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Full text of "Annual report of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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THE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



OF THE 



(DIliisiirE(B^4(D"W3a IFircso SA®©!^ 



Made in pursuance of tUe Act of 1838. 



-*»*#®®«<*' 



CHARLESTOWN: 

PRESS OF THE BUNKER-HILL AURORA. 

1845. 



\^W.miL :Ei2F®M< 



The BOARD OF TRUSTEES of the Charlestown Free 
Schools, in compliance with law and custom, respectfully submit their 

ANNUAL REPORT 
of the present number and condition of the Public Schools. 

The special appropriation, made by the town in May last, for the pur- 
pose of enlarging the accommodations in the Harvard and Winthrop 
School Houses, has been expended. Four good recitation rooms have 
been added to the Winthrop School House, and that portion of the area 
of the building in this, and the Harvard School House, heretofore occupi- 
ed as recitation rooms, has been thrown open to the main room. This 
has added very much to the light, convenience, and comfort of the school 
rooms, and furnished additional accommodations for eighty scholars in 
each school house. The work was done by contract, by Messrs. Clark & 
Varney, and Mr. Ames Drake, and cost $1,612 28. 

The work on the Winthrop School House, was protracted much beyond 
the time which the Board anticipated, when the contract was made, and 
was a serious interruption to the School. The Board feel it to be their 
duty to call the attention of the town to the condition of the Bunker EQll 
School House. The building is in a dilapidated state, and needs constant 
repairs to render it tenantable. The lower room, occupied by the lower 
division of the School, is a basement, originally intended and used as a 
cellar only, and is so low, that it is impossible to ventilate it, so as to render 
the air comfortable or wholesome. A wise regard to the health of the 
children, requires that the House should be rebuilt. The upper room is 
now filled with scholars to its utmost capacity, and the increase of popula- 
tion in this part of the town, will soon demand increased accommodations. 
The Board therefore feel constrained to recommend, that the town take 
measures to rebuild the House on an enlarged plan. 

The number of scholars in Primary School No. 1 , having increased to 
104, and in Primary School No. 2, to 96, the Board have been obliged to 
establish another Primary School in that part of the town. The Commit- 
tee found much difficulty in procuring a suitable room for the School ; — 
and by the advice of the Board, a School House has been erected by Mr. 
Thomas Greenleaf, with the understanding that it should be offered to 



4 



the town at the cost of the land and building. The House has beeo 
erected under the direction of a Committee of the Board, on Mead street. 
The lot contains about 2,100 feet of land, and cost $525 ; the building in- 
cluding fences, painting, blinds, &c., cost $430. It is a substantial building, 
and capable of being enlarged so as to accommodate two Primary Schools. 
The Board recommend that the town authorize the purchase of the land 
and building. The town will then own houses for the accommodation of 
all the Primary Schools, except that kept in the Boylston Chapel, — all of 
which are fitted up with separate seats, adapted to the comfort and con- 
Tenience of the children. 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The new Primary School in Mead street, was opened about the first 
of October last, and Miss M. B. Skilton, who has labored long and faith- 
fully in Primary School No. 1, was, at her own request, transferred to 
this School ; and Miss M. A. Lewis was appointed Teacher of Primary 
School No. 1. Miss Sarah C. Reynolds resigned the charge of Primary 
School No. 5, and Miss Jane M. Burckes was transferred from Primary 
School No. 14, to this School ; Miss Mary E. Sanborn was appointed 
Teacher of Primary School No. 14. Miss C. R. Wiley resigned the 
charge of Primary School No. 6, and Miss E. A. Blanchard was ap- 
pointed to supply her place. Miss Frances A. Sawyer was appointed 
Teacher of Primar}- School No. 16, in place of Miss H. S. Austin, who 
was appointed Teacher in the Bunker Hill School. 

The following table, exhibits the numbers in the Prilnary Schools at 
the last examinations : 









^o 


1 










^ 


<4J S 


s "^ 




TEACHERS. 


LOCATION. 




^ « 


S -S 




. 






« -TS 


05 ^ 


i 








5^ C 


^^ 


1 


M. A. Lewis, 


B. H. School House, 


76 


55 


60 


2 


E. M. Whittemore, 


Main Street, 


65 


54 


47 


3 


M. A. Chandler, 


AVarren School House, 


89 


70 


75 


4 


E. D. Pratt, 


Elm Street, 


69 


66 


56 


5 


J. M. Burckes, 


Bow Street, 


58 


48 


50 


6 


E. A. Blanchard, 


Bow Street^ 


74 


52 


52 


7 


S. E. Smith, 


Bow Street, 


71 


56 


57 


8 


E. D. Moulton, 


Bow Street, 


62 


54 


53 


9 


Elizabeth Eames, 


Common Street, 


72 


73 


56 


10 


J. S. Putnam, 


Training Field, 


85 


70 


71 


11 


Maria Peabody, 


Harvard Street, 


80 


60 


69 


12 


Lydia A. Keith, 


Boylston Chapel, 


67 


67 


57 


13 


S.M. Nichols. 


Bunker Hill Street, 


89 


63 


65 


14 


Mary E. Sanborn, 


Moult;On Point, 


70 


58 


53 


15 


M. J. Chandler, 


Warren School House, 


88 


69 


78 


16 


F. A. Sawyer, 


Elm Street, 


53 


47 


45 


17 


C. Brockett, 


Bunker Hill Street, 


72 


65 


ee 


18 


M. B. Skilton, 


Mead Street. 


59 


48 


49 



The salary of each of the primary school teachers is $210 per annum 

Custom requires that children shall be admitted to the Primary Schools 
at the age of 4 years — thus, almost literally transferring them from the 
nursery to the school room. It may well be questioned whether their 
physical, or intellectual improvement is promoted, by subjecting them, at 
so tender an age, to the discipline of the Public School. There are now 
in the Primary Schools, about 1300 children, averaging about 72 scholars 
to each school ; a much larger immber than is convenient or proper to be 
placed in the charge of one teacher. 591 of these, are under 6 years of 
age, and 291 are under 5 years of age. The crowded state of these 
schools and the rapidly increasing population of the town, will require the 
establishment of several additional Primary Schools in the course of an- 
other year. Should the age of admission be fixed at 5, instead of 4, it 
would save to the town the expense of about four schools, amounting to at 
least one thousand dollars per annum. Should it be fixed at 6, it would 
save about double this amount. The Board are not prepared to recom- 
mend any measure of this kind, but would respectfully suggest, that if the 
hand of retrenchment must be laid upon our Public Schools, whether it 
would not be better to begin here than, by reducing the salaries, to subject 
our children to less competent teachers. The times demand, and we be- 
lieve our citizens demand, improvement — elevation^ in our teachers, and in 
our schools. 

Our Primary Schools may, undoubtedly, accomplish a most important 
preparatory work in our system of education, without overtasking the 
minds, or subjecting the children to any severe physical restraints. To 
do this, the discipline should be mild and maternal ; the school room 
should be made attractive, the attention of the pupils should be occupied, 
and their time employed, without requiring of them severe mental effort, 
or long continued physical restraint. The instructions of the teacher 
should "drop as the rain and distil as the dew," upon their expanding 
minds and impressible hearts, exciting a desire for knowledge, a love of 
truth and goodness, and encouraging everything that is pure and lovely, 
and of good report. 

Children are admitted to the Grammar Schools at 8 years of age. The 
required qualifications are, that they read fluently, spell correctly, and 
understand the arithmetical tables. It would seem that the four years spent 
in the Primary Schools, would be time enough to ensure these qualifica- 
tions ; and yet, it must be admitted, that scholars frequently find their 
way into the Grammar Schools, but poorly qualified ; and much valuable 
time is employed in correcting had habits of pronunciation, and indistinct 
utterance, which would be saved to the pupil by a thorough system of in- 
struction in the Primary Schools. The Board are disposed to attribute 
this, partly at least, to the character of the books heretofore used. To 
aid the teachers in their work, and to secure uniformity in the system of 
reading, the Board have, during the last year, introduced a series of 
reading books, better adapted, they think, to accomplish this object, 
than any books previously used in the Primary Schools. These books 
were prepared by Mr.Wm. D. Swan, for many years the able and successful 
teacher of the Bunker Hill School. They consist of three parts — the first, 
designed to teach the powers of the letters, as well as their names ; direct- 
ing the attention of the scholar to one sound in each lesson, "until the 



6 

organs of speech are called into exercise upon every sound in the lan- 
guage, and a habit of correct articulation is established." The second part, 
is designed to teach the inflections of the voice, with lessons upon the con- 
sonant sounds in combination ; and the third, contains a choice selection 
of reading lessons — designed to extend and carry out the system upon the 
principle of teaching one thing at a time, until a habit of correct pronun- 
ciation and distinct utterance is established. Correct habits of speech, 
may, in this wa)^, be formed. Children will acquire the control of their 
own vocal organs, and thus, Xha foundation be laid for good reading in the 
Grammar Schools. To secure the introduction of these books, they 
•'vere furnished by the publishers at a very low price, in exchange for 
the old ones, previously used. 

To lay the foundation of good reading, the Board regard as one great 
object of our Primary Schools. To accomplish it, requires thorough prepa- 
ration, and an accurate knowledge of the subject on the part of the teacher. 

No system of reading books, no regulations of the Committee, will se- 
cure a good School. " The Teacher makes the School," — and as well 
might we expect a bad tree to produce good fruit, as a poor teacher to 
make a good school. A combination of the qualities required in a good 
teacher, is more rarely met with in the same individual, than is generally 
supposed. There must be not only a familiar and critical knowledge of 
the required studies, but facility and tact in imparting this knowledge, so 
as to av/aken and interest the mind of the pupil. A cheerful, even tem- 
per, entire self-control, patience, decision, and firmness, united with gen- 
tleness and suavity of manners — and above all, an enthusiastic loveof the 
employment, and an elevated tone of moral feeling, — these qualities, in a 
high degree, are rarely combined. All good men or good women, are not 
fitted by nature to be good teachers ; when any one is essentially deficient 
in these qualifications, it is unfortunate that this profession is chosen ; and 
the teachers or their friends should not regard it as unkind, if their places 
are supplied by others. It is better, certainly, that an individual should 
be disappointed in his hopes, than that a whole school should suffer from 
his or her incompetency. Where these qualities are combined, the 
Teacher is doing a great work, and should be esteemed highly for his 
work's sake. Our Teachers should all receive a cordial and generous 
support, and then be required to do their work well. The Board are 
happy to bear testimony to the assiduity and ability with which the Teach- 
ers generally, botli of the Grammar and the Primary Schools, devote 
themselves to their duties. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The Warren School. There have been no changes in the princi- 
pal Teachers of this School, during the past year. It is much the largest 
in town, and being composed of children of both sexes, the duties of the 
Teachers are very arduous. This School was opened five years ago, 
with about 300 scholars ; the present number is 407. Although last in 
the time of its establffehment, it is now Jirst in point of numbers; and with 
its present able Teachers, second to none in regard to its discipline and 
improvement. 

WiNTHROP School, The changes in this School have been numer- 



ous. The Board felt much regret at losing the services of Mr. Samuel 
Swan, for many years the able and successful Teacher of the writing de- 
partment. Mr. Stacy Baxter, at his own request, was transferred from 
the grammar department, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation 
of Mr. Swan. Mr. M. T. Gardner was appointed to the grammar departr- 
ment ; but, having retained his situation a few months only, tendered his 
resignation. Mr. Aaron Walker, Jr., of Lowell, was chosen to supply his 
place. His high reputation as a Teacher, and his present success, afford 
the highest confidence that this School will be judiciously and successfully 
conducted. Mr. Munroe and Mr. Sanborn, who were employed as assist- 
ant pupils, having resigned, their places were supplied by females. 

The Board, by the experience of the past year, have been more than 
ever impressed with the great evils attendant upon a change of Teachers 
in our large Schools. But our proximity to the city, and the greater 
compensation given there, render this evil unavoidable. 

Harvard School. There has been no change of Teachers in the 
Harvard School during the year, and the Board believe the School has 
fully sustained its deservedly high reputation. 

Bunker Hill School. Mr. A. O. Lindsey, having resigned his sit- 
uation as Teacher of the writing department, it was decided by the Board, 
after mature deliberation, to change the organization of this School, so far 
as to put the upper division of it, including the higher classes, under the 
entire charge of Mr. Tweed, the principal Teacher ; thus securing to 
them, the services of one of our most able and experienced teachers — and 
the junior department under the entire charge of a female Teacher. 

The expense of supporting this School has been so great, in proportion 
to the number of scholars, that the Board did not feel authorized to in- 
crease it by employing an experienced Teacher in the writing depart- 
ment ; and the services of any other, must fail to be acceptable. The 
smaller scholars are now under the charge of Miss H. S. Austin, who ap- 
pears to be quite successful in the management of them. Scholars of a 
corresponding age, in the other Schools, are successfully taught by fe- 
males ; and the Board feel entire confidence in the utility of this arrange- 
ment, and trust that it will prove satisfactory to all concerned. The 
expense of the School is reduced some $150 per annum by this change. 

The following tables present their statistics at the date of the last ex- 
amination : — 



Warren, 
Winthrop, 
Harvard, 
Bunker Hill, 


o 

o 
o 


•-* Ca5 CO *>• 
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Oi O CO N& 


Average Attend- 
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Present at Ex- 
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Reading. 


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C5 O H-» o 
OO C^ Oi ^1 


Spelling. 


i-* CO Oi i4^ 

C5 O I— O 
•JO C^ Oi ^J 


Writing. 


H-* CO CO rf^ 
O O I-' o 
00 Cn Cr< ^ 


Arithmetic. 


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C£> O ^1 I-' 
CO CO C7t Cn 


Gramrtiar. 


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CJ O t-* O 
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Geography. 


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Composition. 


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Declamation. 


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History. 


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CO oo 


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to 


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Geometry. 


C5 C5 


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Rhetoric. 



Drawing. 
Languages. 



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The current expenses of our Schools, may be stated as follows, y\z : 

Salaries. 
Warren School, 2,350 00 

Winthrop School, 2,335 00 

Harvard School, 2,335 00 

Bunker Hill School, 1,200 00 

18 Primary School Teachers, at $210, 3,780 00 

$12,000 00 
Contingent expenses, including fuel, repairs, care 7 9 025 58 

of School Houses, rent, ink, stationary, &c., &c., ) ' 

Total, $14,025 58 

There have been no essential alterations in our excellent School system 
the past year. The only changes have been in regard to the mode of 
conducting the examinations tlds Spring^ and the introduction of the Bible 
Reader as a Text Book. The impression has prevailed, to some extent, 
that our usual semi-annual examinations do not alFord to the Trustees or 
the public, a fair criterion to judge of the condition of the Schools. To 
meet this impression, and to learn the actual condition of the Schools, 
they have all been examined by the Committees, in the most thorough 
manner, without previous notice to the Teachers, and these examinations 
form the basis of the present Report. The semi-annual examinations 
have also been held in all the Schools, as usual, with this difference only, 
that the design has been for the teachers to exhibit all their pupils in their 
various studies, in such a manner as their own taste and judgment might 
dictate. The appearance of the Schools has been highly gratifying to the 
Board, and tends to confirm them in their belief of the utility of this ar- 
rangement. It has been the custom, for some years past, to exhibit the 
higher classes in the Town Hall, subsequent to the semi-annual examina- 
tions in the Spring. Our Schools have become so large, that only a 
portion of the higher classes can take a part in the exercises on these 
occasions, and the schools having been so fully exhibited in their own rooms, 
the necessity for this, the present season, is avoided. Besides, the Board 
think it may admit of serious doubt, whether the moral influence of these 
exhibitions is, on the whole, salutary. If the tendency is to bring for- 
ward and stimulate a few, and depress the many, or to excite an undue 
and unhealthy spirit of rivalry between different schools, these occasions 
certainly had better be avoided. 

The Board have witnessed with regret for a few years past, the almost 
entire disuse of the Bible in our schools. By the last report of the Secre- 
tary of the Board of Education, it appears that of the 308 towns in the 
Commonwealth, there are at present but three in which the Bible is not 
used as a reading book, or in the exercises of devotion. We suppose there 
are but few if any of our citizens, who would esteem it an honor to our 
town to be one of the three thus distinguished. The New Testament has 
been one of the books prescribed, by the rules of the Board, for the Prima- 
ry Schools from their establishment; and they have, the last year, re- 
quested the teachers of the Grammar Schools, to read from the Scrip- 
tures, without note or comment, at the opening of the Schools in the morn- 



10 

ing ; and they were bappy to find, on the part of the teachers, a cordial 
compliance with the wishes of the Board. 

In order strictly to guard against any sectarian influence, and to ob- 
viate objections that might arise in the minds of some, to the reading of 
the Scriptures in course, and also to relieve the teacher from the incon- 
venience of making the selection at the time of reading ; the Board have 
unanimously introduced "Fowle's Bible Reader." It is also used as a 
Reading Book in one of the classes. The work consists wholly of extracts 
from the Bible, and is divided into three parts ; the first, containing some 
of the most interesting and instructive portions of the Old Testament — the 
second, such extracts as enforce the principles of the christian religion — 
and the third, consisting entirely of selections from the New Testament, 
arranged in chronological order. 

The Board do not feel called upon to go mto an argumentto justify the 
use of the Bible in our schools. It needs no defence from us. It lies at 
the source of those influences which originated our whole system of popu- 
lar education and Free Schools. An able writer remarks, that " al- 
most all the education which exists, or ever has existed, among the people 
at large, has come to them through the Bible. Scotland^ New England, 
and Germany^ the countries where the Bible is the book of the people, 
are the countries in which the Common School system originated, and 
where it has been perpetuated. No system of education can be regarded 
as complete, unless it includes a study of the Bible." 

The Board of Education considered this matter so important, that they 
have made it a subject of distinct notice. We cannot forbear quoting a 
few paragraphs from their eighth Annual Report. They remark, that — 
"By direction of the Board, the Bible has been in daily use, in all the 
Normal Schools, from their commencement, and it is believed that it is 
used, in like manner, in all our Academies. While we rejoice in the change 
that has taken place, (in regard to the use of the Bible in our schools,) the 
fact, that there is a single institution of learning in the peculiar home of the 
Pilgrims, where the light of the Bible is excluded from the minds of its 
pupils, is a ground of serious apprehension and regret. 

"While the Christian world is subdivided into such a variety of religious 
sects, it is to be expected that their jealousies would be excited by secta- 
rian instructions, or by the introduction of books of a denominational 
character. And indeed, as well in the present state of public opinion, as 
of the enactments of our Legislature, that teacher would act strangely in 
contravention of his duty, who should attempt to disregard such a well 
understood and beneficial provision of the laws. But the Bible has nothing 
in it of a sectarian character. All Christian sects regard It as the text- 
book of their faith. Our fathers brought it with them, as tlieir choicest 
patrimony, and bequeathed it to us, as our richest Inheritance. They 
imbued their children Avith Its spirit ; — they founded our government up- 
on its principles, and to render that government permanent, they estab- 
lished the institutions of common schools, as the nursury of piety. 

"It is also worthy of remark, that while our Legislatures have guarded, 
sedulously and effectually, our common schools, from becoming places for 
sectarian instruction, they have, at the same time, provided for the in- 
struction of the youth, both in the schools and in the other institutions of 
learning, in a knowledge of the principles of the Christian religion. The . 



11 

7th sec. of the 23d chap, of the Revised Statutes, enjoins it as a duty upon 
all the instructors of youth, that they shall impress upon their minds " the 
principles of piety," and those other virtues, which are the basis upon 
which a republican constitution is founded ; — and that they shall also en- 
deavor to lead their pupils to a clear understanding of the tendency of the 
above-mentioned virtues — to preserve and perfect a republican constitu- 
tion, and secure the blessings of liberty, as well as to promote their future 
happiness ; and also to point out to them the evil tendency of the opposite 
vices. 

" It is difficult to perceive how these results can be accomplished, with- 
out a frequent reference to the pages of the sacred volume ; and it is 
equally difficult to imagine what objection can be raised to the study of a 
book, which is not only the palladium of our liberties, but the very foun- 
dation, also, of our most cherished hopes. 

"If it is said, by the use of the Bible in the Schools, a wrong interpretation 
may be given by the teacher, to any of its passages, the reply is an obvi- 
ous one, that this would be a fault in the manner of instruction, provided 
for by the law, and not in the use of the Bible itself. But it may be fur- 
ther replied, that even this danger is guarded against. The spirit of the 
law is opposed to it, and public opinion, in this country stronger than the 
law, would at once put down the attempt of any teacher to violate the 
rights of conscience, by giving to his pupils sectarian instruction. 

"If it is said, also, that the Church, the Sabbath School, and the family, 
are places better adapted than the Common School, for the education of 
children, in the principles of the Christian religion, we reply, that, though 
undoubtedly it is the duty of parents and of religious teachers, to co-ope- 
rate with the Common School teachers in these religious instructions, yet 
it is only in the Common School that thousands of the children in our 
Commonwealth can be thus instructed. How many are there, in our 
cities, and scattered through our hundreds of towns, who, save in the pub- 
lic schools, receive no religious instruction ? They hear it not from the 
lips of their parents — they receive it not at the Sabbath School, or from 
the pulpit — and if in the common school the impulses of their souls are 
not aroused and directed by judicious religious instruction, they will grow 
up, active in error and fertile in crime. 

"K the community will look back upon the institutions of the Pilgrims, 
and contemplate the wonders which those institutions have wrought for 
us, — if it will compare the moral aspect of New England, with the most 
favored features of a nation, where the light of the Bible has shone with 
less eflfulgence ; — or if it will compare an individual, subjected at an early 
age^ to religious influences, his energies aroused, guided, and controlled by 
judicious discipline, and his affections trained and confirmed in habits of 
kindness and benevolence, — with one reared without principle, educated 
without morals — corrupting j^outh by his example, and harrassing society 
by his crimes, — it will form, it is believed, a more correct estimate of the 
"unspeakable value of a religious education." These excellent sentiments 
are worthy the high source from whence they emanated. 

Connected with each of our Grammar S(;hools, is a well-selected Li- 
brary, to which any scholar may have access by the payment of a small 
sum. Many of these volumes find their way into families, who have not 
the means or conveniences of obtaining them from other sources, and 



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tend to promote the great object of common school education, viz : — the 
universal diffusion of knowledge. 

For many years, Singing has been a daily exercise in the schools, and 
is attended with pleasing effects. In many of the large schools, the intro- 
duction of this science is attended with additional expense, a teacher 
being employed for this specific purpose. In this town, however, by the 
exertion of the teachers, it is generally well sustained, (as all, we think, 
will bear witness, who have listened to it, at our examinations,) without 
incurring any expense ; and the Board hope that its practice will be con- 
tinued and encouraged by all the teachers. 

The present condition, both of the Grammar and Primary Schools, we 
think, indicates progress. While there is an increasing attention to the 
rudiments of education, instruction in the higher branches is not less 
thorough and general. Still, great sacrifices on the part of individuals, 
and the persevering efforts and co-operation of all, are requisite to make 
our schools what it is hoped they will ere long become. It is much easier 
to find fault with a school, than to devise practicable plans for its im- 
provement. There will be a diversity of opinions in regard to the best 
mode of governing and conducting a school. The general forbearance 
and candor of parents in this town, have usually prevented that excite- 
ment and irritation which have been witnessed in some other places. The 
enlightened views, the liberal appropriations, and the almost universal 
interest felt by our citizens, render any suggestions from us almost 
superfluous ; — still, as all need to be often reminded of their duty, a 
few suggestions may not be inappropriate. 

The full advantage of our Public Schools cannot be realized, until a 
more constant attendance on the part of the pupil is secured. Few ap- 
preciate the loss to the scholar, attendant upon occasional absences from 
school ; and this, though serious indeed, is slight, when compared with 
the evil inflicted upon the class to which the scholar belongs. Unable to 
advance himself, like a leaden weight, he helps to drag others down to his 
own level. 

There will, of necessity, be some interruptions, from causes beyond hu- 
man control ; but we believe our Schools suffer more from this, than 
from any other single evil. We would prefer three months at school, 
with regularity, to six months, when dispersed through the whole year. 

Another error, often committed, is the withdrawal of children from our 
schools, at too early an age. Perhaps a greater amount of actual knowl- 
edge may be acquired, between the ages of 14 and IG, than during all 
the time which precedes that period — the powers of the mind being more 
fully developed. Children and youth are often anxious to anticipate the 
duties and occupations of manhood, and thus suffer their golden opportu- 
nity to slip by them, much to their regret in after life. 

Little can be done by the teacher, without the co-operation of the pa- 
rents. If want of confidence in the teacher Is expressed by the parent, 
his efforts will be neutralized. Parents should remember, that the true 
interests of the teacher are identified with the Improvement of the pupil, 
and the prosperity of the school ; and this fact should lead them to at- 
tribute any seeming wrong, to an error of judgment rather than design. 

Instances in which complaints are made, are rare, considering the num- 
ber of scholars in our schools, — and all should conscientiously abstain from 



13 

every thing calculated to impair the influence ot the teacher. That our 
schools are as good as they should be, we do not assert ; but that they are 
among the best in the State, we think any of our citizens will admit, who 
will take the pains to visit the schools of other towns and cities. 

Few can present stronger claims to be enrolled among the benefactors 
o£ their rsice than the faithful teacher. To him are committed interests 
the most important, trusts the most sacred. 

Another thing essential to the advancement of our schools, is a contin- 
uation of those liberal appropriations which have characterised Charles- 
town, — and enabled the Board to adopt and carry out measures for their 
improvement, which have raised them to the rank they now occupy. ^ — 
Who, that takes a comprehensive view of his duties to the community, 
would wish that we had done less. Those who have children to be edu- 
cated in our schools, cannot but feel that they receive an hundred fold for 
their portion of the money expended; and let not those who are not pa- 
rents, feel that they pay their money without receiving an equivalent. 
What, but general intelligence and morality, can render property and 
life secure ? And what agency can be employed so effectually to secure 
these, as our system of common school instruction ? We must have the 
prisons of Old England, or the schools of New England. The support of 
the latter is the less expensive and far more congenial with our feelings, 
and in harmony with Christian principles. Let, then, our noble Free 
Schools be sustained, as the richest legacy of our fathers, — as the surest 
guarantee for the perpetuity of our government, — as the glory of New 
England. 

With these suggestions the Board surrender the trust confided to them, 
simply remarking, that their duties the past year, have been arduous, — 
sometimes difficult. They have endeavored to discharge them with a con- 
scientious regard to the best interCvSts of the schools. And next to the 
approbation of their own consciences, they have found the highest reward 
in witnessing their increased efficiency and usefulness. 

In conclusion, the Trustees would respectfully recommend to the Town 
the adoptioh of the annexed resolutions, 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

E. P. MACKINTIRE, President, 
HENRY K. FROTHINGHAM, Secretary. 
Charlestown, April 21, 1845. 



14 

RESOLUTIONS. 

1 St. That the Trustees of the Schools be authorized and instructed to take 
a deed in behalf of the Town, of the land and building on Mead Street, 
occupied by Primary School No 18, and that the sum of nine hundred and 
fifty-five dollars be appropriated for the purpose. 

2d. That the subject of rebuilding the Bunker Hill School House, be 
referred to the Trustees, with instructions to procure a plan and estimate 
of the expense, and report to the Town at the adjournment of this 
meetinf>". 



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