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Full text of "Annual report of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools"

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SCHOOL REPORT. 



The Board of Trustees op the Charlestown Free Schools, 
jii compliance with a law of the Commonwealth, respectfully submit 
the following as their 

ANxNUAL REPORT. 

The statistics of the Schools, at the last examination, were as fol- 
lows: number of Schools 21; teachers and assistant S9; salaries $11,- 
740; scholars 2416; average attendance 19S6. 

There have been no alterations in the School System of the town 
during the past year. The Warren School House, partially destroy- 
ed by fire, has been thoroughly repaired. This beautiful and sub- 
stantial building is now in better condition than it was originally. — 
The finish of the interior is better; the accommodations for the Pri- 
mary Schools are increased and the building is better ventilated. The 
expense of repairs was $4030. 

The following table gives the statistics of these Schools at the date of 

» 

the last examinations. 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



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^ 

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situation. 


TEACHERS. 


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1 


B. Hill School House, 


Melvina B. Skilton, 


89 


64 


77 


2 


Maine Street, 


Ellen W. Whittemore, 


82 


64 


62 


8 


Warren School Hou^e, 


Martha Chandler, 


77 


65 


65 


4 


Elm Street, 


Elizabeth Pratt, 


69 


65 


55 


5 


Bow Street, 


Sarah C. Reynolds, 


59 


48 


48 


6 


Bow Street, 


Caroline R. Wiley, 


59 


48 


58 


7 


Bow Street, 


Sarah E. Smith, 


91 


70 


71 


8 


Bow Street, 


E. D. Moulton, 


60 


50 


55 


9 


Common Street, 


Elizabeth Eames, 


84 


65 


75 


10 


Training Field, 


J. S. Putnam, 


78 


65 


65 


11 


Town Hill Street, 


Maria Peabody, 


80 


60 


76 


12 


Boylston Chapel, 


Lydia Keith, 


77 


67 


66 


13 


Bunker Hill Street, 


Susan M. Nichols, 


82 


70 


79 


14 


Moulton's Point, 


Jane M. Burkess, 


80 


75 


76 


15 


Warren School House, 


Mary J. Chandler, 


77 


56 


72 


16 


Elm Street, 


H. M. Austin, 


60 


55 


55 


1^ 


Bunker-Hill Street, 


Cynthia Brockett, 


70 


58 


53 



good order, cheerfulness and a fine spirit. In a word — our schools, 
so far from retrograding or standing still, are improving. They are 
keeping up with the times, and this is saying a good deal ; for if appear- 
ances indicate any thing it is, that the community will not rest satis- 
fied until they see these free grammar schools furnishing full oppor- 
tunities for youth to acquire a thorough English Education, an edu- 
cation that shall fit them for extended usefulness and high self-culture. 

Gentlemen from abroad concur with the observation of the com- 
mittee, in ranking our schools as among the best of the vicinity. 
That the progress of the scholars, generally, is satisfactory to the 
citizens, may be inferred from the full attendance to be seen in them. 
In fact our free schools have been steadily increasing in usefulness 
and numbers, and thus superseding the necessity for private schools. 
Five years ago, to meet the growing demand for school-room, the 
Town voted $15,000 to build the Warren School House. This 
is one of the best in the State and one of the cheapest in the 
Town; it may be gratifying for the citizens to learn, that friends of 
education far and near, have visited it and approve of it. When 
this was built, many doubters thought that it was unwise to provide 
such spacious rooms, and that it would take ten years, at least, to 
fill it up. In this they will be disappointed. It is already nearly full 
and the time has come when additional accommodations are necessa- 
ry for the increase of scholars, in other schools. To prove this, let 
facts be submitted to a candid community. 

The Bunker Hill school, in May 1840, after satisfying the draft of 
the Warren School on the South, still numbered 142 pupils. Two 
years later, the incorporation of Somerville on the North, took off 
more scholars. Yet, though this District has been clipped at both 
sides, and made smaller, the number increased so much that an addi- 
tional assistant was appointed the past year. It has now on its list 
180 scholars, and the rooms have 183 seats. The venerable build- 
ing that accommodates this school may, for a couple of years, meet 
the wants of the population in its vicinity; but to say more, would 
require of the Board to utterly disregard the signs indicated by the 
neat and commodious dwellings rising on the sides of Bunker Hill. 
These will soon send forth children, who will claim the right to go 
to a "master's school." The citizens can run out the consequences 
as well as the Board can. 

The Warren School commenced April, 1840, with 275 pupils, ta- 
ken from the Bunker Hill, Harvard, Winthrop grammar schools, and 
the Primaries. Even after this general swarming it was remarked 
there were scholars enough, for profit, left in the old hives. This 
school now numbers 388, the school rooms have 400 seats. In all 
probability, after the October examinations, there will be more scho- 
lars than seats: but additional seats can be put in so as to accommo- 
date, for some time, the influx of scholars. This school, may be set 
down as nearly full. We now come to the Harvard school. In 
April, 1840, this school was left with 240 scholars. When we view 
the Substantial buildings that have been erected within a few years 
near its central location, it will not appear so strange that there are 
323 scholars now on its list as it will to suppose that this number of 
pupils can be properly accommodated in school-rooms having but 
284 seats. It cannot be denied that this school is overflowing with 
pupils. But another case, worse yet, will be found in the Winthrop 



for rejoicing : for an increase of population without an increase of 
children presenting themselves lor instruction, would never be a wel- 
come sign to patriotism. It would indicate indifference on the part 
of parents to the noblest legacy they can give to their offspring. — 
Hence to see our schools increase in numbers, as well as in useful- 
ness, ought ever to be a graiilying spectacle. To preserve them from 
factious partizanship and sectarian zeal should be the aim of the 
watchful citizen. Whatever else they see fit to economise in, let it 
be a point of duty with the rich and of right with the poor, to sustain 
in full vigor the healthy influences of our noble Free Schools. 

RICHARD FROTHINGHAM Jun. President. 
Frederick Robinson, Secretary, 
CAarlestown, Aprils 1844. 



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