



The School at Winter ililL under tiie di- 



■9 



rection of a male teacher G months, and a 
female 6 months, enrolling 75 puj3ils from 4 
to 16 years of age, 75 

The School in Russell District, male tea- 
cher 4 months, female 6 months, 41 

The School in Gardiner's District, male 
teacher 4 months, female 6 montlis, 35 

The School in 51 ilk liow, male teacher 
six months, female six months, do. 127 



Total number of pupils enrolled, 1581 



From this view of our School Department, it 
w-ill be seen that it embraces no less than nineteen 
distinct schools, under as many teachers, and 15S1 
pupils, from four to sixteen years of age. 

The supervision and control of a Department, so 
important in itself, and so extensive as that of 
the Charlestown Free Schools, presents to those 
who undertake it, a task requiring no ordinary sac- 
rifice of time to the public good, no ordinary de- 
gree of industry, patience, impartiality and fidelity 
in the discharge of their various and oftentimes 



1 



6 

perplexing and unpleasant diUieSj and alluring to 
their performance only by the gratification of that 
ambition which finds its exercise and reward in 
promoting the public good. We may appeal to the 
experience of parents in relation to this subject — 
fjr it should be borne in mind that parents, chil- 
dren, teachers and trustees, are but parts of one 
great system, designed to promote the best inter- 
ests of all, and demanding most imperatively, the 
utmost attainable degree of harmonious action. 

To govern a family of children of the ordinary 
number is quite enough — and, too frequently, much 
more than the heads of it, find it easy or practica- 
ble to do well, or even to their own satisfaction, 
much less to those around them. Consider then 
a family of children, swelled to the number of six- 
teen hundred, taken under the public care and 
placed under its constituted authorities, — taken as 
it were from chaos, to be reduced to order, con- 
"^tituted as they must be, with every variety of tem- 
perament, and drawn from every condition of soci- 
ety, — taken up ignorant to be inducted into the 
mysteries of knowledge by that slow and tedious 
process, through which alone they can be admitted 
— to be early taught and constantly advanced in the 
principles and habits of Virtue and Religion, — to be 
guarded from the seducing temptations of the world 
into which they are just entering, ignorant of the 
results and too weak to resist the fascinations of 
vicious habits — and to be trained up in the way 
they should go. 



7 

Nor is this all. The unpleasant but urgent du- 
ty has quite too frequently to be performed, to go 
between the delicate and lively sensibilities of pa- 
rents and the unfortunate perversities of their chil- 
dren, and to reconcile the importance of good order, 
as the first step to all improvement, and the neces- 
sity of rigid discipline in peculiar cases to effect it, 
with those tender parental feelings, which, in their 
too abundant exercise, very often mislead our judg- 
ment and blind us to the best interests of those for 
whom we feel the strongest regard. 

Surely all this is no ordinary task, if performed 
with any good degree of fidelity, whether it be in 
the capacity of trustees, or in the responsible, ar- 
duous and honorable office of teachers — and it is a 
point of duty peculiarly binding on all parents, to 
estimate justly the important relation in which they 
stand to our school department, not merely and 
solely as the parents of certain children and inter- 
ested in them alone, but also with reference to the 
community at large, to the great objects of general 
improvement and progress in knowledge and virtue, 
to the more elevated and perfect condition of the 
social state; and to this department in our public 
ajQfairs, through all its branches, above all others, 
as the great moral machine, w^hich, as it may be 
well or ill conducted, moves the w^hole fabric of hu- 
man society forward or backward, in its attempts 
towards a more perfect condition. 

In relation to the Financial concerns of the 
School Department^ it appears from the Report of 



g 

the Treasurer, that the sum total of Receipts^ for 
the year cndhig May, ISSi., is $8023 14 

and that the auiount of Expenditures is $7462 01 



presenting a balance on hand of $581 13 

The Trustees would remark, that the ajopear- 
ance of a balance in the treasury of (heir Board, 
should not be viewed as indicating any room for re- 
trenchment in the appropriation by the town to 
this department, for the ensuing year, as a quar- 
ter's salary to all the teachers, amounting to about 
$1600, will fall due on the 16th inst, and that the 
present crowded state of our Primary Schools ren- 
ders it probable, if not indeed certain, that a new 
school of this class w^ill have to be established du- 
ring the current year. 

With these statements, the Trustees indulge the 
hope that the same appropriation as last year, will 
be made for the support of the schools, believing 
that any retrenchment upon the present estabhsh- 
nient would be very far from judicious economy, 
and would prove very prejudicial to the best inter- 
ests of our community. For a more detailed ac- 
count of the financial concerns of the Department, 
reference is made to the statement of the Treasur- 
er, which has been printed and circulated. 

The Trustees, impelled by a sense of duty to 
themselves, to the community at large, to that 
most interesting class among us, the rising genera- 
tion, and to those whose duty it is to remedy the 
evil, feel bound, thus publicly, toi complain of the 



rr^ 9 



^.:<j 



conduct of tliose parents^ wlio so frequently, and 
so reckless of the consequences to their chihh'en. 
to themselves, and to the community, neglect the 
liberal and abundant privileges provided in this 
town for the education of tlieir children, by allow- 
ing them to be absent in many instances more than 
one half of the time from school, thereby greatly re- 
ducing the value of the other portion of the time, 
and greatly retarding the progress of those w^ho are 
constant in their attendance. 

This is an alarming evil, and demands of those 
who are verily guilty in this point, a speedy reme- 
dy ; for in its operation it is unjust to the commu- 
nity, filling it with an idle and vicious population ; 
unjust in parents to themselves, and, in the highest 
degree, unjust to their children. How many there 
are among us, which the utmost exertions of trus- 
tees and teachers, unaided by the serious and hear- 
ty cooperation of parents, have not been able to 
draw and retain within the healthful influences of 
our public schools, who are now wasting away 
their most valuable tune, — either through an exces- 
sive indulgence, or;for the want of that government 
over their children on the part of parents, w-hich it 
is one great object, so desirable, but oftentimes so 
difficult to effect in our schools,— indulging in hab- 
its of idleness, or, perhaps, still further advanced 
on the high road to ruin, and who w^ill, ere long, 
reap the bitter fruits of their neglect, vex vsociety 
with their outrages, and bring down the grey hairs 
of their too kind and too indulgent parents in sor- 
row" to the grave. 



10 



The Trustees dwell oii iliis poiiU with earnest- 
ness, for the records of our schools, and daily ob- 
servation, bear startling evidence to the fact, and 
because it is a truth, f dly borne out by the expe- 
rience of all who have the management of schools, 
that the pupil who is constant in his attendance at 
school is seldom, if ever, the subject of severe dis- 
cipline ; bat more particularly for the purpose of 
directing to this point a share of that jealous vigi- 
lance, ever watchful over this department in some 
particulars, as it should be in every particular 5 but 
which is loo often satisfied that the privileges of free 
schools should exist, without a corresponding vigi- 
lance that they should be improved. 

In concluding their report, the Trustees call, and 
call earnestly upon their fellow- citizens to feel as 
deeply as they can feel the importance of their rela- 
tive position to our schools, and of the influences 
which an extensive and well endowed and conduc- 
ted school department exerts upon society ; — ^if 
fij^ithfuUy improved how salutary — if neglected how 
prejudicial— to watch with untiring, but well in- 
tended vigilance, the conduct of all those, whoever 
they may be, whether trustees of teachers, who 
may be placed over it^ — but they call on them also, 
and v^ith undiminished earnestness, to estimate 
justly the important duties which devolve on them 
to perform — to make common ca^use with trustees 
and teachers, in every well, intended effort to effect 
the great common object — the improvement and 
right training up of the rising generation — to con- 
sider the difficulties that must be met and over- 



11 



come — riglitiy to appreciate the motives which lead 
to rigid disciphne, and not only to be earnest in 
their desires that there should be good free schoolsj 
but that they should be well sustained^ and, above 
ail; constantly attended by their children. With 
such viewS; and such a spirit pervading our com- 
munity, with such a system of harmonious action 
enlisting all, our School Department would rise to 
an unequalled elevation , and like a pure and living 
fountain continually send forth streams that would 
fertilize and adorn our whole population. Society 
would be purified and elevated. Parents would 
have occasion to rejoice in the midst of a virtuous 
and improving offspring, and our children would 
rise up and call us blessed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Board of Trustees, 

BENJ. THOMPSON, Secretary, 
€harlestotvn^ May 5th^ 1834/. 



i 



p 



K'U 



STATEMENT 
Of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Charles- 
toiun Free Schools, from May 1834, to May 
1835. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in the Treasurer's hands, at the settlement 

of his accounts in May last, $561 13 

Appropriation by the Town, received in sundry drafts, 7000 00 

Dividends on Union Bank Stock, 175 00 

Interest on Town Note, " 72 00 

Rent of Primary School Houses, 90 00 

Interest on Deac. Miller's legacy, 6 00 

$7904 13 



EXPENDITURES. 

SALARIES OF MASTERS WITHLN THE PENINSULA, VIZ: 
Trainingjield. — Joshua Bates, 
James Swan, 

Town jHi//.— Nathan Merrill, 

Reuben Swan, Jr. 

JVecA:.— Wm. D. Swan, 



A. G. Twycross, 
Susan L. Sawyer, 
Mary Walker, 
Hannah Andrews, 
Hannah Rea, 
Betsey Putnam, 
Ann Brown, 

^ ) Amount carried forward, $1,575 00 



$800 




700 






1500 00 


700 


650 






1350 00 
700 00 






$3,550 00 


2ACHERS 


, VIZ. 




225 00 




225 00 




225 00 




225 00 




225 00 




225 00 




22^ 00 



Amount bro't forward, $1575 00 

Emeline G. Whitin, 56 25 

Elizabeth L. Johnson, 168 75 

Margaret W. Locke, 1G8 75 

Ann W. Locke, 56 25 

Eliza Cutter, 168 75 

Lydia A. Skilton, 56 25 



$2,250 00 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS OUTSIDE THE NECK, VIZ ; 

Russell Z>is/nd.— Martha F . McKoun, 85 00 

Henry L Jewett, 120 50 

Gardner^s Row. — S. M. Crovvninshield, 90 50 

Wm. E. Faulkner, 112 60 

Winter Hi//.— Abby Mead, 92 15 

Henry Bulfinch, 192 00 

Mlk Row.— Ann W. Locke, 120 00 

Calvin Farrar, 192 00 



$1004 75 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Jacob Foster, rent of school room, f 36 00 

Emeline G. Whitin, allowance for rent, 2 50 

Susan L. Sawyer, do. 5 00 

James Caldwell, services as constable, 4 30 

Isaac Kendall, repairs. Milk Row, 12 44 

John W. xMuUiken, do. do. 97 41 

John Sweetser, labor and materials, 8 72 

Thomas Sampson, washing windows, 1 25 

Josiah H. Russell, repairs, 3 00 

Wm. D. Swan, books, 1 00 

A. Quimby, do. ^ 22 70 

Benj. Edmands, repairs, 7 18 

Edward Adams, bell rope, 65 

Amount carried forward, $202 15 



Amount bro't forwardj 
John Hovey, repairs, 
Susan L. Sawyer, allowance for rent, 
E. L. Johnson, do. 

Calvin Hubbell, maps, 
Benj Thompson, wood, 
James Frost, sawing wood, 
Wm. D. Swan, disbursement for books, 
Samuel Kidder & Co. ink, 
Reuben Swan, Jr. making fires, 
James K. Frolhingham, disbursements, 
Benj. Edmands, repairs, 
Leonard Tufts, repair of lock 
Timo. Tufts, carting gravel 
Wm. M. Edmands, repairs 
N. Tufts St Co. wood 
Jos. Thompson, insurance 
Jeremy Wilson, repairs 
S.imuel Daggett, horse and chaise hire, 
J. P. Frolhingham, do. 

Jotham Johnson, wood 
A. Quimby, books 
N. Tufts & Co. wood 
Abijah Monroe, repairing locks 
James Adams, hardware 
Nathan Tufts, 2d. wood and sawing 
Guy C. Hawkins, disbursements, 
Jeremy Wilson, repairs 



^202 


15 


3 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


30 


00 


44 


56 


2 


50 


5 


00 


10 87 


13 38 


8 


61 


28 


69 




20 


'to' 


25 


11 


75 


GG 


81 


2 


25 


58 


04 


4 


50 


1 


00 


C 


12 


21 


02 


5 


63 


2 


10 


10 


23 


G3 


37 


8 


50 


5 


00 



$628 03 



RECAPITULATION. 

Total Receipts, $7904 13 

Total Expenditures — viz. 

Masters" salaries within the Peninsula, 3,550 00 



Amount carried forward, $3^550 00 



Amount broH forward, * . $'-^,550 00 

Salaries of Primary School Teachers, , 2,250 00 

Do. Teachers outgide the Neck, 1,004 75 

Contingent expenses, 638 03 

Balance, 471 35 



-$7904 13 



The Act incorporating the Board of Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools, 

provides, that a statement of receipts and expenditures, for the year preceding, 

shall be laid before the town, in the month of May annually ; at which time, the 

Treasurer's accounts are audited by a Committee of the Board. A statement, 

therefore, in March, when the other departments of the municipality exhibit their 

financial concerns, would be only a partial anticipation of the business, which must 

be done, at this time, and would give an erroneous view of the subject. 

It will be perceived, that the contingent expenses have been greater the last year, 
than is usual. This is accounted for by the fact, that the Trustees have made ex- 
pensive repairs oh the school house at Milk Row, and have paid for the same, out 
of their ordinary resources, instead of asking of the town, a specific appropriation 
for this object. The balance on hand, is proportionally less — the other expenses 
having been, substantially, the same as heretofore. 

The permanent funds of the Trustees consist in the following items, viz— 

Thirty-five Shares Union Bank Stock, .^3,500 

Town Note on interest, 1,200 

Deac. Miller's legacy at interest, 100 

Tvvo Primary School houses, valued at 600 



^5,400 

This has been the only source of receipts, except the annual appropriations. 

There are now on the rolls of the schools, the names of over sixteen hundred chil-- 
dren. The Primary Schools alone include more than seven hundred. This gives 
seventy to each of the schools of this class. When it is considered, that the chil- 
dren of these schools are between the ages of 4 and 8, and are, consequently, in an 
untutored condition, comparatively, it will be perceived that the task of the teach- 
ers, must be exceedingly onerous, there being only a single female teacher to each 
Bchool. The children, who attend these schools, have multiplied to such a degree, 
with the increasing population of the town, that there seems to be a clear case of 
necessity for the immediate establishment of an additional number of Primary 
Schools. Hence the necessity of an increase in the appropriation of monies by the 
town. 

The absence of the Secretary of the Board, devolves upon the undersigned, the 
duty of adverting to other than the pecuniary concerns of the department. It is be- 
lieved this cannot be done more acceptably, than by referring to the Secretary's 
Report of last year, which was ordered to be printed and distributed to every fam- 
ily in town. It is hoped, that the true exposition of the state of the schools, and 
the faitlWul appeal to the good sense of this community, therein contained, have not 
yet been lost or forgotten. All the views, principles and reasonings of that docu- 
ment, are important, and applicable at the present time. 

At the recent semi-annual examinations, satisfactory evidence was given, that 
the schools, generally, are in as good condition, as they have heretofore been. It 
would be unjust to withhold an expression of the belief, that the three High Schools 
within the Neck, under the care of five masters, have reacheda standing not before^ 
attained bv them. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Charlestown, May 1, 1S35. PAUL WH.LARD, Treasurer. 



' j ft Yti 

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