(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Water Commissioner, for the year ending .."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofwa11896bost 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



WATER COMMISSIONER, 

*OB THE (3 S'S*^ ST "2L- 

TEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1896. 



$rmtei> for tfje JBepwctimmt 







BOSTON: 

EOCKWELL AND CHUECHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1896. 



, 






I 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 

City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1896. 

Hon. Josiah Quincy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : I submit the annual report of the Water Department 
for the financial year ending January 31, 1896. As the 
duties of Water Commissioner were assumed by me Febru- 
ary 1, 1896, I am not in a position to make any comments 
or recommendations. 

The receipts and disbursements of the department for the 
year were as follows : 

The total receipts of the Water Works, from all sources, 
for the year ending January 31, 1896, were as follows, viz. : 

Income from sales of water . . . $2,211,907 76 
Income from shutting off and letting on 

water, and fees 7,830 49 

Elevator, fire and service pipes, sale of 

old materials, etc 53,231 44 

$2,272,969 69 



The total expenditures of the Water Works, from rev- 
enue, for the year ending January 31, 1896, were as follows, 
viz. : 

Current expenses $626,568 37 

Less stock used purchased in previous years, 16,466 67 



,101 70 

Interest on funded debt 863,277 51 

Sinking-fund requirement, 1894-95 . ... . 205,791 00 

Refunded water-rates 2,472 85 

Extension of mains, etc. 251,984 94 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett, under 

contracts 163,605 01 

Balance to sinking-fund 109,036 68 

Redemption of Mystic Water 4% Loan . . , . 65,000 00 
Transferred to Police Dept. appi'opi'iation (on account 

of officers at Chestnut Hill driveway) . . . 1,700 00 



$2,272,969 69 



City Document No. 32. 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION, AND CONDITION OF THE WATER 

DEBT. 

Cost of construction of Water- Works to February 1, 

1895 $25,400,581 03 

Cost of construction of Water-Works to February 1, 

1896 26,856,002 82 

Increase during the year . . $1,455,421 79 

Stock on hand February 1, 1895 $156,982 22 

Stock on hand February 1, 1896 62,268 85 

Decrease during the year $94,713 37 

The outstanding Water Loans February 1, 1895, were . $17,761,273 98 

The outstanding Water Loans February 1, 1896, were . 18,261,273 98 

Increase during the year .... . $500,000 00 

The Water Sinking-Fund February 1, 1895, was . . $8,444,773 55 

The Water Sinking-Fund February 1, 1896, was . . » 9,099,966 39 

Increase during the year $655,192 84 

Net Water Debt February 1, 1895 $9,316,500 43 

Net Water Debt February 1, 1896 9,161,307 59 

Decrease during the year . . . . . . $155,192 84 



SUMMARY OF COST OF SUDBURY AND COCHITUATE 
WORKS TO FEBRUARY 1, 1896. 

Cochituate supply : 

Lake Cochituate . . . $291,838 35 
Compensating reservoirs . . 66,859 80 
Land and water damages . . 248,827 34 
Engineering expenses to Janu- 
ary 1, 1852 .... 40,000 00 
Cochituate aqueduct . . 1,068,425 24 

$1,715,950 73 

Carried forward, $1,715,950 73 

1 Consisting of investments (city of Boston bonds) $8,911,600.00 and cash to the amount 
of $188,366.39. 



Watek Department. 



Brought forward, 






$1,715,950 73 


Sudbury supply : 






Reservoir No. 1 


$257,143 8 


" " 2 . 




465,954 


11 


" " 3 




419,402 


72 


" " 4 




813,846 


38 


" "5, to date 




882,770 


55 


" " 6 




911,752 


33 


Whitehall pond 




301,293 


37 


Cedar swamp . 




33,590 


21 


Work about Farm pond 




17,297 


94 


Roadway in Framingham 


23,947 


32 


Land damages, not otherwise 






specified .... 


342,846 


38 


Water damages 


559,190 


64 


Temporary connection with 






Lake Cochituate . 


75,611 


73 


Investigations of Shawshine and 






Charles rivers, etc. 


27,646 


59 


Protection of supplies 


298,462 


27 


Engineering and engineering ex- 






penses .... 


300,371 


22 


Office expenses, travelling, etc., 


80,594 


74 


Miscellaneous .... 


35,282 


93 


Conduit and connections at 






Chestnut-hill reservoir . 


3,082,661 


95 

e qoq ftfi7 iq 






0,»7^t7,UUJ A.O 


Distributing reservoirs and dis- 






tribution : 






Brookline reservoir . 


$200,077 21 


Beacon-hill " (net cost) . 


363,533 


21 


Chestnut-hill " 


2,277,042 


93 


South Boston" 


90,908 


10 


East " "... 


66,103 


09 


Parker-hill " 


205,793 


81 


Fisher-hill "... 


191,135 


35 


Roxbury high service 


103,829 


53 


Brighton " " 


7,745 


00 


East Boston high service . 


30,208 


12 


West Roxbury high service 


22,346 


56 


Chestnut-hill pumping-station . 


523,420 


46 


Jamaica-pond aqueduct . 


88,417 


20 


Pipe-yards and buildings . 


94,832 


16 


Engineering expenses 


57,873 


58 


Distribution .... 


10,083,343 


30 

14. AOfi fi09 61 









Total cost of Sudbury and Cochituate works, $25,052,227 53 
Credit by amount received from the State on 

account of Basin 5 600,000 00 



t,452,227 53 



City Document No. 32. 



Cost of Mystic works to February 1, 1896 
Land damages 



Dam 

Grubbing at lake 
Lowering Mystic river 

Conduit 

Engine-house 

Engines 

Reservoir . 

Distribution 

Buildings . 

Engineering, inspection, and salaries 

Mystic-valley sewer 

Miscellaneous 

Total cost of Mystic works . 
Total cost of combined supplies 



17,167 26 
9.393 26 
3,012 06 



$82,419 33 
212,637 71 



$152,836 63 



29,572 58 
129,714 30 



295,057 04 

141,856 26 

874,863 58 

18,603 05 

53,216 27 

83,608 70 

24,446 88 

$1,803,775 29 

$25,256,002 82 



The outstanding Water Loans on this date, February 1, 
1896, are as follows : 











Date of 






Loans. 




Maturity. 


Amount. 


6 per cent 


Currency, 


Due Dec, 1897 . 


$500,000 00 


6 ' 


i a 


a 


tt 


June, 1898 . 


450,000 00 


6 < 


' " 


" 


" 


Oct., 1898 . 


540,000 00 


6 ' 


i it 


tt 


ti 


April, 1899 . 


250,000 00 


6 « 


t tt 


" 


a 


Jan., 1901 . 


625,000 00 


6 ' 


' " 


" 


1 1 


April, 1901 . 


688,000 00 


6 ' 


( tt 


" 


a 


July, 1901 . 


330,000 00 


6 < 


i ti 


tt 


it 


July, 1902 . 


100,000 00 


5 < 


( (< 


Sterling Loan, 












(£399,500), 


t i 


Oct., 1902 . 


1,947,273 98 


6 ' 


t tt 


Currency, 


1 1 


April, 1903 . 


905,000 00 


6 ' 


t tt 


tt 


a 


Jan., 1904 . 


8,000 00 


6 < 


t a 


a 


a 


April, 1904 . 


38,000 00 


6 ' 


t it 


a 


a 


Jan., 1905 


161,000 00 


6 < 


t ti 


" 


a 


April, 1905 . 


142,700 00 


6 ' 


i tt 


1 1 


a 


July, 1905 . 


44,000 00 


6 ' 


i it 


" 


a 


Oct., 1905 . 


6,000 00 


5 ' 


i a 


Gold Loan, 


a 


Oct., 1905 . 


1,000,000 00 


6 ' 


' " 


Currency, 


it 


Jan., 1906 . 


82,550 00 


6 ' 


t it 


" 


tt 


April, 1906 


8,750 00 


5 ' 


t a 


Gold Loan, 


a 


April, 1906 . 


552,000 00 


o ' 


t a 


" 


a 


Oct., 1906 . 


2,000,000 00 


6 ' 


I ti 


Currency, 


(( 


Oct., 1906 . 


4,000 00 


6 ' 


t it 


" 


a 


Jan., 1907 . 


8,000 00 


6 ' 


' " 


" 


a 


April, 1907 


5,000 00 


6 ' 


( It 


" 


ti 


Julv, 1907 . 


1,000 00 


5 ' 


i i i 


Currency Loan, 


" 


Oct", 1907 . 


1,000 00 


5 ' 


< it 


(1 (C 


tt 


April, 1908 . 


12,000 00 


4 < 


t a 


it 


" 


April, 1908 . 


588,000 00 


4 ' 


i ti 


Loan, 


ti 


July, 1909 . 


82,000 00 




Carried forward, 






$14,547,273 98 



Water Department. 









Date of 








Loans. 




Maturity. 


Amount. 




Brought forward, 




$14,547,273 98 


44 


per cent. Loan, 


Due Oct., 1909 


268,000 00 


4 


44 44 (C 


4 4 


April, 1910 




280,000 00 


4 


(( (1 c< 


" 


April, 1912 




324,000 00 


4 


44 44 44 


44 


July, 1913 




111,000 00 


4 


£ 4 4 4 44 


" 


Oct., 1913 




336,000 00 


4 


44 a tt 


" 


Jan., 1914 




466,000 00 


4 


tt a it 


44 


April, 1914 




18,500 00 


4 


a a a 


" 


Oct., 1914 




16,000 00 


4 


n a u 


44 


Jan., 1915 




50,000 00 


34 


c« u a 


44 


April, 1915 




50,000 00 


4 


44 a tt 


" 


April, 1915 




145,700 00 


34 


(< (< (C 


" 


Oct., 1915 




50,000 00 


4 


44 «< (< 


44 


Oct., 1915 




23,000 00 


34 


44 (C (I 


44 


Jan., 1916 




100,000 00 


4 


44 (C <4 


" 


Jan., 1916 




58,000 00 


4 


C< << (< 


44 


April, 1916 




128,500 00 


34 


44 44 (6 


4 4 


July, 1916 




75,000 00 


34 


44 ii It 


44 


Oct., 1916 




25,000 00 


4 


it it It 


" 


Oct., 1916 




286,300 00 


4 


it it it 


" 


Jan., 1917 




21,000 00 


3 


it ti it 


it 


April, 1917 




200,000 00 


34 


tt ti it 


li 


April, 1917 




275,000 00 


4 


it it it 


it 


April, 1917 




161,000 00 


4 


it ii it 


44 


July, 1917 




7,000 00 


4 


a a tt 


44 


Oct., 1917 




160,700 00 


4 


a a tt 


44 


Jan., 1918 




20,000 00 


4 


tin 44 


44 


April, 1918 




6,300 00 


34 


" " " 


< 4 


July, 1918 




100,000 00 


4 


ti tt ft 


" 


Oct., 1918 




100,000 00 


4 


ti n n 


" 


April, 1919 




200,000 00 


34 


a a it 


" 


Oct., 1919 




145,000 00 


4 


a a a 


44 


Oct., 1919 




300,000 00 


34 


a a a 


44 


Nov., 1919 




130,000 00 


34 


<t << c< 


44 


Jan., 1920 . 




220,000 00 


4 


" " " 


4 4 


Oct., 1920 




384,000 00 


4 


(4 ti li 


" 


April, 1921 




100,000 00 


4 


ii ii ii 


44 


Oct., 1921 




162,500 00 


4 


ii a a 


44 


Jan., 1922 




100,000 00 


4 


tt a tt 


(4 


April, 1922 . 




75,000 00 


4 


a a a 


44 


Oct., 1922 . 




283,000 00 


4 


(4 44 li 


4 I 


Oct., 1923 . 




576,275 00 


4 


44 44 4 4 

Total . 


li 


Oct., 1924 . 




644,225 00 






$18,261,273 98 






Summary. 






3 per cent. 


Loans, 


$ 


200,000 00 




34 " " 


44 


1, 


170,000 00 




4 " " 


44 


6, 


214,000 00 




44 " " 


" 




268,000 00 




5 " " 


Currency Loans, 


13,000 00 




5 " " 


Gold 


3, 


552,000 00 




5 " " 


Sterling 


1, 


947,273 98 




6 " " 
Total 


Loans, 


4, 


897,000 00 




. $18, 


261,2 


73 98 



City Document No. 32. 



Cochituate Water Debt, Gross and Net, 

At the Close of Each Fiscal Year. 



Fiscal Year. 


Gross Debt. 


Sinking-Funds. 


Net Debt. 


1847-48. . . 


$2,129 fififi 39 1 




$2,129 ft-^ 39 


1848-49. .. 


3,787 


328 98 




3^787 


328 98 


1849-50. . . 


4,463 


,205 56 




4,463 


205 56 


1850-51. . . 


4,955 


,613 51 




4,955 


613 51 


1851-52... 


5,209 


223 26 




5,209 


223 26 


1852-53. . . 


5,972 


976 11 




5,972 


976 11 


1853-54. . . 


5,432 


261 11 




5,432 


261 11 


1854-55. . . 


5,403 


961 11 




5,403 


961 11 


1855-56. . . 


5,230 


961 11 




5,230 


961 11 


1856-57. . . 


5,031 


961 11 




5,031 


961 11 


1857-58. . . 


4,724 


961 11 




4,724 


961 11 


1858-59... 


4,' 754 


461 11 




4,754 


461 11 


1859-60... 


3,846 


211 11 




3,846 


211 11 


1860-61. . . 


3,455 


211 11 




3,455 


211 11 


1861-62. . . 


3,012 

2,992 


711 11 
711 11 






3,012 

2,992 


711 11 


1862-63... 




711 11 


1863-64... 


2,992 


711 11 




2,992 


711 11 


1864-65... 


2,942 


711 11 




2,942 


711 11 


1865-66... 


3,152 


711 11 




3,152 


711 11 


1866-67... 


3,370 


711 11 




3,370 


711 11 


1867-68... 


3,867 


711 11 




3,867 


711 11 


1868-69... 


5,107 


711 11 




5,107 


,711 11 


1869-70. . . 


5,731 

6,482 


711 11 
711 11 




00 


5,731 

5,382 


711 11 


1870-71... 


$1,100,000 


711 11 


1871-72... 


6,812 


711 11 


1,185,049 


67 


5,627 


,661 44 


1872-73... 


6,912 


711 11 


1,268,234 


97 


5,644 


476 14 


1873-74... 


7,863 


711 11 


1,372,953 


62 


6,490 


757 49 


1874-75... 


8,123 


,711 11 


1,533,890 


28 


6,589 


820 83 


1875-76... 


9,735 


711 11 


1,560,917 


83 


8,174 


793 28 


1876-77... 


11,548 


711 11 


1,709,492 


60 


9,839 


218 51 


1877-78... 


11,545 


273 98 


2,043,764 


73 


9,501 


509 25 


1878-79... 


11,753 


273 98 


2,143,847 


85 


9,609 


426 13 


1879-80... 


11,697 


273 98 


1,771,692 


92 


9,925 


581 06 


1880-81... 


11,631 


273 98 


1,989,300 


88 


9,641 


973 10 


1881-82... 


11,631 


273 98 


2,281,857 


89 


9,349 


416 09 


1882-83... 


11,955 


273 98 


2,607,768 


46 


9,347 


505 52 


1883-84... 


12,882 


273 98 


2,746,505 


58 


10,135 


768 40 


1884-85... 


13,045 


473 98 


3,106,323 


82 


9,939 


150 16 


1885-86... 


13,491 


473 98 


3,385,201 


26 


10,106 


272 72 


1886-87... 


14,142 


273 98 


3,947,616 


92 


10,194 


657 06 


1887-88... 


14,741 


273 98 


4,373,304 


09 


10,367 


969 89 


1888-89... 


14,941 


,273 98 


4,864,092 


54 


10,077 


181 44 


1889-90... 


15,696 


,273 98 


5.440,819 


47 


10,255 


454 51 


1890-91... 


16,267 


,773 98 


5,979,297 


80 


10,288 


476 18 


1891-92... 


16,423 


773 98 


6,471,545 


34 


9,952 


228 64 


1892-93... 


16,758 


,773 98 


7,019,058 


38 


9,739 


715 60 


1893-94... 


17,055 


,273 98 


7,649,504 


87 


9,405 


769 11 


1894-95... 


17,761 


273 98 


8,444,773 


55 


9,316 


500 43 


1895-96... 


18,261 


273 98 


9,099,966 


39 


9,161 


307 59 



1 No account taken of amounts borrowed temporarily from 1846 to 1852 and afterwards 
funded by the issue of the water bonds that figure in this statement. 



Water Department. 






02 



1* 

Ph o 



e3 OS 
P3 



5 ° 



^3 



OSWIStON'^O'HOOOOaOOClNOOOSSONCqtDQONOJCOOCKM 

•*10tDC0Nt"*l>Nl0'*C05Dr-H0-<00NINt>THOTl'«ia) 
OrtO;(B010«OS«O i »^MCOO'*««:i>'*INlO'*INH 

»o~ooo o"iONooto"io"-* co i-h i-h" as" co n ms" ©s <^co cxTt-^o co irT 

r-)HrtcOCO'*CO<N«Mrt03N»0'*'*"OlOIOlOCDa3<» 



■* r-t IM ■>* rH 
30 rf t- ■* CNl^ 

oT^i-H i-T 



o o o 

ioioo 

• <N <M O 

iO 05 03 
ms 0_10 

; ,-H ScTcO 
, iH CO CO 



CO —i • o 

-* w • so 

CD*-* '. -^T 

r-ii—l .to 







o 
o 

CO 

t— 

as 




o 

o 

CO 
CI 

MS 



















QO«H^O!ON •OSOIUSrHNONlOONSJO 

HOffiWlSCOt- 'MHOHlOONCOINNO 

OOJIONCOOH •XS)00O050JIO'*ieN00i- 1 

CO Oi OS O CO ^t- CO •lONWMHOt-HWOHCi 

-* O ■— I NtD»>0 •NHO>(DOffltOO'*'*lON 

scT t~~ t~ -^ ms" co o !oToN-?DdiNioo"8>s"io" 

, <N <M t- r-l OS OS i-H .ONfflNlOOiJlNTjiOlOJO 

3§= i-h eq t-h i-i cq .<Mi-is<i(NCMcocNioq(M(MCN<M 



S)N«HN01OHI>NS®00O^-*0000OMOIBM-*N 

■*HK«HHOooooffl»ooeiHO'*i>ioco!Oto-*ci3fio) 

WOOHtDr-MHfflHt-'*MlOOOCCiHOJt-MOHHiacO 
^i-Tc^cfcO-*cTcOM5 



ONCSNOl0O*NO<BfflO01<*T|iM00Offl00©^iCil0S 
OCOlS*t»'*ra!DI>fflTj(NIN^CltOOO'*OOOOlNCOH 
O i—l I— CO 1*1 CSJ^OO N-*1ilOrtHOtON«OOlO<10lONWCO 

HOtooqiowoMOtotoioweo «sHas co ooos'iod'ao n to" 

50tit»0000000)a)OSOOOlOCOi*ilQOOQrHlM(Mh.cc03iHt- 
£§: rHi— li-Hi-Hi— li— ICqCqCNIi-HC^CNICOCO 



OlfllOOOM^^OlO 
ONtiOO-.MOiHOlO 

ownoooiioccio-* 
o ^oTcToMr»oi*Ti*rt-r 

OH COt-COCOi-HO 

i-H (N cq CM 



<D CU 02 CD 01 

x y, m mm 
H HH H H 

"2 i : "T* I.:::.::::::.::::::::: : : : : : 

> K 

"S3 a * ; III! 

o o • . . . ; ■ 

o 

t* <v • 

-SS : :::::::::::::::::::::::: 

O+^cj 

m sQ : I::::::::::::::::::::::- 

r2==fH ; 

»• S o 

<lOg 

_, .5 <M W^lOONOOaOHNOSrHiatasiOfflOHlNeO^iOffl 
H-w t- t~l-t-L—t-t-t-0000COCO00COCOCO00COOSO5OSO5OSO5OS 

•o2 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

i— I Si P ■— I NM-*l0!DNC0OOHCqc0-*L'3C0S000)O-NM-fia 
t- =H 'O t- t-Nt-Nt^t-Nt-OOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOCOmOSOJCSOlOS 
CO CO COCOCOCOCOQOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOOOCOCOCOCOCOCOOO 



City Document No. 32. 



DETAILED EXPENDITURES UNDER 
APPROPRIATIONS. 



THE SEVERAL 



February Draft, 1895, to February Draft, 1896. 
Extension of Mains, etc. {from Revenue). 

Labor $121,841 79 

Teaming 6,295 05 

Blasting 7,607 03 

Water-pipes, contracts (including in- 
spection, $1,756.65) . ■ . . 58,082 76 

Stock 52,251 18 

Miscellaneous 5,907 13 



$251,984 94 



1 Additional Supply of Water. 

(Account of Basin 5,"Whitehall pond, Cedar swamp, 
and Protection of Supply.) 

Salaries and labor .... $13,498 87 

Engineering and supplies . . . 30,246 84 

Materials 3,833 42 

Teaming . . . . . . 2,158 59 

Freight and express .... 145 09 

Travelling expenses .... 701 38 

Advertising, printing, and stationery . 927 83 

Rents 425 55 

Land damages 317,831 06 

Miscellaneous 4,619 53 

Town of Southborough, for police ser- 
vice 6,133 25 

Town of Framingham, towards sewer- 
age system 2 1,000 00 

Marlborough filter beds . . . 10,706 75 
Miscellaneous contracts . . . 827 00 
Contract, Dam 5 (on account) . . 153,127 68 
Contract, Section A, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 15,852 34 

Contract, Section B, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 21,209 42 

Contract, Section C, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 18,616 71 

Contract, Section D, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 36,540 91 

Carried forward, $638,402 22 

1 Of expenditures under this appropriation the amount of $541,122.28 was from loans 
issued hy the City, and $566,905.72 from sums received from the State on account of 
the taking of Basin 5 by the Metropolitan Water Board. 

2 Additional sum of $30,000 also paid from appropriation " Protection of Water 
Supply." 



Water Department. 

Brought forward, $638,402 22 

Contract, Section E, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 20,747 44 

Contract, Section F, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 24,999 96 

Contract, Section G, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 13,116 06 

Contract, Section H, Basin 5 (on ac- 
count) 11,425 26 

Contract, fence for roads, Basin 5 

(on account) .... 1,561 65 

Contract, two portions Framingham- 

Marlborough road . . . 13,220 56 



(Account of High Service.) 
Labor . . ' . . . . $87,888 58 

Engineering 1,342 00 

Materials 34,172 22 

Teaming 6,361 02 

Blasting 2,560 13 

Freight and express . . . 348 46 

Travelling expenses . . . 1,534 35 

Advertising, printing, and stationery, 333 69 

Miscellaneous 706 64 

Miscellaneous contracts . . . 4,088 00 

Contract, pipes and specials (includ- 
ing inspection, $1,012.50) . . 167,985 09 
Contract, additional pumping-engine 

No. 3, balance (total, $122,499.30) , 18,067 58 
Contract, laying 42-inch main in New- 
bury street ...... 2,987 82 

Contract, laying 6-inch main between 

Long and Gallop's Islands . . 12,081 96 
Contract, laying sewer in Walnut 

street, Brookline . . . . 2,152 84 

Contract, laying 48-inch main in 

Brookline (on account) . . 14,909 91 

Contract, laying 42-inch main in 

Huntington avenue (on account) . 18,645 06 
Contract, laying 4-inch pipe between 
Long and Rainsford Islands (on 
account) . . . . ' . 8,389 50 



$723,473 15 



384,554 85 
$1,108,028 00 

Protection of Water Supply (Special Loan) . 

Amount paid to town of Framingham, towards sys- 
tem of sewerage filtration 1 $30,000 00 

1 Payment of $1,000 also made from appropriation "Additional Supply of Water," 
making total of $31,000 paid to town under agreement. 



10 



City Document No. 32. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, COCHITUATE SYSTEM. 

(From Revenue.) 
February Draft, 1895, to February Draft, 1896. 



Salaries, travelling expenses, printing, stationery, 
advertising, postage, and miscellaneous, on ac- 
count of office ....... 

Salaries and labor, travelling expenses, printing, 
stationery, and miscellaneous, on account of In- 
come Division l . 

Salaries, travelling expenses and transportation of 
men, printing, stationery, and miscellaneous, on 
account of Eastern Division .... 

Salaries, travelling expenses, printing, stationery, 
and miscellaneous, on account of Western Di- 
vision ..... 

Engineering ..... 

New meters, and setting 

Meters, repairing .... 

Machine-shop, Albany street 

Telephones ..... 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

Main-pipe relaying (including stock and labor) 
" repairing " " " " 

Hydrants " " " " " 

Stop-cocks " " " " " 

Hydrant and stop-cock boxes, and repairing (includ 
ing stock and labor) ..... 

Tools and repairing (including stock and labor) 

Streets " " " " " 

Fountains " " " " " 

Stables " " " " " 

Waste-detection ...... 

Basins, Framingham and Ashland (including stock 
and labor) ...... 

Service-pipe repairing (including stock and labor) 

Protection of Sudbury and Cochituate supply . 

High service, Chestnut Hill (including fuel, salaries 
repairs, etc.) ...... 

High service, East Boston (including fuel, salaries 
repairs, etc.) ...... 

High service, West Roxbury (including fuel, salaries 
repairs, etc.) ...... 

Electrolysis ..... 

Harbor service .... 

Carried forward, 



$23,290 43 
33,430 46 
17,165 03 



27,767 70 

5,963 18 

8,841 46 

14,590 21 

10,272 71 

1,482 44 

2,361 54 

7,837 80 

22,282 62 

12,639 15 

20,406 25 

2,876 50 



2,096 
8,090 
6,064 
2,189 
19,109 
9,858 



15 

28 
66 
94 
32 

57 



7,972 55 

20,540 63 

682 48 

38,246 14 

4,672 35 

4,053 86 

3,082 45 

13,410 14 

551,277 00 



1 From July 1, 1895. 



Water Department. 



11 



Brought forward, 
Temporary high-service, Elm Hill . 
Albany-street yard 
Chestnut-Hill Reservoir (care of grounds 
Parker-Hill Reservoir 
Brookline Reservoir 
East Boston and South Boston Reservoirs 
Fisher-Hill Reservoir 
Lake Cochituate .... 

Chestnut-Hill driveway (including stable) 
Taxes ...... 

Damages ..... 

Analyses of water, etc. . 
Filtration ..... 

Biological Laboratory 
Natick filters 



etc. 



$351,277 00 

3,024 16 

4,626 17 

13,143 58 

1,198 23 

2,556 35 

465 63 

3,826 97 

3,745 62 

10,757 63 

9,224 84 

767 90 

410 00 

141 67 

1,802 44 

3,321 09 

$410,289 28 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, MYSTIC SYSTEM. 

(From Revenue.) 
February Draft, 1895, to February Draft, 1896. 



Salaries, printing, stationery, advertising, postage, 
travelling expenses, and miscellaneous, on account 
of office ........ 

Salaries and labor, printing and stationery, travel- 
ling expenses, and miscellaneous, on account of 
Income Division 1 ..... 

Salaries, printing, stationery, travelling expenses, 
and miscellaneous, on account of Mystic Division, 

Engineer's Department .... 

Meters, repairing . . . . . . 

Off and on water (labor) .... 

Main-pipe laying (including stock and labor) 

Main-pipe relaying (including stock and labor) 
" repairing " 

Service-pipe laying " 

" repairing " 

Hydrants " " 

Gates " " 

Streets " " 

Lake .... 

Conduit 

New meters, and setting 

Stables ... 

Carried forward, 



!,292 66 



7,716 53 



5,753 


87 


6,353 


72 


3,199 


40 


1,846 


07 


2,605 


03 


4,216 


02 


1,171 


96 


1,023 


07 


1,747 


32 


1,957 


95 


942 


64 


318 


31 


8,219 


44 


1,494 


18 


1,178 


05 


5,337 


23 


$61,373 


45 



1 From July 1, 1895. 



12 



City Document No. 32. 



Brought forward, 
Reservoir ........ 

Pumping-service (salaries, wages, fuel, repairs, etc.), 
Repair-shop ..... 

Fountains ..... 

Tools and repairing 

Mystic Sewer (repairs, and pumping and treatment 

of sewage) .... 

Waste-detection Service 
Protection of water sources (including salaries of 

three Special Agents on Pollution) 
Analyses of water 
Damages ..... 
Taxes . 

New pumping-engine No. 4 (on account) 
Addition to pumping-station (on account) 



861,873 45 

4,609 13 

32,695 96 

2,634 68 

683 63 

954 53 

9,529 05 
2,930 49 

5,802 41 

125 00 

5 60 

115 58 

54,138 16 

9,578 91 



,176 58 



Water Department. 



13 



CO 



>> 




•- 




a 









fl 




c3 




b 




iX 


r^ 


= 


fc. 


•pi 




>a 


3 


a 


8 


<v 




ri 


to 


2 


s» 


a 


*, 


K 




OS 


« 


QC 


— N 





^ 


ea 


rig 


p0 


is 


0) 


"i 


fe 


s 


br 


s 
o 


a 


§ 




^ 


s 




0) 

2 


CO 

to 


S 


~s. 







a 


o 






^ 


<u 


rr: 


!«. 


0) 


<S 


H 


* 


Sx 




S 


2 


•H 


r^ 


- 




5 


"W 


>d 


r4? 


8* 


it. 

e 


S 


§ 






rS 




s 


w 


4i 




Ph 


a 






■ti 


<o 


c 




C3 













o 

CO 






o 




CO 


5 




cc 
c- 




o 


CO 

cs 


o 

U3 










OS 




t- 


CO 


f- 


*-H 


OS 








■3 


OS 




<o 


CO 


CT 


CO 


o 


OS 


■* 






-*_ 






in 


<c 


°i. 


00 


c 


CM 






























o 


oT 






CO 


c 


CO 


CO 


Ti 








EH 


CM 




>* 


CO 












E4 








N 














o 






& 


















-4 
K 
Eh 
























U0 
OS 
CO 


o 

CO CO 




eoio 


OH 


cc 


o 


o 


■r 






o< 

o> 




<MTt< 


O 00 




o 






CO 


o 




CO OS 




OS CO 


*n> co 




»n 


to 


c 


CO 


Q 




CD OS 




t--* 


CO t-h 


5 


OS 






OS 




SH 


°. ■* — 








iO_ 




cc 




o 




c3 
o 






rH t-T 


rH 1 "*"" 


in 
















O H— 


l-H 














(h 


«& 




rH 














< 




























(M. 




OS 


O 


CO 


CO 


o 


M 


CO 


Ph 




§2 


t- 




CO 


O 


CM 


CD 


o 




1-1 










OS 


O 


o 


id 


CO 


s^ 


OS 






"S ^ 
Ph 


CO 




CO 


«3 


>r: 


00 


OS 


■d 


tH 






o 




CO 
CO 




CN 
IS 


CO 

c?q 


CO 
CO 


o 










■» 
























— ■— s 


T3 


, — 








V ~~~ 














OS 




ts-i 






















SI ft 
0> 






II 










• s 
















cs 
C4 
















J a 














a «• 








** s 










OS^IC* 














■3 O 


as 






^^ 










& OI 
















£r= 

<D 

O " 




T3 


o 










a >- 

rl«> 
CM O 

a 

o _ 

u " 
as 

ft 










EH 

55 
& 
O 

a 
< 




o "8 

C3 O 

o ^ 

00 o 


■3 

as 

ft 

o 

OS 

c» 


as 
ft 
ft 
03 

ft 

o 

OS 
OS 


. N.B. $50 
,e city when 
was made . 

cents per lb. 

i per lb , . . 


= 


r ton 2,240 lbs 
per ton . . 








O O 1 o 




<M 1M 


o ■«: <s 








OS CD 








o o 1 o 




t^co^ 


us-wiv 




az S 


CJ 


ft -^ 








•* CN* 1-* 


P< 
O IT3 




c» ^e ^ 


as 
o 


goo 








IM (N 


OS O 


■* ^(i 


co" s \5 . . 
















#>S. 




■» 


*" -■•.>..- 


^* >o 








<=& 1 €©■ 


■S& 


— ~- 






riH rH ^„^^_ 


<*■ CM 












• * 






















tin • 


































a . 
































v as 












a [ 
o 




















03 B'-' 






























a Phco" 












l> 


















03 


tso -j 1 -* 




M 
H 

o 




CO 

d 
aT 

P 

OS 


9 o 

as 

P H 

^ft 

"S as 

S ° 


r 

a 


3 
3 

a 

3 
3 

Q 


c 
!z 

4 


1 


! 

c 


c 
|z 

c 

) c 

X 

1 


(M C-- 


as 

>s 

as 
fl 
o 

c2 

d 
as 


tnut Hill Pumpi 

ins, Chestnut H 
r contract of Jul 








a 


n3 is 


o" 


'S 


t 


a 


§ 


3 ^"os 








ft 

a 

Ph 


22 
33 


d 

a 


a 

OS 

bn 


a 

c. 


o 

aT 
SO 


ft 

ft 
as 


o ™ *a 












oi 


ft 


"f 


a 


"el 

SB 

a 

a 

03 




o a 








o 




P 


a 


c 


"m 


"3 h „3 

rs 00 _ 










la 


bo 

.9 
2 


3 

Ph 
o 


c 

a 

e 


03. . 

o- - 

2 


tons ci 

rimmin 
station 








S 


<|cD 


Ph 


>s 


c 




OS 
, &H 


§ EH 

CO ^ ^ 








d 


as 




-. 




















O 


S d 


>, 


3 . 
















tn 




<SJ 


So 

J3 Sh 


o 


63 

3 • 
















O 

O 

1] 

K 

55 




1-3 




as • 




d 


OS 












3 

a 

"3 


as as 

0s_a 


6 

<55 


So 

r^.9 




' "3 


o 

w 


c 
C 


> 

> 

! 




o 




a 


OS 3 




ca 










O 




&h' 


H 


o 
"3 


6CX5 

Sh cs 
O C8 


t: 
c 
c 

! 


i -3 

C3 


OS 

3 


C 

£ 


s 








fc 


^ 


o 


tj"" 


c 


) 5 






H 








——-V 


OS 




o 






t- 


c 


i-l 










<M 


,(N 


CO 










CM 




H 




N*? rH 




CO 




■* 












& 




OS OJH . 




OS 




03 . 












-1 




CO £ 

* 


T3 M 
1 O 3 


ft 

as 
CE 




3 

3 


< 


> 


* 


! 
1 


# 




# 


I- 


5 " 
> 

* 





14 



City Document No. 32. 



r* O r-i 



.X o» -1 



CO iO CO OS 



CO O CO OS 



^ 



u 
eg 

a> 

be 

a 

P 

d 

fee 
a 

a 
« 

Ph 

d 
= 

d 

e3 



o 

03 
5 

o 
Q 



tfS T-< rH 






« !S 



3 1 «1 



>s >> ja o_ 



a-g 



I fa * 



ia « 



Ph 

-20 



<D fl 



^ 0) 



EC 

a <a .2 
° S« 

©'as 

o 



3.9 



MX 

o <s 



N CM <M <M 






< 3 



|6 



M 



fe.9 



■fi : 



P O 



< O 



Water Department. 



15 



*0 rH 



<M r~\ 



i— I ifS 



gco 






N "* (M CO T*< 

■gjj- £f£ ff-r f-f- , ^ 



*» 




ag 
'■£•£ 



*-H a) n ie _ . 



Pa 
03 
Is 

SO 

s 

a 

03 
a) 
H 



' !-5 X O O O 

_, Wo o o 

' o -a °.°. . 

jo a oo io co 

! o" 8 « 

) 5 g rH<N CO* 



ro 


o 


M 


<a 


O 




Is 


o 
o 


o 


£ 


a 




ej 


M 






<l 


M 


3 


00 










OO ^ 





P^o 



SO 



to t- 



16 



City Document No. 32. 



OO co 

OO CO 



s 



Si 


be 

s 

•H 

a 

0) 



= 

4) 

ci 



43 

« 

s 
© 



£, ris* CO 



»■€&<§&■?»■ 



i-H lO CO 











b 


T3 














en 


t>> 














ft 
















ft 


« 






<B 








M 








P 


t>> 






C3 


fl 






cd 


,C 








< 






















o 








CO 


T3 
03 






J5 








M 


> 







.2.3" " 

OO o to 

•H" 1MC0 CO 

fll I I 

"o t-rHOO 



fe « 



fto 
£ O 



> g 3 a g 1 ^ 
« a -s 5 go 

60 6B.9 



Sft 

6B W 



T3 


O 












o 


a 


tfl 


.a 


~ 



« fi 3 



« £ 



PQ W 



o-a 


a 


^3 




*= o 




6BDQ 








S^ 3 


a 


3 o 


"nr 



W m 



3 • 



-So 

9 M 



•-3 S 

^H O 



a> S3 
'a) oj) 



W ~ W 



a h 



OO CO CO CO 



Ph s 

51 



Water Department. 



17 













cr 






o 


CC 


o 


t- 


en 




C 


CM 




CD 


O 


O 


1-1 




c- 


■<* 




c 


CM 


o 


CO 


r- 


o 


i-^ 


CO 


(31 




























l-f 


CD 




o 


CO 


»o 




c» t- 






ifi 


























o 
















CO 


CO^ 


-+ 

CI 


t- 

o" 

CM 


co" 


r- 
ri 


. «■ 


i-i 








CM 




o» 
i-i 


i-T oT 

CM 




CM 

H 


co" 




rt 


H 




TX 


CO 


m 






O 




o 


^ 


OJ 


i-i 






CO 


o 


o 


tH 




a 


tH 


o 


c- 




O 


CO 




o 


I-I 






Tjl 03 




O) 






















CD 




o 


CO 


ifi 


Ol 










o 


























o 


















CO 


CD 
l-H 


<M 


CM 


CO 


■d 


€©■ 










CM 




-f" 


CN 
C 


oT 




o 

CM 


CO - 




T3 


S 1 

cd 










T3 










-a 






































C5 




Ti 














CD 

3 


C3 
1 

CD 


" 


" 


5 


" 


>> 

o 

s 


S 


; 


3 




o 

3 

CJ 


s 


CD 

a 

a 


S 


o 

o 

<4H 




= 


: 


a 
o 






































<o 




































ft 


o 


o o 


o 


§ * 


" 


- 


- 


o 


ft 


" 


t-H 


oo ft 

00 








































o 


Oi 


CM 




■* 




OJ 






CO 


oo 














o 


CM 


■* -* 


-* ■* 


CM 


-v 


-* -# 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO CM 




CM 


-* 




•» 


■» 


■» <■& 


«■ 


€& €& 


m 


4» 


* * 


€& 


■*»■ 


«■ 


«■ «■ 




«J 


«• 


4» 
































— - 






, 


- — 
































£> . 


P 


CD 


ft * 


CD ' 






















ft 










ftp 


P.72 


ft " 


i3 ° 






















ti 

a 
Pm 






.5 
2 




a 
o 




.9 • 
"3 . 


PmcI 

pja 


>, 












^ 














o 
o 




o o 

.?. CD 

'M m 


oi 


a 


CD CO 


5^ 


3 

M 
o 


J3 
on 
3 
o 

h 










CD 


_ 


_ 


b 


1 t>» 


3 




pq 

60 

a 
o 

■a 

g. 
"a 


■E 
6 

E 


5-3 

MM 
CD 

=3 m 


a'p 

M 03 
CD 'crj 
cHm 


fl o 
ilfl 


0) 

"8 

CD 


,0 
A 
3 
O 
(72 










o 

p 

3 

o 
o 




CD 

CD 

a 

-a 


f. 
V 
c 

PC 


C3 
CD 

CD 
ft 


M 
O 

CD 


S 


c 
ir 


"S a 

3,5 
„ *? 60 


a 

CD 

CD 
ch 


o 

a 

-a 


+= a 
II 


ft^ 
a ® 

.9 a 

.Op 


in 

o 

a 

C3 
U 

D 

50 
_P 


O 


- 


" 


" 


" 


60 


s 


T 


TI 


■a 




d 


c 




5 


03 


KT3 

co a 

CD 03 


3"? 

CD CD 
6D-S 

a o 


a 
pq 


2 


" 


S 


; 


O 


a 
o 

a 


CD 
CD 


C, 
C 
& 
6 


C3 
O 

1 ? r 


o 

^2 


o 


C3 

a 

a' 




PC 


.9§ 
rt a 

o o 

O o 

■>.^ 

c8 *■ 


a 

o 

o 


60 

a 
o 
fl 


.5 60 

^ a 

OM 


D 

a 

O 

o 


& 


H 


C5 


tr 


bo 
.9 


<i 


£ 


5 


boa 

"£ '5 
-2 c 


60 

.9 
■g 




R 


00 

■<* 

60 

a 

'Si 


PC 

= 
c 

c 

CI 


61 

a 


a^ 
| e 

CD C 


, CM-g 
60g 

9-S 


•S ft 

S3 


m 


OQ 










PQ 








<1 


. w 




P 


i/. 


i-q 


i-l 




fl 


tH 






























































C8 






































































> 










3 








> 


J T3 




















c 




























a 

CD 






b 


D 

• 




a 
c 


• 








S, 


• 






c 
J= 


CD 
P 




» 




>> 

CD 

"a! 

M 


60 

a 


1 
c 

!7 


a 

C3 
CD 


- 


cc 

c 


CD 

■a 


; 


; 






>> 

"3 
M 


: 


'cD 

a 
a 
o 


r 
5 

C 


* 

s 






CD 


O 

EH 


ri 


cSS 


* 


fl 




cS 


IS 








CD c 


c h 




6 


cfe 


1* 




» 


=8 


£ 


p 


a 




0) 




c 


08 

a 

o 








a 


s 


c 


60 






a 


CD 
60 


h 


o 


f 


= S 


5 




; 


« 


; 




^ 




h 


p 


f-i 






M 




3 


* 





> .d 

< o 




> 


> ,d 

EH 








c5 


, a 




fl 


i 


CD 






CD 

Ph 


CD 

t5 


CO 


O! 


c 








CO 


00 


03 


C 


o 




CM 


CO 


«• 


CM 




CM 


CM 


CM 






» 


1 CM 


cm 


o 


i 








rH 


i -1 






*" 






1-1 


1-1 




o> ■£ 












>> 




























3 ft 


























a 














^ 












£ 


" 


* 


■ 


" 


*• 


"" 


3 


" 


™ 




* 


*" 


* 


* 












# 


# 


* 


# 


# 


# 


# 


»-3 




# 




* 




* 



18 



City Document No. 32. 






0> I-H 



r-1 t- O 



u 
S 
-0 

to 

a 

•H 

a 

d 

a 

d 

eg 



o 

S 
© 



■»«&#* 



S? I 2 * 



=5 * 



WW 






ftf 1 * 



"S.2 



5t3 o 
» a o 

13 



a 






•S ° 

8 Ml 

S3 

C3 d 

aft 

as 

3W 



(52 



'3 ^ 2 ^ & 



O ffl 



C3 c8 <u •;' 

5 3 ? u 



ft 



c3 ft 



13 a! 















o 




p • 










3 • 














O 




a . 
























<J8 




S • 










S£ 


at 

PS 
o 

B 
O 
«I 

B 

o 

a 


M 
ft 

.2 


c 
pe 


h 

'o 

3 

02 

s 

Ml 


d 
O 

ctg 

a 
w 


0! 

< 


o 

W> 

_P 

.2 
1 


3 
pq 

a 

o 


£ 6 
pqo 

. to 
fc.9 
oi 3 

Mi-S 
^ o 

O ci 


(1) 
"3 

M 
ft 


- 


2 

cj 

a 
o 
ft 

O 
QQ 

a 

1-3 


a 

ft 

.2 

M) 

to 


C3 
<B ft 

■a a 

pqO 

CD 3 

o a 

CD Hh 




3 


£ 


«l 


J 


C 


o 

H 


rt 
H 


o 


S 




O 

pq 


O 




« 


-t- 


o 


fc~ 








to 


o 


Ol 




iO 


Jr- 




ct 


e- 


































> 


















P 


1-3 


2 


- 


- 


= 




















# 


# 






# 


* 


* 


* 




# 


* 







Water Department. 



19 



<M 1- 

ia co 

CO i-l 



CO CO CO CD 



CO <M (N iO 



CM i-l 



CO CO CO CO 



i-i C5 CO Ol i— I 



CO "tfi t- tH 



CO CM <N iO 

































2 37-100 cents per lb. .... . 


1 
> 

3 


o 


> 

IS 

B 
c 

p 


c 




- 




> 
c 


c 

a 
a 

= 


- 


5< -* 




1 " ton (2,240 lbs.) ... 
5 " cubic yard ....... 



CO CI <M CO & CO 



€& 4^ 4& 



rt «§■ #> » 



•C5T3 



o 7- 
S 3 



fi O Q 



a I 



02 O * 



W 3> -a 



3 5 



* a s 



« 03 — 

pq i-5 ffl 



H PQ rn" PQ 



a 

3 • 
o . 








T3 


































3 








>> 




.3 

o 




> 








-d 


>, 


"3 

3 


> 








a 

a 

73 




d 
O 

<£5 




o 

po 

>> 














































0> 03 
ftft 

sg 


3 
o 

3 
P4 


"3 
M 

Pq 


a 
o 

>3 
1-1 


SO 

.3 


3 
O 
>» 

i-q 








3 
O 

fi 
o 




U 

6 


M 

pq' 




= 


3 
o 


3 

pq 


a 

03 

.4 
3 

3 


3 

pq 


03 

02 

3 a 

Or* 






>> 

3 
ID 

w 


.S 

03 
3 


3 




02 


'3 
a 


.3 

03 


s 


= 


ID 

S 

o3 


.3 

3 


'5 
a 

Q 




.3 
5 
3 


- 


= 


2 
3 

£ 


S3 

a 

o 


pq 

6 

i-q 


03 

O 

.3 

H 




















lO 


CO 
















































r-i 












OJ 




















































































- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


; 




3 


3 


- 


* 


- 


- 




- 


* 


» 


~ 


» 


u 


~ 





20 



City Document No. 32. 



(MO -* 



4> 

6 
to 

d 

•M 

s 
d 

bn 

.2 

d 

4) 

Ph 

•d 
d 

eg 

d 

e3 



63 

I 

O 



r-g'S'S »■§ * m o5 • 

>or:o v g u - ; 

"E a) m ° « '£ » 

60 ft §*-§ P^ 

S'.sSmS'oSIs 



& o o 
• O on 



jr! 3 a 
Joes 



CO rH 



^ »)"m 

SI" 

"S3 ■§ 



111 



-P T3T3 

son a> 



sw 



P te - - 

-Jig 



a rt - 



u a 
o q 



3 O 

a a 






a H>> 



-* -M 


bu3 




P- 


P >? 


•E M 






C3" 


«« 


a 


ffl 



a o* 

■a a 



60^ 

as 



M 


3 
O 


ft 


tf 





O 












m 



as c3 
P Pi 



Water Department. 



21 







o 


o 


CI 




c 


c 




o 


H 






o 


t- 


CO 


o 


-t< 


<M 


o 








o 


o 


o 


T-J 


N 


1A 


o 


o 


w 


o 


o 


o 


(M 


m 


CD 










o 




00 


IN 


O 


•* 


O! 


■a 


00 


CD 








Oa 


o 


OS 


fc- 


■* 


o 




I- 






K 




















c 


T- 










■» 


















CO 








lO 












o 


M 


o 


o 


IN 


t- 


C 


c 


o 


o 




e 




o 






o 


-t 


IM 


o 




t- 


o 


o 


C 




CI 


>n 


o 


c 


lO 


o 




c 


<M 


K3 
















CO 


c 


o 










<D 




s? 




o- 


o 


<S 


fc- 




o 












cc 














cc 


C 








CS 




¥. 


» 






i- 


■* 










CO 








■rt 




















— 






























































































































p 








































p<s? 




































































T3 




























■* H _ 








c 




•> 




P 




















2,2 
o ya 






>> 

o 


X 


- 
1 


s 


S3 




i 


" 


- 


- 


- 


" 


- 


- 


- 


I 1 = 


S 




Pi 


c 


> 




"3.S 






















^ o 








i 






OCu 


< 




















CD ~ 








< 










it " 


























f 


2( * 


> c 










c 


> 




c 


> 


3 C 


o " 




00 ^ 
5 • O 



Tf| ■ 



CO T* -■# O 



So 3 



S « IJZ5 



(2 g 



: q 



03 A 3 

.Scd 
"5-2 






S £ 



* W A 



O m 

o.S g> 

fcj P-.S 



rtf:L,fi«>ciMP^ 






so P3 Hi Dh 



IH H 



B 3 B S 



i-i T-H CM <M CM <M 



M £ 



EH H 




22 



City Document No. 32. 



OS CO <M 



1*3 



CO CM <M <M 



+s 

a 

•H 

5 

d 

a 

•H 

-d 

a 

•d 
a 

•d 

c3 






(M OS Ol 00 



i—l CO CO 






£ o 



fL, -ot, 

§ 1S 



73 . a 



3-2 






£ f"~ p< 



"(J D- 

CD C3 „ 



cc o g 

O 

O O of 

I*- 

S a,-, 



2 K 



.2 fl 



« A 



o W M 



Q tf « 



5 ^ H^ 



O cp 

"^,3 

oO 



a 


o 




<8 


M 


O 






3 




O 


fL| 


a 




o 


CD 



££ 



<M <N <N (M 



Water Department. 



23 



co o oo cq 



O lO 00 iO to 
CO CD <M <N OS 



CO <N CO CO OS CD CD 
CO O lO r* CO CD CO 



m oo io co 

CD CM <N OS 



m »o q in 



CO Oi O 00 ^ . 




in 


O • • - CO . 

iHCOCOrH<MCO<MC: 


o 


* «©■€£■■€©■ » «3= 


€&«■€&€& «& 


€& 


f&<i&<&m*&m<gr&r 


m 
























"xT" 


















cj m , 












P 






























° S 












a 






























MOO * 












8j 












<s 


















p o . 






















C3 


















X« . 












d 

o 












a 
■a 

a 


















P'g • 

W 8) • 












P 












C3 


















P w • 










C 


d 

p 


> 


■> fc 






O 


SB 
d 


V 


■* 








( 




P 


o aj 
P ■§ • 










a 


s 


C 
PC 


r 




£ 


g 


So^ 
o| 

O £ 

tp.2 

§° 

o c 

si 

9 ^ 

'oof 

P 3 - 

0) c. 

box 

■ss 

p*- 




« 


; 


S 






- 


o * 










c 
P 


ft 


pc 


E 

p 


1 

- PC 


o 

"5 

"5 

T3 
O 
O 


PC 

2 








pc 

a 


t- 
c 

p 




M 
o 


S s . 

d-S 
§p " 






































C 

c 

1 

I 

e, 
c 
c 

c 


C 

c^ 

1 

a: 

k 


c 

1 


m 
1 


is 

a 

p 

a 


n 
*? 

o 

03 

2 

1 

50 

a 
& 


a 

c 
c 
a 


| 

£ 

8 

p 
> 


| 

8 

i 

c 


c 

"S 
a 

1 


11 a 
\ 

U ' 

\ 

PC 

1 1 


8 

\ 
1 

5 


t 

S 

5 

8 
b 


it 

i 

i 

■ a 


a 
C 
a 

s 

p 
.E 

s 

c 


U 8 

C 



c 


= 

t 

c 

|z 
i 


P 

.2 


1* '. 
o d 

Is: 
^^ . 

.9 p p 
sod P 
a <» a> 

« S & 


a 






, PC 


i-l 


PC 










N 


. pc 










5 






O 










d 












P 
p 

C3 
3 






























O 




































00 

a 






<8 

44 


a 




c 

p 


| 


>> 

"3 


44 
_c3 

5 c 










c 
C 


J 




>> 
01 

"3 








h3 




a 


P 


p 


- 


P 


M 




n ? 








c 
c 

P 




s 


M 


d 

a! 

Pm 




H 

.d 




c 
PC 

h 


b 

PQ 


c 

E 
c 






J 


n 


05 .5 

ojoJ: 

^ r 

+- 

01 C 


c 
PC 

i-: 


„ 






° 

p 
c 


_ 


.9 
3 




1-5 




ft 


i-s 


b- 




h 


E - 


a 




- £ 








pc 


b- 




S 


W 




to 




a 


00 


a 


e 


c 


o 


CO 


05 








-t 






a 


o 


o 




















' r " 1 


1-1 












"" 










> 









































24 



City Document No. 32. 



<m cq CD 



O <M OS Ol 






59 

sa 

cj O 

o 



60 

a 

•P* 

d 

€ 

d 

A3 

d 

0) 
C3 



si 

PhCS 



SP^ 



flh a 



« o 



DQ h1 Q 



' i^ 



C5 <] M 






Pjz; 


^ 


C3 


' a 


&a 


O 


a 

o 


s* 


6D 


-2 


a) 

-a 


° o 










be 6U 

a a 


t 


S 


60" 


It 


3 


a 


a a 
la"" 


a a 






si 


fa 








w 


pq 


fa 



a • 



a „ 



a EH 






£ pq 



W fa H 



Water Department. 25 

In the appendices annexed hereto will be found the re- 
ports of the City Engineer and the several Superintendents. 
They show in detail the present condition of the works and 
what has been accomplished. 

Eespectfully, 

John E. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner. 



Water Department. 



27 



APPENDIX A. 



EEPORT OF THE WATEK-XNCOME DIVISION. 



City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1896. 
Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Sir : Agreeable to the request of January 31, I herewith 
submit the doings of the Income Division for the preceding 
financial year, ending January 31, 1896. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Division were : 



Receipts. 

Cochituate. Mystic. 

For water off and on for repairs . $2,248 50 $484 50 



Salaries . . . . 
Travelling expenses 
Printing and stationery 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



Expenditures. 

Cochituate. 

. $51,054 90 
1,651 85 
1,509 70 
3,369 92 



Total. 

2,733 00 



Total. 

$13,168 30 $64,223 20 
546 66 2,198 51 
339 92 1,849 62 
608 25 3,978 17 



$57,586 37 $14,663 13 $72,249 50 



TABLE I. 





Cochit- 
uate. 


Mystic. 






Boston, ex- 
cluding 
Cliarlestown. 


o 

o 


6 

"F" 

a 

o 

CO 


O 


-t-3 
f 

> 


O 


Number of takers by annual 


85,183 
4,049 


6,905 
188 


13,383 
115 


6,727 
104 


4,938 

28 


117,136 


Number of takers by meter . 


4,482 


Number of takers of all kinds, 


89,232 


7,091 


13,498 


6,831 


4,966 


121,618 



28 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE II. 

Showing the purposes for which water was taken by Annual Bates, and the districts 

where taken. 





Cochit- 
uate. 


Mystic. 




pueposes for which 
Water was taken 
bt Annual Rates. 




2 
o 


a 

o 
to 


"a) 
O 


+5 
to 

> 


r e8 
O 

H 




3 

249 

5 

1,401 

1 

10 

212 

91 

19 

1 

47,274 

8 

3 

5 

6,031 

15 

40 

337 

20 

2 

75 

2 

76 

8,527 

47 

1 

367 

8 


3 

21 


" 11 ' 


1 

21 


5* 


7 




307 


Cattle-yards 


5 


9 
1 


351 


79 


179 


2,019 
2 




1 
15 
30 

1 


9* 
3 

5 


11 


12 

27 


23 
11 

7 


271 




162 


Fire Department : 

Chemical engines .... 
Combination wagons . . . 

Ladder companies .... 


32 
1 


4,811 


8,058 


4,766 


3,171 


68,080 
8 










3 










5 


272 


115 


85 


32 


6,535 
15 


6 
42 

6 
11 


8 
12 
10 


6 
9 
6 


2 
2 
3 


62 
402 


Halls 


45 
13 


18 


3 


8 


104 

2 


11 
270 


11 

2,719 


6 

608 

1 


4 
741 


108 




12,865 


Hospitals and asylums . . . 


48 






1 




31 
1 
3 

381 


28 
1 

15 
390 


27 
1 

24 

187 


11 

7* 

90 


464 




11 




49 




6,612 

1 

4 

2 

1,471 

22 

6 

17 

280 

429 

117 

1 

2,665 

38 

3,290 

269 

6 

5 

5,107 

4 

1 

3 

3 


7,660 






1 


1 


.... 


6 




2 


35 
1 
1 
1 

12 

42 

6 

7 

171 

1 

327 

24 


17 
1 

1 ' 
3 


56 

2 


22 
1 
1 


1,601 




27 

8 

19 


9 


2 


306 
471 


6 

2 

110 


3 

1 

109 


4 

"2V 


136 




11 




3,082 




39 




1,188 
2 


344 
8 


489 


5,638 


Steam-rollers 


303 
6 


359" 


1 

262 


1 
315 


1 
118 


8 
6,161 




4 










1 










3 




1 


1 


1 


6 


Totals 


85,183 


6,905 


13,383 


1 6,727 


1 4,938 


117,136 



Water Department. 



29 



TABLE III. 





COCHIT- 
UATE. 


Mystic. 




Purposes for which 

Water was taken 

bt Meter. 


Boston, ex- 
cluding 
Chaiiestown. 


a 
o 


'? 
S 

a 

o 


o3 

o 

o 


> 

3 


o 
H 




10 
6 

58 

34 

24 

3 

8 

22 

5 

6 

512 

262 

32 

13 

12 

4 

18 

94 

1 

33 

10 

1 

7 

25 

706 

1,077 

6 

10 

15 

35 

278 

240 

18 

301 

68 

6 

1 

4 

13 

7 

64 


4 


1 

1 
1 

6 
21 

1 ' 

2 

2 

1 

5 
6 

16 

1 
4 

17 

3 

18 

8 


1 
1 


1 

3 ' 

6 

2' 

1 
1 

3 

6 

4 
1 


15 
6 
60 
35 
26 
4 
10 








l" 

2 

2 

1 

6 ' 
30 

2 

3." 








1 

6 

39 

2 




Electrical companies .... 
Elevators and motors .... 

Halls 


22 

7 

8 

533 

358 

32 

17 

15 

7 

22 




2 

1 
3 

2 
1 

10 
2 

4 
9 

13 

4 

1 

2 




6 
1 
3 
2 

9 
18 

2 
11 

1 

1 

1 

2 

4 
11 

'46* 
13 


102 


Ice-manufacturing companies 


2 
39 
16 

1 

7 

41 

731 

2 
1,117 

9 
11 




Models 


Offices, stores, and shops . . 


Saloons and restaurants . . 


17 

45 

282 

283 

21 

382 

94 

6 

1 

4 

13 

8 


Slaughtering-houses .... 

Stables 

Steam and street R.R. co's . 

Stone-works 

Sugar-refineries 






Wharves and shipping . . . 


4 


1 


71 


Totals 


4,049 


186 


115 


104 


28 


4,482 



30 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE IV. 





COCHITU- 
ATE. 


Mystic. 




Quantities taken 
by Meter. 


°gpS 

o 15 a> 
In Tl 
o'o 03 

PQ • a - 


a 

O 

CD 
03 

o 


CD 

O 


cJ 

'> 
3 

a 

o 
CO 


CO 

> 


"ce 
o 
H 


Bakeries 

Electrical companies . 
Elevators and motors, 

Gas companies . . . 
Greenhouses .... 

Ice-manufg. companies 

Laundries 

Marble-works .... 

Mills and engines . . 

Navy Y'd and barracks 
Offices, stores, and 

Oil-works 

Police-stations .... 
Public buildings . . . 
Saloons and restaurants 
Schools . 


Cubic feet. 

808,000 

854,000 

2,747,000 

3,238,000 

22,840,000 

282,000 

588,000 

5,384,000 

787,000 

35,971,000 

50,455,000 

41,513,000 

2,726,000 

11,722,000 

598,000 

880,000 

9,096,000 

40,707,000 

3,517,000 

5,105.000 

3,578,000 

71,000 

375,000 

4,609,000 

47,331,000 

92,005,000 

704,000 

1,002,000 

1,691,000 

17,363,000 

23,681,000 
8,686,000 
1,116,000 

14,180,000 

69,696,000 

569,000 

32,035,000 

306,000 

2,803,000 

4,517,000 

21,974,000 


Cubic feet. 
674,000 


Cubic feet. 
54,000 


Cubic feet. 


Cubic feet. 


Cubic feet. 

1,536,000 

854,000 






34,000 
2,118,000 


14,000 


18,000 




2,779,000 

3,272,000 

24,958,000 

338,000 










28,000 


28,000 


146,000 




734,000 








5,384,000 


201,000 

'288,000 
2,931,000 


887,000 

146,000 

5,606,000 


176,000 
1,311,000 

146,000 
2,558,000 


22,000 
99,000 


1,164,000 
38,169,000 
51,057,000 
52,707,000 

2,726,000 


1,723,000 


52,000 






13,497,000 


3,000 


37,000 


638,000 


106,000 

423,000 

249,000 
299,000 
423,000 




986,000 


703,000 


2,154.000 
123,000 




11,953,000 

41,253,000 

3,766,000 


45,000 
121,000 


22,000 


268,000 
186,000 


5,739,000 

4,308,000 

71,000 










375,000 


1,994,000 
1,357,000 
4,606,000 

269,000 

25,000 

49,000 

35,000 

3,640,000 

111,000 

522,000 


542,000 
38,000 


264,000 
323,000 




7,409,000 

49,049,000 

4,606,000 


297,000 
104,000 


606,000 


47,000 


93,224,000 
833,000 






1,051,000 


1,646,000 


66,000 
146,000 




1,792,000 
22,795,000 
23,792,000 


143,000 


668,000 

13,607,000 

797,000 

11,126,000 


237,000 
139,000 
151,000 


10,256,000 
14,723,000 


Steam and street R.R. 

companies .... 

Stone-works .... 

Sugar-refineries . . . 

Wharves and shipping, 


1,487,000 
25,664,000 


420,000 
2,859,000 


17,023,000 

109,496,000 
569,000 










32,035,000 










306,000 










2,803,000 


3,069,000 


490,000 
459,000 






5,007,000 


55,000 




25,557,000 




588,110,000 


52,443,000 


14,626,000 


34,197,000 


1,214,000 


690,590,000 



Water Department. 



31 



Table V. 



Amounts 

Assessed by 

Meter. 



Bakeries 

Baths 

Boarding 

Bottling 

Breweries .... 

Cemeteries .... 

Chemicals .... 

Club-houses .... 

Distilleries .... 

Electrical compa- 
nies 

Elevators and 
motors 

Factories 

Fish-houses .... 

Gas companies . . 

Greenhouses . . . 

Halls 

Hospitals 

Hotels 

Ice - manufacturing 
companies . . . 

Iron- works .... 

Laundries .... 

Marble-works . . . 

Markets 

Mills and engines . 

Models 

Navy Yard barracks 

Offices, stores, and 
shops 

Oil-works 

Parks 

Police -stations . . 

Public buildings . 

Saloons and restau- 
rants 

Schools 

Slaughtering-houses 

Stables 

Steam and street 
railroads .... 

Stone-works . . . 

Sugar-refineries . . 

Tanneries .... 

Theatres 

Warehouses . . . 

"Wharves and ship- 
ping 

Totals .... 



Cochit- 

T/ATE. 



e 
bJ3o 

2 to 
PQ 



$1,062 70 


1,005 40 


3,646 40 


4,417 85 


27,963 60 


365 60 


822 20 


6,378 30 


1,071 65 


37,917 60 


66,862 65 


51,280 50 


3,534 20 


15,771 20 


810 70 


1,095 60 


11,207 00 


50,181 90 


4,016 80 


6,552 30 


4,919 40 


91 20 


524 00 


5,888 05 


64,214 17 


123,281 00 


962 10 


1,317 20 


2,246 30 


21,419 30 


31,267 35 


11,638 00 


1,434 30 


19,680 40 


70,454 37 


761 60 


27,252 00 


409 80 


2,256 40 


3,137 70 



22,348 60 



$711,467 39 



Mxstic. 



<_> 



$848 00 



47 60 
2,569 40 



195 10 
264 10 



408 80 
3,825 21 



1,552 40 
' 131 60 



578 30 

319 80 
401 70 
551 20 



3,002 20 
1,898 30 
5,557 69 

381 60 

35 00 

67 00 

49 00 

4,416 00 

162 40 

730 90 



2,674 00 
26,638 60 



3,748 80 



$61,054 70 



$28 20 



233 70 

1,597 20 

172 40 
3,359 80 



15 00 



2,632 00 
171 20 



30 80 



355 30 
504 70 



847 60 



92 30 
197 20 



937 20 

13,968 40 

1,101 40 

10,784 80 



76 30 



$37,105 50 



O 



$76 20 
19 60 



1,088 40 

218 60 
7,197 90 



72 80 
892 60 



63 00 
168 80 



689 20 
53 20 



445 10 
147 80 



2,036 80 



219 60 
" 596 90 
3,493 70 



612 00 
574 40 



$18,666 60 



$39 20 



45 00 
3,066 70 



51 80 



345 60 
247 20 



71 00 



329 50 
190 00 
223 30 



$4,609 30 



$1,986 90 
1,005 40 
3,694 20 
4,465 45 

30,533 00 

404 80 

1,017 30 

6,378 30 

1,569 45 

40,603 20 

67,707 45 

68.730 11 
3,534 20 

17,396 40 

877 50 

1,227 20 

14.731 60 
50,931 40 

4,336 60 

7,393 40 

5,886 60 

91 20 

524 00 

9,934 75 

66,670 37 

5,557 69 

125,026 30 

1,144 90 

1,384 -20 

2,387 60 

28,069 30 

31,429 75 
13,855 20 
15,402 70 
24,242 70 

111,594 77 

761 60 

27,252 00 

409 80 

2,256 40 

3,749 70 

26,748 10 



$832,903 49 



32 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE VI. 

Showing the amounts assessed for water taken by Annual Rates, the purposes 
for which and the places where taken. 



Amounts 

Assessed by 

Annual Rates. 



Armories . . 
Bakeries . . 
Bath-houses 
Build'g purposes 
Cattle-yards 
Cemeteries . 
Churches . . 
Clubs . . . 
Depots . . . 
Disinfect'g-places 
Dwelling-houses 
Fire Department 

Chemical 
engines . . 

Combinat io 
wagon . ._ 

Hose companies 

Hydrants . . 

Ladder com 
panies . . 

Steam engines 
Fire-pipes . . 
Fountains . . 
Freight-houses 
Greenhouses . 
Gymnasiums . 
Halls .... 
Hand-hose . . 
Hospitals and asy 

lums .... 
Hotels ... 
Laundries . . 
Libraries . . . 
Manufactories 
Model houses 
Morgue . . 
Motor . . . 
Offal-stations , 
Offices .... 
Photograph-r'ms 
Police-stations , 
Public buildings 
Restaurants . 
Saloons . . , 
Schools . . . 
Sewers .... 
Shops .... 
Shipping . . . 
Stables . . . 
Steam-engines 
Steam-rollers . 
Stone-crushers 
Stores .... 
Theatre (special) 
Urinals (public) 
Washing carts , 
"Watering streets, 



Cochituate. 



Mystic. 



Totals . 



r-fiai 



O O^ 
PQ O 



$93 00 

3,188 09 

218 00 

12,911 15 

15 00 

96 00 

2,464 08 

1,647 51 

305 09 

25 00 

687,214 99 



120 00 

45 00 

75 00 

120 62 

225 00 

1,000 00 

6,096 84 

423 00 

10 00 

1,329 17 

32 00 

1,014 32 

42,635 00 

3,917 00 
150 00 

6,710 71 
100 00 



140,985 06 

10 00 

19 58 

225 00 

12,156 19 

457 35 

90 42 

7,647 50 

5,502 87 

15,313 05 

1,695 62 

500 00 

21,937 46 

1,211 74 

23,463 67 

3,549 13 

150 00 

125 00 

53,209 91 

163 12 

5 00 

150 00 

796 00 



,073,486 62 $84,294 79 



$56 50 
276 50 



53 20 
10 00 



161 50 
270 41 



63,164 42 



544 00 



127 00 

650 00 

60 00 

65 50 



146 50 
1,350 00 



546 67 

10 00 

27 00 

7,043 84 



$148 00 



1,630 01 



232 50 
166 58 
122 50 



104,862 08 



3,220 00 



164 00 

240 00 

55 00 



119 00 



113 00 
13,595 00 



298 33 

24 00 

23 00 

44 50 

203 00 

1,713 57 

18 00 

86 38 

1,201 76 

3 00 

2,680 70 

279 00 



3,096 51 



509 67 

24 00 

213 30 

7,718 57 



o 



$15 00 
276 00 



309 96 



5 00 

187 50 

298 50 

19 50 



61,754 62 



2,418 00 



129 58 

135 00 

50 00 



$71 00 



553 49 



97 50 
45 00 
84 00 



36,286 13 



896 00 



57 50 
30 00 
25 00 



34 00 



113 00 
3,040 00 



20 00 



5 00 



179 50 
22 00 



170 00 
55 00 



78 00 

90 00 

710 32 



5,805 86 
24 00 



152 00 
2,246 85 



502 50 

12 00 

278 67 

3,855 08 



35 00 



465 58 
35 00 



147 83 



59 00 



109 17 
3,705 00 



194 50 



64 00 
1,806 95 



171 16 
17 00 
20 00 



33 50 
100 00 

879 58 



1,682 81 
126 00 



10 00 
2,965 16 



4,294 32 



$146,966 06 



603 04 



32 50 

64 00 

' 155 42 

1,904 30 



24 40 
866 09 



443 68 



537 41 $47,782 79 



$164 50 

3,959 59 

218 00 

15,457 81 

25 00 

101 00 

3,143 08 

2,428 00 

531 09 

25 00 

953,282 24 



120 00 

45 00 

75 00 

19,140 00 

225 00 

1,478 08 

7,151 84 

613 00 

75 50 

1,541 17 

32 00 

1,495 99 

64,325 00 

3,937 00 

150 00 

8,464 05 

146 00 

582 97 

161,409 50 

10 00 

59 58 

225 00 

13,270 76 

555 35 

133 42 

7,862 00 

5,941 20 

17,026 62 

1,949 12 

776 38 

24,884 54 

1,214 74 

35,537 34 

3,978 13 

150 00 

311 40 

62,384 52 

163 12 

5 00 

150 00 

6,137 04 



1,433,067 67 



Water Department. 



33 



O si 







ooo 


co 




a 
a 
o 

a 
< 


oco 


CO 




O lO 


IO 




CM CO 


oo 




t^t^ 


■*_ 


eg 


€©■ 


is= 










CD 








> 


















00 00 


CD 




6 


IO CM 


oo 




*Z 




CM 






r-l O 


CO 




a 
a 
o 

a 


"* t~- 






-#OD 


CO 




t^o 


oo 


cu 


1-1 t- 


00_ 

cm" 




< 


t& 


m= 








a 

o 














02 












"OCM 


\>~ 




6 


tH t— 






fc 


CM CM 


ia 






l^t>. 


■* 




a 

a 
o 
d 


t-rH 


Ci 




■* C35 


CO 




••# CO 


CO 


03 


o_— <_ 


<M^ 


CD 


«l 




cm" 




€& 


<=©= 


"aa 








.d 








o 


















CM CO 


IO 




© 


io co 


CO 




fe 


CM ^ 








io co 


co 




a 
a 
o 

a 


O t- 


CD 




oo co 


CM 


a 


I-H t— 


a> 


fe 


C0 CO 


t-^ 


O 


۩= 






"i 




۩= 


CD 
























C3 






















o 




OlO 


OS 




6 


oo 


o 




6 


CM 1-H 


co 





COHtHO 




^s 


CD O IO 00 


o 


a 


CM CO CO -# 


■* 




Oi Tft^O 






io c^tH co 




a 






t--© t- 


co - 


< 




-* 


۩= 


€& 




a0-*©CN 


■* 


a 


-* t — tH 


co 


Szj 


OO^i-i CM_ 


CM 




CM i-H 


-* 



OS OS OS OS 

oo co co oc 



© "•'T! 
"t3 



1/3 



O 
up fs 

a 8 § 

°*« *■ 
*§§ *, 

"g te'-S £ 

§H 1 

03 "^ 'to *^a 
O.S o 

a^ fc. ^ 

03 03 CO ~ 






o3 a) 



3-D -J 



to 



H » - - 2? 

eg. a ~ 
°1I * 

"2. 1 §« °o 

o a„JS ^ 

a >>o s~^ 

aga ° 

GQ 3 ^ "** 

Sga g 
8|p 






O 

S3 

"as § 

S d | § 

03T3 ^ S 

a § a "§ 

Q 03 M <3 

1-2 I ^ 

J S *< to 



■2 "Sgfl 






0)r 



QJ 



o o 

o3 a 

> m 



Total. 


$10,743 01 

17,473 54 

304 80 


CO 

CD 




o 
o 

o 

OS 
CN 




h"6 

CO HH 

O 


o 

CM 






Uncollectible — Change 
of ownership, failures, 
shut off for non-pay- 
ment, cleaning up of 
old accounts. 


iOtIIO 
C5 t^OO 

COO ^H 
05 t-^O 
O^CN^CO 
CM~CM* 


a 
a 
o 
o 
o 

<j 

5 


coo 

CD CD 
CO CO 

^ri »o 
■^co 
co^co' 




Overcharges, changes in 
premises, vacancies, 
errors in valuation, 
assessments. 


oo o 

^H CM 

IO Oi 
IO »o 
^J< CM 






-t 
a 
a. 


o- 


r 
oc 

i— 





34 



City Document No. 32. 



Tables VIII. and IX. represent the work of the Off and 
On Service, as follows : 



TABLE VIII. 





COCHIT- 
XJATE. 


Mystic. 




New Elevator, Motor, 
Fire, and Service Pipes. 


0> fcl) O 

pq o 


a 

o 
o 

03 

O 


"> 

CD 

a 

o 


CD 
O 




o 

H 




15 

8 

26 

2,632 










15 


Motor 










8 


Fire . . . , 


1 

38 


429 


130 


265 


27 




3,494 








2,681 


39 


429 


130 


265 


3,544 



TABLE IX. 





Cochit- 
uate. 


Mystic. 




Turning Water Off 
and On. 


, a 

<u boo 
- c "S 

Om a) 

o ^ 

pq o 


Charlestown. 


o5 

"> 

03 

a 

o 
m 


Chelsea. 


s 


o 

H 


For repairs in mains .... 
For repairs in service . . . 


1,342 
4,854 
1,977 
13 
2,224 










1,342 


387 
98 


186 
153 


170 
198 


131 

148 


5,728 

2,574 

13 


Turning on first time .... 


58 


358 


94 


305 


3,039 




10,410 


543 


697 


462 


584 


12,696 



Water Department. 



35 



TABLE X. 

Showing the hinds of fixtures in use January 31, 1896, their number, and 
the districts wherein located. 





COCHIT- 

UATE. 


Mystic. 




Fixtures in use January 
31, 1896. 


* . & 

aj or o 

ill 


a 

o 

o5 

C3 
Si 

Q 


0> 

"> 

a 

o 

02 


c3 

6 


> 


© 




48,755 

78,541 

513 

138,081 

18,457 

4,611 

70,313 

115,138 


1,613 

2,423 

5 

11,830 

1,056 

152 

2,068 

8,134 


6,450 

6,625 

2 

15,428 

3,054 

56 

7,464 

13,148 


2,170 
2,749 
1 
9,471 
1,026 
85 
2,303 
6,988 


2,622 
2,415 

' 5,045 

790 

24 

2,210 

3,561 


61,610 

92,753 

521 






179,855 

24,383 

4,928 

84,358 

146,969 




Totals 


474,409 


27,281 


52,227 


24,793 


16,667 


595,377 



The Waste Detection report for the year is as follows : 

Premises on which defective fixtures were found 7,970 

Premises reexamined 8,150 

Second notices to repair 595 

Wilful-waste notices issued 39 

The defective fixtures may be divided into the following 
classes : 

Ball-cocks and valves 5,282 

Sink, hopper, bowl, and bath faucets 3,551 

Service-pipes burst 407 

Wilful waste 39 

Most respectfully submitted, 

J. H. Caldwell, 

General Superintendent Income Division. 



36 City Document No. 32. 



APPENDIX B. 



EEPOET OF THE RESIDENT ENGINEER AND 
SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WESTERN DIVI- 
SION. 



South Framingham, January 1, 1896. 

Charles W. Smith, Esq., 

Water Commissioner : 

Sir : The annual report for the Western Division of the 
Boston Water Works is herewith submitted. 



SUDBURY-RlVER BASINS. 
Water-shed, 75.2 Square Miles. 

The rainfall for 1895 was 51.40 iaches at Fraraingham, 
and 45.96 inches at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. The mean 
rainfall on the Sudbury-River water-shed was 50.75 inches, 
which is about 2.75 inches above the average. 

This abundant rainfall has enabled us to keep up the full 
supply to the city. A season of extreme drought would find 
the city still behind in its supply, but the completion of 
Basin No. 5, now well under way, will meet every demand 
for several years and until the Metropolitan works are com- 
pleted, when the question of quantity will be finally settled. 

Probably the largest fall of rain in a single and continuous 
storm that has ever been registered in Boston since accurate 
records have been kept occurred October 12-14, 1895. The 
Weather Bureau record seems to be defective, inasmuch as 
only slightly over five inches was reported from this station. 
The Boston Water- Works gauges having been located with 
care and near the surface of the ground can be depended 
upon, especially since there are at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir 
several gauges which act as a check on each other. Any 
gauges situated on the tops of high buildings are likely to 
give unsatisfactory results, on account of the effects of the 
wind. 

Rain began to fall in Boston at 1.30 P.M. on Saturday, 
October 12, and ceased at 4.15 A.M. on Monday, October 



Water Department. 



37 



14, 1895. The following are the amounts of rain collected 
in the different sauces on the Boston Water-Works : 



Locality. 






Rainfall. 
Inches. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir . . . . 7.45 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir 


. 




7.55 


West Medford 


. 




7.42 


Lake Cochituate 


, 




6.95 


Framinghani . 


. 




8.49 


Ashland 


, 




7.50 


Cordaville 


, 




7.60 


Cordaville 


. 




7.90 



This great rain of 7.5 inches (in round numbers) in less 
than thirty-nine hours would certainly have produced very 
great freshets in the rivers had the rain occurred when the 
ground was frozen or when the water tables were high and 
the streams full. As it was, the ground was exceedingly dry 
and absorbed readily a large proportion of the rain . On the 
Sudbury river the maximum flow in twenty-four hours repre- 
sented about one-half inch collected over the water-shed, a 
very small amount. The rate of rainfall at any portion of 
the storm, as shown by the self-recording rain-gauge, was 
remarkabty uniform and not large. 

Plans and specifications were completed early in the year 
for stripping the loam and muck from about one-half the area 
of Basin No. 5, and the contracts advertised in April. The 
following table shows the names of the bidders to whom the 
contracts were awarded, with the dates, prices per cubic yard 
for earth excavation, and the amounts of the contracts. Sec- 
tion "A" was let the previous season. A series of filter beds 
was planned in connection with the basin to filter the water 
from one of the brooks flowing through the city of Marl- 
boro'. The whole work included in all of these sections 
covered all of the contemplated improvements on the south- 
erly half of the basin, with the exception of the bridge under 
the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 



38 



City Document No. 32. 



Names. 



John Berry 

A. Michelini & Jos. Cenedella 

Moulton & O'Mahoney .... 

Malone & Strang 

Auguste Saucier 

Chas. Linehan 

Newell & Snowllng 

Chas. Linehan 

Moulton & O'Mahoney . . . . 
Henry Parsons 



Work. 



Filter-beds. Marlboro' 



2 Portions Fram.-Marl. 
Road 



Section B . 

O . 

D . 

E . 

F . 

G- , 

H 

Iron fences , 



Price 

per 

cu. yd. 



$0 23 

21 
29 
21 
21 
23 
26 
19 
26 



Date 
Contract. 



April 29 

April 22 
June 12 
April 29 
June 25 
April 29 



July 17 



$3,950 

10,607 
68,788 
82,160 
67,691 
48,070 
46,020 
24,510 
47,060 



The work on these sections has been half completed, and 
as the whole basin will be seized by the Metropolitan Water 
Board in a few days, the completion of this portion of the 
Boston Water Works will rest with the Commonwealth. 

Work on this dam has progressed rapidly during the year. 
The masonry section has been carried from grade 190 to 
grade 217, and the earth embankment at the northerly end 
of the dam has been carried to grade 210, and the southerly 
embankment to grade 224. 

Owing to past experience with epidemics of typhoid 
fever amono; the workmen where such extensive works are 
undertaken, a Medical Inspector was appointed early in the 
season, and a set of sanitary rules adopted for the regulation 
of latrines and to prevent contamination of the water sup- 
ply. The rules were printed on cloth in English and Italian 
and properly posted. The effect of this course has been 
excellent. 

No unusual growths of Algse have occurred this year in 
the sources of supply. The color of the water in the city 
taps has averaged 0.64 at Park Square, and 0.54 at Mattapan 
(Platinum Scale). 

Extensive tracts of land have been secured in Cedar 
Swamp for the better carrying out of the drainage scheme 
already devised, but no construction has as yet been under- 
taken. 

Plans for a new dam at Whitehall Pond have been perfected. 

An extended series of experiments was made during the 
year to determine the effects of sixteen years of tuber- 
culation on the interior of the 48-in. mains at the Rose- 
mary siphon of the Sudbury Aqueduct. The results were 



"Water Department. 39 

fully published in the Transactions of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, and showed that the carrying capacity 
of the pipes had been diminished 25% by the growths of 
tubercles. These were removed from one of the lines of 
pipe without material injury to the original coating, and 
the line then carried practically as much water with the same 
losses of head as when first laid. 

For ordinary velocities the coefficient "c" in the Chezy 
formula V = c*/ Rl was found to be 110 for the incrusted 
mains and 140 for the clean pipes. On February 2 the 
weirs were all removed from the aqueduct and the normal 
flow resumed. 

The town of Ashland made another effort in March to 
secure legislation for damages from the city for lands taken 
in years past and for which settlements had already been 
made with the private owners, but were again unsuccessful. 

In January and February a large and substantial weir 10 
feet long was erected at Fisher-Hill Reservior to measure the 
flow from the new pumping machinery of the High Service 
Supply erected at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. A preliminary 
test by the students of the Institute of Technology has been 
made, but the final test of the pumps has not yet been 
arranged. 

The most important event of the year in connection with 
the Boston Water Works was the passage of an Act, approved 
June 5 (and printed in full in the Appendix), to provide for 
a Metropolitan water supply. Under the provisions of this 
bill the Commonwealth has undertaken the duty of supply- 
ing the Metropolitan District with its water. 

On June 29 the title of Superintendent of the Western 
Division was changed to that of General Superintendent of 
the Western Division. 

Basin 1. 

Grades, H.W., 161.00 ; Tops of Flash-boards, 159.29 and 158.41; Crest of Dam, 157.54. 

Area, Water Surface, 143 acres ; Greatest Depth, 14 ft.; Contents, below 161.00, 

376,900,000; below 159.29, 288,400,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this basin stood at elevation 
156.50, and remained at about this level until January 11, 
when it commenced to rise, and on January 13 was wasting 
over the stone crest. Waste continued until February 1. The 
surface then fell, and remained about one foot below the 
stone crest until March 1 1 , when waste over the stone crest 
again commenced and continued until May 9, when both sets 
of flash-boards were placed in position. From May 20 to 
June 11 water was wasting over the flash-boards. 

By July 30 the water-surface had fallen to 158.54,; there 



40 City Document No. 32. 

was a sudden rise to 158.91 on July 31, after which it fell 
again, reaching 158.11 on October 12, when it began to rise. 
The flash-boards were removed on October 16, and water was 
wasted over the stone crest for the remainder of the year. 

The only waste of water through the flood gates was on 
October 13, 14, and 15. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 159.33, 
on May 23; and the lowest, 156.17 on January 2. 

Water was drawn from this basin for the supply of the city 
from 7 A.M., January 1, to 2 P.M., April 8. 

The slope paving at the dam, above elevation 158.00, was 
relaid in the autumn. 

Basin 2. 

Grades, H.W., 168. 00; Tops of Flash-boards, 167.12 and 166.49; Crest of Dam, 165.87. 

Area, Water Surface, 134 acres ; Greatest Depth, 17 ft.; Contents, below 168.00, 

668,300,000 ; below 167.12, 529,860,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this basin stood at elevation 
166.00 and was flowing over the stone crest, and this over- 
flow continued until February 10. The surface then fell 
gradually, reaching elevation 161.22 on March 1, when it 
began to rise ; and on March 10 water was again flowing over 
the stone crest. It continued to overflow until May 9, when 
both sets of flash-boards were placed in position. From May 
15 to May 17 water was flowing over the flash-boards. The 
surface then fell, and on July 3 had reached elevation 163.54. 

From July 3 to October 13 the water was kept between 
elevations 163.00 and 163.50, by drafts from Basins 4 and 6. 
On October 13 the surface rose rapidly, and water was flow- 
ing over the flash-boards from October 14 to October 20, and 
again from November 1 until the flash-boards were removed. 
The upper set of flash-boards was removed on November 5, 
and the lower on November 6. During; the remainder of the 
year the water was flowing over the stone crest. 

The highest elevation reached by the water-surface was 
167.32, on November 3 ; and the lowest, 161.22, on March 1. 

Water for the supply of the city was drawn wholly from 
this basin from 11.40 A.M., June 27, to 11 A.M., July 19 ; 
from 7 A.M., July 24, to 12 M., October 1 ; from 10 A.M., 
October 13, to 11 A.M., October 24; from 11 A.M., 
November 25, to 7 A.M., December 2; from 5 P.M., De- 
cember 2, to 11 A.M., December 3; and from 11 A.M., 
December 23, to the end of the year. 

Water was drawn partly from this basin and partly from 
Basin 3, from 2 P.M., April 8, to 11.40 A.M., June 27; 
from 11 A.M., July 19, to 7 A.M., July 24 ; from 2 P.M., 
October 3, to 10 A.M., October 13; from 11 A.M., Octo- 



Water Department. 41 

ber 24, to 11 A.M., November 25; from 7 A.M. to 5 
P.M., December 2; and from 1 P.M., December 5, to 11 
A.M., December 23. 

A new fence has been built on the northerly side of Union 
Street, Ashland, by the South Middlesex Street Railway Com- 
pany to replace the fence which was removed when the street 
was widened by the town. This fence is on the relocated 
street line of the city's land, at the head of the basin. 

The town of Ashland has widened Fountain Street along 
the line of the property of the city, taking a narrow strip of 
the city's land for this purpose. I advise that steps be taken 
to secure compensation therefor. 

Very few organisms were present during the year 1895. 
The average number for the year was 55 per c.c, and the 
amorphous matter was 374 per c.c. 

Basest 3. 

Grades, H. W., 177.00 ; Crest of Dam {no flash-boards), 175.24. 

Area at 177.00, 253 acres ; Contents, below 177.00, 1,224,500,000 gals. 

Area at 175.24, 248 acres ; Contents, below 175.24, 1,081,500,000 gals. 

Greatest depth, 21 feet. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this basin stood at elevation 
175.24, the top of the stone crest. On January 12 it began 
to overflow, and continued until February 6. On March 2 
the surface had fallen to 172.21, but on March 11 it flowed 
over the crest again, and continued to overflow until May 7. 
During the remainder of May the surface was a little below 
elevation 175.00, but in June it began to fall, and by June 
27 it had receded to elevation 169.08 ; it then began to rise, 
and by July 14 had reached elevation 170.04. During the 
remainder of July it was very nearly stationary, but in Au- 
gust it rose again to elevation 172.50 on September 1, and 
it remained at about this level until October 4, after which 
it fell again, reaching elevation 171.03 on October 14. The 
water then rose rapidly, and on October 15 it flowed, over 
the crest, and continued to overflow, except on October 29 
and November 16, for the remainder of the year. 

The highest elevation reached was 176.21, on March 15; 
and the lowest, 169.08, on June 27. 

The water for the supply of the city has at no time during 
the year been drawn wholly from this basin. Water has 
been drawn partly from this basin and partly from Basin 
2 on the dates already given under the head of Basin 2. 

The joints between the stones in the overflow at the dam 
have been in bad condition for some years, and this year 
they were cleaned out and pointed with Portland cement 
mortar. It was found necessary to scrape some of the joints 
to a depth of eighteen inches or more. 



42 City Document No. 32. 

Advantage was taken of this opportunity to point the 
joints in the wing- wall of the overflow, and in some parts of 
the substructure of the gate-house, which were in poor con- 
dition. 

The paving in front of the overflow has been relaid, and 
the rip-rap below it brought up to grade where accessible. 

The algse growths were exceptionally heavy in 1895. The 
diatoms appeared as usual in the spring and autumn. The 
spring growth did not begin till May, but continued into Au- 
gust. Tabellaria appeared first ; they reached their highest 
development in June, but continued until August. In July 
Stephanocliscus were abundant. The fall growth of diatoms 
was heavier than the spring growth, but was of shorter 
duration. Tabellaria and Asterionella predominated. 

Chlorophyceas were present in July and in October, being 
chiefly Protococcus and Closterium. 

The Cyanophycese were very abundant during the summer. 
Coelospheerium appeared soon after the ice broke up. It in- 
creased steadily until the last of August. Anabsena appeared 
in July ; it increased slowly for several weeks, and finally dur- 
ing the first week in September rose suddenly to very large 
numbers. Thus it happened that in September Coslosphse- 
rium and Anabsena were both present in large numbers. On 
September 10 there were 1,360 standard units of Anabaena 
and 1,240 units of Coelosphserium at the surface. The growth 
extended throughout the entire basin. The water at this 
time had a deep brownish color, characteristic of the color- 
ing-matter of the Cyanophycese when seen by reflected light. 
When concentrated these organisms had a strong taste like 
that of uncooked sweet corn. The Anabgena disappeared by 
the middle of October, but the Coelosph?erium continued for 
another month. 

Infusoria were found in small numbers throughout the 
summer. 

The average number of organisms for the year was 550 
per c.c, and of the amorphous matter, 466 per c.c. 

Owing to the stripping and other work going on in Basin 
5, which is but a short distance above Basin 3, the water has 
been of poor quality in the latter basin, and has been used 
but little for the supply of the city. 

Basin 4. 

Grades, H. W., 215.21; Tops of Flash-boards, 215.21 and 214.89; Crest of Dam, 

214.23. 
Area, Water Surface, 167 Acres ; Greatest Depth, 49 feet; Contents, beloio 215.21, 

1,416,400,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this basin was at elevation 
196.18; it rose gradually, and on April 9 flowed over the 



Water Department. 43 

stone crest, and continued to overflow until May 10, when 
the lower set of flash-boards was placed in position. The 
water then rose, and on May 13 flowed over the boards. 
This overflow continued until May 24, when the upper set 
of flash-boards was put in place. The water rose and over- 
flowed the flash-boards from May 29 to June 19 and from 
June 28 to July 3. On July 3 one of the outlet gates was 
opened to furnish water to Basin 2, and the water gradually 
fell, reaching elevation 191.84 on October 13, when the outlet 
gate was closed. The water immediately rose again, and on 
December 31 had reached elevation 213.59. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 215.39, 
on June 6 ; and the lowest, 191.78, on October 12. 

Some repairs have been made to the gate-house and other 
buildings. 

The new channel of Cold Spring brook, from Dam 4 to 
Main Street, and the waterway under Main Street, should be 
finished, for it may at any time become necessary to draw 
from Basin 4 a quantity of water which the brook in its 
present condition could not carry without flooding the mead- 
ows and rendering the city liable for damages. 

The organisms in Basin 4 throughout the year were slightly 
higher than in 1894, but still very low. The average number 
for the year was 39 per c.c, and amorphous matter, 158 
per c.c. 

Basin 6 . 

Grades, H. IF., 296,00 ; Top of Flash-boards, 295.00 ; Crest of Dam, 294.00. 
Estimated Area, 185 Acres ; Estimated Contents, 1,630,300,000 Gallons. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this basin stood at elevation 
278.84. It then rose gradually, and flowed over the stone 
crest from April 4 to May 9, when the lower set of flash- 
boards was put in position. On May 19 water flowed over 
these boards, and continued to overflow until the upper set 
of flash-boards was put in place, on May 23. On May 29 
water was flowino; over the flash-boards, and the overflow 
continued until July 13, except June 20 to June 27. On 
July 13 an outlet gate was opened to supply water to Basin 
2. The water then fell gradually to elevation 272.26 on 
October 13, when the gate was closed. The water immedi- 
ately began to rise, and on December 26 was overflowing the 
stone crest. This overflow continued for the remainder of 
the year. The highest elevation reached during the year 
was 295.08, on June 6 ; and the lowest, 272.26, on October 
12 and 13. 

All of the elevations at Basin 6 are subject to a correction, 
as no good line of bench levels has yet been run to connect 
these with our permanent benches. 



44 City Document No. 32. 

The present channel of the brook is insufficient to pass the 
quantity of water required during the summer, without 
flooding and consequent claims for damages. I recommend 
that surveys and plans be made for a new channel. 

A force of men has been continually employed since 
March 30 in grading the grounds immediately below the dam 
and preparing filter beds. 

A stone chamber with wooden cover has been built around 
the gate on the 36-inch pipe leading to filter bed No. 1. A 
brick measuring well with wooden roof has been erected at 
the outlet of the drain from Bed No. 1. 

The water in both Basins 4 and 6 has been of excellent 
quality throughout the year, and the supply for the city dur- 
ing the summer was taken almost entirely from these sources. 

Diatoms were present in small numbers from May to 
October. Chlorophycese were somewhat abundant in Sep- 
tember and October. A few infusoria were present in the 
spring and fall. The average number of organisms for the 
year was 72 per c.c. ; of amorphous matter, 234 per c.c. 

Basin 8. 

Elevation, H.W., 327.91 ; Bottom of Gates, 317.78. 
Area at 327.91, 601 acres ; Contents, between 327.91 and 317.78, 1,236,900,000 



On January 1, 1895, water in this basin stood at elevation 
323.23, or 4.68 feet below high water. It gradually rose to 
elevation 325.61 on March 25, and, although water was 
wasted at various times after this date to prevent the water 
from rising too rapidly, it reached elevation 326.96 on April 
30. The water was kept at about this elevation, by occa- 
sionally wasting, until June 14, when the quantity wasted 
was increased, and the surface fell to elevation 325.90 on 
June 22. The water then fell slowly, the amount of waste 
being small, to elevation 323.22, on October 12, after which 
it rose, at first rapidly and then more slowly, to elevation 
326.31 on November 27. The waste gate was opened on 
November 27, and on December 31 the water had fallen to 
elevation 325.35. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 327.01, 
on June 6 ; and the lowest, 323.22, on October 12. 

Water was wasted at various times, both to regulate the 
height of the water and to furnish water to Basin 2 for the 
supply of the city. The outlet gate was closed and no water 
drawn from the basin from 7 A.M., January 1, to 7 A.M., 
March 25 ; from 7 A.M., April 5, to 7 A.M., April 9 ; from 
7 A.M., April 12, to 7 A.M., April 15 ; from 7 A.M., April 
20, to 7 A.M., April 30 ; from 6 P.M., Mav 9, to 7 A.M., 



Water Department. 45 

May 10; from 6 P.M., May 16, to 7 A.M., May 18; from 
7 A.M., May 23, to 7 A.M., June 14; from 10 A.M., 
June 22, to 7 P.M., June 23; from 6 P.M., July 24, to 
6 P.M., August 8; and from 5 P.M., October 14, to 5 
P.M., November 27. 

Weir measurements of the waste have been taken as usual 
during the year, when the outlet gate was open and also 
when it was closed. Observations during the summer show 
that with Whitehall Pond brook in its present condition, very 
little water can be drawn from the basin without flooding the 
meadows along the entire length of the brook, and conse- 
quently making the city liable for damages. 

The scows, dredger, and steamer are still in fair condition. 
The roof of the dredger has been shingled. 

The Wood Bros, shoe factory has been sold and torn down, 
but the rubbish has not yet been cleaned up. 

There is quite a large leak in the bulkhead in which the 
waste gates are located. This bulkhead should be renewed, 
unless the new dam is to be built soon. 

Farm Pond. 

Grades, R. W., 149.25; Low Water, 746.00. 
Area at 149.25, 159 acres; Contents, between 149.25 and 146.00, 165,500,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in this pond was at elevation 
148.79. On January 26 it had risen to elevation 149.03, 
and it remained at about this height until March 7. It then 
began to rise, reaching elevation 149.32 on March 14, and 
remained nearly at this elevation until June 9, when it 
receded, falling to elevation 149.00 on June 21. The height 
again remained nearly constant until August 2 1 , when the 
water began to go down, reaching elevation 148.44 on Octo- 
ber 11 and 12. This fall was followed by a rise, the surface 
reaching elevation 149.87 on November 28 and 29, when 
water was wasted into the Sudbury river ; the water then 
fell, reaching elevation 149.36 on December 1, and remained 
a little above high water until the end of the year. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 149.87, 
on November 28 and 29 ; and the lowest, 148.44, on Octo- 
ber 11 and 12. 

No water for the supply of the city has been drawn from 
this pond during the year. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped from the 
pond 132,200,000 gallons during the year, an average of 
362,192 gallons daily. 

The total amount of waste was 34,900,000 gallons, of 
which 7,300,000 gallons were used in cleaning the aqueduct, 
and the remainder was wasted into the Sudbury river. 



46 City Document No. 32. 

The paving on the slope at the south side of the influent 
chamber, which had settled in many places, has been taken 
up and relaid to grade. During the winter the coping on 
both sides of the entrance of Farm Pond sluice was moved 
out of place by the ice. This has been replaced, and heavy 
paving laid against it, to prevent, if possible, any future 
movement. 

Lake Cochituate. 

Grades, R. W., 134.36; Invert of Aqueduct, 121.03; Top of Aqueduct, 127 .36. 

Area, Water Surface at 134.36, 785 acres. 

Contents, between 134.36 and 127.36, 1,515,180,000 gals.; between 134.36 and 125.03, 

1,910,280,000 gals. 

Approximate Contents, between 134.36 and 121.03, 2,447,000,000 gals.; betioeen 

134.36 and 117.03, 2,907,000,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in the lake was at elevation 
126.28, or 8.08 feet below high water. On January 6 it had 
fallen to elevation 126.13, but by January 14 it had risen to 
elevation 126.55, and until March 9 it remained between 
elevations 126.50 and 127.00. On March 9 the water began 
to rise, and on March 10 water from the Sudbury-river 
basins began to flow into the lake; and on April 1, when 
the flow from the Sudbury sources was cut off, the water had 
risen to elevation 132.97. On April 14 it had risen to high- 
water mark, elevation 134.36. From this time until May 28 
the surface was kept at about this height, by wasting from 
the lake in April, and by a few drafts from the Sudbury 
basins, in May. On May 28 the water began to fall, and, 
although the fall was checked temporarily by a draft from 
the Sudbury, in June, by October 12 the surface had fallen 
to elevation 128.27. At this time there was a heavy rain- 
fall, and the water rose in consequence, reaching elevation 
133.05 on December 6, when the waste gate in the new dam 
was opened and the water drawn down, receding two feet 
below high water on December 15. For the remainder of 
the year the surface was kept at about this level by occa- 
sionally wasting water. 

The amount of water wasted from the lake at the outlet 
dam was 285,000,000 gallons in April, and 372,600,000 gal- 
lons in December; a total of 657,600,000 gallons. 

In January, 1,300,000 gallons were turned into the lake 
from the Sudbury sources ; in March, 680,000,000 gallons ; 
in May, 87,700,000 gallons; in June, 114,000,000 gallons; 
in October, 6,600,000 gallons ; in November, 5,600,000 gal- 
lons ; and in December, 1,600,000 gallons; or a total amount 
of 896,800,000 gallons. 

All of the flash-boards have been in place on the crest of 
the outlet dam during the entire year. 

Four of the stop-planks at the circular dam were removed 



Water Department. 47 

on March 19, and replaced on July 5. On September 23 
nearly all of the stop-planks were removed, and that part of 
the lake above the circular dam was drawn down to allow 
repairs on the dam. These planks were not replaced during 
the year, as the temporary works at the new bridge of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, just below the circular dam, main- 
tained the water in the lake at the usual grade, and the stop- 
planks were not needed. 

The sheet-piling core of the circular dam, which was rotten 
at the top, has been repaired by sawing off from eighteen to 
twenty-four inches and replacing by new sheet-piling, thor- 
oughly spliced to the old. The slopes of the dam have also 
been brought up to grade, and repaved where necessary. 

A small force of men and teams has been employed from 
September 30 to October 25 in grading and paving the banks 
of the pool between the old upper dam and the new dam. 
The paving of the north bank, which was not finished last 
year, was also completed. The work above the new dam is 
now entirely completed. In all, about 168 square yards of 
paving have been laid. 

About 900 feet of fence have been built on the line between 
the city and Edward Hammond, on the east side of the lake, 
just south of Snake brook. 

The Pegan filter beds have been in use the larger part of 
the time during the year. 

The following table shows the total number of gallons of 
water pumped, the amounts delivered to each bed, etc., for 
each month of the year : 



City Document No. 32. 





No. of 
Days 

on 

which 

Pumps 

were 

run. 


Amount of Water 
Pumped. 


Amount of Water Delivered 
on to Beds. 


Month, 1895. 


Total for 
the Month. 


Average for 

each Day 
Pumps ran. 


No.l. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 




Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


September .... 


29 
26 
31 
30 
21 
17 
15 
9 
8 
18 
29 
29 


28,379,000 
14,246,000 
40,062,000 
38,064,000 
19,824,000 
12,474,000 
13,756,000 
7,952,000 
5,653,000 
21,030,000 
39,836,000 
32,422,000 


978,600 

547,900 

1,292,300 

1,268,800 

944,000 

733,800 

917,100 

883,600 

706,600 

1,168,300 

1,373,700 

1,118,000 


6,746,000 

1,394,000 

11,457,000 

10,175,000 

3,618,000 

527,000 

1,432,000 

754,000 

603,000 

2,714,000 

9,987,000 

7,090,000 


8,819,000 
3,317,000 
18,203,000 
9,648,000 
9,686,000 
3,128,000 

829,000 
3,241,000 

151,000 
4,711,000 
6,181,000 
8,301,000 


12,814,000 

9,535,000 

10,402,000 

18,241,000 

6,520,000 

8,819,000 

11,495,000 

3,957,000 

4,899,000 

13,605,000 

23,668,000 

17,031,000 


For the Tear . . . 


262 


273,698,000 


1,044,600 


56,497,000 


76,215,000 


140,986,000 



The total amount of coal used during the year was 225,843 
pounds ; 1,211.9 gallons were pumped per pound of coal. 

Water ran over the overflow in the dam across Pegan 
brook during the entire twenty-four hours on March 14, and 
for part of the day on March 13 and 15, April 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 20, and 22, October 13 and 14, November 18, 26, 
27, 28, and 29, and December 2. 

Bed No. 1 was cleaned in May, June, August, and Octo- 
ber ; Bed No. 2 in May, July, and August ; and Bed No. 3 
in June, August, September, and October. 

Considerable work was done early in the year in removing 
stumps, muck, etc., from the meadow to high ground. 

The new location of the Boston & Albany Eailroad 
crosses the filter beds. The railroad has built other filter 
beds to take the place of those destroyed. A considerable 
amount of filling in the lake has been done by the company 
on their new line during the year, and this filling has pushed 
up a large amount of mud, and otherwise has affected the 
quality of the lake water. Negotiations are now going on 
between the city and railroad authorities, and it is to be 
hoped that the evil will be properly remedied. 

It was found that the Hoadley engine in use at the beds 



Water Department. 



49 



was not large enough. It was consequently removed, on 
December 19, and replaced by one of the Atlas engines 
stored near the effluent gate-house. 

The spring growth of diatoms in the lake was the lowest 
for many years. In the fall there was a vigororous growth 
of Asterionella followed by one of Melosira. 

Protococcus was rather more abundant than usual durino- 
the summer. 

In July and August there was considerable Microcystis, 
and in November Anabsena (the so-called "sterile form") 
was very abundant. At one time it rose to the surface, 
forming a thick scum, covering one or two acres in the Mid- 
dle Division. When concentrated this organism had a strong 
odor not unlike that of a raw squash. 

Infusoria were not abundant except for a short time after 
the "turning over." 

Crenothrix was observed at the bottom in July and again 
in November. 

The average number of organisms for the year was 360 
per c.c, against 363 for 1894. 

While the organisms in the lake do not show an increase 
over last year, the amount of matter in suspension has been 
very largely increased owing to the work on the B. & A. 
R.R., already referred to. 

Feeders of Lake Coehituate. 

Means of Monthly Observations (1895). 



Locality. 



Beaver Dam brook 

" " " mouth of brook 

Course brook (last culvert) .... 

Dug pond 

Circular dam . 

Pegan brook 

Snake brook 



aj 













m 




GJ 




a 


o 


















a 


_o 


so 


a 


Eh 


O 


O 


< 


51.9 


1.00 


83 


149 


52.0 


0.91 


43 


286 


53.5 


0.88 


50 


158 


56.5 


0.21 


387 


271 


51.3 


0.88 


57 


141 


54.5 


0.19 


42 


1,730 


51.7 


0.60 


31 


348 



CQ 



423 
552 
207 
149 
295 
1,875 
402 



50 City Document No. 32. 

Dudley Pond. 

Grades, H. W., 146.46; 18-inch Pipe, 130.36 and 127.36. 
Area, Water Surface, 81 acres; Greatest Depth, 27 feet ; Contents, above 130.36, 

250,000,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water in the pond was at elevation 
139.96, or 6.50 feet below high water. The water gradually 
rose during the year, reaching elevation 143.53 on Decem- 
ber 31. 

No water has been drawn from this pond during the year. 

SUDBURY-RlVER AQUEDUCT. 

Grades, 141.352 at Farm Pond; 124.051 at Terminal Gate-House. 
Length, 15.89 miles ; Size, 7 ft. 8 in. X 9 ft. ; Capacity, 109,000,000 gals, in 24 hours- 

The three portions of this aqueduct are in good condition. 
The Supply and Farm-pond aqueducts were cleaned twice 
by machine, on April 11 and December 12. The main 
aqueduct was cleaned once, by hand, from Farm pond to 
Station 400 on April 17 and 18, and from Station 400 
to Chestnut-Hill Keservoir on May 2 and 3 . The brick-work 
was very dirty as far as the Rosemary siphon. In the Bea- 
con-street tunnel about 50 lbs. of rock which had fallen 
from the roof was found at Station 780-J-53. The concrete 
lining and railway track were in excellent condition. 

The 48-in. pipes in Basin 1 have been flushed into the 
river below Dam 1 twice during the year. 

The three portions of the aqueduct have been in use for 
the same length of time, 335.9 days. The flow was stopped 
only for the experiments at the siphon pipes, for cleaning 
the aqueduct, and for repairs at the Waban Valley and 
Charles-river bridges. 

The amount of water sent to the city has been 12,908,- 
500,000 gallons, a daily average of 35,366,000 gallons. 
Besides the above, 896,800,000 have been turned into Lake 
Cochituate. 

Hitherto the machine used in cleaning the Supply and 
Farm-pond aqueducts has simply scraped or brushed the 
deposit from the masonry. In the autumn of this year a 
force pump was attached, operated by the movement of the 
cleaning-machine, to force water through a perforated iron 
pipe against the whole circumference of the aqueduct, thus 
washing off the material loosened by the brushes. The 
pump was tried in the December cleaning, and showed that, 
with some slight modifications, it will doubtless work 
successfully. 

Extensive repairs were made on the Waban arches in 
October. This bridge has always given a great deal of 
trouble from cracks and leaks, and it was determined to 



Water Department. 51 

repair it thoroughly, and see if the work could be maintained 
in a permanent condition in spite of temperature changes to 
which the masonry is subjected. The plastering on the 
inside of the aqueduct was removed wherever it was found 
necessary, and the cracks were followed up, cut out to a 
depth of two inches, and carefully cleaned before pointing. 
Portland cement mortar, mixed one to one, was forced into 
the cracks with a calking-iron. The plastering was then 
restored. It is intended to watch carefully the results of 
the work. The aqueduct was found to be perfectly tight 
under a large flow of water by test made in November. It 
is expected that the cracks will open again under the effect 
of very low temperatures. 

Charles-river bridge, which has also leaked to a consider- 
able extent, was repaired in November. The plastering on 
the lines of the cracks was loose from the skew-back to a 
point about 6 inches above the springing line. It was re- 
moved, the cracks pointed and the plastering replaced. 

The brick masonry of the aqueduct bridges should be 
thoroughly overhauled, oiled, and pointed during the sum- 
mer. In some portions of the walls it will be necessary to 
cut out the bricks and insert new ones. The granite 
masonry of all the bridges requires pointing. 

A considerable amount of work was done towards erecting; 
an iron stairway to connect the upper levels of the bridge 
with the street which was made under one of the arches. 
Owing to lack of funds the work was suspended. The 
foundations were protected during the winter. 

The usual attention has been given to the culverts alono; 
the line, especially during the cold months, when they are 
apt to fill up with snow and ice. 

Mr. Oldham, in charge of the aqueduct force, was called 
to Dam No. 6 to take charge of the seeding of the embank- 
ments. He also acted as Inspector of Masonry at Dam 5 
for two weeks. 

A building for storage of tools is much needed, and I 
recommend that one be erected during the present year. 
The Westerly Siphon Chamber would be a good location for 
the building. 

Cochituate Aqueduct. 

Grades, 121.03 at Lake ; 116.77 at Brookline Reservoir. 
Length, 14.60 miles ; Size, 6 ft. X 6 ft. 4 in.; Capacity, 20,000,000 gals, per 24 hours. 

This aqueduct has been in constant service during the year, 
except from 5 P.M., February 24, to 5 A.M., February 28, 
when the flow was stopped for cleaning the interior. 

From the lake to Station 25 there was a great amount of 



52 City Document No. 32. 

Spongilla growing upon the walls, some of it being 4 inches 
in length. Froni Station 25 to Station 130, Division 1, the 
Spongilla gradually decreased, but the black deposit all along 
the line was worse than it has been for several years. The 
brick-work was given a double washing in the upper portions 
of the aqueduct as far as Station 35 . From Station 130 to the 
Westerly Pipe Chamber there was a considerable amount of 
the Spongilla in some sections. From the Easterly Pipe 
Chamber to the Ventilator there was very little sponge, but 
it was abundant in the tunnel. 

New gaivanized-iron gate rods were inserted in the gates 
at Dedmans, Grantville, and Newton Centre Waste Weirs, 
and in the first two of the above structures new southern 
pine bulkheads were placed. 

A depth of 6^ feet has been maintained in the aqueduct, 
except from January 1 to March 11, when the lake was not 
high enough to furnish this flow. 



Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

H. W., 126.00 ; Darn, 128.00; Effluent pipes, 99.80. 

Area, Lawrence Basin, 87.5 acres ; Contents, 166,000,000 gals.; Bradley Basin, 87.6 

acres; Contents, 391,000,000 gals. 

Total Contents above grade 100.00, 667,000,000 gals. 

The extension of Commonwealth avenue has cut through 
a portion of the driveway near the entrance arch and neces- 
sitated many changes. The arch which has marked the be- 
ginning of the drive must be taken down, and as it possesses 
no architectural merit and would be an inappropriate monu- 
ment under the new conditions, it is to be hoped that it will 
never be reerected, except perhaps at the entrance to some 
cemetery. The new entrance to the Chestnut-Hill Reservoir 
Drive, which is on the brink of a deep slope towards the 
reservoir, would be better marked by some simpler device of 
stone posts and shrubbery. 

On the grounds of the Lawrence Basin a new connection 
with the Boulevard has been made and the old driveway to 
South street abandoned. 

Four wells have been sunk on the grounds at this reser- 
voir for use in the summer months, and the public have 
appreciated them highly. 



Brookline Reservoir. 

R. W., 125.00; Area, 23 acres ; Greatest Depth, 24 feet ; Contents, 119,583,960 gals. 

Everything in connection with this reservoir is in good 
condition. No other work than maintenance has been done 
at this point during the year. 



Water Department. 



53 



Fisher-Hill Eeservoir. 

E. W., 241.00; Pipe Inverts, 220.00; Depth, 21 feet; Contents, 15,400,000 gals, above 

223.00. 

This high-service reservoir is in good condition. It has 
been maintained by the Chestnut-Hill Reservoir force. 



Inspection of Water Sources. 

The following is a digest of the report of Mr. J. S. Con- 
cannon, Chief Inspector : 

Total number of cases inspected . . . . 668 

Old cases 637 

New cases ........ 31 

Present condition of all cases : 

Remedied ........ 156 

Present safe ........ 405 

Seem safe ........ 42 

Suspected ........ 20 

Unsatisfactory ....... 45 

Legal notices ....... 14 

No legal injunctions were necessary during the year. 



Biological Laboratory. 

During the year 1895 2,044 microscopical examinations of 
water and 1,217 cultures of bacteria were made at the 
laboratory. 

Some of the special subjects investigated during the year 
were : 

The circulation of water in an ice-covered reservoir as 
shown by color and temperature observations. 

Comparisons of the effect of storage in Basins 4 and 6. 

Temperature of the water at various depths in Lake Winni- 
piseogee and other frozen lakes. 

Continued investigation of stagnation phenomena, with an 
extensive series of therrnophone observations. 

Continued investigation of the cause of the seasonal dis- 
tribution of micro-organisms. 

New method of collecting samples for bacteriological 
examination. 

The seasonal changes in the color of streams. 

Use of aspirator in connection with the Sedgwick-Raffcer 
method of water examination. 

The following report of experiments made in the labora- 
tory has been prepared by Mr. Gr. C. Whipple. 

Studies made in the laboratory previous to 1894 estab- 



54 City Document No. 32. 

lishecl the following facts in regard to the growth of diatoms 
in surface-waters : 

In deep ponds there are two well-marked seasons of growth, 
one in the spring and one in the fall. These periods of 
growth follow the periods of stagnation, due to the thermal 
stratification of the water, and are coincident with the sea- 
sons when the water is in complete vertical circulation. In 
shallow ponds, where the phenomena of stagnation and cir- 
culation are somewhat different, there is usually a regular 
recurring spring growth, and occasional growths in the sum- 
mer and autumn. The explanation heretofore offered for 
this peculiar seasonal distribution was based chiefly upon 
food-supply. In a former report, 1 it was shown that diatoms 
require a sufficient supply of nitrogen as nitrates and a free 
circulation of air ; and that during the periods of circulation 
this food-supply is abundant. 

More extended observations and experiments, however, 
seem to indicate that the food-supply theory, taken by itself, 
is inadequate to explain all the phenomena : and while it is 
true that the question of food is one of fundamental impor- 
tance, yet there are other factors which materially influence 
the growth. Of these factors light is perhaps the most im- 
portant. 

Diatoms, in common with all chlorophyllaceous plants, 
require a certain amount of light for their proper develop- 
ment. They will not grow in the dark, although they will 
there preserve their vitality for a long time. Exposure to 
bright sunlight, on the other hand, is usually fatal. The 
amount of light most favorable to their, growth must, of 
course, lie between these two limits, and it will be seen that 
here lies a wide field for experiment. With a view to 
determining the relation between the intensity of light and 
the corresponding growth of diatoms several series of experi- 
ments have been made in the laboratory, the results of which 
are here described. 

Preliminary experiments showed that, on account of the 
extreme sensitiveness of diatoms to external influences, cult- 
ures made in the laboratory would have little comparative 
value, and it was also found to be a very difficult matter to 
control properly the intensity of the light. It was therefore 
decided to make the experiments in the reservoirs under con- 
ditions as nearly as possible like those found in nature. 

The method employed was an extremely simple one. It 
consisted of suspending bottles, filled with water from the 
same source, at different depths in the reservoir, the bottles 

1 Nineteenth Annual Report of the Boston Water Board for the year ending January 31, 
1895. 



Water Department. 55 

being tied to a rope suspended from a buoy. After certain 
intervals of time the bottles were drawn to the surface 
and the water examined, records being kept of the number 
of diatoms in each sample both before and after exposure. 
The bottles varied in capacity from 150 to 1,000 cubic centi- 
meters. In the early experiments they were tightly stop- 
pered, but in the later ones cloth was tied over the mouths 
of the bottles, and above these inverted tumblers were 
secured. The latter arrangement was found to give heavier 
growths on account of providing better opportunities for the 
circulation of air and for the renewal of food-supply. 

The practical question to be decided by the experiments 
was not the exact amount of light necessary for the develop- 
ment of diatoms, but the variations in their growth at dif- 
ferent depths due to the intensity of light. 

The subject of the penetration of light into bodies of water 
has not been as thoroughly investigated as its importance 
appears to demand. Forel and others have studied the 
transparency of the water in some of the Swiss lakes, and 
similar studies have been been made upon the water of the 
ocean. In most cases the experiments consisted simply of 
the determination of the limit of visibility of a white disc or 
incandescent light lowered into the water, the results being 
valuable only for comparing the relative transparency of 
different waters, or of the same water at different times. In 
a few instances photographic methods have been used, and 
the results show approximately the relative intensity of light 
at different depths. All the observations, however, have 
been made on waters which were almost colorless, and the 
results are of little value when applied to the brown-colored 
waters of many of our New England ponds. For example, 
Forel found that in Lake Geneva a white disc 20 cm. in 
diameter was visible at a depth of 70 feet. A similar disc 
lowered in Chestnut-Hill Keservoir at a time when the color 
was 0.92 (Platinum Scale) disappeared from view at a depth 
of 6 feet. 

The decrease in intensity of light below the surface is due 
to two causes : first, the absorption of a certain portion of 
light by the water ; and, second, the presence of fine parti- 
cles in suspension which act as a screen to shut out the light. 
The coefficient of absorption of light by water varies greatly 
with the quality of the water, its temperature, etc. Theoret- 
ically, the reduction of light passing through water follows 
the law that as the depth increases arithmetically the inten- 
sity of the light decreases geometrically. For example., if 
the intensity of the light falling upon the surface of a pond 
is 1, and if |- of the lisrht is absorbed by the first foot of 



56 City Document No. 32. 

water, then the intensity of the light at a depth of one foot 
will be f . The second foot of water will absorb J of f , and 
the intensity of light at a depth of two feet will be T |, and 
so on. At this rate of decrease, the intensity of light at a 
depth of ten feet will be only 5 per cent, of that of the sur- 
face. Not only does the intensity of the light vary at differ- 
ent depths, but its quality also varies. The red and yellow 
rays are said to be most readily transmitted. Several series 
of observations on the growth of diatoms at different depths 
are given in the tables printed below. In experiment No. 1, 
which may be considered as typical of the general results 
obtained, bottles were filled with water from Lake Cochitu- 
ate and placed in Chestnut-Hill Reservoir at depths of 2, 4, 
6, 8, 10, and 25 feet, where they remained from April 29 to 
May 13. During this time the temperature varied from 53° 
to 62°, and the color of the water in which they were 
immersed averaged 0.58. The relative growths at the differ- 
ent depths will be readily seen from the table. Near the 
surface, there was a vigorous growth of several genera, 
Synedra, however, being by far the most abundant. At 
greater depths the total numbers were less. At the bottom, 
there were fewer than in the original sample. In experiment 
No. 3, the surface sample was so placed that at times it was 
partially above the water and consequently exposed to the 
varying atmospheric temperature, and occasionally to direct 
sunlight. The effect was seen in a diminished growth. In 
most of the experiments the " surface " samples were immersed 
about six inches. 

One of the most interesting features of the experiments 
was the determination of the depth below which the diatoms 
would not grow. This, as would naturally be expected, was 
found to vary with the character of the water, — its color, 
turbidity, etc. For example, two series of observations 
(Experiments Nos. 5 and 6) were made upon water from the 
same source, one series of bottles being located in the white 
water of Lake Cochituate, and the other in the darker water 
of the Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir. The time of growth was the 
same for both. The results showed that in Lake Cochituate 
the limit of growth was about twelve feet, while in the Chest- 
nut-Hill Reservoir it was about six feet. That the limit of 
growth depends to a large extent upon the color of the water 
may be seen from the following table, which shows the aver- 
age limit of growth for three groups of observations arranged 
according to the color of the water : 



Water Department. 



57 



Table showing the Relation between the Limit of Diatom Growth and the 
Color of the Water. 



Group. 


Number of Obser- 
vations. 


Average Color 
(Platinum Standard). 


Average Limit of Growth, 
Depth in Feet. 


No. 1. 
No. 2. 

No. 3. 


5 

5 
2 


0.29 
0.60 
0.86 


15 
12 

8 



Thus, in dark waters the limit of growth is only about 8 
feet, while in the light-colored waters it is 15 feet. The 
depth at which diatoms will grow in perfectly colorless waters 
is unknown, but the experiments of Forel indicate that the 
limit of growth might be found at a considerable depth. In 
ground waters (practically colorless) stored in comparatively 
deep open reservoirs diatoms have often been found growing 
upon the bottom. 

In order to appreciate better the fact that the luxuriance 
of diatom growths depends upon the intensity of light, dia- 
grams have been drawn showing the average growth at dif- 
ferent depths, and the intensity of light calculated for each 
depth according to the above-mentioned law, using a coeffi- 
cient of absorption approximately determined by laboratory 
experiment. The parallelism between the two curves was 
very striking. 

Diatoms are said to be positively heliotropic, that is, they 
tend to move towards the light. In some genera this power 
is strong, but in most it is comparatively weak. Our experi- 
ments have shown that all of the common diatoms found in 
water-supplies sink rapidly in quiet water, and are of their 
own accord unable to rise towards the light through any 
great distance. Very slight convection currents, however, 
serve to overcome the effect of gravity and keep them near 
the surface. 

The bearing which these facts have upon the seasonal dis- 
tribution of diatoms is obvious, and we are now better able 
to understand why it is that their growths occur during those 
seasons of the year when the water is in circulation. During 
those periods not only is food more abundant, but the verti- 
cal currents keep the diatoms near the surface where there is 
light enough to stimulate their growth, and where there is an 
abundant supply of air. If this theory be true it must fol- 
low that the weather has a marked influence on their growth. 
We should expect the greatest growths to occur on warm 
fair days when there is just wind enough to keep the diatoms 



58 City Document No. 32. 

near the surface. On quiet days we should expect the dia- 
toms to sink in the water, — perhaps below the limit of their 
growth. During a long period of quiet weather they might 
even sink in a deep pond to such a depth that the circulation 
induced by the wave action would not be able to bring them 
again to the surface. 

This was exactly what took place in Lake Cochituate in 
the spring of 1895. In this lake there is almost invari- 
ably a heavy spring growth of diatoms, but in 1895 the 
growth was small. It began as usual, the diatoms being 
apparently in good condition. Early in May, however, 
there were several days of uncommonly warm weather. 
The temperature of the air went above 90°, and the tem- 
perature of the water at the surface one day reached 76° F. 
For almost a week the water was perfectly calm. Dur- 
ing this calm weather the diatoms settled rapidly, disap- 
pearing almost entirely from the surface. Meanwhile the 
water was becoming; stratified on account of the his;h surface 
temperature, and when once more the wind began to blow, 
its influence was felt only to a depth of ten or fifteen feet. 
The diatoms, however, having settled below that depth, were 
unable to rise, and consequently their growth ceased. 

In Basin 3, which is not nearly as deep as Lake Cochitu- 
ate, the growth of diatoms was arrested during the same 
warm quiet period, but inasmuch as circulation afterwards 
extended to the bottom, the growth began again and con- 
tinued until the next warm quiet period, which occurred in 
June, checked it. 

In this connection it will be recalled that when the ice 
forms over a pond the diatoms growths usually cease. 

Since diatoms are dependent upon light, and since light 
penetrates to greater depths in light than in dark waters, we 
should expect to find heavy growths most common in ponds 
where the water has a low color. An examination of the 
analyses of the Massachusetts State Board of Health shows 
that in a general way this is true. 



Water Department. 



59 



Experiment No. 1. 

Cochituate Water in Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, April 29 to May 13, 1895. 
Temperature, 53° to 62°. Color, 0.58. 



Date. 


Depth. 


Number per Cubic Centimeter. 
















Asterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


April 29 . . 


* 


94 


196 


3 


11 


15 


319 


May 13 . . . 


2 ft. 


4,040 


910 


20 


22,010 


550 


27,530 




4 " 


570 


80 


10 


6,800 


120 


7,580 




6 " 


380 


650 


26 


4,510 


284 


5,850 




8 " 


650 


840 


10 


1,304 


100 


2,920 




10 " 


154 


1,380 


26 


80 





1,624 




25 " 


16 


132 





88 


28 


264 



* Representative sample of the water before exposure. 



Experiment No. 2. 

Cochituate Water in Chestnut- Hill Reservoir, May 15 to June 3, 1895. 
Temperature, 62° to 68°. Color, 0.57. 



Date. 


Depth. 


Number per Cubic Centimeter. 


















Asterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


May 15 . 




* 


61 


29 


12 


17 


10 


129 


May 20 . 




Surface, 


196 


28 


12 


896 


104 


1,236 


" . 




2 ft. . . 


108 


32 


20 


1,408 


56 


1,624 


" . 




4 " . . 


116 


56 


36 


584 


80 


872 


" 




6 " . . 


88 


20 


32 


288 


28 


456 


" . 




8 " . . 


56 


8 


24 


136 


24 


248 


" . 




10 " . . 








36 


220 


8 


264 


" . 




15 " . . 


48 


24 


8 


192 


28 


300 


it 




20 " . . 


16 


16 


32 


204 


16 


284 


" . 




25 " . . 


80 


36 


20 


104 





240 


May 23 . 




Surface, 


140 





40 


9,340 


80 


9,600 


" . 




2 ft. . . 


80 





80 


6,870 





7,030 


" . 




4 " . . 


572 


76 


48 


3,464 


204 


4,364 


■• . 




6 " . . 


176 


36 


60 


1,020 


104 


1,396 


" . 




8 " . . 


256 


76 


48 


500 


68 


948 


" 




10 " . . 


56 


56 


16 


904 


24 


1,056 



* Representative sample of the water before exposure. 



60 



City Document No. 32. 



Experiment No. 2. — Concluded. 



Date. 


Depth. 


Number per Cubic Centimeter. 


















A sterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


May 23 . 




15 ft. . . 


60 


16 


20 


376 


56 


528 


" 






20 " . . 


20 








400 





420 


" 






25 " . . 


12 


20 


24 


152 


8 


216 


May 27 






Surface, 


200 





60 


18,800 


40 


19,100 


" 






2 ft.. . 











10,100 


80 


10,180 


" 






4 " . . 


140 


100 


60 


21,550 


290 


22,140 


" 






6 " . . 


70 


50 


90 


4,580 


90 


4,880 


" 






8 " . . 


188 


56 


40 


1,184 


160 


1,628 


" 






10 " . . 


60 


92 


80 


1,256 


64 


1,480 


" 






15 " . . 


104 


56 


16 


316 


16 


508 


" 






20 " . . 


40 


32 


16 


404 





492 


" 






25 " . . 





16 


20 


96 


16 


148 


June 3 






Surface, 














" 






2ft.. . 


170 








28,050 


40 


28,260 


" 






4 " . . 











88,600 


40 


88,640 


" 






6 " . . 








20 


15,850 


110 


15,980 


" 






8 " . . 


160 





30 


14,250 


170 


14,630 


it 






10 " . . 


80 


120 


50 


5,140 





5,390 


" 






15 " . . 


80 


20 


10 


1,830 





1,940 


" 






20 " . . 


60 


80 


20 


950 


10 


1,120 


" 






25 " . . 


50 


20 


20 


70 


70 


230 



Water Department. 



61 



Experiment ISTo. 3. 

Cochituate Water in Lake Cochituate, May 31 to June 7, 1895. 
Temperature, 64° to 70°. Color, 0.29. 











Depth. 


Number per Cubic Centimeter. 




Asterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


May 
June 


31 
7 






* 
Surface, 

2| ft., 

5 " 
10 " 
15 " 
20 " 
25 «' 
30 " 
40 " 
50 " 
60 " 


31 

350 
120 
310 
32 
20 
48 
24 
24 
56 
40 
12 


62 



40 







12 



48 

16 

48 

56 


2 

70 

80 

40 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

28 

12 

12 


2 

380 

11,100 

2,030 

44 

24 

12 

32 

4 

4 

20 

44 


7 



50 

160 

28 

8 

4 

12 

16 

40 

28 

40 


104 

800 

11,390 

2,540 

112 

60 

84 

76 

100 

144 

148 

164 



* Representative sample of the water before exposure. 



Experiment Ko. 4. 

Cochituate Water in Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, July 11 to July 26, 1895. 
Temperature, 69° to 77°. Color, 0.58. 









Number per Cubic Centimeter. 




Date. 


Depth. 


























Asterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


July 11 






* 


2 


30 


8 


4 





44 


July 26 






Surface, 











328 





328 








21 ft., 





32 





8 





40 








5 " 











4,400 





4,400 








7J " 











1,472 





1,472 








10 " 











140 


56 


196 








12| " 





72 





32 


12 


116 








15 " 





60 





48 


68 


176 








17| " 











32 


24 


56 








20 " 





24 





8 





32 








25 " 











12 


4 


16 



; Representative sample of the water before exposure. 



62 



City Document No. 32. 



Experiment No. 5. 

Cochituate Water in Lake Cochituate and Chestnut- Hill Reservoir, November 
22 to November 29, 1895. 
Temperature, 42° to 46°. 



rv>i™. S Lake Cochituate, 0.33. 
^oior, | H R e 8 ervoir, 0.90. 



Date. 


Depth. 




Number per Cubic Centimeter. 




Asterio- 
nella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tabellaria. 


Total. 


Nov. 22 . . 


* 


824 


244 


8 


24 


8 


1,108 



In Lake Cochituate. 



Nov. 29 . . . 


Surface, 


2,820 


675 


20 








3,515 


"... 


2Jft. 


2,540 


285 


10 





10 


2,845 


"... 


5 " 


2,180 


290 


10 





50 


2,530 


"... 


1h " 


1,485 


495 


5 


50 


5 


2,040 


" ... 


10 " 


840 


110 











950 


"... 


15 " 


290 


205 


15 








510 


"... 


30 " 


520 


360 


10 


40 


20 


950 


" ... 


50 " 


285 


520 


10 





15 


830 



In Chestnut-Hill Reservoir . 



Nov. 29 . . . 


Surface, 

1\ ft. 














1,070 


125 


10 





10 


1,215 


"... 


5 " 


770 


230 


5 





20 


1,025 


"... 


71 » 


840 


310 


5 








1,155 


"... 


10 " 


485 


140 


10 








635 


" ... 


15 " 


470 


145 


25 








640 



* Representative sample of the water before exposure. 



Water Department. 



63 



Experiment No. 6. 

Cochituate Water in Lake Cochituate and Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, November 
29 to December 9, 1895. 



Temperature, 40° to 44° 



p , ( Lake Cochituate, 0.33. 
uolor | C.H. Reservoir, 0.84. 



Date. 


Depth. 


Number per Cubic Centimeter. 


Asterio- 
oella. 


Melosira. 


Stephano- 
discus. 


Synedra. 


Tahellaria. 


Total. 


Nov. 29 . . . 


* 


625 


150 


13 


17 





810 



In Lake Cochituate. 



Dec. 9 . . . 


Surface, 


3,010 


685 


35 


60 





3,790 


... 


21 ft. . 


1,570 


505 


25 








2,100 


(€ 


5 " . 


1,240 


240 


40 


20 





1,540 


" 


10 " . 


990 


270 











1,260 


" 


15 " . 


865 


260 


15 





20 


1,160 


" ... 


20 " . 


680 


230 


15 





30 


955 







In Chestnut- Hill Reservoir. 






Dec. 9 . . . 


Surface, 


895 


435 


40 


60 


50 


1,480 


" 


2i ft. . 


1,125 


265 


20 





10 


1,420 


« 


5 " . 


965 


260 


30 








1,255 


'< 


10 " . 


510 


170 


55 


10 





745 


" 


15 " . 


110 


430 


20 


60 


55 


675 


„ 

































* Representative sample of the water before exposure. 

Quality of Water. 

Owing to the stirring up of a large extent of country above 
Basin 3 due to the stripping in Basin 5, it has been very 
difficult to maintain the usual standard of quality in the 
Boston water, but there has been no complaint. 

The following tables give first the average condition of the 
chemical analyses of the tap water as made under the direc- 
tion of the State Board of Health, and second the averages of 
monthly analyses of the sources of supply ; then follow bio- 
logical tables, which are the result of the work in the labora- 
tory at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. Following these tables are 
the usual tables of detailed expenditures and rainfall. 
Very truly yours, 

Desmond FitzGerald, 
Resident Engineer and Gen. Supt. 



64 



City Document No. 32. 



1© 

H 



CO 



o 




pfi 




a 




o 




CJ 




0! 

P 


w 







4^ 


a 



p 



r*a n 
eS 

<v . 

I s 

a 
o 



CH 

O 



0) 

to 

























CD 




























P 


























^j 


























O 


























o 




































EG 
















I-H 










P5 
















CD 






"E 
ft 




s 
















S"S 






s 


















cog 






m 




















o 






CD 




















-^ 






"-3 




















^H O 






S. 
























3 








IN 


a 


CO 


CM 






CO CO 


H 


t- 


•* 




•ssanpjTBH 






CM 


1-1 




rt 


*" 


1-1 I-( 


C 




iO 






03 






o 


■■* 




o 


t- CD 


CC 




CO 






CO 


« 


a 


-t 




ti 


ec 


iO \Cs 


c 


o 


CM 




•pamtisaoQ uqSS^xq 


a: 
a- 




a- 


-T 




o 
cs 




CO CO 
00 fc- 


CM 

-* 


CO 


CM 

CO 








cc 


C 


CC 


T- 


Tt 


CM 


O 1 


00 -* 


c 


rH 


ira 










C 


c 


*G 


CO 




<M 


-* CD 






CO 






•99;inij!i sy 


c 


CC 

c 


c 


5 


c 
c 




C 

c 


o o 
o o 


E 


O 


o 












CO 




c: 


o 


c 


O i-M 




,_, 


CD 










c 


c 


E 


c 


o 


c 


O O 


c 


o 






& 


•saiBaiiij sy 


CC 




— 




c 


o 
o 


c 


o o 
o © 


c 


o 

o 


O 
O 






























H 




-* 








CO 


lO 


OS 


iO CO 


in 


o 


o 




a 








5 


C 


o 




c 


i-t CO 




o 


im 




o 


■BinoracaY aa-t^I 


c 
c 


5 
o 


c 

o 


O 

c 




o 
o 


c 


o o 
o © 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 




E-i 




























£ 
































CC 




CC 






CO 


c 


OS i-l 


eo 




t- 














CC 


CO 


cZ 


o 






i- 




CO 






TJ . 


•paisjUJ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


D 


CM 


c 


CC 








rH 






■£ c8 


c 


c 


c 


o 


O 


o 


c 


o © 


5 


o 


o 






O -r* 






























a a 






























11 


























































1-1 


3 


e 


ea 




CO 


r- 


t- ** 


CC 












c 






CC 


^ 


iC 


Tjl © 












•paja-Hpan. 


CO 
o 


cm 

c 


CO 

o 


o 
c 


c 


CM 

o 


CC 

c 


CM (M 

© © 


c 


o 


CM 

O 






CC 


•>* 


g 




c 


(M 




© i-l 


H 


o 


>o 




■aauotqg 


cc 


CO 




-+ 




CO 




"■* "* 


IT3 


•* 


CM 

CO 








T^ 


a 


ȣ2 




1a 


CO 


iT3 


"* OS 


O 


CO 


rH 






•paxi^ 


la 


CC 
CM 




CO 


CN 


CM 


oc 


CO CO 
CM CS 


CO 


CM 


CO 






























s ■< 




c 


*a 


a 


CM 


*cs 




t- 


© T*< 


CC 


CM 


CO 




go 


•noiiinSj no ssoq; 


CM 
CM 


o 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CN 


o 


oc 


© © 

rH 1-H 


CO 


o 

CM 


Ol 
CS1 




5 fc 






















































PS > " 






»fl 


lit 


CO 


o 


CM 


<M 


CO CO 




O 






•TOOX 




CC 


»r 


-d 




C^ 


c 


CO CO 


<t 


°J 






-* 


TJ 


cc 


IG 


■<* 


•* 


?c 


rtl "* 


iC 


^* 


CO 










CO 


CO 


cr 


cr 


«c 


r-1 ia 


IT. 


CM 


o 






C 


c 


c 


00 






C£ 


CO t- 


c 


t- 






■jcopo 








a 




O 




© © 


— 


O 


o 
























a 




























o 
























1 a 




o 

M 




















































d o 




























CO ^5 




* 








|M 












+ 




»T 


e 


CD 










c 




^a 




c 




CD 




En 








M 
1-1 
< 
























c 
a 


1 

t 


1 


c 


1 


1 


1 


1 = 


- 

c 


■g 
a 

to 








o 

l-H 


c 


2 


I 




1 


c 


! 




c 


























c 


C3 










o 


o 


cr 


« 


■d 


■^ 


CC 


© co 




3 










c 


c 


e 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o o 




„ 


CD 






!z 


!z 


|z 


|z 


!2 


r? 


lz 


& * 


2 

c 


CD 
ft 


M 

CC! 






*■ 


t 


t 




^ 






u u 


ft 






'E 


"E 


"E 


"c 


*E 


C 


"c 


*o "o 


g 








t> 


> 


| 


t> 


> 


6 


t 


> > 


CD 








*- 






^ 




F- 


f-t u 










t 

a 


a 

a 
a 


c 
< 


< 

C 


< 

c 




c 


C 


QJ CD 


C 


It 

CD 


>. 












pe 


p: 


P- 


pe 


pe 


PC 


cS 


P5 P3 


H 


m 


r? 







Water Department. 



65 



05 
H 

s 

© 



PC 






H 

© 

s 
© 



s 
© 







TO 

14 

« 


to 

CD 
>1 

"3 

a 

a a 
ffl S 

i! 


•ssanpaBjj 


r-H 


■paumsuoQ neS^xo 


CO 


15 

o 
« 


■sai«jjiti s^" 


ir- 


•sa^LHijsj by 


o 
o 
o 


•Btnoramy aaa^ 


CO 

o 
o 
© 


2 cs 

■g.s 

5^ 


•pa-wili^ 


o 


•pajanigoQ 


o 


•anuo^qo 


© 


§1 

fio 

TO 5* 

H ^ 


•paxM 


00 
00 


•not^mSj no bsot; 


© 
CN 


•moj, 


o 


■JOIOQ 


CM 

© 




> 

E 

c 


i 

1 

> 
> 

1 


os 

_o 
"o 
a 
■a 

o 

CD 

H 

O 

TO 

a 

M 
TO 

03 

©" 
& 

Pi 
i> 
e 

CD 
02 1 



66 



City Document No. 32. 



8 8 8 8 8 jM 8 



8 



a a 



o P o g ? o o a &S o 

gSgoogaS s3g 

C3— -, C3 — _< C3 TO <£ «C3eTJ 



O fi 



x ofio o'oooooofi OPm flo 



15 



CO C3 O CO 



"* CO »o 



r-t iH r-l C* CO 



rH CO CO 



rH CO r- i— 





a 

03 

1 


I— 1 CO Ci <M t- t-H c~ Oi OO t- O O 
CO Gl CN O O t- O CO (M CO OO CO 
CO r-ll-t CI O <M r-< CO i-^CO 


O 
CO 
CO 


« 
O 


o 

m 


(MCMiOrHCO CO CO O CO <M 00 OO 

cm co 10 o co co oo>io»ra o o 


CO 
CO 




fr- rH CO CI O 00 CT> Oi CO © CI r- 1 
© <M CM © "* CO COIMOiO © CM 
•^ 7— i t — 1 rH *0 CO T— 1 *cfl r-l © 


CO 

co 




a 


»T3 T# © t- 00 t— © CO t— © © CM 
lO CO rH © O0 CO 00 -* CO U3 »£> CD 
CM iH Til •* CN 1-H "* rH . t- 

r-T 


CO 


E 
r 
C 

2 


i 

I 

i 




a 

C3 



Water Department. 



67 









o 




O T3 




2 




















ca 

3 




t-s 3 




a 

p 


















a 
p 




a ^ 




,— 1 Sh 




















2 s 




S-° 


















*w 




<+-« "~ i 




la 














K 

4 




CO 




l 1 


















53 






2 2 




*a 












f>3 




ft 




ft ft 

8 8 






















8 




CU £ 
























O o 




£<c3 

.3^ 


















is 


























ft-° ftp 
























P O O 61 




a 


















so 




3 ° S 5 

30^ 












































"5 

o 

ep. 


<£> I-( 


CO 


o 


CO t- 





t- 


OO 


OS 


ir- 


1 

-* 


rH 




O O 




o 


CD OS 




■* 




-f 


es 


CM 






(M i-H 




ex 


OS CM 


OS 






<* 


CM 




CM 




























CI 


























1— 1 
























g 


W5 CO 


OS 


"* 


CD 00 


OS 


OS 





00 


OS 


US 


■* 




eJ 


Tt! C>J 






OS 10 







OS 


CM 


CM 


T-i 






a> 




1-1 




I- ** 


CO 


US 


OS 


CO 


■* 




OS 


03 


S 
























o 
M 

Ph 
O 


















































• 


CO Ir- 


CD 


o 


US OS 


CO 


10 


CS 


OS 


01 


rH 


-* 


o 

M 


m csj 


00 




CD *# 


t- 




CI 


ITS 










r-* 


' H 


O 00 


*~ 


CD 


US 


CO 


■* 


H 


1* 


<1 




















































T3 


O CO 




CO 


lo r- 




O 





CO 




O 


OS 




CO rH 


CD 


CO 


OS OS 


CD 




OS 


OS 


00 


rH 


OS 




S 


rH i-H 






CO <M 


ITS 


-* 


CO 


1CS 


-* 




OS 




3 


CM CO 






fc- r-t 


-f 


us 







US 


CM 







■* <M 


CO 


SJ 


O CM 








?? 




O 












to CM 




^i< 


OS 




OS 




OS 




P 
OS 


^ to 


a 


CD 


^ 








CM 


m 


i-H 


CM 






CM 


T 


CO Oi 


OS 


■* 


CM 


CO 




CM 


CO 




3 


























tpl 


























p 


























h- 1 
























P 


iO t- 


-* 


CM 


"* CO 


OS 


CO 


OS 


00 


I- 


US 


us 




ci 






OS 


tO 00 






00 


us 






us 




CD 












1-1 












"co 


8 
























s 


















































in 


























2! 


^ 


•* t- 


t- 


CM 


fc- CO 





CO 


T* 


OS 


CM 


OS 




o 






CM 


•^ CD 


CO 


00 




1* 


CM 




■* 


m 










r " 1 














« 


























o 




























1 




















1 




T3 


CD t- 


CO 


US 


05 «© 


US 


00 


OS 


OS 


-# 


t- 


CO 








CM 


O t- 


OS 





OS 


1-0 






1 us 




3 


| 




















1 




a 

OQ 


CD OO 


CD 


CSS 


CO G> 


OS 


CM 


CM 


CM 


US 




rH 








^* 


O O 


CO 


10 


00 


fc- 




H 


1 CD 










i-l 


















w 




























B 




























& 




























O 




























S 


>s 












3 

s 



ft 

CD 
OQ 




3 


3 


C 








>> £ 










Si) 

p 

<1 


M 


£.■ 


^3 


03 






ci P 

3 » 


,3 
cs 

CO 


ft 

< 


1 S 


p 
i-s 



O 


a 

CO 

> 


'A 


a 

CS 

O 


* 


} 

i 



68 



City Document No. 32. 



H5 
OS 



M 









June, 

and 

June 
ugust 

ed. 
Octo- 


























t in 

July 

tfrom 
in A 
Casio 
minat 
ril to 
























s _ a ^ on, 

■3 -S %*%%< 




















QQ 

< 
4 




1 3 §3|&s 






















Diatoinacese were a 
July, and October 

Chlorophyceae pres 
October. 

Cyanophyceaa very a 
to November, esp 
and September, 
rium and Anabaen 

Infusoria present fr 
ber. 


































































a 

CD 

3 


00 to OS CO CO -cfl 


cm 




no 




CO 


































<M r-l CN CO -^ O 


CB 


-» 


>n 


CO 


cq 


CM 


■* 










tH 




















a 
























M 






















a 








CO 






CO 
















■<* 


Td 












«' 






r1 r-l CO CO CSl 


rH 


CO 


■c* 


CD 




CM 


•* 




t> 
























O 

W 

K 


























• 


CD in Cq O CO CO 


CD 


■* 




CM 


CO 


CO 


,_( 






o 
M 






























o 










o 






<N 
















<3 


















































T3 
























© 00 t— UO CO ira 


O 


CO 


CO 








GO 








iH iH CM in r-" 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 








*H 




t)i 




CO 




-n 


IO 


in 










CO 




■^1 


CTj 


N 


<M 










QQ 


ri r-< ■** CO tH 




CN 


-» 






CO 


CO 














CD 




00 














r-l -1 CM Tf t# — 1 


o 


■* 


CM 


CO 














r-l 


r-( 




















td 
























a 
























M 






















ri 


CO CO -3< ȣ> O b- 


i— 


CO 


CO 


CO 


j_ 




o 








































CD 


CM 














S 




























I— 1 


*-* 


r-l 










3 




























t- -* CO r— i£> r— 


CO 


CD 


t~ 


(M 


CI 


t- 








o 

W 




CO 








CM 






























3 
K 
O 








ri" 






























































tj 




<M 


-f 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


•*JI 


CO 




















CO 


^tl 








H 
















































r-l 


1-1 


rH 


^ 














£ 


CO CO -* <N ITS t- 




.O 


on 


^ 


CD 


CO 


1-1 






































t- 


IN 


















rt 


rt 


*"" 


" 










t 


5 
























1 


























i 


5 
























i 


5 
























fc 


3 










r-f 












































a 










>i >? 










£> 




cj 










it a • ' • 

M 3 .a r- 

p| £ U c? | 

H^ pL( S <j r? »"5 


1-3 


3 


d 

a 
ft 

CO 

cm 


o 

o 


8 

> 

o 


a 
ft 


01 







Water Department. 



69 







3 is 




fl 






a 
















<1fl 




O 






fl . 
















oa 

*= HI 




>> 






CD J-i 
















a? 




03 






^g 


















o , 






3a 
2 ■" 












OQ 

M 

a 






©a 






^ 2 












^ o 






^ 




a >> 












SO 

- a 
ftp 

o fl 

03 S 




£3 

61) 

8 a 

CD'S 

ft'° 
S> 


a 

IS 

fl 

03 

8 

CD 
CD 

>> 




CD O 
T3 

* a 

fl 03 
O - 




















a 

cS 

>> 




a 54 
















Q 




U 


U 


















fi 






C* 






O -# 


CO 


CM 


CO 


^ 












o 


iQ 
















3 






IH 












































CI 


























tH 


































*s 


■* CD 


o 


^ 


^ 


CO 














CO 


























rH 
















OQ 


3 
























O 


















































B 














IN ■»# 




i£> 


CO 


o 


















CO CD 












rt 


























o 


PQ 






















































































fc- 


CO CO 


1-1 


CO 


O 


































% 


rH iH 
























3 

OQ 










<N 


CO O 


rt 


CO 


o 


<M 


































rH IN 


rH 


















^ 


























a 






































■<* O 


"* 




rH 


o 






a 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM CO 






































i— i 
























a 








U3 




-HI IN 


-H 


OO 


cq 


OS 






=3 






rH ■* 


•O 


















CD 
























CO 


H 
























a 


























TO 


























15 










P, 




CO t- 


CO 


H 


CD 


l£5 




o 






rH CM 


■^ 


-+ 


CO 














M 
























O 




















































>d 








£_ 




CO Oi 


tO 


t_ 


Oi 


W5 










rH CO 


■* 




t- CM 














3 


























3 










CO 


lO o 


o 


O 


CM 


fc- 






t- b- 




CM b- 


t- 




t- CO 














OQ 
























t 


d 


























H 


























5 


























3 
























V 


3 


>, {? 










fl 


hi 


3 
fl 


o 


03 








s a 

C3 » 






a 
a 

1-5 


a 

1-5 


■s a 

3 CD 
S ft 
<J OQ 


CD 
fl 
O 

a 
O 


s 

CD 
> 
O 


m 

CD 

CD 

ft 


^ 





70 



City Document No. 32. 



as 



.a « 
O 



& O 
C3 O 

8 'S 



am 

fl5 O 



e* o cs to 



00 CO os •* to OS 
OS CO CO rH r- -* 
i-l i-i rH tH CO (N 



tO rH CO OS 



<M CO CO CO 



to 

Cs 
G© 
H 

© 



CM. tH 1-1 



LO CD 00 CO 



CO CO <M OO 

co cm cm cm. cm 



CO CM CM CM (M <M 






CM (N CM to tO OS 



*G> i-l tO i— I 



CO rH CO rH 



CO O Oi OS 



I a 



fq Si «1 3 



O fc A 



Watek Department. 



71 



i-H <M CO 00 
CD 00 i— I CI 



00 iC CO 00 



(MCOO<NOOtJ<cc>cO 



tH i-H CO <M CO CM 



^ Oi co 



CO CD iO CO CM 



OS CO CM 



CM 00 CO CO CO 
r-i CO CI CO t- 



Oi CM O CD 



Sm 



00 <M CO CO 



o- 2 



CO CO <M i-l <N CN cq 



© ^ C! lO 



T-l i-l CM 



CM CO CO Cq 



(M i-l i-l 



CO CO CO CO 



CO !-( CO -^ 



n h >n io 



os co oo Ti< 



<M i-H i-H 



>> 












CD 




X 




~ cs 


* 


^ 








■s a 


CD 


g 


3 



ha<ia^>?< I a0^fi 



72 



City Document No. 32. 



OS 

0(0 

H 



d 
a 







CO 


o 


o 


b- 


m 


to 


Ol 


OS 


o 


o 


CO 


b- 


1 a 


3 






o> 


o 


o 


o> 


CO 


b- 




CO 




CO 












CO 


■5* 




CO 


■* 


-f 


T* 


U0 




no 


^1 


co 




H 




PQ 






























to 






























































fc 




to 


© 


o 


00 


» 


CO 


CM 


»H 


b- 


m 


fc- 


l-l 






a 


to 


CO 


O) 


o 






















ID 


CO 


co 




1< 


T* 


U0 


lO 


to 


to 


U0 


^1 


CO 




LH 


w 
































. 


CO 


00 


b- 


m 


o 


,_, 


CO 


in 


HO 


CM 


,_ 


CM 


c 


IS 




3 


-* 


CI 


tH 




b- 


CO 




-11 
















CQ 










w 


b- 






t- 




•* 


CO 


u 


3 






a> 


fc_ 


J_ 


CO 


U0 


CO 


tf 


CO 


co 


CO 


Tjl 


o 


C£ 


3 




O 


to 


CO 


00 




to 


to 


to 


b- 














■* 


M 




co 




-* 


■** 




-f 


■* 


"* 


iC 


^tf 


CO 




K 
































|Zi 




00 


in 


00 


IH 


to 


o> 


CO 


CO 


00 


IH 


CO 


Ol 


c 


1 




o 


to 






o 


-+ 


















go 

< 


3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^Jl 


1Q 


in 


in 


in 




lO 


■<* 


CO 




(< 


































o> 


<s 


Oi 


id 


CM 


rH 


o> 


o 


o> 


■<* 


CM 


a> 


e 


1 






CO 


IN 






oc 


CI 








CO 




K> 








XJ1 




co 






lO 








CO 


m 


T 


CO 


If 


3 




• 


IN 


co 


to 


T-» 


a. 


o 


OS 


iQ 


CO 


OS 


o 


t- 


c 


o3 




PQ 


to 




b- 


9 




in 


b- 






















m 








to 


in 


■* 


co 


u 


co 






























A 






























o 


% 




■* 


to 


to 


in 


-to 


to 


CM 


iO 


00 


CO 


^* 


o> 


If 


5 a 




3 


in 


lO 


-f 










CO 


o 












< 




CO 


CO 




in 


b- 


b- 


*-. 


tr- 


in 


^* 


CO 


If 


5 I 






























4 




^ 


b- 


in 


IM 


lO 


to 


CM 


in 


^t< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 





1 ■*" 




3 


CO 


CO 


CO 






















i 3 




02 


CO 


CO 


CO 




to 






*" 


*" 




^* 


CO 


If 


3 .^- 

is 








^j 


b- 


T* 


00 


o 


CM 


01 


CO 


1-1 


CO 


in 


CO 


m 


IC 


J4 




m 


■* 






CO 


cs 


to 




o 




t* 












CO 




CO 






to 


CO 






m 


^1 


CO 


1-- 


































13 


cm 






























































% 


13 


o 


IM 


IM 


01 


■* 


OS 


I-l 


rH 


IH 


m 


o> 


o> 


0* 


M 


3 


3 




-t 
























< 


CO 


CO 


■<* 


to 


b- 


b- 




t— 


in 


-* 


CO 


u? 


X2 
































u> 








CO 




CO 


■* 


to 


o 


o 


IH 




CM 







i N 




3 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CI 


to 










5 


CO 










CO 


CO 








L~ 






uo 


CO 


If 


































































cu 




































a 






o 


o> 




^* 




CM 


<N 


IM 


CO 


Tit 


o 


CO 


c 


! H 


H 






00 




o 




















Eh 


PQ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"* 


■* 


-* 


-# 


■* 


m 


^* 


^< 


CO 


T 


1 M 


^ 
































P 
































IH 
































































W 




•* 


b- 


^< 


to 


to 


>n 




05 


CO 


CO 


o 




a 


> 


O 








CO 




-v 


T* 




3! 














O 

8 


3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


>* 






■* 


■* 


«* 


>* 


CO 


Td 


































• 


T)< 


■* 


00 


co 


l-l 


o 


en 


o 


Tit 


m 


in 


CO 








to 




•»* 




o 






to 






CO 








02 


CO 




CO 


■* 


to 






b- 


CO 


o 


«* 


CO 


iC 




t 


d 






























i 
































! 


5 






























i 


S 






























k 


4 


>> 


t>» 














s 

cu 
A 

a> 
m 




s 


cu 


g 








a 

C3 
>-5 


p 


a 

3 

* 


< 


OS 


a 

a 


►> 

§ 


a 

en 

p 

"1 


CD 

& 
o 
o 

o 


3 

> 
o 

to 


a 

a 

o 

CO 

Q 


cu 





Water Department. 



73 



Temperatures (Fahrenheit), 1895. 





Chestnut-Hill 

re8brvoir 
Gate-Houses. 


Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 1 


Brook- 
line. 


Taps. 


Month. 


u 

-a 

s 
m 


6 

03 

p 

3 

a 
O 

O 


3 
S3 


6 

u 
02 


•3 

s 


g 

o 

o 
pq 


a 

p 
o 

a 
"El 

O 

37.0 
36.0 
36.9 
42.8 
57.6 
69.1 
71.2 
73.0 
69.6 
57.2 
46.6 
38.4 


OQ 

M 

u 


a 




36.5 
35.3 
36.8 
42.5 
58.4 
69.0 
70.5 
72.2 
69.1 
56.3 
46.1 
37.9 


37.7 
37.6 
37.4 
41.0 
57.7 
69.3 
71.1 
73.0 
69.7 
57.3 
48.2 
39.8 


36.3 
35.5 
36.6 
42.3 

57.8 
67.7 
70.5 
72.3 
70.2 
57.9 
46.7 
38.3 








37.6 
36.9 
38.0 
43.2 
57.5 
66.7 
69.2 
70.4 
69.3 
57.8 
48.4 
39.6 


40.3 




32.3 


34.8 


36.2 


38.9 
36.6 




42.3 
59.6 

72.7 
73.6 
74.7 
70.7 
54.2 
44.1 


41.8 
57.8 
67.5 
69.6 
71.1 
67.9 
53.9 
43.6 


40.6 
48.7 
49.4 
50.4 
51.4 
52.1 
52.4 
43.5 


40.1 




49.9 




59.1 




63.2 




S3.7 
64.3 
56.6 
51.1 
43.9 












52.6 


53.3 


52.7 








52.9 

f 


52.9 


50.6 











1 Temperature observations taken with the thermophone. 



74 



City Document No. 32. 



c3 

P 
e8 

+s 
QQ 

a 














^j, 








Ol 


o 


CI 


CO 


CO 


CO 1 


T* 






■* 




o 


CI 


CO 


oj 


■* 


















iH 


rH 


rt 


^ 


1-1 


T-l 


T-l 


<N 


H 


-H 


1-1 




rH 


i 












,_, 


ia 


OS 


CO 


O 


CO 


CO 


„ 


to 


•n«9j^ 1 




CO 


fc- 


t- 


fc- 


t- 




















_,, 


u, 




,_ 




,_, 


Ol 


■C* 


rt 


•># 


t_ 


Tjl 




•ioa 


to 


CO 




tr- 


*- 




t- 












^ 




































m 


m 








£_ 


,, 


CO 


o> 


CO 


CO 


O 




•piw 


co 


CD 




fc- 




SO 


CO 




























CO 


o> 


t_ 


o 


(N 


CD 


o> 




'■rag 


CO 


CO 


00 




























,_, 










<M 


CO 


,_, 


t_ 


r-l 


,_, 


,H 




•;nang;ni 


o 


2 


°J 


o 




t-H 


OJ 












rH 















,_, 




t- 


OS 


CO 


^ 


j_ 


t- 


a 


•UB3H 




CO 




fc- 


CO 


CO 


t- 










^ l 






00 










j_ 


r- 


© 


CM 


CO 


!^ 


t- 


CO 


■?og 


t- 


t- 


so 




















*t 


CO 

M 
































J. 










CO 


co 


t_ 


,_, 


CI 


^ 


t. 


t- 




•p™ 










CO' 
























rH 






CO 


CO 


CO 


ITS 


CM 


CO 


^ 


Ol 




■jng 




o 

T-l 


00 




00 






























^ 


CO 


CO 


0-1 


01 


t- 


■* 


CO 


i£) 




•inanpni 


00 


OS 


t- 


05 


CO 


CO 










T-l 




^ 
















[_ 


tH 


CO 


co 


CO 


CI 


•** 


CO 

.3 

M 


•UB8J^ 


CO 


CO 






CO 


OJ 












T-l 








£_ 


H 






«5 




id 


,_, 


■* 


CO 


Ol 


00 


■;og 


00 










o 


o 




CO 


^ 




Ol 






-# 




00 




Ol 








fc_ 


■■* 


o 


,_, 


CM 




•PTH 




CO' 




t- 


• 




fc- 


CD 


ifO 




rH 






















CO 


t- 


Ol 


■* 


CD 


<N 




ung 


OS 


00 




* 


CO 


CO 




CO 


• 




01 
























^ 


o 


,_, 


-n 


lO 






•^natigai 


o 


o 




CO 


rH 


01 


o 


CO 


• 


TH 


CI 




















CO 






Cd 


^ 


^ 


O 




■nT38J^ 


01 


o 


t~~ 




CO 


es 


Ol 




CO 


o 








e4 

a 






,H 
















rt 


rt 
















o 


CO 


Ol 


CO 




Ol 


o 


(M 


CO 


•?oa 


en 


OJ 




fc- 


CB 




o 








CO 






cS 

W 














rH 


1-1 






rt 


r "' 








H 


,_, 


rH 




00 




CO 




CO 


(N 


-n 


CO 


Ol 




•PIM 


01 


o 
T-l 






00 


en 


OS 


' 


CO 




CO 










,_, 




CNI 


fc. 


OJ 






CD 


1H 


CO 


t- 


00 




■■raS 


1 


o 






CO 




o> 


fc— 




O 


rH 












m 


m 


^ 


CM 




id 


fc_ 


,_, 


t- 


>o 


CO 


<M 


00 


•co 


•;nangni 


r- 


■ 


• 




OS 








CO 


* 
















•* 














t. 


CM 


CO 


C3 

3 


•aeaj^; 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


•J- 


CO 


CD 


lO 


CO 






































































CO 




CO 








CO 




CO 


Ol 




•■jog 


CO 


Til 


■<* 


CO 


CO 


LCO 




t- 


-p 


-* 


o 


CO 




O 

CO 




















rH 


'-' 










,_, 






CM 


<M 


o 


,_, 






CO 


IM 


IM 


o 


ca 


*P!M 


CO 


01 


01 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


CI 


CO 




































- 


o> 


># 


O 






o 


■"# 


,_, 


,_, 


^ 


CN 


Ol 




■•rag 


CO 


01 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


01 


Ol 


CI 






M . 




W 






























EH 






























IB 






























O 


















h 












3 




t>l 


















0) 




a 




>> 




















fl 




03 






cS 

a 


p 

.5 

CD 


o 

3 


P< 


>> 


CO 

a 

1-3 


hi 


a 


id 

o 

co 

02 


^3 
O 

o 


CO 

o 

15 


a 

CO 

o 

CO 




a 



Water Department. 



75 



Colors, 1895 (Platinum Standard). 



Month. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 

Mean . 



Chestnut-Hill 


Reservoir 


Gate-Houses. 




a 










3 





"2 


r= 


■=) 




T3 


o 
o 


33 


DQ 


O 


H 


.84 


.30 


.76 


.82 


.30 


.72 


.75 


.35 


.71 


.72 


.36 


.58 


.81 


.32 


.58 


.87 


.33 


.60 


.89 


.29 


.62 


.71 


.24 


.56 


.70 


.22 


.51 


.91 


.21 


.52 


1.24 


.29 


.83 


.90 


.31 


.77 


.85 


.29 


.65 



Che stnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 



2.61 2 .62 2.75 



.72 



.58 
.57 
1.57 
1.57 
i.57 
1.74 
.55 
.82 



Brook- 
line. 



Taps. 



.59 
.58 
.59 
.51 
.50 
.56 
.58 
.51 
.45 
.48 
.77 
.65 



.56 



.74 
.71 
.69 
.56 
.56 
.61 
.64 
.53 
.50 
.53 
.81 
.77 



.61 
.63 
.61 

.47 
.49 
.54 
.58 
.46 
.43 
.41 
.65 
.62 



i Five feet above the bottom. 
2 Mean for nine months only. 



76 



City Document No. 32. 



Bacteria, 1895. 



Month. 



January 
February - 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 
August . , 
September 
October . 
November 
December 

Mean 



Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir 

GrATE-HOUSES. 



222 
119 
460 
162 
157 
94 
87 
191 
171 
283 
370 
122 



516 
59 
207 
597 
156 
335 
216 
371 
144 
19 



145 

46 

270 

64 

36 

39 

143 

157 

103 

186 

49 

55 



Chestntjt-Hill 
Reservoir. 



128 
49 
54 

155 



203 235 108 2 70 2 146 2 145 



320 
320 
221 

83 
118 

54 
'46 



201 
191 
168 
364 
113 

83 
169 

55 
145 



Brook- 
line. 



105 
40 

268 
59 
92 
21 
64 
49 
40 

157 
58 
44 



Taps. 



95 

25 

146 

55 
50 
62 
89 
56 
58 
50 
50 
65 



83 



69 
23 
64 
37 
85 
106 
156 
34 
37 
17 
19 
23 

56 



1 Two weeks only. 



2 Ten months only. 



Water Department. 



77 



CO 
Si 



s 
© 



© 

+s 

EG 

© 

© 
© 

a 
a 



















CO 






Cl 


I— 


o 












in 


in 




o 


CM 


-CM 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


to 


»ro 


rH 




^s 




■^ 


CO 


Ol 


00 


CO 


fc- 


l~ 


CO 


3 


Ol 


CO 


1^ 


































00 


to 


<N 


CD 


Uj 


_< 


M 


CI 




CO 






O 




rH 








CO 






l— 






CO 


Ol 


o 


CO 




*& 






















rH 


■t» 




































to 
























to 




•noiUBJJiia 


0» 


































to 


tfi 


en 


CO 


CI 


CO 


ICO 


Cl 


CO 


uo 


•* 






cm 


00 


lO 


CO 


o 




















•Haani^iBdad 


CM 


o> 


t-H 




Ol 


CO 


O 


CO 
CM 


-p 


-t< 


rH 


CO 

•* 


CO 




not|oadsai 


€& 


-p 


CO 


CO 


■* 






«o 


-* 




O 


to 


co_ 
.ccT 




















































00 


CO 










Ol 




CO 


Ol 


■a 


CM 


>a 


Ol 


Co 


■n 


00 


CO 


CM 




•^aannjBde<j 


OS 


Cl 




to 


£ 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


o 


CO 


iH 
O 


Ol 


lO 




tuoiSoioig 


m 


<N 


■* 


CI 


■sK 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"* 


T)T 








































-* 


CO 


•o 


.o 


© 


© 


.Cj 












iH 




to 


ira 


o 












CO 


•* 


CO 




•jiOAjasa'jj 


O 


CO 


CO 


o 


00 


7-H 

CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


01 


Ol 


CM 


CO 




ItlH-JaqsM 


HO 


CO 




-f 


CO 












-p 


T-l 


OS^ 

co" 












CO 


o 


O 


© 


*a 


o 


o 


Cl 


•o 










o 


o 


o 


o 






CM 


o 


o 


lO 




CO 




■atoAJasa'Ji 




CO 


en 


o 


o 

Tj 


CM 

CO 


CO 


uo 

CO 


W3 
XCD 


CO 


t— 


CM 


CO 




ami^ooag; 




4*r 




rH 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Cl 


Cl 


CM 


cm" 
















o 


CO 


-p 




CO 


CM 




CO 






t— 


CM 


CI 


■* 


CO 


01 


© 


CO 


-f 


-t 


CO 


CO 






•A^AVSAUQ; 


CI 


CO 

to 


*# 


Ol 


o 


CO 


CO 


m 


la 

o 


o 


CO 

o 








IIlH-'jnn'jssqo 


«. 




Ol 












Ol 




CO 

i-T 
















to 






o 






CO 






CO 






CO 


Ol 


no 


-p 


CO 






»co 


to 


Ol 


IQ 


CO 






•jioAiasag 


CM 


UO 


o 


Til 

CI 


iO 


t- 


00 
to 


o 


CO 

o 


CO 


Cl 


U5 
CO 


Ol 
Ol 




IUH-inn;saqo 


«■ 


















o 




CM 


lO 






































o 


■* 


-p 




CO 


-tf 


CO 


■* 


o 


rH 


CM 


CO 




•BJajna 










to 


to 


















Cl 


I- 






Ol 


iH 






o 


CO 






CO 




Q'eSaj 


■€& 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CI 




CI 


CM 


CO 




eo" 

■ee- 








to 




























o 


o 


ira 


CM 




CM 


t- 




Ol 


o 


Ol 




to 




■a^Brntqooo 


o> 


pi 


o 


o 

CI 


CO 

CI 


CO 


CO 
CM 


CO 


o 


CO 




CO 


eo 

o 




asfeq; 


*» 










CI 


CO 


CM 


CO 




IH 


CO 


co" 














CO 






















"CH 


o 


00 




kA 


Cl 


01 


-H 


CO 


to 


O 


Ol 


CO 




•jonpanbv 


i-H 


ci 


CO 


ci 


CO 


o 




CM 


*T3 


00 


o 


rH 


CM 

CO 




aiBn^iqooo 


€& 




to 


CM 


CM 


■* 


CI 


r-l 




r-i 


CM 


tH 


o 

CO 
















CO 






IH 






Ol 


CM 






CM 


•* 


Cl 


CO 




o 


















■^onpanbv 


oq 


<N 


co 




CO 


CI 


CO 

Co 


CM 


{; 


Ol 

CO 


CO 

CO 


PJ 


Cd 




^jnqpng 


■» 


"tf 


-* 


lO 


CO 




t* 








|H 


r-7 


ocT 












o 




CM 










o 




WO 






CO 


CO 


CM 


in 










































"* 


xa 


CM 


o 




































€& 


eo 


r)l 


t- 




CO 


00 




■*. 


to 


to 


lO 


co_ 
oT 


















CO 




o 


CO 


t- 


Ol 


Ol 






CO 


■* 


■*H 




lO 




iO 


Ol 


-en 




CO 








•nOI81AI(J 
















CM 






CO 




CM 














CO 


















tU9}89 AA 


CO 


o 


■*« 


CO 


CI 


"* 


CO 


CI 




CO 






»o 


























































































Ol 










































































iffl 
































Ol 






















CO 








fri 


' H 






















T3 


































































to 

"3 




« 
P 


>» 


rt " 


- 








"- 1 


CD 


tH 


CD 


o 


iH 






C3 

3 

r= 




<1 


08 


CD 

a 


>f 
•"5 


s 

So 


a 

a 

"S. 

CD 


CD 
,£3 

O 

to 

O 


CD 

t> 

o 


i 

p 


C3 
3 

a 

03 


b 





78 



City Document No. 32. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir for Year ending 
December 31, 1895. 



Date. 


a 

a 

M 


Snow or 
Rain. 


Duration. 


Date. 

Mar. 25 
« 27 
" 28 
" 29 
" 30 


A 

M 


02 


Duration. 


Jan. 


6 
7 
7 
8 
10 
11 
13 
16 
18 
21 
22 
26 
29 


( 0.49 
( 0.25 

| 1.08 

0.08 
0.50 
0.18 

[ 0.24 

0.93 
0.16 


Snow and 
rain. 

Rain and 
snow. 

Snow and 
rain. 

Rain. 

Snow. 

Rain. 

Snow and 
rain. 
Snow. 


5.00 a.m. to 

6.45 a.m. 
6.45 p.m. to 

11.45 p.m. 
7.30 a.m. to 

11 a.m. 
4 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 
7.45 a.m. to 9.15 p.m. 
8.30 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
5.15 p.m. to 

5.00 a.m. 
2.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 
5.00 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


0.13 
j 0.25 

( 0.06 


Rain. 
Snow. 


1.30 p.m. to 4.40 p.m. 
11.15 p.m. to 

2.45 p.m. 
11.00 p.m. to 

2.00 a.m. 


« 


Total. 

April 2 
" 3 
" 9 
" 10 
" 13 
« 14 
" 15 
" 15 
" 16 
" 22 
" 27 
" 30 


2.91 






ic 


j 0.44 

0.94 
0.26 

1 

1- 2.46 

J 

| 0.05 

0.17 
0.15 
0.13 


Rain and 

snow. 

Rain. 


11.40 p.m. to 

11.30 am. 
1.00 a.m. to 9.45 a.m. 
12.40 a.m. to 5.30 a.m. 
5.00 p.m. 


Total. 


3.91 






3.00 a.m. 
6.30 p.m. to 

1.30 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 
4.15 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 
1.30 a.m. to 8.30 a.m. 


Feb. 


2 
4 
7 
8 
21 


0.20 
0.25 

| 0.38 

0.05 


Snow. 


9.30 a.m. to 3.45 p.m. 
5.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 
8.30 p.m. to 

7-45 a.m. 
10.15 j>.m. to 11.50 p.m. 




Total. 

May 4 
" 12 
" 13 
" 14 
" 15 
" 18 
" 26 
" 27 


4.60 








al. 


0.88 








To1 


0.09 
I 1.19 

( 0.65 

0.25 
0.10 
0.30 


Rain. 


8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


Mar 

Cf 


2 

4 

6 

7 

8 

13 

14 

15 

16 

22 


0.52 
0.07 
0.11 

| 0.79 

Jo.80 

J 0.16 
) 

0.02 


Snow. 
Rain. 
Snow. 

Rain. 
Snow. 


6.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 
8.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. to 

11.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 

9.30 a.m. 
11.45 a.m. to 

10.30 a.m. 
2.30 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 


11.00 a.m. to 

9.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 

10.00 a.m. 
5.45 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 
3.00 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 
5.45 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


» 


Total. 


2.58 







Water Department. 



79 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 



Date. 


a 
i— i 




Duration. 


Date. 


o 

a 
>— \ 


°a 

02 


Duration. 


June 1 
" 3 
« 4 


0.29 
| 0.11 


Rain. 


7.40 p.m. to 8.15 p.m. 
1.20 p.m. to 

9.30 a.m. 


Sept. 


9 
10 
11 


I 0.52 
0.75 


Rain. 


9.30 p.m. to 

4.00 a.m. 
2.00 p.m. to 3.05 p.m. 


" 6 


0.12 


» 


3.00 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


" 


12 


0.29 


" 


12.30 a.m. to 2.00 a.m. 


" 22 


0.02 


" 


4.00 a.m. to 4.30 a.m. 


" 


18 


0.10 


" 


8.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


" 25 


0.27 


" 


12.30 a.m. to 1.30 a.m. 


« 


26 


0.05 


" 


5.00 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 


" 27 
" 28 


1- 


« 


12.05 p.m. to 

3.00 p.m. 


« 


26 

27 


[ 0.15 


« 


6.00 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 


" 30 


0.23 


" 


1.00 p.m. to 4.40 p.m. 


" 


30 


0.29 


" 


2.30 a.m. to 6.30 a.m. 


Total. 


2.21 






Total. 


2.15 






July 4 


0.50 


Rain. 


5.00 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


Oct. 


8 


0.31 


Rain. 


11.15 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 


" 6 


0.40 


" 


5.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


" 


12 


1 




1.30 p.m. 


" 9 


1.31 


" 


5.40 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 


" 


13 


[ 7.55 


" 


to 


" 13 


0.45 


" 


11.30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. 


" 


14 


J 




4.15 a.m. 


" 16 


0.05 


" 


12.10 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 


15 


0.05 


" 


3.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


" 22 


0.18 


« 


12.45 a.m. to 2.30 a.m. 


" 


28 


0.03 


" 


2.00 a.m. to 3.00 a.m. 


" 27 
" 28 
" 30 


I 0.03 
0.63 


cc 


9.00 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 
3.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


" 


31 


1.30 


" 


4.20 p.m. to midnight. 


Total. 


9.24 






Total. 


3.55 






Nov. 


1 

2 
3 


1.56 
[ 0.62 


Rain. 

Rain and 
Snow. 


Midnight, Oct. 31, to 

7.30 a.m. 
10.45 a.m. to 

1.00 a.m. 


Aug. 2 


0.01 


Rain. 


2.30 p.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


" 7 
" 12 


1.48 
0.44 


« 


9.05 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 
2.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m. 


« 


9 
10 


| 0.15 


Rain. 


11.30 a.m. to 

11.00 a.m. 


" 18 
" 24 


1.17 
0.01 


« 


7.30 a.m. to 12.15 p.m. 
7.45 p.m. to 9.15 p.m. 


« 


14 
15 


| 1.86 


'< 


4.30 p.m. to 

12.30 p.m. 


" 28 
" 29 


| 0.08 


« 


10.40 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 


« 


15 
17 


0.07 
0.81 


<« 


4.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. 
12.30p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


" 31 


0.72 


" 


7.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


" 


20 


0.68 




12.15 a.m. to 4.45 a.m. 










" 


20 
21 


| 0.39 


Rain and 
Snow. 


3.00 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 


Total. 


3.91 







80 



City Document No. 32. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



Date. 


0) 

A 
o 

P 

M 


u 

° a 


Duration. 


Date. 

Dec. 4 
" 5 
" 6 
" 22 
« 27 
" 30 
" 31 


<x> 

a 


° a 


Duration. 


Nov. 23 
" 24 
" 25 
" 26 
" 26 
" 27 


| 0.18 
| 0.12 
| 1.25 


Rain. 


5.30 p.m. to 

3.30 p.m. 
12.50 p.m. to 

2.00 a.m. 
3.15 p.m. to 

12.30 a.m. 


1 

j> 0.56 

0.60 
0.34 

I 0.67 


Snow. 
Rain. 


9.00 p.m. 
to 

5.30 a.m. 
2.30 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 
1.00 a.m. to 4.00 a.m. 
7.30 p.m to 

6.30 a.m. 


Total. 


7.69 






Total. 


2.33 






Dec. 2 


0.16 


Rain. 


9.00 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 





Note. — Total Rainfall for Tear, 45.96 Inches. 



Water Department. 81 

[Chap. 48S.] 
AN ACT 

TO PROVIDE FOR A METROPOLITAN WATER SUPPLY. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

METROPOLITAN WATER BOARD. 

Section 1. The governor, by and with the advice and consent of the 
council, shall appoint three water commissioners, who shall constitute 
the Metropolitan Water Board. Said commissioners shall hold office, 
one for the term of five years, one for the term of four years and one 
for the term of three years, beginning with the first Monday in May in 
the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five; and in the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-eight, and annually thereafter, the governor shall 
appoint, as aforesaid, one member of said board to hold office for the 
term of three years, beginning with the first Monday in May in the year 
of his appointment. The governor, with the consent of the council, 
may remove any member of said board, and may appoint for the residue 
of the term, in the same manner in which the original appointment was 
made, a commissioner to fill any vacancy occurring by removal, resigna- 
tion or otherwise. One of said commissioners shall be always a citizen 
of Boston, one shall be always a citizen of one of the other cities or 
towns in the water district hereinafter described, and one shall be 
always a citizen of this Commonwealth. The chairman of said board 
shall receive a salary of five thousand dollars a year, and the other 
members a salary of four thousand five hundred dollars a year. 

OFFICERS AND ACCOUNTS. 

Sect. 2. The governor shall, as soon as may be after the appoint- 
ment of said board, and annually thereafter on or before the first Mon- 
day of May, designate one of their number to serve as chairman for the 
ensuing year ; said board shall from time to time appoint an engineer, 
secretary, and such other agents, officers, clerks and other employees 
as said board may deem necessary, shall determine the duties and com- 
pensation of such appointees, and may remove the same at pleasure, 
and may employ counsel ; shall at all times keep full, accurate, and 
separate accounts of the doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of said board, and include an abstract of the same 
in an annual report to the general court on or before the first Wednes- 
day in January in each year, such report to be numbered as one of the 
series of public documents ; and four thousand five hundred copies 
thereof to be printed annually. 

metropolitan water district. 

Sect. 3. Said board, acting for the Commonwealth, shall construct, 
maintain and operate a system of metropolitan water works substantially 
in accordance with the plans and recommendations of the State Board of 
Health, contained in their report to the legislature of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-five, and shall provide thereby a sufficient supply 
of pure water for the following named cities and towns, and the inhabi- 
tants thereof, to wit: — The cities of Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, 
Medford, Newton and Somerville, and the towns of Belmont, Hyde 



82 City Document No. 32. 

Park, Melrose, Revere, Watertown and Winthrop, which cities and 
towns shall constitute the Metropolitan Water District ; shall secure and 
protect the purity of said water ; shall on application furnish water to 
any city or town aforesaid that at the time of application owns its water 
pipe system ; shall on application admit any other city or town, any 
part of which is within ten miles of the state house, into said water 
district, and furnish water to the same on the terms prescribed by this 
act for the cities and towns aforesaid, and on such payment of money as 
said board may determine ; shall on application furnish water to any 
water company owning the water pipe system in any town within said 
ten miles, on such water company assuming the assessments of the 
town, if any, and making such payment of money as said board may 
determine ; and may from time to time furnish water to any other city, 
town or water company, on such payment of money as said board may 
determine. All payments of money aforesaid shall be distributed to 
the cities and towns in said district in proportion to the total amount of 
the annual assessments theretofore paid by them respectivelj*. Said 
board shall furnish said water to the city, town or company, by deliver- 
ing the same into a main water pipe, reservoir, or tank of the city, 
town, or company, under sufficient pressure for use without local pump- 
ing, unless delivered in some other manner by mutual agreement be- 
tween the parties interested ; and shall have the direction and control of 
the connections between the metropolitan and local systems. Said 
board may utilize the fall of water at any dam under their charge, and 
may thereby produce power or electricity, and may transmit such power 
or electricity by pipes, wires, or other suitable means, and sell the 
same, or the right to use such water, by written or other contract, to 
run for a term not exceeding fifteen years. Any person or corporation 
authorized by said board shall have all the powers relating to the pro- 
duction, sale and transmission of power and electricity given by this act 
to said board. 

WATER SOURCES. 

Sect. 4, Said board may take, by purchase or otherwise, the waters 
of the south branch of the Nashua river, at and above a point above 
the dam of the Lancaster Mills in the town of Clinton, but shall allow 
not less than twelve million gallons of water to flow from a reservoir 
above said dam in each week, and such further quantity, not exceeding 
twelve million gallons a week, as the owner of said mills shall from 
time to time certify to be necessary for use therein and in other 
buildings now or hereafter owned by him, for domestic or manu- 
facturing purposes, other than the production of water power, and 
said board, in regulating the flow of said quantities, shall, as far as 
practicable, conform to any reasonable request in writing of the owner 
of said mills ; said board may also take the waters of Sandy pond, 
so-called, in the town of Clinton, and the waters which may flow into 
and from said pond or river, and the tributaries thereof above said 
point; may take such water rights as they deem necessary connected 
with said waters ; said board shall forthwith, after taking the 
waters of said Nashua river, take by purchase or otherwise all real 
estate which will be submerged or flooded, or submerged to an 
increased depth, by the construction of the proposed reservoir on the 
Nashua river hereinafter provided for, and all parcels of real estate 
above the dam of said reservoir used for mill purposes and owned by 
the owner of any mill property of which any part will be submerged 
or flooded by the construction of said reservoir, including all the 
machinery used on such real estate and tenements for operatives ; 
shall, on or before the first day of January in the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-eight, take all the lands and all the ponds, basins, 
reservoirs, filter beds, dams, aqueducts, conduits, pumping stations, 
pipes, pumps, and other property held by the city of Boston for the 



Water Department. 83 

purpose of supplying water or for the purpose of storing or of 
protecting or preserving the purity of the water, and situated west- 
ward of Chestnut Hill reservoir in said city and westward of the inter- 
sections of the main pipes to be laid from Chestnut Hill reservoir to 
Spot pond, with the main pipes which convey water from the Mystic 
distributing reservoir ; also the pumping station at Chestnut Hill 
reservoir and lands under and surrounding the same, and the pipes and 
aqueduct leading thereto ; also Spot pond, so-called, in or near the 
town of Stoneham, and the lands under and surrounding the same, 
now owned by the cities of Maiden and Medford and the town of 
Melrose, or either of them, held for the purpose of water supply or of 
protecting or preserving the purity of the water, and the pumping 
stations and pumps thereon ; any or all of the aforesaid lands to be 
taken in fee or otherwise, as said board may determine. Said board 
may take any other lands in fee, easements, rights and other property 
that said board may deem necessary or desirable for carrying out the 
powers and duties conferred upon them by this act. 

RECORD OF TAKING. 

Sect. 5. Said board, to take any property by right of eminent 
domain, shall sign and cause to be recorded in the registry of deeds for 
the county and district in which the property to be taken is situated, a 
statement containing a description thereof, as certain as is required in a 
common conveyance of land, and stating that the same is taken for the 
Metropolitan water works ; and upon such recording the ponds, works, 
lands, waters, easements, rights and other property described in said 
description shall be taken for the Commonwealth. Said board, upon 
entering upon any land for the purpose of using the same for carrying 
out any of the purposes of this act, shall sign and cause to be recorded 
in the registry aforesaid a statement containing a general description 
of the land and the purposes for which it is to be used, and the proba- 
ble time for which the same is to be used, and after they have taken 
any property under the right of eminent domain shall notify the 
owner thereof, and on the request of the owner within three years after 
such taking, shall, within thirty days after such request, furnish him with 
a plan or description, in writing, of his land or other property so taken. 

RESERVOIRS. 

Sect. 6. Said board shall forthwith, after taking the waters of said 
Nashua river, construct a storage reservoir upon said Nashua river 
above said dam of the Lancaster Mills ; shall forthwith construct the 
reservoir in Southborough already partially constructed by the city of 
Boston, and the dams thereof, and assume and carry out the agi'eement 
made by said city with the town of Southborough, and all contracts 
made by said city relating to the building of said reservoir ; may con- 
struct other reservoirs, and may raise the level of any pond or reservoir 
under their charge. Said board may, as they deem desirable in con- 
structing, or raising the level of, any pond or reservoir, l'aise or alter 
or discontinue parts of any railroad or public ways, and in case of a 
railroad shall make such raisings or alterations of the railroad, or con- 
struct upon existing or other locations, parts of the railroad to take the 
place of the parts so discontinued, as, and in such manner as, shall be 
mutually agreed upon by said water board and the board of directors of 
the railroad company ; and if they cannot agree thereon then as, and in 
such manner as, shall be determined on the application of either party, 
in writing, by the board of railroad commissioners of this Common- 
wealth, who are hereby authorized and directed to adjudicate finally 
upon the same ; and if said water board shall be of the opinion that the 
making of any such change of grade, alteration or construction requires 



84 City Document No. 32. 

that lands be taken therefor, said board shall, in the name of the Com- 
monwealth, take such lands and convey the same to the railroad com- 
pany to be thereafter held and used as the board of directors of such 
company may determine, and the railroad company may if it desires 
locate its lines over any lands so conveyed to it, and when said new 
lines of railroad are completed the railroad company may discontinue 
the operation of the portions of its existing lines for which the new 
lines are substituted, and may maintain and operate said new lines of 
railroad ; and said water board shall build the dam of any pond or 
reservoir constructed, or whose level is raised, as aforesaid, and make 
the raisings or alterations of the public ways aforesaid, and build in 
place of the parts of public ways discontinued, as aforesaid, such other 
reasonable and suitable ways, which shall thereafter be highways, as, 
and in such manner as, shall be mutually agreed upon by said water 
board and the county commissioners of the county in which such clam 
is to be built; or if they cannot agree thereon then as, and in such 
manner as, shall be determined on the application of said board, in 
writing, by the highway commission of this Commonwealth, which 
commission is hereby authorized and directed to adjudicate finally upon 
the same. Said water board, in flooding or otherwise affecting any 
burial ground, shall conform to any reasonable requirements relating 
thereto of the board of health of the city or town in which the same is 
situated. 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

Sect. 7. Said water board shall forthwith lay pipes to connect the 
pumping station at Chestnut Hill reservoir with the main water pipes 
through which water is now supplied to the cities of Somerville, 
Chelsea and Everett, and the Charlestown district of the city of Boston, 
and with Spot pond, and on the first day of January in the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-eight the contracts of the city of Boston with the 
cities of Somerville, Chelsea and Everett, described in, and confirmed 
by, chapter three hundred and fifty-one of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and eighty-six, for a supply of water, shall be cancelled. Said 
board shall also forthwith, after taking the waters of Nashua river as 
aforesaid, connect said river with the tributaries of said reservoir in 
South borough. 

DELIVERY OF WATER TO LANCASTER MILLS. 

Sect. 8. Said board, until they shall have completed the dam of 
said proposed reservoir on the Nashua river, and rebuilt the dam of 
said Lancester Mills, shall, unless otherwise agreed by said board and 
the owner of said mills, deliver each week day at, and at the level of, 
the present top of the dam of said mills at least one million gallons of 
the water of said river, unpolluted by any acts or doings of said board, 
conforming in the delivery of said quantity, so far as practicable, to any 
reasonable request in writing of the owner of said mills. 

CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS, ROADS, ETC. 

Sect. 9. Said board in carrying out the powers and duties herein- 
before conferred upon them may construct and maintain buildings, 
machinery, roads, conduits and aqueducts ; may lay and maintain pipes, 
drains and wires ; may alter or change the grades or directions of any 
water course ; may carry and conduct any aqueduct, conduit, pipe, drain 
or wire under or over any water course, or any railroad, street or other 
way, in such a manner as not unnecessarily to obstruct or impede travel 
thereon ; may dig up any such road, street or way, and lay, maintain and 
repair aqueducts, conduits, pipes, wires and other works beneath the 
surface thereof, conforming to any reasonable regulations made by the 
mayor and aldermen of cities and the selectmen of towns, respectively, 



Water Department. 85 

wherein such works are performed, and restoring, so far as practicable, 
any such road, street or way, to as good order and condition as the same 
was in when such digging was commenced ; said board may enter upon 
and use the lands of others ; may take down dams to such an extent as 
they may deem necessary for prosecuting their works, and shall rebuild 
such dams whenever the necessity for keeping them down ceases ; shall 
use such lands and do all work relating to such dams, in a reasonable 
manner with regard to the interests of the owners thereof, and, so far 
as practicable, shall heed all reasonable requests made by such owners ; 
and in general may do any other act or thing necessary or proper for 
carrying out the powers and duties conferred upon them by this act. 

OPERATION OF "WORKS TAKEN FROM BOSTON. 

Sect. 10. Said board, on or before the first day of January in the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, shall commence the operation 
of the works taken by them from the city of Boston, and shall thereafter 
keep the same and all water works constructed by them, and all bridges 
which they may build across said reservoir upon the Nashua river, and 
(until they abandon the same by notice in writing to said city) said 
Chestnut Hill reservoir, safe, and shall have charge of, use, maintain 
and operate the same, and the Commonwealth shall exclusively be re- 
sponsible for all damages caused thereby or by any defect or want of 
repair therein ; said board shall have the exclusive right and control 
over all ponds and reservoirs used by them in supplying water, and may 
order all persons to keep from entering in, upon or over, the waters 
thereof and the lands of the Commonwealth, city or town, surrounding 
the same ; may inspect the water works and fixtures in any city or town 
supplied wholly jor in part from the works under their charge, and may 
take all proper measures to determine the amount of water used and 
wasted and to prevent the improper use or waste of water. 

PURCHASE AND SALE OF PROPERTY. 

Sect. 11. Said board and any city, town or water company aforesaid, 
may agree with each other for the storing or pumping of water, or the 
furnishing of the same as aforesaid by either party to any city, town or 
company ; and any such city, town or company may sell to said board, 
and said board may purchase any property of such city, town or company, 
whether taken by eminent domain or otherwise, that said board may 
deem desirable for use in furnishing, as aforesaid, water to any city, 
town or water company ; and said board may sell at public or private 
sale any property, real or personal, whether taken by eminent domain 
or otherwise, no longer needed for the water works under their charge, 
or may from time to time lease any property not then so needed. The 
proceeds from the operations of said board shall be paid into the treasury 
of the Commonwealth. 

EXPENSES AND DAMAGES. 

Sect. 12. Said board shall incur such expenses as they deem neces- 
sary in constructing, operating and maintaining the water works under 
their charge ; may agree with the party injured, upon the damages sus- 
tained by any city or town by the taking or use of its lands, ponds, reser- 
voirs, water sources, acqueducts or other property, or the cancellation of 
contracts, as aforesaid ; the damages sustained by the town of Clinton 
by any interference with its sewerage system or with its drainage rights 
or privileges ; the damages sustained by any person or railroad or 
other corporation in property by any taking of property or by any 
change of grade, alteration or discontinuance of any railroad or public 
way, or by the construction or maintenance of any reservoir or other 
work, or by the interference with the use of any water, or by any other 



86 City Document No. 32. 

act or thing done by said board under this act ; shall save harmless the 
several cities and towns within which any road, street or way is dug up 
as aforesaid, against all damages for injuries resulting from a defect or 
want of repair in any road, street or way, caused by such digging up, 
or by constructing, laying, maintaining or repairing any aqueduct, con- 
duit, pipe, wire or other works therein, and shall furnish without charge 
to all towns within which any work is done under authority of this act 
such additional police protection as may be necessary in consequence 
thereof : provided, said board shall have due and reasonable notice of 
the claims for such damages and opportunity to make a legal defence 
thereto. 

PETITION FOR JURY. 

Sect. 13. Said board, city, town, person or corporation, if they can- 
not agree upon any damages, sustained as aforesaid, may, except in the 
cases in which payment is otherwise provided for in this act, within two 
years after the day of the taking of any land, water, easements or other 
property, or of the use of any property, or of the making of any change 
of grade, alteration, discontinuance or location of a way or railroad, 
or of the doing of any other act or thing causing the damage, file in the 
office of the clerk of the superior court for the county in which the 
property taken, used or affected in value by such taking or other act of 
said board is situated, a petition, signed by the petitioner or the attorney 
of the petitioner, for a jury to determine such damages, and thereupon, 
after such notice as said court shall order, the damages so sustained shall 
be determined by a jury in said court, in the same manner as damages 
for lands taken for highways are determined. In determining any 
damages caused by any change of grade or discontinuance of a public 
way or railroad, or the substitution of a j:>ai't of a public way or railroad 
for another part, there shall be taken into account any benefit to the 
party injured received from this act and anything done thereunder. 
Interest shall be included in such damages from the date of the taking, 
or the doing of the act or thing causing the damages, and costs shall be 
taxed and execution issued as in civil cases, against the Commonwealth 
in case the petitioner prevails, and against the petitioner in case he 
does not prevail. Damages for the temporary use of or injury to 
property may, on the request of the petitioner, be assessed by monthly 
payments, to be continued so long as the property is used. 



COMMISSIONS MAY BE APPOINTED TO DETERMINE DAMAGES. 

Sect. 14. Said board, upon the application of the owner of any real 
estate taken for said proposed reservoir upon the Nashua river, or the 
owner of any real estate entered upon and used, or of any real estate 
injured by the taking of the waters of said Nashua river, whether said 
real estate is within or without the Commonwealth, or of any real estate 
not taken but directly or indirectly decreased in value by this act or the 
doings of said board thereunder, situated in the town of West Boylston 
or in that part of the town of Boylston on the northerly side of said 
proposed reservoir, or in that part of the town of Clinton on either side 
of River or Grove streets, between the dam of said proposed reservoir 
and a line drawn from the northerly corner of Oak and Boylston streets 
to the northerly corner of said Grove and Nashua streets, and not owned 
on the first day of April in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, 
by the owner of the Lancaster Mills, may agree with such owner upon 
the damages to be paid for such taking, injury or decrease in value, and 
if said board and the owner of any such real estate cannot agree upon 
such damages, such owner may, within two years after the first taking 
of water, or of land for said reservoir, under the right of eminent 
domain, file in the clerk's office of the supreme judicial court for the 



Water Department. 87 

county of Worcester, in term time or vacation, a petition for the deter- 
mination of such damages, and thereupon said court, after notice by- 
publication in some newspaper published in the county of Worcester, 
and in such other manner as the court may order, that all persons 
entitled to file such petitions will be heard by said court on a day therein 
named, and a hearing thereon ; shall from time to time appoint one or 
more commissions, each consisting of three disinterested persons, and 
may after notice and hearing fill any vacancy occurring in any such 
commission until all petitions referred to it have been heard and deter- 
mined. Each of said commissions shall, after notice and hearing, 
determine the damages specified in all such petitions as may be filed as 
aforesaid and referred to it by said comt ; and if the owner of any such 
real estate, no part of which is taken but which is decreased in value, 
shall in the petition aforesaid signify his willingness to surrender the 
real estate, or if there is a mill thereon, the real estate and machinery 
thereon, to the Commonwealth, the commission shall also determine the 
value of such real estate, or real estate and machinery, and interest may 
be included in such damages and in such value at such rate and for such 
time as the commission may deem just and equitable. Said commis- 
sions shall determine the damage to and value of real estate, machinery 
and business, and from time to time report their determinations on the 
petitions of such owners to said court. In case any individual or firm 
owning on the first day of April in the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
five an established business on land in the town of West Boylston, 
whether the same shall be taken or not under this act, or the heirs or 
personal representatives of such individual or firm, shall deem that such 
business is decreased in value by the carrying out of this act, whether 
by loss of custom or otherwise, and unable to agree with said board as 
to the amount of damages to be paid for such injury, such damages 
shall be determined and paid in the manner hereinbefore provided. 
The words "real estate "as used in this section shall include water 
rights, and in the case of mills all machinery thereon. 

PAYMENT OF DAMAGES. 

Sect. 15. Said board shall, upon agreeing upon any damages, or 
upon the acceptance by said court of any determination specified in the 
preceding section, notify the owner that they will pay the damages, or 
in case the petitioner offers to make surrender, if they so prefer, they 
will pay the value so agreed upon or determined, and if any such owner 
shall in accordance with such notice and within one year after being so 
notified, deliver a release of such damages or a deed" of the real estate, 
to and satisfactory to, said water board, said water board shall certify 
to the treasurer of the Commonwealth the amount to be paid such owner, 
and said treasurer shall pay the same from the proceeds of the bonds 
hereinafter pi-ovided for. Said water board, or any persons whose 
property is taken under the right of eminent domain, or entered upon or 
injured by the taking of said water, if dissatisfied with any determina- 
tion of damages made by any commission, may at the term on which 
such determination is filed in court, or at the succeeding term, claim a 
trial by jury to determine such damages, and thereupon the damages 
shall be determined by a jury in said supreme judicial court as provided 
in section thirteen of this act. 

PAYMENT TO CITY OF BOSTON AND TOWNS OF BOYLSTON AND 
WEST BOYLSTON. 

Sect. 16. The treasurer of the Commonwealth shall, from the pro- 
ceeds of the bonds hereinafter jarovided for, reimburse the city of Boston 
for all moneys paid or that may hereafter be paid by said city for land 
damages, or otherwise, in connection with the location, building or 



88 City Document No. 32. 

maintenance of reservoirs or basins not yet built, or for lands taken for 
the preservation or protection of the purity of the waters of any reser- 
voirs, or basins or of the tributaries thereof, and shall pay as part of the 
expenses of said metropolitan water works to the town of Boylston the 
sum of two thousand dollars a year, and to the town of West Boylston 
the sum of twelve thousand dollars a year for the year of and each year 
succeeding said taking of the waters of said Nashua river, so long as 
each of said towns remains a municipality, and shall pay no tax or other 
payment to either of said towns on account of any property held by said 
water board for the purposes of a water supply. 

METROPOLITAN WATER LOAN. 

Sect. 17. The treasurer and receiver general shall, from time to 
time, on the request of said board, issue negotiable bonds in the name 
and behalf of the Commonwealth, and under its seal, to an amount not 
exceeding twenty-seven million dollars, designated on the face thereof, 
Metropolitan Water Loan. Said bonds shall be deemed a pledge of the 
faith and credit of the Commonwealth, shall be countersigned by the gov- 
ernor; shall have the principal and interest made payable thereon, in 
gold coin of the United States of America or its equivalent; shall bear 
interest payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July of 
each year ; shall be registered, or with interest coupons attached ; shall 
be payable within such terms not less than thirty nor more than forty 
years, and shall bear such rates of interest not exceeding four per cent, 
per annum, and be issued and disposed of in such amounts and in such 
modes and at such times and prices as the treasurer and receiver gen- 
eral, with the approval of the governor, shall from time to time deter- 
mine. Said treasurer shall, on issuing any of said bonds, establish a 
sinking fund, and determine the amount to be paid thereto each year, 
sufficient with its accumulations to extinguish the debt at maturity. 

PROCEEDS FROM SALES OF PROPERTY AND BONDS. 

Sect. 18. Said treasurer shall apply the proceeds from the sales of 
property made as hereinbefore provided, and the proceeds from the 
sales of said bonds, exclusive of the amounts received from premiums, 
to the payments for the property taken by said board, the payment of 
the damages aforesaid, and the payment of the expenses of construc- 
tion of said water works, and the other payments specified in this act, 
and shall apply any premiums received from sales of said bonds, any 
assessments hereinafter provided for paid by the cities and towns, and 
the proceeds from the operations of said board, exclusive of the pro- 
ceeds from sales of property, to the payment of the interest, sinking 
fund l'equirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of said 
water works, and shall take the balance required for said payments, if 
any, from the proceeds of said bonds, and shall apply the surplus, if 
any, to the payment of said interest, sinking fund requirements and 
expenses, for the following year. Said treasurer shall advance to such 
person as shall have been designated by said water board and shall 
have given a bond with sufficient sureties, to be approved by the 
auditor of the Commonwealth, in the sum of ten thousand dollars, such 
sums, not exceeding ten thousand dollars at any time, as said auditor 
may certify to be necessary to enable said board to make direct pay- 
ment upon the pay rolls and other accounts of said board, and such 
persons shall, as soon as may be after expending any sum so advanced, 
and in all cases within thirty days from the receipt of any such sum, 
file with the auditor a statement in detail of the moneys expended 
subsequent to the last previous accounting, approved by said water 
board, and where it is practicable to obtain them, also file receipts or 



Water Department. 89 

other like vouchers of the persons to whom the payments have been 
made. 

ESTIMATE AND APPORTIONMENT OF ANNUAL EXPENSES. 

Sect. 19. Said treasurer shall in each year estimate the amount, in 
addition to the premiums from sales of said bonds and the proceeds 
from the operations of said board, exclusive of the proceeds from sales 
of property, required during the year to pay the interest, sinking fund 
requirements, expenses of maintenance and operation of said water 
works, and shall apportion to the city of Boston the proportion of such 
amount that the valuation of said city for the preceding year bears to 
the total of all such valuations of all cities and towns in said water 
district : provided, hoivever, there shall be included only one sixth of 
the total valuation of any such city and town which has not reached 
the safe capacity of its present sources of supply in a dry year, as 
determined by said water board and certified to said treasurer, and has 
not made application to said board for water, and the remainder to the 
other cities and towns in said district, one third in proportion to their 
respective valuations and the remaining two thirds in proportion to 
their respective populations, including hoAvever only one sixth of the 
total valuation and one sixth of the total population of any such city and 
town which has not reached the safe capacity of its sources or of the 
sources of supply of the water company by which a town is supplied, 
or has not made application for water as aforesaid ; and provided, 
further, that any city or town assessed upon its full valuation and popu- 
lation, which furnishes a part of its water supply from its own works 
or receives a supply from a water company, shall be allowed and 
credited in its apportionment with a sum equal to twelve dollars for 
each million gallons of water furnished as aforesaid, as determined by 
said water board and certified to said treasurer, and provided, further, 
that no such amount shall be so apportioned until the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-eight, and in said year only the amount of three 
hundred thousand dollars shall be apportioned, and the sums of money 
expended by the state board of health under chapter four hundred and 
fifty-nine of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-three and 
chapter four of the resolves of the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
five, and in the succeeding years the said amount of three hundred 
thousand dollars and two hundred thousand dollars additional for each 
year thereafter shall be so apportioned until the entire amount required 
as aforesaid is reached, and thereafter such entire amount shall be so 
apportioned. Said treasurer shall in each year notify each city and 
town of the amount of its assessment, and the same shall be paid by the 
city or town into the treasury of the Commonwealth at the time required 
for the payment and as part of its state tax. 

CONTROL AND DISTRIBUTION OP "WATER. 

Sect. 20. The water board, water commissioners or superintendent 
of any city or town in the metropolitan water district, shall for their 
respective cities or towns, on and after the first day of January in the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, have the charge and control of 
the water sources, water and water works owned and. used by said city 
or town and not taken or used by said metropolitan water board as 
herein provided. Said water board, water commissioners or superin- 
tendent shall distribute and control the use of the water so furnished, 
and apply meters and extend the pipes and other work as said water 
board, water commissioners or superintendent may deem expedient; 
shall keep the pipes, fixtures and other works under their charge in 
good condition and repair, but shall not expend in any year more than 
the amount appropriated by the city or town therefor. Said water 



90 City Document No. 32. 

board, water commissioners or superintendent, with the approval of the 
mayor or selectmen, shall determine the rate to be paid for water by 
the owner of the premises to which the water is furnished, or by the 
person or persons using the water : provided, however, that the mini- 
mum rates to be paid for water, and the premises to which the high 
service supply shall be furnished, shall be subject to the approval of 
said metropolitan water board. Any water board, water commissioner 
or superintendent as aforesaid shall for the water works under his 
charge do all the acts and things relating to buildings, machinery, 
roads, conduits, aqueducts, pipes and drains, which said metropolitan 
water board is authorized to do for the water works under their charge, 
and may take lands therefor, in fee or otherwise, and shall do all such 
acts and things and make all such takings in the manner in which said 
metropolitan water board are authorized to do similar things, and the 
damages sustained shall be recovered of, and paid by, the city or town 
for which such water board, water commissioners or superintendents 
are appointed or elected, in the same manner as damages caused by 
similar acts of said metropolitan water board are recovered of, and paid 
by, the Commonwealth. 

APPLICATION OF INCOME. 

Sect. 21. The income received in each city or town from the water 
works under the charge of its Avater board, water commissioners or 
superintendent, shall be applied to the payment of the expenses of 
maintenance and operation incurred by said water board, water com- 
missioners or superintendent ; the interest and sinking fund require- 
ments of all bonds, notes or scrip of the city or town issued on account 
of the water works of such city or town ; the assessment of the city or 
town to be paid to the treasurer of the Commonwealth as hereinbefore 
provided ; the expenses of the extension of the works ; and the balance, 
if any, as the city or town may determine. If such income in any year 
shall not be sufficient for said payments the balance required therefor 
shall be raised by taxation or by loan, as the city or town may deter- 
mine ; and the city or town is hereby authorized to assess such taxes 
and make such loans without further authority from the legislature. 

WORCESTER AND CERTAIN TOWNS MAY TAKE WATER. 

Sect. 22. The towns of Clinton, Sterling, Boylston, West Boylston, 
Lancaster, Holden, Rutland, Princeton, Paxton and Leicester, and the 
city of Worcester, may take from the south branch of the Nashua river, 
above the dam of the proposed reservoir on said river, so much of the 
water thereof as they have already been or may hereafter be authorized 
by the legislature to take, for supplying their inhabitants with water, 
and in case either of the towns of Lancaster, Holden, Rutland, Prince- 
ton, Paxton or Leicester, or the city of Worcester, shall so take water, 
it shall pay to the Commonwealth, to be paid into the sinking funds for 
said bonds, a fair proportion of the cost incurred by the Commonwealth 
for said water and for the construction, maintenance and operation of 
said works, the same to be determined by the engineer of said board 
and an engineer to be appointed by the city or town, and if they cannot 
agree, the proportion shall be determined by a master to be appointed 
by the supreme judicial court on the petition of either party interested, 
and the report of such master made and accepted by said court shall be 
final and binding on all parties. 

USE OF WATER IN DISTRICT RESTRICTED. 

Sect. 23. No city or town, any pa.rt of which is within ten miles of 
the state house, or any water company owning a water pipe system in 



"Water Department. 91 

any such city or town shall, except in case of emergency, use, for 
domestic purposes, water from any source not now used by it except as 
herein provided or as shall be hereafter authorized by the legislature. 
If any town or towns in said district shall take the franchise, works and 
property in such town or towns, of any water company, the compensa- 
tion to be allowed and paid therefor shall not be increased or decreased 
by reason of the provisions of this act. No town in said water district 
now supplied with water by a water company owning the water pipe 
system in such town, shall introduce water from the metropolitan water 
works until it shall first have acquired the works of such company. 

SANITARY PROTECTION OF WATER. 

Sect. 24. The state board of health is hereby authorized and required 
to make rules and regulations for the sanitary protection of all waters 
used by the metropolitan water board for the water supply of any city, 
town or water company aforesaid, and to transfer and deliver to said 
water board, such plans, maps and other information in their possession 
as will assist said board in carrying out the provisions of this act. 

IMPROPER USE OP WATER PROHIBITED. 

Sect. 25. No person shall take or divert any water of a water sup- 
ply of any city or town in said water district from any water source, 
reservoir, conduit or pipe used for supplying such water to, or in any 
such city or town, or occupy, injure or interfere with any such water, 
or with any land, building, aqueduct, pipe, drain, conduit, hydrant, 
machinery or other work or property so used, and no person shall cor- 
rupt, render impure, waste or improperly use, any such water. 



PRECEDING SECTION NOT TO APPLY IN CERTAIN CASES. 

Sect. 26. The provisions of the preceding section shall not apply 
to any person in taking or diverting any such water or interfering with 
or occupying any water, land or works therein described, by permission 
of said meti-opolitan water board, or the water board, water commis- 
sioners or superintendent of any city or town having charge of the land, 
water or work ; nor to the individual inhabitants of any city or town 
within the watershed of any water supply used by said metropolitan 
water board, or by any city or town aforesaid, in taking from the part 
of the supply or from the tributaries of the supply within their respec- 
tive city or town limits so much of the water thereof as they shall need 
for their oi'dinary domestic household purposes, for extinguishing fires, 
or for generating steam. 

ENFORCEMENT. 

Sect. 27. Said metropolitan water board, and their employees 
designated for the purpose, shall enforce the provisions of this act, and 
of the rules, regulations and orders made thereunder, and may enter 
into any building, and upon any land for the purpose of ascertaining 
whether sources of pollution there exist, and whether the provisions of 
this act and of the rules, regulations and orders made as aforesaid are 
complied with ; and, where the enforcement of any such provisions, 
rules, regulations or orders will require public works for the removal 
or purification of sewage, said metropolitan water board shall not 
enforce the same until they have provided such works, and the amount 
paid therefor shall be considered as part of the expenses of construction 
of the metropolitan water works, and such works shall be maintained 
and operated as a part of said water works. 



92 City Document No. 32. 



JURISDICTION OF THE COURTS. 

Sect. 28. The supreme judicial court or any justice thereof, and the 
superior court or any justice thereof, shall, in term time or vacation, on 
the petition of said board or any city, town, corporation or person inter- 
ested, or of the attorney of any such petitioner, have jurisdiction in 
equity or otherwise to enforce the provisions of this act, and of any rule, 
regulation or order made under the authority of this act, and to prevent 
any violation of said provisions, rules, regulations or orders. 

penalties. 

Sect. 29. Whoever shall do any of the acts herein prohibited, or 
shall violate or refuse to comply with any rule, regulation or order 
made under the authority of this act shall, on complaint or indictment 
therefor and conviction thereof, be punished for each offence by a fine 
not exceeding five hundred dollars, to be paid to the Commonwealth, 
or by imprisonment not exceeding one year in the house of correction, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

GENERAL LAWS. 

Sect. 30. All general laws relating to the water supplies of cities 
and towns or the lands and other property used for such supplies shall, 
so far as they are not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, apply 
to and be observed in carrying out the purposes of this act. 

CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS. 

Sect. 31. In the construction of these works preference in employ- 
ment shall be given to citizens of this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 32. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
June 5, 1895. 



Water Department. 93 



APPENDIX C. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF 
EASTEEN DIVISION. 



Office of Superintendent of Eastern Division, 

710 Albany Street, Boston, January 31, 1896. 

Hon. John E. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Dear Sir : I herewith submit the annual report of the 
Eastern Division of the Boston Water Department for the 
year ending January 31, 1896 : 

Extension of Mains. 

During the year there have been laid 26^ miles of pipe- 
mains, and 16,421 feet of main pipe abandoned, making a 
total of 595.9 miles now connected with the system, an 
increase of 8.3 miles over the length laid last year. 

There were laid for the Park Department, 3,674 feet of 
10-in. pipe. This pipe is not included in the total amount 
named in our system. 

A 48-inch high-service main has been laid from the con- 
nection with Fisher-Hill Eeservoir, at Fisher avenue and 
Boylston street, Brookline, through Boylston, Walnut and 
Washington streets, Brookline, — through the Muddy Eiver 
Park District to the junction of Huntington avenue and 
Heath street, Boston, where it was reduced to a 42-inch 
and a 36-inch. The 42-inch was continued through Hunt- 
mgton avenue, across Boylston street, through Clarendon 
and Newbury streets, crossing Arlington street and the 
Public Garden and Charles street on to Boston Common, 
where, at a point nearly in a line with Temple place, it was 
reduced to 30-inch, then continued 30-inch to a line with 
Winter street, where it was reduced to 16-inch, and con- 
tinued to and connected with Park street. 

Connections were made at Waite street, Gainsboro' street 
and Boston Common, with the 20-inch and 16-inch his-h- 
service mams, and branches left for connections at various 
other points. 



94 City Document No. 32. 

This 42-inch line is now in commission as far as Hunting- 
ton avenue and Grainsboro' street. There still remains about 
200 feet to lay across the Boston & Albany Railroad bridge, 
on Huntington avenue, when this bridge is rebuilt the coin- 
ing" summer. 

There has also been laid 4,600 feet of 36-inch pipe in 
Heath street, from the connection at Huntington avenue to 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad crossing on 
Heath street, and connection was made near Day street 
with the supply to Parker-Hill Reservoir. On account of 
change of grade of railroad no more could be done at this 
point, but this Roxbury and Dorchester line was continued 
by laying 2,000 feet of 36-inch pipe in Ruthven street and 
Walnut avenue. 

We laid a temporary 2-inch lead pipe in March, 1895, 
from Moon Island to Long Island, and when the weather 
permitted, a 6-inch pipe was laid from Moon Island to Long 
Island, and also a new 6-inch pipe from Long Island to 
Galloupe's Island. A 4-inch pipe is being laid from Long 
Island to Rainsford Island. 

A thorough monthly inspection has been made of all main 
pipes crossing over, under or through railroad bridges and 
culverts, and where made necessary by vibration, joints have 
been calked, and blocking and straps renewed. 

Gates, or Stop-cocks. 

The number of gates established during the year was 321. 
Of this number there were eight 36-inch, two 30-inch, two 
24-inch and four 20-inch gates connected with the new 
high-service main, thirty-two gates were abandoned ; mak- 
ing the total number now in service 6,648, all of which 
have been attended to in the matter of oiling, packing, etc. 



Reservoirs. 

Parker-hill Reservoir. — The grounds, buildings, fences 
and gate-house have received the usual attention, and are in 
good condition. 

Bast Boston. — The reservoir grounds, gates and fences 
are in good condition. 

South Boston. — This reservoir, which is not in use, and 
which probably will never be used again, is in a poor and 
leaky condition. 

The fences will need painting the coming year. Some 
repairs have been made to the same during the past year. 



Water Department. 95 



High-Service Stand-Pipes. 

The Breed's Island and Mt. Bellevue stand-pipes are in 
fair condition. The Mt. Bellevue tank and grounds have 
been kept open for the public during the past season. The 
buildings covering both will require some repairs, also paint- 
ing, during the coming year. 

The grounds at Mt. Bellevue are in good condition. It is 
now partly surrounded by a fence. This fence should be 
continued to enclose the grounds. 



Hydrants. 

Three hundred hydrants were established and 58 aban- 
doned, making a net increase for the year of 242, and there 
are now 6,459 in service connected with the system. Of the 
new pattern independent Post hydrant, 20 were put in dur- 
ing the year. These seem to be a favorite hydrant with the 
Fire Department in hazardous districts, and I recommend that 
more of them be used. 

We have still 1,103 Boston hydrants, old pattern, in use. 
These should be discontinued as rapidly as possible and 
replaced by Post hydrants. 

Bequests from the Fire Department, such as raising and 
lowering hydrants, etc., have received prompt attention. 
All hydrants have been examined, tested and oiled during 
the summer months, and during the winter months a daily 
inspection and test has been made of all hydrants connected 
with the system. 

This department supplies the Fire Department gratis with 
the salt used on hydrants, which we deliver to the various 
fire-houses upon request. During the year 4,194 bushels of 
salt have been delivered to them. We have used 1,756 
bushels in care of gates and hydrants. 

Water-Posts. 

Twelve new water-posts were established, making the 
number now in use 378. These are established and locations 
changed upon request of the Superintendent of Streets, or 
Deputy of Street Watering. 

Fountains. 

Two new fountains have been established for man and 
beast, and one for beast only ; and one change made as to 
location. 



96 City Document No. 32. 

I earnestly recommend that more of these fountains for 
beasts be established during the coming year. The oppor- 
tunities offered for procuring water by horses and dogs are 
all too few at present. The public safety requires that every 
opportunity should be offered dogs to obtain water. 

Service-Pipes . 

During the year 2,734 service-pipes have been laid, with 
an aggregate length of 61,615 feet, and 411 have been aban- 
doned, making a net increase of 2,323 pipes during the year. 
Of the abandoned pipes 74 services, equalling 910 feet, have 
been the ^-in. services connected with the old Jamaica Pond 
system, which were replaced by f-in. from our system. 
There still remains a few of the old Jamaica Pond Aqueduct 
service-pipes. 

Under the law of laying out new streets, we were obliged 
to lay 65 service-pipes, from which no revenue is at present 
derived. 

Meters. 

Oochituate Division. — Three hundred and nineteen meters 
have been set, 248 have been discontinued, 1,296 have been 
changed, and 6 have been lost in service during the year ; 
making a net gain of 65, and the total number now in use 
4,398. 

Mystic Division. — Thirty-eight meters have been set, 27 
have been discontinued, 147 have been changed, and 1 has 
been lost in service during the year ; making a net gain of 
10, and the total number now in service 504. 



Blasting. 

We have had seven breaks of main pipe by blasting, but 
the most serious one occurred on the evening of November 
27, 1895, at Walnut street, Brookline, when a sewer con- 
tractor for the town of Brookline exploded a blast within a 
few feet of our new 48-inch high- service main. This blast 
broke the main, and a piece, V-shaped, about 6 feet long and 
3 feet wide on the widest end, was blown out. 

This break discharged water at the rate of seven and one- 
half million gallons per hour. We pressed every available 
man into service, and at 4.30 A.M., November 28, we had 
a new connection made at another point, our high-service 
district being supplied meanwhile. from Parker-Hill Reser- 
voir, which had been held full for an emergency. 



Water Department. 97 



Maintenance. 

The work of relaying mains in a large number of streets 
in the city proper has been delayed the past year on account 
of the large amount of work on extensions. Some of these 
should be delayed no longer than the coming season, as the 
portions we have taken out indicate that it is hardly safe to 
continue them through another winter, and I hope to be able 
to do a large portion of the relaying already authorized by 
the Water Commissioner. 

Of repairs on pipes of all sizes we have made 1,535 during 
the year. Of those on main-pipes (215), we have found the 
most numerous causes to be defective joints (71), defective 
packing (58), defective stop-cocks (19), and settling of 
earth (25). 

The causes of leaks and stoppages on service-pipes, which 
number 1,320, are many, but chief among them are: Rust, 
557 ; fish, 39 ; struck by pick, 75 ; settling of earth, 235 ; and 
defective pipe, 67. 

The following tables show in detail the work performed by 
this department : 



98 



City Document No. 32. 



© 


3 


© 





© 


+J 


a 




© 


xn u 


«M 


T) 





a 


fc 


c3 


0> 




,2 


k, 


a 





S -C 


fe 


d 
a 


© 


so 


-2 


IT) 


■M 


A 


* 


•p 


s * 


e8 


-M 




•H 


d 


£ 






03 «c 


1—1 


© 




■M 


en 


V 


- 


^ 


•H 


£ 


0j 


a 


g 


© 




5H 

© 


" 




+- 


a 






•fH 


& 


■H 

a 


J 


,o 




■H 


© 


- 
on 


5 


Q 


d 

a 




T! 


d 




a 


»N 


e8 £ 




a 




- 

3 


© 


!J1 





■d ^ ® 

a € • 

® 7 h 



a 

- d 
^d 
cj. _ 

EG 

£1 



c8 



>d ,© 

© 05 

3 © 

cS 



I— I rH O 



r-1 rH O 



A 


s 






fc 




PS 


a . 


w 




H 
DO 

-1 


5.n 

Men 


M 


a S 



if* 



su a 













o 






"5 


1-1 
















-* 




Tf 








CO 








o 


b- 




3D 


CO 




s 








CO 
CO 




CO 
CO 



a E 



6o e» 
(3 



^ en 
cc 



S^ 



Water Department. 



99 



M 

a 



•o 

eg 


■ 

© 



5 
c3 
- 

k. 



o 





00 r-! T 


* id 




a 


CD OS fc 


CO 




CD tH r 


H CO 




5 


o* c<T 


ci" 


H 


■* 




-* 






1- O 


OS 






■* >ra r 
















* 


1H 




©" 






CO CO c 


IS CO 






fc- CM t 


J< tfa 




« 


CC^ 


^ 


■* 






CK i-H 












IM 




ao 


CO 
CM 




00 


CO 












H 












D 












O 

izi 


































fc 




lO 




'. i2 


M 


9 


°i. 




°v 


B 




cn" 




" <N~ 


H 












^ 












3 






















<1 












M 












P 


© 




c 


> 


o 






c 




© 




H 








T-H 






c 


»r 


t- 


00 




H 


a 

CC 


* 




co" 




© 


Cs 


c 




c* 




b- 


c 








H 


C 


cs 




■* 












a 














00 












IH 
































u 




CO 






lO 






>> 






GO 


>■ 


CS 


C3 








CD 




a 
a 








J3 


f>- 






CO 




V 


ca 






>- 


tx 


si 


1-5 








3 










3 


■£ 


SI 








3 

a 
a 


3 

•a 


3 
-a 


m 

a 
.S 






V 


"S 


■o 


d 









"3 


a> 

a 


a 






a. 


*4 

o 


o 






£ 


3 


a 


"a 






M 


'3 


^5 






C] 




S3 


o 






CU 


^ 


,a 


H 






a 


M 


a 










a 


a 








o 


© 










Eh 


i-I 


£ 







100 



City Document No. 32. 



u 



a 

be 



a 
o 
d 

S 

-a 



d 
d 

d 

•H 

hi 



GO 



•}99J 



•B80IAJ3S 

jo J9qani& 



CM CO t- 



m -^ o o r- oo cd 

** io cs i— i cd co o 

lO 00 iH fc- lO 



t-t © 00 lA 
CO t- CO CM 
<M CO CD CO 



Ci "^ CO CO 



■■* 10 CO -* 



CN r-l ce rH 



■}99j 
ut q^ra^ 



"B80IAJ8S 

jo .laqnmfci 



•J99J 

ni q^Saai 



•B80tAJ8S 

jo jeqran^i 



•193J 

m qiStrai 



•saoiAjas 
jo J9qtnnj^ 



.nsaj 
m qiSaafj 



•S90TAI98 

jo aaqtnn^i 



CO CM CM CM 



•■}93J 



•a90lAJ38 

jo jgqmn^i 



•J99J 



•S90IAI9S 

jo jaqrariij 



"■# (M t- 



•^99J 

m q^ngq; 



•8991AJ9S 

jo jaqrati^i 



COCOiOTjIb-COCSGOCI) 
COt--*W300it-«D"35 







T3 


n3 


T3 


TJ 






CD 


o> 










a 


a 


a 


E 






o 


o 


o 


o 


• T3 


T3 


•n 


13 


T3 


-d 



CO CM CM 



r-< to !-H 



&H H 



Watek Department. 



101 



102 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Laid during the Year ending January 31, 1896. 

Note. — B., indicates Boston; S. B., South Boston; E. B., East Boston; Rox., Roxbury; 

Dor., Dorchester; W. R., West Roxbury; Bri., Brighton; Brk., Brookline; 

Chn., Charlestown. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 












s 


33 












325 


Brookline (Town) . . 
Brookline (Town) 






«( 


16 






« 


7,949 








8,290 












Huntington ave. . . . 


Brookline line and Boston Common . . 




42-in. 


6,292 


Huntington ave. (con- 


<< <( (i (i (i 




« 


9,186 




15,478 










^— 










40 






Rox. 




2,000 




Huntington ave. and R.R. crossing . . . 


" 


" 


4,600 




6,640 






B. 
S.B. 


30-in. 


835 


Dorchester ave. and D 
st 


Total 30-inch 


7,538 








8,373 












At Parker and Heath 




Rox. 
So. B. 


24-in. 


185 






523 










708 


Huntington ave. . . . 




Rox. 


20-in. 


80 






B. 
Bri. 


: 


50 




Brighton ave. and Brookline line .... 


1,652 






Brk. 


" 


48 




1,830 


New Commonwealth 




Bri. 
B. 


16-in. 


1,545 




450 






" 


" 


470 






2,465 



Water Department. 
Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



103 



In what Street. 



Park st. . 
Talbot ave. 



Heath st. 



Congress st 

Travers st 

Endicott st 

Federal st 

Bellflower st 

Byron st 

Marginal st 

Towers st 

Beachmont ave. . . 

Elm Hill ave 

Beacon st 

Beacon st 

Delaware st 

Beaver st 

St. Alphonsus st. . . 
Audubon road . . . 
Parker Hill ave. . . 

Lawu st 

Rogers ave 

Shawmut ave. . . . 
West Selden st. . . 

Park st 

Romsey st 



Groveland st. . . 
Dorchester ave. 
Oakland st. . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . 
Tremont and Beacon sts. . 
Bernard and Westcott . . 
Colonial and Southern ave. 



Total 16-inch . 



Off Federal st 

Charlestown and Merrimac sts. 
Hanover and Causeway sts. . 
Essex st. and No. 318 .... 
Boston st. and Dorchester ave. 



Montmorenci st. and Orient ave. 



Howland and Crawford sts. , 
South side of bridge .... 
Deerfield st. and R.R. bridge 

From Tremont st 

Blue Hill ave. and Maple st. 
Longwood ave. and Ward st. , 



Hillside st. and Huntington ave. 

Hayden and Heath sts 

Ruggles st. and Bay View place 
Rutland and West Newton st. . 



Washington and Waldeck sts. 
From Sagamore st 



" River st 

Templeton and Edwin sts. . . 
Rockville and Rockdale sts. . 
Rockdale st. and Blue Hill ave. 
Opposite Rockdale st. .... 

Carried forward 



B. 

Dor. 



Rox. 



So.B. 
E. B. 



Rox. 



Dor. 



16-in. 



2,465 

291 

60 

205 

20 

3,041 

86 

998 

1,841 

683 

24 

60 

418 

39 

96 

204 

230 

742 

144 

875 

15 

81 

152 

380 

311 

250 

36 

36 

52 

48 

502 

229 

45 

522 

8 

9,107 



104 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


'&* 




a 






s 


m 










9,107 

205 






Dor. 


12-in. 


ii i< 




«i 


« 


630 






132 


" . . . . 


" « " " 


" 


" 


75 






" 


" 


157 






" 


" 


1,693 






• < 


<• 


640 






i« 


«■ 


418 






" 


" 


282 


(1 It 




« 


: 


36 

427 






" 


" 


128 






: 


: 


36 
130 






« 


•i 


528 






„ 


,, 


418 




(( 


„ 


236 






<i 


» 


628 






(i 


« 


72 






« 


» 


348 






" 


" 


60 


Willowwood st. . . . 




" 


" 


244 




Willowwood and Mountain ave 


" 


" 


171 






" 


" 


629 


Columbia st. . . . • . 


m 


„ 


•• 


778 




Montelair ave., toward Farquhar st. . . 


W. R. 


" 


216 






" 


" 


811 
305 




Walkhill st. and Bussey-park entrance . 


« 


•• 


1,622 








«« 


253 




From Blue Hill ave. and Angell st. . . . 


" 


" 


580 






ii 


ii 


100 




« 


" 


814 






" 


" 


332 










23,241 



Water Department. 



105 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. 



Continued. 



In what Street. 



Washington st. . . 
Beech st. , . . • . 

Poplar st 

Catalpa st 

Lockstead ave. . . 
Castleton st. ... 
Neponset ave. . . 
Mt. Vernon st. . . 

"Walker st 

Williams st. . . . 
Bellevue ave. . . . 
Park Driveway . . 
Litchfield st. . . . 
Bigelow st. .... 

Corey road .... 

Nonantum st. . . 

Faneuil st 

Oakland st 

Commonwealth ave 

Federal st 

Capen st 

A new st 

Cf (( <( 

Walker st 

Washington st. . . 

Lincoln st 

Montmorenci ave. 
Farrington st. . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

At Forest Hills Station .... 
Belgrade and Aldrich sts. . . 

Dale and James sts 

Perkins and Castleton sts. . . 
Perkins st., across Castleton st. 
Centre st. and Jamaicaway . . 
Parkway and Catalpa st. . . . 
Canterbury and Jewett sts. . . 
Corner of Baker st. ..... 

From Weld st 

Washington and Plainfield sts. 

South of Cornell st 

Washington st. and Railroad . 

From Lincoln st 

Dunboy and High sts 



Winsor road and Washington st. 
Summit ave. and Warren st. . . 
Washington st. and Newton line 

Parsons and Hobart sts 

Washington and Faneuil sts. . . 

Brighton ave. and Harvard ave. 

Total 12-inch 



Franklin and Channing sts. 
Norfolk and Dyar sts. . . 
Off South st 



" Weld st 

At Forest Hills Station , 
Total 10-inch . . . , 



Essex and Tufts sts. . . 
Tower st. and Orient ave. 

From Orient ave , 

Carried forward . . , 



W. R. 



Bri. 



B. 
Dor. 
W. R. 



B. 
E. B. 



10-in. 



23,241 
332 
150 
128 
233 
442 
974 
696 
744 
72 
338 
395 
262 
324 
264 
300 
145 
521 
157 
388 
120 
400 
498 

31,124 

154 

271 
280 
169 
658 
30 
1,562 

158 

120 

96 

374 



106 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Rawson st. . . 
Kingsbury st. . 
Hutchins st. . 
Granby st. . . 
Huntington ave 
Weston st. . . 
Sherborn st. . 
Mt. Vernon st. 
Fuller st. . . . 
Welles ave. . 
Thane st. . . . 
Almont st. . . 
Waldeck st. . 

Phipps ave. . 
Duncan st. . . 
Colonial ave. . 
Speedwell st. . 
Holden st. . . 
Kenwood st. . 
McLellan st. . 
Northern ave. 
Fowler st. . . 
Greenwood st. 
Rossiter st. . . 
Eldon st. . . . 
Stanwoodst. . 
Chester st. . . 
Porter st. . . . 
Amesbury st. . 
Amherst st. . . 
Ashland st. . . 
Allendale st. . 
Catalpa st. . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Dorchester ave. and Boston st 

Washington and Bainbridge sts 

Elm Hill ave. and Humboldt ave. . . . 
Bay State road and Commonwealth ave. . 

Cor. of Calumet st 

Cabot and Warwick st 

Commonwealth ave. and Bay State road 
Buttonwood st. and Von Hillern . . . . 

Morton and Capen sts 

Ocean and Alban sts 

Off West Park st 

From Blue Hill ave 

From Lindsey st 

Tremlet Park and Park st 

Off Blue Hill ave 

Green wick and Fenton sts 

New England and Talbot aves 

Topliff and Barrington sts 

From Boston st 

Washington and Allston sts 

Erie st. and Page ave 

Washington and Whitfield sts 

Glenway st. and Greenwood st 

From Fowler st 

Bowdoin ave. and Bullard 

Washington st. and Bowdoin ave. . . 

Blue Hill ave. and Columbia st 

Rockway and Oakland sts 

Jess and Bismark sts 

From Baker st 

Dudley ave. and Albans st 

Shelton and Sherwood sts 

From Centre st 

Perkins and Castleton sts 

Carried forward 



So. B. 
Rox. 



Dor. 



W. R. 



374 

96 

43 

150 

281 

43 

84 

310 

220 

84 

90 

424 

200 

148 

192 

295 

40 

954 

755 

96 

248 

345 

205 

896 

345 

228 

298 

862 

345 

180 

298 

726 

280 

1,588 

24 

11,753 



Water Department. 



107 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. 



Continued. 



In what Street. 



Clarendon ave. . . , 
Farquhar 8t. . . . , 
Farrington st. . • . 
Parkway 

Proctor st 

South Walter st. . . 

Tower st 

Temple st 

Walter st 

Aldie st , 

Allston Terrace . . 
(i << 

Brighton ave 

Commonwealth ave, 
Elmira st. • . . . . 

Hobart st 

Malvern st 

Ridgemont st. . . . 
Summit ave 

Chauncy st 

Essex pi 

Farnsworth st. . . , 

Lewis st 

Milk st 

Norway st 

Powers court . . . . 

Strong pi 

Whitmore st 

Hst 

N st 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Hillburn st. and Clarendon park 

From Centre st 

Kenneth st. and Anawan ave. . 
At Centre St., near May st 



Fairview and Walter sts 

From South st. towards Roberts st. 

From Washington st 

Cor. of Mt. Vernon st 

Mendum & Bussey sts 

Athol and Everett sts 

From Hobart st 



Cambridge st. and Commonwealth ave. 
Harvard ave. and Brighton ave. . . . 

Murdock and George sts 

Faneuil st. and Allston terrace .... 

From Brighton ave 

From Eleanor st 

Corey road and Allston st 

Total 8-inch 



Bedford and Summer sts. 
Essex and Tufts sts. . . 



Off Congress st 

North and Moon sts. . . . 
Hawley st. and Sewall pi. 
Falmouth and St. Paul sts. 

Off North st 

Off Cambridge st 

Kneeland and Harvard sts. 
Broadway and Fourth st. 
" " Second st. . 

Carried forward . . . 



W.R. 



Bri. 



B. 



S.B. 



11,753 

160 

4 

172 

40 

48 

73 

107 

55 

18 

948 

321 

156 

188 

3,538 

468 

212 

263 

22 

28 

90 

18,664 

116 

73 

67 

100 

105 

21 

161 

192 

144 

82 

293 

156 

1,510 



108 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. 



Continued. 



In what Street. 



Story st. . . . 

Everett pi. . . 

Homer st. . . 

Meridian st. . 

Shelby st. . . 

Aspen st. . . . 
Abbotsford st. 

Beacon st. . . 

Bay State road 

Burney st. . . 
Brunswick st. 
Cardington st. 
Cherokee st. . 
Danube st. . . 
Duncan st. . . 
Eldora st. . . 
Fisher ave. . . 
Flaggst. . . . 
Fairweather st 
Fenno st. . . . 
Hammett st. . 
Heath ave. . . 

Lansdowne st. 
Logan st. . . . 
Oswald st. . . 
Penryth st. . . 
Prentiss-st. pi. 
Eockledge st. . 
Rogers ave. . 
Sudbury pi. . 
Stanmore pi. . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

G and H sts 

Off Everett st 

Moore and Byron sts 

West Eagle and Falcon sts. . . . 
Lexington and Princeton sts. . . . 
Montrose and Copeland sts. . . . 
"Walnut ave. and Harold st. . . . 
Bay State road and Raleigh st. . . 

At Audubon circle 

Sherburn and Granby sts 

Granby and Ashby stp 

Tremont st. and Delle ave 

Blue Hill ave. and Warren st. . . 

Off Cobden st 

Hillside and Pontiac sts 

Brookford and Dewey sts 

Ruggles and Halleck sts 

Hillside and Sunside sts 

At Lawn st 

Off Washington st 

Off Harrison ave. 

Rockland st. and Buena Vista ave. 

Weston and Sarsfield sts 

Heath pi. and Heath st 



Off Massachusetts ave. . 

Off Lambert ave 

Calumet and Hillside sts. 
Centre and Pynchon sts. 
Off Linden Park st. . . 

Off Lambert ave 

Near Ruggles st 

Off Weston st 

Off Warren st 

Carried forward . . 



B. 

E.B. 



Rox. 



1,510 
211 
115 

27 
117 
247 
187 
627 
390 
145 
740 

60 
131 
467 
208 
216 

36 
606 
170 

48 
227 
150 
172 

50 

60 
125 
147 
147 
341 

43 
234 
196 

29 
202 

27 
8,408 



Watee Department. 



109 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. 



Continued. 



In what Street. 



St. Botolph st. . . . 

Wait st 

Willow court . . . . 
Arcadia terrace . . . 
Adams terrace . . . 

Auckland st 

Belfortst 

Burbank st 

Branch ave 

Baker pi 

Bruce st 

Balfour st 

Cunningham terrace 
Cottage terrace . . . 

Chamberlain st. „ . 

Cook st 

Clifton park . . • , 
Centre court . . . . 
Dorchester ave. . . 
Dunbar ave. . . . . 

Devon st 

Kvandale terrace . , 

Grace st , 

G-lenmore st. . . . . 

Hunter st 

Howe st , 

Lyon st 

Leeds st , 

Letterfine terrace . . 

Milton st 

Mascot ave. ... 
Mellen st 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Massachusetts ave. and Gainsboro' st. 
Hillside st. and Huntington ave. . . , 

Off Shawmut ave. , 

Off Arcadia st 

Adams st. to Muzzey terrace . . . . , 

Towards Dorchester 

Off Dorchester ave 

Washington and Merrill sts 

Ditson and Arcadia sts 



Off East Cottage st 

Wrentham and Ashmont sts. . . . 

Wayland and Dalkeith sts 

Off Hartford st 

From East Cottage st 

Marshfield and East Cottage sts. . 
Algonquin and Harvard sts. . . . 
Washington and Chamberlain sts. 

Dudley st. and Clifton st 

Off Centre st. . • 

Wrentham and Templeton sts. . . 

Off Washington st. . 

Off Blue Hill ave 

From Savin Hill ave 

From Walton st 

Groveland and Standard sts. . . . 

Off Morton st 

Off Hancock st 

Dorchester ave. and Adams st. . . 

From Savin Hill ave 

Off Howard ave 

From Granite ave 

From Mountain ave. ....... 

Ocean and Alban sts 

Carried forward 



Rox. 



Dor. 



200 
48 
388 
112 
308 
364 
125 
215 
271 
252 
132 
167 
313 
128 
65 
71 
102 
228 
216 
133 
464 
94 
196 
42 
222 



186 
202 
698 
190 
15,529 



110 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 












SQ 

s 


m 












15,529 
96 


Mt. Bowdoin Green . . 




Dor. 


6-in. 






,i 


(l 


15 






«■ 


» 


IT 






" 


" 


633 






CI 


u 


257 


Muzzey terrace .... 




305 






" 


" 


186 






" 


" 


190 






tt 


(C 


184 




» 


" 


76 


" " 


" 


" 


" 


141 


" " 




" 


" 


100 






" 


" 


138 






,1 


„ 


36 




« 


« 


385 


" 




" 


" 


20 






" 


" 


439 






« 


II 


276 






« 


•' 


364 






" 


" 


295 






« 


II 


642 
156 






" 


" 


739 






« 


II 


144 




<• 


" 


316 






" 


" 


144 


Street off "Wells ave. . 


Dorchester ave. and railroad crossing . . 


" 


" 


45 






'* 


" 


132 


Trowbridge court . . 




41 




(1 


" 


303 






" 


" 


132 


Whitfield st 




» 


.. 


155 
127 






" 


" 


396 
23,154 



Water Department. 



Ill 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Wayland st. . . 
Willowwood st. 

Allen st 

Argyle st. . . . 
Berwick st. . . . 
Bishop st. . . . 
Cranston st. . . 

Cable st 

Clifton st. . . . 

Egleston st. . . 
Folsom st. . . . 
Glines ave. . . . 
Georgianna st. . 

Hall st 

Jones st 

Lamartine st. . . 
Metropolitan ave 
Merriam st. . . . 
Minton st. . . . 
Mozart st. . . . 
Maybury terrace 
(New street) . . 

Ophir st 

Perham st. . . . 
Pleasant st. . . . 
Paul Gore st. . . 
Rexham st. . . . 

Rowe st 

Spruce st. . . . 

Sylvia st 

Tafts pi 

Woodside ave. . 
Zamora St. . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward , 

Off Howard ave , 

From Ballou ave -. . 

Rowe st. and Brown ave , 

Off Cornwall st 

Off Baker st 

Everett and Call sts 

Off Sheridan st 

Menton and Merriam sts , 

Albano and Norfolk sts 

" " Kittredge sts. . . . , 

School and Boylston sts 

Mt. Hope and Neponset ave. . . . 

Off School st 

Off Boylston st 

South and Call sts 

Fairview and Walter sts 

Bell and Green sts 

Off Washington st. (right side) , 
Brookside ave. and Stony Brook , 



Selwyn and Walter sts 

Off Amory st 

Rowe st. and Railroad 

Washington st. and Brookside . . 
Winslow and Mt. Vernon sts. . . 
LaGrange and " " " . . 

Danforth and Lamartine sts. . . . 

Off Palgrade ave 

Ashland st. and Allen st 

Florence and Bourne sts 

Washington st. and Forest Hills st. 

Off South st 

Washington st. and Forest Hills st. 

Off Castleton st 

Carried forward 



W.R. 



23,154 

478 

7 

90 
214 
421 
166 
263 
283 

70 
225 
122 
115 
198 
194 

36 
148 
247 

48 
250 
219 

24 
273 
203 
340 
252 
386 

27 
230 
113 

83 
142 

48 
165 

39 
29,273 



112 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Bayard st 

Brentwood st. . . . 
Cypress road .... 
Etna st 

Linden et 

Maple ave 

Mapleton st 

Peaceable st 

Quint-ave. Extension 
Boston Harbor . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Kenneth st. and N". Harvard st. ... 

Athol st. and Appian way 

Murdock and Etna sts 

Cypress road and Spring st 

" " " Elmira st 

Harvard ave. and Reedsdale st 

Elmira st. and Garden st 

Market and Murdock sts 

Winship and Rockland sts 

Off Brighton ave 

Between Long and Gralloupe's Islands 
" " " Moon Islands . . 
On Long Island , 

" Moon " 

" Gralloupe's Island , 



Total 6-inch . 



Moon to Long Island , 



Bri. 



29,273 
145 
233 
133 
174 
132 

16 
266 
178 

56 

12 

4,068 

3,336 

400 

30 
685 

39,137 

3,745 



Water Department. 



113 



Statement of Pipes Abandoned. 



In what Street. 



(New) Commonwealth 
ave 



Cove st 

Furnace st 

Endicott st. ... 

Park st 

Revere st 

Shawmut ave. . . 

Travers st 

"West st 

Swan st 

Duncan st 

Long Island . . . 
Linden st. . . . . 

Spruce st 

Galloupe's Island 

Baxter st 

Colony st 

Ontario st 

Flaggst 

Knight's court . . 



Long to Galloupe's 
Island 



Between what Streets. 



South and Foster sts 

Cove place and Furnace sts. . 
" " " Cove st. ... 
Hanover st. and Charlestown . 
Tremont and Beacon sts. . . . 
Irving and South Russell sts. . 
Rutland and West Newton sts. 
Charlestown and Merrimac sts. 
"Washington and Tremont sts. 
Dorchester ave. and Colony st. 
Ruggles and Halleck sts. . . . 



Florence and Bourne sts. 



Off D st 

Swan and Foundry sts. 



Off Washington st. 
Off Oakdale st. . . 



Willow court 



Bri. 
B. 



Off Shawmut ave. 



So. B. 
Rox. 



W. R. 



3d. B. 



Rox. 
W. R. 



Rox. 



12-in, 
8-in. 



4 -in. 



3-in. 



565 
255 

65 
1,841 
291 
100 
250 
998 
450 
382 
264 
200 
410 

83 
660 
134 
496 
496 
252 

24 

4,068 
200 



114 City Document No. 32. 

Statement of Pipes Abandoned on the J. P. A. System. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


District. 


53 


a 
a 


Parker st 




Rox. 


8-in. 
6-in. 

4-in. 
3-in. 

Cf 


420 




1-53 


Off Cabot st 


450 
184 
1,400 
300 
300 
190 


Simmons st 




320 
220 



Statement of Pipes Lowered. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


P 


a 

N 

53 


Ml 

a 

0) 

•J 




Off Norfolk st 


Bri. 
Dor. 

W. R. 


12-in. 

8-in. 
6-in. 


300 
96 
36 




189 



Cochituate Meters Applied. 







Diameter in 


Inches. 




Totals. 




4 


3 


2 


11 


1 


3 
5 


s 

B 












1 
19 






1 




3 
1 


6 
1 
2 


6 


16 


11 


46 


107 




2 




3 
1 
3 


4 

11 

5 


12 
10 
31 


22 

93 

6 


3 


46 






115 






3 


48 










4 


12 


13 


36 


73 


132 


49 


319 







Watek Department. 
Cochituate Meters Discontinued. 



115 





Diameter in Inches. 






6 


4 


3 


2 


I3 


1 


H 


6 
S 




B.W.W 














1 

7 


58 


1 






1 


3 


6 


2 


3 


80 




1 


1 








1 


3 
2 
5 


3 
16 


12 
112 

9 














117 








1 


2 












Total 


1 


1 


4 


9 


12 


22 


141 


58 









Cochituate Meters Sent to Factory for Repairs. 





Diameter in Inches. 






3 


2 


11 


1 


3 

A 


5 


Totals. 




2 


1 

2 


1 


4 
2 

18 
27 


11 

9 
60 

2 


68 
4 
1 


87 
17 






79 
32 




1 


1 


1 






Totals 


3 


4 


2 


51 


82 


73 


215 







Meters Purchased. 





Diameter in Inches. 






4 


3 


2 


11 


1 


3 
3 


6 
8 


Totals. 




3 
1 


2 


9 

7 
3 
5 


20 
5 

15 
9 


40 
12 


25 

25 

6 


25 






52 




43 






4 


24 








Totals 


4 


8 


24 


49 


52 


56 


25 


218 







116 



City Document No. 32, 



Mystic Meters Applied. 







Diameter in Inche 


s. 








4 


3 


2 


n 


i 


i 


6 
B 






1 
1 


1 


2 
1 




5 

1 
4 


3 


4 


15 




4 




13 
1 




17 








1 




2 
















2 


1 


4 




10 


17 


4 


38 







Mystic Meters Discontinued. 





Diameter in Inches. 






4 


2 


11 


1 


3 
5 


6 
5 


Totals. 






2 
2 




2 
1 
3 

2 


1 


2 


7 






3 






6 

4 




g 




1 




1 


8 








1 


4 


1 


8 


11 


2 


27 







Mystic Meters in Service January 31, 1896. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


11 


1 


I 


i 








1 

8 
4 












1 




3 


9 
2 


16 
3 


2 
2 


29 

9 

23 

66 


45 


98 


210 




20 






66 
49 


5 


89 






10 


6 


40 


8 


184 








Totals 


3 


21 


19 


59 


12 


127 


160 


103 


504 







"Water Department. 117 

Mystic Meters sent to Factory for Repairs. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


1| 


1 


3 

i 


5 

s 
















1 

9 
6 


6 


„ 














6 

2 


15 










1 




9 










Totals 








1 




8 


16 


6 


31 













Cochituate Meters in Service January 31, 1896. 









Diameter 


in Inches. 






Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


11 


1 


5 


6 
5 


Ball and Fitts 












1 


1 

45 

1 

371 


1 

1,180 


3 














45 
















1 




2 


25 

2 

2 


38 
1 

7 


53 


130 


279 


2,078 










16 
4 


27 
14 


52 
114 


151 
647 


17 

1 

5 

32 


272 






782 










1 










1 
114 


100 


1 
530 


390 


7 




2 


12 


26 


1,206 




4 


41 


T2 


188 


271 


977 


1,606 


1,239 


4,398 



118 



City Document No. 32. 



Meters Changed. 



Cause. 



Mystic. 




Not registering 

For test 

Unsatisfactory 

Stoppage 

Leak at body 

Leak at coupling 

Leak at spindle 

Clock broken 

Clock defaced 

Enlargement of service-pipe 

No force 

Frozen 

Meters burst 

Hands off 

Hands loose 

To relocate 

By mistake 

Totals 



Meters Repaired in Service. 



Cause. 



Clock changed — unsatisfactory 

Leak at spindle 

Leak at coupling 

Leak at joint 

Leak at bushing 

Leak at stop-cock 

Leak on pipe 

Cap broken 

Ratchet 

Gearing adjusted 

Fish-box frozen — burst . . . . 

Repacked meter 

Cleaned fish-box 



Totals 



COCHITUATE. 



156 

76 

18 

11 

3 

2 

4 

2 

3 

3 

1 



279 



Mystic. 



Water Department. 



119 



General Statement of Meters for the Year ending 
January 31, 1896. 



In service January 31, 

New set 

Discontinued .... 
Lost in service .... 

Changed 

Changed location . . . 
Tested at shop .... 
Repaired at shop . . . 
Repaired at factory . 
Repaired in service . 
Purchased 



Cochituate. 



Meters. 



319 

248 

6 

1,296 
15 

2,870 
934 
215 
279 
210 



73 



Mystic. 



Meters. 



504 

38 

27 

1 

147 
3 

260 
73 
31 
95 



Boxes. 



22 



Hydrants Established and Abandoned during the Year. 





Established. 


CQ 

o 


Abandoned. 


"3 
o 
Eh 






>> 

u 
o 




o 

►H 


a 
o 

o 


>> 

o 

►J 


o 

Ph 


>> 

is 
o 

•J 


a 
o 

o 
pq 


d 

OS 

o> 

a 
i— i 




8 
7 
1 
6 
4 
4 


6 
6 

1 
32 
79 
41 

28 
1 


2 

1 

13 

35 

17 

5 


1 
1 

1 


15 
16 

3 

52 

118 

62 

33 

1 


3 
1 

7 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 

1 


2 
1 

2 
5 
6 


6 
10 

3 

2 
2 
2 


11 
13 

13 

8 
9 
4 


4 




3 
3 




39 




110 




53 
29 






1 




30 


194 


73 


3 


300 


13 


4 


16 


25 


58 


242 



120 City Document No. 32. 

Total Number of Hydrants in use January 31, 1896. 





O 


o 


>> 

o 

J 


d 
o 

o 

m 


o 

o 

m 


7a 
o 

Eh 




704 
220 
140 
662 
580 
129 
78 


281 
102 
104 
261 
550 
548 
304 
17 


58 
23 
24 
77 
226 
182 
64 


l 


485 
249 
136 
86 
60 
44 
32 


1,528 
595 






404 




1,086 




1,416 
903 






478 




17 




5 






3 

7 


8 










7 






7 
6 
2 






7 












6 












2 










1 


1 






1 






1 
















2,518 


2,183 


654 


l 


1,103 


6,459 



Water-Posts. 



DlSTKICT. 


Number 

in use 

Jan. 31, 1895. 


Established 

during 

the year. 


Abandoned 

during 

the year. 


Number 

in use 

Jan. 31, 1896. 




48 
27 
31 
66 
80 
67 
47 


5 
1 
1 
3 




53 




28 




32 




69 




80 




2 




69 




47 












366 


12 




378 



Water Department. 



121 



Dead ends blown off 

Hydrant barrels changed for repairs 

" boxes repaired in service 

" " renewed . 

" nipple put in 
Hydrants oiled 
Boxes over bridges repaired 
Main cocks repaired 
S.W. cocks repaired 
New S.W. cocks put on 
Stop-cock boxes repaired in service 

" " renewed 

Fire reservoirs repaired . 
Change from low to high — 4-inch and upwards 

" " " " " — 3 " " under . 



80 

146 

93 

92 

8 
22 

5 

35 

14 

154 

133 

96 

2 

9 
37 



Repairs of Pipes during- the Year ending- Jan. 31, 1896. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 






48 


42 


40 
2 


36 
1 

2 
1 

4 


30 
1 

1 

4 

6 


•28 
1 

1 


24 

1 

1 

2 


20 
2 

1 
3 


16 

1 
1 

1 
1 

4 


12 

16 
1 

2 
7 
3 
6 
1 

36 


8 

6 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 

1 

16 


6 

56 
16 
4 
9 
9 
6 

1 
1 

102 


4 

26 
2 

8 
37 


3 

4 

1 
5 


2 

23 
8 
6 

12 
5 
2 

62 


5 

1 
1 

7 


1 
1 


1 

21 
3 
1 
2 


I 

12 
1 
2 
3 

1 


5 
g 


| 


c3 
O 




440 

197 

100 

237 

79 

76 

20 


8 
11 

8 
19 

2 

1 


625 








241 

125 
307 


West Roxbury .... 
Brighton 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 


102 

98 

32 

3 

1 

1 




2 


27 


19 


1,149 


49 


1,535 



Causes of repairs that have been made on pipes of 4-inch 
diameter and upwards : 



Defective pipe 
" joint 
' ' packing 

Frozen . 



11 
71 

58 
10 



Carried forward, 



150 



122 



City Document No. 32. 



Brought forward, 
Leak at main . 
Pipe broken by blasting- 



Settling of earth 
Stop-cock broken 

" leak 
Struck by pick 



On 3-inch and on 
Broken in wall 

" " sewer 
Burst 
Defective joint 

' ' packing 
' ' pipe 
' ' stop-cock 
Eaten by soil . 
Frozen . 
Gnawed by rats 
Injured by electricity 
Leak at coupling 
" " joint 
" " main 
" " valve 
No force 
Pipe broken 
Settling . 
Stopped by dirt 
fish 
gasket 
gravel 
rust 
solder 
Struck by pick 
Valve broken . 



service-pipes 



150 

4 

7 

8 

25 

11 



— 215 

11 

6 

3 
16 
10 
67 
12 

7 
85 

7 

1 
15 
17 

9 
17 

2 
62 
235 
40 
39 
17 

2 
557 

o 
O 

75 
5 
1,320 



1,535 



In addition to the above, 331 service-pipes were shut off 
for repairs inside street line, and notice of the same sent to 
the On-and-Off Department of the Income Division. 



"Water Department. 



123 



Statement of Leaks and Stoppages, from 1850 to 1895. 





Diameter 


in Inches. 




Tear. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 

213 

211 

135 

145 

170 

171 

253 

111 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
234 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
707 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,160 
725 
734 
801 
1,024 
995 
929 
883 
1,248 
782 
1,127 
638 


104 


1852 


237 
323 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363 


1858 


311 


1860 

1861 


531 
592 
508 


1862 


490 




494 


1864 


489 


1865 


607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 


1868 


531 


1869 


489 


1870 


864 


1871 


1,565 


1872 


1,647 
1,229 


1873 


1874 


2,594 


1876 


928 
948 


1877 


910 


1878 


1,237 


1879 


1,206 


1880 


1,064 


1882 


1,028 
1,418 


1883 


953 


1884 


1,380 




749 



124 



City Document No. 32. 



Statement of Leaks and Stoppages, from 1850 to 1895. 

Concluded. 





Diameter 


in Inches. 




Teak. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Totajl. 


1886 


150 
172 

216 
183 
180 
194 
212 
327 
349 
215 


725 

869 

1,140 

849 

718 

758 

1,232 

1,555 

1,354 

1,320 


875 




1,041 
1,356 
1,032 


1888 

1889 


1891 


898 
952 


1892 


1,444 




1,882 


1894 


1,703 




1,535 







Yards. 



Gity Proper. — Albany Street. — The yard and buildings 
are in good condition. During the year the outside of all 
the buildings has been painted, also the fences, gates, etc., 
the roofs repaired, weather-boards renewed, the grounds 
have been filled in with ashes and cracked stone, the horse- 
stalls in stable repaired, steam-boilers and elevators inspected 
by the proper authorities, and the heating-apparatus has been 
overhauled and put in first-class condition. 

The coming year some additional machinery will be needed 
for our machine shop, as the manufacture of gates, hydrants 
and brass cocks is yearly growing larger. 

Dorchester District. — This yard is in good condition and 
the buildings are nearly new ; but very little will be needed 
the coming year. 

West Roxbury. — This yard is in very poor condition, 
besides being too small. The stable is poor, and we should 
have a new and better location. I have caused to be hired 
the past year another small yard and shed nearby for addi- 
tional room ; have also built a fence and gates to enclose this 
and the old yard, and have painted the same. 

East Boston. — This yard and buildings are in fair condi- 
tion, but will, however, need painting the coming year. 

Yours respectfully, 

H. C. ElCHARDSON, 

General Superintendent, Eastern Division, B. W. W. 



Water Department. 



125 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DIVISION. 



Office of Superintendent, 
Corner Medford and Tufts Streets, 

Boston, February 1, 1896. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Sir : The annual report of the Mystic Division of the 
Boston Water Department is herewith submitted. 

Mystic Lake. 

Mystic lake rose to its highest point, 6.84, on May 10, 
and then fell until October 12, when it reached its lowest 
point in the year, 2.17. At this time an abnormally heavy 
rain of over seven inches caused it to rise four feet. 

Water was wasted over the dam from January 11 to 
February 9, from March 8 to May 29, and again from Octo- 
ber 15 to January 1, excepting a few days. 

The rainfall on the Mystic water-shed for the past twelve 
months was as follows : 



February 


. 0.655 


August 


. 5.435 


March 


. 3.000 


September . 


. 2.040 


April 


. 4.185 


October 


. 10.195 


May 


. 3.150 


November . 


. 6.260 


June 


. 3.630 


December . 


. 2.300 


July 


. 4.345 


January 


. 2.355 


Total 


. . 




47.550 



Due attention was given to clearing the ponds and streams 
of algse and other contaminating matter. Owing to the 
unusual quantity of water, less trouble was experienced than 
in former years. 

Reservoir. 

The three gates — 30, 24, and 16-inch in the delivery-gate 
chamber — were repaired, new valve-rods were substituted 



126 City Document No. 32. 

and the gearing rearranged, the old 10 to 1 gears being 
replaced by gears 4 to 1, thus greatly facilitating the opera- 
tion of the gates. Also, slight repairs were made at the 
gate-house. 

The roads, walks, and slopes received the usual attention. 

Conduit. 

The following improvements recommended in my last re- 
port — the replacing of the wooden sills with stone and the 
renewing of the grooves for the screens in the pipe-chamber 
— were made. 

A 30-inch gate is being made for the blow-off, and will be 
placed in position in a few weeks. One of the gates in the 
gate-chamber, that regulate the passage of the water from 
the receiving-chamber to the conduit, was overhauled and 
thoroughly repaired. 

The conduit was cleaned and flushed several times during 
the year. 

Pumping-Station . 

To conduct water to the pump-well connected with the 
new pump, 178 feet of 36-inch main were laid, with one 
gate and brick gate-chamber. From the pump, 187 feet of 
30-inch force main were laid, with one check-valve and 3 
gates ; and 4 brick chambers were built, one for the check- 
valve and one for each of the gates. 

To the sewer were run, from pumps Nos. 1,2, and 3, 172 
feet of 12-inch pipe ; from the pump- well, 78 feet of 6-inch ; 
and from the cellar, 50 feet of 6-inch. 

In the fire-room, about 30 feet of 6-inch pipe were laid ; a 
brick manhole was built, and the brick- work around the 
boilers repaired. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The Mystic Valley sewer and pumping-station were trans- 
ferred to the State authorities on July 18, and about 2\ miles 
of the sewer are used as a branch of the metropolitan system, 
but the pumping plant is discontinued. The amount of sew- 
age pumped from January 31, 1895, to the time of abandon- 
ment was 56,723,713 gallons, to which was applied as a 
precipitant 117,815 pounds of crude sulphate of alumina. 
The sludge pumped was 1,546,757 gallons, or 2 t 7 q- per cent, 
of the sewage. The alumina was applied at the rate of 1 part 
alumina to 4,012 parts sewerage, or at the rate of 1.038 tons 
per 1,000,000 gallons of sewage. The amount of coal used 
was 90.16 tons. 



Water Department. 127 

This plant was completed in 1887 and required the services 
of about 14 men to operate it. Its transfer and discontinu- 
ance removes from this department an annual expense of 
about $20,000. 

Water Sources. 

There is a decided improvement in the conditions along 
the sources of the supply. 

Since the construction of the trunk line of the metro- 
politan sewer through this section and the subsequent con- 
struction of the local systems along the line, a number of 
important cases of pollution have been disposed of. 

In Woburn, 10.5 miles of the local system are constructed 
to date ; in Winchester, 10.25 miles ; and in Stoneham, prep- 
arations are being made to commence its system in the 
spring. 

The glue-work of Baeder, Adamson, & Co., in Woburn, 
which was the largest pollution case on the supply, was con- 
nected with the metropolitan sewer on November 14. In 
Winchester, Waldmyer's tannery, a large stable, and eleven 
dwelling-houses, a long-standing nuisance, were demolished 
in the fall. This property was situated along the banks of 
the Abajonna river, in the tract of land proposed for a public 
park. During the past season, 17 per cent, of the recorded 
cases of pollution were remedied, and in the coming year 
probably 50 per cent, of the remaining number will be re- 
moved. 

The following is a summary of the report of Mr. John S. 
Concannon, Chief Inspector : Present number of cases, 528 ; 
of these there are, present safe, 431 ; seem safe, 32 ; sus- 
pected, 18; unsatisfactory, 47. 

Nine new cases were discovered and 108 cases remedied. 
Thirty legal notices were sent. 

Sewage Treatment at Stoneham. 

The chemical treatment of sewage at Tidd's tannery was 
continued the past year and very satisfactory results were 
obtained. 

The quantity of sewage pumped was 4,990,924 gallons, to 
which was applied as a precipitant 71,360 pounds of sulphate 
of alumina. 

The quantity of sludge pumped was 648,820 gallons, or 13 
per cent, of the sewage. This sludge was disposed of by 
the firm to neighboring farmers, who carted it away for fertil- 
izing purposes. The pulleys and the submerged pumps 



128 City Document No. 32. 

received slight repairs and new belts were supplied during 
the year. 

At Fitzgerald's tannery, the amount of sewage increased 
to 10,000 gallons daily in August, so instead of depending 
upon the lime from the beam-house as a precipitant, addi- 
tional chemical was applied. 

The owner constructed a vat for the chemical, and this 
department furnished and applied sulphate of alumina. 

The quantity of alumina applied to date was 10,520 pounds, 
and the effluent is much more satisfactory than formerly. 

Distribution-Pipes . 

The distribution-pipes have been extended by the addi- 
tion of 452 feet of 4-inch pipe, 17,618 feet of 6-inch pipe, 
4,051 feet of 8-inch pipe, 1,061 feet of 10-inch pipe, 2,176 
feet of 12-inch pipe, 187 feet of 30-inch pipe, 178 feet of 
36-inch pipe. Thirty-nine thousand one hundred and ninety- 
nine feet of pipe were relaid. 

There now remains in Charlestown 8,260 feet of cement- 
lined pipe, varying in size from 2 to 20 inches. 

The work rendered necessary by the abolition of grade 
crossings between the Chelsea bridges, and referred to in 
my last report, was completed this fall. 

Hydrants and Gates. 

Ninety-seven new hydrants, 2 street Lowry hydrants, 
and 95 Post hydrants, were established. One Post hydrant 
was replaced by a street Lowry hydrant. Five street 
Lowry hydrants were repaired, and eight Lowry hydrant 
barrels were replaced with longer ones. One hundred and 
ninety-eight gates were established, — two 3-inch, fifteen 
4-inch, one hundred and twenty 6-inch, twenty-three 8-inch, 
thirteen 10-inch, twenty 12-inch, one 24-inch, three 30-inch, 
and one 36-inch. There were abandoned four 3-inch, thirty 
4-inch, ten 6-inch, seven 8-inch. 

Six hydrant-boxes and thirty gate-boxes were replaced by 
new ones. 

Fountains and Standpipes. 

Three new drinking-fountains were established, and one 
abandoned. Ten new standpipes were erected for street- 



watering. 



Service-Pipes. 



Eight hundred and sixty-three new services were laid, 
distributed as follows: Charlestown, 39; Chelsea, 130; 



Water Department. 



129 



Everett, 265; Soinerville, 429,— for which 20,524 feet of 
pipe were required. 

Two hundred and thirty-four services were repaired. Thir- 
teen services were removed and larger ones substituted. 

Seventeen stop-cock boxes were replaced by new ones. 
Thirty-six stoppages by eels, four by rust, and eight by 
moss were forced out. 

New Services. 



Size 


|-in. 


f-in. 


|-in. 


1-in. 


U-in. 


li-in. 


2-in. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


Total. 


Total ft. 




29 


15 

92 
262 


18 

7 

421 


1 
2 
3 

4 






2 


2 


1 


39 
130 

265 
429 


1,102 
4,511 


















5,763 






2 


1 






1 


9,148 










Totals 


29 


369 


446 


10 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


863 


20,524 



Summary of Services, February 1, 1896. 



Number of services 
" " feet . . 



CharlestowD. 



6,182 
165,130 



Chelsea. 



5,739 
155,468 



Everett. Somerville 



3,554 
71,206 



8,644 
283,215 



Totals. 



24,119 
675,019 



Breaks and Leaks on Distribution-Pipes. 



Size 


2-in. 


3-in. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


Totals. 




2 


1 
3 


21 
7 
15 


1 

7 

6 

15 


1 
1 
3 
2 


6 


5 




38 






16 




2 




34 








4 


4 


43 


29 


7 


6 


93 







130 



City Document No. 32. 



Distribution-Pipes Relaid. 



Locations. 


Original 
Size. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


24-in. 


30-in 


Totals. 


Charlestown : 


4-in. 
4-in. 




200 
348 












200 














348 








277 
125 






277 


















125 




16 &24in. 










684 


541 


1,225 


Chelsea : 


4-in. 
300 6-in. 
6 &10in. 
10-in. 


! :: 


150 








150 






540 
1,300 








540 


Shurtleff st. . . 








1,300 
550 




4-in. 

270 3-in. 
440 4-in. 


!•• 


550 
710 






















710 


Cary ave. . . . 
Broadway . . . 




949 
1,100 








949 
















1,100 
225 


4-in. 
4-in. 




225 






825 










825 




2,070 








2,070 








950 








950 




573 
1,510 

26 








573 


















1,510 










2,200 








26 


Arlington ave. . 
Marginal st. . . 
Everett : 
Waverley ave. 








2,200 


940 








940 


2-in. 

6-in. 

lO.in. 

4-in. 

4-in. 

1,800 6-in. 
90 4-in. 

4 in. 


!•• 


36 
60 
60 

33 
6 

15 

20 










36 












60 


Broadway . . 
Somerville : 


70 






2,485 




2,545 
70 


Autumn st. . . 










33 




636 








642 


Beacon st. . . J 
Beacon pi. . . 


1,875 






1,890 










20 














Carried forw'd, 






2,413 


4,045 


9,644 


2,277 


3,169 


541 


22,089 









Water Department. 



131 



Distribution-Pipes Kelaid. — Continued. 



Locations. 


Original 

Size. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


24-in. 


30-in. 


Totals. 


Brought forw' d 
Broadway . . 

• \ 






2,413 


4,045 


9,644 


2,277 
4,900 


3,169 


541 


22,089 


8-in. 

110 4-in. 
15 6-in. 

3-in. 

4-in. 




33 


125 










125 


I 
Broadway pi. . 












33 


616 












616 








24 






24 
45 


Cooney at. . . 


4-in. 






45 
18 




















18 




30 








30 
285 


Ellsworth st. . 


4-in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 
6-in. 
3-in. 
4-in. 

4-in. 




285 

874 

8 

357 






















874 


Evergreen ave. 


444 










452 










357 




860 












George st. . . 




33 
33 

10 










33 












33 














10 




1,075 










1 075 


Homer sq. . . 
Jenny Lind 




223 
17 






















17 








410 










4-in. 
8-in. 
6-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 
6-in. 






298 








298 








9 
33 










Marshall st. . . 




14 

255 
33 










33 










14 


Mystic ave. . . 












255 












33 

11 

269 






11 










3-in. 
4-in. 




269 
33 












885 










885 


Rush st. ... 










33 








406 








Sargent ave. . . 


4-in. 
4-in. 




33 
312 










33 












312 










3,169 






Carried forw'd 




33 


5,943 


7,670 


9,727 


8,017 


541 


35,100 



132 City Document No. 32. 

Distribution-Pipes Relaid. — Concluded. 



Locations. 


Original 
Size. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


24-in. 


30-in. 


Totals. 


Brought forw'd 


4-in. 
4-in. 


33 


5,943 
45 
765 


7,670 


9,727 


8,017 


3,169 


541 


35,100 
45 


Spring st. . . . 












765 




969 








969 




6-in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
2-in. 








76 






76 










816 






816 


Village st. . . 
Waverley st. . 




374 
168 










374 












168 






986 






986 




















Total .... 




33 


7,295 


7,670 


11,512 


9,079 


3,169 


541 


39,299 









Water Department. 



133 



Extension of Distribution-Pipes. 



Location. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 12-in. 


30-in. 


36-in. 


Totals. 


Charlestown : 




123 












123 




72 












72 






160 










160 












187 


178 


365 


Chelsea : 




228 








228 






252 








252 






528 
272 
100 
710 
324 

332 
45 
293 
432 
600 
216 
817 
72 
200 
580 
248 










528 
















272 
















100 
















710 
















324 


Everett : 














332 
















45 
















293 
















432 
















600 
















216 
















817 
















72 
















200 
















580 
















248 






483 










483 






260 
222 
164 
220 
388 
552 
40 
274 
933 










260 
















222 
















164 
















220 
















388 
















552 
















40 
















274 
















933 


















Carried forioard . 


72 


9,173 


643 


252 


.... 


187 


178 


10,505 



134 City Document No. 32. 

Extension of Distribution-Pipes. — Continued. 



Location. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


30-in. 


36-in. 


Total. 


Brought forward . 
Clay 


72 


9,173 
14 
485 
130 
344 
170 
84 
713 
412 
226 
458 


643 


252 




187 


178 


10,505 

14 
















485 
















130 
















344 
















170 
















84 
















713 
















412 
















226 
















458 








84 








84 






84 
144 










84 
















144 








60 








60 






104 

20 
46 
46 

6 










104 
















20 
















46 
















46 


Somerville : 














6 








446 








446 






7 

45 

112 

312 

13 

38 

7 

6 


535 








542 














45 










1,155 






1,267 
312 














211 










224 






.... 








38 






146 










153 














6 






60 










60 






170 

13 

6 

360 










170 






569 










582 














6 




158 












360 












158 


















Carried forward . 


230 


13,748 


2,164 


842 


1,155 


187 


178 


18,504 



"Watee Department. 135 

Extension of Distribution- Pipes. — Continued. 



Locations. 


4-ln. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


30-in. 


36-in. 


Totals. 


Brought forward . 


230 


13,748 

96 

7 


2,164 


842 


1,155 


187 


178 


18,504 

96 
















7 










112 






112 








143 














18 










18 




10 
















271 
6 

12 

72 
239 

16 
496 
239 
244 

14 
208 


















525 










531 




























72 






























































































14 






















23 
















21 
30 

200 










21 








































322 










8 












8 




8 












g 










587 






587 








141 












156 

263 

12 

264 

7 


200 


























































509 














194 














5 

7 
12 




























7 
12 






























Carried forward . 


442 


16,671 


3,505 


1,042 


2,176 


187 


178 


24,201 



136 City Document No. 32. 

Extension of Distribution- Pipes. — Concluded. 



Location. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


30-in. 


36-in. 


Totals. 


Brought forward . 


442 


16,671 

183 

6 

12 

5 

235 

13 

28 

465 


3,505 


1,042 


2,176 


187 


178 


24,201 
183 
















6 








19 








31 












5 
















235 






523 










536 














28 




10 












475 




23 










23 




















452 


17,618 


4,051 


1,061 


2,176 


187 


178 


25,723 



Water Department. 



137 



CD 

Gi 



•h 

o3 

S 

rH 

r© 

© 



'H 
© 

5 



bo 

a 

•-a 

r© 



5H 

© 



a 
© 









Ki 


CO -* 


t- as 








O 


CO rH 


CM 








•* 


CO as 




OS 






















C3 


GO* 


-4> O 


OS 








o 


CO CO 


CO -HH 






o 


CM 


rH rH 


CO OS 






H 


















CM 








CM 






a 


lO 








i£i 






















co 

CO 


'"' 








1-1 








CO 








l - 






a 


CO 








1 CO 








-* 








1 -* 






o 


.cT 








»o" 






CO 


« 








CM 








CO 




iTS 




CO 






a 






CO 




CO 
















CD 






-* 


o" 




cm" 




,_^ 








rH 








CM 








O 




o 


cr 


CO 






a 


CO 




o 










,rH 


i-^ 




°l 


5 








CM 


CD 




CM 




o~ 
















t- 






a 








01 


o 














c^ 


CO 






CO 
















"* 


















"* 


01 


CO 


CC 








a 


^ 




CO 


CT 


CM 








cs_ 


c^ 


CM_ 


C 


a 




K 


co 


t-T 


CN 


of 




co" 




H 










CM 




EH 
















3 






























< 








CO 




CO 






_S 






o 


e'- 


-<# 




a 


■* 






CM 


er 


8,2 








as 




^ 




t- 






a 






CO 


a 








"7* 


~**L 




o^ 


t- 


CM^ 








uo~ 








aT 








IH 






c- 


■* 








CO 




CM 


c> 


CO 






a 


CD 


c 


CO 


O 


CO 






■•? 


°- 


■d 




a 












•^ 


ocT 


c 


CO 










V 


tH 


c> 


CO 








CO 


-1 


CO 


a 








a 


CO 


a 


CO 


a 








OS 


er 


as 


cc 


o 






















op 


O 








CD 






CM 






*c 


o 
















rH 








"* 


a 


CO 


c- 


CM 






a 




o 


CO 


c 


CO 






CM 


c 


CO 


c 


as 
























CO 


c 


CO 


*r 


-HH 








CO 




CO 




OS 
CO 








o 


if 


rH 


c£ 


CM 






a 


QO 


c 




C 








(M 


o 




a 


CO 






















4< 


^H 


a 


CO 


l> 


lO 






CM 




»o 


c£ 


> OS 
















1-1 








CO 


cc 


CO 


CC 


CO 






a 


CO 


D 


OO 




) as 






^# 


O 


1 *- 


»r 


OS 




















CO 


CM 


-1 




«■ 


> CM 
CM 








a 
















Es 






_a 


. 








o 
































CD 


c 


if, 

CD 


a 


o 








cl 




CU 


* 








■Et 


,£ 


> 


c 








© 


c 


> H 


a 


! 



CD 



© 



t- CO fc- CO 

OS CO »0 -HH 
lO CO O fc- 


if: 

CM 


' 


rt 








rH 


>o 








>o 


CM 


rH 




CO 


■* 


^* rH 


OS 
















CM 


-* CM 


rH 

CO 






^ 




* 


o 




CO 

o 


O 1— t- >C5 
CM CM CO -^ 


C53 
CM 


O i-l CO "* 
CO CO CM Ir- 


OS 


es © O CO 
CO CM CM 00 
(M iH CO CO 


CM 

CD 


OS lO CO O 
CO t- >o CO 
rH i-H T-H rH 


CM 

CO 

CO 


CM O CM ■* 
r-i CO 


CO 


c 
i 
c 

C 

1 
c 
S. 

C 


; 

: a 

: "a 


J c 

> a 

) ft 


, 1 

: I 

■ i 


1 

s 
2 


c 
c 





138 



City Document No. 32. 



Hydrants Established. 





Established. 


03 

a 
a 

a 

h- 1 






% 

o 

1-1 


>> 

m 


o 

On 




Remaeks. 


Charlestown .... 


2 




1 

10 

25 
60 




2 
10 
25 

60 


1 Post replaced by Lowry. 


























Totals 


2 




95 




97 





Hydrants in Use, February 1, 1896. 





is 
o 


(A. 

a £ 

O P 

pq 


o 


3 

5 


"3 
o 




Charlestown .... 


217 


37 


74 

206 

282 

702 

2 

2 


10 

4 

6 
1 


338 
210 
282 
702 
8 
3 














































217 


37 


1,268 


21 


1,543 





Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene S. Sullivan, 

General Superintendent. 



Water Department. 



139 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER. 



Engineering Department, 

City Hall, February 1, 1896. 
Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Sir : I hereby submit the following report of the work 
done and records kept during the past year : 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall during the year 1895 was above the average in 
amount, and the supply of water has been ample at all times. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds were as follows : 



Rainfall, in inches 

Rainfall collected, in inches 

Daily average yield of watershed, 1 
in gallons / 



Sudbury. 



50.62 
24.196 

86,632,900 



Cochituate. 



48.96 
20.172 

18,125,934 



Mystic. 



48.73 
17.426 

22,300,000 



An unusually large fall of rain occurred October 12-14, 
1895 ; beginning at 1.30 P.M. on Saturday, October 12, 
the rain was continuous and uniform until 4.15 A.M. of 
Monday, October 14, 1895. During that time — less than 
thirty-nine hours — 7.5 inches of rain fell. 

Reservoir JVb. 1. 

Grades, E.W., 161.00 ; Tops of Flash-boards, 159.29 and 168.41; Crest of Dam, 157.64. 

Area, Water Surface, 143 acres ; Greatest Depth, 14 ft.; Contents below 161.00, 

376,900,000 gals.; Below 159.29, 288,400,000 gals. 

The surface of this reservoir was about one foot below the 
crest of the dam on January 1, 1895. Waste began January 
13 and continued until February 2, and no more waste 
occurred until March 12. 

From March 12 to May 9 water was wasted over the 
dam, and on May 9 the flash-boards were placed in position. 
On May 22 the reservoir was full, and waste began over the 
flash-boards, lasting until May 28. From June 5 to June 9 



140 City Document No. 32. 

water was wasted over the flash-boards. The flash-boards 
were removed on October 16, and waste occurred from 
October 16 to January 1, 1896. The dam is in good 
condition. 

Reservoir No. 2. 

Grades, H. W., 1 68.00 ; Tops of Mash-boards, 167.12 and 1 66.49 ; Crest of Dam, 1 65.87. 

Area, Water Surf ace, 134 acres; Greatest Depth, 17 ft.; Contents Below 168.00, 

568,300,000 gals.; Below 167.12, 529,860,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water was wasting over the dam. 
From January 3 to 13 there was no waste. Beginning on 
the 13th, water was wasted until February 10. Waste 
occurred from March 11 until May 9, when the flash-boards 
were placed upon the dam. On April 8 the reservoir was 
drawn upon for the supply of the city. During July, 
August, September, and part of October, water was run 
into the reservoir from Keservoirs 4 and 6. The flash- 
boards were removed from the dam on November 6. Waste 
occurred on that day, and continued during the remainder 
of the year. The dam is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 3. 

Grades, R.W., 1 77.00; Crest of Dam (no Mash-boards), 175.24. 

Area at 177.00, 253 acres ; Contents below 177.00, 1,224,500,000 gallons. 

Area at 175.24, 248 acres ; Contents below 175.24, 1,081,500,000 gallons. 

Greatest Depth, 21ft. 

On January 1, 1895, this reservoir was full. On January 
11 waste began, and continued until February 7. Waste 
also occurred from March 10 to May 7. On July 25 the 
surface of reservoir was 5.25 feet below crest of the dam. 
Filling slowly from that time, the water surface reached the 
crest of the dam on October 16. From October 16 to 
January 1, 1896, water has wasted over the dam, excepting 
October 29 and November 16. The dam is in good 
condition. 

Reservoir No. 4. 

Grades, H.W., 215.21 ; Tops of Flash-boards, 215.21+and 214.89; 

Crest of Dam, 214.23. 

Area, Water Surface, 167 acres; Greatest Depth, 49 ft.; Contents below 215.21, 

1,416,400,000 gallons. 

On January 1, 1895, the surface of water in the reservoir 
was 18.05 feet below the crest of the dam. The reservoir 
filled gradually, and on April 9 waste began, and continued 
until May 9, when one set of flash-boards was placed upon 
the dam. Water wasted over the first set of flash-boards 
from May 14 to May 23, when the second set of flash-boards 
was added. Waste occurred over the second set from May 
28 to June 19 and from June 28 to July 4. On July 3 the 
reservoir was drawn upon for the supply of the city, and on 
October 12 the water surface had fallen 22.45 feet below the 



Water Department. 



141 



crest of the dam. Since October 12 it has been gradually 



fillino-. 



The dam is in good condition. 



Reservoir JVo. 5. 
"Work for the year was commenced on April 13, and has 
been prosecuted throughout the year. The following report 
of Desmond FitzGerakl, Resident Engineer, gives further 
information in regard to the work on this reservoir, as well 
as other matters connected with additional supply : 

Southborough, Mass., January 1, 1896. 
William Jackson, Esq., City Engineer: 

Dear Sir : Herewith please find report of work accom- 
plished by additional supply force under my direction during 
the past year. The grounds adjoining the embankment of 
Dam No. 6 have been cleared of waste material, graded, and 
top-dressed with loam. The filter beds are now under con- 
struction ; one bed has been entirely completed and under- 
drained, and the second bed has been graded and is ready 
for the drains. 

Stone bounds have been set at the angles of all the pieces 
of land owned by the city at Basin No. 6. At Dam No. 5 
work was begun on April 13, and continued at a satisfactory 
rate during the year. The following grades indicate in a 
general way the progress made : 

Masonary section from grade 190 to grade 217. 

Earth embankment at northerly end of dam from grade 
203 to grade 210. 

Earth embankment at southerly end of dam from grade 
220 to grade 224. 

The core wall at northerly end of dam is completed to 
grade 211, and at the southerly end to grade 225. 

The northerly wing wall is completed to grade 217, and 
the southerly one to grade 225. 

The quantities of materials handled during the year on the 
dam are as follows : 



Soil moved 
Soil placed on dam 
Earth excavation 
Rock excavation 
Concrete masonry 
Rubble masonry 
Range work 
Plastering 

In connection with the reservo 



1,409 cubic yards. 

776 " 
61,109 " 

2,154 << 

3,825 " 
15,812 " 

2,281 " 

1,657 square 

r the work of stripping on 



142 



City Document No. 32. 



Section A was continued until September. The completion 
of this section must await the removal of the injunction 
which now holds against carrying on work. Early in the 
year plans and specifications were prepared for letting two 
portions of the new Framingham-Marlboro' road, comprising 
about 2f miles in length. 

This work was let in April and completed during the year. 

In February and March plans and specifications were 
prepared for the stripping and shallow flowage connected 
with the Stony-brook branch of the basin. This work was 
let in April and is now well under way. The following 
quantities of materials have been moved in connection with 
the stripping : 

698,654 cubic yards. 
2,048 
369 
740 
811 
730 
2,784 

71 rods. 



Earth excavation 
Split stone masonry 
Paving in mortar 
Concrete masonry 
Rubble masonry 
Dry paving 
Rip-rap 
Stone wall 

The contract for building 20,000 linear feet of iron fence 
was made in July, and under this contract 2,300 feet have 
been constructed. The lands owned by the city and the 
road lines have been marked by stone bounds. In April a 
contract was made for grading a series of 20 filter beds near 
Marlboro' Junction. This work has been completed and the 
final estimate is now under way. Besides the above work, a 
number of plans and estimates have been made for an exten- 
sion of the work on this basin. 

Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Resident Engineer. 



Reservoir JSTo. 6. 

Grades, H.W., 295.00 ; Top of Flash-boards, 293.00; Crest of Dam, 294.00. 
Estimated Area, 185 acres; Estimated Contents, 1,530,300,000 gals. 

The surface of the reservoir was 15.16 feet below the crest 
of the dam on January 1, 1895. Filling gradually, water 
began to waste over the dam on April 5, and continued 
until May 9, when the first set of flash-boards was placed 
upon the dam. On May 19 water wasted over the flash- 
boards, and continued until May 23. 

The second set was placed upon the dam on May 23, and 
waste occurred over this set from May 23 to June 17. On 



Water Department. 143 

October 13 the water surface reached its lowest point, being 
21.74 feet below the crest of the dam. During November 
and December it filled gradually, and on December 27 waste 
began over the crest of the dam. The dam is in good con- 
dition. 



Whitehall Pond. 

Elevation, H.W., 327.91 ; Bottom of Gates, 317.78. 
Area at 327.91, 601 acres; Contents, between 327.91 and 317.78, 1,266,900,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, the water surface of this pond was 
323.23 feet, or 4.68 feet below high water. It rose during 
the spring, the water surface on May 1 being 326.95, or .96 
feet below high water. It remained at about this height 
until June 15, when it fell; and on October 12 the water 
surface was 323.22. 

Since October 12 it has been gradually filling. Water 
was drawn from the pond, for the supply of the city, from 
March 25 to April 5, April 9 to 12, April 15 to 20, April 30 
to May 23, June 14 to July 24, August 8 to October 14, and 
November 27 to January 1, 1896. Plans for a new dam at 
Whitehall pond have been perfected. 

Farm Pond. 

Grades, H.W., 149.25; Low Water, 146.00. 
Area at 149.25, 159 acres; Contents, between 149.26 and 146.00, 165,500,000 gals. 

No water was drawn from this pond for the supply of the 
city during the year 1895. 

On January 1, 1895, the surface of the pond was 46 feet 
below high water. High-water mark was reached on Jan- 
uary 23, and on April 15 the water surface was at grade 
149.70. 

It remained at or above 149.00 until August 20. The 
lowest point reached was on September 29, and on October 
14 high-water mark was again reached, remaining at that 
height during November and December. The Framingham 
Water Company has drawn 132,200,000 gallons from the 
pond during the year. 

Lake Cochituate. 

Grades, R.W., 134.36; Invert Aqueduct, 121.03 ; Top of Aqueduct, 127.36. 
Area, Water Surface at 134.36, 785 acres ; Contents, between 134.36 and 127.36, 

1,516,180,000 gals.; between 134.36 and 125.03, 1,910,280,000 gals. 

Approximate Contents, between 134.36 and 121.03, 2,447 ,000,000 gals. ; Between 

134.36 and 117.03, 2,907,000,000 gals. 

The dam is in good condition. On January 1, 1895, the 
surface of the lake was 8.08 feet below high-water mark. 

It remained at about this level until March 1, when it 
began to rise. On March 10 water was turned into the lake 
from the Sudbury river, and on April 15 the water surface 



144 



City Document No. 32. 



was at high-water mark. It remained at about high-water 
mark until May 5, after which its surface fell until October 
12, being 128.28 on that day. On January 1, 1896, the 
water surface was 132.30, or 2.06 feet below high-water 
mark. 

«, The beds for filtering the water of Pegan brook have been 
in use for the greater portion of the year, and 273,698,000 
gallons have been pumped upon them. No difficulty has 
been experienced in their operation during the winter season. 
Water has been drawn from the different reservoirs as 
follows : 



om 7 


A.M. Jan. 1 


to 


2 


P.M. Apr. 8 from Reservoir No. 


1. 




" 2 


P.M. Apr. 8 


a 


11.40 A.M. June 27 " 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


" 11.40 A.M. June 27 


n 


11 


A.M. July 19 " " 


No. 


2. 




" 11 


A.M. July 19 


" 


7 


A.M. July 24 " " 


Nos 


2, 


3 


7 


A.M. July 24 


(c 


12 


M. Oct. 1 " 


No. 


2. 




" 12 


M. Oct. 1 


t< 


2 


P.M. Oct. 3 No flow. 








« 2 


P.M. Oct. 3 


" 


10 


A.M. Oct. 13 from Reservoir 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


" 10 


A.M. Oct. 13 


(i 


11 


A.M. Oct. 24 " " 


No. 


2. 




" 11 


A.M. Oct. 24 


<< 


7 


A.M. Nov. 25 " " 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


" 11 


A.M. Nov. 25 


te 


11 


A.M. Dec. 3 " " 


No. 


2. 




" 11 


A.M. Dec. 3 


cc 


1 


P.M. Dec. 5 No flow. 








1 


P.M. Dec. 5 


tt 


11 


A.M. Dec. 23 from Reservoii 


Nos. 


2 


3 


" 11 


A.M. Dec. 23 


ti 


7 


A.M. Jan. 1 " " 


No. 


2. 





The height of the water in the various storage reservoirs 
on the first day of each month is given below : 





Reservoirs. 


Farm 
Pond. 


White- 
hall 
Pond. 


Lake 
Cochit- 

UATE. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 


No. 6. 




Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


High 
Water. 


High 
Water. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 




159.29 


167.12 


175.24 


214.23 


295.00 


149.25 


327.91 


134.36 


January 1, 1895 . 


156.50 


166.00 


175.24 


196.18 


278.84 


148.79 


323.23 


126.28 


February 1, " . 


, 157.83 


166.05 


175.45 


201.65 


283.48 


149.06 


324.26 


126.90 


March 1, " . 


156.46 


161.22 


172.47 


203.79 


285.21 


149.01 


324.63 


126.50 


April 1, " . 


157.86 


166.16 


175.66 


212.91 


293.42 


149.35 


325.71 


132.97 


May 1, " . 


157.86 


166.09 


175.37 


214.60 


294.28 


149.63 


326.95 


134.35 


June 1, " . 


159.25 


166.05 


174.68 


215.34 


295.02 


149.32 


326.98 


134.04 


Julyl, " . 


159.04 


164.23 


169.46 


215.31 


295.04 


149.01 


325.81 


133.09 


August 1, " . 


158.91 


163.97 


170.47 


210.25 


290.58 


149.00 


325.28 


131.72 


September 1, " . 


158.68 


163.30 


172.50 


203.98 


283.91 


148.89 


324.62 


130.20 


October 1, " . . 


158.32 


163.14 


172.57 


194.41 


273.64 


148.58 


323.68 


128.98 


November 1, " . . 


157.91 


167.15 


175.66 


197.35 


279.19 


149.27 


324.73 


129.63 


December 1, " . 


158.10 


166.23 


175.77 


207.83 


289.92 


149.36 


326.36 


132.71 


January 1, 1896 . . 


158.11 


166.17 


175.75 


213.86 


294.39 


149.67 


325.29 


132.30 



Boston Water Works. 

Diagram showing the heights of Sudhu/y RiveK ReseKvoiKs Nos. I, 2 and 3, Fartm 
Fbnd and Cochi-huafe- and Mystio Lakes dui'ing the. yea^* 18 95". 



CAPACITY 
/H MILUON 
G.HL.L.ONS. 






*/eiHuaiy February A/a-rcfr 4pr// M<zy e/cifis <Ju/y /4<jauS& }5>pMn,leh October Atoenglw Oeaem/och 



Ses£RVSMS- 



ySftfe., 



!S 



S3= 



flash Boards Daw Si 



'Se?KiWj&2 



A -^^. 



s;^^ 



/7«" 



377 
£23 



8 , 



/45* 



ISIS 

/eSe 
l4So 
Wo 

813 
GiS 

2 7 o 
">7 




Mo^ 



/3ok 



tzs 




Boston Water Works. 

Diagram showing the heights of Sudbui-V Rivei' ReseiVoii'S Nos. 4-andS, and 
the Rainfall on the SudbuiV Rivei' Watershed dui'i'ng the yea/-' 1895. 




(January 


February 


Afarr^l 


dpril 


May 


e/urvs 


O/u/y 


•August- 


•September 


Ocfoacr 


A/o* m h*<- 


December 




/*V /*ttt-t-ION 
GALLOMS. 


r 


□ 


1 


I 


IT 


" 


5 




1 l|' 


|_. 


'1 


~^ 


1 1 


• - • 


1 1 r ■ ■ 


™~ 


J 


' | 




■ | 


1. 




nr 


1 


1 




;! 


1 ' 
























'II 


















i 




1 








































































































































f?£TS 




































































/Wo 
/2S£ 
/Z-?3 
//3o 

losi 
/o3S 
383 
342 
837 
8li 
8°3 
7«7 
72« 
s*7 

G48 

a/o 

S74- 
533 
So4 
*7l 
433 
4°8 
377 
3-fS 
32° 
233 
267 
242 
ZlS 
I3S 

in 

ISA 

134 

in 




255 

285 
28c, 
ZJS 

&° 

-J 












n. 


tg<y /?g^g; 


?-g pg- £ 


IAf « 




















p*^ 


— 




— v 














— r 






/' 










\ 














j 






/ 










\ 












^ 






j 




f?£S£ 


^/•pl^O//? 


/Vo. 6" 












f 






/ 










\ 
















/ 










\ 








f 








/ 










\ 








i 








/ 










\ 








/ 








/ 










\ 








f 


















\ 






































/ 






















J 




r 






















/ 




/ 






















f 




/ 


























t 

1 

ID 
Q 

I 

ZoS- 






















J 


























/ 


























y 






































































































X. 





















































































































































































































































































































S 

§ 

Q 

Is- 

2cS 








- rJO*lTt~ 


**r- ■—- 






















/ 






















/ 


















/ 






/ 








" "\ 










/ 






y> 








V. 










,r-^ 






/ 










V 








/ 


















V 








/ 
















\, 
























Yv 


























































































































































135 
/SO 
«5 


y' 
























136- 
ISo 

tes- 

ISo 


./ 


































































s- 











































































































































































































































































































































































































SWDfTOM :: i n I 



Water Department. 



145 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use 335.9 days, 
and has delivered 12,908,500,000 gallons into Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir, and 896,800,000 gallons into Lake Cochituate. 
The Cochituate aqueduct has been used 361 days, and 
delivered 5,654,765,700 gallons. Both aqueducts have been 
cleaned during the year. 

The different distributing reservoirs are in good condition. 



High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

The daily average quantity pumped at the Chestnut-Hill 
station was 9.4 per cent, more than in 1894. 

Engine No. 1 was run 4,341 hours 

12 minutes, pumping 
Engine No. 2 was run 2,285 hours 

35 minutes, pumping 
Engine No. 3 was run 1,793 hours 

16 minutes, pumping 
Total amount pumped . 
Amount coal used by Engines Nos. 

1 and 2 .... 
Amount coal used by Engine No. 3, 
Total amount coal used 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 



1,739,232,730 gallons. 

919,218,525 " 

1,507,338,275 « 
4,165,789,530 " 

3,363,475 lbs. 
1,503,331 " 

4,866,806 " 
10.3 

790.4 gallons. 

1,002.7 " 
Daily average amount pumped . 11,413,100 " 

Table VII., on pages 167, 168, shows in detail the work 
done by the engines and boilers. 



Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 

Engines Nos. 1 and 2 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal, 



Engine No. 3 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries $14,854 11 

Fuel 11,261 46 

Repairs 803 09 

Oil, waste, and packing .... 1,759 73 

Small supplies 2,888 46 

Total $31,566 85 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, $7 58 



146 



City Document No. 32. 



The following are notes of a practice test of Engine No. 
3, made by students of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
under the direction of Professor Miller : 



Fire started under boiler .... 8.30 A.M. 

Engine started 9.08 " 

Engine test began . . . . . 9.15" 

Engine test ended . . . . 9.15" 

Length of engine trial (steam basis) . . 24 hours 

Length of engine trial (coal basis) . . 24.3 " 

Revolutions, 9.08 A.M. to 9.26 A.M. . . 73,516 

Revolutions, 9.15 " 9.15 " . . 72,843 

Coal burned ...... 16,839 lbs. 

Coal burned, less 200 lbs. allowance for fall- 
ing grate ...... 16,639 " 

Water received from engine and weighed to 

boiler 142,528 

Cold water make up . . . . . 8,532 

Total amount weighed to boiler . . ,. 151,060 

Less leakage from feed pump . . . 1,440 

149,620 
Steam required by plant for 24 hours, except 

H.P. jackets 146,226 



Temperatures . 

Engine-room ..... 

Condensed steam from air pump 

Cold condensing water . 

Hot condensing water 

Feed water to economizer 

Feed water to boiler from economizer 

Jacket return at engine . 

Jacket return at boiler . 

Gases entering economizer 

Gases leaving economizer 



23. 3 C 
89.3 
51.9 
85.2 
127. 
198.3 
370.6 
369.6 
502. 
233. 



C. 
F. 



Water Department. 



147 



Pressures 



Barometer 
Steam at throttle . 
Vacuum in condenser 
First receiver 
Second receiver 
Low-pressure jacket 
High-pressure jacket 
Draught in inches . 



14.85 lbs. 
175.7 " 
27.25 in. 

46.5 lbs. 
2.4 " 

99.6 " 
175.7 " 

0.375 



Head. 

Horse power. High. 80.78 
Int. 97.05 
Low. 117.12 



Pump H.P. 



High. 
Int. 

Low. 



Pump end. 

90.12 
91.59 

87.90 



Crank. Total. 

70.08 150.86 

89.09 186.14 

121.54 238.66 Tot., 575.66 

Steam end. Total. 

85.95 176.07 

87.36 178.95 

86.94 174.84 529.86 



Steam per H.P. per hour, engine alone 

Coal per H.P. per hour, whole plant 

Lift in feet . 

Water over weir, 24 hours 

Slip .... 

Duty per 100 lbs. coal 

Duty per 1,000,000 B.T.U. 

Duty per 100 lbs. combustible 



11.22 lbs. 

1.18 " 

137.48 ft. 

21,016,000 gals. 

. 1.83 percent. 

. 150,045,000 

. 145,470,000 

. 160,000,000 



At the West Roxbury pumping-station the daily average 
quantity pumped was 179,200 gallons, an increase of 47.5 
per cent, over the amount pumped in the previous year. 

At the East Boston station 465,500 gallons per day have 
been pumped for the supply of the high-service district, and 
39,300 gallons per day for the Breed's Island high-service. 



High Service. 

In 1870 the high-service works were established, with a 
capacity of 5,000,000 gallons daily with no storage. 

In 1874 a reservoir was built on Parker Hill, with a ca- 
pacity of 7,200,000 gallons, the average daily consumption 
being at that time 1,200,000 gallons. Late in 1885 the 
consumption of water from the high service had reached 
2,500,000 gallons daily; the demand for its extension was 
pressing, and a new pumping-station with a capacity of 



148 City Document No. 32. 

16,000,000 gallons daily was constructed at Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir, and an additional reservoir at Fisher Hill having 
a capacity of 15,400,000 gallons, making with the Parker- 
Hill reservoir a total storage capacity of 22,600,000 gallons. 

In 1894 the consumption had reached over 11,000,000 
gallons daily, and a new pump was added to the Chestnut- 
Hill plant having a capacity of 20,000,000 gallons daily. 

The consumption for high service for the year 1895 
averaged 10,384,600 gallons daily, the maximum being 
11,719,300 gallons; it is evident that our present reserve 
in the Parker and Fisher Hill reservoirs is not sufficient, 
and an additional reservoir or reservoirs should be con- 
structed at once with as large a capacity as it is practicable 
to obtain. It would be desirable to have, were it possible, 
a reservoir storage of 200,000,000 gallons. 

Owing to the rapid increase of the portion of the city 
which is supplied from the high service, steps should also 
be taken at once, looking to the addition of another engine 
to the present plant. The experience of the past shows that 
it requires several years to design and build a pumping- 
engine, and at the present rate of increase in the high-ser- 
vice consumption the safe capacity of the present plant will 
have been reached by the time an additional engine can be 
supplied if work is commenced at once on the plans. 

Mystic Lake. 

Grades, H.W., 7.00; Invert of Aqueduct, —4.17; Contents, between 7.00 and 1.50, 
442,000,000 gallons. 

On January 1, 1895, the lake surface was 3.63 feet below 
hio-h water. On March 4 it had risen to grade 4.14, and 
the stop-planks were placed upon the dam, waste occurring 
over the stop-planks from March 9 to May 29. On May 29 
the water surface was at 6.85 ; falling gradually, it reached 
grade 4.08 on July 29. The fish-waj^ was opened on April 
16, and was kept open until June 20, when it was closed, 
and remained closed the remainder of the year. 

The lowest point reached during the year was on October 
12, the water surface being at grade 2.15, or 4.85 feet below 
high water. 

Waste occurred over the dam from October 15 to Janu- 
ary 1, 1896, with the exception of five days in the early part 
of November. 

The dam at the outlet of the lake is in good condition . 



Water Department. 



149 



Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The operation of this plant by the city ended on July 18, 
1895, when the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission assumed 
control of it. During the time of operation, 70,013,500 
gallons of sewage were pumped and chemically treated with 
sulphate of aluminum. Table XI., on page 172, gives the 
monthly quantities of sewage pumped, coal and aluminum 
used. 

Mystic Conduit and Eeservoir. 

The conduit has been cleaned several times during the 
year. 

The repairs recommended at the conduit screen-chamber, 
namely, replacing the wooden sills with stone sills and the 
renewing of the grooves for the screens, have been made 
during the year. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 



Engine No. 1 was used 3,240 hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 2 was used l,392f hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 3 was used 6,676| hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 4 was used 380 hours 

pumping .... 
Total quantity pumped . 
Daily average quantity pumped 
Total quantity of coal burned . 
Percentage ashes and clinkers . 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 



720,723,300 gals. 

295,205,000 " 

2,276,190,200 " 

163,704,200 " 

3,455,822,700 " 

9,468,000 " 

8,121,000 lbs. 

10.9 

425.5 gals. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Salaries 

Fuel .... 

Repairs 

Oil, waste, and packing 

Small supplies 

Total . 



Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, 



511,560 
13,650 

2,867 
1,161 

1,328 



94 
80 
04 
60 
69 



530,569 07 

$8.84 



150 Citt Document No. 32. 

Table VIII., on page 169, shows in detail the work done by 
the engines during the year. The foundation for Engine 
No. 4 was finished and ready for the erection of the engine on 
April 1, 1895, and about April 15 the G. F. Blake Manu- 
facturing Company commenced to deliver parts of the pump 
and began the work of erecting the engine. The engine was 
run for the first time on August 28, and has been in use 
more or less since that time. It has been lagged, painted, 
etc. , and is now practically finished and ready to be accepted 
by the city. The engine has not yet been tested by the 
city. 

The Mystic Pumping -engine No. 4 is an independent 
compound beam and flywheel engine of the Leavitt type, and 
operates two differential plunger pumps. 

The steam cylinders are vertical and inverted, one high 
and one low pressure, with pistons connected to opposite 
ends of the beam. 

The pumps are located beneath the engine bedplate, in a 
masonry pit, and their plungers are rigidly connected to the 
steam-piston crossheads. 

The high-pressure piston with its connected pump plunger 
makes its upward stroke at the same time that the low- 
pressure piston and its plunger are making their downward 
stroke, and vice versa. 

The pumps rest upon solid masonry foundations at the 
bottom of the pit, to which they are strongly bolted ; their 
upper ends are firmly secured to the engine bedplate by ad- 
justable stools and bolts. 

The discharge from the pump worked by high-pressure 
piston is into the delivery chamber of the pump worked by 
the low-pressure piston, from whence it enters the force 
main. Similarly the suction main connects with the low- 
pressure pump inlet chamber, with which the inlet chamber 
of the high-pressure pump is connected. 

Each pump consists of three principal sections, viz. : the 
upper chamber, forming the air vessel and containing the 
delivery valves ; middle chamber, containing the suction 
valves ; and lower or inlet chamber, which is constructed to 
form a vacuum chamber. 

The pump valves consist of thin flat rings of composition, 
working over annular openings in the valve seats and closed 
by springs. 

The pedestals for the main beam pin and crank shaft 
journals are formed in the engine bedplate, and are all in the 
same horizontal plane. 



Water Department. 151 

The main framing for supporting the steam cylinders con- 
sists of two massive columns forming the crosshead guides 
and five auxiliary columns, all of which have their bases 
bolted to the bedplate and their caps to the entablature. 

The steam distribution is effected by Corliss valves and 
valve gear, with separate eccentrics for the inlet and exhaust 
gear. 

The cylinders are thoroughly steam-jacketed on sides and 
ends, and the exhaust from the high-pressure cylinder enters 
a reheater filled with tubes containing high-pressure steam, 
on its way to the low-pressure cylinder. 

All heated surfaces are thoroughly protected from radiation 
by approved non-conductors and handsome black walnut 
lagging. 

The condensing apparatus is of the jet type, with a double- 
acting horizontal air pump worked from the beam. 

There is a cast-iron gallery surrounding the cylinder 
bases, which is provided with a polished brass handrail and 
finished wrought-iron stanchions ; the gallery is reached by 
an iron stair at the low-pressure end of the engine. 

The leading dimensions of the engine are : 

The high-pressure cylinder is bored 21 inches and the low- 
pressure cylinder 42 inches diameter, with 4-foot stroke of 
pistons. 

The upper pump plungers are turned 14| inches and the 
lower plungers 21 inches diameter, with a stroke of 4 feet. 

The radius of the beam is 51 inches to centres of link and 
connecting-rod attachments, and 17 inches to centre of pin 
working air pump. 

The air pump is 16| inches diameter by 16 inches stroke. 

The horizontal distance between centres of cylinders and 
pumps is 8 feet, ditto between centres of main beam pin, 
and crank shaft 10 feet 8^ inches. 

The length of connecting rod from centre to centre of 
journals is 10 feet, and of the steam links 3 feet \ inch. 
The radius of the crank is 2 feet. 

Diameter of flywheel is 18 feet ; weight of same, about 
17 tons. 

Speed of the engine for regular working capacity, 51 
revolutions per minute. Displacement capacity at above 
speed in U. S. gallons per 24 hours amounts to 
10,570,000. 

The working boiler-pressure is 100 pounds per square 
inch above atmosphere. 



152 City Document No. 32. 

The following preliminary test of Engine No. 4 was made 
by the builders, The Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Co., De- 
cember 13-14, 1895 : 

Duration of test, 24 hours 30 seconds. 

Total number of revolutions, 74,385. 

Pressure by gauge near engine, 95.3 lbs. 

Pressure by gauge on receiver, 5.9 lbs. 

Pressure by mercurial column on condenser, 27.3 ins. 

Total pressure per square inch on pump, 65.7 lbs. 

Revolutions per minute, 51.7. 

Horse-powers: High-pressure steam cylinder, top, 74.5; 
bottom, 79.65 ; total, 154.15. Low-pressure steam cylinder, 
top, 83.19; bottom, 83.71; total, 166.9. Both steam 
cylinders, total, 321.05. 

Horse-power of main pump cylinders, 284.86. 

Water pumped in 24 hours by displacement, 10,703,000 
gals. 

Total coal burned during the test, 10,661 lbs. 

Water pumped per pound of coal, 1,004 gallons. 

Coal per pump horse-power, per hour, 1.56 lbs. 

Duty per 100 lbs. of coal, 127,000,000 ft. lbs. 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption for the year was as fol- 
lows : 

Sudbury and Cochituate works . . 50,801,100 gals. 
Mystic works 9,467,000 " 



Total for the combined supplies . 60,268,100 " 

an increase of 3,426,000 gallons, or 6 per cent., from that of 
the previous year. 

On account of the limited quantity of the Mystic supply at 
the beginning of the year, all of Charlestown District lying 
east of Cambridge street has been supplied from the Cochit- 
uate works during the entire year, with the exception of the 
periods between February 6 to 21, and May 18 to July 13. 

The following table shows the consumption per inhabitant 
for the past two years : 



Water Department. 



153 



Month. 



Cochituate. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita, 



1894. 



1S95. 



Mystic. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 



1894. 



1895. 



Combined Supplies. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 



1S94. 



1895. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . , 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 

Average 



108.1 

109.6 

99.7 



101.4 
110.3 

104.0 
98.2 
95.0 
94.8 
97.5 



104.9 

129.4 

107.1 

94.5 

97.3 

102.0 

104.2 

107.0 

107.1 

98.9 

96.7 

105.9 



91.9 
95.4 
83.0 
79.0 
82.1 
96.4 
93.3 
81.8 
94.3 
80.1 
81.3 
92.8 



99.1 



104.3 



87.6 



92.0 
94.8 
83.5 
77.3 
77.6 
83.2 
76.8 
76.5 
93.3 
81.1 
78.8 
86.1 



83.3 



104.5 

106.5 

96.0 

86.7 

90.2 

100.3 

106.5 

99.0 

97.6 

92.6 

92.7 

96.7 



97.4 



102.7 

120.7 

102.9 

91.5 

93.3 

97.6 

98.7 

101.6 

104.7 

95. S 

93.6 

102.4 

100.3 



The daily average consumption was, last year, 24 per cent, 
in excess of the dry-year capacity of the combined system 
of water supply. 

Whitehall Pond. 

Last June plans and specifications were prepared for a 
new dam at the outlet of Whitehall pond, for the purpose of 
increasing the storage capacity of the pond, but on account 
of complications arising by reason of the proposed taking of 
the supply systems by the State, nothing was done. It is 
now so evident, however, that the proposed increased 
storage of Whitehall pond is necessary that the construction 
of the new dam should be no longer delayed. 



Corrosion oe Pipes by Electrolysis. 

The investigations of the effect of electrolysis upon the 
water-pipes have been continued during the year, under 
the supervision of Messrs. Stone & Webster, and in brief 
the results arrived at are as follows : 



154 City Document No. 32. 

William Jackson, City Engineer, Boston, Mass. : 

Dear Sir : In our reports for the years 1893 and 1894 
we considered the theory of electrolytic corrosion of water- 
pipes, giving detailed accounts of the experiments we were 
carrying on, and of our methods of investigation. 

For the past year we have spent a great deal of time in 
taking hydrant readings in almost every part of the city 
where electric-car tracks are located, and have already made 
three minor reports on the work. 

During the summer of 1895 we confined our investigations 
to the most thickly-settled portion of the city, and along the 
car lines extendino; into the suburbs. These investigations 
showed that the electrical condition of the pipes had changed 
for the better. Headings taken at the service-pipe stations, 
which we installed in 1894, as described in our report for 
that year, showed also that there has been a marked 
improvement. 

In the fall we confined our investigations to the district 
about Brighton. Here in one locality we found slight indi- 
cations of electrolytic corrosion, and in our report for 
November we suggested the remedy of bending the pipes to 
the tracks at a point on Cambridge street. 

Owing to the fact that the ground was frozen, and to the 
unfavorable condition of the weather, we were unable to 
renew electrolytic investigations until the last of March. 
Since that time, however, we have made careful investiga- 
tions in Charlestown and East Boston, and have found no 
indications of danger in these districts. This result is in 
accordance with the observations made last summer. At the 
time of writing this report we are carrying on investigations 
in South Boston, the indications being that there are some 
points of danger ; but we have not arrived at conclusions 
sufficiently definite to be incorporated here. 

The electrical conditions of the pipes is in the main im- 
proving, showing that measures have been taken to lessen 
the possibility of corrosion. Notwithstanding this improve- 
ment, there are districts which are not entirely free from 
electrolytic action ; and, moreover, there is always liability 
to corrosion at isolated points, as well as the ever-present 
danger due to deterioration of rail bonds and supplementary 
return wires. 

(Signed) Stone & Webster. 



Water Department. 155 

Distribution. 

On the Cochituate works 26|- miles of pipe were laid and 
2|- miles abandoned, making a net increase of 23.1 miles 
and a total of 595.9 miles now connected with the system. 

A 20-inch main for the supply of Brighton was laid as far 
as Brighton avenue early in the season, and was in service in 
June. 

The 30-inch main for the South Boston low service was 
extended from Washington Village, through Dorchester 
avenue and D street, as far as Congress street, a length of 
8,373 feet. 

For the improvement of the high service in Roxbury and 
Dorchester, the 48-inch, 42-inch, and a part of the 36-inch 
lines, recommended in 1894, were laid cluring the year; the 
48-inch pipe extends from the junction of Fisher avenue and 
Boylston street through Boylston, Walnut, and Washington 
streets in Brookline, and through Huntington avenue, to 
Heath street, a length of 8,290 feet; 7,965 feet of this were 
laid by contract. At Heath street the pipe is divided into 
42-inch and 36-inch lines ; the 42-inch pipe continues through 
Huntington avenue, Clarendon street, Newbury street, the 
Public Garden and the Common, to Park street. Connection 
is made with the 20-inch high-service pipe in Huntington 
avenue, at Wait and Gainsboro' streets. On the Common, 
after connecting with the 20-inch high-service pipe, the 42- 
inch line is reduced to 30 inches. Opposite Temple place 
the 30-inch pipe is again reduced to 16-inch and con- 
tinued to Park street. The length of 42-inch pipe laid was 
15,478 feet, of which 9,186 feet were laid by contract. Water 
was let on to the 48 and 42 inch lines as far as Wait street 
on October 20, 1895. 

From Huntington avenue and Heath street the 36-inch 
line runs through Heath street as far as Parker street, and is 
connected with the 24-inch high-service pipe at Hayden street 
and at Parker street. These new lines have given an in- 
creased pressure in Roxbury and Dorchester, of nine and six 
pounds respectively at times of minimum pressure ; when 
the water was turned on, Parker-Hill Reservoir quickly filled 
up, and was shut off to prevent overflowing. It is now out 
of service, and will be maintained as a reserve reservoir for 
use in emergency. 

A small pumping-plant has been established on Wayne 
street, at Blue Hill avenue, to improve the service in the 
Elm-Hill district. 

The distributing mains connected with the Mystic works 



156 City Document No. 32. 

have been extended 4.9 miles, and 7.4 miles have been 
relaid. The total length now in service is 178.6 miles. 

There has been an increase of 242 in the number of 
hydrants connected with the Cochituate works, making a 
total now in use of 6,459. 

On the Mystic works 97 hydrants have been added, and 
the total now in use is 1,543. 

260 petitions for main pipe have been reported upon, and 
88 contracts for rock excavation have been made. 

Various profiles have been made, levels taken, and lines 
and grades furnished for the main-pipe laying. 

All pipe laid has been located and plotted on the plans. 

During a severe spell of cold weather in January the pipes 
between the islands in the harbor were frozen, and burst in a 
number of places. Service between Moon and Long Islands 
was at once reestablished by laying a 2-inch lead pipe, and 
as soon as practicable contracts were awarded for laying 
6-inch pipe, with Ward's flexible joints, between Long and 
Moon Islands and Long and Gallop's Islands. In each 
case the pipes were laid in a trench excavated 6 feet deep 
between mean high- water marks. After the lines were tested 
the trenches were carefully back-filled. A contract has also 
been awarded for laying a 4-inch flexible pipe from Long 
Island to Rainsford Island. This work is now in progress. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, etc., for the past year, and in addition, 
tables are given of the rainfall, rainfall collected, and per- 
centage collected on the Cochituate water-shed since 1863, 
on the Sudbury-river water-shed since 1875, and on the 
Mystic water-shed since 1878. These will be found valuable 
for future reference. 

Yours respectfully, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



Water Department. 



157 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Sudbury and Cochituatb Works. 



Daily average consumption in gallons 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 



Percentage of total consumption metered, 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates 
Yearly revenue from metered water. 



Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on February 1 

Yearly expense of maintenance. 

Mystic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons. . . . 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 



Percentage of total consumption metered , 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles , 



Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates .... 
Yearly revenue from metered water. 



Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on February 1. . . 
Yearly expense of maintenance. 



1892. 



11,225,900 

27.2 

65,074 

4,412 

536 

5,793 

$1,433,413 78 

$649,672 31 

45.3 

$22,243,351 56 

$392,762 21 

9,810,800 

78.8 

1,862,200 

19.0 

21,588 

550 

160 
1,223 

$394,008 75 
$105,685 56 

26.8 

$1,713,227 00 

$129,354 49 



1893. 



47,453,200 

107.5 

11,651,600 

24.5 

66,586 

4,585 

560 

6,042 

$1,637,531 94 

$683,948 52 

41.8 

$22,727,456 03 

$433,408 18 

10,742,500 

84.4 

1,921,570 

17.9 

22,398 

482 

165 

1,306 

$421,573 48 

$109,367 37 

25.9 

$1,721,609 33 

$160,643 97 



1894. 



46,560,000 

99.8 

11,170,400 

24.0 

68,556 

4,877 

572.8 

6,217 

$1,644,405 25 

$672,474 17 

40.9 

$23,583,967 89 

$440,840 63 

10,282,100 

S7.6 

2,014,000 

19.6 

23,257 

515 

173.7 

1,446 

$447,554 35 

$115,811 32 

25.9 

* $1,676,471 94 

$156,214 05 



1895. 

50,801,100 

104.3 

12,084,500 

23.8 

70,879 

4,910 

595.9 
6,459 

$1,784,954.01 
$711,467.39 

39.9 

$25,052,227.53 

$420,907.09 

9,467,000 

83.3 

2,105,800 

22.2 

24,120 

525 

178.6 

1,543 

$481,017.15 

$121,436.10 

25.2 

$1,803,775.29 

$189,194.61 



* $52,637.00 credited on account of sale of portion of Mystic Sewer. 



158 



City Document No. 32. 



- 


O 


ri 


« 


a 


Cts 


<! 


§ 

•<!» 


h 


c 




w> 








1 




^ 




s 





CI 


00 


co 


o 












































■ro 


CI 




Oi 


to 


-* 


CI 


jj CN 


00 


oo 


o> 


H 


Oi 


00 


o> 


00 


00 


o 


5 O 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 
















o 




















o 


CO 


o 






CI 




00 



<N ■ OS (N CO CD iO 



CI CO CO r~ I 



CI CD iO iH 



rH CO CO <M 

i—l CD iO CD 
OS OS OS rH 



OS rH <N rH 



OS OS OS Os 



» CO 


CO 


o 


00 


<* 


oc 


CM 

01 


CI 


o 

CI 


i-O 

oo 

.ro 


o 

CO 

o 


Ji ca 


00 


CO 


CO 


OS 


oa 


o> 


o> 


OS 


CO 


00 


i 2 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 

CO 


o 
o 

(01 


o 
o 


o 

o 


CO 

o 
oo 


o 
o 

CO 


- Cl 


• to 


IH 


CO 


co 


CO 


CI 


CO 


-i" 


IH 


■CO 



00 OS iO CO oo 



•3 CD 


CD 


t- 


co 


t- 


to 


?1 


O 


ta 


t- 


01 


JS CO 

D t- 
O 


fc- 
CO 


rH 


CO 
CD 

CD 


r-1 
O 


CO 


CO 

rH 


CO 
CO 

o 




CO 

I— 1 

CO 


CO 



3 3 


CI 


01 


CO 
OS 


iH 

CD 


CD 
01 


CO 


CO 
CI 


en 
- 


en 


cs 


H 3 


OS 


*- 


CO 


*- 


CO 


*" 


t ~ 


*~ 


CO 


t - 


D O 
3 O 
-i r- 1 


o 

o 


o 
o 

CI 


o 

o 


o 

o 

if: 


o 

o 

CO 


o 

o 


o 
o 
os 


o 
o 

o 


O 

o 


o 
o 



<M Ol CM OS 



<M rH »-t 
t- O rH 

O rH IQ 



iO CO OS 



rH *- ^ CD 



CO CO CO CO 



cq oo co 






CD CD I— 



rH CM i-H 



CO i- 1 ^ OS 



CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



a 5 

O . 0) 

^"3 2 

s o >, 

^ 2 « 
«gp 
si" a 

n 

O'C si 
ft? o 
co -a c3 
§5^ 

= p< 2 

& 0,03 

o <t *-; 

§ §2 

.»o 

o a^ 
pQ r-iJ 'a 

^ Ol ^ 
3H 21 
^ ^ GO 



£ I H. 



■^fi OS t^ 



CO CO CO CO 



CO CO CO CO 



u p -S 



d a ^ Q< 



pq a <i a '-5 



O SZ5 A 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diai gram showing the rainfall and daily era'ege Consumpti 




Water Department. 



159 









o 




o 


o 


CD 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 












o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 




o 








Pa 




o 


c 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


CD 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


c^ 








60 
S 


































o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


CD 




© 


© 


©" 


© 


o" 


cT 








~ a $ 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


CO 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 










© 






CO 


00 






Ci 


© 


CO 


t- 


©» 




CO 






































© 
© 






CD 


CO 


IC5 


Ol 






T-i 








CO 


o 


to* 








e 


CO 








CO 


-* 


© 


-n 


-f 


o 


© 


CO 


o 






0s 








Ol 


© 


© 


o 






© 


© 










































IS 








rr 










IH 












o 


CM 


ft 

00 






























1-1 


eo^ 
•o* 
o 


oo 

CO 






o 




o 




© 


o 








© 


o 


© 


o 


H 






© 




© 




o 


o 








o 


© 




o 


0) -^ 

^ C3 




o 




o. 




©_ 


© 








© 


© 


©^ 


o_ 








a 




























CO 






ffi 3 


o 




o 




o 


© 








© 


©" 


© 


c? 






^3 


© 


o 




o 






o 








© 


© 


© 


o 












o 






o 








to 


© 


tcc^ 


CO 










































o o 


e 






© 




t- 


"* 








© 


•a 


r-T 


CO 








^3 


05 






to 




00 


X 














OS 
00 












o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 












o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


CD 


© 


© 


o 








*J ^ 




© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 








a" 00 


a 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 










o 


©_ 


o 




CD 






© 


© 






© 


r-^ 


<D n 






































© 
© 






in" 


t! 






© 




-r 












o" 






^3 = 


s 




TK 


CM 


Ol 










o 




CO 


•O 






Cb 


©^ 


OS 




t- 


CO 


GO 




© 


© 


© 


© 




■** 






* 


T-7 












r-T 








r-T 


,-T 




o 

o 


© 


9 

50 






























rt 


00^ 


CO 










o 


o 


o 


o 








© 


© 


© 


o 


H 


© -2 








o 


o 


o 


o 








© 


© 


o 


o 










o_ 


p_ 


o 


© 








© 


© 


© 


o 


































cq* 






« 3 








©~ 


©" 


CD 


o 








© 


© 


© 


cT 






ol 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 








© 


© 


© 


o 






*s 






i-i. 


■-J, 


°^ 


^ 








i"i 


tH 


o_ 


CN 










e 






o 


-+ 


iO 


o 














ci" 










0s 






01 

•a 


CO 


01 
















CD 
CD 












© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


CD 


© 








© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 




-*j £ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 




P"Jo 


a 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 




es 


^ fi a) 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


U0 


ft 




o 


°i 


CO 


°i. 


©__ 


CD 




CO 




CO 


© 




*- 


c^ 




T-H^ 


































X) 








CO 




CO 


to 


o 


■* 


CO* 




01 


lO 






c^r 


AS 


e 


Ol 


\o 


01 


IH 


«r> 


ta 


■* 


o 


*T 




© 




CO 


CO 


CO 


H 


0! 


CO 


o> 


©^ 


C3S 


GO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


GO 


© 




^ 








r-T 




r-T 








i-T 
















































i-H 


rH 










o 




o 


© 


© 


© 


CD 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 












o 


© 




o 


o 


© 


o 




© 


o 


© 


© 


o 








2 "to 






o 


o 


o_ 


CD 


o 


CD_ 


CD^ 


© 


© 


© 




o 








s 


































.Co 


o 


©~ 


o 


o" 


o 


© 


o" 


©" 


© 


©" 


© 


© 


o 








r?"£f"3 

E-i 8 M 


© 


o 


o 




o 




© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 










CO 


■*_ 


Ol 




>* 


CO 


co_ 




eo 


ICI 


© 




CN 




© 


































© 
©^ 




as 


8 


o 


©~ 




01 


© 


OC 




t- 


'S 








CO 






0) 


CO 




Ol 


CD 


© 


t- 


-V 


© 




— 


GO 








« 


to 


CO 


to 


© 


© 


*~ 


a> 


CO 


CO 


© 


*- 


<M_ 


eo^ 


o 
o 


©* 


ft 

so 

H 






























oT 


lO 


00^ 
CO* 
CM 










© 


o 


o 


CD 














o 


■si 

J 3 


a 






o 
o 
© 


o 
o" 


o 
©_ 
o" 


o 

CD^ 

o" 














o 


CO 




s 






© 


o 


o 


o 














o 


^ 














o 


l ^ 


^v 














TO 






o o 


e 






U0 




-t< 
















c4* 








H ° 


03 






>* 


m 


r-l 


© 














o 

OS 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


<o 


© 








o 


o 


o 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 




O-ffl 




o 


©_ 


o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


© 


©_ 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


GO 




































H 


— o> 


a 


o 


©" 


©* 


o" 


CD 


o 


© 


© 


o" 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


Jt— 


ft 


m(2 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


Id 




© 


CO 


01 


c» 








© 




CO 


fM 




CD 


o 




OB 
H 




































a 




o 


CO 




o 


o 


lO 


Ol* 


eq 


ic> 






CO 




CM 


05 




to 






-l< 




vfO 


01 


CO 






© 


o 


o 


CM 




t— 


ta 


>o 


CD 


t- 


© 


t* 




t^ 


t- 


t - 


t- 


co_ 


CO 
































oo" 


00* 










o 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 




o 


© 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 








o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


CD 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


CM 






































© 

ft 


_ a o> 


a 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o" 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 




gftf 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 






CD 


o 


to 


CD_ 


co_ 


w 


IH 




■* 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


CO 




































« 


CO 


>o 


CO 




CO* 


CO 


•* 




to* 


©* 




lO 


CO 






m 


05 


iH 




a> 








© 


01 


o 


CO 


cq 




OS 


OS 






1T3 


T)l 


^c 


^ 


o 


■o 


© 


© 


o 


>n 


»rs 


© 


•o 


lO 
































CO** 


CD* 










O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 












O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 








Sm 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


CD 


© 


©__ 


©_ 


o 


o 


© 












































_ a $ 




o 


o 


o 


CD 


CD 


o 


© 


<coT 


©" 


© 


© 


© 


o 








°5 


© 


o 




o 


o 


CD 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 










10 






o 




CD 


© 








© 


CM 


O 




© 




e 


"** 


TN 




o 






-+ 


CO 




-i 






o 


o 


1 




05 








© 




© 


CO 


•<* 








o 


CO 


c^ 


CO 


ft 


t* 


1C 


*a 


■* 


© 


U3 


»o 


Til 


TH 


T|l 


■* 


lO 


■"i 


cd" 


»o* 


CO 




























CO 


o 

OS 

co" 


•*_ 


50 


OS 












CD 
















o 


H 


m o3 

1-5 -fl 




























cs^ 


CD 






© 










CD~ 

o 
















cT 

o 


co_ 
cO~ 
















«* 
















■^ 








O o 




































e 










CO 
















CO* 








^a 


03 










CO 
CM 
















CO 












O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


— 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 




3 "to 




O 


— 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 






o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO. 


so 






o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


es 


50 


j2 g« 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


z> 


CD 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO 




Til 








CO 


o > 


© 


© 




c» 




CM 


r- 






50 




































e 


Tl* 


to 










CO* 


to 






o 




-* 




© 


H 


03 


© 


o 




o 


© 


CO 


01 


01 


00 




IH 


© 


<N 








GO 


en 


to 


-* 


lO 


■* 


IT3 


© 


o 


-* 


-TH 


© 


c^ 


c^ 




































fl >J 


>>% • 


































O JH 


-^ O u 




































"3,^ * 




w 

o 
3 




>> 

a 
a 

03 
1-3 


>> 

03 

3 
■a 


p 


3h 




CD 

p 

1-CD 


3 

•-3 


cc 

so 


a> 

© 

CD 

"£, 

05 
DQ 


u 

05 

© 

o 


05 

© 

g 

05 

o 


05 

.© 

a 

CD 

o 

03 


*3 
o 

H 


2- 
> 

rf O > 


rs 05 

a >* 

o 

05 "Sd 05 

boti'TS 

s >% 

t>."s ^ 








£ 


1 


<1 


a 


<1 


o 


Iz; 


p 




E-i 


<l 



160 



City Document No. 32. 



^ 



CO 


^ 


r^- 


1- 


es 


i^ 


H 


C> 


£ 


o^ 


•«y 


M 


■>-; 


„ 




■» 


<-> 


8 




H 






^ 


^ 



e ^ 



S 



a 




kj 


<u 


^ 




•KJ 


.^ 


~ 


>^ 


^ 


Ol 




00 


^ 






>~ 


-^ 


?1 


<u 


'O 


<n 


cc 



^ 



K 


-^ 


o. 






« 


< 


■g 


> 


H 


« 


« 




<o 


^ 






^ 




w 






H 


Sss 



^ 



w 


,* 










'>: 


» 




■~ 




^ 


.8 


&i 












k.i 


^ 


^ 




'<> 



g 


«, 


^ 


<u 




r« 


C>, 


B 


s 


M 






s 




O 


V 


^r 










•>; 


t* 


u 


S 


V> 



01 






































sn a rrt 


































cci <*-< nj 


































■S a 2 


































a -2 o 


« 




5 O 






V o 


3 t— 1 CO 


o»» 


■^ 




b- 


POhS 


5~ 


































1? 
































■^ r a 


































a <s> 








Cft CC 


^TfOifseocotooi— i 


a a 


n 


o a 


\ csi 




co-^oj-^-^cococoioo 

COGlOOOSiOC^CDCOOCO 


<s;3 


IM i-l CM 




^r-iCOrHCqe^CMr-ICNTH 


M 8 


^ 


































__; 
















, 


















"3 




COCOOCDOOCDCN^-^OiOOeOCM 




CS l- 


I— , as CO rH cc 


5 O *^* -* CD O 


3 CD *t^ CO 


a 


cj 




» CO •* o c 


3 OO OS O if 




s as cm crs c-i 


■3 


^1 o ^ c 


^T tD -«ti -rji o r: 


1 "* O •* »f CD 


>> 
































average 
t of Rain- 
ollected 
Lake. 




o o o 




oooooooooo 




o o o 




oooooooooo 




ai co o 




CD O 1- 


^ rH C 




































CD CO QO 




t- OS t- r^ ^ r-f C ) iO 




OS fc— lr- 




(M o a 


> rH t* t» CO fc- 


<M CD 


o 


co a 






O) t- 


^ CO t- 






































I- . 




rHt-^*lr-COO'^*OCi-* 


>>a « _, 


e 


l-H l 




■^irHCOi-lCNCMC^HiHrH 


dS a— a 


03 
































'c3 ° "3 "" 


































p |<H 


































s 


^ 




o o o 




oooooooooc 


a —• a 




o o o 




oooooooooo 


»«■" 




t- o o 




ooooasoot-c^o 






































Oi I 


CO 




O i« i 


00 


s 


^ CO CD 




CD CC 


r-J^OSO^t-OSC-l 


a .a i; ^ 


o 


CN C33 IH 




io o ■; 




































CO cr 








CO CN r- C 


t- <3J W 


»o C 


e 


CO (M 00 




o oo cd a 


o a 








o 


Qs 


^ "^ ^ 




CO^ t# cc 


mI. "" 


°i a 


CCS^ O^ CM 


o o g 




CD CD t- 




tOCD^C^CDOOt-OOiT 


t- IO 


£H 










































O 


o c 






o 




c 






c 














o 


o c 






o 




o 


















o 


o c 






o 




cc 






cc 




















































o 


o c 






o 




c 






t-^ 












CD 


o c 


























o 


CO 










uo 




Cv 
















o 












































CC 












cr 
















lJ 


8 


CD 


T-l CN 






^ 






»c 






-r 












<£ 


CN 


cq « 






l"" 1 




Tt 














H 






































O 






































-a 
(3 








































































o 








C 






C 


c 




c 


c 




c 


c 




o o 


En 








C 






c 






c 


c 




c 


c 




o o 


m 








C 






c 


c 




c 


c 






c 




in irs 










C 






c 


c 




c 


c 




' c 


c 




CM CM 










a 






iC 






-1 


-d 




c 


c 




-* •* 






o 










a 


cc 


■ 




o 






a 




CN CM 




C3 






















4 






K 
* 












o 






cc 


o 




cc 


H 




cc 


c 




CO CO 




B 




o" 






CT 


o- 










c 


CC 




■* -* 






<ij 




c> 






«: 






o 


1- 




Ci" 


t- 




r- t- 






































£ 


































o o 




































*> a S •" 




































a-S op^ 


s 


































° ® „, >s 


































a.s^ 3 






































































oi— Its 




































* a 




































OQ 




































■a 




C 


c 


<= 


p 


i 


c 


c 


c 




c 


c 


c 


c 


- 








c 


c 


o 


e. 




c 


c 


c 




c 


c 


c 


cc 


c 






a- 


»r 


c 






c 


c 


c 




cc 


c 


IG 


c 




































1 & 3 




cc 




cc 






c 


o 


c 






c 


CC 


X 


c 










o- 


p 

, p 




c 


c 


c 




ir 


c 


c 


-r 


c 


CO 


-S 


IC 


5 


t- 




o 




c 




« 


CN 


CC 






o 






c 


cc 




c 






t: 


a 




c 




CO 




53 


CN 


cc 




c 




CN 


cc 




£ 




cr 


CC 


cc 


CO 


|Zj 


03 


C 








Is 




cc 


CT 


If. 








CO 


CC 


1? 




** 


. CO 


-!t 




c 








CO 




(M 


n 








a 




O 


c 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


c 




o 


c 


c 


o 


o 


« o 




C 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


cc 


cc 


o 


o 


o 


l-s.3 

"■go 








o 






c 


o 


o 


e 


cr 


CC 




I- 


c 


o 






































Oi 




oa 




o 


iC 


m 




U3 


o 




CO 


o 


IC3 




■d 


CO 


cc 


a 


oo 


cr 






c 




o 




o 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 






cr 




OC 




c 


c 


c 


CO 


CC 


IO 




































"d. 




-t 


O 


C35 


-d 


o 


a 


cs 


cr 


o 








CO 


!3 










O 


"^ 




O 


o 


CO 




o 


o 


01 


CO 


0! 


c 


, »~ 


cc 


t ^ 


-r 


cc 


cc 


„ <* 


CO 


cc 


c 


cr 




ec 


•*. 




c; 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


Tj 


«* 


^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


IO 


CO 


•* 


■* 


r- 


































P3 


































«! 


































H 


































h 




rt 














(N 




















CN 


CO 


■^1 


*a 


CO 


t- 


CO 


OS 


o 




CM 


CO 




in 


CO 












IO 


*a 


« 


m 




CO 


CO 


CD 








CO 








OC 


r r. 


12 




2 


CO 


oo 


oo 


CO 


cc 


CO 


OC 


00 


00 


rH 





Water Department. 



161 



CO »o CO -^ CO CO 



CO OS CO CO CM CO 



O iO »-t CO CO CO CO 



cm cm cn <n 






*0 iT5 CO »0 



CM CM *C CO Oi 



i« 00 CO CO 



CO tO rH 



o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


































o 


o 
















o 






















OS 






cc 




»* 


<M 






















o 










CO 














S? 


























o 












cn 
























o 


o 


CM 


to 


IO 


o 


IM 







CM rH rH 



-OCOCOOr^COCTi 



CO Ol rH 



U3 O Ol CO CO Ci 



>* 


o 


ci 


CO 


Id 


■* 


CD 


|H 


o 


m 


Ol 


CI 


CM 


1- 


OS 


CO 


o 


^ 


CO 




o 


eo 


OS 

m 

CI 


o 


o 


CI 

OS 


CI 
CD 




o 


o 

CO 


-t 


o 

id 


CO 
CO 


■* 


co 


CO 


to 

OS 


-* 

CO 


o 
c 

CO 


CO 

o 


CO 


OS 

CD 




oc 


fr- 




■<* 


«o 


00 


CO 


ȣ> 


CO 


" 


oo 




CO 


IO 


-* 


CO 


CO 


■o 


t ~ 


"" 



• o o 




o 






o 


o 




o 




































o 
































o 
















































































































































o> 














































































CO 






CM 


CO 








































































<M 




CO 


CM 






-* 
























1-1 






1-1 


















rH 


















o 






o 


o 


o 




o 














































































o 




















































































o 


o 


© 


o 


c 
































o 






a 


o 




































CO 


CO 


OC 


CO 




CO 








































































*o 


CO 


■* 






cc 


































CI 














































CO 




at 












































































CM. 




IM 










rH 


" 










o c 


c 


o 






o 


o 




o 


o 


































c 




o 










































to 




T 












oc 


o; 


C3S 


^3 ^ 


c 








H- 






CO 


CO 




































CD 


-f 






CO 






-1 












cm i- 




CO 


a 
o 


a 
o 


h- 




o 




os_ 


"i 


CO 


ICS 


©^ 


LC 


CO 


00^ 




°? 


CD 








fc 


*A 


r- 


-1 


fc 






-+ 


cq 






ir. 


CC 






























IM 


K 






























































(N 








tH 


CO 


rt 




CM 


rt 




~ 


r-l 


CO 


CO 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 






































o 


o 








































































































o 








































o 














o 
































a 


os 




GO 


os 






"* 


-^ 


CN 




CO 






tH it; 


K 




CO 


»G> 


1- 


cc 


CM 




to 


CO 




















































































































































ira 


CO 


CD 




fc- 








■* 


CM 


CO 


^ 


-* 


** 


-tf 


■<* 
















































162 



City Document No. 32. 



8 

S 
o 

^ fc 

-,^ 

■S3 



f«3 



8 -g 

S OS 

© qo 



~e 






- 




N~ 


s § 


B5 


& ^ 


< 


-4; ©> 


H 


"3 » 




^ «S1 




e 








O qi 








^ fc 




a «h 




§ . 




5* v' 




•s s 






^1 



6Q 



"73 ^ 
13 



►< g 



BQ 





o» 






























J3"- 1 S 


g 
























|-|| 


o 


-* 


<o 




o> 


C33 


es 


CO 










ia 




T* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


** 






Ph o u 


























a-d 


























.2 • 






lO 




t* 


>o 


■a 


CO 




CO 






•1 


a> 


a 


in 


o 


CO 


cc 


a 




CO 






o 




■* 


OJ 


id 




c5 


O 








'c5 ~ 


CO 


CI 


IM 


CO 


lH 


FH 


l-H 


CI 


CM 






«g 






















































CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


-+ 


CO 


CC 


CO 








oS 


■* 


a 


s* 


o; 


■51 


o 


c; 


c 


en 








c 


CC 


c 




ec 


a 


ic; 


c- 


cc 












o 




o 


■* 


CO 


•* 


co 


■« 


-* 






« 


N 
























® a 




o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Tj 


o 






verag 
of Rai 
Iccted 
ake. 




o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 




© 








<d 


cc 




CO 


'O 


c 


o 


c" 


00 




































CO 




CO 






ir. 








a 


>-o 




CI 






CO 




c 


t- 






o 






o 






CO 


CC 




-* 






*>oj 






























iG 


c 




c^ 


»r; 




CC 


CO 






>>2 °a 


a 


0) 


CN 


IM 


c^ 
















0> 
























a2d 


























A S>" 


























^, 




c 


o c 


a 


G 


CD 


o c 


o 






2- a 




c 


c 


=: 


o 


C 


C 


o 


G 


o 










■<* 






<c 


>rc 




CO 






Amo 
ainfa 
cted 
ake. 


8 
5 


CO 


o "^ 




u- 




CN 


tC 


03 






7,01 

5,71 
S 44 


c 


l- CO 

t-^ <c 

CO <? 


CJ3 CC 


CO_ 

T-T 






'otal 

of R 

colle 

L; 


e 




to cc 




er 


OC 


CD r~ 








03 


c 


Oi oc 


c 


c 


t- CN cc 

o ■<* cc 








t-< 




































C 


c 




c 























C 


G 




c 


o 




















c< 






c 


o 












































s 






c£ 






c 


o 


















EC 


»r: 




a 


o 














© 








c 






c 












































o 








-+ 


ec 




a 


CO 












1-1 


e 






cc 


itl 




cc 


03 












03 








c 






CM 










s 






























13 






























<1 


























































o 






c 


c 






c 






c 










H 






c 


c 






c 






CC 










OQ 






c 


cr 






c^ 






c 












































a 


'■C 






■>s 






c 












g 






(C 






or 






c 












o 










e 






T 















































■^ 






G 






<c 












e 










c 






c 














05 




T 






^ 






e> 


_ 








^ 






c 






c 




c 


c 






1 










c 






c 




c 


c 










«flS.S 






c 






c 




c 


c 




































sz; 2^ 






c 


> 








c 


e 










S 




c 






c 




c 


<c 










© 




-fl 


* 




ff 


* 


o 


C/ 










s|J8S 






c 






e> 




c 


CC 


r 








e 




o - 






c 




cc 


c 


> 








^1^ 


03 




o 






c 




a 


a- 










fc( P 




























OQ 


























"3 . 

«4H CO (V, 

« ea cd 




c 


c 


> c 


c 


c 


G 




c 


o 








c 


c 


c 


c 


cr 


C 




c 


o 








c 


c 




c 


c 


C 




c 


o 
































c 


a 




c 


c 


C 




c 


C33 






a 


c 






^r 


c 


c: 


a 


c 


CJ3 






g $■>! 


o 


e- 


c 


_ 


G 


c 


c 


« c 


« 


I— 1 






o '" a 

S-So 




c 


c 


c 


-! 






c 




" lO 






53 




t- 




tc 




IT 


y 




-* 






03 


c- 


c 


c 


c 


ec- 


O 


i cc 


1 CN_ 






«!££ 




■^ 


c 


e- 


tc 










of 






F 


























a 

°s5 




c 


>' c: 


3 C 


> c 


> c 


3 C 


J c 


3 C 


3 O 








c 


> c 


> c 


) c 


> c 


3 C 


J c 


v c 


3 O 










I 


i a 


a 


c 


L ,r 






• co^ 






cc 


c 


" a 


i c 


a 


* r 


* o 


r o 


r * 


r co* 






+2 *-i cfl 




c 




i i 




a 


3 CI 


3 C 


3 Cf 


3 T* 






g-sj 


C3 


*r 


i -e 


l< i- 








I C 


3 t 


to 






B a ° 






3 C 


3 O 


c» 


3 ^ 


f C 


3 C 


3 T 


h en 






e 


Q 


> fc- 




1 c 


5 <f 


3 C 


I C 


4 IC 


3 ICO 






03 


C 


3 11 


3 i 




3 "* 


!• tC 


3 it 


3 CI 


3 C-> 






<?££ 






H u 


3 i£ 


3 l£ 


3 U 


3 if 


3 kf 


3 >C 


3 lO 






« 




















CD 

cm 






< 




















c4 


























> 

< 










a 


3 C 


3 C 


3 r 


4 C 


1 a 


3 T 


H u 


3 










a 


D O 


3 a 




3 C 


3 C 


3 C 


3 C 


3 






■ 






c» 


3 r> 


j a 


1 


^ C 




3 o 


D o 


3 







Water Department. 



163 



~.1 


OS 




00 


tel 


M 




© 


s 




g 


»o 




f^ 


►s" 


CO 


<o 


M 


s 


53 


« 


nj 



> 

r— 1 




I 




M 


<S 


y 


o 


fti 


M 


*» 


^ 


pq 




«3 


< 


=c; 


« 


h 


^ 






S 








£ 




a 






OQ 


V. 



"^ 



s 

•* 

§ 

o 








o> 






oc 


■* 




co 


« 


r- 


CC 


m 


c- 


CC 


•* 


id 


co 






.2 « 5 






oc 


cr 




kC 


O 


CC 




-t 


C 


■^1 

er. 


ur 
O 


K 


°1 

ci 




a*- "3-5 


■3 


■* 


o 


lO 


<* 


« 


■^ 




M 




■* 


<* 


iQ 


CO 




g SG3 


5~ 
































S « o 


3 




































oc 


oc 




u- 


<N 


1C 


CN 


cc 


-+ 


<c 


if: 


fc* 


03 




ST3 






o 


-* 


cc 






^c 


cr 


oc 


CC 




e 


O 


-* 




a a 




5 


a 


cc 


■fl 












t-- C33 


of 


Ci 


t>; 




"a ° 
.5 o> 


< 


c 


« 


•r 


c 


or 


C- 


c 


oc 




CO 


CO 


CI 


Tj 


O 




CN 


CN 


<M 


c-: 




T- 


CN 


I-l 




(M 


IH 


« 


CSI 


CO 




<S"3 


,s 
































C3 o 


s 




































c 


CO 


oc 


T- 


CT 


t- c 


■^ 


c 


v« 


vrc 


if; 


\r. 


tf5 








G 


to 




K 




t- CC 


<cr 


OC 


--" 




cc 


G 


CO 




3 




-* 


IC 


c 


cr 


5 






K 








G 


I- 


-* 




•si 


«: 


o 


"d 


t^ 




oc 


5 


<r 


o 


t^ CO 


CC 


IM 


1^ 




a 


■4 


-J- 


■« 


*c 


3 


cr. 


« 


cc 


^* 


■ql 


"* 


Tf 


>o 




"3 


































O 


































OD 




c 


o 


C 


c 


c 


e 


c 


— 


c 


c 


o 


G 


G 


o 




:.-. □ 




c 


CD 


c: 


o 


c 


c 


G 




a 


G 


o 


G 


G 


© 








cn 


■* 


CM 


w 


CI 


K 


a 


c-t 


CN 


(M 


cr 




CO 


OS 




ave 

our: 
low 
iver 


s 


a 


oc 


es 


<s 


(N 


9 


CO rKl 


CC 


CR 




O 




<M 




© 


— 




tz 


cc 


-* 




K 




»n 


<N 


c~ 


CO 




■^* 






iC 


c^ 


M 


ac 


cr 


6 


CC 


cc 


G 


a 


t- 






CO 




its <1 <w 

C8 O 


B 




oc 


■^ 


cs 


cr 


(M 


CO ^ 


C 


•^ 






CC 






Qs 




oc 


a 




CC 


■*t 


*- cc 


-f 


cc 


cr 


OC 


OC 


CN 












































































c 


a 


c 


c 


c 


C 


c 


c 


C 


c 


G 


G 


G 


o 








c 


a 


c 


G 


cr 


c 


O G 




G 


cr 


G 


G 


o 




a 




c 


c 


c 


C 


c 


cr 


G 


c 


G 


C 


G 


C 


G 


o 




■3 9 fe ** 

C3 p P- q> 




































c 


o 


c 


C 


cr 


c 


C> C 


G 


C 


G 


G 




o 






c 


a 


lO <- 


cr 


c 


O O C 


o o 


G 




o 




o 




a 




C 


a 


CO c 


1G 


I-l ■* 






CO 




o25> 
Eh Sfeaj 

o 




































CO 


cr 


Ti 


c^ 


oc 




CC 


cc 


c 


** 


CC 




CO 1 






© o 




c 


Ci 


5 i 


c 


CO r- 


« 


cc 






Qs 


U" 


cc 


■^ 


Cf 


ifi 


*r 


OO 1 


CC 


G 




CC 


cc 


t- 




































1^ ( 


^* 




»r 


cb < 


a 




CO 






CM 


co 


CO Tt 


CV 


T- 


CM CM T-H CO O 


CN 


CO Til 












© 








o 


G 


G 




o 


















© 








G 




G 


G 




G 


















c 








C 




G 


G 




G 


















c 








C 




C 


" c 




C 














s 




g 








cr 




G 


G 




G 














o 












or 




CC 


-5 




CT 












o 


^ 




c 








oc 




e> 


~ « 
















r-H 


b 




CC 








d 




in 


S 




^d 










H 






















»~ 



















































5 








































































o 






C 




c 


c 


c 




c 






C 




c 


c 


o 




f-i 






C 




c 


cr 


c 




c 






G 




G 


G 


o 




DQ 






G 




c 


c 


cr 




c 






G 




C 


G 


o 












































C 




c 


c 


c 




c 






G 




C 


C 


o 






c" 


g 


C 




c 


c 


c 










G 




G 


c 


o 








0" 








o 










CC 




u- 


T 


CD 








^s 


































CS 


cc 




e> 


-1 
















-: 


b- 


o 






O 


CiS 










cc 










-: 




« 




cn 












r ^ 


o 












k 






CO 












































c 


o c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


C 


G 


C 


C 


o 




«M 9 

o o 




g 


O G 


c 


c 


c 


c 




G 


C 


G 


G 


G 


o 






g 


o c 


G 


c 


c 


c 


c 


G 


G 




C 


C 


© 




































_ t. t. . 




c 


o c 


c 


c 


c 


G 


G 


G 


C 


C 


C 


C 


© 




Amount 
Wate 

wasted f 
River 




c 


o c 


c 


c 


cc 


G 


c: 


C 


c 


G 


G 


G 


© 




o 


cc 


CO V 


c> 


IT 


c 


C 


a 


C 


O 


cc 


G 










c* a 


»r 






C 


D 


1- 


a 


OC 




-H 


I © 








rji or 


c 




c 








C* 


t- 





CC 


Tjl 




03 


o 


a> -i 




5 


r 


o 


e 


C- 


c 


« 


c 


cr 


© 




































Tj 


CO Cs 




c 






cc 






> a 




»f 


i 03 






o 


CS1 cr 


c 


Cn 


P 








c- 


r- 


c> 


1 c- 


CO 




a 
























G 


c 


C 


© 




o oj-a o 
























G 


G 


G 


© 


























C 


G 


G 


C3_ 






g 






















G 
G 


G 
G 


G 
G 


© 




y — > &-» 
























CC 


CC 


IT 






Amoi] 

Water 

y Fram 

Wate 


^ct 
























CC 




i-T 




B 






















G 




a 


CO 




Qs 




































































































S ®_ 




c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 




C 


c 


© 




•^^^-H 




c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


= 


c 


G 


C 


G 


c 


© 




<ScS«3 . 




c 


c 


c 


c 




c 


c 


c 


c 


C 


G 


G 


G 


© 




L^2w.s 




c 


c 


c 


= 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


C 


C 


C 


C 


© 






c 


c 


>c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


C 


C 


G 


C 


© 




mount of 
iverted to 
Cochituati 
Chestnut 
Reserve 


a 


a 


!_ »■ 


er 


I- 


e- 


c 


c 


r 


G 






CC 




t— 




o 


1C 


a 


-l 


c- 


CJ 


c 


If 


iC 


H- 


c 




CC 


; 


-*" 










c 




>! 





-1 


V 


■r 


T- 





cc 








B 




* 


cr 


4 






or 


t- 


■r 




r 


c^ 


. r- 


e» 




03 


c- 


c^ 


T- 


V 


c* 1 


cc 


or 


r t- 




cc 






cc 


t-T 




































<«- 


































« 


































<J 


































a 


































fcn 






> cc 


t- 


« 


a 


3 C 


3 a 


3 a 


3 a 


3 ■« 

3 a 




> cc 


) t- 


; " 










ot 


cr 


a- 


X 


a 


> Q 


3 01 


3 a 


3 a- 


:j 











164 



City Document No. 32. 






s 

| 


e '5 







< ^ ^ 
Eh s •- 



o 0$ 















*- 


-l< 


© 


-f 


*n 


o 


© © 






i? ~V 






°i 




CO 








© 




"S 


QO 


© 


iO 


o> 


U3 


© 






ercenti 

of 
Rain fa 
ollecte 


Ss 


ta 


ITS 


*o 


CO 


<* 


-+ 


ij -5 
























Cm 


























to 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


■* 


<M 


© CO 




—i 73 




if3 


OS 






t- 


oc 


OS CO 




"5 3 


S 


© 


OS 


to 


""? 


t^ 




rH CO 








OS 


cd 




CO 




cc 


^ oi 




Ss 




CM 


CM 


CI 


1-1 


U<1 




<M CX 




s -p 






















tfg 


s 
































o 


© 




l£> 








iO 


o 


<M 


CO 




-i- 


<M 




7a 




o> 


© 






ex 


t- 


© CO 




•§ 


OS 


CO 


c» 




CO 


CT 


© >rs 




a 


■* 


U3 


■<* 


"* 






o ■* 


























'5 


^ 




















co 

sua 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


— 


© © 






o 


o 


o 




© 


© 


© © 










lO 


o 


CO 


cc 


© © 




03 P t> t- 

t» P £ 0) 

5 0.° t» 




© 


GO 




CO 


CO 


t^ <M © 




o 


CO 




CO 




© 


CT 


CO CM 






o 








CT 


CB 


© CN 




rt o 


8 


■* 


CO 


oc7 


CO 


t-T 


t-^ © 00 




Qs 


o 


os 


a> 


>o 


*~ 




CO t- 































© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


c 


© 








o 


o 


CO 


s 




© 


c 






-u a 




©^ 


©_ 


o 


© 


o 


CT 


c 


© 


























•3 S fe •-' 
ej p is 3 

o °.2 > 




©" 


©" 


o 


o 


© 


CT 


c 








o 


© 


o 




© 


CT 


c 






-S 


©_ 


°1, 


°i. 


co_ 


CO- 




CT 


©_ 








©" 




C0~ 


CO* 






o" 




En 5 hod 
o 


« 








© 


*n 


- 


e> 


t- 




<S 


OS 


CM 


o 

CO 


*a 


■* 




CC 


OS 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CJ 


o< 


o 


cc 


<M 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


















o 


o 


o 


© 


o 
















S 


o 
o 


o 
© 


© 

o 


o 

o 


© 
© 




















-r 






CO 














O 




<M 




o 




CT 














HH 


8 




o 


o 


>o 


CO 














Cb 








(M 


*- 












H 










.H 
















CS 


























<< 


























K 


























o 
















© 


c 








02 
















c 


c 










• 












c 


c 


% 






















c 


c 










P 














c 













o 












tc 


o 


























t- 










o 


e 












c 


Cf 










OS 












o 




N 




































o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


c 


c 


> © 




<H P 

° . o . 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


c 


s © 






© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


c 


c 


s t- 






o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


c 


c 


s © 




PS^S 


s: 


o 


© 


o 




o 


c 


c 


> © 




© 


■* 




CO 


o 








3 CO 




Amou 

Wa 

wasted 

Riv 




o 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


© 


ir 


u 


S CM 

5. ^ 








CO* 








cc 


ir 


r c<r 






CO 


CM 


OJ 


1-1 


rH 






H CM 




a 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


c 


) c 


3 © 




•f-,73 « . 
O 03 -P O 




o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


c 


> c 


3 © 




• 


o_ 


o 


o 


c:^ 


o^ 


c 


^ c 


- ^ 




p 3 .3^ 




o" 


o 


o" 


o 


o" 


c 


r c 


>" esT 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


c 


s c 


3 t- 




© 


o 








© 


c 


s c 


^ rH 




s « 2£ 


e 


as 


■* 


© 


IN 


CO 




c 


1 to 




no 






CO 


© 




< c 


3 CO 




0: 














< r 


•i 
























XI 






















3 a) 




o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


c 


s c 


> © 




~,M73-2 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




> c 


3 © 




c3 o3 a H3 . 




o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


c 


s c 


3 ■"* 




of VV 
to L 
ate a 
ut H 
rvoir 




o 


c 


o 


© 


o 


c 


s c 


3 rH 






© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


c 


> e 


3 CM 




o 


OS 
CO 


o 

CO 


CO 
CO 


>o 


OS 


e 


5 a 


3 t- 
3 © 




^ 73 p a as 




© 


OS 


© 


CO 


CO 






3 rH 




0U1V 

erte 

chit 
best 

Ren 


e 


co^ 


o 










'- ° 


3 CJS^ 




03 


CO 


to" 


00 


o" 


,_7 


c 


1 <■■ 


3* ©" 
































































. 






















o 






















so 




K 






















<1 


























as 


o 




Ol 


CO 


T 


h u 


• 03 

> 

^ 








00 


o> 


o 


CT. 


OS 


c 


<s C 










CO 
rH 


00 

H 


OD 


CO 


CO 

rH 


a 


3 G 









Water Department. 



165 























































5P«T3 






















































































































































*a 


t- CO c 






op5 =; 

3<n g 
CLi O 


i. 


"f 


*G> 


■5 


■«* 


CO 


■«* CO OS u^> OS OS 
-* CO CM -<* CO -Hi 


-# 


-n 


o 


CI O O ••# CO tfS -^ 
O CO "* -^ CO CO "* 




^ 














































3"d 

s3 <d 


















































OS 


CO 


CM 


-^ 




t- iO CM CO iO lO 












a § 




















■rt* 


O CO OS CO -* -^ o 




l| 


o 


o 


CM 




CO 


<N 


SO *fi OS © t^ CI 


-I 












^ 


















CO 


CI 


CM CM rH rH rH i-i CM 




^ 






o 


>o 










































OS 




















a 


"S 












OS i-i CM CO iO »0 


*# 




CO 


CO r^ r-( (M (M t- 












-H 






rH OS i-l t# --H m 


!D 










> -* 




03 


^ 














■*n 


IO 


o 


^f "^ CO ^ CO ^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© o o o o o 


o 











gog« 

© +j M 
















o 










°= 


o 


oo* 




© 


tjT 


co r-T cf oT r-T cT 






Cfl 


CO O t-- tf 


i. "^ °^ ^ 






























Daily a\ 

amom 

Rainfa] 

lected in 
















(M CS tr~ •*& OS 


CO 






CO CD CO rH ^ji o" 


















CO OS rH ir 


CM GO 




























CM i-H rH (M 


oq 


CO 


CO 






uj 














































"3- a 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o o o o o 




























c? 










































°S^ • 


2 


CO 


CO 


otT 


o 


CD 


OS Tj* t- ^J 


OS CO 






j^r 




r ec 






1 An: 
Rain 

[ecte 
1/ake 




























s 






o" 


CO 


co~ 




■*_ 




CO 


O iO OS CM t- CC 


<M 
















<M CO if 


3 CM OS t- 






OS 








J«o 


CK 




















rH CO -* rH t- r- 




















tr- ** OS CO O 


o 


ri< 










CH 


























T-4 


rt 


r " 1 




















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 









o o 






































o o 








































o o 


o 


o 




O O 


o o 












S 






o 


o 


o 






OS 


o o 


o 


































































































O 
1-5 
























































CO 




eo 


CO 




































o 






























H 




<is 










rH 




















^ 
































































->1 




















































O 


































































o 


© 




© 








* 
























































































— 


o 




c 
- 










© 






c 






a 




























































c3 














'- 




CO 

© 
















c 






o 






























































Os 




















































© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 






























































































o 
























00 


-t 


CO 


t- 


H 


rH 


c 


" CO 


C3 


CO 


© 




CO 


CO 


1^ 


















a 






























































c 




<N 


(M 








t- 


c- 


»f: 










OS 


o 


00 


O 




t1 


■^ 




Tj 


cc 


CO 




^* 




















""So 


e 
































































if: 


tr- 


-f 


CO 


oo 


O 


c 


Tl 












05 




fc- 


CO 


«* 


CM 


ifi 


T* 


C< 


cc 


ir: 




t . 


r-l 


CO 


cr 


^ 






c 


























































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 












































o 




























































C3 


c 




cc 














GO 


o 


a 


CC 


■^ 






























g 
o 






















-* 




CM 








































O 


CI 






c 


a 






a 








o 


o 


1— 


o 


CI 


if: 


c 


<H 


a: 


O 


























2.2 S 

O c3 O 






















ex 


























03 


















-+ 




oo 


o 


CM 


o 


c 






CC 




■^ 














CO 


CM 


CM 


<M 


01 


CI 


c^ 


<M 


CO 


CO 


OQ 


CO 


CO 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 




« 
















































<t 
















































H 












































5C 




fH 












































CD 
> 
<l 








CO 


fc~ 


GO 


OS 


o 


,— 1 


CM 


CO 


-<* 


m 




j^ 








,_, 








iO 






















































































































rH 




T-! 


i-H 

























166 



City Document No. 32. 



^8 



to .O 



r-O (^ 



S 2 



k2 s 
5» 1 



s 
e 



•aoiA.ias q3{H 

^'jcnqxo'jj 
'isajjs najaB M 

aBnoq-aatSng; 



•80IAJ83 q§iH 

aajsaqoaoQ 

'^aaiis paBAiBH 

'81 -ojsi 

asnoq-aaiSug; 



•eoiAaaa qSifj 



CM (M i-i i-H i-l iH 



CO OONMOH^ 

2? ^ ^ S c5 ^ O 

00 00 01 Ol o C" o 



OO CO ifi UO 



CM CM CM CM CM CM 



01 D-*n-^ t-o 

I— I N^iO^Ho 

i-H t— < CO T ~ ' CO *— ' CO 

IM CM CM CM CM CM CSI 



fc- lO CM 



COrHCOCDOlOloOi-' 
OlOlOlOlGOt— COCO 



b- t^cocjai 1 



O Ift i-H CO cm 

00 CO CO iO CO* 



CM CM CM CM CM CM 



£- N -t O ^ fl" t- 

© r-^-*oJOo 

IT3 itt cm IT. cm ri co 

CM CM cm CM cm CM M 



CD CO I-H 



Oi Ol Ol Ol Ol CO 



co oo m cm 



CM CM CI CM CM CM 



S! d rt S ri m ■* r- 1 co r? 



O « OO H t- 
CM CM CM CM? 



OTi 



'nAV0^88[JBqO 

'SS 'Oil 
asnoq-aniSug; 



CD CO r- 



OO 00 CO CO OO OO 



■* CM © OO CM 



) CM OO OO 



O O CO ,-H rH ,-H 



I-H i-H ,-H ,-H iH ,_, i-H iH 



*il ■* -ti -* 



•aaisaqojO(j 
'iaa.i18 aaAi 1 }! 

'9t 'OK 
asnoq-auiSng; 



Ol Ol Ol Ol 



OO OO Ol CI 



CMOSCOC1COCOCOCO 



'qaa.r|s sijej 

'6'Oij 
asnoq-auiSng; 



■noiaog *og 
'jaaa^a q^moji 

'S-ojsI 
asnoq-auiSag; 



•^CMCOOO»Ot-(COCO»OiO 
ciot-^OloOt^COo'i-HCO 
COCOCOCOCOOOOIOSCIOI 



CM i-H i-H 



IC3 CD CD CD tH *C 



•uojsog *og 
'iaa.i}s 
BsajgnoQ 

'88 '°K 
asnoq-auiSng; 



id CO CD CM lO »d 



•^aaj}s isbji; 

'I -OK 
asnoq-aaiSng; 



•jaaa^s raajBg 

'8 'OK 
asnoq-aaiSag; 



•notncaoQ 
uojsoa 



CO O CM id 



i-l O O i-H 



CO CO CO O 



T-" Ifl 00 i-H 



Oi Ol 01 



CM CO CO 00 



© Ol 00 



en co co co oo co 

CI OS Ol Ol CI Ol 



Pq 3 <1 S 



I B 



O fc c 



<N O o M rf ■■* N J 



s 


O 


1T3 


o 


•* 




lO 


■* 


?-( 


-TP 


TH 


o 


CO 


o 
















t^ 


t- 






t- 


t' 


^ 






























iC 


■* 


o 


-* 


o> 


CO 


t- 


rf 


CO 


115 


-# 


t- 


CO 




OS 






CO 


OJ 


O 


a> 














^ 














o 


















r " 1 




1-1 


1-1 


'"■' 


T-H 


H 













Ol 


a> 


1-H 


I-H 


CO 


CO 


a> 


CM 


CO 


o 


CO 


00 


I-l 






-+ 
























^ 


Oi 


00 


o> 


Ol 


O) 


Ol 


en 


Oi 


o> 


o> 


OS 


o 


OS 





CO 


r*i 


I-H 


© 


^ 


cq 


Ol 


U^l 


t— 


t- 


Ol 


I-H 


H 


g 


*n 


b- 


en 


lO 


Id 


CO 


TH 






CO 






CM 


S( 


a 


OO 


CO 


CO 


O! 


Ol 


Ol 


c. 


Ci 


Ol 


OJ 


Ol 


a; 



P..2S: 




•jaiBaq 




o 


CO 


HI 

as 


CO 


CO 




















Water eva 
orated 
boilers p 
lb. of co 


ja^BAv-paaj 
, Snfpupui '•£ 


S 


r-H 


O 


o 


o 


o 




















glg ?b paB tooj.1 






































to 




CI 


I- 




















•IBnioy 


■sq-j 


CO 
OS 


as 


CM 
CO 


CO 


o> 


























o 


© 


o 


— 


o 






























o 




o 
























































•Snnqgi[ ptre 




CI 


o 


rH 


I- 


t- 




















|g 


Surreaq joj pa-joajJOQ 


K 


.- 


CI 


-f 


CO 


1-1 




















h3<H 




CO 


-f 






e 




















fa o 








CO 


CO 






























o 








o 


O 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 






















o 














c5 


•SuiiqSn 


J° 


^ 


L ^ 


1"^ 


CO 


-f 


|H 




^t. 






^ 


a 


^ 






puB Snireaq joj 
































h^ 




o 


o 


o 


OJ 




C) 


GO 


-T 




CO 


-* 


>0 






p 


uojcpajjoo ^noqji^ 


^ 








CO 


CO 


o 


O 


CO 


o 


^ 






OS 




P 






*~ 


*~ 




*• 


t- 


OS 


OS 


05 


a> 


uu 




CO 


t ~ 


















CO 
























































•Snidran<j 


•co 


CO 


to 


o_ 


t- 


■*_ 






















































o 






CO 


M 


CO 


CO 


co 














































































. 






o 

03 


•SniiqSi^ 


►cs 


» 




°i, 


■* 


























cq 




i-i 


H 


H 






















































































5 


•Sarreajj 






<M 


Cl 


o 






































-f 




CO 


■<* 


o 




CO 








as 






o 


CO 


o 


o 


CB 


OS 




i-i 








•cjaaj ni jjif aSvxdAY 


5 


oi 


CI 


IM 


on 


CM 

CI 


o 


O 
Ol 


■~ 


o> 


cc 

01 


o 

Oi 


o 

Cl 


CM 




■SnijqSi[ ptre Sai 


« 








CO 


o 




















-IBaq JOJ paj03.I.I00 'JBOO 


e 


C-1 


CO 


O 




CO 




















jo -qj .iad padocmd A'lrnreriJ) 


5b 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






















•SuiiqSq jo Sajaeaq 


.8 










CI 




OS 




CO 


»T5 


CO 


CO 
CO 


■* 




joj aorjoajjoo o^j -reoo 


c 


CI 


■* 




m 


-* 


o 


o 


CO 


o 




as 


CM 


OS 




jo - qj jad padamd AipaBn^) 


55 


L " 




*" 


*" 


*" 










CO 


*~ 


o 


t ~ 




*9J9 


•}UdD 


00 


CO 


IN 


r* 


CO 


CO 


^» 


--^ 


t- 


t— 


o 


CM 


CO 


































-qnip pnB saqsB '^nao ja<j 


Md 










*-< 












1-1 


























CM 


co 


CO 






CM 
















CI 




M 








O: 












CO 


-fl 


H 


O 


o 


CO 


CO 










CO 






•sjaqntio pnB saqsB rejox 


J3 


CO 


05 


-+ 


CO 
CO 


CO 


iO 


O 




CO 
CO 


■* 


CM 


CO 


CM 

CO 


























































-* 


CO 




OS 




•paomsnoo jeoo 
jo ^unorrjB aSejaAE a^ibq; 


5 




** 


CO 

rH 


IH 


*£3 

o 


<N 


- 


CO 
C) 
rH 


CM 

CO 
H 


CD 
CO 


c: 


o 

Cl 


i 
















o 










-)■ 
































Ol 




















CO 












CM 




Cl 


























































CO 


CM 


CM 






































-aoo reoo jo lanonre ibjox 


^ 


Tjl 


^* 


-1- 


CO 


CO 








CO 


-f 


CM 




CO 

co" 












O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~ 


O 


o 


o 






































g 


o 




O 


CO 


C) 


CO 


CM 


cc 




CO 






to 




•padramd 


M 




i^r 


cc 


CO 


t _ 


CO 


lA 


-t- 


OS 


Cl 


CO 


•«* 




^anoniB aSBjaAB Sivbq 




o 

U3 


Cl 


M 


o 




c5 




CO 


OS 


L- 




.o 


CO 






5b 


o 


s 


ra 


co 


CO 


o 


o 


o 




I-l 


o 


*" 


o 




















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


»o 






















o 


o 












































































■dtis JOJ paAVOHB 
iiZ 'padamd cnmomB xb:jox 
































•S 


o 


CO 


02 


c l 


<o 


o_ 


CO 
CO 


CO 

•^1 


CO 


e> 


^* 


cc^ 


■*_ 






5b 




















CO 


C7 


CM 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CI 




1-1 




CO 


CO 


Cl 




of 




































































CM 






a'S 




o 


CO 


t- 










o 


C) 




Cl 


lO 








II 


s 
















TJ1 




CO 






00 






















CO 




o 


CO 












GO 


l— 






CO 


CO 






CO 






CO 


<M 




to 


















CM 


co 


CO 


CO 




OS 




") ft 


5b 


5 




o 

01 




o 




CM 


CI 










OS 






•u-lfir 










o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




















-Tf 


CM 


o 






o 




















o 


o 


uo 


CO 


o 




CM 


tfO 




fa 


•acnrj Snidcand IB}0X 


•»J>H 


* 


CM 


■* 


CI 


<M 


c^ 


a> 




CM 


CM 


1-1 




cm" 




















o 




o 


CD 


o 




o 




























o 






CO 






n -0 






O 


CO 


OJ 




CC 




o 




CD 












is 

Is 


g 














00 








OS 


CO 


CM 






















Ctt 




CO 










o 




CO. 




CO 


m 




(M 


o 


oo^ 


l ~^ 


ir v 


i~i. 




























CD 




CO 


>o 






5b 


s 


C7. 


o> 


CN 


CO 


t* 




CD 


(M 








!-T 






•Ml/f 














^0 




O 


*a 


o 








c5 
5 




«o 


■* 


o 




(N 


C^J 


■>* 




"T 


Cl 
























o 








-* 


CO 






fa 


■arat; Snidumd peiox 


•SUff 


CO 


l£3 

ill 


<N 


CO 
U5 


en 
CM 




o 

CI 




*~ 


CJ 


■* 




CO 
































■* uT 






























































P 




1ft 




>s 


S-l 
















t- 






C3 OB 




© 


g 


oa 




^3 












ti 


— 


ti 


s 


to C3 








H 


^ 


a 

' 1-5 


0) 

fa 




ft 


03 

s 


a 

1-3 


'3 

1-5 


60 
< 


ft 

m 
□Q 


o 
a 

C 


> 
o 

to 


o 
o 
A 


O cS 





168 



City Document No. 32. 



Hi 


1 


as 


Is 


<! 




H 


■^ 



•te 

























£ 
























































12 2 


























































DQ 




























03 a 








jj 




















£ * 






CO 


o 




















CO CO 






a 


£ 




















0" 

































of 






















a a 






■H 






















'Si 'Sa 

a a 






© 






















H W 






a 
































'3) 

a 


























O 


000 


O 


















o 













000 


O 





>ii«a 


a 


CO 


us 




-*_. 







th 


CO 


r-l CO 




I-H 


H 


^ss 



































CM 






OS 


CO 




*-H OS US 


O 


CO 




o > a 










o> 


OS 





-f 


■* 


CI 


us rH CM 




rH 




a 


o_ 


*~, 


*"^ 


-* 


c» 


CO 


c» 


■* 


OS. ^ CD. 


CM^ 


■* 




a o3 


S3 






O 


O 


0" 




0" 


T-T 


rH* i-T of 


cm" 




r- 1 


»■* 


rH 


T-i 


*H 


l~t 


1-f 


rH 


rH rH rH 




rH 
































a 


a 










O 


O 


O 








O 


OOO 


O 


O 


g 


§■§ 










O 


O 


O 








O 


O O CO 


O 


CO 


p 




02 




O 


CO 


01 


CD 


CO 


■* 


t- Tjl IQ 


CO 


US 
































QQ 











CO 


CM 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


■*" 






us 


c 


OS 


<s 


CN 








CO 


fc- 


-* 




CM 1 


OS 






Sa 




C/D 


to 


*- 


OS. 


■* 


CM 







CM 1 - 


CO 


































r2 s 


8 


CO 




-I- 









oT 


-+ 


CO CO 











0) 


T* 


CI 






TH 








O CO CO 


CO 


CD 




o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co CO CO 


CO 






Eh 




























■* 




»&* 






































O 









CO 






























O 




o3 


<N 


-f 


t- 


cc 


OS 




OS 


01 






CO 


CM 


O. 




aj8 

a o 


































O 


CO 


CM 


CM 




us 










• CO 

















O 


OS 


■* 


OS 








OS 




CO 











CM 


CO 





CO 


CO' 








• CO 


CO 






■M 

O 
































CO 


O 


OS 














CD 


CO 


Th 




10 




CO 


CO 




Ol 










OS 


OS 

















1-1 


I -1 


l -1 


1-1 










rH 








-*> 


CO 


■* 




CO 


us 


Til 






■* 


CO 


US 











TJI 








t- 










CO 


CO 


CM 






<S 


■* 


-V 


in 


^ 


-* 


CO 


■^1 


us 






US 


"<* 


us 






IN 


CM 




CO 


CM 


01 


01 


Ol 






CM 


CM 


IM 




1-1 


1-1 


r " 1 




1-1 


'-' 




1-1 






r-l 


1-1 


rH 


■g-a .-• 


03 


OS 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 






US 


■* 


CO 




2 a— o 

§ag° 

5 a SvK 




cm' 


as 


CO 


CD* 




Tfi 


rH 


Til 






co' 




CI 




53 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




0) 




t- 








Til 


O 




Qs 


ITS 


US 




CO 





3- 


rH" 


CO. 






OS 


OS 


O 


J » «h 




<N 


00 


CO 


H 


OS 





CO 









CM. 


CO 


US 




o.ca as 

o °3 cs a 


s-TS 


_j 


»rs 


■* 


us 


^ 


CO 





,_( 






CM 


CM 


COM 




$8 


^ 


rH 


1-1 


rH 


rH 


IH 


rt 


rt 






rt 


1-1 


1-1 




Pm"H s 
































o o 






























a 3 £ 




O 











O 


CM 


us 


00 






O 


CD 


ri 




o to a^f 




O 




■a 


OS 








OS 








OS 






.0 


«* 




CM 


CO 








U3 






O^ 


co_ 


OS 




a a c3 a 
<1 o o 


s 


CO 


•* 


US. 




TT 





CI 








CO* 














iH 




CO 


CM 


CM 








•* 




d 




























1 ~ i 


Q > B 

03 ej 













O 


O 





O 


O 

























CD 


O 


>o 


O 


O 















g 






US 


■* 


CI 

us 


OS 


CO 
CO 


OS 


OS 


O 






CO 
CM 


co" 


oT 


3 






























55 


S"=* a 
a o a 




US 


US 


CO 


O 


CO 


^ 


CO 


OS 






us 


rt 


,_, 




to 




CM 


-T 


CO 


OS 


US 


01 






OS 


us 


CO 








°i. 


CO 


cs_ 


t- 


CO 


CO 


o_ 









CM 






003 


hO 


0" 


O 


CO* 


■*" 


us* 


co" 


■* 


0" 






06" 


tJ* 


CO 




5 a 

<J 




^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 




us 






H* 



















01 


01 


c<t 






IH 


CO 


r> 





















cs 












O 





O 



































O 





O 









CO 


CD 


-X 


OS 


01 




CM 






■* 


rH 






"3 s 8 

03 





CO 


CM 


O 




us 


01 











us" 












CO 




-t< 


?* 


CO 


-t> 


- 






CO 


CO 


OS 




8 


CO 
CM 


01 


O 


CO 


CO 


rH 


00 









CO.. 


CO 
CM 


Cs" 









































10 


O 
























O 


us 








US 


CM 






CO 


















O 






aT3 






CM 


CO 


ol 


CM 


■* 


OS 


CO 








OS 


<M 








































CO 


us 


CO 






-# 


OS 






-* 


US 









CM 


CM 




CM 


-* 


00 


I-H 


CO 






CM 




CO 








CO 





US 


CO 


>* 


CO 








CD 




CO. 




8 


to 




CO 


CO 


CM 





CO 


CO 






CO 








^5 


I-H 


H 


CM. 


us 





CM 


CO 
CM 


CD 
CM 






- CO 


CO 




US^ 
































r4 " 


































hfl 




O 


O 


O 






IM 


us 








C3 




CD 




its 


S3 


O 


CO 


■* 


^ 


us 


(M 


us 


CO 






CM 


rH 


rH 
































5 a l 




fc- 


CM 


CM 




us 


CO 


-* 








CO 




CO 








CM 


CO 


CO 




CO 













us 


OS 




$ 










7-1 


CO 


CM 


CO 






rH 


Til 


r-T 
























h 




u 


£h 


~ 




us 

eft 

00 


1 


3 
a 
a 

c3 

rj 


3 
u 

CO 


■a 

5 


s. 


58 


a 


>s 


3 
OB 

a 


\ 

s 

CO 


CJ 




B 

CD 
> 
O 


CO 

r= 

a 




0,5 00 

CO fj 

"3 3 

O cd 








S 


< 


a 


>-i 


rs 


< 


c 


& 


o 


EH ° 



Water Department. 



169 













"j 


cq 


lO 


t— 


t-- 


t- 


IA 


00 


eo 


CO 


©. 


cq 


i ". 






jo pnnod aad 
pedumd jfypntin?) 


"a 


d 

CO 


d 

CO 
CO 




CO 
CI 


CM 




CO 

rH 


CO 

■* 

-r 


cq 


j 


CO 


© 


1 * 






s. . 


fr-» 


I-- 


CD 


o> 


r4 


© 


kO 


cn 


t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


l cn 






•saa^nip pire 


d 


d 


d 


o 






d 


d 




rH 


o 


© 


© 






eaqsB "juao ja<j 


f^o 


rH 




H 


H 


H 


r "' 


H 


7-1 


1-1 


rt 


r^ 


rt 


rt 








ira 


© 


CI 


cn 




i- 


to 


-o 


CO 


-* 


CO 




© 














CI 




CO 


to 




CO 


-t< 


Cl 


Cl 




rH 






•sjeaniTO 


ao 


CO 


■* 


00 


o 






CO 


Cl 


CO 


cq 


CO 


-f 


CO 








■O 




c^ 




CI 


to 


o 


Cl 




CO 


Cl 


CO 


>o 


•^* 






puB saqsB jejoj, 


s 


CO 


en 


fc- 


CO 




CO 




to 


t- 




o 


co 


CO 

CO 










Ol 


t- 


o 


to 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<* 


CO 


CO 


°J 








_ 


CO 






o 


o 






rn 


CO 


© 


co 


o 


H* 






•psoo jo jnnoniB 


JS 


oc 


o_ 


w . 


°i 


CO_ 


o_ 


IH 




.o 


>o 




Cl_ 


CN_ 






oSbJOAB ^IJB(J 


s 




CO 




3 


c» 
oq 


CO 
C) 


oq 


CO 


ci 
cq 


d 


CO 
rH 


d 


(N 








© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


© 






•paransuoo 


00 


o 
o 


»C1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


c 


o 

CO 


o 


o 
o 


o 

U0 


© 






IBO0 JO 


rO 


r~ 


t»t 


C£T 


^ 


r-T 


o" 


vnT 


^J 


CO 


CC 


4 


i-T 






^anoniB [ejoj, 


s 


© 


C3 


to 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 


© 

CO 


CO 

to 


ocT 








o 




o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 












o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 












u: 


o 


■* 


-* 


■* 




c i 




o 


CO 


t~; 


CC 


© 






•padamd 


s 


o 




«5* 


cf 


ocT 


,_7 


to" 


c : 


to 


o 


a 


d 


1 co" 












t' 




o 


tM 


CO 


t— 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cq 


t- 


© 






^anoni'B 


~* 


us 


as 






■* 


■* 


Cl 


o 


cn 


co 


-f 


ci 


^1 






9Sbj8ab a"iibq; 


8 

0) 


cn 


C-) 


CO 


CO 


CO 


rH 


CO 


tx 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cn 




*o 


































Oi 






C 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


© 








C 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 




CO 


-co 


© 




00 














CI 


uO 


-f 


»o 


CO 


CM 


-4 


U3 






fH 


•padamd 


g 


cc 


en 


C/D 


o 


CO 


-* 


cq 


U3 

it; 


tc 
© 


CO 


cr 


O- 


cq 
cq 






^unoTOB i^ox 


8 


© 
to 


CO 


o 


o 

CO 


tN 


■^ 




CO 


CO 

c- 


-r 
cr 


CC 


CO 


CO 






Qj 


CM 


CO 


CM 


-f 

CI 


CO 
CM 


-n 

CO 


CO 

cq 


CM 


CN 


CC 

CN 


IC 

CM 


CC 
CM 


o 

t 




8 

o 






























CO 






















CC 


© 


© 


© 


C 


© 
























CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 






n^ 


















CC 


t£ 


CO 


cc 


■CO 


cq^ 




t* 


3 s 


s 
















ira 




CO 


1C 


c 


tjT 






o "X 


















>c 






c 


c 


© 




35 


6 


ll 


I-*. 


















CO 


CO 


c 


cc 


t- 






















cc 


m 


tc 


CN 


CO 


co 




1 




<S 


















r^ 


CN 


CC 


CC 


© 




bo 


4 
















CO 


u; 


c 


c 


IT 


i o 






_- P . 


1 
















CC 




cr 


c 


t: 


© 


H 






o a a 




























M 

M 


~5 


















CC 

cc 


IT 


to t^ 

t- CT 


1 

© 

CO 


> 






ft 
























*" 


CO 












o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© © © © c 


© 














o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o © © © c 


© 


fc3 


1 




si 


s 




T* 


CO 


to 

1T3 


CJ 


■* 


CO 

to 


CO •** © tt= >f 

© to "^ ua a 


cn 
© 


K? 




■o 








CO 


iO 




CO 


cq co to t- o 


cn 




CO 


11 






to 










CO 


to co to cr 


a 


rH 


n 


to 


6 


e 




CO 






C) 


to 


t— 


to © CO to u - 


© 


«-! ft 


£5 




CO 


tN 


OS 


'C 


CO 


t- 
rt 


CO CO © rH t- 

c-i cq cq cq r- 


IN 


-4 




H 






























cq" 
































H 


H 








o 


in» 


© 


lA 


© 


l<3 


xri iO © O C 


© 


CO 

£ 
o 
•c* 


S 


_ a . 


*S 




CO 


1-1 


CO 


rt 


o 


•>* 


-* rH CO h* — 


H* 






jSp.2 

og.9 


^ 
























































© 












o> 


cn 


CI 




© 


CO 


cq to cq ■* tc 


t- 




e 








CO 


M 




uo 


CI 


CN 


© t- © CO c 


© 








ft 


$ 








o 


-* 




us 


t- © to to U" 


co" 










c 


o 




© 


o 




© 












© 










c 


o 




o 


o 




© 












o 








a" 73 




t 








CO^ 




c^ 












© 




^ 




H 


s 


c 


o 




TjT 


ocT 




cf 












ucf 




CN 


a 


t- 




o 






CO 












© 




















°i 




-H_ 












-N^ 




-^ 


6 


8 


(j. 


ocT 




vo" 


CO 




-f 












icT 




s 


fc 


Qs 


a- 


cs 




rt 


ca 




CN 












cq 






H 




































Jz; 


60 


s 


c 


o 




irt 


o 




o 












no 






3 


S5 


ci- 


CO 




^ 


o 




o 












^ti 




S> 




I a! 

ft 
































» 


te 


to 




CI 


CO 




■* 












cq 












»o 






o 
























§ 


t£ 


^n 










1-1 












™" 








c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 




c 


C 


c 


© 












c 


o 


o 




o 


o 


© 


c 


c 


o 


C 


c 


o 








S"o 




c 


en 




CO 


CI 




to 




c 


t> 


CC 


CO 


eo 












































§1 


o 


a 


CO 




o 


m 


© 




cr 




c 


o 




CO 












o 


C/3 


■<# 




© 






c 




cc 


cq 








E§ 




c 


CO 


o 


lO 


la 


CD, 




■* 


IT 


















































J3 3 

"S ft 




c 


T-< 


CO 


CO 


ta 




uo 




->i 


c 


ci- 


- 


cs 






6 


Gs 


cc 


CO 




CI 




o 


CO 




IT 


c 




c- 


cq 






fc 














1-1 


1-1 














1 *~ 






• 


w 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


*G 


c 


c 


u- 


,r. 


o 








60 






o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


it 


CO 


c 




•4 


© 








p-. fl • 


§ 


































S ft 

o a J 

EH 3- 


^ 




































en 


CO 


<M 


to 


cq 


CO 


cc 


q 




cc 


CO 


© 












to 


ITD 


CI 


© 


T-i 




-T 










-* 








ft 


1 










to 


*a 






C 


1- 






Cl^ 

CO 
































* m 






16 


d 




>. 














a 




c 


i 


g co 

03 so 










s 


7 a 
3 


^ 












r^ 

E 


1 




% 


3 S 






H 


^ 


I 
1 £ 


5 

o 


0! 


ft 


09 


3 


3 


5 


1 1 


c 

- t 


> 

c 


a 

c. 
a 


r. C3 
fcn 












I h 


3 


<j 


3 


1-3 


i-s 


<■ 


a 


c 


^ 


e 





170 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE IX. 

Statement of Operations at the East Boston Pumping- Station for the 

Year 1895. 





Engines Nos. 1 and 2. 


Engine No. 3. 


C3 
O 

o 

o 

a_: 
3 To 
° a 
S3 

<S 5 

o « 
Eh 


o 

.a 


1895. 


ft . 

a s 

ftS 

31? 

Eh 


Is* 

ITS 

§ ft£ 

-s§ 

* g 


09 

bo 

> 

_>> 

's 

Q 


ft . 

II 
fttg 

3a° 

O-rH 

EH 


!&■ 

rt g § 

o ft-w 

En 


M 

o 

> 

a 

'5 


15 to 

.a 

1 o 

Cm 


Month. 


Rrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


l 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per c£. 


Jan. . 
Feb. . 
March, 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
Aug. . 
Sept. . 
Oct. . 
Nov. . 
Dec. . 


373 
410 
374 
322 
345 
334 
336 
334 
296 
329 
325 
355 


15 
50 
05 
50 
00 
05 
15 
45 
15 
30 
00 
25 


14,869,540 
17,078,320 
15,328,600 
13,316,800 
14,254,520 
13,663,580 
13,821,500 
13,868,820 
12,116,440 
13,653,920 
13,011,880 
14,915,460 


479,700 
609,900 
494,500 
443,900 
459,900 
455,500 
445,900 
447,400 
403,900 
440,400 
433,700 
481,100 


54 
68 
53 
53 
68 
88 
95 

105 
96 
91 
88 

il6 


25 
45 
10 
25 
15 
15 
00 
45 
20 
15 
45 
35 


844,020 

1,035,420 

816,000 

770,160 

961,020 

1,315,440 

1,407,780 

1,594,260 

1,443,300 

1,288,440 

1,169,520 

1,693,020 


27,200 
37,000 
26,300 
25,700 
31,000 
43,800 
45,400 
51,400 
48,100 
41,600 
39,000 
54,600 


43,900 
48,750 
43,540 
36,380 
36,150 
36,100 
36,630 
37,700 
35,200 
35,700 
34,870 
43,600 


19.1 
18.9 
18.8 
17.8 
18.1 
18.0 
18.1 
18.0 
18.3 
18.2 
18.0 
18.3 


Totals, 


4,137 


15 


169,899,380 


465,500 


979 


55 


14,338,380 


39,300 


468,520 


18.4 



Engines Nos. 1 and 2 pump to the reservoir. 
Engine No. 3 pumps to the tank on Breed's Island. 



Water Department. 



171 



TABLE X. 

Statement of Operations at the West Roxbury Pumping- Station for the 

Year 1895. 



1895. 


cm 
a 
'S 

S 0) 

p*3 

"3 
o 
tX 


p 

P . 
o-p 

is. 

*a 

(3 ;3 

H 


P 
6BP< 

2 a 

IS 

>»p 

'3 o 


Quantity pumped 
per lb. of coal. 


OP 
w 0J 

§ a 
gg 

a a 

ra a 
o o 


0> 


a 
em 

03 

u 

V 

> 
< 


Month. 


[Hours. 


Min. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per cent. 


Feet. 


January . . 


390 


30 


4,611,675 


148,700 


145.5 


31,700 


18.6 


135.39 


February . 


410 


30 


4,783,275 


170,800 


157.5 


30,375 


17.1 


134.07 


March . . . 


399 


30 


4,706,400 


151,800 


152.6 


30,850 


17.3 


134.83 


April . . . 


357 


00 


4,270,200 


142,300 


162.1 


26,350 


16.3 


136.60 


May .... 


395 


00 


5,019,825 


161,900 


172.1 


29,175 


17.4 


136.57 


June. . . . 


583 


00 


6,465,600 


215,500 


162.8 


39,425 


20.4 


138.88 


July .... 


446 


30 


5,617.950 


181,200 


166.1 


33,825 


18.2 


138.60 


August . . 


494 


30 


6,344,175 


204,700 


162.7 


39,000 


18.4 


138.09 


September . 


471 


30 


6,169,950 


205,700 


161.0 


38,325 


19.4 


142.52 


October . . 


440 


00 


5,783,475 


186,600 


155.9 


37,100 


18.4 


148.53 


November . 


410 


00 


5,540,250 


184,700 


165.6 


33,450 


16.8 


142.67 


December . 


462 


00 


6,102,975 


196,900 


157.1 


38,850 


17.3 


140.83 


Totals and ) 
Averages. \ 


5,260 


00 


65,415,750 


179 200 


160.2 


408,425 


18.1 


138.97 



172 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE XI. 

Table showing Work done at the Mystic Sewage Pumping- Station during 

the year 1895. 



1895. 



January 
February 
March . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 

Totals 



543 
472 
523 
474 
464 
390 
279 



Jlin. 



a • 

3 m «* 

a IS 
< 



Gallons. 



13,289,300 

10,492,100 

13,670,000 

10,254,800 

9,529,400 

7,296,900 

5,4S0,500 



Lbs. 



25,360 
21,560 
25,740 
20,470 
20,085 
17,775 
12,550 



Lbs. 



32,400 
28,100 
32,500 
28,300 
28,200 
23,500 
16,200 



<B 2 73 

> a aj T3 

cs p ft a 

c« rt ft+J 



Gallons. 



423,700 
388,600 
441,000 
353,600 
352,900 
304,000 
322,400 



3,147 



70,013,500 



143,540 



189,200 



376,400 



Total number of days engine worked, 186. 

Plant turned over to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission on July 19, 1895. 



Water Department. 



173 



TABLE XII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Sudbury River Water-shed for 

the Year 1895. 



1895. 


>> 

a 
a 

p 

c3 
1-5 


a 


a 


EL 
< 


>> 


a 

3 
1-5 


>-2 


a 
< 


U 
CD 

B 

CD 

ft 
<u 
DQ 


u 

o 
o 
O 


s 

CD 

l> 

o 


3 

a 

CD 
A 


2 




0.150 


0.620 


















0.30 






















4 




0.140 


0.110 






































0.94 


6 






0.100 






0.545 


0.825 












7 


0.585 
0.255 
1.065 








1.355 










8 


1.055 


0.835 












0.155 






9 

11 




0.045 




0.51 




0.69 






12 




0.030 










0.27 


0.56 








13 


0.065 




0.750 


2.755 


0.680 


0.08 


0.46 
0.065 






0.01 


14 






7.995 
0.04 






15 






0.560 


0.015 






2.465 




16 


0.475 




0.120 




0.065 




















18 


0.205 








0.235 






1.13 


0.14 








19 








22 


0.255 


0.050 




0.185 
















0.915 


24 
















0.005 






0.205 
0.185 
1.805 




25 






0.145 


0.015 


0.055 
0.315 


0.555 




0.335 


0.055 




26 .... 


0.995 






27 






0.295 








0.41 


28 






0.185 

0.085 




30 






0.215 




0.080 


2.215 




0.575 




















Totals . 


4.060 


1.395 


2.980 


5.250 


2.020 


2.770 


5.040 


4.150 


2.300 


9.500 


7.805 


3.350 



Total rainfall during the year, 50.62 inches, being an average of two gauges located at 
Framineham and Ashland. 



174 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE XIII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituate for the Year 1895. 



1S95. 


>> 

u 
ea 

u 
a 

c« 

l"3 


(A 

C3 

53 

CO 


■a 
o 


<1 


3 


o 

a 

1-J 


"5 


3 
SB 

<1 


0) 

a 

CD 

© 

DQ 


o 
o 
o 

o 


JO 

§ 

> 
o 


u 
co 

.a 

§ 
o 

QJ 

ft 




























2 




0.16 


0.61 
















0.50 


0.27 








4 




0.11 


0.10 
























0.83 














0.37 


0.55 
























8 




1.38 


0.91 


1.01 






0.51 




0.59 




0.15 




9 


0.20 






























































































0.14 


0.39 






6.95 
































15 








2.79 
0.04 


0.59 
0.02 










0.04 


2.37 




16 


0.48 




0.11 
















































21 






1 09 


0.12 










































































































0.57 
















































































26 


0.98 








0.09 








0.30 




1.79 




27 








0.25 


0.17 




0.13 






0.06 


• • • 


0.32 


















































1.13 


2.57 




0.59 
































0.72 


Totals . . 


3.93 


1.70 


3.11 


5.03 


2.03 


3.12 


4.71 


3.96 


2.77 


8.43 


7.46 


2.71 



Total rainfall during the year, 48.96 inches. 



Water Department. 



175 



TABLE XIV. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Mystic Lake Water-shed for the Year 

1895. 



1895. 


>> 

3 

3 

a 

1-5 


u 

a 
3 

o 


o 

u 
03 


p. 

< 


03 


o 

PI 

3 




3 
6D 

3 
< 


C 

0) 

a 

CO 


u 
o 

o 


a 

o 


o 

42 

a 

02 
O 
V 

A 














0.04 


0.25 


0.115 






1.405 
0.585 




2 




0.110 


0.600 






0.21 








4 




0.110 






0.260 


0.225 


0.18 






















6 






0.095 




0.585 


0.09 


0.225 










0.64 


2.55 














0.425 


0.800 
0.010 


















9 


0.220 


0.785 


















































0.175 


1.305 








13 

15 . . 


0.095 






2.190 
0.060 


1.255 
0.470 


0.685 
















0.075 


2.210 




16 

18 


0.410 


. . . 


0.090 












0.22 






1.99 


0.085 






























0.485 




22 


0.245 




0.030 


0.210 


0.035 


0.04 


0.08 








0.56 












25 






0.160 
0.025 


0.065 


0.09 


0.40 




0.01 


0.060 
0.030 
0.175 

0.385 


0.075 


0.155 

1.245 




26 


0.900 




0.355 


30 






0.040 


0.195 




2.150 


1.985 












0.535 


Totals . . 


3.535 


0.655 


3.000 


4.185 


3.150 


3.630 


4.345 


5.435 


2.040 


8.790 


7.665 


2.300 



Total rainfall during the year, 48.73 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Mystic Lake and Mystic Reservoir. 



176 



City Document No. 32. 



> 


o 


M 






^ 


H 




ri 




BQ 




«l 


00 




M 


H 






^ 




s 








S- 




S 




IS 




c/T 




«j 




►SS 








►S 




a 




•>?> 




1 




s 








w 




ft* 







o 


-* 


,_, 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


to 


tO 


IN 


CO 


1 ,_< 






"3 


■* 


cc 


o 


C5 


en 


CB 


lO 


CO. 


tO 




I- 


CO 




o 


l-i 


Ol 




00 






1~ 




CO 


© 


d 






o 


«* 


to 


>* 


•* 


»* 


-* 


-f 


■* 


to 


>* 


"* 






o 


o 


00 


rt 


CO 


CO 


-* 


1^ 


en 


,_, 


CO 


1 t- 




cj 


cn 


lO 


Tf 




CO 


CO 








CD 


CD 


co 




03 

p 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


IN 


1-1 


IN 


IN 


IN 


CN 


IN 


IN 






*# 


,_ 


(_ 


CO 


OS 


lO 


O0 


fc. 


■w 


^ 


CO 


1 - 




t> 


cn 


CO 


■* 


Tl< 




3> 


CO 


~f 


oo 






1 ^ 




o 










t- 


b- 


t- 




CO 


'O 


CO 






fc 






























j. 


CO 


CC 


CO 


,_, 


-r 


•* 


f. 


o 


CO 


l_ 


CO 






© 




CO 


-* 


Ol 


CN 


cc 


01 




o 


CO 


00 




a 


d 


CO 


en 


cc 


en 


Ol 


CO 


en 


t~^ 




CO 






O 




















1-1 










o 


,_, 


J_ 


J_ 


tO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


-f 


tO 


CO 


,_, 








"* 


Ol 






01 


oo 






tO 


Ol 


CN 




P* 


IM 


<N 


IN 


05 


CM 


IN 


I-l 


I-l 


CM 


CN 


<N 


Ci 




0Q 






























O 


o 


CO 


CO 


i— 1 


,_, 


CO 


en 


o 


<N 


CM 


IN 




si 


o 


CO 




c : 


C» 


CO 


lO 


CN 


o> 


ea 


q 


CO 




^ 


■* 


"* 


■* 


CO 


CO 


to 


id 


to 


CO 


■* 


CN 


^ 






J_ 


,_, 


CO 


,_, 


tO 


CO 


CO 


-t 


1Q 


-* 


CO 


CO 




>> 




a 


CO 




IC 


cc 


c 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 






"5 


to 


-f 


■* 


-* 


CC 


■*" 


■* 


■^ 


CO 


-d< 


ci 


-* 




1-3 






























CO 


,_, 


o 


IN 


,_, 


,_, 


lO 


■* 


CO 


t- 


CO 


■* 




o 


CN 


co 






01 








I- 






q 




a 


CO 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CO 


CO 


co" 


esi 


CO 


IN 


CO 




1-3 






























*# 


O 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


,_, 


at 


Tjl 


CO 


CO 


cc 


rt 




tA, 


en 






o 


to 


1- 






en 


o 


CD 


CO 




C3 
3 


H 


CN 


IN 


CN 


IN 


IN 


CO 


CN 




CN 


" 


IN 






QO 


O' 


CO 


CO 


O 


CD 


,_, 


CO 


CO 


^ 


t_ 


CO 






CO 




CO 


© 


CO 




a 


CM 


to 


CO 




CD 




a, 


o 


IS 


m 


to 


"* 


r* 


CO 


■* 


CO 


'Cf 


•<* 


-* 




«l 




























A 


tO 


^ 


m 


,_, 


T-i 


to 


IO 


tO 


CO 


rH 


CD 


CN 




en 


o 


en 




Ol 




O0 


CC 


CD 


O 


CO 


en 




8 


<N 


co 


CN 


so 


IN 


M 


CN 


CM 


CN 


CO 


Ol 


c4 
































in 




,__ 


o 


cc 


OO 


CO 


to 


CO 


en 




en 




^2 
0) 




CO 








a: 


Tt 




o 


Ol 


-f 




























|H 




1=1 






























oc 


Tt 


cc 


CO. 




■>* 


CO 


<M 


to 


cc 


c 






P 
03 


ce 


p 


c 


o 


a 


cc 


c 


CC 




c 




CO 




K 


"* 


-* 


CO 


cc 


CO 


CO 


CC 


cc 


•* 


cc 


CO 




i-s 
















































c 






























C 




a) 
o 
























& 


D 


_« 
























£ 




p< 
























P 


£ 






<i 




















c 




t> 




j 




















« 




CD 




Ph 
















P 


t- 


v P 


1 


a 




















c 


c 




O 























> 


S 










"C 













i 


> i 


| 


p 


C3 








p 












p 


g 






m 






























O 






£ 

si 
,c 
& 
_p 

c- 
1= 


2= 
< 



* 
P 


= 

c 
c 


2 

c 
c 
C 
a. 
l* 
a 


— 

s 

p 

p 

a 

c 


a 

■5 

I 


1 

c 

X. 
c 

c 

5 & 


p 

£ 
p 

B 


H C 

cT 

. ! 

o 


c 

cc 

» c 

c 



"5 


c5 
"a 




3 



Water Department. 



177 



TABLE XVI. 

Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations 
on the Water- Works. 







Temperature of Air. 


Temperature of 
Water. 


1895. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Fr 


amingham. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
House. 




a 
a 

3 


a 

I 

'S 


p 


a 
a 


a 
a 

"2 

3 


a 

C3 


a 


a 
o 

8 


January . . 




50.0 


2.0 


26.3 


49.0 


-4.0 


23.4 


37.0 


28.2 


February . 




44.5 


-8.5 


22.4 


45.0 


-13.0 


20.1 


36.0 


23.8 


March. . . . 




53.5 


11.5 


34.2 


52.0 


11.0 


32.5 


37.0 


34.3 


April . . . 




82.0 


24.0 


46.1 


79.0 


22.0 


45.1 


44.6 


47.1 


May .... 




94.0 


27.5 


61.2 


92.0 


26.0 


59.8 


59.1 


61.2 


June .... 




94.0 


46.0 


69.1 


93.0 


43.0 


67.8 


69.4 


69.5 


July .... 




93.0 


48.0 


69.1 


93.0 


44.0 


67.1 


71.3 


70.8 


August . . 




92.0 


47.5 


70.4 


87.0 


40.0 


67.9 


72.9 


71.2 


September . 




96.0 


38.0 


65.3 


96.0 


34.0 


63.8 


70.0 


67.4 


October . . 




71.0 


21.0 


47.4 


69.0 


22.0 


47.0 


55.9 


48.8 


November . 




T3.5 


14.5 


43.9 


73.0 


16.0 


43.8 


46.4 


46.2 


December . 




63.0 


6.0 


33.3 


| 60.0 


6.0 


33.4 


38.1 


36.2 



Note. — The maximum and minimum air temperatures in above table are the highest 
and lowest temperatures in anyone day of the month. The mean air temperature is the 
average of the maximum and minimum temperatures of the whole month. The water tem- 
peratures are the mean temperatures for the whole month. 



178 



City Document No. 32. 






- . 


oo 


TP 


^ 














© 


oo 


00 


00 


EC 


CM 


00 


lO 


Id- 


JO 


CO 


CO 




lH 


© 


•« 


0J 




CO 




© 




































© 


o 


t- 


fc- 


-r 


© 




•o 


CM 






CM 


CM 




CM 






CM 


















O >> 






































s — 






































rHI-3 


















































rt 






© 




CO 


CO 


© 


CS 


o 


00 


rt 


CO 




CO 


•-J- 


-r 




CM 




CO 


oo 












































lO 


lO 






CO 


CO 


00 


IO 




O 




-* 


CO 


IO 


■* 


CO 


lO 


■** 


^tl 


-* 


CO 














En 
























































■* 


CM 


IO 


© 


-* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


o 


© 




O 


CM 


:-- 


so 


© 


■* 


© 



























>o 


■*f 


CO 


-* 




o 


IO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




© 


CO 




IO 


CO 


CM 






»o 




















lO 


CO 


© 


■* 


© 


00 


© 




lO 


■<* 




iO 


CO 




CI 


-& 


© 


CM 




o 














o 


00 


iO 


■* 


•* 


CM 


CO 


CO 


-* 




-# 


-* 


CM 


-* 


© 


© 


© 


CM 










© 


CO 






© 










■* 


IO 


© 


•* 


IO 


© 


IO 






lO 


_. 


-* 








© 


CO 


© 




o 














a 

O 


Tft 


CO 


CO 


CO 






© 




IO 


CO 


© 




^t< 


CM 


CO 


lO 


o 


CM 








CO 


CO 


CO 








© 




CM 


.o 


CO 


nn 


© 


CM 


'ill 


© 




CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


-^ 


© 


■^1 


CM 


© 


IO 














P« 


CO 


i-H 


1-H 


CO 


1-1 


t- 


00 


© 


I-l 


© 


CM 


lH 


CO 


CO 


o 


1-1 


1-1 


r-i 


w. 










































CO 


CO 








■* 


CO 






_ 




CO 


© 


IO 


"* 


CO 


rt 


iss 


© 


10 


CO 


© 


CO 


C0 




© 








00 


lO 












3 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 




CM 


CM 


CO 






■* 


iO 


CM 


CO 


© 




CO 


< 


















































CO 


CO 










© 




a 


_ 




00 


3 


>. 




o 




CO 


CO 




CO 




CM 


IO 


© 




iO 


•* 


fc— 


— 






3 


■5f 




CO 




o 


CM 




CO 


CM 






CO 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


CO 








































1-3 












































_ 












© 




or> 










CO 


■* 


© 




© 




© 


oo 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 




CO 




CM 


CO 


© 


CO 






13 


1-1 


o 


o 


Tf 


CM 


CM 


CO 


■* 


IO 


^* 


o 


-* 


© 


1-1 


CM 


CO 


**r 


1-1 
















































CO 


CM 


© 


•* 


© 


-* 


"* 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


CO 


© 


oo 


>. 


© 






-* 


■>* 












CM 


Tf 










CI 






CI 


CM 


00 


CO 


CD 






CO 


■a 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 








■** 


CM 




■* 


CO 








© 


-* 


o 


© 


CO 






CO 




•*■ 




CO 


o 




© 










CM 




© 


CO 


CM 


CM 












lH 


■* 


CM 


1-1 


CM 


lO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


i-H 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IO 


-* 


CM 


«l 












































00 


CM 


lO 




CM 


■^1 


CM 


© 
















CO 


lO 


-* 


-tf 


o 


CO 






o 




o 


© 










CM 


© 


OO 


p 


CO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


lO 


CM 


t- 


© 


IO 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


CO 


t- 


t- 


-d< 


CO 


CM 


% 








































CO 


CO 


© 


© 


o 


oo 








„ 








rt 












CO 


a> 


■* 




■* 




© 


CO 


CO 


CO 




© 








© 


© 


© 


a 
fe 


•* 


o 


■» 


•o 


IO 








CM 




CM 


CM 


CO 


■* 


o 


lO 


CO 






o 




en 


*# 


CO 


o 








© 


-H 


© 


CM 


CO 




_ 


o 










© 












:- 




CM 


© 


■* 








© 


o 


c3 
1-3 


•W! 


CO 


-* 




CM 


CO 


CO 










CM 


CM 




CO 




CM 


CO 


PS 






































< 






































H 






































1* 








































CO 


_ 


10 


CO 


,_ 


CO 


© 


o 


,_, 


CM 






lO 


© 




















































CO 


CO 


00 


30 


CO 


CO 


CO 


°o 


22 


oo 


oo 


CO 


CO 


30 


30 


OO 


oo 



Water Department. 



179 



O Tfl M tD 



00 CD OS <M O CO 



CM r-l r-t i-H l-H 



COC0C0CO<M'<*CO00 



i-H O tH 



CO t- -^ rH 
CO t-4 i-f CO 



CM rH rH 



00 CO 00 tH 



C0<MC0iO(M*OC0»r0(M*O 



lOCOcOCOCOCDCDCO 



!M 00 r-i 



r# CO CO CM 



r-r i-i tH 



CM CM iQ CM O CO 



CO OS CO CM 
rH O* i-i CO 



CO CM CM r-i <M CM 



co *o <m CO 



CM (M CO (M 



-* r-t i-i CO <M i-H CS1 



00 CO US CM 



ciosococoeO'^'^t^o 

CMiH^COuDrHiOOCOCM 



r-H *-f CM CO CO CM 



(M CO (M CO 



CO CO CO CO 



t- CO l-i 



CO CO CO Cs O CO 
iO OJ 00 CO cm »o 
iO* uO CM W O CD* 



CO l-H lO CO 



















CD 
0) 

cS 




o 
Eh 




JOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ0000050iCS0505 
300O00000D000O000OQO000O00O0CO 





180 



City Document No. 32. 



M 


1 


H 


01 






> 


B 




S 


X 


>o 




r# 




"-> 


s 


S 


ri 


e 


S3 


o 


^ 


fi 


h 


^3 

pa 



^"S 




































IS 

2 >> 










CM 


CO 


© 




© 


lO 


•*# 




© 


© 


** 


CO 


© a 




o 


O 




o 






© 


CO 






© 


CO 




Ol 


CO 


-* cs 


CD 


CO 


CM 


■* 


-* 


•* 


-* 


CM 


CM 


■* 


*# 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CI 


<N rH 


S3 




































•*b 












































^ 


o 




© 


00 


© 


CM 


CO 


CM 






b- 


^ 


rH © 


C3 


GO 


CO 




O 


c,c 


© 


© 


o 




CM 












CO 


CO CO 


















to 




t~ 








co 




t— © 




CM 




CM 


iH 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


rH 




CM 








CI 


CM 




EH 












































CD 








t- 


^ 




00 


rH 


CM 


© 


to 


■* 








CO 




to 




r-i 




fc- 














SI 


o 


© © 


0) 


CM 












CO 


o 






CM 


O 




© 


rH 


** 


rH O 


ft 










































O 




O 


CD 


© 


00 


© 


© 


© 




© 


to 






CM CO 




CD 


CI 


_ 


© 




a 






CO 








© 




© 


© 


i^- OO 


O 


CM 


IH 




o 








© 




CM 




O 






CM 


CM 


© o 




CM 


CO 


O 


CO 


CM 




^ 




© 


© 


-# 


CM 


© 


© 


© 








CO 






© 




OS 










o 




rH 








© T* 


o 






© 


o 




© 


CM 




© 


iH 


CM 


O 


rH 


o 


I-H 


© 


© © 




CO 


OS 


.11 


■>* 




tO 




© 


© 




00 




© 


00 


© 




rH -* 




as 
















CO 


t- 










"* 


CM 


© C* 




o 


o 


o 


rH 


O 


rH 


rH 


o 


© 


rH 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© © 


02 






































rH 


CO 


t- 


■>* 


o 


OO 


CO 




io 


CM 


o 


CM 


CM 


HI 


t- 


•* 




bD 




















CO 


-* 


© 


© 








© o; 


3 

<1 




o 


o 


o 


CM 




O 


o 


© 






O 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© o 








CO 


o 


© 


to 




CO 




















>> 


© 




■* 


CM 




■* 


t— 


o 


«* 




© 


© 


CM 




© 


■* 


CO V. 




CM 


o 


o 


rH 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© © 


1-3 






































t- 


© 


■* 


© 




© 
























a 






CO 




CO 




o 






■■* 


■* 


— . 




IO 


© 




tr- O 


o 


o 


© 


rH 


© 


rH 


rH 


© 


o 


rH 


© 


rH 


rH 


© 


© 


O 


© © 


1-3 






































*# 


CM 


o 


Ol 


o 


^_ 






© 




© 










© 












CI 






CI 


© 


o 








CO 


"* 


O 


© 


■* -CT 


CS 






•<* 




CM 


© 


<M 


tH 


CM 


rH 


CM 


CM 




rH 


CM 




rH © 




CM 


to 


o 


CO 


^ 




© 




CO 


GO 


© 










CO 






















to 


O 


o 






CM 


CM 


00 


■<# >£ 




>* 


CM 


CM 


T-l 


CM 


CO 


CM 


© 


rH 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


TH 


CO 


CM 


■* rH 


<1 




































,£) 


T— 1 


in 


CO 


CO 


© 


■>* 










© 


"* 








O 


O © 
















03 


CO 




^ 










00 


•"* 


CO t- 




CO 


■>* 


"* 


|H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


rH 


CO 


rH 


CM 


tO 


© 


IO 


CO rH 


a 






































^ 


CD 


-* 


->* 


T* 


CM 


•<* 








_ 














P 












rH 




c. 


CM 


© 






© 






© 


CO cs 




CO 






CM 


to 






CO 


CM 


O 




CM 


CM 






CO 


CM CM 




CO 


© 


tO 


CO 


© 


<M 


CM 






















a 


















o 




o 


IO 




o 


CI 


CM 


CM ■# 




T-l 


IN 


CM 


o 






T-i 


■* 






CO 


CO 


© 






CO 




PS 




































«4 




































H 




































h 






































CO 


-** 


IO 


CO 


r_ 


00 




© 


,_, 
































© 


£- 


t- 


*- 






t- 






fr- 


t- OO 



GO CO CO 00 CO 00 Q0 



Water Department. 



181 



to 






■>* 


w 


rH 


oo 


o> 


© 


co 


r— 


© 


© 






© 




to 


CO 






CO 






(M 










CO 


CO 




© 


CM 


o 












CO 


© 


CO 


»o 




IM 


CM 




CO 


ire 
© 


CO 












en 


£_ 




o 


^ 


fc- 


io 


ire 




t _ 






CO 


o 




(N 


10 


© 




ca 


en 








© 


© 




© 


*# 








- 






CO 


© 


t- 


t* 


01 


iO 




01 


o 








H 








IM 


IM 


CO 














IM 


© 






<N 






-* 




© 


© 


© 




o 


■* 


00 


-* 


o 


© 




■* 


CO 


OS 


00 


to 




co 


~r< 


Ol 












Tt 






r-4 


o 


o 






IM 


© 


m 


CO 


Ol 




o 




rH 


IM 


© 


rH 








IM 






o 




ifD 




CO 


CO 


o 


Ol 




© 




00 


ire 


■* 


to 


o 


01 




01 


© 


-* 


00 


o 




OS 




CO 




O 


o 


o 


o 


IM 




o 


-* 


IM 




© 




1-1 


o 


CO 


© 


T-H 


00 










S» 












^_ 


© 


© 




ri( 




rH 


00 


o 


CO 




-* 


■>* 


in 


CO 


■^* 






o 




© 


O 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


IM 




CO 


© 


o 




© 


1-H 


CO 




CO 


_ 


















© 


© 


IM 


© 


© 


CO 




01 


© 


to 




IM 


CO 


© 


CO 




■* 




© 


■* 


"=fl 


© 






© 


o 


o 


o 


O 


© 


© 


(M 






© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


IM 


O 
















-H 


CO 


© 




© 




^ 






© 


o 


o 


o 


to 


CO 




CO 


o> 




tK 








1* 


ire 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 




o 


CO 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 
(M 


o 


to 






to 












CO 


© 


CO 


OO 












© 


o 


IM 


00 


IM 




** 


CO 


CO 


uO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•re 


■* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


" 


© 


rH 


cm 


t- 


„ 


CO 


00 


IM 


CO 






t- 


CO 


IO 




© 










o 




-r 


r- 1 








■* 






I- 


■** 


■* 


C-l 






o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 






© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


© 


to 


iO 


to 












o 


ire 




CO 


CO 


rH 






,_, 








CO 




a 


CO 


CO 


01 




© 


© 

CM 


■"' 


© 

© 


© 
© 




1-1 


OS 


CO 

© 


to 

CD 


o 
o 


to 

CO 


IM 


© 


ire 


fc~ 


CO 

01 




,_, 


rs 


id 


ire 

CO 


vC 


© 










© 




■* 


01 


(M 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CM 


** 


o 


IM 


IM 


CO 




<M 


to 


J_ 


—< 


t- 


^ 




© 


© 
















n 




















© 


00 


O 






ire 


ire 


ire 


t— 


ire 


CO 


cm 


^1 


Ol 


CO 


-« 


■* 


(M 


ire 


00 


CO 


"* 


IM 


CO 


CO 
CM 


CO 


no 


o 


OJ 


to 


o 


CO 


-+ 


















^ 














co 


CO 






© 


© 


© 


ire 


© 




00 


© 


Ol 


CO 




IM 


<M 




"* 






IM 


© 




cq 




© 


© 

00 




0! 


■* 


•* 


•* 


o 


CO 


© 


CO 


O 




© 








00 
























CO 


Ol 




CO 


Ol 






© 


rH 


rH 


o 


rH 




IM 


^Jl 




<* 




© 


CO 


o 






© 


CM 


































<D 


































cm 


































C3 
































ca 


ca 


i-< 


cq 


CO 


■* 


in 


to 


f^. 


CO 
















o 
H 


< 
































tH 


s 


lH 








s 


s 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO' 


JO 











182 



City Document No. 32. 





1 






H 


*> 


M 


a 


M 






^ 


« 


S 


ri 


e 


W 


o 


<| 




H 





i 



m-J 


in 


CO 


co 


T~< 


-* 


o 


© 


<N 


t- 


CI 


CI 


© 


CO 


CI 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


s s 


-* 


CO 


CO 


-* 


in 


-r 


© 




CO 




-f 
















2 >> 


IN 


CM 




l"" 1 


'■H 






CI 


»-* 


1-1 


IN 


CI 


rH 




CI 




CI 








































S-g 






































-*i-s 






































>. 


00 


o 


•* 


t- 


t~ 


<N 


<M 


b- 


~r 


ITJ 


00 


CO 


to 


CO 


© 


CI 


© 


t- 


ft* 




CO 








© 


«* 


© 


CO 


WO 


© 


-f 


























lO 


CO 






CO 


















<D 






































}* 








































O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


■* 


CO 


© 


» 


CO 


wo 


© 


CO 


© 


00 


o 








© 




IH 




-f 
























"* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ITS 


© 


iO 


IN 


CO 


CO 


© 


CI 


C! 












ft 








































o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


■* 


© 


-* 


wo 


^ 


CO 


© 


IN 


© 


> 




CO 








en 


o 


© 


CO 


fc- 




CO 
















CO 


CI 


<N 




<* 


ci 


T* 


CI 


rH 






CI 


-# 






CO 


CI 




a 








































o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


fc. 


■* 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


wo 


© 














© 






CI 


to 


CO 


o 


TH 


■* 










o 


<N 


<N 




CI 




CO 


CI 






-f 


CO 




<N 


d 


rH 




© 


T-< 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


■■* 


IN 


CO 


00 


© 


CO 










© 




-n 










© 






CI 


© 








<N 


CO 


in 




CI 


CI 


rH 


CO 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CO 






© 


IN 


CO 


T-i 




O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


W5 


wo 


,_ 


<N 


CO 


© 


o 


„_ 


,_, 


be 








© 




© 






CO 


CO 


© 


ro 




CO 


~ 






















CI 




CI 




















<j 








































o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


iH 


© 


IH 


© 


CO 


WO 


t- 


^ 
















CO 




© 


<N 


wo 


© 


t- 






CO 








IN 


CO 








CM 


CN 


rH 








CO 






CI 








'-a 








































O 


o 


o 


©' 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


rt 


CO 


t_ 


© 


CO 


<N 


© 


lO 






















© 


© 


CO 




•^1 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


(N 


CI 


IO 


CI 


IN 


rH 


CO 


£j. 


># 


CI 


CO 


CO 


CI 


I -1 




1-5 








































o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


CO 


CO 


« 


t _ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


CI 


t>> 




















CO 


IN 






o 


-f 


© 


t- 
























CO 






CO 












3 
































IN 


rH 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


_X 


C3 


WO 


b- 


o 


t_ 


© 


CO 


ft 
<1 


















CO 


t- 


© 


© 




O 


© 


© 


WO 


CO 


















© 




CI 




© 


CI 














r-< 
















CI 


















o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


■* 


© 


CO 


t_ 


<N 


© 


** 


© 


WO 


CO 


























-* 




© 




CO 


■* 


CO 












© 








ul 


T* 


© 






















































S 








































© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


WO 


00 


Til 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 
















© 








-f 


o 


IN 


CI 




© 


© 


WO 
















IN 


CO 


© 


© 






© 












ft 




H 




































© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


00 


© 


© 


US 


CO 


© 


CO 


-* 


© 


i-s 
















© 


© 




<N 


© 


WO 


© 






tH 










o 




CO 


-f 




























































P5 






































•«( 






































w 






































h 








































00 


■* 














,_, 


IN 


CO 


*tl 


WO 


© 


t_ 


CO 


© 


o 










































s 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 

H 


CO 
rH 


CO 


CO 




s 




H 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r^ 


rH 



Water Department. 



183 



T* 


iH 


CO 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


en 


O 


iH 


CO 


00 


CO 


1-1 


t- 


t- 


CO 










00 


00 


CO 




en 




OS 


t- 


o 


-P 




en 






iH 








CM 


CM 








rH 








CO 




00 


-* 


■* 


CM 


fc- 


fc. 


CO 


-* 


CD 


O) 


,_, 


CO 


o 


CO 


CM 


,_, 


CM 
























G> 


en 


CO 




CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


co 


<* 


-* 


in 


lO 


"* 




CO 






■•* 


■=* 


-tf 
































fr- 


CO 


00 


IN 


£_ 


^_ 


CO 


^ 


Cn 


IN 


lO 


iH 


tH 


,_, 


CO 


H 


on 
















CO 




O 


o 


rH 


CO 


CO 




CO 




M 


-t- 


CM 






CI 


CM 


en 


CI 


■>* 












en 


CD 


00 


-* 


o 


j_ 


o 


t- 


■* 


Ol 


OS 


O 


CM 


CM 


Ti) 


^ 


lO 


en 


CO 


















O 


o 


en 






CO 




CO 




CM 


co 


<N 


<N 


CO 


CM 


CM 




o 


01 












o 


CD 
CO 


-*. 


en 


id 


„ 


© 


■* 


^_ 


en 


CO 


*- 


o 


CM 


00 


CO 


CO 


-<H 


CD 


















en 


co 


en 


O 


00 


CM 


o 


CO 






CO 






1-1 






1C3 




CO 




T* 


CM 


1-1 


CM 


cn 

CO 


CM 


CO 


o 


tH 


en 


lO 


fc. 


© 


CM 


■* 


CO 


en 


iH 


en 


o 


o 


CO 


en 












o 


(N 


CO 


CO 








CO 


o 










rH 


■<* 








CO 


CM 


CO 




CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 




c» 


CM 


to 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


,_, 


OS 


o 


en 


£_ 


„_ 


CM 


,_, 


CO 


CO 


o 




CO 




CO 








-t< 






-f 




CO 


CO 












iH 








CM 














rH 




o 


t- 


00 


t _ 


CO 


o 


o 


,_, 


CM 


H 


en 


CM 


fc_ 


lO 


en 


Til 


CO 


CO 


en 


■*o 




o 


U3 


o 




CO 






-f 


CO 


en 


■O. 


o 




CO 


































-* 


CO 

l-H 


o 


,_, 


J_ 


CO 


-# 


lO 


CO 


oc 


,_, 


,_, 


■* 


CO 


CM 


en 


o 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


t- 


-V 


W3 


t- 


lO 


Ir- 


en 


o 










CD 






CO 








CO 


Tjl 


CM 


CO 




<N 




CM 


01 




o 


CM 

CO 



©ocMcsaicornoeqco 

-**rHu3COCOi£>COCC<M-<*l 



CO OJ t- OS 

\d CO CM r-i 

rH O O O 

rH rH <N T-l 



CO rH r-t 



■CO Ci CO "HH 



lO i-t W5 CM 



rH Ol rH 



CM CO CO OS 



CO CO CO CO CO CO 



oocoaiaiCiOiOioi 



184 



City Document No. 32. 



aT-*-» 


o 


CI 


rH 


to 


05 


-n 


o 


rH 


ia 


o 


o 


m 


irj 


in 




















19 










































































IN 


CO 


CC' 


CO 


to 




?<■ 










b- 


in 




CO 


m 


o> 


-# 


o 




ia 


CO 


CO 




iH 


IN 




01 










































IN 


IN 


r-t 




l-H 


i-H 


cq 


IN 




a 13 












































CO 




■*•-= 
















































• 


o 


CO 


00 


1-1 


01 


fc_ 


O) 


-p 


o 


■e 


IA 


m 














.n 










3 
























to 














































o 




-# 


CO 


O 


lO 


CO 


^ 




CD 


t- 


CO 






Ol 


■* 


t- 


r-t 


CO 


■^ 




Ol 


t~ 




























H 
















CO 


CO 


"* 




■>* 


"* 


in 


-f 


in 


^K 


■* 


Tj* 


CO 


ifi> 


Ol 


vll 




o 


o 


o 


w 


3 


CO 


CO 


to 


o 


o 


o 


in 


o 


in 
















CO 


















































tu 
























Oi 




CO 




CO 


to 




OD 




CO 


I-H 


to 


« 


o 


CO 


o 


to 


"* 


<M 


CO 


IN 


CO 


lA 


IN 


■<* 


CO 


m 


CO 


m 


CO 


1-1 


^ 


■^ 


CO 


t- 


CO 




o 


■* 


CO 


■* 


<M 


lO 


rt 


*- 


o 


IA 


in 


■n 


© 












































OS 






cq 










































o 








CI 


C-l 


o 


CO 




-* 


CO 


oo 




fc 


T* 


in 


lO 


t- 


Cq 




-* 


" 


" 


IN 


CO 


■*< 


CN 


*" 


to 


1-1 


CO 


in 


"M 


CO 


O 


CO 

CO 


■* 




o 


r-i 


1A 


^ 


OS 


© 


lA 


■* 


o 


o 


US 


in 


in 








































o 




Ol 


CO 
























o 






















o 


<N 




Ol 


C-) 




CO 




O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


in 


O 


■* 


<M 


CO 


to 


O 


CO 


« 


Ol 


1*3 


IN 


1Q 


CO 


CN 


■^i 


" 


o 


CO 


r " 1 


** 


Ud 


o 

rH 


lO 

OS 


">Jt 




o 


"* 


CO 


^ 


00 


CO 






o 


lA 


Id 


m 


o 


in 
































o 






N 




Ol 


o 


-1 














































OJ 


CO 




to 


o 


CO 


CO' 




CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


DQ 


CO 


■* 


o 


1-f 


" 


iH 


cq 


CO 


1-4 


o 


rH 


IN 


T-t 


CO 


■* 


to 


<N 


IN 


"^ 


cq 


IN 


CO 
CO 


CO 




o 


O 


eq 


*- 


CI 


CO 


CO 


t- 




o 


IA 


© 


































































































Ol 


oi 










-* 


o 




CO 


<N 


< 


<n 




CO 


to 


to 


■* 


rt 




o 


-* 




^1 


in 


to 


■fjl 


CO 


■^1 


■* 


UD 


cq 


"* 


CO 


H< 




o 


■* 


rt 


1 _ l 


CO 


CO 


© 


o> 


o 


lA 


m 


in 


o 


in 
















































© 



















































ca 


-t> 


CO 


IN 




ci 


o 


o 




CO 


OS 


in 


<N 


CO 


to 


<M 


I-l 


(N 


CQ 


" 


CO 


CO 


r " 1 


CO 


IN 


CO 


■>* 


(N 


CO 


m 


OS 


CO 




o 


O 


m 


■* 


m 


CO 


in 


^ 


o 


ITS 


lO 


in 


o 


in 


o 














































CO 


































CO 








CO 


If 




in 


CO 


o 


I— 


t- 


CO 


rH 




CO 


CO 


i-s 


to 


Ol 


CN 


CO 


CO 


IN 


lO 


T-l 


IN 


CO 


IN 


1 ~ i 


IN 


<N 


<N 


CN 


CO 


CN 


cq 


T ~ 1 


CM 


o 

CO 


IN 




o 


co 


Ol 


to 


o> 


to 




to 


m 


o 


in 


in 








o 


o 














S» 






































































01 




CO 


Ol 


01 




in 


CO 


CI 


O 




^* 


3 


CO 


cn 


CO 


o 


I-l 


1-H 


CO 


in 


■* 


CO 


CO 


IN 


rH 


m 


IN 


in 


CM 


m 


CO 


-* 


tN 


t- 


CO 




o 






o 




in 


o 


Til 


in 


lO 


1A 




























CO 




CO 






o 


o 


IN 


-f 


o 


o 




to 






















ft 
«1 


IN 


H 


■* 








o 






-f 


to 


(N 


01 


-f 


-l< 




CI 


CO 


CO 


-f 


CM 






CO 


■* 


CO 


lO 


■* 


CO 


IN 






^* 


CO 


IN 


■* 


Cl 


CO 


<N 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


m 


© 


CO 




o 


O 


fc- 


OS 


o 


m 


o 


Ol 


o 


o 


o 
























in 




■* 












CO 








































CO 






CO 










o 


to 


oa 


o 


CO 




tH 


o 


CO 


■^ 


Ol 


CO 


CO 




CO 




CO 




•a 


CO 


in 


eq 
































3 












































OS 






o 


o 


o» 


CO 


IN 


o 


to 


to 


lO 


IA 




o 


o 




















to 


,Q 




















Til 


to 






















CO 


CO 








o> 
















Ol 




to 


CO 


in 


01 






Cl 


CO 


CO 




rH 


CO 


•* 


o 


1A 


CO 


CO 


■* 


■* 


CO 


to 


CO 


to 


-r 


CO 


"" , 


CO 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 


rH 


CO 


„ 








to 






to 


CO 


I-l 


o 


in 


o 




o 




















in 


a 
a 


























o 












ea 








<N 


^* 


CO 


cq 


to 


-* 






oa 




o 




CO 


71 




CO 


in 


o 




OS 


o 


o 


CO 




IN 


rH 


CO 


in 


cq 


CO 


ia 


IA 


(N 


lO 


■^1 


to 


m 


«* 


in 


IN 


t- 


in 


<N 


^ 


^ 


o 

OS 


•* 


« 
















































-<I 














































111 


















































r-i 












































7a 






to 


to 








o 




















o 




<N 








H 


<4 




































Ol 














CO 


CO 


CO 








CO 












CO 


CO 



















Water Department. 



185 





















to 














o 


Cn 




Cl 


to 


to 


CO 


co- 


OS 


















3 






















o 






















01 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 




CO 


CO 


1-1 


■* 






















n 


rt 


M 


CM 


7-1 


o 


1-1 


1-i 


o 


lH 


1-1 


o 


** 


CO 


** 


US 


1-t 


rt 


rH 


rt 


CO 


ed 


IN 




y-g 


















































T*^ 






















































on 




^ 




















n> 


CO 


CO 


CCI 


CO 


"iH 


-n 


to 


IN 


CO 






























CI 






OS 




















■* 


os 


t|< 


■<# 










H 




en 


CO 






o 


OJ 








































CI 


-f 


US 


Cl 


to 






rH 


to 


■* 


CO 


IN 




H 


CM 


C4 


IN 


CO 






Cl 


*~ l 


1-1 


CI 


1-1 


01 


IN 


CO 


Cl 


Cl 


IN 


rH 








-f 




















CO 






o 




o> 


t- 


on 


fc- 


to 


^ 


U5 


^ 


^_ 


en 


t- 


rt 




o 




























Cl 


OS 








^ 












O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


GO 


CO 


CO 


>o 


CO 




o 








en 


















ft 


1-1 


O 


IN 


&o 


© 


o 




o 


o 


i-l 


IN 


rH 




u, 


CO 


rt 


O 


o 


" 


H 


CO 


CO 


rH 
























rq 


CO 


^ 


to 


^ 




t- 


CO 


-f 


O 


IN 


-* 


en 






t> 




















o 




to 


CO 






OS 


















CI 


00 


-* 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 




























121 


IN 


lH 


CI 


<N 


© 


o 


o 


o 


©. 


o 


d 


1-1 


o 


■*# 


CO 


IN 


o 


" 


o 


T-i 


T* 


CO 


rH 




















-* 








o 




?o 


^ 


CO 


111 


■* 


W3 


CO 


o 


H 


,_, 






























CO 
























1-* 


-f 


lH 




H 


H 


CO 


la 


CO 




»o 


CI 


CO 














<o 










o 


1-1 


o 


1-1 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


IN 


■* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


IN 


o 
ci 


O 














s? 


00 








to 


as 


CO 


T-1 


TH 


IN 


o 


© 


to 


h- 


00 


CO 


Cl 


rti 
























o 


o 


OS 


























CO 


CO 




IN 


CI 




CO 


o 




o 
































o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


" 


" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


O 
























on 






CI 


*- 


-f 


111 


o 


o 


IN 


CO 


OS 


o 


O 






















































3 
< 


t- 


t- 


Cl 


CO 




01 


01 


o 




>* 


t* 




CO 
























o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


IN 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




r-i 


O 








to 






















■* 


OS 


O 




CO 


Cl 


IN 


t- 


rt 


lO 


■* 
































3 


CO 


OS 


















3 
*"5 


o 


CO 


CO 


IN 


CI 


CO 


■* 




CI 




rH 


CI 


01 


01 






















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


rH 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 




o 
































CO 


CO 


o 


■* 


en 


on 


CO 


rt 


•*H 


to 
































IN 








CO 














P 


uo 


CO 


o 






CO 


CO 


—J 


o 


r- 




CO 


b- 






OS 


















3 


tH 


o 


rH 


o 


o 


o 


cm 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


T-H 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


b- 


o 
























00 


CO 


us 


os 


IN 


os 




OS 


ia 


CO 


CO 


^H 


co 


00 




>> 




















































o 


rj( 


tH 


os 






CO 


CO 




CO 


<N 




OS 






















3 


IN 


ci 


CI 


CM 


rH 


o 


rH 


IN 


tH 


rt 


IN 


7-1 


7-1 


01 


7-1 


IN 




« 


■° 


lH 




CO 


IN 
























.H 








to 


tH 




CO 


-h 


00 


Cl 


rt 


^ 


lO 
























































CM 






CO 


CO 


o 


to 


-* 


CO 


OS 




CO 


*a 




-f 




















<j 


ia 


m 


-# 


in 


>o 


IN 


■n 


lH 


CI 


T* 


CO 


CO 


"* 


"* 


IN 


co 


-* 


rH 


CO 


Cl 


■* 


-f 


CO 




A 










CO 


^ 
















o 


CO 


00 


^* 


CO 


<^> 


Cl 


OS 


en 


OS 




































































O 


































a 


IN 


*" 


00 


to 


-* 


ci 


*■■ 


U3 


(M 


<o 


IM 


CO 


o 


us 


IN 


to 


" 


CO 


IA 


CO 


-* 


o 










<N 


























CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


lO 


CO 


rt 


T ^ l 


00 


































01 






















^ 




o 


OS 




OS 


•^t 


CO 




t~ 






US 


tN 


OS 




















pq 


IN 


cm. 


rH 


CO 


74 


CI 


CM 


CO 


rH 


■* 


IN 


fc- 


•>* 


CO 


rH 


IN 


ia 


rH 


IN 




o 


IN 

CO 


IN 
















o 






^ 






to 


OS 


00 


CO 




CO 


»o 


CO 


to 


■* 


-H 


to 














































































to 




os 




















""3 


O 


r "' 


i-l 


CO 


rH 


IN 


o 


cm 


o 


TH 


CI 


IN 


■* 


7-1 


•<* 


IN 


* 


CO 


o 




rH 


-H 






K 
-q 

H 














































CD 

SB 




h 












































eg 


i *-< 












00 








in 








to 


J_ 


00 


os 


o 


,_, 


IN 


CO 


^ 


uo 


o 
H 


> 
< 


































































CO 










CO 


00 


































rH 


rt 


7-1 

































186 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE XXII. 

Percentage of Rainfall collected on Sudbury -river Water-shed, 
1875 to 1895. 



Year. 


03 
3 

g 


>> 

3 
3 

& 
ft 


o 
03 


< 


>> 

03 


a 
p 




3 

3 


u 
o 

a 

a, 
<o 
m 


S 

O 
O 

o 


u 

i 
> 

o 


S 
& 
3 

a 
o 

<9 
ft 




o 

*4 

O 3 

-* 


1875. 




7.6 


76.5 


76.5 


162.9 


59.5 


24.0 


16.0 


12.8 


10.4 


23.8 


46.5 


110.7 


44.9 


16.0 


1876. 




62.7 


54.2 


106.5 


135.4 


73.5 


18.8 


3.6 


42.0 


6.9 


18.6 


32.6 


22.3 


48.2 


10.1 


1877. 




36.5 


206.9 


102.7 


120.3 


67.0 


42.5 


12.2 


5.9 


31.9 


13.2 


42.2 


264.4 


57.9 


11.7 


1878. 




57.3 


66.5 


133.4 


48.5 


260.2 


22.5 


7.7 


12.2 


21.5 


14.3 


41.6 


89.0 


52.6 


12.9 


1879. 




50.4 


77.4 


80.9 


114.1 


125.8 


18.8 


7.1 


10.8 


12.9 


15.6 


13.2 


19.0 


45.3 


10.3 


1880. 




56.0 


74.9 


73.9 


65.0 


50.0 


14.2 


5.0 


5.3 


8.6 


4.8 


19.9 


11.0 


31.9 


5.4 


1881. 




13.3 


53.6 


124.6 


133.4 


49.0 


42.8 


21.0 


19.4 


13.0 


11.2 


16.7 


34.9 


46.6 


15.4 


1882. 




37.2 


85.2 


191.2 


82.1 


45.5 


54.9 


8.7 


5.9 


6.0 


25.7 


31.5 


24.5 


45.9 


9.2 


1883. 




21.2 


43.0 


161.4 


126.3 


40.0 


21.6 


7.7 


19.1 


10.4 


5.9 


19.5 


9.7 


34.1 


7.9 


1884. 




34.9 


72.5 


143.1 


111.8 


53.0 


20.9 


10.9 


9.8 


8.9 


6.0 


11.4 


31.9 


50.5 


9.3 


1885. 




46.8 


56.4 


262.1 


86.9 


68.4 


25.7 


7.8 


6.0 


14.7 


11.8 


33.3 


77.0 


43.4 


8.9 


1886. 




40.9 


123.2 


101.7 


151.1 


42.9 


23.9 


6.3 


4.1 


7.0 


8.0 


25.0 


36.6 


49.5 


6.2 


1887. 




88.8 


95.3 


104.4 


106.0 


154.5 


26.9 


5.5 


7.2 


14.5 


12.0 


23.8 


29.6 


56.7 


8.5 


1888 . 




45.3 


88.3 


95.9 


188.3 


60.3 


28.7 


14.9 


10.9 


23.2 


71.4 


65.9 


100.6 


62.2 


30.4 


1889. 




92.4 


116.4 


100.9 


71.4 


53.3 


40.3 


12.6 


61.2 


30.9 


51.6 


53.3 


127.3 


58.2 


33.2 


1890. 




88.4 


70.3 


84.0 


122.3 


46.8 


48.3 


7.8 


6.1 


13.2 


38.6 


174.7 


33.5 


50.9 


23.1 


3891. 




76.7 


107.3 


122.7 


106.0 


51.7 


18.9 


7.8 


6.1 


14.7 


9.8 


17.0 


26.3 


55.8 


8.9 


1892. 




57.0 


50.1 


85.9 


181.1 


40.2 


26.8 


9.0 


11.3 


13.9 


19.2 


20.7 


76.9 


39.3 


11.8 


1893 . 




26.4 


30.3 


157.7 


101.7 


77.8 


31.9 


11.0 


5.9 


10.8 


9.7 


25.1 


29.2 


45.2 


8.6 


1894. 




30.2 


40.8 


278.2 


82.9 


35.4 


62.6 


8.8 


18.4 


9.8 


12.5 


42.1 


26.5 


40.7 


12.0 


1895. 




45.4 


62.5 


144.2 


82.7 


56.1 


10.8 


8.2 


9.9 


6.7 


23.0 


72.4 


94.9 


47.8 


15.5 


Totals . 


1015.4 


X651.6 


2731.9 


2380.2 


1510 9 


625.8 


199.6 


290.3 


289.9 


406.7 


828.4 


1275.8 


1007.6 


275.3 


Averag 


es 


48.4 


78.6 


130.1 


113.3 


71.9 


29.8 


9.5 


13.8 


13.8 


19.4 


39.4 


60.8 


48.0 


13.1 



Water Department. 



187 



-^J 










































Jo 










m 




ITS 




in 




in 




in 


m 






































3 






© 
























OS 








© 




© 


CI 




o 


o 


© 




o >> 


© 


o 


-H 


r- 




O 






CM 


CO 




© 




CO 














Ss 




■" ' 


rH 




1-1 


'" , 


1-1 


1-1 


rt 


1-1 


CM 




1-1 


1-1 


1-1 




rH 


CM 


© 




TK^ 










































a 


m 
















© 




in 




















05 






















■* 










© 
















OS 




CI 


CO 












CO 


-r 




CM 


CM 




rH 


© 


O 


■<* 




-* 


rH 


OS 




5! 


TH 


m 


© 


© 


o 








5 




rW 






H 














•* 


•* 






m 


-p 




CO 


CO 


Tti 


© 


Til 




in 










in 








o 






























OS 


CO 


OS 




o 




































CM 


OS 








i-O 


Cl 




© 


•* 


1-1 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


T)l 





■* 


CO 


cm 


CO 


CM 


CM 


■* 


cm 


■* 


CO 


in 


CM 


•* 


CO 


rt 


■* 


CO 


IM 


© 


CO 












o 




in 












m 






















o 


CM 


-* 




o 








m 


























© 




r~ 




o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 




CO 


© 


CO 


CM 


-v 


CM 


iH 


© 


fe 


m 


CM 


rH 


CO 


rt 




CM 


CD 


■* 


CO 


© 


in 


rt 


CM 


■<# 


CM 


CO 


© 


© 
© 


CO 


















































O 








o 


CM 




-K 


m 


© 


















o 






















© 




CO 


t- 


00 




in 






(M 


O 


-* 


o 


CM 


CM 


" 


in 


CM 


m 


CM 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


■* 


1-1 


■* 


o 


O 
rH 


in 


T* 














in 




in 


in 












■n 
































© 


© 




















0Q 










CO 


■* 






© 








to- 




o 


© 


in 


© 




© 


CO 




1H 


CM 


CO 


" 


o 


IH 


CM 


1-1 


CO 


tH 


CO 


CM 


<M 


CM 


Cl 


CM 


CM 

m 


IM 


























































in 


o 






CO 


CO 


















3 










o 


CO 




OS 


CM 


© 


Cl 


© 




CO 


CO 


"# 


m 


Tt< 


© 




< 




U3 


CO 


O 




o 


•* 


m 


CO 


■* 


© 


CO 


CO 


co 


■* 


in 


(M 


in 


-* 


tH 






















in 










,n 


























CM 


tH 






CO 




















3 
•-5 






CM 




CO 






© 




in 


CI 


-t> 


Cl 




in 


o 


■>* 


CO 


^j< 


© 


CO 


cm 


b- 


CM 


CN 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


Tf 


in 


CO 


IB 














































© 


■* 


OS 


CO 


CO 




-n 




© 




CO 


CO 


in 






CO 
















o 












CM 


CO 


CO 


T* 










CO 


rH 


h> 


CM 


CO 


I-H 


© 


IN 


1-1 


■* 


># 


r " t 


CM 


IM 


CO 


CO 


H* 


Tf 


CM 


o 


CO 


in 


CO 


















,n 
























^ 








CM 




00 


CO 


uo 










-* 


o 


© 




© 










C3 








OS 






OS 


OS 


© 


© 


_ 


© 


C3 


HTt 




Cl 




rH 




© 


g 


o 


" 


cm 


<M 


Til 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


rH 


in 


■* 


© 


CM 


in 


© 


m 


CO 


m 

© 


CO 






















m 
















»n 


m 




















** 


o 


o 










t4 












ft 
















tH 




CO 






-f. 






CO 










in 


<* 


CM 






CM 


CO 




CI 








CM 




© 




CO 












































in 




rd 














































© 


OS 


OS 


CM 
























© 






^ 


© 








■* 


CM 


CI 




CO 


o 




IM 


© 


© 


© 


m 


© 


© 


^f< 


© 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CD 


IM 


CM 
















© 














a 






































© 














































.Q 








CO 
























o 














Cl 






© 


o 


-H 




-f 


CM 




CO 


o 


o 




CO 


CO 


CM 


© 


rH 


in 


IN 


tH 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to- 


-* 


CO 


1-1 


CO 


in 


CO 




CO 


© 


CO 


■* 












in 








in 








m 


in 












to 


a 


t- 


CM 




CM 


-* 




■* 












































CO 


CM 


© 






<N 




Cl 


© 


m 


© 


CO 


1-3 


■° 


1-1 


CM 


lO 


in 


CM 


"* 


"* 


CO 


in 




in 


IN 


CO 


-* 


IN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t* 


P3 




































:| 




CD 
6H 








































as 
O 


s 

> 
<3 






OS 


O 




CM 


CO 














© 






CO 


































































CO 






































M 


IH 


H 


r-l 




rH 
















rH 







188 



City Document No. 32. 



TABLE XXIV. 

Rainfall collected, in Inches, on Mystic Water-shed, 1878 to 1895. 



Yeab 




a 
a 

C3 
1-5 


p 


a 

3 
3 


«1 


(A 


CD 

3 

1-3 


"3 


3 
< 


u 

a 

CD 

CD 
DQ 


CD 

o 
"8 
O 


CD 

3 

CD 
> 
O 


S 

,2 

a 

03 
O 

P 


"3 

o 
Eh 


1878. . 






3.55 


3.97 


4.91 


2.21 


2.16 


0.78 


0.48 


1.11 


0.56 


0.71 


1.75 


3.63 


25.82 


1879. 








1.21 


2.33 


3.31 


3.97 


1.95 


0.97 


0.54 


0.70 


0.48 


0.34 


0.45 


0.69 


16.94 


1880. 








1.70 


2.54 


1.95 


1.50 


0.96 


0.51 


0.67 


0.54 


0.45 


0.36 


0.44 


0.59 


12.21 


1881. 








0.82 


2.14 


6.79 


2.17 


1.51 


2.05 


0.87 


0.35 


0.31 


0.29 


0.50 


0.87 


18.67 


1882. 








1.37 


3.03 


4.19 


1.16 


1.85 


0.81 


0.35 


0.22 


0.53 


0.58 


0.39 


0.57 


15.05 


1883. 








0.70 


1.43 


1.8S 


1.63 


1.20 


0.52 


0.30 


0.22 


0.18 


0.39 


0.42 


0.44 


9.31 


1884. 








1.49 


3.89 


5.42 


3.85 


1.48 


0.85 


0.58 


0.60 


0.23 


0.27 


0.35 


1.17 


20.18 


1885. 








1.79 


1.81 


2.05 


2.03 


2.18 


0.86 


0.47 


0.54 


0.34 


0.68 


2.41 


2.39 


17.55 


1886. 








2.31 


7.70 


3.91 


3.24 


1.27 


0.55 


0.41 


0.25 


0.32 


0.38 


0.88 


1.43 


22.65 


1887. 








3.16 


3.61 


3.60 


3.75 


1.89 


1.27 


0.87 


1.35 


0.48 


0.57 


0.71 


0.91 


22.17 


1888. 








1.43 


3.32 


4.28 


3.27 


2.88 


0.84 


0.39 


0.54 


1.31 


2.74 


5.04 


5.08 


31.12 


1889. 








4.51 


1.83 


1.60 


2.27 


2.18 


1.89 


1.33 


2.05 


1.06 


1.21 


2.49 


3.06 


25.48 


1890. 








2.07 


2.23 


5.37 


2.93 


3.00 


1.92 


0.43 


0.46 


0.58 


2.61 


1.95 


2.49 


26.04 


1891. 








6.29 


5.97 


7.21 


3.43 


1.40 


1.01 


0.42 


0.44 


0.42 


0.58 


0.56 


0.87 


28.60 


1892. 








2.49 


1.76 


3.03 


1.33 


2.10 


1.17 


0.66 


0.49 


0.56 


0.45 


1.07 


0.87 


15.98 


1893. 








0.75 


2.14 


4.52 


2.72 


4.42 


1.04 


0.47 


0.69 


0.41 


0.55 


0.71 


1.27 


19.69 


1894. 








1.37 


1.87 


3.05 


2.27 


1.31 


0.91 


0.49 


0.38 


0.36 


0.58 


0.91 


0.90 


14.40 


1895. 






1.50 


0.81 


3.12 


2.70 


1.31 


0.50 


0.55 


0.77 


0.32 


1.43 


2.34 


2.08 


17.43 


Totals . 




38.51 


52.38 


70.19 


46.43 


35=05 


18.45 


10.28 


11.70 


8.90 


14.72 


23.37 


29.31 


359.29 


Aver 


ȣ 


es 


. . 


2.14 


2.91 


3.90 


2.58 


1.95 


1.03 


0.57 


0.65 


0.49 


0.82 


1.30 


1.63 


19.96 



2.86 
2.06 
2.02 
1.82 
1.68 
1.09 
1.68 
2.03 
1.36 
3.27 
4.98 
5.65 
4.08 
1.86 
2.16 
2.12 
1.81 
3.07 

45.60 



Water Department. 



189 



TABLE XXV. 

Percentage of Waterfall collected at Mystic Water-shed, 1878 to 1895. 



Teak. 


3 
a 

03 
>-3 


(A. 

a 

ft 




< 




o 

a 

3 

t-3 


"3 

1-5 


3 
3 


a 

"Si 

<D 

QQ 


S 
,a 
o 

o 

O 


a 

> 
o 
SZi 


u 

a 

© 

o 






I"! 

2 3 

a^ 


1878 . . 




62.6 


69.2 


125.0 


38.6 


322.9 


29.6 


13.5 


14.8 


17.7 


14.3 


30.8 


74.9 


47.8 


14.9 


1879 . . 




66.6 


85.4 


93.9 


85.3 


104.9 


24.5 


22.6 


12.8 


29.7 


44.2 


16.2 


18.6 


48.0 


20.1 


1S80 . . 




64.9 


60.1 


78.4 


68.8 


47.3 


34.3 


9.2 


14.7 


31.7 


13.5 


22.9 


23.8 


35.5 


13.5 


1881 . . 




14.2 


5S.9 


101.5 


141.1 


50.7 


29.9 


33.3 


51.9 


14.1 


13.6 


14.3 


26.3 


44.5 


23.9 


1882 . . 




24.8 


64.8 


168.4 


55.0 


40.4 


38.6 


14.9 


20.8 


6.3 


30.0 


22.2 


25.5 


38.4 


12.3 


1883 . . 




26.1 


46.7 


84.8 


65.9 


33.5 


31.8 


10.8 


25.7 


12.1 


7.2 


21.1 


14.7 


29.8 


10.3 


1884 . . 




31.5 


63.9 


127.3 


121.2 


50.2 


18.3 


15.5 


12.4 


33.5 


9.9 


17.4 


25.6 


45.5 


14.0 


1885 . . 




37.1 


53.3 


174.5 


58.8 


55.3 


19.6 


22.8 


9.2 


23.7 


12.2 


38.2 


113.6 


39.4 


13.6 


1886 . . 




36.6 


107.3 


101.9 


154.3 


43.0 


35.5 


11.1 


7.8 


10.7 


13.4 


21.7 


29.7 


49.7 


10.7 


1887 . . 




60.2 


80.8 


72.0 


81.3 


112.0 


47.3 


13.2 


27.1 


32.0 


18.7 


23.4 


25.6 


47.8 


20.3 


1888 . . 




35.2 


101.3 


82.5 


115.2 


56.6 


38.1 


17.5 


8.8 


15.3 


55.3 


73.6 


96.4 


54.8 


22.7 


1889 . . 




81.8 


98.2 


70.2 


63.0 


46.9 


57.0 


15.8 


52.2 


22.5 


33.7 


44.1 


107.0 


50.6 


27.3 


1890 . . 




75.6 


66.0 


80.4 


121.8 


47.6 


56.9 


19.0 


12.7 


15.6 


29.5 


141.2 


53.5 


52.8 


22.1 


1891 . . 




100.7 


117.6 


118.7 


109.0 


57.0 


22.8 


13.3 


11.3 


19.3 


12.1 


21.7 


25.6 


60.3 


13.3 


1892 . . 




55.0 


58.5 


75.7 


163.6 


37.5 


28.3 


25.7 


10.2 


27.7 


24.3 


23.1 


75.2 


40.9 


19.2 


1893 . . 




33.3 


28.6 


177.3 


80.7 


70.6 


49.5 


23.2 


12.6 


20.5 


13.4 


31.5 


29.1 


44.5 


15.6 


1894 . . 




34.8 


56.5 


280.1 


65.4 


25.3 


125.8 


14.2 


15.1 


14.3 


10.5 


26.0 


22.7 


36.7 


12.9 


1895 . . 




42.4 


123.4 


103.9 


64.7 


41.5 


13.7 


12.8 


14.1 


15.7 


14.0 


37.3 


90.7 


35.8 


13.9 


Totals 




883.4 


1340.5 


2116.5 


1G53.7 


1243.2 


7ui.5 


SOS. 4 


334.2 


362.4 


369.8 


626.7 


878.5 


802.8 


300.6 


Averages . 


49.1 


74.5 


117.6 


91.9 


69.1 


39.0 


17.1 


18.6 


20.1 


20.5 


34.8 


48.8 


44.6 


16.7 



190 



City Document No. 32. 



> 


^ 


H 


e 


M 


^ 


S 




tf 


OS 


£fi 


I"1 





1 








_ 






o 
o 


© 
o 


o 
o 








© 




© 
© 






© 
© 












■* 












CO 










©_ 












































r-T 


CO 


CO 








-f 










of 






p 




o 


05 


CD 








CO 










CO 




M 

o> 


2 2*? 

® S CD 


"3 






























£ 


P S-& 

0Q 


c5 






























>> 

a 


































































03 


S<2 






3 


o 


O 








o 




o 






© 










© 


o 


o 








o 




© 






© 










O 


o 


o 








o 




CO 






OS 






































^2S 


p 




o 


© 


© 








-f 










01 




-o 




o 


o 


o 








o 




us 






© 








o_ 




CO 








CD 










1-^ 




CD 

p 




"3 




■* 


rt " 


lO* 








of 










CO 




1 


Q§? 


















































CO 




© 






-* 






















01 




01 






Ol 




"3 




M 
















1 

o 




-1 






1 

CO 




9 




(0 
















Ol 




1"* 






r-< 




















si) 




CD 






p< 

CD 


























OQ 






m 






^ Ft 




O 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 




a; c» qj 


P 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 




»sp<>, 


CI 


o_ 


CO 


Tt< 




CO 




CO 


US 


OS 








-f 




































•73 nj CD <S 




of 


CO 


c? 


CO 


o 


© 






CO 


CO 


01 


■» 








© ago 


73 


o 




»cs 


01 


b- 


00 


** 


>o 


*" 


■* 


CO 


OS 


rH 


^ 


2 


$ 






























©"s-p 




© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


c 


73 


.5 2 « 

2PS 


P 


o n 


© 


CO 


°i 


CO 


o_ 


>.o 


•-I 


irs^ 


CO 


L ^. 


•* 


^ 


CO 


P 


O 


o 


oT 


co" 


CO 


of 


© 






co" 


co" 






CO 


■ c" 




o 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


1CS 


© 


o 


CO 




■* 


CI 




"a 
O 


o 


N 


CO 


°t. 




N 






e» 


CO 


© 


o__ 


°i, 


OD^ 


3 
p 

o 


"3 ^ ■ 


co" 


■* 




cjT 


o 1 


CO* 


-" 


■* 


us* 


co" 


-*" 


t ~ 


CO 


CO 




■ 


o 


■* 


CO 


rt 


a> 


CO 


00 


^. 


,- 


us 


us 


o 


o 


to 


.S — 


cd 




co 


CN 




© 


o 


us 


CD 


CO 




Ol 


© 


Ol 


o 


A 


** 




CO 


C-i 


00 


CO 


CO 








■m 




CO 


-V 


a 


C3 7S 
Ph"" 


o 

p 


CN 


as 


o 


zx 


© 


1-1 


r "' 


1-1 


o 


© 


rt 


■* 


r-i 


rH 


a 




































































































a 




































































3 




.P 




















u 


















CD 






CD 








a 






CD 








P 
O 


>, 




^2 






.Q 








^ 






^2 










£ 




CD 


s 


^ 


"^ 


M 


s 




ffl 


£ 








3 






9 




,a 


CD 


p 


p 


S 


CD 




p 


o 








p 
a 

03 
1-5 


1-3 


<B 

CD 


p 


o 
o 

O 


CD 

GO 


60 

p 

< 


p 

<1 


P 


CD 

VI 


p 
>-o 


so 

p 


Pi 

CD 
CQ 


»-3 


*- 






© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 






P 

o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 




^l^ 


!-J_ 


r^ 


©_ 


IO 




© 


CO 


°i 


o^ 


°^, 


C0_ 


01_ 


c i* 


CO 


T 


p cd cs 




■*" 


of 


io* 






oT 




in 


00* 


Ol 


o 


co" 




cT 




32S 

1 " 


2 


OS 


us 




<M 


03 




o 




rH 


us 


o 




us 


i-i 


7 

£ 


CO 


<N 


CM 


CO 




' 


Ol 


rt 


^ 




rt 


rt 




a> 




S-aV 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 








© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 




o 


o 


© 


o 








"* 


CO^ 




CO 


o 




o^ 


Ol 




© 


© 


OS 




o 




p 
o 
































©~ 


to" 


N 




-H~ 


CD 


co" 




© 


t- 


CO 






00 




US 


o 


CO 


o 


t- 








1^ 


00 




CI 










©_ 


CO 




o_ 


o 


CO 


1-i 


es 




rJH 


CO 


CO 


00 


Ttf 






































|l^ 


$ 


©" 


os~ 


a> 


la 


■* 


oT 


ta 








Tfl 


CO 




OO 




TO 


1-< 


rH 


(N 


rH 




T-t 


rH 




1-1 


rH 




r-< 


o 




43 


m 


© 


as 


,_, 


CO 


Ol 


■»* 


o 


rH 


Id 


© 


© 


■o 


us 


ia 


_c 


" 1 5 






© 


t- 


rH 


01 


Ol 


00 




CO 


us 


CO 


o 


OS 


o 


= JO 


fl 


CO 




■* 


CO 




CO 


<N 


(M 




CO 




i-O 




C-1 




o 
P 
M 


t— 








CO 


.-O 


o> 


-f 


o 




us 


CO 


CO 




p 


rH 


rH 


rH 


1-1 












rt 


' H 


1-H 


rH 


c» 




05 U 




O 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 
o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




P 

o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


t 


^S PH>> 


ei_ 




ITS 


CD_ 


©_ 


■*| 


N 


C^ 


~*l. 


^ 


°°„ 


CD 


~^ 


*z 


P a> d 






us" 


CO 


ih" 


■* 


co" 


c? 




of 

CO 

us 


oi" 


© 


CD 


co" 






0Q§ H 


73 
3 




CO 




ia 


o> 






CO 


Ol 


o 


CO 


us 


OS 


> 


OS 


t-h" 


OJ 


-r^ 


CO 


IO 


o> 


00 


rH" 


C3 


© 


- 


CO 




®3 ^ 




o 


© 


o 


O 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


© 


O 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 




t- 13 cj 




°L 


■^ 


N 


0^ 


01_ 


CO 


03 


CO 


Ol 


Ol 


CD 






as 






p 
o 
































oT 




oi* 


c<T 


csT 




co" 


of 




© 




© 


OS 


CM 




Cs 






CO 


-t< 




CO 






Ol 




CO 




-* 






iO_ 


N 


CO 




°i 


CN 


CD 


CO 


o 


cs 








CO 






































fi 60 S 


O 




ocT 


-n" 


01 


oT 


ia 


CO 




© 


~f 






CO 






I ~ 


CO 


C3 




CD 


■* 


t- 


CO 


-p 


CO 


© 


00 


CO 


CI 






CO 


o 


CO 


K 


,_, 


OS 


,_ 


o> 


^ 


© 


us 


us 


us 


iO 


U2 




SJ 


O 


cs 


CD 




CO 


rH 




CO 




CO 


CO 


-T 


© 


o 


CO 






Tjl 


lO 


o 


o» 








CO 






us 


© 




-^ 






73 


us 


oS 


-fi 


lr^ 




co' 


-* 


I3> 


oi 


14 


CO 


CO 


eq 


t-^ 




p 


Tt 


-3> 




US 


■* 


CO 


•* 


CO 


CO 


^* 


•* 


>* 


rH 


iO 






1— 1 
































H 






































































us 


CD 


t- 


CO 


CI 


o 


rt 


Ol 


CO 


■* 


us 


CO 


t. 


OO 




















CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


OO 


OO 








00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 




CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 



Water Department. 



191 



(M O OS CO 



r-l CO <M ■* 



i-H <M CD 



s a a 



m 3i m 



r-l CO CM 



r-l CM "* 



CO O CM to 



r-l r-l CO 



-1" iH CD 

r-l 00 CO 



O r-l CM CO Tjl id 

Oi o o> a C) Oi 



m irj 






in 


U3 


o 


CT> 
















3> oo 


CO 
















CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


O 


cn cm 


r-l 


r-l 


1-1 













o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 




















-e 




o 






















CM 


t- 












CO 






O 


CO 


00 




0) 


05 
















b- 


CD 


o 






03 






iffl 






1-1 
























,n 


o 


O 


o 










CM 








e» 


o 




00 


CM 






















m 


-f 


in 


-* 


■* 


ril 


CO 























<4 



192 



City Document No. 32. 



SUMMAEY OF STATISTICS. 
REPORT FOR 1895. 



Boston Water Works, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, supplies 
also the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett. 



Population by census of 1895 : 
Boston .... 
Chelsea 
Somerville 
Everett 



496,920 
31,264 
52,200 
18,573 

598,957 



Total 

Date of construction : 

Cochituate Works 1848 

Mystic 1864 

By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and Mystic 

lake. 
Mode of supply. — Sixty-five per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty-five " " pumping " 





Pumping. 




Cochituate. Mtstic. 


Builder of pumping ma- 




chinery 


Holly Mfg. Co. H. R. Worthington 




and Quintard and G. F. Blake 




Iron Works. Mfg. Co. 


Description of coal used : 




a Kind 


Bituminous. Bituminous. 


c Size .... 


Broken. Broken. 


e Price per gross ton, 




in bins . 


$4.27, $3.92*, $3.63, $3.59, 




$3.90. " $3.34. 


/Per cent, of ash, 


10.2 10.9 




Cochituate. Mystic. 


Coal consumed for year, in lbs. . 4,866,806 8,121,000 



Total pumpage for year, in 

gallons . . . 
Gallons pumped per lb. of coal . 
Cost of pumping figured on 

pumping-station expenses, 

viz. :..... 
Cost per million gallons raised 

to reservoir . 



4,165,789,530 3,455,822,700 
855.9 425.5 



$31,566.85 

$7.58 



),569.07 

$8.84 



Water Department. 



193 



Consumption. 

COCHITTTATE. MYSTIC. 

Estimated population . . 487,000 113,700 
Estimated number of consumers, 483,500 112,500 
Total consumption, gallons . 18,542,416,600 3,455,460,300 
Passed through meters . . 4,410,825,000 768,600,000 
Percentage metered ... 23.8 22.2 
Average daily consumption, gal- 
lons . * . . . ' . 50,801,100 9,467,000 
Gallons per day, each inhabi- 
tant 104.3 83.3 

Gallons per day, each consumer, 105.0 84.1 

Gallons per day to each tap . 716.7 392.5 



Distribution. 
Mains. 



COCHITUATE. 



Kind of pipe used 

Sizes .... 
Extended, miles . 
Total now in use . 
Distribution-pipes less 
4 in., length, miles . 
Hydrants added . 
Hydrants now in use . 
Stop-gates added 
Stop-gates now in use . 



Cast- Iron 
48 in. to ■ 



than 



Mystic. 

Cast-Iron, Wrought- 
Iron, and Cement. 
4 in. 30 in. to 3 in. 

23.1 4.9 

595.9 178.6 



2.2 

242 
6,459 

289 
6,648 



4.3 

97 

1,543 

147 

2,285 



Services. 



Kind of pipe used 

Sizes .... 

Extended, feet . 

Service-taps added 

Total now in use 

Meters added 

Meters now in use 

Motors and elevators in use 



Lead. 



to 6 in. 

53,192 

2,323 

70,879 

61 

4,398 

512 



Lead and 

Wrought-Iron. 

^ in. to 4 in. 

20,524 

863 

24,120 

10 

504 

21 



194 City Document No. 32. 

1 Boston Water Board. 
Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879 ; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 2 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 2 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to March 18, 1889. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from August 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888. 
Philip J. Doherty, from March 18, 1889, to May 4, 1891. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from August 26, 1885, to May 5, 1890; and 

from May 4, 1891, to July 1, 1895. 
Robert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to July 18, 1893. 
John W. Leighton, from May 5, 1890, to July 1, 1895. 
William S. McNary, from August 15, 1893, to November 5, 1894. 
Charles W. Smith, from January 23, 1895, to July 1, 1895. 

Organization of the Board to July 1, 1895. 

Chairman. 

Thos. F. Doherty. 

Chief Clerk and Secretary. 
Walter E. Swan. 



From July 1, 1895. 
1 Water Commissioner. 
Charles W. Smith. 

Assistant Water Commissioner. 
Jeremiah J. McCarthy. 

Chief Clerk and Secretary. 
Walter E. Swan. 

General Superintendent Income Division. 
Jos. H. Caldwell. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Department. 
William Jackson. 

1 Under Chap. 449 of the Acts of 1895 the Boston Water Board was abolished, and 
the Water-Supply and Water-Income Departments consolidated and placed under the 
charge of one Water Commissioner. 

2 Deceased. 



Water Department. 195 

General Superintendent of the Western Division and Resident Engineer 
of Additional Supply. 

Desmond FitzGerald. 

General Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 

William J. Welch, to July 1. 

Henry C. Richardson, from July 1. 

General Superintendent of the Mystic Division. 
Eugene S. Sullivan. 

General Superintendent of Pumping- Stations. 
M. H. Ballou, from July 1, 1895. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Abatements ........... 33 

Analyses of water .......... 64, 65 

Bacteria in water .......... 76 

Biological laboratory ......... 53 

Brookline reservoir .......... 52 

Cost of Cochituate works ........ 2 

Cost of construction ......... 2 

Cost of Mystic works ......... 4 

Cost of Sudbury-river works ........ 3 

Chestnut Hill pumping-station ........ 145 

Chestnut Hill reservoir 52 

City Engineer, Report of 139 

Cochituate aqueduct ......... 51 

Color of water 74, 75 

Consumption of water ......... 152, 153 

Contracts made and pending ........ 13 

Distribution system .......... 155 

Dudley Pond 50 

East Boston reservoir ......... 94 

Eastern Division, Report of Superintendent 93 

Electrolysis 153, 154 

Expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 2, 8 

Extension of mains . . . . . . . . • • 8, 93 

Farm Pond 45, 143 

Filtration 48 

Fisher Hill reservoir ......... 53 

Fixtures 35 

Fountains 95, 128 

High service 145, 147, 155 

High-service pumping- engine No. 3 ...... 146, 147 

Hydrants . . 95, 128 

Inspection of water sources ........ 53 

Lake Cochituate 46, 143 

Mains abandoned .......... 113 

Mains connected with Mystic works ...... 128, 133 

Mains laid and length connected with Cochituate works . . 98, 102 

Maintenance, Cost of 10-12 

Meters . . . 96, 114 

Metropolitan water-supply, Act of Legislature .... 81 

Mystic aqueduct .......... 126 

Mystic department .......... 125 



198 Table of Contents. 

PAGE 

Mystic Division, Report of Superintendent 125 

Mystic Lake 125, 148 

Mystic pumping-engine No. 4 ....... 150-152 

Mystic pumping-station . . . . . . . . . 126, 149 

Mystic reservoir .......... 125 

Mystic Valley sewer . . 126, 149 

Organization of Board . . . . . . . . 194 

Parker Hill reservoir 94, 147 

Quality of water .......... 68 

Rainfall 36, 37, 78-80 

Receipts ............ 1 

Repairs of pipes .......... 121 

Reservoir No. 1 39, 139 

Reservoir No. 2 .40, 140 

Reservoir No. 3 41, 140 

Reservoir No. 4 42, 140 

Reservoir No. 5 37, 141 

Reservoir No. 6 . . 43, 142 

Reservoir No. 8 44 

Service-pipes ........... 96, 128 

Shutting-off and letting-on service . 34 

Sinking-funds 7 

South Boston reservoir ......... 94 

Statistics 157, 192 

Stopcocks ........... 94 

Sudbury-river aqueduct 50 

Tables : 

Average height of water in mains in city ..... 166 

Chestnut Hill pumping-station, monthly records . . . 167, 168 

Daily average consumption, 1889-1895 158 

Diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1888-1895 .... 159 

East Boston pumping-station, monthly records . . . 170 

Heights of reservoirs on first of each month .... 144 

Hydrants in use January 31, 1896 120 

Mains laid during the year, and lengths in use January 31, 1896, 98, 102 
Monthly percentage of rainfall collected on Cochituate water- 
shed, 1863-1895 182, 183 

Monthly percentage of rainfall collected on Mystic water-shed, 

1878-1895 189 

Monthly percentage of rainfall collected on Sudbury-river 

water-shed, 1875-1895 186 

Monthly rainfall collected on Cochituate water-shed, 1863- 

1895 180, 181 

Monthly rainfall collected on Mystic water-shed, 1878-1895 . 188 
Monthly rainfall collected on Sudbury-river water-shed, 1875- 

1895 185 

Monthly rainfall on Cochituate water-shed, 1863-1895 . .178, 179 

Monthly rainfall on Mystic water-shed, 1878-1895 ... 187 



Table of Contents. 199 

PAGE 

Monthly rainfall on Sudbury-river water-shed, 1875-1895 . 184 

Mystic pumping-station, monthly records . . . . 169 

Mystic Sewage pumping-station, monthly records . . . 172 

Rainfall at Lake Cochituate, 1895 174 

Rainfall at Mystic lake, 1895 175 

Rainfall at various places in eastern Massachusetts, 1895 . 176 
Rainfall on and yield of Lake Cochituate water-shed, 1852- 

1895 160 

Rainfall on and yield of Sudbury-river water-shed, 1875-1895, 190, 191 

Rainfall on Sudbury-river water-shed, 1895 .... 173 

Service-pipes laid and abandoned ...... 100, 129 

Temperature of air and water, 1895 ...... 177 

Water meters in use January 31, 1896 ..... 117 

"West Roxbury pumping-station, monthly records . . . 171 

Temperatures of water 72, 73, 146 

Waste detection 35 

Water debt 2, 6 

Water-Income Division, Report of Superintendent ... 27 

Water loans, outstanding ........ 4, 5 

Water posts ........... 95 

Water revenue .......... 1 

Water sinking-fund ......... 7 

Water takers 27-33 

Western Division, Report of Superintendent of . . . 36 

Whitehall pond 143, 153