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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital"

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 23. 



SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



THE TRUSTEES 



Worcester Insane Hospital, 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM AT WORCESTER, 



Year ending September 30, 1899. 



BOSTON : 

"WRrGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1900. 



1 ±AC, DOCUMENT .... .... No. 23. 



SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



THE TRUSTEES 



Worcester Insane Hospital, 

AND 

TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

or THE 

WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM AT WORCESTER, 

FOB THE 

Year ending September 30, 1899.- \ 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1900. 

ft 



s~ , 



%iUU4 \ .(Cf&cliufo 



OFFICEES OF THE HOSPITAL. 



TRUSTEES. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, Worcester. 

GEORGE W. WELLS, Southbridge. 

ROCKWOOD HOAR, Worcester. 

SARAH E. WHITIN, Whitinsville. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN Worcester. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD, Worcester. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS 
HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., 
ALFRED I. NOBLE, M.D., . 
ADOLF MEYER, M.D., 



REVERE R. GURLEY, M.D., 
WALTER D. BERRY, M.D., 
MARGARET A. FLEMING, M.D 
THOMAS VAN URK, M.D., 
OTTO P. GEIER, M.D., 
DAVID R. TALBOTT, M.D., 
FRANK T. BUDD, M.D., . 
THOMAS T. SCHOULER, . 
LILA J. GORDON, 
S. JOSEPHINE BRECK, . 
JOSEPH F. REYNOLDS, . 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician and 
Director of Laboratory. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Junior Assistant. 
Junior Assistant. 
Junior Assistant. 
Junior Assistant. 
Steward. 
Matron. 
Clerk. 
Farmer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, Auditor. 

ALVAN G. LAMB, Engineer. 



&amraantoz%lfy of ||Iassar^itsdts» 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital respectfully 
present their sixty-seventh annual report, it being for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1899. 

That provision of the Public Statutes which requires the 
trustees to submit annually " for the use of the government" 
a " particular statement of the condition of the hospital and all 
its concerns" might perhaps in the present instance be fully 
complied with by referring all persons desirous of such infor- 
mation to the accompanying reports of the treasurer, superin- 
tendent and pathologist, and to the annexed carefully prepared 
tables. It is believed that these furnish, in concise, convenient 
and accessible form, all the information concerning the institu- 
tion's affairs which the statutes either contemplate or specifically 
require. A very few words, therefore, on the part of the 
Board, by way of explanation, and of directing attention to 
some matters that seem more particularly deserving of notice, 
will be all that the occasion demands. 

During the year, the infirmary wards, the new kitchen and 
the boiler house, and the rearrangement of the steam heating 
of the building, all of which have been fully described in the 
superintendent's previous reports, and for all of which, except 
the rearrangement of the steam ducts, legislative appropriations 
have been made, have been finished and furnished and equipped 
for service, and are now in use. 

Exteriorly, the infirmary wards, in material and design, 
harmonize with the general architectural plan of the building 



6 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

and add to rather than detract from its attractive features. 
Interiorly, the plan is admirable and the general effect pleasing. 
High studded, bright, sunny, roomy, with abundant air space for 
the ten occupants, and a surpassingly lovely outlook, the general 
ward leaves nothing to be desired, and equally perfect in every 
detail are the private rooms and all the accessory arrangements. 

One passing through sees almost nothing to remind him that 
he is in an insane hospital, and might easily persuade himself 
that he was visiting one of the newest and best wards of Roose- 
velt, or the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

The completion and occupation of these wards are interesting, 
and, it is believed, very significant events in the history of this 
institution. They mark the first step towards the adaptation 
of the best general hospital methods to the treatment of the 
inmates. Henceforth, at least a hundred of the patients will 
have the advantage of skilful nursing, and will be under the 
constant supervision of trained observers. Facts daily and 
almost hourly recorded at the bedside will aid the physicians in 
their practical duties, and facilitate their study of disease. 
The trustees anticipate far-reaching beneficial results from this 
experiment. 

By a vote of the trustees, the new male ward has received 
the name of Thayer, in memory of valuable services rendered 
the hospital during many years by Prof. James B. Thayer of 
Cambridge ; and the new female ward that of Folsom, as a 
slight evidence of the high regard in which the remembrance of 
Miss Anna S. Folsom's short but pleasant connection with the 
hospital is held. 

In this connection the Board desires to acknowledge, and to 
direct particular attention to, the great advantages which have 
resulted and are likely in the future to result to the hospital 
from the reorganization of the medical service. It is not, 
however, thought necessary to describe here in detail the 
objects and methods of the new system, because this has 
already been fully and admirably done by Dr. Quinby in the 
reports of previous years ; nor yet to attempt a statement of its 
underlying principles, which, after the exceedingly able and 
interesting paper of Dr. Meyer, published in the report of 
1898, would be quite superfluous. It is only the Board's 
desire to point out and bear testimony to the inspiring effect of 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7 

the new departure, and to call attention to the fact that, as a 
result, a scientific spirit and atmosphere, so to speak, pervade 
the house. It is easy for even a casual observer to see that 
individual cases receive a larger share of professional attention 
than formerly; that observations are systemized and more 
exact ; and that all this, though primarily intended to benefit 
the patient by making clearer the indications for treatment, is 
done also with a view to the collection of material for the 
advancement of science. And it is pleasant to note the fact 
that experience gathered here has already begun to be available 
for the latter purpose. Several very valuable papers, and com- 
munications to scientific journals, in which observations made 
here have been utilized, have already appeared from the pen of 
Dr. Meyer. It is, indeed, not an exaggeration to say that the 
trustees feel themselves justified in anticipating and promising 
the most important results, not only for their patients, but for 
the advancement of this particular department of medical 
science, from Dr. Meyer's connection with the institution. 

The new kitchen, the providing of which had become an im- 
perative necessity, is a model of convenience and of adaptation 
to the purposes for which it has been built. No needful or 
desirable appliance is wanting. It will immensely facilitate and 
expedite the daily feeding of the hospital's great household. 
And so of the new boiler house and the rearrangement of the 
steam mains ; these are notable improvements. Taking the 
latter out of the trenches where they have lain for twenty-two 
years, and carrying them, open to view, through the air ducts, 
which have been deepened for the purpose, is a great and 
obvious advantage. There is every reason to believe that the 
lowering of the battery of boilers and the relocating of the steam 
mains will not only make the circulation of steam more perfect, 
but economize the cost of heating. 

Of the extension of the chapel wing, which has been planned 
to increase the accommodations for employees, and for which the 
last Legislature made an appropriation of $40,000, it can only 
be reported that the work is progressing, but is yet uncompleted. 
It could not be begun until the new kitchen was finished, 
because it occupies ground which was covered by the old. As 
soon as opportunity offered, however, work was begun and 
has since gone on uninterruptedly. The foundations are in, 



8 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

the basement is finished, the new air duct for the steam main, 
connecting with the fan tower, is done, and the walls have be- 
gun to rise. Whether it can be completed with the unexpended 
balance of the appropriation, however, under the changed con- 
ditions in the cost of all building materials, remains to be seen. 
The trustees as well as the superintendent, have grave fears 
that it cannot be. It is, indeed, quite certain that it cannot be, 
and, moreover, that its completion will either make necessary 
a further appropriation by the Legislature, or require a use, 
for the purpose, of the current funds of the hospital as they 
gradually reaccumulate. The trustees very much regret the 
necessity of adopting either alternative, but especially the 
latter. It has long been their policy to maintain a moderate 
surplus of earnings, with which to meet contingencies, provide 
promptly for repairs, take advantage of markets in the purchase 
of supplies, etc. ; and they cannot look with favor upon its use 
for expenditures which, in their judgement, should be borne by 
the Commonwealth. They regret the inadequacy of the legis- 
lative appropriations of the past two years, which have already 
compelled them to draw very heavily upon this reserve to meet 
the cost of the large operations in which the hospital has been 
so much interested. The treasurer's report shows that within 
two years almost $40,000 from these earnings has gone into 
permanent improvements, and that the surplus now on hand is 
only about $5,000. Such a reduction for such a purpose, 
necessary as it has seemed to be, they cannot but disapprove. 
When both Dr. Quinby and Dr. Meyer are repeatedly remind- 
ing them of the great need of more medical help to carry on 
the work of the reorganized medical service, and of additional 
equipment for the laboratory, they cannot but regret the 
diversion of the means upon which they would ordinarily rely 
for meeting these needs. It is quite probable that the circum- 
stances alluded to will compel the Board to ask again for legis- 
lative assistance to complete this chapel wing extension. 

But whether or not an appropriation is asked for to finish 
the wing, it is quite certain that sooner or later one will be 
asked for to build a nurses' home. The need for trained 
nurses has been frequently alluded to in these reports, and has 
now, with the completion and occupation of the infirmary 
wards, become imperative. To get with untrained attendants 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 9 

the full benefits these magnificent wards are capable of giving, 
is impossible. A grand general ward without trained nurses 
is in these days a marked inconsistency. Trained nurses, 
then, must be had ; and if trained nurses, then a training 
school to educate them ; and if a training school, then a nurses' 
home, to which, when off duty in the wards, the pupils can 
resort for rest, recreation and study. A building for such a 
purpose, a little apart from the hospital and yet near by, will 
have to be provided. 

Referring to the treasurer's report, it will be observed that 
several small invested funds are separately accounted for, of 
one or two of which, so far as the writer is aware, no explana- 
tion has hitherto appeared. The hospital library fund, which 
was constituted twenty years ago by a consolidation of the 
Lewis and Wheeler funds, and which has proved an exceed- 
ingly valuable foundation, has been frequently alluded to and is 
well understood. The Manson fund has resulted from a legacy 
contained in the will of Jane E. Manson of Rhode Island. 
The sum of nearly $1,000 was received from her executor 
several years ago, and was without special conditions. The 
trustees have made it a separate and permanent fund, and have 
hitherto appropriated the income to the furnishing of bookcases 
for the wards. The lawn fund has been established by appro- 
priating for the purpose the proceeds of the sale of wood and 
timber from the lot at the rear of the building. It is a per- 
manent deposit in the Worcester Mechanic's Savings Bank, 
and the income only is devoted to the care and improvement of 
the grounds. 

It will be seen that the land account grows smaller every 
year. It will soon disappear from the reports entirely. The 
land of the old hospital farm, which the trustees, by special act 
of the Legislature, were directed to sell, has been nearly all 
disposed of, only one or two building lots remaining. 

The hospital officials, while necessarily more or less absorbed 
in duties connected with the great and costly improvements 
which have been going on under the patronage of the Legis- 
lature, have neither forgotten nor neglected other important 
matters. The buildings have been kept in excellent repair; 
the farms both in Worcester and Shrewsbury have been well 
managed and made productive and profitable ; the grounds 



10 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

have been kept in good order, and have been embellished 
by moderate expenditures ; the comforts and welfare of the 
patients have been assiduously provided for ; and the results of 
treatment have been kept up at least to the standard of former 
years. There has been no epidemic sickness and no accident. 
The year has been prosperous. 

There has been but a single change in the permanent official 
force of the institution since the last report. Mr. Thomas T. 
Schouler, who for several years has very acceptably filled 
the office of steward, left the hospital in September to take a 
more lucrative position at the City Almshouse. The Board 
accepted his resignation with regret. 

In closing their report, the trustees avail themselves of the 
opportunity to record anew their very high appreciation of the 
services rendered the institution by the superintendent, the 
assistant superintendent, and the director of the laboratory. 
Nor would they fail to acknowledge their indebtedness to the 
subordinate officials who have in any capacity contributed to 
the successes of the year. The State that can continuously 
command such service for its unfortunate wards is to be con- 
gratulated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 
GEORGE W. WELLS. 
ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
SARAH E. WHITIN. 
FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 
SAMUEL B. WOODWARD. 
Worcester, Mass., Sept. 30, 1899. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 11 



YALUE OF PEKSONAL ESTATE. 

Sept. 30, 1899. 



Live stock on the farm, $10,235 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, 12,000 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements, ..... 6,780 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 29,992 25 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, .... 31,994 22 

Other furniture in inmates' department, 24,053 89 

Personal property belonging to the State in superintendent's 

department, 27,393 67 

Ready-made clothing, 1,504 72 

Dry goods, 923 66 

Provisions and groceries, 2,344 19 

Drugs and medicine, . . 900 00 

Fuel, 758 00 

Library, 4,700 00 

Other supplies undistributed, 5,575 05 

Pipes and radiators in hospital, 39,700 00 

Boiler pipes and radiators in farm-house, .... 2,700 00 

Total, $201,554 65 



12 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



["Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

I herewith submit my annual report on the finances of the 
Worcester Insane Hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 

1899: — 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1898, 

Received of the Commonwealth for support of patients, 

of cities and towns for support of patients, 

of individuals for support of patients, 

for interest, sale of produce, etc., .... 

from J. W. Bishop Company, contractor, for plumb- 
ing infirmary wards, 

belonging to patients, 



$25,314 33 


41,170 


72 


86,307 


93 


48,765 


20 


5,822 


37 


6,000 


00 


1,533 


84 


$214,914 39 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows : — 



Salaries and wages, . 

Provisions and supplies, viz. 
Meat of all kinds, 
Fish of all kinds, 
Fruit and vegetables, 
Flour, 

Grain and meal for table, , 
Grain and meal for stock, , 
Tea, coffee and chocolate, 
Sugar and molasses, . 
Butter and cheese, 
Salt and other groceries, 
All other provisions, . 

Total for provisions and supplies, 



3,921 96 



Clothing, 
Fuel, . 
Lights, 
Water, 



Amounts carried forward, 



$14,489 29 




2,932 39 




4,846 55 




3,907 30 




608 00 




5,414 42 




1,608 84 




4,095 20 




9,768 70 




4,839 49 




1,603 50 






54,113 68 




$8,046 94 




9,167 49 




4,888 14 




3,262 87 




$25,365 44 


$118,035 64 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



Amounts brought forward, 

Medicine and medical supplies, 
Furniture, beds and bedding, 
Transportation, . 
Ordinary repairs, 
Trustees 1 expenses, . 
Pathological department, . 
All other current expenses, 

Total current expenses, 



Extraordinary expenses : — 

Water sections, $156 39 

Plumbing, furnishing and painting 

new infirmary wards, . . . 11,485 47 
Piping, painting, slate floor, furnish- 
ings, etc., for new kitchen, . . 11,500 73 

Refrigerator 2,017 12 

. 271 60 

. 108 30 

. 6,929 37 

. $190 00 
14 28 



Telephone system, 
Tramway, . 
Boiler house, 

Undertaking, 

Cash refunded, . 

Cash refunded patients (on deposits) , 1,120 20 

Total extraordinary expenses, . 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, .... 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, 

Due from the Commonwealth for board, etc., . 
from cities and towns for board, etc., 
from individuals for board, etc., 

Liabilities. 

Due for supplies and improvements, 

for salaries and wages, .... 
to patients (on deposits), .... 



No. 23. 


13 


$25,365 44 


$118,035 64 


2,193 67 




8,702 97 




428 98 




9,724 24 




42 58 




1,108 25 




9,731 97 


57,298 10 




. . . 


$175,333 74 



$32,468 98 



1,324 48 



33,793 46 



,127 20 
5,787 19 



. 


$214,914 39 

$5,787 19 
11,357 82 
22,281 30 
13,237 45 


$8,773 72 
5,640 00 
1,619 33 


$52,663 76 
16,033 05 





Respectfully submitted, 



5,630 71 



ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1899. 



14 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 





Appropriation. 


Balance 
Unexpended 
Oct. 1, 1898. 


Expended. 


Balance 
Oct. 1, 1899. 


For construction of new 










infirmary wards, . 
Construction of new kit- 


$80,000 00 


$22,129 10 


$22,129 10 


- 


chen, .... 
Construction of adminis- 


18,000 00 


9,590 09 


9,590 09 


- 


tration building exten- 
sion, .... 


40,000 00 


- 


4,593 44 


$35,406 56 



INCOME OF LIBRARY FUNDS. 



Lewis Fund. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1898, $50 69 

Interest on Springfield bond, 70 00 

Rent in State Safe Deposit Company, . . . $5 00 

Deposit in Worcester County Institution for Savings, 20 00 

Expended for books, 25 50 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, 70 19 

Wheeler Fund. 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1898, $59 62 

Dividends and tax rebate, 203 74 

Expended for books, $114 85 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, 148 51 



$120 69 



$120 69 



$263 36 



$263 36 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



15 



Income of Lawn Fund. 



Balance in Mechanic's Savings Bank, 

Sale of wood, 

Dividends, 



$1,669 00 

100 00 

57 04 



Landscape gardening, 
Balance in bank, 



$250 00 
1,576 04 



Income of Manson Fund. 
Dividends, $45 21 



Lewis Fund Investment. 

Springfield bond, 

Worcester County Institution for Savings, 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, .... 

Wheeler Fund Investment. 
Seven shares Central National Bank, 
Three shares Worcester National Bank, . 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, . 



, $1,120 00 

160 67 

70 19 



Total of library funds, 



L,826 04 
1,826 04 

$45 21 



$1,350 86 



. $910 00 




540 00 




1,445 86 




1,719 49 




. 148 51 






4,763 86 





5,114 72 



Manson Fund. 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, . . $1,176 18 

Lawn Fund. 
Worcester Mechanic's Savings Bank, . . . $1,576 04 



Note. — The holding of Woi'cester National 
Bank stock was diminished during the year by the 
reduction of its capital. Six shares were surrendered 
at $600, three shares were bought at $300, and bal- 
ance, $300, was deposited in Worcester County In- 
stitution for Savings. 



Land Account. 



Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1898, 
For sale of land, 



$131 13 
453 69 



1,176 18 



1,576 04 
$8,866 94 



$584 82 



16 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



Expenditures. 

Commission, . $15 00 

Surveying, 7 80 

Revenue stamp, 50 

Making deed, 3 00 

Remitted to State Treasurer, 500 00 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, ... . . . 58 52 



$584 82 



Respectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, 



Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1899. 

"Worcester, Mass., Oct. 19, 1899. 

I hereby certify that I have this day compared the treasurer's statement of disburse- 
ments for the year ending Sept. 30, 1899, with the vouchers on file at the Worcester 
Insane Hospital, and find them to agree. I have also inspected the securities represent- 
ing the invested funds of the institution, and find that their market value is as stated. 

GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 17 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

I herewith respectfully submit the following report of the 
hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 1899, it being the sixty- 
seventh annual report. 

There remained at the hospital Oct. 1, 1898, 874 patients, 

— 378 men and 496 women. During the year 548 patients 

— 278 men and 270 women — were admitted ; 359 patients — 
183 men and 176 women — were discharged; and 60 men and 
35 women died, leaving at the end of the official year 968 
patients, — 413 men and 555 women. Of this number, 294 
were supported by the State, 508 by cities and towns and 166 
by friends. Of the 359 persons discharged, 107, including 2 
habitual drunkards (women), were reported recovered, 78 much 
improved, 78 improved and 83 not improved; 13 were dis- 
charged not insane. Twelve men and 16 women were removed 
by the overseers of the poor ; 20 men and 23 women were dis- 
charged to the care of the Board of Insanity, to be removed 
from the State ; 1 man and 2 women were transferred to the 
Westborough Insane Hospital ; 3 men and 30 women to the 
Worcester Insane Asylum ; 2 men and 1 woman to Tewks- 
bury ; 3 men to the Hospital for Epileptics ; and 1 woman to 
the Medheld Asylum. Seven men and 1 woman escaped, and 
were not returned to the hospital or accounted for at the end 
of the official year. 

There remained at the end of the year nearly 100 more 
patients than at the beginning. The smallest number under 
treatment in any one day was 857 and the largest 968. The 
daily average number was 913.5. 

The percentage of recoveries, calculated upon the number 
of discharges and deaths, was 23.5; calculated upon the num- 
ber of admissions, it was 17.7. 



18 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

The death rate was 6.6 calculated on the whole number of 
patients under treatment, and 10.4 calculated upon the average 
population. 

Of the cases discharged not insane, one was a case of simple 
delirium, and another, one of epilepsy. All of the remainder 
were victims of alcoholism or of the drug habit, or of both 
combined. None of them were proper subjects for treatment 
or detention in an insane hospital. In case of the three women 
included in this list, their committal was perhaps excusable, on 
the ground that the State has not as yet provided any suitable 
place for their care ; but there was no such excuse in the case 
of the men, as a special institution has been provided for male 
inebriates. Eight male inebriates, however, have been sent us 
during the year, one man having been committed and discharged 
three times in the twelve months. Every one who is in any 
way conversant with the purposes had in mind by the advo- 
cates of the Hospital for Dipsomaniacs and Inebriates at Fox- 
borough, when its establishment was urged, will agree that the 
relief of the insane hospitals from this class of cases was a most 
prominent one if not the one the most insisted upon ; and that 
drunkards are still sent to us is, in my opinion, in direct con- 
travention of the intention if not of the letter of the law estab- 
lishing this institution. The law provides that judges " may" 
commit to Foxborough any person who is subject to dipsomania. 
This seems in the opinion of some of the judges — not a major- 
ity, I am happy to say — to make it discretional with them 
whether such a person shall be committed to the Hospital for 
Dipsomaniacs or to one of the insane hospitals, as of old. The 
failure of the Legislature to repeal chapter 339 of the Acts of 
1885, which authorized the committal of dipsomaniacs to the 
latter, would seem to lend some color to this claim ; but that it 
was not the intention of the act establishing the institution at 
Foxborough, or of its prominent promoters, at least, that, 
such commitments should continue, I am certain. In fact, the 
act itself goes to prove this, as it distinctly provides for the 
removal of such cases from the insane hospitals on the com- 
pletion of the new institution, — a useless thing to do if the 
hospitals were to be filled immediately with the same class of 
patients through new commitments. 

All ambiguity as to the intention of the law could be obviated 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 19 

by the repeal of the act of 1885, regarding the committal of 
inebriates to the insane hospitals, and I think that every super- 
intendent will agree that this should be done, and I hope to see 
the attention of the coming Legislature called to this matter. 

The infirmary wards which were in process of construction 
at the time of my last report were completed, furnished and 
occupied early in the year. They prove to be a very attractive 
as well as a useful addition to the hospital, and to be well 
adapted to the purposes for which they were designed. They 
are constructed with regard to economy as well as efficiency of 
service, and furnish superior facilities for caring for all of our 
acute and feeble cases, whatever their means or necessities, 
— facilities which we have heretofore been able to furnish only 
to such of our patients as could afford to pay for private rooms 
with special attendance. The change from the old "sick ward" 
to these quiet, bright, sunny and well-ventilated rooms is one 
greatly appreciated by our patients and by the medical staff as 
well, as the wards, being near the centre building, are easily 
reached by the physician in case of necessity or emergency. 

Our new kitchen, which was nearly completed at the time of 
my last report, and which we then hoped to be able to furnish 
and move into within a few weeks, was not, in fact, ready for 
occupancy until late in the following spring, owing to the diffi- 
culty experienced in making, during the cold weather, the tem- 
porary connection for the purpose of distribution of supplies 
between the wards and the new building ; the delay in procuring 
and installing the necessary furnishings, and to the many com- 
plications incident to the transfer from the old kitchen to the new. 
After many delays and disappointments, however, this was 
finally accomplished without serious inconvenience to any one 
and without interruption of the work of the household. The 
building is roomy and convenient, and will no doubt meet any 
needs of the institution that are likely to arise on account of 
future enlargement. 

As the proposed extension of the chapel wing was to occupy 
the site of the former kitchen, nothing could be done on this 
building until the kitchen could be vacated and torn down. 
We were able, however, to do considerable of the excavating 
during the winter, and to make the changes in our water, steam 
and gas pipes necessary to insure a supply to the chapel wing 



20 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

and centre building during the progress of the new work. We 
were not able, however, to commence work on the building 
itself until some time in August ; but the foundations are now 
laid and the superstruction well under way, and it is expected 
that it will be covered in by the first of January. 

This extension, which is designed to furnish additional room 
for employees, together with working rooms for our patients, 
is 108 feet long by 48 feet wide, and three stories high, — the 
same as the building to which it is an addition, — with a base- 
ment entirely above ground and an attic which is to be finished 
into living rooms for the help. It is built of stone from our 
own quarry, and conforms in its architectural features to the 
old chapel wing. The basement, which has direct connection 
with the new kitchen, and through which the food and supplies 
are to be distributed to the wards, is to be devoted to store 
rooms for the matron and steward's department. On the first 
floor there is a dining room for the outside help, with a sitting 
room opposite ; while on the second floor there are similar 
rooms for the women nurses. At the end of the building on 
each of the three main floors is a large work room, 43 by 24 
feet, that on the first floor being designed for the sewing room, 
and being connected by a covered way with ironing room and 
laundry directly in the rear. The other two rooms are designed 
for work rooms for patients. Each floor has a linen room, 
trunk room, lavatory and broom closet, and each is provided 
with two modes of exit in case of fire. Together with the attic, 
which is both heated and ventilated, there are sleeping accom- 
modations for twenty-five persons. 

The plans and estimates for this building were made nearly 
two years ago, and were based upon the prices then prevailing. 
Had we been able to complete our plans and begin work at the 
time we expected, we could no doubt have built the building 
within the appropriation ; but during the last year there has 
been, as every one is aware, an almost unprecedented advance 
in all building material, so that the cost of construction is now at 
least twenty-five per cent, greater than it was at the time our esti- 
mates were made. After having gone over our plans and cut 
out everything that could safely be cut out, we find that with 
the present sum of money at our disposal we shall only be able 
to erect the outside walls of the building, cover it in, to get it 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 21 

ready for the inside finish. We are very much in need of this 
building and there should be no delay in its completion, and I 
hope, therefore, that the trustees may see fit to ask for and the 
Legislature to grant the additional sum necessary to finish it. 

In several former reports I have called attention to the neces- 
sity of making some provision for our women nurses outside 
of the hospital wards, but up to the present I have not felt that 
it was time to urge immediate action in this direction, for the 
reason that there were other and quite as important improve- 
ments necessary in our wards and executive department, and 
which ought first to be provided for. Now, however, that this 
has been done, I would again call attention to the needs of 
our nurses, and urge that immediate steps be taken toward 
providing a nurses' home. For the old-style attendant, who 
was simply a care-taker, occupied in looking after the general 
order of the wards and in seeing that the material wants of the 
patients were provided for, the accommodations furnished were 
no doubt ample and satisfactory ; but the present methods of 
caring for the insane demand a more intelligent and complicated 
service. The nurse has come to be the doctor's complement, 
and in his absence stands in his place. She can do much to 
mar or to further his work, but to insure the latter result she 
must be intelligent, alert, painstaking and willing ; but how- 
ever willing she may be, she cannot be expected to do her best 
when her service is practically continuous, save for a few hours' 
outing once or twice a week, and where she is obliged to live, 
eat and sleep with her work ever before her. 

The current expenses, less the amount received from articles 
sold, have been $169,820.64 ; dividing this by 913.52, the daily 
average number of patients, gives $185.89 as the annual cost 
of support,, which is equivalent to a weekly cost of $3.56. 

The only change in our medical staff was the resignation of 
Dr. W. D. Berry. His place has been filled by the promotion 
of Dr. F. T. Budd from junior assistant. 

I am sorry to have to record the resignation of Mr. T. T. 
Schouler, who has given the institution most valuable and 
entirely satisfactory service as steward for the past six years. 
He left the hospital September 1, to take the position of super- 
intendent of the Worcester Poor Farm, and carried with him, 
I am sure, the respect of every employee of this institution, as 



22 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

he certainly did of its trustees and its superintendent, who had 
every reason to know of his sterling qualities and his untiring 
devotion to the interests of the hospital. I can only say in 
this connection that I hope and expect that he will have in his 
new and more onerous position the same success that he had 
here. 

It is an added source of regret that his resignation should 
have deprived us also of the services of his mother, Mrs. Eme- 
line T. Schouler, as our farm-house, under her skilful manage- 
ment, in conjunction with his own, has been in the highest 
degree successful. 

H. M. QUINBY, 

Superintendent. 

Worcester Insane Hospital, Sept. 30, 1899. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 23 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL WORK. 



Three years have passed since the present organization of the 
medical work was adopted. I herewith beg to present a short 
report of the trend of our labors during this period. 

The chief aim of our plan has been to so outline the medical 
work of the hospital that it would do justice to the needs of 
the patients, and at the same time furnish data for the advance- 
ment of our knowledge of psychiatry. A tendency to divide 
routing practice and research has been avoided ; the " practical 
work," if done well enough to serve the needs of the physician 
for an understanding of the condition and wants of the patient, 
furnishes perfectly satisfactory data for our problems in psy- 
chiatry. In the laboratory some work must be carried out 
which has no direct bearing on the needs of the patient, but 
which is necessary in order to get together a sufficient material 
for comparison, without which opinions as to what is abnormal 
cannot be formed. 

Certain discussions at the meeting of the Medico-Psycho- 
logical Association in New York showed that it is exceedingly 
difficult to make it plain what clinical psychiatry purports to be. 
It implies nothing but a careful examination of the previous 
history of the patient and of the condition from day to day, 
such as every painstaking physician makes on his patients. 
Our only ambition is to do this essential work systematically, 
and with all the means of modern medicine at our disposal ; to 
keep such records of our observations as will show us our 
shortcomings, and also help us to make a truer picture of the 
disease forms than superficial observation and the faithful 
following of second-hand text-book opinions and the ordinary 
impressionist method without records would allow us to form. 
Most of the points to which we pay attention are points essential 
for differential diagnosis and prognosis and for indications of 



24 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

treatment ; and it is this side of our observations, and the labora- 
tory methods involved, that we want to extend this year with 
all our energy. 

The criticism has been made by a warm friend of our en- 
terprise that we should above all demonstrate the " modus 
operandi of cures," for the sake of advancement of therapeutics. 
While we work to know more about that, it is our imperative 
task to find out first what we are called upon to cure ; when we 
shall have some sort of common understanding of what we 
mean by the concepts and the names we give the object of our 
treatment, we shall be better able to speak of the effects and 
value of our methods and theories. Until that is reached, 
discussions of therapeutics are far from being mature. The 
statistics on thyroid treatment ought to show this. All the 
statements on its use in melancholia, etc., are useless as long as 
we are not able to state explicitly even to our own satisfaction 
what cases we include under the term melancholia, and what 
forms and what sort of a disease process we claim to have 
influenced. It is not enough to want to do " work," but 
above all a foundation must exist on which to build ; we must 
have problems which are reasonable and workable, and a 
certainty that everything that is being done tends to a better 
understanding of the patients needs and to improvements in 
our hospital work. To imagine that these two ends of the 
chain, the study of general pathology and of therapeutics, are 
already close together, is an illusion which we are not fortunate 
enough to share. 

The material accumulated during the first three years of our 
work is as follows : 975 closed observations of patients admitted 
after Oct. 1, 1896, and since discharged, and 160 autopsies, 
105 of which cases were admitted since clinical observation was 
begun. 

The anatomical collection consists of: — 

1. A complete series of sections of a brain with sclerosis 
of the temporal and parietal lobe. 

k 2. A similar series of a case with softening of the floor of 
the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle and degeneration of the 
central tegmental bundle. 

3. A complete series of a brain with destruction of the left 
third frontal gyrus and secondary degenerations. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 25 

4 and 5. Two series of the optic thalamus in cases of hemi- 
plegic contracture in general paralysis. 

6. A series of a brain with destruction of the orbital surface 
of one frontal lobe, one eye and both olfactory bulbs (Marchi). 

7. A sagittal series through an adult brain stem. 

8. An oblique series through an adult brain stem. 

9. A horizontal series of the optic thalami. 

10. A sagittal series of a child's brain. 

11. Series of the brain stem of an idiot without pons. 

12. Series of the brain stem of an idiot with hemiatrophy 
of the cerebrum and of the opposite cerebellum (the brains of 
series 11 and 12 received from Dr. Delia Howe). 

13. Series of the brain stem in a case of a tumor of the 
midbrain. 

14. Series of the brain of the new-born. 

15. Series of the brain of a seven-months foetus (the spec- 
imen obtained from Dr. Baker) . 

16. Series of the brain of a five-months foetus (the specimen 
obtained from Dr. Delahanty). 

17. Series of the nervous system of a case of anencephaly 
(obtained through Dr. Fallon). 

18. Series of the thalamus with degeneration of the fornix. 

19. A number of series of brains of animals. 

Further, a great number of sections from the blocks taken 
from the autopsies, representing a large material for comparison 
and research. 

The following articles were published during the current 
year : — 

Critical review of the data and general methods and deduc- 
tions of modern neurology. (" Journal of Comparative Neu- 
rology," Vol. VIII., pages 113-148 and pages 249-313, with 
7 plates.) 

Critical review of recent publications of Bethe and Nissl. 
("Journal of Comparative Neurology," Vol. IX., pages 38- 
45.) 

The chief aims of this year's work have been the improve- 
ment of our records in the direction of greater clinical useful- 
ness, and the study of certain histopathological topics which 
had attracted our attention. The old plan of a course of 
lectures on the nervous system and daily staff meetings for the 



26 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

reports of the cases was continued. Even more than in the 
previous years we felt the restrictions due to a disproportion 
between working force and task, mentioned in my last report 
and recommended to your kind attention. As the number of 
admissions increased (to 536 cases), a redistribution of the 
work became more and more necessary, and it has been carried 
further in the plan of work for the coming year. A system 
was to be formulated, by which everybody could keep his work 
up to date, instead of allowing it to be a never-finished burden, 
like that of the proverbial housewife. Great arrears in the 
work of the clinical clerk (increased by added work for the 
office of the State Board) had been one of the causes of pro- 
crastination ; the overburdening of the physicians of the ad- 
mission services and inadequate distribution of the cases among 
the physicians another ; and the time spent on autopsy material 
a third one. It has seemed best to throw the great share of 
our energy on the purely clinical work the coming year, for 
the purpose of arriving at some conclusion concerning a number 
of questions regarding the general nature of the diseases coming 
under our observation, the meaning of periodicity of insanity, 
etc., and also to pay more attention to a few problems of hem- 
atology in connection with several well-defined disease types. 
The neuro-histological work will suffer until we shall be able 
to make arrangements for more workers. The great share of 
the technical laboratory work is now being done by Miss Gur- 
ley, who has, through her arduous devotion to her task, acquired 
sufficient technique to carry out all the operations necessary for 
preserving the most valuable part of our perishable material, 
until such a time as we have sufficient help to more thoroughly 
work it up. We realize that the autopsy work ought to be 
broadened out instead of being reduced ; but we are forced to 
make sacrifices here as well as in other matters of great interest, 
and we trust that this is the best compromise under the existing 
conditions. 

That we should complain of a disproportion of working force 
and task may seem singular, in view of the fact that our medi- 
cal staff is somewhat larger already than the needs of ten or 
twenty years ago had made traditional. It is impossible to 
give in the short scope of an annual report all the reasons for 
this. We may say, however, that when an institution has 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 27 

adopted a definite scope of work, it puts itself under obligations 
to carry it out in a manner which is guarantee for success. 
For this, a good balance between plans and means must exist. 
The tendency is to accept the whole plans and to substitute 
good intentions for part of the means. Compromises are 
made ; the difficulties accumulate ; and, instead of encourage- 
ment by a bright outlook, disappointment paves the road of 
the workers. 

It has been the misfortune of psychiatry in this country that 
possibilities for medical work along the lines of investigation 
are only offered in the largest State hospitals. The govern- 
ment hospital in Washington, several hospitals in Iowa, those 
in Alabama, Kankakee, St. Peter, Minnesota, Danvers and 
Worcester are all very large, and the difficulty due to the size 
of the task partly accounts for the slowness of progress. 
McLean Hospital, the only private institution which has done 
justice to the call of the times, is more fortunate, since it has 
a smaller number of admissions and beds than any of the State 
hospitals, and a ground in every way prepared for clinical 
work. It represents conditions most like those of the few 
privileged psychiatric clinics of Germany, where a professor 
of psychiatry has a corps of from four to six permanent and 
well-trained assistants for a service of from forty to one hun- 
dred and twenty beds. Considering the feverish restlessness 
with which results are asked for in almost any enterprise in 
this country, the non-recognition of what might be called the 
business principles of the movement are very difficult to under- 
stand. We are here confronted with one of the inconvenient 
puzzles of the psychology of progressive humanity. A ratio 
of one assistant to from two hundred to three hundred patients 
has been the accepted standard for many years. These men, 
however, were not required to do anything like the work that 
is now demanded of an assistant, when investigation has given 
place to mere surveillance. Yet their work was considered 
laborious enough. Curiously, post-mortem pathology received 
the first attention among modern needs. The pathologist 
formed the entering wedge into the traditional asylum repose. 
Yet it lies in the nature of our field of investigation that the 
kind of pathologist who works only under the sign of the 
skeleton must yield to the pathologist of the living — the 



28 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

clinician — before anything can be done for psychiatry. Here 
the situation shows itself in all its seriousness. One man can 
go through the routine of many autopsies and examinations of 
urine, as long as he has no psychiatric problems ; but observa- 
tions and examinations of living patients with the consciousness 
of modern methods require more time, more thought, more 
skill and more reliability than the analysis of urine and the 
counting of blood corpuscles alone. For the plan of work 
now adopted, a ratio of one physician to two hundred and 
more patients would be a farce, and that of one physician to 
one hundred patients a serious task, if not merely an experi- 
ment. 

For reasons given in last year's report, it is useless, in view 
of the fundamental problems of the present day, to attempt 
anything short of a complete study of all of our patients, if we 
want at least to study psychiatry instead of elaborating a pet 
idea. Although this line of study could be carried on much 
more efficiently and with much less disturbance of one's peace of 
mind in a smaller hospital, there is an imperative demand that 
the general preliminary survey at least shall be extended over 
a large field of observation, such as our hospital offers. Under 
such conditions we can form plans for detail work, should the 
need of such work develop a smaller clinic in an educational 
centre with more adequate opportunities. This undoubtedly 
will come when psychiatry gives evidence of greater teacha- 
bility and greater power to attract medical students than it 
does under the present conditions, where the only choice would 
seem to be between stale tradition and confusion. That a 
clinic can and must be located in closest proximity with other 
clinics is not difficult to prove both by examples and by reasons. 

In the mean time we labor confidently over the execution of 
our plans, and we hope the authorities on whose good- will we 
depend will favor us further with their encouragement and 
co-operation. 

Yours respectfully, 

ADOLF MEYER. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 29 



LIBRARY REPORT. 



There are now 3,409 volumes in the library. One hundred 
and fifty-five volumes have been added during the year, while 
16 have been laid aside as useless. Three hundred and fifty- 
three volumes have been repaired. 

The average number of books issued each week from the 
main library was 105, and the average number from the six 
ward libraries was about the same as last year, — 42. These 
small libraries on the wards have been a great convenience to 
the patients, and it has been found profitable to change them 
around occasionally. 

As heretofore, 6 books have been sent out weekly to nine 
different halls, where they have been allowed to lie on the 
centre tables. 

The total average of volumes issued each week has increased 
somewhat from last year, it now being 179. 



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WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



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1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



35 



3. — - Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 











Ca 


SES ADMITTED. 


Times previously 
recovered. 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 


232 


227 


459 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Second, 








29 


30 


59 


15 


13 


28 


Third, . ' 








11 


6 


17 


7 


3 


10 


Fourth, 








2 


5 


7 


1 


1 


2 


Fifth, . 








2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


Sixth, . 








2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


Seventh, 








- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Total of cases, 


278 


270 


548 


26 


19 


45 


Total of persons, 




269 


267 


536 


24 


19 


43 



4. — Relation to Hospital of Persons admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Never before in any hospital for insane, . 


211 


202 


413 


Former inmates of this hospital only, 


35 


33 


68 


Former inmates of other hospitals only, . 


21 


25 


46 


Former inmates of this and other hospitals : — 








Danvers, 


- 


3 


3 


Danvers, Taunton, Boston and West- 








borough, 


- 


1 


1 


Foxborough, 


1 


- 


1 


McLean, 


1 


- 


1 


Tewksbury, 


- 


1 


1 


Westborough and McLean, 


- 


1 


1 


Westborough and Taunton, 


- 


1 


1 


Total of persons, 


269 


267 


536 



36 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



5. — Parentage of Persons admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES OF NATIVITY. 
















Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 1 

1 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, .... 


36 


39 


37 


34 


73 


73 


Other States : — 














Maine, .... 


10 


8 


8 


10 


18 


18 


New Hampshire, 




7 


8 


4 


2 


11 


10 


Vermont, . 




8 


8 


- 


3 


8 


11 


Rhode Island, 




2 


1 


2 


2 


4 


3 


Connecticut, 




1 


2 


4 


3 


5 


5 


New York, . 




2 


1 


2 


1 


4 


2 


Pennsylvania, 




- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


District of Columbia, 




1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


North Carolina, . 




- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Michigan, . 




1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Other countries : — 














Canada, .... 


13 


14 


9 


10 


22 


24 


Nova Scotia, 






4 


3 


5 


6 


9 


9 


New Brunswick, 






3 


4 


- 


- 


3 


4 


Newfoundland, 






2 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


Scotland, 






5 


6 


1 


1 


6 


7 


England, 






8 


7 


9 


10 


17 


17 


Ireland, 






102 


99 


120 


119 


222 


218 


Norway, 






3 


3 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Sweden, 






10 


10 


■ 6 


6 


16 


16 


Finland, 






1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


France, 






1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


2 


Germany, . 






5 


5 


3 


1 


8 


6 


Poland, 






2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Russia, 






4 


4 


4 


4 


8 


8 


Spain, . 






- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


Italy, . 






1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Switzerland, 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


China, 






1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Unknown, . 




35 


35 


48 


49 


83 


84 


Total of persons 




269 


269 


267 


267 


536 


536 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



6. — Birthph 


ice of Persons admitted. 






PLACES OF BIRTH. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




100 


98 


198 


Other States : — 








Maine, 


10 


10 


20 


New Hampshire, 
Vermont, 










7 
6 


7 
5 


14 

11 


Rhode Island, 










5 


- 


5 


Connecticut, 










1 


3 


4 


New York, . 










2 


5 


7 


New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, 










1 


1 


1 
1 


Virginia, 










1 


1 


2 


District of Columbia, 










1 


- 


1 


North Carolina, . 










1 


1 


2 


Georgia, 










1 


1 


2 


Louisiana, . 










- 


1 


1 


Texas, . 










1 


- 


1 


Iowa, . 










1 


- 


1 


Michigan, . 
California, . 










1 


1 


1 

1 


Other countries : — 








Canada, 


16 


8 


24 


Nova Scotia, 










3 


5 


8 


New Brunswick, 






i 




5 


3 


8 


Newfoundland, . 










1 


- 


1 


Scotland, 










2 


2 


4 


England, 










15 


6 


21 


Ireland, 










48 


81 


129 


Norway, 
Sweden, 










2 

8 


1 
5 


3 
13 


Finland, 










3 


4 


7 


Germany, . 
Poland, 










1 
1 


: 


1 
1 


Russia, 










5 


3 


8 


Italy, . 
China, . 










1 

1 


1 


2 
1 


Unknown, . 










18 


14 


32 


Totals, 


269 


267 


536 



38 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



7. — Residence of Persons admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Massachusetts (by counties) : — 








Berkshire, . 












• 


- 


2 


2 


Hampden, . 














1 


- 


1 


Middlesex, . 














87 


109 


196 


Norfolk, 














4 


9 


13 


Suffolk, 














26 


24 


50 


Worcester, . 














160 


126 


286 


Totals, . 


278 


270 


548 


Cities or towns, . 






« 








278 


270 


548 


Country districts, 














- 


- 


- 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



39 



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40 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



9. — Occupation of Persons admitted. 



Bookbinder, .... 1 


Straw worker, 


1 


Clerk, . 






1 


Seamstresses, 


3 


Cooks, . 






2 


Student, . 


1 


Copyist, . 






1 


Tailoress, 


1 


Domestics, 






47 


Teachers, 


4 


Housewives, . 






61 


Unknown, 


. 15 


Housekeepers, 






46 


No occupation, 


. 65 


Jewelry worker, 






1 







Operatives, . 






15 


Total, . 


. 267 


Saleswomen, . 






2 







Agent, . 

Baker, . 

Barbers, 

Blacksmiths, 

Bartenders, 

Brass polisher, 

Book-keepers, 

Boiler maker, 

Boss finisher, 

Box maker, . 

Boot cutter, . 

Butcher, 

Carpenters, . 

Carder, . 

Chair maker, . 

Carriage ornamenter, 

Clerks, . 

Civil engineer, 

Cook, 

Coachman, 

Commercial traveller, 

Cooper, . 



Detective, . 


1 


Designer, . 


1 


Drug clerks, . 


2 


Electric car conductor, . 


1 


Electrician, . 


1 


Envelope maker, . 


1 


Engineers, . 


2 


Farmers, 


14 


Firemen, 


2 


Fisherman, 


1 


Fruit dealers, 


2 


Gardener, 


1 


Gilder, .... 


1 


Grocer, .... 


1 


Herdic driver, 


1 


Inspector, 


1 


Ironworkers, . 


2 


Jewellers, 


2 


Journalist, 


2 


Laborers, 


59 


Laundrymen, . 


2 


Lawyers, 


2 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



41 



9. — Occupation of Persons admitted — Concluded. 



MALES — Concluded. 



Laster, 1 


Reedworker, .... 1 


Leather dealer, 






1 


Reporter, 








Liquor dealer, 






1 


Restaurant keeper, 








Loom fixer, . 






1 


Real estate agent, 








Lumber dealer, 






1 


Roofer, . 








Machinists, . 






11 


Salesmen, 








Manufacturer, 






1 


Stationary enginee 


V, 






Master marine, 






1 


Sailor, . 








Merchants, 






3 


Steward, 








Medical student, 






1 


Sign painter, . 








Mechanics, 






2 


Shoemakers, . 








Moulders, 






4 


Shoe vamper, 








Musician, 






1 


Shoe laster, . 








Night watchman, 






1 


Students, 






3 


Nurse, . 






1 


Tailors, . 






2 


Operatives, . 






16 


Teachers, 






2 


Optical employee, 






1 


Teamsters, 






3 


Painters, 






3 


Toy maker, . 






1 


Plasterer, 






1 


Watchmakers, 






4 


Peddlers, 






2 


Waiters, 






3 


Pipe fitter, 






1 


Wire worker, 






1 


Piano key maker, 






1 


Unknown, 






8 


Porter, . 






1 


No occupation, 






18 


Professor of music 


i 




1 





Plumbers, 






2 


Total, . . . .269 


Rag sorter, 






1 





42 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



43 



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44 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



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1899.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



45 



12. — Ages of Insane at First Attack, Admission and Death. 





Persons First admitted 
to Ant Hospital. 


Persons died. 


AGES. 


AT 
FIRST ATTACK. 


WHEN 
ADMITTED. 


AT 

first attack. 


AT 
TIME OF DEATH. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 1 Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, 


- 


3 


3 




















15 years and less, 


1 


3 


4 


2 


2 


4 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


From 15 to 20 years, 


8 


12 


20 


8 


13 


21 


2 


3 


5 


- 


- 


- 


20 to 25 years, 


28 


23 


51 


32 


23 


55 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


25 to 30 years, 


13 


23 


36 


25 


23 


48 


6 


1 


7 


4 


1 


5 


30 to 35 years, 


21 


17 


38 


30 


25 


55 


1 


5 


6 


7 


4 


11 


35 to 40 years, 


13 


22 


35 


22 


30 


52 


3 


2 


5 


1 


4 


5 


40 to 50 years, 


21 


19 


40 


34 


28 


62 


11 


4 


15 


10 


2 


12 


50 to 60 years, 


23 


12 


35 


25 


15 


40 


10 


4 


14 


14 


7 


21 


60 to 70 years, 


11 


6 


17 


16 


17 


33 


6 


10 


16 


12 


4 


16 


70 to 80 years, 


6 


11 


17 


10 


16 


26 


4 


3 


7 


7 


6 


13 


Over 80 years, . 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


1 


- 


1 


3 


6 


9 


Unknown 


65 
211 


50 
202 


115 
413 


6 


7 
202 


13 


13 


3 
35 


16 
95 


- 


1 


1 


Total of persons, 


211 


413 


60 


60 


35 


95 


Mean ages in years, . 


39.4 


36.2 


37.8 


39.3 


39.2 


39.2 


46.2 


42.8 


44.5 


52.2 


58.1 


55.1 



13. — Reported Duration of Disease before Last Admission. 



PREVIOUS DURATION. 


First Admission 
to ant Hospital . 


All Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, 






- 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


4 


5 


Under 1 month, 






47 


44 


91 


16 


14 


30 


63 


58 


121 


From 1 to 3 months, 






29 


40 


69 


10 


7 


17 


39 


47 


86 


3 to 6 months, 






18 


24 


42 


3 


6 


9 


21 


30 


51 


6 to 12 months, 






9 


11 


20 


3 


6 


9 


12 


17 


29 


1 to 2 years, 






13 


8 


21 


5 


4 


9 


18 


12 


30 


2 to 5 years, 






29 


14 


43 


6 


6 


12 


35 


20 


55 


5 to 10 years, 






8 


8 


16 


3 


8 


11 


11 


16 


27 


10 to 20 years, 






5 


6 


11 


5 


4 


9 


10 


10 


20 


Over 20 years, . 






- 


5 


5 


- 


2 


2 


- 


7 


7 


Unknown, . 






53 


39 


92 


15 


10 


25 


68 


49 


117 


Total of cases, . 


211 


202 


413 


67 


68 


135 


278 


270 


548 


Total of persons, 






211 


202 


413 


58 


65 


123 


269 


267 


536 


Average in years, 






2.05 


2.48 


2.26 


2.64 


3.58 


3.11 


2.35 


3.03 


2.69 



46 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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A. — Insane : — 

Epileptic insanity, 
Constitutional inferiority, 
Hysterical insanity, . 
Constitutional neurasthenia, 
Sexual neurasthenia, 

Periodic insanity — 

Manic and delirious forms, 

Circular forms, 

Depressed forms, . 
Climacteric melancholia, . 
Katatonia, .... 
Dementia praecox, 
Paranoic condition, . 
General paralysis, 
Alcoholic insanity, . 

Cocainism 

Delirium (infectious, toxic anc 

asthenic), 
Traumatic insanity, . 
Senile dementia, 

B. — Habitual drunkards, 

Not insane, 


* do" 

„ a 

m o 
a> m 

a ejj 

o ft 

o "o 

a o 
M Eh 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



47 






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48 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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^ 



6 



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o s 
a z 
o < 

o to 
J Z 


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1 1 i— I ■ ■ 1 1 1 i— 1 1 1 rHi-i|| 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 llll 




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1 I 1 I t 1 ■ 1 I i — 1 1 llll 




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Is 


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PI CO 1 1 1 1 | 1 rH 1 1 llll 




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rH <M 1 | | | | | | | | llll 




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Respiratory [system : — 
Pulmonary phthisis, . 
Lobar pneumonia, 

[ Broncho-pneumonia, . 
Bronchitis, 

nypostaticpneumonia, 
Pleurisy, 

Pleurisy and peritonilis, 
Pulmonary gangrene, 
Pulmonary oedema, 
Pulmonary infarct, 
Pulmonary embolism, . 

Circulatory system : — 
Valvular disease, . 
Heart failure, 
Cerebral hemorrhage, . 
Cerebral softening, 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



49 



, ■ , rH ■ r+ , , , |«, 




...... 1 . . |« 




1 1 1 ?H 1 rH 1 1 1 1 O 




|- 




i i i i i i . i i i 




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i ■ 




I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I-l 1 1 "# 




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i-H 1 . 1 1 I 1 1 1 I fr- 




IH ' 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 TH 




1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 








1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 CO 




I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 CO 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I CO 




I 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 CO 








1 | 1 1 1 1 1 1 T— 1 1 00 




1 

1 ' ' ' I th 




1 ^ i" 








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CM 




1 
1 1 1 1 1 i-l i-H I 1 1 i-l 




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CO 




1 rH rH rH 1 eq CM 1 i-H 1 O 

1 O 




General: — 

General miliary tuber- 
culosis. 
Gastric carcinoma, 

Hepatic and intestinal 

carcinoma. 
Hypertrophic cirrhosis, 

Intestinal obstruction, . 

Rectal abscess, 

Nephritis, 

Tonsillitis, 

Hemorrhage following 
injury. 

Totals, . 





50 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



73 

s 



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73 



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<3(NH 


iQ O H H 1 1 

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1— 1 • 

10 


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CM O 

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■«# h t^ -* ! 

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1 "ONOCNCNH | | t> 


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CM CO 

1—1 


CM CO 

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p ^ 

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1 CO 

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fe z 
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50 

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Totals, 

Average of known cases (in months), 

B. — Habitual drunkards : — 
Under 1 month, . 
From 3 to 6 months, 
10 to 12 years, . 
Over 20 years, . 

Totals 

Average of known cases (in months), 




A — Insane : — 

Under 1 month, . 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, . 
Unknown, . 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



51 



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8 











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■< 

o 


O . 

2 a 

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a o 

a a 

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Z <! 
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■<j( o> iO CS O O CO CO (M 1 

I— 1 l-H CM H i-H 


OS 


CO 
"0 




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WHtT-iN^COCOH | 


CO 


CO 

CO 

co 

CO 




•saiBH 


rH 00 CO CC CO CO K5 1 i—i 1 

l-H I— 1 


o 


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CM 

CM 
CM 




fa 
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a a 
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a a 

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a a 

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1— I T— 1 T— 1 T-t CM 


OS 


CO 

o 

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•saiBtasj 


HCM I (MCOHNOCOtD 


CO 


co 

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•sal-en 


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co 


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M 
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la 

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Under 1 month, . 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, 
Unknown, 



52 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



g 



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| ■§ 

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g <*-> 
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rv « 



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i i i i i i i i i i i i i ! i i i i i i i i i i i i r i 




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i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 




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i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 




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1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IrH 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH | | | | | 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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11 ' ' ' ' 1 . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 . . I 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I 




•satBjif 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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TfiO-^iO(Ob*t'l-tDt-OOOOJ' H OlOOOOOJH- , iNOOOOMl>b« 




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OOtOiOiOt'OOtOtOOt-OOlOOOO'-'OlOOlOffiCOtUt-OOClOOCO 




3 o 






















1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



53 



I | \ | I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I <M» 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I *H IN 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I Ir-ll I I i-H I <N I I I I HdlMNHrOHiOg-O 



I 1 I I I Iri I I Irt in I I I IH««HHH l«Ni«» 



lllllll'llllllllllllrHI>OiHCQO(DCN 



i I i i i i i i i i mi n ihhi ini isnac; 



I I I I I I I I 1 |H I I I IHH I IH I I T-IM t- OJ^J 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I i i I i ih i eq i 



I I i I i I I i I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I IHIOOl- 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I >o co -; 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I HHt-ffl 



I I I I I I I ( I I I I I I <■ — I ■ I 



I I I IN ICfOO 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1-1 I I 



I I I I I I ISOCO 



I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I IN I I >0 CO 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I i-l I I HM( 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I IH I I l»l 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I IrliOi 



•Hlt-t'a)Nrt'i:rl<t--J(BH(Drot-Of10»iO«5i0^a)0(Ot-(Ofl)0'1 , H'IOCOOOH! 
00-*^COO(NOOCCCOMOOO)QOCO©-*ClQOO-t'-0'OiOinrtf-<ID©'flinocOO> 






■ orooiMi'ioC'ioiocoHmc 



<OHTtr-io-t>noinortoio^O)i 



(NM^nc0MNM!DC0rll-iW)0l-O!0O0>'*'»Or-0)0)n0)«OO'+l»OTl"fiHi00)«! 

1<N<N<NCN!N<MCM<NC^!N 



C4t't'00^<NOHHMi-»iO'jtOintiH^xMq'OOJco^coxt"-i!co^^c5'n^'ti 



^"WfO-+'0(Dl^(K010^MW1<inOI-COO)0»-" 



tD(DffltO(DCO( 



t-C001OT-WM-Mfl(Dt-0001 



ICOCOOOCOOOOOCCCOOOC 



ICOOOODODCCOC! 



)0)Oio;050)C50iO)0)Oi 



54 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 





Remaining op 

Each Year's 

Admissions 

Sept. 30, 1899. 


•sisioj, 


1 • ' ' ' ' ■ ■ ' ' ' rt ' ' 




•ssxtJcnD.j 


1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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OOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOO 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



55 



IrH | | r-l | |H IH^HWOJ |HO!t<^iiO»fl)HOHOOCOH<NiOOO>«(»HCO(£) 

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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f» IrHrHrH IrH IHirtCOC^WOiMCOOOtO^cotOTtoiMQOOlOMrtHt- |cO 

r-lrH riHCOiOiOCO j r-l 


1 1 'l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■* | ■« 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■* | -* 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ol 1 o 1 t- 


i i I i i I I i i I i I i I i i I I i i I I i i I i I I I I i i I i I i cq i "# eo 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Irl I iH 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IH 1 1 1 1 IHHrtf » 


3 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1-1 1 l_ 1 1 1 l-H-tlH CO 03 


o 


I i I i i i I I I i i I i I i i i i i i I i i i I I I r I I I I i I I i i t-i i 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 03 IN 


co 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 t II IH 1 1 | 1 IH 1 CO <0 


■* 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IH I COT* 


00 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 iHiis 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IrHCOrH 


o 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H0O 


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N'J'OOt'0)tD«010fON<NHT(iinHNi001(»i-<iO---fcCt-l»p:(NtDir50(OM'*iO{OHCl 
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WCOKOOODCOCCCCQCCOOOCOOOMCOCOaiXCOQOaOCOCOCOCOOOQOCOOOcOOOXCOXOOCOCOCOOO 



56 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



OS 

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00 






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CM CM r-l 


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1— 1 1— 1 T— 1 


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1-hcm i i (N eo ^ ^ 1 in co ^ » co 

1— 1 


YEARS ENDING 
SEPT. 30. 






GOaiCMCO-^COt^COClOi— 1 CM CO -* 

cocor^t^r^r^t^i^t^cooooooooo 

COCOGOGO0OCOOOOOCOCOCOO0COQO 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



57 



i-I(Mt-HCNt-Hi-HCM,C<>-*(Mt-iiOCOCOiC> 

CM 


co 
so 


| | ! 1 — 1 | ' . iH tH i~l <N | i-t ■<* <N i-H i-H 


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TJH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 


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T-H 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iH 


i-H 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1-H 1— 1 1— 1 


co 


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cococococoojosasaiajoioiasoCTs 

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58 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Employed in the Worcester Insane Hospital, Sept. 30, 1899. 



Superintendent and physician, per year, 




. $3,000 00 


Assistant superintendent and physician, per year 


i 


1,500 00 


Assistant physician, " " 




1,500 00 


Assistant physician, " " 




1,100 00 


Assistant physicians (two), each, " " 




1,000 00 


Junior assistant physicians (four), each, " " 




400 00 


Steward, " " 




1,200 00 


Treasurer, " " 




500 00 


Auditor, " " 




75 00 


Matron, " " 




600 00 


Clerk, " " 




720 00 


Stenographers (three), per month, 


$ 30 00 and 60 00 


Supervisor (man), " 


tt 


45 00 


Supervisor (woman), " 


it 


30 00 


Assistant supervisors (men, two), each, " 


u 


40 00 and 35 00 


Assistant supervisors (women, two), each, " 


(t 


25 00 


Marker of clothing, etc., " 


u 


20 00 


Seamstresses (two) each, " 


t( 


18 00 


Attendants (men, forty-seven), " 


(C 


. 23 00 to 28 00 


Attendants (women, fifty-three), " 


tl 


. 14 00 to 20 00 


Night attendants (men, six), " 


u 


. 25 00 to 28 00 


Night attendants (seven) , " 


" 


18 00 


Baker (one), " 


u 


50 00 


Assistant baker (one), " 


" 


27 00 


Steward's assistant, " 


ct 


30 00 


Office girl, 


11 


16 00 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No 


. 23 


59 


Kitchen men (two), per month, . 


$25 00 and $35 00 


Cooks (two), " " 






25 00 and 28 00 


Laundry-man, " " 






30 00 


Laundress, " " 








20 00 


Assistant-laundry man, " " 








27 00 


Laundry girls (eight), " " 








14 00 to 18 00 


Kitchen girls (five), " " 








14 00 to 16 00 


House girls (eight) , each, " " 








14 00 


Carpenters (five), per day, . 








2 50 and 3 00 


Painters (two), " " . 








2 50 and 2 75 


Mason, " " . 








3 00 


Helper, " " 








2 25 


Plumber, " year, . 








900 00 


Engineer, " " . 








1,000 00 


Firemen (two), per month, 








40 00 


Farmer, " " 








60 00 


Housekeeper, " " 








20 00 


Farm laborers (fifteen) , " " 








23 00 to 30 00 


Farm help (women, four), " " 








. 14 00 to 20 00 


Florist, 








45 00 


Coachman, " " 








25 00 


Expressman, " " 








25 00 


Basement and yard man, " " 








25 00 



60 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



PRODUCTS OF THE FARM 

On Hand Oct. 1, 1899, and not delivered at the Hospital. 



Apples, . 

Beets, 

Cabbages, 

Carrots, . 

Celery, 

Corn fodder, 

Ensilage, . 

Hay, 

Hay, swale, 

Mangolds, 

Oat fodder, 

Onions, 

Parsnips, . 

Pumpkins, 

Rye,. . 

Squash, . 
Straw rye, 
Turnips, 
Pop corn, . 



800 barrels. 
200 bushels. 
5,000 heads. 

100 bushels. 
5,000 heads. 
10 tons. 
500 tons. 
400 tons. 
10 tons. 
21 tons. 
30 tons. 
600 bushels. 
200 bushels. 
2 tons. 
25 bushels. 
40,000 pounds. 
4 tons. 
1,100 bushels. 
25 bushels. 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



61 



FAEM ACCOUNT 



Dr 



Bread, 

Butter, . 

Current expenses, 

Fertilizers, 

Fuel and light, 

Furniture, 

Groceries, 

Grain and meal, 

Live stock, 

Meats, etc., 

Repairs, 

Seeds, 

Sugar, 

Water, 

Wages, 



Net gain for year ending Sept. 30, 1899, 



$240 00 

634 40 

726 65 

417 00 

267 57 

44 65 

1,566 14 

5,414 42 

1,319 50 

1,817 65 

151 96 

214 30 

309 81 

161 93 

5,771 55 

$19,057 53 

1.959 51 

I 

$21,017 04 



Cr. 



Apples, 259 barrels, 
Asparagus, 48 dozen bunches, 
Beets, 170 bushels, . 
Beans, Lima, 31 bushels, 
Beans, string, 48 bushels, 
Beans, shell, 2 bushels, . 
Beet tops, 3 barrels, 
Bones, 3,536 pounds, 

Amount carried forward, 



. $486 75 


57 


81 


80 


85 


40 


38 


43 


69 


2 


00 


1 


50 


17 


88 


. $730 86 



62 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

Amount brought forward, $730 86 

Cash for drawing coal, 44 00 

Currants, 1,053 boxes, ......... 105 30 

Cucumbers, 291, 5 82 

Corn, 2,886 dozen, 254 20 

Carrots, 1J bushels, 1 30 

Cabbage, 563 barrels, . . . 953 90 

Cauliflower, 98 heads, . 13 80 

Celery, 190 dozen bunches, 317 13 

Chicken, 64 pounds, 12 05 

Cider, 110 gallons, . . 11 10 

Egg plant, 221, 21 15 

Eggs, 55 dozen, 11 75 

Honey, 14 pounds, 2 10 

Hay, 46,9 10 pounds, 398 03 

Hides, 3, 9 00 

Horseradish, 95 pounds, 7 60 

Ice, cut, 100 tons, 25 00 

Kale, 38 barrels, 36 00 

Live stock sold, . 604 75 

Lettuce, 582 dozen, 21183 

Milk, 322,285 quarts, 12,891 40 

Melons, 273, 48 00 

Oats, 300 bushels, 102 00 

Onions, 437 bushels, 329 13 

Parsley, 3£ bushels, 3 50 

Pears, 1 bushel, 1 50 

Potatoes, 746 bushels, 470 00 

Peas, 72 bushels 192 00 

Pork, 25,053 pounds, 1,344 33 

Parsnips, 48 bushels, 70 20 

Plants, 11 30 

Pickle cucumbers, 82 bushels, 163 00 

Rye, 4 bushels, 2 40 

Radish, 621 dozen 81 00 

Rhubarb, 8,331 pounds 138 79 

Raspberries, 2 boxes, 30 

Straw, 5 tons, 50 00 

Sand, 9 00 

Amount carried forward, |19,684 52 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



63 



Amount brought forward, 

Strawberries, 512 boxes, 
Squash, summer, 323, . 
Squash, winter, 56,500 pound 
Swiss chard, 41 bushels, . 
Spinach, 189 bushels, 
Sage, 2k bushels, . 
Sprouts, 3 bushels, . 
Turnips, 422 bushels, 
Tomatoes, 556 bushels, . 
Tomatoes, green, 18 bushels, 
Wheels, four, . 
Wood, 
Cash for 214 pounds fowl, 



$19,684 52 



51 


20 


12 


92 


641 


50 


16 


40 


84 75 


2 


50 


3 


25 


169 


65 


286 


05 


7 


20 


10 


00 


15 


00 


32 


10 


$21,017 


04