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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"

A 



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in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr55temp 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



m 




lie Cliic 



WOECESTEK 



Foe the Yeae ending Septembee 30, 1883. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Squake. 

1884. 



OFFICEES OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

ROBERT W. HOOPER, M.D., Boston. 

A. GEORGE BULLOCK, . . . . . . Worcester. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, M.D Worcester. 

FRANCIS H. DEWEY, ...... Worcester. 

WILLIAM DICKINSON Worcester. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., Superintendent. 

E. MEADE PERKINS, M.D., . . . . . Assistant Physician. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER, Clerk and Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN Engineer. 



ALBERT WOOD, , 



TREASURER. 



Worcester. 



C0mmottb)eaIt]^ of P^assat^setts* 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor 

and the Honorable Council of the Gor)imonweaUh : 

The trustees beg leave to present their sixth annual 
report of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

From the nature of the cases of disease here represented, 
no very satisfactory results can be expected. 

The great mass of patients sent here are afflicted with 
physical as well as mental diseases of long continuance and 
grave character. The most that can be expected is to make 
them comfortable and contented. The whole number of 
patients treated during the year was 461, the average num- 
ber 384. 

The buildings and appurtenances, of more than fifty years 
standing, require much to be done to bring them to the 
proper standard for a hospital, and this can only be done 
gradually while they are occupied. But under the super- 
vision of the superintendent great improvements have already 
been made and are still going on without calling for extra 
appropriation. 

The work on the front wall, on Summer Street, is now 
completed to the satisfaction of the trustees, and the im- 
provement in the street, by adding fifteen feet to its width, 
is valuable to the asylum as well as to the city. 

The patients are well supplied with all the comforts they 
require. There are few complaints, but with some there is 
the desire to go home, where they have no homes to go to, 
or to be with friends, who have ceased to exist. 



70 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

It is painful to witness such a number of cases of loss of 
all the faculties ; only a mere animal existence remaining, 
but everything that can contribute to their comfort or to 
ameliorate their sad condition is faithfully done by the 
superintendent and his assistants. 

By the treasurer's report, the amount received for board 
is sufficient to defray the expenses and leave a small surplus 
for contingencies. 

The average cost of each patient was $3.04 a week. 

R. W. HOOPER, 
A. G. BULLOCK, 
THOMAS H. GAGE, 
FRANCIS H. DEWEY, 
WM. DICKINSON. 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



71 



OFFICEES A]S[D THEIE SALAEIES. 



Hosea M. Quinby, M. D., Superintendent, . 
E. Meade Perkins, M. D., Assistant Physician, 
Clarence R. Macomber, Clerk and Steward, 
Sophia N. Graves, Matron, .... 
William Sherman, Engineer, . 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

325 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 



VALUE OF STOCK AIS^D SUPPLIES. 

October 1, 1883, 



Live stock, ,.,.,. 

Carriages and agricultural implements, 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department. 

Other furniture in inmates' department, 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department 

Ready-made clothing, 

Dry goods, 

Provisions and groceries 

Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel, 

Library, . 

Building material, - 



$200 


00 


503 


65 


6,300 


00 


9,120 


55 


3,231 


20 


8,721 


25 


856 


81 


647 64 


2,896 68 


176 


00 


1,995 


00 


140 00 


2,062 


26 


$35,849 84 



72 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



TEEASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my sixth annual report, 
on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1883 : — 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1882 : — 



Cash belonging to asylum, .... 


$8,472 61 




Deposits of inmates, 


489 99 


$8,962 60 






Amounts received : — 






From the Commonwealth for support of 






patients, 


$16,970 20 




cities and towns for support of patients, 


52,279 33 




other sources, 


1,466 46 




patients (on deposit), .... 


14 13 


70,730 12 







The expenditures for the year have been as 
follows : — 
Salaries and wages, . 
Extra labor (ordinary), . 

Provisions and supplies, viz. 
Meats of all kinds, . 
Fish of all kinds. 
Fruit and vegetables, 
Flour, .... 

Grain and meal for table, . 
Grain, meal and hay for stock, 
Tea and coffee, . 
Sugar and molasses, . 
Milk, butter and cheese, . 
Salt and other groceries, . 
All other provisions, . 

Amotmt carried forward, 



),692 72 



$20,207 90 
121 38 


$20,329 28 


$4,431 CO 

870 77 


1,877 70 

4,231 03 

79 05 




249 45 




533 37 




1,624 62 

6,908 66 

659 06 




1,546 86 


22,911 57 





13,240 85 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



73 



Amount brought forward, 
Clothing and material. 

Fuel, 

Light 

Medicine and medical supplies 

Fm'nituve and furnishings, 

Crockery, . 

Beds and bedding. 

Transportation, . 

Travelling, 

Trustees' expenses, . 

Soap, .... 

Water, 

Stationery, . 

Undertaking, 

Repairs (ordinary), . 

All other current expenses, 



Total current expenses. 
Repairs and improvements (extraordinary). 
Refunded inmates from deposits. 

Total amount expended, . 
Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1883, . 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, 

Due from the Commonwealth, . 

cities and towns, . . 

other sources, .... 

Liabilities. 
Due for supplies and expenses, 
salaries and wages, 
inmates (cash on deposit), . 



13,240 85 



$2,252 


56 




4,835 39 




1,778 


03 




547 


53 




515 


76 




350 


18 




1,174 31 




163 


08 




53 


94 




31 


26 




784 73 




400 


11 




122 


00 




450 50 




3,000 


00 




1,329 


07 


17,788 45 
$61,029 30 






$9,472 54 




17 


00 








9,489 54 
$70,518 84 








* 


9,173 88 




$79,692 72 


$9,173 


88 




4,413 


76 




12,941 


55 




78 


48 


$26,607 67 


$4,067 


09 


1,716 05 




487 


12 


6,270 26 









Total surplus. 



$20,337 41 



Respectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 



WoucESTEE, Mass., Oct. 16, 1883. 
The undersigned has this day carefully compared the Treasurer's statement of 
expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1883, with the vouchers which are on file 
at the Asylum, and found it to be correct. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, 

Auditor of Accounts, 



74 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



SUPERmTENDENT'S BEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Itisane. 

Gentlemen, — There remained in the asylum at the 
close of the last official year, 381 patients, — 190 males 
and 191 females. 

During the year 51 males and 29 females were admitted ; 
6 males and 2 females were discharged, and 37 males and 
24 females died ; leaving at the end of the year 392 pa- 
tients, — 198 males and 194 females. 

Of the number discharged, three males and one female 
were removed to poor-houses, two males and one female 
were taken home by friends, and one male eloped. 

The asylum has been filled during the most of the year to 
its utmost limit, and at times has been overcrowded on the 
female side of the house. Its nominal capacity has always 
been placed at about 400 patients ; but we only have, as 
accommodations for this number, 124 single rooms and 65 
dormitory beds on the male side of the house ; while on 
the female there are but 113 single rooms and 55 dormi- 
tory beds, — making in all 357 beds. With anything 
above this latter number, therefore, we may be said to 
be crowded, since we are obliged to find sleeping 
accommodations for the surplus in hall-beds upon the 
corridors of the wards. Although this is always unde- 
sirable when it can be avoided, no serious harm can 
result from thus moderately increasing the capacity of our 
insane hospitals, since such accommodations are not al- 
together unsuitable for a limited number of the quietly 
demented. Nearly all of this class, however, has been 
culled from the asylum by the overseers of the poor, leav- 



1883.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 75 

iiig very few for whom such accommodations are either 
suitable or safe. 

Many of our patients, bereft of relatives and friends, and 
broken down both in mind and body, have found in the 
asylum a home which they appreciate, and they neither seek 
or desire a change. They come and go at will, do what- 
ever work they are able to do, indulge in their little freaks 
and peculiarities unmolested ; and finding the burden of their 
lives relieved — in so far as it is capable of relief — are un- 
complaining and happy. 

These could undoubtedly be as well cared for in private 
families as at the hospital ; but if their own wishes were 
consulted, they would, in most cases, prefer to stay among 
others of their kind, where their peculiarities attract no 
comment. The large majority of our patients are, how- 
ever, of quite a different class, and under no system could 
they be farmed out upon the community. Many of them, 
from their extreme filthy habits, require almost constant 
attention ; while the greater number would be dangerous 
members of society if at large. 

The large death-rate of the past year has been due en- 
tirely to causes inherent in the mental and physical condi- 
tion of the patients themselves, and in no way to epidemic 
or an unsanitary state of the asylum. We receive no pa- 
tients from the general public, and only such from the other 
hospitals as by longer or shorter residence have been found 
to be almost beyond question incurable. Under this ar- 
rangement the most unpromising cases, both as regards their 
mental and physical condition, naturally gravitate from the 
other hospitals to the asylum ; and we should expect to find 
in these transfers but few strong and able-bodied persons. 
Such, indeed, is the fact ; a large majority of these transfers 
being mere wrecks of humanity at the time of their en- 
trance, — broken down by mental suffering, or in an ad- 
vanced stage of incurable physical disease. 

As a consequence, our death-rate, although likely to vary 
greatly from year to year, will of necessity always be large. 
No skill or form of treatment can long avert the fjital end ; 
and all that the best-directed efforts can do is, by kindly 
attention and careful nursing, to alleviate the sufferings of 



76 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

these unfortunates, and smooth their path to the grave. 
Such patients are easily afiected by sudden climatic changes, 
— the protracted cold of the winter, and the heat and drouth 
of our summer months, always proving fatal to a greater or 
less number. 

Of the 61 deaths, 22 have been due to phthisis; 21 to 
exhaustion of chronic mania ; 7 to epilepsy ; 2 to paralysis ; 
3 to general paresis ; and 1 each to uremia, pyemia, cir- 
rhosis, senility, heart disease, and dj^sentery. 

During the year, repairs and alterations in the wards have 
been continued, the plumbing in the administration building 
renewed, two new boilers put in, our entire heating ap- 
paratus overhauled, and twenty thousand feet of steam pipe 
bought to replace that now in our air chamber. 

We have also added a new Shaker washing-machine to our 
laundry, and a sixty-gallon tea and coffee urn to our kitchen 
furniture, and furnished the entire house with woven wire 
mattresses. 

There is still much to be done in the way of alteraticms 
and repairs before the asylum can be said to be in a perfect 
sanitary condition, but every year, from its opening in 
1877 to the present time, a large portion of our income has 
been devoted to this purpose, and it is safe to say that the 
hygienic condition of the house has never been better than 
it is to-day. During a greater portion of the year our reser- 
voir gives us an abundance of pure water, and as our pipes 
are connected with the city service we have at all times an 
unfailing supply. Our drains have been relaid, one-half of 
our water closets and bath-rooms have been torn out, en- 
larged, rebuilt and thoroughly ventilated, and a plan 
adopted for the ventilation of the wards which is being 
carried out as rapidly as our means will warrant. 

The garden has not only given us an abundant supply of 
vegetables through the season, but has furnished work for 
many of the patients, while more have found employment in the 
extensive grading on the front of the asylum grounds, made 
necessary by the relocation of our wall in the widening of 
Summer Street. We find no difficulty in giving employment 
to every one of our patients who is willing and able to work. 



1883.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 77 

In fact, our great difficulty is in finding laborers enough to 
carry on the daily duties of the household. 

There have been very few additions to our working force, 
among the late transfers, and as our older hands, upon whom 
we have depended for much of the labor in the various 
mechanical departments of the asylum, are gradually drop- 
ping out of the ranks, we find it difficult to fill their places. 
Our working force, at best, varies greatly from day to day, 
being governed entirely by the changing mental and physical 
state of the patient. 

Although we compel no one to work, we use every efibrt 
to persuade them to do so, however little their labor may be 
worth. As a matter of fact it is worth but very little save to 
the patient himself. A record of the number of days' work 
performed would be misleading, as, save in very exceptional 
cases, it would not mean a day's work in the ordinary sense, 
but simply that the patient had been more or less employed 
during the time specified, nor would it necessarily mean 
that anything had been added thereby lo the income of the 
asylum, for in a majority of cases it actually costs more for 
necessary supervision than the work itself is worth. 

We still find it difficult to secure competent attendants, or 
keep them when secured, and especially on the male side of 
the house. There has been no lack of applicants for vacant 
places, but the material from which we have been obliged to 
select during the last two years has been poor in quality, and 
as a consequence changes have been frequent, a short trial 
having sufficed in many cases to prove the entire ineffi- 
ciency of the person employed. 

The majority of our employes, however, have been worthy 
people. They have remained with us a reasonable time, 
although not as long, in many cases, as I could wish, and by 
their fidelity to duty and length of service may justly be 
classed as trained attendants. To them is due whatever 
credit this institution may have gained for the perfect clean- 
liness of its wards and the personal neatness of its patients. 
Such a condition implies constant care and attention on the 
part of the attendant, as any neglect — not to say habitual, 
but even for a day — cannot be covered up at short notice for 
the purposes of official inspection. The duties of an attend- 



78 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. '83. 

ant are extremely exacting and often repulsive, and as the 
characteristics which insure success here can always command 
generous remuneration in other and more desirable occupa- 
tions, we cannot expect young men and women having such 
characteristics to remain long in a position which offers but 
little more pay than that demanded by the day laborer. 

November 1, Mr. C. R. Macoraber, who had held the 
position of clerk at the asylum since its opening, was ap- 
pointed steward by your honorable board. He has since 
tilled both offices to my entire satisfaction, and by his gentle- 
manly bearing and careful attention to the duties assigned 
him, has gained the good will of our entire household. . 

In Mr. Wra. C. Townsend, carpenter, who left the ser- 
vice of the asylum September 1, this institution has lost a 
model employe, and every one in it a personal friend. A 
skilled mechanic, his whole time and his best efforts were 
always at the service of the asylum. 

To him belonofs in a great measure the credit for the thor- 
ough and economical manner in which our repairs have been 
carried on. 

H. M. QUINBY, 

8uperi7itendenf . 

Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 
Oct. 1, 1883. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



TABLES FOR UOTFORM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 

FOR THE INSANE. 

(Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy, and Charity, April 3, 1880.) 



By the act of the legislature establishing an Asylum for 
the Chronic Insane, it was provided, "That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the asylum, therefore, have been former 
inmates of one or more hospitals in the State ; and whenever 
in these tables they appear as " first admissions," they are 
only to be regarded as first admissions to this asylum. 



82 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANK. 



[Oct. 



1 . General Statistics of the Year. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Patients in hospital Oct. 1, 1882, . 


190 


191 


381 


Admissions within the year, 


51 


29 


80 


Whole number of cases within the year. 


241 


220 


461 


Discharges within the year. 


43 


26 


69 


Viz. : as recovered, 


- 


_ 


_ 


much improved, .... 




_ 


_ 


improved, ...... 


1 


2 


3 


unimproved, 


5* 


- 


5 


Deaths, 


37 


24 


61 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1883, 


198 


194 


392 


Viz. : supported as State patients, 


74 


31 


105 


town patients, 


124 


163 


287 


private patients, . 


- 


- 


- 


Number of different persons within the year, 


241 


220 


461 


admitted, 


51 


29 


80 


recovered, 


- 


- 




Daily average number of patients. 


194.27 


190.06 


384.33 



2. Monthly Admissions, Discharges and Averages. 



MONTHS. 


Admissioj 


s. 


Discharges 
(Including Deaths). 


Dailt Avekaqe of 
Patients in the House. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


1888. 




















October, 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


3 


5 


189.42 


190.19 


379.61 


November, . 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


5 


187.06 


186.67 


373.73 


December, 


20 


7 


27 


1 


1 


2 


203.64 


191.32 


394.96 


1883. 




















Januarv, 


- 


_ 


_ 


. 2 


4 


6 


203.58 


188.77 


392.35 


February, 


- 


- 


- 


9 


2 


11 


199.21 


187.32 


386.53 


March, . 


- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


6 


191.45 


184.71 


376.16 


April, . 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


187. 


184. 


371. 


Mav, 


19 


14 


33 


9 


- 


9 


188.90 


190.32 


379.22 


June, 


- 




- 


2 


5 


7 


193.80 


195.90 


389,70 


July, . 


- 


2 


2 


4 


3 


7 


190.96 


192.26 


383.22 


August, . 


12 


6 


18 


1 


3 


4 


197.64 


1-94.32 


39196 


September, . 


51 


29 


80 


2 
43 


1 
26 


3 
69 


198.63 194.87 


393.50 


Total of cases, 


— ' — 


_ 


Total of per- 
sons, . 


51 


29 ! 

i 


80 


43 


26 


69 


1 


- 


- 



One eloped. 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



83 



8. Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Cases Admitted. 


Times Pkeviodslt 
Keooveked. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First 

Second, 

Etc., . . . 


51 


'29 


80 

_ 


- 


- 


- 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


51 
51 


29 
29 


80 
80 


- 


- 


- 



4. Ages of Persons Admitted for the First Time. 



Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to .30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Over 80 years. 

Unknown, 

Totals, . 



At Fikst Attack of 
. Insanity. 



Males. Females. Total 



2 

2 
10 
7 
7 
6 
6 
5 
9 



51 



29 



9 

7 

15 

8 

9 

11 

12 

7 

2 



80 



When Admitted. 



Males. Females. Total 



51 



29 



10 
11 
10 
12 
12 
7 
5 



80 



84 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



5. Parentage of Persons Admitted. 





! 

Males. 1 


Females. 


Totals. 




1 










Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, . 


17 


17 


5 





22 


22 


Maine, .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Vermont, . . . 


1 


1 


- 


- 


! 1 


1 


Scotland, .... 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 1 


1 


England, .... 


2 


2 


- 


- . 


1 2 


2 


Ireland, 


26 


26 


17 17 


43 


43 


Virginia, .... 


1 


1 


- 


- 




1 


Unknown, .... 


2 


2 


6 


6 


8 


8 


Totals, . . 


ol 


51 


29 


29 


80 


80 



6. Residence of Persons Admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Massachusetts, viz. : — 

Suffolk County, 

Bristol County, 

Hampden County, .... 

Essex County, 

Unknown, 


43 

1 

1 
6 


20 
1 
2 
4 
2 


63 

2 

2 

, 5 

8 


Total, 

Cities or large towns, ..... 


51 
51 


29 
29 


80 
80 



7. Civil Condition of Persons Admitted. 





Unmarried. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


NUMBER OF 










THE ADMISSION. 


























Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First, 


37 


14 


51 


9 


8 


17 


3 


4 


7 


2 


3 


5 


Total, . 


37 


14 


51 


9 


8 


17 


3 


4 


7 


2 


3 


5 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



85 



8. Occupations of Persons Admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Laborers, 


31 




31 


Domestics, 


- 


3 


3 


Seamstresses, 


- 


2 


2 


No Occupation, 


20 


12 


32 


Wives, 


- 


8 


8 


Widows, 


51 


4 


4 


Total, 


29 


80 



9. Form of Disease in the Cases Admitted. 



FORM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Mania, chronic, 

Epilepsy, 

Dementia, chronic, . . 

Total of cases, 

Total of persons 


29 

8 

14 

51 
51 


15 
5 

9 

29 

29 


44 

13 

23 

80 

80 



86 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 



PREVIOUS DURATION. 


First Admission 
TO THIS Hospital. 


All Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tol.- 


Congenital, 

Under 1 month. 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 yeai's, . 
10 to 20 years, . 

Over 20 years, . 
Unknown, . 


2 
3 
4 
6 
9 
4 
3 
20 

51 
51 

7 33 


3 
6 
9 
3 
2 
6 

29 
29 

8.20 


2 

3 

7 

12 

■ 18 

7 

5 

26 

80 
80 

8.63 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total of cases, . 
Total of persons, 

Av'ge of known cases. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Intemperance, .... 
Epilepsy, .... 
Unknown, . . . . 


8 

9 
34 


3 

4 

22 


11 
13 

56 


Totals, 


51 


29 


80 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



81 



12. Relation to Hospitals of Persons Admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


First admission to any hospital for insane, . 

Former inmates of the hospital, .... 
of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 
of Tewksbury Almshouse, . 
of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


39 
12 


17 

6 
6 


56 

6 

18 


Totals, 


51 


29 


80 



13. How Supported. 





Patients Admitted. 


Average op the 


Year. 


SUPPORTED AS 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female 


Total. 


State patients, . 
Town patients, . 


21 
30 


6 

23 


27 
53 


67.07 

127.20 


30.98 

159.08 


98.05 

286.28 


Totals, 


51 


29 


80 


194.27 


190.06 


384.33 



14. Discharges^ Classified by Admission and Result. 





Improved. 


Umimpkoved. 


Died. 


Total. 


ADMISSION. 












Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First, .... 


1 


2 


3 


5 


- 


5 


37 


24 


61 


43 


26 


69 


Totals, 


1 


2 


3 


5 


_ 


5 


37 


24 


61 


43 


26 


69 


Persons, , 


1 


2 


3 


5 


— 





37 


24 


61 


43 


26 


69 



88 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



15. Cases Resulting in Death. — Duration.* 



PERIOD. 


Duration before 
Admission. 


Hospital 
Residence. 


Whole dueation 
FROM THE Attack. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, . 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to o months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, ■ 
Over 20 years, 
Unknown, . 


3 

2 
3 

3 
3 
4 
2 
2 
15 


2 

3 
1 

1 

3 

2 

12 

24 

28 


4 
6 
1 

4 
6 
6 
2 
2 
27 


1 

1 

4 

8 

19 

3 

1 

37 

85 


2 

8 

5 
6 
3 

24 

117 


1 
1 

6 

16 

24 

9 

4 

61 

101 


1 

8 

9 

4 

15 


2 

6 

3 

1 

12 


3 
14 
12 

5 

27 


Total, . 

Average of known cases 
(in months), . 


37 
64 


61 
46 


37 
160 


24 
109 


61 
134 



16. Cases Discharged by Recovery or Death. 



FORM OF INSANITY. 


Recoveries. 


Deaths. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Mania, chronic, 

Epilepsy, ....... 

Dementia, chi-onic, 




- 


- 


17 

6 

14 


13 
2 

9 


30 

8 

23 


Total of cases, 

Total of persons, .... 


- 


- 


- 


37 

37 


24 
24 


61 
61 



* Of the attack resulting in death. 



1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



89 



17. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Phthisis, 


14 


8 


22 


Epilepsy, 
Dysentery, . 
Senility, 
Exhaustion, . 














5 
1 

1 
9 


2 
12 


7 

1 

1 

21 


Paresis, . 














3 


_ 


3 


Paralysis, 

Pyemia, 

Uremia, 














1 

1 


1 
1 


2 
1 
1 


Heart disease. 














1 


- 


1 


Cirrhosis, 














1 


- 


1 


Totals, . 














37 


24 


61 



18. Ages of those who Died. 









At time of First Attack. 


At time of Death. 


AGES. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Fifteen years and less, . 


2 




2 






_ 


From 15 to 20 years, 






7 


9 


9 


■ 2 


- 


2 


20 to 25 years, 






5 


4 


9 


6 


- 


6 


25 to 30 years. 






5 


1 


6 


3 


3 


6 


30 to 35 years, 






4 


5 


9 


6 


4 


10 


35 to 40 years. 






3 


1 


4 


4 


2 


6 


40 to 50 years. 






6 


2 


7 


5 


4 


9 


50 to 60 years, 






2 


5 


7 


2 


5 


7 


60 to 70 j'ears. 






1 


1 


2 


4 


4 


8 


70 to 80 years. 






- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Over 80 years, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown, 






3 


2 


5 


3 


- 


3 


Totals, . 






37 


24 


61 


37 


24 


61 



90 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 






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1883.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 






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1878, . 

1879, . 

1880, . . . . 

1881, . 

1882, . 

1883, . 


to 

1 



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