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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"

6U 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Massachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr49temp 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 




V V 



AT WORCESTER, 



FOE THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1880. 



BOSTON: 
ffiatrtf, &oerg, & Co., printers to tfje Commmtfoeaitfr, 

117 Franklin Street. 
1881. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 



THOMAS H. GAGE, M.D. 
Col. JOHN D. "WASHBURN 
Prof. JAMES B. THAYER 
ROBERT W. HOOPER, M.D. 
Hon. RUFUS D. WOODS . 



Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Cambridge. 

Boston. 

Enfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D. 
CHARLES A. PEABODY, M.D. . 
WILLIAM H. RAYMENTON, M.D. 
CHARLES H. SAFFORD . 
SOPHIA N. GRAVES 
CLARENCE R. MACOMBER . 



Superintendent. 

First Assistant Physician. 

Second Assistant Physician. 

Steward. 

Matron. 

Clerk. 



WILLIAM SHERMAN 



Engineer. 



TREASURER. 



ALBERT WOOD 



Worcester. 



$0mm0ttfoealii) of JttaasattjuBeifa 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor^ and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, acting 
as Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, respect- 
fully submit their Third Annual Report. For that "parties 
ular statement of the condition of the Asylum and all its 
concerns," which is required by the statute, we beg leave to 
refer to the full and carefully-prepared reports of the Super- 
intendent and Treasurer, which are herewith transmitted, 
The report of the Superintendent is especially commended 
to the careful consideration of any who are interested either 
in the Asylum and its unfortunate inmates, or in the import 
tant charity which it represents. It will be seen that though 
the year has been marked by no unusual or striking events, 
its general results, in ameliorating the condition of the hope* 
lessly insane, will compare favorably with any that have pre* 
ceded it. 

That part of the Superintendent's report which gives an 
account of what has been accomplished in the matter of 
renovating the " old wings," and transforming them into 
bright and cheerful wards, will attract particular attention. 

The work which was commenced last year has steadily 
progressed during the present, and is now, so far as the 
"wings" are concerned, rapidly approaching completion. 

These important improvements were originally suggested 
by Dr. Quinby, and have been made under his direction and 



6 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

constant supervision. They have been managed with econ- 
omy and good judgment, and the result is highly creditable 
to him as an administrative officer. 

During the year the medical staff has been increased by 
the appointment of Dr. Charles A. Peabody of Worcester to 
the office of first assistant physician. Dr. Peabody was 
formerly superintendent of the City Hospital, and has been 
for several years well and favorably known to the public as a 
general practitioner. 

No other changes of importance have occurred ; and the 
year closes with all departments of the Asylum in successful 
and harmonious operation. 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 

JOHN D. WASHBURN. 

JAMES B. THAYER. 

R. W. HOOPER. 

RUFUS D. WOODS. 

Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1880. 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES. 

Sept. 30, 1880. 



Live-stock > 

Carriages and agricultural implements . . ; 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures .... 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department . 

Other furniture in inmates' department 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department 

Ready-made clothing 

Dry-goods . 

Provisions and groceries 

Drugs and medicines 

Fuel . 

Library s : 




$200 00 

506 10 

2,800 00 

8,378 96 

1,940 48 

8,600 47 

1,599 99 

1,202 16 

5,130 86 

192 41 

2,208 00 

100 00 



32,859 43 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



TREASURER'S KEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my Third Annual Report 
on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, for 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1880 : — 



Eeceipts. 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1879. 



Cash belonging to Asylum 
deposits of inmates 



Amount Received. 



From the Commonwealth for support of patients, 
cities and towns for support of patients . 



other sources . 
patients (on deposit) 



12,378 11 
391 83 



$18,652 45 
43,265 17 



$12,772 94 



L,917 62 

769 33 

21 53 

),481 42 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows:—- 



Salaries and wages . . * 
Extra labor (ordinary) . 

Provisions and supplies > viz. t 
Meats of all kinds . 
Fish of all kinds 
Fruit and vegetables 
Flour i 

Grain and meal for table . 
Grain, meal, and hay for stock 
Tea and coffee . 
Sugar and molasses . 

Amounts carried forward 



),193 90 
94 63 



$3,284 61 


514 24 


1,091 


63 


4,262 


50 


95 


06 


265 


59 


SOO 


25 


1,553 


69 



$19,288 53 



$11,867 57 $19,288 53 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



9 



Amounts brought forward 
Milk, butter, and cheese 
Salt and other groceries 
All other provisions . 

Clothing and material 

Fuel and light 

Medicine and medical supplies 

Furniture, beds, and bedding 

Transportation and travelling 

Repairs (ordinary) . 

All other current expenses 



$11,867 57 119,288 53 
5,676 97 



430 46 
2,529 38 

14,751 48 
3,766 62 

175 48 
2,677 15 

185 16 
3,000 00 
2,044 50 



20,504 38 



Total current expenses 
Repairs (extraordinary) . 
Refunded inmates from deposits 



$12,056 32 
20 28 



Total amount expended 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1880 



Resources. 
Cash on hand ...... 

Due from the Commonwealth . 

cities and towns 

other sources .... 

Liabilities. 
Due for supplies and expenses 
salaries and wages 
inmates (cash on deposit) . 



16,600 39 
$56,393 30 

12,076 # 60 

$68,469 90 
7,011 52 

$75,481 42 



$7,011 


52 


5,147 


35 


11,424 


54 


40 


So 


$5,936 96 


1,624 04 


396 


08 



5,624 26 



7,957 08 



Total surplus $15,667 18 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 

Asylum eor the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1880. 

Worcester, Mass., Oct. 13, 1880. 
The Treasurer's statement of expenditures, for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1880, has been this day carefully compared with the vouchers, which are on 
file at the Asylum, and found to be correct. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



10 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insdne. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor of presenting for your 
consideration the Third Annual Report of the Superintendent 
of this Asylum. 

There were remaining in the Asylum, Oct. 1, 1879, three 
hundred and seventy-one patients, — one hundred and 
seventy-five males and one hundred and ninety-six females. 
During the year, forty-two patients have been admitted, — 
twenty ^six males and sixteen females ; making a total of 
four hundred and thirteen inmates. 

Six have been discharged improved, eleven unimproved, 
and twenty-three have died ; leaving, at the end of the year, 
one hundred and eighty-two males and one hundred and 
ninety-one females, or a total of three hundred and seventy- 
three patients. 

The average duration of insanity, prior to admission, in 
those cases transferred to this Asylum within the last twelve 
months, was eight years. 

Few or none of these can reasonably be expected to appear 
in our future reports in the column of recoveries: yet the 
condition of many is susceptible of improvement ; and, 
although the process may be slow, it may frequently result 
in such an amelioration of the patients' disease as to make it 
possible for their friends to remove them from the Asylum 
and relieve the State of the burden of their support. Of 
the seventeen patients discharged, twelve were taken home 
by their friends, and five were removed to the almshouse by 
the Overseers of the Poor. 

It has always been the policy of the Asylum to encourage, 



1880.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 11 

and in many cases to urge, the relatives of the harmless 
insane to remove them to their homes, whenever it has 
appeared that they could properly care for them. As the 
primary object of the hospital has been accomplished as soon 
as the condition of the patient is so far improved that he no 
longer requires especial oversight, it seems eminently proper 
that the relatives should then resume the burden of his sup- 
port, and thus make room for those who, through the 
exigencies of their disease, are necessarily subjected to con- 
tinuous detention, as well as for that other large class who, 
having no friends, can justly claim the Asylum as their home 
and refuge. When consulted in regard to the discharge of 
a harmless patient for removal to an almshouse, we have 
uniformly discouraged such a course, believing that the best- 
conducted almshouse cannot, under any circumstances, be 
the best place for an insane person, and that the trifling 
difference in expense should not decide the question. 

Of the forty-one patients admitted, thirteen were noted as 
" violent and dangerous " on the record of the hospital from 
which they were transferred, and seven were brought in 
restraint. 

During the year an average of sixty-two patients have 
been furnished occupation outside the wards of the Asylum, 
in addition to the usual number employed in various duties 
on the halls. 

Of the signal advantage of such labor to the patient, the 
Asylum contains many examples. 

The turbulent are made more quiet, the demented gain 
mental strength, and all improve in bodily health. Many a 
patient, who for years sat about the wards doing absolutely 
nothing, has been awakened from his lethargy, and made a 
useful member of the household, by going out in the daily 
exercise of an assigned duty. 

The effort to employ all the patients in a hospital has 
never, as far as my experience goes, been hampered by a lack 
of suitable work, but rather by the mental state of the per- 
sons themselves. 

A necessarily large proportion of the inmates of the 
Asylum are detained for the reason that it is dangerous to 
permit them to be at large in the community. Such patients 
are often the most willing and anxious to work ; and it is 



12 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

never difficult to find employment suited to their tastes, in 
an establishment where so many mechanical branches are 
carried on. They are never employed, however, with entire 
safety, and it is always a delicate question to decide when 
and how far they can be trusted with the necessary imple- 
ments of labor. A patient perfectly trustworthy to-day, 
may awake on the morrow laboring under dangerous, though 
to the non-professional eye unmanifest, excitement. To 
always successfully draw the line, and avoid clanger, is impos- 
sible ; for with increased liberty come greater opportunities 
for doing harm, and more frequent chances for escaping 
observation. 

A larger class, and one more difficult to employ, are those 
who, through the progress of their disease, have virtually lost 
all mind, and with it the power to apj)ly themselves to any 
employment whatsoever. These must be stimulated to work; 
must, by patient effort and personal oversight, be re-taught 
some simple branch of labor ; and, finally, they must be con- 
firmed in the habits of industry. 

Success may fail to crown one's efforts in either step of 
this long and usually tedious process ; but the habit once 
established is general^ permanent, and the condition of the 
patient so vastly improved thereby as to warrant almost any 
outlay of time and labor to secure this end. Such patients 
can seldom be educated to do any thing requiring mechanical 
dexterity; but few, however, are so demented that they can- 
not do the work of a day-laborer. 

Shops established in connection with the Asylum for the 
employment of this class have proved of but little utility ; 
but the considerable tract of land adjoining our building has 
been found to be indispensable in securing suitable employ- 
ment for many who would otherwise have to walk our wards 
in idleness. 

Towards the accomplishment of the object above indicated, 
we have brought together into two wards all the men who 
are daily employed outside of the Asylum. These wards are 
thus left vacant through the day, and the attendants are at 
liberty to devote their time to taking out from the other 
wards all who can in any way be induced to work, and who 
jjf;cd special supervision. 

In this way an intelligent attendant can, by his example 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



13 



and encouragement, teach habits of industry to many seem- 
ingly hopeless cases, — habits which frequently are lasting, 
and which, in time, may change the person from a drone on 
the wards to a cheerful laborer in some special branch of 
industry. 

Table 
Shoivhig Number of Articles, made by Female Patients. 



ARTICLES. 


NUMBER. 


ARTICLES. 


NUMBER. 


Awnings . , , 


6 


Nightdresses 


26 


Aprons 


. 110 


Pillow-cases 


578 


Chemises 


, 332 


Pillow-ticks 


12 


Camisoles . 


8 


Pillows, hair (made over) 


42 


Clothes-bags 


23 


Quilts (hemmed) 


124 


Curtains . . . 


. 160 


Sheets. 


583 


Cushions 


6 


Sacks .... 


22 


Caps (bakery) 


4 


Skirts . ... 


172 


Coffee- bags . 


4 


Shirts .... 


8 


Canvas-seats 


15 


Suspenders (pairs) 


140 


Carpet-strips (hemmed) 


22 


Straw-ticks . 


2 


Dresses 


, 313 


Towels (roller) . 


347 


Drawers (pairs) . 


. 120 


Towels (hand) 


306 


Holders 


. 210 


Towels (dish) . . 


180 


Handkerchiefs (hemmed) 


10 


Table-cloths 


44 


Ironing-sheets 


4 


Tea-bags . 


4 


Mattresses (made over) 


. 198 


Vests (under) 


5 


Mattress-ticks 


16 


Waists (under) . 


32 


Mittens (pairs) . 


12 







Napkins . . , 


. 112 


Total number 


4,312 



Products of the Garden. 



Sweet corn 

Tomatoes 

Beets 

Onions . 

String-beans 

Carrots . 

Turnips 

Squashes 

Parsnips 

Celery . 



9,555 ears 
400 bushels 
175 bushels 
75 bushels 
52 bushels 
35 bushels 
60 bushels 
5 tons 
150 bushels 
800 heads 



Pease 
Melons . 
Cabbages 
Cucumbers 
Spinach . 
Apples . 
Pie-plant 
Asparagus 
Radishes 



15 bushels 
85 

1,200 heads 
15 bushels 
50 bushels 
75 barrels 
400 pounds 
150 pounds 
50 dozens. 



14 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



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1880.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



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16 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

In compliance with your directions the repairs have been 
carried on as rapidly as was consistent with thorough work. 
The male- wing is already occupied ; the female- wing will be 
finished on or before the first of January. The object 
sought in these alterations has been to make the wards con- 
form, as nearly as the original plan of the building would 
permit, to modern ideas as regards light and ventilation. To 
accomplish this it was necessary to remove nearly the entire 
inside of the wards. The old four-inch by four-inch air- 
flues have been enlarged to six-inch by eight-inch, and car- 
ried from each room independently to the attic, where they 
are to be connected with a cupola eight feet square, contain- 
ing a coil of steam-pipes. The water-closets have been en- 
tirely remodelled, the bath-tubs placed in an adjoining room, 
and between the two a ventilating shaft erected, carried 
above the ridge-pole of the wing, and covered with a Van 
Noordan ventilator. All the soil and water pipes have been 
run in this shaft. The main soil-pipe, four inches in diameter, 
which has been carried to the top of the shaft and then left 
open, is kept entirely above ground in the basement until it 
finds exit through the walls of the building, where it enters 
a brick trap. The closets, the urinals, the slop-hoppers, the 
wash-bowls, and the bath-tubs all have separate traps venti- 
lated by a two-inch iron pipe running to the top of the shaft. 
Above the trap of the privy-seat is placed a ventilating arm, 
which is connected with a three-inch iron pipe which also 
runs to the top of the ventilating shaft. An eighty-gallon 
copper boiler has been placed at the bottom of this shaft, and 
so connected with our main boiler that there is a constant 
circulation of hot water through it. Sufficient heat is thus 
secured to insure strong ventilation summer and winter, at a 
minimum expense. This boiler also supplies the baths for 
each ward. To gain light, and give the wards a more cheer- 
ful outlook, two bay-windows have been thrown out to the 
east. Both wings have been re-slated, and a cupola placed 
on each for the purpose of ventilation. 

All the work has been done by the day, under the imme- 
diate supervision of our regular mechanics, who deserve 
much praise for the interest which they have taken in it, and 
the economy and thoroughness with which it has been car- 
ried on. 



1880.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 17 

These repairs, when carried out over the entire house, will 
place the Asylum on a par with the more modern structures 
in sanitary equipments and in its cheerful and homelike 
aspect. 



18 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



STATEMENT. 

Showing Net Cost of Maintenance to Sept. 30, 1880. 

(Fifty-two weeks.) 
Flour, barrels 523 . 
Flour (Graham), barrels 17 
Corn and rye meal, pounds 3,020 
Oatmeal, pounds 1,025 . 
Hominy, pounds 1,110 . 
Tapioca, pounds 175 
Crackers . . 

Fresh beef (cuts), pounds 
Soup-beef, pounds . 
Corned beef . 



Total beef, pounds 
Lamb and mutton, pounds 2,058 
Poultry . 

Fresh pork, pounds 2,761 
Salt pork, pounds 921 
Sausage, pounds 893 
Hams, pounds 512 . 
Meats (miscellaneous) 
Vegetables (purchased) 
Potatoes, bushels 1,131 
Sweet potatoes 
Beans, bushels 89 . 
Rice, pounds 850 
Salt, barrels 13 
Spices 
Vinegar . 

Provisions (miscellaneous) 
Fresh fish, pounds 9,649 
Salt fish, pounds 2,942 
Oysters . 

Sugar, pounds 15,358 
Molasses, gallons 533 
Sirup, gallons 91 
Eggs, dozens 1,858 . 
Butter, pounds 10,620 

Amount carried forward 





S3, 230 22 




95 00 




48 78 




39 50 




27 77 




11 58 




77 38 


12,150 


5,165 


22,106 


39,421 


. 2,356 38 




236 53 




209 01 




217 63 




• 69 61 




74 41 




50 13 




48 48 




88 58 




525 74 




37 99 




141 62 




60 90 




31 95 




45 83 




45 17 




125 32 




297 78 




151 80 




84 26 




1,221 67 




213 20 




43 88 




326 96 




2,420 54 




$12,655 00 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 23. 



19 



Amount brought forward 
Cheese, pounds 1,069 
Lard, pounds 2,475 
Milk, quarts 64,775 
Coffee, pounds 2,287 
Tea, pounds 851 
Chiccory, pounds 55 
Berries (not including those grown) 
Fruit 

Dried fruit 
Raisins . 

Cream of tartar, pounds 275 
Saleratus, pounds 295 
Tobacco . 
Medicines 

Grain and pro vender 
Water . 
Ice, pounds 195,930 
Soap 
Starch 

Groceries (miscellaneous) 
Hay, pounds 11,830 
Straw, pounds 31,315 
Blankets and spreads 



Dry-goods (including women's 

Clothing, " men's 

Boots, shoes, and slippers 

Crockery and glassware 

Furniture 

House-furnishings . 

Stationery 

Seeds and plants 

Gas, cubic feet 498,000 

Coal, tons (gross) 837^ 

Charcoal 

Undertaker's charges 

Postage . 

Transportation 

Travelling 

Ordinary repairs (materials and labor) 

Current expenses .... 

Net supplies issued to Sept. 30, 1880 

Supplies expended as above 
Pay-roll, to Sept. 30, 1880 

Less sundry sales 



quarts 710 



clothing and furnishings) 



. $12,655 


60 


. ■ 135 


59 


180 


01 


. 2,914 


83 


462 


88 


333 


84 


4 21 


75 


73 


228 


81 


54 


40 


60 


52 


S4 00 


13 


07 


100 


19 


173 


00 


161 


SI 


518 


59 


363 


42 


649 


43 


20 


63 


124 


SO 


112 


23 


204 


93 


524 


51 


. 1,587 


61 


. 1,513 


05 


580 


82 


214 


45 


781 


79 


553 


09 


201 


77 


85 


50 


. 1,419 


3^ 


. 3,757 70 


35 


00 


119 


00 


73 


IS 


95 


99 


46 


44 


. 3,000 


00 


917 


32 


$35,139 07 


$35,139 


07 


19,184 


52 



$54,323 59 
612 13 

$53,711 46 



20 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. '80. 

Dividing the expenditures ($53,711.46) by the average daily 
number of patients (363.15) gives the cost of each patient 
for 52 weeks $147 90 

This amount divided by 52 weeks gives the weekly cost per 
patient 2 84 

The cost of support of the patients is slightly less than last 
year. 

The steward's department has been conducted with the 
same economy and good judgment that has characterized it 
in former years. That he has been successful in his efforts 
to satisfy every reasonable demand of the inmates, is proved 
by the very infrequent complaints that have been made 
either as regards the quantity, quality, or variety of the 
diet. 

H. M. QUINBY, Superintendent. 

Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1880. 



TABLES FOR UNIFORM STATISTICS 

IN THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 
FOR THE INSANE. 



Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy, and Charity, April 3, 1SS0. 



By the Act of the Legislature establishing an Asylum for the Chronic In- 
sane, it was provided: "That the inmates thereof shall consist only of such 
chronic insane as may he transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities 
in the manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and forty of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty-three." [Statutes 1877, chap. 227.] 

All patients of the Asylum, therefore, have been former inmates of one or 
more hospitals in the State; and whenever in these tables they appear as ' ' first 
admissions," they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this Asylum. 



1. General Statistics of the Year 



Patients in hospital Oct. 1, 1879 
Admissions within the year * 

Whole number of cases within the year 
Discharges within the year * 
Viz., as recovered . 

as much improved . 

as improved 

as unimproved 
Deaths 

Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1880 
Viz., supported as State patients 
as town patients 
as private patients 



Number of different persons within the year, 
admitted ..... 
recovered ..... 

Daily average number of patients 



175 
f26 



201 



1 

3 

15 

182 

57 

125 



200 
25 

170.67 



196 
16 



212 



191 

62 

129 



212 

16 

192.48 



371 

42 



413 



11 

23 



373 
119 

254 



412 
41 

363.15 



* Actual, not nominal. 



f One returned from elopement. 



oo 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



2. Monthly Adm 


issions, Disch 


arge 


s, and Avei 


ages. 




MONTHS. 


Admissions. 


Discharges. 
(Including Deaths.) 


Daily Av'ge op Patients 
in the House. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1879. October. 


1 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 


2 


175.29 


196. 


371.29 


November 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 


174. 


195.16 


369.16 


December 


1 


1 


2 


3 


- 


3 


172.26 


195 06 


367.32 


1880. January- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


171.68 


195 09 


366.77 


February 














171. 


194.83 


365.83 


March . 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


5 


169.49 


193 06 


362.55 


April 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


167.40 


193. 


360.40 


May 


- 


- 


- 


. 6 


1 


7 


162.84 


192. 


354.84 


June 


10 


5 


15 


1 


7 


8 


162.67 


188.56 


351.23 


July 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


169.68 


188 70 


358.38 


August . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


4 


169.42 


185.71 


355.13 


September 


11 

26 


10 
16 


24 
42 


1 
19 


3 

21 


4 
40 


182-.50 


192.73 


375.23 


Total of cases 


- 


- 


- 


Total of persons . 


25 


16 


41 


19 


21 


40 


- 


- 


- 



3. Received on Fir 


st and 


Subset 


juent Admissions. 




NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Times previously Re- 
covered. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


31 ales. 


Females. 


Total. 


First 


25 


16 


42 


- 


- 


- 


Second .... 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Third 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Fourth .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Fifth 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Etc 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total of cases . 


26 


16 


42 








Total of persons 


25 


16 


41 









1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 23. 



4. Ages of Persons admitted for the First Time. 



Fifteen years and less 

From 15 to 20 years 
20 to 25 years 
25 to 30 years 
30 to 35 years 
35 to 40 years 
40 to 50 years 
50 to 60 years 
60 to 70 years 
70 to 80 years 

Over 80 years " . 

Unknown 

Total 



At First Attack of 
Insanity. 



Males. Females. 1 Total. 



5 
25 



16 



41 



When admitted. 



Males. Females. Total 



1 

3 
3 
3 
• 1 
9 
1 
3 



25 



16 



1 
5 
3 

9 

4 

12 

o 

4 



41 



5. Parentage of . 


Persons admitted. 






PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts 




4 


4 


2 


3 


6 


7 


New Hampshire . 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


Vermont 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


New York . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


England 




1 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Ireland 




10 


10 


9 


9 


19 


19 


Germany . 




- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Unknown . 




11 


12 


- 


-. 


11 


12 


Total 


26 


26 


16 


16 


42 


42 



24 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



6. Residence of Persons admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Massachusetts: — 








Viz., Middlesex County .... 


2 


2 


4 


Suffolk County 


21 


12 


33 


Bristol County ..... 


1 


1 


2 


Norfolk County ..... 


- 


1 


1 


Unknown ....... 


2 


- 


2 


Total 


26 


16 


42 


Cities or large towns . . 


26 


15 


41 


Country districts . . . . 


— 


1 


1 



7. Civil Condition of Persons admitted. 



NUMBER OF 


Unmarried. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


THE 
ADMISSION. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First . 
Second 
Third . 
Fourth 
Fifth . 
Etc. . 


13 

1 


5 


18 


6 


8 


14 


4 


3 


7 


2 




2 


Total . 


14 


5 


19 


6 


8 


.14 


4 


3 


7 


2 


— 


2 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



25 



8. Occupations 


of Persons admitted. 




OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Farmer ....... 


1 


- 


1 


Tinsmith 














1 


- 


1 


Laborers 














12 


- 


12 


Marble- worker 














1 


- 


1 


Blacksmith . 














1 


- 


1 


Map-agent . 














1 


- 


1 


Seaman 














1 


- 


1 


Soldier 














1 


- 


1 


Upholsterer . 














1 


- 


1 


Photographer 














1 


- 


1 


Carpenter . 














1 


- 


1 


Gardener 














1 


- 


1 


Clock-maker 














• 1 


- 


1 


Manufacturer 














1 


- 


1 


Domestics . 














- 


2 


2 


Seamstress . 


♦ 












- 


1 


1 


No occupation 














1 


2 


3 


Wives . 














- 


8 


8 


Widows 














- 


3 


3 


Total . 


26 


16 


42 



9. Form of Disease in the Cases admitted. 



FOKM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania, acute ...... 

chronic ...... 

Melancholia ...... 

Epilepsy . . . . 

Dementia, chronic . . ... 


11 

5 
10 


9 

1 

6 


20 
6 

16 


Total of cases 

Total of persons ..... 


26 
25 


16 
16 


42 
41 



26 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



10. Reported Duration. of Insanity before Last Admission 






First Admission 


All 


other Ad- 


Total. 


PREVIOUS DURATION. 


to any Hospital. 


missions. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Ma 


Fe. 


Total. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Congenital 


- 


1 


1 














Under 1 month . 


- 


1 


1 














From 1 to 3 months . 


1 


3 


4 














3 to 6 months . 


- 


- 


- 


o 


- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


6 to 12 months . 




















1 to 2 years 


7 


2 


9 


10 


6 


16 


2 


2 


4 


2 to 5 years 


4 


3 


7 


5 


5 


10 


3 


8 


11 


5 to 10 years 


2 


- 


2 


4 


- 


4 


4 


2 


6 


10 to 20 years . 


1 


1 


o 


4 


4 


8 


5 


2 


7 


Over 20 years 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Unknown .... 


11 
26 


5 
16 


16 

42 


26 


1 
16 


1 

42 


11 


1 


12 


Total of cases- . 


26 


16 


42 


Total of persons . 


25 


16 


41 


25 


16 


41 


25 


16 


41 


Average of known cases 


3.07 


5.04 


4.05 


6.05 


5. 


5.52 


7.08 


9.20 


8.14 



11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


, Total. 


Intemperance ...... 


- 


1 


1 


Puerperal 


- 


3 


3 


Epilepsy 


5 


1 


6 


Typhoid fever ...... 


1 


- 


1 


Hereditary ....... 


1 


2 


3 


Unknown ....... 


19 


9 


28 


Total 


26 


16 


42 



1880-] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



27 



12. Relation to Hospitals of Persons admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First admission to any hospital for insane . 

Former inmates of this hospital 

of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 
of Taunton " " 
of Worcester " " 


1 

14 

10 

1 


10 
5 
1 


1 

24 

15 

o 


Total ... 


26 


16 


42 



13. 


How & 


upported. 










Patients admitted. 


Average of the Year. 


i 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


State patients 
Town patients 
Private patients . 


9 
.17 


3 
13 


12 
30 


53.03 
117.64 


63.30 
129.19 


116.32 

246.83 


Total .... 


26 


16 


42 


170 67 


192.48 


363.15 



14. Discharges, classified by 


Admission 


and Result 








ADMISSION. 


Kecovered. 


Much 
Improved. 


Im- 
proved. 


Unim- 
proved. 


Died. 


Total. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Tots 

Pers 


tl . 
ons 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


„_ 


1 

1 
1 


9 

9 

9 


10 

10 
10 


_ 


4 

4 
4 


4 

4 
4 


15 

15 
15 


8 

8 
8 


23 

23 
23 


16 

16 
16 


21 

21 

21 


37 

37 

•37 



28 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



15. Gases discharged Recovered. 


Duration * 








Duration- before 
Admission. 


Hospital 
Residence. 


Whole Duration 
from the Attack. 


ERI 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital 
Under 1 month 
From 1 to 3 months 
3 to 6 months 
6 to 12 months 

1 to 2 years . 

2 to 5 years . 
5 to 10 years . 

10 to 20 years . 
Over 20 years . 
Unknown .... 






- 




- 


- 








Total of cases 
Total of persons . 
Average of known cases 
(in months) 















16. Cases residting in 


Death. 


Dur 


ation 


•t 








Duration before 
Admission. 


Hospital 
Residence. 


Whole Duration 
from the Attack. 


PERIOD. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital 

Under 1 month . 

From 1 to 3 months 
3 to 6 months 
6 to 12 months 

1 to 2 years . 

2 to 5 years . 
5 to 10 years . 

10 to 20 years . 
Over 20 years . 
Unknown .... 


4 
5 
2 

4 


9 
2 

4 


2 

4 
7 
2 

8 


2 

9 
1 
3 

15 

27 


1 

7 

8 
40 


2 
1 
16 
1 
3 

23 
33.5 


5 
5 
2 

3 
15 

83 


o 

1 
1 

4 

8 

84 


7 

6 
3 

7 


Total. 
Average of known cases 
(in months) 


15 

50 


8 
51 


23 
53.5 


23 
83.5 



* Of the attack resulting in recovery. 



t Of the attack resulting in death. 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



29 



17. Cases discharged by Recovery or Death. Form of Insanity. 



FORM OF INSANITY. 


Recovbkies. 


Deaths. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania, acute 

chronic . 
Melancholia 

Epilepsy .... 
Dementia, chronic 


- 


- 


- 


10 

1 

4 


4 

1 
3 


14 

o 
7 


Total of cases . 
Total of persons 


- 


- 


- 


15 

15 


8 
8 


23 
23 



18. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Phthisis 


4 


5 


9 


Pneumonia 
















1 


- 


1 


Epilepsy 
Heart-disease 
















3 
2 


1 


4 
2 


Dysentery 
Homicide 
















1 


1 


1 
1 


Old aoe . 
















1 


- 


1 


Exhaustion 






• 










3 


1 


4 


Total 
















15 


8 


23 



19. Deaths, 


classified by Results 


of Previous A 


dmi 


ssio 


ns. 




NUMBER OF 
THE 


Recoveeed. 


Much 
Improved. 


Improved. 


UNIM 'ROVED. 


Total. 


ADMISSION. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


First . 
Second 
Third . 
Fourth 
Fifth . 
Etc. . 

Total 





















— 

















ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



20. Recoveries, classified by Results of Previous Admissions. 



NUMBER OF 
THE 


Recoveked. 


Much 
Improved. 


Improved. 


Unimproved. 


Total. 


ADMISSION. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


To. 


First . , . 
Second . 
Third . 
Fourth . 
Fifth . 

Total . 


































21. Deaths, classified by 


Duration of L 


.sanity 


and of Treatment. 


PERIOD. 


Duration op Insanity.* 


Whole Known Period of 
Hospital Residence^ 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Congenital .... 


- 


_ 


._ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Under 1 month 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


From 1 to 3 months 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 to 6 months 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 to 12 months 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


1 to 2 years 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 to 5 years 






5 


2 


7 


9 


3 


12 


5 to 10 years 






5 


1 


6 


1 


3 


4 


10 to 20 years 






2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


4 


Over 20 years 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown 






3 


4 


7 


- 


- 


- 


Total . 


15 


8 


23 


15 


8 


23 


Average of known cases in 














months .... 


96 


84 


90 


74 


84 


79 



* Duration since first attack of insanity. 



| Wherever passed. 



1880.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



31 



22. Ages of those who Died. 



AGES. 






At Time of the First 
Attack. 


At Time of Death. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Fifteen years and less 

From 15 to 20 years 
20 to 25 years 
25 to 30 years 
30 to 35 years 
35 to 40 years 
40 to 50 years 
50 to 60 years 
60 to 70 years 
70 to 80 years 

Over 80 years 

Unknown 






2 
2 

1 

] 
1 

1 

2 
3 

2 


1 
1 

2 
4 


2 
3 

1 

2 
3 

1 

o 

3 
6 


1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 


1 
1 

1 

2 
3 


1 

2 
3 

1 
3 
4 
1 

2 
2 

1 
3 


Total 


15 


8 


23 


15 


8 


23 



32 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct.'* 






6^ 



s s 






^ 



q 



to 

to 



Eemaining 

of each 

Year's 

Admissions 

Sept. 30, 

1880. 


■rooi 


D3 OS '-< W 


•S9113LU9jI 


S -" — |-S5 


■S9I13M 




Q 

H 

a 
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