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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum at Worcester"

|ii||ilBiiiiWi«^ 



A 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportoftr67worc 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 23. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TEUSTEES 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM 



WORCESTER, 



Year Ending September 30, 1889. 



BOSTON : 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 

IS Post Office Square. 

1890. 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES 



ELLEN S. HALE, 
EKANCES M. LINCOLN, 
A. GEORGE BULLOCK, 
THOMAS H. GAGE, . 
HENRY S. NOURSE, 
ROCKWOOD HOAR, . 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL, 



BOSTOX. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Lancaster. 

Worcester. 

Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., Superintendent. 

ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D., .... Assistant Phxjsidan. 

CLARENCE R. MACOMBER, Clerk and Steward. 

SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 



WILLIAM SHERMAN, 



Engineer. 



ALBERT WOOD, 



TREASURER. 



Worcester. 



(SJommantotaltlj ai Sfessacljus^tts. 



TKUSTEES' KEPORT. 



lb His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in charge 
of the Worcester Insane Asylum, respectfully present their 
twelfth annual report, together with the reports of the super- 
intendent and treasurer. 

A detailed statement of our condition, financial and other- 
wise, will be found under the treasurer's report and the 
tables of uniform statistics. 

We are fortunate in retaining Dr. Quinby at the head of 
the asylum, who continues to administer its afl'airs faithfully 
and successfully ; and we have had no changes in our staff of 
assistants. 

Dr. Quinby has gone on with his task of renovating and 
remodelling the buildings. Our buildings are old, and in 
many ways fail to meet modern requirements for light and 
ventilation. One after another these wards are changed. 
New bays and other extensions let in light, air and sunshine, 
and the whole atmosphere and appearance is altered. Not 
the least among the advantages of this is the skill with which 
Dr. Quinby has utilized the labor of the patients, and re- 
duced the expenses of the work, while giving them emplo}'- 
ment. It must always be remembered that the insane cannot 
be forced to work, hoAvever advantageous the occupation 
may be for them. 



74 WORCESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

The trustees must continue to call attention to the crowded 
condition of the institution. Further provision must soon 
be made for the increasing numbers of the insane. Our 
wards are filled to overflowing, leaving inadequate space for 
each patient, and making classification more diflScult, while 
increasing the labor in caring properly for the patients. 

EespectfuUy submitted, 

ELLEN S. HALE. 
FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 
A. GEORGE BULLOCK. 
THOMAS H. GAGE. 
HENRY S. NOURSE. 
ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



75 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 



HosEA M. QuiNBY, M.D., 8u2?erintendent, 
Ernest V. Sceibner, M.D., Assistajit Physician, 
Clarence R. Macomber, Clerk and Steivard, 
Sophia X. Graves, Matron, .... 
William Sherman, Engineer, 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, .... 



P,500 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 

325 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES, 

Oct. 1, 1889. 



Live stock, 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . 

Macliiuerj^ and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates' dejiartment. 

Other furniture in inmates' department, . 

Personal property of State in superintendent's 

Readj'-made clothing. 

Dry goods, 

Provisions and groceries, 

Drugs and medicines. 

Fuel, .... 

Library, 

Otiier supplies, . 





f425 00 


. 


650 00 


. 


9,000 00 


. 


9,500 00 




3,000 00 


department. 


9,500 00 




1,059 30 




1,394 44 




2,496 20 


. 


350 00 


. 


819 00 


. 


400 00 




2,150 00 



),743 94 



76 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my twelfth annual re- 
port on the finances of the Worcester Insane Asylum for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 

Eeceipts. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1888 : — 
Cash belonging to asylum, . * . 
Deposits of inmates, 

Amounts received : — 
From the Commonwealth for support of i^a- 

tients, 

cities and towns for supjoort of j^atients, 

other som'ces, 

patients (on deposit), .... 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows : — 
Salaries and wages, . 

Provisions and supplies 
Meats of all kinds. 
Fish of all kinds. 
Fruit and vegetables, 
Flour, 

Meal for table, . 
Grain and hay, . 
Tea and coffee, . 
Sugar and molasses, . 
Milk, butter and cheese, 
Salt and other groceries. 
All other provisions, . 



Clothing and material. 
Fuel, .... 
Lights, 

Amoimts carried forivard, 



$6,742 22 




768 88 






$7,511 10 


$15,940 68 


49,998 03 




1,176 33 




27 45 






fi7 14-9 4.Q 




U i ^X'Xiii *Xt/ 




§74,653 59 


allows : — 






121,560 14 


$3,957 21 




737 49 




1,659 71 




3,897 60 




98 33 




400 00 




1,026 33 




1,474 22 




7,184 51 




1,045 91 




1,569 22 





$3,796 35 
5,094 99 
1,267 03 



23,050 43 



),158 37 $44,610 57 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23 



77 



Amounts brought forivard, 

Medicine and medical supplies, 

Furniture and furnishings, 

Crockeiy, . 

Beds and bedding, 

Transportation, . 

Travelling, 

Trustees' expenses. 

Soap and water, . 

Stationery, . 

Undertaking, 

Repairs (ordinary). 

All other current expenses, 



Total current expenses, 
Repairs and improvements (extraordinary), 



Total amount expended, 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1889, 



Resoukces. 

Cash on hand, 

Due from the Commonwealth, . 

cities and towns, 

other sources, .... 

Liabilities. 
Due for supj)lies and expenses. 
Due for salaries and wages. 
Due inmates (cash on deposit). 

Total surplus, 



$10,168 


37 $44,610 57 


333 


27 


444 16 


411 


50 


810 


77 


84 49 


60 00 


45 


03 


841 


13 


89 


34 


264 00 


3,000 00 


1,349 


10 



$9,620 13 

4,187 07 

12,612 60 

90 25 



$3,506 32 

1,771 14 

796 33 



$62,501 73 
2,531 73 

$65,033 46 
9,620 13 

$74,653 59 



5,510 05 



6,073 79 
120,436 26 



Respectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 26, 1889. 
The undersigned has this day carefully compared the treasurer's statement of ex- 
penditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1889, with the vouchers which are on file at 
the asylum, also the statement of cash received with the ledger accounts, and found 
them to be correct. 

GEO. L. CLARK, 

A%iditor of Accounts. 



78 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 



SUPERmTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Tmstees of the Worcester Insa7ie Asylum. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I beg to lay before you the 
following report of the condition of the asylum for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1889. 

There were remaining in the asylum Oct. 1, 1888, 395 
patients; 195 males and 200 females. During the year 31 
males and 5 females were admitted, 4 males and 6 females 
were discharged, and 27 males and 11 females died ; leaving, 
at the end of the official year, 383 patients, — 195 males and 
188 females. 

Of the patients admitted, 4 women were received from 
Tewksbury Almshouse, 20 males were transferred from 
Northampton, 10 males and 1 female from the Worcester 
Lunatic Hospital, and 1 male was returned from boarding 
out. 

Of the patients discharged, 1 male and 4 females were 
taken home by friends, 1 male was removed to Austin Farm, 
1 to Beverly Almshouse, 1 male and 1 female were boarded 
out, and 1 female w^as discharged recovered. 

For obvious reasons, one would not expect to find among 
the inmates of this asylum many cases suitable for boarding 
out. Patients at once harmless, quiet, cleanly, and easily 
controlled in a private family, are seldom included in our 
transfers. At the request, however, of the Board of Lunacy 
and Charity, we have, from time to time, carefully gone 
over our list of patients, for the purpose of selecting any 
who might be thus cared for ; but our search has not been 
rewarded by any very encouraging results. In all, four 
patients have been boarded out from the asylum, three of 
whom were returned within a few weeks after their dis- 
charge. The fourth still remains in the family where she 
was first placed, and is apparently doing well. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 79 

One woman is reported recovered. This case was one of 
chronic mania, following intemperance. The patient, after 
having been the rounds of the jails, was committed to 
Dan vers in January, 1880, where she remained until August 
of the same year. She was then discharged, but was re- 
committed on the following day. In January, 1881, she 
was transferred to the Worcester Lunatic Hospital ; was 
quiet for a few weeks thereafter, but soon became violent, . 
destructive and exceedingly difBcult to manage. In Jan- 
uary, 1887, she came to the asylum. She was reported as 
very troublesome, but no longer violent save with her 
tongue. Here she was at first somewhat unreasonable in 
her demands, and disposed to be irritable when these de- 
mands were not complied with. She soon improved in this 
respect, however, and gave conclusive evidence that she was 
both determined and able to control herself. When she had 
been at the asylum something over a year, she was put on 
an open ward and allowed the liberty of the grounds, and 
finally given her parole, with the privilege of going outside 
to church and about the city at will. After having enjoyed 
these liberties for some months, without showing any dis- 
position to abuse them, it seemed proper that she should be 
discharged, and especially as she had for some time appeared 
perfectly rational and seemed very anxious to go to work, 
and try once more to support herself. She left the asylum 
February 16, after a continuous hospital residence of nine 
years ; and a boarding place was provided for her in the city, 
until such a time as she could find satisfactory employment. I 
saw her frequently for the next two months. After this she 
passed from under my observation, having procured work. 
It seemed, at the time of her discharge, that the case was 
one where a brain disordered by a long course of dissipation 
had after many years been restored to its normal, healthy 
condition, through enforced abstinence, regular habits and 
good diet ; and, notwithstanding the fact that the person in 
question is at the present writing an inmate of the Worcester 
County Jail, where she is, for the second time since her dis- 
charge from the asylum, serving out a sentence for drunken- 
ness, I think a recovery may justly be claimed in this case. 
Unfortunately, however, a recovery from insanity resulting 



80 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



from intemperance seldom includes a cure of the craving for 
intoxicants. Even after years of enforced abstinence, such 
persons usually return to their dissipated habits, and with 
renewed indulgence comes a recurrence of mental derano-e- 
ment. 

Such patients are well only so long as they are under 
restraint. They are more weak than vicious. They have a 
feebleness of will power, either inherited or acquired, which 
renders it impossible for them voluntarily to restrain their 
appetites ; and they are therefore in continual need of the 
protecting arm of society and of the State to shield them 
from the consequences of their own acts. 

Although the abuse of alcohol often produces brain changes 
which may result in permanent insanity, in cases like the 
above it is probable that there is simple derangement of this 
organ, rather than actual disease. In most instances this 
derangement is of short duration, and reason returns as soon 
as the alcohol is fully eliminated from the system. It is 
therefore impracticable to detain such persons for any suf- 
ficient length of time in a hospital for the insane. It is no 
less a fact, however, that many of these cases need restraint, 
some permanently, and others for a longer or shorter time ; 
and it is to the credit of the State of Massachusetts that she 
has now made special provisions for this class of her depend- 
ents in a separate institution. 

Ratio of Deaths from the Opening of the Asylum to Oct. i, 1889. 





o 
6 w 


Daily Aver- 
age No. of 
Patients. 


Deaths. 


t. on 

No. 

lents 


§ i ° 

53 Q 2 H. 


OFFICIxiL YEAE. 


o la 


rt 


■5 

1 


H 


Per cen 
AVhole 
of Pat 
treated 


1877-78, . 


429 


382.98 


18 


8 


26 


6.05 


6.78 


1878-79, 






422 


367.41. 


22 


11 


33 


7.82 


8.98 


1879-80, 






413 


363.15 


15 


8 


23 


5.56 


6.33 


1880-81, 






401 


362.09 


18 


6 


24 


5.98 


6.62 


1881-82, 






439 


375.59 


21 


11 


32 


7.28 


8.51 


1882-83, 






461 


384.33 


37 


24 


61 


13.23 


15.84 


1883-84, 






438 


390.69 


22 


20 


42 


9.58 


10.75 


1884-85, 






448 


891.12 


20 


14 


34 


7.58 


8.69 


1885-86, 






476 


400.28 


23 


16 


38 


7.98 


9.49 


1886-87, 






444 


393.52 


21 


17 


38 


8.55 


9.65 


1887-88, 






451 


393.95 


23 


14 


37 


8.20 


9.39 


1888-89, 






431 


385.56 


27 


11 


38 


8.81 


9.85 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. ' 81 

We have had no accident or unusual sickness during the 
year. Of the 38 deaths, i) were from phthisis, 8 from 
exhaustion of chronic mania, 4 from paralysis, 3 from dysen- 
tery, and 1 each from heart disease, embolism, pyeemia, and 
obstruction of the bowels. Six of these patients were be- 
tween seventy and eighty years of age at the time of their 
death. The average duration of insanity in these cases was 
twelve years and eight months. 

As far as the general history of the asylum is concerned, 
nothing has taken place during the year requiring special 
comment. Realizing that the purpose of the institution is 
something more than simply to furnish food and shelter to 
those intrusted to its care, we have endeavored, while 
administering to the bodily comforts of its inmates, to leave 
no method untried for improving their mental condition ; 
and, although the measure of our success can not be made 
apparent in any table of statistics, you who have visited 
these wards from week to week will, I think, bear me out" 
in the assertion that our efforts have not been unrewarded. 

In common with others, we have found that labor in some 
form is one of the most useful means for improving the 
mental condition of the insane. We try, therefore, to keep 
every one employed as fully as possible, for their own good, 
rather than for the good of the asylum, knowing that, how- 
ever valuable a patient's work may be to the institution, it 
is of tenfold more value to himself. Occupation is the great 
remedial agent ; and it is to be regretted that so many of the 
insane, led by their delusions, are unwilling to employ them- 
selves, and prefer a life of idleness. 

After work comes recreation, as the most useful means for 
diverting the mind from its morbid fancies. The circus, the 
New England fair, the Thanksgiving dinner, the Christmas 
tree, and the frequent lectures and entertainments given in 
our chapel during the winter months, have all found eager 
and interested patrons among our inmates. 

Our daily average number of patients has been a little less 
than last year. We have had very few female transfers ; 
and for this reason the overcrowded condition of our women's 
wards, noted in my last report, has been in a measure relieved. 
But we are still crowded, and this crowdinof must increase 



82 WOKCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

rather than dimmish during the coming year, as the same con- 
dition holds, in an equal or greater degree, in all the hospitals. 
Additional provisions for the insane should be made at 
once. The State of Massachusetts has always shown a will- 
ingness to provide for any and all of its wards, whenever 
it could be demonstrated that such provisions were actually 
needed ; and I hope, therefore, that this matter will be 
brought before the coming Legislature in its proper light. 

With the exception of this asylum and the insane de- 
partment of the Tewksbury Almshouse, all the provisions 
which have been made heretofore for the insane in Massachu- 
setts have been with reference to acute patients ; until we now 
have ample, and, in fact, more than ample, accommodations 
for this class for many years to come. The wards of our 
hospitals are crowded with chronic cases, and it is for these 
that additional and separate provisions should be made. 
There may be some diversity of opinion as to how and where 
this should be done, — whether in a separate institution, or 
as an adjunct to one or more of the existing hospitals ; but 
no one who has to do with our institutions for the insane will 
deny the necessity for immediate action in some direction. 
After having had some considerable experience in caring 
for the insane, both in a hospital for the acute and in an 
institution for chronic cases only, I am decided in the opin- 
ion that it is not for the interest of either class to add to our 
present establishments. They are already too large to be 
administered with the best results. If our hospitals are to 
remain in any sense curative, their numbers must be kept 
within such reasonable limits that the superintendent can 
have personal knowledge of his patients, and not be obliged 
to treat them at second hand. The only argument that I am 
aware of in favor of the plan of building for the chronic 
insane in connection with our present hospitals, is that of 
economy. But it is very doubtful whether this plan would 
prove an economical one in the end, either in regard to 
building or administration. An}^ material addition to either 
of the hospitals would necessitate a corresponding addition 
to each of the several administrative departments. To make 
these alterations in an already existing plant would, in the 
end, be quite as expensive as to build de novo, and the 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 83 

results far less satisfactory. Possibly in adopting this plan 
there might be a slight saving in salaries, if only three or 
four hundred patients were in question. Should the number 
be increased, however, to one thousand or twelve hundred, 
the outlay for salaries would undoubtedly be less in a sepa- 
rate establishment especially designed for the class in ques- 
tion, than it would be if the same number of patients were 
scattered about in four or five hospitals. 

An institution adapted to the wants of the chronic insane 
can be built for a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars 
per bed, while the cost of support of the patients in such an 
institution can be materially reduced without sacrificing any- 
thing necessary for their comfort and well-being. 

On account of a diminished income, our repairs have gone 
on but slowly. During the year, however, we have reslated 
the centre and Johonnot wards on the male side of the 
house, renewed the last remaining tier of bath-rooms and 
closets, and thrown out three bay windows, — one from the 
centre, one from the west Johonnot wards, and one from the 
south-west corner of the portico (this last being carried up 
to a tower) ; thus virtually completing the alterations upon 
the outside of the male wings. We are now in a position to go 
on and finish the repairs, begun last year, on the inside of these 
wards ; and this we hope to do during the coming winter. 

Heretofore the asylum has had no suitable place for 
carrying on pathological and microscopical investigations. 
By dividing the general office, however, which was unneces- 
sarily large, we have secured a room very convenient for 
this purpose. 

Our daily average number of patients has been 385.56, 
and the per capita cost of support $3.12 per week. 

No one can realize, more fully than does the superin- 
tendent, that the success of this institution is due in a large 
measure to the character and zeal of its subordinate officers 
and employees ; the majority of whom, it is a pleasure to be 
able to say, have labored conscientiously for the interest of 
the asylum, and have performed their duties (often exacting 
and disagreeable) kindly, patiently and faithfully. 

H. M. QUINBY, 

Superintendent. 



TABLES FOE UNIFOEM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 
FOR THE INSANE. 



[Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, April 3, 1880.] 



By the act of the Legislature establishing an asylum for 
the chronic insane, it was provided, "That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the asylum, therefore, have been 
former inmates of one or more hospitals in the State ; and 
whenever in these tables they appear as " first admissions," 
they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this 
asylum. 



86 



WOECESTEE INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



1. General Statistics of the Year 



• 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1888, . 
Admissions within the year. 


195 
31 


200 
5 


395 

36 


Whole nmiibei' of cases within the year, 
Discharges within the year, .... 
Viz. : as recovered, 

much improved, .... 

improved, 

unimproved, 

Deaths, 


226 

2 

2 

27 


205 

1 

5 

11 


431 

1 

7 

2 

38 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1889, 
Viz. : supported as State patients, 
town patients, 
private patients, . 
Number of different pei'sons within the year, 
admitted, ..... 

recovered, 

Daily average number of patients. 


195 

64 

131 

226 
31 

190.98 


188 

30 

158 

205 

5 

1 

194.58 


383 

94 

289 

431 

36 

1 

385.56 



2. Monthly Admissions, Discharges and Averages. 



MONTHS. 


Admissions. 


Discharges 
(including Deaths). 


Daily Aveeagb of 
Patients in the House. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


1888. 




















October, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


4 


192.71 


198.35 


391.06 


November, . 


— 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


2 


191.66 


197.27 


388.83 


December, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


189.74 


197.00 


386.74 


1889. 




















January, 


_ 


4 


4 


3 


2 


5 


187.64 


197.68 


385.32 


February, . 
March, 


- 


- 


- 


1 
2 


1 
4 


2 
6 


185.50 
183.19 


197.68 
196.32 


383.18 
379.51 


April, . 


1 


_ 


1- 


5 


1 


6 


180.56 


192.17 


372.73 


May, . 


20 


1 


21 


- 


- 


- 


189.97 


192.13 


382.10 


June, . 


— 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


198.43 


193.00 


391.43 


July, . 


_ 


_ 


— 


4 


_ 


4 


197.03 


192.00 


389.03 


August, 


10 


_ 


10 


4 


1 


5 


197.45 


191.39 


388.84 


September, . 


- 


- 


- 


6 


5 


11 


198.03 


189.97 


388.00 


Total of cases, . 


31 


5 


36 


31 


17 


48 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Total of persons, 


31 


5 


36 


31 


17 


48 


— 


— 


~ 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUxMENT — No. 23. 



87 



3. Received on First and Stibsequent Admissions, 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Cases Admitted. 


Times Previooslt 
Kecoveked. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 

Second, 

Etc., 


31 


5 


36 


- 


- 


- 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


31 
31 


5 
5 


36 
36 


- 


- 


- 



4. Ages of Persons admitted for the First Time. 



AGES. 




At First Attack of 
Insanity. 


When Admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less. 

From 15 to 20 years, . 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 60 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Over 80 years. 

Unknown, 




3 

2 
1 

2 
2 
3 
4 

1 

13 


1 

1 
1 

2 


3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
5 
1 

15 


1 

2 

4 
5 
7 
7 
2 
3 


1 

2 

1 

1 


2 

2 
4 
5 
9 
8 
2 
4 


Totals, . 


31 


5 


36 


31 


5 


36 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



5. Parentage of Persons admitted. 











Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 


Father. 


t 

Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Vermont, 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Massachusetts, 








7 


7 


- 


- 


7 


7 


New Hamj)shire, 










- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


New York, . 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


North Carolina, 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


England, 








4 


4 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Ireland, 








10 


10 


4 


4 


14 


14 


Canada, 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Austria, 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Germany, 








2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Scotland, 








1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Unknown, 








2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals, . 


31 


31 


5 


5 


86 


36 



6. Residence of Persons admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. Totals. 


Massachusetts, viz. : — 

Bristol Count}", ..... 

Suffolk County, 

Middlesex County, .... 
Hampshire County, .... 
Norfolk County, .... 
Berkshire County, .... 
Hampden County, . . .' . 
AVorcester County, .... 
Unknown, 


1 

9 
3 
1 

1 

1 
5 
4 
6 


3 
1 

1 


1 

12 
4 
1 
1 
1 
5 
5 
6 


Totals 

Cities or large towns, . . . . . 


31 
31 


,5 36 
6 36 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



89 



7. Civil Condition of Persons admitted. 




8. Occupations of Persons admitted. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Laborers, 












8 


- 


8 


Domestics, 












- 


2 


2 


Cook, . 












- 


1 


1 


Surgeon, 












1 


- 


1 


Marble worker, 












1 


- 


1 


Clerks, . 












2 


- 


2 


Waiters, 












2 


- 


2 


Farmer, 












1 




1 


Teacher, 












1 




1 


Sailor, . 












1 


- 


1 


Operatives, . 












2 


- 


2 


Carpenters, . 












2 


- 


2 


No occvipation, 












2 


1 


3 


Unknown, 












8 


1 


9 


Totals, . 


31 


5 


36 



90 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



9. Form of Disease in the Cases admitted. 



FORM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, chronic, 

Epilepsy, ....... 

Dementia, chronic, ..... 

Idiocy, 


17 
3 
9 

2 


3 

2 


20 
3 

11 
2 


Total of eases, 

Total of persons, 


31 
31 


5 

5 


36 
36 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 





First Admission to 


All Other 






PREVIOUS DURATION. 


This Asyldm. 


Admissions. 








Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, . 


2 


- 


2 


1 - 


- 


- 


2 


~ 


2 


Under 1 month, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


From 1 to 3 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 to 6 months, . 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


-_ 


- 


6 to 12 months, . 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 to 2 years, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 to 5 yeai-s. 


1 


1 


2 


! _ 


- 


- 


1 


, 1 


2 


5 to 10 years. 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


10 to 20 years, . 


12 


1 


13 


- 


- 


- 


12 


1 


13 


Over 20 years, 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Unknown, 


13 


2 


15 


- 


- 


- 


13 


2 


15 


Total of eases. 


31 


5 


36 


- 


- 


- 


31 





36 


Total of persons, . 


31 


5 


36 


- 


- 


- 


31 


5 


36 


Av^ge of known cases, . 


16.69 


8 05 


12.37 


- 


- 


« 


16.69 


8.05 


12.37 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Sunstroke, 






1 


- 


1 


Intemperance, 






1 


- 


1 


Epilepsy, 






2 


- 


2 


Congenital, . 






2 


- 


2 


Heredity, 






3 


- 


3 


Over-study, . 






2 


- 


2 


Senility, 






- 


1 


1 


Sickness, 






1 


1 


2 


Unknown, 






19 


3 


22 


Totals, . 


81 


5 


36 



12. Relations to Hospitals of Persons admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First admission to any hospital for the insane, 


- 


- 


- 


Former inmates of the asylum, 


1 


- 


1 


of Tewksbury Almshouse, 


2 


4 


6 


of Worcester Lunatic Hospital, 


15 


4 


19 


of Ipswich Receptacle, .... 


1 




1 


of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


4 


1 


5 


of Northampton Lunatic Hospital, 


21 


- 


21 


of McLean Asylum, .... 


2 


- 


2 


Total of cases, . , 


46 


9 


55 


Total of persons, 


31 


5 


36 



92 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 









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1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



93 



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94 



WOECESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



16. Cases discharged by Recovery or Death. 





Kecoveries. 


Deaths. 


FORM OF INSANITY. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, acute, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


chronic, . 


- 


1 


1 


16 


9 


25 


Epilepsy, .... 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


Dementia, clironic. 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


7 


Senility, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Paresis, 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Total of eases, 


- 


1 


1 


27 


11 


88 


Total of persons, . 


- 


1 


1 


27 


11 


38 



17. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Phthisis, 














7 


2 


9 


Epilepsy, 














3 


1 


4 


Heart disease, 














1 


- 


1 


Exhaustion, . 














6 


2 


8 


Paresis, . 














3 


- 


3 


Embolism, 














- 


1 


1 


Pyjemia, 














1 


- 


1 


Paralysis, 














1 


3 


4 


Bright's disease, 














2 


1 


3 


Dysentery, 














3 


- 


3 


Obstruction of bowels, 












- 


1 


1 


Totals, . 




27 


11 


38 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



95 



18. Ages of Those who died. 









At Time of First 
Attack. 


At Time of Death. 


AGES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 yeai"s, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years. 

Over 80 years. 

Unknown, 






3 
4 
1 
5 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 

5 


1 

3 

1 
2 
1 

1 

2 


4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
3 
2 

1 

7 


7 
7 
7 
1 
2 
3 


1 
1 

3 

2 

1 

3 


1 
1 

7 

10 
9 
1 
3 
6 


Totals, . 


27 


11 


38 


27 


11 


38 



96 



WOEGESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 






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1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



97 



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