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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Massachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr47temp 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPOET 



THE TRUSTEES 



WOEOESTEE, 



For the Year ending September 30, 1879. 



BOSTON: 

&anti, l&erg, & Co., printers to tfje &0mttt0tt&jealtf>, 

117 Franklin Street. 
1880. 



Officers of the asylum. 



TRUSTEES. 

Gen. WILLIAM S. LINCOLN 
THOMAS n. GAGE, M.D. 
Col. JOHN D. WASHBURN 
Prof. JAMES B. THAYER 
ROBERT W. HOOPER, M.D. 



wokcester. 
wokcestek. 
Worcester. 
Cambridge. 
Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D Superintendent. 

WILLIAM H. RAYMENTON, M.D. . . . Assistant Physician. 

CHARLES H. SAFFORD Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES Matron. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER Clerk. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN Engineer. 

TREASURER. 
ALBERT WOOD Worcester. 



1879.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 41 



Commonwealtl) of Jitci0sact)U0£ti0* 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To his Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, acting 
as Trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic In- 
sane, respectfully submit their Second Annual Report ; and 
refer for additional details to the annexed reports of the 
Superintendent and Treasurer, 

Movement of Population. 

At the close of the year ending Sept. 30, 1878, there were 
remaining in the Asylum 375 patients; and there have been 
received during the year 47 : so that a total number of 422 
have been under treatment. Of these, 33 have died ; one 
has eloped ; seventeen have been discharged to the care of 
overseers of the poor, or to friends ; and 371 remain. The 
daily average number has been a small fraction above 367. 

The actual working of the law under which the Asylum 
for the Chronic Insane came into existence, has resulted, 
whether the Legislature so intended or not, in peopling this 
institution almost entirely with the incurable insane. This 
accounts for the meagre report of recoveries as compared with 
other institutions in the State devoted to the care and treat- 
ment of this unfortunate class. Our humbler efforts here are 
directed to the relief and mitigation of an affliction which 
will only, in most cases, be completely removed when the 
sufferers cease to exist. 
6 



42 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

Cost of Maintenance. 
The average weekly cost of supporting patients during 
the year has been $2.86. This might perhaps be slightly 
reduced, should present cost of living continue, if the num- 
ber of patients were kept up to the full capacity of the 
Asylum, which is 400. 

Repairs. 

Allusion was made in our last report to the work of repairs 
on the buildings and grounds. 

It was stated that these had been pushed forward as rapid- 
ly as possible, but were not yet completed. The expense of 
repairs up to that time, which had been paid out of the 
accumulated funds of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, for 
reasons then stated, was given as 18,706.86. Since that 
report was made, the Hospital has paid bills, which had then 
been incurred but remained unpaid, to the amount of $427.89 ; 
making a total of expenditure for repairs at the old building, 
by the Hospital, of $9,134.75. 

The belief was expressed that what remained to be done 
could be paid for out of the earnings of the institution. 
Accordingly, as the work has progressed, it has been paid for 
in that maimer, and appears in the Treasurer's report under 
the head of repairs, amounting to $4,179.57. There is in- 
cluded in this item, renewal of steam-heating apparatus in 
the centre of the house, re-building of fences, building of 
bins for storage of coal, paving gutters under the eaves, com- 
plete renovation of the interior-finish of one of the wards 
in the south wing, &c. The work thus begun we hope to be 
able to continue until all the wards in the "old wings" are 
renovated. 

Garden. 

The success which has attended the operations in the 
vegetable garden during the year, certainly appears to justify 
the action of the Trustees in allowing the use for that pur- 
pose of the lot east of Mulberry Street. This lot, contain- 
ing about four acres, has been entirely cultivated by the 
labor of the patients, under the direction of a gardener, and 
has furnished the table with all vegetables used, except pota- 
toes. 



1879.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 43 

Viewed in the light of economy, this is by no means a tri- 
fling matter ; but when we consider how great the benefit of 
such occupation has been to the patients themselves, it shows 
to double advantage. We think the lot should remain in- 
tact, and be used for its present purpose as long as a manifest 
good results from such application. 

Change in Official Staff. 

Early in February, 1879, Dr. John G. Park, Superintend- 
ent or the Asylum, left it to take the superintendency of the 
Worcester Lunatic Hospital. On the 21th of the same 
month the Trustees made choice of Dr. H. M. Quinby, who 
had been for many years an assistant physician at the Hospi- 
tal, to fill the vacancy occasioned by Dr. Park's departure. 
Dr. Marston, who had been Assistant Physician, having also 
left to take Dr. Quinby 's place in the staff of the Hospital, 
choice was made of Dr. W. H. Raymenton to be Assistant 
Physician at the Asylum. 

No other changes have occurred ; and we take particular 
pleasure in adding, that all the affairs of the institution have 
been conducted harmoniously and with apparently mutual 
confidence and respect on the part of Trustees and Officers. 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 
JOHN D. WASHBURN. 
JAMES B. THAYER. 
R. W. HOOPER. 



44 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES 

Sept. 30, 1879. 



Live stock . . ' f 250 00 

Carriage and agricultural implements 562 30 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures . . . . 2,800 00 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department .... 8,296 00 

Other furniture in inmates' department .... 1,764 48 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department . 8,515 32 

Ready-made clothing 911 05 

Dry-goods 1,075 77 

Provisions and groceries ....... 2,195 73 

Drugs and medicines 193 81 

Fuel 1,973 49 

Library 100 00 

$28,637 95 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



45 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my Second Annual Re- 
port on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1879 : — 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1878: 

belonging to Asylum . . . . $2,329 55 
deposits of inmates 364 19 

Amount received: 

From the Commonwealth for support of patients . $19, 146 51 
cities and towns for support of patients . 50,487 34 



other sources . 
patients (on deposit) 



>,693 74 



),633 85 
611 89 

81 87 



,021 35 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows : 

Salaries and wages ..... 
Extra labor (ordinary) ..... 



Provisions and supplies, viz. : 
Meats of all kinds 
Fish of all kinds . 
Fruit and vegetables 
Flour, 532 barrels, at $5.36 . 
Grain and meal for table 
Grain, meal, and hay for stock 
Tea and coffee 
Sugar and molasses 
Milk, butter, and cheese 
Salt and other groceries 
All other provisions 

Amount carried forward . 



$20,205 56 




73 73 






$20,279 29 




$3,197 96 




559 82 




1,491 20 




2,853 60 




92 22 




212 35 




867 85 




1,506 02 




5,208 59 




446 88 




2,073 65 






$18,510 14 





,789 43 



46 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Amount brought forward . 
Clothing' and material . 
Fuel and light 

Medicine and medical supplies 
Furniture, beds, and bedding 
Transportation and travelling 
Repairs .... 

Appraisers .... 
All other current expenses . 

Total current expenses . 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital for 
Supplies left in building .Oct. 23, 1877 
Refunded inmates from deposits . 

Total amount expended . 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1879 



Resources. 



Cash on hand 

Due from the Commonwealth 

cities and towns . 

other sources 



5,789 43 



3,519 


01 






6,238 


05 






282 


93 






2,126 


92 






226 


95 






4,179 


57 






75 00 






1 ,933 


66 


$18,582 


09 




• 




• 


$57,371 


52 


2,825- 


66 






51 


23 


9 87fi 


RQ 



60,248 41 
12,772 94 

$73,021 35 



£12,772 94 

4,583 86 

10,658 41 

57 72 



$28,072 93 



Liabilities. 



Due for supplies and expenses 
salaries and wages 
inmates (cash on deposit) 

Total surplus 



. 3,823 97 

. 1,633 42 

394 83 



5,852 22 



$22,220 71 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 
Asylum for the Chronic Insane, Oct. 1, 1879. 

Worcester, Mass., Oct. 14, 1879. 

The undersigned has examined the account of the Treasurer of the 
Asylum for the Chronic Insane, and has inspected all the vouchers of 
expenditures from Oct. 1, 1878, to Sept. 30, 1879, inclusive. 

He finds all the items properly vouched, every voucher being endorsed 
with the approval of the Superintendent, and with that of the Auditor. 
THOMAS H. GAGE, Auditor of Accounts. 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



47 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present the Second Annual 
Report of the Superintendent of this institution. 



Table No. 1. 

Movement of Population. 



Bate. 




Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1878. 












Sept. 30. 


Remaining in the Asylum 




173 


202 


375 


Oct. 10. 


Transferred from State 


Almshouse, 










Tewksbury 




- 


2 


2 


22. 


Transferred from State 


Almshouse, 










Tewksbury 




15 


- 


15 


1879. 












Feb. 5. 


Transferred from State 


Almshouse, 










Tewksbury 




2 


2 


4 


Mar. 12. 


Transferred from State 


Almshouse, 










Tewksbury 




- 


1 


1 


Aug. 19. 


Transferred from Danvers 


Hospital for 










Total . 


. 


13 


12 


25 




203 


219 


422 



This number represents 421 persons, one female having 
been discharged to the care of the Overseers of the Poor, 
committed to the Danvers Hospital, and again transferred to 
this Asylum. 



48 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 2. 
Form of Disease of Patients admitted. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




8 


11 


19 




11 


3 


14 




1 


- 


1 




7 


2 


9 




2 


- 


2 




- 


1 


1 


Paralytic with maniacal attacks . 


1 


- 


1 


Total 


30 


17 


47 



Table No. 3. 

Number of Patients Discharged and their Condition at time of 

Discharge. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Improved ....... 

Not improved 

Died 


4 

o 
22 


3 

9 
11 


7 
11 
33 


Total 


28 


23 


51 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1879 . 


175 


196 


371 



Of the number discharged, 7 were removed by friends, 
6 by the Overseers of the Poor, 4 by the Board of State 
Charities, and 1 eloped. 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



49 



Table No. 


4. 








Cause of Death. 












Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Phthisis ...... 




2 


6 


8 ' 


Exhaustion of chronic mental disease 




3 


2 


5 


Epilepsy . . 




3 


3 


6 


Pneumonia . 




3 




3 


Paresis ...... 




8 


- 


8 


Intestinal obstruction . . 




1 


- 


1 


Rupture of the intestines 




1 


- 


1 


Congestive apoplexy . . 




1 


- 


1 


Total 


22 


11 


33 



During the year the house has been free from accidents of 
a fatal or serious character, and from any unusual sickness, 
notwithstanding the fact that a large proportion of the in- 
mates are so far enfeebled as to render their tenure of life 
extremely precarious. Completely wrecked in mind and 
body, they succumb rapidly to slight disturbing influences. 

Table No. 5. 
Showing Nativity of Patients Admitted. 



'• Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Maine . 


_ 


1 


1 


Vermont . . . . . 


o 


- 


2 


Massachusetts 


9 


4 


13 


Rhode Island ...... 


1 




1 


Michigan ....... 


1 


- 


1 


Total Americans ..... 


13 


5 


18 


Ireland 


14 


12 


26 


England ....... 


1 


- 


1 


Nova Scotia 


1 


- 


1 


Spain ........ 


1 


- 


1 


Total foreigners 


17 


12 


29 


Total persons . . . 


30 


17 


47 



50 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 6. 
Showing Residence of Patients Admitted. 



COUNTY. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




7 


2 


9 


Suffolk 


6 


11 


17 


Unknown ....... 


17 


, 4 


21 


Total . . ... 


30 


17 


47 



Table No. 7. 

Showing the Ages of Patients Admitted, Discharged, and Died dur- 
ing the Year. 









Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Died. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


From 15 to 20 . 
20 to 25 • 
25 to 30 . 
30 to 35 
35 to 40 . 
40 to 50 
50 to 60 . 
60 to 70 . 
70 to 80 . 
80 to 90 . 

Unknown . 






4 
4 
2 
3 

7 
6 
1 
1 

2 


2 
2 

2 

5 
3 
2 

1 


6 
6 
4 
3 
12 
9 
3 
1 

3 


3 

2 
1 


1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
o 
1 

1 

1 


4 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 

2 


1 
6 
1 

2 

6 

3 
1 
2 

22 


1 

4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

11 


2 

10 
2 
4 
7 
1 
4 
1 
2 


Total . 


30 


17 


47 


6 


12 


18 


33 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



51 



Table No. 8. 

Showing by whom the Patients have been supported during the 

Year. 







a5 








a5 






2 


"3 

a 


"3 




9 


"3 

a 


3 




1 


Cm 






1 


0> 

fa 


o 

Eh 


State 


59 


66 


125 


Brought forward . 


168 


198 


366 


Boston . 




66 


89 


155 


Newton . 




1 


1 


2 


Acton 




1 


- 


1 


Newburyport 






- 


2 


2 


Brookfield 




1 


3 


4 


Needham 






3 


- 


3 


Beverly . 




2 


1 


3 


Natick . 






- 


1 




Brookline 




- 


1 


1 


Northampton 




1 


- 




Bradford 




- 


1 


1 


Plymouth 




1 


- 




Blackstone 




1 


- 


1 


Pembroke 






1 


- 




Concord . 




1 


- 


1 


Peabody 






1 


- 




Chelsea . 




9 


5 


14 


Pittsfield 






- 


1 




Cambridge 




6 


8 


14 


Quincy . 






1 


- 




Clinton . 




- 


1 


1 


Randolph 






1 


- 




Cohasset 




- 


1 


1 


Stoneham 






2 


1 




Chelmsford 




1 


- 


1 


Sutton . 






1 


- 




Douglas . 




1 


- 


1 


Swampscott 






1 


- 




Dighton . 




- 


1 


1 


Scituate 






- 


1 




Edgartown 




1 


- 


1 


Salem . 






2 


3 




Essex 




1 


- 


1 


Southampton 






- 


1 




Franklin 




2 


1 


3 


Shrewsbury 






- 


1 




Fitchburg 




- 


2 


2 


Sherburne 






1 


- 




Fall River 




1 


- 


1 


Southbridge 






- 


1 




Holliston 




1 


_ 


1 


Sharon . 






1 


- 




Haverhill 




_ 


2 


2 


Somerville 






1 


- 




Lawrence 




1 


1 


2 


Templeton 






- 


1 




Lynn 




2 


3 


5 


Tewksbury 






- 


1 




Lowell . 




1 


1 


2 


Uxbridge 






1 


1 




Leicester 




1 


- 


1 


Westborough 






1 


- 




Lincoln . 




- 


1 


1 


Woburn 






- 


2 




Marblehead 




1 


2 


3 


Warren . 






1 


- 




Maiden . 




2 


- 


2 


Waltham 






1 


- 




Medfield 




_ 


2 


2 


Wakefield 






3 


- 


3 


Manchester 




1 


1 


2 


Wilmington 






- 


1 


1 


Melrose . 




_ 


2 


2 


Westford 






2 


- 


2 


Medway . 




- 


1 


1 


Worcester 






1 


1 


2 


Millbury 




1 


1 


2 


Webster 






3 


- 


3 


Medford . 




2 


1 


3 


Walpole 






1 


- 


1 


Milford . 




2 


- 


2 


Weymouth 


2 
203 


218 


2 


Carried foru 


ard . 


168 


198 


366 


Total 






421 



52 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct, 



Table No. 9. 

Showing Daily Average Number of Patients for each Month for 
the Year ; the Largest and the Smallest Number of Patients in 
the Asylum at any Time. 



DAILY AVERAGE. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1878. 








October 




172.32 


200.68 


373 


November . 




175.93 


196.90 


372.83 


December . 




182.58 


196 


378.58 


1879 










January 




175.94 


195.19 


371.13 


February . 




173.97 


196.06 


370.03 


March 




172.26 


195.12 


367.38 


April 




169.30 


193 


362.30 


May . 




168 


191.35 


359.35 


June . 




168 


191 


359 


July . 




166.26 


190.77 


357.03 


August 




170.45 


194.20 


364.65 


September 




176.37 


197.53 


373.90 


Total daily average for the year end- 








ing Sept. 30, 1879 .... 






367.41 


Largest number in the Asylum afc 








any time . ". ... 


186 


197 


383 


Smallest number in the Asylum at 








any time 


165 


189 


354 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



53 



Table No. 10. 

Shoiving Number of Articles made by the Female Patients. 



Articles. 


Number. 


Articles. 


Number. 


Aprons .... 72 


Brought forward . 


1,128 


Apron ticking . 






16 


Napkins 


41 


Camisoles 






9 


Neck-handkerchiefs 


2 


Curtains . 




148 


Pillows (hair) 


336 


Chemise . 




240 


Pillow-slips . 


394 


Clothes-bags . 






24 


Pillow-ticks 




14 


Coffee-bags 




4 


Quilts . 




112 


Drawers (pairs) 




106 


Sheets . 




402 


Dresses . 






322 


Sacks 




22 


Hats trimmed . 






29 


Skirts . 




143 


Ironing-sheets 






4 


Shirts . 




10 


Lambrequins . 






4 


Suspenders 




78 


Mittens (pairs) 






12 


Towels . 




743 


Mattresses 






99 


Table-cloths 




28 


Mattress-ticks . 






5 
34 


Under-waists 

Total number . 


16 


Night-dresses . 


3,469 


Carried forward 


1,128 









Table No. 11. 
Products of the Garden. 



Beets 
Parsnips . 
Celery 
Cucumbers 
Tomatoes . 
Lettuce 
Radishes . 
Peppers . 



220 bushels. 

252 bushels. 

2,000 heads. 

25 bushels. 

120 bhshels. 

600 heads. 

50 dozen. 

1 peck. 



Cabbages . 
Turnips . 
Squashes . 
Sweet corn 
Onions 
Beans 
Egg plant 



2,000 heads. 

30 bushels. 

2 tons. 

150 bushels. 

50 bushels. 

40 bushels. 

3 dozen. 



54 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE, 



[Oct. 



STATEMENT 

Showing Net Cost of Maintenance to Sept. 30, 1879. 
(Fifty-two weeks.) 



Flour, 503 barrels . 

Flour (Graham), 15 barrels . 

Corn and rye meal, 3,780 pounds 

Oatmeal, 1,291 pounds . 

Hominy, 799 pounds 

Cracked wheat, 488 pounds . 

Crackers, 42 barrels 

Fresh beef, 10,018 pounds . 

Corned beef, 21,950 pounds . 

Soup beef, 5,477 pounds 

Lamb and mutton, 1,905 pounds 

Poultry, 1,010 pounds . 

Fresh pork, 3,668 pounds 

Salt pork, 4 barrels 

Sausage, 1,128 pounds . 

Hams, 446 pounds 

Fish (fresh), 13,397 pounds . 

Fish (salt), 2,960 pounds 

Vegetables .... 

Potatoes, 1,147 bushels 

Potatoes (sweet), 80 bushels . 

Beans, 95£ bushels 

Rice, 620 pounds . 

Salt, 11£ barrels . 

Spices . 

Vinegar 

Sugar, 16,997 pounds 

Molasses, 567 gallons 

Syrup, 105 gallons 

Lard, 3,092 pounds 

Eggs, 1,536 dozen 

Butter, 10,967 pounds 

Cheese, 1,550 pounds 

Milk, 69,994 quarts 

Coffee, 2,389 pounds 

Tea, 1,141 pounds 

Amount carried forward 



$2,714 75 

65 25 

46 61 

42 37 

19 21 

17 74 

116 50 

1,123 68 

1,097 50 

160 91 

207 32 

172 43 

244 12 

50 50 

82 39 

40 07 

387 47 

154 43 

98 29 

917 94 

59 05 

143 57 

46 12 

27 69 

36 99 

56 26 

1,230 18 

239 25 

50 65 

217 91 

283 57 

1,952 93 

143 65 

3,149 72 

512 09 

442 14 

$16,351 25 



1879.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



56 



and furni 



Amount brought forward 
Chicory, 140 pounds 
Ice, 169,284 pounds 
Fruit . 
Dried fruit . 
Raisins, 26 boxes . 
Bi-carb. soda, 289 pounds 
Cream of tartar, 281 pounds 
Tobacco, 268 pounds 
Groceries (miscellaneous) 
Medicines 
Disinfectant . 
Soap (hard and soft) 
Starch, 376 pounds 
Hay, 7,346 pounds 
Straw, 37,437 pounds . 
Provender 

Dry-goods (including women's clothing and 
Clothing (including men's clothin 
Boots, shoes, and slippers 
Blankets and spreads 
Crockery and glass 
Furniture 
House furnishings . 
Stationery 
Seeds and plants . 
Gas, 529,900 cubic feet . 
Coal-, 8081 tons (gross) . 
Charcoal 

Undertakers' charges 
Postage. 
Transportation 
Travelling 

Oil (machinery and lights) 
Labor (ordinary) . 
Repairs (materials and labor) 
Water (from Worcester City Water- Works) 
Current expenses . 

Net supplies issued to Sept. 30, 1879, 
Supplies expended as above . 
Pay-roll to Sept. 30, 1879 . 

Less sundry sales ..... 



furnishin 



hing 



s) 







$16,351 25 






13 35 






253 94 






266 45 






40 94 






48 90 






14 45 






83 08 






126 88 






133 23 






242 47 






35 36 






468 07 






22 80 






61 25 






242 56 






113 75 


ingf 
) 





937 95 

1,243 90 

408 63 

415 12 

304 71 

396 17 

325 36 

167 51 

84 16 

1,510 25 

4,124 89 

58 75 

229 00 

52 25 

177 15 

49 80 

62 70 

73 73 

3,935 69 

424 24 

1,665 65 


-135,166 34 


35,166 34 


20,( 


)46 5 


9 



55,212 93 
611 89 



Net expenditures ..... 

Dividing this expenditure ($54,601.04) by the average daily 
number of patients (367.41) gives the cost of each patient 
for 52 weeks ......... 

This amount divided by 52 weeks gives the weekly cost per 
patient 



4,601 04 

$148 61 
$2 86 



56 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

It was not deemed advisable, at the opening of the Asy- 
lum, to make any reduction in the quality or quantity of 
the dietary from that found necessary in other hospitals for 
the insane. 

In a household like ours, where the larger number are 
suffering from wasting diseases, and all are of a low degree 
of vitality, a generous diet is a necessity. 

In the department of supplies, the utmost care has been 
exercised in the selection and purchase of articles of subsis- 
tence. Variety in diet has been secured, and economy en- 
couraged, by holding each employe strictly accountable for 
all unnecessary waste. 

It has not seemed judicious or safe to materially reduce 
the number of our attendants. A majority of the inmates 
are subject to periodical attacks of violence ; many are uni- 
formly turbulent ; and the class of dangerous epileptics is 
well represented. 

One attendant to thirteen patients is, in my opinion, the 
least number that can be employed with due regard for the 
safety and well-being of our inmates. 

The pleasure manifested by so many of our people in the 
chapel service ; in the regular weekly entertainments fur- 
nished during the winter by the officers and employe's, and 
in the books sent them, reminds us that they are still sus- 
ceptible of moral influences, and that we cannot justly 
neglect any means that can possibly make them more happy 
and contented in their enforced seclusion, whether it be 
personal attention, entertainments, exercise in the open air, 
employment in useful labor, or the beautifjdng the wards 
with birds and flowers. 

The labor performed by the patients during the year has 
helped materially in reducing the cost of their support. 
With the aid of the attendants and patients alone, most of 
our mattresses have been taken apart, the hair thoroughly 
cleansed, picked over, and made up again; much of our fur- 
niture has been repaired and redressed ; the necessary paint- 
ing and glazing done; a portion of our garden trenched; 
gutters laid about the building ; not to mention the material 
assistance rendered our carpenter and mason on the repairs 
now being made. For the present, and until we can bring 
our building up to the condition, as regards repairs, which is 



1879.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 57 

absolutely requisite, the demand for laborers of every capac- 
ity will exceed the supply. Thereafter it may be feasible 
to put in operation some system whereby a certain class of 
our patients, now for the most part idle, may be taught some 
useful employment. 

Our garden, in the same hands as last year, has continued 
to furnish ns with an abundance of vegetables. The entire 
tract now in cultivation is none too large for the purpose for 
which it is employed, and should, I think, be set apart for 
the permanent use of the Asylum. 

The repairs have been carried on slowly but steadily, being 
limited and somewhat delayed by the uncertainty as to the 
means at our command. During the year, new steam-heating 
apparatus has been introduced into the centre building; six 
of the wards re-painted; a portion of the fences in the rear of 
the Asylum rebuilt; a coal-shed erected to enable us to store 
a year's supply of coal ; and in the lower ward of the male 
wing, all the plastering, and much of the standing finish, has 
been removed ; the transoms and ventilators enlarged ; direct 
heat introduced into several of the rooms; and a drying-shaft 
for mops and towels placed in the ward and dining-room. In 
compliance with a vote of the Trustees, material is now be- 
ing purchased to repair, in like manner, the five remaining 
wards in the two wings. 

In behalf of the patients of the. Asylum, I wish to thank 
Dr. R. W. Hooper for the full sets of "St. Nicholas" for 
1878 and 1879, presented by him ; and the proprietors of the 
" Worcester Evening Gazette " for a copy of their paper dur- 
ing the year. 

The good order which has prevailed in the Asylum during 
the year, and the prosperity which has marked all its affairs, 
could not have been secured save by the united efforts of its 
officers and employes. To each and to every one who has 
contributed to these results, I would .express my sincere 
thanks. 

H. M. QUINBY, Superintendent. 
Asylum for the Chronic Insane, Oct. 1, 1879. 
8 



MR 2 5 ^ W.FA