(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools"

9999 06298 252 3 



\\ 



♦?5 



? 






l'Ui>' 






V 






> > > J ♦ . ' 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr4243char 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The Board of Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools, 
in compliance with a law of the Commonwealth, respectfully submit 
the following" as their \ 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

The Board voted to invest part of the funds in their possession, in a 
substantial building for the accommodation of four primary schools. 
They purchased a lot of land situated in Bow Street, of Mr. John Mur- 
ray, and erected a building of brick. This work was done by contract, 
and the cost was as follows : — 

Cash paid J. Murray, for land, .... 

Clarke & Varney, as per bill, 

J. L. Jennison, for labor, . . , . 

Ames Drake, . . • . 

Abijah Blanchard, making seats, 

$4913 67 
This building furnishes four commodious School Rooms. It is oc- 
cupied by Schools Nos. 5, 6, 8 and 10. 

The Bunker Hill School has long needed Recitation rooms. These 
have been added during the past year. The work was done by T. J. 
Elliott, and cost $290. 

No alterations have been made in our School system since the date 
of the last Annual Report. The plan of employing assistant pupils, 
has, thus far, proved advantageous. The best scholars, and those who 
have manifested the requisite qualifications for the office of teacher, 



1G75 00 


2919 12 


90 50 


99 45 


129 60 



have been selected ; and in this way for a small sum, important servi- 
ces are obtained ; while the certainty of securing- a situation, either in 
our own Schools, or in the Schools of other towns in case of success, is 
a sufficient inducement for these assistant pupils to remain in the 
School. This plan, in reality, makes a Normal School of our Gram- 
mar Schools. Already other towns have taken several of these pupils, 
and thus far, there has not been an instance of failure. While re- 
maining in the Grammar Schools their duties are chiefly confined to 
the lower classes — or to the scholars from the Primary Schools. So 
advantageous have they proved that the Board recommend a contin- 
uance of this policy. 

The number and statistics of the Schools, at the last examination, 
were as follows : number of Schools, teachers and assistants 38 ; sala- 
ries $11,420 ;|scholars 2267; average attendance 1914. 



THE PRIIVlARr SCHOOLS. 
The following table gives the statistics of these Schools at the date of 
the last examinations. 



f>0 


SITUATION. 


TEACHERS. 


4 


be S 


1 ^ 

11 


< 








11 




1 


B. Hill School House, 


Melvina B. Skilton, 


78 


58 


75 


2 


Main Street, 


Mary Walker, 


75 


65 


64 


3 


Warren School House, 


C. A. Sawyer, 


77 


63 


72 


4 


Elm Street, 


Lucy Blanchard, 


62 


55 


50 


5 


Bow Street, 


Sarah C. Reynolds, 


63 


45 


54 


6 


Bow Street, 


Leonora L. Skilton, 


73 


63 


67 


7 


Bow Street, 


Sarah E. Smith, 


80 


65 


69 


8 


Bow Street, 


M. E. Chamberlain, 


77 


64 


60 


9 


Common Street, 


Elizabeth Eames, 


71 


65 


62 


10 


Training Field, 


J. S. Putnam, 


80 


68 


67 


11 


Town Hill Street, 


Maria Peabody, 


80 


60 


76 


12 


Boylston Chapel, 


Lydia Keith, 


71 


65 


58 


13 


Bunker Hill Street, 


Susan M. Nichols, 


68 


63 


64 


14 


Moulton's Point, 


Jane M. Burkess, 


68 


58 


65 


15 


Warren School House, 


Esther M. Hay, 


69 


60 


63 


16 


Elm Street, 


H. M. Austin, 


56 


50 


50 


17 


Bunker Hill Street, 


Cynthia Brockett, 


70, 


63 


65 



The Board regard these schools as constituting an important branch 
of our system of education, and in preceding reports have dwelt upon 
thei.) at length. Their character remains the same. There is to be 
seen in these schools, generally, fluent reading, creditable spelling, 
prompt answers in the " First Lessons in Arithmetic," good order and 
interest on the part of the children in the school. But the defects 
heretofore alluded to remain. There is much bad pronunciation, con- 
fused articulation and bad tone, in the reading. These are pernicious 



liabits. All our Grammar Schools are not free from them. Four years 
constant practise in them requires full four years labor to correct them. 
It is not too much to say that they might, in a great degree, be avoid- 
ed. The secret of success here would be simply to begin right. And 
to begin right teachers themselves must know what is right. Is it too 
much to expect of those intrusted with the work of training up the 
voice in the way it should go, a thorough preparation for this impor- 
tant duty ? Ought they not to be perfectly familiar with the elemen- 
tary sounds of the language ? With the various inflexions and tones 
of the voice ? In a word, with the principles of Elocution ? It would 
require no more mental effort in children to learn to read properly, than 
it now does to acquire these bad habits ; and what is more important 
than to hear from the lips of ciiildren, words pronounced full and dis- 
tinct ? This can be attained. The practise of the elementary sounds 
can be made a healthy and inviting exercise in these schools — an ex- 
ercise that will be as welcome to the children as is that of singing. 
But before this can be done, the teacher must be thorough in this prac- 
tice herself; or the evil of bad habit, from becoming more radical, will 
become more fixed. In the last Report it was remarked, that, to gain 
this, " attention to a course of lessons from a teacher of Elocution," 
would be valuable. When teachers are well qualified for their labors, 
then the reading in all our schools, will be what it should be. These 
remarks are intended to be applied, also, to the teachers of the Gram- 
mar Schools. They are introduced in this place, because it is in the 
Primary Schools that these errors have their origin. 



m 

O 
O 



S 

►J 
<; 
O «2 



CO 

< 

O 





^O o o 


o 






\n 






53 C5 C5 


G< 






i>Ca 




1— ( 




1-5 


^ 




€^ 




C 








o 








IB 

o 


IP ^ 




tn 






s 






W 


e ff^-O^ 




14 


• Sfe 


OJ 




fc 


S t^ -c xi 




P 








C V 0) — 








?!Clpq<:a 






6 








-i,o ^ o o o o 


lA 




r^o G^ »o o lo o 


t>. 




!S C5 G< 


o ^ 


Ci 




'^ 




1—1 




^ 




m 


iJ 








O 








o 

s 

o 
en 

Q 

< 
> 



















<o O O O lO o 






53 Ci T— t 


Ci c< 










m 


1^ 








O 




G) 












K 


• 


CC 




u 








^ -cos ~ ^ 




O 










^ 








CTi 


fe 






;:^0 tO O O lO O 


o 




5^0 C< vTJ O G-l UI> 


vft 




55 cr> s< 


c; G< 


GTS 




c? 






J 








O 








O 




^ .*_* ** •^ 










Pi 








si r- ci 
S ~ 'fj 


5^ O ~ ~ 
.2 X - ^ 


i 




55 ^ 3 


-w O K 5- 






gQc^ 


•?:'^r/:--ji^ 






rv 


^ 






w 


x^ 







a?/? Ml S9iunj0yj[ 



Oi ^ Gi 

r^ t^ oo 

tT GO GO 



'DUOpiJH 


GO 
GO 


'SuiOflV.lQ 


GO CO 
GO 


'SdO^miSuvj 


J> 


'Smdddjf ^ooQ 


CO 


'fupmodQ 


GO C< CK) 


'ViqdSiy* 


OJ >o O O 
p-« C< CM i-H 


'IL 


CO 
GO 


•fi.qsiiud^Q 


O O 1— 1 CO 

»-H G^ 1-H !->» 


"Tioog; 


05 


'fiildo 


TP CO lO CD 

1— ( l> uo rj* 


'fldOlSlJl 


G< 'O GO CO 
lO 00 GO ^ 



•uoi^isodmoQ 
'fhidv.iSodQ 









,-. Tf »0 O 

vfi C< CO G< 



CO rj< t^ r- 
O GO 00 GO 

eo ct <?« t-< 



•.muiiujyuQ 



CO 00 -^ o 

05 CO ^^l 00 

r-l C< C» 



'dipmiiiui/* 



I— I CO t^ irt 
C?^ QO 00 krt 
CO C< G< r-1 



'Smjij.^1 


1—r CO t-^ lO 

G< CO CO kJO 

eo (?<(?< -H 


'Suijpdg 


— < CO t^ in 

G-^ CO QO »0 
GO G< G< r-i 


'Suipttd}£ 


I— CO t^ to 

sv» 00 GO »n 

60 G« G-< .-. 


'uoipouivin 


CO G< G-{ -^ 

CO in -^ GO 

G< G< G< .-H 


'3DUD 


r^ m o c?< 

1>- GO Th GO 
G< C< (H i-i 


'n}dnj -oj^ 


.-< CO {^ »o 

G< CO GO in 

•c o< &« !-• 



1-5 
O 
O 

X 



^ o rz 
— i- ;- i. 

r" *^ > ^ 



The condition of these schools is, in a high degree, satisfactory to 
the Board. A minute criticism upon each might point out wherein 
one school excels in one branch of study, and another school in a 
different branch of study. It is believed, however, that all of them 
will bear a thorough examination with credit. Such an examination 
will convince reasonable and candid minds that the pupils, in pur- 
suing the studies suitable to their years, have acquired a mental dis- 
cipline which reflects honor alike upon themselves and their teachers. 
The Board respectfully invite the citizens to visit the Schools, ques- 
tion the scholars in their studies — paying no other attention to the 
text booJcs than to confine their questions to the ground gone over — • 
examine their penmanship and composition, and then decide for 
themselves. The Board do not assert that the standard of common 
school education has been reached, or that there are no defects. Far from 
this. Thiey only say that the schools exhibit a good degree of im- 
provement on the part of the pupils and faithfulness on the part of the 
teachers. 

Visits of parents and friends to the schools would be valuable on 
more accounts than one. It is no objection to say that many do not 
feel competent to criticise the various studies. There are other modes, 
equally as efficient, of doing good to schools. Scholars need sympa- 
thy and encouragement. They need to be assured that the work that 
they are engaged in is really an important work ; that the tim'e they are 
spending is really precious time ; that those who hang over them with 
undying interest at home feel the same interest for them at school. It 
is true that they hear all this continually, in the school room and out of 
it. Parents, guardians and' friends magnify, rightly enough too, the 
importance of education, and admit that its worth is priceless, and its 
influence as lasting as mind. They admit that the child is endowed 
with capacities to perceive and appropriate truth in all its forms. And 
to do this is its beings high end. Yea, that before this all things else 
sink into insignificance, as this is the link that connects man, the crea- 
ture, with God, the creator. But what is the practical commentary 
which the child sees on these high admissions ? It beholds these same 
individuals so constantly immersed in business avocations, as to find no 
occasion on which to visit a school room, from the time it enters the 
Primary School until it graduates from the Grammar School. It sees 
neglect where it should see sympathy and attention. Is it strange, when 
this is considered, that teachers often find it difficult to interest chil- 
dren in study ? And when to this there is added an indifference at 
home to the whole subject of education, is it strange that there are 
backward scholars to be found in every school ? Such visits as friends 
of the schools might make would be invaluable. Each one would be 
a voice of encouragement, more eloquent and efficient than words. 
And all are qualified to give it. 

The extent of Home Influence upon the schools can hardly be over- 
rated. It can diminish the number of absences by ensuring punctual 
attendance, or it can increase them by permitting trifling excuses for 
non-attendance ; it can aid in maintaining order, the school's first law, 
by inculcating the duty of obedience to its rules, and by friendly con- 
sultation with the teachers in cases of discipline, or it can impair it by 
injudicious language while listening with too ready an ear to exagger- 
ated reports from the lips of corrected pupils : and, more than all, it can 
aid in banishing the rod from the school-room, by securing good con- 
duct through the in^uences of kindness, reasoning and moral suasion, 



i£j| 






\'. trA 



*■:■:>,'