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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the Chronic Insane at Worcester"

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NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



rr 



m i» 



WORCESTER, 



For the Year ending September 30, 1886, 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office SquAKEi 

1887. 



OFFICEKS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

JOHN F. MOORS, Greenfield. 

ROCKWOOD HOAR, Worcbstee. 

FRANCIS C. LOWELL, Boston. 

ANNA S. FOLSOM, Boston. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN Woecestee. 

A. GEORGE BULLOCK, Woecestee. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, ....... Woecestee. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., Superintendent. 

ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D Assistant Physician. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER, Clerk and Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 



WILLIAM SHERMAN, 



Engineer. 



TREASURER. 
ALBERT WOOD, Woecestee. 



Comm0ntoealtlj d 'MuBBRt^ixxuth* 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Ris Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in their 
capacity as Trustees of the Temporary Asylum for the 
Chronic Insane, present this their Ninth Annual Report. 

Dr. H. M. Quinby, the superintendent, has given us the 
main facts with reojard to the institution under his charsre in 
his report to us which accompanies this, and to which we 
call your attention. 

It appears from his report that there are at present in the 
asylum 398 patients. 

There have been under treatment during the year 476. 
There have been discharged 40, while 38 have died. The 
whole number received has been 71. 

We call your attention to what Dr. Quinby says as to the 
name by which this institution is legally known, — "The Tem- 
porary Asylum for the Chronic Insane," — a name which ex- 
pressed the purpose and intent of those who established it 
nine years ago. 

It was then expected that the demand for such an institu- 
tion would be fully met by the new Lunatic Hospital, and 
that this old one, the oldest in the State, would soon be 
given up. Experience has not justified this expectation. 
There is found an imperative necessity for an institution of 
this sort, and there is no probability that it will be given up. 



74 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

The designation "Temporary" may as well be dropped 
from the official designation, as it is from common use, and 
we feel that there is great force in what Dr. Quinby says of 
the term " Chronic." It does convey the idea to friends of 
patients, and to those outside, that this institution has be- 
come the receptacle of those for whom there is no hope, and 
for whom little can or need be done. The statement in his 
report of one case which seemed hopeless and where 
recovery has come after many years, assures us that chronic 
cases are not necessarily hopeless. We would endorse his 
hope that the Legislature will change the name of this insti- 
tution to that of " Asylum in Worcester," 

AVe also call your attention to what the Superintendent 
has to say with regard to the improved condition of the 
patients under his charge, and especially with regard to the 
more open and free use of the grounds, and the exercise in 
the open air, and the more unrestrained cohdition within the 
house. The nature of the diseases under which these 
patients are suffering obviously allows the exercise of more 
freedom on their part than could be permitted to more vio- 
lent classes. The change in this respect marks a great 
advance over the old methods of treatment of this class of 
patients . 

It will be borne in mind that the buildings which this 
institution occupies were erected more than fifty years ago, 
and when it came to be seen that a new building must soon 
take its plape, repairs ceased to be made, and the buildings 
were left largely to natural decay. 

They are so soon to be given up, it was said, it is not 
well to do much in the way of repairs. But when it was 
determined to use them temporarily after the new buildings 
were erected. Dr. Park, who was then at the head, began at 
once to make some needed repairs, and this work has gone 
on steadily ever since for nine years, for the last seven 
under the supervision of Dr. Quinby. A little has been 
done each year, and as a result the whole range of buildings 
has been gone over, modernized and fitted for such use as 
our age requires in such a structure. For its convenience of 
arrangement and its adaptability to the purpose for which it 
was designed it compares quite favorably with newer and 



1886.] PUBLIC DOCUJVIENT — No. 23. 75 

more costly structures. In its original plan it anticipated 
most of the advantages which experience has confirmed. 

The sanitary condition of this asylum is especially to be 
commended, and to this, to a large degree, is to be attribu- 
ted the remarkable exemption from sickness of which the 
superintendent speaks. If it is the old hospital in name it 
deserves to be ranked with new ones in all that constitutes 
it a fit habitation for the unfortunate class who find a home 
under its roof. 

The renovation of this old building and its adaptation to 
modern requirements are largely due to the genius for such 
work which Dr. Quinby has shown, and to the industry and 
enthusiasm with which he has put his plans into execution. 
We are glad to have those who knew the institution in its 
earlier days come and visit it now, and see to what an 
extent it has kept abreast with the times. The changes and 
improvements made the past year are briefly indicated in the 
accompanying report. 

It need hardly be said our confidence in Dr. Quinby, as 
superintendent, is unabated. We believe that all the aflairs 
of this institution are carefull}^ prudently and tenderly 
managed. 

We are glad to report that no changes have occurred among 
those who directly administer the afijiirs of the asylum and 
but few in the corps of attendants. 

J. F. MOORS. 
ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL. 
ANNA 8. FOLSOM. 
FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 
A. G. BULLOCK. 
THOMAS H. GAGE. 

Worcester, Sept. 30, 1886. 



76 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



OFFICERS ANB THEIR SALARIES. 



Hosea M. Quinby,M.D., Superintendent, 
Ernest V. Scribner, M.D., Assistant Physician, 
Clarence R. Macomber, Clerk and Steward, , 
Sophia N. Graves, Matron, .... 
Wm. Sherman, Engineer, .... 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, .... 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

325 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 



VALUE OF STOCK ANT) SUPPLIES, 

October 1, 



Live stock, ...... 

Carriages and agricultural implements. 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department 

Other furniture in inmates' department, 

Pei'sonal property of State in superintendent 

Ready-made clothing, 

Dry goods, . . , . 

Provisions and groceries. 

Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel, ..... 

Library, 

Other supplies, 



s department, 



^200 00 


650 


00 


9,000 


00 


8,964 


35 


8,000 


00 


9,500 


00 


898 


88 


1,084 


61 


8,792 


81 


300 


00 


930 


00 


325 


00 


1,798 


90 



;-l0,444 55 



1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



77 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my Ninth 
Annual Report on the finances of the Asylum for the Chronic 
Insane, for the year ending Sept. 30, 1886 : — 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1885 : — 
Cash belongino; to asylum, 
Deposits of inmates, . . 



,346 70 
767 26 



$10,113 96 



Amounts received : — 
From the Commonwealth for support of patients, $18,384 87 
cities and towns for support of patients, 53,643 13 

other sources, 614 95 

patients (on deposit), .... 60 24 



Salaries and wages, . 
Extra labor (ordinary), . 

Provisions and supplies, viz. : — 
Meats of all kinds, . 
Fish of all kinds. 
Fruit and vegetables. 
Flour, 

Meal for table, . 
Grain and hay, . 
Tea and coffee, . 
Sugar and molasses, 
Milk, butter and cheese, 
Salt and other groceries. 
All other provisions, 



Amount carried forward, 







( i,( \JO LJ 




$S2,817 15 


ve been as follows : — 




• ■ 


$20,614 18 
24 00 


$20,638 18 




• 




$3,874 04 
693 73 








1,5S6 38 








4,514 95 
78 65 








244 92 








446 60 








1,247 77 

7,693 05 

926 65 








1,376 06 


?22,682 70 






.... 


$43,320 88 



78 



ASYLUM FOE CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward, 

Clothing and other material, 

Fuel, 

Light, .... 

Medicine and medical supplies 

Furniture and furnishings, 

Crockery, . 

Beds and bedding, 

Transportation, 

Travelling, 

Trustees' expenses, 

iSoap and water. 

Stationery, 

Undertaking, . 

Repairs (ordinary). 

All other current expenses, 



Total current expenses, 
Repairs and improvements (extraordinary). 
Refunded inmates from deposits. 

Total amount expended, . . 
Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1886, . 



• 




$43,320 88 


14,362 

3,637 

1,545 

392 


26 
63 
44 
92 




1,730 
344 


24 
63 




1,050 
189 


88 
09 




169 


14 




41 


62 




1,193 

98 


64 

27 




285 


60 




3,000 00 
1,476 47 


19,517 73 




49 

00 


$9,678 
33 


162,838 61 
9,711 49 



?72,550 10 
10,267 05 

^82,817 15 



Resources. 






Cash on hand, 


. $10,267 05 




Due from the Commonwealth, 


4,591 49 




cities and towns, 


14,368 05 




other sources, .... 


211 32 


129,437 91 






Liabilities. 






Due for supplies and expenses. 


14,231 13 




salaries and wages. 


1,744 75 




Due inmates (cash on deposit). 


794 50 


6,770 38 






Total surplus, 


$22,667 63 



Kespectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 1, 1886. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 16, 1886. 
The undersigned has this day carefully compared the Treasurer's statement of 
expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1886, with the vouchers which are on file 

at the Asylum, and found it to be correct. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



1886.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 79 



SUPEEINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I herewith submit for your 
consideration the Ninth Annual Eeport of the Superintend- 
ent of the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. 

Oct. 1, 1885, there remained at the asylum 405 patients, 
of whom 207 were males and 198 females. Forty-one males 
and 30 females were admitted, 33 males and 7 females were 
discharged and 23 males and 15 females died, leaving at the 
close of the official year 398 patients, — 192 males and 206 
females. 

The total number of patients under treatment during the 
year has been 476, — 248 males and 228 females, with a daily 
average of 400.28. 

Of the 71 persons admitted, 40 males and 26 females were 
transferred from the Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 4 females 
from the almshouse at Tewksbury, and 1 male from the 
Northampton Lunatic Hospital. 

Of the persons discharged, 24 were transferred to the 
State Almshouse at Tewksbury, 5 to Bridge water Alms- 
house, 1 to the Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 3 were removed 
from the State by the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, 
4 were taken home by friends, 1 was removed by Overseers 
of the Poor to their almshouse, and 1 escaped. Of the 
above number, 35 were reported not improved at the time of 
their discharge, 4 were reported improved, and 1 recovered. 

The patient discharged recovered was a female, first com- 
mitted to Taunton in May, 1872, at the age of 44 years, and 
transferred to the asylum in October, 1877, suffering from 



80 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



chronic dementia with delusions. She was vain, silly, gar- 
rulous, and at times irritable, and continued so for five years, 
when the active manifestations of her disease ceased, and for 
the next two years she led the life of a quiet dement. From 
this time on she began to show signs of interest in her sur- 
roundings, and in the summer of ^85 was sent on a visit to 
her friends in New Hampshire. After staying there some 
three or four months she returned to the asylum vastly 
improved in bodily health and with little or no remaining 
evidence of former mental disturbance. As her friends 
were not able to care for her, slie remained at the asylum 
through the winter, but was finally discharged in April of 
the present year, after a continuous hospital residence of 
13 years and 11 months. Since her discharge, although not 
placed under the most favorable conditions for preserving 
mental health, she has kept well, and up to the present time 
has been able to support herself by her work. 

Thirty-eight patients died during the year, — 12 of 
phthisis, 9 from exhaustion of clironic mania, 5 from epi- 
lepsy, 5 from paresis, and 1 each from apoplexy, paralysis, 
brain disease, empyema, heart disease, senility and senile 
gangrene. 



Ratio 


of Deaths from the 


Opening of the 


Asylum to Oct. 1, 1886. 




o 


tc 03 


Deaths. | 


1 §11 


° o ^ 




6 oi 


1^. 




1 


ent. 
Die 
I'atie 
ted. 




OFFICIAL YEAR. 








1"^ ^ = 




Jt 


aily 
No. 
tien 


"3 


a 


« 


S^^-g 


fcl Is 




& 


« 


f^ 


S E^ 1 


(1( 


;^ 


1877-78, . 


429 


382.98 


18 


8 


26 


6.05 


6.78 


1878-79, 








422 


367.41 


22 


11 


33 


7.82 


8.98 


1879-80, 








413 


363.15 


15 


8 


23 


5.56 


6.33 


1880-81, 








401 


362.09 


18 


6 


24 


5.98 


6.G2 


1881-82, 








439 


375.59 


21 


11 


32 


7.28 


8.51 


1882-83, 








461 


384.33 


37 


24 


61 


13.23 


16.84 


1883-84, 








438 


390.69 


22 


20 


42 


9.58 


10.75 


1884-85, 








448 


391.12 


20 


14 


34 


7..58 


8.69 


1885-86, 








476 


400.28 


23 


15 


38 


7.98 


9.49 



From the nature of the case, our change of population is 
not a rapid one, and were it not for the transfers made by 
the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charities, it would be still 
slower than it is. Of the 40 persons discharged from the 



1886.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 81 

asylum during the past year 31 were removed to some other 
State hospital or receptacle for the insane, leaving only 9 
actual discharges. Adding to this number the 38 deaths, it 
will be seen that the asylum, if left to itself, could furnish 
room for about 50 new patients yearly and only to this extent 
relieve the overcrowded condition of the other State hos- 
pitals. 

Our number of patients has at no time been much below 
the full capacity of the asylum, and during the greater part 
of the year the house has been crowded to the utmost limit 
consistent with safety. We have, however, again escaped 
serious accident, and have been unusually free from sickness 
in any form. Although all of the deaths for several years 
past have been fi'om chronic and lingering disease, directly 
dependent upon or intimately related to the mental condition 
of the patient, there has always been much acute sickness 
during this time and often of a severe type, as was to be 
expected among so large a class of persons in an extreme 
state of mental and physical debility. Notwithstanding the 
fact that our patients cannot get out of doors during the 
winter and early spring on account of their feeble bodily 
condition, they appear to have been more free from physical 
ailments during these months than during the warmer por- 
tions of the year, when bowel troubles have been especially 
prevalent. For the last twelve months, however, with an aver- 
age population of over 400, it is certainly worthy of remark 
that we have not had a single case of acute sickness severe 
enough to confine the person to the bed for more than three 
or four days at a time. I cannot but attribute a great deal of 
this result to the fact that the patients have been more gen- 
erally employed than heretofore and that those who have not 
had employment have been kept as much as possible in the 
open air. During the spring and summer our wards have 
been generally deserted through the day, the patients being 
out of doors, scattered about the grounds in front of the 
asylum, from 9 a. m. until dark, only coming in for their 
meals. 

On any pleasant day it is seldom possible to find more 
than half a dozen patients (including the sick in bed) in the 
male wards. Although it has not seemed practicable to so 



82 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

completely clear the female wards, — the women, both patients 
and attendants, being less disposed to go out of doors, and 
having more legitimate excuses for remaining in, — not more 
than fifteen or twenty women are usually found indoors after 
ten o'clock, and a majority of these go out during some por- 
tion of the day. With a single exception, no patient has 
been kept in on account of mental condition, and all have 
used the lawn in front of the asylum for their out-door recrea- 
tion, and as our grounds border on one of the most frequented 
streets of Worcester, these patients have at all times been 
subject to inspection by passers-by. I formerly regarded 
this lack of seclusion as one of the great disadvantages of 
our location here in the heart of the city, but with further 
experience I am forced to look upon this publicity rather as 
an advantage than otherwise. To watch the busy traffic of 
the street is to many an inmate of the asylum, shut out as 
it were from the world, no small amount of pleasure and I 
have no doubt it adds a certain degree of diversity to each 
patient's life and serves to relieve the monotony of daily 
routine. 

The difficulty of providing a place of out-door recreation 
for our disturbed patients has proved, upon trial, not insur- 
mountable. Formerly such patients were turned loose in the 
" airing courts," so called, or blind yards at the rear of the 
asylum ; courts with no outlook but a high board fence on 
one side and the bare walls of the asylum on the other, — a 
place cheerless and dismal in the extreme. Here the excited 
patients were turned out to spend the day, with nothing to 
occupy their attention save their own insane fancies ; these they 
were at liberty to indulge to any and every extent, the very 
seclusion inviting rather than repressing the exercise of their 
degrading habits. Since these yards were abolished, our dis- 
turbed classes have used the grounds in front of the asylum 
in common with the more quiet patients, but as they were 
taken out either one by one or at most two or three together, 
they have been thereby limited in their out-of-door exercise 
to a very short time each day. During the past season all 
such patients have been out the same as the others and I have 
yet to see any bad results therefrom. True, it has not been 
an easy matter at all times to repress the turbulent, and keep 



1886.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 83 

certain patients within bounds, but there has been no serious 
difficulty on this score, and the change has appeared to me 
to be in every way advantageous. The patients, in watch- 
ing the passers-by, have found something to attract their 
attention and excite their interest and, under the stimukis of 
publicity, the noisy, untidy and shameless have gained in 
self-control and self-respect, while the attendants have been 
stimulated to exercise greater vigilance to prevent escapes 
and repress turbulent and unseemly conduct on the part of 
those under their charge. 

Although the amount of liberty granted patients has 
been increased gradually from time to time, there has been 
no increase in the number of escapes. During the past sea- 
son, when all the patients in eight open wards have had 
liberty to go and come within the grounds without any 
restrictions whatever, and when at least ninety per cent, of 
our inmates, during a great portion of the day, have not 
been under lock and key, but four persons have escaped, all 
but one of whom have been returned. 

For the past three months there has been no restraint or 
seclusion on the male side of the house. At the present 
writing two females are confined in chairs by waist-belts, 
one wears a camisole, one is in seclusion, and six are con- 
fined in bed at night, — a fair average of the daily amount of 
restraint used during the year. 

Our patients have been more generally employed than 
during any previous year. Between sixty and seventy 
work daily outside the wards, doing in every case a fair 
day's labor, while as many more have been occupied a por- 
tion of each day in ward-work, sewing, mending, or in odd 
jobs about the premises. It would be difficult to estimate 
the value in dollars and cents of this work to the asylum, 
but that it is considerable there can be no doubt, neither can 
it be doubted that such labor is of almost incalculable value 
to the patients employed. 

In the way of improvements, we have completed our 
laundry, put in a steam-mangle, a shirt and collar ironer, 
a centrifugal wringer, a patented device for drying clothing, 
the principle of which is the removal of the moist air from 
the dry-room by a blower, passing it over cold water pipes 



84 ASYLUM FOE CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 

to condense the moisture and returning it to the room as dry 
air without appreciable loss of heat. This arrangement has 
now been in use durino- one season and has been found to 
work very satisfactorily, drying clothing with far greater 
rapidity than by the old methods, whatever the state of the 
out-door atmosphere. 

Last year the city raised the grade of the street opposite 
our rear entrance and along Mulberry and East Central streets 
several feet, and it became necessary to take down our 
fence on the line of these streets, put in a retaining wall 
and, resetting the stone posts, replace the fence, which was 
done in the early spring, s We have also put the stable in 
repair, laid a new plank floor in our air-chamber, thrown out 
an addition to our chapel wing dining-room in order that all 
our outside help may be served with their meals at the same 
time and not as now at difi'erent tables, and torn out our 
general kitchen with the view to thorough repair. The 
demand for alterations and repairs in this department has 
been pressing for several years, but the work has been put 
oif from time to time on account of the difficulty of pro- 
viding temporary arrangements for cooking while these alter- 
ations were goino; on. This however, althousfh necessitating 
considerable preliminary work, has now been successfully 
provided for, our kitchen has been relathed and plastered 
and is ready for the floors and standing finish. 

Outside fire-escapes have been built at the suggestion and 
under the approval of the state inspector of factories and 
buildings. With these and our four hydrants, a stand pipe 
in each portico, with ample hose to reach any part of the 
house, hand-pumps and fire-pails in every clothes room, 
hand-grenades in the attendants' room and on every floor of 
the centre and rear buildings, and in the various work rooms, 
two chemical engines, and the city fire department within 
easy call, every reasonable provision against fire seems to 
have been made. 

The longer I am connected with this institution the more 
strongly am I convinced that there is really very much in a 
name, and that it would be greatly to the advantage of the asy- 
lum if its name, which I cannot but regard as a very unfortu- 
nate one, could be changed. As "The Temjporari/ Asylum for 



1886.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 85 

the Chronic Insane " it mattered little by what term it was 
known ; but now that the " temporary " seems to have been 
dropped by common consent, only appearing in our official 
reports, the necessity for a permanent institution of this 
kind in Massachusetts being conceded with the prospect that 
other similar ones will be needed in the near future, it is 
really a matter of some consequence as to the name by which 
this and like institutions shall be designated. I find that in 
the minds of the majority of people there attaches something 
of reproach to the term " chronic" as applied to the insane. 
They forget that nothing is thereby asserted as to curability or 
incurability, but recognizing the fact that most insanity of long 
standing is permanent, jump to the conclusion that chronic, 
incurable and hopeless are interchangeable terms as applied 
to this disease. After every transfer of patients from other 
hospitals the friends of some one or more of them come to 
me with expressions of deep grief over the fact that their 
relatives have been pronounced incurable and sent to an insti- 
tution where, as they inferred, their surroundings would be 
less comfortable, their diet more meagre, and where nothing 
further would be attempted toward the treatment or cure of 
their malady. 

It has always been an easy matter to reassure any such 
who come to the asylum in person, go through our wards and 
there see their friends ; but I have no doubt that many 
others, who cannot or do not come and see for themselves, 
feel that their friends have been harshly dealt with in being 
removed to the Asylum for the Chronic Insane. It is true 
that many of our patients are entirely oblivious as to name 
or surroundings, but such is not the fact with the majority. 
Some patients even retain all of the finer feelings natural to 
them in health, and in their correspondence and their inter- 
course with friends avoid the use of the word chronic as 
applied to the asylum, showing that to them as well as to 
others something of opprobrium attaches to the name. To 
some persons these objections, as urged by friends of patients, 
may seem to spring from sentiment merely, and therefore to 
be unworthy of attention, but every one will, I think, agree 
that, as far as the patients themselves are concerned, no 
good purpose can be served by constantly keeping before 



86 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. '86. 

them, like a death's head at the feast, a reminder that 
their condition is hopeless and beyond palliation or cure. 
The only argument in favor of the jDresent name is that it 
plainly distinguishes between the two Worcester Hospitals, 
but the same result would be equally as well accomplished 
by the use of the word asylum. 

In consideration of the above facts, I would respectfully 
request your honorable board to petition the coming Legis- 
lature to change the name of this institution from " The Tem- 
porary Asylum for the Chronic Insane "to * ' The Asylum at 
Worcester." 

The average weekly cost per patient has been $3.01. 

We have had the usual Sunday afternoon service in our 
chapel during the year and a weekly entertainment through 
the winter. 

The asylum is indebted to Miss Anna S. Folsom for maga- 
zines, etc., to the Hospital Newspaper Company of Boston 
for papers, magazines and Christmas cards, and to Charles 
H. Doe & Co. for a copy of the Evening Gazette. 

There has been no change in the asylum stafi' and less' 
than usual among the attendants, the most of whom have, 
as I can but feel, worked conscientiously for the welfare of 
the institution and the patients under their care. 

H. M. QUINBY, 

Superintendent. 
September 30, 1886. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



TABLES FOR UNIFOEM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 
FOR THE INSANE. 

(Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, April 3, 1880.) 



By the act of the Legislature establishing an Asylum for 
the Chronic Insane, it was provided, "That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the Asylum, therefore, have been for- 
mer inmates of one or more hospitals in the State ; and 
whenever in these tables they appear as " first admissions," 
they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this 
Asylum. 



90 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



General Statistics of the Tear. 



Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1885, . 
Adniissions within tlie year, 

Wiiole numbei' of cases within the year, 
Discharges within the year. 
Viz. : as recovered, 

much improved, . 

improved, . 

unimproved, 
Deaths, .... 

Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1886, 
Viz. : supported as State patients, 
town patients, 
private patients, , 
Number of different persons within the year 
admitted, .... 
recovered, .... 
Daily average number of patients, 



207 
41 

248 



2 
81 

23 

192 
64 

128 

248 
41 

195.78 



198 
30 

228 



2 

4 

15 

206 

38 

168 

228 
30 
1 
204.60 



405 
71 

476 



4 
35 

38 

398 
102 
296 

476 

71 

1 

400.28 



2. Monthly Admissions, Discharges and Averagps. 



MONTHS. 


Admissions. 


IHSCHAKGES 

(including Deaths) . 


Daily Average of Patients 
IN THE House. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


1885. 




















October, 


_ 




_ 


2 


1 


3 


206.71 


197.19 


403.90 


November, . 


- 


- 


- 


25 


3 


28- 


200.16 


195.77 


395.93 


December, . 


20 


19 


39 


4 


5 


9 


196.84 


190.25 


387.09 


1886. 




















January, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


196.00 


207.13 


403.13 


February, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 




19.0.57 


207.00 


402 57 


March, . 


_ 


- 


- 


3 


1 


4 


192.42 


206.19 


398.61 


April, . 


- 


1 


1 


4 


1 


5 


188.30 


205.80 


394.10 


May, 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


186.71 


205.87 


392.58 


June, 


20 


10 


30 


1 


2 


3 


189.50 


205.80 


395.30 


July, . 


_ 


- 


- 


3 


2 


5 


202.91 


212.64 


415.55 


Au2:ust, 


1 


- 


1 


3 


2 


5 


199.51 


211.39 


410.90 


September, . 


- 


- 


71 


8 
56 


4 

22 


12 

78 


194.73 


208.97 


403.70 


Total of cases, 


41 


30 


- 


- 


- 


Total of per- 
sons, . 


41 


30 


71 


56 


22 


78 


- 


- 


- 



1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



3. Eeceivecl on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases Admitted. 


Times PREviocsLy 
Recovebkd. 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 

Second, 

Etc., 


41 


30 


71 


~" 


1 1 1 1 1 


- 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


41 

41 


30 

30 


71 

71 


- 


- 



4. Ages of Persons Admitted for the First Time. 









At First Attack of 
Insanity. 


When Admitted. 


AGES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen yeai-s and less. 
From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 
Over 80 years, 
Unknown, . . 






2 
2 
5 
5 
2 
4 
9 
3 
1 

8 


2 

1 
4 
3 
5 
5 
1 
1 

1 

.7 


4 

2 
6 
9 
5 
9 

14 
4 
2 

1 
15 


1 
1 

4 
3 
4 
5 
12 
5 
4 

2 


1 

1 

6 
1 
6 
6 
3 
3 
1 
1 
2 


1 

2 
5 
8 
5 
11 
18 
8 
7 
1 
1 
4 


Totals, . 


41 


30 


71 


41 


30 


71 



92 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. 



[Oct. 



5. Parentage of Persons Adviitted. 





Males. 


Fkmales. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 
















Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Vermont, .... 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Massachusetts, . 






11 


11 


2 


2 


13 


13 


Rhode Island, 






1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Maine, . 






- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


New Hampshire, 






2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Georgia, 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Louisiana, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






New York, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Texas, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Nova Scotia, 






2 


-2 


1 


1 






Newfoundland, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Prince Edward Island 






1 


1 


- 


- 






New Brunswick, . 






- 


- 


1 


1 






England, 






- 


- 


1 


1 






Scotland, 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Ireland, 






8 


8 


15 


15 


23 


23 


Sweden, 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Italy, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Germany, . 






4 


4 


1 


1 






South America, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 






Unknown, . 






3 


3 


5 


5 






Totals, . 


41 


41 


30 


30 


71 


-7 1 



6. Residence of Persons Admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. ' 


Total. 


Massachusetts, viz. : — 

Suffolk County 

Middlesex County, .... 

Norfolk County, . . . . , 

Essex County, 

Worcester County, .... 
Unknown, 


31 

6 

1 
1 
3 


20 
6 
1 

3 


51 
11 

1 
1 

1 

6 


Totals, . 

Cities or large towns, 


41 
41 


30 
30 


71 
71 



1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



93 



7. Civil Condition of Persons Admitted. 



NUMBER OF THE 


Unmarried. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


ADMISSIOX. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First, . 
Second, . 


19 


13 


32 


18 


5 


23 


2 


8 


10 


2 
2 


4 
4 


6 


Totals, 


19 


13 


32 


18 


5 


23 


2 


8 


10 


6 



8. Occxipations of Persons Admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Housekeepers, 




3 


3 


Laborers, 














7 


_ 


7 


Domestics, 
















_ 


6 


6 


Dressmakers, 
















_ 


2 


2 


Gilder, . 
















1 


- 




Wives, . 
















_ 


1 




Waiters, 
















2 


_ 




Sailor, . 
















1 


— 




Carpenter, 
















1 


_ 




Blacksmith, 
















1 


_ 




Salesmen, 
















2 


_ 




Barber, . 
















1 


_ 




Mason, . 
















1 


_ 




Shoemaker, 
















1 


_ 




Locksmith, 
















1 


_ 




Curriers, 
















2 


_ 




Jeweller, 
















1 


_ 




Hostler, . 
















1 


_ 




Brickmaker, 
















1 


_ 




Musician, 
















I 


_ 




Teamster, 
















1 


_ 




Printer, . 
















1 


_ 




Operative, 
















1 


1 




Tailor, . 
















1 


_ 




Washerwoman, 














_ 


1 




No occupation. 














5 


1 


6 


Unknown, 














7 


15 


22 


Totals, 
















41 


30 


71 



94 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



9. Form of Disease in the Cases Admitted. 



rOEM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, chronic, 

Mania, recurrent, 

Epilepsy, 

Dementia, chronic, 

Melancholia, chronic, 

Idiocy, congenital, 

Paresis, . . 

Primary dementia, ..... 

Total of cases, 

Total of persons, 


26 

3 
2 
1 
1 

7 
1 

41 
41 


11 

1 

3 

8 
4 

9 
1 

30 
30 


37 

1 

6 

10 
5 
1 
9 
2 

71 
71 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 





First Admission to 


All other 


A.DMIS- 








THIS 


Hospital. 


SIONS. 










PKEVIOUS DURATION. 






















Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, 


1 


- 


1 

1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Under 1 month, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


From 1 to 3 months, . 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


2 


3 to 6 months, . 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 to 12 months, 


1 


2 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


."1 
o 


1 to 2 years. 


rr 
i 


4 


11 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


11 


2 to 5 years, 


7 


9 


16 


- 


- 


- 


7 


9 


16 


5 to 10 years, . 


4 


3 


7 


- 


- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


10 to 20 years, . 


6 


3 


9 


- 


1 


1 


6 


4 


10 


Over 20 years, . 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Unknown, . 


14 


6 


20 


- 


- 


- 


14 


6 


20 


Total of cases, . 


41 


29 


70 


- 


1 


1 


41 


30 


71 


Total of persons, 


41 


29 


70 


- 


1 


1 


41 


30 


71 


Av'ge of known cases. 


6.01 


3.65 


4.83 


- 


10.25 


10.25 


6.01 


4.05 


5.03 



1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



^35 



11. Assigned Causes of Insanity in Persons Admitted. 



Cerebvo-ppinal meningitis, 

Intemperance, 

Epilepsy, 

Syphilis, 

Masturbation, 

General dissipation, 

Heredity, 

Menopause, . 

Apoplexy. 

Typhoid fever, 

Menstrual irregularity. 

Old age. 

Fright, . 

Religious excitement, 

Financial trouble, 

Overwork, 

Injury, . 

Ill health. 

Congenital, . 

Family troubles. 

Business troubles, 

Puerperal, 

Lactation, 

Unknown, 

Totals, . 



14 

41 



2 

3 

1 

2 

1 

12 



1 

4 
2 
1 
5 
1 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
26 

71 



12. Relations to Hospitals of Persons Admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


fi'eniales. 


Totals. 


First admission to any hospital for insane, . 

Former inmates of the asylum, .... 
of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 
of Tewksbury Almshouse, . 
of Boston Lunatic Hospital, 
of Worcester Lunatic Hospital, . 
of Northampton Lunatic Hospital, 
of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 
of Stockton (Cal.) Hospital, 


40 

1 
1 
1 
2 


1 

28 
5 

1 

1 

1 


1 

68 
5 
1 
2 
2 

1 


Total of cases, 

Total of persons, 


45 
41 


37 
30 


82 
71 



96 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



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1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



97 



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98 



ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 



16. Cases Discharged by Recovery or Death. 





Kecoveeies. 


Deaths. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Mania, chronic, . 
Epilepsy, .... 
Dementia, chronic. 
Melancholia, chronic, . 
Paresis, .... 
Dementia, primary, 





1 


1 


11 

7 
1 

4 


9 
1 
3 

1 

1 


20 
8 
4 

5 
1 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


1 

1 


1 
1 


23 
23 


15 
15 


38 
38 



17. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Phthisis, 












8 


4 


12 


Epilepsy, 












5 


- 


5 


Senility, 












- 


1 


1 


Exhaustion, . 












3 


6 


9 


Paresis, 












4 


1 


5 


Apoplexy, 












1 


- 




Paralysis, 












1 


- 




Brain disease, 












- 


1 




Heart disease, 












- 


1 




Empyema, . 












1 


- 




Senile gangrene, . 












- 


1 




Totals, . 


23 


15 


38 



1886.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



99 



18. Ages of those who Died. 



Fifteen years and less, 
From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to -^0 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 
Over 80 years, , 
Unknown, . . 
Totals, . 



At Time of First Attack. 



23 



15 



Tot. 



38 



At Time of Death. 



23 



15 



38 



100 ASYLUM FOR CHRONIC INSANE. [Oct. 









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1886. J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



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YEARS. 


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1879, . 

1880, . 

1881, . 

1882, . 

1883, . 

1884, . 

1885, . 

1886, . 


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