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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum at Worcester"

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 23. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TEUSTEES 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM 



WORCE STER, 



Year En^ding September 30, 1888. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO , STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1889. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

FRANCIS C. LOWELL, Boston. 

ELLEN S. HALE, Boston. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN, Worcester. 

A. GEORGE BULLOCK, Worcester. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, Worcester. 

EOCKWOOD HOAR, Worcester. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., . . . . Superintendent. 

ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D., . . . Assistant Physician. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER, .... Clerk and Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN, . . . . . . . Engineer. 



ALBERT WOOD, 



TREASURER. 



Worcester. 



dC0mm0nfamIt]^ of glassatJ^us^tt^. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Cotmcil. 

The Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, ia 
charge of the Worcester Insane Asylum, respectfully pre- 
sent their eleventh annual report, together with the reports 
of the Superintendent and Treasurer. 

During the past year the aifairs of the asylum have been 
successfully and economically managed by the Superintend- 
ent, Dr. Quinby, and by his assistants. No change has 
taken place in the staiF of the asylum. 

The changes in the structure of the asylum buildings have 
been continued through the year just past, but of course 
they are not yet complete. Such changes must be very 
considerable, when it is proposed to treat, in an asylum 
built fifty-five years ago, the insane patients of to-day. 
Any one who passes at once from the present bright and 
cheerful wards to the old strong-rooms of the asylum, now 
used as storage cellars, — dark, damp and half under 
ground, — will realize how the present treatment of the 
insane differs from the most humane and enlightened treat- 
ment of half a century ago. In making these changes, we 
believe that Dr. Quinby has been singularly successful. He 
has employed upon the work a considerable number of the 
male patients, and so has required very little outside help, 
while the employment thus furnished to' the patients has 
been of great value in improving their condition. 



74 WOECESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

About a year ago, the cities and towns of the Common- 
wealth, acting generally in concert, refused to reimburse 
the several lunatic hospitals for clothing furnished by the 
hospitals to the paupers settled in such municipalities, and 
also for the breakage caused by such patients. The opinion 
of the Attorney-General was taken, and it was found to be 
unfavorable to the claim of the hospitals. This refusal to 
pay charges which, even if illegal, had been reimbursed to 
the hospitals for many years, has caused much embarrass- 
ment. In common with the Trustees of the other State 
lunatic hospitals, we presented to the last General Court a 
petition, asking that the system of charging, so long prac- 
tised, be definitely legalized, or that an addition of twenty- 
five cents per week be made to the rate of board. A 
committee of the Legislature gave several hearings upon 
the matter, at which the Trustees of the several hospitals 
were present, as well as the authorities of many cities and 
towns. At these hearings we endeavored to show that, 
under the new interpretation of the law, it would be impos- 
sible for either the hospital or the asylum to meet its cur- 
rent expenses. The committee reported a bill fixing the 
rate of board at $3 40 per week, an increase of fifteen 
cents. The bill passed the House, but was rejected in the 
Senate by a majority of two votes. 

We are of opinion that a large part of the opposition 
which the bill encountered arose from a very natural doubt 
of the accuracy of our predictions. We think that the Leg- 
islature believed it wiser to test the present working of the 
law by actual experiment, rather than grant an increase of 
rate to meet a condition which might never arise. The ex- 
periment has been tried, and the result is not in doubt ; the 
expenses of the hospital have exceeded its receipts by 
$5,700; the deficit at the asylum is $2,679. At the hos- 
pital, owing to a small balance which has resulted from 
the skilful management of past years, it will be possible to 
go through the next year without aid from the Common- 
wealth, but obviously the respite is a very short one. At 
the asylum the insignificant balance has almost disap- 
peared; and, unless relief is given very soon, we shall be 
forced to support our inmates more cheaply. It will be 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 75 

easy to do this, no doubt, if the Commonwealth desires us 
to use the necessary means. By furnishing a less varied 
and less nutritious diet, by discharging some of our much- 
needed attendants, and by placing in restraint or confinement 
a considerable number of our patients, we can make a large 
saving in expense. We are confident, however, that such a 
course would not be approved by the Commonwealth for a 
moment. By it our hospitals would at once be degraded 
from the honorable rank which they now occupy. No one 
familiar with the present management of lunatic hospitals 
in Massachusetts will assert that their inmates are pam- 
pered in diet, or indulged in privileges un&uited to their 
sad condition. As the rate at which the insane are sup- 
ported here is less than the rate paid to the hospitals of 
other States, the Trustees cannot charge themselves with 
extravagance in administering their trust. 

At the hearing before the legislative committee last win- 
ter it was asserted that insane paupers are supported in the 
poorhouses of the several municipalities at a rate consider- 
ably less than that allowed for their support in the State 
lunatic hospitals. To this statement it may be answered : — 

First. The paupers supported in such poorhouses are the 
quietest and least troublesome among the insane, while those 
supported in the hospitals and in the asylum are the most 
unruly and most troublesome. Inevitably, the care of the 
latter is much more expensive than that of the former. 

Second. In many such poorhouses the rate of support is 
calculated indiscriminately for sane and insane paupers. 
Not only is the cost of supporting the former much less, so 
that the joint average is thus reduced, but the sane paupers 
are able to do much of the work which, in a hospital, must 
fall upon the attendants and servants. In this way, there- 
fore, the cost of supporting the insane in poorhouses is still 
further reduced, and a comparison between them and the 
hospitals becomes still more unfair. 

Third. In some poorhouses the care of the insane is dis- 
tinctly defective. The thorough examination made by the 
agents of the State Board of Lunacy and Charity in 1887 
shows clearly that this is the case. 

For these reasons we do not feel that the treatment of the 



76 WORCESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

insane in municipal poorhouses has any tendency to demon- 
strate extravao-ance in the manasfement of either the hos- 
pital or the asylum ; and being convinced, for the reasons 
just given, that the present rate allowed us for the support 
of insane paupers is too low, we respectfully urge that it be 
raised to $3.50 per week, or that the long-established cus- 
tom of charging for clothing and breakage be definitely 
legalized. 

FRANCIS C. LOWELL. . 

ELLEN S. HALE. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 

A. G. BULLOCK. 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 

ROCKWOOD HOAR. 

Worcester, Oct. 1, 1888. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



77 



OFFICERS AIS^D THEIR SALA.RIES. 



HosEA M. QuiNBT, M.D., Superintendent, 
Ernest V. Scribner, M.D., Assistant Physician, 
Clarence R. Macomber, Clerk and Steward, 
Sophia N. Graves, Matron, .... 
William Sherman, Engineer, 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, . . . . 



$2,500 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 

325 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 



YALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES, 

Oct. 1, 1888. 



Live stock, $425 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements, 650 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 9,000 00 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, .... 9,458 95 

Other furniture in inmates' department, .... 3,000 00 

Personal property of State in Superintendent's department, . 9,500 00 

Ready-made clothing, 1,308 95 

Dry goods, 1,391 90 

Provisions and groceries, 2,918 77 

Drugs and medicines, 350 00 

Fuel, 831 00 

Library, . ' ' . . . . 375 00 

Other supplies, 1,925 85 



,135 42 



78 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



TEEASUKER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Bisane Asyhmi. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my eleventh annual 
report on the finances of the Worcester Insane Asylum for 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 



Receipts. 
Cash on hand Sept. 80, 1887 : — 
Cash belonging to asylum. 
Deposits of inmates, 

Amounts received : — 
From the Commonwealth for support of patients, 
cities and towns for support of patients, 
other sources, ...... 

patients (on deposit), .... 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows : — 
Salaries and wages, . 
Extra labor (ordinary) , , 

Provisions and supplies 
Meats of all kinds, . 
Fish of all kinds, 
Fruit and vegetables, 
Flour, 

Meal for table, . 
Grain and hay, . 
Tea and coffee, . 
Sugar and molasses, . 
Milk, butter and cheese. 
Salt and other groceries. 
All other provisions, 

Clothing and material. 
Fuel, . . . . 
Lights, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$10,332 28 




850 


53 


$11,182 81 






,$16,367 


47 




51,456 


03 




846 


32 




125 


30 


68,795 12 






allows ; — 


§79,977 93 


$21,853 


17 




15 


00 


$21,868 17 


|4,223 


37 




651 


41 




2,278 


77 




2,920 


00 




89 


09 




219 


17 




791 


05 




1,280 


41 




7,073 


87 




944 


44- 




1,804 


58 


22,276 16 



$3,271 


33 


5,481 


10 


1,094 


55 



$9,846 98 $44,144 33 



■] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



Amounts brotight forioar^, 
Medicine and medical supplies 
Furniture and furnishings 
Crockery, . 
Beds and bedding, 
Transportation, 
Travelling, 
Trustees' expenses, 
Soap and water, 
Stationery, 
Undertaking, 
Repairs (ordinary) 
All other current expenses, 



)9,846 98 

370 62 

1,541 61 

490 97 

942 11 

206 59 

89 47 

24 26 

1,257 05 

79 65 

294 00 

3,000 00 

1,606 72 



79 

t,144 33 



Total current expenses, 
Repairs and improvements (exti'aordinary). 
Refunded inmates from dei^osits, 



,365 52 
206 95 



19,750 03 
^63,894 86 



8,572 47 



Total amount expended, $72,466 83 



Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1888, 



Resources. 



7,511 10 
^9,977 93 



Cash on hand, 

Due from the CommonAvealth, 

cities and towns, 

other sources, .... 

Liabilities. 
Due for supplies and expenses, 

salaries and wages, 
Due inmates (cash on deposit), 



Total sm-plus, . f 18,298 33 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT WOOD, 

WoRCESTEE, Mass., Oct. 1, 1888. 



$7,511 10 




4,314 68 




12,942 43 




220 85 






$24,989 06 




$4,064 02 




1,857 83 




768 88 






6,690 73 





Treasurer. 



k 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 26, 18S8. 
The undersigned hereby certifies that he has carefully compared the Treasurer's 
statement of expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1888, with the voiichers 
which are on file at the asylum, and found it to be correct. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accmmts. 



80 WOECESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — The following exhibit of the 
operations and condition of the asykim for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1888, is respectfully submitted. 

There remained, Oct. 1, 1887, 392 patients, — 182 males 
and 210 females. During the year 46 males and 13 females 
have been admitted, 10 males and 9 females have been dis- 
charged, and 23 males and 14 females have died ; leaving, at 
the end of the year, 395 patients, — 195 males and 200 
females. 

Of the 59 patients admitted, 30 males were transferred 
from Taunton, 15 males and 11 females from Dan vers, 2 
females from Tewksbury, and 1 male from the State Farm. 

Of the 19 patients discharged, 3 males and 2 females were 
taken home by friends ; 4 males w^ere removed out of the 
State by the Board of Lunacy and Charity ; 3 females were 
discharged to the care of the Inspector of Charities, to be 
boarded out ; 2 females were transferred to Tewksbury, 1 
to Westborough, and 1 to Danvers ; 1 male was discharged 
to the care of the overseers of the poor, and 2 males escaped, 
and are still at large. 

Of the two patients who escaped, one is harmless, as far 
as known, and capable of caring for himself in a measure. 
The other is an epileptic, and is at times quite dangerous. 
His mental condition is such, however, that in all probability 
he cannot remain at large many weeks before being appre- 
hended as an insane person, and recommitted to some one of 
our institutions. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



81 



Ratio of Deaths from the Opening of the Asylum to Oct. i, 1888. 





o 
6 <n 


erage 
3r of 
ts. 


Deaths. 


= 11 


t. on 
Vver- 
0. of 
ts. 


OFFICIAL YEAR. 


<%l 




« 


<» 


c * « "2 


s Z,-^ g 




o a 


til 


d 




^ 


l^-ol 


fel 1^ 






" 


S 


fe 


^ 


fin 


i=H 


1877-78, . 


429 


382.98 


18 


8 


26 


6.05 


6 78 


1878-79, . 






422 


367.41 


22 


11 


33 


7.82 


8.98 


1879-80, . 






413 


363.15 


15 


8 


23 


5.56 


6.33 


1880-81, . 






401 


362.09 


18 


6 


24 


5.98 


6.62 


1881-82, . 






439 


375.59 


21 


11 


32 


7.28 


8.51 


1882-83, . 






461 


384.33 


37 


24 


61 


1323 


15.84 


1883-84, . 






438 


390.69 


22 


20 


42 


9.58 


10.75 


1884-85, . 






448 


391.12 


20 


14 


34 


7.58 


8.69 


1885-86, . 






476 


400.28 


23 


15 


38 


7.98 


9.49 


1886-87, . ■ 






444 


393.52 


21 


17 


38 


8.55 


9.65 


1887-88, . 






451 


393.95 


23 


14 


37 


8.20 


9.39 



We have been unusually free from acute sickness during 
the year, and especially from the diseases incident to the 
summer months ; a fact largely due, no doubt, to the almost 
constant out-of-door life of a large majority of the patients. 
Of the 37 deaths, 12 were from exhaustion, 7 from paresis, 
5 from phthisis, 4 from paralysis, 3 from epilepsy, 2 from 
apoplexy, 2 from senility, 1 from Bright's disease, and 1 
from suicide. 

The above case of suicide is the first that has occurred at 
the asylum since its opening. The patient, a male, was 
adjudged insane, and sent to Taunton July 20, 1887, from 
State Prison, where he had been confined nine years, serving 
a life sentence for murder. He was transferred to the asylum 
Feb. 18, 1888. His record stated that he was a dangerous 
person, and utterly unreliable. It also stated that he was 
suicidal ; but this statement was questioned. During the 
three months that he was resident at the asylum he gave no 
evidence of suicidal tendencies, but was at all times cheerful, 
and perfectly quiet and orderly. One morning, on unlock- 
ing his door, he was found hanging to the w^ire window 
screen by a pair of suspenders which he had succeeded in 
smuggling into his room. The case was reported to the 
medical examiner, and the usual inquest was held. 

Nothing has occurred during the past twelve months to 
disturb the usual routine of asylum life. The patients have 



82 WOECESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

as heretofore been largely employed about the house and 
grounds, while those not thus occupied have been kept out 
of doors the greater part of the day. They have enjoyed 
the usual entertainments and chapel services during the 
winter months, and have been supplied with daily papers 
and the current periodicals. A large number have had 
unrestricted freedom of the grounds, a privilege highly 
appreciated by most of those who have enjoyed it. 

During the year the house has not only been filled to its 
full capacity, but on the female side it has been unduly 
crovvded. At no time since the opening of the asylum have 
we had less than our full complement of patients ; in fact, 
we have from the first been obliged to make room for more 
or less patients upon the floor of the corridors. I am led to 
make this statement now for the reason that a notion seems 
to have gained currency that there is and ahvays has been 
considerable unutilized room at the asylum, and that, while 
the hospitals have been overcrowded, the asylum has for 
some reason not been willins^ to receive its normal number 
of patients. Such an idea can have arisen only through 
entire misconception as regards the capacity of the asylum. 

The buildings, as they now stand, were never designed for 
more than three hundred patients, but on the opening of the 
asylum it w^as decided that four hundred patients could be 
accommodated here without any especial discomfort, on the 
supposition that among the patients to wdiose use the build- 
ings were in the future to be adapted there w^ould be found 
a large proportion of quiet and harmless persons, who could 
readily be placed together in dormitories, and even bear a 
certain deOTce of crowdino- without serious danger. But 
after utilizing all available space, — putting two 'l)eds in 
some of the single rooms, turning the stairwaj^s into sleeping 
apartments, and crowding the dormitories to their utmost 
limit, — it w^as found possible to provide beds for only three 
hundred and fifty patients. The balance must sleep on the 
floor of the corridors. 

The female side of the house has less capacity by twenty 
beds than the male, while the demand for accommodations 
always has been most pressing here, and never more so than 
during the past year, when we have had many and urgent 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 83 

requests to add still further to the discomforts and dangers 
of overcrowded wards by receiving a larger number of female 
patients. In fact on one occasion we have been obliged to 
find place for a transfer of ten females, after having signi- 
fied our inability to properly provide for them. 

The supposition that the asylum would receive a large 
proportion of quiet patients proved true as far as the first 
arrivals were concerned, since, by the order of the Board of 
State Charities, those persons were selected for transfer who 
had been longest insane. The character of all subsequent 
transfers, however, has been largely determined by the 
superintendents of the hospitals from which the patients 
came. In making their selections, the superintendents very 
justly availed themselves of the opportunity of ridding their 
institutions of the more disturbing element. It thus hap- 
pens that a large majority of the later transfers have been 
violent, uois}'' and turbulent, and that, while the quiet class 
has received but few accessions to its ranks, its numbers 
have been gradually diminished by discharge and transfer, 
until we now have only a very small number of patients who 
can with safety be associated at night upon the corridors or 
in dormitories. 

It has been urged that the asylum cannot possibly be 
crowded with only four hundred patients, since twice at 
least in its history it has cared for over five hundred 
inmates. This is indeed true of the two years just prior to 
the opening of the Taunton hospital ; but, if we turn to the 
reports for those years, we shall find that much sickness and 
discomfort resulted from this overcrowding, and that it was 
endured only for the reason that there was at that time 
nowhere in the State any other provisions for insane persons 
at all suited to their needs. When the hospital at Taunton 
was finally opened, 210 patients were transferred from 
Worcester, reducing the number of its inmates to 343, and 
removing, as is stated in the superintendent's report, "no 
more than the surplus." Since this time many alterations 
have been made in the building, materially reducing its 
capacity, while nothing has been added thereto. The 
asylum was again greatly crowded during the year just prior 
to the opening of the new hospital, when the number of its 



84 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

inmates reached 527. Then its capacity, including the 
three cottages at the lake, with their 30 patients, was stated 
to be 365. 

In attempting to decide how far in this particular case 
crowding may be allowed without serious danger, we must 
not forget that these buildings were planned at a time when 
less space per person was thought to be requisite than later 
experience has proved to be necessary ; and, therefore, 
that they can bear much less crowding than the more recent 
hospitals, with their lofty ceilings and more ample air space. 
Modern authorities agree that from fifteen hundred to two 
thousand cubic feet of air space is necessary in all hospitals. 
At the asylum there is barely one thousand cubic feet per 
patient. 

The refusal of the towns to pay for clothing or breakage 
for their patients has reduced our income the past year some 
$5,000. We have spent $3,671.71 over and above our 
receipts, and diminished our surplus nearly $3,000. The 
cost of support has been $3.12 per patient. The asylum has 
been at considerable expense each year for repairs and 
improvements ; and this expenditure must continue for some 
time longer if the buildings are to be put into proper 
sanitary condition, and the institution suitably equipped for 
the work demanded of it. We cannot hope to do this from 
our present income, and, unless the price of board is 
increased, we must either give up further repairs or apply to 
the Legislature for assistance. 

As soon as it became apparent that our receipts were to 
be reduced, it was decided to discontinue the work on the 
male Johonnot w^ards begun last year, and which we had 
hoped to finish in the early spring. Contracts, however, 
had already been made, material bought, and many of the 
wards so torn up that they could not be used the coming 
winter unless the repairs were in a measure completed. 
The work was therefore continued with a reduced corps of 
mechanics, and has dragged along through the year. It will 
be impossible to finish these wards before another spring, 
but they can be occupied the coming winter with entire 
comfort. 

In our laundry the shaker washing machines, which had 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 85 

been in service eight years and were beyond repair, have 
been replaced by two rotary washers of the "Eureka" 
pattern. 

We are again indebted to the proprietors of the " Worces- 
ter Evening Gazette " for a copy of their paper, and to the 
Hospital Newspaper Society for books, pamphlets and 
magazines. 

H. M. QUINBY, M.D., 

Superintendent. 
"Worcester, Mass., Oct. 1, 1888. 



TABLES POE UNIFOEM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 

FOE THE INSANE. 



[Approved by tlie Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, April 3, 1880.] 



By the act of the Legislature establishing an asylum for 
the chronic insane, it was provided, "That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the asylum, therefore, have been 
former inmates of one or more hospitals in the Stale ; and 
whenever in these tables they appear as "first admissions," 
they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this 
asylum. 



88 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



1. General Statistics of the Year. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1887, . 
Admissions within the year, 


182 
46 


210 
13 


392 
59 


Whole number of cases within the year. 
Discharges within the year, .... 
Viz. : as recovered, 

much improved, 

improved, 

unimproved, 

Deaths, 


228 

3 

7 
23 


223 

2 

7 

14 


451 
5 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1888, 
Viz. : supported as State patients, 
town patients, 
private patients, . 
Number of diiferent persons within the year, 

admitted, 

recovered, 

Daily average number of patients. 


195 

63 

132 

228 
46 

189.12 


200 

36 

164 

223 
13 

204.83 


395 

99 

296 

451 
59 

393.95 



2. Monthly Admis 


Si07li 


, DiscJiai 


-ges and Averages, 










\ 


Discharges 1 


Dail^ 


I- Average 


OF 










_ 
















lincluding Deaths).] 


Patients in the House. 


MONTHS. 






















Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


188T. 




















October, 


10 


_ 


10 


2 


3 


5 


187.12 


209.42 


396.54 


November, . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


2 


6 


187.27 


205.63 


392.90 


December, . 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


4 


184.90 


204.55 


389.45 


1888. 




















Januarv, 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


182. 


204. 


386. 


February, 


8 


2 


10 


5 


4 


9 


182.87 


202.89 


385.76 


March, . 


- 


_ 


_ 


5 


- 





181.71 


202. 


383.71 


April, . 


16 


10 


26 


3 


2 


5 


185.64 


205.46 


391.10 


May, 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


4 


6 


191. 


209.51 


400.51 


June, . 


12 


_ 


12 


3 


1 


4 


193.20 


206.80 


400. 


July, . 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


2 


2 


199.42 


205.13 


404.55 


August, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


4 


198.52 


202.45 


400.97 


September, . 


- 


- 


- 


5 


1 


6 


195.84 


200.13 


395.97 


Total of cases. 


46 


13 


69 


33 


23 


56 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Total of persons, . 


46 


13 


59 


33 


23 


56 




" 





1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



89 



3. Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases Admitted. 


Times Previously 
Recovered. 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 

Second, 

Etc., 


46 


13 


59 


- 


_ 




Total of cases. 
Total of persons, . 


46 
46 


13 
13 


59 
59 


- 




- ■ 



4. Age of Persons admitted for the First Time. 



k 









At First Attack of 

Insanity. 


When Admitted. 


AGES. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. ■ 


Fifteen years and less, 






1 


- 


1 

1 


- 


- 


- 


From 15 to 20 jeavs. 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


20 to 25 years, 






3 


- 


3 


3 


1 


4 


25 to 30 years. 






2 


3 


5 


7 


3 


10 


30 to 35 years, 






5 


3 


8 


5 


2 


7 ■ 


35 to 40 years. 






2 


2 


4 


9 


2 


11 


40 to 50 years, 






8 


- 


8 


13 


3 


16 


60 to 60 years, 






5 


1 


6 


6 


- 


6 


60 to 70 years. 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


70 to 80 years. 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Over 80 years. 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown, 






20 


3 


23 


1 


1 


2 


Totals, . 


46 


13 


59 


46 


13 


59 



90 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



5. Parentage of Persons achiiitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


















Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Faiher. 


Mother. 


Vermont, 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Massachusetts, . 






22 


22 


3 


3 


. 25 


25 


New Hampshire, 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Rhode Ishaud, 






1 


1 


- 




1 


1 


Maine, 






2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Nova Scotia, 






- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


England, 






3 


3 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Ireland, 






9 


9 


8 


8 


17 


17 


Sweden, 






1 


1 


- 


-^ 


1 


1 


Italy, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Germany, . 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Scotland, 






- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Unknown, . 






4 


4 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Totals, . 


46 


46 


13 


13 

1 


59 


59 



6. Residence of Persons admitted. 



PL.\CES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Massachusetts, viz. : — 

Bristol County, 

Suffolk County, 

Middlesex County, .... 
Norfolk County, .... 
Plymouth County, .... 

Essex County, 

Unknown, 


6 

16 
9 
3 
3 
5 
4 


2 

8 

3 


6 

18 
17 
3 
3 
8 
4 


Totals, 

Cities or large towns, 


46 
46 


13 
13 


59 
59 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



7. Civil Condition of Persons Admitted. 





Unmarried. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


NUMBER OF 
THE ADMISSION. 


3 
s 


1 


5 

o 


C3 


■3 

a 


o 


S 


i 


o 

H 


rt 


■3 

a 

0) 

Eh 


1 


First, . 
Second, . 


17 


9 


26 


22 


3 


25 


3 


1 


1 

4 


4 
4 


- 


4 


Totals, . 


17 


9 


26 


22 


3 


25 


3 


1 


4 


4 



8. Occupations of Persons admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Housekeepers, 
Laborers, 
Domestics, 
Upholsterers, 
Shoemakers, 
Gold platers, 
Machinists, 
Tar roofers. 
Masons, . 
AVheel Wright, 
Sailors, . 
Editor, . 
Peddler, 
Marketman, 
Wood carver, 
CuiTier, . 
Jewellers, 
Vietualer, 
Conductor, 
Bookkeeper, 
Operative, 
Tailors, . 
Carpenters, . 
Morocco dealer, 
No occupation. 
Unknown, 

Totals, . 



46 



13 



3 
7 
6 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
2 
1 
6 
2 

59 



92 



WOECESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



9. Form of Disease in the Cases admitted. 



FORM or DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, acute, 

chronic, 

Epilepsy, ....... 

Dementia, chronic, 

primary, 

Paresis, 

Melancholia, chronic, ..... 


3 • 
21 

5 

7 

7 
3 


8 

2 
1 

2 


3 

29 
5 
9 
1 

7 
5 


Total of eases, 

Total of persons, ..... 


46 
46 


13 
13 


59 
59 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 





First Admission to 


All Other 










THIS Hospital. 


Admissioss. 




Totals 




PREVIOUS DURATION. 






















"3 


s 


■5 



1 




a 


*-> 



.e5 


1 


■3 




Congenital, . 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 




1 


- 


1 


Under 1 month, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Fi'om 1 to 3 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 to 6 months, . 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


6 to 12 months, . 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


1 to 2 years, 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


2 to 5 years. 


10 


7 


17 


- 


- 


- 


10 


7 


17 


5 to 10 years. 


2 


3 


5 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


5 


10 to 20 years, . 


3 


- 


3 


~ 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Over 20 yeai's. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown, 


20 

46 


3 


23 


- 


- - 


20 


3 


23 


Total of cases, 


13 


59 


- 


- 


- 


46 


13 


59 


Total of persons, . 


46 


13 


59 


- 


- 


- 


46 


13 


59 


Ay'gQ of known eases, . 


3.80 


4.20 


4.00 


- 


- 


- 


3.80 


4.20 


4.00 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



93 



11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Sunstroke, 


1 


_ 


1 


Intemperance, 

Ej)ilepsy, 

Masturbation, 










7 
3 
1 


- 


7 
3 
1 


Hereditarj% . 










3 


3 


6 


Suppression of menses, 

Injury, . 

Loss of property, . 

Nervous prostration. 

Sickness, 










2 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 


1 
3 
1 

1 
2 


Unknown, 










26 


7 


33 


Totals, . . . 










46 


13 


59 



12. Relations to Hospitals of Persons admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First admission to any hospital for the insane, . 


- 


- 


- 


Former inmates of the asylum, 


1 


- 


1 


of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 


16 


12 


28 


of Tewksbury Almshouse, 


1 


2 


3 


of Worcester Lunatic Hospital, 


2 


1 


8 


of Ipswich ReceiDtacle, .... 


1 


- 


1 


of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


31 


1 


32 


of Concord, N. H., Lunatic Hospital, 


1 


- 


1 


of McLean Asylum, .... 


2 


- 


2 


of State Workhouse, .... 


2 


- 


2 


of Brattleborough, Vt., Asylum, . 


1 


- 


1 


Total of cases, 


58 


16 


74 


Total of persons, 


46 


13 


59 



94 



WORCESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 









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1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



95 









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96 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



16. Cases discharged by Recovery or Death. 





Eecoveries. 


Deaths. 


FORM OF INSANITY. 


i 


"5 

a 


■3 

H 


■3 


s 


"3 


Mania, acute, 

chronic. 
Epilepsy, .... 
Dementia, chronic, 
Melancholia, chronic, . 
Paresis, 


- 


- 


- 


1 

12 

4 
2 
1 
3 


8 
1 

1 

4 


1 

20 
5 
3 
1 

7 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


- 


- 


- 


23 
23 


14 
14 


37 
37 







17. 


Causes 


jf Death. 






CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Phthisis, 












- 


5 


5 


Epilepsy, 












3 


- 


3 


Senility, . 












- 


2 


2 


Exhaustion, . 












11 


1 


12 


Paresis, . 












3 


4 


7 


Suicide, . 












1 


- 


1 


Paralysis, 












3 


1 


4 


Bright's disease, 












1 


- 


1 


Apoplexy, 












1 


1 


2 


Totals, . 


23 


14 


37 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



97 



18. Ages of those who died. 







At Time of Fikst 
Attack- 


At Time of Death. 


AGES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
60 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Over 80 years. 

Unknown, 




1 

1 

2 

1 

6 

4 

8 


1 
1 

3 
2 
2 
1 

1 
3 


1 
1 
1 

3 
3 
3 

8 
5 

1 
11 


1 

3 
3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
1 

2 


4 

3 
1 
3 
1 ' 

1 
1 


1 

7 
3 

5 
6 
5 
2 
1 
2 


Totals, . 


23 


14 


37 


23 


14 


37 



98 



WOECESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 









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1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



99 









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