(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the State Lunatic Hospital at Worcester"


% i|:, u'li ' 






i> J i 



.' J. 



1 i t 


ill! 






1 *iS 
1 1 iH 




1 V 


ill 



{ ! 




■ A 

/^HC HIVES 



TYUu^/u. \ yC^i/ULAJ-JA^ (U^aAL- IuzAcOlX. (V,>^,j 



? J 



REPORT 



RELATING TO 



LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



A 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr04stat 



SIXTH 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 



A T WORC ESTER 



DECEMBER, 1838. 



]$oston: 

DUTTON AND WENTWORTH, STATE PRINTERS. 

1839. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 



DECEMBER, 1838. 



To His Excellency Edward Everett, Governor, and the Honorable 
Council : 

The Trustees of the State Lunatic Hospital, at Worcester, in compli- 
ance with the provisions of law, hereby submit their Sixth Annual 



REPORT: 

On no former occasion, have circumstances so auspicious, attended 
the performance of this duty. One fact of a most gratifying character 
exists now for the first time. This institution is substantially com- 
plete in all its parts. The bounty of the Legislature, from time to 
time most liberally bestowed, has enabled the Trustees to supply all 
those accommodations and appendages which, by promoting the cura- 
tive processes of such an establishment, are essential constituents of a 
perfect whole. 

During the first two years of the existence of this institution, its 
utility was proved to the satisfaction of the people of the Common- 
wealth. In that brief period of time, almost three hundred insane per- 
sons, comprising a class of cases more hopeless and deplorable than 
were ever before collected together, were received at the Hospital. Of 
this number, about one hundred were restored to reason, and the con- 
dition of the remainder greatly ameliorated. It was also ascertained 
during the same time, that a far greater number were" still enduring 



4 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 

the various miseries of insanity, in garrets, cellars, cages, dens, and 
other places of solitude and privation. Applications made at the Hos- 
pital in behalf of these sufferers were necessarily rejected for want of 
room. Under these circumstances, the Trustees made an appeal to 
the Legislature to enlarge the institution. The appeal was successful. 
Two wings, capable of accommodating a hundred additional patients, 
were added, — one in each of the two succeeding years. Almost im- 
mediately after these wings were opened for the reception of patients, 
they were filled. During the two years following the application last 
mentioned, the Trustees again felt constrained to ask pecuniary aid for 
the purchase of land to supply the wants of the institution, and to fur- 
nish the means of healthful agricultural employment for the patients, 
as one of the best restoratives. They also requested funds for the 
erection of a chapel, where the religious feelings of the inmates might 
find some solace for their sufferings, a stimulus for their efforts at self- 
command, and those higher consolations of a spiritual nature which are 
underivable from any but a religious source. And, as might have been 
expected beforehand, religious motives have been found to give more 
energy to the thoughts and affections, than any others could have im- 
parted. At the last session of the Legislature a further grant was 
made for the erection of an Infirmary, where the sick could have the 
comforts and alleviations appropriate to sickness, in apartments by 
themselves without disturbing others, and undisturbed by them. In no 
one instance, has any of these requests been refused or even delayed. 
They have been answered with a promptitude and in a spirit, which re- 
flects the highest honor upon the Legislature, and exhibits their conduct 
as an example, worthy to be imitated by other States and times. 

The Hospital is now possessed of a farm and garden containing 
about sixty acres of fertile and highly cultivated land, whose produce, 
during the last season, has exceeded the sum of eighteen hundred dol- 
lars in value. It has spacious and commodious rooms, where skill and 
kindness will, as far as possible, assuage the pains of disease and death. 
And that nothing may be wanting which can subserve the physical or 
spiritual welfare of this afflicted portion of our fellow-beings, it has a 
chapel in which a very large majority of all the inmates do not forsake 
the assembling of themselves together for public and social worship, ev- 
ery Sabbath day. In submitting this report, therefore, the Trustees 
have no further occasion to solicit the aid of the Legislature for build- 
ings, appurtenances, or lands. 

During the six years of the existence of this Hospital, eight hundred 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 5 

and fifty-five insane persons have partaken of its remedial treatment. Of 
this number, three hundred and forty-four have recovered their lost 
reason. The residue, with few exceptions, have been reclaimed from 
a state of nakedness and filth; from ferocity, which assaulted relatives 
and friends with deadly intent ; from melancholy, which poured itself 
out in continual tears, to a quiet, an orderly, and, to a great extent, a 
cheerful community, observant of the decorous usages of civilized life. 
And, in the opinion of the Trustees, the blessing of this success, great, 
manifold, precious, as it is, is hardly superior in value to a less obvious, 
though not a less useful and real result. At the time of the establish- 
ment of this institution, the common ideas, prevalent among the great 
mass of the sane community, were almost as unsound upon the subject 
of insanity, as the ideas of the insane themselves were upon other sub- 
jects. The general opinion entertained at that time was, that insanity 
is an affection of the mind, and not a disease of the body, and that it 
is produced by a direct visitation of Heaven, instead of being the con- 
sequence of some departure from the organic laws to which our nature 
is subject, which laws men can discover and obey. It was further the 
common belief, that the victims of this visitation of Heaven must con- 
tinue to suffer its unknown and inexhaustible agonies, until rescued 
from them by another direct interposition of omnipotent power ; instead 
of supposing it to be a malady, curable by such restorative influences, 
as have been graciously placed within our own control, and even sus- 
ceptible of being prevented beforehand. So long as its causes were 
unknown, they could not be intelligently avoided ; so long as it was 
supposed that the Giver of reason had withdrawn the bestowment, 
those appointed means would, of course, be neglected, upon the use oi 
which the same Giver had made its restoration dependant. And in the 
mean time, while the friends of the maniac were idly awaiting divine 
interference, they would seek to secure themselves from his fury by 
such afPiictive discipline and violence of restraint, as would only aggra- 
vate, the disorder and eventually preclude all chances of recovery. 
Hundreds and hundreds of times has it happened, that if one, who un- 
derstood the real causes and the appropriate treatment of insanity, had 
witnessed the contests which have been carried on for years, between 
the passions of a demoniac and the activity of friends striving, by im- 
prisonment, stripes, drowning, to quell his rage, he would have been 
unable to determine which party was the most insane. 

But the pre-eminent skill and success of the superintendent of this 
institution^ manifested for the benefit of so many of our fellow-beings, 



6 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

aad in the midst of us all, have effected a deep change in public opinion. 
■^^They have demonstrated that insanity is a physical disease; that it has 
its origin in certain natural causes, being induced by a violation of 
some of the organic laws upon which mental functions depend ; that 
these causes are not mysterious and inscrutable in any peculiar sense; 
that they are capable of being recognized and understood, like the 
causes which bring on consumption or the gout ; that insanity is a cur- 
able disease ; that it is a disease far less dangerous to life than fevers 
usually are ; that the means of effecting its cure have been graciously 
put into our hands ; and finally, that not only the means of cure, but 
the ways of prevention, in ordinary cases, have been entrusted to us, 
accompanied by the responsibility of rightly using them. Insanity, 
therefore, is no longer to be looked upon as some vast, unknown, and 
awful minister of evil or judgment to mankind ; as dreadful for its 
mysteriousness as for its actual terrors. It is not an evil to which one 
person is as much exposed as another ; or to whose assaults any one is 
equally exposed at all times, and under varying circumstances. It is a 
calculable agency. We see why it befalls and how it may be averted. 
We see, that should we all obey certain laws, which are annexed to our 
being, and are the conditions of enjoying mental soundness, we should 
be exempt from its power ; but we also see, that if we will transgress 
rules, to whose violation the dreadful consequences of insanity have 
been attached, it is as certain to befall us, as fire is to burn. The ex- 
cellence of these discoveries is, that they convert a disease, once most 
formidable and appalling from its uncertainty, into a measurable and 
calculable agency, — an agency whose action can be put aside, in most 
cases, by adopting certain precautions ; or can even be repelled, when 
expending its force upon us, by the application of certain known rem- 
edies. They make known, also, that there are certain indulgences, 
whose continuance is an infallible mode of bringing the full severity of 
its woe upon the transgressor. 

The Trustees submit these remarks, not in the spirit of theorizing or 
speculation ; but for obvious and practical purposes, as they will pro- 
ceed to show. 

As has been before stated, the causes of insanity have been dis- 
covered and classified. We propose to look at these causes from two 
different' points of view. 

First. In regard to their efficiency in prostrating the minds of 
men ; that is, the relative proportions, in which these causes are found 
to contribute to this form of human suffering; and, 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 7 

Secondly, The different degrees in which these causes are under im- 
mediate control ; that is, assuming them to be, to a very great extent, 
under human control, how soon can human intelligence, and human 
power diminish the number of the insane. 

First. In regard to efficiency, the ascertained causes of insanity in 
the eight hundred and fifty-five cases at this Hospital, rank thus: 1, 
Intemperance ; 2, 111 health of all kinds ; 3, Masturbation ; 4, Do- 
mestic afflictions ; 5, Religious excitements ; 6, Loss of property and 
fear of poverty ; 7, Disappointed ambition ; 8, Injuries of the head ; 
9, Use of snuff and tobacco. In a few cases, the cause of the insan- 
ity is unknown. Foreigners and citizens of other States found insane 
in this, have occasionally been committed, whose histories could not be 
ascertained. Probably we should approximate the truth very closely 
in distributing the unknown causes, under the above heads, according 
to their relative proportions. 

Secondly. But if we look at the causes of insanity, not in the order 
of their efficiency, but in that of their subjection to human control, 
their position will be materially changed. The great object at the 
Hospital is the cure of insanity or the mitigation of its sufferings. The 
great object of the State and of individuals should be its prevention. 
The Hospital is succeeding pre-eminently well in accomplishing the 
former ; what can be done by the State and by individuals to effect the 
latter purpose 1 

Nearly one third part of the cases, which have been in the Hospital 
from the beginning, are cases either proximately or remotely, of hered- 
itary insanity ; — that is, cases, when some near ancestor of the insane 
subject was insane, and has transmitted the disease to descendants, or 
rather, has communicated to the system of the descendants, a pre-disposi- 
tion to contract that disease. This presents a large class of cases, to 
a great extent, beyond present control. One of the highest of human 
responsibilities was violated by the ancestors, in forming an alliance, 
when they bore a hereditary taint of insanity in the system, and the 
consequence of that violation is, that the descendants now exist with 
an organization pre-adapted to incur the disease. They are incapable 
of resisting such exposures to it, as to others, would be perfectly harm- 
less. This class of cases now exists, probably to as great an extent 
as ever heretofore ; and year after year, victim after victim must come 
to fill the wards of the Hospital, and slowly to expiate an ancestor's 
transgression. We cannot now foretell, which of the descendants, in 
such cases, it will be, as we cannot foretell who will be injured, when 



8 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

a gun is fired into a crowd of people. But the result is none the less 
certain, because we cannot now designate the sufferers, in whose per- 
sons an immutable law of the Creator is to be verified. While ances- 
tors continue to violate this law, some portion of their innocent de- 
scendants must bear the consequences. The transmitted tendency, 
however, does not in all cases, and by virtue of its own inherent en- 
ergy, produce the result. Some proximate cause is generally requisite ; 
some application by one's self of a torch to the train, laid by another. 
No means, therefore, either of prevention or of avoidance should be 
neglected. Still, however, this cause of insanity, so far as the present 
generation is concerned, is mainly beyond human control ; and should 
those to whom the dreadful heritage has descended imitate the conduct 
of their ancestors, the disease may be perpetuated in the lineage for 
generations to come. 

After hereditary insanity, whose cause antedates even the existence 
of its victim, there are several other classes of cases, where the seeds 
of the disease are sown in childhood and youth to be developed in 
maturer years. Looking to proximate effects, in our efforts to mitigate 
this species of human woe, these causes, too, seem nearly beyond pre- 
sent prevention ; and hence to a great extent they may be set down as 
remediless. We refer to " ill health," " domestic afflictions," and "re- 
ligious excitements." 

Chronic ill health, extreme feebleness of constitution, or a debility 
in the vital powers, existing from childhood to middle life, can rarely 
be replaced by soundness of constitution and a healthful and vigorous 
performance of all the physical fun.ctions. In these cases, the conditions 
on which the Creator has made human health dependant have not 
been known, or have not been observed ; and the consequence is the 
existence of a class of persons, who in addition to all the other evils 
of ill health, are more or less liable to the loss of reason. The field 
of labor here is with the young. It is in the power of parents so to 
rear and educate their children as greatly to diminish the chances of 
thsir ever becoming inmates of a Hospital for the Insane. Motives 
arising from this source address themselves especially to all who have 
the superintendence of the physical or intellectual education of the 
rising generation. 

In point of subjection either to individual influence or to the collective 
power of the community, the next cause is equally beyond immediate 
control. All are liable to " domestic afflictions," and those whom we 
admire for the disinterestedness and fervor of their attachments ; — - 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 9 

those, whose natures are so formed, that the existence of a friend is a 
boon more precious than their own life, — are most liable to be over- 
whelmed in the day of bereavement. The only way to obviate this 
cause of insanity is to cultivate throughout the community such just 
views of the government and attributes of God, as will tend to recon- 
cile its members to the wise ordinations of Providence. 

Nor does the third cause, above mentioned, — that of " religious ex- 
citements," appear to be more within the remedial control of society. 
How wide from the appropriate office of religion it is to cause insan- 
ity, — to carry human beings backwards, as it were, from the knowl- 
edge and the contemplation of their Creator, instead of aiding their 
approaches towards Him ! Why then, should it produce this effect ! 
Why, in less than six years, should it have sent seventy persons to this 
Hospital for the Insane ! It can only be because its motives and 
its sanctions have not been rightly addressed to individuals ; or be- 
cause those individuals have widely misapprehended the true nature, 
office, and power of religion. There seems, then, little reason to an- 
ticipate, that either of these three causes of insanity will be materially 
diminished, until juster notions of our human condition, duty, desti- 
nation, shall pervade those portions of society, where error is now pre- 
paring its victims to become insane. 

There are one or two other standing causes of insanity, which fall 
nearly into the same class as the preceding, but as the effects are not 
numerous, we shall pass them by. 

But the cause of insanity, which ranks as the third in point of power 
to deprive its victims of reason, is perfectly within human control and 
that immediately. This form of insanity is suffered by the young. It 
differs from other forms, in two material respects. Before it is incurred, 
the way of prevention is perfectly certain ; afterwards, its cure is almost 
impossible. No one need ever suffer it, unless he so wills ; but when 
once infatuation has brought it on, it is too fatal to admit a second of- 
fence. It is not only most certain in its activity, but above all other 
kinds of insanity, it stamps its victims with every abhorrent and loath- 
some stigma of degradation. Such is the nature of this dreadful form 
of insanity, and the singleness and certainty of the cause from which it 
proceeds, that we feel perfectly authorized to say, if medical men, pa- 
rents and teachers of youth, would do their duty on this one subject to 
the rising generation, this frightful and prolific cause, which stands the 
third upon the list in point of destructive efficiency, would substantially 
cease, in a single year. It is the vice of ignorance, not of depravity. 
The sufferers are, personally, less offenders than victims; but the wel- 
2 



10 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

fare of the Hospital and the interests of humanity imperatively demand, 
that something should be done to rescue the most moral, conscientious, 
and sometimes the most promising youth of the State, from the mind- 
wasting ravages of an indulgence, of whose terrible consequences they 
have never been forewarned. 

So, too, intemperance is another cause of insanity susceptible of im- 
mediate and final suppression. This stands at the opposite end of the 
scale, compared with hereditary insanity. One descends, the other is 
self-inflicted. In all the ascertained and proximate causes of insanity 
at this Hospital, intemperance stands out prominently and alone, as the 
most successful agent in the overthrow of human reason. One other 
cause, that of " ill health of all kinds," exhibits a small fraction more 
than two thirds as many victims as intemperance. The next most pro- 
lific cause is the one last above spoken of, and which is susceptible of be- 
ing prevented at once. After these two, there is no other which sends 
half so many inmates to the Hospital as intemperance. Here, there- 
fore, we meet with a calamity, self-produced by the sufferer. He is not 
brought into the world, exposed, though innocent, to the sorest of hu- 
man misfortunes, compelled to bear infirmities not his own, and to ex- 
piate offences, committed by his ancestors. But he is the voluntary 
procuring cause of his own fate ; and the punishment he suffers looked 
him in the face, during the transgressions which incurred it. But 
though this fact ought to supply adequate motives to all for resisting 
this form of temptation ; yet it is not so much on account of the suf- 
ferers themselves, as on account of others, that the Trustees here refer 
to it. They will now proceed to show how these two last classes of 
cases, which might be immediately prevented, bear upon the other 
classes, which are not the subjects of immediate prevention. 

The number of the insane differs greatly in different countries. The 
disease is confined almost wholly to civilized nations. Among the sav- 
ages of North America and of Africa it is rarely known. It is uncom- 
mon among the half-civilized nations of Asia. But it prevails to a great 
extent in England, France, Germany, Norway, Holland and the United 
States. According to the latest compiled tables, the United States 
rank as the fourth, among civilized nations, in the proportion which the 
insane bear to the whole population ; their proportion being exceeded in 
Norway, Scotland and England only. The proportion in this country 
is set down at one in eight hundred. This proportion would give nearly 
nine hundred insane persons to Massachusetts. Owing to the cures, 
however, which have been effected at Charlestown and at this place, 
the last mentioned number must be considerably too large. Yet a great 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 11 

number of applications for admission at this institution has been 
rejected every year, since its opening. And, although there are now 
(Dec. 31, 1838,) in the Hospital forty-three more inmates than 
there were a year ago, yet, during this year, we have been obliged 
to shut our doors upon not less than ninety of our afflicted fellow- 
beings, in whose behalf application has been here made for admis- 
sion. Supposing, however, that the whole number of insane persons 
in Massachusetts is only about six hundred, the existing accommoda- 
tions for their suitable treatment are wholly inadequate to the wants of 
the State. There should not be at this institution more than two hun- 
dred and twenty patients. The institution at Charlestown will not or- 
dinarily have more than a hundred and twenty more. A new Hospital 
at South Boston, erected by the city, and now almost completed, is de- 
signed for but about seventy more. When that institution is occupied, 
there will still be a deficiency in accommodations for about two hun- 
dred of this unfortunate class of our fellow-beings. 

This leads us to speak of another fact, most important in this con- 
nexion. Insanity, though generally speaking one of the most curable 
of diseases, if seasonably attended to, becomes, when inveterate, one of 
the most intractable and hopeless. The twelfth Table of the Superin- 
tendent shows that upon the proper and usual basis of computation, the 
proportion of cures at this Hospital, in recent cases, — that is, in cases 
of less than one year's duration at the time when received, — is ninety- 
four per cent. ; while the proportion of cures in cases of more than 
five years' duration, has been only twelve and a half per cent., and in 
cases of more than ten years' duration, only three and a_;^half per 
cent. Or, to present the same fact in another striking point of view, 
the proportion of the old cases, remaining at the end of this year, is 
about eighty-seven and a half per cent. ; while the proportion of recent 
cases remaining at the same time, is only twelve and a half per cent. 

In order to present this subject, strictly, as a pecuniary or economi- 
cal matter, the Trustees requested the Superintendent to prepare a sep- 
arate table, (see Table IS,) showing the actual expense of twenty of 
the earliest cases received at the Hospital, which, owing to the dura- 
tion of the disease, when admitted, were incurable, and therefore still 
remain ; and doubtless will continue a charge upon the State as long 
as life lasts. These cases are not selected, but are taken in their or- 
der. They are the first twenty cases of admission, which now remain. 
Their expense, before admission, is computed at only one dollar and 
fijty cents a week. These cases have already cost the Commonwealth 



12 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

fifteen hundred and fifty 25-100 dollars each. On the other hand, and 
as a contrast to the above, the table shows the actual expense of the last 
twenty cases, which have been discharged from the Hospital, cured. It 
amounts only to forty-seven 50-100 dollars each. Hence it appears, that 
the expense already incurred for taking care of twenty cases, which, from 
neglect, had been suffered to run on until they became incurable, has been 
more than thirty-two times greater than the expense of the same number 
of cases, for which early and proper provision was made. The recent ca- 
ses are now well ; the old ones will doubtless continue a charge through 
life. However extraordinary it may appear, it is still true, that taking an 
average chance for cures, it would have been a pecuniary saving to the 
State to have taken seasonable care of these old cases, though at an ex- 
pense of eighty dollars a week, rather than, by neglect, to have in- 
curred the necessity of supporting them, even up to the present time. 
Another aggravation of intemperance, considered as a cause of in- 
sanity will appear from the following fact. Almost all cases of insan- 
ity, originating in this cause, are ferocious and dangerous, and hence 
its subjects are arrested and committed at once, in order to save the 
lives and property of the community from the peril of their being at 
large. Insanity arising from other causes is usually less violent and 
frantic, and the subjects of it are therefore postponed to make room for 
the intemperate; that is, under our system, the claims of him who has 
made himself a voluntary demoniac are preferred to the claims of those 
who came innocently by a pre-disposition to the disease. The criminal 
exclude the innocent; and guilt is made a passport to privileges denied 
to misfortune. 

Again, it will be seen on inspection of Table 14, that the intemper- 
ate insane furnish a less proportion of cures, than any other class ex- 
cept one. Thus they occupy the rooms of the Hospital earliest ; they 
retain them longest ; they virtually close the doors of the Hospital 
against other cases of a recent date, and by thus postponing the admis- 
sion of such cases, to a later period, deprive them of the chance they 
otherwise would have enjoyed of a restoration to reason, to society, to 
their families. 

Now, were it not for the two classes last above mentioned, in which 
the insanity is caused by the misconduct or guilt of the sufferers them- 
selves ; the liberal means provided in the State would, in a short time, 
it is believed, prove sufficient for the relief of its insane citizens. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 13 

In administering the affairs of the institution, a painful necessity has 
from time to time been imposed upon the Trustees, of remanding to 
the jails and houses of correction of the respective counties whence 
they came, a large number of the inmates, in order to make room for 
the more ferocious, committed by the courts. In all, seventy-three per- 
sons have been discharged from the Hospital, solely for want of room. 
This number is greater than that originally received from the jails, houses 
of correction and poor houses, when the Hospital was first opened. It 
will be seen, therefore, that the class of persons for whose relief it was 
primarily erected, and who otherwise might have participated in its 
privileges, have been excluded from time to time to make room for two 
classes of persons who have brought their insanity upon themselves by 
their own misconduct or crimes. In removing a part of the inmates to 
give accommodations to the two last named classes, the Trustees have 
made no discrimination between those whose insanity was occasioned 
without any fault or offence of their own, and those upon whom the 
disease was self-inflicted. This being a test not prescribed by the Leg- 
islature, they have not felt themselves authorized to apply it. 

The Trustees have pointed out the above distinctions between the 
different causes of insanity for another reason of great practical im- 
portance. Not only is insanity regarded by the community at large 
as one of the greatest afflictions to which our nature is liable, but it is 
looked upon by some as a malady which brings disgrace as well as suf- 
fering. Instances have come to the knowledge of the Trustees, where 
a family has resorted to various devices, for a length of time, to conceal 
the insanity of one of its members ; supposing that if the fact were 
known, it would affix a reproachful stigma upon the character of the 
unfortunate sufferer. In this way, the best season for recovery has 
been lost. But as soon as it is generally known, that the causes of in- 
sanity are various; that some of them are voluntary, others involun- 
tary ; that some of them are as free from the slightest suspicion of 
wrong or dishonor as any epidemic can be, while other cases are 
wholly referrible to the previous fault or crime of the sufferers them- 
selves, the whole subject of insanity will be presented in a moral as- 
pect, entirely new. Those upon whom the disease has been entailed 
by their ancestors, or who suffer under it from causes beyond their 
own control, will be regarded with deep and genuine pity ; while such 
as are the direct authors of their own melancholy fate will be regard- 
ed — with pity it is true, but not unmingled — with condemnation. 

The Trustees hope it will not be without practical results, to state 



14 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

that great embarrassment, and sometimes serious evils, have ensued 
from the importunate demands of the friends of the insane, or of the 
towns which support their insane poor at the Hospital, to have a dis- 
charge granted, before a recovery is fully confirmed. It often happens 
that a patient, under the influence of the unsurpassed medical and moral 
treatment of the Superintendent, is shortly relieved from the external 
and obvious symptoms of insanity, while his recovery is yet imperfect, 
and if carried back to the scene of the exciting causes, a relapse would 
be almost inevitable. In this unconfirmed state, such patients are vis- 
ited by their friends, or by some agent of the town where they belong, 
who, on perceiving their apparent exemption from the former indica- 
tions of disease, insist upon an instantaneous discharge ; and some- 
times communicating their own views to the patient, they excite in him 
so strong a desire to be returned to his home and friends, as to make 
an enforced stay almost as dangerous as a premature removal. Under 
such circumstances, it is in vain to reason and to remonstrate. When 
the desire of being discharged is excited, the mischief is done. Six 
cases of this kind have occurred within the last year. A relapse 
has ensued, and after a few weeks, the patients have been returned in 
a worse condition than at first. Considering the painful necessity the 
Superintendent and the Trustees are under, of refusing so many 
earnest solicitations for admission to the Hospital, the public ought to 
be satisfied, that in every case, they will volunteer the discharge of a 
patient at the earliest hour, when, in the exercise of their best judgment, 
they believe it can be done with safety. 

The Trustees would also, with a loud and earnest voice, call the 
attention of the public to the utility, to the humanity, to the necessity, 
•of attending to the earliest indications of insanity, in whatever form 
they may appear. We trust that what we have said in relation to the 
causes of insanity will not be without avail, in diminishing both their 
number and their efficiency. The remarkable difference, now estab- 
lished by the experiments of six years, between the curability of old 
and of recent cases, admonishes the community never to suffer the fa- 
vorable season for recovery to pass by unimproved. If the broad ave- 
nues through which this formidable enemy makes its attacks, are still left 
open; if it is permitted to make unresisted incursions into the domains 
of the soul ; then, when the citadel of reason is first seen to totter un- 
der its assaults, and the pillars of judgment are shaken and torn from 
their places, and the passions are set on fire to consume all the treas- 
ures of joy and of hope, which have been garnered up for years ; — then. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 15 

let all of human energy and alertness be instantaneously put forth to 
rescue the scene from total and remediless desolation. 

The Trustees herewith submit the annual report of the Treasurer 
of the Hospital, from which it will be seen that its pecuniary concerns 
are in as favorable a condition as ever before. Since the enlargement 
of the institution, the duties of this officer have greatly increased. 
They have always been performed with the most exact and conscien- 
tious fidelity. 

The report of the Superintendent, also, accompanies this. It is a 
document of extraordinary interest and value. While the Trustees 
would make honorable mention of all persons filling subordinate sta- 
tions at the institution ; they would ascribe its unexampled prosperity, 
to the assiduity and the skill, the talent and the benevolence of its pre- 
siding officer. 

To supply the vacancy, which annually occurs, in consequence of 
the law that forbids an immediate reappointment of the senior mem- 
ber of the Board, the Hon. Edward D. Bangs, was commissioned as 
one of its members, at the commencement of the current year. That 
gentleman had attended a meeting for the organization of the Board 
and had made one or two of the monthly visitations of the Hospital, 
when, in March last, he was suddenly removed by death. It would be 
in vain for the Trustees, by any passing encomium of theirs, in this 
place, to attempt to add any thing to the reputation of a man, so uni- 
versally known, as was Mr Bangs, and so highly respected by all who 
knew him. But without recurring to the excellence of his character 
in private life, or to those offices of dignity and of trust, which he so 
long, so ably and so acceptably filled ; the Trustees cannot refrain 
from recording, in this place, the expression of their deep regret, that 
this institution should have lost a friend, who was so eminently quali- 
fied, by his knowledge of affairs and by his lively sympathy for the 
unfortunate, to advance its prosperity, and to obtain in its behalf the 
favorable regards of the public. 

HORACE MANN, 
STEPHEN SALISBURY, 
ABRAHAM R. THOMPSON, 
MYRON LAWRENCE, 
WILLIAM LINCOLN. 

Worcester, Dec. 31 si, 1888. 



16 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



CD 
CO 
00 



O 
CO 



CO 
00 



^ 



e 
^ 



s^ 



ss 
s 



2Q 



^ 






55i 






s 






o 


c- G> »H 2 




w 


•2| 1 >: ^ 1 




^ 


cs ^ 3 « ts ii 




1 




'3 S 










ll 
B 


1 Bm^i '1 Pi :il 1 

111 i 1>:^^Sl i|.H|-pl 


2 

2 


£3 


Q 

S 


5 


'S = 'o o o c fcjn o ■-= w to <u ?i "5 o =2 c ^^1= a. " a o 


g 


^ <o 




!rC2 fa OhJ^hJ-JS JQHIPJQ 


cd o 


ffi 


JOh 




-a -^ 13 -a 






Qj c> e> 0) 






> > > > 




S 


o _ o o o 




■J:? 


Cu a) cu aj 0-, o) s. 




r- 


So>Sooocoo>Egc>Sooooooco 


o o 


? 


HHx; P^~"a~'ci3T3 gi-H-D-o gM-a'axi-O'U'a-s-o 


-c-o 


c 


■K ^-S '^-' o.-^ 




o c o p o c o 

z ^z Jz Jz 






.1 .S 




"o '"' S 


'cs c o__'5 OOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOO 


o o 


5 ^ 


S"a-3'B g-c-o-OT3'u-o'OT3-c-OT3"a — -D-D-a-o-oT; 


13 -O 


3 ^ n 


■BSSSS-S'S'^-S'S-S-S-S-S-S'B'S-S'h^SSSS 


^^ 










nc'Sss'Hc'Scs'Sp'Scccc'Sasccc'H 


a a 




ooooooooooooooooooooocoo 


o o 


|,| 


SESSSESSSSSEBSSSESSESHSS 


S 6 


O00^oc^a^oaic7^oa^oocococoi>t>t^i0»0i0^-^0 


t-o 




*>t^ooc^^ootr)t^tDtototoo^^^t^tr)t^^toti^^^ 


in lo 


o S 


3 'hjas 






O (DO 




>'g 


OoooJOocoooooccooooooooo 


o o 


>.3 


Q-a'O-o Q a,ijT3-c-c-a-a-s-o-3T: — 'O-s-O'O-a-O'U 


-0T3 


Kg 


-^ _p _p 






^ f-H 




•2 2-1 






U<^»2t2>2(2t22£2j22»li»2i2si2»2t2t2fc2i2t2(2t2fc2 


i2 £ 


g<|.2 


nictirtcJcSrec^nJcticdfiJoicocticOcOcdcOcOcocdcdcticB 


ra ns 




OGJQ;QJCQJ<lJIUO4)0G3<yOQJO'lJC»QJQJ(UCtQJQJ 


0) 4) 


Q^l 


>»>■. >^>,?%i->>>>.>>>»>^>>>>>~.>,>^>»>>>,>-,>^>^>,S-. 


i^'r^ 




t~COtOOOCO^GOi>iOlO»OT?!r)^tD(rtOOOT}<tO&»GO 


oo 




— rtG^-HS^ T-H r-1,-1 _,_irtrtrH 


i-H S^ 




C 
O 

• ■§ -s 3 • . ■ . 


a 
.2 






3 


S tS J2 


o 


C8 

o 

v. 






<D 


-o 


a. 
a. 
3 


:5-2 s.^ l-o S-l"^! §^ S-l.o^ s --o §_§ |-5 - 


01 

.S o 


cc 


g.-° 




s 




5 


■d 






|s| 


o— o— . o O — T— o— -r — 




-o bjra hjDC-30-oOhx)Oj;hx)0-obooooooj;ohc 


o o 


S 55 


J- a j-; a "C — "o ~ -a a "o cs aT3j- b'Otj'ots-o a'O a 


T3T3 


^S;i>c»l>^!»SiB^f» Sco 






o O V 










X 


(3 -O -U T3 T3 -U T3 g-O C3 -a -O -O -U -O T3 g tO 13 "U 5 "O "O CS 


o o 


73 


r3T3 




S C2 S faS fa g 




|§I 




^^ 




G<ie<!coc5Cri>0»oeocococ-cocototooDGO>r5iootr>coo^o 


OtP 


V- ^ 


s^e<iG^s<ie^ i-irtr-(i-is<(G< ^-i(M ©<.— ©< 




o o 


CO - -^ 




fl 


co^=^oooo-"?oooooo£iooo--ooooo.>S 

'^ CTS'O'D'O-g-S-a'O-CTS'U E3XS-G-0 0,-0 -0 a-OTJ ■Q c 

>^ fa S ^ ^ oz 


1-^ 

fa 


d 




^f: 






fH ^^ 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. l7> 



■ "o _• 



;k -? 



^ 13 



.5p-^ii =S S pS 



S -a £ ^ o 



t, el, S ■ £ •— a. '^ 






^S t:2s -§S u 5*" ."5 2—2 2. 5=22 -2 £& S322.^iJ S 

«PCg^ = o'oPO"i^ :S<"o'S=J5 = c^'5— '':p^ IX^^ 2 o't:^^-2?!5 = o-3 

o2'aoo2'a-p"-o oo~'p2--2'^o5i;;'^£ o-?o o '^o^o2SogT=o 

J- -:i.C SQ u B-] SSkS :- -j s ::^ a ^ :.. :l. -: C-S- — >j.ja eu 



CU 0-. Q, O'^O — 0—0^ O— '^O. 

Soooooooooo — Sooo^Eoo^SooiS^S ooooo^S—oS 

>-iX'-3-3-3"OT3T3-C-3-3 £— (-C'C-3£— <"C-S£i— — -SjX'-iCmh '3-3'ai3-3 2— "£T3I— I 

*- — -J Cl— ' i^-.* Cl— 'Q-w Q.-*^-^ 

O njo eO cO pCcO cCJOO 

z ffiz nSz ^z >Sz.Sz iZS Z 



0000000 j=<sooooooooo 

■3T3"0'3T3"3Tr O P-3 — ■3"0-3T3~T3"3 



c j= 's i; 
^ -3 -3 £ 


■5oj=aoooj=o« 
p— p — is" 0-3 g 


.!£ .- 


.- .2 q> 



j:j:-c^ '-^^j=j=.= ^ 


J2 2^S2JJJ^^S^JJ^J 


mj22S5S222J22 


oocooococco 
SSSEEEESEES 


occocoSccoooSocco 
EEEEEEESSpEESESpS 
t^ « 10 'M G~) — — c; CO OD r~ -r c -o J-) 


oooocoSoco 
EEESEESEES 


3 

Oooocoooooo 

0^'3"3'3*3's3'3'3'3'3 


ococoococoocooooo 

'3~-3'C'3-C'C'3-C'3'3'3"3-3-3"313 


.2 '^ 
oo^^oooooo 

-3— o'^'^'VO'V-TS 


rartcocCrenJcflcstScoS^ 


13 monihs 

Unknown 

6 years 

16 years 

2 years 

3 years 
5 3'ears 
•5 years 
G years 

3 3'ears 
11 years 

2 years 

4 years 
Unknown 

1 year 
C years 
1 year 


rtCBCOCtfcCCSCCCwrtOj 
OOCOOOOOOCI 

©^■OtOiOtO!0&!-*-#CO 




Intemperance 
Jealousy, 
Unknown 
do 
Intemperance 
Religious 

Disappointed Ambition 
Jealousy, 
Unknown 

Disappointed Affection 
Masturbation . 


do 
Unknown 
111 Health 
Unknown 
Domestic Affliction 

do 
III Health 
Masturbation . 
Intemperance 
Domestic Affliction 
Unknown 

do 
Masturbation . 
Intemperance 
Paralysis 
Puerperal 
Domestic Affliction 


Masturbation . 

Unknown 

Mastuibation, 

Domestic Affliction 

Masturbation . 

Unknown 

Religious 

Masturbation . 

Unknown 

Puerperal 


Married 

do 
Single 

do 

do 
Married 
Single 
Married 
Single 

do 

do 


do 

do 
\larried 
Single 
iVlarried 
Widow 
Married 
Single 
Married 

do 

do 
Widower 
Single 
Married 
Widower 
Married 

do 


-0 
.2 
"Fc 0000000 'Eo 

s -0 -3 "3 -u -o -3 -3 ce'O 




^000c00«000 

§ fa S 


^ i .2 .2 .2 
ogoagoiJpJipoa'Ooogo 
"0 5-3 CO j; "^ a r a ^"3 c - - - 3 "3 


Male 
Female 
Mnle 
Female 

do 

do 
Male 

do 

do 
Female 




C132'^'>OC5C032C^-*C^C0t-'.0— 'cn — 'O 


r-iC003i#t~.'#OlOOGO 



•5 _ . (" -? _ . . CO >, >% u _ 

« o-c o o 1^— o. 5; 0=0 t:-c o >,o © 00 t^bJo'P.°_:°° > o=°'-^°x '-^'C o >»o o 
g ^ ^^'^ Oa §<1 S ^ ^<'h O ZQ ^ faS <i ^ 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



•si 



f ^ 



«"- J 



° S o = cs <u -01 


•|-^--bT:- ^ 


-6 




o 




5|||-§:h 


c 


: i S c >. E ■« S 


i E S £> S 


fi 




C O 5. O 3 O 




.jQ2a.:=a2Q 


OQECiKlll 


P 



£»-H-a' 



J":; ~ P -^TJ' 



i; ;p - h « ^ 

>— > S > S 

£ E £ o £^ 

C'p CO Q.- 

g m r; O - O 



.s — >-> 



'-^ ^ rTz 



W GO w 






CO 

II 



o g ci So o 
o S o c: 3 « 



E^^SS- 



. a; £1. 



E ?: -5 a; z - z^z, 






Qcd 



CCai CciC! cs 



CC-SCrcC-CC^OOOCO 
"OT; o-D E~ - g'C'w'vl'D'O 

a a CCS 



ooocococcocoococoo 
EESEEESESEEEEEEEES 

CTcoeoMcocQg^coccs^s^s^e^ — (M — — !?< 



^^-£:j:-i:J=j=-c.^-=-=-c.5 

occccccccccco 
EEEEEEESESESS 
cocooio«s^'# — —'•-■ — — r; 



m 

Eh 



oooooocococcoccco 



ooooooooooooo 



tosreraracraSK.-catBrecccoro 
cy;roaiiiso^a;a;c;ajQ;ocjci; 
>>=>-. >^ >-.-a >, E >i >> >> i~. >i ;^, >, ?^, 



( 1^ QJ^ .-^ c 

— r-l hJ 



t- G-l -^ 



cccocCr:c5CDcoc3iCcccdctic3 



E^ 
o = 






. ■- Q. 

15 6 






c tJ -I- ^ o 



E E-S 

O i o 






p , o a, c°f'2^ = = *> 5 -^ 
jj2c = i5jg^ga;£^g 



i <u r 



h 


fc- 


o 


0/ o 





















f^'fe 




o •= ta 




ta 








0, 


n 


E 
c 


CS 

_a;_o 


S re 


^3 




3 


ouiLbO.;^ 


CS 


^ 


s 



^•^^ 



> fSbt; bn" J:-a'5Joo o c-r 
! c: = a =~ cs;- =~-o~~ 

5 i» S ■» S $ i» 5 



O bj; O o C O 






c o ^ 






CO^GJ^— '3^Mt-Ot~00S<(- 












S >^-2 



>.-2 ° bio 



° ° n -J o >■ 

3 -^- g-O-^ O 



3 " O O O O O 

3 re-D-U-O T! 13 






STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



19 



ffias D 





S-.-3 


u 








V 


■o 
















T. 


Qj 








0> 




a> 








V 


Om 






Q 












« 




>■ 




>^ 


n 




re 


X 


a 




o 












^'i 


~ 


-a 


C' 


^ 


















rr. 


rrt 


ffi 


c 


£ 


-J 











■^ "C 



3 o •- ^•-■- "" rS ^'O 
'C — — — — ^^— 'ZH'-c'^ 
C r/3 ^ 7; Y3 — O) O CU g a Q 



c5 



CO ■ " 
T3-0^ 

_ _ li- ^ 'C 

C £ fa '-:: e tB fa Q -i! GO eu 






i^sJ^^-Sg^^>^ 



OJ 



a, O- 



C; Cl 



£B £z 



3 £•^►-1 c" S o" 
J o. -^ Q.-^ i: tJ -^ 
; c c c c ra Ci o 



a; j; o « a> o c 



£Z ^Qi 






o '5 Oj='ra ca j3 o cfi o o "= ^ ^ -c * -s 6 



Qii 



iClQcd 



.i O) .S a. .5i aj.i.' 



O-D PT313'5 E « 



E 0-0 



naiQciQaiCi 



c = c = = = 
c c c o c o 
E E E 



SEE 



OC__-.__ 

bc = SSH£SSS = 



scc = = = c: = = = = t = = = = = ^s = i^i:;t.-££EESES£E = = S£ES 



o >,= .S o .2 c.S o 

OoooooO^^i^oo—oOtiOo 
5j "O -o -o — TT o o aj a'^'O 



O V 



'iOooooooooc^O 
4) aj-a-c-o-co-co-ca jj a;' 



f-Hhr-' 



H E-E-H 



E-H E-H 



E-Eh 



' 0) (U 

j: -a 



mcflWOT^-:S>w'« 

00 c- O ©^ ;n « 
« CO 



i, V V 1> Q, Q) X 

>> >> >^ >% ^ >. E 

c- o -* 00 



.. . .^ >-,;-,>-,>-,£ >%£ £ w-.-a >»>->>,£ >^-^ c>»E^>.EBa 

O — OOtDG<IOe<ICOS^Tf'OG-^S-)fS — — S^"#Oh^C0'-<Oh^C0^Drfi&t 



G^ 



J "T C^ ^-j CO 1 



G-t 1 



.2 c.S c _ 



. • . . y ■ . • «^^. 

.i:.2 <.° •< 

^ > '£ S = '/ "^ ^ -« E 
sc== = ora_=_o 
D kJ S =- r: s =; D = C 



o c o o c o «(] 

'■S c3 — J- re '— j; 

: = bii§T; £-0 3 ° E£ ta-o 



aJ ,S^ aj .2 a; .aj aj.af o ? 
■n "So— t "bJo t To S "m n "hr O -3 

g '-/i > S i» S -Z S y; S GO ^ 



by)_o o o i — Tco STct-c I: 



"3 -C " "C 

11; a;o a;Qja)gj qj 

Tr, o fcTfiO o t'bJctTioo t o' 



(U 



re cc C3 ^^ re 

£15 =;re-c £-0T3-0-D re-u 5 

fcSfaS fa S fa 



•w-ct; re g-u (s g re g-O' 
S fa S fa S fa 



rt 



: = O 'i' O c o Ji 



O U O C O O C 



T3 la -o -a t: T3 -c 



fa S 



PCOOoioG<IOO^G^CO(«'-f>G^t®JCOCOT?OG^--CO(^|iOTj'«e<!O^^OOiO'*(?<OCOe^W 

« e^ e<) i-H i-H ©^ &< s^ s^ 



£oe'rooooo>^ooo 



eoocoooocc 



>^oooO[,V, 00000000000 

*-^ -r^ -r- TT zr-'-n T^ -M -r-. T-i -rr ^-^ T^ T-i tt -t-* 



■o-o-u — -o-o-o-CTS 






t^COOOCOeOCOOSC-. CTiClOlOOOO'-H— <i-..-i.-i^^-Hrti-iS^5 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 



1 








_; 




^ 




i 




>>2^ 








S: *> 




M 




-3 


^ b -^ 

2 o S 


— s 


5 "S c8 ns "5 S 


£ c 


"5 •- a 




-O o _: ^ o ^ 


"-* 3 

a, aj s 
■3 3.y=S| 

-'^ a- — ^ 


2 -g % 

(^ a a 


1 




ts J' a> • (B « 




5 a^ '5 a; '5. D '5 o^ a) S 


000^'' 


C3 D- H) '5 « !> 


K 


d, EwQCdQ !bE Qffi 


Ot-QS 


§ < C 73 = ti Q 




"C -D 


" 


-0 "a 




O O 





<o 


Si 


> > 


> 


> > 


rt 


-o o "3 -c o t; 


-3 


-3 TS 




'Cc'C'- a; 'wty ^o 


-a 1- CO a> 


~ !> i S 5^ i; 




o^ q;0- ^ Ot- CL^ 


a. V-. c 


c I- a.--r> %- a. 


•g 






sll4H>^4^ 




a. o a.— o c. o — a 


c— b 


Q. " — i " -S 


5 


CO CO O cWOd) 


2 ° u5 1^ 


- Q to a) 


-3 


-3 -a -o 


-3 


-3 




o o aj 


0) 


<1> 


m" .S 


bo m CO fcfl oi bo 


S £." 


bt ^ 


■§ ° 2 




o_'5 J 


000 0j;0C*O0 




o-a-u-o ^ — ~ £ o-u — — -o— f: o 




'3~-3-3-3 0-3 £-3"3 


i3 f^ 


.2 5 .5 a, .'£ a- .2 


".2 S.-C 


.2 .2 S 




Q ai CcdCi cd^i 


Coid 


Q c ci 


G 


w y M -J- 'J5 -y) M V v m OT M tr oi !/■ tr 


V! CO CO CO ,0 


cocococo cocococotn 


^^.■? 


■5-5-5-5-£-5-5-5-=5-5-£-£-£-5-£ 






cu9 S 
















"^^'3, 


ococSooSoocooooc 


00000 


000c? 00000 


l-^l 


SSSSEcSSSSHSSSgE 


S S £ S S 


EEEE-SSESES 


03to — C0-#-*O-rC0OC0OG0i-0C0C0'Ot-^OC-l>C0-*t003C0>0-*C0C0 


»— < ^ •— •— ^ »— «— « 


f— r-H 


^^ ^- I— t 




_^ 


_«: 


^ — -22 _j -n — 












3 

o 


a) 


« § .20 


?3 


O =^^^_o^_2^ °^^^^ ° ~ 


_o _o _o 


oiOiO o'::0 
"3oc;a)a)"''2aJo"° 


bI 




^ -J "3 w 5} 




H 


r-i 


?^f^H ^H 


fl S 


-X -. CO 


CO 


CO CO c« CO m 


O C C) 






.= co:5-S 2 "^-w '^■■B 


•- w-;^ 


fc*"^t:;— ^"^ L. i-i-t-TXi-it^'X — "-^"^ 


:- u. L- u; p 


lili§iiisi 


ell 




cs cs n3 ra = 
0; aj ii 
>> >~. >i >> c 


cotjDG^toe^-HO — cotocoG<!ccoG>)e^e^ooto<^e<(<«tC)Coe-)io— lOOGOtr; 






S< — < -1 


^ »— t -^ 


o5 




• • . . 






.2 .2 .2 






d 


'■3 ■3 _ _ . ^ 


E 




■3 


a ' gE ' = c 'b ' g cE " 


^ aj - 


S a ' ' ' s ' 


o 


.2 c-^ .2 .2 < =.2<1 


"S " ° 


c .2 .2 


«coSo-£s = a = o = co2rao 


5-5 2'-i-5 


t^ "5 c^ -^ a "cS re's 


3 


j3 = o-^-=-c ^x ^-z; -:-s o^-^ 


-3 aJ -c — 


0— j2— a EjoE 


CO 


i.cc^-/)i^^a'-a-^c>~.~^'-nO 


> p c - e 


cra--rtSooa''-<u 
g_^ = a; 2-^-5 Q.3 a 




= Tr,cii'^ = 232a)2jC^-2o-5 






c3aj;;C_52 = " = OS[3— cOo 




-= to z; 3 to 3 




gaiMC:sS;DSDQDa.H=SQ 


t5 = »^s^ 


^ = SsD euSa. 


■S n; 


-3 1-3 -3 -3 -3 ;. 

aj .2 .2 9> .2 u .2 aj .2 * 


_ 


-3 g -3 -3 


OJ 0) 


^ .2 ^ 


,a) (u -^ 41 .2 ii .2 




"b/j'E-S't boo'E tJlo'E boo o't-% 


bo t bo 


c To c -c "bo t: To t; 


= G:^n=-3a!=T:c= — "wxics^ 


= re =-3-3 


reC3~— = cB-3=:rt 


tcS^Siw §■■« SiK S> 


a)Si» 


S K > t» S ic S 




aj 0) 





_a, u ai 










g 


S^OOcO^OOOcOjiOCcO 

■rt-^'3|-c2-c-3'^£-3n'T;-3|- 


oi; c 

-3.^„-3| 


(I g C3 5 --S-3 £-3-3 


m 


W"a5 




2s^° 




W^-^-^G-HOiM — S<)C--*COG<!e-IG< 


a^'"-ij 










co.^rS'tocococoai«trjcniococoaiwwco»o»o£-c-0';ft-f>c-'— s^ioio 




g^ rtT-<— G^lG^le■)G-^^ 




rti-1-^r-i — G^e^e^G^ 


o o 


c^ -i aj 
CO ?„— oooooooooococo 

— ' 5- g--3 -D-D-S-U-a-U-O-O-S-U-CTJ 3 






|.2 


c 


occcoooooo 


H'i 


Xi-UX! — ■3-3-3-OT3'S-B-3-DT3-a 


a 


<1.y) 






o 




ta J- CO Ol 


-Hs^co^iotnocooio 


1 '^ 




xO^OiC^iCO>OiOiOtd 


tOC^tOtOtO^^tO^tOC^tCCD^tD^ 


(OtntO^D^OtDOtOCCHO 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 21 



S-H 



-] Si _^ 



H 5-^ 




•' 


" 


:h^| 






o-a 






■= o 


















= (D P 




a 




ccffi s 




-1 


cPh 


Q 






c . 


. >.— 


>- 




.£ >, 










; 0) c o 


'■3 


o 


CO 13 
— 0) 



i>cc~i «ccJ-S>-. o tot! £ q "'-ri5?~> S 

. o a; Ji aj 'o 






(u V <u (u v :; 

s- > ^ > > > R 

5 -G -C O — _ O -a "S O O -O -co -3 ^-3 

J -C (U "CQ "-'Co'S'ii- jjwQ b;~'-o-c;ilJ "r ■SO .^lU' 

;oo>oo5:oo>^oo£>g>^Scg-2?;ca> = g>g So>5fo>.^ 



j300ora_cOoora_ccoo^_a^ji;^o_cooo _scc_2cc_c; roo^^o .s^o 

oT3'a-ogo'a-DT:;£--s-u-oEogog-co"w-a'a"Ot^gogo g — -ac-c'^og-u 

jCocsiuCS = aj = = = — = = = c -IL^ c = cc ccasccscc 

OOOOOOttjCirOCQjCOCciOOOOCOCOpcOCOO ooccccooo 

EEcS£S?£& = cs£ = S?Sc5 = SSE £ -;: £££££ SEccHESES 



<i:o^'i:^oocoo>i:^ooo — '-^coooc<i:Oc'^cO'-=^ o q c c o 
js j= -c ^ j= j= -a ^ ^ j= j= ^ ^ J3 









•r 5 ?e ., to a- S -b ■ j ca « >><= 

..^-2 .<d-2-? . '^ . . . . -g . . •- u-S . gr-s: 

.S<'^ »i£^.£=^ .2 =7^ 2 c .2-<'^ Ho2 



to o tT-S ■= r- 



,CL- „^ 



I i =K i^i'= I pa" 5i.|5t.^:t.||I I-|-§|||i I|^ |J III § 

gaa.=:QfaO-5>:;<=: g rg: >:= a. a; ^ -3 a^ = >:: s h= 1:^ SipQa. D^fc.Q=:>=a.5>^ 



■- i/i.- « Q.>^~ I- o-i^ g o I- o c-r .2 S-o °t=utoo.So'-c^-- 



<u .5i ^ .i o--^ •- ^ •£ o -2 .- i> Si 0^.2 



bctO-ctcfcSlBOCO-aOhfifcOO'bcn-ctbJCOCtObJlOt-cbD to'brOOt-CbjO 

^ *'^i:.E ".5"°""^ ^.5 to-^T^.g a\- m =^=-13 ffi— =-u c^ = CO— = — -aoi-s = to 

iJciico^coooco^S_QoooocoocJiccc^co coO0c«c«O 
cogco£-Offl-c-T='T3-a£-Cjo5«-cT3'T3-G-o~-0 5co-CT!to--u g-^;^''^^!'^" 

afcSb. g fa gp-g fag fa g fa g faSfag 

64 ^ „,_ „rt .- ^ G^ G^ S<l t-1 SOq G^ G^ SS» « — « S-i y 1-^ r-; 

CO 

.k;ocooococooooooo,; oocoooooooooooJ*"" 000000"!= 
Xj qS -a -rs "^ -o -o ts -c -c -o -u -tz -c- t:- -o g-a-c-c-c-^-c — -c-a-o-o-c— =-3 — -u-d — -S-S-o 
C^ O hg 

©jw>#io<js(^coOTO'-©»co-#iotnc^coa>o.-'G^co-^o^cr~-ooa50— I G<!«Tpifnot-cocio 
5o«tO!£>tD<5totDt£no«5«£noto<otatatotata;D^otjst£)tnvoioio'-o'-n tiJoototcto^istcTs 



22 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



o 


■o 


a 


o 

a 


2 


&-_• 


!sl 




°5S 


3«3 1 i i h^ Y i 


■->^_:>> _; ^ ^t: — b— — '^ — 


eredita 

[eredi 
do 

lemen 

[eredi 
do 
do 

uicida 

eriodi 

do 

do 

pilepl 

abore 

yncop 

eredii 

do 

oreigi 

do 

do 

do 

do 

eriodi 

eredi' 

eriodi 

uirida 

eriodi 

eredii 

ujcida 

pilept 

eriodi 


M a: Q3 m Cu t:_3 KJE Li Q.E2.73 — -Cyjt^D^ 


'D -O 13 -D 


o <u (u a) a 


a > > > ;» 


■2 -C C -O -3 C -O O -3 -3 O 13 "3-3 "O 


■OD'-DTSiu 'roj"S'-a) "C ta-o-a <• qjm-o (u-ac oi« 


■S dJi-Q-i-ui. Ci-cjCi- CJ liajmQ. ilMoj i,iut, mi. 


s 


g5^£>i>ooEi:>5go>c«>>Eo3f^>cSi>"ooJJ» 
£c-'oSo--^«o£-<c-S-^oS£--nS£S-^oSo-°^£o 


f3 


CO— OQ.O -.<;.n.-^o Q. oo-c- oiro, oa.u "30 








•n 


■8 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 




CJ OJ 0) (U a 


t? c 


tn b£ w hjo '/: hxi tn Cuo m br o5 tJD m faC 


r! i-('S 


c>-c';C'- =•- =iir= >-^=i: 




ts_cc3j=ts_-oo«^ooocB JSmooo^orc^ooooooo 


•l ^ 


E " E " E 0-0-3 £ oTJ-S-B-w £"3 £-3T3'3 o— £ o-aT^-STJ-B-Sia 


0.- a).- <u .- ii .'H o.Si.i' m .!£ n.- 




Ci C Ci C lii 2 Dia oi:;c2i Q DiP 


a .1 to CO « tr « M -J, t« M »i M V, -A c« to « -y, t« ./, en CO c« »! VJ r/, „ en M c« 


m^'S 1 .^.^.S.C.C.£.£.= .£.C.£.£:.£ cn_r3 in^^^^.c_s^.c^.c.B.£.c.c".£ 






o^uT ' oocoocooooccoocSccoccooocoocooto 


S-= o ! ESESESSESEEEESS^EEEEEEEEEEESSESS 


— ^^ w- .— 1 ^ .— 




horn 
tied. 

ourt 

iend 
ourt 
iend 

ourt 

ver' 
ourt 

iend 
ourt 
iend 

ourt 
iend 


^S OooocooOiOioOoooooOOocooc — OiooOo'i: 


:i,3 (u~"3'3wot3|unjm-3c)'0'^~'^'^ajaj'^"'~~''ooaj'0'^a>^u 


(S3 .= j=-=j: ^ ^-a .= -=^ .= J3 


f- E-.-^c- t-H -r-^HEHH- 


-C cncocncncn cocowcr co en ./■■ntncnoiM 


ill ||siil|gs||g|||£|g2o2|ssi|||||£| 

a-5 £ S f^c >>= E >,.^ = c>,E£E>.E >,-a ^ >..£>. s-.>>E£EE£s-.S 


1 — i-J — . CO 1— ' (N rt -- 


1 — "-J 


c.. , . a . . 


0) <u 


E^ 1 


a> 


« a (13 . . . 2 . . 


3 


t £ a S 


Supposed Ci 

Health . 
mily Trouble 
slurbation . 
Health 
known 

mily Trouble 
erperal 
Health . 
emperance 

do 

Health 
ilepsy 
emperance 
cuniary Emba 
ligious Excite 
emperance 
ligious 
emperance 
known . 

do 
emperance 

do 
ilepsy 
known 

rental Indulge 
known 
Health 

mesiic Afflicli 
Health 

onniary Emba 
lilepsy 
ar of Poverty 


1 ^ a JB. = ra -i !^iaj«--z'i':== n D.= (cG_c_a)Ci.D 


il =t.§ = Si,cs>S =;u^a:a;.5c£^D >=. u:j2.;D = C; = a-t:fc, 


or 
ngle. 

rried 

o 

gle 

o 

rried 

gle 

rried 

gle 

o 

rried 

gle 



o 

rried 



o 

gle 

rried 

gle 

o 



rried 

gle 

o 

o 

rried 

gle 

lo 

rried 

dower 

gle 

dow 


S 'ri S'mS'n § yj S yj S » S m S i« IS :S y; > 


g; CO q;q3 cjo^oj 






g 


iojiooo|oi^|ooiiococjjpooijoogj^ = ooiipc 

g-O m-C-O-w g-3 (d =-3-3 CO -3-3-3 g cc g "3 "D CO "3 "3 J co g -3 "C rt 5 -O 


03 




tb S b Sb S bSb S b.Sb SEb 


u C 9i 1 


C-5CO" — WS^COCO-*iO— i'-HiQC0-*5'Tj'toS<l'OC0T?i-HC0S0rJ'g<l-MWOG^!O 


£§^"! 


. 


SSS^T^^^S~'^'"'°'^="2SSSS£:255g5^'^'^222;^^w 


O O 

II 


».r~'coooooo'-_oooooooooocoooo£oooooco 


-' =-a-3-3-C-C-3'3-g-3-C-3-3-3-C-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3 cO-3-B-3'3-3-3T3 




>^ lu S 


^ 


©00000©00'-<-HS'?i»rirt'-5-H,-<™S^S:)S<e^&<g5G^gJge^W52«3. 


Z 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 23 












ved 

ved 
rov. 

ved 
ved 




-3 




V 




> 


T3 T: O -3 -^ O o -3 -a -Ci__C13 -3 c 




o 


TS a "8 o foa* "^ o-a---3 cP"0?J"3 !ii^S9~- i'S 




fe "3 






>Sio>ooSfcE>goo>og>E'>oc"S;>?f>oog>S5:>^oe> 
gST!=-oT3S-o«g|T='32-«c£-S'^-^-=oc:S2-o-ac2-'o2S'=«£' 





F > 


13 




CO n, o wco c oc z_ Sjos.:^:!, cc— oo-o — q. 




— o. 






zj 



3i;-a~So-T3g"ct-S-3~o5i,5-u'ocg-acjg--3£-3"co2 
O £2 cicdC; ai:nDi Ctf aejCegj Cai Oci:^ cd Cos 



c = = = : 



EEESS = EESEs = c = S£5c££S£& = feSSSS = S£5SSSE£SH 

.2 o .2 c > o .2 0.2 o > c .2 C.2 o .2 o 

'iioooo'-'ooocoo'iOOOociO'iOOcOo'i^O'— Oo'— -^0000000 

5)"OT3"D-S a"3'3'3-a'3-0 (v, a; (V, 5;"C~ 0, tj a; aj {j'S a)"3 ^ j, ^j ;,"3 j, q — — -c-a-3'T3"0 

«:S^J-5£r3j o.:!^^^ 2 £-- S2 ^ 2----- £ ;. ^ u.- I- 2-5^ « «^ ^ £ 
m5ji3555 = raSoa)gra^5£n:Bc3g55s5xc3Sc5o5ra = graaOa« 
<y2?'2;:;:£2o2oo = oo?°oaji>°2SS2o!La)o- = -a)2gooOiu(a 



o :l^ . o . (S; . 2 •. .H .Si .... S" _o 

uC- = o-5i.-«^i_:=co5 -SlrS— o"=oi.2 -Srli^ra S"- w«.^o 

7^ r-5l3§.£§ 015 -e § o~- ^o^ o o'^r^Cr^ S. o o "^ t ^^ -? o § co c o o'? ^'S 
£u £S^ £l-5Dbija-5i,-§^ £'5c^-§"§ S-^; S £•&■§" 5 ^"S-o'-SDE^-S-c-S-Sbf'S-l 
OQi3C ^tloo- 3^^ rocj ^■:io_, o^o-iaj 3-'ait^ o— * OtcC-O 

^ '^■3n3'3 T!'3 t3 'T3'3'0"3 

5 o .2_2,2jJ .2 _5; .2 ^ .2 j;.2 o .2 o .o o _o o j; o H 

-a'fei:ooooot;hjoetJDOi:sru:o tjjo to bjDtTxjO o o o o'ETcO o'hTnE oTcETjo''' 

J- =-0T3-0-3-3 C3.E '3="3 rt=_ca"3=-3jo ^G ra3-3-C-B-a-3 rj CC-O M C re'3 = <a = ri 

^^.o S'-^SJB Sec--: '^ 5 r^'S'xi S "Z 5 '/! S 72 S i/:; ^ 

O OOO OO OjOQ? 

cooooJJcooe^poo^opooooo^cJJco^ooocoOcoc«oa 

g-CT3-3T3 nJ-aT3-3 g CO g-O-O CD'S g-O-CTD-O-D ce g to rlS (0-3T3-3 §-315-3-3 g"3-3 g 
t; g C^Sfc g fa Slj-SC:;. S fa S faS fa 



« 1-1 •-( 1-1 1-1 S9 e<i s^ G<| i-< 1-1 1-1 1-f 1-1 rH i-( 1-1 e^ G< &< e^ G^ GO GO GO <rt 

g-^coooocoooooooo>,oooooooooooooooooooooa)o 

IS 0.-3 ■d-3-0-3"3-0-3'3-3-C-3-3-3 cS"0-0'3"3-3-3"3-3-U-3-3'3-3-B''a-3'3'U'0'3'3 =-3 

s< g ^ 

".£?£' .5? .?5 G0G0-*'*-:fi-#^-*'^.*Tf'*ir5lOU0'Ol0iOiO'OlO'O55OtOtOt£>«5i£loSti>r>f>f^ 



24 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



s — 



— -O i.' 



^ ^ ^ ^ J2 






tj o) s ca Z.X 



• - ~ IB 






)-2 >— ^ c^^^-S^.£ 



e§s-§- 

— coo. 



Z^:d^ 



— o cu 

o cj c 



fcJD be CO he 



o "O o C C' ~ 
.22.?i.':2 5.2.5; o 



^ ts c j3 ro o , 



Cci O. 



)!Soooocoooc^racj=Oj=oco 



^ J= -^ 






CoCOOOOOOOOCCOOOOOOCOCOOOOO 

EES£S?£E5 = S£SH£SS = E£SE£SESSESES 






oO 



H H 






,OiO 



E-f- 



S S ^ S « S K 






«^«^«Sra? 



^ .. ,„ J3 



= H e c "v? 



£ c ^S >-.>-, >^>^S E E E E >^>>B >,£ >-.£ >>^ EE>.>>E>^cE& 



:= i^ 2 ^ 



Cu rt O Q "3 O 






*7H £ 'T' ^ _5 K 



Q.S c -5 o = o 



2 = ri-5 
C3 u -5 



as 



£^E E~J3t;ffi 



o (u = ts __ t; o 



o 

g C !/! -S = -C 

£.§ o'ta lis 

oj -^ ^^ hG .i: 1-U 
— ' = <p c _ 



o 
c 




r' a 


^. « 




0) -.3 




D.O »; 


f.^ 








^^ 


^ Q 



"bjo t: o o be u: bt-5 ' 



"hit; i: "be O O O l:"bJot b/;t"bc~ il'bcC O O t 



0) 



u 



> O Ji o c 
: Tl ^. T3 ¥ - 



rj 



ca 



•t- SiiS Ci.S 






0.2 

si 



_ rt i-( i-i — . — 1-1 -.^ (M G^ G^l G^ e~t <M ,_( ,-1 — , ,^ ,-, ,-1 ^ ,-, ^ s.» 



i>l:~c~(:~t:~c~t~cococococorococoeoo3aiajOCT)Cr>CT50;ia50}CTiOO o.fB 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 26 



2"^ ^ ^ 

'a "^ .- a 



K 






^M-isSri^ £ .2:? ^1 



..c.^ 



E^ 






.■= o 



00 



;S-D-cgi3^^£- 313 s -g .^£-0 -c .ii s^ S--i:>'S'^ 3 "^^ S-^ 

>SSo>S>S>oooooc S^ >S>og>oS cii i^oS>Sooo>;o3> 



«.^.2i (U.S 0.2; o .2 <u .!£ c ._ _ - ~ ^ 

-.(dsccoS — — C2 = ciiCGoa^aja;acja;Qaja>oOQja)Q;ajajQ;QjaJti)a)<DC? 
oooooc;OcococcooOfljoQjc;<uc>Qja:ia;Q;c;G;a;oocjQ;oDWQ;QiUQj 
SSSSE&S£EESSS5:ESS&&SS^B:5&^&^^&&&&&5^s:^?& 

rfi'0^lf'-*i-H-*C0-*-#^MMOG0G0OCT)00C0C0tOC0C0C0C~t~i>^!J3<O'0'0'Ol0'*'lf''^C0M 



o.^ o>c >o .5;o .3^^ 'x>>o >o i* 

OtinOoOOooOOooooo'iJ^oooo'.i: 0^000 •iO—'ooo^^ooc'Ho 

0) o o''^ O l,13'0 Qj a,-0~-CT3-!3 Q 5; w-O-CO qj-O 0-OT3T3 jj j, j^-^-U-U 4j 5jl3-C-0 jj^O 

^ j: J3 .^ -c j= -S -c -c J2 ^ j= ^ -C -c ^ J3 

w „_) ^ lj *^ K^ ~^ "^ '/I t/) ~ " in (7) 'X OT t/: > "^ "i^ "^ > 1/3 (/) ^ w t5 "w > _^ "CZ ''■^ ^ "w 'J^ ^ _^ 

ii|s$||5|ii§5iiiii2|5|goiisi||ggiiig|isi 

>^>.£?SE&Ss>.>, cS>^>.>,t->>-..^ESE^'0>,;.-..^>.SS-a5;-.S>^>^E>^SS 



.. ..o ^o ..o ?•- <^....-^ .. . 0.0. 

c^ S-5 c o iSa- o 2 c-5 o« = >.«£-5":S 2_-5 ^o c bg « « 2 c 2 o = « »> 

■72 -C Sf> ~ > -CT3-0-3 -Ci^TS-O 

a; .2^ .2 o c— .2 JJ Q^ .2 '^.2^.2 ^.2 '^.2 o^.2 i>.2 4J.2 s> 

"Sot: bx)_o to 3 -3 -a b-B.5^ t: hriOT3 bB_2^ ° t °"So!^ ioS'Si'S o o bo't bjo'E'Sr)'E'5Jo"S o"5ij 

cT3ctfT3T3 — — =i3-acs.n-o^c-ci3-aeo'c = te = t8 = tc-a-a = cacccc:rac5T3c 



bl) iZ bX)_0 t O 3 • 
'CB§"CB a :>!>hQ S'b gg) S JggOigiBg ^aigg^Scoa JB 

Qi O Qj <V 000 G^iflJ tDGJQJ 

'io«oliJoociio2o^opiJpjecooo^'loo1<Docooc'l«1'i>1o 

gl3«13£ffl13-0g<s-o£-acsTJ5cC5«gn3--^fflgT3;ffl5^-313-T3-B-og2g;2S'^ 

fa g fag fag fa a bgfcafa gfa gfag fagfagfa 

-Hif3tocrit-ococoino-*0'*ocotn'^c3cocoooc5Cocoo-fcocriOCTiGoc^ooe^s^ioccnn 
•^tot^i— i&qT#05i— i'^u30e^t--t^-#»f3s^'^y3i>co&»e^GO^u2coa)'-<s^ocotritrir--crjOi— it--t- 

•^.OOOkfiOOOOOOOOO-iOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO'li.OO 

^T3 -o -a a'TS TJ'O'O'niSTSTs-a g--o '73"0-013l3-5-a-a'UT3-0-OT3-0-0-0-0-0'UT3'a g-o-o 

■^ <1 M o z 

gioto^coOTOi->e^(rtTj*io'.oi>eoa)0'-Hs^sOTfiiotoi:~coaio--He^mTf>intr)r-cocjiOi-iiNco 
eocococowcococococococoiMcococooscococooseococococococoTOeooscocoososeocoeoosco 



26 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 



K 



;p C-- " 

(P o o O 

& 

_; O g £ CS g 

• — ii ^ o ii Q o 

.^ B •= S ^-c 

= i? «^^ «^ 

oj Q a- Q a; (1- 



-:: -c 



Dh5 






t>>5D 






fJOOOOOOOOOOO 






(S'o 



c o c o o o o 



Hf- 



5 po 



I— > — 1 (?< 






^^ c ?? — 



•E-(K 



OJ — 



CdlD 



& o O — 



-73 g -O 

^ "Sc o ^ -^ "hb o o o o o t 



Sffi 



gi o. 



a oj o o c oj o 

fag fag faS 






^§ 






COCOCOCOCOCO0OCOCOO3»9? 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



%*i 



TABLE L 

Showing the state of the Hospital from December \st, 1837, to No' 
vember SOth, 183S. 



Patients admitted, 




177 


Of the cases now in 






Males, 


96 




the Hospital of less 






Females, . 


81- 


—177 ! 


duration than 1 year. 


28 




Cases of less duration 






Of longer duration 






than 1 year, . 


82 




than 1 year, . 


190— 


—218 


Males, 45 






Patients in the Hospi- 






Females, 37- 


-82 




tal in the course of 






Cases of longer dui'a- 






the year, . 




3654 


tion than 1 year, 


95 




In the Hospital at the 






Males, . 51 






commencement of 






Females, 44- 


-95- 


—177 


the yeai*, . 


185 




Admitted by the Com-ts, 


123 




Admitted during the 






Private, 


54- 


—177 


year. 


177— 


—362 


Remain at the end of 




1 








the year, . 




218 








Males, 


115 










Females, . 


103- 


— 218 









TABLE 2. 



Discharges and Deaths. 





No. of 
each sex. 


Recov'd. 


ImproVd. iin^roV'd. 


Harm- 
less. 


Died. 


Total. 


Patients discharged, 144 
Males, 
Females, 


84 
60 


45 
31 


11 

13 


8 
6 


10 
4 


10 
6 




Of duration less than 
1 year, 74 
Males, 
Females, 


144 

47 
27 


76 

38 
26 


24 

2 
4 


14 





14 





16 

3 
1 


144 


Of duration more 
than 1 year, 70 
Males, 
Females, 


74 

42 

28 


64 

7 
5 


6 

10 

8 




8 
6 




10 
4 


4 

7 
5 


74 




70 


12 


18 


14 


14 


12 


70 


Remains, Nov. .30, 218 
Males, 115 
Females, 103—218 


Natii 
Fore 
Nati 


t^es of t 
igners, 
res of 


he Stat 
ther St 


e, 
ates, . 


* 


188 
20 
10- 


—218 



Foreigners in the Hospital in the course of the year, 
Natives of other States, ...,,. 



30 

15 45 



28 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TABLE 3. 



Duration of Insanity witli tliose remaining in the 


Ages of 


Patients in tlie Hospital, December ist/ 


Hospital, December 1st, 183 


i. \ 




1838. 


Less than 1 year, 


28 


Under 20, .... 4 


From 1 to 5 yeais, 


65 


From 20 to 25, . 






25 


5 to 10, 


44 




25 to 30, 






21 


10 to 15, . 




27 




30 to 35, 






34 


15 to 20, . 




14 




35 to 40, 






35 


20 to 25, - 




15 




40 to 45, 






30 


25 to 30, . 




3 




45 to 50, 






23 


Over 30, 




3 




50 to 55, 






le 


Unknown, . 




19 




55 to 60, 






8 








60 to 65, 






6 




218 


Unkr 


65 to 70, 
70 to 75, 
75 to 80, 
own, . 






8 
3 
1 
4 








1 








218 



TABLE 4, 



Number admitted and discharged each month. 


Average of Patients in the Hospital each month. 




Admitted. 


Discharged. 




December, 


13 


8 


December, . . . 190 


January, 


17 


7 


January, . 




196 


February, 


16 


6 


February, 




208 


March, 


9 


7 


March, 




212 


April, 


15 


14 


April, 




2]5i 


May, 


22 


21 


May, . . 




212^ 


June, 


21 


17 


J une. 




217 


July, 


16 


14 


July, 




220i 


August, 


10 


18 


August, . 




217 


September, 


7 


9 


September, 




210i 


October, 


16 


11 


October, . 




213i 


November, 


15 


12 


November, 




218i 




177 


144 


Average for 1838, about 211 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 



29 



TABLE 5. 

Statistics of the State Lunatic Hospital, from Jan. 1833 to Dec. 1, 1838. 





1833. 


1834. 


1835. 


1836. 


1837. 


183S. 


Total. 


Admissions, .... 


153 


119 


113 


125 


168 


177 


855 


Discharged, including Deaths and Elope- 
ments, .... 


39 


115 


112 


106 


121 


144 


637 


Discharged, recovered, 


25 


64 


52 


57 


69 


76 


343 


Discharged, improved. 


7 


22 


23 


17 


23 


24 


116 


Died, 

Eloped, .... 


4 

1 


8 


8 
1 


8 
1 


9 



16 



53 
4 


Patients in the Hospital in the course of 
each year, .... 


153 


233 


24] 


245 


306 


362 


855 


Patients remaining at the end of each 
year, 


114 


118 


119 


138 


185 


218 




Males admitted, 
Females admitted, 


96 
57 


79 
39 


51 

62 


66 
59 


94 
75 


96 
81 


482 
373 


Males discharged. 
Females discharged, . 


20 
15 


59 
49 


57 

46 


56 
41 


65 
47 


74 
54 


331 
252 


Males died, .... 
Females died, .... 


3 
1 


5 
3 


4 
4 


6 
2 


6 
3 


10 

6 


34 
19 


Patients sent by Courts, 

Private, .... 


109 
44 


55 
64 


89 
21 


117 

8 


129 
39 


123 

54 




Recoveries : 

Males, .... 
Females, .... 


25 
13 
12 


64 
33 
31 


52 
27 
25 


58 
32 
26 


69 
37 
32 


76 
45 
31 


344 


Average in the Hospital each year, 


107 


117 


120 


127 


163 


211 





m 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TABLE 6. 



Statistics of the different Seasons. 





1S33. 


1834. 


* 

1835. 


1836. 


1837. 


183S. 


Total. 


Admissions in Winter, 


27 


26 


24 


23 


26 


46 


172 


Admissions in Spring, 


71 


35 


31 


36 


49 


46 


268 


Admissions in Summer, 


21 


30 


30 


42 


40 


47 


210 


Admissions in Autumn, 


21 


28 


28 


24 


53 


38 


202 


Discharges in Winter, 





22 


21 


20 


15 


18 


86 


Discharges in Spring, 


7 


33 


30 


33 


38 


37 


178 


Discharges in Summer, 


10 


28 


31 


24 


30 


43 


166 


Dischai-ges in Autumn, 


24 


24 


22 


21 


38 


32 


161 


Recoveries in Winter, 





12 


14 


11 


10 


15 


62 


Recoveries in Spring, 





20 


13 


14 


17 


23 


87 


Recoveries in Summer, 


9 


16 


1 


12 


15 


18 


86 


Recoveries in Autumn, 


16 


15 


12 


20 


27 


20 


110 


Deaths in Winter, 





3 


1 





1 


3 


8 


Deaths in Spring, 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


5 


14 


Deaths in Summer, 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 


5 


17 


Deaths ia Autumn, 








3 


3 


5 


3 


14 



TABLE 7. 
Classification of Insanity. 





Whole No. 


Each Sex. 


Curable or 
Cured. 


Total of Cura- 
ble or Cured. 


Mania, 
Males, . 
Females, 


444 


236 

208 


137 
131 


268 


Melancholia, 
Males, . 
Females, 


235 


129 
106 


75 

65 


140 


Dementia, 
Males, . 
Females, 


128 


77 
51 


2 
3 


5 


Idiots, 
Males, . 


8 


8 


A few cases 


notclas'fied 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 



31 



TABLE a 



Of Occupation. 



Farmers, 


« 102 


Stonecutters, ... 2 


Laborers, 


89 


Comb-makers, 






2 


Shoemakers, 


39 


Alusicians, 






2 


Seamen, 


32 


Turners, 






2 


Merchants, . 


28 


Harness-makers, . 






2 


Carpenters, . 


23 


Pedlers, 






2 


Manufacturers, 


22 


Physicians, 






2 


Teachers, 


20 


Broom-makers, 






2 


Blacksmiths, 


12 


Coppersmiths, 






2 


Printers, 


11 


Coachmen, 






2 


Tailors, 


8 


Butchers, 






2 


Students, 


8 


Currier, 








Machinists, . 


7 


Bricklayer, 








Clothiers, 


6 


Lawyer, 








Millers, 


4 


Jeweller, 








Coopers, 


4 


Watchman, , 








Painters, 


4 


Drover, 








Paper-makers, 


3 


News Collector, 








Calico Printers, 


3 


Rope-maker, 








Cabinet-makers, 


3 


Engineer, 








Clergymen, 


3 


Hatter, 








Sail-makers, 


3 


Gardener, 








Tanners, 


3 


Idiots, 






'. 8 


Bakers, 


2 


Vagrants, 






. 24 


Stevedores, . 


2 


Few Females only 


are c 


.lassi 


Red. 



TABLE 9. 

Diseases which have proved Fatal, 



Marasmus, . 


13 


Disease of the brain, 


2 


Epilepsy, 




10 


Brain fever from intemperance, 




Consumption, 




7 


Disease of the heart. 




Apoplexy, 




4 


Disease of the bladder, 




Mortification of limbs. 




3 


Lung fever, 




Suicide, 




3 


Dropsy, 




Cholera Morbus, . 




2 






Hemorrhage, 




2 ' 


Total, . 


53 


Inflammation of the bo^ 


ivels, 


2 







32 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TABLE 10. 

Duration of Insanity before admitted to the Hospital. 





1833. 


1834. 


1835. 


1836. 


1837. 


1833. 


Total. 


Less than ] year, 


48 


56 


49 


54 


73 


82 


*362 


From 1 to 5 yeai-s, 


20 


29 


37 


37 


58 


50 


231 


5 to 10, . 


27 


14 


17 


13 


15 


16 


102 


10 to 20, .... 


31 


8 


6 


11 


15 


8 


79 


20 to 30, . 


12 


4 


1 


2 


4 


7 


30 


30 to 40, .... 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


9 


Unknown, .... 


12 


6 


7 


6 


5 


13 


49 


Duration of Insanity with those remain- 
















ing at the end of each year : 
















Less than 1 year, 


29 


22 


21 


11 


29 


28 


140 


From 1 to 5 years, . . 


20 


25 


22 


39 


51 


65 


222 


5 to 10, . 


20 


24 


34 


35 


38 


44 


195 


10 to 20, .... 


30 


24 


29 


35 


41 


41 


200 


20 to 30, .... 


9 


5 


3 


7 


11 


18 


51 


Over 30, .... 


3 


2 


4 


2 


2 


3 


16 


Unknown, .... 


8 


16 


6 


9 


13 


19 


71 


Ages of Patients when admitted : 
















Under 20, .... 


2 


6 


3 


11 


13 


17 


52 


Between 20 and 30, . 


34 


23 


22 


29 


58 


47 


213 


30 and 40, . 


48 


44 


42 


30 


34 


51 


249 


40 and 50, . 


34 


28 


30 


25 


31 


32 


180 


50 and 60, . 


14 


9 


11 


16 


13 


20 


83 


60 and 70, . 


17 


6 


6 


10 


12 


8 


59 


70 and 80, . 


5 


2 


5 





7 


2 


21 


Civil state of Patients admitted : 
















Single, .... 


92 


71 


52 


68 


94 


101 


478 


Married, .... 


38 


40 


46 


49 


61 


65 


295 


Widows, .... 


12 


4 


8 


6 


11 


5 


46 


Widowers, 


11 


4 


7 


2 


o 


6 


32 



See E.iplanation of 12th Table. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



33 



TABLE IL 

Causes of Insanity, S^c. 



138 
20- 



Intemperance, 

Males, . 
Females, 

111 Health, . 

Epilepsy, . 

Puei'peral, . 

Religious, . 

Masturbation, 

Domestic Afflictions, 

Loss of property and fear of 
poverty, . 

Disappointed affection. 

Disappointed ambition. 

Injuries of the head, 

Abuse of snuff and tobacco, 



158 
-158 

110 
32 
22 
70 
81 
75 

58 
38 
23 
10 
5 



Hereditary, or having in- 
sane ancestors or near 
kindred, • 

Periodical, . 

Homicidal, . 

Actual homicides, . 

Suicidal, or having a strong 
propensity to self-de 
struction. 

Actual suicides. 



267 

152 

16 

12 

96 



Of 429 cases that have been 

examined have dark 

hair, eyes and com])lex- 

ions, . . . 220 

Light hair, eyes and com- 
plexions, . . 209 

Of 1 52 periodical cases, 94 

are caused by 
Intemperance, . . 94 



Many unknown. 



34 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TABLE 12. 

Shewing the comparative Curability of Insanity treated at different 
periods of disease. 









Total of 
Cases. 


Of each 
Sex. 


Cured or 
Curable. 


Incurable. - 


Less than 1 year's duration 
Males, . 
Females, 






334 


183 
151 


160 
134 


23 
17 


From 1 to 2 years, . 

Males, . 
Females, 






118 


61 
57 


37 
42 


24 
15 


From 2 to 5 years. . 
Males, . 
. Females, 






141 


80 
61 


23 
22 


57 

39 


From 5 to 10 yeai-s. 
Males, . 
Females, 






96 


50 

46 


7 
5 


43 
41 


From 10 to 15 years, 

Males, . 
Females, 






64 


40 
24 


2 

1 


38 
23 


From 15 to 20 years. 
Males, . 
Females, 






26 


18 

8 


1 



17 

8 


From 20 to 25 years. 

Males, . 
Females, 






18 


10 

8 






10 

8 


From 25 to 30 yeai-s. 

Males, . 
Females, 






6 


5 
I 






5 
1 


Over 30 years. 

Males, . 
Females, 






2 


1 
1 


I 


1 
1 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 



35 



TABLE 13. 

Shevfing the per cent, of Cases from the most prominent Causes of In- 
sanity admitted each year. 





1833. 


1834. 


1S35. 


1836. 


1837. 


183S. 


Intemperance, 


241 


24 


22^ 


Ui 


lOi 


161 


111 Health, 


8a 


17| 


211 


22h 


21i 


28 


The AflFections, 


131 


m 


m 


16 


16 


141 


Concerning Propeity, 


6i 


101- 


81 


5h 


6h 


101 


Religious of all kinds, 


8^ 


6i 


6i 


7i 


6i 


9 


Masturbation, 


5 


5| 


71 


16^ 


2U 


5h 



From Intemperance, the average for the first 3 years was 24 per cent. 
For the last 3 years, nearly 14 per cent. 
For the six years, about 19 per cent 



36 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 



TABLE 14. 

Comparative Curability of cases of Insanity attaching at different 

Ages. 











Total of Ca- 
ses. 


Total of each 
Sex. 


Cured or Cu- 
rable. 


Incurable. 


Under 20 years, 


109 








Males, . 




, 






61 


19 


42 


Females, 










48 


30 


18 


From 20 to 25, 








121 








Males, . 










70 


33 


37 


Females, 










51 


29 


22 


From '25 to 30, 








119 








Males, . 










65 


33 


32 


Females, 










54 


29 


25 


From 30 to 35, 








118 








Males, . 










76 


34 


42 


Females, 










42 


26 


16 


From 35 to 40, 








102 








Males, . 










46 


24 


22 


Females, 










56 


28 


28 


From 40 to 45, 








64 








Males, . 










3) 


22 


14 


Fe males. 










23 


2[ 


7 


From 45 to 50, 








55 








Males, . 










29 


22 


7 


Females, 










26 


23 


3 


Fi-om 50 to 55, 








50 








Males, . 










24 


14 


10 


Females, 










26 


16 


10 


From 55 to 60, 








27 








Males, . 










13 


10 


3 


Females, 










14 


8 


6 


From 60 to 65, 








16 








Males, . 










9 


9 





Females, 










7 


6 


1 


From 65 to 70, 








15 








Males, . 










11 


7 


4 


Females, 










4 


3 


1 


From 70 to 75, 








4 








Males, . 










3 


2 


1 


Females, 










1 


1 





Over 75, 








3 








Males, . 










1 


1 





Females, 










2 





2 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



37 



TABLE 15. 

Shewing the relation of the paroxysms of excitement in from 50 to 60 
cases of periodical Insanity, amounting to 425 distinctly marked, to 
the stale of the moon on the day of their occurrence. Also to the 53 
deaths that have occurred in the Hospitcd. 



Number of Paroxy 


sms each day. 




Number of Deaths 


on each day. 




Day of the Moon. 


Tota'. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


First 
Quarter. 


Day of the Moon. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


First 
Quarter. 


1 


9 


4 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


2 


27 


15 


12 


2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


2 


3 


16 


11 


5 


3 


3 


4 


1 


3 


3 


4 


18 


9 


9 


4 


4 


3 


2 


1 


4 


5 


12 


7 


5 


5 


5 


2 


1 


1 


5 


6 


17 


9 


8 


6 


6 


1 


J. 





6 


7 


20 


8 


12 


7 


7 

End of First Quar- 
ter. 


2 





2 


7 


End of First Quar- 
ter. 


Second 
Quarter. 


Second 
Quarter. 


8 


24 


12 


12 


1 


8 


1 


1 





1 


9 


18 


10 


8 


2 


9 


2 


1 


1 


2 


10 


9 


3 


6 


3 


10 


1 


1 





3 


11 


14 


8 


6 


4 


11 











4 


12 


18 


9 


9 


5 


12 


1 


1 





5 


13 


14 


9 


5 


6 


13 


5 


3 


2 


6 


14 


15 


8 


7 


7 


14 

End of Second Quar- 
ter. 


1 


1 





7 


End of Second Quar- 
ter. 


Third 
Quarter. 


Third 
Quarter. 


15 


16 


8 


8 


1 


15 


1 


1 





1 


16 


12 


7 


5 


2 


16 


3 


3 





2 


17 


20 


11 


9 


3 


17 


1 





1 


3 


18 


12 


6 


6 


4 


18 











4 


19 


10 


6 


4 


5 


19 


1 





1 


5 


20 


15 


11 


4 


6 


20 


4 


3 


1 


6 


21 


16 


9 


7 


7 


21 

End of Third Quar- 
ter. 


5 


4 


1 


7 


End of Third Quar- 
ter. 


Fourth 
Quarter. 


Fourth 
Quarter. 


22 


16 


10 


6 


1 


22 


1 


1 





1 


23 


18 


6 


12 


2 


23 











2 


24 


21 


13 


8 


3 


24 


2 


1 


1 


3 


25 


15 


6 


9 


4 


i 25 


4 


2 


2 


4 


26 


17 


8 


9 


5 


26 


1 


1 





5 


27 


5 


1 


4 


6 


27 











6 


28 


8 


5 


3 


7 


28 

End of Fourth Quar- 
ter. 


1 


1 





7 


End of Fourth Quar- 
ter. 


53 


34 


19 





38 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TABLE 16. 

Shelving the relation between Cause and Recover^/. 





Whole 
Number. 


No. of each 
Sex. 


Cured or 
Curable. 


Incurable. 


Intemperance, 

Males, .... 
Females, 


158 


138 
20 


72 

9 


66 
11 


Domestic Afflictions of various kinds. 
Domestic Broils. Hl-requited Love. 
Anxiety about Property, &c. 

Males, .... 

Females, 


193 


82 
111 


49 
63 


33 

48 


111 Health, including Puerperal cases. 
Wounds, Amenorrhoea, &c. 
Males, .... 
Females, 


155 


38 
117 


19 

78 


19 
39 


Religious of all kinds. 

Males, .... 
Females, 


70 


38 
32 


22 
17 


16 
15 


Masturbation, 

Males, .... 
Females, 


81 


69 
12 


14 
1 


55 
11 


Epileptics, .... 
Males, .... 
Females, 


30 


27 
3 


4 



23 
3 


Palsy, .... 
Males, .... 
Females, 


15 


13 
2 


2 




11 
2 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



39 



TABLE 17. 

Of Per Cent. — Recoveries. 





1834. 


1835. 


1836. 


1837. 


1838. 


85 
53 
19 


82 

531 

20a 


S2h 
151 


84i 
531 

181 


89^ 

57 

25i 


86^ 
52^ 
15^ 



Per cent, of cases discharged recovered of 

duration less than one year, 
Per cent, of recoveries of all discharged, . 
Per cent, of recoveries of old cases disch'd, 

There have been admitted, since the Hospital was opened, 334 cases, of 
duration less than one year. There have been discharged, recovered, of 
recent cases, in the same time, 276, which is 82| per cent. 

Deduct from 334, 28 recent cases, mostly convalescing, now in the Hos- 
pital, and there remains 306, of which 276 is 90| per cent. 

Deduct from 306, the number above specified, 12, which is the number of 
deaths of recent cases, and there remains 294, which is 93^ per cent. 

There have been 855 cases in the Hospital, and 344 recovei'ies, which is 
40^ per cent. 

Deaths. 

Per cent, of deaths of all the patients in the Hos- 
pital each year, ..... 

Per cent, of the whole number in the Hospital, (53 of 855) 6 1-6 per cent. 



1834. 


1835. 


1836. 1837. 


1838. 


3^ 


3^ 


3i 3 


u 



Cases old and recent, (190 of 218.) 

There are, at present, in the Hospital, cases of more than one year's dura- 
tion 190, which is 87^ per cent. 

Of less duration than one year 28 cases, which is 12| per cent. 

There have been Foreigners in the Hospital, since its commencement, 123, 
(of 855) which is 14^ per cent. 



Recovery of Insanity from certain causes : 
From Intemperance, 
Domestic Afflictions, 
111 Health, . 
Religious causes, 
Masturbation, 



51^ per cent. 
58 per cent. 
62i per cent. 
55^ per cent. 
18i per cent. 



Hereditary, (267 of 855) . . 31^ per cent. 

Periodical, (152 of 855) . . 18 percent. 

Of the Periodical cases, 96 were from Intemperance, (96 of 152) 63 pr. cent. 
Of 840 patients whose civil state was known, there were 

Single 555, which is . . QQ per cent. 

Married 295, which is . . 34 per cent. 



40 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 






1^ 



^-s 






"-^ C 



s to 
S 

O " 



"^ 



r^ 

^ 



(s^ e^ (M e<i ©* e^ 







^ ri rH 1^ ^ rA ri rH »H -i 


-i Ji-^ — — 


^ 




'ei 


s<»oooioe-?ot^ot~t--t~ine-noif5t-io»^i~ 


2g^g<ico5 


9 




1 




^ 










^ (M 
























O .- r lO . 


G^ s;! s^)ej> E<( ejG;»e>(e^sj(s<!e;j) 






a ooi — 


T-=< 1-H — Nf— < 1—1 ^— (»—(,— IT— "f—ti-Hr-l 




' 




= l = *t^ 


ot-ioioos<»ot~t~icin&5ios^(s-)!?»e<iG<i(5^'?j 











&JS^f-<»-<S^iO&<W'-iG^CO-5fiG-(TjiTiiCOiO-*Tfi&J 


S 






iPl^ 


Si^ 




a 



J 




= VI ? 


^^J£^^^^^^^^^^J^^^^^-^-^ 








omocJQOO^cuoooa/ajoG^Q^QjaJOQj 










QCyOjCJlDOQ^ajOOCJOWajOlUQ^COQ; 








&^S&5^&sS&^^^iS&5&^^S 


" S ' 


' 


tn 




C0'^'O'J3C0^C0i0!>O^t-C>t>l>C0--'t-OCi 


_r"o 




< 




rt c^ 




? -g 




•|| .■ • 




t: — " J 




' 




I'll 


e^G^iO'Oioo©Os<i(Me<)oQo&i<N'Ogjioir5 


IT' "^ 2 

-5 " c . , 




5-e 


CO 1-1 .-H &< i-< CO T-. G^ G< GO CO "-I CO 1-1 

as 


C g = 

•^ a; 
■c G) J= _- 


^ 


f^ 


^ a 




•pr-,- g- 


a 


c ' ' 




eij 




^ ■— o 


!/• v^cnt/icrt'-T'^ VI crcocflu5t/)-yw5mw 


-c-= S 


c 






.:i^^^-a!^j:J_^^Ja:J:<!^-2i:^^-:i.i:-^-ii:^ 


" i^rM 








coooj005.0QtuO(L-aJoojii)a)aa)a) 


2-s-S , 


ti-1 






a>a^cjcjQjc^ajawCiG^i»c;cQc;ocja;a) 







o =-■ — 


S-:^Sis&5isS?5?iS&?&"S&?S 


,0 ts '7 -5 







£ s =_• 


CO-4S^G-)tO-5f'CO'T'rtCOrtOCOCOCOC0050VOS^ 


a 




H^-r3 


^ rt „ „ „ 


(K 'c ^ 9 


si 




J3 w C 




£"c c « 








•^ 






ir5CO^CO-TS-)C^OG<IGO^>OOOCO-#OOCrjiO 


o- ;: ■- a. tuD 3 
X CJ 1' X ^ 




C0C0G^»i-ilMC0"COCOG^&^G'-l<MG^e^'^!>G< — ■^ 


n.-:. S 


CJ 








OJ C G OJ > 

hjo be bt e£ cs 


S, 










— c * 


cns<itj3coot-co-#moco-*r ir;iocot:f~co 


c c; rc c: „ 


CB 




6'3 ^ S 


C-lOOCO'*iOG-»COCO^-*^'OCOCOOOOO'3< 


c: i- 0. iS 







;?;=- 3 = 


iOO!^tCHStOi>t>C~{— Oi>i>t-t>C-COCOCOOCI 


> > > > a 


> 




°«^ 




<.<<.<r' 


<i! 






G<( s^ s-) ©;) e^ e<i 


"f "f 








f— t^ ,^ — ri „ 


— i-H 






"3 


t-O0?)r?r-- — -<iOOOCriOiC"0OC5G^-#O 


to •* 








^ ^ lO ^ r lo to »o to — 3-j s-i CO CO s-i 


■* UO 






^ 


— e^iocrjcoo^eO'— c^ — oOG^i-Ofi — cncrj^ 


03 t> lO 






G-) 1-1 ^ P-. G^ 1-H C~( r- i-i .— 1— ,-, G^ i-H i-i .-I r-( >-( 






'*-■ r- (^ 


G<l G^ G-! s^ e^ e-! 








ri-i ™-^^ ^ 








w *j N^ a& 5 


lO 10 &) G^ in 1-0 uo 1- G) c^ lO ot- 


1 t f 






S g" -^ 


t-t^r-C-f~oto'0 0!Ot^iOio-*TfTr'-^<-C — t 










c-c-r-c^i:-i>c-c~Of>i>c-c-oc-c-t~tocoto 










&Q 


"3 1 . 




•T3 


vjtBKOTWtriyimmcnaiwW-yMMMc/; Mm 






C 


.:!:.i:^^^^".;i.:j:^^^^^^^^^j:i^ja! 


'a. 






<« ci~ 


ajouooooooooaioooooioca; 








c S ii 


QQc;a>t)Q;<uc;Qa;c;a)OoaJoa^a;G;o 









§--a 


^5?S^5:i:^5^&?S?^&S^&& 


a , , 




in 


o~i 


ooc^c^ccioot^'o-^-^co — Cicocor^oocoo 


CJ 




m 


s s 


^ — ooooooooooOinc^cncototDin 








COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOS-^G^G^IG-IG^G^G* 






m 
< 


p 









HI- 






Q 










o oS 


G-3»-00O'T?!NtStDOO.OS^C0C0OOG^S^-S'O 


.« 






aicotO(Mt^CiO-*ciC-oi — TT<^oocof- — GOoo 


g 









&)CO-^C- — — OCO'-<COGOS^'*t>C-'T'CO&<C~ 
1—1 G^ 1— 1 G^ t— 1 1— 1 







i^ 


eis 




Q 


1 'fi ^ QJ ^ 

5 III 




0"° 




C * J= 








S tS *^ 


S2£i2£i£i2 2iSi£2s222S222i2£J2w 


G<35 






= ■=-,. 


c;ccP3rar3c3(Cr3n3rorec;cBrtn:c3coc::ccre 


QJ rti 






— 0.0-4 


ajQ;Q>C^Q>G;^aJOQPQ;aJl)0;QJ(U^Q31<^ 


J 2i 






o w"^ rt 


!»i>^>>>>>.--.>%>>?->>^>->^>>>»>->;>^S»^>^>j?-) 


— -^ 








i>co«50co-#r--c-iou;5i£5'wiooooo'#'ooo 


'c.S 








F-1 .^ (J^ _, (j^ „ ^ r-1 — 1— 








I Iffi 




a 














ScS, 


TF'G2G<!CO-HOtDT?TjCOS^Cr)G<»OCOCO-5j'iOC~Cl 
<£)CO'<3<'OC~T*"iDiOCOI>TrcOi0^iOtO'^iOCO-* 


>; X ^ 








« a; 5 










J, ^ 






(m '^ 




hJObt c» 






°oi 


^o^o^o^ggg-gg^^ggcogo^o 


CC c: _ 










,2 ®r^ 




> > 






S.5P 




«i^ 





STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 41 



Presenting our Sixth Annual Report, at the close of another year, 
we feel that we have great cause of gratitude to the Author of all good, 
that we have been so greatly blessed with health and security, and 
that its former prosperity has still attended this institution. 

During the residence of nearly six years, we have been exempt from 
severe sickness, and no epidemic has ever visited the Hospital. In 
this period, we have had under our care dgTit hundred and fifty-jive. 
patients, exhibiting insanity in all its forms, from the high excitement 
which induces its victim to discard and destroy his raiment and ex- 
pose himself to injuries in a manner wholly reckless of consequences, 
to that state of imbecility and torpor, which unfits him from attending 
to what is absolutely necessary to his existence, much more to his 
security and comfort; yet we have never, in a single instance, had a 
patient either burned, scalded, or frozen. 

This exemption from physical suffering, to which the insane, when 
at large or in confinement with their friends, are particularly liable, 
arises, to a great extent, from the excellent arrangements for warmth 
and ventilation which have been adopted, and to which we may fur- 
ther allude in the progress of the report. 

Table L By a reference to the table it will be perceived that, 
in the course of the last year, we have admitted one hundred and seventy- 
seven patients, a greater number than has heretofore been admitted in 
any single year. Of these, ninety-six were males and eighty-one were 
females ; eighty-tioo were of less duration than one year, forty-five 
males and thirty-seven females, and ninety-five of longer duration than 
one yediX, fifty-one males ^.nd. forty-four females. 

There have been sent to the Hospital by the different Courts, one 
hundred and twenty-three patients deemed furiously mad and danger- 
ous to go at large, and fifty-four have been admitted as private board- 
ers. Many rooms, daring the early part of the year, not being occu- 
pied by those sent by the courts, this unusually large number of private 
boarders were, in the course of the year, accommodated. At the 
present time we are hardly able to admit any of the latter class. 

At the close of the year there were in the Hospital, two hundred and 
eighteen patients of whom one hundred and fifteen were males and 
one hundred and three were females. Of this number of cases twenty- 
eight are of duration less than one year, and one hundred and ninety 
of duration longer than one year. 

During the year there have been in the Hospital, three hundred and 
sixty-two patients, one hundred and seventy-seven of whom were ad- 
6 



42 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

mitted in the course of the year, and one hundred and eighty-Jive were 
in the Hospital at the commencement of the year. 

Table 2. There have been discharged during the year, including 
deaths, one hundred and forty-four patients, of whom eighty-four were 
males and sixty were females. Seventy-six of these recovered, forty- 
five males and thirty-one females; twenty-four were improved, eleven 
males and thirteen females; fourteen were not improved, eight males 
and six females; fourteen were discharged harmless and incurable, for 
want of room, ten males and four females ; and sixteen have died, 
ten males and six females. 

Of this number of cases discharged, seventy-four were of less dura- 
tion than one year, forty-seven males and twenty-seven females. Of 
these sixty-four recovered, thirty-eight males and twenty-six females ; 
six were discharged improved, tivo males and four females; four have 
died, three males and one female. 

Of the number of cases discharged, seventy were of duration longer 
than one year. Of these forty-tivo were males and twenty-eight were 
females; twelve recovered, seven males andj?we females; eighteen were 
discharged improved, ten males and eight females; and twelve died, 
seven males and five females. 

Of the patients remaining at the end of the year, one hundred and 
eighty-eight are natives of this State, icn are natives of other States, 
and twenty are foreigners. 

In the course of the year there have been in the Hospital, three hun- 
dred and seventeen persons belonging to the State, and forty-five na- 
tives of other states or foreigners. 

These two tables furnish the principal statistics for the year. 

The number of deaths the past year has been larger than in any 
former year, and yet we have never had a more healthy season. The 
first death that occurred was from mortified feet, the effect of frost. 
This man was at the point of death when he arrived at the Hospital, 
and survived but a ^qw hours. Five others were affected with fatal 
disease when they entered the Hospital, and survived but a few weeks ; 
one died in eight days, 

Four epileptics, not included in the above list, have died suddenly 
without apparent previous indisposition except what had existed for 
a long time, showing no disposition to a fatal tendency till the fatal 
symptoms occurred. 

In this institution, having no power to exclude patients sent by the 
courts, we shall always be liable to receive unfavorable cases, and, of 
course, to have a large list of deaths. Thus far, however, we must be 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 43 

considered fortunate, having had but fifty-three deaths of eight hun- 
dred and fifty five cases, which is about six and onefourth per cent, 
quite below the common average in hospitals of this character. 

Table 3. From this table we learn the number of old cases re- 
maining under our care compared with those of recent origin. Twen- 
ty-eight only are of less duration than one year, v\^hile sixty-five have 
been of from one to five years' duration; forty-four from five to ten 
years, and nearly three times the number over ten years. The propor- 
tion, as before stated, is as twenty-eight to one hundred and ninety. 

Respecting the ages of patients now in the Hospital, it will be seen, 
that, of any ten years, the greatest number of patients are between 
thirty and forty years of age, few are under tiventy, and more are be- 
tween the ages oi forty and fifty than between tivtnty and thirty. 
This, it is believed, is different from the fact with most hospitals for 
the insane, and may be accounted for, in part, from the accumulation 
of old cases in this Hospital, which was originally designed principally 
for incurables, many of whom will continue within its wards while 
life remains. 

The institution commenced this year with one hundred and eighty- 
five patients, and closed with two hundred and eighteen ; showing an 
increase of thirty-three patients in the course of the year, although 
one hundred and forty-four have been discharged. 

The average number for the year 1837 was one hundred and sixty- 
three ; the average number for the year 1838 is tivo hundred and eleven, 
a difference oi fifty -five in the average of the tivo years. 

At this time the Hospital is as full of patients as it is desirable that 
it should ever be, and without the lodges, which should never be esti- 
mated as a part of the accommodations of the establishment, is already 
more than full. 

Table 4. It will be seen by this table that three hundred and ttoen- 
ty-one patients were received and discharged in the course of the year, 
showing a change of more than an average of one patient daily for the 
weekdays of the year. In the last two months of spring and the first 
two months of summer, there were received and discharged one hun- 
dred and forty patients in one hundred and twenty-two days, sabbaths 
included. 

The average for the month of July was greater than that for any 
other month, being two hundred and twenty and one-fourth, and that of 
November the next greatest, being two hundred and eighteen and one- 
half. 

Such an exchange of patients as this table exhibits, tends greatly to 



44 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

keep the house disturbed. Those who leave are quiet, either recov- 
ered, greatly improved or harmless, while those who are admitted are 
violent and noisy ; notwithstanding this, however, the Hospital is pro- 
verbially a quiet and peaceful residence to a large proportion of its 
inmates. 

Table 5. From this table almost every statistical fact connected 
with our history as an institution, can be obtained. The whole 
number of admissions, and the number each year, the total number 
of discharges and the number discharged each year, the number that 
have remained at the end of each year, the number of deaths and 
elopements, the number that have been in the institution in the course 
of each year, the number of recoveries and of those that have been 
discharged improved. This table shows the manner in which the Hos- 
pital has been filled up and the regular increase of the average num- 
ber of every succeeding year, also the proportion of the sexes in the 
cases admitted, discharged, recovered and dead. 

Table 6. From this table we learn the number of patients admit- 
ted, discharged, recovered and died at the different seasons of the 
year. 

There have been admitted in the winter months, one hundred and 
seventy-two patients, which is a trifle more than twentT/ per cent, of the 
whole. 

In the spring months there have been admitted tico hundred and 
sixtif-d^ht patients, which is more than thirty per cent, of the whole. 

There have been admitted in the summer months, tivo hundred and 
ten, which is more than twenty-four and a half per cent, of the whole. 

In the autumnal months there have been admitted two hundred and 
two, which is less than twentij-four per cent. 

The discharges in winter have been eighty-six, which is less than 
fifteen per cent. The discharges in spring have been one hundred, and 
seventy -eight, which is more than thirty per cent. The discharges in 
summer have been one hundred and sixty-six, which is more than 
twenty-eight and a half per cent. The discharges in autumn have 
been one hundred and sixty-one, which is more than tiventy-seven per 
cent. 

In winter the recoveries have been sixty-tioo, which is more than 
eighteen per cent, of the whole number of recoveries. The recoveries 
in spring have been eighty-seven, which is about twenty-five and a half 
per cent. The recoveries in summer have been eighty-six, which is 
about twenty-five and one-fourth per cent. The recoveries in autumn 
have been one hundred and ten, which is very nearly thirty-two per cent. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 45 

The deaths in winter have been eight, which is a trifle more than 
fifteen per cent, of the whole number of deaths. The deaths in spring 
have heenfowteen, which is about twenty-six and one-fourth per cent. 
The deaths in summer have been seventeen, which is about thirty-two 
per cent. The deaths in autumn have heen fourteen, which is twenty- 
six and one-fourth per cent. 

It appears from this table that the admissions, discharges, recoveries 
and deaths have been least in the winter months. The number of ad- 
missions and discharges have been greatest in spring, while au- 
tumn affords the greatest number of recoveries, and summer the great- 
est number of deaths. 

These facts may be too few to afford any criterion for correct con- 
clusions, but are preserved as valuable for future use. 

Table 7. From this table may be learned the number of cases of 
different kinds of insanity that have been in the Hospital. The symp- 
toms of mania and melancholy as exhibited in strongly marked cases 
of either form of disease are very distinct and easily recognised, but 
as they are less prominent they become less obvious till it is difficult, 
indeed quite impossible to classify them distinctly. In forming this 
table I have endeavored to observe the usual rule of distinction. Such 
classification is of little or no practical utility, and is only useful as 
showino- the prevalence of high excitement or depression on the mind 
and feelings in the cases. The same is true of the cases of melan- 
cholia and mania on the one hand, and dementia on the other ; many 
patients belonging to the first two classes seem at first, or in the pro- 
gress of the disease, to be considerably demented, but if these symp- 
toms are soon removed, they will be found arranged in the other classes 
as not strictly belonging to the class dementia. We classify as idiots, 
those only who are so from birth, of course the number is quite small. 
A few are not classified. 

The recoveries of mania are about sixty per cent., and the recov- 
eries of melancholia <i\)ow\. fifty-nine per cent., while recoveries of de- 
mentia, as we use the term, are from tico to three per cent. only. 

This table also shows the influence which the large number of cases 
of dementia has upon the per cent, of recoveries in the Hospital. 
Without it the average would be about sixty per cent, of the discharg- 
ed, and probably nec^rly fifty per cent, of the whole that have been ad- 
mitted. 

Table 8. From this table we learn that the farmers are still the most 



46 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

numerous among the male inmates of the Hospital, and that' laborers 
are the next most numerous class. Great as is this list of farmers, it 
probably falls short of the proportion which this employment holds to 
the many trades enumerated in this table. There is unquestionably, 
in the community, more than thi-ee farmers to one shoemaker, and 
more than four to one merchant, or jive to one carpenter ; it cannot 
therefore be inferred that the employment of cultivating the land tends 
to produce insanity ; probably no business which is pursued by our 
citizens, has less tendency to it, and no set of men in their legitimate 
employment can be more exempt from the causes of disease, mental or 
physical. Hereditary predisposition and the influence of causes which 
disturb the nervous system independent of employment, such as intem- 
perance, speculation and domestic affliction, probably bring a large 
proportion of this respectable class of men into institutions for the in- 
sane. 

The great list of employments in the table show conclusively that 
all mankind, of whatever pursuits, are liable to the evil, and that little 
can be said of the occupation as a cause of the insanity in any case. 

Table 9 has reference to the number and causes of the deaths 
that have occurred in the Hospital. We have, as remarked at the 
commencement of this report, been unusually exempt from acute dis- 
eases and entirely so from epidemic febrile disease. Marasmus still 
stands at the head of the list of deaths as to numbers; a large propor- 
tion of the subjects of it come under our care with the disease upon 
them, or with symptoms which run directly into it, and prove fatal in 
a short time. Two individuals were brought into the Hospital this 
season, who were able to leave the bed for a short time only, both of 
whom went steadily down to death with a rapidity not a little accelera- 
ted by the influence of insanity. 

Next to Marasmus, on our list, stands Epilepsy ; a disease to which 
the insane are particularly inclined. Four deaths from this disease 
have taken place during the last year. All but one sudden and unex- 
pected at the time ; in two of the subjects the symptoms of insanity 
were subsiding in the most favorable manner. 

Consumption is generally the most fatal disease in hospitals for 
the insane, and in our records stands high among the causes of death. 
A considerable proportion of those who have died of consumption 
have come into the institution with symptoms of disease upon them. 
The little regard which the insane have to prudence and care respect- 
ing health, and the frequency of their exposures and privations ren- 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 47 

deis them particularly liable to a class of diseases in no way connected 
with insanity. 

In the course of this year, two patients have died of mortification of 
the limbs, one arising from frost, who survived his admission but two 
days. The other from land scurvy, who lingered two or three weeks 
before he expired ; another case of frost-bitten limbs survived, after 
great suffering and the loss of many of his toes ; and we have recently 
admitted a patient whose feet are frozen in a most shocking manner, 
and who, if he survives the severe wounds that now threaten his life, 
will, in future, be a cripple. 

These cases are mentioned to show, that, as regards fatality, an in- 
stitution of the character of this Hospital will always be liable to re- 
ceive such cases of insanity complicated with other diseases as will 
swell its catalogue of deaths, and increase its per cent, of fatality above 
that of hospitals which have power to reject unfavorable cases. 

Table 10. The number of cases admitted into the Hospital of less 
duration than one year has been, as appears by the table, three hundred 
and sixty-two, which is about two-fifths of all that have been in the in- 
stitution. With the exception of one year, the number of this recent 
class of cases remaining at the end of the year has varied from tioenty- 
one to twt7ity-nine ; most of these, in each year, had been recently ad- 
mitted and were generally more or less improved. Ai the close of the 
present year, there were ttocnty-eight cases of duration less than one 
year ; sixty-eight from one to Jz?;e years ; foriy-five from five to ten 
years ; forty-one from ten to twenty years ; eighteen from twenty to 
thirty years ; three over thirty years, and nineteen of which the dura- 
tion was unknown, — showing a great accumulation of very old cases. 
There are probably more cases over ttoenty years' duration than of less 
than one year. 

This table shows that the number of single persons continues to be 
much larger than the married, as has always been the case in the Hos- 
pital. During the last year, we have received one hundred and one pa- 
tients that have never been married, sixty-five married, and eleven in a 
state of widowhood. 

Table 11. The records of this table, — the causes, hereditary taint, 
periodicity, homicidal, and suicidal propensities, — are subjects of great 
interest, and are sufficient of themselves to fill the report. 

Intemperance continues to be a prominent cause, but we are happy 
to think it is less frequent than formerly. It will elsewhere be re- 
corded that this cause, during the first three years of the Hospital, gave 
origin to tioenty-five per cent, of the cases of insanity admitted, while it 



48 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 

it is supposed to be the cause in hut fourteen per cent, of the cases ad- 
mitted the last three years. If this is any indication of the proportion- 
ate diminution of its influence in other respects, unfavorable to public 
health and public morals, the prospect is most cheering. We have had 
no case of delirium tremens for the last year, and very few since the in- 
stitution was opened. 

Of the one hundred and Jifty-Uvo cases of periodical insanity that 
have been in the Hospital, ninety-four have arisen from intemperance, 
nearly ttoo-tJnrds of the whole. This has reference not only to those 
cases in which a renewal of the cause produces a return of the disease, 
but to that state of periodicity which occurs at short intervals, and at 
regular periods, the subjects of which, remaining in confinement, have 
no access to these means of excitement during the intervals of the par- 
oxysms. 

It has occurred to me, that the brain and its appendages, its nerves 
and blood-vessels, under the influence of the high stimulation of alco- 
hol, and the corresponding torpor when that influence is not felt and 
its effect has subsided, may have a tendency, after a long time, to 
induce a habit of disease which does not yield with the removal of the 
cause. This may be true of other causes of this form of insanity as 
well as intemperance. It is peculiarly liable to take place in females 
at the period of the menses, and continue independent of this cause as 
well as the other. 

In all cases of periodical insanity in which the paroxysms occur at 
short intervals of one or a few months, what is called the lucid inter- 
val is a period of more or less gloom and depression : in proportion to 
the degree of severity which either of these opposite conditions present 
is the corresponding one of excitement and collapse. 

If intemperance, besides producing ordinary insanity and delirium 
tremens, does in fact induce such a state of the brain as to establish pe- 
riodical insanity, the very worst form of all diseases affecting the mind, 
the whole catalogue of disastrous effects from it have not yet been 
known, and it may have in this way produced suffering as intense as 
any other calamity which has arisen from its noxious influence. 

During the last year, a case of most appalling homicidal insanity, 
produced by intemperance, has been added to our large list of cases of 
this unfortunate class, swelling it now to twelve actual homicides, and 
sixteen who have made assaults with intent to kill, four of which have 
fortunately proved unsuccessful. 

A large proportion of the cases of homicidal insanity have been pro- 
duced by intemperance ; and other individuals not strictly intemperate 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 49 

seem to have been thrown by alcoholic drink into a state of temporary 
excitement, or such utter confusion of mind, as to make them quite 
unconscious of the influences which prompted to the fatal deed, or it has 
excited in their minds false and delusive impressions of duty which, 
thouo-h temporary, existed long enough to deprive a fellow-being of 
life, his family of a guide and protector, and the community of a valu- 
able citizen. 

The number of admissions from religious causes has been about the 
same as usual the past year. A subject so deeply interesting to the 
human mind as its eternal well being, must ever have an agency in the 
production of insanity ; these cases come in bold relief before us, and 
we deprecate the influence which has produced them. All the most 
valuable institutions of society, however, are liable to the same objec- 
tion, — marriage, education and civilization, as well as Christianity, are 
the causes of insanity in many cases, though it is not the legitimate 
tendency of any of them to produce this effect. 

There is no good without some corresponding evil, and the best in- 
stitutions of society can be perverted so as, in individual cases, to pro- 
duce mischievous effects. 

Under the influence of many causes of disease affecting the mind, 
consolations of religion afford the best security and are the most effec- 
tual preventive. In a thousand cases religion interposes its soothing 
influences and confident hopes to secure the mind from distraction 
amid the evils of life, and thus doubtless prevents, more frequeally than 
it causes, insanity. Without it, Vv'here would the agitated mind seek 
rest, or the perturbed feelings find repose? 

The number of admissions from masturbation, the last year, have 
been less, and the cases of a more favorable character. Six cases only 
are known to have arisen from this cause; but probably three or four 
others may have done so. F'aur or five of these cases have recovered, 
and have been discharged with such feelings of the nature and tenden- 
cy of the practice, as it may confidently be hoped, will ensure them 
from future indulgence and its consequences. 

If, from this reduced number of cases from this debasing cause, we 
could indulge hope that the evil had diminished with the young, and 
that, as light is diffused upon the subject, the habit had become less 
common, it should encourage to perseverance in all the means which 
prudence and delicacy will admit, to exterminate a cause of insanity 
most fruitful in the destruction of every quality of mind and feeling 
which distinguishes man from animals of inferior creation. 

7 



50 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

The number of cases denominated hereditary, is very large on onr 
table ; for facts on this subject we rely wholly on information derived 
from friends. If near collateral relatives are or have been insane, we call 
the case hereditary, wishing to be understood that the family have a 
propensity to the disease. 

The influence of hereditary pre-disposition is rarely, perhaps never, 
sufficient to produce insanity without the intervention of other causes ; 
but, with such causes, we believe that insanity is much more certainly 
induced in individuals having this pre-disposition. If the exciting 
causes of disease are avoided, the strongest pre-disposition need not re- 
sult in insanity. 

We record sixteen cases of homicidal insanity, and twelve actual 
homicides. We denominate no cases homicidal in which there has 
not been an actual attack made with previous determination to kill, or 
a certain rush with a dangerous weapon in such a way as to endanger 
the life of the individual assailed. A great many patients in the mo- 
ments of passion and excitement threaten to kill and even prepare or 
secrete a weapon for the purpose. We have not called such cases hom- 
icidal, — if we did, our number would be four times greater than the 
records of the table. 

One man discharged two pistols at his neighbor and friend, neither 
of which took effect, although they penetrated his clothes ; he then 
fired a ball into his own head, intending to destroy two lives at once. 
Three others made a desperate attack upon persons against whom their 
prejudices were excited with a dangerous weapon in hand, and inflicted 
severe wounds which fortunately did not prove fatal. These cases are 
recorded homicidal, and no others, except those whose well-aimed ef- 
forts destroyed the victims of their rage. 

As to suicidal insanity, we have been less limited in our record ; we 
denominate as suicidal not only those who actually attempt self-destruc- 
tion, but also those who feel a strong desire to do it, or express great 
apprehensions that they shall be placed in a situation in which they 
cannot refrain from it, although they have the greatest horror of the 
deed, and alarming fears lest they should commit it. 

The number of suicides has been small, — amounting to only three 
of nearly nine hundred insane, and of one hundred who were strongly 
predisposed to it. 

Table 12. From this table, we learn some interesting facts on the 
subject of the comparative curability of insanity treated at early or late 
period of disease. There have been admitted into the hospital three 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 51 

hundred and thirty-four cases of less duration than one year, of which 
there are recovered or supposed curable two hundred and ninety-four , 
which is eighty-eight per cent. 

There will be found some variation in the number stated in this ta- 
bJe and table I5th. This table is most accurate as it has been cor- 
rected from time to time as information has been received of the dura- 
tion of the cases. 

There have been admitted one hundred and eighteen cases of from 
one to tivo years' duration, of which seventy-nine have recovered or are 
supposed curable, which is a fraction more than sixty-six per cent. 

There have been admitted one hundred and forty-one cases of from 
two to five years' duration, of which forty-five are recovered or sup- 
posed curable, which is a little less than thirty-six per cent. 

There have been admitted nintty-six cases from^i!e to ten years' du- 
ration, of which ttvelve have recovered or are supposed curable, which 
is twelve and a half per cent. 

There have been one hundred and eighteen cases over ten years' du- 
ration, of which ybwr have recovered, which is less than three and a 
half per cent. 

These facts show most clearly the importance of placing patients 
under suitable care in early periods of disease, when the prospect of 
recovery is so favorable as is represented by the table. 

Table 13. At the commencement of the institution, in 1833, a 
large proportion of the cases came from the public receptacles where 
they had been accumulating for years. There were many vagrants, 
the cause of whose insanity was intemperance, so as to make about 
one-fourth of the whole, to wit, tiventy-four and three-fourths per cent, 
of the admissions from that cause. Since that time the proportion has 
been regularly diminishing till the present year. In 1837 the propor- 
tion was only ten and one-eighth per cent,, the last year it again in- 
creased to sixteen and three-fourths per cent., a proportion considera- 
bly greater than the tico preceding years. 

The regular increase of admissions from ill health probably arises 
Irom the fact that the Hospital has gained some reputation as a cura- 
tive institution, and the friends of patients have felt increased solici- 
tude to obtain the advantage of medical treatment here afforded. A 
large proportion of the private boarders are of this class of patients. 
During the past year this class has been unusually numerous, and the 
per oent. from the various causes of ill health is twenty-eight. 



52 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

The cases from the various affections concerning property, and from 
religious causes have not varied much from year to year. 

Table 14. From this table we learn the comparative curability of 
cases attacking at different ages. 

The result of these observations differ very little from the last year. 
There have been admitted one kundi^ed and nine cases in which insan- 
ity commenced under twenty years of age, of these forty-nine recov- 
ered or are curable, which is nearly forty-six per cent. ; last year the 
recoveries of this class were dhoni forty -nine per cent. 

There have been admitted one hundred and tioenty-one patients in 
whom insanity commenced between the ages o{ tvKnty and ticenty-fve, 
of whom sixty-tiDo recovered, which is fifty-one and one-third per 
cent. 

There have been admitted one hundred and nineteen patients in 
whom insanity commenced between the ages of twenty five and thirty, 
of whom sixty-two recovered, which is about fifty-two per cent. Last 
year the average on these two classes was about forty-eight per cent. 

There have been admitted one hundred and eighteen patients in 
whom insanity commenced between the ages of thirty and thirty-five 
of whom sixty recovered which is about^^if?/-onc per cent. 

There have been admitted one hundred and tioo patients in whom 
insanity commenced between the ages of thirty-five and forty, of 
of whom fifty-two recovered, which is about fifty-one per cent. 

There have been admitted sixty-four patients in whom insanity com- 
menced between the ages o^ forty and forty-five, of whom forty-three 
recovered, which is about sixty-seven per cent. 

There have been admitted fifty-five patients in whom insanity com- 
menced between the ages of fifty and fifty-five, of whom thirty recov- 
ered, which is sixty per cent. 

There have been admitted twenty-seven patients in whom insanity 
commenced between the ages oi fifty -five and sixty, of whom eighteen 
recovered, which is sixty-six per cent. 

There have been admitted sixteen patients in whom insanity com- 
menced between the ages of sixty and sixty-five, of whom fifteen re- 
covered, which is nearly ninety per cent. 

There have been admitted fifteen patients in whom insanity com- 
menced between the ages of sixty five and seventy, of whom ^ew recov- 
ered, which is about sixty-seven per cent. 

There have been admitted seven patients whose insanity commenced 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 53 

after the age of seventy, of whom/owr recovered, which is ffty-stvcn 
per cent. 

Table 15. Having last year made a table in which was noted 
the day of the moon on which three hundred and ffty paroxysms of 
excitement commenced, I now add the experience of the last year in 
an additional number of seventy-jive paroxysms, making in the whole 
four hundred and twenty-five paroxysms. The greatest number of par- 
oxysms, as will be seen in the table, occurred on the second day of the 
first quarter, which was Iwmty-sevtn ; this was also the case the year 
before, the number then being twenty-two. 

This year the next greatest number will be found on the first day 
of the second quarter, which was ttoenty-foiir. Before the addition of 
those of the last year the day previous had the second number. 

On the third day of the fourth quarter there occurred twenty-one 
paroxysms which is the third number. 

On the last day of the first quarter and the third day of the third 
quarter an equal number occurred which is twentij. 

The results of the present year have varied the results of former 
years but little, o^ four days that had the highest number this year, 
three had the highest last ; these four days have an aggregate of nine- 
ty-two paroxysms, while the four days on which the least number of 
paroxysms occurred have an aggregate of thirty-unc paroxysms only. 
Three of the four days having the least number are the same as in the 
table last year, one is different. 

The days of the moon on which occurred the least number of par- 
oxysms, will be seen to be the^r.s^ day of the first quarter, the third 
day of the second quarter, and the last tico days of the fourth quarter. 
The extremes are tiventy-scven and five. 

With respect to the fifty-three deaths which have occurred in the 
Hospital, an equal number occurred on the second day of the J??-5^ quar- 
ter, on the sixth day of the second quarter, and on the last day of the 
third quarter, which was^re. 

On the third day of the j^rs^ quarter, on the sixth day of the third 
quarter, and on the fowth day o( the fourth quarter, an equal number 
of deaths occurred, which WRsfour. 

On the fou7-th day of the second quarter, on the fourth day of the 
third quarter, and on the second and sixth days of the fourth quarter, 
no deaths occurred. 

We have collected these facts with as much care as the nature 
of the subject will admit, time only can render them useful or 



54 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

interesting as sustaining or overthrowing the popular opinion which, 
for centuries, has been prevalent with respect to the influence of the 
moon on the excitement of the insane. We have no theory to estab- 
lish and, of course, can wait the results of long experience and careful 
observation without a desire to make any deductions from them at this 
time. 

In about thirty cases of periodical insanity that have been in the 
Hospital, the periods have been regular every four, six, eight or twelve 
weeks. A majority occur at monthly periods, that is, a lucid interval 
one month, and an excitement the next, making about six paroxysms in 
a year; others have four, and others have two paroxysms annually. In 
some cases the paroxysm occurs once a year regularly, but if the period 
is longer than this, it is usually more irregular. 

In o?ie case belonging to the Hospital, regular paroxysms with regu- 
lar lucid intervals have occurred, each about six in a year, for at least 
/j/jc/ue successive years. Other cases have long been with us in which 
the paroxysms occur at nearly as regular periods. 

One female is now in the Hospital who is greatly excited about iivo- 
ihirds of the time, and is quiet and rational the remainder. These ex- 
citements occur at nearly regular periods. 

There have been two cases in which every other day was a day of 
excitement and the alternate day quiet. 

During the very warm weather of the last summer we had unusual 
excitements in the Hospital, and we have always found the winter more 
quiet than the summer months. 

Table 16. Shows the proportionate recovery of cases of insanity 
produced by different causes. 

The number of cases caused by intemperance has been one hundred 
and fifty-eight, oi which eighty-one have recovered, or are curable, 
which is ahoni fifoy-one per cent. 

The number of cases admitted, the cause of which are the various 
domestic afflictions, has been one hundred and ninety-three, of which 
one hundred and tivelve have recovered, which is a little less than sixty 
per cent. 

The number admitted arising from ill health, has been one hundred 
and fifty-five, of these ninety-seven recovered, which is more than 5zx^?/- 
tiDo per cent. 

The number of cases admitted arising from religious causes, has been 
seventy, of which thirty-nine recovered, which is more than fifty-five 
per cent. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 55 

The number of cases from masturbation has been eighty-one, of 
Vfhich ffteen have recovered, which is about eighteen and a half per 
cent. 

On the subject of this last cause it is proper to remark that it is im- 
possible to decide what cases arise from it, and in what cases it is the 
effect of disease ; this, however, is certain, that it renders all incurable 
that do not abandon it. 

Table 17. In this table I have brought together various interest- 
ing facts, and presented the per cent, of recoveries, deaths, &c. 

We learn from it that, in cases of less duration than one year, insan- 
ity is a very curable disease, the recoveries of all that have been dis- 
charged being eightij-five per cent., varying from year to year, for the 
six years, from eighty-tioo per cent., annually, to eighty-nine and a half 
per cent. 

The recoveries of all the cases discharged has been fifty-three per 
cent, on an average, varying from forty-six and a half to fifty-seven 
per cent. 

The recoveries of cases of longer duration than one year has averaged 
nineteen, varying ^loxa. fifteen and a half io twenty-five and a half per 
cent. 

These calculations have been made on the discharged. The follow- 
ing are made on the admitted. 

There have been admitted since the Hospital was opened, three hun- 
dred and thirty-four cases of less duration than one year, of which two 
hundred and seventy-six have recovered, which is about eighty-tioo and 
ttco-thirds per cent. 

In most institutions, it is customary to deduct cases that have not had 
sufficient time ; this may be said of the twenty-eight recent cases left in 
the Hospital at the end of the year ; these deducted, the per cent, of 
recoveries will be ninety and one half 

If we make a further deduction of the deaths of the cases from this 
class, which is also the rule in many institutions, we should increase 
the per cent, to about ninety-four. 

There have been in the institution eight hundred and fifty-five pa- 
tients of all forms of insanity ; of these, there have been discharged re- 
covered three hundred and forty-four, which is forty and one-fourth 
per cent. 

The various modes of reporting adopted by different institutions make 
it extremely difficult to ascertain with accuracy the comparative suc- 
cess of each. Some institutions make a recent case one of three 



56 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

months' duration ; others make it six months, which I believe is the 
general rule adopted in this country. We have called a case recent, 
that is of less duration than one year 

There is great propriety in deducting cases of insufficient trial, as 
the disposition of friends to remove patients when recovering is quite 
too common and very disadvantageous to the institution. 

In the course of the last year, six private patients who had been in- 
sane less than a year, and who were in a state of most favorable im- 
provenient, were removed from the Hospital by their friends. Five of 
these afterwards returned by order of the courts ; one has been dis- 
charged recovered, and the others are now convalescing. Thus six 
individuals have been recorded as eleven cases on our records, making 
six cases improved when discharged and not cured, which materially 
diminishes the i)er cent, of cures, both on the discharged and the ad- 
mitted. If these cases had not been discharged till recovered, we 
should have had^yc less admissions of recent cases the past year, to 
wit : seventji-sevcn, instead of eighty-two. 

In this institution, we have some advantages over others; we can 
retain patients committed by the courts when improving, till they are 
recovered, which private institutions cannot do. They can, however, 
reject them if presented for admission a second time, which we cannot 
do if sent to us by the authority of the courts, so that our advantage is 
in this way counterbalanced, and we have a great disadvantage as a 
curative institution in the number and condition of old demented cases 
that cannot be discharged. 

Of the deaths that have occurred in the Hospital, tioelve have been 
of recent cases, and forty-one of old cases. No one has died of fever, 
andyb//?- only of inflammatory disease. 

The proportion of deaths must be considered small for the number 
of the imbecile, feeble and diseased that have annually been brought to 
our care, being only fifty-three of eight hundred and fifty-ficr, a little 
more than six per cent. ; the average on the number in the Hospital 
each year, is about three and a halfiper cent. 

The proportion of old cases at the end of this year has been about 
the common average; it is eighty-seven and a haff per cent., and the 
recent cases of less duration than one year, twilvc and a half per cent. 
The number remaining this year is twenty-tight. The average number 
of recent cases at the end of the year for six years, is twenty-three and 
one-third. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 57 

Table 18. Shows the comparative expense of supporting a recent 
case of insanity till recovered, and an old case which is hopeless and 
incurable. The price of support before admitted to the Hospital is, in 
both cases, fixed at a low rate, probably lower than the actual expense, 
but since admitted into the Hospital, it is fixed at the actual rate of 
charge paid for support. 

The twenty old cases in the table are the first twenty cases admitted 
into the Hospital which still remain, and which are known to have 
been in confinement nearly the whole time. 

The twenty recent cases recovered, are taken from the last records of 
recovery ; the cases known to have existed not over three months, all 
of which have remained free from disease and able to labor, so far as is 
known, since their discharge. 

These twenty old cases have cost their friends or the public, in the 
aggregate, thirty-one thousand and Jif teen dollars, — an average oi fif- 
teen hundred and fifty dollars and a fraction, each. The subjects of 
them are still in confinement at the same rate of expense without a 
hope that it will be materially lessened. The number of this class of 
patients now under our care, is not less than one hundred and ninety- 
five who will always be a burthen upon their friends or the public. 
The annual expense of supporting these 07ie hundred an'^^ ninety-five ^a- 
tients at tico dollars and fifty cents per week, is twenty-four thousand 
three hundred and fifty dollars. 

If we suppose that these patients on the average should continue to live 
/€W, years each, the expense offuture support will be ^?oo hundred and forty- 
three thousand five hundred dollars, a sum sufiicient to erect a hospital in 
every New England State sufficiently large for the accommodation of all 
cases of insanity of less duration than one year, which will be likely to 
occur for half a century. Allowing this estimate to be true, the sum 
which will be expended in the support of twenty old cases of insanity, 
will be sixty-seven thousand and fifteen dollars, or three thousand three 
hundred and ffity dollars for each individual. 

If these twenty cases had been subjected to proper medical treatment 
in a Hospital, when recent, we may suppose, that at least seventeen of 
them would have recovered at an expense not exceeding the average 
cost of support of the twenty recent cases in the table, to wit : forty- 
seven dollars and fifty cents. There would then have been a saving of 
actual expense to the friends or the public of more than fifty -seven 
thousand dollars, a sum sufficient to erect and endow an institution for 
the support of twenty recent insane persons perpetually. 
8 



58 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

This is not all, the seventeen persons who should recover under 
proper treatment, would no longer be a burthen upon their friends and 
useless in society, but would contribute their share to public and pri- 
vate wealth, domestic comfort, and the pleasures of rational life. 

The twenty recent cases of insanity in the table had been affected,, 
on an average, six and a half weeks before admission to the Hospital^ 
and continued in the Hospital tioelve and a half weeks. Most of these 
cases, however, were convalescing at least half this time, and were 
quite rational and free from disease from two io four weeks before they 
left. This does not affect the jjrice of support, but will diminish the 
period of insanity on an average from nineteen weeks to nearly sixteen 
weeks. 

The comfort and happiness of at least ten individuals is more or less 
disturbed by every insane person that is abroad in the community. Of 
the twenty old cases in the table, six are homicidal, having inflicted 
wounds of which ybii?- were immediately fatal. Thus, to the common 
disturbance and anxiety of friends occasioned by the insane, is added 
the deep and irreparable loss of valuable members of families, sacrificed 
to their rage and delusions, all of which might have been prevented by 
the timely application of the appropriate means of recovery ! 

I have now gone through the explanation of the tables, in a manner 
to render them intelligible to oil who may wish to examine them for 
information. Much has been suid m them of the per cent, of recovery 
and improvement, and the number and condition of the patients ad- 
mitted ; but there is one benefit derived from the Hospital which can- 
not be estimated in figures or presented in tables of per cent., which is 
equal to any other that can be contemplated or named. I refer to the 
improvement in the condition and comfort of the great number of hope- 
less and incurable insane that have come into its wards, for the amelio- 
ration of whose state, and the preservation of the community from dan- 
ger, the institution was principally designed. 

In the abstract of our records at the commencement of this report 
the term " not improved," is often used. This relates to insanity alone, 
for in every other respect the condition of a large proportion of the in- 
mates of the Hospital is greatly improved. The furious and violent 
have become quiet and docile ; the filthy and degraded have become 
cleanly and respectful ; and the circumstances in which they are now 
situated, contrasted with the condition of suffering and wretchedness 
in which they formerly were, will be found to exhibit great improve- 
ment and decided benefit. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 59 

While this paragraph is being written, with every room in this large 
establishment occupied, amounting in numbers to more than two 
hundred and thirtij patients, but unc individual, either man or woman, 
in our wards has upon his or her person any restraint whatever ; five 
only are in strong rooms in consequence of violence ; the remainder of 
the strong rooms are occupied by imbeciles and idiots, because we have 
no other place for them to occupy. 

Of this number of insane persons, a very great proportion of whom 
were sent into the Hospital " furiously mad and dangerous to go at 
large," hoo hundred and twenty at least sit at the table at their meals, 
use knives, forks and crockery like other boarders, and generally con- 
duct themselves with decorum and propriety. At night, each has his 
bed, consisting of a good hair mattress, a straw bed, pillow of hair or 
feathers, and covering of blankets, comforters and quilts, a bedstead, 
&c., as comfortable in all respects as lodgers in a private family gen- 
erally are. It is rare that these privileges are abused; no injury has 
ever been done with knives and forks, comparatively little crockery has 
been broken, and the beds have been preserved neat and comfortable, 
with very few exceptions. 

Many of these individuals engage in labor and unite in amusements, 
thus occupying their time profitably and pleasantly, so that few mani- 
fest any particular solicitude to leave or make any effort to escape. 

During the past year we have relaxed the rigor of confinement, and, 
in a great number of cases, suffered our patients to go into the garden 
or workshops to labor, or into the fields and village for exercise and 
recreation, indulging them in long walks, on a pledge of punctual re- 
turn, without any attendance or supervision ; and we have seen the 
most decided benefit from these indulgences. At least, eighty patients 
have thus gone unrestrained during the past season, spe-iding day 
after day, and week after week, in this independent manneJ", and no one 
has escaped, or apparently wished to leave the Hospit-ii till regularly 
and honorably discharged. Not less than an equai number have la- 
bored more or less, or taken long walks and rides so slightly attended 
as, in innumerable instances, to admit of easy escape, with equal safety 
and advantage : the attendants, in such cases, being considered by 
them as guides and directors, ratJier than as task-masters and watch- 
men. Another class of patients, whose violence or discontent pre- 
cluded these indulgences, have labored almost daily under the eye of a 
skilful and vigilant attendant, and have been made more healthy and 
happier by the exercise thus afforded them. Besides these indulgenceg 



60 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

without the walls of the Hospital, the verandahs afford delightful op- 
portunities of exercise and airing, amusements and labor, particularly 
to the females which contributed greatly to their comfort and happi- 
ness. These indulgences are extended alike to all who are capable 
of appreciating them. The benefit that has resulted from these and 
other modes of management in daily operation cannot be better illus- 
trated than by the brief rehearsal of a few interesting cases, most of 
them from the list of incurables. 

No. I. Within a month after the opening of the institution, there 
was placed under our care a man who had committed homicide. On 
his trial for that offence, he had been proved insane, and, for want of 
a more suitable place, was confined in the common jail of the county 
in which the offence was committed. Here he had been imprisoned 
seventeen years, sometimes being permitted to have the company of the 
worst prisoners with whom he often quarrelled, and by whom he was 
often sadly beaten and abused ; sometimes he was a long time in soli- 
tude and occasionally loaded with heavy irons, at all times he was in 
close confinement and considered a dangerous man even when under 
the severest restraints. 

When he first came into the Hospital he was violent, noisy, and of- 
ten furious ; he was permitted to enjoy the privilege of walking in the 
hall unrestrained on condition that he would not injure his associates, 
he soon became more calm and pleasant, and was occasionally taken 
out to labor ; he conducted well, and was soon indulged with greater 
liberties ; — the bible was given him, and he was fond of reading it ; he 
^(?orked much abroad and with great pleasure, assisted the women in 
the kitchen to scrub the floors and in their other labors. He has been 
thus iiidulged more than five years, he has injured no one abroad, and 
has been lespectful and civil. He now takes his meals at table quietly 
and orderly, attends chapel much of the time, and, although a very in- 
sane man, and &t times violent in his language, is contented, peaceable 
and happy, and w^en calm has no desire to leave the Hospital, but 
considers it his residence for life. 

No. 2. In the spring after the opening of the institution, a female 
was admitted who had been insane seven years. She was so extremely 
violent for some time before she was brought to the Hospital, that her 
friends had chained her closely to the floor, and she had remained in 
this position so long that she had entirely lost the use of her limbs. 
When she came under our care she was considered incurably insane 
^nd lame for life. At first she was quite helpless as to getting about. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 61 

but so furious at times as to tear her clothes and do violence to all 
within her reach. By persevering efforts her limbs were after a while 
restored, and her health and mind improved. 

She went home to her friends and remained a year, but finding that, 
though greatly benefited, she was not entirely cured, her friends, with 
her consent, it is believed, again brought her to the Hospital. Dur- 
ing her second residence with us she did better than before, but still 
exhibited a capriciousness of temper and estrangement of feeling that 
showed remains of disease. She was again put upon the use of rem- 
edies which she continued six months, when she seemed to be entirely 
restored. She now returned to her friends, and has since been well 
both in body and mind, and is now a pleasant, industrious and healthy 
young woman. 

No. 3, is a case of homicidal insanity, the subject of v/hich has 
been in confinement tliirty-four years. Before he came to the Hos- 
pital, he had for more than a quarter of a century been confined in a 
filthy dungeon without the comforts of life, with neither bed nor cov- 
ering to keep him warm, and infested with vermin to such a degree 
that he could hardly sleep if the means of comfortable repose had been 
afforded him. He declares that for seven winters he did not feel the 
influence of fire, and that on one occasion a stout and healthy cock 
lio-hted upon a tree by the window of his cell and frozeto death ; this was 
the " cold Friday and Saturday" which, in the recollection of all who felt 
its influence, was proverbially the coldest season of the cold. During 
these three days he declares he did not lie down or sleep, but kept con- 
tinually walking to keep himself from freezing. He remained in this 
solitary and filthy cell, the object of the sport and abuse of every idle 
and mischievous person who took delight in the rage and violence 
which he could excite, till removed to the Hospital. 

When he entered this institution he was furnished with a neat and 
cleanly room, a comfortable bed, and every thing necessary for his 
happiness. He had not been shaved for many years, he had not eaten 
at a table or in company, neither had he used a knife and fork during 
the whole period of this protracted confinement ; he soon, however, 
relearned their use, and became, to a considerable extent, a civil, quiet 
man. 

Although the delusions of insanity remain the same, he is now com- 
fortable and happy, he walks abroad at this time unrestrained, takes 
o-reat care of the poultry, walks about the town and village in company 
with others, keeps his room in perfect order, makes his bed in the 



62 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

neatest manner, attends chapel every Sabbath, and enjoys life as well as 
the nature of his delusion will permit. 

No. 4. In the summer of 1834, there came into the Hospital a for- 
eioTier whose great violence had rendered him the terror of all who 
came in his way ; his beard was long and dirty, his countenance ex- 
ceedingly insane, and the rapidity and vigor of his muscular move- 
ments were such as to excite alarm in all who witnessed his gestures 
or listened to his vehement and excited language. 

The first business was to shave him. Accompanied by the steward 
I visited his room to persuade him to submit to the operation without 
restraint. I proposed to him to be shaved, he replied, " not till you 
put me in irons," and appeared greatly enraged. He was soon quiet, 
and I said to him in a decided tone, " you must be shaved ; take your 
seat on the bench, and let the man shave you peaceably, for it must be 
done." He seated himself quietly, and was shaved without trouble. 
After the operation was over he asked me to give him a paper to show 
that the shaving was not voluntary but by compulsion, as his country- 
men would not receive him and treat him with respect if he had lost 
his beard which his religion obliged him to hold sacred. I promised 
him the certificate and he was satisfied, but was afterwards unwilling 
to be shaved although he never again resisted. He left the Hospital 
after some months' residence, in consequence of its crowded state, but 
returned two years afterwards the same savage, terrific man as before. 
He Avas violent for a time, but became more subdued, and after a while 
quite harmless and clever, except, occasionally a few days of excite- 
ment. During the summer and autumn he has walked the grounds 
and enclosures of the Hospital unrestrained, on giving his pledge that 
he would not extend his walks beyond the limits prescribed to him. 
He has been faithful to his engagements, and, although no less insane 
than ever, and having a full conviction that he ought to be immediate- 
ly liberated, and that we have no right to detain him ; yet he scrupu- 
lously regards his pledge, and will not violate it upon any consideration. 
He flies his kite, unites in sports with the neighboring boys who are 
fond of visiting him, is generally respectful, and attends public worship 
on the Sabbath much of the time. 

Case 5. In the spring of 1835, a man was brought into the Hos- 
pital who had been insane sixteen years. He had been confined for a 
long time in a cage, and having become more quiet than usual, he was 
unchained and enlarged, he seized the first weapon that came in his 
way, assailed his brother, who was also insane, and slew him on the 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 63 

spot ; one or more other members of the family were fortunate enough 
to escape his violence, and as soon as practicable he was secured and 
chained in the safest way possible, and so closely that he was unable to 
walk or rise. In this situation he was brought to the Hospital. When 
he first came under our care, he was unable to stand or walk, but could 
hop about a little. In this manner he moved for many months. His 
habits were as filthy as possible ; so much so that he was confined for 
a time in a solitary room ; he had nearly forgotten the use of knife and 
fork, and took his food in the most savage and oflTensive manner. It 
was a long time before these habits could be changed. After a time, 
however, he became more decent in his habits, and more cleanly in his 
person. His limbs, by the greatest attention, improved, and in a year he 
was able to walk, though in a very indifferent manner. As his habits 
became more cleanly, he was brought into the halls and associated with 
the other patients. In the course of another year, he was able to walk 
well, his habits became cleanly, and he could do some labor ; at present 
he is altogether cleanly, walks well, takes his food at table with others, 
using knife, fork, and crockery, walks abroad, works some, has at- 
tended chapel on the Sabbath, and is a very decent man in all respects 
so far as cleanliness is concerned. His mind is much demented, and 
will never recover. 

Case 6. The following account of a man, who, for most of the time 
for more than twenty years, had been confined in a cell of a work- 
house, was transmitted to us about the time that the subject of it was 
admitted to the Hospital. He is a man o{ sixty-eight years of age, and 
has been insane nearly thirty years. 

J*** M***, the person about whom you request information, was born 
in this town ; he is a shoemaker by trade ; his natural temper is irascible 
and, before his confinement, he drank spirituous liquors freely and ha- 
bitually, but not to the extent which, in popular language, gives the 
name of drunkard. He married early, and has a wife and children in 

the State of , His insanity first discovered itself in the violence 

of his language, the abuse of his family and others. He was prosecuted 
at this time for beating a colored woman, merely for the reason thatshe 
was a negro. After this, he was confined in the county jail ; this was 
during the summer of 1813. After his release from prison, he re- 
mained at large, although frequently insane, till 1816, when he was 
confined to the house of correction, by two justices of the peace, as a 
lunatic person so furiously mad as to render it dangerous to the peace 
and safety of the people for him to go at large. After remaining in 



64 - STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

the house a few months he was discharged, and for a time attended to 
his affairs with occasional aberrations of mind. His conduct becoming 
outrageous he was committed to the work-house, and has remained 
there until this time, a period of more than twenty years, and most of 
the time has, of necessity, been confined in a cell ; sometimes he has 
been so calm, and rational as to be permitted to associate with other 
inmates of the work-house; but as the recurrence of the more violent 
symptoms of insanity could not be foreseen, he has frequently been 
kept in close confinement during the intervals between his paroxysms, 
when, under other circumstances, he might have been at lai'ge. He 
has never showed any disposition to put an end to his own life, but has 
frequently destroyed his bedding and every thing within his reach. For 
years he has had antipathies against particular persons, so that, when in 
his fits of violent derangement, he would uniformily utter the most 
abusive language to them. His language is frequently profane, obscene 
and noisy, sometimes continuing his hallooing through several nights 
in succession. 

I have rather given the sense than quoted the language of the writer, 
in his interesting account of this case. His father was insane many 
years ; and his sisters more or less so. In February last, this man 
came into the Hospital ; for several years before his removal he had not 
been shaved. On the journey, which was on a cold day, he took some 
cold and appeared considerably sick ; he was at this time uneasy and 
impatient ; but w^e kept him in the hall with sixteen others, and he in- 
jured no one. He was at first unwilling to undress at night and take 
his food at table. After a while, however, he consented to do both, 
and for a long time has given us no trouble of this kind. In less than 
a month he attended religious worship on the Sabbath, and continued 
to do so for many weeks in succession. Sometime in the month of 
June he became excited ; for a few days he talked much and loud ; he 
was soon calm, and has continued so ; he is now pleasant and quiet, 
walks about occasionally without attendants, goes to chapel on the 
Sabbath, dresses neatly, is very cleanly in his person, is civil and re- 
spectful to all in authority, and harmless and docile with all other pa- 
tients with whom he associates ; he keeps his bed, room, and garments 
clean, takes his food at table with knife and fork with propriety, and is 
in all respects a decent man. His mind is as insane as ever ; he has 
great possessions in his native town and in Boston, and offers large 
sums if he can go on to his farm and be suffered to manage his own 
business unmolested. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 65 

Case 7. Among the first patients committed to the Hospital, was a 
Vagrant, who, having wandered from his native State in the far West, 
was taken up and confined in one of the Houses of Correction in this 
Commonwealth. It was not known how long he had been insane, or 
what had caused his malady. The place of his confinement was not 
the best, and when he came into the institution his appearance was 
most forbidding. He was a mere skeleton in flesh ; his countenance 
was haggard in the extreme ; and he looked as if he was fast declining 
under fatal disease ; his mind was as dull and imbecile as his body was 
emaciated ; he had a voracious appetite, and complained of having been 
starved ; he was entirely negligent of his personal appearance, and his 
habits were all vitiated and depraved. He was allowed as much whole- 
some food as it was proper for him to have; but it was a long time 
before he became satisfied with his supply. His room was neat, and his 
bed comfortable, and it was enjoined upon him to keep them so. After 
a while, his appearance improved ; he gained flesh and strength, in the 
course of three or four months his liealth became good ; and he has 
since become corpulent and enjoys excellent health. His mind and 
feelings, however, did not improve so favorably, he was morose, ill- 
natured and obstinate. He made a desperate attack upon the Steward, 
who was endeavoring to persuade him to labor, and was determined that 
he would not work at any rate. After a while he could be persuaded to 
do some work, and in the course of the year became reconciled to 
labor ; he now assists much in the domestic work of the establishment, 
and often goes into the garden and field, and labors faithfully. The 
vigor of his mind has hardly kept pace with the increase of his physical 
strength, but has brightened up greatly, and he has become a very 
pleasant man. The greatest change has been made in his habits; it 
was nearly two years before he desired to change his habiliments, and 
assume the character of a gentleman ; he then wanted better clothes ; 
they were furnished him, and he was very much gratified; he kept 
them well, and they made him respect himself He now works every 
day, goes about the premises wherever he pleases, attends chapel every 
Sabbath attired in his " Sunday suit," with his " fingered gloves" and 
his " nine dollar hat," and enjoys himself well. He is still very 
insane, owns many houses and farms, great stocks of cattle, and vast 
possessions in this town and elsewhere, which he sometime intends to 
visit and enjoy. 

Case 8. In the Spring of 1836, there was brought into the institu- 
tion, a female, who had been long in confinement, and who was reduced 
9 



m STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

to degradation the most extreme and miserable that it is possible to con- 
ceive ; so bad were her habits that she was kept in a solitary room where 
she was regardless of ail decency ; she had not, for a long time, 
associated with any human being, and was considered hopeless and 
incurable. She was dressed in a decent suit when brought to the 
Hospital, and when introduced into her neat and pleasant apartment, 
she seemed pleased. The next day she worked a little and showed that 
she had not forgotten how to labor, and she was encouraged to perse- 
vere. Her personal habits, however, continued bad for a long time ; 
as she was brought to mingle more with decent society and saw what 
were the practices of others, her self-respect increased, and her habits 
improved. She is now neat and cleanly in her person, engages in daily 
labor in the work-room, attends the matron's parties weekly, and 
dresses genteelly ; she attends chapel every Sabbath, and much of the 
time has united in our choir of music, and thus from the most degraded 
and filthy being, she is transformed into a decent and useful woman. 
Yet there is no change in the state of her mind ; she is as insane as 
ever, and has the same delusions which have characterized her case 
from the commencement. 

Case 9. The subject of the following case of Homicidal Insanity 
came into the Hospital in the Spring of 1834. He was a young man of 
twenty-three years of age when he committed the deed. He was known 
previously to be somewhat insane, but was supposed to be harmless, and 
entirely safe to be at large. On the morning of the homicide, 
he was left in the room with a child, some accounts have said, asleep 
in a cradle, but he says in a bed, while the mother of it went to milking. 
While she was gone, an irresistible impulse seized him to kill the child; 
he took a razor and cut its throat so effectually that it appeared not to 
have moved ; and when the distressed mother returned to witness the 
horrid spectacle, it was dead. He then seized an axe and followed an 
aged gentleman to destroy him also ; but he was rescued in time to save 
his life, and the maniac was arrested and confined. It has been said 
that he acted at the time from the supposed direction of Almighty power 
which he dared not resist ; he denies this at present, and says he can 
give no reason why he killed the child, but he could not help it and is 
entirely innocent. For a long time after he came into the Hospital, 
he had turns of great anxiety and distress ; at such times he would re- 
peatedly and loudly proclaim his innocence. 

From the time of the homicide till he came into the Hospital he was 
in confinement in the jail of his native county, except for a season when 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 67 

he was in an institution for the insane, from which he returned to the 
jail without particular benefit. For a long time after he came under our 
care he was a most unhappy man, talked loudly, vehemently and fre- 
quently about the child, and always has appeared particularly afraid of 
death. He has, for the last year or two, been generally quiet, works 
well, appears neat and cleanly in his person, keeps his room in good 
order, takes his food in the most quiet and orderly manner, attends 
chapel, and conducts himself well every Sabbath, and always wears a 
pleasant countenance, on which, nevertheless, anxiety is often seen to 
dwell ; and he most earnestly wishes that, if he dies, he may be re- 
moved to his native town and be buried with his fathers. 

He is not very communicative on the subject of the homicide, it is 
possible he may not recollect all the circumstances of that dreadful day 
which has, for years, filled his mind with so great apprehension and 
alarm. 

Case 10. The subject of this case came into the Hospital in the 
autumn of 1837 ; he had been insane about eighteen months ; his age 
was sixty-seven. The information given respecting him was this. The 
winter of 1836 was one of great severity in the region of his residence. 

The supply of fodder for the cattle was deficient, and among 
others, our patient suffered greatly in his feelings to see his stock suf- 
fering with hunger, and, being unable to procure the means for their 
subsistence, was obliged to see some die of starvation, others he killed 
to save them from the same dreadful end. In addition to this, his wife 
sickened and was languishing with a rapid consumption. He was sus- 
tained in all these trials by the consolations and promises of Christianity ; 
he was an exemplary professor of religion, and his piety was ardent and 
sincere. In March 1836, a pig belonging to him was attacked with 
hydrophobia and was running at large among his and his neighbors' 
flocks ; he with others had great difficulty in securing the dangerous 
animal, and it cost them a labor of many hours to accomplish it , he be- 
came greatly fatigued and felt unpleasant sensations in his head, and on 
the following nights was sleepless and restless. His head feeling so 
bad, he was advised to be bled. This was done freely ; but he gained 
no relief, and almost immediately became worse. For the first time he 
now neglected to read his Bible, and omitted his morning and evening 
devotions. His sleeplessness and restlessness disturbed his sick wife, 
and he took separate lodgings. He now felt strangely indeed, and 
began to look upon himself as the vilest of men ; the Bible, which had 



68 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

been his delight, became a thorn to him, and for months after he came 
to the Hospital the sight of it, mentioning it, or hearing it read, would 
throw him into the greatest possible excitement, and he would scream 
violently. While in this condition he had a great propensity to suicide, 
and, on one occasion he ran, with all speed, to a neighboring river, 
intending to drown himself; some of his friends seeing him and sus- 
necting his object, pursued and overtook him, thus preventing the 
dreadful purpose of his mind. 

When he arose from his bed on the morning of the 19th of March, 
as he related the story, having passed a sleepless and wretched night, 
he felt as if he could tear in pieces every thing before him ; a sudden 
impulse seized him that he must kill his wife ; he rushed into her room, 
seized her as she lay sleeping, exceedingly feeble and emaciated, threw 
her upon the floor with great violence and stamped upon her. She 
awoke in great fright, screamed " murder," and exclaimed, " Mr. 

, you have killed me." The family were aroused by her cries, 

and soon came to her rescue. He was secured and confined ; his wife 
failed rapidly after this, and soon died. From this time he became im- 
pressed with the idea that he had murdered his wife ; her image was 
constantly before him as she lay upon the floor, her countenance wild 
and terrific, and the exclamation, " you have killed me," constantly 
sounded in his ears. Before and after he came to the Hospital he would 
exclaim at the top of his voice, " I killed my poor wife," and become 
so agitated that his whole system would tremble with agony and alarm. 
At the time of his wife's death he became frantic from the conviction,, 
that he had committed murder and killed the wife of his youth whom 
he tenderly loved ; he said he was "given over to the devil," was 
" unfit to live," and " a fit associate for the meanest imp of the infernal 
regions." He contemplated suicide and sought opportunities to effect 
his object, but was constantly watched by his family, or confined so as 
to prevent it. At times he would be so calm as to labor moderately ; 
but he informed me that, so great was his propensity to kill his asso- 
ciates and the children that were about him, he dared not trust him- 
self with the implements of labor in his hand, and that on more than 
one occasion he dropped them and ran away. He felt an irresistible 
propensity to kill, yet shuddered at the thought of doing a deed so hor- 
rible : he knew it was wrong, but yet in a moment it would return 
again so forcibly, that he could not restrain himself When most calm, 
he suffered m.ost from the apprehension that he should do some terrible 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 69 

deed ; when this impulse to destroy was greatest, and a mighty strug- 
gle was going on in his mind, whether he should instantly destroy his 
family or not, they were often quite unconcerned, pursuing their em- 
ployments, not suspecting his designs. 

On one occasion he felt that he must burn his barn ; he instantly 
seized a fire-brand and ran towards it with the fullest intention of ac- 
complishing his object ; he was fortunately prevented by the interference 
of his friends. Much of the time his thoughts were occupied by the 
contemplation of suicide, and the impression that he must commit 
homicide. 

For a long time after he came to the Hospital he was the most wretched 
man conceivable. At the sight of the Bible he would scream many 
minutes so loud as to disturb the whole establishment ; by a visit from 
myself he would be thrown into the greatest agitation, and declared 
that he wanted to kill me and would kill me, making use of language 
violent and profane. At times he was composed and rational, would 
converse calmly, tell a story collectedly, and perhaps while seated by 
him, one of these impulses would seize him, he would be instantly in a 
rage and scream with frightful violence. 

It was many months before he improved essentially ; his physical 
health was bad ; he had frequent, slight attacks of erysipelas in the 
face, and other sudden attacks of ill health. After a long time he be- 
came more composed and cheerful ; his diseased impressions wore away ; 
he was able to read the Bible with comfort and satisfaction ; attended 
religious worship in the chapel ; lost his gloom and despondency, and 
became a pleasant, social and rational man. He left us and returned to 
his home with the best feelings towards the institution and all his for- 
mer affection and attachment to his family. Most of the facts above 
detailed respecting the patient before he came to the Hospital were de- 
rived from him after his mind became composed and rational. 

The history of similar cases might be written to fill a volume ; but 
enough has been presented to show tbat the institution, besides restor- 
ing many to health and soundness of mind, is ameliorating the conditi on 
and increasing the happiness of a large class of the most unfortunate of 
human sufferers whose history is never given to the public ; and these 
cases are, from time to time, presented to show the benefits which re- 
sult from watchful care and mild management in cases hopeless and 
incurable. 

The results of labor have never been more satisfactory than the past 



70 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



year. It is the first season that we have improved the land procured 
for us by the munificence of the government ; much of the farm pur- 
chased for us was in a low state, and will require enriching and culti- 
vation to make it as productive as it ought to be ; it has, however, 
already been very much improved. There is a manifest difference in 
the feelings of the cultivator when the land is his own or that of another ; 
this feeling pervades our family as well as others. The inmates who 
labor have taken an interest in all improvements, and have lent a cheer- 
ful hand in effecting them. 

The garden, which has been cultivated for some years, has become 
quite productive, and is an interesting field of labor to a very large num- 
ber of the inmates. Ninety per cent, of the labor of a garden containing 
four acres, cultivated principally to roots and minor vegetables, has 
been performed by patients, many of whom have derived great pleasure 
and advantage from the exercise. 



The following statement, furnished by the Steward, shows the amount 
of produce raised, the profit of our agricultural and horticultural ope- 
rations, and the labor on improvements of various kinds. 

In the garden were raised 



500 bushels of Carrots at 


40 cents a bushel, 


$200 00 


200 " Beets 


40 ''■ 




80 00 


80 " Onions " 


90 " 




72 00 


75 " Turnips " 


40 " 




30 00 


90 " Ruta Baga " 


2 shillings 




30 00 


100 " English Turnips " 


25 cents 




25 00 


1000 Cabbages 


5 " 




50 00 


1 1-2 loads of Winter Squashes, 






30 00 


5 " Pumpkins at $1 50 per load. 




7 50 


4 barrels of Pickles, 






16 00 


Green Vegetables in abundance, as 


Beans, Peas, 


green 




Corn, Squashes, Lettuce, Cucumbers, &c., estimated at 


75 00 



Produce of the Garden, 



1615 50 



Besides this amount a large quantity of excellent fodder was fur- 
nished from the tops of the Ruta Baga, Beets, &c., which almost 
wholly fed a pair of oxen and seven cows for some weeks during the 
season of drought. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. tl 



On the farm were raised 
300 bushels of Potatoes at 37 1-2 cents per bushel, 
40 " Corn at $1 17 

16 tons of Hay at $15 per ton, 
10 loads of Pumpkins at $1 50 per load, 
Corn Fodder, estimated at 
Pasturing seven cows 22 weeks, at 50 cents, 



bushel. 


$112 50 


(( 


46 17 




240 00 




15 00 




10 00 


cents, 


77 00 


Farm, 


$500 00 


Garden, 


615 50 



1116 17 



We have raised, fattened and killed 

12 hogs, weighing 4800 lbs. 

6 pigs, « 1720 " 



6520 lbs. at 11 cts., 717 20 
Pigs sold, 126 00 ; killed 2, |5 00; Poultry, 128 lbs. at 

16 cents, 51 48 



1844 85 



In addition to this, much labor was employed in various improve* 
ments on the garden and grounds. At least one hundred rods of wall 
have been built, the stone dug and drawn, ditches have been made, 
land cleared of bushes and stones, &c. 

The sixteen tons of hay were mowed and made entirely by the pa- 
tients; the carting alone being done by the farmer. Vrom four io Jive 
hundred cords of wood have been sawed and piled ; tioo cellars for the 
infirmaries were dug, fifty-one feet by twenty-two , a very large propor- 
tion of which labor was performed by the inmates of the Hospital. 

The females have not been less industrious than the males, but have 
been constantly employed in the various departments of domestic labor, 
making clothes and bedding, knitting socks and stockings, binding 
shoes, &c. 

In the shops, more or less labor is constantly done. In the carpen- 
ter's shop, the labor has been principally confined to repairing furniture 
and utensils, and making such articles as are needed in the establishment. 

In the shoe shop, the following statement will show the extent of 
our operations. 



72 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL 

The amount of work done, according to the statement of 

the Overseer, with value of tools and stock on hand^ $1264 66 

Expenses have been for stock, f 650 27 

tools, 59 98 

fuel, 10 00 

Board and wages of Overseer, 301 82 

1022 07 



Making a profit of $242 59 

The shop has been in operation ten months. 

There have been from Uvo io four inmates in this shop constantly ^ 
during the season ; they have been required to do but little labor, no 
more than has been advantageous to them. In a number of cases, this 
labor has proved decidedly beneficial to convalescent patients, and has 
done good to all. There may be some discount on the value of manu- 
factured articles on hand ; but there can be no doubt that the business 
has afforded a profit ; and its convenience in repairing and furnishing 
shoes for our family, must be obvious to all. 

At the commencement of the report I remarked that we had enjoyed 
uncommon health in the institution, and that much benefit in this par- 
ticular, may be attributed to the excellent arrangements, in the Hospital 
buildings, for warmth and ventilation ; both these objects are effected 
by hot air furnaces in the basement. From much experience and no 
little reflection I am fully satisfied that every other mode of warming, is 
objectionable ; and no other assists in ventilation, an object hardly 
secondary to warmth, as a means of promoting health in this and simi- 
lar establishments. - Stoves, steam and boiling water may be used to 
afford a proper degree of temperature, but can never be as safe and 
effectual as the furnaces which are here used. From the former, the 
warmth will not be well diffused, and the temperature will not be equal 
in different parts of the apartments ; some parts will be too warm, and 
others too cool, and the air will rush in at every crevice to supply com- 
bustion and the waste which the outlets will occasion. 

Furnaces to warm such establishments should be placed in the 
basement of the building so that the heat can ascend directly to the 
apartments above ; the air chambers should be capacious, and the pas- 
sages large so that the current can be free, and a large volume of air 
be forced into the apartments heated not many degrees above the tem- 
perature at which they should be kept, so that the whole air may be 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL, 73 

frequently changed, and the foul air be forced out at the ventilating 
passages. 

In all cases external air should be used. If the cellar be sufficiently 
large to aiford a supply, the air is always contaminated with vegetable 
odors, or other offensive effluvia, which is a sufficient objection to its 
use; besides this, the air of a cellar, when in any way removed, must 
always be supplied from without. Many attempts to warm buildings in 
this way, have failed for want of attention to this important circum- 
stance. It requires a great quantity of air to warm so extensive an 
establishment as a Hospital, or so large a room as a church; if the 
cellar be as large as the building itself, the air cannot be removed from 
it to any great extent, unless the means of supplying the deficiency are 
amply provided ; for one given quantity of air cannot be removed with- 
out another be at hand to supply its place. If, therefore, a cellar is to 
be relied upon to supply air for a furnace, it is obvious that it must be 
many times as large as all the apartments to be heated. 

In the construction of such furnaces, the principal design should be 
to keep up a constant and regular influx of warm, pure air, in such 
abundance, as to change the whole atmosphere of the apartments, fre- 
quently. In this way the currents are made to be outward, not only 
through the ventilating passages, or flues, but also through every cre- 
vice which admits air into the room. 

The currents from the crevices being small, are met at their threshold 
by an ample supply of warm air, which, if it does not force it back, will 
warm it, and thus render it inoffensive. In rooms heated in this man- 
ner, the temperature will be equable and well diffused, so that at the 
windows and by the walls, it will be comfortable even in cold weather ; 
this will not be true of any other mode of warming. 

For the purpose of ventilation, the flues for the escape of the contami- 
nated air must be in due proportion to the apertures admitting fresh 
air from without ; if too small, the escape of foul air will be retarded; 
if too large, the temperature of the rooms will be too much reduced, or 
the consumption of fuel be greater than is necessary. As on one hand 
we cannot derive air from a source which does not contain an abundant 
supply, so on the other, we cannot force any considerable current of 
air into a room already full of air that has no outlet ; as well may we 
attempt to force water into a vessel that is already full. 

The furnaces we use and most approve in this Hospital, are con- 
structed by an ingenious mechanic in this village, one of which is 
10 



74 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

sufficient to warm fifty apartments in three stories, and the long halls 
connected with them ; the quantity of fuel which these consume in a 
day is one quarter of a cord of good wood during the cold season. In 
the Hospital, we prefer wood to coal for many reasons, particularly as 
it is here much cheaper. The preparation of wood for the fire, sawing, 
cutting, splitting, piling and carrying to the various departments, makes 
a great deal of valuable labor for our people, of which they are fond, 
and which they volunteer to perform. All the labor upon coal is disa- 
greeable and forbidding. There are other reasons not less important 
for preferring wood to coal. If it be found that the temperature of the 
rooms is too low, a small quantity of dry wood will make afire that will 
raise it immediately without making it too great in the end ; whereas, 
if coal be added to the fire under such circumstances, the temperature 
will continue to diminish for some time ; and, when the whole be- 
comes ignited, the fire will be too great, and the apartments become too 
warm. 

I have made these remarks on the subject because I believe that 
some misapprehension exists as to the utility of furnaces in warming 
large establishments, and because I have the fullest conviction, arising 
from much experience and observation, that no other mode of warming 
or ventilating Hospital buildings should be adopted in any case, or that 
they can be equally conducive to the health and comfort of the inmates. 

The Infirmaries, erected by order of the Government, have been com- 
pleted in a very satisfactory manner. They are durable structures of 
two stories, e<ic\\ fifty-one feet in length and eighteen feet in width, oc- 
cupying the entire space between the lateral wings and the lodges on 
one side, and the wash-room on the other. 

The buildings are of brick and the roof of slate, which makes them 
nearly fire-proof; the apartments are spacious, well warmed and ven- 
tilated, and so secure as to render them as safe from escape as any part 
of the Hospital. They have been fitted up in a neat and comfortable 
manner, and are now ready for the sick. 

It is a source of great satisfaction that we now have departments out 
of the halls, for the sick, where they can be quiet and undisturbed, and 
receive all the aid that any private boarding-house can afford. In case 
of an epidemic or infectious disease, the inmates of the wings may be 
preserved free from danger by the timely removal of all the infected. 
The basement rooms are useful for the storage of wood or vegetables, 
and contain the furnaces used for warming the apartments above. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 75 

Ever since the opening of the Hospital we have been impressed with 
the utility of reading for the better classes of our patients. The Bible 
and New Testament have been given to them freely and unreservedly ; 
newspapers and periodicals are greatly sought after, and extensively 
circulated throughout the establishment. From the Worcester County 
Bible Society, we have received two very liberal donations of Bibles 
and Testaments which lay us under the deepest obligations to that ex- 
cellent Association. From Alfred D. Foster, Esq., Bezaleel Taft, 
Esq., John Tappan, Esq., Samuel Jennison, Esq., and Miss Emilj 
Gardner, we have received valuable contributions of books which have 
furnished much useful and interesting reading for our people. In the 
month of July, a Miss Harland, of Philadelphia, visited the Hospital, 
and attended the religious worship of our Chapel on the Sabbath ; she 
expressed herself greatly pleased, and on leaving, placed ten dollars in 
my hand, with which she requested me to purchase a judicious list of 
books, designated by herself. Soon after this, our esteemed friend and 
fellow-laborer, Wm. M. Awl, M. D., Superintendent of the Ohio Lu- 
natic Asylum, while on a visit to the Hospital, also contributed ten 
dollars for the same benevolent design. For two successive years, the 
Trustees appropriated twenty-Jive dollars to purchase suitable books. 
By these means we have been able to furnish much valuable reading for 
our family, which has relieved many tedious hours of seclusion and 
confinement. 

It is now more than a year since we commenced having religious 
worship in our chapel. During that time, with very few exceptions, 
we have had two regular meetings on each Sabbath ; more than one 
hundred sermons have been preached to our congregation by about 
thirty clergymen of different denominations. At the present time we 
have a regular chaplain. We have a choir of singers, who perform 
very acceptabljr every Sabbath ; in the course of the season, from 
thirty io forty patients have belonged to this choir, on some occasions 
the music has been led by a patient ; we have never less than two, and 
generally three ox four musical instruments in our choir. 

It was our design at the commencement of religious worship for the 
insane, to give our chapel all the solemnity of a church dedicated to 
Almighty God, and to our religious exercises, all the dignity and char- 
acter of other religious assemblies ; for this purpose we employed a 
regular preacher, assembled a choir of singers, and adopted the same 
hours of meeting, that are customary in the New England churches. 

We soon found, that to carry out our plans to perfection in this im- 



76 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

portant part of moral management, we must have the aid and assis- 
tance of every person employed in the Hospital. If individuals , chose 
to attend church elsevi^here, it was proof to the minds of our patients 
that other places were preferred, and of course supposed better. This^ 
to many, seemed at first too arbitrary. Almost every person employed 
at the Hospital had attended some one of the churches in the village^ 
paid his taxes and owned or rented a seat for which he had paid or 
was obligated to pay. After much deliberation it was resolved to take 
a decided stand and make a regulation, that every officer of the insti- 
tution must attend worship in the chapel, on the Sabbath, and nowhere 
else. The example was set by my own family, my Assistant, the Stew- 
ard and Matron. With an unanimity and disinterested zeal worthy of 
all commendation, did our whole family come into the measure, and 
have persevered, without a desire of change to this time ; to this most 
benevolent and necessary action of our whole body of attendants and 
assistants, we are greatly indebted for the perfection and beauty with 
which this part of our plan of management has been accomplished. 

The number of patients that have been in the Hospital, since the 
chapel was dedicated, is three hundred and seventy-six, of which num- 
ber, three hundred and fourteen have attended religious worship. Of 
the one hundred and seventy -seven that have been admitted during the 
last year, one hundred and forty-four have been in the chapel more or 
less. 

The number that assemble on each Sabbath varies from one hundred 
and twenty to one hundred and forty, makmg, with our family, a con- 
gregation of from one hundred and seventy-five to two hundred. 

The order and decorum of these meetings has been to all who have 
witnessed them no less gratifying than surprising ; the patients have, 
almost without exception, felt the importance of quiet and order. 

The power of self-control, which many excited patients have exer- 
cised in the chapel, during the hour of worship, a control which no 
motive could induce them to exercise elsewhere, is itself a most forci- 
ble argument in favor of religious worship for the insane. 

Many interesting examples might be given of the restraint which 
these occasions have imposed, which exhibit, in a strong light, the 
influence which our institutions of religion have upon the character of 
our citizens even when insane. 

On the evening previous to the dedication of the chapel, a patient 
was brought to the Hospital, who had been quite furious and excited 
for a considerable time ; he was so much fatigued by his journey, that 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 77 

he went immediately to bed, and we hoped would be quiet and rest well 
through the night ; after midnight he arose in great alarm, rushed to 
his window and broke the glass as rapidly as possible. The distur- 
bance which he made, aroused me and others, and we were immedi- 
ately in his room ; he was exceedingly agitated and declared that ene- 
mies were breaking into his room and he was fighting them off. He 
was placed in a strong room and suffered to remain till morning. 
When I visited him in the morning, he was composed and peaceable ; 
having learned that we were to have a public meeting in the chapel, 
he proposed to attend. I expressed some fears that he would not be 
able to control himself; but upon receiving his pledge, consented that 
he might attend. During the service he was perfectly quiet and con- 
ducted with the utmost propriety ; the next day he again broke his 
window on the same pretence. He continued considerably excited for 
some time after, but attended chapel every Sabbath and conducted 
with the utmost propriety. He recovered favorably and was discharged 
in less than three months. 

Sometime in the Spring, a female patient came into the Hospital in 
the highest state of excitement ; she disturbed the whole establishment 
for three ox four days and nights previous to the Sabbath. On Sab- 
bath morning she appeared more composed, but far from being quiet ; 
when I visited the hall in which she was confined, she approached me 
very respectfully and asked if she could attend meeting. I told her 
our rules were very rigid and I was afraid she could not observe them 
strictly ; she inquired what they were, and was told that she must sit 
still, be quiet and attend strictly to the preacher; she promised to do 
all and was permitted to attend. She was still till the choir began to 
sing, when she struck up loudly, but not discordantly with the choir ; 
she was gently checked by the attendant who sat beside her and re- 
quested not to sing ; she replied in a whisper, " That was not in the 
pledge to the Doctor." She however, concluded to desist. 

After the service was over, she complained bitterly that she was not 
permitted to sing unmolested, and declared that if she went in the after- 
noon she would sing at any rate. I was informed of her determina- 
tion and sent word to her, that as she was not accustomed to sing with 
our choir she must defer it till she had some opportunity to practise 
with them, when we should be very glad of her assistance. She hesi- 
tated a minute, and then said, " give me a cracker, with the aid of that 
I think I can stop my mouth and keep still." The cracker was given 
her ; during the singing she used her cracker, and went through the 



7^8 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

service perfectly well, and, although often much excited, she has always 
conducted with propriety in the chapel. 

Within a few days a man came into the Hospital in the state af most 
furious mania. He arrived in the evening, passed a disturbed 
night and was greatly excited the following day. The next night he 
was more calm, and was removed to a more comfortable apartment 
than he had previously occupied. This was on Friday morning. 
When I entered the hall in which was his apartment, to make my 
morning visit, I found him in great excitement, having just broken 
every thing within his reach, and exhibiting the greatest violence. 
When the attendant went to his room he made a desperate attack 
upon him, tried to strike,^ kick and bite all who assisted in holding and 
securing him with proper confinement. He soon became more calm, 
and the remainder of the day and the next he was composed and quiet, 
and promised that he would scrupulously observe every direction that I 
should give him. 

The next day, being the Sabbath, I found him in bed, calm and 
quiet • he expressed a desire to attend religious worship in the chapel, 
on receiving his pledge he was permitted to attend. He conducted 
with the utmost propriety, and although yet quite insane has attended 
regularly each chapel exercise since, and has appeared as well as it is 
possible for any man whatever to appear. 

On the same day that the last named patient came into the Hospital, 
another man equally violent and insane was also admitted. He was 
not as manageable at first as the patient last mentioned, but tore his 
clothes and refused in any way to be covered. During the whole of 
the Sabbath he was naked in his cell, and wholly destitute of self-com- 
mand and self-respect. 

In the course of the next week he became more composed, consented 
to wear his clothes, and was removed to a more comfortable apartment. 
He was pleasant, but quite insane and considerably boisterous. On 
the Sabbath, which was the last, he proposed to attend chapel ; on his 
conforming to the rule, consent was given that he might attend. He 
went during the day, was greatly delighted with the meeting, and has 
since changed in the most favorable manner ; he appears at this time 
to be rapidly recovering. 

Sometime in the winter, a young woman was brought to the Hos- 
pital, whose mind appeared perfectly demented ; she talked incessantly 
in the day time and most of the night, and there appeared to be no 
amendment in the case for a long time. One Sabbath morning while 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 79 

talking in her indistinct and rapid manner as usual, I proposed to her 
to attend chapel more to see what influence the proposition would have 
upon her mind than from any expectation that she would consent to 
go or would command herself if she went. She expressed a desire to 
attend, and was permitted ; she was perfectly silent and quiet for the 
hour, made not the least disturbance and returned regularly to her 
room ; no sooner had she done so than she commenced talking again 
and continued it till the hour of service in the afternoon. She again 
attended in the same orderly manner and continued to do so for weeks 
although the same disposition to talk remained. She ultimately recov- 
ered, and the first motive which was effectual to excite self-control, 
was the desire and determination not to disturb the religious exercises 
of the Sabbath. The benefit of one hour of self-control in such a case, 
from such a cause is incalculable. It is needless to add cases. If a 
stranger was to visit our congregation in the chapel, he would at first 
discover little worthy of observation ; he would find from one hundred 
and fifty to two hundred people assembled together, quietly seated, 
neatly dressed, resembling in all respects an ordinary congregation. 

If, however, he was told that here from eight to ten homicides were 
mingled with the others, and four times as many other individuals who, 
in their moments of excitement, had violated the public peace or 
trampled on private rights when wholly irresponsible ; that on his right 
hand sat the " owner" of all things whose self-complacency will not 
be likely to be disturbed by any animadversions which may be made 
upon the character of the " true God ;" that by him sits the poet and 
commentator who swallows every word that is uttered from the desk, 
and returns to write commentaries on the text which shall, at some 
future day, fill his purse with riches and the world with "celestial 
light ;" that here may be found " the King of England, the King of 
Heaven, the heir apparent to the throne of Prussia," and the " Prophet 
over Albany, who speaks from Jehovah," and who daily expects the 
" Patroon" to send him a coach with black horses, to carry him to his 
friends ; that here is also the military chieftain, the man of wealth, 
" the rich poor man and poor rich man," the mother of Christ and 
innumerable other characters not less consequential ; that here may 
also be found the laughing idiot, the perpetual jabberer, the gay, the 
passionate, the depressed, a hundred individuals with the delusions, 
impulses and propensities of insanity so active as to be constantly obvi- 
ous in their conduct and conversation elsewhere, now listening with 
deep solemnity to the exhibitions of divine truth, uniting with apparent 



So STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

devotion in the fervent prayer, and joining vj^ith pleasure in the song of 
praise, — I say, could all this fail to astonish him ? Can an hour, twice 
on each Sabbath, spent in this way fail to make the most favorable 
impression on the insane mind ? 

What may not be expected from one hour of self-control, brought 
into requisition twice on each Sabbath, independent of the instructions 
and admonitions from the desk ? 

The more I contemplate this subject, and the more I witness this 
influence, the greater is my estimate of good from our chapel exercises. 

There is no community that observes the Sabbath more strictly 
than that of the Hospital ; no labor is done but what is work of neces- 
sity or mercy. Amusements are all laid aside, and the Bible, religious 
publications, sermons and other appropriate books are very generally 
read on the Sabbath, before and after worship, by the quiet and sober 
part of our family. 

It has ever been our plan to bring the insane mind under the influ- 
ence of rational motives as far as possible. We discourage as far as 
practicable every departure from the customs and habits of rational 
society ; we acquiesce in the general desire to keep the Sabbath as 
holy time, and discountenance both labor and amusement as incom- 
patible with the solemn contemplations and religious duties of the day. 

That the influence of regular religious worship should be well un- 
derstood and duly appreciated, individuals of all classes of the insane 
have been permitted to attend our religious exercises, who would give 
a pledge to observe suitable quiet and order in the place, and it has 
been truly interesting and curious to see how faithfully the pledge has 
been observed. 

The religious melancholic has in no case been deprived of the priv- 
ilege of attending worship when desired, and we have learned a fact 
no less interesting than important, that the same judicious discourse 
and religious exercise will calm the excited, awaken serious contem- 
plation in the giddy and unreflecting mind, and at the same time in- 
spire confidence and awaken hope in the depressed and melancholy. 
Very few, if any, have been unfavorably affected by the exposition of 
religious truth in the judicious but forcible manner in which it has 
usually been given in our chapel. All our former views on this sub- 
ject have been more than realized by this year's experience of religious 
worship. The principles of Christianity are eminently calculated to 
excite rational contemplation, calm the perturbed feelings, and encour- 
age the faithless and desponding in the way of duty. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 81 

In the condition of composure, a motive of self-control can gener- 
ally be found to influence the insane ; he can be thrown upon his re- 
sponsibility and be made to feel that he is accountable for his conduct 
as well as others ; and, even when he is excited and agitated by the 
illusions and impulses of his disease, who can say, that the fervent de- 
votion of his soul poured out in prayer to his Heavenly Father, may 
not be heard with complacency, and accepted with approbation at the 
Throne of Grace ? 

It will be seen, by our augmented numbers, as well as by the extent 
of our operations in the various departments of industry, that the duties 
and labors of the Hospital have increased every year since its establish- 
ment. No small item of responsibility and care has been added by the 
introduction of religious worship on the Sabbath. 

While this report is being written we have more patients in the in- 
stitution than there are rooms for their accommodation. In the course 
of the last year a number of patients have been discharged for want of 
room and more than ninety applications have been rejected from the 
same cause. Such a crowded state of the Hospital is attended with 
much embarrassment when the press of patients from the courts is as 
great as it has recently been. 

In the supervision of the establishment, I have derived every aid 
from my associates which it has been in their power to render ; and I 
take great pleasure in bearing testimony to the fidelity of all who have 
had a duty to perform in any department. 

The success which has hitherto attended our efforts in the manage- 
ment of the institution, prompts us to continue our exertions to sustain 
its reputation and render it still worthy of the patronage of the gov- 
ernment and the confidence of the public. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD. 

State Lunatic Hospital, December, 1838. 



n 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To His Excellency Edward Everett, Governor, and to the Honorabk 
Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts : 

The Treasurer of the State Lunatic Hospital respectfully presents 
his Sixth Annual Report. 

The Treasurer charges himself with Receipts from December 1, 
1837, to November 30, 1838, inclusive, as follows: 

Prom the State Treasury, - - - $8,000 00 

Prom cities, towns and individuals, including 
credits on sundry bills for flour barrels, 
grease, ashes, old iron, &c. ' - ^ - 21,550 74 

Balance to next account, . - - 530 01 



He credits himself 


as follows : 




For balance of last account. 


1341 35 


" payments foi 


■ improvements and repairs. 


1108 98 


(( C( 


salaries, wages and labor, 


6513 29 


(( tc 


furniture and bedding. 


1712 28 


It l( 


clothes, linen, &c. 


2006 29 


(( (< 


fuel and lights, - 


2692 41 


<( (( 


provisions and groceries, 


12,760 57 


(( « 


medical supplies. 


718 00 


(( (( 


hay and straw, 


340 59 


le (I 


miscellaneous. 


886 99 


Deducting the balance of last account, the cost 




of supporting the institution is - 


$28,739 40 



The item of clothing, linen, &c. includes the cost of most of the 
stock for the shoe shop, which has been put in operation since the last 
report. 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



83 



'u Sic 

O V 

cd Ci 



9 S 
cS 






O Q 



Oj 


t3 




S 




(fl 


3 

n 


-d 




0^ 






0) 


cd 




S 



_^ as 0) 
.2h ^ .2 ^ 

S o t: S 
o s 

fl3 CO 
-^ as 

cd cd 

H^ 

&D S 

.H " 

;=! cd 

® 03 

.s 

ta 03 
cd 



s 1 

o '-< 



•S «i 



o 



i3 s 

o .tS 



S ® 

cd 2^ 

as K^ 
fee >> 

11' 



,2 «3 ~ 

irt » e 
cd ^ 



^ fl 

Ph-2 

cd oa 

- .9 

cd 0) 



na A 



^ m O 






i-l 



-S >. 






g 



-2 H 



^ o o o © 

Cin'^ T3 1^ T3 

s 

03 

. O 

'O O O O O CO 
03 « 'T3 'O "TS 'd 03 

°Z -So 



T3 

I 

"El 

a 

03 

o 

9 






as .-a 

^ 5 o o o o 

O cd '^ '^ ''O '«3 

O 000 in QOQD o 



S 

03 

o 



S 
03 

I 

a 
o 



50000000000 

cd'd'O'OTS'd'O'd'^'O'13 
S O O r-K 

€©■€©■ ^ €©■ ^ <§©■ ^ €©■ ^ €©■ €© 



o rt 

So 






O C3 ^ CC O 'Tl* o 

»n C* Oi<M ODQO 10 

Tf 00 OT i-H o a> Oi 

OJ Tjt (X) 1-1 r-1 C^ 10 

r- r-l CO 



CXD Oi 'T! 
lO 03 00 
CO 



OQOQO 00 m 00 

OJ Oi O (TJ 03 ?0 

CO -H I-H t>. W O 

000 i^O'* r>. 



03OajS3a34i5 
03O03OS5a3a3O 

^ s & a ^^ ^ a 

U U ft -r^ U U U ''S. 

030303030^030303 

mooooomo 
^1— I i-i irj "—I 

"Sooooooo 



50000000 



a ^ ^jT . 

-H0303gO3O303O3 
^50303003030303 

§^&a^^&^ 

0303030303030303 

PhShPhPhOhOiPhPh 

00000000 
00000000 

o oj (?? 10 c^ c^ c^ CT in 0? 

m 1— i i-H 



00000000 

'X3"0'CT3'^'^T3"0 



1^" 

11 


1^ u 


88 



00000000 



-O 

a a 



-c 
'^ 




cd 

a 

§ &.2 a 



-a 13 -a 



' 2 o J, o +L 

.„Sir<S;-ia3^03fla3a f^: ^ ^^ .^ n 
acd$cd03co3acsj3cd SRjs-acs 

^flSSi2ti--b==--Or§o.a'^-!5G 

U03So3Scd4)CdO3^03^— NjMo03 



« ^ a3 

-■^ s^ a 

— r- jd _g 
03 o c2 o 
&0 ,^ 

H ,Opa 

b "03 SO 

o ^ cd E^ 



oT >; 






-= 03 >; u5 ja 

sfi-^f^a 

•J^:2 cdj^- 



i^SoO^.H^^OocdrN 
, flus a c^ as c-- = *^ «S?' 




84 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



O 

Oh 

w 

< 

p^ 



Pi 
S 


O O o 

i i 

1 '"% ■% t -i t 
1 r t t t 1 

0< Oh CIn U* 

S CO -§ -§ -S -§ -c -§ -o -« -€ -§ o a 1 ow'^'Oo 


Q 
Oh 

S 
< 


Tj< In C^ Oi "<9< CO 00 ■* W l^ C? O O? 00 •<# CO 00 «5 --H 00 J> i-l<© CO rH 
1-1 i-i •<* i> 00 O IC^ 05 CO 00 t>. Tf Oi m lO 00 lit Ol O t- t^ kO O I— 

lO is t^O OGOOi <>0 QOOCO i> O^ OOCOCO OOQUTOOO^O iOi-t 
C^Jr-.i— ii— 1 CJC*i— irHi— 1 ^^1— ii— 1 T-N 


i, 
o 

< 

s 
o 
O 


MliffiMilMflimM 

8§Sg§gSSgg§S§SSgSSSg§§S88§g 

»oojxo^cO(?}i-(C>}wc^io«oo(7Ji:^--*(rj(?^»o»n»ooj:^o}Oi-<*< 

I— 1— -^C^i— 1 r-l 1— ir^i— II— 1 1—1 

|oo^oooooo^oooo^ooooococooo 


U 


Attendant, ? - - " 

do S - - - 
do . - . - 
Chambermaid, - - - 
Housekeeper, - - - 
Attendant, ... 
Table Girl, 

Attendant, ... 

Cook, . - - - 

Attendant, ... 

Farmer, - - . - 

In kitchen, - - - 

Shoemaker, ... 

Attendant, ... 

do - - - - 

do ... - 

do ... - 

do - - - - 

do ... - 

In kitchen, ... 

Attendant, _ . - 

do - - . . 

Fireman, - - - - 

Attendant, _ _ . 

Seamstress, . . - 

Attendant, . _ _ 

do . , , , 


m 

Ed 
S 

<: 
2:; 


James B. Billings, ? 

Mrs. Billings, \ 
*George Sessions, - 
Mary May, - - - 
Eunice Druiy, 
Betsey Allen, - . - 
Harriet N. Howe, - 
Theoda M. Bartlett, 
*Mary Kelly, - 
*Persis Go/dthwait, 
Moore M. Chaffin, i 

Mrs. Chaffin, \ 
Rufus Hayward, 
Samuel Preston, 
*Maiy G. Mirick, - 
Sarali Jennings, 
*Horace Mirick, 
Hannala Baker, 
*A. Maria Drury, 
Francis W. Converse, 
Harrison W. Babbitt, 
William H. Blackmer, 
*Aaron Locke, 
Mehitable Farwell, - 
Clarissa Chaffin, 
Harriet H. Cary, 
William R. Lincoln, 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



■T3 

I 

S 

I 

a 
o 



o 



o 

is 









k« o -^ t>. 
CO C>Ji-i 



coo 
ao 


1© 

CO 


C55 


(NO 

coo 


8 


CO 



ooooooooooooooioirs 

OOOt^iOWkCOoOOOOOI>.l^ 
1-1 r-( "-I "-I 

'^ooooooooooooooo 

w ^D ^) T3 ^3 ^3 ^O '^ ^^ "^ ^3 ^3 ^O no '^ ^3 



gooooooooooooooo 

Q ^3 ^3 n3 t3 ^3 ^3 "^ ^O ^O T3 T3 ^O ^O ^3 '^ 




|^-B|||I|I1 



^iS ^^ /-s ^ — ^ Tr . ""^ '•W 



<c~ p J ® ^ 
w 3 S £ t«" 

£ '^ 03 y <» 









X 



«H;C55 



10 "o r S .Z <- la-.'S.SS'S =3 m JO -g 



Uh O 



a; 



QQ 



>-t* JH§* f 



.5 9J 

a c 
3 bo 



^ 



s « 

a ?^ 
cs o 
ti "3. 



(D be 
3 S^ .'S 

« c 3 
en . ^ 

Q o.a 



^-5 



86 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 



Provisions and Groceries include 



Apples, pears, berries, oranges, lemons, raisins. 



apple-sauce, &c. 


- 


- 


$425 81 1-2 


Spices, salt, 


, and small 


groceries. 


- 


191 64 


Soap, 


- 


- 


- 


279 78 


Honey, 


- 


13 lbs. 


- 


11 68 


Vinegar, 


- 


7 barrels 36 gallons, 


34 92 


Milk, 


- 


4031 quarts, - 


- 


204 29 


Butter, 


- 


8538 lbs. 


- 


1828 57 


Cheese, 


- 


7973 lbs. 15 oz. 


- 


799 13 


Beans, 


- 


33 bushels, 


- 


55 30 


Eggs, 


- 


264 6-12 dozen. 


- 


53 22 


Peas, 


- 


12 1-4 bushels. 


- 


23 44 


Cabbages, 


- 


44 


- 


2 50 


Turnips, 


- 


54 bushels. 


- 


19 95 


Potatoes, 


- 


1073 bushels. 


- 


411 06 


Corn, 


- 


952 bushels, 


- 


1041 38 


Rye, 


- 


164 1-2 bushels. 


- 


115 88 


Oats, 


- 


275 bushels. 


- 


144 58 


Biscuit, 


- 


- 


- 


151 56 


Rice, 


- 


1933 1-2 lbs. 


- 


99 17 


Flour, 


- 


231 1-2 barrels. 


- 


2065 34 


Tea, 


- 


680 lbs. 


- 


207 26 


Coffee, 


- 


1437 lbs. 


- 


154 03 


Brown sugar. 


9349 3-4 lbs. - 


- 


832 97 


Loaf sugar, 


- 


567 12-16 lbs. 


- 


86 93 


Molasses, 


- 


607 gallons. 


- 


257 28 


Poultry, 


- 


415 1-2 lbs. - 


- 


58 31 


Fresh fish, 


- 


2878 1-2 lbs. (20 shad, 3 lobsteri 


3,) 104 24 


Salt fish. 


- 


4804 lbs. 


- 


180 66 


Mackerel, 


- 


4 3-4 bbls. 102 lbs 




61 24 1-2 


Salmon, 


- 


1 bbl. 93 3-4 lbs. 




28 61 


Ham, 


- 


238 lbs. 


- 


33 61 


Sausages, 


. 


184 1-2 lbs. - 


- 


26 90 


Mutton and Lamb, - 


1944 1-2 lbs. - 


- 


189 38 


Pork, 


- 


2252 lbs. 


- 


253 19 


Beef, 


- 


22,091 lbs. 


- 


1658 69 



STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 87 



Salt beef, 
Salt Pork, 
Veal, 
Liver, 



5 bbls. 544 1-2 lbs 


75 76 


8 bbls. 


- 214 13 


3531 lbs. 


- 277 12 


- 


1 05 




$12,760 57 



Fuel and Lights include 



Wood, 


496 cords, 10 inches. 


2268 66 


Charcoal, 


1214 2-3 bushels. 


130 26 


Anthracite, - 


4 tons 2 qrs. 22 lbs. 


53 63 


Oil, 


263 1-2 gallons, 


224 23 


Wicking, and 82 lbs. 


of candles. 


15 63 



$2692 41 



Miscellaneous includes 

Money paid to patients when discharged, or advanced to 

them and charged in their accounts. 
Expenses of pursuing elopers, - - . - 

Expenses of Trustees' visits, . - 

Funeral expenses, -.-,.. 

Postage, _...._ 

Sleigh, $40 50— three cows, $140, 

Books, periodicals, stationary, printing regulations, &c. - 
Sundries, .„.--- 

* Including ^50 for an escape of a preceding year. 



183 47 


64 57* 


96 86 


115 00 


45 24 


180 50 


109 35 


92 00 



$886 99 



The accounts, of more than one year's standing, on the first of Jan- 
uary in each year, are, by direction of the Trustees, placed in the 
hands of the Attorney for the Middle District for examination, and, if 
practicable, for collection. Very few, however, which are collectable, 
require his care. Several remain in his hands, and more will be placed 
there in the ensuing month. 



88 STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL. 

The receipts from towns and individuals, during the past year, have 
been larger, and the expenditures less, than the estimates of the last 
report. 

Of the appropriation made by the Legislature at its last session, 
$4000 remained in the treasury of the Commonwealth on the first inst. 
The Treasurer has since received it, and holds the unexpended bal- 
ance in his hands. The receipts will probably equal those of the past, 
in the year ensuing ; but, with the amount on hand, will not be sufii- 
cient for the expenditures. The Treasurer would propose that an 
appropriation of $9Q00 should be naade this year as in the two last 
years. 

A. D. FOSTER, 

TVecaurer of the State iMnatic Hospital, 

Worcester, Dec. 1838.