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Full text of "Annual report of the Trustees of the Charlestown Free Schools"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THB 



(ttts of efiarlefi5toton» 



FEBRUARY, 1849, 




CHARLESTOWN: 

WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, PRINTER, 

184 9. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr4849char 



REPORT. 



The time has again arrived, when our citizens are accustomed 
to look to those intrusted with the educational interests of our 
city, for a statement of the condition of our Public Schools, and 
what provisions have been made to secure to the children of 
all classes in our midst, the means of efficient and thorough in- 
struction in all the branches of knowledge usually pursued in 
these institutions. 

At the commencement of the present municipal year, some of 
our schools were, and had for some time been, subjected to incon- 
v«nience and embarrassment, from a want of suitable school ac- 
commodations ; occasioned by the action of the city government 
relative to school houses. 

On the 14th of June, 1847, an order was passed in both 
branches of the city government, in favor of a petition made to 
the Mayor and Aldermen, for the erection of a new Grammar 
School house in Ward 2. 

On the 21st of the same month, an order passed the Common 
Council, which was also passed in the other branch of the city 
government, for the removal of the school houses and other build- 
ings from the Trainingfield ; and on the 9th of August, 1847, an 
order passed the common council, which was also concurred in 
by board of aldermen, for the re-building of the Har/ard School 
house. These measures were carried into effect by the appro- 
priate committees from the city government, and consequently the 
scholars of the Harvard and Winthrop schools, xvere deprived of 
the use of their school-rooms until the new buildings were com- 
pleted. 



The new school house in Ward 2, which was to supply the 
place of the Winthrop School house, removed from the Training- 
field, was first occupied by the scholars on the 27th day of March, 
184S, and the Harvard School house was occupied on the 29th of 
the same month ; — the Winthrop contains seats and desks for 
364 scholars, and the Harvard for 432. 

The joint standing committee on public instruction from the 
city government, by whom the above improvements were carried 
out, recommended to the city council the adoption of an order for 
the erection of a building, and the establishing of a High School 
for boys and girls ; which order was passed on the 12th of July, 
1847, and an appropriation was made to defray the necessary ex- 
pense of the same, which sum was placed at the disposal of the 
above committee. 

On the 6th of June, 1348, a vote was passed by the joint stand- 
ing committee on public instruction, directing their clerk to inform 
the school committee, that they should *' deliver over into the 
charge of the school committee, the High School building, on 
Saturday, the 17th of June instant." On the receipt of this no- 
tice, the school committee made arrangements for publicly receiv- 
ing and acknowledging this new trust, and dedicating it to the 
purposes for which it had been created. 

The day selected for this service, was one prominent not only 
in the annals of Charlestovvn, but also in the history of our 
nation's freedom and prosperity. It was a fit time from which to 
date the establishment of another of those institutions which are 
the pride and glory of New England, (her public free schools,) 
and one, too, dedicated to the culture of the higher branches of 
knowledge and science, — free alike to the children of every class 
of citizens in our community. 

The large number of persons who were present to participate in 
the exercises on this occasion, was a *naik of the warm and general 
interest felt by our citizens, in welcoming to their midst, an insti- 
tution promising so much for the advancement of science, litera- 
ture, and useful knowledge, among the youth of our city. 

Under the date of January 3d, 1849, the School Committee re- 
ceived a communication from the clerk of the common council, 
transmitting, under a vote of that branch of the city government, 
information relative to the cost of erecting and furnishing the 
Winthrop, Harvard, and High School buildings, under the direc* 



tion and superintendence of the joint standing commiUee c( lh« 
city council on public instruction, for the year 1S47. 
By this communication, it appears that the 

Cost of the Winthrop School House, with Ward- 
room, kc. in the basement, was - - - $ 21,040.88 

For re-building the Harvard School House, with 

Engine House in the basement, - • - S 12,949.26 

For the High School building, .... $ 25,393.81 



Examinations of Scliolars for tlie High School. 

Previous to the completion of the High School building, notice 
was given in each of the Grammar Schools, and in the public 
journals, that on the 19th day of May, there would be an exam- 
ination of all applicants for admission to the High School, when 
146 candidates presented themselves and wore examined ; 62 of 
this number were boys, and 84 were girls. None were to be re- 
ceived for examination who were under 13 years of age ; this 
being the age fixed upon, at that time, by a vote of the School 
Committee, as requisite to entitle any applicant to a certificate of 
admission for the examination. The questions submitted to the 
scholars, were all printed upon sheets of paper, and were in 
American History, in Grammar, in Geography, and in Arithmetic, 
— in all forty-eight; some of these, however, were compound 
questions, requiring more than one answer, which made the 
answers required to the whole series, seventy. 

The names of those answering any particular series of these 
questions were not known to the Committee, as each applicant 
was furnished with a card containing a number, which number 
was affixed to each sheet when answered, with the addition of the 
letter B. or G. to designate the sex by which the number was 
held. 

After the result was made up, a list of the successful numbers 
was sent to each of the Grammar Schools, where they were an- 
nounced by the teachers, in order that those holding them might be 
registered for admission to the High School. 





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It will be seen by the above result, that there were 90 of the 
applicants who passed a successful examination, but it was subse- 
quently ascertained, that two of the successful numbers were held 
by scholars who were not 13 years of age ; consequently, a certifi- 
cate of admission to the High School could not be allowed them, 
without violating the rule which the Committee had adopted, and 
from which they did not think it prudent to depart. 

These were both girls, which reduced the number who were 
admitted to the High School ©n the 19th day of June last, (the 
day on which this school was organized) to 88, of whom 40 were 
boys and 48 were girls. 

8 Boys and Girls answered from 88 to 41 questions correctly. 
i «< 41 *' 45 " '* 

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' I. 50 " 55 " " 

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* •' 60 questions and upwards. 

The largest number of correct answers which were given by 
any one scholar, was 67, and these were by a boy who held 
No. 101 ; the next was 66, and were by a boy who held No. 1. 

By the present rules and regulations of this board for the gov- 
ernment of our public schools, the age required for the admission 
of boys to an examination for the High School, is 12 years, and 
of girls 13 years. 

The second examination of scholars for promotion to the High 
School, was held on the 27th day of January, 1849, at which 
lime 110 presented themselves as candidates, 42 of whom were 
boys and 68 were girls. 

The mode of conducting this examination was the same as that 
adopted at the previous one, and the number of questions sub- 
mitted was forty ; these were in American History, in Grammar, 
in Geography, and in Arithmetic. 

Of the 110 who were examined at this time, 52 were succeisful, 
25 of whom were boy«, and 27 were girls. 

4 Boys and Girls answered 24 questions correctly. 

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3 •' ♦• " 35 *' 38 *' " 

The highest number of correct answers (38), were given by 
No. 39 ; the next highest (36), by Nos. 20 and 38. 



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In addition to the 52 in the above table, who were successful at 
this examination, there are to be added, the two girls who 
answered the required number of questions correctly in May last, 
but who were at that time disqualified for admisv«.ion to the High 
School on accojnt of age, which disqualification is now removed, 
and they have been admitted ; making the whole number admitted 
at this time, ffly-four. 

These will enter the school on the 1st Monday of February, 
current, and with the 71 who are now members of the school, will 
increase its number to 125, — which is as many as can be ac- 
commodated in the room now occupied. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

This school, as herein before stated, was organized on the 19th 
day of June last, at which time 86 of the successful candidates 
availed themselves of its privileges. 

The course of study commenced was a '* thorough review by 
the whole school, of Arithmetic, Grammar, and Geography, this 
last study being pursued in connection with History and the 
drawing of Maps." 

In addition to this, the study of " Algebra and Ancient and 
Modern History, have been pursued by the whole school," and after 
a full explanation of what would be expGc;.ed in the department of 
Latin, all who wished it were permitted to commence this study, 
when 70 of the number in school availed themselves of the oppor- 
tunity of pursuing it. 

In addition to reading, the scholars have had " frequent exer- 
cises in composition upon subjects connected with, or suggested 
by their studies, which composition served likewise as lessons in 
writing, punctuation, &c." 

Declamation has been attended to by the boys. 

At the close of the vacation at Thanksgiving time, in Novem- 
ber last, it was found advisable to class the scholars with reference 
to their proficiency ; which arrangement gave a new stimulus to 
the whole school. 

At this time, exercises in " Book-keeping were introduced ; 
all the girls receiving lessons in single entry, and the boys who 
desired it were taught in double entry ; — about twenty availed 
themselves of this privilege." 

The instruction given by the teachers in this school, is, in the 
2 



10 

opinion of your committee, thorough and systematic. Nothing 
appears to have been hurried over, nor has any difficulty been 
left unexplained. The endeavor has been, to make each scholar 
master of every lesson, and generally with good success. "Very 
few scholars have been found, who have not appreciated the privi- 
leges of this school, and most of them have devoted themselves to 
their studies, and accomplished all that your committee could rea- 
sonably desire." 

The teachers connected with this school are competent, devoted, 
faithful, and ardently engaged in their calling; and your com- 
mittee would recommend them and the High School, to the confi- 
dence and patronage of the citizens of Charlestown. 

'• A good foundation has now been laid in this school, and dur- 
ing the present and succeeding years, studies will be pursued 
more peculiarly belonging to a High School. The study of 
Rhetoric, Geometry, Physiology, and French, has been com- 
menced, and will be pursued this term. These will in time give 
place to other studies, necessary for a thorough preparation for 
college, or for the various duties of active life." 

If this school continues under the present organization, your 
committee believe that it will, as its plan is more fully developed, 
compare favorably with the best schools of its class, — public or 
private, in this vicinity or elsewhere, and commend itself to the 
highest confidence and the cheerful support of all classes in our 
community. 

Teachers in the High and Grammar schools the past year, and 
the amount of salary paid to each. 

High School, 

Caleb Emery $1,312 50 

William C. Bradlee 665 00 

Rebecca T. Duncan 206 25 



2,183 75 



Bunker-Hill School^ No. 1. 

Benjamin F. Tweed 750 00 

Philip C. Knapp 202 76 



952 76 



Amount carried forward 962 76 2,183 75 



11 

Amounts brought forward 952 76 2.183 75 

Robert Swan 487 80 

David Atwood 142 08 

• 629 38 

Martha A. Chandler 250 00 



Bunker-Hill School, No. 2, 

Lydia A. Hanson 19 21 

M. Louise Putnam 230 79 

— 250 00 

Mary A. Stover 250 00 



Warren School, No. 1. 

Calvin S. Pennel! 1,000 00 

Thomas Metcalf 621 14 

Frances H. Clarke 37 10 

A. J. Davis 3 60 

M. Louise Burroughs 203 13 



246 83 



Winthrop School, No. 1. 

William C. Bradlee 335 00 

Luther W. Anderson 655 85 



990 85 



Luther W. Anderson 187 25 

Charles F. Latham 460 81 

• — 648 06 

A. j\l. Bradley 250 00 

Rebecca T. Ames 250 00 



1,832 14 



500 00 



M. M. Hayes 250 00 

~ 2,117 97 

Warren School, No. 2. 

Joseph T. Swan, 1,000 00 

William S. Reynolds 621 14 

Mary J. Chandler 250 00 

Sarah T, Chandler 250 00 



2,121 14 



2,138 91 



Amount carried forward 10,893 91 



12 



Amount brought forward 
Winthrop School, No, 2. 



10,893 91 



Robert Swan 


96 13 




William S. Williams 


906 53 


1,002 66 
648 06 


Samuel S. Wilson 




M. L. Rowland 




7 93 


Frances T. Holland 


10 41 




A. A. Moulton 


219 79 


230 20 


Maria L. Thompson 
Lucy F. Hall 


62 50 
187 50 



250 00 



Harvard School, No. 1. 



Stacy Baxter 
William H. Ladd 
A. E. Hinckley 
E. A. Flint 
S. F. Kittredge 



125 00 
106 96 



1,000 00 
630 74 
250 00 



231 96 



Harvard School, No. 2. 



Paul H. Sweelser 
J. P. Averill 

John S. Osgood 
Rebecca Drake 
Mary J. Whiting 
Adeline M. West 



2,138 85 



2,112 70 



98 90 






922 75 


1,021 65 










607 68 






250 00 




4167 






204 00 


94/? «7 








2,125 00 






Total 


$17,270 46 



The salary of each Primary school teacher is S 250 per annum, 
and the amount of salary paid to this class of teachers the past 
year, has been S 6,266 84. 



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-4 


00 


o 


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05 


»u 


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Map and other 




»-* 


to 


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*^ 


o 


to 


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H» 


Drawing. 


/ 








09 




09 




o 




No. of Vols, in 




• 


* 


* 


W 


' 


Oi 




o 


' 


the Library. 

























5 

ft 

9 
ft 

u 



ft 
B 

a 

99 

ft 

ft 

% 

8S 

a 
M« 

ft 



ft 



ft 



19 
S* 

P 

s 

ft 

i 

S9 

ft 

5f 
ft 


CD 



14 



The following table presents the number, and other statistics 
relating to our schools, at the close of the examinations on the 
31st of January, 1849. 





« 






. j 




00 c3 ® 






-, «*' 






O O nl 






a> o 




Rank of School. 


o 
o 


(U CO 


Salaries. 


CO 

'o 


re cd 


Average 
Absence. 




6 


. n3 
o C 




f/5 


< 






2 


Z « 










High School 


1 3 


2,183,75 


71 


73 


Absences are very 
rare in this School. 


Grammar Schools .... 


8 29 


15,086,71 


1340 


1064 


276 


Primary Schools 


25 25 


6,266,84 


1656 


1205 


451 



It is computed that the number of children in this city between 
the ages of 4 and 16 years, is 3,675. 

It appears by the records kept by the several teachers, that the 
members of the School Committee have visited the High and 
Grammar schools 480 times, and the Primary schools 529 times, 
during the past year. 

We give below the number who have been members of the 
Grammar schools during the past year, together with the per 
centage of absence in each school. 





|i Q> 


<v 


<o 








•5 


o 


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^ 




o ho 


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O .fi 0) 




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SCHOOLS. 




Whole N 

holars du 

Year 


Whole N 

holars at t 

of the Y 


Average da 

tendance du 

Year 


er centage 

mces for t 

1848- 








o 
U2 


Pu ^ 


Bunker Hill, No 


.1. 


172 


139 


104 


■ 
16^ 


> > >> 


2. 


174 


99 


76 


23 


Warren, 


1. 


298 


165 


141 


21 


»> «' 


2. 


298 


186 


139 


2U 


Winthrop, .... 


1- 


289 


187 


145 


20 


»> »» 


2. 


261 


171 


141 


19 


Harvard, 


1. 


253 


182 


153 


16.i 


»> s» 


2. 


293 


211 


162 


18 



We deem it our duty to make a passing remark relative to ab- 
sences and lateness in our Grammar schools. It will be seen by 
the above table, that this evil prevails more in some schools than 
in others ; but in any school, however rarely it occurs, it is preju- 
dicial to the pupil and the school. Sickness must, of course, al. 
ways be a sufficient excuse, and so also necessary detention 



15 



by the parent. Parents who look well to the best interest of thpir 
children will exert themselves to break up the practice of de- 
taining them from school for trifling purposes, and also that of 
allowing them, during school hours, to attend to duties for the 
famil}; which may be just as well done in the intervals of school. 
No parent can feel that he has a right to interfere with the pro- 
gress of the children of others, by detaining his child upon slight 
grounds from the exercises of the school, as all such detentions 
interrupt and embarrass the progress of the division of which the 
absentee may be a member. 

Such instances are evils which call loudly for reform, and we 
cannot but appeal to all parents, to do whatever lies in their power 
to correct this fault, both for the good of their own children and 
for the general welfare of our schools. 

We give below, a table which presents the number of children 
in the High and each of the Grammar schools at the close of the 
examinations on the 31st of January, 1849; together with the 
number who were promoted from them to the High School, and 
also the number of scholars in the High and Grammar schools, 
after the accessions were made to them on the first Monday in 
February; the time at which scholars are sent up from the Pri- 
mary schools, and also from the Grammar schools. 







1—1 


n3 "o 

Ol o 

E m 


ng after 

uns 

School. 


School 
cession 
Schools 


Scholars 
hool. 


[ 
S i 


SCHOOLS. 




ole N 
on Ji 


er pr( 
High 


'S '*^ -^ 

igffi 


in the 
the ac 
the L. 




incre; 

e Sch 






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1^ ^ 


o "^ 








2 2 


1 2 


^^ti: 




H 


High School, 




71 




71 


125 


54 


54 


Bunker Hill, 




139 


18 


121 


142 


21 


21 


>> »> » 




99 


.... 


99* 


99 


.... 




Warren, 


1. 


165 


S 


163 


193 


30 




»» >» )» 


2. 


186 


6 


180 


211 


31 


61 


Winthrop, . . . , 


1. 


187 


5 


182 


208 


26 




»> >i >> 


2 


171 


4 


167 


184 


17 


43 


Harvard, 


1. 


182 


U 


171 


188 


17 




»> j» )» 


2. 


211 


4 


207 


229 


22 


39 


218 



Aa many came into this School from the Primary Schools, as were pro- 
moted from it to th« upper division of the Bunker Hill School 



16 

It will be seen by the above table, that there are now in the 
Grammar schools 1454 scholars. 

On the 24th of April, 1848. an order passed the Common Coun- 
cil, and subsequently, on the 1st of May, the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, appropriating S^.lOO for building recitation rooms for 
the Warren Schools. On the 8th of May, 1848, it was ordered in 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, in which order the Common 
Council concurred, that the "moneys appropriated and placed at 
the disposal of the Joint Standing Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion, for constructing an addition to the Warren School House, be 
transferred, and placed at the disposal of the School Committee, 
for the same purpose." 

These improvements were completed under the superintendence 
of the School Committee, and in conformity to the original plan of 
the same, embracing also an improvement in the ventilation of the 
main school rooms, to conform with the mode of ventilating the 
other Grammar Schools in the city, and all in a thorough and 
workmanlike manner, for the sum of $2,075 00, being S25 00 
within the appropriation made for the above purposes. 

The amount appropriated by the City Government for the sup- 
port of the public schools in this city the past year, was as follows, 
viz : 

For the "salary of teachers," $23,955 00 

There has been disbursed from this amount, 

for salaries, $23,537 30 

Leaving a balance on this account of $417 70 

For "contingencies, fuel, small repairs of 

buildings, care of same, &c.," $5,045 00 
There has been expended for the above pur- 
poses, the sum of $4,967 27 
Leaving a balance on this account of $77 73 

Total amount uncApended, $495 43 

It will be remembered, that previous to the date of the last 
School Report, the citizens in the western section of the city, to- 
wards the Prison, petitioned the School Committee for a new Pri- 
mary School in that part of the city. This subject was presented 
to the City Council by your Committee. An appropriation for the 
salary of an additional teacher for the proposed schooh and for 
another teacher for a new Primary School which was wanted in 



17 



the eastern section of Ward 2, was made by the City Government ; 
but no buildings having yet been furnished for these schools, the 
amount appropriated for the salaries of the teachers has not been 
expended. 

We give below the statistics of the Primary schools, at the re- 
cent examination, showing the whole number, average attendance, 
Sec. for the past term, which closed on the 31st of January, 1849. 



Teachers' 
Names. 



Location of Schools. 



2 JO 

^V2 



Caroline Phipps 
M. B. Skilton 

E. IM. Sweetser 
M. H. Rico 
M. H.Farnsworth 

F. A. Sawyer 
S. Ij. Sawyer 

^ E. A. Thorndiks 
9 S. E. Woodbridge 
Elizabeth Emei 
Joanna S. Putnam 
M. E. Pennell 
M. E, Lincoln 
Sarah E. Smith 
Jane E. Rugg 
A5bv E. Hinckley 
E. W. Butts 
.^ Louise A. Pratt 
19 S. E. Sanborn 
2oIe C. Hunting 
121 1 Deborah Norton 
92 Frances M. Lane 
93|cJ. J. Bradbury 
24 Ann M. Gregory 
25lF. A. J. Morse 



Near Bunker-Hill School-House 

Mead strt^et 

Rear of ]87 Main street. 

Basement of Warren S. House 

Elm street, near High street 

Ehn street, near Medford street 

Main street, renr of 162 

Corner of Cross and Bartlett streets 

Corner of Cross and Bartlett streets 

Common street 

Common street 

Bow street 

Bow street 

Bow street 

Bow street 

Common street 

Bunker-Hill street, at Point 

Bunker-Hill street, at Point 

Moulton street 

Winthrop street 

Corner of Sullivan and Bartlett sts 

Corner of Sullivan and Bartlett sts 

I Cor. Kingston st. and Medford road 

Common street 

Ward-room of Ward 2. 



52 
68 
76 
83 
57 
68 
70 
48 
58 
56 
75 
54 
88 
82 
54 
65 
76 
57 
70 
69 
60 
60 
46 
50 
108 



be c 



Kl 



Sub-Committee 
for 1848-9. 



39 
52 
54 
58 
45 
53 
49 
39 
49 
41 
50 
40 
65 
59 
41 
45 
38 
48 
51 
40 
44 
50 
33 
42 
80 



1656 1205 1283 



41Joseph F. Tufts 
54!joseph F. Tufts 
51 Edward Thorndike 
69 Cha's W. Moore 
38 Cha's \V. Moore 
55 Edward Thorndike 
55 H. K. Froth ingham 

47 N. Y. Culbertson 

51 N. Y. Culberison 

48 James Adams 

57 George A. Parker 
44 George P. Sanger 
73 Seth J. Thomas 
68Seth J. Thomas 
44 George P. Sanger 
50 James Adams 
43 James Miskelly 
40 James Miskelly 
55 H, K. Frothingham 

43 James Adams 

52 Lemuel Gulliver 
46 Lemuel Gulliver 
31 Joseph F. Tufts 

44 George A. Parker 
84 Edward Thorndike 



The above number, 1658, represents those who were members 
of the Primary Schools at the time the examinations were held, 
and not the number who have been enrolled in them durinsf the 
term. 

The number in these schools is constantly changing, from vari- 
ous causes, mainly however, in consequence of families moving 
from one section of the city to another, so that we find on the reg- 
isters of these schools, the names of 2,106 children who have been 
members of them during the past term. The average daily attend- 
ance in all these schools, it will be seen by the above table, has 
been 1205, or 48 to each school. This however, is not the usual 
attendance, as one or two stormy half days in a week, will dimin- 
ish very considerably the average for that week, and so also for the 
month or the term;— besides, the average attendance in this class 



18 

of our schools, is not as large in the winter as in the summer 
terns. 

This class of our schools with but very few exceptions, are 
found to maintain a rank highly satisfactory to your Committee, 
and the teachers to be competent, devoted and successful, in the 
work in which they are engaged. 

To conduct these schools properly, and regulate the hours ior 
recreation and study, which must necessarily be changed more fre- 
quently than with an older class of children, in order to give vari- 
ety and interest to the exercises of the school, requires tact and 
judgment on the part of the teacher. 

The cultivation of mild dispositions in early childhood, — of grace- 
ful manners — of ready and cheerful obedience, is a no less impor- 
tant part of the teacher's work, than the correction of a sing-song 
or artificial tone of voice, peculiar to many children; or of impart- 
ing intelligibly to her pupils, a correct knowledge of the elements 
of the English language. In these schools must be laid the foun- 
dation of all future educational interests, and therefore, attention 
should be directed to them, in order that what is done in them 
may be well and thoroughly done, or else nothing is done to any 
good purpose. 



SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATION. 

The semi-annual examination of all the Public Schools in the 
city, which takes place during the last 15 days of January, under 
the immediate supervision of the sub-committees of the several 
schools, has just been completed, and all the reports from these 
committees have been presented; together with the statistics of 
each school. From these reports, it appears that the Grammar 
Schools have been subjected to a very patient and thorough exam- 
ination by the Committees, they having spent in almost every 
instance, an entire week in the two rooms of each of the Grammar 
Schools. 

This is in addition to the occasional visits by members of the 
Committee from time to time during the term, at which they listen 
to recitations from the several classes in the school. 



19 

After these examinations were completed, there was an exhi- 
bition at each of the Grammar schools, which parents and citizens 
were generally invited to attend. From the large number of per- 
sons who were present to witness the exercises on each of these 
occasions, and the expressions of approbation so frequently made 
by them, it does not appear that any argument is required from 
your Committee in support of our public schools, or that any thing 
they may be able to say in their behalf, will strengthen the con- 
viction which is believed to prevail so generally among our citi- 
zens, that our schools are now in a highly prosperous condition. 
Your Committee will only add here their own convictions, that 
whatever may have been the standing of our schools in times past, 
there has been no period when they have more highly deserved 
the confidence and support of the community ; nor has there at 
any time been associated with them, a more devoted, efficient, and 
successful corps of teachers than at the present moment. 

BUNKER-HILL SCHOOL. 

This school has, during most of the past year, been under the 
charge of Mr. Benjamin F. Tweed, as principal and Mr. Robert 
Swan as sub-master. Mr. Tweed, who has been principal of this 
school for the past ten years, and, as is well known to the parents 
in this school district and to our citizens generally, eminently suc- 
cessful in his labors, resigned his position in November last ; — 
the loss of such a teacher is regretted by this board and by all who 
feel an interest in the prosperity of our schools. About the same 
time, Mr. Swan, who had been filling the office of sub-master in 
the school for about nine months, " with good success and to the 
satisfaction of the committee of this school," resigned his place, 
leaving two vacancies to be supplied at the same time. This re- 
sult could not but be regretted, as such changes are always attend- 
ed with some interruption to the prosperity of a school. These 
teachers were succeeded by Mr. Philip C. Knapp as principal, anc 
Mr. David Atwood as sub-master, who are now laboring with de 
votion to promote the best interests of those intrusted to thei 
charg'e. The female teachers in this school are devoted to thei 
calling, efficient and successful in their labors, and the Committe 
express themselves " satisfied with the result of the recent exami- 
nation and exhibition of the school." 



WARREN SCHOOLS, 

No. 1 AND No. 2. 

These schools are both in a prosperous condition; and the resnh 
of the recent examination has been most gratifying to the friends of 
these schools. The sub-committee assigned to them, in their re- 
port, speak of all the teachers connected with them, as well qual- 
ified for their work, and as being ardently engaged in promoting 
the best interests of the pupils intrusted to their charge. 

There is decisive evidence of improvement in the general de- 
portment of the scholars, — of a cheerful compliance on their part 
with the wishes of their teachers, and a ready cooperation in alJ 
that will help to advance the welfare and prosperity of the schooL 

These schools have for several years been laboring under some 
disadvantage, from the want of recitation rooms. This want has 
been supplied during the past year, and each of the two schools in 
this building, has now two conveniently arranged and well venti- 
lated recitation rooms. The mode of ventilating the main building 
has been improved, and the accommodations and general arrange- 
ments for the scholars in these schools, are as convenient as those 
at the other Grammar schools in the city. 

WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 

No. 1 AND No. 2. 

These schools are found to be in good condition. No 1 has 
been subject to some interruption in consequence of the transfer of 
Mr. William C. Bradlee to the High School, and the appointment 
of a new sub-master in place of Mr. L. W. Anderson, who was 
elected as principal in place of Mr. Bradlee. The result of the 
examination in these schools, shows a " competency and faithful- 
ness on the part of the teachers, and satisfactory improvement in 
the scholars." " In both these schools, the importance of thorough- 
ness on the part of the pupils is required as a paramount consid- 
eration, and is practically adhered to in all the departments of edu- 
cation embraced in the studies pursued in them." 



21 
HARVARD SCHOOLS. 

No. 1 AND No. 2. 

The examination of these schools b}' the sub-committee, " was 
extended to all the studies pursued in each of the classes in them, 
and the result was entirely satisfactory." 

The teachers in these schools, " without exception, are entitled 
to the confidence of the Committee and of parents." Both schools 
are now in a very prosperous condition, and may be said to " stand 
high, but high as they now stand, at the close of another term, 
under the same teachers, with the same inducements to labor, they 
will have made a manifest improvement upon their present con- 
dition." 

SCHOOL BOOKS. 

The books authorized by the Commiitee for the use of the 
scholars in the Grammar schools, are as follows, viz. : 

Tower's North American Reader ; Tower's Practical Reader ; 
Tower's Gradual Reader ; Lynd's First Book in Etymology ; 
Parker's Exercises in English Composition ; Tower's Grammar ; 
Tower's Gradual Speller; Wilson's History of the United States ; 
Cutter's abridged Physiology ; Morse's Cerographic Geography ; 
Smith's Primary Geography ; Colburn's First Lessons in Arith- 
metic ; Frederick Adams's Arithmetic ; Emerson's Third Part 
Arithmetic ; Tower's Intellectual Algebra ; Crosby's First Lessons 
in Geometry. 

MUSIC. 

J. Edgar Gould, Teacher of Music in the High and Grammar 
schools. 

Vocal music has been taught in the High and Grammar schools 
by a skilful teacher and with good success. It needs no argument 
from this Committee to prove that it enlivens the school-room, — 
is elevating and improving in its influences upon the mind, — is an 
important and healthful exercise of the lungs ; — that it tends to 
soften the feelings and subdue passion, and that, by acquiring a 
taste for, and a knowledge of, this science, we are only cultivating 
one of the faculties which an all-wise and beneficent Creator has 
seen fit to bestow upon his children. We hope it may be con- 



22 

tinued as a branch of common education, for the healthful influ- 
ence it exerts upon the discipline of the schools, and for its happy 
and lasting effects upon the character of the pupils. We recom- 
mend the subject to the attention of parents, teachers, and the 
friends of our public schools. 



It was believed, that, under the present arrangement of the 
additional force of teachers in our Grammar schools, much would 
be accomplished by them, and that the scholars would show a 
marked improvement in the various branches of study pursued in 
them. In these expectations, your Committee have not been dis- 
appointed. 

It is true, that the Grammar schools have not numbered as 
many scholars the past year, as can be accommodated in them ; 
owing partly to the draught made upon them for the High School, 
and partly to the increased accommodations furnished by the erec* 
tion of larger buildings for these schools, than were afforded in the 
old school houses. In ihe four buildings now occupied by eight 
Grammar schools, there are seats and desks for 1572 scholars. It 
will be seen, therefore, that with the present compliment of teach- 
ers in each school, the average number of scholars to each teacher, 
when the schools are full, will not be less than 50 ; — a number 
large enough for any one teacher, however competent and devoted 
such teacher may be ; if it is expected that full justice will be done 
to those placed under his charge. 

None, wc presume, will doubt the necessity of moral in connec- 
tion with intellectual training, — of establishing good principles and 
forming good habits ; and to this end, the teacher will take into 
consideration the character and ability of each scholar, in order 
that he may, by addressing the reason and the affections of his 
pupils, overcome any prejudices which may exist in their minds, — 
secure their regard for him and his authority, and strengthen in 
each, such a sense of character and self-respect, as will secure a 
healthy tone of public opinion throughout the school. 

A knowledge of individual character, and the keeping of that 
character constantly in view, is indispensable to the teacher, in 
order, that by applying the right means in a proper direction, 
whatever is wrong may be overcome, and whatever is right sup- 
ported and strengthened ; thus producing results, alike useful to 
the individual, and the best interests of the school. 



23 

Your Committee believe this to have been accomplished in an 
eminent degree, and that, in addition to the increased attainments 
of the children in our Grammar schools the past year, the present 
force of teachers employed in these schools, by the appointment of 
a sub-master to each of them, has afforded the means of a more 
uniform and thorough oversight of the scholars, and the internal 
regulations of the schools, by which means the frequency of cases 
requiring punishment, has been reduced to a very limited number, 
and most of these arise from impulsive outbreaks of passion or ex- 
citement, in which youth is somewhat prone to indulge, under a 
mistaken view of what they deem their individual rights or privi- 
leges. 

We can say, and not without a knowledge of the facts, that there 
has been no single year of our acquaintance with the schools in 
this city, when resort to punishments has been so infrequent, or 
the occasions for them so rare, as during the year which has just 
closed. Teachers, by pointing their pupils to the right path and 
warning them against the wrong, — presenting to them the advan- 
tages of following the first, and the difficulties which surround the 
second ; have done, and can do, much to exert an influence which 
is essential to a mild and wholesome discipline^in school, and to 
secure a surrender of individual wishes or will, to the benefit and 
good order of the whole school. 

In discharge of the duties devolving upon your Committee dur- 
ing the past year, they have not been unmindful of the deep re- 
sponsibility which has attended their trust, and they have endeav- 
oured to keep constantly in view, the best interests of our schools, 
in every action of theirs which would effect their prosperity or 
usefulness. 

On resigning the charge which has been intrusted to them, your 
Committee cannot but be impressed with the importance of com- 
mending OUT free schools to the highest consideration of those who 
may be called to administer to their advancement ; that, as the 
nurseries of a free and intelligent community, they may still secure 
the admiration of our citizens, and continue to be the bulwarks of 
safety to the free institutions of our land. 

HENRY K. FROTHINGHAM, Chairman. 



In School Committee, Feb. 22, 1849: 

Voted, That the foregoing Report be accepted by this Board. 
Voted, That twenty-five hundred copies be printed and distrib- 
uted to the citizens. 

Edward Thorndike, Secretary. 









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