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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"



so 



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in 2010 with funding from 

University of Massachusetts Amherst 



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FIEST ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



TEMPORARY ASYLUM FOR THE CHRONIC INSANE 



WORCESTER, 



For the Year ending September 30, 1878. 



BOSTON : 
foanfc, 8&«ts, $ <&a., printers to tfje Qtommaxitotzltij, 

117 Franklin Street. 
1879- 



OFFICEES OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

EOBERT W. HOOPER, M.D. 
Gen. WILLIAM S. LINCOLN 
THOMAS H. GAGE, M.D. 
Col. JOHN D. WASHBURN 
Prof. JAMES B. THAYER 



Boston. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 
Cambridge. 



JOHN G. PARK, M.D. 
ENOCH Q. MARSTON, M.D. 
WILLIAM H. RAYMENTON, M 
CHARLES H. SAEFORD . 
SOPHIA N. GRAVES . 
CLARENCE R. MACOMBER 
WILLIAM SHERMAN 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Superintendent. 
First Assistant Physician. 
D. Second Assistant Physician. 
Steward.' 
Matron. 
Clerk. 
Engineer. 



TREASURER. 



ALBERT WOOD 



Worcester. 



Commomoealtf) of Jfta0Bacf)ii0rti0« 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in their 
capacity as Trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the 
Chronic Insane, submit their First Annual Report. 

The Asylum was established by an act of the legislature, 
approved May 15, 1877, of which the following is a copy : — 

" An Act establishing an Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 
"Be it enacted, Sfc, as follows: 

" Section 1. There shall be established at Worcester a temporary 
asylum for the chronic insane, and so much of the land and buildings 
there situate heretofore used for a lunatic hospital, as the trustees thereof 
may deem necessary, is hereby appropriated for the use of such asylum. 

" Sect. 2. The trustees of Worcester lunatic hospital are hereby 
invested with the same authority relative to the management and govern- 
ment of said asylum, the care of the inmates thereof, the custody of its 
funds, and the collection and disbursement of moneys for and on account 
of it, and to the same extent, as if the asylum was a part of said hospital : 
provided, however, that the inmates thereof shall consist only of such 
chronic insane as may be transferred thereto by the board of state chari- 
ties in the manner provided in section four of chapter two hundred and 
forty of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty-three. 

" Sect. 3. Said trustees are hereby authorized to sell and convey any 
land heretofore used by said hospital, not necessary for the purpose of the 
asylum, in accordance with the provisions of section four of chapter two 
hundred and thirty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
seventy. 

" Sect. 4. This act shall take effect on the first day of September 
next. [Approved May 15, 1877." 



6 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Under the authority thus conferred it was determined, 
Oct. 25, 1877, that the permanent officers of the Asylum 
should be a Superintendent, one Assistant Physician, a 
Steward, a Matron, a Treasurer, a Clerk, and an Engineer, 
who should be elected by the Trustees, and whose salaries 
should be fixed by them. 

On the same day, Dr. John G. Park was elected Superin- 
tendent, with a salary of $2,000 per annum ; Dr. Enoch Q. 
Marston was elected Assistant Physician, with a salary of 
$900 ; Dr. Albert Wood, Treasurer, with a salary of $400 ; 
Mr. C. R. Macomber, Clerk, with a salary of $400 ; and Mr. 
William Sherman, Engineer, with a salary of $1,000. At 
a subsequent meeting Miss Sophia N. Graves was chosen 
Matron, with salary fixed at $325; and Mr. C. H. Safford, 
Steward, with a salary of $800. Although no second Assist- 
ant Physician has been appointed, the Trustees have author- 
ized the employment of Dr. William H. Raymenton in that 
capacity, with a salary of $600 ; it having been found that 
such assistance, at least temporarily, was required. 

REPAIRS. 

Up to the passage of the "act," the board — sharing in the 
generally prevailing idea, that, upon the completion of the 
new Hospital buildings, the old ones were to be abandoned — 
had allowed the same to depreciate, and become much out of 
repair ; but, perceiving by the new legislation that their 
occupancy was to be continued, they at once set themselves 
to the work of having them put in a proper state of repair. 
This has been done with as much rapidity as possible, but is 
not yet fully completed. The amount thus far expended for 
the above purpose is $8,767.86, and has been paid out of the 
accumulated funds of the Hospital. More remains to be 
done, the payment for which, it is hoped and believed, can be 
met from the earnings of the institution. 

INMATES. 

On the thirteenth day of October, 1877, the Trustees were 
furnished with a copy of a vote passed the day previous by 
the Board of State Charities, to the effect that " 200 State 
and town patients from the Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 100 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7 

from the Worcester .Lunatic Hospital, and 25 from the North- 
ampton Lunatic Hospital were to be removed to the Asylum ; " 
the work of removal " to be begun at once, and completed 
by the 1st of November " then next following. 

In accordance with this vote, the work of removal to the 
new building was at once commenced ; and on the nineteenth 
day of the same month the Trustees, by vote, directed " that 
all patients belonging to the Worcester Lunatic Hospital 
be removed from the old to the new buildings on or before 
the 23d inst., and that all patients committed to the Hospital 
before that day be sent to the new building." 

On the day designated in this vote every patient belonging 
to the Hospital was domiciled in the new building. One 
hundred of the patients had been designated by the General 
Agent as subjects for the Asylum, and were left undisturbed. 

On the twenty-third day of October, 100, on the 26th 
another 100 patients, were transferred from the Taunton 
Hospital to the Asylum ; and on the 30th of the same month 
25 more were received from the institution at Northampton : 
so that at the end of seven days a family of 325 patients had 
been gathered within the Asylum. All this without any acci- 
dent or escape. 

Other transfers to this institution have been made during 
the year, until the largest number was reached which could 
be comfortably accommodated. 

The largest number of patients at any one time during the 
year has been 407 ; the average number, 382.98 ; the smallest 
number, 200 ; while the number now remaining is 375. The 
average weekly cost of supporting each patjent during the 
time the Asylum has been in operation has been $2.79. 
There is due the Hospital, for supplies left in the building 
at the time of removal, the sum of $2,825.66, payment of 
which sum will be easily made from the receipts of the com- 
ing year. 

LAND. 

So much of the land heretofore occupied by the Worces- 
ter Lunatic Hospital as is bounded by Summer, East Cen- 
tral, Mulberry, and Asylum Streets, with the buildings 
thereon, was, by vote of the Trustees, passed on the twenty- 
fifth day of October, 1877, under the authority conferred by 



8 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

the statute before referred to, set apart " for the use of the 
Asylum," — that being all, which, in the opinion of the 
Trustees, was, using the language of the act, " necessary " 
for the institution. The temporary use of about four acres 
additional was allowed. In consideration of the fact, as 
appears by the report of the Superintendent, that this last 
lot has furnished the household abundantly with vegetables 
during the season, and with a considerable supply for the 
winter ; that the vegetables have been raised almost entirely 
b}^ the labor of the patients ; that health has been promoted 
by this labor, — it may be a matter of question whether this 
tract, or some other of sufficient size, might not have been 
wisely included in the premises appropriated for the perma- 
nent use of the Asylum. 

It is a matter of congratulation, that, if the Trustees have 
erred in this point, the error is not past remedy. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the inmates of the institution during the 
season has been good. 

Twenty-six deaths only have occurred. 
You are respectfully referred to the accompanying report 
of the Superintendent for a more detailed account of the 
working and present condition of the institution. The 
Treasurer's report shows a gratifying result. 

The Trustees feel that they have been fortunate in the 
selection of officers^ who, under their general supervision, 
have administered the affairs of the Asylum. To the skill 
and judgment of these gentlemen the success of the past 
year is mainly due. 

R. W. HOOPER. 
WM. S. LINCOLN. 
THOMAS H. GAGE. 
JOHN D. WASHBURN. 
JAMES B. THAYER. 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES, 

Sept. 30, 1878. 



Live-stock $100 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements ..... 608 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures 3,000 00 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department . ... . 9,120 00 

Other furniture in inmates' department .... 2,205 60 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department . 9,394 15 

Ready-made clothing . . . . . . . . 96 75 

Dry-goods 572 00 

Provisions and groceries . . . . . . . 2,497 86 

Drugs and medicines . . . . . . . . 325 00 

Fuel 2,222 25 

Library 150 00 

$30,292 11 



10 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my Annual Report on 
the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1878 : — 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount received : 

From the Commonwealth for support of patients 
cities and towns for support of patients 

loans 

all other sources 



$10,393 05 

41,122 39 

10,000 00 

1,343 89 

$62,859 33 



The expenditures for the year (49 weeks) have been as 
follows : — 



Salaries and wages . 








117,817 53 




Provisions and supplies, viz. : 


245 61 


$18,063 14 




Meats of all kinds $3,392 85 




Fish of all kinds 








465 53 




Fruit and vegetables . 








1,566 93 




Flour, 452^ barrels, at $6.53 








2,953 25 




Grain and meal for table . 








143 42 




Grain, meal, and hay for stock 


- 






171 01 




Tea and coffee 








1,210 85 




Sugar and molasses . 








1,774 46 




Milk, butter, and cheese . 








5,855 06 




Salt and other groceries . 








459 29 




All other provisions . 








1,195 83 


19,188 48 


Clothing and material 


3,752 46 


Fuel and lights . 








4,322 35 




Medicine and medical supplies 








344 77 




Furniture, beds, and bedding 








1,351 07 

$9,770 65 




Amounts carried forward 


$37,251 62 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 

Amounts brought forward 
Transportation and travelling . 
Ordinary repairs ..... 
All other current expenses 

Total current expenses 
Loans paid to Worcester Lunatic Hospital 
Refunded, and furnished patients 



Cash on hand Sept 30, 1878 



No. 23. 


11 


$9,770 65 


$37,251 62 


191 59 




222 45 




2,618 76 


12,803 45 






$50,055 07 


$10,000 00 




110 52 






10,110 52 






$60,165 59 
2,693 74 



>,859 33 



RESOURCES. 



Cash on hand . 
Due from the Commonwealth 
from cities and towns 



LIABILITIES. 



$2,693 74 




4,513 25 




14,235 83 


$21,442 82 




$3,007 78 

2,825 66 

364 19 




1,792 39 


7,990 02 





Due for supplies . . . . 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital for supplies 
inmates ...... 

for salaries and wages 



Total surplus $13,452 80 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 

Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1878. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 9, 1878. 
The undersigned have this day examined the account of the Treasurer 
of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, and have inspected all the vouchers 
of expenditures from Oct. 23, 1877, to Sept. 30, 1878, inclusive. 

They find all the items properly vouched, every voucher being indorsed 
with the approval of the Superintendent, and with that Of three or more 
of the Trustees. 

(Signed) JOSEPH SARGENT, } 

THOMAS H. GAGE, \ Audltors - 



12 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with an act of the legisla- 
ture of 1877, entitled " An Act establishing an Asylum for 
the Chronic Insane," approved May 15, 1877, the buildings 
heretofore used as a lunatic hospital were, on the 23d of 
October, 1877, occupied for the purposes specified in the act. 

The Board of State Charities, by the authority given them 
in the act, have, during the year, transferred from the State 
Lunatic Hospitals, and the State Almshouse at Tewksbury, 
429 patients, as follows : — 



Table No. 1. 

Number of Admissions during the Year. 



Date. 


Transfeebed from — 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1877. 










Oct. 23. 


Worcester Lunatic Hospital 


50 


50 


100 


23. 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital 


50 


50 


100 


26. 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital 


50 


50 


100 


30. 


Northampton Lunatic Hospital 


5 


20 


25 


Nov. 16. 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital 


25 


25 


50 


30. 


Northampton Lunatic Hospital 


1 


- 


1 


Dec. 28. 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital 


12 


13 


25 


1878. 










Feb. 14. 


State Almshouse, Tewksbury . 


4 


11 


15 


April 18. 


Worcester Lunatic Hospital 


- 


1 


1 


Aug. 1. 


State Almshouse, Tewksbury . 
Total 


12 


- 


12 




209 


220 


429 



The above table represents 428 persons, one patient having 
been discharged, and committed to the Worcester Lunatic 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 13 

Hospital, and again transferred to the Asylum. The patients 
were all of them considered to be suffering from insanity in 
its chronic form ; and, in making the transfers, the general 
rule was followed by the Board of State Charities of select- 
ing for removal those patients who resided nearest Worces- 
ter, and who had been longest in the various hospitals from 
which they were transferred : the question of who are the 
" chronic insane " being in this case decided by the date of 
the commitment paper. 

While this plan did not relieve the other hospitals of many 
disagreeable patients, who could properly be classed as 
chronic, and who would have been willingly spared, it was 
probably the only one which could have been adopted with- 
out prejudice to this Asylum. 

In the first report of the Board of State Charities in 
1864, the want of a proper classification of the inmates of 
our lunatic hospitals was spoken of as one of the evils con- 
nected with their management. 

The necessity of securing a more uniform price for those 
patients supported by towns and cities was urged, and the 
regret expressed that the State, in 1855, had not built a 
smaller hospital at Northampton, and expended the balance 
left of the $350,000 which that hospital cost " in the pur- 
chase of lands, and in the erection and furnishing of a plain, 
convenient, and substantial building in some rural district as 
an asylum for the incurable insane." But until the last year 
no attempt has been made in this State to provide for the 
dependent incurable insane in an asylum devoted exclu- 
sively to their care. 

The question of the advisability of caring for the acute 
and chronic, the curable «and incurable, insane in separate 
institutions, is one which has been pretty thoroughly dis- 
cussed in this country during the last few years. It has 
been generally opposed by the superintendents of hospitals 
for the insane on the ground that it would be disadvanta- 
geous to both classes, and advocated by State Boards of 
Charities for reasons of economy. 

It is possible that the opponents of the plan may have 
had their judgment biased somewhat by the consideration of 
the effect such a sj^stem might have on their own institu- 
tions. At any rate, while many good reasons may be given 



14 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

against the plan, there seems to have been a good deal of 
sentiment made to do the duty of argument by those who 
object to the separation of the curable and incurable insane, 
and their treatment and care in different and distinct insti- 
tutions. 

The State having probably provided buildings for the 
insane of all classes for some time to come, no new asylum 
will be built for the special accommodation of the chronic 
insane. For this reason it does not seem necessary to discuss 
the subject at any length in the present report. 

Should, however, in years to come, the success of this 
Asylum be such as to encourage the extension of the system 
here inaugurated, the State already possesses the " rural dis- 
trict," the quiet neighborhood, the well-cultivated farm, and 
suitable buildings, to which additions could easily be made 
to accommodate any required number of patients. 

The number of insane persons now provided for in alms- 
houses by the cities and towns in the State is about 450. 
The managers of these institutions are undoubtedly efficient 
and humane, and well suited to perform their ordinary duties*; 
but none of them have probably ever paid any attention to, or 
had any experience in, the special care and treatment of the 
insane, other than of the few who happen to be in the building 
under their control. They cannot therefore be expected to 
understand their peculiarities and wants. While it is true 
that some insane persons can be as well cared for in the alms- 
house or private family as in a large hospital, this number, 
in comparison with all the insane, must be small. 

The custom, as it prevails at present, of removing insane 
patients from the State hospitals by the Overseers of the 
Poor to their almshouses, is one in many ways objectionable. 
It acts unfavorably on the insane themselves, who exert an 
influence upon the other inmates of the almshouse, especially 
the children, which is extremely pernicious ; and now that 
the State institutions devoted to the insane are not over- 
crowded, the plan of almshouse treatment should be discour- 
aged and condemned. 

With the decrease of the market price of supplies, it is to 
be hoped that the expense of caring for the dependent insane 
may be reduced to such a point that the cost cannot be an 
excuse for their removal from the hospital or asylum to the 



1878.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



15 



almshouse. If, however, the practice is to continue, it would 
seem that the best interests of this unfortunate class require 
that the matter should be directly under the control of the 
State, and that the determination of who is a proper person 
to receive almshouse care and treatment should be intrusted 
to a medical man whose experience and education fit him for 
his duties, and who, in arriving at a decision, would take into 
consideration all the circumstances of the case, and not 
assent to such removal simply because the patient is not 
dangerous to society. 

Table No. 2. 
Number of Patients discharged during the Year, and their Con- 
dition at Time of Discharge. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




4 


_ 


4 




2 


2 


4 




12 


8 


20 




18 


8 


26 




36 


18 


54 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1878 .... 


173 


202 


375 



All of the patients of the Asylum being at the time of 
their transfer considered incurable, the number discharged 
recovered would naturally be small. The above table shows 
that number to have been 4. 

One of these was a patient suffering from recurrent mania v 
from which attack he had recovered at the time of his dis- 
charge. It is probable that he will have another attack 
sooner or later. 

The insanity of the other 3 being caused by intemper- 
ance, their recovery will be of as long duration as their 
abstinence. 

Of the 4 who had improved, 2 were well enough to go to 
their homes, and 2 were removed to other States by the 
Board of State Charities. 



16 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Of the 20 discharged not improved, 9 were removed by 
Overseers of the Poor to their almshouses. 
Twenty-six have died. 
The number remaining Sept. 30, 1878, was 375. 

Table No. 3. 
Showing Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




4 


4 


8 




5 


- 


5 


Exhaustion from chronic mania . . . 


2 


1 


3 




2 


1 


3 


Exhaustion from chronic dementia 


1 


1 


2 




- 


1 


1 




1 


- 


1 


Chronic dysentery ..... 


1 


- 


1 




1 


- 


1 




1 


- 


1 


. Total ....... 


18 


8 


26 



The house has been during the year free from any epidemic 
or contagious disease, and the amount of serious acute sick- 
ness has been very small ; only one death from this cause 
having occurred, that of an old lady, who died from double 
pneumonia. 

Among the patients received were 34 suffering from chronic 
epilepsy, — 19 males and 15 females, — and 18 males affected 
with general paralysis. 

Five have died of the latter disease, and 3 of the former. 

Consumption stands at the head of the list as a cause of 
death, 8 having died of this disease. 



1878.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



17 



Table No. 4. 

Assigned Causes of Insanity. 



ASSIGNED CAUSES. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Hereditary 


44 


34 


78 


Epilepsy .... 










19 


15 


34 


Intemperance 










19 


9 


28 


111 health . 










4 


18 ' 


22 


Paresis 










18 


- 


18 


Masturbation . . ' . 










12 


5 


m 


Injury .... 










12 


3 


15 


Domestic troubles 










- 


14 


14 


Old age 










6 


3 


9 


Puerperal condition 










- 


8 


8 


Sunstroke . 










6 


- 


6 


Overwork . 










5 


1 


6 


Religious excitement . 










1 


5 


6 


Business troubles 










5 


/ 


5 


Turn of life 










- 


4 


4 


Disappointment in love 










1 


3 


4 


Syphilis 










2 


1 


3 


Solitary habits of life 










1 


- 


1 


Political excitement 










1 


- 


1 


Fright . ' . 










1 ' 


- 


1 


Unknown . 










52 


96 


148 


Total . 


209 


219 


428 


The causes of insan 


Lty, as g] 


ven in the above table, were 


the ones assigned on th 


eir c 


omn 


litm 


3E 


t paper 


s to the 


various 



hospitals from which they were transferred to the Asylum. 
In 148 cases no cause was given. In many of the cases 
the wrong cause was undoubtedly assigned, and the table 
itself can have but little statistical value, 
3 



18 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 5. 
Showing Nativity of Patients. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Maine 


9 


9 


18 


New Hampshire . 












5 


8 


13 


Vermont 












- 


1 


1 


Massachusetts 












108 


79 


187 


Rhode Island 












3 


- 


3 


Pennsylvania 












1 


- 


1 


Maryland . 












- 


1 


1 


Virginia 












1 


- 


1 


North Carolina 












1 


- 


1 


Georgia 












- 


1 


1 


Florida 












1 


- 


1 


"The South" 












- 


1 


1 


Total of Americans 


129 


100 


229 


British Provinces 








4 


4 


8 


Western Islands . 








2 


o 


4 . 


Ireland 










61 


96 


157 


Scotland 












3 


5 


8 


England 












7 


2 


9 


France 












1 


1 


2 


Germany 




. 








1 


7 


8 


Austria 












- 


1 


1 


Poland 




. 








1 


- 


1 


Sweden 




• 








- 


1 


1 


Total of foreigners 


80 


119 


199 


Total p 


• per 


sons 


• 


209 


219 


428 



1878.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



19 



Table No. 6. 

Showing Residence of Patients. 



COUNTY. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Bristol ....... 


4 


_ 


4 


Dukes . 














1 


- 


1 


Essex . 














13 


11 


24 


Hampden 














1 


- 


1 


Middlesex 














29 


22 


51 


Norfolk 














8 


8 


16 


Plymouth 














1 


- 


1 


Suffolk 














118 


141 


259 


Worcester 














20 


19 


39 


Unknown 














14 


18 


32 


Total . 


209 


219 


428 



Table No. 7. 

Showing the Ages of Patients admitted, discharged recovered, 

not recovered, and died during the Year. 



t 
AGES. 




Admitted. 


Discharged 
recovered. 


Discharged 

not 
recovered. 


Died. 




Ma. Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Under 15 . 

From 15 to 20 
20 to 25 
25 to 30 
30 to 35 
35 to 40 
40 to 50 
50 to 60 
60 to 70 
70 to 80 . 
80 to 90 . 

Unknown . 




3 
5 

19 
26 
22 
30 
36 
29 
13 
5 
1 
20 


4 
11 
20 
24 
34 
51 
27 
24 
6 
1 
17 


3 

9 
30 
46 
46 
64 
87 
56 
37 ■ 
11 

2 
37 


1 

2 
1 

4 


- 


1 

2 
1 

4 


4 

3 
3 

4 

14 


2 

1 

4 
2 
1 

10 


2 
4 
1 
3 

7 
6 
1 

24 


2 

1 

3 

2 

5 
3 
1 

1 

18 


1 

1 
1 

o 

2 

8 


3 

2 

4 
2 
8 
3 
3 

1 


Total 


209 


219 


428 


26 



20 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



Table No. 8. 



Shoiving Occupat 


ion c 


f Me' 


i admitted during the Year. 




Laborers 33 


Machinists .... 2 


Farmers . 








15 


Lawyers . 






2 


Carpenters 








11 


Butchers 






2 


Clerks . 








11 


Harness-makers 






2 


Shoemakers 








9 


Oystermen 






2 


Sailors . 








8 


Music-teacher . 






1 


Masons . 








6 


Engineer 






1 


Mechanics 








5 


Rope-maker . 






1 


Teamsters 








5 


Trunk-maker . 






1 


Storekeepers 








5 


Expressman . 






1 


Operatives 








4 


Waiter . 






1 


Tailors . 








4 


Broker . 






1 


Painters . 








4 


Calker 






1 


Students 








3 


Constable 






1 


Printers . 








3 


Baker 






1 


Gardeners 








3 


Brass-moulder 






1 


Merchants 








2 


C arriage-maker 






1 


Sea captains 








2 


Boat-builder . 






1 


Hotel-keepers 








2 


Unknown 






47 


Barbers . 








2 





Blacksmiths 








2 


Total 






209 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



21 



Table No. 9. 
Showing by whom the Patients have been supported during the 

Year. 





6 


S 
fa 


o 






1 


3 

o 


State 


47 


61 


108 


Brought forward . 


187 


206 


393 


Boston . 




77 


89 


166 


Chelmsford . 


1 


- 


1 


Cambridge 




9 


9 


18 


Cohasset 




- 


1 


1 


Chelsea . 




9 


5 


14 


Concord 




1 


- 


1 


Salem 




4 


4 


8 


Dighton 




- 


1 


1 


Lynn 




2 


3 


5 


Douglas 




1 


- 


1 


Brookfield 




1 


3 


4 


Edgartown 




1 


- 


1 


Beverly . 




2 


1 


3 


Essex . 




1 


- 


1 


Fitchburg 




— 


3 


3 


Fall River 




1 


- 


1 


Franklin 




2 


1 


3 


Holliston 




1 


- 


1 


Lowell . 




1 


2 


3 


Lancaster 




1 


~ 


1 


Marblehead 




1 


2 


3 


Leicester 




1 


- 


1 


Melrose . 




1 


2 


3 


Lincoln 




- 


1 


1 


Needham 




3 


- 


3 


Medway 




- 


1 


1 


Newburyport 




1 


2 


3 


Natick" . 




- 


1 


1 


Stoneham 




2 


1 


3 


Plymouth 




1 


- 


1 


Woburn . 




1 


o 


3 


Pembroke 




1 


- 


1 


Waltham 




2 


1 


3 


Peabody 




1 


- 


1 


Wakefield 




3 


- 


3 


Revere . 




- 


1 


1 


Haverhill 




- 


2 


2 


Randolph 




1 


- 


1 


Lawrence 




1 


1 


2 


Sutton . 




1 


- 


1 


Maiden . 




2 


- 


2 


Spi'ingfield 




1 


- 


1 


Manchester 




1 


1 


2 


Swampscott 




1 


- 


1 


Medfield . 




- 


2 


2 


Scituate 




- 


1 


1 


Millbury 




1 


1 


2 


Southampton 




- 


1 


1 


Medford . 




1 


1 


2 


Shrewsbury 




- 


1 


1 


Mili'ord . 




2 


- 


2 


Sherborne 




1 


- 


1 


Newton . 




1 


1 


2 


Southbridge 




- 


1 


1 


Quincy . 




1 


1 


2 


Templeton 




- 


1 


1 


Uxbridge 




1 


1 


2 


Tewksbury 




- 


1 


1 


Westford 




2 


- 


2 


Westborough 




1 


- 


1 


Webster . 




2 


_ 


2 


Warren 




1 


- 


1 


Weymouth 




2 


- 


2 


Wilmington 




- 


1 


1 


Worcester 




1 


1 


2 


Walpole 




1 


- 


1 


Blackstone 




1 


- 


1 


West Boylsto 


n 


- 


1 


1 


Bradford 




_ 


1 


1 


Acton . 




1 


- 


1 


Brookline 




— 


1 


1 


Sharon . 




1 


- 


1 


(^ 1 • ^4_„ 






1 


1 










v^nnton ... 




Total . 


209 


220 


429 


Carried forward . 


187 


206 


393 











22 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



Table No. 10. 

Showing Daily Average Number of Patients for each Month for 
the Year ; the Largest and the Smallest Number of Patients in 
the Asylum at any Time. 



DAILY AVERAGE. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1877. 








October ...... 


134.44 


137.78 


272.22 


November ..... 


167.53 


182.27 


349.80 


December ..... 


182.03 


194.74 


376.77 


1878. 








January . . . . . ' . 


191.55 


205.09 


396.64 


February- 




190.79 


209.67 


400.46 


March 




190.81 


213.51 


404.32 


April 




189.43 


211.27 


400.70 


May . 




182.64 


205.74 


388.38 


June 




178.93 


205 


383.93 


July. 




174.71 


204 51 


379.22 


August 




183 54 


203.16 


386.70 


September 


177 16 


202 


379.16 


Total daily average for the year (343 








days) ending Sept. 30, 1878 . 


• 


• 


382.98 


Largest number in the Asylum at 








any time . 


192 


215 


407 


Smallest number in the Asylum at 








any time 


100 


100 


200 



1878.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



23 



Table No. 11. 
Showing Number of Articles made in the Seimng-Room. 



Articles. 


Number. 


Articles. 


Number. 


Dresses .... 


250 


Pillow-slips . . . 


94 


Print sacks . 






12 


Pillow-shams . 






5 


Skirts . 






55 


Curtains . 






30 


Chemises 






170 


Table-cloths . 






6 


Drawers 






64 


Towels . 






104 


Night-dresses 






16 


Dining-room towels 






95 


Print aprons . 






28 


Clothes-bags . 






12 


Underwaists . 






6 


Ticking aprons 






8 


Spreads . 






24 


Suspenders (pairs) 






42 


Sheets . 






84 







24 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



STATEMENT 

Showing Cost of Maintenance to Sept. 30, 1878. 



Flour, 471 barrels . 

Flour (Graham), 15 barrels 

Corn and rye meal, 7,102 pounds 

Oatmeal, 634 pounds 

Hominj", 5 barrels . 

Cracked wheat, 689 pounds 

Crackers, 63 barrels 

Fresh beef, 12,657 pounds 

Corned beef, 21,544 pounds 

Soup beef, 5,098 pounds . 

Lamb and veal, 929 pounds 

Mutton, 862 pounds 

Poultry, 909 pounds 

Fresh pork, 2,798 pounds 

Salt pork, 5^ barrels 

Sausage, 2,069 pounds . 

Hams, 409 pounds . 

Fish (fresh), 10,185 pounds 

Fish (salt), 4,238 pounds 

Vegetables 

Potatoes, 1,680 bushels 

Potatoes (sweet), 1,329 pounds 

Beans, 108 bushels . 

Rice, 898 pounds 

Salt, 13 barrels 

Spices 

Vinegar, 320 gallons 

Sugar, 18,544 pounds 

Molasses, 572 gallons 

Sirup, 121 gallons . 

Lard, 2,734 pounds 

• Amount carried forward, 



$3,070 75 


76 


40 


107 


10 


24 


43 


24 


64 


27 


59 


195 


25 


1,456 


83 


1,102 


19 


152 


96 


178 


09 


78 


95 


183 


99 


193 


04 


81 


00 


169 


03 


45 


52 


314 


46 


211 


96 


149 


43 


925 


24 


30 


50 


205 


37 


66 


26 


29 


75 


49 


82 


64 


00 


1,576 


21 


255 


79 


71 


12 


231 


11 



.1,348 78 



1878.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



25 



Amount brought forward 
Eggs, 1,926 dozen . 
Butter, 11,715 pounds 
Cheese, 1,723 pounds 
Milk, 66,127 quarts 
Coffee, 2,448 pounds 
Tea (Japan), 867 pounds 
Tea (Oolong), 918 pounds 
Chiccory, 189 pounds 
Ice, 224,665 pounds 
Fruit 

Fruit (dried) . 
Raisins, 26 boxes . 
Bi-carb. soda, 256 pounds 
Cream of tartar, 274 pounds 
Tobacco, 308 pounds 
Groceries (miscellaneous) 
Medicines, etc. 
Disinfectant, 1,515 pounds 
Soap, 4,160 pounds 
Soap (soft) 
Starch, 330 pounds 
Hay, 9,993 pounds 
Straw, 39,892 pounds 
Provender 
Dry-goods (including women's 

ings) 

Clothing (including men's clothing and furnishings) 
Boots, shoes, and slippers' 
Blankets and spreads, 
Crockery and glass 
Tinware 
Hardware 
Pipe and fittings 
Tools . 
Furniture 
House furnishings 
Stationery 
Brooms . 
Paints and oils 
Lime and cement 
Lumber . 

Amount carried forward 

4 



clothing: and furnish 



$11,348 78 

346 65 

2,747 99 

206 44 

2,975 71 

626 15 

158 40 

468 74 

19 56 

349 99 

144 61 

99 62 

54 62 

13 08 

81 16 

153 24 

143 91 

291 75 

45 80 

262 78 

169 67 

22 44 

101 91 

334 15 

77 30 

926 21 
1,852 00 
553 90 
416 24 
169 13 
240 50 
211 98 

114 83 
21 50 
51 50 

559 56 

300 19 

76 55 

115 50 
48 97 

122 71 

$27,025 72 



26 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward, 








$27,025 72 


Carriages and wagons 








478 75 


Horse .... 












125 00 


Seeds and plants 












39 47 


Gas, 484,300 cubic feet . 












1,380 29 


Oil .... 












106 36 


Coal, 1,374,390 pounds . 




^ 








§,867 38 


Charcoal, 153 bushels 












41 50 


Chaplain 












130 00 


Undertaker's charges 












199 50 


Labor .... 












283 49 


Expense 












742 95 


Repairs (ordinary) 












300 33 


Net expended for suppl 


Les issued t 


o Sept. 30, 1878 


, $33,720 74 


Net expended for suppl 


ies 


. $33,720 74 




Pay-roll to Sept. 30, 1878 


19,609 95 
$53,330 66 




Less sundry sales 


• 




. 


869 It 


i 



Dividing this expenditure ($52,461.48) by the aver- 
age daily number of patients (382.98) gives the 
cost of each patient for 49 weeks 

Dividing this by 49, the number of weeks the Asylum 
has been opened, gives the weekly cost per 
patient ........ 



5,461 48 



$136.98 



$2.79 



It being supposed that, upon the completion of the new- 
Hospital, the use of the old buildings for hospital purposes 
would be discontinued, only those repairs have been at- 
tempted for the last five or six years which were absolutely 
necessary. 

All of the buildings and fences needed painting; and 
much work, in the way of painting, plastering, and laying of 
new floors, was necessary. 

The work of outside painting was commenced in August, 
1877 ; and it was expected, that, upon the transfer of the 
patients to the new Hospital, a few months could be used for 
completing the necessary repairs and alterations in the wards 
before they were again occupied ; but the overcrowded con- 
dition of the other hospitals called for immediate relief. 

The last patient was taken from the old to the new Hospi- 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 27 

tal on Oct. 23 ; and on Nov. 1 the Asylum contained 325 
patients. Thus the repairs, which, it was hoped, could be 
completed in a few months, have dragged slowly along 
through the whole year, owing to the difficulty of employ- 
ing many workmen at the same time in a house full of 
patients. 

The old laundry, situated in the basement of the chapel 
wing, was of insufficient size, and in a dilapidated condition. 

The building above being devoted to living and sleeping 
rooms for the employe's and for a general sewing-room, these 
apartments were frequently filled with the most disagreeable 
and unhealthy odors, which emanated from the filthy clothes 
washed below. 

A building of brick, two stories in height, was added to 
the north side of the engine-house, which furnishes a room 
below for laundry purposes, taking power from the adjacent 
engine-room, and one above for an ironing and dry room. 
These repairs have been made from the surplus funds of the 
Worcester Lunatic Hospital, and have cost about $9,000. 
Much still remains to be done. New floors have been laid 
in twelve of the twenty-four wards ; others should be relaid 
as opportunity offers. 

The system of water-closets, which has been in use for 
more than twenty years, needs re-organizing. 

The floors of many of the rooms and dormitories occupied 
by patients require a coat or two of paint ; 'and the plastering 
and ceiling — which is badly cracked in places, and started 
from the laths in many of the wards — will need renewing. 
These repairs we hope to be able to make from our own cur- 
rent receipts, without asking for a special appropriation for 
the purpose from the legislature. 

Although, from the chronic character of the malady of the 
inmates of the Asylum, but very few recoveries are to be 
expected, the usual means for their recreation and amuse- 
ment have been employed. The stereopticon, concerts, plays, 
and readings have brought together in the chapel, once or 
twice a week during the autumn and winter evenings, those 
patients whose mental condition would admit of it. 

These entertainments were furnished entirely by the offi- 
cers and employes, who cheerfully assumed this extra labor 
in addition to their regular daily duties. 



28 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

Religious services have been held on sabbath afternoons, 
the pulpit being occupied by clergymen of different denomi- 
nations from the city. 

Much attention has been given to employment of some 
kind as a sanitary measure ; and every endeavor Has been 
made to have our patients do something useful. In this 
way their thoughts have been diverted, for the time being, 
from themselves and their troubles and delusions. 

I am pleased to acknowledge a kindly interest shown in 
our behalf by Miss Dix, who has remembered this new insti- 
tution by a donation of copies of "Social Hymns and 
Tunes " for chapel service. 

A water-color picture of Lake Quinsigamond, executed by 
himself, has been given by Mr. Henry Woodward, son of the 
first distinguished Superintendent of the Worcester Lunatic 
Hospital, and himself one of its former Treasurers. The pro- 
prietors of " The Worcester Evening Gazette " have, gener- 
ously contributed a copy of their paper during the year. 

The lot of land east of the Asylum, containing about four 
acres, and heretofore occupied by the Lunatic Hospital as a 
garden, was wisely set apart by you for the temporary use 
of the Asylum. Under the management of our faithful 
gardener, Daniel O'Neil, assisted by several patients, it has 
furnished the household abundantly with vegetables during 
the season, and with beets, turnips, parsnips, and celery suf- 
ficient for winter use. 

Much of the success obtained in the management of large 
institutions like the Asylum must depend on the faithfulness 
and efficiency of the subordinate officers and employes. 

Dr. Enoch Q. Marston, formerly Assistant Physician at the 
State Almshouse at Tewksbury, was appointed First Assistant 
Physician ; and Dr. W. H. Raymenton was continued in the 
office of Second Assistant Physician, having held a similar 
position in the Worcester Lunatic Hospital for the three years 
previous. 

Miss Sophia N. Graves was appointed Matron, having had, 
in other capacities, four or five years' experience among the 
insane. 

Mr. Clarence R. Macomber was appointed Clerk. I desire 
to commend the general maimer in which each and all of 
them have performed the duties of their respective positions. 



1878.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 29 

In December Mr. C. H. Safford was chosen Steward, and 
continues to fill the office in an acceptable manner. An 
examination of the tables accompanying this report, refer- 
ring to subsistence and supplies, will show that the most 
careful and constant economy has been practised during the 
year in his department. 

The employe's, with few exceptions, have engaged in their 
duties with zeal and fidelity. 

To you, gentlemen, I feel greatly indebted for aid and 
counsel during the year. 

In closing, I think we may say that the first year of the 
Asylum has been one of gratifying success, and furnishes 
good reason to believe that this special charity will be, in the 
future, another commendable addition to the ones which 
Massachusetts has already established for the care and relief 
of the poor and unfortunate, both within and from without 
her borders. 

JOHN G. PARK, 

Super inten ent. 
Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1878. 




Profile of . Ham Line or v« 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 




Profile of Line across Irrigation Field from entl of Pipe to Lake 



A 




LUN A TIC HOSPITAL 

Worcester Mass 



"■■-■ ■ ' " '" 



A ^25^W,FA