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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"



r\ 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



hporaff isflii for tie Oiiiic Insane 



WORCESTEK, 



FoK THE Year bidding September 30, 18S5. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1886. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr59temp 



OFFICEKS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, M.D. Worcester. 

REV. JOHN F. MOORS, Greenfield. 

WILLIAM DICKINSON, Worcester. 

JAMES H. WHITTEMORE, M.D., .... Boston. 

ANNA S. FOLSOM Boston. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN, ...... Worcester. 

A. GEORGE BULLOCK, Worcester. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., Superintendent. 

ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER Clerk and Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 



WILLIAM SHERMAN, 



Engineer. 



TREASURER. 



ALBERT WOOD, 



AVoRC ester. 



€0mmonu)ealtt) of iMasaacbuaettee 



TRUSTEES' REPORT, 



To His Excellency the Oovernor and the Honorable CounciL 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, acting 
for the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane, respect" 
fully submit their eighth annual report. 

The history of the year presents the record of no unusual 
or startling event. The asylum has continued its unpreten- 
tious but useful work of caring for the incurable and chronic 
insane, and has been almost constantly tilled to its normal 
capacity. There have been sixty-two admissions of new 
patients during the year by transfers from the lunatic hos- 
pitals of the State ; and this number added to the three 
hundred and eighty-six remaining Oct. 1, 1884, shows that 
four hundred and forty-eight have been under treatment. 

The daily average has been three hundred and ninety-one 
and twelve oue-hundredths. There have been discharged 
forty-three, and four hundred and five remain. Of those 
who were discharged it is pleasant to record the exceptional 
fact that one was cured, and went from the asylum to his 
home in Ireland. Of the others one was improved and went 
away with friends ; three unimproved, left in charge of rela- 
tives ; two unimproved, left to go to almshouses ; two unim- 
proved, to go to other institutions for the insane ; and 
thirty-four died. Of those who died, twelve (the larger 
proportion, as usual), died of consumption; four of epi- 
lepsy ; two of Bright's disease ; one of pneumonia ; two of 



74 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

paralysis ; one of general paralysis of the insane ; and 
twelve of exhaustion from different forms of chronic mania 
and dementia. This is a large death rate, but it is not as 
large as last year when it was forty-two, or as year before 
last when it was sixty-one; almost double that of the 
present. But it must be borne in mind that the chronic 
insane as a class are physically, as well as mentally, feeble, 
and that they have little of that power of resistance which 
the sound and vigorous human sytem interposes against the 
encroachments of disease. They are pecnliarly prone to 
disease in its chronic forms, and especially to that degener- 
ative nutritive process which manifests itself in tubercular 
consumption. 

It is some satisfaction, however, to note the comparatively 
few deaths from acute affections. This shows excellent sani- 
tary arrangement, and the good effect of constant care with 
regard to diet, dress, and exposure. The remarkable free- 
dom from acute sickness is unquestionable evidence of good 
general management on the part of the superintendent and 
those who are associated with him. 

In our last report mention was made of some needed im- 
provements, especially in the laundry department, and the 
possibility that we might be obliged to petition the legisla- 
ture for a special appropriation was alluded to. It is a 
pleasure to be able to report that this necessity has been 
avoided. 

The improvements required have been undertaken with 
the moderate surplus which we have at our disposal, and 
are now far advanced toward completion. When finished, 
the new laundry will contribute to the comfort, convenience 
and efficiency of the institution in many ways. 

By slow degrees, yet steadily, under the prudent and 
economical management of Dr. Quinby, the buildings of the 
asylum are becoming repaired and modernized to such an 
extent as to make them compare favorably with the best of 
the new structures. 

There are some features of this old building, belonging to 
its original construction and design, that are not surpassed for 
cheeriness and effect by anything in the newer and more pre- 
tentious ones. Of these are the old porticos or verandas. 



1885.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7.5 

There is nothing equal to them in airiness and comfort in 
any other building for the insane in the State. And these, 
under Dr. Quinby's direction and management, have been so 
renovated as to be tenfold more agreeable than ever. 

The Trustees as a body have made their customary visits to 
the asylum, and individual members have visited more fre- 
quently, and alone ; in this latter way the lady members of 
the board more especially. And here, as at the hospital, 
the manifest pleasure of the patients at meeting them has 
attested the wisdom of the legislature in providing for their 
appointment. 

Accompanying this report will be found those of the super- 
intendent and treasurer, and to them we respectfully call 
your attention for that fuller information with regard to 
details which the various departments of the government 
may require. 

No changes have occurred in the staff of the asylum. The 
same efficient corps of officers as reported last year remain, 
and to each and all we desire to express in this public 
manner our high appreciation of the services they have 
rendered. 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 
JOHN F. MOORS. 
WM. DICKINSON. 
JAMES H. WHITTEMORE. 
ANNA S. FOLSOM. 
FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 
A. G. BULLOCK. 

Worcester, Sept. 30, 188r5. 



76 



ASYLUM FOK .CHRONIC INSANE. 



l_Oct. 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 



Hosea M. Quinby, M.D., Superintendent, 
Ernest V. Scribner, M.D., Assistant Physician, 
Clarence R. Macomber, Clerk and Steward, . 
Sophia N. Graves, Matron, .... 
Wm. Sherman, Engineer, . . . 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, .... 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

325 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 



YALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES. 

October 1, 1885. 



Live stock, . . . 

Carriages and agricultural implements. 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 

Other furniture in inmates' department. 

Personal property of State in superintendent' 

Ready-made clothing, 

Dry goods, 

Provisions and groceries. 

Drugs and medicines. 

Fuel, .... 

Library, .... 

Other supplies. 



s department, 



$200 


00 


650 


00 


7,600 


00 


9,500 


00 


3,000 


00 


9,500 


00 


1,360 


00 


1,150 


00 


3,427 


48 


300 


00 


2,375 


00 


200 00 


1,659 


09 



),921 57 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



77 



TREASUEEE'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane, 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my eighth 
annual report on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic 
Insane, for the year ending Sept. 30, 1885 : — 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1884 : — 
Cash belonging to asylum, .... 
Deposits of inmates, ..... 

Amounts received : — 
From the Commonwealth for support of patients, 
cities and towns for support of patients, 

other sources, 

patients (on deposit), .... 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows 
Salaries and wages, . 
Extra labor (ordinary), . 



Provisions and supplies, viz 
Meats of all kinds, . 
Fish of all kinds, 
Fruit and vegetables. 
Flour, 

Meal for table, . 
Grain and hay, 
Tea and coffee, 
Sugar and molasses, 
Milk, butter and cheese. 
Salt and other groceries. 
All other provisions, 

Amount carried forward. 



$8,095 01 




499 49 






$8,594 50 


$18,.567 80 


51,506 46 




726 73 




■ 277 85 






71,078 84 






$79,673 34 


allows : — 
f20,781 13 




50 67 






$20,831 80 


$3,944 70 


643 41 




1,312 13 




3,387 50 




76 78 




228 70 




843 59 




1,054 18 




6,424 42 




814 98 




1,406 04 







20,136 43 


, . 


$40,968 23 



78 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Amount brought forwai'd. 
Clothing and other material. 
Fuel, .... 

Light, .... 
Medicine and medical supplies 
Furniture and furnishings. 
Crockery, . 
Beds and bedding, . 
Transportation, 
Travelling, 
Trustees' expenses, . 
Soap and water, 
Stationery, 
Undertaking, 
Repairs (ordinary), . 
All other current expenses, 



Total current expenses, 
Repairs and improvements (extraordinary). 
Refunded inmates from deposits. 

Total amount expended. 
Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1885, . 

Resoukces. 

Cash on hand, 

Due from the Commonwealth, 

cities and towns, 

other sources, .... 

Liabilities. 
Due for supplies and expenses, 
salaries and wages, 
inmates (cash on deposit). 



Total surplus, 



$4,482 54 

4,504 44 

1,727 65 

379 68^ 


$10,968 23 


1,103 23 
459 04 




730 58 




127 80 




9 17 




80 43 




1,347 39 
73 46 




265 00 




3,000 00 
1,589 89 


19,830 30 




18,750 77 
10 08 


$60,798 53 



$69,.559 38 
10,113 96 





$79,673 84 


$10,113 96 




4,676 61 




12,779 51 




162 94 






$27,733 02 


$4,415 55 


1,746 93 




767 26 






6,929 74 





^20,803 28 



Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT WOOD, 



Treasurer. 



WoRCESTEE, Mass., Oct. 1, 1885. 



WoRCESTEE, Mass., Oct. 13, 1885. 

The undersigned has this day carefully compared the Treasurer's statement of 

expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1885, with the vouchers which are on file 

at the Asylum, and found it to be correct. 

THOMAS H.GAGE, 

Auditor of Accoimts. 



1885.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



superinte:ntdent's report. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Ladiks and Gentlemen: — I herewith submit for your 
consideration the eighth annual report of the Asylum for the 
Chronic Insane. 

By reference to the " Statistical Tables" which accom- 
pany this report, it appears that at the beginning of the 
official year there were three hundred and eighty-six patients 
in the asylum, of whom two hundred and nine were males, 
and one hundred and seventy-seven were females. At the 
close of the year there were four hundred and five patients, 
— two hundred and seven males, and one hundred and 
ninety-eight females. 

The total number of patients under treatment during the 
year was four hundred and forty-eight, of whom two hundred 
and thirty-three were males, and two hundred and fifteen 
females, with a daily average nunjber of three hundred and 
ninety-one and twelve one-hundredths. 

There were admitted within the year twenty-four males, 
and thirty-eight females ; twenty-six males and seventeen 
females were discharged, and twenty males and fourteen 
females died. 

Of the persons admitted, twenty-one males and thirty-four 
females were transferred from the Danvers Lunatic Hospital ; 
one male and three females from the State Almshouse at 
Tewksbury ; one female from the Worcester Lunatic Hospi- 
tal ; one male from Taunton, and one male was readmitted 
after having escaped from the asylum in the previous year. 

Of the persons discharged five were taken from the 
asylum by friends, one was transferred to Dan vers, one was 
removed to an almshouse by the overseers of the poor, and 
one was discharged to be committed to the Worcester Luna- 
tic Hospital. 



80 ASYLUM FOR CHEONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

The patient reported cured was transferred to the asy- 
him from the Danvers Lunatic Hospital, June 16, 1884, 
having been admitted April 18, of the same year, with 
"primary dementia," duration unknown. This patient was 
a young Irishman, temperate, single, and but a short time in 
the country, where, as it appears, he had worked industri- 
ously, sending home the greater part of his earnings. At 
the time of his transfer he was apparently in a complete state 
of dementia, and his bodily health was much reduced. In 
July he developed hfematoma auris, with the usual shrivel- 
ing of the ear, from a blow received at the hands of a fellow 
patient. He remained in this abject state until early in 
January of the following year, when he became much 
brighter and began to converse with considerable freedom 
and some intelligence. There was little chano-e in his con- 
dition, however, for several months, but in the spring he 
asked for employment, went out of doors to work, and 
improved rapidly thereafter. Being familiar with farm 
labor, he soon became of material assistance in our vegetable 
garden, doing whatever was assigned him thoroughly and 
without oversight. In fact, he developed a degree of intelli- 
gence not often found in a day-laborer, and, on this account, 
was frequently allowed to take out other patients. These he 
always looked after carefully and directed with no little skill. 
September 5, he was discharged, to be sent home to Ireland, 
having to all appearance entirely recovered his mental 
balance. 

Of the thirty-four deaths occurring during the year, all, 
with three exceptions, were due more or less directly to 
brain disease. Phthisis, as usual, heads the list with twelve 
deaths, and is followed by exhaustion of chronic mania, nine 
persons having died with this form of disease. Four died of 
epilepsy, three of old age, two of paralysis, two of Bright's 
disease, one of general paralysis of the insane, and one, an 
old man of sixty-five, of pneumonia. 

Hitherto, but very few general paralytics have found their 
way to the asylum, a fact which will account for the small 
number of deaths reported from this disease. During the 
past year, however, we have received a number of this class 
of patients, the majority of whom will, in all probability, 
soon figure in our mortuary list. 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



81 



The ratio of death rate to the number of inmates of the 
asylum from the time of its opening in 1877, will be seen 



from the following table : — 



Ratio of Deaths from the Opening of the Asylum to October 

1st, 1885. 





Cm 
O 

6 i 


erage 
r of 
ts. 


Deaths. 


HI . 


Si's 

■ > 6 S 


OFFICIAL YEAR. 


*A c 

|2 


Daily Av 
numbe 
Patien 




1! 


"5 


Per cen 
Whole 
of Pat 
treated 


Per cen 
daily A 

Patien 


1877-78, . 


429 


382.98 


18 


8 


26 


6.05 


6,78 


1878-79, 








422 


367.41 


22 


11 


33 


7.82 


8.98 


1879-80, 








413 


363.15 


15 


8 


23 


6.56 


6.33 


1880-81, 








401 


362.09 


18 


6 


24 


5.98 


6.62 


1881-82, 








439 


375.59 


21 


11 


32 


7.28 


8.51 


1882-83, 








461 


384.33 


37 


24 


61 


13.23 


15.84 


1883-84, 








438 


390.69 


22 


20 


42 


9.58 


10.75 


1884-85, 








448 


391.12 


20 


14 


34 


7.58 


8.69 



There has been no undue amount of sickness among the 
patients during the year, and none which could be attributed 
to local causes. We have escaped serious accident, homici- 
dal or suicidal, notwithstanding the fact that the former 
tendency, at least, is a prominent characteristic of a large 
number of. the inmates of the asylum, and that restraint has 
not been resorted to except in those cases where the homi- 
cidal impulse could not be foreseen and otherwise guarded 
against. Persistent suicidal attempts are, in my experience, 
not commonly present in the chronic insane, even in those 
cases where this had been a prominent feature of the earlier 
stage of the disease. Two cases, however, have been ad- 
mitted during the year in which the suicidal tendency con- 
tinued active. One of these persons, after having made 
repeated and almost daily attempts at self-destruction, died, 
a few months after admission, from exhaustion of chronic 
mania. The other still remains at the asylum. 

On the male side of the house the use of restraint has 
been confined almost exclusively to two homicidal patients, 
one of whom wears it continuously ; the other, at his own 
request, being secluded a portion of the time in place of 
restraint. In neither case was restraint resorted to until 



82 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

the person had made several dangerous assaults upon other 
patients or upon attendants. The form used has invariably 
been the belt and wrist-strap. Seclusion has been employed 
only in very rare instances, and for short periods, in the 
case of four patients, including the one above mentioned. 
Although restraint is used much less frequently than in 
former years among the females, the average number tlius 
confined is still more than twice as large as upon the male 
side of the house. On account of the proportionately larger 
number of turbulent and dangerous women, the necessity for 
restraint has always appeared to be greatest among the 
females. I am convinced, however, that this could and 
should be reduced at least one-half, although at present it 
seems impossible to do so, and at the same time pay due 
regard to the safety of the other inmates of the asylum. 

With all of the hospitals of the State overcrowded, the 
tendency is to overcrowd the asylum, which, on account of 
the character of its patients, is least able of all to bear 
crowding. Lack of single rooms makes it necessary to pro- 
vide for a number of dangerous persons upon the corridors 
at night, and these wear restraint. We hope, however, to 
obviate this difficulty in the near future, or as soon as we 
can secure the means necessary for carrying out the proposed 
enlargement and alteration in the north Johonnot wards ; 
changes intended chiefly to better adapt the asylum to the 
necessities of the present number and class of patients, 
rather than for the enlargement of its capacity, although a 
slight increase in capacity will incidentally result, should the 
plans be completed as proposed. 

During the year the south-centre bath-rooms have been 
torn out and replumbed, and the porticos connecting the 
several wings virtually rebuilt. These porticos were un- 
glazed, and therefore exposed to the weather, except in 
winter, when they were closed with shutters alternating 
with windows. Nothing had been clone to keep them in 
repair for many years. The roofs leaked, much of the 
woodwork had rotted, the ceilings had fallen off and been 
patched in many places, and the floors were badly worn. 
In putting these porticos in repair we availed ourselves of 
the opportunity of altering somewhat their original plan, 



1885.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 83 

adding to their attractiveness, and better adapting them to 
our present n6eds, without material increase in expqnse. 

Work on the enlargement of the laundry, begun in the 
early summer, has been carried on as rapidly as practicable. 
The building will probably be completed and ready for occu- 
pancy by the first of January of the coming year. In carry- 
ing out these changes, it was found necessary to take down 
the greater portion of the outside walls of the old building, 
as they were out of line, and cracked in many places. All 
of the labor, except the brickwork and slating, has been 
done by our regular mechanics, with the assistance of the 
patients. The cost of the building will probably fall some- 
what below the estimated cost, $5,000, and will be met 
without difficulty from the income of the current year. 

The average weekly cost of supporting patients during the 
year has been $2.99. 

I am glad to be able to report that there have been but 
few changes in our corps of attendants during the past year, 
and that I have found little or no difficulty in filling any 
vacancies that have occurred. In only rare instances has 
the conduct of the employees in either department of the 
asylum given cause for serious complaint, while the prompt- 
ness and zeal with which the majority have performed their 
duties is in the highest degree commendable. 



Sept. 30, 1885. 



H. M. QUINBY, 

Superintendent. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



TABLES FOE UNIFORM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS FOR 
THE INSANE. 

(Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, April 3, 1880.) 



By the act of the legislature establishing an Asylum for 
the Chronic Insane, it was provided, "That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferried thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the Asyhim, therefore, have been for- 
mer inmates of one or more hospitals in the State ; and 
whenever in these tables they appear as " first admissions," 
they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this 
Asylum. 



88 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



1. General Statistics of 


the Tear 


• 






Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1884, . 


209 


177 


386 


Admissions within the year, . . . 


24 


38 


62 


Whole number of cases within the year, 


233 


215 


448 


Discharges within the year, . . , . 


26 


17 


43 


Viz. : as recovered, 


1 


- 


1 


much improved, 

improved, . . . ... 

unimproved, 

Deaths, . 


1 

4 
20 


3 
14 


1 

7 
34 


Patients remaining Sept. .SO, 1885, 


207 


198 


405 


Viz. : supported as State patients, 
town patients. 


78 
129 


34 
164 


112 
293 


private patients, . 
Number of different persons within the year. 


233 


214 


447 


admitted, ..... 


24 


37 


61 


recovered, 


1 


- 


1 


Daily average number of patients. 


204.62 


186.50 


391.12 



2. Monthly Admissions, Discharges, and Averages. 









1 


DiSCHAEG 


ES. 


Daily Average of 




Admissions. 


(Including Deaths.) 


Patients in the 


House. 


MONTHS. 






















Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


1884. 




















October, 


_ 


._ 


_ 


1 


3 


4 


208.42 


176,29 


384.71 


November, . 


_ 


12 


12 


3 


- 


3 


206.23 


175.83 


382.06 


December, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


203.97 


183.84 


387.81 


1885. 




















January, 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


3 


4 


203.26 


180.74 


384. 


February, 




9 


13 


22 


- 


2 


2 


206.21 


186.86 


393.07 


Marcli, 




_ 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


210.58 


193.93 


404.51 


April, . 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


3 


209. 


191.87 


40: '.87 


May, . 




1 


■ _ 


1 


6 


1 


7 


206.22 


190.08 


396.30 


June, . 




1 


_ 


1 


3 


1 


4 


202.53 


189.70 


392.23 


July, . 




_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


- 


4 


199.68 


188.26 


387.94 


August, 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


197.94 


188. 


385.94 


September, 




12 
24 


10 
38 


22 
62 


3 
26 


1 
17 


4 
43 


201.40 


192.57 


393.97 


Total of cases, . 


- 


- 


- 


Total of persons. 


24 


37 


61 


26 


17 


43 


- 


- 


- 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



89 



3. Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases Admitted. 


Times Peeviodslt 
Recoveked. 


KUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 

Second, . . . 

Etc., ..... 


24 


37 

1 


61 

1 


- 


; 


: 


Total of cases. 
Total of persons, . 


24 
24 


38 
37 


62 
61 


- 


- 


- 



4. Ages of Persons Admitted for the First Time. 









At First Attack of 
Insanity. 


When Admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Over 80 years, 

Unknown, 






1 
1 

2 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 

9 


2 
1 
5 
6 
6 
3 
7 
3 

4 


3 

2 
7 
8 
10 
5 
8 
4 
1 

13 


4 

3 
2 
4 
7 
2 
1 

1 


2 
3 
8 
4 
12 
5 
2 

1 


6 
6 

10 
8 

19 
7 
3 
1 

1 


Totals, . 


24 


37 


61 


24 


37 


61 



90 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. TOct. 



5. Parentage of Persons Admitted. 









Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 
















Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, 






8 


8 


3 


3 


11 


11 


Maine, . 






- 


- 


5 


5 


5 


5 


New Hampshire, . 






1 


1 






2 


•2 


;New York, . 






- 


- 








1 


Nova Scotia, 






- 


- 








1 


Newfoundland, 






- 


- 








1 


New Brunswick, 






- 


- 








1 


England, 






- 


- 






1 


1 


Ireland, 






12 


12 


19 


19 


31 


31 


Italy, . 






- 


- 








1 


Germany, 






2 


2 






3 


3 


West Indies, 






- 


- 






1 


1 


Unknown, . 






1 


1 


2 


2 


3 

62 


3 


Totals, . 


24 


24 


38 


38 


02 



6. Residence of Persons Admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Massachusetts, viz. : 

Suffolk County, .... 
Middlesex County, 
Norfolk County, .... 
Essex County, .... 
Worcester, . . .' . 
Unknown, 

Totals, .... 
Cities or large towns, .... 




12 

8 

2 
1 
1 

24 
24 


30 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 

38 
38 


42 
11 
2 
3 
2 
2 

62 
62 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



7. Civil Condition of Persons Admitted. 





Unmarkied. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknotitn. 


NUMBER OF 










THE ADMISSION. 


1 
























Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First, 


16 


18 


34 


7 


14 


21 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


Second, . 


- 


- 




- 


'l 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


16 


18 


34 


7 


15 


22 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 4 



8. Occupations of Persons Admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Laborers, ....... 


4 




4 


Domestics, . 












- 


8 


8 


Dressmakers, 












_ 


1 


1 


Seamstress, . . . 












- 


2 


2 


Wives, . 












- 


5 





Waiters, 














_ 




Carpenters, . 














- 




Bar-tenders, . 














_ 




Travelling salesman, 














- 




Stone mason, 














_ 




Stonecutter, . 














_ 




Currier, 














_ 




Hostler, 














_ 




Marble vporker, . 














_ 




Bookbinder, . 














_ 




Fisherman, . 














_ 




Farmer, 














_ 




Tailor, . 














_ 




No occupation. 












2 


_ 





Unknown, 












5 


22 


27 


Totals, , 












24 


38 


62 



92 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



9. Form of Disease in the Cc 


ises Adn 


litted. 




FORM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, chronic, 


14 


27 • 


41 


Epilepsy, 


4 


1 


5 


Dementia, clironic, ..... 


1 


6 


6 


Melancholia, ..... 


1 


2 


3 


Paresis, . 


4 
24 


3 


7 ^ 


Total of cases, 


38 


62 


Total of persons, 


24 


37 


61 



10. Reported Duration of 


Insanity before 


Last 


Admission. 




First Admission to 
THIS Hospital. 


ALL OTHER Admis- 
sions. 


Totals. 


PREVIOUS DURATION. 




















Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Under 1 month, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


From 1 to 3 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 to 6 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 to 12 months. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 to 2 years, . 


4 


6 


10 


- 


- 


- 


4 


6 


10 


2 to 5 years, . 


2 


14 


16 


- 


- 


- 


2 


14 


16 


5 to 10 years, . 


4 


5 


9 


- 


- 


- 


4 


5 


9 


10 to 20 years, 


4 


7 


11 


- 


- 


- 


4 


7 


11 


Over 20 years, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Unknown, . 


10 


4 


14 


- 


1 


1 


10 


5 


15 


Total of cases, . 


24 


37 


61 


- 


1 


1 


24 


38 


62 


Total of persons. 


24 


37 


61 


- 


1 


1 


24 


38 


62 


Av'ge of known cases, 


6.78 


6.12 


6.45 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



93 



11. Probable Causes of 


Insanity in Persons Admitted. 


CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Intemperance, 


1 


1 


2 


Epilepsy, 










1 


- 


1 


Injury to head, 










2 


- 


2 


Masturbation , 










3 


- 


3 


Injury to spine, 










1 


- 


1 


Heredity, 










— 


3 


3 


Menopause, . 










- 


2 


2 


Uterine disease, . 










- 


2 


2 


Sunstroke, 










1 




2 


Menorrhagia, 










- 






Grief, . 










_ 






Loss of leg, . 










1 


- 




Religious excitement, 










- 






Spiritualism, . 










- 






Overwork, 










— 






Over study, . 










- 






Ill health, . 










_ 






Family troubles, . 










_ 






Loss of property, . 










- 






Puerperal, 










- 


3 


3 


Unknown, 










14 


15 


29 


Totals, . 










24 


88 


62 . 



12. Relation to Hospital of Persons Admitted. 



HOSPITAL EELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First admission to any hospital for insane, . 

Former inmates of the asylum, ... 
of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 
of Tewksbm-y Almshouse, , 
of Worcester Lunatic Hospital, . 
of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


3 

21 

1 

1 


1 

34 
3 
1 


4 

55 

4 

1 

1 


Total of cases, 

Total of persons, . . . 


26 
24 


39 
38 


65 
62 



94 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



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First, .... 
Second, . . . . 


Totals, . . . 
Persons, .... 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



95 



CB 
H 

o 
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a 
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20 
68.66 




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34 
50.10 


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20 
46.20 




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to 


Congenital, 

Under 1 month. 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
6 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years. 
Over 20 years, 
Unknown, 


Totals, . 

Average of known case 
months). 



96 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



16, Cases Discharged by Recovery or Death. 





Kbcoveeibs. 


Deaths. 


FORM OF INSANITY. 


Ma. 


. Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Mania, chronic, . 
Epilepsy, .... 
Dementia, chronic, 
Paresis, .... 
Dementia, primary, 


1 


- 


1 


11 

3 
6 
1 


10 

1 

3 


21 

4 
8 
1 


Total of cases. 
Total of persons, . 


1 

1 


- 


1 
1 


20 
20 


14 
14 


84 
34 







17. 


Causes of Death. 






CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totalf. 


Phthisis, 










5 


7 


12 


Epilepsy, 










3 


1 


4 


Senility, 










1 


2 


3 


Exhaustion, . 










6 


3 


9 


Paresis, 










1 


- 


1 


Paralysis, 










2 


- 


2 


Pneumonia, . 










1 


- 


1 


Bright's disease. 










1 


1 


2 


Totals, . 










20 


14 


34 



1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



97 



18. Ages of those who Died. 









At Time of First Attack. 


At Time of Death. 


AGES. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years. 

Over 80 years, 

Unknown, 






1 

1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
4 
4 
1 

1 


2 
4 

2 

2 
3 
1 


3 
1 
8 
3 
1 
2 
4 
6 
4 
1 

1 


2 
5 
2 
3 

6 

2 


2 
2 
3 
2 

2 
2 
1 


2 
4 
8 
4 
3 
6 
4 
2 
1 


Totals, . 


20 


14 


34 


20 


14 


34 



98 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



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1885.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



99 



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