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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum at Worcester"

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in 2010 with funding from 

University of Massachusetts Amherst 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 23. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TKTJSTEES 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM 



WORCESTER, 



Yeak Exding September 30 ? 1890. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1891. 



1 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 



FRANCES M. LINCOLN, 
A. GEORGE BULLOCK, 
THOMAS H. GAGE, 
HENRY S. NOURSE, . 
ROCKWOOD HOAR, . 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL, 
ELLEN S. HALE, 



Worcester 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Lancaster. 

Worcester. 

Boston. 

Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D , Superintendent. 

ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D., .... Assistant Physician. 
CLARENCE R. MACOMBER, .... Clerk and Steward. 
SOPHIA N. GRAVES, Matron. 

WILLIAM SHERMAN, Engineer. 



TREASURER. 

ALBERT WOOD, . Y'orcester. 



(fommcmfoealtl] of IJjJassacJjitsrtte* 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, in charge 
of the Worcester Insane Asylum, respectfully submit their 
thirteenth annual report, together with the reports of the 
superintendent and treasurer. 

The event of greatest importance this year was the burn- 
ing of several wards on the female side of the asylum, on 
the evening of the 18th of January. It was occasioned by 
an accident, and was discovered early in the evening. Steps 
were at once taken to remove the patients from the burning 
wards, and, owing to the remarkable calmness and presence 
of mind of the staff and attendants, this was done without 
an accident ; the patients were not disturbed or frightened, 
and were quiet and orderly in their new and crowded 
quarters. The fire was extinguished after seriously burn- 
ing the roof of the Johonnot wards. 

A meeting was called the next morning of those trustees 

© © 

who could be reached. The work of tearing down the 
burned roof had already begun ; telegrams were at once 
sent to the State Board of Lunacy, asking for the removal 
of half the female patients ; arrangements for repairing the 
building were made, and a card of thanks for assistance 
rendered by the fire department and friends and neighbors, 
written and sent to the daily papers. 

At a special meeting, held on the 31st of January, it was 
voted to ask the Legislature for an appropriation of $10,000 
for repairing the building, and $2,000 for high-service water- 
supply. The whole of the appropriation for building and 



74 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

repairs has been spent, and $1,076.16 of the appropriation 
for high-service water supply, leaving an unexpended bal- 
ance of $923.94, all of which will be spent before the work 
is finished. 

The building is now nearly completed, and will be ready 
for patients by the first of November. The work has been 
well done, and the Johonnot wards are now light and cheer- 
ful. The patients must be greatly benefited by the change. 
Additional hydrants have been placed about the building, 
and every precaution taken to guard against a like accident 
in the future. For full particulars of the repairs, we refer 
you to the report of the superintendent. 

The average attendance during the year has been 330, — 
smaller than usual, owing to the removal of 92 women after 
the fire. 

There has been no change in the staff during the year. 
The affairs of the asylum have been admirably managed. 
The Board desires to return thanks to the superintendent, 
the staff, and all employees, for their conduct on the night of 
the fire. It is through their presence of mind and coolness 
that we were saved from what mio;ht have been a oreat 
calamity. Nothing in the history of the asylum so surely 
indicates its perfect discipline and good management as 
that night's work. The Board also desires to thank the Fire 
Department of the City of Worcester and the public for 
assistance rendered at that time. A small sum of money 
was voted to the Relief Association of the Fire Department. 
We could not be as generous with the money of the State 
as we individually desired, and sent it simply to acknowl- 
edge in a slight way our indebtedness to that department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 
A. GEORGE BULLOCK. 
THOS. H. GAGE. 
HENRY S. NOURSE. 
ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
FRANCIS C. LOWELL. 
ELLEN S. HALE. 



1890.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



75 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 



Hosea M. Quinby, M.D., Superintendent, 
Ernest V. Scribner, M.D., Assistant Physician, 
Clarence E,. Macomber, Clerk and Steward, 
Sophia N. Graves, Matron, .... 
William Sherman, Engineer, 
Albert Wood, Treasurer, .... 



$2,500 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 oo 

325 00* 

1,000 00 

400 00 



YALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES, 

Oct. 1, 1890. 



Live stock, . 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates 1 department, 

Other furniture in inmates 1 department, . 

Personal property of State in superintendent 1 

Ready-made clothing, 

Dry goods, 

Provisions and groceries, 

Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel, .... 

Library, 

Other supplies, . 



. 


$425 00 


. 


650 00 




9,000 00 




9,500 00 




3,000 00 


s department, 


9,500 00 




1,400 00 




1,600 00 




2,300 00 




350 00 




2,940 00 




500 00 




2,500 00 




$13,665 00 



76 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my thirteenth annual 
report on the finances of the Worcester Insane Asylum for 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1889 : — 
Cash belonging to asylum, . . 
Deposits of inmates, ..... 

Amounts received : — 
From the Commonwealth, for support of pa- 
tients, 

cities and towns, for support of pa- 
tients, 

Commonwealth, special appropriation, 
other sources, ..... 
inmates (on deposits), 



,823 80 
796 33 



>,819 97 



42,356 


71 


11,076 


L6 


728 


47 


124 


49 



,620 13 



70,105 83 



),725 96 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows : — 



Salaries and wages, 

Provisions and supplies : — 
Meats of all kinds, 
Fish of all kinds, . 
Fruit and vegetables, 
Flour, . 
Meal for table, 
Tea and coffee, 
Sugar and molasses, 
Milk, butter and cheese, 
Salt and other groceries, 
All other provisions, 

Clothing and material, . 
Fuel, .... 
Lights, .... 

Amounts carried forward, 



. $3,849 


52 


. 613 


41 


. 1,648 


67 


. 3,293 


70 


74 


65 


. 458 


06 


. 1,232 


19 


. 4,828 


23 


. 804 93 


. 1,650 


86 


. $3,250 


26 


. 4,155 


09 


. 1,208 


00 



620,048 30 



5,454 22 



5,613 35 



5,502 52 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



77 



Amounts brought forward, 
Medicine and medical supplies, 
Furniture and furnishings, 
Crockery, 

Beds and bedding, . 
Transportation, 
Travelling, 
Trustees 1 expenses, 
Soap and water, 
Stationery, 
Repairs (ordinary), 
All other current expenses, 



Total current expenses, . 
Repairs and improvements (extraordinary) 

Undertaking, 

Refunded inmates (on deposits), . 

Total amount expended, 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1890, 



Resources. 

Cash on hand, ....... 

Due from the Commonwealth, for support, . 

Commonwealth, balance of appropriation, 
cities and towns, ..... 
other sources, 



8,613 35 


|38,502 52 


341 48 




929 20 




437 05 




918 94 




115 34 




60 00 




31 39 




391 21 




116 55 




3,000 00 




1,281 13 


16,235 64 





. $54,738 16 


21,337 


25 


270 


00 


20 


69 


. $76,366 10 


3,359 


86 



Liabilities. 

Due for supplies and expenses, .... $7,132 29 

Due for salaries and wages, 1,681 50 

Due inmates (cash on deposit), .... 900 13 



$79,725 96 



$3,359 86 

3,550 07 

923 84 

10,887 81 

785 00 

$19,506 58 



9,663 92 



Total surplus, |9,843 66 

Respectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, 



Treasurer. 



"Worcestee, Mass., Oct. 1, 1890. 



"Worcester, Mass., Oct. 27, 1890. 
The undersigned has this day carefully compared the treasurer's statement of 
expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1890, with the vouchers which are on file 
at the asylum, also the statement of cash received with the ledger accounts, and 
found them to be correct. 

GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



78 WOKCESTEK INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Asylum. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I beg to lay before you the 
following report of the condition of the asylum for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1890. 

There were remaining in the asylum Oct. 1, 1889, 383 
patients, — 195 males and 188 females. During the year 
32 males and 13 females have been admitted, 4 males and 
94 females have been discharged, and 27 males and 4 females 
have died ; leaving, at the end of the official year, 299 
patients, — 196 males and 103 females. 

Of the 45 patients received, all were from the Worcester 
Lunatic Hospital. Of the 98 patients discharged, 2 males 
were removed to the poor-house, 3 females were taken home 
by friends, 1 male was transferred to Dan vers, 1 male and 
60 females were transferred to the Boston Lunatic Hospital, 
and 31 females were sent to Westborough. One patient — 
a case of recurrent mania — is reported recovered, 3 as 
improved, and 94 as unimproved. 

On the evening of January 18, at about eight o'clock, fire 
was discovered in the "Lower North Johonnot," — our 
extreme female ward. It started from a scrap of lighted 
paper thrown down the water-closet by one of the attend- 
ants. The closet in question was of a similar pattern to those 
in use for many years throughout the house, although the 
only one of its kind left in the building at the time of the 
fire. It was very faulty, and, as it proved, dangerous, in 
construction, having a ventilating arm leading from just 
above the trap, into a wooden ventilating shaft, which ran 
direct to the attic. The lighted paper, instead of falling 
into the trap and being extinguished, as was intended, was 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7!) 

drawn into this ventilating shaft, where it came in contact 
with more or less combustible matter in the shape of dust 
and lint, to which it set fire. Fanned by the draft thus 
created, the fire gradually crept up the sides of the shaft 
into the attic, where it found abundant material for a con- 
flagration in the wooden framework of the roof. 

It was first discovered by the attendants on the lower hall, 
their attention being attracted by the unusual roaring in the 
ventilating shaft. On first going to the closet, however, 
nothing was to be seen, as the fire did not get under sufficient 
headway to burn through the sides of the shaft until it 
reached the upper story. Seeing nothing, they concluded 
that the noise came from the street outside, and for a time 
their fears were allayed ; but, as the noise not only continued 
but increased, they were led to make a more careful investi- 
gation, and then discovered the true state of affairs. There 
were three attendants upon the hall, and, while two of them 
went to give the alarm, the third, with great presence of 
mind, filled the bath-tubs and got ready to remove her 
patients. 

The fire had no doubt been burning half an hour or more 
when discovered, for, although both my assistant and myself 
were promptly on the scene (stopping only to get out our 
extinguishers and to direct an alarm to be rung in from the 
box at the foot of the avenue), the heat had already burst 
open the attic door, and the stairway leading thereto was a 
solid mass of flame when we reached the ward. It was at 
once apparent that the fire was beyond our control, and that 
it would only be a waste of valuable time to try to cope with 
it with the appliances at hand. Our whole attention, there- 
fore, was turned toward removing the patients to a place 
of safety, leaving the care of the building to the fire depart- 
ment, when it should arrive. 

There were something over a hundred patients upon the 
three Johonnot wards, most of whom had retired for the 
night, and were locked in their rooms. Many of these 
patients were violent, many were feeble, some were bed- 
ridden, and some were, of necessity, tied to their beds. 
There was very little excitement among them, and no one 
caused us any serious trouble, through violence or otherwise, 



80 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

while being removed. To be rudely awakened from sleep, 
taken from bed, wrapped in a blanket, stood upon one's feet 
and passed along from hand to hand to an adjoining ward, 
hardly knowing why or wherefore, was enough to upset the 
strongest nerves ; and I am sure that our patients behaved 
quite as well through this trying ordeal as an equal number 
of sane people would have done under like circumstances. 

The attendants, almost without exception, went about the 
work assigned them with a coolness that was as commend- 
able as it was worthy of remark, showing conclusively that 
they could act promptly in an emergency, and that they 
were lacking neither in courage, good judgment nor disci- 
pline. Many former employees of the institution, living in 
the city, came to the asylum on hearing of the fire, and, as 
they were familiar with the building and used to the care 
of the insane, they were able to render us very material 
aid. 

At first all of the female patients were taken to the centre 
wards, there being no immediate danger of the fire spread- 
ing to this part of the house. In fact, knowing that a 
fire-wall separated the Johonnot attic from the wing, and 
that a second wall divided the wing from the centre wards, I 
was confident that the department would be able to confine 
the fire to the attic where it originated, or at least would 
stop it before it reached the centres. To be entirely safe, 
however, and to allay the fears of some of the patients, all 
were transferred to the male side of the house as soon as 
sufficient wards could be vacated. 

There was some considerable delay in the arrival of the 
fire department, as the fire alarm did not act properly, strik- 
ing a mixed alarm, and sending most of the companies to 
the opposite side of the city. This delay gave the fire a 
chance to gain increased headway, but it also allowed us to 
get most of our patients out of the wards before the firemen 
came, leaving to the department a clear field when it finally 
arrived. 

The distance of our buildings from the street in front, 
their height above the street, our guarded windows, and the 
lack of water pressure, added greatly to the difficulties of 
the department. On their arrival the fire had already 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 81 

broken through the Johonnot roof in several places, and it 
hardly seemed possible to prevent its sweeping over the 
entire building. The firemen, however, fought the fire with 
their usual bravery and success, notwithstanding the great 
odds against them, and in a very short time had it under 
control, but not until it had destroyed the greater part of 
the Johonnot roof, and had crept over the fire-wall along the 
jet into the wing attic, where it did considerable damage. 

The fire patrol was promptly on hand, and soon had every- 
thing in the shape of furniture and bedding securely covered, 
so that our loss in this direction was little or nothing. But 
this was not their only service. It was through their care 
alone that we were able to find dry beds for our people after 
the fire, and to clothe them properly the following day ; for 
there was no time to remove any of the bedding aud but 
little of the clothing from the burning wards. 

The fire attracted a crowd of spectators, who thronged 
our grounds and wards. They were held well in check, 
however, by the police, and gave us no serious trouble ; 
most of them, in fact, being led evidently by higher motives 
than those of mere curiosity, for they were quite ready to 
lend a helping hand whenever the opportunity offered, and 
in many cases made themselves very useful. To all such, 
and to the many friends who both during and after the fire 
came to offer assistance and to congratulate us on our 
fortunate escape from what might have been a very serious 
calamity, I wish thus publicly to return my most heartfelt 
thanks. 

The fire was extinguished and the house cleared of 
strangers by midnight, and in a short time thereafter all 
of our patients were safely and comfortably in bed, and we 
were able to assure ourselves that, notwithstanding our 
forced removal and the haste and excitement incident 
thereto, no one was injured or missing. 

The fire occurred Saturday night, aud, the next day being 
Sunday, it was impossible to get together the full Board of 
Trustees ; but the local members of the Board met at the 
as}dum, and, after visiting the patients, looking over the 
building and carefully considering the situation, voted to 
ask the Board of Lunacy and Charity to remove 90 women 



82 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

from the asylum to other institutions. In compliance with 
this request, Mr. S. C. Wrightington, the Superintendent 
of Indoor Poor, came to Worcester the following Monday 
morning, and arranged for and personally superintended the 
transfer. 

The actual damage occasioned by the fire was not great. 
It could without doubt have been made good with an outlay 
of from three to four thousand dollars ; but, as the Johonnot 
wards were otherwise greatly out of repair, and as it was the 
intention of the trustees, in any event, to begin tearing out 
one of these wards in the early spring, with a view to finally 
remodelling the whole, after a plan similar to that already 
carried out on the male side of the house, it was deemed 
best to take this opportunity and complete all the desired 
alterations at once. 

This work has been carried on as rapidly as possible, and 
is now nearly finished. The inside of the Johonnot wards 
has been torn out, but little of the original structure being 
eft except the brick walls. In rebuilding, four bay win- 
dows have been added to these wards, the ventilating ducts 
have been increased in size and number, the heat flues 
rearranged, the windows enlarged, and all wooden chutes, 
ventilators and partitions done away with. Upon the lower 
ward, which was especially dark and gloomy, radical 
changes have been made for the purpose of introducing 
light and air ; the blank wall at the south end of the 
west hall having been taken down and the ward carried 
under the portico, and windows placed in the front and rear. 
This has necessitated the digging of a cellar under the 
addition to the ward, lowering the air chamber, removing 
part of the retaining wall in the north side of the wing, and 
taking out all of the foundations in this part of the building 
and relaying them deeper. The results gained by these 
alterations have been very gratifying, and certainly warrant 
the outlay. The wooden corridor connecting the Johonnot 
wards with the wings and centres has been removed and a 
brick tower built in its place, serving the double purpose of 
a fire-wall separating these wards and a bay window. The 
front of the portico has been taken down and rebuilt in 
brick, large mullioned windows, being inserted in place of 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



83 



the old iron grating, which extended from floor to ceiling, 
and gave a prison-like appearance to this part of the house. 

A fire-alarm box has been placed at our main entrance, and 
the high-service brought into our grounds and attached to 
two hydrants in the rear of the house. It is the intention 
to extend this service, as soon as possible, around the entire 
building. 

There is still much to be done, and especially upon the 
centre wards, before the repairs are completed ; but the 
most essential, as well as the most difficult and expensive, 
part of the work is now finished, and what remains can be 
done readily with our own help and from our own resources. 
It is not necessary that all of the remaining work should be 
undertaken at once. In fact, it would be better to do a 
little each year, and thus furnish employment for a number 
of patients for some time to come. 



Ratio of Deaths from the Opening of the Asylum to Oct. I, 1890. 













u 

a . 
8 -2 

S5 £ 
at 

O ,_ 
•5 ° 


£ ° 

► ° ™ 

a s 

A 


Deaths. 


Per Cent, on 

Whole Num- 
ber of Patients 
Treated. 


. on 
iver- 
lber 

s. 


OFFICIAL YEAR. 


s 

§ 


1 


'3 


Per Cent 
Daily / 
ajre N im 
of Patien 


1877-78, .... 


429 


382.98 


18 


8 


26 


6.05 


6.78 


1878-79, 










422 


367.41 


22 


11 


33 


7.82 


8.98 


1879-80, . 










413 


363.15 


15 


8 


23 


5.56 


6.33 


1880-81, . 










401 


363.09 


18 


6 


24 


5.98 


6.62 


1881-82, . 










439 


375.59 


21 


11 


32 


7.28 


8.51 


1882-83, . 










461 


384.33 


37 


24 


61 


13.23 


15.84 


1883-84, 










438 


390.69 


22 


20 


42 


9.58 


10.75 


1884-85, 










448 


391.12 


20 


14 


34 


7.58 


8.69 


1885-86, 










476 


400.28 


23 


15 


38 


7.98 


• 9.49 


1886-87, 










444 


393.52 


21 


17 


38 


8.55 


9.65 


1887-88, 










451 


393.95 


23 


14 


37 


8.20 


9.39 


1888-89, 










431 


385.56 


27 


11 


38 


8.81 


9.85 


1889-90, 










428 


330.23 


27 


4 


31 


7.24 


9.38 



During the year there have been 31 deaths : 7 from 
phthisis, 8 from exhaustion of chronic mania, 6 from general 
paralysis, 2 each from apoplexy, paralysis and dysentery, 
and 1 each from epilepsy, heart disease and senility. It is 
interesting to note that but 1 female patient has died during 
the past nine months. 



84 WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 

Our per capita cost for the support of patients has been 
$3 ,19 per week, — a slight increase over last year, due no 
doubt to the decrease in our number since the fire. 

Nothing gives me more pleasure than to be able to com- 
mend the work of the various officers and employees of the 
institution, and to bear public testimony to the faithful and 
untiring service which they have rendered the asylum during 
the past year. 

H. M. QUINBY, 

Superintendent. 
Worcester, Mass., Oct. 1, 1890. 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 85 



TABLES FOE UNIFORM STATISTICS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS 
FOR THE INSANE. 



[Approved by the Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, April 3, 1880.] 



By the act of the Legislature establishing an asylum for 
the chronic insane, it was provided, " That the inmates 
thereof shall consist only of such chronic insane as may be 
transferred thereto by the Board of State Charities in the 
manner provided in section four, chapter two hundred and 
forty, of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and sixty- 
three." (Statutes, 1877, chap. 227.) 

All the patients of the asylum, therefore, have been 
former inmates of one or more hospitals in the State : and 
whenever in these tables they appear as " first admissions," 
they are only to be regarded as first admissions to this 
asylum. 



86 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



1. General Statistics of the Year 



Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1889, . 
Admissions within the year, 

"Whole number of cases within the year, 
Discharges within the year, 
Viz. : as recovered, 

much improved, 

impi'oved, 

unimproved, . 
Deaths, .... 

Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1890, 
Viz. : supported as State patients, 
town patients, 
private patients, . 
Number of different persons within the year 
admitted, .... 

recovered, .... 
Daily average number of patients, 



195 
32 



227 



1 
3 

27 



196 

63 

133 

227 

32 

198.67 



188 
13 



201 



2 
91 

4 



103 
19 
84 

201 

13 

1 

131.56 



383 
45 



428 
1 

3 

94 
31 



299 

82 

217 

428 

45 

1 

330.23 



Monthly Admissions, Discharges and Averages. 







Discharges 


Daily Average of 






















(including Deaths). 


Patien 


rS IN THE 


House. 


MONTHS. 


















Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


1889. 




















October, 


_ 


_ 


- 


2 


1 


3 


193 68 


187.06 


380.74 


November, . 


12 


13 


25 


5 


1 


6 


204.77 


197.33 


402.10 


December, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


198.74 


199. 


397.74 


1890. 




















January, 


- 


- 


- 


5 


93 


98 


195.94 


166 80 


362.74 


February, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


193. 


104.18 


297.18 


March, 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


192.45 


104. 


296.45 


April, . 




20 


_ 


20 


5 


- 


5 


202.17 


104. 


306.17 


May, . 




_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


- 


3 


205.94 


104. 


309.94 


June, . 




_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


1 


3 


202.73 


103.40 


306.13 


July, . 




_ 


_ 


— 


4 


_ 


4 


20032 


103. 


303.32 


August, 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


197.52 


103. 


300.52 


September, 




32 


13 


45 


1 


1 


2 


196 77 


103. 


299.77 


Total of cases, . 


31 


98 


129 


_ 


- 


- 


Total of persons, 


32 


13 


45 


31 


98 


129 


— 


" 


" 



1890 ] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



3. Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Cases Admitted. 


Times Previously 
Recovered. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, . ... 
Second, ..... 
Etc., 


31 
1 


12 
1 


43 

2 




- 


- 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


32 
32 


13 
13 


45 
45 


- 




- 



4. Ages of Persons admitted for the First Time. 



AGES. 




At First Attack of 

iNSANITr. 


When Admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less, 




4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


From 15 to 20 years, 




2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


20 to 25 years, 




7 


3 


10 


2 


- 


2 


25 to 30 years, 




4 


1 


5 


4 


- 


4 


30 to 35 years, 




1 


2 


3 


6 


2 


8 


35 to 40 years, 




2 


1 


3 


7 


3 


10 


40 to 50 years, 




3 


2 


5 


7 


3 


10 


50 to 60 years, 




2 


2 


4 


1 


4 


5 


60 to 70 years, 




1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


70 to 80 years, 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Over 80 years, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown, 




5 


1 


6 


1 


- 


1 


Totals, . 


31 


12 


43 


31 


12 


43 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



5. Parentage of Persons admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, 


12 


12 


2 


2 


14 


14 


Cape Breton, 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Ireland, .... 


18 


18 


10 


10 


28 


28 


Canada, .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Totals, .... 


32 


32 


13 


13 


45 


45 



6. Residence of Persons admitted. 



PL VCE 1 *. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Massachusetts, viz. : — 








Essex County, 


1 


- 


1 


Suffolk County 


12 


3 


15 


Middlesex County, .... 


10 


1 


11 


^Norfolk County, .... 


2 


1 


3 


Hampden County, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Worcester County, .... 


6 


6 


12 


Unknown, 


- 


2 


2 


Totals, 


32 


13 


45 


Cities or large towns, . . . 


32 


13 


45 











1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No 23. 



89 



7. Civil Condition of Persons admitted. 



NUMBER OF 


Unmarried. 


Married. 


WlDOWE 


D. 


Unknown. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


First, 


20 


2 


22 


9 


10 


19 


- 


- 




2 


- 


2 


Second, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


2 





- 


Totals, . 


20 


2 


22 


10 


10 


20 


- 


1 


1 


2 



8. 


Occvpat 


ions 


of Persons admitted. 




OCCUPATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Laborers, 


5 


- 


5 


Housewifes, . 












- 


7 


7 


Tailoress, 














- 


1 


1 


Mill operative, 














- 


1 


1 


Housekeeper, 














- 


1 


1 


Teamster, 
















- 


1 


Collector, 
















- 


1 


Lather, . 
















- 


1 


Clerks, . 


















2 


Press-feeder, . 


















1 


Butcher, 
















- 


1 


Farmer, 
















- 


1 


Railroad conductor 


*, 














- 


1 


Liquor dealer, 
















- 


1 


Shoemakers, . 














4 


- 


4 


Machinist, 
















- 


1 


Currier, . 
















- 


1 


Fisherman, . 
















- 


1 


Herdic driver, 
















- 


1 


Shoe dealer, . 
















- 


1 


No occupation, 














5 


2 


7 


Unknown, 














3 


1 


4 


Totals, . 


32 


13 


45 



90 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



9. Form of Disease in the Gases admitted. 



FORM OF DISEASE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, chronic, . . 

Epilepsy, ....... 

Dementia, chronic, ..... 


11 
1 

14 

2 
4 


7 
6 


18 
1 

20 
2 
4 


Total of cases, ..... 
Total of persons, 


32 
82 


13 

13 


45 
45 



10. Reported Duration of Insanity before Last Admission. 





First Admission to 


Ail Other 




Totals 




PREVIOUS DURATION. 


THIS ASTLUM. 


Admissions. 








Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenita], . 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Under 1 month, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


From 1 to 3 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 to 6 months, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 to 12 months, . 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 to 2 years, 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 to 5 years, 


5 


3 


8 


- 


- 


- 


5 


3 


8 


5 to 10 years, 


8 


8 


11 


- 


- 


- 


8 


3 


11 


10 to 20 years, 


7 


8 


10 


- 


- 


- 


7 


3 


10 


Over 20 years, 


2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


Unknown, 


7 
31 


1 

12 


8 
43 


1 
1 


1 

1 


2 
2 


8 


2 


10 


Total of cases, . 


32 


13 


45 


Total of persons, 


31 


12 


43 


1 


1 


2 


32 


13 


45 


Av^ge of known cases, . 


9.75 


6.30 


8.02 




- 


- 


9.75 


6.30 


8.02 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



11. Probable Causes of Insanity in Persons admitted. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Sunstroke, 


2 


- 


2 


Climacteric, . 












- 


2 


2 


Intemperance, 












3 


1 


4 


Injury to head, 












3 


- 


3 


Epilepsy, 












1 


- 


1 


Menstrual, 












- 


1 


1 


Congenital, . 












1 


- 


1 


Heredity, 












2 


1 


3 


Overwork, 












1 


- 


1 


Fall from herdic, 












1 


- 


1 


Puerperal, 












- 


3 


3 


Sickness, 












8 


- 


3 


Unknown, 












15 


5 


20 


Totals, . 


32 


13 


45 



12. Relations in Hospitals of Persons admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First admission to any hospital for the insane, 


- 


- 


- 


Former inmates of the asylum, .... 


1 


1 


2 


of Tewksbury Almshouse, . 


2 


1 


3 


of Worcester Lunatic Hospital, . 


32 


13 


45 


of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 


6 


3 


9 


of Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


2 


- 


2 


of Mt. Pleasant (Iowa) Hospital, . 


1 


- 


1 


of Eastern Lunatic Hospital (Va), 


1 


- 


1 


of Stockton (Cal.) Hospital, 


1 


- 


1 




46 


18 


64 




32 


13 


45 



92 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. 



[Oct. 



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181)0.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 






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94 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 



16. Cases discharged by Recovery or Death. 





Recoveries. 


Deaths. 


FORM OF INSANITY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Mania, acute, 

chronic, . 

recurrent, 
Epilepsy, .... 
Dementia, chronic, 
Melancholia, chronic, . 
Paresis, .... 


- 


1 


1 


— 

13 

1 
6 
1 
6 


4 


17 

1 

6 
1 

6 


Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


27 
27 


4 
4 


31 

31 



17. Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals, 


Phthisis, 










7 


- 


7 


Epilepsy, 










1 


- 


1 


Heart disease, 










1 


- 


1 


Exhaustion, . 










7 


1 


8 


Paresis, . 










6 


- 


6 


Senility, 










- 


1 


1 


Apoplexy, 










2 


- 


2 


Paralysis, 










1 


1 


2 


Bright's disease, 










1 


- 


1 


Dysentery, 










1 


1 


9 


Totals, . 


27 


4 


31 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



95 



18. Ages of Those tvho died. 









At Time of First 
Attack. 


At Time of Death. 


AGES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Fifteen years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
CO to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Over 80 years, 

Unknown, 






1 

2 
3 
3 

8 
3 

7 


2 
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1 


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2 
3 
3 

2 
9 
4 

7 


3 
3 
4 
5 
7 
3 
1 

1 


2 
2 


3 
3 
4 
5 
9 
3 
3 

1 


Totals, . 


' 27 


4 


31 


27 


4 


31 



96 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM. [Oct. 






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1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



97 





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