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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester State Hospital"

6 



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Public Document No. 23 

®fj? (Enrrotumwpaltlj of ifoaHarfjttartta 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OP 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Worcester State Hospital 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1925 



Department or Mental Diseases; 







Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
500 10-'26 Order 6772 



OFFICERS OF THE WORCESTER STATE HOSPITAL 

- 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Anna C. Tatman, Secretary, Worcester. 
Caroline M. Caswell, Northborough. 
William J. Delehanty, M.D., Worcester. 
Edward F. Fletcher, Chairman, Worcester. 
Howard W. Cowee, Worcester. 
John G. Perman, D.M.D., Worcester. 
Luther C. Greenleaf, Boston. 

MEDICAL STAFF. 

William A. Bryan, M.D., Superintendent. 
Lewis B. Hill, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 

, Director, Clinical Psychiatry. 
Michael J. O'Meara, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
George A. Gaunt, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
- Manley B. Root, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
Abraham Weidman, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Walford Johnson, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Russell T. Draper, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Juanita P. Johns, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William J. Curry, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Rene Brequet, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

VISITING STAFF. 

Ernest L. Hunt, M.D. 

John F. Curran, M.D. 

C. J. Byrne, M.D. \ Surgeon 

William H. Rose, M.D. 

Benjamin H. Alton, M.D. 

M. M. Jordon, M.D. I Ar , • , 

Benjamin T. Burley, M.D. \ Neurologists. 

William F. Holzer, M.D., Ophfhoiwioiogisl. 

John W. O'Meara, M.D., Orthopedist. 

Phillip H. Cook, M.D., Roentgenologist. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

Florence M. Wooldridge, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of 

Training School. 
Maurice Scannell, Supervisor, Male Department. 
Jessie M. D. Hamilton, Treasurer. 
Herbert W. Smith, Steward. 
Lillian G. Carr, Matron. 
William H. Clark, Head Farmer. 
James Dickison, Jr., Chief Engineer. 
Anton Swenson, Foreman Mechanic. 






TRUSTEES' REPORT. 

To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital respectfully submit the ninety- 
third annual report of the Hospital, together with the report of the Superinten- 
dent, William A. Bryan, M.D., report of the Treasurer, Miss Jessie M. D. Hamil- 
ton, and other statistical information. 

Attached to this report is a more detailed report of Doctor William A. Bryan, 
Superintendent of the Hospital, to which the Board of Trustees have given careful 
attention, and respectfully urge the necessity of the various repairs, reforms, and 
improvements recommended by him. 

In addition to this, the Trustees, feeling the responsibility of the trust imposed 
upon them by the State, respectfully submit some matters which are in need of 
immediate attention. 

The Summer Street Department of the Hospital is almost one hundred years 
old, and it would seem that a careful survey should be made as to the future of 
this Department of the Hospital. In the opinion of the Board, this building is 
ideally located for a receiving and psychopathic hospital for the city of Worcester 
and the surrounding community. The Plant is not in the best state of repair, 
due to lack of finances, and we would respectfully recommend that a suitable ap- 
propriation be made to make such changes and alterations as would put the build- 
ings in first class condition, to serve the purpose recommended. Continuous bath 
equipment is on hand for installation, but before this can be installed, reinforce- 
ment of the floors is necessary. The entire building should be repainted, altera- 
tions should be made in the old carpenter shop for use as a laboratory, and the old 
laundry renovated for use as a nurses' home. Considerable landscaping should 
be done, and a new fence placed around the grounds. It is the desire of the Board 
that very careful study be given to the needs of this Department of the Hospital, 
in order to bring it into first class condition. 

Attention is again called to the necessity of some comprehensive program being 
taken for the future care of our herd. The cattle are now free from tuberculosis, 
and in the opinion of the Board, it would be unwise to again attempt to use the old 
barn at the Home Farm without complete renovation. The transportation of 
feed to Hillside, and the hauling of milk and manure from that farm to the Main 
Hospital is very expensive, and at times, during the winter months, it taxes the 
entire resources of the Hospital to keep the supplies moving. There are two 
courses open for the solution of this problem. One would be a complete renova- 
tion of the old barn. This would include new cement floors, straightening the 
building, as it is out of plumb, and the installation of modern dairy equipment. 
The other course would be the beginning of a new unit located at some other part 
of the Main Farm, and this, in the opinion of the Board, would be the better 
course to follow, for two reasons. 

First, the expense for the new Farm group would be practically no greater than 
completely renovating the present barn. Secondly, it is very desirable to remove 
the cow barn from its present location, because of its close proximity to the main 
highway between New York and Boston. Our methods of handling and cooling 
milk are antiquated and primitive, due to the location of the herd, and a new 
group would enable us to put this procedure on a more efficient basis. 

The Board would again call attention to the necessity for appropriating money 
as rapidly as possible to diminish the fire risks of the hospital. Installation of 
sprinkling systems, and metal staircases where needed, are imperative necessities, 



4 P.D. 23. 

and it is to be hoped that these matters will be remedied as quickly as the funds of 
the Commonwealth will permit. 

In conclusion, the Trustees wish to report their satisfaction with the policies of 
the Hospital, and desire to express their appreciation for the loyalty and con- 
scientious service of all employees during the past year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE M. CASWELL. HOWARD W. COWEE. 

ANNA C. TATMAN. JOHN G. PERMAN. 

WILLIAM J. DELAHANTY. LUTHER G. GREENLEAF. 

EDWARD F. FLETCHER. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital: 

I herewith respectfully submit the following, report of the Hospital for the year 
ending November 30, 1925, it being the ninety-third annual report. 

There remained on the Hospital books October 1, 1924, 2,536 patients, 1,299 
men and 1,237 women. During the year ending September 30, 1925, there were 
admitted 618 patients, 341 men and 277 women. Five hundred and thirteen 
patients, 305 men and 208 women, were discharged from the Hospital. Of this 
number 296 patients, 170 men and 126 women, were discharged; 190 patients, 
117 men and 73 women, died; and 27 patients, 18 men and 9 women, were trans- 
ferred, leaving at the end of the statistical year, 2,758 patients, 1,383 men and 
1,375 women. Two thousand, three hundred and sixty-eight patients, 1,131 
men and 1,237 women, were actually in the institution. Of the patients discharged, 
59 were reported as recovered, 133 as improved, and 63 as not improved. Forty- 
three patients, 31 men and 12 women, were discharged as not insane. Nine men 
were transferred by the Department of Mental Diseases to the U. X. V. H. No. 95, 
at Northampton; 1 man and 3 women to the State Infirmary; 2 men and 1 woman 
to the Northampton State Hospital; 1 man and 2 women to the Medfield State 
Hospital; 1 man and 1 woman to the Foxboro State Hospital; 1 man to Dr. 
Ring's Sanatorium; 1 man to Herbert Hall; 1 man to the Monson State Hospital; 
1 man to the Westborough State Hospital; 1 woman to the Psychopathic Hospi- 
tal; and 1 woman to the Boston State Hospital. Eight men and 9 women were 
removed from the State, and 4 men and 3 women were deported. 

There remained in the Hospital at the end of the Statistical year, 245 more 
patients, than at the beginning. The smallest number under treatment on any 
day was 2,116, and the largest, 2,385. The daily average was 2,224.60. 

The percentage of recoveries calculated upon the number of discharges and 
deaths was 10.31; calculated upon the number of admissions, 9.54. The death 
rate was 5.75, calculated on the whole number of patients under treatment; and 
8.48, calculated on the daily average number. 

General Health of the Population. 
During the year the general health of both patients and employees was very 
good. One male patient committed suicide by hanging in the basement of the 
greenhouse. 

Principal Causes of Deaths. 
Thirty per cent of all deaths were due to cardio-vascular-renal disease; 10 per 
cent to general paralysis of the insane; 9 per cent to pulmonary tuberculosis; and ; 
7 per cent to lobar pneumonia. 

Staff Changes. 
Resignations. 
Dr. Mervin Fossner resigned to go into general practice, December 31, 1924. 
Dr. John P. Powers resigned to accept a position at the Psychopathic Hospital, 
December 31, 1924. 

Dr. Sidney M. Simons resigned to accept an internship at the City Hospital, 
Providence, R. I., January 15, 1925. 



P.D. 23. 5 

Dr. Donald B. Cheetham resigned to go into general practice September 13, 1925. 

Dr. Leon E. Duval resigned to accept another hospital appointment outside the 
State, September 16, 1925. 

Dr. J. Paul Bouthilher resigned to accept a position in New York, November 
14, 1925. 

Dr. Horace J. Forman resigned November 21, 1925. 

Dr. Leonard L. Tormey resigned to go into general practice, November 26, 1925. 

Appointments. 
Dr. Lewis B. Hill was appointed assistant superintendent, November 1, 1924. 
Dr. Abraham Weidman was appointed assistant physician, November 1, 1924. 
Dr. Horace J. Forman was appointed assistant physician, November 21, 1924. 
Dr. Walford Johnson was appointed assistant physician, January 15, 1925. 
Dr. Russell T. Draper was appointed assistant physician, June 17, 1925. 
Dr. Juanita P. Johns was appointed assistant physician, August 1, 1925. 
Dr. William J. Curry was appointed assistant physician, September 17, 1925. 
Dr. Rene Brequet was appointed assistant physician, November 2, 1925. 

Student Internes. 
During the summer of 1925, six medical and one dental interne assisted the 
Staff physicians in the usual routine work: — 

Richard C. Blackall . . . Johns Hopkins University. 



Lorenzo A. Remy 
William E. Nesbit 
George Dupre . 
N. Eugene Lacy 
Omer C. Rathman 
John J. Similie . 



Tufts Medical School. 
University of Michigan. 
Tufts Medical School. 
University of Michigan. 
University of Michigan. 
Harvard Dental School. 



Medical Report. 

The medical work of the hospital has been carried on along the lines of organiza- 
tion indicated in former reports; namely, distinct division between physical and 
psychiatric service. This method of organization after two years' trial has proven 
so successful that it will be continued. 

We have a general hospital service of two hundred and fifty beds, active, medical 
and surgical service. During the year, a determined effort has been made to 
bring the service of this department of the hospital up to the standard of the bet- 
ter general hospitals. 

One of the better innovations was the opening of two diet kitchens, one for the 
male medical kitchen and one for the female medical kitchen. These diet kitchens 
are under the supervision of the dietitian and the work is carried on by the train- 
ing school, under her direction. 

In connection with this, an attempt has been made to put the food service of 
the medical and surgical wards on a better basis, by serving trays and special diets 
in a more attractive manner. The heavy crockery formerly used has been elimi- 
nated, and dainty china with individual tea pots, tray cloths, and napkins have 
been substituted. The result is that our patients who are physically ill are receiv- 
ing better service in every way. 

X-Ray Department. 

The X-Ray Department of the hospital has been active, as the following report 
indicates: 

Exposures: Ankle, 12; Arm, 9; Chest, 59; Elbow, 8; Forearm, 2; Foot, 20 
Finger, 2; Gall Bladder, 2; Gastro-Intestinal, 99; Hand, 18; Heart, 1; Hip, 24 
Jaw, 6; Knee, 23; Kidnev, 3; Leg, 3; Liver, 4; Nose, 5; Pelvis, 3; Ribs, 22 
Shoulder, 15; Spine, 23; Skull, 126; Stomach, 3; Thigh, 3; Throat, 2: Thumb^ 
1; Thymus, 2; Wrist, 12. 

Dental X-Rays, 115. 

Surgery. 

Treatments: Salvarsan, 1,594; Swift Ellis, 655; Eye Clinic, 18; Gyn. Clinic, 20; 
Obs., 2; Casts, 5; Lumbar Puncture, 111; Wassermann, 204; Mercury in Oil, 
242; Horse Serum, 38; Acriflavine, 57. 



6 P.D. 23. 

Major Operations: Appendectomies, 14; Hysterectomies, 3; Tonsillectomies, 
15; Hemorrhoidectomies, 3; Hydrocele, 1; Bone Patella, 1; Intestional Ob- 
structions, 1; Colostomy, 2; Cystotomy Superpubic, 1; Amputations, Leg, 2; 
Castration, 1; Ventral Fixation of Uterus, 1; Umbilical Herniotomies, 2; Unguinal 
Herniotomies, 9; Strangulated Herniotomies, 1; Double Herniotomies, 2. 

Minor Operations: Removal of Foreign Bodies, 3; Removal of Growths, 3; 
Removal of Needle, 1; Removal of Piece of Steel, 1; Incision of Abscesses, 6; 
Incision of Cysts, 2; Incision of Sub Pectoral Abs., 1; Plaster Operation on Fin- 
ger, 1. 

Laboratory Report. 
Autopsies, 45; Animal Autopsies, 2; Animal Inoculations, 6 ; Bacterial Cultures, 
36; Bacterial Smears, 74; Basal Metabolism Tests, 9; Blood Counts, Red, 63; 
Blood Counts, White, 192; Blood Counts, Differential, 174; Blood Counts, 
Haemoglobin, 139; Blood Chemistry: Urea Nitrogens, 11; Non Protein Nitro- 
gens, 1; Creatinine, 1; Sugar, 32; Examination for Malarial Parasites, 32; Stool 
Analyses, 9; Galactose Tolerance Tests, 2; Microscopical Sections, 16; Stomach 
Contents, 1; Sputum, 45; Spinal Fluids, Colloidal Golds, 367; Cell Counts, 606; 
Globulin, 399; Albumin, 378; T. B. Stain, 1; Mastic, 23; Urinalyses, 1,593; 
Urines, quantitative for sugar, 49; Renal Functional Test, 4. 

Social Service Department. 

The annual report of the Social Service Department has sometimes consisted 
simply in the tabulation of statistics, but in social work, as in all types of edu- 
cational work, results obtained cannot be tangibly expressed in numbers. We 
shall undertake this year, therefore, to present the year's work in concrete form, 
illustrating the various types of work carried on by case stories. 

A considerable portion of the work of this department consists in gathering in- 
formation regarding the patient's life in the community, before his hospitalization. 
Court cases, all cases in which traumatic injury might have caused the psychosis, 
and all cases in which the diagnosis of insanity is questioned, because of the lack 
of knowledge, bias or untruthfulness, of informants, or because the patient shows 
little deviation from the normal during the early days of the hospital residence, 
are investigated by the Social Service Department. The following illustrates this 
point. 

E. J. is a pleasant, plausible young woman, who readily adapts herself to the 
routine of the hospital. She does her share of the work readily, gets along well 
with the other patients, and is apparently quite clear mentally. Her story is that 
she has been assaulted by an employer, and that she has been very badly used in 
the factory where she worked — a possible enough story. 

In justice to the patient, the case is turned over to the Social Service. An ex- 
haustive investigation proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that this girl has been 
telling false stories about numerous well-known, reputable men of the town, and 
that there has been no basis in fact for these stories. A girl of this sort, as can 
be easily seen, is a distinct menace to the community, and needs hospital care. 

On the other hand, when Mrs. D., a plain and simply dressed seamstress of sixty 
years, tells the doctor she owns diamonds worth hundreds of dollars, and that her 
friend put her into the hospital simply to get the jewels, the doctor's first thought 
is that she is suffering from delusions. His second thought is to turn the matter 
over to the social worker for investigation, and lo! the diamonds are found to be 
a reality. She is recovering from her depressed condition, and the social worker 
has found a new home for her in the community. 

The patient's fate is closely linked to that of his family. When Mrs. Z., the 
mother of four small children, comes to the hospital, the father must be advised 
as to where the children can be cared for, for his relatives are in the old country. 

This year we have attempted the systematic follow-up of the families suffering 
from syphilis. Because of the infectious nature of this disease, other members of 
a family are sometimes also afflicted. The social worker sees the husband or wife 
of the patient, and tactfully explains the need of a blood test for the mate and the 
children. This is either arranged for through the family physician, or is done at 
the hospital, and where there are positive findings, arrangements are made by the 



P.D. 23. 7 

social worker at the nearest clinic for treatment. Mrs. R., whom since her hus- 
band's commitment, has had the care of four children, was examined at our hos- 
pital and found to be syphilitic also. Treatment was arranged, and because of 
this she will probably be saved to her children for many added years. 

When the patient is ready to be returned to the commmunity, he is again fre- 
quently a problem for the Social Service. Perhaps he is without a home to go to, 
and there is no one to care for him until he is again working, and independent. 
The transition to life in the community must not involve too difficult adjustments. 
F. L. has been a salesman in a distant city. He has recovered from a severe de- 
pression, climbing back to health through his opportunity to work in the hospital 
store. Now he is ready to go out, but no relatives can assume responsibility for 
him. A room is secured for him at the Y. M. C. A. where the director is asked to 
interest himself particularly in him. A small loan is made him, and a position in 
a local store is secured for him. Mr. L., needs no further help except an occasional 
consultation with his doctor at the hospital. Readjustment in industry is fre- 
quently most difficult because employers are afraid to take State Hospital patients, 
and much educational work in this direction is required. 

Frequently the family situation into which the patient is to return must be re- 
adjusted to meet the patient's needs. "We will be more patient with her now, 
since we know it's because she's sick, and not because she's mean, that she says 
these things," says a husband, when we explain that only with infinite patience 
and understanding on his part can Mrs. S. be expected to get along in her home. 
Perhaps mismanagement of finances, irregular hours, or careless housekeeping 
have been responsible for some of the stress and strain under which the patient 
lived. With regular visits from the social worker, with instruction on budgets, 
and advice regarding the health of the children, the patient sometimes finds her- 
self able to meet adequately the difficult task of housekeeping. 

The Out-Patient Clinic work is in process of reorganization. With the coming 
of the new clinical director, and the new out-patient physician, the work of this 
department looks most promising. To this clinic are brought not only the chil- 
dren whom the social agencies are finding as problems, but also the children se- 
lected by social service from the families of patients whenever there is evidence of 
need of mental hygiene. 

In order to do effective social work, other allied activities must be carried on 
by the department. It was felt that a loan fund, from which a patient, who had 
no relatives, might obtain assistance, until he had gotten employment, was a real 
necessity. The physicians' wives, under the direction of Mrs. L. B. Hill, arranged 
for a dance for the employees, and a fund of $70.00 was secured in this way. 

As recreation is an important factor in mental hygiene, a survey of the city's 
recreational resources has been undertaken. This year, a student from Smith 
College School of Social Work has been in training at this hospital. She is at 
work on a research problem and her findings will be of value to our work. 

We have felt the need of interpreting the hospital's work to the community, to 
the end that better understanding for our patients would obtain. Opportunities 
for speaking before various groups were readily accepted, and nine different groups, 
including the college women's club, school teachers, church clubs, and a farm 
organization were addressed. 

Dental Report. 

The following report is submitted by our resident dentist, Doctor Carl A. Oberg: 

During the year there was a monthly average of 195 patients treated in the 
Dental Department. 

Cleanings, 1,902; fillings, 971; new plates made, 66; treatments, 311; extrac- 
tions, 750; plates repaired, 60; inlays, 18; facings, 1; bridges, 8; three-quarter 
crowns, 2. 

Psychological Department. 

We have been able to undertake a more varied programme than heretofore, in- 
cluding the following activities: 

1. Psychometric Tests: 

a. All out-patient cases under twenty years of age. 

b. Any hospital cases suspected of mental defect. 

c. All court cases admitted to the hospital. 



8 P.D. 23. 

2. Intensive personality studies of specially assigned cases, and of all very 
young patients admitted to the hospital. 

3. Daily observations and notes on patients receiving special treatment. 

4. A course in elementary psychology for the students in the class of occupa- 
tional therapy. 

5. The development and standardization of thirteen new tests especially adapted 
to the needs of our clinics. 

6. The manufacture, in our own shop, of materials required for performance 
tests. 

The department has been represented at one national psychological meeting, 
and at two meetings held in this State. 

The most important achievement of the year has been the development of a 
performance test known as The Worcester Formboard Series. This consists of a 
graded series of mechanical puzzles, devised and manufactured in our own labora- 
tory, and standardized in the schools of Leicester. A paper describing the test, 
by Shakow and Kent, is now in the press. This test, because it covers a range 
from the three-year level to the sixteen-year level, and especially because it can 
be administered to a patient having no knowledge of English, is the most univer- 
sally applicable test in use in our laboratory. It has been found especially useful 
in our school clinics, and this is true to some extent of the other twelve tests which 
are the product of the department. Our psychometric work is much more trust- 
worthy because of these additional tools for mental measurement. 

Hydrotherapy. 

The Hydrotherapy Department continues to be one of the most important de- 
partments in the hospital. We have, in operation, thirteen continuous baths, four 
on the male side, and nine on the female side. These baths are in operation twenty- 
four hours each day, as are the pack rooms on both sides. In addition to the 
Ward Hydrotherapy, the treatment rooms are constantly being used. The fol- 
lowing treatments were given during the year: 

Salt Glows, 107; Saline Baths, 347; Electric Light Baths, 369; Fomentation 
to Liver and Spleen, 159; Massage to Abdomen and Spine, 22; Shoulder Massage, 
60; Needle Spray, 1,100; Fan Douche, 1,100; Tub Shampoos, 306; Hair Sham- 
poos, 204; Massage and Baking to Ankle, 14; Massage and Baking to Knee, 18; 
Jet Douche, 4; Sitz Baths, 44; Massage to Arm, 56; Massage to Back, 45; Mas- 
sage to Stomach, 4; Baking Hands and Arms, 41 ; Baking Hip, 13; Baking Should- 
er, 10; Foot Baths, 14; Baking and Massage to Arms and Hands, 70; Massage to 
Spinal Column, 2; Tonic Baths, 28; Hot and Cold to Spine, 23; Hot and Cold to 
Abdomen with Massage, 6; Scotch Douche, 10; Baking and Massage to Shoulder, 
4; Massage to Hip and Knees, 16; Massage to Hands, Arms, Feet and Legs, 28; 
Baking Feet and Legs, 15; Massage of Back and Popliteal Space, 7. 

Continuous Baths: 

Baths, 17,311; Hours, 101,150; Average Patients per month, 104. 

Packs : 

Packs, 11,394; Hours, 43,879; Average Patients per month, 78. 

Out-Patient Report. 

Clinics have been held regularly during the year, and the following are some of 
the sources, with the number of cases seen: — 

City Hospital, 72; Memorial Hospital, 51; City of Lowell, 15; Agencies and 
Charitable Associations, 47; Police and Court Cases, 10; Sent by outside Physi- 
cians, 6; Sent by other Hospitals, 6; Came by own initiative, 34; Industrial Schools, 
382; Public Schools, 159; Returned cases, 242. 

Training School. 

The School of Nursing has been carried on in keeping with the requirements of 
the State Board of Registration for Nurses, besides giving the special theory and 
practice made possible in this large, well-equipped hospital. 

Four nurses were granted diplomas, two of whom are with us in positions of re- 
sponsibility, two retired to private life. We have ten seniors, five intermediates, 
and ten preliminary students. The health of the whole nursing personnel has been 



P.D. 23. 9 

unusually good. The present arrangement of the services and various clinics gives 
our patients so much better nursing care and affords the students every opportu- 
nity to acquire more perfect nursing skill. 

An affiliation of three months with the Rutland State Sanatorium for their new- 
students, whereby they may receive instruction and practice in the care of the 
mentally sick, including the special therapies, began September 1, 1925. 

The school was represented at all meetings pertaining to nurses and nursing. 
The school entertained the St. Barnabas Guild for nurses. 

The attendants' classes were carried on, completing two courses. This is not an 
encouraging piece of work, because so many men drop out before the end. We 
do believe in its value, however. 

Projects Completed. 

The regular repair work of the hospital has been kept up throughout the year. 
The greater amount of our work in this respect consists of minor repairs. I would 
respectfully call attention to the necessity of planning a liberal appropriation each 
year for paint. Nothing conserves property as does paint, frequently applied, and 
it would seem that if our buildings are to be kept in the state of repair they should 
be, a liberal allowance should be made for this kind of work. 

During the year we relaid the floors of the Fulsom and Thayer wards, which were 
very badly in need of repair. The roof of the Woodward building, which has given 
much trouble in the past, was entirely relaid and is now in water-tight condition. 

We completed the screening of the hospital, and now every window in the in- 
stitution in both departments is screened. All of the cupolas at both the Main 
Hospital and the Summer Street Department are repainted. Some were in very 
bad condition and required considerable carpenter work. They are now in first- 
class shape. 

A beginning was made on repointing the Summer Street building. This build- 
ing is almost one hundred years old, and is beginning to need very extensive re- 
pairs. A small amount of repointing was done this year, and we plan to continue 
this work until it is completed. 

The Lincoln toilets were completed during the year, and a beginning made on 
the Salisbury toilet sections. Our plumbing is beginning to need extensive repairs, 
and in accordance with the program outlined in previous reports, we have been 
taking a section each year, in order to replace the old and obsolete type of fixtures. 

Another improvement which was completed this year is the installation of grille 
work on the Fulsom and Thayer wards. This has been badly needed and the wards 
are now r fully protected by the grilles, covering one half the window. 

Recommendations. 

I respectfully call attention to the need of suitable provision for our herd. Since 
the elimination of the tubercular cattle in the herd, the animals have been kept at 
Hillside, which is two miles and one-half away from the new building. This 
necessitates the cartage of all feed to that point, and the transportation of milk 
back to the Main Hospital. In the winter the difficulties at times are almost in- 
surmountable because of the trouble in keeping the road open. The old barn at 
the main hospital would need very extensive repairs to make it suitable for our 
herd, and I would recommend the appropriation of a sufficient amount to begin a 
new unit, to be placed on a suitable site on the main farm, farther back from the 
road. 

I would also call attention to the fact that the Summer Street Department of 
this hospital would make an ideal psychopathic and receiving hospital for the city 
of Worcester and the surrounding community, but before it can be put into use for 
this purpose, considerable repairs and alterations should be made. We have, at 
the present time, a considerable amount of hydrotherapy equipment, which has 
not been installed, because of the need of strengthening the floors before such in- 
stallation can be made. 

It would seem wise, at this time, that a complete survey be made of the needs of 
Summer Street, and a sufficient amount of money be appropriated to put it in 
first-class condition. 



10 P.D. 23. 

I would again call attention to the necessity of the continuance of the program 
of replacing our wooden staircases, and installing sprinkler systems in the hospital 
as rapidly as possible. During the year we were able to replace three wooden stair- 
cases and I am hopeful that the others will be replaced next year. Later, it would 
seem proper to consider the installation of sprinklers throughout the entire build- 
ing and at the Summer Street Department. 

I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my thanks to the members of the 
profession in Worcester, who have served on our visiting staff. They have been 
co-operative at all times, and have worked assiduously for the best interests of 
the patients and the hospital. 

I wish to acknowledge the splendid loyalty and co-operation of the medical staff, 
heads of departments, officers and employees of the hospital. It is through their 
splendid co-operation that we have been able to make the progress we have. I 
also wish to acknowledge the kindness and courtesy of various organizations of the 
city of Worcester, who have contributed so much of their time and energy in order 
to make our patients happy. 

In conclusion I wish to express my personal gratitude to the members of the 
Board of Trustees for their support and co-operation given me during the year. 
I would not hesitate to call upon all of them for advice and assistance, and they 
have always been willing to give of their time and energy to assist us. 

WILLIAM A. BRYAN, Superintendent. 
November 30, 1925. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1925. 



supplies 



Income. 
Board of Patients .... 

Personal services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 
Sales: 

Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 

Furnishings and household 

Medical and general care 

Heat, light and power 

Farm : 

Cows and calves . 

Hides . 

Vegetables and grain 

Garage, stable and ground; 
Repairs, ordinary 



Total sales . 
Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances 
Rent . . . . 



Cash Account. 
Receipts. 



$76 00 
101 92 
95 95 



S22 94 
420 57 
21 00 
60 4S 
37 47 
39 00 



273 87 
125 50 
809 01 



i,420 78 
232 68 



$1,809 84 



$1,128 94 
1,300 00 



Total income 



Maintenance. 



Balance from previous year, brought forward 
Appropriations, current year 

Total 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 



Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 

Analysis of Expenses 

Personal services .... 

Religious instruction .... 
Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 



$84,892 24 



$36,396 63 
790,550 00 



$826,946 63 
801,049 88 



$25,896 75 



$373,789 37 

2,660 00 

8,259 91 

159,983 56 

18,987 55 



P.D. 23. 

Furnishings and household supplies 

Medical and general care 

Heat, light and power 

Farm 

Garage, stable and grounds 

Repairs, ordinary 

Repairs and renewals . 



11 

$42,230 69 
33,687 17 
85,408 59 
26,344 12 
7,446 34 
21,322 93 
20,929 65 



Total expenses for maintenance .......... $801,049 88 



Special Appropriations. 



Balance December 1, 1924 ..... 
Appropriations for current year .... 

Total ........ 

Expended during the year (see statement below) 
Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 

Balance November 30, 1925, carried to next year 



$20,780 92 



$8,000 00 
168,000 00 



$176,000 00 
20,780 92 



$155,219 08 



Obtppt Act or 
UBJECT> Resolve. 

1 


Whole 
Amount. 


Expended 
during 

Fiscal 
Year. 


Total 
expended 
to Date. 


Balance 

at end of 

Year. 


Additional fire protection 

Dining-room 

Fire protection, 1925 


Chap. 510, Acts 1924 
Chap. 211, Acts 1925 
Chap. 347, Acts 1925 


$8,000 00 

150,000 00 

18,000 00 


$3,009 82 
17,771 10 


$3,009 82 
17,771 10 


$4,990 18 

132,228 90 

18,000 00 




$176,000 00 


$20,780 92 


$20,780 92 


$155,219 OS 



Balance carried to next year . 
Total as above 



$155,219 08 
. $155,219 08 



Per Capita. 
During the year the average number of inmates has been 2,266.04. 
Total cost for maintenance, $801,049.88. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $6.7981 (52 weeks to year). 
Receipt from sales, $1,809.84. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.0153. 
All other institution receipts, $83,082.40. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.7050. 
Net weekly per capita $6.0778. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JESSIE M. D. HAMILTON, Treasurer. 



STATEMENT OF FUNDS. 



Patient's Fund. 



Balance on hand November 31, 1924 
Receipts .... 

Interest ..... 

Refunded .... 

Interest paid to State Treasury 



Investment- 



Worcester County Institution for Savings 

Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank 

Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank 

People's Savings Bank 

Bay State Savings Bank . 

Balance Worcester Bank and Trust Company 

Cash on hand December 1, 1925 . - . 



Lewis Fund. 



Balance on hand November 30, 1924 
Income ..... 

Expended for entertainments, etc. 



Investment. 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company collateral trust 4% bond 
Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds ........ 

Balance Worcester Bank and Trust Company . . . . . 



$11,381 


63 






16,202 


10 






472 


51 










$28,056 


24 


$13,113 


76 




472 


51 










13,586 


''7 










$14,469 97 


$2,000 


00 






2,000 


00 






2,000 


00 






2,000 


00 






2,000 


00 






4,137 


76 






332 


21 










$14,469 


97 


$1,592 


18 




65 


49 










$1,657 
116 


67 






51 




$1,541 


16 


$926 


36 






600 


00 






14 


80 


«1 K4.1 


18 



12 P.D. 23. 

Wheeler Fund. 

Balance on hand November 30, 1924 $6,258 90 

Income 265 27 

$6,524 17 

Expended for entertainments, etc. ........ 391 55 

$6,132 62 
Investment, 
American Telephone and Telegraph Company collateral trust 4% bond . $712 50 

Second Liberty Loan Converted Bonds ....... 4,000 00 

Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds 1,300 00 

Balance Worcester Bank and Trust Company ...... 120 12 

$6,132 62 

Manson Fund. 

Balance on hand November 30, 1924 . $1,16100 

Income ............. 46 73 

$1,207 73 

Expended for entertainments ......... 80 15 

$1,127 58 
Investment. 

Fourth Liberty Loan Bond $1,100 00 

Balance Worcester Bank and Trust Company ...... 27 58 

$1,127 58 

Respectfully submitted, 

JESSIE M. D. HAMILTON, Treasurer. 

November 30, 1925. 

N. B. — The values assigned to the above securities are their respective purchase 
prices. 

Total receipts and payments are in agreement with Comptroller's books of ac- 
counts. 

james c. Mccormick. 



VALUATION. 



November 30, 1925. 

Real Estate. 



Land (5S9 acres) 
Buildings 



Personal Property. 



Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Medical and general care . 
Heat, light and power 
Farm .... 
Garage, stable and grounds 
Repairs .... 



Real estate 
Personal property 



Summary. 



$438,200 00 
2,198,481 30 

$2,636,681 30 

$10,059 37 

9,286 97 

32,342 SI 

254,699 98 
20,577 46 
27,818 52 
32,613 16 
14,361 25 
29,855 26 

$431,614 78 

$2,636,681 30 
431,614 78 

$3,068,296 08 



P.D. 23. 13 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 

As adopted by American Psychiatric Association. 
Prescribed by Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases. 
Table 1. — General Information. 

1. Date of opening as an institution for the insane: Jan. 18, 1833. 

2. Type of institution: State. 

3. Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings ......... $2,636 

Personal property ........... 431 



681 30 
614 78 



Total 

Total acreage of hospital, 589.16. 

Acreage under cultivation during previous year, 155.5. 

Medical service: 

Superintendent ....... 

Assistant physicians ...... 

Medical internes ....... 

Dentist ......... 

Total physicians ....... 



Employees on pay roll (not including physicians) : 
Graduate nurses ..... 
Other nurses and attendants 
All other employees .... 

Total employees .... 



Patients employed in industrial classes or in general hospital work on 
date of report ......... 

Patients in institution on date of report (excluding paroles) 



Men. 



. $3,068,296 08 

Women. Totals. 

1 
1 9 



10 


1 


11 


Men. 


Women. 


Totals. 


1 

119 

95 


30 
109 

77 


31 

228 
172 


215 


216 


. 431 


Men. 


Women. 


Totals. 


854 
1,149 


622 

1,240 


1,476 
2,389 



Table 2. — Financial Statement. 
See treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



14 



P.D. 23. 



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(6) Readmissi 

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during year 
verage daily num 
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umber of volunta 
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30, 1925 


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P.D. 23. 15 

Table 4. — Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions. 











Parents 


OF 


Parents 




Patients 




Male 




of Female 


Nativity. 








Patients. 


Patients. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. ■ 


M. 


F. 


T. 


United States .... 


108 


97 


205 


56 


55 


111 


29 


29 


58 


At sea ..... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 




Belgium 










2 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 


- 


_ 


_ 


Canada 










26 


23 


49 


33 


33 


66 


34 


31 


65 


China 










2 


- 


9 


3 


3 


6 








Czecho-Slovakia 












1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


Denmark 












- 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 






England 










13 


10 


23 


12 


12 


24 


10 


10 


20 


Finland 












4 





1 


1 


9 


4 


4 


8 


France 












1 


9 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


Germany . 












1 


9 


2 


3 


5 


2 


3 


5 


Greece 










4 


2 


6 


4 


4 


8 


2 


2 


4 


Holland . 










- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 








Ireland 










16 


23 


39 


31 


37 


68 


45 


46 


91 


Italy 










14 


7 


21 


15 


15 


30 


9 


9 


18 


Norway 










9 


- 


2 


3 


2 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Poland 










11 


5 


16 


15 


15 


30 


7 


7 


14 


Portugal 










- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


9 


Russia 










11 


8 


19 


13 


12 


25 


9 


10 


19 


Scotland 










- 


4 


4 


4 


_ 


4 


3 


4 


7 


Sweden 










8 


7 


15 


10 


9 


19 


10 


10 


20 


Turkey in Asia 










1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


_ 






Turkey in Europe 








4 


- 


4 


4 


4 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ 


West Indies 








1 


4 


5 


1 


1 


2 


5 


4 


9 


Total foreign born 


120 


101 


221 


157 


157 


314 


143 


143 


286 


Unascertained 






2 


1 


3 


17 


18 


35 


27 


27 


54 


Grand totals 










230 


199 


429 


230 


230 


460 


199 


199 


398 



Table 5. — Citizenship of First Admissions. 





M. 


F. 


T. 


Citizens by birth ......... 

Citizens by naturalization ........ 

Aliens ........... 

Citizens unascertained ........ 


108 
39 
67 
16 


97 
15 
74 
13 


205 
54 

141 
29 


Totals .......... 


230 


199 


429 



16 



P.D. 23. 





Table 6. — 


Psychoses of First Admissions. 








Psychoses. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1, 


Traumatic, total ....... 








_ 


1 


1 




Traumatic delirium .... 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Senile, total ..... 






- 


- 


- 


22 


26 


48 




Simple deterioration .... 






16 


20 


36 


- 


- 


- 




Delirious and confused types 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 




Depressed and agitated types 






2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 




Paranoid types .... 






4 


3 


7 


- 


- 


- 




Pre-senile type .... 






- 


2 


2 


— 


- 


— 


.% 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 






- 


- 


- 


21 


23 


44 


4. 


General paralysis .... 






- 


- 


- 


36 


7 


43 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis . . 






- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


7 


6. 


With Huntington's chorea 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


7. 


With brain tumor .... 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases, total 






- 


- 


- 


3 


5 


8 




Paralysis agitans .... 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 




Meningitis, tubercular or other forms . 






3 


4 


7 


- 


- 


- 


9. 


Alcoholic, total ..... 






- 


- 


- 


24 


3 


27 




Pathological intoxication . 






2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 




Delirium tremens .... 






1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— 




Korsakow's psychosis 






1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 




Acute hallucinosis .... 






10 


1 


11 


- 


- 


- 




Chronic hallucinosis .... 






3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 




Acute paranoid type 






3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 




Chronic paranoid type 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


— 




Alcoholic deterioration 






4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 
Opium (and derivatives), cocaine, bromides, choral 




"~ 


~ 


~ 


_ 


1 


1 




etc., alone or combined (to be specified) . 




- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


11. 


With pellagra ..... 






- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


12. 


With other somatic diseases, total 








- 


- 


- 


6 


7 


13 




Exhaustion delirium . 








3 


6 


9 


- 


- 


- 




Cardio-renal disease . 








2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 




Diseases of the ductless glands 








1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— 


13. 


Manic-depressive, total. 








- 


- 


- 


9 


21 


30 




Manic type 








6 


7 


13 


- 


- 


- 




Depressed type. 








3 


11 


14 


- 


- 


- 




Mixed type 








- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 




Circular type . 








- 


1 


1 


— 


- 


— 


14. 


Involution melancholia 








- 


- 


- 


8 


6 


14 


15. 


Dementia praecox, total 








- 


- 


- 


46 


29 


75 




Paranoid type . 








IS 


11 


29 


- 


- 


- 




Katatonic type 








12 


5 


17 


- 


- 


- 




Hebephrenic type 








10 


5 


15 


- 


- 


- 




Simple type 








6 


8 


14 


- 


- 


- 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 








- 


- 


- 


5 


12 


17 


17. 


Epileptic, total 








— 


— 


- 


3 


2 


5 




Epileptic deterioration 








3 


2 


5 


- 


- 


— 


18. 


Psychoneurosis and neurosis, total 








- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 




Psychasthenic type . 








3 


- 


3 


— 


— 


— 




Neurasthenic type 








1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 




Anxiety neuroses 








2 


- 


2 


- 


— 


- 


19. 


With psychopathic personality 








- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


5 


20. 


With mental deficiency 








- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


6 


21. 


Undiagnosed 








- 


- 


- 


28 


37 


65 


22. 


Without psychosis, total 








- 


- 


- 


5 


8 


13 




Epilepsy .... 








1 


— 


1 


- 


- 


- 




Alcoholism 








1 


— 


1 


— 


- 


- 




Psychopathic personality . 








1 


3 


4 


- 


- 


- 




Mental deficiency 








- 


5 


5 


- 


- 


- 




Others .... 








2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


_ 




Totals .... 














230 


199 


429 



P.D. 23. 17 

Table 7. — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses. 



Race 






Total. 


Traumatic. 


Senile. 


With 
Cerebral 
Arterio- 
sclerosis. 


General 
Paralysis. 


With 
Cerebral 
Syphilis. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


African (bla 

Armenian 

Dutch 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish . 

Italian 

Lithuanian 

Mongolian 

Portuguese 

Scandinavia 

Scotcn 

Slavonic 

Syrian 

Turkish 

West Indian 

Mixed 

Race unasce 

Totals 


ck) 

n 

rtaine 


d 


7 
1 
1 

23 
2 

25 
2 
4 
5 

26 

15 
3 
3 

15 

o 

17 
1 
3 

1 

74 

230 


6 
1 

24 

4 
18 

2 
2 
2 
46 
9 
4 

1 

8 
4 
12 

5 
41 

10 

199 


13 

2 
1 

47 
6 

43 
4 
6 
7 

72 

24 
7 
3 
1 

23 
6 

29 

1 

3 

6 

115 

10 

429 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 
o 

2 

1 
1 

14 
22 


4 
5 

o 

2 
1 
1 

4 
26 


6 

7 

11 

3 
2 
1 

18 
48 


5 
3 

4 
1 

8 
21 


4 

1 
1 

8 

7 
2 

23 


9 

4 

1 

12 
1 

15 

2 

44 


5 

8 

2 

1 
1 

1 

3 
1 
14 

36 


3 
1 
1 

1 

1 

7 


5 

11 

2 

2 
1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

15 
1 

43 


1 

1 

1 
3 


3 
1 

4 


1 

1 

4 
1 

7 



Table 7. — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued. 



Race. 






With 

Huntington's 

Chorea. 


With Other 
Brain or 

Nervous 
Diseases. 


Alcoholic. 


With Other 
Somatic 
Diseases. 


Due to 

Drugs 

and Other 

Exogenous 

Toxins. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


African (bl 

Armenian 

Dutch 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian 

Lithuanian 

Mongolian 

Portuguese 

Scandinavi 

Scotch 

Slavonic 

Syrian 

Turkish 

West India 

Mixed 

Race unas( 


aok) 

an 

n 

ertaii 


led 




1 
1 


= 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 

3 


1 
1 

2 

1 

5 


2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

9 
2 

4 
2 

2 
24 


3 
3 


1 

1 

2 
1 

12 
2 

4 
2 

2 

27 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
6 


2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

7 


2 
1 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 

3 
13 


- 


1 

1 


1 


Totals 








8 


1 



18 P.D. 23. 

Table 7. — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Continued. 



1 
Race. 






Manic- 
Depressive. 


Involution 
Melan- 
cholia. 


Dementia 
Precox. 


Paranoia 
or Paranoid 
Condition. 


Epileptic 
Psychoses. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


African (bl 

Armenian 

Dutch 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian 

Lithuanian 

Mongolian 

Portuguese 

Scandinavi 

Scotch 

Slavonic 

Syrian 

Turkish 

West Indir 

Mixed 

Race unas 


ack) 

an 

n 

;ertaii 


led 




2 
1 

1 
1 

2 
2 


3 
1 

1 

4 
2 
3 

1 
1 

2 

3 


5 
1 

2 

1 

4 
3 
3 

3 
1 
2 

5 


1 

1 

3 

1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

2 


2 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 
1 

3 


2 

4 
1 

2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
4 

3 

7 

1 

14 


1 
1 

5 

4 

5 
1 

2 
1 

2 
6 

1 


3 
1 

9 
1 
6 
1 
2 
3 
7 
5 

5 

8 

1 

2 
20 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
5 


1 
1 

4 

2 

1 
2 
1 


2 

1 

1 

1 
4 
1 

2 

1 
3 
1 


2 
1 


1 

1 
2 


1 
2 

1 
1 


Totals 








9 


21 


30 


8 


6 


14 


46 


29 


75 


12 


17 


3 


5 



Table 7. — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded. 



Race. 






Psycho- 
neuroses 
and 

Neuroses. 


With 
Psychopathic 
Personality. 


With 

Mental 

Deficiency. 


Undiag- 
nosed 
Psychoses 


Without 
Psychoses. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


m. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


African (bl 

Armenian 

Dutch 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian 

Lithuanian 

Mongolian 

Portuguese 

Scandinavi 

Scotch 

Slavonic 

Syrian 

Turkish 

West India 

Mixed 

Race unas( 


ack; 

an 

n 

•ertaii 


led . 




1 
1 

1 
3 


- 


1 
1 

1 
3 


1 
1 


2 

2 


2 
3 


1 
o 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

1 
2 


2 
1 

1 

3 

3 
1 
2 

3 

3 
1 
1 
1 
6 


• 2 

1 

2 
3 

2 
1 
4 
6 

1 

1 
1 
5 

2 
4 
2 


4 
1 

2 
2 
6 

2 
1 

4 
9 

2 
2 

4 
1 
8 
1 
1 
3 
10 
2 


1 
1 

2 
1 


1 
1 

1 

4 
1 


1 

2 
1 

3 

5 
1 


Totals 








6 


- 


6 


4 


5 


3 


3 


6 


28 


37 


65 


5 


8 


13 



P.D. 23. 19 

Table 8. — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses. 



Psychoses. 




Total. 


Under 15 
Years. 


15-20 

Years. 


20-25 

Years. 


25-30 

Yeabs. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic .... 

2. Senile .... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 

4. General paralysis . 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous disease 

9. Alcoholic . . ■ . 

10. Due to drugs or other exogenou 

toxins .... 

11. With pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases . 

13. Manic-depressive . 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia precox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic .... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed. 

22. Without i sychosis 

Totals .... 


3 
3 


22 

21 

36 

3 

1 

3 
24 

6 

9 
8 

46 
5 
3 
6 
1 
3 

28 

230 


1 
26 
23 

7 
4 

5 
3 

1 

7 
21 

6 
29 
12 

4 
3 

37 
8 

199 


1 

48 

44 

43 

7 

1 

8 
27 

1 

13 
30 
14 
75 
17 
5 
6 

6 
65 
13 

429 


1 

1 


2 
2 


3 
3 


2 

1 
3 

1 

1 

8 


1 

1 
6 

3 

1 
2 

14 


2 
1 

2 
9 

1 
3 

2 
2 

22 


1 

1 

7 

1 
1 
1 

12 


1 
6 

3 
1 

11 


1 

2 
13 

1 

4 
2 

23 


1 

12 
2 

1 
1 

9 

26 


2 

8 

1 

3 
14 


1 

2 

8 

13 
2 
1 
1 

12 

40 



Table 8. — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued . 



Psychoses. 




30-35 

Years. 


35-40 

Years. 


40-45 

Years. 


45-50 

Years. 


50-55 

Years. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic .... 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis . 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous disease 

9. Alcoholic .... 

10. Due to drugs or other exogenou 

toxins .... 

11. With pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive . 

14. Involution melancholia . 

15. Dementia precox . 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic .... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency . 

21. Undiagnosed 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals .... 


3 
3 


4 

4 

1 

8 

1 

5 
1 

24 


1 

1 

1 
3 

5 
1 
1 

i 
2 

16 


5 

5 

1 
4 

13 
1 
1 

1 
1 

7 
1 

40 


7 

4 

1 
2 

6 

2 

1 

4 

27 


3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

4 
4 

1 
1 

7 

24 


10 

5 

1 

2 
3 

10 
4 

2 

1 

2 

11 

51 


4 
1 

2 

2 

1 

5 

1 

3 

26 


2 

3 

1 
6 
1 

13 


6 

1 

2 

7 

2 
3 
1 

5 

1 

1 
9 
1 

39 


1 

7 
1 

3 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 

25 


1 
1 

1 

1 
2 
5 
1 

7 
1 

20 


1 

2 

7 
1 

1 
3 

3 
3 
8 
2 
1 
1 

1 

9 
2 

45 


5 
1 

3 

1 

2 
1 

1 
14 


1 

3 

1 

3 
1 

5 

2 

16 


1 
5 

4 

3 

2 

5 
2 
5 
1 

2 
30 



20 P.D. 23. 

Table 8. — Age of First Admissions classified ivith Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded. 



Psychoses. 




55-60 

Years. 


60-65 

Years. 


65-70 

Years. 


70-75 

Years. 


75 Years 

AND OVER. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic .... 

2. Senile .... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous disease 

9. Alcoholic .... 

10. Due to drugs or other exogenou 

toxins .... 

11. Witn pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases . 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia pra>cox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic .... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals .... 


s 

3 


4 

2 
3 

1 

1 

11 


2 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

4 
1 

14 


2 
1 

4 

1 

1 
3 

4 
1 
1 
1 

5 
1 

25 


2 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
12 


6 
6 
1 
1 

2 

2 
1 

1 
20 


8 
9 
1 
2 

3 

1 

2 
1 

2 

3 
32 


3 
5 
1 

1 
1 

11 


3 
6 

1 

1 
11 


6 

11 

1 

1 
2 

1 

22 


5 
5 
1 

1 
1 

13 


5 
4 

1 
10 


10 
9 

1 

1 

1 
1 

23 


12 
7 

1 

20 


10 
4 

14 


22 

11 

1 

34 



21 



R3 



:— . 





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Id 1 O | 1 i <M 1-1 | 1 | i-H 1 ■* | 1 1 1 1 IOC! 


03 


ft 


IM|th|||ih||||ih||IIIIIII 


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1 1 1 "5 1 1 1 ^^ 1 1 1 1 1 ■* 1 1 I 1 1 >C<N 


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l*i 


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-* 


§ 


1 1 1-KN.-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


t^ 






M O 


H 




X 


fci 


1 HlOH | | | | | | |HCHHH | | | | ^i-l 


as 

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1 i-KN-tf 1 -- 1 1 1 «H 1 II 1 1 0C-< 111) i — l 1 


03 






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co 


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22 P.D. 

Table 10. — Environment of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses. 


23. 




Total. 


Urban. 


Rural. 


Unascer- 
tained. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea . 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic ..... 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous 

toxins ..... 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia precox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals 


22 

21 

36 

3 

1 

3 

24 

6 
9 
8 

46 
5 
3 
6 
1 
3 

28 
5 

230 


1 
26 
23 

7 
4 

5 
3 

1 

7 
21 

6 
29 
12 

2 

4 

3 

37 

8 

199 


1 

48 
44 
43 

7 
1 

8 
27 

1 

13 

30 

14 

75 

17 

5 

6 

5 

6 

65 

13 

429 


18 

15 

33 

3 

1 

3 
20 

3 
7 
6 

40 
5 
3 
6 
1 
2 

23 
4 

193 


1 

23 

18 

5 

3 

3 

2 

1 

7 
20 

5 
25 
12 

2 

2 

3 

34 

6 

173 


1 

41 

33 

38 

6 

1 

6 
22 

1 

10 

27 

11 

66 

17 

5 

6 

3 

5 

57 

10 

366 


4 
6 
2 

4 

3 
2 

2 
6 

1 
5 

1 

36 


3 

5 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
3 

2 

3 

2 

25 


7 

11 

4 

1 

1 

5 

3 
3 
3 
9 

2 
1 
8 
3 

61 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
_ 

1 
2 


Table 11. — Economic Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference 
to Principal Psychoses. 


Psychoses. 


Total. 


Depen- 
dent. 


Margi- 
nal. 


Comfort- 
able. 


Unascer- 
tained. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile 

3. With arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic ..... 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous 

toxins ..... 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases . 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia prrecox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. LTndiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals ..... 


22 

21 

36 

3 

1 

3 
24 

6 
9 
8 

46 
5 
3 
6 
1 
3 

28 
5 

230 


1 
26 
23 

7 
4 

5 
3 

1 

7 
21 

6 
29 

12 
2 

4 

3 

37 

8 

199 


1 

48 

44 

43 

7 

1 

8 
27 

1 

13 

30 

14 

75 

17 

5 

6 

5 

6 

65 

13 

429 


1 


2 4 

3 3 

- 2 

- 1 

3 - 

- 8 

1 - 
1 - 
1 - 
1 18 


6 
6 
2 

1 

3 

8 

1 

1 

1 

29 


7 

3 

20 

3 

1 
14 

4 
4 

21 
3 
3 

2 

1 
11 
4 

104 1 


1 

11 
9 
5 
1 

3 
3 

1 

2 
12 

1 
19 

4 
2 

4 

1 

30 

5 

14 


1 
18 
12 
25 

4 

4 
17 

1 

6 

16 

1 

40 
7 
5 
2 
4 
2 

44 
9 

218 


13 
15 
16 

1 

2 
10 

2 
5 
8 

22 
2 

3 

1 

1 

11 

112 


11 
11 

3 
2 

5 
8 
5 
10 

2 

7 
3 

67 


24 

26 

16 

3 

1 

4 

10 

7 
13 
13 
32 

2 

3 
1 
3 
18 
3 

179 


3 
3 


- 


- 

:; 

3 



P.D. 23. 

Table 12. — Use of Alcohol by First Admissions classified with Reference 
Principal Psychoses. 


\o 


23 


P8YCHO8ES. 


Total. 


Absti- 
nent. 


Temper- 
ate. 


Intem- 
perate. 


Unascer- 
tained. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis .... 

5. With cerebral syphilis 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor .... 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic ..... 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous 

toxins ..... 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive .... 

14. Involution melancholia . 

15. Dementia prascox .... 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency . 

21. Undiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals ..... 


22 

21 

36 

3 

1 

3 
24 

6 

9 

8 

46 

3 
6 

1 

3 

28 

5 

230 


1 

26 
23 

7 
4 

5 
3 

1 

7 
21 

e 

29 
12 
2 

4 

3 

37 

8 

199 


1 

48 

44 

43 

7 

1 

8 
27 

1 

13 

30 

14 

75 

17 

5 

6 

5 

6 

65 

13 

429 


8 
2 
7 
2 
1 

2 

2 
5 
2 
12 
1 
1 
2 

2 
4 
2 

55 


2 
1 
1 

o 

4 

3 
1 

1 
1 
2 

20 


10 
3 

8 

2 

i 

2 

4 
9 

15 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
5 
4 

75 


9 
16 

18 
1 

3 
3 
4 

24 
2 
1 
4 
1 

9 

2 

97 


1 

19 
16 
5 
2 

4 

4 
14 

3 
16 

9 

1 

2 
1 

29 
6 

132 


1 

28 

32 

23 

3 

1 

7 

17 

7 

40 

11 

2 

4 

3 

1 

38 

8 

229 


2 
3 

8 

24 

1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 

6 
1 

54 


5 
6 
1 
2 

3 
1 

1 

1 

20 


7 
9 
9 
2 

27 
1 

1 

1 
2 
3 
2 

2 

7 
1 

74 


3 
3 

1 

7 

1 
9 

24 


1 

1 
3 
3 
10 
2 

1 
6 

27 


3 
3 

2 

1 
3 
3 
17 
2 

2 
15 

51 



24 



P.D. 23. 





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P.D. 23. 



25 



Table 14. — Psychoses of Readmissions. 



Psychoses. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic, total ....... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2. Senile, total ..... 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


4. General paralysis .... 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


5. With cerebral syphilis 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


6. With Huntington's chorea 








- 


— 


- 


1 


- 


1 


7. With brain tumor .... 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


8. With other brain or nervous diseases 


, total 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9. Alcoholic, total 








- 


— 


— 


5. 


- 


5 


Acute hallucinosis 








3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


Acute paranoid type . 








1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Alcoholic deterioration 








1 


— 


1 


- 


— 


- 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Opium (and derivatives), cocaine, bromides, chloral 
















etc., alone or combined (to be specified) 




1 


- 


1 


— 


— 


- 


11. With pellagra ..... 






— 


— 


- 


— 


- 


- 


12. With other somatic diseases, total 










— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Exhaustion delirium . 










- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


13. Manic-depressive, total . 










- 


- 


- 


3 


10 


13 


Manic type 










3 


4 


7 


- 


- 


— 


Depressed type . 










- 


o 


5 


- 


- 


- 


Mixed type 










— 


1 


1 


- 


— 


- 


14. Involution melancholia . 










— 


— 


— 


- 


2 


2 


15. Dementia praecox, total . 










- 


— 


- 


15 


18 


33 


Paranoid type 










8 


7 


15 


- 


- 


- 


Katatonic type . 










- 


4 


4 


- 


- 


- 


Hebephrenic type 










3 


3 


6 


- 


- 


— 


Simple type 










4 


4 


8 


- 


— 


- 


16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 










— 


- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


17. Epileptic, total 










— 


- 


- 


- 






18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 










- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Hysterical type . 










1 


— 


1 


- 


- 


- 


19. With psvchopathic personality 










- 


- 


- 


2 


— 


2 


20. With mental deficiency . 










- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


4 


21. Undiagnosed 










- 


— 


- 


4 


10 


14 


22. Without psychosis, total. 










- 


— 


— 


1 


1 


2 


Psychopathic personality 










1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


















43 


47 


90 



Table 15. — Discharges of Patients classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
and Condition on Discharge. 



Psychoses. 




Total. 


Re- 
covered. 


Im- 
proved. 


Unim- 
proved. 


Without 
Psychosis. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


V. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic .... 

2. Senile .... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous disease 

9. Alcoholic . . . . 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenou 

toxins .... 

11. With pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases . 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic .... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals .... 


- 


1 

4 

4 

1 

1 

24 

2 

1 
19 
2 
29 
1 
1 
3 

1 

18 
3 

115 


1 

1 
3 
1 

2 

4 

29 

3 

24 
3 

2 

5 
4 

20 

104 


1 

2 

7 
5 

1 

1 
26 

2 

5 

48 

5 

53 

4 

3 

3 

5 

5 

38 

5 

219 


11 
1 

1 

7 

3 
23 


2 

2 
9 
1 

14 


13 

1 

3 

16 

1 

3 
37 


1 
3 
1 

11 
1 

p. 

2 
IS 

1 

2 

12 
61 


1 
1 
2 

2 
15 

1 
19 

2 

1 

3 
3 

14 

64 


1 

2 
5 
1 

11 

1 

2 

24 

3 

37 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

26 

125 


1 
3 
1 

1 

2 

3 

11 
1 

1 

1 

3 

28 


1 
1 

5 
1 
5 
1 
1 

2 
1 
6 

24 


2 
4 
1 

1 

2 

8 
1 
16 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
9 

52 


3 
3 


2 

2 


5 
5 



26 



P.D. 23. 



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— c ~ / ''- 


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il regurgitat: 
ral arterioscl 
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nic myocard 
nic endocard 
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c insufficienc 
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Diseases of th 
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27 



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III 1 III II 1 1 1 I OS 




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Pulmonary tuberculosis 

Miliary tuberculosis .... 

Tubercular pneumonia .... 

Diseases of the Digestive System. 
Carcinoma of liver .... 

Volvulus intestinal obstruction with toxe- 
mia ...... 

Ulcer of stomach ..... 

Carcinoma of pylorus .... 

Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System. 
Chronic renal disease .... 
Carcinoma of cervix of uterus 

Accidents, Violence and Sudden Deaths. 
Surgical anaesthesia shock (nasal tumor) . 
Suicide by hanging .... 
Homicide (bullet wound of right shoulder) 
Fracture of left femur .... 

Totals 



28 



P.D. 23. 









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J -1 <■ U 

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32 

Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying 
classified according to Psychoses. 


P.D. 

in Hospital 


23. 




Total. 


Less than 
1 Month. 


1-3 

Months. 


4-7 
Months. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile . 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea . 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic ..... 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous 

toxins ..... 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia prsecox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals 


22 
19 
19 

2 

4 
8 

6 

4 

11 
1 

2 

1 
4 

7 
3 

113 


8 

12 

3 

1 

3 

3 
3 

2 

15 

5 

1 

2 

11 

1 

70 


30 

31 

22 

3 

4 
11 

g 

7 
2 

26 
6 
2 
1 
1 
6 

18 
4 

183 


2 
5 

1 

3 

3 
1 

15 


1 

2 

1 

2 
6 


3 

7 

1 

4 

5 
1 

21 


2 

4 

7 

1 
2 

2 
18 


1 
3 

1 

2 

1 

8 


3 

7 
7 

1 

2 

3 
2 

1 

26 


3 
1 
3 

1 
8 


1 

4 

1 

2 
8 


4 

5 
3 

1 

3 

16 



Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life 
classified according to Psychoses 


of Patients dying 
— Continued. 


in Hospital 


| 




8-12 

Months. 


1-2 

Years. 


3-4 

Years. 


5-10 

Years. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F.' 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic . . . 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous 

toxins ..... 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia pracox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Totals 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
5 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

5 


1 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

10 


6 
4 

7 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

23 


4 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

15 


10 

5 
9 

2 

1 
3 

1 

2 

1 

2 
2 

38 


3 
3 
1 

1 

1 

2 

11 


1 

3 

2 
6 


3 

4 
1 

3 
1 

3 

2 

17 


3 

1 

2 

1 
2 

1 
4 

1 
15 


1 

1 

1 

5 
1 

1 
10 


■1 

1 

3 

1 

3 

1 
? 

1 
1 

2.3 





























P.D. 23. 

Table 18. 



33 



Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital 
classified according to Psychoses — Concluded. 







10-15 

Yeabs. 


15-20 

Yeabs. 


OVER 20 

Yeabs. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ..... 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis. 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic ..... 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxin 

11. With pellagra .... 

12. With other somatic diseases . 

13. Manic-depressive. 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia or paranoid condition 

17. Epileptic ..... 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed .... 

22. Without psychosis 




1 
1 

1 
3 


1 

2 
1 


1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

3 


1 

1 

1 

2 
1 


1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

1 

1 

3 
3 

1 

1 


1 

3 

1 

1 


1 

1 
1 


1 

1 

4 
1 

1 
1 


Totals ..... 




6 


4 


10 


6 


5 


11 


6 


3 


9 



Table 19. — 


Family Care Department. 






M. 


F. 


T. 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1924 . 




_ 


17 


17 


Admitted witnin the year 








— 


9 


9 


Nominally returned from visit for discharge 








- 


- 


- 


Whole number of cases within the year . 








- 


26 


26 


Dismissed within the year . 








— 


9 


9 


Returned to the institution 








— 


5 





Discharged ..... 








- 


- 


— 


Died 








— 


— 


— 


Visit 








— 


3 


3 


Escaped ..... 








- 


1 


1 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1925 








- 


17 


17 


Supported by State 








- 


11 


11 


Private ...... 








— 


4 


4 


Self-supporting . . ... 








- 


2 




Number of different persons within the year 








- 


19 


19 


Number of different persons admitted . 








- 





5 


Number of different persons dismissed . 








— 


6' 


6 


Daily average number 








— 


16.92 


16.92 


State ...... 








- 


9.52 


9.52 


Private ...... 








- 


4.97 


4.97 


Self-supporting .... 










2.43 


2.43