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Full text of "Annual report of the trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital"



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



. . . . No. 23. 



SEVENTIETH ANNUAL EEPOET 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

01' THE 

WOECESTER Insane Hospital, 

AND 

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OP THE 

WOECESTEE INSANE ASYLUM AT WOECESTEE, 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1902. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1903. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 23. 

SEVENTIETH ANNUAL EEPOET 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Worcester Insane Hospital, 

AND 

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

WORCESTER INSANE ASYLUM AT WORCESTER, 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1902. 







BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER FRTT^ITIKG jO.., .^T \ .'F PI,INT/RS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1903. 



VV 



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SfATt i-! . ^'n 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3 



CONTENTS 



Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 28 

Report of Treasurer, 37 

Statistics, . . . 43 



OFFICERS OF THE HOSPITAL. 



TRUSTEES. 

THOMAS RUSSELL, Bostoxnt. 

SARAH E. WHITIN, Whitinsville. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN, Worcester. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD, Worcester. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, Worcester. 

GEORGE W. WELLS, Southeridge. 

ROCKWOOD HOAR, . . , Worcester. 



RESIDENT 
HOSE A M. QUINBY, M.D., 
ALFRED L NOBLE, M.D., 
HARRY A. COTTON, M.D., 
CORNELIA B. J. SCHORER, M.D 
ISADOR H. CORIAT, M.D., 
THEODORE A. HOCH, M.D , 
HENRY S. CHAFFEE, M.D., 
CHARLES T. FISHER, M.D., 
WILLIAM E. KORNEGAY, M.D. 
H. WALTON WOOD, M.D., 

HENRY R. CENTER, 
LILA J. GORDON, . 
S. JOSEPHINE BRECK, . 
JOSEPH T. REYNOLDS, . 



OFFICERS. 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Super intetident. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Junior Assistant. 
Junior Assistant. 
Junior Assistant, 
Junior Assistant. 

Steioard. 
Matron. 
. Clerk. 
Farmer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

WILLIAM D. SPROAT, Druygist. 

ALBERT WOOD, Treasurer. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, Auditor. 

JAMES DICKISON, Jr., Engineer. 



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C0mm0ntotaIt^ 0f "^uBButiimtttB. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital respectfully 
submit their seventieth annual report, together with the reports 
of the superintendent and treasurer. 

The hospital has during the year last past been conducted 
with economy and efficiency of management by its officers, as 
will appear from the reports of the superintendent and treas- 
urer, presented herewith. 

It has cared for a larger number of patients than in any 
previous year, the average daily number being 1,100.75, and 
the number of patients on Sept. 30, 1902, being 1,116. 

The principal change in tlie course of the year in the medical 
staff of the institution has been the resignation of Dr. Adolf 
Meyer, the pathologist, who left to take an important position 
in New York State, connected with the care of the insane, and 
whose work is now being carried on by his former assistants. 

The enlargement of the chapel and the chapel wing have 
l)een completed, and furnish needed accommodation for the 
employees of the hospital, and also work rooms in which an 
additional number of the patients can be given beneficial em- 
ployment. 

There have been no epidemics of contagious disease during 
the year. 

In the latter part of last August the attention of the public 
was drawn to this institution by a series of statements con- 
tained in some of the papers of this State, especially those 
published in the city of Worcester, making charges of bad 



8 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

management against the hospital and its officers. These 
charges seemed to the trustees to call for an investigation by 
them ; and such an investigation was made, and on September 
13 a report of the result of such an investigation was made by 
this Board and published in pamphlet form. This report not 
only contains a statement of the circumstances which gave rise 
to the charges and the result of the findings of the trustees as 
to their truth or falsity, but it also contained such a good state- 
ment of the methods, resources and conduct of the institution, 
that we desire to make it a part of this report, as an Appendix. 

Good progress has been made during the year in the build- 
ing of the nurses' home, for which an appropriation was made 
by the Legislature of 1901 ; and during the spring of the com- 
ing year it should be completed, and be ready to supply much- 
needed accommodations for 60 female attendants. 

The Board would repeat the recommendation made last year 
of an appropriation of $10,000 for a morgue ; and would ask 
for an additional appropriation for carrying on the equipment 
of the hospital with means for electrical lighting; and for 
$3,000 for the enlargement of the office, where there is now no 
proper room for the typewriters, who have to do their work in 
the room with the medical officers. 

THOMAS EUSSELL, 
SARAH E. WHITIN, 
FRANCES M. LINCOLN, 
SAMUEL B. WOODWARD, 
THOMAS H. GAGE, 
GEORGE W. WELLS, 
ROCKAVOOD HOAR, 

Trustees. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. n. 



APPENDIX 



Statement of the Board of Trustees of the Worcester 
Insane Hospital, with Reference to the Manage- 
ment OF that Institution, Sept. 13, 1902. 
The Board of Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital, 
in view of the statements contained in some of the papers of 
the State concerning matters at the hospital in their charge, 
sul)mit the following report : — 

The attention of the public has been drawn recently to 
the stories of several female attendants, discharged from the 
Worcester Insane Hospital. Not content with giving a version 
of the circumstances attending their discharge, several of the 
attendants went on to give accounts of the conduct and man- 
agement of the institution, which were published and given 
a wide circulation as facts. Such things as these were pub- 
lished : "Many of the patients sleeping on the floor with 
nothing to cover them but the swab cloths, — the filthy 
rao;s which are used in cleanino- the buildinof." " The food 
is miserable; in cases it is positively filthy." "The .eggs 
which are put into the egg-nogs are so stale and decayed 
that the odor can be detected throughout the corridors. The 
patients would protest at drinking such filthy stuff", and then 
the attendants would be instructed and obliged to make them 
drink it through a tube." "The soup is full of flies, cock- 
roaches, bugs and other delicacies." " The stench of rotten 
meat which permeates the house several times a week and 
sometimes daily is almost enough to make one sick." " A 
nightly occurrence to take the swab cloth, full of grease, oil, 
germs, filth and dust, and shake it out, so that the patient 
might have something to keep warm." " Innnense rats which 



10 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct, 

roam at will through the corridors and rooms, and which 
nibble at them and their clothing." 

These things and such things as these have gone out to the 
public as a fair picture of the state of things existing in an 
institution which has been located in Worcester for seventy- 
years, and which has been supposed, hitherto, to be a model 
institution of its kind, and which has repeatedly received the 
approval of the Governor and Council and of the State Board 
of Insanity in its annual reports. 

The present trustees, whose names are appended to this 
report, publicly through the newspapers of September 3 in- 
vited any one who desired to bring any matter to their attention 
to write them or call upon them, giving the name and address 
of each trustee, four of whom live in Worcester. They have 
failed to receive any responses, save from three persons, two 
of them former patients, one now in Boston, the other now in 
Marlborough, the third a patient now in the hospital. The 
trustees thereupon have proceeded to carefully investigate 
each matter alleged with reference to the discharge of the 
attendants, and also with reference to the stories as to the man- 
agement of the institution, and desire to report to the public 
the facts as ascertained. 

First, as to the discharge of the attendants. 

Certain female attendants, who under the rules were allowed 
each week an afternoon and an evening until 10.30 o'clock, 
desired to obtain another evening as a regular allowance. 
Failing to obtain this, on Monday evening, August 26, eleven 
of them left the wards where they belonged and the building, 
and stayed out for a second evening until 10.30 o'clock. At 
that hour they returned, when the patients in the ward were 
asleep and the wards were quiet for the night. They were 
met by the superintendent, who had previously communicated 
with one of the trustees, who took their keys from them, told 
them they could not enter the wards, and showed them to 
another part of the building, where there were suitable beds 
and quarters for each one. There they were found congregated 
at half-past 6 the next morning, singing and raising a dis- 
turbance. They were paid off and discharged, and out of 
sympathy twelve others, who had taken no part in the previous 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 11 

affair, left at once. The girls stated that they were locked in 
their rooms. They were in fact put into a new part, finished 
and furnished and ready for occupancy, but not yet occupied. 
There were no keys to the rooms nor ta the part of the build- 
ing where they were, and they were free to go into the centre 
part of the building through a swinging door. Obviously, 
they could not have been left outside the building at that 
hour of the night, though if they had been men they would 
have deserved it. They could not be permitted to disturb 
the patients. The superintendent did what was an entirely 
proper thing to do. Each of these attendants had a beefsteak 
breakfast served to her the next mornino; in the Sargent dining 

o o o 

room. The sympathizing attendants had the regular break- 
fast served in the ward, but they refused to help the patients 
or assist in caring for them in any way, so that they left the 
patients in their wards utterly uncared for by them, not even 
unlocking their doors. 

Some of the attendants who so left proceeded to narrate as 
facts stories with reference to the conduct of the hospital which 
have been published. These stories were not told by all of 
the attendants who left, and several of them, previous to the 
publication of the trustees' call for information, told trustees 
that they were horrified when they read the article published 
in the evening paper, the stories were so exaggerated. The 
trustees recognize the wild exao;geration of these statements. 
Yet it is just to those of the public who have not become 
familiar with the administration of the hospital by having 
friends or relatives there as inmates, as well as to those more 
directly interested by having friends and relatives there, and 
also to those who, as physicians, supervisors, employees and 
attendants, give their lives to faithful performance of their 
respective duties, that the facts concerning the hospital and its 
management should be stated. 

The charges made by these attendants relate to — 

1. Insufficient supervision, and ignorance of what occurs in 
the hospital. 

2. Bad food. 

3. Lack of bedding and bed clothing. 

4. Rats, bugs and vermin. 



12 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

5. Overcrowding' of" patients. 

6. Neglect of patients. 

7. Long hours required of attendants. 
Taking up the charges enumerated above : — 

1. Insufficient Supervision. 

The hospital is regularly inspected and its affairs scrutinized 
as follows : — 

Each month by its Board of seven trustees, who also, 
especially the women and the two physicians and surgeons on 
the Board, visit the institution at other times, while all mem- 
bers are frequently employed in the direction of its details in 
Worcester and elsewhere. They serve entirely without pay. 
It is also frequently visited and inspected by the agent of the 
State Board and by members of that Board, by the Governor 
and the Council, by the joint standing committee on public 
charitable institutions, and by friends and relatives of patients, 
who come in large numbers on two days in each week which 
are public visiting days. Besides this, many patients write 
constantly of their condition and surroundings to their friends, 
and each ward contains a letter-box regularly opened by the 
State agent, where letters and any complaints can be directly 
brought to him, without going through the hands of any officer 
or employee. 

The trustees also employ, as auditor and confidential ad- 
viser, a former steward, now the head of one of the principal 
educational institutions of Worcester, who is an expert in all 
matters relating to the prices and quality of all supplies pur- 
chased; and he acts independently of a competent steward of 
great experience, and of the superintendent, who is known 
throughout the United States both for his medical skill and 
also his great practical executive ability. 

It would seem, therefore, as if the hospital was guarded at 
every point by different independent methods of examination, 
sufficient to insure a proper, careful and successful manage- 
ment. Of course it is no small thing to manage successfully 
the personal and daily affairs of a thousand persons ; still 
greater if they are a thousand sick persons ; still greater by 
far if they are a thousand insane persons. One such person 
has usually utterly upset and disturbed the nerves of a whole 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 13 

family before the commitment of the patient to the hospital. 
And yet the superintendent, as the head of the institution, 
takes all these thousand people on his heart and brain ; has 
them seven days in the week and fifty-two weeks in the year 
to deal with, — their physical comfort, food, clothing, medical 
treatment, their health, their whims, their friends and family 
to meet and to write to. He cannot lay by matters to take up 
later ; he must settle things as they come up ; it won't do to 
let them accumulate. It is easy to mistake business prompt- 
ness in him for brusqueness, and decision for discourtesy, or, 
when we deal with one patient, to criticise him who deals with 
a thousand. Those who know the problems of hospital man- 
agement realize that the superintendent of a great insane 
hospital is entitled to the forbearance and the respect of his 
fellowmen. 

2. Bad Food. 

With reference to the statements that "the food is miser- 
able, in cases it is positively filthy;" "the eggs which are 
put into the egg-nogs are so stale and decayed that the odor 
can be detected throughout the corridors ; " " the soup is full 
of flies, cockroaches, bugs and other delicacies ; " "the stench 
of rotten meat which permeates the wards several times a week 
and sometimes daily is almost enough to make one sick," and 
other statements of like nature, the trustees will call the atten- 
tion of the public first to the following letters from the dealers 
of whom supplies are purchased, in which they state clearly 
the quality of the goods furnished : — 

Sept. 9, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — Eeplying to your verbal questions regarding the 
meats supplied by our house to the Worcester Insane Hospital, I 
have to say that we have always furnished the very best native or 
corn-fed cattle. Your steward frequently buys the whole beeves, 
leaving parts hanging, in order that it may thoroughly ripen ; pur- 
chases of from two to four whole cattle are often made, while the 
supply of fore-quarters ranges from ten to eighteen at a time, always 
according to quality. The lambs supplied are always late winter or 
early spring, and care is always taken to deliver the freshest and best. 
This will apply to all meats supplied by our house to your institution. 
Yours respectfully, C. H. Prentice & Co., 

By Wm. VanKenner, Manager. 



14 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

Sept. 9, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

G-ENTLEMEN : — In regard to your inquiry as to quality of meats 
supplied by our house, I beg to say that only the very best of beef, 
lambs, poultry, hams, bacon, etc., have been furnished. The beef 
has always been what is commercially known as native or corn-fed 
stock, and has been supplied in the carcass or by quarters. The 
hams and bacon are of our own curing, which we consider are the 
very best. 

Yours truly, Armour & Co., 

By E. E. Sessions, Manager. 

Aug. 30, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Bisane Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

Gentlemek : — In response to your verbal inquiry, made to us to- 
day, regarding the quality and quantities of goods furnished to the 
Worcester Insane Hospital, we beg to advise that we have supplied 
the institution at various times during the past year with quantities 
of fresh pork, smoked shoulders, ham and lard. Shoulders have been 
purchased in quantities from 500 to 1,000 pounds, hams from 150 
pounds upwards, lard in various quantities from 5 tierces down as 
market conditions would suggest. We have delivered our standard 
quality or best brand of goods in all cases. 

Trusting the above will supply you with the information you desire, 
we remain, 

Yours respectfully, White, Pevet and Dexter Co., 

By R. F. D. 

To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

In response to your inquiry regarding the quality of fish, both fresh 
and salt, supplied by our house to the Worcester Insane Hospital, we 
have to say that for a number of years we have supplied weekly from 
600 to 800 pounds of fresh fish, which has always been of the very 
best quality obtainable. In nearly every case codfish has been fur- 
nished ; in a very few instances, when cod could not be obtained, 
haddock has been substituted ; hake has never been supplied. We 
have also furnished for a number of years during the season from 90 
to 100 gallons of oysters each month; these have always been sent 
in not less than 4 5 -gallon lots. These oysters are the choicest 
medium select quality. Further, we have also supplied the Worces- 
ter Insane Hospital with salmon for the 4th of July dinner. This 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 15 

fish has always been the very best quality obtainable. The salt fish 
supplied is the best medium bank codfish, and we have been careful 
to send only the freshest and best. 

Respectfully yours, G. P. Cobb. 

Aug. 30, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

Gentlemen : — In reply to your request in regard to the quality of 

eggs bought of us for the Worcester Insane Hospital, would say we 

are sending 300 to 750 dozen per week of the finest quality ; these 

eggs are known as fresh gathered western eggs, and grade as extras 

on the market. We always save them from our best collections, 

sometimes holding over the order a day, so as to be sure to send the 

finest. Every egg sent is tested by electric light, — a quality of egg 

that is used by the best grocery trade of Worcester. 

Respectfully, The W. W. Whipple Company. 

Aug. 30, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

Gentlemen : — In reply to your inquiry in regard to quality of eggs 

purchased for your institution, will state that they are fresh-gathered 

western eggs, candled and selected. Will also state that this quality 

of egg is the same as is used by probably 80 per cent, of the people 

of this city. 

Yours truly, J. Heslok & Co. 

Sept. 9, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — Replying to your verbal question as to the quality 
of goods that have been supplied by our house to your institution, 
would say, of the various products, mainly vegetables and fruits, that 
they have always been of the very best quality. The potatoes, which 
are often purchased in car lots, are invariably of Maine stock, such 
as Hebrons, New Queen an(i Early Rose. The small fruits, berries, 
peaches, etc., have been the best the market could supply. The can- 
teloupes have been Black Japs, Rocky Fords and Jennie Linds. The 
watermelons have always been carefully selected from the best of our 
receipts. I might say, in closing, that these fruits and melons have 
frequently been supplied in lai'ge quantities. 

Yours respectfully, Walter N. Gleason. 



16 WORCESTER INSANE ELOSPITAL. [Oct. 

Sept. 9, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

Replying to your request for a statement as to the kind and grade 
of food supplies purchased of us for the Worcester Insane Hospital, 
we submit the following : — 

Tea. — Pure Oolong tea, in original chests, of the grade retailed at 
40 to 50 cents. You have bought this usually in 25-chest lots. The 
United States government inspection guarantees that all teas admitted 
to this country are free from dust and not injurious to health, so the 
fact that you purchase tea in original packages admits of no doubt as 
to its purity and wholesomeness. 

Coffee. — Good quality Maracaibo or Bourbon Santos coffee, retail 
value 25 cents. This you always have delivered to you fresh roasted 
and unground. Quantity contracted for, 3,000 to 10,000 pounds at 
a time, the raw coffee being set aside for you and roasted to your 
order. 

Spices. — Strictly pure mustard, pepper, cassia, cream of tartar, 
etc., of the same grade as we supply to the best trade in Worcester 
County. These you purchase in regular wholesale packages of from 
5 to 50 pounds. 

As the goods mentioned above are articles often adulterated, we 
wish to state that we have never sold or delivered to the Worcester 
Insane Hospital an ounce of compound or adulterated tea, coffee or 
spice. 

Cheese. — New York State full cream, finest grade sold in any 
market, retailed at 15 cents per pound. Purchases, 300 to 1,500 
pounds. 

Molasses. — Absolutely pure domestic molasses, retailed at 40 to 
50 cents per gallon. Purchases, 5 to 15 barrels. 

Raisins. — California 3 crown, sound standard goods, retailed at 
10 cents per pound, and fancy seeded, retailed at 12 cents per pound. 

Prunes. — Size 50 to 60, California, retailed at 10 cents per 
pound ; sound and standard grade. 

Cereals. — Including oat meal, corn meal and cracked wheat, — all 
of standard quality and sound goods. 

Canned Goods. — Stancjard grade of peas, corn, succotash, beans ; 
retail price from 10 to 13 cents. 

S^^ga,rs. — Standard granulated and brown sugars, perfectly pure, 
in lots from 1 to 25 barrels. 

So far as the prices on the goods we sell you may indicate the qual- 
ity, we wish to say that the quantities you use of staple food supplies 
are such that you get, and are entitled to, prices as low as the largest 
retailers or even small wholesalers. 

Yours respectfully, E. T. Shith Company. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 17 

Boston, Sept. 8, 1902. 
H. M. QuiNBY, M.D., Superintendent, Worcester, Mass. 

Dear Sir : — Our salesman, Mr. E. H. Shaffer, has asked us to 
send you a line with reference to the quality of the flour which we 
have been shipping you during the past year or more. It hardly 
seems that this is necessary, because the quality of this flour must 
have spoken for itself both in regard to quantity and bread per barrel 
which it produces, and through the quality of the bread itself. 

However, we would say that we have been shipping you our Top 
Patent, made from the very choicest Minnesota and Dakota hard 
spring wheat. This flour enjoys a very high reputation in the trade 
throughout the United States and in Europe as well. It is a favorite 
with the bakers because of its large bread yield. 

This company is owned entirely by Massachusetts men, who have 
been engaged in the distribution of flour for thirty years past. They 
embarked in the milling business with the sole idea of purchasing the 
highest grade and most reliable article in the way of flour that is upon 
the market. We are safe in saying that no mill in the United States 
enjoys a higher reputation. 

With regard to your purchases of our flour, would say that they 
have been very fortunate for the State, but decidedly less so for us, 
as they have usually been made in a large way on a low point in the 
market, and the flour taken out later on, we presume as your neces- 
sities required, but usually upon a considerably higher market than 
when purchases were made. 

Thanking you for past favors, and relying upon the merit of our 
flour to secure us a continuance of same, we remain, 

Very truly yours, Bay State Milling Company, 

By B. J. RoTHWELL, Pi'esident. 

Sept. 9, 1902. 
To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

Gentlemen : — Having learned of the dissatisfaction alleged to 
exist at your institution in regard to the food supplies, we take pleas- 
ure in stating that our house has supplied the institution with large 
quantities of peaches and small fruits, i.e., strawberries, raspberries, 
etc. These very often have been furnished in quantities of from 5 
to 25 baskets of peaches and from 50 to 800 quarts of strawberries 
at one time. While nominally our business is a retail one, yet we 
know that we have the reputation of handling the very best fruits, 
and it has always been this quality that we have furnished to the 
hospital. 

Yours very respectfully, Arnold &, Maine. 



18 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

The vegetables, with the exception of potatoes, are raised in 
abundant quantities on the farm, consequently they are fresher 
than if purchased in the market. They consist of peas, string 
beans, butter beans, lima beans, cucumbers, beets, turnips, 
cabbages, summer and winter squashes, early and late corn, 
celery, carrots, parsnips, onions, rhubarb and lettuce. The 
farm produces also quantities of apples. There is a herd of 
ninety-five cows. During August eighty-four were in milk ; 
eleven dry; and 1,137.7 quarts of milk were delivered at the 
hospital daily from this herd. This milk was put into the ice 
closet in the cans in which it was delivered, and from them 
poured into the receptacles for the wards, milk and cream un- 
separated, and sent up three times a day. 

Four years ago a new kitchen was built, which is thoroughly 
up to date in every particular, and of capacity to cook food 
for a much larger number of inmates than are now in the hos- 
pital. It is well ventilated, and has all the modern improve- 
ments. Good cooks, who thoroughly understand their busi- 
ness, are employed. The bakery is a model in every way, and 
the bakers have great experience in their work. Scullery and 
all rooms connected with the kitchen are perfectly clean ; the 
swill is never allowed to remain to sour in the tubs, but is taken 
to the piggery perfectly sweet. There is an up to date butch- 
er's room, where the meat is received and cut up. There are 
three large ice rooms, one for meats, one for milk, butter and 
eggs, and the third for the every-day use of the kitchen for all 
other articles which should be kept on ice. The hospital cuts 
its own ice, and has large quantities of it. 

The food, when cooked, is carried on cars through passages 
in the basement to the wards, and sent up on lifts to the dining 
rooms, where it is served. The dining rooms are in charge of 
the attendants, who are responsible for the proper serving of 
the food and the cleanliness of the rooms and closets. The 
kitchen and all its departments are frequently visited by the 
trustees and carefully inspected. 

They also, both before and since these charges appeared, 
have frequently inspected the meat rooms, and have never 
found therein any meat not in perfectly good condition, and 
have never found the slightest odor of decayed meat. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 19 

The management found a few years ago that it was exceed- 
mgly difficult to obtain an adequate supply of satisfactory 
butter at prices which made it possible to furnish the quantity 
demanded by patients within the total cost per week of $3.25 
allowed by the State for all State, city and town patients. The 
alternatives were either to very materially restrict the amount 
used or the quality furnished, or to find some satisfactory sub- 
stitute. The use of oleomargarine was adopted, as being the 
least objectionable. Consequently a careful inspection was 
made, and a kind of oleo was procured not in the general 
market, but specially from a selected manufactory. This was 
tried and found to be very satisfactory, and accepted without 
complaint. Its use was in no way covered up. The trustees 
at their monthly meetings, the physicians and employees, have 
regularly used it, as have the patients, and have found it eco- 
nomical and excellent. Its use, however, will have to be aban- 
doned, because of the recently enacted legislation by Congress, 
which has imposed such a tax on the product, which is artifi- 
cially colored, as is all butter, that the price will be raised so 
that there can be no economy in its future purchase or use. 

Notes are taken of every part of the work in the hospital, 
and everything pertaining to the condition and care of patients 
is recorded. These records are made by the attendants, under 
direction of the physicians ; they are all on file, and can be re- 
ferred to at any time, so that the condition of the patients can 
be followed year after year. 

Among other matters recorded- is the weight of the patients, 
which is taken monthly. These records have been carefully 
examined ; the average weight of the patients on the female 
side of the house was ascertained for August, 1901, and the 
average weight of the same patients for July, 1902. It is as 
follows : — 



20 



WOKCESTEE INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



WARD. 



Number 


Average 


of 


Weight, 


Patients. 


August, 1901. 




Pounds. 


22 


131.2 


16 


111.7 


26 


140.2 


31 


129.9 


12 


107.0 


13 


107.7 


15 


106.5 


47 


129,0 


54 


129.0 


66 


133.4 


54 


106.4 


18 


111.8 


33 


124.0 


33 


125.3 


36 


122.6 



Average 

Weiglit of 

Same Patients, 

July, 1902. 



Howe 1, 
Howe 2, 
Howe 3, 
Howe 4, 
Folsom 1, 
Folsom 2, 
Folsom 3, 
Phillips 1, 
Phillips 2, 
Phillips 3, 
Phillips 4, 
Hooper Hall 
Washburn 
Washburn 
Washburn 



131.8 
121.2 
140.9 
133.9 
111.3 
110.5 
107.9 
134.8 
131.0 
136.4 
123.2 
117.0 
121.3 
125.5 
125.2 



The attendants who make this charge of food unfit to eat 
thus by their own records show a gain in the average weight 
of from .2 of a pound in Washburn 2 to 16.8 pounds in 
Phillips 4. On but one ward was there an average loss, on 
Washburn 1, which is the most excited ward. 

All private patients paying over $5 per week have special 
diet, and special diet is also provided for the infirmary wards. 

As the kitchen is in an entirely separate building, it seems 
impossible that any great odor should reach the wards from it. 
Rotten meats are not sold to the hospital, rotten meats are not 
cooked, and rotten meats are not served to the patients ; con- 
sequently, no stench from them can permeate the wards. 



3. Lack of Bedding and Bed Clothing. 

It is charged that patients are forced to sleep on the bare 
floors without proper covering, and that the humane attend- 
ants cover them with the swab blankets, which they take from 
the handles and shake in a vain endeavor to free them from 
dirt and filth. 

Everything bought for the hospital and issued from the 
storerooms is recorded, and a very perfect system is used for 
these records. It is easy to ascertain just what has been issued 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 21 

to the wards, even to a paper of pins ; and, in addition to 
these records, an account of stock was taken in each ward in 
question the very day the attendants left. The number of pa- 
tients in each ward was noted, and the exact number of sheets, 
pillow cases, quilts, blankets, mattresses, pillows, straw beds 
and pads. There is no need of giving the detail of each ward, 
but the total in these twelve wards was 410 patients, 1,835 
sheets, 832 pillow cases, 529 quilts, 639 pairs blankets, 55 
single indestructible blankets, 264 mattresses, 138 straw beds, 
65 pads and 474 pillows ; in addition to this list, there were 
many articles in the laundry for each ward, which had not 
been returned from the wash, over 900 sheets, as well as other 
articles, being washed daily. 

Certainly these figures show that there could not have been 
a lack of bedding. If it was not used, it was the fault of the 
very attendants who make the complaint. The straw beds and 
pads are used for those patients on the excited wards whose 
habits are such that their bed tickings must be washed and 
refilled daily. The swabs are made of partly worn blankets. 
Each pair of blankets makes, when separated, two swabs. 
They are attached to long handles, and are used for keeping 
the floors in order. The supervisors all state that they never 
heard of a swab blanket being used to cover a patient. One 
attendant stated that such a blanket was in use at the present 
time, and pointed it out. Upon examination it was found to 
be a perfectly clean, single indestructible blanket. But one 
shortage of blankets had been reported to a supervisor. That 
was in the spring, on a ward where an unusually large number 
of blankets had been sent to the wash. There were five blan- 
kets short, and these were borrowed from another ward. The 
blankets used are of good quality. Bed clothing not in use is 
kept in the clothing rooms of each ward, which are in charge 
of the attendants. Steam heat is used day and night through 
the cold weather. 

• 
4. Overcrovjding of Patients. 

■ This is a state of things which exists in every hospital in 
the State, and for which the hospital officials are in no way 
responsible. Patients are sent beyond the capacity of the 



22 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

hospital, and the officials do the best they can under these 
conditions. No one regrets more than they the being obliged 
to have patients sleep on the floors. Airing courts are turned 
into dormitories as far as possible. Unfortunately, in very 
few cases can two patients be put into one room, on account 
of the danger, as the overcrowding is almost entirely on the 
excited wards. In the case of Maggie Piper and Eliza Ann 
Carr, mentioned in the papers, they were not locked up together 
in a bath room, as stated ; they were in separate rooms, in each 
of which was a bath tub. They were put there to seclude them, 
that they might not disturb the other patients, and they had 
beds, pillows, sheets and blankets like those used by the other 
patients. This was one of the cases due to overcrowding the 
hospital. 

Careful inspection by the trustees at night on both the 
women's and the men's side show that the patients have com- 
fortable mattresses and bed clothes, and sleep as soundly and 
contentedly as those having separate rooms . The class of patients 
who do not sleep in rooms are those on wards where constant 
watches are maintained, and where the patients require prompt 
and constant supervision and attention. This is more carefully 
and readily given when the patients are under the eye of the night 
watch. When a patient gets so that he can rest without such 
attention through the night, his place is given to a patient from 
one of the rooms who needs such care, and the former is trans- 
ferred to the separate room. It is the decided opinion of many 
people that this method of caring for certain patients is of great 
personal benefit to the patients themselves. The dormitories 
in the building are each occupied by a number of quiet patients, 
who are able to care for themselves and do not disturb their 
fellows. 

5. Rats, Gockroaches and Other Vermin. 

To say that the institution is infested with vermin is utterly 
false. In any large institution for the insane, demented patients 
throw food, as well as papers and clothing, out of the windows. 
These articles are gathered up every day, but when food is 
thrown out late in the day it remains there over night, and 
naturally attracts rats and rnice about the building. They 
burrow in the earth, get into the basement, and sometimes 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 23 

follow the pipes into the wards. Poisons, of course, cannot be 
used in exterminating them, both on account of the probability 
that they may die in the building, as well as the danger that 
some patient may get the poison. Traps are set in the base- 
ment, and wherever required, holes when discovered are stopped 
up, and endless efforts are made to get rid of these pests ; and 
employees are expected to give notice whenever they are seen 
about the building, so that their number is very inconsiderable. 
Mouse traps are furnished for all the wards, and if not set and 
used, it is through carelessness of the attendants. The trustees 
can say, as the result of careful inspection both by night and 
day, that there are no cockroaches about the building. Of 
water bugs there are a few about some of the sinks, but in 
most of the wards none at all. Borax and like remedies are 
furnished whenever called for. The condition is very much as 
it is in many private houses, where warfare must occasionally 
be waged against such annoyances. The statement that the 
food is full of vermin is entirely untrue. 

6. Neglect of Patients. 
Several cases are instanced of neglect of patients, and names 
are given. These cases have all been carefully investigated ; 
and, first, it must be distinctly stated that in all cases the 
board of private patients is paid directly to the treasurer, 
never to the superintendent. No money for board of patients, 
public or private, passes through the superintendent's hands. 
Of the three cases where it is stated that large sums are paid 
for care, and no equivalent received, one patient has a private 
suite of rooms, including room with three windows for herself, 
a room for her private attendant, and a private bath room. She 
is quite feeble, and is confined to the bed much of the time. 
The attendant volunteered to do work in tlie dining room, 
which is almost opposite the patient's room. She also some- 
times takes out patients on the lawn. This was allowed because 
she did not have enough to do, and wished to occupy her spare 
time. The family of the patient knew of it. Another patient 
mentioned has a room on the infirmary ward, with two windows ; 
has a private attendant, who has done some work on the ward 
for the same reasons. Her son is entirely satisfied with the 



24' WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

arrangement and the care his mother receives. The third 
case is also on the infirmary ward. This patient has never 
paid for nor had a private attendant. She has everything 
needed done for her. One member of her family lives in town 
and visits her, and she also happens to be a relative of one of 
the trustees, who has been attached to her by many years of 
personal afiection, and is a townswomau and personal friend 
of another trustee ; so that her condition and care is a matter 
of unusual interest to several members of the Board. In not 
one of these cases is the board so large as the attendants state, 
by a good many dollars. The other two private patients men- 
tioned are in excited wards. Five dollars a week is paid for 
each of them ; they have rooms to themselves and require a 
good deal of attention, as they are noisy and violent. They 
receive far more care than is paid for. 

Two cases of sudden deaths are spoken of. One occurred 
at the Worcester Insane Asylum, and Dr. Quinby is accused 
of causing this death, when superintendent there, through 
neglect. This case can be disposed of in a very few words, 
for the records of the asylum show that the patient died of con- 
sumption sixteen months after the doctor left that institution ; 
or, to be exact, she was transferred to the asylum from Danvers 
Nov. 5, 1890 ; Dr. Quinby left the asylum to take charge of 
the Worcester Insane Hospital Nov. 25, 1890 ; and the patient 
died at the asylum March 22, 1892, of phthisis. The other 
case is of recent occurrence. The patient was melancholy, ex- 
ceedingly resistant of every attention, and finally refused to 
eat and had to be fed through a stomach tube, which she resisted 
with all her strength, as she did every other attention. She had 
long suffered from heart disease, and because of this her face 
would become purple when resisting. The post-mortem ex- 
amination showed that her death was caused b}'' heart disease, 
and also showed no evidence of careless or improper feeding. 

7. Hours of Labor of Attendants. 

The matter of regulating and prescribing the hours of work 
is a difficult one. It has been under consideration constantly 
by the State Board and almost annually by the Legislature. 

It is impossible to deal with the case according to the meth- 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 25 

ods in workshops or factories. A separate force is employed 
to do all the cooking; the patients themselves render much 
help in serving the meals and in doing domestic work about 
the wards. The attendants go out for recreation and fresh air 
with the patients. Abundant hours for sleep are provided. 
An afternoon and an evening each week are permitted, as well 
as every other Sunday evening. On the infirmary ward, where 
the work is more confining, attendants are allowed every other 
evening in addition to their regular time ; and on the excited 
wards, where the work is harder, they have each week an extra 
evening out after 8 o'clock; and during July, August and Sep- 
tember they all have every other Sunday afternoon, and once a 
month during the year they are allowed to stay out until 12 
o'clock at night, so that they may go to any entertainment if 
they wish to. 

A beautiful and convenient building is in process of construc- 
tion, where unusual facilities for rest and recreation and for 
separate meals will soon be furnished for them alone. They 
are like nurses in our city hospitals, who are amply paid and 
carefully looked out for, but where it is impossible to regulate 
the exact hours of attendance ; with a few exceptions, a most 
excellent class of help, coming largely from New England and 
the Provinces, are glad to obtain employment as attendants, and 
find the work congenial and not burdensome. They frequently 
return after an absence for renewal of service, and seek to get 
their friends and relatives employment at the institution. 

With reference to the charge that patients suffered from poor 
care after the strike, and pandemonium reigned in the excited 
wards at night after the strikers left, the trustees wish to state 
that, as none of the night watch struck, all the wards have been 
in exactly the same condition at night as before the strike. 
The strikers' places were filled temporarily from other depart- 
ments. Many of those called in to assist were women who had 
formerly been attendants, but, because of their superior quali- 
ties, had been promoted to other places. They were taken 
from the marking room, sewing room and laundry. Two for- 
mer forewomen in the laundry, now living in homes of their 
own, and one from the farm whose husband has charge there, 
came to help in the care of the patients. There are now more 



26 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

attendants than when the strike occurred, and all vacancies will 
be filled when those engaged arrive. The trustees feel that 
there can be no better proof of the able management of the in- 
stitution than the bare fact that twenty-three out of fifty-four 
attendants employed at the time on the female side left the hos- 
pital at once without notice, and that the patients were cared 
for and the work went on as usual. A poorly managed insti- 
tution might have been wrecked by it. 

The trustees would call attention to the fact that they have 
made visits at least as often as once a month to the institution, 
and gone through the wards for the purpose, among others, 
of finding out if anything is wrong about the management ; 
and that no one of these nurses has ever made any complaint 
to the Board or to any member thereof, either on such visits 
or at any other time ; and we find that three of these attend- 
ants who left had been within two years previously employed 
as nurses in the hospital, and, after leaving without complaint, 
returned, and in some cases had sought and obtained employ- 
ment here for other members of their families. 

The two hospitals are of enormous value to the community, 
and the trustees are glad to say that their earnest efforts will 
soon secure the establishment of a third, which will use Worces- 
ter as a purchasing centre. They now spend a quarter of a 
million dollars annually in the purchase of supplies. The 
hospital is the largest water taker, not a manufacturing con- 
cern, in the city. It is a very great consumer of gas. It 
buys the best supplies of every kind, and in so doing enables 
all householders to be benefited by the sale here of such large 
quantities by the wholesale dealers. It afibrds a home near 
at hand, where the relatives of the rich and poor, the humble 
and prominent, can be cared for, and can be constantly visited 
on two visiting days of each week, so that their exact condi- 
tion and treatment can be accurately known. Special wards 
for suicidal cases ; hospital wards for the sick ; a large farm 
for people able to work, where all the milk is produced ; a 
farmhouse, where laborers among the patients can live and 
have special privileges ; new and commodious quarters for the 
employees ; a splendid home, in process of building, for the 
nurses, — all make up the most complete equipment in New 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 27 

England for public charges and private patients. A superin- 
tendent, assistant superintendent, eight resident physicians 
(one a woman), one druggist, ninety-two employees, six 
supervisors, one hundred and fifteen attendants make up the 
administrative force. This hospital is knoAvn everywhere, and 
is a noble monument to the liberality of the State and to the 
care and unfailing devotion in the past of many trustees and 
of the present and the former superintendents. 

The trustees desire to report, as a result of their frequent 
inspections made previous to the departure of these attend- 
ants, and of careful investigation of the truth of the charades 
and of the management of the hospital, that the charges are 
without foundation, and that the institution is in every respect 
admirably managed and conducted by the superintendent and 
those associated with him, whether as physicians, employees 
or attendants. 

THOMAS RUSSELL. 

SARAH E. WHITIN. 

FRANCES M. LINCOLN. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD. 

THOMAS H. GAGE. 

GEORGE W. WELLS. 

ROCKWOOD HOAR. 
Worcester, Sept. 13, 1902. 



28 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 



SUPERmTE:N'DEI^T'S KEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

I herewith respectfully submit the following report of the 
hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 1902, it being the seven- 
tieth annual report. 

There remained at the hospital Oct. 1, 1901, 1,098 patients, 
— 528 men and 570 women. During the year 601 patients — 
313 men and 288 women — were admitted, 447 patients — 232 
men and 215 women — were discharged, and 75 men and 61 
women died, leaving at the end of the official year 1,116 
patients, — 534 men and 582 women. Of this number, 328 
Avere supported by the State, 611 by cities and towns and 177 
by friends. Of the 447 persons discharged, 119, including 4 
habitual drunkards (women), were reported recovered, 92 
much improved, 80 improved and 154 not improved ; 2 were 
discharged not insane. Five men and 8 women were removed 
"by the overseers of the poor; 19 men and 8 women were dis- 
charged to the care of the Board of Insanity, to be removed 
from the State ; 3 women to Tewksbury, 15 men and 33 women 
to the Worcester Insane Asylum, 22 men and 21 women to 
Medfield, 11 men and 7 women to Palmer, 3 women to board 
out and 1 woman each to Westborough and McLean. One 
woman and 8 men escaped, and were not returned to the hos- 
pital or accounted for at the end of the official year. 

There remained at the end of the year 18 more patients 
than at the beginning. The smallest number under treatment 
on any one day was 1,064, and the largest 1,135. The daily 
average number was 1,100.75. 

The percentage of recoveries, calculated upon the number 
of discharges and deaths, was 20.41 ; calculated upon the num- 
ber of admissions, it was 18.13. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 29 

The death rate was 8, calculated on the whole number of 
patients under treatment; and 12.2, calculated upon the daily 
average number. 

No serious accident has occurred during the year. We have 
had four cases of diphtheria, — three employees and one inmate. 
In. one case the means of communication was direct, but in 
neither of the others were we able to trace the source of con- 
tagion. Recovery followed in each. There was also a case 
of typhoid occurring in a male patient, seven months resident 
at the hospital. The attack was a mild one, and ended in re- 
covery. For this also we were unable to find any local cause. 
During the winter we had an epidemic of measles among our 
employees, — fifteen cases in all ; and in the spring and sum- 
mer quite a number of cases of malaria. Aside from these, the 
general health of the hospital has been good. 

Two bills were introduced in the Massachusetts Legislature 
at its last session, prescribing the number of hours during 
which the employees of State institutions may be employed. 
In neither case were the trustees of the institution, or its offi- 
cers, consulted in regard to the advisability of such legislation, 
or as to its probable effect upon those under their charge. 
Both bills passed the House, but failed to secure the approval 
of the Senate. Understanding that the same or similar meas- 
ures are to be introduced at the cominoj session of the Leo:is- 
lature, it seems to me proper that some statement should be 
made as to the conditions which obtain as regards employees 
in the institutions where this legislation is to be applied, 
should it prevail, — conditions which I cannot believe to be 
fully understood by the general public, or by those advocating 
the above bills. 

Every large institution like the Worcester Insane Hospital 
is a little community within itself. To meet its various wants, 
it is obliged to carry on all or most of the industries that are 
found in a small New England tov/n. It has its carpenters, its 
painters, its masons, its plumbers, its bakers, its engineers, its 
blacksmiths, its tailors and its storekeeper. It runs a farm of 
400 acres and a housekeeping department which supplies the 
daily wants of from 1,200 to 1,300 people. All of this is 
outside the hospital proper, with its 1,100 patients and 130 



30 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

nurses. This requires in the aggregate a large number of em- 
ployees, but the conditions under which each and all of them 
are employed differ entirely from those which obtain in the 
community at large. None of our industries are carried on 
for purposes of gain, but simply to supply the needs of the 
hospital. They are part of our daily household work, and this 
work varies in character and amount from day to day, as all 
such work must. To bring all employees under the same 
inflexible rule as to hours would be in many cases to the 
detriment of the service and to the disadvantage rather than 
advantage of the employee. On the farm and in most of the 
mechanical departments patients are employed as assistants, 
and, as they always make short hours, the actual working time 
of those having them in charge is correspondingly shortened. 
In the wards somewhat different conditions prevail. Here the 
hours in which the nurses are on duty are long. Their work, 
however, is in most cases light, and they have, beside their 
daily outings, considerable time practically to themselves. 
Many of the nurses act as private attendants for special cases. 
Their duties are largely that of a companion, and are corre- 
spondingly light. They are chosen for their special ability to 
gain the confidence and get along smoothly with the patient 
placed in their charge, and a frequent change of attendants is 
always of disadvantage to the patient. Other attendants are 
in charge of critical cases, where the same difficulty as to 
change applies. It is a part of the nurse's training to meet 
the conditions which will confront her when she comes to 
undertake her chosen work outside of the hospital, and to 
school herself to submit readily and cheerfully to whatever 
demands may be made upon her time and energy in a given 
emergency ; but in all cases when the work is specially hard 
and exacting, provisions are made for extra outings, and the 
attendant is never allowed to sacrifice her health to her duties. 
That the nurses as a whole should, hoAvever, have shorter 
hours, has long been felt, and plans have already been made 
which, when completed, as they soon will be, will not only 
shorten their hours but give them an attractive home to which 
they can go when off duty. Legislation in this direction is- 
uncalled for, and would be most pernicious in its effect both 
upon the hospital and upon its nurses. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 31 

In an institution where the various branches of labor are so 
intimately connected, to attempt to apply a law to one class of 
employees to the exclusion of the others would be an unending- 
source of annoyance and discomfort. An eight-hour law, ap- 
plied to all employees of the hospital, would oblige us to 
double our force in most departments. This, of course, would 
add largely to the cost of maintenance, but the additional ex- 
pense would not stop here. It is necessary that most of our 
employees should live on the premises, and, as we have at 
present no accommodations for such an additional number of 
persons, a building or buildings would have to be provided for 
them. We should be obliged to consider also the unemployed 
half of our help, many of whom would naturally remain about 
the premises when off duty, and we should be forced, in self- 
defence, if for no other reason, to furnish them means for 
recreation and amusement. From what source is this large 
additional cost in the running expenses of the institution to be 
met? Unless the State is willing to provide for this by in- 
creasing the price allowed for the board of patients (which 
under present conditions is hardly to be expected) , this addi- 
tional cost must come out of our present income, — that is, out 
of the sum now applied to the support of our inmates. 

The attitude of the trustees toward the employees of the 
hospital has always been a generous one, and the management 
has found them not only ever ready but anxious to provide 
everything necessary for their health and comfort. It has been 
their constant aim to make the work of the employees agree- 
able and attractive, and to reduce their hours whenever the 
exigencies of the service would allow. They recognize the fact 
that the success of the institution depends largely upon the 
character of its help, and to attract and hold the best they have 
provided them with pleasant apartments and commodious, light, 
cheerful and sanitary work rooms, and have furnished them 
with all the labor-saving devices and appliances necessary for 
carrying on their work to the best advantage. They have pro- 
vided recreation rooms for the help when off duty, and in 
worthy cases extra vacations after long service without loss of 
pay. When sick, they have furnished medical treatment free 
of cost and often outside the hospital. They have sought, in 
fact, to do everything possible to make them feel that good 



32 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 

service and faithfulness to duty would be recognized and ap- 
preciated at its full value. What is true of this hospital is, in 
the main, I believe, true of every other hospital in the State ; 
and it would seem, therefore, that the welfare of the employees 
in these institutions can safely be left to those having them in 
charge. 

Dr. Meyer resigned his position at the hospital in May, to 
take the directorship of the Pathological Institute in New York. 
His assistant. Dr. Dunlap, left us at the same time, to take a 
position in the same institution. This necessitated a certain 
rearrangement of our medical staff. The direction of the clin- 
ical work has been placed in the hands of Dr. Noble, while the 
laboratory has been put temporarily in the charge of Dr. Hoch. 
An interesting and valuable series of studies, entitled "Ob- 
servations upon the elimination of indican, acetone and diecetic 
acid in the various psychoses," by Dr. Coriat, has been com- 
pleted and published in the " American Journal of Insanity," 
Vol. LVIII.,No. 4, 1902. 

In order to furnish a more liberal supply of ice for the ever- 
increasing demand of our household, our ice house has been 
enlarged and doubled in capacity ; with this addition sve are 
now able to store 1,000 tons of ice. 

The contract for our nurses' home was let May 1, 1902, and 
the work thereon at once begun. This has been delayed some- 
what by a strike on the part of the workmen ; but the building 
is now covered in, and will soon be ready for the interior finish. 
It will no doubt be completed and ready for occupancy in the 
early spring. 

We were authorized by the Legislature of 1902 to use, for 
the building of an addition to our boiler house and doing cer- 
tain other preliminary work necessary to the installing of an 
electric light plant, $16,000 of the unexpended balance to our 
credit after settling our old account, preparatory to entering 
upon the new system of accounting which went into effect Jan- 
uary 1 of this year. This work is now well under way. An 
additional appropriation will be necessary to complete the work. 

At present we have no suitable room for our stenographers 
and typewriters. A one-story addition in the rear of the ad- 
ministrative building, off the present library, would provide 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 33 

the needed accommodations, and could be built at a compara- 
tively small expense. 1 would ask that means for such an ad- 
dition be furnished. 

I wish again to call attention to the need of a morgue, and for 
rooms connected therewith for our laboratorj'^ work. We are 
unable, in the present situation of our laboratory, under the 
offices of the executive building, to carry on without offence 
certain investigations which are necessary in our clinical work 
and in the study of the specialty. 

The current expenses, less the amount received from articles 
sold, have been $230,333.22; dividing this by 1,100.75, the 
daily average number of patients, gives $209.25 as the annual 
cost of support, which is equivalent to a weekly cost of $4.01. 

The apparent increase in the cost of support is due largely 
to the new method of accounting. Formerly all extraordinary 
expenses for repairs and improvements were excluded in mak- 
ing up this estimate ; now all expenses are included except 
money appropriated for new buildings. 

HOSEA M. QUINBY, M.D., 

Superintendent. 

WoKCESTER Insane Hospital, Sept. 30, 1902. 



34 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



LIBRARY REPORT. 



Total number of books in library Sept, 30, 1901, 
Books added during the year, .... 
Total number of books in library Sept. 30, 1902, 
Total number of books taken out during the year. 

By male patients, 

By female patients, 



3,838 
141 
3,979 
6,898 
3,914 
2,984 



During the year only one book was destroyed beyond repair 
by a female patient. 



PRODUCTS OF THE FARM 

On Hand Oct. 1, 1902, and not delivered at the Hospital. 



Apples, barrels, . 
Apples, cider, bushels 
Barley, fodder, tons. 
Beans, Lima, bushels. 
Beets, bushels, . 
Cabbages, heads. 
Carrots, bushels. 
Cauliflower, heads, 
Celery, heads. 
Corn, broom, pounds. 
Corn, sweet, dozen, 
Corn, fodder, tons, 
Egg plants, 
Ensilage, tons, . 
Hay, tons, . 



275 

275 

5 

50 

487 

10,000 

430 

1,000 

10,000 

1,000 

640 

20 

100 

625 

300 



Hay, swale, tons. 
Lettuce, plants, . 
Mangolds, bushels 
Oat fodder, tons, 
Onions, bushels, . 
Parsnips, bushels. 
Pears, bushels, 
Rowen, tons, 
Rye, bushels. 
Squash, pounds, 
Straw, oat, tons, 
Straw, rye, tons. 
Tomatoes, bushels 
Turnips, bushels. 



5 

1,000 

100 

12 

600 

400 

10 

35 

25 

50,000 

4 

4 

100 

1,000 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



6b 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Employed in the Worcester Insane Hospital, Sept. 30, 1902. 



Superintendent, per year, . . . 






$3,000 00 


Assistant superintendent, 






2,000 00 


Assistant physician, per year, .... 






1,000 00 


Assistant piiysicians (three), each, per year, . 






800 00 


Junior assistant physicians (four), each, per year. 






400 00 


Druggist, per week, . . . . . . 






20 00 


Assistant in laboratory, per week, . . . 






10 00 


Steward, per year, 






1,200 00 


Matron, per year, 






600 00 


Clerk, per year, 






720 00 


Treasurer, per year, 






500 00 


Auditor, per year, 






75 00 


Stenographers (two), per month, 




$60 00 and 30 00 


Stenographers (two), per week, 






10 00 


Supervisors (three men), each, per month, 




140 00 


to 45 00 


Supervisors (four women), each, " ' 








25 00 


Marker of clothing, etc., " ' 








20 00 


Seamstresses (four), " ' 








18 00 


Attendants (fifty-three men), " ' 






f23 00 


to 28 00 


Attendants (sixty women), " ' 






14 00 


to 20 00 


Night attendants (eight men), " ' 






25 00 


to 28 00 


Night attendants (eight women)," ' 








18 00 


Baker, " ' 






, 


60 00 


Assistant baker, " ' 








30 00 


Steward's assistant, " ' 








30 00 


Kitchen men (three), " ' 






$25 00 


to 45 00 


Cooks (two), " 






25 00 and 28 00 


Laundrymen (two), " ' 






. 


30 00 


Laundress, " ' 








20 00 


Laundry girls (seven), " ' 






$14 00 


to 18 00 


Kitchen girls (five), . " ' 






14 00 


to 18 00 


House girls (ten), " ' 






14 00 


to 16 00 


Office girl, " ' 








18 00 


Carpenter, per day, ..,,.. 






3 00 


Painter, per day, 






2 50 


Mason, per day, 






3 25 


Mason's helper, 


. 






2 25 



3fi 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



Plumber, per month, .... 
Engineer, per day, . . . . 
Firemen (two), per month. 
Farmers (two), each, per month. 
Housekeepers (two), each, per month. 
Farm laborers (thii'teen), per month, 
Fai'm fireman, per month, . 
Farm help (five women), per month, 
Florist, per month. 
Coachman, per month, 
Expressman, per month, . 
Basement and yard man, . 
Butcher, per month, . 



$75 00 

3 00 

40 00 

p60 00 and 45 00 

18 00 and 20 00 

25 00 to 35 00 

30 00 

22 00 

45 00 

25 00 

25 00 

28 00 

25 00 



$14 00 to 



VALUATION OF PERSONAL ESTATE 

Sept. 30, 1902. 



Live stock on the farm, .... 

Produce of farm on hand, .... 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . 

Machinery. and mechanical fixtures, . 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department. 

Other furniture in inmates' department, . 

Personal property of State in superintendent's 

Ready-made clothing. 

Dry goods, . 

Provisions and groceries, 

Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel, .... 

Library, 

Other supplies undistributed, 



department. 



113,996 00 

13,535 13 

7,206 90 

35,413 55 

31,993 00 

24,053 30 

32,719 09 

2,538 29 

1,573 27 

4,925 28 

410 60 

4,726 50 

5,401 44 

6,848 11 



$185,340 46 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



37 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester Insane Hospital. 

I herewith submit my annual report on the finances of the 
Worcester Insane Hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 1902. 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Se}3t. oKi, 1901, 

Received from Commonwealth for support of patients, 

from cities and toM^ns for support of patients, 

from individuals for support of jjatients, . 

from soldiers' relief for support of patients, 

from interest on bank balance, 

from farm and farm products, . 

from sale of tubs and barrels, . 

from sale of rags and rubber, . 

from sale of old iron and brass, 

from sale of sundries, 

from sales from store, 

from Commonwealth for current expenses, 

from Commonwealth from special appropriations. 



Total receipts. 



$14,971 


61 


27,377 


55 


109,951 


10 


53,591 


11 


1,330 


65 


676 


02 


4,084 74 


146 


74 


230 68 


46 


04 


489 


01 


544 


33 


141,459 


19 


16,398 


64 


1371,297 


41 



Expenditures. 
Pay roll, $71,879 89 

Food : — 
Butter and butterine. 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, . 
Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 
Cheese, 
Eggs, 
Flour, 
Fish, . 
Fruit, . 
Meats, 
Molasses, . 



Amoimls carried forivard, 



17,744 64 


534 


40 


489 


77 


1,195 


18 


824 


86 


5,270 


21 


6,924 46 


2,930 


65 


2,318 


07 


14,115 


28 


486 


92 


$42,834 


44 



$71,879 89 



38 WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 


[Oct. 


Amounts brought forward, 


$42,834 44 


$71,879 89 


Sugar, 


4,457 66 




Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, . 


2,199 85 




Vegetables, 


4,539 47 




Sundries, ....... 


3,719 42 


57,750 84 






Clothing and clothing material : — 






Boots, shoes and rubbers, 


|867 98 






5,309 84 




Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, 


1,295 03 




Furnishing goods, 


1,682 16 




Hats and caps, 


188 54 




Leather and shoe findings, 


105 21 




Sundries, 


135 08 


9,583 84 






Furnishings : — 






Beds, bedding, table linen, etc.. 


14,032 81 




Brushes, brooms, etc., .... 


364 72 




Carpets, rugs, etc., ..... 


783 28 




Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . 


1,474 50 




Furniture and upholstery, 


2,949 97 




Kitchen furnishings, .... 


348 55 






87 74 




Sundries, 


515 68 


10,557 25 






Heat, light and power : — 






Coal 


$18,160 88 




Gas, . 


6,045 03 




Oil 


105 64 




Sundries, . 


129 35 


24,440 90 


Repairs and improvements : — 




Bricks, 


$674 24 




Cement, lime and plaster. 


893 67 




Doors, sashes, etc., 


549 51 




Electrical work and supplies, . 


509 33 




Hardware, 


993 12 




Lumber, 


1,831 02 




Machinery, ...... 


3,724 64 




Paints, oils, glass, etc., .... 


1,241 96 




Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 


3,230 35 




Roofing and materials, .... 


533 17 




Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll). 


7,517 90 




Sundries, ....... 


5,294 92 








26,993 83 


Farm, stable and grounds : — 






Blacksmith, and supplies, 


• . $559 71 




Carriages, wagons and repairs. 


934 60 




Amounts carried forward, . 


$1,494 31 


$201,206 55 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



39 



Amounts brought forward. 


fl,494 


31 


$201,206 55 


Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . 


1,028 


01 




Hay, grain, etc.. 


7,627 


93 




Harness and repairs. 


513 


48 




Horses, . . . . . 


1,595 


00 




Cows, 


3,392 


00 




Other live stock. 


95 


00 




Labor (not on pay roll), . 


62 


95 




Tools, farm, machines, etc., 


764 47 




Sundries, 


690 


16 








— 


17,263 31 


Miscellaneous : — 








Books, periodicals, etc.. 


$470 59 




Chapel services and entertainments. 


547 


40 




Freight, expresses and transportatic 


)n, . . 357 


61 




Funeral expenses. 


381 


00 




Gratuities, 


22 


84 




Hose, etc., 


. . 24 50 




Ice, 


438 


15 




Labor (not on pay roll), . 


365 


24 




Medicines and hospital supplies. 


2,054 


73 




Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (ex 


tra), . ,376 


71 




Postage, 


393 


26 




Printing and printing supplies. 


509 


52 




Return of runaways, 


79 


92 




Soap and laundry supplies. 


2,439 


48 




Stationery and oflS.ce supplies, . 


672 


88 




Travel and expenses (oflicials). 


162 


82 




Telephone and telegraph, 


201 


23 




Tobacco, 


571 


22 




Water, 


4,959 


71 




Sundries, ..... 


2,376 


09 










17,404 90 
$235,874 76 


Total, 






Paid out of special appropriations. 






15,626 11 


Receipts paid to State Treasurer, 






114,402 13 


Total expenditures, . 


$365,903 00 


Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1902, . 

Res 


OURCES. 




5,394 41 
$371,297 41 


Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1902, 


$5,394 41 




Bills due from cities and towns. 


28,918 


34 




Bills due from individuals. 


13,180 


43 




Bills due from soldiers' relief, . 


324 


04 








— 


$47,817 22 


Unexpended special appropriations 


. • . 




45,667 15 


Total resources, . 


. . . • • 


, 


$93,484 37 



40 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



Liabilities. 
Due for maintenance paid in advance, 

for salaries, wages and labor, . . . 
for all other current expenses, . 

Special Appropriations. 



fl50 94 

6,450 61 

13,651 84 



$20,253 39 



OBJECT. 



Resolves. 



Whole 
Amount. 



Expended 

in 

1900 and 1901. 



Expended 

in 

1902. 



Balance 
Oct. 1, 1902. 



Administration building 
extension. 



Nurses' home, . 
Electric lighting, 



1900, chap. 69, $39,998 44 



1901, chap. 471, 

1902, chap. 118, 



f $8,931 59"! 

I I 

^ 28,788 24 > 

I I 

1. $37,719 83 J 



45,000 00 
16,000 00 



$2,278 61 

14,767 85 
565 00 



$30,232 15 
15,435 00 



Patiekts' Funds. 
Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1901, ... 
Receipts during year, ..... 
Interest on bank balance, .... 

Expenditures during year, .... 

Balance on hand Se^Dt. 30, 1902, 

Respectfully submitted, 



. $2,064 99 

. 1,662 77 

27 33 



f3,755 09 
1,597 34 

52,157 75 



ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer. 



Oct. 1, 1902. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



41 



STATEMENT OF FUNDS. 



LEMas Fund. 



Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1901, 
Receipts during year, 

Expenditures during year. 
Depreciation of Springfield bond, . 



Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1902, . 

Investment. 

Springfield bond, 

Worcester County Institute for Savings, 
Cash on hand Sept, 30, 1902, .... 

Wheeler Fund. 
Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1901, . 
Receipts during year, . . 
Advance in Worcester National Bank shares. 



fl,290 77 
78 99 



fl,369 76 



fo5 16 
60 00 



115 16 

. $1,254 60 



1,010 00 
244 13 

47 



,539 86 

206 64 

15 GO 



$1,254 60 



Expenditures during year. 

Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1902, 



1,761 50 
113 28 

1,648 22 



Investment. 
Seven shares Central National Bank, . 
Three shares Worcester National Bank, 
Worcester County Institute for Savings, 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, . 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1902, . 



Lawn Fund. 
Balance in Mechanics Savings Bank, Sept. 30, 1901, 
Dividends, ........ 



$770 00 

555 00 

1,445 86 

1,719 47 

157 89 



1,648 22 



51,163 76 
46 52 
|1,210 28 



42 WOKCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. [Oct. 1902. 



Manson Fund. 
Balance in Worcester County Institute for Savings 

Sept. 30, 1901, .$1,272 14 

Dividends, 50 88 



f 1,323 02 



Land Account. 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1902 $58 52 

Respectfully submitted, 



ALBERT WOOD, 

Treasurer of Corporation. 



Oct. 1, 1902. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 24, 1902. 
I hereby certif.y that I have this day compared the treasurer's statement of disburse- 
ments for the year ending Sept. 30, 1902, with the vouchers on file at the "Worcester 
Insane Hospital, and find them to agree. I have also inspected the securities represent- 
ing the invested funds of the institution, and find that their market value is as stated. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



[Fork prescribed bt State Board of Insanity.] 



cc <-• <y> a5G<<0'#<M«o 

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05 



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46 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



&5 









s 

I 



o^ 



oo 


3 
^ 


1,093.35 
1,091.50 
1,091.51 


oo-*cococi(Ma50 
(Mcoc^r--0'— 1— itMt-i 


1 


1 


10 

d 


r-T 


CMC0Oit^tOO5'+t>.CO 
^__ ^__ r-^ 0. 0_ T-J^ ,-4_ 


3 


570.00 
574.83 
570.64 


I>.-*uOCOCOO<MiOO 
»Ot^iOOC55COCOCOI> 


1 


1 


06 

to 



(M05>r5'-t^tOiO05-- 

t^tototooiotor^GO 

lO'OiO'OiOiO'OO'O 


1 


523.35 
516.66 
620.86 


<Mt00iOOOO-*O 

to"0>— 't^r-iasQOOs-^ 


1 


1 





GO 

CO 
UO 


cneo-rHtooooiGOt^^H 

COtCiOCOC^CNC^C^ICO 
iO^*O»O*O*O»O*Ou0 


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H 

■< 





-^ (N 


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I 

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to 


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to 


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r-HCOCOi-li-l.-l^CO 


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CO 
(M 


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CO 


1 


o 

ft 


■3 


01 (M 
-*1 CO to 


r--.^t^GOiO'— icot^oo 
iocoto^-^toto-<tico 




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uo 


1 


a 

Eh 


00 Ci 
C^ 1-1 CM 


tOCOCOiO!MtOGO— 't-- 
CM^^CO(Mi>l(MCOCMi-i 


00 

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00 

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1 


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^ CO 
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.^^-rt^coeoioictoi-i 

CO(MCO(M(MCOCN<MG<l 


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CO 


05 



CO 


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B 
3 


1901. 

October, 

November, 

December, 


e 


00" 

00 

03 


■^ 


H 


E 


EC 

&( 

=4-1 


"^ 

H 


Daily average. 


January, . 

February, 

March, . 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



47 



3. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 







Cases admitted. 


Times pbbviodslt 
recovered. 


















Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, . 




267 


228 


49,5 


- 


- 


- 


Second, 




30 


41 


71 


12 


13 


25 


Third, . 




9 


13 


22 


4 


5 


9 


Fourth, 




6 


2 


8 


7 


1 


8 


Fifth, . 




- 


3 


3 


- 


2 


2 


Sixth, . 




1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Seventh, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Eighth, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Ninth, . 




- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Total of cases, 


313 


288 


601 


24 


22 


46 


Total of persons, 




309 


286 


595 


23 


22 


45 



48 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



4. — Relation to Hospital of Persons admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Never before in any hospital for insane, 


242 


204 


446 


Former inmates of this hospital only, 


41 


47 


88 


Former inmates of other hospitals only, . 


25 


23 


48 


Former inmates of this and other hospitals : — 








Danvers, 


- 


2 


2 


Danvers and Taunton, .... 


1 




2 


Danvers and VVestborough, 


1 






Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics, 


- 






Massachusetts Hospital for Inebriates, 


1 






McLean, 


1 






McLean and Westborough, 


- 






Medfield, 


- 






Newton Nervine and McLean, . 


1 






Northampton, 


- 






Taunton, ....... 


- 






Taunton and Westborough, 


- 






Tevs^ksbury, 


- 






Ward's Island, Danvers, Taunton, South 
Boston and Westborough, 


- 






Westborough, 


- 


2 




Total of cases, 


313 


288 


601 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



49 



5. — Parentage of Persons admitted. 











Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES OF NATIVITY. 
















Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, .... 


35 


33 


35 


32 


70 


65 


Other States : — 














Maine, .... 


4 


6 


5 


8 


9 


14 


New Hampshire, 






8 


8 


4 


6 


12 


14 


"Vermont, . 






4 


3 


1 


3 


5 


6 


Rhode Island, 








_ 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


Connecticut, 








4 


4 


2 


1 


6 


5 


New York, 








4 


2 


2 


3 


6 


5 


Virginia, . 








_ 


1 


2 


2 


2 


S 


North Carolina, 








1 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


Georgia, 








1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


Florida, 








1 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


Michigan, . 








- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Other countries : — 














Cape Breton, 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Canada, 






22 


23 


6 


7 


28 


30 


Nova Scotia, 






6 


7 


5 


3 


11 


10 


New Brunswick, 






4 


4 


4 


3 


8 


7 


Newfoundland, . 






2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 


Prince Edward Islanc 


^ 




1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


AVest Indies, 






_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 - 


Scotland, . 






5 


8 


6 


5 


11 


8 


England, . 






18 


19 


18 


14 


36 


33 


Ireland, 






116 


115 


91 


97 


207 


212 


Wales, 






- 


_ 


3 


3 


3 


3 


Norway, 






3 


3 


2 


2 


5 


5 


Sweden, 






9 


10 


6 


6 


15 


16 


Denmark, . 






1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Germany, . 






5 


5 


1 


1 


6 


6 


Austria, 






1 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


Italy, . 






2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 


Greece, 






1 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


Armenia, . 






1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


Hungary, . 






- 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Finland, 






1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


4 


Poland, 






5 


6 


_ 


_ 


5 


5 


Russia, 






4 


4 


2 


2 


6 


6 


Unknown, . 






44 


42 


79 


77 


123 


119 


Total of persons 




313 


313 


288 


288 


601 


601 



ft 



50 



WORCESTEE INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 



PLACES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Massachusetts (by counties) : — 








Berkshire, 










- 


1 


1 


Essex, 










8 


1 


4 


Hampden, 










- 


1 


1 


Middlesex, 










93 


101 


194 


Norfolk, . 










6 


7 


13 


Suffolk, . 










48 


42 


90 


Worcester, 










163 


135 


298 


Totals, 


313 


288 


601 


Cities or towns, 










313 


288 


601 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



51 



< 
Eh 


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1 




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00 
00 




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«o CO 


CO 

1—1 
CO 




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M 


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CO 




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t- 1-1 T-l 1 1 1 1 


05 




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CM 




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g 

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1 




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a 


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CO 




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CO 






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1—1 






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oo o CO 1-1 1-1 1 1-1 

05 (M 


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1—1 




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1—1 


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CO 
1—1 




d 


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to" 

o 
H 





52 



WOECESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



Occupation of Persons admitted. 

FEMALES. 



Artist, 1 


Nurses, . . . . .3 


Attendant, . 








1 


Operatives, 






17 


Bookkeepers, 








2 


Printing press work, 






1 


Boxmaker, 








1 


Table waiter, 






1 


Clerk, 








1 


Teachers, . 






6 


Cook, . 








1 


Weaver, 






1 


Domestics, 








71 


Unknown, . 






10 


Dressmakers, 








3 


No occupation, . 






73 


Housekeepers, 








67 




Housewives, 








37 


Total, 288 


Milliners, . 








2 











Agent, 1 


Carriage trimmer, 




Assistant buyer, 






1 


Cigar maker. 




Bakers, 






2 


Civil and mining engineer 




Barbers, 








2 


Clerks, 


. 10 


Basket maker, 








1 


Comb maker, 






Bell boy, . 








1 


Core makers. 






Bicycle riders, 








2 


Corset ironer. 






Blacksmiths, 








4 


Currier, 






Bookkeepers, 








3 


Drug clerk. 






Boots, . 








1 


Engineers, . 






Boot shop, . 








1 


Farmers, . 




. 17 


Bottlers, . 








3 


Fisherman, 






Boxmaker, . 








1 


Gardener, . 






Brick layer. 








1 


Gate tender, 






Brickmaker, 








1 


Grocers, 






Cabinet makers, 






2 


Hostler, 






Carpenters, 






7 


"House painter, 






Carriage painter. 






1 


Ironworker, 







1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



53 



8. — Occupation of Persons admitted — ■ Concluded. 



MALES — Concluded. 



Journalist, .... 


1 


Rubber maker, .... 1 


Junk dealer. 




1 


Rubber workers. 






2 


Laborers, . 




53 


Sailor, 






1 


Last maker. 




1 


Salesmen, . 








3 


Laundryman, 




1 


Section hand, 








1 


Liquor dealer, 




1 


Shoe cutter, 








1 


Loom fixer. 




1 


Shoemakers, 








3 


Lumber dealers, 




2 


Stableman, 








1 


Machinists, 




13 


Steam fitters, 








3 


Masons, 




3 


Steam sponger. 








1 


Mechanics, 




6 


Stenographer, 








1 


Melter, 






Stevedore, . 








1 


Merchant, . 






Stone cutter. 








1 


Milkman, . 






Students, . 








2 


Milling, 






Tailors, 




- 




2 


Miner, 






Teamsters, 








4 


Moulder, . 






Tinsmith, . 








1 


Mule spinner, 






Tutor and clerk. 








1 


Operatives, 




12 


Upholsterer, 








1 


Painters, . 




5 


Waiters, 








4 


Paper hangers. 




2 


Weavers, . 








8 


Paper stainer, 




1 


Wheelwright, 








1 


Physicians, 




2 


Wire makers. 








2 


Police officer. 




1 


Wire workers, 








3 


Polishers, . 




2 


Wood turner, 








1 


Pressmen, . 




2 


Unknown, . 








23 


Printer, 




1 


No occupation. 








37 


Railroad section foreman, . 


1 




Restaurant keeper, . 


1 


Total, . . . . .313 


Rubber boot maker, . 


1 





54 



WOECESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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6 



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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 23. 



55 



1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■* 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


to 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 

1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 


to 


CO 


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o 


- 


1 


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1 


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IM 


o 


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1 


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56 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 









'S 






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1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



57 



11. — Ages of Insane at First Attack, Admission and Death. 




12. — Reported Duration of Disease before Last Admission. 



PREVIOUS DURATION'. 


First Admission 
TO Any Hospital . 


All Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 




Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 1 Fe. 


Tot. 


Ma. 


Fe. 


Tot. 


Congenital, 






2 


2 


4 


1 


- 


1 


3 


2 


5 


Under 1 month, 






68 


43 


111 


16 


17 


33 


84 


60 


144 


From 1 to 3 months, 






31 


23 


54 


10 


13 


23 


41 


36 


77 


Z to 6 months, 






15 


17 


32 


13 


^ 5 


18 


28 


22 


50 


6 to 12 months, 






13 


7 


20 


2 


7 


9 


15 


14 


29 


1 to 2 years, . 






20 


10 


30 


4 


2 


6 


24 


12 


36 


2 to 5 years, . 






19 


15 


34 


3 


4 


7 


22 


19 


41 


5 to 10 years, . 






8 


12 


20 


1 


4 


5 


9 


16 


25 


10 to 20 years, . 






8 


6 


14 


1 


1 


2 


9 


7 


16 


Over 20 years, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


2 


Unknown, . 






58 


69 


127 


20 


29 


49 


78 


98 


176 


Total of cases, . 


242 


204 


446 


71 


84 


155 


313 


288 


601 


Total of persons. 






239 


203 


442 


70 


83 


153 


309 


286 


595 


Average In years, 






1.41 


1.85 


1.63 


.80 


2.25 


1.65 


2.21 


4.10 


3.18 



58 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



o 



-« 



o 






6 






^ 












t~ooo 






to ooo^ 


r COIMOOrH 1 


CO 


r. \ 




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Delirium (infectious 

and asthenic), . 
Dementia, prsecox, 
Epileptic insanity. 
General paralysis, 
Huntington's chorea 
Hysterical insanity, 
Imbecility, . 
Katatonia, . 




. 


1 


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CO 

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— Insane : — 
Alcoholic insanity 
Climacteric melanc 
Constitutional infe 


'a 
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o 

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a a 
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c p 

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eriodic insanity : 
Manic, 
Depressed, 
Circular, . 
Manic-delirious, 
Depressed-deliri 
enile dementia, . 
raumatic insanit) 
Habitual drunkai 
ot insane, . 


a 
a 

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o 


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aocus 


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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



59 







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60 



WOECESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



•SIBJOi 



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pH^Pni-iiJiJMCQmWWWWPMiiHOHCLi 



■:: 3 '3 ^ 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



61 





1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1H 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 '"' 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l-l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j l-l 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


liri-lllllllr-IIIIIIIIIIT^ 


lllrll rHIIIIIIIIljo 


1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j (N 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 .H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (N 


1' 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 tH 1 1 1 rH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I <-l 


llltrHllllllllllllf-lll|-« 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l-l 


llllrHlllllllllllli-'lICO 


1 ICOl 1 1 1 1 1 1 |(NI 1 IrHI-^l lI'M 

CO 


ll(MIIIIIIII(Mlllll^ll|ao 


iiiHriiiiiiriiiii-Hicoiil^ 


IM 


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CO 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 


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CO 


<M 




rHtD,-(T-ltHrHrHr-li-ilHO»!Hi-lpHi-lcqOi-lr-ltO 


1 l->*r-l li-l lr-lrHr-lr-l-*i-l 1 1 lrH(M 1 l|-^ 

1 ^^ 


«i-l(N IrH liH 1 1 1 liO lrHi-lr-lrl00r-lrl|in 


C 

a 
> 

£ 


Empyema and septic pericarditis, 

Heart failure, 

Endocarditis 

Chronic nephritis 

Metastatic carcinoma, 

Carcinoma of stomach, 

Carcinoma of liver and gall bladder, .... 

THntpritiB . 


Entero-colitis 

Septicaemia, 

Status epilepticuB, ........ 

Asphyxia from food inspiration 

Total- . 





62 



WORCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



a 

a 
o 
O 



■^ 
s 






e 
O 



8 



^ 



Huntington's 
Chorea. 


•SIB^OJ, 


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1 1 i 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lit 


u 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


o £ 

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o -^ 


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ft 


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IHI IrHI 1 1 li-HrHII 1 1 1 liH 


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1-lllllllllrHlllrHIII 


= S 
= 2 

E- SI 
Om 

O 


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1 1 1 IH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 


■saiBcnaj 


1 1 1 rH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■S9[BJ5; 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


Periodic 
Insanity. 


•SIBJOX 


rHIIiHIIIIIrHrHIIIIII 


•saiBcaaj 


l-lllrHlllllrHIIIIIII 


•93[BJ^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l-H 1 1 1 1 t 1 


4 

o 
U 
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lll(MIICOIIIIII(MIII 


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lll(NIIINIIIIIIiHIII 


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1 1 1 1 t 1 i-< 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH i 1 1 




lii 
O 

OQ 

CO 






Phthisis pulmonalis 

Phthisis pulmonalis and heart failure, . 

Lobar pneumonia, 

Lobar pneumonia and pleurisy with effusion. 
Lobar pneumonia and pulmonary oedema. 
Broncho-pneumonia, 

Broncho-pneumonia and cystitis. 

Hypostatic pneumonia, 

Hypostatic pneumonia and exhaustion, . 
Hypostatic pneumonia with pulmonary abscess, 
Hypostatic pneumonia, pyelitis and cystitis, . 

Pulmonary oedema and exhaustion, . 

Pulmonary infarction 

Pulmonary infarction and nephritis. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



63 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 >-( J r 


'^ 


^ , , 1^ 


1 1 r r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1-1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH 

■ 


.... 1 . 1 ............ 1 


1 


lr-llllliHIIIII|lltli-l|||c^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 01 


IrHI I 1 li-ir 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IrHI '1^ 


1 *"* 


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1 1 1 1 1 r 1 r 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 CO 


1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 r 1 1 1 1 


- 


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' 


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iir-tiiiiiiiii-iiiriiiiro 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t rl 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 cq 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i-( 1 (M 1 1 [ r 1 r-l 1 1 j -< 


llllltlllrHlT-irilllllljt- 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r-< 1 1 1 1 1 r-( 1 1 j Tf 


Empyema, 

Heart failure, 

Endocarditis 

Acute dilatation of heart 

Nephritis and pleurisy with effusion 

Metastatic carcinoma 

Carcinoma of stomach, 

Carcinoma of liver and gall bladder, .... 

Carcinoma of uterus, ■ . . 

Enteritis, 

Entero-colitis, 

Purulent meningitis 

Septicaemia, 

Gangrene of foot 

Status epilepticus 

Exhaustion, 

Asphyxia from food inspiration, 

Asphyxia from vomitus inspiration 


"3 
o 



64 



AVOECESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



ts 



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f>3 




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1 month, 
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3 to 6 mon 
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1 to 2 year 

2 to 5 year 
6 to 10 year 
to 20 year 
years. 




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month, 
to 3 mon 
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to 12 mon 
to 2 year 
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Under 
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From 

Unkno 


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PUBLIC DOCUl^IENT — No. 23. 



65 



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1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 6 years, . 
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10 to 20 years, . 
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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



67 



I I I 1 I I I ll-ll I I I I I I I I IrHI I I lrH|f-lr1i-(i-Heq(MCCIlHIN^COO ■* 

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I I I I I I I [ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Cq <N 



I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I r I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I li-ll I I I IrHI liHCOU3ICOn>00>OCOa3(X><-< 



i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IrHI I I I IrHI I l(NCOICOIM(N(MrHOCnaOrH 



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68 



WORCESTEK INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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Remaining op 
Each Year's 
Admissions 
Sept. 30, 1902. 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 




1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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YEARS 
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CO ^ »ft CD t^COOi O r-TtM Co"-* >0 CD t-^C30 Ol O r-TlM CO-^^CDi— c»C:Oi-l(MCO'^ 

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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 23. 



69 



rHrH rH (^©^PHCOCOTjtiOi^OOWCOiO 
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1865 
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1867 
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1872 
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1874 
1875 
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1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
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1900 
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70 



WOKCESTER INSANE HOSPITAL. 



[Oct. 



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1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



71 



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