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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Massachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr51temp 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

JOHN D. "WASHBURN Worcester. 

JAMES B. THAYER Cambridge. 

ROBERT W. HOOPER, M.D Boston. 

RUFUS D. WOODS Enfield. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, M.D Worcester. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D Superintendent. 

E. MEADE PERKINS, M.D Assistant PiirsiciAN. 

CHARLES H. SAFFORD ...... Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES Matron. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER Clerk. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN . Engineer. 



TREASURER. 



ALBERT WOOD 



Worcester. 



Commontoealtl) of JtlassacljuaettB. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To his Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council of the Common- 
wealth. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital submit 
their Fourth Annual Report on the affairs of the Asylum 
for the Chronic Insane, which has been placed by the Legis- 
lature under their jurisdiction and control. 

Late in the autumn of 1880 a petition was presented to the 
Trustees, asking a release of land on Summer Street for the 
purpose of enabling the city to widen that street. The tract 
proposed for release was fifteen feet wide in its broadest 
part, and about twelve hundred feet in length. It was pro- 
posed that this should be released without compensation. 

The Trustees, although authorized by the Legislature to 
sell any portion of the land of the old hospital which, in the 
exercise of their discretion, they should think not needed for 
the use of the asylum, were unwilling to assume that this 
authority included the power to give land of the State to any 
person or corporation without compensation, and referred 
the petitioners to the Legislature, soon to meet for the session 
of 1881. A petition was duly presented to that body, and 
at a hearing before the proper committee the Trustees ap- 
peared to explain the situation and see that, should the Legis- 
lature see fit to grant the petition, as to which their interest 
was the same as that of any other citizen's, the rights of 
the State were properly protected in the bill. 

The petition was granted, a bill framed, which was sub- 
mitted to the Trustees for inspection or amendment, and 
eventually became a law as Statute of 1881, chap. 135. 

In accordance with its provisions, plans and specifications 



6 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

were presented to and received the approval of the Trustees, 
on the 16th of August, 1881. The work has not yet been 
commenced, but the decree of the County Commissioners 
authorized it to be begun at any time, and after it is begun 
the statute requires that it be " forthwith done and completed 
to the acceptance of the Trustees." The work will be, when 
completed, a great benefit to the city and county, as was 
earnestly claimed by the petitioners ; and the Trustees are 
happy to believe that, if it is so finished as to obtain their 
approval, the State will suffer no detriment. 

Of the land formerly pertaining to the old hospital, and 
which the Trustees were authorized to sell, in their dis- 
cretion, a small tract has been sold during the past year, and 
the proceeds paid over to the State Treasurer, in accordance 
with the provisions of law. But the Trustees have made no 
effort to press any of the land of the State for sale. The 
tracts which the market would now accept at fair valuations 
are already appropriated by law to the use "and necessary 
for the welfare of the asylum." In this territory is included 
nearly all the land which has been considered entitled to a 
valuation on the scale of city lots. And at any valuation 
ever put upon it, the Trustees are of the opinion that no in- 
vestment of that amount by the State could bring anything 
like so liberal a return as it is earning now by the use to 
which the statute of 1877 appropriated it. The outlying 
lands have not yet been reached in the revival of speculative 
investment, and there is little call for them for immediate 
occupancy. As the Trustees shall have the opportunity to 
dispose of them at what they consider fair values, it is their 
intention to do so, but not to push them on the market. In 
other words, they propose, till otherwise instructed, to manage 
this property as a prudent person would manage his own. 

In conducting the financial affairs of the asylum, the 
Trustees have, to the best of their ability, applied the same 
principles of management spoken of in their report on the 
hospital, — systematic analysis and audit of expenditure, 
keeping the same within the income, and maintaining a 
moderate surplus for contingencies. Unlike any of the other 
institutions for the care of the insane, within the State, the 
asylum has not a single private patient, nor is it permitted 
by law to receive one- 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7 

The statute rate for State, city, and town patients is all it 
receives, and it has not a dollar of income from any other 
source. Yet, on the basis of present prices, the institution 
is self-supporting, and will probably continue to be so, and 
asks no appropriation from the State. The improvements on 
the premises which have been going on under the wise and 
prudent administration of Dr. Quinby have added much to 
the comfort and healthfulness of the inmates, and their cost 
has been met from the current receipts and surplus. 

For the financial details of the year, reference is made to 
the report of the Treasurer, herewith submitted. 

The beneficent purpose of the State in providing this 
asylum for the treatment of a certain class of the dependent 
insane has, it is believed, been reasonably fulfilled during 
the past year. In another respect than that just mentioned 
this institution differs from any other within the State : not 
a patient is received here of whose recovery there is any 
reasonable probability. Mental conditions of distress are 
often alleviated, and physical conditions which bear upon the 
menta, 1 are improved by diet and prescriptions ; but it is not 
expected that the tables will show any recoveries, and it is 
seldom that they do so. Kind and gentle treatment, as little 
physical restraint as the safety of the patient and others will 
permit, constant medical inspection, and attention to all the 
sanitary considerations, are the ends to which the labors of 
Dr. Quinby and his assistant,, Dr. Perkins, have been 
directed; and in their labors it is bare justice to say that, 
in the judgment of the Trustees, they have been faithful 
and untiring. 

The report of Dr. Quinby, which accompanies this, and 
the tables he furnishes in illustration of its statements in 
connection with the financial exhibit, seem to vindicate the 
wisdom of the Legislature in devoting this property of the 
State to its present use, and the Trustees hope and believe 
that the institution enjoys the confidence of the discrimi- 
nating and thoughtful public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN D. WASHBURN, 
JAMES B. THAYER, 
ROBERT W. HOOPER, 
RUFUS D. WOODS, 
THOMAS H. GAGE, 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES 

Sept. 30, 1881. 



Live stock 1175 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements 531 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures ..... 2,600 00 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department .... 8,656 35 

Other furniture in inmates' department . . . . 3,231 20 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department . 8,721 25 

Ready-made clothing . 1,723 87 

Dry-goods 1,420 89 

Provisions and groceries 4,409 68 

Drugs and medicines . 161 30 

Fuel 1,203 60 

Library 100 00 

132,934 14 



1881.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 2? 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my Fourth Annual 
Report on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1881 : — 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1880 : — 
Cash belonging to Asylum . . . . $6,615 44 

Deposits of inmates 396 08 

Amounts received: — 
From the Commonwealth for support of pa- 
tients $18,980 42 

cities and towns for support of patients, 47,088 07 



other sources 
patients (on deposit) 



The expenditures for the year have been 
as follows : — 



Salaries and wages 
Extra labor (ordinary) 



),924 18 
64 50 



SOU 52 



5,068 49 

542 67 

97 70 

5,720 38 



Provisions and supplies, 


viz. : — 


fli7,OUU W 


Meats of all kinds 




$3,460 50 


Fish of all kinds 


. 


582 19 


Fruit and vegetables . 


. 


1,329 51 


Flour .... 




2,512 50 


Grain and meal for table 




274 32 


Grain, meal, and hay for stock 


77 70 


Tea and coffee 




723 99 


Sugar and molasses 


. 


1,414 09 


Milk, butter, and cheese 


. 


6,335 07 



A mounts carried forward 



5,709 87 $19,9SS 9S 



10 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



Amounts brought forward 


$16,709 87 


$19,988 98 


Salt and other groceries 


541 30 




All other provisions 


2,310 83 


19,562 00 


Clothing and material . 


$3,766 21 




Fuel and light 


7,881 05 




Medicine and medical supplies 


236 02 




Furniture, beds, and bedding 


4,777 36 




Transportation and travelling 


275 63 




Repairs (ordinary) 


3,000 00 




All other current expenses . 


• 1,504 70 


21,440 97 






Total current expenses 


...... 


$60,991 95 


Repairs (extraordinary) . . 


.$7,147 13 




Refunded inmates from deposits 


6 39 


7,153 52 






Total amount expended . 


...... 


$68,145 47 


Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1881 




5,574 91 
$73,720 38 


Resources. 




Cash on hand 


$5,574 91 




Due from the Commonwealth 


4,015 14 




cities and towns 


12,030 05 




other sources . 


37 76 


$21,657 86 






Liabilities. 




Due for supplies and expenses 


$3,671 04 




salaries and wages . 


1,555 73 




inmates (cash on deposi 


b) . . 487 39 


5,714 16 










$15,943 70 



Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Asylum fob the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1881. 



Worcestek Mass, Oct. 11, 1881. 
The undersigned has this day carefully compared the Treasurer's state- 
ment of expenditures for the year ending, Sept. 30, 1881, with the vouchers 
which are on file at the asylum, and found it to be correct, 

THOMAS H. GAGE, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 11 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor of presenting to you the 
Fourth Annual Report of the Superintendent of the asylum 
under your care. At the close of the last official year there 
were remaining in the asylum three hundred and seventy- 
three patients, — one hundred and eighty-two males and one 
hundred and ninety-one females. 

During the year ten males and eighteen females have 
been admitted, six males and four females have been dis- 
charged, and eighteen males and six females have died ; leav- 
ing at the end of the year three hundred and sixty-seven 
patients, — one hundred and sixty-eight males and one hun- 
dred and ninety-nine females. 

Of the number discharged, one male and two females have 
been taken home by friends, three males and two females 
have been removed to poor-houses, and one male has been 
transferred to Taunton Lunatic Hospital. 

As heretofore, the majority of deaths during the year has 
been due to chronic brain disease. But two acute cases have 
ended fatally, both of dysentery ; one in a female much 
reduced by chronic melancholia, and one as a complication 
of an attack of recurrent mania, in an old lady a resident of 
this and . the Worcester Lunatic Hospital for twenty-five 
years. 

There were during the month of July an unusual number 
of severe cases of bowel trouble ; but aside from this the 
health of the house has been good, and there has been but 
little call for medicine or for medical treatment. 

The changes in our population have been few. Up to 
Sept. 22 there had been but thirteen admissions. At no 
time during the year have the male wards been full, while 
the female side of the house has been crowded, and much of 



12 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

the time uncomfortably so, considering the class of female 
patients for whom we have to care. With a nominal capacity 
of four hundred, there are accommodations for two hundred 
and ten males and one hundred and ninety females ; but we 
have constantly fallen short of the former number and as 
constantly gone above the latter. At the present writing 
there are twenty-two female patients sleeping on the halls, 
while one entire male ward is empty. A large number of 
the female patients belong to the turbulent class, and we 
therefore feel the pressure most in those wards where over- 
crowding is most detrimental to the discipline of the house 
and to the safety of its inmates. Since this excess of female 
transfers is likely to continue indefinitely, I would suggest 
that in any future repairs that may be made upon the female 
side of the house its capacity be made uniform with that of 
the male side by an addition of thirty-five feet to the ex- 
treme ward. Such an addition could be made by our regular 
mechanics, with the assistance of our patients, for a very 
small outlay. 

With this completed, there will be no difficulty in always 
keeping up our number to four hundred, without crowding ; 
a number which it seems desirable to maintain in order to 
secure the most economical management of the institution. 

Fully one-third of the inmates of the asylum belong to the 
turbulent and dangerous class, and demand the same watch- 
fulness on the part of those having them under their care 
that they required while in the more acute stage of their 
disease. Many are dangerous epileptics, many are victims of 
false hearing, and though not always excited, are always 
dangerous, being liable at any time to make furious and 
unprovoked assaults upon their fellow-patients, or upon the 
attendant having them in charge. Among such a class it is 
impossible to prevent all outbreaks; but by careful classifica- 
tion, and an increase in the number of the attendants upon 
the excited wards, we endeavor to make these as infrequent 
as possible. Through the same means we have tried to 
reduce the amount of restraint used to the lowest limit con- 
sistent with safety, and to its milder and least objectionable 
forms, and without substituting therefor other means as 
undesirable as that rejected. An accurate inventory of our 
restraining apparatus is as follows : six muffs, twenty wrist- 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 13 

straps and belts, five camisoles. Seclusion lias been con- 
fined, on the male side of the house, almost exclusively to 
two cases of recurrent mania during the attacks of excite- 
ment, and, on the female, to three cases ; two having delu- 
sions dangerous to their fellow-patients, and the third being 
a patient who denudes herself. In no case has chloral, 
bromide, morphine, or other narcotics been used in place of 
restraint. 

Stationery has been furnished to every patient desiring it 
in quantities sufficient for them to write at least one letter 
per week. All letters thus written have been forwarded as 
addressed, while letters and all other articles sent to patients 
have been given them. The friends of patients are at lib- 
erty to visit them at any time, and, while it is not considered 
just toward the inmates to open the doors of the asylum to 
mere sight-seers, all parts of the building are freely open, 
every day in the week, and at all times of the day, to any 
one who comes with a legitimate interest in the care and 
treatment of the insane. 

Eight wards, four on either side of the house, containing 
more than one-third of our patients, are unlocked excepting 
at night. In suitable weather, every one has an opportunity 
to go out upon the grounds surrounding the building for 
from one to six hours a day. 

The usual amount of work has been performed by the 
patients during the year. Weekly entertainments have been 
provided through the winter months by the officers of the 
asylum, and chapel service has been held each Sunday by 
the various local clergymen. 

The repairs upon the female wing, which were being 
pushed to completion at the time of writing my last report, 
were finished in January of this year, and the wards occupied. 
The two wings have been newly furnished throughout, the 
walls painted and hung with pictures, and hanging-baskets 
placed in the bays. 

Ample and separate closet space has been provided in the 
dining-rooms for the food and dishes, a drying-shaft arranged 
for towels, and the room furnished with round tables, covered 
during the day with red damask cloths and with simple 
though attractive table furniture at meal times. Each ward 
has a broom-closet and a heated and ventilated shaft for 



14 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

drying mops. These two wings have now been occupied 
through one entire summer and winter, and have proved well 
ventilated, convenient, light, cheerful, and homelike, and 
compare favorably in every respect with the wards of the 
newer hospitals. The water-closets are especially satisfactory 
through their perfect ventilation and their consequent free- 
dom from odor. 

While we hope, in time, to continue these repairs through- 
out the remaining wards, it seems necessary to postpone this 
for the present, as we shall be obliged to provide in the near 
future for the renewal of our entire heating apparatus, at 
an estimated expense of some five or six thousand dollars. 

In the mean time some repairs are necessary, on account 
of the dilapidated condition of certain parts of the wards, 
and their unsightly and offensive water-closets. In pursu- 
ance of this plan, we have already renewed several of the 
ceilings in the halls on the male side of the house, refitted 
three of the six bath-rooms as completely as it was possible 
to do without tearing out and replumbing the entire tier, 
painted the woodwork and walls in five of the halls, and 
made some slight alterations for the purpose of increasing 
the amount of light. After painting two other wards, the 
repairs on the male side of the house will be completed, and 
but little additional outlay will be necessary here for some 
time to come. 

There still remain many repairs of a similar nature in the 
female wards, which should be done at once, and which we 
hope to complete during the' coming winter. 

The net cost of support of the patients has been $3.12 per 
week, an increase over the cost of former years, due, in the 
greater part, to the increased expenditure in beds and bed- 
ding, furniture, and house-furnishings for the wards lately 
repaired. 

There have been several changes in the medical staff during 
the year. Dr. William H. Raymenton, after a continuous 
service from the opening of the asylum, resigned early in the 
year, to go abroad. 

On Feb. 1, Dr. E. Meade Perkins was appointed to fill his 
place. Dr. Perkins comes to the asylum after having had 
experience in mental diseases, and from a successful general 
practice of two years at Sterling, of this State. April 24, 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 15 

Dr. Charles A. Peabody left the asylum to take a position on 
the staff of the hospital. t 

We are indebted to the proprietors of " The Evening 
Gazette " for a copy of their paper, and to Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Agassiz and to Dr. R. W. Hooper for books, pamphlets, and 
magazines. Such gifts are always acceptable, and I hope that 
we may be able to record many more such presents in the 
future. Old files of illustrated papers, odd numbers of 
magazines, copies of the " Franklin Library," and other 
similar publications, which are usually read and then thrown 
into the waste-basket, would, if sent to the asylum, furnish 
both pleasure and instruction to many of our patients. 

The work of the asylum has been somewhat hampered 
during the latter part of the year by the difficulty experi- 
enced in getting suitable attendants. I am, however, in- 
debted to the majority of the emploj^s for their hearty 
co-operation, for the interest which they have taken in their 
work, and for the kind and intelligent care which they have 
given those placed under their charge. 



H. M. QUINBY, Superintendent. 



Asylum foe the Chronic Insane, 
Oct. 1, 1881. 



16 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



TABLES FOR UNIFORM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS FOR THE 

INSANE. 

[Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy, and Charity, April 3, 1880.] 



By the act of the Legislature establishing an Asylum for 
the Chronic Insane, it was provided, " That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." [Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.] 

All the patients of the asylum, therefore, have been former 
inmates of one or more hospitals in the State ; and whenever 
in these tables they appear as "first admissions," they are 
only to be regarded as first admissions to this asylum. 

1. General Statistics of the Year. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Patients in hospital Oct. 1, 1880 . 


182 


191 


373 


Admissions "within the year 


10 


18 


28 


Whole number of cases "within the year 


192 


209 


401 


Discharges within the year,* 








Viz., as recovered ..... 


- 


- 


- 


as much improved .... 


- 


- 


- 


as improved ..... 


4 


3 


7 


as unimproved .... 


2 


1 


3 


Deaths 


18 


6 


24 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1881 


168 


199 


367 


Viz., supported as State patients 


47 


51 


98 


as town patients 


121 


148 


269 


as private patients . 


- 


- 


— 


Number of different persons within the year, 


192 


209 


401 


admitted ..... 


10 


18 


28 


recovered ..... 


— 


— 


— 


Daily average number of patients 


170.43 


191.66 


362.09 



* One eloped. 



1881.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



17 



2. Monthly Admissions, Disch 


irgei 


, and Averages. 








Discharges. 


Daily Average of 


MONTHS. 


Admmissions. 


(Including Deaths.) 


Patients in the House. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1880. 




















October . 


- 


- 


- 


Q 


1 


4 


179.77 


190.81 


370.58 


November 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


178.26 


189.14 


367.40 


December 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


177.39 


188.19 


365.48 


1881. 




















January 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


177 


188 


365 


February 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


175.10 


187 


362.10 


March . 


- 


10 


10 


4 


1 


5 


171.87 


191.06 


362.93 


April 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


167.73 


196 l 


363.73 


May . 


1 


- 


1 


3 


1 


4 


165.38 


195.62 


361 


June 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


163 


195 


358 


July 


1 


1 


2 


- 


4 


4 


163.42 


193 


356.42 


August . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


162.64 


192 


354.64 


September 


8 
10 


7 
18 


15 

28 


2 


- 


2 


163.60 


194.10 


357.70 


Total of cases 


24 


10 


34 


- 


- 


- 


Total of persons . 


10 


18 


28 


24 


10 


34 


— 


— 


- 



3. Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Cases Admitted. 


Times Previously 
Recovered. 




Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First 


10 


18 


28 


_ 


_ 


- 


Second .... 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


Etc 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total of cases . 


10 


18 


28 


- 


- 


- 


Total of persons 


10 


18 


2S 









18 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



4. Ages of Persons admitted for the First Time. 





At Fiest Attack of In- 










SANITY. 




When Admitted. 


AGES. 














Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Fifteen years and less . 


1 




1 








From 15 to 20 years 






1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


20 to 25 years 






1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


25 to 30 years 






3 


- 


3 


3 


- 


3 


30 to 35 years 






- 


1 


1 


2 


4 


6 


35 to 40 years 






- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


2 


40 to 50 years 






1 


- 


1 


2 


4 


6 


50 to 60 years 






- 


3 


3 


- 


o 


2 


60 to 70 years . 






- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


70 to 80 years 






- 


2 


2 


- 


4 


4 


Over 80 years 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown 






3 


8 


11 


- 


- 


1 


Totals . 






10 


18 


28 


- 


18 


28 



5. Parentage of Persons admitted. 










Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


PLACES. 












Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts 




2 


O 


2 


2 


4 


4 


New Hampshire . 
Vermont 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


New York . 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


England 






- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


Ireland 






5 


5 


13 


13 


18. 


18 


Germany 
Unknown 






1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

2 


1 
2 


2 
3 


2 
3 


Totals . 






10 


10 


18 


18 


28 


28 



1881.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



19 



6. Residence of Persons admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Massachusetts, viz : — 

Suffolk County ..... 

Bristol County 

Norfolk' County 


7 

2 
1 


16 
1 
1 


23 

1 
3 
1 


Totals 

Cities or large towns 


10 
10 


18 
18 


28 
28 





7. 


Civil 


Con 


ditio 


nof 


Persons admitted. 








NUMBER OF 
THE 


Unmarried. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


ADMISSION. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First . 
Second 


6 
6 


5 


11 


3 


8 


11 


- 


5 


5 


1 


- 


1 


Totals . 


5 


11 


3 


8 


11 




5 


5 


1 


- 


1 



8. Ocmipations of Persons admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 




2 




o 




- 


3 


3 




- 


1 


1 


No occupation ...... 


8 


3 


11 




- 


6 


6 




- 


5 


5 




10 


18 

• 


28 



20 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

9. Form of Disease in the Cases admitted. 



FORM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania, chronic ...... 

Epilepsy 

Dementia, chronic ..... 


8 
2 


15 
1 

2 


23 
1 
4 


Total of cases 

Total of persons 


10 
10 


18 

18 


28 
28 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 



PREVIOUS DURATION. 


First Admission 
to this Hospital- 


All other Ad- 
missions. 


Total. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital 

Under 1 month . 

From 1 to 3 months 
3 to 6 months 
6 to 12 months 

1 to 2 years . 

2 to 5 years . 
5 to 10 years . 

10 to 20 years . 
Over 20 years 
Unknown .... 


2 

1 
2 

2 

3 

10 
10 

2.10 


7 
2 
1 

8 

18 
18 

5.09 


2 
1 
9 
2 
3 

11 

28 
28 

3.59 














Total of cases 
Total of persons 

Average of known cases 









11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females, 


Total. 


Intemperance 


2 

1 

7 


1 

17 


2 

2 

24 




10 


18 


28 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 21 

12. Relation to Hospitals of Persons admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First admission to any hospital for insane . 

Former inmates of this hospital . 

of Dan vers Lunatic Hospital, 
of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 
of Tewksbury Almshouse . 


8 

2 


10 

7 
1 


10 
15 

3 


Totals 


10 


18 


28 



13. How Supported. 



SUPPORTED AS 


Patients Admitted. 


Average of the Year. 




Males. Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


State patients 
Town patients 


4 
6 


4 
14 


8 

20 


49.89 
120.54 


55.08 
136 58 


104.97 
257.12 


Totals . 


10 


18 


28 


170.43 


191.66 


362.09 



14. Discharges 


, classified by Admission 


and Residt 


• 






ADMISSION. 


Recovered. 


Much 
Improved. 


Im- 
proved. 


Unim- 
proved. 


Died. 


Total. 




M. 


F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


First 

Totals 
Persons . 







— 









4 

4 
4 


3 

3 
3 


7 

7 
7 


2 

2 

2 


1 

1 
1 


3 

3 
3 


IS 

18 

IS 


6 

6 
6 


•24 

24 
2-1 


24 

24 

24 


10 

10 
10 


34 

34 
34 



22 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 

15. Cases resulting in Death. — Duration.* 



[Oct. 



PERIOD. 


Duration before 
Admission. 


Hospital 
Residence. 


Whole Duration 
from the Attack. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital 

From 1 to 3 months 
3 to 6 months 
6 to 12 months 

1 to 2 years . 

2 to 5 years . 
5 to 10 years . 

10 to 20 years . 
Over 20 years . 
Unknown .... 


1 

6 
2 
1 

1 

7 
18 
41 


2 
1 
1 

2 

6 

45 


1 

8 
3 
2 
1 

9 

24 

43 


9 
6 
3 


3 
2 

1 


12 
8 
3 
1 


5 
4 

5 
4 


2 
1 

1 

2 


7 
5 
5 
1 
6 


Totals 
Average of known cases 
(in months) . 


18 

76 


6 
98 


24 

87 


18 
88 


6 
92 


24 

90 



* Of the attack resulting in death. 



16. Cases discharged by Recovery or Death. — Form of Insanity. 



FORM OF INSANITY. 


Recoveries. 


Deaths. 




Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania, chronic . 
Epilepsy .... 
Dementia, chronic 


- 


- 


- 


11 

1 
6 


4 
1 
1 


15 
2 

7 


Total of cases 
Total of persons . 


— 


— 


- 


18 
18 


6 
6 


24 
24 



17. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Phthisis ....... 

Epilepsy . . . . . . . 

Dysentery ....... 

Old age ....... 

Exhaustion ...... 


6 
1 

3 

8 


3 
1 
2 


9 
2 

2 
3 

8 


Totals 


18 


6 


24 



1881.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 23 

18. Ages of those who died. 



AGES. 






At Time of First Attack. 


At Timb of Death. 




Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Fifteen years and less 

From 15 to 20 years 
20 to 25 years 
25 to 30 years 
30 to 35 years 
35 to 40 years 
40 to 50 years 
50 to 60 years 
60 to 70 years 
70 to 80 years 

Over 80 years 

Unknown . 






1 

4 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 


2 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 

4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 
2 


1 

3 
1 
3 
6 
1 
1 
2 


1 

3 

1 
1 


1 
3 
2 
3 

9 
1 
2 
3 


Totals . 






18 


6 


24 


18 


6 


24 



24 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct.'81. 



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Totals 





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